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Sample records for exercise induces biphasic

  1. Acute exercise induces biphasic increase in respiratory mRNA in skeletal muscle

    SciTech Connect

    Ikeda, Shin-ichi; Kizaki, Takako; Haga, Shukoh; Ohno, Hideki; Takemasa, Tohru

    2008-04-04

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor {gamma} coactivator-1{alpha} (PGC-1{alpha}) promotes the expression of oxidative enzymes in skeletal muscle. We hypothesized that activation of the p38 MAPK (mitogen-activated protein kinase) in response to exercise was associated with exercise-induced PGC-1{alpha} and respiratory enzymes expression and aimed to demonstrate this under the physiological level. We subjected mice to a single bout of treadmill running and found that the exercise induced a biphasic increase in the expression of respiratory enzymes mRNA. The second phase of the increase was accompanied by an increase in PGC-1{alpha} protein, but the other was not. Administration of SB203580 (SB), an inhibitor of p38 MAPK, suppressed the increase in PGC-1{alpha} expression and respiratory enzymes mRNA in both phases. These data suggest that p38 MAPK is associated with the exercise-induced expression of PGC-1{alpha} and biphasic increase in respiratory enzyme mRNAs in mouse skeletal muscle under physiological conditions.

  2. Exercise-Induced Bronchoconstriction

    MedlinePlus

    ... Conditions & Treatments ▸ Conditions Dictionary ▸ Exercise-Induced Bronchoconstriction Share | Exercise-Induced Bronchoconstriction (EIB) « Back to A to Z Listing Exercise-Induced Bronchoconstriction, (EIB), often known as exercise-induced ...

  3. Exercise-Induced Asthma

    MedlinePlus

    ... Your 1- to 2-Year-Old Exercise-Induced Asthma KidsHealth > For Parents > Exercise-Induced Asthma Print A ... previous continue Tips for Kids With Exercise-Induced Asthma For the most part, kids with exercise-induced ...

  4. Biphasic cardiovascular and respiratory effects induced by β-citronellol.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro-Filho, Helder Veras; de Souza Silva, Camila Meirelles; de Siqueira, Rodrigo JoséBezerra; Lahlou, Saad; dos Santos, Armênio Aguiar; Magalhães, Pedro Jorge Caldas

    2016-03-15

    β-Citronellol is a monoterpene found in the essential oil of various plants with antihypertensive properties. In fact, β-citronellol possesses hypotensive actions due to its vasodilator abilities. Here we aimed to show that β-citronellol recruits airway sensory neural circuitry to evoke cardiorespiratory effects. In anesthetized rats, intravenous injection of β-citronellol caused biphasic hypotension, bradycardia and apnea. Bilateral vagotomy, perivagal capsaicin treatment or injection into the left ventricle abolished first rapid phase (named P1) but not delayed phase P2 of the β-citronellol effects. P1 persisted after pretreatment with capsazepine, ondansetron, HC-030031 or suramin. Suramin abolished P2 of apnea. In awake rats, β-citronellol induced biphasic hypotension and bradycardia being P1 abolished by methylatropine. In vitro, β-citronellol inhibited spontaneous or electrically-evoked contractions of rat isolated right or left atrium, respectively, and fully relaxed sustained contractions of phenylephrine in mesenteric artery rings. In conclusion, chemosensitive pulmonary vagal afferent fibers appear to mediate the cardiovascular and respiratory effects of β-citronellol. The transduction mechanism in P1 seems not to involve the activation of transient receptor potential vanilloid subtype 1 (TRPV1), transient receptor potential ankyrin subtype 1 (TRPA1), purinergic (P2X) or 5-HT3 receptors located on airways sensory nerves. P2 of hypotension and bradycardia seems resulting from a cardioinhibitory and vasodilatory effect of β-citronellol and the apnea from a purinergic signaling.

  5. Exercise-induced anaphylaxis.

    PubMed

    Feldweg, Anna M

    2015-05-01

    Exercise-induced anaphylaxis is an uncommon disorder in which anaphylaxis occurs in response to physical exertion. Food-dependent exercise-induced anaphylaxis is a disorder with similar symptoms, although symptoms develop only if exercise takes place within a few hours of eating and, in most cases, only if a specific food is eaten. Management includes education about safe conditions for exercise, the importance of ceasing exercise immediately if symptoms develop, appropriate use of epinephrine, and, for patients with food-dependent exercise-induced anaphylaxis, avoidance of the culprit food for at least 4 hours before exercise. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Exercise-induced asthma

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000036.htm Exercise-induced asthma To use the sharing features on this page, ... such as running, basketball, or soccer. Use Your Asthma Medicine Before you Exercise Take your short-acting, ...

  7. Exercise-Induced Asthma

    MedlinePlus

    ... Accessed Oct. 1, 2014. Stickland MK, et al. Effect of warm-up exercise on exercise-induced bronchoconstriction. Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise. 2012;44:383. Asthma action plans: Help patients take control. National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute. http://www.nhlbi.nih. ...

  8. Exercise-induced bronchospasm.

    PubMed

    Storms, William W

    2009-01-01

    Exercise-induced bronchospasm (EIB) is a relatively common condition that affects both recreational and elite athletes. The latest data suggest that it is an inflammatory process, especially in elite athletes. Proper diagnosis is important to differentiate EIB from other respiratory conditions. Effective treatment usually controls this condition.

  9. [Exercise-induced anaphylaxis].

    PubMed

    Gani, Federica; Selvaggi, Lucia; Roagna, Davide

    2008-01-01

    Exercise-induced anaphylaxis (EIA) was defined for the first time in 1980. EIA is associated with different kind of exercise, although jogging is the most frequently reported. The clinical manifestations progress from itching, erythema and urticaria to some combination of cutaneous angioedema, gastrointestinal and laryngeal symptoms and signs of angioedema and vascular collapse. Mast cell participation in the pathogenesis of this syndrome has been proved by the finding of an elevated serum histamine level during experimentally-induced attacks and by cutaneous degranulation of mast cells with elevated serum tryptase after attacks. As predisposing factors of EIA, a specific or even aspecific sensitivity to food has been reported and such cases are called "food-dependent EIA". Many foods are implicated but particularly wheat, vegetables, crustacean. Another precipitating factor includes drugs intake (non steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs), climate variations and menstrual cycle factors. Treatment of an attack should include all the manoeuvres efficacious in the management of conventional anaphylactic syndrome, including the administration of epinephrine and antihistamines. Prevention of the attacks may be achieved with the interruption of the exercise at the appearance of the first premonitory symptoms. To prevent the onset of EIA it is also suitable to delay the exercise practice after at least 4-6 hours from the swallowing of food.

  10. Exercise-induced anaphylaxis.

    PubMed

    Sheffer, A L; Austen, K F

    1980-08-01

    Sixteen patients were seen because of possibly life-threatening exercise-associated symptoms similar to anaphylactic reactions. Asthma attacks, cholinergic urticaria and angioedema, and cardiac arrythmias are recognized as exertion-related phenomena in predisposed patients but are distinct from the syndrome described here. A syndrome characterized by the exertion-related onset of cutaneous pruritus and warmth, the development of generalized urticaria, and the appearance of such additional manifestations as collapse in 12 patients, gastrointestinal tract symptoms in five patients, and upper respiratory distress in 10 patients has been designated exercise-induced anaphylaxis, because of the striking similarity of this symptom complex to the anaphylactic syndrome elicited by ingestion or injection of a foreign antigenic substance. There is a family history of atopic desease for 11 patients and cold urticaria for two others and a personal history of atopy in six. The size of the wheals, the failure to develop an attack with a warm bath or shower or a fever, and the prominence of syncope rule against the diagnosis of conventional cholinergic urticaria. There is no history or evidence of an encounter with an environmental source of antigen during the exercise period.

  11. Exercise-Induced Urticaria

    MedlinePlus

    ... weight:400;font-style:normal;font-size:24px;}h2,.blog-item .quote-excerpt{font-family:"Source Sans ... Nutrients and Nutritional Info Sugar and Sugar Substitutes Exercise and Fitness Exercise Basics Sports Safety Injury Rehabilitation ...

  12. T-regulatory cells exhibit a biphasic response to prolonged endurance exercise in humans.

    PubMed

    Clifford, Tom; Wood, Matthew J; Stocks, Philip; Howatson, Glyn; Stevenson, Emma J; Hilkens, Catharien M U

    2017-08-01

    T-regulatory cells (Tregs) are a sub-population of lymphocytes that act to suppress aberrant immune responses. We investigated changes in the numbers of naïve and terminally differentiated Tregs in the peripheral blood to establish their role in the immuno-suppressive response to prolonged exercise. Blood was drawn from seventeen experienced runners (age 40 ± 12 years; height 1.75 ± 0.08 m; mass 71.4 ± 10.8 kg) before, ~1 h after (POST-1h), and on the day following the marathon (POST-1d). Tregs (CD3(+)CD4(+)Foxp3(+)CD25(++)CD127(-)) were analysed in peripheral blood mononuclear cells using flow cytometry. The markers CD45RA and HLA-DR were included to define naïve and terminally differentiated Tregs, respectively. The absolute number of Tregs decreased (27%) POST-1h marathon (P < 0.001) but increased (21%) at POST-1d (P < 0.01). Naïve CD45RA(+) Tregs fell by 39% POST-1h (P < 0.01) but were unaffected POST-1d (P > 0.05). In contrast, an increased number of Tregs expressing HLA-DR was observed at POST-1d (P < 0.01). Interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, IL-8 and IL-10 levels in the serum all increased POST-1h (P > 0.05) but returned to pre-exercise levels POST-1d. The suppressive cytokine, transforming growth factor-beta, was unaffected by the marathon (P > 0.05). These results suggest that Tregs do not play a major role in immune suppression in the early hours of recovery from a marathon. However, terminally differentiated HLA-DR(+) Tregs are mobilized the following day, which could represent a compensatory attempt by the host to restore immune homeostasis and limit excessive cell damage.

  13. Micropore-induced Capillarity Enhances Bone Distribution in vivo in Biphasic Calcium Phosphate Scaffolds

    PubMed Central

    Rustom, Laurence E.; Boudou, Thomas; Lou, Siyu; Pignot-Paintrand, Isabelle; Nemke, Brett W.; Lu, Yan; Markel, Mark D.; Picart, Catherine; Wagoner Johnson, Amy J.

    2016-01-01

    The increasing demand for bone repair solutions calls for the development of efficacious bone scaffolds. Biphasic calcium phosphate (BCP) scaffolds with both macropores and micropores (MP) have improved healing compared to those with macropores and no micropores (NMP), but the role of micropores is unclear. Here, we evaluate capillarity induced by micropores as a mechanism that can affect bone growth in vivo. Three groups of cylindrical scaffolds were implanted in pig mandibles for three weeks: MP were implanted either dry (MP-Dry), or after submersion in phosphate buffered saline, which fills pores with fluid and therefore suppresses micropore-induced capillarity (MP-Wet); NMP were implanted dry. The amount and distribution of bone in the scaffolds were quantified using micro-computed tomography. MP-Dry had a more homogeneous bone distribution than MP-Wet, although the average bone volume fraction, BVF¯, was not significantly different for these two groups (0.45±0.03 and 0.37±0.03, respectively). There was no significant difference in the radial bone distribution of NMP and MP-Wet, but the BVF¯ of NMP was significantly lower among the three groups (0.25±0.02). These results suggest that micropore-induced capillarity enhances bone regeneration by improving the homogeneity of bone distribution in BCP scaffolds. The explicit design and use of capillarity in bone scaffolds may lead to more effective treatments of large and complex bone defects. PMID:27544807

  14. Exercise-induced cardiac remodeling.

    PubMed

    Weiner, Rory B; Baggish, Aaron L

    2012-01-01

    Early investigations in the late 1890s and early 1900s documented cardiac enlargement in athletes with above-normal exercise capacity and no evidence of cardiovascular disease. Such findings have been reported for more than a century and continue to intrigue scientists and clinicians. It is well recognized that repetitive participation in vigorous physical exercise results in significant changes in myocardial structure and function. This process, termed exercise-induced cardiac remodeling (EICR), is characterized by structural cardiac changes including left ventricular hypertrophy with sport-specific geometry (eccentric vs concentric). Associated alterations in both systolic and diastolic functions are emerging as recognized components of EICR. The increasing popularity of recreational exercise and competitive athletics has led to a growing number of individuals exhibiting these findings in routine clinical practice. This review will provide an overview of EICR in athletes.

  15. Mechanism of conduction block in amphibian myelinated axon induced by biphasic electrical current at ultra-high frequency.

    PubMed

    Tai, Changfeng; Guo, Dong; Wang, Jicheng; Roppolo, James R; de Groat, William C

    2011-11-01

    The mechanism of axonal conduction block induced by ultra-high frequency (≥ 20 kHz) biphasic electrical current was investigated using a lumped circuit model of the amphibian myelinated axon based on Frankenhaeuser-Huxley (FH) equations. The ultra-high frequency stimulation produces constant activation of both sodium and potassium channels at the axonal node under the block electrode causing the axonal conduction block. This blocking mechanism is different from the mechanism when the stimulation frequency is between 4 kHz and 10 kHz, where only the potassium channel is constantly activated. The minimal stimulation intensity required to induce a conduction block increases as the stimulation frequency increases. The results from this simulation study are useful to guide future animal experiments to reveal the different mechanisms underlying nerve conduction block induced by high-frequency biphasic electrical current.

  16. Bone in-growth induced by biphasic calcium phosphate ceramic in femoral defect of dogs.

    PubMed

    Manjubala, I; Sastry, T P; Kumar, R V Suresh

    2005-04-01

    Biphasic calcium phosphate (BCP) ceramics consisting of hydroxyapatite (HA) and tricalcium phosphate (TCP) has been used as a bone graft material during the last decade. In this paper, we report the bone in-growth induced by BCP ceramic in the experimentally created circular defects in the femur of dogs. This BCP ceramic consists of 55% hydroxyapatite (HA) and 45% b-tricalcium phosphate (TCP) prepared in situ by the microwave method. The defects were created as 4-mm holes on the lateral aspect of the femur of dogs and the holes were packed with the implant material. The defective sites were radiographed at a period of 4, 8, and 12 weeks postoperatively. The radiographical results showed that the process of ossification started after 4 weeks and the defect was completely filled with new woven bone after 12 weeks. Histological examination of the tissue showed the formation of osteoblast inducing the osteogenesis in the defect. The collageneous fibrous matrix and the complete Haversian system were observed after 12 weeks. The blood serum was collected postoperatively and biochemical assays for alkaline phosphatase activity were carried out. The measurement of alkaline phosphatase activity levels also correlated with the formation of osteoblast-like cells. This microwave-prepared BCP ceramic has proved to be a good biocompatible implant as well as osteoconductive and osteoinductive materials to fill bone defects.

  17. FK506 induces biphasic Ca2+ release from microsomal vesicles of rat pancreatic acinar cells.

    PubMed

    Ozawa, Terutaka

    2006-07-01

    The effect of the immunosuppressant drug FK506 on microsomal Ca2+ release was investigated in rat pancreatic acinar cells. When FK506 (0.1-200 microM) was added to the microsomal vesicles at a steady state of ATP-dependent 45Ca2+ uptake, FK506 caused a dose-dependent and a biphasic release of 45Ca2+. Almost 10% of total 45Ca2+ uptake was released at FK506 concentrations up to 10 microM (Km=0.47 microM), and 60% of total 45Ca2+ uptake was released at FK506 concentrations over 10 microM (Km=55 microM). Preincubation of the vesicles with cyclic ADP-ribose (cADPR, 0.5 microM) increased the FK506 (< or =10 microM)-induced 45Ca2+ release (Ozawa T, Biochim Biophys Acta 1693: 159-166, 2004). Preincubation with heparin (200 microg/ml) resulted in significant inhibition of the FK506 (30 microM)-induced 45Ca2+ release. Subsequent addition of inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3, 5 microM) after FK506 (100 microM)-induced 45Ca2+ release did not cause any release of 45Ca2+. These results indicate that two types of FK506-induced Ca2+ release mechanism operate in the endoplasmic reticulum of rat pancreatic acinar cells: a high-affinity mechanism of Ca2+ release, which involves activation of the ryanodine receptor, and a low-affinity mechanism of Ca2+ release, which involves activation of the IP3 receptor.

  18. Adolescents and Exercise Induced Asthma

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hansen, Pamela; Bickanse, Shanna; Bogenreif, Mike; VanSickle, Kyle

    2008-01-01

    This article defines asthma and exercise induced asthma, and provides information on the triggers, signs, and symptoms of an attack. It also gives treatments for these conditions, along with prevention guidelines on how to handle an attack in the classroom or on the practice field. (Contains 2 tables and 1 figure.)

  19. Adolescents and Exercise Induced Asthma

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hansen, Pamela; Bickanse, Shanna; Bogenreif, Mike; VanSickle, Kyle

    2008-01-01

    This article defines asthma and exercise induced asthma, and provides information on the triggers, signs, and symptoms of an attack. It also gives treatments for these conditions, along with prevention guidelines on how to handle an attack in the classroom or on the practice field. (Contains 2 tables and 1 figure.)

  20. The biphasic nature of hypoxia-induced directional migration of activated human hepatic stellate cells.

    PubMed

    Novo, Erica; Povero, Davide; Busletta, Chiara; Paternostro, Claudia; di Bonzo, Lorenzo Valfrè; Cannito, Stefania; Compagnone, Alessandra; Bandino, Andrea; Marra, Fabio; Colombatto, Sebastiano; David, Ezio; Pinzani, Massimo; Parola, Maurizio

    2012-03-01

    Liver fibrogenesis is sustained by pro-fibrogenic myofibroblast-like cells (MFs), mainly originating from activated hepatic stellate cells (HSC/MFs) or portal (myo)fibroblasts, and is favoured by hypoxia-dependent angiogenesis. Human HSC/MFs were reported to express vascular-endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and VEGF-receptor type 2 and to migrate under hypoxic conditions. This study was designed to investigate early and delayed signalling mechanisms involved in hypoxia-induced migration of human HSC/MFs. Signal transduction pathways and intracellular generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) were evaluated by integrating morphological, cell, and molecular biology techniques. Non-oriented and oriented migration were evaluated by using wound healing assay and the modified Boyden's chamber assay, respectively. The data indicate that hypoxia-induced migration of HSC/MFs is a biphasic process characterized by the following sequence of events: (a) an early (15 min) and mitochondria-related increased generation of intracellular ROS which (b) was sufficient to switch on activation of ERK1/2 and JNK1/2 that were responsible for the early phase of oriented migration; (c) a delayed and HIF-1α-dependent increase in VEGF expression (facilitated by ROS) and its progressive, time-dependent release in the extracellular medium that (d) was mainly responsible for sustained migration of HSC/MFs. Finally, immunohistochemistry performed on HCV-related fibrotic/cirrhotic livers revealed HIF-2α and haem-oxygenase-1 positivity in hepatocytes and α-SMA-positive MFs, indicating that MFs were likely to be exposed in vivo to both hypoxia and oxidative stress. In conclusion, hypoxia-induced migration of HSC/MFs involves an early, mitochondrial-dependent ROS-mediated activation of ERK and JNK, followed by a delayed- and HIF-1α-dependent up-regulation and release of VEGF.

  1. Micropore-induced capillarity enhances bone distribution in vivo in biphasic calcium phosphate scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Rustom, Laurence E; Boudou, Thomas; Lou, Siyu; Pignot-Paintrand, Isabelle; Nemke, Brett W; Lu, Yan; Markel, Mark D; Picart, Catherine; Wagoner Johnson, Amy J

    2016-10-15

    The increasing demand for bone repair solutions calls for the development of efficacious bone scaffolds. Biphasic calcium phosphate (BCP) scaffolds with both macropores and micropores (MP) have improved healing compared to those with macropores and no micropores (NMP), but the role of micropores is unclear. Here, we evaluate capillarity induced by micropores as a mechanism that can affect bone growth in vivo. Three groups of cylindrical scaffolds were implanted in pig mandibles for three weeks: MP were implanted either dry (MP-Dry), or after submersion in phosphate buffered saline, which fills pores with fluid and therefore suppresses micropore-induced capillarity (MP-Wet); NMP were implanted dry. The amount and distribution of bone in the scaffolds were quantified using micro-computed tomography. MP-Dry had a more homogeneous bone distribution than MP-Wet, although the average bone volume fraction, BVF‾, was not significantly different for these two groups (0.45±0.03 and 0.37±0.03, respectively). There was no significant difference in the radial bone distribution of NMP and MP-Wet, but the BVF‾, of NMP was significantly lower among the three groups (0.25±0.02). These results suggest that micropore-induced capillarity enhances bone regeneration by improving the homogeneity of bone distribution in BCP scaffolds. The explicit design and use of capillarity in bone scaffolds may lead to more effective treatments of large and complex bone defects. The increasing demand for bone repair calls for more efficacious bone scaffolds and calcium phosphate-based materials are considered suitable for this application. Macropores (>100μm) are necessary for bone ingrowth and vascularization. However, studies have shown that microporosity (<20μm) also enhances growth, but there is no consensus on the controlling mechanisms. In previous in vitro work, we suggested that micropore-induced capillarity had the potential to enhance bone growth in vivo. This work illustrates the

  2. Shock-induced termination of reentrant cardiac arrhythmias: Comparing monophasic and biphasic shock protocols

    SciTech Connect

    Bragard, Jean Simic, Ana; Elorza, Jorge; Grigoriev, Roman O.; Fenton, Flavio H.; Cherry, Elizabeth M.; Gilmour, Robert F.; Otani, Niels F.

    2013-12-15

    In this article, we compare quantitatively the efficiency of three different protocols commonly used in commercial defibrillators. These are based on monophasic and both symmetric and asymmetric biphasic shocks. A numerical one–dimensional model of cardiac tissue using the bidomain formulation is used in order to test the different protocols. In particular, we performed a total of 4.8 × 10{sup 6} simulations by varying shock waveform, shock energy, initial conditions, and heterogeneity in internal electrical conductivity. Whenever the shock successfully removed the reentrant dynamics in the tissue, we classified the mechanism. The analysis of the numerical data shows that biphasic shocks are significantly more efficient (by about 25%) than the corresponding monophasic ones. We determine that the increase in efficiency of the biphasic shocks can be explained by the higher proportion of newly excited tissue through the mechanism of direct activation.

  3. Shock-induced termination of reentrant cardiac arrhythmias: Comparing monophasic and biphasic shock protocols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bragard, Jean; Simic, Ana; Elorza, Jorge; Grigoriev, Roman O.; Cherry, Elizabeth M.; Gilmour, Robert F.; Otani, Niels F.; Fenton, Flavio H.

    2013-12-01

    In this article, we compare quantitatively the efficiency of three different protocols commonly used in commercial defibrillators. These are based on monophasic and both symmetric and asymmetric biphasic shocks. A numerical one-dimensional model of cardiac tissue using the bidomain formulation is used in order to test the different protocols. In particular, we performed a total of 4.8 × 106 simulations by varying shock waveform, shock energy, initial conditions, and heterogeneity in internal electrical conductivity. Whenever the shock successfully removed the reentrant dynamics in the tissue, we classified the mechanism. The analysis of the numerical data shows that biphasic shocks are significantly more efficient (by about 25%) than the corresponding monophasic ones. We determine that the increase in efficiency of the biphasic shocks can be explained by the higher proportion of newly excited tissue through the mechanism of direct activation.

  4. Shock-induced termination of reentrant cardiac arrhythmias: Comparing monophasic and biphasic shock protocols

    PubMed Central

    Bragard, Jean; Simic, Ana; Elorza, Jorge; Grigoriev, Roman O.; Cherry, Elizabeth M.; Gilmour, Robert F.; Otani, Niels F.; Fenton, Flavio H.

    2013-01-01

    In this article, we compare quantitatively the efficiency of three different protocols commonly used in commercial defibrillators. These are based on monophasic and both symmetric and asymmetric biphasic shocks. A numerical one–dimensional model of cardiac tissue using the bidomain formulation is used in order to test the different protocols. In particular, we performed a total of 4.8 × 106 simulations by varying shock waveform, shock energy, initial conditions, and heterogeneity in internal electrical conductivity. Whenever the shock successfully removed the reentrant dynamics in the tissue, we classified the mechanism. The analysis of the numerical data shows that biphasic shocks are significantly more efficient (by about 25%) than the corresponding monophasic ones. We determine that the increase in efficiency of the biphasic shocks can be explained by the higher proportion of newly excited tissue through the mechanism of direct activation. PMID:24387558

  5. Ryanodine receptor 2 contributes to hemorrhagic shock-induced bi-phasic vascular reactivity in rats

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Rong; Ding, Xiao-li; Liu, Liang-ming

    2014-01-01

    Aim: Ryanodine receptor 2 (RyR2) is a critical component of intracellular Ca2+ signaling in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs). The aim of this study was to investigate the role of RyR2 in abnormal vascular reactivity after hemorrhagic shock in rats. Methods: SD rats were hemorrhaged and maintained mean arterial pressure (MAP) at 40 mmHg for 30 min or 2 h, and then superior mesenteric arteries (SMA) rings were prepared to measure the vascular reactivity. In other experiments, SMA rings of normal rats and rat VSMCs were exposed to a hypoxic medium for 10 min or 3 h. SMA rings of normal rats and VSMCs were transfected with siRNA against RyR2. Intracellular Ca2+ release in VSMCs was assessed using Fura-2/AM. Results: The vascular reactivity of the SMA rings from hemorrhagic rats was significantly increased in the early stage (30 min), but decreased in the late stage (2 h) of hemorrhagic shock. Similar results were observed in the SMA rings exposed to hypoxia for 10 min or 3 h. The enhanced vascular reactivity of the SMA rings exposed to hypoxia for 10 min was partly attenuated by transfection with RyR2 siRNA, whereas the blunted vascular reactivity of the SMA rings exposed to hypoxia for 3 h was partly restored by transfection with RyR2 siRNA. Treatment with the RyR agonist caffeine (1 mmol/L) significantly increased Ca2+ release in VSMCs exposed to hypoxia for 10 min or 3 h, which was partially antagonized by transfection with RyR2 siRNA. Conclusion: RyR2-mediated Ca2+ release contributes to the development of bi-phasic vascular reactivity induced by hemorrhagic shock or hypoxia. PMID:25263335

  6. Bronchial or Laryngeal Obstruction Induced by Exercise?

    PubMed

    Bey, Ayoub; Botti, Sophie; Coutier-Marie, Laurianne; Bonabel, Claude; Metche, Stéphanie; Demoulin-Alexikova, Silvia; Schweitzer, Cyril Etienne; Marchal, François; Coffinet, Laurent; Ioan, Iulia

    2017-01-01

    A child suspected of exercise-induced laryngeal obstruction and asthma is examined by laryngoscopy and respiratory resistance (Rrs) after exercise challenge. Immediately at exercise cessation, the visualized adduction of the larynx in inspiration is reflected in a paroxystic increase in Rrs. While normal breathing has apparently resumed later on during recovery from exercise, the pattern of Rrs in inspiration is observed to reoccur following a deep breath or swallowing. The procedure may thus help diagnosing the site of exercise-induced obstruction when laryngoscopy is not available and identify re-inducers of laryngeal dysfunction.

  7. Biphasic Effect of Phyllanthus emblica L. Extract on NSAID-Induced Ulcer: An Antioxidative Trail Weaved with Immunomodulatory Effect.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Ananya; Chattopadhyay, Subrata; Bandyopadhyay, Sandip K

    2011-01-01

    Amla (Phyllanthus emblica L.), apart from its food value, can be used as a gastroprotective agent in non steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID)-induced gastropathy. It has been suggested that the antioxidative property of amla is the key to its therapeutic effect. Hence, on the basis of in vitro antioxidative potential, the ethanolic extract of amla (eAE) was selected for in vivo study in NSAID-induced ulcer. Intriguingly, eAE showed biphasic activity in ulcerated mice, with healing effect observed at 60 mg/kg and an adverse effect at 120 mg/kg.The dose-dependent study revealed that switching from anti-oxidant to pro-oxidant shift and immunomodulatory property could be the major cause for its biphasic effect, as evident from the total antioxidant status, thiol concentration, lipid peroxidation, protein carbonyl content followed by mucin content, PGE(2) synthesis and cytokine status. Further, Buthionine sulfoxamine (BSO) pretreatment established the potential impact of antioxidative property in the healing action of eAE. However, eAE efficiently reduced pro-inflammatory cytokine (TNF-α and IL-1β) levels and appreciably upregulate anti-inflammatory cytokine (IL-10) concentration. In conclusion, gastric ulcer healing induced by eAE was driven in a dose-specific manner through the harmonization of the antioxidative property and modulation of anti-inflammatory cytokine level.

  8. Conduction block in myelinated axons induced by high-frequency (kHz) non-symmetric biphasic stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Shouguo; Yang, Guangning; Wang, Jicheng; Roppolo, James R.; de Groat, William C.; Tai, Changfeng

    2015-01-01

    This study used the Frankenhaeuser–Huxley axonal model to analyze the effects of non-symmetric waveforms on conduction block of myelinated axons induced by high-frequency (10–300 kHz) biphasic electrical stimulation. The results predict a monotonic relationship between block threshold and stimulation frequency for symmetric waveform and a non-monotonic relationship for non-symmetric waveforms. The symmetric waveform causes conduction block by constantly activating both sodium and potassium channels at frequencies of 20–300 kHz, while the non-symmetric waveforms share the same blocking mechanism from 20 kHz up to the peak threshold frequency. At the frequencies above the peak threshold frequency the non-symmetric waveforms block axonal conduction by either hyperpolarizing the membrane (if the positive pulse is longer) or depolarizing the membrane (if the negative pulse is longer). This simulation study further increases our understanding of conduction block in myelinated axons induced by high-frequency biphasic electrical stimulation, and can guide future animal experiments as well as optimize stimulation parameters that might be used for electrically induced nerve block in clinical applications. PMID:26217217

  9. Conduction block in myelinated axons induced by high-frequency (kHz) non-symmetric biphasic stimulation.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Shouguo; Yang, Guangning; Wang, Jicheng; Roppolo, James R; de Groat, William C; Tai, Changfeng

    2015-01-01

    This study used the Frankenhaeuser-Huxley axonal model to analyze the effects of non-symmetric waveforms on conduction block of myelinated axons induced by high-frequency (10-300 kHz) biphasic electrical stimulation. The results predict a monotonic relationship between block threshold and stimulation frequency for symmetric waveform and a non-monotonic relationship for non-symmetric waveforms. The symmetric waveform causes conduction block by constantly activating both sodium and potassium channels at frequencies of 20-300 kHz, while the non-symmetric waveforms share the same blocking mechanism from 20 kHz up to the peak threshold frequency. At the frequencies above the peak threshold frequency the non-symmetric waveforms block axonal conduction by either hyperpolarizing the membrane (if the positive pulse is longer) or depolarizing the membrane (if the negative pulse is longer). This simulation study further increases our understanding of conduction block in myelinated axons induced by high-frequency biphasic electrical stimulation, and can guide future animal experiments as well as optimize stimulation parameters that might be used for electrically induced nerve block in clinical applications.

  10. AIC649 Induces a Bi-Phasic Treatment Response in the Woodchuck Model of Chronic Hepatitis B

    PubMed Central

    Paulsen, Daniela; Weber, Olaf; Ruebsamen-Schaeff, Helga; Tennant, Bud C.; Menne, Stephan

    2015-01-01

    AIC649 has been shown to directly address the antigen presenting cell arm of the host immune defense leading to a regulated cytokine release and activation of T cell responses. In the present study we analyzed the antiviral efficacy of AIC649 as well as its potential to induce functional cure in animal models for chronic hepatitis B. Hepatitis B virus transgenic mice and chronically woodchuck hepatitis virus (WHV) infected woodchucks were treated with AIC649, respectively. In the mouse system AIC649 decreased the hepatitis B virus titer as effective as the “gold standard”, Tenofovir. Interestingly, AIC649-treated chronically WHV infected woodchucks displayed a bi-phasic pattern of response: The marker for functional cure—hepatitis surface antigen—first increased but subsequently decreased even after cessation of treatment to significantly reduced levels. We hypothesize that the observed bi-phasic response pattern to AIC649 treatment reflects a physiologically “concerted”, reconstituted immune response against WHV and therefore may indicate a potential for inducing functional cure in HBV-infected patients. PMID:26656974

  11. Bioabsorbable zinc ion induced biphasic cellular responses in vascular smooth muscle cells

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Jun; Zhao, Nan; Zhu, Donghui

    2016-01-01

    Bioabsorbable metal zinc (Zn) is a promising new generation of implantable scaffold for cardiovascular and orthopedic applications. In cardiovascular stent applications, zinc ion (Zn2+) will be gradually released into the surrounding vascular tissues from such Zn-containing scaffolds after implantation. However, the interactions between vascular cells and Zn2+ are still largely unknown. We explored the short-term effects of extracellular Zn2+ on human smooth muscle cells (SMCs) up to 24 h, and an interesting biphasic effect of Zn2+ was observed. Lower concentrations (<80 μM) of Zn2+ had no adverse effects on cell viability but promoted cell adhesion, cell spreading, cell proliferation, cell migration, and enhanced the expression of F-actin and vinculin. Cells treated with such lower concentrations of Zn2+ displayed an elongated shape compared to controls without any treatment. In contrast, cells treated with higher Zn2+ concentrations (80–120 μM) had opposite cellular responses and behaviors. Gene expression profiles revealed that the most affected functional genes were related to angiogenesis, inflammation, cell adhesion, vessel tone, and platelet aggregation. Results indicated that Zn has interesting concentration-dependent biphasic effects on SMCs with low concentrations being beneficial to cellular functions. PMID:27248371

  12. Investigation of biphasic tumor oxygen dynamics induced by hyperoxic gas intervention: the dynamic phantom approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jae G.; Liu, Hanli

    2008-01-01

    We have developed dynamic tumor vascular phantoms and utilized them to investigate the biphasic behavior of increases in light absorption, which is directly associated with oxygenated hemoglobin concentration that was observed in vivo from rat breast tumor experiments during carbogen/oxygen inhalation. The experimental setup for the phantom study included a continuous-wave, multichannel, near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) system and syringe pumps to drive the simulated blood through the dynamic vascular phantoms. The results from such phantom experiments clearly show that the two time constants observed in tumor oxygenation dynamics in vivo can result from two different perfusion rates or two different blood flow velocities. We provide experimental support for our previous hypothesis: the biphasic tumor hemodynamic feature stems from a well-perfused and poorly perfused region that could be detected with the two time constants of the NIRS signals. With a multichannel approach, noninvasive NIRS measurements may have useful and prognostic values to quantify the therapeutic effects of cancer treatments.

  13. Acetylcholine sensitivity of biphasic Ca2+ mobilization induced by nicotinic receptor activation at the mouse skeletal muscle endplate

    PubMed Central

    Dezaki, Katsuya; Kimura, Ikuko

    1998-01-01

    Acetylcholine (ACh) was locally applied onto the endplate region in a mouse phrenic nerve-diaphragm muscle preparation to measure intracellular free calcium ([Ca2+]i) entry through nicotinic ACh receptors (AChRs) by use of Ca2+-aequorin luminescence.ACh (0.1–3 mM, 20 μl) elicited biphasic elevation of [Ca2+]i (fast and slow Ca2+ mobilization) in muscle cells. The peak amplitude of the slow Ca2+ mobilization (not accompanied by twitch tension) was concentration-dependently increased by ACh, whereas that of the fast component (accompanied by twitch tension) reached a maximum response at a lower concentration (0.1 mM) of applied ACh.A pulse of nicotinic agonists, (−)-nicotine (10 mM) and 1,1-dimethyl-4-phenyl-piperazinium (10 mM), but not a muscarinic agonist pilocarpine (10 mM), also elicited a biphasic Ca2+ signal.Even though ACh release from motor nerve endings was blocked by botulinum toxin (5 μg, bolus i.p. before isolation of the tissue), the generation of both a fast and slow Ca2+ component caused by ACh application was observed.These results strongly suggest that ACh locally applied onto the endplate region of skeletal muscle induces a slow Ca2+ signal reflecting Ca2+ entry through a postsynaptic nicotinic AChR, which has a low sensitivity to transmitter ACh. PMID:9579738

  14. Exercise-induced oxidative stress and hypoxic exercise recovery.

    PubMed

    Ballmann, Christopher; McGinnis, Graham; Peters, Bridget; Slivka, Dustin; Cuddy, John; Hailes, Walter; Dumke, Charles; Ruby, Brent; Quindry, John

    2014-04-01

    Hypoxia due to altitude diminishes performance and alters exercise oxidative stress responses. While oxidative stress and exercise are well studied, the independent impact of hypoxia on exercise recovery remains unknown. Accordingly, we investigated hypoxic recovery effects on post-exercise oxidative stress. Physically active males (n = 12) performed normoxic cycle ergometer exercise consisting of ten high:low intensity intervals, 20 min at moderate intensity, and 6 h recovery at 975 m (normoxic) or simulated 5,000 m (hypoxic chamber) in a randomized counter-balanced cross-over design. Oxygen saturation was monitored via finger pulse oximetry. Blood plasma obtained pre- (Pre), post- (Post), 2 h post- (2Hr), 4 h post- (4Hr), and 6 h (6Hr) post-exercise was assayed for Ferric Reducing Ability of Plasma (FRAP), Trolox Equivalent Antioxidant Capacity (TEAC), Lipid Hydroperoxides (LOOH), and Protein Carbonyls (PC). Biopsies from the vastus lateralis obtained Pre and 6Hr were analyzed by real-time PCR quantify expression of Heme oxygenase 1 (HMOX1), Superoxide Dismutase 2 (SOD2), and Nuclear factor (euthyroid-derived2)-like factor (NFE2L2). PCs were not altered between trials, but a time effect (13 % Post-2Hr increase, p = 0.044) indicated exercise-induced blood oxidative stress. Plasma LOOH revealed only a time effect (p = 0.041), including a 120 % Post-4Hr increase. TEAC values were elevated in normoxic recovery versus hypoxic recovery. FRAP values were higher 6Hr (p = 0.045) in normoxic versus hypoxic recovery. Exercise elevated gene expression of NFE2L2 (20 % increase, p = 0.001) and SOD2 (42 % increase, p = 0.003), but hypoxic recovery abolished this response. Data indicate that recovery in a hypoxic environment, independent of exercise, may alter exercise adaptations to oxidative stress and metabolism.

  15. Cancer: brain-regulated biphasic stress response induces cell growth or cell death to adapt to psychological stressors.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Charles; Bhatia, Shruti

    2014-01-01

    According to Indian Vedic philosophy, a human being contains 3 major bodies: (1) the matter body--brain, organs, and senses; (2) the mental body--mind, individual consciousness, intellect, and ego; and (3) the soul or causal body--universal consciousness. The third, which is located in the heart according to all spiritual traditions and recent scientific literature, can be seen as the information body that contains all memories. The mental body, which can interface with the matter and information bodies, can be seen as a field of immaterial energy that can carry, regulate, and strengthen all information (eg, thoughts or emotions) both positively and negatively. This body of information may store ancestral and/or autobiographical memories: unconscious memories from inner traumas--inner information (Ii) or samskaras in Vedic philosophy--and conscious memories from outer traumas--outer information (Io). These conscious and unconscious memories can be seen as potential psychological stressors. Resonance between Ii and Io may induce active conflicts if resistance occurs in the mental body; this conflict may cause specific metabolic activity in the brain and a stress response in the physical body, which permits adjustment to psychological stressors. The brainregulated stress response may be biphasic: cell death or growth induced by adrenergic molecular pathways during the conflict's unresolved phase and reversion to cell growth or death induced by cholinergic molecular pathways during the conflict's resolved phase. Case studies and data mining from PubMed suggest that this concept complies with the principles of holistic medicine and the scientific literature supporting its benefits. We suggest that the evolution of cancer can be seen as a biphasic stress response regulated by the brain to adapt to psychological stressors, which produce imbalance among the physical, mental, and information bodies.

  16. Biphasic effects of histamine on ethanol-induced gastric mucosal lesions: Studies with betahistine, dimaprit, (R). alpha. -methylhistamine and nizatidine

    SciTech Connect

    Morales, R.E.; Palitzsch, K.D.; Szabo, S. )

    1991-03-15

    In elucidating further the role that histamine (H) may play in gastroprotection against hemorrhagic mucosal lesions (HML) induced by ethanol (E), fasted S-D rats were treated with subcutaneous (s.c.) H 10, 15, 20 and 30 min before intragastric (i.g.) 100% E or H-agonists betahistine (H1) or dimaprit (H2) i.g. 30 min. before 75% E. All animals were killed 1 hr after E, HML were measured with stereomicrosopic planimetry and expressed as % of glandular stomach. The H2 antagonist nizatidine did not influence the extent of HML. As a follow up to previously reported nizatidine blockade of H2-induced gastroprotection against 75% E, nizatidine + H1 or nizatidine + H3 agonist (R){alpha}-methylhistamine was also tested. The H2 antagonist nizatidine abolished the gastroprotection by H3 but did not influence the H1-induced reduction of HML. H injected s.c. showed a dose- and time-dependent biphasic effect on E-induced gastric mucosal lesions. Both H1- and H2-agonists injected s.c. reduced the E-induced damage. Nizatidine alone failed to influence mucosal lesions, blocked gastroprotection induced by H2 or H3, but not by H1 agonists.

  17. Facile preparation of biphasic-induced magnetic icariin-loaded composite microcapsules by automated in situ click technology.

    PubMed

    Pan, Panpan; Chen, Jingdi; Fan, Tiantang; Hu, Yimin; Wu, Tao; Zhang, Qiqing

    2016-04-01

    This research aims to prepare the biphasic-induced magnetic composite microcapsules (BIMCM) as a promising environmental stimuli-responsive delivery vehicle to dispose the problem of drug burst effect. The paper presented a novel automated in situ click technology of magnetic chitosan/nano hydroxyapatite (CS/nHA) microcapsules. Fe3O4 magnetic nanoparticles (MNP) and nHA were simultaneously in situ crystallized by one-step process. Icariin (ICA), a plant-derived flavonol glycoside, was combined to study drug release properties of BIMCM. BIMCM were characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and Thermal gravimetric analysis/Differential Scanning Calorimetry(TGA/DSC) in order to reveal their component and surface morphology as well as the role of the in situ generated Fe3O4 MNP and nHA. The magnetic test showed the BIMCM were super-paramagnetic. Both in situ generated Fe3O4 MNP and nHA serve as stable inorganic crosslinkers in BIMCM to form many intermolecular crosslinkages for the movability of the CS chains. This makes ICA loaded microcapsules take on a sustained release behavior and results in the self-adjusting of surface morphology, decreasing of swelling and degradation rates. In addition, in vitro tests were systematically carried out to examine the biocompatibility of the microcapsules by MTT test, Wright-Giemsa dying assay and AO/EB fluorescent staining method. These results demonstrated that successful introduction of the in situ click Fe3O4 MNP provided an alternative strategy because of magnetic sensitivity and sustained release. As such, the novel ICA loaded biphasic-induced magnetic CS/nHA/MNP microcapsules are expected to find potential applications in drug delivery system for bone repair.

  18. Metabolic response to light exercise after exercise-induced rhabdomyolysis.

    PubMed

    Sayers, Stephen P; Clarkson, Priscilla; Patel, Jehangir J

    2002-01-01

    Inherent compromises in substrate metabolism, or impaired perfusion of muscle may contribute to the occurrence of exercise-induced rhabdomyolysis. In this study, the lactate response of the elbow flexor muscles to light exercise was examined in eight subjects (five males, three females) who previously demonstrated rhabdomyolysis with extreme swelling (ES; n = 4) or no swelling (NS; n = 4) of the upper arm after eccentric exercise. Subjects performed identical light exercise bouts (45 s of rapid isotonic biceps curls consisting of both concentric and eccentric actions at 25% of maximum voluntary contraction force) using their previously eccentrically exercised arm (E-ARM) and control arm, which was not used previously to perform eccentric exercise (C-ARM). Blood lactate concentration ([La]b) was assessed 1.5, 3, 4.5, 6, and 9 min post-exercise. Peak [La]b and the area under the curve (AUC) were compared between the E-ARM of the ES and NS groups and between the C-ARM and E-ARM of the ES group. The AUC did not differ between the E-ARM of the ES and NS groups (P > 0.05) or between the C-ARM and E-ARM of the ES group (P > 0.05). In the ES group, the increase in [La]b after light exercise with the C-ARM [mean (SD) change, delta: 1.98 (0.7) mmol/l] was not different from the increase after exercising the E-ARM [delta: 2.10 (0.7) mmol/l; P>0.05]. Comparing the response of the E-ARM between groups, the increase in [La]b of the NS group [delta: 1.40 (0.4) mmol/l] was not different than that observed in the ES group [delta: 2.10 (0.7) mmol/l; P>0.05). Thus, subjects who had previously exhibited signs of exercise-induced rhabdomyolysis did not show an abnormal response to low-intensity anaerobic exercise.

  19. Carrageenan-induced mouse paw oedema is biphasic, age-weight dependent and displays differential nitric oxide cyclooxygenase-2 expression

    PubMed Central

    Posadas, Inmaculada; Bucci, Mariarosaria; Roviezzo, Fiorentina; Rossi, Antonietta; Parente, Luca; Sautebin, Lidia; Cirino, Giuseppe

    2004-01-01

    Injection of carrageenan 1% (50 μl) in the mouse paw causes a biphasic response: an early inflammatory response that lasts 6 h and a second late response that peaks at 72 h, declining at 96 h. Only mice 7- or 8-week old, weighing 32–34 g, displayed a consistent response in both phases. In 8-week-old mice, myeloperoxidase (MPO) levels are significantly elevated in the early phase at 6 h and reach their maximum at 24 h to decline to basal value at 48 h. Nitrate+nitrite (NOx) levels in the paw are maximal after 2 h and slowly decline thereafter in contrast to prostaglandin E2 levels that peak in the second phase at the 72 h point. Western blot analysis showed that inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) is detectable at 6 h and cyclooxygenase 2 (COX-2) at 24 h point, respectively. Analysis of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS), iNOS and COX-2 expression at 6 and 24 h in 3–8-week-old mice demonstrated that both eNOS and iNOS expressions are dependent upon the age–weight of mice, as opposite to COX-2 that is present only in the second phase of the oedema and is not linked to mouse age–weight. Subplantar injection of carrageenan to C57BL/6J causes a biphasic oedema that is significantly reduced by about 20% when compared to CD1 mice. Interestingly, in these mice, iNOS expression is absent up to 6 h, as opposite to CD1, and becomes detectable at the 24 h point. Cyclooxygenase (COX-1) expression is upregulated between 4 and 24 h after carrageenan injection, whereas in CD1 mice COX-1 remains unchanged after irritant agent injection. MPO levels are maximal at the 24 h point and they are significantly lower, at 6 h point, than MPO levels detected in CD1 mice. In conclusion, mouse paw oedema is biphasic and age-weight dependent. The present results are the first report on the differential expressions of eNOS, iNOS, COX-1 and COX-2 in response to carrageenan injection in the two phases of the mouse paw oedema. PMID:15155540

  20. Cholinergic urticaria and exercise-induced anaphylaxis.

    PubMed

    Montgomery, Stefan L

    2015-01-01

    In this article, we will present the physical manifestations of two similar conditions. The first is cholinergic urticaria. This is chronic urticaria precipitated by an elevated body temperature. The second is exercise-induced anaphylaxis. Anaphylaxis can be idiopathic, a result of a specific allergenic trigger (food, medication, or insect sting), or exercise induced. We will focus on the third subtype. We describe the causes, symptoms, pathophysiology, testing, treatment, and prognosis of these two conditions.

  1. Exercise-induced pulmonary syndromes.

    PubMed

    Kyle, J M

    1994-03-01

    When respiratory distress occurs in the exercise arena, the clinician must differentiate between a potential serious bout of EIA or the commoner EIB. The physician's game day medical kit should include epinephrine for initial treatment in suspected EIA. Sports medicine personnel need to maintain a high index of suspicion for EIB in athletes at risk and confirm the diagnosis with a treadmill exercise challenge test. Initial pharmacologic management should consist of a trial of albuterol inhaler use 15 minutes before exercise. Early identification and treatment of EIB may enhance sports performance as well as enjoyment.

  2. Exercise-induced plasticity of AMPA-type glutamate receptor subunits in the rat brain.

    PubMed

    Real, Caroline C; Ferreira, Ana F B; Hernandes, Marina S; Britto, Luiz R G; Pires, Raquel S

    2010-12-02

    The aim of this study was to analyze the plastic effects of moderate exercise upon the motor cortex (M1 and M2 areas), cerebellum (Cb), and striatum (CPu) of the rat brain. This assessment was made by verifying the expression of AMPA-type glutamate receptor subunits (GluR1 and GluR2/3). We used adult Wistar rats, divided into 5 groups based on duration of exercise training, namely 3 days (EX3), 7 days (EX7), 15 days (EX15), 30 days (EX30), and sedentary (S). The exercised animals were subjected to a treadmill exercise protocol at the speed of the 10 meters/min for 40 min. After exercise, the brains were subjected to immunohistochemistry and immunoblotting to analyze changes of GluR1 and GluR2/3, and plasma corticosterone was measured by ELISA in order to verify potential stress induced by physical training. Overall, the results of immunohistochemistry and immunoblotting were similar and revealed that GluR subunits show distinct responses over the exercise periods and for the different structures analyzed. In general, there was increased expression of GluR subunits after longer exercise periods (such as EX30), although some opposite effects were seen after short periods of exercise (EX3). In a few cases, biphasic patterns with decreases and subsequent increases of GluR expression were seen and may represent the outcome of exercise-dependent, complex regulatory processes. The data show that the protocol used was able to promote plastic GluR changes during exercise, suggesting a specific involvement of these receptors in exercise-induced plasticity processes in the brain areas tested. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Exercise-induced rhinitis in competitive swimmers.

    PubMed

    Alves, Ana; Martins, Carla; Delgado, Luís; Fonseca, João; Moreira, André

    2010-01-01

    Elite swimmers are at increased risk of asthma, which has been related to chronic effects of pool chlorine environment. However acute effects of swimming on rhinitis remain unknown. We aimed to assess the nasal response to exercise in competitive swimmers compared with competitive runners. Measurements of nasal symptoms, peak nasal inspiratory flow, lung function, dyspnea, and of airway inflammation were obtained before and after a training session of 19 international-level swimmers and 13 professional runners. Exercise-induced rhinitis was defined as a fall in peak nasal inspiratory flow above 20% from baseline and atopy by positivity to skin-prick testing. Changes within groups were compared using paired t test and differences compared by analysis of covariance. Prevalence of exercise-induced rhinitis was similar between swimmers and runners, respectively 21% and 23%. Contrary to runners, swimmers experienced a decrease in nasal inspiratory flow levels and increase in sneezing, nasal congestion, itching, and postnasal drip after exercise. However, difference in changes was only significant for postnasal drip (p = 0.050). All subjects experiencing exercise-induced rhinitis were nonatopic. An overall improvement in nasal flows, sneezing, and itching after exercise was observed in atopic athletes, although no significant differences in changes compared with nonatopic athletes existed. Swimmers, contrary to runners, experience a worsening of nasal function after training. Although these differences were only significant for postnasal drip, our results provide support to the existence of a "swimming-induced rhinitis" independent of the atopic status of the athlete.

  4. L-cysteine reversibly inhibits glucose-induced biphasic insulin secretion and ATP production by inactivating PKM2.

    PubMed

    Nakatsu, Daiki; Horiuchi, Yuta; Kano, Fumi; Noguchi, Yoshiyuki; Sugawara, Taichi; Takamoto, Iseki; Kubota, Naoto; Kadowaki, Takashi; Murata, Masayuki

    2015-03-10

    Increase in the concentration of plasma L-cysteine is closely associated with defective insulin secretion from pancreatic β-cells, which results in type 2 diabetes (T2D). In this study, we investigated the effects of prolonged L-cysteine treatment on glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS) from mouse insulinoma 6 (MIN6) cells and from mouse pancreatic islets, and found that the treatment reversibly inhibited glucose-induced ATP production and resulting GSIS without affecting proinsulin and insulin synthesis. Comprehensive metabolic analyses using capillary electrophoresis time-of-flight mass spectrometry showed that prolonged L-cysteine treatment decreased the levels of pyruvate and its downstream metabolites. In addition, methyl pyruvate, a membrane-permeable form of pyruvate, rescued L-cysteine-induced inhibition of GSIS. Based on these results, we found that both in vitro and in MIN6 cells, L-cysteine specifically inhibited the activity of pyruvate kinase muscle isoform 2 (PKM2), an isoform of pyruvate kinases that catalyze the conversion of phosphoenolpyruvate to pyruvate. L-cysteine also induced PKM2 subunit dissociation (tetramers to dimers/monomers) in cells, which resulted in impaired glucose-induced ATP production for GSIS. DASA-10 (NCGC00181061, a substituted N,N'-diarylsulfonamide), a specific activator for PKM2, restored the tetramer formation and the activity of PKM2, glucose-induced ATP production, and biphasic insulin secretion in L-cysteine-treated cells. Collectively, our results demonstrate that impaired insulin secretion due to exposure to L-cysteine resulted from its direct binding and inactivation of PKM2 and suggest that PKM2 is a potential therapeutic target for T2D.

  5. Mechanisms of Exercise-Induced Hypoalgesia

    PubMed Central

    Koltyn, Kelli F.; Brellenthin, Angelique G.; Cook, Dane B.; Sehgal, Nalini; Hillard, Cecilia

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine opioid and endocannabinoid mechanisms of exercise-induced hypoalgesia (EIH). Fifty-eight men and women (mean age = 21 yrs) completed three sessions. During the first session, participants were familiarized with the temporal summation of heat pain and pressure pain protocols. In the exercise sessions, following double-blind administration of either an opioid antagonist (50 mg naltrexone) or placebo, participants rated the intensity of heat pulses and indicated their pressure pain thresholds (PPT) and ratings (PPR) before and after 3 minutes of submaximal isometric exercise. Blood was drawn before and after exercise. Results indicated circulating concentrations of two endocannabinoids, N-arachidonylethanolamine (AEA) and 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG) as well as related lipids oleoylethanolamide (OEA), palmitoylethanolamide (PEA), N-docsahexaenoylethanolamine (DHEA), and 2-oleoylglycerol (2-OG) increased significantly (p < 0.05) following exercise. PPT increased significantly (p < 0.05) while PPR decreased significantly (p < 0.05) following exercise. Also, temporal summation ratings were significantly lower (p < 0.05) following exercise. These changes in pain responses did not differ between placebo or naltrexone conditions (p > 0.05). A significant association was found between EIH and DHEA. These results suggest involvement of a non-opioid mechanism in EIH following isometric exercise. PMID:25261342

  6. Acetylcholine and tachykinins involvement in the caffeine-induced biphasic change in intracellular Ca2+ in bovine airway smooth muscle

    PubMed Central

    Montaño, Luis M; Carbajal, Verónica; Arreola, José L; Barajas-López, Carlos; Flores-Soto, Edgar; Vargas, Mario H

    2003-01-01

    Caffeine has been widely used as a pharmacological tool to evaluate Ca2+ release from the sarcoplasmic reticulum in isolated smooth muscle cells. However, in nervous tissue this drug also causes neurotransmitters release, which might cause additional effects when smooth muscle strips are evaluated. To assess this last possibility, simultaneous measurements of contraction and cytosolic Ca2+ concentration (using Fura–2/AM) were carried out in bovine airway smooth muscle strips during caffeine stimulation. A first stimulation (S1, n=11) with caffeine (10 mM) induced a biphasic change in cytosolic Ca2+, which consisted of a transient Ca2+ peak (254±40 nM, X±SEM) followed by a plateau (92±13 nM), and a transient contraction (204.72±31.56 mg tension mg tissue−1). A second caffeine stimulation (S2) produced a similar response but these parameters had a different magnitude. The S2/S1 ratios for these parameters were 0.69±0.02, 0.83±0.06 and 1.01±0.03, respectively. Addition of ω-conotoxin GVIA (1 μM) and tetrodotoxin (3.1 μM) before S2 significantly diminished these S2/S1 ratios (0.26±0.05, 0.26±0.09 and 0.64±0.11, respectively, n=5, P<0.05), implicating the neurotransmitters release involvement in the response to caffeine. A similar effect (P<0.01) was observed with atropine (1 μM, n=4), the fragment 4–11 of substance P (SP) (an SP receptor antagonist, 10 μM, n=5), and with both substances (n=4). We discarded a direct effect of ω-conotoxin GVIA (1 μM) plus tetrodotoxin (3.1 μM) or of atropine (1 μM) plus SP fragment 4–11 on smooth muscle cells because they did not modify caffeine responses in isolated tracheal myocytes. We confirmed by HPLC that caffeine increased the release of acetylcholine (from 0.43±0.19 to 2.07±0.56 nM mg tissue−1, P<0.02) in bovine airway smooth muscle strips. Detection of substance P by ELISA was not statistically different after caffeine stimulation (geometric means before and after caffeine, 0.69 vs. 1.97 pg ml−1

  7. Temperature jump induced force generation in rabbit muscle fibres gets faster with shortening and shows a biphasic dependence on velocity.

    PubMed

    Ranatunga, K W; Roots, H; Offer, G W

    2010-02-01

    We examined the tension responses to ramp shortening and rapid temperature jump (<0.2 ms, 3-4 degrees C T-jump) in maximally Ca(2+)-activated rabbit psoas muscle fibres at 8-9 degrees C (the fibre length (L(0)) was approximately 1.5 mm and sarcomere length 2.5 microm). The aim was to investigate the strain sensitivity of crossbridge force generation in muscle. The T-jump induced tension rise was examined during steady shortening over a wide range of velocities (V) approaching the V(max) (V range approximately 0.01 to approximately 1.5 L(0) s(1)). In the isometric state, a T-jump induced a biphasic tension rise consisting of a fast (approximately 50 s(1), phase 2b) and a slow (approximately 10 s(1), phase 3) component, but if treated as monophasic the rate was approximately 20 s(1). During steady shortening the T-jump tension rise was monophasic; the rate of tension rise increased linearly with shortening velocity, and near V(max) it was approximately 200 s(1), approximately 10x faster than in the isometric state. Relative to the tension reached after the T-jump, the amplitude increased with shortening velocity, and near V(max) it was 4x larger than in the isometric state. Thus, the temperature sensitivity of muscle force is markedly increased with velocity during steady shortening, as found in steady state experiments. The rate of tension decline during ramp shortening also increased markedly with increase of velocity. The absolute amplitude of T-jump tension rise was larger than that in the isometric state at the low velocities (<0.5 L(0) s(1)) but decreased to below that of the isometric state at the higher velocities. Such a biphasic velocity dependence of the absolute amplitude of T-jump tension rise implies interplay between, at least, two processes that have opposing effects on the tension output as the shortening velocity is increased, probably enhancement of crossbridge force generation and faster (post-stroke) crossbridge detachment by negative strain

  8. Mycobacterium terrae isolated from indoor air of a moisture-damaged building induces sustained biphasic inflammatory response in mouse lungs.

    PubMed

    Jussila, Juha; Komulainen, Hannu; Huttunen, Kati; Roponen, Marjut; Iivanainen, Eila; Torkko, Pirjo; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Pelkonen, Jukka; Hirvonen, Maija-Riitta

    2002-11-01

    Occupants in moisture-damaged buildings suffer frequently from respiratory symptoms. This may be partly due to the presence of abnormal microbial growth or the altered microbial flora in the damaged buildings. However, the specific effects of the microbes on respiratory health and the way they provoke clinical manifestations are poorly understood. In the present study, we exposed mice via intratracheal instillation to a single dose of Mycobacterium terrae isolated from the indoor air of a moisture-damaged building (1 X 10(7), 5 X 10(7), or 1 X 10(8) microbes). Inflammation and toxicity in lungs were evaluated 2 hr later. The time course of the effects was assessed with the dose of 1 X 10(8) bacterial cells for up to 28 days. M. terrae caused a sustained biphasic inflammation in mouse lungs. The characteristic features for the first phase, which lasted from 6 hr to 3 days, were elevated proinflammatory cytokine [i.e., tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) and interleukin-6 (IL-6)] levels in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF). TNF-alpha was produced in the lungs more intensively than was IL-6. Neutrophils were the most abundant cells in the airways during the first phase, although their numbers in BALF remained elevated up to 21 days. The characteristics of the second phase, which lasted from 7 to 28 days, were elevated TNF-alpha levels in BALF, expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase in BAL cells, and recruitment of mononuclear cells such as lymphocytes and macrophages into the airways. Moreover, total protein, albumin, and lactate dehydrogenase concentrations were elevated in both phases in BALF. The bacteria were detected in lungs up to 28 days. In summary, these observations indicate that M. terrae is capable of provoking a sustained, biphasic inflammation in mouse lungs and can cause a moderate degree of cytotoxicity. Thus, M. terrae can be considered a species with potential to adversely affect the health of the occupants of moisture

  9. Dissection of the biphasic nature of hypoxia-induced motogenic action in bone marrow-derived human mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Busletta, Chiara; Novo, Erica; Valfrè Di Bonzo, Lorenzo; Povero, Davide; Paternostro, Claudia; Ievolella, Monica; Mareschi, Katia; Ferrero, Ivana; Cannito, Stefania; Compagnone, Alessandra; Bandino, Andrea; Colombatto, Sebastiano; Fagioli, Franca; Parola, Maurizio

    2011-06-01

    Hypoxic conditions have been reported to facilitate preservation of undifferentiated mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) phenotype and positively affect their colony-forming potential, proliferation, and migration/mobilization. In this study, designed to dissect mechanisms underlying hypoxia-dependent migration of bone marrow-derived human MSC (hMSC), signal transduction, and molecular mechanisms were evaluated by integrating morphological, molecular, and cell biology techniques, including the wound healing assay (WHA) and modified Boyden's chamber assay (BCA) to monitor migration. Exposure of hMSCs to moderate hypoxia resulted in a significant increase of migration of hMSCs in both WHA (from 6 to 20 hours) and BCA (within 6 hours). Mechanistic experiments outlined the following sequence of hypoxia-dependent events: (a) very early (15 minutes) increased generation of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS), which (b) was sufficient to switch on activation of extracellular regulated kinase 1/2 and c-Jun N-terminal protein kinase 1/2, found to be relevant for the early phase of hMSC migration; (c) hypoxia inducible factor-1 (HIF-1)-dependent increased expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) (facilitated by ROS) and its progressive release that was responsible for (d) a delayed and sustained migration of hMSCs. These results suggest that hypoxia-dependent migration relies on a previously unrecognized biphasic scenario involving an early phase, requiring generation of ROS, and a delayed phase sustained by HIF-1-dependent expression and release of VEGF.

  10. Muscle stiffness, strength loss, swelling and soreness following exercise-induced injury in humans.

    PubMed Central

    Howell, J N; Chleboun, G; Conatser, R

    1993-01-01

    1. In order to study injury-related changes in muscle stiffness, injury to the elbow flexors of thirteen human subjects was induced by a regimen of eccentric exercise. 2. Passive stiffness over an intermediate range of elbow angles was measured with a device which held the relaxed arm of the subject in the horizontal plane and stepped it through the range of elbow angles from 90 deg to near full extension at 180 deg. The relation between static torque and elbow angle was quite linear over the first 50 deg and was taken as stiffness. 3. Stiffness over this range of angles more than doubled immediately after exercise and remained elevated for about 4 days, and may result from low level myofibrillar activation induced by muscle stretch. 4. Arm swelling was biphasic; arm circumference increased by about 3% immediately after exercise, fell back toward normal, then increased by as much as 9% and remained elevated for as long as 9 days. 5. Ultrasound imaging showed most of the swelling immediately following the exercise to be localized to the flexor muscle compartment; subsequent swelling involved other tissue compartments as well. 6. Muscle strength declined by almost 40% after the exercise and recovery was only slight 10 days later; the half-time of recovery appeared to be as long as 5-6 weeks. PMID:8229798

  11. Spontaneous breathing with biphasic positive airway pressure attenuates lung injury in hydrochloric acid-induced acute respiratory distress syndrome.

    PubMed

    Xia, Jingen; Zhang, Heng; Sun, Bing; Yang, Rui; He, Hangyong; Zhan, Qingyuan

    2014-06-01

    It has been proved that spontaneous breathing (SB) with biphasic positive airway pressure (BIPAP) can improve lung aeration in acute respiratory distress syndrome compared with controlled mechanical ventilation. The authors hypothesized that SB with BIPAP would attenuate lung injury in acute respiratory distress syndrome compared with pressure-controlled ventilation. Twenty male New Zealand white rabbits with hydrochloric acid aspiration-induced acute respiratory distress syndrome were randomly ventilated using the BIPAP either with SB (BIPAP plus SB group) or without SB (BIPAP minus SB group) for 5 h. Inspiration pressure was adjusted to maintain the tidal volume at 6 ml/kg. Both groups received the same positive end-expiratory pressure level at 5 cm H2O for hemodynamic goals. Eight healthy animals without ventilatory support served as the control group. The BIPAP plus SB group presented a lower ratio of dead space ventilation to tidal volume, a lower respiratory rate, and lower minute ventilation. No significant difference in the protein levels of interleukin-6 and interleukin-8 in plasma, bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, and lung tissue were measured between the two experimental groups. However, SB resulted in lower messenger ribonucleic acid levels of interleukin-6 (mean ± SD; 1.8 ± 0.7 vs. 2.6 ± 0.5; P = 0.008) and interleukin-8 (2.2 ± 0.5 vs. 2.9 ± 0.6; P = 0.014) in lung tissues. In addition, lung histopathology revealed less injury in the BIPAP plus SB group (lung injury score, 13.8 ± 4.6 vs. 21.8 ± 5.7; P < 0.05). In hydrochloric acid-induced acute respiratory distress syndrome, SB with BIPAP attenuated lung injury and improved respiratory function compared with controlled ventilation with low tidal volume.

  12. Biphasic Functional Regulation in Hippocampus of Rat with Chronic Cerebral Hypoperfusion Induced by Permanent Occlusion of Bilateral Common Carotid Artery

    PubMed Central

    Lee, In Sun; Han, Jung-Soo; Kim, Bu-Yeo

    2013-01-01

    Background Chronic cerebral hypoperfusion induced by permanent occlusion of the bilateral common carotid artery (BCCAO) in rats has been commonly used for the study of Alzheimer’s disease and vascular dementia. Despite the apparent cognitive dysfunction in rats with BCCAO, the molecular markers or pathways involved in the pathological alternation have not been clearly identified. Methods Temporal changes (sham, 21, 35, 45, 55 and 70 days) in gene expression in the hippocampus of rats after BCCAO were measured using time-course microarray analysis. Gene Ontology (GO) and pathway analyses were performed to identify the functional involvement of temporally regulated genes in BCCAO. Results Two major gene expression patterns were observed in the hippocampus of rats after BCCAO. One pattern, which was composed of 341 early up-regulated genes after the surgical procedure, was dominantly involved in immune-related biological functions (false discovery rate [FDR]<0.01). Another pattern composed of 182 temporally delayed down-regulated genes was involved in sensory perception such as olfactory and cognition functions (FDR<0.01). In addition to the two gene expression patterns, the temporal change of GO and the pathway activities using all differentially expressed genes also confirmed that an immune response was the main early change, whereas sensory functions were delayed responses. Moreover, we identified FADD and SOCS3 as possible core genes in the sensory function loss process using text-based mining and interaction network analysis. Conclusions The biphasic regulatory mechanism first reported here could provide molecular evidence of BCCAO-induced impaired memory in rats as well as mechanism of the development of vascular dementia. PMID:23936146

  13. Exercise-induced muscle vasodilatation and treadmill exercise test responses in individuals without overt heart disease.

    PubMed

    Nunes, Rafael Amorim Belo; Giampaoli, Viviana; de Freitas, Humberto Felício Gonçalves; da Costa Pereira, Alexandre; Araújo, Fernando; Correia, Gustavo Ferreira; Rondon, Maria Urbana Pinto Brandão; Negrão, Carlos Eduardo; Mansur, Alfredo José

    2014-01-01

    The beneficial effects of exercise on cardiovascular health may be related to the improvement in several physiologic pathways, including peripheral vascular function. The aim of this study was to evaluate the relationship between cardiovascular responses during the treadmill exercise test and exercise-induced muscle vasodilatation in individuals without overt heart disease. The study included 796 asymptomatic subjects (431 females and 365 males) without overt heart disease. We evaluated the heart rate (chronotropic reserve and heart rate recovery), blood pressure (maximum systolic and diastolic blood pressure as well as systolic blood pressure recovery) and exercise capacity during symptom-limited treadmill exercise testing. Exercise-induced muscle vasodilatation was studied with venous occlusion plethysmography and estimated by forearm blood flow and vascular conductance responses during a 3-min handgrip maneuver. Forearm blood flow increase during the handgrip exercise was positively associated with heart rate recovery during treadmill exercise testing (p < 0.001). Forearm vascular conductance increase during the handgrip exercise was inversely associated with exercise diastolic blood pressure during exercise treadmill testing (p = 0.038). No significant association was found between exercise capacity and exercise-induced muscle vasodilation. In a sample of individuals without overt heart disease, exercise-induced muscle vasodilatation was associated with heart rate and blood pressure responses during treadmill exercise testing, but was not associated with exercise capacity. These findings suggest that favorable hemodynamic and chronotropic responses are associated with better vasodilator capacity, but exercise capacity does not predict muscle vasodilatation.

  14. Biphasic function of focal adhesion kinase in endothelial tube formation induced by fibril-forming collagens.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Junko; Shigematsu, Satoshi; Yamauchi, Keishi; Takeda, Teiji; Yamazaki, Masanori; Kakizawa, Tomoko; Hashizume, Kiyoshi

    2008-10-03

    Migration and tube formation of endothelial cells are important in angiogenesis and require a coordinated response to the extra-cellular matrix (ECM) and growth factor. Since focal adhesion kinase (FAK) integrates signals from both ECM and growth factor, we investigated its role in angiogenesis. Type I and II collagens are fibril-forming collagens and stimulate human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) to form tube structure. Although knockdown of FAK restrained cell motility and resulted in inhibition of tube formation, FAK degradation and tube formation occurred simultaneously after incubation with fibril-forming collagens. The compensation for the FAK degradation by a calpain inhibitor or transient over-expression of FAK resulted in disturbance of tube formation. These phenomena are specific to fibril-forming collagens and mediated via alpha2beta1 integrin. In conclusion, our data indicate that FAK is functioning in cell migration, but fibril-forming collagen-induced FAK degradation is necessary for endothelial tube formation.

  15. Exercise-induced Myocardial Ischemia Detected by Cardiopulmonary Exercise Testing

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhry, Sundeep; Arena, Ross; Wasserman, Karlman; Hansen, James E.; Lewis, Gregory D.; Myers, Jonathan; Chronos, Nicolas; Boden, William E.

    2010-01-01

    Cardiopulmonary exercise testing (CPET) is a well-accepted physiologic evaluation technique in patients diagnosed with heart failure and in individuals presenting with unexplained dyspnea on exertion. Several variables obtained during CPET, including oxygen consumption relative to heart rate (VO2/HR or O2-pulse) and work rate (VO2/Watt) provide consistent, quantitative patterns of abnormal physiologic responses to graded exercise when left ventricular dysfunction is caused by myocardial ischemia. This concept paper describes both the methodology and clinical application of CPET associated with myocardial ischemia. Initial evidence indicates left ventricular dysfunction induced by myocardial ischemia may be accurately detected by an abnormal CPET response. CPET testing may complement current non-invasive testing modalities that elicit inducible ischemia. It provides a physiologic quantification of the work rate, heart rate and O2 uptake at which myocardial ischemia develops. In conclusion, the potential value of adding CPET with gas exchange measurements is likely to be of great value in diagnosing and quantifying both overt and occult myocardial ischemia and its reversibility with treatment. PMID:19231322

  16. Transcriptional changes in canine distemper virus-induced demyelinating leukoencephalitis favor a biphasic mode of demyelination.

    PubMed

    Ulrich, Reiner; Puff, Christina; Wewetzer, Konstantin; Kalkuhl, Arno; Deschl, Ulrich; Baumgärtner, Wolfgang

    2014-01-01

    Canine distemper virus (CDV)-induced demyelinating leukoencephalitis in dogs (Canis familiaris) is suggested to represent a naturally occurring translational model for subacute sclerosing panencephalitis and multiple sclerosis in humans. The aim of this study was a hypothesis-free microarray analysis of the transcriptional changes within cerebellar specimens of five cases of acute, six cases of subacute demyelinating, and three cases of chronic demyelinating and inflammatory CDV leukoencephalitis as compared to twelve non-infected control dogs. Frozen cerebellar specimens were used for analysis of histopathological changes including demyelination, transcriptional changes employing microarrays, and presence of CDV nucleoprotein RNA and protein using microarrays, RT-qPCR and immunohistochemistry. Microarray analysis revealed 780 differentially expressed probe sets. The dominating change was an up-regulation of genes related to the innate and the humoral immune response, and less distinct the cytotoxic T-cell-mediated immune response in all subtypes of CDV leukoencephalitis as compared to controls. Multiple myelin genes including myelin basic protein and proteolipid protein displayed a selective down-regulation in subacute CDV leukoencephalitis, suggestive of an oligodendrocyte dystrophy. In contrast, a marked up-regulation of multiple immunoglobulin-like expressed sequence tags and the delta polypeptide of the CD3 antigen was observed in chronic CDV leukoencephalitis, in agreement with the hypothesis of an immune-mediated demyelination in the late inflammatory phase of the disease. Analysis of pathways intimately linked to demyelination as determined by morphometry employing correlation-based Gene Set Enrichment Analysis highlighted the pathomechanistic importance of up-regulated genes comprised by the gene ontology terms "viral replication" and "humoral immune response" as well as down-regulated genes functionally related to "metabolite and energy generation".

  17. Transcriptional Changes in Canine Distemper Virus-Induced Demyelinating Leukoencephalitis Favor a Biphasic Mode of Demyelination

    PubMed Central

    Ulrich, Reiner; Puff, Christina; Wewetzer, Konstantin; Kalkuhl, Arno; Deschl, Ulrich; Baumgärtner, Wolfgang

    2014-01-01

    Canine distemper virus (CDV)-induced demyelinating leukoencephalitis in dogs (Canis familiaris) is suggested to represent a naturally occurring translational model for subacute sclerosing panencephalitis and multiple sclerosis in humans. The aim of this study was a hypothesis-free microarray analysis of the transcriptional changes within cerebellar specimens of five cases of acute, six cases of subacute demyelinating, and three cases of chronic demyelinating and inflammatory CDV leukoencephalitis as compared to twelve non-infected control dogs. Frozen cerebellar specimens were used for analysis of histopathological changes including demyelination, transcriptional changes employing microarrays, and presence of CDV nucleoprotein RNA and protein using microarrays, RT-qPCR and immunohistochemistry. Microarray analysis revealed 780 differentially expressed probe sets. The dominating change was an up-regulation of genes related to the innate and the humoral immune response, and less distinct the cytotoxic T-cell-mediated immune response in all subtypes of CDV leukoencephalitis as compared to controls. Multiple myelin genes including myelin basic protein and proteolipid protein displayed a selective down-regulation in subacute CDV leukoencephalitis, suggestive of an oligodendrocyte dystrophy. In contrast, a marked up-regulation of multiple immunoglobulin-like expressed sequence tags and the delta polypeptide of the CD3 antigen was observed in chronic CDV leukoencephalitis, in agreement with the hypothesis of an immune-mediated demyelination in the late inflammatory phase of the disease. Analysis of pathways intimately linked to demyelination as determined by morphometry employing correlation-based Gene Set Enrichment Analysis highlighted the pathomechanistic importance of up-regulated genes comprised by the gene ontology terms “viral replication” and “humoral immune response” as well as down-regulated genes functionally related to “metabolite and energy

  18. Exercise-induced bronchoconstriction update-2016.

    PubMed

    Weiler, John M; Brannan, John D; Randolph, Christopher C; Hallstrand, Teal S; Parsons, Jonathan; Silvers, William; Storms, William; Zeiger, Joanna; Bernstein, David I; Blessing-Moore, Joann; Greenhawt, Matthew; Khan, David; Lang, David; Nicklas, Richard A; Oppenheimer, John; Portnoy, Jay M; Schuller, Diane E; Tilles, Stephen A; Wallace, Dana

    2016-11-01

    The first practice parameter on exercise-induced bronchoconstriction (EIB) was published in 2010. This updated practice parameter was prepared 5 years later. In the ensuing years, there has been increased understanding of the pathogenesis of EIB and improved diagnosis of this disorder by using objective testing. At the time of this publication, observations included the following: dry powder mannitol for inhalation as a bronchial provocation test is FDA approved however not currently available in the United States; if baseline pulmonary function test results are normal to near normal (before and after bronchodilator) in a person with suspected EIB, then further testing should be performed by using standardized exercise challenge or eucapnic voluntary hyperpnea (EVH); and the efficacy of nonpharmaceutical interventions (omega-3 fatty acids) has been challenged. The workgroup preparing this practice parameter updated contemporary practice guidelines based on a current systematic literature review. The group obtained supplementary literature and consensus expert opinions when the published literature was insufficient. A search of the medical literature on PubMed was conducted, and search terms included pathogenesis, diagnosis, differential diagnosis, and therapy (both pharmaceutical and nonpharmaceutical) of exercise-induced bronchoconstriction or exercise-induced asthma (which is no longer a preferred term); asthma; and exercise and asthma. References assessed as relevant to the topic were evaluated to search for additional relevant references. Published clinical studies were appraised by category of evidence and used to document the strength of the recommendation. The parameter was then evaluated by Joint Task Force reviewers and then by reviewers assigned by the parent organizations, as well as the general membership. Based on this process, the parameter can be characterized as an evidence- and consensus-based document.

  19. Exercise-induced anaphylaxis: A clinical view

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Exercise-induced anaphylaxis (EIA) is a distinct form of physical allergy. The development of anaphylaxis during exertion often requires the concomitant exposure to triggering factors such as intake of foods (food dependent exercise-induced anaphylaxis) or drugs prior to exercise, extreme environmental conditions. EIA is a rare, but serious disorder, which is often undetected or inadequately treated. This article summarizes current evidences on pathophysiology, diagnosis and management. We reviewed recent advances in factors triggering the release of mediators from mast cells which seems to play a pathogenetic role. A correct diagnosis is essential to avoid unnecessary restricted diet, to allow physical activity in subjects with EIA dependent from triggering factors such as food, and to manage attacks. An algorithm for diagnosing EIA based on medical history, IgE tests and exercise challenge test has been provided. In the long-term management of EIA, there is a need for educating patients and care-givers to avoid exposure to precipitating factors and to recognize and treat episodes. Future researches on existing questions are discussed. PMID:22980517

  20. Exercise-induced bronchospasm in clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Pierson, W E

    1988-01-01

    The early recognition and appropriate management of EIB can allow children and adolescents to fully participate in physical activities and sports. The diagnosis by history of chest congestion, coughing, and decreasing performance with exercise is helpful but is aided by a more systematic questionnaire that can detect otherwise "normal" people with EIB. The diagnosis is documented by performance of an exercise challenge test such as a treadmill or cycloergometer to verify bronchospasm induced by exercise. The management can be accomplished by nonpharmacologic means such as an early vigorous warmup, the use of a mask for rebreathing warmed air, and participation in a physical training program to increase anaerobic fitness. Pharmacologic management includes the appropriate use of cromolyn sodium, beta adrenergic agonists, theophylline, ipratroprium bromide, and calcium channel blocking agents. In addition the antihistamine, terfenadine, can also be utilized to effectively block exercise-induced bronchospasm. These pharmacologic agents can be utilized in both national and international competition when approved by the appropriate national governing body and/or the US Olympic Committee and the International Olympic Committee.

  1. [Cereal-dependent exercise-induced anaphylaxis].

    PubMed

    Seoane-Rodríguez, Marta; Caralli, María Elisa; Morales-Cabeza, Cristina; Micozzi, Sarah; De Barrio-Fernández, Manuel; Rojas Pérez-Ezquerra, Patricia

    2016-01-01

    Wheat-dependent exercise-induced anaphylaxis (WDEIA) is increasing. In vitro test such as omega-5-gliadin levels are useful in the diagnosis, while oral single blind challenge tests (OCT) with wheat plus exercise continuous being the gold standard diagnostic method. This paper reports the case of a 38-year-old woman, with several episodes of anaphylaxis after eating different foods and doing exercise after ingestion. An allergy study was performed with positive skin prick tests for wheat, barley and rye. Total IgE 238.0KU/L, positive specific IgE (>100KU/L) to wheat, barley and rye, and negative to rTri-a-19 omega-5 gliadin. OCT with bread and exercise was positive. In this case of wheat-dependent exerciseinduced anaphylaxis (WDEIA) with negative serum specific IgE to omega-5-gliadin, negative results with gamma, alpha, bheta y omega-gliadin doesn't exclude the diagnosis of WDEIA.

  2. [Exercise-induced anaphylaxis--a review].

    PubMed

    Plavec, Davor; Vuljanko, Ivana Maloca

    2010-01-01

    Exercise-induced anaphylaxis (EIA) is a syndrome in which patients experience the symptoms of anaphylaxis, which occur only after increased physical activity. It is characterised by a gradual development of symptoms: itching, erythema, urticaria, angioedema, anaphylactic shock (hypotension, syncope, loss of consciousness, shortness of breath, wheezing, nausea and vomiting), and at the end of the late phase prolonged urticaria and headache. The triggering factors for EIA are as follows: significant exposure to airborne allergens, insect sting, weather extremes, higher air humidity, taking nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. The most frequent causative nutritive allergens include wheat, crabs and shells. Prophylactic management for EIA comprises avoding the triggers. Exercise or other physical activity should be performed in proximity of medically trained companion.

  3. [Exercise-induced inspiratory stridor. An important differential diagnosis of exercise-induced asthma].

    PubMed

    Christensen, Pernille; Thomsen, Simon Francis; Rasmussen, Niels; Backer, Vibeke

    2007-11-19

    Recent studies suggest that exercise-induced inspiratory stridor (EIIS) is an important and often overlooked differential diagnosis of exercise-induced asthma. EIIS is characterised by astma-like symptoms, but differs by inspiratory limitation, fast recovery, and a lack of effect of inhaled bronchodilators. The prevalence of EIIS is reported to be 5-27%, and affects both children and adults. The pathophysiology, the pathogenesis, and the treatment of the condition are not yet clarified. At present, a population-based study is being conducted in order to address these points.

  4. Nox4 Is Dispensable for Exercise Induced Muscle Fibre Switch

    PubMed Central

    Vogel, Juri; Figueiredo de Rezende, Flávia; Rohrbach, Susanne; Zhang, Min; Schröder, Katrin

    2015-01-01

    Introduction By producing H2O2, the NADPH oxidase Nox4 is involved in differentiation of mesenchymal cells. Exercise alters the composition of slow and fast twitch fibres in skeletal. Here we hypothesized that Nox4 contributes to exercise-induced adaptation such as changes in muscle metabolism or muscle fibre specification and studied this in wildtype and Nox4-/- mice. Results Exercise, as induced by voluntary running in a running wheel or forced running on a treadmill induced a switch from fast twitch to intermediate fibres. However the induced muscle fibre switch was similar between Nox4-/- and wildtype mice. The same held true for exercise-induced expression of PGC1α or AMPK activation. Both are increased in response to exercise, but with no difference was observed between wildtype and Nox4-/- mice. Conclusion Thus, exercise-induced muscle fibre switch is Nox4-independent. PMID:26083642

  5. Exercise induces autophagy in peripheral tissues and in the brain.

    PubMed

    He, Congcong; Sumpter, Rhea; Levine, Beth

    2012-10-01

    We recently identified physical exercise as a newly defined inducer of autophagy in vivo. Exercise induced autophagy in multiple organs involved in metabolic regulation, such as muscle, liver, pancreas and adipose tissue. To study the physiological role of exercise-induced autophagy, we generated mice with a knock-in nonphosphorylatable mutation in BCL2 (Thr69Ala, Ser70Ala and Ser84Ala) (BCL2 AAA) that are defective in exercise- and starvation-induced autophagy but not in basal autophagy. We found that BCL2 AAA mice could not run on a treadmill as long as wild-type mice, and did not undergo exercise-mediated increases in skeletal glucose muscle uptake. Unlike wild-type mice, the BCL2 AAA mice failed to reverse high-fat diet-induced glucose intolerance after 8 weeks of exercise training, possibly due to defects in signaling pathways that regulate muscle glucose uptake and metabolism during exercise. Together, these findings suggested a hitherto unknown important role of autophagy in mediating exercise-induced metabolic benefits. In the present addendum, we show that treadmill exercise also induces autophagy in the cerebral cortex of adult mice. This observation raises the intriguing question of whether autophagy may in part mediate the beneficial effects of exercise in neurodegeneration, adult neurogenesis and improved cognitive function.

  6. Trypsin induces biphasic muscle contraction and relaxation via transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 and neurokinin receptors 1/2 in porcine esophageal body.

    PubMed

    Xiaopeng, Bai; Tanaka, Yoshimasa; Ihara, Eikichi; Hirano, Katsuya; Nakano, Kayoko; Hirano, Mayumi; Oda, Yoshinao; Nakamura, Kazuhiko

    2017-02-15

    Duodenal reflux of fluids containing trypsin relates to refractory gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). Esophageal peristalsis and clearance are important factors in GERD pathogenesis. However, the function of trypsin in esophageal body contractility is not fully understood. In this study, effects of trypsin on circular smooth muscle (CSM) and longitudinal smooth muscle (LSM) of the porcine esophageal body were examined. Trypsin elicited a concentration dependent biphasic response, a major contraction and a subsequent relaxation only in CSM. In CSM, contraction occurred at trypsin concentrations of 100nM and relaxation at 1μM. A proteinase-activated receptor (PAR)2 activating peptide, SLIGKV-NH2 (1mM), induced a monophasic contraction. Those responses were unaffected by tetrodotoxin though abolished by the gap junction uncouplers carbenoxolone and octanol. They were also partially inhibited by a transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1) antagonist and abolished by combination of neurokinin receptor 1 (NK1) and NK2 antagonists, but not by an NK3 antagonist, suggesting a PAR2-TRPV1-substance P pathway in sensory neurons. Substance P (100nM), an agonist for various NK receptors (NK1, NK2 and NK3) with differing affinities, induced significant contraction in CSM, but not in LSM. The contraction was also blocked by the combination of NK1 and NK2 antagonists, but not by the NK3 antagonist. Moreover, substance P-induced contractions were unaffected by the TRPV1 antagonist, but inhibited by a gap junction uncoupler. In conclusion, trypsin induced a biphasic response only in CSM and this was mediated by PAR2, TRPV1 and NK1/2. Gap junctions were indispensable in this tachykinin-induced response.

  7. Exercise-induced respiratory symptoms not due to asthma.

    PubMed

    Pandit, Chetan A; Batterby, Eugenie; Van Asperen, Peter; Cooper, Peter; Selvadurai, Hiran; Fitzgerald, Dominic A

    2014-10-01

    This manuscript describes two interesting patients who had exercise-induced symptoms that unmasked an alternative underlying diagnosis. The first is an 8-year-old boy who was treated for asthma all his life but really had exercise-induced stridor (labelled as wheeze) causing significant exercise limitation, which was due to a double aortic arch with the right arch compressing the trachea. The second case describes the diagnosis of vocal cord dysfunction in a 13-year-old anxious high achiever. He also initially had exercise-induced symptoms treated as exercise-induced wheeze but again had a stridor due to vocal cord dysfunction. Both these cases demonstrate the importance of detailed history including during exercise, which can unmask alternative diagnosis. Another important message is that if there is no response to bronchodilator treatment with absence of typical signs and symptoms of asthma, alternative diagnosis should be considered.

  8. Molecular Aspects of Exercise-induced Cardiac Remodeling.

    PubMed

    Bernardo, Bianca C; McMullen, Julie R

    2016-11-01

    Exercise-induced cardiac remodeling is typically an adaptive response associated with cardiac myocyte hypertrophy and renewal, increased cardiac myocyte contractility, sarcomeric remodeling, cell survival, metabolic and mitochondrial adaptations, electrical remodeling, and angiogenesis. Initiating stimuli/triggers of cardiac remodeling include increased hemodynamic load, increased sympathetic activity, and the release of hormones and growth factors. Prolonged and strenuous exercise may lead to maladaptive exercise-induced cardiac remodeling including cardiac dysfunction and arrhythmia. In addition, this article describes novel therapeutic approaches for the treatment of heart failure that target mechanisms responsible for adaptive exercise-induced cardiac remodeling, which are being developed and tested in preclinical models.

  9. Challenges in the management of exercise-induced asthma.

    PubMed

    Storms, William

    2009-05-01

    Exercise and physical activity are common triggers of symptoms in patients with asthma, although some individuals - especially athletes - may have symptoms with exercise alone. Exercise-induced bronchospasm (EIB) describes airway hyper-reactivity that is observed following exercise in a patient who is not otherwise diagnosed with asthma; exercise-induced asthma (EIA) describes airway hyper-reactivity associated with exercise in a patient who has persistent asthma. Specific challenges affecting both the diagnosis and treatment of these conditions are discussed in this review. The past decade has seen substantial advances in our understanding of EIA and EIB, including new guidelines on their management. With appropriate therapy, all patients with exercise-related symptoms should be able to reach their desired level of performance.

  10. Low-Intensity Repetitive Exercise Induced Rhabdomyolysis.

    PubMed

    Tran, Mina; Hayden, Nicholas; Garcia, Brandon; Tucci, Veronica

    2015-01-01

    Rhabdomyolysis is a rare condition caused by the proteins of damaged muscle cells entering the bloodstream and damaging the kidneys. Common symptoms of rhabdomyolysis are muscle pain and fatigue in conjunction with dark urine; kidney damage is a common symptom among these patients. We present a case of a 23-year-old woman who displayed myalgia in the upper extremities caused by low-intensity and high-repetition exercise. She was successfully diagnosed and treated for exertional rhabdomyolysis. This patient had no significant medical history that would induce this condition. We urge the emergency medical community to observe and monitor patients that complain of myalgia to ensure they are not suffering from rhabdomyolysis even in atypical cases.

  11. Exercise-induced bronchoconstriction update: therapeutic management.

    PubMed

    Spector, Sheldon; Tan, Ricardo

    2012-01-01

    Management of exercise-induced bronchoconstriction (EIB) should include both prevention and treatment directed toward the underlying asthma and bronchial hyperresponsiveness. Both nonpharmacologic and pharmacologic approaches should be followed. Preexercise warm-up, to take advantage of the refractory period that follows EIB, is an important preventive technique. Dietary interventions such as fish oil, vitamin D, and ascorbic acid have shown promising results. Beta 2-agonists are considered the most effective agents for EIB at this time but intermittent use is recommended to avoid tolerance or decreased effectiveness with daily regular use. Leukotriene inhibitors and mast cell stabilizing agents can be useful in EIB but are less effective than beta 2-agonists. Tolerance to beta 2-agonists is not prevented by concomitant use of inhaled corticosteroid but it is not known whether use of leukotriene inhibitors can affect tolerance. EIB in elite athletes with no underlying asthma may have a different pathogenesis.

  12. Low-Intensity Repetitive Exercise Induced Rhabdomyolysis

    PubMed Central

    Tran, Mina; Hayden, Nicholas; Garcia, Brandon; Tucci, Veronica

    2015-01-01

    Rhabdomyolysis is a rare condition caused by the proteins of damaged muscle cells entering the bloodstream and damaging the kidneys. Common symptoms of rhabdomyolysis are muscle pain and fatigue in conjunction with dark urine; kidney damage is a common symptom among these patients. We present a case of a 23-year-old woman who displayed myalgia in the upper extremities caused by low-intensity and high-repetition exercise. She was successfully diagnosed and treated for exertional rhabdomyolysis. This patient had no significant medical history that would induce this condition. We urge the emergency medical community to observe and monitor patients that complain of myalgia to ensure they are not suffering from rhabdomyolysis even in atypical cases. PMID:26693360

  13. Personality does not influence exercise-induced mood enhancement among female exercisers.

    PubMed

    Milton, K E; Lane, A M; Terry, P C

    2005-06-01

    The present study investigated the influence of personality on exercise-induced mood changes. It was hypothesised that a) exercise would be associated with significant mood enhancement across all personality types, b) extroversion would be associated with positive mood and neuroticism with negative mood both pre- and post-exercise, and c) personality measures would interact with exercise-induced mood changes. Participants were 90 female exercisers (M=25.8 y, SD=9.0 y) who completed the Eysenck Personality Inventory once and the Brunel Mood Scale before and after a 60-min exercise session. Median splits were used to group participants into 4 personality types: stable introverts (n=25), stable extroverts (n=20), neurotic introverts (n=26), and neurotic extroverts (n=19). Repeated measures MANOVA showed significant mood enhancement following exercise across all personality types. Neuroticism was associated with negative mood scores pre- and post-exercise but the effect of extroversion on reported mood was relatively weak. There was no significant interaction effect between exercise-induced mood enhancement and personality. Findings lend support to the notion that exercise is associated with improved mood. However, findings show that personality did not influence this effect, although neuroticism was associated with negative mood.

  14. Biphasic Erk1/2 activation sequentially involving Gs and Gi signaling is required in beta3-adrenergic receptor-induced primary smooth muscle cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Hadi, Tarik; Barrichon, Marina; Mourtialon, Pascal; Wendremaire, Maeva; Garrido, Carmen; Sagot, Paul; Bardou, Marc; Lirussi, Frédéric

    2013-05-01

    The beta3 adrenergic receptor (B3-AR) reportedly induces cell proliferation, but the signaling pathways that were proposed, involving either Gs or Gi coupling, remain controversial. To further investigate the role of G protein coupling in B3-AR induced proliferation, we stimulated primary human myometrial smooth muscle cells with SAR150640 (B3-AR agonist) in the absence or presence of variable G-protein inhibitors. Specific B3-AR stimulation led to an Erk1/2 induced proliferation. We observed that the proliferative effects of B3-AR require two Erk1/2 activation peaks (the first after 3min, the second at 8h). Erk1/2 activation at 3min was mimicked by forskolin (adenylyl-cyclase activator), and was resistant to pertussis toxin (Gi inhibitor), suggesting a Gs protein signaling. This first signaling also required the downstream Gs signaling effectors PKA and Src. However, Erk1/2 activation at 8h turned out to be pertussis toxin-dependent, and PKA-independent, indicating a Gi signaling pathway in which Src and PI3K were required. The pharmacological inhibition of both the Gs and Gi pathway abolished B3-AR-induced proliferation. Altogether, these data indicate that B3-AR-induced proliferation depends on the biphasic activation of Erk1/2 sequentially induced by the Gs/PKA/Src and Gi/Src/PI3K signaling pathways. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Astragalus membranaceus improves exercise performance and ameliorates exercise-induced fatigue in trained mice.

    PubMed

    Yeh, Tzu-Shao; Chuang, Hsiao-Li; Huang, Wen-Ching; Chen, Yi-Ming; Huang, Chi-Chang; Hsu, Mei-Chich

    2014-03-03

    Astragalus membranaceus (AM) is a popular "Qi-tonifying" herb with a long history of use as a Traditional Chinese Medicine with multiple biological functions. However, evidence for the effects of AM on exercise performance and physical fatigue is limited. We evaluated the potential beneficial effects of AM on ergogenic and anti-fatigue functions following physiological challenge. Male ICR strain mice were randomly assigned to four groups (n = 10 per group) for treatment: (1) sedentary control and vehicle treatment (vehicle control); (2) exercise training with vehicle treatment (exercise control); and (3) exercise training with AM treatment at 0.615 g/kg/day (Ex-AM1) or (4) 3.075 g/kg/day (Ex-AM5). Both the vehicle and AM were orally administered for 6 weeks. Exercise performance and anti-fatigue function were evaluated by forelimb grip strength, exhaustive swimming time, and levels of serum lactate, ammonia, glucose, and creatine kinase after 15-min swimming exercise. Exercise training combined with AM supplementation increased endurance exercise capacity and increased hepatic and muscle glycogen content. AM reduced exercise-induced accumulation of the byproducts blood lactate and ammonia with acute exercise challenge. Moreover, we found no deleterious effects from AM treatment. Therefore, AM supplementation improved exercise performance and had anti-fatigue effects in mice. It may be an effective ergogenic aid in exercise training.

  16. Exercise-induced endocannabinoid signaling is modulated by intensity.

    PubMed

    Raichlen, David A; Foster, Adam D; Seillier, Alexandre; Giuffrida, Andrea; Gerdeman, Gregory L

    2013-04-01

    Endocannabinoids (eCB) are endogenous ligands for cannabinoid receptors that are densely expressed in brain networks responsible for reward. Recent work shows that exercise activates the eCB system in humans and other mammals, suggesting eCBs are partly responsible for the reported improvements in mood and affect following aerobic exercise in humans. However, exercise-induced psychological changes reported by runners are known to be dependent on exercise intensity, suggesting that any underlying molecular mechanism should also change with varying levels of exercise intensity. Here, we examine circulating levels of eCBs following aerobic exercise (treadmill running) in recreationally fit human runners at four different intensities. We show that eCB signaling is indeed intensity dependent, with significant changes in circulating eCBs observed following moderate intensities only (very high and very low intensity exercises do not significantly alter circulating eCB levels). Our results are consistent with intensity-dependent psychological state changes with exercise and therefore support the hypothesis that eCB activity is related to neurobiological effects of exercise. Thus, future studies examining the role of exercise-induced eCB signaling on neurobiology or physiology must take exercise intensity into account.

  17. Exercise excess pressure and exercise-induced albuminuria in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Climie, Rachel E D; Srikanth, Velandai; Keith, Laura J; Davies, Justin E; Sharman, James E

    2015-05-01

    Exercise-induced albuminuria is common in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) in response to maximal exercise, but the response to light-moderate exercise is unclear. Patients with T2DM have abnormal central hemodynamics and greater propensity for exercise hypertension. This study sought to determine the relationship between light-moderate exercise central hemodynamics (including aortic reservoir and excess pressure) and exercise-induced albuminuria. Thirty-nine T2DM (62 ± 9 yr; 49% male) and 39 nondiabetic controls (53 ± 9 yr; 51% male) were examined at rest and during 20 min of light-moderate cycle exercise (30 W; 50 revolutions/min). Albuminuria was assessed by the albumin-creatinine ratio (ACR) at rest and 30 min postexercise. Hemodynamics recorded included brachial and central blood pressure (BP), aortic stiffness, augmented pressure (AP), aortic reservoir pressure, and excess pressure integral (Pexcess). There was no difference in ACR between groups before exercise (P > 0.05). Exercise induced a significant rise in ACR in T2DM but not controls (1.73 ± 1.43 vs. 0.53 ± 1.0 mg/mol, P = 0.002). All central hemodynamic variables were significantly higher during exercise in T2DM (i.e., Pexcess, systolic BP and AP; P < 0.01 all). In T2DM (but not controls), exercise Pexcess was associated with postexercise ACR (r = 0.51, P = 0.002), and this relationship was independent of age, sex, body mass index, heart rate, aortic stiffness, antihypertensive medication, and ambulatory daytime systolic BP (β = 0.003, P = 0.003). Light-moderate exercise induced a significant rise in ACR in T2DM, and this was independently associated with Pexcess, a potential marker of vascular dysfunction. These novel findings suggest that Pexcess could be important for appropriate renal function in T2DM.

  18. Memory of pain induced by physical exercise.

    PubMed

    Bąbel, Przemysław

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the memory of pain induced by running a marathon and the factors that influence it. Sixty-two marathon runners participated in the study, which comprised two phases. Immediately after a participant had reached the finishing line of the marathon, they were asked to rate the intensity and the unpleasantness of their pain and the emotions they felt at that time. Either three or six months later they were asked again to rate the intensity and the unpleasantness of the same pain experience. Regardless of the length of recall delay, participants underestimated both recalled pain intensity and unpleasantness. The pain and negative affect reported at the time of the pain experience accounted for 24% of the total variance in predicting recalled pain intensity and 22% of the total variance in predicting recalled pain unpleasantness. Positive affect at the time of pain experience was not a significant predictor of both the recalled pain intensity and pain unpleasantness. It is concluded that pain induced by physical exercise is not remembered accurately and the pain and negative affect experienced influence recall. Further research is needed on the influence of positive affect on the memory of pain.

  19. Exercise-induced rhabdomyolysis from stationary biking: a case report.

    PubMed

    Inklebarger, J; Galanis, N; Kirkos, J; Kapetanos, G

    2010-10-01

    There are several reports concerning exercise and rabdomyolysis. There has been no report in the English literature of exercise induced rabdomyolisis from a stationary bike.A 63-year-old female recreational athlete presented to our hospital seeking treatment for lower back, leg pain and stiffness after exercising on a stationary bicycle one day prior. Blood work showed a raised CK of 38,120 U/L, a myoglobin of 5330 and an AST 495 U/L with normal urea and electrolytes. Urinalysis remained negative. She was admitted for oral and intravenous hydration and fluid balance monitoringThis is a very rare case of rhabdomyolysis due to exercise. This study highlights the difficulties faced by accident and emergency teams in distinguishing delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS) from exercise-induced rhabdomyolysis, and reinforces the concept that rhabdomyolysis can occur at any level of exercise intensity.

  20. Clinical application of neuromuscular electrical stimulation induced cardiovascular exercise.

    PubMed

    Caulfield, Brian; Crowe, Louis; Coughlan, Garrett; Minogue, Conor

    2011-01-01

    We need to find novel ways of increasing exercise participation, particularly in those populations who find it difficult to participate in voluntary exercise. In recent years researchers have started to investigate the potential for using electrical stimulation to artificially stimulate a pattern of muscle activity that would induce a physiological response consistent with cardiovascular exercise. Work to date has indicated that this is best achieved by using a stimulation protocol that results in rapid rhythmical isometric contractions of the large leg muscle groups at sub tetanic frequencies. Studies completed by our group indicate that this technique can serve as a viable alternative to voluntary cardiovascular exercise. Apart from being able to induce a cardiovascular exercise effect in patient populations (e.g. heart failure, COPD, spinal cord injury, obesity), this approach may also have value in promotion of exercise activity in a microgravity environment.

  1. Update on Exercise-Induced Asthma. A Report of the Olympic Exercise Asthma Summit Conference.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Storms, William W.; Joyner, David M.

    1997-01-01

    Summarizes results from the Olympic Exercise Asthma Summit Conference, offering the latest on identifying and managing exercise-induced asthma (EIA). Concludes that effective pharmacologic and nonpharmacologic treatment is available, but EIA is underrecognized and underdiagnosed. Physicians should look for it in all patients, including school…

  2. Exercise Challenge for Exercise-Induced Bronchospasm. Confirming Presence, Evaluating Control.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaplan, Ted A.

    1995-01-01

    Exercise-induced bronchospasm commonly strikes young people, keeping many away from activity. The exercise challenge test (a powerful tool in diagnosing the condition, fine-tuning treatment, and improving patient compliance) can help get patients back in action. Knowing how to interpret and use test results helps physicians expedite effective…

  3. Personality Does not Influence Exercise-Induced Mood Enhancement Among Female Exercisers.

    PubMed

    Lane, Andrew M; Milton, Karen E; Terry, Peter C

    2005-09-01

    The present study investigated the influence of personality on exercise-induced mood changes. It was hypothesised that (a) exercise would be associated with significant mood enhancement across all personality types, (b) extroversion would be associated with positive mood and neuroticism with negative mood both pre- and post-exercise, and (c) personality measures would interact with exercise-induced mood changes. Participants were 90 female exercisers (M = 25.8 yr, SD = 9.0 yr) who completed the Eysenck Personality Inventory (EPI) once and the Brunel Mood Scale (BRUMS) before and after a 60-minute exercise session. Median splits were used to group participants into four personality types: stable introverts (n = 25), stable extroverts (n = 20), neurotic introverts (n = 26), and neurotic extroverts (n = 19). Repeated measures MANOVA showed significant mood enhancement following exercise across all personality types. Neuroticism was associated with negative mood scores pre- and post-exercise but the effect of extroversion on reported mood was relatively weak. There was no significant interaction effect between exercise-induced mood enhancement and personality. In conclusion, findings lend support to the notion that exercise is associated with improved mood. However, findings show that personality did not influence this effect, although neuroticism was associated with negative mood. Key PointsResearch in general psychology has found that stable personality trait are associated changes in mood states. Ninety females exercisers completed a personality test and mood scales before and after exercise. Results indicated mood changes were not associated with personality, although neuroticism was associated with negative mood.

  4. Personality Does not Influence Exercise-Induced Mood Enhancement Among Female Exercisers

    PubMed Central

    Lane, Andrew M.; Milton, Karen E.; Terry, Peter C.

    2005-01-01

    The present study investigated the influence of personality on exercise-induced mood changes. It was hypothesised that (a) exercise would be associated with significant mood enhancement across all personality types, (b) extroversion would be associated with positive mood and neuroticism with negative mood both pre- and post-exercise, and (c) personality measures would interact with exercise-induced mood changes. Participants were 90 female exercisers (M = 25.8 yr, SD = 9.0 yr) who completed the Eysenck Personality Inventory (EPI) once and the Brunel Mood Scale (BRUMS) before and after a 60-minute exercise session. Median splits were used to group participants into four personality types: stable introverts (n = 25), stable extroverts (n = 20), neurotic introverts (n = 26), and neurotic extroverts (n = 19). Repeated measures MANOVA showed significant mood enhancement following exercise across all personality types. Neuroticism was associated with negative mood scores pre- and post-exercise but the effect of extroversion on reported mood was relatively weak. There was no significant interaction effect between exercise-induced mood enhancement and personality. In conclusion, findings lend support to the notion that exercise is associated with improved mood. However, findings show that personality did not influence this effect, although neuroticism was associated with negative mood. Key Points Research in general psychology has found that stable personality trait are associated changes in mood states. Ninety females exercisers completed a personality test and mood scales before and after exercise. Results indicated mood changes were not associated with personality, although neuroticism was associated with negative mood. PMID:24453525

  5. Topical application of l-menthol induces heat analgesia, mechanical allodynia, and a biphasic effect on cold sensitivity in rats

    PubMed Central

    Klein, Amanda H.; Sawyer, Carolyn M.; Carstens, Mirela Iodi; Tsagareli, Merab; Tsiklauri, Nana; Carstens, E.

    2010-01-01

    Menthol is used in analgesic balms and also in foods and oral hygiene products for its fresh cooling sensation. Menthol enhances cooling by interacting with the cold-sensitive thermoTRP channel TRPM8, but its effect on pain is less well understood. We presently used behavioral methods to investigate effects of topical menthol on thermal (hot and cold) pain and innocuous cold and mechanical sensitivity in rats. Menthol dose-dependently increased the latency for noxious heat-evoked withdrawal of the treated hindpaw with a weak mirror-image effect, indicating antinociception. Menthol at the highest concentration (40%) reduced mechanical withdrawal thresholds, with no effect at lower concentrations. Menthol had a biphasic effect on cold avoidance. At high concentrations (10 and 40%) menthol reduced avoidance of colder temperatures (15 and 20°C) compared to 30°C, while at lower concentrations (0.01–1%) menthol enhanced cold avoidance. In a −5°C cold-plate test, 40% menthol significantly increased the nocifensive response latency (cold hypoalgesia) while lower concentrations were not different from vehicle controls. These results are generally consistent with neurophysiological and human psychophysical data and support TRPM8 as a potential peripheral target of pain modulation. PMID:20398704

  6. Increasing UV-B induces biphasic leaf cell expansion in Phaseolus vulgaris, suggesting multiple mechanisms for controlling plant growth.

    PubMed

    Barkan, Lenore; Evans, Marc A; Edwards, Gerald E

    2006-01-01

    Leaf expansion, comprising cell division and cell enlargement, is controlled by light quality and quantity. The role of UV-B irradiance on leaf cell enlargement has not been determined. We studied the effect of a wide range of UV-B irradiances on the cell-enlargement-driven expansion of Phaseolus vulgaris L., cv. Contender (bush bean) leaf discs. Our growth method allowed separation of the cell enlargement phase of leaf expansion from the cell division phase. In two series of experiments with different types of UV-B screening filters, the effect of increasing levels of UV-B on the area of excised P. vulgaris leaf discs was investigated. One set of experiments utilized polyester (UV-B-absorbing) and cellulose acetate (UV-B-transmitting) filters. The other set utilized UV-B-absorbing and UV-B-transmitting acrylic filters. Regardless of which type of filter was used for screening, high (above summer solstice) levels of supplemental UV-B inhibited cell enlargement in a linear, dose-dependent manner, resulting in smaller leaf discs than treatment with UV-B-absorbing filters. Conversely, low levels of supplemental UV-B enhanced cell enlargement in a linear, dose-dependent manner, resulting in larger leaf discs than did treatment with UV-B-absorbing filters. The results suggest a biphasic response to UV-B, and that there is an optimum UV-B level that results in maximum leaf expansion by cell enlargement.

  7. mRNA Noise Reveals that Activators Induce a Biphasic Response in the Promoter Kinetics of Highly Regulated Genes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quinn, Katie; To, Tsz-Leung; Maheshri, Narendra

    2012-02-01

    A dominant source of fluctuations in gene expression is thought to be the process of transcription. The statistics of these fluctuations arise from the kinetics of transcription. Multiple studies suggest the bulk of fluctuations can be understood by a simple process where genes are inactive for exponentially distributed times punctuated by geometric bursts of mRNA. Yet it's largely unknown how cis and trans factors affect the two lumped kinetic parameters, burst size and burst frequency, that describe this process. Importantly, how these parameters are regulated in a single gene can qualitatively affect the dynamical behavior of the network it is embedded within. Here, we ask whether transcriptional activators increase gene expression by increasing the burst size or burst frequency. We do so by deducing these parameters from steady-state mRNA distributions measured in individual yeast cells using single molecule mRNA FISH. We find that for both a synthetic and natural promoter, activators appear to first increase burst size, then burst frequency. We suggest this biphasic response may be common to all highly regulated genes and was previously unappreciated because of measurement techniques. Furthermore, its origins appear to relate to cis events at the promoter, and may arise from combinations of basal and activator-dependent bursts. Our measurements shed new light on transcriptional mechanisms and should assist in building synthetic promoters with tunable statistics.

  8. Biphasic water splitting by osmocene

    PubMed Central

    Ge, Peiyu; Todorova, Tanya K.; Patir, Imren Hatay; Olaya, Astrid J.; Vrubel, Heron; Mendez, Manuel; Hu, Xile; Corminboeuf, Clémence; Girault, Hubert H.

    2012-01-01

    The photochemical reactivity of osmocene in a biphasic water-organic solvent system has been investigated to probe its water splitting properties. The photoreduction of aqueous protons to hydrogen under anaerobic conditions induced by osmocene dissolved in 1,2-dichloroethane and the subsequent water splitting by the osmocenium metal-metal dimer formed during H2 production were studied by electrochemical methods, UV-visible spectrometry, gas chromatography, and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Density functional theory computations were used to validate the reaction pathways. PMID:22665787

  9. Endurance exercise attenuates ventilator-induced diaphragm dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Smuder, Ashley J.; Min, Kisuk; Hudson, Matthew B.; Kavazis, Andreas N.; Kwon, Oh-Sung; Nelson, W. Bradley

    2012-01-01

    Controlled mechanical ventilation (MV) is a life-saving measure for patients in respiratory failure. However, MV renders the diaphragm inactive leading to diaphragm weakness due to both atrophy and contractile dysfunction. It is now established that oxidative stress is a requirement for MV-induced diaphragmatic proteolysis, atrophy, and contractile dysfunction to occur. Given that endurance exercise can elevate diaphragmatic antioxidant capacity and the levels of the cellular stress protein heat shock protein 72 (HSP72), we hypothesized that endurance exercise training before MV would protect the diaphragm against MV-induced oxidative stress, atrophy, and contractile dysfunction in female Sprague-Dawley rats. Our results confirm that endurance exercise training before MV increased both HSP72 and the antioxidant capacity in the diaphragm. Importantly, compared with sedentary animals, exercise training before MV protected the diaphragm against MV-induced oxidative damage, protease activation, myofiber atrophy, and contractile dysfunction. Further, exercise protected diaphragm mitochondria against MV-induced oxidative damage and uncoupling of oxidative phosphorylation. These results provide the first evidence that exercise can provide protection against MV-induced diaphragm weakness. These findings are important and establish the need for future experiments to determine the mechanism(s) responsible for exercise-induced diaphragm protection. PMID:22074717

  10. Endurance exercise attenuates ventilator-induced diaphragm dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Smuder, Ashley J; Min, Kisuk; Hudson, Matthew B; Kavazis, Andreas N; Kwon, Oh-Sung; Nelson, W Bradley; Powers, Scott K

    2012-02-01

    Controlled mechanical ventilation (MV) is a life-saving measure for patients in respiratory failure. However, MV renders the diaphragm inactive leading to diaphragm weakness due to both atrophy and contractile dysfunction. It is now established that oxidative stress is a requirement for MV-induced diaphragmatic proteolysis, atrophy, and contractile dysfunction to occur. Given that endurance exercise can elevate diaphragmatic antioxidant capacity and the levels of the cellular stress protein heat shock protein 72 (HSP72), we hypothesized that endurance exercise training before MV would protect the diaphragm against MV-induced oxidative stress, atrophy, and contractile dysfunction in female Sprague-Dawley rats. Our results confirm that endurance exercise training before MV increased both HSP72 and the antioxidant capacity in the diaphragm. Importantly, compared with sedentary animals, exercise training before MV protected the diaphragm against MV-induced oxidative damage, protease activation, myofiber atrophy, and contractile dysfunction. Further, exercise protected diaphragm mitochondria against MV-induced oxidative damage and uncoupling of oxidative phosphorylation. These results provide the first evidence that exercise can provide protection against MV-induced diaphragm weakness. These findings are important and establish the need for future experiments to determine the mechanism(s) responsible for exercise-induced diaphragm protection.

  11. Biphasic anaphylaxis to gemifloxacin.

    PubMed

    Yilmaz, Insu; Doğan, Serkan; Tutar, Nuri; Kanbay, Asiye; Büyükoğlan, Hakan; Demir, Ramazan

    2012-10-01

    Anaphylaxis have been documented as adverse effects of ciprofloxacin, ofloxacin, norfloxacin, levofloxacin, and moxifloxacin. However resistant and biphasic anaphlylactic reactions to gemifloxacin have not been reported to date. Management of severe anaphylaxis in the elderly can be complicated by concurrent medications such as beta (β) adrenergic, alpha (α) adrenergic blockers and angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors. We report here in the case of a 60-year-old male who was taking on ACE inhibitor, α and β blockers and experienced a severe, resistant and biphasic anaphlylactic reaction to gemifloxacin mesylate.

  12. Exercise-induced asthma. What family physicians should do.

    PubMed Central

    D'Urzo, A.

    1995-01-01

    Exercise-induced asthma is described as a transitory increase in airway resistance during or after vigorous exercise. Nearly 90% of patients with chronic asthma and 40% of allergic nonasthmatic patients have the condition. Family physicians should try to educate patients about their asthma and, barring contraindications, encourage them to participate in regular physical activity. PMID:8563507

  13. Cholinergic stimulation with pyridostigmine protects against exercise induced myocardial ischaemia

    PubMed Central

    Castro, R R T; Porphirio, G; Serra, S M; Nóbrega, A C L

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To determine the acute effects of pyridostigmine bromide, a reversible cholinesterase inhibitor, during exercise in patients with coronary artery disease. Design: Double blind, randomised, placebo controlled, crossover study. Setting: Outpatients evaluated in an exercise test laboratory. Patients: 15 patients with exercise induced myocardial ischaemia. Interventions: Maximal cardiopulmonary exercise test on a treadmill according to an individualised ramp protocol on three days. The first day was used for adaptation to the equipment and to determine exercise tolerance and the presence of exercise induced ischaemia. On the other two days, the cardiopulmonary exercise test was performed two hours after oral administration of pyridostigmine (45 mg) or placebo. All patients were taking their usual medication during the experiments. Main outcome measures: Rate–pressure product and oxygen uptake during exercise. Results: Pyridostigmine inhibited the submaximum chronotropic response (p  =  0.001), delaying the onset of myocardial ischaemia, which occurred at a similar rate–pressure product (mean (SE) placebo 20.55 (1.08) mm Hg × beats/min 103; pyridostigmine 19.75 (1.28) mm Hg × beats/min 103; p  =  0.27) but at a higher exercise intensity (oxygen consumption: placebo 18.6 (1.7) ml/kg/min; pyridostigmine 19.6 (1.8) ml/kg/min; p  =  0.03). Also, pyridostigmine increased peak oxygen consumption (placebo 23.6 (2) ml/kg/min; pyridostigmine 24.8 (2) ml/kg/min; p  =  0.01) and peak oxygen pulse (placebo 12.9 (1) ml/beat; pyridostigmine 13.6 (1) ml/beat; p  =  0.02). Conclusions: Pyridostigmine improved peak exercise tolerance and inhibited the chronotropic response to submaximum exercise, increasing the intensity at which myocardial ischaemia occurred. These results suggest that pyridostigmine can protect against exercise induced myocardial ischaemia. PMID:15367503

  14. Wheezing or Breezing through Exercise-Induced Asthma.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCarthy, Paul

    1989-01-01

    Several physicians discuss the tests they use to diagnose exercise-induced asthma (EIA), the medications they typically prescribe and why, and the importance of properly educating athletes about EIA. (JD)

  15. Dose-dependent biphasic leptin-induced proliferation is caused by non-specific IL-6/NF-κB pathway activation in human myometrial cells

    PubMed Central

    Barrichon, Marina; Hadi, Tarik; Wendremaire, Maeva; Ptasinski, Clémentine; Seigneuric, Renaud; Marcion, Guillaume; Delignette, Marc; Marchet, Jacques; Dumas, Monique; Sagot, Paul; Bardou, Marc; Garrido, Carmen; Lirussi, Frédéric

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose Leptin, an adipokine synthesized by the placenta during pregnancy, has been proposed for the management of preterm labour (PTL), as it is able to prevent in vitro uterine contractility and remodelling associated with labour onset. Another common feature of labour onset is the phenotypic switch of myometrial smooth muscle cells from a proliferative to a hypertrophic state. As proliferative effects have been demonstrated for leptin in other tissues, we aimed to investigate its ability to induce myometrial proliferation and thus to maintain uterine quiescence. Experimental Approach We stimulated human primary myometrial smooth muscle cells with leptin in the presence or absence of receptor antagonists or signalling pathway inhibitors. Key Results Leptin induced myometrial cell proliferation in a biphasic manner. At 6.25 ng·mL−1, leptin-induced proliferation was mediated by the leptin receptor and required the early activation of ERK1/2. At a concentration above 25 ng·mL−1, leptin induced direct non-specific stimulation of the IL-6 receptor, leading to NF-κB activation, and exerted anti-proliferative effects. However, at 50 ng·mL−1, leptin re-induces proliferation via IL-6 receptor stimulation that requires STAT3 and delayed ERK1/2 activation. Conclusions and Implications These data bring new insights into leptin signalling-induced myometrial proliferation and its interrelationship with the IL-6/IL-6 receptor axis. In the light of our previous work, the present study emphasizes the potential value of leptin in the pharmacological management of PTL and it also strengthens the hypothesis that leptin might be a contributory factor in the parturition-related disorders observed in obese women. PMID:25653112

  16. Polyphenols in exercise performance and prevention of exercise-induced muscle damage.

    PubMed

    Malaguti, Marco; Angeloni, Cristina; Hrelia, Silvana

    2013-01-01

    Although moderate physical exercise is considered an essential component of a healthy lifestyle that leads the organism to adapt itself to different stresses, exercise, especially when exhaustive, is also known to induce oxidative stress, inflammation, and muscle damage. Many efforts have been carried out to identify dietary strategies or micronutrients able to prevent or at least attenuate the exercise-induced muscle damage and stress. Unfortunately most studies have failed to show protection, and at the present time data supporting the protective effect of micronutrients, as antioxidant vitamins, are weak and trivial. This review focuses on those polyphenols, present in the plant kingdom, that have been recently suggested to exert some positive effects on exercise-induced muscle damage and oxidative stress. In the last decade flavonoids as quercetin, catechins, and other polyphenols as resveratrol have caught the scientists attention. However, at the present time drawing a clear and definitive conclusion seems to be untimely.

  17. Polyphenols in Exercise Performance and Prevention of Exercise-Induced Muscle Damage

    PubMed Central

    Hrelia, Silvana

    2013-01-01

    Although moderate physical exercise is considered an essential component of a healthy lifestyle that leads the organism to adapt itself to different stresses, exercise, especially when exhaustive, is also known to induce oxidative stress, inflammation, and muscle damage. Many efforts have been carried out to identify dietary strategies or micronutrients able to prevent or at least attenuate the exercise-induced muscle damage and stress. Unfortunately most studies have failed to show protection, and at the present time data supporting the protective effect of micronutrients, as antioxidant vitamins, are weak and trivial. This review focuses on those polyphenols, present in the plant kingdom, that have been recently suggested to exert some positive effects on exercise-induced muscle damage and oxidative stress. In the last decade flavonoids as quercetin, catechins, and other polyphenols as resveratrol have caught the scientists attention. However, at the present time drawing a clear and definitive conclusion seems to be untimely. PMID:23983900

  18. Age affects exercise-induced improvements in heart rate response to exercise.

    PubMed

    Ciolac, E G; Roberts, C K; da Silva, J M Rodrigues; Guimarães, G V

    2014-05-01

    The aim of the present study was to analyze the effects of age on cardiorespiratory fitness (CRF), muscle strength and heart rate (HR) response to exercise adaptation in women in response to a long-term twice-weekly combined aerobic and resistance exercise program. 85 sedentary women, divided into young (YG; n=22, 30.3 ± 6.2 years), early middle-aged (EMG; n=28, 44.1 ± 2.5 years), late middle-aged (LMG; n=20, 56.7 ± 3.5 years) and older (OG; n=15, 71.4 ± 6.9 years) groups, had their CRF, muscle strength (1-repetition maximum test) and HR response to exercise (graded exercise test) measured before and after 12 months of combined exercise training. Exercise training improved CRF and muscle strength in all age groups (P<0.05), and no significant differences were observed between groups. Exercise training also improved resting HR and recovery HR in YG and EMG (P<0.05), but not in LMG and OG. Maximal HR did not change in any group. Combined aerobic and resistance training at a frequency of 2 days/week improves CRF and muscle strength throughout the lifespan. However, exercise-induced improvements in the HR recovery response to exercise may be impaired in late middle-aged and older women. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  19. Leg Immersion in Warm Water, Stretch-Shortening Exercise, and Exercise-Induced Muscle Damage

    PubMed Central

    Skurvydas, Albertas; Kamandulis, Sigitas; Stanislovaitis, Aleksas; Streckis, Vytautas; Mamkus, Gediminas; Drazdauskas, Adomas

    2008-01-01

    Context: Whether muscle warming protects against exercise-induced muscle damage is unknown. Objective: To determine the effect of leg immersion in warm water before stretch-shortening exercise on the time course of indirect markers of exercise-induced muscle damage. Design: Crossover trial. Setting: Human kinetics laboratory. Patients or Other Participants: Eleven healthy, untrained men (age  =  21.5 ± 1.7 years). Intervention(s): Participants' legs were immersed in a water bath at 44 ± 1°C for 45 minutes. Main Outcome Measure(s): Creatine kinase changes in the blood, muscle soreness, prolonged (within 72 hours) impairment in maximal voluntary contraction force and height of drop jump, and electrically evoked muscle force at low and high stimulation frequencies at short and long muscle lengths. Results: Leg immersion in warm water before stretch-shortening exercise reduced most of the indirect markers of exercise-induced muscle damage, including creatine kinase activity in the blood, muscle soreness, maximal voluntary contraction force, and jump height. The values for maximal voluntary contraction force and jump height, however, were higher during prewarming than for the control condition at 48 hours after stretch-shortening exercise, but this difference was only minor at other time points. Muscle prewarming did not bring about any changes in the dynamics of low-frequency fatigue, registered at either short or long muscle length, within 72 hours of stretch-shortening exercise. Conclusions: Leg immersion in warm water before stretch-shortening exercise reduced most of the indirect markers of exercise-induced muscle damage. However, the clinical application of muscle prewarming may be limited, because decreasing muscle damage did not necessarily lead to improved voluntary performance. PMID:19030137

  20. Exercise-Induced Skeletal Muscle Damage.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evans, William J.

    1987-01-01

    Eccentric exercise, in which the muscles exert force by lengthening, is associated with delayed onset muscle soreness. How soreness occurs, how recovery proceeds, and what precautions athletes should take are described. (Author/MT)

  1. Exercise-Induced Skeletal Muscle Damage.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evans, William J.

    1987-01-01

    Eccentric exercise, in which the muscles exert force by lengthening, is associated with delayed onset muscle soreness. How soreness occurs, how recovery proceeds, and what precautions athletes should take are described. (Author/MT)

  2. A comparison of biphasic and monophasic shocks for external defibrillation. Physio-Control Biphasic Investigators.

    PubMed

    Higgins, S L; Herre, J M; Epstein, A E; Greer, G S; Friedman, P L; Gleva, M L; Porterfield, J G; Chapman, F W; Finkel, E S; Schmitt, P W; Nova, R C; Greene, H L

    2000-01-01

    The ability of a shock to defibrillate the heart depends on its waveform and energy. Past studies of biphasic truncated exponential (BTE) shocks for external defibrillation focused on low energy levels. This prospective, randomized, double-blind clinical trial compared the first-shock efficacies of 200-joule (J) BTE, 130-J BTE, and 200-J monophasic damped sine wave shocks. Ventricular fibrillation (VF) was induced in 115 patients during evaluation of implantable cardioverter-defibrillator function and 39 patients during electrophysiologic evaluation of ventricular arrhythmias. After 19 +/- 10 seconds of VF, a randomized transthoracic shock was administered. Mean first-shock success rates of the three groups were compared using a "Tukey-like" statistical test, adjusting for multiple comparisons. Blood pressures and arterial oxygen saturations were measured before VF induction and 30, 90, and 150 seconds after successful defibrillation. First-shock success rates were 61/68 (90%) for 200-J monophasic, 39/39 (100%) for 200-J biphasic, and 39/47 (83%) for 130-J biphasic shocks. The 200-J biphasic shocks were simultaneously superior in first-shock efficacy to both 200-J monophasic and 130-J biphasic shocks (experimentwise error rate, alpha < 0.01). There was no significant difference between the efficacies of 200-J monophasic and 130-J biphasic shocks, nor was there any significant difference between the three groups in hemodynamic parameters after successful shocks. Biphasic shocks of 200 J provide better first-shock defibrillation efficacy for short-duration VF than 200-J monophasic and 130-J biphasic shocks and thus may allow earlier termination of VF in cardiac arrest patients.

  3. Exercise induces BDNF and synapsin I to specific hippocampal subfields.

    PubMed

    Vaynman, Shoshanna; Ying, Zhe; Gómez-Pinilla, Fernando

    2004-05-01

    To assess the relationship between brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and synapsin I in the hippocampus during exercise, we employed a novel microsphere injection method to block the action of BDNF through its tyrosine kinase (Trk) receptor and subsequently measure the mRNA levels of synapsin I, using real-time TaqMan RT-PCR for RNA quantification. After establishing a causal link between BDNF and exercise-induced synapsin I mRNA levels, we studied the exercise-induced distribution of BDNF and synapsin I in the rodent hippocampus. Quantitative immunohistochemical analysis revealed increases of BDNF and synapsin I in CA3 stratum lucidum and dentate gyrus, and synapsin I alone in CA1 stratum radiatum and stratum laconosum moleculare. These results indicate that exercise induces plasticity of select hippocampal transsynaptic circuitry, possibly comprising a spatial restriction on synapsin I regulation by BDNF.

  4. Exercise-Induced Oxidative Stress Responses in the Pediatric Population

    PubMed Central

    Avloniti, Alexandra; Chatzinikolaou, Athanasios; Deli, Chariklia K.; Vlachopoulos, Dimitris; Gracia-Marco, Luis; Leontsini, Diamanda; Draganidis, Dimitrios; Jamurtas, Athanasios Z.; Mastorakos, George; Fatouros, Ioannis G.

    2017-01-01

    Adults demonstrate an upregulation of their pro- and anti-oxidant mechanisms in response to acute exercise while systematic exercise training enhances their antioxidant capacity, thereby leading to a reduced generation of free radicals both at rest and in response to exercise stress. However, less information exists regarding oxidative stress responses and the underlying mechanisms in the pediatric population. Evidence suggests that exercise-induced redox perturbations may be valuable in order to monitor exercise-induced inflammatory responses and as such training overload in children and adolescents as well as monitor optimal growth and development. The purpose of this review was to provide an update on oxidative stress responses to acute and chronic exercise in youth. It has been documented that acute exercise induces age-specific transient alterations in both oxidant and antioxidant markers in children and adolescents. However, these responses seem to be affected by factors such as training phase, training load, fitness level, mode of exercise etc. In relation to chronic adaptation, the role of training on oxidative stress adaptation has not been adequately investigated. The two studies performed so far indicate that children and adolescents exhibit positive adaptations of their antioxidant system, as adults do. More studies are needed in order to shed light on oxidative stress and antioxidant responses, following acute exercise and training adaptations in youth. Available evidence suggests that small amounts of oxidative stress may be necessary for growth whereas the transition to adolescence from childhood may promote maturation of pro- and anti-oxidant mechanisms. Available evidence also suggests that obesity may negatively affect basal and exercise-related antioxidant responses in the peripubertal period during pre- and early-puberty. PMID:28106721

  5. Exercise-Induced Oxidative Stress Responses in the Pediatric Population.

    PubMed

    Avloniti, Alexandra; Chatzinikolaou, Athanasios; Deli, Chariklia K; Vlachopoulos, Dimitris; Gracia-Marco, Luis; Leontsini, Diamanda; Draganidis, Dimitrios; Jamurtas, Athanasios Z; Mastorakos, George; Fatouros, Ioannis G

    2017-01-17

    Adults demonstrate an upregulation of their pro- and anti-oxidant mechanisms in response to acute exercise while systematic exercise training enhances their antioxidant capacity, thereby leading to a reduced generation of free radicals both at rest and in response to exercise stress. However, less information exists regarding oxidative stress responses and the underlying mechanisms in the pediatric population. Evidence suggests that exercise-induced redox perturbations may be valuable in order to monitor exercise-induced inflammatory responses and as such training overload in children and adolescents as well as monitor optimal growth and development. The purpose of this review was to provide an update on oxidative stress responses to acute and chronic exercise in youth. It has been documented that acute exercise induces age-specific transient alterations in both oxidant and antioxidant markers in children and adolescents. However, these responses seem to be affected by factors such as training phase, training load, fitness level, mode of exercise etc. In relation to chronic adaptation, the role of training on oxidative stress adaptation has not been adequately investigated. The two studies performed so far indicate that children and adolescents exhibit positive adaptations of their antioxidant system, as adults do. More studies are needed in order to shed light on oxidative stress and antioxidant responses, following acute exercise and training adaptations in youth. Available evidence suggests that small amounts of oxidative stress may be necessary for growth whereas the transition to adolescence from childhood may promote maturation of pro- and anti-oxidant mechanisms. Available evidence also suggests that obesity may negatively affect basal and exercise-related antioxidant responses in the peripubertal period during pre- and early-puberty.

  6. Treadmill Exercise Induces Hippocampal Astroglial Alterations in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Bernardi, Caren; Tramontina, Ana Carolina; Nardin, Patrícia; Biasibetti, Regina; Costa, Ana Paula; Vizueti, Adriana Fernanda; Batassini, Cristiane; Tortorelli, Lucas Silva; Wartchow, Krista Minéia; Dutra, Márcio Ferreira; Bobermin, Larissa; Sesterheim, Patrícia; Quincozes-Santos, André; de Souza, Jaqueline; Gonçalves, Carlos Alberto

    2013-01-01

    Physical exercise effects on brain health and cognitive performance have been described. Synaptic remodeling in hippocampus induced by physical exercise has been described in animal models, but the underlying mechanisms remain poorly understood. Changes in astrocytes, the glial cells involved in synaptic remodeling, need more characterization. We investigated the effect of moderate treadmill exercise (20 min/day) for 4 weeks on some parameters of astrocytic activity in rat hippocampal slices, namely, glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), glutamate uptake and glutamine synthetase (GS) activities, glutathione content, and S100B protein content and secretion, as well as brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) levels and glucose uptake activity in this tissue. Results show that moderate treadmill exercise was able to induce a decrease in GFAP content (evaluated by ELISA and immunohistochemistry) and an increase in GS activity. These changes could be mediated by corticosterone, whose levels were elevated in serum. BDNF, another putative mediator, was not altered in hippocampal tissue. Moreover, treadmill exercise caused a decrease in NO content. Our data indicate specific changes in astrocyte markers induced by physical exercise, the importance of studying astrocytes for understanding brain plasticity, as well as reinforce the relevance of physical exercise as a neuroprotective strategy. PMID:23401802

  7. Can Exercise Make You Smarter, Happier, and Have More Neurons? A Hormetic Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Gradari, Simona; Pallé, Anna; McGreevy, Kerry R.; Fontán-Lozano, Ángela; Trejo, José L.

    2016-01-01

    Exercise can make you smarter, happier and have more neurons depending on the dose (intensity) of the training program. It is well recognized that exercise protocols induce both positive and negative effects depending on the intensity of the exercise, among other key factors, a process described as a hormetic-like biphasic dose-response. However, no evidences have been reported till very recently about the biphasic response of some of the potential mediators of the exercise-induced actions. This hypothesis and theory will focus on the adult hippocampal neurogenesis (AHN) as a putative physical substrate for hormesis responses to exercise in the context of exercise-induced actions on cognition and mood, and on the molecular pathways which might potentially be mediating these actions. PMID:27013955

  8. Neurohumoral mediation of exercise-induced growth.

    PubMed

    Borer, K T

    1994-06-01

    To assess exercise effects on growth, other variables modulating growth need to be taken into account. Endogenous control of growth proceeds from local actions of growth factors and dependence on nutrition abundance through guidance by growth hormone (GH) and other anabolic hormones to neuroendocrine suppression of growth. Nutrient abundance controls the reparative growth of lean body mass in adulthood by coupling it to anabolic endocrine reflexes. Growth is blocked when catabolic endocrine reflexes govern energy expenditure. The relationship between exercise intensity and growth is nonlinear. Growth is an intermittent process. Its expression and stimulation are dependent on ultradian and circadian rhythms of energy metabolism and neurohumoral release. High-resistance exercise selectively stimulates growth of the musculoskeletal system through expression of growth factor genes in the challenged tissues and without the GH guidance or abundant nutritional support. Habitual endurance exercise stimulates reparative growth of lean body mass through the neuroendocrine adaptations including increased pulsatile GH secretion. These also facilitate oxidative utilization of storage lipids thereby contributing to the regulation of body composition in adulthood. In the absence of sufficient high-resistance and endurance exercise regulation of adult body mass is impaired: excess LBM is lost during energy deficit, and excess fat accumulates during energy surplus.

  9. Effect of non-symmetric waveform on conduction block induced by high-frequency (kHz) biphasic stimulation in unmyelinated axon.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Shouguo; Yang, Guangning; Wang, Jicheng; Roppolo, James R; de Groat, William C; Tai, Changfeng

    2014-10-01

    The effect of a non-symmetric waveform on nerve conduction block induced by high-frequency biphasic stimulation is investigated using a lumped circuit model of the unmyelinated axon based on Hodgkin-Huxley equations. The simulation results reveal that the block threshold monotonically increases with the stimulation frequency for the symmetric stimulation waveform. However, a non-monotonic relationship between block threshold and stimulation frequency is observed when the stimulation waveform is non-symmetric. Constant activation of potassium channels by the high-frequency stimulation results in the increase of block threshold with increasing frequency. The non-symmetric waveform with a positive pulse 0.4-0.8 μs longer than the negative pulse blocks axonal conduction by hyperpolarizing the membrane and causes a decrease in block threshold as the frequency increases above 12-16 kHz. On the other hand, the non-symmetric waveform with a negative pulse 0.4-0.8 μs longer than the positive pulse blocks axonal conduction by depolarizing the membrane and causes a decrease in block threshold as the frequency increases above 40-53 kHz. This simulation study is important for understanding the potential mechanisms underlying the nerve block observed in animal studies, and may also help to design new animal experiments to further improve the nerve block method for clinical applications.

  10. Exercise protects against methamphetamine-induced aberrant neurogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Park, Minseon; Levine, Harry; Toborek, Michal

    2016-01-01

    While no effective therapy is available for the treatment of methamphetamine (METH)-induced neurotoxicity, aerobic exercise is being proposed to improve depressive symptoms and substance abuse outcomes. The present study focuses on the effect of exercise on METH-induced aberrant neurogenesis in the hippocampal dentate gyrus in the context of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) pathology. Mice were administered with METH or saline by i.p. injections for 5 days with an escalating dose regimen. One set of mice was sacrificed 24 h post last injection of METH, and the remaining animals were either subjected to voluntary wheel running (exercised mice) or remained in sedentary housing (sedentary mice). METH administration decreased expression of tight junction (TJ) proteins and increased BBB permeability in the hippocampus. These changes were preserved post METH administration in sedentary mice and were associated with the development of significant aberrations of neural differentiation. Exercise protected against these effects by enhancing the protein expression of TJ proteins, stabilizing the BBB integrity, and enhancing the neural differentiation. In addition, exercise protected against METH-induced systemic increase in inflammatory cytokine levels. These results suggest that exercise can attenuate METH-induced neurotoxicity by protecting against the BBB disruption and related microenvironmental changes in the hippocampus. PMID:27677455

  11. Exercise protects against methamphetamine-induced aberrant neurogenesis.

    PubMed

    Park, Minseon; Levine, Harry; Toborek, Michal

    2016-09-28

    While no effective therapy is available for the treatment of methamphetamine (METH)-induced neurotoxicity, aerobic exercise is being proposed to improve depressive symptoms and substance abuse outcomes. The present study focuses on the effect of exercise on METH-induced aberrant neurogenesis in the hippocampal dentate gyrus in the context of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) pathology. Mice were administered with METH or saline by i.p. injections for 5 days with an escalating dose regimen. One set of mice was sacrificed 24 h post last injection of METH, and the remaining animals were either subjected to voluntary wheel running (exercised mice) or remained in sedentary housing (sedentary mice). METH administration decreased expression of tight junction (TJ) proteins and increased BBB permeability in the hippocampus. These changes were preserved post METH administration in sedentary mice and were associated with the development of significant aberrations of neural differentiation. Exercise protected against these effects by enhancing the protein expression of TJ proteins, stabilizing the BBB integrity, and enhancing the neural differentiation. In addition, exercise protected against METH-induced systemic increase in inflammatory cytokine levels. These results suggest that exercise can attenuate METH-induced neurotoxicity by protecting against the BBB disruption and related microenvironmental changes in the hippocampus.

  12. Increased releasability of skin mast cells after exercise in patients with exercise-induced asthma.

    PubMed

    Choi, Inseon S; Koh, Youngil I; Chung, Se-Woong; Lim, Ho

    2004-10-01

    The role of lung mast cells in exercise-induced asthma (EIA) is controversial. To investigate whether the skin mast cell releasability is increased after exercise in EIA, 49 young atopic men with or without asthma took part in a free-running test for 6 min and were given skin prick tests using morphine, a mast cell secretagogue, before and after the exercise. The mean diameters of the wheal induced by morphine in patients with EIA were not significantly different from those in patients without EIA before exercise, although the baseline lung function was significantly lower and the airway hyperresponsiveness, the peripheral blood eosinophil count, and the size of the wheal in response to Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus were significantly higher in patients with EIA. However, the differences of the morphine-induced wheal diameter between patients with EIA and those without EIA became significant at 120 min after exercise (p<0.05), while the responses to histamine were not significantly different. These results suggest that exercise increases the releasability of skin mast cells in EIA patients whose asthma/allergy are relatively severe.

  13. Exercise-induced neuromuscular dysfunction under reflex conditions.

    PubMed

    Kaufman, T; Burke, J R; Davis, J M; Durstine, J L

    2001-06-01

    The purpose of this research was to describe further the effects of exercise-induced muscle damage on reflex sensitivity. The subjects were eight physically active, but untrained males, between the ages of 18 and 29 years. The effects of eccentric and concentric exercise on patellar tendon reflex responses were determined. The 8 week experiment consisted of two, 5 day, test protocols with a 6 week wash-out period between test protocols. Each 5 day test protocol consisted of the following six test sessions: (1) day 1--baseline, (2) day 2 baseline, (3) day 2--immediate post-exercise, and (4-6) days 3-5: 24, 48, and 72 h post-exercise. On day 2, the subjects made either 100 fatiguing concentric or eccentric isotonic contractions using the right leg at 75% of the corresponding repetition maximum values. During each test session, the electromyogram (EMG) and force-time characteristics of basic and conditioned patellar tendon reflex responses were measured. The reflex amplitudes of basic and conditioned patellar tendon reflex responses were decreased following fatiguing concentric exercise. There were no immediate effects of fatiguing eccentric exercise on the basic and conditioned patellar tendon reflex responses, but the EMG amplitudes of these reflex responses were reduced on the days following eccentric exercise. The amount of conditioned patellar tendon reflex facilitation was decreased following the concentric exercise protocol and at 48 h post-eccentric exercise. Our conditioned reflex data suggest that post-exercise changes to the physiological mechanisms that modulate the recruitment gain of the alpha-motoneuron pool may depend upon the type of fatiguing exercise.

  14. The accumulations of HIF-1α and HIF-2α by JNK and ERK are involved in biphasic effects induced by different levels of arsenite in human bronchial epithelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Yuan; Li, Yuan; Li, Huiqiao; Pang, Ying; Zhao, Yue; Jiang, Rongrong; Shen, Lu; Zhou, Jianwei; Wang, Xinru; Liu, Qizhan

    2013-01-15

    The biphasic effects of arsenite, in which low levels of arsenite induce cell proliferation and high levels of arsenite induce DNA damage and apoptosis, apparently contribute to arsenite-induced carcinogenesis. However, the mechanisms underlying this phenomenon are not well understood. In this study, we investigated the effects of different levels of arsenite on cell proliferation, DNA damage and apoptosis as well as on signal transduction pathways in human bronchial epithelial (HBE) cells. Our results show that a low level of arsenite activates extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK), which probably mediate arsenite-inhibited degradation of ubiquitinated hypoxia-inducible factor-2α (HIF-2α) in HBE cells. ERK inhibition blocks cell proliferation induced by a low level of arsenite, in part via HIF-2α. In contrast, a high level of arsenite activates c-Jun N-terminal kinases (JNK), which provoke a response to suppress ubiquitinated HIF-1α degradation. Down-regulation of HIF-1α by inhibiting JNK, however, increases the DNA damage but decreases the apoptosis induced by a high level of arsenite. Thus, data in the present study suggest that the accumulations of HIF-1α and HIF-2α by JNK and ERK are involved in different levels of arsenite-induced biphasic effects, with low levels of arsenite inducing cell proliferation and high levels of arsenite inducing DNA damage and apoptosis in HBE cells. -- Highlights: ► Biphasic effects induced by different concentrations of arsenite. ► Different regulation of ERK or JNK signal pathway by arsenite. ► Different regulation of HIF1α or HIF 2α by arsenite.

  15. Exercise-Induced Muscle Damage and Running Economy in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Assumpção, Cláudio de Oliveira; Lima, Leonardo Coelho Rabello; Oliveira, Felipe Bruno Dias; Greco, Camila Coelho; Denadai, Benedito Sérgio

    2013-01-01

    Running economy (RE), defined as the energy demand for a given velocity of submaximal running, has been identified as a critical factor of overall distance running performance. Plyometric and resistance trainings, performed during a relatively short period of time (~15–30 days), have been successfully used to improve RE in trained athletes. However, these exercise types, particularly when they are unaccustomed activities for the individuals, may cause delayed onset muscle soreness, swelling, and reduced muscle strength. Some studies have demonstrated that exercise-induced muscle damage has a negative impact on endurance running performance. Specifically, the muscular damage induced by an acute bout of downhill running has been shown to reduce RE during subsequent moderate and high-intensity exercise (>65% VO2max). However, strength exercise (i.e., jumps, isoinertial and isokinetic eccentric exercises) seems to impair RE only for subsequent high-intensity exercise (~90% VO2max). Finally, a single session of resistance exercise or downhill running (i.e., repeated bout effect) attenuates changes in indirect markers of muscle damage and blunts changes in RE. PMID:23431253

  16. A bovine stress syndrome associated with exercise-induced hyperthermia.

    PubMed

    Hill, B D; McManus, A C; Brown, N N; Playford, C L; Noble, J W

    2000-01-01

    To investigate an exercise-induced bovine stress syndrome under field and controlled experimental conditions. In the field study, cattle affected with the stress syndrome were observed while they were grazing and during normal mustering using horses. This study served to define the clinical nature of the syndrome. The experimental study utilised three affected and five normal unaffected cattle. These animals were compared on the basis of their response to a defined exercise program, which consisted of walking 3.6 km in 2 h. Blood samples and measurements of respiratory rate, ambient temperature and rectal temperature were taken immediately before exercise, and at 0.5, 1.0, 1.5 and 2.0 h during the exercise and 24 h later. Clinical and blood constituent data were subjected to standard analysis of variance and repeated measures analysis. In the field study, affected cattle were observed to show abnormally anxious and hyperactive behaviour. This behaviour was exhibited by affected cattle during the experimental exercise program where it was shown to be accompanied by hyperthermia and hyperventilation. The experimental study showed that affected cattle developed metabolic acidosis and became hyperglycaemic. Their plasma creatine kinase activity remained markedly increased at 24 h after exercise but other clinical and blood constituent variables had returned to normal values. The clinical and biochemical changes detected in affected cattle were consistent with exercise-induced malignant hyperthermia.

  17. Overloaded training increases exercise-induced oxidative stress and damage.

    PubMed

    Palazzetti, Stephane; Richard, Marie-Jeanne; Favier, Alain; Margaritis, Irene

    2003-08-01

    We hypothesized that overloaded training (OT) in triathlon would induce oxidative stress and damage on muscle and DNA. Nine male triathletes and 6 male sedentary subjects participated in this study. Before and after a 4-week OT, triathletes exercised for a duathlon. Blood ratio of reduced vs. oxidized glutathione (GSH/GSSG), plasma thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS), leukocyte DNA damage, creatine kinase (CK), and CK-MB mass in plasma, erythrocyte superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity, erythrocyte and plasma glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) activities, and plasma total antioxidant status (TAS) were measured before and after OT in pre- and postexercise situations. Triathletes were overloaded in response to OT. In rest conditions, OT induced plasma GSH-Px activity increase and plasma TAS decrease (both p < 0.05). In exercise conditions, OT resulted in higher exercise-induced variations of blood GSH/GSSG ratio, TBARS level (both p < 0.05), and CK-MB mass (p < 0.01) in plasma; and decreased TAS response (p < 0.05). OT could compromise the antioxidant defense mechanism with respect to exercise-induced response. The resulting increased exercise-induced oxidative stress and further cellular susceptibility to damage needs more study.

  18. Nitric oxide-induced biphasic mechanism of vascular relaxation via dephosphorylation of CPI-17 and MYPT1.

    PubMed

    Kitazawa, Toshio; Semba, Shingo; Huh, Yang Hoon; Kitazawa, Kazuyo; Eto, Masumi

    2009-07-15

    Nitric oxide (NO) from endothelium is a major mediator of vasodilatation through cGMP/PKG signals that lead to a decrease in Ca(2+) concentration. In addition, NO-mediated signals trigger an increase in myosin light chain phosphatase (MLCP) activity. To evaluate the mechanism of NO-induced relaxation through MLCP deinhibition, we compared time-dependent changes in Ca(2+), myosin light chain (MLC) phosphorylation and contraction to changes in phosphorylation levels of CPI-17 at Thr38, RhoA at Ser188, and MYPT1 at Ser695, Thr696 and Thr853 in response to sodium nitroprusside (SNP)-induced relaxation in denuded rabbit femoral artery. During phenylephrine (PE)-induced contraction, SNP reduced CPI-17 phosphorylation to a minimal value within 15 s, in parallel with decreases in Ca(2+) and MLC phosphorylation, followed by a reduction of contractile force having a latency period of about 15 s. MYPT1 phosphorylation at Ser695, the PKG-target site, increased concurrently with relaxation. Phosphorylation of RhoA, MYPT1 Thr696 and Thr853 differed significantly at 5 min but not within 1 min of SNP exposure. Inhibition of Ca(2+) release delayed SNP-induced relaxation while inhibition of Ca(2+) channel, BK(Ca) channel or phosphodiesterase-5 did not. Pretreatment of resting artery with SNP suppressed an increase in Ca(2+), contractile force and phosphorylation of MLC, CPI-17, MYPT1 Thr696 and Thr853 at 10 s after PE stimulation, but had no effect on phorbol ester-induced CPI-17 phosphorylation. Together, these results suggest that NO production suppresses Ca(2+) release, which causes an inactivation of PKC and rapid CPI-17 dephosphorylation as well as MLCK inactivation, resulting in rapid MLC dephosphorylation and relaxation.

  19. Ischemic Preconditioning Blunts Muscle Damage Responses Induced by Eccentric Exercise.

    PubMed

    Franz, Alexander; Behringer, Michael; Harmsen, Jan-Frieder; Mayer, Constantin; Krauspe, Rüdiger; Zilkens, Christoph; Schumann, Moritz

    2017-08-22

    Ischemic preconditioning (IPC) is known to reduce muscle damage induced by ischemia and reperfusion-injury (I/R-Injury) during surgery. Due to similarities between the pathophysiological formation of I/R-injury and eccentric exercise-induced muscle damage (EIMD), as characterized by an intracellular accumulation of Ca, an increased production of reactive oxygen species and increased pro-inflammatory signaling, the purpose of the present study was to investigate whether IPC performed prior to eccentric exercise may also protect against EIMD. Nineteen healthy men were matched to an eccentric only (ECC) (n=9) or eccentric proceeded by IPC group (IPC+ECC) (n=10). The exercise protocol consisted of bilateral biceps curls (3x10 repetitions at 80% of the concentric 1RM). In IPC+ECC, IPC was applied bilaterally at the upper arms by a tourniquet (200 mmHg) immediately prior to the exercise (3x5 minutes of occlusion, separated by 5 minutes of reperfusion). Creatine Kinase (CK), arm circumference, subjective pain (VAS score) and radial displacement (Tensiomyography, Dm) were assessed before IPC, pre-exercise, post-exercise, 20 minutes-, 2 hours-, 24 hours-, 48 hours- and 72 hours post-exercise. CK differed from baseline only in ECC at 48h (p<0.001) and 72h (p<0.001) post-exercise. After 24h, 48h and 72h, CK was increased in ECC compared to IPC+ECC (between groups: 24h: p=0.004, 48h: p<0.001, 72h: p<0.001). VAS was significantly higher in ECC at 24-72 h post-exercise, when compared to IPC+ECC (between groups: all p<0.001). Dm was decreased on all post-exercise days in ECC (all p<0.001) but remained statistically unchanged in IPC+ECC (between-groups p<0.01). These findings indicate that IPC performed prior to a bout of eccentric exercise of the elbow flexors blunts EIMD and exercise-induced pain, while maintaining the contractile properties of the muscle.

  20. The role of muscle mass in exercise-induced hyperemia.

    PubMed

    Garten, Ryan S; Groot, H Jonathan; Rossman, Matthew J; Gifford, Jayson R; Richardson, Russell S

    2014-05-01

    Exercise-induced hyperemia is often normalized for muscle mass, and this value is sometimes evaluated at relative exercise intensities to take muscle recruitment into account. Therefore, this study sought to better understand the impact of muscle mass on leg blood flow (LBF) during exercise. LBF was assessed by Doppler ultrasound in 27 young healthy male subjects performing knee-extensor (KE) exercise at three absolute (5, 15, and 25 W) and three relative [20, 40, and 60% of maximum KE (KEmax)] workloads. Thigh muscle mass (5.2-8.1 kg) and LBF were significantly correlated at rest (r = 0.54; P = 0.004). Exercise-induced hyperemia was linearly related to absolute workload, but revealed substantial between-subject variability, documented by the coefficient of variation (5 W: 17%; 15 W: 16%; 25 W: 16%). Quadriceps muscle mass (1.5-2.7 kg) and LBF were not correlated at 5, 15, or 25 W (r = 0.09-0.01; P = 0.7-0.9). Normalizing blood flow for quadriceps muscle mass did not improve the coefficient of variation at each absolute workload (5 W: 21%; 15 W: 21%; 25 W: 22%), while the additional evaluation at relative exercise intensities resulted in even greater variance (20% KEmax: 29%; 40% KEmax: 29%; 60% KEmax: 27%). Similar findings were documented when subjects were parsed into high and low aerobic capacity. Thus, in contrast to rest, blood flow during exercise is unrelated to muscle mass, and simply normalizing for muscle mass or comparing normalized blood flow at a given relative exercise intensity has no effect on the inherent blood flow variability. Therefore, during exercise, muscle mass does not appear to be a determinant of the hyperemic response.

  1. Transitory endolymph leakage induced hearing loss and tinnitus: depolarization, biphasic shortening and loss of electromotility of outer hair cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zenner, H. P.; Reuter, G.; Zimmermann, U.; Gitter, A. H.; Fermin, C.; LePage, E. L.

    1994-01-01

    There are types of deafness and tinnitus in which ruptures or massive changes in the ionic permeability of the membranes lining the endolymphatic space [e.g., of the reticular lamina (RL)] are believed to allow potassium-rich endolymph to deluge the low [K+] perilymphatic fluid (e.g., in the small spaces of Nuel). This would result in a K+ intoxication of sensory and neural structures. Acute attacks of Meniere's disease have been suggested to be an important example for this event. The present study investigated the effects of transiently elevated [K+] due to the addition of artificial endolymph to the basolateral cell surface of outer hair cells (OHC) in replicating endolymph-induced K+ intoxication of the perilymph in the small spaces of Nuel. The influence of K+ intoxication of the basolateral OHC cell surface on the transduction was then examined. Intoxication resulted in an inhibition of the physiological repolarizing K+ efflux from hair cells. This induced unwanted depolarizations of the hair cells, interfering with mechanoelectrical transduction. A pathological longitudinal OHC shortening was also found, with subsequent compression of the organ of Corti possibly influencing the micromechanics of the mechanically active OHC. Both micromechanical and electrophysiological alterations are proposed to contribute to endolymph leakage induced attacks of deafness and possibly also to tinnitus. Moreover, repeated or long-lasting K+ intoxications of OHC resulted in a chronic and complete loss of OHC motility. This is suggested to be a pathophysiological basis in some patients with chronic hearing loss resulting from Meniere's syndrome.

  2. Carbuterol, salbutamol and DSCG in exercise-induced asthma.

    PubMed

    Tabas, A; Rodríguez, A; Lobera, T; Diéguez, I; Oehling, A

    1985-01-01

    We decided in this work to evaluate the prophylactic value of carbuterol in exercise-induced asthma (EIA), comparing this drug to salbutamol and DSCG in order to describe its usefulness in exercise-induced asthma, while employing the closing-pressure method for the early detection of airway constriction. The study involved 44 bronchial asthmatics with prior histories of EIA. Only 10 patients had noticeable symptoms after exercise. All patients were asymptomatic and without any medication for at least one week prior to the commencement of the study. A continuous running treadmill was chosen for the exercise test, and a 10 minute time-period with a maximum heart rate of 180 beats/min. was the limit. Measurements of the FEV1, PEF and Raw were also done. Drug therapy was carried out by administering 10.5 mg of carbuterol, or 4 mg of salbutamol orally, 1.5 hours, before the exercise, or a 20 mg DSCG capsule, 30 minutes also prior to exercise. We concluded that: DSCG is the drug of choice in the control of EIA, while salbutamol results were somewhat less effective. Orally administered carbuterol did not provide any protection effect as expected. Raw measurements enter as a new parameter for consideration in this type of disease, being entirely compatible with FEV1 and PEF values during assessment.

  3. Exercise-Induced Anaphylaxis: An Update on Diagnosis and Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Barg, Wojciech; Medrala, Wojciech

    2010-01-01

    Exercise-induced anaphylaxis (EIA) and food-dependent, exercise-induced anaphylaxis (FDEIA) are rare but potentially life-threatening clinical syndromes in which association with exercise is crucial. The range of triggering physical activities is broad, including as mild an effort as a stroll. EIA is not fully repeatable (ie, the same exercise may not always result in anaphylaxis in a given patient). In FDEIA, the combined ingestion of sensitizing food and exercise is necessary to precipitate symptoms. Clinical features and management do not differ significantly from other types of anaphylaxis. The pathophysiology of EIA and FDEIA is not fully understood. Different hypotheses concerning the possible influence of exercise on the development of anaphylactic symptoms are taken into consideration. These include increased gastrointestinal permeability, blood flow redistribution, and most likely increased osmolality. This article also describes current diagnostic and therapeutic possibilities, including changes in lifestyle and preventive properties of antiallergic drugs as well as acute treatment of these dangerous syndromes. PMID:20922508

  4. Pathophysiology, diagnosis and management of exercise-induced anaphylaxis.

    PubMed

    Robson-Ansley, Paula; Toit, George Du

    2010-08-01

    The aim of this review is to challenge the current opinions of the pathophysiological mechanisms that give rise to food dependent exercise-induced anaphylaxis (FDEIA) and to consider these mechanisms within the wider context of exercise physiology to further inform our understanding and treatment of this condition. Exercise-induced anaphylaxis (food dependent and nonfood dependent) is a clinical syndrome in which anaphylaxis occurs in conjunction with exercise. Given the rarity of the condition, our current understanding relies on the many case studies and reviews of the topic. The pathophysiology of FDEIA remains to be fully elucidated with well constructed trials but current working hypotheses to date involve alterations in plasma osmolaltiy and pH, tissue enzyme activity, blood flow redistribution, altered gastrointestinal permeability and facilitated epitope recognition/allergen binding. Implications for future research are the physiological changes that occur during exercise need deeper consideration to ensure that proposed mechanisms are realistic and actually occur within the time frame and exercise-intensity domain during which the reported FDEIA occurred. These theories must be tested rigorously with sufficiently powered studies if progress is to be made in determining the perplexing pathophysiology of FDEIA.

  5. The influence of exercise-induced fatigue on cognitive function.

    PubMed

    Moore, Robert D; Romine, Mathew W; O'connor, Patrick J; Tomporowski, Phillip D

    2012-05-01

    Although anecdotal reports suggest that information processing and decision making is impaired immediately following prolonged periods of physical activity, results obtained from laboratory studies of exercise-induced fatigue have been inconsistent. Fatigue effects may be task specific and related to the time of post-exercise testing. The present study examined the effects on adults' performance of two cognitive tasks that differed in processing demands over an 80-min period of fatigue. Thirty young adult men and women were randomly assigned to either an exercise group and completed a 60-min bout of cycle ergometry at 90% ventilatory threshold or a control group and rested for 60 min. Following interventions, each participant completed a simple and complex version of a visual perceptual discrimination test, a 40-min memory-based vigilance test and a repetition of the visual perceptual discrimination tests. Those who exercised evidenced significant decrements in performance on complex perceptual-discrimination tasks compared to participants who rested. The response time of exercisers during a memory-demanding vigilance test were significantly slower than those of participants who rested; however, detection performance did not differ between groups neither was there a decrease in target detection across the vigil. The effects of exercise-induced fatigue may be task specific, with greater effects on perceptual tasks, which involve relatively automatic processing, compared to effortful memory-based tasks.

  6. Exercise Prevents Fructose-Induced Hypertriglyceridemia in Healthy Young Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Egli, Léonie; Lecoultre, Virgile; Theytaz, Fanny; Campos, Vanessa; Hodson, Leanne; Schneiter, Philippe; Mittendorfer, Bettina; Patterson, Bruce W.; Fielding, Barbara A.; Gerber, Philipp A.; Giusti, Vittorio; Berneis, Kaspar; Tappy, Luc

    2013-01-01

    Excess fructose intake causes hypertriglyceridemia and hepatic insulin resistance in sedentary humans. Since exercise improves insulin sensitivity in insulin-resistant patients, we hypothesized that it would also prevent fructose-induced hypertriglyceridemia. This study was therefore designed to evaluate the effects of exercise on circulating lipids in healthy subjects fed a weight-maintenance, high-fructose diet. Eight healthy males were studied on three occasions after 4 days of 1) a diet low in fructose and no exercise (C), 2) a diet with 30% fructose and no exercise (HFr), or 3) a diet with 30% fructose and moderate aerobic exercise (HFrEx). On all three occasions, a 9-h oral [13C]-labeled fructose loading test was performed on the fifth day to measure [13C]palmitate in triglyceride-rich lipoprotein (TRL)-triglycerides (TG). Compared with C, HFr significantly increased fasting glucose, total TG, TRL-TG concentrations, and apolipoprotein (apo)B48 concentrations as well as postfructose glucose, total TG, TRL-TG, and [13C]palmitate in TRL-TG. HFrEx completely normalized fasting and postfructose TG, TRL-TG, and [13C]palmitate concentration in TRL-TG and apoB48 concentrations. In addition, it increased lipid oxidation and plasma nonesterified fatty acid concentrations compared with HFr. These data indicate that exercise prevents the dyslipidemia induced by high fructose intake independently of energy balance. PMID:23674606

  7. Rosa rugosa Aqueous Extract Alleviates Endurance Exercise-Induced Stress.

    PubMed

    Seo, Eunjin; You, Yanghee; Yoon, Ho-Geun; Kim, Boemjeong; Kim, Kyungmi; Lee, Yoo-Hyun; Lee, Jeongmin; Chung, Jin Woong; Shim, Sangin; Jun, Woojin

    2015-06-01

    This study was performed to investigate the effect of water extract from Rosa rugosa (RRW) on endurance exercise-induced stress in mice. The mice were orally administered with distilled water or RRW, respectively. The endurance capacity was evaluated by exhaustive swimming using an adjustable-current water pool. Mice administered RRW swam longer before becoming exhausted. Also, RRW administration resulted in less lipid peroxidation, lower muscular antioxidant enzyme activities, and lower cortisol level. The results suggest that RRW can prevent exercise-induced stress by decreasing oxidative stress levels.

  8. A comparative study of biphasic calcium phosphate ceramics for human mesenchymal stem-cell-induced bone formation.

    PubMed

    Arinzeh, T Livingston; Tran, T; Mcalary, J; Daculsi, G

    2005-06-01

    For the repair of bone defects, a tissue engineering approach would be to combine cells capable of osteogenic (i.e. bone-forming) activity with an appropriate scaffolding material to stimulate bone regeneration and repair. Human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs), when combined with hydroxyapatite/beta-tricalcium phosphate (HA/TCP) ceramic scaffolds of the composition 60% HA/40% TCP (in weight %), have been shown to induce bone formation in large, long bone defects. However, full repair or function of the long bone could be limited due to the poor remodeling of the HA/TCP material. We conducted a study designed to determine the optimum ratio of HA to TCP that promoted hMSC induced bone formation yet be fully degradable. In a mouse ectopic model, by altering the composition of HA/TCP to 20% HA/80% TCP, hMSC bone induction occurred at the fastest rate in vivo over the other formulations of the more stable 100% HA, HA/TCP (76/24, 63/37, 56/44), and the fully degradable, 100% TCP. In vitro studies also demonstrated that 20/80 HA/TCP stimulated the osteogenic differentiation of hMSCs as determined by the expression of osteocalcin.

  9. Suspected exercise-induced seizures in a young dog.

    PubMed

    Motta, L; Dutton, E

    2013-04-01

    A 12-month-old female neutered crossbreed was referred for investigation of seizure-like episodes occurring only at intense exercise. Thorough medical, neurological and cardiac investigations were performed and excluded the most commonly known causes of seizure-like activity. The dog was fitted with an ambulatory electrocardiography device and underwent another exercise-induced seizure. The electrocardiogram during the episode revealed a sinus tachycardia at approximately 300 beats/minute. A video recording of the episode revealed generalised tonic clonic limb activity with jaw chomping and frothing at the mouth typical of seizure activity. Antiepileptic medications were not prescribed and the owner was advised not to exercise the dog intensely. The dog responded well and did not seizure after 12 months of mild-moderate off-lead exercise. As all the seizures in this case were triggered by intense physical activity, it is suggested that this may be a new form of reflex seizure activity.

  10. Biphasic response of checkpoint control proteins in hyperoxia: exposure to lower levels of oxygen induces genome maintenance genes in experimental baboon BPD.

    PubMed

    Das, Kumuda C; Wasnick, John D

    2014-10-01

    Breathing high concentrations of oxygen (hyperoxia) causes lung injury and is associated with lung diseases such as bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD), respiratory distress syndrome and persistent pulmonary hypertension of the newborns. Hyperoxia (95-100 %O2) causes DNA damage and growth arrest of lung cells and consequently cells die by apoptosis or necrosis. Although supplemental oxygen therapy is clinically important, the level and duration of hyperoxic exposure that would allow lung cells to reenter the cell cycle remains unclear. We hypothesized that cells exposed to lower concentrations of hyperoxia will retain the capacity to enter cell cycle when recovered in room air. We employed varying concentrations of oxygen (21-95 %) to determine the response of lung cells to hyperoxia. Our results indicate that cells were growth arrested and failed to reenter the cell cycle when exposed to greater than 60 % oxygen. Cell cycle checkpoint proteins were increased in a biphasic manner, increasing until 70 % oxygen, but declined in greater than 90 % oxygen. Microarray analysis shows that there is significant decrease in the abundance of Cdks 6-8 and retinoblastoma protein (Rb), p107 and p130 in exposure to 90 % oxygen for 48 h. We further tested the effect of clinically relevant as needed oxygen [(pro-re-nata (prn)] in premature infant (125-days and 140-days) baboon model of BPD. The microarray results show that 6 or 14d PRN oxygen-exposed animals had induced expression of chromosomal maintenance genes (MCMs), genes related to anti-inflammation, proliferation, and differentiation.

  11. Biphasic contractions induced by milrinone at low temperature in ferret ventricular muscle: role of the sarcoplasmic reticulum and transmembrane calcium influx.

    PubMed

    Malecot, C O; Bers, D M; Katzung, B G

    1986-08-01

    The effects of milrinone were studied in ferret papillary muscle stimulated at various rates and temperatures from 23 degrees to 36 degrees C. In voltage-clamp experiments, 50 micrograms/ml (0.237 mM) milrinone induced a 2.1-fold increase in calcium current at 28 degrees or 36 degrees C. At 50 micrograms/ml, milrinone transiently increased contractility in all muscles at 28 degrees C, but its steady-state effect was either increased (+50%) or decreased (-24.7%) steady-state twitch amplitude. A negative inotropic effect always occurred below 27 degrees C. Milrinone decreased the total twitch duration and split the twitch into two components (P1 and P2) in the absence of any evidence of aberrant conduction. Increasing milrinone concentration from 50 to 300 micrograms/ml decreased P1 and increased P2. Ryanodine (100 mM) or caffeine (10 mM) suppressed P1. Contractions elicited after 30 seconds of rest were also biphasic in the presence of milrinone, but not in its absence. P2 of post-rest contraction was increased by caffeine or calcium (10 mM) and decreased by cobalt (2 mM) when drugs were applied at the beginning of the rest. Ryanodine and caffeine also suppressed P1 of post-rest contraction. The evidence suggests that P1 may be caused by Ca release from the sarcoplasmic reticulum and P2 by increased Ca influx during the action potential via the calcium channel. It is also suggested that P2 may be present under control conditions, but to a lesser extent, and masked by a large P1.

  12. Bone regeneration with micro/nano hybrid-structured biphasic calcium phosphate bioceramics at segmental bone defect and the induced immunoregulation of MSCs.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yu; Zhang, Kun; Zhao, Rui; Ye, Xingjiang; Chen, Xuening; Xiao, Zhanwen; Yang, Xiao; Zhu, Xiangdong; Zhang, Kai; Fan, Yujiang; Zhang, Xingdong

    2017-12-01

    Adequate bone regeneration has been difficult to achieve at segmental bone defects caused by disease. The surface structure and phase composition of calcium phosphate bioceramic are crucial for its bioactivity and osteoinductivity. In the present study, biphasic calcium phosphate (BCP) bioceramics composed of micro-whiskers and nanoparticles hybrid-structured surface (hBCP) were fabricated via a hydrothermal reaction. The in vivo long bone defect model of beagle dogs implanted with hBCP bioceramics achieved a higher quality regenerated bone as compared to the traditional smooth-surface BCP control group. After a 12-week implantation period, more new bone formation within the implanted material and a higher fracture load were observed in the hBCP group (p < 0.05 vs. control). In addition, the local bone integration efficacy, as determined by nanoindentation, showed a significantly closer elastic modulus of the implanted hBCP bioceramics to that of the natural bone adjacent. Finally, in vitro gene microarray analysis of the mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) co-cultured with two bioceramics showed that the hBCP group induced a drastic downregulation of the genes associated with inflammatory response, which was never documented in previous studies regarding biomaterials with a micro/nano hybrid structure. The tumor necrosis factor (TNF) signalling pathway was the most involved and preferentially inhibited by the hBCP material. Collectively, the findings suggested that the micro/nano hybrid-structured bioceramics augmented local bone regeneration at segmental bone defects and presented a potential alternative to autologous bone grafts. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Modulating exercise-induced hormesis: Does less equal more?

    PubMed

    Peake, Jonathan M; Markworth, James F; Nosaka, Kazunori; Raastad, Truls; Wadley, Glenn D; Coffey, Vernon G

    2015-08-01

    Hormesis encompasses the notion that low levels of stress stimulate or upregulate existing cellular and molecular pathways that improve the capacity of cells and organisms to withstand greater stress. This notion underlies much of what we know about how exercise conditions the body and induces long-term adaptations. During exercise, the body is exposed to various forms of stress, including thermal, metabolic, hypoxic, oxidative, and mechanical stress. These stressors activate biochemical messengers, which in turn activate various signaling pathways that regulate gene expression and adaptive responses. Historically, antioxidant supplements, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, and cryotherapy have been favored to attenuate or counteract exercise-induced oxidative stress and inflammation. However, reactive oxygen species and inflammatory mediators are key signaling molecules in muscle, and such strategies may mitigate adaptations to exercise. Conversely, withholding dietary carbohydrate and restricting muscle blood flow during exercise may augment adaptations to exercise. In this review article, we combine, integrate, and apply knowledge about the fundamental mechanisms of exercise adaptation. We also critically evaluate the rationale for using interventions that target these mechanisms under the overarching concept of hormesis. There is currently insufficient evidence to establish whether these treatments exert dose-dependent effects on muscle adaptation. However, there appears to be some dissociation between the biochemical/molecular effects and functional/performance outcomes of some of these treatments. Although several of these treatments influence common kinases, transcription factors, and proteins, it remains to be determined if these interventions complement or negate each other, and whether such effects are strong enough to influence adaptations to exercise.

  14. Heat-killed BCG induces biphasic cyclooxygenase 2+ splenic macrophage formation--role of IL-10 and bone marrow precursors.

    PubMed

    Shibata, Yoshimi; Gabbard, Jon; Yamashita, Makiko; Tsuji, Shoutaro; Smith, Mike; Nishiyama, Akihito; Henriksen, Ruth Ann; Myrvik, Quentin N

    2006-09-01

    Previous studies have shown that prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2)) release by splenic F4/80(+) cyclooxygenase (COX)-2(+) macrophages (MØ) isolated from mice, treated with mycobacterial components, plays a major role in the regulation of immune responses. However, splenic MØ, isolated from untreated mice and treated in vitro with lipopolysaccharide and interferon-gamma, express COX-1 and COX-2 within 1 day but release only minimal amounts of PGE(2) following elicitation with calcium ionophore A23187. For further characterization of in vivo requirements for development of PGE(2)-releasing MØ (PGE(2)-MØ), C57Bl/6 [wild-type (WT)], and interleukin (IL)-10-deficient (IL-10(-/-)) mice were treated intraperitoneally with heat-killed Mycobacterium bovis bacillus Calmette-Guerin (HK-BCG). One day following injection, COX-2 was induced in splenic MØ of both mouse strains. However, PGE(2) biosynthesis by these MØ was not increased. Thus, expression of COX-2 is not sufficient to induce PGE(2) production in vivo or in vitro. In sharp contrast, 14 days after HK-BCG treatment, PGE(2) release by COX-2(+) splenic MØ increased as much as sevenfold, and a greater increase was seen in IL-10(-/-) cells than in WT cells. To further determine whether the 14-day splenic PGE(2)-MØ could be derived from bone marrow precursors, we established a chimera in which bone marrow cells were transfused from green fluorescent protein (GFP)-transgenic donors to WT mice. Donors and recipients were treated with HK-BCG simultaneously, and marrow transfusion was performed on Days 1 and 2. On Day 14 after BCG treatment, a significant number of spleen cells coexpressed COX-2 and GFP, indicating that bone marrow-derived COX-2(+) MØ may be responsible for the increased PGE(2) production.

  15. Effect of Submaximal Warm-up Exercise on Exercise-induced Asthma in African School Children

    PubMed Central

    Mtshali, BF; Mokwena, K; Oguntibeju, OO

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background: Regular physical activity has long been regarded as an important component of a healthy lifestyle. Exercise-induced asthma (EIA) is one of the major problems interfering with the performance of exercise. A warm-up exercise programme has been cited as a non-pharmacologic means of reducing EIA, but its effect has not been fully elucidated. Objective: The aims of this study were to determine the prevalence of unrecognized EIA in Pretoria primary school children, determine the effect of a warm-up exercise programme on EIA and to establish the relationship between history of allergy, family history of asthma and EIA. Methods: A random sample of 640 school children was selected. The study was divided into three phases. In phase one, a descriptive cross-sectional study was done using the standardized European Community Respiratory Health Survey (ECRHS) questionnaire. In phase two, non-asthmatic participants that returned a completed questionnaire were included in the field study. Pre-test and post-test experimental designs were used, where peak expiratory flow rate (PEFR) was measured at baseline and within ten minutes after exercise. A total of 340 subjects completed the Free Running Asthma Screening Test (FRAST); EIA was defined as a decrease in baseline PEFR ≥ 10% after exercise and 75 children (22%) had EIA. In phase three, 29 of the 75 subjects participated in the warm-up programme which was performed in the laboratory and subjects acted as their own controls. Predefined protocols for the study were followed. Results: Seventy-five (22%) of the 340 participants had EIA. The mean age, height and weight were 10.51 years, 139.26 cm and 33.45 kg, respectively. Exercise-induced asthma symptoms were cough (25%), chest pain (16%), wheeze (12%) and chest tightness (12%). The history of allergy was 75%, family history of allergy 40% and positive history of allergy when near animals, feathers or in dusty areas 38%. Wheezing during or after exercise

  16. Exercise-induced pain intensity predicted by pre-exercise fear of pain and pain sensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Bishop, Mark D; Horn, Maggie E; George, Steven Z

    2011-01-01

    Objectives Our primary goals were to determine whether pre-existing fear of pain and pain sensitivity contributed to post-exercise pain intensity. Methods Delayed onset muscle pain was induced in the trunk extensors of 60 healthy volunteers using an exercise paradigm. Levels of fear of pain and experimental pain sensitivity were measured before exercise. Pain intensity in the low back was collected at 24 and 48 hours post-exercise. Participants were grouped based on pain intensity. Group membership was used as the dependent variable in separate regression models for 24 and 48 hours. Predictor variables included fear, pain sensitivity, torque lost during the exercise protocol, and demographic variables. Results The final models predicting whether a participant reported clinically meaningful pain intensity at 24 hours only included baseline fear of pain at each level of pain intensity tested. The final model at 48 hours included average baseline pain sensitivity and the loss of muscle performance during the exercise protocol for one level of pain intensity tested (greater than 35mm out of 100). Discussion Combined, these findings suggest that the initial reports of pain after injury maybe more strongly influenced by fear while the inflammatory process and pain sensitivity may play a larger role for later pain intensity reports. PMID:21415719

  17. Exercise-induced ischemic preconditioning detected by sequential exercise stress tests: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Lalonde, François; Poirier, Paul; Sylvestre, Marie-Pierre; Arvisais, Denis; Curnier, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Exercise-induced ischemic preconditioning (IPC) can be assessed with the second exercise stress test during sequential testing. Exercise-induced IPC is defined as the time to 1 mm ST segment depression (STD), the rate-pressure product (RPP) at 1 mm STD, the maximal ST depression and the rate-pressure product at peak exercise. The purpose of this meta-analysis is to validate the parameters used to assess exercise-induced IPC in the scientific community. A literature search was performed using electronic database. The main key words were limited to human studies, which were (a) ischemic preconditioning, (b) warm-up phenomenon, and (c) exercise. Meta-analyses were performed on the study-specific mean difference between the clinical measures obtained in the two consecutive stress tests (second minus first test score). Random effect models were fitted with inverse variance weighting to provide greater weight to studies with larger sample size and more precise estimates. The search resulted in 309 articles of which 34 were included after revision (1053 patients). Results are: (a) time to 1 mm ST segment depression increased by 91 s (95% confidence interval (CI): 75-108), p < 0.001; (b) peak ST depression decreased by -0.38 mm (95% CI: -0.66 to -0.10), p < 0.01; and (c) rate-pressure product at 1 mm STD increased by 1.80 × 10(3)mmHg (95% CI: 1.0-2.0), p < 0.001. This is the first meta-analysis to set clinical parameters to assess the benefit of exercise-induced ischemic preconditioning in sequential stress testing. The results of this first meta-analysis on the sequential stress test confirm what is presented in the literature by independent studies on exercise-induced ischemic preconditioning. From now on, the results could be used in further research to set standardized parameters to assess the phenomenon. © The European Society of Cardiology 2013 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  18. Aqueous biphasic extraction

    SciTech Connect

    Chaiko, D.J.

    1994-02-01

    The aqueous biphasic separation (ABS) process, which involves the selective partitioning of ultrafine particles or solutes between two immiscible aqueous phases, is being evaluated for removing uranium from contaminated clay soils. Goal is to remove ultrafine U from the soil, leaving residues below regulatory cleanup limits. Tests were made using U-contaminated soil near the Fernald waste incinerator; over 80% of the soil is <45 {mu}m. All the biphasic systems used polyethylene glycol in combination with inorganic salt phase. Results: U was reduced from 500--600 mg/kg to about 90 mg/kg, and in some cases even down to 15 mg/kg. However, a soil sample from the Fernald storage pad area did not give encouraging results. Selective flocculation of soil particles and dissolution of U in the salt phase occurred but were not troublesome. Scaleup tests using uncontaminated clay mineral feed were successful. Operating costs for soil remediation using ABS is estimated to be $25--50 per ton. A pilot-scale column is being installed at ANL.

  19. EXERCISE-INDUCED PULMONARY HEMORRHAGE AFTER RUNNING A MARATHON

    EPA Science Inventory

    We report on a healthy 26-year-old male who had an exercise-induced pulmonary hemorrhage (EIPH) within 24 hours of running a marathon. There were no symptoms, abnormalities on exam, or radiographic infiltrates. He routinely participated in bronchoscopy research and the EIPH was e...

  20. Coping with Exercise-Induced Asthma in Sports.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Katz, Roger M.

    1987-01-01

    This article reviews the history of research on exercise-induced asthma (EIA) and the pathophysiology of the condition, including its development and influencing factors. Four groups of drugs that are effective against EIA--theopyhlline, beta-adrenergic agents, cromolyn sodium, and anticholinergics--are discussed. (Author/CB)

  1. EXERCISE-INDUCED PULMONARY HEMORRHAGE AFTER RUNNING A MARATHON

    EPA Science Inventory

    We report on a healthy 26-year-old male who had an exercise-induced pulmonary hemorrhage (EIPH) within 24 hours of running a marathon. There were no symptoms, abnormalities on exam, or radiographic infiltrates. He routinely participated in bronchoscopy research and the EIPH was e...

  2. Exercise-induced stress response as an adaptive tolerance strategy.

    PubMed Central

    Sonneborn, J S; Barbee, S A

    1998-01-01

    Interaction between the quality of the environment and the health of the exposed population determines the survival response of living organisms. The phenomenon of induced tolerance by exposure to threshold levels of stressors to stimulate natural defense mechanisms has potential therapeutic value. The paucity of information on predictability of individual response and information on the operative fundamental mechanisms limit applicability of the adaptive tolerance strategy. A potential biomarker of the stress response includes members of the stress-inducible ubiquitin gene family. Transcript sizes detected with Northern blot analysis identify different classes of ubiquitin gene family members and the intensity of the radioactive signal allows abundance determinations. Using moderate exercise as the stressor, significant increase (p < 0.028) in abundance of inducible polyubiquitin genes was found in human blood. Both the potential of exercise as a model system of a natural stress inducer and polyubiquitin as a biomarker of stress were established in these studies. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:9539026

  3. Knee proprioception after exercise-induced muscle damage.

    PubMed

    Torres, R; Vasques, J; Duarte, J A; Cabri, J M H

    2010-06-01

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate whether exercise-induced quadriceps muscle damage affects knee proprioception such as joint position sense (JPS), force sense and the threshold to detect passive movement (TTDPM). Fourteen young men performed sets of eccentric quadriceps contractions at a target of 60% of the maximal concentric peak torque until exhaustion; the exercise was interrupted whenever the subject could not complete two sets. Muscle soreness, JPS, the TTDPM and force sense were examined before the exercise as well as one, 24, 48, 72 and 96 h after exercise. The results were compared using one-way repeated-measure ANOVA. Plasma CK activity, collected at the same times, was analyzed by the Friedman's test to discriminate differences between baseline values and each of the other assessment moments (p<0.05). Relative to the proprioception assessment, JPS at 30 and 70 degrees of knee flexion and force sense were significantly decreased up to 48 h, whereas TTDPM decreased significantly at only one hour and 24 h after exercise, at 30 and 70 degrees of the knee flexion, respectively. The results allow the conclusion that eccentric exercise leading to muscle damage alters joint proprioception, suggesting that there might be impairment in the intrafusal fibres of spindle muscles and in the tendon organs.

  4. Exercise Prevents Diet-Induced Cellular Senescence in Adipose Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Schafer, Marissa J.; White, Thomas A.; Evans, Glenda; Tonne, Jason M.; Verzosa, Grace C.; Stout, Michael B.; Mazula, Daniel L.; Palmer, Allyson K.; Baker, Darren J.; Jensen, Michael D.; Torbenson, Michael S.; Miller, Jordan D.; Ikeda, Yasuhiro; Tchkonia, Tamara; van Deursen, Jan M.; Kirkland, James L.

    2016-01-01

    Considerable evidence implicates cellular senescence in the biology of aging and chronic disease. Diet and exercise are determinants of healthy aging; however, the extent to which they affect the behavior and accretion of senescent cells within distinct tissues is not clear. Here we tested the hypothesis that exercise prevents premature senescent cell accumulation and systemic metabolic dysfunction induced by a fast-food diet (FFD). Using transgenic mice that express EGFP in response to activation of the senescence-associated p16INK4a promoter, we demonstrate that FFD consumption causes deleterious changes in body weight and composition as well as in measures of physical, cardiac, and metabolic health. The harmful effects of the FFD were associated with dramatic increases in several markers of senescence, including p16, EGFP, senescence-associated β-galactosidase, and the senescence-associated secretory phenotype (SASP) specifically in visceral adipose tissue. We show that exercise prevents the accumulation of senescent cells and the expression of the SASP while nullifying the damaging effects of the FFD on parameters of health. We also demonstrate that exercise initiated after long-term FFD feeding reduces senescent phenotype markers in visceral adipose tissue while attenuating physical impairments, suggesting that exercise may provide restorative benefit by mitigating accrued senescent burden. These findings highlight a novel mechanism by which exercise mediates its beneficial effects and reinforces the effect of modifiable lifestyle choices on health span. PMID:26983960

  5. Exercise-induced oxidative stress and dietary antioxidants.

    PubMed

    Yavari, Abbas; Javadi, Maryam; Mirmiran, Parvin; Bahadoran, Zahra

    2015-03-01

    Overproduction of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species during physical exercise, exercise induced oxidative stress and antioxidant supplementation is interesting and controversial concepts that have been considered during the past decades. In this review, we aimed to summarize current evidence in relation to antioxidant supplementation outcomes during exercise and physical activity. For this aim, we obtained relevant articles through searches of the Medline and PubMed databases between 1980 to 2013. Although major studies have indicated that antioxidants could attenuate biomarkers of exercise-induced oxidative stress and the use of antioxidant supplement is a common phenomenon among athletes and physically active people, there are some doubts regarding the benefits of these. It seems that the best recommendations regarding antioxidants and exercise are having a balanced diet rich in natural antioxidants and phytochemicals. Regular consumption of various fresh fruits and vegetables, whole grains, legumes and beans, sprouts and seeds is an effective and safe way to meet all antioxidant requirements in physically active persons and athletes.

  6. Exercise-induced arteriovenous intrapulmonary shunting in dogs.

    PubMed

    Stickland, Michael K; Lovering, Andrew T; Eldridge, Marlowe W

    2007-08-01

    We have previously shown, using contrast echocardiography, that intrapulmonary arteriovenous pathways are inducible in healthy humans during exercise; however, this technique does not allow for determination of arteriovenous vessel size or shunt magnitude. The purpose of this study was to determine whether large-diameter (more than 25 microm) intrapulmonary arteriovenous pathways are present in the dog, and whether exercise recruits these conduits. Through the right forelimb, 10.8 million 25-microm stable isotope-labeled microspheres (BioPAL, Inc., Worcester, MA) were injected either at rest (n = 8) or during high-intensity exercise (6- 8 mph, 10-15% grade, n = 6). Systemic arterial blood was continuously sampled during and for 3 minutes after injection. After euthanasia, tissue samples were obtained from the heart, liver, kidney, and skeletal muscle. In addition, 25- and 50-microm microspheres were infused into four isolated dog lungs that were ventilated and perfused at constant pressures similar to exercise. Blood and tissue samples were commercially analyzed for the presence of microspheres. No microspheres were detected in the arterial blood or tissue samples from resting dogs. In contrast, five of six exercising dogs showed evidence of exercise-induced intrapulmonary arteriovenous shunting, as microspheres were detected in arterial blood and/or tissue. Furthermore, shunt magnitude was calculated to be 1.4 +/- 0.8% of cardiac output (n = 3). Evidence of intrapulmonary arteriovenous anastomoses was also found in three of four isolated lungs. Consistent with previous human findings, these data demonstrate that intrapulmonary arteriovenous pathways are functional in the dog and are recruited with exercise.

  7. Exercise-induced Arteriovenous Intrapulmonary Shunting in Dogs

    PubMed Central

    Stickland, Michael K.; Lovering, Andrew T.; Eldridge, Marlowe W.

    2007-01-01

    Rationale: We have previously shown, using contrast echocardiography, that intrapulmonary arteriovenous pathways are inducible in healthy humans during exercise; however, this technique does not allow for determination of arteriovenous vessel size or shunt magnitude. Objectives: The purpose of this study was to determine whether large-diameter (more than 25 μm) intrapulmonary arteriovenous pathways are present in the dog, and whether exercise recruits these conduits. Methods: Through the right forelimb, 10.8 million 25-μm stable isotope-labeled microspheres (BioPAL, Inc., Worcester, MA) were injected either at rest (n = 8) or during high-intensity exercise (6– 8 mph, 10–15% grade, n = 6). Systemic arterial blood was continuously sampled during and for 3 minutes after injection. After euthanasia, tissue samples were obtained from the heart, liver, kidney, and skeletal muscle. In addition, 25- and 50-μm microspheres were infused into four isolated dog lungs that were ventilated and perfused at constant pressures similar to exercise. Measurements and Main Results: Blood and tissue samples were commercially analyzed for the presence of microspheres. No microspheres were detected in the arterial blood or tissue samples from resting dogs. In contrast, five of six exercising dogs showed evidence of exercise-induced intrapulmonary arteriovenous shunting, as microspheres were detected in arterial blood and/or tissue. Furthermore, shunt magnitude was calculated to be 1.4 ± 0.8% of cardiac output (n = 3). Evidence of intrapulmonary arteriovenous anastomoses was also found in three of four isolated lungs. Conclusions: Consistent with previous human findings, these data demonstrate that intrapulmonary arteriovenous pathways are functional in the dog and are recruited with exercise. PMID:17478619

  8. Effects of polyphenolic antioxidants on exercise-induced oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Morillas-Ruiz, J M; Villegas García, J A; López, F J; Vidal-Guevara, M L; Zafrilla, P

    2006-06-01

    Polyphenols are of increasing interest to consumers and food manufacturers for several reasons. Commonly referred to as antioxidants (they are the most abundant antioxidants in our diets), they may prevent various oxidative stress-related diseases, such as cancer, cardiovascular disease, inflammation and others. Physical activity is known to induce oxidative stress in individuals after intensive exercise. In this study, the effect of the flavonoid contents (which are the most abundant polyphenols) was investigated, as the only antioxidant in a replacement drink designed for sportsmen on various oxidative stress biomarkers after two identical trials of sub-maximal aerobic exercise, in a group of 30 sportsmen. In one of the trials, the cyclists consumed the antioxidant supplement (with 2.3g polyphenols/trial), and in another they consumed a placebo. Blood samples were collected both at rest and after exercise immediately and 45 minutes (min) later, for measurements of plasmatic indices of oxidative stress: lipid oxidation (TBARS), total antioxidant status (TAS); protein oxidation (carbonyl groups, CO) and the lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and creatine kinase (CK) enzymes for each trial. All values were adjusted for changes in plasma volume. No changes were detected in plasma TAS and LDH after exercise or after the polyphenolic supplement. CK and TBARS increased after exercise in both tests. However, in response to strenuous exercise, the polyphenol-supplemented test showed a smaller increase in plasma TBARS and CK than the placebo test. CO increased by 12% in response to the placebo test, whereas it decreased by 23% in the polyphenol-supplement test. This may indicate that the antioxidant supplement offered protection against exercise-induced oxidative stress.

  9. Exercise-induced histone modifications in human skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    McGee, Sean L; Fairlie, Erin; Garnham, Andrew P; Hargreaves, Mark

    2009-12-15

    Skeletal muscle adaptations to exercise confer many of the health benefits of physical activity and occur partly through alterations in skeletal muscle gene expression. The exact mechanisms mediating altered skeletal muscle gene expression in response to exercise are unknown. However, in recent years, chromatin remodelling through epigenetic histone modifications has emerged as a key regulatory mechanism controlling gene expression in general. The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of exercise on global histone modifications that mediate chromatin remodelling and transcriptional activation in human skeletal muscle in response to exercise. In addition, we sought to examine the signalling mechanisms regulating these processes. Following 60 min of cycling, global histone 3 acetylation at lysine 9 and 14, a modification associated with transcriptional initiation, was unchanged from basal levels, but was increased at lysine 36, a site associated with transcriptional elongation. We examined the regulation of the class IIa histone deacetylases (HDACs), which are enzymes that suppress histone acetylation and have been implicated in the adaptations to exercise. While we found no evidence of proteasomal degradation of the class IIa HDACs, we found that HDAC4 and 5 were exported from the nucleus during exercise, thereby removing their transcriptional repressive function. We also observed activation of the AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and the calcium-calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) in response to exercise, which are two kinases that induce phosphorylation-dependent class IIa HDAC nuclear export. These data delineate a signalling pathway that might mediate skeletal muscle adaptations in response to exercise.

  10. Intra-articular injections of high-molecular-weight hyaluronic acid have biphasic effects on joint inflammation and destruction in rat antigen-induced arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Roth, Andreas; Mollenhauer, Jürgen; Wagner, Andreas; Fuhrmann, Reneè; Straub, Albrecht; Venbrocks, Rudolf A; Petrow, Peter; Bräuer, Rolf; Schubert, Harald; Ozegowski, Jörg; Peschel, Gundela; Müller, Peter J; Kinne, Raimund W

    2005-01-01

    To assess the potential use of hyaluronic acid (HA) as adjuvant therapy in rheumatoid arthritis, the anti-inflammatory and chondroprotective effects of HA were analysed in experimental rat antigen-induced arthritis (AIA). Lewis rats with AIA were subjected to short-term (days 1 and 8, n = 10) or long-term (days 1, 8, 15 and 22, n = 10) intra-articular treatment with microbially manufactured, high-molecular-weight HA (molecular weight, 1.7 × 106 Da; 0.5 mg/dose). In both tests, 10 buffer-treated AIA rats served as arthritic controls and six healthy animals served as normal controls. Arthritis was monitored by weekly assessment of joint swelling and histological evaluation in the short-term test (day 8) and in the long-term test (day 29). Safranin O staining was employed to detect proteoglycan loss from the epiphyseal growth plate and the articular cartilage of the arthritic knee joint. Serum levels of IL-6, tumour necrosis factor alpha and glycosaminoglycans were measured by ELISA/kit systems (days 8 and 29). HA treatment did not significantly influence AIA in the short-term test (days 1 and 8) but did suppress early chronic AIA (day 15, P < 0.05); however, HA treatment tended to aggravate chronic AIA in the long-term test (day 29). HA completely prevented proteoglycan loss from the epiphyseal growth plate and articular cartilage on day 8, but induced proteoglycan loss from the epiphyseal growth plate on day 29. Similarly, HA inhibited the histological signs of acute inflammation and cartilage damage in the short-term test, but augmented acute and chronic inflammation as well as cartilage damage in the long-term test. Serum levels of IL-6, tumour necrosis factor alpha, and glycosaminoglycans were not influenced by HA. Local therapeutic effects of HA in AIA are clearly biphasic, with inhibition of inflammation and cartilage damage in the early chronic phase but with promotion of joint swelling, inflammation and cartilage damage in the late chronic phase. PMID

  11. Treadmill exercise ameliorates intracerebral hemorrhage-induced depression in rats.

    PubMed

    Roh, Joo Hwan; Ko, Il-Gyu; Kim, Sung-Eun; Lee, Jae-Min; Ji, Eun-Sang; Kim, Ju Ho; Chang, Hyun-Kyung; Lee, Seung Kyu; Kim, Khae Hawn

    2016-08-01

    Intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) is a severe type of stroke causing neurological dysfunction with high mortality rate. Depression is one of the most common complications of ICH. In the present study, the effects of treadmill exercise on ICH-induced depressive symptoms in relation with apoptosis were investigated using rats. ICH rat model was induced by injection of collagenase into the hippocampus using stereotaxic instrument. Open field test for activity and forced swimming test for depressive symptoms were conducted. Apoptosis in the hippocampus was detected using terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end labeling assay, immunohistochemistry for caspase-3, and western blot for Bcl-2 and Bax. Western blot analysis for 5-hydroxy-tryptamine (5-HT, serotonin) and tryptophan hydroxylase (TPH) in the dorsal raphe was also conducted for biomarkers of depression. In the present results, immobility time was increased and climbing time was decreased by induction of ICH and treadmill exercise inhibited immobility time and increased climbing time in ICH rats. DNA fragmentation and caspase-3 expression in the hippocampal dentate gyrus were enhanced by induction of ICH and treadmill exercise suppressed ICH-induced DNA fragmentation and caspase-3 expression. Bax expression in the hippocampus was increased by induction of ICH and treadmill exercise inhibited Bax expression in the ICH rats. Expressions of 5-HT and TPH in the dorsal raphe were decreased by induction of ICH and treadmill exercise increased expressions of 5-HT and TPH in the ICH rats. In the present study, treadmill exercise ameliorated depressive symptoms through inhibiting apoptosis.

  12. Apoptotic lymphocytes induce progenitor cell mobilization after exercise.

    PubMed

    Mooren, Frank C; Krüger, Karsten

    2015-07-15

    There is evidence that apoptotic cells and their components have immunmodulatory properties and signaling function. The present study investigated first whether exercise-induced apoptosis and exercise-induced mobilization of progenitor cells are similarly affected by subjects' training status and, second, whether the appearance of dying cells in the circulation might mobilize progenitor cells. CD1 SWISS mice were subjected to a 10-wk endurance training using free wheel running or served as untrained controls. Mice of both groups performed an intensive exercise test after the training period at a velocity corresponding to 80% maximal oxygen uptake for 30 min. Cells from blood and bone marrow were analyzed, and apoptosis and number of progenitor cells determined via flow cytometry. In a second experiment, apoptotic cells were transferred into recipient mice, and mobilization of progenitor cells was analyzed while vital cells served as controls. In untrained animals, the exhaustive exercise was followed by an enhanced rate of annexin V positive CD3(+) cells in blood and bone marrow (P < 0.05), whereas no increase was found in trained mice. Similarly, exercise mobilized Sca-1(+)/c-kit(+) and Sca-1(+)/Flk(+) cells in untrained (P < 0.05) but not trained mice. Furthermore, application of apoptotic cells and their supernatant mobilized Sca-1(+)/c-kit(+) cells into the blood (P < 0.05), whereas Sca-1(+)/Flk(+) cells were not affected. The present study demonstrated that both lymphocyte apoptosis, as well as mobilization of progenitor cells are similarly related to training status. Furthermore, apoptotic cells seem to induce signals that effectively mobilize hematopoietic progenitor cells. The relevance of this effect for the adaptation to exercise stimuli remains to be shown. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  13. Treadmill exercise ameliorates intracerebral hemorrhage-induced depression in rats

    PubMed Central

    Roh, Joo Hwan; Ko, Il-Gyu; Kim, Sung-Eun; Lee, Jae-Min; Ji, Eun-Sang; Kim, Ju Ho; Chang, Hyun-Kyung; Lee, Seung Kyu; Kim, Khae Hawn

    2016-01-01

    Intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) is a severe type of stroke causing neurological dysfunction with high mortality rate. Depression is one of the most common complications of ICH. In the present study, the effects of treadmill exercise on ICH-induced depressive symptoms in relation with apoptosis were investigated using rats. ICH rat model was induced by injection of collagenase into the hippocampus using stereotaxic instrument. Open field test for activity and forced swimming test for depressive symptoms were conducted. Apoptosis in the hippocampus was detected using terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end labeling assay, immunohistochemistry for caspase-3, and western blot for Bcl-2 and Bax. Western blot analysis for 5-hydroxy-tryptamine (5-HT, serotonin) and tryptophan hydroxylase (TPH) in the dorsal raphe was also conducted for biomarkers of depression. In the present results, immobility time was increased and climbing time was decreased by induction of ICH and treadmill exercise inhibited immobility time and increased climbing time in ICH rats. DNA fragmentation and caspase-3 expression in the hippocampal dentate gyrus were enhanced by induction of ICH and treadmill exercise suppressed ICH-induced DNA fragmentation and caspase-3 expression. Bax expression in the hippocampus was increased by induction of ICH and treadmill exercise inhibited Bax expression in the ICH rats. Expressions of 5-HT and TPH in the dorsal raphe were decreased by induction of ICH and treadmill exercise increased expressions of 5-HT and TPH in the ICH rats. In the present study, treadmill exercise ameliorated depressive symptoms through inhibiting apoptosis. PMID:27656626

  14. The effects of pre-exercise vibration stimulation on the exercise-induced muscle damage

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ji-Yun; Kang, Da-Haeng; Lee, Joon-Hee; O, Se-Min; Jeon, Jae-Keun

    2017-01-01

    [Purpose] To investigate the effects of pre-induced muscle damage vibration stimulation on the pressure-pain threshold and muscle-fatigue-related metabolites of exercise-induced muscle damage. [Subjects and Methods] Thirty healthy, adult male subjects were randomly assigned to the pre-induced muscle damage vibration stimulation group, post-induced muscle damage vibration stimulation group, or control group (n=10 per group). To investigate the effects of pre-induced muscle damage vibration stimulation, changes in the pressure-pain threshold (lb), creatine kinase level (U/L), and lactate dehydrogenase level (U/L) were measured and analyzed at baseline and at 24 hours, 48 hours, and 72 hours after exercise. [Results] The pressure-pain thresholds and concentrations of creatine kinase and lactate dehydrogenase varied significantly in each group and during each measurement period. There were interactions between the measurement periods and groups, and results of the post-hoc test showed that the pre-induced muscle damage vibration stimulation group had the highest efficacy among the groups. [Conclusion] Pre-induced muscle damage vibration stimulation is more effective than post-induced muscle damage vibration stimulation for preventing muscle damage. PMID:28210056

  15. Exercise-induced muscle damage following dance and sprint-specific exercise in females.

    PubMed

    Brown, Meghan A; Howatson, Glyn; Keane, Karen; Stevenson, Emma J

    2016-11-01

    There is a paucity of studies investigating exercise-induced muscle damage (EIMD) in females and only one in response to dance-type exercise. This study sought to firstly elucidate the physiological profile of EIMD following a dance-specific protocol, and second to compare the magnitude of damage to that experienced following a sport-specific protocol in physically active females. Twenty-nine female recreational dancers (19±1 years) were recruited. Participants completed either a dance-specific protocol (DPFT; N.=15) or sport-specific repeated sprint protocol (SSRS; N.=14). Muscle soreness, limb girths, creatine kinase (CK), countermovement jump height (CMJ), reactive strength index (RSI), maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) and 30 m sprint time were recorded pre, 0-, 24-, 48-, and 72 h post exercise. The DPFT induced muscle damage, with significant time effects for all variables except RSI. However the response was acute, and muscle function returned to near-baseline levels by 48 h. Although no group differences existed, there were significant interaction effects; notably in CMJ (P=0.038) where the decline at 0 h (-6.9%) was smaller and recovery was greater at 72 h (which exceeded pre-exercise levels by 3.7%) post DPFT compared to post SSRS. The results offer new information showing that dance-specific activity results in EIMD in females. In addition, the magnitude of damage was similar to repeated sprint exercise and demonstrated that, in this population, recovery from these strenuous activities takes several days. These data have important implications for understanding the consequences of dance activity and other strenuous exercise in females.

  16. Fluid replacement drinks during high intensity exercise: effects on minimizing exercise-induced disturbances in homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Powers, S K; Lawler, J; Dodd, S; Tulley, R; Landry, G; Wheeler, K

    1990-01-01

    The purpose of these experiments was to examine the influence of various fluid replacement drinks on exercise-induced disturbances in homeostasis during heavy exercise. Nine trained cyclists performed constant load exercise on a cycle ergometer to fatigue on three occasions with 1-week separating experiments. The work rate was set initially at approximately 85% of VO2max (range 82-88%) with fatigue being defined as a 10% decline in power output below the initial value. During each experiment subjects consumed one of the following three beverages prior to and every 15 min during exercise: (1) non-electrolyte placebo (NEP; 31 mosmol.kg-1); (2) glucose polymer drink containing electrolytes (GP; 7% CHO, 231 mosmol.kg-1), and (3) electrolyte placebo drink without carbohydrate (EP; 48 mosmol.kg-1). Both the GP and EP beverage contained sodium citrate/citric acid (C) as a flavoring agent while C was not contained in the NEP drink. Although seven of nine subjects worked longer during the GP and EP treatment when compared with the NEP trial, the difference was not significant (P greater than 0.05). No differences (P greater than 0.05) existed between the GP and EP treatments in performance time. Exercise changes in rectal temperature, heart rate, delta % plasma volume and plasma concentrations of total protein, free fatty acids, glucose, lactate, potassium, chloride, calcium, and sodium did not differ (P greater than 0.05) between trials.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  17. Exercise-induced energy expenditure: implications for exercise prescription and obesity.

    PubMed

    Colley, Rachel C; Hills, Andrew P; King, Neil A; Byrne, Nuala M

    2010-06-01

    Walking is commonly recommended to help with weight management. We measured total energy expenditure (TEE) and its components to quantify the impact of increasing exercise-induced energy expenditure (ExEE) on other components of TEE. Thirteen obese women underwent an 8-week walking group intervention. TEE was quantified using doubly labeled water, ExEE was quantified using heart rate monitors, daily movement was assessed by accelerometry and resting metabolic rate was measured using indirect calorimetry. Four of the 13 participants achieved the target of 1500kcalwk(-1) of ExEE and all achieved 1000kcalwk(-1). The average ExEE achieved by the group across the 8 weeks was 1434+/-237kcalwk(-1). Vigorous physical activity, as assessed by accelerometry, increased during the intervention by an average of 30min per day. Non-exercise activity thermogenesis (NEAT) decreased, on average, by 175kcald(-1) (-22%) from baseline to the intervention and baseline fitness was correlated with change in NEAT. Potential alterations in non-exercise activity should be considered when exercise is prescribed. The provision of appropriate education on how to self-monitor daily activity levels may improve intervention outcomes in groups who are new to exercise. Strategies to sustain incidental and light physical activity should be offered to help empower individuals as they develop and maintain healthy and long-lasting lifestyle habits. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Strenuous Exercise Induced Syncope Due to Coronary Artery Anomaly

    PubMed Central

    Yavuz, Veysel; Cetin, Nurulah; Tuncer, Esref; Dalgic, Onur; Taskin, Ugur; Bilge, Ali Riza; Tikiz, Hakan

    2014-01-01

    Coronary artery anomalies are among the neglected topics in cardiology. Anomalous origin of the left main coronary artery from the right sinus of valsalva is a rare coronary anomaly observed in 0.15% of patients. During exercise, the distended aorta and pulmonary artery with increased blood flow may squeeze the Left Main Coronary Artery (LMCA) between them. Even though arrhythmias are common causes of syncope, one should also think about aberrant coronary artery in the patients with syncope of unexplained origin. Patients experiencing exercise induced syncope accompanied by symptoms of coronary ischemia (typically: chest pain, ischemic findings on ECG, and raised cardiac markers) should be referred to diagnostic coronary angiography. PMID:25177677

  19. [Exercise-induced urticaria and angioedema - case report].

    PubMed

    Stelmach, Iwona; Sztafińska, Anna; Lechańka, Joanna; Balcerak, Joanna; Jerzyńska, Joanna

    2014-01-01

    Urticaria is a heterogeneous group of disorders, with various clinical manifestations and intensity of symptoms. Urticaria can be induced with a wide variety of environmental stimuli, such as cold, pressure, vibration, sunlight, exercise, temperature changes, heat, and water. In a select group of patients, exercise can induce a spectrum of urticaria symptoms, ranging from cutaneous pruritus and warmth, generalised urticaria, angioedema, and the appearance of such additional manifestations as collapse, upper respiratory distress, and anaphylaxis. Specific provocation tests should be carried out on an individual basis to investigate the suspected cause and proper diagnosis. Modification of activities and behaviour is the mainstay of treatment in patients with physical urticaria. The aim of this study was to emphasise that primary care paediatricians should be able to recognise physical urticaria, supply a patient with rescue medications, and refer him/her to a specialist. In the article, the authors present a 13-year-old girl with typical urticaria lesions and angioedema after exercise. According to the history, physical examination, and provocation test, exercise-induced urticaria and angioedema were diagnosed.

  20. Eucapnic voluntary hyperpnoea and exercise-induced vocal cord dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Turmel, Julie; Gagnon, Simon; Bernier, Mélanie; Boulet, Louis-Philippe

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Exercise-induced bronchoconstriction (EIB) is a common condition in endurance athletes. Exercise-induced vocal cord dysfunction (EIVCD) is a frequent confounder of EIB. The diagnosis of EIVCD may be challenging and can be missed as the problem is often intermittent and may only occur during intense exercise. Eucapnic voluntary hyperventilation (EVH) is the best test to detect EIB. This pilot study aimed to assess if EVH could be helpful in the diagnosis of EIVCD associated or not to EIB in athletes. Methods A nasolaryngoscopy was performed during a 6 min EVH test, in 13 female athletes suspected to have VCD, aged 21±7 years. Image analysis was conducted by two Ear Nose and Throat surgeons in random order. Results During the EVH, three athletes showed incomplete paradoxical vocal cords movement, without inspiratory stridor. However, 12 athletes showed marked supraglottic movement without inspiratory stridor. In two athletes, this supraglottic movement was severe, one showing a marked collapse of the epiglottis with an almost complete obstruction of the larynx by the arytenoid cartilage mucosa. In 3 of the 12 athletes with supraglottic movement, severe vibration of the mucosa covering the arytenoid cartilages was also observed. Conclusions EVH challenge in athletes can provide information on various types of glottic and supraglottic obstruction in reproducing laryngeal movements during hyperventilation. Our findings make us suggest that exercise induced upper airway obstructions should be named: Exercise-induced laryngeal obstruction (EILO). Then, EILO should be divided in three categories: supraglottic, glottic (EIVCD) and mixed (glottic and supraglottic) obstruction. PMID:27900141

  1. Oral biomarkers in exercise-induced neuroplasticity in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Mougeot, J-Lc; Hirsch, M A; Stevens, C B; Mougeot, Fkb

    2016-11-01

    In this article, we review candidate biomarkers for Parkinson's disease (PD) in oral cavity, potential of oral biomarkers as markers of neuroplasticity, and literature on the effects of exercise on oral cavity biomarkers in PD. We first describe how pathophysiological pathways of PD may be transduced from brain stem and ganglia to oral cavity through the autonomic nervous system or transduced by a reverse path. Next we describe the effects of exercise in PD and potential impact on oral cavity. We propose that biomarkers in oral cavity may be useful targets for describing exercise-induced brain neuroplasticity in PD. Nevertheless, much research remains to be carried out before applying these biomarkers for the determination of disease state and therapeutic response to develop strategies to mitigate motor or non-motor symptoms in PD.

  2. Dietary strategies to recover from exercise-induced muscle damage.

    PubMed

    Sousa, Mónica; Teixeira, Vítor H; Soares, José

    2014-03-01

    Exhaustive or unaccustomed intense exercise can cause exercise-induced muscle damage (EIMD) and its undesirable consequences may decrease the ability to exercise and to adhere to a training programme. This review briefly summarises the muscle damage process, focusing predominantly on oxidative stress and inflammation as contributing factors, and describes how nutrition may be positively used to recover from EIMD. The combined intake of carbohydrates and proteins and the use of antioxidants and/or anti-inflammatory nutrients within physiological ranges are interventions that may assist the recovery process. Although the works studying food instead of nutritional supplements are very scarce, their results seem to indicate that food might be a favourable option as a recovery strategy. To date, the only tested foods were milk, cherries, blueberries and pomegranate with promising results. Other potential solutions are foods rich in protein, carbohydrates, antioxidants and/or anti-inflammatory nutrients.

  3. Diagnosis of exercise-induced anaphylaxis: current insights

    PubMed Central

    Pravettoni, Valerio; Incorvaia, Cristoforo

    2016-01-01

    Exercise-induced anaphylaxis (EIAn) is defined as the occurrence of anaphylactic symptoms (skin, respiratory, gastrointestinal, and cardiovascular symptoms) after physical activity. In about a third of cases, cofactors, such as food intake, temperature (warm or cold), and drugs (especially nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs) can be identified. When the associated cofactor is food ingestion, the correct diagnosis is food-dependent EIAn (FDEIAn). The literature describes numerous reports of FDEIAn after intake of very different foods, from vegetables and nuts to meats and seafood. One of the best-characterized types of FDEIAn is that due to ω5-gliadin of wheat, though cases of FDEIAn after wheat ingestion by sensitization to wheat lipid transfer protien (LTP) are described. Some pathophysiological mechanisms underlying EIAn have been hypothesized, such as increase/alteration in gastrointestinal permeability, alteration of tissue transglutaminase promoting IgE cross-linking, enhanced expression of cytokines, redistribution of blood during physical exercise leading to altered mast-cell degranulation, and also changes in the acid–base balance. Nevertheless, until now, none of these hypotheses has been validated. The diagnosis of EIAn and FDEIAn is achieved by means of a challenge, with physical exercise alone for EIAn, and with the assumption of the suspected food followed by physical exercise for FDEIAn; in cases of doubtful results, a double-blind placebo-controlled combined food–exercise challenge should be performed. The prevention of this particular kind of anaphylaxis is the avoidance of the specific trigger, ie, physical exercise for EIAn, the assumption of the culprit food before exercise for FDEIAn, and in general the avoidance of the recognized cofactors. Patients must be supplied with an epinephrine autoinjector, as epinephrine has been clearly recognized as the first-line intervention for anaphylaxis. PMID:27822074

  4. Exercise-induced muscle cramp. Proposed mechanisms and management.

    PubMed

    Bentley, S

    1996-06-01

    Muscle cramp is a common, painful, physiological disturbance of skeletal muscle. Many athletes are regularly frustrated by exercise-induced muscle cramp yet the pathogenesis remains speculative with little scientific research on the subject. This has resulted in a perpetuation of myths as to the cause and treatment of it. There is a need for scientifically based protocols for the management of athletes who suffer exercise-related muscle cramp. This article reviews the literature and neurophysiology of muscle cramp occurring during exercise. Disturbances at various levels of the central and peripheral nervous system and skeletal muscle are likely to be involved in the mechanism of cramp and may explain the diverse range of conditions in which cramp occurs. The activity of the motor neuron is subject to a multitude of influences including peripheral receptor sensory input, spinal reflexes, inhibitory interneurons in the spinal cord, synaptic and neurotransmitter modulation and descending CNS input. The muscle spindle and golgi tendon organ proprioceptors are fundamental to the control of muscle length and tone and the maintenance of posture. Disturbance in the activity of these receptors may occur through faulty posture, shortened muscle length, intense exercise and exercise to fatigue, resulting in increased motor neuron activity and motor unit recruitment. The relaxation phase of muscle contraction is prolonged in a fatigued muscle, raising the likelihood of fused summation of action potentials if motor neuron activity delivers a sustained high firing frequency. Treatment of cramp is directed at reducing muscle spindle and motor neuron activity by reflex inhibition and afferent stimulation. There are no proven strategies for the prevention of exercise-induced muscle cramp but regular muscle stretching using post-isometric relaxation techniques, correction of muscle balance and posture, adequate conditioning for the activity, mental preparation for competition and

  5. The inflammatory basis of exercise-induced bronchoconstriction.

    PubMed

    Brannan, John D; Turton, James A

    2010-12-01

    Exercise-induced bronchoconstriction (EIB) is common in individuals with asthma, and may be observed even in the absence of a clinical diagnosis of asthma. Exercise-induced bronchoconstriction can be diagnosed via standardized exercise protocols, and anti-inflammatory therapy with inhaled corticosteroids (ICS) is often warranted. Exercise-related symptoms are commonly reported in primary care; however, access to standardized exercise protocols to assess EIB are often restricted because of the need for specialized equipment, as well as time constraints. Symptoms and lung function remain the most accessible indicators of EIB, yet these are poor predictors of its presence and severity. Evidence suggests that exercise causes the airways to narrow as a result of the osmotic and thermal consequences of respiratory water loss. The increase in airway osmolarity leads to the release of bronchoconstricting mediators (eg, histamine, prostaglandins, leukotrienes) from inflammatory cells (eg, mast cells and eosinophils). The objective assessment of EIB suggests the presence of airway inflammation, which is sensitive to ICS in association with a responsive airway smooth muscle. Surrogate tests for EIB, such as eucapnic voluntary hyperpnea or the osmotic challenge tests, cause airway narrowing via a similar mechanism, and a response indicates likely benefit from ICS therapy. The complete inhibition of EIB with ICS therapy in individuals with asthma may be a useful marker of control of airway pathology. Furthermore, inhibition of EIB provides additional, useful information regarding the identification of clinical control based on symptoms and lung function. This article explores the inflammatory basis of EIB in asthma as well as the effect of ICS on the pathophysiology of EIB.

  6. Exercise-induced oxidative stress: past, present and future.

    PubMed

    Powers, Scott K; Radak, Zsolt; Ji, Li Li

    2016-09-15

    The existence of free radicals in living cells was first reported in 1954 and this important finding helped launch the field of free radical biology. However, the discovery that muscular exercise is associated with increased biomarkers of oxidative stress did not occur until 1978. Following the initial report that exercise promotes oxidative stress in humans, many studies have confirmed that prolonged or short-duration high intensity exercise results in increased radical production in active skeletal muscles resulting in the formation of oxidized lipids and proteins in the working muscles. Since these early descriptive studies, the investigation of radicals and redox biology related to exercise and skeletal muscle has grown as a discipline and the importance of this research in the biomedical sciences is widely recognized. This review will briefly summarize the history of research in exercise-induced oxidative stress and will discuss the major paradigm shifts that the field has undergone and continues to experience. We conclude with a discussion of future directions in the hope of stimulating additional research in this important field. © 2016 The Authors. The Journal of Physiology © 2016 The Physiological Society.

  7. Acute Biphasic Effects of Ayahuasca

    PubMed Central

    Schenberg, Eduardo Ekman; Alexandre, João Felipe Morel; Filev, Renato; Cravo, Andre Mascioli; Sato, João Ricardo; Muthukumaraswamy, Suresh D.; Yonamine, Maurício; Waguespack, Marian; Lomnicka, Izabela; Barker, Steven A.; da Silveira, Dartiu Xavier

    2015-01-01

    Ritual use of ayahuasca, an amazonian Amerindian medicine turned sacrament in syncretic religions in Brazil, is rapidly growing around the world. Because of this internationalization, a comprehensive understanding of the pharmacological mechanisms of action of the brew and the neural correlates of the modified states of consciousness it induces is important. Employing a combination of electroencephalogram (EEG) recordings and quantification of ayahuasca's compounds and their metabolites in the systemic circulation we found ayahuasca to induce a biphasic effect in the brain. This effect was composed of reduced power in the alpha band (8–13 Hz) after 50 minutes from ingestion of the brew and increased slow- and fast-gamma power (30–50 and 50–100 Hz, respectively) between 75 and 125 minutes. Alpha power reductions were mostly located at left parieto-occipital cortex, slow-gamma power increase was observed at left centro-parieto-occipital, left fronto-temporal and right frontal cortices while fast-gamma increases were significant at left centro-parieto-occipital, left fronto-temporal, right frontal and right parieto-occipital cortices. These effects were significantly associated with circulating levels of ayahuasca’s chemical compounds, mostly N,N-dimethyltryptamine (DMT), harmine, harmaline and tetrahydroharmine and some of their metabolites. An interpretation based on a cognitive and emotional framework relevant to the ritual use of ayahuasca, as well as it's potential therapeutic effects is offered. PMID:26421727

  8. Acute Biphasic Effects of Ayahuasca.

    PubMed

    Schenberg, Eduardo Ekman; Alexandre, João Felipe Morel; Filev, Renato; Cravo, Andre Mascioli; Sato, João Ricardo; Muthukumaraswamy, Suresh D; Yonamine, Maurício; Waguespack, Marian; Lomnicka, Izabela; Barker, Steven A; da Silveira, Dartiu Xavier

    2015-01-01

    Ritual use of ayahuasca, an amazonian Amerindian medicine turned sacrament in syncretic religions in Brazil, is rapidly growing around the world. Because of this internationalization, a comprehensive understanding of the pharmacological mechanisms of action of the brew and the neural correlates of the modified states of consciousness it induces is important. Employing a combination of electroencephalogram (EEG) recordings and quantification of ayahuasca's compounds and their metabolites in the systemic circulation we found ayahuasca to induce a biphasic effect in the brain. This effect was composed of reduced power in the alpha band (8-13 Hz) after 50 minutes from ingestion of the brew and increased slow- and fast-gamma power (30-50 and 50-100 Hz, respectively) between 75 and 125 minutes. Alpha power reductions were mostly located at left parieto-occipital cortex, slow-gamma power increase was observed at left centro-parieto-occipital, left fronto-temporal and right frontal cortices while fast-gamma increases were significant at left centro-parieto-occipital, left fronto-temporal, right frontal and right parieto-occipital cortices. These effects were significantly associated with circulating levels of ayahuasca's chemical compounds, mostly N,N-dimethyltryptamine (DMT), harmine, harmaline and tetrahydroharmine and some of their metabolites. An interpretation based on a cognitive and emotional framework relevant to the ritual use of ayahuasca, as well as it's potential therapeutic effects is offered.

  9. Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation reduces exercise-induced perceived pain and improves endurance exercise performance.

    PubMed

    Astokorki, Ali H Y; Mauger, Alexis R

    2017-03-01

    Muscle pain is a natural consequence of intense and prolonged exercise and has been suggested to be a limiter of performance. Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) and interferential current (IFC) have been shown to reduce both chronic and acute pain in a variety of conditions. This study sought to ascertain whether TENS and IFC could reduce exercise-induced pain (EIP) and whether this would affect exercise performance. It was hypothesised that TENS and IFC would reduce EIP and result in an improved exercise performance. In two parts, 18 (Part I) and 22 (Part II) healthy male and female participants completed an isometric contraction of the dominant bicep until exhaustion (Part I) and a 16.1 km cycling time trial as quickly as they could (Part II) whilst receiving TENS, IFC, and a SHAM placebo in a repeated measures, randomised cross-over, and placebo-controlled design. Perceived EIP was recorded in both tasks using a validated subjective scale. In Part I, TENS significantly reduced perceived EIP (mean reduction of 12%) during the isometric contraction (P = 0.006) and significantly improved participants' time to exhaustion by a mean of 38% (P = 0.02). In Part II, TENS significantly improved (P = 0.003) participants' time trial completion time (~2% improvement) through an increased mean power output. These findings demonstrate that TENS can attenuate perceived EIP in a healthy population and that doing so significantly improves endurance performance in both submaximal isometric single limb exercise and whole-body dynamic exercise.

  10. Exercise induced laryngeal obstruction: a review of diagnosis and management.

    PubMed

    Liyanagedara, Savinda; McLeod, Robert; Elhassan, Hassan A

    2017-04-01

    Exercise induced laryngeal obstruction (EILO) is a condition where inappropriate vocal cord or glottic closure occurs during exercise. This review of the literature provides an overview of the current understanding of the definition, epidemiology, diagnosis and management of EILO. Using The Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Review and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) guidelines the Cochrane, Embase, Ovid MEDLINE and PubMed databases were searched. Four search domains "exercise", "induced", "laryngeal" and "obstruction" were used. Primary searching found 469 records, 308 were excluded following screening of titles and citation. 100 were duplicates, a further 47 studies were excluded after applying inclusion and exclusion criteria. Two studies were identified following cross-referencing. A total of 15 studies were included. The last search date was 6/06/15. Average prevalence in the general adolescent population and athletes was 7.1 and 35.2 %, respectively. Dyspnoea was reported in 96.5, 99 and 100 % of three EILO patient cohorts. Two studies (n = 107) reported continuous laryngoscopy during exercise (CLE) testing could differentiate between patients and controls. In two studies (n = 33) the visual analogue scale (VAS) showed a beneficial effect of endoscopic supraglottoplasty (ES). Thirty-eight out of 43 patients who received two or more laryngeal control therapy sessions (LCT) had improvement or resolution of EILO symptoms. Exercise induced dyspnoea is the most common EILO symptom. EILO has a high occurrence in adolescents and athletes. The CLE test is the current gold standard for EILO diagnostics. Management of EILO includes both surgical and non-surgical interventions.

  11. Resistance to exercise-induced weight loss: compensatory behavioral adaptations.

    PubMed

    Melanson, Edward L; Keadle, Sarah Kozey; Donnelly, Joseph E; Braun, Barry; King, Neil A

    2013-08-01

    In many interventions that are based on an exercise program intended to induce weight loss, the mean weight loss observed is modest and sometimes far less than what the individual expected. The individual responses are also widely variable, with some individuals losing a substantial amount of weight, others maintaining weight, and a few actually gaining weight. The media have focused on the subpopulation that loses little weight, contributing to a public perception that exercise has limited utility to cause weight loss. The purpose of the symposium was to present recent, novel data that help explain how compensatory behaviors contribute to a wide discrepancy in exercise-induced weight loss. The presentations provide evidence that some individuals adopt compensatory behaviors, that is, increased energy intake and/or reduced activity, that offset the exercise energy expenditure and limit weight loss. The challenge for both scientists and clinicians is to develop effective tools to identify which individuals are susceptible to such behaviors and to develop strategies to minimize their effect.

  12. Exercise-Induced Pulmonary Edema in a Triathlon

    PubMed Central

    Yamanashi, Hirotomo; Koyamatsu, Jun; Nobuyoshi, Masaharu; Murase, Kunihiko; Maeda, Takahiro

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. Family physicians have more opportunities to attend athletic competitions as medical staff at first-aid centers because of the increasing popularity of endurance sports. Case. A 38-year-old man who participated in a triathlon race experienced difficulty in breathing after swimming and was moved to a first-aid center. His initial oxygen saturation was 82% and a thoracic computed tomography scan showed bilateral ground glass opacity in the peripheral lungs. His diagnosis was noncardiogenic pulmonary edema associated with exercise or swimming: exercise-induced pulmonary edema (EIPE) or swimming-induced pulmonary edema (SIPE). Treatment with furosemide and corticosteroid relieved his symptoms of pulmonary edema. Discussion. Noncardiogenic pulmonary edema associated with endurance sports is not common, but knowledge about EIPE/SIPE or neurogenic pulmonary edema associated with hyponatremia, which is called Ayus-Arieff syndrome, is crucial. Knowledge and caution for possible risk factors, such as exposure to cold water or overhydration, are essential for both medical staff and endurance athletes. Conclusion. To determine the presence of pulmonary edema associated with strenuous exercise, oxygen saturation should be used as a screening tool at a first-aid center. To avoid risks for EIPE/SIPE, knowledge about these diseases is essential for medical staff and for athletes who perform extreme exercise. PMID:26229538

  13. Resistance to exercise-induced weight loss: compensatory behavioral adaptations

    PubMed Central

    Melanson, Edward L.; Keadle, Sarah Kozey; Donnelly, Joseph E.; Braun, Barry; King, Neil A.

    2013-01-01

    In many interventions that are based on an exercise program intended to induce weight loss, the mean weight loss observed is modest and sometimes far less than the individual expected. The individual responses are also widely variable, with some individuals losing a substantial amount of weight, others maintaining weight, and a few actually gaining weight. The media have focused on the sub-population that loses little weight, contributing to a public perception that exercise has limited utility to cause weight loss. The purpose of the symposium was to present recent, novel data that help explain how compensatory behaviors contribute to a wide discrepancy in exercise-induced weight loss. The presentations provide evidence that some individuals adopt compensatory behaviors, i.e. increased energy intake and/or reduced activity, that offset the exercise energy expenditure and limit weight loss. The challenge for both scientists and clinicians is to develop effective tools to identify which individuals are susceptible to such behaviors, and to develop strategies to minimize their impact. PMID:23470300

  14. Human Invasive Muscular Sarcocystosis Induces Th2 Cytokine Polarization and Biphasic Cytokine Changes, Based on an Investigation among Travelers Returning from Tioman Island, Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Tappe, Dennis; Slesak, Günther; Pérez-Girón, José Vicente; Schäfer, Johannes; Langeheinecke, Andreas; Just-Nübling, Gudrun; Muñoz-Fontela, César; Püllmann, Kerstin

    2015-06-01

    Sarcocystis nesbitti is a parasite responsible for a biphasic eosinophilic febrile myositis syndrome in two recent outbreaks in Malaysia. We demonstrate Th2 cytokine polarization in infected travelers, an overall cytokine production decrease in the early phase of the disease suggestive of initial immunosuppression, and elevated levels of proinflammatory and chemotactic cytokines in the later myositic phase. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  15. Exercise-induced ROS in heat shock proteins response.

    PubMed

    Dimauro, Ivan; Mercatelli, Neri; Caporossi, Daniela

    2016-09-01

    Cells have evolved multiple and sophisticated stress response mechanisms aiming to prevent macromolecular (including proteins, lipids, and nucleic acids) damage and to maintain or re-establish cellular homeostasis. Heat shock proteins (HSPs) are among the most highly conserved, ubiquitous, and abundant proteins in all organisms. Originally discovered more than 50 years ago through heat shock stress, they display multiple, remarkable roles inside and outside cells under a variety of stresses, including also oxidative stress and radiation, recognizing unfolded or misfolded proteins and facilitating their restructuring. Exercise consists in a combination of physiological stresses, such as metabolic disturbances, changes in circulating levels of hormones, increased temperature, induction of mild to severe inflammatory state, increased production of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (ROS and RNS). As a consequence, exercise is one of the main stimuli associated with a robust increase in different HSPs in several tissues, which appears to be also fundamental in facilitating the cellular remodeling processes related to the training regime. Among all factors involved in the exercise-related modulation of HSPs level, the ROS production in the contracting muscle or in other tissues represents one of the most attracting, but still under discussion, mechanism. Following exhaustive or damaging muscle exercise, major oxidative damage to proteins and lipids is likely involved in HSP expression, together with mechanically induced damage to muscle proteins and the inflammatory response occurring several days into the recovery period. Instead, the transient and reversible oxidation of proteins by physiological concentrations of ROS seems to be involved in the activation of stress response following non-damaging muscle exercise. This review aims to provide a critical update on the role of HSPs response in exercise-induced adaptation or damage in humans, focusing on experimental

  16. Reported Exercise-Related Respiratory Symptoms and Exercise-Induced Bronchoconstriction in Asthmatic Children

    PubMed Central

    Inci, Demet; Guggenheim, Refoel; Altintas, Derya Ufuk; Wildhaber, Johannes H.; Moeller, Alexander

    2017-01-01

    Background Unlimited physical activity is one of the key issues of asthma control and management. We investigated how reliable reported exercise-related respiratory symptoms (ERRS) are in predicting exercise-induced bronchoconstriction (EIB) in asthmatic children. Methods In this prospective study, 179 asthmatic children aged 7 - 15 years were asked for specific questions on respiratory symptoms related to exercise and allocated into two groups according to whether they complained about symptoms. Group I (n = 134) consisted of children answering “yes” to one or more of the questions and group II (n = 45) consisted of children answering “no” to all of the questions. Results Sixty-four of 179 children showed a positive exercise challenge test (ECT). There was no difference in the frequency of a positive test between children in group I (n = 48) and group II (n = 12) (P = 0.47). The sensitivity of a positive report for ERRS to predict a positive ECT was only 37%, with a specificity of 0.72. Conclusion According to current guidelines, the report or lack of ERRS has direct consequences on treatment decisions. However, the history of ERRS did not predict EIB and one-third of asthmatic children without complaints of ERRS developed EIB during the ECT. This raises the question of the need for objective measures of bronchial hyperresponsiveness (BHR) in pediatric asthma management. PMID:28392861

  17. Airway smooth muscle in exercise-induced bronchospasm: some speculations.

    PubMed

    Middleton, E

    1975-11-01

    Some possible neurophysiological, biochemical, and pharmacological pathways affecting the state of contractility if airway smooth muscle in exercise-induced bronchospasm (EIB) are described. No unifying hypothesis can be set forth at this time. Indeed, it is likely that the heterogeneous nature of EIB is a reflection of the numerous biochemical loci in smooth muscle cells that could be affected by the various metabolic changes accompanying heavy exertion.

  18. Extreme sports: extreme physiology. Exercise-induced pulmonary oedema.

    PubMed

    Ma, Joyce Lok Gee; Dutch, Martin John

    2013-08-01

    We report five patients who presented to an on-site medical team with concurrent haemoptysis and shortness of breath at a recent triathlon event. After initial management in the field, three of the five patients were transported to hospital via ambulance for further management, resulting in patients with haemoptysis and dyspnoea being 17 times more likely to require hospital transport. It is important to consider the differential diagnoses for this presentation, particularly exercise-induced pulmonary oedema.

  19. Exercise-induced myokymia with congenital spinal stenosis.

    PubMed

    Colachis, S C; Bobulski, R J

    1991-10-01

    Myokymia and myokymic discharges are observed in a variety of neurologic conditions. An unusual case of myokymia induced by exercise and febrile illness presented in an 11-yr-old male with congenital spinal stenosis. Myokymia was not generalized, but occurred below the level of his umbilicus. We hypothesize that local spinal cord ischemia was the underlying mechanism for this rare phenomenon. The pathophysiology, clinical features and electrodiagnostic findings of myokymia are reviewed.

  20. Exercise Training Prevents Dexamethasone-induced Rarefaction.

    PubMed

    Herrera, Naiara A; Jesus, Isley; Dionísio, Evandro J; Dionísio, Thiago J; Santos, Carlos F; Amaral, Sandra L

    2017-09-01

    Dexamethasone (DEX) causes rarefaction. In contrast, training (T) prevents rarefaction and stimulates angiogenesis. This study investigated the mechanisms responsible for the preventive role of T in DEX-induced rarefaction. Rats underwent T or were kept sedentary (8 weeks) and were treated with DEX or saline during the following 14 days. Tibialis anterior muscle was used for measurements of capillary density (CD), capillary-to-fiber ratio (C:F ratio), superoxide dismutase CuZn (SOD-1), superoxide dismutase MnSOD (SOD-2), catalase (CAT) mRNA as well as SOD-1, SOD-2, CAT, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2 (VEGF-R2), cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2), Bd-2-like protein 4 (Bax), p-Bax, and caspase-3 cleaved protein levels. DEX decreased CD (-38.1%), C:F ratio (-30.0%), VEGF (-19.0%), VEGFR-2 (-20.1%), COX-2 (-22.8%), Bcl-2 (-20.5%), Bcl-2/Bax ratio (-13.7%), p-Bax/Bax (-20.0%) and increased SOD-2 (+41.6%) and caspase-3 cleaved (+24.1%). Conversely, T prevented reductions in CD (+54.2%), C:F ratio (+32.9%), VEGF (+25.3%), VEGFR-2 (+22.2%), COX-2 (+31.5%), Bcl-2 (+35.5%), Bcl-2/Bax ratio (+19.9%), p-Bax/Bax (+32.1%), and caspase-3 cleaved increase (-7.8%). T increased CAT mRNA (+21.5%) in the DEX-treated group. In conclusion, T prevented the DEX-induced rarefaction by increasing antioxidant enzymes resulting in a better balance between apoptotic and anti-apoptotic protein levels.

  1. Exercise-induced suppression of acylated ghrelin in humans.

    PubMed

    Broom, D R; Stensel, D J; Bishop, N C; Burns, S F; Miyashita, M

    2007-06-01

    Ghrelin is an orexigenic hormone secreted from endocrine cells in the stomach and other tissues. Acylation of ghrelin is essential for appetite regulation. Vigorous exercise induces appetite suppression, but this does not appear to be related to suppressed concentrations of total ghrelin. This study examined the effect of exercise and feeding on plasma acylated ghrelin and appetite. Nine male subjects aged 19-25 yr participated in two, 9-h trials (exercise and control) in a random crossover design. Trials began at 0800 in the morning after an overnight fast. In the exercise trial, subjects ran for 60 min at 72% of maximum oxygen uptake between 0800 and 0900. After this, they rested for 8 h and consumed a test meal at 1100. In the control trial, subjects rested for 9 h and consumed a test meal at 1100. Area under the curve values for plasma acylated ghrelin concentration (assessed from venous blood samples) were lower over the first 3 h and the full 9 h of the exercise trial compared with the control trial: 317+/-135 vs. 510+/-186 pg.ml(-1).3 h and 917+/-342 vs. 1,401+/-521 pg.ml(-1).9 h (means+/-SE) respectively (P<0.05). Area under the curve values for hunger (assessed using a visual scale) were lower over the first 3 h of the exercise trial compared with the control trial (P=0.013). These findings demonstrate that plasma acylated ghrelin concentration and hunger are suppressed during running.

  2. Complete Reversion of Cardiac Functional Adaptation Induced by Exercise Training.

    PubMed

    Oláh, Attila; Kellermayer, Dalma; Mátyás, Csaba; Németh, Balázs Tamás; Lux, Árpád; Szabó, Lilla; Török, Marianna; Ruppert, Mihály; Meltzer, Anna; Sayour, Alex Ali; Benke, Kálmán; Hartyánszky, István; Merkely, Béla; Radovits, Tamás

    2017-03-01

    Long-term exercise training is associated with characteristic cardiac adaptation, termed athlete's heart. Our research group previously characterized in vivo left ventricular (LV) function of exercise-induced cardiac hypertrophy in detail in a rat model; however, the effect of detraining on LV function is still unclear. We aimed at evaluating the reversibility of functional alterations of athlete's heart after detraining. Rats (n = 16) were divided into detrained exercised (DEx) and detrained control (DCo) groups. Trained rats swam 200 min·d for 12 wk, and control rats were taken into water for 5 min·d. After the training period, both groups remained sedentary for 8 wk. We performed echocardiography at weeks 12 and 20 to investigate the development and regression of exercise-induced structural changes. LV pressure-volume analysis was performed to calculate cardiac functional parameters. LV samples were harvested for histological examination. Echocardiography showed robust LV hypertrophy after completing the training protocol (LV mass index = 2.61 ± 0.08 DEx vs 2.04 ± 0.04 g·kg DCo, P < 0.05). This adaptation regressed after detraining (LV mass index = 2.01 ± 0.03 vs 1.97 ± 0.05 g·kg, n.s.), which was confirmed by postmortem measured heart weight and histological morphometry. After the 8-wk-long detraining period, a regression of the previously described exercise-induced cardiac functional alterations was observed (DEx vs DCo): stroke volume (SV; 144.8 ± 9.0 vs 143.9 ± 9.6 μL, P = 0.949), active relaxation (τ = 11.5 ± 0.3 vs 11.3 ± 0.4 ms, P = 0.760), contractility (preload recruitable stroke work = 69.5 ± 2.7 vs 70.9 ± 2.4 mm Hg, P = 0.709), and mechanoenergetic (mechanical efficiency = 68.7 ± 1.2 vs 69.4 ± 1.8, P = 0.742) enhancement reverted completely to control values. Myocardial stiffness remained unchanged; moreover, no fibrosis was observed after the detraining period. Functional consequences of exercise-induced physiological LV hypertrophy

  3. Thyroid hormone and estrogen regulate exercise-induced growth hormone release.

    PubMed

    Ignacio, Daniele Leão; da S Silvestre, Diego H; Cavalcanti-de-Albuquerque, João Paulo Albuquerque; Louzada, Ruy Andrade; Carvalho, Denise P; Werneck-de-Castro, João Pedro

    2015-01-01

    Growth hormone (GH) regulates whole body metabolism, and physical exercise is the most potent stimulus to induce its secretion in humans. The mechanisms underlying GH secretion after exercise remain to be defined. The aim of this study was to elucidate the role of estrogen and pituitary type 1 deiodinase (D1) activation on exercise-induced GH secretion. Ten days after bilateral ovariectomy, animals were submitted to 20 min of treadmill exercise at 75% of maximum aerobic capacity and tissues were harvested immediately or 30 min after exercise. Non-exercised animals were used as controls. A significant increase in D1 activity occurred immediately after exercise (~60%) in sham-operated animals and GH was higher (~6-fold) 30 min after exercise. Estrogen deficient rats exhibited basal levels of GH and D1 activity comparable to those found in control rats. However, after exercise both D1 activity and serum GH levels were blunted compared to sedentary rats. To understand the potential cause-effect of D1 activation in exercise-induced GH release, we pharmacologically blocked D1 activity by propylthiouracil (PTU) injection into intact rats and submitted them to the acute exercise session. D1 inhibition blocked exercise-induced GH secretion, although basal levels were unaltered. In conclusion, estrogen deficiency impairs the induction of thyroid hormone activating enzyme D1 in the pituitary, and GH release by acute exercise. Also, acute D1 activation is essential for exercise-induced GH response.

  4. Thyroid Hormone and Estrogen Regulate Exercise-Induced Growth Hormone Release

    PubMed Central

    Ignacio, Daniele Leão; da S. Silvestre, Diego H.; Cavalcanti-de-Albuquerque, João Paulo Albuquerque; Louzada, Ruy Andrade

    2015-01-01

    Growth hormone (GH) regulates whole body metabolism, and physical exercise is the most potent stimulus to induce its secretion in humans. The mechanisms underlying GH secretion after exercise remain to be defined. The aim of this study was to elucidate the role of estrogen and pituitary type 1 deiodinase (D1) activation on exercise-induced GH secretion. Ten days after bilateral ovariectomy, animals were submitted to 20 min of treadmill exercise at 75% of maximum aerobic capacity and tissues were harvested immediately or 30 min after exercise. Non-exercised animals were used as controls. A significant increase in D1 activity occurred immediately after exercise (~60%) in sham-operated animals and GH was higher (~6-fold) 30 min after exercise. Estrogen deficient rats exhibited basal levels of GH and D1 activity comparable to those found in control rats. However, after exercise both D1 activity and serum GH levels were blunted compared to sedentary rats. To understand the potential cause-effect of D1 activation in exercise-induced GH release, we pharmacologically blocked D1 activity by propylthiouracil (PTU) injection into intact rats and submitted them to the acute exercise session. D1 inhibition blocked exercise-induced GH secretion, although basal levels were unaltered. In conclusion, estrogen deficiency impairs the induction of thyroid hormone activating enzyme D1 in the pituitary, and GH release by acute exercise. Also, acute D1 activation is essential for exercise-induced GH response. PMID:25874614

  5. Exploring the Relationship between Exercise-Induced Arousal and Cognition Using Fractionated Response Time

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chang, Yu-Kai; Etnier, Jennifer L.; Barella, Lisa A.

    2009-01-01

    Although a generally positive effect of acute exercise on cognitive performance has been demonstrated, the specific nature of the relationship between exercise-induced arousal and cognitive performance remains unclear. This study was designed to identify the relationship between exercise-induced arousal and cognitive performance for the central…

  6. Effects of nedocromil sodium, cromolyn sodium, and a placebo in exercise-induced asthma.

    PubMed

    Morton, A R; Ogle, S L; Fitch, K D

    1992-02-01

    The incidence and severity of exercise-induced asthma were determined in nineteen asthmatic patients who performed eight minutes of exercise following four treatments administered in a random order. The treatments were nedocromil sodium, cromolyn sodium, placebo, and no treatment. It was concluded that nedocromil sodium (8 mg) and cromolyn sodium (4 mg) provide equal protection against exercise-induced asthma.

  7. Exploring the Relationship between Exercise-Induced Arousal and Cognition Using Fractionated Response Time

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chang, Yu-Kai; Etnier, Jennifer L.; Barella, Lisa A.

    2009-01-01

    Although a generally positive effect of acute exercise on cognitive performance has been demonstrated, the specific nature of the relationship between exercise-induced arousal and cognitive performance remains unclear. This study was designed to identify the relationship between exercise-induced arousal and cognitive performance for the central…

  8. Lycium barbarum Polysaccharides Reduce Exercise-Induced Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Shan, Xiaozhong; Zhou, Junlai; Ma, Tao; Chai, Qiongxia

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate the effects of Lycium barbarum polysaccharides (LBP) on exercise-induced oxidative stress in rats. Rats were divided into four groups, i.e., one control group and three LBP treated groups. The animals received an oral administration of physiological saline or LBP (100, 200 and 400 mg/kg body weight) for 28 days. On the day of the exercise test, rats were required to run to exhaustion on the treadmill. Body weight, endurance time, malondialdehyde (MDA), super oxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione peroxidase (GPX) level of rats were measured. The results showed that the body weight of rats in LBP treated groups were not significantly different from that in the normal control group before and after the experiment (P > 0.05). After exhaustive exercise, the mean endurance time of treadmill running to exhaustion of rats in LBP treated groups were significantly prolonged compared with that in the normal control group. MDA levels of rats in LBP treated groups were significantly decreased compared with that in the normal control group (P < 0.05). SOD and GPX levels of rats in LBP treated groups were significantly increased compared with that in the normal control group (P < 0.05). Together, these results indicate that LBP was effective in preventing oxidative stress after exhaustive exercise. PMID:21541044

  9. Exercise-inducible factors to activate lipolysis in adipocytes.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Takeshi; Sato, Koji; Iemitsu, Motoyuki

    2013-07-15

    We examined the effects of exercise training on the levels of lipid droplet (LD)-associated and mitochondria-related proteins in diet-induced obese (DIO) rats. Furthermore, we assessed putative factors induced by exercise to activate lipolysis in differentiated 3T3-L1 adipocytes. DIO Wistar male rats (age 20 wk) were divided into sedentary control (SED, n = 7) and exercise training (EX, n = 7) groups. EX animals were subjected to treadmill running (25 m/min, 1 h/day, 5 days/wk) for 6 wk. Epididymal fat was dissected and used for protein analyses. 3T3-L1 adipocytes were incubated with media containing hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), sodium-lactate, caffeine, AICAR, or SNAP (NO donor) for 6 h, or 1 mM H2O2 for 15 min, followed by incubation with normal media for up to 24 h total. Protein expression levels and lipolytic activities were biochemically assayed. Epididymal fat significantly decreased in EX animals compared with SED animals. Levels of cytochrome c oxidase (COx), perilipin, hormone sensitive lipase (HSL), and adipose triglyceride lipase (ATGL) proteins in epididymal fat pads of EX animals were significantly increased compared with those in SED animals. In 3T3-L1 cells, glycerol or fatty acid release was significantly increased by all treatments. Lactate or SNAP significantly increased PGC-1α expression, and H2O2 significantly increased COx protein levels compared with controls. Expression of perilipin, HSL, ATGL, or comparative gene identification (CGI)-58 was significantly increased by all treatments. By increasing lipolytic activity in adipocytes, the exercise-inducible factors are attractive therapeutic effectors against LD-associated metabolic diseases.

  10. Exercise prevents cardiometabolic alterations induced by chronic use of glucocorticoids.

    PubMed

    Pinheiro, Carlos Hermano da Justa; Sousa Filho, Wilson Martins de; Oliveira Neto, Joselito de; Marinho, Maria de Jesus Ferreira; Motta Neto, Renato; Smith, Manuela Maria Ramos Lima; Silva, Carlos Antônio Bruno da

    2009-10-01

    Chronically, glucocorticoids induce adverse cardiometabolic alterations including insulin resistance, diabetes, dyslipidemia, liver steatosis and arterial hypertension. To evaluate the effect of regular practice of aerobic exercise on cardiometabolic alterations induced by chronic administration of dexamethasone (Dex - 0.5 mg/kg/day ip) in rats. Male Wistar rats (n = 24) were divided in four groups: Control group; Trained group; Treated with Dex group and Treated with Dex and trained group. The exercise training (initiated 72 hours after the first dose of Dex) was carried out three times a week until the end of the treatment. At the end of this period, the following biochemical assessments were performed: fasting glycemia, oral glucose tolerance test and analysis of the blood lipid profile that included total cholesterol (TC), LDL-c, HDL-c, VLDL-c and triglycerides (TG). The weight of the gastrocnemius muscle, the histopathological analysis of the liver and cardiometabolic indices (TC/HDL-c, LDL-c/HDL-c and TG/HDL-c) were also performed. Hyperglycemia, lower glucose tolerance, increased TC, LDL-c, VLDL-c, TG, CT/HDL-c, LDL-c/HDL-c and TG/HDL-c, decreased HDL-c, presence of liver steatosis and muscular hypotrophy were observed in the animals treated with Dex. The exercise training reduced hyperglycemia, improved glucose tolerance, decreased dyslipidemia and prevented liver steatosis, muscular hypotrophy and reduced CT/HDL-c, LDL-c/HDL-c and TG/HDL-c ratios. However, there was no significant effect on HDL-c. The aerobic exercise training have a protective effect against the cardiometabolic alterations induced by the chronic use of glucocorticoids.

  11. Exercise-induced bronchoconstriction and atopy in Tunisian athletes

    PubMed Central

    Sallaoui, Ridha; Chamari, Karim; Mossa, Abbas; Tabka, Zouhair; Chtara, Moktar; Feki, Youssef; Amri, Mohamed

    2009-01-01

    Background This study is a cross sectional analysis, aiming to evaluate if atopy is as a risk factor for exercise induced bronchoconstriction (EIB) among Tunisian athletes. Methods Atopy was defined by a skin prick test result and EIB was defined as a decrease of at least 15% in forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1) after 8-min running at 80–85% HRmaxTheo. The study population was composed of 326 athletes (age: 20.8 ± 2.7 yrs – mean ± SD; 138 women and 188 men) of whom 107 were elite athletes. Results Atopy was found in 26.9% (88/326) of the athletes. Post exercise spirometry revealed the presence of EIB in 9.8% of the athletes including 13% of the elite athletes. Frequency of atopy in athletes with EIB was significantly higher than in athletes without EIB [62.5% vs 23.1%, respectively]. Conclusion This study showed that atopic Tunisian athletes presented a higher risk of developing exercise induced bronchoconstriction than non-atopic athletes. PMID:19196480

  12. Acute exercise-induced bilateral thigh compartment syndrome.

    PubMed

    Boland, Michael R; Heck, Chris

    2009-03-01

    Acute compartment syndrome of the thigh is rare due to the space's ability to accommodate large volumes of fluid and, with the exception of the lateral septum, its thin compliant linings. This article describes a case of bilateral exercise-induced severe compartment syndrome treated with anterior and posterior fasciotomies. A 29-year-old man was admitted to intensive care with myoglobinuria. His left thigh was evaluated 18 hours later for compartment syndrome. The patient reported that 14 hours prior to initial presentation, he had participated in a 1-hour session of vigorous basketball. He gradually developed bilateral moderately severe thigh pain and tea-colored urine. Physical examination revealed pain secondary to passive stretch of both knees at 20 degrees flexion, plus firm anterior and posterior compartments to palpation. A handheld pressure monitor revealed the following compartment pressures: left anterior 80 mm Hg; left posterior 75 mm Hg; right anterior 45 mm Hg; and right posterior 50 mm Hg. Bilateral emergent anterior and posterior compartment fasciotomies were performed. The patient developed a significant severe distal motor and sensory neurological deficit on the left side, which recovered to 3/5 motor strength and protective sensation. At 6-month follow-up, he ambulated with the assistance of a left ankle foot orthosis. Acute severe compartment syndrome can occur following vigorous exercise. We recommend fasciotomies after exercise-induced acute compartment syndrome rather than initial observation because of the severity of morbidity associated with undertreated compartment syndrome.

  13. Exercise-induced bronchoconstriction and atopy in Tunisian athletes.

    PubMed

    Sallaoui, Ridha; Chamari, Karim; Mossa, Abbas; Tabka, Zouhair; Chtara, Moktar; Feki, Youssef; Amri, Mohamed

    2009-02-05

    This study is a cross sectional analysis, aiming to evaluate if atopy is as a risk factor for exercise induced bronchoconstriction (EIB) among Tunisian athletes. Atopy was defined by a skin prick test result and EIB was defined as a decrease of at least 15% in forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1) after 8-min running at 80-85% HRmaxTheo. The study population was composed of 326 athletes (age: 20.8 +/- 2.7 yrs - mean +/- SD; 138 women and 188 men) of whom 107 were elite athletes. Atopy was found in 26.9% (88/326) of the athletes. Post exercise spirometry revealed the presence of EIB in 9.8% of the athletes including 13% of the elite athletes. Frequency of atopy in athletes with EIB was significantly higher than in athletes without EIB [62.5% vs 23.1%, respectively]. This study showed that atopic Tunisian athletes presented a higher risk of developing exercise induced bronchoconstriction than non-atopic athletes.

  14. Exercise-Induced Vasculitis: A Review with Illustrated Cases.

    PubMed

    Espitia, Olivier; Dréno, Brigitte; Cassagnau, Elisabeth; Didier, Quentin; Quillard, Thibaut; Nicol, Christelle; Le Bouch, Yann; Planchon, Bernard; Pistorius, Marc-Antoine

    2016-12-01

    Although exercise-induced vasculitis (EIV) is usually misdiagnosed, it is not uncommon. Occurring mostly after prolonged exercise, especially in hot weather, EIV is an isolated cutaneous vasculitis with stereotypical presentation. This article reviews the clinical characteristics, treatments, and outcomes of EIV based on the published literature. We report 99 patients who developed EIV after walking, dancing, swimming, or hiking especially during hot weather, including the records of 16 patients with EIV treated at our hospital from 2007 to 2015. Erythematous or purpuric plaques arise on the lower legs, without the involvement of compression socks or stockings. Symptoms include itch, pain, and a burning sensation. EIV is an isolated cutaneous vasculitis. Lesions resolve spontaneously after 10 days. When triggering conditions persist, relapses are frequent (77.5 %). Histopathology demonstrates leukocytoclastic vasculitis in 95 % of cases with C3 or immunoglobulin M deposits in 88 and 46 % of cases, respectively. Blood investigations are negative. EIV appears to be a consequence of venous stasis induced by an acute failure of the muscle pump of the calf and thermoregulation decompensation. Both appear after prolonged and unusual exercise in hot weather. Treatment is not codified; topical corticosteroids may reduce symptoms and wearing light clothes might limit lesion occurrence.

  15. Exercise-Induced growth hormone during acute sleep deprivation.

    PubMed

    Ritsche, Kevin; Nindl, Bradly C; Wideman, Laurie

    2014-10-01

    The effect of acute (24-h) sleep deprivation on exercise-induced growth hormone (GH) and insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) was examined. Ten men (20.6 ± 1.4 years) completed two randomized 24-h sessions including a brief, high-intensity exercise bout following either a night of sleep (SLEEP) or (24-h) sleep deprivation (SLD). Anaerobic performance (mean power [MP], peak power [PP], minimum power [MinP], time to peak power [TTPP], fatigue index, [FI]) and total work per sprint [TWPS]) was determined from four maximal 30-sec Wingate sprints on a cycle ergometer. Self-reported sleep 7 days prior to each session was similar between SLEEP and SLD sessions (7.92 ± 0.33 vs. 7.98 ± 0.39 h, P = 0.656, respectively) and during the actual SLEEP session in the lab, the total amount of sleep was similar to the 7 days leading up to the lab session (7.72 ± 0.14 h vs. 7.92 ± 0.33 h, respectively) (P = 0.166). No differences existed in MP, PP, MinP, TTPP, FI, TWPS, resting GH concentrations, time to reach exercise-induced peak GH concentration (TTP), or free IGF-1 between sessions. GH area under the curve (AUC) (825.0 ± 199.8 vs. 2212.9 ± 441.9 μg/L*min, P < 0.01), exercise-induced peak GH concentration (17.8 ± 3.7 vs. 39.6 ± 7.1 μg/L, P < 0.01) and ΔGH (peak GH - resting GH) (17.2 ± 3.7 vs. 38.2 ± 7.3 μg/L, P < 0.01) were significantly lower during the SLEEP versus SLD session. Our results indicate that the exercise-induced GH response was significantly augmented in sleep-deprived individuals.

  16. Exercise-induced bronchospasm, asthma control, and obesity.

    PubMed

    Ostrom, Nancy K; Parsons, Jonathan P; Eid, Nemr S; Craig, Timothy J; Stoloff, Stuart; Hayden, Mary Lou; Colice, Gene L

    2013-01-01

    Exercise-induced bronchospasm (EIB) commonly affects patients with asthma. However, the relationship between EIB and asthma control remains unclear. Exercise limitation due to asthma might lead to reduced physical activity, but little information is available regarding obesity and EIB in asthma. A recent survey evaluated the frequency of EIB and exercise-related respiratory symptoms in a large number of patients with asthma. The survey results were reanalyzed to address any relationship between EIB and asthma control and obesity. A nationwide random sample of children aged 4-12 years (n = 250), adolescents aged 13-17 years (n = 266), and adults aged ≥18 years (n = 1001) with asthma were interviewed by telephone. Questions in the survey addressed asthma symptoms in general, medication use, and height and weight. Asthma control was categorized using established methods in the Expert Panel Report 3. Body mass index (BMI) was calculated using standard nomograms and obesity was defined as a BMI ≥ 30 kg/m(2). Most children (77.6%), adolescents (71.1%), and adults (83.1%) had either "not well" or "very poorly" controlled asthma. Children with "not well" controlled asthma reported a history of EIB significantly more often than those with "well" controlled" asthma. Asthma patients of all ages who had "not well" and "very poorly" controlled asthma described multiple (four or more) exercise-related respiratory symptoms significantly more often than those with "well-controlled" asthma. Obesity was significantly more common in adolescents with "not well" and "very poorly" controlled asthma and adults with "very poorly" controlled asthma. Children, adolescents, and adults with asthma infrequently have well-controlled disease. A history of EIB and exercise-related respiratory symptoms occur more commonly in patients with not well and very poorly controlled asthma. Obesity was found more often in adolescents and adults, but not children, with asthma, which was not well and

  17. Exercises

    MedlinePlus

    ... COPD: Overview COPD: Lifestyle Management COPD: Exercises COPD: Exercises Make an Appointment Refer a Patient Ask a ... lifelong activity you enjoy. Medication to Help You Exercise People with COPD often use inhaled short acting ...

  18. Exercises

    MedlinePlus

    ... Disease (COPD) COPD: Overview COPD: Lifestyle Management Exercises Exercises Make an Appointment Refer a Patient Ask a ... lifelong activity you enjoy. Medication to Help You Exercise People with COPD often use inhaled short acting ...

  19. Abolition of exercise induced ST depression after exercise training and its recurrence after beta blockade.

    PubMed Central

    Todd, I C; McGuinness, J B; Ballantyne, D

    1988-01-01

    Exercise training can improve angina. A patient whose exercise tolerance test became normal after a year on an exercise programme nevertheless had a positive exercise test when he was taking a beta blocker. These results suggest that it may be undesirable to use beta blockers in patients with angina who are on exercise programmes. Images Fig 1 Fig 2 PMID:3342165

  20. Blood Flow After Exercise-Induced Muscle Damage

    PubMed Central

    Selkow, Noelle M.; Herman, Daniel C.; Liu, Zhenqi; Hertel, Jay; Hart, Joseph M.; Saliba, Susan A.

    2015-01-01

    Context: The most common modality used to address acute inflammation is cryotherapy. Whereas pain decreases with cryotherapy, evidence that changes occur in perfusion of skeletal muscle is limited. We do not know whether ice attenuates the increases in perfusion associated with acute inflammation. Objective: To examine the effects of repeated applications of ice bags on perfusion of the gastrocnemius muscle after an eccentric exercise protocol. Design: Controlled laboratory study. Setting: Laboratory. Patients or Other Participants: Eighteen healthy participants (3 men, 15 women; age = 22.2 ± 2.2 years, height = 166.0 ± 11.9 cm, mass = 69.4 ± 25.0 kg). Intervention(s): To induce eccentric muscle damage, participants performed 100 unilateral heel-lowering exercises off a step to the beat of a metronome. A randomized intervention (cryotherapy, sham, control) was applied to the exercised lower extremity immediately after the protocol and again at 10, 24, and 34 hours after the protocol. Main Outcome Measure(s): Baseline perfusion measurements (blood volume, blood flow, and blood flow velocity) were taken using contrast-enhanced ultrasound of the exercised leg. Perfusion was reassessed after the first intervention and 48 hours after the protocol as percentage change scores. Pain was measured with a visual analog scale at baseline and at 10, 24, 34, and 48 hours after the protocol. Separate repeated-measures analyses of variance were used to assess each dependent variable. Results: We found no interactions among interventions for microvascular perfusion. Blood volume and blood flow, however, increased in all conditions at 48 hours after exercise (P < .001), and blood flow velocity decreased postintervention from baseline (P = .041). We found a time-by-intervention interaction for pain (P = .009). Visual analog scale scores were lower for the cryotherapy group than for the control group at 34 and 48 hours after exercise. Conclusions: Whereas eccentric muscle damage

  1. A 45-Year-Old Man With Recurrent Dyspnea and Hemoptysis during Exercise: Exercise-Induced Pulmonary Hemorrhage/Edema

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Dae Sung; Lee, Minhyeok; Kwon, Oh Jung; Jeong, Inbeom; Son, Ji Woong; Na, Moon Jun

    2015-01-01

    A 45-year-old man presented with dyspnea and hemoptysis during exercise. A chest computed tomography (CT) revealed multifocal diffuse patchy ground glass opacity and interlobular septal thickening in both the lungs. Permeability pulmonary edema or pulmonary hemorrhage was suspected. Serologic studies for autoimmune disorders and vasculitis were negative. There was no laboratory evidence of coagulopathy, other hematopoietic disease or infectious disease. Considering correlation with exercise, we diagnosed exercise-induced pulmonary hemorrhage (EIPH) or exercise-induced pulmonary edema (EIPE). The patient was managed with antifibrinolytics, antibiotics, and antitussive agent. After a week, follow-up chest CT revealed completely resolved pulmonary hemorrhage. About 2 months after the first event, he visited again with dyspnea and hemoptysis during running. In the present study, we report a case of recurrent pulmonary hemorrhage after exercise. PMID:26508928

  2. Pre-Exercise Hyperpnea Attenuates Exercise-Induced Bronchoconstriction Without Affecting Performance.

    PubMed

    Eichenberger, Philipp A; Scherer, Thomas A; Spengler, Christina M

    2016-01-01

    Whole-body warm-up exercises were shown to attenuate exercise-induced bronchoconstriction (EIB). Whether intense pre-exercise hyperpnea offers similar protection and whether this might negatively affect exercise performance is unknown. Nine subjects with EIB (25±5 yrs; forced expiratory volume in 1s [FEV1], 104±15% predicted) performed an exercise challenge (ECh) followed-after 30min-by a constant-load cycling test to exhaustion. The ECh was preceded by one of four conditions: by i) control warm-up (CON) or by 10min of normocapnic hyperpnea with partial rebreathing at either ii) 50% (WU50) or iii) variable intensity (8x 30s-80%/45s-30%; WU80/30), or at iv) 70% (WU70) of maximal voluntary ventilation. FEV1 was measured at baseline and in 5-min intervals until 15min after CON/warm-up and 30min after ECh. None of the warm-up conditions induced EIB. The maximal post-ECh decrease in FEV1 was -13.8±3.1% after CON, -9.3±5.0% after WU50 (p = 0.081 vs. CON), -8.6±7.5% after WU80/30 (p = 0.081 vs. CON) and -7.2±5.0% after WU70 (p = 0.006 vs. CON), and perception of respiratory exertion was significantly attenuated (all p≤0.048), with no difference between warm-up conditions. Only after CON, FEV1 remained significantly reduced up to the start of the cycling endurance test (-8.0±4.3%, p = 0.004). Cycling performance did not differ significantly between test days (CON: 13±7min; WU50: 14±9min; WU80/30: 13±9min; WU70: 14±7min; p = 0.582). These data indicate that intense hyperpnea warm-up is effective in attenuating EIB severity and accelerating lung function recovery while none of the warm-up condition do compromise cycling performance.

  3. Pre-Exercise Hyperpnea Attenuates Exercise-Induced Bronchoconstriction Without Affecting Performance

    PubMed Central

    Eichenberger, Philipp A.; Scherer, Thomas A.; Spengler, Christina M.

    2016-01-01

    Whole-body warm-up exercises were shown to attenuate exercise-induced bronchoconstriction (EIB). Whether intense pre-exercise hyperpnea offers similar protection and whether this might negatively affect exercise performance is unknown. Nine subjects with EIB (25±5 yrs; forced expiratory volume in 1s [FEV1], 104±15% predicted) performed an exercise challenge (ECh) followed—after 30min—by a constant-load cycling test to exhaustion. The ECh was preceded by one of four conditions: by i) control warm-up (CON) or by 10min of normocapnic hyperpnea with partial rebreathing at either ii) 50% (WU50) or iii) variable intensity (8x 30s-80%/45s-30%; WU80/30), or at iv) 70% (WU70) of maximal voluntary ventilation. FEV1 was measured at baseline and in 5-min intervals until 15min after CON/warm-up and 30min after ECh. None of the warm-up conditions induced EIB. The maximal post-ECh decrease in FEV1 was -13.8±3.1% after CON, −9.3±5.0% after WU50 (p = 0.081 vs. CON), −8.6±7.5% after WU80/30 (p = 0.081 vs. CON) and −7.2±5.0% after WU70 (p = 0.006 vs. CON), and perception of respiratory exertion was significantly attenuated (all p≤0.048), with no difference between warm-up conditions. Only after CON, FEV1 remained significantly reduced up to the start of the cycling endurance test (−8.0±4.3%, p = 0.004). Cycling performance did not differ significantly between test days (CON: 13±7min; WU50: 14±9min; WU80/30: 13±9min; WU70: 14±7min; p = 0.582). These data indicate that intense hyperpnea warm-up is effective in attenuating EIB severity and accelerating lung function recovery while none of the warm-up condition do compromise cycling performance. PMID:27898744

  4. Exercise-Induced Hypoxaemia Developed at Sea-Level Influences Responses to Exercise at Moderate Altitude.

    PubMed

    Gaston, Anne-Fleur; Durand, Fabienne; Roca, Emma; Doucende, Grégory; Hapkova, Ilona; Subirats, Enric

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of exercise-induced hypoxaemia (EIH) developed at sea-level on exercise responses at moderate acute altitude. Twenty three subjects divided in three groups of individuals: highly trained with EIH (n = 7); highly trained without EIH (n = 8) and untrained participants (n = 8) performed two maximal incremental tests at sea-level and at 2,150 m. Haemoglobin O2 saturation (SpO2), heart rate, oxygen uptake (VO2) and several ventilatory parameters were measured continuously during the tests. EIH athletes had a drop in SpO2 from 99 ± 0.8% to 91 ± 1.2% from rest to maximal exercise at sea-level, while the other groups did not exhibit a similar decrease. EIH athletes had a greater decrease in VO2max at altitude compared to non-EIH and untrained groups (-22 ± 7.9%, -16 ± 5.3% and -13 ± 9.4%, respectively). At altitude, non-EIH athletes had a similar drop in SpO2 as EIH athletes (13 ± 0.8%) but greater than untrained participants (6 ± 1.0%). EIH athletes showed greater decrease in maximal heart rate than non-EIH athletes at altitude (8 ± 3.3 bpm and 5 ± 2.9 bpm, respectively). EIH athletes demonstrated specific cardiorespiratory response to exercise at moderate altitude compared to non-EIH athletes with a higher decrease in VO2max certainly due to the lower ventilator and HRmax responses. Thus EIH phenomenon developed at sea-level negatively impact performance and cardiorespiratory responses at acute moderate altitude despite no potentiated O2 desaturation.

  5. Ibuprofen intake increases exercise time to exhaustion: A possible role for preventing exercise-induced fatigue.

    PubMed

    Lima, F D; Stamm, D N; Della Pace, I D; Ribeiro, L R; Rambo, L M; Bresciani, G; Ferreira, J; Rossato, M F; Silva, M A; Pereira, M E; Ineu, R P; Santos, A R; Bobinski, F; Fighera, M R; Royes, L F F

    2016-10-01

    Although the intake of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) intake by athletes prevents soreness, little is known concerning their role in exercise performance. This study assessed the effects of ibuprofen intake on an exhaustive protocol test after 6 weeks of swimming training in rats. Animals were divided into sedentary and training groups. After training, animals were subdivided into two subsets: saline or ibuprofen. Afterwards, three repeated swimming bouts were performed by the groups. Ibuprofen (15 mg/kg) was administered once a day. Pain measurements were performed and inflammatory and oxidative stress parameters were assayed in cerebral cortex and gastrocnemius muscle. Training, ibuprofen administration, or both combined (P < 0.05; 211 ± 18s, 200 ± 31s, and 279 ± 23s) increased exercise time to exhaustion. Training decreased the acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity (P < 0.05; 149 ± 11) in cerebral cortex. Ibuprofen intake decreased the AChE activity after exhaustive protocol test in trained and sedentary rats (P < 0.05; 270 ± 60; 171 ± 38; and 273 ± 29). It also prevented neuronal tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and interleukin (IL 1β) increase. Fatigue elicited by this exhaustive protocol may involve disturbances of the central nervous system. Additive anti-inflammatory effects of exercise and ibuprofen intake support the hypothesis that this combination may constitute a more effective approach. In addition, ergogenic aids may be a useful means to prevent exercise-induced fatigue. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Exercise-Induced Hypoxaemia Developed at Sea-Level Influences Responses to Exercise at Moderate Altitude

    PubMed Central

    Gaston, Anne-Fleur; Durand, Fabienne; Roca, Emma; Doucende, Grégory; Hapkova, Ilona; Subirats, Enric

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of exercise-induced hypoxaemia (EIH) developed at sea-level on exercise responses at moderate acute altitude. Methods Twenty three subjects divided in three groups of individuals: highly trained with EIH (n = 7); highly trained without EIH (n = 8) and untrained participants (n = 8) performed two maximal incremental tests at sea-level and at 2,150 m. Haemoglobin O2 saturation (SpO2), heart rate, oxygen uptake (VO2) and several ventilatory parameters were measured continuously during the tests. Results EIH athletes had a drop in SpO2 from 99 ± 0.8% to 91 ± 1.2% from rest to maximal exercise at sea-level, while the other groups did not exhibit a similar decrease. EIH athletes had a greater decrease in VO2max at altitude compared to non-EIH and untrained groups (-22 ± 7.9%, -16 ± 5.3% and -13 ± 9.4%, respectively). At altitude, non-EIH athletes had a similar drop in SpO2 as EIH athletes (13 ± 0.8%) but greater than untrained participants (6 ± 1.0%). EIH athletes showed greater decrease in maximal heart rate than non-EIH athletes at altitude (8 ± 3.3 bpm and 5 ± 2.9 bpm, respectively). Conclusion EIH athletes demonstrated specific cardiorespiratory response to exercise at moderate altitude compared to non-EIH athletes with a higher decrease in VO2max certainly due to the lower ventilator and HRmax responses. Thus EIH phenomenon developed at sea-level negatively impact performance and cardiorespiratory responses at acute moderate altitude despite no potentiated O2 desaturation. PMID:27583364

  7. [Exercise-induced shear stress: Physiological basis and clinical impact].

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Núñez, Iván; Romero, Fernando; Saavedra, María Javiera

    2016-01-01

    The physiological regulation of vascular function is essential for cardiovascular health and depends on adequate control of molecular mechanisms triggered by endothelial cells in response to mechanical and chemical stimuli induced by blood flow. Endothelial dysfunction is one of the major risk factors for cardiovascular disease, where an imbalance between synthesis of vasodilator and vasoconstrictor molecules is one of its main mechanisms. In this context, the shear stress is one of the most important mechanical stimuli to improve vascular function, due to endothelial mechanotransduction, triggered by stimulation of various endothelial mechanosensors, induce signaling pathways culminating in increased bioavailability of vasodilators molecules such as nitric oxide, that finally trigger the angiogenic mechanisms. These mechanisms allow providing the physiological basis for the effects of exercise on vascular health. In this review it is discussed the molecular mechanisms involved in the vascular response induced by shear stress and its impact in reversing vascular injury associated with the most prevalent cardiovascular disease in our population.

  8. Effect of simulated weightlessness on exercise-induced anaerobic threshold

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Convertino, V. A.; Karst, G. M.; Kirby, C. R.; Goldwater, D. J.

    1986-01-01

    The effect of simulated weightlessness, induced by ten days of continuous bedrest (BR) in the -6 deg head-down position, on the exercise-induced anaerobic threshold (AT) was determined by comparing specific ventilatory and gas-exchange measurements during an incremental ergometer test performed before and after BR. The primary index for determining the exercise-induced AT values of each subject was visual identification of the workrate or oxygen uptake (VO2) at which the ratio of the expired minute ventilation volume (VE) to VO2 exhibited a systematic increase without a concomitant increase in the VE/VCO2 value. Following BR, the mean VO2max of the subjects decreased by 7.0 percent, and the AT decreased from a mean of 1.26 L/min VO2 before BR to 0.95 L/min VO2 after BR. The decrease in AT was manifested by a decrease in both absolute and relative workrates. The change in AT correlated significantly with the change in plasma volume but not with the change in VO2max. The results suggest that the reduction in AT cannot be completely explained by the reduction in VO2, and that the AT decrease is associated with the reduction in intravascular fluid volume.

  9. Dynamic aerobic exercise induces baroreflex improvement in diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Jorge, Luciana; da Pureza, Demilto Y; da Silva Dias, Danielle; Conti, Filipe Fernandes; Irigoyen, Maria-Cláudia; De Angelis, Kátia

    2012-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to investigate the effects of an acute aerobic exercise on arterial pressure (AP), heart rate (HR), and baroreflex sensitivity (BRS) in STZ-induced diabetic rats. Male Wistar rats were divided into control (n = 8) and diabetic (n = 8) groups. AP, HR, and BRS, which were measured by tachycardic and bradycardic (BR) responses to AP changes, were evaluated at rest (R) and postexercise session (PE) on a treadmill. At rest, STZ diabetes induced AP and HR reductions, associated with BR impairment. Attenuation in resting diabetes-induced AP (R: 103 ± 2 versus PE: 111 ± 3 mmHg) and HR (R: 290 ± 7 versus PE: 328 ± 10 bpm) reductions and BR dysfunction (R: -0.70 ± 0.06 versus PE: -1.21 ± 0.09 bpm/mmHg) was observed in the postexercise period. In conclusion, the hemodynamic and arterial baro-mediated control of circulation improvement in the postexercise period reinforces the role of exercise in the management of cardiovascular risk in diabetes.

  10. Dynamic Aerobic Exercise Induces Baroreflex Improvement in Diabetic Rats

    PubMed Central

    Jorge, Luciana; da Pureza, Demilto Y.; Dias, Danielle da Silva; Conti, Filipe Fernandes; Irigoyen, Maria-Cláudia; De Angelis, Kátia

    2012-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to investigate the effects of an acute aerobic exercise on arterial pressure (AP), heart rate (HR), and baroreflex sensitivity (BRS) in STZ-induced diabetic rats. Male Wistar rats were divided into control (n = 8) and diabetic (n = 8) groups. AP, HR, and BRS, which were measured by tachycardic and bradycardic (BR) responses to AP changes, were evaluated at rest (R) and postexercise session (PE) on a treadmill. At rest, STZ diabetes induced AP and HR reductions, associated with BR impairment. Attenuation in resting diabetes-induced AP (R: 103 ± 2 versus PE: 111 ± 3 mmHg) and HR (R: 290 ± 7 versus PE: 328 ± 10 bpm) reductions and BR dysfunction (R: −0.70 ± 0.06 versus PE: −1.21 ± 0.09 bpm/mmHg) was observed in the postexercise period. In conclusion, the hemodynamic and arterial baro-mediated control of circulation improvement in the postexercise period reinforces the role of exercise in the management of cardiovascular risk in diabetes. PMID:22203833

  11. Provocation by eucapnic voluntary hyperpnoea to identify exercise induced bronchoconstriction

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, S; Argyros, G; Magnussen, H; Holzer, K

    2001-01-01

    The International Olympic Committee Medical Commission (IOC-MC) requires notification for use of a ß2 agonist at the Winter Olympic Games in Salt Lake City. This notification will be required seven days before the event and must be accompanied by objective evidence that justifies the need to use one. The IOC-MC has expressed the viewpoint that, at present, eucapnic voluntary hyperpnoea (EVH) is the optimal laboratory challenge to confirm that an athlete has exercise induced bronchoconstriction (EIB). The EVH test recommended was specifically designed to identify EIB. EVH has been performed in thousands of subjects in both the laboratory and the field. The test requires the subject to hyperventilate dry air containing 5% carbon dioxide at room temperature for six minutes at a target ventilation of 30 times the subject's forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1). The test conditions can be modified to simulate the conditions that give the athlete their symptoms with exercise. A reduction in FEV1 of 10% or more of the value before the test is considered positive. Key Words: hyperpnoea; bronchial provocation; exercise PMID:11579071

  12. Exercise-induced effects on a gym atmosphere.

    PubMed

    Žitnik, M; Bučar, K; Hiti, B; Barba, Ž; Rupnik, Z; Založnik, A; Žitnik, E; Rodrìguez, L; Mihevc, I; Žibert, J

    2016-06-01

    We report results of analysis of a month-long measurement of indoor air and environment quality parameters in one gym during sporting activities such as football, basketball, volleyball, badminton, boxing, and fitness. We have determined an average single person's contribution to the increase of temperature, humidity, and dust concentration in the gym air volume of 12500 m(3) : during 90-min exercise performed at an average heart rate of 143 ± 10 bpm, a single person evaporated 0.94 kg of water into the air by sweating, contributed 0.03 K to the air temperature rise and added 1.5 μg/m(3) and 5 ng/m(3) to the indoor concentration of inhalable particles (PM10 ) and Ca concentration, respectively. As the breathing at the observed exercise intensity was about three times faster with respect to the resting condition and as the exercise-induced PM10 concentration was about two times larger than outdoors, a sportsman in the gym would receive about a sixfold higher dose of PM10 inside than he/she would have received at rest outside. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Exercise-induced anaphylaxis as a cause of syncope.

    PubMed

    Goldflam, Katja; Silvers, Christine Tsien

    2012-10-01

    Exercise-induced anaphylaxis (EIA) is an under-recognized condition that is a distinct physical allergy. Triggers include varying amounts of exercise, alone or in combination with certain foods or medications (food-dependent EIA, or FDEIA). Therapy is identical to that of any immunoglobulin E-mediated allergic reaction. This case is reported to increase awareness among emergency physicians of EIA and FDEIA. A 57-year-old man was found with a diffuse erythematous rash after eating a wheat bagel and walking up five flights of stairs. Emergency medical services found him hypotensive and combative. In the Emergency Department, the patient's blood pressure was 72/27 mm Hg, with an oxygen saturation of 97% on non-rebreather mask. The physical examination was notable for bilateral inspiratory crackles in the lower one-third of the lungs. He received intravenous (i.v.) diphenhydramine 25 mg, i.v. methylprednisolone 125 mg, and 1 L of normal saline, after which his blood pressure improved to 110/54 mm Hg. He was admitted to the hospital where his recovery was uneventful. EIA and FDEIA are uncommon forms of physical allergy, but they represent important entities for emergency physicians to consider. Recognition of the association with exercise is key, as recurrences can be prevented by avoiding triggers. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Sinusitis and chronic progressive exercise-induced cough and dyspnea.

    PubMed

    Williams, Adam N; Simon, Ronald A; Woessner, Katharine M

    2008-01-01

    We present the case of a 47-year-old man with exercise-induced dyspnea, cough, chest tightness, and recalcitrant chronic rhinosinusitis. Evaluation revealed IgE sensitization to grass, tree, and weed pollen, no evidence of obstruction on spirometry, and a negative methacholine challenge. Diagnostic considerations included allergic and nonallergic rhinitis, asthma, aspirin-exacerbated respiratory disease, vocal cord dysfunction, extra-esophageal manifestations of acid reflux, and vasculitits. Further evaluation with sinus imaging, laryngoscopy, ambulatory pharyngeal pH testing, upper endoscopy, and bronchoscopy led to a diagnosis. Key issues surrounding the diagnostic and therapeutic approaches to this patient's condition are reviewed.

  15. Exercise-induced increments in plasma levels of propranolol and noradrenaline.

    PubMed Central

    Hurwitz, G A; Webb, J G; Walle, T; Bai, S A; Daniell, H B; Gourley, L; Boyd Loadholt, C; Gaffney, T E

    1983-01-01

    Exercise-induced changes in the plasma levels of propranolol and noradrenaline were determined in nine volunteers. Total plasma propranolol levels were increased during submaximal treadmill exercise, with exercise-induced increments of 13 +/- 4% at 4 h after the last dose, 18 +/- 7% at 9 h and 41 +/- 5% at 16 h. Exercise-induced increments in plasma propranolol were observed after single as well as repeated doses. During exercise, increments in plasma propranolol were correlated temporally with changes in plasma noradrenaline. Exercise-induced increments in plasma noradrenaline were greater during propranolol administration than during placebo periods. The changes in plasma propranolol concentration during exercise may reflect a redistribution of propranolol at its site(s) of action. PMID:6661342

  16. Exercise-induced bronchospasm in the elite athlete.

    PubMed

    Rundell, Kenneth W; Jenkinson, David M

    2002-01-01

    The term exercise-induced bronchospasm (EIB) describes the acute transient airway narrowing that occurs during and most often after exercise in 10 to 50% of elite athletes, depending upon the sport examined. Although multiple factors are unquestionably involved in the EIB response, airway drying caused by a high exercise-ventilation rate is primary in most cases. The severity of this reaction reflects the allergic predisposition of the athlete, the water content of the inspired air, the type and concentration of air pollutants inspired, and the intensity (or ventilation rate) of the exercise. The highest prevalence of EIB is seen in winter-sport populations, where athletes are chronically exposed to cold dry air and/or environmental pollutants found in indoor ice arenas. When airway surface liquid lost during the natural warming and humidification process of respiration is not replenished at a rate equal to the loss, the ensuing osmolarity change stimulates the release of inflammatory mediators and results in bronchospasm; this cascade of events is exacerbated by airway inflammation and airway remodelling. The acute EIB response is characterised by airway smooth muscle contraction, membrane swelling, and/or mucus plug formation. Evidence suggests that histamine, leukotrienes and prostanoids are likely mediators for this response. Although the presence of symptoms and a basic physical examination are marginally effective, objective measures of lung function should be used for accurate and reliable diagnosis of EIB. Diagnosis should include baseline spirometry, followed by an appropriate bronchial provocation test. To date, the best test to confirm EIB may simply be standard pulmonary function testing before and after high-intensity dry air exercise. A 10% post-challenge fall in forced expiratory volume in 1 second is used as diagnostic criteria. The goal of medical intervention is to limit EIB exacerbation and allow the athlete to train and compete symptom free

  17. Evaluation of Various Cooling Systems After Exercise-Induced Hyperthermia.

    PubMed

    Tan, Pearl M S; Teo, Eunice Y N; Ali, Noreffendy B; Ang, Bryan C H; Iskandar, Iswady; Law, Lydia Y L; Lee, Jason K W

    2017-02-01

    Rapid diagnosis and expeditious cooling of individuals with exertional heat stroke is paramount for survival. To evaluate the efficacy of various cooling systems after exercise-induced hyperthermia. Crossover study. Laboratory. Twenty-two men (age = 24 ± 2 years, height = 1.76 ± 0.07 m, mass = 70.7 ± 9.5 kg) participated. Each participant completed a treadmill walk until body core temperature reached 39.50°C. The treadmill walk was performed at 5.3 km/h on an 8.5% incline for 50 minutes and then at 5.0 km/h until the end of exercise. Each participant experienced 4 cooling phases in a randomized, repeated-crossover design: (1) no cooling (CON), (2) body-cooling unit (BCU), (3) EMCOOLS Flex.Pad (EC), and (4) ThermoSuit (TS). Cooling continued for 30 minutes or until body core temperature reached 38.00°C, whichever occurred earlier. Body core temperature (obtained via an ingestible telemetric temperature sensor) and heart rate were measured continuously during the exercise and cooling phases. Rating of perceived exertion was monitored every 5 minutes during the exercise phase and thermal sensation every minute during the cooling phase. The absolute cooling rate was greatest with TS (0.16°C/min ± 0.06°C/min) followed by EC (0.12°C/min ± 0.04°C/min), BCU (0.09°C/min ± 0.06°C/min), and CON (0.06°C/min ± 0.02°C/min; P < .001). The TS offered a greater cooling rate than all other cooling modalities in this study, whereas EC offered a greater cooling rate than both CON and BCU (P < .0083 for all). Effect-size calculations, however, showed that EC and BCU were not clinically different. These findings provide objective evidence for selecting the most effective cooling system of those we evaluated for cooling individuals with exercise-induced hyperthermia. Nevertheless, factors other than cooling efficacy need to be considered when selecting an appropriate cooling system.

  18. [Attenuation of chronic stress-induced hippocampal damages following physical exercise].

    PubMed

    Ma, Qiang; Wang, Jing; Liu, Hong-Tao; Chao, Fu-Huan

    2002-10-25

    The long-term potentiation (LTP) in the hippocampal dentate gyrus and the plasma glucocorticoids level were observed in rats to study the effects of physical exercise on chronic stress-induced hippocampal damages. Eight-week spontaneous wheel running exercise could attenuate the suppression of LTP induced by 21-day restraint stress, and maintain the normal plasma glucocorticoids levels. It is suggested that long-term physical exercise may protect the hippocampus from stress-induced damages.

  19. Exercise-induced albuminuria is related to metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Greenberg, Sharon; Shenhar-Tsarfaty, Shani; Rogowski, Ori; Shapira, Itzhak; Zeltser, David; Weinstein, Talia; Lahav, Dror; Vered, Jaffa; Tovia-Brodie, Oholi; Arbel, Yaron; Berliner, Shlomo; Milwidsky, Assi

    2016-06-01

    Microalbuminuria (MA) is a known marker for endothelial dysfunction and future cardiovascular events. Exercise-induced albuminuria (EiA) may precede the appearance of MA. Associations between EiA and metabolic syndrome (MS) have not been assessed so far. Our aim was to investigate this association in a large sample of apparently healthy individuals with no baseline albuminuria. This was a cross-sectional study of 2,027 adults with no overt cardiovascular diseases who took part in a health survey program and had no baseline MA. Diagnosis of MS was based on harmonized criteria. All patients underwent an exercise test (Bruce protocol), and urinary albumin was measured before and after the examination. Urinary albumin-to-creatinine ratio (ACR) values before and after exercise were 0.40 (0.21-0.89) and 1.06 (0.43-2.69) mg/g for median (interquartile range) respectively. A total of 394 (20%) subjects had EiA; ACR rose from normal rest values (0.79 mg/g) to 52.28 mg/g after exercise (P < 0.001); this effect was not shown for the rest of the study population. EiA was related to higher prevalence of MS (13.8% vs. 27.1%, P < 0.001), higher metabolic equivalents (P < 0.001), higher baseline blood pressure (P < 0.001), and higher levels of fasting plasma glucose, triglycerides, and body mass index (P < 0.001). Multivariate binary logistic regression model showed that subjects with MS were 98% more likely to have EiA (95% confidence interval: 1.13-3.46, P = 0.016). In conclusion, EiA in the absence of baseline MA is independently related to MS. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  20. Regulation of exercise-induced lipid metabolism in skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Jordy, Andreas Børsting; Kiens, Bente

    2014-12-01

    Exercise increases the utilization of lipids in muscle. The sources of lipids are long-chain fatty acids taken up from the plasma and fatty acids released from stores of intramuscular triacylglycerol by the action of intramuscular lipases. In the present review, we focus on the role of fatty acid binding proteins, particularly fatty acid translocase/cluster of differentiation 36 (FAT/CD36), in the exercise- and contraction-induced increase in uptake of long-chain fatty acids in muscle. The FAT/CD36 translocates from intracellular depots to the surface membrane upon initiation of exercise/muscle contractions. This occurs independently of AMP-activated protein kinase, and data suggest that Ca(2+)-related signalling is responsible. The FAT/CD36 has an important role; long-chain fatty acid uptake is markedly decreased in FAT/CD36 knockout mice during contractions/exercise compared with wild-type control mice. In skeletal muscle, 98% of the lipase activity is accounted for by adipose triglyceride lipase and hormone-sensitive lipase. Give that inhibition or knockout of hormone-sensitive lipase does not impair lipolysis in muscle during contraction, the data point to an important role of adipose triglyceride lipase in regulation of muscle lipolysis. Although the molecular regulation of the lipases in muscle is not understood, it is speculated that intramuscular lipolysis may be regulated in part by the availability of the plasma concentration of long-chain fatty acids. © 2014 The Authors. Experimental Physiology © 2014 The Physiological Society.

  1. Foot forces induced through Tai Chi push-hand exercises.

    PubMed

    Wong, Shiu Hong; Ji, Tianjian; Hong, Youlian; Fok, Siu Lun; Wang, Lin

    2013-08-01

    The low impact forces of Tai Chi push-hand exercises may be particularly suited for older people and for those with arthritis; however, the biomechanics of push-hand exercises have not previously been reported. This paper examines the ground reaction forces (GRFs) and plantar force distributions during Tai Chi push-hand exercises in a stationary stance with and without an opponent. Ten male Tai Chi practitioners participated in the study. The GRFs of each foot were measured in three perpendicular directions using two force plates (Kistler). The plantar force distribution of each foot was measured concurrently using an insole sensor system (Novel). The results showed that the average maximum vertical GRF of each foot was not more than 88% ± 6.1% of the body weight and the sum of the vertical forces (103% ± 1.4%) generated by the two feet approximately equals the body weight at any one time. The horizontal GRFs generated by the two feet were in the opposite directions and the measured mean peak values were not more than 12% ± 2.8% and 17% ± 4.3% of the body weight in the medio-lateral and antero-posterior directions respectively. Among the nine plantar areas, the toes sustained the greatest plantar force. This study indicates that push-hand exercises generate lower vertical forces than those induced by walking, bouncing, jumping and Tai Chi gait, and that the greatest plantar force is located in the toe area, which may have an important application in balance training particularly for older adults.

  2. Beta2-agonists and exercise-induced asthma.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Sandra D; Caillaud, Corinne; Brannan, John D

    2006-01-01

    Beta2-agonists taken immediately before exercise provide significant protection against exercise- induced asthma (EIA) in most patients. However, when they are taken daily, there are some negative aspects regarding severity, control, and recovery from EIA. First, there is a significant minority (15-20%) of asthmatics whose EIA is not prevented by beta2-agonists, even when inhaled corticosteroids are used concomitantly. Second, with daily use, there is a decline in duration of the protective effect of long-acting beta2-agonists. Third, if breakthrough EIA occurs, recovery of lung function is slower in response to a beta2-agonist, and additional doses are often required to achieve pre-exercise values. If a person who takes a beta2-agonist daily experiences problems with exercise, then the physician should consider changing the treatment regimen to achieve better control of EIA. These problems likely result from desensitization of the beta2-receptor on the mast cell, which enhances mediator release, and on the bronchial smooth muscle, which enhances the bronchoconstrictor response and delays recovery from EIA. These effects are reversed within 72 h after cessation of a beta2-agonists. The important clinical question is: Are we actually compromising the beneficial effects of beta2-agonists on the prevention and recovery from EIA by prescribing them daily? Patients with EIA need to ensure that their doses of inhaled corticosteroid or other anti-inflammatory therapy are optimized so that, if necessary, a beta2-agonist can be used intermittently as prophylactic medication with greater confidence in the outcome.

  3. Exercise Induced Alterations in Rat Monocyte Number, Morphology, and Function

    PubMed Central

    GUERESCHI, MARCIA G.; PRESTES, JONATO; DONATTO, FELIPE F.; DIAS, RODRIGO; FROLLINI, ANELENA B.; FERREIRA, CLÍLTON KO.; CAVAGLIERI, CLAUDIA R.; PALANCH, ADRIANNE C.

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to verify the histophysiological alterations in monocytes and macrophages induced by short periods of exercise. Male Wistar rats (age = 2 months, body weight = 200g) were divided into seven groups (N = 6 each): sedentary control (C), groups exercised (swimming) at low intensity for 5 (5L), 10 (10L), and 15 minutes (15L), and groups exercised at moderate intensity for 5 (5M), 10 (10M) or 15 minutes (15M). At moderate intensity the animals carried a load of 5% of body weight on their backs. Blood monocytes were evaluated for quantity and morphology, and peritoneal macrophages were analyzed for quantity and phagocytic activity. Data were analyzed using ANOVA and Tukey’s post hoc test (p ≤ 0.05). Low intensity groups and 5M exhibited an increase in monocyte levels when compared with the control. There was an increase in monocyte cellular area for the 5L, 10L, 5M and 10M groups; monocyte nuclear area increased for the 10L, 5M and 10M groups in comparison with the control. There was an increase in peritoneal macrophages for the 15L, 10M, 15M and decrease for the 5M group. Macrophage phagocytic capacity increased for low intensity groups and for 10M group. The exercise performed for short periods modulated macrophage levels and function, and monocyte levels and morphology, in an intensity-dependent manner. The sum of acute responses observed in this study may exert a protective effect against sickness and may be used to improve health and lifespan. PMID:27182297

  4. The Effects of Creatine Supplementation on Exercise-Induced Muscle Damage.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rawson, Eric S.; Gunn, Bridget; Clarkson, Priscilla M.

    2001-01-01

    Investigated the effects of oral creatine (Cr) supplementation on markers of exercise-induced muscle damage following high-force eccentric exercise in men randomly administered Cr or placebo. Results indicated that 5 days of Cr supplementation did not reduce indirect makers of muscle damage or enhance recovery from high-force eccentric exercise.…

  5. Effect of beta-adrenoreceptor stimulants on exercise-induced asthma.

    PubMed

    Sly, R M

    1975-11-01

    Exercise-induced asthma can be prevented or minimized by beta-adrenoreceptor stimulating drugs, which may elicit bronchodilation before exercise has begun or may enhance thebronchodilating effect of more prolonged exercise. Recently introduced beta-adrenoreceptor stimulants have longer durations of action than isoproterenol, are effective following oral administration, and are selective for beta-adrenoreceptors.

  6. The Effects of Creatine Supplementation on Exercise-Induced Muscle Damage.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rawson, Eric S.; Gunn, Bridget; Clarkson, Priscilla M.

    2001-01-01

    Investigated the effects of oral creatine (Cr) supplementation on markers of exercise-induced muscle damage following high-force eccentric exercise in men randomly administered Cr or placebo. Results indicated that 5 days of Cr supplementation did not reduce indirect makers of muscle damage or enhance recovery from high-force eccentric exercise.…

  7. [Exercise-induced oedema due to hormone-containing intrauterine device].

    PubMed

    Franssen, Laurens E; Bos, Willem-Jan W

    2012-01-01

    Oedema is a known adverse effect of the levonorgestrel-containing intrauterine device (Mirena IUD). However, exercise-induced oedema has not been described before. A 38-year-old woman presented with symptoms of diffuse, exercise-induced oedema and dyspnoea. Tests for heart failure and other causes of oedema showed no abnormalities. All symptoms resolved spontaneously after the patient initiated removal of the IUD. The pathophysiology of exercise-induced oedema is still poorly understood. When confronted with a patient with oedema (induced by exercise or other cause), the most common causes must first be excluded. If no explanation can be found, then the effects of medication must not be overlooked.

  8. Influence of pre-exercise muscle glycogen content on exercise-induced transcriptional regulation of metabolic genes.

    PubMed

    Pilegaard, Henriette; Keller, Charlotte; Steensberg, Adam; Helge, Jørn Wulff; Pedersen, Bente Klarlund; Saltin, Bengt; Neufer, P Darrell

    2002-05-15

    Transcription of metabolic genes is transiently induced during recovery from exercise in skeletal muscle of humans. To determine whether pre-exercise muscle glycogen content influences the magnitude and/or duration of this adaptive response, six male subjects performed one-legged cycling exercise to lower muscle glycogen content in one leg and then, the following day, completed 2.5 h low intensity two-legged cycling exercise. Nuclei and mRNA were isolated from biopsies obtained from the vastus lateralis muscle of the control and reduced glycogen (pre-exercise glycogen = 609 +/- 47 and 337 +/- 33 mmol kg(-1) dry weight, respectively) legs before and after 0, 2 and 5 h of recovery. Exercise induced a significant (P < 0.05) increase (2- to 3-fold) in transcription of the pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase 4 (PDK4) and uncoupling protein 3 (UCP3) genes in the reduced glycogen leg only. Although PDK4, lipoprotein lipase (LPL) and hexokinase II (HKII) mRNA were elevated in the reduced glycogen leg before exercise, no consistent difference was found between the two legs in response to exercise. In a second study, six subjects completed two trials (separated by 2 weeks) consisting of 3 h of two-legged knee extensor exercise with either control (398 +/- 52 mmol kg(-1) dry weight) or low (240 +/- 38 mmol kg(-1) dry weight) pre-exercise muscle glycogen. Exercise induced a significantly greater increase in PDK4 transcription in the low glycogen (> 6-fold) than in the control (< 3-fold) trial. Induction of PDK4 and UCP3 mRNA in response to exercise was also significantly higher in the low glycogen (11.4- and 3.5-fold, respectively) than in the control (5.0- and 1.7-fold, respectively) trial. These data indicate that low muscle glycogen content enhances the transcriptional activation of some metabolic genes in response to exercise, raising the possibility that signalling mechanisms sensitive to glycogen content and/or FFA availability may be linked to the transcriptional control of

  9. Influence of pre-exercise muscle glycogen content on exercise-induced transcriptional regulation of metabolic genes

    PubMed Central

    Pilegaard, Henriette; Keller, Charlotte; Steensberg, Adam; Wulff Helge, Jørn; Klarlund Pedersen, Bente; Saltin, Bengt; Neufer, P Darrell

    2002-01-01

    Transcription of metabolic genes is transiently induced during recovery from exercise in skeletal muscle of humans. To determine whether pre-exercise muscle glycogen content influences the magnitude and/or duration of this adaptive response, six male subjects performed one-legged cycling exercise to lower muscle glycogen content in one leg and then, the following day, completed 2.5 h low intensity two-legged cycling exercise. Nuclei and mRNA were isolated from biopsies obtained from the vastus lateralis muscle of the control and reduced glycogen (pre-exercise glycogen = 609 ± 47 and 337 ± 33 mmol kg−1 dry weight, respectively) legs before and after 0, 2 and 5 h of recovery. Exercise induced a significant (P < 0.05) increase (2- to 3-fold) in transcription of the pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase 4 (PDK4) and uncoupling protein 3 (UCP3) genes in the reduced glycogen leg only. Although PDK4, lipoprotein lipase (LPL) and hexokinase II (HKII) mRNA were elevated in the reduced glycogen leg before exercise, no consistent difference was found between the two legs in response to exercise. In a second study, six subjects completed two trials (separated by 2 weeks) consisting of 3 h of two-legged knee extensor exercise with either control (398 ± 52 mmol kg−1 dry weight) or low (240 ± 38 mmol kg−1 dry weight) pre-exercise muscle glycogen. Exercise induced a significantly greater increase in PDK4 transcription in the low glycogen (> 6-fold) than in the control (< 3-fold) trial. Induction of PDK4 and UCP3 mRNA in response to exercise was also signficantly higher in the low glycogen (11.4- and 3.5-fold, respectively) than in the control (5.0- and 1.7-fold, respectively) trial. These data indicate that low muscle glycogen content enhances the transcriptional activation of some metabolic genes in response to exercise, raising the possibility that signalling mechanisms sensitive to glycogen content and/or FFA availability may be linked to the transcriptional control of

  10. Effects of grape seed extract supplementation on exercise-induced oxidative stress in rats.

    PubMed

    Belviranlı, Muaz; Gökbel, Hakkı; Okudan, Nilsel; Başaralı, Kemal

    2012-07-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of grape seed extract (GSE) supplementation on exercise performance and oxidative stress in acutely and chronically exercised rats. A total of sixty-four male rats were used in the study. Rats were divided into six groups: control, chronic exercise control, acute exercise control (AEC), GSE-supplemented control, GSE-supplemented chronic exercise and GSE-supplemented acute exercise groups. Chronic exercise consisted of treadmill running at 25 m/min, 45 min/d, 5 d a week for 6 weeks. Rats in the acute exercise groups were run on the treadmill at 30 m/min until exhaustion. GSE were given at 100 mg/kg of body weight with drinking water for 6 weeks. Plasma was separated from blood samples for the analysis of oxidative stress markers. There was no significant difference in time of exhaustion between the acute exercise groups. Plasma malondialdehyde (MDA) levels were higher in the acute exercise groups and lower in the chronic exercise groups. GSE supplementation decreased MDA levels. Xanthine oxidase and adenosine deaminase activities were higher in the AEC group compared to all the other groups. NO levels were increased with both chronic exercise and GSE supplementation. Superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase activities were lower in the acute exercised groups and higher in the chronic exercised groups. GSE supplementation caused an increase in antioxidant enzyme activities. In conclusion, GSE supplementation prevents exercise-induced oxidative stress by preventing lipid peroxidation and increasing antioxidant enzyme activities.

  11. Exercise-induced stem cell activation and its implication for cardiovascular and skeletal muscle regeneration.

    PubMed

    Wahl, Patrick; Brixius, Klara; Bloch, Wilhelm

    2008-01-01

    A number of publications have provided evidence that exercise and physical activity are linked to the activation, mobilization, and differentiation of various types of stem cells. Exercise may improve organ regeneration and function. This review summarizes mechanisms by which exercise contributes to stem cell-induced regeneration in the cardiovascular and the skeletal muscle system. In addition, it discusses whether exercise may improve and support stem cell transplantation in situations of cardiovascular disease or muscular dystrophy.

  12. Social isolation prevents exercise-induced proliferation of hippocampal progenitor cells in female rats.

    PubMed

    Leasure, J Leigh; Decker, Linda

    2009-10-01

    Social isolation negatively affects the behavior and health of laboratory rats. Recently, it has been found that social isolation retards exercise-induced neurogenesis in the hippocampal dentate gyrus (DG) of male rats (Stranahan et al. (2006) Nat Neurosci 9:526-533). Since male and female rats react differently to housing changes and exercise opportunities, we investigated whether social isolation would also suppress the exercise-dependent increase in proliferation of dentate gyrus progenitor cells in females. Accordingly, female rats were housed either alone (isolated) or in groups (social) with (exercise) or without (sedentary) the opportunity to run in an exercise wheel. Proliferating progenitor cells were labeled with bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU). As expected, exercise increased the number of BrdU+ cells in socially housed animals. However, isolation prevented this running-induced increase. Our results expand upon previous findings by showing that the female brain is also susceptible to the suppressive effect of social isolation on exercise-induced neurogenesis.

  13. Increased atrial arrhythmia susceptibility induced by intense endurance exercise in mice requires TNFα

    PubMed Central

    Aschar-Sobbi, Roozbeh; Izaddoustdar, Farzad; Korogyi, Adam S.; Wang, Qiongling; Farman, Gerrie P.; Yang, FengHua; Yang, Wallace; Dorian, David; Simpson, Jeremy A.; Tuomi, Jari M.; Jones, Douglas L.; Nanthakumar, Kumaraswamy; Cox, Brian; Wehrens, Xander H.T.; Dorian, Paul; Backx, Peter H.

    2015-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common supraventricular arrhythmia that, for unknown reasons, is linked to intense endurance exercise. Our studies reveal that 6 weeks of swimming or treadmill exercise improves heart pump function and reduces heart-rates. Exercise also increases vulnerability to AF in association with inflammation, fibrosis, increased vagal tone, slowed conduction velocity, prolonged cardiomyocyte action potentials and RyR2 phosphorylation (CamKII-dependent S2814) in the atria, without corresponding alterations in the ventricles. Microarray results suggest the involvement of the inflammatory cytokine, TNFα, in exercised-induced atrial remodelling. Accordingly, exercise induces TNFα-dependent activation of both NFκB and p38MAPK, while TNFα inhibition (with etanercept), TNFα gene ablation, or p38 inhibition, prevents atrial structural remodelling and AF vulnerability in response to exercise, without affecting the beneficial physiological changes. Our results identify TNFα as a key factor in the pathology of intense exercise-induced AF. PMID:25598495

  14. Residual effects of prior exercise and recovery on subsequent exercise-induced metabolic responses.

    PubMed

    Ronsen, Ola; Haugen, Oystein; Hallén, Jostein; Bahr, Roald

    2004-08-01

    Data on the metabolic responses to repeated endurance exercise sessions are limited. Thus, the aims of this study were to examine (1) the impact of prior exercise on metabolic responses to a subsequent exercise session and (2) the effect of different recovery periods between two daily exercise sessions on metabolic responses to the second bout of exercise. Nine male elite athletes participated in four 25-h trials: one bout of exercise (ONE), two bouts of exercise separated by 3 h of rest and one meal (SHORT), two bouts of exercise separated by 6 h of rest and two meals (LONG), and a trial with no exercise (REST). All exercise bouts consisted of 10 min cycling at 50% followed by 65 min at 75% of maximal O2 uptake. Compared to no prior exercise (ONE), a previous bout of exercise (SHORT) was followed by higher mean O2 uptake, heart rate (HR), rectal temperature (TR), excess post-exercise oxygen consumption and lower respiratory exchange ratio (R) during and after a similar exercise session 3 h later. A longer rest interval between the two exercise bouts (6 h versus 3 h) and an additional meal resulted in a decrease in O2 uptake, HR, TR and an increase in R during the second bout of exercise, but no effects on post-exercise metabolism were found. Thus, augmented metabolic stress was observed when strenuous exercise was repeated after only 3 h of recovery, but this was attenuated when a longer recovery period including an additional meal was provided between the exercise sessions.

  15. [Impaired exercise-induced blood pressure control in patients with Parkinson's disease and related disorders].

    PubMed

    Deguchi, Kazushi

    2013-01-01

    An almost directly proportional increase in blood pressure (BP) and heart rate with exercise intensity has been reported in healthy subjects. In contrast, patients with multiple system atrophy (MSA) and pure autonomic failure (PAF) characterized by autonomic failure exhibit exercise-induced hypotension (EIH), prolonged hypotension following the cessation of exercise and exaggerated orthostatic hypotension after exercise. EIH, which can be the earliest symptom of PAF, provides a clue to the diagnosis of autonomic failure. Exercise-induced hypertension, which may be due to adrenergic receptor supersensitivity, may also be observed. BP during and after exercise was significantly lower in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) than in healthy subjects. Some PD patients exhibited symptoms related to EIH. PD patients who did not achieve 85% of target HR with treadmill testing lacked BP elevations during sub-maximal and peak exercise. On the other hand, no significant difference was observed in exercise-induced BP elevations between PD patients with and without cardiac sympathetic denervation. Since BP control during exercise in PD was not affected by dosing with levodopa, exercise-related BP abnormalities in PD appear to manifest with the disease. These findings suggest that PD has impaired exercise-induced BP control, but not to the extent of MSA and PAF.

  16. Does correction of exercise-induced desaturation by O(2) always improve exercise tolerance in COPD? A preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Héraud, Nelly; Préfaut, Christian; Durand, Fabienne; Varray, Alain

    2008-09-01

    This study sought to investigate whether correction of exercise-induced desaturation by oxygen supply (O(2)) systematically improves exercise tolerance and cardiorespiratory adaptations in COPD patients. Twenty-five COPD patients [FEV(1)=52+/-2.5% pred] exhibiting exercise-induced desaturation performed cyclo-ergometer endurance exercise at 60%of their maximal workload in two randomized conditions: air vs. O(2). O(2) was adjusted to ensure 90 < or = SpO(2) < or = 95%. Endurance time (Tlim), dyspnoea, ventilation (V (E)), breathing frequency (fb), tidal volume (V(T)), cardiac output (CO), heart rate (HR) and arterio-venous difference in oxygen (AVD) were compared between conditions. The comparison of whole group performance between conditions revealed no differences, but individual analysis showed that O(2) increased Tlim for 14 patients [+68%; p<0.01; (positive responders)], decreased it for seven [-36%; p<0.05; (negative responders)] and induced no change for four (non-responders). For positive responders, improved performance was supported by reduced dyspnoea, V (E), fb, HR and CO and increased AVD. For negative responders, hyperoxia resulted in increased dyspnoea and fb without change in V (E) or cardiovascular parameters. For comparable correction of exercise desaturation, O(2) does not induce similar effects on exercise responses in all patients. These results were confirmed in complementary study with 11 consecutives patients at higher exercise intensity. For R+, we recorded the classic and expected O(2) effects on cardiorespiratory adaptations (i.e. reduced ventilatory demand and cardiac output). In the other group, exercise breathing frequency and dyspnoea were paradoxically increased despite desaturation correction. However, this study must be considered as pilot study, which will need to be confirmed in future studies conducted on a larger case series.

  17. Bi-phase transition diagrams of metallic thin multilayers

    SciTech Connect

    Li, J.C.; Liu, W.; Jiang, Q. . E-mail: jiangq@jlu.edu.cn

    2005-02-01

    Phase transitions of metallic multilayers induced by differences in interface energy are considered thermodynamically, based on a thermodynamic model for interface energy and the Goldschmidt premise for lattice contraction. Bi-phase transition diagrams of Co/Cr, Zr/Nb, Ti/Nb and Ti/Al multilayers are constructed, which are in agreement with experimental results.

  18. Aerobic Interval Exercise Training Induces Greater Reduction in Cardiac Workload in the Recovery Period in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Borges, Juliana Pereira; Masson, Gustavo Santos; Tibiriçá, Eduardo; Lessa, Marcos Adriano

    2014-01-01

    Background Aerobic interval exercise training has greater benefits on cardiovascular function as compared with aerobic continuous exercise training. Objective The present study aimed at analyzing the effects of both exercise modalities on acute and subacute hemodynamic responses of healthy rats. Methods Thirty male rats were randomly assigned into three groups as follows: continuous exercise (CE, n = 10); interval exercise (IE, n = 10); and control (C, n = 10). Both IE and CE groups performed a 30-minute exercise session. The IE group session consisted of three successive 4-minute periods at 60% of maximal velocity (Max Vel), with 4-minute recovery intervals at 40% of Max Vel. The CE group ran continuously at 50% of Max Vel. Heart rate (HR), blood pressure(BP), and rate pressure product (RPP) were measured before, during and after the exercise session. Results The CE and IE groups showed an increase in systolic BP and RPP during exercise as compared with the baseline values. After the end of exercise, the CE group showed a lower response of systolic BP and RPP as compared with the baseline values, while the IE group showed lower systolic BP and mean BP values. However, only the IE group had a lower response of HR and RPP during recovery. Conclusion In healthy rats, one interval exercise session, as compared with continuous exercise, induced similar hemodynamic responses during exercise. However, during recovery, the interval exercise caused greater reductions in cardiac workload than the continuous exercise. PMID:24270864

  19. Perception of Exercise-Induced Bronchoconstriction in College Athletes.

    PubMed

    Burnett, David M; Vardiman, John P; Deckert, Jake A; Ward, Jaimie L; Sharpe, Matthew R

    2016-07-01

    Exercise-induced bronchoconstriction (EIB) can lead to long-term respiratory illness and even death. EIB prevalence rates are both high and variable in college athletes. Also, prevalence rates may be underestimated due to ineffective screening. The purpose of this study is to investigate the prevalence of EIB and the perceived impact of EIB in college athletes via a self-report questionnaire. A self-report EIB questionnaire was administered to college athletes on 8 different sports teams. Information collected was used to identify athletes who self-reported: (1) a history of EIB and/or asthma, (2) respiratory symptoms during exercise, (3) medication use, and (4) concern about EIB. Results showed that 56 of 196 athletes (28.6%) self-reported a history of EIB or asthma. Over half (52%) reported a history of EIB/asthma or current EIB symptoms. Forty-six of the 140 athletes (32.9%) who did not report a history of EIB or asthma indicated symptoms of EIB during sports, training, or exercise. Fourteen of 56 athletes (25%) self-reporting a history of EIB or asthma did not report the use of a respiratory medication. Nineteen of 196 athletes (9.7%) reported being concerned that EIB was adversely affecting their sports performance. College athletes self-report a high prevalence of EIB or asthma. Although college athletes may not report a history of EIB or asthma, they indicate symptoms of EIB. A majority of athletes reported a history or current symptoms related to EIB or asthma. Many athletes with a history of EIB or asthma are not taking any asthma medication. Last, athletes report concern about EIB adversely affecting their sports performance. More work is needed using a combination of a screening questionnaire and standardized EIB testing to develop a validated tool for accurately screening and diagnosing EIB in college athletes. Copyright © 2016 by Daedalus Enterprises.

  20. Effects of ipratropium on exercise-induced bronchospasm.

    PubMed

    Boaventura, L C; Araujo, A C; Martinez, J B; Vianna, E O

    2010-07-01

    Exercise-induced bronchospasm (EIB) is the transient narrowing of the airways that follows vigorous exercise. Ipratropium bromide may be used to prevent EIB, but its effect varies among individuals. We hypothesized that time of administration of ipratropium interferes with its action. This was a prospective, double-blind, cross-over study carried out to evaluate the bronchoprotective and bronchodilatory effect of ipratropium at different times of day. The study consisted of 4 exercise challenge tests (2 at 7 am and 2 at 6 pm). In the morning, one of the tests was performed after placebo administration and the other one after ipratropium (80 microg) and the two tests (placebo and ipratropium) were repeated in the evening. Twenty-one patients with severe or moderate asthma and previous confirmation of EIB were enrolled in this prospective trial. The bronchodilatory effect of ipratropium was 0.25+/-0.21 L or 13.11+/-10.99% (p=0.001 compared to baseline values) in the morning, and 0.14+/-0.25 L or 7.25+/-11.37% (p>0.05) in the evening. In the morning, EIB was 0.58+/-0.29 L on the placebo day and 0.38+/-0.22 L on the treatment day (p=0.01). In the evening, EIB was 0.62+/-0.28 L on the placebo day and 0.51+/-0.35 L on the treatment day (p>0.05). We suggest that the use of ipratropium for the treatment of asthma and EIB should take into consideration the time of administration.

  1. Sodium cromoglycate and ipratropium bromide in exercise-induced asthma.

    PubMed Central

    Thomson, N C; Patel, K R; Kerr, J W

    1978-01-01

    In thirteen patients with extrinsic asthma the effects of placebo, sodium cromoglycate, ipratropium bromide, and ipratropium bromide plus sodium cromoglycate were studied in a random double-blind fashion to assess their inhibitory action in exercise-induced asthma (EIA). Exercise testing consisted of steady state running on an inclined treadmill for up to eight minutes. In eight of the 13 patients studied the baseline ratio of expiratory flow at 50% vital capacity (VC) breathing helium-oxygen (V50He) to V50air was over 1.20 and they were called responders; the remaining five patients were called non-responders. There was a significantly lower baseline maximum mid-expiratory flow rate (MMEF) in non-responders (P less than 0.02) as compared to responders but no difference in forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1) or forced vital capacity (FVC). Sodium cromoglycate (P less than 0.02), ipratropium bromide (P less than 0.01), and ipratropium bromide plus spdium cromoglycate (P less than 0.01) all significantly inhibited the percentage fall in FEV1 after exercise in the responders. Ipratropium bromide had no preventive action on non-responders, unlike sodium cromoglycate (P less than 0.05) and ipratropium bromide plus sodium cromoglycate (P less than 0.02). It is postulated that mediator release is an important factor in development of EIA in most extrinsic asthmatics, whereas cholinergic mechanisms are relevant only in those patients in whom the main site of airflow obstruction is in the large central airways. PMID:154747

  2. High-intensity interval training attenuates the exercise-induced increase in plasma IL-6 in response to acute exercise.

    PubMed

    Croft, Louise; Bartlett, Jonathan D; MacLaren, Don P M; Reilly, Thomas; Evans, Louise; Mattey, Derek L; Nixon, Nicola B; Drust, Barry; Morton, James P

    2009-12-01

    This aims of this study were to investigate the effects of carbohydrate availability during endurance training on the plasma interleukin (IL)-6, IL-8, and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha response to a subsequent acute bout of high-intensity interval exercise. Three groups of recreationally active males performed 6 weeks of high-intensity interval running. Groups 1 (LOW+GLU) and 2 (LOW+PLA) trained twice per day, 2 days per week, and consumed a 6.4% glucose or placebo solution, respectively, before every second training session and at regular intervals throughout exercise. Group 3 (NORM) trained once per day, 4 days per week, and consumed no beverage during training. Each group performed 50 min of high-intensity interval running at the same absolute workloads before and after training. Muscle glycogen utilization in the gastrocnemius muscle during acute exercise was reduced (p < 0.05) in all groups following training, although this was not affected by training condition. Plasma IL-6 concentration increased (p < 0.05) after acute exercise in all groups before and after training. Furthermore, the magnitude of increase was reduced (p < 0.05) following training. This training-induced attenuation in plasma IL-6 increase was similar among groups. Plasma IL-8 concentration increased (p < 0.05) after acute exercise in all groups, although the magnitude of increase was not affected (p > 0.05) by training. Acute exercise did not increase (p > 0.05) plasma TNF-alpha when undertaken before or after training. Data demonstrate that the exercise-induced increase in plasma IL-6 concentration in response to customary exercise is attenuated by previous exercise training, and that this attenuation appears to occur independent of carbohydrate availability during training.

  3. Familial Paroxysmal Exercise-Induced Dystonia: Atypical Presentation of Autosomal Dominant GTP-Cyclohydrolase 1 Deficiency

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dale, Russell C.; Melchers, Anna; Fung, Victor S. C.; Grattan-Smith, Padraic; Houlden, Henry; Earl, John

    2010-01-01

    Paroxysmal exercise-induced dystonia (PED) is one of the rarer forms of paroxysmal dyskinesia, and can occur in sporadic or familial forms. We report a family (male index case, mother and maternal grandfather) with autosomal dominant inheritance of paroxysmal exercise-induced dystonia. The dystonia began in childhood and was only ever induced…

  4. Familial Paroxysmal Exercise-Induced Dystonia: Atypical Presentation of Autosomal Dominant GTP-Cyclohydrolase 1 Deficiency

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dale, Russell C.; Melchers, Anna; Fung, Victor S. C.; Grattan-Smith, Padraic; Houlden, Henry; Earl, John

    2010-01-01

    Paroxysmal exercise-induced dystonia (PED) is one of the rarer forms of paroxysmal dyskinesia, and can occur in sporadic or familial forms. We report a family (male index case, mother and maternal grandfather) with autosomal dominant inheritance of paroxysmal exercise-induced dystonia. The dystonia began in childhood and was only ever induced…

  5. Prevalence of exercise-induced bronchospasm in Thokoza schoolchildren.

    PubMed

    Mashalane, M B N; Stewart, A; Feldman, C; Becker, P; de Charmoy, S

    2006-01-01

    Asthma is a common childhood illness, with a prevalence of 1 in 10 children. Exercise-induced bronchospasm (EIB) is a common feature of asthma and is found more often in children than in adults. To determine the prevalence and potential impact of various factors on the prevalence of EIB in Thokoza schoolchildren. Data were collected on respiratory health and the home environment of children living in Thokoza, Gauteng. A total of 475 9- and 10-year-old children performed the free-running asthma screening test (FRAST). An abnormal response to FRAST was defined as a reduction in the post-exercise peak flow of more than 15% of the pre-exercise value, at 3- and 10- minute intervals. All children who had a fall in post-exercise flow rate (PEFR) of more than 15% on 2 occasions after FRAST were classified as having EIB. Using the above criteria to diagnose EIB, an overall prevalence rate of 7.26% (95% confidence interval (CI): 4.5 - 10.3%) was recorded. A less rigorous definition of EIB is a fall in PEFR of more than 10% on 2 occasions after FRAST, and if this was used then the prevalence of EIB was 15.69% (95% CI: 10.6 - 20.8%). Difficulty breathing and a tight chest were the most prevalent respiratory symptoms in children with EIB (odds ratio (OR): 1.79, 95% CI: 0.49 - 6.49 and OR 1.69, 95% CI: 0.72 - 3.99, respectively). The use of gas and electricity as domestic fuels was the strongest risk factor associated with EIB, as shown by logistical regression analysis using an adjusted OR in a reduced model (OR 2.44, 95% CI: 0.71 - 8.44 and OR 2.33, 95% CI: 0.59 - 9.24, respectively). The prevalence of EIB reported in this study is higher than that reported in studies from other African countries, with the exception of a study from Kenya. Findings of the present study suggest that there may be a trend towards increasing prevalence of EIB in South African urban areas.

  6. Short- and Long-term exercise induced alterations in haemostasis: a review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Posthuma, Jelle J; van der Meijden, Paola E J; Ten Cate, Hugo; Spronk, Henri M H

    2015-05-01

    Although regular exercise is beneficial for health, exercise-related thrombotic events, such as venous thromboembolism and myocardial infarctions, are occasionally observed. These events are characterized by a prothrombotic condition in which interactions between coagulation factors, the vessel wall and the fibrinolytic system play an important role. Apparently, various durations and intensities of exercise have different effects on haemostasis and especially high intensity exercise tends to increase the risk of thrombotic events. However, the mechanisms behind this have not been entirely established. In this review we provide an overview of the various effects of the different intensities and durations of exercise on haemostasis. Overall, the haemostatic profile is mainly affected by the intensity of exercise; and is more pronounced after high (>80%) compared to low intensity (<60%), as reflected by increased platelet and coagulant activity. These findings are in line with the increased risk of exercise-induced thrombotic events during high intensity exercise.

  7. Voluntary exercise counteracts Aβ25-35-induced memory impairment in mice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qin; Xu, Zhiqiang; Tang, Jinrong; Sun, Jianguo; Gao, Junying; Wu, Ting; Xiao, Ming

    2013-11-01

    Exercise has been shown to enhance hippocampus-related cognition and slow the progression of Alzheimer's disease (AD). However, whether voluntary exercise directly decreases the neurotoxicity of amyloid peptide (Aβ) needs to be determined. In the present study, two-month old male C57bl/6 mice were intracerebroventricularly injected with Aβ25-35, and then allowed for voluntary exercise for 12 days. Y-maze test revealed that voluntary exercise mitigated spatial memory impairment induced by Aβ25-35. Consistently, Aβ25-35 treated mice with exercise showed reduced neuronal degeneration and synaptic protein loss in the hippocampus compared with sedentary controls. Moreover, voluntary exercise significantly ameliorated oxidative stress markers and increased vessel branches in the hippocampus of Aβ25-35 treated mice. Our results suggest that voluntary exercise counteracts the neurotoxicity of Aβ by reducing oxidative stress and increasing angiogenesis, which may underlie the beneficial effect of exercise on AD.

  8. MRI-detectable changes in mouse brain structure induced by voluntary exercise.

    PubMed

    Cahill, Lindsay S; Steadman, Patrick E; Jones, Carly E; Laliberté, Christine L; Dazai, Jun; Lerch, Jason P; Stefanovic, Bojana; Sled, John G

    2015-06-01

    Physical exercise, besides improving cognitive and mental health, is known to cause structural changes in the brain. Understanding the structural changes that occur with exercise as well as the neuroanatomical correlates of a predisposition for exercise is important for understanding human health. This study used high-resolution 3D MR imaging, in combination with deformation-based morphometry, to investigate the macroscopic changes in brain structure that occur in healthy adult mice following four weeks of voluntary exercise. We found that exercise induced changes in multiple brain structures that are involved in motor function and learning and memory including the hippocampus, dentate gyrus, stratum granulosum of the dentate gyrus, cingulate cortex, olivary complex, inferior cerebellar peduncle and regions of the cerebellum. In addition, a number of brain structures, including the hippocampus, striatum and pons, when measured on MRI prior to the start of exercise were highly predictive of subsequent exercise activity. Exercise tended to normalize these pre-existing differences between mice.

  9. The biphasic interphase-mitotic polarity of cell nuclei induced under DNA replication stress seems to be correlated with Pin2 localization in root meristems of Allium cepa.

    PubMed

    Żabka, Aneta; Trzaskoma, Paweł; Winnicki, Konrad; Polit, Justyna Teresa; Chmielnicka, Agnieszka; Maszewski, Janusz

    2015-02-01

    Long-term treatment of Allium cepa seedlings with low concentration of hydroxyurea (HU) results in a disruption of cell cycle checkpoints, leading root apex meristem (RAM) cells to an abnormal organization of nuclear structures forming interphase (I) and mitotic (M) domains of chromatin at opposite poles of the nucleus. Thus far, both critical cell length and an uneven distribution of cyclin B-like proteins along the nuclear axis have been recognized as essential factors needed to facilitate the formation of biphasic interphase-mitotic (IM) cells. Two new aspects with respect to their emergence are investigated in this study. The first concerns a relationship between the polarity of increasing chromatin condensation (IM orientation) and the acropetal (base→apex) alignment of RAM cell files. The second problem involves the effects of auxin (IAA), on the frequency of IM cells. We provide evidence that there is an association between the advanced M-poles of the IM cell nuclei and the polarized accumulation sites of auxin efflux carriers (PIN2 proteins) and IAA. Furthermore, our observations reveal exclusion regions for PIN2 proteins in the microtubule-rich structures, such as preprophase bands (PPBs) and phragmoplast. The current and previous studies have prompted us to formulate a hypothetical mechanism linking PIN2-mediated unilateral localization of IAA and the induction of bipolar IM cells in HU-treated RAMs of A. cepa.

  10. Exercise preconditioning modulates genotoxicity induced by doxorubicin in multiple organs of rats.

    PubMed

    Martins, Renato Almeida; Minari, André Luis; Chaves, Marcelo Donizetti; dos Santos, Ronaldo Wagner Thomatieli; Barbisan, Luis Fernando; Ribeiro, Daniel Araki

    2012-06-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of exercise in multiple organs of rats treated with doxorubicin. Male adult Wistar rats were distributed into the following groups: sedentary + NaCl; exercise + NaCl; sedentary + doxorubicin; and exercise + doxorubicin. Animals were sacrificed 2 days following injections. Central fragments from heart, liver, and kidney were collected and minced in 0.9% NaCl being cellular suspensions used for the single-cell gel (comet) assay. The results showed that exercise was able to prevent genotoxicity induced by doxorubicin in heart cells. By contrast, exercise was not able to prevent genotoxicity induced by doxorubicin in liver cells. The same occurred to kidney cells, i.e. no statistically significant differences (p > 0.05) were found when compared with groups not exposed to doxorubicin. Taken together, our results support the idea that exercise could contribute to the protective effect against genotoxicity induced by doxorubicin in heart cells.

  11. Exercise-induced cardioprotection: a role for eNOS uncoupling and NO metabolites.

    PubMed

    Farah, C; Kleindienst, A; Bolea, G; Meyer, G; Gayrard, S; Geny, B; Obert, P; Cazorla, O; Tanguy, S; Reboul, Cyril

    2013-11-01

    Exercise is an efficient strategy for myocardial protection against ischemia-reperfusion (IR) injury. Although endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) is phosphorylated and activated during exercise, its role in exercise-induced cardioprotection remains unknown. This study investigated whether modulation of eNOS activation during IR could participate in the exercise-induced cardioprotection against IR injury. Hearts isolated from sedentary or exercised rats (5 weeks training) were perfused with a Langendorff apparatus and IR performed in the presence or absence of NOS inhibitors [N-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester, L-NAME or N5-(1-iminoethyl)-L-ornithine, L-NIO] or tetrahydrobiopterin (BH₄). Exercise training protected hearts against IR injury and this effect was abolished by L-NAME or by L-NIO treatment, indicating that exercise-induced cardioprotection is eNOS dependent. However, a strong reduction of eNOS phosphorylation at Ser1177 (eNOS-PSer1177) and of eNOS coupling during early reperfusion was observed in hearts from exercised rats (which showed higher eNOS-PSer1177 and eNOS dimerization at baseline) in comparison to sedentary rats. Despite eNOS uncoupling, exercised hearts had more S-nitrosylated proteins after early reperfusion and also less nitro-oxidative stress, indexed by lower malondialdehyde content and protein nitrotyrosination compared to sedentary hearts. Moreover, in exercised hearts, stabilization of eNOS dimers by BH4 treatment increased nitro-oxidative stress and then abolished the exercise-induced cardioprotection, indicating that eNOS uncoupling during IR is required for exercise-induced myocardial cardioprotection. Based on these results, we hypothesize that in the hearts of exercised animals, eNOS uncoupling associated with the improved myocardial antioxidant capacity prevents excessive NO synthesis and limits the reaction between NO and O₂·- to form peroxynitrite (ONOO⁻), which is cytotoxic.

  12. Food-dependent exercise-induced anaphylaxis -importance of omega-5 gliadin and HMW-glutenin as causative antigens for wheat-dependent exercise-induced anaphylaxis-.

    PubMed

    Morita, Eishin; Matsuo, Hiroaki; Chinuki, Yuko; Takahashi, Hitoshi; Dahlström, Jörgen; Tanaka, Akira

    2009-12-01

    Food-dependent exercise-induced anaphylaxis (FDEIA) is a special form of food allergy where a food-intake alone does not induce any symptoms. However, allergic symptoms are elicited when triggering factors such as exercise or aspirin-intake are added after ingestion of the causative food. The most frequent causative foodstuff in Japan is wheat. The triggering factors, both exercise and aspirin-intake, facilitate allergen absorption from the gastrointestinal tract, resulting in allergic symptoms in the patients with wheat-dependent exercise-induced anaphylaxis (WDEIA). Analysis using purified wheat proteins revealed that approximately 80% of the patients with WDEIA have IgE reacting to omega-5 gliadin and the remaining of the patients to high molecular weight glutenin (HMW-glutenin). Simultaneous measurement of specific IgE to omega-5 gliadin and HMW-glutenin was found to be highly useful in diagnosing WDEIA compared with the routine diagnostic system for wheat.

  13. Exercise-induced muscle damage impairs insulin signaling pathway associated with IRS-1 oxidative modification.

    PubMed

    Aoi, W; Naito, Y; Tokuda, H; Tanimura, Y; Oya-Ito, T; Yoshikawa, T

    2012-01-01

    Strenuous exercise induces delayed-onset muscle damage including oxidative damage of cellular components. Oxidative stress to muscle cells impairs glucose uptake via disturbance of insulin signaling pathway. We investigated glucose uptake and insulin signaling in relation to oxidative protein modification in muscle after acute strenuous exercise. ICR mice were divided into sedentary and exercise groups. Mice in the exercise group performed downhill running exercise at 30 m/min for 30 min. At 24 hr after exercise, metabolic performance and insulin-signaling proteins in muscle tissues were examined. In whole body indirect calorimetry, carbohydrate utilization was decreased in the exercised mice along with reduction of the respiratory exchange ratio compared to the rested control mice. Insulin-stimulated uptake of 2-deoxy-[(3)H]glucose in damaged muscle was decreased after acute exercise. Tyrosine phosphorylation of insulin receptor substrate (IRS)-1 and phosphatidyl-3-kinase/Akt signaling were impaired by exercise, leading to inhibition of the membrane translocation of glucose transporter 4. We also found that acute exercise caused 4-hydroxy-nonenal modification of IRS-1 along with elevation of oxidative stress in muscle tissue. Impairment of insulin-induced glucose uptake into damaged muscle after strenuous exercise would be related to disturbance of insulin signal transduction by oxidative modification of IRS-1.

  14. Restoration of MPTP-induced deficits by exercise and Milmed® co-treatment

    PubMed Central

    Archer, Trevor; Fredriksson, Anders

    2014-01-01

    1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) induces permanent neurochemical and functional deficits. Following the administration of either two or four injections of the dopamine neurotoxin, MPTP, at a dose of 40 mg/kg, C57/BL6 mice were given access to running-wheels (30-min sessions, four times/week, Monday–Thursday) and treatment with the treated yeast, Milmed® (four times/week, Monday–Thursday), or simply running-wheel exercise by itself, over ten weeks. It was observed that the combination of physical exercise and Milmed® treatment, the MPTP + Exercise + Yeast (MC) group [MPTP + Exercise + Milmed® (MC)], restored spontaneous motor activity markedly by test day 10, restored completely subthreshold L-Dopa-induced activity, and dopamine concentration to 76% of control values, in the condition wherein two administrations of MPTP (2 × 40 mg/kg) were given prior to initiation of exercise and/or Milmed® treatment. Physical exercise by itself, MPTP + Exercise (MC) group, attenuated these deficits only partially. Administration of MPTP four times (i.e., 40 mg/kg, s.c., once weekly over four weeks for a total of 160 mg/kg, MPTP + Exercise + Yeast (MC) group [MPTP + Exercise + Milmed® (SC)] and MPTP + Exercise (SC), induced a lesioning effect that was far too severe for either exercise alone or the exercise + Milmed® combination to ameliorate. Nevertheless, these findings indicate a powerful effect of physical exercise reinforced by Milmed® treatment in restoring MPTP-induced deficits of motor function and dopamine neurochemistry in mice. PMID:25210657

  15. Exercise Protects against PCB-Induced Inflammation and Associated Cardiovascular Risk Factors

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, Margaret O.; Petriello, Michael C.; Han, Sung Gu; Sunkara, Manjula; Morris, Andrew J; Esser, Karyn; Hennig, Bernhard

    2015-01-01

    Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) are persistent environmental pollutants that contribute to the initiation of cardiovascular disease. Exercise has been shown to reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease; however, whether exercise can modulate PCB-induced vascular endothelial dysfunction and associated cardiovascular risk factors is unknown. We examined the effects of exercise on coplanar PCB- induced cardiovascular risk factors including oxidative stress, inflammation, impaired glucose tolerance, hypercholesteremia, and endothelium-dependent relaxation. Male ApoE−/− mice were divided into sedentary and exercise groups (voluntary wheel running) over a 12 week period. Half of each group was exposed to vehicle or PCB 77 at weeks 1, 2, 9, and 10. For ex vivo studies, male C57BL/6 mice exercised via voluntary wheel training for 5 weeks and then were administered with vehicle or PCB 77 24 hours before vascular reactivity studies were performed. Exposure to coplanar PCB increased risk factors associated with cardiovascular disease, including oxidative stress and systemic inflammation, glucose intolerance, and hypercholesteremia. The 12 week exercise intervention significantly reduced these pro-atherogenic parameters. Exercise also upregulated antioxidant enzymes including phase II detoxification enzymes. Sedentary animals exposed to PCB 77 exhibited endothelial dysfunction as demonstrated by significant impairment of endothelium-dependent relaxation, which was prevented by exercise. Lifestyle modifications such as aerobic exercise could be utilized as a therapeutic approach for the prevention of adverse cardiovascular health effects induced by environmental pollutants such as PCBs. Keywords: exercise, polychlorinated biphenyl, endothelial function, antioxidant response, cardiovascular disease, inflammation, oxidative stress PMID:25586614

  16. Different protocols of treadmill exercise induce distinct neuroplastic effects in rat brain motor areas.

    PubMed

    Real, Caroline C; Garcia, Priscila C; Britto, Luiz R G; Pires, Raquel S

    2015-10-22

    A variety of exercise protocols have been used to promote experimental neuroplasticity. However, the plastic brain responses generated by several aspects of training (types, frequency, regimens, duration) remain undetermined. The aim of this study was to compare the plastic changes in the glutamatergic system and synaptic proteins in motor cortex, striatum and cerebellum promoted by two different treadmill exercise regimens. The present study analyzed by immunohistochemistry and Western blotting the expression of the subunits of AMPA receptors (GluA1 and GluA2/3) and synaptic proteins (synapsin I and synaptophysin) in adult male Wistar rat brains. The animals were divided into animals subjected to two different frequencies of aerobic exercise groups and sedentary animals. The exercise groups were: intermittent treadmill exercise (ITE) - animals that exercised 3 times a week (every other day) during four weeks, and continuous treadmill exercise (CTE) - animals that exercised every day during four weeks. Our results reveal that different protocols of treadmill exercise were able to promote distinct synaptic reorganization processes among the exercised groups. In general, the intermittent exercise regimen induced a higher expression of presynaptic proteins, whereas the continuous exercise regimen increased postsynaptic GluA1 and GluA2/3 receptors.

  17. Evidence of a Redox-Dependent Regulation of Immune Responses to Exercise-Induced Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Sakelliou, Alexandra; Athanailidis, Ioannis; Tsoukas, Dimitrios; Chatzinikolaou, Athanasios; Draganidis, Dimitris; Jamurtas, Athanasios Z.; Liacos, Christina; Mandalidis, Dimitrios; Stamatelopoulos, Kimon; Dimopoulos, Meletios A.; Mitrakou, Asimina

    2016-01-01

    We used thiol-based antioxidant supplementation (n-acetylcysteine, NAC) to determine whether immune mobilisation following skeletal muscle microtrauma induced by exercise is redox-sensitive in healthy humans. According to a two-trial, double-blind, crossover, repeated measures design, 10 young men received either placebo or NAC (20 mg/kg/day) immediately after a muscle-damaging exercise protocol (300 eccentric contractions) and for eight consecutive days. Blood sampling and performance assessments were performed before exercise, after exercise, and daily throughout recovery. NAC reduced the decline of reduced glutathione in erythrocytes and the increase of plasma protein carbonyls, serum TAC and erythrocyte oxidized glutathione, and TBARS and catalase activity during recovery thereby altering postexercise redox status. The rise of muscle damage and inflammatory markers (muscle strength, creatine kinase activity, CRP, proinflammatory cytokines, and adhesion molecules) was less pronounced in NAC during the first phase of recovery. The rise of leukocyte and neutrophil count was decreased by NAC after exercise. Results on immune cell subpopulations obtained by flow cytometry indicated that NAC ingestion reduced the exercise-induced rise of total macrophages, HLA+ macrophages, and 11B+ macrophages and abolished the exercise-induced upregulation of B lymphocytes. Natural killer cells declined only in PLA immediately after exercise. These results indicate that thiol-based antioxidant supplementation blunts immune cell mobilisation in response to exercise-induced inflammation suggesting that leukocyte mobilization may be under redox-dependent regulation. PMID:27974950

  18. Evidence of a Redox-Dependent Regulation of Immune Responses to Exercise-Induced Inflammation.

    PubMed

    Sakelliou, Alexandra; Fatouros, Ioannis G; Athanailidis, Ioannis; Tsoukas, Dimitrios; Chatzinikolaou, Athanasios; Draganidis, Dimitris; Jamurtas, Athanasios Z; Liacos, Christina; Papassotiriou, Ioannis; Mandalidis, Dimitrios; Stamatelopoulos, Kimon; Dimopoulos, Meletios A; Mitrakou, Asimina

    2016-01-01

    We used thiol-based antioxidant supplementation (n-acetylcysteine, NAC) to determine whether immune mobilisation following skeletal muscle microtrauma induced by exercise is redox-sensitive in healthy humans. According to a two-trial, double-blind, crossover, repeated measures design, 10 young men received either placebo or NAC (20 mg/kg/day) immediately after a muscle-damaging exercise protocol (300 eccentric contractions) and for eight consecutive days. Blood sampling and performance assessments were performed before exercise, after exercise, and daily throughout recovery. NAC reduced the decline of reduced glutathione in erythrocytes and the increase of plasma protein carbonyls, serum TAC and erythrocyte oxidized glutathione, and TBARS and catalase activity during recovery thereby altering postexercise redox status. The rise of muscle damage and inflammatory markers (muscle strength, creatine kinase activity, CRP, proinflammatory cytokines, and adhesion molecules) was less pronounced in NAC during the first phase of recovery. The rise of leukocyte and neutrophil count was decreased by NAC after exercise. Results on immune cell subpopulations obtained by flow cytometry indicated that NAC ingestion reduced the exercise-induced rise of total macrophages, HLA(+) macrophages, and 11B(+) macrophages and abolished the exercise-induced upregulation of B lymphocytes. Natural killer cells declined only in PLA immediately after exercise. These results indicate that thiol-based antioxidant supplementation blunts immune cell mobilisation in response to exercise-induced inflammation suggesting that leukocyte mobilization may be under redox-dependent regulation.

  19. Skeletal muscle volume following dehydration induced by exercise in heat

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Intracellular skeletal muscle water is redistributed into the extracellular compartment during periods of dehydration, suggesting an associated decline in muscle volume. The purpose of this study was to evaluate skeletal muscle volume in active (knee extensors (KE)) and less active (biceps/triceps brachii, deltoid) musculature following dehydration induced by exercise in heat. Methods Twelve participants (seven men, five women) cycled in the heat under two conditions: (1) dehydration (DHYD) resulting in 3% and 5% losses of estimated total body water (ETBW), which was assessed by changes in body mass, and (2) fluid replacement (FR) where 3% and 5% losses of ETBW were counteracted by intermittent (20 to 30 min) fluid ingestion via a carbohydrate-electrolyte beverage. During both conditions, serum osmolality and skeletal muscle volume (assessed by magnetic resonance imaging) were measured at baseline and at the 3% and 5% ETBW loss measurement points. Results In DHYD, serum osmolality increased at 3% (p = 0.005) and 5% (p < 0.001) ETBW losses, while FR decreased serum osmolality at the 5% loss of ETBW time point (p = 0.009). In DHYD, KE muscle volume declined from 1,464 ± 446 ml to 1,406 ± 425 ml (3.9%, p < 0.001) at 3% ETBW loss and to 1,378 ± 421 ml (5.9%, p < 0.001) at 5% ETBW loss. The largest decline in KE volume in DYHD occurred in the mid-belly (31 ml, p = 0.001) and proximal (24 ml, p = 0.001) regions of the grouped vasti muscles. There were no changes in volume for the biceps/triceps (p = 0.35) or deltoid (p = 0.92) during DHYD. FR prevented the loss of KE muscle volume at 3% (1,430 ± 435 ml, p = 0.074) and 5% (1,431 ± 439 ml, p = 0.156) ETBW loss time points compared to baseline (1,445 ± 436 ml). Conclusions Following exercise in the heat, the actively contracting muscles lost volume, while replacing lost fluids intermittently during exercise in heat prevented this decline

  20. Screening for exercise-induced bronchoconstriction in college athletes.

    PubMed

    Parsons, Jonathan P; Cosmar, David; Phillips, Gary; Kaeding, Christopher; Best, Thomas M; Mastronarde, John G

    2012-03-01

    Previous studies have reported that the prevalence of exercise-induced bronchoconstriction (EIB) in athletes is higher than that of the general population. There is increasing evidence that athletes fail to recognize and report symptoms of EIB. As a result, there has been debate whether athletes should be screened for EIB, particularly in high-risk sports. We prospectively studied 144 athletes from six different varsity sports at a large National Collegiate Athletic Association Division I collegiate athletic program. Baseline demographics and medical history were obtained and the presence of asthma symptoms during exercise was documented. Each athlete subsequently underwent a eucapnic voluntary hyperventilation (EVH) test to document the presence of EIB. Exhaled nitric oxide (eNO) quantification was performed immediately before EVH testing. EIB was defined as a ≥10% decline in forced expiratory volume in 1 second compared with baseline. Only 4 of 144 (2.7%) athletes were EIB-positive after EVH testing. The presence of symptoms was not predictive of EIB as only 2 of the 64 symptomatic athletes (3%) were EIB-positive based on EVH testing. Two of the four athletes who were found to be EIB-positive denied such symptoms. The mean baseline eNO in the four EIB-positive athletes was 13.25 parts per billion (ppb) and 24.5 ppb in the EIB-negative athletes. Our data argue that screening for EIB is not recommended given the surprisingly low prevalence of EIB in the population we studied. In addition, the presence or absence of symptoms was not predictive of EIB and eNO testing was not effective in predicting EIB.

  1. Short and longer-term effects of creatine supplementation on exercise induced muscle damage.

    PubMed

    Rosene, John; Matthews, Tracey; Ryan, Christine; Belmore, Keith; Bergsten, Alisa; Blaisdell, Jill; Gaylord, James; Love, Rebecca; Marrone, Michael; Ward, Kristine; Wilson, Eric

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to determine if creatine supplementation assisted with reducing the amount of exercise induced muscle damage and if creatine supplementation aided in recovery from exercise induced muscle damage. Two groups of subjects (group 1 = creatine; group 2 = placebo) participated in an eccentric exercise protocol following 7 and 30 days of creatine or placebo supplementation (20 g.d(-1) for 7 d followed by 6g.d(-1) for 23 d = 30 d). Prior to the supplementation period, measurements were obtained for maximal dynamic strength, maximal isometric force, knee range of motion, muscle soreness, and serum levels of creatine kinase (CK) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH). Following 7 days of creatine supplementation, on day 8, subjects began consuming 6 g.d(-1) of creatine for 23 days. Additionally on days 8 and 31, subjects performed an eccentric exercise protocol using the knee extensors to induce muscle damage. Indirect markers of muscle damage, including maximal isometric force, knee range of motion, muscle soreness, and serum levels of CK and LDH, were collected at 12, 24, and 48 hours following each exercise bout. The results indicated that acute bouts of creatine have no effect on indirect markers of muscle damage for the acute (7 days) bout. However, maximal isometric force was greater for the creatine group versus placebo for the chronic (30 days) bout. This suggests that the ergogenic effect of creatine following 30 days of supplementation may have a positive impact on exercise induced muscle damage. Key pointsEccentric muscle actions highly associated with exercise induced muscle damage.Creatine supplementation has ergogenic effect to increase protein synthesis.Creatine supplementation does not attenuate exercise induced muscle damage with short term supplementation (7 days).Increased maximal isometric force seen with creatine supplementation after 30 days following exercise induced muscle damage.Ergogenic effect of creatine

  2. Exercise training attenuates placental ischemia-induced hypertension and angiogenic imbalance in the rat.

    PubMed

    Gilbert, Jeffrey S; Banek, Christopher T; Bauer, Ashley J; Gingery, Anne; Needham, Karen

    2012-12-01

    An imbalance between proangiogenic (vascular endothelial growth factor) and antiangiogenic (soluble fms-like tyrosine kinase 1) factors plays an important role in hypertension associated with reduced uteroplacental perfusion (RUPP). Exercise has been shown to stimulate proangiogenic factors, such as vascular endothelial growth factor, in both the pregnant and nonpregnant state; thus, we hypothesized that exercise training would attenuate both angiogenic imbalance and hypertension attributed to RUPP. Four groups of animals were studied, RUPP and normal pregnant controls and normal pregnant and RUPP+exercise training. Exercise training attenuated RUPP-induced hypertension (P<0.05), decreased soluble fms-like tyrosine kinase 1 (P<0.05), increased VEGF (P<0.05), and elevated the soluble fms-like tyrosine kinase 1:vascular endothelial growth factor ratio. The positive effects of exercise on angiogenic balance in the RUPP rats were confirmed by restoration (P<0.05) of the RUPP-induced decrease in endothelial tube formation in human umbilical vascular endothelial cells treated with serum from each of the experimental groups. Placental prolyl hydroxylase 1 was increased (P<0.05) in RUPP+exercise training rats. Decreased trolox equivalent antioxidant capacity in the placenta, amniotic fluid, and kidney of the RUPP rats was reversed by exercise. RUPP-induced increase in renal thiobarbituric acid reactive species was attenuated by exercise. The present data show that exercise training before and during pregnancy attenuates placental ischemia-induced hypertension, angiogenic imbalance, and oxidative stress in the RUPP rat and reveals that increased prolyl hydroxylase 1 is associated with decreased soluble fms-like tyrosine kinase 1, thus revealing several potential pathways for exercise training to mitigate the effects of placental ischemia-induced hypertension. Lastly, the present study demonstrates that exercise training may be a useful approach to attenuate the development

  3. Treadmill exercise alters ecstasy- induced long- term potentiation disruption in the hippocampus of male rats.

    PubMed

    Sajadi, Azam; Amiri, Iraj; Gharebaghi, Alireza; Komaki, Alireza; Asadbeigi, Masoumeh; Shahidi, Siamak; Mehdizadeh, Mehdi; Soleimani Asl, Sara

    2017-06-13

    3, 4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA) or ecstasy is a derivative of amphetamine that leads to long term potentiation (LTP) disruption in the hippocampal dentate gyrus (DG). Exercise has been accepted as a treatment for the improvement of neurodegenerative disease. Herein, the effects of exercise on the MDMA- induced neurotoxicity were assessed. Male Wistar rats received intraperitoneal injection of MDMA (10 mg/kg) and exercised for one month on a treadmill (Simultaneously or asynchronously with MDMA). LTP and expression of BDNF were assessed using electrophysiology and western blotting methods, respectively. MDMA attenuated the field excitatory post-synaptic potential (fEPSP) slope in comparison with the control group, whereas treadmill exercise increased this parameter when compared to MDMA group. Furthermore, BDNF expression significantly decreased in MDMA group and treadmill exercise could increase that. In conclusion, results of this study suggest that synchronous exercise is able to improve MDMA-induced LTP changes through increase of BDNF expression in the hippocampus of rats.

  4. The 5-HT3 receptor is essential for exercise-induced hippocampal neurogenesis and antidepressant effects.

    PubMed

    Kondo, M; Nakamura, Y; Ishida, Y; Shimada, S

    2015-11-01

    Exercise has a variety of beneficial effects on brain structure and function, such as hippocampal neurogenesis, mood and memory. Previous studies have shown that exercise enhances hippocampal neurogenesis, induces antidepressant effects and improves learning behavior. Brain serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT) levels increase following exercise, and the 5-HT system has been suggested to have an important role in these exercise-induced neuronal effects. However, the precise mechanism remains unclear. In this study, analysis of the 5-HT type 3A receptor subunit-deficient (htr3a(-/-)) mice revealed that lack of the 5-HT type 3 (5-HT3) receptor resulted in loss of exercise-induced hippocampal neurogenesis and antidepressant effects, but not of learning enhancement. Furthermore, stimulation of the 5-HT3 receptor promoted neurogenesis. These findings demonstrate that the 5-HT3 receptor is the critical target of 5-HT action in the brain following exercise, and is indispensable for hippocampal neurogenesis and antidepressant effects induced by exercise. This is the first report of a pivotal 5-HT receptor subtype that has a fundamental role in exercise-induced morphological changes and psychological effects.

  5. Exercise Does Not Protect against MPTP-Induced Neurotoxicity in BDNF Happloinsufficent Mice

    PubMed Central

    Gerecke, Kim M.; Jiao, Yun; Pagala, Viswajeeth; Smeyne, Richard J.

    2012-01-01

    Exercise has been demonstrated to potently protect substantia nigra pars compacta (SN) dopaminergic neurons from 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP)-induced neurotoxicity. One mechanism proposed to account for this neuroprotection is the upregulation of neurotrophic factors. Several neurotrophic factors, including Brain Derived Neurotrophic Factor (BDNF), have been shown to upregulate in response to exercise. In order to determine if exercise-induced neuroprotection is dependent upon BDNF, we compared the neuroprotective effects of voluntary exercise in mice heterozygous for the BDNF gene (BDNF+/−) with strain-matched wild-type (WT) mice. Stereological estimates of SNpc DA neurons from WT mice allowed 90 days exercise via unrestricted running demonstrated complete protection against the MPTP-induced neurotoxicity. However, BDNF+/− mice allowed 90 days of unrestricted exercise were not protected from MPTP-induced SNpc DA neuron loss. Proteomic analysis comparing SN and striatum from 90 day exercised WT and BDNF+/− mice showed differential expression of proteins related to energy regulation, intracellular signaling and trafficking. These results suggest that a full genetic complement of BDNF is critical for the exercise-induced neuroprotection of SNpc DA neurons. PMID:22912838

  6. A comparison of the acute haemodynamic response to aerobic and resistance exercise in subjects with exercise-induced pulmonary arterial hypertension.

    PubMed

    Fowler, Robin M; Maiorana, Andrew J; Jenkins, Sue C; Gain, Kevin R; O'Driscoll, Gerry; Gabbay, Eli

    2013-08-01

    Exercise-induced pulmonary arterial hypertension (EIPAH) is associated with reduced exercise capacity and abnormal central haemodynamic responses to maximal aerobic exercise. Aerobic and resistance exercise training are commonly employed to treat reduced exercise capacity; however, the haemodynamic response to aerobic and resistance exercise, at training intensities, in subjects with EIPAH is unknown. Fourteen subjects (11 with scleroderma, 12 females) with EIPAH underwent cardiopulmonary exercise testing on a cycle ergometer, a one-repetition maximum (1RM) strength test and resistance exercise at 40% and 60% of maximum on a bilateral leg press machine. All tests were performed with a pulmonary artery catheter in situ. Haemodynamic and symptomatic responses to aerobic and resistance exercise, performed at 40% of peak oxygen consumption and 40% of 1RM, and at 60% of peak oxygen consumption and 60% of 1RM, were compared. For maximal exercise, the highest haemodynamic responses recorded during the cycling and 1RM tests were compared. There were no differences in haemodynamic or symptomatic responses between the two modalities of submaximal exercise. At maximal exercise, all haemodynamic and symptomatic responses were lower during resistance compared with aerobic exercise (p < 0.05). At the intensities studied, lower-limb resistance exercise was well tolerated and was mostly associated with similar or lower haemodynamic responses compared with aerobic exercise, in subjects with EIPAH.

  7. The regulation of autophagy during exercise in skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Vainshtein, Anna; Hood, David A

    2016-03-15

    The merits of exercise on muscle health and well-being are numerous and well documented. However, the mechanisms underlying the robust adaptations induced by exercise, particularly on mitochondria, are less clear and much sought after. Recently, an evolutionary conserved cellular recycling mechanism known as autophagy has been implicated in the adaptations to acute and chronic exercise. A basal level of autophagy is constantly ongoing in cells and tissues, ensuring cellular clearance and energy homeostasis. This pathway can be further induced, as a survival mechanism, by cellular perturbations, such as energetic imbalance and oxidative stress. During exercise, a biphasic autophagy response is mobilized, leading to both an acute induction and a long-term potentiation of the process. Posttranslational modifications arising from upstream signaling cascades induce an acute autophagic response during a single bout of exercise by mobilizing core autophagy machinery. A transcriptional program involving the regulators Forkhead box O, transcription factor EB, p53, and peroxisome proliferator coactivator-1α is also induced to fuel sustained increases in autophagic capacity. Autophagy has also been documented to mediate chronic exercise-induced metabolic benefits, and animal models in which autophagy is perturbed do not adapt to exercise to the same extent. In this review, we discuss recent developments in the field of autophagy and exercise. We specifically highlight the molecular mechanisms activated during acute exercise that lead to a prolonged adaptive response.

  8. The Role of Exercise-Induced Cardiovascular Adaptation in Brain Health.

    PubMed

    Tarumi, Takashi; Zhang, Rong

    2015-10-01

    Regular aerobic exercise improves brain health; however, a potential dose-response relationship and the underling physiological mechanisms remain unclear. Existing data support the following hypotheses: 1) exercise-induced cardiovascular adaptation plays an important role in improving brain perfusion, structure, and function, and 2) a hormetic relation seems to exist between the intensity of exercise and brain health, which needs to be further elucidated.

  9. Resistance exercise enhances the molecular signaling of mitochondrial biogenesis induced by endurance exercise in human skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Wang, Li; Mascher, Henrik; Psilander, Niklas; Blomstrand, Eva; Sahlin, Kent

    2011-11-01

    Combining endurance and strength training (concurrent training) may change the adaptation compared with single mode training. However, the site of interaction and the mechanisms are unclear. We have investigated the hypothesis that molecular signaling of mitochondrial biogenesis after endurance exercise is impaired by resistance exercise. Ten healthy subjects performed either only endurance exercise (E; 1-h cycling at ∼65% of maximal oxygen uptake), or endurance exercise followed by resistance exercise (ER; 1-h cycling + 6 sets of leg press at 70-80% of 1 repetition maximum) in a randomized cross-over design. Muscle biopsies were obtained before and after exercise (1 and 3 h postcycling). The mRNA of genes related to mitochondrial biogenesis [(peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ coactivator-1 (PGC-1)α, PGC-1-related coactivator (PRC)] related coactivator) and substrate regulation (pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase-4) increased after both E and ER, but the mRNA levels were about twofold higher after ER (P < 0.01). Phosphorylation of proteins involved in the signaling cascade of protein synthesis [mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), ribosomal S6 kinase 1, and eukaryotic elongation factor 2] was altered after ER but not after E. Moreover, ER induced a larger increase in mRNA of genes associated with positive mTOR signaling (cMyc and Rheb). Phosphorylation of AMP-activated protein kinase, acetyl-CoA carboxylase, and Akt increased similarly at 1 h postcycling (P < 0.01) after both types of exercise. Contrary to our hypothesis, the results demonstrate that ER, performed after E, amplifies the adaptive signaling response of mitochondrial biogenesis compared with single-mode endurance exercise. The mechanism may relate to a cross talk between signaling pathways mediated by mTOR. The results suggest that concurrent training may be beneficial for the adaptation of muscle oxidative capacity.

  10. Exercise four hour redistribution thallium-201 single photon emission computed tomography and exercise induced ST segment elevation in detecting the viable myocardium in patients with acute myocardial infarction

    PubMed Central

    Yamagishi, H; Akioka, K; Takagi, M; Tanaka, A; Takeuchi, K; Yoshikawa, J; Ochi, H

    1999-01-01

    Objective—To investigate the specificity and sensitivity of the combination of redistribution in exercise thallium-201 single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and exercise induced ST elevation for detecting the viable myocardium in patients with acute myocardial infarction.
Design—37 patients were studied within seven weeks of onset of Q wave myocardial infarction (anterior in 22, inferior in 15). All patients underwent exercise four hour redistribution thallium-201 SPECT and positron emission tomography using fluorine-18-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) and nitrogen-13 ammonia under fasting conditions.
Results—Sixteen patients showed exercise induced ST elevation ⩾ 1.5 mm, and 15 of these had increased FDG uptake in the infarct region. Eleven of 16 patients (10 of 11 patients with anterior infarctions) with irreversible thallium-201 defects and increased FDG uptake showed exercise induced ST elevation. The sensitivity, specificity, and predictive accuracy of redistribution, exercise induced ST segment elevation, or both for detecting increased FDG uptake were 82%, 75%, and 67% (94%, 75%, and 91% for anterior infarctions), respectively. 
Conclusions—In patients with acute Q wave myocardial infarction, the combination of redistribution in exercise thallium-201 SPECT and exercise induced ST elevation can detect the viable myocardium in the infarct region with high sensitivity and specificity, especially in patients with anterior infarctions.

 Keywords: acute myocardial infarction;  viability;  exercise induced ST elevation;  exercise thallium-201 SPECT PMID:10220539

  11. Exercise-induced changes of the capillaries in the cortex of middle-aged rats.

    PubMed

    Huang, C-X; Qiu, X; Wang, S; Wu, H; Xia, L; Li, C; Gao, Y; Zhang, L; Xiu, Y; Chao, F; Tang, Y

    2013-03-13

    Previous studies have shown that running exercise could increase regional cerebral blood flow. There have been previous studies investigating the effects of running exercise on capillary density in the brain and showing that running exercise could induce brain angiogenesis. However, there have been no studies investigating the effects of running exercise on the total volume, total length and total surface area of the capillaries in the cortex. Moreover, sex differences in the effects of running exercise on the capillaries of the cortex have not previously been investigated. The current study was designed to investigate the effects of running exercise on the capillaries in the cortex of middle-aged rats using the new unbiased stereological methods. The present study found that the total length and total surface area of the capillaries in the cortex of running middle-aged female rats were significantly increased, compared to control rats. Our results also reveal that there are sex differences in the effects of running exercise on the capillaries in the cortex of middle-aged rats. These results demonstrate that exercise-induced increases of the capillaries in the female rat cortex might be one of the structural bases for the exercise-induced improvement in the spatial learning capacity of middle-aged female rats. These results provide a baseline for further studies that search for strategies to delay the deleterious effects of brain aging.

  12. Exercise protects against PCB-induced inflammation and associated cardiovascular risk factors.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Margaret O; Petriello, Michael C; Han, Sung Gu; Sunkara, Manjula; Morris, Andrew J; Esser, Karyn; Hennig, Bernhard

    2016-02-01

    Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) are persistent environmental pollutants that contribute to the initiation of cardiovascular disease. Exercise has been shown to reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease; however, whether exercise can modulate PCB-induced vascular endothelial dysfunction and associated cardiovascular risk factors is unknown. We examined the effects of exercise on coplanar PCB-induced cardiovascular risk factors including oxidative stress, inflammation, impaired glucose tolerance, hypercholesteremia, and endothelium-dependent relaxation. Male ApoE(-/-) mice were divided into sedentary and exercise groups (voluntary wheel running) over a 12-week period. Half of each group was exposed to vehicle or PCB 77 at weeks 1, 2, 9, and 10. For ex vivo studies, male C57BL/6 mice exercised via voluntary wheel training for 5 weeks and then were administered with vehicle or PCB 77 24 h before vascular reactivity studies were performed. Exposure to coplanar PCB increased risk factors associated with cardiovascular disease, including oxidative stress and systemic inflammation, glucose intolerance, and hypercholesteremia. The 12-week exercise intervention significantly reduced these proatherogenic parameters. Exercise also upregulated antioxidant enzymes including phase II detoxification enzymes. Sedentary animals exposed to PCB 77 exhibited endothelial dysfunction as demonstrated by significant impairment of endothelium-dependent relaxation, which was prevented by exercise. Lifestyle modifications such as aerobic exercise could be utilized as a therapeutic approach for the prevention of adverse cardiovascular health effects induced by environmental pollutants such as PCBs.

  13. Effect of guarana on exercise in normal and epinephrine-induced glycogenolytic mice.

    PubMed

    Miura, T; Tatara, M; Nakamura, K; Suzuki, I

    1998-06-01

    The tonic action of water Guarana extract, (Paullinia cupana MART.), was investigated in normal, exercised, and epinephrine-induced glycogenolytic mice. A water extract of Guarana (GW) (500 mg/kg) increased the blood glucose level (p < 0.001) and decreased the liver glycogen contents of mice 60 min after oral maltose administration (p < 0.05). GW also significantly suppressed exercise-induced hypoglycemia (60 min: p < 0.05). However, GW did not affect the blood glucose in epinephrine-induced glycogenolytic and exercise mice. These findings indicate that the suppressive mechanism of hypoglycemia might be due to the promotion of glycogen resolution.

  14. Bioinformatics Analysis Reveals MicroRNAs Regulating Biological Pathways in Exercise-Induced Cardiac Physiological Hypertrophy.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jiahong; Liu, Yang; Xie, Yuan; Zhao, Cuimei; Wang, Hongbao

    2017-01-01

    Exercise-induced physiological cardiac hypertrophy is generally considered to be a type of adaptive change after exercise training and is beneficial for cardiovascular diseases. This study aims at investigating exercise-regulated microRNAs (miRNAs) and their potential biological pathways. Here, we collected 23 miRNAs from 8 published studies. MirPath v.3 from the DIANA tools website was used to execute the analysis, and TargetScan was used to predict the target genes. Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) and Gene Ontology (GO) analyses were performed to identify potential pathways and functional annotations associated with exercise-induced physiological cardiac hypertrophy. Various miRNA targets and molecular pathways, such as Fatty acid elongation, Arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy (ARVC), and ECM-receptor interaction, were identified. This study could prompt the understanding of the regulatory mechanisms underlying exercise-induced physiological cardiac hypertrophy.

  15. Chronic exercise dampens hippocampal glutamate overflow induced by kainic acid in rats.

    PubMed

    Holmes, Philip V; Reiss, Jenny I; Murray, Patrick S; Dishman, Rod K; Spradley, Jessica M

    2015-05-01

    Our laboratory has previously reported that chronic, voluntary exercise diminishes seizure-related behaviors induced by convulsant doses of kainic acid. The present experiments tested the hypothesis that exercise exerts this protective effect through a mechanism involving suppression of glutamate release in the hippocampal formation. Following three weeks of voluntary wheel running or sedentary conditions, rats were injected with 10 mg/kg of kainic acid, and hippocampal glutamate was measured in real time using a telemetric, in vivo voltammetry system. A separate experiment measured electroencephalographic (EEG) activity following kainic acid treatment. Results of the voltammetry experiment revealed that the rise in hippocampal glutamate induced by kainic acid is attenuated in exercising rats compared to sedentary controls, indicating that the exercise-induced protection against seizures involves regulation of hippocampal glutamate release. The findings reveal the potential benefit of regular exercise in the treatment and prevention of seizure disorders and suggest a possible neurobiological mechanism underlying this effect.

  16. Bioinformatics Analysis Reveals MicroRNAs Regulating Biological Pathways in Exercise-Induced Cardiac Physiological Hypertrophy

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Jiahong; Liu, Yang; Xie, Yuan

    2017-01-01

    Exercise-induced physiological cardiac hypertrophy is generally considered to be a type of adaptive change after exercise training and is beneficial for cardiovascular diseases. This study aims at investigating exercise-regulated microRNAs (miRNAs) and their potential biological pathways. Here, we collected 23 miRNAs from 8 published studies. MirPath v.3 from the DIANA tools website was used to execute the analysis, and TargetScan was used to predict the target genes. Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) and Gene Ontology (GO) analyses were performed to identify potential pathways and functional annotations associated with exercise-induced physiological cardiac hypertrophy. Various miRNA targets and molecular pathways, such as Fatty acid elongation, Arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy (ARVC), and ECM-receptor interaction, were identified. This study could prompt the understanding of the regulatory mechanisms underlying exercise-induced physiological cardiac hypertrophy. PMID:28286759

  17. Platelet activation during exercise induced asthma: effect of prophylaxis with cromoglycate and salbutamol.

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, C E; Belfield, P W; Davis, S; Cooke, N J; Spencer, A; Davies, J A

    1986-01-01

    Peak expiratory flow (PEF) and plasma concentrations of platelet factor 4 and beta thromboglobulin were measured before and after exercise in nine asthmatic patients and 12 non-asthmatic volunteers. Exercise was preceded by administration in random order of either placebo, salbutamol 200 micrograms, or sodium cromoglycate 2 mg from a pressurised inhaler. In control subjects there were minimal changes in PEF and plasma concentrations of platelet factor 4 and beta thromboglobulin. In the asthmatic patients the typical changes in PEF were seen on exercise; plasma concentrations of platelet factor 4 and beta thromboglobulin rose significantly in parallel, the rise preceding the fall in PEF. The changes in peak flow and platelet activation induced by exercise were attenuated by prior administration of salbutamol or cromoglycate. These results indicate that exercise induced asthma is associated with a rise in platelet release products similar to that observed in antigen induced asthma. PMID:2943049

  18. Assessment of Eccentric Exercise-Induced Oxidative Stress Using Oxidation-Reduction Potential Markers

    PubMed Central

    Stagos, Dimitrios; Goutzourelas, Nikolaos; Ntontou, Amalia-Maria; Kafantaris, Ioannis; Deli, Chariklia K.; Poulios, Athanasios; Jamurtas, Athanasios Z.; Bar-Or, David; Kouretas, Dimitrios

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the use of static (sORP) and capacity ORP (cORP) oxidation-reduction potential markers as measured by the RedoxSYS Diagnostic System in plasma, for assessing eccentric exercise-induced oxidative stress. Nineteen volunteers performed eccentric exercise with the knee extensors. Blood was collected before, immediately after exercise, and 24, 48, and 72 h after exercise. Moreover, common redox biomarkers were measured, which were protein carbonyls, thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances, total antioxidant capacity in plasma, and catalase activity and glutathione levels in erythrocytes. When the participants were examined as one group, there were not significant differences in any marker after exercise. However, in 11 participants there was a high increase in cORP after exercise, while in 8 participants there was a high decrease. Thus, the participants were divided in low cORP group exhibiting significant decrease in cORP after exercise and in high cORP group exhibiting significant increase. Moreover, only in the low cORP group there was a significant increase in lipid peroxidation after exercise suggesting induction of oxidative stress. The results suggested that high decreases in cORP values after exercise may indicate induction of oxidative stress by eccentric exercise, while high increases in cORP values after exercise may indicate no existence of oxidative stress. PMID:25874019

  19. Assessment of eccentric exercise-induced oxidative stress using oxidation-reduction potential markers.

    PubMed

    Stagos, Dimitrios; Goutzourelas, Nikolaos; Ntontou, Amalia-Maria; Kafantaris, Ioannis; Deli, Chariklia K; Poulios, Athanasios; Jamurtas, Athanasios Z; Bar-Or, David; Kouretas, Dimitrios

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the use of static (sORP) and capacity ORP (cORP) oxidation-reduction potential markers as measured by the RedoxSYS Diagnostic System in plasma, for assessing eccentric exercise-induced oxidative stress. Nineteen volunteers performed eccentric exercise with the knee extensors. Blood was collected before, immediately after exercise, and 24, 48, and 72 h after exercise. Moreover, common redox biomarkers were measured, which were protein carbonyls, thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances, total antioxidant capacity in plasma, and catalase activity and glutathione levels in erythrocytes. When the participants were examined as one group, there were not significant differences in any marker after exercise. However, in 11 participants there was a high increase in cORP after exercise, while in 8 participants there was a high decrease. Thus, the participants were divided in low cORP group exhibiting significant decrease in cORP after exercise and in high cORP group exhibiting significant increase. Moreover, only in the low cORP group there was a significant increase in lipid peroxidation after exercise suggesting induction of oxidative stress. The results suggested that high decreases in cORP values after exercise may indicate induction of oxidative stress by eccentric exercise, while high increases in cORP values after exercise may indicate no existence of oxidative stress.

  20. Hyperthermia, dehydration, and osmotic stress: unconventional sources of exercise-induced reactive oxygen species.

    PubMed

    King, Michelle A; Clanton, Thomas L; Laitano, Orlando

    2016-01-15

    Evidence of increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) production is observed in the circulation during exercise in humans. This is exacerbated at elevated body temperatures and attenuated when normal exercise-induced body temperature elevations are suppressed. Why ROS production during exercise is temperature dependent is entirely unknown. This review covers the human exercise studies to date that provide evidence that oxidant and antioxidant changes observed in the blood during exercise are dependent on temperature and fluid balance. We then address possible mechanisms linking exercise with these variables that include shear stress, effects of hemoconcentration, and signaling pathways involving muscle osmoregulation. Since pathways of muscle osmoregulation are rarely discussed in this context, we provide a brief review of what is currently known and unknown about muscle osmoregulation and how it may be linked to oxidant production in exercise and hyperthermia. Both the circulation and the exercising muscle fibers become concentrated with osmolytes during exercise in the heat, resulting in a competition for available water across the muscle sarcolemma and other tissues. We conclude that though multiple mechanisms may be responsible for the changes in oxidant/antioxidant balance in the blood during exercise, a strong case can be made that a significant component of ROS produced during some forms of exercise reflect requirements of adapting to osmotic challenges, hyperthermia challenges, and loss of circulating fluid volume. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  1. Exercise-induced neuroplasticity in human Parkinson's disease: What is the evidence telling us?

    PubMed

    Hirsch, Mark A; Iyer, Sanjay S; Sanjak, Mohammed

    2016-01-01

    While animal models of exercise and PD have pushed the field forward, few studies have addressed exercise-induced neuroplasticity in human PD. As a first step toward promoting greater international collaboration on exercise-induced neuroplasticity in human PD, we present data on 8 human PD studies (published between 2008 and 2015) with 144 adults with PD of varying disease severity (Hoehn and Yahr stage 1 to stage 3), using various experimental (e.g., randomized controlled trial) and quasi-experimental designs on the effects of cognitive and physical activity on brain structure or function in PD. We focus on plasticity mechanisms of intervention-induced increases in maximal corticomotor excitability, exercise-induced changes in voxel-based gray matter volume changes and increases in exercise-induced serum levels of brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF). Finally, we provide a future perspective for promoting international, collaborative research on exercise-induced neuroplasticity in human PD. An emerging body of evidence suggests exercise triggers several plasticity related events in the human PD brain including corticomotor excitation, increases and decreases in gray matter volume and changes in BDNF levels. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Exercise-induced silent myocardial ischemia in patients with vasospastic angina

    SciTech Connect

    Aoki, M.; Koyanagi, S.; Sakai, K.; Irie, T.; Takeshita, A.; Nakamura, M.; Nakagaki, O. )

    1990-03-01

    To clarify the incidence and clinical characteristics of exercise-induced myocardial ischemia in patients with vasospastic angina, we performed exercise thallium computed tomography in 25 patients who had no significant coronary artery stenosis greater than 70%. Coronary artery spasm was documented by coronary angiography in all patients. Eleven patients (44%) developed exercise-induced perfusion defects, but only four of them had anginal pain (36%). Diltiazem (90 mg, administered orally) prevented the development of exercise-induced perfusion defects in all patients. Multivessel coronary spasm was documented by coronary angiography in 11 patients, and nine of them (82%) showed exercise-induced perfusion defects (p less than 0.05). From this study it can be concluded: (1) Exercise-induced myocardial ischemia was demonstrated in 44% of patients who had vasospastic angina without fixed coronary stenosis, and 64% of them were asymptomatic. (2) Patients with multivessel spasm had a greater prevalence of exercise-induced myocardial ischemia than those with single-vessel spasm.

  3. Thermoreversible (Ionic-Liquid-Based) Aqueous Biphasic Systems

    PubMed Central

    Passos, Helena; Luís, Andreia; Coutinho, João A. P.; Freire, Mara G.

    2016-01-01

    The ability to induce reversible phase transitions between homogeneous solutions and biphasic liquid-liquid systems, at pre-defined and suitable operating temperatures, is of crucial relevance in the design of separation processes. Ionic-liquid-based aqueous biphasic systems (IL-based ABS) have demonstrated superior performance as alternative extraction platforms, and their thermoreversible behaviour is here disclosed by the use of protic ILs. The applicability of the temperature-induced phase switching is further demonstrated with the complete extraction of two value-added proteins, achieved in a single-step. It is shown that these temperature-induced mono(bi)phasic systems are significantly more versatile than classical liquid-liquid systems which are constrained by their critical temperatures. IL-based ABS allow to work in a wide range of temperatures and compositions which can be tailored to fit the requirements of a given separation process. PMID:26843320

  4. Thermoreversible (Ionic-Liquid-Based) Aqueous Biphasic Systems.

    PubMed

    Passos, Helena; Luís, Andreia; Coutinho, João A P; Freire, Mara G

    2016-02-04

    The ability to induce reversible phase transitions between homogeneous solutions and biphasic liquid-liquid systems, at pre-defined and suitable operating temperatures, is of crucial relevance in the design of separation processes. Ionic-liquid-based aqueous biphasic systems (IL-based ABS) have demonstrated superior performance as alternative extraction platforms, and their thermoreversible behaviour is here disclosed by the use of protic ILs. The applicability of the temperature-induced phase switching is further demonstrated with the complete extraction of two value-added proteins, achieved in a single-step. It is shown that these temperature-induced mono(bi)phasic systems are significantly more versatile than classical liquid-liquid systems which are constrained by their critical temperatures. IL-based ABS allow to work in a wide range of temperatures and compositions which can be tailored to fit the requirements of a given separation process.

  5. Thermoreversible (Ionic-Liquid-Based) Aqueous Biphasic Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Passos, Helena; Luís, Andreia; Coutinho, João A. P.; Freire, Mara G.

    2016-02-01

    The ability to induce reversible phase transitions between homogeneous solutions and biphasic liquid-liquid systems, at pre-defined and suitable operating temperatures, is of crucial relevance in the design of separation processes. Ionic-liquid-based aqueous biphasic systems (IL-based ABS) have demonstrated superior performance as alternative extraction platforms, and their thermoreversible behaviour is here disclosed by the use of protic ILs. The applicability of the temperature-induced phase switching is further demonstrated with the complete extraction of two value-added proteins, achieved in a single-step. It is shown that these temperature-induced mono(bi)phasic systems are significantly more versatile than classical liquid-liquid systems which are constrained by their critical temperatures. IL-based ABS allow to work in a wide range of temperatures and compositions which can be tailored to fit the requirements of a given separation process.

  6. Effects of exercise on stress-induced changes of norepinephrine and serotonin in rat hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jing; Chen, Xuewei; Zhang, Na; Ma, Qiang

    2013-10-31

    Exercise is beneficial to brain and can attenuate stress-induced hippocampal damages. However, the details involved monoamine neurotransmitter in exercise to counteract stress have not been well elucidated. The aim of this study was to examine exercise-induced responses of the norepinephrine (NE) and serotonin (5-HT) systems in counteracting stress-induced hippocampal damages. Rats were divided into exercise (four weeks of voluntary wheel running), stress (three weeks of restraint stress), exercise-stress (three weeks of stress following four weeks of exercise), and control groups. Levels of NE and 5-HT were detected with high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), mRNA expression was detected with real-time fluorescence quantitative reverse transcription polymerase reaction (FQ-RT-PCR) and proteins associated with 5-HT₁Α receptors (5-HT₁Α-R) and β₂-adrenergic receptors (β₂-AR) were analyzed by western blotting. 5-HT levels were highest (P < 0.01) in the exercised group, lowest (P < 0.05) in the stressed rats, and were similar (P = 0.065) in stressed and exercise-stressed rats. NE levels were highest (P < 0.01) in the exercised group, and higher in the exercise-stressed than the stressed rats (P < 0.01). 5-HT₁A-R mRNA expression was highest (P < 0.01) in the exercised group, lowest in the stressed group. The 5-HT₁Α-R protein expression changed in the same tendency as its mRNA levels. The β₂-AR mRNA was highest in exercised rats (P < 0.05), and its protein expression was higher in the exercised and exercise-stress rats than in the control and stress rats (P < 0.05). In conclusion, norepinephrine may represent endophenotypic features of exercise states. Serotonin levels may be more susceptible to stress and responsible for deleterious stress-induced effects. Norepinephrine and serotonin may both contribute to counteraction of stress-induced hippocampal damages of physical exercises.

  7. Exercise training attenuates placental ischemia induced hypertension and angiogenic imbalance in the rat

    PubMed Central

    Gilbert, Jeffrey S; Banek, Christopher T; Bauer, Ashley J; Gingery, Anne; Needham, Karen

    2013-01-01

    An imbalance between pro-angiogenic (vascular endothelial growth factor, VEGF) and anti-angiogenic (soluble fms-like tyrosine kinase-1, sFlt-1) factors plays an important role in hypertension associated with reduced utero-placental perfusion (RUPP). Exercise has been shown to stimulate pro-angiogenic factors such as VEGF in both the pregnant and non-pregnant state, thus we hypothesized exercise training would attenuate both angiogenic imbalance and hypertension due to RUPP. Four groups of animals were studied: RUPP and normal pregnant (NP) controls and NP and RUPP + exercise training (NP or RUPP+EX). Exercise training attenuated RUPP-induced: hypertension (P<0.05); increased sFlt-1(P<0.05); decreased VEGF (P<0.05), and elevated sFlt-1:VEGF ratio. The positive effects of exercise on angiogenic balance in the RUPP rats were confirmed by restoration (P<0.05) of the RUPP-induced decrease in endothelial tube formation in HUVECs treated with serum from each of the experimental groups. Placental prolyl hydroxylase-1 (PHD1) was increased (P<0.05) in RUPP+Ex rats. Decreased trolox equivalent antioxidant capacity in the placenta, amniotic fluid and kidney of the RUPP rats was reversed by exercise. RUPP induced increase in renal TBARS was attenuated by exercise. The present data show exercise training before and during pregnancy attenuates placental ischemia-induced hypertension, angiogenic imbalance and oxidative stress in the RUPP rat and reveals that increased PHD1 is associated with decreased sFlt-1 thus revealing several potential pathways for exercise training to mitigate the effects of placental ischemia-induced hypertension. Lastly, the present study demonstrates exercise training may be a useful approach to attenuate the development of placental ischemia-induced hypertension during pregnancy. PMID:23090773

  8. [Exercise-induced atrioventricular block. Significance of the ischemic component. Report of 4 new cases].

    PubMed

    Rumoroso, J R; Montes Orbe, P M; Cembellín, J C; Pérez-García, P; González-Liébana, J; Gómez-Varela, S; Bodegas, A; Barrenetxea, J I

    1997-04-01

    We report four new cases of exercise-induced atrio-ventricular block (appearing during treadmill exercise testing). The mechanism was ischemia in two patients and the conduction disturbance disappeared after coronary artery bypass grafting. The literature on this matter is reviewed. Also the etiology, the natural history and management are discussed in these cases.

  9. Effect of aerobic exercise against vanadyl sulphate-induced nephrotoxicity and hepatotoxicity in rats

    PubMed Central

    Ahmadi, Fatemeh; Nematbakhsh, Mehdi; Kargarfard, Mehdi; Eshraghi-Jazi, Fatemeh; Talebi, Ardeshir; Shirdavani, Soheila

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Vanadium compounds are insulin like drugs which are accompanied with nephrotoxicity and hepatotoxicity as their major side effects. Aerobic exercise is well known as an approach to reduce the side effects of many drugs. Objectives: This study was designed to determine the role of aerobic exercise against vanadyl sulphate induced nephrotoxicity and hepatotoxicity in male rats. Materials and Methods: Twenty-four male Wistar rats were randomly divided into three groups. Group I had aerobic exercise on a treadmill 5 days/week for 6 weeks. Group II received vanadyl sulphate (50 mg/kg/week; i.p.) for 6 weeks. Group III had combination of exercise and vanadyl sulphate therapy as groups 1 and 2. At the end of study, blood samples were obtained, and the animals were sacrificed for the tissues injury determination. Results: Vanadyl sulphate alone increased serum levels of blood urea nitrogen (BUN), creatinine (Cr), and kidney weight (KW) and kidney tissue damage score (KTDS) (P<0.05). These observations revealed nephrotoxicity induced by vanadyl sulphate, although exercise training did not attenuate these results. In addition, vanadyl sulphate alone induced liver tissue damage score and exercise training intensified it insignificantly, while the serum levels of aspartate amino transferase and alanine amino transferase were greater in exercise alone group than others groups. Conclusion: Aerobic exercise could not attenuate vanadyl sulphate induced nephrotoxicity and hepatotoxicity. These findings must be considered when vanadyl sulphate is suggested as insulin like drug. PMID:27689120

  10. Use of thermodilution cardiac output overestimates diagnoses of exercise-induced pulmonary hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Steven; Brusca, Samuel B.; Rhodes, Parker S.; Kolb, Todd M.; Mathai, Stephen C.

    2017-01-01

    Two new definitions of exercise-induced pulmonary hypertension (EIPH) have emerged. Both rely on measuring cardiac output (CO), yet this remains unstandardized. In our cohort of patients undergoing invasive cardiopulmonary exercise testing, we found that using thermodilution CO rather than direct Fick CO led to a significant excess of EIPH diagnoses. PMID:28680584

  11. Use of thermodilution cardiac output overestimates diagnoses of exercise-induced pulmonary hypertension.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Steven; Brusca, Samuel B; Rhodes, Parker S; Kolb, Todd M; Mathai, Stephen C; Tedford, Ryan J

    2017-03-01

    Two new definitions of exercise-induced pulmonary hypertension (EIPH) have emerged. Both rely on measuring cardiac output (CO), yet this remains unstandardized. In our cohort of patients undergoing invasive cardiopulmonary exercise testing, we found that using thermodilution CO rather than direct Fick CO led to a significant excess of EIPH diagnoses.

  12. High-intensity exercise training induces morphological and biochemical changes in skeletal muscles.

    PubMed

    Toti, L; Bartalucci, A; Ferrucci, M; Fulceri, F; Lazzeri, G; Lenzi, P; Soldani, P; Gobbi, P; La Torre, A; Gesi, M

    2013-12-01

    IN THE PRESENT STUDY WE INVESTIGATED THE EFFECT OF TWO DIFFERENT EXERCISE PROTOCOLS ON FIBRE COMPOSITION AND METABOLISM OF TWO SPECIFIC MUSCLES OF MICE: the quadriceps and the gastrocnemius. Mice were run daily on a motorized treadmill, at a velocity corresponding to 60% or 90% of the maximal running velocity. Blood lactate and body weight were measured during exercise training. We found that at the end of training the body weight significantly increased in high-intensity exercise mice compared to the control group (P=0.0268), whereas it decreased in low-intensity exercise mice compared to controls (P=0.30). In contrast, the food intake was greater in both trained mice compared to controls (P < 0.0001 and P < 0.0001 for low-intensity and high-intensity exercise mice, respectively). These effects were accompanied by a progressive reduction in blood lactate levels at the end of training in both the exercised mice compared with controls (P=0.03 and P < 0.0001 for low-intensity and high-intensity exercise mice, respectively); in particular, blood lactate levels after high-intensity exercise were significantly lower than those measured in low-intensity exercise mice (P=0.0044). Immunoblotting analysis demonstrated that high-intensity exercise training produced a significant increase in the expression of mitochondrial enzymes contained within gastrocnemius and quadriceps muscles. These changes were associated with an increase in the amount of slow fibres in both these muscles of high-intensity exercise mice, as revealed by the counts of slow fibres stained with specific antibodies (P < 0.0001 for the gastrocnemius; P=0.0002 for the quadriceps). Our results demonstrate that high-intensity exercise, in addition to metabolic changes consisting of a decrease in blood lactate and body weight, induces an increase in the mitochondrial enzymes and slow fibres in different skeletal muscles of mice, which indicates an exercise-induced increase in the aerobic metabolism.

  13. Exercise preconditioning attenuates pressure overload-induced pathological cardiac hypertrophy

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Tongyi; Tang, Hao; Zhang, Ben; Cai, Chengliang; Liu, Xiaohong; Han, Qingqi; Zou, Liangjian

    2015-01-01

    Pathological cardiac hypertrophy, a common response of the heart to a variety of cardiovascular diseases, is typically associated with myocytes remodeling and fibrotic replacement, cardiac dysfunction. Exercise preconditioning (EP) increases the myocardial mechanical load and enhances tolerance of cardiac ischemia-reperfusion injury (IRI), however, is less reported in pathological cardiac hypertrophy. To determine the effect of EP in pathological cardiac hypertrophy, Male 10-wk-old Sprague-Dawley rats (n=30) were subjected to 4 weeks of EP followed by 4-8 weeks of pressure overload (transverse aortic constriction, TAC) to induce pathological remodeling. TAC in untrained controls (n=30) led to pathological cardiac hypertrophy, depressed systolic function. We observed that left ventricular wall thickness in end diastole, heart size, heart weight-to-body weight ratio, heart weight-to-tibia length ratio, cross-sectional area of cardiomyocytes and the reactivation of fetal genes (atrial natriuretic peptide and brain natriuretic peptide) were markedly increased, meanwhile left ventricular internal dimension at end-diastole, systolic function were significantly decreased by TAC at 4 wks after operation (P < 0.01), all of which were effectively inhibited by EP treatment (P < 0.05), but the differences of these parameters were decreased at 8 wks after operation. Furthermore, EP treatment inhibited degradation of IκBα, and decreased NF-κB p65 subunit levels in the nuclear fraction, and then reduced IL2 levels in the myocardium of rats subject to TAC. EP can effectively attenuate pathological cardiac hypertrophic responses induced by TAC possibly through inhibition of degradation of IκB and blockade of the NF-κB signaling pathway in the early stage of pathological cardiac hypertrophy. PMID:25755743

  14. Prior exercise and standing as strategies to circumvent sitting-induced leg endothelial dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Morishima, Takuma; Restaino, Robert M; Walsh, Lauren K; Kanaley, Jill A; Padilla, Jaume

    2017-06-01

    We have previously shown that local heating or leg fidgeting can prevent prolonged sitting-induced leg endothelial dysfunction. However, whether physical activity prevents subsequent sitting-induced leg endothelial dysfunction remains unknown. Herein, we tested the hypothesis that sitting-induced leg endothelial dysfunction would be prevented by prior exercise. We also examined if, in the absence of exercise, standing is an effective alternative strategy to sitting for conserving leg endothelial function. Fifteen young healthy subjects completed three randomized experimental trials: (1) sitting without prior exercise; (2) sitting with prior exercise; and (3) standing without prior exercise. Following baseline popliteal artery flow-mediated dilation (FMD) measurements, subjects maintained a supine position for 45 min in the sitting and standing trials, without prior exercise, or performed 45 min of leg cycling before sitting (i.e. sitting with prior exercise trial). Thereafter, subjects were positioned into a seated or standing position, according to the trial, for 3 h. Popliteal artery FMD measures were then repeated. Three hours of sitting without prior exercise caused a significant impairment in popliteal artery FMD (baseline: 3.8±0.5%, post-sitting: 1.5±0.5%, P<0.05), which was prevented when sitting was preceded by a bout of cycling exercise (baseline: 3.8±0.5%, post-sitting: 3.6±0.7%, P>0.05). Three hours of standing did not significantly alter popliteal artery FMD (baseline: 4.1±0.4%, post-standing: 4.3±0.4%, P>0.05). In conclusion, prolonged sitting-induced leg endothelial dysfunction can be prevented by prior aerobic exercise. In addition, in the absence of exercise, standing represents an effective substitute to sitting for preserving leg conduit artery endothelial function. © 2017 The Author(s). published by Portland Press Limited on behalf of the Biochemical Society.

  15. Prior exercise and standing as strategies to circumvent sitting-induced leg endothelial dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Morishima, Takuma; Restaino, Robert M.; Walsh, Lauren K.; Kanaley, Jill A.; Padilla, Jaume

    2017-01-01

    We have previously shown that local heating or leg fidgeting can prevent prolonged sitting-induced leg endothelial dysfunction. However, whether physical activity prevents subsequent sitting-induced leg endothelial dysfunction remains unknown. Herein, we tested the hypothesis that sitting-induced leg endothelial dysfunction would be prevented by prior exercise. We also examined if, in the absence of exercise, standing is an effective alternative strategy to sitting for conserving leg endothelial function. Fifteen young healthy subjects completed three randomized experimental trials: 1) sitting without prior exercise; 2) sitting with prior exercise; and 3) standing without prior exercise. Following baseline popliteal artery flow-mediated dilation (FMD) measurements, subjects maintained a supine position for 45 min in the sitting and standing trials, without prior exercise, or performed 45 min of leg cycling before sitting (i.e., sitting with prior exercise trial). Thereafter, subjects were positioned into a seated or standing position, according to the trial, for 3 hours. Popliteal artery FMD measures were then repeated. Three hours of sitting without prior exercise caused a significant impairment in popliteal artery FMD (baseline: 3.8±0.5%, post-sitting: 1.5±0.5%, p<0.05), which was prevented when sitting was preceded by a bout of cycling exercise (baseline: 3.8±0.5%, post-sitting: 3.6±0.7%, p>0.05). Three hours of standing did not significantly alter popliteal artery FMD (baseline: 4.1±0.4%, post-standing: 4.3±0.4%, p>0.05). In conclusion, prolonged sitting-induced leg endothelial dysfunction can be prevented by prior aerobic exercise. In addition, in the absence of exercise, standing represents an effective substitute to sitting for preserving leg conduit artery endothelial function. PMID:28385735

  16. Normal human synovial fluid: osmolality and exercise-induced changes.

    PubMed

    Baumgarten, M; Bloebaum, R D; Ross, S D; Campbell, P; Sarmiento, A

    1985-12-01

    We measured the osmolality of human synovial fluid in the knees of healthy young adults following minimum activity and exercise. These results were compared with each subject's blood-serum osmolality. The synovial fluid was hyperosmolal with minimum activity, decreasing to blood-serum levels after exercise.

  17. Exercise training-induced regulation of mitochondrial quality.

    PubMed

    Yan, Zhen; Lira, Vitor A; Greene, Nicholas P

    2012-07-01

    Mitochondria are dynamic organelles in skeletal muscle critical in physical performance and disease. The mitochondrial life cycle spans biogenesis, maintenance, and clearance. Exercise training may promote each of these processes, conferring positive impacts on skeletal muscle contractile and metabolic functions. This review focuses on the regulation of these processes by endurance exercise and discusses potential benefits in health and disease.

  18. Exercise training-induced Regulation of Mitochondrial Quality

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Zhen; Lira, Vitor A.; Greene, Nicholas P.

    2012-01-01

    Mitochondria are dynamic organelles in skeletal muscle critical in physical performance and disease. The mitochondrial life cycle spans biogenesis, maintenance, and clearance. Exercise training may promote each of these processes, conferring positive impacts on skeletal muscle contractile and metabolic functions. This review focuses on the regulation of these processes by endurance exercise and discusses potential benefits in health and disease. PMID:22732425

  19. Exercise-induced diaphragmatic fatigue in healthy humans.

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, B D; Babcock, M A; Suman, O E; Dempsey, J A

    1993-01-01

    1. Twelve healthy subjects (33 +/- 3 years) with a variety of fitness levels (maximal oxygen uptake (VO2, max) = 61 +/- 4 ml kg-1 min-1, range 40-80), exercised at 95 and 85% VO2, max to exhaustion (mean time = 14 +/- 3 and 31 +/- 8 min, expired ventilation (VE) over final minute of exercise = 149 +/- 9 and 126 +/- 10 l min-1). 2. Bilateral transcutaneous supramaximal phrenic nerve stimulation (BPNS) was performed before and immediately after exercise at four lung volumes, and 400 ms tetanic stimulations were performed at 10 and 20 Hz. The coefficients of variation of repeated measurements for the twitch transdiaphragm pressures (Pdi) were +/- 7-10% and for compound muscle action potentials (M wave) +/- 10-15%. 3. Following exercise at 95% of VO2, max, group mean Pdi twitch values were reduced at all lung volumes (range -8 +/- 3 to -32 +/- 5%) and tetanically stimulated Pdi values were reduced at both 10 and 20 Hz (-21 +/- 3 and -13 +/- 2%, respectively) (P = 0.001-0.047). Following exercise at 85% VO2, max, stimulated Pdi values were reduced at all lung volumes and stimulating frequencies, but only significantly so with the twitch at functional residual capacity (-15 +/- 5%). Stimulated Pdi values recovered partially by 30 min post-exercise and almost completely by an average time of 70 min. 4. The fall in stimulated Pdi values post-exercise was significantly correlated with the percentage increase in diaphragmatic work (integral of Pdi min-1) from rest to end-exercise and the relative intensity of the exercise. 5. The integral of Pdi min-1 and the integral of Po min-1 (Po, esophageal pressure) rose together from rest through the fifth to tenth minute of exercise, after which integral of Pdi min-1 plateaued even though integral of Po min-1, VE and inspiratory flow rate all continued to rise substantially until exercise terminated. Thus, the relative contribution of the diaphragm to total respiratory motor output was progressively reduced with exercise duration. 6

  20. Deconditioning-induced exercise responses as influenced by heat acclimation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shvartz, E.; Bhattacharya, A.; Sperinde, S. J.; Brock, P. J.; Sciaraffa, D.; Haines, R. F.; Greenleaf, J. E.

    1979-01-01

    A study to determine the effect of heat acclimation and physical training in temperate conditions on changes in exercise tolerance following water-immersion deconditioning is presented. Five young men were tested on a bicycle ergometer before and after heat acclimation and after water immersion. The subjects and the experimental procedure, heat acclimation and exercise training, water immersion, and exercise tolerance are discussed. Heat acclimation resulted in the usual decreases in exercise heart rate and rectal temperature and an increase in sweat rate. Water immersion resulted in substantial diuresis despite water consumed. The results show that heat acclimation provides an effective method of preventing the adverse effects of water-immersion deconditioning on exercise tolerance.

  1. Deconditioning-induced exercise responses as influenced by heat acclimation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shvartz, E.; Bhattacharya, A.; Sperinde, S. J.; Brock, P. J.; Sciaraffa, D.; Haines, R. F.; Greenleaf, J. E.

    1979-01-01

    A study to determine the effect of heat acclimation and physical training in temperate conditions on changes in exercise tolerance following water-immersion deconditioning is presented. Five young men were tested on a bicycle ergometer before and after heat acclimation and after water immersion. The subjects and the experimental procedure, heat acclimation and exercise training, water immersion, and exercise tolerance are discussed. Heat acclimation resulted in the usual decreases in exercise heart rate and rectal temperature and an increase in sweat rate. Water immersion resulted in substantial diuresis despite water consumed. The results show that heat acclimation provides an effective method of preventing the adverse effects of water-immersion deconditioning on exercise tolerance.

  2. Enhancement of ozone-induced lung injury by exercise

    SciTech Connect

    Mautz, W.J.; McClure, T.R.; Reischl, P.; Phalen, R.F.; Crocker, T.T.

    1985-01-01

    Rats were exposed for up to 3.75 h to 0.20-0.80 ppm O/sub 3/ under conditions of rest and treadmill exercise up to 30 m/min, 20% grade, to assess the importance of exposure duration, O/sub 3/ concentration, and exercise on lung tissue injury. Focal lung parenchymal lesions increased in abundance and severity in response to the three variables; however, exercise was the most important. Lesion response to exercise was greater than that predicted by a simple proportion to estimated effective dose of O/sub 3/. The results emphasize the importance of including exercise in assessment of possible adverse health effects of exposure to airborne pollutants.

  3. Daily treadmill exercise attenuates cocaine cue-induced reinstatement and cocaine induced locomotor response but increases cocaine-primed reinstatement

    PubMed Central

    Thanos, Panayotis K.; Stamos, Joshua; Robison, Lisa S.; Heyman, Gary; Tucci, Andrew; Wang, Gene-Jack; Robinson, John K.; Anderson, Brenda J.; Volkow, Nora D.

    2013-01-01

    Exercise affects neuroplasticity and neurotransmission including dopamine (DA), which modulates drug-taking behavior. Previous research in rodents has shown that exercise may attenuate the rewarding effects of drugs of abuse. The present study examined the effects of high and low exercise on cocaine responses in male Wistar rats that had been trained to self-administer and were compared to a group of sedentary rats. High exercise rats (HE) ran daily on a treadmill for 2 h and low exercise (LE) ran daily for 1 h. After 6 weeks of this exercise regimen, rats were tested over 2 days for reinstatement (day 1: cue-induced reinstatement; day 2: cocaine-primed reinstatement). During cue-induced reinstatement, the sedentary rats showed the expected increase in active lever responses when compared to maintenance, whereas these increased responses were inhibited in the exercised rats (HE and LE). During cocaine-primed reinstatement, however, there was a significant increase in active lever presses when compared to maintenance only in the HE group. This data suggests that chronic exercise during abstinence attenuates the cue-induced reinstatement seen in the sedentary rats by 26% (LE) and 21% (HE). In contrast, only the high exercise rats exhibited sensitized cocaine-seeking behavior (active lever presses) following cocaine-primed reinstatement. Finally, while sedentary rats increased locomotor activity during cocaine-primed reinstatement over that seen with cocaine during maintenance, this was not observed in the exercised rats, suggesting that exercise may interfere with the sensitized locomotor response during cocaine reinstatement. PMID:23103403

  4. Ingestion of TRP channel agonists attenuates exercise-induced muscle cramps.

    PubMed

    Craighead, Daniel H; Shank, Sean W; Gottschall, Jinger S; Passe, Dennis H; Murray, Bob; Alexander, Lacy M; Kenney, W Larry

    2017-02-13

    Exercise associated muscle cramping (EAMC) is a poorly understood problem that is neuromuscular in origin. Ingestion of transient receptor potential (TRP) channel agonists has been efficacious in attenuating electrically-induced muscle cramps.

  5. Acute hypoxia and exercise-induced blood oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    McGinnis, Graham; Kliszczewiscz, Brian; Barberio, Matthew; Ballmann, Christopher; Peters, Bridget; Slivka, Dustin; Dumke, Charles; Cuddy, John; Hailes, Walter; Ruby, Brent; Quindry, John

    2014-12-01

    Hypoxic exercise is characterized by workloads decrements. Because exercise and high altitude independently elicit redox perturbations, the study purpose was to examine hypoxic and normoxic steady-state exercise on blood oxidative stress. Active males (n = 11) completed graded cycle ergometry in normoxic (975 m) and hypoxic (3,000 m) simulated environments before programing subsequent matched intensity or workload steady-state trials. In a randomized counterbalanced crossover design, participants completed three 60-min exercise bouts to investigate the effects of hypoxia and exercise intensity on blood oxidative stress. Exercise conditions were paired as such; 60% normoxic VO(2)peak performed in a normoxic environment (normoxic intensity-normoxic environment, NI-NE), 60% hypoxic VO(2)peak performed in a normoxic environment (HI-NE), and 60% hypoxic VO(2)peak performed in a hypoxic environment (HI-HE). Blood plasma samples drawn pre (Pre), 0 (Post), 2 (2HR) and 4 (4HR) hr post exercise were analyzed for oxidative stress biomarkers including ferric reducing ability of plasma (FRAP), trolox equivalent antioxidant capacity (TEAC), lipid hydroperoxides (LOOH) and protein carbonyls (PCs). Repeated-measures ANOVA were performed, a priori significance of p ≤ .05. Oxygen saturation during the HI-HE trial was lower than NI-NE and HI-NE (p < .05). A Time × Trial interaction was present for LOOH (p = .013). In the HI-HE trial, LOOH were elevated for all time points post while PC (time; p = .001) decreased post exercise. As evidenced by the decrease in absolute workload during hypoxic VO(2)peak and LOOH increased during HI-HE versus normoxic exercise of equal absolute (HI-NE) and relative (NI-NE) intensities. Results suggest acute hypoxia elicits work decrements associated with post exercise oxidative stress.

  6. Physical exercise can reverse the deficit in fear memory induced by maternal deprivation.

    PubMed

    Mello, Pâmela Billig; Benetti, Fernando; Cammarota, Martín; Izquierdo, Iván

    2009-10-01

    Maternal deprivation during the first 10 days of life induces significant behavioral alterations in rodents which persist through adulthood. Physical exercise reduces the cognitive deficits associated with pharmacologic and pathological conditions. Here we investigated whether forced physical exercise alters memory deficits caused by postnatal maternal deprivation. Male rats were divided into four groups: (1) control, (2) deprived, (3) exercised, and (4) deprived+exercised. In groups 2 and 4, pups were deprived from their mothers for 3h/day during the first 10 days post-birth. In groups 3 and 4, from postnatal day 45 (PND-45) on, animals were submitted to forced treadmill exercise. At adulthood, animals were submitted to four different behavioral tasks: open field, Morris water maze (MWM), object recognition (OR) and inhibitory avoidance (IA). Maternal deprivation had no effect on open field behavior, but disrupted memory in the three other tasks. Physical exercise alone had no effect, except for a slight enhancement of MWM learning. Importantly, physical exercise reversed the deficit of IA and reduced the deficit of spatial memory but not that of OR seen in deprived animals. It is possible that physical exercise may counteract the influence of maternal deprivation on neurohumoral or hormonal memory modulatory systems related to stress. Indeed, the decreasing order of the effect of exercise on the memory disturbances induced by deprivation roughly follows the descending degree of stress associated with each task (IA>MWM>OR). Maternal deprivation is known to hinder hormonal mechanisms involved in coping with stress.

  7. A Novel Role for Subcutaneous Adipose Tissue in Exercise-Induced Improvements in Glucose Homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Stanford, Kristin I.; Middelbeek, Roeland J.W.; Townsend, Kristy L.; Lee, Min-Young; Takahashi, Hirokazu; So, Kawai; Hitchcox, Kristen M.; Markan, Kathleen R.; Hellbach, Katharina; Hirshman, Michael F.; Tseng, Yu-Hua

    2015-01-01

    Exercise training improves whole-body glucose homeostasis through effects largely attributed to adaptations in skeletal muscle; however, training also affects other tissues, including adipose tissue. To determine whether exercise-induced adaptations to adipose tissue contribute to training-induced improvements in glucose homeostasis, subcutaneous white adipose tissue (scWAT) from exercise-trained or sedentary donor mice was transplanted into the visceral cavity of sedentary recipients. Remarkably, 9 days post-transplantation, mice receiving scWAT from exercise-trained mice had improved glucose tolerance and enhanced insulin sensitivity compared with mice transplanted with scWAT from sedentary or sham-treated mice. Mice transplanted with scWAT from exercise-trained mice had increased insulin-stimulated glucose uptake in tibialis anterior and soleus muscles and brown adipose tissue, suggesting that the transplanted scWAT exerted endocrine effects. Furthermore, the deleterious effects of high-fat feeding on glucose tolerance and insulin sensitivity were completely reversed if high-fat–fed recipient mice were transplanted with scWAT from exercise-trained mice. In additional experiments, voluntary exercise training by wheel running for only 11 days resulted in profound changes in scWAT, including the increased expression of ∼1,550 genes involved in numerous cellular functions including metabolism. Exercise training causes adaptations to scWAT that elicit metabolic improvements in other tissues, demonstrating a previously unrecognized role for adipose tissue in the beneficial effects of exercise on systemic glucose homeostasis. PMID:25605808

  8. Biochemical changes on the repair of surgical bone defects grafted with biphasic synthetic micro-granular HA + β-tricalcium phosphate induced by laser and LED phototherapies assessed by Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinheiro, Antonio Luiz B.; Soares, Luiz Guilherme P.; Marques, Aparecida Maria C.; Silveira, Landulfo

    2016-03-01

    This work aimed the assessment of the biochemical changes during bone mineralization induced by laser and LED irradiation in an animal model of bone repair using a spectral model based on Raman spectroscopy. Six groups were studied: Clot, Laser (λ780 nm, 70 mW), LED (λ850 nm +/- 10 nm, 150 mW), Biomaterial (biphasic synthetic microgranular hydroxyapatite (HA) + β-tricalcium phosphate), Laser + Biomaterial and LED + Biomaterial. When indicated, defects were further irradiated at 48 h interval during 2 wks, 20 J/cm2 per session. At 15th and 30th days, femurs were dissected and spectra of the defects were collected. Raman spectra were submitted to a model to estimate the relative amount of collagen, phosphate HA and carbonate HA, by using spectra of pure collagen, biomaterial and basal bone, respectively. At 15th days, the use of biomaterial associated to phototherapy reduced the collagen formation, whereas the amount of carbonate HA was not different in all groups. The phosphate HA was higher in the groups that received biomaterial grafts. At 30th days, it was observed an increase of collagen for the group Laser + Biomaterial, and a reduction in the carbonate HA for the LED + Biomaterial. The phosphate HA was higher for the groups LED + Biomaterial and Laser + Biomaterial, while decreased for the group Biomaterial. These results indicated that the use of Laser and LED phototherapies improved the repair of bone defects grafted with the biomaterial by increasing the collagen deposition and phosphate HA.

  9. Physical exercise reverses spatial memory deficit and induces hippocampal astrocyte plasticity in diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    de Senna, Priscylla Nunes; Bagatini, Pamela Brambilla; Galland, Fabiana; Bobermin, Larissa; do Nascimento, Patrícia Severo; Nardin, Patrícia; Tramontina, Ana Carolina; Gonçalves, Carlos Alberto; Achaval, Matilde; Xavier, Léder Leal

    2017-01-15

    Physical exercise can induce brain plasticity and reduce the cognitive decline observed in type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM). We investigated the effects of physical exercise to prevent or reverse spatial memory deficits produced by diabetes and some biochemical and immunohistochemical changes in hippocampal astrocytes of T1DM model. In this study, 56 male Wistar rats were divided in four groups: trained control (TC), non-trained control (NTC), trained diabetic (TD) and non-trained diabetic (NTD). 27 days after streptozotocin-induced (STZ) diabetes, the exercise groups were submitted to 5 weeks of aerobic exercise. All groups were assessed in place recognition (PR) test before and after training. The glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) positive astrocytes were evaluated using planar morphology, optical densitometry and Sholl's concentric circles method. Glucose and glutamate uptake, reduced glutathione (GSH) and glutamine synthetase (GS) levels were measured using biochemical assays. Our main results are: 1-Exercise reverses spatial memory impairments generated by T1DM; 2-Exercise increases GSH and GS in TC but not in TD rats; 3-Exercise increases density of GFAP positive astrocytes in the TC and TD groups and increases astrocytic ramification in TD animals. Our findings indicate that physical exercise reverses the cognitive deficits present in T1DM and induces important biochemical and immunohistochemical astrocytic changes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Determinants of exercise-induced fat oxidation in obese women and men.

    PubMed

    Haufe, S; Engeli, S; Budziarek, P; Utz, W; Schulz-Menger, J; Hermsdorf, M; Wiesner, S; Otto, C; Fuhrmann, J C; Luft, F C; Boschmann, M; Jordan, J

    2010-03-01

    Endurance training at an intensity eliciting maximal fat oxidation may have a beneficial effect on body weight and glucose metabolism in obese patients. However, the exercise intensity at which maximal fat oxidation occurs and the factors limiting fat oxidation are not well studied in this population. Obese, otherwise healthy men (n=38) and women (n=91) performed an incremental exercise test up to exhaustion on a cycle ergometer. Substrate oxidation was estimated using indirect calorimetry. Magnetic resonance tomography and spectroscopy were conducted to assess body fat distribution and intramyocellular fat content. We determined the exercise intensity at which maximal body fat oxidation occurs and assessed whether body composition, body fat distribution, intramyocellular fat content, or oxidative capacity predict exercise-induced fat oxidation. Maximal exercise-induced fat oxidation was 0.30+/-0.02 g/min in men and 0.23+/-0.01 g/min in women (p<0.05). Exercise intensity at the maximum fat oxidation was 42+/-2.2% VO (2 max) in men and 43+/-1.7% VO (2 max) in women. With multivariate analysis, exercise-induced fat oxidation was related to fat-free mass, percent fat mass, and oxidative capacity, but not to absolute fat mass, visceral fat, or intramyocellular fat content. We conclude that in obese subjects the capacity to oxidize fat during exercise appears to be limited by skeletal muscle mass and oxidative capacity rather than the availability of visceral or intramyocellular fat.

  11. Active paraplegics are protected against exercise-induced oxidative damage through the induction of antioxidant enzymes.

    PubMed

    Inglés, M; Serra-Añó, P; Gambini, J; Abu-Sharif, F; Dromant, M; Garcia-Valles, R; Pareja-Galeano, H; Garcia-Lucerga, C; Gomez-Cabrera, M C

    2016-10-01

    Experimental study. Exercise improves functional capacity in spinal cord injury (SCI). However, exhaustive exercise, especially when sporadic, is linked to the production of reactive oxygen species that may have a detrimental effect on SCI. We aimed to study the effect of a single bout of exhaustive exercise on systemic oxidative stress parameters and on the expression of antioxidant enzymes in individuals with paraplegia. The study was conducted in the Physical Therapy department and the Physical Education and Sports department of the University of Valencia. Sixteen paraplegic subjects were submitted to a graded exercise test (GET) until volitional exhaustion. They were divided into active or non-active groups. Blood samples were drawn immediately, 1 and 2 h after the GET. We determined plasma malondialdehyde (MDA) and protein carbonylation as markers of oxidative damage. Antioxidant gene expression (catalase and glutathione peroxidase-GPx) was determined in peripheral blood mononuclear cells. We found a significant increase in plasma MDA and protein carbonyls immediately after the GET (P<0.05). This increment correlated significantly with the lactate levels. Active paraplegics showed lower levels of exercise-induced oxidative damage (P<0.05) and higher exercise-induced catalase (P<0.01) and GPx (P<0.05) gene expression after the GET. These results suggest that exercise training may be useful in SCI patients to develop systemic antioxidant defenses that may protect them against exercise-induced oxidative damage.

  12. Aerobic Exercise Protects Retinal Function and Structure from Light-Induced Retinal Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Lawson, Eric C.; Han, Moon K.; Sellers, Jana T.; Chrenek, Micah A.; Hanif, Adam; Gogniat, Marissa A.

    2014-01-01

    Aerobic exercise is a common intervention for rehabilitation of motor, and more recently, cognitive function (Intlekofer and Cotman, 2013; Wood et al., 2012). While the underlying mechanisms are complex, BDNF may mediate much of the beneficial effects of exercise to these neurons (Ploughman et al., 2007; Griffin et al., 2011; Real et al., 2013). We studied the effects of aerobic exercise on retinal neurons undergoing degeneration. We exercised wild-type BALB/c mice on a treadmill (10 m/min for 1 h) for 5 d/week or placed control mice on static treadmills. After 2 weeks of exercise, mice were exposed to either toxic bright light (10,000 lux) for 4 h to induce photoreceptor degeneration or maintenance dim light (25 lux). Bright light caused 75% loss of both retinal function and photoreceptor numbers. However, exercised mice exposed to bright light had 2 times greater retinal function and photoreceptor nuclei than inactive mice exposed to bright light. In addition, exercise increased retinal BDNF protein levels by 20% compared with inactive mice. Systemic injections of a BDNF tropomyosin-receptor-kinase (TrkB) receptor antagonist reduced retinal function and photoreceptor nuclei counts in exercised mice to inactive levels, effectively blocking the protective effects seen with aerobic exercise. The data suggest that aerobic exercise is neuroprotective for retinal degeneration and that this effect is mediated by BDNF signaling. PMID:24523530

  13. Aerobic exercise protects retinal function and structure from light-induced retinal degeneration.

    PubMed

    Lawson, Eric C; Han, Moon K; Sellers, Jana T; Chrenek, Micah A; Hanif, Adam; Gogniat, Marissa A; Boatright, Jeffrey H; Pardue, Machelle T

    2014-02-12

    Aerobic exercise is a common intervention for rehabilitation of motor, and more recently, cognitive function (Intlekofer and Cotman, 2013; Wood et al., 2012). While the underlying mechanisms are complex, BDNF may mediate much of the beneficial effects of exercise to these neurons (Ploughman et al., 2007; Griffin et al., 2011; Real et al., 2013). We studied the effects of aerobic exercise on retinal neurons undergoing degeneration. We exercised wild-type BALB/c mice on a treadmill (10 m/min for 1 h) for 5 d/week or placed control mice on static treadmills. After 2 weeks of exercise, mice were exposed to either toxic bright light (10,000 lux) for 4 h to induce photoreceptor degeneration or maintenance dim light (25 lux). Bright light caused 75% loss of both retinal function and photoreceptor numbers. However, exercised mice exposed to bright light had 2 times greater retinal function and photoreceptor nuclei than inactive mice exposed to bright light. In addition, exercise increased retinal BDNF protein levels by 20% compared with inactive mice. Systemic injections of a BDNF tropomyosin-receptor-kinase (TrkB) receptor antagonist reduced retinal function and photoreceptor nuclei counts in exercised mice to inactive levels, effectively blocking the protective effects seen with aerobic exercise. The data suggest that aerobic exercise is neuroprotective for retinal degeneration and that this effect is mediated by BDNF signaling.

  14. Comparison of sweat rate during graded exercise and the local rate induced by pilocarpine.

    PubMed

    Vimieiro-Gomes, A C; Magalhães, F C; Amorim, F T; Machado-Moreira, C A; Rosa, M S; Lima, N R V; Rodrigues, L O C

    2005-07-01

    Centrally stimulated sweat rate produced by graded exercise until exhaustion was compared to the local sweat rate induced by pilocarpine, often used as a sweating index for healthy individuals. Nine young male volunteers (22 +/- 4 years) were studied in temperate environment in two situations: at rest and during progressive exercise with 25 W increases every 2 min until exhaustion, on a cycle ergometer. In both situations, sweating was induced on the right forearm with 5 ml 0.5% pilocarpine hydrochloride applied by iontophoresis (1.5 mA, 5 min), with left forearm used as control. Local sweat rate was measured for 15 min at rest. During exercise, whole-body sweat rate was calculated from the body weight variation. Local sweat rate was measured from the time when heart rate reached 150 bpm until exhaustion and was collected using absorbent filter paper. Pharmacologically induced local sweat rate at rest (0.4 +/- 0.2 mg cm-2 min-1) and mean exercise-induced whole-body sweat rate (0.4 +/- 0.1 mg cm-2 min-1) were the same (P > 0.05) but were about five times smaller than local exercise-induced sweat rate (control = 2.1 +/- 1.4; pilocarpine = 2.7 +/- 1.2 mg cm-2 min-1), indicating different sudorific mechanisms. Both exercise-induced whole-body sweat rate (P < 0.05) and local sweat rate (P < 0.05) on control forearm correlated positively with pilocarpine-induced local sweat rate at rest. Assuming that exercise-induced sweating was a result of integrated physiological mechanisms, we suggest that local and whole-body sweat rate measured during graded exercise could be a better sweating index than pilocarpine.

  15. Sand training: Exercise-induced muscle damage and inflammatory responses to matched-intensity exercise.

    PubMed

    Brown, Henry; Dawson, Brian; Binnie, Martyn J; Pinnington, Hugh; Sim, Marc; Clemons, Tristan D; Peeling, Peter

    2017-07-01

    This study compared markers of muscle damage and inflammation elevated by a matched-intensity interval running session on soft sand and grass surfaces. In a counterbalanced, repeated-measures and crossover design, 10 well-trained female athletes completed 2 interval-based running sessions 1 week apart on either a grass or a sand surface. Exercise heart rate (HR) was fixed at 83-88% of HR maximum. Venous blood samples were collected pre-, post- and 24 h post-exercise, and analysed for myoglobin (Mb) and C-reactive protein (CRP). Perceptual ratings of exertion (RPE) and muscle soreness (DOMS) were recorded immediately post- and 24 h post-exercise. A significant time effect showed that Mb increased from pre- to post-exercise on grass (p = .008) but not on sand (p = .611). Furthermore, there was a greater relative increase in Mb on grass compared with that on sand (p = .026). No differences in CRP were reported between surfaces (p > .05). The HR, RPE and DOMS scores were not significantly different between conditions (p  >  .05). These results suggest that in response to a matched-intensity exercise bout, markers of post-exercise muscle damage may be reduced by running on softer ground surfaces. Such training strategy may be used to minimize musculoskeletal strain while still incurring an equivalent cardiovascular training stimulus.

  16. Pathophysiological mechanisms of exercise-induced anaphylaxis: an EAACI position statement.

    PubMed

    Ansley, L; Bonini, M; Delgado, L; Del Giacco, S; Du Toit, G; Khaitov, M; Kurowski, M; Hull, J H; Moreira, A; Robson-Ansley, P J

    2015-10-01

    This document is the result of a consensus on the mechanisms of exercise-induced anaphylaxis (EIAn), an unpredictable and potentially fatal syndrome. A multidisciplinary panel of experts including exercise physiologists, allergists, lung physicians, paediatricians and a biostatistician reached the given consensus. Exercise-induced anaphylaxis (EIAn) describes a rare and potentially fatal syndrome in which anaphylaxis occurs in conjunction with exercise. The pathophysiological mechanisms underlying EIAn have not yet been elucidated although a number of hypotheses have been proposed. This review evaluates the validity of each of the popular theories in relation to exercise physiology and immunology. On the basis of this evidence, it is concluded that proposed mechanisms lack validity, and it is recommended that a global research network is developed with a common approach to the diagnosis and treatment of EIAn in order to gain sufficient power for scientific evaluation. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. The Impaired Function of Macrophages Induced by Strenuous Exercise Could Not Be Ameliorated by BCAA Supplementation.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Weihua; Chen, Peijie; Liu, Xiaoguang; Zhao, Linlin

    2015-10-21

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of strenuous exercise on the functions of peritoneal macrophages in rats and to test the hypothesis that branched-chain amino acid (BCAA) supplementation will be beneficial to the macrophages of rats from strenuous exercise. Forty male Wistar rats were randomly divided into five groups: (C) Control, E) Exercise, (E1) Exercise with one week to recover, (ES) Exercise + Supplementation and (ES1) Exercise + Supplementation with 1 week to recover. All rats except those of the sedentary control were subjected to four weeks of strenuous exercise. Blood hemoglobin, serum testosterone and BCAA levels were tested. Peritoneal macrophages functions were also determined at the same time. The data showed that hemoglobin, testosterone, BCAA levels, and body weight in group E decreased significantly as compared with that of group C. Meanwhile, phagocytosis capacity (decreased by 17.07%, p = 0.031), reactive oxygen species (ROS) production (decreased by 26%, p = 0.003) and MHC II mRNA (decreased by 22%, p = 0.041) of macrophages decreased in the strenuous exercise group as compared with group C. However, the chemotaxis of macrophages did not change significantly. In addition, BCAA supplementation could slightly increase the serum BCAA levels of rats from strenuous exercise (increased by 6.70%, p > 0.05). Moreover, the body weight, the blood hemoglobin, the serum testosterone and the function of peritoneal macrophages in group ES did not change significantly as compared with group E. These results suggest that long-term intensive exercise impairs the function of macrophages, which is essential for microbicidal capability. This may represent a novel mechanism of immunosuppression induced by strenuous exercise. Moreover, the impaired function of macrophage induced by strenuous exercise could not be ameliorated by BCAA supplementation in the dosing and timing used for this study.

  18. The Impaired Function of Macrophages Induced by Strenuous Exercise Could Not Be Ameliorated by BCAA Supplementation

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Weihua; Chen, Peijie; Liu, Xiaoguang; Zhao, Linlin

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of strenuous exercise on the functions of peritoneal macrophages in rats and to test the hypothesis that branched-chain amino acid (BCAA) supplementation will be beneficial to the macrophages of rats from strenuous exercise. Forty male Wistar rats were randomly divided into five groups: (C) Control, E) Exercise, (E1) Exercise with one week to recover, (ES) Exercise + Supplementation and (ES1) Exercise + Supplementation with 1 week to recover. All rats except those of the sedentary control were subjected to four weeks of strenuous exercise. Blood hemoglobin, serum testosterone and BCAA levels were tested. Peritoneal macrophages functions were also determined at the same time. The data showed that hemoglobin, testosterone, BCAA levels, and body weight in group E decreased significantly as compared with that of group C. Meanwhile, phagocytosis capacity (decreased by 17.07%, p = 0.031), reactive oxygen species (ROS) production (decreased by 26%, p = 0.003) and MHC II mRNA (decreased by 22%, p = 0.041) of macrophages decreased in the strenuous exercise group as compared with group C. However, the chemotaxis of macrophages did not change significantly. In addition, BCAA supplementation could slightly increase the serum BCAA levels of rats from strenuous exercise (increased by 6.70%, p > 0.05). Moreover, the body weight, the blood hemoglobin, the serum testosterone and the function of peritoneal macrophages in group ES did not change significantly as compared with group E. These results suggest that long-term intensive exercise impairs the function of macrophages, which is essential for microbicidal capability. This may represent a novel mechanism of immunosuppression induced by strenuous exercise. Moreover, the impaired function of macrophage induced by strenuous exercise could not be ameliorated by BCAA supplementation in the dosing and timing used for this study. PMID:26506374

  19. Role of PGC-1α during acute exercise-induced autophagy and mitophagy in skeletal muscle

    PubMed Central

    Vainshtein, Anna; Tryon, Liam D.; Pauly, Marion

    2015-01-01

    Regular exercise leads to systemic metabolic benefits, which require remodeling of energy resources in skeletal muscle. During acute exercise, the increase in energy demands initiate mitochondrial biogenesis, orchestrated by the transcriptional coactivator peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ coactivator-1α (PGC-1α). Much less is known about the degradation of mitochondria following exercise, although new evidence implicates a cellular recycling mechanism, autophagy/mitophagy, in exercise-induced adaptations. How mitophagy is activated and what role PGC-1α plays in this process during exercise have yet to be evaluated. Thus we investigated autophagy/mitophagy in muscle immediately following an acute bout of exercise or 90 min following exercise in wild-type (WT) and PGC-1α knockout (KO) animals. Deletion of PGC-1α resulted in a 40% decrease in mitochondrial content, as well as a 25% decline in running performance, which was accompanied by severe acidosis in KO animals, indicating metabolic distress. Exercise induced significant increases in gene transcripts of various mitochondrial (e.g., cytochrome oxidase subunit IV and mitochondrial transcription factor A) and autophagy-related (e.g., p62 and light chain 3) genes in WT, but not KO, animals. Exercise also resulted in enhanced targeting of mitochondria for mitophagy, as well as increased autophagy and mitophagy flux, in WT animals. This effect was attenuated in the absence of PGC-1α. We also identified Niemann-Pick C1, a transmembrane protein involved in lysosomal lipid trafficking, as a target of PGC-1α that is induced with exercise. These results suggest that mitochondrial turnover is increased following exercise and that this effect is at least in part coordinated by PGC-1α. Anna Vainshtein received the AJP-Cell 2015 Paper of the Year award. Listen to a podcast with Anna Vainshtein and coauthor David A. Hood at http://ajpcell.podbean.com/e/ajp-cell-paper-of-the-year-2015-award-podcast/. PMID

  20. Delayed exercise-induced functional and neurochemical partial restoration following MPTP.

    PubMed

    Archer, Trevor; Fredriksson, Anders

    2012-02-01

    In two experiments, MPTP was administered to C57/BL6 mice according to a single-dose weekly regime (MPTP: 1 × 30 mg/kg on the fifth day of the week, Friday, over 4 weeks) with vehicle group (Vehicle: 1 × 5 ml/kg) treated concurrently. Exercise schedules (delayed) were introduced either at the beginning of the week after the second MPTP injection (MPTP + Exercise(2) group), or at the beginning of the week after the fourth MPTP injection (MPTP + Exercise(4) group). Wheel-running was provided on the first 4 days of each week (Monday-Thursday) more than 30-min periods. In Experiment I, wheel-running exercise was introduced either after 2 or 4 weeks after MPTP/Vehicle. MPTP and Vehicle groups not provided access to the running wheels were placed in single cages within the wheel-running room over 30-min concomitantly with the wheel-running groups. In Experiment II, wheel-running exercise was introduced 2 weeks after MPTP/Vehicle but a no-exercise control group with non-revolving wheel included (MPTP-Wheel). In both experiments, spontaneous motor activity tests during 60-min intervals were performed at the end (Fridays) of weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 6, 8, and 10, where the week on which the first injection of MPTP was the first week; in the case of weeks 1-4, this was immediately before MPTP/Vehicle injections. It was observed that the introduction of the exercise schedule after the second MPTP injection, but not after the fourth injection, restored motor activity that had been markedly elevated by the end of the tenth week. Subthreshold administration of L-dopa tests was performed after the spontaneous motor activity tests 6, 8 and 10; these indicated significant effects of exercise, MPTP + Exercise(2) group, on Tests 6 and 8, but not Test 10. The physical exercise schedule in that group also showed markedly attenuated loss of dopamine (DA). Restoration of MPTP-induced motor activity deficits and DA loss was a function of the point at which exercise was introduced, in the

  1. Exercise-induced signs of muscle overuse in children.

    PubMed

    Duarte, J A; Magalhães, J F; Monteiro, L; Almeida-Dias, A; Soares, J M; Appell, H J

    1999-02-01

    Signs of overuse after intense muscular exertion are well described in adults, while little research has been conducted in children. The aim of the study was to investigate some indirect markers of muscle damage in 13 years old boys following two different protocols of one-leg stepping exercise to exhaustion. This stepping exercise was performed by two experimental groups with different contributions of concentric and eccentric contractions in a 1:1 vs 1:2 ratio of timing. Subjective soreness perception and maximum voluntary isometric force of the knee extensor muscles were measured immediately prior to and immediately following the exercise, and at 1, 3, 24, 48, 72, 96 hours post exercise. Metabolic markers of exercise stress were taken at similar time intervals and included plasma glutathione concentrations as a marker for oxidative stress, circulating leukocyte numbers, and plasma creatine kinase (CK) activity. All parameters studied demonstrated a higher level of muscular exertion, with more evident signs of overuse in the group with the more eccentric contribution. Complete recovery was achieved between 72 and 96 hours after exertion. However, in this group of boys, the CK activity did not show the typical adult-like increase. Therefore the wide use of CK as an indicator of intense muscle exertion was not supported in this group of children. It can be concluded that children, like adults, experience similar degrees of muscle disturbances following intense exercise and that they may recover more quickly from such exercise.

  2. Exercise training attenuates diet-induced reduction in metabolic rate.

    PubMed

    Ballor, D L; Tommerup, L J; Thomas, D P; Smith, D B; Keesey, R E

    1990-06-01

    The combined influence of exercise training and dietary restriction on daily energy expenditure was evaluated by exposing 48 male Sprague-Dawley rats to one of three food intake conditions [ad libitum (AL), moderately restricted (MR), or severely restricted (SR)] and to one of two exercise conditions [treadmill exercised (E) or cage confined (CC)]. After 10 wk of exercise and dietary restriction, the MR-CC and MR-E rats weighed 84 and 86%, respectively, of AL-CC, whereas the SR-CC and SR-E rats weighed 66 and 68% of AL-CC. Dietary restriction and subsequent weight loss produced significant reductions in both total and resting daily energy expenditure. Exercise partially reversed this effect, but the extent of this reversal diminished as the severity of dietary restriction was increased. These results raise the distinct possibility that inconsistencies in the current literature concerning the effects of exercise on whole body metabolism during periods of dietary restriction might be reconciled by an appreciation and an understanding of the influence that duration of exercise training and severity of food restriction have on this measure.

  3. Exercise Induced Nausea and Vomiting: Another Sign of Pheochromocytoma and Paraganglioma Preferably in Young Patients?

    PubMed Central

    King, Kathryn S.; Darmani, Nissar; Adams, Karen T.; Pacak, Karel

    2012-01-01

    Objective A cohort of nine patients, mostly young adults, presented with a new symptom of pheochromocytoma/paraganglioma: exercise induced nausea and vomiting. The aim of this report is to present this symptom of pheochromocytoma/paraganglioma and to suggest a hypothesis for the observation. Design This is a prospective study looking at the patient accounts of the reported symptom and the clinical data on the patients disease. Methods Following a 2000 report from a paraganglioma patient of the experience of exercise induced nausea and vomiting, researchers and clinicians at the National Institutes of Health (NIH), pheochromocytoma/paraganglioma protocol, began asking patients about instances of nausea and vomiting induced through exercise. A cohort of nine patients reporting exercise induced nausea and vomiting was found and their clinical data are analyzed and presented here. Results Exercise induced nausea and vomiting in pheochromocytoma/paraganglioma patients is most likely due to the elevation of circulating catecholamines that activate adrenergic receptors of the area postrema, which induces nausea and vomiting. Succinate dehydrogenase subunit B mutations/deletions were prevalent in the patients described. Conclusions Post exercise nausea and vomiting should be considered as a symptom of pheochromocytoma/paraganglioma and should be addressed in the clinical evaluation of these patients, especially in young adults. PMID:20960160

  4. NOX2 Inhibition Impairs Early Muscle Gene Expression Induced by a Single Exercise Bout

    PubMed Central

    Henríquez-Olguín, Carlos; Díaz-Vegas, Alexis; Utreras-Mendoza, Yildy; Campos, Cristian; Arias-Calderón, Manuel; Llanos, Paola; Contreras-Ferrat, Ariel; Espinosa, Alejandra; Altamirano, Francisco; Jaimovich, Enrique; Valladares, Denisse M.

    2016-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) participate as signaling molecules in response to exercise in skeletal muscle. However, the source of ROS and the molecular mechanisms involved in these phenomena are still not completely understood. The aim of this work was to study the role of skeletal muscle NADPH oxidase isoform 2 (NOX2) in the molecular response to physical exercise in skeletal muscle. BALB/c mice, pre-treated with a NOX2 inhibitor, apocynin, (3 mg/kg) or vehicle for 3 days, were swim-exercised for 60 min. Phospho–p47phox levels were significantly upregulated by exercise in flexor digitorum brevis (FDB). Moreover, exercise significantly increased NOX2 complex assembly (p47phox–gp91phox interaction) demonstrated by both proximity ligation assay and co-immunoprecipitation. Exercise-induced NOX2 activation was completely inhibited by apocynin treatment. As expected, exercise increased the mRNA levels of manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD), glutathione peroxidase (GPx), citrate synthase (CS), mitochondrial transcription factor A (tfam) and interleukin-6 (IL-I6) in FDB muscles. Moreover, the apocynin treatment was associated to a reduced activation of p38 MAP kinase, ERK 1/2, and NF-κB signaling pathways after a single bout of exercise. Additionally, the increase in plasma IL-6 elicited by exercise was decreased in apocynin-treated mice compared with the exercised vehicle-group (p < 0.001). These results were corroborated using gp91-dstat in an in vitro exercise model. In conclusion, NOX2 inhibition by both apocynin and gp91dstat, alters the intracellular signaling to exercise and electrical stimuli in skeletal muscle, suggesting that NOX2 plays a critical role in molecular response to an acute exercise. PMID:27471471

  5. NOX2 Inhibition Impairs Early Muscle Gene Expression Induced by a Single Exercise Bout.

    PubMed

    Henríquez-Olguín, Carlos; Díaz-Vegas, Alexis; Utreras-Mendoza, Yildy; Campos, Cristian; Arias-Calderón, Manuel; Llanos, Paola; Contreras-Ferrat, Ariel; Espinosa, Alejandra; Altamirano, Francisco; Jaimovich, Enrique; Valladares, Denisse M

    2016-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) participate as signaling molecules in response to exercise in skeletal muscle. However, the source of ROS and the molecular mechanisms involved in these phenomena are still not completely understood. The aim of this work was to study the role of skeletal muscle NADPH oxidase isoform 2 (NOX2) in the molecular response to physical exercise in skeletal muscle. BALB/c mice, pre-treated with a NOX2 inhibitor, apocynin, (3 mg/kg) or vehicle for 3 days, were swim-exercised for 60 min. Phospho-p47(phox) levels were significantly upregulated by exercise in flexor digitorum brevis (FDB). Moreover, exercise significantly increased NOX2 complex assembly (p47(phox)-gp91(phox) interaction) demonstrated by both proximity ligation assay and co-immunoprecipitation. Exercise-induced NOX2 activation was completely inhibited by apocynin treatment. As expected, exercise increased the mRNA levels of manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD), glutathione peroxidase (GPx), citrate synthase (CS), mitochondrial transcription factor A (tfam) and interleukin-6 (IL-I6) in FDB muscles. Moreover, the apocynin treatment was associated to a reduced activation of p38 MAP kinase, ERK 1/2, and NF-κB signaling pathways after a single bout of exercise. Additionally, the increase in plasma IL-6 elicited by exercise was decreased in apocynin-treated mice compared with the exercised vehicle-group (p < 0.001). These results were corroborated using gp91-dstat in an in vitro exercise model. In conclusion, NOX2 inhibition by both apocynin and gp91dstat, alters the intracellular signaling to exercise and electrical stimuli in skeletal muscle, suggesting that NOX2 plays a critical role in molecular response to an acute exercise.

  6. Treadmill exercise alleviates nigrostriatal dopaminergic loss of neurons and fibers in rotenone-induced Parkinson rats.

    PubMed

    Shin, Mal-Soon; Kim, Tae-Woon; Lee, Jae-Min; Ji, Eun-Sang; Lim, Baek-Vin

    2017-02-01

    Parkinson disease is one of the common brain diseases caused by dopaminergic neuronal loss in the substantia nigra and dopaminergic fiber loss in the striatum. In the present study, the effects of treadmill exercise on motor performance, dopaminergic loss of neurons and fibers, and α-synuclein expression in the nigrostriatum were evaluated using rotenone-induced Parkinson rats. For the induction of Parkinson rats, 3-mg/kg rotenone was injected, once a day for 14 consecutive days. Treadmill running was conducted for 30 min once a day during 14 consecutive days. Rota-rod test for motor balance and coordination and immunohistochemistry for tyrosine hydroxylase and α-synuclein in the nigrostriatum were performed. In the present study, motor balance and coordination was disturbed by induction of rotenone-induced Parkinson disease, in contrast, treadmill exercise alleviated motor dysfunction in the rotenone-induced Parkinson rats. Nigrostriatal dopaminergic loss of neurons and fibers was occurred by induction of rotenone-induced Parkinson disease, in contrast, treadmill exercise alleviated nigrostriatal dopaminergic loss of neurons and fibers in the rotenone-induced Parkinson rats. α-Synuclein expression in the nigrostriatum was enhanced by induction of rotenone-induced Parkinson disease, in contrast, treadmill exercise suppressed α-synuclein expression in the rotenone-induced Parkinson rats. Treadmill exercise improved motor function through preservation of nigrostriatal dopaminergic neurons and fibers and suppression of nigrostriatal formation of Lewy bodies in rotenone-induced Parkinson rats.

  7. Treadmill exercise alleviates nigrostriatal dopaminergic loss of neurons and fibers in rotenone-induced Parkinson rats

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Mal-Soon; Kim, Tae-Woon; Lee, Jae-Min; Ji, Eun-Sang; Lim, Baek-Vin

    2017-01-01

    Parkinson disease is one of the common brain diseases caused by dopaminergic neuronal loss in the substantia nigra and dopaminergic fiber loss in the striatum. In the present study, the effects of treadmill exercise on motor performance, dopaminergic loss of neurons and fibers, and α-synuclein expression in the nigrostriatum were evaluated using rotenone-induced Parkinson rats. For the induction of Parkinson rats, 3-mg/kg rotenone was injected, once a day for 14 consecutive days. Treadmill running was conducted for 30 min once a day during 14 consecutive days. Rota-rod test for motor balance and coordination and immunohistochemistry for tyrosine hydroxylase and α-synuclein in the nigrostriatum were performed. In the present study, motor balance and coordination was disturbed by induction of rotenone-induced Parkinson disease, in contrast, treadmill exercise alleviated motor dysfunction in the rotenone-induced Parkinson rats. Nigrostriatal dopaminergic loss of neurons and fibers was occurred by induction of rotenone-induced Parkinson disease, in contrast, treadmill exercise alleviated nigrostriatal dopaminergic loss of neurons and fibers in the rotenone-induced Parkinson rats. α-Synuclein expression in the nigrostriatum was enhanced by induction of rotenone-induced Parkinson disease, in contrast, treadmill exercise suppressed α-synuclein expression in the rotenone-induced Parkinson rats. Treadmill exercise improved motor function through preservation of nigrostriatal dopaminergic neurons and fibers and suppression of nigrostriatal formation of Lewy bodies in rotenone-induced Parkinson rats. PMID:28349030

  8. Short-term exercise training protects against doxorubicin-induced cardiac mitochondrial damage independent of HSP72.

    PubMed

    Kavazis, Andreas N; Smuder, Ashley J; Min, Kisuk; Tümer, Nihal; Powers, Scott K

    2010-11-01

    Doxorubicin (Dox) is an antitumor agent used in cancer treatment, but its clinical use is limited due to cardiotoxicity. Although exercise training can defend against Dox-mediated cardiac damage, the means for this cardioprotection remain unknown. To investigate the mechanism(s) responsible for exercise training-induced cardioprotection against Dox-mediated cardiotoxicity, we tested a two-pronged hypothesis: 1) exercise training protects against Dox-induced cardiotoxicity by preventing Dox-mediated mitochondrial damage/dysfunction and increased oxidative stress and 2) exercise training-induced cardiac expression of the inducible isoform of the 70-kDa heat shock protein 72 (HSP72) is essential to achieve exercise training-induced cardioprotection against Dox toxicity. Animals were randomly assigned to sedentary or exercise groups and paired with either placebo or Dox treatment (i.e., 20 mg/kg body wt ip Dox hydrochloride 24 h before euthanasia). Dox administration resulted in cardiac mitochondrial dysfunction, activation of proteases, and apoptosis. Exercise training increased cardiac antioxidant enzymes and HSP72 protein abundance and protected cardiac myocytes against Dox-induced mitochondrial damage, protease activation, and apoptosis. To determine whether exercise-induced expression of HSP72 in the heart is required for this cardioprotection, we utilized an innovative experimental strategy that successfully prevented exercise-induced increases in myocardial HSP72 levels. However, prevention of exercise-induced increases in myocardial HSP72 did not eliminate the exercise-induced cardioprotective phenotype that is resistant to Dox-mediated injury. Our results indicate that exercise training protects against the detrimental side effects of Dox in cardiac myocytes, in part, by protecting mitochondria against Dox-mediated damage. However, this exercise-induced cardioprotection is independent of myocardial HSP72 levels. Finally, our data are consistent with the

  9. Exercise- and hypoxia-induced blood flow through intrapulmonary arteriovenous anastomoses is reduced in older adults.

    PubMed

    Norris, H Cameron; Mangum, Tyler S; Duke, Joseph W; Straley, Taylor B; Hawn, Jerold A; Goodman, Randy D; Lovering, Andrew T

    2014-05-15

    Mean pulmonary arterial pressure (Ppa) during exercise is significantly higher in individuals aged ≥50 yr compared with their younger counterparts, but the reasons for this are unknown. Blood flow through intrapulmonary arteriovenous anastomoses (IPAVA) can be detected during exercise or while breathing hypoxic gas mixtures using saline contrast echocardiography in almost all healthy young individuals. It has been previously hypothesized that a lower degree of exercise-induced blood flow through IPAVA is associated with high Ppa during exercise. This association may suggest that individuals who are known to have high Ppa during exercise, such as those ≥50 yr of age, may have lower blood flow through IPAVA, but the presence and degree of exercise-induced blood flow through IPAVA has not been specifically studied in older populations. Using transthoracic saline contrast echocardiography, we investigated the potential effects of age on exercise-induced blood flow through IPAVA in a cross-section of subjects aged 19-72 yr. To verify our findings, we assessed the effects of age on hypoxia-induced blood flow through IPAVA. Age groups were ≤41 yr (younger, n = 16) and ≥50 yr (older, n = 14). Qualitatively measured exercise- and hypoxia-induced blood flow through IPAVA was significantly lower in older individuals compared with younger controls. Older individuals also had significantly higher pulmonary arterial systolic pressure and total pulmonary resistance (TPR) during exercise. Low blood flow through IPAVA was independently associated with high TPR. The reasons for the age-related decrease in blood flow through IPAVA are unknown. Copyright © 2014 the American Physiological Society.

  10. Exercise Physiology and Pulmonary Hemodynamic Abnormality in PH Patients with Exercise Induced Venous-To-Systemic Shunt.

    PubMed

    Guo, Jian; Shi, Xue; Yang, Wenlan; Gong, Sugang; Zhao, Qinhua; Wang, Lan; He, Jing; Shi, Xiaofang; Sun, Xingguo; Liu, Jinming

    2014-01-01

    To identify the pulmonary hypertension (PH) patients who develop an exercise induced venous-to-systemic shunt (EIS) by performing the cardiopulmonary exercise test (CPET), analyse the changes of CPET measurements during exercise and compare the exercise physiology and resting pulmonary hemodynamics between shunt-PH and no-shunt-PH patients. Retrospectively, resting pulmonary function test (PFT), right heart catheterization (RHC), and CPET for clinical evaluation of 104 PH patients were studied. Considering all 104 PH patients by three investigators, 37 were early EIS+, 61 were EIS-, 3 were late EIS+, and 3 others were placed in the discordant group. PeakVO2, AT and OUES were all reduced in the shunt-PH patients compared with the no-shunt-PH subjects, whereas VE/VCO2 slope and the lowest VE/VCO2 increased. Besides, the changes and the response characteristics of the key CPET parameters at the beginning of exercise in the shunt group were notably different from those of the no shunt one. At cardiac catheterization, the shunt patients had significantly increased mean pulmonary artery pressure (mPAP), mean right atrial pressure (mRAP) and pulmonary vascular resistance (PVR), reduced cardiac output (CO) and cardiac index (CI) compared with the no shunt ones (P<0.05). Resting CO was significantly correlated with exercise parameters of AT (r = 0.527, P<0.001), OUES (r = 0.410, P<0.001) and Peak VO2 (r = 0.405, P<0.001). PVR was significantly, but weakly, correlated with the above mentioned CPET parameters. CPET may allow a non-invasive method for detecting an EIS and assessing the severity of the disease in PH patients.

  11. Central release of nitric oxide mediates antinociception induced by aerobic exercise.

    PubMed

    Galdino, G S; Duarte, I D; Perez, A C

    2015-09-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is a soluble gas that participates in important functions of the central nervous system, such as cognitive function, maintenance of synaptic plasticity for the control of sleep, appetite, body temperature, neurosecretion, and antinociception. Furthermore, during exercise large amounts of NO are released that contribute to maintaining body homeostasis. Besides NO production, physical exercise has been shown to induce antinociception. Thus, the present study aimed to investigate the central involvement of NO in exercise-induced antinociception. In both mechanical and thermal nociceptive tests, central [intrathecal (it) and intracerebroventricular (icv)] pretreatment with inhibitors of the NO/cGMP/KATP pathway (L-NOArg, ODQ, and glybenclamide) prevented the antinociceptive effect induced by aerobic exercise (AE). Furthermore, pretreatment (it, icv) with specific NO synthase inhibitors (L-NIO, aminoguanidine, and L-NPA) also prevented this effect. Supporting the hypothesis of the central involvement of NO in exercise-induced antinociception, nitrite levels in the cerebrospinal fluid increased immediately after AE. Therefore, the present study suggests that, during exercise, the NO released centrally induced antinociception.

  12. Delayed Onset Vascular Stiffening Induced by Eccentric Resistance Exercise and Downhill Running.

    PubMed

    Lin, Hsin-Fu; Chou, Chun-Chung; Cheng, Hao-Min; Tanaka, Hirofumi

    2017-07-01

    Eccentric exercise induces muscle stiffening and soreness as well as unfavorable changes in macrovascular function. We tested the hypothesis that systemic eccentric exercise could evoke greater arterial stiffening than local eccentric resistance exercise. Twenty healthy young men were randomly assigned into either the downhill running (DR) and the eccentric resistance exercise (RE) group followed by a crossover design with an exercise and sham control trial. Carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity (cfPWV), central hemodynamic measures, and biomarkers were obtained. Muscle soreness and plasma creatine kinase concentrations increased similarly after exercise in both groups. The cfPWV increased significantly at 48 hours post-exercise in both groups and remained elevated at 72 hours in DR. C-reactive protein (CRP) was elevated at 24 and 48 hours in DR, and 48 hours in RE. The increases in cfPWV were associated with the corresponding elevations in CRP in DR (r = 0.70, P < 0.05). There were no changes in arterial wave reflection measures. Both systemic and localized eccentric exercise modes induced delayed onset vascular stiffening with more prolonged changes observed in downhill running. The effect on arterial stiffening was associated, at least in part, with systemic inflammatory responses.

  13. Exercise-induced interstitial pulmonary edema at sea-level in young and old healthy humans

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Bryan J.; Carlson, Alex R.; Miller, Andrew D.; Johnson, Bruce D.

    2014-01-01

    We asked whether aged adults are more susceptible to exercise-induced pulmonary edema relative to younger individuals. Lung diffusing capacity for carbon monoxide (DLCO), alveolar-capillary membrane conductance (Dm) and pulmonary-capillary blood volume (Vc) were measured before and after exhaustive discontinuous incremental exercise in 10 young (YNG; 27±3 yr) and 10 old (OLD; 69±5 yr) males. In YNG subjects, Dm increased (11±7%, P=0.031), Vc decreased (−10±9%, P=0.01) and DLCO was unchanged (30.5±4.1 vs. 29.7±2.9 ml/min/mmHg, P=0.44) pre- to post-exercise. In OLD subjects, DLCO and Dm increased (11±14%, P=0.042; 16±14%, P=0.025) but Vc was unchanged (58±23 vs. 56±23 ml, P=0.570) pre- to post-exercise. Group-mean Dm/Vc was greater after vs. before exercise in the YNG and OLD subjects. However, Dm/Vc was lower post-exercise in 2 of the 10 YNG (−7±4%) and 2 of the 10 OLD subjects (−10±5%). These data suggest that exercise decreases interstitial lung fluid in most YNG and OLD subjects, with a small number exhibiting evidence for exercise-induced pulmonary edema. PMID:24200644

  14. Moderate exercise training attenuates aging-induced cardiac inflammation, hypertrophy and fibrosis injuries of rat hearts

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Po-Hsiang; Hsieh, Dennis Jine-Yuan; Kuo, Chia-Hua; Day, Cecilia-Hsuan; Shen, Chia-Yao; Lai, Chao-Hung; Chen, Ray-Jade; Padma, V. Vijaya

    2015-01-01

    Aging is the most important risk factor in cardiovascular disease (CVD), which is the leading causes of death worldwide and the second major cause of death in Taiwan. The major factor in heart failure during aging is heart remodeling, including long-term stress-induced cardiac hypertrophy and fibrosis. Exercise is good for aging heart health, but the impact of exercise training on aging is not defined. This study used 3-, 12- and 18-month-old rats and randomly divided each age group into no exercise training control groups (C3, A12 and A18) and moderate gentle swimming exercise training groups (E3, AE12 and AE18). The protocol of exercise training was swimming five times weekly with gradual increases from the first week from 20 to 60 min for 12 weeks. Analyses of protein from rat heart tissues and sections revealed cardiac inflammation, hypertrophy and fibrosis pathway increases in aged rat groups (A12 and A18), which were improved in exercise training groups (AE12 and AE18). There were no heart injuries in young rat hearts in exercise group E3. These data suggest that moderate swimming exercise training attenuated aging-induced cardiac inflammation, hypertrophy and fibrosis injuries of rat hearts. PMID:26496028

  15. Moderate exercise training attenuates aging-induced cardiac inflammation, hypertrophy and fibrosis injuries of rat hearts.

    PubMed

    Liao, Po-Hsiang; Hsieh, Dennis Jine-Yuan; Kuo, Chia-Hua; Day, Cecilia-Hsuan; Shen, Chia-Yao; Lai, Chao-Hung; Chen, Ray-Jade; Padma, V Vijaya; Kuo, Wei-Wen; Huang, Chih-Yang

    2015-11-03

    Aging is the most important risk factor in cardiovascular disease (CVD), which is the leading causes of death worldwide and the second major cause of death in Taiwan. The major factor in heart failure during aging is heart remodeling, including long-term stress-induced cardiac hypertrophy and fibrosis. Exercise is good for aging heart health, but the impact of exercise training on aging is not defined. This study used 3-, 12- and 18-month-old rats and randomly divided each age group into no exercise training control groups (C3, A12 and A18) and moderate gentle swimming exercise training groups (E3, AE12 and AE18). The protocol of exercise training was swimming five times weekly with gradual increases from the first week from 20 to 60 min for 12 weeks. Analyses of protein from rat heart tissues and sections revealed cardiac inflammation, hypertrophy and fibrosis pathway increases in aged rat groups (A12 and A18), which were improved in exercise training groups (AE12 and AE18). There were no heart injuries in young rat hearts in exercise group E3. These data suggest that moderate swimming exercise training attenuated aging-induced cardiac inflammation, hypertrophy and fibrosis injuries of rat hearts.

  16. Aerobic exercise attenuates inhibitory avoidance memory deficit induced by paradoxical sleep deprivation in rats.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, Jansen; Baliego, Luiz Guilherme Zaccaro; Peixinho-Pena, Luiz Fernando; de Almeida, Alexandre Aparecido; Venancio, Daniel Paulino; Scorza, Fulvio Alexandre; de Mello, Marco Tulio; Arida, Ricardo Mario

    2013-09-05

    The deleterious effects of paradoxical sleep deprivation (SD) on memory processes are well documented. Physical exercise improves many aspects of brain functions and induces neuroprotection. In the present study, we investigated the influence of 4 weeks of treadmill aerobic exercise on both long-term memory and the expression of synaptic proteins (GAP-43, synapsin I, synaptophysin, and PSD-95) in normal and sleep-deprived rats. Adult Wistar rats were subjected to 4 weeks of treadmill exercise training for 35 min, five times per week. Twenty-four hours after the last exercise session, the rats were sleep-deprived for 96 h using the modified multiple platform method. To assess memory after SD, all animals underwent training for the inhibitory avoidance task and were tested 24h later. The aerobic exercise attenuated the long-term memory deficit induced by 96 h of paradoxical SD. Western blot analysis of the hippocampus revealed increased levels of GAP-43 in exercised rats. However, the expression of synapsin I, synaptophysin, and PSD-95 was not modified by either exercise or SD. Our results suggest that an aerobic exercise program can attenuate the deleterious effects of SD on long-term memory and that this effect is not directly related to changes in the expression of the pre- and post-synaptic proteins analyzed in the study.

  17. Size-dependent cytotoxicity of Fe3O4 nanoparticles induced by biphasic regulation of oxidative stress in different human hepatoma cells.

    PubMed

    Xie, Yuexia; Liu, Dejun; Cai, Chenlei; Chen, Xiaojing; Zhou, Yan; Wu, Liangliang; Sun, Yongwei; Dai, Huili; Kong, Xianming; Liu, Peifeng

    2016-01-01

    The application of Fe3O4 nanoparticles (NPs) has made great progress in the diagnosis of disease and in the drug delivery system for cancer therapy, but the relative mechanisms of potential toxicity induced by Fe3O4 have not kept pace with its development in the application, which has hampered its further clinical application. In this article, we used two kinds of human hepatoma cell lines, SK-Hep-1 and Hep3B, to investigate the cytotoxic effects and the involved mechanisms of small Fe3O4 NPs with different diameters (6 nm, 9 nm, and 14 nm). Results showed that the size of NPs effectively influences the cytotoxicity of hepatoma cells: 6 nm Fe3O4 NPs exhibited negligible cytotoxicity and 9 nm Fe3O4 NPs affected cytotoxicity via cellular mitochondrial dysfunction and by inducing necrosis mediated through the mitochondria-dependent intracellular reactive oxygen species generation. Meanwhile, 14 nm Fe3O4 NPs induced cytotoxicity by impairing the integrity of plasma membrane and promoting massive lactate dehydrogenase leakage. These results explain the detailed mechanism of different diameters of small Fe3O4 NPs-induced cytotoxicity. We anticipate that this study will provide different insights into the cytotoxicity mechanism of Fe3O4 NPs, so as to make them safer to use in clinical application.

  18. Size-dependent cytotoxicity of Fe3O4 nanoparticles induced by biphasic regulation of oxidative stress in different human hepatoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Yuexia; Liu, Dejun; Cai, Chenlei; Chen, Xiaojing; Zhou, Yan; Wu, Liangliang; Sun, Yongwei; Dai, Huili; Kong, Xianming; Liu, Peifeng

    2016-01-01

    The application of Fe3O4 nanoparticles (NPs) has made great progress in the diagnosis of disease and in the drug delivery system for cancer therapy, but the relative mechanisms of potential toxicity induced by Fe3O4 have not kept pace with its development in the application, which has hampered its further clinical application. In this article, we used two kinds of human hepatoma cell lines, SK-Hep-1 and Hep3B, to investigate the cytotoxic effects and the involved mechanisms of small Fe3O4 NPs with different diameters (6 nm, 9 nm, and 14 nm). Results showed that the size of NPs effectively influences the cytotoxicity of hepatoma cells: 6 nm Fe3O4 NPs exhibited negligible cytotoxicity and 9 nm Fe3O4 NPs affected cytotoxicity via cellular mitochondrial dysfunction and by inducing necrosis mediated through the mitochondria-dependent intracellular reactive oxygen species generation. Meanwhile, 14 nm Fe3O4 NPs induced cytotoxicity by impairing the integrity of plasma membrane and promoting massive lactate dehydrogenase leakage. These results explain the detailed mechanism of different diameters of small Fe3O4 NPs-induced cytotoxicity. We anticipate that this study will provide different insights into the cytotoxicity mechanism of Fe3O4 NPs, so as to make them safer to use in clinical application. PMID:27536098

  19. Recurrent exercise-induced rhabdomyolysis due to low intensity fitness exercise in a healthy young patient

    PubMed Central

    Karre, Premnath Reddy; Gujral, Jeetinder

    2011-01-01

    Rhabdomyolysis is an uncommon but life threatening condition that develops due to breakdown of muscle and release of intracellular components into the circulation. A 24-year-old man otherwise healthy was admitted to our hospital because of muscle aches and weakness as well as cola coloured urine developed 3 days after carrying out the low intensity exercise. Diagnosis of rhabdomyolysis was made with creatine kinase (CK) levels of 214 356 U/l. He was treated for a similar condition at age 21. A muscle biopsy was done and the findings were normal. Rhabdomyolysis can develop with low intensity exercise; thus, it be considered in healthy young people. Young people with recurrent rhabdomyolysis due to low intensity exercise, in the absence of obvious medical and physical causes, should be evaluated further to rule out uncommon metabolic diseases. Our case demonstrates that complications especially renal failure in patients with rhabdomyolysis do not correspond to CK levels. PMID:22700603

  20. Recurrent exercise-induced rhabdomyolysis due to low intensity fitness exercise in a healthy young patient.

    PubMed

    Karre, Premnath Reddy; Gujral, Jeetinder

    2011-04-01

    Rhabdomyolysis is an uncommon but life threatening condition that develops due to breakdown of muscle and release of intracellular components into the circulation. A 24-year-old man otherwise healthy was admitted to our hospital because of muscle aches and weakness as well as cola coloured urine developed 3 days after carrying out the low intensity exercise. Diagnosis of rhabdomyolysis was made with creatine kinase (CK) levels of 214 356 U/l. He was treated for a similar condition at age 21. A muscle biopsy was done and the findings were normal. Rhabdomyolysis can develop with low intensity exercise; thus, it be considered in healthy young people. Young people with recurrent rhabdomyolysis due to low intensity exercise, in the absence of obvious medical and physical causes, should be evaluated further to rule out uncommon metabolic diseases. Our case demonstrates that complications especially renal failure in patients with rhabdomyolysis do not correspond to CK levels.

  1. Individual responsiveness to exercise-induced fat loss is associated with change in resting substrate utilization.

    PubMed

    Barwell, Nicholas D; Malkova, Dalia; Leggate, Melanie; Gill, Jason M R

    2009-09-01

    Fat loss in response to exercise training varies between individuals, even when differences in compliance to the exercise program are accounted for. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether individual variation in change in fasting respiratory quotient (RQ) after exercise training contributes to this interindividual variability. Fifty-five premenopausal women participated in a 7-week endurance-type exercise training program; and fitness, body composition, and resting substrate utilization and metabolic rate in the fasted state were assessed at baseline and postintervention. Total net energy expenditure of the exercise intervention (exEE) was determined from heart rate obtained in all exercise sessions and individualized calibration of the heart rate vs oxygen uptake relationship. Dietary intake and physical activity (by constant heart rate monitoring) were assessed at baseline and during the final week of the intervention. Mean change in fat mass for the group was -0.97 kg (range, +2.1 to -5.3 kg). The strongest correlate of change in fat mass was exEE (r = 0.60, P < .0005). Change in fasting RQ correlated significantly (r = -0.26, P = .05) with the residual for change in fat mass after adjusting for the effects of both exEE and change in energy intake, explaining 7% of the variance. In multiple regression analysis, exEE (P < .0005) and change in fasting RQ (P = .02) were the only statistically significant independent predictors of change in fat mass, together explaining 40.2% of the variance. Thus, fat loss in response to exercise training depends not only on exercise energy expenditure but also on exercise training-induced changes in RQ at rest. This suggests that development of strategies to maximize the change in resting fat oxidation in response to an exercise training program may help individuals to maximize exercise-induced fat loss.

  2. Exercise-induced stimulation of murine macrophage chemotaxis: role of corticosterone and prolactin as mediators.

    PubMed Central

    Ortega, E; Forner, M A; Barriga, C

    1997-01-01

    1. Exercise provokes changes in the immune system, including macrophage activity. Chemotaxis is a necessary function of macrophages if they are to reach the focus of infection and strenuous acute exercise may modulate chemotaxis. However, the precise mechanisms remain unknown. 2. Three experiments were performed in the present study. (1) The effect of strenuous acute exercise (swimming until exhaustion) on the chemotactic capacity of macrophages was evaluated. (2) Peritoneal macrophages from control mice were incubated with plasma from exercised mice or control (no exercise) mice. The differences in the resulting chemotactic capacity were measured. (3) Changes in the concentration of plasma corticosterone and prolactin after exercise were also measured, and the effect of incubation with the post-exercise levels of plasma corticosterone and prolactin on the chemotactic capacity of the peritoneal macrophages was then studied in vitro. 3. Exercise induced an increase in the macrophage chemotaxis index (103 +/- 8 vs. 47 +/- 11 in controls). Incubation with plasma from exercised mice led to an increased level of chemotaxis (68 +/- 18 vs. 40 +/- 6 with plasma from controls). Incubation with concentrations of corticosterone and prolactin similar to those observed in plasma immediately after exercise (corticosterone, 0.72 mumol l-1; prolactin, 88 pmol l-1) raised the chemotactic capacity with respect to that following incubation with the basal concentrations of the hormones in control animals (90 +/- 9 vs. 37 +/- 4 for corticosterone; 72 +/- 9 vs. 41 +/- 4 for prolactin). 4. It is concluded that corticosterone and prolactin may mediate the increased chemotaxis of peritoneal macrophages induced by exercise. Images Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:9051584

  3. Exploring the Mechanisms of Exercise-Induced Hypoalgesia Using Somatosensory and Laser Evoked Potentials.

    PubMed

    Jones, Matthew D; Taylor, Janet L; Booth, John; Barry, Benjamin K

    2016-01-01

    Exercise-induced hypoalgesia is well described, but the underlying mechanisms are unclear. The aim of this study was to examine the effect of exercise on somatosensory evoked potentials, laser evoked potentials, pressure pain thresholds and heat pain thresholds. These were recorded before and after 3-min of isometric elbow flexion exercise at 40% of the participant's maximal voluntary force, or an equivalent period of rest. Exercise-induced hypoalgesia was confirmed in two experiments (Experiment 1-SEPs; Experiment 2-LEPs) by increased pressure pain thresholds at biceps brachii (24.3 and 20.6% increase in Experiment 1 and 2, respectively; both d > 0.84 and p < 0.001) and first dorsal interosseous (18.8 and 21.5% increase in Experiment 1 and 2, respectively; both d > 0.57 and p < 0.001). In contrast, heat pain thresholds were not significantly different after exercise (forearm: 10.8% increase, d = 0.35, p = 0.10; hand: 3.6% increase, d = 0.06, p = 0.74). Contrasting effects of exercise on the amplitude of laser evoked potentials (14.6% decrease, d = -0.42, p = 0.004) and somatosensory evoked potentials (10.9% increase, d = -0.02, p = 1) were also observed, while an equivalent period of rest showed similar habituation (laser evoked potential: 7.3% decrease, d = -0.25, p = 0.14; somatosensory evoked potential: 20.7% decrease, d = -0.32, p = 0.006). The differential response of pressure pain thresholds and heat pain thresholds to exercise is consistent with relative insensitivity of thermal nociception to the acute hypoalgesic effects of exercise. Conflicting effects of exercise on somatosensory evoked potentials and laser evoked potentials were observed. This may reflect non-nociceptive contributions to the somatosensory evoked potential, but could also indicate that peripheral nociceptors contribute to exercise-induced hypoalgesia.

  4. Exploring the Mechanisms of Exercise-Induced Hypoalgesia Using Somatosensory and Laser Evoked Potentials

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Matthew D.; Taylor, Janet L.; Booth, John; Barry, Benjamin K.

    2016-01-01

    Exercise-induced hypoalgesia is well described, but the underlying mechanisms are unclear. The aim of this study was to examine the effect of exercise on somatosensory evoked potentials, laser evoked potentials, pressure pain thresholds and heat pain thresholds. These were recorded before and after 3-min of isometric elbow flexion exercise at 40% of the participant's maximal voluntary force, or an equivalent period of rest. Exercise-induced hypoalgesia was confirmed in two experiments (Experiment 1–SEPs; Experiment 2–LEPs) by increased pressure pain thresholds at biceps brachii (24.3 and 20.6% increase in Experiment 1 and 2, respectively; both d > 0.84 and p < 0.001) and first dorsal interosseous (18.8 and 21.5% increase in Experiment 1 and 2, respectively; both d > 0.57 and p < 0.001). In contrast, heat pain thresholds were not significantly different after exercise (forearm: 10.8% increase, d = 0.35, p = 0.10; hand: 3.6% increase, d = 0.06, p = 0.74). Contrasting effects of exercise on the amplitude of laser evoked potentials (14.6% decrease, d = −0.42, p = 0.004) and somatosensory evoked potentials (10.9% increase, d = −0.02, p = 1) were also observed, while an equivalent period of rest showed similar habituation (laser evoked potential: 7.3% decrease, d = −0.25, p = 0.14; somatosensory evoked potential: 20.7% decrease, d = −0.32, p = 0.006). The differential response of pressure pain thresholds and heat pain thresholds to exercise is consistent with relative insensitivity of thermal nociception to the acute hypoalgesic effects of exercise. Conflicting effects of exercise on somatosensory evoked potentials and laser evoked potentials were observed. This may reflect non-nociceptive contributions to the somatosensory evoked potential, but could also indicate that peripheral nociceptors contribute to exercise-induced hypoalgesia. PMID:27965587

  5. Potentiation of Ecstasy-induced hyperthermia and FAT/CD36 expression in chronically exercised animals

    PubMed Central

    Hrometz, Sandra L.; Ebert, Jeremy A.; Grice, Karen E.; Nowinski, Sara M.; Mills, Edward M.; Myers, Brian J.; Sprague, Jon E.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Fatal hyperthermia as a result of 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA) use involves non-esterified free fatty acids (NEFA) and the activation of mitochondrial uncoupling proteins (UCP). NEFA gain access into skeletal muscle via specific transport proteins, including fatty acid translocase (FAT/CD36). FAT/CD36 expression is known to increase following chronic exercise. Previous studies have demonstrated the essential role of NEFA and UCP3 in MDMA-induced hyperthermia. The aims of the present study were to use a chronic exercise model (swimming for two consecutive hours per day, five days per wk for six wk) to increase FAT/CD36 expression in order to: 1) determine the contribution of FAT/CD36 in MDMA (20 mg/kg, s.c.)-mediated hyperthermia; and 2) examine the effects of the FAT/CD36 inhibitor, SSO (sulfo-N-succinimidyl oleate), on MDMA-induced hyperthermia in chronic exercise and sedentary control rats. MDMA administration resulted in hyperthermia in both sedentary and chronic exercise animals. However, MDMA-induced hyperthermia was significantly potentiated in the chronic exercise animals compared to sedentary animals. Additionally, chronic exercise significantly reduced body weight, increased FAT/CD36 protein expression levels and reduced plasma NEFA levels. The FAT/CD36 inhibitor, SSO (40 mg/kg, ip), significantly attenuated the hyperthermia mediated by MDMA in chronic exercised but not sedentary animals. Plasma NEFA levels were elevated in sedentary and exercised animals treated with SSO prior to MDMA suggesting attenuation of NEFA uptake into skeletal muscle. Chronic exercise did not alter skeletal muscle UCP3 protein expression levels. In conclusion, chronic exercise potentiates MDMA-mediated hyperthermia in a FAT/CD36 dependent fashion. PMID:28090559

  6. Exercise

    MedlinePlus

    ... people with MS about their perspectives on aquatics exercise. Share Smaller Text Larger Text Print Discover More Here are a few related topics that may interest you Accessible Nature Trails Learn More Finding Another Sport To Love Learn More Accessible Bicycling Learn More ...

  7. Contribution of β-adrenergic receptors to exercise-induced bronchodilatation in healthy humans.

    PubMed

    Antonelli, Andrea; Torchio, Roberto; Bertolaccini, Luca; Terzi, Alberto; Rolfo, Fabrizio; Agostoni, Piergiuseppe; Gulotta, Carlo; Brusasco, Vito; Pellegrino, Riccardo

    2012-10-15

    Exercise in healthy subjects is usually associated with progressive bronchodilatation. Though the decrease in vagal tone is deemed to be the main underlying mechanism, activation of bronchial β(2)-receptors may constitute an additional cause. To examine the contribution of β(2)-adrenergic receptors to bronchodilatation during exercise in healthy humans, we studied 15 healthy male volunteers during maximum exercise test at control conditions and after a non-selective β-adrenergic blocker (carvedilol 12.5mg twice a day until heart rate decreased at least by 10beats/min) and inhaled β(2)-agonist (albuterol 400μg). Airway caliber was estimated from the partial flow at 40% of control forced vital capacity (V˙(part40)) and its changes during exercise from the slope of linear regression analysis of V˙(part40) values against the corresponding minute ventilation during maximal exercise until exhaustion. At control, V˙(part40) increased progressively and significantly with exercise. After albuterol, resting V˙(part40) was significantly larger than at control increased but did not further increase during exercise. After carvedilol, V˙(part40) was similar to control but its increase with exercise was significantly attenuated. These findings suggest that β(2)-adrenergic system plays a major role in exercise-induced bronchodilation in healthy subjects. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Two cases of wheat-dependent anaphylaxis induced by aspirin administration but not by exercise.

    PubMed

    Matsukura, S; Aihara, M; Sugawara, M; Kunimi, Y; Matsuki, M; Inoue, Y; Kambara, T; Ikezawa, Z

    2010-04-01

    Aspirin and other nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) have been reported to enhance the symptoms of wheat-dependent exercise-induced anaphylaxis (WDEIA). In contrast to many reports on WDEIA, there have been only a few reports of wheat-dependent aspirin-induced anaphylaxis not induced by the combination of wheat and exercise. Two patients with wheat-dependent anaphylaxis underwent provocation tests to clarify the cause of their symptoms. Skin-prick testing (SPT) was also performed with and without administration of aspirin. Specific IgE antibody to wheat, gluten, and omega-5 gliadin were examined. In the provocation tests, anaphylactic reactions were not induced by wheat or aspirin alone or by the combination of wheat and exercise, but were induced by the combination of wheat and aspirin. An increase in the blood histamine level was detected after provocation in both patients. Pretreatment with aspirin enhanced the SPT reactions to wheat and gluten in both patients. Specific IgE antibodies to wheat and gluten were expressed in the serum of both patients, and specific omega-5 gliadin IgE antibody was detected in the serum of one patient. We present two cases of specific wheat-dependent anaphylaxis induced by aspirin but not by exercise. We suggest that pretreatment with aspirin under controlled conditions is useful to confirm the diagnosis of food allergy when a challenge test with food alone or with food and exercise fails to induce positive reactions.

  9. Effects of a Strength Training Session After an Exercise Inducing Muscle Damage on Recovery Kinetics.

    PubMed

    Abaïdia, Abd-Elbasset; Delecroix, Barthélémy; Leduc, Cédric; Lamblin, Julien; McCall, Alan; Baquet, Georges; Dupont, Grégory

    2017-01-01

    Abaïdia, A-E, Delecroix, B, Leduc, C, Lamblin, J, McCall, A, Baquet, G, and Dupont, G. Effects of a strength training session after an exercise inducing muscle damage on recovery kinetics. J Strength Cond Res 31(1): 115-125, 2017-The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of an upper-limb strength training session the day after an exercise inducing muscle damage on recovery of performance. In a randomized crossover design, subjects performed the day after the exercise, on 2 separate occasions (passive vs. active recovery conditions) a single-leg exercise (dominant in one condition and nondominant in the other condition) consisting of 5 sets of 15 eccentric contractions of the knee flexors. Active recovery consisted of performing an upper-body strength training session the day after the exercise. Creatine kinase, hamstring strength, and muscle soreness were assessed immediately and 20, 24, and 48 hours after exercise-induced muscle damage. The upper-body strength session, after muscle-damaging exercise accelerated the recovery of slow concentric force (effect size = 0.65; 90% confidence interval = -0.06 to 1.32), but did not affect the recovery kinetics for the other outcomes. The addition of an upper-body strength training session the day after muscle-damaging activity does not negatively affect the recovery kinetics. Upper-body strength training may be programmed the day after a competition.

  10. Dose-response effect of sodium cromoglycate pressurised aerosol in exercise induced asthma.

    PubMed Central

    Tullett, W M; Tan, K M; Wall, R T; Patel, K R

    1985-01-01

    The effects of 2, 10, and 20 mg of sodium cromoglycate delivered by aerosol were compared with those of placebo in a double blind study in 11 patients with extrinsic and exercise induced asthma. The effect of nebulised sodium cromoglycate delivered through a Wright nebuliser (estimated dose 12 mg) was also studied. Patients exercised on a treadmill for six to eight minutes at submaximal work loads on five days, 30 minutes after inhaling placebo or sodium cromoglycate. The FEV1 was recorded before treatment, before exercise, and up to 30 minutes after exercise. Mean baseline values of FEV1 before and after placebo or sodium cromoglycate did not differ significantly on the five days. After exercise the mean (SEM) maximal percentage fall in FEV1 after placebo; 12 mg sodium cromoglycate nebuliser solution; and 2, 10, and 20 mg sodium cromoglycate aerosol were 31.1 (3.8); 9.4 (2.1); and 19.4 (4.6), 13.7 (3.5), and 9.4 (1.9). Sodium cromoglycate inhibited exercise induced asthma at all doses used; the protective effect of the aerosol increased from 2 to 20 mg. The protective effect of 20 mg sodium cromoglycate aerosol was similar to that seen with 12 mg nebulised solution. Our results suggest that the effect of sodium cromoglycate aerosol in exercise induced asthma is dose related. PMID:3918356

  11. Taurine supplementation attenuates delayed increase in exercise-induced arterial stiffness.

    PubMed

    Ra, Song-Gyu; Choi, Youngju; Akazawa, Nobuhiko; Ohmori, Hajime; Maeda, Seiji

    2016-06-01

    There is a delayed increase in arterial stiffness after eccentric exercise that is possibly mediated by the concurrent delayed increase in circulating oxidative stress. Taurine has anti-oxidant action, and taurine supplementation may be able to attenuate the increase in oxidative stress after exercise. The purpose of the present study was to investigate whether taurine supplementation attenuates the delayed increase in arterial stiffness after eccentric exercise. In the present double-blind, randomized, and placebo-controlled trial, we divided 29 young, healthy men into 2 groups. Subjects received either 2.0 g of placebo (n = 14) or taurine (n = 15) 3 times per day for 14 days prior to the exercise, on the day of exercise, and the following 3 days. The exercise consisted of 2 sets of 20 maximal-effort eccentric repetitions with the nondominant arm only. On the morning of exercise and for 4 days thereafter, we measured serum malondialdehyde (MDA) and carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity (cfPWV) as indices of oxidative stress and arterial stiffness, respectively. On the third and fourth days after exercise, both MDA and cfPWV significantly increased in the placebo group. However, these elevations were significantly attenuated in the taurine group. The increase in MDA was associated with an increase in cfPWV from before exercise to 4 days after exercise (r = 0.597, p < 0.05) in the placebo group, but not in the taurine group. Our results suggest that delayed increase in arterial stiffness after eccentric exercise was probably affected by the exercise-induced oxidative stress and was attenuated by the taurine supplementation.

  12. The effect of estrogen usage on eccentric exercise-induced damage in rat testes.

    PubMed

    Can, Serpil; Selli, Jale; Buyuk, Basak; Aydin, Sergulen; Kocaaslan, Ramazan; Guvendi, Gulname Findik

    2015-04-01

    Recent years, lots of scientific studies are focused on the possible mechanism of inflammatory response and oxidative stress which are the mechanism related with tissue damage and exercise fatigue. It is well-known that free oxygen radicals may be induced under invitro conditions as well as oxidative stress by exhaustive physical exercise. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of anabolic steroids in conjunction with exercise in the process of spermatogenesis in the testes, using histological and stereological methods. Thirty-six male Sprague Dawley rats were divided to six groups, including the control group, the eccentric exercise administered group, the estrogen applied group, the estrogen applied and dissected one hour after eccentric exercise group, the no estrogen applied and dissected 48 hours after eccentric exercise group and the estrogen applied and dissected 48 hours after eccentric exercise group. Eccentric exercise was performed on a motorized rodent treadmill and the estrogen applied groups received daily physiological doses by subcutaneous injections. Testicular tissues were examined using specific histopathological, immunohistochemical and stereological methods. Sections of the testes tissue were stained using the TUNEL method to identify apoptotic cells. Apoptosis was calculated as the percentage of positive cells, using stereological analysis. A statistical analysis of the data was carried out with one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) for the data obtained from stereological analysis. Conventional light microscopic results revealed that testes tissues of the eccentric exercise administered group and the estrogen supplemented group exhibited slight impairment. In groups that were both eccentrically exercised and estrogen supplemented, more deterioration was detected in testes tissues. Likewise, immunohistochemistry findings were also more prominent in the eccentrically exercised and estrogen supplemented groups. The findings suggest

  13. Refractory period after exercise-induced asthma unexplained by respiratory heat loss.

    PubMed

    Ben-Dov, I; Bar-Yishay, E; Godfrey, S

    1982-05-01

    Fifteen asthmatic children and young adults each exercised for 6 min by cycling on a cycle ergometer while breathing either cold (4.1 degrees C +/- 0.5 SEM) and dry (2.05 mg/L +/- 0.05) air or warm (37.2 degrees C +/- 0.3) fully saturated air. Each subject performed 4 tests arranged in pairs. Test pair A consisted of cold dry exercise followed by another cold dry exercise and test pair B consisted of a warm humid exercise followed by a cold dry exercise. Ventilation, heart rate, and gas exchange were closely matched in all 4 tests in each subject with a mean oxygen consumption of 34.8 +/- 0.8 ml/min/kg. In test pair A, all subjects were rendered refractory by the first cold dry exercise as manifested by a significant attenuation of their exercise-induced asthma (EIA) after the second cold dry test (per cent decrease in FEV1, delta FEV1 = 16 +/- 4 compared with 38 +/- 4). In 3 subjects, the warm humid exercise did not cause EIA and did not render them refractory to the second cold dry exercise. The 12 remaining subjects exhibited a refractory period similar to that shown in test pair A. They did not develop EIA after the warm humid test (delta FEV1 = 1 +/- 2), but after the subsequent cold dry exercise the per cent decrease in FEV1 was 19 +/- 3, similar to that in the second of the 2 cold dry exercise tests. These experiments suggest that in the majority of subjects exercise per se appears to be the cause for refractoriness and not airway cooling or bronchoconstriction.

  14. An Evaluation of Levalbuterol HFA in the Prevention of Exercise-Induced Bronchospasm

    PubMed Central

    Pearlman, D.S.; Rees, William; Schaefer, Kendyl; Huang, Holly; Andrews, William T.

    2007-01-01

    Background Exercise-induced bronchospasm (EIB) affects up to 90% of all patients with asthma. Objective This study evaluated the ability of levalbuterol hydrofluoroalkane (HFA) 90 μg (two actuations of 45 μg) administered via metered dose inhaler (MDI) to protect against EIB in mild-to-moderate asthmatics. Methods This was a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, two-way cross-over study. Patients with asthma (n = 15) were ≥18 years, had a ≥6-month history of EIB, ≥70% baseline predicted forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1), and a 20% to 50% decrease in FEV1 after treadmill exercise challenge using single-blind placebo MDI. Levalbuterol or placebo was self-administered 30 minutes before exercise. Treatment sequences were separated by a 3-to 7-day washout period. Spirometry was performed predose, 20 minutes postdose/pre-exercise, and 5, 10, 15, 30, and 60 minutes post-exercise. The primary endpoint was the maximum percent decrease in FEV1 from baseline (postdose/pre-exercise). The percentage of protected (≤20% decrease in post-exercise FEV1) patients was also assessed. Results Levalbuterol had significantly smaller maximum percent post-exercise decrease in FEV1 compared with placebo (LS mean ± SE; −4.8% ± 2.8% versus −22.5% ± 2.8%, respectively). For levalbuterol, 14/15 (93.3%) patients had <20% decrease in post-exercise FEV1 compared with 8/15 (53.3%) for placebo (p = 0.0143). Treatment was well tolerated. Conclusion Levalbuterol HFA MDI (90 μg) administered 30 minutes before exercise was significantly more effective than placebo in protecting against EIB after a single exercise challenge and was well tolerated. Clinical Implications Levalbuterol HFA MDI when administered before exercise was effective in protecting adults with asthma from EIB. PMID:17994402

  15. Exercise-induced bronchospasm in children with asthma in the United States: results from the Exercise-Induced Bronchospasm Landmark Survey.

    PubMed

    Ostrom, Nancy K; Eid, Nemr S; Craig, Timothy J; Colice, Gene L; Hayden, Mary Lou; Parsons, Jonathan P; Stoloff, Stuart W

    2011-01-01

    Despite the availability of effective therapies, uncontrolled asthma remains a common problem. Previous large surveys suggest that exercise-related respiratory symptoms may be a significant element of uncontrolled asthma. The Exercise-Induced Bronchospasm (EIB) Landmark Survey is the first comprehensive, national survey evaluating EIB awareness and impact among the general public, asthma patients, and health care providers. This study was designed to evaluate the prevalence and impact of exercise-related respiratory symptoms in children (aged 4-17 years) with asthma. A national survey was conducted with parents of 516 children diagnosed with asthma or taking medications for asthma in the prior year. The majority of parents reported that their child experienced one or more exercise-related respiratory symptom and almost one-half (47.4%) experienced four or more symptoms. Most commonly reported symptoms were coughing, shortness of breath, and wheezing. Respondents reported that asthma limited their child's ability to participate either "a lot" or "some" in sports (30%), other outdoor activities (26.3%), and normal physical exertion (20.9%). Only 23.1% of children with exercise-related respiratory symptoms were reported to take short-acting beta-agonists such as albuterol "always" or "most of the time" before exercising. Exercise-related respiratory symptoms among pediatric asthma patients are common and substantially limit the ability of children to participate normally and perform optimally in physical activities. Such symptoms may reflect uncontrolled underlying asthma that should be evaluated and treated with appropriate controller medications. Despite the availability of preventative therapy, many children do not use short-acting bronchodilators before exercise as recommended in national guidelines.

  16. Hemostatic studies in racing standardbred horses with exercise-induced pulmonary hemorrhage. Hemostatic parameters at rest and after moderate exercise.

    PubMed

    Johnstone, I B; Viel, L; Crane, S; Whiting, T

    1991-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether a defect in hemostasis might be a factor in the etiology of exercise-induced pulmonary hemorrhage (EIPH). Hemostatic parameters were evaluated in 22 EIPH-positive and ten EIPH-negative racing horses while in a rested state. Nineteen EIPH-positive and ten EIPH-negative horses were further evaluated just before and immediately after a 15 min exercise period on a 260 m oval track. When EIPH-positive and EIPH-negative horses were compared at rest, there was no significant difference in any of the coagulation and fibrinolytic parameters studied. There was however, a significant difference in platelet function as assessed by aggregometry. The platelets from affected horses were significantly less responsive than those from nonaffected horses when exposed in vitro to the platelet agonists adenosine diphosphate, collagen and platelet activating factor. Exercise tended to increase the packed cell volume and factor VIII/von Willebrand factor and to decrease platelet aggregation responses to low concentrations of adenosine diphosphate. These effects of exercise however were quantitatively similar in both EIPH-positive and EIPH-negative horses. Reduced platelet function may therefore be a contributing factor in the bleeding characteristic of horses with EIPH.

  17. Exercise- and Hypoxia-Induced Anaerobic Metabolism and Recovery: A Student Laboratory Exercise Using Teleost Fish

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rees, B. B.; Boily, P.; Williamson, L. A. C.

    2009-01-01

    Anaerobic metabolism is recruited in vertebrates under conditions of intense exercise or lowered environmental oxygen availability (hypoxia), typically resulting in the accumulation of lactate in blood and tissues. Lactate will be cleared over time after the reoxygenation of tissues, eventually returning to control levels. Here, we present a…

  18. Exercise- and Hypoxia-Induced Anaerobic Metabolism and Recovery: A Student Laboratory Exercise Using Teleost Fish

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rees, B. B.; Boily, P.; Williamson, L. A. C.

    2009-01-01

    Anaerobic metabolism is recruited in vertebrates under conditions of intense exercise or lowered environmental oxygen availability (hypoxia), typically resulting in the accumulation of lactate in blood and tissues. Lactate will be cleared over time after the reoxygenation of tissues, eventually returning to control levels. Here, we present a…

  19. Exercise intensity does not affect the composition of diet- and exercise-induced body mass loss.

    PubMed

    Ballor, D L; McCarthy, J P; Wilterdink, E J

    1990-02-01

    The effect of caloric restriction (1200 kcal/d intake) in combination with high (High) (80-90% of peak VO2) or low (Low) (40-50% of peak VO2) exercise work rates on the composition of lost body mass was determined in 27 obese women (percent fat, 36.7 +/- 4.2%; mean +/- SD). All subjects trained 3 d/wk for 8 wk, with the High (n = 14) and Low (n = 13) groups exercising for 25 and 50 min/d, respectively. After posttesting there were no differences between the groups with respect to pre- to posttest changes (mean of combined groups) in body mass (-7%), fat-free mass (-10%), fat mass (-16%), percent fat (-10%), and sum of five skinfold-thickness measurements (-16%). This study suggests that with regard to conservation of fat-free mass, the selection of an exercise intensity for a diet and exercise regimen may be left to the preference of the clinician and/or dieter.

  20. Strenuous physical exercise inhibits granulocyte activation induced by high altitude.

    PubMed

    Choukèr, Alexander; Demetz, Florian; Martignoni, André; Smith, Leslie; Setzer, Florian; Bauer, Andreas; Hölzl, Joseph; Peter, Klaus; Christ, Frank; Thiel, Manfred

    2005-02-01

    To test the hypothesis of whether strenuous physical exercise inhibits neutrophils that can get activated by hypobaric hypoxia, we analyzed the effects of both high altitude and strenuous exercise alone and in combination on potentially cytotoxic functions of granulocytes in healthy volunteers (n = 12 men; average age 27.6 yr; range 24-38 yr). To this end, a field study was prospectively performed with an open-labeled within-subject design comprising three protocols. Protocol I (high altitude) involved a helicopter ascent, overnight stay at 3,196 m, and descent on the following day. Protocol II (physical exercise) involved hiking below an altitude of 2,100 m with repetitive ascents amounting to a total ascent to that of protocol III. Protocol III (combination of physical exercise and high altitude) involved climbing from 1,416 to 3,196 m, stay overnight, and descent on the following day. In protocol I, number of granulocytes did not change, but potentially cytotoxic functions of cells (CD18 expression and superoxide production) were early and significantly upregulated. In protocol II, subjects developed granulocytosis, but functions of cells were inhibited. In protocol III, granulocytosis occurred at higher values than those observed under protocol II. Potentially cytotoxic functions of cells, however, were strongly inhibited again. In conclusion, high altitude alone, even moderate in extent, can activate potentially cytotoxic functions of circulating granulocytes. Strenuous physical exercise strongly inhibits this activation, which may give protection from an otherwise inflammatory injury.

  1. Effects of cold environment exposure and cold acclimatization on exercise-induced salivary cortisol response.

    PubMed

    Izawa, Shuhei; Kim, Kijin; Akimoto, Takayuki; Ahn, Nayoung; Lee, Hoseong; Suzuki, Katsuhiko

    2009-01-01

    Considering the adverse effects of exercise-induced cortisol secretion on health in athletes, it is important to determine the environmental and individual factors that contribute to the variations in exercise-induced cortisol secretion. In this study, the effects of cold environment exposure and cold acclimatization on exercise-induced salivary cortisol responses were investigated. Short track skaters (n = 11), who usually practice under cold conditions, and inline skaters (n = 11), who usually practice under room temperature conditions, participated in a randomized crossover study. All participants cycled for 60 minutes at 65% Vo2 max under cold (ambient temperature: 5 +/- 1 degrees C, relative humidity 41% +/- 9%) and room temperature (ambient temperature: 21 +/- 1 degrees C, relative humidity 35% +/- 5%) conditions. The participants had a 120-minute bed rest recovery phase at room temperature after both exercise bouts. Cortisol levels were measured in saliva samples collected pre-exercise and postexercise at 1 minute, 30 minutes, 60 minutes, and 120 minutes. Both short track and inline skaters exhibited clear cortisol responses to exercise under cold and room temperature conditions. The magnitude of the cortisol response, however, was different between skaters and conditions. The inline skaters exhibited significantly higher cortisol values under cold conditions than under room temperature conditions (7.6 nmol/L and 4.2 nmol/L, respectively). However, the short track skaters exhibited significantly higher cortisol values under cold conditions compared to room temperature conditions (8.7 nmol/L and 5.4 nmol/L, respectively). The effects of cold environment exposure on exercise-induced cortisol response were different between skaters who usually practice under cold or room temperature conditions. These results can be interpreted as acclimatization to either cold or room temperature conditions attenuating the cortisol response, suggesting that acclimatization may

  2. Treadmill exercise alleviates depressive symptoms in rotenone-induced Parkinson disease rats.

    PubMed

    Shin, Mal-Soon; Kim, Tae-Woon; Lee, Jae-Min; Sung, Yun-Hee; Lim, Baek-Vin

    2017-04-01

    Parkinson disease (PD) is characterized by selective loss of the dopaminergic neurons. The symptoms of depression following PD are closely associated with reduced activity of the serotonergic system in the dorsal raphe. We explored the antidepressive effect of exercise and its possible mechanism using the rotenone-induced PD rats. PD rats were induced by subcutaneously injection with rotenone for 14 days. The rats in the exercise groups were made to run on a treadmill for 30 min once a day during 14 consecutive days. Forced swimming test, immunohistochemistry for serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT), tryptophan hydroxylase (TPH), and western blot for serotonin 1A (5-HT1A) receptor were conducted. Injection of rotenone induced PD rats. PD rats showed depressive state and treadmill exercise ameliorated this depressive state. 5-HT, TPH, and 5-HT1A receptor expressions in the dorsal raphe were suppressed by rotenone injection and treadmill exercise increased the expressions of 5-HT, TPH, and 5-HT1A receptor in the rotenone-injected rats. The present results show that treadmill exercise ameliorated depressive symptoms in the rotenone-induced PD rats. The antidepressive effect of treadmill exercise might be ascribed to the enhancement of serotonergic function through upregulation of 5-HT1A expression in the dorsal raphe.

  3. Treadmill exercise alleviates depressive symptoms in rotenone-induced Parkinson disease rats

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Mal-Soon; Kim, Tae-Woon; Lee, Jae-Min; Sung, Yun-Hee; Lim, Baek-Vin

    2017-01-01

    Parkinson disease (PD) is characterized by selective loss of the dopaminergic neurons. The symptoms of depression following PD are closely associated with reduced activity of the serotonergic system in the dorsal raphe. We explored the antidepressive effect of exercise and its possible mechanism using the rotenone-induced PD rats. PD rats were induced by subcutaneously injection with rotenone for 14 days. The rats in the exercise groups were made to run on a treadmill for 30 min once a day during 14 consecutive days. Forced swimming test, immunohistochemistry for serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT), tryptophan hydroxylase (TPH), and western blot for serotonin 1A (5-HT1A) receptor were conducted. Injection of rotenone induced PD rats. PD rats showed depressive state and treadmill exercise ameliorated this depressive state. 5-HT, TPH, and 5-HT1A receptor expressions in the dorsal raphe were suppressed by rotenone injection and treadmill exercise increased the expressions of 5-HT, TPH, and 5-HT1A receptor in the rotenone-injected rats. The present results show that treadmill exercise ameliorated depressive symptoms in the rotenone-induced PD rats. The antidepressive effect of treadmill exercise might be ascribed to the enhancement of serotonergic function through upregulation of 5-HT1A expression in the dorsal raphe. PMID:28503522

  4. Familial hypercholesterolemia impairs exercise-induced systemic vasodilation due to reduced NO bioavailability.

    PubMed

    de Beer, Vincent J; Merkus, Daphne; Bender, Shawn B; Tharp, Darla L; Bowles, Douglas K; Duncker, Dirk J; Laughlin, M Harold

    2013-12-01

    Hypercholesterolemia impairs endothelial function [e.g., the nitric oxide (NO)-cyclic GMP-phosphodiesterase 5 (PDE5) pathway], limits shear stress-induced vasodilation, and is therefore expected to reduce exercise-induced vasodilation. To assess the actual effects of hypercholesterolemia on endothelial function and exercise-induced vasodilation, we compared the effects of endothelial NO synthase (eNOS) and PDE5 inhibition in chronically instrumented Yucatan (Control) and Rapacz familial hypercholesterolemic (FH) swine, at rest and during treadmill exercise. The increases in systemic vascular conductance produced by ATP (relative to nitroprusside) and exercise were blunted in FH compared with Control swine. The vasoconstrictor response to eNOS inhibition, with nitro-l-arginine (NLA), was attenuated in FH compared with Control swine, both at rest and during exercise. Furthermore, whereas the vasodilator response to nitroprusside was enhanced slightly, the vasodilator response to PDE5 inhibition, with EMD360527, was reduced in FH compared with Control swine. Finally, in the pulmonary circulation, FH resulted in attenuated vasodilator responses to ATP, while maintaining the responses to both NLA and EMD360527. In conclusion, hypercholesterolemia reduces exercise-induced vasodilation in the systemic but not the pulmonary circulation. This reduction appears to be the principal result of a decrease in NO bioavailability, which is mitigated by a lower PDE5 activity.

  5. The effect of exercise-induced elevation in core temperature on cold-induced vasodilatation response in toes.

    PubMed

    Dobnikar, Uros; Kounalakis, Stylianos N; Mekjavic, Igor B

    2009-06-01

    Cold-induced vasodilatation (CIVD) has been proposed as a potential protective mechanism against cold injuries during exposure of extremities to a cold environment. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of exercise and the associated elevation in core temperature on toe skin temperatures during immersion of the foot in cold (8 degrees C) water. Subjects (N = 8) participated in two trials. In one, they conducted an incremental exercise to exhaustion (exercise) on a cycle ergometer, which was followed by immersion of the right foot in 8 degrees C water. In the second trial (control), immersion of the foot in cold water was not preceded by exercise. Upon completion of the exercise in the exercise trial, and at the onset of the immersion of the foot in cold water, tympanic temperature was 0.6 degrees C (P < 0.01) higher than pre-exercise levels. There was a significant increase (P < 0.05) in the number of CIVD waves, but not their amplitudes, in the exercise trial compared to the control trial. A CIVD response occurred in 57.5% of all toes in the exercise trial, and in only 27.5% in the control trial. Additionally, 50% of subjects exhibited CIVD in at least one toe in the control trial, and 87.5% during the exercise trial. It is concluded that exercise, and particularly the associated elevation in core temperature, enhances the frequency of the toe CIVD responses, and can therefore potentially act as a protective mechanism against cold injury.

  6. Biphasic Regulation of p38 MAPK by Serotonin Contributes to the Efficacy of Stimulus Protocols That Induce Long-Term Synaptic Facilitation

    PubMed Central

    Smolen, Paul; Baxter, Douglas A.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract The MAPK isoforms ERK and p38 MAPK are believed to play opposing roles in long-term synaptic facilitation (LTF) induced by serotonin (5-HT) in Aplysia. To fully understand their roles, however, it is necessary to consider the dynamics of ERK and p38 MAPK activation. Previous studies determined that activation of ERK occurred ∼45 min after a 5-min pulse of 5-HT treatment. The dynamics of p38 MAPK activation following 5-HT are yet to be elucidated. Here, the activity of p38 MAPK was examined at different times after 5-HT, and the interaction between the ERK and p38 MAPK pathways was investigated. A 5-min pulse of 5-HT induced a transient inhibition of p38 MAPK, followed by a delayed activation between 25 and 45 min. This activation was blocked by a MAPK kinase inhibitor, suggesting that similar pathways are involved in activation of ERK and p38 MAPK. ERK activity decreased shortly after the activation of p38 MAPK. A p38 MAPK inhibitor blocked this decrease in ERK activity, suggesting a causal relationship. The p38 MAPK activity ∼45 min after different stimulus protocols was also characterized. These data were incorporated into a computational model for the induction of LTF. Simulations and empirical data suggest that p38 MAPK, together with ERK, contributes to the efficacy of spaced stimulus protocols to induce LTF, a correlate of long-term memory (LTM). For example, decreased p38 MAPK activity ∼45 min after the first of two sensitizing stimuli might be an important determinant of an optimal interstimulus interval (ISI) for LTF induction. PMID:28197555

  7. The biphasic nature of nitric oxide responses in tumor biology.

    PubMed

    Ridnour, Lisa A; Thomas, Douglas D; Donzelli, Sonia; Espey, Michael G; Roberts, David D; Wink, David A; Isenberg, Jeffrey S

    2006-01-01

    The dual or biphasic responses of cancer to nitric oxide (NO) arise from its concentration dependent ability to regulate tumor growth, migration, invasion, survival, angiogenesis, and metastasis. The outcome of these various NO-dependent processes is dictated by several factors including NO flux, the chemical redox environment, and the duration of NO exposure. Further, it was recently discovered that an NO-induced redox flux in vascular endothelial cells hypersensitizes these cells to the antiangiogenic effects of thrombospondin-1. This suggests a novel treatment paradigm for targeting tumor-driven angiogenesis that combines redox modulation with mimetic derivatives of thrombospondin-1. This article discusses the biphasic nature of NO in cancer biology and the implications of NO-driven redox flux for modulation of tumor-stimulated angiogenesis, growth, and metastasis.

  8. Differential effects of sauna-, diuretic-, and exercise-induced hypohydration.

    PubMed

    Caldwell, J E; Ahonen, E; Nousiainen, U

    1984-10-01

    The physiological effects on submaximal and maximal exercise of three methods commonly used by athletes for achieving rapid weight loss were determined by measuring cardiorespiratory variables in 62 nonendurance athletes. A mean weight loss of 4.1% was achieved by those who followed either a sauna (SAU), diuretic (DIU), or exercise (ACT) protocol, compared with the average weight loss of 1.2% in the control group. At maximal exercise O2 consumption, O2 pulse, blood lactate concentration, and work load decreased in SAU and DIU groups relative to the ACT group, whereas only a few differences were observed at the aerobic threshold. Weight loss achieved over a 48-h period was less detrimental to an athlete than was a more rapid (24-h) weight reduction achieved through sauna bathing or the use of diuretics. We conclude that not only the quantity of weight loss but also the method itself may limit physical performance.

  9. Exhaled breath condensate pH decreases during exercise-induced bronchoconstriction.

    PubMed

    Bikov, Andras; Galffy, Gabriella; Tamasi, Lilla; Bartusek, Dora; Antus, Balazs; Losonczy, Gyorgy; Horvath, Ildiko

    2014-05-01

    Exercise-induced bronchoconstriction (EIB) is the temporary narrowing of the airways caused by physical exercise. Its exact pathophysiology is unclear; however, acute changes in airways pH may play a role. Exhaled breath condensate (EBC) pH was suggested as a surrogate indicator for airway acid-base status, but its value is also affected by volatile molecules and respiratory droplet dilution. The aim of the study was to assess changes in EBC pH during EIB. Twenty-two asthmatics who reported breathlessness following exercise and 16 healthy individuals participated in the study. Lung function test was performed and exhaled breath samples were collected for pH, dilution factor and volatile compound pattern measurements (Cyranose 320) pre-exercise and at 0, 10, 20 and 30 min after physical exercise challenge. Fractional exhaled nitric oxide was measured before exercise. EIB developed in 13 asthmatic subjects. In these participants, but not in the EIB-negative asthmatics (P = 0.51), EBC pH reduced significantly during exercise (P = 0.01). In addition, changes in EBC pH were related to the degree of bronchospasm in the EIB-positive group (P = 0.01, r = 0.68). Exhaled volatile pattern became altered (P < 0.05) during exercise in all subjects (asthmatics and controls). EBC pH changes were not related to EBC dilution or volatile compound pattern alterations (P > 0.05). The development of EIB was related to acute changes of EBC pH, which suggest the role of airway pH decrease in the pathophysiology of EIB. Exercise-induced changes in exhaled biomarkers suggest methodological precautions to avoid physical exercise before performing exhaled breath tests. © 2014 The Authors. Respirology © 2014 Asian Pacific Society of Respirology.

  10. Exercise-Induced Skeletal Muscle Remodeling and Metabolic Adaptation: Redox Signaling and Role of Autophagy

    PubMed Central

    Giammarioli, Anna Maria; Chiandotto, Sergio; Spoletini, Ilaria

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Skeletal muscle is a highly plastic tissue. Exercise evokes signaling pathways that strongly modify myofiber metabolism and physiological and contractile properties of skeletal muscle. Regular physical activity is beneficial for health and is highly recommended for the prevention of several chronic conditions. In this review, we have focused our attention on the pathways that are known to mediate physical training-induced plasticity. Recent Advances: An important role for redox signaling has recently been proposed in exercise-mediated muscle remodeling and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ) coactivator-1α (PGC-1α) activation. Still more currently, autophagy has also been found to be involved in metabolic adaptation to exercise. Critical Issues: Both redox signaling and autophagy are processes with ambivalent effects; they can be detrimental and beneficial, depending on their delicate balance. As such, understanding their role in the chain of events induced by exercise and leading to skeletal muscle remodeling is a very complicated matter. Moreover, the study of the signaling induced by exercise is made even more difficult by the fact that exercise can be performed with several different modalities, with this having different repercussions on adaptation. Future Directions: Unraveling the complexity of the molecular signaling triggered by exercise on skeletal muscle is crucial in order to define the therapeutic potentiality of physical training and to identify new pharmacological compounds that are able to reproduce some beneficial effects of exercise. In evaluating the effect of new “exercise mimetics,” it will also be necessary to take into account the involvement of reactive oxygen species, reactive nitrogen species, and autophagy and their controversial effects. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 21, 154–176. PMID:24450966

  11. An exercise regimen prevents development paclitaxel induced peripheral neuropathy in a mouse model.

    PubMed

    Park, Jae Sung; Kim, Sangri; Hoke, Ahmet

    2015-03-01

    Peripheral neuropathy is a major, dose-limiting complication of many chemotherapeutic agents. Currently there is no effective method to prevent development of chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy (CIPN). Recent studies have shown that exercise can improve regeneration of peripheral nerves but its effect in preventing peripheral neuropathy is unknown. In this study, we examined the effect of a rigorous treadmill exercise program that was started 1 week before administration of paclitaxel and continued throughout the study in a mouse model of CIPN. We showed that exercise can partially abrogate features of axonal degeneration induced by paclitaxel including reduction in epidermal nerve fiber density in the plantar hind paw and thermal hypoalgesia. Furthermore, detyrosinated tubulin that is elevated in nerves treated with paclitaxel was normal in exercised animals. This study points to a relatively simple and potentially effective therapeutic option to reduce the neurotoxic effects of chemotherapy. © 2015 Peripheral Nerve Society.

  12. High protein diet maintains glucose production during exercise-induced energy deficit: a controlled trial

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Inadequate energy intake induces changes in endogenous glucose production (GP) to preserve muscle mass. Whether addition provision of dietary protein modulates GP response to energy deficit is unclear. The objective was to determine whether exercise-induced energy deficit effects on glucose metaboli...

  13. Systematic review: exercise-induced gastrointestinal syndrome-implications for health and intestinal disease.

    PubMed

    Costa, R J S; Snipe, R M J; Kitic, C M; Gibson, P R

    2017-08-01

    "Exercise-induced gastrointestinal syndrome" refers to disturbances of gastrointestinal integrity and function that are common features of strenuous exercise. To systematically review the literature to establish the impact of acute exercise on markers of gastrointestinal integrity and function in healthy populations and those with chronic gastrointestinal conditions. Search literature using five databases (PubMed, EBSCO, Web of Science, SPORTSdiscus, and Ovid Medline) to review publications that focused on the impact of acute exercise on markers of gastrointestinal injury, permeability, endotoxaemia, motility and malabsorption in healthy populations and populations with gastrointestinal diseases/disorders. As exercise intensity and duration increases, there is considerable evidence for increases in indices of intestinal injury, permeability and endotoxaemia, together with impairment of gastric emptying, slowing of small intestinal transit and malabsorption. The addition of heat stress and running mode appears to exacerbate these markers of gastrointestinal disturbance. Exercise stress of ≥2 hours at 60% VO2max appears to be the threshold whereby significant gastrointestinal perturbations manifest, irrespective of fitness status. Gastrointestinal symptoms, referable to upper- and lower-gastrointestinal tract, are common and a limiting factor in prolonged strenuous exercise. While there is evidence for health benefits of moderate exercise in patients with inflammatory bowel disease or functional gastrointestinal disorders, the safety of more strenuous exercise has not been established. Strenuous exercise has a major reversible impact on gastrointestinal integrity and function of healthy populations. The safety and health implications of prolonged strenuous exercise in patients with chronic gastrointestinal diseases/disorders, while hypothetically worrying, has not been elucidated and requires further investigation. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Biochemical changes on the repair of surgical bone defects grafted with biphasic synthetic micro-granular HA + β-tricalcium phosphate induced by laser and LED phototherapies and assessed by Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Pinheiro, Antônio Luiz Barbosa; Soares, Luiz Guilherme Pinheiro; Marques, Aparecida Maria Cordeiro; Cangussú, Maria Cristina Teixeira; Pacheco, Marcos Tadeu Tavares; Silveira, Landulfo

    2017-04-01

    This work aimed the assessment of biochemical changes induced by laser or LED irradiation during mineralization of a bone defect in an animal model using a spectral model based on Raman spectroscopy. Six groups were studied: clot, laser (λ = 780 nm; 70 mW), LED (λ = 850 ± 10 nm; 150 mW), biomaterial (biphasic synthetic micro-granular hydroxyapatite (HA) + β-tricalcium phosphate), biomaterial + laser, and biomaterial + LED. When indicated, defects were further irradiated at a 48-h interval during 2 weeks (20 J/cm(2) per session). At the 15th and 30th days, femurs were dissected and spectra of the defects were collected. Raman spectra were submitted to a model to estimate the relative amount of collagen, phosphate HA, and carbonate HA by using the spectra of pure collagen and biomaterials composed of phosphate and carbonate HA, respectively. The use of the biomaterial associated to phototherapy did not change the collagen formation at both 15 and 30 days. The amount of carbonate HA was not different in all groups at the 15th day. However, at the 30th day, there was a significant difference (ANOVA, p = 0.01), with lower carbonate HA for the group biomaterial + LED compared to biomaterial (p < 0.05). The phosphate HA was higher in the groups that received biomaterial grafts at the 15th day compared to clot (significant for the biomaterial; p < 0.01). At the 30th day, the phosphate HA was higher for the group biomaterial + laser, while this was lower for all the other groups. These results indicated that the use of laser phototherapy improved the repair of bone defects grafted with the biomaterial by increasing the deposition of phosphate HA.

  15. Global Proteome Changes in the Rat Diaphragm Induced by Endurance Exercise Training

    PubMed Central

    Burniston, Jatin G.; Kavazis, Andreas N.; Morton, Aaron B.; Wiggs, Michael P.; Ahn, Bumsoo; Smuder, Ashley J.; Powers, Scott K.

    2017-01-01

    Mechanical ventilation (MV) is a life-saving intervention for many critically ill patients. Unfortunately, prolonged MV results in the rapid development of diaphragmatic atrophy and weakness. Importantly, endurance exercise training results in a diaphragmatic phenotype that is protected against ventilator-induced diaphragmatic atrophy and weakness. The mechanisms responsible for this exercise-induced protection against ventilator-induced diaphragmatic atrophy remain unknown. Therefore, to investigate exercise-induced changes in diaphragm muscle proteins, we compared the diaphragmatic proteome from sedentary and exercise-trained rats. Specifically, using label-free liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry, we performed a proteomics analysis of both soluble proteins and mitochondrial proteins isolated from diaphragm muscle. The total number of diaphragm proteins profiled in the soluble protein fraction and mitochondrial protein fraction were 813 and 732, respectively. Endurance exercise training significantly (P<0.05, FDR <10%) altered the abundance of 70 proteins in the soluble diaphragm proteome and 25 proteins of the mitochondrial proteome. In particular, key cytoprotective proteins that increased in relative abundance following exercise training included mitochondrial fission process 1 (Mtfp1; MTP18), 3-mercaptopyruvate sulfurtransferase (3MPST), microsomal glutathione S-transferase 3 (Mgst3; GST-III), and heat shock protein 70 kDa protein 1A/1B (HSP70). While these proteins are known to be cytoprotective in several cell types, the cyto-protective roles of these proteins have yet to be fully elucidated in diaphragm muscle fibers. Based upon these important findings, future experiments can now determine which of these diaphragmatic proteins are sufficient and/or required to promote exercise-induced protection against inactivity-induced muscle atrophy. PMID:28135290

  16. Exercise-induced ischemia initiates the second window of protection in humans independent of collateral recruitment.

    PubMed

    Lambiase, Pier D; Edwards, Richard J; Cusack, Michael R; Bucknall, Clifford A; Redwood, Simon R; Marber, Michael S

    2003-04-02

    This study was designed to examine if exercise-induced ischemia initiated late preconditioning in humans that becomes manifest during subsequent exercise and serial balloon occlusion of the left anterior descending coronary artery (LAD). The existence of late preconditioning in humans is controversial. We therefore compared myocardial responses to exercise-induced and intracoronary balloon inflation-induced ischemia in two groups of patients subjected to different temporal patterns of ischemia. Thirty patients with stable angina secondary to single-vessel LAD disease underwent percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) after two separate exercise tolerance test (ETT) protocols designed to investigate isolated early preconditioning (IEP) alone or the second window of protection (SWOP). The IEP subjects underwent three sequential ETTs at least two weeks before PCI. The SWOP subjects underwent five sequential ETTs commencing 24 h before PCI. During PCI there was no significant difference in intracoronary pressure-derived collateral flow index (CFI) between groups (IEP = 0.15 +/- 0.13, SWOP = 0.19 +/- 0.15). In SWOP patients, compared with the initial ETT, the ETT performed 24 h later had a 40% (p < 0.001) increase in time to 0.1-mV ST depression and a 60% (p < 0.05) decrease in ventricular ectopic frequency. During the first balloon inflation, peak ST elevation was reduced by 49% (p < 0.05) in the SWOP versus the IEP group, and the dependence on CFI observed in the IEP group was abolished (analysis of covariance, p < 0.05). The significant attenuation of ST elevation (47%, p < 0.005) seen at the time of the second inflation in the IEP patients was not seen in the SWOP patients. Exercise-induced ischemia triggers late preconditioning in humans, which becomes manifest during exercise and PCI. This is the first evidence that ischemia induced by coronary occlusion is attenuated in humans by a late preconditioning effect induced by exercise.

  17. Low Fat Loss Response after Medium-Term Supervised Exercise in Obese Is Associated with Exercise-Induced Increase in Food Reward

    PubMed Central

    Finlayson, Graham; Caudwell, Phillipa; Gibbons, Catherine; Hopkins, Mark; King, Neil; Blundell, John

    2011-01-01

    Objective. To examine exercise-induced changes in the reward value of food during medium-term supervised exercise in obese individuals. Subjects/Methods. The study was a 12-week supervised exercise intervention prescribed to expend 500 kcal/day, 5 d/week. 34 sedentary obese males and females were identified as responders (R) or non-responders (NR) to the intervention according to changes in body composition relative to measured energy expended during exercise. Food reward (ratings of liking and wanting, and relative preference by forced choice pairs) for an array of food images was assessed before and after an acute exercise bout. Results. 20 responders and 14 non-responders were identified. R lost 5.2 kg ± 2.4 of total fat mass and NR lost 1.7 kg ± 1.4. After acute exercise, liking for all foods increased in NR compared to no change in R. Furthermore, NR showed an increase in wanting and relative preference for high-fat sweet foods. These differences were independent of 12-weeks regular exercise and weight loss. Conclusion. Individuals who showed an immediate post-exercise increase in liking and increased wanting and preference for high-fat sweet foods displayed a smaller reduction in fat mass with exercise. For some individuals, exercise increases the reward value of food and diminishes the impact of exercise on fat loss. PMID:20886014

  18. Low fat loss response after medium-term supervised exercise in obese is associated with exercise-induced increase in food reward.

    PubMed

    Finlayson, Graham; Caudwell, Phillipa; Gibbons, Catherine; Hopkins, Mark; King, Neil; Blundell, John

    2011-01-01

    Objective. To examine exercise-induced changes in the reward value of food during medium-term supervised exercise in obese individuals. Subjects/Methods. The study was a 12-week supervised exercise intervention prescribed to expend 500 kcal/day, 5 d/week. 34 sedentary obese males and females were identified as responders (R) or non-responders (NR) to the intervention according to changes in body composition relative to measured energy expended during exercise. Food reward (ratings of liking and wanting, and relative preference by forced choice pairs) for an array of food images was assessed before and after an acute exercise bout. Results. 20 responders and 14 non-responders were identified. R lost 5.2 kg ± 2.4 of total fat mass and NR lost 1.7 kg ± 1.4. After acute exercise, liking for all foods increased in NR compared to no change in R. Furthermore, NR showed an increase in wanting and relative preference for high-fat sweet foods. These differences were independent of 12-weeks regular exercise and weight loss. Conclusion. Individuals who showed an immediate post-exercise increase in liking and increased wanting and preference for high-fat sweet foods displayed a smaller reduction in fat mass with exercise. For some individuals, exercise increases the reward value of food and diminishes the impact of exercise on fat loss.

  19. Exercise Prevents Amyloid-β-Induced Hippocampal Network Disruption by Inhibiting GSK3β Activation.

    PubMed

    Isla, Arturo G; Vázquez-Cuevas, Francisco Gabriel; Peña-Ortega, Fernando

    2016-03-16

    Exercise is becoming a promising therapeutic approach to prevent alterations both in Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients and in transgenic models of AD. This neuroprotection has been associated with changes in hippocampal structure and function, as well as with the reduction of amyloid-β (Aβ) production and accumulation. However, whether exercise produces lasting changes in hippocampal population activity and renders it resistant to Aβ-induced network dysfunction is still unknown. Thus, we tested whether voluntary exercise changes hippocampal population activity and prevents its alteration in the presence of Aβ, which has been associated to glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK3β) activation. We found that the hippocampal population activity recorded in slices obtained from mice that exercised voluntarily (with free access to a running wheel for 21 days) exhibits higher power and faster frequency composition than slices obtained from sedentary animals. Moreover, the hippocampal network of mice that exercised becomes insensitive to Aβ-induced inhibition of spontaneous population activity. This protective effect correlates with the inability of Aβ to activate GSK3β, is mimicked by GSK3β inhibition with SB126763 (in slices obtained from sedentary mice), and is abolished by the inhibition of PI3K with LY294002 (in slices obtained from mice that exercised). We conclude that voluntary exercise produces a lasting protective state in the hippocampus, maintained in hippocampal slices by a PI3K-dependent mechanism that precludes its functional disruption in the presence of Aβ by avoiding GSK3β activation.

  20. Effects of Exercise on Oxidative Stress in Rats Induced by Ozone

    PubMed Central

    Martinez-Campos, Catalina; Lara-Padilla, Eleazar; Bobadilla-Lugo, Rosa Amalia; Kross, Robert David; Villanueva, Cleva

    2012-01-01

    Oxidative stress (OS) induced by acute exercise is reduced by chronic exercise. Ozone (O3) exposure produces OS. The aim of this study was to determine if aerobic exercise (AE) reduced OS produced by O3. A pilot experiment was performed with male Wistar rats submitted to AE (trained to swim 90 min/day). Adaptation to exercise was demonstrated three weeks after training by means of changes in reduced nitrates (NOx) in plasma. Therefore, two-week training was chosen for the following experiments. Six of twelve trained rats were exposed to O3 (0.5 ppm, 4 h/day, one hour before exercise). Two groups of sedentary animals (n = 6 each) were used as controls, one of which was exposed to O3. At the end of the experiments NOx, 8-isoprostane (8-IP), malondialdehyde (MDA), superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity, and carbonyls (CBs) were measured in plasma. CBs did not change in any group. O3-induced OS was manifested by reduced NOx and SOD activity, as well as increased 8-IP and MDA. Exercise significantly blocked O3 effects although SOD was also decreased by exercise (a greater drop occurring in the O3 group). It is concluded that AE protects against OS produced by O3 and the effect is independent of SOD. PMID:22619585

  1. Effects of exercise on oxidative stress in rats induced by ozone.

    PubMed

    Martinez-Campos, Catalina; Lara-Padilla, Eleazar; Bobadilla-Lugo, Rosa Amalia; Kross, Robert David; Villanueva, Cleva

    2012-01-01

    Oxidative stress (OS) induced by acute exercise is reduced by chronic exercise. Ozone (O(3)) exposure produces OS. The aim of this study was to determine if aerobic exercise (AE) reduced OS produced by O(3). A pilot experiment was performed with male Wistar rats submitted to AE (trained to swim 90 min/day). Adaptation to exercise was demonstrated three weeks after training by means of changes in reduced nitrates (NO(x)) in plasma. Therefore, two-week training was chosen for the following experiments. Six of twelve trained rats were exposed to O(3) (0.5 ppm, 4 h/day, one hour before exercise). Two groups of sedentary animals (n = 6 each) were used as controls, one of which was exposed to O(3). At the end of the experiments NO(x), 8-isoprostane (8-IP), malondialdehyde (MDA), superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity, and carbonyls (CBs) were measured in plasma. CBs did not change in any group. O(3)-induced OS was manifested by reduced NO(x) and SOD activity, as well as increased 8-IP and MDA. Exercise significantly blocked O(3) effects although SOD was also decreased by exercise (a greater drop occurring in the O(3) group). It is concluded that AE protects against OS produced by O(3) and the effect is independent of SOD.

  2. Futsal and continuous exercise induce similar changes in specific skeletal muscle signalling proteins.

    PubMed

    Serpiello, F R; McKenna, M J; Coratella, G; Markworth, J F; Tarperi, C; Bishop, D; Stepto, N K; Cameron-Smith, D; Schena, F

    2014-09-01

    Exercise elicits skeletal-muscle adaptations which are important for improved health outcomes. We compared the effects of a futsal game (FUT) and moderate-intensity continuous exercise (MOD), on the skeletal-muscle protein signalling responses in young, healthy individuals. 16 men undertook an incremental exercise test and a resting muscle biopsy performed >48 h apart. They were then randomly allocated to either FUT (n=12) consisting of 2 x 20 min halves, or MOD (n=8) consisting of a work-matched running bout performed at an intensity corresponding to the individual ventilatory threshold 1. Work matching was achieved by means of triaxial accelerometers. Immediately after FUT and MOD, participants underwent a second biopsy to assess exercise-induced changes in protein signalling. Total and phosphorylated protein abundance was assessed via western blotting. Both FUT and MOD altered signalling responses in skeletal muscle. FUT increased total ATF2 protein abundance (p=0.048) and phosphorylation (p=0.029), while no changes occurred with MOD. Both exercise regimes increased ACC phosphorylation (p=0.01) and returned a trend for increased p38MAPK phosphorylation. Futsal may be employed as an alternative to continuous exercise to elicit muscle adaptations which may be associated with improved health outcomes. As only FUT increased ATF2 activation, this protein might be a target of future investigation on exercise-induced signalling. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  3. Adaptations to exercise training and contraction-induced muscle injury in animal models of muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Carter, Gregory T; Abresch, R Ted; Fowler, William M

    2002-11-01

    This article reviews the current status of exercise training and contraction-induced muscle-injury investigations in animal models of muscular dystrophy. Most exercise-training studies have compared the adaptations of normal and dystrophic muscles with exercise. Adaptation of diseased muscle to exercise occurs at many levels, starting with the extracellular matrix, but also involves cytoskeletal architecture, muscle contractility, repair mechanisms, and gene regulation. The majority of exercise-injury investigations have attempted to determine the susceptibility of dystrophin-deficient muscles to contraction-induced injury. There is some evidence in animal models that diseased muscle can adapt and respond to mechanical stress. However, exercise-injury studies show that dystrophic muscles have an increased susceptibility to high mechanical forces. Most of the studies involving exercise training have shown that muscle adaptations in dystrophic animals were qualitatively similar to the adaptations observed in control muscle. Deleterious effects of the dystrophy usually occur only in older animals with advanced muscle fiber degeneration or after high-resistive eccentric training. The main limitations in applying these conclusions to humans are the differences in phenotypic expression between humans and genetically homologous animal models and in the significant biomechanical differences between humans and these animal models.

  4. Exercise prevents β-aminopropionitrile-induced morphological changes to type I collagen in murine bone

    PubMed Central

    Hammond, Max A; Wallace, Joseph M

    2015-01-01

    This study evaluated the effects of reduced enzymatic crosslinking, exercise and the ability of exercise to prevent the deleterious impact of reduced crosslinking on collagen D-spacing. Eight-week-old female mice were divided into four weight-matched groups receiving daily injections of either phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) or 300 mg kg−1 β-aminopropionitrile (BAPN) while undergoing normal cage activity (Sed) or 30 min per day of treadmill exercise (Ex) for 21 consecutive days. BAPN caused a downward shift in the D-spacing distribution in Sed BAPN compared with Sed PBS (P<0.001) but not in Ex BAPN (P=0.429), indicating that exercise can prevent changes in collagen morphology caused by BAPN. Exercise had no effect on D-spacing in PBS control mice (P=0.726), which suggests that exercise-induced increases in lysyl oxidase may be a possible mechanism for preventing BAPN-induced changes in D-spacing. The D-spacing changes were accompanied by an increase in mineral crystallinity/maturity due to the main effect of BAPN (P=0.016). However, no changes in nanoindentation, reference point indentation or other Raman spectroscopy parameters were observed. The ability of exercise to rescue BAPN-driven changes in collagen morphology necessitates further research into the use of mechanical stimulation as a preventative therapy for collagen-based diseases. PMID:25798234

  5. Exercise induces transient transcriptional activation of the PGC-1α gene in human skeletal muscle

    PubMed Central

    Pilegaard, Henriette; Saltin, Bengt; Neufer, P Darrell

    2003-01-01

    Endurance exercise training induces mitochondrial biogenesis in skeletal muscle. The peroxisome proliferator activated receptor co-activator 1α (PGC-1α) has recently been identified as a nuclear factor critical for coordinating the activation of genes required for mitochondrial biogenesis in cell culture and rodent skeletal muscle. To determine whether PGC-1α transcription is regulated by acute exercise and exercise training in human skeletal muscle, seven male subjects performed 4 weeks of one-legged knee extensor exercise training. At the end of training, subjects completed 3 h of two-legged knee extensor exercise. Biopsies were obtained from the vastus lateralis muscle of both the untrained and trained legs before exercise and after 0, 2, 6 and 24 h of recovery. Time to exhaustion (2 min maximum resistance), as well as hexokinase II (HKII), citrate synthase and 3-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase mRNA, were higher in the trained than the untrained leg prior to exercise. Exercise induced a marked transient increase (P < 0.05) in PGC-1α transcription (10- to > 40-fold) and mRNA content (7- to 10-fold), peaking within 2 h after exercise. Activation of PGC-1α was greater in the trained leg despite the lower relative workload. Interestingly, exercise did not affect nuclear respiratory factor 1 (NRF-1) mRNA, a gene induced by PGC-1α in cell culture. HKII, mitochondrial transcription factor A, peroxisome proliferator activated receptor α, and calcineurin Aα and Aβ mRNA were elevated (≈2- to 6-fold; P < 0.05) at 6 h of recovery in the untrained leg but did not change in the trained leg. The present data demonstrate that exercise induces a dramatic transient increase in PGC-1α transcription and mRNA content in human skeletal muscle. Consistent with its role as a transcriptional coactivator, these findings suggest that PGC-1α may coordinate the activation of metabolic genes in human muscle in response to exercise. PMID:12563009

  6. Exercise induces transient transcriptional activation of the PGC-1alpha gene in human skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Pilegaard, Henriette; Saltin, Bengt; Neufer, P Darrell

    2003-02-01

    Endurance exercise training induces mitochondrial biogenesis in skeletal muscle. The peroxisome proliferator activated receptor co-activator 1alpha (PGC-1alpha) has recently been identified as a nuclear factor critical for coordinating the activation of genes required for mitochondrial biogenesis in cell culture and rodent skeletal muscle. To determine whether PGC-1alpha transcription is regulated by acute exercise and exercise training in human skeletal muscle, seven male subjects performed 4 weeks of one-legged knee extensor exercise training. At the end of training, subjects completed 3 h of two-legged knee extensor exercise. Biopsies were obtained from the vastus lateralis muscle of both the untrained and trained legs before exercise and after 0, 2, 6 and 24 h of recovery. Time to exhaustion (2 min maximum resistance), as well as hexokinase II (HKII), citrate synthase and 3-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase mRNA, were higher in the trained than the untrained leg prior to exercise. Exercise induced a marked transient increase (P < 0.05) in PGC-1alpha transcription (10- to > 40-fold) and mRNA content (7- to 10-fold), peaking within 2 h after exercise. Activation of PGC-1alpha was greater in the trained leg despite the lower relative workload. Interestingly, exercise did not affect nuclear respiratory factor 1 (NRF-1) mRNA, a gene induced by PGC-1alpha in cell culture. HKII, mitochondrial transcription factor A, peroxisome proliferator activated receptor alpha, and calcineurin Aalpha and Abeta mRNA were elevated (approximately 2- to 6-fold; P < 0.05) at 6 h of recovery in the untrained leg but did not change in the trained leg. The present data demonstrate that exercise induces a dramatic transient increase in PGC-1alpha transcription and mRNA content in human skeletal muscle. Consistent with its role as a transcriptional coactivator, these findings suggest that PGC-1alpha may coordinate the activation of metabolic genes in human muscle in response to exercise.

  7. Exercise-induced changes in interleukin-10 in patients with knee osteoarthritis: new perspectives?

    PubMed

    Lems, Willem F; den Uyl, Debby

    2010-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) of the knee is a common chronic disease leading to increased morbidity and reduced quality of life. Although exercise therapy has been shown to be beneficial for both pain and physical functioning, its underlying mechanism is not fully understood. However, a recent study found an exercise-induced increase in interleukin-10 levels, to which anti-inflammatory and chondroprotective properties are ascribed, in the (peri-)synovial fluid of patients with knee OA. These interesting results provide more insight into the effects of exercise in OA and need to be validated and confirmed. Hopefully, the study offers a promising basis for further research.

  8. Exercise-induced ventricular tachycardia in association with a myocardial bridge.

    PubMed

    Feld, H; Guadanino, V; Hollander, G; Greengart, A; Lichstein, E; Shani, J

    1991-05-01

    Sustained ventricular tachycardia induced by exercise is uncommon. This is a report of a patient who has a positive exercise test at a high level of exercise. The electrocardiogram has classic ischemic ST depressions. Following the appearance of these ST depressions, the patient developed ventricular tachycardia at a rapid rate. Workup that included an echocardiogram and cardiac catheterization revealed myocardial bridging of the left anterior descending artery as the only structural abnormality. Electrophysiologic studies revealed the patient to have ventricular tachycardia only with isoproterenol (Isuprel) infusion.

  9. Neurobiological Alterations Induced by Exercise and Their Impact on Depressive Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Helmich, Ingo; Latini, Alexandra; Sigwalt, Andre; Carta, Mauro Giovanni; Machado, Sergio; Velasques, Bruna; Ribeiro, Pedro; Budde, Henning

    2010-01-01

    Background: The impact of physical activity on brain metabolic functions has been investigated in different studies and there is growing evidence that exercise can be used as a preventive and rehabilitative intervention in the treatment of depressive disorders. However, the exact neuronal mechanisms underlying the latter phenomenon have not been clearly elucidated. The present article summarises key results derived from studies that focussed on the neurobiological impact of exercise on brain metabolic functions associated with depressive disorders. Since major depressive disorder (MDD) is a life threatening disease it is of great significance to find reliable strategies to prevent or to cure this illness. Therefore, the aim of this paper is to review (1) the physiological relationship between physical activity and depressive disorders and (2) the potential neurobiological alterations induced by exercise that might lead to the relief of mental disorders like depression. Methods: We searched electronic databases for literature concerning the relationship between exercise and depression from 1963 until 2009. Results: The data suggests an association between physical inactivity and higher levels of depressive symptoms. Properly designed studies could show that exercise training can be as effective as antidepressive medications. Conclusion: The exact mechanisms how exercise affects the brain are not fully understood and the literature lacks of well designed studies concerning the effects of exercise training on depressive disorders. But the observed antidepressant actions of exercise are strong enough that it already can be used as an alternative to current medications in the treatment of depressive disorders. PMID:21283646

  10. [Exercised-induced asthma in soccer players ages from 8 to 13 years].

    PubMed

    Sidiropoulou, M; Tsimaras, V; Fotiadou, E; Aggelopoulou-Sakadami, N

    2005-04-01

    The purpose of this study was the detection of exercise induced asthma in soccer players aged 8-13 years. Thirty boys, 8-13 years old participated in the study. They were coming from an athletic team of north of Thessaloniki. The study included clinical examination, administration of a respiratory health questionnaire and the exercise -- free running -- test with spirometric measurements. Spirometric measurements were performed by using a microspirometer, before exercise and 2, 5, 10, 15 and 30 min after a 6 min free running exercise (80 - 90 % max heart rate). The highest forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV (1)) value before exercise was compared with the lowest of post exercise values. The results showed a decline in FEV (1) > 15 % in 12 out of 30 children. Particularly, decline in FEV (1) was present in 1 (11 %) out of 9 children with free personal medical history but positive family history for asthma, in 3 (25 %) out of 12 children with allergies, and in 8 (89 %) out of 9 children with asthma. Symptoms were reported by 9 of 12 children with fall in FEV (1) > 15 %, during the 6 min exercise test, who had no symptoms during the soccer games. Identification of EIA by exercise challenge test in young athletes is a useful component for the diagnosis of bronchial hyperresponsiveness. Similar studies should be performed on older and younger athletes who participate in different sports and games.

  11. Exercise-induced hypertension among healthy firefighters-a comparison between two different definitions.

    PubMed

    Leiba, Adi; Baur, Dorothee M; Kales, Stefanos N

    2013-01-01

    Different studies have yielded conflicting results regarding the association of hypertensive response to exercise and cardiovascular morbidity. We compared two different definitions of exaggerated hypertensive response to exercise and their association with cardio-respiratory fitness in a population of healthy firefighters. We examined blood pressure response to exercise in 720 normotensive male career firefighters. Fitness was measured as peak metabolic equivalent tasks (METs) achieved during maximal exercise treadmill tests. Abnormal hypertensive response was defined either as systolic blood pressure ≥ 200 mm Hg; or alternatively, as responses falling in the upper tertile of blood pressure change from rest to exertion, divided by the maximal workload achieved. Using the simple definition of a 200 mm Hg cutoff at peak exercise less fit individuals (METs ≤ 12) were protected from an exaggerated hypertensive response (OR 0.45, 95%CI 0.30-0.67). However, using the definition of exercise-induced hypertension that corrects for maximal workload, less fit firefighters had almost twice the risk (OR 1.8, 95%CI 1.3-2.47). Blood pressure change corrected for maximal workload is better correlated with cardiorespiratory fitness. Systolic blood pressure elevation during peak exercise likely represents an adaptive response, whereas elevation out of proportion to the maximal workload may indicate insufficient vasodilation and a maladaptive response. Prospective studies are needed to best define exaggerated blood pressure response to exercise.

  12. Biphasic nature of gastric emptying.

    PubMed Central

    Siegel, J A; Urbain, J L; Adler, L P; Charkes, N D; Maurer, A H; Krevsky, B; Knight, L C; Fisher, R S; Malmud, L S

    1988-01-01

    The existence of a lag phase during the gastric emptying of solid foods is controversial. It has been hypothesised that among other early events, the stomach requires a period of time to process solid food to particles small enough to be handled as a liquid. At present no standardised curve fitting techniques exist for the characterisation and quantification of the lag phase or the emptying rate of solids and liquids. We have evaluated the ability of a modified power exponential function to define the emptying parameters of two different solid meals. Dual labelled meals were administered to 24 normal volunteers. The subjects received meals consisting of either Tc-99m in vivo labelled chicken liver or Tc-99m-egg, which have different densities, and In-111-DTPA in water. The emptying curves were biphasic in nature. For solids, this represented an initial delay in emptying or lag phase followed by an equilibrium emptying phase characterised by a constant rate of emptying. The curves were analysed using a modified power exponential function of the form y(t) = 1-(1-e-kt)beta, where y(t) is the fractional meal retention at time t, k is the gastric emptying rate in min-1, and beta is the extrapolated y-intercept from the terminal portion of the curve. The length of the lag phase and half-emptying time increased with solid food density (31 +/- 8 min and 77.6 +/- 11.2 min for egg and 62 +/- 16 min and 94.1 +/- 14.2 min for chicken liver, respectively). After the lag phase, both solids had similar emptying rates, and these rates were identical to those of the liquids. In vitro experiments indicated that the egg meal disintegrated much more rapidly than the chicken liver under mechanical agitation in gastric juice, lending further support to the hypothesis that the initial lag in emptying of solid food is due to the processing of food into particles small enough to pass the pylorus. We conclude that the modified power exponential model permits characterisation of the biphasic

  13. Biphasic transthoracic defibrillation causes fewer ECG ST-segment changes after shock.

    PubMed

    Reddy, R K; Gleva, M J; Gliner, B E; Dolack, G L; Kudenchuk, P J; Poole, J E; Bardy, G H

    1997-08-01

    Electrocardiographic abnormalities are common after transthoracic defibrillation. ECG ST-segment changes are especially problematic after defibrillation and may indicate ischemic or shock-induced cardiac dysfunction after resuscitation. Biphasic defibrillation waveforms, compared with monophasic waveforms, diminish shock-induced cardiac dysfunction in laboratory preparations. This effect has not been validated in human subjects. We therefore evaluated in a prospective, blinded fashion the effect of biphasic and monophasic transthoracic defibrillation on the ECG ST segment in 30 consecutive patients during surgery for the implantation of a cardioverter-defibrillator. In each patient two low-energy truncated biphasic transthoracic defibrillation shocks (115 and 130 J) were compared with a standard clinical 200 J monophasic damped-sine wave shock. The biphasic shocks and the damped-sine wave shock have been demonstrated to have equal defibrillation efficacy of 97%. Fifteen-second ECG signals recorded across transthoracic defibrillation electrodes were digitized before ventricular fibrillation induction and immediately after each defibrillation attempt. The ST segments 80 msec after the J point were analyzed in a blinded fashion by two reviewers. The ST-segment deflection, QRS-interval duration, QT interval, and heart rate after each therapy were compared with baseline values. ECG ST-segment elevation was significantly greater with the 200-J damped-sine waveform than with either biphasic waveform. The ECG ST-segment levels were -.55 +/- .36 at baseline, -.76 +/- .36 mm after internal shock, -.02-.36 mm after 115-J biphasic shock, .21 +/- .38 mm after 130-J biphasic shock, and 2.09 +/- .37 mm after 200-J damped-sine wave shock (P<.0001). QRS-interval duration, QT interval, and heart rate did not change significantly with any waveform. Transthoracic defibrillation with biphasic waveforms results in less postshock ECG evidence of myocardial dysfunction (injury or ischemia

  14. Effect of acute treadmill exercise on cisplatin-induced muscle atrophy in the mouse.

    PubMed

    Sakai, Hiroyasu; Kimura, Minami; Isa, Yosuke; Yabe, Saori; Maruyama, Akihide; Tsuruno, Yukari; Kai, Yuki; Sato, Fumiaki; Yumoto, Tetsuro; Chiba, Yoshihiko; Narita, Minoru

    2017-07-31

    Cisplatin, a platinum-based anti-cancer drug, is one of the most effective broad-spectrum anti-cancer agents used against various cancers. It has been recently suggested that low skeletal muscle mass is predictive of mortality in patients with cancer. Although several molecules produced by the actual tumor itself contribute to skeletal muscle impairment, we recently suggested that the administration of cisplatin could increase levels of muscle RING finger-1 (MuRF1) and atrogin-1, possibly leading to muscle atrophy in the mouse. Exercise is an important factor that induces muscle protein synthesis and muscle hypertrophy by enhancing the positive effects of the Akt/mTOR/p70S6 kinase pathway. In the present study, we therefore investigated the effect of treadmill exercise on cisplatin-induced muscle atrophy. C57BL/6J mice were treated with cisplatin (3 mg/kg, i.p.) or saline for four consecutive days. On day 4, the quadriceps and gastrocnemius muscles were isolated from the mice. The animals in the treadmill exercise groups were forced to run on a motorized treadmill for 20 min once a day for 9 days. In addition to muscle mass, the decrease in myofiber diameter associated with cisplatin administration was significantly restored by treadmill exercise. This exercise also significantly attenuated cisplatin-induced upregulation of MuRF1 and atrogin-1 in quadriceps and gastrocnemius muscle. The decreased Akt, p70S6 kinase, and Foxo3a phosphorylation observed with cisplatin treatment was significantly recovered by treadmill exercise in both the muscles. In the present study, myostatin (Mstn) gene expression, upregulated by cisplatin administration, was also attenuated by treadmill exercise. These findings suggest that treadmill exercise could attenuate cisplatin-induced muscle atrophy, at least partially, and could improve prognosis.

  15. Inflammation During Gestation Induced Spatial Memory and Learning Deficits: Attenuated by Physical Exercise in Juvenile Rats

    PubMed Central

    Thangarajan, Rajesh; Rai, Kiranmai. S.; Gopalakrishnan, Sivakumar; Perumal, Vivek

    2015-01-01

    Background Gestational infections induced inflammation (GIII) is a cause of various postnatal neurological deficits in developing countries. Such intra uterine insults could result in persistent learning-memory disabilities. There are no studies elucidating the efficacy of adolescence exercise on spatial learning- memory abilities of young adult rats pre-exposed to inflammatory insult during fetal life. Aims and Objectives The present study addresses the efficacy of physical (running) exercise during adolescent period in attenuating spatial memory deficits induced by exposure to GIII in rats. Materials and Methods Pregnant Wistar dams were randomly divided into control and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) groups, injected intra peritoneally (i.p) with saline (0.5ml) or lipopolysaccharide (LPS) (0.5mg/kg) on alternate days from gestation day 14 (GD 14) till delivery. After parturition, pups were divided into 3 groups (n=6/group) a) Sham control and LPS group divided into 2 subgroups- b) LPS and c) LPS exercise group. Running exercise was given only to LPS exercise group during postnatal days (PNDs) 30 to 60 (15min/day). Spatial learning and memory performance was assessed by Morris water maze test (MWM), on postnatal day 61 to 67 in all groups. Results Young rats pre-exposed to GIII and subjected to running exercise through juvenile period displayed significant decrease in latency to reach escape platform and spent significant duration in target quadrant in MWM test, compared to age matched LPS group. Results of the current study demonstrated that exercise through juvenile/adolescent period effectively mitigates gestational inflammation-induced cognitive deficits in young adult rats. Conclusion Inflammation during gestation impairs offspring’s spatial memory and learning abilities. Whereas, early postnatal physical exercise attenuates, to higher extent, cognitive impairment resulted from exposure to LPS induced inflammation during intrauterine growth period. PMID:26266117

  16. Effect of N-2-mercaptopropionyl glycine on exercise-induced cardiac adaptations.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Matthew J; Harris, M Brennan; Boluyt, Marvin O; Hwang, Hyun Seok; Starnes, Joseph W

    2011-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that exercise-induced cardiac adaptations would be attenuated by the free radical scavenger N-2-mercaptopropionyl glycine (MPG). Male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into four groups (n = 9-13 per group) for 3-4 wk: sedentary (S), S+MPG (100 mg/kg ip daily), exercised on a treadmill (E) (60 min/day, 5 days/wk, at a speed of 20 m/min up a 6° grade in a 6°C room), or E+MPG given 10 min prior to exercise. Additional rats (n = 55) were used to determine acute exercise effects on myocardial redox state [nonprotein nonglutathione sulfhydryls (NPNGSH)] and PI3K/Akt signaling pathway activation. Compared with S, NPNGSH levels were 48% lower in E (P < 0.05) and unchanged in E+MPG (P > 0.05). MPG also attenuated exercise-induced activation of the signaling proteins Akt and S6. Hearts from the 4-wk groups were weighed, and cardiac function was evaluated using an isolated perfused working heart preparation. Similar increases (P < 0.05) in both exercised groups were observed for heart weight and heart weight-to-body weight ratio. Cardiac function improved in E vs. S, as indicated by greater (P < 0.05) external work performed (cardiac output × systolic pressure) and efficiency of external work (work/Vo(2)). MPG prevented these exercise-induced functional improvements. Skeletal muscle mitochondria content increased to similar levels in E and E+MPG. This study provides evidence that free radicals do not play an essential role in the development of exercise-induced cardiac hypertrophy; however, they appear to be involved in functional cardiac adaptations, which may be mediated through the PI3K/Akt pathway.

  17. Improvement of Acetylcholine-Induced Vasodilation by Acute Exercise in Ovariectomized Hypertensive Rats.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Tsung-Lin; Lin, Yi-Yuan; Su, Chia-Ting; Hu, Chun-Che; Yang, Ai-Lun

    2016-06-30

    Postmenopause is associated with the development of cardiovascular disease, such as hypertension. However, limited information is available regarding effects of exercise on cardiovascular responses and its underlying mechanisms in the simultaneous postmenopausal and hypertensive status. We aimed to investigate whether acute exercise could enhance vasodilation mediated by acetylcholine (ACh) and sodium nitroprusside (SNP) in ovariectomized hypertensive rats. The fifteen-week-old female spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) were bilaterally ovariectomized, at the age of twenty-four weeks, and randomly divided into sedentary (SHR-O) and acute exercise (SHR-OE) groups. Age-matched WKY rats were used as the normotensive control group. The SHR-OE group ran on a motor-driven treadmill at a speed of 24 m/min for one hour in a moderate-intensity program. Following a single bout of exercise, rat aortas were isolated for the evaluation of the endothelium-dependent (ACh-induced) and endothelium-independent (SNP-induced) vasodilation by the organ bath system. Also, the serum levels of oxidative stress and antioxidant activities, including malondialdehyde (MDA), superoxide dismutase (SOD), and catalase, were measured after acute exercise among the three groups. We found that acute exercise significantly enhanced the ACh-induced vasodilation, but not the SNP-induced vasodilation, in ovariectomized hypertensive rats. This increased vasodilation was eliminated after the inhibition of nitric oxide synthase (NOS). Also, the activities of SOD and catalase were significantly increased after acute exercise, whereas the level of MDA was comparable among the three groups. These results indicated that acute exercise improved the endothelium-dependent vasodilating response to ACh through the NOS-related pathway in ovariectomized hypertensive rats, which might be associated with increased serum antioxidant activities.

  18. Exercise induced adipokine changes and the metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Golbidi, Saeid; Laher, Ismail

    2014-01-01

    The lack of adequate physical activity and obesity created a worldwide pandemic. Obesity is characterized by the deposition of adipose tissue in various parts of the body; it is now evident that adipose tissue also acts as an endocrine organ capable of secreting many cytokines that are though to be involved in the pathophysiology of obesity, insulin resistance, and metabolic syndrome. Adipokines, or adipose tissue-derived proteins, play a pivotal role in this scenario. Increased secretion of proinflammatory adipokines leads to a chronic inflammatory state that is accompanied by insulin resistance and glucose intolerance. Lifestyle change in terms of increased physical activity and exercise is the best nonpharmacological treatment for obesity since these can reduce insulin resistance, counteract the inflammatory state, and improve the lipid profile. There is growing evidence that exercise exerts its beneficial effects partly through alterations in the adipokine profile; that is, exercise increases secretion of anti-inflammatory adipokines and reduces proinflammatory cytokines. In this paper we briefly describe the pathophysiologic role of four important adipokines (adiponectin, leptin, TNF-α, and IL-6) in the metabolic syndrome and review some of the clinical trials that monitored these adipokines as a clinical outcome before and after exercise.

  19. Carbohydrate-Dependent, Exercise-Induced Gastrointestinal Distress

    PubMed Central

    de Oliveira, Erick Prado; Burini, Roberto C.

    2014-01-01

    Gastrointestinal (GI) problems are a common concern of athletes during intense exercise. Ultimately, these symptoms can impair performance and possibly prevent athletes from winning or even finishing a race. The main causes of GI problems during exercise are mechanical, ischemic and nutritional factors. Among the nutritional factors, a high intake of carbohydrate and hyperosmolar solutions increases GI problems. A number of nutritional manipulations have been proposed to minimize gastrointestinal symptoms, including the use of multiple transportable carbohydrates. This type of CHO intake increases the oxidation rates and can prevent the accumulation of carbohydrate in the intestine. Glucose (6%) or glucose plus fructose (8%–10%) beverages are recommended in order to increase CHO intake while avoiding the gastric emptying delay. Training the gut with high intake of CHO may increase absorption capacity and probably prevent GI distress. CHO mouth rinse may be a good strategy to enhance performance without using GI tract in exercises lasting less than an hour. Future strategies should be investigated comparing different CHO types, doses, and concentration in exercises with the same characteristics. PMID:25314645

  20. Optimal use of fluids of varying formulations to minimise exercise-induced disturbances in homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Lamb, D R; Brodowicz, G R

    1986-01-01

    The rationale underlying the development of various formulations of beverages for consumption before, during, and/or after physical exercise is that such formulations should minimise some of the disturbances in physiological homeostasis that occur during exercise and thereby prevent injury and/or enhance performance. Exercise- and dehydration-induced increases in core temperature, body fluid osmolality, heart rate, losses of plasma and other body fluid volumes, and carbohydrate depletion are probably the most important homeostatic disturbances that can be ameliorated by fluid consumption. With the exception of athletes subject to hyponatraemia after consumption of ordinary water during prolonged activity, changes in electrolyte concentrations in the body fluids of most athletes do not justify the inclusion of electrolytes in fluid replacement beverages to be consumed during exercise. However, small amounts of sodium added to water does speed gastric emptying and fluid absorption from the intestine. Recent evidence suggests that a precompetition meal high in easily digested carbohydrates should be consumed not later than 5 to 6 hours before competition. There is little published research on the optimal composition of this meal. Water ingestion 30 to 60 minutes before exercise seems to be of benefit to temperature regulation and cardiovascular homeostasis if the exercise is of moderate intensity (50 to 65% VO2max), but probably has little effect at the higher intensities of athletic performance. There is no systematic evidence to support the inclusion of calcium or sodium chloride in drinks consumed an hour or 2 before exercise. Furthermore, if glucose solutions are fed 15 to 45 minutes before prolonged exercise, they will probably cause a fall in blood glucose during exercise and may adversely affect performance. These adverse effects are not present when fructose is consumed before exercise. Contrary to the adverse effects of glucose feedings 15 to 60 minutes

  1. Hemodynamic effects of high intensity interval training in COPD patients exhibiting exercise-induced dynamic hyperinflation.

    PubMed

    Nasis, I; Kortianou, E; Vasilopoulou, Μ; Spetsioti, S; Louvaris, Z; Kaltsakas, G; Davos, C H; Zakynthinos, S; Koulouris, N G; Vogiatzis, I

    2015-10-01

    Dynamic hyperinflation (DH) has a significant adverse effect on cardiovascular function during exercise in COPD patients. COPD patients with (n = 25) and without (n = 11) exercise-induced DH undertook an incremental (IET) and a constant-load exercise test (CLET) sustained at 75% peak work (WRpeak) prior to and following an interval cycling exercise training regime (set at 100% WRpeak with 30-s work/30-s rest intervals) lasting for 12 weeks. Cardiac output (Q) was assessed by cardio-bio-impedance (PhysioFlow, enduro, PF-O7) to determine Q mean response time (QMRT) at onset (QMRT(ON)) and offset (QMRT(OFF)) of CLET. Post-rehabilitation only those patients exhibiting exercise-induced DH demonstrated significant reductions in QMRT(ON) (from 82.2 ± 4.3 to 61.7 ± 4.2 s) and QMRT(OFF) (from 80.5 ± 3.8 to 57.2 ± 4.9 s ). These post-rehabilitation adaptations were associated with improvements in inspiratory capacity, thereby suggesting that mitigation of the degree of exercise-induced DH improves central hemodynamic responses in COPD patients. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Little exercise, big effects: Reversing aging and infection-induced memory deficits, and underlying processes

    PubMed Central

    Barrientos, Ruth M.; Frank, Matthew G.; Crysdale, Nicole Y.; Chapman, Timothy R.; Ahrendsen, Jared T.; Day, Heidi E.W.; Campeau, Serge; Watkins, Linda R.; Patterson, Susan L.; Maier, Steven F.

    2011-01-01

    We have previously found that healthy aged rats are more likely to suffer profound memory impairments following a severe bacterial infection than are younger adult rats. Such a peripheral challenge is capable of producing a neuroinflammatory response, and in the aged brain this response is exaggerated and prolonged. Normal aging primes, or sensitizes microglia and this appears to be the source of this amplified inflammatory response. Among the outcomes of this exaggerated neuroinflammatory response are impairments in synaptic plasticity, and reductions of brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), both of which have been associated with cognitive impairments. Since it has been shown that physical exercise increases BDNF mRNA in the hippocampus, the present study examined voluntary exercise in 24 mos old F344xBN rats as a neuroprotective therapeutic in our bacterial infection model. Although aged rats ran only an average of 0.7 km per week, this small amount of exercise was sufficient to completely reverse infection-induced impairments in hippocampus-dependent long-term memory compared to sedentary animals. Strikingly, exercise prevented the infection-induced exaggerated neuroinflammatory response and the blunted BDNF mRNA induction seen in the hippocampus of sedentary rats. Moreover, voluntary exercise abrogated age-related microglial sensitization, suggesting a possible mechanism for exercise-induced neuroprotection in aging. PMID:21832188

  3. A Comparison of Exercise-Induced Muscle Damage Following Maximal Eccentric Contractions in Men and Boys.

    PubMed

    Deli, Chariklia K; Fatouros, Ioannis G; Paschalis, Vassilis; Georgakouli, Kalliopi; Zalavras, Athanasios; Avloniti, Alexandra; Koutedakis, Yiannis; Jamurtas, Athanasios Z

    2017-08-01

    Research regarding exercise-induced muscle-damage mainly focuses on adults. The present study examined exercise-induced muscle-damage responses in adults compared with children. Eleven healthy boys (10-12 y) and 15 healthy men (18-45 y) performed 5 sets of 15 maximal eccentric contractions of the knee extensors. Range of motion (ROM), delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS) during squat and walking, and peak isometric, concentric and eccentric torque were assessed before, post, 24, 48, 72, and 96 hr postexercise. Creatine kinase (CK) activity was assessed before and 72 hr postexercise. Eccentric exercise resulted in DOMS during squat that persisted for up to 96h in men, and 48 hr in boys (p < .05), and DOMS during walking that persisted for up to 72 hr in men, and 48 hr in boys (p < .01). The ROM was lower in both age groups 48 hr postexercise (p < .001). Isometric (p < .001), concentric (p < .01) and eccentric (p < .01) force decreased post, and up to 48 hr postexercise in men. Except for a reduction in isometric force immediately after exercise, no other changes occurred in boys' isokinetic force. CK activity increased in men at 72 hr postexercise compared with pre exercise levels (p = .05). Our data provide further confirmation that children are less susceptible to exercise-induced muscle damage compared with adults.

  4. Skeletal muscle NAMPT is induced by exercise in humans

    PubMed Central

    Costford, Sheila R.; Bajpeyi, Sudip; Pasarica, Magdalena; Albarado, Diana C.; Thomas, Shantele C.; Xie, Hui; Church, Timothy S.; Jubrias, Sharon A.; Conley, Kevin E.

    2010-01-01

    In mammals, nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (NAMPT) is responsible for the first and rate-limiting step in the conversion of nicotinamide to nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+). NAD+ is an obligate cosubstrate for mammalian sirtuin-1 (SIRT1), a deacetylase that activates peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ coactivator-1α (PGC-1α), which in turn can activate mitochondrial biogenesis. Given that mitochondrial biogenesis is activated by exercise, we hypothesized that exercise would increase NAMPT expression, as a potential mechanism leading to increased mitochondrial content in muscle. A cross-sectional analysis of human subjects showed that athletes had about a twofold higher skeletal muscle NAMPT protein expression compared with sedentary obese, nonobese, and type 2 diabetic subjects (P < 0.05). NAMPT protein correlated with mitochondrial content as estimated by complex III protein content (R2 = 0.28, P < 0.01), MRS-measured maximal ATP synthesis (R2 = 0.37, P = 0.002), and V̇o2max (R2 = 0.63, P < 0.0001). In an exercise intervention study, NAMPT protein increased by 127% in sedentary nonobese subjects after 3 wk of exercise training (P < 0.01). Treatment of primary human myotubes with forskolin, a cAMP signaling pathway activator, resulted in an ∼2.5-fold increase in NAMPT protein expression, whereas treatment with ionomycin had no effect. Activation of AMPK via AICAR resulted in an ∼3.4-fold increase in NAMPT mRNA (P < 0.05) as well as modest increases in NAMPT protein (P < 0.05) and mitochondrial content (P < 0.05). These results demonstrate that exercise increases skeletal muscle NAMPT expression and that NAMPT correlates with mitochondrial content. Further studies are necessary to elucidate the pathways regulating NAMPT as well as its downstream effects. PMID:19887595

  5. Skeletal muscle NAMPT is induced by exercise in humans.

    PubMed

    Costford, Sheila R; Bajpeyi, Sudip; Pasarica, Magdalena; Albarado, Diana C; Thomas, Shantele C; Xie, Hui; Church, Timothy S; Jubrias, Sharon A; Conley, Kevin E; Smith, Steven R

    2010-01-01

    In mammals, nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (NAMPT) is responsible for the first and rate-limiting step in the conversion of nicotinamide to nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+). NAD+ is an obligate cosubstrate for mammalian sirtuin-1 (SIRT1), a deacetylase that activates peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma coactivator-1alpha (PGC-1alpha), which in turn can activate mitochondrial biogenesis. Given that mitochondrial biogenesis is activated by exercise, we hypothesized that exercise would increase NAMPT expression, as a potential mechanism leading to increased mitochondrial content in muscle. A cross-sectional analysis of human subjects showed that athletes had about a twofold higher skeletal muscle NAMPT protein expression compared with sedentary obese, nonobese, and type 2 diabetic subjects (P < 0.05). NAMPT protein correlated with mitochondrial content as estimated by complex III protein content (R(2) = 0.28, P < 0.01), MRS-measured maximal ATP synthesis (R(2) = 0.37, P = 0.002), and Vo(2max) (R(2) = 0.63, P < 0.0001). In an exercise intervention study, NAMPT protein increased by 127% in sedentary nonobese subjects after 3 wk of exercise training (P < 0.01). Treatment of primary human myotubes with forskolin, a cAMP signaling pathway activator, resulted in an approximately 2.5-fold increase in NAMPT protein expression, whereas treatment with ionomycin had no effect. Activation of AMPK via AICAR resulted in an approximately 3.4-fold increase in NAMPT mRNA (P < 0.05) as well as modest increases in NAMPT protein (P < 0.05) and mitochondrial content (P < 0.05). These results demonstrate that exercise increases skeletal muscle NAMPT expression and that NAMPT correlates with mitochondrial content. Further studies are necessary to elucidate the pathways regulating NAMPT as well as its downstream effects.

  6. Treadmill Exercise Protects Against Pentylenetetrazol-Induced Seizures and Oxidative Stress after Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Luiz Fernando Almeida; Hoffmann, Maurício Scopel; Gerbatin, Rogério da Rosa; Fiorin, Fernando da Silva; Dobrachinski, Fernando; Mota, Bibiana Castagna; Wouters, Angelica Terezinha Barth; Pavarini, Saulo Petinatti; Soares, Félix Alexandre Antunes; Fighera, Michele Rechia

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a major cause of acquired epilepsy, and significant resources are required to develop a better understanding of the pathologic mechanism as targets for potential therapies. Thus, we decided to investigate whether physical exercise after fluid percussion injury (FPI) protects from oxidative and neurochemical alterations as well as from behavioral electroencephalographic (EEG) seizures induced by subeffective convulsive doses of pentylenetetrazol (PTZ; 35 mg/kg). Behavioral and EEG recordings revealed that treadmill physical training increased latency to first clonic and tonic-clonic seizures, attenuated the duration of generalized seizures, and protected against the increase of PTZ-induced Racine scale 5 weeks after neuronal injury. EEG recordings also revealed that physical exercise prevented PTZ-induced amplitude increase in TBI animals. Neurochemical analysis showed that exercise training increased glutathione/oxidized glutathione ratio and glutathione levels per se. Exercise training was also effective against alterations in the redox status, herein characterized by lipid peroxidation (thiobarbituric acid reactive substances), protein carbonyl increase, as well as the inhibition of superoxide dismutase and Na+,K+-ATPase activities after FPI. On the other hand, histologic analysis with hematoxylin and eosin revealed that FPI induced moderate neuronal damage in cerebral cortex 4 weeks after injury and that physical exercise did not protect against neuronal injury. These data suggest that the ability of physical exercise to reduce FPI-induced seizures is not related to its protection against neuronal damage; however, the effective protection of selected targets, such as Na+/K+-ATPase elicited by physical exercise, may represent a new line of treatment for post-traumatic seizure susceptibility. PMID:23530735

  7. Biphasic Effects of Nitric Oxide Radicals on Radiation-Induced Lethality and Chromosome Aberrations in Human Lung Cancer Cells Carrying Different p53 Gene Status

    SciTech Connect

    Su Xiaoming; Takahashi, Akihisa; Guo Guozhen; Mori, Eiichiro; Okamoto, Noritomo; Ohnishi, Ken; Iwasaki, Toshiyasu; Ohnishi, Takeo

    2010-06-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to clarify the effects of nitric oxide (NO) on radiation-induced cell killing and chromosome aberrations in two human lung cancer cell lines with a different p53 gene status. Methods and Materials: We used wild-type (wt) p53 and mutated (m) p53 cell lines that were derived from the human lung cancer H1299 cell line, which is p53 null. The wtp53 and mp53 cell lines were generated by transfection of the appropriate p53 constructs into the parental cells. Cells were pretreated with different concentrations of isosorbide dinitrate (ISDN) (an NO donor) and/or 2-(4-Carboxyphenyl)-4,4,5,5-tetramethylimidazoline-1-oxyl-3-oxide (c-PTIO) (an NO scavenger) and then exposed to X-rays. Cell survival, apoptosis, and chromosome aberrations were scored by use of a colony-forming assay, Hoechst 33342 staining assay and TUNEL (terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP [deoxyuridine triphosphate] nick end labeling) assay, and chromosomal banding techniques, respectively. Results: In wtp53 cells the induction of radioresistance and the inhibition of apoptosis and chromosome aberrations were observed in the presence of ISDN at low 2- to 10-{mu}mol/L concentrations before X-irradiation. The addition of c-PTIO and ISDN into the culture medium 6 h before irradiation almost completely suppressed these effects. However, at high concentrations of ISDN (100-500 {mu}mol/L), clear evidence of radiosensitization, enhancement of apoptosis, and chromosome aberrations was detected. However, these phenomena were not observed in mp53 cells at either concentration range with ISDN. Conclusions: These results indicate that low and high concentrations of NO radicals can choreograph inverse radiosensitivity, apoptosis, and chromosome aberrations in human lung cancer cells and that NO radicals can affect the fate of wtp53 cells.

  8. The Biphasic Effects of Moderate Alcohol Consumption with a Meal on Ambiance-Induced Mood and Autonomic Nervous System Balance: A Randomized Crossover Trial

    PubMed Central

    Schrieks, Ilse C.; Stafleu, Annette; Kallen, Victor L.; Grootjen, Marc; Witkamp, Renger F.; Hendriks, Henk F. J.

    2014-01-01

    Background The pre-drinking mood state has been indicated to be an important factor in the mood effects of alcohol. However, for moderate alcohol consumption there are no controlled studies showing this association. Also, the mood effects of consuming alcohol combined with food are largely unknown. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of moderate alcohol combined with a meal on ambiance-induced mood states. Furthermore effects on autonomic nervous system activity were measured to explore physiological mechanisms that may be involved in changes of mood state. Methods In a crossover design 28 women (age 18–45 y, BMI 18.5–27 kg/m2) were randomly allocated to 4 conditions in which they received 3 glasses of sparkling white wine (30 g alcohol) or alcohol-free sparkling white wine while having dinner in a room with either a pleasant or unpleasant created ambiance. Subjects filled out questionnaires (B-BAES, POMS and postprandial wellness questionnaire) at different times. Skin conductance and heart rate variability were measured continuously. Results Moderate alcohol consumption increased happiness scores in the unpleasant, but not in the pleasant ambiance. Alcohol consumption increased happiness and stimulation feelings within 1 hour and increased sedative feelings and sleepiness for 2.5 hour. Skin conductance was increased after alcohol within 1 hour and was related to happiness and stimulation scores. Heart rate variability was decreased after alcohol for 2 hours and was related to mental alertness. Conclusion Mood inductions and autonomic nervous system parameters may be useful to evaluate mood changes by nutritional interventions. Moderate alcohol consumption elevates happiness scores in an unpleasant ambiance. However, drinking alcohol during a pleasant mood results in an equally positive mood state. Trial Registration Clinicaltrials.gov NCT01426022. PMID:24465955

  9. Resistance exercise-induced fluid shifts: change in active muscle size and plasma volume

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ploutz-Snyder, L. L.; Convertino, V. A.; Dudley, G. A.

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that the reduction in plasma volume (PV) induced by resistance exercise reflects fluid loss to the extravascular space and subsequently selective increase in cross-sectional area (CSA) of active but not inactive skeletal muscle. We compared changes in active and inactive muscle CSA and PV after barbell squat exercise. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was used to quantify muscle involvement in exercise and to determine CSA of muscle groups or individual muscles [vasti (VS), adductor (Add), hamstring (Ham), and rectus femoris (RF)]. Muscle involvement in exercise was determined using exercise-induced contrast shift in spin-spin relaxation time (T2)-weighted MR images immediately postexercise. Alterations in muscle size were based on the mean CSA of individual slices. Hematocrit, hemoglobin, and Evans blue dye were used to estimate changes in PV. Muscle CSA and PV data were obtained preexercise and immediately postexercise and 15 and 45 min thereafter. A hierarchy of muscle involvement in exercise was found such that VS > Add > Ham > RF, with the Ham and RF showing essentially no involvement. CSA of the VS and Add muscle groups were increased 10 and 5%, respectively, immediately after exercise in each thigh with no changes in Ham and RF CSA. PV was decreased 22% immediately following exercise. The absolute loss of PV was correlated (r2 = 0.75) with absolute increase in muscle CSA immediately postexercise, supporting the notion that increased muscle size after resistance exercise reflects primarily fluid movement from the vascular space into active but not inactive muscle.

  10. Treadmill exercise ameliorates symptoms of Alzheimer disease through suppressing microglial activation-induced apoptosis in rats.

    PubMed

    Baek, Seung-Soo; Kim, Sang-Hoon

    2016-12-01

    Alzheimer disease (AD) is a most common form of dementia and eventually causes impairments of learning ability and memory function. In the present study, we investigated the effects of treadmill exercise on the symptoms of AD focusing on the microglial activation-induced apoptosis. AD was made by bilateral intracerebroventricular injection of streptozotocin. The rats in the exercise groups were made to run on a treadmill once a day for 30 min during 4 weeks. The distance and latency in the Morris water maze task and the latency in the step-down avoidance task were increased in the AD rats, in contrast, treadmill exercise shortened these parameters. The numbers of terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end labeling-positive and caspase-3-positive cells in the hippocampal dentate gyrus were decreased in the AD rats, in contrast, treadmill exercise suppressed these numbers. Expressions of glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) and cluster of differentiation molecule 11B (CD11b) in the hippocampal dentate gyrus were increased in the AD rats, in contrast, treadmill exercise suppressed GFAP and CD11b expressions. Bax expression was increased and Bcl-2 expression was decreased in the hippocampus of AD rats, in contrast, treadmill exercise decreased Bax expression and increased Bcl-2 expression. The present results demonstrated that treadmill exercise ameliorated AD-induced impairments of spatial learning ability and short-term memory through suppressing apoptosis. The antiapoptotic effect of treadmill exercise might be ascribed to the inhibitory effect of treadmill exercise on microglial activation.

  11. Treadmill exercise ameliorates symptoms of Alzheimer disease through suppressing microglial activation-induced apoptosis in rats

    PubMed Central

    Baek, Seung-Soo; Kim, Sang-Hoon

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer disease (AD) is a most common form of dementia and eventually causes impairments of learning ability and memory function. In the present study, we investigated the effects of treadmill exercise on the symptoms of AD focusing on the microglial activation-induced apoptosis. AD was made by bilateral intracerebroventricular injection of streptozotocin. The rats in the exercise groups were made to run on a treadmill once a day for 30 min during 4 weeks. The distance and latency in the Morris water maze task and the latency in the step-down avoidance task were increased in the AD rats, in contrast, treadmill exercise shortened these parameters. The numbers of terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end labeling-positive and caspase-3-positive cells in the hippocampal dentate gyrus were decreased in the AD rats, in contrast, treadmill exercise suppressed these numbers. Expressions of glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) and cluster of differentiation molecule 11B (CD11b) in the hippocampal dentate gyrus were increased in the AD rats, in contrast, treadmill exercise suppressed GFAP and CD11b expressions. Bax expression was increased and Bcl-2 expression was decreased in the hippocampus of AD rats, in contrast, treadmill exercise decreased Bax expression and increased Bcl-2 expression. The present results demonstrated that treadmill exercise ameliorated AD-induced impairments of spatial learning ability and short-term memory through suppressing apoptosis. The antiapoptotic effect of treadmill exercise might be ascribed to the inhibitory effect of treadmill exercise on microglial activation. PMID:28119873

  12. Effect of various ratios of carbohydrate-protein supplementation on resistance exercise-induced muscle damage.

    PubMed

    Samadi, A; Gaeini, A A; Kordi, M R; Rahimi, M; Rahnama, N; Bambaeichi, E

    2012-04-01

    Previous studies have indicated that exercise-induced muscle damage might be attenuated by coingestion of protein and carbohydrate supplement. The purpose of this study was to compare the effect of three various ratios of carbohydrate-protein (CHO+PRO) supplements on resistance exercise-induced muscle damage indices. Twenty-eight untrained male students voluntarily participated in this study and were randomly assigned to one of the four groups: 1) CHO+PRO 2:1 ratio, N.=7; 2) CHO+PRO 3:1 ratio, N.=8; 3) CHO+PRO 4:1 ratio, N.=7; 4) placebo group, N.=6. They performed a single bout of resistance exercise (whole body: 3 set×8-10 reps with 70-75% 1RM), with eccentric concentration. Every group consumed prepared CHO/PRO beverages (9% concentration, 10 mL/kg/bw-1 at different ratios) or the same amount of placebo beverage before and in 15 min intervals during exercise. Blood samples were taken before the exercise bout and also at 1 and 24 h post-exercise. In addition, muscle soreness scores were recorded before and 1, 24, and 48 h postexercise. Repeated measures ANOVA (between-within design) and Bonferroni post hoc test were used to analyze dependent measures (α=0.05). Serum creatine kinase (CK) and myoglobin (Mb) increased in all groups compared with pre-exercise but the significant difference among groups was observed in 24 h postexercise, in a way that both CK and Mb levels were higher in placebo group. Muscle soreness increased for all groups from pre to postexercise, but there was not any significant difference among groups at any time point. Findings of this study showed that CHO+PRO decreased serum CK and Mb at 24 h post exercise, but did not affect muscle soreness at any time points after exercise. Moreover, there were no significant differences between various ratios of CHO-PRO supplementation.

  13. Resistance exercise-induced fluid shifts: change in active muscle size and plasma volume

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ploutz-Snyder, L. L.; Convertino, V. A.; Dudley, G. A.

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that the reduction in plasma volume (PV) induced by resistance exercise reflects fluid loss to the extravascular space and subsequently selective increase in cross-sectional area (CSA) of active but not inactive skeletal muscle. We compared changes in active and inactive muscle CSA and PV after barbell squat exercise. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was used to quantify muscle involvement in exercise and to determine CSA of muscle groups or individual muscles [vasti (VS), adductor (Add), hamstring (Ham), and rectus femoris (RF)]. Muscle involvement in exercise was determined using exercise-induced contrast shift in spin-spin relaxation time (T2)-weighted MR images immediately postexercise. Alterations in muscle size were based on the mean CSA of individual slices. Hematocrit, hemoglobin, and Evans blue dye were used to estimate changes in PV. Muscle CSA and PV data were obtained preexercise and immediately postexercise and 15 and 45 min thereafter. A hierarchy of muscle involvement in exercise was found such that VS > Add > Ham > RF, with the Ham and RF showing essentially no involvement. CSA of the VS and Add muscle groups were increased 10 and 5%, respectively, immediately after exercise in each thigh with no changes in Ham and RF CSA. PV was decreased 22% immediately following exercise. The absolute loss of PV was correlated (r2 = 0.75) with absolute increase in muscle CSA immediately postexercise, supporting the notion that increased muscle size after resistance exercise reflects primarily fluid movement from the vascular space into active but not inactive muscle.

  14. Protective role of L-carnitine supplementation against exhaustive exercise induced oxidative stress in rats.

    PubMed

    Síktar, Elif; Ekinci, Deniz; Síktar, Erdinç; Beydemir, Sükrü; Gülçin, Ilhami; Günay, Mehmet

    2011-10-15

    The objective of this study was to investigate temperature dependent effects of oral l-carnitine supplementation on exhaustive exercise induced oxidative damage in rats. 42 male Spraque Dawley rats were randomly divided into seven experimental groups. These groups were formed as three non-carnitine exercise groups, three carnitine-exercise groups and a sedentary group. l-carnitine was given intraperitoneally to the carnitine-exercise groups 1h before the exercise in 100mg/kg. Blood was collected to measure paraoxonase-1 (PON1) activity, plasma malondialdehyde (MDA), low-density lipoprotein (LDL) and cholesterol concentrations. These biomarkers were measured in venous blood samples collected before and after the rats swam in pools at different water temperatures (18°C, 28°C and 38°C). In the non-carnitine group, exercise caused a significant decrease in PON1 activity and a significant elevation in MDA concentration at 28°C compared to the sedentary group. No significant alterations were evidenced in LDL and cholesterol concentrations upon exercise. The decrease in PON1 activity became higher with increasing temperature whereas the elevation in MDA levels increased at 18°C. In the l-carnitine supplementation group, recovery in PON1 activity was observed significant at 28°C and very significant at 38°C. MDA concentration was almost the same with that of the non-carnitine group at 18 and 38°C, but it significantly decreased at 28°C. Considering the recovery in PON1 and MDA levels at 28°C, which is the temperature of the sedentary group; our results suggest that l-carnitine supplementation has a protective role on exhaustive exercise-induced oxidative stress. Findings of this study also demonstrate influences of thermal stress on these parameters during exhaustive exercise.

  15. Training augments resistance exercise induced elevation of circulating brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF).

    PubMed

    Yarrow, Joshua F; White, Lesley J; McCoy, Sean C; Borst, Stephen E

    2010-07-26

    Brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is postulated to be an important mediator of exercise-induced neuroprotection. We tested the hypothesis that resistance exercise elevates circulating BDNF. Twenty healthy untrained college-aged males underwent a 5-week traditional or eccentric-enhanced progressive resistance training intervention. Blood was acquired at rest and 1, 30, and 60min following a standardized resistance exercise testing bout performed at baseline and at the completion of the intervention. Serum BDNF responses did not differ between the two groups at any time point during baseline or post-intervention testing; thus, all values were combined into a single cohort for further analysis. Resting BDNF was not altered by the exercise training intervention [23,304+/-1835pg/ml (baseline) vs. 19,433+/-1992pg/ml (post-intervention)]. Following the baseline resistance exercise bout, serum BDNF increased 32% (p<0.05) and was gradually reduced to 41% below resting levels at 60min into recovery (p<0.01). During post-intervention testing, serum BDNF increased 77% in response to the standardized resistance exercise bout (p<0.01) and returned to resting values within 30min. Ultimately, the change in serum BDNF from rest to immediately post-exercise was 98% greater at post-intervention than at baseline (p<0.05). Our study is the first to demonstrate that resistance exercise induces a robust, yet transient, elevation of circulating BDNF and that progressive resistance training augments this response; perhaps demonstrating one mechanism through which exercise influences brain health.

  16. Endurance exercise training induces fat depot-specific differences in basal autophagic activity

    SciTech Connect

    Tanaka, Goki; Kato, Hisashi; Izawa, Tetsuya

    2015-10-23

    autophagosome associated LC3-II in WAT. • Exercise-induced changes in p62 and ATG7 were WAT-type specific. • Exercise-induced basal autophagic activity shows fat depot-specific differences.

  17. Effect of age on exercise-induced alterations in cognitive executive function: relationship to cerebral perfusion.

    PubMed

    Lucas, Samuel J E; Ainslie, Philip N; Murrell, Carissa J; Thomas, Kate N; Franz, Elizabeth A; Cotter, James D

    2012-08-01

    Regular exercise improves the age-related decline in cerebral blood flow (CBF) and is associated with improved cognitive function; however, less is known about the direct relationship between CBF and cognitive function. We examined the influence of healthy aging on the capability of acute exercise to improve cognition, and whether exercise-induced improvements in cognition are related to CBF and cortical hemodynamics. Middle cerebral artery blood flow velocity (MCAv; Doppler) and cortical hemodynamics (NIRS) were measured in 13 young (24±5 y) and 9 older (62±3 y) participants at rest and during cycling at 30% and 70% of heart rate range (HRR). Cognitive performance was assessed using a computer-adapted Stroop task (i.e., test of executive function cognition) at rest and during exercise. Average response times on the Stroop task were slower for the older compared to younger group for both simple and difficult tasks (P<0.01). Independent of age, difficult-task response times improved during exercise (P<0.01), with the improvement greater at 70% HRR exercise (P=0.04 vs. 30% HRR). Higher MCAv was correlated with faster response times for simple and difficult tasks at rest (R(2)=0.47 and R(2)=0.47, respectively), but this relation uncoupled progressively during exercise. Exercise-induced increases in MCAv were similar and unaltered during cognitive tasks for both age groups. In contrast, prefrontal cortical hemodynamic NIRS measures [oxyhemoglobin (O(2)Hb) and total hemoglobin (tHb)] were differentially affected by exercise intensity, age and cognitive task; e.g., there were smaller increases in [O(2)Hb] and [tHb] in the older group between exercise intensities (P<0.05). These data indicate that: 1) Regardless of age, cognitive (executive) function is improved while exercising; 2) while MCAv is strongly related to cognition at rest, this relation becomes uncoupled during exercise, and 3) there is dissociation between global CBF and regional cortical oxygenation and

  18. Does Equating Total Volume of Work between Two Different Exercise Conditions Matter when Examining Exercise-Induced Feeling States?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blanchard, Chris M.; Rodgers, Wendy M.; Wilson, Philip M.; Bell, Gordon J.

    2004-01-01

    This study offers novel information to the acute exercise-feeling state literature, by using a community sample of exercisers participating in a 12-week exercise program to compare feeling state changes of those who exercised at a HISD versus a LILD. Within this study, pre- and post-exercise feelings states were compared between the two different…

  19. Does Equating Total Volume of Work between Two Different Exercise Conditions Matter when Examining Exercise-Induced Feeling States?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blanchard, Chris M.; Rodgers, Wendy M.; Wilson, Philip M.; Bell, Gordon J.

    2004-01-01

    This study offers novel information to the acute exercise-feeling state literature, by using a community sample of exercisers participating in a 12-week exercise program to compare feeling state changes of those who exercised at a HISD versus a LILD. Within this study, pre- and post-exercise feelings states were compared between the two different…

  20. Plasma endothelin-1 level in athletes after exercise in a hot environment: exercise-induced dehydration contributes to increases in plasma endothelin-1.

    PubMed

    Maeda, S; Miyauchi, T; Waku, T; Koda, Y; Kono, I; Goto, K; Matsuda, M

    1996-01-01

    We investigated whether dehydration due to exercise contributes to the increase in plasma endothelin-1 (ET-1) concentration. We measured the plasma concentration of ET-1 before and after exercise in a hot environment (about 30 degrees C). Five male intercollegiate Kendo (Japanese fencing) players entered the present study. Each athlete participated in 15 min of Kendo fighting, followed by 5 min of rest and another 15 min of Kendo fighting (i.e., total exercise 30 min), with or without oral intake of 700 ml of water. Body weight and left atrial diameter, a parameter that reflects changes in circulating plasma volume, were significantly decreased after exercise under both conditions. However, the decreases in both values were significantly greater after exercise without water intake than after exercise with water intake, indicating that dehydration and decreased circulating plasma volume were more marked after exercise without water intake. The extent of the increase in plasma ET-1 concentration appeared to be closely related to the extent of exercise-induced dehydration; the greater the dehydration, the greater the increase in plasma ET-1 concentration. These findings suggest that exercise-induced dehydration may contribute to increases in plasma ET-1 concentrations.

  1. The effects of treadmill exercise on penicillin-induced epileptiform activity

    PubMed Central

    Tutkun, Erkut; Arslan, Gokhan; Ayyildiz, Mustafa; Agar, Erdal

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of short-, moderate- and long-duration treadmill exercise (15, 30 and 60 min) on the mean frequency and amplitude of penicillin-induced epileptiform activity in rats. Material and methods In this study, 32 rats were assigned to 15, 30, and 60 min running exercise groups and the control group, each consisting of 8 rats. According to the specified protocol, the rats were submitted to running exercises at the same hour of each day for 90 days. After the exercise program, the rats were administered (500 IU/2.5 µl) of penicillin into the left cortex by the microinjection method. An electrocorticogram (ECoG) recording was performed for 3 h using a data acquisition system. The frequency and the amplitude of the recordings were analyzed. Results Short-duration treadmill exercise (15 min) caused a decrease in the frequency of penicillin-induced epileptiform activity at 70 min after penicillin injection (p < 0.001). The mean frequency of epileptiform activity decreased at 90 min after penicillin injection in the 30 and 60 min treadmill exercise groups (p < 0.01). The mean amplitude of epileptiform activity was not changed in any of the exercise groups compared to the control (p > 0.05). Conclusions The results of the present study demonstrate for the first time that short-, moderate- and long-duration treadmill exercises decreased the frequency of penicillin-induced epileptiform activity. These findings may contribute to improving the quality of life in epileptic patients. PMID:27695482

  2. The influence of fatigue-induced increase in relative work rate on temperature regulation during exercise.

    PubMed

    Kacin, Alan; Golja, Petra; Tipton, Michael J; Eiken, Ola; Mekjavic, Igor B

    2008-05-01

    Heat-loss responses during steady-load exercise are affected by an increase in relative work rate induced by muscle ischaemia or hypoxaemia. The present study investigated whether progressive increases in perception of exertion and relative oxygen uptake %VO2peak which occur during prolonged steady-load exercise as a result of progressively increased peripheral fatigue, might also affect the regulation of heat loss responses and hence the exercise-induced increase in mean body temperature. Ten male subjects first performed a ramp-test to exhaustion on a cycle ergometer to evaluate their initial peak oxygen uptake (Control VO2peak). On a separate day, 120 min of cycling at constant power output corresponding to 60% of Control VO2peak was performed in thermoneutral environment (Ta = 23 degrees C, RH = 50%, wind speed = 5 m s(-1)). This was immediately followed by another maximal performance test (Fatigue VO2peak). During prolonged exercise, median (range) rating of perceived exertion for whole-body (RPEwb) increased (P < 0.01) from initial 3.5 (1-5) to 5.5 (5-9) at the end of exercise. Fatigue VO2peak and peak power output were 9 (5) and 10 (5)% lower (P < 0.01) when compared to control values. At the onset of exercise, heat production, mechanical efficiency, heat loss and mean body temperature increased towards asymptotic values, thereafter remained constant throughout the 120 min exercise, despite the concomitant progressive increase in relative work rate, as reflected in increased RPEwb and relative oxygen uptake. It is thus concluded that the increase in relative work rate induced predominantly by peripheral muscle fatigue affects neither the level of increase in mean body temperature nor the regulation of heat loss responses during prolonged steady-load exercise.

  3. Muscle Contraction Induces Acute Hydroxymethylation of the Exercise-Responsive Gene Nr4a3

    PubMed Central

    Pattamaprapanont, Pattarawan; Garde, Christian; Fabre, Odile; Barrès, Romain

    2016-01-01

    Exercise training triggers numerous positive adaptations through the regulation of genes controlling muscle structure and function. Epigenetic modifications, including DNA methylation, participate in transcriptional activation by allowing the recruitment of the transcription machinery to gene promoters. Exercise induces dynamic DNA demethylation at gene promoters; however, the contribution of the demethylation precursor hydroxymethylcytosine is unknown. Given the evanescent nature of hydroxymethylcytosine, a muscle contraction model that allows for the collection of samples that are repeatedly stimulated over time is required to determine whether contraction-induced demethylation is preceded by changes in the hydroxymethylcytosine level. Here, we established an acute skeletal muscle contraction model to mimic the effects of acute exercise on gene expression. We used this model to investigate the effect of muscle contraction on DNA demethylation and hydroxymethylation. First, we performed an acute exercise study in healthy humans to identify an exercise-responsive gene that we could study in culture. We identified the nuclear receptor subfamily 4 group A member 3 (Nr4a3) gene with the highest fold-expression increase after acute exercise. We then refined an electrical pulse stimulation (EPS) protocol that could induce expression of the Nr4a3 gene in C2C12 myotubes. Using targeted bisulfite sequencing, we found that in response to EPS, a region of the Nr4a3 promoter is rapidly demethylated at 60 min and re-methylated at 120 min. Of interest, hydroxymethylation of the differentially methylated region of Nr4a3 promoter after EPS was elevated immediately after EPS, with lowest levels reached at 60 min after EPS. In conclusion, we have established a cell culture-based protocol to mimic the acute transcriptional responses to exercise. Furthermore, we provide insight into the mechanism by which the exercise-responsive gene Nr4a3 is demethylated after muscle

  4. Responses of brown adipose tissue to diet-induced obesity, exercise, dietary restriction and ephedrine treatment.

    PubMed

    Slocum, Nikki; Durrant, Jessica R; Bailey, David; Yoon, Lawrence; Jordan, Holly; Barton, Joanna; Brown, Roger H; Clifton, Lisa; Milliken, Tula; Harrington, Wallace; Kimbrough, Carie; Faber, Catherine A; Cariello, Neal; Elangbam, Chandikumar S

    2013-07-01

    Drug-induced weight loss in humans has been associated with undesirable side effects not present in weight loss from lifestyle interventions (caloric restriction or exercise). To investigate the mechanistic differences of weight loss by drug-induced and lifestyle interventions, we examined the gene expression (mRNA) in brown adipose tissue (BAT) and conducted histopathologic assessments in diet-induced obese (DIO) mice given ephedrine (18 mg/kg/day orally), treadmill exercise (10 m/min, 1-h/day), and dietary restriction (DR: 26% dietary restriction) for 7 days. Exercise and DR mice lost more body weight than controls and both ephedrine and exercise reduced percent body fat. All treatments reduced BAT and liver lipid accumulation (i.e., cytoplasmic lipids in brown adipocytes and hepatocytes) and increased oxygen consumption (VO2 ml/kg/h) compared with controls. Mitochondrial biogenesis/function-related genes (TFAM, NRF1 and GABPA) were up-regulated in the BAT of all groups. UCP-1 was up-regulated in exercise and ephedrine groups, whereas MFSD2A was up-regulated in ephedrine and DR groups. PGC-1α up-regulation was observed in exercise and DR groups but not in ephedrine group. In all experimental groups, except for ephedrine, fatty acid transport and metabolism genes were up-regulated, but the magnitude of change was higher in the DR group. PRKAA1 was up-regulated in all groups but not significantly in the ephedrine group. ADRß3 was slightly up-regulated in the DR group only, whereas ESRRA remained unchanged in all groups. Although our data suggest a common pathway of BAT activation elicited by ephedrine treatment, exercise or DR, mRNA changes were indicative of additional nutrient-sensing pathways in exercise and DR.

  5. ALDH2 restores exhaustive exercise-induced mitochondrial dysfunction in skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qiuping; Zheng, Jianheng; Qiu, Jun; Wu, Xiahong; Xu, Yangshuo; Shen, Weili; Sun, Mengwei

    2017-04-15

    Mitochondrial aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 (ALDH2) is highly expressed in heart and skeletal muscles, and is the major enzyme that metabolizes acetaldehyde and toxic aldehydes. The cardioprotective effects of ALDH2 during cardiac ischemia/reperfusion injury have been recognized. However, less is known about the function of ALDH2 in skeletal muscle. This study was designed to evaluate the effect of ALDH2 on exhaustive exercise-induced skeletal muscle injury. We created transgenic mice expressing ALDH2 in skeletal muscles. Male wild-type C57/BL6 (WT) and ALDH2 transgenic mice (ALDH2-Tg), 8-weeks old, were challenged with exhaustive exercise for 1 week to induce skeletal muscle injury. Animals were sacrificed 24 h post-exercise and muscle tissue was excised. ALDH2-Tg mice displayed significantly increased treadmill exercise capacity compared to WT mice. Exhaustive exercise caused an increase in mRNA levels of the muscle atrophy markers, Atrogin-1 and MuRF1, and reduced mitochondrial biogenesis and fusion in WT skeletal muscles; these effects were attenuated in ALDH2-Tg mice. Exhaustive exercise also enhanced mitochondrial autophagy pathway activity, including increased conversion of LC3-I to LC3-II and greater expression of Beclin1 and Bnip3; the effects of which were mitigated by ALDH2 overexpression. In addition, ALDH2-Tg reversed the increase of an oxidative stress biomarker (4-hydroxynonenal) and decreased levels of mitochondrial antioxidant proteins, including manganese superoxide dismutase and NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase 1, in skeletal muscle induced by exhaustive exercise. ALDH2 may reverse skeletal muscle mitochondrial dysfunction due to exhaustive exercise by regulating mitochondria dynamic remodeling and enhancing the quality of mitochondria. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. ACE inhibition modifies exercise-induced pro-angiogenic and mitochondrial gene transcript expression.

    PubMed

    van Ginkel, S; Ruoss, S; Valdivieso, P; Degens, H; Waldron, S; de Haan, A; Flück, M

    2016-10-01

    Skeletal muscle responds to endurance exercise with an improvement of biochemical pathways that support substrate supply and oxygen-dependent metabolism. This is reflected by enhanced expression of associated factors after exercise and is specifically modulated by tissue perfusion and oxygenation. We hypothesized that transcript expression of pro-angiogenic factors (VEGF, tenascin-C, Angpt1, Angpt1R) and oxygen metabolism (COX4I1, COX4I2, HIF-1α) in human muscle after an endurance stimulus depends on vasoconstriction, and would be modulated through angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibition by intake of lisinopril. Fourteen non-specifically trained, male Caucasians subjects, carried out a single bout of standardized one-legged bicycle exercise. Seven of the participants consumed lisinopril in the 3 days before exercise. Biopsies were collected pre- and 3 h post-exercise from the m. vastus lateralis. COX4I1 (P = 0.03), COX4I2 (P = 0.04) mRNA and HIF-1α (P = 0.05) mRNA and protein levels (P = 0.01) showed an exercise-induced increase in the group not consuming the ACE inhibitor. Conversely, there was a specific exercise-induced increase in VEGF transcript (P = 0.04) and protein levels (P = 0.03) and a trend for increased tenascin-c transcript levels (P = 0.09) for subjects consuming lisinopril. The observations indicate that exercise-induced expression of transcripts involved in angiogenesis and mitochondrial energy metabolism are to some extent regulated via a hypoxia-related ACE-dependent mechanism.

  7. Effects of the homeopathic remedy arnica on attenuating symptoms of exercise-induced muscle soreness

    PubMed Central

    Plezbert, Julie A.; Burke, Jeanmarie R.

    2005-01-01

    Abstract Objective To evaluate the clinical efficacy of Arnica at a high potency (200c), on moderating delayed onset muscle soreness and accompanying symptoms of muscle dysfunction. Methods Twenty subjects completed a maximal eccentric exercise protocol with the non-dominate elbow flexors to induce delayed onset muscle soreness. Either Arnica or placebo tablets were administered in a random, double- blinded fashion immediately after exercise and at 24 hours and 72 hours after exercise. Before exercise, immediately post-exercise, and at 24, 48, 72, and 96 hours post-exercise, assessments of delayed onset muscle soreness and muscle function included: 1) muscle soreness and functional impairment; 2) maximum voluntary contraction torque; 3) muscle swelling; and 4) range of motion tests to document spontaneous muscle shortening and muscle shortening ability. Blood samples drawn before exercise and at 24, 48, and 96 hours after exercise were used to measure muscle enzymes as indirect indices of muscle damage. Results Regardless of the intervention, the extent of delayed onset muscle soreness and elevations in muscle enzymes were similar on the days following the eccentric exercise protocol. The post-exercise time profiles of decreases in maximum voluntary contraction torque and muscle shortening ability and increases in muscle swelling and spontaneous muscle shortening were similar for each treatment intervention. Conclusions The results of this study did not substantiate the clinical efficacy of Arnica at a high potency on moderating delayed onset muscle soreness and accompanying symptoms of muscle dysfunction. Despite the findings of this study, future investigations on the clinical efficacy of homeopathic interventions should consider incorporating research strategies that emphasize differential therapeutics for each patient rather than treating a specific disease or symptom complex, such as DOMS, with a single homeopathic remedy. PMID:19674657

  8. Exercise induces cortical plasticity after neonatal spinal cord injury in the rat

    PubMed Central

    Kao, T; Shumsky, JS; Murray, M; Moxon, KA

    2009-01-01

    Exercise-induced cortical plasticity is associated with improved functional outcome after brain or nerve injury. Exercise also improves functional outcomes after spinal cord injury, but its effects on cortical plasticity are not known. The goal of this investigation was to study the effect of moderate exercise (treadmill locomotion, 3 min/day, 5days/week) on the somatotopic organization of forelimb and hindlimb somatosensory cortex (SI) after neonatal thoracic transection. We used adult rats spinalized as neonates because some of these animals develop weight-supported stepping and, therefore, the relationship between cortical plasticity and stepping could also be examined. Acute, single-neuron mapping was used to determine the percentage of cortical cells responding to cutaneous forelimb stimulation in normal, spinalized, and exercised spinalized rats. Multiple single neuron recording from arrays of chronically implanted microwires examined the magnitude of response of these cells in normal and exercised spinalized rats. Our results show that exercise not only increased the percentage of responding cells in the hindlimb SI, but also increased the magnitude of the response of these cells. This increase in response magnitude was correlated with behavioral outcome measures. In the forelimb SI, neonatal transection reduced the percentage of responding cells to forelimb stimulation but exercise reversed this loss. This restoration in the percentage of responding cells after exercise was accompanied by an increase in their response magnitude. Therefore, the increase in responsiveness of hindlimb SI to forelimb stimulation after neonatal transection and exercise may be due, in part, to the effect of exercise on the forelimb SI. PMID:19515923

  9. Vorticity banding in biphasic polymer blends.

    PubMed

    Caserta, Sergio; Guido, Stefano

    2012-11-27

    Pattern formation under the action of flow is a subject of considerable scientific interest with applications going from microfluidics to granular materials. Here, we present a systematic investigation of shear-induced banding in confined biphasic liquid-liquid systems, i.e., formation of alternating regions of high and low volume fraction of droplets in a continuous phase (shear bands). This phenomenon is investigated in immiscible polymer blends sheared in a sliding parallel plate flow cell. Starting from a spatially uniform distribution of droplets, the formation of bands aligned along the flow direction is observed, eventually leading to an almost complete separation between droplet-rich and continuous phase regions. The initial band size is related to the gap dimension; the merging of bands and consequent spacing reduction has also been observed for long times. Shear banding is only observed when the viscosity of the dispersed phase is lower as compared to the continuous phase and in a limited range of the applied shear rate. Rheological measurements show that band formation is associated with a viscosity decrease with respect to the homogeneous case, thus implying that system microstructure is somehow evolving toward reduced viscous dissipation under flow.

  10. Familial paroxysmal exercise-induced dystonia: atypical presentation of autosomal dominant GTP-cyclohydrolase 1 deficiency.

    PubMed

    Dale, Russell C; Melchers, Anna; Fung, Victor S C; Grattan-Smith, Padraic; Houlden, Henry; Earl, John

    2010-06-01

    Paroxysmal exercise-induced dystonia (PED) is one of the rarer forms of paroxysmal dyskinesia, and can occur in sporadic or familial forms. We report a family (male index case, mother and maternal grandfather) with autosomal dominant inheritance of paroxysmal exercise-induced dystonia. The dystonia began in childhood and was only ever induced after many minutes of exercise, and was never present at rest, or on initiation of movements. In addition, family members suffered restless legs syndrome (RLS), depression, and adult-onset Parkinsonism. The index case had low cerebrospinal fluid neurotransmitters and pterins. The PED and RLS stopped on initiation of L-Dopa therapy. Both live family members were found to have a nonsense mutation (p.E84X) in exon 1 of the GTP-cyclohydrolase 1 (GCH-1) gene. We propose that GCH-1 mutations should be considered a genetic cause of familial PED, especially if additional clinical features of monoaminergic deficiency are present in affected individuals.

  11. Circulatory impairment induced by exercise in the lizard Iguana iguana.

    PubMed

    Farmer, C G; Hicks, J W

    2000-09-01

    Mechanical integration of the cardiac, muscular and ventilatory pumps enables mammals to vary cardiac output over a wide range to match metabolic demands. We have found this integration lacking in a lizard (Iguana iguana) that differs from mammals because blood flow from the caudal body and ventilation are maximal after, rather than during, exercise. Because Iguana iguana are constrained from ventilation during intense locomotion, they appear to be unable to recruit the abdomen and thorax as a pump for venous return. This constraint on simultaneous running and costal breathing arises from their musculoskeletal design, which is similar to that of basal tetrapods, and so a constraint on venous return during exercise may be ancestral for tetrapods. We suggest that mechanical coupling of the pulmonary and cardiac pumps may have been important for the evolution of high-speed locomotor stamina in terrestrial vertebrates.

  12. Effects of low-intensity concentric and eccentric exercise combined with blood flow restriction on indices of exercise-induced muscle damage

    PubMed Central

    Yasuda, Tomohiro; Loenneke, Jeremy P.; Abe, Takashi

    2013-01-01

    Low-intensity blood-flow restriction (BFR) resistance training significantly increases strength and muscle size, but some studies report it produces exercise-induced muscle damage (EIMD) in the lower body after exercise to failure. Purpose: To investigate the effects of a pre-set number of repetitions of upper body concentric and eccentric exercise when combined with BFR on changes in EIMD. Methods: Ten young men had arms randomly assigned to either concentric BFR (CON-BFR) or eccentric BFR (ECC-BFR) dumbbell curl exercise (30% one-repetition maximum (1-RM), 1 set of 30 repetitions followed by 3 sets of 15 repetitions). Maximal isometric voluntary contraction force (MVC), muscle thickness (MTH), circumference, range of motion (ROM), ratings of perceived exertion (RPE), and muscle soreness were measured before, immediately after, and daily for 4 days post-exercise. Results: MVC decreased by 36% for CON-BFR and 12% for ECC-BFR immediately after exercise but was not changed 1–4 days post-exercise (p > 0.05). Only CON-BFR had significant changes in MTH and circumference immediately after exercise (p < 0.05). Muscle soreness was observed in the ECC-BFR arm at 1 and 2 days after exercise. Conclusions: Low-intensity ECC-BFR produces significant muscle soreness at 24 h but neither ECC-BFR nor CON-BFR exercise produces significant changes in multiple indices of EIMD. PMID:24265891

  13. Exercise, appetite and weight management: understanding the compensatory responses in eating behaviour and how they contribute to variability in exercise-induced weight loss.

    PubMed

    King, N A; Horner, K; Hills, A P; Byrne, N M; Wood, R E; Bryant, E; Caudwell, P; Finlayson, G; Gibbons, C; Hopkins, M; Martins, C; Blundell, J E

    2012-04-01

    Does exercise promote weight loss? One of the key problems with studies assessing the efficacy of exercise as a method of weight management and obesity is that mean data are presented and the individual variability in response is overlooked. Recent data have highlighted the need to demonstrate and characterise the individual variability in response to exercise. Do people who exercise compensate for the increase in energy expenditure via compensatory increases in hunger and food intake? The authors address the physiological, psychological and behavioural factors potentially involved in the relationship between exercise and appetite, and identify the research questions that remain unanswered. A negative consequence of the phenomena of individual variability and compensatory responses has been the focus on those who lose little weight in response to exercise; this has been used unreasonably as evidence to suggest that exercise is a futile method of controlling weight and managing obesity. Most of the evidence suggests that exercise is useful for improving body composition and health. For example, when exercise-induced mean weight loss is <1.0 kg, significant improvements in aerobic capacity (+6.3 ml/kg/min), systolic (-6.00 mm Hg) and diastolic (-3.9 mm Hg) blood pressure, waist circumference (-3.7 cm) and positive mood still occur. However, people will vary in their responses to exercise; understanding and characterising this variability will help tailor weight loss strategies to suit individuals.

  14. Atropine-Induced Cutaneous Vasodilation Decreases Body Temperature during Exercise,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-07-01

    during exercise in a cool environment after atropine treatment decreased body temperature and resulted in further suppression of eccrine sweating , thereby...block nsumber) FIEL GRUP SB-GOUP cholinergic blockage, skin blood flow, sweating , temperature regulation, vasodilation * 19. ABSTRACT (Contine on...revese sf neceury and Ilentify by block number) Jil ystemic atropine enhances forearm cutaneous blood flow (FBF) but depresses forearm sweating (Ia5) in

  15. Mechanisms Involved in Exercise-Induced Cardioprotection: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Borges, Juliana Pereira; Lessa, Marcos Adriano

    2015-01-01

    Background Acute myocardial infarction is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Furthermore, research has shown that exercise, in addition to reducing cardiovascular risk factors, can also protect the heart against injury due to ischemia and reperfusion through a direct effect on the myocardium. However, the specific mechanism involved in exerciseinduced cardiac preconditioning is still under debate. Objective To perform a systematic review of the studies that have addressed the mechanisms by which aerobic exercise promotes direct cardioprotection against ischemia and reperfusion injury. Methods A search was conducted using MEDLINE, Literatura Latino-Americana e do Caribe de Informação em Ciências da Saúde, and Scientific Electronic Library Online databases. Data were extracted in a standardized manner by two independent researchers, who were responsible for assessing the methodological quality of the studies. Results The search retrieved 78 studies; after evaluating the abstracts, 30 studies were excluded. The manuscripts of the remaining 48 studies were completely read and, of these, 20 were excluded. Finally, 28 studies were included in this systematic review. Conclusion On the basis of the selected studies, the following are potentially involved in the cardioprotective response to exercise: increased heat shock protein production, nitric oxide pathway involvement, increased cardiac antioxidant capacity, improvement in ATP-dependent potassium channel function, and opioid system activation. Despite all the previous investigations, further research is still necessary to obtain more consistent conclusions. PMID:25830711

  16. Mechanisms Involved in Exercise-Induced Cardioprotection: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Borges, Juliana Pereira; Lessa, Marcos Adriano

    2015-07-01

    Acute myocardial infarction is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Furthermore, research has shown that exercise, in addition to reducing cardiovascular risk factors, can also protect the heart against injury due to ischemia and reperfusion through a direct effect on the myocardium. However, the specific mechanism involved in exerciseinduced cardiac preconditioning is still under debate. To perform a systematic review of the studies that have addressed the mechanisms by which aerobic exercise promotes direct cardioprotection against ischemia and reperfusion injury. A search was conducted using MEDLINE, Literatura Latino-Americana e do Caribe de Informação em Ciências da Saúde, and Scientific Electronic Library Online databases. Data were extracted in a standardized manner by two independent researchers, who were responsible for assessing the methodological quality of the studies. The search retrieved 78 studies; after evaluating the abstracts, 30 studies were excluded. The manuscripts of the remaining 48 studies were completely read and, of these, 20 were excluded. Finally, 28 studies were included in this systematic review. On the basis of the selected studies, the following are potentially involved in the cardioprotective response to exercise: increased heat shock protein production, nitric oxide pathway involvement, increased cardiac antioxidant capacity, improvement in ATP-dependent potassium channel function, and opioid system activation. Despite all the previous investigations, further research is still necessary to obtain more consistent conclusions.

  17. Post-exercise hot water immersion induces heat acclimation and improves endurance exercise performance in the heat.

    PubMed

    Zurawlew, M J; Walsh, N P; Fortes, M B; Potter, C

    2016-07-01

    We examined whether daily hot water immersion (HWI) after exercise in temperate conditions induces heat acclimation and improves endurance performance in temperate and hot conditions. Seventeen non-heat-acclimatized males performed a 6-day intervention involving a daily treadmill run for 40 min at 65% V̇O2max in temperate conditions (18 °C) followed immediately by either HWI (N = 10; 40 °C) or thermoneutral (CON, N = 7; 34 °C) immersion for 40 min. Before and after the 6-day intervention, participants performed a treadmill run for 40 min at 65% V̇O2max followed by a 5-km treadmill time trial (TT) in temperate (18 °C, 40% humidity) and hot (33 °C, 40% humidity) conditions. HWI induced heat acclimation demonstrated by lower resting rectal temperature (Tre , mean, -0.27 °C, P < 0.01), and final Tre during submaximal exercise in 18 °C (-0.28 °C, P < 0.01) and 33 °C (-0.36 °C, P < 0.01). Skin temperature, Tre at sweating onset and RPE were lower during submaximal exercise in 18 °C and 33 °C after 6 days in HWI (P < 0.05). Physiological strain and thermal sensation were also lower during submaximal exercise in 33 °C after 6 days in HWI (P < 0.05). HWI improved TT performance in 33 °C (4.9%, P < 0.01) but not in 18 °C. Thermoregulatory measures and performance did not change in CON. Hot water immersion after exercise on 6 days presents a simple, practical, and effective heat acclimation strategy to improve endurance performance in the heat. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Clinical significance of plasminogen activator inhibitor activity in patients with exercise-induced ischemia

    SciTech Connect

    Sakata, K.; Kurata, C.; Taguchi, T.; Suzuki, S.; Kobayashi, A.; Yamazaki, N.; Rydzewski, A.; Takada, Y.; Takada, A. )

    1990-10-01

    To assess the fibrinolytic system in patients with exercise-induced ischemia and its relation to ischemia and severity of coronary artery disease (CAD), 47 patients with CAD confirmed by results of coronary angiography underwent symptom-limited multistage exercise thallium-201 emission computed tomography. All patients with CAD had exercise-induced ischemia as assessed from thallium-201 images. Pre- and peak exercise blood samples from each patient and preexercise blood samples from control subjects were assayed for several fibrinolytic components and were also assayed for plasma adrenaline. The extent of ischemia was defined as delta visual uptake score (total visual uptake score in delayed images minus total visual uptake score in initial images) and the severity of CAD as the number of diseased vessels. In the basal condition, plasminogen activator inhibitor (PAI) activity was significantly higher in patients with exercise-induced ischemia as compared to control subjects (p less than 0.01), although there were no significant differences in other fibrinolytic variables between the two groups. Moreover, PAI activity in the basal condition displayed a significantly positive correlation with the extent of ischemia (r = 0.47, p less than 0.01). Patients with exercise-induced ischemia were divided into two groups (24 with single-vessel disease and 23 with multivessel disease). There were no significant differences in coronary risk factors, hemodynamics, or plasma adrenaline levels during exercise between single-vessel and multivessel disease except that delta visual uptake score was significantly higher in multivessel disease (p less than 0.01).

  19. Effect of moderate exercise-induced heat stress on carotid wave intensity.

    PubMed

    Smith, Denise L; DeBlois, Jacob P; Wharton, Margaret; Fehling, Patricia C; Ranadive, Sushant M

    2015-10-01

    Exercise disrupts the interaction between the left ventricle and the vasculature, as measured by wave intensity (WI) analysis. However, the effect of exercise-induced heat stress on WI amplitude is unknown. WI measures are calibrated using brachial or carotid artery blood pressure, but the influence of calibration method on WI outcomes is unknown. (1) To compare WI analysis during low and moderate exercise-induced heat stress; (2) to examine differences in carotid WI analysis based on calibration method. Eleven healthy, young men (22 ± 3 years) performed intermittent exercise in moderate- and low-heat stress conditions. WI was assessed pre- and post-exercise on the right carotid artery, and calibrated with brachial and carotid blood pressures. A main effect of time was found for W1 when calibrated by brachial, but not carotid pressure. A time-by-condition interaction was observed for late systolic/early diastolic function (W2) in both brachial (p = 0.047) and carotid calibration methods (p = 0.042), where W2 increased following exercise-induced moderate-heat stress but decreased following low-heat stress. The elastic modulus exhibited a significant time-by-condition interaction (brachial p = 0.039; carotid p = 0.044), increasing following moderate-heat stress but decreasing following low-heat stress. Calibrations using carotid blood pressure significantly reduced WI amplitudes compared with brachial calibrations (p < 0.001). Arterial-ventricular coupling is affected in different ways following moderate and low exercise-induced heat stress. Wave amplitudes were lower (~13 %) following carotid calibration compared with brachial.

  20. Fatty acid-inducible ANGPTL4 governs lipid metabolic response to exercise

    PubMed Central

    Catoire, Milène; Alex, Sheril; Paraskevopulos, Nicolas; Mattijssen, Frits; Evers-van Gogh, Inkie; Schaart, Gert; Jeppesen, Jacob; Kneppers, Anita; Mensink, Marco; Voshol, Peter J.; Olivecrona, Gunilla; Tan, Nguan Soon; Hesselink, Matthijs K. C.; Berbée, Jimmy F.; Rensen, Patrick C. N.; Kalkhoven, Eric; Schrauwen, Patrick; Kersten, Sander

    2014-01-01

    Physical activity increases energy metabolism in exercising muscle. Whether acute exercise elicits metabolic changes in nonexercising muscles remains unclear. We show that one of the few genes that is more highly induced in nonexercising muscle than in exercising human muscle during acute exercise encodes angiopoietin-like 4 (ANGPTL4), an inhibitor of lipoprotein lipase-mediated plasma triglyceride clearance. Using a combination of human, animal, and in vitro data, we show that induction of ANGPTL4 in nonexercising muscle is mediated by elevated plasma free fatty acids via peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-δ, presumably leading to reduced local uptake of plasma triglyceride-derived fatty acids and their sparing for use by exercising muscle. In contrast, the induction of ANGPTL4 in exercising muscle likely is counteracted via AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK)-mediated down-regulation, promoting the use of plasma triglycerides as fuel for active muscles. Our data suggest that nonexercising muscle and the local regulation of ANGPTL4 via AMPK and free fatty acids have key roles in governing lipid homeostasis during exercise. PMID:24591600

  1. Reproducibility of exercise-induced modulation of cardiovascular responses to cold stress.

    PubMed

    Rashed, H M; Leventhal, G; Madu, E C; Reddy, R; Cardoso, S

    1997-04-01

    The modulation of cardiovascular responses to the cold pressor test (CPT) as produced by exercise was studied in 13 volunteers. The reproducibility of the measurements selected for the study, i.e. heart rate (HR), blood pressure (BP), blood flow (BF) and skin temperature (ST), was investigated through repeat experiments in the fall of 1994 and the winter of 1995. HR was monitored before, during and after a 10-min period of bicycling at 70% of reserve HR. BP, cutaneous BF and ST were measured before and after exercise. Two CPTs (hand into ice-cold water for 1 min) were performed: one preceding exercise and another at 3 min after exercise. The results obtained allow us to conclude that in non-hypertensive volunteers (1) the pronounced cardiovascular responses (ST, BF and BP) induced by CPT are reproducible (p > 0.2) when compared to basal level values and (2) cardiovascular responses to cold stress are significantly attenuated by exercise (p < 0.03). Our study, therefore, supports and validates the use of our coupled exercise-CPT method in ongoing epidemiological studies attempting to identify individuals at risk for the development of hypertension as well as those most likely to benefit from preventative exercise programs.

  2. Moderate exercise-induced energy expenditure does not alter leptin levels in sedentary obese men.

    PubMed

    Kyriazis, George A; Caplan, Jonathan D; Lowndes, Joshua; Carpenter, Richard L; Dennis, Karen E; Sivo, Stephen A; Angelopoulos, Theodore J

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to determine whether exercise-induced increases in energy expenditure (EE) alter circulating leptin levels in obese individuals. Participants were randomized to an exercise intervention group (n = 8) or nonexercising control (n = 7). All data were collected on an outpatient basis at the exercise physiology laboratory at the University of Central Florida. Fifteen healthy obese males (24.9 +/- 1.4 years old, body mass index 33.4 +/- 0.7 kg . m). Members of the intervention group underwent a single exercise session of moderate intensity (58.4 +/- 1.3% of VO2max) for 60 minutes. Postexercise, 24 hour postexercise, and 48 hour postexercise levels of leptin, insulin, and ghrelin. The exercise session elicited an EE of 567 +/- 25 Kcal. No significant main effect or time-by-group interactions for leptin or ghrelin were observed immediately after the exercise bout or in the days following the intervention. These preliminary data suggest that a bout of acute exercise of moderate intensity and duration does not affect leptin concentration. It is possible that a higher level of EE is required to elicit substantial changes.

  3. The Effects of Voluntary Exercise on Oocyte Quality in a Diet-Induced Obese Murine Model

    PubMed Central

    Boudoures, Anna L.; Chi, Maggie; Thompson, Alysha; Zhang, Wendy; Moley, Kelle H.

    2016-01-01

    Obesity negatively affects many aspects of the human body, including reproductive function. In females, the root of the decline in fertility is linked to problems in the oocyte. Problems seen in oocytes that positively correlate with increasing BMI include changes to the metabolism, lipid accumulation, meiosis, and metaphase II (MII) spindle structure. Studies in mice indicate dietary interventions fail to reverse these problems [4]. How exercise affects the oocytes has not been addressed. Therefore, we hypothesized an exercise intervention would improve oocyte quality. Here we show in a mouse model of an exercise intervention can improve lipid metabolism in germinal vesicle (GV) stage oocytes. Oocytes significantly increased activity and transcription of the β-oxidation enzyme Hadha (Hydroxyacyl-CoA-dehydrogenase) in response to exercise training only if the mice had been fed a high fat diet (HFD). An exercise intervention also reversed the lipid accumulation seen in GV stage oocytes of HFD females. However, delays in meiosis and disorganized MII spindles remained present. Therefore, exercise is able to improve, but not reverse, damage imparted on oocytes as a result of a high fat diet and obesity. By utilizing an exercise intervention on a HFD, we determined only lipid content and lipid metabolism is changed in GV oocytes. Moving forward, interventions to improve oocyte quality may need to be more targeted to the oocyte specifically. Because of the HFD induced deficiency in β-oxidation, dietary supplementation with substrates to improve lipid utilization may be more beneficial. PMID:26700938

  4. Exercise induces age-dependent changes on epigenetic parameters in rat hippocampus: a preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Elsner, Viviane Rostirola; Lovatel, Gisele Agustini; Moysés, Felipe; Bertoldi, Karine; Spindler, Christiano; Cechinel, Laura Reck; Muotri, Alysson Renato; Siqueira, Ionara Rodrigues

    2013-02-01

    Regular exercise improves learning and memory, including during aging process. Interestingly, the imbalance of epigenetic mechanisms has been linked to age-related cognitive deficits. However, studies about epigenetic alterations after exercise during the aging process are rare. In this preliminary study we investigated the effect of aging and exercise on DNA methyltransferases (DNMT1 and DNMT3b) and H3-K9 methylation levels in hippocampus from 3 and 20-months aged Wistar rats. The animals were submitted to two exercise protocols: single session or chronic treadmill protocol. DNMT1 and H3-K9 methylation levels were decreased in hippocampus from aged rats. The single exercise session decreased both DNMT3b and DNMT1 levels in young adult rats, without any effect in the aged group. Both exercise protocols reduced H3-K9 methylation levels in young adult rats, while the single session reversed the changes on H3-K9 methylation levels induced by aging. Together, these results suggest that an imbalance on DNMTs and H3-K9 methylation levels might be linked to the brain aging process and that the outcome to exercise seems to vary through lifespan.

  5. Profiling of exercise-induced transcripts in the peripheral blood cells of Thoroughbred horses

    PubMed Central

    TOZAKI, Teruaki; KIKUCHI, Mio; KAKOI, Hironaga; HIROTA, Kei-ichi; MUKAI, Kazutaka; AIDA, Hiroko; NAKAMURA, Seiji; NAGATA, Shun-ichi

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Transcriptome analyses based on DNA microarray technology have been used to investigate gene expression profiles in horses. In this study, we aimed to identify exercise-induced changes in the expression profiles of genes in the peripheral blood of Thoroughbred horses using DNA microarray technology (15,429 genes on 43,603 probes). Blood samples from the jugular vein were collected from six horses before and 1 min, 4 hr, and 24 hr after all-out running on a treadmill. After the normalization of microarray data, a total of 26,830 probes were clustered into four groups and 11 subgroups showing similar expression changes based on k-mean clustering. The expression level of inflammation-related genes, including interleukin-1 receptor type II (IL-1R2), matrix metallopeptidase 8 (MMP8), protein S100-A8 (S100-A8), and serum amyloid A (SAA), increased at 4 hr after exercise, whereas that of c-Fos (FOS) increased at 1 min after exercise. These results indicated that the inflammatory response increased in the peripheral blood cells after exercise. Our study also revealed the presence of genes that may not be affected by all-out exercise. In conclusion, transcriptome analysis of peripheral blood cells could be used to monitor physiological changes induced by various external stress factors, including exercise, in Thoroughbred racehorses. PMID:27974875

  6. Elevated central venous pressure: A consequence of exercise training-induced hypervolemia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Convertino, Victor A.; Mack, Gary W.; Nadel, Ethan R.

    1990-01-01

    Resting plasma volumes, and arterial and central venous pressures (CVP) were measured in 16 men before and after exercise training to determine if training-induced hypervolemia could be explained by a change in total vascular capacitance. In addition, resting levels of plasma vasopressin (AVP), atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP), aldosterone (ALD), and norepinephrine (NE) were measured before and after training. The same measurements of vacular volume, pressures, and plasma hormones were measured in 8 subjects who did not undergo exercise and acted as controls. The exercise training program consisted of 10 weeks of controlled cycle exercise for 30 min/d, 4 d/wk at 75 to 80 percent of maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max). A training effect was verified by a 20 percent increase in VO2max, a resting bradycardia, and a 370 ml (9 percent) increase in blood volume. Mean arterial blood pressure was unaltered by exercise training, but resting CVP increased. The percent change in blood volume from before to after training was linearly related to the percent change in CVP. As a consequence of elevations in both blood volume and CVP, the volume-to-pressure ratio was essentially unchanged following exercise training. Plasma AVP, ANP, ALD, and NE were unaltered. Results indicate that elevated CVP is a consequence of training-induced hypervolemia without alteration in total effective venous capacitance. This may represent a resetting of the pressure-volume stimulus-response relation for regulation of blood volume.

  7. Elevated central venous pressure: a consequence of exercise training-induced hypervolemia?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Convertino, V. A.; Mack, G. W.; Nadel, E. R.

    1991-01-01

    Resting blood volumes and arterial and central venous pressures (CVP) were measured in 14 men before and after exercise training to determine whether training-induced hypervolemia is accompanied by a change in total vascular capacitance. In addition, resting levels of plasma arginine vasopressin (AVP), atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP), aldosterone (Ald), and norepinephrine (NE) were measured. The same measurements were conducted in seven subjects who did not undergo exercise and acted as controls. Exercise training consisted of 10 wk of controlled cycle exercise for 30 min/day, 4 days/wk at 75-80% of maximal O2 uptake (VO2max). A training effect was verified by a 20% increase in VO2max, a resting bradycardia, and a 9% increase in blood volume. Mean arterial blood pressure was unaltered by exercise training, but resting CVP increased by 16% (P less than 0.05). The percent change in blood volume from before to after training was linearly related to the percent change in CVP (r = 0.903, P less than 0.05). As a consequence of elevations in both blood volume and CVP, the volume-to-pressure ratio was unchanged a