Science.gov

Sample records for excursion set model

  1. Excursion-Set-Mediated Genetic Algorithm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noever, David; Baskaran, Subbiah

    1995-01-01

    Excursion-set-mediated genetic algorithm (ESMGA) is embodiment of method of searching for and optimizing computerized mathematical models. Incorporates powerful search and optimization techniques based on concepts analogous to natural selection and laws of genetics. In comparison with other genetic algorithms, this one achieves stronger condition for implicit parallelism. Includes three stages of operations in each cycle, analogous to biological generation.

  2. An Excursion Set Model of the Cosmic Web: the Abundance of Sheets, Filaments And Halos

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, Jiajian; Abel, Tom; Mo, Houjun; Sheth, Ravi; /Pennsylvania U.

    2006-01-11

    We discuss an analytic approach for modeling structure formation in sheets, filaments and knots. This is accomplished by combining models of triaxial collapse with the excursion set approach: sheets are defined as objects which have collapsed along only one axis, filaments have collapsed along two axes, and halos are objects in which triaxial collapse is complete. In the simplest version of this approach, which we develop here, large scale structure shows a clear hierarchy of morphologies: the mass in large-scale sheets is partitioned up among lower mass filaments, which themselves are made-up of still lower mass halos. Our approach provides analytic estimates of the mass fraction in sheets, filaments and halos, and its evolution, for any background cosmological model and any initial fluctuation spectrum. In the currently popular {Lambda}CDM model, our analysis suggests that more than 99% of the mass in sheets, and 72% of the mass in filaments, is stored in objects more massive than 10{sup 10}M{sub {circle_dot}} at the present time. For halos, this number is only 46%. Our approach also provides analytic estimates of how halo abundances at any given time correlate with the morphology of the surrounding large-scale structure, and how halo evolution correlates with the morphology of large scale structure.

  3. Stochastic bias in multidimensional excursion set approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castorina, Emanuele; Sheth, Ravi K.

    2013-08-01

    We describe a simple fully analytic model of the excursion set approach associated with two Gaussian random walks: the first walk represents the initial overdensity around a protohalo, and the second is a crude way of allowing for other factors which might influence halo formation. This model is richer than that based on a single walk, because it yields a distribution of heights at first crossing. We provide explicit expressions for the unconditional first crossing distribution which is usually used to model the halo mass function, the progenitor distributions from which merger rates are usually estimated and the conditional distributions from which correlations with environment are usually estimated. These latter exhibit perhaps the simplest form of what is often called non-local bias, and which we prefer to call stochastic bias, since the new bias effects arise from `hidden variables' other than density, but these may still be defined locally. We provide explicit expressions for these new bias factors. We also provide formulae for the distribution of heights at first crossing in the unconditional and conditional cases. In contrast to the first crossing distribution, these are exact, even for moving barriers, and for walks with correlated steps. The conditional distributions yield predictions for the distribution of halo concentrations at fixed mass and formation redshift. They also exhibit assembly bias like effects, even when the steps in the walks themselves are uncorrelated. Our formulae show that without prior knowledge of the physical origin of the second walk, the naive estimate of the critical density required for halo formation which is based on the statistics of the first crossing distribution will be larger than that based on the statistical distribution of walk heights at first crossing; both will be biased low compared to the value associated with the physics. Finally, we show how the predictions are modified if we add the requirement that haloes form

  4. Non-Gaussianity and Excursion Set Theory: Halo Bias

    SciTech Connect

    Adshead, Peter; Baxter, Eric J.; Dodelson, Scott; Lidz, Adam

    2012-09-01

    We study the impact of primordial non-Gaussianity generated during inflation on the bias of halos using excursion set theory. We recapture the familiar result that the bias scales as $k^{-2}$ on large scales for local type non-Gaussianity but explicitly identify the approximations that go into this conclusion and the corrections to it. We solve the more complicated problem of non-spherical halos, for which the collapse threshold is scale dependent.

  5. Excursion sets and non-Gaussian void statistics

    SciTech Connect

    D'Amico, Guido; Musso, Marcello; Paranjape, Aseem; Norena, Jorge

    2011-01-15

    Primordial non-Gaussianity (NG) affects the large scale structure (LSS) of the Universe by leaving an imprint on the distribution of matter at late times. Much attention has been focused on using the distribution of collapsed objects (i.e. dark matter halos and the galaxies and galaxy clusters that reside in them) to probe primordial NG. An equally interesting and complementary probe however is the abundance of extended underdense regions or voids in the LSS. The calculation of the abundance of voids using the excursion set formalism in the presence of primordial NG is subject to the same technical issues as the one for halos, which were discussed e.g. in Ref. [51][G. D'Amico, M. Musso, J. Norena, and A. Paranjape, arXiv:1005.1203.]. However, unlike the excursion set problem for halos which involved random walks in the presence of one barrier {delta}{sub c}, the void excursion set problem involves two barriers {delta}{sub v} and {delta}{sub c}. This leads to a new complication introduced by what is called the 'void-in-cloud' effect discussed in the literature, which is unique to the case of voids. We explore a path integral approach which allows us to carefully account for all these issues, leading to a rigorous derivation of the effects of primordial NG on void abundances. The void-in-cloud issue, in particular, makes the calculation conceptually rather different from the one for halos. However, we show that its final effect can be described by a simple yet accurate approximation. Our final void abundance function is valid on larger scales than the expressions of other authors, while being broadly in agreement with those expressions on smaller scales.

  6. STATISTICS OF DARK MATTER HALOS FROM THE EXCURSION SET APPROACH

    SciTech Connect

    Lapi, A.; Salucci, P.; Danese, L.

    2013-08-01

    We exploit the excursion set approach in integral formulation to derive novel, accurate analytic approximations of the unconditional and conditional first crossing distributions for random walks with uncorrelated steps and general shapes of the moving barrier; we find the corresponding approximations of the unconditional and conditional halo mass functions for cold dark matter (DM) power spectra to represent very well the outcomes of state-of-the-art cosmological N-body simulations. In addition, we apply these results to derive, and confront with simulations, other quantities of interest in halo statistics, including the rates of halo formation and creation, the average halo growth history, and the halo bias. Finally, we discuss how our approach and main results change when considering random walks with correlated instead of uncorrelated steps, and warm instead of cold DM power spectra.

  7. On the area of excursion sets of spherical Gaussian eigenfunctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marinucci, Domenico; Wigman, Igor

    2011-09-01

    The high frequency behaviour for random eigenfunctions of the spherical Laplacian has been recently the object of considerable interest, also because of strong motivation arising from physics and cosmology. In this paper, we are concerned with the high frequency behaviour of excursion sets; in particular, we establish a uniform central limit theorem for the empirical measure, i.e., the proportion of spherical surface, where spherical Gaussian eigenfunctions lie below a level z. Our proofs borrow some techniques from the literature on stationary long memory processes; in particular, we expand the empirical measure into Hermite polynomials, and establish a uniform weak reduction principle, entailing that the asymptotic behaviour is asymptotically dominated by a single term in the expansion. As a result, we establish a functional central limit theorem; the limiting process is fully degenerate.

  8. Statistics of dark matter halos in the excursion set peak framework

    SciTech Connect

    Lapi, A.; Danese, L. E-mail: danese@sissa.it

    2014-07-01

    We derive approximated, yet very accurate analytical expressions for the abundance and clustering properties of dark matter halos in the excursion set peak framework; the latter relies on the standard excursion set approach, but also includes the effects of a realistic filtering of the density field, a mass-dependent threshold for collapse, and the prescription from peak theory that halos tend to form around density maxima. We find that our approximations work excellently for diverse power spectra, collapse thresholds and density filters. Moreover, when adopting a cold dark matter power spectra, a tophat filtering and a mass-dependent collapse threshold (supplemented with conceivable scatter), our approximated halo mass function and halo bias represent very well the outcomes of cosmological N-body simulations.

  9. Peaks and dips in Gaussian random fields: a new algorithm for the shear eigenvalues, and the excursion set theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossi, Graziano

    2013-04-01

    We present a new algorithm to sample the constrained eigenvalues of the initial shear field associated with Gaussian statistics, called the `peak/dip excursion-set-based' algorithm, at positions which correspond to peaks or dips of the correlated density field. The computational procedure is based on a new formula which extends Doroshkevich's unconditional distribution for the eigenvalues of the linear tidal field, to account for the fact that haloes and voids may correspond to maxima or minima of the density field. The ability to differentiate between random positions and special points in space around which haloes or voids may form (i.e. peaks/dips), encoded in the new formula and reflected in the algorithm, naturally leads to a straightforward implementation of an excursion set model for peaks and dips in Gaussian random fields - one of the key advantages of this sampling procedure. In addition, it offers novel insights into the statistical description of the cosmic web. As a first physical application, we show how the standard distributions of shear ellipticity and prolateness in triaxial models of structure formation are modified by the constraint. In particular, we provide a new expression for the conditional distribution of shape parameters given the density peak constraint, which generalizes some previous literature work. The formula has important implications for the modelling of non-spherical dark matter halo shapes, in relation to their initial shape distribution. We also test and confirm our theoretical predictions for the individual distributions of eigenvalues subjected to the extremum constraint, along with other directly related conditional probabilities. Finally, we indicate how the proposed sampling procedure naturally integrates into the standard excursion set model, potentially solving some of its well-known problems, and into the ellipsoidal collapse framework. Several other ongoing applications and extensions, towards the development of

  10. Experimental verification of theoretical model for speckle intensity excursion areas

    SciTech Connect

    Alexander, T.L.; Harvey, J.E.; Hefele, D.

    1994-12-31

    Speckle is inherently an interference phenomenon produced when a rough object or turbulent medium introduces some degree of randomness to a reflected or transmitted electromagnetic field. Speckle characteristics are therefore a major concern in many laser imaging or wave propagation applications. For many applications, a detailed description of speckle size as a function of intensity threshold level is desirable. Extensive experimental measurements of average speckle size as a function of intensity threshold level were therefore made for several different targets and illumination conditions. The authors then compare these measurements with a theoretical model for excursion areas of speckle intensity. Excellent agreement is obtained for intensity threshold levels greater than approximately twice the mean intensity level.

  11. Constrained simulations and excursion sets: understanding the risks and benefits of `genetically modified' haloes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porciani, Cristiano

    2016-12-01

    Constrained realizations of Gaussian random fields are used in cosmology to design special initial conditions for numerical simulations. We review this approach and its application to density peaks providing several worked-out examples. We then critically discuss the recent proposal to use constrained realizations to modify the linear density field within and around the Lagrangian patches that form dark-matter haloes. The ambitious concept is to forge `genetically modified' haloes with some desired properties after the non-linear evolution. We demonstrate that the original implementation of this method is not exact but approximate because it tacitly assumes that protohaloes sample a set of random points with a fixed mean overdensity. We show that carrying out a full genetic modification is a formidable and daunting task requiring a mathematical understanding of what determines the biased locations of protohaloes in the linear density field. We discuss approximate solutions based on educated guesses regarding the nature of protohaloes. We illustrate how the excursion-set method can be adapted to predict the non-linear evolution of the modified patches and thus fine tune the constraints that are necessary to obtain pre-selected halo properties. This technique allows us to explore the freedom around the original algorithm for genetic modification. We find that the quantity which is most sensitive to changes is the halo mass-accretion rate at the mass scale on which the constraints are set. Finally, we discuss constraints based on the protohalo angular momenta.

  12. Scalar excursions in large-eddy simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matheou, Georgios; Dimotakis, Paul E.

    2016-12-01

    The range of values of scalar fields in turbulent flows is bounded by their boundary values, for passive scalars, and by a combination of boundary values, reaction rates, phase changes, etc., for active scalars. The current investigation focuses on the local conservation of passive scalar concentration fields and the ability of the large-eddy simulation (LES) method to observe the boundedness of passive scalar concentrations. In practice, as a result of numerical artifacts, this fundamental constraint is often violated with scalars exhibiting unphysical excursions. The present study characterizes passive-scalar excursions in LES of a shear flow and examines methods for diagnosis and assesment of the problem. The analysis of scalar-excursion statistics provides support of the main hypothesis of the current study that unphysical scalar excursions in LES result from dispersive errors of the convection-term discretization where the subgrid-scale model (SGS) provides insufficient dissipation to produce a sufficiently smooth scalar field. In the LES runs three parameters are varied: the discretization of the convection terms, the SGS model, and grid resolution. Unphysical scalar excursions decrease as the order of accuracy of non-dissipative schemes is increased, but the improvement rate decreases with increasing order of accuracy. Two SGS models are examined, the stretched-vortex and a constant-coefficient Smagorinsky. Scalar excursions strongly depend on the SGS model. The excursions are significantly reduced when the characteristic SGS scale is set to double the grid spacing in runs with the stretched-vortex model. The maximum excursion and volume fraction of excursions outside boundary values show opposite trends with respect to resolution. The maximum unphysical excursions increase as resolution increases, whereas the volume fraction decreases. The reason for the increase in the maximum excursion is statistical and traceable to the number of grid points (sample size

  13. Preliminary Landing Tests of a 1/6-Scale Dynamic Model of a Lunar Excursion Vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1962-01-01

    Preliminary Landing Tests of a 1/6-Scale Dynamic Model of a Lunar Excursion Vehicle. The film shows 21 trials made on 8 days of the scale Model 413 lunar landing vehicle. Attitudes tested were a pitch of 0, -15, or 15 degrees and yaw of 0 or 45 degrees. Velocities were vertical 10 and horizontal 10, though two trials were simple vertical drops. [Entire movie available on DVD from CASI as Doc ID 20070030974. Contact help@sti.nasa.gov

  14. Biology Excursions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baldock, R. N.

    1973-01-01

    Provides many useful suggestions and cautions for planning and executing a biology field excursion. Specific procedures are outlined for investigating land communities and coastal areas, and a number of follow-up laboratory activities are described. The appendix provides an extensive bibliography with useful comments on the literature. (JR)

  15. A new multiregion computer model for predicting nuclear excursions in aqueous homogeneous solution assemblies

    SciTech Connect

    Kimpland, R.H. )

    1992-01-01

    This paper reports on new work in the computer simulation of nuclear excursions in water solutions of uranium sulphate and nitrate. The goal of this work is a new multiregion model that improves on previous work. Improvements include better power, pressure, and reactivity feedback traces of pulses. Computed power and pressure pulses are compared with data from research reactors (KEWB, CRAC, and SILENE). A multiregion model represents the spatial distribution of energy being dumped into the system more accurately than a single lumped region. Future work will include a study of the senstivity of the model to certain parameters, such as physical properties and rates of radiolytic gas formation. The model will be expanded from five regions to ten regions to observe the effect of discretization on the model. Also, an attempt to improve the reactivity feedback will be made.

  16. An improved multiregion computer model for predicting nuclear excursions in aqueous homogeneous solution assemblies

    SciTech Connect

    Kimpland, R.H. )

    1993-01-01

    This paper reports on new work in the computer simulation of nuclear excursions in water solutions of uranium sulfate and nitrate. The goal of this work is a new multiregion model that improves on previous work. Improvements include better power, pressure, and reactivity feedback traces of pulses. Computed power and pressure pulses are compared with data from research reactors (KEWB, CRAC, and SILENE). A multiregion model represents the spatial distribution of energy being dumped into the system more accurately than a single lumped region. It also makes it possible to model variations in axial and radial velocities from region to region. Each region has its own equation of state and its own energy, continuity, and momentum equations, which are coupled with the reactor kinetics equations through reactivity feedback. The equation of state for a liquid containing bubbles of radiolytic gas is given in Ref. 1.

  17. Model-based control rescues boiler from steam-temperature excursions

    SciTech Connect

    Hanson, K.; Werre, J.; Chloupek, J.; Richerson, J.

    1995-05-01

    This article describes how, after operators of a lignite-fired boiler wrestled for years to control its main steam temperature, a switch to model-based control resolved the problem. Decoupling of control loops was essential. Montana Dakota Utilities (MDU) is the operator of the Coyote station, a 450-MW unit located at Beulah, ND, in the heart of lignite country. Owners of the plant are MDU, Northern Municipal Power Agency, Northwestern Public Service Co., and Otter Tail Power Co. The unit, a Babcock and Wilcox Co. (Barberton, Ohio) drum-boiler design, came on line in 1981. It burns lignite with a heating value of 6,900 Btu/lb using 12 cyclones. Because of unique boiler characteristics and controls implementation using several different control systems, the Coyote station had experienced significant steam-temperature excursions over the years.

  18. A two-dimensional multiregion computer model for predicting nuclear excursions in aqueous homogeneous solution assemblies

    SciTech Connect

    Kimpland, R.H.; Kornreich, D.E.

    1996-02-01

    The reprocessing of nuclear fuel usually involves the process of chemical separation. The fuel, usually in oxide form, is first dissolved in some type of acid such as nitric, sulfuric, or hydrofluoric. This results in the fuel being transformed into a homogeneous aqueous fissile solution. In this form there may be a higher probability of an accidental criticality of the solution, especially when being transported through pipes or stored in vessels. Here, a new two-dimensional computer model for simulating power and pressure pulses in aqueous fissile solutions has been developed. This model includes a radiolytic gas production model that tracks the number of gas bubbles produced during an excursion. An equation of state has been developed that accounts for the production of inertial pressure due to a lag in thermal expansion and the creation of radiolytic gas bubbles. In addition, a study of various reactivity feedback mechanisms occurring during nuclear bursts has been made. The model`s predicted power and pressure pulses are compared with data from the KEWB and SILENE solution pulsed reactor experiments and have produced results that closely match the experimental data and that exhibit the main features of the experimental power and pressure traces.

  19. Development of a Bayesian Belief Network Runway Incursion and Excursion Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, Lawrence L.

    2014-01-01

    In a previous work, a statistical analysis of runway incursion (RI) event data was conducted to ascertain the relevance of this data to the top ten Technical Challenges (TC) of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Aviation Safety Program (AvSP). The study revealed connections to several of the AvSP top ten TC and identified numerous primary causes and contributing factors of RI events. The statistical analysis served as the basis for developing a system-level Bayesian Belief Network (BBN) model for RI events, also previously reported. Through literature searches and data analysis, this RI event network has now been extended to also model runway excursion (RE) events. These RI and RE event networks have been further modified and vetted by a Subject Matter Expert (SME) panel. The combined system-level BBN model will allow NASA to generically model the causes of RI and RE events and to assess the effectiveness of technology products being developed under NASA funding. These products are intended to reduce the frequency of runway safety incidents/accidents, and to improve runway safety in general. The development and structure of the BBN for both RI and RE events are documented in this paper.

  20. Record of the Late Devonian Hangenberg global positive carbon-isotope excursion in an epeiric sea setting: Carbonate production, organic-carbon burial and paleoceanography during the late Famennian

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cramer, Bradley D.; Saltzman, Matthew R.; Day, J.E.; Witzke, B.J.

    2008-01-01

    Latest Famennian marine carbonates from the mid-continent of North America were examined to investigate the Late Devonian (very late Famennian) Hangenberg positive carbon-isotope (??13 Ccarb) excursion. This global shift in the ?? 13C of marine waters began during the late Famennian Hangenberg Extinction Event that occurred during the Middle Siphonodella praesulcata conodont zone. The post-extinction recovery interval spans the Upper S. praesulcata Zone immediately below the Devonian-Carboniferous boundary. Positive excursions in ?? 13 Ccarb are often attributed to the widespread deposition of organic-rich black shales in epeiric sea settings. The Hangenberg ??13 Ccarb excursion documented in the Louisiana Limestone in this study shows the opposite trend, with peak ??13 Ccarb values corresponding to carbonate production in the U.S. mid-continent during the highstand phase of the very late Famennian post-glacial sea level rise. Our data indicate that the interval of widespread black shale deposition (Hangenberg Black Shale) predates the peak isotope values of the Hangenberg ??13 Ccarb excursion and that peak values of the Hangenberg excursion in Missouri are not coincident with and cannot be accounted for by high Corg burial in epeiric seas. We suggest instead that sequestration and burial of Corg in the deep oceans drove the peak interval of the ??13Ccarb excursion, as a result of a change in the site of deep water formation to low-latitude epeiric seas as the global climate shifted between cold and warm states.

  1. Flow excursion time scales in the advanced neutron source reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Sulfredge, C.D.

    1995-04-01

    Flow excursion transients give rise to a key thermal limit for the proposed Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) reactor because its core involves many parallel flow channels with a common pressure drop. Since one can envision certain accident scenarios in which the thermal limits set by flow excursion correlations might be exceeded for brief intervals, a key objective is to determine how long a flow excursion would take to bring about a system failure that could lead to fuel damage. The anticipated time scale for flow excursions has been examined by subdividing the process into its component phenomena: bubble nucleation and growth, deceleration of the resulting two-phase flow, and finally overcoming thermal inertia to heat up the reactor fuel plates. Models were developed to estimate the time required for each individual stage. Accident scenarios involving sudden reduction in core flow or core exit pressure have been examined, and the models compared with RELAP5 output for the ANS geometry. For a high-performance reactor like the ANS, flow excursion time scales were predicted to be in the millisecond range, so that even very brief transients might lead to fuel damage. These results should prove useful whenever one must determine the time involved in any portion of a flow excursion transient.

  2. Design of a full scale model fuel assembly for full power production reactor flow excursion experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Nash, C.A.; Blake, J.E.; Rush, G.C.

    1990-12-31

    A novel full scale production reactor fuel assembly model was designed and built to study thermal-hydraulic effects of postulated Savannah River Site (SRS) nuclear reactor accidents. The electrically heated model was constructed to simulate the unique annular concentric tube geometry of fuel assemblies in SRS nuclear production reactors. Several major design challenges were overcome in order to produce the prototypic geometry and thermal-hydraulic conditions. The two concentric heater tubes (total power over 6 MW and maximum heat flux of 3.5 MW/m{sup 2}) (1.1E+6 BTU/(ft{sup 2}hr)) were designed to closely simulate the thermal characteristics of SRS uranium-aluminum nuclear fuel. The paper discusses the design of the model fuel assembly, which met requirements of maintaining prototypic geometric and hydraulic characteristics, and approximate thermal similarity. The model had a cosine axial power profile and the electrical resistance was compatible with the existing power supply. The model fuel assembly was equipped with a set of instruments useful for code analysis, and durable enough to survive a number of LOCA transients. These instruments were sufficiently responsive to record the response of the fuel assembly to the imposed transient.

  3. Design of a full scale model fuel assembly for full power production reactor flow excursion experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Nash, C.A. ); Blake, J.E.; Rush, G.C. )

    1990-01-01

    A novel full scale production reactor fuel assembly model was designed and built to study thermal-hydraulic effects of postulated Savannah River Site (SRS) nuclear reactor accidents. The electrically heated model was constructed to simulate the unique annular concentric tube geometry of fuel assemblies in SRS nuclear production reactors. Several major design challenges were overcome in order to produce the prototypic geometry and thermal-hydraulic conditions. The two concentric heater tubes (total power over 6 MW and maximum heat flux of 3.5 MW/m{sup 2}) (1.1E+6 BTU/(ft{sup 2}hr)) were designed to closely simulate the thermal characteristics of SRS uranium-aluminum nuclear fuel. The paper discusses the design of the model fuel assembly, which met requirements of maintaining prototypic geometric and hydraulic characteristics, and approximate thermal similarity. The model had a cosine axial power profile and the electrical resistance was compatible with the existing power supply. The model fuel assembly was equipped with a set of instruments useful for code analysis, and durable enough to survive a number of LOCA transients. These instruments were sufficiently responsive to record the response of the fuel assembly to the imposed transient.

  4. Radiolysis gas formation and pressure increase during a criticality excursion

    SciTech Connect

    Barbry, F.; Rozain, J.P.

    1989-01-01

    During a criticality excursion occurring in fissile solution, most of the energy released is transformed into thermal heating and the formation of gas by radiolytic decomposition of water. In addition, for fast kinetics excursions, a pressure increase in the internal solution is observed. This pressure increases and hydrogen generation can pose a safety concern. To understand and to model these phenomena, the Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique (CEA) Institute for Nuclear Protection and Safety has carried out specific experiments at the SILENE facility to: measure the pressure increase accompanying the power peak and determine the volume of radiolysis gas formed as a function of the energy and medium. These results are interrelated, and it should be possible to make use of pressure, energy, and radiolysis gas data to set up an equation of state of fissile solution and, consequently, to improve currently existing calculation models.

  5. Complete Basis Set Model Chemistries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ochterski, Joseph Wallace

    1994-01-01

    The major source of error in most ab initio calculations of molecular energies is the truncation of the one-electron basis set. Extrapolation to the complete basis set second -order (CBS2) limit using the N^{-1 } asymptotic convergence of N-configuration pair natural orbital (PNO) expansions can be combined with the use of relatively small basis sets for the higher-order correlation energy to develop cost effective computational models. Following this strategy, four new computational models denoted CBS-4, CBS-q, CBS-Q, and CBS-QCI/APNO are introduced. The mean absolute deviations (MAD) from experiment for the 125 energies of the G2 test set are 2.0, 1.7, 1.0 and 0.5 kcal/mol, respectively. The error distributions for all six models are indistinguishable from Gaussian distribution functions. Calculations on the cyclopropenyl radical and cyclopropenylidene provide new dissociation energies which are in accord with an interpretation of the thermochemistry emphasizing aromaticity. Several levels of theory are examined as candidates for the routine calculation of molecular geometries. The very simple UHF/3-21G* model gives bond lengths to an accuracy of +/-0.027 A compared with experiment for a test set of 69 small molecules. The commonly used MP2/6-31G* model (RMS error 0.025 A) offers virtually no improvement and use of the considerably more expensive QCISD calculations with the same basis set provides only a modest reduction to 0.020 A. However, spin projected MP3 calculations with a modified basis set including f -functions on Si, P, S, and Cl, reduce the RMS error to 0.010 A. This PMP3/6-31Gdf* model is recommended as a general scheme of geometry optimization for small molecules. The equilibrium structure and binding energy of the water dimer have been determined for several levels of ab initio theory. The basis set convergence of the SCF energy, the intramolecular and intermolecular MP2 energy, and higher-order effects, are examined separately and realistic error

  6. Bounded excursion stable gravastars and black holes

    SciTech Connect

    Rocha, P; Da Silva, M F; Wang, Anzhong; Santos, N O E-mail: yasuda@on.br E-mail: mfasnic@gmail.com E-mail: anzhong_wang@baylor.edu

    2008-06-15

    Dynamical models of prototype gravastars were constructed in order to study their stability. The models are the Visser-Wiltshire three-layer gravastars, in which an infinitely thin spherical shell of stiff fluid divides the whole spacetime into two regions, where the internal region is de Sitter, and the external one is Schwarzschild. It is found that in some cases the models represent the 'bounded excursion' stable gravastars, where the thin shell is oscillating between two finite radii, while in other cases they collapse until the formation of black holes occurs. In the phase space, the region for the 'bounded excursion' gravastars is very small in comparison to that of black holes, but not empty. Therefore, although the possibility of the existence of gravastars cannot be excluded from such dynamical models, our results indicate that, even if gravastars do indeed exist, that does not exclude the possibility of the existence of black holes.

  7. Dynamics of the Laschamp geomagnetic excursion from Black Sea sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nowaczyk, N. R.; Arz, H. W.; Frank, U.; Kind, J.; Plessen, B.

    2012-10-01

    Investigated sediment cores from the southeastern Black Sea provide a high-resolution record from mid latitudes of the Laschamp geomagnetic polarity excursion. Age constraints are provided by 16 AMS 14C ages, identification of the Campanian Ignimbrite tephra (39.28±0.11 ka), and by detailed tuning of sedimentologic parameters of the Black Sea sediments to the oxygen isotope record from the Greenland NGRIP ice core. According to the derived age model, virtual geomagnetic pole (VGP) positions during the Laschamp excursion persisted in Antarctica for an estimated 440 yr, making the Laschamp excursion a short-lived event with fully reversed polarity directions. The reversed phase, centred at 41.0 ka, is associated with a significant field intensity recovery to 20% of the preceding strong field maximum at ˜50 ka. Recorded field reversals of the Laschamp excursion, lasting only an estimated ˜250 yr, are characterized by low relative paleointensities (5% relative to 50 ka). The central, fully reversed phase of the Laschamp excursion is bracketed by VGP excursions to the Sargasso Sea (˜41.9 ka) and to the Labrador Sea (˜39.6 ka). Paleomagnetic results from the Black Sea are in excellent agreement with VGP data from the French type locality which facilitates the chronological ordering of the non-superposed lavas that crop out at Laschamp-Olby. In addition, VGPs between 34 and 35 ka reach low northerly to equatorial latitudes during a clockwise loop, inferred to be the Mono lake excursion.

  8. Unphysical scalar excursions in large-eddy simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matheou, Georgios; Dimotakis, Paul

    2016-11-01

    The range of physically realizable values of passive scalar fields in any flow is bounded by their boundary values. The current investigation focuses on the local conservation of passive scalar concentration fields in turbulent flows and the ability of the large-eddy simulation (LES) method to observe the boundedness of passive scalar concentrations. In practice, as a result of numerical artifacts, this fundamental constraint is often violated with scalars exhibiting unphysical excursions. The present study characterizes passive-scalar excursions in LES of a turbulent shear flow and examines methods for error diagnosis. Typically, scalar-excursion errors are diagnosed as violations of global boundedness, i.e., detecting scalar-concentration values outside boundary/initial condition bounds. To quantify errors in mixed-fluid regions, a local scalar excursion error metric is defined with respect to the local non-diffusive limit. Analysis of such errors shows that unphysical scalar excursions in LES result from dispersive errors of the convection-term discretization where the subgrid-scale model (SGS) provides insufficient dissipation to produce a sufficiently smooth scalar field. Local scalar excursion errors are found not to be correlated with the local scalar-gradient magnitude. This work is supported by AFOSR, DOE, and Caltech.

  9. Excursions in technology policy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Archibald, Robert B.

    1995-01-01

    This technical report presents a summary of three distinct projects: (1) Measuring economic benefits; (2) Evaluating the SBIR program; and (3) A model for evaluating changes in support for science and technology. the first project deals with the Technology Applications Group (TAG) at NASA Langley Research Center. The mission of TAG is to assist firms interested in commercializing technologies. TAG is a relatively new group as is the emphasis on technology commercialization for NASA. One problem faced by TAG and similar groups at other centers is measuring their effectiveness. The first project this summer, a paper entitled, 'Measuring the Economic Benefits of Technology Transfer from a National Laboratory: A Primer,' focused on this measurement problem. We found that the existing studies of the impact of technology transfer on the economy were conceptually flawed. The 'primer' outlines the appropriate theoretical framework for measuring the economic benefits of technology transfer. The second project discusses, one of the programs of TAG, the Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) program. This program has led to over 400 contracts with Small Business since its inception in 1985. The program has never been evaluated. Crucial questions such as those about the extent of commercial successes from the contracts need to be answered. This summer we designed and implemented a performance evaluation survey instrument. The analysis of the data will take place in the fall. The discussion of the third project focuses on a model for evaluating changes in support for science and technology. At present several powerful forces are combining to change the environment for science and technology policy. The end of the cold war eliminated the rationale for federal support for many projects. The new- found Congressional conviction to balance the budget without tax increases combined with demographic changes which automatically increase spending for some politically popular programs

  10. Excursion detection using leveling data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, MinGyu; Ju, Jaewuk; Habets, Boris; Erley, Georg; Bellmann, Enrico; Kim, Seop

    2016-03-01

    Wafer leveling data are usually used inside the exposure tool for ensuring good focus, then discarded. This paper describes the implementation of a monitoring and analysis solution to download these data automatically, together with the correction profiles applied by the scanner. The resulting height maps and focus residuals form the basis for monitoring metrics tailored to catching tool and process drifts and excursions in a high-volume manufacturing (HVM) environment. In this paper, we present four six cases to highlight the potential of the method: wafer edge monitoring, chuck drift monitoring, correlations between focus residuals and overlay errors, and pre-process monitoring by chuck fingerprint removal.

  11. Buoyancy-driven flow excursions in fuel assemblies

    SciTech Connect

    Laurinat, J.E.; Paul, P.K.; Menna, J.D.

    1995-12-31

    A power limit criterion was developed for a postulated Loss of Pumping Accident (LOPA) in one of the recently shut down heavy water production reactors at the Savannah River Site. These reactors were cooled by recirculating moderator downward through channels in cylindrical fuel tubes. Powers were limited to prevent a flow excursion from occurring in one or more of these parallel channels. During full-power operation, limits prevented a boiling flow excursion from taking place. At low flow rates, during the addition of emergency cooling water, buoyant forces reverse the flow in one of the coolant channels before boiling occurs. As power increases beyond the point of flow reversal, the maximum wall temperature approaches the fluid saturation temperature, and a thermal excursion occurs. The power limit criterion for low flow rates was the onset of flow reversal. To determine conditions for flow reversal, tests were performed in a mock-up of a fuel assembly that contained two electrically heated concentric tubes surrounded by three flow channels. These tests were modeled using a finite difference thermal-hydraulic code. According to code calculations, flow reversed in the outer flow channel before the maximum wall temperature reached the local fluid saturation temperature. Thermal excursions occurred when the maximum wall temperature approximately equaled the saturation temperature. For a postulated LOPA, the flow reversal criterion for emergency cooling water addition was more limiting than the boiling excursion criterion for full power operation. This criterion limited powers to 37% of historical levels.

  12. Buoyancy-driven flow excursions in fuel assemblies

    SciTech Connect

    Laurinat, J.E.; Paul, P.K.; Menna, J.D.

    1995-09-01

    A power limit criterion was developed for a postulated Loss of Pumping Accident (LOPA) in one of the recently shut down heavy water production reactors at the Savannah River Site. These reactors were cooled by recirculating heavy water moderator downward through channels in cylindrical fuel tubes. Powers were limited to safeguard against a flow excursion in one of more of these parallel channels. During-full-power operation, limits safeguarded against a boiling flow excursion. At low flow rates, during the addition of emergency cooling water, buoyant forces reverse the flow in one of the coolant channels before boiling occurs. As power increased beyond the point of flow reversal, the maximum wall temperature approaches the fluid saturation temperature, and a thermal excursion occurs. The power limit criterion for low flow rates was the onset of flow reversal. To determine conditions for flow reversal, tests were performed in a mock-up of a fuel assembly that contained two electrically heated concentric tubes surrounded by three flow channels. These tests were modeled using a finite difference thermal-hydraulic code. According to code calculations, flow reversed in the outer flow channel before the maximum wall temperature reached the local fluid saturation temperature. Thermal excursions occurred when the maximum wall temperature approximately equaled the saturation temperature. For a postulated LOPA, the flow reversal criterion for emergency cooling water addition was more limiting than the boiling excursion criterion for full power operation. This criterion limited powers to 37% of the limiting power for previous long-term reactor operations.

  13. An investigation of the dynamic relationship between navicular drop and first metatarsophalangeal joint dorsal excursion.

    PubMed

    Griffin, Nicole L; Miller, Charlotte; Schmitt, Daniel; D'Août, Kristiaan

    2013-06-01

    The modern human foot is a complex biomechanical structure that must act both as a shock absorber and as a propulsive strut during the stance phase of gait. Understanding the ways in which foot segments interact can illuminate the mechanics of foot function in healthy and pathological humans. It has been proposed that increased values of medial longitudinal arch deformation can limit metatarsophalangeal joint excursion via tension in the plantar aponeurosis. However, this model has not been tested directly in a dynamic setting. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that during the stance phase, subtalar pronation (stretching of the plantar aponeurosis and subsequent lowering of the medial longitudinal arch) will negatively affect the amount of first metatarsophalangeal joint excursion occurring at push-off. Vertical descent of the navicular (a proxy for subtalar pronation) and first metatarsophalangeal joint dorsal excursion were measured during steady locomotion over a flat substrate on a novel sample consisting of asymptomatic adult males and females, many of whom are habitually unshod. Least-squares regression analyses indicated that, contrary to the hypothesis, navicular drop did not explain a significant amount of variation in first metatarsophalangeal joint dorsal excursion. These results suggest that, in an asymptomatic subject, the plantar aponeurosis and the associated foot bones can function effectively within the normal range of subtalar pronation that takes place during walking gait. From a clinical standpoint, this study highlights the need for investigating the in vivo kinematic relationship between subtalar pronation and metatarsophalangeal joint dorsiflexion in symptomatic populations, and also the need to explore other factors that may affect the kinematics of asymptomatic feet.

  14. Rough set models of Physarum machines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pancerz, Krzysztof; Schumann, Andrew

    2015-04-01

    In this paper, we consider transition system models of behaviour of Physarum machines in terms of rough set theory. A Physarum machine, a biological computing device implemented in the plasmodium of Physarum polycephalum (true slime mould), is a natural transition system. In the behaviour of Physarum machines, one can notice some ambiguity in Physarum motions that influences exact anticipation of states of machines in time. To model this ambiguity, we propose to use rough set models created over transition systems. Rough sets are an appropriate tool to deal with rough (ambiguous, imprecise) concepts in the universe of discourse.

  15. Framing Learning Conditions in Geography Excursions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jonasson, Mikael

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to investigate and frame some learning conditions involved in the practice of geographical excursions. The empirical material from this study comes from several excursions made by students in human geography and an ethnomethodological approach through participant observation is used. The study is informed by theories from…

  16. Does the Shuram δ13C excursion record Ediacaran oxygenation?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Husson, J. M.; Maloof, A. C.; Schoene, B.; Higgins, J. A.

    2013-12-01

    The most negative carbon isotope excursion in Earth history is found in carbonate rocks of the Ediacaran Period (635-542 Ma). Known colloquially as the the 'Shuram' excursion, workers have long noted its tantalizing, broad concordance with the rise of abundant macro-scale fossils in the rock record, variously interpreted as animals, giant protists, macro-algae and lichen, and known as the 'Ediacaran Biota.' Thus, the Shuram excursion has been interpreted by many in the context of a dramatically changing redox state of the Ediacaran oceans - e.g., a result of methane cycling in a low O2 atmosphere, the final destruction of a large pool of recalcitrant dissolved organic carbon (DOC), and the step-wise oxidation of the Ediacaran oceans. More recently, diagenetic interpretations of the Shuram excursion - e.g. sedimentary in-growth of very δ13C depleted authigenic carbonates, meteoric alteration of Ediacaran carbonates, late-stage burial diagenesis - have challenged the various Ediacaran redox models. A rigorous geologic context is required to discriminate between these explanatory models, and determine whether the Shuram excursion can be used to evaluate terminal Neoproterozoic oxygenation. Here, we present chemo-stratigraphic data (δ13C, δ18O, δ44/42Ca and redox sensitive trace element abundances) from 12 measured sections of the Ediacaran-aged Wonoka Formation (Fm.) of South Australia that require a syn-depositional age for the extraordinary range of δ13C values (-12 to +4‰) observed in the formation. In some locations, the Wonoka Fm. is ~700 meters (m) of mixed shelf limestones and siliclastics that record the full 16 ‰ δ13C excursion in a remarkably consistent fashion across 100s of square kilometers of basin area. Fabric-altering diagenesis, where present, occurs at the sub-meter vertical scale, only results in sub-permil offsets in δ13C and cannot be used to explain the full δ13C excursion. In other places, the Wonoka Fm. is host to deep (1 km

  17. Simulation of Altered Excursion of the Pronator Quadratus

    PubMed Central

    Feeney, Micheal S.; Wentorf, Fred; Putnam, Matthew D.

    2014-01-01

    Background Loss of forearm rotation is frequently seen after healing of distal radius fractures. Questions/Purposes Our purpose was to determine whether restricted excursion of the pronator quadratus muscle can affect forearm rotation. Methods We evaluated the relationship between pronator quadratus excursion and forearm rotation in a cadaveric model. Eight adult fresh-frozen above-elbow specimens were attached to a mounting device that permitted free rotation of the forearm around its ulnar axis. Forearm rotation was measured with a protractor while alternating pronation and supination loads were applied. Measurements were repeated after restricting the excursion of pronator quadratus by 10, 20, and 30% of its initial length. Results There was a mean 15° loss of supination for each 10% reduction in pronator excursion. There was no significant effect on pronation. Conclusions We conclude that, independent of any bone deformity or nearby joint stiffness, posttraumatic scarring of this muscle may result in a loss of supination. PMID:25097814

  18. The Asymmetric Exclusion Process and Brownian Excursions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Derrida, B.; Enaud, C.; Lebowitz, J. L.

    2004-04-01

    We consider the totally asymmetric exclusion process (TASEP) in one dimension in its maximal current phase. We show, by an exact calculation, that the non-Gaussian part of the fluctuations of density can be described in terms of the statistical properties of a Brownian excursion. Numerical simulations indicate that the description in terms of a Brownian excursion remains valid for more general one dimensional driven systems in their maximal current phase.

  19. Geomagnetic excursions reflect an aborted polarity state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valet, Jean-Pierre; Plenier, Guillaume; Herrero-Bervera, E.

    2008-10-01

    Geomagnetic excursions represent short episodes of a few thousand years at most during which the field considerably exceeds its normal range of variability during a polarity state. Paleomagnetic records have now been obtained with extremely high temporal resolution which have improved our knowledge of these short events. We have compiled the most detailed records of excursions that had occurred during the Brunhes and Matuyama chrons. We show that virtual geomagnetic poles (VGPs) of at least one record of each event are able to reach the opposite polarity. In the next step, we have computed different simulations of excursions during which the dipole progressively vanishes before growing back without reversing. This scenario produces very few reversed directions which are only visible at some latitudes. We infer that it is impossible to reach the ratio of reversed to intermediate VGPs present in the paleomagnetic records if the excursions were not associated with a short period of reversed dipole field. Therefore, excursions should be regarded as two successive reversals bracketing an aborted polarity interval. We propose that the same underlying mechanisms prevail in both situations (excursions or reversals) and that below a certain strength the field reaches an unstable position which preludes either the achievement of a reversal or its return to the former polarity.

  20. Soybean canopy reflectance modeling data sets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ranson, K. J.; Biehl, L. L.; Daughtry, C. S. T.

    1984-01-01

    Numerous mathematical models of the interaction of radiation with vegetation canopies have been developed over the last two decades. However, data with which to exercise and validate these models are scarce. During three days in the summer of 1980, experiments are conducted with the objective of gaining insight about the effects of solar illumination and view angles on soybean canopy reflectance. In concert with these experiment, extensive measurements of the soybean canopies are obtained. This document is a compilation of the bidirectional reflectance factors, agronomic, characteristics, canopy geometry, and leaf, stem, and pod optical properties of the soybean canopies. These data sets should be suitable for use with most vegetation canopy reflectance models.

  1. Scaling properties of excursions in heartbeat dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reyes-Ramírez, I.; Guzmán-Vargas, L.

    2010-02-01

    In this work we study the excursions, defined as the number of beats to return to a local mean value, in heartbeat interval time series from healthy subjects and patients with congestive heart failure (CHF). First, we apply the segmentation procedure proposed by Bernaola-Galván et al. (Phys. Rev. Lett., 87 (2001) 168105), to nonstationary heartbeat time series to identify stationary segments with a local mean value. Next, we identify local excursions around the local mean value and construct the distributions to analyze the time organization and memory in the excursions sequences from the whole time series. We find that the cumulative distributions of excursions are consistent with a stretched exponential function given by g(x)~e-aτb, with a=1.09±0.15 (mean value±SD) and b=0.91±0.11 for healthy subjects and a=1.31±0.23 and b=0.77±0.13 for CHF patients. The cumulative conditional probability G(τ|τ0) is considered to evaluate if τ depends on a given interval τ0, that is, to evaluate the memory effect in excursion sequences. We find that the memory in excursions sequences under healthy conditions is characterized by the presence of clusters related to the fact that large excursions are more likely to be followed by large ones whereas for CHF data we do not observe this behavior. The presence of correlations in healthy data is confirmed by means of the detrended fluctuation analysis (DFA) while for CHF records the scaling exponent is characterized by a crossover, indicating that for short scales the sequences resemble uncorrelated noise.

  2. Spatial occupancy models for large data sets

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, Devin S.; Conn, Paul B.; Hooten, Mevin B.; Ray, Justina C.; Pond, Bruce A.

    2013-01-01

    Since its development, occupancy modeling has become a popular and useful tool for ecologists wishing to learn about the dynamics of species occurrence over time and space. Such models require presence–absence data to be collected at spatially indexed survey units. However, only recently have researchers recognized the need to correct for spatially induced overdisperison by explicitly accounting for spatial autocorrelation in occupancy probability. Previous efforts to incorporate such autocorrelation have largely focused on logit-normal formulations for occupancy, with spatial autocorrelation induced by a random effect within a hierarchical modeling framework. Although useful, computational time generally limits such an approach to relatively small data sets, and there are often problems with algorithm instability, yielding unsatisfactory results. Further, recent research has revealed a hidden form of multicollinearity in such applications, which may lead to parameter bias if not explicitly addressed. Combining several techniques, we present a unifying hierarchical spatial occupancy model specification that is particularly effective over large spatial extents. This approach employs a probit mixture framework for occupancy and can easily accommodate a reduced-dimensional spatial process to resolve issues with multicollinearity and spatial confounding while improving algorithm convergence. Using open-source software, we demonstrate this new model specification using a case study involving occupancy of caribou (Rangifer tarandus) over a set of 1080 survey units spanning a large contiguous region (108 000 km2) in northern Ontario, Canada. Overall, the combination of a more efficient specification and open-source software allows for a facile and stable implementation of spatial occupancy models for large data sets.

  3. Deep Reconstruction Models for Image Set Classification.

    PubMed

    Hayat, Munawar; Bennamoun, Mohammed; An, Senjian

    2015-04-01

    Image set classification finds its applications in a number of real-life scenarios such as classification from surveillance videos, multi-view camera networks and personal albums. Compared with single image based classification, it offers more promises and has therefore attracted significant research attention in recent years. Unlike many existing methods which assume images of a set to lie on a certain geometric surface, this paper introduces a deep learning framework which makes no such prior assumptions and can automatically discover the underlying geometric structure. Specifically, a Template Deep Reconstruction Model (TDRM) is defined whose parameters are initialized by performing unsupervised pre-training in a layer-wise fashion using Gaussian Restricted Boltzmann Machines (GRBMs). The initialized TDRM is then separately trained for images of each class and class-specific DRMs are learnt. Based on the minimum reconstruction errors from the learnt class-specific models, three different voting strategies are devised for classification. Extensive experiments are performed to demonstrate the efficacy of the proposed framework for the tasks of face and object recognition from image sets. Experimental results show that the proposed method consistently outperforms the existing state of the art methods.

  4. Multiple Palaeoproterozoic carbon burial episodes and excursions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, A. P.; Prave, A. R.; Condon, D. J.; Lepland, A.; Fallick, A. E.; Romashkin, A. E.; Medvedev, P. V.; Rychanchik, D. V.

    2015-08-01

    Organic-rich rocks (averaging 2-5% total organic carbon) and positive carbonate-carbon isotope excursions (δ13C > + 5 ‰ and locally much higher, i.e. the Lomagundi-Jatuli Event) are hallmark features of Palaeoproterozoic successions and are assumed to archive a global event of unique environmental conditions following the c. 2.3 Ga Great Oxidation Event. Here we combine new and published geochronology that shows that the main Palaeoproterozoic carbon burial episodes (CBEs) preserved in Russia, Gabon and Australia were temporally discrete depositional events between c. 2.10 and 1.85 Ga. In northwest Russia we can also show that timing of the termination of the Lomagundi-Jatuli Event may have differed by up to 50 Ma between localities, and that Ni mineralisation occurred at c. 1920 Ma. Further, CBEs have traits in common with Mesozoic Oceanic Anoxic Events (OAEs); both are exceptionally organic-rich relative to encasing strata, associated with contemporaneous igneous activity and marked by organic carbon isotope profiles that exhibit a stepped decrease followed by a stabilisation period and recovery. Although CBE strata are thicker and of greater duration than OAEs (100 s of metres versus metres, ∼106 years versus ∼105 years), their shared characteristics hint at a commonality of cause(s) and feedbacks. This suggests that CBEs represent processes that can be either basin-specific or global in nature and a combination of circumstances that are not unique to the Palaeoproterozoic. Our findings urge circumspection and re-consideration of models that assume CBEs are a Deep Time singularity.

  5. High-resolution palaeomagnetic records of the Laschamp geomagnetic excursion from the Blake Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mac Niocaill, C.; Bourne, M. D.; Thomas, A. L.; Henderson, G. M.

    2013-05-01

    Geomagnetic excursions are brief (1000s of years) deviations in geomagnetic field behaviour from that expected during 'normal secular' variation. The Laschamp excursion (~41 ka) was a global deviation in geomagnetic field behaviour. Previously published records suggest rapid changes in field direction and a concurrent substantial decrease in field intensity. Accurate dating of excursions and determinations of their durations from multiple locations is vital to our understanding to global field behaviour during these deviations. We present here high-resolution palaeomagnetic records of the Laschamp excursion obtained from two Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) Sites 1061 and 1062 on the Blake-Bahama Outer Ridge (ODP Leg 172) Relatively high sedimentation rates (~30-40 cm kyr-1) at these locations allow the determination of transitional field behaviour during the excursion. Despite their advantages, sedimentary records can be limited by the potential for unrecognized variations in sedimentation rates between widely spaced age-constrained boundaries. Rather than assuming a constant sedimentation rate between assigned age tie-points, we employ measurements of the concentration of 230Thxs in the sediment. 230Thxs is a constant flux proxy and may be used to assess variations in the sedimentation rates through the core sections of interest. Following this approach, we present a new age model for Site 1061 that allows us to better determine the temporal behaviour of the Laschamp excursion with greater accuracy and known uncertainty. Palaeomagnetic measurements of discrete samples from four cores reveal a single excursional feature, across an interval of 30 cm, associated with a broader palaeointensity low. The excursion is characterised by rapid transitions (less than 200 years) between a stable normal polarity and a partially-reversed, polarity. Peaks in inclination either side of the directional excursion indicate periods of time when the local field is dominated by vertical

  6. Systematic Behavior of the Non-dipole Magnetic Field during the 32 ka Mono Lake Excursion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Negrini, R. M.; McCuan, D.; Cassata, W. S.; Channell, J. E.; Verosub, K. L.; Liddicoat, J. C.; Knott, J. R.; Coe, R. S.; Benson, L. V.; Sarna-Wojcicki, A.; Lund, S.; Horton, R.; Lopez, J.

    2012-12-01

    Paleomagnetic excursions are enigmatic phenomena that reveal geodynamo behavior in its transitional state and provide important refinements in age control for the late Pleistocene, a critical time period for the study of paleoclimate and human evolution. We report here on two widely separated, unusually detailed records of the Mono Lake excursion (MLE) from sedimentary sequences dated at 32 ka. One of the records is from Summer Lake, Oregon. The vector components of this new record faithfully reproduce the principle features of the MLE as recorded at the type localities around Mono Lake, CA, though with greater detail and higher amplitude. Radiocarbon dates on bulk organics in the Summer Lake record confirm the 32 ka age of the MLE. The other record is from the marine Irminger Basin off of eastern Greenland and is based on the measurement of discrete samples rather than u-channels. The associated VGP paths of the two records strongly suggest systematic field behavior that includes three loci of nondipole flux whose relative dominance oscillates through time. The staggered sequence followed by the two paths through each flux locus further suggests that both the demise and return of the main field floods zonally during the excursion. The composite path is also compatible with the VGPs of a 32 ka set of lavas from New Zealand and, notably, it does not include VGPs associated with the 40 ka Laschamp excursion. This confirms that these two excursions are distinct events and, more specifically, shows that it is the 32 ka Mono Lake excursion that is recorded in the sediments surrounding Mono Lake rather than the ~40 ka Laschamp excursion.

  7. Isukasia area: Regional geological setting (includes excursion guide)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nutman, A. P.; Rosing, M.

    1986-01-01

    A brief account of the geology of the Isukasis area is given and is biased toward the main theme of the itinerary for the area: What has been established about the protoliths of the early Archean rocks of the area - the Isua supracrustal belt and the Amitsoq gneisses? The area's long and complex tectonometamorphic history of events can be divided into episodes using a combination of dike chronology, isotopic, and petrological studies. The earliest dikes, the ca 3700 Ma Inaluk dikes, intrude the earliest (tonalitic) components of the Amitsoq gneisses but are themselves cut up by the injection of the younger (granitic and pegmatitic) phases of the Amitsoq gneisses of the area. The areas of low late Archean deformation, strongly deformed early Archean mafic rocks have coarse grained metamorphic segregations and are cut by virtually undeformed mid-Archean Tarssartoq (Ameralik) dikes devoid of metamorphic segregations. The shows that the area was affected by regional amphibolite facies metamorphism in the early Archean. Late Archean and Proterozoic metamorphic imprints are marked to very strong in the area. Much of the early Archean gneiss complex was already highly deformed when the mid-Archean Tarssartoq dikes were intruded.

  8. A Comparison of two Brunhes Chron Geomagnetic Excursions Recorded by Neighbouring North Atlantic Sites (ODP Sites 1062 and 1063)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourne, M.; Mac Niocaill, C.; Knudsen, M. F.; Thomas, A. L.; Henderson, G. M.

    2012-04-01

    A full picture of geomagnetic field behaviour during the Blake excursion is currently limited by a paucity of robust, high-resolution records of this ambiguous event. Some records seem to point towards a 'double-excursion' character whilst others fail to record the Blake excursion at all. We present here a high-resolution record of the Blake excursion obtained from Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) Site 1062 on the Blake Outer Ridge (ODP Leg 172). Palaeomagnetic measurements in three cores reveal a single excursional feature associated with a broad palaeointensity low, characterised by rapid transitions (less than 500 years) between a stable normal polarity and a fully-reversed, pseudo-stable polarity. A relatively high sedimentation rate (~10 cm kyr-1) allows the determination of transitional field behaviour during the excursion. Rather than assuming a constant sedimentation rate between assigned age tie-points, we employ measurements of 230Thxs concentrations in the sediment to assess variations in the sedimentation rates through the core sections of interest. This allows us to determine an age and duration for the two excursions with greater accuracy and known uncertainty. Our new age model gives an age of 127 ka for the midpoint of the Blake event at Site 1062. The age model also gives a duration for the directional excursion of 7.1±1.6 kyr. This duration is similar to that previously reported for the Iceland Basin Excursion (~185 ka) from the nearby Bermuda Rise (ODP Site 1063), which recorded a ~7-8 kyr event. Similarly, a high sedimentation rate (10-15 cm kyr-1) at this site allows a high-resolution reconstruction of the geomagnetic field behaviour during the Iceland Basin Excursion. The Site 1063 palaeomagnetic record suggests more complicated behaviour than that of the Blake excursion at Site 1062. Instead, transitional VGP paths are characterised by stop-and-go behaviour between VGP clusters that may be related to long-standing thermo-dynamic features of the

  9. Carbon Isotopic Excursions Associated with the Mid-Pleistocene Transition and the Mid-Brunhes Transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barth, A. M.; Bill, N. S.; Clark, P. U.; Pisias, N. G.

    2015-12-01

    During the last 2 Myr, the climate system experienced two major transitions in variability: the mid-Pleistocene Transition (MPT), which represents a shift from dominant low-amplitude 41-kyr frequencies to dominant high-amplitude 100-kyr frequencies, and the mid-Brunhes Transition (MBT), which represents an increase in the amplitude of the 100-kyr frequency. While the MPT and MBT are typically identified in the benthic marine δ18O stack, their expression in other components of the climate system is less clear. Pleistocene δ13C records have been used to characterize climate and ocean circulation changes in response to orbital forcing, but these studies have used either a limited number of records or stacked data sets, which have the potential to bias the variability from the large number of young records. Here we present those existing δ13C data sets (n=18) that completely span these transitions. We use empirical orthogonal functions (EOFs) on these continuous data sets rather than stacking, allowing the determination of the dominant modes of variability and characterization of the time-frequency variation during the last 2 Myr. Our results identify two substantial carbon isotopic excursions. The first is a pronounced negative excursion during the MPT (~900 ka, MIS 23) that stands out as the strongest minimum in the last 2 Myr (previously identified from five records by Raymo et al., 1997). Corresponding ɛNd data from the South Atlantic suggest a strong weakening of the Atlantic meridional overturning circulation through the MIS 23 interglacial associated with this excursion. The second is a robust positive excursion ~530 ka (MIS 13), prior to the MBT (MIS 11), which stands out as the strongest maximum in the last 2 Myr. Possible causes of these excursions will be discussed.

  10. A New High-Resolution Record of the Blake Geomagnetic Excursion from ODP Site 1062

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourne, M. D.; Mac Niocaill, C.; Henderson, G. M.; Thomas, A. L.; Faurschou Knudsen, M.

    2010-12-01

    We present a high resolution record of the Blake geomagnetic excursion from Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) Site 1062 on the Blake-Bahama Outer Ridge. The excursion is recorded in three separate cores, with the high sedimentation rate (~10 cm/ka) at this location allowing the determination of transitional field behaviour during the excursion. A complex geometry is observed for the excursional geomagnetic field at the site. The directional records show an initial deviation from the expected directions across an interval of 1 m that achieves a completely reversed state, and then returns to normal polarity. A second, although less well-defined, short-lived phase of anomalous directions is observed immediately following the first event in two of the three cores. Measurements of the magnetic susceptibility show little variation through the core indicating that the concentration and grain size of the remanence carriers remain relatively constant during the studied interval. Measurements of the S-Ratio and remanence coercivity also remain constant through the sections of interest, and indicate magnetite to be the primary remanence carrier. The relatively homogeneous sediment enables the determination of two relative palaeointensity proxies by normalizing natural remanent magnetization measurements using artificially induced magnetizations (anhysteretic remanence, ARM and isothermal remanence, IRM). These records are consistent between all three cores. The relative palaeointensity proxies suggest that the Earth's magnetic field decreased substantially in intensity several tens of kyr prior to the initial event, before reaching an intensity minimum coinciding with the directional excursion maximum. A second palaeointensity minimum is also observed after the excursional event with no associated directional change. These features are consistent with global palaeointensity stacks. Our age model uses a new oxygen isotope stratigraphy. However, rather than assuming a constant

  11. Data Mining Using Extensions of the Rough Set Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lingras, P. J.; Yao, Y. Y.

    1998-01-01

    Examines basic issues of data mining using the theory of rough sets, a recent proposal for generalizing classical set theory. Demonstrates that a generalized rough set model can be used for generating rules from incomplete databases. Discusses the importance of rule extraction from incomplete databases in data mining. (AEF)

  12. A Logical Difficulty of the Parameter Setting Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sasaki, Yoshinori

    1990-01-01

    Seeks to prove that the parameter setting model (PSM) of Chomsky's Universal Grammar theory contains an internal contradiction when it is seriously taken to model the internal state of language learners. (six references) (JL)

  13. 40 CFR 63.1438 - Parameter monitoring levels and excursions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ..., each excursion constitutes a violation of the emission limit. (ii) For each recovery or recapture... excursion constitutes a violation of the emission limit. (iii) For each combustion, recovery, or recapture... 75 percent of the operating hours. (iii) The period of combustion, recovery, or recapture...

  14. The IIASA set of energy models: Its design and application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basile, P. S.; Agnew, M.; Holzl, A.; Kononov, Y.; Papin, A.; Rogner, H. H.; Schrattenholzer, L.

    1980-12-01

    The models studied include an accounting framework type energy demand model, a dynamic linear programming energy supply and conversion system model, an input-output model, a macroeconomic model, and an oil trade gaming model. They are incorporated in an integrated set for long-term, global analyses. This set makes use of a highly iterative process for energy scenario projections and analyses. Each model is quite simple and straightforward in structure; a great deal of human judgement is necessary in applying the set. The models are applied to study two alternative energy scenarios for a coming fifty year period. Examples are presented revealing the wealth of information that can be obtained from multimodel techniques. Details are given for several models (equations employed, assumptions made, data used).

  15. Parameterization of Model Validating Sets for Uncertainty Bound Optimizations. Revised

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lim, K. B.; Giesy, D. P.

    2000-01-01

    Given measurement data, a nominal model and a linear fractional transformation uncertainty structure with an allowance on unknown but bounded exogenous disturbances, easily computable tests for the existence of a model validating uncertainty set are given. Under mild conditions, these tests are necessary and sufficient for the case of complex, nonrepeated, block-diagonal structure. For the more general case which includes repeated and/or real scalar uncertainties, the tests are only necessary but become sufficient if a collinearity condition is also satisfied. With the satisfaction of these tests, it is shown that a parameterization of all model validating sets of plant models is possible. The new parameterization is used as a basis for a systematic way to construct or perform uncertainty tradeoff with model validating uncertainty sets which have specific linear fractional transformation structure for use in robust control design and analysis. An illustrative example which includes a comparison of candidate model validating sets is given.

  16. A new level set model for multimaterial flows

    SciTech Connect

    Starinshak, David P.; Karni, Smadar; Roe, Philip L.

    2014-01-08

    We present a new level set model for representing multimaterial flows in multiple space dimensions. Instead of associating a level set function with a specific fluid material, the function is associated with a pair of materials and the interface that separates them. A voting algorithm collects sign information from all level sets and determines material designations. M(M ₋1)/2 level set functions might be needed to represent a general M-material configuration; problems of practical interest use far fewer functions, since not all pairs of materials share an interface. The new model is less prone to producing indeterminate material states, i.e. regions claimed by more than one material (overlaps) or no material at all (vacuums). It outperforms existing material-based level set models without the need for reinitialization schemes, thereby avoiding additional computational costs and preventing excessive numerical diffusion.

  17. The Mathematical Concept of Set and the 'Collection' Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fischbein, Efraim; Baltsan, Madlen

    1999-01-01

    Hypothesizes that various misconceptions held by students with regard to the mathematical set concept may be explained by the initial collection model. Study findings confirm the hypothesis. (Author/ASK)

  18. A Model Evaluation Data Set for the Tropical ARM Sites

    DOE Data Explorer

    Jakob, Christian

    2008-01-15

    This data set has been derived from various ARM and external data sources with the main aim of providing modelers easy access to quality controlled data for model evaluation. The data set contains highly aggregated (in time) data from a number of sources at the tropical ARM sites at Manus and Nauru. It spans the years of 1999 and 2000. The data set contains information on downward surface radiation; surface meteorology, including precipitation; atmospheric water vapor and cloud liquid water content; hydrometeor cover as a function of height; and cloud cover, cloud optical thickness and cloud top pressure information provided by the International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project (ISCCP).

  19. The Record of Geomagnetic Excursions from a ~150 m Sediment Core: Clear Lake, Northern California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levin, E.; Byrne, R.; Looy, C. V.; Wahl, D.; Noren, A. J.; Verosub, K. L.

    2015-12-01

    We are studying the paleomagnetic properties of a new ~150 meter drill core from Clear Lake, CA. Step-wise demagnetization of the natural remanent magnetism (NRM) yields stable directions after 20 mT, implying that the sediments are reliable recorders of geomagnetic field behavior. Several intervals of low relative paleointensity (RPI) from the core appear to be correlated with known geomagnetic excursions. At about 46 m depth, and ~33 ka according to an age model based on radiocarbon dates obtained from pollen and the Olema ash bed, a low RPI zone seems to agree with the age and duration of the Mono Lake Excursion, previously identified between 32 and 35 ka. Slightly lower in the core, at about 50 m depth and ~40 ka, noticeably low RPI values seem to be coeval with the Laschamp excursion, which has been dated at ~41 ka. A volcanic ash near the bottom of the core (141 mblf) is near the same depth as an ash identified in 1988 by Andrei Sarna-Wojcicki and others as the Loleta ash bed in a previous Clear Lake core. If the basal ash in the new core is indeed the, Loleta ash bed, then the core may date back to about 270-300 ka. Depending on the age of the lowest ash, a sequence of low RPI intervals could correlate with the Blake (120 ka), Iceland Basin (188 ka), Jamaica/Pringle Falls (211 ka), and CR0 (260 ka) excursions. Correlation of the low RPI intervals to these geomagnetic excursions will help in the development of a higher resolution chronostratigraphy for the core, resolve a long-standing controversy about a possible hiatus in the Clear Lake record, and provide information about climatically-driven changes in sedimentation.

  20. Geomagnetic excursions date early hominid migration to China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharya, Atreyee

    2012-09-01

    Global-scale geomagnetic reversals, which are periods when the direction of Earth's magnetic field flips, leave imprints in magnetic minerals present in sediments. But so do smaller-scale, even local, changes in Earth's magnetic field direction. Paleomagnetists believe that the smaller-scale events represent “failed reversals” and refer to them as “geomagnetic excursions.” Scientists use geomagnetic excursions in sedimentary basins as markers to tie together events of Earth's history across the globe.

  1. Modeling sets of unordered points using highly eccentric ellipses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerogiannis, Demetrios; Nikou, Christophoros; Likas, Aristidis

    2014-12-01

    An algorithm for modeling a set of unordered two-dimensional points by line segments is presented. The points are modeled by highly eccentric ellipses, and line segments are extracted by the major axes of these elongated ellipses. At first, a single ellipse is fitted to points which is then iteratively split to a large number of highly eccentric ellipses to cover the set of points. Then, a merge process follows in order to combine neighboring ellipses with almost collinear major axes to reduce the complexity of the model. Experimental results on various databases show that the proposed scheme is an efficient technique for modeling unordered sets of points and shapes by line segments. A computer vision application of the method is also presented regarding the detection of retinal fundus image features, such as end-points, junctions, and crossovers.

  2. Comparisons of thermospheric density data sets and models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doornbos, Eelco; van Helleputte, Tom; Emmert, John; Drob, Douglas; Bowman, Bruce R.; Pilinski, Marcin

    During the past decade, continuous long-term data sets of thermospheric density have become available to researchers. These data sets have been derived from accelerometer measurements made by the CHAMP and GRACE satellites and from Space Surveillance Network (SSN) tracking data and related Two-Line Element (TLE) sets. These data have already resulted in a large number of publications on physical interpretation and improvement of empirical density modelling. This study compares four different density data sets and two empirical density models, for the period 2002-2009. These data sources are the CHAMP (1) and GRACE (2) accelerometer measurements, the long-term database of densities derived from TLE data (3), the High Accuracy Satellite Drag Model (4) run by Air Force Space Command, calibrated using SSN data, and the NRLMSISE-00 (5) and Jacchia-Bowman 2008 (6) empirical models. In describing these data sets and models, specific attention is given to differences in the geo-metrical and aerodynamic satellite modelling, applied in the conversion from drag to density measurements, which are main sources of density biases. The differences in temporal and spa-tial resolution of the density data sources are also described and taken into account. With these aspects in mind, statistics of density comparisons have been computed, both as a function of solar and geomagnetic activity levels, and as a function of latitude and local solar time. These statistics give a detailed view of the relative accuracy of the different data sets and of the biases between them. The differences are analysed with the aim at providing rough error bars on the data and models and pinpointing issues which could receive attention in future iterations of data processing algorithms and in future model development.

  3. Demonstration of saw blade accuracy and excursion: a cadaveric comparison study of blade types used in total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Wetzel, Robert J; Shah, Ritesh R; Puri, Lalit

    2013-06-01

    In total knee arthroplasty, outcomes partly depend on accurate osteotomies and integrity of stabilizing structures. We compared accuracy and excursion between a conventional and an oscillating tip saw blade. Two sets of osteotomies were made on cadaveric knees. Bi-planar accuracy was compared using computer navigation, and excursion was compared using methylene blue. Wilcoxon-Mann-Whitney testing demonstrated no significant difference in blade accuracy (p=0.35). Blades were within 0.5 degrees of neutral coronally and 2.0 degrees sagittally. The oscillating tip blade demonstrated less dye markings on the surrounding tissues. Accurate osteotomies and soft tissue protection are critical to successful arthroplasties. Although comparative accuracy was equal, the oscillating tip blade exhibited less excursion displaying potential for less iatrogenic soft tissue injuries leading to catastrophic failure.

  4. Computerized reduction of elementary reaction sets for combustion modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wikstrom, Carl V.

    1991-01-01

    If the entire set of elementary reactions is to be solved in the modeling of chemistry in computational fluid dynamics, a set of stiff ordinary differential equations must be integrated. Some of the reactions take place at very high rates, requiring short time steps, while others take place more slowly and make little progress in the short time step integration. The goal is to develop a procedure to automatically obtain sets of finite rate equations, consistent with a partial equilibrium assumptions, from an elementary set appropriate to local conditions. The possibility of computerized reaction reduction was demonstrated. However, the ability to use the reduced reaction set depends on the ability of the CFD approach in incorporate partial equilibrium calculations into the computer code. Therefore, the results should be tested on a code with partial equilibrium capability.

  5. Controllable set analysis for planetary landing under model uncertainties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, Jiateng; Gao, Ai; Cui, Pingyuan

    2015-07-01

    Controllable set analysis is a beneficial method in planetary landing mission design by feasible entry state selection in order to achieve landing accuracy and satisfy entry path constraints. In view of the severe impact of model uncertainties on planetary landing safety and accuracy, the purpose of this paper is to investigate the controllable set under uncertainties between on-board model and the real situation. Controllable set analysis under model uncertainties is composed of controllable union set (CUS) analysis and controllable intersection set (CIS) analysis. Definitions of CUS and CIS are demonstrated and computational method of them based on Gauss pseudospectral method is presented. Their applications on entry states distribution analysis under uncertainties and robustness of nominal entry state selection to uncertainties are illustrated by situations with ballistic coefficient, lift-to-drag ratio and atmospheric uncertainty in Mars entry. With analysis of CUS and CIS, the robustness of entry state selection and entry trajectory to model uncertainties can be guaranteed, thus enhancing the safety, reliability and accuracy under model uncertainties during planetary entry and landing.

  6. Computerized reduction of elementary reaction sets for CFD combustion modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wikstrom, Carl V.

    1992-01-01

    Modeling of chemistry in Computational Fluid Dynamics can be the most time-consuming aspect of many applications. If the entire set of elementary reactions is to be solved, a set of stiff ordinary differential equations must be integrated. Some of the reactions take place at very high rates, requiring short time steps, while others take place more slowly and make little progress in the short time step integration.

  7. An experimental methodology for a fuzzy set preference model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turksen, I. B.; Willson, Ian A.

    1992-01-01

    A flexible fuzzy set preference model first requires approximate methodologies for implementation. Fuzzy sets must be defined for each individual consumer using computer software, requiring a minimum of time and expertise on the part of the consumer. The amount of information needed in defining sets must also be established. The model itself must adapt fully to the subject's choice of attributes (vague or precise), attribute levels, and importance weights. The resulting individual-level model should be fully adapted to each consumer. The methodologies needed to develop this model will be equally useful in a new generation of intelligent systems which interact with ordinary consumers, controlling electronic devices through fuzzy expert systems or making recommendations based on a variety of inputs. The power of personal computers and their acceptance by consumers has yet to be fully utilized to create interactive knowledge systems that fully adapt their function to the user. Understanding individual consumer preferences is critical to the design of new products and the estimation of demand (market share) for existing products, which in turn is an input to management systems concerned with production and distribution. The question of what to make, for whom to make it and how much to make requires an understanding of the customer's preferences and the trade-offs that exist between alternatives. Conjoint analysis is a widely used methodology which de-composes an overall preference for an object into a combination of preferences for its constituent parts (attributes such as taste and price), which are combined using an appropriate combination function. Preferences are often expressed using linguistic terms which cannot be represented in conjoint models. Current models are also not implemented an individual level, making it difficult to reach meaningful conclusions about the cause of an individual's behavior from an aggregate model. The combination of complex aggregate

  8. Setting up virgin stress conditions in discrete element models

    PubMed Central

    Rojek, J.; Karlis, G.F.; Malinowski, L.J.; Beer, G.

    2013-01-01

    In the present work, a methodology for setting up virgin stress conditions in discrete element models is proposed. The developed algorithm is applicable to discrete or coupled discrete/continuum modeling of underground excavation employing the discrete element method (DEM). Since the DEM works with contact forces rather than stresses there is a need for the conversion of pre-excavation stresses to contact forces for the DEM model. Different possibilities of setting up virgin stress conditions in the DEM model are reviewed and critically assessed. Finally, a new method to obtain a discrete element model with contact forces equivalent to given macroscopic virgin stresses is proposed. The test examples presented show that good results may be obtained regardless of the shape of the DEM domain. PMID:27087731

  9. Setting conservation management thresholds using a novel participatory modeling approach.

    PubMed

    Addison, P F E; de Bie, K; Rumpff, L

    2015-10-01

    We devised a participatory modeling approach for setting management thresholds that show when management intervention is required to address undesirable ecosystem changes. This approach was designed to be used when management thresholds: must be set for environmental indicators in the face of multiple competing objectives; need to incorporate scientific understanding and value judgments; and will be set by participants with limited modeling experience. We applied our approach to a case study where management thresholds were set for a mat-forming brown alga, Hormosira banksii, in a protected area management context. Participants, including management staff and scientists, were involved in a workshop to test the approach, and set management thresholds to address the threat of trampling by visitors to an intertidal rocky reef. The approach involved trading off the environmental objective, to maintain the condition of intertidal reef communities, with social and economic objectives to ensure management intervention was cost-effective. Ecological scenarios, developed using scenario planning, were a key feature that provided the foundation for where to set management thresholds. The scenarios developed represented declines in percent cover of H. banksii that may occur under increased threatening processes. Participants defined 4 discrete management alternatives to address the threat of trampling and estimated the effect of these alternatives on the objectives under each ecological scenario. A weighted additive model was used to aggregate participants' consequence estimates. Model outputs (decision scores) clearly expressed uncertainty, which can be considered by decision makers and used to inform where to set management thresholds. This approach encourages a proactive form of conservation, where management thresholds and associated actions are defined a priori for ecological indicators, rather than reacting to unexpected ecosystem changes in the future.

  10. Instruction manual model 600F, data transmission test set

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    Information necessary for the operation and maintenance of the Model 600F Data Transmission Test Set is presented. A description is contained of the physical and functional characteristics; pertinent installation data; instructions for operating the equipment; general and detailed principles of operation; preventive and corrective maintenance procedures; and block, logic, and component layout diagrams of the equipment and its major component assemblies.

  11. A Novel Multipurpose Model Set for Teaching General Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gupta, H. O.; Parkash, Brahm

    1999-01-01

    Reports on a low-cost and unique molecular model set capable of generating a large number of structures for teaching and learning general chemistry. An important component of the kit is an 11-hole ball that gives tetrahedral, octahedral, trigonal, trigonal bipyramidal, and square planar symmetries. (WRM)

  12. A fuzzy set preference model for market share analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turksen, I. B.; Willson, Ian A.

    1992-01-01

    Consumer preference models are widely used in new product design, marketing management, pricing, and market segmentation. The success of new products depends on accurate market share prediction and design decisions based on consumer preferences. The vague linguistic nature of consumer preferences and product attributes, combined with the substantial differences between individuals, creates a formidable challenge to marketing models. The most widely used methodology is conjoint analysis. Conjoint models, as currently implemented, represent linguistic preferences as ratio or interval-scaled numbers, use only numeric product attributes, and require aggregation of individuals for estimation purposes. It is not surprising that these models are costly to implement, are inflexible, and have a predictive validity that is not substantially better than chance. This affects the accuracy of market share estimates. A fuzzy set preference model can easily represent linguistic variables either in consumer preferences or product attributes with minimal measurement requirements (ordinal scales), while still estimating overall preferences suitable for market share prediction. This approach results in flexible individual-level conjoint models which can provide more accurate market share estimates from a smaller number of more meaningful consumer ratings. Fuzzy sets can be incorporated within existing preference model structures, such as a linear combination, using the techniques developed for conjoint analysis and market share estimation. The purpose of this article is to develop and fully test a fuzzy set preference model which can represent linguistic variables in individual-level models implemented in parallel with existing conjoint models. The potential improvements in market share prediction and predictive validity can substantially improve management decisions about what to make (product design), for whom to make it (market segmentation), and how much to make (market share

  13. HDU Pressurized Excursion Module (PEM) Prototype Systems Integration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gill, Tracy R.; Kennedy, Kriss; Tri, Terry; Toups, Larry; Howe, A. Scott

    2010-01-01

    The Habitat Demonstration Unit (HDU) project team constructed an analog prototype lunar surface laboratory called the Pressurized Excursion Module (PEM). The prototype unit subsystems were integrated in a short amount of time, utilizing a skunk-works approach that brought together over 20 habitation-related technologies from a variety of NASA centers. This paper describes the system integration strategies and lessons learned, that allowed the PEM to be brought from paper design to working field prototype using a multi-center team. The system integration process included establishment of design standards, negotiation of interfaces between subsystems, and scheduling fit checks and installation activities. A major tool used in integration was a coordinated effort to accurately model all the subsystems using CAD, so that conflicts were identified before physical components came together. Some of the major conclusions showed that up-front modularity that emerged as an artifact of construction, such as the eight 45 degree "pie slices" making up the module whose steel rib edges defined structural mounting and loading points, dictated much of the configurational interfaces between the major subsystems and workstations. Therefore, 'one of the lessons learned included the need to use modularity as a tool for organization in advance, and to work harder to prevent non-critical aspects of the platform from dictating the modularity that may eventually inform the fight system.

  14. Cardiac rehabilitation delivery model for low-resource settings

    PubMed Central

    Grace, Sherry L; Turk-Adawi, Karam I; Contractor, Aashish; Atrey, Alison; Campbell, Norm; Derman, Wayne; Melo Ghisi, Gabriela L; Oldridge, Neil; Sarkar, Bidyut K; Yeo, Tee Joo; Lopez-Jimenez, Francisco; Mendis, Shanthi; Oh, Paul; Hu, Dayi; Sarrafzadegan, Nizal

    2016-01-01

    Objective Cardiovascular disease is a global epidemic, which is largely preventable. Cardiac rehabilitation (CR) is demonstrated to be cost-effective and efficacious in high-income countries. CR could represent an important approach to mitigate the epidemic of cardiovascular disease in lower-resource settings. The purpose of this consensus statement was to review low-cost approaches to delivering the core components of CR, to propose a testable model of CR which could feasibly be delivered in middle-income countries. Methods A literature review regarding delivery of each core CR component, namely: (1) lifestyle risk factor management (ie, physical activity, diet, tobacco and mental health), (2) medical risk factor management (eg, lipid control, blood pressure control), (3) education for self-management and (4) return to work, in low-resource settings was undertaken. Recommendations were developed based on identified articles, using a modified GRADE approach where evidence in a low-resource setting was available, or consensus where evidence was not. Results Available data on cost of CR delivery in low-resource settings suggests it is not feasible to deliver CR in low-resource settings as is delivered in high-resource ones. Strategies which can be implemented to deliver all of the core CR components in low-resource settings were summarised in practice recommendations, and approaches to patient assessment proffered. It is suggested that CR be adapted by delivery by non-physician healthcare workers, in non-clinical settings. Conclusions Advocacy to achieve political commitment for broad delivery of adapted CR services in low-resource settings is needed. PMID:27181874

  15. A mesoscopic network model for permanent set in crosslinked elastomers

    SciTech Connect

    Weisgraber, T H; Gee, R H; Maiti, A; Clague, D S; Chinn, S; Maxwell, R S

    2009-01-29

    A mesoscopic computational model for polymer networks and composites is developed as a coarse-grained representation of the composite microstructure. Unlike more complex molecular dynamics simulations, the model only considers the effects of crosslinks on mechanical behavior. The elastic modulus, which depends only on the crosslink density and parameters in the bond potential, is consistent with rubber elasticity theory, and the network response satisfies the independent network hypothesis of Tobolsky. The model, when applied to a commercial filled silicone elastomer, quantitatively reproduces the experimental permanent set and stress-strain response due to changes in the crosslinked network from irradiation.

  16. Influence of lateral excursion on vestibular cervical dental abfraction.

    PubMed

    Palomino-Gómez, Sandra P; Jeremias, Fabiano; Finoti, Livia S; Paredes-Coz, Gerson; Raveli, Dirceu B

    2011-01-01

    A study was performed to evaluate the influence of mandibular lateral excursion, group function and canine guidance on vestibular cervical dental abfraction (VCDA). Thirty-six individuals of both sexes, aged 20 to 45 years, with full natural dentition with at least one tooth with VCDA were selected at the San Marcos University Clinic. We evaluated number of teeth with VCDA per side (left and right), tooth type and lateral excursive movement (canine guidance or group function) affecting it. The results showed no statistical difference (p > 0.05). The tooth type most often showing VCDA was the first lower premolar, with 30.8% on the right side and 36.4% on the left. Moderate positive correlation was found between age and VCDA (R = 0.40). It is concluded that group function during lateral excursion may contribute to presence of VCDA.

  17. Exploring the Angstrom Excursion of Au Nanoparticles Excited away from a Metal Surface by an Impulsive Acoustic Perturbation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ji-Wan; Kovalenko, Oleksandr; Liu, Yu; Bigot, Jean-Yves

    2016-12-27

    We report the anharmonic angstrom dynamics of self-assembled Au nanoparticles (Au:NPs) away from a nickel surface on top of which they are coupled by their near-field interaction. The deformation and the oscillatory excursion away from the surface are induced by picosecond acoustic pulses and probed at the surface plasmon resonance with femtosecond laser pulses. The overall dynamics are due to an efficient transfer of translational momentum from the Ni surface to the Au:NPs, therefore avoiding usual thermal effects and energy redistribution among the electronic states. Two modes are clearly revealed by the oscillatory shift of the Au:NPs surface plasmon resonance-the quadrupole deformation mode due to the transient ellipsoid shape and the excursion mode when the Au:NPs bounce away from the surface. We find that, contrary to the quadrupole mode, the excursion mode is sensitive to the distance between Au:NPs and Ni. Importantly, the excursion dynamics display a nonsinusoidal motion that cannot be explained by a standard harmonic potential model. A detailed modeling of the dynamics using a Hamaker-type Lennard-Jones potential between two media is performed, showing that each Au:NPs coherently evolves in a nearly one-dimensional anharmonic potential with a total excursion of ∼1 Å. This excursion induces a shift of the surface plasmon resonance detectable because of the strong near-field interaction. This general method of observing the spatiotemporal dynamics with angstrom and picosecond resolutions can be directly transposed to many nanostructures or biosystems to reveal the interaction and contact mechanism with their surrounding medium while remaining in their fundamental electronic states.

  18. Setting development goals using stochastic dynamical system models

    PubMed Central

    Nicolis, Stamatios C.; Bali Swain, Ranjula; Sumpter, David J. T.

    2017-01-01

    The Millennium Development Goals (MDG) programme was an ambitious attempt to encourage a globalised solution to important but often-overlooked development problems. The programme led to wide-ranging development but it has also been criticised for unrealistic and arbitrary targets. In this paper, we show how country-specific development targets can be set using stochastic, dynamical system models built from historical data. In particular, we show that the MDG target of two-thirds reduction of child mortality from 1990 levels was infeasible for most countries, especially in sub-Saharan Africa. At the same time, the MDG targets were not ambitious enough for fast-developing countries such as Brazil and China. We suggest that model-based setting of country-specific targets is essential for the success of global development programmes such as the Sustainable Development Goals (SDG). This approach should provide clear, quantifiable targets for policymakers. PMID:28241057

  19. Single High Fidelity Geometric Data Sets for LCM - Model Requirements

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-11-01

    Defence R&D Canada – Atlantic DEFENCE DÉFENSE & Single High Fidelity Geometric Data Sets for LCM – Model Requirements D. Brennan T. Koko K. Mackay M...Brennan T. Koko K. Mackay M. Norwood S. Tobin E. Teng J. Wallace Martec Limited Martec Limited 1888 Brunswick Street, Suite 400 Halifax...result in SPMs for use in LCM analysis of existing and future classes of Canadian naval vessels. D. Brennan, T. Koko , K. Mackay, M. Norwood, S. Tobin, E

  20. Ocean sunfish rewarm at the surface after deep excursions to forage for siphonophores.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Itsumi; Goto, Yusuke; Sato, Katsufumi

    2015-05-01

    Ocean sunfish (Mola mola) were believed to be inactive jellyfish feeders because they are often observed lying motionless at the sea surface. Recent tracking studies revealed that they are actually deep divers, but there has been no evidence of foraging in deep water. Furthermore, the surfacing behaviour of ocean sunfish was thought to be related to behavioural thermoregulation, but there was no record of sunfish body temperature. Evidence of ocean sunfish feeding in deep water was obtained using a combination of an animal-borne accelerometer and camera with a light source. Siphonophores were the most abundant prey items captured by ocean sunfish and were typically located at a depth of 50-200 m where the water temperature was <12 °C. Ocean sunfish were diurnally active, made frequently deep excursions and foraged mainly at 100-200 m depths during the day. Ocean sunfish body temperatures were measured under natural conditions. The body temperatures decreased during deep excursions and recovered during subsequent surfacing periods. Heat-budget models indicated that the whole-body heat-transfer coefficient between sunfish and the surrounding water during warming was 3-7 times greater than that during cooling. These results suggest that the main function of surfacing is the recovery of body temperature, and the fish might be able to increase heat gain from the warm surface water by physiological regulation. The thermal environment of ocean sunfish foraging depths was lower than their thermal preference (c. 16-17 °C). The behavioural and physiological thermoregulation enables the fish to increase foraging time in deep, cold water. Feeding rate during deep excursions was not related to duration or depth of the deep excursions. Cycles of deep foraging and surface warming were explained by a foraging strategy, to maximize foraging time with maintaining body temperature by vertical temperature environment.

  1. Global Secular Variation and Excursions Within the Brunhes - is it Real?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barckhausen, U.; Weske, M.

    2015-12-01

    We analyzed 64 high quality magnetic profiles crossing the Central Indian Ridge and the Southeast Indian Ridge between 21°S and 28°S. All profiles cover the entire Anomaly 1 and they do not cross discontinuities, major faults, or significant isolated bathymetric features. When stacked over single ridge segments, correlated variations in the magnetic field become apparent. However, these variations change from one ridge segment to the next and when stacked over the entire ridge, all correlated variations are lost. Therefore we conclude that the correlated variations represent local effects, in this case mainly caused by bathymetry and irregularities of the spreading process which are typically limited to one ridge segment. Since we do not see any anomalies associated to geomagnetic excursions, we carried out forward modelling which shows that any excursion lasting for longer than 10.000 years should become visible in our data, thus putting an upper limit of 10.000 years to the maximum duration of geomagnetic excursions during the Brunhes.

  2. Modelling gene and protein regulatory networks with answer set programming.

    PubMed

    Fayruzov, Timur; Janssen, Jeroen; Vermeir, Dirk; Cornelis, Chris; De Cock, Martine

    2011-01-01

    Recently, many approaches to model regulatory networks have been proposed in the systems biology domain. However, the task is far from being solved. In this paper, we propose an Answer Set Programming (ASP)-based approach to model interaction networks. We build a general ASP framework that describes the network semantics and allows modelling specific networks with little effort. ASP provides a rich and flexible toolbox that allows expanding the framework with desired features. In this paper, we tune our framework to mimic Boolean network behaviour and apply it to model the Budding Yeast and Fission Yeast cell cycle networks. The obtained steady states of these networks correspond to those of the Boolean networks.

  3. Paleoproductivity And Carbon Cycling During The Middle Miocene Monterey Excursion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Billups, K.; Diester-Haass, L.; Emeis, K.; François, L.; Jacquemin, I.; Lefebvre, V.

    2010-05-01

    A prominent middle Miocene (17.5 to 13.5 Ma) carbon-isotope excursion (the so-called Monterey event) is punctuated by six distinct carbon isotope maxima (CM). Orbital tuning of carbon isotope records links each CM event with the long term component of eccentricity (400 kyr) highlighting the importance of insolation control on the global carbon cycle (Holbourn et al., 2008). Here we use proxy reconstructions (benthic foraminiferal accumulation rates) from six sites in the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans combined with geochemical modelling to investigate whether there is a link between long term insolation forcing and the marine carbon isotope record via marine productivity and thus atmospheric CO2 levels. Our results show that none of the CM events are associated with distinctly large changes in paleoproductivity. This observation is consistent with our previous finding that the overall mid Miocene carbon isotope maximum is not associated with a change in marine productivity (Diester-Haass et al., 2009). There are, albeit minor, fluctuations in productivity that can be related to the 400 kyr variability in the carbon isotope records with several productivity maxima between CM events, whereas CM events often show minima in productivity. Only the last of the CM events (CM 6), which occurs in close association with the major step in mid Miocene Antarctic ice growth, is accompanied by an ocean-wide increase in paleoproductivity. To tentatively explain the observed 400 kyr variability of the deep ocean carbon isotope record an improved version of the geochemical box model used Diester-Haass et al. (2009) has been forced by sealevel fluctuations reconstructed for the middle Miocene (Holbourn pers. comm., 2009). Calculations indicate that the induced changes in weathering rates and carbon cycle can explain the temporal variability of the carbon isotope record, but not the observed amplitude.

  4. The impact of pH inhomogeneities on CHO cell physiology and fed-batch process performance - two-compartment scale-down modelling and intracellular pH excursion.

    PubMed

    Brunner, Matthias; Braun, Philipp; Doppler, Philipp; Posch, Christoph; Behrens, Dirk; Herwig, Christoph; Fricke, Jens

    2017-01-12

    Due to high mixing times and base addition from top of the vessel, pH inhomogeneities are most likely to occur during large-scale mammalian processes. The goal of this study was to set-up a scale-down model of a 10-12 m(3) stirred tank bioreactor and to investigate the effect of pH perturbations on CHO cell physiology and process performance. Short-term changes in extracellular pH are hypothesized to affect intracellular pH and thus cell physiology. Therefore, batch fermentations, including pH shifts to 9.0 and 7.8, in regular one-compartment systems are conducted. The short-term adaption of the cells intracellular pH are showed an immediate increase due to elevated extracellular pH. With this basis of fundamental knowledge, a two-compartment system is established which is capable of simulating defined pH inhomogeneities. In contrast to state-of-the-art literature, the scale-down model is included parameters (e.g. volume of the inhomogeneous zone) as they might occur during large-scale processes. pH inhomogeneity studies in the two-compartment system are performed with simulation of temporary pH zones of pH 9.0. The specific growth rate especially during the exponential growth phase is strongly affected resulting in a decreased maximum viable cell density and final product titer. The gathered results indicate that even short-term exposure of cells to elevated pH values during large-scale processes can affect cell physiology and overall process performance. In particular, it could be shown for the first time that pH perturbations, which might occur during the early process phase, have to be considered in scale-down models of mammalian processes.

  5. Potential Cislunar and Interplanetary Proving Ground Excursion Trajectory Concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McGuire, Melissa L.; Strange, Nathan J.; Burke, Laura M.; MacDonald, Mark A.; McElrath, Timothy P.; Landau, Damon F.; Lantoine, Gregory; Hack, Kurt J.; Lopez, Pedro

    2016-01-01

    NASA has been investigating potential translunar excursion concepts to take place in the 2020s that would be used to test and demonstrate long duration life support and other systems needed for eventual Mars missions in the 2030s. These potential trajectory concepts could be conducted in the proving ground, a region of cislunar and near-Earth interplanetary space where international space agencies could cooperate to develop the technologies needed for interplanetary spaceflight. Enabled by high power Solar Electric Propulsion (SEP) technologies, the excursion trajectory concepts studied are grouped into three classes of increasing distance from the Earth and increasing technical difficulty: the first class of excursion trajectory concepts would represent a 90-120 day round trip trajectory with abort to Earth options throughout the entire length, the second class would be a 180-210 day round trip trajectory with periods in which aborts would not be available, and the third would be a 300-400 day round trip trajectory without aborts for most of the length of the trip. This paper provides a top-level summary of the trajectory and mission design of representative example missions of these three classes of excursion trajectory concepts.

  6. Waterborne norovirus outbreak during a summer excursion in Northern Italy.

    PubMed

    Di Bartolo, Ilaria; Pavoni, Enrico; Tofani, Silvia; Consoli, Marta; Galuppini, Elisa; Losio, Marina Nadia; Ruggeri, Franco Maria; Varisco, Giorgio

    2015-01-01

    In September 2011, an acute gastroenteritis outbreak affected 33 children in Northern Italy. Patients had drunk river water during an excursion. Identical GI.4 norovirus genomes were detected from one patient's stools and from the river water. Improper discharge of human sewage into the river may have caused this waterborne outbreak.

  7. Nongeocentric axial dipole field behavior during the Mono Lake excursion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Negrini, Robert M.; McCuan, Daniel T.; Horton, Robert A.; Lopez, James D.; Cassata, William S.; Channell, James E. T.; Verosub, Kenneth L.; Knott, Jeffrey R.; Coe, Robert S.; Liddicoat, Joseph C.; Lund, Steven P.; Benson, Larry V.; Sarna-Wojcicki, Andrei M.

    2014-04-01

    A new record of the Mono Lake excursion (MLE) is reported from the Summer Lake Basin of Oregon, USA. Sediment magnetic properties indicate magnetite as the magnetization carrier and imply suitability of the sediments as accurate recorders of the magnetic field including relative paleointensity (RPI) variations. The magnitudes and phases of the declination, inclination, and RPI components of the new record correlate well with other coeval but lower resolution records from western North America including records from the Wilson Creek Formation exposed around Mono Lake. The virtual geomagnetic pole (VGP) path of the new record is similar to that from another high-resolution record of the MLE from Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) Site 919 in the Irminger Basin between Iceland and Greenland but different from the VGP path for the Laschamp excursion (LE), including that found lower in the ODP-919 core. Thus, the prominent excursion recorded at Mono Lake, California, is not the LE but rather one that is several thousands of years younger. The MLE VGP path contains clusters, the locations of which coincide with nonaxial dipole features found in the Holocene geomagnetic field. The clusters are occupied in the same time progression by VGPs from Summer Lake and the Irminger Basin, but the phase of occupation is offset, a behavior that suggests time-transgressive decay and return of the principal field components at the beginning and end of the MLE, respectively, leaving the nonaxial dipole features associated with the clusters dominant during the excursion.

  8. 5. Photocopy of photograph. JANE MOSELEY (VESSEL 53) DURING EXCURSION, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. Photocopy of photograph. JANE MOSELEY (VESSEL 53) DURING EXCURSION, DETAIL OF FORE DECK AND CABIN AREA. Date end photographer unknown. (Original in Mariners Museum, Newport News, Virginia, negative #PB 30017) - Shooters Island, Ships Graveyard, Vessel No. 53, Newark Bay, Staten Island (subdivision), Richmond County, NY

  9. Excursion behaviour of female roe deer may depend on density.

    PubMed

    Bocci, A; Aiello, V; Lovari, S

    2013-07-01

    The excursion behaviour of roe does was studied for two years in a low density population (ca. 6.5 ind./100 ha), in an Apennine-continental forest of Southern Italy, through satellite radiotracking. During the rutting period, our radiotagged does (N=6) moved well outside their summer ranges, with an average exploration area eight times greater than summer ranges. The median duration of excursions was 51 h (range: 10-99 h). One female stayed away for a total of 11 days. In order further to understand this behaviour, we reviewed all studies (N=6) dealing with excursion behaviour of roe does and carried out in areas where population density was assessed through the same method (i.e. drive counts). Out of five ecological parameters included in the analysis, excursion behaviour of roe does was found significantly and negatively associated only to population density: when density was low, the proportion of roaming does increased, probably because of the lower availability of "free" bucks during the short time of female oestrous.

  10. Stratigraphic Correlation of an Excursion at 22 kyr in the U.S. Great Basin - the Hilina Pali Excursion?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liddicoat, J. C.; Coe, R. S.

    2013-12-01

    An unusually large secular variation of the geomagnetic field recorded in outcrops of pluvial Lake Russell sediment about 22 kyr old in the Mono Basin, CA, can be used for precise correlation to other lacustrine sections in the western U.S., and perhaps beyond. We present new AF and thermal demagnetization results for paired samples at 2-cm intervals between ash layers 7 and 8 of Lajoie (1968) in the bank of Wilson Creek that document an excursion having an inclination as low as 16 degrees and as high as 73 degrees, while the declination swings from 15 degrees west during the low inclination to 30 east when the inclination is high, and back to average northerly declination and expected inclination. The corresponding VGPs form a narrow clockwise-trending loop centered at about 50 N, 30 E. The Mono Lake Excursion (MLE; Liddicoat and Coe, 1979) occurs 1.7 m lower in the same section. The best estimates for the ages of the two excursions are about 22 and 32 kyr, based on 14-C dates (Cassata et al., 2010). About 150 km to the north, sediments of about the same age exposed along the Truckee River that were deposited in pluvial Lake Lahontan record a similar geomagnetic signature. Moreover, both the MLE and this excursion are exhibited at the appropriate levels in a sediment core taken from Pyramid Lake, the remnant of Lake Lahontan (Benson et al., 2008). Thus, this excursion is a valuable marker for high-resolution correlation of Quaternary sediments in the western U.S., especially when paired with the MLE. It is tempting to try to identify this geomagnetic feature with others of about the same age further away. On the island of Hawaii, Coe et al. (1978) discovered a lava flow on the Hilina Pali with a calibrated 14-C age of 21 +/-1 kyr that has an inclination about 30 degrees shallower and a paleointensity 60 percent lower than today. Later Teanby et al. (2002) documented an excursion with inclinations as low as -35 degrees, recorded by around 40 successive flows with

  11. Spatial and temporal patterns of subtidal and intertidal crabs excursions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, A. C. F.; Boaventura, D. M.; Thompson, R. C.; Hawkins, S. J.

    2014-01-01

    Highly mobile predators such as fish and crabs are known to migrate from the subtidal zone to forage in the intertidal zone at high-tide. The extent and variation of these habitat linking movements along the vertical shore gradient have not been examined before for several species simultaneously, hence not accounting for species interactions. Here, the foraging excursions of Carcinus maenas (L.), Necora puber (Linnaeus, 1767) and Cancer pagurus (Linnaeus, 1758) were assessed in a one-year mark-recapture study on two replicated rocky shores in southwest U.K. A comparison between the abundance of individuals present on the shore at high-tide with those present in refuges exposed at low-tide indicated considerable intertidal migration by all species, showing strong linkage between subtidal and intertidal habitats. Estimates of population size based on recapture of marked individuals indicated that an average of ~ 4000 individuals combined for the three crab species, can be present on the shore during one tidal cycle. There was also a high fidelity of individuals and species to particular shore levels. Underlying mechanisms for these spatial patterns such as prey availability and agonistic interactions are discussed. Survival rates were estimated using the Cormack-Jolly-Seber model from multi-recapture analysis and found to be considerably high with a minimum of 30% for all species. Growth rates were found to vary intraspecifically with size and between seasons. Understanding the temporal and spatial variations in predation pressure by crabs on rocky shores is dependent on knowing who, when and how many of these commercially important crab species depend on intertidal foraging. Previous studies have shown that the diet of these species is strongly based on intertidal prey including key species such as limpets; hence intertidal crab migration could be associated with considerable impacts on intertidal assemblages.

  12. The Latitudinal Excursion of Coronal Magnetic Field Lines in Response to Differential Rotation: MHD Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lionello, Roberto; Linker, Jon A.; Mikic, Zoran; Riley, Pete

    2006-01-01

    Solar energetic particles, which are believed to originate from corotating interacting regions (CIRS) at low heliographic latitude, were observed by the Ulysses spacecraft even as it passed over the Sun's poles. One interpretation of this result is that high-latitude field lines intercepted by Ulysses connect to low-latitude CIRs at much larger heliocentric distances. The Fisk model explains the latitudinal excursion of magnetic field lines in the solar corona and heliosphere as the inevitable consequence of the interaction of a tilted dipole in a differentially rotating photosphere with rigidly rotating coronal holes. We use a time-dependent three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) algorithm to follow the evolution of a simple model of the solar corona in response to the differential rotation of the photospheric magnetic flux. We examine the changes of the coronal-hole boundaries, the redistribution of the line-of-sight magnetic field, and the precession of field lines in the corona. Our results confirm the basic idea of the Fisk model, that differential rotation leads to changes in the heliographic latitude of magnetic field lines. However, the latitudinal excursion of magnetic field lines in this simple "tilted dipole" model is too small to explain the Ulysses observations. Although coronal holes in our model rotate more rigidly than do photospheric features (in general agreement with observations), they do not rotate strictly rigidly as assumed by Fisk. This basic difference between our model and Fisk's will be explored in the future by considering more realistic magnetic flux distributions, as observed during Ulysses polar excursions.

  13. Preference Mining Using Neighborhood Rough Set Model on Two Universes

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Preference mining plays an important role in e-commerce and video websites for enhancing user satisfaction and loyalty. Some classical methods are not available for the cold-start problem when the user or the item is new. In this paper, we propose a new model, called parametric neighborhood rough set on two universes (NRSTU), to describe the user and item data structures. Furthermore, the neighborhood lower approximation operator is used for defining the preference rules. Then, we provide the means for recommending items to users by using these rules. Finally, we give an experimental example to show the details of NRSTU-based preference mining for cold-start problem. The parameters of the model are also discussed. The experimental results show that the proposed method presents an effective solution for preference mining. In particular, NRSTU improves the recommendation accuracy by about 19% compared to the traditional method. PMID:28044074

  14. Level Set Segmentation of Lumbar Vertebrae Using Appearance Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fritscher, Karl; Leber, Stefan; Schmölz, Werner; Schubert, Rainer

    For the planning of surgical interventions of the spine exact knowledge about 3D shape and the local bone quality of vertebrae are of great importance in order to estimate the anchorage strength of screws or implants. As a prerequisite for quantitative analysis a method for objective and therefore automated segmentation of vertebrae is needed. In this paper a framework for the automatic segmentation of vertebrae using 3D appearance models in a level set framework is presented. In this framework model information as well as gradient information and probabilities of pixel intensities at object edges in the unseen image are used. The method is tested on 29 lumbar vertebrae leading to accurate results, which can be useful for surgical planning and further analysis of the local bone quality.

  15. Preference Mining Using Neighborhood Rough Set Model on Two Universes.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Kai

    2016-01-01

    Preference mining plays an important role in e-commerce and video websites for enhancing user satisfaction and loyalty. Some classical methods are not available for the cold-start problem when the user or the item is new. In this paper, we propose a new model, called parametric neighborhood rough set on two universes (NRSTU), to describe the user and item data structures. Furthermore, the neighborhood lower approximation operator is used for defining the preference rules. Then, we provide the means for recommending items to users by using these rules. Finally, we give an experimental example to show the details of NRSTU-based preference mining for cold-start problem. The parameters of the model are also discussed. The experimental results show that the proposed method presents an effective solution for preference mining. In particular, NRSTU improves the recommendation accuracy by about 19% compared to the traditional method.

  16. Modeling cellular deformations using the level set formalism

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Liu; Effler, Janet C; Kutscher, Brett L; Sullivan, Sarah E; Robinson, Douglas N; Iglesias, Pablo A

    2008-01-01

    Background Many cellular processes involve substantial shape changes. Traditional simulations of these cell shape changes require that grids and boundaries be moved as the cell's shape evolves. Here we demonstrate that accurate cell shape changes can be recreated using level set methods (LSM), in which the cellular shape is defined implicitly, thereby eschewing the need for updating boundaries. Results We obtain a viscoelastic model of Dictyostelium cells using micropipette aspiration and show how this viscoelastic model can be incorporated into LSM simulations to recreate the observed protrusion of cells into the micropipette faithfully. We also demonstrate the use of our techniques by simulating the cell shape changes elicited by the chemotactic response to an external chemoattractant gradient. Conclusion Our results provide a simple but effective means of incorporating cellular deformations into mathematical simulations of cell signaling. Such methods will be useful for simulating important cellular events such as chemotaxis and cytokinesis. PMID:18652669

  17. A Whale of an Interest in Sea Creatures: The Learning Potential of Excursions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hedges, Helen

    2004-01-01

    Excursions, or field trips, are a common component of early childhood programs, seen as a means of enriching the curriculum by providing experiences with people, places, and things in the community. Although excursions have been used as a framework for research on children's memory development, research on the efficacy of excursions in terms of…

  18. Modeling decision support rule interactions in a clinical setting.

    PubMed

    Sordo, Margarita; Rocha, Beatriz H; Morales, Alfredo A; Maviglia, Saverio M; Oglio, Elisa Dell'Oglio; Fairbanks, Amanda; Aroy, Teal; Dubois, David; Bouyer-Ferullo, Sharon; Rocha, Roberto A

    2013-01-01

    Traditionally, rule interactions are handled at implementation time through rule task properties that control the order in which rules are executed. By doing so, knowledge about the behavior and interactions of decision rules is not captured at modeling time. We argue that this is important knowledge that should be integrated in the modeling phase. In this project, we build upon current work on a conceptual schema to represent clinical knowledge for decision support in the form of if then rules. This schema currently captures provenance of the clinical content, context where such content is actionable (i.e. constraints) and the logic of the rule itself. For this project, we borrowed concepts from both the Semantic Web (i.e., Ontologies) and Complex Adaptive Systems (CAS), to explore a conceptual approach for modeling rule interactions in an enterprise-wide clinical setting. We expect that a more comprehensive modeling will facilitate knowledge authoring, editing and update; foster consistency in rules implementation and maintenance; and develop authoritative knowledge repositories to promote quality, safety and efficacy of healthcare.

  19. Excurrent jets of a set of model clams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Excurrent jets of a set of model clams that are discharging into the near-wall region of a turbulent boundary layer in a laboratory flume. These false-color images were produced using planar laser-induced fluorescence and represent 16-s averages of dye concentration fields associated with the excurrent jets. Fluid that leaves the excurrent siphone is dyed to represent phytoplankton-depleted fluid, whereas the clear ambient fluid represents phytoplanktonrich fluid. This particular sequence of images shows how the speed of the crossflow affects the food-depleted (high dye concentration) boundary layer that develops over the bed of clams in two different ways—through its direct effect on the trajectories of the excurrent jets and through its effect on turbulent mixing of the jets.

  20. Excursions in fluvial (dis)continuity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Grant, Gordon E.; O'Connor, James E.; Safran, Elizabeth

    2017-01-01

    Lurking below the twin concepts of connectivity and disconnectivity are their first, and in some ways, richer cousins: continuity and discontinuity. In this paper we explore how continuity and discontinuity represent fundamental and complementary perspectives in fluvial geomorphology, and how these perspectives inform and underlie our conceptions of connectivity in landscapes and rivers. We examine the historical roots of continuum and discontinuum thinking, and how much of our understanding of geomorphology rests on contrasting views of continuity and discontinuity. By continuum thinking we refer to a conception of geomorphic processes as well as geomorphic features that are expressed along continuous gradients without abrupt changes, transitions, or thresholds. Balance of forces, graded streams, and hydraulic geometry are all examples of this perspective. The continuum view has played a prominent role in diverse disciplinary fields, including ecology, paleontology, and evolutionary biology, in large part because it allows us to treat complex phenomena as orderly progressions and invoke or assume equilibrium processes that introduce order and prediction into our sciences.In contrast the discontinuous view is a distinct though complementary conceptual framework that incorporates non-uniform, non-progressive, and non-equilibrium thinking into understanding geomorphic processes and landscapes. We distinguish and discuss examples of three different ways in which discontinuous thinking can be expressed: 1) discontinuous spatial arrangements or singular events; 2) specific process domains generally associated with thresholds, either intrinsic or extrinsic; and 3) physical dynamics or changes in state, again often threshold-linked. In moving beyond the continuous perspective, a fertile set of ideas comes into focus: thresholds, non-equilibrium states, heterogeneity, catastrophe. The range of phenomena that is thereby opened up to scientific exploration similarly expands

  1. Estimates of fission yields in nuclear criticality excursions

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, J.S.; Thompson, J.W.; Reed, R.

    1995-06-01

    There is a need for computer simulation of hypothetical criticality excursions involving significant quantities of fissionable materials, especially in fissile aqueous system. The need arises due to the requirements for the emergency planning of facilities where the fissionable materials are handled, processed, or stored; and the regulatory requirements associated with facility operation or conversion. It is proposed here that a data base of fission yeilds for critical experiments and known accidents (both aqueous and solid) should be generated by using existing or new computer codes. The success in compiling this data base would provide useful source-terms for criticality excursions, realistic estimates of emergency-response boundary, as well as a replacement for the ``rule-of-thumb`` or ``bounding`` method. 10 refs.

  2. On the Age of the Laschamp Geomagnetic Excursion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guillou, H.; Singer, B.; Scaillet, S.; Laj, C.; Kissel, C.; Jicha, B.

    2004-12-01

    The Laschamp geomagnetic excursion is a critical tie-point found directly in deep sea sediment cores and revealed in polar ice as an abrupt change in the rate of cosmogenic nuclide flux. Despite the importance of this excursion to quantifying paleoclimate proxy records archived in sediment and ice, and to providing an independent calibration of the radiocarbon calendar, its timing remains poorly known. Previous K-Ar, 40Ar/39Ar, and U-Th isochron determinations from lava flows at the type locality in the Massif Central, France, vary widely, are imprecise, and suggest a mean age of about 46.2 +/- 2.5 ka (AƒA_A,A¿A,A 1/2 2sigma). Results of 6 new unspiked K-Ar and 13 40Ar/39Ar incremental heating experiments on subsamples from 3 sites on the Laschamp and Olby flows are concordant and give a weighted mean age of 40.4 +/- 1.1 ka (2sigma uncertainty including analytical sources only) that is 10% younger than the previous estimates. Considering that the 40K - 40Ar decay constant is not known to a precision better than AƒA_A,A¿A,A 1/2 2.4%, the most probable radioisotopic age for the Laschamp excursion is 40.4 +/- 2.0 ka (2sigma, analytical plus decay constant uncertainties). This new age for the Laschamp excursion agrees precisely with that deduced from the NAPIS-75 deep sea sediment paleointensity stack when calibrated against the GISP2 ice core chronology using the O isotopes in ice and the magnetic properties of the marine cores.

  3. Age of the Mono Lake excursion and associated tephra

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Benson, L.; Liddicoat, J.; Smoot, J.; Sarna-Wojcicki, A.; Negrini, R.; Lund, S.

    2003-01-01

    The Mono Lake excursion (MLE) is an important time marker that has been found in lake and marine sediments across much of the Northern Hemisphere. Dating of this event at its type locality, the Mono Basin of California, has yielded controversial results with the most recent effort concluding that the MLE may actually be the Laschamp excursion (Earth Planet. Sci. Lett. 197 (2002) 151). We show that a volcanic tephra (Ash #15) that occurs near the midpoint of the MLE has a date (not corrected for reservoir effect) of 28,620 ?? 300 14C yr BP (??? 32,400 GISP2 yr BP) in the Pyramid Lake Basin of Nevada. Given the location of Ash #15 and the duration of the MLE in the Mono Basin, the event occurred between 31,500 and 33,300 GISP2 yr BP, an age range consistent with the position and age of the uppermost of two paleointensity minima in the NAPIS-75 stack that has been associated with the MLE (Philos. Trans. R. Soc. London Ser. A 358 (2000) 1009). The lower paleointensity minimum in the NAPIS-75 stack is considered to be the Laschamp excursion (Philos. Trans. R. Soc. London Ser. A 358 (2000) 1009).

  4. On the geographic and stratigraphic variability of the Hirnantian positive carbon isotope excursion across Anticosti Island, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, D. S.; Fike, D. A.; Finnegan, S.; Fischer, W. W.

    2010-12-01

    The mass extinction at the end of the Ordovician Period was one of the most extreme diversity depletions of the Phanerozoic Eon. It is associated with widespread glaciation on the southern supercontinent Gondwana and with a globally documented positive carbon isotope excursion. Mixed carbonate-siliciclastic facies on the Anticosti Island carbonate ramp contain a complete and richly fossiliferous record of this important interval of Earth history. The Ellis Bay and Becscie formations straddle the Ordovician/Silurian boundary and record several cycles of glacioeustatic sea level fluctuations. We report new chemostratigraphic records for the depositional sequence associated with glaciation during the Hirnantian, the final stage of the Ordovician Period. High-resolution inorganic and organic carbon isotope data through the +4‰ positive isotope excursion provide an independent measure of time which provides a robust context for the stratigraphic record. The positive carbon isotope excursion in the Laframboise Member (Ellis Bay Formation) is shown to match the architecture of the organic carbon isotope excursions documented at the GSSPs for the base of the Hirnantian Stage and the base of the Silurian System. A lower excursion in the stratigraphy correlates with pre-Hirnantian excursions documented in the Upper Ordovician Katian Stage in Baltica. Discontinuities in the isotope record correspond to key lithologic transitions across the island, providing the foundation for a dischronous model of the deposition of the Hirnantian strata. The oncolite marker bed that defines the base of the Laframboise Member is time transgressive, with deposition proceeding across the basin from the distal western end to the proximal east; it likely represents sea level rise associated with partial deglaciation of Gondwana. The Fox Point Member (Becscie Formation) is also time transgressive, prograding from the east to the west as the carbonate factory filled the newly created

  5. High-resolution record of the Laschamp geomagnetic excursion at the Blake-Bahama Outer Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourne, Mark D.; Mac Niocaill, Conall; Thomas, Alex L.; Henderson, Gideon M.

    2013-12-01

    Geomagnetic excursions are brief deviations of the geomagnetic field from behaviour expected during `normal secular' variation. The Laschamp excursion at ˜41 ka was one such deviation. Previously published records suggest rapid changes in field direction and a concurrent substantial decrease in field intensity associated with this excursion. Accurate dating of excursions, and determination of their durations from multiple locations, is vital to our understanding of global field behaviour during these deviations. We present here high-resolution palaeomagnetic records of the Laschamp excursion obtained from two Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) Sites, 1061 and 1062 on the Blake-Bahama Outer Ridge (ODP Leg 172). High sedimentation rates (˜30-40 cm kyr-1) at these locations allow determination of transitional field behaviour during the excursion. Palaeomagnetic measurements of discrete samples from four cores reveal a single excursional feature, across an interval of 30 cm, associated with a broader palaeointensity low. We determine the age and duration of the Laschamp excursion using a stratigraphy linked to the δ18O record from the Greenland ice cores. This chronology dates the Laschamp excursion at the Blake Ridge to 41.3 ka. The excursion is characterized by rapid transitions (less than 200 yr) between stable normal polarity and a partially reversed polarity state. The palaeointensity record is in good agreement between the two sites, revealing two prominent minima. The first minimum is associated with the Laschamp excursion at 41 ka and the second corresponds to the Mono Lake excursion at ˜35.5 ka. We determine that the directional excursion during the Laschamp at this location was no longer than ˜400 yr, occurring within a palaeointensity minimum that lasted 2000 yr. The Laschamp excursion at this location is much shorter in duration than the Blake and Iceland Basin excursions.

  6. Effects of Age and Bolus Volume on Velocity of Hyolaryngeal Excursion in Healthy Adults.

    PubMed

    Barikroo, Ali; Carnaby, Giselle; Crary, Michael

    2015-10-01

    Reduced movement velocity has been identified as a risk marker for movement impairment in older adults. Hyolaryngeal excursion is a key movement feature of normal swallowing function which is known to change with age and other extrinsic variables such as bolus volume. However, velocity of hyolaryngeal excursion has received limited attention in the literature on normal or abnormal swallowing. This study evaluated the effects of age and bolus volume on the velocity of hyoid and laryngeal excursion during swallowing in healthy adults. Forty-four healthy volunteers were grouped into three age bands (young: 20-35 years, middle age: 36-55 years, older: 56 ≥ years). All subjects swallowed 5 and 20 mL of thin liquid during fluoroscopic recording. Fluoroscopic images were extracted for each swallow representing the onset and maximum excursion positions of the hyoid and larynx. Superior and anterior excursion distance (excursion magnitude) and the time difference between rest and maximum excursion (excursion duration) were calculated. Velocity was calculated as a ratio of distance over time. Superior hyoid excursion magnitude was significantly increased for the 20 mL volume. Anterior laryngeal excursion magnitude was also significantly increased for the 20 mL volume. No kinematic duration measure demonstrated significant change across age or bolus conditions. Superior hyoid excursion velocity was significantly faster for the 20 mL volume. Superior and anterior laryngeal excursion velocity were significantly faster for the 20 mL volume only in the older group. Results of this study indicate that magnitude and velocity of hyoid and laryngeal excursion vary with age and volume. Comprising both excursion magnitude and duration, kinematic velocity may be a more complete metric to evaluate age-related swallowing performance.

  7. Improving a Lecture-Size Molecular Model Set by Repurposing Used Whiteboard Markers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dragojlovic, Veljko

    2015-01-01

    Preparation of an inexpensive model set from whiteboard markers and either HGS molecular model set or atoms made of wood is described. The model set is relatively easy to prepare and is sufficiently large to be suitable as an instructor set for use in lectures.

  8. A Novel Erbium-Doped Fiber Amplifier Simulator for Gain Excursion Estimation in Multi-Channel Dynamic Optical Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Sharbani; Priye, Vishnu

    2012-01-01

    A novel erbium-doped fiber amplifier simulator designed using the SIMULINK toolbox of MATLAB 7.0 (The MathWorks, Natick, MA, USA) is reported in this article. The present simulator has an ability to incorporate multi-channel amplification simultaneously in both the C- and L-bands. It is realized by defining new FUNCTION block sets and replacing the MATLAB FUNCTION block set reported earlier for multi-channel amplification. Spectral variation of gain for an erbium-doped fiber amplifier simulator is first verified in both the C- and L-bands. Next, the simulator is employed to study gain excursion in a multi-channel dynamic optical network, where the change in the gain excursion by varying the pump power has also been estimated. The present approach to estimate the gain excursion will find applications in quantifying inter-channel cross-talk due to cross-gain saturation among co-propagating multi-channels in a dynamic optical network.

  9. Setting, Evaluating, and Maintaining Certification Standards with the Rasch Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grosse, Martin E.; Wright, Benjamin D.

    1986-01-01

    Based on the standard setting procedures or the American Board of Preventive Medicine for their Core Test, this article describes how Rasch measurement can facilitate using test content judgments in setting a standard. Rasch measurement can then be used to evaluate and improve the precision of the standard and to hold it constant across time.…

  10. Models of Music Therapy Intervention in School Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Brian L., Ed.

    2002-01-01

    This completely revised 2nd edition edited by Brian L. Wilson, addresses both theoretical issues and practical applications of music therapy in educational settings. 17 chapters written by a variety of authors, each dealing with a different setting or issue. A valuable resource for demonstrating the efficacy of music therapy to school…

  11. Using Set Covering with Item Sampling to Analyze the Infeasibility of Linear Programming Test Assembly Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huitzing, Hiddo A.

    2004-01-01

    This article shows how set covering with item sampling (SCIS) methods can be used in the analysis and preanalysis of linear programming models for test assembly (LPTA). LPTA models can construct tests, fulfilling a set of constraints set by the test assembler. Sometimes, no solution to the LPTA model exists. The model is then said to be…

  12. Does rational selection of training and test sets improve the outcome of QSAR modeling?

    PubMed

    Martin, Todd M; Harten, Paul; Young, Douglas M; Muratov, Eugene N; Golbraikh, Alexander; Zhu, Hao; Tropsha, Alexander

    2012-10-22

    Prior to using a quantitative structure activity relationship (QSAR) model for external predictions, its predictive power should be established and validated. In the absence of a true external data set, the best way to validate the predictive ability of a model is to perform its statistical external validation. In statistical external validation, the overall data set is divided into training and test sets. Commonly, this splitting is performed using random division. Rational splitting methods can divide data sets into training and test sets in an intelligent fashion. The purpose of this study was to determine whether rational division methods lead to more predictive models compared to random division. A special data splitting procedure was used to facilitate the comparison between random and rational division methods. For each toxicity end point, the overall data set was divided into a modeling set (80% of the overall set) and an external evaluation set (20% of the overall set) using random division. The modeling set was then subdivided into a training set (80% of the modeling set) and a test set (20% of the modeling set) using rational division methods and by using random division. The Kennard-Stone, minimal test set dissimilarity, and sphere exclusion algorithms were used as the rational division methods. The hierarchical clustering, random forest, and k-nearest neighbor (kNN) methods were used to develop QSAR models based on the training sets. For kNN QSAR, multiple training and test sets were generated, and multiple QSAR models were built. The results of this study indicate that models based on rational division methods generate better statistical results for the test sets than models based on random division, but the predictive power of both types of models are comparable.

  13. Possible record of the Laschamp Excursion in lacustrine sediments in the Searles Valley, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liddicoat, J.; Coe, R.; Knott, J.

    2009-04-01

    The Pleistocene history of Searles Lake, California, is known in detail from field work and cores recovered during industrial exploration of Searles Valley, in which the lake formed (Smith et al., 1979; Liddicoat et al., 1980). Exposed siltstone assigned the age about 34,000 to 46,000 calendar years B.P. (eight AMS 14-Carbon dates on gastropods and mollusks from fine- to medium-grain sand units that bracket the siltstone) records reverse palaeomagnetic polarity following thermal demagnetization to 600˚ C at two localities 3 km apart. For 12 samples (six pairs from six horizons, three pairs from each locality), the mean palaeomagnetic directions are Incl = - 37.5˚, Decl = 180.2˚, alpha 95 = 19.5˚ and the mean Virtual Geomagnetic Pole (VGP) is 73.6˚ S, 231.8˚ E, Alpha 95 = 20.6˚. The reverse polarity is not part of the Mono Lake Excursion (Denham and Cox, 1971) that never has a VGP in the Southern Hemisphere (Liddicoat and Coe, 1979). Other samples from the two Searles Valley localities do not reach a definite reverse direction but contain a component of magnetization that approaches reverse polarity above 400˚ C. The reverse polarity in Searles Lake sediments offers an opportunity to model the geomagnetic field for two excursions (Laschamp and Mono Lake) in western North America at localities separated by about 300 km.

  14. Comparison of Diaphragmatic Breathing Exercise, Volume and Flow Incentive Spirometry, on Diaphragm Excursion and Pulmonary Function in Patients Undergoing Laparoscopic Surgery: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Anand, R.

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To evaluate the effects of diaphragmatic breathing exercises and flow and volume-oriented incentive spirometry on pulmonary function and diaphragm excursion in patients undergoing laparoscopic abdominal surgery. Methodology. We selected 260 patients posted for laparoscopic abdominal surgery and they were block randomization as follows: 65 patients performed diaphragmatic breathing exercises, 65 patients performed flow incentive spirometry, 65 patients performed volume incentive spirometry, and 65 patients participated as a control group. All of them underwent evaluation of pulmonary function with measurement of Forced Vital Capacity (FVC), Forced Expiratory Volume in the first second (FEV1), Peak Expiratory Flow Rate (PEFR), and diaphragm excursion measurement by ultrasonography before the operation and on the first and second postoperative days. With the level of significance set at p < 0.05. Results. Pulmonary function and diaphragm excursion showed a significant decrease on the first postoperative day in all four groups (p < 0.001) but was evident more in the control group than in the experimental groups. On the second postoperative day pulmonary function (Forced Vital Capacity) and diaphragm excursion were found to be better preserved in volume incentive spirometry and diaphragmatic breathing exercise group than in the flow incentive spirometry group and the control group. Pulmonary function (Forced Vital Capacity) and diaphragm excursion showed statistically significant differences between volume incentive spirometry and diaphragmatic breathing exercise group (p < 0.05) as compared to that flow incentive spirometry group and the control group. Conclusion. Volume incentive spirometry and diaphragmatic breathing exercise can be recommended as an intervention for all patients pre- and postoperatively, over flow-oriented incentive spirometry for the generation and sustenance of pulmonary function and diaphragm excursion in the management of laparoscopic

  15. A Move to an Innovative Games Teaching Model: Style E Tactical (SET)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nathan, Sanmuga; Haynes, John

    2013-01-01

    This paper reports on the development and testing of a hybrid model of teaching games--The Style "E" Tactical (SET) Model. The SET is a combination of two pedagogical approaches: Mosston and Ashworth's Teaching Styles and Bunker and Thorpe's Teaching Games for Understanding (TGfU). To test the efficacy of this new model, the SET was…

  16. Upward excursion limits from air saturation at 5 ATA (Atmospheres Absolute)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parker, James W.

    1989-01-01

    Present USN submarine rescue capability makes a prolonged exposure of the submarine crew to hyperbaric air a distinct possibility. The exposure may be to pressures as great as 5 atmospheres absolute (ATA), and for periods of time of up to 72 hours. A series of experimental dives were conducted to establish the safe, upward excursion from 5 ATA (132 FSWG); that is, the maximum, immediate reduction in pressure which these individuals can safely tolerate. This specifies the required pressure in the compartment of a mother submarine to which the rescued personnel would be transferred. In order to minimize the effects of pulmonary oxygen toxicity, the limits first were established using a nitrox equivalent of air at 5 ATA. The upward limit from 4.36 ATA (111 FSWG) was found to be 2.97 ATA (65 FSWG). Once this limit had been set, a series of dives were conducted to test this up limit from standard air at 5 ATA.

  17. Morphology of the Iceland Basin Excursion from a spherical harmonics analysis and an iterative Bayesian inversion procedure of sedimentary records

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lanci, Luca; Kissel, Catherine; Leonhardt, Roman; Laj, Carlo

    2008-08-01

    Based on 5 published marine high-resolution sedimentary records of the Iceland Basin Excursion [IBE; Channell, J.E.T., Hodell, D.A., Lehman, B., 1997. Relative geomagnetic paleointensity and ∂ 18O at ODP Site 983/Gardar Drift, North Atlantic since 350 ka. Earth Planet. Sci. Lett. 153, 103-118; Laj, C., Kissel, C., Roberts, A., 2006. Geomagnetic field behavior during the Iceland Basin and Laschamp geomagnetic excursions: a simple transitional field geometry? Geochem. Geophys. Geosystems. 7, Q03004, doi:10.1029/2005GC001122] dated around 186-190 kyr, we present models of the excursional geomagnetic field at the Earth's surface using two different approaches. First a spherical harmonics analysis is performed after synchronization of the records using their paleointensity profiles. Second, we have used an iterative Bayesian inversion procedure, calibrated using the single volcanic data available so far. Both modeling approaches suffer from imperfections of the paleomagnetic signals and mostly from the still poor geographical distribution of detailed records, presently available only from the North Atlantic and the West Pacific. For these reasons, our modeling results should only be regarded as preliminary models of the geomagnetic field during the IBE, susceptible to improvements when including results from future paleomagnetic studies. Nevertheless, both approaches show distinct similarities and are stable against moderate variations of modeling parameters. The general picture is that of a dipole field undergoing a strong reduction, but remaining higher than the non-dipole field all through the excursional process, except for a very short interval of time corresponding to the dipole minimum at the center of the excursion. On the other hand, some differences exist between the results of the two models with each other and with the real data when the virtual geomagnetic pole (VGP) paths are considered. The non-dipole field does not appear to undergo very significant

  18. Attachment Disorders: A Proposed Model for the School Setting.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parker, Kandis Cooke

    This paper explores the literature on attachment disorders in order to discover if the school setting can be an appropriate treatment option for children with mild attachment disorders, and in order to investigate how counselors can implement this treatment option. The introduction discusses the effects of recent changes in family structure on…

  19. Modeling mania in preclinical settings: a comprehensive review

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Ajaykumar N.; Fries, Gabriel R.; Galvez, Juan F.; Valvassori, Samira S.; Soares, Jair C.; Carvalho, André F.; Quevedo, Joao

    2015-01-01

    The current pathophysiological understanding of mechanisms leading to onset and progression of bipolar manic episodes remains limited. At the same time, available animal models for mania have limited face, construct, and predictive validities. Additionally, these models fail to encompass recent pathophysiological frameworks of bipolar disorder (BD), e.g. neuroprogression. Therefore, there is a need to search for novel preclinical models for mania that could comprehensively address these limitations. Herein we review the history, validity, and caveats of currently available animal models for mania. We also review new genetic models for mania, namely knockout mice for genes involved in neurotransmission, synapse formation, and intracellular signaling pathways. Furthermore, we review recent trends in preclinical models for mania that may aid in the comprehension of mechanisms underlying the neuroprogressive and recurring nature of BD. In conclusion, the validity of animal models for mania remains limited. Nevertheless, novel (e.g. genetic) animal models as well as adaptation of existing paradigms hold promise. PMID:26545487

  20. Physical property parameter set for modeling ICPP aqueous wastes with ASPEN electrolyte NRTL model

    SciTech Connect

    Schindler, R.E.

    1996-09-01

    The aqueous waste evaporators at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) are being modeled using ASPEN software. The ASPEN software calculates chemical and vapor-liquid equilibria with activity coefficients calculated using the electrolyte Non-Random Two Liquid (NRTL) model for local excess Gibbs free energies of interactions between ions and molecules in solution. The use of the electrolyte NRTL model requires the determination of empirical parameters for the excess Gibbs free energies of the interactions between species in solution. This report covers the development of a set parameters, from literature data, for the use of the electrolyte NRTL model with the major solutes in the ICPP aqueous wastes.

  1. Geomagnetic Estimates of the Mean Rates of Paleomagnetic Dipole Power Excursions and Reversals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voorhies, C. V.

    2007-12-01

    To further and better test some kinematic, dynamical, and statistical hypotheses about the core geodynamo, previous predictions for the mean rates and durations of dipole power excursions and axial dipole reversals [Voorhies & Conrad, 1996] are re-examined and refined. The hypotheses yield a theoretical form for the low degree, core-source part of the Lowes-Mauersberger spectrum R(n) - the mean square field, averaged over the sphere of radius a, in spherical harmonics of degree n. This form is \\{R(n)\\} = K[(n + 1/2)/n(n + 1)](c/a)**(2n+4); core radius c = 3.5 +/- 0.1 Mm is recovered with no significant error by fitting log-theoretical to log-observational spectra for Earth [Voorhies, 2004]. Jupiter may also have a "1/n" spectrum, but Mercury's field seems too weak and for its core dynamo to be very Earth-like. Our statistical hypothesis distributes (2n+1)R(n)/\\{R(n)\\} as chi-square with 2n+1 degrees of freedom. The implied field is usually mainly dipolar and can be primarily axial. During a small fraction of geologic time, however, dipole power R(1) is expected to be quite small. An unusually weak axial dipole might reverse during such an interval. So we defined "dipole power excursion" as an interval when absolute dipole moment is less than or equal to a threshold value, taken to be the absolute equatorial dipole moment at 1980. Our amplitude estimate implied that such excursions would occupy 2.5% of geologic time. We used the 1945-1980 dipole power time scale to convert this fraction into mean duration, hence mean rate. For dipole power excursions, we predicted a mean duration of 2767 years and a mean rate of 9.04 per million years; for reversals, we predicted a mean duration of 5534 years and a mean rate of 2.26 per million years [Voorhies & Conrad, 1996]. The method and results are critically reviewed and updated, with special attention to definitions, calibration, time scale, the one quarter rule for reversal/excursion rates, and uncertainty estimates. For

  2. Using behavior modeling for supervisory development in health care settings.

    PubMed

    Decker, P J; Sullivan, E; Moore, R

    1982-01-01

    Behavior modeling is one training method found effective in helping health care managers deal with their day-to-day management problems. This article defines and explains the five basic steps of behavior modeling training, suggests the workshop format as its most effective mode of instruction, and presents examples of successful use of the method.

  3. High-resolution palaeomagnetic records of the Laschamp geomagnetic excursion from ODP Sites 1061 and 1062

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourne, M. D.; Henderson, G. M.; Thomas, A. L.; Mac Niocaill, C.

    2012-12-01

    The Laschamp geomagnetic excursion (~41 ka) was a brief global deviation in geomagnetic field behaviour from that expected during normal secular variation. Previously published records suggest rapid changes in field direction and a concurrent substantial decrease in field intensity. We present here high-resolution palaeomagnetic records of the Laschamp excursion obtained from two Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) Sites 1061 and 1062 on the Blake-Bahama Outer Ridge (ODP Leg 172) and compare this record with previously published records of the Blake and Iceland Basin Excursions. Relatively high sedimentation rates (>10 cm kyr-1) at these locations allow the determination of transitional field behaviour during the excursion. Rather than assuming a constant sedimentation rate between assigned age tie-points, we employ measurements of 230Thxs concentration in the sediment to assess variations in the sedimentation rates through the core sections of interest. This allows us to better determine the temporal behaviour of the Laschamp excursion with greater accuracy and known uncertainty. The Laschamp excursion at this location appears to be much shorter in duration than the Blake and Iceland Basin excursions. Palaeomagnetic measurements of discrete samples from four cores reveal a single excursional feature, across an interval of 30 cm, associated with a broader palaeointensity low. The excursion is characterised by rapid transitions (less than 500 years) between a stable normal polarity and a partially-reversed, polarity. Peaks in inclination either side of the directional excursion indicate periods of time when the local field is dominated by vertical flux patches. Similar behaviour has been observed in records of the Iceland Basin Excursion from the same region. The palaeointensity record is in good agreement between the two sites. The palaeointensity record shows two minima, where the second dip in intensity is associated with a more limited directional deviation. Similar

  4. Polarity and Excursion Transitions: Can they be Adequately Recorded in High-Sedimentation-Rate Marine Sediments?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Channell, J. E. T.

    2014-12-01

    Polarity transitions and magnetic excursions have durations of a few thousand years, or less. Transition/excursion records in volcanic sequences are, at best, partial snap-shots of the transition/excursion field. Records from high-sedimentation-rate marine sediments may be more continuous but they are always smoothed by progressive acquisition of detrital remanent magnetization (DRM), and by sampling/measurement limitations. North Atlantic records of the Matuyama-Brunhes (M-B) polarity transition are compared with records of the Iceland Basin excursion (190 ka). Virtual geomagnetic polar (VGP) paths are used to map characteristic magnetization directions during the transition/excursion. Relative paleointensity (RPI) proxies indicate partial recovery of field intensity during the transition/excursion, with RPI minima coinciding with abrupt VGP shifts at the onset and end of the transition/excursion. Discrepancies in VGP paths among holes at the same site, among sites, and a comparison of u-channel and discrete sample measurements, reveal limitations in resolution of the transition/excursion fields. During the M-B polarity transition, VGP clusters appear in the NW Pacific, NE Asia and in the South Atlantic. Similarities in VGP clustering for the M-B boundary and the Iceland Basin excursion imply that the polarity transition and excursion fields had common characteristics. Similarities with the modern non-axial dipole (NAD) field imply that polarity transitions and excursions involve the demise of the Earth's axial dipole relative to the NAD field, and that the NAD field has long-lasting features locked in place by the lowermost mantle.

  5. Multiple High-Frequency Carbon Isotope Excursions Across the Precambrian-Cambrian Boundary: Implications for Correlations and Environmental Change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, E. F.; Macdonald, F. A.; Schrag, D. P.; Laakso, T.

    2014-12-01

    The GSSP Precambrian-Cambrian boundary in Newfoundland is defined by the first appearance datum (FAD) of Treptichnus pedum, which is considered to be roughly coincident with the FAD of small shelly fossils (SSFs) and a large negative carbon isotope excursion. An association between the FAD of T. pedum and a negative carbon isotope excursion has previously been documented in Northwest Canada (Narbonne et al., 1994) and Death Valley (Corsetti and Hagadorn, 2000), and since then has been used as an chronostratigraphic marker of the boundary, particularly in siliciclastic poor sections that do not preserve T. pedum. Here we present new high-resolution carbon isotope (δ13C ) chemostratigraphy from multiple sections in western Mongolia and the western United States that span the Ediacaran-Cambrian transition. High-resolution sampling (0.2-1 m) reveals that instead of one large negative excursion, there are multiple, high-frequency negative excursions with an overall negative trend during the latest Ediacaran. These data help to more precisely calibrate changes in the carbon cycle across the boundary as well as to highlight the potential problem of identifying the boundary with just a few negative δ13C values. We then use a simple carbon isotope box model to explore relationships between phosphorous delivery to the ocean, oxygenation, alkalinity, and turnovers in carbonate secreting organisms. Corsetti, F.A., and Hagadorn, J.W., 2000, Precambrian-Cambrian transition: Death Valley, United States: Geology, v. 28, no. 4, p. 299-302. Narbonne, G.M., Kaufman, A.J., and Knoll, A.H., 1994, Integrated chemostratigraphy and biostratigraphy of the Windermere Supergroup, northwestern Canada: Implications for Neoproterozoic correlations and the early evolution of animals: Geological Society of America Bulletin, v. 106, no. 10, p. 1281-1292.

  6. Dynamics of the earth magnetic field in the 10-75 kyr period comprising the Laschamp and Mono Lake excursions: New results from the French Chaîne des Puys in a global perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laj, Carlo; Guillou, Hervé; Kissel, Catherine

    2014-02-01

    We report here on a new paleomagnetic (directions and intensities) and coupled K/Ar and 40Ar/39Ar analysis of 35 different flows, emplaced in the Chaîne des Puys during the 75 to 10 kyr interval, which contains the Mono Lake and Laschamp excursions. There is a remarkable agreement between the new set of absolute volcanic intensities and published sedimentary (GLOPIS-75) and cosmogenic (10Be and 36Cl) records. The Laschamp and Mono Lake excursions are clearly revealed by a very significant intensity drop at 41.2±1.6 ka and 34.2±1.2 ka respectively. The duration of the Laschamp excursion is ˜1500 yr and about 640 yr when the drop of paleointensity or the directional change are considered respectively. The intensity drop at the Mono Lake is twice as short. In the ˜7 ka interval separating the two excursions, the field intensity recovers to almost non-transitional values. The rate of decrease of the field intensity during these excursions attains 18 nT/yr for the Laschamp and even greater value (33 nT/yr) for the Mono Lake. This figure is, for the Laschamp excursion, similar to the present field intensity decrease in the last two centuries so that one may wonder whether such a high rate of change may be characteristic of an impending geomagnetic event (reversal or excursion). We suggest that the name Auckland excursion should be used for the present-day called Mono Lake.

  7. The Earth climate and life evolution response to cosmic radiation enhancement arising from reversals and excursions of geomagnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuznetsova, N.

    Climate abrupt warming as well as biologic evolutionary events in respect to fauna and human evolution are shown to originate during reversals and excursions of geomagnetic field when the geomagnetic field loses a lot in its module value and consequently in its protective characteristics making galactic cosmic rays GCR and solar protons penetration into the Earth atmosphere possible Usually preceded by climate cooling and populations reduction reversals and excursions stimulate evolutionary genetic mutations generated by intense radiation and climate abrupt warming resulted from destruction of stratospheric aerosols by GCR Favorable environment conditions on new features and species origin For example it was Gauss-Matuyama reversal 2 3 Myr to make for Hominid evolutionary mutations and for distinctly new species Homo erectus origin The evolutionary events and climate shifts appear explicable on the context of the fundamentally new model of the geomagnetic field generation based on hypothesis of the hot Earth and the theory of the Earth magnetic poles drift throughout reversals and excursions theory

  8. A geometric level set model for ultrasounds analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Sarti, A.; Malladi, R.

    1999-10-01

    We propose a partial differential equation (PDE) for filtering and segmentation of echocardiographic images based on a geometric-driven scheme. The method allows edge-preserving image smoothing and a semi-automatic segmentation of the heart chambers, that regularizes the shapes and improves edge fidelity especially in presence of distinct gaps in the edge map as is common in ultrasound imagery. A numerical scheme for solving the proposed PDE is borrowed from level set methods. Results on human in vivo acquired 2D, 2D+time,3D, 3D+time echocardiographic images are shown.

  9. Modeling a set of heavy oil aqueous pyrolysis experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Thorsness, C.B.; Reynolds, J.G.

    1996-11-01

    Aqueous pyrolysis experiments, aimed at mild upgrading of heavy oil, were analyzed using various computer models. The primary focus of the analysis was the pressure history of the closed autoclave reactors obtained during the heating of the autoclave to desired reaction temperatures. The models used included a means of estimating nonideal behavior of primary components with regard to vapor liquid equilibrium. The modeling indicated that to match measured autoclave pressures, which often were well below the vapor pressure of water at a given temperature, it was necessary to incorporate water solubility in the oil phase and an activity model for the water in the oil phase which reduced its fugacity below that of pure water. Analysis also indicated that the mild to moderate upgrading of the oil which occurred in experiments that reached 400{degrees}C or more using a FE(III) 2-ethylhexanoate could be reasonably well characterized by a simple first order rate constant of 1.7xl0{sup 8} exp(-20000/T)s{sup {minus}l}. Both gas production and API gravity increase were characterized by this rate constant. Models were able to match the complete pressure history of the autoclave experiments fairly well with relatively simple equilibria models. However, a consistent lower than measured buildup in pressure at peak temperatures was noted in the model calculations. This phenomena was tentatively attributed to an increase in the amount of water entering the vapor phase caused by a change in its activity in the oil phase.

  10. Redox State of the Deep Ocean During the 2.22-2.1 Ga Carbon Isotope Excursion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bekker, A.; Shen, Y.; Scott, C.; Kacanda, M.; Lyons, T.; Kenig, F.; Anbar, A.; Rouxel, O.

    2006-05-01

    Response of the redox state of the deep ocean to the rise of atmospheric oxygen, as well as the 2.22-2.1 Ga carbon isotope excursion that followed, is not known. The c. 2.15 Ga Sengoma Argillite Formation (SAF), Botswana, is correlative with the Silverton Formation (SF), South Africa, which contains carbonates with δ °13°C values ranging from +8.3 to +11.3 ‰ PDB. Both units were deposited along the northern margin of the Kaapvaal Craton in an open-marine environment. The SAF consists of two upward- shallowing cycles with organic-rich sulfidic shales deposited in subtidal settings at the base and red beds deposited in coastal and fluvial settings at the top. Sulfur isotope data show a large range from -21.3 to +13.7 ‰ V-CDT with highly negative values confined to the lower part of the cycles and positive values to the upper part of the cycles. The Fe speciation data show similar stratigraphic trends. Carbon isotope values of organic matter are as low as -33.7 ‰ PDB, and if compared with carbonate carbon isotope record of the correlative SF, suggest significant contribution from secondary productivity via either sulfur or methane oxidation. Mo concentrations in these organic-rich shales are just above crustal levels. These data suggest deep ocean euxinic conditions during the carbon isotope excursion. Fe isotope data for sulfides from these shales show an unusually narrow range of Fe isotope values relative to other Archean and Paleoproterozoic sulfides. These data fall within the range of the hydrothermal iron flux, suggesting complete Fe reduction and precipitation as sulfide in the deep ocean. The 2.1-2.0 Ga Ludikovian black shales, Russia, were also deposited in an open marine and euxinic environment but contain much higher Mo levels up to 74 ppm and sulfides with Fe isotope values ranging from those of hydrothermal Fe flux to highly positive values. Higher Mo concentrations in these shales suggest that significant part of the ocean was not a sink for Mo

  11. Analysis of energy balance models using the ERBE data set

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graves, Charles E.; North, Gerald R.

    1991-01-01

    A review of Energy Balance Models is presented. Results from the Outgoing Longwave Radiation parameterization are discussed. The albedo parameterizations and the consequences of the new parameterizations are examined.

  12. 36 CFR 1192.177 - Ferries, excursion boats and other vessels. [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Ferries, excursion boats and other vessels. 1192.177 Section 1192.177 Parks, Forests, and Public Property ARCHITECTURAL AND... TRANSPORTATION VEHICLES Other Vehicles and Systems § 1192.177 Ferries, excursion boats and other vessels....

  13. 49 CFR 38.177 - Ferries, excursion boats and other vessels. [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Ferries, excursion boats and other vessels. 38.177 Section 38.177 Transportation Office of the Secretary of Transportation AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT... Ferries, excursion boats and other vessels....

  14. 46 CFR 72.25-15 - Passenger accommodations for excursion boats, ferryboats, and passenger barges.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Passenger accommodations for excursion boats, ferryboats, and passenger barges. 72.25-15 Section 72.25-15 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY... accommodations for excursion boats, ferryboats, and passenger barges. (a) Except as specifically excluded by...

  15. 36 CFR 1192.177 - Ferries, excursion boats and other vessels. [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2013-07-01 2012-07-01 true Ferries, excursion boats and other vessels. 1192.177 Section 1192.177 Parks, Forests, and Public Property ARCHITECTURAL AND... TRANSPORTATION VEHICLES Other Vehicles and Systems § 1192.177 Ferries, excursion boats and other vessels....

  16. 46 CFR 72.25-15 - Passenger accommodations for excursion boats, ferryboats, and passenger barges.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Passenger accommodations for excursion boats, ferryboats, and passenger barges. 72.25-15 Section 72.25-15 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY... accommodations for excursion boats, ferryboats, and passenger barges. (a) Except as specifically excluded by...

  17. 49 CFR 38.177 - Ferries, excursion boats and other vessels. [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Ferries, excursion boats and other vessels. 38.177 Section 38.177 Transportation Office of the Secretary of Transportation AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT... Ferries, excursion boats and other vessels....

  18. 36 CFR 1192.177 - Ferries, excursion boats and other vessels. [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Ferries, excursion boats and other vessels. 1192.177 Section 1192.177 Parks, Forests, and Public Property ARCHITECTURAL AND... TRANSPORTATION VEHICLES Other Vehicles and Systems § 1192.177 Ferries, excursion boats and other vessels....

  19. 49 CFR 38.177 - Ferries, excursion boats and other vessels. [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Ferries, excursion boats and other vessels. 38.177 Section 38.177 Transportation Office of the Secretary of Transportation AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT... Ferries, excursion boats and other vessels....

  20. 49 CFR 38.177 - Ferries, excursion boats and other vessels. [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Ferries, excursion boats and other vessels. 38.177 Section 38.177 Transportation Office of the Secretary of Transportation AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT... Ferries, excursion boats and other vessels....

  1. 46 CFR 72.25-15 - Passenger accommodations for excursion boats, ferryboats, and passenger barges.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Passenger accommodations for excursion boats, ferryboats, and passenger barges. 72.25-15 Section 72.25-15 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY... accommodations for excursion boats, ferryboats, and passenger barges. (a) Except as specifically excluded by...

  2. 49 CFR 38.177 - Ferries, excursion boats and other vessels. [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Ferries, excursion boats and other vessels. 38.177 Section 38.177 Transportation Office of the Secretary of Transportation AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT... Ferries, excursion boats and other vessels....

  3. 36 CFR 1192.177 - Ferries, excursion boats and other vessels. [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Ferries, excursion boats and other vessels. 1192.177 Section 1192.177 Parks, Forests, and Public Property ARCHITECTURAL AND... TRANSPORTATION VEHICLES Other Vehicles and Systems § 1192.177 Ferries, excursion boats and other vessels....

  4. 46 CFR 72.25-15 - Passenger accommodations for excursion boats, ferryboats, and passenger barges.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Passenger accommodations for excursion boats, ferryboats, and passenger barges. 72.25-15 Section 72.25-15 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY... accommodations for excursion boats, ferryboats, and passenger barges. (a) Except as specifically excluded by...

  5. 36 CFR 1192.177 - Ferries, excursion boats and other vessels. [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Ferries, excursion boats and other vessels. 1192.177 Section 1192.177 Parks, Forests, and Public Property ARCHITECTURAL AND... TRANSPORTATION VEHICLES Other Vehicles and Systems § 1192.177 Ferries, excursion boats and other vessels....

  6. 46 CFR 72.25-15 - Passenger accommodations for excursion boats, ferryboats, and passenger barges.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Passenger accommodations for excursion boats, ferryboats, and passenger barges. 72.25-15 Section 72.25-15 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY... accommodations for excursion boats, ferryboats, and passenger barges. (a) Except as specifically excluded by...

  7. Place-Responsive Pedagogy: Learning from Teachers' Experiences of Excursions in Nature

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mannion, Greg; Fenwick, Ashley; Lynch, Jonathan

    2013-01-01

    The nature-based excursion has been a significant teaching strategy in environmental education for decades. This article draws upon empirical data from a collaborative research project where teachers were encouraged to visit natural areas to provide an understanding of their roles and experiences of planning and enacting excursions. The analysis…

  8. Regional Dimensions of the Triple Helix Model: Setting the Context

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Todeva, Emanuela; Danson, Mike

    2016-01-01

    This paper introduces the rationale for the special issue and its contributions, which bridge the literature on regional development and the Triple Helix model. The concept of the Triple Helix at the sub-national, and specifically regional, level is established and examined, with special regard to regional economic development founded on…

  9. Leader Succession: A Model and Review for School Settings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miskel, Cecil; Cosgrove, Dorothy

    Recent research casts doubt on the commonly held notions that administrators affect student learning through instructional leadership and that changing administrators will improve school performance. To help construct a model for examining the process of leader succession that specifies a number of major school process and outcome variables…

  10. Empirical Data Sets for Agent Based Modeling of Crowd Scenarios

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-08-06

    Conclusion 2UNCLASSIFIED- Approved for Public Release Crowd Research • Large numbers • Heterogeneous • Individual Actors • Interdependence • Language ... Barriers • Empirical testing is difficult • Simulations require models based on real data, otherwise they are fiction 3UNCLASSIFIED- Approved for

  11. Modeling of Protection in Dynamic Simulation Using Generic Relay Models and Settings

    SciTech Connect

    Samaan, Nader A.; Dagle, Jeffery E.; Makarov, Yuri V.; Diao, Ruisheng; Vallem, Mallikarjuna R.; Nguyen, Tony B.; Miller, Laurie E.; Vyakaranam, Bharat; Tuffner, Francis K.; Pai, M. A.; Conto, Jose; Kang, Sun Wook

    2016-07-19

    This paper shows how generic protection relay models available in planning tools can be augmented with settings that are based on NERC standards or best engineering practice. Selected generic relay models in Siemens PSS®E have been used in dynamic simulations in the proposed approach. Undervoltage, overvoltage, underfrequency, and overfrequency relays have been modeled for each generating unit. Distance-relay protection was modeled for transmission system protection. Two types of load-shedding schemes were modeled: underfrequency (frequency-responsive non-firm load shedding) and underfrequency and undervoltage firm load shedding. Several case studies are given to show the impact of protection devices on dynamic simulations. This is useful for simulating cascading outages.

  12. Geomagnetic Excursions: A Critical Assessment of the Evidence as Recorded in Sediments of the Brunhes Epoch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verosub, K. L.

    1982-08-01

    Geomagnetic excursions have tantalized geophysicists since the earliest suggestion of their occurrence over 15 years ago. Either as large-scale geomagnetic secular variation, geomagnetic reversals of short duration or aborted reversals, they held great promise of providing new insights into the nature of the origin of the geomagnetic field. Unfortunately the evidence for geomagnetic excursions from the palaeomagnetic record of Brunhes age sediments is not as compelling as the theoretical arguments. A critical assessment of the available data indicates that the Gothenburg excursion is unlikely to have occurred and the Erieau excursion is very unlikely. The Mono Lake excursion probably occurred, but its absence in nearby contemporaneous sites creates profound problems. The Blake Event appears to be an actual short reversal of complex character, but confirmation of its global nature may be quite difficult.

  13. Alternatives to the fixed-set model: A review of appraisal models of emotion.

    PubMed

    Fernando, Julian W; Kashima, Yoshihisa; Laham, Simon M

    2017-01-01

    Over several decades, appraisal theory has emerged as a prominent theoretical framework explaining the elicitation and differentiation of emotions, and has stimulated a great deal of theorising and empirical research. Despite the large amount of research in this area, there are many aspects of appraisal theory and research that remain unclear or problematic. In this review, we identify a common assumption of many appraisal theories-the fixed appraisal set-and argue that this assumption, combined with a lack of explicit theorising about the predicted relationship between appraisals and emotions, leads to a lack of clarity in both appraisal models and the empirical testing of those models. We recommend that appraisal theorists move in a direction already taken by a small number of theorists, and adopt the starting assumption of a variable appraisal set. We further suggest that theories of concepts and categorisation may inform theorising about appraisal-emotion relationships.

  14. Construction of 3-D Terrain Models from BIG Data Sets

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-05-14

    support for dynamically updating the model using the submitted corrections, and using periodic re- computations though an automated system for managing the...NUMBER Pankaj Agarwal Pankaj K. Agarwal, Thomas Moelhave 665502 c. THIS PAGE The public reporting burden for this collection of information is estimated...needed, and completing and reviewing the collection of information . Send comments regarding this burden estimate or any other aspect of this collection

  15. Ca and Mg isotope constraints on the origin of Earth's deepest δ13 C excursion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Husson, Jon M.; Higgins, John A.; Maloof, Adam C.; Schoene, Blair

    2015-07-01

    Understanding the extreme carbon isotope excursions found in carbonate rocks of the Ediacaran Period (635-541 Ma), where δ13 C of marine carbonates (δ13 Ccarb) reach their minimum (- 12 ‰) for Earth history, is one of the most vexing problems in Precambrian geology. Known colloquially as the 'Shuram' excursion, the event has been interpreted by many as a product of a profoundly different Ediacaran carbon cycle. More recently, diagenetic processes have been invoked, with the very negative δ13 C values of Ediacaran carbonates explained via meteoric alteration, late-stage burial diagenesis or growth of authigenic carbonates in the sediment column, thus challenging models which rely upon a dramatically changing redox state of the Ediacaran oceans. Here we present 257 δ 44 / 40 Ca and 131 δ26 Mg measurements, along with [Mg], [Mn] and [Sr] data, from carbonates of the Ediacaran-aged Wonoka Formation (Fm.) of South Australia to bring new isotope systems to bear on understanding the 'Shuram' excursion. Data from four measured sections spanning the basin reveal stratigraphically coherent trends, with variability of ∼1.5‰ in δ26 Mg and ∼1.2‰ in δ 44 / 40 Ca. This Ca isotope variability dwarfs the 0.2-0.3 ‰ change seen coeval with the Permian-Triassic mass extinction, the largest recorded in the rock record, and is on par with putative changes in the δ 44 / 40 Ca value of seawater seen over the Phanerozoic Eon. Changes in both isotopic systems are too large to explain with changes in the isotopic composition of Ca and Mg in global seawater given modern budgets and residence times, and thus must be products of alternative processes. Relationships between δ 44 / 40 Ca and [Sr] and δ26 Mg and [Mg] are consistent with mineralogical control (e.g., aragonite vs. calcite, limestone vs. dolostone) on calcium and magnesium isotope variability. The most pristine samples in the Wonoka dataset, preserving Sr concentrations (in the 1000s of ppm range) and δ 44 / 40

  16. Buried-euxenic-basin model sets Tarim basin potential

    SciTech Connect

    Hsu, K.J. )

    1994-11-28

    The Tarim basin is the largest of the three large sedimentary basins of Northwest China. The North and Southwest depressions of Tarim are underlain by thick sediments and very thin crust. The maximum sediment thickness is more than 15 km. Of the several oil fields of Tarim, the three major fields were discovered during the last decade, on the north flank of the North depression and on the Central Tarim Uplift. The major targets of Tarim, according to the buried-euxenic-basin model, should be upper Paleozoic and lower Mesozoic reservoirs trapping oil and gas condensates from lower Paleozoic source beds. The paper describes the basin and gives a historical perspective of exploration activities and discoveries. It then explains how this basin can be interpreted by the buried-euxenic-basin model. The buried-euxenic-basin model postulates four stages of geologic evolution: (1) Sinian and early Paleozoic platform sedimentation on relic arcs and deep-marine sedimentation in back-arc basins in Xinjiang; (2) Late Paleozoic foreland-basin sedimentation in north Tarim; (3) Mesozoic and Paleogene continental deposition, subsidence under sedimentary load; and (4) Neogene pull-apart basin, wrench faulting and extension.

  17. Causal Inference and Model Selection in Complex Settings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Shandong

    Propensity score methods have become a part of the standard toolkit for applied researchers who wish to ascertain causal effects from observational data. While they were originally developed for binary treatments, several researchers have proposed generalizations of the propensity score methodology for non-binary treatment regimes. In this article, we firstly review three main methods that generalize propensity scores in this direction, namely, inverse propensity weighting (IPW), the propensity function (P-FUNCTION), and the generalized propensity score (GPS), along with recent extensions of the GPS that aim to improve its robustness. We compare the assumptions, theoretical properties, and empirical performance of these methods. We propose three new methods that provide robust causal estimation based on the P-FUNCTION and GPS. While our proposed P-FUNCTION-based estimator preforms well, we generally advise caution in that all available methods can be biased by model misspecification and extrapolation. In a related line of research, we consider adjustment for posttreatment covariates in causal inference. Even in a randomized experiment, observations might have different compliance performance under treatment and control assignment. This posttreatment covariate cannot be adjusted using standard statistical methods. We review the principal stratification framework which allows for modeling this effect as part of its Bayesian hierarchical models. We generalize the current model to add the possibility of adjusting for pretreatment covariates. We also propose a new estimator of the average treatment effect over the entire population. In a third line of research, we discuss the spectral line detection problem in high energy astrophysics. We carefully review how this problem can be statistically formulated as a precise hypothesis test with point null hypothesis, why a usual likelihood ratio test does not apply for problem of this nature, and a doable fix to correctly

  18. Dynamic sensitivity analysis of long running landslide models through basis set expansion and meta-modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rohmer, Jeremy

    2016-04-01

    Predicting the temporal evolution of landslides is typically supported by numerical modelling. Dynamic sensitivity analysis aims at assessing the influence of the landslide properties on the time-dependent predictions (e.g., time series of landslide displacements). Yet two major difficulties arise: 1. Global sensitivity analysis require running the landslide model a high number of times (> 1000), which may become impracticable when the landslide model has a high computation time cost (> several hours); 2. Landslide model outputs are not scalar, but function of time, i.e. they are n-dimensional vectors with n usually ranging from 100 to 1000. In this article, I explore the use of a basis set expansion, such as principal component analysis, to reduce the output dimensionality to a few components, each of them being interpreted as a dominant mode of variation in the overall structure of the temporal evolution. The computationally intensive calculation of the Sobol' indices for each of these components are then achieved through meta-modelling, i.e. by replacing the landslide model by a "costless-to-evaluate" approximation (e.g., a projection pursuit regression model). The methodology combining "basis set expansion - meta-model - Sobol' indices" is then applied to the La Frasse landslide to investigate the dynamic sensitivity analysis of the surface horizontal displacements to the slip surface properties during the pore pressure changes. I show how to extract information on the sensitivity of each main modes of temporal behaviour using a limited number (a few tens) of long running simulations. In particular, I identify the parameters, which trigger the occurrence of a turning point marking a shift between a regime of low values of landslide displacements and one of high values.

  19. Evolution of Autocatalytic Sets in Computational Models of Chemical Reaction Networks.

    PubMed

    Hordijk, Wim

    2016-06-01

    Several computational models of chemical reaction networks have been presented in the literature in the past, showing the appearance and (potential) evolution of autocatalytic sets. However, the notion of autocatalytic sets has been defined differently in different modeling contexts, each one having some shortcoming or limitation. Here, we review four such models and definitions, and then formally describe and analyze them in the context of a mathematical framework for studying autocatalytic sets known as RAF theory. The main results are that: (1) RAF theory can capture the various previous definitions of autocatalytic sets and is therefore more complete and general, (2) the formal framework can be used to efficiently detect and analyze autocatalytic sets in all of these different computational models, (3) autocatalytic (RAF) sets are indeed likely to appear and evolve in such models, and (4) this could have important implications for a possible metabolism-first scenario for the origin of life.

  20. Evolution of Autocatalytic Sets in Computational Models of Chemical Reaction Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hordijk, Wim

    2016-06-01

    Several computational models of chemical reaction networks have been presented in the literature in the past, showing the appearance and (potential) evolution of autocatalytic sets. However, the notion of autocatalytic sets has been defined differently in different modeling contexts, each one having some shortcoming or limitation. Here, we review four such models and definitions, and then formally describe and analyze them in the context of a mathematical framework for studying autocatalytic sets known as RAF theory. The main results are that: (1) RAF theory can capture the various previous definitions of autocatalytic sets and is therefore more complete and general, (2) the formal framework can be used to efficiently detect and analyze autocatalytic sets in all of these different computational models, (3) autocatalytic (RAF) sets are indeed likely to appear and evolve in such models, and (4) this could have important implications for a possible metabolism-first scenario for the origin of life.

  1. Magnetic Excursion Recorded in Basalt at Newberry Volcano, Central Oregon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Champion, D. E.; Donnelly-Nolan, J. M.; Lanphere, M. A.; Ramsey, D. W.

    2004-12-01

    Paleomagnetic study of basalt flows on the north flank of Newberry Volcano has identified a major eruptive episode that occurred during a magnetic excursion. The measured direction of the basalt flows erupted during the excursion shallows from 81° to 76° inclination along a declination of ˜ 155° . The Virtual Geomagnetic Pole also shallows from 29° to 19° paleolatitude, along a paleolongitude of ˜ 250° , and is located off the west coast of Mexico. Geologic evidence combined with limited argon dating indicate that the basalt erupted from multiple sites about 80,000 years ago, probably during the time of anomalous magnetic directions recorded by ( ˜80 ka) ocean sediments in the Norwegian Sea and the North Atlantic. The westernmost flows erupted from spatter vents located a few km south of the city of Bend, and flowed north through lava tube(s) which form Stevens Cave, Horse Cave, and Redmond Cave among others. This western lobe flowed more than 50 km to the north, over NW-trending faults of the Tumalo Fault Zone that cut the adjacent and underlying basalt of Bend (40Ar/39Ar plateau age of 78±9 ka; isochron age of 77±19 ka); it is overlain by the basaltic andesite of Klawhop Butte (40Ar/39Ar plateau age of 39±6 ka). One sample of the transitional magnetic direction basalt has a K-Ar age of 77±40 ka; another sample has a 40Ar/39Ar plateau age of 92±25 ka and an isochron age of 73±24 ka. The eastern lobe erupted from vents at and near Lava Top Butte, located approximately 15 km SE of the western vents. These eastern lavas flowed through Arnold Cave and formed a broad ~10-12 km rootless shield known as the Badlands, the NE extent of which is about 30 km from Lava Top Butte. The west and east lobes each cover about 150 km2, and comprise an estimated volume of 3-5 km3. Newly acquired 10-meter DEM's and compilation of the mapping in ArcGIS will allow more precise calculation of the total area covered and the volume erupted. Chemical analyses of multiple

  2. Process Setting through General Linear Model and Response Surface Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senjuntichai, Angsumalin

    2010-10-01

    The objective of this study is to improve the efficiency of the flow-wrap packaging process in soap industry through the reduction of defectives. At the 95% confidence level, with the regression analysis, the sealing temperature, temperatures of upper and lower crimper are found to be the significant factors for the flow-wrap process with respect to the number/percentage of defectives. Twenty seven experiments have been designed and performed according to three levels of each controllable factor. With the general linear model (GLM), the suggested values for the sealing temperature, temperatures of upper and lower crimpers are 185, 85 and 85° C, respectively while the response surface method (RSM) provides the optimal process conditions at 186, 89 and 88° C. Due to different assumptions between percentage of defective and all three temperature parameters, the suggested conditions from the two methods are then slightly different. Fortunately, the estimated percentage of defectives at 5.51% under GLM process condition and the predicted percentage of defectives at 4.62% under RSM process condition are not significant different. But at 95% confidence level, the percentage of defectives under RSM condition can be much lower approximately 2.16% than those under GLM condition in accordance with wider variation. Lastly, the percentages of defectives under the conditions suggested by GLM and RSM are reduced by 55.81% and 62.95%, respectively.

  3. Development of an Optimum Tracer Set for Apportioning Emissions of Individual Power Plants Using Highly Time-Resolved Measurements and Advanced Receptor Modeling

    SciTech Connect

    John Ondov; Gregory Beachley

    2007-07-05

    In previous studies, 11 elements (Al, As, Cd, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mn, Ni, Pb, Se, and Zn) were determined in 30-minute aerosol samples collected with the University of Maryland Semicontinuous Elements in Aerosol Sampler (SEAS; Kidwell and Ondov, 2001, 2004; SEAS-II) in several locations in which air quality is influenced by emissions from coal- or oil-fired power plants. At this time resolution, plumes from stationary high temperature combustion sources are readily detected as large excursions in ambient concentrations of elements emitted by these sources (Pancras et al. ). Moreover, the time-series data contain intrinsic information on the lateral diffusion of the plume (e.g., {sigma}{sub y}), which Park et al. (2005 and 2006) have exploited in their Pseudo-Deterministic Receptor Model (PDRM), to calculate emission rates of SO{sub 2} and 11 elements (mentioned above) from four individual coal- and oil-fired power plants in the Tampa Bay area. In the current project, we proposed that the resolving power of source apportionment methods might be improved by expanding the set of maker species and that there exist some optimum set of marker species that could be used. The ultimate goal was to determine the utility of using additional elements to better identify and isolate contributions of individual power plants to ambient levels of PM and its constituents. And, having achieved better resolution, achieve, also, better emission rate estimates. In this study, we optimized sample preparation and instrumental protocols for simultaneous analysis of 28 elements in dilute slurry samples collected with the SEAS with a new state-of-the-art Thermo-Systems, Inc., X-series II, Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectroscopy (ICP-MS), and reanalyzed the samples previously collected in Tampa during the modeling period studied by Park et al. (2005) in which emission rates from four coal- and oil-fired power plants affected air quality at the sampling site. In the original model, Park et al

  4. A scoping study of water table excursions induced by seismic and volcanic events

    SciTech Connect

    Carrigan, C.R.; King, G.C.P.; Barr, G.E.

    1990-11-01

    We develop conservative models of water table response to displacements just beneath the water table simulating (1) shallow intrusion of a dike and (2) high level slip on a normal fault locked at the end. For matrix flow, we fine local water table excursions of under 10 m. in cases of isotropic permeability which includes dike inflation of 4 m and fault slips corresponding to earthquakes having a moment magnitude of 7.4. Even for enhancements of vertical permeability up to 10{sup 4}:1, excursions did not exceed 15 m which implies that pumping is strongly volume limited. We also present an analysis of upward directed flow in cracks for the case of earthquake induced pore pressure changes. For matrix properties characteristic of the Calico Hills (vitric) formation and a crack distribution bounding the potential flow capacity of published data, we estimate an upper bound of 0.25 cu m. of ground water per m. of fault length as the amount capable of being pumped to a level 250 m. above the normal water table. While the presence of even larger fractures than assumed might carry more ground water to that level an absolute upper limit of less than 50 cu. m. per m. of fault length is available to be pumped assuming a value n=0.46 for the rock porosity. For less porous rocks typical of the Topopah Spring or Tiva Canyon formations (n{approx}0.10) the upper limit may be reduced to less than 10 cu. m. per m. of fault length. This upper limit depends only upon strain, the height of pumping above the water table and the formation porosity.

  5. Genetic Optimization of Training Sets for Improved Machine Learning Models of Molecular Properties.

    PubMed

    Browning, Nicholas J; Ramakrishnan, Raghunathan; von Lilienfeld, O Anatole; Roethlisberger, Ursula

    2017-04-06

    The training of molecular models of quantum mechanical properties based on statistical machine learning requires large data sets which exemplify the map from chemical structure to molecular property. Intelligent a priori selection of training examples is often difficult or impossible to achieve, as prior knowledge may be unavailable. Ordinarily representative selection of training molecules from such data sets is achieved through random sampling. We use genetic algorithms for the optimization of training set composition consisting of tens of thousands of small organic molecules. The resulting machine learning models are considerably more accurate: in the limit of small training sets, mean absolute errors for out-of-sample predictions are reduced by up to ∼75%. We discuss and present optimized training sets consisting of 10 molecular classes for all molecular properties studied. We show that these classes can be used to design improved training sets for the generation of machine learning models of the same properties in similar but unrelated molecular sets.

  6. High resolution and continuous reconstruction of Blake and Post Blake excursions using cosmogenic radio nuclides in the Antarctic ice core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yokoyama, Y.; Tsunekawa, R.; Takahashi, S.; Miyairi, Y.; Aze, T.; Horiuchi, K.; Matsuzaki, H.; Motoyama, H.

    2015-12-01

    Geomagnetic excursions provide information on field mechanics and serve as a chronostratigraphic tool. Interpretation of sedimentological paleointensity records is complicated, and volcanic rocks provide only non-continuous records. Another means for reconstructing paleomagnetic intensity is analyzing cosmogenic radio nuclides. In this study, we reconstruct the Blake and the Post-Blake Excursions using the cosmogenic radio nuclide 10Be in the Dome Fuji ice core. It has been reported that the Blake Excursion and the Post-Blake Excursion occurred within the Brunhes Chron, at around 115 ka and 100 ka, respectively. These two excursions occurred in quick succession. The Post-Blake Excursion is relatively poorly studied, only being reconstructed from sediments and volcanic rocks. Results indicate there is a significant peaks in 10Be flux that is thought to be reflect respectively the Blake and the Post-Blake Excursions. The maximum 10Be flux during the Post-Blake Excurison is similar to that of the Blake Excursion, suggesting that the geomagnetic dipole field during the Post-Blake Excursion weakened by the same amount as during the Blake Excursion. We also compare the results for the Laschamp Excursion that we also reconstructed from the same ice core to discuss the nature of individual excursions inferred from the cosmogenic radio nuclides data.

  7. Be a Healthy Role Model for Children: 10 Tips for Setting Good Examples

    MedlinePlus

    10 tips Nutrition Education Series be a healthy role model for children 10 tips for setting good examples You are the ... such as candy or cookies—as replacement foods. 10 be a good food role model Try new ...

  8. Two Possible but Unconfirmed Paleomagnetic Excursions in Pleistocene Lacustrine Sediments in North America and Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liddicoat, J. C.

    2011-12-01

    The paleomagnetic literature is replete with reports of investigations of continuous field behavior (secular variation) using volcanic rocks and lacustrine and marine sediments from around the globe, and some of the reports are about paleomagnetic excursions. The Laschamp Excursion in volcanic rocks in the Massif Central of France (Bonhommet and Babkine, 1967) and Mono Lake Excursion in exposed lacustrine sediment in California (Denham and Cox, 1971) are two excursions that are recognized. At other localities and for different time intervals, confirmation of some excursions in sediment has not been successful at nearby sites where the deposits are believed to be the same age. An example is in the Basin of Mexico at Tlapacoya (19.4 N, 261.2 E)(Liddicoat et al., 1979). Another excursion that has not been confirmed but might have occurred is recorded in Pleistocene Lake Bonneville sediments that are exposed in the bank of the Sevier River near Delta, Utah (39.4 N, 247.6 E). In Mexico and Utah, the excursion is in a single, fully-oriented hand sample that was prepared into consecutive, 2-cm-thick horizons. Each horizon contains six samples that were demagnetized in an alternating field, and for each Lake Bonneville horizon the scatter of directions is 4 degrees or less. Several possibilities for why the excursion at Tlapacoya could not be confirmed were presented (Liddicoat et al., 1979), leaving open the possibility that the excursion might have occurred in Mexico about 14,500 years ago. The field behavior in Utah where the sediments are older than those at Tlapacoya by several tens of thousands of years (Oviatt et al., 1994) is nearly identical to the behavior recorded at Tlapacoya. At both localities, a path of the Virtual Geomagnetic Poles during the excursion is confined to a narrow meridional zone centered at about 200 E longitude and that descends to about 15 N latitude. The difficulty of confirming the anomalous field behavior at Tlapacoya and in Utah

  9. Two Possible but Unconfirmed Palaeomagnetic Excursions in Pleistocene Lacustrine Sediments in North America and Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liddicoat, J.; Coe, R.; Oviatt, J.

    2012-04-01

    The palaeomagnetic literature is replete with reports of investigations of continuous field behaviour (secular variation) using volcanic rocks and lacustrine and marine sediments, and some of the reports are about palaeomagnetic excursions. The Laschamp Excursion in volcanic rocks in the Massif Central of France (Bonhommet and Babkine, 1967) and Mono Lake Excursion in exposed lacustrine sediment in California (Denham and Cox, 1971) are two excursions that generally are accepted as having occurred in the late Pleistocene. At other localities and for different time intervals, confirmation of some excursions in sediment has not been successful at nearby sites where the deposits are believed to be the same age. An example is in the Basin of Mexico at Tlapacoya (19.4˚ N, 261.2˚ E) in lacustrine sediments about 14,500 years old (Liddicoat et al., 1979). Another excursion that has not been confirmed but might have occurred is recorded in Lake Bonneville sediments that are exposed in the bank of the Sevier River near Delta, Utah (39.4˚ N, 247.6˚ E). In Mexico and Utah, the excursions are in a single, fully-oriented hand sample that was prepared into consecutive, 2-cm-thick horizons, each consisting of six subsamples. The subsamples were demagnetized in an alternating field to at least 60 mT or when possible because of consolidation, thermally demagnetized to 600˚ C; for each Lake Bonneville horizon, the scatter of palaeomagnetic directions is 4˚ or less. Several possibilities for why the excursion at Tlapacoya could not be confirmed were presented (Liddicoat et al., 1979), leaving open the possibility that the excursion might have occurred in Mexico. The field behaviour in Utah where the sediments are older than those at Tlapacoya by several tens of thousands of years (Oviatt et al., 1994) is nearly identical to the behaviour recorded at Tlapacoya. At both localities, a path of the Virtual Geomagnetic Poles during the excursion is confined to a narrow meridional zone

  10. Dating the Laschamp Excursion: Why Speleothems are Valuable Tools for Constraining the Timing and Duration of Short-Lived Geomagnetic Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lascu, I.; Feinberg, J. M.; Dorale, J. A.; Cheng, H.; Edwards, R. L.

    2015-12-01

    Short-lived geomagnetic events are reflections of geodynamo behavior at small length scales. A rigorous documentation of the anatomy, timing, duration, and frequency of centennial-to-millennial scale geomagnetic events can be invaluable for theoretical and numerical geodynamo models, and for the understanding the finer dynamics of the Earth's core. A critical ingredient for characterizing such geomagnetic instabilities are tightly constrained age models that enable high-resolution magnetostratigraphies. Here we focus on a North American speleothem geomagnetic record of the Laschamp excursion, which was the first geomagnetic excursion recognized and described in the paleomagnetic record, and remains the most studied event of its kind. The geological significance of the Laschamp lies chiefly in the fact that it constitutes a global time-synchronous geochronological marker. The Laschamp excursion occurred around the time of the demise of Homo neanderthalensis, in conjunction with high-amplitude, rapid climatic oscillations leading into the Last Glacial Maximum, and precedes a major supervolcano eruption in the Mediterranean. Thus, the precise determination of the timing and duration of the Laschamp would help in elucidating major scientific questions situated at the intersection of geology, paleoclimatology, and anthropology. Here we present a geomagnetic record from a stalagmite collected in Crevice Cave, Missouri, which we have dated using a combination of high-precision 230Th ages and annual layer counting using confocal microscopy. We have found a maximum duration for the Laschamp that spans the interval 42,250-39,700 years BP, and an age of 41,100 ± 350 years BP for the height of the excursion. During this period relative paleointensity decreased by an order of magnitude and the virtual geomagnetic pole was located at southerly latitudes. Our chronology provides the first robust bracketing for the Laschamp excursion, and improves on previous age determinations

  11. Parameter Set Uniqueness and Confidence Limits in Model Identification of Insulin Transport Models for Simulation Data Diabetic Patient Models

    PubMed Central

    Farmer, Terry G.; Edgar, Thomas F.; Peppas, Nicholas A.

    2011-01-01

    Background The use of patient models describing the dynamics of glucose, insulin, and possibly other metabolic species associated with glucose regulation allows diabetes researchers to gain insights regarding novel therapies via simulation. However, such models are only useful when model parameters are effectively estimated with patient data. Methods The use of least squares to effectively estimate model parameters from simulation data was investigated by observing factors that influence the accuracy of estimates for the model parameters from a data set generated using a model with known parameters. An intravenous insulin pharmacokinetic model was used to generate the insulin response of a patient with type 1 diabetes mellitus to a series of step changes in the insulin infusion rate from an external insulin pump. The effects of using user-defined gradient and Hessian calculations on both parameter estimations and the 95% confidence limits of the estimated parameter sets were investigated. Results Estimations performed by either solver without user-supplied quantities were highly dependent on the initial guess of the parameter set, with relative confidence limits greater than ±100%. The use of user-defined quantities allowed the one-compartment model parameters to be effectively estimated. While the two-compartment model parameter estimation still depended on the initial parameter set specification, confidence limits were decreased, and all fits to simulation data were very good. Conclusions The use of user-defined gradients and Hessian matrices results in more accurate parameter estimations for insulin transport models. Improved estimation could result in more accurate simulations for use in glucose control system design. PMID:18260776

  12. A novel level set model with automated initialization and controlling parameters for medical image segmentation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qingyi; Jiang, Mingyan; Bai, Peirui; Yang, Guang

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, a level set model without the need of generating initial contour and setting controlling parameters manually is proposed for medical image segmentation. The contribution of this paper is mainly manifested in three points. First, we propose a novel adaptive mean shift clustering method based on global image information to guide the evolution of level set. By simple threshold processing, the results of mean shift clustering can automatically and speedily generate an initial contour of level set evolution. Second, we devise several new functions to estimate the controlling parameters of the level set evolution based on the clustering results and image characteristics. Third, the reaction diffusion method is adopted to supersede the distance regularization term of RSF-level set model, which can improve the accuracy and speed of segmentation effectively with less manual intervention. Experimental results demonstrate the performance and efficiency of the proposed model for medical image segmentation.

  13. Teaching generalization of purchasing skills across community settings to autistic youth using videotape modeling.

    PubMed

    Haring, T G; Kennedy, C H; Adams, M J; Pitts-Conway, V

    1987-01-01

    Three young autistic adults were trained to purchase items. Training was conducted in one setting with concurrent generalization probes taken in three community stores. Training in one setting failed to produce generalization to the three probe settings. Generalization training, which consisted of viewing videotapes of models who purchased items in the probe settings and answering questions about the models' responses, was then introduced. Training with the videotapes resulted in generalization to the three community stores. Results of the use of videotapes as a cost-effective means to program generalization in community training programs are discussed.

  14. Assessing effects of variation in global climate data sets on spatial predictions from climate envelope models

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Romanach, Stephanie; Watling, James I.; Fletcher, Robert J.; Speroterra, Carolina; Bucklin, David N.; Brandt, Laura A.; Pearlstine, Leonard G.; Escribano, Yesenia; Mazzotti, Frank J.

    2014-01-01

    Climate change poses new challenges for natural resource managers. Predictive modeling of species–environment relationships using climate envelope models can enhance our understanding of climate change effects on biodiversity, assist in assessment of invasion risk by exotic organisms, and inform life-history understanding of individual species. While increasing interest has focused on the role of uncertainty in future conditions on model predictions, models also may be sensitive to the initial conditions on which they are trained. Although climate envelope models are usually trained using data on contemporary climate, we lack systematic comparisons of model performance and predictions across alternative climate data sets available for model training. Here, we seek to fill that gap by comparing variability in predictions between two contemporary climate data sets to variability in spatial predictions among three alternative projections of future climate. Overall, correlations between monthly temperature and precipitation variables were very high for both contemporary and future data. Model performance varied across algorithms, but not between two alternative contemporary climate data sets. Spatial predictions varied more among alternative general-circulation models describing future climate conditions than between contemporary climate data sets. However, we did find that climate envelope models with low Cohen's kappa scores made more discrepant spatial predictions between climate data sets for the contemporary period than did models with high Cohen's kappa scores. We suggest conservation planners evaluate multiple performance metrics and be aware of the importance of differences in initial conditions for spatial predictions from climate envelope models.

  15. Fractionation between inorganic and organic carbon during the Lomagundi (2.22 2.1 Ga) carbon isotope excursion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bekker, A.; Holmden, C.; Beukes, N. J.; Kenig, F.; Eglinton, B.; Patterson, W. P.

    2008-07-01

    The Lomagundi (2.22-2.1 Ga) positive carbon isotope excursion in shallow-marine sedimentary carbonates has been associated with the rise in atmospheric oxygen, but subsequent studies have demonstrated that the carbon isotope excursion was preceded by the rise in atmospheric oxygen. The amount of oxygen released to the exosphere during the Lomagundi excursion is constrained by the average global fractionation between inorganic and organic carbon, which is poorly characterized. Because dissolved inorganic and organic carbon reservoirs were arguably larger in the Paleoproterozoic ocean, at a time of lower solar luminosity and lower ocean redox state, decoupling between these two variables might be expected. We determined carbon isotope values of carbonate and organic matter in carbonates and shales of the Silverton Formation, South Africa and in the correlative Sengoma Argillite Formation, near the border in Botswana. These units were deposited between 2.22 and 2.06 Ga along the margin of the Kaapvaal Craton in an open-marine deltaic setting and experienced lower greenschist facies metamorphism. The prodelta to offshore marine shales are overlain by a subtidal carbonate sequence. Carbonates exhibit elevated 13C values ranging from 8.3 to 11.2‰ vs. VPDB consistent with deposition during the Lomagundi positive excursion. The total organic carbon (TOC) contents range from 0.01 to 0.6% and δ13C values range from - 24.8 to - 13.9‰. Thus, the isotopic fractionation between organic and carbonate carbon was on average 30.3 ± 2.8‰ ( n = 32) in the shallow-marine environment. The underlying Sengoma shales have highly variable TOC contents (0.14 to 21.94%) and δ13C values (- 33.7 to - 20.8‰) with an average of - 27.0 ± 3.0‰ ( n = 50). Considering that the shales were also deposited during the Lomagundi excursion, and taking δ13C values of the overlying carbonates as representative of the δ13C value of dissolved inorganic carbon during shale deposition, a carbon

  16. Two-phase electro-hydrodynamic flow modeling by a conservative level set model.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yuan

    2013-03-01

    The principles of electro-hydrodynamic (EHD) flow have been known for more than a century and have been adopted for various industrial applications, for example, fluid mixing and demixing. Analytical solutions of such EHD flow only exist in a limited number of scenarios, for example, predicting a small deformation of a single droplet in a uniform electric field. Numerical modeling of such phenomena can provide significant insights about EHDs multiphase flows. During the last decade, many numerical results have been reported to provide novel and useful tools of studying the multiphase EHD flow. Based on a conservative level set method, the proposed model is able to simulate large deformations of a droplet by a steady electric field, which is beyond the region of theoretic prediction. The model is validated for both leaky dielectrics and perfect dielectrics, and is found to be in excellent agreement with existing analytical solutions and numerical studies in the literature. Furthermore, simulations of the deformation of a water droplet in decyl alcohol in a steady electric field match better with published experimental data than the theoretical prediction for large deformations. Therefore the proposed model can serve as a practical and accurate tool for simulating two-phase EHD flow.

  17. A Science and Technology Excursion-based Unit of Work: The Human Body.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Terry, Laura

    2000-01-01

    Presents a unit of work based on a few systems of the human body. Stretches students' learning beyond the classroom into the local community by going on an excursion to Kalgoorlie Regional Hospital. (ASK)

  18. A global deglacial negative carbon isotope excursion in speleothem calcite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breecker, D.

    2015-12-01

    δ13C values of speleothem calcite decreased globally during the last deglaciation defining a carbon isotope excursion (CIE) despite relatively constant δ13C values of carbon in the ocean-atmosphere system. The magnitude of the CIE varied with latitude, increasing poleward from ~2‰ in the tropics to as much as 7‰ at high latitudes. This recent CIE provides an interesting comparison with CIEs observed in deep time. A substantial portion of this CIE can be explained by the increase in atmospheric pCO2 that accompanied deglaciation. The dependence of C3 plant δ13C values on atmospheric pCO2 predicts a 2‰ δ13C decrease driven by the deglacial pCO2 increase. I propose that this signal was transferred to caves and thus explains nearly 100% of the CIE magnitude observed in the tropics and no less than 30% at the highest latitudes in the compilation. An atmospheric pCO2 control on speleothem δ13C values, if real, will need to be corrected for using ice core data before δ13C records can be interpreted in a paleoclimate context. The decrease in the magnitude of the equilibrium calcite-CO2 carbon isotope fractionation factor explains a maximum of 1‰ of the CIE at the highest northern latitude in the compilation, which experienced the largest deglacial warming. Much of the residual extratropical CIE was likely driven by increasing belowground respiration rates, which were presumably pronounced at high latitudes as glacial retreat exposed fresh surfaces and/or vegetation density increased. The largest increases in belowground respiration would have therefore occurred at the highest latitudes, explaining the meridional trend. This work supports the notion that increases in atmospheric pCO2 and belowground respiration rates can result in large CIEs recorded in terrestrial carbonates, which, as previously suggested, may explain the magnitude of the PETM CIE as recorded by paleosol carbonates.

  19. Sedimentary and Volcanic Records of the Laschamp and Mono Lake Excursions from Australia and New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ingham, E. M.; Roberts, A. P.; Turner, G. M.; Heslop, D.; Ronge, T.; Conway, C.; Leonard, G.; Townsend, D.; Tiedemann, R.; Lamy, F.; Calvert, A. T.

    2014-12-01

    Geomagnetic excursions are short-lived deviations of the geomagnetic field from the normal range of secular variation. Despite significant advances in geomagnetic excursion research over the past 20 years, fundamental questions remain concerning the typical duration and global morphology of excursional geomagnetic fields. To answer such questions, more high-resolution, chronologically well-constrained excursion records are required, particularly from the Southern Hemisphere. We present preliminary paleomagnetic records of the Laschamp (~41 ka) and Mono Lake (~35 ka) excursions from three marine sediment cores from the Bounty Trough, New Zealand margin, and complementary volcanic records of the Laschamp excursion from lavas of Mt Ruapehu, New Zealand. Relatively high sedimentation rates of 12 - 26 cm/kyr in the Bounty Trough during glacial periods allow identification of excursional field behavior at each of the studied core locations. Each core displays one or two excursional events, with rapid directional swings between stable normal polarity and reversed excursional directions, each associated with coincident relative paleointensity minima. These anomalous paleomagnetic directions are interpreted to represent the Laschamp and Mono Lake excursions, based on a combination of tephrochronology, radiocarbon dating, and cyclostratigraphy (defined from core-scanning X-ray fluorescence and magnetic susceptibility records). Beside these records, we present results from fourteen lava flows, on Mt Ruapehu, for which 40Ar-39Ar dating indicates ages of between 39 and 45 ka. The step heating 40Ar-39Ar experiments produced particularly flat age plateaus, with corresponding 2 s.d. errors mostly approaching 1 kyr. The youngest and oldest flows carry normal polarity magnetization, however six flows, dated between 41 and 43 ka, display transitional field characteristics. Three of these flows display a declination swing of around 180o, which coincides with a previously published

  20. Basic priority rating model 2.0: current applications for priority setting in health promotion practice.

    PubMed

    Neiger, Brad L; Thackeray, Rosemary; Fagen, Michael C

    2011-03-01

    Priority setting is an important component of systematic planning in health promotion and also factors into the development of a comprehensive evaluation plan. The basic priority rating (BPR) model was introduced more than 50 years ago and includes criteria that should be considered in any priority setting approach (i.e., use of predetermined criteria, standardized comparisons, and a rubric that controls bias). Although the BPR model has provided basic direction in priority setting, it does not represent the broad array of data currently available to decision makers. Elements in the model also give more weight to the impact of communicable diseases compared with chronic diseases. For these reasons, several modifications are recommended to improve the BPR model and to better assist health promotion practitioners in the priority setting process. The authors also suggest a new name, BPR 2.0, to represent this revised model.

  1. A Data Preprocessing Algorithm for Classification Model Based On Rough Sets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiang-wei, Li; Yian-fang, Qi

    Aimed to solve the limitation of abundant data to constructing classification modeling in data mining, the paper proposed a novel effective preprocessing algorithm based on rough sets. Firstly, we construct the relation Information System using original data sets. Secondly, make use of attribute reduction theory of Rough sets to produce the Core of Information System. Core is the most important and necessary information which cannot reduce in original Information System. So it can get a same effect as original data sets to data analysis, and can construct classification modeling using it. Thirdly, construct indiscernibility matrix using reduced Information System, and finally, get the classification of original data sets. Compared to existing techniques, the developed algorithm enjoy following advantages: (1) avoiding the abundant data in follow-up data processing, and (2) avoiding large amount of computation in whole data mining process. (3) The results become more effective because of introducing the attributes reducing theory of Rough Sets.

  2. Head excursion of restrained human volunteers and hybrid III dummies in steady state rollover tests.

    PubMed

    Moffatt, Edward; Hare, Barry; Hughes, Raymond; Lewis, Lance; Iiyama, Hiroshi; Curzon, Anne; Cooper, Eddie

    2003-01-01

    Seatbelts provide substantial benefits in rollover crashes, yet occupants still receive head and neck injuries from contacting the vehicle roof interior when the roof exterior strikes the ground. Prior research has evaluated rollover restraint performance utilizing anthropomorphic test devices (dummies), but little dynamic testing has been done with human volunteers to learn how they move during rollovers. In this study, the vertical excursion of the head of restrained dummies and human subjects was measured in a vehicle being rotated about its longitudinal roll axis at roll rates from 180-to-360 deg/sec and under static inversion conditions. The vehicle's restraint design was the commonly used 3-point seatbelt with continuous loop webbing and a sliding latch plate. This paper presents an analysis of the observed occupant motion and provides a comparison of dummy and human motion under similar test conditions. Thirty-five tests (eighteen static and seventeen dynamic) were completed using two different sizes of dummies and human subjects in both near and far-side roll directions. The research indicates that far-side rollovers cause the restrained test subjects to have greater head excursion than near-side rollovers, and that static inversion testing underestimates head excursion for far-side occupants. Human vertical head excursion of up to 200 mm was found at a roll rate of 220 deg/sec. Humans exhibit greater variability in head excursion in comparison to dummies. Transfer of seatbelt webbing through the latch plate did not correlate directly with differences in head excursion.

  3. Late Ordovician (Turinian-Chatfieldian) carbon isotope excursions and their stratigraphic and paleoceanographic significance

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ludvigson, Greg A.; Witzke, B.J.; Gonzalez, Luis A.; Carpenter, S.J.; Schneider, C.L.; Hasiuk, F.

    2004-01-01

    Five positive carbon isotope excursions are reported from Platteville-Decorah strata in the Upper Mississippi Valley. All occur in subtidal carbonate strata, and are recognized in the Mifflin, Grand Detour, Quimbys Mill, Spechts Ferry, and Guttenberg intervals. The positive carbon isotope excursions are developed in a Platteville-Decorah succession in which background ??13C values increase upward from about -2??? at the base to about 0??? Vienna Pee Dee belemnite (VPDB) at the top. A regional north-south ??13C gradient, with lighter values to the north and heavier values to the south is also noted. Peak excursion ??13C values of up to +2.75 are reported from the Quimbys Mill excursion, and up to +2.6 from the Guttenberg excursion, although there are considerable local changes in the magnitudes of these events. The Quimbys Mill, Spechts Ferry, and Guttenberg carbon isotope excursions occur in units that are bounded by submarine disconformities, and completely starve out in deeper, more offshore areas. Closely spaced chemostratigraphic profiles of these sculpted, pyrite-impregnated hardground surfaces show that they are associated with very abrupt centimeter-scale negative ??13C shifts of up to several per mil, possibly resulting from the local diagenetic effects of incursions of euxinic bottom waters during marine flooding events. ?? 2004 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Development of technique to detect and classify small-scale magnetic flux cancellation and rapid blue-shifted excursions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xin; Deng, Na; Lamb, Derek A.; Jing, Ju; Liu, Chang; Liu, Rui; Park, Sung-Hong; Wang, Haimin

    2015-07-01

    We present a set of tools for detecting small-scale solar magnetic cancellations and the disk counterpart of type II spicules (the so-called Rapid Blueshifted Excursions (RBEs)), using line-of-sight photospheric magnetograms and chromospheric spectroscopic observations, respectively. For tracking magnetic cancellation, we improve the Southwest Automatic Magnetic Identification Suite (SWAMIS) so that it is able to detect certain obscure cancellations that can be easily missed. For detecting RBEs, we use a normalized reference profile to reduce false-positive detections caused by the non-uniform background and seeing condition. Similar to the magnetic feature tracking in SWAMIS, we apply a dual-threshold method to enhance the accuracy of RBE detection. These tools are employed to analyze our coordinated observations using the Interferometric BIdimensional Spectrometer at the Dunn Solar Telescope of the National Solar Observatory and Hinode. We present the statistical properties of magnetic cancellations and RBEs, and explore their correlation using this data set.

  5. Diverse Data Sets Can Yield Reliable Information through Mechanistic Modeling: Salicylic Acid Clearance.

    PubMed

    Raymond, G M; Bassingthwaighte, J B

    This is a practical example of a powerful research strategy: putting together data from studies covering a diversity of conditions can yield a scientifically sound grasp of the phenomenon when the individual observations failed to provide definitive understanding. The rationale is that defining a realistic, quantitative, explanatory hypothesis for the whole set of studies, brings about a "consilience" of the often competing hypotheses considered for individual data sets. An internally consistent conjecture linking multiple data sets simultaneously provides stronger evidence on the characteristics of a system than does analysis of individual data sets limited to narrow ranges of conditions. Our example examines three very different data sets on the clearance of salicylic acid from humans: a high concentration set from aspirin overdoses; a set with medium concentrations from a research study on the influences of the route of administration and of sex on the clearance kinetics, and a set on low dose aspirin for cardiovascular health. Three models were tested: (1) a first order reaction, (2) a Michaelis-Menten (M-M) approach, and (3) an enzyme kinetic model with forward and backward reactions. The reaction rates found from model 1 were distinctly different for the three data sets, having no commonality. The M-M model 2 fitted each of the three data sets but gave a reliable estimates of the Michaelis constant only for the medium level data (Km = 24±5.4 mg/L); analyzing the three data sets together with model 2 gave Km = 18±2.6 mg/L. (Estimating parameters using larger numbers of data points in an optimization increases the degrees of freedom, constraining the range of the estimates). Using the enzyme kinetic model (3) increased the number of free parameters but nevertheless improved the goodness of fit to the combined data sets, giving tighter constraints, and a lower estimated Km = 14.6±2.9 mg/L, demonstrating that fitting diverse data sets with a single model

  6. Diverse Data Sets Can Yield Reliable Information through Mechanistic Modeling: Salicylic Acid Clearance

    PubMed Central

    Raymond, G. M.; Bassingthwaighte, J. B.

    2016-01-01

    This is a practical example of a powerful research strategy: putting together data from studies covering a diversity of conditions can yield a scientifically sound grasp of the phenomenon when the individual observations failed to provide definitive understanding. The rationale is that defining a realistic, quantitative, explanatory hypothesis for the whole set of studies, brings about a “consilience” of the often competing hypotheses considered for individual data sets. An internally consistent conjecture linking multiple data sets simultaneously provides stronger evidence on the characteristics of a system than does analysis of individual data sets limited to narrow ranges of conditions. Our example examines three very different data sets on the clearance of salicylic acid from humans: a high concentration set from aspirin overdoses; a set with medium concentrations from a research study on the influences of the route of administration and of sex on the clearance kinetics, and a set on low dose aspirin for cardiovascular health. Three models were tested: (1) a first order reaction, (2) a Michaelis-Menten (M-M) approach, and (3) an enzyme kinetic model with forward and backward reactions. The reaction rates found from model 1 were distinctly different for the three data sets, having no commonality. The M-M model 2 fitted each of the three data sets but gave a reliable estimates of the Michaelis constant only for the medium level data (Km = 24±5.4 mg/L); analyzing the three data sets together with model 2 gave Km = 18±2.6 mg/L. (Estimating parameters using larger numbers of data points in an optimization increases the degrees of freedom, constraining the range of the estimates). Using the enzyme kinetic model (3) increased the number of free parameters but nevertheless improved the goodness of fit to the combined data sets, giving tighter constraints, and a lower estimated Km = 14.6±2.9 mg/L, demonstrating that fitting diverse data sets with a single model

  7. Diagnostic Profiles: A Standard Setting Method for Use with a Cognitive Diagnostic Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skaggs, Gary; Hein, Serge F.; Wilkins, Jesse L. M.

    2016-01-01

    This article introduces the Diagnostic Profiles (DP) standard setting method for setting a performance standard on a test developed from a cognitive diagnostic model (CDM), the outcome of which is a profile of mastered and not-mastered skills or attributes rather than a single test score. In the DP method, the key judgment task for panelists is a…

  8. Modeling the Effects of Choice-Set Size on the Processing of Letters and Words

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rouder, Jeffrey N.

    2004-01-01

    Letters and words are better identified when there are fewer available choices. How do readers use choice-set restrictions? By analyzing new experimental data and previously reported data, the author shows that Bayes theorem-based models overestimate readers' use of choice-set restrictions. This result is discordant with choice-similarity models…

  9. USE OF ROUGH SETS AND SPECTRAL DATA FOR BUILDING PREDICTIVE MODELS OF REACTION RATE CONSTANTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A model for predicting the log of the rate constants for alkaline hydrolysis of organic esters has been developed with the use of gas-phase min-infrared library spectra and a rule-building software system based on the mathematical theory of rough sets. A diverse set of 41 esters ...

  10. What Time Is Sunrise? Revisiting the Refraction Component of Sunrise/set Prediction Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Teresa; Bartlett, Jennifer L.; Hilton, James Lindsay

    2017-01-01

    Algorithms that predict sunrise and sunset times currently have an error of one to four minutes at mid-latitudes (0° - 55° N/S) due to limitations in the atmospheric models they incorporate. At higher latitudes, slight changes in refraction can cause significant discrepancies, even including difficulties determining when the Sun appears to rise or set. While different components of refraction are known, how they affect predictions of sunrise/set has not yet been quantified. A better understanding of the contributions from temperature profile, pressure, humidity, and aerosols could significantly improve the standard prediction. We present a sunrise/set calculator that interchanges the refraction component by varying the refraction model. We then compare these predictions with data sets of observed rise/set times to create a better model. Sunrise/set times and meteorological data from multiple locations will be necessary for a thorough investigation of the problem. While there are a few data sets available, we will also begin collecting this data using smartphones as part of a citizen science project. The mobile application for this project will be available in the Google Play store. Data analysis will lead to more complete models that will provide more accurate rise/set times for the benefit of astronomers, navigators, and outdoorsmen everywhere.

  11. Applicability domains for classification problems: benchmarking of distance to models for AMES mutagenicity set

    EPA Science Inventory

    For QSAR and QSPR modeling of biological and physicochemical properties, estimating the accuracy of predictions is a critical problem. The “distance to model” (DM) can be defined as a metric that defines the similarity between the training set molecules and the test set compound ...

  12. Extrapolatable analytical functions for tendon excursions and moment arms from sparse datasets

    PubMed Central

    Kurse, Manish U.; Lipson, Hod

    2013-01-01

    Computationally efficient modeling of complex neuromuscular systems for dynamics and control simulations often requires accurate analytical expressions for moment arms over the entire range of motion. Conventionally, polynomial expressions are regressed from experimental data. But these polynomial regressions can fail to extrapolate, may require large datasets to train, are not robust to noise, and often have numerous free parameters. We present a novel method that simultaneously estimates both the form and parameter values of arbitrary analytical expressions for tendon excursions and moment arms over the entire range of motion from sparse datasets. This symbolic regression method based on genetic programming has been shown to find the appropriate form of mathematical expressions that capture the physics of mechanical systems. We demonstrate this method by applying it to (i) experimental data from a physical tendon-driven robotic system with arbitrarily routed multiarticular tendons and (ii) synthetic data from musculoskeletal models. We show it outperforms polynomial regressions in the amount of training data, ability to extrapolate, robustness to noise, and representation containing fewer parameters – all critical to realistic and efficient computational modeling of complex musculoskeletal systems. PMID:22410321

  13. Introduction to the development and validation of predictive biomarker models from high-throughput data sets.

    PubMed

    Deng, Xutao; Campagne, Fabien

    2010-01-01

    High-throughput technologies can routinely assay biological or clinical samples and produce wide data sets where each sample is associated with tens of thousands of measurements. Such data sets can be mined to discover biomarkers and develop statistical models capable of predicting an endpoint of interest from data measured in the samples. The field of biomarker model development combines methods from statistics and machine learning to develop and evaluate predictive biomarker models. In this chapter, we discuss the computational steps involved in the development of biomarker models designed to predict information about individual samples and review approaches often used to implement each step. A practical example of biomarker model development in a large gene expression data set is presented. This example leverages BDVal, a suite of biomarker model development programs developed as an open-source project (see http://bdval.org /).

  14. The Late Eocene 187Os / 188Os excursion: Chemostratigraphy, cosmic dust flux and the Early Oligocene glaciation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalai, Tarun K.; Ravizza, Gregory E.; Peucker-Ehrenbrink, B.

    2006-01-01

    High resolution records (ca. 100 kyr) of Os isotope composition ( 187Os / 188Os) in bulk sediments from two tropical Pacific sites (ODP Sites 1218 and 1219) capture the complete Late Eocene 187Os / 188Os excursion and confirm that the Late Eocene 187Os / 188Os minimum, earlier reported by Ravizza and Peucker-Ehrenbrink [Earth Planet. Sci. Lett. 210 (2003) 151-165], is a global feature. Using the astronomically tuned age models available for these sites, it is suggested that the Late Eocene 187Os / 188Os minimum can be placed at 34.5 ± 0.1 Ma in the marine records. In addition, two other distinct features of the 187Os / 188Os excursion that are correlatable among sections are proposed as chemostratigraphic markers which can serve as age control points with a precision of ca. ± 0.1 Myr. We propose a speculative hypothesis that higher cosmic dust flux in the Late Eocene may have contributed to global cooling and Early Oligocene glaciation (Oi-1) by supplying bio-essential trace elements to the oceans and thereby resulting in higher ocean productivity, enhanced burial of organic carbon and draw down of atmospheric CO 2. To determine if the hypothesis that enhanced cosmic dust flux in the Late Eocene was a cause for the 187Os / 188Os excursion can be tested by using the paired bulk sediment and leachate Os isotope composition; 187Os / 188Os were also measured in sediment leachates. Results of analyses of leachates are inconsistent between the south Atlantic and the Pacific sites, and therefore do not yield a robust test of this hypothesis. Comparison of 187Os / 188Os records with high resolution benthic foraminiferal δ18O records across the Eocene-Oligocene transition suggests that 187Os flux to the oceans decreased during cooling and ice growth leading to the Oi-1 glaciation, whereas subsequent decay of ice-sheets and deglacial weathering drove seawater 187Os / 188Os to higher values. Although the precise timing and magnitude of these changes in weathering fluxes

  15. Joint Clustering and Component Analysis of Correspondenceless Point Sets: Application to Cardiac Statistical Modeling.

    PubMed

    Gooya, Ali; Lekadir, Karim; Alba, Xenia; Swift, Andrew J; Wild, Jim M; Frangi, Alejandro F

    2015-01-01

    Construction of Statistical Shape Models (SSMs) from arbitrary point sets is a challenging problem due to significant shape variation and lack of explicit point correspondence across the training data set. In medical imaging, point sets can generally represent different shape classes that span healthy and pathological exemplars. In such cases, the constructed SSM may not generalize well, largely because the probability density function (pdf) of the point sets deviates from the underlying assumption of Gaussian statistics. To this end, we propose a generative model for unsupervised learning of the pdf of point sets as a mixture of distinctive classes. A Variational Bayesian (VB) method is proposed for making joint inferences on the labels of point sets, and the principal modes of variations in each cluster. The method provides a flexible framework to handle point sets with no explicit point-to-point correspondences. We also show that by maximizing the marginalized likelihood of the model, the optimal number of clusters of point sets can be determined. We illustrate this work in the context of understanding the anatomical phenotype of the left and right ventricles in heart. To this end, we use a database containing hearts of healthy subjects, patients with Pulmonary Hypertension (PH), and patients with Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy (HCM). We demonstrate that our method can outperform traditional PCA in both generalization and specificity measures.

  16. An interactive environment for the analysis of large Earth observation and model data sets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowman, Kenneth P.; Walsh, John E.; Wilhelmson, Robert B.

    1993-01-01

    We propose to develop an interactive environment for the analysis of large Earth science observation and model data sets. We will use a standard scientific data storage format and a large capacity (greater than 20 GB) optical disk system for data management; develop libraries for coordinate transformation and regridding of data sets; modify the NCSA X Image and X DataSlice software for typical Earth observation data sets by including map transformations and missing data handling; develop analysis tools for common mathematical and statistical operations; integrate the components described above into a system for the analysis and comparison of observations and model results; and distribute software and documentation to the scientific community.

  17. An interactive environment for the analysis of large Earth observation and model data sets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowman, Kenneth P.; Walsh, John E.; Wilhelmson, Robert B.

    1992-01-01

    We propose to develop an interactive environment for the analysis of large Earth science observation and model data sets. We will use a standard scientific data storage format and a large capacity (greater than 20 GB) optical disk system for data management; develop libraries for coordinate transformation and regridding of data sets; modify the NCSA X Image and X Data Slice software for typical Earth observation data sets by including map transformations and missing data handling; develop analysis tools for common mathematical and statistical operations; integrate the components described above into a system for the analysis and comparison of observations and model results; and distribute software and documentation to the scientific community.

  18. Robust autonomous model learning from 2D and 3D data sets.

    PubMed

    Langs, Georg; Donner, René; Peloschek, Philipp; Bischof, Horst

    2007-01-01

    In this paper we propose a weakly supervised learning algorithm for appearance models based on the minimum description length (MDL) principle. From a set of training images or volumes depicting examples of an anatomical structure, correspondences for a set of landmarks are established by group-wise registration. The approach does not require any annotation. In contrast to existing methods no assumptions about the topology of the data are made, and the topology can change throughout the data set. Instead of a continuous representation of the volumes or images, only sparse finite sets of interest points are used to represent the examples during optimization. This enables the algorithm to efficiently use distinctive points, and to handle texture variations robustly. In contrast to standard elasticity based deformation constraints the MDL criterion accounts for systematic deformations typical for training sets stemming from medical image data. Experimental results are reported for five different 2D and 3D data sets.

  19. Developing a Suitable Model for Water Uptake for Biodegradable Polymers Using Small Training Sets

    PubMed Central

    Valenzuela, Loreto M.; Knight, Doyle D.; Kohn, Joachim

    2016-01-01

    Prediction of the dynamic properties of water uptake across polymer libraries can accelerate polymer selection for a specific application. We first built semiempirical models using Artificial Neural Networks and all water uptake data, as individual input. These models give very good correlations (R2 > 0.78 for test set) but very low accuracy on cross-validation sets (less than 19% of experimental points within experimental error). Instead, using consolidated parameters like equilibrium water uptake a good model is obtained (R2 = 0.78 for test set), with accurate predictions for 50% of tested polymers. The semiempirical model was applied to the 56-polymer library of L-tyrosine-derived polyarylates, identifying groups of polymers that are likely to satisfy design criteria for water uptake. This research demonstrates that a surrogate modeling effort can reduce the number of polymers that must be synthesized and characterized to identify an appropriate polymer that meets certain performance criteria. PMID:27200091

  20. Rational selection of training and test sets for the development of validated QSAR models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golbraikh, Alexander; Shen, Min; Xiao, Zhiyan; Xiao, Yun-De; Lee, Kuo-Hsiung; Tropsha, Alexander

    2003-02-01

    Quantitative Structure-Activity Relationship (QSAR) models are used increasingly to screen chemical databases and/or virtual chemical libraries for potentially bioactive molecules. These developments emphasize the importance of rigorous model validation to ensure that the models have acceptable predictive power. Using k nearest neighbors ( kNN) variable selection QSAR method for the analysis of several datasets, we have demonstrated recently that the widely accepted leave-one-out (LOO) cross-validated R2 (q2) is an inadequate characteristic to assess the predictive ability of the models [Golbraikh, A., Tropsha, A. Beware of q2! J. Mol. Graphics Mod. 20, 269-276, (2002)]. Herein, we provide additional evidence that there exists no correlation between the values of q 2 for the training set and accuracy of prediction ( R 2) for the test set and argue that this observation is a general property of any QSAR model developed with LOO cross-validation. We suggest that external validation using rationally selected training and test sets provides a means to establish a reliable QSAR model. We propose several approaches to the division of experimental datasets into training and test sets and apply them in QSAR studies of 48 functionalized amino acid anticonvulsants and a series of 157 epipodophyllotoxin derivatives with antitumor activity. We formulate a set of general criteria for the evaluation of predictive power of QSAR models.

  1. Engaging students in research learning experiences through hydrology field excursions and projects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ewen, T.; Seibert, J.

    2014-12-01

    One of the best ways to engage students and instill enthusiasm for hydrology is to expose them to hands-on learning. A focus on hydrology field research can be used to develop context-rich and active learning, and help solidify idealized learning where students are introduced to individual processes through textbook examples, often neglecting process interactions and an appreciation for the complexity of the system. We introduced a field course where hydrological measurement techniques are used to study processes such as snow hydrology and runoff generation, while also introducing students to field research and design of their own field project. In the field projects, students design a low-budget experiment with the aim of going through the different steps of a 'real' scientific project, from formulating the research question to presenting their results. In one of the field excursions, students make discharge measurements in several alpine streams with a salt tracer to better understand the spatial characteristics of an alpine catchment, where source waters originate and how they contribute to runoff generation. Soil moisture measurements taken by students in this field excursion were used to analyze spatial soil moisture patterns in the alpine catchment and subsequently used in a publication. Another field excursion repeats a published experiment, where preferential soil flow paths are studied using a tracer and compared to previously collected data. For each field excursion, observational data collected by the students is uploaded to an online database we developed, which also allows students to retrieve data from past excursions to further analyze and compare their data. At each of the field sites, weather stations were installed and a webviewer allows access to realtime data from data loggers, allowing students to explore how processes relate to climatic conditions. With in-house film expertise, these field excursions were also filmed and short virtual

  2. Determination of the Parameter Sets for the Best Performance of IPS-driven ENLIL Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yun, Jongyeon; Choi, Kyu-Cheol; Yi, Jonghyuk; Kim, Jaehun; Odstrcil, Dusan

    2016-12-01

    Interplanetary scintillation-driven (IPS-driven) ENLIL model was jointly developed by University of California, San Diego (UCSD) and National Aeronaucics and Space Administration/Goddard Space Flight Center (NASA/GSFC). The model has been in operation by Korean Space Weather Cetner (KSWC) since 2014. IPS-driven ENLIL model has a variety of ambient solar wind parameters and the results of the model depend on the combination of these parameters. We have conducted researches to determine the best combination of parameters to improve the performance of the IPS-driven ENLIL model. The model results with input of 1,440 combinations of parameters are compared with the Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE) observation data. In this way, the top 10 parameter sets showing best performance were determined. Finally, the characteristics of the parameter sets were analyzed and application of the results to IPS-driven ENLIL model was discussed.

  3. Paleointensity and 40Ar/39Ar geochronology of basalts at Gamarri, Ethiopia: Correlation with the Réunion subchron and Huckleberry Ridge excursion?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kindley, C.; Macho, A.; Tsegaye, M. A.; Feinberg, J. M.; Singer, B. S.; Jicha, B. R.; Brown, M. C.; Birke, T. K.

    2012-12-01

    several excursions occurring between ~2.2 and ~2.5 Ma. These excursions have been observed within records from ODP 982 (Channell & Guyodo, 2004) and IODP U1314 (Ohno et al., 2012), as well as within the GPTS as cryptochron C2r.2r-1 (originally dated as 2.420 to 2.441 Ma by Cande & Kent, 1995). Thus, we no longer interpret the excursion recorded in the lower portion of the Gamarri section to be part of the Réunion subchron and recommend that it be omitted from efforts to construct integrated global field models across the Huckleberry Ridge excursion and Réunion subchron.

  4. Effects of Visual Display on Joint Excursions Used to Play Virtual Dodgeball

    PubMed Central

    France, Christopher R; Applegate, Megan E; Leitkam, Samuel T; Pidcoe, Peter E; Walkowski, Stevan

    2016-01-01

    Background Virtual reality (VR) interventions hold great potential for rehabilitation as commercial systems are becoming more affordable and can be easily applied to both clinical and home settings. Objective In this study, we sought to determine how differences in the VR display type can influence motor behavior, cognitive load, and participant engagement. Methods Movement patterns of 17 healthy young adults (8 female, 9 male) were examined during games of Virtual Dodgeball presented on a three-dimensional television (3DTV) and a head-mounted display (HMD). The participant’s avatar was presented from a third-person perspective on a 3DTV and from a first-person perspective on an HMD. Results Examination of motor behavior revealed significantly greater excursions of the knee (P=.003), hip (P<.001), spine (P<.001), shoulder (P=.001), and elbow (P=.026) during HMD versus 3DTV gameplay, resulting in significant differences in forward (P=.003) and downward (P<.001) displacement of the whole-body center of mass. Analyses of cognitive load and engagement revealed that relative to 3DTV, participants indicated that HMD gameplay resulted in greater satisfaction with overall performance and was less frustrating (P<.001). There were no significant differences noted for mental demand. Conclusions Differences in visual display type and participant perspective influence how participants perform in Virtual Dodgeball. Because VR use within rehabilitation settings is often designed to help restore movement following orthopedic or neurologic injury, these findings provide an important caveat regarding the need to consider the potential influence of presentation format and perspective on motor behavior. PMID:27634561

  5. Using an Agenda Setting Model to Help Students Develop & Exercise Participatory Skills and Values

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perry, Anthony D.; Wilkenfeld, Britt S.

    2006-01-01

    The Agenda Setting Model is a program component that can be used in courses to contribute to students' development as responsible, effective, and informed citizens. This model involves students in finding a unified voice to assert an agenda of issues that they find especially pressing. This is often the only time students experience such a…

  6. Buttonpusher or Partner? Two Contrasting Models of Film Production in a University Setting.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pfaff, Gunter

    There are two distinct models of film production. One model, characterized as assembly line production, is the most prevalent in commercial settings and in universities. The project is initiated through management and progresses in an ordered flow of assembly through the hands of the specialized film workers; power is from the top down. The…

  7. Addressing HIV in the School Setting: Application of a School Change Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walsh, Audra St. John; Chenneville, Tiffany

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes best practices for responding to youth with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) in the school setting through the application of a school change model designed by the World Health Organization. This model applies a whole school approach and includes four levels that span the continuum from universal prevention to direct…

  8. Information Content in Data Sets for a Nucleated-Polymerization Model

    PubMed Central

    Banks, H.T.; Doumic, Marie; Kruse, Carola; Prigent, Stephanie; Rezaei, Human

    2015-01-01

    We illustrate the use of statistical tools (asymptotic theories of standard error quantification using appropriate statistical models, bootstrapping, model comparison techniques) in addition to sensitivity analysis that may be employed to determine the information content in data sets. We do this in the context of recent models [25] for nucleated polymerization in proteins, about which very little is known regarding the underlying mechanisms; thus the methodology we develop here may be of great help to experimentalists. We conclude that the investigated data sets will support with reasonable levels of uncertainty only the estimation of the parameters related to the early steps of the aggregation process. PMID:26046598

  9. On some questions in computer modeling of the reachability sets constructing problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ushakov, V. N.; Parshikov, G. V.; Matviychuk, A. R.

    2016-10-01

    The research considers the problem of constructing the reachability sets of non-linear dynamical system in n-dimensional Euclidean space on the fixed time interval. The approximate solution methods of the reachability sets constructing are considered in this research as well as the accuracy estimation for this methods is given. The research contains the computational experiments on computer modeling of described reachability sets constructing methods, which use the algorithms implemented for two computation technologies CPU as well as GPU (using CUDA technology). In this research the description and comparison of approaches to the computer modeling of the problem are given. Furthermore, the CPU-based computer modeling result comparison with the result obtained on GPU based on CUDA technology are presented. Besides, this research discusses some the side issues appeared during computer modeling, the issues raised during the computer algorithms implementation, as well as the ways to eliminate these issues or reduce their impact.

  10. Effect of Hamstring Flexibility on Hip and Lumbar Spine Joint Excursions During Forward Reaching Tasks in Individuals With and Without Low Back Pain

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Erica N.; Thomas, James S.

    2010-01-01

    Objective To examine the correlation between hamstring flexibility and hip and lumbar spine joint excursions during standardized reaching and forward bending tasks. Design Retrospective analysis of data obtained during two previous prospective studies that examined kinematics and kinetics during forward bending tasks in individuals with and without low back pain (LBP). Setting The two previous studies were conducted in the Motor Control Lab at Ohio University. Participants Data from a total of 122 subjects from two previous studies. Study 1: 86 subjects recovered from an episode of acute LBP (Recovered). Study 2 (unpublished findings): 18 chronic low back pain subjects (LBP) and 18 healthy matched controls (Healthy). Interventions Not Applicable. Main Outcome Measure Correlation values between hamstring flexibility as measured by straight leg raise (SLR) and amount of hip and lumbar spine joint excursions used during standardized reaching and forward bending tasks. Results No significant correlation was found between hamstring flexibility and hip and lumbar joint excursions during forward bending tasks in the LBP or Recovered groups. Straight leg raise had a significant negative correlation with lumbar spine excursions during reaching tasks to a low target in the Healthy group (Right SLR: P=.011, Left SLR: P=.004). Conclusions Hamstring flexibility is not strongly related to the amount of lumbar flexion used to perform forward bending tasks in individuals who have chronic LBP or who have recovered from LBP. More research needs to be conducted to examine the influence of hamstring flexibility on observed movement patterns to further evaluate the efficacy of flexibility training in the rehabilitation of patients with low back pain. PMID:20599054

  11. Relation of Phanerozoic stable isotope excursions to climate, bacterial metabolism, and major extinctions

    PubMed Central

    Stanley, Steven M.

    2010-01-01

    Conspicuous global stable carbon isotope excursions that are recorded in marine sedimentary rocks of Phanerozoic age and were associated with major extinctions have generally paralleled global stable oxygen isotope excursions. All of these phenomena are therefore likely to share a common origin through global climate change. Exceptional patterns for carbon isotope excursions resulted from massive carbon burial during warm intervals of widespread marine anoxic conditions. The many carbon isotope excursions that parallel those for oxygen isotopes can to a large degree be accounted for by the Q10 pattern of respiration for bacteria: As temperature changed along continental margins, where ∼90% of marine carbon burial occurs today, rates of remineralization of isotopically light carbon must have changed exponentially. This would have reduced organic carbon burial during global warming and increased it during global cooling. Also contributing to the δ13C excursions have been release and uptake of methane by clathrates, the positive correlation between temperature and degree of fractionation of carbon isotopes by phytoplankton at temperatures below ∼15°, and increased phytoplankton productivity during “icehouse” conditions. The Q10 pattern for bacteria and climate-related changes in clathrate volume represent positive feedbacks for climate change. PMID:21041682

  12. Relation of Phanerozoic stable isotope excursions to climate, bacterial metabolism, and major extinctions.

    PubMed

    Stanley, Steven M

    2010-11-09

    Conspicuous global stable carbon isotope excursions that are recorded in marine sedimentary rocks of Phanerozoic age and were associated with major extinctions have generally paralleled global stable oxygen isotope excursions. All of these phenomena are therefore likely to share a common origin through global climate change. Exceptional patterns for carbon isotope excursions resulted from massive carbon burial during warm intervals of widespread marine anoxic conditions. The many carbon isotope excursions that parallel those for oxygen isotopes can to a large degree be accounted for by the Q10 pattern of respiration for bacteria: As temperature changed along continental margins, where ∼90% of marine carbon burial occurs today, rates of remineralization of isotopically light carbon must have changed exponentially. This would have reduced organic carbon burial during global warming and increased it during global cooling. Also contributing to the δ(13)C excursions have been release and uptake of methane by clathrates, the positive correlation between temperature and degree of fractionation of carbon isotopes by phytoplankton at temperatures below ∼15°, and increased phytoplankton productivity during "icehouse" conditions. The Q10 pattern for bacteria and climate-related changes in clathrate volume represent positive feedbacks for climate change.

  13. Habitat Demonstration Unit (HDU) Pressurized Excursion Module (PEM) Systems Integration Strategy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gill, Tracy; Merbitz, Jerad; Kennedy, Kriss; Tri, Terry; Toups, Larry; Howe, A. Scott

    2011-01-01

    The Habitat Demonstration Unit (HDU) project team constructed an analog prototype lunar surface laboratory called the Pressurized Excursion Module (PEM). The prototype unit subsystems were integrated in a short amount of time, utilizing a rapid prototyping approach that brought together over 20 habitation-related technologies from a variety of NASA centers. This paper describes the system integration strategies and lessons learned, that allowed the PEM to be brought from paper design to working field prototype using a multi-center team. The system integration process was based on a rapid prototyping approach. Tailored design review and test and integration processes facilitated that approach. The use of collaboration tools including electronic tools as well as documentation enabled a geographically distributed team take a paper concept to an operational prototype in approximately one year. One of the major tools used in the integration strategy was a coordinated effort to accurately model all the subsystems using computer aided design (CAD), so conflicts were identified before physical components came together. A deliberate effort was made following the deployment of the HDU PEM for field operations to collect lessons learned to facilitate process improvement and inform the design of future flight or analog versions of habitat systems. Significant items within those lessons learned were limitations with the CAD integration approach and the impact of shell design on flexibility of placing systems within the HDU shell.

  14. Consistency of QSAR models: Correct split of training and test sets, ranking of models and performance parameters.

    PubMed

    Rácz, A; Bajusz, D; Héberger, K

    2015-01-01

    Recent implementations of QSAR modelling software provide the user with numerous models and a wealth of information. In this work, we provide some guidance on how one should interpret the results of QSAR modelling, compare and assess the resulting models, and select the best and most consistent ones. Two QSAR datasets are applied as case studies for the comparison of model performance parameters and model selection methods. We demonstrate the capabilities of sum of ranking differences (SRD) in model selection and ranking, and identify the best performance indicators and models. While the exchange of the original training and (external) test sets does not affect the ranking of performance parameters, it provides improved models in certain cases (despite the lower number of molecules in the training set). Performance parameters for external validation are substantially separated from the other merits in SRD analyses, highlighting their value in data fusion.

  15. A Dual Hesitant Fuzzy Multigranulation Rough Set over Two-Universe Model for Medical Diagnoses

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Chao; Li, Deyu; Yan, Yan

    2015-01-01

    In medical science, disease diagnosis is one of the difficult tasks for medical experts who are confronted with challenges in dealing with a lot of uncertain medical information. And different medical experts might express their own thought about the medical knowledge base which slightly differs from other medical experts. Thus, to solve the problems of uncertain data analysis and group decision making in disease diagnoses, we propose a new rough set model called dual hesitant fuzzy multigranulation rough set over two universes by combining the dual hesitant fuzzy set and multigranulation rough set theories. In the framework of our study, both the definition and some basic properties of the proposed model are presented. Finally, we give a general approach which is applied to a decision making problem in disease diagnoses, and the effectiveness of the approach is demonstrated by a numerical example. PMID:26858772

  16. Symmetry-enriched string nets: Exactly solvable models for SET phases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinrich, Chris; Burnell, Fiona; Fidkowski, Lukasz; Levin, Michael

    2016-12-01

    We construct exactly solvable models for a wide class of symmetry-enriched topological (SET) phases. Our construction applies to two-dimensional (2D) bosonic SET phases with finite unitary on-site symmetry group G and we conjecture that our models realize every phase in this class that can be described by a commuting projector Hamiltonian. Our models are designed so that they have a special property: If we couple them to a dynamical lattice gauge field with gauge group G , the resulting gauge theories are equivalent to string-net models. This property is what allows us to analyze our models in generality. As an example, we present a model for a phase with the same anyon excitations as the toric code and with a Z2 symmetry which exchanges the e and m type anyons. We further illustrate our construction with a number of additional examples.

  17. Validation of the U.S. NRC coupled code system TRITON/TRACE/PARCS with the special power excursion reactor test III (SPERT III)

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, R. C.; Xu, Y.; Downar, T.; Hudson, N.

    2012-07-01

    The Special Power Excursion Reactor Test III (SPERT III) was a series of reactivity insertion experiments conducted in the 1950's. This paper describes the validation of the U.S. NRC Coupled Code system TRITON/PARCS/TRACE to simulate reactivity insertion accidents (RIA) by using several of the SPERT III tests. The work here used the SPERT III E-core configuration tests in which the RIA was initiated by ejecting a control rod. The resulting super-prompt reactivity excursion and negative reactivity feedback produced the familiar bell shaped power increase and decrease. The energy deposition during such a power peak has important safety consequences and provides validation basis for core coupled multi-physics codes. The transients of five separate tests are used to benchmark the PARCS/TRACE coupled code. The models were thoroughly validated using the original experiment documentation. (authors)

  18. Hyoid and laryngeal excursion kinematics - magnitude, duration and velocity - changes following successful exercise-based dysphagia rehabilitation: MDTP.

    PubMed

    Sia, I; Carvajal, P; Lacy, A A; Carnaby, G D; Crary, M A

    2015-05-01

    Variability in magnitude of deglutitional hyolaryngeal excursion in patients with dysphagia suggests that it does not adequately represent the kinematics of swallowing difficulties or recovery following rehabilitation. On the other hand, reduced hyolaryngeal excursion velocity has been reported in patients with dysphagia. While increased movement velocity often accompanies clinical and functional recovery in many diseases, velocity changes in swallowing-related movement following dysphagia therapy have not been well studied. This study evaluated changes in hyoid and laryngeal excursion (magnitude, duration and velocity) before and following successful dysphagia therapy to provide a more comprehensive representation of improvement to swallowing kinematics in patients who have experienced successful rehabilitation. A secondary analysis of case series data was completed. Eight patients with severe, chronic dysphagia completed a standard course of an exercise-based dysphagia treatment programme (McNeill dysphagia therapy program, MDTP). Pre- and post-treatment, kinematic aspects of swallowing were evaluated for thin liquid, thick liquid and pudding swallows. Maximum hyoid and laryngeal excursion magnitude and excursion duration were measured. Excursion velocities were calculated from excursion magnitude and duration measures. Successful treatment for dysphagia facilitated increased hyolaryngeal excursion magnitude, duration and velocity. These changes were most prominent for the hyoid and most often observed with thin liquids. By examining hyoid and laryngeal excursion velocity in patients who have experienced successful dysphagia rehabilitation, this study demonstrated the value of evaluating spatial and temporal aspects of swallowing kinematics in a single measure for a more comprehensive representation of positive changes underlying functional recovery.

  19. THE DEVELOPMENT AND USE OF A MODEL TO PREDICT SUSTAINABILITY OF CHANGE IN HEALTH CARE SETTINGS

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Innovations adopted through organizational change initiatives are often not sustained leading to diminished quality, productivity, and consumer satisfaction. Research explaining variance in the use of adopted innovations in health care settings is sparse, suggesting the need for a theoretical model to guide research and practice. In this article, we describe the development of a hybrid conjoint decision theoretic model designed to predict the sustainability of organizational change in health care settings. An initial test of the model’s predictive validity using expert scored hypothetic profiles resulted in an r-squared value of .77. The test of this model offers a theoretical base for future research on the sustainability of change in health care settings. PMID:22262947

  20. Neural model for learning-to-learn of novel task sets in the motor domain.

    PubMed

    Pitti, Alexandre; Braud, Raphaël; Mahé, Sylvain; Quoy, Mathias; Gaussier, Philippe

    2013-01-01

    During development, infants learn to differentiate their motor behaviors relative to various contexts by exploring and identifying the correct structures of causes and effects that they can perform; these structures of actions are called task sets or internal models. The ability to detect the structure of new actions, to learn them and to select on the fly the proper one given the current task set is one great leap in infants cognition. This behavior is an important component of the child's ability of learning-to-learn, a mechanism akin to the one of intrinsic motivation that is argued to drive cognitive development. Accordingly, we propose to model a dual system based on (1) the learning of new task sets and on (2) their evaluation relative to their uncertainty and prediction error. The architecture is designed as a two-level-based neural system for context-dependent behavior (the first system) and task exploration and exploitation (the second system). In our model, the task sets are learned separately by reinforcement learning in the first network after their evaluation and selection in the second one. We perform two different experimental setups to show the sensorimotor mapping and switching between tasks, a first one in a neural simulation for modeling cognitive tasks and a second one with an arm-robot for motor task learning and switching. We show that the interplay of several intrinsic mechanisms drive the rapid formation of the neural populations with respect to novel task sets.

  1. Root cause analysis of overlay metrology excursions with scatterometry overlay technology (SCOL)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gutjahr, Karsten; Park, Dongsuk; Zhou, Yue; Cho, Winston; Ahn, Ki Cheol; Snow, Patrick; McGowan, Richard; Marciano, Tal; Ramanathan, Vidya; Herrera, Pedro; Itzkovich, Tal; Camp, Janay; Adel, Michael

    2016-03-01

    We demonstrate a novel method to establish a root cause for an overlay excursion using optical Scatterometry metrology. Scatterometry overlay metrology consists of four cells (two per directions) of grating on grating structures that are illuminated with a laser and diffracted orders measured in the pupil plane within a certain range of aperture. State of art algorithms permit, with symmetric considerations over the targets, to extract the overlay between the two gratings. We exploit the optical properties of the target to extract further information from the measured pupil images, particularly information that maybe related to any change in the process that may lead to an overlay excursion. Root Cause Analysis or RCA is being developed to identify different kinds of process variations (either within the wafer, or between different wafers) that may indicate overlay excursions. In this manuscript, we demonstrate a collaboration between Globalfoundries and KLA-Tencor to identify a symmetric process variation using scatterometry overlay metrology and RCA technique.

  2. Influence of turbulence model parameter settings on conjugate heat transfer simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Peng; Li, Yu; Zou, Zhengping; Wang, Lei; Song, Songhe

    2014-04-01

    Rationality of the parameter settings in turbulence model is an important factor affecting the accuracy of conjugate heat transfer (CHT) prediction. On the basis of a developed CHT methodology and the experimental data of Mark// cooling turbine blade, influences of the turbulence model parameter settings and the selection of turbulence models on CHT simulation are investigated. Results and comparisons with experimental data indicate that the inlet setting of the in Spalart-Allmaras model has nearly no influence on flow and heat transfer in blade surface. The inlet turbulence length scale l T in the low-Reynolds number Chien k- ɛ turbulence model and the blade surface roughness in shear stress transport (SST) k- ω SST model have relatively obvious effects on the blade surface temperature which increases with the increase of them. Both of the laminar Prandtl number and turbulent Prandtl number have slight influences on the prediction, and they only need to be constant in CHT simulation. The k- ω SST model has the best accuracy in the turbine blade CHT simulation compared with the other two models.

  3. Using Bayesian Multilevel Whole Genome Regression Models for Partial Pooling of Training Sets in Genomic Prediction

    PubMed Central

    Technow, Frank; Totir, L. Radu

    2015-01-01

    Training set size is an important determinant of genomic prediction accuracy. Plant breeding programs are characterized by a high degree of structuring, particularly into populations. This hampers the establishment of large training sets for each population. Pooling populations increases training set size but ignores unique genetic characteristics of each. A possible solution is partial pooling with multilevel models, which allows estimating population-specific marker effects while still leveraging information across populations. We developed a Bayesian multilevel whole-genome regression model and compared its performance with that of the popular BayesA model applied to each population separately (no pooling) and to the joined data set (complete pooling). As an example, we analyzed a wide array of traits from the nested association mapping maize population. There we show that for small population sizes (e.g., <50), partial pooling increased prediction accuracy over no or complete pooling for populations represented in the training set. No pooling was superior; however, when populations were large. In another example data set of interconnected biparental maize populations either partial or complete pooling was superior, depending on the trait. A simulation showed that no pooling is superior when differences in genetic effects among populations are large and partial pooling when they are intermediate. With small differences, partial and complete pooling achieved equally high accuracy. For prediction of new populations, partial and complete pooling had very similar accuracy in all cases. We conclude that partial pooling with multilevel models can maximize the potential of pooling by making optimal use of information in pooled training sets. PMID:26024866

  4. Dynamic changes in sulfate sulfur isotopes preceding the Ediacaran Shuram Excursion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osburn, Magdalena R.; Owens, Jeremy; Bergmann, Kristin D.; Lyons, Timothy W.; Grotzinger, John P.

    2015-12-01

    Large excursions in δ13C and δ34S are found in sedimentary rocks from the Ediacaran Period that may provide detailed mechanistic information about oxidation of Earth's surface. However, poor stratigraphic resolution and diagenetic concerns have thus far limited the interpretation of these records. Here, we present a high-resolution record of carbon and sulfur isotopes from the Khufai Formation, leading up to and including the onset of the Shuram carbon isotope excursion. We document large coherent excursions in the sulfur isotope composition and concentration of carbonate-associated sulfate (CAS) that occur both independently and synchronously with the carbon isotope excursion. Isotopic changes appear decoupled from major stratigraphic surfaces and facies changes, suggesting regional or global processes rather than local controls. Our data suggest that very low marine sulfate concentrations are maintained at least through the middle-Khufai Formation and require that the burial fraction of pyrite and the fractionation factor between sulfate and pyrite necessarily change through deposition. Reconciliation of simultaneous, up-section increases in marine sulfate concentration and δ34SCAS requires the introduction of strongly 34S-enriched sulfate, possibly from weathering of Cryogenian and earlier Ediacaran 34S-enriched pyrite. Our analysis of the onset of the Shuram carbon isotope excursion, observed in stratigraphic and lithologic context, is not consistent with diagenetic or authigenic formation mechanisms. Instead, we observe a contemporaneous negative excursion in sulfate δ34S suggesting linked primary perturbations to the carbon and sulfur isotope systems. This work further constrains the size, isotopic composition, and potential input fluxes of the Ediacaran marine sulfate reservoir, placing mechanistic constraints on possible drivers of extreme isotopic perturbations during this critical period in Earth history.

  5. Improved Quaternary North Atlantic stratigraphy using relative paleointensity (RPI), oxygen isotopes, and magnetic excursions (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Channell, J. E.

    2013-12-01

    Improving the resolution of Quaternary marine stratigraphy is one of the major challenges in paleoceanography. IODP Expedition 303/306, and ODP Legs 162 and 172, have yielded multiple high-resolution records (mean sedimentation rates in the 7-20 cm/kyr range) of relative paleointensity (RPI) that are accompanied by oxygen isotope data and extend through much of the Quaternary. Tandem fit of RPI and oxygen isotope data to calibrated templates (LR04 and PISO), using the Match protocol, yields largely consistent stratigraphies, implying that both RPI and oxygen isotope data are dominated by regional/global signals. Based on the recent geomagnetic field, RPI can be expected to be a global signal (i.e. dominated by the axial dipole field) when recorded at sedimentation rates less than several decimeters/kyr. Magnetic susceptibility, on the other hand, is a local/regional lithologic signal, and therefore less useful for long-distance correlation. Magnetic excursions are directional phenomena and, when adequately recorded, are manifest as paired reversals in which the virtual geomagnetic poles (VGPs) reach high latitudes in the opposite hemisphere, and they occupy minima in RPI records. Reversed VGPs imply that excursions are attributable to the main axial dipole, and therefore provide global stratigraphy. The so-called Iceland Basin excursion is recorded at many IODP/ODP sites and lies at the MIS 6/7 boundary at ~188 ka, with a duration of 2-3 kyr. Other excursions in the Brunhes chron are less commonly recorded because their duration (perhaps <~1 kyr) requires sedimentation rates >20 cm/kyr to be adequately recorded. On the other hand, several excursions within the Matuyama Chron are more commonly recorded in North Atlantic drift sediments due to relatively elevated durations. With some notable exceptions (e.g. Iberian Margin), high quality RPI records from North Atlantic sediments, together with magnetic excursions, can be used in tandem with oxygen isotope data to

  6. Development of optimization models for the set behavior and compressive strength of sodium activated geopolymer pastes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fillenwarth, Brian Albert

    As large countries such as China begin to industrialize and concerns about global warming continue to grow, there is an increasing need for more environmentally friendly building materials. One promising material known as a geopolymer can be used as a portland cement replacement and in this capacity emits around 67% less carbon dioxide. In addition to potentially reducing carbon emissions, geopolymers can be synthesized with many industrial waste products such as fly ash. Although the benefits of geopolymers are substantial, there are a few difficulties with designing geopolymer mixes which have hindered widespread commercialization of the material. One such difficulty is the high variability of the materials used for their synthesis. In addition to this, interrelationships between mix design variables and how these interrelationships impact the set behavior and compressive strength are not well understood. A third complicating factor with designing geopolymer mixes is that the role of calcium in these systems is not well understood. In order to overcome these barriers, this study developed predictive optimization models through the use of genetic programming with experimentally collected set times and compressive strengths of several geopolymer paste mixes. The developed set behavior models were shown to predict the correct set behavior from the mix design over 85% of the time. The strength optimization model was shown to be capable of predicting compressive strengths of geopolymer pastes from their mix design to within about 1 ksi of their actual strength. In addition to this the optimization models give valuable insight into the key factors influencing strength development as well as the key factors responsible for flash set and long set behaviors in geopolymer pastes. A method for designing geopolymer paste mixes was developed from the generated optimization models. This design method provides an invaluable tool for use in future geopolymer research as well as

  7. Secondary Structure Predictions for Long RNA Sequences Based on Inversion Excursions and MapReduce.

    PubMed

    Yehdego, Daniel T; Zhang, Boyu; Kodimala, Vikram K R; Johnson, Kyle L; Taufer, Michela; Leung, Ming-Ying

    2013-05-01

    Secondary structures of ribonucleic acid (RNA) molecules play important roles in many biological processes including gene expression and regulation. Experimental observations and computing limitations suggest that we can approach the secondary structure prediction problem for long RNA sequences by segmenting them into shorter chunks, predicting the secondary structures of each chunk individually using existing prediction programs, and then assembling the results to give the structure of the original sequence. The selection of cutting points is a crucial component of the segmenting step. Noting that stem-loops and pseudoknots always contain an inversion, i.e., a stretch of nucleotides followed closely by its inverse complementary sequence, we developed two cutting methods for segmenting long RNA sequences based on inversion excursions: the centered and optimized method. Each step of searching for inversions, chunking, and predictions can be performed in parallel. In this paper we use a MapReduce framework, i.e., Hadoop, to extensively explore meaningful inversion stem lengths and gap sizes for the segmentation and identify correlations between chunking methods and prediction accuracy. We show that for a set of long RNA sequences in the RFAM database, whose secondary structures are known to contain pseudoknots, our approach predicts secondary structures more accurately than methods that do not segment the sequence, when the latter predictions are possible computationally. We also show that, as sequences exceed certain lengths, some programs cannot computationally predict pseudoknots while our chunking methods can. Overall, our predicted structures still retain the accuracy level of the original prediction programs when compared with known experimental secondary structure.

  8. A model providing long-term data sets of energetic electron precipitation during geomagnetic storms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamp, M.; Seppälä, A.; Clilverd, M. A.; Rodger, C. J.; Verronen, P. T.; Whittaker, I. C.

    2016-10-01

    The influence of solar variability on the polar atmosphere and climate due to energetic electron precipitation (EEP) has remained an open question largely due to lack of a long-term EEP forcing data set that could be used in chemistry-climate models. Motivated by this, we have developed a model for 30-1000 keV radiation belt driven EEP. The model is based on precipitation data from low Earth orbiting POES satellites in the period 2002-2012 and empirically described plasmasphere structure, which are both scaled to a geomagnetic index. This geomagnetic index is the only input of the model and can be either Dst or Ap. Because of this, the model can be used to calculate the energy-flux spectrum of precipitating electrons from 1957 (Dst) or 1932 (Ap) onward, with a time resolution of 1 day. Results from the model compare well with EEP observations over the period of 2002-2012. Using the model avoids the challenges found in measured data sets concerning proton contamination. As demonstrated, the model results can be used to produce the first ever >80 year long atmospheric ionization rate data set for radiation belt EEP. The impact of precipitation in this energy range is mainly seen at altitudes 70-110 km. The ionization rate data set, which is available for the scientific community, will enable simulations of EEP impacts on the atmosphere and climate with realistic EEP variability. Due to limitations in this first version of the model, the results most likely represent an underestimation of the total EEP effect.

  9. CUTSETS - MINIMAL CUT SET CALCULATION FOR DIGRAPH AND FAULT TREE RELIABILITY MODELS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iverson, D. L.

    1994-01-01

    Fault tree and digraph models are frequently used for system failure analysis. Both type of models represent a failure space view of the system using AND and OR nodes in a directed graph structure. Fault trees must have a tree structure and do not allow cycles or loops in the graph. Digraphs allow any pattern of interconnection between loops in the graphs. A common operation performed on digraph and fault tree models is the calculation of minimal cut sets. A cut set is a set of basic failures that could cause a given target failure event to occur. A minimal cut set for a target event node in a fault tree or digraph is any cut set for the node with the property that if any one of the failures in the set is removed, the occurrence of the other failures in the set will not cause the target failure event. CUTSETS will identify all the minimal cut sets for a given node. The CUTSETS package contains programs that solve for minimal cut sets of fault trees and digraphs using object-oriented programming techniques. These cut set codes can be used to solve graph models for reliability analysis and identify potential single point failures in a modeled system. The fault tree minimal cut set code reads in a fault tree model input file with each node listed in a text format. In the input file the user specifies a top node of the fault tree and a maximum cut set size to be calculated. CUTSETS will find minimal sets of basic events which would cause the failure at the output of a given fault tree gate. The program can find all the minimal cut sets of a node, or minimal cut sets up to a specified size. The algorithm performs a recursive top down parse of the fault tree, starting at the specified top node, and combines the cut sets of each child node into sets of basic event failures that would cause the failure event at the output of that gate. Minimal cut set solutions can be found for all nodes in the fault tree or just for the top node. The digraph cut set code uses the same

  10. Model-based setting of inspiratory pressure and respiratory rate in pressure-controlled ventilation.

    PubMed

    Schranz, C; Becher, T; Schädler, D; Weiler, N; Möller, K

    2014-03-01

    Mechanical ventilation carries the risk of ventilator-induced-lung-injury (VILI). To minimize the risk of VILI, ventilator settings should be adapted to the individual patient properties. Mathematical models of respiratory mechanics are able to capture the individual physiological condition and can be used to derive personalized ventilator settings. This paper presents model-based calculations of inspiration pressure (pI), inspiration and expiration time (tI, tE) in pressure-controlled ventilation (PCV) and a retrospective evaluation of its results in a group of mechanically ventilated patients. Incorporating the identified first order model of respiratory mechanics in the basic equation of alveolar ventilation yielded a nonlinear relation between ventilation parameters during PCV. Given this patient-specific relation, optimized settings in terms of minimal pI and adequate tE can be obtained. We then retrospectively analyzed data from 16 ICU patients with mixed pathologies, whose ventilation had been previously optimized by ICU physicians with the goal of minimization of inspiration pressure, and compared the algorithm's 'optimized' settings to the settings that had been chosen by the physicians. The presented algorithm visualizes the patient-specific relations between inspiration pressure and inspiration time. The algorithm's calculated results highly correlate to the physician's ventilation settings with r = 0.975 for the inspiration pressure, and r = 0.902 for the inspiration time. The nonlinear patient-specific relations of ventilation parameters become transparent and support the determination of individualized ventilator settings according to therapeutic goals. Thus, the algorithm is feasible for a variety of ventilated ICU patients and has the potential of improving lung-protective ventilation by minimizing inspiratory pressures and by helping to avoid the build-up of clinically significant intrinsic positive end-expiratory pressure.

  11. Masting by Betula-species; applying the resource budget model to north European data sets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ranta, Hanna; Oksanen, Annukka; Hokkanen, Tatu; Bondestam, Kristoffer; Heino, Saini

    2005-01-01

    Masting, the intermittent production of large crops of flowers by a plant population, is a common feature among trees in boreal and temperate forests. The pollen of many broadleaved trees causes allergic diseases, which are major causes of increasing health-care costs in industrialised countries. As the prevalence and severity of allergic diseases are connected with the concentrations of airborne pollen, an universal model predicting the intensity of the coming flowering would be a valuable tool for pollen information services, and ultimately for allergic people and allergologists. We investigated whether a resource budget model created in Japan explains the fluctuations in the annual pollen sums of Betula-species in north European data sets (10 12 years at 4 sites, 20 years at 10 sites). Using the shorter data sets, the model explained 76 92% of the annual fluctuations at five study sites. Using the 20-year data set, the percentage for southern Finland was much lower, only 48%, compared with the 85% of the 12-year data set. The annual pollen sums have been higher during the 1990s than in the 1980s, which may explain the ineffectiveness of the model, while applied to the 20-year data set. Our results support the resource budget model: the masting of birch species is regulated by weather factors together with the system of resource allocation among years. The model can serve pollen information service. However, only the 10 most recent years should be used to avoid interference from trends in changing vegetation and/or climate.

  12. Knowledge discovery in clinical databases based on variable precision rough set model.

    PubMed Central

    Tsumoto, S.; Ziarko, W.; Shan, N.; Tanaka, H.

    1995-01-01

    Since a large amount of clinical data are being stored electronically, discovery of knowledge from such clinical databases is one of the important growing research area in medical informatics. For this purpose, we develop KDD-R (a system for Knowledge Discovery in Databases using Rough sets), an experimental system for knowledge discovery and machine learning research using variable precision rough sets (VPRS) model, which is an extension of original rough set model. This system works in the following steps. First, it preprocesses databases and translates continuous data into discretized ones. Second, KDD-R checks dependencies between attributes and reduces spurious data. Third, the system computes rules from reduced databases. Finally, fourth, it evaluates decision making. For evaluation, this system is applied to a clinical database of meningoencephalitis, whose computational results show that several new findings are obtained. PMID:8563283

  13. Data sets for snow cover monitoring and modelling from the National Snow and Ice Data Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holm, M.; Daniels, K.; Scott, D.; McLean, B.; Weaver, R.

    2003-04-01

    A wide range of snow cover monitoring and modelling data sets are pending or are currently available from the National Snow and Ice Data Center (NSIDC). In-situ observations support validation experiments that enhance the accuracy of remote sensing data. In addition, remote sensing data are available in near-real time, providing coarse-resolution snow monitoring capability. Time series data beginning in 1966 are valuable for modelling efforts. NSIDC holdings include SMMR and SSM/I snow cover data, MODIS snow cover extent products, in-situ and satellite data collected for NASA's recent Cold Land Processes Experiment, and soon-to-be-released ASMR-E passive microwave products. The AMSR-E and MODIS sensors are part of NASA's Earth Observing System flying on the Terra and Aqua satellites Characteristics of these NSIDC-held data sets, appropriateness of products for specific applications, and data set access and availability will be presented.

  14. Mentoring for junior medical faculty: Existing models and suggestions for low-resource settings.

    PubMed

    Menon, Vikas; Muraleedharan, Aparna; Bhat, Ballambhattu Vishnu

    2016-02-01

    Globally, there is increasing recognition about the positive benefits and impact of mentoring on faculty retention rates, career satisfaction and scholarly output. However, emphasis on research and practice of mentoring is comparatively meagre in low and middle income countries. In this commentary, we critically examine two existing models of mentorship for medical faculty and offer few suggestions for an integrated hybrid model that can be adapted for use in low resource settings.

  15. Quantifying tensions between CMB and distance data sets in models with free curvature or lensing amplitude

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grandis, S.; Rapetti, D.; Saro, A.; Mohr, J. J.; Dietrich, J. P.

    2016-12-01

    Recent measurements of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) by the Planck Collaboration have produced arguably the most powerful observational evidence in support of the standard model of cosmology, i.e. the spatially flat ΛCDM paradigm. In this work, we perform model selection tests to examine whether the base CMB temperature and large scale polarization anisotropy data from Planck 2015 (P15; Planck Collaboration XIII) prefer any of eight commonly used one-parameter model extensions with respect to flat ΛCDM. We find a clear preference for models with free curvature, ΩK, or free amplitude of the CMB lensing potential, AL. We also further develop statistical tools to measure tension between data sets. We use a Gaussianization scheme to compute tensions directly from the posterior samples using an entropy-based method, the surprise, as well as a calibrated evidence ratio presented here for the first time. We then proceed to investigate the consistency between the base P15 CMB data and six other CMB and distance data sets. In flat ΛCDM we find a 4.8σ tension between the base P15 CMB data and a distance ladder measurement, whereas the former are consistent with the other data sets. In the curved ΛCDM model we find significant tensions in most of the cases, arising from the well-known low power of the low-ℓ multipoles of the CMB data. In the flat ΛCDM+AL model, however, all data sets are consistent with the base P15 CMB observations except for the CMB lensing measurement, which remains in significant tension. This tension is driven by the increased power of the CMB lensing potential derived from the base P15 CMB constraints in both models, pointing at either potentially unresolved systematic effects or the need for new physics beyond the standard flat ΛCDM model.

  16. Heat transfer in fish: are short excursions between habitats a thermoregulatory behaviour to exploit resources in an unfavourable thermal environment?

    PubMed

    Pépino, Marc; Goyer, Katerine; Magnan, Pierre

    2015-11-01

    Temperature is the primary environmental factor affecting physiological processes in ectotherms. Heat-transfer models describe how the fish's internal temperature responds to a fluctuating thermal environment. Specifically, the rate coefficient (k), defined as the instantaneous rate of change in body temperature in relation to the difference between ambient and body temperature, summarizes the combined effects of direct thermal conduction through body mass, passive convection (intracellular and intercellular fluids) and forced convective heat transfer (cardiovascular system). The k-coefficient is widely used in fish ecology to understand how body temperature responds to changes in water temperature. The main objective of this study was to estimate the k-coefficient of brook charr equipped with internal temperature-sensitive transmitters in controlled laboratory experiments. Fish were first transferred from acclimation tanks (10°C) to tanks at 14, 19 or 23°C (warming experiments) and were then returned to the acclimation tanks (10°C; cooling experiments), thus producing six step changes in ambient temperature. We used non-linear mixed models to estimate the k-coefficient. Model comparisons indicated that the model incorporating the k-coefficient as a function of absolute temperature difference (dT: 4, 9 and 13°C) best described body temperature change. By simulating body temperature in a heterogeneous thermal environment, we provide theoretical predictions of maximum excursion duration between feeding and resting areas. Our simulations suggest that short (i.e. <60 min) excursions could be a common thermoregulatory behaviour adopted by cold freshwater fish species to sustain body temperature below a critical temperature threshold, enabling them to exploit resources in an unfavourable thermal environment.

  17. Paradigms, Mental Models, and Mind-Sets: Triple Barriers to Transformational Change in School Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duffy, Francis M.

    2014-01-01

    This article presents a simile for understanding the power of paradigms, mental models, and mind-sets as religion-like phenomena. The author clarifies the meaning of the three phenomena to help readers to see how the phenomena become significant sources of resistance to change. He concludes by outlining a paradigm-shifting process to assist…

  18. Video Self-Modeling: A Job Skills Intervention with Individuals with Intellectual Disability in Employment Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goh, Ailsa E.; Bambara, Linda M.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the effectiveness of video self-modeling (VSM) to teach chained job tasks to individuals with intellectual disability in community-based employment settings. Initial empirical evaluations have demonstrated that VSM when used in combination with other instructional strategies, are effective methods to teach…

  19. Analyzing Academic Achievement of Junior High School Students by an Improved Rough Set Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pai, Ping-Feng; Lyu, Yi-Jia; Wang, Yu-Min

    2010-01-01

    Rough set theory (RST) is an emerging technique used to deal with problems in data mining and knowledge acquisition. However, the RST approach has not been widely explored in the field of academic achievement. This investigation developed an improved RST (IMRST) model, which employs linear discriminant analysis to determine a reduct of RST, and…

  20. Technology Adoption Applied to Educational Settings: Predicting Interventionists' Use of Video-Self Modeling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heckman, Andrew R.

    2010-01-01

    Technology provides educators with a significant advantage in working with today's students. One particular application of technology for the purposes of academic and behavioral interventions is the use of video self-modeling (VSM). Although VSM is an evidence-based intervention, it is rarely used in educational settings. The present research…

  1. Breaking Bad News in Counseling: Applying the PEWTER Model in the School Setting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keefe-Cooperman, Kathleen; Brady-Amoon, Peggy

    2013-01-01

    Breaking bad news is a stressful experience for counselors and clients. In this article, the PEWTER (Prepare, Evaluate, Warning, Telling, Emotional Response, Regrouping) model (Nardi & Keefe-Cooperman, 2006) is used as a guide to facilitate the process of a difficult conversation and promote client growth in a school setting. In this…

  2. Goal Setting and Performance Evaluation with Different Starting Positions: The Modeling Dilemma.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pray, Thomas F.; Gold, Steven

    1991-01-01

    Reviews 10 computerized business simulations used to teach business policy courses, discusses problems with measuring performance, and presents a statistically based approach to assessing performance that permits individual team goal setting as part of the computer model, and allows simulated firms to start with different financial and operating…

  3. A long-term data set for hydrologic modeling in a snow-dominated mountain catchment

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An hourly modeling data set is presented for the water years 1984 through 2008 for a snow-dominated headwater catchment. Meteorological forcing data and GIS watershed characteristics are described and provided. The meteorological data are measured at two sites within the catchment, and include pre...

  4. A new LPV modeling approach using PCA-based parameter set mapping to design a PSS.

    PubMed

    Jabali, Mohammad B Abolhasani; Kazemi, Mohammad H

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents a new methodology for the modeling and control of power systems based on an uncertain polytopic linear parameter-varying (LPV) approach using parameter set mapping with principle component analysis (PCA). An LPV representation of the power system dynamics is generated by linearization of its differential-algebraic equations about the transient operating points for some given specific faults containing the system nonlinear properties. The time response of the output signal in the transient state plays the role of the scheduling signal that is used to construct the LPV model. A set of sample points of the dynamic response is formed to generate an initial LPV model. PCA-based parameter set mapping is used to reduce the number of models and generate a reduced LPV model. This model is used to design a robust pole placement controller to assign the poles of the power system in a linear matrix inequality (LMI) region, such that the response of the power system has a proper damping ratio for all of the different oscillation modes. The proposed scheme is applied to controller synthesis of a power system stabilizer, and its performance is compared with a tuned standard conventional PSS using nonlinear simulation of a multi-machine power network. The results under various conditions show the robust performance of the proposed controller.

  5. Index-based groundwater vulnerability mapping models using hydrogeological settings: A critical evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Prashant; Bansod, Baban K.S.; Debnath, Sanjit K.; Thakur, Praveen Kumar; Ghanshyam, C.

    2015-02-15

    Groundwater vulnerability maps are useful for decision making in land use planning and water resource management. This paper reviews the various groundwater vulnerability assessment models developed across the world. Each model has been evaluated in terms of its pros and cons and the environmental conditions of its application. The paper further discusses the validation techniques used for the generated vulnerability maps by various models. Implicit challenges associated with the development of the groundwater vulnerability assessment models have also been identified with scientific considerations to the parameter relations and their selections. - Highlights: • Various index-based groundwater vulnerability assessment models have been discussed. • A comparative analysis of the models and its applicability in different hydrogeological settings has been discussed. • Research problems of underlying vulnerability assessment models are also reported in this review paper.

  6. Using the Many-Facet Rasch Model to Evaluate Standard-Setting Judgments: Setting Performance Standards for Advanced Placement® Examinations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaliski, Pamela; Wind, Stefanie A.; Engelhard, George, Jr.; Morgan, Deanna; Plake, Barbara; Reshetar, Rosemary

    2012-01-01

    The Many-Facet Rasch (MFR) Model is traditionally used to evaluate the quality of ratings on constructed response assessments; however, it can also be used to evaluate the quality of judgments from panel-based standard setting procedures. The current study illustrates the use of the MFR Model by examining the quality of ratings obtained from a…

  7. Model choice for phylogeographic inference using a large set of models.

    PubMed

    Pelletier, Tara A; Carstens, Bryan C

    2014-06-01

    Model-based analyses are common in phylogeographic inference because they parameterize processes such as population division, gene flow and expansion that are of interest to biologists. Approximate Bayesian computation is a model-based approach that can be customized to any empirical system and used to calculate the relative posterior probability of several models, provided that suitable models can be identified for comparison. The question of how to identify suitable models is explored using data from Plethodon idahoensis, a salamander that inhabits the North American inland northwest temperate rainforest. First, we conduct an ABC analysis using five models suggested by previous research, calculate the relative posterior probabilities and find that a simple model of population isolation has the best fit to the data (PP=0.70). In contrast to this subjective choice of models to include in the analysis, we also specify models in a more objective manner by simulating prior distributions for 143 models that included panmixia, population isolation, change in effective population size, migration and range expansion. We then identify a smaller subset of models for comparison by generating an expectation of the highest posterior probability that a false model is likely to achieve due to chance and calculate the relative posterior probabilities of only those models that exceed this expected level. A model that parameterized divergence with population expansion and gene flow in one direction offered the best fit to the P. idahoensis data (in contrast to an isolation-only model from the first analysis). Our investigation demonstrates that the determination of which models to include in ABC model choice experiments is a vital component of model-based phylogeographic analysis.

  8. Accurate Predictions of Mean Geomagnetic Dipole Excursion and Reversal Frequencies, Mean Paleomagnetic Field Intensity, and the Radius of Earth's Core Using McLeod's Rule

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Voorhies, Coerte V.; Conrad, Joy

    1996-01-01

    The geomagnetic spatial power spectrum R(sub n)(r) is the mean square magnetic induction represented by degree n spherical harmonic coefficients of the internal scalar potential averaged over the geocentric sphere of radius r. McLeod's Rule for the magnetic field generated by Earth's core geodynamo says that the expected core surface power spectrum (R(sub nc)(c)) is inversely proportional to (2n + 1) for 1 less than n less than or equal to N(sub E). McLeod's Rule is verified by locating Earth's core with main field models of Magsat data; the estimated core radius of 3485 kn is close to the seismologic value for c of 3480 km. McLeod's Rule and similar forms are then calibrated with the model values of R(sub n) for 3 less than or = n less than or = 12. Extrapolation to the degree 1 dipole predicts the expectation value of Earth's dipole moment to be about 5.89 x 10(exp 22) Am(exp 2)rms (74.5% of the 1980 value) and the expected geomagnetic intensity to be about 35.6 (mu)T rms at Earth's surface. Archeo- and paleomagnetic field intensity data show these and related predictions to be reasonably accurate. The probability distribution chi(exp 2) with 2n+1 degrees of freedom is assigned to (2n + 1)R(sub nc)/(R(sub nc). Extending this to the dipole implies that an exceptionally weak absolute dipole moment (less than or = 20% of the 1980 value) will exist during 2.5% of geologic time. The mean duration for such major geomagnetic dipole power excursions, one quarter of which feature durable axial dipole reversal, is estimated from the modern dipole power time-scale and the statistical model of excursions. The resulting mean excursion duration of 2767 years forces us to predict an average of 9.04 excursions per million years, 2.26 axial dipole reversals per million years, and a mean reversal duration of 5533 years. Paleomagnetic data show these predictions to be quite accurate. McLeod's Rule led to accurate predictions of Earth's core radius, mean paleomagnetic field

  9. Kinome-wide activity modeling from diverse public high-quality data sets.

    PubMed

    Schürer, Stephan C; Muskal, Steven M

    2013-01-28

    Large corpora of kinase small molecule inhibitor data are accessible to public sector research from thousands of journal article and patent publications. These data have been generated employing a wide variety of assay methodologies and experimental procedures by numerous laboratories. Here we ask the question how applicable these heterogeneous data sets are to predict kinase activities and which characteristics of the data sets contribute to their utility. We accessed almost 500,000 molecules from the Kinase Knowledge Base (KKB) and after rigorous aggregation and standardization generated over 180 distinct data sets covering all major groups of the human kinome. To assess the value of the data sets, we generated hundreds of classification and regression models. Their rigorous cross-validation and characterization demonstrated highly predictive classification and quantitative models for the majority of kinase targets if a minimum required number of active compounds or structure-activity data points were available. We then applied the best classifiers to compounds most recently profiled in the NIH Library of Integrated Network-based Cellular Signatures (LINCS) program and found good agreement of profiling results with predicted activities. Our results indicate that, although heterogeneous in nature, the publically accessible data sets are exceedingly valuable and well suited to develop highly accurate predictors for practical Kinome-wide virtual screening applications and to complement experimental kinase profiling.

  10. Elephants, Whales, and Dinosaurs: An Excursion into Biomechanics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGuire, Thomas

    1987-01-01

    Describes an activity designed to help children understand why there is a limit to the size of animals that live on land. Details the materials and set-up for this activity. Contains a reproducible, three-part activity sheet to accompany the activity. A key for the teacher is included. (CW)

  11. Many Parameter Sets in a Multicompartment Model Oscillator Are Robust to Temperature Perturbations

    PubMed Central

    Caplan, Jonathan S.; Williams, Alex H.

    2014-01-01

    Neurons in cold-blooded animals remarkably maintain their function over a wide range of temperatures, even though the rates of many cellular processes increase twofold, threefold, or many-fold for each 10°C increase in temperature. Moreover, the kinetics of ion channels, maximal conductances, and Ca2+ buffering each have independent temperature sensitivities, suggesting that the balance of biological parameters can be disturbed by even modest temperature changes. In stomatogastric ganglia of the crab Cancer borealis, the duty cycle of the bursting pacemaker kernel is highly robust between 7 and 23°C (Rinberg et al., 2013). We examined how this might be achieved in a detailed conductance-based model in which exponential temperature sensitivities were given by Q10 parameters. We assessed the temperature robustness of this model across 125,000 random sets of Q10 parameters. To examine how robustness might be achieved across a variable population of animals, we repeated this analysis across six sets of maximal conductance parameters that produced similar activity at 11°C. Many permissible combinations of maximal conductance and Q10 parameters were found over broad regions of parameter space and relatively few correlations among Q10s were observed across successful parameter sets. A significant portion of Q10 sets worked for at least 3 of the 6 maximal conductance sets (∼11.1%). Nonetheless, no Q10 set produced robust function across all six maximal conductance sets, suggesting that maximal conductance parameters critically contribute to temperature robustness. Overall, these results provide insight into principles of temperature robustness in neuronal oscillators. PMID:24695714

  12. Exhaustively characterizing feasible logic models of a signaling network using Answer Set Programming

    PubMed Central

    Guziolowski, Carito; Videla, Santiago; Eduati, Federica; Thiele, Sven; Cokelaer, Thomas; Siegel, Anne; Saez-Rodriguez, Julio

    2013-01-01

    Motivation: Logic modeling is a useful tool to study signal transduction across multiple pathways. Logic models can be generated by training a network containing the prior knowledge to phospho-proteomics data. The training can be performed using stochastic optimization procedures, but these are unable to guarantee a global optima or to report the complete family of feasible models. This, however, is essential to provide precise insight in the mechanisms underlaying signal transduction and generate reliable predictions. Results: We propose the use of Answer Set Programming to explore exhaustively the space of feasible logic models. Toward this end, we have developed caspo, an open-source Python package that provides a powerful platform to learn and characterize logic models by leveraging the rich modeling language and solving technologies of Answer Set Programming. We illustrate the usefulness of caspo by revisiting a model of pro-growth and inflammatory pathways in liver cells. We show that, if experimental error is taken into account, there are thousands (11 700) of models compatible with the data. Despite the large number, we can extract structural features from the models, such as links that are always (or never) present or modules that appear in a mutual exclusive fashion. To further characterize this family of models, we investigate the input–output behavior of the models. We find 91 behaviors across the 11 700 models and we suggest new experiments to discriminate among them. Our results underscore the importance of characterizing in a global and exhaustive manner the family of feasible models, with important implications for experimental design. Availability: caspo is freely available for download (license GPLv3) and as a web service at http://caspo.genouest.org/. Supplementary information: Supplementary materials are available at Bioinformatics online. Contact: santiago.videla@irisa.fr PMID:23853063

  13. Applicability domains for classification problems: Benchmarking of distance to models for Ames mutagenicity set.

    PubMed

    Sushko, Iurii; Novotarskyi, Sergii; Körner, Robert; Pandey, Anil Kumar; Cherkasov, Artem; Li, Jiazhong; Gramatica, Paola; Hansen, Katja; Schroeter, Timon; Müller, Klaus-Robert; Xi, Lili; Liu, Huanxiang; Yao, Xiaojun; Öberg, Tomas; Hormozdiari, Farhad; Dao, Phuong; Sahinalp, Cenk; Todeschini, Roberto; Polishchuk, Pavel; Artemenko, Anatoliy; Kuz'min, Victor; Martin, Todd M; Young, Douglas M; Fourches, Denis; Muratov, Eugene; Tropsha, Alexander; Baskin, Igor; Horvath, Dragos; Marcou, Gilles; Muller, Christophe; Varnek, Alexander; Prokopenko, Volodymyr V; Tetko, Igor V

    2010-12-27

    The estimation of accuracy and applicability of QSAR and QSPR models for biological and physicochemical properties represents a critical problem. The developed parameter of "distance to model" (DM) is defined as a metric of similarity between the training and test set compounds that have been subjected to QSAR/QSPR modeling. In our previous work, we demonstrated the utility and optimal performance of DM metrics that have been based on the standard deviation within an ensemble of QSAR models. The current study applies such analysis to 30 QSAR models for the Ames mutagenicity data set that were previously reported within the 2009 QSAR challenge. We demonstrate that the DMs based on an ensemble (consensus) model provide systematically better performance than other DMs. The presented approach identifies 30-60% of compounds having an accuracy of prediction similar to the interlaboratory accuracy of the Ames test, which is estimated to be 90%. Thus, the in silico predictions can be used to halve the cost of experimental measurements by providing a similar prediction accuracy. The developed model has been made publicly available at http://ochem.eu/models/1 .

  14. Use of an Anatomical Scalar to Control for Sex-Based Size Differences in Measures of Hyoid Excursion during Swallowing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Molfenter, Sonja M.; Steele, Catriona M.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Traditional methods for measuring hyoid excursion from dynamic videofluoroscopy recordings involve calculating changes in position in absolute units (mm). This method shows a high degree of variability across studies but agreement that greater hyoid excursion occurs inmen than in women. Given that men are typically taller than women, the…

  15. A theoretical and computational setting for a geometrically nonlinear gradient damage modelling framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nedjar, B.

    The present work deals with the extension to the geometrically nonlinear case of recently proposed ideas on elastic- and elastoplastic-damage modelling frameworks within the infinitesimal theory. The particularity of these models is that the damage part of the modelling involves the gradient of damage quantity which, together with the equations of motion, are ensuing from a new formulation of the principle of virtual power. It is shown how the thermodynamics of irreversible processes is crucial in the characterization of the dissipative phenomena and in setting the convenient forms for the constitutive relations. On the numerical side, we discuss the problem of numerically integrating these equations and the implementation within the context of the finite element method is described in detail. And finally, we present a set of representative numerical simulations to illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed framework.

  16. Simultaneous financial evaluation of a complex set of capital budgeting alternatives: a mathematical model.

    PubMed

    Duncan, C S

    1983-01-01

    Capital budgeting technics provide for financial evaluation of planned purchases of equipment or other major investments. In capital budgeting, the laboratorian often is faced with a complex set of alternatives, including leasing, installment purchasing, contracting work to another laboratory, and outright purchasing. This paper presents a mathematical model useful for simultaneously evaluating the financial worth of all such alternatives under the same set of assumptions. Armed with the results of financial evaluation and evaluations of quality, turnaround time, and other patient-care factors, the laboratorian can make better decisions regarding the choice of method which, in turn, will affect the productivity of the laboratory. The model is tended for application to mutually exclusive alternatives and includes three useful capital budgeting technics: (1) payback period, (2) net present value, and (3) profitability index. The technics are demonstrated as well as a method of programming the model in financial planning software for solution by microcomputer.

  17. Robust group-wise rigid registration of point sets using t-mixture model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ravikumar, Nishant; Gooya, Ali; Frangi, Alejandro F.; Taylor, Zeike A.

    2016-03-01

    A probabilistic framework for robust, group-wise rigid alignment of point-sets using a mixture of Students t-distribution especially when the point sets are of varying lengths, are corrupted by an unknown degree of outliers or in the presence of missing data. Medical images (in particular magnetic resonance (MR) images), their segmentations and consequently point-sets generated from these are highly susceptible to corruption by outliers. This poses a problem for robust correspondence estimation and accurate alignment of shapes, necessary for training statistical shape models (SSMs). To address these issues, this study proposes to use a t-mixture model (TMM), to approximate the underlying joint probability density of a group of similar shapes and align them to a common reference frame. The heavy-tailed nature of t-distributions provides a more robust registration framework in comparison to state of the art algorithms. Significant reduction in alignment errors is achieved in the presence of outliers, using the proposed TMM-based group-wise rigid registration method, in comparison to its Gaussian mixture model (GMM) counterparts. The proposed TMM-framework is compared with a group-wise variant of the well-known Coherent Point Drift (CPD) algorithm and two other group-wise methods using GMMs, using both synthetic and real data sets. Rigid alignment errors for groups of shapes are quantified using the Hausdorff distance (HD) and quadratic surface distance (QSD) metrics.

  18. PIV study of the wake of a model wind turbine transitioning between operating set points

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Houck, Dan; Cowen, Edwin (Todd)

    2016-11-01

    Wind turbines are ideally operated at their most efficient tip speed ratio for a given wind speed. There is increasing interest, however, in operating turbines at other set points to increase the overall power production of a wind farm. Specifically, Goit and Meyers (2015) used LES to examine a wind farm optimized by unsteady operation of its turbines. In this study, the wake of a model wind turbine is measured in a water channel using PIV. We measure the wake response to a change in operational set point of the model turbine, e.g., from low to high tip speed ratio or vice versa, to examine how it might influence a downwind turbine. A modified torque transducer after Kang et al. (2010) is used to calibrate in situ voltage measurements of the model turbine's generator operating across a resistance to the torque on the generator. Changes in operational set point are made by changing the resistance or the flow speed, which change the rotation rate measured by an encoder. Single camera PIV on vertical planes reveals statistics of the wake at various distances downstream as the turbine transitions from one set point to another. From these measurements, we infer how the unsteady operation of a turbine may affect the performance of a downwind turbine as its incoming flow. National Science Foundation and the Atkinson Center for a Sustainable Future.

  19. Towards deep inclusion for equity-oriented health research priority-setting: A working model.

    PubMed

    Pratt, Bridget; Merritt, Maria; Hyder, Adnan A

    2016-02-01

    Growing consensus that health research funders should align their investments with national research priorities presupposes that such national priorities exist and are just. Arguably, justice requires national health research priority-setting to promote health equity. Such a position is consistent with recommendations made by the World Health Organization and at global ministerial summits that health research should serve to reduce health inequalities between and within countries. Thus far, no specific requirements for equity-oriented research priority-setting have been described to guide policymakers. As a step towards the explication and defence of such requirements, we propose that deep inclusion is a key procedural component of equity-oriented research priority-setting. We offer a model of deep inclusion that was developed by applying concepts from work on deliberative democracy and development ethics. This model consists of three dimensions--breadth, qualitative equality, and high-quality non-elite participation. Deep inclusion is captured not only by who is invited to join a decision-making process but also by how they are involved and by when non-elite stakeholders are involved. To clarify and illustrate the proposed dimensions, we use the sustained example of health systems research. We conclude by reviewing practical challenges to achieving deep inclusion. Despite the existence of barriers to implementation, our model can help policymakers and other stakeholders design more inclusive national health research priority-setting processes and assess these processes' depth of inclusion.

  20. Truth, models, model sets, AIC, and multimodel inference: a Bayesian perspective

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barker, Richard J.; Link, William A.

    2015-01-01

    Statistical inference begins with viewing data as realizations of stochastic processes. Mathematical models provide partial descriptions of these processes; inference is the process of using the data to obtain a more complete description of the stochastic processes. Wildlife and ecological scientists have become increasingly concerned with the conditional nature of model-based inference: what if the model is wrong? Over the last 2 decades, Akaike's Information Criterion (AIC) has been widely and increasingly used in wildlife statistics for 2 related purposes, first for model choice and second to quantify model uncertainty. We argue that for the second of these purposes, the Bayesian paradigm provides the natural framework for describing uncertainty associated with model choice and provides the most easily communicated basis for model weighting. Moreover, Bayesian arguments provide the sole justification for interpreting model weights (including AIC weights) as coherent (mathematically self consistent) model probabilities. This interpretation requires treating the model as an exact description of the data-generating mechanism. We discuss the implications of this assumption, and conclude that more emphasis is needed on model checking to provide confidence in the quality of inference.

  1. GeneTopics - interpretation of gene sets via literature-driven topic models

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Annotation of a set of genes is often accomplished through comparison to a library of labelled gene sets such as biological processes or canonical pathways. However, this approach might fail if the employed libraries are not up to date with the latest research, don't capture relevant biological themes or are curated at a different level of granularity than is required to appropriately analyze the input gene set. At the same time, the vast biomedical literature offers an unstructured repository of the latest research findings that can be tapped to provide thematic sub-groupings for any input gene set. Methods Our proposed method relies on a gene-specific text corpus and extracts commonalities between documents in an unsupervised manner using a topic model approach. We automatically determine the number of topics summarizing the corpus and calculate a gene relevancy score for each topic allowing us to eliminate non-specific topics. As a result we obtain a set of literature topics in which each topic is associated with a subset of the input genes providing directly interpretable keywords and corresponding documents for literature research. Results We validate our method based on labelled gene sets from the KEGG metabolic pathway collection and the genetic association database (GAD) and show that the approach is able to detect topics consistent with the labelled annotation. Furthermore, we discuss the results on three different types of experimentally derived gene sets, (1) differentially expressed genes from a cardiac hypertrophy experiment in mice, (2) altered transcript abundance in human pancreatic beta cells, and (3) genes implicated by GWA studies to be associated with metabolite levels in a healthy population. In all three cases, we are able to replicate findings from the original papers in a quick and semi-automated manner. Conclusions Our approach provides a novel way of automatically generating meaningful annotations for gene sets that are directly

  2. Constitutive modeling of Radiation effects on the Permanent Set in a silicone elastomer

    SciTech Connect

    Maiti, A; Gee, R; Weisgraber, T; Chinn, S; Maxwell, R

    2008-03-10

    When a networked polymeric composite under high stress is subjected to irradiation, the resulting chemical changes like chain scissioning and cross-link formation can lead to permanent set and altered elastic modulus. Using a commercial silicone elastomer as a specific example we show that a simple 2-stage Tobolsky model in conjunction with Fricker's stress-transfer function can quantitatively reproduce all experimental data as a function of radiation dosage and the static strain at which radiation is turned on, including permanent set, stress-strain response, and net cross-linking density.

  3. Mathematical modeling of vibrations in turbogenerator sets of Sayano-Shushenskaya Hydroelectric Power Station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leonov, G. A.; Kuznetsov, N. V.; Solovyeva, E. P.

    2016-02-01

    Oscillations in turbogenerator sets, which consist of a synchronous generator, a hydraulic turbine, and an automatic speed regulator, are investigated. This study was motivated by the emergency that took place at the Sayano-Shushenskaya Hydroelectric Power Station in 2009. During modeling of the parameters of turbogenerator sets of the Sayano-Shushenskaya Hydroelectric Power Station, the ranges corresponding to undesired oscillation regimes were determined. These ranges agree with the results of the full-scale tests of the hydropower units of the Sayano-Shushenskaya Hydroelectric Power Station performed in 1988.

  4. Elastic model-based segmentation of 3-D neuroradiological data sets.

    PubMed

    Kelemen, A; Székely, G; Gerig, G

    1999-10-01

    This paper presents a new technique for the automatic model-based segmentation of three-dimensional (3-D) objects from volumetric image data. The development closely follows the seminal work of Taylor and Cootes on active shape models, but is based on a hierarchical parametric object description rather than a point distribution model. The segmentation system includes both the building of statistical models and the automatic segmentation of new image data sets via a restricted elastic deformation of shape models. Geometric models are derived from a sample set of image data which have been segmented by experts. The surfaces of these binary objects are converted into parametric surface representations, which are normalized to get an invariant object-centered coordinate system. Surface representations are expanded into series of spherical harmonics which provide parametric descriptions of object shapes. It is shown that invariant object surface parametrization provides a good approximation to automatically determine object homology in terms of sets of corresponding sets of surface points. Gray-level information near object boundaries is represented by 1-D intensity profiles normal to the surface. Considering automatic segmentation of brain structures as our driving application, our choice of coordinates for object alignment was the well-accepted stereotactic coordinate system. Major variation of object shapes around the mean shape, also referred to as shape eigenmodes, are calculated in shape parameter space rather than the feature space of point coordinates. Segmentation makes use of the object shape statistics by restricting possible elastic deformations into the range of the training shapes. The mean shapes are initialized in a new data set by specifying the landmarks of the stereotactic coordinate system. The model elastically deforms, driven by the displacement forces across the object's surface, which are generated by matching local intensity profiles. Elastic

  5. Multicultural Group Work on Field Excursions to Promote Student Teachers' Intercultural Competence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brendel, Nina; Aksit, Fisun; Aksit, Selahattin; Schrüfer, Gabriele

    2016-01-01

    As a response to the intercultural challenges of Geography Education, this study seeks to determine factors fostering intercultural competence of student teachers. Based on a one-week multicultural field excursion of eight German and eight Turkish students in Kayseri (Turkey) on Education for Sustainable Development, we used qualitative interviews…

  6. IDEA: A Language Learning Excursion: Making Communication Central in the Community College Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, David

    1996-01-01

    Notes that one way to ensure that students understand the importance of developing communicative abilities is to utilize Spanish language resources in the United States, as in an excursion to a "tienda" (shop), where they negotiate with the Spanish-speaking owner. (seven references) (Author/CK)

  7. The Carnian (Late Triassic) carbon isotope excursion: new insights from the terrestrial realm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Charlotte; Kürschner, Wolfram; Peterse, Francien; Baranyi, Viktoria; Reichart, Gert-Jan

    2016-04-01

    The geological record contains evidence for numerous pronounced perturbations in the global carbon cycle, some of which are associated with eruptions from large igneous provinces (LIP), and consequently, ocean acidification and mass extinction. In the Carnian (Late Triassic), evidence from sedimentology and fossil pollen points to a significant change in climate, resulting in biotic turnover: during a period termed the 'Carnian Pluvial Event' (CPE). Additionally, during the Carnian, large volumes of flood basalts were erupted from the Wrangellia LIP (western North America). Evidence from the marine realm suggests a fundamental relationship between the CPE, a global 'wet' period, and the injection of light carbon into the atmosphere from the LIP. Here we provide the first evidence from the terrestrial realm of a significant negative δ13C excursion through the CPE recorded in the sedimentary archive of the Wiscombe Park Borehole, Devon (UK). Both total organic matter and plant leaf waxes reflect a gradual carbon isotope excursion of ~-5‰ during this time interval. Our data provides evidence for the global nature of this isotope excursion, supporting the hypothesis that the excursion was likely the result of an injection of light carbon into the atmosphere from the Wrangellia LIP.

  8. Engaging students in research learning experiences through hydrology field excursions and short films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ewen, Tracy; Seibert, Jan

    2015-04-01

    One of the best ways to engage students and instill enthusiasm for hydrology is to expose them to hands-on learning. A focus on hydrology field research can be used to develop context-rich and active learning, and help solidify idealized learning where students are introduced to individual processes through textbook examples, often neglecting process interactions and an appreciation for the complexity of the system. We introduced a field course where hydrological measurement techniques are used to study processes such as snow hydrology and runoff generation, while also introducing students to field research and design of their own field project. Additionally, we produced short films of each of these research-based field excursions, with in-house film expertise. These films present a short overview of field methods applied in alpine regions and will be used for our larger introductory hydrology courses, exposing students to field research at an early stage, and for outreach activities, including for potential high school students curious about hydrology. In the field course, students design a low-budget experiment with the aim of going through the different steps of a 'real' scientific project, from formulating the research question to presenting their results. During the field excursions, students make discharge measurements in several alpine streams with a salt tracer to better understand the spatial characteristics of an alpine catchment, where source waters originate and how they contribute to runoff generation. Soil moisture measurements taken by students in this field excursion were used to analyze spatial soil moisture patterns in the alpine catchment and subsequently used in a publication. Another field excursion repeats a published experiment, where preferential soil flow paths are studied using a tracer and compared to previously collected data. For each field excursion, observational data collected by the students is uploaded to an online database we

  9. Description of a practice model for pharmacist medication review in a general practice setting

    PubMed Central

    Brandt, Mette; Hallas, Jesper; Graabæk, Trine; Pottegård, Anton

    2014-01-01

    Background Practical descriptions of procedures used for pharmacists’ medication reviews are sparse. Objective To describe a model for medication review by pharmacists tailored to a general practice setting. Methods A stepwise model is described. The model is based on data from the medical chart and clinical or laboratory data. The medication review focuses on the diagnoses of the patient instead of the individual drugs. Patient interviews are not part of the model. The model was tested in a pilot study by conducting medical reviews on 50 polypharmacy patients (i.e. receiving 7 or more drugs for regular use). Results The model contained seven main steps. Information about the patient and current treatment was collected in the first three steps, followed by identification of possible interventions related to either diagnoses or drugs in the fourth and fifth step. The sixth and seventh step concerned the reporting of interventions and the considerations of the GPs. 208 interventions were proposed among the 50 patients. The acceptance rate among the GPs was 82%. The most common interventions were lack of clinical or laboratory data (n=57, 27%) and drugs that should be discontinued as they had no indication (n=47, 23%). Most interventions were aimed at cardiovascular drugs. Conclusion We have provided a detailed description of a practical approach to pharmacists’ medication review in a GP setting. The model was tested and found to be usable, and to deliver a medication review with high acceptance rates. PMID:25243030

  10. ImSET 3.1: Impact of Sector Energy Technologies Model Description and User's Guide

    SciTech Connect

    Scott, Michael J.; Livingston, Olga V.; Balducci, Patrick J.; Roop, Joseph M.; Schultz, Robert W.

    2009-05-22

    This 3.1 version of the Impact of Sector Energy Technologies (ImSET) model represents the next generation of the previously-built ImSET model (ImSET 2.0) that was developed in 2005 to estimate the macroeconomic impacts of energy-efficient technology in buildings. In particular, a special-purpose version of the Benchmark National Input-Output (I-O) model was designed specifically to estimate the national employment and income effects of the deployment of Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)–developed energy-saving technologies. In comparison with the previous versions of the model, this version features the use of the U.S. Bureau of Economic Analysis 2002 national input-output table and the central processing code has been moved from the FORTRAN legacy operating environment to a modern C++ code. ImSET is also easier to use than extant macroeconomic simulation models and incorporates information developed by each of the EERE offices as part of the requirements of the Government Performance and Results Act. While it does not include the ability to model certain dynamic features of markets for labor and other factors of production featured in the more complex models, for most purposes these excluded features are not critical. The analysis is credible as long as the assumption is made that relative prices in the economy would not be substantially affected by energy efficiency investments. In most cases, the expected scale of these investments is small enough that neither labor markets nor production cost relationships should seriously affect national prices as the investments are made. The exact timing of impacts on gross product, employment, and national wage income from energy efficiency investments is not well-enough understood that much special insight can be gained from the additional dynamic sophistication of a macroeconomic simulation model. Thus, we believe that this version of ImSET is a cost-effective solution to estimating the economic

  11. Aerostructural Level Set Topology Optimization for a Common Research Model Wing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunning, Peter D.; Stanford, Bret K.; Kim, H. Alicia

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this work is to use level set topology optimization to improve the design of a representative wing box structure for the NASA common research model. The objective is to minimize the total compliance of the structure under aerodynamic and body force loading, where the aerodynamic loading is coupled to the structural deformation. A taxi bump case was also considered, where only body force loads were applied. The trim condition that aerodynamic lift must balance the total weight of the aircraft is enforced by allowing the root angle of attack to change. The level set optimization method is implemented on an unstructured three-dimensional grid, so that the method can optimize a wing box with arbitrary geometry. Fast matching and upwind schemes are developed for an unstructured grid, which make the level set method robust and efficient. The adjoint method is used to obtain the coupled shape sensitivities required to perform aerostructural optimization of the wing box structure.

  12. An intelligent knowledge mining model for kidney cancer using rough set theory.

    PubMed

    Durai, M A Saleem; Acharjya, D P; Kannan, A; Iyengar, N Ch Sriman Narayana

    2012-01-01

    Medical diagnosis processes vary in the degree to which they attempt to deal with different complicating aspects of diagnosis such as relative importance of symptoms, varied symptom pattern and the relation between diseases themselves. Rough set approach has two major advantages over the other methods. First, it can handle different types of data such as categorical, numerical etc. Secondly, it does not make any assumption like probability distribution function in stochastic modeling or membership grade function in fuzzy set theory. It involves pattern recognition through logical computational rules rather than approximating them through smooth mathematical functional forms. In this paper we use rough set theory as a data mining tool to derive useful patterns and rules for kidney cancer faulty diagnosis. In particular, the historical data of twenty five research hospitals and medical college is used for validation and the results show the practical viability of the proposed approach.

  13. A Model Plan for the Supervision and Evaluation of Therapy Services in Educational Settings. TIES: Therapy in Educational Settings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reed, Penny; And Others

    The manual serves as a model for school districts developing procedures for supervising and evaluating their therapy services. The narrative is addressed to therapists rather than supervisors so that school districts can photocopy or adapt sections of the manual and assemble customized manuals for therapists in their programs. The first chapter,…

  14. Modeling bacterial colonization and infection routes in health care settings: analytic and numerical approaches.

    PubMed

    Simon, Carl P; Percha, Bethany; Riolo, Rick; Foxman, Betsy

    2013-10-07

    Health-care associated infections are a major problem in our society, accounting for tens of thousands of patient deaths and millions of dollars in wasted health care expenditures each year. Many of these infections are caused by bacteria that are transmitted from patient to patient either through direct contact or via the hands or clothing of health care workers. Because of the complexity of bacterial transmission routes in health care settings, computational approaches are essential, though often analytically intractable. Here we describe the construction and detailed analysis of a model for bacterial transmission in health care settings. Our model includes both colonization and disease stages for patients and health care workers, as well as an isolation ward and both patient-patient and patient-HCW-patient transmission pathways. We explicitly derive the basic reproductive ratio for this complex model, a nine-term expression that contains all nine ways with which a new colonization can occur. Using key parameters found in the medical literature, we use our model to gain insight into the relative importance of various bacterial transmission pathways within health care facilities, and to identify which forms of interventions are likely to prove most effective in hospitals and long-term care settings. We show that analytical and numerical approaches can complement each other as we seek to untangle the complex web of interactions that occur within a health care facility.

  15. A paradigm for human body finite element model integration from a set of regional models.

    PubMed

    Thompson, A B; Gayzik, F S; Moreno, D P; Rhyne, A C; Vavalle, N A; Stitzel, J D

    2012-01-01

    Computational modeling offers versatility, scalability, and cost advantages to researchers in the trauma and injury biomechanics communities. The Global Human Body Models Consortium (GHBMC) is a group of government, industry, and academic researchers developing human body models (HBMs) that aim to become the standard tool to meet this growing research need. The objective of this study is to present the methods used to develop the average seated male occupant model (M50, weight = 78 kg, height = 175 cm) from five separately validated body region models (BRMs). BRMs include the head, neck, thorax, abdomen, and a combined pelvis and lower extremity model. Modeling domains were split at the atlanto-occipital joint, C7-T1 boundary, diaphragm, abdominal cavity (peritoneum/retroperitoneum), and the acetabulum respectively. BRM meshes are based on a custom CAD model of the seated male built from a multi-modality imaging protocol of a volunteer subject found in literature.[1] Various meshing techniques were used to integrate the full body model (FBM) including 1-D beam and discrete element connections (e.g. ligamentous structures), 2D shell nodal connections (e.g. inferior vena cava to right atrium), 3D hexahedral nodal connections (e.g. soft tissue envelope connections between regions), and contact definitions varying from tied (muscle insertions) to sliding (liver and diaphragm contact). The model was developed in a general-purpose finite element code, LS-Dyna (LTSC, Livermore, CA) R4.2.1., and consists of 1.95 million elements and 1.3 million nodes. The element breakdown by type is 41% hexahedral, 33.7% tetrahedral, 19.5% quad shells and 5% tria shell. The integration methodology presented highlights the viability of using a collaborative development paradigm for the construction of HBMs, and will be used as template for expanding the suite of GHBMC models.

  16. SAF - Sets and Fields parallel I/O and scientific data modeling system

    SciTech Connect

    Matzke, Robb; Illescas, Eric; Espen, Peter; Jones, Jake S.; Sjaardema, Gregory; Miller, Mark C.; Schoof, Larry A.; Reus, James F.; Arrighi, William; Hitt, Ray T.; O'Brien, Matthew J.

    2005-07-01

    SAF is being developed as part of the Data Models and Formats (DMF) component of the Accelerated Strategic Computing Initiative (ASCI). SAF represents a revolutionary approach to interoperation of high performance, scientific computing applications based upon rigorous, math oriented data modeling principles. Previous technologies have required all applications to use the same data structures and/or mesh objects to represent scientific data or lead to an ever expanding set of incrementally different data structures and/or mesh objects. SAF addresses this problem by providing a small set of mathematical building blocks, sets, relations and fields, out of which a wide variety of scientific data can be characterized. Applications literally model their data by assembling these building blocks. Sets and fields building blocks are at once, both primitive and abstract: * They are primitive enough to model a wide variety of scientific data. * They are abstract enough to model the data in terms of what it represents in a mathematical or physical sense independent of how it is represented in an implementation sense. For example, while there are many ways to represent the airflow over the wing of a supersonic aircraft in a computer program, there is only one mathematical/physical interpretation: a field of 3D velocity vectors over a 2D surface. This latter description is immutable. It is independent of any particular representation or implementation choices. Understanding this what versus how relationship, that is what is represented versus how it is represented, is key to developing a solution for large scale integration of scientific software.

  17. Timing of Carbon isotope excursions during the late Triassic and early Jurassic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yager, J. A.; West, A. J.; Corsetti, F. A.; Berelson, W.; Bottjer, D. J.; Rosas, S.

    2015-12-01

    The emplacement of the Central Atlantic Magmatic Province during the late Triassic and early Jurassic is implicated in the end-Triassic mass extinction and is associated with dramatic increases in atmospheric pCO2. Changes in the isotopic composition of CO2 as recorded on land and in the ocean have been observed in many sections worldwide, but the timing and causes of the changes are debated. Recent high-resolution ash bed dating (Schaltegger et al., 2008; Schoene et al., 2010; Guex et al., 2012; Wotzlaw et al., 2014) from a continuous Rhaetian-Hettangian section near Levanto, Peru, provide an opportunity to understand the duration of these carbon cycle disruptions, and ammonite biostratigraphy allows comparison to other sections. We measured % organic carbon and % inorganic carbon along with δ13Corganic and δ13Ccarbonate at the section near Levanto. We find a series of δ13Corganic excursions that are similar to those found in other Triassic-Jurassic successions, both from the Tethyan (St. Audrie's Bay, UK) and Panthalassic oceans (Kennecott Point, CAN), pointing to the global extent of these changes. At Levanto, we can identify a brief, initial positive carbon isotope excursion followed first by a sharp negative excursion that coincides with the last appearance of Triassic ammonites, and then a more extended positive carbon isotope excursion that extends into the initial Jurassic recovery. Using the ash bed dates from Levanto, we are able for the first time to estimate robustly the duration of each carbon isotope excursion across the Triassic-Jurassic interval. These estimates of durations aid in our understanding of timing and causes of carbon cycle perturbations associated with the emplacement of CAMP and its relation to mass extinction.

  18. The Palaeocene-Eocene carbon isotope excursion: constraints from individual shell planktonic foraminifer records.

    PubMed

    Zachos, James C; Bohaty, Steven M; John, Cedric M; McCarren, Heather; Kelly, Daniel C; Nielsen, Tina

    2007-07-15

    The Palaeocene-Eocene thermal maximum (PETM) is characterized by a global negative carbon isotope excursion (CIE) and widespread dissolution of seafloor carbonate sediments. The latter feature supports the hypothesis that the PETM and CIE were caused by the rapid release of a large mass (greater than 2000Gt C) of 12C-enriched carbon. The source of this carbon, however, remains a mystery. Possible sources include volcanically driven thermal combustion of organic-rich sediment, dissociation of seafloor methane hydrates and desiccation and oxidation of soil/sediment organics. A key constraint on the source(s) is the rate at which the carbon was released. Fast rates would be consistent with a catastrophic event, e.g. massive methane hydrate dissociation, whereas slower rates might implicate other processes. The PETM carbon flux is currently constrained by high-resolution marine and terrestrial records of the CIE. In pelagic bulk carbonate records, the onset of the CIE is often expressed as a single- or multiple-step excursion extending over 10(4) years. Individual planktonic shell records, in contrast, always show a single-step CIE, with either pre-excursion or excursion isotope values, but no transition values. Benthic foraminifera records, which are less complete owing to extinction and diminutive assemblages, show a delayed excursion. Here, we compile and evaluate the individual planktonic shell isotope data from several localities. We find that the most expanded records consistently show a bimodal isotope distribution pattern regardless of location, water depth or depositional facies. This suggests one of several possibilities: (i) the isotopic composition of the surface ocean/atmosphere declined in a geologic instant (<500yr), (ii) that during the onset of the CIE, most shells of mixed-layer planktonic foraminifera were dissolved, or (iii) the abundances or shell production of these species temporarily declined, possibly due to initial pH changes.

  19. Into the deep: the functionality of mesopelagic excursions by an oceanic apex predator.

    PubMed

    Howey, Lucy A; Tolentino, Emily R; Papastamatiou, Yannis P; Brooks, Edward J; Abercrombie, Debra L; Watanabe, Yuuki Y; Williams, Sean; Brooks, Annabelle; Chapman, Demian D; Jordan, Lance K B

    2016-08-01

    Comprehension of ecological processes in marine animals requires information regarding dynamic vertical habitat use. While many pelagic predators primarily associate with epipelagic waters, some species routinely dive beyond the deep scattering layer. Actuation for exploiting these aphotic habitats remains largely unknown. Recent telemetry data from oceanic whitetip sharks (Carcharhinus longimanus) in the Atlantic show a strong association with warm waters (>20°C) less than 200 m. Yet, individuals regularly exhibit excursions into the meso- and bathypelagic zone. In order to examine deep-diving behavior in oceanic whitetip sharks, we physically recovered 16 pop-up satellite archival tags and analyzed the high-resolution depth and temperature data. Diving behavior was evaluated in the context of plausible functional behavior hypotheses including interactive behaviors, energy conservation, thermoregulation, navigation, and foraging. Mesopelagic excursions (n = 610) occurred throughout the entire migratory circuit in all individuals, with no indication of site specificity. Six depth-versus-time descent and ascent profiles were identified. Descent profile shapes showed little association with examined environmental variables. Contrastingly, ascent profile shapes were related to environmental factors and appear to represent unique behavioral responses to abiotic conditions present at the dive apex. However, environmental conditions may not be the sole factors influencing ascents, as ascent mode may be linked to intentional behaviors. While dive functionality remains unconfirmed, our study suggests that mesopelagic excursions relate to active foraging behavior or navigation. Dive timing, prey constituents, and dive shape support foraging as the most viable hypothesis for mesopelagic excursions, indicating that the oceanic whitetip shark may regularly survey extreme environments (deep depths, low temperatures) as a foraging strategy. At the apex of these deep

  20. Environmental forcing of terrestrial carbon isotope excursion amplification across five Eocene hyperthermals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowen, G. J.; Abels, H.

    2015-12-01

    Abrupt changes in the isotope composition of exogenic carbon pools accompany many major episodes of global change in the geologic record. The global expression of this change in substrates that reflect multiple carbon pools provides important evidence that many events reflect persistent, global redistribution of carbon between reduced and oxidized stocks. As the diversity of records documenting any event grows, however, discrepancies in the expression of carbon isotope change among substrates are almost always revealed. These differences in magnitude, pace, and pattern of change can complicate interpretations of global carbon redistribution, but under ideal circumstances can also provide additional information on changes in specific environmental and biogeochemical systems that accompanied the global events. Here we evaluate possible environmental influences on new terrestrial records of the negative carbon isotope excursions (CIEs) associated with multiple hyperthermals of the Early Eocene, which show a common pattern of amplified carbon isotope change in terrestrial paleosol carbonate records relative to that recorded in marine substrates. Scaling relationships between climate and carbon-cycle proxies suggest that that the climatic (temperature) impact of each event scaled proportionally with the magnitude of its marine CIE, likely implying that all events involved release of reduced carbon with a similar isotopic composition. Amplification of the terrestrial CIEs, however, does not scale with event magnitude, being proportionally less for the first, largest event (the PETM). We conduct a sensitivity test of a coupled plant-soil carbon isotope model to identify conditions that could account for the observed CIE scaling. At least two possibilities consistent with independent lines of evidence emerge: first, varying effects of pCO2 change on photosynthetic carbon isotope discrimination under changing background pCO2, and second, contrasting changes in regional

  1. Star Excursion Balance Test Anterior Asymmetry Is Associated With Injury Status in Division I Collegiate Athletes.

    PubMed

    Stiffler, Mikel R; Bell, David R; Sanfilippo, Jennifer L; Hetzel, Scott J; Pickett, Kristen A; Heiderscheit, Bryan C

    2017-03-29

    Study Design Retrospective cohort. Background Star Excursion Balance Test (SEBT) performance differs by sport in healthy collegiate athletes and lower extremity injury rates also vary among sports, sex, and athletic exposure. The relationship between SEBT performance and injury risk has not been evaluated with consideration of these additional variables which may be necessary to fully describe the relationship between SEBT performance and injury risk. Objectives To assess the association between pre-season SEBT performance and non-contact injury occurrence to the knee or ankle in Division I collegiate athletes when controlling for sport, sex, and athletic exposure. Methods SEBT performance, starting status, and injury status were reviewed retrospectively for NCAA Division I collegiate athletes from a single institution. A total of 147 athletes were healthy at the time of pre-season SEBT testing and either remained healthy (N=118) or sustained a non-contact injury to the knee or ankle (N=29) during their sport's subsequent competitive season. Side-to-side asymmetries were calculated in each direction as the absolute difference in reach distance between limbs. SEBT reach distances and asymmetries were compared between groups using multivariable regression controlling for sport, sex, and athletic exposure (starter, non-starter). ROC curves were used to determine optimal sensitivity and specificity for significant models. Results When controlling for sport, sex, and athletic exposure, the SEBT ANT direction side-to-side asymmetry, expressed as an absolute or normalized to limb length, discriminated between injured and non-injured athletes (AUCs >0.82). Conclusion Assessing side-to-side reach asymmetry in the ANT direction of the SEBT may assist in identifying collegiate athletes who are at risk for sustaining non-contact injuries to the knee or ankle. Level of Evidence Prognosis, level 2b. J Orthop Sports Phys Ther, Epub 29 Mar 2017. doi:10.2519/jospt.2017.6974.

  2. Galectin-3 Reflects Mitral Annular Plane Systolic Excursion Being Assessed by Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Seung-Hyun; Natale, Michele; Hoffmann, Julia; Reckord, Nadine; Hoffmann, Ursula; Budjan, Johannes; Henzler, Thomas; Papavassiliu, Theano; Borggrefe, Martin; Bertsch, Thomas; Akin, Ibrahim

    2016-01-01

    Background. This study investigates whether serum levels of galectin-3 may reflect impaired mitral annular plane systolic excursion (MAPSE) in patients undergoing cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (cMRI). Methods. Patients undergoing cMRI during routine clinical care were included prospectively within an all-comers design. Blood samples for biomarker measurements were collected within 24 hours following cMRI. Statistical analyses were performed in all patients and in three subgroups according to MAPSE (MAPSE I: ≥11 mm, MAPSE II: ≥8 mm–<11 mm, and MAPSE III: <8 mm). Patients with right ventricular dysfunction (<50%) were excluded. Results. 84 patients were included in the study. Median LVEF was 59% (IQR 51–64%). Galectin-3 correlated significantly with NT-proBNP (r = 0.42, p = 0.0001). Galectin-3 increased significantly according to the different stages of impaired MAPSE (p = 0.006) and was able to discriminate both patients with impaired MAPSE <11 mm (area under the curve (AUC) = 0.645, p = 0.024) and <8 mm (AUC = 0.733, p = 0.003). Combining galectin-3 with NT-proBNP improved discrimination of MAPSE <8 mm (AUC 0.803, p = 0.0001). In multivariable logistic regression models galectin-3 was still associated with impaired MAPSE (MAPSE < 11 mm: odds ratio (OR) = 3.53, p = 0.018; MAPSE < 8 mm: OR = 3.18, p = 0.06). Conclusions. Galectin-3 reflects MAPSE being assessed by cardiac MRI. PMID:28044067

  3. Impact of CAMEX-4 Data Sets for Hurricane Forecasts using a Global Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kamineni, Rupa; Krishnamurti, T. N.; Pattnaik, S.; Browell, Edward V.; Ismail, Syed; Ferrare, Richard A.

    2005-01-01

    This study explores the impact on hurricane data assimilation and forecasts from the use of dropsondes and remote-sensed moisture profiles from the airborne Lidar Atmospheric Sensing Experiment (LASE) system. We show that the use of these additional data sets, above those from the conventional world weather watch, has a positive impact on hurricane predictions. The forecast tracks and intensity from the experiments show a marked improvement compared to the control experiment where such data sets were excluded. A study of the moisture budget in these hurricanes showed enhanced evaporation and precipitation over the storm area. This resulted in these data sets making a large impact on the estimate of mass convergence and moisture fluxes, which were much smaller in the control runs. Overall this study points to the importance of high vertical resolution humidity data sets for improved model results. We note that the forecast impact from the moisture profiling data sets for some of the storms is even larger than the impact from the use of dropwindsonde based winds.

  4. Regionalisation of statistical model outputs creating gridded data sets for Germany

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Höpp, Simona Andrea; Rauthe, Monika; Deutschländer, Thomas

    2016-04-01

    The goal of the German research program ReKliEs-De (regional climate projection ensembles for Germany, http://.reklies.hlug.de) is to distribute robust information about the range and the extremes of future climate for Germany and its neighbouring river catchment areas. This joint research project is supported by the German Federal Ministry of Education and Research (BMBF) and was initiated by the German Federal States. The Project results are meant to support the development of adaptation strategies to mitigate the impacts of future climate change. The aim of our part of the project is to adapt and transfer the regionalisation methods of the gridded hydrological data set (HYRAS) from daily station data to the station based statistical regional climate model output of WETTREG (regionalisation method based on weather patterns). The WETTREG model output covers the period of 1951 to 2100 with a daily temporal resolution. For this, we generate a gridded data set of the WETTREG output for precipitation, air temperature and relative humidity with a spatial resolution of 12.5 km x 12.5 km, which is common for regional climate models. Thus, this regionalisation allows comparing statistical to dynamical climate model outputs. The HYRAS data set was developed by the German Meteorological Service within the German research program KLIWAS (www.kliwas.de) and consists of daily gridded data for Germany and its neighbouring river catchment areas. It has a spatial resolution of 5 km x 5 km for the entire domain for the hydro-meteorological elements precipitation, air temperature and relative humidity and covers the period of 1951 to 2006. After conservative remapping the HYRAS data set is also convenient for the validation of climate models. The presentation will consist of two parts to present the actual state of the adaptation of the HYRAS regionalisation methods to the statistical regional climate model WETTREG: First, an overview of the HYRAS data set and the regionalisation

  5. Software tools that facilitate kinetic modelling with large data sets: an example using growth modelling in sugarcane.

    PubMed

    Uys, L; Hofmeyr, J H S; Snoep, J L; Rohwer, J M

    2006-09-01

    A solution to manage cumbersome data sets associated with large modelling projects is described. A kinetic model of sucrose accumulation in sugarcane is used to predict changes in sucrose metabolism with sugarcane internode maturity. This results in large amounts of output data to be analysed. Growth is simulated by reassigning maximal activity values, specific to each internode of the sugarcane plant, to parameter attributes of a model object. From a programming perspective, only one model definition file is required for the simulation software used; however, the amount of input data increases with each extra interrnode that is modelled, and likewise the amount of output data that is generated also increases. To store, manipulate and analyse these data, the modelling was performed from within a spreadsheet. This was made possible by the scripting language Python and the modelling software PySCeS through an embedded Python interpreter available in the Gnumeric spreadsheet program.

  6. Multiple data sets and modelling choices in a comparative LCA of disposable beverage cups.

    PubMed

    van der Harst, Eugenie; Potting, José; Kroeze, Carolien

    2014-10-01

    This study used multiple data sets and modelling choices in an environmental life cycle assessment (LCA) to compare typical disposable beverage cups made from polystyrene (PS), polylactic acid (PLA; bioplastic) and paper lined with bioplastic (biopaper). Incineration and recycling were considered as waste processing options, and for the PLA and biopaper cup also composting and anaerobic digestion. Multiple data sets and modelling choices were systematically used to calculate average results and the spread in results for each disposable cup in eleven impact categories. The LCA results of all combinations of data sets and modelling choices consistently identify three processes that dominate the environmental impact: (1) production of the cup's basic material (PS, PLA, biopaper), (2) cup manufacturing, and (3) waste processing. The large spread in results for impact categories strongly overlaps among the cups, however, and therefore does not allow a preference for one type of cup material. Comparison of the individual waste treatment options suggests some cautious preferences. The average waste treatment results indicate that recycling is the preferred option for PLA cups, followed by anaerobic digestion and incineration. Recycling is slightly preferred over incineration for the biopaper cups. There is no preferred waste treatment option for the PS cups. Taking into account the spread in waste treatment results for all cups, however, none of these preferences for waste processing options can be justified. The only exception is composting, which is least preferred for both PLA and biopaper cups. Our study illustrates that using multiple data sets and modelling choices can lead to considerable spread in LCA results. This makes comparing products more complex, but the outcomes more robust.

  7. Analysis of Atmospheric Aerosol Data Sets and Application of Radiative Transfer Models to Compute Aerosol Effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmid, Beat; Bergstrom, Robert W.; Redemann, Jens

    2002-01-01

    This report is the final report for "Analysis of Atmospheric Aerosol Data Sets and Application of Radiative Transfer Models to Compute Aerosol Effects". It is a bibliographic compilation of 29 peer-reviewed publications (published, in press or submitted) produced under this Cooperative Agreement and 30 first-authored conference presentations. The tasks outlined in the various proposals are listed below with a brief comment as to the research performed. Copies of title/abstract pages of peer-reviewed publications are attached.

  8. Comparison of Computed SAR Focus-Setting Curves with Model Predictions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-01-01

    optimal focus-setting velocity for azimuthally-traveling long surface waves occurs at one-half of the phase speed of the dominant wave . The computed...phase velocity or the orbital velocity of the wave . An important part of the paper involves the manner in which the data is analyzed Wc-&hew that...to obtain the optimally-focused image. One popular model favors the use of phase velocity of the long waves being imaged, while another favors the

  9. Agenda Setting for Health Promotion: Exploring an Adapted Model for the Social Media Era

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background The foundation of best practice in health promotion is a robust theoretical base that informs design, implementation, and evaluation of interventions that promote the public’s health. This study provides a novel contribution to health promotion through the adaptation of the agenda-setting approach in response to the contribution of social media. This exploration and proposed adaptation is derived from a study that examined the effectiveness of Twitter in influencing agenda setting among users in relation to road traffic accidents in Saudi Arabia. Objective The proposed adaptations to the agenda-setting model to be explored reflect two levels of engagement: agenda setting within the social media sphere and the position of social media within classic agenda setting. This exploratory research aims to assess the veracity of the proposed adaptations on the basis of the hypotheses developed to test these two levels of engagement. Methods To validate the hypotheses, we collected and analyzed data from two primary sources: Twitter activities and Saudi national newspapers. Keyword mentions served as indicators of agenda promotion; for Twitter, interactions were used to measure the process of agenda setting within the platform. The Twitter final dataset comprised 59,046 tweets and 38,066 users who contributed by tweeting, replying, or retweeting. Variables were collected for each tweet and user. In addition, 518 keyword mentions were recorded from six popular Saudi national newspapers. Results The results showed significant ratification of the study hypotheses at both levels of engagement that framed the proposed adaptions. The results indicate that social media facilitates the contribution of individuals in influencing agendas (individual users accounted for 76.29%, 67.79%, and 96.16% of retweet impressions, total impressions, and amplification multipliers, respectively), a component missing from traditional constructions of agenda-setting models. The influence

  10. Testing and Application in Mission Critical Settings and Transmission, Siting, and Metrics Models Research

    SciTech Connect

    Rich Sedano-Regulatory Assistance Project; Mariana Uhrlaub

    2006-10-31

    The Distributed Generation: Testing and Application in Mission Critical Settings and Transmission, Siting, and Metrics Models Research grant has been in place for several years and has accomplished all the objectives and deliverables that were originally set forth in the proposal. The National Association of State Energy Officials (NASEO), the City of Portland, OR, Bureau of Environmental Services and the Regulatory Assistance Project (RAP) have been able to successfully monitor and evaluate DG applications in a wastewater treatment plant environment, develop a metrics model for new voluntary DG guidelines that could be used as a prototype, and through outreach and education venues provide the results of these projects to state, professional, and national organizations and their members addressing similar issues. This project had three specific tasks associated with it: (1) Field Research and Testing; (2) Metrics/Verification Model for DG Guidelines; and (3) Northeastern Transmission/Siting Data Research. Each task had its own set of challenges and lessons learned but overall there were many successes that will serve as learning opportunities in these technology areas. Continuing to share the outcomes of this project with a wider audience will be beneficial for all those involved in distributed generation and combined heat and power projects.

  11. Northern Russian chironomid-based modern summer temperature data set and inference models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nazarova, Larisa; Self, Angela E.; Brooks, Stephen J.; van Hardenbroek, Maarten; Herzschuh, Ulrike; Diekmann, Bernhard

    2015-11-01

    West and East Siberian data sets and 55 new sites were merged based on the high taxonomic similarity, and the strong relationship between mean July air temperature and the distribution of chironomid taxa in both data sets compared with other environmental parameters. Multivariate statistical analysis of chironomid and environmental data from the combined data set consisting of 268 lakes, located in northern Russia, suggests that mean July air temperature explains the greatest amount of variance in chironomid distribution compared with other measured variables (latitude, longitude, altitude, water depth, lake surface area, pH, conductivity, mean January air temperature, mean July air temperature, and continentality). We established two robust inference models to reconstruct mean summer air temperatures from subfossil chironomids based on ecological and geographical approaches. The North Russian 2-component WA-PLS model (RMSEPJack = 1.35 °C, rJack2 = 0.87) can be recommended for application in palaeoclimatic studies in northern Russia. Based on distinctive chironomid fauna and climatic regimes of Kamchatka the Far East 2-component WAPLS model (RMSEPJack = 1.3 °C, rJack2 = 0.81) has potentially better applicability in Kamchatka.

  12. Plane surface suddenly set in motion in a viscoelastic fluid with fractional Maxwell model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wenchang, Tan; Mingyu, Xu

    2002-08-01

    The fractional calculus approach in the constitutive relationship model of viscoelastic fluid is introduced. The flow near a wall suddenly set in motion is studied for a non-Newtonian viscoelastic fluid with the fractional Maxwell model. Exact solutions of velocity and stress are obtained by using the discrete inverse Laplace transform of the sequential fractional derivatives. It is found that the effect of the fractional orders in the constitutive relationship on the flow field is significant. The results show that for small times there are appreciable viscoelastic effects on the shear stress at the plate, for large times the viscoelastic effects become weak.

  13. A long-term data set for hydrologic modeling in a snow-dominated mountain catchment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reba, Michele L.; Marks, Danny; Seyfried, Mark; Winstral, Adam; Kumar, Mukesh; Flerchinger, Gerald

    2011-07-01

    A modeling data set (meteorological forcing data, geographic information system data, and validation data) is presented for water years 1984 through 2008 for a snow-dominated mountain catchment. The forcing data include hourly precipitation, wind speed and direction, air and soil temperature, relative humidity, dew point temperature, and incoming solar and thermal radiation from two sites. Validation data include stream discharge, snow water equivalent, snow depth, soil moisture, and groundwater elevation. These data will improve the development, testing, and application of the next generation of hydrologic models.

  14. Using climate models to estimate the quality of global observational data sets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massonnet, François; Bellprat, Omar; Guemas, Virginie; Doblas-Reyes, Francisco J.

    2016-10-01

    Observational estimates of the climate system are essential to monitoring and understanding ongoing climate change and to assessing the quality of climate models used to produce near- and long-term climate information. This study poses the dual and unconventional question: Can climate models be used to assess the quality of observational references? We show that this question not only rests on solid theoretical grounds but also offers insightful applications in practice. By comparing four observational products of sea surface temperature with a large multimodel climate forecast ensemble, we find compelling evidence that models systematically score better against the most recent, advanced, but also most independent product. These results call for generalized procedures of model-observation comparison and provide guidance for a more objective observational data set selection.

  15. Informed consent in the NICU setting: an ethically optimal model for research solicitation.

    PubMed

    Golec, Lisa; Gibbins, Sharyn; Dunn, Michael S; Hebert, Philip

    2004-12-01

    Recruiting patients for studies in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit is a complex endeavour. Much discussion has occurred regarding the optimal recruitment "model" for this environment. This paper discusses current and suggested recruitment models for the NICU setting and presents a systematic approach to the consent process that focuses on the protection and promotion of parental autonomy. The proposed model incorporates several key considerations for an ethically optimal approach to the inclusion of neonates in research: informing parents about research and their rights prior to any solicitation, asking parents if they wish to be approached for research, approaching for one study at a time, assuring the study is relevant to the infants' current clinical status, minimising information overload, allowing parents appropriate time (which will vary from study to study) to consider their choice, and providing a waiting period between subsequent approaches. It is argued that parental ability to make a truly informed choice may be improved when following the proposed model.

  16. A connectionist model for convex-hull of a planar set.

    PubMed

    Datta, A; Pal, S; Pal, N R

    2000-04-01

    A neural network model is proposed for computation of the convex-hull of a finite planar set. The model is self-organizing in that it adapts itself to the hull-vertices of the convex-hull in an orderly fashion without any supervision. The proposed network consists of three layers of processors. The bottom layer computes the activation functions, the outputs of which are passed onto the middle layer. The middle layer is used for winner selection. These information are passed onto the topmost layer as well as fed back to the bottom layer. The network in the topmost layer self-organizes by labeling the hull-processors in an orderly fashion so that the final convex-hull is obtained from the topmost layer. Time complexities of the proposed model are analyzed and are compared with existing models of similar nature.

  17. Modified graphical autocatalytic set model of combustion process in circulating fluidized bed boiler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yusof, Nurul Syazwani; Bakar, Sumarni Abu; Ismail, Razidah

    2014-07-01

    Circulating Fluidized Bed Boiler (CFB) is a device for generating steam by burning fossil fuels in a furnace operating under a special hydrodynamic condition. Autocatalytic Set has provided a graphical model of chemical reactions that occurred during combustion process in CFB. Eight important chemical substances known as species were represented as nodes and catalytic relationships between nodes are represented by the edges in the graph. In this paper, the model is extended and modified by considering other relevant chemical reactions that also exist during the process. Catalytic relationship among the species in the model is discussed. The result reveals that the modified model is able to gives more explanation of the relationship among the species during the process at initial time t.

  18. Tree-Ring Proxies of Hydroclimate Variability in the Great Lakes Region during Cold Excursions Back to 15ka

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panyushkina, I. P.; Leavitt, S. W.

    2014-12-01

    A decade-long investigation of subfossil wood buried in glacio-fluvial, fluvial and lacustrine deposits from the U.S. Great Lakes region has resulted in a Great Lakes tree-ring network (GLTRN) comprising 47 sites dated from ca. 15 ka to 3ka. The GLTRN provides high-resolution proxies for exploration of local and regional responses to hydroclimate change at inter-annual scales during the transition from the Late Pleistocene to the Holocene. Classification of radiometric ages of GLTRN wood with relative cumulative-probability function delineates intervals and importance of hydrological changes in time and space. The overwhelming majority of wood burial events correlate with generally cold climate excursions. Forest-stand deterioration and tree mortality events at the studied sites are demonstrated to result from flooding, via river aggradation (identifying occurrence of extreme hydrologic events), rise of water table, or lake inundation. To better evaluate the special patterns of hydrological change back to 15ka, we developed four floating d13C chronologies from spruce tree rings. The length of these tree-ring proxy series that capture high-frequency moisture variability of the Great Lakes area ranges from 120 to 250 years. Our data indicate progressive wet intervals during the cold excursions precisely dated with 14C tree-ring wiggles at 13.7ka, 12.1ka, and 11.3ka that fall in the Bølling-Allerød and Pre-Boreal Interstadials, and Younger Dryas Stadial. The inter-annual and decadal variability of tree-ring moisture proxies are similar across the studied locations and time intervals. Such coherence of respective proxies may result from both local ecological stability of spruce communities or regional response to a common source of moisture at the studied time intervals and locations. This study demonstrates a potential of GLTRN proxies for modeling hydroclimatic changes at the North American continent back 15 ka.

  19. Data, models, and views: towards integration of diverse numerical model components and data sets for scientific and public dissemination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofmeister, Richard; Lemmen, Carsten; Nasermoaddeli, Hassan; Klingbeil, Knut; Wirtz, Kai

    2015-04-01

    Data and models for describing coastal systems span a diversity of disciplines, communities, ecosystems, regions and techniques. Previous attempts of unifying data exchange, coupling interfaces, or metadata information have not been successful. We introduce the new Modular System for Shelves and Coasts (MOSSCO, http://www.mossco.de), a novel coupling framework that enables the integration of a diverse array of models and data from different disciplines relating to coastal research. In the MOSSCO concept, the integrating framework imposes very few restrictions on contributed data or models; in fact, there is no distinction made between data and models. The few requirements are: (1) principle coupleability, i.e. access to I/O and timing information in submodels, which has recently been referred to as the Basic Model Interface (BMI) (2) open source/open data access and licencing and (3) communication of metadata, such as spatiotemporal information, naming conventions, and physical units. These requirements suffice to integrate different models and data sets into the MOSSCO infrastructure and subsequently built a modular integrated modeling tool that can span a diversity of processes and domains. We demonstrate how diverse coastal system constituents were integrated into this modular framework and how we deal with the diverging development of constituent data sets and models at external institutions. Finally, we show results from simulations with the fully coupled system using OGC WebServices in the WiMo geoportal (http://kofserver3.hzg.de/wimo), from where stakeholders can view the simulation results for further dissemination.

  20. Terminator field-aligned current system: A new finding from model-assimilated data set (MADS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, L.; Schunk, R. W.; Scherliess, L.; Sojka, J. J.; Gardner, L. C.; Eccles, J. V.; Rice, D.

    2013-12-01

    Physics-based data assimilation models have been recognized by the space science community as the most accurate approach to specify and forecast the space weather of the solar-terrestrial environment. The model-assimilated data sets (MADS) produced by these models constitute an internally consistent time series of global three-dimensional fields whose accuracy can be estimated. Because of its internal consistency of physics and completeness of descriptions on the status of global systems, the MADS has also been a powerful tool to identify the systematic errors in measurements, reveal the missing physics in physical models, and discover the important dynamical physical processes that are inadequately observed or missed by measurements due to observational limitations. In the past years, we developed a data assimilation model for the high-latitude ionospheric plasma dynamics and electrodynamics. With a set of physical models, an ensemble Kalman filter, and the ingestion of data from multiple observations, the data assimilation model can produce a self-consistent time-series of the complete descriptions of the global high-latitude ionosphere, which includes the convection electric field, horizontal and field-aligned currents, conductivity, as well as 3-D plasma densities and temperatures, In this presentation, we will show a new field-aligned current system discovered from the analysis of the MADS produced by our data assimilation model. This new current system appears and develops near the ionospheric terminator. The dynamical features of this current system will be described and its connection to the active role of the ionosphere in the M-I coupling will be discussed.

  1. Power excursion analysis for BWR`s at high burnup

    SciTech Connect

    Diamond, D.J.; Neymoith, L.; Kohut, P.

    1996-03-01

    A study has been undertaken to determine the fuel enthalpy during a rod drop accident and during two thermal-hydraulic transients. The objective was to understand the consequences to high burnup fuel and the sources of uncertainty in the calculations. The analysis was done with RAMONA-4B, a computer code that models the neutron kinetics throughout the core along with the thermal-hydraulics in the core, vessel, and steamline. The results showed that the maximum fuel enthalpy in high burnup fuel will be affected by core design, initial conditions, and modeling assumptions. The important parameters in each of these categories are discussed in the paper.

  2. Iron in galaxy groups and clusters: confronting galaxy evolution models with a newly homogenized data set

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yates, Robert M.; Thomas, Peter A.; Henriques, Bruno M. B.

    2017-01-01

    We present an analysis of the iron abundance in the hot gas surrounding galaxy groups and clusters. To do this, we first compile and homogenize a large data set of 79 low-redshift (tilde{z} = 0.03) systems (159 individual measurements) from the literature. Our analysis accounts for differences in aperture size, solar abundance, and cosmology, and scales all measurements using customized radial profiles for the temperature (T), gas density (ρgas), and iron abundance (ZFe). We then compare this data set to groups and clusters in the L-GALAXIES galaxy evolution model. Our homogenized data set reveals a tight T-ZFe relation for clusters, with a scatter in ZFe of only 0.10 dex and a slight negative gradient. After examining potential measurement biases, we conclude that some of this negative gradient has a physical origin. Our model suggests greater accretion of hydrogen in the hottest systems, via stripping from infalling satellites, as a cause. In groups, L-GALAXIES over-estimates ZFe, indicating that metal-rich gas removal (via e.g. AGN feedback) is required. L-GALAXIES is consistent with the observed ZFe in the intracluster medium (ICM) of the hottest clusters at z = 0, and shows a similar rate of ICM enrichment as that observed from at least z ˜ 1.3 to the present day. This is achieved without needing to modify any of the galactic chemical evolution (GCE) model parameters. However, the ZFe in intermediate-T clusters could be under-estimated in our model. We caution that modifications to the GCE modelling to correct this disrupt the agreement with observations of galaxies' stellar components.

  3. Modeling the Formation Process of Grouping Stimuli Sets through Cortical Columns and Microcircuits to Feature Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Williamson, Adam

    2013-01-01

    A computational model of a self-structuring neuronal net is presented in which repetitively applied pattern sets induce the formation of cortical columns and microcircuits which decode distinct patterns after a learning phase. In a case study, it is demonstrated how specific neurons in a feature classifier layer become orientation selective if they receive bar patterns of different slopes from an input layer. The input layer is mapped and intertwined by self-evolving neuronal microcircuits to the feature classifier layer. In this topical overview, several models are discussed which indicate that the net formation converges in its functionality to a mathematical transform which maps the input pattern space to a feature representing output space. The self-learning of the mathematical transform is discussed and its implications are interpreted. Model assumptions are deduced which serve as a guide to apply model derived repetitive stimuli pattern sets to in vitro cultures of neuron ensembles to condition them to learn and execute a mathematical transform. PMID:24369455

  4. Modeling the formation process of grouping stimuli sets through cortical columns and microcircuits to feature neurons.

    PubMed

    Klefenz, Frank; Williamson, Adam

    2013-01-01

    A computational model of a self-structuring neuronal net is presented in which repetitively applied pattern sets induce the formation of cortical columns and microcircuits which decode distinct patterns after a learning phase. In a case study, it is demonstrated how specific neurons in a feature classifier layer become orientation selective if they receive bar patterns of different slopes from an input layer. The input layer is mapped and intertwined by self-evolving neuronal microcircuits to the feature classifier layer. In this topical overview, several models are discussed which indicate that the net formation converges in its functionality to a mathematical transform which maps the input pattern space to a feature representing output space. The self-learning of the mathematical transform is discussed and its implications are interpreted. Model assumptions are deduced which serve as a guide to apply model derived repetitive stimuli pattern sets to in vitro cultures of neuron ensembles to condition them to learn and execute a mathematical transform.

  5. H2RM: A Hybrid Rough Set Reasoning Model for Prediction and Management of Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Rahman; Hussain, Jamil; Siddiqi, Muhammad Hameed; Hussain, Maqbool; Lee, Sungyoung

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes is a chronic disease characterized by high blood glucose level that results either from a deficiency of insulin produced by the body, or the body’s resistance to the effects of insulin. Accurate and precise reasoning and prediction models greatly help physicians to improve diagnosis, prognosis and treatment procedures of different diseases. Though numerous models have been proposed to solve issues of diagnosis and management of diabetes, they have the following drawbacks: (1) restricted one type of diabetes; (2) lack understandability and explanatory power of the techniques and decision; (3) limited either to prediction purpose or management over the structured contents; and (4) lack competence for dimensionality and vagueness of patient’s data. To overcome these issues, this paper proposes a novel hybrid rough set reasoning model (H2RM) that resolves problems of inaccurate prediction and management of type-1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) and type-2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). For verification of the proposed model, experimental data from fifty patients, acquired from a local hospital in semi-structured format, is used. First, the data is transformed into structured format and then used for mining prediction rules. Rough set theory (RST) based techniques and algorithms are used to mine the prediction rules. During the online execution phase of the model, these rules are used to predict T1DM and T2DM for new patients. Furthermore, the proposed model assists physicians to manage diabetes using knowledge extracted from online diabetes guidelines. Correlation-based trend analysis techniques are used to manage diabetic observations. Experimental results demonstrate that the proposed model outperforms the existing methods with 95.9% average and balanced accuracies. PMID:26151207

  6. H2RM: A Hybrid Rough Set Reasoning Model for Prediction and Management of Diabetes Mellitus.

    PubMed

    Ali, Rahman; Hussain, Jamil; Siddiqi, Muhammad Hameed; Hussain, Maqbool; Lee, Sungyoung

    2015-07-03

    Diabetes is a chronic disease characterized by high blood glucose level that results either from a deficiency of insulin produced by the body, or the body's resistance to the effects of insulin. Accurate and precise reasoning and prediction models greatly help physicians to improve diagnosis, prognosis and treatment procedures of different diseases. Though numerous models have been proposed to solve issues of diagnosis and management of diabetes, they have the following drawbacks: (1) restricted one type of diabetes; (2) lack understandability and explanatory power of the techniques and decision; (3) limited either to prediction purpose or management over the structured contents; and (4) lack competence for dimensionality and vagueness of patient's data. To overcome these issues, this paper proposes a novel hybrid rough set reasoning model (H2RM) that resolves problems of inaccurate prediction and management of type-1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) and type-2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). For verification of the proposed model, experimental data from fifty patients, acquired from a local hospital in semi-structured format, is used. First, the data is transformed into structured format and then used for mining prediction rules. Rough set theory (RST) based techniques and algorithms are used to mine the prediction rules. During the online execution phase of the model, these rules are used to predict T1DM and T2DM for new patients. Furthermore, the proposed model assists physicians to manage diabetes using knowledge extracted from online diabetes guidelines. Correlation-based trend analysis techniques are used to manage diabetic observations. Experimental results demonstrate that the proposed model outperforms the existing methods with 95.9% average and balanced accuracies.

  7. Beyond Maximum Independent Set: AN Extended Model for Point-Feature Label Placement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haunert, Jan-Henrik; Wolff, Alexander

    2016-06-01

    Map labeling is a classical problem of cartography that has frequently been approached by combinatorial optimization. Given a set of features in the map and for each feature a set of label candidates, a common problem is to select an independent set of labels (that is, a labeling without label-label overlaps) that contains as many labels as possible and at most one label for each feature. To obtain solutions of high cartographic quality, the labels can be weighted and one can maximize the total weight (rather than the number) of the selected labels. We argue, however, that when maximizing the weight of the labeling, interdependences between labels are insufficiently addressed. Furthermore, in a maximum-weight labeling, the labels tend to be densely packed and thus the map background can be occluded too much. We propose extensions of an existing model to overcome these limitations. Since even without our extensions the problem is NP-hard, we cannot hope for an efficient exact algorithm for the problem. Therefore, we present a formalization of our model as an integer linear program (ILP). This allows us to compute optimal solutions in reasonable time, which we demonstrate for randomly generated instances.

  8. QSAR modeling of a set of pyrazinoate esters as antituberculosis prodrugs.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, João P S; Pasqualoto, Kerly F M; Felli, Veni M A; Ferreira, Elizabeth I; Brandt, Carlos A

    2010-02-01

    Tuberculosis is an infection caused mainly by Mycobacterium tuberculosis. A first-line antimycobacterial drug is pyrazinamide (PZA), which acts partially as a prodrug activated by a pyrazinamidase releasing the active agent, pyrazinoic acid (POA). As pyrazinoic acid presents some difficulty to cross the mycobacterial cell wall, and also the pyrazinamide-resistant strains do not express the pyrazinamidase, a set of pyrazinoic acid esters have been evaluated as antimycobacterial agents. In this work, a QSAR approach was applied to a set of forty-three pyrazinoates against M. tuberculosis ATCC 27294, using genetic algorithm function and partial least squares regression (WOLF 5.5 program). The independent variables selected were the Balaban index (J), calculated n-octanol/water partition coefficient (ClogP), van-der-Waals surface area, dipole moment, and stretching-energy contribution. The final QSAR model (N = 32, r(2) = 0.68, q(2) = 0.59, LOF = 0.25, and LSE = 0.19) was fully validated employing leave-N-out cross-validation and y-scrambling techniques. The test set (N = 11) presented an external prediction power of 73%. In conclusion, the QSAR model generated can be used as a valuable tool to optimize the activity of future pyrazinoic acid esters in the designing of new antituberculosis agents.

  9. Recognition of Early Eocene global carbon isotope excursions using lipids of marine Thaumarchaeota

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schoon, Petra L.; Heilmann-Clausen, Claus; Pagh Schultz, Bo; Sluijs, Appy; Sinninghe Damsté, Jaap S.; Schouten, Stefan

    2013-07-01

    The Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum (PETM; ˜56 Ma) and Eocene Thermal Maximum 2 (ETM2; ˜53 Ma) are geological short (<200,000 years) episodes of extreme global warming and environmental change. Both the PETM and ETM2 are associated with the injection of 13C-depleted carbon into the ocean-atmosphere system as revealed through a globally recognized carbon isotope excursion (CIE) and massive dissolution of deep sea carbonate. However, the magnitude of these CIEs vary with the type of fossil matter, i.e. multiple carbonate phases, bulk organic matter, and terrestrial and marine biomarker lipids, making it difficult to constrain the actual CIE in atmospheric and oceanic carbon pools. Here we analyzed the stable carbon isotopic composition (δ13C) of glycerol dibiphytanyl glycerol tetraether lipids (GDGTs) derived from marine Thaumarchaeota in sediments deposited during the PETM in the North Sea Basin and ETM2 in the Arctic Ocean. The δ13C values of these lipids are potentially directly recording variations in δ13C dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) and can thus provide a record of marine δ13C DIC across both these Eocene carbon cycle perturbations. Reconstructed pre-CIE δ13CDIC values are slightly lower (0.5-1‰) than modern day values, possibly because Thaumarchaeotal lipids are not only derived from surface waters but also from 13C-depleted subsurface waters. Their values decrease by ˜3.6 (±0.3) ‰ and ˜2.5 (±0.7)‰ during the PETM and ETM2, respectively. The CIE in crenarchaeol for ETM2 is higher than that in marine calcite from other locations, possibly because of the admixture of deep water 13C-depleted CO2 generated by the euxinic conditions that developed occasionally during ETM2. However, the reconstructed PETM CIE lies close to the CIE inferred from marine calcite, suggesting that the δ13C record of crenarchaeol may document changes in marine DIC during the PETM in the North Sea Basin. The δ13C of thaumarchaeotal lipids may thus be a novel tool to

  10. How can mathematical models advance tuberculosis control in high HIV prevalence settings?

    PubMed

    Houben, R M G J; Dowdy, D W; Vassall, A; Cohen, T; Nicol, M P; Granich, R M; Shea, J E; Eckhoff, P; Dye, C; Kimerling, M E; White, R G

    2014-05-01

    Existing approaches to tuberculosis (TB) control have been no more than partially successful in areas with high human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) prevalence. In the context of increasingly constrained resources, mathematical modelling can augment understanding and support policy for implementing those strategies that are most likely to bring public health and economic benefits. In this paper, we present an overview of past and recent contributions of TB modelling in this key area, and suggest a way forward through a modelling research agenda that supports a more effective response to the TB-HIV epidemic, based on expert discussions at a meeting convened by the TB Modelling and Analysis Consortium. The research agenda identified high-priority areas for future modelling efforts, including 1) the difficult diagnosis and high mortality of TB-HIV; 2) the high risk of disease progression; 3) TB health systems in high HIV prevalence settings; 4) uncertainty in the natural progression of TB-HIV; and 5) combined interventions for TB-HIV. Efficient and rapid progress towards completion of this modelling agenda will require co-ordination between the modelling community and key stakeholders, including advocates, health policy makers, donors and national or regional finance officials. A continuing dialogue will ensure that new results are effectively communicated and new policy-relevant questions are addressed swiftly.

  11. Cost accounting models used for price-setting of health services: an international review.

    PubMed

    Raulinajtys-Grzybek, Monika

    2014-12-01

    The aim of the article was to present and compare cost accounting models which are used in the area of healthcare for pricing purposes in different countries. Cost information generated by hospitals is further used by regulatory bodies for setting or updating prices of public health services. The article presents a set of examples from different countries of the European Union, Australia and the United States and concentrates on DRG-based payment systems as they primarily use cost information for pricing. Differences between countries concern the methodology used, as well as the data collection process and the scope of the regulations on cost accounting. The article indicates that the accuracy of the calculation is only one of the factors that determine the choice of the cost accounting methodology. Important aspects are also the selection of the reference hospitals, precise and detailed regulations and the existence of complex healthcare information systems in hospitals.

  12. "no snow - no skiing excursion - consequences of climatic change?"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neunzig, Thilo

    2014-05-01

    Climatology and climate change have become central topics in Geography at our school. Because of that we set up a climatological station at our school. The data are an important basis to observe sudden changes in the weather. The present winter (2013/2014) shows the importance of climate change in Alzey / Germany. In winter many students think of the yearly skiing trip to Schwaz / Austria which is part of our school programme. Due to that the following questions arise: Will skiing still be possible if climate change accelerates? How are the skiing regions in the Alpes going to change? What will happen in about 20 years? How does artificial snow change the landscape and the skiing sport? Students have to be aware of the ecological damage of skiing trips. Each class has to come up with a concept how these trips can be as environmentally friendly as possible. - the trip is for a restricted number of students only (year 8 only) - a small skiing region is chosen which is not overcrowded - snow has to be guaranteed in the ski area to avoid the production of artificial snow (avoidance of high water consumption) - the bus arrives with a class and returns with the one that had been there before These are but a few ideas of students in order to make their trip as environmentally friendly as possible. What is missing is only what is going to happen in the future. What will be the effect of climate change for skiing regions in the secondary mountains? How is the average temperature for winter going to develop? Are there possibilities for summer tourism (e.g. hiking) instead of skiing in winter? The students are going to try to find answers to these questions which are going to be presented on a poster on the GIFT-Workshop in Vienna.

  13. Developing interpretable models with optimized set reduction for identifying high risk software components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Briand, Lionel C.; Basili, Victor R.; Hetmanski, Christopher J.

    1993-01-01

    Applying equal testing and verification effort to all parts of a software system is not very efficient, especially when resources are limited and scheduling is tight. Therefore, one needs to be able to differentiate low/high fault frequency components so that testing/verification effort can be concentrated where needed. Such a strategy is expected to detect more faults and thus improve the resulting reliability of the overall system. This paper presents the Optimized Set Reduction approach for constructing such models, intended to fulfill specific software engineering needs. Our approach to classification is to measure the software system and build multivariate stochastic models for predicting high risk system components. We present experimental results obtained by classifying Ada components into two classes: is or is not likely to generate faults during system and acceptance test. Also, we evaluate the accuracy of the model and the insights it provides into the error making process.

  14. The Chronic Care Model and Diabetes Management in US Primary Care Settings: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Stellefson, Michael; Stopka, Christine

    2013-01-01

    Introduction The Chronic Care Model (CCM) uses a systematic approach to restructuring medical care to create partnerships between health systems and communities. The objective of this study was to describe how researchers have applied CCM in US primary care settings to provide care for people who have diabetes and to describe outcomes of CCM implementation. Methods We conducted a literature review by using the Cochrane database of systematic reviews, CINAHL, and Health Source: Nursing/Academic Edition and the following search terms: “chronic care model” (and) “diabet*.” We included articles published between January 1999 and October 2011. We summarized details on CCM application and health outcomes for 16 studies. Results The 16 studies included various study designs, including 9 randomized controlled trials, and settings, including academic-affiliated primary care practices and private practices. We found evidence that CCM approaches have been effective in managing diabetes in US primary care settings. Organizational leaders in health care systems initiated system-level reorganizations that improved the coordination of diabetes care. Disease registries and electronic medical records were used to establish patient-centered goals, monitor patient progress, and identify lapses in care. Primary care physicians (PCPs) were trained to deliver evidence-based care, and PCP office–based diabetes self-management education improved patient outcomes. Only 7 studies described strategies for addressing community resources and policies. Conclusion CCM is being used for diabetes care in US primary care settings, and positive outcomes have been reported. Future research on integration of CCM into primary care settings for diabetes management should measure diabetes process indicators, such as self-efficacy for disease management and clinical decision making. PMID:23428085

  15. First-principle modelling of forsterite surface properties: Accuracy of methods and basis sets.

    PubMed

    Demichelis, Raffaella; Bruno, Marco; Massaro, Francesco R; Prencipe, Mauro; De La Pierre, Marco; Nestola, Fabrizio

    2015-07-15

    The seven main crystal surfaces of forsterite (Mg2 SiO4 ) were modeled using various Gaussian-type basis sets, and several formulations for the exchange-correlation functional within the density functional theory (DFT). The recently developed pob-TZVP basis set provides the best results for all properties that are strongly dependent on the accuracy of the wavefunction. Convergence on the structure and on the basis set superposition error-corrected surface energy can be reached also with poorer basis sets. The effect of adopting different DFT functionals was assessed. All functionals give the same stability order for the various surfaces. Surfaces do not exhibit any major structural differences when optimized with different functionals, except for higher energy orientations where major rearrangements occur around the Mg sites at the surface or subsurface. When dispersions are not accounted for, all functionals provide similar surface energies. The inclusion of empirical dispersions raises the energy of all surfaces by a nearly systematic value proportional to the scaling factor s of the dispersion formulation. An estimation for the surface energy is provided through adopting C6 coefficients that are more suitable than the standard ones to describe O-O interactions in minerals. A 2 × 2 supercell of the most stable surface (010) was optimized. No surface reconstruction was observed. The resulting structure and surface energy show no difference with respect to those obtained when using the primitive cell. This result validates the (010) surface model here adopted, that will serve as a reference for future studies on adsorption and reactivity of water and carbon dioxide at this interface.

  16. Modelling reverberation mapping data - II. Dynamical modelling of the Lick AGN Monitoring Project 2008 data set

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pancoast, Anna; Brewer, Brendon J.; Treu, Tommaso; Park, Daeseong; Barth, Aaron J.; Bentz, Misty C.; Woo, Jong-Hak

    2014-12-01

    We present dynamical modelling of the broad-line region (BLR) for a sample of five Seyfert 1 galaxies using reverberation mapping data taken by the Lick AGN Monitoring Project in 2008. By modelling the AGN continuum light curve and Hβ line profiles directly, we are able to constrain the geometry and kinematics of the BLR and make a measurement of the black hole mass that does not depend upon the virial factor, f, needed in traditional reverberation mapping analysis. We find that the geometry of the BLR is generally a thick disc viewed close to face-on. While the Hβ emission is found to come preferentially from the far side of the BLR, the mean size of the BLR is consistent with the lags measured with cross-correlation analysis. The BLR kinematics are found to be consistent with either inflowing motions or elliptical orbits, often with some combination of the two. We measure black hole masses of log _{10}(M_ BH/M_{odot })=6.62^{+0.10}_{-0.13} for Arp 151, 7.42^{+0.26}_{-0.27} for Mrk 1310, 7.59^{+0.24}_{-0.21} for NGC 5548, 6.37^{+0.21}_{-0.16} for NGC 6814, and 6.99^{+0.32}_{-0.25} for SBS 1116+583A. The f factors measured individually for each AGN are found to correlate with inclination angle, although not with M BH, L5100, or FWHM/σ of the emission line profile.

  17. A universal surface complexation framework for modeling proton binding onto bacterial surfaces in geologic settings

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Borrok, D.; Turner, B.F.; Fein, J.B.

    2005-01-01

    Adsorption onto bacterial cell walls can significantly affect the speciation and mobility of aqueous metal cations in many geologic settings. However, a unified thermodynamic framework for describing bacterial adsorption reactions does not exist. This problem originates from the numerous approaches that have been chosen for modeling bacterial surface protonation reactions. In this study, we compile all currently available potentiometric titration datasets for individual bacterial species, bacterial consortia, and bacterial cell wall components. Using a consistent, four discrete site, non-electrostatic surface complexation model, we determine total functional group site densities for all suitable datasets, and present an averaged set of 'universal' thermodynamic proton binding and site density parameters for modeling bacterial adsorption reactions in geologic systems. Modeling results demonstrate that the total concentrations of proton-active functional group sites for the 36 bacterial species and consortia tested are remarkably similar, averaging 3.2 ?? 1.0 (1??) ?? 10-4 moles/wet gram. Examination of the uncertainties involved in the development of proton-binding modeling parameters suggests that ignoring factors such as bacterial species, ionic strength, temperature, and growth conditions introduces relatively small error compared to the unavoidable uncertainty associated with the determination of cell abundances in realistic geologic systems. Hence, we propose that reasonable estimates of the extent of bacterial cell wall deprotonation can be made using averaged thermodynamic modeling parameters from all of the experiments that are considered in this study, regardless of bacterial species used, ionic strength, temperature, or growth condition of the experiment. The average site densities for the four discrete sites are 1.1 ?? 0.7 ?? 10-4, 9.1 ?? 3.8 ?? 10-5, 5.3 ?? 2.1 ?? 10-5, and 6.6 ?? 3.0 ?? 10-5 moles/wet gram bacteria for the sites with pKa values of 3

  18. A restricted-open-shell complete-basis-set model chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wood, Geoffrey P. F.; Radom, Leo; Petersson, George A.; Barnes, Ericka C.; Frisch, Michael J.; Montgomery, John A.

    2006-09-01

    A restricted-open-shell model chemistry based on the complete basis set-quadratic Becke3 (CBS-QB3) model is formulated and denoted ROCBS-QB3. As the name implies, this method uses spin-restricted wave functions, both for the direct calculations of the various components of the electronic energy and for extrapolating the correlation energy to the complete-basis-set limit. These modifications eliminate the need for empirical corrections that are incorporated in standard CBS-QB3 to compensate for spin contamination when spin-unrestricted wave functions are used. We employ an initial test set of 19 severely spin-contaminated species including doublet radicals and both singlet and triplet biradicals. The mean absolute deviation (MAD) from experiment for the new ROCBS-QB3 model (3.6±1.5kJmol-1) is slightly smaller than that of the standard unrestricted CBS-QB3 version (4.8±1.5kJmol-1) and substantially smaller than the MAD for the unrestricted CBS-QB3 before inclusion of the spin correction (16.1±1.5kJmol-1). However, when applied to calculate the heats of formation at 298K for the moderately spin-contaminated radicals in the G2/97 test set, ROCBS-QB3 does not perform quite as well as the standard unrestricted CBS-QB3, with a MAD from experiment of 3.8±1.6kJmol-1 (compared with 2.9±1.6kJmol-1 for standard CBS-QB3). ROCBS-QB3 performs marginally better than standard CBS-QB3 for the G2/97 set of ionization energies with a MAD of 4.1±0.1kJmol-1 (compared with 4.4±0.1kJmol-1) and electron affinities with a MAD of 3.9±0.2kJmol-1 (compared with 4.3±0.2kJmol-1), but the differences in MAD values are comparable to the experimental uncertainties. Our overall conclusion is that ROCBS-QB3 eliminates the spin correction in standard CBS-QB3 with no loss in accuracy.

  19. A restricted-open-shell complete-basis-set model chemistry.

    PubMed

    Wood, Geoffrey P F; Radom, Leo; Petersson, George A; Barnes, Ericka C; Frisch, Michael J; Montgomery, John A

    2006-09-07

    A restricted-open-shell model chemistry based on the complete basis set-quadratic Becke3 (CBS-QB3) model is formulated and denoted ROCBS-QB3. As the name implies, this method uses spin-restricted wave functions, both for the direct calculations of the various components of the electronic energy and for extrapolating the correlation energy to the complete-basis-set limit. These modifications eliminate the need for empirical corrections that are incorporated in standard CBS-QB3 to compensate for spin contamination when spin-unrestricted wave functions are used. We employ an initial test set of 19 severely spin-contaminated species including doublet radicals and both singlet and triplet biradicals. The mean absolute deviation (MAD) from experiment for the new ROCBS-QB3 model (3.6+/-1.5 kJ mol(-1)) is slightly smaller than that of the standard unrestricted CBS-QB3 version (4.8+/-1.5 kJ mol(-1)) and substantially smaller than the MAD for the unrestricted CBS-QB3 before inclusion of the spin correction (16.1+/-1.5 kJ mol(-1)). However, when applied to calculate the heats of formation at 298 K for the moderately spin-contaminated radicals in the G2/97 test set, ROCBS-QB3 does not perform quite as well as the standard unrestricted CBS-QB3, with a MAD from experiment of 3.8+/-1.6 kJ mol(-1) (compared with 2.9+/-1.6 kJ mol(-1) for standard CBS-QB3). ROCBS-QB3 performs marginally better than standard CBS-QB3 for the G2/97 set of ionization energies with a MAD of 4.1+/-0.1 kJ mol(-1) (compared with 4.4+/-0.1 kJ mol(-1)) and electron affinities with a MAD of 3.9+/-0.2 kJ mol(-1) (compared with 4.3+/-0.2 kJ mol(-1)), but the differences in MAD values are comparable to the experimental uncertainties. Our overall conclusion is that ROCBS-QB3 eliminates the spin correction in standard CBS-QB3 with no loss in accuracy.

  20. Mono Lake Excursion as a Chronologic Marker in the U.S. Great Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liddicoat, J. C.; Coe, R. S.; Knott, J. R.

    2008-05-01

    Nevada, Utah, and California east of the Sierra Nevada are in the Great Basin physiographic province of western North America. During periods of the Pleistocene, Lake Bonneville and Lake Lahontan covered valleys in Utah and Nevada, respectively, and other lakes such as Lake Russell in east-central California did likewise (Feth, 1964). Now dry except for its remnant, Mono Lake, Lake Russell provides an opportunity to study behavior of Earth's past magnetic field in lacustrine sediments that are exposed in natural outcrops. The sediments record at least 30,000 years of paleomagnetic secular variation (Liddicoat, 1976; Zimmerman et al., 2006) and have been of particular interest since the discovery of the Mono Lake Excursion (MLE) by Denham and Cox (1971) because the field behavior can be documented at numerous sites around Mono Lake (Liddicoat and Coe, 1979, Liddicoat, 1992; Coe and Liddicoat, 1994) and on Paoha Island in the lake. Moreover, there have been recent attempts to date the excursion (Kent et al., 2002, Benson et al., 2003) more accurately and use the age and relative field intensity in paleoclimate research (Zimmerman et al., 2006). It has been proposed that the excursion in the Mono Basin might be older than originally believed (Denham and Cox, 1971; Liddicoat and Coe, 1979) and instead be the Laschamp Excursion (LE), ~ 40,000 yrs B.P. (Guillou et al., 2004), on the basis of 14C and 40Ar/39Ar dates (Kent et al., 2002) and the relative paleointensity record (Zimmerman et al., 2006) for the excursion in the Mono Basin. On the contrary, we favor a younger age for the excursion, ~ 32,000 yrs B.P., using the relative paleointensity at the Mono and Lahontan basins and 14C dates from the Lahontan Basin (Benson et al., 2003). The age of ~ 32,000 yrs B.P. is in accord with the age (32,000-34,000 yrs B.P.) reported by Channell (2006) for the MLE at Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) Site 919 in the Irminger Basin in the North Atlantic Ocean, which contains as well an

  1. The effects of climate downscaling technique and observational data set on modeled ecological responses.

    PubMed

    Pourmokhtarian, Afshin; Driscoll, Charles T; Campbell, John L; Hayhoe, Katharine; Stoner, Anne M K

    2016-07-01

    Assessments of future climate change impacts on ecosystems typically rely on multiple climate model projections, but often utilize only one downscaling approach trained on one set of observations. Here, we explore the extent to which modeled biogeochemical responses to changing climate are affected by the selection of the climate downscaling method and training observations used at the montane landscape of the Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest, New Hampshire, USA. We evaluated three downscaling methods: the delta method (or the change factor method), monthly quantile mapping (Bias Correction-Spatial Disaggregation, or BCSD), and daily quantile regression (Asynchronous Regional Regression Model, or ARRM). Additionally, we trained outputs from four atmosphere-ocean general circulation models (AOGCMs) (CCSM3, HadCM3, PCM, and GFDL-CM2.1) driven by higher (A1fi) and lower (B1) future emissions scenarios on two sets of observations (1/8º resolution grid vs. individual weather station) to generate the high-resolution climate input for the forest biogeochemical model PnET-BGC (eight ensembles of six runs).The choice of downscaling approach and spatial resolution of the observations used to train the downscaling model impacted modeled soil moisture and streamflow, which in turn affected forest growth, net N mineralization, net soil nitrification, and stream chemistry. All three downscaling methods were highly sensitive to the observations used, resulting in projections that were significantly different between station-based and grid-based observations. The choice of downscaling method also slightly affected the results, however not as much as the choice of observations. Using spatially smoothed gridded observations and/or methods that do not resolve sub-monthly shifts in the distribution of temperature and/or precipitation can produce biased results in model applications run at greater temporal and/or spatial resolutions. These results underscore the importance of

  2. A Julia set model of field-directed morphogenesis: developmental biology and artificial life.

    PubMed

    Levin, M

    1994-04-01

    One paradigm used in understanding the control of morphogenetic events is the concept of positional information, where sub-organismic components (such as cells) act in response to positional cues. It is important to determine what kinds of spatiotemporal patterns may be obtained by such a method, and what the characteristics of such a morphogenetic process might be. This paper presents a computer model of morphogenesis based on gene activity driven by interpreting a positional information field. In this model, the interactions of mutually regulating developmental genes are viewed as a map from R2 to R2, and are modeled by the complex number algebra. Functions in complex variables are used to simulate genetic interactions resulting in position-dependent differentiation. This is shown to be equivalent to computing modified Julia sets, and is seen to be sufficient to produce a very rich set of morphologies which are similar in appearance and several important characteristics to those of real organisms. The properties of this model can be used to study the potential role of fields and positional information as guiding factors in morphogenesis, as the model facilitates the study of static images, time-series (movies) and experimental alterations of the developmental process. It is thus shown that gene interactions can be modeled as a multi-dimensional algebra, and that only two interacting genes are sufficient for (i) complex pattern formation, (ii) chaotic differentiation behavior, and (iii) production of sharp edges from a continuous positional information field. This model is meant to elucidate the properties of the process of positional information-guided biomorphogenesis, not to serve as a simulation of any particular organism's development. Good quantitative data are not currently available on the interplay of gene products in morphogenesis. Thus, no attempt is made to link the images produced with actual pictures of any particular real organism. A brief

  3. A complete basis set model chemistry. V. Extensions to six or more heavy atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ochterski, Joseph W.; Petersson, G. A.; Montgomery, J. A., Jr.

    1996-02-01

    The major source of error in most ab initio calculations of molecular energies is the truncation of the one-electron basis set. Extrapolation to the complete basis set second-order (CBS2) limit using the N-1 asymptotic convergence of N-configuration pair natural orbital (PNO) expansions can be combined with the use of relatively small basis sets for the higher-order (i.e., MP3, MP4, and QCI) correlation energy to develop cost effective computational models. Following this strategy, three new computational models denoted CBS-4, CBS-q, and CBS-Q, are introduced. The mean absolute deviations (MAD) from experiment for the 125 energies of the G2 test set are 2.0, 1.7, and 1.0 kcal/mol, respectively. These results compare favorably with the MAD for the more costly G2(MP2), G2, and CBS-QCI/APNO models (1.6, 1.2, and 0.5 kcal/mol, respectively). The error distributions over the G2 test set are indistinguishable from Gaussian distribution functions for all six models, indicating that the rms errors can be interpreted in the same way that experimental uncertainties are used to assess reliability. However, a broader range of examples reveals special difficulties presented by spin contamination, high molecular symmetry, and localization problems in molecules with multiple lone pairs on the same atom. These characteristics can occasionally result in errors several times the size expected from the Gaussian distributions. Each of the CBS models has a range of molecular size for which it is the most accurate computational model currently available. The largest calculations reported for these models include: The CBS-4 heat of formation of tetranitrohydrazine (91.5±5 kcal/mol), the CBS-4 and CBS-q isomerization energies for the conversion of azulene to naphthalene (ΔHcalc=-35.2±1.0 kcal/mol, ΔHexp=-35.3±2.2 kcal/mol), and the CBS-Q heat of formation of SF6 (ΔHcalc=-286.6±1.3 kcal/mol, ΔHexp=-288.3±0.2 kcal/mol). The CBS-Q value for the dissociation energy of a C-H bond in

  4. Testing departure from additivity in Tukey's model using shrinkage: application to a longitudinal setting.

    PubMed

    Ko, Yi-An; Mukherjee, Bhramar; Smith, Jennifer A; Park, Sung Kyun; Kardia, Sharon L R; Allison, Matthew A; Vokonas, Pantel S; Chen, Jinbo; Diez-Roux, Ana V

    2014-12-20

    While there has been extensive research developing gene-environment interaction (GEI) methods in case-control studies, little attention has been given to sparse and efficient modeling of GEI in longitudinal studies. In a two-way table for GEI with rows and columns as categorical variables, a conventional saturated interaction model involves estimation of a specific parameter for each cell, with constraints ensuring identifiability. The estimates are unbiased but are potentially inefficient because the number of parameters to be estimated can grow quickly with increasing categories of row/column factors. On the other hand, Tukey's one-degree-of-freedom model for non-additivity treats the interaction term as a scaled product of row and column main effects. Because of the parsimonious form of interaction, the interaction estimate leads to enhanced efficiency, and the corresponding test could lead to increased power. Unfortunately, Tukey's model gives biased estimates and low power if the model is misspecified. When screening multiple GEIs where each genetic and environmental marker may exhibit a distinct interaction pattern, a robust estimator for interaction is important for GEI detection. We propose a shrinkage estimator for interaction effects that combines estimates from both Tukey's and saturated interaction models and use the corresponding Wald test for testing interaction in a longitudinal setting. The proposed estimator is robust to misspecification of interaction structure. We illustrate the proposed methods using two longitudinal studies-the Normative Aging Study and the Multi-ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis.

  5. Testing Departure from Additivity in Tukey’s Model using Shrinkage: Application to a Longitudinal Setting

    PubMed Central

    Ko, Yi-An; Mukherjee, Bhramar; Smith, Jennifer A.; Park, Sung Kyun; Kardia, Sharon L.R.; Allison, Matthew A.; Vokonas, Pantel S.; Chen, Jinbo; Diez-Roux, Ana V.

    2014-01-01

    While there has been extensive research developing gene-environment interaction (GEI) methods in case-control studies, little attention has been given to sparse and efficient modeling of GEI in longitudinal studies. In a two-way table for GEI with rows and columns as categorical variables, a conventional saturated interaction model involves estimation of a specific parameter for each cell, with constraints ensuring identifiability. The estimates are unbiased but are potentially inefficient because the number of parameters to be estimated can grow quickly with increasing categories of row/column factors. On the other hand, Tukey’s one degree of freedom (df) model for non-additivity treats the interaction term as a scaled product of row and column main effects. Due to the parsimonious form of interaction, the interaction estimate leads to enhanced efficiency and the corresponding test could lead to increased power. Unfortunately, Tukey’s model gives biased estimates and low power if the model is misspecified. When screening multiple GEIs where each genetic and environmental marker may exhibit a distinct interaction pattern, a robust estimator for interaction is important for GEI detection. We propose a shrinkage estimator for interaction effects that combines estimates from both Tukey’s and saturated interaction models and use the corresponding Wald test for testing interaction in a longitudinal setting. The proposed estimator is robust to misspecification of interaction structure. We illustrate the proposed methods using two longitudinal studies — the Normative Aging Study and the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis. PMID:25112650

  6. Boron and diagenesis: Questioning the fidelity of Snowball δ11B excursions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foster, G. L.; Stewart, J.; Gutjahr, M.; Pearce, F.; Swart, P. K.

    2014-12-01

    Large negative carbon (δ13C) and boron (δ11B) isotope excursions (both >6‰) within the widely distributed Neoproterozoic "Snowball Earth" cap carbonates are interpreted as evidence for considerable perturbation of the carbon cycle and the associated reduction, then recovery of global ocean pH. Yet, before conclusive interpretations may be drawn, isotopic data must first be shown to be primary in origin and non-diagenetic. Recent studies of Quaternary carbonate platform sediments from a number of locations worldwide reveal δ13C excursions of similar magnitude and distribution to the "Snowball Earth" excursions. However, these recent analogues were formed following eustatic sea level fall and exposure of recent carbonates to meteoric diagenesis (Swart and Kennedy, 2012). Here we present δ11B and B/Ca data from Pleistocene-aged carbonate platform sediments recovered by the Clino Core from the Bahamas to examine the effects of diagenesis on the boron system. We find that within the interval of meteoric diagenesis the δ11B of bulk carbonate is substantially reduced by approximately 6‰ in conjunction with a drop in B/Ca of 90%. These isotopic and elemental down-core patterns are strikingly similar to those reported for δ11B and B/Ca in the cap carbonates of the Neoproterozoic snowball Earth events (Kasemann et al., 2005; Kasemann et al., 2010). Our results may therefore question the primary nature of "Snowball Earth" isotope excursions. We recommend more rigorous assessment of the diagenetic history of these ancient carbonates to ensure palaeoclimatological interpretations are robust.

  7. Cerium anomaly across the mid-Tournaisian carbon isotope excursion (TICE)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, G.; Morales, D. C.; Maharjan, D. K.

    2015-12-01

    The Early Mississippian (ca. 359-345 Ma) represents one of the most important greenhouse-icehouse climate transitions in Earth history. Closely associated with this critical transition is a prominent positive carbon isotope excursion (δ13C ≥ +5‰) that has been documented from numerous stratigraphic successions across the globe. This δ13C excursion, informally referred to as the TICE (mid-Tournaisian carbon isotope excursion) event, has been interpreted as resulting from enhanced organic carbon burial, with anticipated outcomes including the lowering of atmospheric CO2 and global cooling, the growth of continental ice sheets and sea-level fall, and the increase of ocean oxygenation and ocean redox changes. The casual relationship between these events has been addressed from various perspectives but not yet clearly demonstrated. To document the potential redox change associated with the perturbation of the carbon cycle, we have analyzed rare earth elements (REE) and trace elements across the TICE in two sections across a shallow-to-deep water transect in the southern Great Basin (Utah and Nevada), USA. In both sections, the REE data show a significant positive cerium (Ce) anomaly (Ce/Ce* = Ce/(0.5La+0.5Pr)). Prior to the positive δ13C shift, most Ce/Ce* values are around 0.3 (between 0.2 and 0.4). Across the δ13C peak, Ce/Ce* values increase up to 0.87, followed by a decrease back to 0.2~0.3 after the δ13C excursion (Figure 1). The positive Ce anomaly is best interpreted as recording expansion of oxygen minimum zone and anoxia resulted from increased primary production. This is consistent with a significant increase of nitrogen isotopes (δ15N) across the δ13C peak. Integration of the carbon, nitrogen, and REE data demonstrates a responsive earth systems change linked to the perturbation of the Early Mississippian carbon cycle.

  8. Effects of temperature excursions on mean kinetic temperature and shelf life.

    PubMed

    Kommanaboyina, B; Rhodes, C T

    1999-12-01

    The international acceptance of the definition of controlled room temperature (CRT) has given additional impetus to the use of mean kinetic temperature (MKT) as a method of quantifying temperatures during transport and storage and consequent possible effects on drug product stability. The present paper explores some of the implications of the MKT concept and considers the effect of temperature excursions on MKT values and hence on stability of drug products.

  9. Forecasting with the Fokker-Planck model: Bayesian setting of parameter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montagnon, Chris

    2017-04-01

    Using a closed solution to a Fokker-Planck model of a time series, a probability distribution for the next point in the time series is developed. This probability distribution has one free parameter. Various Bayesian approaches to setting this parameter are tested by forecasting some real world time series. Results show a more than 25 % reduction in the ' 95 % point' of the probability distribution (the safety stock required in these real world situations), versus the conventional ARMA approach, without a significant increase in actuals exceeding this level.

  10. Brief report: Predictors of outcomes in the Early Start Denver Model delivered in a group setting.

    PubMed

    Vivanti, Giacomo; Dissanayake, Cheryl; Zierhut, Cynthia; Rogers, Sally J

    2013-07-01

    There is a paucity of studies that have looked at factors associated with responsiveness to interventions in preschoolers with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). We investigated learning profiles associated with response to the early start Denver model delivered in a group setting. Our preliminary results from 21 preschool children with an ASD aged 2- to 5-years suggest that the children with more advanced skills in functional use of objects, goal understanding and imitation made the best developmental gains after 1 year of treatment. Cognitive abilities, social attention, intensity of the treatment and chronological age were not associated with treatment gains.

  11. Effect of flow leakage on the benchmarking of FLOWTRAN with Mark-22 mockup flow excursion test data from Babcock and Wilcox

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Kuo-Fu.

    1992-10-01

    This report presents a revised analysis of the Babcock and Wilcox (B and W) downflow flow excursion tests that accounts for leakage between flow channels in the test assembly. Leak rates were estimated by comparing results from the downflow tests with those for upflow tests conducted using an identical assembly with some minor modifications. The upflow test assembly did not contain leaks. This revised analyses shows that FLOWTRAN with the SRS working criterion conservatively predicts onset of flow instability without using a local peaking factor to model heat transfer variations near the ribs.

  12. The Laschamp geomagnetic excursion featured in nitrate record from EPICA-Dome C ice core

    PubMed Central

    Traversi, R.; Becagli, S.; Poluianov, S.; Severi, M.; Solanki, S. K.; Usoskin, I. G.; Udisti, R.

    2016-01-01

    Here we present the first direct comparison of cosmogenic 10Be and chemical species in the period of 38–45.5 kyr BP spanning the Laschamp geomagnetic excursion from the EPICA-Dome C ice core. A principal component analysis (PCA) allowed to group different components as a function of the main sources, transport and deposition processes affecting the atmospheric aerosol at Dome C. Moreover, a wavelet analysis highlighted the high coherence and in-phase relationship between 10Be and nitrate at this time. The evident preferential association of 10Be with nitrate rather than with other chemical species was ascribed to the presence of a distinct source, here labelled as “cosmogenic”. Both the PCA and wavelet analyses ruled out a significant role of calcium in driving the 10Be and nitrate relationship, which is particularly relevant for a plateau site such as Dome C, especially in the glacial period during which the Laschamp excursion took place. The evidence that the nitrate record from the EDC ice core is able to capture the Laschamp event hints toward the possibility of using this marker for studying galactic cosmic ray flux variations and thus also major geomagnetic field excursions at pluri-centennial-millennial time scales, thus opening up new perspectives in paleoclimatic studies. PMID:26819064

  13. Effect of lateral excursive movements on the progression of abfraction lesions.

    PubMed

    Wood, Ian David; Kassir, Ali Sabet Abbas; Brunton, Paul Anthony

    2009-01-01

    The theory of abfraction suggests that tooth flexure arising from occlusal loads causes the formation and progression of abfraction lesions. The current study investigated whether reducing occlusal loading by adjusting the occlusion on a tooth during lateral excursive movements had any effect on the rate of progression of existing abfraction lesions. Recruited were 39 subjects who had two non-carious cervical lesions in the maxillary arch that did not need restoration and were in group function during lateral excursive movements of the mandible. One of the teeth was randomly selected to have the excursive occlusal contacts reduced by using a fine grain diamond bur. Centric occlusal contacts were not reduced. Impressions of the lesion were taken over a 30-month period to enable monitoring of the wear rate, and duplicate dies were poured into epoxy resin to allow for sectioning. The size of the lesions was measured using stereomicroscopic analysis of the sectioned epoxy resin dies, and the results were analyzed using an Independent t-test. No statistically significant difference in wear rates between the adjusted and non-adjusted teeth was found (p > 0.05). Within the limitations of the current study, it was concluded that occlusal adjustment does not appear to halt the progression of non-carious cervical lesions; consequently, this procedure cannot be recommended.

  14. Variation transmission model for setting acceptance criteria in a multi-staged pharmaceutical manufacturing process.

    PubMed

    Montes, Richard O

    2012-03-01

    Pharmaceutical manufacturing processes consist of a series of stages (e.g., reaction, workup, isolation) to generate the active pharmaceutical ingredient (API). Outputs at intermediate stages (in-process control) and API need to be controlled within acceptance criteria to assure final drug product quality. In this paper, two methods based on tolerance interval to derive such acceptance criteria will be evaluated. The first method is serial worst case (SWC), an industry risk minimization strategy, wherein input materials and process parameters of a stage are fixed at their worst-case settings to calculate the maximum level expected from the stage. This maximum output then becomes input to the next stage wherein process parameters are again fixed at worst-case setting. The procedure is serially repeated throughout the process until the final stage. The calculated limits using SWC can be artificially high and may not reflect the actual process performance. The second method is the variation transmission (VT) using autoregressive model, wherein variation transmitted up to a stage is estimated by accounting for the recursive structure of the errors at each stage. Computer simulations at varying extent of variation transmission and process stage variability are performed. For the scenarios tested, VT method is demonstrated to better maintain the simulated confidence level and more precisely estimate the true proportion parameter than SWC. Real data examples are also presented that corroborate the findings from the simulation. Overall, VT is recommended for setting acceptance criteria in a multi-staged pharmaceutical manufacturing process.

  15. The Impacts of Different Meteorology Data Sets on Nitrogen Fate and Transport in the SWAT Watershed Model

    EPA Science Inventory

    In this study, we investigated how different meteorology data sets impacts nitrogen fate and transport responses in the Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) model. We used two meteorology data sets: National Climatic Data Center (observed) and Mesoscale Model 5/Weather Research ...

  16. Implementing the Career Domain of the American School Counselor Association's National Model into the Virtual Setting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Terry, Laura Robin

    2012-01-01

    The implementation of the American School Counselor Association (ASCA) national model has not been studied in nontraditional settings such as in virtual schools. The purpose of this quantitative research study was to examine the implementation of the career domain of the ASCA national model into the virtual high school setting. Social cognitive…

  17. The carbon star adventure: modelling atmospheres of a set of C-rich AGB stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rau, Gioia; Paladini, Claudia; Hron, Josef; Aringer, Bernard; Erikssonn, Kjell; Groenewegen, Martin

    2015-08-01

    We study the atmospheres of a set of carbon rich AGB stars to improve our understanding of the dynamic processes happening in there.For the first time we compare in a systematic way spectrometric, photometric and mid-infrared (VLTI/MIDI) interferometric measurements with different type of model atmospheres: (1) hydrostatic models + MOD-dusty models (Groenewegen, 2012) added a posteriori; (2) self-consistent dynamic model atmospheres (Eriksson et al. 2014). These allow to interpret in a coherent way the dynamic behavior of gas and dust. In addition, the geometric model fitting tool for interferometric data GEM-FIND is applied to carry out a first interpretation of the structural environment of the stars.The results underline that the joint use of different kind of observations, as photometry, spectroscopy and interferometry, is essential for understanding and modeling the atmosphere of pulsating C-rich AGB stars. For our first target, the carbon-rich Mira star RU Vir, the dynamic model atmospheres fit well the ISO/SWS spectra in the wavelength range λ = [2.9, 13.0] μm. However, the object turned out to be “peculiar”: we notice a discrepancy in the visible part of the SED, and in the visibilities. Possible causes are intra/inter-cycle variations in the dynamic model atmospheres, and an eventual presence of a companion star and/or disk or clumps in the atmosphere of RU Vir (Rau et al. subm.). Results on further targets will also be presented.The increased sample of C-rich stars of this work provides crucial constraints for the atmospheric structure and the formation of SiC. Moreover the second generation VLTI instrument MATISSE will be a perfect tool to detect and study asymmetries, as it will allow interferometric imaging in the L, M, and N bands.

  18. Modeling the climate impact of Southern Hemisphere ozone depletion: The importance of the ozone data set

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, P. J.; Davis, S. M.; Hassler, B.; Solomon, S.; Rosenlof, K. H.

    2014-12-01

    The ozone hole is an important driver of recent Southern Hemisphere (SH) climate change, and capturing these changes is a goal of climate modeling. Most climate models are driven by off-line ozone data sets. Previous studies have shown that there is a substantial range in estimates of SH ozone depletion, but the implications of this range have not been examined systematically. We use a climate model to evaluate the difference between using the ozone forcing (Stratospheric Processes and their Role in Climate (SPARC)) used by many Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change Fifth Assessment Report (Coupled Model Intercomparison Project) models and one at the upper end of the observed depletion estimates (Binary Database of Profiles (BDBP)). In the stratosphere, we find that austral spring/summer polar cap cooling, geopotential height decreases, and zonal wind increases in the BDBP simulations are all doubled compared to the SPARC simulations, while tropospheric responses are 20-100% larger. These results are important for studies attempting to diagnose the climate fingerprints of ozone depletion.

  19. Testing geodynamic models of lowermost mantle flow with a regional shear wave splitting data set

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ford, H. A.; Long, M. D.

    2015-12-01

    Global flow models rely on a number of assumptions, including composition, temperature, viscosity, and deformation mechanism. In the upper mantle, flow models and their associated assumptions can be tested and refined with observations of seismic anisotropy, which is treated as a proxy for flow direction. Beneath the transition zone, direct observations of seismic anisotropy are scarce, except for in the lowermost ~250 km of the mantle. In this study, we utilize a comprehensive, previously published (Ford et al., 2015) shear wave splitting study in order to test a three-dimensional global geodynamic flow model (Walker et al., 2011). Our study focuses on a region of the lowermost mantle along the eastern edge of the African Superplume beneath the Afar region. We find that our observations are fit by a model which invokes slip along the (010) plane of post-perovskite with flow directed down and to the southwest. Critically, we demonstrate the ability of a regional data set to interrogate models of lower mantle flow.

  20. European air quality modelled by CAMx including the volatility basis set scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciarelli, G.; Aksoyoglu, S.; Crippa, M.; Jimenez, J. L.; Nemitz, E.; Sellegri, K.; Äijälä, M.; Carbone, S.; Mohr, C.; O'Dowd, C.; Poulain, L.; Baltensperger, U.; Prévôt, A. S. H.

    2015-12-01

    Four periods of EMEP (European Monitoring and Evaluation Programme) intensive measurement campaigns (June 2006, January 2007, September-October 2008 and February-March 2009) were modelled using the regional air quality model CAMx with VBS (Volatility Basis Set) approach for the first time in Europe within the framework of the EURODELTA-III model intercomparison exercise. More detailed analysis and sensitivity tests were performed for the period of February-March 2009 and June 2006 to investigate the uncertainties in emissions as well as to improve the modelling of organic aerosols (OA). Model performance for selected gas phase species and PM2.5 was evaluated using the European air quality database Airbase. Sulfur dioxide (SO2) and ozone (O3) were found to be overestimated for all the four periods with O3 having the largest mean bias during June 2006 and January-February 2007 periods (8.93 and 12.30 ppb mean biases, respectively). In contrast, nitrogen dioxide (NO2) and carbon monoxide (CO) were found to be underestimated for all the four periods. CAMx reproduced both total concentrations and monthly variations of PM2.5 very well for all the four periods with average biases ranging from -2.13 to 1.04 μg m-3. Comparisons with AMS (Aerosol Mass Spectrometer) measurements at different sites in Europe during February-March 2009, showed that in general the model over-predicts the inorganic aerosol fraction and under-predicts the organic one, such that the good agreement for PM2.5 is partly due to compensation of errors. The effect of the choice of volatility basis set scheme (VBS) on OA was investigated as well. Two sensitivity tests with volatility distributions based on previous chamber and ambient measurements data were performed. For February-March 2009 the chamber-case reduced the total OA concentrations by about 43 % on average. On the other hand, a test based on ambient measurement data increased OA concentrations by about 47 % for the same period bringing model

  1. A moist Boussinesq shallow water equations set for testing atmospheric models

    SciTech Connect

    Zerroukat, M. Allen, T.

    2015-06-01

    The shallow water equations have long been used as an initial test for numerical methods applied to atmospheric models with the test suite of Williamson et al. being used extensively for validating new schemes and assessing their accuracy. However the lack of physics forcing within this simplified framework often requires numerical techniques to be reworked when applied to fully three dimensional models. In this paper a novel two-dimensional shallow water equations system that retains moist processes is derived. This system is derived from three-dimensional Boussinesq approximation of the hydrostatic Euler equations where, unlike the classical shallow water set, we allow the density to vary slightly with temperature. This results in extra (or buoyancy) terms for the momentum equations, through which a two-way moist-physics dynamics feedback is achieved. The temperature and moisture variables are advected as separate tracers with sources that interact with the mean-flow through a simplified yet realistic bulk moist-thermodynamic phase-change model. This moist shallow water system provides a unique tool to assess the usually complex and highly non-linear dynamics–physics interactions in atmospheric models in a simple yet realistic way. The full non-linear shallow water equations are solved numerically on several case studies and the results suggest quite realistic interaction between the dynamics and physics and in particular the generation of cloud and rain. - Highlights: • Novel shallow water equations which retains moist processes are derived from the three-dimensional hydrostatic Boussinesq equations. • The new shallow water set can be seen as a more general one, where the classical equations are a special case of these equations. • This moist shallow water system naturally allows a feedback mechanism from the moist physics increments to the momentum via buoyancy. • Like full models, temperature and moistures are advected as tracers that interact

  2. A comparison of foetal SAR in three sets of pregnant female models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimbylow, Peter J.; Nagaoka, Tomoaki; Xu, X. George

    2009-05-01

    This paper compares the foetal SAR in the HPA hybrid mathematical phantoms with the 26-week foetal model developed at the National Institute of Information and Communications Technology, Tokyo, and the set of 13-, 26- and 38-week boundary representation models produced at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute. FDTD calculations are performed at a resolution of 2 mm for a plane wave with a vertically aligned electric field incident upon the body from the front, back and two sides from 20 MHz to 3 GHz under isolated conditions. The external electric field values required to produce the ICNIRP public exposure localized restriction of 2 W kg-1 when averaged over 10 g of the foetus are compared with the ICNIRP reference levels.

  3. Generating extreme weather event sets from very large ensembles of regional climate models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massey, Neil; Guillod, Benoit; Otto, Friederike; Allen, Myles; Jones, Richard; Hall, Jim

    2015-04-01

    Generating extreme weather event sets from very large ensembles of regional climate models Neil Massey, Benoit P. Guillod, Friederike E. L. Otto, Myles R. Allen, Richard Jones, Jim W. Hall Environmental Change Institute, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK Extreme events can have large impacts on societies and are therefore being increasingly studied. In particular, climate change is expected to impact the frequency and intensity of these events. However, a major limitation when investigating extreme weather events is that, by definition, only few events are present in observations. A way to overcome this issue it to use large ensembles of model simulations. Using the volunteer distributed computing (VDC) infrastructure of weather@home [1], we run a very large number (10'000s) of RCM simulations over the European domain at a resolution of 25km, with an improved land-surface scheme, nested within a free-running GCM. Using VDC allows many thousands of climate model runs to be computed. Using observations for the GCM boundary forcings we can run historical "hindcast" simulations over the past 100 to 150 years. This allows us, due to the chaotic variability of the atmosphere, to ascertain how likely an extreme event was, given the boundary forcings, and to derive synthetic event sets. The events in these sets did not actually occur in the observed record but could have occurred given the boundary forcings, with an associated probability. The event sets contain time-series of fields of meteorological variables that allow impact modellers to assess the loss the event would incur. Projections of events into the future are achieved by modelling projections of the sea-surface temperature (SST) and sea-ice boundary forcings, by combining the variability of the SST in the observed record with a range of warming signals derived from the varying responses of SSTs in the CMIP5 ensemble to elevated greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions in three RCP scenarios. Simulating the future with a

  4. Testing the forward approach in modelling β Cephei pulsators: setting the stage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miglio, A.; Montalbán, J.; Thoul, A.

    2009-07-01

    The information on stellar parameters and on the stellar interior we can get by studying pulsating stars depends crucially on the available observational constraints: both seismic constraints (precision and number of detected modes, identification, nature of the modes) and ``classical'' observations (photospheric abundances, effective temperature, luminosity, surface gravity). We consider the case of β Cephei pulsators and, with the aim of estimating quantitatively how the available observational constraints determine the type and precision of our inferences, we set the stage for Hare&Hound exercises. In this contribution we present preliminary results for one simple case, where we assume as ``observed'' frequencies a subset of frequencies of a model and then evaluate a seismic merit function on a dense and extensive grid of models of B-type stars. We also compare the behaviour of χ^2 surfaces obtained with and without mode identification.

  5. Development of a large-sample watershed-scale hydrometeorological data set for the contiguous USA: data set characteristics and assessment of regional variability in hydrologic model performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newman, A. J.; Clark, M. P.; Sampson, K.; Wood, A.; Hay, L. E.; Bock, A.; Viger, R. J.; Blodgett, D.; Brekke, L.; Arnold, J. R.; Hopson, T.; Duan, Q.

    2015-01-01

    We present a community data set of daily forcing and hydrologic response data for 671 small- to medium-sized basins across the contiguous United States (median basin size of 336 km2) that spans a very wide range of hydroclimatic conditions. Area-averaged forcing data for the period 1980-2010 was generated for three basin spatial configurations - basin mean, hydrologic response units (HRUs) and elevation bands - by mapping daily, gridded meteorological data sets to the subbasin (Daymet) and basin polygons (Daymet, Maurer and NLDAS). Daily streamflow data was compiled from the United States Geological Survey National Water Information System. The focus of this paper is to (1) present the data set for community use and (2) provide a model performance benchmark using the coupled Snow-17 snow model and the Sacramento Soil Moisture Accounting Model, calibrated using the shuffled complex evolution global optimization routine. After optimization minimizing daily root mean squared error, 90% of the basins have Nash-Sutcliffe efficiency scores ≥0.55 for the calibration period and 34% ≥ 0.8. This benchmark provides a reference level of hydrologic model performance for a commonly used model and calibration system, and highlights some regional variations in model performance. For example, basins with a more pronounced seasonal cycle generally have a negative low flow bias, while basins with a smaller seasonal cycle have a positive low flow bias. Finally, we find that data points with extreme error (defined as individual days with a high fraction of total error) are more common in arid basins with limited snow and, for a given aridity, fewer extreme error days are present as the basin snow water equivalent increases.

  6. Modeling the advection of discontinuous quantities in Geophysical flows using Particle Level Sets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aleksandrov, V.; Samuel, H.; Evonuk, M.

    2010-12-01

    Advection is one of the major processes that commonly acts on various scales in nature (core formation, mantle convective stirring, multi-phase flows in magma chambers, salt diapirism ...). While this process can be modeled numerically by solving conservation equations, various geodynamic scenarios involve advection of quantities with sharp discontinuities. Unfortunately, in these cases modeling numerically pure advection becomes very challenging, in particular because sharp discontinuities lead to numerical instabilities, which prevent the local use of high order numerical schemes. Several approaches have been used in computational geodynamics in order to overcome this difficulty, with variable amounts of success. Despite the use of correcting filters or non-oscillatory, shock-preserving schemes, Eulerian (fixed grid) techniques generally suffer from artificial numerical diffusion. Lagrangian approaches (dynamic grids or particles) tend to be more popular in computational geodynamics because they are not prone to excessive numerical diffusion. However, these approaches are generally computationally expensive, especially in 3D, and can suffer from spurious statistical noise. As an alternative to these aforementioned approaches, we have applied a relatively recent Particle Level set method [Enright et al., 2002] for modeling advection of quantities with the presence of sharp discontinuities. We have tested this improved method, which combines the best of Eulerian and Lagrangian approaches, against well known benchmarks and classical Geodynamic flows. In each case the Particle Level Set method accuracy equals or is better than other Eulerian and Lagrangian methods, and leads to significantly smaller computational cost, in particular in three-dimensional flows, where the reduction of computational time for modeling advection processes is most needed.

  7. An intercomparison of model ozone deficits in the upper stratosphere and mesosphere from two data sets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siskind, David E.; Connor, Brian J.; Eckman, Richard S.; Remsberg, Ellis E.; Tsou, J. J.; Parrish, Alan

    1995-06-01

    We have compared a diurnal photochemical model of ozone with nighttime data from the limb infrared monitor of the stratosphere (LIMS) and ground-based microwave observations. Consistent with previous studies, the model underpredicts the observations by about 10-30%. This agreement is strong confirmation that the model ozone deficit is not simply an artifact of observational error since it is unlikely to occur for two completely different ozone data sets. We have also examined the seasonal, altitudinal, and diurnal morphology of the ozone deficit. Both comparisons show a deficit that peaks in the upper stratosphere (2-3 mbar) and goes through a minimum in the lower mesosphere from 1.0 to 0.4 mbar. At lower pressures (<0.2 mbar) the deficit appears to increase again. The seasonal variation of the deficit is less consistent. The deficit with respect to the LIMS data is least in winter while with respect to the microwave data, the deficit shows little seasonal variation. Finally, the night-to-day ratio in our model is in generally good agreement with that seen in the microwave experiment. Increasing the rate coefficient for the reaction O + O2 + M → O3 + M improves the fit, while a very large (50%) decrease in the HOx catalytic cycle is not consistent with our observations. Increasing the atomic oxygen recombination rate also improves the overall agreement with both data sets; however, a residual discrepancy still remains. There appears to be no single chemical parameter which, when modified, can simultaneously resolve both the stratospheric and mesospheric ozone deficits.

  8. An analysis of a joint shear model for jointed media with orthogonal joint sets; Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project

    SciTech Connect

    Koteras, J.R.

    1991-10-01

    This report describes a joint shear model used in conjunction with a computational model for jointed media with orthogonal joint sets. The joint shear model allows nonlinear behavior for both joint sets. Because nonlinear behavior is allowed for both joint sets, a great many cases must be considered to fully describe the joint shear behavior of the jointed medium. An extensive set of equations is required to describe the joint shear stress and slip displacements that can occur for all the various cases. This report examines possible methods for simplifying this set of equations so that the model can be implemented efficiently form a computational standpoint. The shear model must be examined carefully to obtain a computationally efficient implementation that does not lead to numerical problems. The application to fractures in rock is discussed. 5 refs., 4 figs.

  9. Comparisons of Transport and Dispersion Model Predictions of the Mock Urban Setting Test Field Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warner, Steve; Platt, Nathan; Heagy, James F.; Jordan, Jason E.; Bieberbach, George

    2006-10-01

    The potential effects of a terrorist attack involving the atmospheric release of chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear, or other hazardous materials continue to be of concern to the United States. The Defense Threat Reduction Agency has developed a Hazard Prediction Assessment Capability (HPAC) that includes initial features to address hazardous releases within an urban environment. Improved characterization and understanding of urban transport and dispersion are required to allow for more robust modeling. In 2001, a scaled urban setting was created in the desert of Utah using shipping containers, and tracer gases were released. This atmospheric tracer and meteorological study is known as the Mock Urban Setting Test (MUST). This paper describes the creation of sets of HPAC predictions and comparisons with the MUST field experiment. Strong consistency between the conclusions of this study and a previously reported HPAC evaluation that relied on urban tracer observations within the downtown area of Salt Lake City was found. For example, in both cases, improved predictions were associated with the inclusion of a simple empirically based urban dispersion model within HPAC, whereas improvements associated with the inclusion of a more computationally intensive wind field module were not found. The use of meteorological observations closest to the array and well above the obstacle array—the sonic anemometer measurements 16 m above ground level—resulted in predictions with the best fit to the observed tracer concentrations. The authors speculate that including meteorological observations or vertical wind profiles above or upwind of an urban region might be a sufficient input to create reasonable HPAC hazard-area predictions.

  10. Consideration Sets and Their Role in Modelling Doctor Recommendations About Contraceptives.

    PubMed

    Fiebig, Denzil G; Viney, Rosalie; Knox, Stephanie; Haas, Marion; Street, Deborah J; Hole, Arne R; Weisberg, Edith; Bateson, Deborah

    2017-01-01

    Decisions about prescribed contraception are typically the result of a consultation between a woman and her doctor. In order to better understand contraceptive choice within this environment, stated preference methods are utilized to ask doctors about what contraceptive options they would discuss with different types of women. The role of doctors is to confine their discussion to a subset of products that best match their patient. This subset of options forms the consideration set from which the ultimate recommendation is made. Given the existence of consideration sets we address the issue of how to model appropriately the ultimate recommendations. The estimated models enable us to characterize doctor recommendations and how they vary with patient attributes and to highlight where recommendations are clear and when they are uncertain. The results also indicate systematic variation in recommendations across different types of doctors, and in particular we observe that some doctors are reluctant to embrace new products and instead recommend those that are more familiar. Such effects are one possible explanation for the relatively low uptake of more cost effective longer acting reversible contraceptives and indicate that further education and training of doctors may be warranted. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  11. Measuring ventilation and modelling M. tuberculosis transmission in indoor congregate settings, rural KwaZulu-Natal

    PubMed Central

    Yates, T. A.; Mthethwa, M.; Tanser, F.; Abubakar, I.; Altamirano, H.

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY SETTING: Molecular epidemiology suggests that most Mycobacterium tuberculosis transmission in high-burden settings occurs outside the home. OBJECTIVE: To estimate the risk of M. tuberculosis transmission inside public buildings in a high TB burden community in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa. DESIGN: Carbon dioxide (CO2) sensors were placed inside eight public buildings. Measurements were used with observations of occupancy to estimate infection risk using an adaptation of the Wells-Riley equation. Ventilation modelling using CONTAM was used to examine the impact of low-cost retrofits on transmission in a health clinic. RESULTS: Measurements indicate that infection risk in the church, classroom and clinic waiting room would be high with typical ventilation, occupancy levels and visit durations. For example, we estimated that health care workers in a clinic waiting room had a 16.9–24.5% annual risk of M. tuberculosis infection. Modelling results indicate that the simple addition of two new windows allowing for cross-ventilation, at a cost of US$330, would reduce the annual risk to health care workers by 57%. CONCLUSIONS: Results indicate that public buildings in this community have a range of ventilation and occupancy characteristics that may influence transmission risks. Simple retrofits may result in dramatic reductions in M. tuberculosis transmission, and intervention studies should therefore be considered. PMID:27510239

  12. Setting the agenda: Different strategies of a Mass Media in a model of cultural dissemination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinto, Sebastián; Balenzuela, Pablo; Dorso, Claudio O.

    2016-09-01

    Day by day, people exchange opinions about news with relatives, friends, and coworkers. In most cases, they get informed about a given issue by reading newspapers, listening to the radio, or watching TV, i.e., through a Mass Media (MM). However, the importance of a given new can be stimulated by the Media by assigning newspaper's pages or time in TV programs. In this sense, we say that the Media has the power to "set the agenda", i.e., it decides which new is important and which is not. On the other hand, the Media can know people's concerns through, for instance, websites or blogs where they express their opinions, and then it can use this information in order to be more appealing to an increasing number of people. In this work, we study different scenarios in an agent-based model of cultural dissemination, in which a given Mass Media has a specific purpose: To set a particular topic of discussion and impose its point of view to as many social agents as it can. We model this by making the Media has a fixed feature, representing its point of view in the topic of discussion, while it tries to attract new consumers, by taking advantage of feedback mechanisms, represented by adaptive features. We explore different strategies that the Media can adopt in order to increase the affinity with potential consumers and then the probability to be successful in imposing this particular topic.

  13. Application of a Cloud Model-Set Pair Analysis in Hazard Assessment for Biomass Gasification Stations.

    PubMed

    Yan, Fang; Xu, Kaili

    2017-01-01

    Because a biomass gasification station includes various hazard factors, hazard assessment is needed and significant. In this article, the cloud model (CM) is employed to improve set pair analysis (SPA), and a novel hazard assessment method for a biomass gasification station is proposed based on the cloud model-set pair analysis (CM-SPA). In this method, cloud weight is proposed to be the weight of index. In contrast to the index weight of other methods, cloud weight is shown by cloud descriptors; hence, the randomness and fuzziness of cloud weight will make it effective to reflect the linguistic variables of experts. Then, the cloud connection degree (CCD) is proposed to replace the connection degree (CD); the calculation algorithm of CCD is also worked out. By utilizing the CCD, the hazard assessment results are shown by some normal clouds, and the normal clouds are reflected by cloud descriptors; meanwhile, the hazard grade is confirmed by analyzing the cloud descriptors. After that, two biomass gasification stations undergo hazard assessment via CM-SPA and AHP based SPA, respectively. The comparison of assessment results illustrates that the CM-SPA is suitable and effective for the hazard assessment of a biomass gasification station and that CM-SPA will make the assessment results more reasonable and scientific.

  14. Creative Practices Embodied, Embedded, and Enacted in Architectural Settings: Toward an Ecological Model of Creativity.

    PubMed

    Malinin, Laura H

    2015-01-01

    Memoires by eminently creative people often describe architectural spaces and qualities they believe instrumental for their creativity. However, places designed to encourage creativity have had mixed results, with some found to decrease creative productivity for users. This may be due, in part, to lack of suitable empirical theory or model to guide design strategies. Relationships between creative cognition and features of the physical environment remain largely uninvestigated in the scientific literature, despite general agreement among researchers that human cognition is physically and socially situated. This paper investigates what role architectural settings may play in creative processes by examining documented first person and biographical accounts of creativity with respect to three central theories of situated cognition. First, the embodied thesis argues that cognition encompasses both the mind and the body. Second, the embedded thesis maintains that people exploit features of the physical and social environment to increase their cognitive capabilities. Third, the enaction thesis describes cognition as dependent upon a person's interactions with the world. Common themes inform three propositions, illustrated in a new theoretical framework describing relationships between people and their architectural settings with respect to different cognitive processes of creativity. The framework is intended as a starting point toward an ecological model of creativity, which may be used to guide future creative process research and architectural design strategies to support user creative productivity.

  15. Creative Practices Embodied, Embedded, and Enacted in Architectural Settings: Toward an Ecological Model of Creativity

    PubMed Central

    Malinin, Laura H.

    2016-01-01

    Memoires by eminently creative people often describe architectural spaces and qualities they believe instrumental for their creativity. However, places designed to encourage creativity have had mixed results, with some found to decrease creative productivity for users. This may be due, in part, to lack of suitable empirical theory or model to guide design strategies. Relationships between creative cognition and features of the physical environment remain largely uninvestigated in the scientific literature, despite general agreement among researchers that human cognition is physically and socially situated. This paper investigates what role architectural settings may play in creative processes by examining documented first person and biographical accounts of creativity with respect to three central theories of situated cognition. First, the embodied thesis argues that cognition encompasses both the mind and the body. Second, the embedded thesis maintains that people exploit features of the physical and social environment to increase their cognitive capabilities. Third, the enaction thesis describes cognition as dependent upon a person’s interactions with the world. Common themes inform three propositions, illustrated in a new theoretical framework describing relationships between people and their architectural settings with respect to different cognitive processes of creativity. The framework is intended as a starting point toward an ecological model of creativity, which may be used to guide future creative process research and architectural design strategies to support user creative productivity. PMID:26779087

  16. Building predictive models for mechanism-of-action classification from phenotypic assay data sets.

    PubMed

    Berg, Ellen L; Yang, Jian; Polokoff, Mark A

    2013-12-01

    Compound mechanism-of-action information can be critical for drug development decisions but is often challenging for phenotypic drug discovery programs. One concern is that compounds selected by phenotypic screening will have a previously known but undesirable target mechanism. Here we describe a useful method for assigning mechanism class to compounds and bioactive agents using an 84-feature signature from a panel of primary human cell systems (BioMAP systems). For this approach, a reference data set of well-characterized compounds was used to develop predictive models for 28 mechanism classes using support vector machines. These mechanism classes encompass safety and efficacy-related mechanisms, include both target-specific and pathway-based classes, and cover the most common mechanisms identified in phenotypic screens, such as inhibitors of mitochondrial and microtubule function, histone deacetylase, and cAMP elevators. Here we describe the performance and the application of these predictive models in a decision scheme for triaging phenotypic screening hits using a previously published data set of 309 environmental chemicals tested as part of the Environmental Protection Agency's ToxCast program. By providing quantified membership in specific mechanism classes, this approach is suitable for identification of off-target toxicity mechanisms as well as enabling target deconvolution of phenotypic drug discovery hits.

  17. Application of a Cloud Model-Set Pair Analysis in Hazard Assessment for Biomass Gasification Stations

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Fang; Xu, Kaili

    2017-01-01

    Because a biomass gasification station includes various hazard factors, hazard assessment is needed and significant. In this article, the cloud model (CM) is employed to improve set pair analysis (SPA), and a novel hazard assessment method for a biomass gasification station is proposed based on the cloud model-set pair analysis (CM-SPA). In this method, cloud weight is proposed to be the weight of index. In contrast to the index weight of other methods, cloud weight is shown by cloud descriptors; hence, the randomness and fuzziness of cloud weight will make it effective to reflect the linguistic variables of experts. Then, the cloud connection degree (CCD) is proposed to replace the connection degree (CD); the calculation algorithm of CCD is also worked out. By utilizing the CCD, the hazard assessment results are shown by some normal clouds, and the normal clouds are reflected by cloud descriptors; meanwhile, the hazard grade is confirmed by analyzing the cloud descriptors. After that, two biomass gasification stations undergo hazard assessment via CM-SPA and AHP based SPA, respectively. The comparison of assessment results illustrates that the CM-SPA is suitable and effective for the hazard assessment of a biomass gasification station and that CM-SPA will make the assessment results more reasonable and scientific. PMID:28076440

  18. Greater volumes of static and dynamic stretching within a warm-up do not impair star excursion balance performance.

    PubMed

    Belkhiria-Turki, L; Chaouachi, A; Turki, O; Hammami, R; Chtara, M; Amri, M; Drinkwater, E J; Behm, D G

    2014-06-01

    Based on the conflicting static stretching (SS) literature and lack of dynamic stretching (DS) literature regarding the effects of differing volumes of stretching on balance, the present study investigated the effects of 4, 8, and 12 sets of SS and DS following a 5 min aerobic running warm-up on the star excursion balance test (SEBT). The objective was to examine an optimal stretch modality and volume to enhance dynamic balance. A randomized, within-subjects experimental design with repeated measures for stretching (SS and DS) versus no-stretching treatment was used to examine the acute effects of 10 (4 sets), 20 (8 sets), and 30 (12 sets) min, of 15s repetitions per muscle of SS and/or DS following a 5 min aerobic warm-up on the performance of the SEBT. Results indicated that a warm-up employing either SS or DS of any volume generally improves SEBT by a "small" amount with effect sizes ranging from 0.06 to 0.50 (11 of 18 conditions>75% likely to exceed the 1.3-1.9% smallest worthwhile change). Secondly, the difference between static and dynamic warm-up on this observed improvement with warm-up improvement was "trivial" to "moderate" (d=0.04 to 0.57) and generally "unclear" (only two of nine conditions>75% likely to exceed the smallest worthwhile change). Finally, the effect of increasing the volume of warm-up on the observed improvement with a warm-up is "trivial" to "small" (d<0.40) and generally "unclear" (only three of 12 conditions>75% likely to exceed the smallest worthwhile change). In summary, an aerobic running warm-up with stretching that increases core and muscle temperature whether it involves SS or DS may be expected to provide small improvements in the SEBT.

  19. Mono Lake Excursion in Cored Sediment from the Eastern Tyrrhenian Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liddicoat, Joseph; Iorio, Marina; Sagnotti, Leonardo; Incoronato, Alberto

    2013-04-01

    A search for the Laschamp and Mono Lake excursions in cored marine and lacustrine sediment younger than 50,000 years resulted in the discovery of both excursions in the Greenland Sea (73.3˚ N, 351.0˚ E, Nowaczyk and Antanow, 1997), in the North Atlantic Ocean (62.7˚ N, 222.5˚ E, Channell, 2006), in Pyramid Lake in the Lahontan Basin, NV, USA (40.1˚ N, 240.2˚ E, Benson et al., 2008), and in the Black Sea (43.2˚ N, 36.5˚ E, Nowaczyk et al., 2012). The inclination, declination, and relative field intensity during the Mono Lake Excursion (MLE) in the Black Sea sediment matches well the behaviour of the excursion in the Mono Basin, CA, in that a reduction in inclination during westerly declination is soon followed by steep positive inclination when declination is easterly, and relative field intensity increases after a low at the commencement of the excursion (Liddicoat and Coe, 1979). A large clockwise loop of Virtual Geomagnetic Poles (VGPs) at the Black Sea when followed from old to young patterns very well the VGP loop formed by the older portion of the MLE in the Mono Basin (Liddicoat and Coe, 1979). We also searched for the MLE in cored sediment from the eastern Tyrrhenian Sea (40.1˚ N, 14.7˚ E) where the age of the sediment is believed to be about 32,000 years when comparing the susceptibility in the core with the susceptibility in a nearby one that is dated by palaeomagnetic secular variation records, Carbon-14, and numerous tephra layers in the Tyrrhenian Sea sediment (Iorio et al., 2011). In the Tyrrhenian Sea core, called C1067, closely spaced samples demagnetized in an alternating field to100 mT record a shallowing of positive inclination to 48˚ that is followed by steep positive inclination of 82˚ when declination moves rapidly to the southeast. The old to young path of the VGPs in C1067 forms a narrow counter-clockwise loop that reaches 30.3˚ N, 30.8˚ E and that is centered at about 55˚ N, 15˚ E. Although descending to a latitude that is

  20. Interactive Visual Analytics Approch for Exploration of Geochemical Model Simulations with Different Parameter Sets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jatnieks, Janis; De Lucia, Marco; Sips, Mike; Dransch, Doris

    2015-04-01

    Many geoscience applications can benefit from testing many combinations of input parameters for geochemical simulation models. It is, however, a challenge to screen the input and output data from the model to identify the significant relationships between input parameters and output variables. For addressing this problem we propose a Visual Analytics approach that has been developed in an ongoing collaboration between computer science and geoscience researchers. Our Visual Analytics approach uses visualization methods of hierarchical horizontal axis, multi-factor stacked bar charts and interactive semi-automated filtering for input and output data together with automatic sensitivity analysis. This guides the users towards significant relationships. We implement our approach as an interactive data exploration tool. It is designed with flexibility in mind, so that a diverse set of tasks such as inverse modeling, sensitivity analysis and model parameter refinement can be supported. Here we demonstrate the capabilities of our approach by two examples for gas storage applications. For the first example our Visual Analytics approach enabled the analyst to observe how the element concentrations change around previously established baselines in response to thousands of different combinations of mineral phases. This supported combinatorial inverse modeling for interpreting observations about the chemical composition of the formation fluids at the Ketzin pilot site for CO2 storage. The results indicate that, within the experimental error range, the formation fluid cannot be considered at local thermodynamical equilibrium with the mineral assemblage of the reservoir rock. This is a valuable insight from the predictive geochemical modeling for the Ketzin site. For the second example our approach supports sensitivity analysis for a reaction involving the reductive dissolution of pyrite with formation of pyrrothite in presence of gaseous hydrogen. We determine that this reaction

  1. Modeling the Behavior of an Underwater Acoustic Relative Positioning System Based on Complementary Set of Sequences

    PubMed Central

    Aparicio, Joaquín; Jiménez, Ana; Álvarez, Fernando J.; Ureña, Jesús; De Marziani, Carlos; Diego, Cristina

    2011-01-01

    The great variability usually found in underwater media makes modeling a challenging task, but helpful for better understanding or predicting the performance of future deployed systems. In this work, an underwater acoustic propagation model is presented. This model obtains the multipath structure by means of the ray tracing technique. Using this model, the behavior of a relative positioning system is presented. One of the main advantages of relative positioning systems is that only the distances between all the buoys are needed to obtain their positions. In order to obtain the distances, the propagation times of acoustic signals coded by Complementary Set of Sequences (CSS) are used. In this case, the arrival instants are obtained by means of correlation processes. The distances are then used to obtain the position of the buoys by means of the Multidimensional Scaling Technique (MDS). As an early example of an application using this relative positioning system, a tracking of the position of the buoys at different times is performed. With this tracking, the surface current of a particular region could be studied. The performance of the system is evaluated in terms of the distance from the real position to the estimated one. PMID:22247661

  2. Large amplitude carbon isotope excursion during the Late Silurian Lau Event

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schoenmaker, N. R.; Reichart, G. J.; Nierop, K. G. J.; Mann, U.; White, T.; Sancay, R. H.

    2010-05-01

    High magnitude excursions in the stable carbon isotope record reveal that the Silurian greenhouse world (443.7-416.0 Ma) represents a period of globally unstable environmental conditions. Fundamental changes in the global carbon cycle were more frequent and had a larger impact during the Silurian compared to any other period of the Phanerozoic [1]. The late Silurian "Lau event" is the largest of four major positive d13Ccarb excursions. The carbon isotope excursion associated with the "Lau event" is recognized globally and reaches values ranging from +6‰ from the Eastern Baltic, +8.5‰ on Gotland, 11‰ from southern Sweden and even up to 12‰ in Australia, Queensland. This makes the "Lau event" the strongest d13C excursion of the entire Phanerozoic, comparable in amplitude to Precambrian events. However, the mechanism underlying the Silurian stable isotope excursions is ill understood. Scenarios proposed include enhanced carbon burial due to anoxic conditions [2] and/or enhanced productivity [3]. Alternative hypotheses range from alternating wet and humid periods influencing global ocean circulation [4], weathering of carbonates [5] to changes in the primary producer community [6]. Evaluating these different scenarios critically relies on establishing the true magnitude of the isotopic excursions and rates of change. Existing stable carbon isotope studies of the Lau event were based on analyses of bulk carbonates or bulk organic matter. Both signal carriers are subject to admixing of organic matter or carbonates from various sources. Moreover, preferential preservation of some organic moieties, e.g. lipids, over other potentially offsets isotopic records, since the carbon isotopic signatures between these moieties substantially differ. A stable organic geochemical composition over the isotope events is thus crucial to ensure capturing the true amplitude of the excursion. Here we therefore investigate, using Curie point pyrolysis GC-MS, the composition of the

  3. Calcium isotope constraints on the marine carbon cycle and CaCO3 deposition during the late Silurian (Ludfordian) positive δ13C excursion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farkaš, Juraj; Frýda, Jiří; Holmden, Chris

    2016-10-01

    reservoir, but rather some local processes in the Prague Basin. These can be related to restricted elemental/sediment cycling involving mixing of isotopically distinct Ca sources and carbonate polymorphs (calcite vs. aragonite), and/or possible kinetic Ca isotope effects due to changes in the rate of marine carbonate formation. Evidence supporting the 'kinetic' effect in the studied mid-Ludfordian carbonates is indicated by correlated δ 44 / 40Ca and Sr-concentration data (rs = - 0.76, p < 0.001, n = 41) yielding a slope of -0.00097, which is indistinguishable from the 'kinetic' slope of abiotic calcite precipitation. Kinetic processes are integral to the model of rapid carbonate precipitation recently proposed by Kozłowski (2015), to explain the origin of the mid-Ludfordian CIE, involving intense methanogenesis/photosynthesis in near shore settings coupled with rapid CaCO3 precipitation (i.e., massive whitings events) and eustatically-controlled carbonate hypersaturation of seawater. More Ca isotope studies are needed to shed light on the question of whether kinetics or mineralogy controls the coupled variations in carbonate δ 44 / 40Ca and δ13 C records observed in this study and other large positive CIEs in geological record.

  4. Benchmark Data Set for Wheat Growth Models: Field Experiments and AgMIP Multi-Model Simulations.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Asseng, S.; Ewert, F.; Martre, P.; Rosenzweig, C.; Jones, J. W.; Hatfield, J. L.; Ruane, A. C.; Boote, K. J.; Thorburn, P.J.; Rotter, R. P.

    2015-01-01

    The data set includes a current representative management treatment from detailed, quality-tested sentinel field experiments with wheat from four contrasting environments including Australia, The Netherlands, India and Argentina. Measurements include local daily climate data (solar radiation, maximum and minimum temperature, precipitation, surface wind, dew point temperature, relative humidity, and vapor pressure), soil characteristics, frequent growth, nitrogen in crop and soil, crop and soil water and yield components. Simulations include results from 27 wheat models and a sensitivity analysis with 26 models and 30 years (1981-2010) for each location, for elevated atmospheric CO2 and temperature changes, a heat stress sensitivity analysis at anthesis, and a sensitivity analysis with soil and crop management variations and a Global Climate Model end-century scenario.

  5. Generating 3D anatomically detailed models of the retina from OCT data sets: implications for computational modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shalbaf, Farzaneh; Dokos, Socrates; Lovell, Nigel H.; Turuwhenua, Jason; Vaghefi, Ehsan

    2015-12-01

    Retinal prosthesis has been proposed to restore vision for those suffering from the retinal pathologies that mainly affect the photoreceptors layer but keep the inner retina intact. Prior to costly risky experimental studies computational modelling of the retina will help to optimize the device parameters and enhance the outcomes. Here, we developed an anatomically detailed computational model of the retina based on OCT data sets. The consecutive OCT images of individual were subsequently segmented to provide a 3D representation of retina in the form of finite elements. Thereafter, the electrical properties of the retina were modelled by implementing partial differential equation on the 3D mesh. Different electrode configurations, that is bipolar and hexapolar configurations, were implemented and the results were compared with the previous computational and experimental studies. Furthermore, the possible effects of the curvature of retinal layers on the current steering through the retina were proposed and linked to the clinical observations.

  6. The Moho in extensional tectonic settings: insights from thermo-mechanical models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cloetingh, Sierd; Burov, Evgenii; Liviu, Matenco

    2013-04-01

    We review consequences for the crustal and lithospheric configuration of different models for the thermo-mechanical evolution of continental lithosphere in extensional tectonic settings. The lithospheric memory is key for the interplay of lithospheric stresses and rheological structure of the extending lithosphere and for its later tectonic reactivation. Other important factors are the temporal and spatial migration of extension and the interplay of rifting and surface processes. The mode of extension and the duration of the rifting phase required to lead to continental break-up is to a large extent controlled by the interaction of the extending plate with slab dynamics. We compare predictions from numerical models with observational constraints from a number of rifted back-arc basin settings and intraplate domains at large distance from convergent plate boundaries. We discuss the record of vertical motions during and after rifting in the context of stretching models developed to quantify rifted basin formation. The finite strength of the lithosphere has an important effect on the formation of extensional basins. This applies both to the geometry of the basin shape as well as to the record of vertical motions during and after rifting. We demonstrate a strong connection between the bulk rheological properties of Europe's lithosphere and the evolution of some of Europe's main rifts and back-arc system. The thermomechanical structure of the lithosphere has a major impact on continental breakup and associated basin migration processes, with direct relationships between rift duration and extension velocities, thermal evolution, and the role of mantle plumes. Compressional reactivation has important consequences for post-rift inversion, borderland uplift, and denudation, as illustrated by polyphase deformation of extensional back-arc basins in the Black Sea and the Pannonian Basin.

  7. Acquisition of a comprhensive air quality model evaluation data set for organic compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Fraser, M.P.; CAss, G.R.; Grosjean, E.; Grosjean, D.

    1995-12-01

    In previous work, photochemical airshed models have been formulated and tested that are capable of predicting the concentrations of more than 50 individual vapor-phase organic compounds that are found in the urban atmosphere. In a separate development, air quality models that account for the concentration of nearly 100 particle-phase organic compounds have been tested. The opportunity thus exists to create a combined air quality model that simultaneously tracks both gas-phase, semi-volatile, and particle-phase organic compounds that range in carbon number from C1 to about C34. Such a tool can be used both to explore the relationship between source emissions and ambient air quality, and to study gas-to-particle conversion processes for organic compounds. A major barrier to the development of such a comprehensive model for atmospheric organic air pollution is the absence of an equally comprehensive atmospheric data base against which such a model can be tested. During September, 1993, an experiment designed to acquire such an air quality model validation data set for organics was conducted in Southern California. At four urban locations and at one upwind offshore island, consecutive measurements over four hour averaging limes were made of speciated vapor phase hydrocarbons, chlorinated organics, and certain gas phase oxygenates via stainless steel canister collection followed by GC/FID and GC/MS analysis. Semi-volatile organics were collected on PUF cartridges, and particle phase organics were collected by filtration, followed by GC/MS analysis. Aldehydes were collected on DNPH impregnated cartridges, and PAN`s were measured by electron capture GC. The design and selected results of that experiment will be discussed.

  8. Volcanic forcing for climate modeling: a new microphysics-based data set covering years 1600-present

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arfeuille, F.; Weisenstein, D.; Mack, H.; Rozanov, E.; Peter, T.; Brönnimann, S.

    2014-02-01

    As the understanding and representation of the impacts of volcanic eruptions on climate have improved in the last decades, uncertainties in the stratospheric aerosol forcing from large eruptions are now linked not only to visible optical depth estimates on a global scale but also to details on the size, latitude and altitude distributions of the stratospheric aerosols. Based on our understanding of these uncertainties, we propose a new model-based approach to generating a volcanic forcing for general circulation model (GCM) and chemistry-climate model (CCM) simulations. This new volcanic forcing, covering the 1600-present period, uses an aerosol microphysical model to provide a realistic, physically consistent treatment of the stratospheric sulfate aerosols. Twenty-six eruptions were modeled individually using the latest available ice cores aerosol mass estimates and historical data on the latitude and date of eruptions. The evolution of aerosol spatial and size distribution after the sulfur dioxide discharge are hence characterized for each volcanic eruption. Large variations are seen in hemispheric partitioning and size distributions in relation to location/date of eruptions and injected SO2 masses. Results for recent eruptions show reasonable agreement with observations. By providing these new estimates of spatial distributions of shortwave and long-wave radiative perturbations, this volcanic forcing may help to better constrain the climate model responses to volcanic eruptions in the 1600-present period. The final data set consists of 3-D values (with constant longitude) of spectrally resolved extinction coefficients, single scattering albedos and asymmetry factors calculated for different wavelength bands upon request. Surface area densities for heterogeneous chemistry are also provided.

  9. Rock Magnetic Cyclostratigraphy of the Edicaran Doushantuo Formation, South China: Determining the Duration of the Shuram Carbon Isotope Excursion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Z.; Kodama, K. P.; Li, Y. X.

    2015-12-01

    To determine the duration of the Shuram carbon-isotope excursion (SE), we conducted paleomagnetic, rock magnetic, and carbon isotopic studies of the Ediacaran Doushantuo Formation at the Dongdahe-Feidatian section near Chengjiang in South China. Zhu et al. (2007)1 indicate that the SE is 97.4 ± 9.5 m thick at this locality. The SE may record the oxidation of the ocean just before the Cambrian explosion. We collected unoriented samples for rock magnetic cyclostratigraphy at 10 cm intervals for 68 m of the Dongdahe section and 101 oriented cores at 2-3 m intervals for paleomagnetism. Comparing our carbon isotope measurements, made on chips from the cores, to Zhu et al.'s previous work shows that the Dongdahe section records 70% of the excursion. The paleomagnetic samples were alternating field and thermally demagnetized, but were totally remagnetized in the present day geomagnetic field (D=358˚, I=38˚). Multi-taper method spectral analysis of the mass-normalized susceptibility of the 600 unoriented samples revealed six strong spectral peaks that rose above the 95% confidence limits of the robust red noise. The stratigraphic thickness of these cycles is 410, 89.3, 32.5, 27.6, 22.1 and 20.9 cm. A smaller peak with a wavelength of 110 cm was also observed. Based on the ratios of these wavelengths we interpret them to be astronomically-forced. If the 410 cm peak is set to long eccentricity (405 kyr), then the other peaks yield near-Milankovitch periods of short eccentricity (109 and 88 kyr), obliquity (32 and 27 kyr), and precession (22 and 21 kyr). A strong peak with a wavelength of 1710 cm was also observed, but is not interpreted to be orbitally-forced. The sediment accumulation rate for the Dongdahe section is 1 cm/kyr making the duration of the SE in South China 9.74 ± 0.95 Myr, in excellent agreement with estimates from Australia and California, thus supporting a primary origin for the SE and possibly the cause of the Cambrian explosion. 1PPP 254 7-61

  10. A Distributed, Cross-Agency Software Architecture for Sharing Climate Models and Observational Data Sets (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crichton, D. J.; Mattmann, C. A.; Braverman, A. J.; Cinquini, L.

    2010-12-01

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) has been developing a distributed infrastructure to supporting access and sharing of Earth Science observational data sets with climate models to support model-to-data intercomparison for climate research. The Climate Data Exchange (CDX), a framework for linking distributed repositories coupled with tailored distributed services to support the intercomparison, provides mechanisms to discover, access, transform and share observational and model output data [2]. These services are critical to allowing data to remain distributed, but be pulled together to support analysis. The architecture itself provides a services-based approach allowing for integrating and working with other computing infrastructures through well-defined software interfaces. Specifically, JPL has worked very closely with the Earth System Grid (ESG) and the Program for Climate Model Diagnostics and Intercomparisons (PCMDI) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) to integrate NASA science data systems with the Earth System Grid to support federation across organizational and agency boundaries [1]. Of particular interest near-term is enabling access to NASA observational data along-side climate models for the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project known as CMIP5. CMIP5 is the protocol that will be used for the next International Panel for Climate Change (IPCC) Assessment Report (AR5) on climate change. JPL and NASA are currently engaged in a project to ensure that observational data are available to the climate research community through the Earth System Grid. By both developing a software architecture and working with the key architects for the ESG, JPL has been successful at building a prototype for AR5. This presentation will review the software architecture including core principles, models and interfaces, the Climate Data Exchange project and specific goals to support access to both observational data and models for AR5. It will highlight the progress

  11. Integrating Soft Set Theory and Fuzzy Linguistic Model to Evaluate the Performance of Training Simulation Systems.

    PubMed

    Chang, Kuei-Hu; Chang, Yung-Chia; Chain, Kai; Chung, Hsiang-Yu

    2016-01-01

    The advancement of high technologies and the arrival of the information age have caused changes to the modern warfare. The military forces of many countries have replaced partially real training drills with training simulation systems to achieve combat readiness. However, considerable types of training simulation systems are used in military settings. In addition, differences in system set up time, functions, the environment, and the competency of system operators, as well as incomplete information have made it difficult to evaluate the performance of training simulation systems. To address the aforementioned problems, this study integrated analytic hierarchy process, soft set theory, and the fuzzy linguistic representation model to evaluate the performance of various training simulation systems. Furthermore, importance-performance analysis was adopted to examine the influence of saving costs and training safety of training simulation systems. The findings of this study are expected to facilitate applying military training simulation systems, avoiding wasting of resources (e.g., low utility and idle time), and providing data for subsequent applications and analysis. To verify the method proposed in this study, the numerical examples of the performance evaluation of training simulation systems were adopted and compared with the numerical results of an AHP and a novel AHP-based ranking technique. The results verified that not only could expert-provided questionnaire information be fully considered to lower the repetition rate of performance ranking, but a two-dimensional graph could also be used to help administrators allocate limited resources, thereby enhancing the investment benefits and training effectiveness of a training simulation system.

  12. Integrating Soft Set Theory and Fuzzy Linguistic Model to Evaluate the Performance of Training Simulation Systems

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Kuei-Hu; Chang, Yung-Chia; Chain, Kai; Chung, Hsiang-Yu

    2016-01-01

    The advancement of high technologies and the arrival of the information age have caused changes to the modern warfare. The military forces of many countries have replaced partially real training drills with training simulation systems to achieve combat readiness. However, considerable types of training simulation systems are used in military settings. In addition, differences in system set up time, functions, the environment, and the competency of system operators, as well as incomplete information have made it difficult to evaluate the performance of training simulation systems. To address the aforementioned problems, this study integrated analytic hierarchy process, soft set theory, and the fuzzy linguistic representation model to evaluate the performance of various training simulation systems. Furthermore, importance–performance analysis was adopted to examine the influence of saving costs and training safety of training simulation systems. The findings of this study are expected to facilitate applying military training simulation systems, avoiding wasting of resources (e.g., low utility and idle time), and providing data for subsequent applications and analysis. To verify the method proposed in this study, the numerical examples of the performance evaluation of training simulation systems were adopted and compared with the numerical results of an AHP and a novel AHP-based ranking technique. The results verified that not only could expert-provided questionnaire information be fully considered to lower the repetition rate of performance ranking, but a two-dimensional graph could also be used to help administrators allocate limited resources, thereby enhancing the investment benefits and training effectiveness of a training simulation system. PMID:27598390

  13. Multiple Brunhes Chron excursions recorded in the West Eifel (Germany) volcanics: Support for long-held mantle control over the non-axial dipole field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singer, Brad S.; Hoffman, Kenneth A.; Schnepp, Elisabeth; Guillou, Hervé

    2008-08-01

    ka correlate with less well-defined excursions or paleointensity minima differentially expressed in marine sediment records. Our findings that at least four, and perhaps five, temporally distinct excursions are recorded between 722 and 528 ka further suggest that each weakening of the dynamo during this period was associated with demise of the axial dipole. The VGPs produced during these excursions are found to be dispersed longitudinally across Eurasia and are remarkably similar to those associated with the calculated south VGPs at West Eifel for the non-axial dipole (NAD) field during the 20th century. A simple model in which the axial dipole repeatedly collapses leaving behind a residual NAD field that is largely held by stationary sources, probably in the lowermost mantle, provides an explanation for the recurrent excursional behavior during this ˜200 kyr period.

  14. Set-Shifting in a Rodent Model of Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Chess, Amy C.; Raymond, Brittany E.; Gardner-Morse, Ira G.; Stefani, Mark R.; Green, John T.

    2011-01-01

    Two experiments compared Spontaneously Hypertensive Rats (SHRs; a rodent model of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder) and Wistars (a normoactive control strain), on the acquisition of a set-shifting strategy. In Experiment 1, SHRs and Wistars were equivalent in trials to criterion to learn a brightness or a texture discrimination but SHRs were faster than Wistars in shifting to the opposite discrimination when there was one or two days between the initial discrimination and the shift. In Experiment 2, SHRs and Wistars were equivalent in shifting when the shift between discriminations occurred immediately after a criterion had been met in the first discrimination. The results are discussed in terms of a failure of SHRs to store or retrieve an initial discrimination and/or latent inhibition over a delay, leading to faster acquisition of a set-shift. This failure in storage or retrieval may be the result of a hypoactive dopamine system in the prefrontal cortex and nucleus accumbens shell as well as abnormalities in entorhinal cortex in SHRs. PMID:21500882

  15. Variational B-spline level-set: a linear filtering approach for fast deformable model evolution.

    PubMed

    Bernard, Olivier; Friboulet, Denis; Thévenaz, Philippe; Unser, Michael

    2009-06-01

    In the field of image segmentation, most level-set-based active-contour approaches take advantage of a discrete representation of the associated implicit function. We present in this paper a different formulation where the implicit function is modeled as a continuous parametric function expressed on a B-spline basis. Starting from the active-contour energy functional, we show that this formulation allows us to compute the solution as a restriction of the variational problem on the space spanned by the B-splines. As a consequence, the minimization of the functional is directly obtained in terms of the B-spline coefficients. We also show that each step of this minimization may be expressed through a convolution operation. Because the B-spline functions are separable, this convolution may in turn be performed as a sequence of simple 1-D convolutions, which yields an efficient algorithm. As a further consequence, each step of the level-set evolution may be interpreted as a filtering operation with a B-spline kernel. Such filtering induces an intrinsic smoothing in the algorithm, which can be controlled explicitly via the degree and the scale of the chosen B-spline kernel. We illustrate the behavior of this approach on simulated as well as experimental images from various fields.

  16. Low contrast detectability in CT for human and model observers in multi-slice data sets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ba, Alexandre; Racine, Damien; Ott, Julien G.; Verdun, Francis R.; Kobbe-Schmidt, Sabine; Eckstein, Miguel P.; Bochud, Francois O.

    2015-03-01

    Task-based medical image quality is often assessed by model observers for single slice images. The goal of the study was to determine if model observers can predict human detection performance of low contrast signals in CT for clinical multi-slice (ms) images. We collected 24 different data subsets from a low contrast phantom: 3 dose levels (40, 90, 150 mAs), 4 signals (6 and 8 mm diameter; 10 and 20 HU at 120kV) and 2 reconstruction algorithms (FBP and iterative (IR)). Images were assessed by human and model observers in 4-alternative forced choice (4AFC) experiments with ms data set in a signal-known-exactly (SKE) paradigm. Model observers with single (msCHOa) and multiple (msCHOb) templates were implemented in a train and test method analysis with Dense Difference of Gaussian (DDoG) and Gabor spatial channels. For human observers, we found that percent correct increased with the dose and was higher for iterative reconstructed images than FBP in all investigated conditions. All model observers implemented overestimated human performance in any condition except one case (6mm and 10HU) for msCHOa and msCHOb with Gabor channels. Internal noise could be implemented and a good agreement was found but necessitates independent fits according to the reconstruction method. Generally msCHOb shows higher detection performance than msCHOa with both types of channels. Gabor channels were less efficient than DDoG in this context. These results allow further developments in 3D analysis technique for low contrast CT.

  17. A Rough Set Bounded Spatially Constrained Asymmetric Gaussian Mixture Model for Image Segmentation

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Zexuan; Huang, Yubo; Sun, Quansen; Cao, Guo; Zheng, Yuhui

    2017-01-01

    Accurate image segmentation is an important issue in image processing, where Gaussian mixture models play an important part and have been proven effective. However, most Gaussian mixture model (GMM) based methods suffer from one or more limitations, such as limited noise robustness, over-smoothness for segmentations, and lack of flexibility to fit data. In order to address these issues, in this paper, we propose a rough set bounded asymmetric Gaussian mixture model with spatial constraint for image segmentation. First, based on our previous work where each cluster is characterized by three automatically determined rough-fuzzy regions, we partition the target image into three rough regions with two adaptively computed thresholds. Second, a new bounded indicator function is proposed to determine the bounded support regions of the observed data. The bounded indicator and posterior probability of a pixel that belongs to each sub-region is estimated with respect to the rough region where the pixel lies. Third, to further reduce over-smoothness for segmentations, two novel prior factors are proposed that incorporate the spatial information among neighborhood pixels, which are constructed based on the prior and posterior probabilities of the within- and between-clusters, and considers the spatial direction. We compare our algorithm to state-of-the-art segmentation approaches in both synthetic and real images to demonstrate the superior performance of the proposed algorithm. PMID:28045950

  18. Undergraduate Research - Analyzing Data Sets: Global Positioning System (GPS) and Modeling the 1994 Northridge Earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simila, G.; Shubin, C.; Horn, W.

    2003-12-01

    Our undergraduate research program (2000-2003), funded by NASA, consisted of four short courses on the analysis of selected data sets from GPS, solar physics, orbital mechanics, and proteomics. During the program, approximately 80 students were recruited from science, math, engineering, and technology disciplines. This short course introduced students to GPS and earthquake data analysis with additional presentations by scientists from JPL. Additional lectures involved discussions of the wave equation, Fourier analysis, statistical techniques, and computer applications of Excel and Matlab. Each student modeled the observed GPS displacements produced by the 1994 Northridge earthquake and presented an oral report. An additional component of the program involved students as research assistants engaged in a variety of projects at CSUN and JPL. Each short course continued the following semester with weekly research lectures.

  19. Discovery of approximate concepts in clinical databases based on a rough set model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsumoto, Shusaku

    2000-04-01

    Rule discovery methods have been introduced to find useful and unexpected patterns from databases. However, one of the most important problems on these methods is that extracted rules have only positive knowledge, which do not include negative information that medical experts need to confirm whether a patient will suffer from symptoms caused by drug side-effect. This paper first discusses the characteristics of medical reasoning and defines positive and negative rules based on rough set model. Then, algorithms for induction of positive and negative rules are introduced. Then, the proposed method was evaluated on clinical databases, the experimental results of which shows several interesting patterns were discovered, such as a rule describing a relation between urticaria caused by antibiotics and food.

  20. Practical aspects of the SAMPL challenge: providing an extensive experimental data set for the modeling community.

    PubMed

    Newman, Janet; Fazio, Vincent J; Caradoc-Davies, Tom T; Branson, Kim; Peat, Thomas S

    2009-12-01

    To provide an experimental basis for a comprehensive molecular modeling evaluation study, 500 fragments from the Maybridge fragment library were soaked into crystals of bovine pancreatic trypsin and the structures determined by X-ray crystallography. The soaking experiments were performed in both single and pooled aliquots to determine if combination of fragments is an appropriate strategy. A further set of data was obtained from co-crystallizing the pooled fragments with the protein. X-ray diffraction data were collected on approximately 1000 crystals at the Australian Synchrotron, and these data were subsequently processed, and the preliminary analysis was performed with a custom software application (Jigsaw), which combines available software packages for structure solution and analysis.

  1. Multiprocessor speed-up, Amdahl's Law, and the Activity Set Model of parallel program behavior

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gelenbe, Erol

    1988-01-01

    An important issue in the effective use of parallel processing is the estimation of the speed-up one may expect as a function of the number of processors used. Amdahl's Law has traditionally provided a guideline to this issue, although it appears excessively pessimistic in the light of recent experimental results. In this note, Amdahl's Law is amended by giving a greater importance to the capacity of a program to make effective use of parallel processing, but also recognizing the fact that imbalance of the workload of each processor is bound to occur. An activity set model of parallel program behavior is then introduced along with the corresponding parallelism index of a program, leading to upper and lower bounds to the speed-up.

  2. Evaluation of European air quality modelled by CAMx including the volatility basis set scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciarelli, Giancarlo; Aksoyoglu, Sebnem; Crippa, Monica; Jimenez, Jose-Luis; Nemitz, Eriko; Sellegri, Karine; Äijälä, Mikko; Carbone, Samara; Mohr, Claudia; O'Dowd, Colin; Poulain, Laurent; Baltensperger, Urs; Prévôt, André S. H.

    2016-08-01

    Four periods of EMEP (European Monitoring and Evaluation Programme) intensive measurement campaigns (June 2006, January 2007, September-October 2008 and February-March 2009) were modelled using the regional air quality model CAMx with VBS (volatility basis set) approach for the first time in Europe within the framework of the EURODELTA-III model intercomparison exercise. More detailed analysis and sensitivity tests were performed for the period of February-March 2009 and June 2006 to investigate the uncertainties in emissions as well as to improve the modelling of organic aerosol (OA). Model performance for selected gas phase species and PM2.5 was evaluated using the European air quality database AirBase. Sulfur dioxide (SO2) and ozone (O3) were found to be overestimated for all the four periods, with O3 having the largest mean bias during June 2006 and January-February 2007 periods (8.9 pbb and 12.3 ppb mean biases respectively). In contrast, nitrogen dioxide (NO2) and carbon monoxide (CO) were found to be underestimated for all the four periods. CAMx reproduced both total concentrations and monthly variations of PM2.5 for all the four periods with average biases ranging from -2.1 to 1.0 µg m-3. Comparisons with AMS (aerosol mass spectrometer) measurements at different sites in Europe during February-March 2009 showed that in general the model overpredicts the inorganic aerosol fraction and underpredicts the organic one, such that the good agreement for PM2.5 is partly due to compensation of errors. The effect of the choice of VBS scheme on OA was investigated as well. Two sensitivity tests with volatility distributions based on previous chamber and ambient measurements data were performed. For February-March 2009 the chamber case reduced the total OA concentrations by about 42 % on average. In contrast, a test based on ambient measurement data increased OA concentrations by about 42 % for the same period bringing model and observations into better agreement

  3. Computer Modeling of Electrostatic Aggregation of Granular Materials in Planetary and Astrophysical Settings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marshall, J.; Sauke, T.

    1999-01-01

    Electrostatic forces strongly influence the behavior of granular materials in both dispersed (cloud) systems and semi-packed systems. These forces can cause aggregation or dispersion of particles and are important in a variety of astrophysical and planetary settings. There are also many industrial and commercial settings where granular matter and electrostatics become partners for both good and bad. This partnership is important for human exploration on Mars where dust adheres to suits, machines, and habitats. Long-range Coulombic (electrostatic) forces, as opposed to contact-induced dipoles and van der Waals attractions, are generally regarded as resulting from net charge. We have proposed that in addition to net charge interactions, randomly distributed charge carriers on grains will result in a dipole moment regardless of any net charge. If grains are unconfined, or fluidized, they will rotate so that the dipole always induces attraction between grains. Aggregates are readily formed, and Coulombic polarity resulting from the dipole produces end-to-end stacking of grains to form filamentary aggregates. This has been demonstrated in USML experiments on Space Shuttle where microgravity facilitated the unmasking of static forces. It has also been demonstrated in a computer model using grains with charge carriers of both sign. Model results very closely resembled micro-g results with actual sand grains. Further computer modeling of the aggregation process has been conducted to improve our understanding of the aggregation process, and to provide a predictive tool for microgravity experiments slated for Space Station. These experiments will attempt to prove the dipole concept as outlined above. We have considerably enhanced the original computer model: refinements to the algorithm have improved the fidelity of grain behavior during grain contact, special attention has been paid to simulation time steps to enable establishment of a meaningful, quantitative time axis

  4. Computer Modeling of Electrostatic Aggregation of Granular Materials in Planetary and Astrophysical Settings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshall, J.; Sauke, T.

    1999-09-01

    Electrostatic forces strongly influence the behavior of granular materials in both dispersed (cloud) systems and semi-packed systems. These forces can cause aggregation or dispersion of particles and are important in a variety of astrophysical and planetary settings. There are also many industrial and commercial settings where granular matter and electrostatics become partners for both good and bad. This partnership is important for human exploration on Mars where dust adheres to suits, machines, and habitats. Long-range Coulombic (electrostatic) forces, as opposed to contact-induced dipoles and van der Waals attractions, are generally regarded as resulting from net charge. We have proposed that in addition to net charge interactions, randomly distributed charge carriers on grains will result in a dipole moment regardless of any net charge. If grains are unconfined, or fluidized, they will rotate so that the dipole always induces attraction between grains. Aggregates are readily formed, and Coulombic polarity resulting from the dipole produces end-to-end stacking of grains to form filamentary aggregates. This has been demonstrated in USML experiments on Space Shuttle where microgravity facilitated the unmasking of static forces. It has also been demonstrated in a computer model using grains with charge carriers of both sign. Model results very closely resembled micro-g results with actual sand grains. Further computer modeling of the aggregation process has been conducted to improve our understanding of the aggregation process, and to provide a predictive tool for microgravity experiments slated for Space Station. These experiments will attempt to prove the dipole concept as outlined above. We have considerably enhanced the original computer model: refinements to the algorithm have improved the fidelity of grain behavior during grain contact, special attention has been paid to simulation time steps to enable establishment of a meaningful, quantitative time axis

  5. Validation of the SimSET simulation package for modeling the Siemens Biograph mCT PET scanner.

    PubMed

    Poon, Jonathan K; Dahlbom, Magnus L; Casey, Michael E; Qi, Jinyi; Cherry, Simon R; Badawi, Ramsey D

    2015-02-07

    Monte Carlo simulation provides a valuable tool in performance assessment and optimization of system design parameters for PET scanners. SimSET is a popular Monte Carlo simulation toolkit that features fast simulation time, as well as variance reduction tools to further enhance computational efficiency. However, SimSET has lacked the ability to simulate block detectors until its most recent release. Our goal is to validate new features of SimSET by developing a simulation model of the Siemens Biograph mCT PET scanner and comparing the results to a simulation model developed in the GATE simulation suite and to experimental results. We used the NEMA NU-2 2007 scatter fraction, count rates, and spatial resolution protocols to validate the SimSET simulation model and its new features. The SimSET model overestimated the experimental results of the count rate tests by 11-23% and the spatial resolution test by 13-28%, which is comparable to previous validation studies of other PET scanners in the literature. The difference between the SimSET and GATE simulation was approximately 4-8% for the count rate test and approximately 3-11% for the spatial resolution test. In terms of computational time, SimSET performed simulations approximately 11 times faster than GATE simulations. The new block detector model in SimSET offers a fast and reasonably accurate simulation toolkit for PET imaging applications.

  6. A musculoskeletal model of human locomotion driven by a low dimensional set of impulsive excitation primitives.

    PubMed

    Sartori, Massimo; Gizzi, Leonardo; Lloyd, David G; Farina, Dario

    2013-01-01

    Human locomotion has been described as being generated by an impulsive (burst-like) excitation of groups of musculotendon units, with timing dependent on the biomechanical goal of the task. Despite this view being supported by many experimental observations on specific locomotion tasks, it is still unknown if the same impulsive controller (i.e., a low-dimensional set of time-delayed excitastion primitives) can be used as input drive for large musculoskeletal models across different human locomotion tasks. For this purpose, we extracted, with non-negative matrix factorization, five non-negative factors from a large sample of muscle electromyograms in two healthy subjects during four motor tasks. These included walking, running, sidestepping, and crossover cutting maneuvers. The extracted non-negative factors were then averaged and parameterized to obtain task-generic Gaussian-shaped impulsive excitation curves or primitives. These were used to drive a subject-specific musculoskeletal model of the human lower extremity. Results showed that the same set of five impulsive excitation primitives could be used to predict the dynamics of 34 musculotendon units and the resulting hip, knee and ankle joint moments (i.e., NRMSE = 0.18 ± 0.08, and R (2) = 0.73 ± 0.22 across all tasks and subjects) without substantial loss of accuracy with respect to using experimental electromyograms (i.e., NRMSE = 0.16 ± 0.07, and R (2) = 0.78 ± 0.18 across all tasks and subjects). Results support the hypothesis that biomechanically different motor tasks might share similar neuromuscular control strategies. This might have implications in neurorehabilitation technologies such as human-machine interfaces for the torque-driven, proportional control of powered prostheses and orthoses. In this, device control commands (i.e., predicted joint torque) could be derived without direct experimental data but relying on simple parameterized Gaussian-shaped curves, thus decreasing the input drive

  7. Blood pressure long term regulation: A neural network model of the set point development

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The notion of the nucleus tractus solitarius (NTS) as a comparator evaluating the error signal between its rostral neural structures (RNS) and the cardiovascular receptor afferents into it has been recently presented. From this perspective, stress can cause hypertension via set point changes, so offering an answer to an old question. Even though the local blood flow to tissues is influenced by circulating vasoactive hormones and also by local factors, there is yet significant sympathetic control. It is well established that the state of maturation of sympathetic innervation of blood vessels at birth varies across animal species and it takes place mostly during the postnatal period. During ontogeny, chemoreceptors are functional; they discharge when the partial pressures of oxygen and carbon dioxide in the arterial blood are not normal. Methods The model is a simple biological plausible adaptative neural network to simulate the development of the sympathetic nervous control. It is hypothesized that during ontogeny, from the RNS afferents to the NTS, the optimal level of each sympathetic efferent discharge is learned through the chemoreceptors' feedback. Its mean discharge leads to normal oxygen and carbon dioxide levels in each tissue. Thus, the sympathetic efferent discharge sets at the optimal level if, despite maximal drift, the local blood flow is compensated for by autoregulation. Such optimal level produces minimum chemoreceptor output, which must be maintained by the nervous system. Since blood flow is controlled by arterial blood pressure, the long-term mean level is stabilized to regulate oxygen and carbon dioxide levels. After development, the cardiopulmonary reflexes play an important role in controlling efferent sympathetic nerve activity to the kidneys and modulating sodium and water excretion. Results Starting from fixed RNS afferents to the NTS and random synaptic weight values, the sympathetic efferents converged to the optimal values

  8. Selection of appropriate training and validation set chemicals for modelling dermal permeability by U-optimal design.

    PubMed

    Xu, G; Hughes-Oliver, J M; Brooks, J D; Yeatts, J L; Baynes, R E

    2013-01-01

    Quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) models are being used increasingly in skin permeation studies. The main idea of QSAR modelling is to quantify the relationship between biological activities and chemical properties, and thus to predict the activity of chemical solutes. As a key step, the selection of a representative and structurally diverse training set is critical to the prediction power of a QSAR model. Early QSAR models selected training sets in a subjective way and solutes in the training set were relatively homogenous. More recently, statistical methods such as D-optimal design or space-filling design have been applied but such methods are not always ideal. This paper describes a comprehensive procedure to select training sets from a large candidate set of 4534 solutes. A newly proposed 'Baynes' rule', which is a modification of Lipinski's 'rule of five', was used to screen out solutes that were not qualified for the study. U-optimality was used as the selection criterion. A principal component analysis showed that the selected training set was representative of the chemical space. Gas chromatograph amenability was verified. A model built using the training set was shown to have greater predictive power than a model built using a previous dataset [1].

  9. Potential carbon sequestration of European arable soils estimated by modelling a comprehensive set of management practices.

    PubMed

    Lugato, Emanuele; Bampa, Francesca; Panagos, Panos; Montanarella, Luca; Jones, Arwyn

    2014-11-01

    Bottom-up estimates from long-term field experiments and modelling are the most commonly used approaches to estimate the carbon (C) sequestration potential of the agricultural sector. However, when data are required at European level, important margins of uncertainty still exist due to the representativeness of local data at large scale or different assumptions and information utilized for running models. In this context, a pan-European (EU + Serbia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Montenegro, Albania, Former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia and Norway) simulation platform with high spatial resolution and harmonized data sets was developed to provide consistent scenarios in support of possible carbon sequestration policies. Using the CENTURY agroecosystem model, six alternative management practices (AMP) scenarios were assessed as alternatives to the business as usual situation (BAU). These consisted of the conversion of arable land to grassland (and vice versa), straw incorporation, reduced tillage, straw incorporation combined with reduced tillage, ley cropping system and cover crops. The conversion into grassland showed the highest soil organic carbon (SOC) sequestration rates, ranging between 0.4 and 0.8 t C ha(-1)  yr(-1) , while the opposite extreme scenario (100% of grassland conversion into arable) gave cumulated losses of up to 2 Gt of C by 2100. Among the other practices, ley cropping systems and cover crops gave better performances than straw incorporation and reduced tillage. The allocation of 12 to 28% of the European arable land to different AMP combinations resulted in a potential SOC sequestration of 101-336 Mt CO2 eq. by 2020 and 549-2141 Mt CO2 eq. by 2100. Modelled carbon sequestration rates compared with values from an ad hoc meta-analysis confirmed the robustness of these estimates.

  10. Global combustion sources of organic aerosols: model comparison with 84 AMS factor-analysis data sets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsimpidi, Alexandra P.; Karydis, Vlassis A.; Pandis, Spyros N.; Lelieveld, Jos

    2016-07-01

    Emissions of organic compounds from biomass, biofuel, and fossil fuel combustion strongly influence the global atmospheric aerosol load. Some of the organics are directly released as primary organic aerosol (POA). Most are emitted in the gas phase and undergo chemical transformations (i.e., oxidation by hydroxyl radical) and form secondary organic aerosol (SOA). In this work we use the global chemistry climate model ECHAM/MESSy Atmospheric Chemistry (EMAC) with a computationally efficient module for the description of organic aerosol (OA) composition and evolution in the atmosphere (ORACLE). The tropospheric burden of open biomass and anthropogenic (fossil and biofuel) combustion particles is estimated to be 0.59 and 0.63 Tg, respectively, accounting for about 30 and 32 % of the total tropospheric OA load. About 30 % of the open biomass burning and 10 % of the anthropogenic combustion aerosols originate from direct particle emissions, whereas the rest is formed in the atmosphere. A comprehensive data set of aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS) measurements along with factor-analysis results from 84 field campaigns across the Northern Hemisphere are used to evaluate the model results. Both the AMS observations and the model results suggest that over urban areas both POA (25-40 %) and SOA (60-75 %) contribute substantially to the overall OA mass, whereas further downwind and in rural areas the POA concentrations decrease substantially and SOA dominates (80-85 %). EMAC does a reasonable job in reproducing POA and SOA levels during most of the year. However, it tends to underpredict POA and SOA concentrations during winter indicating that the model misses wintertime sources of OA (e.g., residential biofuel use) and SOA formation pathways (e.g., multiphase oxidation).

  11. Timed colored Petri nets and fuzzy-set-based model for decision making

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scopel Simoes, Marcos A.; Barretto, Marcos R. P.

    2000-10-01

    This work proposes the use of Timed Colored Petri nets as a formal base to a decision making tool for applications in industrial productive processes planning and programming. The Timed Colored Petri net is responsible for the transition of states in the decision process, establishing in time the use of resources and of heuristics that correspond to the more important managerial and operational actions for the planning activities and programming of the productive processes of an industrial plant. To negotiate with the uncertainties involved in a decision process, that in general takes care of the responsible specialist's knowledge for the routines involved in the productive system, we make use of the theory of fuzzy sets to suggest decisions logically consistent that obtain a viable solution just leading the viable states of the decision tree, that, in this case, is confused with the occurrence graph of the Petri net. As application example to the proposed model, we used a production system characterized by a port plant, whose model and simulation results are described at the end of this work.

  12. Relative fascicle excursion effects on dynamic strength generation during gait in children with cerebral palsy.

    PubMed

    Martín Lorenzo, T; Lerma Lara, S; Martínez-Caballero, I; Rocon, E

    2015-10-01

    Evaluation of muscle structure gives us a better understanding of how muscles contribute to force generation which is significantly altered in children with cerebral palsy (CP). While most muscle structure parameters have shown to be significantly correlated to different expressions of strength development in children with CP and typically developing (TD) children, conflicting results are found for muscle fascicle length. Muscle fascicle length determines muscle excursion and velocity, and contrary to what might be expected, correlations of fascicle length to rate of force development have not been found for children with CP. The lack of correlation between muscle fascicle length and rate of force development in children with CP could be due, on the one hand, to the non-optimal joint position adopted for force generation on the isometric strength tests as compared to the position of TD children. On the other hand, the lack of correlation could be due to the erroneous assumption that muscle fascicle length is representative of sarcomere length. Thus, the relationship between muscle architecture parameters reflecting sarcomere length, such as relative fascicle excursions and dynamic power generation, should be assessed. Understanding of the underlying mechanisms of weakness in children with CP is key for individualized prescription and assessment of muscle-targeted interventions. Findings could imply the detection of children operating on the descending limb of the sarcomere length-tension curve, which in turn might be at greater risk of developing crouch gait. Furthermore, relative muscle fascicle excursions could be used as a predictive variable of outcomes related to crouch gait prevention treatments such as strength training.

  13. IODP Expedition 303 (North Atlantic): Excursions and Reversals in the Brunhes and Matuyama Chrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Channell, J. E.; Mazaud, A.; Stoner, J. S.

    2005-12-01

    The primary objective of IODP Expedition 303 (Sept.-Nov., 2004) was to recover complete and continuous records of Pliocene-Quaternary millennial-scale environmental and geomagnetic variability, and place these records into high-resolution isotopic and magnetic stratigraphies (including relative paleointensity). Some of the Exp. 303 site locations (Orphan Knoll, Eirik and Gardar Drifts, and DSDP Site 609) have already been instrumental in developing marine records of suborbital climate variability for the last climate cycle, and the goal of Exp. 303 was to extend the records back through the Quaternary and into the Pliocene. High mean sedimentation rates (15-20 cm/ky) at sites located on Orphan Knoll (Site U1302/3), Eirik Drift (Sites U1305 and U1306) and Gardar Drift (Site U1304) have resulted in shipboard records of excursions and reversals in the Brunhes and Matuyama Chrons. Site U1308 (DSDP Site 609) has lower mean sedimentation rate (7.9 cm/kyr) and extends the record into the Gauss Chron to ~3.1 Ma. Initial u-channel magnetic data support the existence of a number of polarity excursions in the Matuyama Chron, but only a single polarity excursion (Iceland Basin Event) has so far been observed in the Brunhes Chron. The Matuyama-Brunhes (M-B) polarity reversal yields virtual geomagnetic polar (VGP) paths that are reminiscent of those recovered from the northern Gardar and Bjorn drifts during ODP Leg 162. VGP clusters in the South Atlantic and off NE Asia accompany a Pacific loop, in what appears to be a repetitive but complex pattern for the M-B transition recorded in 9 holes from three Exp. 303 North Atlantic sites.

  14. Probable excursions in Alaskan loess deposits and potential for detailed correlations and chronology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jensen, B. J.; Evans, M. E.; Kravchinsky, V. A.; Froese, D. G.

    2011-12-01

    As part of a larger study to refine the chronology of paleoenvironmental records in Alaskan loess deposits, the type section for the Gold Hill loess was sampled at 5 cm intervals for detailed paleomagnetic investigations. We sampled from the level of the Jaramillo Subchron (~21 m from the base of the exposure) through the Holocene (~51 m). Initial results indicate the presence of several pronounced directional perturbations that may record excursions of the geomagnetic field. A perturbation found in association with an organic-rich unit at 48 m is likely of late Pleistocene age and a candidate for the Laschamp excursion. An additional perturbation is present above the VT tephra (106±10 ka; ~44 m). This event is also present at the nearby Halfway House site in a similar stratigraphic context. This interval is a good candidate for the post-Blake event that has recently been dated at 106±14 ka and 104±2 ka by Singer et al. (2011). A tephra bed below this level indicates the presence of a significant unconformity and the excursion recorded below this at ~41 m is unidentified, but is likely between MIS 9 and late MIS 8 in age. From the GI tephra (560±80 ka; ~35 m) to the Bruhnes-Matuyama boundary (~25.5 m), we observe variations in the field, but these are relatively small. Lastly, between the Bruhnes-Matuyama boundary and the Jaramillo Subchron we have identified the Kamikatsura event (900.3±4.7 ka). These findings suggest that Alaskan loess may turn out to be an excellent recorder of geomagnetic field behaviour, the details of which offer significant potential for high-resolution correlations and chronology.

  15. Power semiconductors empirical diagrams expressing life as a function of temperature excursion

    SciTech Connect

    Somos, I.L. ); Piccone, D.E.; Willinger, L.J.; Tobin, W.H. )

    1993-01-01

    Solid state switches are being actively pursued to replace thyratons, ignitrons and triggered spark gaps in various pulse power applications. These include electric gun development for tanks such as the EM gun (electromagnetic) and the ETC gun (electrothermal) and electromechanical launcher for aircraft. High power thyristors and rectifier diodes have been applied in stringent power cycling applications in the past with predictable life assurance. The validity of a simple mathematical concept expression life in terms of numbers of power cycles versus temperature excursion is explained and supported by examples of empirical tests data.

  16. Further studies on anti-invasive chemotypes: An excursion from chalcones to curcuminoids.

    PubMed

    Roman, Bart I; De Ryck, Tine; Verhasselt, Sigrid; Bracke, Marc E; Stevens, Christian V

    2015-03-01

    In our ongoing search for new anti-invasive chemotypes, we have made an excursion from previously reported potent 1,3-diarylpropenones (chalcones) to congeners bearing longer linkers between the aromatic moieties. Nine 1,ω-diarylalkenones, including curcumin and bisdemethoxycurcumin, were evaluated in the chick heart invasion assay. Unfortunately, these compounds proved less potent and more toxic than earlier evaluated chemotypes. In the 1,3-diarylpenta-2,4-dien-1-one series, fluoro and/or trimethoxy substitution caused an increase in potency. This agrees with observations made earlier for the chalcone class.

  17. Visual evidence of the Sterno-Etrussia geomagnetic excursion (~2700 BP)?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raspopov, O. M.; Dergachev, V. A.; Goos'kova, E. G.; Morner, N.-A.

    2003-04-01

    In the Bible's Old Testament Book of Ezekiel there is a description of the Ezekiel's vision of "a great cloud with brightness round about it" to the north of the observation site. The event described in the Bible occurred in 593 BC, i.e., approximately 2600 years ago. Ezekiel was at that time approximately 100 km south of Babylon (latitude ~ 32 N, longitude ~ 45 E). Auroral specialists interpret the Ezekiel's vision as observation of coronal auroral displays at low latitudes. However, to support this hypothesis, it is necessary to understand the physical mechanism responsible for generation of these forms of auroras at low latitudes. Analysis of palaeo- and archaeomagnetic data, including our data on magnetic properties of sediments of the Barents and White Seas and the literature data, has shown that about 2700 BP, i.e., in Ezekiel's time, development of a geomagnetic "Sterno-Etrussia" excursion took place. The duration of the excursion during which the northern geomagnetic pole wandered to the Southern Hemisphere was no more than 200-300 years. Manifestations of this excursion were found in 16 regions of the Eurasian continent and adjacent seas and also in the North and South America. By plotting the path along which the northern geomagnetic pole wandered to the southern latitudes during this excursion on the basis of palaeomagnetic data, we have found that it wandered in the longitude sector plus or minus 30 degrees, and about 2700 BP the northern geomagnetic pole was at the longitude close to the Babylon longitude, where Ezekiel had his vision. Thus, at that time Babylon was at high geomagnetic latitudes where regular coronal auroral displays occur. Records of observation of the unusual brightness of the sky in the V-VI centuries BC can also be found in Greek chronicles. This indicates that the Ezekiel's vision was not the only observation of auroras at low latitudes during the period considered here. This work was supported by INTAS, Grant 97-31008 and PFBR

  18. Application of a neptune propulsion concept to a manned mars excursion. Master's thesis

    SciTech Connect

    Finley, C.J.

    1993-04-01

    NEPTUNE is a multimegawatt electric propulsion system. It uses a proven compact nuclear thermal rocket, NERVA, in a closed cycle with a magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) generator to power a magnetoplasmadynamic (MPD) thruster. This thesis defines constraints on an externally sourced propulsion system intended to carry out a manned Martian excursion. It assesses NEPTUNE's ability to conform to these constraints. Because an unmodified NEPTUNE system is too large, the thesis develops modifications to the system which reduce its size. The result is a far less proven, but more useful derivative of the unmodified NEPTUNE system.

  19. MUTILS - a set of efficient modeling tools for multi-core CPUs implemented in MEX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krotkiewski, Marcin; Dabrowski, Marcin

    2013-04-01

    The need for computational performance is common in scientific applications, and in particular in numerical simulations, where high resolution models require efficient processing of large amounts of data. Especially in the context of geological problems the need to increase the model resolution to resolve physical and geometrical complexities seems to have no limits. Alas, the performance of new generations of CPUs does not improve any longer by simply increasing clock speeds. Current industrial trends are to increase the number of computational cores. As a result, parallel implementations are required in order to fully utilize the potential of new processors, and to study more complex models. We target simulations on small to medium scale shared memory computers: laptops and desktop PCs with ~8 CPU cores and up to tens of GB of memory to high-end servers with ~50 CPU cores and hundereds of GB of memory. In this setting MATLAB is often the environment of choice for scientists that want to implement their own models with little effort. It is a useful general purpose mathematical software package, but due to its versatility some of its functionality is not as efficient as it could be. In particular, the challanges of modern multi-core architectures are not fully addressed. We have developed MILAMIN 2 - an efficient FEM modeling environment written in native MATLAB. Amongst others, MILAMIN provides functions to define model geometry, generate and convert structured and unstructured meshes (also through interfaces to external mesh generators), compute element and system matrices, apply boundary conditions, solve the system of linear equations, address non-linear and transient problems, and perform post-processing. MILAMIN strives to combine the ease of code development and the computational efficiency. Where possible, the code is optimized and/or parallelized within the MATLAB framework. Native MATLAB is augmented with the MUTILS library - a set of MEX functions that

  20. A Structured Microprogram Set for the SUMC Computer to Emulate the IBM System/360, Model 50

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gimenez, Cesar R.

    1975-01-01

    Similarities between regular and structured microprogramming were examined. An explanation of machine branching architecture (particularly in the SUMC computer), required for ease of structured microprogram implementation is presented. Implementation of a structured microprogram set in the SUMC to emulate the IBM System/360 is described and a comparison is made between the structured set with a nonstructured set previously written for the SUMC.

  1. Modeling Primary Breakup: A Three-Dimensional Eulerian Level Set/Vortex Sheet Method for Two-Phase Interface Dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herrmann, M.

    2003-01-01

    This paper is divided into four parts. First, the level set/vortex sheet method for three-dimensional two-phase interface dynamics is presented. Second, the LSS model for the primary breakup of turbulent liquid jets and sheets is outlined and all terms requiring subgrid modeling are identified. Then, preliminary three-dimensional results of the level set/vortex sheet method are presented and discussed. Finally, conclusions are drawn and an outlook to future work is given.

  2. A Validated Set of MIDAS V5 Task Network Model Scenarios to Evaluate Nextgen Closely Spaced Parallel Operations Concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gore, Brian Francis; Hooey, Becky Lee; Haan, Nancy; Socash, Connie; Mahlstedt, Eric; Foyle, David C.

    2013-01-01

    The Closely Spaced Parallel Operations (CSPO) scenario is a complex, human performance model scenario that tested alternate operator roles and responsibilities to a series of off-nominal operations on approach and landing (see Gore, Hooey, Mahlstedt, Foyle, 2013). The model links together the procedures, equipment, crewstation, and external environment to produce predictions of operator performance in response to Next Generation system designs, like those expected in the National Airspaces NextGen concepts. The task analysis that is contained in the present report comes from the task analysis window in the MIDAS software. These tasks link definitions and states for equipment components, environmental features as well as operational contexts. The current task analysis culminated in 3300 tasks that included over 1000 Subject Matter Expert (SME)-vetted, re-usable procedural sets for three critical phases of flight; the Descent, Approach, and Land procedural sets (see Gore et al., 2011 for a description of the development of the tasks included in the model; Gore, Hooey, Mahlstedt, Foyle, 2013 for a description of the model, and its results; Hooey, Gore, Mahlstedt, Foyle, 2013 for a description of the guidelines that were generated from the models results; Gore, Hooey, Foyle, 2012 for a description of the models implementation and its settings). The rollout, after landing checks, taxi to gate and arrive at gate illustrated in Figure 1 were not used in the approach and divert scenarios exercised. The other networks in Figure 1 set up appropriate context settings for the flight deck.The current report presents the models task decomposition from the tophighest level and decomposes it to finer-grained levels. The first task that is completed by the model is to set all of the initial settings for the scenario runs included in the model (network 75 in Figure 1). This initialization process also resets the CAD graphic files contained with MIDAS, as well as the embedded

  3. Galaxy Evolution Insights from Spectral Modeling of Large Data Sets from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey

    SciTech Connect

    Hoversten, Erik A.

    2007-10-01

    This thesis centers on the use of spectral modeling techniques on data from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) to gain new insights into current questions in galaxy evolution. The SDSS provides a large, uniform, high quality data set which can be exploited in a number of ways. One avenue pursued here is to use the large sample size to measure precisely the mean properties of galaxies of increasingly narrow parameter ranges. The other route taken is to look for rare objects which open up for exploration new areas in galaxy parameter space. The crux of this thesis is revisiting the classical Kennicutt method for inferring the stellar initial mass function (IMF) from the integrated light properties of galaxies. A large data set (~ 105 galaxies) from the SDSS DR4 is combined with more in-depth modeling and quantitative statistical analysis to search for systematic IMF variations as a function of galaxy luminosity. Galaxy Hα equivalent widths are compared to a broadband color index to constrain the IMF. It is found that for the sample as a whole the best fitting IMF power law slope above 0.5 M is Γ = 1.5 ± 0.1 with the error dominated by systematics. Galaxies brighter than around Mr,0.1 = -20 (including galaxies like the Milky Way which has Mr,0.1 ~ -21) are well fit by a universal Γ ~ 1.4 IMF, similar to the classical Salpeter slope, and smooth, exponential star formation histories (SFH). Fainter galaxies prefer steeper IMFs and the quality of the fits reveal that for these galaxies a universal IMF with smooth SFHs is actually a poor assumption. Related projects are also pursued. A targeted photometric search is conducted for strongly lensed Lyman break galaxies (LBG) similar to MS1512-cB58. The evolution of the photometric selection technique is described as are the results of spectroscopic follow-up of the best targets. The serendipitous discovery of two interesting blue compact dwarf galaxies is reported. These

  4. In situ thermal excursions detected in the Nankai Trough forearc slope sediment at IODP NanTroSEIZE Site C0008

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kinoshita, Masataka; Fukase, Hiroaki; Goto, Shusaku; Toki, Tomohiro

    2015-02-01

    At Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) Site C0008 in the Nankai Trough slope sediment, we discovered in situ temperature anomalies at 80 to 160 m below the seafloor, where pore fluid Cl and δ 18O excursions were identified and interpreted as pore fluid refreshing due to hydrate dissociation. The volume fraction of hydrates is estimated to be approximately 3% and approximately 40% maximum at Holes C0008A and C0008C, respectively. In the vicinity of these anomalies, we discovered negative and positive temperature excursions of up to 1 K measured in situ using the Advanced Piston Corer Temperature (APC-T) tool attached to the shoe of a hydraulic piston corer. They are significantly larger than the uncertainties caused during data acquisition and processing. Frictional heat due to penetration increased the temperature by >10 K, exceeding the gas/hydrate stability temperature at that depth. This heat is partly consumed by hydrate dissociation, which disturbs the thermal decay curve after penetration, but 2D numerical modeling revealed that hydrate dissociation does not significantly change the extrapolated equilibrium temperature. So far, we cannot suggest any acceptable explanation for the observed thermal anomalies, although we strongly suspect that it is related to hydrate dissociation.

  5. Dynamics of the Earth Magnetic Field during the period of high variability covering the Laschamp and Mono Lake excursions.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laj, Carlo; Guillou, Hervé; Kissel, Catherine

    2014-05-01

    We report on a synthesis of new paleomagnetic data (direction and intensity), conducted together with new K/Ar and 40Ar/39Ar dating over the past few years on 37 lava flows from the Chaîne des Puys (Massif Central, France). New flows emplaced during the Laschamp excursion have been identified and their K/Ar and 40Ar/39Ar dating improves again the precision of the age of this excursion, now established at 41.3 ± 0.6 ka (2sigma). Also, transitional flows corresponding to the Mono Lake excursion have been identified for the first time in this region, widening the geographical expression of this excursion. Absolute intensities obtained from 22 flows out of the 35 studied flows indicate that the intensity of the earth magnetic field is highly reduced, not only during the Laschamp but also during the Mono Lake excursion (to about 10% of the present-day field value). These two well identified and well dated minima, therefore now constitute very precise and accurate tie-points for the chronostratigraphy of this time period. In the 7000 years long interval separating the two excursions, the intensity of the earth magnetic field recovers to almost non-transitional values. This rules out the recent suggestion that a long intensity minimum (6000 years) between the two excursions would have resulted in the extinction of the Neandertal man-kind, via a strong decrease of the atmospheric ozone and an increase in UVB concentration. Not only the amplitude but also the duration of the observed changes are remarkably consistent in the high resolution records obtained from marine sediments, lavas and cosmogenic isotopes from polar ice. They indicate that the duration of the Laschamp can be estimated at about 1500 years based on the intensity drop and to about 640 years based on the directional change. If an excursion is an aborted polarity state as previously suggested, this would imply a duration of only 320 years for a polarity reversal, far shorter than what is invoked in the

  6. Effects of diaphragm stretching on posterior chain muscle kinematics and rib cage and abdominal excursion: a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    González-Álvarez, Francisco J.; Valenza, Marie C.; Torres-Sánchez, Irene; Cabrera-Martos, Irene; Rodríguez-Torres, Janet; Castellote-Caballero, Yolanda

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background Few studies have explored the effects of stretching techniques on diaphragm and spine kinematics. Objective To determine whether the application of diaphragm stretching resulted in changes in posterior chain muscle kinematics and ribcage and abdominal excursion in healthy subjects. Method Eighty healthy adults were included in this randomized clinical trial. Participants were randomized into two groups: the experimental group, which received a diaphragmatic stretching technique, or the placebo group, which received a sham-ultrasound procedure. The duration of the technique, the position of participants, and the therapist who applied the technique were the same for both treatments. Participant assessment (cervical range of movement, lumbar flexibility, flexibility of the posterior chain, and rib cage and abdominal excursion) was performed at baseline and immediately after the intervention by a blinded assessor. Results The mean between-group difference [95% CI] for the ribcage excursion after technique at xiphoid level was 2.48 [0.97 to 3.99], which shows significant differences in this outcome. The remaining between-group analysis showed significant differences in cervical extension, right and left flexion, flexibility of the posterior chain, and ribcage excursion at xiphoid level (p<0.05) in favor of the experimental group. Conclusion Diaphragm stretching generates a significant improvement in cervical extension, right and left cervical flexion, flexibility of the posterior chain, and ribcage excursion at xiphoid level compared to a placebo technique in healthy adults. PMID:27333481

  7. Hierarchical simulation of aquifer heterogeneity: implications of different simulation settings on solute-transport modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Comunian, Alessandro; De Micheli, Leonardo; Lazzati, Claudio; Felletti, Fabrizio; Giacobbo, Francesca; Giudici, Mauro; Bersezio, Riccardo

    2016-03-01

    The fine-scale heterogeneity of porous media affects the large-scale transport of solutes and contaminants in groundwater and it can be reproduced by means of several geostatistical simulation tools. However, including the available geological information in these tools is often cumbersome. A hierarchical simulation procedure based on a binary tree is proposed and tested on two real-world blocks of alluvial sediments, of a few cubic meters volume, that represent small-scale aquifer analogs. The procedure is implemented using the sequential indicator simulation, but it is so general that it can be adapted to various geostatistical simulation tools, improving their capability to incorporate geological information, i.e., the sedimentological and architectural characterization of heterogeneity. When compared with a standard sequential indicator approach on bi-dimensional simulations, in terms of proportions and connectivity indicators, the proposed procedure yields reliable results, closer to the reference observations. Different ensembles of three-dimensional simulations based on different hierarchical sequences are used to perform numerical experiments of conservative solute transport and to obtain ensembles of equivalent pore velocity and dispersion coefficient at the scale length of the blocks (meter). Their statistics are used to estimate the impact of the variability of the transport properties of the simulated blocks on contaminant transport modeled on bigger domains (hectometer). This is investigated with a one-dimensional transport modeling based on the Kolmogorov-Dmitriev theory of branching stochastic processes. Applying the proposed approach with diverse binary trees and different simulation settings provides a great flexibility, which is revealed by the differences in the breakthrough curves.

  8. A General Fuzzy Cerebellar Model Neural Network Multidimensional Classifier Using Intuitionistic Fuzzy Sets for Medical Identification.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jing; Lin, Lo-Yi; Lin, Chih-Min

    2016-01-01

    The diversity of medical factors makes the analysis and judgment of uncertainty one of the challenges of medical diagnosis. A well-designed classification and judgment system for medical uncertainty can increase the rate of correct medical diagnosis. In this paper, a new multidimensional classifier is proposed by using an intelligent algorithm, which is the general fuzzy cerebellar model neural network (GFCMNN). To obtain more information about uncertainty, an intuitionistic fuzzy linguistic term is employed to describe medical features. The solution of classification is obtained by a similarity measurement. The advantages of the novel classifier proposed here are drawn out by comparing the same medical example under the methods of intuitionistic fuzzy sets (IFSs) and intuitionistic fuzzy cross-entropy (IFCE) with different score functions. Cross verification experiments are also taken to further test the classification ability of the GFCMNN multidimensional classifier. All of these experimental results show the effectiveness of the proposed GFCMNN multidimensional classifier and point out that it can assist in supporting for correct medical diagnoses associated with multiple categories.

  9. A General Fuzzy Cerebellar Model Neural Network Multidimensional Classifier Using Intuitionistic Fuzzy Sets for Medical Identification

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Jing; Lin, Lo-Yi

    2016-01-01

    The diversity of medical factors makes the analysis and judgment of uncertainty one of the challenges of medical diagnosis. A well-designed classification and judgment system for medical uncertainty can increase the rate of correct medical diagnosis. In this paper, a new multidimensional classifier is proposed by using an intelligent algorithm, which is the general fuzzy cerebellar model neural network (GFCMNN). To obtain more information about uncertainty, an intuitionistic fuzzy linguistic term is employed to describe medical features. The solution of classification is obtained by a similarity measurement. The advantages of the novel classifier proposed here are drawn out by comparing the same medical example under the methods of intuitionistic fuzzy sets (IFSs) and intuitionistic fuzzy cross-entropy (IFCE) with different score functions. Cross verification experiments are also taken to further test the classification ability of the GFCMNN multidimensional classifier. All of these experimental results show the effectiveness of the proposed GFCMNN multidimensional classifier and point out that it can assist in supporting for correct medical diagnoses associated with multiple categories. PMID:27298619

  10. High resolution tsunami modelling for the evaluation of potential risk areas in Setúbal (Portugal)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ribeiro, J.; Silva, A.; Leitão, P.

    2011-08-01

    The use of high resolution hydrodynamic modelling to simulate the potential effects of tsunami events can provide relevant information about the most probable inundation areas. Moreover, the consideration of complementary data such as the type of buildings, location of priority equipment, type of roads, enables mapping of the most vulnerable zones, computing of the expected damage on man-made structures, constrain of the definition of rescue areas and escape routes, adaptation of emergency plans and proper evaluation of the vulnerability associated with different areas and/or equipment. Such an approach was used to evaluate the specific risks associated with a potential occurrence of a tsunami event in the region of Setúbal (Portugal), which was one of the areas most seriously affected by the 1755 tsunami. In order to perform an evaluation of the hazard associated with the occurrence of a similar event, high resolution wave propagation simulations were performed considering different potential earthquake sources with different magnitudes. Based on these simulations, detailed inundation maps associated with the different events were produced. These results were combined with the available information on the vulnerability of the local infrastructures (building types, roads and streets characteristics, priority buildings) in order to impose restrictions in the production of high-scale potential damage maps, escape routes and emergency routes maps.

  11. An Environmental Data Set for Vector-Borne Disease Modeling and Epidemiology

    PubMed Central

    Chabot-Couture, Guillaume; Nigmatulina, Karima; Eckhoff, Philip

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the environmental conditions of disease transmission is important in the study of vector-borne diseases. Low- and middle-income countries bear a significant portion of the disease burden; but data about weather conditions in those countries can be sparse and difficult to reconstruct. Here, we describe methods to assemble high-resolution gridded time series data sets of air temperature, relative humidity, land temperature, and rainfall for such areas; and we test these methods on the island of Madagascar. Air temperature and relative humidity were constructed using statistical interpolation of weather station measurements; the resulting median 95th percentile absolute errors were 2.75°C and 16.6%. Missing pixels from the MODIS11 remote sensing land temperature product were estimated using Fourier decomposition and time-series analysis; thus providing an alternative to the 8-day and 30-day aggregated products. The RFE 2.0 remote sensing rainfall estimator was characterized by comparing it with multiple interpolated rainfall products, and we observed significant differences in temporal and spatial heterogeneity relevant to vector-borne disease modeling. PMID:24755954

  12. Parents and technology in the inpatient pediatric setting: a beginning model for study.

    PubMed

    Dunn, Kelly; Board, Rhonda

    2011-01-01

    Medical technology has an increasing presence in the pediatric general care unit (GCU) and is an important tool in the provision of nursing care to children. As a result, both nurses and parents or other patient caregivers have had to integrate medical technology into their roles in the GCU setting. For nurses, this integration of technology into their workflow may be less stressful because new technologies are seen as additional resources to be used to provide proficient, safe patient care. Parents and other caregivers, however, may be more challenged by the sudden presence of technology in their caregiver role. Despite the increased presence of technology in the GCU, the impact of medical technology on nurse-parent-child relationships has not been explicitly researched. A descriptive review of the literature addresses some of the elements in these relationships and nursing care. A theoretical model of the influence of technology on the nurse-parent-child relationship is proposed, and suggestions for future research are made.

  13. Toward accurate tooth segmentation from computed tomography images using a hybrid level set model

    SciTech Connect

    Gan, Yangzhou; Zhao, Qunfei; Xia, Zeyang E-mail: jing.xiong@siat.ac.cn; Hu, Ying; Xiong, Jing E-mail: jing.xiong@siat.ac.cn; Zhang, Jianwei

    2015-01-15

    Purpose: A three-dimensional (3D) model of the teeth provides important information for orthodontic diagnosis and treatment planning. Tooth segmentation is an essential step in generating the 3D digital model from computed tomography (CT) images. The aim of this study is to develop an accurate and efficient tooth segmentation method from CT images. Methods: The 3D dental CT volumetric images are segmented slice by slice in a two-dimensional (2D) transverse plane. The 2D segmentation is composed of a manual initialization step and an automatic slice by slice segmentation step. In the manual initialization step, the user manually picks a starting slice and selects a seed point for each tooth in this slice. In the automatic slice segmentation step, a developed hybrid level set model is applied to segment tooth contours from each slice. Tooth contour propagation strategy is employed to initialize the level set function automatically. Cone beam CT (CBCT) images of two subjects were used to tune the parameters. Images of 16 additional subjects were used to validate the performance of the method. Volume overlap metrics and surface distance metrics were adopted to assess the segmentation accuracy quantitatively. The volume overlap metrics were volume difference (VD, mm{sup 3}) and Dice similarity coefficient (DSC, %). The surface distance metrics were average symmetric surface distance (ASSD, mm), RMS (root mean square) symmetric surface distance (RMSSSD, mm), and maximum symmetric surface distance (MSSD, mm). Computation time was recorded to assess the efficiency. The performance of the proposed method has been compared with two state-of-the-art methods. Results: For the tested CBCT images, the VD, DSC, ASSD, RMSSSD, and MSSD for the incisor were 38.16 ± 12.94 mm{sup 3}, 88.82 ± 2.14%, 0.29 ± 0.03 mm, 0.32 ± 0.08 mm, and 1.25 ± 0.58 mm, respectively; the VD, DSC, ASSD, RMSSSD, and MSSD for the canine were 49.12 ± 9.33 mm{sup 3}, 91.57 ± 0.82%, 0.27 ± 0.02 mm, 0

  14. Comparison of Atmospheric Water Vapor in Observational and Model Data Sets

    SciTech Connect

    Boyle, J.S.

    2000-03-01

    The global water vapor distribution for five observational based data sets and three GCM integrations are compared. The variables considered are the mean and standard deviation values of the precipitable water for the entire atmospheric column and the 500 to 300 hPa layer for January and July. The observationally based sets are the radiosonde data of Ross and Elliott, the ERA and NCEP reanalyses, and the NVAP blend of sonde and satellite data. The three GCM simulations all use the NCAR CCM3 as the atmospheric model. They include: a AMIP type simulation using observed SSTs for the period 1979 to 1993, the NCAR CSM 300 year coupled ocean--atmosphere integration, and a CSM integration with a 1% CO2 increase per year. The observational data exhibit some serious inconsistencies. There are geographical patterns of differences related to interannual variations and national instrument biases. It is clear that the proper characterization of water vapor is somewhat uncertain. Some conclusions about these data appear to be robust even given the discrepancies. The ERA data are too dry especially in the upper levels. The observational data evince much better agreement in the data rich Northern Hemisphere compared to the Southern. Distinct biases are quite pronounced over the Southern Ocean. The mean values and particularly the standard deviations of the three reanalyses are very dependent upon the GCM used as the assimilation vehicle for the analyses. This is made clear by the much enhanced tropical variability in the NCEP/DOE/ AMIP reanalyses compared the initial NCEP/NCAR Reanalysis. The NCAR CCM3 shows consistent evidence of a dry bias. The 1% CO2 experiment shows a very similar pattern of disagreement with the sonde data as the other integrations, once account is taken of the warming trend. No new modes of difference are evident in the 1% CO2 experiment. All the CCM3 runs indicated too much Tropical variability especially in the western Tropical Pacific and Southeast Asia

  15. Fixed-distance latent class models for the analysis of sets of two-way contingency tables.

    PubMed

    Formann, A K

    1993-06-01

    This paper develops and describes the application of modified latent class models for analyzing sets of two-way contingency tables. The proposed fixed-distance models differ from traditional latent class models in that the assumption of local stochastic independence is superseded by allowing interactions of the manifest variables within each class, which can be represented by a single association parameter. As an example, two data sets on eye color by hair color [collected in Caithness (N1 = 5,387) and Aberdeen (N2 = 22,361)] and fixed-distance models with up to six classes (three classes per data set) are considered, finally leading to satisfactory fit and rather simple interpretation.

  16. Multiple data sets converge on a geologic structural model for Glass Buttes, Oregon geothermal prospect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walsh, P.; Martini, B.; Lide, C.; Boschmann, D.; Dilles, J. H.; Meigs, A.

    2010-12-01

    Geologic field work is being combined with multiple remote sensing and geophysical tools to model fault structure at the Glass Buttes geothermal prospect in central Oregon. Glass Buttes are a Pliocene volcanic center that sits near the junction of the Abert Rim and Brothers Fault Zones. West-northwest-striking faults, which typify the Brothers Fault Zone, bound Glass Buttes. Individual faults and fault intersections are anticipated to provide permeability for utility scale geothermal development in central Oregon. Existing temperature data reveal a maximum of 90° C measured at 600 m, with ~160° C/km bottom hole temperature gradient. High temperature surface alteration, abundant WNW-oriented faulting, and reported drilling mud losses indicate likely commercial temperatures and fracture-controlled permeability at depth. LiDAR, hyperspectral mineral mapping, and field mapping constrain near-surface structure and volcanic contacts; aeromagnetic data constrain surface to intermediate (<1000 m) structure; and gravity data constrain deeper structure (surface-2000 m). Data sets agree reasonably well in some areas, although gravity data reflect a few deep-seated faults more than the densely faulted surface structure. On the east side of the prospect, these interpreted faults trend ENE, nearly perpendicular to observed surface structures. To the north of Glass Buttes, a curvilinear gravity high and topographic low indicate that Glass Buttes sits on the southern end of a previously unidentified buried caldera or graben. Interpretation of subsurface and gravity data do not uniquely distinguish between these alternative interpretations. Exploratory drilling will target intersections of surface faults with deeper gravity-defined features.

  17. Modeling and monitoring of tooth fillet crack growth in dynamic simulation of spur gear set

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guilbault, Raynald; Lalonde, Sébastien; Thomas, Marc

    2015-05-01

    This study integrates a linear elastic fracture mechanics analysis of the tooth fillet crack propagation into a nonlinear dynamic model of spur gear sets. An original formulation establishes the rigidity of sound and damaged teeth. The formula incorporates the contribution of the flexible gear body and real crack trajectories in the fillet zone. The work also develops a KI prediction formula. A validation of the equation estimates shows that the predicted KI are in close agreement with published numerical and experimental values. The representation also relies on the Paris-Erdogan equation completed with crack closure effects. The analysis considers that during dN fatigue cycles, a harmonic mean of ΔK assures optimal evaluations. The paper evaluates the influence of the mesh frequency distance from the resonances of the system. The obtained results indicate that while the dependence may demonstrate obvious nonlinearities, the crack progression rate increases with a mesh frequency augmentation. The study develops a tooth fillet crack propagation detection procedure based on residual signals (RS) prepared in the frequency domain. The proposed approach accepts any gear conditions as reference signature. The standard deviation and mean values of the RS are evaluated as gear condition descriptors. A trend tracking of their responses obtained from a moving linear regression completes the analysis. Globally, the results show that, regardless of the reference signal, both descriptors are sensitive to the tooth fillet crack and sharply react to tooth breakage. On average, the mean value detected the crack propagation after a size increase of 3.69 percent as compared to the reference condition, whereas the standard deviation required crack progressions of 12.24 percent. Moreover, the mean descriptor shows evolutions closer to the crack size progression.

  18. What's statistical about learning? Insights from modelling statistical learning as a set of memory processes.

    PubMed

    Thiessen, Erik D

    2017-01-05

    Statistical learning has been studied in a variety of different tasks, including word segmentation, object identification, category learning, artificial grammar learning and serial reaction time tasks (e.g. Saffran et al. 1996 Science 274: , 1926-1928; Orban et al. 2008 Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences 105: , 2745-2750; Thiessen & Yee 2010 Child Development 81: , 1287-1303; Saffran 2002 Journal of Memory and Language 47: , 172-196; Misyak & Christiansen 2012 Language Learning 62: , 302-331). The difference among these tasks raises questions about whether they all depend on the same kinds of underlying processes and computations, or whether they are tapping into different underlying mechanisms. Prior theoretical approaches to statistical learning have often tried to explain or model learning in a single task. However, in many cases these approaches appear inadequate to explain performance in multiple tasks. For example, explaining word segmentation via the computation of sequential statistics (such as transitional probability) provides little insight into the nature of sensitivity to regularities among simultaneously presented features. In this article, we will present a formal computational approach that we believe is a good candidate to provide a unifying framework to explore and explain learning in a wide variety of statistical learning tasks. This framework suggests that statistical learning arises from a set of processes that are inherent in memory systems, including activation, interference, integration of information and forgetting (e.g. Perruchet & Vinter 1998 Journal of Memory and Language 39: , 246-263; Thiessen et al. 2013 Psychological Bulletin 139: , 792-814). From this perspective, statistical learning does not involve explicit computation of statistics, but rather the extraction of elements of the input into memory traces, and subsequent integration across those memory traces that emphasize consistent information (Thiessen and Pavlik

  19. Comparative modeling and benchmarking data sets for human histone deacetylases and sirtuin families.

    PubMed

    Xia, Jie; Tilahun, Ermias Lemma; Kebede, Eyob Hailu; Reid, Terry-Elinor; Zhang, Liangren; Wang, Xiang Simon

    2015-02-23

    Histone deacetylases (HDACs) are an important class of drug targets for the treatment of cancers, neurodegenerative diseases, and other types of diseases. Virtual screening (VS) has become fairly effective approaches for drug discovery of novel and highly selective histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACIs). To facilitate the process, we constructed maximal unbiased benchmarking data sets for HDACs (MUBD-HDACs) using our recently published methods that were originally developed for building unbiased benchmarking sets for ligand-based virtual screening (LBVS). The MUBD-HDACs cover all four classes including Class III (Sirtuins family) and 14 HDAC isoforms, composed of 631 inhibitors and 24609 unbiased decoys. Its ligand sets have been validated extensively as chemically diverse, while the decoy sets were shown to be property-matching with ligands and maximal unbiased in terms of "artificial enrichment" and "analogue bias". We also conducted comparative studies with DUD-E and DEKOIS 2.0 sets against HDAC2 and HDAC8 targets and demonstrate that our MUBD-HDACs are unique in that they can be applied unbiasedly to both LBVS and SBVS approaches. In addition, we defined a novel metric, i.e. NLBScore, to detect the "2D bias" and "LBVS favorable" effect within the benchmarking sets. In summary, MUBD-HDACs are the only comprehensive and maximal-unbiased benchmark data sets for HDACs (including Sirtuins) that are available so far. MUBD-HDACs are freely available at http://www.xswlab.org/ .

  20. Precise ages of the Réunion event and Huckleberry Ridge excursion: Episodic clustering of geomagnetic instabilities and the dynamics of flow within the outer core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singer, Brad S.; Jicha, Brian R.; Condon, Daniel J.; Macho, Alexandra S.; Hoffman, Kenneth A.; Dierkhising, Joseph; Brown, Maxwell C.; Feinberg, Joshua M.; Kidane, Tesfaye

    2014-11-01

    The Réunion event is one of the earliest recognized periods of normal polarity within the reversed Matuyama chron. Named for the site at which it was first discovered on Réunion Island, it has since purportedly been found globally in both volcanic rocks and sediments, and thus has become a key chronostratigraphic marker. However, geochronologic results from several locations thought to have recorded this event have caused considerable confusion regarding not only its age and duration, but also the number of Réunion events. New 40Ar/39Ar ages from eight Réunion Island lavas in three distinct sections are indistinguishable from one another, thereby placing the event at 2.200±0.007/0.010 Ma (±2σ analytical/total uncertainty, note this format is used throughout the paper). The paleomagnetic behavior recorded at two of the island sites shows that the opposite (normal) polarity was reached and sustained for a period during which several lava flows were erupted. Whether this can be classified as a very short subchron bounded by a rapid set of back-to-back reversals, or as a special case of a geomagnetic excursion, is unclear. Hence, we choose to continue labeling the dynamo activity recorded by these Réunion Island lavas as an “event”. This event preceded a ∼38 kyr period of normal polarity that we name the Feni subchron after its locality of discovery at ODP site 981. The Feni subchron was succeeded by the Huckleberry Ridge excursion for which 40Ar/39Ar sanidine and U-Pb zircon ages of 2.077±0.001/0.003 Ma and 2.084±0.012/0.013 Ma, respectively, from member B of the Huckleberry Ridge tuff in Idaho, are in agreement. These findings suggest that the full normal polarity recorded on Réunion Island is a singular brief period of unstable field behavior at the onset of a ∼125 kyr bundling of dynamo instabilities from 2.20 to 2.07 Ma. Disturbances to the axial dipole component of earth's magnetic field during this period, and by analogy similar periods of

  1. Neurocomputing model for computation of an approximate convex hull of a set of points and spheres.

    PubMed

    Pal, Srimanta; Bhattacharya, Sabyasachi

    2007-03-01

    In this letter, a two-layer neural network is proposed for computation of an approximate convex hull of a set of given points in 3-D or a set of spheres of different sizes. The algorithm is designed based on an elegant concept-shrinking of a spherical rubber balloon surrounding the set of objects in 3-D. Logically, a set of neurons is orderly placed on a spherical mesh i.e., on a rubber balloon surrounding the objects. Each neuron has a parameter vector associated with its current position. The resultant force of attraction between a neuron and each of the given points/objects, determines the direction of a movement of the neuron lying on the rubber balloon. As the network evolves, the neurons (parameter vectors) approximate the convex hull more and more accurately.

  2. Mathematical models of the simplest fuzzy PI/PD controllers with skewed input and output fuzzy sets.

    PubMed

    Mohan, B M; Sinha, Arpita

    2008-07-01

    This paper unveils mathematical models for fuzzy PI/PD controllers which employ two skewed fuzzy sets for each of the two-input variables and three skewed fuzzy sets for the output variable. The basic constituents of these models are Gamma-type and L-type membership functions for each input, trapezoidal/triangular membership functions for output, intersection/algebraic product triangular norm, maximum/drastic sum triangular conorm, Mamdani minimum/Larsen product/drastic product inference method, and center of sums defuzzification method. The existing simplest fuzzy PI/PD controller structures derived via symmetrical fuzzy sets become special cases of the mathematical models revealed in this paper. Finally, a numerical example along with its simulation results are included to demonstrate the effectiveness of the simplest fuzzy PI controllers.

  3. Size distribution of function-based human gene sets and the split-merge model.

    PubMed

    Li, Wentian; Fontanelli, Oscar; Miramontes, Pedro

    2016-08-01

    The sizes of paralogues-gene families produced by ancestral duplication-are known to follow a power-law distribution. We examine the size distribution of gene sets or gene families where genes are grouped by a similar function or share a common property. The size distribution of Human Gene Nomenclature Committee (HGNC) gene sets deviate from the power-law, and can be fitted much better by a beta rank function. We propose a simple mechanism to break a power-law size distribution by a combination of splitting and merging operations. The largest gene sets are split into two to account for the subfunctional categories, and a small proportion of other gene sets are merged into larger sets as new common themes might be realized. These operations are not uncommon for a curator of gene sets. A simulation shows that iteration of these operations changes the size distribution of Ensembl paralogues and could lead to a distribution fitted by a rank beta function. We further illustrate application of beta rank function by the example of distribution of transcription factors and drug target genes among HGNC gene families.

  4. Size distribution of function-based human gene sets and the split–merge model

    PubMed Central

    Fontanelli, Oscar; Miramontes, Pedro

    2016-01-01

    The sizes of paralogues—gene families produced by ancestral duplication—are known to follow a power-law distribution. We examine the size distribution of gene sets or gene families where genes are grouped by a similar function or share a common property. The size distribution of Human Gene Nomenclature Committee (HGNC) gene sets deviate from the power-law, and can be fitted much better by a beta rank function. We propose a simple mechanism to break a power-law size distribution by a combination of splitting and merging operations. The largest gene sets are split into two to account for the subfunctional categories, and a small proportion of other gene sets are merged into larger sets as new common themes might be realized. These operations are not uncommon for a curator of gene sets. A simulation shows that iteration of these operations changes the size distribution of Ensembl paralogues and could lead to a distribution fitted by a rank beta function. We further illustrate application of beta rank function by the example of distribution of transcription factors and drug target genes among HGNC gene families. PMID:27853602

  5. Ion leaching of a glass-ionomer glass: an empirical model and effects on setting characteristics and strength.

    PubMed

    Prentice, Leon H; Tyas, Martin J; Burrow, Michael F

    2007-01-01

    The release of ions from a glass-ionomer glass, which in the polyacid matrix effects the cross-linking and setting of a cement, can be modelled and initiated by acid-treatment in a dilute acid. This study examined the effect of time of acetic acid leaching on the working time, setting time, and strength of a model GIC. A reactive fluoride glass was immersed in hot acetic acid for 0 (control), 5, 15, 35, 65, 95 and 125 min, filtered and dried. The glass was mixed with an experimental GI liquid in a capsule system and the mixed pastes assessed for working and initial setting time. Compressive strength testing was undertaken according to ISO9917:2003. Immersion time had a significant effect on both working and setting time of the resultant pastes only up to 65 min of immersion, and corresponded with a thin-film ion diffusion model. Compressive strength did not vary significantly with immersion time. The glass-ionomer setting reaction can be conveniently retarded by immersion of the powder in acetic acid, without affecting strength. A reactivity model was developed, whereby the effects of various changes to the leaching process may be usefully examined.

  6. Modeling mode choice behavior incorporating household and individual sociodemographics and travel attributes based on rough sets theory.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Long; Chen, Xuewu; Wei, Ming; Wu, Jingxian; Hou, Xianyao

    2014-01-01

    Most traditional mode choice models are based on the principle of random utility maximization derived from econometric theory. Alternatively, mode choice modeling can be regarded as a pattern recognition problem reflected from the explanatory variables of determining the choices between alternatives. The paper applies the knowledge discovery technique of rough sets theory to model travel mode choices incorporating household and individual sociodemographics and travel information, and to identify the significance of each attribute. The study uses the detailed travel diary survey data of Changxing county which contains information on both household and individual travel behaviors for model estimation and evaluation. The knowledge is presented in the form of easily understood IF-THEN statements or rules which reveal how each attribute influences mode choice behavior. These rules are then used to predict travel mode choices from information held about previously unseen individuals and the classification performance is assessed. The rough sets model shows high robustness and good predictive ability. The most significant condition attributes identified to determine travel mode choices are gender, distance, household annual income, and occupation. Comparative evaluation with the MNL model also proves that the rough sets model gives superior prediction accuracy and coverage on travel mode choice modeling.

  7. Estimating the Tradeoff Between Risk Protection and Moral Hazard with a Nonlinear Budget Set Model of Health Insurance*

    PubMed Central

    Kowalski, Amanda E.

    2015-01-01

    Insurance induces a tradeoff between the welfare gains from risk protection and the welfare losses from moral hazard. Empirical work traditionally estimates each side of the tradeoff separately, potentially yielding mutually inconsistent results. I develop a nonlinear budget set model of health insurance that allows for both simultaneously. Nonlinearities in the budget set arise from deductibles, coinsurance rates, and stoplosses that alter moral hazard as well as risk protection. I illustrate the properties of my model by estimating it using data on employer sponsored health insurance from a large firm. PMID:26664035

  8. Oxidation instability of SiC and Si3N4 following thermal excursions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ogbuji, Linus U. J. T.

    1991-01-01

    The effect of thermal excursion and thermal cycling on the oxidation stability of chemical vapor-deposited (CVD) SiC and Si3N4 was studied at 1350 C. Thermal cycling alone produced no noticeable change in oxidation kinetics. However, TEM showed that oxide scales grown in cycles consist of alternating layers of SiO2 and Si2N2O. When the oxidation of CVD SiC or Si3N4 at 1350 C was interrupted with a 1.5-h annealing in Ar at 1500 C, the kinetics of reoxidation at 1350 C were found to be drastically increased. The SiC and Si3N4 then oxidized essentially at the same rate, which is over 50 times the preannealing rate, and comparable to the expected oxidation rate of these materials at 1500 C.

  9. Possible Recording of the Hilina Pali Excursion in Cored Tyrrhenian Sea Sediment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iorio, Marina; Liddicoat, Joseph; Sagnotti, Leonardo; Incoronato, Alberto; de Anteriis, Giovanni; Insinga, Donatella; Angelino, Antimo

    2013-04-01

    First encountered in marine sediment cored from the Gulf of Mexico (19.5˚ N, 267.0˚ E)(Clark and Kennett, 1973), the Hilina Pali Excursion (HPE) is named for a locality in Hawaii (19.5˚ N, 205.0˚ E) where inclination of about negative 40˚ is documented in cored basalt (Teanby et al., 2002). Prior to naming the excursion, Coe et al. (1978) also found shallow inclination in basalt from Kilauea Volcano (19.2˚ N, 204.7˚ E) that is dated at about 18,000 yrs B.P. (uncorrected Carbon-14, Rubin and Berthold, 1961) - the age now assigned to the HPE - and was erupted when the field intensity was reduced to nearly half the present intensity. More recently, the HPE was located at Changbaishan Volcano in northeastern China (40.2˚ N, 128.0˚ E) where the age is established by Ar40/Ar39 dates (Singer et al., 2011). In exposed lake sediments in the Mono Basin, CA (38.0˚ N, 240.8˚ E), shallow positive inclination at about 18,000 yrs B.P. might also be the HPE. In the Mono Basin, normalized (NRM/ARM) intensity is reduced at that time (Zimmerman et al., 2006), and the Virtual Geomagnetic Poles (VGPs) during the reduced intensity form a clockwise trending loop when followed from old to young that descends to 53.8˚ N, 22.7˚ E (n = 6, Alpha-95 = 2.3˚) and is centered at about 50˚ N, 30˚ E (Coe and Liddicoat, 2012). There is a possible excursion of the palaeomagnetic field recorded in marine sediment at a locality in the Tyrrhenian Sea about 25 km south of Ischia (40.5˚ N, 13.7˚ E). The excursion is in sediment from two core segments that span about 22,000-18,000 yrs B.P. (de Alteriis et al., 2010) and occurs as reduced positive inclination (about 50˚) at about 20,000 yrs B.P. that increases to about 80˚ at about 18,000 yrs B.P. when declination changes from west to east. This pattern of field behaviour is similar to the behaviour of the possible HPE in the Mono Basin (Coe and Liddicoat, 2012) and in sediment cored from Lac du Bouchet, FR (44.9˚ N, 3.8˚ E) that is

  10. Translocal ecologies: the Norfolk broads, the "natural," and the international phytogeographical excursion, 1911.

    PubMed

    Cameron, Laura; Matless, David

    2011-01-01

    What we consider "nature" is always historical and relational, shaped in contingent configurations of representational and social practices. In the early twentieth century, the English ecologist A.G. Tansley lamented the pervasive problem of international misunderstandings concerning the nature of "nature." In order to create some consensus on the concepts and language of ecological plant geography, Tansley founded the International Phytogeographical Excursion, which brought together leading plant geographers and botanists from North America and Europe. The first IPE in August 1911 started with the Norfolk Broads. It was led by Marietta Pallis, Tansley's former student at Cambridge. This trip and the work of Pallis, neglected in other accounts of this early period of the history of ecology, influenced the relations between Tansley and important American ecologists H.C. Cowles and F.E. Clements. Understanding "place" as a network of relations, our regional focus shows how taking international dialogue, travel and interchange into account enriches understanding of ecological practice.

  11. Depriming of arterial heat pipes: An investigation of CTS thermal excursions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Antoniuk, D.; Edwards, D. K.

    1980-01-01

    Four thermal excursions of the Transmitter Experiment Package (TEP) were the result of the depriming of the arteries in all three heat pipes in the Variable Conductance Heat Pipe System which cooled the TEP. The determined cause of the depriming of the heat pipes was the formation of bubbles of the nitrogen/helium control gas mixture in the arteries during the thaw portion of a freeze/thaw cycle of the inactive region of the condenser section of the heat pipe. Conditions such as suction freezeout or heat pipe turn-on, which moved these bubbles into the active region of the heat pipe, contributed to the depriming mechanism. Methods for precluding, or reducing the probability of, this type of failure mechanism in future applications of arterial heat pipes are included.

  12. Five scientists on excursion — a picture of marine biology on Helgoland before 1892

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zissler, D.

    1995-03-01

    Five scientists on excursion — a picture of marine biology on Helgoland before 1892. The picture, of which several variant poses with minor differences exist, is a photograph taken on Helgoland in September, 1865. The original is to be found in the collections of the Ernst-Haeckel-Haus in Jena. The photograph shows only a few objects and fewer persons, but they are arranged like a bouquet: in front, collecting vessels; behind, grouped around a table, five scientists, Dohrn, Greeff, Haeckel, Salverda, Marchi. They hold up their catching nets like insignia, identifying their basic activity. This photograph is a unique document for the marine biological research on Helgoland before 1892. Furthermore, it illustrates a time and place for the birth of the idea of establishing the world's most famous marine biological station, the Stazione Zoologica di Napoli.

  13. Keeping the Purpose in Mind: The Implementation of Instructional Models in Physical Education Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gurvitch, Rachel; Metzler, Mike

    2010-01-01

    Models-Based Instruction (MBI) is a comprehensive approach to teaching and learning. In MBI, a teacher becomes familiar with multiple ways (called models) to plan, implement and assess instruction, and then selects the model that can best promote specific kinds of student learning in each unit. By using several models within the same curriculum, a…

  14. Resolving the age of Wilson Creek Formation tephras and the Mono Lake excursion using high-resolution SIMS dating of allanite and zircon rims

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vazquez, J. A.; Lidzbarski, M. I.

    2012-12-01

    Sediments of the Wilson Creek Formation surrounding Mono Lake preserve a high-resolution archive of glacial and pluvial responses along the eastern Sierra Nevada due to late Pleistocene climate change. An absolute chronology for the Wilson Creek stratigraphy is critical for correlating the paleoclimate record to other archives in the western U.S. and the North Atlantic region. However, multiple attempts to date the Wilson Creek stratigraphy using carbonates and interbedded rhyolitic tephras yield discordant 14C and 40Ar/39Ar results due to open-system effects, carbon reservoir uncertainties, as well as abundant xenocrysts entrained during eruption. Ion microprobe (SIMS) 238U-230Th dating of the final increments of crystallization recorded by allanite and zircon autocrysts from juvenile pyroclasts yields ages that effectively date eruption of key tephra beds and resolve age uncertainties about the Wilson Creek stratigraphy. To date the final several micrometers of crystal growth, individual allanite and zircon crystals were embedded in soft indium to allow sampling of unpolished rims. Isochron ages derived from rims on coexisting allanite and zircon (± glass) from hand-selected pumiceous pyroclasts delimit the timing of Wilson Creek sedimentation between Ashes 7 and 19 (numbering of Lajoie, 1968) to the interval between ca. 27 to ca. 62 ka. The interiors of individual allanite and zircon crystals sectioned in standard SIMS mounts yield model 238U-230Th ages that are mostly <10 k.y. older than their corresponding rim age, suggesting a relatively brief interval of allanite + zircon crystallization before eruption. A minority of allanite and zircon crystals yield rim and interior model ages of ca. 90-100 ka, and are likely to be antecrysts recycled from relatively early Mono Craters volcanism and/or intrusions. Tephra (Ash 15) erupted during the geomagnetic excursion originally designated the Mono Lake excursion yields a rim isochron age of ca. 41 ka indicating that

  15. Development and Validation of Decision Forest Model for Estrogen Receptor Binding Prediction of Chemicals Using Large Data Sets.

    PubMed

    Ng, Hui Wen; Doughty, Stephen W; Luo, Heng; Ye, Hao; Ge, Weigong; Tong, Weida; Hong, Huixiao

    2015-12-21

    Some chemicals in the environment possess the potential to interact with the endocrine system in the human body. Multiple receptors are involved in the endocrine system; estrogen receptor α (ERα) plays very important roles in endocrine activity and is the most studied receptor. Understanding and predicting estrogenic activity of chemicals facilitates the evaluation of their endocrine activity. Hence, we have developed a decision forest classification model to predict chemical binding to ERα using a large training data set of 3308 chemicals obtained from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration's Estrogenic Activity Database. We tested the model using cross validations and external data sets of 1641 chemicals obtained from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's ToxCast project. The model showed good performance in both internal (92% accuracy) and external validations (∼ 70-89% relative balanced accuracies), where the latter involved the validations of the model across different ER pathway-related assays in ToxCast. The important features that contribute to the prediction ability of the model were identified through informative descriptor analysis and were related to current knowledge of ER binding. Prediction confidence analysis revealed that the model had both high prediction confidence and accuracy for most predicted chemicals. The results demonstrated that the model constructed based on the large training data set is more accurate and robust for predicting ER binding of chemicals than the published models that have been developed using much smaller data sets. The model could be useful for the evaluation of ERα-mediated endocrine activity potential of environmental chemicals.

  16. Instantaneous changes in respiratory function induced by passive pelvic suspension in the supine position in relation to increased diaphragm excursion

    PubMed Central

    Ishizuka, Tatsuya; Nishida, Naoya; Homma, Yuuki; Hirayama, Tetsuro; Ishida, Yukisato; Kakizaki, Fujiyasu; Konishi, Masato

    2017-01-01

    [Purpose] This study aimed to introduce an approach of pelvic suspension (PS) using sling cords and to obtain evidence for changes in respiratory function of healthy subjects. [Subjects and Methods] Subjects were 25 healthy men. In the supine position, with hip and knee joints flexed at 90°, the subjects’ pelvises were suspended with sling belts. Diaphragm excursion, respiratory function, and respiratory comfort in these postures were measured using ultrasonography, respirometry, and visual analog scale (VAS), respectively. [Results] When the pelvis was passively suspended with sling cords, the diaphragm moved 5 mm cranially and diaphragm excursion showed an instantaneous increase compared with the control. The tidal volume (VT) showed an increase and the respiration rate (RR) showed a decrease. The extent of diaphragm excursion was correlated with changes in VT under the control and PS conditions. Independent measurements of pulmonary function revealed that PS reduced the expiratory reserve volume, being correlated positively and negatively to increases in vital and inspiratory capacities, respectively. Furthermore, VAS values for respiratory ease were greater with PS than with the control. [Conclusion] These results suggest that PS effectively changed diaphragm excursion and respiratory function, leading to ease of breathing (i.e., deep and slow respiration). PMID:28356625

  17. Anomalous negative excursion of carbon isotope in organic carbon after the last Paleoproterozoic glaciation in North America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sekine, Yasuhito; Tajika, Eiichi; Ohkouchi, Naohiko; Ogawa, Nanako O.; Goto, Kazuhisa; Tada, Ryuji; Yamamoto, Shinji; Kirschvink, Joseph L.

    2010-08-01

    Early Paleoproterozoic time (2.5-2.0 Ga) spanned a critical phase in Earth's history, characterized by repeated glaciations and an increase in atmospheric oxygen (the Great Oxidation Event (GOE)). Following the last and most intense glaciation of this period, marine carbonates record a large positive excursion of δ13C value (termed the "Lomagundi event") between about 2.2 and 2.1 Ga coinciding with the global appearances of red beds and sulfates, which suggest an accumulation of high levels of atmospheric oxygen. Here we report the discovery of large negative excursions of δ13C in organic matter (down to -55‰) from quartzose sandstones (of the Marquette Range and the Huronian Supergroups, North America) intermediate in age between the last Paleoproterozoic glaciation and the possible onset of the Lomagundi event. The negative excursion is concomitant with the appearance of intensely weathered quartzose sandstones, which may represent hot and humid conditions. There are some interpretations that potentially explain the negative excursions: (1) redeposition of older 13C-depleted kerogen, (2) later post-depositional infiltration of oil, (3) active methane productions by methanogens in shallow-marine environments, or (4) dissociation of methane hydrate. If the latter two were the case, they would provide clues for understanding the environmental change connecting the intense glaciation and an increase in oxygen.

  18. Tuning the Field Trip: Audio-Guided Tours as a Replacement for 1-Day Excursions in Human Geography

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wissmann, Torsten

    2013-01-01

    Educators are experiencing difficulties with 1-day field trips in human geography. Instead of teaching students how to apply theory in the field and learn to "sense" geography in everyday life, many excursions have degraded into tourist-like events where lecturers try to motivate rather passive students against a noisy urban backdrop.…

  19. The significance of an Early Jurassic (Toarcian) carbon-isotope excursion in Haida Gwaii (Queen Charlotte Islands), British Columbia, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caruthers, Andrew H.; Gröcke, Darren R.; Smith, Paul L.

    2011-07-01

    During the Early Toarcian there was a significant disruption in the short-term active carbon reservoir as revealed by carbon-isotope records, which show a broad positive shift that is interrupted by a large 5-7‰ negative excursion (δ 13C org). Carbon-isotope excursion co-occurs with the deposition of organic-rich shales in many areas. This perturbation in carbon isotopes is thought to be indicative of severe climate change and marine anoxia. The two leading hypotheses as to the cause of this event invoke either global or regional controls. Here we present carbon-isotope data from Haida Gwaii, British Columbia, Canada showing a significant perturbation within a temporally constrained Early Toarcian succession that was deposited in the northeastern paleo-Pacific Ocean. These data reinforce the concept that the short-term active carbon reservoir was affected globally, and assist with the correlation of ammonite zonal schemes between western North America and Europe. The δ 13C org data show a broad positive shift that is interrupted by a sharp and pronounced negative excursion of 7‰ (8.5‰ in δ 13C wood) in the Early Toarcian Kanense Zone. This negative excursion also coincides with increasing total organic carbon (TOC) from ~ 0.4% to ~ 1.2%. These data suggest that the Early Toarcian carbon-isotope perturbation was indeed global and imprinted itself on all active global reservoirs of the exchangeable carbon cycle (deep marine, shallow marine, atmospheric).

  20. Depositional sequence stratigraphy and architecture of the cretaceous ferron sandstone: Implications for coal and coalbed methane resources - A field excursion

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Garrison, J.R.; Van Den, Bergh; Barker, C.E.; Tabet, D.E.

    1997-01-01

    This Field Excursion will visit outcrops of the fluvial-deltaic Upper Cretaceous (Turonian) Ferron Sandstone Member of the Mancos Shale, known as the Last Chance delta or Upper Ferron Sandstone. This field guide and the field stops will outline the architecture and depositional sequence stratigraphy of the Upper Ferron Sandstone clastic wedge and explore the stratigraphic positions and compositions of major coal zones. The implications of the architecture and stratigraphy of the Ferron fluvial-deltaic complex for coal and coalbed methane resources will be discussed. Early works suggested that the southwesterly derived deltaic deposits of the the upper Ferron Sandstone clastic wedge were a Type-2 third-order depositional sequence, informally called the Ferron Sequence. These works suggested that the Ferron Sequence is separated by a type-2 sequence boundary from the underlying 3rd-order Hyatti Sequence, which has its sediment source from the northwest. Within the 3rd-order depositional sequence, the deltaic events of the Ferron clastic wedge, recognized as parasequence sets, appear to be stacked into progradational, aggradational, and retrogradational patterns reflecting a generally decreasing sediment supply during an overall slow sea-level rise. The architecture of both near-marine facies and non-marine fluvial facies exhibit well defined trends in response to this decrease in available sediment. Recent studies have concluded that, unless coincident with a depositional sequence boundary, regionally extensive coal zones occur at the tops of the parasequence sets within the Ferron clastic wedge. These coal zones consist of coal seams and their laterally equivalent fissile carbonaceous shales, mudstones, and siltstones, paleosols, and flood plain mudstones. Although the compositions of coal zones vary along depositional dip, the presence of these laterally extensive stratigraphic horizons, above parasequence sets, provides a means of correlating and defining the tops

  1. A Collaborative Model for Developing Classroom Management Skills in Urban Professional Development School Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dobler, Elizabeth; Kesner, Cathy; Kramer, Rebecca; Resnik, Marilyn; Devin, Libby

    2009-01-01

    This article describes a school-university partnership that focuses on the development of classroom management skills for preservice teachers in an urban setting, through collaboration between mentors, principals, and a university supervisor. To prepare preservice teachers for the unique challenges of urban schools, three key elements were…

  2. BEST in CLASS: A Classroom-Based Model for Ameliorating Problem Behavior in Early Childhood Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vo, Abigail; Sutherland, Kevin S.; Conroy, Maureen A.

    2012-01-01

    As more young children enter school settings to attend early childhood programs, early childhood teachers and school psychologists have been charged with supporting a growing number of young children with chronic problem behaviors that put them at risk for the development of emotional/behavioral disorders (EBDs). There is a need for effective,…

  3. Best in Class: A Classroom-Based Model for Ameliorating Problem Behavior in Early Childhood Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vo, Abigail K.; Sutherland, Kevin S.; Conroy, Maureen A.

    2012-01-01

    As more young children enter school settings to attend early childhood programs, early childhood teachers and school psychologists have been charged with supporting a growing number of young children with chronic problem behaviors that put them at risk for the development of emotional/behavioral disorders (EBDs). There is a need for effective,…

  4. Outcomes of a Behavioral Education Model for Children with Autism in a Mainstream School Setting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grindle, Corinna F.; Hastings, Richard P.; Saville, Maria; Hughes, J. Carl; Huxley, Kathleen; Kovshoff, Hanna; Griffith, Gemma M.; Walker-Jones, Elin; Devonshire, Katherine; Remington, Bob

    2012-01-01

    The authors report 1-year outcomes for 11 children (3-7 years) with autism who attended an "Applied Behavior Analysis (ABA) classroom" educational intervention in a mainstream school setting. The children learned new skills by the end of 1 year and learned additional skills during a 2nd year. Group analysis of standardized test outcomes (IQ and…

  5. An Innovative Model of Integrated Behavioral Health: School Psychologists in Pediatric Primary Care Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adams, Carolyn D.; Hinojosa, Sara; Armstrong, Kathleen; Takagishi, Jennifer; Dabrow, Sharon

    2016-01-01

    This article discusses an innovative example of integrated care in which doctoral level school psychology interns and residents worked alongside pediatric residents and pediatricians in the primary care settings to jointly provide services to patients. School psychologists specializing in pediatric health are uniquely trained to recognize and…

  6. A Goal-Setting Model for Young Adolescent At-Risk Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martino, Louis R.

    1993-01-01

    Many young adolescent students are frustrated, reluctant learners that seem resigned to helplessness and other self-defeating behaviors. Telling students to try harder is not particularly effective. This article offers a goal-setting strategy to help youngsters become failure-avoiding, instead of failure-accepting, students. Teachers help students…

  7. Valuing the Adult Learner in E-Learning: A Conceptual Model for Corporate Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waight, Consuelo L.; Stewart, Barbara

    2005-01-01

    The framework describes that e-Learning engagement, learning and transfer within corporate settings can possibly be achieved if antecedents such as needs assessment, learner analysis, for example, and moderators such as return on investment, learning theories, for example, are adhered. The realization of antecedents and moderators, however, are…

  8. A two DOF simulation of meshing in spur gear sets with modelling of the effect of individual tooth mass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komitopoulos, Nikolaos; Vakouftsis, Christos

    2014-10-01

    A Two-Degree Of Freedom analytical model of meshing in a single-stage spur gear set was developed and used for time-domain dynamic simulation. Apart from the time-varying tooth stiffness, the individual tooth mass, reduced to the meshing point, was also taken into consideration and modeled. The simulations that were performed by means of MatLab software using numerical methods highlight the effect of the individual tooth mass in the dynamic response of the gear stage.

  9. The social justice roots of the Mentors in Violence Prevention model and its application in a high school setting.

    PubMed

    Katz, Jackson; Heisterkamp, H Alan; Fleming, Wm Michael

    2011-06-01

    The social justice roots and theory of the Mentors in Violence Prevention (MVP) model is presented, followed by an empirical study examining the influence of MVP in high school settings. Findings reveal students exposed to the MVP model are more likely to see forms of violence as being wrong and are more likely to take actions to intervene than students not exposed to the program. Findings support the premises on which MVP is founded.

  10. SLO blind data set inversion and classification using physically complete models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shamatava, I.; Shubitidze, F.; Fernández, J. P.; Barrowes, B. E.; O'Neill, K.; Grzegorczyk, T. M.; Bijamov, A.

    2010-04-01

    Discrimination studies carried out on TEMTADS and Metal Mapper blind data sets collected at the San Luis Obispo UXO site are presented. The data sets included four types of targets of interest: 2.36" rockets, 60-mm mortar shells, 81-mm projectiles, and 4.2" mortar items. The total parameterized normalized magnetic source (NSMS) amplitudes were used to discriminate TOI from metallic clutter and among the different hazardous UXO. First, in object's frame coordinate, the total NSMS were determined for each TOI along three orthogonal axes from the training data provided by the Strategic Environmental Research and Development Program (SERDP) along with the referred blind data sets. Then the inverted total NSMS were used to extract the time-decay classification features. Once our inversion and classification algorithms were tested on the calibration data sets then we applied the same procedure to all blind data sets. The combined NSMS and differential evolution algorithm is utilized for determine the NSMS strengths for each cell. The obtained total NSMS time-decay curves were used to extract the discrimination features and perform classification using the training data as reference. In addition, for cross validation, the inverted locations and orientations from NSMS-DE algorithm were compared against the inverted data that obtained via the magnetic field, vector and scalar potentials (HAP) method and the combined dipole and Gauss-Newton approach technique. We examined the entire time decay history of the total NSMS case-by-case for classification purposes. Also, we use different multi-class statistical classification algorithms for separating the dangerous objects from non hazardous items. The inverted targets were ranked by target ID and submitted to SERDP for independent scoring. The independent scoring results are presented.

  11. PR-Set7 is degraded in a conditional Cul4A transgenic mouse model of lung cancer

    DOE PAGES

    Wang, Yang; Xu, Zhidong; Mao, Jian -Hua; ...

    2015-06-01

    Background and objective. Maintenance of genomic integrity is essential to ensure normal organismal development and to prevent diseases such as cancer. PR-Set7 (also known as Set8) is a cell cycle regulated enzyme that catalyses monomethylation of histone 4 at Lys20 (H4K20me1) to promote chromosome condensation and prevent DNA damage. Recent studies show that CRL4CDT2-mediated ubiquitylation of PR-Set7 leads to its degradation during S phase and after DNA damage. This might occur to ensure appropriate changes in chromosome structure during the cell cycle or to preserve genome integrity after DNA damage. Methods. We developed a new model of lung tumor developmentmore » in mice harboring a conditionally expressed allele of Cul4A. We have therefore used a mouse model to demonstrate for the first time that Cul4A is oncogenic in vivo. With this model, staining of PR-Set7 in the preneoplastic and tumor lesions in AdenoCre-induced mouse lungs was performed. Meanwhile we identified higher protein level changes of γ-tubulin and pericentrin by IHC. Results. The level of PR-Set7 down-regulated in the preneoplastic and adenocarcinomous lesions following over-expression of Cul4A. We also identified higher levels of the proteins pericentrin and γ-tubulin in Cul4A mouse lungs induced by AdenoCre. Conclusion. PR-Set7 is a direct target of Cul4A for degradation and involved in the formation of lung tumors in the conditional Cul4A transgenic mouse model.« less

  12. Simulation of Heterogeneous Atom Probe Tip Shapes Evolution during Field Evaporation Using a Level Set Method and Different Evaporation Models

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Zhijie; Li, Dongsheng; Xu, Wei; Devaraj, Arun; Colby, Robert J.; Thevuthasan, Suntharampillai; Geiser, B. P.; Larson, David J.

    2015-04-01

    In atom probe tomography (APT), accurate reconstruction of the spatial positions of field evaporated ions from measured detector patterns depends upon a correct understanding of the dynamic tip shape evolution and evaporation laws of component atoms. Artifacts in APT reconstructions of heterogeneous materials can be attributed to the assumption of homogeneous evaporation of all the elements in the material in addition to the assumption of a steady state hemispherical dynamic tip shape evolution. A level set method based specimen shape evolution model is developed in this study to simulate the evaporation of synthetic layered-structured APT tips. The simulation results of the shape evolution by the level set model qualitatively agree with the finite element method and the literature data using the finite difference method. The asymmetric evolving shape predicted by the level set model demonstrates the complex evaporation behavior of heterogeneous tip and the interface curvature can potentially lead to the artifacts in the APT reconstruction of such materials. Compared with other APT simulation methods, the new method provides smoother interface representation with the aid of the intrinsic sub-grid accuracy. Two evaporation models (linear and exponential evaporation laws) are implemented in the level set simulations and the effect of evaporation laws on the tip shape evolution is also presented.

  13. Reliability and Validity Evidence for Achievement Goal Models in High School Physical Education Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guan, Jianmin; McBride, Ron; Xiang, Ping

    2007-01-01

    Although empirical research in academic areas provides support for both a 3-factor as well as a 4-factor achievement goal model, both models were proposed and tested with a collegiate sample. Little is known about the generalizability of either model with high school level samples. This study was designed to examine whether the 3-factor model…

  14. Examining Parallelism of Sets of Psychometric Measures Using Latent Variable Modeling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raykov, Tenko; Patelis, Thanos; Marcoulides, George A.

    2011-01-01

    A latent variable modeling approach that can be used to examine whether several psychometric tests are parallel is discussed. The method consists of sequentially testing the properties of parallel measures via a corresponding relaxation of parameter constraints in a saturated model or an appropriately constructed latent variable model. The…

  15. Rapid directional changes associated with a 6.5 kyr-long Blake geomagnetic excursion at the Blake-Bahama Outer Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourne, Mark; Mac Niocaill, Conall; Thomas, Alex L.; Knudsen, Mads Faurschou; Henderson, Gideon M.

    2012-06-01

    Geomagnetic excursions are recognized as intrinsic features of the Earth's magnetic field. High-resolution records of field behaviour, captured in marine sedimentary cores, present an opportunity to determine the temporal and geometric character of the field during geomagnetic excursions and provide constraints on the mechanisms producing field variability. We present here the highest resolution record yet published of the Blake geomagnetic excursion (∼125 ka) measured in three cores from Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) Site 1062 on the Blake-Bahama Outer Ridge. The Blake excursion has a controversial structure and timing but these cores have a sufficiently high sedimentation rate (∼10 cm ka-1) to allow detailed reconstruction of the field behaviour at this site during the excursion. Palaeomagnetic measurements of the cores reveal rapid transitions (<500 yr) between the contemporary stable normal polarity and a completely reversed state of long duration which spans a stratigraphic interval of 0.7 m. We determine the duration of the reversed state during the Blake excursion using oxygen isotope stratigraphy, combined with 230Th excess measurements to assess variations in the sedimentation rates through the sections of interest. This provides an age and duration for the Blake excursion with greater accuracy and with constrained uncertainty. We date the directional excursion as falling between 129 and 122 ka with a duration for the deviation of 6.5±1.3 kyr. The long duration of this interval and the fully reversed field suggest the existence of a pseudo-stable, reversed dipole field component during the excursion and challenge the idea that excursions are always of short duration.

  16. Performance of a Mathematical Model to Forecast Lives Saved from HIV Treatment Expansion in Resource-Limited Settings

    PubMed Central

    Kimmel, April D.; Fitzgerald, Daniel W.; Pape, Jean W.; Schackman, Bruce R.

    2014-01-01

    Background International guidelines recommend HIV treatment expansion in resource-limited settings, but funding availability is uncertain. We evaluated performance of a model that forecasts lives saved through continued HIV treatment expansion in Haiti. Methods We developed a computer-based, mathematical model of HIV disease and used incidence density analysis of patient-level Haitian data to derive model parameters for HIV disease progression. We assessed internal validity of model predictions and internally calibrated model inputs when model predictions did not fit the patient-level data. We then derived uncertain model inputs related to diagnosis and linkage to care, pre-treatment retention, and enrollment on HIV treatment through an external calibration process that selected input values by comparing model predictions to Haitian population-level data. Model performance was measured by fit to event-free survival (patient-level) and number receiving HIV treatment over time (population-level). Results For a cohort of newly HIV-infected individuals with no access to HIV treatment, the model predicts median AIDS-free survival of 9.0 years pre-calibration and 6.6 years post-calibration versus 5.8 years (95% CI 5.1, 7.0) from the patient-level data. After internal validation and calibration, 16 of 17 event-free survival measures (94%) had a mean percentage deviation between model predictions and the empiric data of <6%. After external calibration, the percentage deviation between model predictions and population-level data on the number on HIV treatment was <1% over time. Conclusions Validation and calibration resulted in a good-fitting model appropriate for health policy decision making. Using local data in a policy model-building process is feasible in resource-limited settings. PMID:25331914

  17. A new adaptation of linear reservoir models in parallel sets to assess actual hydrological events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mateo Lázaro, Jesús; Sánchez Navarro, José Ángel; García Gil, Alejandro; Edo Romero, Vanesa

    2015-05-01

    A methodology based on Parallel Linear Reservoir (PLR) models is presented. To carry it out has been implemented within the software SHEE (Simulation of Hydrological Extreme Events), which is a tool for the analysis of hydrological processes in catchments with the management and display of DEM and datasets. The algorithms of the models pass throughout the cells and drainage network, by means of the Watershed Traversal Algorithm (WTA) that runs the entire drainage network of a basin in both directions, upwards and downwards, which is ideal for incorporating the models of the hydrological processes of the basins into its structure. The WTA methodology is combined with another one based on models of Parallel Linear Reservoirs (PLR) whose main qualities include: (1) the models are defined by observing the recession curves of actual hydrographs, i.e., the watershed actual responses; (2) the models serve as a way to simulate the routing through the watershed and its different reservoirs; and (3) the models allow calculating the water balance, which is essential to the study of actual events in the watershed. A complete hydrometeorological event needs the combination of several models, each one of which represents a hydrological process. The PLR model is a routing model, but it also contributes to the adjustment of other models (e.g., the rainfall-runoff model) and allows establishing a distributed model of effective rainfall for an actual event occurred in a basin. On the other hand, the proposed formulation solves the rainfall distribution problem for each deposit in the reservoir combination models.

  18. Partial record of a Miocene geomagnetic field excursion: Paleomagnetic data from the Paiute Ridge volcanic center, southern Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Ratcliff, C.D.; Geissman, J.W.; Perry, F.V. ); Crowe, B.M. )

    1993-04-01

    In the Palute Ridge area, northern Halfpint Range, a complex system of late Miocene (about 8.5 Ma) intrusive and extrusive alkaline mafic rocks crops out over an area of about 25km[sup 2]. Post-magmatic faulting and erosion have resulted in excellent exposure of this sub-volcanic center, allowing for a detailed study of mechanisms and timing of magma emplacement. Paleomagnetic data have been obtained from over 50 sites in mafic rocks, and host ash-flow tuffs and carbonate strata, to better understand the duration of magmatic activity. Magnetizations, isolated in progressive alternating field and thermal demagnetization, for most of the sites at Palute Ridge deviate significantly from expected directions for a time-averaged late Miocene field. Demagnetization data show that there are two types of sample behavior. First, samples with close to expected reverse polarity directions (e.g., the chilled margin of a sill, D=209.2, l=[minus]36.4, [alpha]95=13.2, N=5, k=34.8). Second, and far more common, are samples giving magnetizations of southwest to northwest declination, with both shallow to moderate positive and negative inclination. Within this second grouping are several sites, including syenite pods which differentiated in situ from a large lopolith, having mean declinations that are due west and of shallow inclination. Contact tests performed at several sites are positive and show a clear correlation between sample position and isolated remanence direction. The authors preferred interpretation of the anomalously directed magnetization is that these rocks acquired a TRM during either a high amplitude excursion, or the transitional portion of a field reversal. Thermal models based on larger intrusions [+-] 10m thick at Paiute Ridge indicate that the magmas could cool through estimated magnetization blocking temperatures within weeks or months of emplacement.

  19. Simulation skill of APCC set of global climate models for Asian summer monsoon rainfall variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, U. K.; Singh, G. P.; Singh, Vikas

    2015-04-01

    The performance of 11 Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation Climate Center (APCC) global climate models (coupled and uncoupled both) in simulating the seasonal summer (June-August) monsoon rainfall variability over Asia (especially over India and East Asia) has been evaluated in detail using hind-cast data (3 months advance) generated from APCC which provides the regional climate information product services based on multi-model ensemble dynamical seasonal prediction systems. The skill of each global climate model over Asia was tested separately in detail for the period of 21 years (1983-2003), and simulated Asian summer monsoon rainfall (ASMR) has been verified using various statistical measures for Indian and East Asian land masses separately. The analysis found a large variation in spatial ASMR simulated with uncoupled model compared to coupled models (like Predictive Ocean Atmosphere Model for Australia, National Centers for Environmental Prediction and Japan Meteorological Agency). The simulated ASMR in coupled model was closer to Climate Prediction Centre Merged Analysis of Precipitation (CMAP) compared to uncoupled models although the amount of ASMR was underestimated in both models. Analysis also found a high spread in simulated ASMR among the ensemble members (suggesting that the model's performance is highly dependent on its initial conditions). The correlation analysis between sea surface temperature (SST) and ASMR shows that that the coupled models are strongly associated with ASMR compared to the uncoupled models (suggesting that air-sea interaction is well cared in coupled models). The analysis of rainfall using various statistical measures suggests that the multi-model ensemble (MME) performed better compared to individual model and also separate study indicate that Indian and East Asian land masses are more useful compared to Asia monsoon rainfall as a whole. The results of various statistical measures like skill of multi-model ensemble, large spread

  20. MAnorm: a robust model for quantitative comparison of ChIP-Seq data sets

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    ChIP-Seq is widely used to characterize genome-wide binding patterns of transcription factors and other chromatin-associated proteins. Although comparison of ChIP-Seq data sets is critical for understanding cell type-dependent and cell state-specific binding, and thus the study of cell-specific gene regulation, few quantitative approaches have been developed. Here, we present a simple and effective method, MAnorm, for quantitative comparison of ChIP-Seq data sets describing transcription factor binding sites and epigenetic modifications. The quantitative binding differences inferred by MAnorm showed strong correlation with both the changes in expression of target genes and the binding of cell type-specific regulators. PMID:22424423

  1. Robust set-point regulation for ecological models with multiple management goals.

    PubMed

    Guiver, Chris; Mueller, Markus; Hodgson, Dave; Townley, Stuart

    2016-05-01

    Population managers will often have to deal with problems of meeting multiple goals, for example, keeping at specific levels both the total population and population abundances in given stage-classes of a stratified population. In control engineering, such set-point regulation problems are commonly tackled using multi-input, multi-output proportional and integral (PI) feedback controllers. Building on our recent results for population management with single goals, we develop a PI control approach in a context of multi-objective population management. We show that robust set-point regulation is achieved by using a modified PI controller with saturation and anti-windup elements, both described in the paper, and illustrate the theory with examples. Our results apply more generally to linear control systems with positive state variables, including a class of infinite-dimensional systems, and thus have broader appeal.

  2. Validation of the AVM Blast Computational Modeling and Simulation Tool Set

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-08-04

    Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) funded the Adaptive Vehicle Make (AVM) portfolio of programs that developed a set of tools and processes whose...goal was to reduce the cost and development time for cyber physical design by a factor of five, while expanding design adaptability and predictability...The Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) launched an ambitious Adaptive Vehicle Make (AVM) program to reduce the time it takes a

  3. A comparison of two finite element models of tidal hydrodynamics using a North Sea data set

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Walters, R.A.; Werner, F.E.

    1989-01-01

    Using the region of the English Channel and the southern bight of the North Sea, we systematically compare the results of two independent finite element models of tidal hydrodynamics. The model intercomparison provides a means for increasing our understanding of the relevant physical processes in the region in question as well as a means for the evaluation of certain algorithmic procedures of the two models. ?? 1989.

  4. Extending the standard model effective field theory with the complete set of dimension-7 operators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehman, Landon

    2014-12-01

    We present a complete list of the independent dimension-7 operators that are constructed using the standard model degrees of freedom and are invariant under the standard model gauge group. This list contains only 20 independent operators, far fewer than the 63 operators available at dimension 6. All of these dimension-7 operators contain fermions and violate lepton number, and 7 of the 20 violate baryon number as well. This result extends the standard model effective field theory and allows a more detailed exploration of the structure and properties of possible deformations from the standard model Lagrangian.

  5. Bayesian Models of Cognition Revisited: Setting Optimality Aside and Letting Data Drive Psychological Theory.

    PubMed

    Tauber, Sean; Navarro, Daniel J; Perfors, Amy; Steyvers, Mark

    2017-03-30

    Recent debates in the psychological literature have raised questions about the assumptions that underpin Bayesian models of cognition and what inferences they license about human cognition. In this paper we revisit this topic, arguing that there are 2 qualitatively different ways in which a Bayesian model could be constructed. The most common approach uses a Bayesian model as a normative standard upon which to license a claim about optimality. In the alternative approach, a descriptive Bayesian model need not correspond to any claim that the underlying cognition is optimal or rational, and is used solely as a tool for instantiating a substantive psychological theory. We present 3 case studies in which these 2 perspectives lead to different computational models and license different conclusions about human cognition. We demonstrate how the descriptive Bayesian approach can be used to answer different sorts of questions than the optimal approach, especially when combined with principled tools for model evaluation and model selection. More generally we argue for the importance of making a clear distinction between the 2 perspectives. Considerable confusion results when descriptive models and optimal models are conflated, and if Bayesians are to avoid contributing to this confusion it is important to avoid making normative claims when none are intended. (PsycINFO Database Record

  6. Search for the standard model Higgs Boson produced in association with top quarks using the full CDF data set.

    PubMed

    Aaltonen, T; Álvarez González, B; Amerio, S; Amidei, D; Anastassov, A; Annovi, A; Antos, J; Apollinari, G; Appel, J A; Arisawa, T; Artikov, A; Asaadi, J; Ashmanskas, W; Auerbach, B; Aurisano, A; Azfar, F; Badgett, W; Bae, T; Barbaro-Galtieri, A; Barnes, V E; Barnett, B A; Barria, P; Bartos, P; Bauce, M; Bedeschi, F; Behari, S; Bellettini, G; Bellinger, J; Benjamin, D; Beretvas, A; Bhatti, A; Bisello, D; Bizjak, I; Bland, K R; Blumenfeld, B; Bocci, A; Bodek, A; Bortoletto, D; Boudreau, J; Boveia, A; Brigliadori, L; Bromberg, C; Brucken, E; Budagov, J; Budd, H S; Burkett, K; Busetto, G; Bussey, P; Buzatu, A; Calamba, A; Calancha, C; Camarda, S; Campanelli, M; Campbell, M; Canelli, F; Carls, B; Carlsmith, D; Carosi, R; Carrillo, S; Carron, S; Casal, B; Casarsa, M; Castro, A; Catastini, P; Cauz, D; Cavaliere, V; Cavalli-Sforza, M; Cerri, A; Cerrito, L; Chen, Y C; Chertok, M; Chiarelli, G; Chlachidze, G; Chlebana, F; Cho, K; Chokheli, D; Chung, W H; Chung, Y S; Ciocci, M A; Clark, A; Clarke, C; Compostella, G; Connors, J; Convery, M E; Conway, J; Corbo, M; Cordelli, M; Cox, C A; Cox, D J; Crescioli, F; Cuevas, J; Culbertson, R; Dagenhart, D; d'Ascenzo, N; Datta, M; de Barbaro, P; Dell'Orso, M; Demortier, L; Deninno, M; Devoto, F; d'Errico, M; Di Canto, A; Di Ruzza, B; Dittmann, J R; D'Onofrio, M; Donati, S; Dong, P; Dorigo, M; Dorigo, T; Ebina, K; Elagin, A; Eppig, A; Erbacher, R; Errede, S; Ershaidat, N; Eusebi, R; Farrington, S; Feindt, M; Fernandez, J P; Field, R; Flanagan, G; Forrest, R; Frank, M J; Franklin, M; Freeman, J C; Funakoshi, Y; Furic, I; Gallinaro, M; Garcia, J E; Garfinkel, A F; Garosi, P; Gerberich, H; Gerchtein, E; Giagu, S; Giakoumopoulou, V; Giannetti, P; Gibson, K; Ginsburg, C M; Giokaris, N; Giromini, P; Giurgiu, G; Glagolev, V; Glenzinski, D; Gold, M; Goldin, D; Goldschmidt, N; Golossanov, A; Gomez, G; Gomez-Ceballos, G; Goncharov, M; González, O; Gorelov, I; Goshaw, A T; Goulianos, K; Grinstein, S; Grosso-Pilcher, C; Group, R C; Guimaraes da Costa, J; Hahn, S R; Halkiadakis, E; Hamaguchi, A; Han, J Y; Happacher, F; Hara, K; Hare, D; Hare, M; Harr, R F; Hatakeyama, K; Hays, C; Heck, M; Heinrich, J; Herndon, M; Hewamanage, S; Hocker, A; Hopkins, W; Horn, D; Hou, S; Hughes, R E; Hurwitz, M; Husemann, U; Hussain, N; Hussein, M; Huston, J; Introzzi, G; Iori, M; Ivanov, A; James, E; Jang, D; Jayatilaka, B; Jeon, E J; Jindariani, S; Jones, M; Joo, K K; Jun, S Y; Junk, T R; Kamon, T; Karchin, P E; Kasmi, A; Kato, Y; Ketchum, W; Keung, J; Khotilovich, V; Kilminster, B; Kim, D H; Kim, H S; Kim, J E; Kim, M J; Kim, S B; Kim, S H; Kim, Y K; Kim, Y J; Kimura, N; Kirby, M; Klimenko, S; Knoepfel, K; Kondo, K; Kong, D J; Konigsberg, J; Kotwal, A V; Kreps, M; Kroll, J; Krop, D; Kruse, M; Krutelyov, V; Kuhr, T; Kurata, M; Kwang, S; Laasanen, A T; Lami, S; Lammel, S; Lancaster, M; Lander, R L; Lannon, K; Lath, A; Latino, G; Lecompte, T; Lee, E; Lee, H S; Lee, J S; Lee, S W; Leo, S; Leone, S; Lewis, J D; Limosani, A; Lin, C-J; Lindgren, M; Lipeles, E; Lister, A; Litvintsev, D O; Liu, C; Liu, H; Liu, Q; Liu, T; Lockwitz, S; Loginov, A; Lucchesi, D; Lueck, J; Lujan, P; Lukens, P; Lungu, G; Lys, J; Lysak, R; Madrak, R; Maeshima, K; Maestro, P; Malik, S; Manca, G; Manousakis-Katsikakis, A; Margaroli, F; Marino, C; Martínez, M; Mastrandrea, P; Matera, K; Mattson, M E; Mazzacane, A; Mazzanti, P; McFarland, K S; McIntyre, P; McNulty, R; Mehta, A; Mehtala, P; Mesropian, C; Miao, T; Mietlicki, D; Mitra, A; Miyake, H; Moed, S; Moggi, N; Mondragon, M N; Moon, C S; Moore, R; Morello, M J; Morlock, J; Movilla Fernandez, P; Mukherjee, A; Muller, Th; Murat, P; Mussini, M; Nachtman, J; Nagai, Y; Naganoma, J; Nakano, I; Napier, A; Nett, J; Neu, C; Neubauer, M S; Nielsen, J; Nodulman, L; Noh, S Y; Norniella, O; Oakes, L; Oh, S H; Oh, Y D; Oksuzian, I; Okusawa, T; Orava, R; Ortolan, L; Pagan Griso, S; Pagliarone, C; Palencia, E; Papadimitriou, V; Paramonov, A A; Patrick, J; Pauletta, G; Paulini, M; Paus, C; Pellett, D E; Penzo, A; Phillips, T J; Piacentino, G; Pianori, E; Pilot, J; Pitts, K; Plager, C; Pondrom, L; Poprocki, S; Potamianos, K; Prokoshin, F; Pranko, A; Ptohos, F; Punzi, G; Rahaman, A; Ramakrishnan, V; Ranjan, N; Redondo, I; Renton, P; Rescigno, M; Riddick, T; Rimondi, F; Ristori, L; Robson, A; Rodrigo, T; Rodriguez, T; Rogers, E; Rolli, S; Roser, R; Ruffini, F; Ruiz, A; Russ, J; Rusu, V; Safonov, A; Sakumoto, W K; Sakurai, Y; Santi, L; Sato, K; Saveliev, V; Savoy-Navarro, A; Schlabach, P; Schmidt, A; Schmidt, E E; Schwarz, T; Scodellaro, L; Scribano, A; Scuri, F; Seidel, S; Seiya, Y; Semenov, A; Sforza, F; Shalhout, S Z; Shears, T; Shepard, P F; Shimojima, M; Shochet, M; Shreyber-Tecker, I; Simonenko, A; Sinervo, P; Sliwa, K; Smith, J R; Snider, F D; Soha, A; Sorin, V; Song, H; Squillacioti, P; Stancari, M; St Denis, R; Stelzer, B; Stelzer-Chilton, O; Stentz, D; Strologas, J; Strycker, G L; Sudo, Y; Sukhanov, A; Suslov, I; Takemasa, K; Takeuchi, Y; Tang, J; Tecchio, M; Teng, P K; Thom, J; Thome, J; Thompson, G A; Thomson, E; Toback, D; Tokar, S; Tollefson, K; Tomura, T; Tonelli, D; Torre, S; Torretta, D; Totaro, P; Trovato, M; Ukegawa, F; Uozumi, S; Varganov, A; Vázquez, F; Velev, G; Vellidis, C; Vidal, M; Vila, I; Vilar, R; Vizán, J; Vogel, M; Volpi, G; Wagner, P; Wagner, R L; Wakisaka, T; Wallny, R; Wang, S M; Warburton, A; Waters, D; Wester, W C; Whiteson, D; Wicklund, A B; Wicklund, E; Wilbur, S; Wick, F; Williams, H H; Wilson, J S; Wilson, P; Winer, B L; Wittich, P; Wolbers, S; Wolfe, H; Wright, T; Wu, X; Wu, Z; Yamamoto, K; Yamato, D; Yang, T; Yang, U K; Yang, Y C; Yao, W-M; Yeh, G P; Yi, K; Yoh, J; Yorita, K; Yoshida, T; Yu, G B; Yu, I; Yu, S S; Yun, J C; Zanetti, A; Zeng, Y; Zhou, C; Zucchelli, S

    2012-11-02

    A search is presented for the standard model Higgs boson produced in association with top quarks using the full Run II proton-antiproton collision data set, corresponding to 9.45 fb(-1), collected by the Collider Detector at Fermilab. No significant excess over the expected background is observed, and 95% credibility-level upper bounds are placed on the cross section σ(ttH → lepton + missing transverse energy+jets). For a Higgs boson mass of 125 GeV/c(2), we expect to set a limit of 12.6 and observe a limit of 20.5 times the standard model rate. This represents the most sensitive search for a standard model Higgs boson in this channel to date.

  7. NCEP and GISS solar radiation data sets available for ecosystem modeling: Description, differences, and impacts on net primary production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hicke, Jeffrey A.

    2005-06-01

    Downwelling surface solar radiation is an important input to ecosystem models, and global models require spatially extensive data sets that vary interannually to capture effects that potentially drive changes in ecosystem function. In this paper, I describe and compare solar radiation data sets from two representative sources, National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) reanalyses and Goddard Institute for Space Studies (GISS) calculations that included satellite observations of cloud properties. The CASA ecosystem model, which uses solar radiation and satellite-derived vegetation information, was run with the two solar radiation data sets to explore how differences affect estimated net primary production (NPP). GISS solar radiation matched ground-based observations better than NCEP solar radiation. Mean global NCEP solar radiation exceeded that from GISS by 16%, likely as a result of lower cloudiness within the NCEP reanalyses compared to satellite observations. Neither data set resulted in a significant trend over the study period (1984-2000). Locally, relative differences were up to 40% in the mean and 10% in the trend of solar radiation and NPP, and varied in sign across the globe. Because reanalysis solar radiation is only indirectly constrained by observations in contrast to the satellite-derived data, it is recommended that studies use the GISS solar radiation when possible.

  8. The Semi-opened Infrastructure Model (SopIM): A Frame to Set Up an Organizational Learning Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grundstein, Michel

    In this paper, we introduce the "Semi-opened Infrastructure Model (SopIM)" implemented to deploy Artificial Intelligence and Knowledge-based Systems within a large industrial company. This model illustrates what could be two of the operating elements of the Model for General Knowledge Management within the Enterprise (MGKME) that are essential to set up the organizational learning process that leads people to appropriate and use concepts, methods and tools of an innovative technology: the "Ad hoc Infrastructures" element, and the "Organizational Learning Processes" element.

  9. PECHCV, PECHFV, PEFHCV and PEFHFV: A set of atmospheric, primitive equation forecast models for the Northern Hemisphere, volume 3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wellck, R. E.; Pearce, M. L.

    1976-01-01

    As part of the SEASAT program of NASA, a set of four hemispheric, atmospheric prediction models were developed. The models, which use a polar stereographic grid in the horizontal and a sigma coordinate in the vertical, are: (1) PECHCV - five sigma layers and a 63 x 63 horizontal grid, (2) PECHFV - ten sigma layers and a 63 x 63 horizontal grid, (3) PEFHCV - five sigma layers and a 187 x 187 horizontal grid, and (4) PEFHFV - ten sigma layers and a 187 x 187 horizontal grid. The models and associated computer programs are described.

  10. Global data set of biogenic VOC emissions calculated by the MEGAN model over the last 30 years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sindelarova, K.; Granier, C.; Bouarar, I.; Guenther, A.; Tilmes, S.; Stavrakou, T.; Müller, J.-F.; Kuhn, U.; Stefani, P.; Knorr, W.

    2014-09-01

    The Model of Emissions of Gases and Aerosols from Nature (MEGANv2.1) together with the Modern-Era Retrospective Analysis for Research and Applications (MERRA) meteorological fields were used to create a global emission data set of biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOC) available on a monthly basis for the time period of 1980-2010. This data set, developed under the Monitoring Atmospheric Composition and Climate project (MACC), is called MEGAN-MACC. The model estimated mean annual total BVOC emission of 760 Tg (C) yr-1 consisting of isoprene (70%), monoterpenes (11%), methanol (6%), acetone (3%), sesquiterpenes (2.5%) and other BVOC species each contributing less than 2%. Several sensitivity model runs were performed to study the impact of different model input and model settings on isoprene estimates and resulted in differences of up to ±17% of the reference isoprene total. A greater impact was observed for a sensitivity run applying parameterization of soil moisture deficit that led to a 50% reduction of isoprene emissions on a global scale, most significantly in specific regions of Africa, South America and Australia. MEGAN-MACC estimates are comparable to results of previous studies. More detailed comparison with other isoprene inventories indicated significant spatial and temporal differences between the data sets especially for Australia, Southeast Asia and South America. MEGAN-MACC estimates of isoprene, α-pinene and group of monoterpenes showed a reasonable agreement with surface flux measurements at sites located in tropical forests in the Amazon and Malaysia. The model was able to capture the seasonal variation of isoprene emissions in the Amazon forest.

  11. A Model for Describing, Analysing and Investigating Cultural Understanding in EFL Reading Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Porto, Melina

    2013-01-01

    This article describes a model used to explore cultural understanding in English as a foreign language reading in a developing country, namely Argentina. The model is designed to investigate, analyse and describe EFL readers' processes of cultural understanding in a specific context. Cultural understanding in reading is typically investigated…

  12. Patient Anxiety Reduction Through Mediated Role Modeling in a Dental Setting.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Logan, Henrietta; And Others

    This investigation was conducted to determine the effect of video-taped role modeling on patient-reported level of anxiety at the beginning of dental treatment and the long term effects of the modeling tape as evidenced by appointment cancellations and failure rate. Subjects completed the state portion of the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI)…

  13. Does Rational Selection of Training and Test Sets Improve the Outcome of QSAR Modeling?

    EPA Science Inventory

    Prior to using a quantitative structure activity relationship (QSAR) model for external predictions, its predictive power should be established and validated. In the absence of a true external dataset, the best way to validate the predictive ability of a model is to perform its s...

  14. A Digital Tool Set for Systematic Model Design in Process-Engineering Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van der Schaaf, Hylke; Tramper, Johannes; Hartog, Rob J.M.; Vermue, Marian

    2006-01-01

    One of the objectives of the process technology curriculum at Wageningen University is that students learn how to design mathematical models in the context of process engineering, using a systematic problem analysis approach. Students find it difficult to learn to design a model and little material exists to meet this learning objective. For these…

  15. A Practical Skills Model for Effectively Engaging Clients in Multicultural Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alberta, Anthony J.; Wood, Anita H.

    2009-01-01

    The Practical Skills Model of Multicultural Engagement represents an attempt to create a means for moving beyond the development of knowledge and awareness into the development of skills that will assist practitioners to practice in a culturally competent manner. The model builds on basic counseling skills, combining them with specific approaches…

  16. An Evidence-Based Practice Model across the Academic and Clinical Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolter, Julie A.; Corbin-Lewis, Kim; Self, Trisha; Elsweiler, Anne

    2011-01-01

    This tutorial is designed to provide academic communication sciences and disorders (CSD) programs, at both the undergraduate and graduate levels, with a comprehensive instructional model on evidence-based practice (EBP). The model was designed to help students view EBP as an ongoing process needed in all clinical decision making. The three facets…

  17. Development of a Model of Care for Rehabilitation of People Living With HIV in a Semirural Setting in South Africa

    PubMed Central

    Hanass-Hancock, Jill

    2014-01-01

    Background Human immunodeficiency virus continues to challenge health care professionals even after the rollout of antiretroviral therapy. South Africa, among the worst affected countries in the world by the pandemic, has seen the effect of people living longer but facing disabling effects of both the virus and the associated impairments of the antiretroviral therapy. Rehabilitation within the evolving context of the disease has changed its focus from the impairment of the individual to the participation restriction within a person’s daily life. Offering a continuum of coordinated, multilevel, multidiscipline, evidence-based rehabilitation within health care will promote its prominence in health care structures. Objective This study aims to develop a model of care within a health care structure using a semi-rural African setting as an example. Methods The study will employ mixed methods using a Learning in Action Approach into the rehabilitation of people living with HIV (PLHIV) at the study setting. The Delphi technique, a multistage consensus method, will be used to obtain feedback from a number of local experts relevant for the field of rehabilitation of people living with HIV. The study will also involve various stakeholders such as the multidisciplinary health care team (doctors, physiotherapists, occupational therapists, dieticians, speech and language therapists, social workers, midlevel workers, community health care workers); department of health representative(s); site affiliated nongovernmental organization representative(s); and service users at the study setting. Results Once a proposed model of care is derived, the model will be assessed for rigour and piloted at the study setting. Conclusions The development of a model of care in rehabilitation for PLHIV in a health care setting is aimed to provide an example of a continuum of coordinated service throughout the disease trajectory. The assumption is that the burden on the health care system will be

  18. Hydrologic Setting and Conceptual Hydrologic Model of the Walker River Basin, West-Central Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lopes, Thomas J.; Allander, Kip K.

    2009-01-01

    The Walker River is the main source of inflow to Walker Lake, a closed-basin lake in west-central Nevada. Between 1882 and 2008, agricultural diversions resulted in a lake-level decline of more than 150 feet and storage loss of 7,400,000 acre-ft. Evaporative concentration increased dissolved solids from 2,500 to 17,000 milligrams per liter. The increase in salinity threatens the survival of the Lahontan cutthroat trout, a native species listed as threatened under the Endangered Species Act. This report describes the hydrologic setting of the Walker River basin and a conceptual hydrologic model of the relations among streams, groundwater, and Walker Lake with emphasis on the lower Walker River basin from Wabuska to Hawthorne, Nevada. The Walker River basin is about 3,950 square miles and straddles the California-Nevada border. Most streamflow originates as snowmelt in the Sierra Nevada. Spring runoff from the Sierra Nevada typically reaches its peak during late May to early June with as much as 2,800 cubic feet per second in the Walker River near Wabuska. Typically, 3 to 4 consecutive years of below average streamflow are followed by 1 or 2 years of average or above average streamflow. Mountain ranges are comprised of consolidated rocks with low hydraulic conductivities, but consolidated rocks transmit water where fractured. Unconsolidated sediments include fluvial deposits along the active channel of the Walker River, valley floors, alluvial slopes, and a playa. Sand and gravel deposited by the Walker River likely are discontinuous strata throughout the valley floor. Thick clay strata likely were deposited in Pleistocene Lake Lahontan and are horizontally continuous, except where strata have been eroded by the Walker River. At Walker Lake, sediments mostly are clay interbedded with alluvial slope, fluvial, and deltaic deposits along the lake margins. Coarse sediments form a multilayered, confined-aquifer system that could extend several miles from the shoreline

  19. A fractal model of HIV transmission on complex sociogeographic networks: towards analysis of large data sets.

    PubMed

    Wallace, R

    1993-01-01

    "A paradigm of HIV (human immunodeficiency virus) transmission along very large 'sociogeographic' networks--spatially focused nets of social interaction--is extended to include fractal (dilationally self-similar) structures upon which a metric of 'sociogeographic' distance can be defined.... Techniques are sketched for determining the sociogeographic structure of a large, geographically centered social network, providing a possible empirical basis for predicting forms and rates of spread of the initial, rapid stages of an HIV outbreak for networks not yet infected, and perhaps greatly expanding the utility of routinely collected small-area administrative data sets in the design of mutually reinforcing, multifactorial disease-control strategies."

  20. A successful model of collaborative practice in a university-based maternity care setting.

    PubMed

    Blanchard, May Hsieh; Kriebs, Jan M

    2012-09-01

    When building an integrated practice, the ability of each team member to work comfortably with other professionals is key. Midwives need to understand departmental expectations for participation in resident/student education, be willing to provide midwifery care in a high-acuity setting with limited opportunities for low-intervention care, and understand expectations for clinical leadership. Physicians need to build on the group expectation of mutual respect and best use of each group member. Confusion about midwifery and physician roles in maternity care still exists.

  1. Use of a Rainfall Runoff Model and Satellite Data Sets for Hydrological Studies of the Upper Contas Watershed, Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martins, T. M.; Rebello, V.; Rotunno Filho, O. C.; Barbosa, M. C.; Franklin, M. R.; Lakshmi, V.

    2015-12-01

    Continuous in-situ monitoring of environmental variables is expensive and difficult to maintain. This is true specifically in large watersheds and remote areas in developing countries, with little infrastructure and limited resources, as well as in semiarid areas, where the lack of water may represent an obstacle to the regional economic and sustainable development. On the other hand, over the past two decades, various satellite data sets that can be used to generate land surface hydrological variables have been made available, as well as model data sets resulting from the assimilation of remotely sensed and in-situ data in land surface models. This work focuses on using these satellite datasets and model outputs for the hydrological modeling of an ungauged basin, wherein stream flow data are absent or insufficient and little or no observations of spatially variable hydrological quantities are carried out. This work will focus on a 18200km² semi­arid catchment Upper Contas watershed in Northeastern Brazil. We will examine the performance of a rainfall runoff model by calibrating the parameters using (a) observed stream flows (b) soil moisture from the GLDAS model output for the periods 1982-present. We also examine the relationship between vegetation growth using NDVI from MODIS and the model generated soil moisture.

  2. A Multilevel Regression Model for Geographical Studies in Sets of Non-Adjacent Cities.

    PubMed

    Marí-Dell'Olmo, Marc; Martínez-Beneito, Miguel Ángel

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, small-area-based ecological regression analyses have been published that study the association between a health outcome and a covariate in several cities. These analyses have usually been performed independently for each city and have therefore yielded unrelated estimates for the cities considered, even though the same process has been studied in all of them. In this study, we propose a joint ecological regression model for multiple cities that accounts for spatial structure both within and between cities and explore the advantages of this model. The proposed model merges both disease mapping and geostatistical ideas. Our proposal is compared with two alternatives, one that models the association for each city as fixed effects and another that treats them as independent and identically distributed random effects. The proposed model allows us to estimate the association (and assess its significance) at locations with no available data. Our proposal is illustrated by an example of the association between unemployment (as a deprivation surrogate) and lung cancer mortality among men in 31 Spanish cities. In this example, the associations found were far more accurate for the proposed model than those from the fixed effects model. Our main conclusion is that ecological regression analyses can be markedly improved by performing joint analyses at several locations that share information among them. This finding should be taken into consideration in the design of future epidemiological studies.

  3. Generalized linear and generalized additive models in studies of species distributions: Setting the scene

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Guisan, A.; Edwards, T.C.; Hastie, T.

    2002-01-01

    An important statistical development of the last 30 years has been the advance in regression analysis provided by generalized linear models (GLMs) and generalized additive models (GAMs). Here we introduce a series of papers prepared within the framework of an international workshop entitled: Advances in GLMs/GAMs modeling: from species distribution to environmental management, held in Riederalp, Switzerland, 6-11 August 2001. We first discuss some general uses of statistical models in ecology, as well as provide a short review of several key examples of the use of GLMs and GAMs in ecological modeling efforts. We next present an overview of GLMs and GAMs, and discuss some of their related statistics used for predictor selection, model diagnostics, and evaluation. Included is a discussion of several new approaches applicable to GLMs and GAMs, such as ridge regression, an alternative to stepwise selection of predictors, and methods for the identification of interactions by a combined use of regression trees and several other approaches. We close with an overview of the papers and how we feel they advance our understanding of their application to ecological modeling. ?? 2002 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Invariance in the recurrence of large returns and the validation of models of price dynamics.

    PubMed

    Chang, Lo-Bin; Geman, Stuart; Hsieh, Fushing; Hwang, Chii-Ruey

    2013-08-01

    Starting from a robust, nonparametric definition of large returns ("excursions"), we study the statistics of their occurrences, focusing on the recurrence process. The empirical waiting-time distribution between excursions is remarkably invariant to year, stock, and scale (return interval). This invariance is related to self-similarity of the marginal distributions of returns, but the excursion waiting-time distribution is a function of the entire return process and not just its univariate probabilities. Generalized autoregressive conditional heteroskedasticity (GARCH) models, market-time transformations based on volume or trades, and generalized (Lévy) random-walk models all fail to fit the statistical structure of excursions.

  5. REGRESSION APPROXIMATIONS FOR TRANSPORT MODEL CONSTRAINT SETS IN COMBINED AQUIFER SIMULATION-OPTIMIZATION STUDIES.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Alley, William M.

    1986-01-01

    Problems involving the combined use of contaminant transport models and nonlinear optimization schemes can be very expensive to solve. This paper explores the use of transport models with ordinary regression and regression on ranks to develop approximate response functions of concentrations at critical locations as a function of pumping and recharge at decision wells. These response functions combined with other constraints can often be solved very easily and may suggest reasonable starting points for combined simulation-management modeling or even relatively efficient operating schemes in themselves.

  6. Analysis of multicrystal pump-probe data