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Sample records for exercise therapy

  1. Exercise therapy for multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Rietberg, M B; Brooks, D; Uitdehaag, B M J; Kwakkel, G

    2005-01-25

    No intervention has proven effective in modifying long-term disease prognosis in Multiple Sclerosis (MS) but exercise therapy is considered to be an important part of symptomatic and supportive treatment for these patients. To assess the effectiveness of exercise therapy for patients with MS in terms of activities of daily living and health-related quality of life. We searched the Cochrane MS Group Specialised Register (searched: March 2004), Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (The Cochrane Library Issue 2, 2004), MEDLINE (from 1966 to March 2004), EMBASE (from 1988 to March 2004 ), CINAHL (from 1982 to March 2004), PEDro (from 1999 to March 2004) . Manual search in the journal 'Multiple Sclerosis' and screening of the reference lists of identified studies and reviews. We also searched abstracts published in proceedings of conferences. Randomised Controlled Trials (RCTs) that reported on exercise therapy for adults with MS, not presently experiencing an exacerbation; outcomes that include measures of activity limitation or health-related quality of life or both. Two reviewers independently extracted data and methodological quality of the included trials. Disagreements were resolved by discussion. The results were analysed using a best-evidence synthesis based on methodological quality. Nine high-methodological-quality RCTs(260 participants) met the inclusion criteria. Six trials focussed on comparison of exercise therapy versus no exercise therapy, whereas three trials compared two interventions that both met our definition of exercise therapy. Best evidence synthesis showed strong evidence in favour of exercise therapy compared to no exercise therapy in terms of muscle power function, exercise tolerance functions and mobility-related activities. Moderate evidence was found for improving mood. No evidence was observed for exercise therapy on fatigue and perception of handicap when compared to no exercise therapy. Finally, no evidence was found

  2. Exercise therapy for fibromyalgia.

    PubMed

    Busch, Angela J; Webber, Sandra C; Brachaniec, Mary; Bidonde, Julia; Bello-Haas, Vanina Dal; Danyliw, Adrienne D; Overend, Tom J; Richards, Rachel S; Sawant, Anuradha; Schachter, Candice L

    2011-10-01

    Fibromyalgia syndrome, a chronic condition typically characterized by widespread pain, nonrestorative sleep, fatigue, cognitive dysfunction, and other somatic symptoms, negatively impacts physical and emotional function and reduces quality of life. Exercise is commonly recommended in the management of people with fibromyalgia, and interest in examining exercise benefits for those with the syndrome has grown substantially over the past 25 years. Research supports aerobic and strength training to improve physical fitness and function, reduce fibromyalgia symptoms, and improve quality of life. However, other forms of exercise (e.g., tai chi, yoga, Nordic walking, vibration techniques) and lifestyle physical activity also have been investigated to determine their effects. This paper highlights findings from recent randomized controlled trials and reviews of exercise for people with fibromyalgia, and includes information regarding factors that influence response and adherence to exercise to assist clinicians with exercise and physical activity prescription decision-making to optimize health and well-being.

  3. Exercise therapy for schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Gorczynski, Paul; Faulkner, Guy

    2014-01-01

    Background The health benefits of physical activity and exercise are well documented and these effects could help people with schizophrenia. Objectives To determine the mental health effects of exercise/physical activity programmes for people with schizophrenia or schizophrenia-like illnesses. Search methods We searched the Cochrane Schizophrenia Group Trials Register (December 2008) which is based on regular searches of CINAHL, EMBASE, MEDLINE and PsycINFO. We also inspected references within relevant papers. Selection criteria We included all randomised controlled trials comparing any intervention where physical activity or exercise was considered to be the main or active ingredient with standard care or other treatments for people with schizophrenia or schizophrenia-like illnesses. Data collection and analysis We independently inspected citations and abstracts, ordered papers, quality assessed and data extracted. For binary outcomes we calculated a fixed-effect risk ratio (RR) and its 95% confidence interval (CI). Where possible, the weighted number needed to treat/ harm statistic (NNT/H) and its 95% confidence interval (CI), was also calculated. For continuous outcomes, endpoint data were preferred to change data. We synthesised non-skewed data from valid scales using a weighted mean difference (WMD). Main results Three randomised controlled trials met the inclusion criteria. Trials assessed the effects of exercise on physical and mental health. Overall numbers leaving the trials were similar. Two trials compared exercise to standard care and both found exercise to significantly improve negative symptoms of mental state (Mental Health Inventory Depression:1RCT, n=10, MD 17.50 CI 6.70 to 28.30, PANSS negative: 1RCT, n=10, MD -8.50 CI -11.11 to -5.89). No absolute effects were found for positive symptoms of mental state. Physical health improved significantly in the exercise group compared to those in standard care (1RCT, n=13, MD 79.50 CI 33.82 to 125.18), but

  4. [Exercise prescription and nutrition therapy].

    PubMed

    Shiota, Masatoshi; Sone, Ryoko; Matsuo, Eriko; Matsubara, Shigeru; Suzuki, Masato

    2014-08-01

    In the report of World Health Organization, the leading global risks for mortality in the world are high blood pressure (12.8%), tobacco use (8.7%), high blood glucose (5.8%), physical inactivity (5.5%), and overweight and obesity (4.8%). Increased blood pressure levels cause the increased morbidity and mortality of chronic diseases, such as stroke, myocardial infarction, chronic kidney disease. Improving the high blood pressure is considered as common challenges around the world. Exercise prescription and nutrition therapy might be important non-pharmacologic therapies in the control of hypertension. Applying these therapies to the general population can help to prevent an increase in blood pressure and decrease elevated blood pressure levels for those with hypertension. Exercise prescription and nutrition therapy are discussed using the international guidelines.

  5. Exercise therapy across the lung cancer continuum.

    PubMed

    Jones, Lee W; Eves, Neil D; Waner, Emily; Joy, Anil A

    2009-07-01

    A lung cancer diagnosis and associated therapeutic management are associated with unique and varying degrees of adverse physical/functional impairments that dramatically reduce patients' ability to tolerate exercise. Poor exercise capacity predisposes to increased susceptibility to other common age-related diseases, poor quality of life, and likely premature death. This article reviews the literature investigating the role of exercise as an adjunct therapy across the lung cancer continuum (ie, prevention to palliation). The current evidence suggests that exercise training is a safe and feasible adjunct therapy for patients with operable lung cancer both before and after pulmonary resection. Among patients with inoperable disease, feasibility and safety studies of carefully prescribed exercise training are warranted. Preliminary evidence in this area suggests that exercise therapy may be an important consideration in multidisciplinary management of patients diagnosed with lung cancer.

  6. Improved exercise myocardial perfusion during lidoflazine therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Shapiro, W.; Narahara, K.A.; Park, J.

    1983-11-01

    Lidoflazine is a synthetic drug with calcium-channel blocking effects. In a study of 6 patients with severe classic angina pectoris, single-blind administration of lidoflazine was associated with improved myocardial perfusion during exercise as determined by thallium-201 stress scintigraphy. These studies demonstrate that lidoflazine therapy is associated with relief of angina, an increased physical work capacity, and improved regional myocardial perfusion during exercise.

  7. Prescribing exercise as preventive therapy

    PubMed Central

    Warburton, Darren E.R.; Nicol, Crystal Whitney; Bredin, Shannon S.D.

    2006-01-01

    Energy expenditure of about 1000 kcal (4200 kJ) per week (equivalent to walking 1 hour 5 days a week) is associated with significant health benefits. Health benefits can be achieved through structured or nonstructured physical activity, accumulated throughout the day (even through short 10-minute bouts) on most days of the week. In this article we outline the means of evaluating cardiovascular and musculoskeletal fitness, the methods of evaluating physical activity levels, the current recommendations for exercise (including intensity, type, time and frequency) and the resources available for patients and physicians interested in learning more about the evaluation of physical activity and fitness levels and the prescription of exercise. PMID:16567757

  8. Chronic Pain and Exercise Therapy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raithel, Kathryn Simmons

    1989-01-01

    Aerobic and resistance exercise are currently prescribed by physicians to treat chronic pain. However, patient fitness level must improve before he/she feels better. Pain management programs help patients become more active so they can function at work and home. (SM)

  9. Chronic Pain and Exercise Therapy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raithel, Kathryn Simmons

    1989-01-01

    Aerobic and resistance exercise are currently prescribed by physicians to treat chronic pain. However, patient fitness level must improve before he/she feels better. Pain management programs help patients become more active so they can function at work and home. (SM)

  10. Exercise therapy for chronic fatigue syndrome.

    PubMed

    Larun, Lillebeth; Brurberg, Kjetil G; Odgaard-Jensen, Jan; Price, Jonathan R

    2015-02-10

    Chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) is characterised by persistent, medically unexplained fatigue, as well as symptoms such as musculoskeletal pain, sleep disturbance, headaches and impaired concentration and short-term memory. CFS presents as a common, debilitating and serious health problem. Treatment may include physical interventions, such as exercise therapy, which was last reviewed in 2004. The objective of this review was to determine the effects of exercise therapy (ET) for patients with CFS as compared with any other intervention or control.• Exercise therapy versus 'passive control' (e.g. treatment as usual, waiting-list control, relaxation, flexibility).• Exercise therapy versus other active treatment (e.g. cognitive-behavioural therapy (CBT), cognitive treatment, supportive therapy, pacing, pharmacological therapy such as antidepressants).• Exercise therapy in combination with other specified treatment strategies versus other specified treatment strategies (e.g. exercise combined with pharmacological treatment vs pharmacological treatment alone). We searched The Cochrane Collaboration Depression, Anxiety and Neurosis Controlled Trials Register (CCDANCTR), the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) and SPORTDiscus up to May 2014 using a comprehensive list of free-text terms for CFS and exercise. We located unpublished or ongoing trials through the World Health Organization (WHO) International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (to May 2014). We screened reference lists of retrieved articles and contacted experts in the field for additional studies Randomised controlled trials involving adults with a primary diagnosis of CFS who were able to participate in exercise therapy. Studies had to compare exercise therapy with passive control, psychological therapies, adaptive pacing therapy or pharmacological therapy. Two review authors independently performed study selection, risk of bias assessments and data extraction. We combined continuous

  11. Exercise therapy for chronic fatigue syndrome.

    PubMed

    Larun, Lillebeth; Brurberg, Kjetil G; Odgaard-Jensen, Jan; Price, Jonathan R

    2016-06-24

    Chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) is characterised by persistent, medically unexplained fatigue, as well as symptoms such as musculoskeletal pain, sleep disturbance, headaches and impaired concentration and short-term memory. CFS presents as a common, debilitating and serious health problem. Treatment may include physical interventions, such as exercise therapy, which was last reviewed in 2004. The objective of this review was to determine the effects of exercise therapy (ET) for patients with CFS as compared with any other intervention or control.• Exercise therapy versus 'passive control' (e.g. treatment as usual, waiting-list control, relaxation, flexibility).• Exercise therapy versus other active treatment (e.g. cognitive-behavioural therapy (CBT), cognitive treatment, supportive therapy, pacing, pharmacological therapy such as antidepressants).• Exercise therapy in combination with other specified treatment strategies versus other specified treatment strategies (e.g. exercise combined with pharmacological treatment vs pharmacological treatment alone). We searched The Cochrane Collaboration Depression, Anxiety and Neurosis Controlled Trials Register (CCDANCTR), the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) and SPORTDiscus up to May 2014 using a comprehensive list of free-text terms for CFS and exercise. We located unpublished or ongoing trials through the World Health Organization (WHO) International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (to May 2014). We screened reference lists of retrieved articles and contacted experts in the field for additional studies Randomised controlled trials involving adults with a primary diagnosis of CFS who were able to participate in exercise therapy. Studies had to compare exercise therapy with passive control, psychological therapies, adaptive pacing therapy or pharmacological therapy. Two review authors independently performed study selection, risk of bias assessments and data extraction. We combined continuous

  12. Exercise therapy for chronic fatigue syndrome.

    PubMed

    Larun, Lillebeth; Brurberg, Kjetil G; Odgaard-Jensen, Jan; Price, Jonathan R

    2016-12-20

    Chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) is characterised by persistent, medically unexplained fatigue, as well as symptoms such as musculoskeletal pain, sleep disturbance, headaches and impaired concentration and short-term memory. CFS presents as a common, debilitating and serious health problem. Treatment may include physical interventions, such as exercise therapy, which was last reviewed in 2004. The objective of this review was to determine the effects of exercise therapy (ET) for patients with CFS as compared with any other intervention or control.• Exercise therapy versus 'passive control' (e.g. treatment as usual, waiting-list control, relaxation, flexibility).• Exercise therapy versus other active treatment (e.g. cognitive-behavioural therapy (CBT), cognitive treatment, supportive therapy, pacing, pharmacological therapy such as antidepressants).• Exercise therapy in combination with other specified treatment strategies versus other specified treatment strategies (e.g. exercise combined with pharmacological treatment vs pharmacological treatment alone). We searched The Cochrane Collaboration Depression, Anxiety and Neurosis Controlled Trials Register (CCDANCTR), the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) and SPORTDiscus up to May 2014 using a comprehensive list of free-text terms for CFS and exercise. We located unpublished or ongoing trials through the World Health Organization (WHO) International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (to May 2014). We screened reference lists of retrieved articles and contacted experts in the field for additional studies SELECTION CRITERIA: Randomised controlled trials involving adults with a primary diagnosis of CFS who were able to participate in exercise therapy. Studies had to compare exercise therapy with passive control, psychological therapies, adaptive pacing therapy or pharmacological therapy. Two review authors independently performed study selection, risk of bias assessments and data extraction. We

  13. Exercise therapy for chronic fatigue syndrome.

    PubMed

    Larun, Lillebeth; Brurberg, Kjetil G; Odgaard-Jensen, Jan; Price, Jonathan R

    2016-02-07

    Chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) is characterised by persistent, medically unexplained fatigue, as well as symptoms such as musculoskeletal pain, sleep disturbance, headaches and impaired concentration and short-term memory. CFS presents as a common, debilitating and serious health problem. Treatment may include physical interventions, such as exercise therapy, which was last reviewed in 2004. The objective of this review was to determine the effects of exercise therapy (ET) for patients with CFS as compared with any other intervention or control.• Exercise therapy versus 'passive control' (e.g. treatment as usual, waiting-list control, relaxation, flexibility).• Exercise therapy versus other active treatment (e.g. cognitive-behavioural therapy (CBT), cognitive treatment, supportive therapy, pacing, pharmacological therapy such as antidepressants).• Exercise therapy in combination with other specified treatment strategies versus other specified treatment strategies (e.g. exercise combined with pharmacological treatment vs pharmacological treatment alone). We searched The Cochrane Collaboration Depression, Anxiety and Neurosis Controlled Trials Register (CCDANCTR), the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) and SPORTDiscus up to May 2014 using a comprehensive list of free-text terms for CFS and exercise. We located unpublished or ongoing trials through the World Health Organization (WHO) International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (to May 2014). We screened reference lists of retrieved articles and contacted experts in the field for additional studies Randomised controlled trials involving adults with a primary diagnosis of CFS who were able to participate in exercise therapy. Studies had to compare exercise therapy with passive control, psychological therapies, adaptive pacing therapy or pharmacological therapy. Two review authors independently performed study selection, risk of bias assessments and data extraction. We combined continuous

  14. Exercise therapy for chronic fatigue syndrome.

    PubMed

    Larun, Lillebeth; Brurberg, Kjetil G; Odgaard-Jensen, Jan; Price, Jonathan R

    2017-04-25

    Chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) is characterised by persistent, medically unexplained fatigue, as well as symptoms such as musculoskeletal pain, sleep disturbance, headaches and impaired concentration and short-term memory. CFS presents as a common, debilitating and serious health problem. Treatment may include physical interventions, such as exercise therapy, which was last reviewed in 2004. The objective of this review was to determine the effects of exercise therapy (ET) for patients with CFS as compared with any other intervention or control.• Exercise therapy versus 'passive control' (e.g. treatment as usual, waiting-list control, relaxation, flexibility).• Exercise therapy versus other active treatment (e.g. cognitive-behavioural therapy (CBT), cognitive treatment, supportive therapy, pacing, pharmacological therapy such as antidepressants).• Exercise therapy in combination with other specified treatment strategies versus other specified treatment strategies (e.g. exercise combined with pharmacological treatment vs pharmacological treatment alone). We searched The Cochrane Collaboration Depression, Anxiety and Neurosis Controlled Trials Register (CCDANCTR), the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) and SPORTDiscus up to May 2014 using a comprehensive list of free-text terms for CFS and exercise. We located unpublished or ongoing trials through the World Health Organization (WHO) International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (to May 2014). We screened reference lists of retrieved articles and contacted experts in the field for additional studies SELECTION CRITERIA: Randomised controlled trials involving adults with a primary diagnosis of CFS who were able to participate in exercise therapy. Studies had to compare exercise therapy with passive control, psychological therapies, adaptive pacing therapy or pharmacological therapy. Two review authors independently performed study selection, risk of bias assessments and data extraction. We

  15. Exercise therapy in juvenile idiopathic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Takken, T; van Brussel, M; Engelbert, R H H; Van der Net, J; Kuis, W; Helders, P J M

    2008-04-16

    Exercise therapy is considered an important component of the treatment of arthritis. The efficacy of exercise therapy has been reviewed in adults with rheumatoid arthritis but not in children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). To assess the effects of exercise therapy on functional ability, quality of life and aerobic capacity in children with JIA. The Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews (The Cochrane Library), MEDLINE (January 1966 to April 2007), CINAHL (January 1982 to April 2007), EMBASE (January 1966 to October 2007), PEDro (January 1966 to October 2007), SportDiscus (January 1966 to October 2007), Google Scholar (to October 2007), AMED (Allied and Alternative Medicine) (January 1985 to October 2007), Health Technologies Assessment database (January 1988 to October 2007), ISI Web Science Index to Scientific and Technical Proceedings (January 1966 to October 2007) and the Chartered Society of Physiotherapy website (http://www.cps.uk.org) were searched and references tracked. Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) of exercise treatment in JIA. Potentially relevant references were evaluated and all data were extracted by two review authors working independently. Three out of 16 identified studies met the inclusion criteria, with a total of 212 participants. All the included studies fulfilled at least seven of 10 methodological criteria. The outcome data of the following measures were homogenous and were pooled in a meta-analysis: functional ability (n = 198; WMD -0.07, 95% CI -0.22 to 0.08), quality of life (CHQ-PhS: n = 115; WMD -3.96, 95% CI -8.91 to 1.00) and aerobic capacity (n = 124; WMD 0.04, 95% CI -0.11 to 0.19). The results suggest that the outcome measures all favoured the exercise therapy but none were statistically significant. None of the studies reported negative effects of the exercise therapy. Overall, based on 'silver-level' evidence (www.cochranemsk.org) there was no clinically

  16. Exercise therapy for claudication: Should home-based exercise therapy be prescribed in clinical practice?

    PubMed

    Lindo, Fae A

    2015-12-01

    Peripheral artery disease is a cause of morbidity and mortality in the United States. The literature suggests evidence that an exercise program can be beneficial in the treatment of patients with claudication. Supervised exercise therapy is well documented in the literature, and national guidelines recommend it as an initial conservative management. When a supervised exercise program is unavailable or not covered by insurance, an alternative to supervised exercise is vital. The purpose of this review is to examine the evidence regarding the efficacy of a home-based exercise program. Four studies were included in this review, and although the evidence supporting a home-based exercise program is limited in the literature, the findings indicate that a home-based exercise program increases claudication onset time, resulting in greater mobility and improvement in the patient's quality of life.

  17. The effectiveness of exercise therapy for ankylosing spondylitis: a review.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ching-Yi; Chiang, Pin-Yen; Lee, Hong-Shen; Wei, James Cheng-Chung

    2009-09-01

    Exercise therapy is an important component of current standard therapy for patients with ankylosing spondylitis. The purpose of this review is to provide important guidelines when prescribing exercises by reviewing articles evaluating the effectives and usefulness of exercise therapy in patients with ankylosing spondylosis.

  18. Occupational stress, relaxation therapies, exercise and biofeedback.

    PubMed

    Stein, Franklin

    2001-01-01

    Occupational stress is a widespread occurrence in the United States. It is a contributing factor to absenteeism, disease, injury and lowered productivity. In general stress management programs in the work place that include relaxation therapies, exercise, and biofeedback have been shown to reduce the physiological symptoms such as hypertension, and increase job satisfaction and job performance. Strategies to implement a successful stress management program include incorporating the coping activities into one's daily schedule, monitoring one's symptoms and stressors, and being realistic in setting up a schedule that is relevant and attainable. A short form of meditation, daily exercise program and the use of heart rate or thermal biofeedback can be helpful to a worker experiencing occupational stress.

  19. Exercise in Treating Hypertension: Tailoring Therapies for Active Patients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chintanadilok, Jirayos

    2002-01-01

    Exercise can be definitive therapy for some, and adjunctive therapy for many, people with hypertension, though people with secondary hypertension may not derive as much benefit. Low-to- moderate-intensity aerobic exercise can help with mild hypertension and reduce drug dosages in more severe cases. For active patients requiring medication,…

  20. Exercise in Treating Hypertension: Tailoring Therapies for Active Patients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chintanadilok, Jirayos

    2002-01-01

    Exercise can be definitive therapy for some, and adjunctive therapy for many, people with hypertension, though people with secondary hypertension may not derive as much benefit. Low-to- moderate-intensity aerobic exercise can help with mild hypertension and reduce drug dosages in more severe cases. For active patients requiring medication,…

  1. Exercise Therapy in the Management of Solid Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Peppercorn, Jeffrey; Scott, Jessica M.; Battaglini, Claudio

    2013-01-01

    Opinion statement The benefits of exercise in patients with chronic disease have been studied extensively over the last half century. In contrast, investigation of the role of exercise following a diagnosis of cancer has received comparably less attention. In this article, we review the efficacy of exercise training in specific areas across the cancer survivorship continuum [i.e., pre-surgery, post-surgery during adjuvant therapy, following the completion of primary adjuvant therapy (survivorship), and palliation], with a view toward future research. The current evidence base provides strong but preliminary evidence that exercise training is a well-tolerated and safe adjunct therapy that can mitigate several common treatment-related side-effects among cancer patients with early disease both during and following adjuvant therapy although many questions remain unanswered. Preliminary evidence in this area supports that exercise therapy may be an important consideration in multidisciplinary management of patients following a cancer diagnosis. PMID:20645033

  2. Working the Continuum between Therapy and Exercise.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sova, Ruth

    Because of the relative weightlessness factor, water exercise is an excellent low-impact aerobic activity for people with physical difficulties. Participants should inform their physicians of intentions to begin aquatic exercise, and physicians should advise participants that water exercise is exertive. Program instructors must be prepared to…

  3. Exercise: An Alternative Therapy for Gestational Diabetes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Artal, Raul

    1996-01-01

    Exercise is encouraged in the management of pregnant women with gestational diabetes or women with Type II diabetes who become pregnant. Although non-weight-bearing exercises may be best for sedentary women, moderate workouts appear to be safe for most women with gestational diabetes. The role of exercise, risk factors, warning signs, and examples…

  4. Exercise: An Alternative Therapy for Gestational Diabetes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Artal, Raul

    1996-01-01

    Exercise is encouraged in the management of pregnant women with gestational diabetes or women with Type II diabetes who become pregnant. Although non-weight-bearing exercises may be best for sedentary women, moderate workouts appear to be safe for most women with gestational diabetes. The role of exercise, risk factors, warning signs, and examples…

  5. Physical exercise as therapy for type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Balducci, Stefano; Sacchetti, Massimo; Haxhi, Jonida; Orlando, Giorgio; D'Errico, Valeria; Fallucca, Sara; Menini, Stefano; Pugliese, Giuseppe

    2014-03-01

    Many studies have highlighted the importance of physical activity (PA) for health, and recent evidence now points to the positive improvements associated with exercise in type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). However, few physicians are willing to prescribe exercise as a therapy for diabetic patients. In addition, there is a lack of information on how to implement exercise therapy especially in long-term exercise regimens. The purpose of this manuscript is to summarize standards of exercise therapy for patients with T2DM, both in terms of prescribing and monitoring, according to the American College of Sports Medicine and the American Diabetes Association guidelines. We present details of the exercise therapies used in long-term studies, describing how the parameters for exercise prescription were applied in clinical practice. These parameters are described in terms of frequency, intensity, duration, mode and rate of progression in long-term therapeutic prescriptions. Individual responses to exercise dose are discussed, and critical issues to be considered in patients with underlying disease and in T2DM patients are highlighted.

  6. Physical Exercise as Therapy for Frailty.

    PubMed

    Aguirre, Lina E; Villareal, Dennis T

    2015-01-01

    Longitudinal studies demonstrate that regular physical exercise extends longevity and reduces the risk of physical disability. Decline in physical activity with aging is associated with a decrease in exercise capacity that predisposes to frailty. The frailty syndrome includes a lowered activity level, poor exercise tolerance, and loss of lean body and muscle mass. Poor exercise tolerance is related to aerobic endurance. Aerobic endurance training can significantly improve peak oxygen consumption by ∼10-15%. Resistance training is the best way to increase muscle strength and mass. Although the increase in muscle mass in response to resistance training may be attenuated in frail older adults, resistance training can significantly improve muscle strength, particularly in institutionalized patients, by ∼110%. Because both aerobic and resistance training target specific components of frailty, studies combining aerobic and resistance training provide the most promising evidence with respect to successfully treating frailty. At the molecular level, exercise reduces frailty by decreasing muscle inflammation, increasing anabolism, and increasing muscle protein synthesis. More studies are needed to determine which exercises are best suited, most effective, and safe for this population. Based on the available studies, an individualized multicomponent exercise program that includes aerobic activity, strength exercises, and flexibility is recommended to treat frailty. © 2015 Michael E. DeBakey VA Medical Center (US Government) Published by S. Karger AG, Basel.

  7. Comparison of manual therapy and exercise therapy in osteoarthritis of the hip: a randomized clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Hoeksma, Hugo L; Dekker, Joost; Ronday, H Karel; Heering, Annet; van der Lubbe, Nico; Vel, Cees; Breedveld, Ferdinand C; van den Ende, Cornelia H M

    2004-10-15

    To determine the effectiveness of a manual therapy program compared with an exercise therapy program in patients with osteoarthritis (OA) of the hip. A single-blind, randomized clinical trial of 109 hip OA patients was carried out in the outpatient clinic for physical therapy of a large hospital. The manual therapy program focused on specific manipulations and mobilization of the hip joint. The exercise therapy program focused on active exercises to improve muscle function and joint motion. The treatment period was 5 weeks (9 sessions). The primary outcome was general perceived improvement after treatment. Secondary outcomes included pain, hip function, walking speed, range of motion, and quality of life. Of 109 patients included in the study, 56 were allocated to manual therapy and 53 to exercise therapy. No major differences were found on baseline characteristics between groups. Success rates (primary outcome) after 5 weeks were 81% in the manual therapy group and 50% in the exercise group (odds ratio 1.92, 95% confidence interval 1.30, 2.60). Furthermore, patients in the manual therapy group had significantly better outcomes on pain, stiffness, hip function, and range of motion. Effects of manual therapy on the improvement of pain, hip function, and range of motion endured after 29 weeks. The effect of the manual therapy program on hip function is superior to the exercise therapy program in patients with OA of the hip.

  8. Exercise as an Adjuvant Therapy for Hematopoietic Stem Cell Mobilization

    PubMed Central

    Emmons, Russell; Niemiro, Grace M.; De Lisio, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT) using mobilized peripheral blood hematopoietic stem cells (HSPCs) is the only curative strategy for many patients suffering from hematological malignancies. HSPC collection protocols rely on pharmacological agents to mobilize HSPCs to peripheral blood. Limitations including variable donor responses and long dosing protocols merit further investigations into adjuvant therapies to enhance the efficiency of HSPCs collection. Exercise, a safe and feasible intervention in patients undergoing HSCT, has been previously shown to robustly stimulate HSPC mobilization from the bone marrow. Exercise-induced HSPC mobilization is transient limiting its current clinical potential. Thus, a deeper investigation of the mechanisms responsible for exercise-induced HSPC mobilization and the factors responsible for removal of HSPCs from circulation following exercise is warranted. The present review will describe current research on exercise and HSPC mobilization, outline the potential mechanisms responsible for exercise-induced HSPC mobilization, and highlight potential sites for HSPC homing following exercise. We also outline current barriers to the implementation of exercise as an adjuvant therapy for HSPC mobilization and suggest potential strategies to overcome these barriers. PMID:27123008

  9. Randomized trial comparing exercise therapy, alternating cold and hot therapy, and low intensity laser therapy for chronic lumbar muscle strain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiaoguang; Li, Jie; Liu, Timon Chengyi; Yuan, Jianqin; Luo, Qingming

    2008-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the effects of exercise therapy, alternating cold and hot (ACH) therapy and low intensity laser (LIL) therapy in patients with chronic lumbar muscle strain (CLMS). Thirty-two patients were randomly allocated to four groups: exercise group, ACH group, LIL group, and combination group of exercise, ACH and LIL, eight in each group. Sixteen treatments were given over the course of 4 weeks. Lumbar muscle endurance, flexion and lateral flexion measures, visual analogue scale (VAS) and lumbar disability questionnaire (LDQ) were used in the clinical and functional evaluations before, immediately after, and 4 weeks after treatment. It was found that the values of endurance, VAS and LDQ in all groups were significantly improved from before to after treatment (P < 0.01). The combination group showed significantly larger reduction on pain level and functional disability than the other groups immediately and 4 weeks after treatment (P < 0.01). Pain level reduced significantly more in the ACH group than in the exercise group or the LIL group immediately and 4 weeks after treatment (P < 0.05). Lumbar muscle endurance and spinal ranges of motion in all groups were improved after treatment but there was no significant difference between any therapy groups. In conclusion, exercise therapy, ACH therapy and LIL therapy were effective in the treatment of CLMS. ACH therapy was more effective than exercise therapy or LIL therapy. The combination therapy of exercise, ACH and LIL had still better rehabilitative effects on CLMS.

  10. Exercise and comorbidity: the i3-S strategy for developing comorbidity-related adaptations to exercise therapy.

    PubMed

    Dekker, Joost; de Rooij, Mariëtte; van der Leeden, Marike

    2016-01-01

    Exercise therapy is effective in a wide range of chronic diseases. Comorbid disease necessitates adaptations to exercise therapy. Guidance on how to develop such adaptations is currently not available. We present an innovative strategy for the development of comorbidity-related adaptations to exercise therapy in an index disease. We previously developed comorbidity-related adaptations to exercise therapy in osteoarthritis. We now broaden this approach into a general strategy for the development of comorbidity-related adaptations to exercise therapy in an index disease. The i3-S strategy consists of four steps. The first three steps involve creating an inventory of comorbid disease, an inventory of contraindications and restrictions on exercise therapy, and an inventory of potential adaptations to exercise therapy. In the fourth step, this information is synthesized into guidance on comorbidity-related adaptations to exercise therapy in the index disease. The adaptations concern physiological, behavioural and environmental factors. In view of the general effectiveness of exercise therapy and the high prevalence of comorbidity in older people, there is a great need for comorbidity-related adaptations to exercise therapy. We recommend to use and evaluate the i3-S strategy in future research. Exercise therapy is effective in a wide range of chronic diseases. Comorbid disease necessitates adaptations to exercise therapy. Guidance on how to develop such adaptations is currently not available. We present an innovative strategy for the development of comorbidity-related adaptations to exercise therapy in an index disease. Researchers and clinicians can use this strategy to develop guidance on the adaptation of exercise therapy to comorbidity.

  11. Manual physical therapy and perturbation exercises in knee osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Rhon, Daniel; Deyle, Gail; Gill, Norman; Rendeiro, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: Knee osteoarthritis (OA) causes disability among the elderly and is often associated with impaired balance and proprioception. Perturbation exercises may help improve these impairments. Although manual physical therapy is generally a well-tolerated treatment for knee OA, perturbation exercises have not been evaluated when used with a manual physical therapy approach. The purpose of this study was to observe tolerance to perturbation exercises and the effect of a manual physical therapy approach with perturbation exercises on patients with knee OA. Methods: This was a prospective observational cohort study of 15 patients with knee OA. The Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Arthritis Index (WOMAC), global rating of change (GROC), and 72-hour post-treatment tolerance were primary outcome measures. Patients received perturbation balance exercises along with a manual physical therapy approach, twice weekly for 4 weeks. Follow-up evaluation was done at 1, 3, and 6 months after beginning the program. Results: Mean total WOMAC score significantly improved (P = 0.001) after the 4-week program (total WOMAC: initial, 105; 4 weeks, 56; 3 months, 54; 6 months, 57). Mean improvements were similar to previously published trials of manual physical therapy without perturbation exercises. The GROC score showed a minimal clinically important difference (MCID)≥+3 in 13 patients (87%) at 4 weeks, 12 patients (80%) at 3 months, and 9 patients (60%) at 6 months. No patients reported exacerbation of symptoms within 72 hours following each treatment session. Discussion: A manual physical therapy approach that also included perturbation exercises was well tolerated and resulted in improved outcome scores in patients with knee OA. PMID:24421635

  12. Exercise therapy for spondyloarthritis: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    O'Dwyer, Tom; O'Shea, Finbar; Wilson, Fiona

    2014-07-01

    To evaluate the effects of therapeutic exercise on pain, stiffness, quality of life, physical function, disease activity, health-related fitness and cardiovascular risk factors in adults with spondyloarthritis (SpA). Electronic databases (Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, EMBASE, MEDLINE/PubMed, PEDro, AMED, CINAHL) were systematically searched from inception to October 2013 using medical subject headings and keywords. This was supplemented by searching conference abstracts and a hand search of reference lists of included studies. Randomised and quasi-randomised studies of adults with SpA in which at least one of the comparison groups received an exercise intervention were included. Outcomes of interest were pain, stiffness, quality of life, physical function and disease activity. Secondary outcomes were health-related fitness and cardiovascular risk factors. Two reviewers independently screened studies for inclusion. Methodological quality was assessed by two reviewers using the Cochrane risk of bias tool and the PEDro scale. Twenty-four studies, involving 1,498 participants, were included. Meta-analyses were not undertaken due to clinical heterogeneity, and this review focuses on qualitative synthesis. Moderate evidence supports exercise interventions in improving physical function, disease activity and chest expansion compared to controls; there is low-level evidence of improved pain, stiffness, spinal mobility and cardiorespiratory function. Supervised group exercise yields better outcomes than unsupervised home exercise. The addition of aerobic components to flexibility programmes improves cardiorespiratory outcomes, but not cardiovascular risk factors. The most effective exercise protocol remains unclear. Current evidence suggests that therapeutic exercises are beneficial for adults with ankylosing spondylitis; effects on other SpA subtypes are unknown.

  13. Kegel's exercises with biofeedback therapy for treatment of stress incontinence.

    PubMed

    Burns, P A; Marecki, M A; Dittmar, S S; Bullough, B

    1985-02-01

    True stress incontinence due to a weakened pelvic floor is one of the most frequently cited urologic complaints of multiparous women past age 40. One treatment modality currently used to treat stress incontinence is exercising the pubococcygeus muscle. Combining biofeedback therapy with a vaginal probe (perineometer) helps patients identify the muscle, provides immediate feedback and assists the nurse and patient in assessing problem resolution. This article describes an intervention program using biofeedback, and measured Kegel's exercises on a small number of women with symptoms of stress incontinence. The lessening of symptoms became a major factor in continued compliance with the exercise program.

  14. [Cardiac reserve in Parkinson's disease and exercise therapy].

    PubMed

    Hirayama, Masaaki; Nakamura, Tomohiko; Sobue, Gen

    2013-01-01

    The clinical feature of Parkinson's disease (PD) is not based on the identification of the extrapyramidal symptom such as bradykinesia, restinbg tremor, rigidity, but also other non-motor symptom (REM sleep disorder, autonomic dysfunction, hyposmia etc). According to the cardio-sympathetic dysfunction, it is well known abnormal MIBG and orthostatic hypotension finding was seen in early disease stage. Furthermore denervation supersensitivity using β1 stimulant correlates the severity of MIBG image, so that this abnormal cardiac function induces inadequate cardiac capacity for exercise. Inadequate cardiac capacity makes easy fatigability, which correlates the abnormal MIBG image and cardio-sympathetic damage. So it is difficult to prescribe a specific exercise program to meet individual PD patients needs. Music therapy and trunk exercise (for example Tai-Chi exercise) are better suited for PD patients.

  15. Cervicothoracic Manual Therapy Plus Exercise Therapy Versus Exercise Therapy Alone in the Management of Individuals With Shoulder Pain: A Multicenter Randomized Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Mintken, Paul E; McDevitt, Amy W; Cleland, Joshua A; Boyles, Robert E; Beardslee, Amber R; Burns, Scott A; Haberl, Matthew D; Hinrichs, Lauren A; Michener, Lori A

    2016-08-01

    Study Design Multicenter randomized controlled trial. Background Cervicothoracic manual therapy has been shown to improve pain and disability in individuals with shoulder pain, but the incremental effects of manual therapy in addition to exercise therapy have not been investigated in a randomized controlled trial. Objectives To compare the effects of cervicothoracic manual therapy and exercise therapy to those of exercise therapy alone in individuals with shoulder pain. Methods Individuals (n = 140) with shoulder pain were randomly assigned to receive 2 sessions of cervicothoracic range-of-motion exercises plus 6 sessions of exercise therapy, or 2 sessions of high-dose cervicothoracic manual therapy and range-of-motion exercises plus 6 sessions of exercise therapy (manual therapy plus exercise). Pain and disability were assessed at baseline, 1 week, 4 weeks, and 6 months. The primary aim (treatment group by time) was examined using linear mixed-model analyses and the repeated measure of time for the Shoulder Pain and Disability Index (SPADI), the numeric pain-rating scale, and the shortened version of the Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand questionnaire (QuickDASH). Patient-perceived success was assessed and analyzed using the global rating of change (GROC) and the Patient Acceptable Symptom State (PASS), using chi-square tests of independence. Results There were no significant 2-way interactions of group by time or main effects by group for pain or disability. Both groups improved significantly on the SPADI, numeric pain-rating scale, and QuickDASH. Secondary outcomes of success on the GROC and PASS significantly favored the manual therapy-plus-exercise group at 4 weeks (P = .03 and P<.01, respectively) and on the GROC at 6 months (P = .04). Conclusion Adding 2 sessions of high-dose cervicothoracic manual therapy to an exercise program did not improve pain or disability in patients with shoulder pain, but did improve patient-perceived success at 4 weeks

  16. Cognitive Load in Voice Therapy Carry-Over Exercises

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iwarsson, Jenny; Morris, David Jackson; Balling, Laura Winther

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: The cognitive load generated by online speech production may vary with the nature of the speech task. This article examines 3 speech tasks used in voice therapy carry-over exercises, in which a patient is required to adopt and automatize new voice behaviors, ultimately in daily spontaneous communication. Method: Twelve subjects produced…

  17. Manual therapy and exercise for neck pain: A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Miller, Jordan; Gross, Anita; D'Sylva, Jonathan; Burnie, Stephen J; Goldsmith, Charles H; Graham, Nadine; Haines, Ted; Brønfort, Gert; Hoving, Jan L

    2010-06-01

    Manual therapy is often used with exercise to treat neck pain. This cervical overview group systematic review update assesses if manual therapy, including manipulation or mobilisation, combined with exercise improves pain, function/disability, quality of life, global perceived effect, and patient satisfaction for adults with neck pain with or without cervicogenic headache or radiculopathy. Computerized searches were performed to July 2009. Two or more authors independently selected studies, abstracted data, and assessed methodological quality. Pooled relative risk (pRR) and standardized mean differences (pSMD) were calculated. Of 17 randomized controlled trials included, 29% had a low risk of bias. Low quality evidence suggests clinically important long-term improvements in pain (pSMD-0.87(95% CI:-1.69,-0.06)), function/disability, and global perceived effect when manual therapy and exercise are compared to no treatment. High quality evidence suggests greater short-term pain relief [pSMD-0.50(95% CI:-0.76,-0.24)] than exercise alone, but no long-term differences across multiple outcomes for (sub)acute/chronic neck pain with or without cervicogenic headache. Moderate quality evidence supports this treatment combination for pain reduction and improved quality of life over manual therapy alone for chronic neck pain; and suggests greater short-term pain reduction when compared to traditional care for acute whiplash. Evidence regarding radiculopathy was sparse. Specific research recommendations are made.

  18. Manual therapy and exercise for neck pain: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Miller, Jordan; Gross, Anita; D'Sylva, Jonathan; Burnie, Stephen J; Goldsmith, Charles H; Graham, Nadine; Haines, Ted; Brønfort, Gert; Hoving, Jan L

    2010-08-01

    Manual therapy is often used with exercise to treat neck pain. This cervical overview group systematic review update assesses if manual therapy, including manipulation or mobilisation, combined with exercise improves pain, function/disability, quality of life, global perceived effect, and patient satisfaction for adults with neck pain with or without cervicogenic headache or radiculopathy. Computerized searches were performed to July 2009. Two or more authors independently selected studies, abstracted data, and assessed methodological quality. Pooled relative risk (pRR) and standardized mean differences (pSMD) were calculated. Of 17 randomized controlled trials included, 29% had a low risk of bias. Low quality evidence suggests clinically important long-term improvements in pain (pSMD-0.87(95% CI: -1.69, -0.06)), function/disability, and global perceived effect when manual therapy and exercise are compared to no treatment. High quality evidence suggests greater short-term pain relief [pSMD-0.50(95% CI: -0.76, -0.24)] than exercise alone, but no long-term differences across multiple outcomes for (sub)acute/chronic neck pain with or without cervicogenic headache. Moderate quality evidence supports this treatment combination for pain reduction and improved quality of life over manual therapy alone for chronic neck pain; and suggests greater short-term pain reduction when compared to traditional care for acute whiplash. Evidence regarding radiculopathy was sparse. Specific research recommendations are made.

  19. Cognitive Load in Voice Therapy Carry-Over Exercises

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iwarsson, Jenny; Morris, David Jackson; Balling, Laura Winther

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: The cognitive load generated by online speech production may vary with the nature of the speech task. This article examines 3 speech tasks used in voice therapy carry-over exercises, in which a patient is required to adopt and automatize new voice behaviors, ultimately in daily spontaneous communication. Method: Twelve subjects produced…

  20. Exercise therapy and other types of physical therapy for patients with neuromuscular diseases: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Cup, Edith H; Pieterse, Allan J; Ten Broek-Pastoor, Jessica M; Munneke, Marten; van Engelen, Baziel G; Hendricks, Henk T; van der Wilt, Gert J; Oostendorp, Rob A

    2007-11-01

    To summarize and critically appraise the available evidence on exercise therapy and other types of physical therapies for patients with neuromuscular diseases (NMD). Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials and Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, Medline, CINAHL, EMBASE (Rehabilitation and Physical Medicine), and reference lists of reviews and articles. Randomized clinical trials (RCTs), controlled clinical trials (CCTs), and other designs were included. Study participants had to have any of the following types of NMD: motoneuron diseases, disorders of the motor nerve roots or peripheral nerves, neuromuscular transmission disorders, or muscle diseases. All types of exercise therapy and other physical therapy modalities were included. Outcome measures had to be at the level of body functions, activities, or participation according to the definitions of the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF). Two reviewers independently decided on inclusion or exclusion of articles and rated the methodologic quality of the studies included. All RCTs, CCTs, and other designs only if of sufficient methodologic quality were included in a best evidence synthesis. A level of evidence was attributed for each subgroup of NMD and each type of intervention. Initially 58 studies were included: 12 RCTs, 5 CCTs, and 41 other designs. After methodologic assessment, 19 other designs were excluded from further analysis. There is level II evidence ("likely to be effective") for strengthening exercises in combination with aerobic exercises for patients with muscle disorders. Level III evidence ("indications of effectiveness") was found for aerobic exercises in patients with muscle disorders and for the combination of muscle strengthening and aerobic exercises in a heterogeneous group of muscle disorders. Finally, there is level III evidence for breathing exercises for patients with myasthenia gravis and for patients with myotonic muscular dystrophy

  1. Eminence in Physical Therapy with Special Reference to Exercise Therapy--A Textbook Definition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dean, Elizabeth; Rose, Suzanne

    1986-01-01

    The study explored the frequency with which authors were cited in the most recent edition of "Therapeutic Exercise," an internationally recognized text in physical therapy. Citation trends across three editions were also used as an index of long-term professional influence. Implications for the physical therapy profession are discussed.…

  2. Exercise and physical therapy in early management of Parkinson disease.

    PubMed

    Alonso-Frech, Fernando; Sanahuja, Juan Juni; Rodriguez, Amelia Mendoza

    2011-11-01

    Experimental research has produced evidence in recent years underlying the beneficial effects that exercise can have in preventing and deceleration of the development of Parkinson disease. These beneficial effects are exerted through various mechanisms such as neuroprotection, neurotransmission, plasticity, neurogenesis, homeostasis, and neurotrophic factors. Studies on clinical application at an early stage are still scarce, although some results are encouraging. There are still many questions to determine the most suitable type of exercise (forced/voluntary), the time of its implementation, the duration, and the combination of strategies. Nonconventional therapies can play an important role in addition to exercise, and are so numerous that they could be adapted to the circumstances of patients, although there is no evidence to date that they could have a neuroprotective effect.

  3. Algorithm of physical therapy exercises following total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Stryła, Wanda; Pogorzała, Adam M; Rogala, Piotr; Nowakowski, Andrzej

    2013-01-09

    Authors present a set of exercises for patients after total hip replacement (THR) treated due to idiopathic hip joint osteoarthritis. Outcome of surgical treatment depends largely on physical therapy conducted after the procedure. Physical therapy following total hip arthroplasty involves restoration of proper physical function. Exercises increase the strength of hip girdle muscles and stabilize the involved hip joint. Total postoperative rehabilitation improves the gait esthetics. Restoring patient's full independence in everyday and professional life after total hip arthroplasty is the best test for properly conducted rehabilitation. A rehabilitation algorithm following hip arthroplasty was established based on the data acquired from literature and authors' own studies. Methods of rehabilitation following total arthroplasty was unified with regard to the type of endoprosthesis (cemented and non-cemented). Rehabilitation after revision and cancer arthroplasties were not taken into consideration. Exercises were divided into those performed in supine and standing positions as well as resistance training (using an elastic TheraBand® tape). At a later stage of rehabilitation, marching and walking as well as cycloergometer training were included. Patient's position during the day and in the sleep for two months following THR was taken into account, including some types of exercises that are contraindicated and pose a threat of endoprosthesis luxation.

  4. Vestibular rehabilitation therapy: review of indications, mechanisms, and key exercises.

    PubMed

    Han, Byung In; Song, Hyun Seok; Kim, Ji Soo

    2011-12-01

    Vestibular rehabilitation therapy (VRT) is an exercise-based treatment program designed to promote vestibular adaptation and substitution. The goals of VRT are 1) to enhance gaze stability, 2) to enhance postural stability, 3) to improve vertigo, and 4) to improve activities of daily living. VRT facilitates vestibular recovery mechanisms: vestibular adaptation, substitution by the other eye-movement systems, substitution by vision, somatosensory cues, other postural strategies, and habituation. The key exercises for VRT are head-eye movements with various body postures and activities, and maintaining balance with a reduced support base with various orientations of the head and trunk, while performing various upper-extremity tasks, repeating the movements provoking vertigo, and exposing patients gradually to various sensory and motor environments. VRT is indicated for any stable but poorly compensated vestibular lesion, regardless of the patient's age, the cause, and symptom duration and intensity. Vestibular suppressants, visual and somatosensory deprivation, immobilization, old age, concurrent central lesions, and long recovery from symptoms, but there is no difference in the final outcome. As long as exercises are performed several times every day, even brief periods of exercise are sufficient to facilitate vestibular recovery. Here the authors review the mechanisms and the key exercises for each of the VRT goals.

  5. Vestibular Rehabilitation Therapy: Review of Indications, Mechanisms, and Key Exercises

    PubMed Central

    Song, Hyun Seok; Kim, Ji Soo

    2011-01-01

    Vestibular rehabilitation therapy (VRT) is an exercise-based treatment program designed to promote vestibular adaptation and substitution. The goals of VRT are 1) to enhance gaze stability, 2) to enhance postural stability, 3) to improve vertigo, and 4) to improve activities of daily living. VRT facilitates vestibular recovery mechanisms: vestibular adaptation, substitution by the other eye-movement systems, substitution by vision, somatosensory cues, other postural strategies, and habituation. The key exercises for VRT are head-eye movements with various body postures and activities, and maintaining balance with a reduced support base with various orientations of the head and trunk, while performing various upper-extremity tasks, repeating the movements provoking vertigo, and exposing patients gradually to various sensory and motor environments. VRT is indicated for any stable but poorly compensated vestibular lesion, regardless of the patient's age, the cause, and symptom duration and intensity. Vestibular suppressants, visual and somatosensory deprivation, immobilization, old age, concurrent central lesions, and long recovery from symptoms, but there is no difference in the final outcome. As long as exercises are performed several times every day, even brief periods of exercise are sufficient to facilitate vestibular recovery. Here the authors review the mechanisms and the key exercises for each of the VRT goals. PMID:22259614

  6. Effectiveness of mobilization therapy and exercises in mechanical neck pain.

    PubMed

    Ganesh, G Shankar; Mohanty, Patitapaban; Pattnaik, Monalisa; Mishra, Chittaranjan

    2015-02-01

    While studies have looked into the effects of Maitland mobilization on symptom relief, to date, no work has specifically looked at the effects of Mulligan mobilization. The objective of this work was to compare the effectiveness of Maitland and Mulligan's mobilization and exercises on pain response, range of motion (ROM) and functional ability in patients with mechanical neck pain. A total sample of 60 subjects (21-45 years of age) with complaints of insidious onset of mechanical pain that has lasted for less than 12 weeks and reduced ROM were randomly assigned to: group I - Maitland mobilization and exercises; group - II Mulligan mobilization and exercises; and group-III exercises only, and assessed for dependent variables by a blinded examiner. Post measurement readings revealed statistical significance with time (p < 0.00) and no significance between groups (p > 0.05) indicating no group is superior to another after treatment and at follow-up. The effect sizes between the treatment groups were small. Our results showed that manual therapy interventions were no better than supervised exercises in reducing pain, improving ROM and neck disability.

  7. Exercise as medicine - evidence for prescribing exercise as therapy in 26 different chronic diseases.

    PubMed

    Pedersen, B K; Saltin, B

    2015-12-01

    This review provides the reader with the up-to-date evidence-based basis for prescribing exercise as medicine in the treatment of 26 different diseases: psychiatric diseases (depression, anxiety, stress, schizophrenia); neurological diseases (dementia, Parkinson's disease, multiple sclerosis); metabolic diseases (obesity, hyperlipidemia, metabolic syndrome, polycystic ovarian syndrome, type 2 diabetes, type 1 diabetes); cardiovascular diseases (hypertension, coronary heart disease, heart failure, cerebral apoplexy, and claudication intermittent); pulmonary diseases (chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, asthma, cystic fibrosis); musculo-skeletal disorders (osteoarthritis, osteoporosis, back pain, rheumatoid arthritis); and cancer. The effect of exercise therapy on disease pathogenesis and symptoms are given and the possible mechanisms of action are discussed. We have interpreted the scientific literature and for each disease, we provide the reader with our best advice regarding the optimal type and dose for prescription of exercise.

  8. [Exercise therapy in the treatment of chronic back pain. An integral part of interdisciplinary therapy].

    PubMed

    Maier, A; Weh, L; Klein, A; Hamel, M; Lucan, S; Marnitz, U

    2009-10-01

    Chronic low back pain requires interdisciplinary and biopsychosocial treatment. Apart from the medical, psychological, and physiotherapeutic aspects of therapy, exercise therapy is an important component. Together with"work hardening," it represents the elements for reconditioning. The isolated effect is scientifically difficult to specify with the available data, but in most analytical studies, exercise therapy is an important component in an interdisciplinary setting. A nonspecific, diversified training program is superior to exercise solely of the trunk muscles. The primary tasks are to recover load capacity and diminish pain-avoidance behaviors, with consideration of the principles of"functional restoration." Thorough information and cooperation with the patient, continuous motivation, ratio control, a systematic increase in load, and permanent feedback are necessary. Close communication within the team makes immediate accompanying interventions of other specialized groups possible.

  9. Effects of thermal therapy combining sauna therapy and underwater exercise in patients with fibromyalgia.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Shuji; Shimodozono, Megumi; Etoh, Seiji; Miyata, Ryuji; Kawahira, Kazumi

    2011-08-01

    Fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS) is a chronic disorder that is characterized by widespread pain with localized tenderness. We aimed to investigate whether thermal therapy combining sauna therapy and underwater exercise improved pain, symptoms, and quality of life (QOL) in FMS patients. Forty-four female FMS patients who fulfilled the American College of Rheumatology (ACR) criteria received 12-week thermal therapy program comprising sauna therapy once daily for 3 days/week and underwater exercise once daily for 2 days/week. Pain, symptoms, and QOL were assessed using a pain visual analog scale (VAS), a fibromyalgia impact questionnaire (FIQ), and a short form 36-item questionnaire (SF-36), respectively. All of the patients reported significant reductions in pain and symptoms of 31-77% after the 12-week thermal therapy program, which remained relatively stable (28-68%) during the 6-month follow-up period (that is, the thermal therapy program improved both the short-term and the long-term VAS and FIQ scores). Improvements were also observed in the SF-36 score. Thermal therapy combining sauna therapy and underwater exercise improved the QOL as well as the pain and symptoms of FMS patients.

  10. Improvements in heart rate variability with exercise therapy

    PubMed Central

    Routledge, Faye S; Campbell, Tavis S; McFetridge-Durdle, Judith A; Bacon, Simon L

    2010-01-01

    Heart rate variability (HRV) is a noninvasive, practical and reproducible measure of autonomic nervous system function. A heart rate that is variable and responsive to demands is believed to bestow a survival advantage, whereas reduced HRV may be associated with poorer cardiovascular health and outcomes. In recent years, many researchers have investigated the prognostic implications of HRV in a variety of clinical populations. Evidence suggests that reduced HRV has prognostic significance for individuals with myocardial infarction, chronic heart failure, unstable angina and diabetes mellitus. Interventions to increase HRV, such as exercise therapy, have also been examined. The findings of the present review suggest that exercise therapy may improve HRV in myocardial infarction, chronic heart failure and revascularization patients by increasing vagal tone and decreasing sympathetic activity. One hypothesis is that a shift toward greater vagal modulation may positively affect the prognosis of these individuals. While the underlying mechanisms by which exercise training improves vagal modulation are speculative at present, angiotensin II and nitric oxide may be potential mediators. PMID:20548976

  11. Acceptance and commitment therapy improves exercise tolerance in sedentary women.

    PubMed

    Ivanova, Elena; Jensen, Dennis; Cassoff, Jamie; Gu, Fei; Knäuper, Bärbel

    2015-06-01

    To test the efficacy of an acute intervention derived from acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT) for increasing high-intensity constant work rate (CWR) cycle exercise tolerance in a group of low-active women age 18-45 yr. The secondary goals were to examine whether ACT would reduce perceived effort and improve in-task affect during exercise and increase postexercise enjoyment. In a randomized controlled trial, 39 women were randomized to either the experimental (using ACT-based cognitive techniques and listening to music during the CWR exercise tests) or a control group (listening to music during the CWR exercise tests). Before (CWR-1) and after the intervention (CWR-2), participants completed a CWR cycle exercise test at 80% of maximal incremental work rate (Wmax) until volitional exhaustion. On average, ACT (n = 18) and control (n = 21) groups were matched for age, body mass index, weekly leisure activity scores, and Wmax (all P > 0.05). Exercise tolerance time (ETT) increased by 15% from CWR-1 to CWR-2 for the ACT group (392.05 ± 146.4 vs 459.39 ± 209.3 s; mean ± SD) and decreased by 8% (384.71 ± 120.1 vs 353.86 ± 127.9 s) for the control group (P = 0.008). RPE were lower (e.g., by 1.5 Borg 6-20 scale units at 55% of ETT, P ≤ 0.01) during CWR-2 in the ACT versus that in the control group. By contrast, ACT had no effect on in-task affect. Exercise enjoyment was higher after CWR-2 in the ACT group versus that in the control group (P < 0.001). An acute ACT intervention increased high-intensity ETT and postexercise enjoyment and reduced perceived effort in low-active women. Further investigations of ACT as an effective intervention for enhancing the established health benefits of high-intensity exercise need to be provided.

  12. Effects of antioxidant therapy in women exposed to eccentric exercise.

    PubMed

    Bloomer, Richard J; Goldfarb, Alan H; McKenzie, Michael J; You, Tonjian; Nguyen, Linh

    2004-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of antioxidant therapy on indirect markers of muscle damage following eccentric exercise (EE). Eighteen women were randomized to an antioxidant supplement or a placebo before a bout of EE. Plasma creatine kinase (CK) activity, muscle soreness (MS), maximal isometric force (MIF), and range of motion (ROM) were assessed before and through 14 d postexercise. Eccentric exercise resulted in an increase in CK activity and MS, and a drop in MIF and ROM during the days following EE, which returned to baseline values 14 d after EE in both groups. Antioxidants attenuated the CK activity and MS response to the EE, while little difference was noted between groups in MIF or ROM. These findings suggest that antioxidant supplementation was helpful in reducing the elevations in plasma CK activity and MS, with little impact on MIF and ROM loss.

  13. Oral magnesium therapy, exercise heart rate, exercise tolerance, and myocardial function in coronary artery disease patients

    PubMed Central

    Pokan, R; Hofmann, P; von Duvillard, S P; Smekal, G; Wonisch, M; Lettner, K; Schmid, P; Shechter, M; Silver, B; Bachl, N

    2006-01-01

    Background Previous studies have demonstrated that in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD) upward deflection of the heart rate (HR) performance curve can be observed and that this upward deflection and the degree of the deflection are correlated with a diminished stress dependent left ventricular function. Magnesium supplementation improves endothelial function, exercise tolerance, and exercise induced chest pain in patients with CAD. Purpose We studied the effects of oral magnesium therapy on exercise dependent HR as related to exercise tolerance and resting myocardial function in patients with CAD. Methods In a double blind controlled trial, 53 male patients with stable CAD were randomised to either oral magnesium 15 mmol twice daily (n = 28, age 61±9 years, height 171±7 cm, body weight 79±10 kg, previous myocardial infarction, n = 7) or placebo (n = 25, age 58±10 years, height 172±6 cm, body weight 79±10 kg, previous myocardial infarction, n = 6) for 6 months. Maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max), the degree and direction of the deflection of the HR performance curve described as factor k<0 (upward deflection), and the left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) were the outcomes measured. Results Magnesium therapy for 6 months significantly increased intracellular magnesium levels (32.7±2.5 v 35.6±2.1 mEq/l, p<0.001) compared to placebo (33.1±3.1.9 v 33.8±2.0 mEq/l, NS), VO2max (28.3±6.2 v 30.6±7.1 ml/kg/min, p<0.001; 29.3±5.4 v 29.6±5.2 ml/kg/min, NS), factor k (−0.298±0.242 v −0.208±0.260, p<0.05; −0.269±0.336 v −0.272±0.335, NS), and LVEF (58±11 v 67±10%, p<0.001; 55±11 v 54±12%, NS). Conclusion The present study supports the intake of oral magnesium and its favourable effects on exercise tolerance and left ventricular function during rest and exercise in stable CAD patients. PMID:16825271

  14. Strength training alone, exercise therapy alone, and exercise therapy with passive manual mobilisation each reduce pain and disability in people with knee osteoarthritis: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Jansen, Mariette J; Viechtbauer, Wolfgang; Lenssen, Antoine F; Hendriks, Erik J M; de Bie, Rob A

    2011-01-01

    What are the effects of strength training alone, exercise therapy alone, and exercise with additional passive manual mobilisation on pain and function in people with knee osteoarthritis compared to control? What are the effects of these interventions relative to each other? A meta-analysis of randomised controlled trials. Adults with osteoarthritis of the knee. INTERVENTION TYPES: Strength training alone, exercise therapy alone (combination of strength training with active range of motion exercises and aerobic activity), or exercise with additional passive manual mobilisation, versus any non-exercise control. Comparisons between the three interventions were also sought. The primary outcome measures were pain and physical function. 12 trials compared one of the interventions against control. The effect size on pain was 0.38 (95% CI 0.23 to 0.54) for strength training, 0.34 (95% CI 0.19 to 0.49) for exercise, and 0.69 (95% CI 0.42 to 0.96) for exercise plus manual mobilisation. Each intervention also improved physical function significantly. No randomised comparisons of the three interventions were identified. However, meta-regression indicated that exercise plus manual mobilisations improved pain significantly more than exercise alone (p = 0.03). The remaining comparisons between the three interventions for pain and physical function were not significant. Exercise therapy plus manual mobilisation showed a moderate effect size on pain compared to the small effect sizes for strength training or exercise therapy alone. To achieve better pain relief in patients with knee osteoarthritis physiotherapists or manual therapists might consider adding manual mobilisation to optimise supervised active exercise programs. Copyright © 2011 Australian Physiotherapy Association. Published by .. All rights reserved.

  15. [Therapeutic effect of scalp-acupuncture combined with exercise therapy on spastic cerebral palsy of the child].

    PubMed

    Ji, Yu-Hong; Sun, Bao-Dong; Zhang, Jing; Zhang, Ru; Ji, Yuan-Hong

    2008-10-01

    To observe clinical therapeutic effect of scalp-acupuncture combined with exercise therapy on spastic cerebral palsy. Eighty children of spastic cerebral palsy were randomly divided into a scalp-acupuncture plus exercise therapy group and a exercise therapy group, 40 cases in each group. The scalp-acupuncture plus exercise therapy group were treated with scalp-acupuncture and exercise therapy, with Yundongqu (the motor area), Pinghengqu (the balance area), Ganjuequ (the sensory area), etc. selected for scalp-acupuncture, and puncture at main points Baihui (GV 20) and Sishencong (EX-HN 1) and exercise therapy. The exercise therapy group were treated by exercise therapy. Changes of GMFM scores and WeeFIM scores before and after treatment were compared. There were significant differences in GMFM scores and WeeFIM scores before and treatment in the scalp-acupuncture plus exercise therapy group (P < 0.001) and in the exercise therapy group (P < 0.05), the former being better than the later (P < 0.05); the total effective rate was 92.5% in the scalp-acupuncture plus exercise therapy group and 72.5% in the exercise therapy group with a significant difference between the two groups (P < 0.05), the former being significantly higher than the later. The scalp-acupuncture combined with exercise therapy can improve motor function of limits of children with spastic cerebral palsy, with therapeutic effect better than that of simple exercise therapy.

  16. Painful Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy: Presentations, Mechanisms, and Exercise Therapy.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Min; Sharma, Neena; Pasnoor, Mamatha; Kluding, Patricia M

    2013-06-30

    Diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN) is a frequent complication of diabetes and a major cause of morbidity and increased mortality. It is typically characterized by significant deficits in tactile sensitivity, vibration sense, lower-limb proprioception, and kinesthesia. Painful diabetic neuropathy (P-DPN) is a common phenotype of DPN that affects up to one-third of the general diabetic population. P-DPN has been shown to be associated with significant reductions in overall quality of life, increased levels of anxiety and depression, sleep impairment, and greater gait variability. The purpose of this review is to examine proposed mechanisms of P-DPN, summarize current treatment regimen, and assess exercise as a potential therapy for P-PDN. Although exercise has been shown to be an effective therapeutic modality for diabetes, its specific effects on DPN and especially the painful phenotype have not been sufficiently investigated in current literature. Several rodent models and clinical trials have presented promising results in this area, and warrant further investigations examining the effect of exercise on P-DPN.

  17. Painful Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy: Presentations, Mechanisms, and Exercise Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Min; Sharma, Neena; Pasnoor, Mamatha; Kluding, Patricia M

    2013-01-01

    Diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN) is a frequent complication of diabetes and a major cause of morbidity and increased mortality. It is typically characterized by significant deficits in tactile sensitivity, vibration sense, lower-limb proprioception, and kinesthesia. Painful diabetic neuropathy (P-DPN) is a common phenotype of DPN that affects up to one-third of the general diabetic population. P-DPN has been shown to be associated with significant reductions in overall quality of life, increased levels of anxiety and depression, sleep impairment, and greater gait variability. The purpose of this review is to examine proposed mechanisms of P-DPN, summarize current treatment regimen, and assess exercise as a potential therapy for P-PDN. Although exercise has been shown to be an effective therapeutic modality for diabetes, its specific effects on DPN and especially the painful phenotype have not been sufficiently investigated in current literature. Several rodent models and clinical trials have presented promising results in this area, and warrant further investigations examining the effect of exercise on P-DPN. PMID:25360348

  18. Metrics for Performance Evaluation of Patient Exercises during Physical Therapy.

    PubMed

    Vakanski, Aleksandar; Ferguson, Jake M; Lee, Stephen

    2017-06-01

    The article proposes a set of metrics for evaluation of patient performance in physical therapy exercises. Taxonomy is employed that classifies the metrics into quantitative and qualitative categories, based on the level of abstraction of the captured motion sequences. Further, the quantitative metrics are classified into model-less and model-based metrics, in reference to whether the evaluation employs the raw measurements of patient performed motions, or whether the evaluation is based on a mathematical model of the motions. The reviewed metrics include root-mean square distance, Kullback Leibler divergence, log-likelihood, heuristic consistency, Fugl-Meyer Assessment, and similar. The metrics are evaluated for a set of five human motions captured with a Kinect sensor. The metrics can potentially be integrated into a system that employs machine learning for modelling and assessment of the consistency of patient performance in home-based therapy setting. Automated performance evaluation can overcome the inherent subjectivity in human performed therapy assessment, and it can increase the adherence to prescribed therapy plans, and reduce healthcare costs.

  19. Enhanced Exercise Therapy in Parkinson’s disease: A comparative effectiveness trial

    PubMed Central

    Ridgel, Angela L.; Walter, Benjamin L.; Tatsuoka, Curtis; Walter, Ellen M.; Colón-Zimmermann, Kari; Welter, Elisabeth; Sajatovic, Martha

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Exercise can improve motor function in people with Parkinson’s disease but depression reduces the motivation to participate in regular exercise. The aim of this study was to develop a novel Enhanced Exercise Therapy program that uses manual-driven guided exercise and peer-facilitated psychoeducation for individuals with Parkinson’s disease and depression. Design 24 week randomized controlled design. Methods Thirty individuals were randomized to Enhanced Exercise Therapy or self-guided therapy, and evaluated at baseline, 12-weeks and at 24-weeks. Enhanced Exercise Therapy included group exercise and group psychoeducation for 12 weeks. Between 13–24 weeks, individuals had access to the fitness facility but group sessions were not held. Self-guided therapy included written guidelines for a self-paced exercise program and psychoeducation. Primary outcome measures included the number of exercise sessions and International Physical Activity Questionnaire score. Secondary measures included resting heart rate, supine blood pressure, estimated VO2max and incidence of orthostatic hypotension. Results Twenty four individuals completed the study (80% retention) and both groups attended similar number of exercise sessions. There were no significant changes in cardiovascular fitness measures but there was a significant increase in the amount of physical activity in the Enhanced Exercise Therapy group and a decrease in the self-guided therapy group during the post-intervention period. Conclusions Enhanced exercise therapy appears to promote engagement in an exercise program and more physical activity, even after group sessions were concluded in individuals with Parkinson’s disease and depression. PMID:25709055

  20. Effects of Color Light and Relaxation Exercise Therapy on Adults with Learning Disabilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rustigan, Carol J.

    In a study at California State University, Sacramento, the effects of color light and relaxation exercise therapy were investigated with 16 students (ages 23 to 48) with learning disabilities. Therapy consisted of either 20 sessions viewing color light through a Lumatron instrument or 20 sessions listening to relaxation exercise tapes. Diagnostic…

  1. Exercise therapy for chronic musculoskeletal pain: Innovation by altering pain memories.

    PubMed

    Nijs, Jo; Lluch Girbés, Enrique; Lundberg, Mari; Malfliet, Anneleen; Sterling, Michele

    2015-02-01

    Even though nociceptive pathology has often long subsided, the brain of patients with chronic musculoskeletal pain has typically acquired a protective (movement-related) pain memory. Exercise therapy for patients with chronic musculoskeletal pain is often hampered by such pain memories. Here the authors explain how musculoskeletal therapists can alter pain memories in patients with chronic musculoskeletal pain, by integrating pain neuroscience education with exercise interventions. The latter includes applying graded exposure in vivo principles during exercise therapy, for targeting the brain circuitries orchestrated by the amygdala (the memory of fear centre in the brain). Before initiating exercise therapy, a preparatory phase of intensive pain neuroscience education is required. Next, exercise therapy can address movement-related pain memories by applying the 'exposure without danger' principle. By addressing patients' perceptions about exercises, therapists should try to decrease the anticipated danger (threat level) of the exercises by challenging the nature of, and reasoning behind their fears, assuring the safety of the exercises, and increasing confidence in a successful accomplishment of the exercise. This way, exercise therapy accounts for the current understanding of pain neuroscience, including the mechanisms of central sensitization. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Exercise therapy in hip osteoarthritis--a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Krauß, Inga; Steinhilber, Benjamin; Haupt, Georg; Miller, Regina; Martus, Peter; Janßen, Pia

    2014-09-01

    Roughly one in ten persons in the industrialized world suffers from hip osteoarthritis, a disease for which there is no cure. The goal of conservative therapy is to relieve symptoms, preferably with methods that let patients assume responsibility for their own treatment, e.g., physical training. In a randomized controlled trial, we studied the effectiveness of twelve weeks of exercise therapy in patients with hip osteoarthritis (THüKo), compared to no treatment (control group) and placebo ultrasound treatment of the hip (placebo ultrasound group). The primary endpoint was a comparison of the pain scores of the intervention versus control groups on the generic SF-36 health questionnaire. Secondary endpoints included comparisons across all three study groups of scores on the 7 other scales of the SF-36 and on the pain, physical function, and stiffness scales of the osteoarthritis-specific WOMAC Index. The statistical analysis was performed with ANCOVA, with baseline values as a covariate. Between-group effects were subsequently tested pairwise (two-tailed t-tests, alpha = 0.05). As for the primary endpoint, pain reduction was significantly greater in the intervention than in the control group (mean difference 5.7 points, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.4-11.1 points, p = 0.034). The comparisons across all three study groups (i.e., secondary endpoints, with 71 subjects in the intervention group, 68 in the control group, and 70 in the placebo group) revealed no significant between-group effects with respect to the SF-36. On the WOMAC Index, however, statistically significant differences were found for pain reduction between the intervention and control group (mean difference 7.4 points, 95% CI 3.0-11.8, p = 0.001) and between the intervention and placebo group (mean difference 5.1 points, 95% CI 0.7-9.4, p = 0.024). Comparable mean differences were also found for functional improvement. Twelve weeks of exercise therapy in hip osteoarthritis patients of normal vitality

  3. Physical therapy treatment effectiveness for osteoarthritis of the knee: a randomized comparison of supervised clinical exercise and manual therapy procedures versus a home exercise program.

    PubMed

    Deyle, Gail D; Allison, Stephen C; Matekel, Robert L; Ryder, Michael G; Stang, John M; Gohdes, David D; Hutton, Jeremy P; Henderson, Nancy E; Garber, Matthew B

    2005-12-01

    Manual therapy and exercise have not previously been compared with a home exercise program for patients with osteoarthritis (OA) of the knee. The purpose of this study was to compare outcomes between a home-based physical therapy program and a clinically based physical therapy program. One hundred thirty-four subjects with OA of the knee were randomly assigned to a clinic treatment group (n=66; 61% female, 39% male; mean age [+/-SD]=64+/-10 years) or a home exercise group (n=68, 71% female, 29% male; mean age [+/-SD]=62+/-9 years). Subjects in the clinic treatment group received supervised exercise, individualized manual therapy, and a home exercise program over a 4-week period. Subjects in the home exercise group received the same home exercise program initially, reinforced at a clinic visit 2 weeks later. Measured outcomes were the distance walked in 6 minutes and the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC). Both groups showed clinically and statistically significant improvements in 6-minute walk distances and WOMAC scores at 4 weeks; improvements were still evident in both groups at 8 weeks. By 4 weeks, WOMAC scores had improved by 52% in the clinic treatment group and by 26% in the home exercise group. Average 6-minute walk distances had improved about 10% in both groups. At 1 year, both groups were substantially and about equally improved over baseline measurements. Subjects in the clinic treatment group were less likely to be taking medications for their arthritis and were more satisfied with the overall outcome of their rehabilitative treatment compared with subjects in the home exercise group. Although both groups improved by 1 month, subjects in the clinic treatment group achieved about twice as much improvement in WOMAC scores than subjects who performed similar unsupervised exercises at home. Equivalent maintenance of improvements at 1 year was presumably due to both groups continuing the identical home exercise program

  4. The Incremental Effects of Manual Therapy or Booster Sessions in Addition to Exercise Therapy for Knee Osteoarthritis: A Randomized Clinical Trial.

    PubMed

    Abbott, J Haxby; Chapple, Catherine M; Fitzgerald, G Kelley; Fritz, Julie M; Childs, John D; Harcombe, Helen; Stout, Kirsten

    2015-12-01

    A factorial randomized controlled trial. To investigate the addition of manual therapy to exercise therapy for the reduction of pain and increase of physical function in people with knee osteoarthritis (OA), and whether "booster sessions" compared to consecutive sessions may improve outcomes. The benefits of providing manual therapy in addition to exercise therapy, or of distributing treatment sessions over time using periodic booster sessions, in people with knee OA are not well established. All participants had knee OA and were provided 12 sessions of multimodal exercise therapy supervised by a physical therapist. Participants were randomly allocated to 1 of 4 groups: exercise therapy in consecutive sessions, exercise therapy distributed over a year using booster sessions, exercise therapy plus manual therapy without booster sessions, and exercise therapy plus manual therapy with booster sessions. The primary outcome measure was the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC score; 0-240 scale) at 1-year follow-up. Secondary outcome measures were the numeric pain-rating scale and physical performance tests. Of 75 participants recruited, 66 (88%) were retained at 1-year follow-up. Factorial analysis of covariance of the main effects showed significant benefit from booster sessions (P = .009) and manual therapy (P = .023) over exercise therapy alone. Group analysis showed that exercise therapy with booster sessions (WOMAC score, -46.0 points; 95% confidence interval [CI]: -80.0, -12.0) and exercise therapy plus manual therapy (WOMAC score, -37.5 points; 95% CI: -69.7, -5.5) had superior effects compared with exercise therapy alone. The combined strategy of exercise therapy plus manual therapy with booster sessions was not superior to exercise therapy alone. Distributing 12 sessions of exercise therapy over a year in the form of booster sessions was more effective than providing 12 consecutive exercise therapy sessions. Providing manual

  5. The Outcomes of Manipulation or Mobilization Therapy Compared with Physical Therapy or Exercise for Neck Pain: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Schroeder, Josh; Kaplan, Leon; Fischer, Dena J.; Skelly, Andrea C.

    2013-01-01

    Study Design Systematic review. Study Rationale Neck pain is a prevalent condition. Spinal manipulation and mobilization procedures are becoming an accepted treatment for neck pain. However, data on the effectiveness of these treatments have not been summarized. Objective To compare manipulation or mobilization of the cervical spine to physical therapy or exercise for symptom improvement in patients with neck pain. Methods A systematic review of the literature was performed using PubMed, the National Guideline Clearinghouse Database, and bibliographies of key articles, which compared spinal manipulation or mobilization therapy with physical therapy or exercise in patients with neck pain. Articles were included based on predetermined criteria and were appraised using a predefined quality rating scheme. Results From 197 citations, 7 articles met all inclusion and exclusion criteria. There were no differences in pain improvement when comparing spinal manipulation to exercise, and there were inconsistent reports of pain improvement in subjects who underwent mobilization therapy versus physical therapy. No disability improvement was reported between treatment groups in studies of acute or chronic neck pain patients. No functional improvement was found with manipulation therapy compared with exercise treatment or mobilization therapy compared with physical therapy groups in patients with acute pain. In chronic neck pain subjects who underwent spinal manipulation therapy compared to exercise treatment, results for short-term functional improvement were inconsistent. Conclusion The data available suggest that there are minimal short- and long-term treatment differences in pain, disability, patient-rated treatment improvement, treatment satisfaction, health status, or functional improvement when comparing manipulation or mobilization therapy to physical therapy or exercise in patients with neck pain. This systematic review is limited by the variability of

  6. The outcomes of manipulation or mobilization therapy compared with physical therapy or exercise for neck pain: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Schroeder, Josh; Kaplan, Leon; Fischer, Dena J; Skelly, Andrea C

    2013-04-01

    Study Design Systematic review. Study Rationale Neck pain is a prevalent condition. Spinal manipulation and mobilization procedures are becoming an accepted treatment for neck pain. However, data on the effectiveness of these treatments have not been summarized. Objective To compare manipulation or mobilization of the cervical spine to physical therapy or exercise for symptom improvement in patients with neck pain. Methods A systematic review of the literature was performed using PubMed, the National Guideline Clearinghouse Database, and bibliographies of key articles, which compared spinal manipulation or mobilization therapy with physical therapy or exercise in patients with neck pain. Articles were included based on predetermined criteria and were appraised using a predefined quality rating scheme. Results From 197 citations, 7 articles met all inclusion and exclusion criteria. There were no differences in pain improvement when comparing spinal manipulation to exercise, and there were inconsistent reports of pain improvement in subjects who underwent mobilization therapy versus physical therapy. No disability improvement was reported between treatment groups in studies of acute or chronic neck pain patients. No functional improvement was found with manipulation therapy compared with exercise treatment or mobilization therapy compared with physical therapy groups in patients with acute pain. In chronic neck pain subjects who underwent spinal manipulation therapy compared to exercise treatment, results for short-term functional improvement were inconsistent. Conclusion The data available suggest that there are minimal short- and long-term treatment differences in pain, disability, patient-rated treatment improvement, treatment satisfaction, health status, or functional improvement when comparing manipulation or mobilization therapy to physical therapy or exercise in patients with neck pain. This systematic review is limited by the variability of

  7. A systematic review into the effectiveness of hand exercise therapy in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Bergstra, S A; Murgia, A; Te Velde, A F; Caljouw, S R

    2014-11-01

    Hand exercises are often part of the treatment of hand rheumatoid arthritis; however, it is still unclear whether and what type of exercises is effective in the treatment of this condition. Therefore, a systematic review into the effectiveness of hand exercises in the treatment of hand rheumatoid arthritis has been performed. Studies were identified in the literature databases by predefined search criteria. The eight included studies are peer-reviewed studies published between 2000 and 2014. Hand exercises differed between studies, but always included resistance and/or active range of motion exercises. Grip strength in various grip types (power grip, key pinch, precision pinch and tripod pinch) was found to improve by hand exercise therapy without having adverse effects on pain or disease activity. Adaptations in the range of motion in response to hand exercise therapy were less pronounced. There appears to be some transfer from the improvements on the body functioning level to the level of daily functioning, with the largest improvements found on grip ability. With regard to the intervention content, there was some evidence in favour of a longer therapy duration and a higher therapy intensity. No conclusions could be drawn on the effectiveness of the different types of exercises. Collectively, the studies indicate that hand exercises may have positive effects on strength and some aspects of daily functioning without aggravating disease activity or pain, although caution should be taken for subjects in the exacerbation period.

  8. Agreements and disagreements in exercise therapy prescriptions after hip replacement among rehabilitation professionals: a multicenter survey.

    PubMed

    Eulenburg, Christine; Rahlf, Anna-Lina; Kutasow, Andrej; Zech, Astrid

    2015-08-05

    Exercise therapy following total hip replacement (THR) is considered to be important during the initial postoperative care, but till date only a few evidence-based recommendations exist. The aim of this survey was to identify prescription standards among different rehabilitation professionals, for the exercise therapy management after THR in Germany. The study was a cross-sectional survey. Standardized questionnaires were sent to 38 eligible rehabilitation facilities in Germany. Participating surgeons, orthopaedic physicians, physiotherapists and exercise therapists rated the optimal early weight-bearing, resistance training, key components and dose of exercise therapy, and the hip loading during exercising. The returned questionnaires were then analyzed for level of agreement (≥80%) among respondents. 313 rehabilitation professionals from 28 clinics returned completed questionnaires and were considered eligible for analysis. Out of total respondents, 53.9% (cemented THR) and 18.2% (uncemented THR) recommended full weight-bearing within five days after surgery. Commencement of resistance training later than three weeks after surgery is recommended by 20.6% (36%) for cemented (uncemented) prosthesis. Feedback varied significantly amongst the professions. Regarding the overall objectives of rehabilitation after hip replacement, respondents agree in six out of eight requested items. Agreement concerning priorities of specific exercises was achieved in three out of twelve items. The recommended exercise therapy dose varied significantly with working experience (p = 0.02). Rehabilitation professionals mainly disagreed with the exercise therapy prescriptions following the total hip replacement during the initial postoperative care in Germany.

  9. Evidence on the effects of exercise therapy in the treatment of chronic disease.

    PubMed

    Kujala, U M

    2009-08-01

    Evidence on the effects of exercise in the treatment of patients with chronic diseases should be based on well designed randomised controlled trials. The most consistent finding of the meta-analyses summarised in the present work is that aerobic/functional capacity and muscle strength can be improved by exercise training among patients with different diseases without having detrimental effects on disease progression. This is important, as with population aging exercise therapy may be an important means of reducing disability and increasing the number of older people living independently. Additionally, there is accumulating evidence that in patients with chronic disease exercise therapy is effective in improving the prognostic risk factor profile and, in certain diseases, in delaying mortality. In some diseases, such as osteoarthritis, pain symptoms may also be reduced. Severe complications during the exercise therapy programs were rare.

  10. Wii Fit™ exercise therapy for the rehabilitation of ankle sprains: Its effect compared with physical therapy or no functional exercises at all.

    PubMed

    Punt, I M; Ziltener, J-L; Monnin, D; Allet, L

    2016-07-01

    Lateral ankle sprains represent the most common sports-related injuries. The Nintendo Wii Fit™ could be useful in the treatment of ankle sprains. The aim of this study was to compare the effectiveness of exercise training using the Wii Fit™ in ankle sprain patients: (a) with physical therapy; and (b) a control group not receiving any treatment. Ninety lateral ankle sprain patients were randomized to a Wii Fit™, physical therapy, or control group. We assessed the following outcome measures before, and 6 weeks after starting the allocated treatment: Foot and Ankle Ability Measure, pain during rest and walking, delay before return to sport, patient satisfaction, and effectiveness of the allocated treatment. Six weeks after the baseline measures, foot and ankle ability scores had improved in all groups, and pain had decreased during walking (P < 0.050). No between-group differences were detected between Wii Fit™ treatment, and both other groups (P > 0.050). In conclusion, the Wii Fit™ could be used as an exercise therapy to treat ankle sprain patients. However, Wii Fit™ was not more effective than only physical therapy, or no exercise therapy at all. Patients who did not receive treatment showed similar results as people who got any kind of exercise therapy. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Exercise therapy for the management of osteoarthritis of the hip joint: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    McNair, Peter J; Simmonds, Marion A; Boocock, Mark G; Larmer, Peter J

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Recent guidelines pertaining to exercise for individuals with osteoarthritis have been released. These guidelines have been based primarily on studies of knee-joint osteoarthritis. The current study was focused on the hip joint, which has different biomechanical features and risk factors for osteoarthritis and has received much less attention in the literature. The purpose was to conduct a systematic review of the literature to evaluate the exercise programs used in intervention studies focused solely on hip-joint osteoarthritis, to decide whether their exercise regimens met the new guidelines, and to determine the level of support for exercise-therapy interventions in the management of hip-joint osteoarthritis. Methods A systematic literature search of 14 electronic databases was undertaken to identify interventions that used exercise therapy as a treatment modality for hip osteoarthritis. The quality of each article was critically appraised and graded according to standardized methodologic approaches. A 'pattern-of-evidence' approach was used to determine the overall level of evidence in support of exercise-therapy interventions for treating hip osteoarthritis. Results More than 4,000 articles were identified, of which 338 were considered suitable for abstract review. Of these, only 6 intervention studies met the inclusion criteria. Few well-designed studies specifically investigated the use of exercise-therapy management on hip-joint osteoarthritis. Insufficient evidence was found to suggest that exercise therapy can be an effective short-term management approach for reducing pain levels, improving joint function and the quality of life. Conclusions Limited information was available on which conclusions regarding the efficacy of exercise could be clearly based. No studies met the level of exercise recommended for individuals with osteoarthritis. High-quality trials are needed, and further consideration should be given to establishing the optimal

  12. Case Report: Exercise in a Patient with Acute Decompensated Heart Failure Receiving Positive Inotropic Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Camarda, Robert; Foley, Laura Little; Givertz, Michael M; Cahalin, Lawrence P

    2011-01-01

    Background and Purpose: The projected increase in persons with advanced heart failure and associated costs warrant the examination of exercise in patients receiving inotropic therapy. Literature supports the use of exercise and inotropic therapy in the treatment of patients with advanced heart failure. The purposes of this paper are to illustrate the use of exercise prescription and outcomes assessment with a 6-minute walk test in a patient with acute decompensated heart failure receiving tailored therapy with dobutamine and to discuss potential relationships resulting in observed improvements. Case Description: A 67-year old man was admitted to an acute care hospital with acute decompensated heart failure for tailored medical therapy including dobutamine. The patient received 14 days of tailored medical therapy, of which 12 days included exercise training by a physical therapist. Outcomes: Functional outcomes showed a clinically significant improvement in distance walked and improvement in the cardiorespiratory response. The improvement in estimated peak oxygen consumption was 7% greater than that predicted to be from tailored medical therapy. Discussion: Exercise was safely provided to a patient hospitalized with advanced heart failure on continuous inotropic therapy. The 6-minute walk test was effectively used to prescribe exercise and examine patient outcomes. PMID:21637393

  13. Supervised Phase II Cardiac Exercise Therapy Shortens the Recovery of Exercise Capacity in Patients with Acute Myocardial Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Chih-Wei; Wang, Ji-Hung; Hsieh, Jen-Che; Hsieh, Tsung-Cheng; Wu, Yu-Zu; Chen, Tung-Wei; Huang, Chien-Hui

    2014-01-01

    [Purpose] To investigate the effects of Phase II cardiac exercise therapy (CET) on exercise capacity and changes in coronary risk factors (CRFs) of patients with acute myocardial infarction (AMI). [Subjects] Thirty male subjects with AMI were divided into an experimental group (EG) and a control group (CG). Another 30 age-matched subjects with patent coronary arteries served as a normal-control group (NCG). [Methods] Subjects in EG (n=20) trained using a stationary bicycle for 30 min at their target heart rate twice a week for 8 weeks. Exercise capacity was defined as the maximal metabolic equivalents (METs) that subjects reached during the symptom-limited maximal exercise test. HR, BP and RPP were recorded. Subjects in EG and CG received exercise tests and screening for CRFs at the beginning of, end of, and 3 months after Phase II CET, while subjects in NCG participated only in the 1st test. [Results] METs of CG did not improve until the 3rd test, while RPP at the 2nd test showed a significant increase. However, EG showed increased METs at the 2nd test without increase of RPP, and increased their high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) during the follow-up period between the 2nd and 3rd tests. [Conclusion] Phase II CET shortens the recovery time of exercise capacity, helps to maintain the gained exercise capacity and increases HDL-C in phase III. PMID:25276046

  14. Effects of 12-week combined exercise therapy on oxidative stress in female fibromyalgia patients.

    PubMed

    Sarıfakıoğlu, Banu; Güzelant, Aliye Yıldırım; Güzel, Eda Celik; Güzel, Savaş; Kızıler, Ali Rıza

    2014-10-01

    The aims of this study were to investigate the effect of exercise therapy on the oxidative stress in fibromyalgia patients and relationship between oxidative stress and fibromyalgia symptoms. Thirty women diagnosed with fibromyalgia according to the American College of Rheumatology preliminary criteria, and 23 healthy women whose age- and weight-matched women were enrolled the study. Pain intensity with visual analog scale (VAS), the number of tender points, the fibromyalgia impact questionnaire (FIQ), the Beck depression inventory (BDI) were evaluated. The oxidative stress parameters thiobarbituric acid reactive substances, protein carbonyls, and nitric oxide, and antioxidant parameters thiols and catalase were investigated in patients and control group. After, combined aerobic and strengthen exercise regimen was given to fibromyalgia group. Exercise therapy consisted of a warming period of 10 min, aerobic exercises period of 20 min, muscle strengthening exercises for 20 min, and 10 min cooling down period. Therapy was lasting 1 h three times per week over a 12-week period. All parameters were reevaluated after the treatment in the patient group. The oxidative stress parameters levels were significantly higher, and antioxidant parameters were significantly lower in patients with fibromyalgia than in the controls. VAS, FIQ, and BDI scores decreased significantly with exercise therapy. The exercise improved all parameters of oxidative stress and antioxidant parameters. Also, all clinical parameters were improved with exercise. We should focus on oxidative stress in the treatment for fibromyalgia with the main objective of reducing oxidative load.

  15. Sounds for Study: Speech and Language Therapy Students' Use and Perception of Exercise Podcasts for Phonetics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knight, Rachael-Anne

    2010-01-01

    Currently little is known about how students use podcasts of exercise material (as opposed to lecture material), and whether they perceive such podcasts to be beneficial. This study aimed to assess how exercise podcasts for phonetics are used and perceived by second year speech and language therapy students. Eleven podcasts of graded phonetics…

  16. Exercise therapy in the management of dyspnea in patients with cancer

    PubMed Central

    Koelwyn, Graeme J.; Jones, Lee W.; Hornsby, Whitney; Eves, Neil D.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose of review Dyspnea is a frequent, debilitating, and understudied symptom in cancer associated with poor prognosis and reduced health-related quality of life. The purpose of this study is to review the incidence, pathophysiology, and mechanisms of dyspnea in patients diagnosed with cancer. We also discuss the existing evidence supporting the efficacy of exercise therapy to complement traditional approaches to reduce the impact of this devastating symptom in persons with cancer. Recent findings In other clinical populations presenting with dyspnea, such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, exercise therapy is demonstrated to be an efficacious strategy. In contrast, relatively few studies to date have investigated the efficacy of exercise training as a therapeutic strategy to mitigate dyspnea in patients with cancer. Summary Although much more work is required, exercise therapy is a promising adjunct strategy to systematically reduce dyspnea in the oncology setting that may also provide additive efficacy when prescribed in combination with other adjunct therapies including pharmacologic interventions. PMID:22516976

  17. Exercise, Behavioral Therapy Reduce Menopausal Symptoms Caused by Breast Cancer Treatment

    Cancer.gov

    Women with breast cancer who were suffering from treatment-related menopausal symptoms experienced symptom relief with cognitive behavioral therapy, physical exercise, or both, according to a Dutch study.

  18. Exercise, Behavioral Therapy Reduce Menopausal Symptoms Caused by Breast Cancer Treatment

    Cancer.gov

    Women with breast cancer who were suffering from treatment-related menopausal symptoms experienced symptom relief with cognitive behavioral therapy, physical exercise, or both, according to a Dutch study.

  19. Stabilization exercise compared to general exercises or manual therapy for the management of low back pain: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Gomes-Neto, Mansueto; Lopes, Jordana Moura; Conceição, Cristiano Sena; Araujo, Anderson; Brasileiro, Alécio; Sousa, Camila; Carvalho, Vitor Oliveira; Arcanjo, Fabio Luciano

    2017-01-01

    We performed a systematic review with a meta-analysis to examine the efficacy of stabilization exercises versus general exercises or manual therapy in patients with low back pain. We searched MEDLINE, Cochrane Controlled Trials, Scielo, and CINAHL (from the earliest date available to November 2014) for randomized controlled trials that examined the efficacy of stabilization exercises compared to general exercises or manual therapy on pain, disability, and function in patients with low back pain. Weighted mean differences (WMD) and 95% confidence intervals were calculated. Eleven studies met the inclusion criteria (413 stabilization exercises patients, 297 general exercises patients, and 185 manual therapy patients). Stabilization exercises may provide greater benefit than general exercise for pain reduction and improvement in disability. Stabilization exercise improved pain with a WMD of -1.03 (95% CI: -1.29 to -0.27) and improved disability with a WMD of -5.41 (95% CI: -8.34 to -2.49). There were no significant differences in pain and disability scores among participants in the stabilization exercise group compared to those in the manual therapy group. Stabilization exercises were as efficacious as manual therapy in decreasing pain and disability and should be encouraged as part of musculoskeletal rehabilitation for low back pain. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Effectiveness of a home exercise program in combination with ultrasound therapy for temporomandibular joint disorders.

    PubMed

    Ucar, Mehmet; Sarp, Ümit; Koca, İrfan; Eroğlu, Selma; Yetisgin, Alparslan; Tutoglu, Ahmet; Boyacı, Ahmet

    2014-12-01

    [Purpose] This study compared the effectiveness of home exercise alone versus home exercise combined with ultrasound for patients with temporomandibular joint disorders. [Subjects and Methods] This study enrolled 23 female and 15 male patients who were divided randomly into two groups. The home exercise group performed a home exercise program consisting of an exercise program and patient education, and the home exercise combined with ultrasound group received ultrasound therapy in addition to the home exercise program. Pain intensity was evaluated using a visual analogue scale. Pain free maximum mouth opening was evaluated at baseline and 2 weeks after the treatment. [Results] There was no difference between the two groups in baseline values. After the treatment, the visual analogue scale decreased and pain free maximum mouth opening scores improved significantly in each group. Additionally, both values were higher in the home exercise combined with ultrasound group than in the home exercise group. [Conclusion] The combination of home exercise combined with ultrasound appears to be more effective at providing pain relief and increasing mouth opening than does home exercise alone for patients with temporomandibular joint disorders.

  1. Preterm Infant Weight Gain is Increased by Massage Therapy and Exercise Via Different Underlying Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Diego, Miguel A.; Field, Tiffany; Hernandez-Reif, Maria

    2014-01-01

    Objective To compare the effects of massage therapy (moderate pressure stroking) and exercise (flexion and extension of limbs) on preterm infants’ weight gain and to explore potential underlying mechanisms for those effects. Methods Weight gain and parasympathetic nervous system activity were assessed in 30 preterm infants randomly assigned to a massage therapy group or to an exercise group. Infants received 10 minutes of moderate pressure massage or passive flexion and extension of the limbs 3 times per day for 5 days, and EKGs were collected during the first session to assess vagal activity. Results Both massage and exercise led to increased weight gain. However, while exercise was associated with increased calorie consumption, massage was related to increased vagal activity. Conclusion Taken together, these findings suggest that massage and exercise lead to increased preterm infant weight gain via different underlying mechanisms. PMID:24480603

  2. Daily Events for Clinical Couples: Examining Therapy Interventions, Positive Events, Arguments, and Exercise in the Beginning Stage of Therapy.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Lee N; Mennenga, Kayla D; Oka, Megan; Tambling, Rachel B; Anderson, Shayne R; Yorgason, Jeremy

    2017-06-15

    This study examined the daily association of several events within the beginning phase of couple therapy. Events examined were as follows: trying something from therapy, an argument, a positive event, and physical exercise. Participants were 33 couples in a treatment-as-usual setting who completed the Daily Diary of Events in Couple Therapy (DDECT). A dyadic multilevel model was used to explore the daily associations between predictor and outcome variables. Results showed when male partners tried something from therapy at rates greater than the average their female partners reported a more positive relationship while when female partners tried something from therapy at rates greater than the average it contributed to a more negative relationship. In addition, results showed that clients in couple therapy rarely try things from therapy on a daily basis. Finally, relative to other predictors trying something from therapy had a smaller, but significant relationship with outcomes. © 2017 Family Process Institute.

  3. Effects of eight weeks of exercise training and orlistat therapy on body composition and maximal exercise capacity in obese females.

    PubMed

    Ozcelik, O; Dogan, H; Kelestimur, H

    2006-01-01

    A comparative assessment was made of the short-term effects of orlistat therapy and exercise training on body composition and aerobic fitness in obese females. A total of 24 obese patients were enrolled in to the study; 12 received orlistat therapy (DO) and 12 participated in a regular aerobic exercise-training programme (DE). All patients were on hypocaloric diets. Each patient performed three incremental ramp exercise tests (one at Week 0, one at the end of Week 4 and one at the end of Week 8) to exhaustion using an electromagnetically braked cycle ergometer to determine their anaerobic threshold and maximal exercise (Wmax) capacity. Patients in the DE group performed continuous exercise at a work rate that corresponded to the anaerobic threshold. Weight loss and loss of fat mass after 8 weeks were -6.4% (P=0.002) and -13.4% (DE) vs -5.8% (P=0.002) and -6.4% (P=0.008) (DO), respectively. Wmax capacity was 90.8+/-5 W (basal) vs 92.9+/-5 W (Week 4, P=0.1) and 100.4+/-6 W (Week 8, 10.5%, P=0.04) in the DO group, and 96.2+/-6 W (basal) vs 129.1+/-4 W (Week 4, 34.1%, P=0.002) and 137.5+/-5 W(Week 8, 42.9%, P=0.002) in the DE group. Despite similar decreases in body weight in both groups, patients in the DE group achieved a markedly higher level of Wmax, reflecting a better improvement in cardiopulmonary fitness, compared with patients in the DO group. Considering the improvement of aerobic fitness in the short term, an aerobic exercise-training programme should be considered for sedentary obese patients to improve their aerobic fitness and thereby reduce the negative outcomes of obesity.

  4. Exercise Therapy for Management of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: Superior Efficacy of Activity Monitors over Pedometers

    PubMed Central

    Umezono, Tomoya; Fukagawa, Masafumi

    2016-01-01

    We compared the efficacy of activity monitor (which displays exercise intensity and number of steps) versus that of pedometer in exercise therapy for patients with type 2 diabetes. The study subjects were divided into the activity monitor group (n = 92) and pedometer group (n = 95). The primary goal was improvement in hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c). The exercise target was set at 8,000 steps/day and 20 minutes of moderate-intensity exercise (≥3.5 metabolic equivalents). The activity monitor is equipped with a triple-axis accelerometer sensor capable of measuring medium-intensity walking duration, number of steps, walking distance, calorie consumption, and total calorie consumption. The pedometer counts the number of steps. Blood samples for laboratory tests were obtained during the visits. The first examination was conducted at the start of the study and repeated at 2 and 6 months. A significant difference in the decrease in HbA1c level was observed between the two groups at 2 months. The results suggest that the use of activity level monitor that displays information on exercise intensity, in addition to the number of steps, is useful in exercise therapy as it enhances the concept of exercise therapy and promotes lowering of HbA1c in diabetic patients. PMID:27761471

  5. The Effects Combining Cryocompression Therapy following an Acute Bout of Resistance Exercise on Performance and Recovery.

    PubMed

    DuPont, William H; Meuris, Brek J; Hardesty, Vincent H; Barnhart, Emily C; Tompkins, Landon H; Golden, Morricia J P; Usher, Clayton J; Spence, Paul A; Caldwell, Lydia K; Post, Emily M; Beeler, Matthew K; Kraemer, William J

    2017-09-01

    Compression and cold therapy used separately have shown to reduce negative effects of tissue damage. The combining compression and cold therapy (cryocompression) as a single recovery modality has yet to be fully examined. To examine the effects of cryocompression on recovery following a bout of heavy resistance exercise, recreationally resistance trained men (n =16) were recruited, matched, and randomly assigned to either a cryocompression group (CRC) or control group (CON). Testing was performed before and then immediately after exercise, 60 minutes, 24 hours, and 48 hours after a heavy resistance exercise workout (barbell back squats for 4 sets of 6 reps at 80% 1RM, 90 sec rest between sets, stiff legged deadlifts for 4 sets of 8 reps at 1.0 X body mass with 60 sec rest between sets, 4 sets of 10 eccentric Nordic hamstring curls, 45 sec rest between sets). The CRC group used the CRC system for 20-mins of cryocompression treatment immediately after exercise, 24 hours, and 48 hours after exercise. CON sat quietly for 20-mins at the same time points. Muscle damage [creatine kinase], soreness (visual analog scale, 0-100), pain (McGill Pain Q, 0-5), fatigue, sleep quality, and jump power were significantly (p < 0.05) improved for CRC compared to CON at 24 and 48 hours after exercise. Pain was also significantly lower for CRC compared to CON at 60-mins post exercise. These findings show that cryocompression can enhance recovery and performance following a heavy resistance exercise workout.

  6. Exercise Therapy for Parkinson's Disease: Pedaling Rate Is Related to Changes in Motor Connectivity

    PubMed Central

    Beall, Erik B.; Frankemolle, Anneke M.M.; Penko, Amanda; Phillips, Michael D.; Lowe, Mark J.; Alberts, Jay L.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Forced-rate lower-extremity exercise has recently emerged as a potential safe and low-cost therapy for Parkinson's disease (PD). The efficacy is believed to be dependent on pedaling rate, with rates above the subjects' voluntary exercise rates being most beneficial. In this study, we use functional connectivity magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to further elucidate the mechanism underlying this effect. Twenty-seven PD patients were randomized to complete 8 weeks of forced-rate exercise (FE) or voluntary-rate exercise (VE). Exercise was delivered using a specialized stationary bicycle, which can augment patients' voluntary exercise rates. The FE group received assistance from the cycle. Imaging was conducted at baseline, end of therapy, and after 4 weeks of follow-up. Functional connectivity (FC) was determined via seed-based correlation analysis, using activation-based seeds in the primary motor cortex (M1). The change in FC after exercise was compared using linear correlation with pedaling rate. Results of the correlation analysis showed a strong positive correlation between pedaling rate and change in FC from the most affected M1 to the ipsilateral thalamus. This effect persisted after 4 weeks of follow-up. These results indicate that a plausible mechanism for the therapeutic efficacy of high-rate exercise in PD is that it improves thalamo-cortical connectivity. PMID:26414696

  7. Exercise Therapy for Parkinson's Disease: Pedaling Rate Is Related to Changes in Motor Connectivity.

    PubMed

    Shah, Chintan; Beall, Erik B; Frankemolle, Anneke M M; Penko, Amanda; Phillips, Michael D; Lowe, Mark J; Alberts, Jay L

    2016-02-01

    Forced-rate lower-extremity exercise has recently emerged as a potential safe and low-cost therapy for Parkinson's disease (PD). The efficacy is believed to be dependent on pedaling rate, with rates above the subjects' voluntary exercise rates being most beneficial. In this study, we use functional connectivity magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to further elucidate the mechanism underlying this effect. Twenty-seven PD patients were randomized to complete 8 weeks of forced-rate exercise (FE) or voluntary-rate exercise (VE). Exercise was delivered using a specialized stationary bicycle, which can augment patients' voluntary exercise rates. The FE group received assistance from the cycle. Imaging was conducted at baseline, end of therapy, and after 4 weeks of follow-up. Functional connectivity (FC) was determined via seed-based correlation analysis, using activation-based seeds in the primary motor cortex (M1). The change in FC after exercise was compared using linear correlation with pedaling rate. Results of the correlation analysis showed a strong positive correlation between pedaling rate and change in FC from the most affected M1 to the ipsilateral thalamus. This effect persisted after 4 weeks of follow-up. These results indicate that a plausible mechanism for the therapeutic efficacy of high-rate exercise in PD is that it improves thalamo-cortical connectivity.

  8. Exercise therapy for osteoporosis: results of a randomised controlled trial.

    PubMed Central

    Preisinger, E; Alacamlioglu, Y; Pils, K; Bosina, E; Metka, M; Schneider, B; Ernst, E

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To define the effects of therapeutic exercise on bone density and back complaints. METHODS: A randomised controlled trial with parallel groups was conducted in an outpatient clinic, Medical School, University of Vienna. Ninety two sedentary post-menopausal women with back problems were randomly allocated to either exercise (groups 1 and 2) or control (group 3, no exercise, n = 31); the exercise group was retrospectively subdivided into compliant (group 1, n = 27) and not fully compliant patients (group 2, n = 34). Regular, initially supervised therapeutic exercise aimed at restoring biomechanical function was performed for four years. Bone density in the forearm was measured by single photon absorptiometry at entry and after four years; subjective back complaints were documented. RESULTS: A significant decrease in bone density was observed in groups 2 and 3; no change was noted in group 1; back complaints decreased in group 1 only. CONCLUSIONS: Sedentary postmenopausal women may benefit from regular long term therapeutic exercise in terms of subjective back complaints and slowed loss of bone mass. PMID:8889112

  9. The efficacy of aerobic exercise therapy on hypertensive patients with mild cardiac complications.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, M; Itoh, H; Ikeda, C; Yanagisawa, E; Miyazawa, Y; Hatogai, F; Iwadare, M

    1992-01-01

    To investigate the antihypertensive efficacy of aerobic exercise therapy in essential hypertensives, 20 patients underwent eight weeks of cycle ergometer training at anaerobic threshold (AT) point. Cardiopulmonary exercise testings with ramp protocol were performed before and at two/four/eight weeks during the training period in order to determine AT and to evaluate the changes in blood pressure (BP), heart rate (HR), oxygen uptake (VO2; ml/min/kg), and O2 pulse (ml/min/beat) during exercise. 75g glucose tolerance test (OGTT) was measured before and after exercise therapy. The mean values of systolic blood pressure, oxygen uptake, O2 pulse, before and after exercise therapy were as follows: systolic blood pressure at rest = 160 +/- 19 mmHg and 135 +/- 11 mmHg, systolic blood pressure at AT = 195 +/- 13 mmHg and 180 +/- 10 mmHg, oxygen uptake AT = 12.0 +/- 0.9 ml/min/kg and 14.4 +/- 1.0 ml/min/kg, O2 pulse at AT = 6.8 +/- 1.5 ml/min/beat and 7.6 +/- 1.88 ml/min/beat. After exercise therapy, systolic blood pressure decreased (p less than 0.01), while O2 pulse and VO2 increased (p less than 0.01). Hyperresponse of serum insulin to glucose also improved. These results show that aerobic exercise therapy at AT level has beneficial effects on high blood pressure and improves exercise tolerance and hyperresponse of serum insulin to glucose without any complications.

  10. Manual therapy associated with upper limb exercises vs. exercises alone for shoulder rehabilitation in postoperative breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Pace do Amaral, Maria Teresa; Freire de Oliveira, Mariana Maia; Ferreira, Néville de Oliveira; Guimarães, Renata Vidigal; Sarian, Luís Otávio; Gurgel, Maria Salete Costa

    2012-05-01

    Our objective was to evaluate the effectiveness of manual therapy (MT) associated with upper limb (UL) exercises in women with impaired shoulder range of motion (ROM) after axillary lymph node dissection (ALND) for breast cancer. A randomized, prospective, blinded clinical trial with 131 women with a ROM  <-  100° for shoulder flexion and/or abduction on the first day postoperatively were evaluated. Sixty-six women were allocated to group exercises and 65 underwent the exercises followed by MT. Shoulder ROM was measured by goniometry, and function was evaluated by the Modified-University of California at Los Angeles Shoulder Rating Scale--the UCLA Scale, in the 1st, 6th, 12th, and 18th month after surgery. The chi-square test was used for the relationship between clinical characteristics and oncological treatment between groups, and ANOVA for repeat measures was used. No difference in recovery of shoulder ROM as well as UL function was observed between groups. Improvement in ROM was gradual from the 1st to the 18th month, and the function achieving a good classification at 18th month. MT associated with exercises did not enhance the results obtained with exercises alone for shoulder ROM and ipsilateral UL function.

  11. Exercise therapy, manual therapy, or both, for osteoarthritis of the hip or knee: a factorial randomised controlled trial protocol

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Non-pharmacological, non-surgical interventions are recommended as the first line of treatment for osteoarthritis (OA) of the hip and knee. There is evidence that exercise therapy is effective for reducing pain and improving function in patients with knee OA, some evidence that exercise therapy is effective for hip OA, and early indications that manual therapy may be efficacious for hip and knee OA. There is little evidence as to which approach is more effective, if benefits endure, or if providing these therapies is cost-effective for the management of this disorder. The MOA Trial (Management of OsteoArthritis) aims to test the effectiveness of two physiotherapy interventions for improving disability and pain in adults with hip or knee OA in New Zealand. Specifically, our primary objectives are to investigate whether: 1. Exercise therapy versus no exercise therapy improves disability at 12 months; 2. Manual physiotherapy versus no manual therapy improves disability at 12 months; 3. Providing physiotherapy programmes in addition to usual care is more cost-effective than usual care alone in the management of osteoarthritis at 24 months. Methods This is a 2 × 2 factorial randomised controlled trial. We plan to recruit 224 participants with hip or knee OA. Eligible participants will be randomly allocated to receive either: (a) a supervised multi-modal exercise therapy programme; (b) an individualised manual therapy programme; (c) both exercise therapy and manual therapy; or, (d) no trial physiotherapy. All participants will continue to receive usual medical care. The outcome assessors, orthopaedic surgeons, general medical practitioners, and statistician will be blind to group allocation until the statistical analysis is completed. The trial is funded by Health Research Council of New Zealand Project Grants (Project numbers 07/199, 07/200). Discussion The MOA Trial will be the first to investigate the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of providing

  12. Exercise therapy, manual therapy, or both, for osteoarthritis of the hip or knee: a factorial randomised controlled trial protocol.

    PubMed

    Abbott, J Haxby; Robertson, M Clare; McKenzie, Joanne E; Baxter, G David; Theis, Jean-Claude; Campbell, A John

    2009-02-08

    Non-pharmacological, non-surgical interventions are recommended as the first line of treatment for osteoarthritis (OA) of the hip and knee. There is evidence that exercise therapy is effective for reducing pain and improving function in patients with knee OA, some evidence that exercise therapy is effective for hip OA, and early indications that manual therapy may be efficacious for hip and knee OA. There is little evidence as to which approach is more effective, if benefits endure, or if providing these therapies is cost-effective for the management of this disorder. The MOA Trial (Management of OsteoArthritis) aims to test the effectiveness of two physiotherapy interventions for improving disability and pain in adults with hip or knee OA in New Zealand. Specifically, our primary objectives are to investigate whether:1. Exercise therapy versus no exercise therapy improves disability at 12 months;2. Manual physiotherapy versus no manual therapy improves disability at 12 months;3. Providing physiotherapy programmes in addition to usual care is more cost-effective than usual care alone in the management of osteoarthritis at 24 months. This is a 2 x 2 factorial randomised controlled trial. We plan to recruit 224 participants with hip or knee OA. Eligible participants will be randomly allocated to receive either: (a) a supervised multi-modal exercise therapy programme; (b) an individualised manual therapy programme; (c) both exercise therapy and manual therapy; or, (d) no trial physiotherapy. All participants will continue to receive usual medical care. The outcome assessors, orthopaedic surgeons, general medical practitioners, and statistician will be blind to group allocation until the statistical analysis is completed. The trial is funded by Health Research Council of New Zealand Project Grants (Project numbers 07/199, 07/200). The MOA Trial will be the first to investigate the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of providing physiotherapy programmes of this kind

  13. The Effects Combining Cryocompression Therapy following an Acute Bout of Resistance Exercise on Performance and Recovery

    PubMed Central

    DuPont, William H.; Meuris, Brek J.; Hardesty, Vincent H.; Barnhart, Emily C.; Tompkins, Landon H.; Golden, Morricia J.P.; Usher, Clayton J.; Spence, Paul A.; Caldwell, Lydia K.; Post, Emily M.; Beeler, Matthew K.; Kraemer, William J.

    2017-01-01

    Compression and cold therapy used separately have shown to reduce negative effects of tissue damage. The combining compression and cold therapy (cryocompression) as a single recovery modality has yet to be fully examined. To examine the effects of cryocompression on recovery following a bout of heavy resistance exercise, recreationally resistance trained men (n =16) were recruited, matched, and randomly assigned to either a cryocompression group (CRC) or control group (CON). Testing was performed before and then immediately after exercise, 60 minutes, 24 hours, and 48 hours after a heavy resistance exercise workout (barbell back squats for 4 sets of 6 reps at 80% 1RM, 90 sec rest between sets, stiff legged deadlifts for 4 sets of 8 reps at 1.0 X body mass with 60 sec rest between sets, 4 sets of 10 eccentric Nordic hamstring curls, 45 sec rest between sets). The CRC group used the CRC system for 20-mins of cryocompression treatment immediately after exercise, 24 hours, and 48 hours after exercise. CON sat quietly for 20-mins at the same time points. Muscle damage [creatine kinase], soreness (visual analog scale, 0-100), pain (McGill Pain Q, 0-5), fatigue, sleep quality, and jump power were significantly (p < 0.05) improved for CRC compared to CON at 24 and 48 hours after exercise. Pain was also significantly lower for CRC compared to CON at 60-mins post exercise. These findings show that cryocompression can enhance recovery and performance following a heavy resistance exercise workout. Key points The combination of circulatory cooling and compression technology enhances recovery from heavy resistance exercise. Sleep quality is enhanced following the use of cyo-compression when compared to typical no intervention control conditions following heavy resistance exercise. Muscle damage markers, pain and soreness markers are improved with cryocompression when compared to no interventional control conditions following heavy resistance exercise. PMID:28912650

  14. Exercises

    MedlinePlus

    ... COPD: Overview COPD: Lifestyle Management COPD: Exercises COPD: Exercises Make an Appointment Refer a Patient Ask a ... lifelong activity you enjoy. Medication to Help You Exercise People with COPD often use inhaled short acting ...

  15. Exercises

    MedlinePlus

    ... Disease (COPD) COPD: Overview COPD: Lifestyle Management Exercises Exercises Make an Appointment Refer a Patient Ask a ... lifelong activity you enjoy. Medication to Help You Exercise People with COPD often use inhaled short acting ...

  16. Effect of anti-inflammatory supplementation with whey peptide and exercise therapy in patients with COPD.

    PubMed

    Sugawara, Keiyu; Takahashi, Hitomi; Kashiwagura, Takeshi; Yamada, Kohko; Yanagida, Satoko; Homma, Mitsunobu; Dairiki, Kazuo; Sasaki, Hajime; Kawagoshi, Atsuyoshi; Satake, Masahiro; Shioya, Takanobu

    2012-11-01

    One of the major pathophysiologies in advanced chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) has been attributed to systemic inflammation. Meta-analysis of the 2005 Cochrane Database concluded the effect of nutritional supplementation alone on stable COPD was insufficient to promote body weight gain or exercise capacity. The aim of this study was to investigate the effectiveness of nutritional supplementation therapy using a nutritional supplement containing whey peptide with low-intensity exercise therapy in stable elderly patients with COPD. In stable elderly COPD patients with %IBW and %FEV(1) of less than 110 and 80%, respectively, anti-inflammatory nutritional supplementation therapy was added to low-intensity exercise therapy. Thirty-six COPD patients were divided into those with and those without the ingestion of an anti-inflammatory nutritional supplement containing whey peptide, which exhibited an anti-inflammatory effect. These two groups were designated as the nutritional support and the control groups, respectively. The body composition, skeletal muscle strength, exercise tolerance, health-related QOL (HRQOL), and inflammatory cytokines were evaluated before and three months after nutritional support combined with exercise therapy in both the nutritional support group and the control group. In the nutritional support group, the body weight, %IBW, FM, energy intake, %AC, Alb, PImax, PEmax, 6MWD, WBI, emotional function, and CRQ total were significantly increased, and the levels of hsCRP, IL-6, IL-8, and TNF-α were reduced significantly, while no significant change was noted in any item of physiological evaluation or any biomarker in the control group. Concomitant use of a anti-inflammatory nutritional supplement containing whey peptide, which exhibits an anti-inflammatory effect, with exercise therapy in stable elderly COPD patients with %IBW<110% and %FEV(1)<80% may not only increase body weight but may also inhibit systemic inflammation and thus

  17. Prone immersion physical exercise therapy in three children with cystic fibrosis: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Clément, M; Jankowski, L W; Beaudry, P H

    1979-01-01

    Prone immersion physical exercise therapy has been used successfully in the physical rehabilitation of middle-aged adults with moderate to severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. The purpose of this pilot project was to evaluate the effects of PIPE therapy in children with cystic fibrosis. Three children with CF, two boys aged 6 and 14 years and one girl aged 15 years, voluntarily participated in the experimental training program. The patients performed individualized group exercise three times a week on alternate days for 28 consecutive weeks at an intensity of approximately 75 percent aerobic capacity. Duration of exercise gradually increased from 15 (3 x 5 minutes) to 60 (3 x 20 minutes) minutes while the rest period after each exercise was constant at two minutes. PIPE training resulted in increased physical work capacity and maximal oxygen consumption in all three subjects. Curiously, these changes were not accompanied by training bradycardia.

  18. Exercise and β-blocker therapy recommendations for inherited arrhythmogenic conditions.

    PubMed

    Christian, Susan; Somerville, Martin; Taylor, Sherry; Atallah, Joseph

    2016-08-01

    Management of individuals with long QT syndrome, catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, and arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy may involve exercise restriction and/or β-blocker therapy. This study assessed the practices of a group of paediatric electrophysiologists regarding the management of genotype-positive/phenotype-positive and genotype-positive/phenotype-negative individuals with these conditions. An online survey was circulated to members of the Pediatric and Congenital Electrophysiology Society in May, 2014. The survey included questions addressing the respondents' approach regarding exercise recommendations and prescription of β-blocker therapy. A total of 45 cardiologists completed the survey. The majority of respondents restricted symptomatic patients from competitive sports; however, only approximately half restricted phenotype-negative mutation carriers from this level of activity. Recommendations were less consistent regarding other types of activities. A trend was identified regarding physician physical activity and exercise recommendations for phenotype-negative mutation carriers. Less-active physicians were more likely to restrict exercise. β-blocker therapy was discussed by the majority of respondents for symptomatic patients and a significant number of asymptomatic patients. Exercise restriction for patients with long QT syndrome, catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, and arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy varies based on several factors including phenotype, type of exercise, guidelines referred to, and physicians' own level of activity.

  19. Exercise therapy for an older patient with left ventricular assist device.

    PubMed

    Park, Won Hah; Seo, Yong Gon; Sung, Ji Dong

    2014-06-01

    A left ventricular assist device (LVAD) is a mechanical circulation support implanted for patients with end-stage heart failure. It may be used either as a bridge to cardiac transplantation or as a destination therapy. The health of a 75-year-old man with a medical history of systolic heart failure worsened. Therefore, he was recommended to have implanted a LVAD (Thoratec Corp.) as a destination therapy. After the surgery, he was enrolled in patient cardiac rehabilitation for the improvement of dyspnea and exercise capacity. In results, there is an improvement on his exercise capacity and quality of life. For the first time in Korea, we reported a benefit of exercise therapy after being implanted with a LVAD.

  20. Full kinetic chain manual and manipulative therapy plus exercise compared with targeted manual and manipulative therapy plus exercise for symptomatic osteoarthritis of the hip: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Brantingham, James W; Parkin-Smith, Gregory; Cassa, Tammy Kay; Globe, Gary A; Globe, Denise; Pollard, Henry; deLuca, Katie; Jensen, Muffit; Mayer, Stephan; Korporaal, Charmaine

    2012-02-01

    To determine the short-term effectiveness of full kinematic chain manual and manipulative therapy (MMT) plus exercise compared with targeted hip MMT plus exercise for symptomatic mild to moderate hip osteoarthritis (OA). Parallel-group randomized trial with 3-month follow-up. Two chiropractic outpatient teaching clinics. Convenience sample of eligible participants (N=111) with symptomatic hip OA were consented and randomly allocated to receive either the experimental or comparison treatment, respectively. Participants in the experimental group received full kinematic chain MMT plus exercise while those in the comparison group received targeted hip MMT plus exercise. Participants in both groups received 9 treatments over a 5-week period. Western Ontario and McMasters Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC), Harris hip score (HHS), and Overall Therapy Effectiveness, alongside estimation of clinically meaningful outcomes. Total dropout was 9% (n=10) with 7% of total data missing, replaced using a multiple imputation method. No statistically significant differences were found between the 2 groups for any of the outcome measures (analysis of covariance, P=.45 and P=.79 for the WOMAC and HHS, respectively). There were no statistically significant differences in the primary or secondary outcome scores when comparing full kinematic chain MMT plus exercise with targeted hip MMT plus exercise for mild to moderate symptomatic hip OA. Consequently, the nonsignificant findings suggest that there would also be no clinically meaningful difference between the 2 groups. The results of this study provides guidance to musculoskeletal practitioners who regularly use MMT that the full kinematic chain approach does not appear to have any benefit over targeted treatment. Copyright © 2012 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Effectiveness of exercise therapy and manual mobilisation in ankle sprain and functional instability: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    van der Wees, Philip J; Lenssen, Anton F; Hendriks, Erik J M; Stomp, Derrick J; Dekker, Joost; de Bie, Rob A

    2006-01-01

    This study critically reviews the effectiveness of exercise therapy and manual mobilisation in acute ankle sprains and functional instability by conducting a systematic review of randomised controlled trials. Trials were searched electronically and manually from 1966 to March 2005. Randomised controlled trials that evaluated exercise therapy or manual mobilisation of the ankle joint with at least one clinically relevant outcome measure were included. Internal validity of the studies was independently assessed by two reviewers. When applicable, relative risk (RR) or standardised mean differences (SMD) were calculated for individual and pooled data. In total 17 studies were included. In thirteen studies the intervention included exercise therapy and in four studies the effects of manual mobilisation of the ankle joint was evaluated. Average internal validity score of the studies was 3.1 (range 1 to 7) on a 10-point scale. Exercise therapy was effective in reducing the risk of recurrent sprains after acute ankle sprain: RR 0.37 (95% CI 0.18 to 0.74), and with functional instability: RR 0.38 (95% CI 0.23 to 0.62). No effects of exercise therapy were found on postural sway in patients with functional instability: SMD: 0.38 (95% CI -0.15 to 0.91). Four studies demonstrated an initial positive effect of different modes of manual mobilisation on dorsiflexion range of motion. It is likely that exercise therapy, including the use of a wobble board, is effective in the prevention of recurrent ankle sprains. Manual mobilisation has an (initial) effect on dorsiflexion range of motion, but the clinical relevance of these findings for physiotherapy practice may be limited.

  2. Qigong and exercise therapy for elderly patients with chronic neck pain (QIBANE): a randomized controlled study.

    PubMed

    von Trott, Philipp; Wiedemann, Anna Maria; Lüdtke, Rainer; Reishauer, Anett; Willich, Stefan N; Witt, Claudia M

    2009-05-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of qigong compared with exercise therapy and no treatment. Elderly patients with chronic neck pain (>6 months) were randomly assigned to qigong or exercise therapy (each 24 sessions over a period of 3 months) or to a waiting list control. Patients completed standardized questionnaires at baseline and after 3 and 6 months. The main outcome measure was average neck pain on the visual analogue scale after 3 months. Secondary outcomes were neck pain and disability (NPAD) and quality of life (SF-36). One hundred seventeen patients (age, 76 +/- 8 years, 95% women) were included in the intention-to-treat analysis. The average duration of neck pain was 19.0 +/- 14.9 years. After 3 months, no significant differences were observed between the qigong group and the waiting list control group (visual analogue scale mean difference, -11 mm [CI, -24.0; 2.1], P = .099) or between the qigong group and the exercise therapy group (-2.5 mm [ - 15.4; 10.3], P = .699). Results for the NPAD were similar (qigong vs waiting list -6.7 (-15.4; 2.1), P = .135; qigong vs exercise therapy 2.3 (-6.2; 10.8); P = .600). We found no significant effect after 3 months of qigong or exercise therapy compared with no treatment. Further studies should include outcomes more suitable to elderly patients, longer treatment, and patients with less chronic pain. In a randomized controlled study, we evaluated whether a treatment of 24 qigong sessions over a period of 3 months is (1) superior to no treatment and (2) superior to the same amount of exercise therapy in elderly patients (age, 76 +/- 8 years, 95% women) with long-term chronic neck pain (19.0 +/- 14.9 years). After 3 and 6 months, we found no significant differences for pain, neck pain, disability, and quality of life among the 3 groups.

  3. The change of pain and lumbosacral sagittal alignment after sling exercise therapy for patients with chronic low back pain

    PubMed Central

    Roh, Hee Sook; Cho, Won Je; Ryu, Won Jong; Park, Seung Jin; An, Chang Sik

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] This study was conducted to quantify the effect of sling exercise therapy in the recovery of lumbosacral sagittal alignment (LSA) and in the control of low back pain. [Subjects and Methods] A total of 102 chronic low back pain patients were divided into two groups, a physical therapy group and a sling exercise group. In both groups, programs were conducted thrice a week for twelve weeks. With respect to LSA, pelvic tilt (PT), sacral slope (SS), and pelvic incidence (PI) were measured with plain radiography. Pain was measured on a visual analogue scale (VAS). [Results] Differences were found in visual analogue scale, delta score of visual analogue scale, pelvic tilt, delta score of pelvic tilt, and delta score of pelvic incidence between sling exercise therapy and physical therapy groups. VAS, pelvic tilt, and pelvic incidence was positively changed after sling exercise. However, only the visual analogue scale was found to be improved after physical therapy. [Conclusion] Sling exercise therapy and physical therapy were effective in reducing pain. However, pelvic tilt and pelvic incidence were positively changed after sling exercise therapy for Lumbosacral Sagittal Alignment, but were unchanged after physical therapy. Therefore, sling exercise therapy is more effective than physical therapy for the recovery of Lumbosacral Sagittal Alignment in patients with chronic low back pain. PMID:27821936

  4. Effect of physical therapy scoliosis specific exercises using breathing pattern on adolescent idiopathic scoliosis.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Sungyoung; Rhee, Min-Hyung

    2016-11-01

    [Purpose] This study was performed to confirm physical therapy scoliosis specific exercises on adolescent idiopathic scoliosis patients. [Subject and Methods] A 15-year-old male middle school student with scoliosis. Cobb's angle, angle of rotation of the spine, and breathing pattern were measured before and after 8 weeks training. [Results] After 8 weeks training, Cobb's angle, angle of rotation of the spine, and breathing pattern were improved better. [Conclusion] These results indicate that physical therapy scoliosis specific exercises improves scoliosis curves and could provide an effective intervention and management of scoliosis.

  5. Effect of physical therapy scoliosis specific exercises using breathing pattern on adolescent idiopathic scoliosis

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Sungyoung; Rhee, Min-Hyung

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] This study was performed to confirm physical therapy scoliosis specific exercises on adolescent idiopathic scoliosis patients. [Subject and Methods] A 15-year-old male middle school student with scoliosis. Cobb’s angle, angle of rotation of the spine, and breathing pattern were measured before and after 8 weeks training. [Results] After 8 weeks training, Cobb’s angle, angle of rotation of the spine, and breathing pattern were improved better. [Conclusion] These results indicate that physical therapy scoliosis specific exercises improves scoliosis curves and could provide an effective intervention and management of scoliosis. PMID:27942163

  6. Effect of Different Types of Exercise in HIV + Mozambican Women Using Antiretroviral Therapy.

    PubMed

    Mangona, Lucília; Daca, Timóteo; Tchonga, Francisco; Bule, Odete; Bhatt, Nilesh; Jani, Ilesh; Damasceno, Albertino; Prista, António

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate and compare the effect of two types of exercises interventions on the regularity and health-related physical fitness in HIV-infected individuals who use antiretroviral therapy (ART). A total of 53 HIV+ African women (mean age=39.5±8.4 years) on ART participated in the study. Subjects were randomly divided into 3 groups, namely, formal exercise (FEG), playful exercise (PEG) and control (CG). During 12 weeks, the exercise groups underwent a program of 1-hour duration with a frequency of 3 times a week. The FEG performed a protocol that included 20 minutes of exercise, cycling at 60 % of V̇O2peak, increasing to 75 % and 85 % in the 4th and 8th weeks, respectively, and a muscular endurance circuit consisted of 6 exercises at 15 repetitions per minute (RM). The PEG followed a program consisting of active games. Before and after the intervention the participants were submitted to a clinical evaluation including immunological parameters (CD4+), cardiovascular risk factors, physical fitness and anthropometry. Comparison of somatic variables before and after the program showed no exercise effect. Immunological and cardiovascular variables were also independent of the exercise group. The main effect was found in cardiorespiratory fitness: exercise groups increased significantly in V̇O2peak (FEG=14.7 %; PEG=11.1 %) with no significant differences in CG. The percentage of high attendance was identical between the two groups. It was concluded that there is no contraindication for exercise in this type of population and the beneficial effect was mainly in cardiorespiratory fitness, regardless of the type of exercise performed.

  7. Effect of Different Types of Exercise in HIV + Mozambican Women Using Antiretroviral Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Mangona, Lucília; Daca, Timóteo; Tchonga, Francisco; Bule, Odete; Bhatt, Nilesh; Jani, Ilesh; Damasceno, Albertino; Prista, António

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate and compare the effect of two types of exercises interventions on the regularity and health-related physical fitness in HIV-infected individuals who use antiretroviral therapy (ART). A total of 53 HIV+ African women (mean age=39.5±8.4 years) on ART participated in the study. Subjects were randomly divided into 3 groups, namely, formal exercise (FEG), playful exercise (PEG) and control (CG). During 12 weeks, the exercise groups underwent a program of 1-hour duration with a frequency of 3 times a week. The FEG performed a protocol that included 20 minutes of exercise, cycling at 60 % of V̇O2peak, increasing to 75 % and 85 % in the 4th and 8th weeks, respectively, and a muscular endurance circuit consisted of 6 exercises at 15 repetitions per minute (RM). The PEG followed a program consisting of active games. Before and after the intervention the participants were submitted to a clinical evaluation including immunological parameters (CD4+), cardiovascular risk factors, physical fitness and anthropometry. Comparison of somatic variables before and after the program showed no exercise effect. Immunological and cardiovascular variables were also independent of the exercise group. The main effect was found in cardiorespiratory fitness: exercise groups increased significantly in V̇O2peak (FEG=14.7 %; PEG=11.1 %) with no significant differences in CG. The percentage of high attendance was identical between the two groups. It was concluded that there is no contraindication for exercise in this type of population and the beneficial effect was mainly in cardiorespiratory fitness, regardless of the type of exercise performed. PMID:26587077

  8. After-exercise heart rate variability is attenuated in postmenopausal women and unaffected by estrogen therapy.

    PubMed

    Harvey, Paula J; O'Donnell, Emma; Picton, Peter; Morris, Beverley L; Notarius, Catherine F; Floras, John S

    2016-04-01

    Delayed heart rate (HR) recovery in the immediate postexercise period has been linked to adverse cardiovascular prognosis. The after effects of an acute bout of exercise on HR modulation in postmenopausal women (PMW) and the influence of estrogen therapy are unknown. In 13 sedentary PMW (54 ± 2 y, mean ± SEM), we assessed HR variability (HRV)--an index of HR modulation--and the influence of estrogen therapy on HRV. HRV in the frequency domain was quantified during supine rest and again 60 minutes after treadmill exercise for 45 minutes, at 60% VO2peak. PMW were studied before and after 4 weeks of oral estradiol. To obtain reference values for the after effects of exercise on HRV in healthy young women, 14 premenopausal women (PreM) completed the identical exercise protocol. Compared with PreM, PMW demonstrated lower high frequency (vagal modulation) and total HRV (P < 0.05) at rest. In PreM, all HRV values were similar before and after exercise. In contrast, in PMW after exercise, despite having identical HR to PreM, high frequency and total HRV were all lower (all P ≤ 0.01) compared with pre-exercise HRV values. Estrogen therapy had no effect on pre or postexercise values for HRV. When compared with PreM, PMW have identical HR, but lower vagal HR modulation at rest and delayed HRV recovery after exercise. Estrogen does not restore baseline HRV or accelerate HRV recovery postexercise, suggesting aging rather than estrogen deficiency per se may lower HRV in PMW.

  9. Effects of Cold Therapy on Pain and Breathing Exercises Among Median Sternotomy Patients.

    PubMed

    Zencir, Gülbanu; Eser, Ismet

    2016-12-01

    The most painful activities during the days following cardiac surgery are coughing and deep breathing exercises. Cold therapy is an effective nonpharmacological method that decreases the pain during coughing and mobilization. In this study, the effects of cold therapy on pain and breathing exercises among patients with median sternotomy following cardiac surgery were investigated in a randomized crossover clinical trial. Data were collected from patients with median sternotomy (N = 34) in the first two postoperative days. Because of the crossover design of the study, each patient was taken as a simultaneous control. Gel pack application was used as the cold therapy. Patients underwent four episodes of deep breathing and coughing exercises using an incentive spirometer (volumetric). Patients were evaluated according to the visual analogue scale for pain intensity before and after deep breathing and coughing exercise sessions. The pain score was 3.44 ± 2.45 at baseline for deep breathing and coughing exercises on the first day. The reported postoperative pain in the gel-pack group was not significantly different before and after the deep breathing and coughing exercises, but it significantly increased in the no-gel-pack group (p < .001). Although the interaction between the treatment and time was significant (partial eta-squared: .09), the gel-pack group had a lower change in average pain levels. This interaction was not significant in terms of spirometric values. In conclusion, cold therapy had a positive effect on pain management in the early period of post-cardiac surgery but was not effective for the pain associated with breathing exercises.

  10. Renal protective effects of chronic exercise and antihypertensive therapy in hypertensive rats with chronic renal failure.

    PubMed

    Kohzuki, M; Kamimoto, M; Wu, X M; Xu, H L; Kawamura, T; Mori, N; Nagasaka, M; Kurosawa, H; Minami, N; Kanazawa, M; Saito, T; Yoshida, K

    2001-10-01

    Patients with chronic renal failure are restricted to mild physical activity and tend to a lack of exercise. However, there have been few reports regarding the influence of chronic exercise on the progression of renal disease. Similarly, there are few animal models concerned with the effect of exercise training on improving renal function. Therefore, we assessed the renal effects of moderate chronic treadmill exercise in a remnant kidney model of spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) with chronic renal failure. We also assessed the effects of exercise and antihypertensive therapy on renal function. Eight-week-old SHR were subjected to 5/6 nephrectomy by removal of the left kidney and excision of two-thirds of the right kidney. The rats were divided into four groups: (i) no exercise (Non-EX); (ii) moderate exercise with treadmill running (20 m/min, 0 grade incline for 60 min) (EX); (iii) EX with an angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor, enalapril (2 mg/kg per day, i.p.); and (iv) EX with an angiotensin receptor antagonist, losartan (5 mg/kg per day, i.p.), for 4 weeks. Chronic EX significantly attenuated the increase in proteinuria (P < 0.01) and significantly protected against increases in the index of glomerular sclerosis (IGS). Both enalapril and losartan with EX significantly decreased blood pressure (P < 0.001), and further decreased the IGS. In the stepwise multiple regression analysis, only antihypertensive drug remained in the model as a significant predictor of IGS (P < 0.0001). In contrast, exercise, antihypertensive drug and mean systolic blood pressure (weeks 1-4) remained in the model as a significant predictors of mean proteinuria (weeks 1-4) (all P < 0.0001). These results suggest that exercise does not worsen renal function and has renal-protective effects in this model of rats. Moreover, the antihypertensive therapy has additional renal-protective effects in this model of rats.

  11. Exercise and the liver: implications for therapy in fatty liver disorders.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Nathan A; Keating, Shelley E; George, Jacob

    2012-02-01

    The increasing recognition that fatty liver plays a direct role in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular and metabolic disease has resulted in significant research enquiry into the efficacy of lifestyle therapy in modulating liver fat. Recently, this has extended to the specific investigation of a possible independent benefit of physical activity/exercise in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). In this article we review the effect of acute and regular exercise (training) on metabolism, including liver glucose and lipid metabolism, and the available human trials that have compared the benefit of regular exercise versus a nonexercise control on liver fat. The limited human research suggests that exercise can reduce liver fat and that this benefit may be mediated, in part, by a reduction in hepatic lipogenesis. The relative importance of extrahepatic adaptations and acute versus regular exercise in explaining this benefit are discussed. From a clinical perspective, the revelation of a benefit of exercise per se offers a novel approach for liver fat reduction, and highlights the importance of incorporating fitness assessment and prescription in the management of patients with fatty liver disorders. Implementation of exercise therapy in a clinical setting is arguably the biggest challenge because evidence shows that mere provision of information about the benefits of exercise and/or exercise prescription to the patient does not translate to positive outcomes. Rather, the focus should be on implementing strategies to promote behavior change including regular contact and assessment with a health care professional, self-monitoring, and personalization of goals that focus on changing physical activity behavior.

  12. Is the severity of knee osteoarthritis on magnetic resonance imaging associated with outcome of exercise therapy?

    PubMed

    Knoop, J; Dekker, J; van der Leeden, M; van der Esch, M; Klein, J P; Hunter, D J; Roorda, L D; Steultjens, M P M; Lems, W F

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate associations between severity of knee osteoarthritis (OA) on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and treatment outcomes in knee OA patients treated with exercise therapy in an exploratory study. Ninety-five participants with knee OA in a 12-week exercise program had obtained 3.0T MRI scans of the knee joint prior to treatment. MRI data were systematically assessed for OA severity of multiple features (cartilage integrity, bone marrow lesions, osteophyte formation, effusion/synovitis, and meniscal abnormalities) according to the Boston Leeds Osteoarthritis Knee Score method. Regression analyses were performed to analyze associations between OA severity on MRI (for the tibiofemoral and patellofemoral [PF] compartments) and outcome of exercise therapy, i.e., changes in activity limitations (Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index physical function; primary outcome), pain and upper leg muscle strength, and treatment response (Outcome Measures in Rheumatology/Osteoarthritis Research Society International criteria). Improvements of 24%, 34%, and 21% on average in activity limitations, pain, and muscle strength, respectively, after 12-week exercise therapy were found (P < 0.001). Severity of abnormalities in PF cartilage integrity was significantly associated with fewer improvements in both activity limitations (P = 0.01) and muscle strength (P = 0.04). Severity of PF osteophyte formation was significantly associated with fewer improvements in muscle strength (P < 0.01). All other features on MRI were not associated with treatment outcome. Effectiveness of exercise therapy seems to be independent of OA severity on MRI, except for abnormalities in cartilage integrity and osteophyte formation, both in the PF compartment. Our study suggests that all grades of OA severity on MRI can benefit from professionally supervised exercise therapy, although the effects might be reduced in patients with advanced PF OA. Copyright © 2014 by the American

  13. Manual therapy and therapeutic exercise in the treatment of osteoarthritis of the hip: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Romeo, A; Parazza, S; Boschi, M; Nava, T; Vanti, C

    2013-05-27

    This systematic review aimed at investigating the role of therapeutic exercise and/or manual therapy in the treatment of hip osteoarthritis (OA). Two independent reviewers (AR, CV) searched PubMed, Cinahl, Cochrane Library, PEDro and Scopus databases and a third one (SP) was consulted in case of disagreement. The research criteria were publication period (from May 2007 to April 2012) and publication language (English or Italian). Ten randomized controlled trials matched inclusion criteria, eight of which concerning therapeutic exercise and two manual therapy. Few good quality studies were found. At mid- and long-term follow-up land-based exercises showed insufficient evidence of effectiveness with respect to pain and quality of life, but positive results were found for physical function. Water exercises significantly reduced fall risk when combined with functional exercises. Programs containing progressive and gradual exposure of difficult activities, education and exercises promoted better outcomes, higher adherence to home program and increased amount of physical activity, especially walking. Manual therapy seemed to reduce pain and decrease disability at short-term. Less use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs was statistically significant at long-term follow-up in patients treated with manual therapy. The relationship between clinical results and radiological grade of OA was not investigated. Encouraging results were found in recent literature for manual therapy and functional training. Further research is needed to elucidate this issue through high-quality trials, especially addressing the aspects that have not been thoroughly explored yet, for instance type, amount and scheduling of conservative treatment.

  14. [Development and evaluation of a dance-based exercise therapy for patients with haemophilia].

    PubMed

    Czepa, D; van Ravenstein, S; Stäuber, F; Hilberg, T

    2013-01-01

    So far, the use of methods derived from creative arts has not been considered in the haemophilia treatment. The AIM was to investigate the expectations for a dance-based exercise therapy for patients with haemophilia and the extent of its acceptance. The one-hour dance-based exercise therapy was offered to 30 haemophilia patients (HI30) (49 ± 11, 30-67 years). For the evaluation of expectations, questionnaires were created and filled out by participants before and after the intervention. Additionally, 19 haemophilia patients (HF) and 20 controls without haemophilia (KF) who did not participate in the intervention were also questioned. The RESULTS show that haemophilia patients have more experience in dance than controls (HI30:62%, HF:74%, KF:45%). In contrast, the proportion of those who are currently dancing is higher in controls without haemophilia (HI30: 17%, HF: 10%, KF:26%). The termination of dance activity in patients with haemophilia who were part of the intervention was mainly due to pain (HI30: 40%, HF: 29%, KF: 0%), whereby controls without intervention terminated the dance activity mainly due to lack of time (HI30: 30%, HF: 57%, KF: 56%). Ultimately, 24 out of 30 patients with haemophilia (HI24) completed the intervention. All HI24 met their expectations. 38% felt limited by haemophilia while carrying out the exercises. The majority of the participants were able to follow the exercises well (96%) and were did not overstrain physically (92%) nor mentally (87%), also 79% did not have pain. 23 of HI24 (96%) can envision a continuation of the dance-based exercise therapy. The experience with the dance-based exercise therapy was predominantly positive. It represents an alternative sports therapy programme for patients with haemophilia. Further studies are needed in order to make statements concerning the long-term use of such training.

  15. Enhancing the Efficacy of Behavior Therapy for Obesity: Effects of Aerobic Exercise and a Multicomponent Maintenance Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perri, Michael G.; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Moderately obese volunteers were randomly assigned to two treatment conditions (behavior therapy or behavior therapy plus aerobic exercise) and two posttreatment conditions (no further contact or a multicomponent maintenance program). Clients in the aerobic exercise condition lost significantly more weight than those who received behavior therapy…

  16. Effect of exercise therapy on monocyte and neutrophil counts in overweight women.

    PubMed

    Michishita, Ryoma; Shono, Naoko; Inoue, Teruo; Tsuruta, Toshiyuki; Node, Koichi

    2010-02-01

    It has been well known that physical inactivity is associated with a significantly higher incidence of coronary artery disease. This study aimed to test our hypothesis that endurance aerobic exercise training has cardiovascular protective effects as a result of inhibiting inflammatory processes. Forty-two overweight women [age, 53.4 +/- 9.8 years; body mass index (BMI), 28.0 +/- 2.8] received electric bicycle ergometer exercise therapy at the lactate threshold intensity for 30 to 60 minutes per day, 1 to 6 times per week for 6 weeks. The exercise training was performed within the possible load (exercise duration and frequency) for each subject. Leukocyte, monocyte, and neutrophil counts significantly decreased after the exercise therapy (P < 0.05). In simple regression analysis, percent changes in monocyte and neutrophil counts were correlated with percent changes in fasting triglyceride levels, insulin sensitivity index, BMI, and maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max). In stepwise multiple regression analysis, the percent change in monocyte counts was associated with percent changes in fasting triglyceride and VO2max (r = 0.368, P < 0.001), and the percent change in neutrophil counts was associated with percent changes in insulin sensitivity index and BMI (r = 0.292, P < 0.001). Endurance aerobic exercise training can influence some inflammatory processes. Furthermore, increased aerobic capacity may be antiinflammatory and have cardiovascular protective effects in overweight women.

  17. Exercise Therapy in Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    Kuntze, Gregor; Nesbitt, Colleen; Whittaker, Jackie L; Nettel-Aguirre, Alberto; Toomey, Clodagh; Esau, Shane; Doyle-Baker, Patricia K; Shank, Jena; Brooks, Julia; Benseler, Susanne; Emery, Carolyn A

    2017-07-18

    To conduct a systematic review to evaluate the efficacy of exercise interventions in improving outcomes across domains of functioning and disability in children and adolescents with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). Seven electronic databases were systematically searched up to November 16, 2016. Original data, analytic prospective design, physical therapy-led exercise intervention evaluation, children and adolescents with JIA, and assessment of functional, structural, activity, participation, or quality of life outcomes. Two authors screened search results, and discrepancies were resolved by consensus. Of 5037 potentially relevant studies, 9 randomized controlled trials and 1 cohort study were included and scored. Study quality (Downs and Black quality assessment tool) and level of evidence (Oxford Centre of Evidence-Based Medicine model) were assessed and meta-analysis conducted where appropriate. Alternatively, a descriptive summary approach was chosen. All randomized controlled trials were moderate-quality intervention studies (level 2b evidence; median Downs and Black score, 20 out of 32; range, 15-27). Interventions included aquatic, strengthening, proprioceptive, aerobic, and Pilates exercises. Pediatric activity capacity (Child Health Assessment Questionnaire) improved with exercise (mean difference, .45; 95% confidence interval, .05-.76). Furthermore, descriptive summaries indicated improved activity capacity, body function and structure (pain and muscle strength), and quality of life outcomes. Exercise therapy appears to be well tolerated and beneficial across clinically relevant outcomes in patients with JIA. The paucity of high-quality evidence and study heterogeneity limited the ability to provide conclusive, generalizing evidence for the efficacy of exercise therapy and to provide specific recommendations for clinical practice at this time. Future research evaluating exercise program implementation using validated outcomes and detailed adherence and

  18. The effect of exercise therapy on knee adduction moment in individuals with knee osteoarthritis: A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Giovanni E; Robinson, Caroline Cabral; Wiebusch, Matheus; Viero, Carolina Cabral de Mello; da Rosa, Luis Henrique Telles; Silva, Marcelo Faria

    2015-07-01

    Exercise therapy is an evidence-based intervention for the conservative management of knee osteoarthritis. It is hypothesized that exercise therapy could reduce the knee adduction moment. A systematic review was performed in order to verify the effects of exercise therapy on the knee adduction moment in individuals with knee osteoarthritis in studies that also assessed pain and physical function. A comprehensive electronic search was performed on MEDLINE, Cochrane CENTRAL, EMBASE, Google scholar and OpenGrey. Inclusion criteria were randomized controlled trials with control or sham groups as comparator assessing pain, physical function, muscle strength and knee adduction moment during walking at self-selected speed in individuals with knee osteoarthritis that underwent a structured exercise therapy rehabilitation program. Two independent reviewers extracted the data and assessed risk of bias. For each study, knee adduction moment, pain and physical function outcomes were extracted. For each outcome, mean differences and 95% confidence intervals were calculated. Due to clinical heterogeneity among exercise therapy protocols, a descriptive analysis was chosen. Three studies, comprising 233 participants, were included. None of the studies showed significant differences between strengthening and control/sham groups in knee adduction moment. In regards to pain and physical function, the three studies demonstrated significant improvement in pain and two of them showed increased physical function following exercise therapy compared to controls. Muscle strength and torque significantly improved in all the three trials favoring the intervention group. Clinical benefits from exercise therapy were not associated with changes in the knee adduction moment. The lack of knee adduction moment reduction indicates that exercise therapy may not be protective in knee osteoarthritis from a joint loading point of view. Alterations in neuromuscular control, not captured by the knee

  19. Bootstrapping Results of Exercise Therapy and Education for Patients with Congestive Heart Failure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Witta, E. Lea; Brubaker, Craig

    2003-01-01

    When studies are conducted over a period of time, the sample size typically decreases. In a study of the effects of exercise therapy and education with recovering congestive heart failure (CHF) patients (Brubaker, Witta, & Angelopoulus, 2003), the sample size decreased from over 40 to 9 participants after an 18-month time span. Although the…

  20. Effects of exercise therapy during dialysis for elderly patients undergoing maintenance dialysis

    PubMed Central

    Chigira, Yusuke; Oda, Takahiro; Izumi, Masataka; Yoshimura, Tukasa

    2017-01-01

    [Purpose] Exercise therapy during dialysis is currently being recommended since it is easy for patients to follow and results in high participation rates. In this study, this therapy was performed for elderly patients undergoing maintenance dialysis, and its effects were examined. [Subjects and Methods] Seven elderly patients (age: 70.6 ± 4.4) with chronic renal failure, who were able to perform exercises during maintenance dialysis, received the exercise therapy 2 or 3 times weekly for 3 months. Lower-limb muscle strength as well as the standardized dialysis dose (Kt/V) was measured before and after intervention. The patients were also evaluated using the 30-sec chair stand test (CS-30), the World Health Organization QOL Assessment 26 (WHO-QOL26), and a questionnaire. [Results] The lower-limb muscle strength and circumference, CS-30 score, and Kt/V values improved after intervention, but the difference was not significant. Significant differences were observed only in the WHO-QOL26 score. [Conclusion] The outcome was particularly favorable in terms of the quality of life (QOL). Based on the results from the questionnaire, the higher QOL may be due to the patients’ development of a positive attitude toward these activities. Although there were no significant differences, the values for the other criteria also improved, thereby supporting the effectiveness of exercise therapy to maintain or improve the patients’ motor functions and activity daily living (ADL) ability. PMID:28210031

  1. Pilot Study of Exercise Therapy on Painful Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Min; D’Silva, Linda; Martin, Katherine; Sharma, Neena; Pasnoor, Mamatha; LeMaster, Joseph

    2015-01-01

    Objective Painful diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN) is a common complication of diabetes. While the beneficial effect of exercise on diabetes is well established, its effect specifically on painful DPN has not been thoroughly explored. The objective of this pilot study was to examine the effect of aerobic exercise on pain in people with DPN. Methods Fourteen sedentary individuals (mean age 57±5.11 years) with painful DPN were enrolled in a 16-week, supervised aerobic exercise program. The Brief Pain Inventory-Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy (BPI-DPN) was used to assess pain intensity (worst, least, average, now) and pain interference with daily life (activity, mood, walk, normal work, relationship, sleep, enjoyment of life) pre- and post -intervention. Body mass index (BMI), maximum oxygen uptake (VO2max), hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c), and blood pressure were also measured pre-and post-intervention as secondary outcomes of interest. Results Significant reductions in pain interference were observed with walking (4.93±3.03 pre to 3.29±2.89 post, p=0.016), normal work (5.39±3.32 pre to 3.79±3.04 post, p=0.032), relationship with others (3.96±3.53 pre to 1.29±1.27 post, p=0.006), sleep (5.11±3.04 pre to 3.5±3.03 post, p=0.02), and the overall pain interference (4.65±2.70 pre to 2.97±2.22 post, p=0.013) following the intervention; however, there was no change in pain intensity. VO2max increased significantly post-intervention (16.02±3.84ml/kg/min pre to 17.18±4.19ml/kg/min, p=0.028), while BMI, HbA1c, and blood pressure remained unchanged. Conclusion These preliminary results suggest that perceived pain interference may be reduced following an aerobic exercise intervention among people with painful DPN, without a change in pain intensity. Further validation by a RCT is needed. PMID:25800666

  2. Exercise therapy for sexual dysfunction after prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Cormie, Prue; Newton, Robert U; Taaffe, Dennis R; Spry, Nigel; Galvão, Daniel A

    2013-12-01

    Sexual dysfunction is one of the most common, distressing and persistent adverse effects of prostate cancer treatment, and has a profound effect on quality of life for the patient and his partner. Current health-care provisions are inadequate to address the demand for the management of sexual dysfunction, with approximately half of prostate cancer survivors reporting unmet sexual health-care needs. Management strategies predominately involve pharmacological interventions to address the direct physiological effects of prostate cancer treatment on erectile function. However, the aetiology of sexual dysfunction is multifaceted and considerable physiological and psychological adverse effects of prostate cancer treatments, which are not addressed by pharmacological intervention, contribute to sexual dysfunction. Exercise has established efficacy for improving many of these factors in men with prostate cancer, including changes in body composition (especially to counteract body feminization), fatigue, physical function, risk of comorbid conditions, depression, anxiety and quality of life. Emerging evidence indicates that exercise also has a positive effect on sexual desire and sexual activity in men with prostate cancer.

  3. Qigong and exercise therapy in patients with long-term neck pain: a prospective randomized trial.

    PubMed

    Lansinger, Birgitta; Larsson, Elisabeth; Persson, Liselott C; Carlsson, Jane Y

    2007-10-15

    A randomized, controlled, multicenter trial: 1-year follow-up. To compare the effectiveness of qigong and exercise therapy in subjects with long-term nonspecific neck pain. The evidence for the benefit of treatment programs focusing on persons with long-term, nonspecific neck pain is conflicting. Several studies have shown support for exercise therapy, but the efficacy of qigong has not been scientifically evaluated. A total of 122 patients were randomly assigned to receive either qigong (n = 60) or exercise therapy (n = 62). Most of them were women (70%), and the mean age was 44 years. A maximum of 12 treatments were given over a period of 3 months. Neck pain frequency and intensity, neck disability (NDI), grip strength, and cervical range of motion were recorded before and immediately after, at 6 months, and at 12 months after the treatment period. Changes in outcome variables were analyzed and dichotomized as improved or unchanged/deteriorated. Clinical and demographic characteristics were similar among groups at baseline. No differences were found between the 2 interventions: qigong and exercise therapy. Both groups significantly improved immediately after treatment and this was maintained at the 6- and 12-month follow-ups in 5 of 8 outcome variables: average neck pain in the most recent week, current neck pain (with exception for immediately after treatment period), neck pain diary, NDI, and cervical range of motion in rotation. These results indicate that treatments including supervised qigong or exercise therapy resulting in reduced pain and disability can be recommended for persons with long-term nonspecific neck pain.

  4. Rate-adaptive AV delay and exercise performance following cardiac resynchronization therapy.

    PubMed

    Shanmugam, Nesan; Prada-Delgado, Oscar; Campos, Ana Garcia; Grimster, Alex; Valencia, Oswaldo; Baltabaeva, Aigul; Jones, Sue; Anderson, Lisa

    2012-11-01

    Physiological shortening of the atrioventricular (AV) interval with increasing heart rate is well documented in normal human beings and is an established component of dual-chamber pacing for bradycardia. To assess the effect of exercise on optimal AV delay and the impact of a patient-specific rate-adaptive AV delay (RAAVD) on exercise capacity in patients with heart failure following cardiac resynchronization therapy. Phase 1: We performed iterative AV optimization at rest and exercise in 52 cardiac resynchronization therapy patients in atrial-sensed mode (mean age 71.6 ± 9.2 years, 25% females). Phase 2: Subsequently, 20 consecutive volunteers from this group (mean age 69.2 ± 9.6 years, 15% females) underwent cardiopulmonary exercise testing with RAAVD individually programmed ON (RAAVD-ON) or OFF (RAAVD-OFF). Phase 1: In 94% of the patients, there was a marked reduction (mean 50%) in optimal AV delay with exercise. The optimal resting vs exercise AV delay was 114.2 ± 29 ms at a heart rate of 64.4 ± 7.1 beats/min vs 57 ± 31 ms at a heart rate of 103 ± 13 beats/min (P < .001). No patients required an increase in AV delay with exercise, and 3 (6%) showed no change. Phase 2: With RAAVD-ON, significantly better exercise times were achieved (8.7 ± 3.2 minutes) compared with RAAVD-OFF (7.9 ± 3.2 minutes; P = .003), and there was a significant improvement in Vo(2)max (RAAVD-ON 16.1 ± 4.0 vs RAAVD-OFF 14.9 ± 3.7 mL/(kg · min); P = .024). There was a dramatic reduction in optimal AV delay with physiological exercise in the majority of this heart failure cardiac resynchronization therapy cohort. Replicating this physiological response with a programmable RAAVD translated into a 10% improvement in exercise capacity. Copyright © 2012 Heart Rhythm Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Effects of acute exercise on fear extinction in rats and exposure therapy in humans: Null findings from five experiments.

    PubMed

    Jacquart, Jolene; Roquet, Rheall F; Papini, Santiago; Powers, Mark B; Rosenfield, David; Smits, Jasper A J; Monfils, Marie-H

    2017-08-01

    Exposure therapy is an established learning-based intervention for the treatment of anxiety disorders with an average response rate of nearly 50%, leaving room for improvement. Emerging strategies to enhance exposure therapy in humans and fear extinction retention in animal models are primarily pharmacological. These approaches are limited as many patients report preferring non-pharmacological approaches in therapy. With general cognitive enhancement effects, exercise has emerged as a plausible non-pharmacological augmentation strategy. The present study tested the hypothesis that fear extinction and exposure therapy would be enhanced by a pre-training bout of exercise. We conducted four experiments with rats that involved a standardized conditioning and extinction paradigm and a manipulation of exercise. In a fifth experiment, we manipulated vigorous-intensity exercise prior to a standardized virtual reality exposure therapy session among adults with fear of heights. In experiments 1-4, exercise did not facilitate fear extinction, long-term memory, or fear relapse tests. In experiment 5, human participants showed an overall reduction in fear of heights but exercise did not enhance symptom improvement. Although acute exercise prior to fear extinction or exposure therapy, as operationalized in the present 5 studies, did not enhance outcomes, these results must be interpreted within the context of a broader literature that includes positive findings. Taken all together, this suggests that more research is necessary to identify optimal parameters and key individual differences so that exercise can be implemented successfully to treat anxiety disorders. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Effect of exercise augmentation of cognitive behavioural therapy for the treatment of suicidal ideation and depression.

    PubMed

    Abdollahi, Abbas; LeBouthillier, Daniel M; Najafi, Mahmoud; Asmundson, Gordon J G; Hosseinian, Simin; Shahidi, Shahriar; Carlbring, Per; Kalhori, Atefeh; Sadeghi, Hassan; Jalili, Marzieh

    2017-09-01

    Suicidal ideation and depression are prevalent and costly conditions that reduce quality of life. This study was designed to determine the efficacy of exercise as an adjunct to cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) for suicidal ideation and depression among depressed individuals. In a randomized clinical trial, 54 mildly to moderately depressed patients (54% female, mean age=48.25) were assigned to a combined CBT and exercise group or to a CBT only group. Both groups received one weekly session of therapy for 12 weeks, while the combined group also completed exercise three times weekly over the same period. Self-reported suicidal ideation, depression, and activities of daily living were measured at the beginning and the end of treatment. Multilevel modelling revealed greater improvements in suicidal ideation, depression, and activities of daily living in the combined CBT and exercise group, compared to the CBT only group. No follow-up data were collected, so the long-term effects (i.e., maintenance of gains) is unclear. The findings revealed that exercise adjunct to CBT effectively decreases both depressive symptoms and suicidal ideation in mildly to moderately depressed individuals. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. British pilot study of exercise therapy. II. Patients with cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed Central

    Nixon, P. G.; Carruthers, M. E.; Taylor, D. J.; Bethell, H. J.; Grabau, W.

    1976-01-01

    Two groups of middle-aged men, one with and one without overt cardiovascular disease, were studied while they were taking part in a specially designed course of exercise therapy in a gymnasium. The "patients" group had at least two months pre-treatment to allow physical recovery and mental re-education before their initial very small test dose of exercise. Using short periods of progressive, mainly weight-loaded, isotonic exercises carefully regulated by control of pulse rate and avoidance of symptoms of over-exertion, both groups showed large increases in effort capacity and reductions in resting pulse rate, blood pressure and plasma lipid levels within two months. The safety of this particular form of exercise was shown in this high-risk population by the low drop-out rate and the absence of cardiovascular accidents in the gymnasium over a ten year period. It is suggested that, given suitable training of the staff and using the safeguards described, the presence of doctors and a cardiac resuscitation team is unnecessary in a gymnasium specializing in cardiac rehabilitation. This makes it possible for rehabilitation and physiotherapy departments throughout the country to carry out this effective and positive form of exercise therapy. PMID:963375

  8. Inpatient cardiac rehabilitation programs’ exercise therapy for patients undergoing cardiac surgery: National Korean Questionnaire Survey

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Yong Gon; Jang, Mi Ja; Park, Won Hah; Hong, Kyung Pyo; Sung, Jidong

    2017-01-01

    Inpatient cardiac rehabilitation (ICR) has been commonly conducted after cardiac surgery in many countries, and has been reported a lots of results. However, until now, there is inadequacy of data on the status of ICR in Korea. This study described the current status of exercise therapy in ICR that is performed after cardiac surgery in Korean hospitals. Questionnaires modified by previous studies were sent to the departments of thoracic surgery of 10 hospitals in Korea. Nine replies (response rate 90%) were received. Eight nurses and one physiotherapist completed the questionnaire. Most of the education on wards after cardiac surgery was conducted by nurses. On postoperative day 1, four sites performed sitting on the edge of bed, sit to stand, up to chair, and walking in the ward. Only one site performed that exercise on postoperative day 2. One activity (stairs up and down) was performed on different days at only two sites. Patients received education preoperatively and predischarge for preventing complications and reducing muscle weakness through physical inactivity. The results of the study demonstrate that there are small variations in the general care provided by nurses after cardiac surgery. Based on the results of this research, we recommended that exercise therapy programs have to conduct by exercise specialists like exercise physiologists or physiotherapists for patients in hospitalization period. PMID:28349037

  9. Inpatient cardiac rehabilitation programs' exercise therapy for patients undergoing cardiac surgery: National Korean Questionnaire Survey.

    PubMed

    Seo, Yong Gon; Jang, Mi Ja; Park, Won Hah; Hong, Kyung Pyo; Sung, Jidong

    2017-02-01

    Inpatient cardiac rehabilitation (ICR) has been commonly conducted after cardiac surgery in many countries, and has been reported a lots of results. However, until now, there is inadequacy of data on the status of ICR in Korea. This study described the current status of exercise therapy in ICR that is performed after cardiac surgery in Korean hospitals. Questionnaires modified by previous studies were sent to the departments of thoracic surgery of 10 hospitals in Korea. Nine replies (response rate 90%) were received. Eight nurses and one physiotherapist completed the questionnaire. Most of the education on wards after cardiac surgery was conducted by nurses. On postoperative day 1, four sites performed sitting on the edge of bed, sit to stand, up to chair, and walking in the ward. Only one site performed that exercise on postoperative day 2. One activity (stairs up and down) was performed on different days at only two sites. Patients received education preoperatively and predischarge for preventing complications and reducing muscle weakness through physical inactivity. The results of the study demonstrate that there are small variations in the general care provided by nurses after cardiac surgery. Based on the results of this research, we recommended that exercise therapy programs have to conduct by exercise specialists like exercise physiologists or physiotherapists for patients in hospitalization period.

  10. Clinical outcomes following manual physical therapy and exercise for hip osteoarthritis: A case series.

    PubMed

    MacDonald, Cameron W; Whitman, Julie M; Cleland, Joshua A; Smith, Marcia; Hoeksma, Hugo L

    2006-08-01

    Case series describing the outcomes of individual patients with hip osteoarthritis treated with manual physical therapy and exercise. Seven patients referred to physical therapy with hip osteoarthritis and/or hip pain were included in this case series. All patients were treated with manual physical therapy followed by exercises to maximize strength and range of motion. Six of 7 patients completed a Harris Hip Score at initial examination and discharge from physical therapy, and 1 patient completed a Global Rating of Change Scale at discharge. Three males and 4 females with a median age of 62 years (range, 52-80 years) and median duration of symptoms of 9 months (range, 2-60 months) participated in this case series. The median number of physical therapy sessions attended was 5 (range, 4-12). The median increase in total passive range of motion of the hip was 82 degrees (range, 70 degrees-86 degrees). The median improvement on the Harris Hip Score was 25 points (range, 15-38 points). The single patient who completed the Global Rating of Change Scale at discharge reported being "a great deal better." Numeric pain rating scores decreased by a mean of 5 points (range, 2-7 points) on 0-to-10-point scale. All patients exhibited reductions in pain and increases in passive range of motion, as well as a clinically meaningful improvement in function. Although we can not infer a cause and effect relationship from a case series, the outcomes with these patients are similar to others reported in the literature that have demonstrated superior clinical outcomes associated with manual physical therapy and exercise for hip osteoarthritis compared to exercise alone.

  11. Effectiveness of Manual Therapy and Therapeutic Exercise for Temporomandibular Disorders: Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    Armijo-Olivo, Susan; Pitance, Laurent; Singh, Vandana; Neto, Francisco; Thie, Norman; Michelotti, Ambra

    2016-01-01

    Manual therapy (MT) and exercise have been extensively used to treat people with musculoskeletal conditions such as temporomandibular disorders (TMD). The evidence regarding their effectiveness provided by early systematic reviews is outdated. The aim of this study was to summarize evidence from and evaluate the methodological quality of randomized controlled trials that examined the effectiveness of MT and therapeutic exercise interventions compared with other active interventions or standard care for treatment of TMD. Electronic data searches of 6 databases were performed, in addition to a manual search. Randomized controlled trials involving adults with TMD that compared any type of MT intervention (eg, mobilization, manipulation) or exercise therapy with a placebo intervention, controlled comparison intervention, or standard care were included. The main outcomes of this systematic review were pain, range of motion, and oral function. Forty-eight studies met the inclusion criteria and were analyzed. Data were extracted in duplicate on specific study characteristics. The overall evidence for this systematic review was considered low. The trials included in this review had unclear or high risk of bias. Thus, the evidence was generally downgraded based on assessments of risk of bias. Most of the effect sizes were low to moderate, with no clear indication of superiority of exercises versus other conservative treatments for TMD. However, MT alone or in combination with exercises at the jaw or cervical level showed promising effects. Quality of the evidence and heterogeneity of the studies were limitations of the study. No high-quality evidence was found, indicating that there is great uncertainty about the effectiveness of exercise and MT for treatment of TMD. © 2016 American Physical Therapy Association.

  12. Paraoxonase responses to exercise and niacin therapy in men with metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Taylor, James Kyle; Plaisance, Eric P; Mahurin, A Jack; Mestek, Michael L; Moncada-Jimenez, Jose; Grandjean, Peter W

    2015-01-01

    Our purpose was to characterize changes in paraoxonase 1 (PON1) activity and concentration after single aerobic exercise sessions conducted before and after 6 weeks of niacin therapy in men with metabolic syndrome (MetS). Twelve men with MetS expended 500 kcal by walking at 65% of VO2max before and after a 6-week regimen of niacin. Niacin doses were titrated by 500 mg/week from 500 to 1500 mg/day and maintained at 1500 mg/day for the last 4 weeks. Fasting blood samples were collected before and 24 hours after each exercise session and analyzed for PON1 activity, PON1 concentration, myeloperoxidase (MPO), apolipoprotein A1, oxidized low-density lipoprotein (oLDL), lipoprotein particle sizes and concentrations. PON1 activity, PON1 concentration, MPO, and oLDL were unaltered following the independent effects of exercise and niacin (P > 0.05 for all). High-density lipoprotein particle size decreased by 3% (P = 0.040) and concentrations of small very low-density lipoprotein increased (P = 0.016) following exercise. PON1 activity increased 6.1% (P = 0.037) and PON1 concentrations increased 11.3% (P = 0.015) with the combination of exercise and niacin. Exercise and niacin works synergistically to increase PON1 activity and concentration with little or no changes in lipoproteins or markers of lipid oxidation.

  13. Aerobic exercise training facilitates the effectiveness of cognitive behavioral therapy in panic disorder.

    PubMed

    Gaudlitz, Katharina; Plag, Jens; Dimeo, Fernando; Ströhle, Andreas

    2015-03-01

    Physical activity has been discussed as a therapeutic alternative or add-on for the treatment of anxiety disorders. We studied whether aerobic exercise compared to physical activity with low impact can improve the effect of cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) in patients with panic disorder (PD) with/without agoraphobia. Forty-seven patients received group CBT treatment over 1 month, which was augmented with an 8-week protocol of either aerobic exercise (three times/week, 30 min, 70% VO(2) max; n = 24) or a training program including exercises with very low intensity (n = 23) in a randomized controlled double-blind design. The primary outcome measure was the total score on the Hamilton Anxiety Scale (Ham-A). A 2 × 3 analysis of covariance (ANCOVA) with baseline value as a covariate was conducted for data analysis. Time × group interaction for the Ham-A revealed a significant effect (P = .047, η(2) p = .072), which represented the significant group difference at a 7-month follow-up. For the other clinical outcome measures no statistical significance emerged, although improvement was more sustained in the exercise group. For patients with PD, regular aerobic exercise adds an additional benefit to CBT. This supports previous results and provides evidence about the intensity of exercise that needs to be performed. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Qigong versus exercise versus no therapy for patients with chronic neck pain: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Rendant, Daniel; Pach, Daniel; Lüdtke, Rainer; Reisshauer, Anett; Mietzner, Anna; Willich, Stefan N; Witt, Claudia M

    2011-03-15

    Randomized controlled trial. To evaluate whether qigong is more effective than no treatment and not inferior to exercise therapy. Lifetime prevalence of chronic neck pain is close to 50%. Qigong is often used by patients, although, the evidence is still unclear. Patients (aged 20-60 years) with chronic neck pain (visual analog scale, VAS ≥ 40 mm) were randomized to 1) qigong or 2) exercise therapy (18 sessions over 6 months) or 3) waiting list (no treatment). At baseline and after 3 and 6 months, patients completed standardized questionnaires assessing neck pain (VAS), neck pain and disability, and quality of life (Short Form SF-36 questionnaire, SF-36). The primary endpoint was average pain in the last 7 days on VAS at 6-month follow-up. Statistical analysis included generalized estimation equation models adjusted for baseline values and patient expectation. A total of 123 patients (aged 46 ± 11 years, 88% women) suffering from chronic neck pain for 3.2 (SD ± 1.6) years were included. After 6 months, a significant difference was seen between the qigong and waiting list control groups (VAS mean difference: -14 mm [95%CI = -23.1 to -5.4], P = 0.002). Mean improvements in the exercise group were comparable to those in the qigong group (difference between groups -0.7 mm [CI = -9.1 to 7.7]) but failed to show statistical significance (P = 0.092). Neck pain and disability, and SF-36 results also yielded superiority of qigong over no treatment and similar results in the qigong and exercise therapy groups. Qigong was more effective than no treatment in patients with chronic neck pain. Further studies could be designed without waiting list control and should use a larger sample to clarify the value of qigong compared to exercise therapy.

  15. Stem cell therapy: an exercise in patience and prudence

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Huan-Ting; Otsu, Makoto; Nakauchi, Hiromitsu

    2013-01-01

    In recent times, the epigenetic study of pluripotency based on cellular reprogramming techniques led to the creation of induced pluripotent stem cells. It has come to represent the forefront of a new wave of alternative therapeutic approaches in the field of stem cell therapy. Progress in drug development has saved countless lives, but there are numerous intractable diseases where curative treatment cannot be achieved through pharmacological intervention alone. Consequently, there has been an unfortunate rise in incidences of organ failures, degenerative disorders and cancers, hence novel therapeutic interventions are required. Stem cells have unique self-renewal and multilineage differentiation capabilities that could be harnessed for therapeutic purposes. Although a number of mature differentiated cells have been characterized in vitro, few have been demonstrated to function in a physiologically relevant context. Despite fervent levels of enthusiasm in the field, the reality is that other than the employment of haematopoietic stem cells, many other therapies have yet to be thoroughly proven for their therapeutic benefit and safety in application. This review shall focus on a discussion regarding the current status of stem cell therapy, the issues surrounding it and its future prospects with a general background on the regulatory networks underlying pluripotency. PMID:23166396

  16. Supervised exercise therapy in the management of peripheral arterial disease - an assessment of compliance.

    PubMed

    Aherne, Thomas M; Kheirelseid, Elrasheid A H; Boland, Michael; Carr, Shane; Al-Zabi, Thekra; Bashar, Khalid; Moneley, Daragh; Leahy, Austin; McCaffrey, Noel; Naughton, Peter

    2017-05-01

    Supervised exercise therapy (SET) is an effective option in the management of peripheral arterial disease (PAD). Unfortunately, poor compliance remains prevalent. This study aimed to assess patient exercise compliance and to identify factors influencing symptomatic improvement and SET participation. Data regarding attendance at SET for this cohort study were extracted from a prospectively maintained database of patients with claudication attending SET at Dublin City University. All patients had ankle brachial index confirmed PAD with associated intermittent claudication. Exercise performance and symptomatic data were gathered retrospectively using patient charts and interviews. Ninety-eight patients were referred for SET during the study period. The mean age was 69.2 (± 10.1) with 18 % being female. Median follow-up was 25.1 months (IQ range 17.0-31.6). Overall, the mean number of sessions attended per patient was 19.5. Exercise compliance was associated with a significant improvement in symptoms (p = 0.001). Other factors including anatomical level of claudication (P = 0.042) and educational level (p = 0.007) were found to affect the outcome of SET. Multivariate analysis revealed hypertension as a predictor of symptomatic outcome after SET (p = 0.045). Furthermore, ex-smokers (p = 0.021) and those previously diagnosed with hypercholesterolaemia (p = 0.020) or ischaemic heart disease (p = 0.029) had superior exercise compliance. Using linear regression, smoking history (p = 0.024) was identified as a predictor of compliance to SET. Establishing exercise compliance remains challenging in the PAD cohort. Pre-exercise patient education and personalised exercise prescriptions may result in improvements in function and compliance.

  17. Aerobic Exercise and Pharmacological Therapies for Skeletal Myopathy in Heart Failure: Similarities and Differences

    PubMed Central

    Bacurau, Aline V.; Cunha, Telma F.; Souza, Rodrigo W.; Voltarelli, Vanessa A.; Gabriel-Costa, Daniele; Brum, Patricia C.

    2016-01-01

    Skeletal myopathy has been identified as a major comorbidity of heart failure (HF) affecting up to 20% of ambulatory patients leading to shortness of breath, early fatigue, and exercise intolerance. Neurohumoral blockade, through the inhibition of renin angiotensin aldosterone system (RAS) and β-adrenergic receptor blockade (β-blockers), is a mandatory pharmacological therapy of HF since it reduces symptoms, mortality, and sudden death. However, the effect of these drugs on skeletal myopathy needs to be clarified, since exercise intolerance remains in HF patients optimized with β-blockers and inhibitors of RAS. Aerobic exercise training (AET) is efficient in counteracting skeletal myopathy and in improving functional capacity and quality of life. Indeed, AET has beneficial effects on failing heart itself despite being of less magnitude compared with neurohumoral blockade. In this way, AET should be implemented in the care standards, together with pharmacological therapies. Since both neurohumoral inhibition and AET have a direct and/or indirect impact on skeletal muscle, this review aims to provide an overview of the isolated effects of these therapeutic approaches in counteracting skeletal myopathy in HF. The similarities and dissimilarities of neurohumoral inhibition and AET therapies are also discussed to identify potential advantageous effects of these combined therapies for treating HF. PMID:26904163

  18. Feasibility and Initial Effectiveness of Home Exercise During Maintenance Therapy for Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Esbenshade, Adam J.; Friedman, Debra L.; Smith, Webb A.; Jeha, Sima; Pui, Ching-Hon; Robison, Leslie L.; Ness, Kirsten K.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) are at increased risk of obesity and deconditioning from cancer therapy. This pilot study assessed feasibility/initial efficacy of an exercise intervention for ALL patients undergoing maintenance therapy. Methods Participants were children with ALL, age 5-10 years, receiving maintenance therapy, in first remission. A 6-month home-based intervention, with written and video instruction, was supervised with weekly calls from an exercise coach. Pre- and post-study testing evaluated strength, flexibility, fitness and motor function. Results Seventeen patients enrolled (participation 63%). Twelve (71%) finished the intervention, completing 81.7±7.2% of prescribed sessions. Improvements ≥5% occurred in 67% for knee and 75% for grip strength, 58% for hamstring/low-back and 83% for ankle flexibility, 75% for the 6-minute-walk-test, and 33% for performance on the Bruininks-Oseretsky Test of Motor Proficiency Version 2. Conclusions This pilot study demonstrated that exercise intervention during ALL therapy is feasible and has promise for efficacy. PMID:24979081

  19. Feasibility and initial effectiveness of home exercise during maintenance therapy for childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Esbenshade, Adam J; Friedman, Debra L; Smith, Webb A; Jeha, Sima; Pui, Ching-Hon; Robison, Leslie L; Ness, Kirsten K

    2014-01-01

    Children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) are at increased risk of obesity and deconditioning from cancer therapy. This pilot study assessed feasibility/initial efficacy of an exercise intervention for patients with ALL undergoing maintenance therapy. Participants were aged 5 to 10 years, receiving maintenance therapy, in first remission. A 6-month home-based intervention, with written and video instruction, was supervised with weekly calls from an exercise coach. Pre- and poststudy testing addressed strength, flexibility, fitness, and motor function. Seventeen patients enrolled (participation 63%). Twelve (71%) finished the intervention, completing 81.7 ± 7.2% of prescribed sessions. Improvements of 5% or more occurred in 67% for knee and 75% for grip strength, 58% for hamstring/low-back and 83% for ankle flexibility, 75% for the 6-Minute Walk Test, and 33% for performance on the Bruininks-Oseretsky Test of Motor Proficiency Version 2. This pilot study demonstrated that exercise intervention during ALL therapy is feasible and has promise for efficacy.

  20. LED therapy or cryotherapy between exercise intervals in Wistar rats: anti-inflammatory and ergogenic effects.

    PubMed

    da Costa Santos, Vanessa Batista; de Paula Ramos, Solange; Milanez, Vinícius Flávio; Corrêa, Julio Cesar Molina; de Andrade Alves, Rubens Igor; Dias, Ivan Frederico Lupiano; Nakamura, Fábio Yuzo

    2014-03-01

    The aim of this study was to test, between two bouts of exercise, the effects of light-emitting diode (LED) therapy and cryotherapy regarding muscle damage, inflammation, and performance. Male Wistar rats were allocated in four groups: control, passive recovery (PR), cryotherapy (Cryo), and LED therapy. The animals were submitted to 45 min of swimming exercise followed by 25 min of recovery and then a second bout of either 45 min of exercise (muscle damage analysis) or time to exhaustion (performance). During the rest intervals, the rats were kept in passive rest (PR), submitted to cold water immersion (10 min, 10 °C) or LED therapy (940 nm, 4 J/cm(2)) of the gastrocnemius muscle. Blood samples were collected to analyze creatine kinase activity (CK), C-reactive protein (CRP), and leukocyte counts. The soleus muscles were evaluated histologically. Time to exhaustion was recorded during the second bout of exercise. After a second bout of 45 min, the results demonstrated leukocytosis in the PR and Cryo groups. Neutrophil counts were increased in all test groups. CK levels were increased in the Cryo group. CRP was increased in PR animals. The PR group presented a high frequency of necrosis, but the LED group had fewer necrotic areas. Edema formation was prevented, and fewer areas of inflammatory cells were observed in the LED group. The time to exhaustion was greater in both the LED and Cryo groups, without differences in CK levels. CRP was decreased in LED animals. We conclude that LED therapy and cryotherapy can improve performance, although LED therapy is more efficient in preventing muscle damage and local and systemic inflammation.

  1. Aquatic Exercise Therapy for People With Parkinson Disease: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Carroll, Louise M; Volpe, Daniele; Morris, Meg E; Saunders, Jean; Clifford, Amanda M

    2017-04-01

    To evaluate the effects of aquatic exercise therapy on gait variability and disability compared with usual care for people with Parkinson disease (PD). Single-blind randomized controlled trial. Community-based hydrotherapy pool. Individuals with PD (Hoehn-Yahr stages I-III) (N=21). Participants were randomly assigned to either an aquatic exercise therapy group (45min, twice a week for 6wk) or a group that received usual care. The primary outcome measure was gait variability as measured using a motion capture system. Secondary outcomes were quality of life measured on the Parkinson's Disease Questionnaire-39 and freezing of gait and motor disability quantified by the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale. Feasibility was evaluated by measuring safety, adverse events, and participant satisfaction. People in the aquatic therapy group and usual care group showed similar small improvements in gait variability. The aquatic therapy group showed greater improvements in disability than the usual care group (P<.01). No differences between groups or over time were identified for freezing of gait or quality of life. Aquatic therapy sessions were safe and enjoyable with no adverse events. Aquatic therapy appears feasible and safe for some people in the early stages of PD. Copyright © 2017 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Cardiac resynchronization therapy modulation of exercise left ventricular function and pulmonary O₂ uptake in heart failure.

    PubMed

    Tomczak, Corey R; Paterson, Ian; Haykowsky, Mark J; Lawrance, Richard; Martellotto, Andres; Pantano, Alfredo; Gulamhusein, Sajad; Haennel, Robert G

    2012-06-15

    To better understand the mechanisms contributing to improved exercise capacity with cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT), we studied the effects of 6 mo of CRT on pulmonary O(2) uptake (Vo(2)) kinetics, exercise left ventricular (LV) function, and peak Vo(2) in 12 subjects (age: 56 ± 15 yr, peak Vo(2): 12.9 ± 3.2 ml·kg(-1)·min(-1), ejection fraction: 18 ± 3%) with heart failure. We hypothesized that CRT would speed Vo(2) kinetics due to an increase in stroke volume secondary to a reduction in LV end-systolic volume (ESV) and that the increase in peak Vo(2) would be related to an increase in cardiac output reserve. We found that Vo(2) kinetics were faster during the transition to moderate-intensity exercise after CRT (pre-CRT: 69 ± 21 s vs. post-CRT: 54 ± 17 s, P < 0.05). During moderate-intensity exercise, LV ESV reserve (exercise - resting) increased 9 ± 7 ml (vs. a 3 ± 9-ml decrease pre-CRT, P < 0.05), and steady-state stroke volume increased (pre-CRT: 42 ± 8 ml vs. post-CRT: 61 ± 12 ml, P < 0.05). LV end-diastolic volume did not change from rest to steady-state exercise post-CRT (P > 0.05). CRT improved heart rate, measured as a lower resting and steady-state exercise heart rate and as faster heart rate kinetics after CRT (pre-CRT: 89 ± 12 s vs. post-CRT: 69 ± 21 s, P < 0.05). For peak exercise, cardiac output reserve increased significantly post-CRT and was 22% higher at peak exercise post-CRT (both P < 0.05). The increase in cardiac output was due to both a significant increase in peak and reserve stroke volume and to a nonsignificant increase in heart rate reserve. Similar patterns in LV volumes as moderate-intensity exercise were observed at peak exercise. Cardiac output reserve was related to peak Vo(2) (r = 0.48, P < 0.05). These findings demonstrate the chronic CRT-mediated cardiac factors that contribute, in part, to the speeding in Vo(2) kinetics and increase in peak Vo(2) in clinically stable heart failure patients.

  3. Low level laser therapy before eccentric exercise reduces muscle damage markers in humans.

    PubMed

    Baroni, Bruno Manfredini; Leal Junior, Ernesto Cesar Pinto; De Marchi, Thiago; Lopes, André Luiz; Salvador, Mirian; Vaz, Marco Aurélio

    2010-11-01

    The purpose of the present study was to determine the effect of low level laser therapy (LLLT) treatment before knee extensor eccentric exercise on indirect markers of muscle damage. Thirty-six healthy men were randomized in LLLT group (n = 18) and placebo group (n = 18). After LLLT or placebo treatment, subjects performed 75 maximal knee extensors eccentric contractions (five sets of 15 repetitions; velocity = 60° seg(-1); range of motion = 60°). Muscle soreness (visual analogue scale--VAS), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and creatine kinase (CK) levels were measured prior to exercise, and 24 and 48 h after exercise. Muscle function (maximal voluntary contraction--MVC) was measured before exercise, immediately after, and 24 and 48 h post-exercise. Groups had no difference on kineanthropometric characteristics and on eccentric exercise performance. They also presented similar baseline values of VAS (0.00 mm for LLLT and placebo groups), LDH (LLLT = 186 IU/l; placebo = 183 IU/l), CK (LLLT = 145 IU/l; placebo = 155 IU/l) and MVC (LLLT = 293 Nm; placebo = 284 Nm). VAS data did not show group by time interaction (P = 0.066). In the other outcomes, LLLT group presented (1) smaller increase on LDH values 48 h post-exercise (LLLT = 366 IU/l; placebo = 484 IU/l; P = 0.017); (2) smaller increase on CK values 24 h (LLLT = 272 IU/l; placebo = 498 IU/l; P = 0.020) and 48 h (LLLT = 436 IU/l; placebo = 1328 IU/l; P < 0.001) post-exercise; (3) smaller decrease on MVC immediately after exercise (LLLT = 189 Nm; placebo = 154 Nm; P = 0.011), and 24 h (LLLT = 249 Nm; placebo = 205 Nm; P = 0.004) and 48 h (LLLT = 267 Nm; placebo = 216 Nm; P = 0.001) post-exercise compared with the placebo group. In conclusion, LLLT treatment before eccentric exercise was effective in terms of attenuating the increase of muscle proteins in the blood serum and the decrease in muscle force.

  4. Effect of aerobic exercise and raloxifene combination therapy on senile osteoporosis

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Chengjin; Hou, Haibing; Chen, Yutao; Lv, Kai

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] This study assessed the effects of combined application of raloxifene and aerobic exercise on senile osteoporosis. [Subjects and Methods] A total of 70 elderly patients with osteoporosis, who treated at our hospital between April 2013 and August 2014, were divided into equal-sized observation and control groups. The control group was administered raloxifene, whereas the observation group received raloxifene treatment plus aerobic exercise. [Results] Outpatient outcomes were considered dependent variables. After treatment, the two groups differed significantly in terms of lumbar spine (L2–L4) and proximal femoral bone mineral density. The urine pyridine/creatinine ratio decreased significantly and serum calcitonin level increased significantly in the observation group. These differences were statistically significant. [Conclusion] Raloxifene combined with aerobic exercise therapy significantly improves bone density and promotes bone formation in patients with senile osteoporosis. PMID:27390417

  5. Effect of aerobic exercise and raloxifene combination therapy on senile osteoporosis.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Chengjin; Hou, Haibing; Chen, Yutao; Lv, Kai

    2016-06-01

    [Purpose] This study assessed the effects of combined application of raloxifene and aerobic exercise on senile osteoporosis. [Subjects and Methods] A total of 70 elderly patients with osteoporosis, who treated at our hospital between April 2013 and August 2014, were divided into equal-sized observation and control groups. The control group was administered raloxifene, whereas the observation group received raloxifene treatment plus aerobic exercise. [Results] Outpatient outcomes were considered dependent variables. After treatment, the two groups differed significantly in terms of lumbar spine (L2-L4) and proximal femoral bone mineral density. The urine pyridine/creatinine ratio decreased significantly and serum calcitonin level increased significantly in the observation group. These differences were statistically significant. [Conclusion] Raloxifene combined with aerobic exercise therapy significantly improves bone density and promotes bone formation in patients with senile osteoporosis.

  6. Inspiratory muscle conditioning exercise and diaphragm gene therapy in Pompe disease: Clinical evidence of respiratory plasticity.

    PubMed

    Smith, Barbara K; Martin, A Daniel; Lawson, Lee Ann; Vernot, Valerie; Marcus, Jordan; Islam, Saleem; Shafi, Nadeem; Corti, Manuela; Collins, Shelley W; Byrne, Barry J

    2017-01-01

    Pompe disease is an inherited disorder due to a mutation in the gene that encodes acid α-glucosidase (GAA). Children with infantile-onset Pompe disease develop progressive hypotonic weakness and cardiopulmonary insufficiency that may eventually require mechanical ventilation (MV). Our team conducted a first in human trial of diaphragmatic gene therapy (AAV1-CMV-GAA) to treat respiratory neural dysfunction in infantile-onset Pompe. Subjects (aged 2-15years, full-time MV: n=5, partial/no MV: n=4) underwent a period of preoperative inspiratory muscle conditioning exercise. The change in respiratory function after exercise alone was compared to the change in function after intramuscular delivery of AAV1-CMV-GAA to the diaphragm with continued exercise. Since AAV-mediated gene therapy can reach phrenic motoneurons via retrograde transduction, we hypothesized that AAV1-CMV-GAA would improve dynamic respiratory motor function to a greater degree than exercise alone. Dependent measures were maximal inspiratory pressure (MIP), respiratory responses to inspiratory threshold loads (load compensation: LC), and physical evidence of diaphragm activity (descent on MRI, EMG activity). Exercise alone did not change function. After AAV1-CMV-GAA, MIP was unchanged. Flow and volume LC responses increased after dosing (p<0.05 to p<0.005), but only in the subjects with partial/no MV use. Changes in LC tended to occur on or after 180days. At Day 180, the four subjects with MRI evidence of diaphragm descent had greater maximal voluntary ventilation (p<0.05) and tended to be younger, stronger, and use fewer hours of daily MV. In conclusion, combined AAV1-CMV-GAA and exercise training conferred benefits to dynamic motor function of the diaphragm. Children with a higher baseline neuromuscular function may have greater potential for functional gains. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Effectiveness of Manual Therapy and Therapeutic Exercise for Temporomandibular Disorders: Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Pitance, Laurent; Singh, Vandana; Neto, Francisco; Thie, Norman; Michelotti, Ambra

    2016-01-01

    Background Manual therapy (MT) and exercise have been extensively used to treat people with musculoskeletal conditions such as temporomandibular disorders (TMD). The evidence regarding their effectiveness provided by early systematic reviews is outdated. Purpose The aim of this study was to summarize evidence from and evaluate the methodological quality of randomized controlled trials that examined the effectiveness of MT and therapeutic exercise interventions compared with other active interventions or standard care for treatment of TMD. Data Sources Electronic data searches of 6 databases were performed, in addition to a manual search. Study Selection Randomized controlled trials involving adults with TMD that compared any type of MT intervention (eg, mobilization, manipulation) or exercise therapy with a placebo intervention, controlled comparison intervention, or standard care were included. The main outcomes of this systematic review were pain, range of motion, and oral function. Forty-eight studies met the inclusion criteria and were analyzed. Data Extraction Data were extracted in duplicate on specific study characteristics. Data Synthesis The overall evidence for this systematic review was considered low. The trials included in this review had unclear or high risk of bias. Thus, the evidence was generally downgraded based on assessments of risk of bias. Most of the effect sizes were low to moderate, with no clear indication of superiority of exercises versus other conservative treatments for TMD. However, MT alone or in combination with exercises at the jaw or cervical level showed promising effects. Limitations Quality of the evidence and heterogeneity of the studies were limitations of the study. Conclusions No high-quality evidence was found, indicating that there is great uncertainty about the effectiveness of exercise and MT for treatment of TMD. PMID:26294683

  8. The effects of FGF-2 gene therapy combined with voluntary exercise on axonal regeneration across peripheral nerve gaps.

    PubMed

    Haastert, Kirsten; Ying, Zhe; Grothe, Claudia; Gómez-Pinilla, Fernando

    2008-10-10

    Studies were conducted to determine the possibility that voluntary exercise could enhance regenerative effects of gene therapy via Schwann cells (SC) over-expressing FGF-2. Sedentary or exercise rehabilitation conditions were therefore provided shortly after reconstructing 10mm sciatic nerve gaps in rats with silicone grafts. Exercise for 7 days elevated mRNA levels of regeneration associated proteins (GAP-43 and synapsin I) in lumbar spinal cord and dorsal root ganglia of SC transplanted, in contrast to non-cellular reconstructed rats. FGF-2 gene therapy followed by 25-27 days of exercise did enhance regeneration of myelinated axons in comparison to sedentary animals. Four weeks after surgery mRNA levels of regeneration associated proteins were significantly higher in lumbar spinal cord of running compared to sedentary SC transplanted animals. Our results suggest that voluntary exercise could reinforce the beneficial effects of SC transplantation and FGF-2 gene therapy in peripheral nerve reconstruction approaches.

  9. Effect on prognosis of abolition of exercise-induced painless myocardial ischemia by medical therapy.

    PubMed

    Lim, R; Dyke, L; Dymond, D S

    1992-03-15

    During exercise radionuclide ventriculography, many patients with coronary artery disease exhibit painless myocardial ischemia defined as an abnormal left ventricular ejection fraction response without accompanying angina. To see if complete suppression of such exercise-induced painless ischemia by anti-ischemic medication implies a better prognosis in medically treated coronary artery disease, 34 patients underwent repeat testing at 4 weeks receiving regular conventional therapy that rendered angina no worse than class I. With such therapy, painless ischemia was abolished in 12 patients (group I) and persisted in 22 (65%, group II). Both groups were similar in age, number of diseased vessels, proportion with previous myocardial infarction, exercise ejection fraction, and degree of exercise-induced painless ischemia at baseline. At 9 months, adverse events had occurred in 11 patients (2 patients with myocardial infarction, 4 with unstable angina, 2 with angioplasty and 3 with bypass surgery). Only 1 of 12 patients (8%) in group I had experienced events compared with 10 of 22 (45%) in group II (chi-square, 5.4; p less than 0.025; 95% confidence interval, 12 to 61%). Thus, the relative risk of adverse events in patients whose painless ischemia was abolished was only 18% of that in patients in whom it was persistent. These results suggest that (1) the abolition of exercise-induced painless ischemia by conventional symptom-dictated medical therapy confers a better short-term prognosis in medically treated coronary artery disease, and (2) therapeutic efficacy may need to be assessed by titration against ischemia and not against angina.

  10. Effect of exercise therapy on cytokine secretion in the saliva of bedridden patients

    PubMed Central

    Iki, Hidemasa; Sawa, Shunji; Teranishi, Toshio; Tomita, Masao; Nishii, Kazuhiro; Yamada, Kouji

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The number of bedridden patients requiring nursing care in Japan has increased sharply in recent years because of its aging population and advances in medical care and has become a major social issue. Because bedridden patients are susceptible to nursing and healthcare-associated pneumonia, it is very important to improve their immunocompetence. Therefore, the effect of exercise therapy on stimulation of cytokine secretion in the saliva of bedridden patients was investigated. [Subjects and Methods] The subjects of this study were bedridden patients admitted to nursing care facilities. They were instructed to perform active assistive movement in the supine and sitting positions, with vital signs used as an index of the exercise load. Thirty-five patients fulfilled the inclusion criteria, which included cerebrovascular disease as the main cause of being bedridden and at least 6 months since onset. Interleukins were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay as immune mediators. [Results] Vital signs improved significantly after therapeutic exercise intervention, and the IL-6, IL-8, IL-15, and IL-17 levels also increased significantly after the intervention. [Conclusion] The results demonstrated that measurement of saliva samples may offer a safe minimally invasive method of measuring immune response in bedridden patients. This study suggests that exercise therapy may hold promise as an effective means of improving immunity in bedridden patients and may contribute to preventing aspiration pneumonia and promoting spontaneous recovery. PMID:27821953

  11. How Do Patients with Chronic Neck Pain Experience the Effects of Qigong and Exercise Therapy? A Qualitative Interview Study

    PubMed Central

    Holmberg, Christine; Farahani, Zubin; Witt, Claudia M.

    2016-01-01

    Background. The high prevalence of chronic neck pain in high income countries impacts quality of life and the social and work-related activities of those afflicted. We aimed to understand how mind-body therapies and exercise therapy may influence the experience of pain among patients with chronic neck pain. Methods. This qualitative interview study investigated how patients with chronic neck pain experienced the effects of exercise or qigong therapy at two time points: during an intervention at three months and after the intervention at six months. Interviews were analysed thematically across interviews and within person-cases. Based on other qualitative studies, a sample size of 20 participants was deemed appropriate. Results. The sample (n = 20) consisted of 16 women and four men (age range: 29 to 59). Patients' experiences differed according to the therapies' philosophies. Exercise therapy group interviewees described a focus on correct posture and muscle tension release. Qigong group interviewees discussed calming and relaxing effects. Maintaining regular exercise was easier to achieve with exercise therapy. Conclusions. The findings of this study may help health care providers when counselling chronic pain patients on self-help interventions by informing them of different bodily and emotional experiences of mind-body interventions compared to exercise therapy. PMID:27418938

  12. Exercise training and music therapy in elderly with depressive syndrome: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Verrusio, W; Andreozzi, P; Marigliano, B; Renzi, A; Gianturco, V; Pecci, M T; Ettorre, E; Cacciafesta, M; Gueli, N

    2014-08-01

    Recent studies have thrown doubt on the true effectiveness of anti-depressants in light and moderate depression. The aim of this study is to evaluate the impact of physical training and music therapy on a sample group of subjects affected by light to moderate depression versus subjects treated with pharmacological therapy only. Randomized controlled study. Patients were randomized into two groups. Subjects in the pharmacotherapy group received a therapy with antidepressant drugs; the exercise/music therapy group was assigned to receive physical exercise training combined with listening to music. The effects of interventions were assessed by differences in changes in mood state between the two groups. Medically eligible patients were screened with the Hamilton Anxiety Scale and with the Geriatric Depression Scale. We used plasmatic cytokine dosage as a stress marker. We recruited 24 subjects (mean age: 75.5 ± 7.4, 11 M/13 F). In the pharmacotherapy group there was a significant improvement in anxiety only (p<0.05) at 6-months. In the exercise/music therapy was a reduction in anxiety and in depression at 3-months and at 6-months (p<0.05). We noted an average reduction of the level of TNF-a from 57.67 (± 39.37) pg/ml to 35.80 (± 26.18) pg/ml. Our training may potentially play a role in the treatment of subjects with mild to moderate depression. Further research should be carried out to obtain more evidence on effects of physical training and music therapy in depressed subjects. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Effects of Sling Exercise Therapy on Trunk Muscle Activation and Balance in Chronic Hemiplegic Patients

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jin Soo; Lee, Hong Gyun

    2014-01-01

    Weakening of trunk muscles in stroke patients hinders functional ability, safety and balance. To confirm whether strengthening trunk muscles could facilitate rehabilitation of stroke patients, we investigated the effectiveness of sling exercise therapy (SET) using closed kinetic chain exercises to activate trunk muscles and improve balance in stroke patients. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty stroke patients with chronic hemiplegia were equally divided into 2 groups, a SET group and a control group that performed regular exercises on a mat with the assistance of a table. Patients in both groups exercised for 30 min, three times per week for 4 weeks. Trunk muscle activity was measured using surface electromyography, whereas balance was measured using the Berg Balance Scale, Frailty and Injuries Cooperative Studies of Intervention Technique, Timed Up & Go test, and BioRescue before and after the 4-week experimental period. [Results] Trunk muscle activity and balance before and after intervention in both groups were significantly different. However, no significant differences were observed between the 2 groups. [Conclusion] Although SET was not more effective than regular exercise, significant improvement was observed before and after SET. Therefore, SET can be considered effective in strengthening trunk muscles in stroke patients with chronic hemiplegia. PMID:24926126

  14. Hyperpolarized Helium-3 MRI of exercise-induced bronchoconstriction during challenge and therapy.

    PubMed

    Kruger, Stanley J; Niles, David J; Dardzinski, Bernard; Harman, Amy; Jarjour, Nizar N; Ruddy, Marcella; Nagle, Scott K; Francois, Christopher J; Sorkness, Ronald L; Burton, Ryan M; Munoz del Rio, Alejandro; Fain, Sean B

    2014-05-01

    To investigate the utility of hyperpolarized He-3 MRI for detecting regional lung ventilated volume (VV) changes in response to exercise challenge and leukotriene inhibitor montelukast, human subjects with exercise induced bronchoconstriction (EIB) were recruited. This condition is described by airway constriction following exercise leading to reduced forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1) coinciding with ventilation defects on hyperpolarized He-3 MRI. Thirteen EIB subjects underwent spirometry and He-3 MRI at baseline, postexercise, and postrecovery at multiple visits. On one visit montelukast was given and on two visits placebo was given. Regional VV was calculated in the apical/basilar dimension, in the anterior/posterior dimension, and for the entire lung volume. The whole lung VV was used as an end-point and compared with spirometry. Postchallenge FEV1 dropped with placebo but not with treatment, while postchallenge VV dropped more with placebo than treatment. Sources of variability for VV included region (anterior/posterior), scan, and treatment. VV correlated with FEV1/ forced vital capacity (FVC) and forced expiratory flow between 25 and 75% of FVC and showed gravitational dependence after exercise challenge. A paradigm testing the response of ventilation to montelukast revealed both a whole-lung and regional response to exercise challenge and therapy in EIB subjects. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Substrate utilization during exercise in postmenopausal women on hormone replacement therapy.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Lisa G; Kraemer, Robert R; Kraemer, Ginger R; Haltom, Ron W; Cordill, Alison E; Welsch, Michael A; Durand, Robert J; Castracane, V Daniel

    2002-12-01

    It has been suggested that due to the slight direct or indirect effect of estrogen on lipolytic activity, the age-related decrease in production associated with the menopause may heighten the risk of cardiovascular and metabolic disease in women. While hormone replacement therapy (HRT) alone may have little or no effect on body mass in postmenopausal women, data suggest it can alter the shift toward abdominal adiposity. Furthermore, estrogen may have a synergistic effect on exercise-induced reduction in fat mass. Accordingly, the purpose of this investigation was to examine the potential influence of HRT on substrate utilization during 30 min of treadmill exercise at approximately 80% maximal oxygen uptake (VO(2max)) in postmenopausal women. Eight women were receiving HRT and nine women were not (NHRT). No significant differences between the HRT and NHRT groups were noted for age, body mass, body fat, VO(2max) or the percentage of VO(2max) maintained during exercise. Expired gas samples were analyzed every 30 s to determine respiratory exchange ratio (R) and % VO(2max). The R, total energy expended and percentage contributions from fats and carbohydrate were averaged over three periods during the exercise (min 1-10, 11-20, and 21-30). There was no effect of HRT on R, total energy expended or substrate contribution. Thus, treatment of postmenopausal women using HRT (primarily conjugated equine estrogens in doses of 0.625-1.25 mg x day(-1)) did not appear to affect the percentages of fat and carbohydrate utilized during 30 min of treadmill exercise at 80% of VO(2max). However, the exercise responses in this group of menopausal women were consistent with a duration-dependent increased reliance on fat as an energy source during exercise of moderate to vigorous intensity as has been demonstrated in younger populations.

  16. Exercise-Induced Release of Pharmacologically Active Substances and Their Relevance for Therapy of Hepatic Injury

    PubMed Central

    Schon, Hans-Theo; Weiskirchen, Ralf

    2016-01-01

    Chronic liver disease (CLD) features constant parenchymal injury and repair together with an increasing hepatic impairment, finally leading to fibrosis and cirrhosis and a heightened risk of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Closely related to the rise in obesity, the worldwide prevalence of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, the most common form of CLD, has reached an epidemic dimension and is estimated to afflict up to 46% of the general population, including more than one out of three U.S. citizens. Up to now there is no effective drug treatment available, which is why recommendations encompass both exercise programs and changes in dietary habits. Exercise is well-known for unleashing potent anti-inflammatory effects, which can principally counteract liver inflammation and chronic low-grade inflammation. This review article summarizes the underlying mechanisms responsible for the exercise-mediated anti-inflammatory effects, illustrates the application in animal models as well as in humans, and highlights the therapeutic value when possible. Based on the available results there is no doubt that exercise can even be beneficial in an advanced stage of liver disease and it is the goal of this review article to provide evidence for the therapeutic impact on fibrosis, cirrhosis, and HCC and to assess whether exercise might be of value as adjuvant therapy in the treatment of CLD. In principle, all exercise programs carried out in these high-risk patients should be guided and observed by qualified healthcare professionals to guarantee the patients’ safety. Nevertheless, it is also necessary to additionally determine the optimal amount and intensity of exercise to maximize its value, which is why further studies are essential. PMID:27625607

  17. Optimisation of atrioventricular delay during exercise improves cardiac output in patients stabilised with cardiac resynchronisation therapy.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jing Ping; Lee, Alex Pui-Wai; Grimm, Richard A; Hung, Ming-Jui; Yang, Xing Sheng; Delurgio, David; Leon, Angel R; Merlino, John D; Yu, Cheuk-Man

    2012-01-01

    Atrioventricular (AV) delay in cardiac resynchronisation therapy (CRT) recipients are typically optimised at rest. However, there are limited data on the impact of exercise-induced changes in heart rate on the optimal AV delay and left ventricular function. The authors serially programmed AV delays in 41 CRT patients with intrinsic sinus rhythm at rest and during two stages of supine bicycle exercise with heart rates at 20 bpm (stage I) and 40 bpm (stage II) above baseline. The optimal AV delay during exercise was determined by the iterative method to maximise cardiac output using Doppler echocardiography. Results were compared to physiological change in PR intervals in 56 normal controls during treadmill exercise. The optimal AV delay was progressively shortened (p<0.05) with escalating exercise level (baseline: 123±26 ms vs. stage I: 102±24 ms vs stage II: 70±22 ms, p<0.05). AV delay optimisation led to a significantly higher cardiac output than without optimisation did during stage I (6.2±1.2 l/min vs. 5.2±1.2 l/min, p<0.001) and stage II (6.8±1.6 l/min vs. 5.9±1.3 l/min, p<0.001) exercise. A linear inverse relationship existed between optimal AV delays and heart rates in CRT patients (AV delay=241-1.61×heart rate, R2=0.639, p<0.001) and healthy controls (R2=0.646, p<0.001), but the slope of regression was significantly steeper in CRT patients (p<0.001). Haemodynamically optimal AV delay shortened progressively with increasing heart rate during exercise, which suggests the need for programming of rate-adaptive AV delay in CRT recipients.

  18. Manual therapy, exercise therapy, or both, in addition to usual care, for osteoarthritis of the hip or knee: a randomized controlled trial. 1: clinical effectiveness.

    PubMed

    Abbott, J H; Robertson, M C; Chapple, C; Pinto, D; Wright, A A; Leon de la Barra, S; Baxter, G D; Theis, J-C; Campbell, A J

    2013-04-01

    To evaluate the clinical effectiveness of manual physiotherapy and/or exercise physiotherapy in addition to usual care for patients with osteoarthritis (OA) of the hip or knee. In this 2 × 2 factorial randomized controlled trial, 206 adults (mean age 66 years) who met the American College of Rheumatology criteria for hip or knee OA were randomly allocated to receive manual physiotherapy (n = 54), multi-modal exercise physiotherapy (n = 51), combined exercise and manual physiotherapy (n = 50), or no trial physiotherapy (n = 51). The primary outcome was change in the Western Ontario and McMaster osteoarthritis index (WOMAC) after 1 year. Secondary outcomes included physical performance tests. Outcome assessors were blinded to group allocation. Of 206 participants recruited, 193 (93.2%) were retained at follow-up. Mean (SD) baseline WOMAC score was 100.8 (53.8) on a scale of 0-240. Intention to treat analysis showed adjusted reductions in WOMAC scores at 1 year compared with the usual care group of 28.5 (95% confidence interval (CI) 9.2-47.8) for usual care plus manual therapy, 16.4 (-3.2 to 35.9) for usual care plus exercise therapy, and 14.5 (-5.2 to 34.1) for usual care plus combined exercise therapy and manual therapy. There was an antagonistic interaction between exercise therapy and manual therapy (P = 0.027). Physical performance test outcomes favoured the exercise therapy group. Manual physiotherapy provided benefits over usual care, that were sustained to 1 year. Exercise physiotherapy also provided physical performance benefits over usual care. There was no added benefit from a combination of the two therapies. Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry ACTRN12608000130369. Copyright © 2013 Osteoarthritis Research Society International. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Association between dynamic exercise therapy and IGF-1 and IGFBP-3 concentrations in the patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Melikoglu, Meltem Alkan; Karatay, Saliha; Senel, Kazim; Akcay, Fatih

    2006-02-01

    We aimed to evaluate the relationship between short-term dynamic exercise therapy and insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) and insulin-like growth factor binding protein-3 (IGFBP-3) levels in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients. Forty RA patients were assigned into dynamic or range of motion (ROM) exercise groups. Also control group carried out the same dynamic exercise protocol. Morning stiffness, pain (VAS), Health assessment questionnaire (HAQ) and Ritchie articular index (RAI) were evaluated and erythrocyte sedimentation rate, serum C-reactive protein, IGF-1 and IGFBP-3 levels of the participants were recorded. The assessments were determined before, at the 7th and 15th days of treatment. VAS and RAI scores were significantly improved by the dynamic exercises in RA patients. There were increases on IGF-1 in dynamic exercise group, although IGF-1 levels showed a decrease in ROM exercise and control groups. Also no significant changes were observed on IGFBP-3 in three groups. Our results suggest that short-term dynamic exercise therapy increases serum IGF-1 in RA patients. The manipulation of serum IGF-1 levels by dynamic exercise therapy may indicate the beneficial effects of dynamic exercise in RA patients.

  20. The Effectiveness of Technology-Supported Exercise Therapy for Low Back Pain: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Matheve, Thomas; Brumagne, Simon; Timmermans, Annick A A

    2017-05-01

    Various technological systems have been developed to assist exercise therapy for low back pain. The aim of this systematic review was to provide an overview and to assess the effectiveness of the available technology-supported exercise therapy (TSET) programs for low back pain. The electronic databases Pubmed, Embase, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, PEDro, IEEE, and ACM were searched until January 2016. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) using electronic technological systems simultaneously with exercise therapy for patients with low back pain were included. Twenty-five RCTs met the inclusion criteria. Seventeen studies involved patients with chronic low back pain, and electromyography biofeedback was the most prevalent type of technological support. This review shows that TSET seems to improve pain, disability, and quality of life for patients with low back pain, and that a standard treatment combined with an additional TSET program might be superior to a standard treatment alone. However, TSET seems not more effective compared to other interventions or a placebo intervention for improving these outcomes, which may partially be explained by the analytical approach of the current TSET-programs. For most technologies, only a limited number of RCTs are available, making it difficult to draw firm conclusions about the effectiveness of individual technological systems.

  1. Aerobic exercise as an adjunct therapy for improving cognitive function in heart failure.

    PubMed

    Gary, Rebecca A; Brunn, Kathryn

    2014-01-01

    Persons with heart failure (HF) are typically older and are at a much higher risk for developing cognitive impairment (CI) than persons without HF. Increasingly, CI is recognized as a significant, independent predictor of worse clinical outcomes, more frequent hospital readmissions, and higher mortality rates in persons with HF. CI can have devastating effects on ability to carry out HF effective self-care behaviors. If CI occurs, however, there are currently no evidence based guidelines on how to manage or improve cognitive function in this population. Improvement in cognition has been reported following some therapies in HF and is thought to be the consequence of enhanced cerebral perfusion and oxygenation, suggesting that CI may be amenable to intervention. Because there is substantial neuronal loss with dementia and no effective restorative therapies, interventions that slow, reverse, or prevent cognitive decline are essential. Aerobic exercise is documented to increase cerebral perfusion and oxygenation by promoting neuroplasticity and neurogenesis and, in turn, cognitive functioning. Few studies have examined exercise as a potential adjunct therapy for attenuating or alleviating cognitive decline in HF. In this review, the potential benefit of aerobic exercise on cognitive functioning in HF is presented along with future research directions.

  2. Cardiopulmonary Exercise Test as a Tool to Choose Therapy in Heart Failure.

    PubMed

    Contini, Mauro

    2017-04-04

    Heart failure treatment can count on several drugs, all providing an improvement in outcome, but that cannot be realistically used all together in the same patient. It would be useful to have a tool that allows arranging the most appropriate therapy cocktail in each patient. The aim of this review is to show the main differences in the effects of several drugs on cardiopulmonary function in heart failure patients, both in resting condition and during exercise, and to discuss how these differences can be taken into account when choosing the most appropriate therapeutic protocol. In summary, angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors and angiotensin II receptor blockers act synergistically increasing exercise capacity and peak oxygen uptake, but through different mechanisms, the former improving lung diffusion and exercise ventilatory efficiency, an action that is counteracted by concomitant aspirin therapy, and the latter probably by improving muscle perfusion. As to beta-blocker, non-selective compounds, such as carvedilol, improve ventilation efficiency on one side, but interfere with lung diffusion on the other, and they are probably less tolerated in hypoxic conditions. On the contrary, β1 selective compounds, such as bisoprolol or nebivolol, have a neutral effect on both lung diffusion and ventilation efficiency. These observations could be the basis for the choice of pharmacological therapy in heart failure patients.

  3. Exercise testing in late-onset glycogen storage disease type II patients undergoing enzyme replacement therapy.

    PubMed

    Marzorati, Mauro; Porcelli, Simone; Bellistri, Giuseppe; Morandi, Lucia; Grassi, Bruno

    2012-12-01

    Enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) has recently became available for patients with glycogen storage disease type II. Previous studies have demonstrated clinical efficacy of enzyme replacement therapy, however, data on physiological variables related to exercise tolerance are scarce. Four glycogen storage disease type II late-onset patients (45 ± 6 years) performed an incremental exercise on a cycle ergometer, up to voluntary exhaustion, before (BEFORE) and after 12 months of ERT (AFTER). Peak workload, oxygen uptake, heart rate, cardiac output (by impedance cardiography) and vastus lateralis oxygenation indices (by continuous-wave near-infrared spectroscopy, NIRS) were determined. Peak workload and oxygen uptake values significantly increased during ERT (54 ± 30 vs. 63 ± 31 watt, and 17.2 ± 4.4 vs. 19.7 ± 3.5 ml/kg/min, respectively, in BEFORE vs. AFTER). On the other hand, for both peak cardiac output (12.3 ± 5.3 vs. 14.8 ± 4.5L/min) and the NIRS-determined peak skeletal muscle fractional O(2) extraction, expressed as a percentage of the maximal values during a transient limb ischemia (30 ± 39% vs. 38 ± 28%), the observed increases were not statistically significant. Our findings suggest that in glycogen storage disease type II patients enzyme replacement therapy is associated with a mild improvement of exercise tolerance. The findings need to be validated during a longer follow-up on a larger group of patients.

  4. Effects of exercise on bone mineral density in calcium-replete postmenopausal women with and without hormone replacement therapy.

    PubMed

    Going, Scott; Lohman, Timothy; Houtkooper, Linda; Metcalfe, Lauve; Flint-Wagner, Hilary; Blew, Robert; Stanford, Vanessa; Cussler, Ellen; Martin, Jane; Teixeira, Pedro; Harris, Margaret; Milliken, Laura; Figueroa-Galvez, Arturo; Weber, Judith

    2003-08-01

    Osteoporosis is a major public health concern. The combination of exercise, hormone replacement therapy, and calcium supplementation may have added benefits for improving bone mineral density compared to a single intervention. To test this notion, 320 healthy, non-smoking postmenopausal women, who did or did not use hormone replacement therapy (HRT), were randomized within groups to exercise or no exercise and followed for 12 months. All women received 800 mg calcium citrate supplements daily. Women who exercised performed supervised aerobic, weight-bearing and weight-lifting exercise, three times per week in community-based exercise facilities. Regional bone mineral density (BMD) was assessed by dual energy X-ray absorptiometry. Women who used HRT, calcium, and exercised increased femoral neck, trochanteric and lumbar spine bone mineral density by approximately 1-2%. Trochanteric BMD was also significantly increased by approximately 1.0% in women who exercised and used calcium without HRT compared to a negligible change in women who used HRT and did not exercise. The results demonstrate that regional BMD can be improved with aerobic, weight-bearing activity combined with weight lifting at clinically relevant sites in postmenopausal women. The response was significant at more sites in women who used HRT, suggesting a greater benefit with hormone replacement and exercise compared to HRT alone.

  5. [Clinical research of knee joint motor impairment after fracture operation treated with relaxing needling manipulation combined with exercise therapy].

    PubMed

    Luo, Kaimin; Qi, Tianchen; Yang, Lin; Hou, Zhi

    2015-09-01

    To compare the clinical efficacy on the motor impairment of knee joint after tracture operation between the combined therapeutic method of relaxing needling manipulation and exercise therapy and the simple exercise therapy. Sixty-four patients after the operation for the fracture of femoral shaft were randomized into a relaxing needling combined with exercise therapy group (group A) and an exercise therapy group (group B), 32 cases in each one. In the group A, the relaxing needling manipulation was applied to the local painful area of knee or the stiff soft tissues. Additionally, the exercise therapy was used in combination. In the group B, the exercise therapy was applied simply. Hospital for special surgery (HSS) pain score, the range of movement (ROM) of knee joint and Lysholm score were compared before and 60 days after treatment in the patients of the two groups. The efficacy was compared between the two groups. After treatment, HSS pain score, ROM and Lysholm score were all improved in the two groups, presenting the significant differences as compared with those before treatment (all P<0. 05). The results in the group A were better than those in the group B (all P<0. 05). The total effective rate was 96. 9% (31/32) in the group A, which was better than 75. 0% (24/32) in the group B (P<0. 05). The combined therapeutic method of relaxing needling manipulation and exercise therapy achieves the significant efficacy on the motor impairment of knee joint after the operation for the fracture of femoral shaft, superior to the simple exercise therapy.

  6. Health behaviour change theories: contributions to an ICF-based behavioural exercise therapy for individuals with chronic diseases.

    PubMed

    Geidl, Wolfgang; Semrau, Jana; Pfeifer, Klaus

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this perspective is (1) to incorporate recent psychological health behaviour change (HBC) theories into exercise therapeutic programmes, and (2) to introduce the International Classification of Functioning (ICF)-based concept of a behavioural exercise therapy (BET). Relevant personal modifiable factors of physical activity (PA) were identified based on three recent psychological HBC theories. Following the principles of intervention mapping, a matrix of proximal programme objectives specifies desirable parameter values for each personal factor. As a result of analysing reviews on behavioural techniques and intervention programmes of the German rehabilitation setting, we identified exercise-related techniques that impact the personal determinants. Finally, the techniques were integrated into an ICF-based BET concept. Individuals' attitudes, skills, emotions, beliefs and knowledge are important personal factors of PA behaviour. BET systematically addresses these personal factors by a systematic combination of adequate exercise contents with related behavioural techniques. The presented 28 intervention techniques serve as a theory-driven "tool box" for designing complex BET programmes to promote PA. The current paper highlights the usefulness of theory-based integrative research in the field of exercise therapy, offers explicit methods and contents for physical therapists to promote PA behaviour, and introduces the ICF-based conceptual idea of a BET. Implications for Rehabilitation Irrespective of the clients' indication, therapeutic exercise programmes should incorporate effective, theory-based approaches to promote physical activity. Central determinants of physical activity behaviour are a number of personal factors: individuals' attitudes, skills, emotions, beliefs and knowledge. Clinicians implementing exercise therapy should set it within a wider theoretical framework including the personal factors that influence physical activity. To increase

  7. A manual therapy and exercise approach to meralgia paresthetica in pregnancy: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Skaggs, Clayton D.; Winchester, Brett A.; Vianin, Michael; Prather, Heidi

    2006-01-01

    Abstract Objective To present a case of a pregnant patient with meralgia paresthetica who improved using manual therapy and exercise procedures. Clinical Features A 22-year-old patient in the sixteenth week of pregnancy had low back pain, bilateral anterolateral thigh paresthesia and groin pain for a duration of 1 month. She had no motor deficits in either lower extremity and her reflexes were intact. As a standard clinic procedure, a battery of functional tests were performed including: active straight leg raise, long dorsal ligament test, and the pelvic pain provocation procedure. Based on her clinical history and physical responses to the aforementioned functional tests, the diagnosis of meralgia paresthetica was deduced. Intervention and Outcome Treatment was provided at 6 visits over a 6-week period where the patient underwent evaluation, manual intervention, and exercise prescription. Active Release Technique (ART) was performed to the restricted right sacroiliac (SIJ) complex and quadratus lumborum muscles. ART and post-isometric relaxation were applied to the illiopsoas muscles. The home exercise program consisted of pelvic/low back mobility, stabilization and relaxation exercises. After 6 treatments, the patient reported complete resolution of low back pain and left lower extremity symptoms and a 90% improvement in the right thigh symptoms. At her one-year follow-up, the patient reported no further complications and the absence of pain. Conclusions Manual therapy and exercises may serve as an effective treatment protocol for pregnant patients experiencing low back pain complicated by paresthesia. Because these conservative procedures offer a low-risk intervention, additional clinical studies are warranted to further study this treatment. PMID:19674679

  8. A manual therapy and exercise approach to meralgia paresthetica in pregnancy: a case report.

    PubMed

    Skaggs, Clayton D; Winchester, Brett A; Vianin, Michael; Prather, Heidi

    2006-01-01

    To present a case of a pregnant patient with meralgia paresthetica who improved using manual therapy and exercise procedures. A 22-year-old patient in the sixteenth week of pregnancy had low back pain, bilateral anterolateral thigh paresthesia and groin pain for a duration of 1 month. She had no motor deficits in either lower extremity and her reflexes were intact. As a standard clinic procedure, a battery of functional tests were performed including: active straight leg raise, long dorsal ligament test, and the pelvic pain provocation procedure. Based on her clinical history and physical responses to the aforementioned functional tests, the diagnosis of meralgia paresthetica was deduced. Treatment was provided at 6 visits over a 6-week period where the patient underwent evaluation, manual intervention, and exercise prescription. Active Release Technique (ART) was performed to the restricted right sacroiliac (SIJ) complex and quadratus lumborum muscles. ART and post-isometric relaxation were applied to the illiopsoas muscles. The home exercise program consisted of pelvic/low back mobility, stabilization and relaxation exercises. After 6 treatments, the patient reported complete resolution of low back pain and left lower extremity symptoms and a 90% improvement in the right thigh symptoms. At her one-year follow-up, the patient reported no further complications and the absence of pain. Manual therapy and exercises may serve as an effective treatment protocol for pregnant patients experiencing low back pain complicated by paresthesia. Because these conservative procedures offer a low-risk intervention, additional clinical studies are warranted to further study this treatment.

  9. Physical exercise and therapy in terminally ill cancer patients: a retrospective feasibility analysis.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Wiebke; Bialy, Laura; Ketels, Gesche; Baumann, Freerk T; Bokemeyer, Carsten; Oechsle, Karin

    2014-05-01

    Physical exercise (PE) and/or therapy (PT) shows beneficial effects in advanced cancer patients and is increasingly implemented in hospice and palliative care, although systematic data are rare. This retrospective study systematically evaluated the feasibility of PE/PT in terminally ill cancer patients and of different modalities in correspondence to socio-demographic and disease- and care-related aspects. All consecutive terminally ill cancer patients treated in a palliative care inpatient ward during a 3.5-year period were included. The modalities were chosen according to the therapists' and patients' appraisal of current performance status and symptoms. PE/PT were offered to 572 terminally ill cancer patients, whereof 528 patients (92 %) were able to perform at least one PE/PT unit (average 4.2 units/patient). The most frequently feasible modalities were physical exercises in 50 %, relaxation therapy in 22 %, breathing training in 10 %, and positioning and lymph edema treatment in 6 % each. Physical exercise and positioning treatment were performed significantly more often in older patients (p=0.009 and p=0.022, respectively), while relaxation (p=0.05) and lymph edema treatment (p=0.001) were used more frequently in younger. Breathing training was most frequently performed in head and neck cancer (p=0.002) and lung cancer (p=0.026), positioning treatment in brain tumor patients (p=0.021), and lymph edema treatment in sarcoma patients (p=0.012). PE/PT were feasible in >90 % of terminally ill cancer patients to whom PE/PT had been offered. Physical exercises, relaxation therapy, and breathing training were the most frequently applicable methods. Prospective trials are needed to evaluate the efficacy of specific PE/PT programs in terminally ill cancer patients.

  10. Therapeutic efficacy of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug therapy versus exercise therapy in patients with chronic nonspecific low back pain: a prospective study.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Naoto; Omata, Jun-Ichi; Iwabuchi, Masumi; Fukuda, Hironari; Shirado, Osamu

    2017-03-22

    Therapy for chronic, nonspecific low back pain is mainly conservative: medication and/or exercise. Pharmacotherapy, however, has side effects, and the quantities of concomitant drugs in older persons require attention. Although exercise promises improved function, its use to alleviate pain is controversial. Thus, we compared the efficacy of pharmacotherapy versus exercise for treating chronic nonspecific low back pain. The pharmacotherapy group (n=18: 8 men, 10 women) were prescribed celecoxib monotherapy. The exercise group (n=22: 10 men, 12 women) undertook stretching exercises. Because of drop-outs, the NSAID group (n=15: 7 men, 8 women) and the exercise group (n =18: 8 men, 10 women) were finally analyzed. We applied a visual analog scale, Roland-Morris disability scores, and the 36-Item Short Form Health Survey. We used a paired t-test for within-group analyses and an unpaired t-test for between-group analyses. Pain relief was achieved after 3 months of pharmacotherapy or exercise. Quality of life improved only in the exercise group. Recovery outcomes for the two groups were not significantly different. Efficacy of exercise therapy for strictly defined low back pain was almost equivalent to that of pharmacotherapy and provided better quality of life.

  11. Effectiveness of resistance exercise compared to aerobic exercise without insulin therapy in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Nery, Cybelle; Moraes, Silvia Regina Arruda De; Novaes, Karyne Albino; Bezerra, Márcio Almeida; Silveira, Patrícia Verçoza De Castro; Lemos, Andrea

    2017-07-05

    Physical exercise has been used to mitigate the metabolic effects of diabetes mellitus. To evaluate the effect of resistance exercise when compared to aerobic exercise without insulin therapy on metabolic and clinical outcomes in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Papers were searched on the databases MEDLINE/PubMed, CINAHL, SPORTDiscus, LILACS, and SCIELO, without language or date of publication limits. Clinical trials that compared resistance exercise to aerobic exercise in adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus who did not use insulin therapy were included. The quality of evidence and risk of bias were assessed using the GRADE system and the Cochrane Risk of Bias tool, respectively. Meta-analysis was also used, whenever possible. Two reviewers extracted the data independently. Eight eligible articles were included in this study, with a total of 336 individuals, with a mean age of 48-58 years. The protocols of aerobic and resistance exercise varied in duration from eight to 22 weeks, 30-60min/day, three to five times/week. Overall the available evidence came from a very low quality of evidence and there was an increase in Maximal oxygen consumption (mean difference: -2.86; 95% CI: -3.90 to -1.81; random effect) for the resistance exercise and no difference was found in Glycated hemoglobin, Body mass index, High-density lipoprotein cholesterol, Low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, triglycerides, and total cholesterol. Resistance exercise appears to be more effective in promoting an increase in Maximal oxygen consumption in protocols longer than 12 weeks and there is no difference in the control of glycemic and lipid levels between the two types of exercise. Copyright © 2017 Associação Brasileira de Pesquisa e Pós-Graduação em Fisioterapia. Publicado por Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  12. Heart rate deceleration after exercise predicts patients most likely to respond to cardiac resynchronisation therapy.

    PubMed

    Thomas, D E; Exton, S A; Yousef, Z R

    2010-09-01

    This study examines the relationship between heart rate recovery following exercise and subsequent response to cardiac resynchronisation therapy (CRT). Blunted heart rate recovery is an adverse prognostic marker in heart failure and has been shown to correlate with disease severity. 37 patients receiving biventricular pacemakers for conventional indications underwent functional assessments; cardiopulmonary exercise test, 6-min walk test and quality-of-life assessment, together with echo analyses, before and at 3 months following implant. Heart rate deceleration (HRD) gradients were calculated at 30-, 60-, 90- and 120-s intervals following cessation of the baseline exercise test and compared with subsequent markers of response to CRT. Functional response was defined as > or =20% improvement in any two of the three functional assessments, and echo response defined as > or =5% increase in ejection fraction. Functional responders demonstrated steeper HRD gradients than non-responders at 30, 60 and 90 s. Echo responders also demonstrated steeper HRD at 30 and 60 s from the cessation of exercise. Receiver-operating curve analysis demonstrates area under the curve of 0.87 and 0.82, respectively, for HRD30 to predict functional and echo response to CRT. A cut-off value of 3 for HRD30, equating to a 5% reduction in HR between peak exercise and 30 s into recovery, demonstrates the optimal sensitivity/specificity profile to perform this function. HRD following exercise correlates with functional and echocardiographic response to CRT. Application of this parameter in addition to standard criteria may provide valuable supplementary information in the evaluation of prospective CRT candidates.

  13. Randomised controlled trial examining the effect of exercise in people with rheumatoid arthritis taking anti-TNFα therapy medication

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Substantial progress has been made in the medical management of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) over the past decade with the introduction of biologic therapies, including anti-tumour necrosis factor alpha (anti-TNFα) therapy medications. However, individuals with RA taking anti-TNFα medication continue to experience physical, psychological and functional consequences, which could potentially benefit from rehabilitation. There is evidence that therapeutic exercise should be included as an intervention for people with RA, but to date there is little evidence of the benefits of therapeutic exercise for people with RA on anti-TNFα therapy medication. A protocol for a multicentre randomised controlled three-armed study which aims to examine the effect of dynamic group exercise therapy on land or in water for people with RA taking anti-TNFα therapy medication is described. Methods/Design Six hundred and eighteen individuals with RA, on anti-TNFα therapy medication, will be randomised into one of 3 groups: a land-based exercise group; a water-based exercise group or a control group. The land and water-based groups will exercise for one hour, twice a week for eight weeks. The control group will receive no intervention and will be asked not to alter their exercise habits for the duration of the study. The primary outcome measure, the Stanford Health Assessment Questionnaire Disability Index (HAQ-DI) which measures functional ability, and secondary measures of pain, fatigue and quality of life, will be assessed at baseline, eight and 24 weeks by an independent assessor unaware of group allocation. Changes in outcome from 0 to 8 weeks and 0 to 24 weeks in the 'land-based exercise group versus control group' and the 'water-based exercise group versus control group' will be examined. Analysis will be conducted on an intention to treat basis. Discussion This trial will evaluate the effectiveness of group exercise therapy on land or in water, for people with

  14. [Clinical observation on acupuncture by stages combined with exercise therapy for treatment of Bell palsy at acute stage].

    PubMed

    Qu, Yong

    2005-08-01

    To find out a method for increasing clinical therapeutic effect on Bell palsy at acute stage. Ninety cases of Bell palsy were randomly divided into an observation group, a control group I and a control group II, 30 cases in each group. They were treated respectively with acupuncture plus exercise therapy, simple acupuncture therapy, and simple exercise therapy, and their therapeutic effects were observed. The cured rate was 66.7% in the observation group, 53.3% in the control group I and 46.70% in the control group II, the observation group being better than the two control groups (P<0.05). Acupuncture by stage combined with exercise therapy can increase the therapeutic effect on Bell palsy at acute stage, and it is a better therapy for Bell palsy.

  15. Indacaterol add-on therapy improves lung function, exercise capacity and life quality of COPD patients.

    PubMed

    Mroz, R M; Minarowski, L; Chyczewska, E

    2013-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a progressive, inflammatory condition, involving airways and lung parenchyma. The disease leads to airflow limitation, and pulmonary hyperinflation, resulting in dyspnea, decreased exercise tolerance, and impaired quality of life. COPD pharmacotherapy guidelines are based on a combination of long-acting beta2-agonists (LABA), long-acting antimuscarinic agents (LAMA) and methyloxantins. Recently, indacaterol, ultralong acting beta2-agonist, has been introduced. The aim of our study was to assess the impact of indacaterol add-on therapy on lung function, exercise tolerance and quality of life of COPD patients. Thirty four COPD patients, receiving stable bronchodilator therapy were randomly allocated into two arms of add-on treatment (1:1 - indacaterol:placebo) for 3 months. Indacaterol replaced LABA in all patients receiving LABA. Spirometry, lung volumes, DLCO, St George's Respiratory Questionnaire (SGRQ) and 6 min Walk Distance (6MWD) were performed before and after therapy. We found that in the indacaterol group FEV1 did not changed significantly. However, there were significant improvements in ERV, 6MWD, and 6MWD-related dyspnea score. We also found that the degree of desaturation before and after 6MWD, and fatigue levels significantly improved in the indacaterol group. The patients' quality of life also changed favorably in the indacaterol treatment arm. We conclude that the add-on therapy with indacaterol exerts positive effects in COPD patients.

  16. A Randomized Study Comparing the Shaker Exercise with Traditional Therapy: A Preliminary Study

    PubMed Central

    Rademaker, Alfred; Pauloski, Barbara Roa; Kelly, Amy; Stangl-McBreen, Carrie; Antinoja, Jodi; Grande, Barbara; Farquharson, Julie; Kern, Mark; Easterling, Caryn; Shaker, Reza

    2010-01-01

    Seven institutions participated in this small clinical trial that included 19 patients who exhibited oropharyngeal dysphagia on videofluorography (VFG) involving the upper esophageal sphincter (UES) and who had a 3-month history of aspiration. All patients were randomized to either traditional swallowing therapy or the Shaker exercise for 6 weeks. Each patient received a modified barium swallow pre- and post-therapy, including two swallows each of 3 ml and 5 ml liquid barium and 3 ml barium pudding. Each videofluorographic study was sent to a central laboratory and digitized in order to measure hyoid and larynx movement as well as UES opening. Fourteen patients received both pre-and post-therapy VFG studies. There was significantly less aspiration post-therapy in patients in the Shaker group. Residue in the various oral and pharyngeal locations did not differ between the groups. With traditional therapy, there were several significant increases from pre- to post-therapy, including superior laryngeal movement and superior hyoid movement on 3-ml pudding swallows and anterior laryngeal movement on 3-ml liquid boluses, indicating significant improvement in swallowing physiology. After both types of therapy there is a significant increase in UES opening width on 3-ml paste swallows. PMID:19472007

  17. Exercise Augmentation of Exposure Therapy for PTSD: Rationale and Pilot Efficacy Data

    PubMed Central

    Powers, Mark B.; Medina, Johnna L.; Burns, Stephanie; Kauffman, Brooke Y.; Monfils, Marie; Asmundson, Gordon J.G.; Diamond, Allison; McIntyre, Christa; Smits, Jasper A.J.

    2015-01-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is associated with synaptic plasticity, which is crucial for long-term learning and memory. Some studies suggest that people suffering from anxiety disorders show reduced BDNF relative to healthy controls. Lower BDNF is associated with impaired learning, cognitive deficits, and poor exposure-based treatment outcomes. A series of studies with rats showed that exercise elevates BDNF and enhances fear extinction. However, this strategy has not been tested in humans. In this pilot study, we randomized participants (N = 9, 8 females, MAge = 34) with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) to (a) prolonged exposure alone (PE) or (b) prolonged exposure + exercise (PE + E). Participants randomized to the PE + E condition completed a 30-minute bout of moderate-intensity treadmill exercise (70% of age-predicted HRmax) prior to each PE session. Consistent with prediction, the PE + E group showed a greater improvement in PTSD symptoms (d = 2.65) and elevated BDNF (d = 1.08) relative to the PE only condition. This pilot study provides initial support for further investigation into exercise augmented exposure therapy. PMID:25706090

  18. Resistance Exercise Reduces Body Fat and Insulin During Androgen-Deprivation Therapy for Prostate Cancer.

    PubMed

    Winters-Stone, Kerri M; Dieckmann, Nathan; Maddalozzo, Gianni F; Bennett, Jill A; Ryan, Christopher W; Beer, Tomasz M

    2015-07-01

    To determine whether exercise could reduce biomarkers of cancer progression in prostate cancer survivors (PCSs) on androgen-deprivation therapy (ADT). Randomized, controlled trial. Oregon Health and Science University School of Nursing. 51 PCSs randomized to one year of resistance and impact training or a stretching control group. The authors investigated changes in body composition and cancer-related biomarkers, and the influence of age and fat loss on changes in biomarkers. Body composition (total fat, trunk fat, and lean mass), insulin, insulin-like growth factor-1, and sex hormone-binding globulin. In the 36 PCSs with baseline and 12-month data, total fat (p = 0.02) and trunk fat (p = 0.06) mass decreased in the training group compared to gains in controls. Loss of total and trunk fat each mediated the relationship between groups and one-year change in insulin (p < 0.05). Age moderated the insulin response to exercise where insulin reductions were smaller with increasing age (p = 0.03). Resistance and impact exercise may reduce body fat among PCSs undergoing ADT, in turn exerting an insulin-lowering effect. Nurses should counsel PCSs to exercise to reduce the risk of obesity and associated conditions, including cancer progression.

  19. Exercise Augmentation of Exposure Therapy for PTSD: Rationale and Pilot Efficacy Data.

    PubMed

    Powers, Mark B; Medina, Johnna L; Burns, Stephanie; Kauffman, Brooke Y; Monfils, Marie; Asmundson, Gordon J G; Diamond, Allison; McIntyre, Christa; Smits, Jasper A J

    2015-01-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is associated with synaptic plasticity, which is crucial for long-term learning and memory. Some studies suggest that people suffering from anxiety disorders show reduced BDNF relative to healthy controls. Lower BDNF is associated with impaired learning, cognitive deficits, and poor exposure-based treatment outcomes. A series of studies with rats showed that exercise elevates BDNF and enhances fear extinction. However, this strategy has not been tested in humans. In this pilot study, we randomized participants (N = 9, 8 females, M(Age) = 34) with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) to (a) prolonged exposure alone (PE) or (b) prolonged exposure+exercise (PE+E). Participants randomized to the PE+E condition completed a 30-minute bout of moderate-intensity treadmill exercise (70% of age-predicted HR(max)) prior to each PE session. Consistent with prediction, the PE+E group showed a greater improvement in PTSD symptoms (d = 2.65) and elevated BDNF (d = 1.08) relative to the PE only condition. This pilot study provides initial support for further investigation into exercise augmented exposure therapy.

  20. Exercise training associated with estrogen therapy induced cardiovascular benefits after ovarian hormones deprivation.

    PubMed

    Flues, Karin; Paulini, Janaina; Brito, Sebastião; Sanches, Iris Callado; Consolim-Colombo, Fernanda; Irigoyen, Maria-Cláudia; De Angelis, Kátia

    2010-03-01

    Menopause is recognized as a period of increased risk for coronary heart disease. Although the benefits of exercise training in lowering cardiovascular risk factors are well established, the risks and benefits of hormone therapy have been questioned. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the effects of estrogen therapy (HT) associated or not with exercise training (ET) in autonomic cardiovascular control in ovariectomized (OVX) rats. Female rats were divided into: control, OVX, OVX+HT, OVX+ET and OVX+HT+ET. HT was performed using a 0.25mg 8-weeks sustained release pellet. Trained groups were submitted to an 8-week exercise training protocol on treadmill. Baroreflex sensitivity (BRS) was evaluated by heart rate responses to arterial pressure (AP) changes, and vagal and sympathetic tonus by pharmacological blockade. Ovariectomy induced an AP increase (123+/-2mmHg vs. 108+/-2mmHg), BRS impairment ( approximately 69%), sympathetic activation ( approximately 100%) and vagal tonus reduction ( approximately 77%) compared to controls. HT or ET normalized the changes in parasympathetic tonus. However, only the association HT+ET was able to promote normalization of AP, BRS and sympathetic tonus, as compared to controls. These results indicate that ET induces cardiovascular and autonomic benefits in OVX rats under HT, suggesting a positive role of this association in the management of cardiovascular risk factor in postmenopausal women.

  1. A Study of Using Massage Therapy Accompanied with Stretching Exercise for Rehabilitation of Mammary Gland Hyperplasia

    PubMed Central

    Lv, Pin; Chong, Yuping; Zou, Huagang

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. To apply massage therapy accompanied with stretching exercises for treatment of mammary gland hyperplasia, evaluate the clinical outcome in patients, and estimate the therapy as a novel treatment method for mammary hyperplasia. Methods. 28 adult female patients were selected and treated with massage therapy and stretching exercises focusing on skeleton muscles of chest, abdomen, and axilla. The mammary gland oxyhemoglobin (OxyHb) and deoxyhemoglobin (DeoxyHb) levels were detected before and after treatment after 15, 30, and 45 days. Results. In this cohort, pretreatment OxyHb (mean ± SD) is 1.32 ± 0.14 (medium-high), and DeoxyHb is 0.87 ± 0.13 (normal). All patients were clinically diagnosed with benign mammary gland hyperplasia and mastitis. The posttreatment OxyHb levels are 1.23 ± 0.09 (normal-medium, 15-day), 1.16 ± 0.08 (normal, 30-day), and 1.05 ± 0.04 (normal, 45-day), and DeoxyHb levels are 0.90 ± 0.11 (normal, 15-day), 0.94 ± 0.18 (normal, 30-day), and 0.98 ± 0.12 (normal, 45-day). Patients were diagnosed with decreased hyperplasia 15 and 30 days after treatment and with no symptom of hyperplasia in mammary gland 45 days after treatment. Conclusion. Mammary gland hyperplasia is closely correlated with pathological changes of skeletal muscles and could be significantly improved by massage therapy and stretching exercises targeting neighboring skeletal muscles. PMID:27022615

  2. Effects of Nia exercise in women receiving radiation therapy for breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Reis, Debra; Walsh, M Eileen; Young-McCaughan, Stacey; Jones, Tisha

    2013-09-01

    To compare a 12-week nontraditional exercise Nia program practiced at home to usual care on fatigue, quality of life (QOL), aerobic capacity, and shoulder flexibility in women with breast cancer undergoing radiation therapy. Randomized clinical trial. Large community-based hospital in the midwestern United States. 41 women with stage I, II, or III breast cancer starting radiation therapy. 22 women were randomized to the Nia group and 19 to the usual care group. Those in the Nia group were instructed to practice Nia 20-60 minutes three times per week for 12 weeks. Those in the usual care group were instructed to continue normal activities. Fatigue, QOL, aerobic capacity, and shoulder flexibility. Controlling for baseline scores, change over time between groups was significantly different for the women who practiced Nia at least 13 times during the 12-week period; those in the Nia intervention reported significantly less fatigue between weeks 6 and 12, as compared to control group (p = 0.05). No statistical differences in QOL, aerobic capacity, or shoulder flexibility were found, but trends favoring Nia were identified. For women undergoing radiation therapy for breast cancer, Nia can help relieve fatigue. Additional research in arm and shoulder mobility and preservation also may be beneficial. Oncology nurses are in a unique position to offer suggestions to help manage fatigue, and Nia could be considered as part of a cancer survivorship program. Exercise is beneficial for women with breast cancer, and interest is growing in nontraditional exercise options. Nia can benefit women with breast cancer undergoing radiation therapy.

  3. Effects of home-based daily exercise therapy on joint mobility, daily activity, pain, and depression in patients with ankylosing spondylitis.

    PubMed

    Lim, Hyun-Ja; Moon, Young-Im; Lee, Myeong Soo

    2005-04-01

    We investigated the effects of home-based daily exercise on joint mobility, functional capacity, pain, and depression in patients with ankylosing spondylitis (AS). The patients were randomly assigned to a wait-list control group or to an exercise-therapy group. The exercise-therapy group performed a 20-min exercise program once per day for 8 consecutive weeks. After 8 weeks, compared with the control group, the exercise group showed improvements in joint mobility (cervical flexion, extension, shoulder flexion, abduction, hip abduction, and knee flexion), finger-floor distance, and functional capacity. Pain and depression scores were significantly lower after the exercise program in the exercise group than in the control group. These findings indicate that exercise therapy increases joint mobility and functional capacity, and decreases pain and depression in patients with AS. Home-based exercise, which is easily accessible to patients, might be an effective intervention for AS.

  4. The additional effect of orthotic devices on exercise therapy for patients with patellofemoral pain syndrome: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Swart, Nynke M; van Linschoten, Robbart; Bierma-Zeinstra, Sita M A; van Middelkoop, Marienke

    2012-06-01

    The aim of the study is to determine "the additional effect of... function" for patellofemoral pain syndrome (PFPS). The additional effect of orthotic devices over exercise therapy on pain and function. A systematic literature search was conducted in MEDLINE, CINAHL, EMBASE, Cochrane and PEDro. Randomised controlled trials and controlled clinical trials of patients diagnosed with PFPS evaluating a clinically relevant outcome were included. Treatment had to include exercise therapy combined with orthotics, compared with an identical exercise programme with or without sham orthotics. Data were summarised using a best evidence synthesis. Eight trials fulfilled the inclusion criteria, of which three had a low risk of bias. There is moderate evidence for no additive effectiveness of knee braces to exercise therapy on pain (effect sizes (ES) varied from -0.14 to 0.04) and conflicting evidence on function (ES -0.33). There is moderate evidence for no difference between knee braces and exercise therapy versus placebo knee braces and exercise therapy on pain and function (ES -0.1-0.10). More studies of high methodological quality are needed to draw definitive conclusions.

  5. Baseline regional perfusion impacts exercise response to endobronchial valve therapy in advanced pulmonary emphysema.

    PubMed

    Argula, Rahul G; Strange, Charlie; Ramakrishnan, Viswanathan; Goldin, Jonathan

    2013-11-01

    Advanced heterogeneous emphysema with hyperinflation impacts exercise tolerance in COPD. Bronchoscopic lung volume reduction using Zephyr endobronchial valves (EBVs) has been shown to improve lung function in patients with heterogeneous emphysema. It is unclear whether the target lobe perfusion of patients receiving EBV therapy impacts exercise tolerance as measured by the 6-min walk test distance (6MWTD). We performed a retrospective analysis on the treatment group of the Endobronchial Valve for Emphysema Palliation Trial (VENT) to evaluate the impact of perfusion, measured by 99mTc-MAA-perfusion scintigraphy, on the 6-month improvement in 6MWTD. A mixed-model analysis was performed for the treatment outcome, adjusting for other variables such as age, target lobe position, fissure integrity, BMI, sex, destruction score, and lobar exclusion. Dichotomized at the median, of the 169 patients who received EBV therapy, 88 had a low target lobe regional perfusion and 81 had high target lobe regional perfusion at baseline. Patients with a low target lobe regional perfusion had a significant improvement in 6MWTD when compared with those with a high baseline target lobe regional perfusion (30.24 m vs 3.72 m, P = .03). Shifts in perfusion after EBV therapy occurred only in patients with high baseline perfusion and did not correlate with improved 6MWTD. Patients having heterogeneous emphysema with a low baseline target lobe regional perfusion benefit from EBV therapy, independent of the degree of target lobe destruction. This effect is attenuated if the EBV therapy is not occlusive. Characterization of baseline perfusion may enhance clinical results of patients with emphysema undergoing EBV therapy. ClinicalTrials.gov; No.: NCT00000606; URL: www.clincialtrials.gov.

  6. Near-Infrared Light Therapy to Attenuate Strength Loss After Strenuous Resistance Exercise

    PubMed Central

    Larkin-Kaiser, Kelly A.; Christou, Evangelos; Tillman, Mark; George, Steven; Borsa, Paul A.

    2015-01-01

    Context: Near-infrared (NIR) light therapy is purported to act as an ergogenic aid by enhancing the contractile function of skeletal muscle. Improving muscle function is a new avenue for research in the area of laser therapy; however, very few researchers have examined the ergogenic effects of NIR light therapy and the influence it may have on the recovery process during rehabilitation. Objective: To evaluate the ergogenic effect of NIR light therapy on skeletal muscle function. Design: Crossover study. Setting: Controlled laboratory. Patients or Other Participants: Thirty-nine healthy men (n = 21) and women (n = 18; age = 20.0 ± 0.2 years, height = 169 ± 2 cm, mass = 68.4 ± 1.8 kg, body mass index = 23.8 ± 0.4 kg/m2). Intervention(s): Each participant received active and sham treatments on the biceps brachii muscle on 2 separate days. The order of treatment was randomized. A class 4 laser with a cumulative dose of 360 J was used for the active treatment. After receiving the treatment on each day, participants completed an elbow-flexion resistance-exercise protocol. Main Outcome Measure(s): The dependent variables were elbow range of motion, muscle point tenderness, and strength (peak torque). Analysis of variance with repeated measures was used to assess changes in these measures between treatments at baseline and at follow-up, 48 hours postexercise. Additionally, immediate strength loss postexercise was compared between treatments using a paired t test. Results: Preexercise to postexercise strength loss for the active laser treatment, although small, was less than with the sham treatment (P = .05). Conclusions: Applied to skeletal muscle before resistance exercise, NIR light therapy effectively attenuated strength loss. Therefore, NIR light therapy may be a beneficial, noninvasive modality for improving muscle function during rehabilitation after musculoskeletal injury. However, future studies using higher treatment doses are warranted. PMID:25397864

  7. Use of participant focus groups to identify barriers and facilitators to worksite exercise therapy adherence in randomized controlled trials involving firefighters

    PubMed Central

    Mayer, John M; Nuzzo, James L; Dagenais, Simon

    2013-01-01

    Background Firefighters are at increased risk for back injuries, which may be mitigated through exercise therapy to increase trunk muscle endurance. However, long-term adherence to exercise therapy is generally poor, limiting its potential benefits. Focus groups can be used to identify key barriers and facilitators to exercise adherence among study participants. Objective To explore barriers and facilitators to worksite exercise therapy adherence among firefighters to inform future randomized controlled trials (RCTs). Methods Participants enrolled in a previous RCT requiring twice-weekly worksite exercise therapy for 24 weeks were asked to take part in moderated focus group discussions centered on eight open-ended questions related to exercise adherence. Responses were analyzed qualitatively using a social ecological framework to identify key intrapersonal, interpersonal, and institutional barriers and potential facilitators to exercise adherence. Results A total of 27 participants were included in the four focus group discussions, representing 50% of those assigned to a worksite exercise therapy group in the previous RCT, in which only 67% of scheduled exercise therapy sessions were completed. Lack of self-motivation was cited as the key intrapersonal barrier to adherence, while lack of peer support was the key interpersonal barrier reported, and lack of time to exercise during work shifts was the key institutional barrier identified. Conclusion Focus group discussions identified both key barriers and potential facilitators to increase worksite exercise therapy adherence among firefighters. Future studies should consider educating and reminding participants about the benefits of exercise, providing individual and group incentives based on exercise adherence and performance, providing outside monitoring of exercise adherence, varying the exercise routine, encouraging group exercise and competition, and scheduling exercise during each work shift. PMID:23515182

  8. Cardiac rehabilitation and exercise therapy in the elderly: Should we invest in the aged?

    PubMed Central

    Menezes, Arthur R; Lavie, Carl J; Milani, Richard V; Arena, Ross A; Church, Timothy S

    2012-01-01

    Coronary heart disease (CHD) is the leading cause of death worldwide and becomes increasingly prevalent among patients aged 65 years and older. Elderly patients are at a higher risk for complications and accelerated physical deconditioning after a cardiovascular event, especially compared to their younger counterparts. The last few decades were privy to multiple studies that demonstrated the beneficial effects of cardiac rehabilitation (CR) and exercise therapy on mortality, exercise capacity, psychological risk factors, inflammation, and obesity among patients with CHD. Unfortunately, a significant portion of the available data in this field pertains to younger patients. A viable explanation is that older patients are grossly underrepresented in these programs for multiple reasons starting with the patient and extending to the physician. In this article, we will review the benefits of CR programs among the elderly, as well as some of the barriers that hinder their participation. PMID:22783325

  9. Anxiety, panic disorder and coronary artery disease: issues concerning physical exercise and cognitive behavioral therapy.

    PubMed

    Sardinha, Aline; Araújo, Claudio Gil S; Soares-Filho, Gastão Luis Fonseca; Nardi, Antonio Egidio

    2011-02-01

    Psychological factors such as stress and depression have already been established as primary and secondary cardiovascular risk factors. More recently, the role of anxiety in increasing cardiac risk has also been studied. The underlying mechanisms of increased cardiac risk in panic disorder patients seem to reflect the direct and indirect effects of autonomic dysfunction, as well as behavioral risk factors associated with an unhealthy lifestyle. Implications of the comorbidity between panic and cardiovascular disease include higher morbidity, functional deficits, increased cardiovascular risk, and poor adherence to cardiac rehabilitation or exercise programs. This article probes the most recent evidence on the association between coronary artery disease, anxiety and panic disorder, and discusses the potential role of incorporating regular physical exercise and cognitive behavioral therapy in the treatment of this condition.

  10. [Exercise therapy in the treatment of idiopathic adolescent scoliosis: Is it useful?].

    PubMed

    Porte, M; Patte, K; Dupeyron, A; Cottalorda, J

    2016-06-01

    Many practitioners, pediatricians, and general practitioners prescribe physical therapy when tracking scoliosis. However, has physical therapy alone proved its efficacy in the care of the scoliosis to slow down progression? Our purpose is to report the results of a literature review on the effectiveness of rehabilitation in idiopathic scoliosis. No current study presents sufficient scientific proof to validate the efficacy of isolated exercise therapy in scoliosis. Learned societies recognize, however, the efficacy of combining conservative therapy (brace+physiotherapy) in idiopathic scoliosis. Should we then still prescribe rehabilitation without brace treatment? Although physical therapy alone does not seem effective in treating scoliosis, it can limit potential painful phenomena and be beneficial for respiratory function. The physical therapist can also teach the teenager the classic principles of hygiene of the back. It may therefore be appropriate to prescribe physical therapy, but the principles and objectives must be explained to the patient and family in light of current evidence-based medicine. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  11. Exercise to Countereact Loss of Bone and Muscle During Androgen Deprivation Therapy in Men with Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-05-01

    CONTRACT NUMBER Exercise to Counteract Loss of Bone and Muscle during Androgen Deprivation Therapy in Men with Prostate Cancer 5b. GRANT NUMBER...of androgen suppression treatment in men with prostate cancer . Prostate Cancer Prostatic Dis 2007. APPENDICES none ...and Muscle during Androgen Deprivation Therapy in Men with Prostate Cancer PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Wendy M Kohrt, Ph.D

  12. Effect of a randomized controlled exercise trial on bone outcomes: influence of adjuvant endocrine therapy.

    PubMed

    Knobf, M Tish; Jeon, Sangchoon; Smith, Barbara; Harris, Lyndsay; Kerstetter, Jane; Thompson, A Siobhan; Insogna, Karl

    2016-02-01

    Bone loss is a significant clinical problem for female cancer survivors (FCS) and increases fracture risk. The aim of the Yale Fitness Intervention Trial (Yale FIT) was to determine the effects of a 12-month aerobic-resistance exercise intervention compared to a home-based physical activity group on bone outcomes [bone mineral density (BMD)] and biomarkers bone turnover). Early postmenopausal FCS (N = 154) were randomized to the exercise intervention (3 times/week) or to a home-based physical activity group. Calcium (1200 mg) and Vitamin D (400 IU) supplements were provided to both groups. BMD was measured at baseline and 12 months. No significant difference in BMD was observed for the exercise vs home-based group. However, subjects on Tamoxifen or no endocrine therapy did not significantly lose BMD, with the exception of the femoral neck (FN). In contrast subjects on aromatase inhibitors (AIs) had significant BMD loss at all sites. The majority of subjects had sufficient serum levels of Vitamin D (>20 ng/mL) but there was significantly less bone loss in subjects in the 20-29 ng/mL range at the LS (p = 0.01), hip (p = 0.03), and GT (p = 0.008) compared to lower or higher levels. Exercise stimulates bone remodeling but the intervention was not superior for BMD outcomes at one year. The dose of the osteogenic stimulus in the intervention has been effective in preserving BMD in healthy postmenopausal women but it may be inadequate for survivors with chemotherapy-induced menopause and for those on adjuvant AI therapy.

  13. Effect of supervised exercise therapy for intermittent claudication in patients with diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    van Pul, Kim M; Kruidenier, Lotte M; Nicolaï, Saskia P A; de Bie, Rob A; Nieman, Fred H M; Prins, Martin H; Teijink, Joep A W

    2012-10-01

    Primary treatment for patients with intermittent claudication is exercise therapy. Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a frequently occurring comorbidity in patients with intermittent claudication, and in these patients, exercise tolerance is decreased. However, there is little literature about the increase in walking distance after supervised exercise therapy (SET) in patients with both intermittent claudication and DM. The objective of this study was to determine the effectiveness of SET for intermittent claudication in patients with DM. Consecutive patients with intermittent claudication who started SET were included. Exclusion criteria were Rutherford stage 4 to 6 and the inability to perform the standardized treadmill test. SET was administered according to the guidelines of the Royal Dutch Society for Physiotherapy. At baseline and at 1, 3, and 6 months of follow-up, a standardized treadmill exercise test was performed. The primary outcome measurement was the absolute claudication distance (ACD). We included 775 patients, of whom 230 had DM (29.7%). At 6 months of follow-up, data of 440 patients were available. Both ACD at baseline and at 6 months of follow-up were significantly lower in patients with DM (P < 0.001). However, increase in ACD after 6 months of SET did not differ significantly (P = 0.48) between the DM group and the non-DM group (270 m and 400 m, respectively). In conclusion, SET for patients with intermittent claudication is equally effective in improving walking distance for both patients with and without DM, although ACD remains lower in patients with DM. Copyright © 2012 Annals of Vascular Surgery Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Phase II Pragmatic Randomized Controlled Trial of Patient-Led Therapies (Mirror Therapy and Lower-Limb Exercises) During Inpatient Stroke Rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Tyson, Sarah; Wilkinson, Jack; Thomas, Nessa; Selles, Ruud; McCabe, Candy; Tyrrell, Pippa; Vail, Andy

    2015-10-01

    Patient-led therapy has the potential to increase the amount of therapy patients undertake during stroke rehabilitation and to enhance recovery. Our objective was to assess the feasibility and acceptability of 2 patient-led therapies during the acute stages of stroke care: mirror therapy for the upper limb and lower-limb exercises for the lower limb. This was a blind assessed, multicenter, pragmatic randomized controlled trial of patient-led upper-limb mirror therapy and patient-led lower leg exercises. Stroke survivors with upper and lower limb limitations, undergoing inpatient rehabilitation and able to consent were recruited at least 1 week poststroke. Both interventions proved feasible, with >90% retention. No serious adverse events were reported. Both groups did less therapy than recommended; typically 5 to 15 minutes for 7 days or less. Participants receiving mirror therapy (n = 63) tended to do less practice than those doing lower-limb exercises (n = 31). Those with neglect did 69% less mirror therapy than those without (P = .02), which was not observed in the exercise group. Observed between-group differences were modest but neglect, upper-limb strength, and dexterity showed some improvement in the mirror therapy group. No changes were seen in the lower-limb group. Both patient-led mirror therapy and lower-limb exercises during inpatient stroke care are safe, feasible, and acceptable and warrant further investigation. Practice for 5 to 15 minutes for 7 days is a realistic prescription unless strategies to enhance adherence are included. © The Author(s) 2015.

  15. Exercise

    MedlinePlus

    ... people with MS about their perspectives on aquatics exercise. Share Smaller Text Larger Text Print Discover More Here are a few related topics that may interest you Accessible Nature Trails Learn More Finding Another Sport To Love Learn More Accessible Bicycling Learn More ...

  16. Long-term outcome after treatment of temporomandibular joint osteoarthritis with exercise and manual therapy.

    PubMed

    Nicolakis, Peter; Erdogmus, Celal Burak; Kollmitzer, Josef; Kerschan-Schindl, Katharina; Sengstbratl, Michaela; Nuhr, Martin; Crevenna, Richard; Fialka-Moser, Veronika

    2002-01-01

    In a previous study, exercise and manual therapy demonstrated a 90% success rate in patients with osteoarthrosis of the temporomandibular joints in the short-term. The aim of this follow-up study was to assess the long-term effect of these treatment modalities. Seventeen patients were evaluated. All patients suffered from osteoarthrosis of the temporomandibular joints with pain in the temporomandibular joint at baseline and were treated successfully in a prior short-term study. The parameters were pain at rest and at chewing, impairment in daily life, and mouth opening. At follow-up, 11 patients (65%) experienced no pain and 13 patients (76%) had no pain at rest (Fisher's Exact Test: p<0.02). Thirteen patients (76%) had a normal incisal edge clearance, and ten patients (59%) felt no impairment due to the disease (Fisher's Exact Test: p=0.01). Thirteen patients (76%), who had been treated once successfully, have not needed treatment within the three years after cessation of their therapy. Exercise therapy is an effective tool to treat osteoarthrosis of the temporomandibular joints.

  17. Targeted exercise therapy for voice and swallow in persons with Parkinson’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Russell, John A.; Ciucci, Michelle R.; Connor, Nadine P.; Schallert, Timothy

    2010-01-01

    Sensorimotor deficits affecting voice and swallowing ability can have a devastating impact on the quality of life of people with Parkinson disease (PD). Recent scientific findings in animal models of PD pinpoint targeted exercise therapy as a potential treatment to reduce neurochemical loss and decrease parkinsonian symptoms. Although there may be beneficial effects, targeted exercise therapy is not a standard component of therapy for the cranial sensiromotor deficits seen in PD. In this paper we review the scientific evidence for targeted training for voice and swallowing deficits. The literature search revealed 19 publications that included targeted training for voice and only one publication that included targeted training for swallowing. We summarize 3 main findings: 1) targeted training may be associated with lasting changes in voice behavior, 2) targeted training of sensorimotor actions with anatomical or functional overlap with voice and swallowing may improve voice and swallowing to some degree, but it is unknown whether these effects endure over time, and 3) evidence regarding cranial sensorimotor interventions for Parkinson disease is sparse. We concluded that targeted training for voice and swallow is a promising but under-studied intervention for cranial sensorimotor deficits associated with PD and posit that animal models can be useful in designing empirically based studies that further the science on targeted training. PMID:20233583

  18. Exercise testing in late-onset glycogen storage disease type II patients undergoing enzyme replacement therapy

    PubMed Central

    Marzorati, Mauro; Porcelli, Simone; Bellistri, Giuseppe; Morandi, Lucia; Grassi, Bruno

    2012-01-01

    Enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) has recently became available for patients with glycogen storage disease type II. Previous studies have demonstrated clinical efficacy of enzyme replacement therapy, however, data on physiological variables related to exercise tolerance are scarce. Four glycogen storage disease type II late-onset patients (45 ± 6 years) performed an incremental exercise on a cycle ergometer, up to voluntary exhaustion, before (BEFORE) and after 12 months of ERT (AFTER). Peak workload, oxygen uptake, heart rate, cardiac output (by impedance cardiography) and vastus lateralis oxygenation indices (by continuous-wave near-infrared spectroscopy, NIRS) were determined. Peak workload and oxygen uptake values significantly increased during ERT (54 ± 30 vs. 63 ± 31 watt, and 17.2 ± 4.4 vs. 19.7 ± 3.5 ml/kg/min, respectively, in BEFORE vs. AFTER). On the other hand, for both peak cardiac output (12.3 ± 5.3 vs. 14.8 ± 4.5 L/min) and the NIRS-determined peak skeletal muscle fractional O2 extraction, expressed as a percentage of the maximal values during a transient limb ischemia (30 ± 39% vs. 38 ± 28%), the observed increases were not statistically significant. Our findings suggest that in glycogen storage disease type II patients enzyme replacement therapy is associated with a mild improvement of exercise tolerance. The findings need to be validated during a longer follow-up on a larger group of patients. PMID:23182645

  19. Exercise or basic body awareness therapy as add-on treatment for major depression: a controlled study.

    PubMed

    Danielsson, Louise; Papoulias, Ilias; Petersson, Eva-Lisa; Carlsson, Jane; Waern, Margda

    2014-10-01

    While physical exercise as adjunctive treatment for major depression has received considerable attention in recent years, the evidence is conflicting. This study evaluates the effects of two different add-on treatments: exercise and basic body awareness therapy. Randomized controlled trial with two intervention groups and one control, including 62 adults on antidepressant medication, who fulfilled criteria for current major depression as determined by the Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview. Interventions (10 weeks) were aerobic exercise or basic body awareness therapy (BBAT), compared to a single consultation with advice on physical activity. Primary outcome was depression severity, rated by a blinded assessor using the Montgomery Asberg Rating Scale (MADRS). Secondary outcomes were global function, cardiovascular fitness, self-rated depression, anxiety and body awareness. Improvements in MADRS score (mean change=-10.3, 95% CI (-13.5 to -7.1), p=0.038) and cardiovascular fitness (mean change=2.4ml oxygen/kg/min, 95% CI (1.5 to 3.3), p=0.017) were observed in the exercise group. Per-protocol analysis confirmed the effects of exercise, and indicated that BBAT has an effect on self-rated depression. The small sample size and the challenge of missing data. Participants׳ positive expectations regarding the exercise intervention need to be considered. Exercise in a physical therapy setting seems to have effect on depression severity and fitness, in major depression. Our findings suggest that physical therapy can be a viable clinical strategy to inspire and guide persons with major depression to exercise. More research is needed to clarify the effects of basic body awareness therapy. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Mood disorders in youth: exercise, light therapy, and pharmacologic complementary and integrative approaches.

    PubMed

    Popper, Charles W

    2013-07-01

    The therapeutic value of physical exercise, bright light therapy and dawn simulation, and several pharmacologic treatments, including hypericum (St. John's wort), S-adenosylmethionine, and 5-hydroxytryptophan, are reviewed, with a focus on their use for treating major depressive disorder in children and adolescents and also for alleviating depressed mood in the general (nonclinical) population of youth. For each treatment discussed, all published randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trials are summarized, along with some additional selected studies. Nutritional psychopharmacology and several other approaches to treating depression will be presented in an upcoming volume in the Child and Adolescent Psychiatric Clinics of North America. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Electrical stimulation-supported voice exercises are superior to voice exercise therapy alone in patients with unilateral recurrent laryngeal nerve paresis: results from a prospective, randomized clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Ptok, Martin; Strack, Daniela

    2008-08-01

    For more than 40 years, electrical stimulation procedures for unilateral recurrent laryngeal nerve paresis (URLNP) therapy have been proposed. However, it is unclear whether electrical stimulation therapy is effective for URLNP patients. In this study we compare the outcome of traditional voice exercise treatment (VE) with electrical stimulation-supported voice exercise (ES). A total of 90 URLNP patients were recruited to participate in a prospective, randomized trial. The decrease in vocal fold irregularity (CFx) and increase in maximum phonation time (MPT) after a 3-month therapy period were the dependent variables. In the ES group, CFx improved to a significantly greater extent than in the VE group. MPT increased similarly in both groups. Our data indicate that ES is superior to VE for patients with URLNP. Because no further data exist, it can be assumed that improvement following VE only reflects spontaneous recovery. However ES appears to be an effective non-surgical therapeutic procedure.

  2. Additive effects of low-level laser therapy with exercise on subacromial syndrome: a randomised, double-blind, controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Abrisham, Seyyed Mohammad Jalil; Kermani-Alghoraishi, Mohammad; Ghahramani, Rahil; Jabbari, Latife; Jomeh, Hossein; Zare, Maryam

    2011-10-01

    The subacromial syndrome is the most common source of shoulder pain. The mainstays of conservative treatment are non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and exercise therapy. Recently, low-level laser therapy (LLLT) has been popularized in the treatment of various musculoskeletal disorders. The aim of this study is to evaluate the additive effects of LLLT with exercise in comparison with exercise therapy alone in treatment of the subacromial syndrome. We conducted a randomised clinical study of 80 patients who presented to clinic with subacromial syndrome (rotator cuff and biceps tendinitis). Patients were randomly allocated into two groups. In group I (n = 40), patients were given laser treatment (pulsed infrared laser) and exercise therapy for ten sessions during a period of 2 weeks. In group II (n = 40), placebo laser and the same exercise therapy were given for the same period. Patients were evaluated for the pain with visual analogue scale (VAS) and shoulder range of motion (ROM) in an active and passive movement of flexion, abduction and external rotation before and after treatment. In both groups, significant post-treatment improvements were achieved in all parameters (P = 0.00). In comparison between the two groups, a significant improvement was noted in all movements in group I (P = 0.00). Also, there was a substantial difference between the groups in VAS scores (P = 0.00) which showed significant pain reduction in group I. This study indicates that LLLT combined exercise is more effective than exercise therapy alone in relieving pain and in improving the shoulder ROM in patients with subacromial syndrome.

  3. Health promotion for young patients with haemophilia. Counselling, adjuvant exercise therapy and school sports.

    PubMed

    Sondermann, Judith; Herbsleb, Marco; Stanek, Frank-Detlef; Gabriel, Holger; Kentouche, Karim

    2016-06-15

    The haemophilia treatment centre of the Clinic for Children and Youth Medicine in Jena extends medical care by health-promotion measures, namely: health counselling, adjuvant exercise therapy and school sports. In addition to the regular medical checks at the treatment centre patients are examined regarding physical fitness, joint situation, quality of life in general and disease-specific manner, as well as psycho-social and nutritional behaviour. Findings and medical results of the examinations are integrated into an individual advice on therapy, school sports, and health recommendations. This aimed at strengthening health-related resources and minimizing potential injuries. First long-term evaluation shows an increase of activity behaviour and physical fitness without increasing bleeding rate and maintained joint function.

  4. [Effects of an optimized exercise therapy on physical performance of patients with cystic fibrosis].

    PubMed

    Rhodius, U; Posselt, S; Posselt, H G; Hofstetter, R; Leyk, D

    2002-09-01

    Regular exercise training can increase the physical performance of patients with cystic fibrosis (CF). However, training is often hampered by negative factors such as infections, lack of time, etc. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of a 3-week-training-program performed under favourable conditions on physical performance and lung function of CF-patients: 17 patients daily trained at least 2,5 h under suspicious conditions at a sport hotel in Israel (Eilat). During the entire 3 weeks a comprehensive care was applied to the patients including intensive physical therapy and nutrition adapted to the individual demands. Testings of lung function and cycle ergometry ramp tests were performed a week before and after the training program. Additional control measurements were taken 7 months post training. After the 3-week-training vital capacity and FEV1 were increased by 7 % and 6 % (p > 0.05). The results of the cycle ergometry showed bigger and significant improvements in the maximal values of power (12 % - 20 %), oxygen uptake and ventilation. This findings were also valid for the submaximal exercise range indicated by a slower heart rate slope and a lower aerobic-anaerobic threshold. The present results suggest, that relatively large increases in physical performance can be obtained by short, but intensive exercise training including a comprehensive care.

  5. Managing lapses in cardiac rehabilitation exercise therapy: examination of the problem-solving process.

    PubMed

    Flora, Parminder K; Brawley, Lawrence R

    2013-11-01

    Poor adherence to cardiac rehabilitation (CR) exercise therapy is an ongoing problem. Problem-solving (PS) is an identified cognitive-behavioral strategy to promote exercise adherence. However, PS process has not been examined, and how PS promotes adherence is not known. Using Social Cognitive Theory and Ewart's Social Problem-Solving Model as guiding frameworks, we examined proposed theoretical links between persistence, an indicator of adherence, and (a) PS effectiveness and (b) self-regulatory efficacy. Based on the Model of Social Problem-Solving, 2 distinct components of the PS process (problem-solving and solution implementation), were examined. Older adult participants (N = 52; 32 men) representing a typical CR sample (mean age = 65.6 years; SD = 10.8) participated in this correlational, observational study. Two hierarchical multiple regressions indicated that PS effectiveness and self-regulatory efficacy were significant predictors of anticipated persistence. Relative to PS process, both predictors accounted for: (a) 41% of the variance in anticipated persistence with PS; and (b) 49% of the variance in anticipated persistence with solution implementation. Proposed theoretical relationships were supported, and both PS effectiveness and self-regulatory efficacy accounted for a greater amount of the variance in anticipated persistence than either alone. Future efforts to improve adherence to rehabilitative exercise could include the use of PS. The 2 distinct components of the PS process may be important for successful adjustment to problems. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2013 APA, all rights reserved.

  6. Effect of hormone therapy on exercise capacity in early postmenopausal women.

    PubMed

    Mercuro, Giuseppe; Saiu, Francesca; Deidda, Martino; Mercuro, Silvia; Vitale, Cristiana; Rosano, Giuseppe M C

    2007-10-01

    To compare the exercise capacity of postmenopausal women with matched premenopausal controls, as well as postmenopausal women before and after 3 months of hormone therapy (HT). This study examined the response to strenuous isotonic exercise in 30 women with recently developed menopause (age, mean+/-standard deviation, 50.6+/-1.1 years) without cardiovascular risk factors or diseases. Thirty premenopausal subjects, matched one-to-one for age and biophysical characteristics, were the control group. Postmenopausal women underwent examination before (T(0)) and 3 months after (T(1)) HT (oral 0.625 mg conjugated estrogen and 2.5 mg medroxyprogesterone acetate/day) with high-resolution ultrasound determination of peripheral flow-mediated vasodilation and an integrative cardiopulmonary test. Postmenopausal women showed an impairment of flow-mediated vasodilation (P<.001) in the radial artery and a worsening of physical performance, primarily exemplified by lower maximal workload (P<.01) and peak oxygen consumption (Vo(2)max, P<.001) compared with premenopausal women. After 3 months on HT, ergometabolic parameters and vasodilation reserve were at a level comparable to premenopausal women. Flow-mediated vasodilation measurements after 3 months on HT significantly correlated with those of peak oxygen consumption (r=0.77, P<.001) and the ratio between the increase in oxygen consumption and that in work rate (DeltaVo(2)/DeltaWR) (r=0.73, P<.001). The peripheral circulation is the limiting system in postmenopausal women experiencing exercise intolerance, and there are benefits in introducing HT.

  7. Cost-utility of exercise therapy in patients with hip osteoarthritis in primary care.

    PubMed

    Tan, S S; Teirlinck, C H; Dekker, J; Goossens, L M A; Bohnen, A M; Verhaar, J A N; van Es, P P; Koes, B W; Bierma-Zeinstra, S M A; Luijsterburg, P A J; Koopmanschap, M A

    2016-04-01

    To determine the cost-effectiveness (CE) of exercise therapy (intervention group) compared to 'general practitioner (GP) care' (control group) in patients with hip osteoarthritis (OA) in primary care. This cost-utility analysis was conducted with 120 GPs in the Netherlands from the societal and healthcare perspective. Data on direct medical costs, productivity costs and quality of life (QoL) was collected using standardised questionnaires which were sent to the patients at baseline and at 6, 13, 26, 39 and 52 weeks follow-up. All costs were based on Euro 2011 cost data. A total of 203 patients were included. The annual direct medical costs per patient were significantly lower for the intervention group (€ 1233) compared to the control group (€ 1331). The average annual societal costs per patient were lower in the intervention group (€ 2634 vs € 3241). Productivity costs were higher than direct medical costs. There was a very small adjusted difference in QoL of 0.006 in favour of the control group (95% CI: -0.04 to +0.02). Our study revealed that exercise therapy is probably cost saving, without the risk of noteworthy negative health effects. NTR1462. Copyright © 2015 Osteoarthritis Research Society International. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Biofeedback-guided pelvic floor exercise therapy for obstructive defecation: An effective alternative

    PubMed Central

    ba-bai-ke-re, Ma-Mu-Ti-Jiang A; Wen, Ni-Re; Hu, Yun-Long; Zhao, Liang; Tuxun, Tuerhongjiang; Husaiyin, Aierhati; Sailai, Yalikun; Abulimiti, Alimujiang; Wang, Yun-Hai; Yang, Peng

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To compare biofeedback-guided pelvic floor exercise therapy (BFT) with the use of oral polyethylene glycol (PEG) for the treatment of obstructive defecation. METHODS: A total of 88 subjects were assigned to treatment with either BFT (n = 44) or oral PEG (n = 44). Constipation symptoms (including difficult evacuation, hard stool, digitation necessity, incomplete emptying sensation, laxative dependence, perianal pain at defecation, and constipation satisfaction), Wexner Scores, and quality of life scores were assessed after 1, 3, and 6 mo. RESULTS: At the 6 mo follow-up, the symptoms of the BFT group patients showed significantly greater improvements compared with the PEG group regarding difficult evacuation, hard stools, digitation necessity, laxative dependence, perianal pain at defecation, constipation satisfaction, Wexner Constipation Score, and quality of life score (P < 0.05). The quality of life score of the BFT group at the final follow-up time (6 mo) was 80 ± 2.2. After a complete course of training, improvements in the clinical symptoms of the BFT group were markedly improved (P < 0.05), and the Wexner Constipation Scores were greatly decreased compared with the oral PEG group (P < 0.05). CONCLUSION: We concluded that manometric biofeedback-guided pelvic floor exercise training is superior to oral polyethylene glycol therapy for obstructive defecation. PMID:25083090

  9. Physical, occupational, speech and swallowing therapies and physical exercise in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Ransmayr, G

    2011-05-01

    Former studies on the effects of physical exercise, physical and occupational therapy (PT, OT) and speech and swallowing therapy (ST, SwT) in Parkinson's disease (PD) have demonstrated little or uncertain effects. New pathophysiological concepts have been developed. Recent controlled high-level studies demonstrate improvement of mobility and balance after training of muscular strength and endurance, trunk control, and amplitude and rhythmicity of movements (treadmill). Attentional and cognitive strategies were found to enforce body awareness and improve movement sequences. Dance, sensory (auditory, visual, tactile) and cognitive cueing are effective for problems of gait and balance. Whether PT and OT reduce the risk of falls remains uncertain. ST including Lee Silverman Voice Treatment has been shown to relieve speech problems. SwT and OT are frequently applied, however, further studies are necessary. Therapeutic interventions need to be evaluated with regard to consistency, intensity, frequency, duration, side effects, home versus institution based and standardized versus individualized training, quality standards, practicability in real life, and cost-effectiveness. Parkinson patients should resume or continue physical exercise as long as possible. There is hope that regular sport may modify PD risk and progression.

  10. Low-level laser therapy and exercise for patients with shoulder disorders in physiotherapy practice (a systematic review protocol).

    PubMed

    Awotidebe, Adedapo W; Inglis-Jassiem, Gakeemah; Young, Taryn

    2015-04-30

    Low-level laser therapy is one of the adjunct treatments of choice with exercise therapy for shoulder rehabilitation in physiotherapy clinical practices. Although previous reviews have found little use of low-level laser therapy, there are recent trials whose findings are yet to be systematically reviewed. We plan to do a systematic review to assess the effects of low-level laser therapy with exercise and exercise alone in participants who are 18 years and above, with a clinical or radiological diagnosis of various shoulder pathologies. We will search CENTRAL, MEDLINE, CINAHL, PEDro, Science Direct, Scopus and Physiotherapy Choices regardless of publication status. We will hand search for subject-specific journals (PhotoMedicine and Laser Surgery, Lasers in Surgery and Medicine and Journals of Lasers in Medical Science) and conference proceedings of World Association for Laser Therapy. Two review authors will independently screen, select studies, extract data and assess the risk of bias based on a priori criteria. Disagreements between review authors will be resolved either through discussion or consultation with a third review author. If there are at least two clinically homogeneous studies, we will perform meta-analysis. The findings will shed more light on the benefit of low-level laser therapy as an adjunct treatment to exercise in the management of shoulder disorders. The findings may also inform decision makers in the review and development of guidelines for shoulder rehabilitation in physiotherapy practices. PROSPERO CRD42014013691.

  11. Hemodynamic benefit of rest and exercise optimization of cardiac resynchronization therapy.

    PubMed

    Stanton, Tony; Haluska, Brian A; Leano, Rodel; Marwick, Thomas H

    2014-09-01

    The optimal method of cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) optimization is as yet unknown. We sought to investigate the responses of optimization at rest and on exercise. This 2 stage study involved 59 patients (age 65 ± 10, 75% male), who had all recently undergone successful CRT implantation. In the first stage, the 6-month response was compared between 30 individuals who underwent resting echocardiographic optimization of CRT [atrioventricular (AV delay) plus ventriculo-ventricular delays (VV delay)], compared with the 29 who did not. In the second stage, a subset of 37 patients from the original cohort were randomized (double-blind) to either resting echocardiographic optimization (n = 20) or exercise echocardiographic optimization (n = 17) and followed for a further 6 months. Clinical and echocardiographic data were collected at each stage. Patients undergoing rest optimization demonstrated improvement in almost all variables and significantly in B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) in contrast to those without optimization. In a linear regression model, the only significant predictor of BNP change was whether an individual underwent resting optimization or not (β = 0.38, P = 0.04). In those undergoing resting optimization, the degree of change in AV delay was correlated with improvement in left ventricle (LV) end-diastolic volume (r(2)  = 0.33, P < 0.01). Optimization on exercise was associated with a significant decrease in 6-minute walk test compared to those randomized to rest optimization possibly due to inducing nonoptimization at rest. In conclusion, echocardiographic optimization of CRT at rest is superior to no optimization or optimization on exercise. Patients with the greatest change in AV delay to reach optimal may undergo greater LV remodeling.

  12. Functional significance of predischarge exercise thallium-201 findings following intravenous streptokinase therapy during acute myocardial infarction

    SciTech Connect

    Touchstone, D.A.; Beller, G.A.; Nygaard, T.W.; Watson, D.D.; Tedesco, C.; Kaul, S.

    1988-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine which predischarge exercise thallium-201 imaging pattern(s) best correlate with myocardial salvage following intravenous streptokinase therapy (IVSK). Myocardial salvage was defined as improvement in regional left ventricular function determined by two-dimensional echocardiography between the time of admission and time of discharge in 21 prospectively studied patients receiving IVSK within 4 hours of chest pain. All patients had coronary angiography 2 hours following IVSK. Whereas 16 of the 21 patients (76%) had patent infarct-related vessels, only seven (33%) showed significant improvement in regional function at hospital discharge. Eleven patients demonstrated persistent defects (PD), and five each showed delayed and reverse redistribution. Patients with both delayed and reverse redistribution demonstrated significant improvement in regional left ventricular function score, while those with PD did not (+3.9 +/- 3.3 versus -0.5 +/- 2.9, p = 0.004). All other clinical, exercise, electrocardiographic, scintigraphic, and angiographic variables were similar between all patients, with the exception of the interval between chest pain and the institution of IVSK, which was longer in patients with reverse compared to delayed redistribution (3.5 +/- 0.4 versus 2.2 +/- 0.4 hours, p = 0.001). It is concluded that both delayed and reverse redistribution seen on predischarge exercise thallium-201 imaging are associated with myocardial salvage, defined as serial improvement in regional systolic function. Despite a high infarct vessel patency rate in patients with acute myocardial infarction receiving IVSK within 4 hours of onset of symptoms, only one third demonstrated improvement in regional function that was associated with either delayed or reverse redistribution seen on predischarge exercise thallium-201 imaging.

  13. A Pilot Prospective Randomized Control Trial Comparing Exercises Using Videogame Therapy to Standard Physical Therapy: 6 Months Follow-Up.

    PubMed

    Parry, Ingrid; Painting, Lynda; Bagley, Anita; Kawada, Jason; Molitor, Fred; Sen, Soman; Greenhalgh, David G; Palmieri, Tina L

    2015-01-01

    Commercially available, interactive videogames that use body movements for interaction are used clinically in burn rehabilitation and have been shown to facilitate functional range of motion (ROM) but their efficacy with burn patients has not yet been proven. The purpose of this pilot randomized control study was to prospectively compare planar and functional ROM, compliance, pain, enjoyment, and exertion in pediatric burn patients receiving two types of rehabilitation therapy. Seventeen school-aged children with 31 affected limbs who demonstrated limited shoulder ROM from burn injury were randomized to receive exercises using either standard therapy ROM activities (ST) or interactive videogame therapy (VGT). Patients received 3 weeks of the designated therapy intervention twice daily. They were then given a corresponding home program of the same type of therapy to perform regularly for 6 months. Standard goniometry and three-dimensional motion analysis during functional tasks were used to assess ROM. Measures were taken at baseline, 3 weeks, 3 months, and 6 months. Pain was measured before and after each treatment session during the 3-week intervention. There was no difference in compliance, enjoyment, or exertion between the groups. Patients in both the ST and VGT groups showed significant improvement in shoulder flexion (P < .001), shoulder abduction (P <.001), shoulder external rotation (P = .01), and elbow flexion (P = .004) ROM from baseline to 6 months as measured with goniometry. Subjects also showed significant gains in elbow flexion (P = .04) during hand to head and shoulder flexion (P = .04) during high reach. There was no difference in ROM gains between the groups. Within group comparison showed that the VGT group had significantly more recovery of ROM during the first 3 weeks than any other timeframe in the study, whereas ST had most gains at 3 months. There was a significant difference between the groups in the subjects' pain response. ST subjects

  14. Supervised exercise therapy for intermittent claudication in a community-based setting is as effective as clinic-based.

    PubMed

    Bendermacher, Bianca L; Willigendael, Edith M; Nicolaï, Saskia P; Kruidenier, Lotte M; Welten, Rob J; Hendriks, Erik; Prins, Martin H; Teijink, Joep A W; de Bie, Robert A

    2007-06-01

    This cohort study was conducted to determine the effect on walking distances of supervised exercise therapy provided in a community-based setting. The study included all consecutive patients presenting at the vascular outpatient clinic with intermittent claudication, diagnosed by a resting ankle brachial index<0.9, who had no previous peripheral vascular intervention for peripheral arterial disease, no major amputation, and sufficient command of the Dutch language. The exclusion criterion was the inability to walk the baseline treadmill test for a minimum of 10 m. The intervention was a supervised exercise therapy in a community-based setting. A progressive treadmill test at baseline and at 1, 3, and 6 months of follow-up measured initial claudication distance and absolute claudication distance. Changes were calculated using the mean percentages of change. From January through October 2005, 93 consecutive patients with claudication were eligible. Overall, 37 patients discontinued the supervised exercise therapy program. Eleven stopped because of intercurrent diseases, whereas for 10, supervised exercise therapy did not lead to adequate improvement and they underwent a vascular intervention. Three patients quit the program, stating that they were satisfied with the regained walking distance and did not require further supervised exercise therapy. Ten patients were not motivated sufficiently to continue the program, and in three patients, a lack of adequate insurance coverage was the reason for dropping out. Data for 56 patients were used and showed a mean percentage increase in initial claudication distance of 187% after 3 months and 240% after 6 months. The mean percentage of the absolute claudication distance increased 142% after 3 months and 191% after 6 months. Supervised exercise therapy in a community-based setting is a promising approach to providing conservative treatment for patients with intermittent claudication.

  15. Strain-Counterstrain therapy combined with exercise is not more effective than exercise alone on pain and disability in people with acute low back pain: a randomised trial.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Cynan; Souvlis, Tina; Sterling, Michele

    2011-01-01

    Is Strain-Counterstrain treatment combined with exercise therapy more effective than exercise alone in reducing levels of pain and disability in people with acute low back pain? Randomised trial with concealed allocation, assessor blinding, and intention-to-treat analysis. 89 (55 female) participants between 18 and 55 years experiencing acute low back pain were randomised to experimental (n = 44) and control (n = 45) groups. Participants attended four treatments in two weeks. The experimental group received Strain-Counterstrain treatment and review of standardised exercises (abdominal bracing, knee to chest, and lumbar rotation). The control group performed the standardised exercises under supervision. Following the intervention period, all participants received exercise progression, manual therapy, and advice. The primary outcome was the modified Oswestry low back pain disability questionnaire, measured at 2 weeks (ie, end of treatment), 6 weeks, and 28 weeks. Secondary outcome measures included the SF-36, visual analogue scale pain ratings, and a 7-point global rating of change. The experimental intervention was not more effective than exercise alone in reducing levels of pain and disability. Mean between-group differences in change from baseline for the Oswestry Disability Index were 0 (95% CI -6 to 7) after treatment, -1 (95% CI -7 to 6) at 6 weeks, and 2 (95% CI -4 to 8) at 28 weeks. Other outcomes did not differ significantly between groups. There is no advantage in providing Strain- Counterstrain treatment to patients with acute low back pain, although further studies could examine whether a subset of these patients can benefit from the treatment. ACTRN 12609000084280. Copyright © 2011 Australian Physiotherapy Association. Published by .. All rights reserved.

  16. Treating trismus: A prospective study on effect and compliance to jaw exercise therapy in head and neck cancer.

    PubMed

    Pauli, Nina; Andréll, Paulin; Johansson, Mia; Fagerberg-Mohlin, Bodil; Finizia, Caterina

    2015-12-01

    Trismus after head and neck cancer is a symptom associated with pain and negatively affected health-related quality of life. The purpose of this study was to compare two different jaw exercise devices and the compliance to exercise. Fifty patients with head and neck cancer were randomized to jaw exercise with either the TheraBite or Engström jaw device in a 10-week exercise program. Patients were regularly assessed by an oral surgeon, filled in exercise diaries, and answered the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Questionnaire-Core 30 Head and Neck 35-questions (EORTC QLQ H&N35) and the Gothenburg Trismus Questionnaire (GTQ). Both groups improved their mouth opening, 7.2 mm (22.9%) and 5.5 mm (17.6%) for TheraBite and Engström, respectively. The largest increase in mouth opening and highest compliance to exercise was seen during the 4 first weeks. Jaw exercise therapy effectively improved mouth opening capacity and led to less trismus-related symptoms. Both jaw devices were proved efficient and compliance to exercise was comparable. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. "Crawling Out of the Cocoon": Patients' Experiences of a Physical Therapy Exercise Intervention in the Treatment of Major Depression.

    PubMed

    Danielsson, Louise; Kihlbom, Birgitta; Rosberg, Susanne

    2016-08-01

    Although the effectiveness of physical exercise for depression has been studied for many years, few studies have described patients' experiences of what exercise means to them, beyond the biological focus. Moreover, exercise as a treatment for depression is rarely explored in a physical therapy context. The purpose of this study was to explore a physical therapy exercise intervention, as experienced by people with major depression. This study had an inductive approach and used qualitative content analysis. Semistructured interviews were conducted with 13 people who participated in physical therapist-guided aerobic exercise in a randomized controlled trial. All participants were diagnosed with major depression according to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders. Data were collected and analyzed in an inductive manner using qualitative content analysis according to Graneheim and Lundman. Four categories emerged: (1) struggling toward a healthy self, (2) challenging the resistance, (3) feeling alive but not euphoric, and (4) needing someone to be there for you. The participants experienced that although the exercise intervention was hard work, it enhanced the feeling of being alive and made them feel that they were doing something good for themselves. These feelings were a welcome contrast to the numbness and stagnation they experienced during depression. The study was conducted in Swedish primary care. Transferability of results must be viewed in relation to context. Exercise in a physical therapy context can improve the patients' perception of their physical ability and create a sense of liveliness, improving their depressed state. The therapeutic relationship is essential for supporting the patient's vulnerability and ambiguity in an empathic and perceptive way. © 2016 American Physical Therapy Association.

  18. Effects of Exercise Therapy on Balance Capacity in Chronic Stroke: Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    van Duijnhoven, Hanneke J R; Heeren, Anita; Peters, Marlijn A M; Veerbeek, Janne M; Kwakkel, Gert; Geurts, Alexander C H; Weerdesteyn, Vivian

    2016-10-01

    The purpose of this systematic review and meta-analysis was to investigate the effects of exercise training on balance capacity in people in the chronic phase after stroke. Furthermore, we aimed to identify which training regimen was most effective. Electronic databases were searched for randomized controlled trials evaluating the effects of exercise therapy on balance capacity in the chronic phase after stroke. Studies were included if they were of moderate or high methodological quality (PEDro score ≥4). Data were pooled if a specific outcome measure was reported in at least 3 randomized controlled trials. A sensitivity analysis and consequent subgroup analyses were performed for the different types of experimental training (balance and/or weight-shifting training, gait training, multisensory training, high-intensity aerobic exercise training, and other training programs). Forty-three randomized controlled trials out of 369 unique hits were included. A meta-analysis could be conducted for the Berg Balance Scale (28 studies, n=985), Functional Reach Test (5 studies, n=153), Sensory Organization Test (4 studies, n=173), and mean postural sway velocity (3 studies, n=89). A significant overall difference in favor of the intervention group was found for the Berg Balance Scale (mean difference 2.22 points (+3.9%); 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.26-3.17; P<0.01; I(2)=52%), Functional Reach Test (mean difference=3.12 cm; 95% CI, 0.90-5.35; P<0.01; I(2)=74%), and Sensory Organization Test (mean difference=6.77 (+7%) points; 95% CI, 0.83-12.7; P=0.03; I(2)=0%). Subgroup analyses of the studies that included Berg Balance Scale outcomes demonstrated a significant improvement after balance and/or weight-shifting training of 3.75 points (+6.7%; 95% CI, 1.71-5.78; P<0.01; I(2)=52%) and after gait training of 2.26 points (+4.0%; 95% CI, 0.94-3.58; P<0.01; I(2)=21, whereas no significant effects were found for other training regimens. This systematic review and meta

  19. Exercise behavior and patient-reported outcomes in women with early breast cancer receiving locoregional radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Arya, Ritu; Siamakpour-Reihani, Sharareh; Palta, Manisha; Massa, Lisa; Broadwater, Gloria; Blitzblau, Rachel C; Horton, Janet K

    2015-01-01

    Radiation therapy is associated with acute treatment-related complications that can lead to decreased quality of life (QOL). Exercise has been shown in other cancer treatment settings to improve negative outcomes. We conducted a prospective pilot study to explore the association between exercise, patient-reported outcomes, and acute radiation therapy toxicities. Women receiving curative breast radiation therapy were enrolled. Each patient completed an exercise behavior/QOL survey before or during the first week of treatment and again during the last week of treatment. Exercise behavior was quantified with the Godin Leisure Time Exercise Questionnaire (metabolic equivalent [MET] hours per week). Measurements to evaluate upper extremity lymphedema and shoulder range of motion were completed. Skin toxicity was assessed weekly. Patient-reported outcomes were measured using standardized questionnaires. Forty-five patients were enrolled. Mean patient age was 54 (range, 28-73) years. Mean METs in the exercise cohort (≥9 METs/wk) was 21 per week (range, 11-38, n = 14); 3 per week (range, 0-8, n = 25) in the nonexercise cohort (<9 METs/wk). Women in the exercise cohort showed improvements in treatment-induced quality of life and fatigue (not significant) despite more extensive surgical, medical, and radiation treatment. No differences in treatment-related toxicities, pain, or sleep scores were noted. Lymphedema was mild (<3 cm) in the entire patient cohort. The vast majority of current exercise oncology literature implicates physical activity as an independent predictor of QOL in cancer patients. Our study noted similar trends, but they were not statistically significant. This may be due to our finding that patient-reported outcomes with radiation therapy are relatively high compared with other treatment modalities and remain stable throughout treatment. Thus, it may be that radiation therapy has a limited impact on QOL in breast cancer patients. Exercise may be best used

  20. Effects of Community Exercise Therapy on Metabolic, Brain, Physical, and Cognitive Function Following Stroke: A Randomized Controlled Pilot Trial.

    PubMed

    Moore, Sarah A; Hallsworth, Kate; Jakovljevic, Djordje G; Blamire, Andrew M; He, Jiabao; Ford, Gary A; Rochester, Lynn; Trenell, Michael I

    2015-08-01

    Exercise therapy could potentially modify metabolic risk factors and brain physiology alongside improving function post stroke. To explore the short-term metabolic, brain, cognitive, and functional effects of exercise following stroke. A total of 40 participants (>50 years, >6 months post stroke, independently mobile) were recruited to a single-blind, parallel, randomized controlled trial of community-based exercise (19 weeks, 3 times/wk, "exercise" group) or stretching ("control" group). Primary outcome measures were glucose control and cerebral blood flow. Secondary outcome measures were cardiorespiratory fitness, blood pressure, lipid profile, body composition, cerebral tissue atrophy and regional brain metabolism, and physical and cognitive function. Exercise did not change glucose control (homeostasis model assessment 1·5 ± 0·8 to 1·5 ± 0·7 vs 1·6 ± 0·8 to 1·7 ± 0·7, P = .97; CI = -0·5 to 0·49). Medial temporal lobe tissue blood flow increased with exercise (38 ± 8 to 42 ± 10 mL/100 g/min; P < .05; CI = 9.0 to 0.1) without any change in gray matter tissue volume. There was no change in medial temporal lobe tissue blood flow in the control group (41 ± 8 to 40 ± 7 mL/100 g/min; P = .13; CI = -3.6 to 6.7) but significant gray matter atrophy. Cardiorespiratory fitness, diastolic blood pressure, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, physical function, and cognition also improved with exercise. Exercise therapy improves short-term metabolic, brain, physical, and cognitive function, without changes in glucose control following stroke. The long-term impact of exercise on stroke recurrence, cardiovascular health, and disability should now be explored. © The Author(s) 2014.

  1. Exercise therapy for bone and muscle health: an overview of systematic reviews

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Musculoskeletal conditions (MSCs) are widely prevalent in present-day society, with resultant high healthcare costs and substantial negative effects on patient health and quality of life. The main aim of this overview was to synthesize evidence from systematic reviews on the effects of exercise therapy (ET) on pain and physical function for patients with MSCs. In addition, the evidence for the effect of ET on disease pathogenesis, and whether particular components of exercise programs are associated with the size of the treatment effects, was also explored. Methods We included four common conditions: fibromyalgia (FM), low back pain (LBP), neck pain (NP), and shoulder pain (SP), and four specific musculoskeletal diseases: osteoarthritis (OA), rheumatoid arthritis (RA), ankylosing spondylitis (AS), and osteoporosis (OP). We first included Cochrane reviews with the most recent update being January 2007 or later, and then searched for non-Cochrane reviews published after this date. Pain and physical functioning were selected as primary outcomes. Results We identified 9 reviews, comprising a total of 224 trials and 24,059 patients. In addition, one review addressing the effect of exercise on pathogenesis was included. Overall, we found solid evidence supporting ET in the management of MSCs, but there were substantial differences in the level of research evidence between the included diagnostic groups. The standardized mean differences for knee OA, LBP, FM, and SP varied between 0.30 and 0.65 and were significantly in favor of exercise for both pain and function. For NP, hip OA, RA, and AS, the effect estimates were generally smaller and not always significant. There was little or no evidence that ET can influence disease pathogenesis. The only exception was for osteoporosis, where there was evidence that ET increases bone mineral density in postmenopausal women, but no significant effects were found for clinically relevant outcomes (fractures). For LBP and

  2. Manual therapy, exercise therapy, or both, in addition to usual care, for osteoarthritis of the hip or knee. 2: economic evaluation alongside a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Pinto, D; Robertson, M C; Abbott, J H; Hansen, P; Campbell, A J

    2013-10-01

    To evaluate the cost effectiveness of manual physiotherapy, exercise physiotherapy, and a combination of these therapies for patients with osteoarthritis of the hip or knee. 206 Adults who met the American College of Rheumatology criteria for hip or knee osteoarthritis were included in an economic evaluation from the perspectives of the New Zealand health system and society alongside a randomized controlled trial. Resource use was collected using the Osteoarthritis Costs and Consequences Questionnaire. Quality-adjusted life years (QALYs) were calculated using the Short Form 6D. Willingness-to-pay threshold values were based on one to three times New Zealand's gross domestic product (GDP) per capita of NZ$ 29,149 (in 2009). All three treatment programmes resulted in incremental QALY gains relative to usual care. From the perspective of the New Zealand health system, exercise therapy was the only treatment to result in an incremental cost utility ratio under one time GDP per capita at NZ$ 26,400 (-$34,081 to $103,899). From the societal perspective manual therapy was cost saving relative to usual care for most scenarios studied. Exercise therapy resulted in incremental cost utility ratios regarded as cost effective but was not cost saving. For most scenarios combined therapy was not as cost effective as the two therapies alone. In this study, exercise therapy and manual therapy were more cost effective than usual care at policy relevant values of willingness-to-pay from both the perspective of the health system and society. Trial registration number Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry ACTRN12608000130369. Copyright © 2013 Osteoarthritis Research Society International. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Functional exercise in combination with auricular plaster therapy is more conducive to rehabilitation of menopausal women patients with anxiety disorder.

    PubMed

    Han, Yubin; Duan, Fugui; Xu, Rongmei; Wang, Yi; Zhang, Hongyu

    2015-01-01

    Observe the effect of functional exercise in combination with auricular plaster therapy on menopausal women patients with anxiety disorder. Select 45 menopausal women patients with anxiety disorder and then adopt random digital table to divide them into a functional exercise group, an auricular plaster therapy group and a combination group. Each group consists of 15 patients. The patients in the functional exercise group do yoga exercise twice a day; those in the auricular plaster therapy group are provided with the auricular plaster therapy twice a day; those in the combination group do yoga exercise and then they are provided with the auricular plaster therapy twice a day. Before the treatment and after 12 weeks' treatment, respectively detect and compare the selected patients in the three groups in respect HAMA score, physical function score and mental function score; And the cured patients are followed up for 3 months to compare recurrence rate of each group. After 12 weeks' treatment, HAMA score, physical function score and mental function score of the combination group are obviously better than those of another two groups (P<0.05); Of the cure rate and the recurrence rate within 3 months, the cure rate of the combination group is higher and the recurrence rate is low. Through the functional rehabilitation exercise in combination with the auricular plaster, the combined curative effect is obviously better than that of single treatment and the clinical recurrence rate is significantly lower than that of single treatment. It shows that the combined treatment method presents obvious synergistic effect and the synergistic treatment is more beneficial to improve the curative effect.

  4. Functional exercise in combination with auricular plaster therapy is more conducive to rehabilitation of menopausal women patients with anxiety disorder

    PubMed Central

    Han, Yubin; Duan, Fugui; Xu, Rongmei; Wang, Yi; Zhang, Hongyu

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Observe the effect of functional exercise in combination with auricular plaster therapy on menopausal women patients with anxiety disorder. Method: Select 45 menopausal women patients with anxiety disorder and then adopt random digital table to divide them into a functional exercise group, an auricular plaster therapy group and a combination group. Each group consists of 15 patients. The patients in the functional exercise group do yoga exercise twice a day; those in the auricular plaster therapy group are provided with the auricular plaster therapy twice a day; those in the combination group do yoga exercise and then they are provided with the auricular plaster therapy twice a day. Before the treatment and after 12 weeks’ treatment, respectively detect and compare the selected patients in the three groups in respect HAMA score, physical function score and mental function score; And the cured patients are followed up for 3 months to compare recurrence rate of each group. Results: After 12 weeks’ treatment, HAMA score, physical function score and mental function score of the combination group are obviously better than those of another two groups (P<0.05); Of the cure rate and the recurrence rate within 3 months, the cure rate of the combination group is higher and the recurrence rate is low. Conclusion: Through the functional rehabilitation exercise in combination with the auricular plaster, the combined curative effect is obviously better than that of single treatment and the clinical recurrence rate is significantly lower than that of single treatment. It shows that the combined treatment method presents obvious synergistic effect and the synergistic treatment is more beneficial to improve the curative effect. PMID:26885051

  5. Effectiveness of manual physical therapy and exercise in osteoarthritis of the knee. A randomized, controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Deyle, G D; Henderson, N E; Matekel, R L; Ryder, M G; Garber, M B; Allison, S C

    2000-02-01

    Few investigations include both subjective and objective measurements of the effectiveness of treatments for osteoarthritis of the knee. Beneficial interventions may decrease the disability associated with osteoarthritis and the need for more invasive treatments. To evaluate the effectiveness of physical therapy for osteoarthritis of the knee, applied by experienced physical therapists with formal training in manual therapy. Randomized, controlled clinical trial. Outpatient physical therapy department of a large military medical center. 83 patients with osteoarthritis of the knee who were randomly assigned to receive treatment (n = 42; 15 men and 27 women [mean age, 60 +/- 11 years]) or placebo (n = 41; 19 men and 22 women [mean age, 62 +/- 10 years]). The treatment group received manual therapy, applied to the knee as well as to the lumbar spine, hip, and ankle as required, and performed a standardized knee exercise program in the clinic and at home. The placebo group had subtherapeutic ultrasound to the knee at an intensity of 0.1 W/cm2 with a 10% pulsed mode. Both groups were treated at the clinic twice weekly for 4 weeks. Distance walked in 6 minutes and sum of the function, pain, and stiffness subscores of the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC). A tester who was blinded to group assignment made group comparisons at the initial visit (before initiation of treatment), 4 weeks, 8 weeks, and 1 year. Clinically and statistically significant improvements in 6-minute walk distance and WOMAC score at 4 weeks and 8 weeks were seen in the treatment group but not the placebo group. By 8 weeks, average 6-minute walk distances had improved by 13.1% and WOMAC scores had improved by 55.8% over baseline values in the treatment group (P < 0.05). After controlling for potential confounding variables, the average distance walked in 6 minutes at 8 weeks among patients in the treatment group was 170 m (95% CI, 71 to 270 m) more than that in the

  6. Exercise therapy for chronic low back pain: protocol for an individual participant data meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Low back pain (LBP) is one of the leading causes of disability and has a major socioeconomic impact. Despite a large amount of research in the field, there remains uncertainty about the best treatment approach for chronic LBP, and identification of relevant patient subgroups is an important goal. Exercise therapy is a commonly used strategy to treat chronic low back pain and is one of several interventions that evidence suggests is moderately effective. In parallel with an update of the 2005 Cochrane review, we will undertake an individual participant data (IPD) meta-analysis, which will allow us to standardize analyses across studies and directly derive results, and to examine differential treatment effects across individuals to estimate how patients’ characteristics modify treatment benefit. Methods/design We will use standard systematic review methods advocated by the Cochrane Collaboration to identify relevant trials. We will include trials evaluating exercise therapy compared to any or no other interventions in adult non-specific chronic LBP. Our primary outcomes of interest include pain, functional status, and return-to-work/absenteeism. We will assess potential risk of bias for each study meeting selection criteria, using criteria and methods recommended by the Cochrane BRG. The original individual participant data will be requested from the authors of selected trials having moderate to low risk of bias. We will test original data and compile a master dataset with information about each trial mapped on a pre-specified framework, including reported characteristics of the study sample, exercise therapy characteristics, individual patient characteristics at baseline and all follow-up periods, subgroup and treatment effect modifiers investigated. Our analyses will include descriptive, study-level meta-analysis and meta-regression analyses of the overall treatment effect, and individual-level IPD meta-analyses of treatment effect modification. IPD

  7. Cost-effectiveness of spinal manipulative therapy, supervised exercise, and home exercise for older adults with chronic neck pain.

    PubMed

    Leininger, Brent; McDonough, Christine; Evans, Roni; Tosteson, Tor; Tosteson, Anna N A; Bronfort, Gert

    2016-11-01

    Chronic neck pain is a prevalent and disabling condition among older adults. Despite the large burden of neck pain, little is known regarding the cost-effectiveness of commonly used treatments. This study aimed to estimate the cost-effectiveness of home exercise and advice (HEA), spinal manipulative therapy (SMT) plus HEA, and supervised rehabilitative exercise (SRE) plus HEA. Cost-effectiveness analysis conducted alongside a randomized clinical trial (RCT) was performed. A total of 241 older adults (≥65 years) with chronic mechanical neck pain comprised the patient sample. The outcome measures were direct and indirect costs, neck pain, neck disability, SF-6D-derived quality-adjusted life years (QALYs), and incremental cost-effectiveness ratios (ICERs) over a 1-year time horizon. This work was supported by grants from the National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health (#F32AT007507), National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases (#P60AR062799), and Health Resources and Services Administration (#R18HP01425). The RCT is registered at ClinicalTrials.gov (#NCT00269308). A societal perspective was adopted for the primary analysis. A healthcare perspective was adopted as a sensitivity analysis. Cost-effectivenesswas a secondary aim of the RCT which was not powered for differences in costs or QALYs. Differences in costs and clinical outcomes were estimated using generalized estimating equations and linear mixed models, respectively. Cost-effectiveness acceptability curves were calculated to assess the uncertainty surrounding cost-effectiveness estimates. Total costs for SMT+HEA were 5% lower than HEA (mean difference: -$111; 95% confidence interval [CI] -$1,354 to $899) and 47% lower than SRE+HEA (mean difference: -$1,932; 95% CI -$2,796 to -$1,097). SMT+HEA also resulted in a greater reduction of neck pain over the year relative to HEA (0.57; 95% CI 0.23 to 0.92) and SRE+HEA (0.41; 95% CI 0.05 to 0.76). Differences in disability and

  8. Method to observe hemodynamic and metabolic changes during hemodiafiltration therapy with exercise.

    PubMed

    Cadena, Miguel; Pérez-Grovas, Héctor; Flores, Pedro; Azpiroz, Joaquín; Borja, Gisella; Medel, Humberto; Rodriguez, Fausto; Flores, Francisco

    2010-01-01

    Intradyalitic exercise programas are important to improve patient's hemodynamic stability. Blood pressure and metabolic changes are correlated when heat accumulation is due to increment of the body core temperature (+1.0 °C). However, increase in temperature could be controlled by lowering dialysate's temperature using two main modalities techniques (isothermic and thermoneural) with different patient's thermal balance consequences, not yet well studied. In this work, a new method to observe the main physiological parameters (hearth rate variability (HRV), blood pressure, BTM dialysate temperature control and substrate utilization by indirect calorimtery) which are involved in hemodiafitration (HDF), are displayd. An experiment was carried out in a group of 5 patients waiting kidney transplant. In each patient, EE was assessed as well as the HRV during isothermic and thermoneutral modalities as a manner of cross and prospective study (a) at before therapy, (b) during therapy and (c) at the end of the HDF therapy. Power extraction was also measured by a BTM (Blood Temperature Monitor from Fresenius Inc), in order to determine how the dialysate temperature was controlled. The results showed important method's advantages which place the BTM performance as unstable control system with the possibility to produce undesirable HRV changes as the vagotonical response. However more patient cases are needed in order to identify the real advantage of this new method.

  9. A Pilot Study to Assess the Feasibility of Group Exercise and Animal-Assisted Therapy in Older Adults.

    PubMed

    Grubbs, Brandon; Artese, Ashley; Schmitt, Karla; Cormier, Eileen; Panton, Lynn

    2016-04-01

    This pilot study assessed the feasibility of incorporating animal-assisted therapy teams (ATT) into a 6-week group exercise program for older adults (77 ± 6 years). Fifteen participants were randomly assigned to an exercise with ATT (E+ATT; n = 8) or exercise only (E; n = 7) group. Groups exercised 3x/week for 45 min. Feasibility was assessed by three objectives: (1) ATT will not need extensive preparation beyond their original therapy training; (2) the study will require minimal cost; and (3) ATT must not impair the effectiveness of the exercise program. By the study conclusion, all objectives were met. Time and cost were minimal for ATT, and adherence was 93% and 90% for E+ATT and E, respectively. There were significant improvements in both groups (p ≤ .05) for arm curls, get-up and go, and 6-min walk. The results of this pilot study suggest that it is feasible to incorporate ATT into group exercise programming for older adults.

  10. Developing a qigong intervention and an exercise therapy for elderly patients with chronic neck pain and the study protocol.

    PubMed

    Wiedemann, Anna Maria; von Trott, Philipp; Lüdtke, Rainer; Reisszlihauer, Anett; Willich, Stefan N; Witt, Claudia M

    2008-08-01

    In the so far published trials on qigong and exercise therapies, the methods and especially the interventions applied are rarely described in detail. Therefore, we report on the development of the interventions, the study design and protocols of a randomised controlled multi-centre trial. The aim of the study was to develop a qigong intervention and an exercise therapy for elderly patients and to evaluate whether qigong is more effective than (1) no treatment or (2) the exercise therapy. DEVELOPMENT OF THE INTERVENTIONS: In a consensus process with qigong experts and physiotherapists special interventions for elderly patients were developed allowing most exercises to be performed in a sitting position. Both interventions will be held by qualified therapists for a period of 3 months twice per week for 45 min. In addition, patients will be encouraged to exercise on their own. In a randomised controlled multi-centre study with 3 groups and a total follow-up time of 6 months, 120 patients from 4 residences for elderly people in Berlin (age >or= 55 years) with chronic neck pain should be included. Average pain intensity of the past 7 days measured by a visual analogue scale (VAS). Secondary parameters are neck pain and disability (Neck Pain and Disability Scale, NPAD), depression (General Depression Scale, ADS) and health-related quality of life (SF-36). The results of this study may help clarify, if qigong is a feasible, safe and effective intervention for elderly people with neck pain. Copyright (c) 2008 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  11. Integrating diet and exercise into care of prostate cancer patients on androgen deprivation therapy

    PubMed Central

    Moyad, Mark A; Newton, Robert U; Tunn, Ulf W; Gruca, Damian

    2016-01-01

    Improved diagnosis and treatment regimens have resulted in greater longevity for men with prostate cancer. This has led to an increase in both androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) use and duration of exposure, and therefore to its associated adverse effects, such as sexual dysfunction, osteoporosis, reduced muscle mass, increased fat mass, and increased incidence of cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes. Given that the adverse effects of ADT are systemic, often debilitating, and difficult to treat, efforts continue in the development of new strategies for long-term management of prostate cancer. The PubMed database was searched to select trials, reviews, and meta-analyses in English using such search terms as “prostate cancer” and “androgen deprivation therapy”, “cardiovascular risk”, “lean body mass”, “exercise”, and “diet”. The initial searches produced 379 articles with dates 2005 or more recent. Articles published after 2004 were favored. This review utilizes the latest data to provide a status update on the effects of exercise and diet on patients with prostate cancer, focusing on ADT-associated side effects, and it discusses the evidence for such interventions. Since the evidence of large-scale trials in patients with prostate cancer is missing, and an extrapolation of supporting data to all patient subgroups cannot be provided, individualized risk assessments remain necessary before the initiation of exercise and diet programs. Exercise, diet, and nutritional supplementation interventions have the potential to provide effective, accessible, and relatively inexpensive strategies for mitigating ADT-associated toxicities without introducing additional adverse effects. PMID:27574584

  12. Effectiveness of massage therapy as co-adjuvant treatment to exercise in osteoarthritis of the knee: a randomized control trial.

    PubMed

    Cortés Godoy, Virginia; Gallego Izquierdo, Tomás; Lázaro Navas, Irene; Pecos Martín, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    The effectiveness of exercise therapy in the treatment of osteoarthritis of the knee (KOA) is widely evidenced. The current study aims to compare the effectiveness of massage therapy as a co-adjuvant treatment for KOA. A blind, randomized controlled trial design was used. Eighteen women were randomly allocated to two different groups. Group A was treated with massage therapy and an exercise program, and Group B was treated with the exercise program alone. The intervention lasted for 6 weeks. Outcomes were assessed using a verbal analogue scale (VAS), the WOMAC index, and the Get-Up and Go test. Baseline, post-treatment, and 1- and 3- month follow-up data were collected. Values were considered statistically significant at a p < 0.05. The Mann-Whitney U test was applied in order to find out the differences between groups, and to verify the existence of such differences, the Friedman Test for repeated measures complemented with multiple comparisons tests was carried out. In both groups, significant differences were found in the three variables between the baseline measurement and three months after treatment, with the exception of the WOMAC variable in group B (p=0.064) No significant differences were found between both groups in the WOMAC index (p=0.508) and VAS (p=0.964) variables and the Get-Up and Go test (p=0.691). Combining exercise-based therapy with massage therapy may lead to clinical improvement in patients with KOA. The use of massage therapy combined with exercise as a treatment for gonarthrosis does not seem to have any beneficial effects.

  13. Integrative Effect of Carvedilol and Aerobic Exercise Training Therapies on Improving Cardiac Contractility and Remodeling in Heart Failure Mice

    PubMed Central

    Vanzelli, Andréa S.; Medeiros, Alessandra; Rolim, Natale; Bartholomeu, Jan B.; Cunha, Telma F.; Bechara, Luiz G.; Gomes, Enéas R. M.; Mattos, Katt C.; Sirvente, Raquel; Salemi, Vera; Mady, Charles; Negrao, Carlos E.; Guatimosim, Silvia; Brum, Patricia C.

    2013-01-01

    The use of β-blockers is mandatory for counteracting heart failure (HF)-induced chronic sympathetic hyperactivity, cardiac dysfunction and remodeling. Importantly, aerobic exercise training, an efficient nonpharmacological therapy to HF, also counteracts sympathetic hyperactivity in HF and improves exercise tolerance and cardiac contractility; the latter associated with changes in cardiac Ca2+ handling. This study was undertaken to test whether combined β–blocker and aerobic exercise training would integrate the beneficial effects of isolated therapies on cardiac structure, contractility and cardiomyocyte Ca2+ handling in a genetic model of sympathetic hyperactivity-induced HF (α2A/α2C- adrenergic receptor knockout mice, KO). We used a cohort of 5–7 mo male wild-type (WT) and congenic mice (KO) with C57Bl6/J genetic background randomly assigned into 5 groups: control (WT), saline-treated KO (KOS), exercise trained KO (KOT), carvedilol-treated KO (KOC) and, combined carvedilol-treated and exercise-trained KO (KOCT). Isolated and combined therapies reduced mortality compared with KOS mice. Both KOT and KOCT groups had increased exercise tolerance, while groups receiving carvedilol had increased left ventricular fractional shortening and reduced cardiac collagen volume fraction compared with KOS group. Cellular data confirmed that cardiomyocytes from KOS mice displayed abnormal Ca2+ handling. KOT group had increased intracellular peak of Ca2+ transient and reduced diastolic Ca2+ decay compared with KOS group, while KOC had increased Ca2+ decay compared with KOS group. Notably, combined therapies re-established cardiomyocyte Ca2+ transient paralleled by increased SERCA2 expression and SERCA2:PLN ratio toward WT levels. Aerobic exercise trained increased the phosphorylation of PLN at Ser16 and Thr17 residues in both KOT and KOCT groups, but carvedilol treatment reduced lipid peroxidation in KOC and KOCT groups compared with KOS group. The present findings

  14. Integrative effect of carvedilol and aerobic exercise training therapies on improving cardiac contractility and remodeling in heart failure mice.

    PubMed

    Vanzelli, Andréa S; Medeiros, Alessandra; Rolim, Natale; Bartholomeu, Jan B; Cunha, Telma F; Bechara, Luiz R G; Bechara, Luiz G; Gomes, Enéas R M; Mattos, Katt C; Sirvente, Raquel; Salemi, Vera Maria Cury; Salemi, Vera; Mady, Charles; Negrao, Carlos E; Guatimosim, Silvia; Brum, Patricia C

    2013-01-01

    The use of β-blockers is mandatory for counteracting heart failure (HF)-induced chronic sympathetic hyperactivity, cardiac dysfunction and remodeling. Importantly, aerobic exercise training, an efficient nonpharmacological therapy to HF, also counteracts sympathetic hyperactivity in HF and improves exercise tolerance and cardiac contractility; the latter associated with changes in cardiac Ca(2+) handling. This study was undertaken to test whether combined β-blocker and aerobic exercise training would integrate the beneficial effects of isolated therapies on cardiac structure, contractility and cardiomyocyte Ca(2+) handling in a genetic model of sympathetic hyperactivity-induced HF (α2A/α2C- adrenergic receptor knockout mice, KO). We used a cohort of 5-7 mo male wild-type (WT) and congenic mice (KO) with C57Bl6/J genetic background randomly assigned into 5 groups: control (WT), saline-treated KO (KOS), exercise trained KO (KOT), carvedilol-treated KO (KOC) and, combined carvedilol-treated and exercise-trained KO (KOCT). Isolated and combined therapies reduced mortality compared with KOS mice. Both KOT and KOCT groups had increased exercise tolerance, while groups receiving carvedilol had increased left ventricular fractional shortening and reduced cardiac collagen volume fraction compared with KOS group. Cellular data confirmed that cardiomyocytes from KOS mice displayed abnormal Ca(2+) handling. KOT group had increased intracellular peak of Ca(2+) transient and reduced diastolic Ca(2+) decay compared with KOS group, while KOC had increased Ca(2+) decay compared with KOS group. Notably, combined therapies re-established cardiomyocyte Ca(2+) transient paralleled by increased SERCA2 expression and SERCA2:PLN ratio toward WT levels. Aerobic exercise trained increased the phosphorylation of PLN at Ser(16) and Thr(17) residues in both KOT and KOCT groups, but carvedilol treatment reduced lipid peroxidation in KOC and KOCT groups compared with KOS group. The present

  15. Supervised exercise therapy for intermittent claudication: current status and future perspectives.

    PubMed

    Lauret, Gert-Jan; van Dalen, Daniëlle C W; Willigendael, Edith M; Hendriks, Erik J M; de Bie, Rob A; Spronk, Sandra; Teijink, Joep A W

    2012-02-01

    Intermittent claudication (IC) has a high prevalence in the older population and is closely associated with cardiovascular and cerebrovascular disease. High mortality rates are reported due to ongoing atherosclerotic disease. Because of these serious health risks, treatment of IC should address reduction of cardiovascular events (and related morbidity/mortality) and improvement of the poor health-related quality of life (QoL) and functional capacity. In several randomized clinical trials and systematic reviews, supervised exercise therapy (SET) is compared with non-supervised exercise, usual care, placebo, walking advice or vascular interventions. The current evidence supports SET as the primary treatment for IC. SET improves maximum walking distance and health-related QoL with a marginal risk of co-morbidity or mortality. This is also illustrated in contemporary international guidelines. Community-based SET appears to be at least as efficacious as programs provided in a clinical setting. In the Netherlands, a national integrated care network (ClaudicatioNet) providing specialized care for patients with IC is currently being implemented. Besides providing a standardized form of SET, the specialized physical therapists stimulate medication compliance and perform lifestyle coaching. Future research should focus on the influence of co-morbidities on prognosis and effect of SET outcome and the potential beneficial effects of SET combined with a vascular intervention.

  16. Contrast Water Therapy and Exercise Induced Muscle Damage: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Bieuzen, François; Bleakley, Chris M.; Costello, Joseph Thomas

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this systematic review was to examine the effect of Contrast Water Therapy (CWT) on recovery following exercise induced muscle damage. Controlled trials were identified from computerized literature searching and citation tracking performed up to February 2013. Eighteen trials met the inclusion criteria; all had a high risk of bias. Pooled data from 13 studies showed that CWT resulted in significantly greater improvements in muscle soreness at the five follow-up time points (<6, 24, 48, 72 and 96 hours) in comparison to passive recovery. Pooled data also showed that CWT significantly reduced muscle strength loss at each follow-up time (<6, 24, 48, 72 and 96 hours) in comparison to passive recovery. Despite comparing CWT to a large number of other recovery interventions, including cold water immersion, warm water immersion, compression, active recovery and stretching, there was little evidence for a superior treatment intervention. The current evidence base shows that CWT is superior to using passive recovery or rest after exercise; the magnitudes of these effects may be most relevant to an elite sporting population. There seems to be little difference in recovery outcome between CWT and other popular recovery interventions. PMID:23626806

  17. Effects of voluntary exercise on antiretroviral therapy-induced neuropathic pain in mice.

    PubMed

    Ye, Hong; Du, Xingguang; Hua, Qingli

    2017-10-03

    Antiretroviral therapy (ART) often results in painful peripheral neuropathy. Given that voluntary exercise has been shown to be beneficial in terms of modulating pain-like behaviors in various animal models of peripheral neuropathy, we have investigated the effects of voluntary wheel running on neuropathic pain induced by chronic ART. We first established an animal model of peripheral neuropathy induced by chronic 2',3'-dideoxycytidine (ddC) treatment. We showed that mice receiving ddC (3 mg/kg/day) had increased mechanical and thermal sensitivity at 9 weeks after the onset of the treatment. We also found that voluntary wheel running attenuated or delayed the onset of ddC-induced peripheral neuropathy. This phenomenon was associated with the attenuation of dorsal root ganglion nociceptive neuron membrane excitability and reduction in the expression of the transient receptor potential cation channel subfamily V member 1 (TRPV1). Taken together, these results suggest that voluntary exercise is an effective strategy by which ART-induced peripheral neuropathy can be alleviated.

  18. Pulsed electromagnetic field with or without exercise therapy in the treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Elgohary, Hany M; Tantawy, Sayed A

    2017-08-01

    [Purpose] To investigate the effect of pulsed electromagnetic field with or without exercise therapy in the treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia. [Subjects and Methods] Sixty male patients aged 55-65 years with benign prostatic hyperplasia were invited to participate in this study. Patients were randomly assigned to Group A (n=20; patients who received pulsed electromagnetic field in addition to pelvic floor and aerobic exercises), Group B (n=20; patients who received pulsed electromagnetic field), and Group C (n=20; patients who received placebo electromagnetic field). The assessments included post-void residual urine, urine flow rate, prostate specific antigen, white blood cells count, and International Prostate Symptom Score were weighed, before and after a 4-week intervention. [Results] There were significant differences in Group A and B in all parameters. Group C showed non-significant differences in all measured variables except for International Prostate Symptom Score. Among groups, all parameters showed highly significant differences in favor of Group A. There were non-significant differences between Group A and B and significant difference between Groups A and C and between Groups B and C. [Conclusion] The present study demonstrated that electromagnetic field had a significant impact on the treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia. Accordingly, electromagnetic field can be utilized alone or in combination with other physiotherapy modalities. Moreover, clinicians should have the capacity to perceive the advantages accomplished using extra treatment alternatives. Electromagnetic field is a safe, noninvasive method and can be used for the treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia.

  19. Competency-based training: objective structured clinical exercises (OSCE) in marriage and family therapy.

    PubMed

    Miller, John K

    2010-07-01

    The field of marriage and family therapy (MFT) has recently engaged in the process of defining core competencies for the profession. Many MFT training programs are adapting their curriculum to develop more competency-based training strategies. The Objective Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE) is widely used in the medical profession to assess clinical competence. These examinations involve using simulated clinical situations as a tool in conducting summative evaluations of trainee competence. This article describes an adaptation of the OSCE procedures for competency-based training of MFT students. Instead of using the procedures as a summative examination as is typical in medical education, this article proposes how to use them as formative exercises in the development of student competence. The development of the OSCE is discussed, including "blueprinting," focused competencies, procedures, and feedback protocols. The article concludes with suggestions of how to continue the development of the OSCE for evaluation in MFT education.

  20. Postoperative treatment of metacarpal fractures-Classical physical therapy compared with a home exercise program.

    PubMed

    Gülke, Joachim; Leopold, Barbara; Grözinger, Daniel; Drews, Björn; Paschke, Stephan; Wachter, Nikolaus J

    2017-04-21

    Prospective cohort randomized controlled trial. Is either a home exercise (HE) program or traditional physical therapy (PT) more effective in the postoperative management of metacarpal fractures? Sixty patients suffering from nonthumb metacarpal fractures who received mobilization-stable open reduction and internal fixation were included. All patients were prospectively randomized into either the PT group or the HE group. Follow-up examinations at 2, 6 and 12 weeks postoperatively. After 2 weeks, the range of motion (ROM) in both groups was still severely reduced. Twelve weeks after surgery the ROM improved to 245° (PT) and 256° (HE). Grip strength after 6 weeks was 68% (PT) and 71% (HE) when compared to the non-injured hand, improving to 91% (PT) and 93% (HE) after 12 weeks. Study results show that both HE program and traditional PT are effective in the postoperative management of metacarpal fractures. II. Copyright © 2017 Hanley & Belfus. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Clinical importance of detecting exaggerated blood pressure response to exercise on antihypertensive therapy.

    PubMed

    Mizuno, Reiko; Fujimoto, Shinichi; Saito, Yoshihiko; Yamazaki, Masaharu

    2016-06-01

    In patients with hypertension, regression of left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) is associated with improved prognosis. Impact of exaggerated blood pressure response to exercise (Ex-BP) seen in patients with hypertension undergoing antihypertensive therapy on the regression of LVH has not been evaluated. This prospective study investigated the relationship between Ex-BP on antihypertensive therapy and the regression of LVH. We prospectively studied 124 never-treated patients with hypertension with LVH. After a pretreatment evaluation, antihypertensive treatment was started and exercise test was performed in all patients. Patients with Ex-BP were divided into the Ex-BP (+) group and those without were divided into the Ex-BP (-) group. Regression of LVH over the follow-up period was compared between the groups. The follow-up duration was approximately 12 months in both the groups. Mean values of blood pressure at rest during the follow-up period were similar between the groups. Reduction of LVH was seen in both the groups. The magnitude of reduction of LVH was significantly smaller in the Ex-BP (+) group compared with the Ex-BP (-) group. Regression of LVH was much frequently seen in the Ex-BP (+) group compared with the Ex-BP (-) group. Multiple regression analysis determined that on-treatment Ex-BP was an independent negative determinant of antihypertensive treatment-induced reduction of LVH. This study suggests that on-treatment Ex-BP is associated with depressed regression of LVH in patients with hypertension with antihypertensive treatment. If Ex-BP is detected despite receiving antihypertensive agents, improvement of Ex-BP may be necessary to achieve an effective reduction of LVH. Active search of Ex-BP is recommended in patients with hypertension with antihypertensive treatment. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  2. Cost-effectiveness of combined oral bisphosphonate therapy and falls prevention exercise for fracture prevention in the USA.

    PubMed

    Mori, T; Crandall, C J; Ganz, D A

    2017-02-01

    We developed a Markov microsimulation model among hypothetical cohorts of community-dwelling US white women without prior major osteoporotic fractures over a lifetime horizon. At ages 75 and 80, adding 1 year of exercise to 5 years of oral bisphosphonate therapy is cost-effective at a conventionally accepted threshold compared with bisphosphonates alone.

  3. Manual Therapy and Exercise to Improve Outcomes in Patients With Muscle Tension Dysphonia: A Case Series

    PubMed Central

    Archer, Kristin R.

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose Muscle tension dysphonia (MTD), a common voice disorder that is not commonly referred for physical therapy intervention, is characterized by excessive muscle recruitment, resulting in incorrect vibratory patterns of vocal folds and an alteration in voice production. This case series was conducted to determine whether physical therapy including manual therapy, exercise, and stress management education would be beneficial to this population by reducing excess muscle tension. Case Description Nine patients with MTD completed a minimum of 9 sessions of the intervention. Patient-reported outcomes of pain, function, and quality of life were assessed at baseline and the conclusion of treatment. The outcome measures were the numeric rating scale (NRS), Patient-Specific Functional Scale (PSFS), and Voice Handicap Index (VHI). Cervical and jaw range of motion also were assessed at baseline and postintervention using standard goniometric measurements. Outcomes Eight of the patients had no pain after treatment. All 9 of the patients demonstrated an improvement in PSFS score, with 7 patients exceeding a clinically meaningful improvement at the conclusion of the intervention. Three of the patients also had a clinically meaningful change in VHI scores. All 9 of the patients demonstrated improvement in cervical flexion and lateral flexion and jaw opening, whereas 8 patients improved in cervical extension and rotation postintervention. Discussion The findings suggest that physical therapists can feasibly implement an intervention to improve outcomes in patients with MTD. However, a randomized clinical trial is needed to confirm the results of this case series and the efficacy of the intervention. A clinical implication is the expansion of physical therapy to include referrals from voice centers for the treatment of MTD. PMID:25256740

  4. INTEGRATING ACUPUNCTURE WITH EXERCISE-BASED PHYSICAL THERAPY FOR KNEE OSTEOARTHRITIS: A RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED TRIAL

    PubMed Central

    Chen, LX; Mao, JJ; Fernandes, S; Galantino, ML; Guo, W; LaRiccia, P; Teal, V; Bowman, MA; Schumacher, HR; Farrar, JT

    2013-01-01

    Background Knee OA is a chronic disease associated with significant morbidity and economic cost. The efficacy of acupuncture in addition to traditional physical therapy has received little study. Objective To compare the efficacy and safety of integrating a standardized true acupuncture protocol versus non-penetrating acupuncture into exercise-based physical therapy (EPT). Methods This was a randomized, double-blind, controlled trial at 3 physical therapy centers in Philadelphia, PA. We studied 214 patients (66% African-American) with at least 6 months of chronic knee pain and X-ray confirmed Kellgren scores of 2 or 3. Patients received 12 sessions of acupuncture directly following EPT over 6–12 weeks. Acupuncture was performed at the same 9 points dictated by the Traditional Chinese “Bi” syndrome approach to knee pain, using either standard needles or Streitberger non-skin puncturing needles. The primary outcome was the proportion of patients with at least a 36% improvement in Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC) score at 12 weeks. Results Both treatment groups showed improvement from combined therapy with no difference between true (31.6%) and non-penetrating acupuncture (30.3%) in WOMAC response rate (p=0.5) or report of minor adverse events. A multivariable logistic regression prediction model identified an association between a positive expectation of relief from acupuncture and reported improvement. No differences were noted by race, sex, or age. Conclusion Puncturing acupuncture needles did not perform any better than non-puncturing needles integrated with EPT. Whether EPT, acupuncture, or other factors accounted for any improvement noted in both groups could not be determined in this study. Expectation for relief was a predictor of reported benefit. PMID:23965480

  5. Integrating acupuncture with exercise-based physical therapy for knee osteoarthritis: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lan X; Mao, Jun J; Fernandes, Shawn; Galantino, Mary Lou; Guo, Wensheng; Lariccia, Patrick; Teal, Valerie L; Bowman, Marjorie A; Schumacher, H Ralph; Farrar, John T

    2013-09-01

    Knee osteoarthritis is a chronic disease associated with significant morbidity and economic cost. The efficacy of acupuncture in addition to traditional physical therapy has received little study. The objective of this study was to compare the efficacy and safety of integrating a standardized true acupuncture protocol versus nonpenetrating acupuncture into exercise-based physical therapy (EPT). This was a randomized, double-blind, controlled trial at 3 physical therapy centers in Philadelphia, PA. We studied 214 patients (66% African Americans) with at least 6 months of chronic knee pain and x-ray-confirmed Kellgren scores of 2 or 3. Patients received 12 sessions of acupuncture directly following EPT over 6 to 12 weeks. Acupuncture was performed at the same 9 points dictated by the traditional Chinese "Bi" syndrome approach to knee pain, using either standard needles or Streitberger non-skin-puncturing needles. The primary outcome was the proportion of patients with at least a 36% improvement in Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index score at 12 weeks. Both treatment groups showed improvement from combined therapy with no difference between true (31.6%) and nonpenetrating acupuncture (30.3%) in Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index response rate (P = 0.5) or report of minor adverse events. A multivariable logistic regression prediction model identified an association between a positive expectation of relief from acupuncture and reported improvement. No differences were noted by race, sex, or age. Puncturing acupuncture needles did not perform any better than nonpuncturing needles integrated with EPT. Whether EPT, acupuncture, or other factors accounted for any improvement noted in both groups could not be determined in this study. Expectation for relief was a predictor of reported benefit.

  6. A prospective randomized controlled trial comparing occupational therapy with home-based exercises in conservative treatment of rotator cuff tears.

    PubMed

    Krischak, Gert; Gebhard, Florian; Reichel, Heiko; Friemert, Benedikt; Schneider, Florian; Fisser, Christoph; Kaluscha, Rainer; Kraus, Michael

    2013-09-01

    This pilot study evaluates the outcome after occupational therapy, compared to home-based exercises in the conservative treatment of patients with full thickness rotator cuff tears. Forty-three adult subjects (range, 18-75 years), who had a full thickness rupture of the rotator cuff which was verified by magnetic imaging tomography, with clinical signs of a chronic rotator cuff impingement, and who were available for follow-up, were randomized to occupational therapy or to independent home-based exercises using a booklet. After drop-out, 38 patients were available for full examination at follow-up. Before therapy and after 2 months of conservative treatment, pain intensity, the Constant-Murley score, isokinetic strength testing in abduction and external rotation, functional limitation, clinical shoulder tests and health-related quality of life (EQ-5D) were evaluated. Two-thirds of the patients improved in clinical shoulder tests, regardless of the therapy group. There were no significant differences between the groups with reference to pain, range of motion, maximum peak force (abduction, external rotation), the Constant-Murley score, and the EQ-5D index. The only significant difference observed was the improvement in the self-assessed health- related quality of life (EQ-5D VAS) favoring home-based exercises. Home-based exercise, on the basis of an illustrated booklet with exercises twice a day, supplies comparable results to formal occupational therapy in the conservative treatment of rotator cuff tears. The results of this pilot study suggest some potential advantages related to psychological benefits using home-based treatment. Copyright © 2013 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. [Effects of different interference orders of electroacupuncture and exercise therapy on the therapeutic effect of hemiplegia after stroke].

    PubMed

    Shen, Fang-Fjang; Wu, Qiang; Lin, Zhong-Rong; Lin, Dong; Huang, Dong-E; Liu, Jian-Zhong; Chen, Li-Dian; Zhang, Xue-Jun

    2008-10-01

    To observe effects of different interference orders of electroacupuncture and exercise therapy on the therapeutic effect of hemiplegia after stroke. The patients of hemiplegia due to stroke were randomly divided into a group A and a group B. The group A were treated by exercise therapy after electroacupuncture (EA) and the group B by EA after exercise therapy. Fugl-Meyer evaluation (FME), modified Barthel index (MBI) and amplitude of somatosensory evoked potential (SEP) on the affected side before treatment and after one therapeutic course (2 weeks) were recorded and compared in the two groups. Before and after treatment, FME were 31.760 +/- 4.438 and 76.640 +/- 3.621, and MBI were 26.520 +/- 2.413 and 62.360 +/- 3.700 in the group A; and FME were 32.480 +/- 5.903 and 65.640 +/- 5.212, and the MBI were 28.000 +/- 3.383 and 54.480 +/- 5.205 in the group B, respectively, with very significant differences in FME and MBI in the two groups (all P < 0.01); and the different values before and after treatment in the two indexes in the group A were better than those in the group B (all P < 0.05). There was a very significant difference in the amplitude of SEP before and after treatment in the group A (P < 0.01) and no significant difference in the group B, and there was no significant difference between the two groups in the different value of the amplitude of SEP. Combination of any orders of electroacupuncture and exercise therapy can improve limb function of the patient with hemiplegia after stroke, but the therapeutic effect of exercise therapy after EA is better.

  8. Effect of exercise therapy combining electrical therapy and balance training on functional instability resulting from ankle sprain—focus on stability of jump landing

    PubMed Central

    Yoshida, Takaki; Tanino, Yoshitsugu; Suzuki, Toshiaki

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] Functional instability leads to a delay in the muscle reaction time and weakness of the peroneal muscles. The present study examined the effects of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation during balance exercise on patients with functional instability of the ankles, including the ability to land after jumping at the center of foot pressure. [Subjects] The subjects were seven males with a history of ankle sprain. All had a sprained ankle score of ≤80 points on Karlson’s functional instability test. [Methods] They were asked to jump over a 20-cm-high platform sideways for 10 consecutive seconds on a force plate with one leg. The length of the center of pressure was measured for comparison of balance exercise and balance exercise with simultaneous transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation. [Results] The length of the center of foot pressure on the sprain side was significantly greater than on the non-sprain side under both conditions. Under the balance exercise with simultaneous transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation therapy condition, the length of the center of foot pressure on the sprain side was significantly reduced, with the values being 627.0 ± 235.4 and 551.8 ± 171.1 mm before and after the challenge, respectively. [Conclusion] Ankle instability on the sprain side was significantly reduced under the balance exercise with simultaneous transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation therapy condition before and after the challenge. Peroneal muscles showed increased activity caused by common peroneal innervation. PMID:26644645

  9. Pre-exercise low-level laser therapy improves performance and levels of oxidative stress markers in mdx mice subjected to muscle fatigue by high-intensity exercise.

    PubMed

    Silva, Andreia Aparecida de Oliveira; Leal-Junior, Ernesto Cesar Pinto; D'Avila, Katia de Angelis Lobo; Serra, Andrey Jorge; Albertini, Regiane; França, Cristiane Miranda; Nishida, Joen Akemi; de Carvalho, Paulo de Tarso Camillo

    2015-08-01

    This study was designed to determine if the levels of oxidative stress markers are influenced by low-level laser therapy (LLLT) in mdx mice subjected to high-intensity exercise training on an electric treadmill. We used 21 C57BL/10ScSn-Dmdmdx/J mice and 7 C57BL/10ScSn mice, all aged 4 weeks. The mice were divided into four groups: a positive control group of normal, wild-type mice (WT); a negative control group of untreated mdx mice; a group of mdx mice that underwent forced high-intensity exercise on a treadmill (mdx fatigue); and another group of mdx mice with the same characteristics that were treated with LLLT at a single point on the gastrocnemius muscle of the hind paw and underwent forced high-intensity exercise on a treadmill. The mdx mice treated with LLLT showed significantly lower levels of creatine kinase (CK) and oxidative stress than mdx mice that underwent forced high-intensity exercise on a treadmill. The activities of the antioxidant enzyme superoxide dismutase (SOD) were higher in control mdx mice than in WT mice. LLLT also significantly reduced the level of this marker. LLLT had a beneficial effect also on the skeletal muscle performance of mdx mice. However, the single application of LLLT and the dose parameters used in this study were not able to change the morphology of a dystrophic muscle.

  10. Exercise, manual therapy, and use of booster sessions in physical therapy for knee osteoarthritis: a multi-center, factorial randomized clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Fitzgerald, G K; Fritz, J M; Childs, J D; Brennan, G P; Talisa, V; Gil, A B; Neilson, B D; Abbott, J H

    2016-08-01

    (1) Do treatment effects differ between participants receiving manual therapy (MT) with exercise compared to subjects who don't, (2) are treatment effects sustained better when participants receive booster sessions compared to those who don't over a one year period in subjects with knee osteoarthritis (KOA)? Multi-center, 2 × 2 factorial randomized clinical trial. 300 participants with knee OA were randomized to four groups: exercise-no boosters (Ex), exercise-with boosters (Ex+B), manual therapy+exercise-no boosters (MT+Ex), manual therapy+exercise-with boosters (MT+Ex+B). The primary outcome was the Western Ontario and McMaster osteoarthritis index (WOMAC) at 1 year. Secondary outcomes included knee pain, physical performance tests, and proportions of participants meeting treatment responder criteria. There were no differences between groups on the WOMAC at 1 year or on any performance-based measures. Secondary analyses indicated a) better scores on the WOMAC and greater odds of being a treatment responder at 9 weeks for participants receiving MT, b) greater odds of being a treatment responder at 1 year for participants receiving boosters. Exploratory interaction analysis suggested knee pain decreases for participants receiving boosters and increases for participants not receiving boosters from 9 weeks to 1 year. MT or use of boosters with exercise did not result in additive improvement in the primary outcome at 1 year. Secondary outcomes suggest MT may have some short term benefit, and booster sessions may improve responder status and knee pain at 1 year. However, the role of booster sessions remains unclear in sustaining treatment effects and warrants further study. gov (NCT01314183). Copyright © 2016 Osteoarthritis Research Society International. All rights reserved.

  11. Predictors of short-term outcome to exercise and manual therapy for people with hip osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    French, Helen P; Galvin, Rose; Cusack, Tara; McCarthy, Geraldine M

    2014-01-01

    Physical therapy for hip osteoarthritis (OA) has shown short-term effects but limited long-term benefit. There has been limited research, with inconsistent results, in identifying prognostic factors associated with a positive response to physical therapy. The purpose of this study was to identify potential predictors of response to physical therapy (exercise therapy [ET] with or without adjunctive manual therapy [MT]) for hip OA based on baseline patient-specific and clinical characteristics. A prognostic study was conducted. Secondary analysis of data from a multicenter randomized controlled trial (RCT) (N=131) that evaluated the effectiveness of ET and ET+MT for hip OA was undertaken. Treatment response was defined using OMERACT/OARSI responder criteria. Ten baseline measures were used as predictor variables. Regression analyses were undertaken to identify predictors of outcome. Discriminative ability (sensitivity, specificity, and likelihood ratios) of significant variables was calculated. The RCT results showed no significant difference in most outcomes between ET and ET+MT at 9 and 18 weeks posttreatment. Forty-six patients were classified as responders at 9 weeks, and 36 patients were classified as responders at 18 weeks. Four baseline variables were predictive of a positive outcome at 9 weeks: male sex, pain with activity (<6/10), Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index physical function subscale score (<34/68), and psychological health (Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale score <9/42). No predictor variables were identified at the 18-week follow-up. Prognostic accuracy was fair for all 4 variables (sensitivity=0.5-0.58, specificity=0.57-0.72, likelihood ratios=1.25-1.77), indicating fair discriminative ability at predicting treatment response. The short-term follow-up limits the interpretation of results, and the low number of identified responders may have resulted in possible overfitting of the predictor model. The authors were

  12. A systematic review of the literature on the effectiveness of exercise therapy for groin pain in athletes

    PubMed Central

    Machotka, Zuzana; Kumar, Saravana; Perraton, Luke G

    2009-01-01

    Background Athletes competing in sports that require running, changes in direction, repetitive kicking and physical contact are at a relatively higher risk of experiencing episodes of athletic groin pain. To date, there has been no systematic review that aims to inform clinicians about the best available evidence on features of exercise interventions for groin pain in athletes. The primary aim of this systematic review was to evaluate the available evidence on the effectiveness of exercise therapy for groin pain in athletes. The secondary aim of this review was to identify the key features of exercise interventions used in the management of groin pain in an athletic population. Methods MEDLINE, CINAHL, PubMed, SPORTSDiscus, Embase, AMED, Ovid, PEDro, Cochrane Controlled Trials Register and Google Scholar databases were electronically searched. Data relating to research design, sample population, type of sport and exercise intervention was extracted. The methodological evaluation of included studies was conducted by using a modified quantitative critical appraisal tool. Results The search strategy identified 468 studies, 12 of which were potentially relevant. Ultimately five studies were included in this review. Overall the quality of primary research literature was moderate, with only one randomised controlled trial identified. All included studies provided evidence that an exercise intervention may lead to favourable outcomes in terms of return to sport. Four of the five studies reviewed included a strengthening component and most utilised functional, standing positions similar to those required by their sport. No study appropriately reported the intensity of their exercise interventions. Duration of intervention ranged from 3.8 weeks to 16 weeks. All five studies reported the use of one or more co-intervention. Conclusion Best available evidence to date, with its limitations, continues to support common clinical practice of exercise therapy as a key component of

  13. Effects of exercise and manual therapy on pain associated with hip osteoarthritis: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Beumer, Lucy; Wong, Jennie; Warden, Stuart J; Kemp, Joanne L; Foster, Paul; Crossley, Kay M

    2016-04-01

    To explore the effects of exercise (water-based or land-based) and/or manual therapies on pain in adults with clinically and/or radiographically diagnosed hip osteoarthritis (OA). A systematic review and meta-analysis was performed, with patient reported pain assessed using a visual analogue scale (VAS) or the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Arthritis Index (WOMAC) pain subscale. Data were grouped by follow-up time (0-3 months=short term; 4-12 months=medium term and; >12 months=long term), and standardised mean differences (SMD) with 95% CIs were used to establish intervention effect sizes. Study quality was assessed using modified PEDro scores. 19 trials were included. Four studies showed short-term benefits favouring water-based exercise over minimal control using the WOMAC pain subscale (SMD -0.53, 95% CI -0.96 to -0.10). Six studies supported a short-term benefit of land-based exercise compared to minimal control on VAS assessed pain (SMD -0.49, 95% CI -0.70 to -0.29). There were no medium (SMD -0.23, 95% CI -0.48 to 0.03) or long (SMD -0.22, 95% CI -0.51 to 0.06) term benefits of exercise therapy, or benefit of combining exercise therapy with manual therapy (SMD -0.38, 95% CI -0.88 to 0.13) when compared to minimal control. Best available evidence indicates that exercise therapy (whether land-based or water-based) is more effective than minimal control in managing pain associated with hip OA in the short term. Larger high-quality RCTs are needed to establish the effectiveness of exercise and manual therapies in the medium and long term. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  14. Diabetic foot and exercise therapy: step by step the role of rigid posture and biomechanics treatment.

    PubMed

    Francia, Piergiorgio; Gulisano, Massimo; Anichini, Roberto; Seghieri, Giuseppe

    2014-03-01

    Lower extremity ulcers represent a serious and costly complication of diabetes mellitus. Many factors contribute to the development of diabetic foot. Peripheral neuropathy and peripheral vascular disease are the main causes of foot ulceration and contribute in turn to the growth of additional risk factors such as limited joint mobility, muscular alterations and foot deformities. Moreover, a deficit of balance, posture and biomechanics can be present, in particular in patients at high risk for ulceration. The result of this process may be the development of a vicious cycle which leads to abnormal distribution of the foot's plantar pressures in static and dynamic postural conditions. This review shows that some of these risk factors significantly improve after a few weeks of exercise therapy (ET) intervention. Accordingly it has been suggested that ET can be an important weapon in the prevention of foot ulcer. The aim of ET can relate to one or more alterations typically found in diabetic patients, although greater attention should be paid to the evaluation and possible correction of body balance, rigid posture and biomechanics. Some of the most important limitations of ET are difficult access to therapy, patient compliance and the transitoriness of the results if the training stops. Many proposals have been made to overcome such limitations. In particular, it is important that specialized centers offer the opportunity to participate in ET and during the treatment the team should work to change the patient's lifestyle by improving the execution of appropriate daily physical activity.

  15. Extracorporeal shockwave therapy and therapeutic exercise for supraspinatus and biceps tendinopathies in 29 dogs.

    PubMed

    Leeman, J J; Shaw, K K; Mison, M B; Perry, J A; Carr, A; Shultz, R

    2016-10-15

    Supraspinatus tendinopathy (ST) and biceps tendinopathy (BT) are common causes of forelimb lameness in large-breed dogs and have historically been treated with conservative management or surgery. Extracorporeal shockwave therapy (ESWT) and therapeutic exercise (TE) are thought to be treatment options for these conditions. The objectives of this study were to report the clinical presentations of dogs treated with ESWT for shoulder tendinopathies, to determine the association between shoulder lesion severity identified on ultrasonography or MRI and outcome, and to compare the outcomes of dogs treated with ESWT with and without TE. Medical records of 29 dogs diagnosed with shoulder tendinopathies and treated with ESWT were reviewed, and 24 dogs were diagnosed with either unilateral BT or BT and ST. None were found to have unilateral ST. Five dogs were diagnosed with bilateral disease. Eighty-five per cent of dogs had good or excellent outcomes determined by owner assessment 11-220 weeks after therapy. Outcomes were found to be better as tendon lesion severity increased (P=0.0497), regardless if ESWT was performed with or without TE (P=0.92). ESWT should be considered a safe primary therapeutic option for canine shoulder tendinopathies. Larger controlled prospective studies are needed to adequately assess these findings.

  16. Exercise therapy for treatment of supraspinatus tears does not alter glenohumeral kinematics during internal/external rotation with the arm at the side.

    PubMed

    Ferrer, Gerald A; Miller, R Matthew; Zlotnicki, Jason P; Tashman, Scott; Irrgang, James J; Musahl, Volker; Debski, Richard E

    2017-09-01

    Rotator cuff tears are a significant clinical problem, with exercise therapy being a common treatment option for patients. Failure rates of exercise therapy may be due to the failure to improve glenohumeral kinematics. Tears involving the supraspinatus may result in altered glenohumeral kinematics and joint instability for internal/external rotation with the arm at the side because not all muscles used to stabilize the glenohumeral joint are functioning normally. The objective of the study is to assess in vivo glenohumeral kinematic changes for internal/external rotation motions with the arm at the side of patients with a symptomatic full-thickness supraspinatus tear before and after a 12-week exercise therapy programme. Five patients underwent dynamic stereoradiography analysis before and after a 12-week exercise therapy protocol to measure changes in glenohumeral kinematics during transverse plane internal/external rotation with the arm at the side. Patient-reported outcomes and shoulder strength were also evaluated. No patient sought surgery immediately following exercise therapy. Significant improvements in isometric shoulder strength and patient-reported outcomes were observed (p < 0.05). No significant changes in glenohumeral kinematics following physical therapy were found. Isolated supraspinatus tears resulted in increased joint translations compared to healthy controls from the previous literature for internal/external rotation with the arm at the side. Despite satisfactory clinical outcomes following exercise therapy, glenohumeral kinematics did not change. The lack of changes may be due to the motion studied or the focus of current exercise therapy protocols being increasing shoulder strength and restoring range of motion. Current exercise therapy protocols should be adapted to also focus on restoring glenohumeral kinematics to improve joint stability since exercise therapy may have different effects depending on the motions of daily living. Prognostic

  17. Qigong versus exercise therapy for chronic low back pain in adults--a randomized controlled non-inferiority trial.

    PubMed

    Blödt, S; Pach, D; Kaster, T; Lüdtke, R; Icke, K; Reisshauer, A; Witt, C M

    2015-01-01

    The value of qigong in the treatment of chronic low back pain is unclear. In a randomized controlled trial, we evaluated whether qigong is non-inferior to exercise therapy in patients with chronic low back pain. German outpatients (aged 46.7 ± 10.4) with chronic low back pain [mean visual analogue scale (VAS), 53.9 ± 12.5 mm] were enrolled and randomly allocated in a 1:1 ratio to receive either qigong (64 patients, 12 sessions with 1 × 90 min/week over 3 months) or exercise therapy (63 patients, 12 sessions 1 × 60 min/week). The primary outcome measure was the average pain intensity over the last 7 days on a VAS (0-100 mm, 0 = no pain, 100 = worst imaginable pain, non-inferiority margin = 5 mm) after 3 months. Follow-up was measured after 6 and 12 months. The mean adjusted low back pain intensity after 3 months was 34.8 mm [95% confidence interval (CI) 29.5; 40.2] in the qigong group and 33.1 mm (95% CI 27.7; 38.4) in the exercise group. Non-inferiority of the qigong group compared with the exercise group failed to show statistical significance (p = 0.204). In both groups, 10 patients reported suspected adverse reactions (e.g., muscle soreness, dizziness, pain) the total number was comparable in both groups (qigong n = 40, exercise n = 44). Qigong was not proven to be non-inferior to exercise therapy in the treatment of chronic low back pain. Its role in the prevention of chronic low back pain might be addressed in further studies. © 2014 European Pain Federation - EFIC®

  18. Effect of low-impact aerobic exercise combined with music therapy on patients with fibromyalgia. A pilot study.

    PubMed

    Espí-López, Gemma V; Inglés, Marta; Ruescas-Nicolau, María-Arántzazu; Moreno-Segura, Noemí

    2016-10-01

    Fibromyalgia is a pathological entity characterized by chronic widespread musculoskeletal pain and the presence of "tender points". It constitutes a significant health problem because of its prevalence and economic impact. The aim of the present study was to determine the therapeutic benefits of low impact aerobic exercise alone or in combination with music therapy in patients with fibromyalgia. A single-blind randomized controlled pilot trial was performed. Thirty-five individuals with fibromyalgia were divided into three groups: (G1) therapeutic aerobic exercise with music therapy (n=13); (G2) therapeutic aerobic exercise at any rhythm (n=13) and (CG) control (n=9). The intervention period lasted eight weeks. Depression, quality of life, general discomfort and balance were assessed before and after intervention. At post-intervention, group G1 improved in all variables (depression (p=0.002), quality of life (p=0.017), general discomfort (p=0.001), and balance (p=0.000)), while group G2 improved in general discomfort (p=0.002). The change observed in balance was statistically different between groups (p=0.01). Therapeutic aerobic exercise is effective in improving depression and general discomfort in individuals with fibromyalgia. However, effectiveness is higher when combined with music therapy, which brings about further improvements in quality of life and balance. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. The effect of forced-exercise therapy for Parkinson's disease on motor cortex functional connectivity.

    PubMed

    Beall, Erik B; Lowe, Mark J; Alberts, Jay L; Frankemolle, Anneke M M; Thota, Anil K; Shah, Chintan; Phillips, Michael D

    2013-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a progressive neurologic disorder primarily characterized by an altered motor function. Lower extremity forced exercise (FE) has been shown to reduce motor symptoms in patients with PD. Recent functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies have shown that FE and medication produce similar changes in brain activation patterns. Functional connectivity MRI (fcMRI) affords the ability to look at how strongly nodes of the motor circuit communicate with each other and can provide insight into the complementary effects of various therapies. Past work has demonstrated an abnormal motor connectivity in patients with PD compared to controls and subsequent normalization after treatment. Here we compare the effects of FE and medication using both resting and continuous visuomotor task fcMRI. Ten patients with mild to moderate PD completed three fMRI and fcMRI scanning sessions randomized under the following conditions: on PD medication, off PD medication, and FE+off medication. Blinded clinical ratings of motor function (a Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Motor Scale-III exam) indicated that FE and medication resulted in 51% and 33% improvement in clinical ratings, respectively. In most nodes of the motor circuit, the observed changes in the functional connectivity produced by FE and medication were strongly positively correlated. These findings suggest that medication and FE likely use the same pathways to produce symptomatic relief in patients with PD. However, the connectivity changes, while consistent across therapy, were inconsistent in polarity for each patient. This finding may explain some past inconsistencies in connectivity changes after medication therapy.

  20. The Effect of Forced-Exercise Therapy for Parkinson's Disease on Motor Cortex Functional Connectivity

    PubMed Central

    Lowe, Mark J.; Alberts, Jay L.; Frankemolle, Anneke M.M.; Thota, Anil K.; Shah, Chintan; Phillips, Michael D.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Parkinson's disease (PD) is a progressive neurologic disorder primarily characterized by an altered motor function. Lower extremity forced exercise (FE) has been shown to reduce motor symptoms in patients with PD. Recent functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies have shown that FE and medication produce similar changes in brain activation patterns. Functional connectivity MRI (fcMRI) affords the ability to look at how strongly nodes of the motor circuit communicate with each other and can provide insight into the complementary effects of various therapies. Past work has demonstrated an abnormal motor connectivity in patients with PD compared to controls and subsequent normalization after treatment. Here we compare the effects of FE and medication using both resting and continuous visuomotor task fcMRI. Ten patients with mild to moderate PD completed three fMRI and fcMRI scanning sessions randomized under the following conditions: on PD medication, off PD medication, and FE+off medication. Blinded clinical ratings of motor function (a Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Motor Scale-III exam) indicated that FE and medication resulted in 51% and 33% improvement in clinical ratings, respectively. In most nodes of the motor circuit, the observed changes in the functional connectivity produced by FE and medication were strongly positively correlated. These findings suggest that medication and FE likely use the same pathways to produce symptomatic relief in patients with PD. However, the connectivity changes, while consistent across therapy, were inconsistent in polarity for each patient. This finding may explain some past inconsistencies in connectivity changes after medication therapy. PMID:23316956

  1. Normalization of aberrant resting state functional connectivity in fibromyalgia patients following a three month physical exercise therapy.

    PubMed

    Flodin, P; Martinsen, S; Mannerkorpi, K; Löfgren, M; Bileviciute-Ljungar, I; Kosek, E; Fransson, P

    2015-01-01

    Physical exercise is one of the most efficient interventions to mitigate chronic pain symptoms in fibromyalgia (FM). However, little is known about the neurophysiological mechanisms mediating these effects. In this study we investigated resting-state connectivity using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) before and after a 15 week standardized exercise program supervised by physical therapists. Our aim was to gain an understanding of how physical exercise influences previously shown aberrant patterns of intrinsic brain activity in FM. Fourteen FM patients and eleven healthy controls successfully completed the physical exercise treatment. We investigated post- versus pre-treatment changes of brain connectivity, as well as changes in clinical symptoms in the patient group. FM patients reported improvements in symptom severity. Although several brain regions showed a treatment-related change in connectivity, only the connectivity between the right anterior insula and the left primary sensorimotor area was significantly more affected by the physical exercise among the fibromyalgia patients compared to healthy controls. Our results suggest that previously observed aberrant intrinsic brain connectivity patterns in FM are partly normalized by the physical exercise therapy. However, none of the observed normalizations in intrinsic brain connectivity were significantly correlated with symptom changes. Further studies conducted in larger cohorts are warranted to investigate the precise relationship between improvements in fibromyalgia symptoms and changes in intrinsic brain activity.

  2. Mesenchymal stem cell therapy associated with endurance exercise training: Effects on the structural and functional remodeling of infarcted rat hearts.

    PubMed

    Lavorato, Victor Neiva; Del Carlo, Ricardo Junqueira; da Cunha, Daise Nunes Queiroz; Okano, Barbara Silva; Belfort, Felipe Gomes; de Freitas, Juliana Silveira; da Mota, Gloria de Fatima Alves; Quintão-Júnior, Judson Fonseca; Silame-Gomes, Luis Henrique Lobo; Drummond, Filipe Rios; Carneiro-Júnior, Miguel Araújo; de Oliveira, Edilamar Menezes; Monteiro, Betania Souza; Prímola-Gomes, Thales Nicolau; Natali, Antônio José

    2016-01-01

    We tested the effects of early mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) therapy associated with endurance exercise on the structural and functional cardiac remodeling of rats with myocardial infarctation (MI). Male Wistar rats (40 days old) were divided into 6 groups: control and exercise sham; control and exercise MI; and control and exercise MI MSC. MI was surgically induced and bone marrow-derived MSCs were immediately injected via caudal vein (concentration: 1 × 10(6 )cells). Twenty-four hours later ET groups exercised on a treadmill (5 days/week; 60 min/day; 60% of maximal running velocity) for 12 weeks. Structural and functional changes were determined by echocardiography. Contractility and intracellular global calcium ([Ca(2 +)]i) transient were measured in myocytes from the left ventricular (LV) non-infarcted area. Calcium regulatory proteins were measured by Western blot. MI increased (p < 0.05) heart, ventricular and LV weights and its ratios to body weight; LV internal dimension in diastole (LVID-D) and in systole (LVID-S) and LV free wall in diastole (LVFW-D), but reduced the thickness of interventricular septum in systole (IVS-S), ejection fraction (EF) and fractional shortening (FS). MI augmented (p < 0.05) the times to peak and to half relaxation of cell shortening as well as the amplitude of the [Ca(2 +)]i transient and the times to peak and to half decay. Early MSCs therapy restored LVFW-D, IVS-S and the amplitude and time to half decay of the [Ca(2 +)]i transient. Early endurance exercise intervention increased (p < 0.05) LVFW-S, IVS-S, EF and FS, and reduced the times to peak and to half relaxation of cell shortening, and the amplitude of the [Ca(2 +)]i transient. Exercise training also increased the expression of left ventricular SERCA2a and PLBser16. Nevertheless, the combination of these therapies did not cause additive effects. In conclusion, combining early MSCs therapy and endurance exercise does not potentiate the benefits of such treatments to

  3. The effect of exercise therapy on cognitive functions in multiple sclerosis patients: A pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Sangelaji, Bahram; Estebsari, Fatemeh; Nabavi, Seyed Massood; Jamshidi, Ensiyeh; Morsali, Damineh; Dastoorpoor, Maryam

    2015-01-01

    Background: The positive impacts of exercise therapy on patients’ cognitive problems still remain unknown. This study was a pilot intervention to examine the effects of combined exercise on the cognitive problems of patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) in Iranian MS Society over 2012 to 2013. Methods: This quasi-experimental research was carried out in the form of a pretest/posttest study. Forty two patients with MS were selected from those visiting the rehabilitation center of Iranian MS Society, using non-probability convenience sampling. The Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS) of each patient was recorded before the intervention and Brief Repeatable Battery of Neuropsychological (BRB-N) test was administered before and after the intervention. The data were analyzed using the analytical tests such as Wilcoxon test. Results: Of 21 participants, 17 subjects (82%, n=14) female with mean (±SD) age of 37 (±9.98) years and mean (±SD) EDSS of 2.35 (±0.90) completed all stages of the study. Changes in long-term storage and permanent long-term retrieval of information after the intervention were statistically significant (p<0.001). In addition, the change in the average of total delay after the intervention was also significant by 1.11 (p<0.001). Conclusion: Our study confirmed the possibility of change in the cognitive abilities of MS patients through physical interventions. This finding emphasizes the necessity of more clinical examinations and increases the hopes for new rehabilitation methods for the disorder. PMID:26157723

  4. Comparison between effectiveness of Mechanical and Manual Traction combined with mobilization and exercise therapy in Patients with Cervical Radiculopathy

    PubMed Central

    Bukhari, Syed Rehan Iftikhar; Shakil-ur-Rehman, Syed; Ahmad, Shakeel; Naeem, Aamer

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objective: Cervical radiculopathy is a common neuro-musculo-skeletal disorder causing pain and disability. Traction is part of the evidence based manual physical therapy management due to its mechanical nature, type of traction and parameters related to its applicability and are still to be explored more through research. Our objective was to determine the Effects of Mechanical versus Manual Traction in Manual Physical Therapy combined with segmental mobilization and exercise therapy in the physical therapy management of Patients with Cervical Radiculopathy. Methods: This randomized control trial was conducted at department of physical therapy and rehabilitation, Rathore Hospital Faisalabad, from February to July 2015. Inclusion criteria were both male and female patients with evident symptoms of cervical spine radiculopathy and age ranged between 20-70 years. The exclusion criteria were Patients with history of trauma, neck pain without radiculopathy, aged less than 20 and more than 70. A total of 72 patients with cervical radiculopathy were screened out as per the inclusion criteria, 42 patients were randomly selected and placed into two groups by toss and trial method, and only 36 patients completed the study, while 6 dropped out. The mechanical traction was applied in group A and manual traction in group B along with common intervention of segmental mobilization and exercise therapy in both groups for 6 weeks. The patient’s outcomes were assessed by self reported NPRS and NDI at the baseline and after completion of 06 weeks exercise program at 3 days per week. The data was analyzed through SPSS version-21, and paired T test was applied at 95% level significance to determine the statistical deference between two groups. Results: Clinically the group of patients treated with mechanical traction managed pain (mean pre 6.26, mean post 1.43), and disability (mean pre 24.43 and mean post 7.26) more effectively as compared with the group of patients

  5. Evaluation of the anatomic effect of physical therapy exercises for mobilization of lumbar spinal nerves and the dura mater in dogs.

    PubMed

    Gruenenfelder, Fredrik I; Boos, Alois; Mouwen, Marco; Steffen, Frank

    2006-10-01

    To adapt and standardize neural tissue mobilization exercises, quantify nerve root movement, and assess the anatomic effects of lumbar spinal nerve and dural mobilization in dogs. 15 canine cadavers. 5 cadavers were used in the preliminary part of the study to adapt 3 neural tissue mobilization physical therapy exercises to canine anatomy. In the other 10 cadavers, the L4 to L7 nerve roots and the dura at the level of T13 and L1 were isolated and marked. Movements during the physical therapy exercises were standardized by means of goniometric control. Movement of the nerve roots in response to each exercise was digitally measured. The effects of body weight and crownrump length on the distance of nerve root movement achieved during each exercise were also assessed. Each exercise was divided into 4 steps, and the overall distance of neural movement achieved was compared with distances achieved between steps. Neural tissue mobilization exercises elicited visible and measurable movement of nerve roots L4 to L7 and of the dura at T13 and L1 in all cadavers. The physical therapy exercises evaluated had measurable effects on nerve roots L4 to L7 and the dura mater in the T13 and L1 segments. These exercises should be evaluated in clinical trials to validate their efficacy as primary treatments or ancillary postsurgical therapy in dogs with disorders of the thoracolumbar and lumbosacral segments of the vertebral column.

  6. Home-based exercise therapy in patients with ankylosing spondylitis: effects on pain, mobility, disease activity, quality of life, and respiratory functions.

    PubMed

    Aytekin, Ebru; Caglar, Nil Sayıner; Ozgonenel, Levent; Tutun, Sule; Demiryontar, Dilay Yilmaz; Demir, Saliha Eroglu

    2012-01-01

    The home-based exercise therapy recommended to the patients with ankylosing spondylitis (AS) is a simply applicable and cheap method. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of home-based exercise therapy on pain, mobility, function, disease activity, quality of life, and respiratory functions in patients with AS. Eighty patients diagnosed with AS according to the modified New York criteria were included in the study. Home-based exercise program including range of motion, stretching, strengthening, posture, and respiratory exercises was practically demonstrated by a physiotherapist. A training and exercise manual booklet was given to all patients. Patients following home-based exercise program five times a week at least 30 min per session (exercise group) for 3 months were compared with those exercising less than five times a week (control group). Visual analog scale pain (VASp) values at baseline were significantly higher in the exercise group. The exercise group showed improvements in VASp, tragus-wall distance, morning stiffness, finger-floor distance, modified Schober's test, chest expansion, the Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Index, the Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Functional Index, Ankylosing Spondylitis Quality of Life Questionnaire (ASQoL), forced expiratory volume in first second, and forced vital capacity at third month. There was significant difference in ASQoL scores between the two groups in favor of the exercise group at third month. Regular home-based exercise therapy should be a part of main therapy in patients with AS. Physicians should recommend that patients with AS do exercise at least five times a week at least 30 min per session.

  7. Effects of Relaxation Exercises and Music Therapy on the Psychological Symptoms and Depression Levels of Patients with Schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Kavak, Funda; Ünal, Süheyla; Yılmaz, Emine

    2016-10-01

    This study aims to identify the effects of relaxation exercises and music therapy on the psychological symptoms and depression levels of patients with chronic schizophrenia. This semi-experimental study was conducted using pre- and post-tests with a control group. The study population consists of patients with schizophrenia who regularly attended community mental health centers in the Malatya and Elazığ provinces of Turkey between May 2015 and September 2015. The study's sample consists of 70 patients with schizophrenia (n=35 in the control group; n=35 in the experimental group) who were selected randomly based on power analysis. The "Patient Information Form," the "Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale (BPRS)" and the "Calgary Depression Scale for Schizophrenia (CDSS)" were used for data collection. Patients in the experimental group participated in relaxation exercises and music therapy 5 times a week for 4 weeks. The experimental group of 35 persons was divided into three groups of approximately 10-12 individuals in order to enable all participants to attend the program. No intervention was applied to the patients in the control group. The data were evaluated using percentage distribution, arithmetic means, standard deviations, Chi-square and independent samples t-tests. The study found that patients in the experimental group showed a decrease in total mean scores on the BPRS and CDSS; the difference between the post-test scores of the experimental group and the post-test scores of the control group was statistically significant (p<0.05). The practice of relaxation exercises and music therapy was proven to be effective in reducing schizophrenic patients' psychological symptoms and levels of depression. Relaxation exercises and music therapy can be used as a complementary therapy in the medical treatment of patients with chronic schizophrenia. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Role of low-level laser therapy added to facial expression exercises in patients with idiopathic facial (Bell's) palsy.

    PubMed

    Ordahan, Banu; Karahan, Ali Yavuz

    2017-05-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the efficacy of low-level laser therapy in conjunction with conventional facial exercise treatment on functional outcomes during the early recovery period in patients with facial paralysis. Forty-six patients (mean age 41 ± 9.7 years; 40 women and 6 men) were randomized into two groups. Patients in the first group received low-level laser treatment as well as facial exercise treatment, while patients in the second group participated in facial exercise intervention alone. Laser treatment was administered at a wavelength of 830 nm, output power of 100 Mw, and frequency of 1 KHz using a gallium-aluminum-arsenide (GaAIAs, infrared laser) diode laser. A mean energy density of 10 J/cm(2) was administered to eight points of the affected side of the face three times per week, for a total of 6 weeks. The rate of facial improvement was evaluated using the facial disability index (FDI) before, 3 weeks after, and 6 weeks after treatment. Friedman analysis of variance was performed to compare the data from the parameters repeatedly measured in the inner-group analysis. Bonferroni correction was performed to compare between groups as a post hoc test if the variance analysis test result was significant. To detect the group differences, the Bonferroni Student t test was used. The Mann-Whitney U test was used to compare numeric data between the groups. In the exercise group, although no significant difference in FDI scores was noted between the start of treatment and week 3 (p < 0.05), significant improvement was observed at week 6 (p < 0.001). In the laser group, significant improvement in FDI scores relative to baseline was observed at 3 and 6 weeks (p < 0.001). Improvements in FDI scores were significantly greater at weeks 3 and 6 in the laser group than those in the exercise group (p < 0.05). Our findings indicate that combined treatment with low-level laser therapy (LLLT) and exercise therapy is associated

  9. A phase III clinical trial of exercise modalities on treatment side-effects in men receiving therapy for prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Newton, Robert U; Taaffe, Dennis R; Spry, Nigel; Gardiner, Robert A; Levin, Gregory; Wall, Bradley; Joseph, David; Chambers, Suzanne K; Galvão, Daniel A

    2009-06-29

    Androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) is accompanied by a number of adverse side effects including reduced bone mass and increased risk for fracture, reduced lean mass and muscle strength, mood disturbance and increased fat mass compromising physical functioning, independence, and quality of life. The purpose of this investigation is to examine the effects of long term exercise on reversing musculoskeletal-related side effects, and cardiovascular and diabetes risk factors in men receiving androgen deprivation for their prostate cancer. Specifically, we aim to investigate the effects of a 12-month exercise program designed to load the musculoskeletal system and reduce cardiovascular and diabetes disease progression on the following primary endpoints: 1) bone mineral density; 2) cardiorespiratory function and maximal oxygen capacity; 3) body composition (lean mass and fat mass); 4) blood pressure and cardiovascular function; 5) lipids and glycemic control; and 6) quality of life and psychological distress. Multi-site randomized controlled trial of 195 men (65 subjects per arm) undergoing treatment for prostate cancer involving ADT in the cities of Perth and Brisbane in Australia. Participants will be randomized to (1) resistance/impact loading exercise, (2) resistance/cardiovascular exercise groups and (3) usual care/delayed exercise. Participants will then undergo progressive training for 12 months. Measurements for primary and secondary endpoints will take place at baseline, 6 and 12 months (end of the intervention). The principal outcome of this project will be the determination of the strength of effect of exercise on the well established musculoskeletal, cardiovascular and insulin metabolism side effects of androgen deprivation in prostate cancer patients. As this project is much longer term than previous investigations in the area of exercise and cancer, we will gain knowledge as to the continuing effects of exercise in this patient population specifically

  10. Exercise therapy for functional capacity in chronic diseases: an overview of meta-analyses of randomised controlled trials.

    PubMed

    Pasanen, Tero; Tolvanen, Samppa; Heinonen, Ari; Kujala, Urho M

    2017-10-01

    To summarise all meta-analyses of randomised controlled trials that have evaluated the effects of exercise therapy on functional capacity in patients with chronic diseases. Umbrella review of meta-analyses of randomised controlled trials. We systematically searched the CENTRAL, CINAHL, DARE, Medline, OTSeeker, PEDro, SPORTDiscus, ProQuest Nursing & Allied Health Database, Web of Science, Scopus, OpenGrey and BMC Proceedings from database inception to 1 September 2016. We included meta-analyses that compared the effects of exercise therapy with no treatment or usual care in adults with non-communicable chronic diseases and included outcomes related to functional capacity. We excluded meta-analyses with less than 100 patients. Eighty-five meta-analyses with 22 different chronic diseases were included. The exercise interventions resulted in statistically significant (p<0.05) improvements for 126 of 146 (86%) functional capacity outcomes, compared with the control group. The standardised mean differences were small in 64 (44%), moderate in 54 (37%) and large in 28 (19%) of the 146 functional capacity outcomes. The results were similar for aerobic exercise, resistance training, and aerobic and resistance training combined. There were no significant differences in serious adverse effects between the intervention and control groups in any of the meta-analyses. Exercise therapy appears to be a safe way to improve functional capacity and reduce disability in individuals with chronic disease. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  11. Building motivation and sustainability into the prescription and recommendations for physical activity and exercise therapy: the evidence.

    PubMed

    Rhodes, Ryan E; Fiala, Bonnie

    2009-07-01

    Client adherence to exercises prescribed by a physical therapist is very important to successful treatment outcomes. Unfortunately, many clients struggle with adherence and thus efficient and effective motivational interventions are desirable. The purpose of this article was to review the available evidence for: 1) the modifiable factors associated with adherence to physical therapy recommended exercise and 2) the efficacy of exercise intervention efforts to make conclusions and suggestions toward practice. Articles were limited to English peer-reviewed journals and published from 1993 to 2008. Major findings from 13 studies were summarized based on common subtopics of: outcome expectations, self-efficacy expectations, cognitive-behavioural and educational interventions, and intervention medium. The review provided evidence for the importance of self-efficacy in exercise adherence to physical therapy, but it showed that current cognitive-behavioural interventions have had limited effectiveness. It was recommended that future research broaden the scope of predictor variables with social ecological designs, increase the length of prospective follow-up in assessments, include larger and more diverse samples, and focus on innovative aesthetic and affective-based intervention strategies.

  12. Efficacy of incentive spirometer exercise on pulmonary functions of patients with ankylosing spondylitis stabilized by tumor necrosis factor inhibitor therapy.

    PubMed

    So, Min Wook; Heo, Hyun Mi; Koo, Bon San; Kim, Yong-Gil; Lee, Chang-Keun; Yoo, Bin

    2012-09-01

    To evaluate the effect of combining incentive spirometer exercise (ISE) with a conventional exercise (CE) on patients with ankylosing spondylitis (AS) stabilized by tumor necrosis factor (TNF) inhibitor therapy by comparing a combination group with a CE-alone group. Forty-six patients (44 men, 2 women) were randomized to the combination group (ISE plus CE; n=23) or the CE group (n=23). The CE regimen of both groups consisted of 20 exercises performed for 30 min once a day. The ISE was performed once a day for 30 min. The trial duration was 16 weeks. Patients were assessed before and at the end of treatment by measuring the Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Index, Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Functional Index (BASFI), chest expansion, finger to floor distance, pulmonary function measures, and 6-min walk distance. Both groups improved significantly in terms of chest expansion (p<0.01), finger to floor distance (p<0.01), and BASFI (p<0.05) after completing the exercise program. However, only the combination group showed significant improvements in the forced vital capacity (p<0.05), total lung capacity (p<0.01), and vital capacity (p<0.05). Although this did not achieve statistical significance, the combination group was mildly superior to the CE-alone group in functional disability and pulmonary function measures. Combining ISE with a CE can provide positive results in patients whose AS has been clinically stabilized by TNF inhibitor therapy.

  13. Supervised exercise therapy: it does work, but how to set up a program?

    PubMed

    Hageman, David; van den Houten, Marijn M; Spruijt, Steffie; Gommans, Lindy N; Scheltinga, Marc R; Teijink, Joep A

    2017-04-01

    Intermittent claudication (IC) is a manifestation of peripheral arterial disease. IC has a high prevalence in the older population, is closely associated with other expressions of atherosclerotic disease and often co-exists in multimorbid patients. Treatment of IC should address reduction of cardiovascular risk and improvement of functional capacity and health-related quality of life (QoL). As recommended by contemporary international guidelines, the first-line treatment includes supervised exercise therapy (SET). In several randomized controlled trials and systematic reviews, SET is compared with usual care, placebo, walking advice and endovascular revascularization. The evidence supporting the efficacy of SET programs to alleviate claudication symptoms is robust. SET improves walking distance and health-related QoL and appears to be the most cost-effective treatment for IC. Nevertheless, only few of all newly diagnosed IC patients worldwide receive this safe, efficient and structured treatment. Worldwide implementation of structured SET programs is seriously impeded by outdated arguments favoring an invasive intervention, absence of a network of specialized physical therapists providing standardized SET and lack of awareness and/or knowledge of the importance of SET by referring physicians. Besides, misguiding financial incentives and lack of reimbursement hamper actual use of SET programs. In the Netherlands, a national integrated care network (ClaudicatioNet) was launched in 2011 to combat treatment shortcomings and stimulate cohesion and collaboration between stakeholders. This care intervention has resulted in optimized quality of care for all patients with IC.

  14. Neck pain in military helicopter aircrew and the role of exercise therapy.

    PubMed

    Salmon, Danielle M; Harrison, Michael F; Neary, J Patrick

    2011-10-01

    Neck pain is a growing aeromedical concern for military forces on an international scale. Neck pain prevalence in the global military helicopter community has been reported in the range of 56.6-84.5%. Despite this high prevalence, historically, research examining helicopter aircrews has focused predominantly on low back pain. A number of recent studies have emerged examining flight-related factors that are hypothesized to contribute to the development of flight-related neck pain. Loading factors such as the posture adopted during flight, use of night vision goggles, and vibration have all been found to contribute to neck pain and muscular fatigue. Prolonged or repeated exposureto these loading factors has been hypothesized to perpetuate or contribute to the development of neck pain. Despite the high number of helicopter aircrew personnel that suffer from neck pain, very few individuals seek treatment for the disorder. The focus of medical personnel should, therefore, be directed toward a solution that addresses not only the issue of muscular fatigue, but the hesitancy to seek treatment. Previous research in military and civilian populations have used exercise therapy as a treatment modality for neck pain and have found improved endurance capacity in the neck musculature and reduced self-reported neck pain.

  15. Comparison of the Effect of Massage Therapy and Isometric Exercises on Primary Dysmenorrhea: A Randomized Controlled Clinical Trial.

    PubMed

    Azima, Sara; Bakhshayesh, Hajar Rajaei; Kaviani, Maasumeh; Abbasnia, Keramatallah; Sayadi, Mehrab

    2015-12-01

    Dysmenorrhea is the most common cyclic pelvic pain, and it affects the quality of life of many women. We sought to compare the effects of massage and isometric exercises on primary dysmenorrhea. We conducted a randomized controlled trial at the dormitories of Shiraz University among 102 students with primary dysmenorrheal. The student groups were randomly divided into massage, isometric exercises, and control groups. The first group received 2 consecutive cycles of effleurage massage with lavender oil. The second group had 8 weeks of isometric exercises. No intervention was performed for the control group. Pain intensity was measured and recorded by using a visual analog scale. In addition, the duration of pain was measured in hours, and Spielberger's questionnaire was used to measure the anxiety level. Pain intensity had significantly reduced in the massage and exercises groups; the reduction was more significant in the massage group (P < .001). The results revealed a significant difference among the 3 groups in regard to the mean duration of pain after the third cycle (P = .006). However, no significant difference was found among the 3 groups concerning the mean level of anxiety. The results of intragroup comparisons only showed a significant reduction of anxiety level in the massage group after the third cycle (P = .017). Based on the present findings, it seems that massage therapy and isometric exercises were effective in reducing some symptoms of dysmenorrhea. Copyright © 2015 North American Society for Pediatric and Adolescent Gynecology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Eccentric versus conventional exercise therapy in patients with rotator cuff tendinopathy: a randomized, single blinded, clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Dejaco, Beate; Habets, Bas; van Loon, Corné; van Grinsven, Susan; van Cingel, Robert

    2017-07-01

    To investigate the effectiveness of isolated eccentric versus conventional exercise therapy in patients with rotator cuff tendinopathy. Thirty-six patients with rotator cuff tendinopathy, diagnosed by an orthopaedic surgeon, were included and randomly allocated to an isolated eccentric exercise (EE) group (n = 20, mean age = 50.2 ± 10.8 years) or a conventional exercise (CG) group (n = 16, mean age = 48.6 ± 12.3 years). Both groups fulfilled a 12-week daily home-based exercise programme and received a total amount of nine treatment sessions. The Constant Murley score was used to evaluate both objective (e.g. range of motion and strength) and subjective measures (e.g. pain and activities of daily living). A visual analogue scale (VAS) was used to evaluate pain during daily activities. As secondary outcomes, shoulder range of motion and isometric abduction strength in 45° in the scapular plane were evaluated. All measurements were taken at baseline, at 6, 12 and 26 weeks. After 26 weeks, both groups showed a significant increase in the Constant Murley score and a significant decrease in VAS scores. No difference was found between the groups, for any of the evaluated outcome measures. A 12-week-isolated eccentric training programme of the rotator cuff is beneficial for shoulder function and pain after 26 weeks in patients with rotator cuff tendinopathy. However, it is no more beneficial than a conventional exercise programme for the rotator cuff and scapular muscles. Based on the results, clinicians should take into account that performing two eccentric exercises twice a day is as effective as performing six concentric/eccentric exercises once a day in patients with rotator cuff tendinopathy.

  17. Effect of theophylline on exercise capacity in COPD patients treated with combination long-acting bronchodilator therapy: a pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Voduc, Nha; Alvarez, Gonzalo G; Amjadi, Kayvan; Tessier, Caroline; Sabri, Elham; Aaron, Shawn D

    2012-01-01

    Background Many patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease continue to experience significant functional limitation despite the use of both long-acting anticholinergic and beta-agonist inhalers. Theophylline is a widely available medication which may further improve lung function and exercise performance. Previous studies evaluating the effects of theophylline on exercise capacity in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) have demonstrated heterogeneous results. Methods We performed a randomized placebo-controlled double-blind pilot study assessing the effects of theophylline on constant load exercise duration and lung function, involving 24 COPD patients already treated with long-acting inhaled beta-agonist and long-acting anti-cholinergic bronchodilator therapy. Results Analyzable data was available in 10 of 12 subjects in the treatment arm and 11 of 12 subjects in the control arm. Theophylline was associated with a 26.1% (95% confidence interval [CI]: −17.3–69.5) improvement in exercise duration compared to placebo. Four of 10 treated patients demonstrated an improvement in exercise duration exceeding the minimum clinically important difference of 33%, compared to 1 of 11 controls (P = 0.15). Furthermore, peak ventilation was reduced by 11.1%, (95% CI: 0.77–21.5) which may suggest improvements in gas exchange. There were no significant observed differences in resting lung function nor measures of dyspnea between the two treatment groups. Conclusions Our study demonstrated a trend, but not a statistically significant improvement in exercise duration and a reduction in peak ventilation with theophylline. Based on the observed mean differences and standard deviations in this pilot study, a randomized controlled trial would require 45 subjects in each arm to detect a significant change in exercise duration. PMID:22563244

  18. Resistance Exercise and Inflammation in Breast Cancer Patients Undergoing Adjuvant Radiation Therapy: Mediation Analysis From a Randomized, Controlled Intervention Trial.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Martina E; Meynköhn, Anna; Habermann, Nina; Wiskemann, Joachim; Oelmann, Jan; Hof, Holger; Wessels, Sabine; Klassen, Oliver; Debus, Jürgen; Potthoff, Karin; Steindorf, Karen; Ulrich, Cornelia M

    2016-02-01

    To explore the mediating role of inflammatory parameters in the development of fatigue, pain, and potentially related depressive symptoms during radiation therapy for breast cancer and its mitigation by resistance exercise. Breast cancer patients scheduled for adjuvant radiation therapy were randomized to 12-week progressive resistance exercise training (EX) or a relaxation control group. Interleukin-6 (IL-6) and interleukin-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1ra) were measured in serum samples collected before, at the end, and 6 weeks after radiation therapy from 103 chemotherapy-naïve participants. Fatigue was assessed with the multidimensional Fatigue Assessment Questionnaire, pain with the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer QLQ-C30, and depressive symptoms with the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale. Analysis of covariance models, partial correlations, Freedman-Schatzkin tests, and R(2) effect-size measures for mediation were calculated. The analysis of covariance models revealed a significant intervention effect on IL-6 (P=.010) and the IL-6/IL-1ra ratio (P=.018), characterized by a marked increase during radiation therapy among controls, but no significant change in EX. Interleukin-1 receptor antagonist did not change significantly in either group (P=.88). Increased IL-6 and IL-6/IL-1ra levels at the end of radiation therapy were significantly associated with increased physical fatigue and pain 6 weeks after radiation. We observed significant partial mediation by IL-6 and IL-6/IL-1ra of the effect of resistance exercise on physical fatigue (Freedman-Schatzkin P=.023 and P<.001) and pain (both P<.001). Hereby IL-6 and IL-6/IL-1ra mediated between 15% and 24% of the variance of physical fatigue and pain explained by the intervention. This randomized, controlled trial showed a significantly increased proinflammatory cytokine level after adjuvant radiation therapy in breast cancer patients. This effect was counteracted by

  19. Effects of Aqua Aerobic Therapy Exercise for Older Adults on Muscular Strength, Agility and Balance to Prevent Falling during Gait.

    PubMed

    Kim, Suk Bum; O'sullivan, David Michael

    2013-08-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of the present study was to examine the effects of an aqua aerobic therapy exercise for older adults on biomechanical and physiological factors affecting gait. [Subjects] A total of 15 subjects participated in this study and they were randomly divided into the experimental and the control group. [Methods] Physiological variables, leg strength, power and flexibility, and biomechanical variables, both kinematic and kinetic, were measured before and after the aqua aerobic therapy exercise. Each subject was instructed to walk along an elevated walkway and during the trials a trapdoor opened at random to create a 10 cm falling perturbation. Full body motion and kinetics was gathered during the gait. [Results] There were significant reductions in body weight, and body fat mass, and stride time after the perturbation. Significant increases in leg strength corresponded to the maximum joint moment of the landing leg showing that the subjects' ability for recovery of balance after the perturbation improved. [Conclusion] As the results showed significant improvements in gait pattern and recovery time after perturbed gait, we conclude that aqua aerobic therapy is an effective exercise method for training older adults to reduce their risk of falling.

  20. Exercise therapy and cognitive behavioural therapy to improve fatigue, daily activity performance and quality of life in postpoliomyelitis syndrome: the protocol of the FACTS-2-PPS trial.

    PubMed

    Koopman, Fieke S; Beelen, Anita; Gerrits, Karin H; Bleijenberg, Gijs; Abma, Tineke A; de Visser, Marianne; Nollet, Frans

    2010-01-18

    Postpoliomyelitis Syndrome (PPS) is a complex of late onset neuromuscular symptoms with new or increased muscle weakness and muscle fatigability as key symptoms. Main clinical complaints are severe fatigue, deterioration in functional abilities and health related quality of life. Rehabilitation management is the mainstay of treatment. Two different therapeutic interventions may be prescribed (1) exercise therapy or (2) cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT). However, the evidence on the effectiveness of both interventions is limited. The primary aim of the FACTS-2-PPS trial is to study the efficacy of exercise therapy and CBT for reducing fatigue and improving activities and quality of life in patients with PPS. Additionally, the working mechanisms, patients' and therapists' expectations of and experiences with both interventions and cost-effectiveness will be evaluated. A multi-centre, single-blinded, randomized controlled trial will be conducted. A sample of 81 severely fatigued patients with PPS will be recruited from 3 different university hospitals and their affiliate rehabilitation centres. Patients will be randomized to one of three groups i.e. (1) exercise therapy + usual care, (2) CBT + usual care, (3) usual care. At baseline, immediately post-intervention and at 3- and 6-months follow-up, fatigue, activities, quality of life and secondary outcomes will be assessed. Costs will be based on a cost questionnaire, and statistical analyses on GEE (generalized estimated equations). Analysis will also consider mechanisms of change during therapy. A responsive evaluation will be conducted to monitor the implementation process and to investigate the perspectives of patients and therapists on both interventions. A major strength of the FACTS-2-PPS study is the use of a mixed methods design in which a responsive and economic evaluation runs parallel to the trial. The results of this study will generate new evidence for the rehabilitation treatment of persons with PPS

  1. Exercise Is Medicine.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elrick, Harold

    1996-01-01

    Suggests that exercise should be the first-line therapy for preventing and treating many common diseases; however, physicians need more training in how best to use exercise therapy. The paper explains the power of exercise and discusses how to motivate individuals to start safe, enjoyable, and life-saving exercise routines. (SM)

  2. Concurrent Intervention With Exercises and Stabilized Tumor Necrosis Factor Inhibitor Therapy Reduced the Disease Activity in Patients With Ankylosing Spondylitis

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Hui; Li, Wen-Rong; Zhang, Hua; Tian, Xu; Wei, Wei; Wang, Chun-Mei

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Since the use of tumor necrosis factor (TNF) inhibitor therapy is becoming wider, the effects of concurrent intervention with exercises and stabilized TNF inhibitors therapy in patients with ankylosing spondylitis (AS) are different. The study aimed to objectively evaluate whether concurrent intervention with exercises and stabilized TNF inhibitors can reduce the disease activity in patients with AS. A search from PubMed, Web of Science, EMBASE, and the Cochrane Library was electronically performed to collect studies which compared concurrent intervention with exercise and TNF inhibitor to conventional approach in terms of disease activity in patients with AS published from their inception to June 2015. Studies that measured the Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Functional Index (BASFI), the Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Index (BASDAI), the Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Metrology Index (BASMI), and chest expansion as outcomes were included. Two independent investigators screened the identified articles, extracted the data, and assessed the methodological quality of the included studies. Quantitative analysis was performed with Review Manager (RevMan) software (version 5.3.0). A total of 5 studies comprising 221 participants were included in the study. Meta-analyses showed that concurrent intervention with exercises and stabilized TNF inhibitors therapy significantly reduced the BASMI scores (MD, −0.99; 95% CI, −1.61 to −0.38) and BASDAI scores (MD, −0.58; 95% CI, −1.10 to −0.06), but the BASFI scores (MD, −0.31; 95% CI, −0.76 to 0.15) was not reduced, and chest expansion (MD, 0.80; 95% CI, −0.18 to 1.78) was not increased. Concurrent intervention with exercises and stabilized TNF inhibitors therapy can reduce the disease activity in patients with AS. More randomized controlled trials (RCTs) with high-quality, large-scale, and appropriate follow-up are warranted to further establish the benefit of concurrent intervention with

  3. Effects of horseback riding exercise therapy on hormone levels in elderly persons

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Sung-Hyoun; Kim, Jin-Woo; Kim, Seon-Rye; Cho, Byung-Jun

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of riding exercise on hormone levels in normal elderly people who were taught horseback riding for 8 weeks. [Subjects] Subjects were classified into an exercise group (n=10) and control group (n=10). [Methods] The two groups, horseback riding exercise group of 10 and control group of 10, were each tested for 15 minutes, 3 times, over 8 weeks. Post-exercise tests were implemented in both groups in the same way as pre-study tests. [Results] The horseback riding group showed a significant difference in the pre- and post-exercise serotonin and cortisol levels. Additionally, serotonin and cortisol levels showed significant differences between the two groups. [Conclusion] Serotonin and cortisol levels significantly increased in the experimental group, suggesting that horseback riding exercise is effective for improving the levels of these hormones. PMID:26311966

  4. Postinjury Exercise and Platelet-Rich Plasma Therapies Improve Skeletal Muscle Healing in Rats But Are Not Synergistic When Combined.

    PubMed

    Contreras-Muñoz, Paola; Torrella, Joan Ramon; Serres, Xavier; Rizo-Roca, David; De la Varga, Meritxell; Viscor, Ginés; Martínez-Ibáñez, Vicente; Peiró, José Luis; Järvinen, Tero A H; Rodas, Gil; Marotta, Mario

    2017-07-01

    Skeletal muscle injuries are the most common sports-related injury and a major concern in sports medicine. The effect of platelet-rich plasma (PRP) injections on muscle healing is still poorly understood, and current data are inconclusive. To evaluate the effects of an ultrasound-guided intramuscular PRP injection, administered 24 hours after injury, and/or posttraumatic daily exercise training for 2 weeks on skeletal muscle healing in a recently established rat model of skeletal muscle injury that highly mimics the muscle trauma seen in human athletes. Controlled laboratory study. A total of 40 rats were assigned to 5 groups. Injured rats (medial gastrocnemius injury) received a single PRP injection (PRP group), daily exercise training (Exer group), or a combination of a single PRP injection and daily exercise training (PRP-Exer group). Untreated and intramuscular saline-injected animals were used as controls. Muscle force was determined 2 weeks after muscle injury, and muscles were harvested and evaluated by means of histological assessment and immunofluorescence microscopy. Both PRP (exhibiting 4.8-fold higher platelet concentration than whole blood) and exercise training improved muscle strength (maximum tetanus force, TetF) in approximately 18%, 20%, and 30% of rats in the PRP, PRP-Exer, and Exer groups, respectively. Specific markers of muscle regeneration (developmental myosin heavy chain, dMHC) and scar formation (collagen I) demonstrated the beneficial effect of the tested therapies in accelerating the muscle healing process in rats. PRP and exercise treatments stimulated the growth of newly formed regenerating muscle fibers (1.5-, 2-, and 2.5-fold increase in myofiber cross-sectional area in PRP, PRP-Exer, and Exer groups, respectively) and reduced scar formation in injured skeletal muscle (20%, 34%, and 41% of reduction in PRP, PRP-Exer, and Exer groups, respectively). Exercise-treated muscles (PRP-Exer and Exer groups) had significantly reduced

  5. Exercise therapy, cardiorespiratory fitness and their effect on brain volumes: a randomised controlled trial in patients with schizophrenia and healthy controls.

    PubMed

    Scheewe, Thomas W; van Haren, Neeltje E M; Sarkisyan, Gayane; Schnack, Hugo G; Brouwer, Rachel M; de Glint, Maria; Hulshoff Pol, Hilleke E; Backx, Frank J G; Kahn, René S; Cahn, Wiepke

    2013-07-01

    The objective of this study was to examine exercise effects on global brain volume, hippocampal volume, and cortical thickness in schizophrenia patients and healthy controls. Irrespective of diagnosis and intervention, associations between brain changes and cardiorespiratory fitness improvement were examined. Sixty-three schizophrenia patients and fifty-five healthy controls participated in this randomised controlled trial. Global brain volumes, hippocampal volume, and cortical thickness were estimated from 3-Tesla MRI scans. Cardiorespiratory fitness was assessed with a cardiopulmonary ergometer test. Subjects were assigned exercise therapy or occupational therapy (patients) and exercise therapy or life-as-usual (healthy controls) for six months 2h weekly. Exercise therapy effects were analysed for subjects who were compliant at least 50% of sessions offered. Significantly smaller baseline cerebral (grey) matter, and larger third ventricle volumes, and thinner cortex in most areas of the brain were found in patients versus controls. Exercise therapy did not affect global brain and hippocampal volume or cortical thickness in patients and controls. Cardiorespiratory fitness improvement was related to increased cerebral matter volume and lateral and third ventricle volume decrease in patients and to thickening in the left hemisphere in large areas of the frontal, temporal and cingulate cortex irrespective of diagnosis. One to 2h of exercise therapy did not elicit significant brain volume changes in patients or controls. However, cardiorespiratory fitness improvement attenuated brain volume changes in schizophrenia patients and increased thickness in large areas of the left cortex in both schizophrenia patients and healthy controls.

  6. Efficacy of walking exercise in promoting cognitive-psychosocial functions in men with prostate cancer receiving androgen deprivation therapy.

    PubMed

    Lee, C Ellen; Kilgour, Andrea; Lau, Y K James

    2012-07-30

    Prostate cancer is the most commonly diagnosed non-melanoma cancer among men. Androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) has been the core therapy for men with advanced prostate cancer. It is only in recent years that clinicians began to recognize the cognitive-psychosocial side effects from ADT, which significantly compromise the quality of life of prostate cancer survivors. The objectives of the study are to determine the efficacy of a simple and accessible home-based, walking exercise program in promoting cognitive and psychosocial functions of men with prostate cancer receiving ADT. A 6-month prospective, single-blinded, randomized controlled trial will be conducted to compare the Exercise Group with the Control Group. Twenty men with prostate cancer starting ADT will be recruited and randomly assigned to one of the two groups: the Exercise Group will receive instructions in setting up an individualized 6-month home-based, walking exercise program, while the Control Group will receive standard medical advice from the attending physician. The primary outcomes will be psychosocial and cognitive functions. Cognitive functions including memory, attention, working memory, and executive function will be assessed using a battery of neurocognitive tests at baseline and 6 months. Psychosocial functions including depression, anxiety and self-esteem will be assessed at baseline, 3 and 6 months using the Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression Scale, Spielberger State-Trait Anxiety Inventory, and Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale. The significance of the cognitive-psychosocial side effects of ADT in men with prostate cancer has only been recently recognized, and the management remains unclear. This study addresses this issue by designing a simple and accessible home-based, exercise program that may potentially have significant impact on reducing the cognitive and psychosocial side effects of ADT, and ultimately improving the health-related quality of life in men with prostate

  7. Combined effects of repeated sauna therapy and exercise training on cardiac function and physical activity in patients with chronic heart failure.

    PubMed

    Haseba, Sumihito; Sakakima, Harutoshi; Kubozono, Takuro; Nakao, Syuhei; Ikeda, Satoshi

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the combined effects of repeated sauna therapy and exercise training on subjective symptoms, cardiac function, daily activities and ambulation capacity in patients with chronic heart failure. Fifty four patients including 26 patients with repeated sauna therapy and exercise training (combined therapy group) and 28 patients with repeated sauna therapy (monotherapy group) participated in the study. Repeated sauna therapy and exercise training were performed once a day, 5 days a week. Clinical symptoms, brain natriuretic peptide concentration, cardiac functions evaluated by echocardiography, cardiac size on chest radiography, Barthel Index (BI) and ambulation capacity were examined and compared between the time of hospital admission and the time of discharge. Both the groups showed significantly improved New York Heart Association functional class, cardiothoracic ratio, brain natriuretic peptide concentration, left ventricular ejection fraction, BI score and ambulation capacity grade. The changes of New York Heart Association functional class, BI score and ambulation capacity in the combined therapy group were a higher level of statistical significance than those in monotherapy group. Notably, significant between group difference was observed in the changes of BI score. The addition of exercise training programs to repeated sauna therapy may be efficient and effective for improvement of cardiac function and daily activities for patients with chronic heart failure. IMPLICATIONS OF REHABILITATION: Repeated sauna therapy is an effective means of improving cardiac, vascular function and mental health in CHF patients. Exercise training is an effective means of improving exercise capacity, thus improving ADL. Combination of repeated sauna therapy and exercise training may be recommended as a comprehensive treatment to improve cardiac function, ambulation capacity, and ADL in CHF patients.

  8. Using computers to enable self-management of aphasia therapy exercises for word finding: the patient and carer perspective.

    PubMed

    Palmer, Rebecca; Enderby, Pam; Paterson, Gail

    2013-01-01

    Speech and language therapy (SLT) for aphasia can be difficult to access in the later stages of stroke recovery, despite evidence of continued improvement with sufficient therapeutic intensity. Computerized aphasia therapy has been reported to be useful for independent language practice, providing new opportunities for continued rehabilitation. The success of this option depends on its acceptability to patients and carers. To investigate factors that affect the acceptability of independent home computerized aphasia therapy practice. An acceptability study of computerized therapy was carried out alongside a pilot randomized controlled trial of computer aphasia therapy versus usual care for people more than 6 months post-stroke. Following language assessment and computer exercise prescription by a speech and language therapist, participants practised three times a week for 5 months at home with monthly volunteer support. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 14 participants who received the intervention and ten carers (n = 24). Questions from a topic guide were presented and answered using picture, gesture and written support. Interviews were audio recorded, transcribed verbatim and analysed thematically. Three research SLTs identified and cross-checked themes and subthemes emerging from the data. The key themes that emerged were benefits and disadvantages of computerized aphasia therapy, need for help and support, and comparisons with face-to-face therapy. The independence, flexibility and repetition afforded by the computer was viewed as beneficial and the personalized exercises motivated participants to practise. Participants and carers perceived improvements in word-finding and confidence-talking. Computer practice could cause fatigue and interference with other commitments. Support from carers or volunteers for motivation and technical assistance was seen as important. Although some participants preferred face-to-face therapy, using a computer for

  9. Can supervised exercise prevent treatment toxicity in patients with prostate cancer initiating androgen-deprivation therapy: a randomised controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Cormie, Prue; Galvão, Daniel A; Spry, Nigel; Joseph, David; Chee, Raphael; Taaffe, Dennis R; Chambers, Suzanne K; Newton, Robert U

    2015-02-01

    To determine if supervised exercise minimises treatment toxicity in patients with prostate cancer initiating androgen-deprivation therapy (ADT). This is the first study to date that has investigated the potential role of exercise in preventing ADT toxicity rather than recovering from established toxicities. Sixty-three men scheduled to receive ADT were randomly assigned to a 3-month supervised exercise programme involving aerobic and resistance exercise sessions commenced within 10 days of their first ADT injection (32 men) or usual care (31 men). The primary outcome was body composition (lean and fat mass). Other study outcomes included bone mineral density, physical function, blood biomarkers of chronic disease risk and bone turnover, general and prostate cancer-specific quality of life, fatigue and psychological distress. Outcomes were compared between groups using analysis of covariance adjusted for baseline values. Compared to usual care, a 3-month exercise programme preserved appendicular lean mass (P = 0.019) and prevented gains in whole body fat mass, trunk fat mass and percentage fat with group differences of -1.4 kg (P = 0.001), -0.9 kg (P = 0.008) and -1.3% (P < 0.001), respectively. Significant between-group differences were also seen favouring the exercise group for cardiovascular fitness (peak oxygen consumption 1.1 mL/kg/min, P = 0.004), muscular strength (4.0-25.9 kg, P ≤ 0.026), lower body function (-1.1 s, P < 0.001), total cholesterol: high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol ratio (-0.52, P = 0.028), sexual function (15.2, P = 0.028), fatigue (3.1, P = 0.042), psychological distress (-2.2, P = 0.045), social functioning (3.8, P = 0.015) and mental health (3.6-3.8, P ≤ 0.022). There were no significant group differences for any other outcomes. Commencing a supervised exercise programme involving aerobic and resistance exercise when initiating ADT significantly reduced treatment toxicity, while improving social functioning and mental

  10. The effects of an 'explicit' values clarification exercise in a woman's decision aid regarding postmenopausal hormone therapy.

    PubMed

    O'Connor, Annette M.; Wells, George A.; Tugwell, Peter; Laupacis, Andreas; Elmslie, Tom; Drake, Elizabeth

    1999-03-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the incremental effect of a graphic weigh-scale values clarification exercise to explicitly consider the personal importance of the benefits versus the risks in a woman's decision aid regarding postmenopausal hormone therapy. DESIGN: Randomized controlled trial. Intervention Decision aid including information on options, benefits and risks, and their probabilities either followed by: (1) a graphic weigh-scale values clarification exercise to explicitly consider the personal importance of each benefit and risk; or (2) a summary of the main benefits and risks to implicitly consider benefits versus the risks. SAMPLE: Two-hundred and one women aged 50-69 years from Ottawa, Canada, who had never used hormone therapy. OUTCOME: Perceived clarity of values, a sub-scale of the decisional conflict scale; congruence between personal values of benefits and risks (measured on 0-10 importance rating scale) and choices (accept, decline, unsure regarding preventive hormone therapy [HRT]) using discriminant function analysis. RESULTS: There were no statistically significant differences between interventions in perceived clarity of values and overall congruence between values and choices. Amongst those choosing HRT, there was a trend in those exposed to the graphic weigh-scale exercise to have better congruence between values and choices compared to implicit values clarification (P = 0.06). CONCLUSION: The use of the graphic weigh-scale exercise in a decision aid conveys no overall short-term benefit. Further study is needed to specifically determine effects in those changing the status quo and on the quality of patient-practitioner communication and persistence with decisions.

  11. Efficacy of Tailored Exercise Therapy on Physical Functioning in Patients With Knee Osteoarthritis and Comorbidity: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    de Rooij, Mariëtte; van der Leeden, Marike; Cheung, John; van der Esch, Martin; Häkkinen, Arja; Haverkamp, Daniël; Roorda, Leo D; Twisk, Jos; Vollebregt, Joke; Lems, Willem F; Dekker, Joost

    2017-06-01

    To evaluate the efficacy on physical functioning and safety of tailored exercise therapy in patients with knee osteoarthritis (OA) and comorbidities. In a randomized controlled trial, 126 participants were included with a clinical diagnosis of knee OA and at least 1 of the following target comorbidities: coronary disease, heart failure, type 2 diabetes mellitus, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, or obesity (body mass index ≥30 kg/m(2) ), with severity score ≥2 on the Cumulative Illness Rating Scale. The intervention group received a 20-week, individualized, comorbidity-adapted exercise program consisting of aerobic and strength training and training of daily activities. The control group received their current medical care for knee OA and were placed on a waiting list for exercise therapy. Primary outcome measures were the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index, subscale physical functioning (WOMAC-pf), and the 6-minute walk test (6MWT). Measurements were performed at baseline, after 20 weeks (directly posttreatment), and at 3 months posttreatment. Statistically significant physical functioning differences over time were found between the intervention and control group (WOMAC: B = -7.43 [95% confidence interval (95% CI) -9.99, -4.87], P < 0.001; and 6MWT: B = 34.16 [95% CI 17.68, 50.64], P < 0.001) in favor of the intervention group. At 3 months followup, the mean improvements in the intervention group were 33% on the WOMAC scale and 15% on the 6MWT. These improvements are of clinical relevance. No serious adverse events occurred during the intervention. This is the first study showing that tailored exercise therapy is efficacious in improving physical functioning and safe in patients with knee OA and severe comorbidities. © 2016, American College of Rheumatology.

  12. Both aerobic exercise and cognitive-behavioral therapy reduce chronic fatigue in FSHD: an RCT.

    PubMed

    Voet, Nicoline; Bleijenberg, Gijs; Hendriks, Jan; de Groot, Imelda; Padberg, George; van Engelen, Baziel; Geurts, Alexander

    2014-11-18

    To investigate the effect of aerobic exercise training (AET) and cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) on chronic fatigue in patients with facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD). We performed a multicenter, assessor-blinded, randomized clinical trial (RCT). Fifty-seven patients with FSHD type 1 with severe chronic fatigue were randomly allocated to AET, CBT, or usual care (UC). Outcomes were assessed before treatment, following 16 weeks of intervention, and after a 12-week follow-up. A linear mixed model for repeated measurements was used to study the estimated group differences. Following treatment, both the AET (28 participants) and CBT (25 participants) intervention groups had less fatigue relative to the UC group (24 participants), with a difference of -9.1 for AET (95% confidence interval [CI] -12.4 to -5.8) and -13.3 for CBT (95% CI -16.5 to -10.2). These beneficial effects lasted through follow-up, with a difference of -8.2 for AET (95% CI -12.4 to -5.8) and -10.2 for CBT (95% CI -14.0 to -6.3). The patients who received CBT had an increase in registered and experienced physical activity, sleep quality, and social participation. The patients who received AET had an increase in registered physical activity only. The increase in registered physical activity in both groups and the improvement in social participation following CBT were still present at follow-up. This RCT shows that AET and CBT can ameliorate chronic fatigue in patients with FSHD. This study provides Class III evidence that, in patients with FSHD type 1 and severe chronic fatigue, AET or CBT reduces the severity of chronic fatigue. © 2014 American Academy of Neurology.

  13. Combined exercise and cognitive behavioral therapy improves outcomes in patients with heart failure

    PubMed Central

    Gary, Rebecca A.; Dunbar, Sandra B.; Higgins, Melinda K.; Musselman, Dominique L.; Smith, Andrew L.

    2014-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study is to compare the effectiveness of a combined 12-week home-based exercise (EX)/cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) program (n=18) with CBT alone (n=19), EX alone (n=20), and with usual care (UC, n=17) in stable New York Heart Association Class II to III heart failure (HF) patients diagnosed with depression. Methods Depressive symptom severity [Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (HAM-D)], physical function [6-min walk test (6MWT)], and health-related quality of life (HRQOL) (Minnesota Living with Heart Failure Questionnaire) were evaluated at baseline (T1), after the 12-week intervention/control (T2), and following a 3-month telephone follow-up (T3). A repeated measures analysis of variance was used to determine group differences. Depression severity was dichotomized as minor (HAM-D, 11–14) and moderate-to-major depression (HAM-D, ≥15), and group intervention and control responses were also evaluated on that basis. Results The greatest reduction in HAM-D scores over time occurred in the EX/CBT group (−10.4) followed by CBT (−9.6), EX (−7.3), and UC (−6.2), but none were statistically significant. The combined group showed a significant increase in 6-min walk distance at 24 weeks (F=13.5, P<.001). Among all groups with moderate-to-major depression, only those in CBT/EX had sustained lower HAM-D scores at 12 and 24 weeks, 6MWT distances were significantly greater at 12 (P=.018) and 24 (P=.013) weeks, and the greatest improvement in HRQOL also occurred. Conclusions Interventions designed to improve both physical and psychological symptoms may provide the best method for optimizing functioning and enhancing HRQOL in patients with HF. PMID:20624510

  14. Supervised exercise therapy for intermittent claudication is increasingly endorsed by Dutch vascular surgeons.

    PubMed

    Hageman, David; Lauret, Gert-Jan; Gommans, Lindy N M; Koelemay, Mark J W; van Sambeek, Marc R H M; Scheltinga, Marc R M; Teijink, Joep A W

    2017-09-08

    Although supervised exercise therapy (SET) is generally accepted as an effective noninvasive treatment for intermittent claudication (IC), Dutch vascular surgeons were initially somewhat hesitant as reported by a 2011 questionnaire study. Later on, a nationwide multidisciplinary network for SET was introduced in the Netherlands. The aim of this questionnaire study was to determine possible trends in conceptions among Dutch vascular surgeons regarding the prescription of SET. In the year of 2015, Dutch vascular surgeons, fellows and senior residents were asked to complete a 26-item questionnaire including issues that were considered relevant for prescribing SET such as patient selection criteria and comorbidity. Outcome was compared to the 2011 survey. Data of 124 respondents (82% males; mean age 46 years; 64% response rate) were analyzed. SET referral rate of new IC patients was not different over time (2015: 81% vs. 2011: 75%; P = 0.295). However, respondents were more willing to prescribe SET in IC patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (2015: 86% vs. 2011: 69%; P = 0.002). Nevertheless, a smaller portion of respondents found that SET was also indicated for aortoiliac disease (2015: 63% vs. 2011: 76%; P = 0.049). Insufficient health insurance coverage and/or personal financial resources were the most important presumed barriers preventing patients from initiating SET (80% of respondents). Moreover, 94% of respondents judged that SET should be fully reimbursed by all Dutch basic health insurances. The concept of SET for IC is nowadays generally embraced by the vast majority of Dutch vascular surgeons. SET may have gained in popularity in IC patients with cardiopulmonary comorbidity. However, SET remains underutilized for aortoiliac disease. Reimbursement is considered crucial for a successful SET implementation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. [Inpatient multimodal pain therapy : Additive value of neuromuscular core stability exercises for chronic back pain].

    PubMed

    Giesche, F; Streicher, H; Maiwald, M; Wagner, P

    2017-04-01

    The medical and healthcare economic burden caused by chronic lumbar back pain (CLBP) requires the use of interdisciplinary treatment approaches. The present study aimed to evaluate whether the effectiveness of inpatient multimodal pain therapy (MPT, operations and procedures (OPS) coding 8-918.02), can be increased by implementing additional neuromuscular core stability exercises (NCSE). As part of a prospective controlled study, subjects with CLBP (n = 48, 17 males, 58.2 ± 11.7 years) were allocated to one of two groups. One group received standard care (SC, n =23) encompassing manual, pharmacological and psychological therapy in addition to passive physiotherapeutic applications. The intervention group (IG, n =25) additionally completed NCSE. On the day of admission and on discharge as well as 1 and 6 weeks after inpatient care, pain intensity (numeric rating scale), pain-related routine daily functions (Oswestry disability index), well-being (SF-12 Health Survey) and motor function parameters (trunk strength, endurance and postural control) were assessed. Data analysis was performed using statistical inference methods. In addition, effect sizes (Cohen's d) of intergroup differences were calculated. Both groups showed significant reductions in pain intensity (p < 0.05, d > 0.6) at all measurement points (MP). Physical well-being and disability (p < 0.05, d > 0.6) were improved 1 week after discharge in the intervention group only. Overall, no systematic differences between groups were detected (p > 0.05). In relation to the motor outcomes, no significant changes over time nor between groups were verified (p > 0.05). Despite the use of an additional NCSE, no significant added value in individuals with CLBP could be detected, although a systematic pre-post effect in daily functions and physical well-being (one week after discharge) was observed for the IG only. Therefore, on the basis of the study results, the implementation of additional NCSE into

  16. Effects of photobiomodulation therapy, pharmacological therapy, and physical exercise as single and/or combined treatment on the inflammatory response induced by experimental osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Tomazoni, Shaiane Silva; Leal-Junior, Ernesto Cesar Pinto; Pallotta, Rodney Capp; Teixeira, Simone; de Almeida, Patricia; Lopes-Martins, Rodrigo Álvaro Brandão

    2017-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) triggers increased levels of inflammatory markers, including prostaglandin (PG) E2 and proinflammatory cytokines. The elevation of cytokine levels is closely associated with increased articular tissue degeneration. Thus, the use of combination therapies may presumably be able to enhance the effects on the modulation of inflammatory markers. The present study aimed to evaluate and compare the effects of photobiomodulation therapy (PBMT), physical exercise, and topical nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) use on the inflammatory process after they were applied either alone or in different combinations. OA was induced by intra-articular papain injection in the knee of rats. After 21 days, the animals began treatment with a topical NSAID and/or with physical exercise and/or PBMT. Treatments were performed three times a week for eight consecutive weeks, totaling 24 therapy sessions. Analysis of real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) gene expression; interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) protein expression; and PGE2 levels by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was conducted. Our results showed that PBMT alone and Exerc + PBMT significantly reduced IL-1β gene expression (p < 0.05) while no treatment changed both IL-6 and TNF-α gene expression. Treatment with NSAID alone, PBMT alone, Exerc + PBMT, and NSAID + PBMT reduced IL-1β protein expression (p < 0.05). All therapies significantly reduced IL-6 and TNF-α protein expression (p < 0.05) compared with the OA group. Similarly, all therapies, except Exerc, reduced the levels of PGE2 (p < 0.05) compared with the OA group. The results from the present study indicate that treatment with PBMT is more effective in modulating the inflammatory process underlying OA when compared with the other therapies tested.

  17. Effects of horseback riding exercise therapy on background electroencephalograms of elderly people

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Seon-Rye; Cho, Sung-Hyoun; Kim, Jin-Woo; Lee, Hyo-Cheol; Brienen, Marten; Cho, Byung-Jun

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] This study investigated the effect of horseback riding exercise on the background electroencephalograms of elderly people who performed horseback riding for 8 weeks. [Subjects] Twenty elderly people were divided into the horseback riding exercise and control group (n = 10 each). [Methods] The exercise was performed for 15 minutes, 3 times per week for 8 weeks. Electroencephalograms were analyzed. Post-exercise evaluation was performed after 8 weeks. [Results] After the horseback riding exercise, the relative slower alpha power index was active in the T3 and P4 domains but suppressed in the Fp1, Fp2, F3, F4, T4, and P3 domains. Moreover, the relative faster alpha power index was active in all domains of the horseback riding exercise group but was suppressed in all domains of the control group. There was a significant difference between groups in the F3 domain. [Conclusion] The alpha power index increased significantly after horseback riding exercise, suggesting the exercise improved background electroencephalogram. PMID:26311985

  18. Effects of Music Therapy on Endothelial Function in Patients With Coronary Artery Disease Participating in Aerobic Exercise Therapy.

    PubMed

    Deljanin Ilic, Marina; Pavlovic, Radmila F; Kocic, Gordana; Simonovic, Dejan; Lazarevic, Gordana

    2017-02-27

    Context • Pleasant music that evokes a positive emotional response may activate brain pathways of the insular cortex, central nucleus of the amygdala, and lateral hypothalamus, which are involved in the integration of emotional and ambient sensory input, with corresponding autonomic responses. Exercise training can improve endothelium-dependent vasodilatation, both in epicardial coronary vessels and in resistance vessels, for patients with coronary heart disease. Objective • The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effects on endothelial function when patients with stable coronary artery disease (CAD) listened to their favorite music. Design • The study was a randomized controlled trial. Setting • The study occurred at the Institute of Cardiology, Niska Banja, Faculty of Medicine, University of Nis (Nis, Serbia). Participants • Participants were 74 patients with stable CAD. Intervention • Participants were randomly assigned to 1 of 3 groups: (1) exercise training only (T) group (n = 33), (2) listening to music and exercise training (MT) group (n = 31), and listening to music only (M) group (n = 10). Participants in the T and MT groups received usual medical care and underwent 3 wk of supervised aerobic exercise training. In addition to the exercise training, participants in the MT group listened to their favorite music for 1.5 h every day. Participants in the M group received the usual medical care and listened to their favorite music for 1.5 h every day. Outcome Measures • At baseline and postintervention, outcomes were assessed through measurement of the changes in circulating blood markers of endothelial function-the stable end product of nitric oxide (NOx), asymmetric dimethylarginine, symmetric dimethylarginine, and xanthine oxidase-and through the results of submaximal or symptom-limited exercise test. Results • After 3 wk, the NOx significantly increased in both in MT and T groups, with P < .001 and P < .01, respectively. The level of

  19. Use of diet, nutritional supplements and exercise in HIV-infected patients receiving combination antiretroviral therapies: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Leyes, Pere; Martínez, Esteban; Forga, Maria de Talló

    2008-01-01

    The use of combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) has improved the prognosis of HIV infection, but it has also been linked to a spectrum of body composition changes and metabolic alterations known as the lipodystrophy syndrome. Nutritional status could influence body composition changes. We performed a systematic search of published peer-reviewed data on the effects of diet, nutrition support and exercise on body composition and metabolic complications in patients receiving cART. Few controlled studies, most of them with small sample size, were found. Oral nutritional support increases protein and energy intake, and results in body weight and fat mass gains. Resistance exercise, with or without an aerobic component, increases lean mass and can improve insulin resistance. Low-fat diets or exercise can result in loss of fat mass, and they should be used with caution in subjects with lipoatrophy. Nutritional support and exercise result in small but significant body composition changes and can be used as complementary interventions. There is a need for further research on nutritional interventions in HIV-infected patients receiving cART.

  20. Effect of aerobic and resistance exercise training on late-onset Pompe disease patients receiving enzyme replacement therapy.

    PubMed

    Terzis, Gerasimos; Dimopoulos, Filippos; Papadimas, George K; Papadopoulos, Constantinos; Spengos, Konstantinos; Fatouros, Ioannis; Kavouras, Stavros A; Manta, Panagiota

    2011-11-01

    Pompe disease is a rare autosomal recessive disorder characterized by the deficiency of acid α-glycosidase resulting in lysosomal accumulation of glycogen. The late-onset disease form is characterized by progressive skeletal and respiratory muscle dysfunction. In addition to the recently introduced enzyme replacement therapy (ERT), treatments such as protein-enriched diet and exercise training have been proposed, although little is known about their effectiveness on the physical condition of such patients. Aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of exercise training on muscular strength and body composition in five patients with late-onset Pompe disease receiving ERT. All subjects followed a 20 week lasting program of supervised aerobic and progressive resistance exercise training. Before and after the training period, body composition was determined with dual X-ray absorptiometry and isometric muscular strength was measured with a specialized load transducer. Functional capacity was assessed using the 6-min shuttle walk test. A significant increase in muscular strength (15-50% at various body parts, p<0.05) and 6-minute walking distance (203.8 ± 177 m before vs. 248.2 ± 184 m after, p<0.01) was observed after training, whereas total and lower extremities lean body mass did not change significantly. These results suggest that exercise training has a positive effect on muscular strength and functional capacity in patients on ERT with late-onset Pompe disease.

  1. Effectiveness of Aerobic Exercise as an Augmentation Therapy for Inpatients with Major Depressive Disorder: A Preliminary Randomized Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Shachar-Malach, Tal; Cooper Kazaz, Rena; Constantini, Naama; Lifschytz, Tzuri; Lerer, Bernard

    2015-01-01

    Physical exercise has been shown to reduce depressive symptoms when used in combination with antidepressant medication. We report a randomized controlled trial of aerobic exercise compared to stretching as an augmentation strategy for hospitalized patients with major depression. Male or female patients, 18-80 years, diagnosed with a Major Depressive Episode, were randomly assigned to three weeks of augmentation therapy with aerobic (n=6) or stretching exercise (n=6). Depression was rated, at several time points using the 21-item Hamilton Depression Scale (HAM-D), Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) and other scales. According to the HAM-D, there were four (out of six) responders in the aerobic group, two of whom achieved remission, and none in the stretching group. According to the BDI, there were two responders in the aerobic group who were also remitters and none in the stretching group. The results of this small study suggest that aerobic exercise significantly improves treatment outcome when added to antidepressant medication. However, due to the small sample size the results must be regarded as preliminary and further studies are needed to confirm the findings.

  2. Exercise overcome adverse effects among prostate cancer patients receiving androgen deprivation therapy: An update meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Yunfeng, Gao; Weiyang, He; Xueyang, He; Yilong, Huang; Xin, Gou

    2017-07-01

    Prostate cancer (PCa) patients initiating androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) are suffering from adverse effects; exercise has been proposed as a treatment to relieve adverse effects of ADT, available meta-analysis has proved exercise improves quality of life, and therapy caused fatigue; recently, some high-quality trials have been conducted in order to get more assessment; we conduct an updated meta-analysis to evaluate feasibility that exercise relieves adverse effects in PCa patients initiating ADT. A systematic article search was performed from Cochrane Library, MEDLINE, EMBASE, and PubMed databases up to March 10, 2017. Outcomes included changes in body composition, physical function, bone health and cardiometabolic changes. We conduct subgroup analysis to analyze the duration and type of exercise correlated with the effect and calculated using standard mean difference (SMD) and corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CI). Fifteen studies involving 1135 patients were included in our meta-analysis, and significant positive effects were found in body strength (leg press (SMD: 0.78 (95%CI: 0.57-0.99, P <.00001, I = 0%)), chest press (SMD: 0.71 (95%CI: 0.50-0.92, P <.00001, I = 0%)), exercise tolerance (VO2 peak SMD: 0.35 (95%CI: 0.04-0.66, P = .03, I = 0%) in 6 months and SMD: 0.59 (95%CI: 0.16-1.03, P = .007, I = 0% over 6 months)), fatigue (SMD: 0.84 (95%CI: -1.43 to 3.10, P = .85, I = 51%) in 6 months and SMD: -9.3 (95%CI: -16.22 to -2.39, P = .0030, I = 49%) over 6 months)), ADT-caused obesity (body mass index SMD: -0.33 (95%CI: -0.55 to -0.12, P = .002, I = 38% in 6 months and SMD: -0.59 95%CI: -1.02 to 0.17, P = .006, I = 25% over 6 months)), and sex function (SMD: 0.66 (95%CI: 0.35-0.97, P <.00001, I = 2%). There were no evidence of benefit for cardiometabolic changes and bone health. No systematic difference was observed between resistance exercise training (RET) and aerobic exercise

  3. Do behaviour-change techniques contribute to the effectiveness of exercise therapy in patients with intermittent claudication? A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Galea, M N; Weinman, J A; White, C; Bearne, L M

    2013-07-01

    This systematic narrative review of randomised controlled trials (RCTs) identifies and evaluates the efficacy of behaviour-change techniques explicitly aimed at walking in individuals with intermittent claudication. An electronic database search was conducted up to December 2012. RCTs were included comparing interventions incorporating behaviour-change techniques with usual care, walking advice or exercise therapy for increasing walking in people with intermittent claudication. Studies were evaluated using the Cochrane Collaboration risk of bias tool. The primary outcome variable was maximal walking ability at least 3 months after the start of an intervention. Secondary outcome variables included pain-free walking ability, self-report walking ability and daily walking activity. A total of 3,575 records were retrieved. Of these, six RCTs met the inclusion criteria. As a result of substantial heterogeneity between studies, no meta-analysis was conducted. Overall, 11 behaviour-change techniques were identified; barrier identification with problem solving, self-monitoring and feedback on performance were most frequently reported. There was limited high-quality evidence and findings were inconclusive regarding the utility of behaviour-change techniques for improving walking in people with intermittent claudication. Rigorous, fully powered trials are required that control for exercise dosage and supervision in order to isolate the effect of behaviour-change techniques alongside exercise therapy. Copyright © 2013 European Society for Vascular Surgery. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. The Effects of Exercise Therapy on CVD Risk Factors in Women

    PubMed Central

    Hur, Sun; Kim, Seon-Rye

    2014-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to search for the association of Type D personality and CVD risk factors through comparison of the association of exercise participation with CVD risk factors in women. [Subjects] The research subjects were randomly assigned to four groups: Type D+Exercise (n=12), Type D+non-exercise (n=12), non-Type D+Exercise (n=12), and non-Type D+non-exercise (n=10). The study consisted of 46 participants. [Methods] An aerobic exercise program and meditation were conducted in parallel for 10 months. Stretching was performed for 10 min as a warm-up, and then walking and running on a treadmill at 60 to 70% of HRmax were performed for 40 min three times a week. Blood samples were processed according to standard laboratory procedures. The concentrations of TG and HDL cholesterol were determined enzymatically using a clinical chemistry analyzer (Hitachi High-Technologies Corporation, Tokyo, Japan). [Results] The weight, percentage of body fat, waist circumference, triglyceride concentration, HDL cholesterol concentration, systolic blood pressure, and diastolic blood pressure showed a significant difference between measurement times in the exercise groups. [Conclusion] In conclusion, there were significant differences between groups in terms of cardiovascular disease risk factors. PMID:25276017

  5. Cardiac regeneration and cellular therapy: is there a benefit of exercise?

    PubMed

    Figueiredo, P A; Appell Coriolano, H-J; Duarte, J A

    2014-03-01

    Cardiovascular diseases (CVD) are a global epidemic in developed countries. Cumulative evidence suggests that myocyte formation is preserved during postnatal life, in adulthood or senescence, suggesting the existence of a growth reserve of the heart throughout lifespan. Several medical therapeutic approaches to CVD have considerably improved the clinical outcome for patients. Intense interest has been focused on regenerative medicine as an emerging strategy for CVD. Cellular therapeutic approaches have been proposed for enhancing survival and propagation of stem cells in myocardium, leading to cardiac cellular repair. Strong epidemiological and clinical data exists concerning the impact of regular physical exercise on cardiovascular health. Several mechanisms of acute and chronic exercise-induced cardiovascular adaptations to exercise have been presented, considering primary and secondary prevention of CVD. In this context, exercise-related improvements in the function and regeneration of the cardiovascular system may be associated with the exercise-induced activation, mobilization, differentiation, and homing of stem and progenitor cells. In this review several topics will be addressed concerning the relation between exercise, recruitment and biological activity of blood-circulating progenitor cells and resident cardiac stem cells. We hypothesize that exercise-induced stem cell activation may enhance overall heart function and improve the efficacy of cardiac cellular therapeutic protocols. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  6. The Effects of Exercise Therapy on CVD Risk Factors in Women.

    PubMed

    Hur, Sun; Kim, Seon-Rye

    2014-09-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to search for the association of Type D personality and CVD risk factors through comparison of the association of exercise participation with CVD risk factors in women. [Subjects] The research subjects were randomly assigned to four groups: Type D+Exercise (n=12), Type D+non-exercise (n=12), non-Type D+Exercise (n=12), and non-Type D+non-exercise (n=10). The study consisted of 46 participants. [Methods] An aerobic exercise program and meditation were conducted in parallel for 10 months. Stretching was performed for 10 min as a warm-up, and then walking and running on a treadmill at 60 to 70% of HRmax were performed for 40 min three times a week. Blood samples were processed according to standard laboratory procedures. The concentrations of TG and HDL cholesterol were determined enzymatically using a clinical chemistry analyzer (Hitachi High-Technologies Corporation, Tokyo, Japan). [Results] The weight, percentage of body fat, waist circumference, triglyceride concentration, HDL cholesterol concentration, systolic blood pressure, and diastolic blood pressure showed a significant difference between measurement times in the exercise groups. [Conclusion] In conclusion, there were significant differences between groups in terms of cardiovascular disease risk factors.

  7. Relation of Exercise Capacity to Risk of Development of Diabetes in Patients on Statin Therapy (the Henry Ford Exercise Testing Project).

    PubMed

    Shaya, Gabriel E; Juraschek, Stephen P; Feldman, David I; Brawner, Clinton A; Ehrman, Jonathan K; Keteyian, Steven J; Al-Mallah, Mouaz H; Blaha, Michael J

    2017-09-01

    High exercise capacity (EC) has been associated with a lower risk of incident diabetes, whereas statin therapy has been associated with a higher risk. We sought to investigate whether the association between EC and diabetes risk is modified by statin therapy. This retrospective cohort study included 47,337 patients without diabetes or coronary artery disease at baseline (age 53 ± 13 years, 48% women, 66% white) who underwent clinical treadmill stress testing within the Henry Ford Health System from January 1, 1991, to May 31, 2009. The patients were stratified by baseline statin use and estimated peak METs achieved during exercise testing. Hazard ratios for incident diabetes were calculated using Cox proportional hazards models adjusted for demographic characteristics, co-morbidities, pertinent medications, and stress test indication. We observed 6,921 new diabetes cases (14.6%) over a median follow-up period of 5.1 years (interquartile interval of 2.6 to 8.2 years). Compared with the statin group, the no-statin group achieved higher mean METs (8.9 ± 2.7 vs 9.6 ± 3.0, respectively; p <0.001). After adjustment for covariates, a higher EC was associated with a lower risk of incident diabetes, irrespective of statin use (p-interaction = 0.15). Each 1-MET increment was associated with an 8%, 8%, and 6% relative risk reduction in the total cohort, the no-statin, and the statin groups, respectively (95% confidence interval, 0.91 to 0.93, 0.91 to 0.93, and 0.91 to 0.96, respectively; p <0.001 for all). We conclude that a higher EC is associated with a lower risk of incident diabetes regardless of statin use. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Exercise-induced pulmonary artery hypertension in a patient with compensated cardiac disease: hemodynamic and functional response to sildenafil therapy.

    PubMed

    Nikolaidis, Lazaros; Memon, Nabeel; O'Murchu, Brian

    2015-02-01

    We describe the case of a 54-year-old man who presented with exertional dyspnea and fatigue that had worsened over the preceding 2 years, despite a normally functioning bioprosthetic aortic valve and stable, mild left ventricular dysfunction (left ventricular ejection fraction, 0.45). His symptoms could not be explained by physical examination, an extensive biochemical profile, or multiple cardiac and pulmonary investigations. However, abnormal cardiopulmonary exercise test results and a right heart catheterization-combined with the use of a symptom-limited, bedside bicycle ergometer-revealed that the patient's exercise-induced pulmonary artery hypertension was out of proportion to his compensated left heart disease. A trial of sildenafil therapy resulted in objective improvements in hemodynamic values and functional class.

  9. Development of virtual reality exercise of hand motion assist robot for rehabilitation therapy by patient self-motion control.

    PubMed

    Ueki, Satoshi; Nishimoto, Yutaka; Abe, Motoyuki; Kawasaki, Haruhisa; Ito, Satoshi; Ishigure, Yasuhiko; Mizumoto, Jun; Ojika, Takeo

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents a virtual reality-enhanced hand rehabilitation support system with a symmetric master-slave motion assistant for independent rehabilitation therapies. Our aim is to provide fine motion exercise for a hand and fingers, which allows the impaired hand of a patient to be driven by his or her healthy hand on the opposite side. Since most disabilities caused by cerebral vascular accidents or bone fractures are hemiplegic, we adopted a symmetric master-slave motion assistant system in which the impaired hand is driven by the healthy hand on the opposite side. A VR environment displaying an effective exercise was created in consideration of system's characteristic. To verify the effectiveness of this system, a clinical test was executed by applying to six patients.

  10. Exercise therapy for office workers with nonspecific neck pain: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Sihawong, Rattaporn; Janwantanakul, Prawit; Sitthipornvorakul, Ekalak; Pensri, Praneet

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of various types of exercise for prevention and cure of nonspecific neck pain in office workers. Publications between 1980 and April 2010 were systematically searched in various databases (PubMed, CINAHL Plus with full text, The Cochrane Library, Science Direct, PEDro, ProQuest, PsycNet, and Scopus). The following key words were used: neck pain, cervical pain, exercise, strengthening, stretching, endurance, office workers, visual display unit, visual display terminal, and computer users. A hand search of relevant journals was also carried out. Relevant randomized controlled trials were retrieved and assessed for methodological quality by 2 independent reviewers. The strength of the evidence was based on methodological quality and consistency of the results. Nine randomized controlled trials were included in this review, of which 6 were rated as high-quality studies. No exercise type was identified as being effective in the prevention of nonspecific neck pain in office workers. Strong evidence was found for the effectiveness of muscle strengthening and endurance exercises in treating neck pain. Moderate evidence supported the use of muscle endurance exercise in reducing disability attributed to neck pain. Literature investigating the efficacy of exercise in office workers with nonspecific neck pain was heterogeneous. Within the limitations, for treatment of neck pain, either muscle strengthening or endurance exercise is recommended, whereas for reduction of pain-related disability, muscle endurance exercise is suggested. Further research is needed before any firm conclusions regarding the most effective exercise programs for office workers can be reached. Copyright © 2011 National University of Health Sciences. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Effect of Beta-Blocker Therapy, Maximal Heart Rate, and Exercise Capacity During Stress Testing on Long-Term Survival (from The Henry Ford Exercise Testing Project).

    PubMed

    Hung, Rupert K; Al-Mallah, Mouaz H; Whelton, Seamus P; Michos, Erin D; Blumenthal, Roger S; Ehrman, Jonathan K; Brawner, Clinton A; Keteyian, Steven J; Blaha, Michael J

    2016-12-01

    Whether lower heart rate thresholds (defined as the percentage of age-predicted maximal heart rate achieved, or ppMHR) should be used to determine chronotropic incompetence in patients on beta-blocker therapy (BBT) remains unclear. In this retrospective cohort study, we analyzed 64,549 adults without congestive heart failure or atrial fibrillation (54 ± 13 years old, 46% women, 29% black) who underwent clinician-referred exercise stress testing at a single health care system in Detroit, Michigan from 1991 to 2009, with median follow-up of 10.6 years for all-cause mortality (interquartile range 7.7 to 14.7 years). Using Cox regression models, we assessed the effect of BBT, ppMHR, and estimated exercise capacity on mortality, with adjustment for demographic data, medical history, pertinent medications, and propensity to be on BBT. There were 9,259 deaths during follow-up. BBT was associated with an 8% lower adjusted achieved ppMHR (91% in no BBT vs 83% in BBT). ppMHR was inversely associated with all-cause mortality but with significant attenuation by BBT (per 10% ppMHR HR: no BBT: 0.80 [0.78 to 0.82] vs BBT: 0.89 [0.87 to 0.92]). Patients on BBT who achieved 65% ppMHR had a similar adjusted mortality rate as those not on BBT who achieved 85% ppMHR (p >0.05). Estimated exercise capacity further attenuated the prognostic value of ppMHR (per-10%-ppMHR HR: no BBT: 0.88 [0.86 to 0.90] vs BBT: 0.95 [0.93 to 0.98]). In conclusion, the prognostic value of ppMHR was significantly attenuated by BBT. For patients on BBT, a lower threshold of 65% ppMHR may be considered for determining worsened prognosis. Estimated exercise capacity further diminished the prognostic value of ppMHR particularly in patients on BBT. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Exercise improves quality of life in androgen deprivation therapy-treated prostate cancer: systematic review of randomised controlled trials.

    PubMed

    Teleni, Laisa; Chan, Raymond J; Chan, Alexandre; Isenring, Elisabeth A; Vela, Ian; Inder, Warrick J; McCarthy, Alexandra L

    2016-02-01

    Men receiving androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) for prostate cancer (PCa) are likely to develop metabolic conditions such as diabetes, cardiovascular disease, abdominal obesity and osteoporosis. Other treatment-related side effects adversely influence quality of life (QoL) including vasomotor distress, depression, anxiety, mood swings, poor sleep quality and compromised sexual function. The objective of this study was to systematically review the nature and effects of dietary and exercise interventions on QoL, androgen deprivation symptoms and metabolic risk factors in men with PCa undergoing ADT. An electronic search of CINAHL, CENTRAL, Medline, PsychINFO and reference lists was performed to identify peer-reviewed articles published between January 2004 and December 2014 in English. Eligible study designs included randomised controlled trials (RCTs) with pre- and post-intervention data. Data extraction and assessment of methodological quality with the Cochrane approach was conducted by two independent reviewers. Seven exercise studies were identified. Exercise significantly improved QoL, but showed no effect on metabolic risk factors (weight, waist circumference, lean or fat mass, blood pressure and lipid profile). Two dietary studies were identified, both of which tested soy supplements. Soy supplementation did not improve any outcomes. No dietary counselling studies were identified. No studies evaluated androgen-deficiency symptoms (libido, erectile function, sleep quality, mood swings, depression, anxiety and bone mineral density). Evidence from RCTs indicates that exercise enhances health- and disease-specific QoL in men with PCa undergoing ADT. Further studies are required to evaluate the effect of exercise and dietary interventions on QoL, androgen deprivation symptoms and metabolic risk factors in this cohort. © 2016 Society for Endocrinology.

  13. [Physical activity and exercise training in the prevention and therapy of type 2 diabetes mellitus].

    PubMed

    Francesconi, Claudia; Lackinger, Christian; Weitgasser, Raimund; Haber, Paul; Niebauer, Josef

    2016-04-01

    Lifestyle in general (nutrition, exercise, smoking habits), besides the genetic predisposition, is known to be a strong predictor for the development of diabetes. Exercise in particular is not only useful in improving glycaemia by lowering insulin resistance and positively affect insulin secretion, but to reduce cardiovascular risk.To gain substantial health benefits a minimum of 150 min of moderate or vigorous intense aerobic physical activity and muscle strengthening activities per week are needed. The positive effect of training correlates directly with the amount of fitness gained and lasts only as long as the fitness level is sustained. The effect of exercise is independent of age and gender. It is reversible and reproducible.Based on the large evidence of exercise referral and prescription the Austrian Diabetes Associations aims to implement the position of a "physical activity adviser" in multi-professional diabetes care.

  14. Efficacy of exercise therapy in workers with rotator cuff tendinopathy: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Desmeules, François; Boudreault, Jennifer; Dionne, Clermont E; Frémont, Pierre; Lowry, Véronique; MacDermid, Joy C; Roy, Jean-Sébastien

    2016-09-30

    To perform a systematic review of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) on the efficacy of therapeutic exercises for workers suffering from rotator cuff (RC) tendinopathy. A literature search in four bibliographical databases (Pubmed, CINAHL, EMBASE, and PEDro) was conducted from inception up to February 2015. RCTs were included if participants were workers suffering from RC tendinopathy, the outcome measures included work-related outcomes, and at least one of the interventions under study included exercises. The methodological quality of the studies was evaluated with the Cochrane Risk of Bias Assessment tool. The mean methodological score of the ten included studies was 54.4%±17.2%. Types of workers included were often not defined, and work-related outcome measures were heterogeneous and often not validated. Three RCTs of moderate methodological quality concluded that exercises were superior to a placebo or no intervention in terms of function and return-to-work outcomes. No significant difference was found between surgery and exercises based on the results of two studies of low to moderate methodological quality. One study of low methodological quality, comparing a workplace-based exercise program focusing on the participants' work demands to an exercise program delivered in a clinical setting, concluded that the work-based intervention was superior in terms of function and return-to-work outcomes. There is low to moderate-grade evidence that therapeutic exercises provided in a clinical setting are an effective modality to treat workers suffering from RC tendinopathy and to promote return-to-work. Further high quality studies comparing different rehabilitation programs including exercises in different settings with defined workers populations are needed to draw firm conclusions on the optimal program to treat workers.

  15. Efficacy of exercise therapy in workers with rotator cuff tendinopathy: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Desmeules, François; Boudreault, Jennifer; Dionne, Clermont E.; Frémont, Pierre; Lowry, Véronique; MacDermid, Joy C.; Roy, Jean-Sébastien

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To perform a systematic review of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) on the efficacy of therapeutic exercises for workers suffering from rotator cuff (RC) tendinopathy. Methods: A literature search in four bibliographical databases (Pubmed, CINAHL, EMBASE, and PEDro) was conducted from inception up to February 2015. RCTs were included if participants were workers suffering from RC tendinopathy, the outcome measures included work-related outcomes, and at least one of the interventions under study included exercises. The methodological quality of the studies was evaluated with the Cochrane Risk of Bias Assessment tool. Results: The mean methodological score of the ten included studies was 54.4%±17.2%. Types of workers included were often not defined, and work-related outcome measures were heterogeneous and often not validated. Three RCTs of moderate methodological quality concluded that exercises were superior to a placebo or no intervention in terms of function and return-to-work outcomes. No significant difference was found between surgery and exercises based on the results of two studies of low to moderate methodological quality. One study of low methodological quality, comparing a workplace-based exercise program focusing on the participants' work demands to an exercise program delivered in a clinical setting, concluded that the work-based intervention was superior in terms of function and return-to-work outcomes. Conclusion: There is low to moderate-grade evidence that therapeutic exercises provided in a clinical setting are an effective modality to treat workers suffering from RC tendinopathy and to promote return-to-work. Further high quality studies comparing different rehabilitation programs including exercises in different settings with defined workers populations are needed to draw firm conclusions on the optimal program to treat workers. PMID:27488037

  16. Efficacy of beta-blocker therapy in symptomatic athletes with exercise-induced intra-ventricular gradients

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Upright exercise stress echocardiography (SE) induces significant intraventricular gradient (IVG) and systolic anterior motion (SAM) in a large proportion of symptomatic athletes, who may therefore benefit from a negative inotropic therapy. The purpose of the present study was to assess the effect of chronic oral β blocker therapy on the occurrence of exercise-induced IVG and mitral valve SAM, in symptomatic athletes. Methods We enrolled 35 symptomatic athletes (age = 23 ± 11 years) with IVG (>30 mmHg) during SE off therapy. All repeated SE on chronic oral beta-blocker therapy (atenolol up to 50 mg, bisoprolol up to 10 mg, or metoprolol up to 100 mg daily according to physician-driven choice). Results On therapy, there was during SE a reduction in IVG (35 off vs 17 on beta blocker, p < 0.01), decrease of IVG (102 ± 34 mmHg off vs 69 ± 24 mmHg on beta blocker, p < 0.01), peak heart rate (178 ± 15 bpm off vs 157 ± 9 bpm on beta blocker), SAM (24 off vs 9 on beta blocker, p < 0.001), symptoms during SE (17 off vs 2 on beta blocker p < 0.001), ST segment depression (13 off vs 2 on beta blocker, p < 0.001). Conclusions In athletes with positive screening on medical evaluation for sports practice and IVG on exertion, treatment with oral beta blockers improved symptoms in the large majority of patients. Symptomatic benefit was mirrored by objective evidence of improvement of echocardiographic signs of obstruction (IVG and SAM) and reduction of ischemia-like electrocardiographic changes. PMID:20813061

  17. Effects of exercise therapy on knee joint function and synovial fluid cytokine levels in patients with knee osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shao-Lan; Liu, Hong-Qi; Xu, Xiao-Zu; Zhi, Juan; Geng, Jiao-Jiao; Chen, Jin

    2013-01-01

    The aims of this study were to observe the effect of exercise therapy on the function of the knee joint and the levels of cytokines and cytokine-related genes, specifically tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), high sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) and matrix metalloproteinase-3 (MMP-3), in the synovial joints of patients with knee osteoarthritis (KOA) and to explore its mechanism of action. A total of 100 KOA patients were divided into a treatment group (n=50) and a control group (n=50) according to the order of admission. The patients in the treatment group were treated with diclofenac sodium combined with exercise therapy and the patients in the control group were treated with diclofenac sodium only. The function of the knee joint and the therapeutic efficacy was evaluated and the TNF-α, hs-CRP and MMP-3 levels in the synovial fluid were measured following 4 weeks of treatment. The results revealed that the knee joint index score and the TNF-α, hs-CRP and MMP-3 levels in the synovial fluid decreased significantly in the KOA patients of the two groups following treatment (P<0.05). Compared with the control group, the knee joint index score and the TNF-α, hs-CRP and MMP-3 levels in the synovial joints were lower and the therapeutic efficacy was increased in the patients of the treatment group (P<0.05). In brief, exercise therapy may decrease cytokine and cytokine-related gene levels in the synovial fluid and inhibit inflammatory factor-mediated cartilage degradation in KOA patients, thus, effectively improving the clinical symptoms of KOA.

  18. The Effect of Aquatic Exercise Therapy on Muscle Strength and Joint's Range of Motion in Hemophilia Patients.

    PubMed

    Kargarfard, Mehdi; Dehghadani, Mehdi; Ghias, Reza

    2013-01-01

    This study was to evaluate the effect of a period of aquatic exercise therapy on muscle strength and joints range of motion in hemophilia patients. This was a semiexperimental, pretest, post-test study with a control group. This semi-experimental study comprised twenty men suffering moderate hemophilia were selected by convenience sampling method from patients of a referral hospital. They were randomly assigned to intervention and control groups of equal number. The hemophilia patients who were referred to Sayedo-Shohada Hospital enrolled in this study. Twenty men suffering moderate hemophilia were selected using convenience sampling method and then divided randomly into intervention and control groups (10 patients in each group). Subjects of aquatic exercise therapy group underwent activity in water in three sessions (45-60 minutes) per week for 8 weeks, while the control group was only under follow-up and during this period did not experience any effective physical activity. The patients' muscle strength and joint range of motion were evaluated through standard laboratory tools, using an isokinetic dynamometer (Biodex, Systems III) and a standard goniometer in the beginning and at end of the study. Finally, data was analyzed using analysis of covariance (ANCOVA). The strength of the muscles around the knee joint (to perform extension and flexion movements) increased significantly in the case group while the control group experienced a significant reduction of strength in left leg, but in right leg remarkable change was observed. Range of motion in all joints was improved in the case group, while the control group did not improve significantly. The results showed that aquatic exercise therapy can be a useful method to improve joints' strength and range of motion in hemophilia patients in order to improve their daily functioning and quality of life.

  19. Interleukin-6 responses to water immersion therapy after acute exercise heat stress: a pilot investigation.

    PubMed

    Lee, Elaine C; Watson, Greig; Casa, Douglas; Armstrong, Lawrence E; Kraemer, William; Vingren, Jakob L; Spiering, Barry A; Maresh, Carl M

    2012-01-01

    Cold-water immersion is the criterion standard for treatment of exertional heat illness. Cryotherapy and water immersion also have been explored as ergogenic or recovery aids. The kinetics of inflammatory markers, such as interleukin-6 (IL-6), during cold-water immersion have not been characterized. To characterize serum IL-6 responses to water immersion at 2 temperatures and, therefore, to initiate further research into the multidimensional benefits of immersion and the evidence-based selection of specific, optimal immersion conditions by athletic trainers. Controlled laboratory study. Human performance laboratory Patients or Other Participants: Eight college-aged men (age = 22 ± 3 years, height = 1.76 ± 0.08 m, mass = 77.14 ± 9.77 kg, body fat = 10% ± 3%, and maximal oxygen consumption = 50.48 ± 4.75 mL·kg(-1) min(-1)). Participants were assigned randomly to receive either cold (11.70°C ± 2.02°C, n = 4) or warm (23.50°C ± 1.00°C, n = 4) water-bath conditions after exercise in the heat (temperature = 37°C, relative humidity = 52%) for 90 minutes or until volitional cessation. Whole-body cooling rates were greater in the cold water-bath condition for the first 6 minutes of water immersion, but during the 90-minute, postexercise recovery, participants in the warm and cold water-bath conditions experienced similar overall whole-body cooling. Heart rate responses were similar for both groups. Participants in the cold water-bath condition experienced an overall slight increase (30.54% ± 77.37%) in IL-6 concentration, and participants in the warm water-bath condition experienced an overall decrease (-69.76% ± 15.23%). We have provided seed evidence that cold-water immersion is related to subtle IL-6 increases from postexercise values and that warmer water-bath temperatures might dampen this increase. Further research will elucidate any anti-inflammatory benefit associated with water-immersion treatment and possible multidimensional uses of cooling

  20. Exercise therapy in primary biliary cirrhosis: the importance of moving while sitting on a surgical waiting list—a case study

    PubMed Central

    Hallsworth, Kate; Jopson, Laura; Jones, David E; Trenell, Michael I

    2016-01-01

    Background It is being increasingly recognised that reduced cardiorespiratory fitness is associated with poorer outcomes after major surgery. Exercise limitation and reduced aerobic capacity are common in people with end-stage liver disease. There is limited evidence about the role of exercise therapy in the management of primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) and no studies have looked at the effect of exercise in people with PBC who are awaiting liver transplantation. This case study is the first to report that personalised exercise therapy improves cardiorespiratory fitness in a patient with PBC without worsening symptoms of severe fatigue. Methods Cardiopulmonary exercise testing was used to assess cardiorespiratory fitness in a patient with end-stage PBC prior to listing for transplantation. A personalised exercise programme was designed to improve cardiorespiratory fitness while the patient was on the transplant waiting list. Results Anaerobic threshold, VO2PEAK and maximum workload all improved with regular exercise. Fatigue levels remained unaltered. Conclusions This patient tolerated and adhered to a personalised exercise programme for a prolonged period of time while awaiting surgery despite significant fatigue and disease burden. Liver transplantation was successfully completed and this woman remains well over 2 years post-surgery. PMID:27429732

  1. Exercise therapy in oncology rehabilitation in Australia: A mixed-methods study.

    PubMed

    Dennett, Amy M; Peiris, Casey L; Shields, Nora; Morgan, Delwyn; Taylor, Nicholas F

    2016-12-22

    Oncology rehabilitation improves outcomes for cancer survivors but little is known about program availability in Australia. The aims of this study were: to describe oncology rehabilitation programs in Australia: determine whether the exercise component of programs is consistent with guidelines: and to explore barriers and facilitators to program implementation. A sequential, explanatory mixed-methods study was completed in two phases: (1) a survey of Australian oncology rehabilitation programs; and (2) purposively sampled follow-up semistructured interviews with senior clinicians working in oncology rehabilitation who were involved with exercise prescription. Hospitals and/or cancer centers from 42 public hospital health networks (representing 163 hospitals) and 39 private hospitals were contacted to identify 31 oncology rehabilitation programs. All 31 surveys were returned (100% response rate). Programs were typically multidisciplinary, ran twice weekly, provided education and exercise and included self-management strategies. Exercise prescription and progression was patient centered and included a combination of resistance and aerobic training supplemented by balance, pelvic floor, and core stability exercises. Challenges to implementation included a lack of awareness of programs in the community and organizational barriers such as funding. Strong links with oncologists facilitated program referrals. Despite evidence to support oncology rehabilitation, there are few programs in Australia and there are challenges that limit it becoming part of standard practice. Programs that exist are multidisciplinary with a focus on exercise with the majority of programs following a cardiac rehabilitation model of care. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  2. Exercise therapy for low back pain: a small-scale exploratory survey of current physiotherapy practice in the Republic of Ireland acute hospital setting.

    PubMed

    Byrne, Karol; Doody, Catherine; Hurley, Deirdre A

    2006-11-01

    A small-scale exploratory cross-sectional survey investigated the current use of a range of exercise therapy approaches for low back pain (LBP) by outpatient physiotherapists in the acute hospital setting in the Republic of Ireland, where the majority of publicly funded treatment is delivered. Of the 120 postal questionnaires distributed to 24 physiotherapy departments, 87 were returned (72.5% response rate). The results showed specific spinal stabilization exercises were the most popular exercise therapy for acute (39%; n = 35) and chronic (51%; n = 48) LBP, followed by the McKenzie approach (acute LBP (ALBP) 35.6%; n = 32: chronic LBP (CLBP) 17%; n = 16), and abdominal exercise (ALBP 11.1%; n = 10: CLBP 9.6%; n = 9). The most popular forms of exercise therapy used by outpatient physiotherapists in acute hospital settings in Ireland lack support from evidence-based clinical guidelines, and further large-scale high quality randomized controlled trials of these approaches are warranted. Further research should also establish the use of exercise therapy and attitudes to clinical guidelines of physiotherapists in other countries and healthcare settings.

  3. The efficacy of manual therapy and exercise for treating non-specific neck pain: A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Hidalgo, Benjamin; Hall, Toby; Bossert, Jean; Dugeny, Axel; Cagnie, Barbara; Pitance, Laurent

    2017-08-02

    To review and update the evidence for different forms of manual therapy (MT) and exercise for patients with different stages of non-specific neck pain (NP). MEDLINE, Cochrane-Register-of-Controlled-Trials, PEDro, EMBASE. A qualitative systematic review covering a period from January 2000 to December 2015 was conducted according to updated-guidelines. Specific inclusion criteria only on RCTs were used; including differentiation according to stages of NP (acute - subacute [ASNP] or chronic [CNP]), as well as sub-classification based on type of MT interventions: MT1 (HVLA manipulation); MT2 (mobilization and/or soft-tissue-techniques); MT3 (MT1 + MT2); and MT4 (Mobilization-with-Movement). In each sub-category, MT could be combined or not with exercise and/or usual medical care. Initially 121 studies were identified for potential inclusion. Based on qualitative and quantitative evaluation criteria, 23 RCTs were identified for review. Evidence for ASNP: MODERATE-evidence: In favour of (i) MT1 to the cervical spine (Cx) combined with exercises when compared to MT1 to the thoracic spine (Tx) combined with exercises; (ii) MT3 to the Cx and Tx combined with exercise compared to MT2 to the Cx with exercise or compared to usual medical care for pain and satisfaction with care from short to long-term. Evidence for CNP: STRONG-evidence: Of no difference of efficacy between MT2 at the symptomatic Cx level(s) in comparison to MT2 on asymptomatic Cx level(s) for pain and function. MODERATE to STRONG-evidence: In favour of MT1 and MT3 on Cx and Tx with exercise in comparison to exercise or MT alone for pain, function, satisfaction with care and general-health from short to moderate-terms. MODERATE-evidence: In favour (i) of MT1 as compared to MT2 and MT4, all applied to the Cx, for neck mobility, and pain in the very short term; (ii) of MT2 using sof-tissue-techniques to the Cx and Tx or MT3 to the Cx and Tx in comparison to no-treatment in the short-term for pain and disability

  4. Efficacy and safety of statins and exercise combination therapy compared to statin monotherapy in patients with dyslipidaemia: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Gui, Ya-Jun; Liao, Cai-Xiu; Liu, Qiong; Guo, Yuan; Yang, Tao; Chen, Jing-Yuan; Wang, Ya-Ting; Hu, Jia-Hui; Xu, Dan-Yan

    2017-06-01

    Background Statin treatment in association with physical exercise can substantially reduce mortality in dyslipidaemic individuals. However, the available data to compare the efficacy and safety of statins and exercise combination therapy with statin monotherapy are limited. Design Systematic review and meta-analysis. Methods We systematically searched PubMed, Embase and the Cochrane Library from database inception until December 2016. We included randomised and non-randomised studies that compared the efficacy and safety of statins and exercise combination therapy with statin monotherapy in patients with dyslipidaemia. Standardised mean differences were calculated and pooled by means of fixed effects models. The risk of bias and heterogeneity among trials was also assessed. Seven articles were assessed in terms of the efficacy of therapy and 13 from the viewpoint of therapeutic safety. Results In terms of efficacy, statins and exercise combination decreased the incidence of diabetes mellitus, improved insulin sensitivity and inflammation, but caused no change in lipid profile compared to statins alone. In terms of safety, statins and exercise combination increased peak oxygen uptake (standardised mean difference 1.01, 95% confidence interval 0.46 to 1.57) compared to statins alone. In contrast to statin-induced myopathy, chronic exercise training prior to statin treatment could counteract statin-induced adverse effects in skeletal muscle. Conclusion Statins and exercise combination therapy is more effective than statin monotherapy in terms of insulin sensitivity, inflammation and exercise capacity. The small number of studies warrants the need for more randomised controlled trials evaluating the efficacy and safety of combination therapy.

  5. Insulin-based strategies to prevent hypoglycaemia during and after exercise in adult patients with type 1 diabetes on pump therapy: the DIABRASPORT randomized study.

    PubMed

    Franc, S; Daoudi, A; Pochat, A; Petit, M-H; Randazzo, C; Petit, C; Duclos, M; Penfornis, A; Pussard, E; Not, D; Heyman, E; Koukoui, F; Simon, C; Charpentier, G

    2015-12-01

    To validate strategies to prevent exercise-induced hypoglycaemia via insulin-dose adjustment in adult patients with type 1 diabetes (T1D) on pump therapy. A total of 20 patients randomly performed four 30-min late post-lunch (3 h after lunch) exercise sessions and a rest session: two moderate sessions [50% maximum oxygen consumption (VO2 max)] with 50 or 80% basal rate (BR) reduction during exercise + 2 h and two intense sessions (75% VO2 max) with 80% BR reduction or with their pump stopped. Two additional early post-lunch sessions (90 min after lunch) were analysed to compare hypoglycaemia incidence for BR reduction versus bolus reduction. In all, 100 late post-lunch sessions were analysed. Regardless of exercise type and BR reduction, no more hypoglycaemic events occurred in the period until the next morning than occurred after the rest sessions. In the afternoon, no more hypoglycaemic events occurred with 80% BR reduction/moderate exercise or with pump discontinuation/intense exercise than for the rest session, whereas more hypoglycaemic events occurred with 50% BR reduction/moderate exercise and 80% BR reduction/intense exercise. After early post-lunch exercise (n = 37), a trend towards fewer hypoglycaemic episodes was observed with bolus reduction versus BR reduction (p = 0.07). Mean blood glucose fell by ∼3.3 mmol/l after 30 min of exercise, irrespective of dose reduction, remaining stable until the next morning with no rebound hyperglycaemia. In adults with T1D, to limit the hypoglycaemic risk associated with 30 min of exercise 3 h after lunch, without carbohydrate supplements, the best options seem to be to reduce BR by 80% or to stop the pump for moderate or intense exercise, or for moderate exercise 90 min after lunch, to reduce the prandial bolus rather than the BR. © 2015 The Authors. Diabetes, Obesity and Metabolism published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Exercise, education, manual-therapy and taping compared to education for patellofemoral osteoarthritis: a blinded, randomised clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Crossley, K M; Vicenzino, B; Lentzos, J; Schache, A G; Pandy, M G; Ozturk, H; Hinman, R S

    2015-09-01

    Patellofemoral joint osteoarthritis (PFJ OA) contributes considerably to knee OA symptoms. This study aimed to determine the efficacy of a PFJ-targeted exercise, education manual-therapy and taping program compared to OA education alone, in participants with PFJ OA. A randomised, participant-blinded and assessor-blinded clinical trial was conducted in primary-care physiotherapy. 92 people aged ≥40 years with symptomatic and radiographic PFJ OA participated. Physiotherapists delivered the PFJ-targeted exercise, education, manual-therapy and taping program, or the OA-education (control condition) in eight sessions over 12 weeks. Primary outcomes at 3-month (primary) and 9-month follow-up: (1) patient-perceived global rating of change (2) pain visual analogue scale (VAS) (100 mm); and (3) activities of daily living (ADL) subscale of the Knee injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS). 81 people (88%) completed the 3-month follow-up and data analysed on an intention-to-treat basis. Between-group baseline similarity for participant characteristics was observed. The exercise, education, manual-therapy and taping program resulted in more people reporting much improvement (20/44) than the OA-education group (5/48) (number needed to treat 3 (95% confidence interval (CI) 2 to 5)) and greater pain reduction (mean difference: -15.2 mm, 95% CI -27.0 to -3.4). No significant effects on ADL were observed (5.8; 95% CI -0.6 to 12.1). At 9 months there were no significant effects for self-report of improvement, pain (-10.5 mm, 95% CI -22.7 to 1.8) or ADL (3.0, 95% CI -3.7 to 9.7). Exercise, education, manual-therapy and taping can be recommended to improve short-term patient rating of change and pain severity. However over 9-months, both options were equivalent. Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry (ACTRN12608000288325): https://www.anzctr.org.au/Trial/Registration/TrialReview.aspx?id=82878. Copyright © 2015 Osteoarthritis Research Society International. Published

  7. Does targeting manual therapy and/or exercise improve patient outcomes in nonspecific low back pain? A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background A central element in the current debate about best practice management of non-specific low back pain (NSLBP) is the efficacy of targeted versus generic (non-targeted) treatment. Many clinicians and researchers believe that tailoring treatment to NSLBP subgroups positively impacts on patient outcomes. Despite this, there are no systematic reviews comparing the efficacy of targeted versus non-targeted manual therapy and/or exercise. This systematic review was undertaken in order to determine the efficacy of such targeted treatment in adults with NSLBP. Method MEDLINE, EMBASE, Current Contents, AMED and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials were electronically searched, reference lists were examined and citation tracking performed. Inclusion criteria were randomized controlled trials of targeted manual therapy and/or exercise for NSLPB that used trial designs capable of providing robust information on targeted treatment (treatment effect modification) for the outcomes of activity limitation and pain. Included trials needed to be hypothesis-testing studies published in English, Danish or Norwegian. Method quality was assessed using the criteria recommended by the Cochrane Back Review Group. Results Four high-quality randomized controlled trials of targeted manual therapy and/or exercise for NSLBP met the inclusion criteria. One study showed statistically significant effects for short-term outcomes using McKenzie directional preference-based exercise. Research into subgroups requires much larger sample sizes than traditional two-group trials and other included studies showed effects that might be clinically important in size but were not statistically significant with their samples sizes. Conclusions The clinical implications of these results are that they provide very cautious evidence supporting the notion that treatment targeted to subgroups of patients with NSLBP may improve patient outcomes. The results of the studies included in this review

  8. Curative effect of Tai Chi exercise in combination with auricular plaster therapy on improving obesity patient with secondary hyperlipidemia.

    PubMed

    Song, Qinghua; Yuan, Yandong; Jiao, Chun; Zhu, Ximei

    2015-01-01

    Observe the effect of Tai Chi in combination with auricular plaster therapy on treating obesity patient with secondary hyperlipidemia. Select 45 patients who suffer from simple obesity and secondary hyperlipidemia and then adopt random digital table to divide them into a Tai Chi group, an auricular plaster therapy group and a combination group. Each group consists of 15 patients. The patients in Tai Chi group are trained with Tai Chi twice a day, while those in auricular plaster therapy are treated with auricular plaster therapy 3-5 times a day and those in the combination group are trained with Tai Chi and auricular plaster therapy twice a day. BMI, body fat percentage and blood lipid indexes are respectively detected for the selected patients in the three groups before treatment and after 180 days' treatment. After 180 days' treatment, BMI index and body fat percentage of Tai Chi group are significantly improved in comparison with those before treatment (P<0.05) and the blood lipid index also presents the improvement trend, but the overall effect is not obvious; body fat percentage and BMI index of the auricular plaster therapy group are not improved obviously in comparison with those before the treatment (P>0.05) but the blood lipid index is improved significantly (P<0.05); each index of the combination group is improved significantly compared with those before treatment (P<0.05). By comparing the improvement effect after treatment with that of the other two groups, P<0.05, the difference shows the statistical significance and the treatment effect is more obvious. As for the patient suffering from simple obesity and secondary hyperlipidemia, Tai Chi exercise in combination with auricular plaster therapy can show the obvious synergistic therapeutic effect and thus the combined curative effect is obviously superior to that of the single therapy method.

  9. Curative effect of Tai Chi exercise in combination with auricular plaster therapy on improving obesity patient with secondary hyperlipidemia

    PubMed Central

    Song, Qinghua; Yuan, Yandong; Jiao, Chun; Zhu, Ximei

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Observe the effect of Tai Chi in combination with auricular plaster therapy on treating obesity patient with secondary hyperlipidemia. Method: Select 45 patients who suffer from simple obesity and secondary hyperlipidemia and then adopt random digital table to divide them into a Tai Chi group, an auricular plaster therapy group and a combination group. Each group consists of 15 patients. The patients in Tai Chi group are trained with Tai Chi twice a day, while those in auricular plaster therapy are treated with auricular plaster therapy 3-5 times a day and those in the combination group are trained with Tai Chi and auricular plaster therapy twice a day. BMI, body fat percentage and blood lipid indexes are respectively detected for the selected patients in the three groups before treatment and after 180 days’ treatment. Results: After 180 days’ treatment, BMI index and body fat percentage of Tai Chi group are significantly improved in comparison with those before treatment (P<0.05) and the blood lipid index also presents the improvement trend, but the overall effect is not obvious; body fat percentage and BMI index of the auricular plaster therapy group are not improved obviously in comparison with those before the treatment (P>0.05) but the blood lipid index is improved significantly (P<0.05); each index of the combination group is improved significantly compared with those before treatment (P<0.05). By comparing the improvement effect after treatment with that of the other two groups, P<0.05, the difference shows the statistical significance and the treatment effect is more obvious. Conclusion: As for the patient suffering from simple obesity and secondary hyperlipidemia, Tai Chi exercise in combination with auricular plaster therapy can show the obvious synergistic therapeutic effect and thus the combined curative effect is obviously superior to that of the single therapy method. PMID:26885081

  10. The effects of manual therapy or exercise therapy or both in people with hip osteoarthritis: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Sampath, Kesava Kovanur; Mani, Ramakrishnan; Miyamori, Takayuki; Tumilty, Steve

    2016-12-01

    To determine whether manual therapy or exercise therapy or both is beneficial for people with hip osteoarthritis in terms of reduced pain, improved physical function and improved quality of life. Databases such as Medline, AMED, EMBASE, CINAHL, SPORTSDiscus, PubMed, Cochrane Library, Web of Science, Physiotherapy Evidence Database, and SCOPUS were searched from their inception till September 2015. Two authors independently extracted and assessed the risk of bias in included studies. Standardised mean differences for outcome measures (pain, physical function and quality of life) were used to calculate effect sizes. The Grading of Recommendations, Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE) approach was used for assessing the quality of the body of evidence for each outcome of interest. Seven trials (886 participants) that met the inclusion criteria were included in the meta-analysis. There was high quality evidence that exercise therapy was beneficial at post-treatment (pain-SMD-0.27,95%CI-0.5to-0.04;physical function-SMD-0.29,95%CI-0.47to-0.11) and follow-up (pain-SMD-0.24,95%CI- 0.41to-0.06; physical function-SMD-0.33,95%CI-0.5to-0.15). There was low quality evidence that manual therapy was beneficial at post-treatment (pain-SMD-0.71,95%CI-1.08to-0.33; physical function-SMD-0.71,95%CI-1.08to-0.33) and follow-up (pain-SMD-0.43,95%CI-0.8to-0.06; physical function-SMD-0.47,95%CI-0.84to-0.1). Low quality evidence indicated that combined treatment was beneficial at post-treatment (pain-SMD-0.43,95%CI-0.78to-0.08; physical function-SMD-0.38,95%CI-0.73to-0.04) but not at follow-up (pain-SMD0.25,95%CI-0.35to0.84; physical function-SMD0.09,95%CI-0.5to0.68). There was no effect of any interventions on quality of life. An Exercise therapy intervention provides short-term as well as long-term benefits in terms of reduction in pain, and improvement in physical function among people with hip osteoarthritis. The observed magnitude of the treatment effect would be considered

  11. The perspectives of older women with chronic neck pain on perceived effects of qigong and exercise therapy on aging: a qualitative interview study

    PubMed Central

    Holmberg, Christine; Rappenecker, Julia; Karner, Julia J; Witt, Claudia M

    2014-01-01

    Chronic pain is prevalent in elderly populations. The goals of this study were 1) to understand the results of a randomized clinical trial – Qigong and Exercise Therapy for Elderly Patients with Chronic Neck Pain (QIBANE) – that showed no difference between qigong, exercise therapy, and no-treatment on quality of life, and 2) to understand how elderly individuals with chronic pain experience interventions of qigong and exercise therapy. A qualitative interview study was conducted with 20 QIBANE participants. Interviews asked about motivation for and expectations of trial participation, experiences with the exercise classes (qigong or exercise therapy), and changes in pain experience. Interviews were transcribed, entered into the software program ATLAS.ti, and coded thematically by two coders. Content analysis was performed. All interviewees reflected positively on their QIBANE experience and described their participation in QIBANE as helpful. However, what was discussed in both groups when they talked about “positive experiences” in the study differed between the two groups. For example, themes that emerged in the exercise-therapy group related to difficulties associated with aging and staying physically active. In the interviews with qigong group members, emergent themes related to qigong as a method that improved bodily experiences and influenced daily activities. The effects that exercise therapy and qigong have on an elderly population cannot be captured by health-related quality-of-life measurements, such as the Short Form (36) Health Survey. Broader concepts of quality of life that include the concepts of self-efficacy and positive affect may be more appropriate. The results presented in this study suggest that for this population group, the approach of patient-centered outcomes is especially pertinent in order to design meaningful intervention studies in the elderly. This means that research questions, interventions, and outcome measurements need to

  12. The perspectives of older women with chronic neck pain on perceived effects of qigong and exercise therapy on aging: a qualitative interview study.

    PubMed

    Holmberg, Christine; Rappenecker, Julia; Karner, Julia J; Witt, Claudia M

    2014-01-01

    Chronic pain is prevalent in elderly populations. The goals of this study were 1) to understand the results of a randomized clinical trial - Qigong and Exercise Therapy for Elderly Patients with Chronic Neck Pain (QIBANE) - that showed no difference between qigong, exercise therapy, and no-treatment on quality of life, and 2) to understand how elderly individuals with chronic pain experience interventions of qigong and exercise therapy. A qualitative interview study was conducted with 20 QIBANE participants. Interviews asked about motivation for and expectations of trial participation, experiences with the exercise classes (qigong or exercise therapy), and changes in pain experience. Interviews were transcribed, entered into the software program ATLAS.ti, and coded thematically by two coders. Content analysis was performed. All interviewees reflected positively on their QIBANE experience and described their participation in QIBANE as helpful. However, what was discussed in both groups when they talked about "positive experiences" in the study differed between the two groups. For example, themes that emerged in the exercise-therapy group related to difficulties associated with aging and staying physically active. In the interviews with qigong group members, emergent themes related to qigong as a method that improved bodily experiences and influenced daily activities. The effects that exercise therapy and qigong have on an elderly population cannot be captured by health-related quality-of-life measurements, such as the Short Form (36) Health Survey. Broader concepts of quality of life that include the concepts of self-efficacy and positive affect may be more appropriate. The results presented in this study suggest that for this population group, the approach of patient-centered outcomes is especially pertinent in order to design meaningful intervention studies in the elderly. This means that research questions, interventions, and outcome measurements need to take

  13. Comparison of adaptive pacing therapy, cognitive behaviour therapy, graded exercise therapy, and specialist medical care for chronic fatigue syndrome (PACE): a randomised trial.

    PubMed

    White, P D; Goldsmith, K A; Johnson, A L; Potts, L; Walwyn, R; DeCesare, J C; Baber, H L; Burgess, M; Clark, L V; Cox, D L; Bavinton, J; Angus, B J; Murphy, G; Murphy, M; O'Dowd, H; Wilks, D; McCrone, P; Chalder, T; Sharpe, M

    2011-03-05

    Trial findings show cognitive behaviour therapy (CBT) and graded exercise therapy (GET) can be effective treatments for chronic fatigue syndrome, but patients' organisations have reported that these treatments can be harmful and favour pacing and specialist health care. We aimed to assess effectiveness and safety of all four treatments. In our parallel-group randomised trial, patients meeting Oxford criteria for chronic fatigue syndrome were recruited from six secondary-care clinics in the UK and randomly allocated by computer-generated sequence to receive specialist medical care (SMC) alone or with adaptive pacing therapy (APT), CBT, or GET. Primary outcomes were fatigue (measured by Chalder fatigue questionnaire score) and physical function (measured by short form-36 subscale score) up to 52 weeks after randomisation, and safety was assessed primarily by recording all serious adverse events, including serious adverse reactions to trial treatments. Primary outcomes were rated by participants, who were necessarily unmasked to treatment assignment; the statistician was masked to treatment assignment for the analysis of primary outcomes. We used longitudinal regression models to compare SMC alone with other treatments, APT with CBT, and APT with GET. The final analysis included all participants for whom we had data for primary outcomes. This trial is registered at http://isrctn.org, number ISRCTN54285094. We recruited 641 eligible patients, of whom 160 were assigned to the APT group, 161 to the CBT group, 160 to the GET group, and 160 to the SMC-alone group. Compared with SMC alone, mean fatigue scores at 52 weeks were 3·4 (95% CI 1·8 to 5·0) points lower for CBT (p = 0·0001) and 3·2 (1·7 to 4·8) points lower for GET (p = 0·0003), but did not differ for APT (0·7 [-0·9 to 2·3] points lower; p = 0·38). Compared with SMC alone, mean physical function scores were 7·1 (2·0 to 12·1) points higher for CBT (p = 0·0068) and 9·4 (4·4 to 14·4) points higher

  14. Physical exercise and internet-based cognitive-behavioural therapy in the treatment of depression: randomised controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Hallgren, Mats; Kraepelien, Martin; Öjehagen, Agneta; Lindefors, Nils; Zeebari, Zangin; Kaldo, Viktor; Forsell, Yvonne

    2015-09-01

    Depression is common and tends to be recurrent. Alternative treatments are needed that are non-stigmatising, accessible and can be prescribed by general medical practitioners. To compare the effectiveness of three interventions for depression: physical exercise, internet-based cognitive-behavioural therapy (ICBT) and treatment as usual (TAU). A secondary aim was to assess changes in self-rated work capacity. A total of 946 patients diagnosed with mild to moderate depression were recruited through primary healthcare centres across Sweden and randomly assigned to one of three 12-week interventions (trail registry: KCTR study ID: KT20110063). Patients were reassessed at 3 months (response rate 78%). Patients in the exercise and ICBT groups reported larger improvements in depressive symptoms compared with TAU. Work capacity improved over time in all three groups (no significant differences). Exercise and ICBT were more effective than TAU by a general medical practitioner, and both represent promising non-stigmatising treatment alternatives for patients with mild to moderate depression. © The Royal College of Psychiatrists 2015.

  15. A 9-week randomized trial comparing a chronotherapeutic intervention (wake and light therapy) to exercise in major depressive disorder patients treated with duloxetine.

    PubMed

    Martiny, Klaus; Refsgaard, Else; Lund, Vibeke; Lunde, Marianne; Sørensen, Lene; Thougaard, Britta; Lindberg, Lone; Bech, Per

    2012-09-01

    The onset of action of antidepressants often takes 4 to 6 weeks. The antidepressant effect of wake therapy (sleep deprivation) comes within hours but carries a risk of relapse. The objective of this study was to investigate whether a new chronotherapeutic intervention combining wake therapy with bright light therapy and sleep time stabilization could induce a rapid and sustained augmentation of response and remission in major depressive disorder. 75 adult patients with DSM-IV major depressive disorder, recruited from psychiatric wards, psychiatric specialist practices, or general medical practices between September 2005 and August 2008, were randomly assigned to a 9-week chronotherapeutic intervention using wake therapy, bright light therapy, and sleep time stabilization (n = 37) or a 9-week intervention using daily exercise (n = 38). Patients were evaluated at a psychiatric research unit. The study period had a 1-week run-in phase in which all patients began treatment with duloxetine. This phase was followed by a 1-week intervention phase in which patients in the wake therapy group did 3 wake therapies in combination with daily morning light therapy and sleep time stabilization and patients in the exercise group began daily exercise. This phase was followed by a 7-week continuation phase with daily light therapy and sleep time stabilization or daily exercise. The 17-item Hamilton Depression Rating Scale was the primary outcome measure, and the assessors were blinded to patients' treatment allocation. Both groups responded well to treatment. Patients in the wake therapy group did, however, have immediate and clinically significantly better response and remission compared to the exercise group. Thus, immediately after the intervention phase (week 2), response was obtained in 41.4% of wake therapy patients versus 12.8% of exercise patients (odds ratio [OR] = 4.8; 95% CI, 1.7-13.4; P = .003), and remission was obtained in 23.9% of wake therapy patients versus 5.4% of

  16. Pilates exercise training vs. physical therapy for improving walking and balance in people with multiple sclerosis: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Kalron, Alon; Rosenblum, Uri; Frid, Lior; Achiron, Anat

    2017-03-01

    Evaluate the effects of a Pilates exercise programme on walking and balance in people with multiple sclerosis and compare this exercise approach to conventional physical therapy sessions. Randomized controlled trial. Multiple Sclerosis Center, Sheba Medical Center, Tel-Hashomer, Israel. Forty-five people with multiple sclerosis, 29 females, mean age (SD) was 43.2 (11.6) years; mean Expanded Disability Status Scale (S.D) was 4.3 (1.3). Participants received 12 weekly training sessions of either Pilates ( n=22) or standardized physical therapy ( n=23) in an outpatient basis. Spatio-temporal parameters of walking and posturography parameters during static stance. Functional tests included the Time Up and Go Test, 2 and 6-minute walk test, Functional Reach Test, Berg Balance Scale and the Four Square Step Test. In addition, the following self-report forms included the Multiple Sclerosis Walking Scale and Modified Fatigue Impact Scale. At the termination, both groups had significantly increased their walking speed ( P=0.021) and mean step length ( P=0.023). According to the 2-minute and 6-minute walking tests, both groups at the end of the intervention program had increased their walking speed. Mean (SD) increase in the Pilates and physical therapy groups were 39.1 (78.3) and 25.3 (67.2) meters, respectively. There was no effect of group X time in all instrumented and clinical balance and gait measures. Pilates is a possible treatment option for people with multiple sclerosis in order to improve their walking and balance capabilities. However, this approach does not have any significant advantage over standardized physical therapy.

  17. Management of pain induced by exercise and mobilization during physical therapy programs: views of patients and care providers

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The expectations of patients for managing pain induced by exercise and mobilization (PIEM) have seldom been investigated. We identified the views of patients and care providers regarding pain management induced by exercise and mobilization during physical therapy programs. Methods We performed a qualitative study based on semi-structured interviews with a stratified sample of 12 patients (7 women) and 14 care providers (6 women): 4 general practitioners [GPs], 1 rheumatologist, 1 physical medicine physician, 1 geriatrician, 2 orthopedic surgeons, and 5 physical therapists. Results Patients and care providers have differing views on PIEM in the overall management of the state of disease. Patients' descriptions of PIEM were polymorphic, and they experienced it as decreased health-related quality of life. The impact of PIEM was complex, and patient views were sometimes ambivalent, ranging from denial of symptoms to discontinuation of therapy. Care providers agreed that PIEM is generally not integrated in management strategies. Care providers more often emphasized the positive and less often the negative dimensions of PIEM than did patients. However, the consequences of PIEM cited included worsened patient clinical condition, fears about physical therapy, rejection of the physical therapist and refusal of care. PIEM follow-up is not optimal and is characterized by poor transmission of information. Patients expected education on how better to prevent stress and anxiety generated by pain, education on mobilization, and adaptations of physical therapy programs according to pain intensity. Conclusion PIEM management could be optimized by alerting care providers to the situation, improving communication among care providers, and providing education to patients and care providers. PMID:21781296

  18. Low-Grade Inflammation and Spinal Cord Injury: Exercise as Therapy?

    PubMed Central

    da Silva Alves, Eduardo; de Aquino Lemos, Valdir; Ruiz da Silva, Francieli; Lira, Fabio Santos; dos Santos, Ronaldo Vagner Thomathieli; Rosa, João Paulo Pereira; Caperuto, Erico; Tufik, Sergio; de Mello, Marco Tulio

    2013-01-01

    An increase in the prevalence of obesity in people with spinal cord injury can contribute to low-grade chronic inflammation and increase the risk of infection in this population. A decrease in sympathetic activity contributes to immunosuppression due to the lower activation of immune cells in the blood. The effects of physical exercise on inflammatory parameters in individuals with spinal cord injury have not been well described. We conducted a review of the literature published from 1974 to 2012. This review explored the relationships between low-grade inflammation, spinal cord injury, and exercise to discuss a novel mechanism that might explain the beneficial effects of exercise involving an increase in catecholamines and cytokines in people with spinal cord injury. PMID:23533315

  19. Chronotropic Incompetence During Exercise in Type 2 Diabetes: Aetiology, Assessment Methodology, Prognostic Impact and Therapy.

    PubMed

    Keytsman, Charly; Dendale, Paul; Hansen, Dominique

    2015-07-01

    During incremental exercise tests, chronotropic incompetence (CI), which is the inability of the heart rate (HR) to rise in proportion to an increase in metabolic demand, is often observed in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Despite the fact that CI is associated with exercise intolerance and elevated risks of development of cardiovascular disease and premature death, this clinical anomaly is often ignored or overlooked by clinicians and physiologists. CI is, however, a significant clinical abnormality that deserves further attention, examination and treatment. The aetiology of CI in T2DM remains poorly understood and is complex. Certain T2DM-related co-morbidities or physiological anomalies may contribute to development of CI, such as altered blood catecholamine and/or potassium levels during exercise, structural myocardial abnormalities, ventricular and/or arterial stiffness, impaired baroreflex sensitivity and cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy. Clinicians should thus be aware of the potential presence of yet undetected anomalies or diseases in T2DM patients who experience CI during exercise testing. However, an effective treatment for CI in T2DM is yet to be developed. Exercise training programmes seem to be the only potentially effective and feasible interventions for partial restoration of the chronotropic response in T2DM, but it remains poorly understood how these interventions lead to restoration of the chronotropic response. Studies are thus warranted to elucidate the aetiology of CI and develop an effective treatment for CI in T2DM. In particular, the impact of (different) exercise interventions on CI in T2DM deserves greater attention in future studies.

  20. Augmented sympathetic vasoconstriction in exercising forearms of postmenopausal women is reversed by oestrogen therapy.

    PubMed

    Fadel, Paul J; Wang, Zhongyun; Watanabe, Hitoshi; Arbique, Debbie; Vongpatanasin, Wanpen; Thomas, Gail D

    2004-12-15

    Sympathetic vasoconstriction is normally attenuated in exercising muscles of young men and women. Recent evidence indicates that such modulation, termed functional sympatholysis, may be impaired in older men. Whether a similar impairment occurs in older women, and what role oestrogen deficiency might play in this impairment, are not known. Based on the strong positive correlation between circulating oestrogen levels and functional sympatholysis previously reported in female rats, we hypothesized that sympatholysis would be impaired in oestrogen-deficient postmenopausal women, and that this impairment would be reversed by oestrogen replacement. To test these hypotheses, we measured vasoconstrictor responses in the forearms of pre- and postmenopausal women using near infrared spectroscopy to detect decreases in muscle oxygenation in response to reflex activation of sympathetic nerves evoked by lower body negative pressure (LBNP). In eight premenopausal women, LBNP decreased muscle oxygenation by 20 +/- 1% in resting forearm, but only by 3 +/- 2% in exercising forearm (P < 0.05). In contrast, in eight postmenopausal women, LBNP decreased muscle oxygenation by 15 +/- 3% in resting forearm, and by 12 +/- 4% in exercising forearm (P > 0.05). After 1 month of transdermal oestradiol replacement in these women, the normal effect of exercise to blunt sympathetic vasoconstriction was restored (rest, -19 +/- 3%; exercise, -2 +/- 3%; P < 0.05). These data indicate that functional sympatholysis is impaired in oestrogen-deficient postmenopausal women. The effect of short-term unopposed oestrogen replacement to correct this impairment implicates a role for oestrogen in the sympathetic neural control of muscle haemodynamics during exercise.

  1. Waon therapy improves quality of life as well as cardiac function and exercise capacity in patients with chronic heart failure.

    PubMed

    Sobajima, Mitsuo; Nozawa, Takashi; Fukui, Yasutaka; Ihori, Hiroyuki; Ohori, Takashi; Fujii, Nozomu; Inoue, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    Waon therapy (WT), which in Japanese means soothing warmth, is a repeated sauna therapy that improves cardiac and vascular endothelial function in patients with chronic heart failure (CHF). We investigated whether WT could improve the quality of life (QOL) of CHF patients in addition to improving cardiac function and exercise capacity.A total of 49 CHF patients (69 ± 14 years old) were treated with a 60°C far infrared-ray dry sauna bath for 15 minutes and then kept in a bed covered with blankets for 30 minutes once a day for 3 weeks. At baseline and 3 weeks after starting WT, cardiac function, 6-minute walk distance (6MWD), flow mediated dilation (FMD) of the brachial artery, and SF36-QOL scores were determined.WT significantly improved left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF), B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP), 6MWD, and FMD (3.6 ± 2.3 to 5.1 ± 2.8%, P < 0.01). Moreover, WT significantly improved not only the physical (PC) but also mental component (MC) of the QOL scores. WT-induced improvement of PC was negatively correlated with changes in BNP (r = -0.327, P < 0.05), but MC improvement was not related directly to changes in BNP, LVEF, or 6MWD. WT-induced changes in MC were not parallel to PC improvement.WT improved QOL as well as cardiac function and exercise capacity in patients with CHF. Mental QOL improved independently of WT-induced improvement of cardiac function and exercise capacity.

  2. The effect of low-level laser therapy on oxidative stress and functional fitness in aged rats subjected to swimming: an aerobic exercise.

    PubMed

    Guaraldo, Simone A; Serra, Andrey Jorge; Amadio, Eliane Martins; Antônio, Ednei Luis; Silva, Flávio; Portes, Leslie Andrews; Tucci, Paulo José Ferreira; Leal-Junior, Ernesto Cesar Pinto; de Carvalho, Paulo de Tarso Camillo

    2016-07-01

    The aim of the present study was to determine whether low-level laser therapy (LLLT) in conjunction with aerobic training interferes with oxidative stress, thereby influencing the performance of old rats participating in swimming. Thirty Wistar rats (Norvegicus albinus) (24 aged and six young) were tested. The older animals were randomly divided into aged-control, aged-exercise, aged-LLLT, aged-LLLT/exercise, and young-control. Aerobic capacity (VO2max(0.75)) was analyzed before and after the training period. The exercise groups were trained for 6 weeks, and the LLLT was applied at 808 nm and 4 J energy. The rats were euthanized, and muscle tissue was collected to analyze the index of lipid peroxidation thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS), glutathione (GSH), superoxide dismutase (SOD), and catalase (CAT) activities. VO2 (0.75)max values in the aged-LLLT/exercise group were significantly higher from those in the baseline older group (p <0.01) and the LLLT and exercise group (p <0.05). The results indicate that the activities of CAT, SOD, and GPx were higher and statistically significant (p <0.05) in the LLLT/exercise group than those in the LLLT and exercise groups. Young animals presented lesser and statistically significant activities of antioxidant enzymes compared to the aged group. The LLLT/exercise group and the LLLT and exercise group could also mitigate the concentration of TBARS (p > 0.05). Laser therapy in conjunction with aerobic training may reduce oxidative stress, as well as increase VO2 (0.75)max, indicating that an aerobic exercise such as swimming increases speed and improves performance in aged animals treated with LLLT.

  3. Design of a randomised intervention study: the effect of dumbbell exercise therapy on physical activity and quality of life among breast cancer survivors in Malaysia

    PubMed Central

    Rufa'i, Adamu Ahmad; Muda, Wan Abdul Manan Wan; Yen, Siew Hwa; Abd Shatar, Aishah Knight; Murali, Bhavaraju Venkata Krishna; Tan, Shu Wen

    2016-01-01

    Background Participation in physical activity has a positive impact on the overall health and quality of life, whereas physical inactivity is associated with a poor prognosis among breast cancer survivors. Despite the health-enhancing benefits of physical activity, the majority of Malaysian breast cancer survivors are not physically active. This paper presents the design of a randomised study to evaluate the feasibility and effect of exercise therapy intervention using light resistance dumbbell exercise to promote active lifestyle and improve the quality of life of breast cancer survivors in Malaysia. Methods/design This is an intervention study of a 12-week exercise therapy that will explore and compare the effects of light resistance and aerobic exercise on physical activity level and quality of life components in 102 female breast cancer survivors. Major eligibility criteria include histologically confirmed diagnosis of breast cancer stages I–III, 3–12 months post-diagnosis, and absence of any disorder contraindicating exercise. Participants will be stratified based on menopausal status (pre-menopause vs post-menopause) and then assigned randomly to one of three groups. Participants in group A will participate in a three-times weekly supervised resistance exercise using light resistance dumbbells; participants in group B will participate in a three-times weekly supervised aerobic exercise; while participants in group C (control group) will be given aerobic exercise after completion of the intervention. The primary end points include physical activity level and quality of life components. The secondary end points are body mass index, body composition, total caloric intake, and waist-to-hip ratio. Discussion Although there have been many studies of resistance exercise in breast cancer survivors, this is the first study using this specific mode of resistance. Findings will contribute data on the feasibility and effects of light resistance dumbbell exercises

  4. Home-based exercise therapy in ankylosing spondylitis: short-term prospective study in patients receiving tumor necrosis factor alpha inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Yigit, Semra; Sahin, Zerrin; Demir, Saliha Eroglu; Aytac, Deniz Hatun

    2013-01-01

    The importance of exercise and regular physiotherapy in patients with ankylosing spondylitis (AS) under treatment with tumor necrosis factor alpha inhibitors (TNFα inhibitors) was reported in some studies, but the literature on this topic is still scarce. The aim of this study was to assess the effects of home-based exercise therapy on functional capacity, disease activity, spinal mobility, quality of life, emotional state and fatigue in patients with AS receiving TNFα inhibitors. Forty-two AS patients were trained on the disease, and home-based exercise program was demonstrated to all the patients. At baseline and at the end of 10 week, we evaluated Bath AS Disease Activity Index, Bath AS Functional Index, Bath AS Metrology Index, Multidimensional Assessment of Fatigue Scale, Beck Depression Inventory and Short-Form 36. Patients following home-based exercise program five times a week at least 30 min per session (exercise group) were compared with those exercising less than five times a week (control group). At baseline, exercise and control group had similar demographic features. After 10 weeks, all outcome parameters showed statistically significant improvements in exercise group. There were significant differences in all the parameters except social functioning subscale of Short-Form 36 between groups in favor of exercise group at 10th week (P < 0.05). Home-based exercise program is an effective therapy in increasing functional capacity and joint mobility, decreasing disease activity, improving emotional state, fatigue and quality of life for AS patient receiving TNFα inhibitors. We need to find out new ways to provide continuity of AS patients with it.

  5. Effect of whole-body vibration exercise in a sitting position prior to therapy on muscle tone and upper extremity function in stroke patients

    PubMed Central

    Boo, Jung-A; Moon, Sang-Hyun; Lee, Sun-Min; Choi, Jung-Hyun; Park, Si-Eun

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of whole-body vibration exercise in a sitting position prior to therapy in stroke patients. [Subjects and Methods] Fourteen chronic stroke patients were included in this study. Prior to occupational therapy, whole-body exercise was performed for 10 minutes, 5 times per week, for a total of 8 weeks. Muscle tone and upper extremity function were measured. The Modified Ashworth Scale (MAS) was used to measure muscle tone, and the Manual Function Test (MFT) and Fugl-Meyer Assessment scale (FugM) were used to measure upper extremity function. [Results] MAS score was significantly decreased, and MFT and FugM were significantly increased. [Conclusion] These results indicate that whole-body vibration exercise in a sitting position prior to therapy had a positive effect on muscle tone, and upper extremity function in stroke patients. PMID:27065354

  6. Helping Older Adults Sustain Their Physical Therapy Gains: A Theory-Based Intervention to Promote Adherence to Home Exercise Following Rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Gallagher, Kristel M

    2016-01-01

    The benefits of exercise gained by older adults during physical therapy are often not maintained once the program is over. This lack of sustained benefits is thought to be partially the result of poor adherence to the prescribed home exercise program to be continued once therapy is completed. Most of what is known about older adults' adherence to physical therapy and home exercise comes from research seeking to identify and understand predictors of adherence, rather than trying to enhance adherence explicitly. The purpose of this study was to test a theoretically grounded approach to promoting adherence to home exercise programs in older adults. Sixty older adults (M age = 69.3 (6.87) years) in a program of physical therapy received 1 of 2 print messages and magnets promoting adherence to home exercise. The content of the messages was informed by the goal-specific tenets of socioemotional selectivity theory-one message described the emotional and meaningful benefits of home exercise, such as time with loved ones and independence, and one message described facts and information about physiological benefits, such as balance and strength. Adherence to home exercise was measured 2 weeks after participants were discharged from physical therapy by calculating the percentage of the prescribed exercises participants reported completing at home. An analysis of covariance indicated that there was no statistically significant difference in adherence rates between participants receiving either message. However, a 2×2 analysis of covariance did reveal a significant interaction between the type of message participants received and the time at which they received that message. Post hoc analyses separately examined the rates of adherence in participants who received the intervention message with time remaining in their therapy program and participants who received the intervention message on the day of discharge. In the subset of participants who received their intervention

  7. Using Pre-Exercise Photobiomodulation Therapy Combining Super-Pulsed Lasers and Light-Emitting Diodes to Improve Performance in Progressive Cardiopulmonary Exercise Tests

    PubMed Central

    Miranda, Eduardo Foschini; Vanin, Adriane Aver; Tomazoni, Shaiane Silva; Grandinetti, Vanessa dos Santos; de Paiva, Paulo Roberto Vicente; Machado, Caroline dos Santos Monteiro; Monteiro, Kadma Karênina Damasceno Soares; Casalechi, Heliodora Leão; de Tarso, Paulo; de Carvalho, Camillo; Leal-Junior, Ernesto Cesar Pinto

    2016-01-01

    Context:  Skeletal muscle fatigue and exercise performance are novel areas of research and clinical application in the photobiomodulation field, and positive outcomes have been reported in several studies; however, the optimal measures have not been fully established. Objective:  To assess the acute effect of photobiomodulation therapy (PBMT) combining superpulsed lasers (low-level laser therapy) and light-emitting diodes (LEDs) on muscle performance during a progressive cardiopulmonary treadmill exercise test. Design:  Crossover study. Setting:  Laboratory. Patients or Other Participants:  Twenty untrained male volunteers (age = 26.0 ± 6.0 years, height = 175.0 ± 10.0 cm, mass = 74.8 ± 10.9 kg). Intervention(s):  Participants received PBMT with either combined superpulsed lasers and LED (active PBMT) or placebo at session 1 and the other treatment at session 2. All participants completed a cardiopulmonary test on a treadmill after each treatment. For active PBMT, we performed the irradiation at 17 sites on each lower limb (9 on the quadriceps, 6 on the hamstrings, and 2 on the gastrocnemius muscles), using a cluster with 12 diodes (four 905-nm superpulsed laser diodes with an average power of 0.3125 mW, peak power of 12.5 W for each diode, and frequency of 250 Hz; four 875-nm infrared LED diodes with an average power of 17.5 mW; and four 640-nm red LED diodes with an average power of 15 mW) and delivering a dose of 30 J per site. Main Outcome Measure(s):  Distance covered, time until exhaustion, pulmonary ventilation, and dyspnea score. Results:  The distance covered (1.96 ± 0.30 versus 1.84 ± 0.40 km, t19 = 2.119, P < .001) and time until exhaustion on the cardiopulmonary test (780.2 ± 91.0 versus 742.1 ± 94.0 seconds, t19 = 3.028, P < .001) was greater after active PBMT than after placebo. Pulmonary ventilation was greater (76.4 ± 21.9 versus 74.3 ± 19.8 L/min, t19 = 0.180, P = .004) and the score for dyspnea was lower (3

  8. Medical exercise therapy, and not arthroscopic surgery, resulted in decreased depression and anxiety in patients with degenerative meniscus injury.

    PubMed

    Østerås, Håvard; Østerås, Berit; Torstensen, Tom Arild

    2012-10-01

    The purpose of this pilot study was to compare the effectiveness of conservative therapy involving medical exercise therapy (MET) versus arthroscopic surgery in patients with knee pain, with MRI-verified degenerative meniscus. The patients were randomly assigned either to MET (n = 9) or to arthroscopic surgery (n = 8). Patients receiving MET had 3 treatments a week for 3 months, a total of 36 treatments. The arthroscopy consisted of meniscectomy with no structured conservative therapy after surgery. Assessment of pain, function, anxiety and depression were performed at inclusion and after 3 months. At the end of treatment, which was 3 months after inclusion, there were no statistical differences between the two groups regarding pain and function. However, anxiety and depression were significantly reduced in the MET group compared with the patients receiving arthroscopic surgery. Bearing in mind the low number of included patients in this pilot study, arthroscopy was found to be no better than MET regarding knee pain and overall daily function. The results from this pilot study are similar to other clinical studies, thereby demonstrating that conservative therapy is just as effective as surgery. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. TNF-α and TNFR1 responses to recovery therapies following acute resistance exercise

    PubMed Central

    Townsend, Jeremy R.; Hoffman, Jay R.; Fragala, Maren S.; Jajtner, Adam R.; Gonzalez, Adam M.; Wells, Adam J.; Mangine, Gerald T.; Fukuda, David H.; Stout, Jeffrey R.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to compare the effect of two commonly used therapeutic modalities (a) neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) and (b) cold water immersion (CWI) on circulating tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) and monocyte TNF-α receptor (TNFR1) expression following intense acute resistance exercise and subsequent recovery. Thirty (n = 30) resistance trained men (22.5 ± 2.7 y) performed an acute heavy resistance exercise protocol on three consecutive days followed by one of three recovery methods (CON, NMES, and CWI). Circulating TNF-α levels were assayed and TNFR1 expression on CD14+ monocytes was measured by flow cytometry measured PRE, immediately post (IP), 30-min post (30M), 24 h post (24H), and 48 h post (48H) exercise. Circulating TNF-α was elevated at IP (p = 0.001) and 30M (p = 0.005) and decreased at 24H and 48H recovery from IP in CON (p = 0.015) and CWI (p = 0.011). TNF-α did not significantly decrease from IP during recovery in NMES. TNFR1 expression was elevated (p < 0.001) at 30M compared to PRE and all other time points. No significant differences between groups were observed in TNFR1 expression. During recovery (24H, 48H) from muscle damaging exercise, NMES treatment appears to prevent the decline in circulating TNF-α observed during recovery in those receiving no treatment or CWI. PMID:25741287

  10. The Interacting-Reflecting Training Exercise: Addressing the Therapist's Inner Conversation in Family Therapy Training

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rober, Peter

    2010-01-01

    In recent years several authors have made a beginning in describing therapeutic conversations from a dialogical perspective. Training and supervision, however, have not yet been addressed from a dialogical perspective. In this article, an experiential training exercise is described that is focused on the basic dialogical skills of the trainee:…

  11. Personalized pulmonary rehabilitation and occupational therapy based on cardiopulmonary exercise testing for patients with advanced chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Maekura, Ryoji; Hiraga, Toru; Miki, Keisuke; Kitada, Seigo; Miki, Mari; Yoshimura, Kenji; Yamamoto, Hiroshi; Kawabe, Toshiko; Mori, Masahide

    2015-01-01

    Personalized pulmonary rehabilitation including occupational therapy improves the prognosis of patients with advanced COPD. We previously reported that patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) exhibit three exercise-induced life-threatening conditions: hypoxemia, sympathetic overactivity, and respiratory acidosis. We aimed to verify whether mortality in patients with advanced COPD could be reduced by a personalized pulmonary rehabilitation (PPR) program in hospital, which determines individual safe ranges and includes occupational therapy (PPR-OT), to prevent desaturation and sympathetic nerve activation during daily activities. The novel PPR-OT program was evaluated in a retrospective study of patients with COPD (Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease [GOLD] Grade D) who underwent cardiopulmonary exercise testing (CPET) between April 1990 and December 1999. They received regular treatment without the proposed therapy (control group: n=61; male-to-female ratio [M:F] =57:4; mean age: 68.5±6.7 years) or with the proposed therapy (PPR-OT group: n=46; M:F =44:2; mean age: 68.7±7.1 years). A prospective observational study included patients with COPD receiving home oxygen therapy (HOT) between April 1995 and March 2007 to compare the survival rates of the control group (n=47; M:F ratio =34:13; mean age: 71.3±10.0 years) and the PPR-OT group (n=85; M:F =78:7; mean age: 70.7±6.1 years) who completed the proposed therapy. Survival after CPET or HOT was analyzed using Cox proportional-hazards regression and Kaplan-Meier analyses. In both studies, the program significantly improved all-cause mortality (retrospective study: risk ratio =0.389 [range: 0.172-0.800]; P=0.0094; log-rank test, P=0.0094; observational study: risk ratio =0.515 [range: 0.296-0.933]; P=0.0291; log-rank test, P=0.0232]. At 5 years and 7 years, all-cause mortality was extremely low in patients in the PPR-OT group receiving HOT (18.8% and 28.2%, respectively

  12. Dual AAV therapy ameliorates exercise-induced muscle injury and functional ischemia in murine models of Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yadong; Yue, Yongping; Li, Liang; Hakim, Chady H; Zhang, Keqing; Thomas, Gail D; Duan, Dongsheng

    2013-09-15

    Neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) membrane delocalization contributes to the pathogenesis of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) by promoting functional muscle ischemia and exacerbating muscle injury during exercise. We have previously shown that supra-physiological expression of nNOS-binding mini-dystrophin restores normal blood flow regulation and prevents functional ischemia in transgenic mdx mice, a DMD model. A critical next issue is whether systemic dual adeno-associated virus (AAV) gene therapy can restore nNOS-binding mini-dystrophin expression and mitigate muscle activity-related functional ischemia and injury. Here, we performed systemic gene transfer in mdx and mdx4cv mice using a pair of dual AAV vectors that expressed a 6 kb nNOS-binding mini-dystrophin gene. Vectors were packaged in tyrosine mutant AAV-9 and co-injected (5 × 10(12) viral genome particles/vector/mouse) via the tail vein to 1-month-old dystrophin-null mice. Four months later, we observed 30-50% mini-dystrophin positive myofibers in limb muscles. Treatment ameliorated histopathology, increased muscle force and protected against eccentric contraction-induced injury. Importantly, dual AAV therapy successfully prevented chronic exercise-induced muscle force drop. Doppler hemodynamic assay further showed that therapy attenuated adrenergic vasoconstriction in contracting muscle. Our results suggest that partial transduction can still ameliorate nNOS delocalization-associated functional deficiency. Further evaluation of nNOS binding mini-dystrophin dual AAV vectors is warranted in dystrophic dogs and eventually in human patients.

  13. A Pilot Study: The Beneficial Effects of Combined Statin-exercise Therapy on Cognitive Function in Patients with Coronary Artery Disease and Mild Cognitive Decline.

    PubMed

    Toyama, Kensuke; Sugiyama, Seigo; Oka, Hideki; Hamada, Mari; Iwasaki, Yuri; Horio, Eiji; Rokutanda, Taku; Nakamura, Shinichi; Spin, Joshua M; Tsao, Philip S; Ogawa, Hisao

    2017-01-01

    Objective Hypercholesterolemia, a risk factor in cognitive impairment, can be treated with statins. However, cognitive decline associated with "statins" (HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors) is a clinical concern. This pilot study investigated the effects of combining statins and regular exercise on cognitive function in coronary artery disease (CAD) patients with prior mild cognitive decline. Methods We recruited 43 consecutive CAD patients with mild cognitive decline. These patients were treated with a statin and weekly in-hospital aerobic exercise for 5 months. We measured serum lipids, exercise capacity, and cognitive function using the mini mental state examination (MMSE). Results Low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels were significantly decreased, and maximum exercise capacity (workload) was significantly increased in patients with CAD and mild cognitive decline after treatment compared with before. Combined statin-exercise therapy significantly increased the median (range) MMSE score from 24 (22-25) to 25 (23-27) across the cohort (p<0.01). Changes in body mass index (BMI) were significantly and negatively correlated with changes in the MMSE. After treatment, MMSE scores in the subgroup of patients that showed a decrease in BMI were significantly improved, but not in the BMI-increased subgroup. Furthermore, the patients already on a statin at the beginning of the trial displayed a more significant improvement in MMSE score than statin-naïve patients, implying that exercise might be the beneficial aspect of this intervention as regards cognition. In a multivariate logistic regression analysis adjusted for age >65 years, sex, and presence of diabetes mellitus, a decrease in BMI during statin-exercise therapy was significantly correlated with an increase in the MMSE score (odds ratio: 4.57, 95% confidence interval: 1.05-20.0; p<0.05). Conclusion Statin-exercise therapy may help improve cognitive dysfunction in patients with CAD and pre-existing mild cognitive

  14. Long-Term Effect of Exercise Therapy and Patient Education on Impairments and Activity Limitations in People With Hip Osteoarthritis: Secondary Outcome Analysis of a Randomized Clinical Trial.

    PubMed

    Svege, Ida; Fernandes, Linda; Nordsletten, Lars; Holm, Inger; Risberg, May Arna

    2016-06-01

    The effect of exercise on specific impairments and activity limitations in people with hip osteoarthritis (OA) is limited. The study objective was to evaluate the long-term effect of exercise therapy and patient education on range of motion (ROM), muscle strength, physical fitness, walking capacity, and pain during walking in people with hip OA. This was a secondary outcome analysis of a randomized clinical trial. The setting was a university hospital. One hundred nine people with clinically and radiographically evident hip OA were randomly allocated to receive both exercise therapy and patient education (exercise group) or patient education only (control group). All participants attended a patient education program consisting of 3 group meetings led by 2 physical therapists. Two other physical therapists were responsible for providing the exercise therapy program, consisting of 2 or 3 weekly sessions of strengthening, functional, and stretching exercises over 12 weeks. Both interventions were conducted at a sports medicine clinic. Outcome measures included ROM, isokinetic muscle strength, predicted maximal oxygen consumption determined with the Astrand bicycle ergometer test, and distance and pain during the Six-Minute Walk Test (6MWT). Follow-up assessments were conducted 4, 10, and 29 months after enrollment by 5 physical therapists who were unaware of group allocations. No significant group differences were found for ROM, muscle strength, predicted maximal oxygen consumption, or distance during the 6MWT over the follow-up period, but the exercise group had less pain during the 6MWT than the control group at 10 months (mean difference=-8.5 mm; 95% confidence interval=-16.1, -0.9) and 29 months (mean difference=-9.3 mm; 95% confidence interval=-18.1, -0.6). Limitations of the study were reduced statistical power and 53% rate of adherence to the exercise therapy program. The previously described effect of exercise on self-reported function was not reflected by

  15. Effects of short-period exercise training and orlistat therapy on body composition and maximal power production capacity in obese patients.

    PubMed

    Colak, R; Ozcelik, O

    2004-01-01

    We examined the effects of weight loss induced by diet-orlistat (DO) and diet-orlistat combined with exercise (DOE) on maximal work rate production (Wmax) capacity in obese patients. Total of 24 obese patients were involved in this study. Twelve of them were subjected to DO therapy only and the remaining 12 patients participated in a regular aerobic exercise-training program in addition to DO therapy (DOE). Each patient performed two incremental ramp exercise tests up to exhaustion using an electromagnetically-braked cycle ergometer: one at the onset and one at the end of the 4th week. DOE therapy caused a significant decrease in total body weight: 101.5+/-17.4 kg (basal) vs 96.3+/-17.3 kg (4 wk) associated with a significant decrease in body fat mass: 45.0+/-10.5 kg (basal) vs 40.9+/-9.8 kg (4 wk). DO therapy also resulted in a significant decrease of total body weight 94.9+/-14.9 kg (basal) vs 91.6+/-13.5 kg (4 wk) associated with small but significant decreases in body fat mass: 37.7+/-5.6 kg (basal) to 36.0+/-6.2 kg (4 wk). Weight reduction achieved during DO therapy was not associated with increased Wmax capacity: 106+/-32 W (basal) vs 106+/-33 W (4 wk), while DOE therapy resulted in a markedly increased Wmax capacity: 109+/-39 W (basal) vs 138+/-30 W (4 wk). DO therapy combined with aerobic exercise training resulted in a significant reduction of fat mass tissue and markedly improved the aerobic fitness and Wmax capacities of obese patients. Considering this improvement within such a short period, physicians should consider applying an aerobic exercise-training program to sedentary obese patients for improving their physical fitness and thereby reduce the negative outcomes of obesity.

  16. Effectiveness of Standardized Physical Therapy Exercises for Patients With Difficulty Returning to Usual Activities After Decompression Surgery for Subacromial Impingement Syndrome: Randomized Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Christiansen, David Høyrup; Frost, Poul; Falla, Deborah; Haahr, Jens Peder; Frich, Lars Henrik; Andrea, Linda Christie; Svendsen, Susanne Wulff

    2016-06-01

    Little is known about the effectiveness of exercise programs after decompression surgery for subacromial impingement syndrome. For patients with difficulty returning to usual activities, special efforts may be needed to improve shoulder function. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness at 3 and 12 months of a standardized physical therapy exercise intervention compared with usual care in patients with difficulty returning to usual activities after subacromial decompression surgery. A multicenter randomized controlled trial was conducted. The study was conducted in 6 public departments of orthopedic surgery, 2 departments of occupational medicine, and 2 physical therapy training centers in Central Denmark Region. One hundred twenty-six patients reporting difficulty returning to usual activities at the postoperative clinical follow-up 8 to 12 weeks after subacromial decompression surgery participated. A standardized exercise program consisting of physical therapist-supervised individual training sessions and home training was used. The primary outcome measure was the Oxford Shoulder Score. Secondary outcome measures were the Constant Score and the Fear-Avoidance Beliefs Questionnaire. At 3 and 12 months, follow-up data were obtained for 92% and 83% of the patients, respectively. Intention-to-treat analyses suggested a between-group difference on the Oxford Shoulder Score favoring the exercise group at 3 months, with an adjusted mean difference of 2.0 (95% confidence interval=-0.5, 4.6), and at 12 months, with an adjusted mean difference of 5.8 (95% confidence interval=2.8, 8.9). Significantly larger improvements for the exercise group were observed for most secondary and supplementary outcome measures. The nature of the exercise intervention did not allow blinding of patients and care providers. The standardized physical therapy exercise intervention resulted in statistically significant and clinically relevant improvement in shoulder pain and

  17. The effectiveness of a manual therapy and exercise protocol in patients with thumb carpometacarpal osteoarthritis: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Villafañe, Jorge H; Cleland, Joshua A; Fernández-de-Las-Peñas, César

    2013-04-01

    Double-blind, randomized controlled trial. To examine the effectiveness of a manual therapy and exercise approach relative to a placebo intervention in individuals with carpometacarpal (CMC) joint osteoarthritis (OA). Recent studies have reported the outcomes of exercise, joint mobilization, and neural mobilization interventions used in isolation in patients with CMC joint OA. However, it is not known if using a combination of these interventions as a multimodal approach to treatment would further improve outcomes in this patient population. Sixty patients, 90% female (mean ± SD age, 82 ± 6 years), with CMC joint OA were randomly assigned to receive a multimodal manual treatment approach that included joint mobilization, neural mobilization, and exercise, or a sham intervention, for 12 sessions over 4 weeks. The primary outcome measure was pain. Secondary outcome measures included pressure pain threshold over the first CMC joint, scaphoid, and hamate, as well as pinch and strength measurements. All outcome measures were collected at baseline, immediately following the intervention, and at 1 and 2 months following the end of the intervention. Mixed-model analyses of variance were used to examine the effects of the interventions on each outcome, with group as the between-subject variable and time as the within-subject variable. The mixed-model analysis of variance revealed a group-by-time interaction (F = 47.58, P<.001) for pain intensity, with the patients receiving the multimodal intervention experiencing a greater reduction in pain compared to those receiving the placebo intervention at the end of the intervention, as well as at 1 and 2 months after the intervention (P<.001; all group differences greater than 3.0 cm, which is greater than the minimal clinically important difference of 2.0 cm). A significant group-by-time interaction (F = 3.19, P = .025) was found for pressure pain threshold over the hamate bone immediately after the intervention; however, the

  18. Effects of a systemic enzyme therapy in healthy active adults after exhaustive eccentric exercise: a randomised, two-stage, double-blinded, placebo-controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Marzin, Tobias; Lorkowski, Gerhard; Reule, Claudia; Rau, Stefanie; Pabst, Elisabeth; Vester, Johannes C; Pabst, Helmut

    2016-01-01

    Systemic enzyme therapy may improve symptoms of exhaustive eccentric exercise due to anti-inflammatory properties. In a randomised, placebo-controlled, two-stage clinical trial, systemic enzyme therapy (Wobenzym) was administered for 72 hours before and 72 hours following a day on which subjects performed an exhaustive eccentric exercise (isokinetic loading of the quadriceps). Efficacy criteria (maximal strength and pain) and time points were selected to account for the multidimensional nature of exercise-induced muscle damage symptoms. Subjects were randomised in a crossover (stage I, n=28) and parallel group design (stage II, n=44). Analysis of stage I data demonstrated a significant superiority (Mann-Whitney=0.6153; p=0.0332; one sided) for systemic enzyme therapy compared with placebo. Stage II was designed as a randomised controlled parallel group comparison. Heterogeneity (I(2)>0.5) between stages led to separate analyses of stage I (endurance-trained subjects) and stage II (strength-trained subjects). Combined analysis resulted in no evidence for corresponding treatment effects. Analysis of pooled biomarker data, however, demonstrated significant favourable effects for systemic enzyme therapy in both stages. Systemic enzyme therapy before and after exhaustive eccentric exercise resulted in higher maximal concentric strength in the less strength-trained subjects (stage I) and in significant favourable effects on biomarkers (inflammatory, metabolic and immune) in all subjects. The application of these findings needs further evaluation.

  19. Effects of a systemic enzyme therapy in healthy active adults after exhaustive eccentric exercise: a randomised, two-stage, double-blinded, placebo-controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Marzin, Tobias; Lorkowski, Gerhard; Reule, Claudia; Rau, Stefanie; Pabst, Elisabeth; Vester, Johannes C; Pabst, Helmut

    2016-01-01

    Background Systemic enzyme therapy may improve symptoms of exhaustive eccentric exercise due to anti-inflammatory properties. Methods In a randomised, placebo-controlled, two-stage clinical trial, systemic enzyme therapy (Wobenzym) was administered for 72 hours before and 72 hours following a day on which subjects performed an exhaustive eccentric exercise (isokinetic loading of the quadriceps). Efficacy criteria (maximal strength and pain) and time points were selected to account for the multidimensional nature of exercise-induced muscle damage symptoms. Subjects were randomised in a crossover (stage I, n=28) and parallel group design (stage II, n=44). Results Analysis of stage I data demonstrated a significant superiority (Mann-Whitney=0.6153; p=0.0332; one sided) for systemic enzyme therapy compared with placebo. Stage II was designed as a randomised controlled parallel group comparison. Heterogeneity (I2>0.5) between stages led to separate analyses of stage I (endurance-trained subjects) and stage II (strength-trained subjects). Combined analysis resulted in no evidence for corresponding treatment effects. Analysis of pooled biomarker data, however, demonstrated significant favourable effects for systemic enzyme therapy in both stages. Conclusion Systemic enzyme therapy before and after exhaustive eccentric exercise resulted in higher maximal concentric strength in the less strength-trained subjects (stage I) and in significant favourable effects on biomarkers (inflammatory, metabolic and immune) in all subjects. The application of these findings needs further evaluation. PMID:28879033

  20. Exercise therapy versus arthroscopic partial meniscectomy for degenerative meniscal tear in middle aged patients: randomised controlled trial with two year follow-up

    PubMed Central

    Kise, Nina Jullum; Risberg, May Arna; Stensrud, Silje; Ranstam, Jonas; Engebretsen, Lars; Roos, Ewa M

    2016-01-01

    Objective To determine if exercise therapy is superior to arthroscopic partial meniscectomy for knee function in middle aged patients with degenerative meniscal tears. Design Randomised controlled superiority trial. Setting Orthopaedic departments at two public hospitals and two physiotherapy clinics in Norway. Participants 140 adults, mean age 49.5 years (range 35.7–59.9), with degenerative medial meniscal tear verified by magnetic resonance imaging. 96% had no definitive radiographic evidence of osteoarthritis. Interventions 12 week supervised exercise therapy alone or arthroscopic partial meniscectomy alone. Main outcome measures Intention to treat analysis of between group difference in change in knee injury and osteoarthritis outcome score (KOOS4), defined a priori as the mean score for four of five KOOS subscale scores (pain, other symptoms, function in sport and recreation, and knee related quality of life) from baseline to two year follow-up and change in thigh muscle strength from baseline to three months. Results No clinically relevant difference was found between the two groups in change in KOOS4 at two years (0.9 points, 95% confidence interval −4.3 to 6.1; P=0.72). At three months, muscle strength had improved in the exercise group (P≤0.004). No serious adverse events occurred in either group during the two year follow-up. 19% of the participants allocated to exercise therapy crossed over to surgery during the two year follow-up, with no additional benefit. Conclusion The observed difference in treatment effect was minute after two years of follow-up, and the trial's inferential uncertainty was sufficiently small to exclude clinically relevant differences. Exercise therapy showed positive effects over surgery in improving thigh muscle strength, at least in the short term. Our results should encourage clinicians and middle aged patients with degenerative meniscal tear and no definitive radiographic evidence of osteoarthritis to consider supervised

  1. Exercise therapy may postpone total hip replacement surgery in patients with hip osteoarthritis: a long-term follow-up of a randomised trial

    PubMed Central

    Svege, Ida; Nordsletten, Lars; Fernandes, Linda; Risberg, May Arna

    2015-01-01

    Background Exercise treatment is recommended for all patients with hip osteoarthritis (OA), but its effect on the long-term need for total hip replacement (THR) is unknown. Methods We conducted a long-term follow-up of a randomised trial investigating the efficacy of exercise therapy and patient education versus patient education only on the 6-year cumulative survival of the native hip to THR in 109 patients with symptomatic and radiographic hip OA. Results regarding the primary outcome measure of the trial, self-reported pain at 16 months follow-up, have been reported previously. Results There were no group differences at baseline. The response rate at follow-up was 94%. 22 patients in the group receiving both exercise therapy and patient education and 31 patients in the group receiving patient education only underwent THR during the follow-up period, giving a 6-year cumulative survival of the native hip of 41% and 25%, respectively (p=0.034). The HR for survival of the native hip was 0.56 (CI 0.32 to 0.96) for the exercise therapy group compared with the control group. Median time to THR was 5.4 and 3.5 years, respectively. The exercise therapy group had better self-reported hip function prior to THR or end of study, but no significant differences were found for pain and stiffness. Conclusions Our findings in this explanatory study suggest that exercise therapy in addition to patient education can reduce the need for THR by 44% in patients with hip OA. ClinicalTrials.gov number NCT00319423 (original project protocol) and NCT01338532 (additional protocol for long-term follow-up). PMID:24255546

  2. The effect of exercise therapy in head and neck cancer patients in the treatment of radiotherapy-induced trismus: A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Scherpenhuizen, Anne; van Waes, Anne M A; Janssen, Luuk M; Van Cann, Ellen M; Stegeman, Inge

    2015-08-01

    Trismus is characterized by a reduced ability to open the mouth, directly affecting many aspects of daily life, such as chewing, swallowing, speaking and maintaining oral hygiene. Several studies have shown that trismus affects health related quality of life. Radiotherapy in the head and neck area is identified as one of the most frequent causes of trismus in head and neck cancer (HNC) patients. Currently, there is no standard treatment for trismus. Several stretching techniques and jaw mobilizing devices are available, but their effect in radiotherapy-induced trismus is still largely unknown. With this review we give an overview of the present relevant literature and compare the effect of exercise therapy versus no exercise therapy on jaw mobility, expressed in millimeters mouth opening, in HNC patients with radiotherapy-induced trismus. A systematic literature search in four electronic bibliographic databases was conducted in July 2014. Selected articles were critically appraised on relevance and validity. Best available evidence was analyzed and compared. Three of the four selected articles show a significant increase (p-value<0.05) in maximal interincisal opening (MIO) after exercise therapy using a jaw-mobilizing device. One article reports a significant decrease in MIO. However, this decrease is less in the intervention group, which implies a positive effect of exercise therapy. Based on this current best clinical evidence, it can be assumed that exercise therapy with a jaw-mobilizing device yields better results than no exercise, with regards to opening of the mouth in HNC patients with radiotherapy-induced trismus. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Trauma-focused cognitive behaviour therapy and exercise for chronic whiplash: protocol of a randomised, controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Letitia; Kenardy, Justin; Andersen, Tonny; McGregor, Leanne; Maujean, Annick; Sterling, Michele

    2015-10-01

    As a consequence of a road traffic crash, persistent pain and disability following whiplash injury are common and incur substantial personal and economic costs. Up to 50% of people who experience a whiplash injury will never fully recover and up to 30% will remain moderately to severely disabled by the condition. The reason as to why symptoms persist past the acute to sub-acute stage and become chronic is unclear, but likely results from complex interactions between structural injury, physical impairments, and psychological and psychosocial factors. Psychological responses related to the traumatic event itself are becoming an increasingly recognised factor in the whiplash condition. Despite this recognition, there is limited knowledge regarding the effectiveness of psychological interventions, either delivered alone or in combination with physiotherapy, in reducing the physical and pain-related psychological factors of chronic whiplash. Pilot study results have shown positive results for the use of trauma-focused cognitive behaviour therapy to treat psychological factors, pain and disability in individuals with chronic whiplash. The results have indicated that a combined approach could not only reduce psychological symptoms, but also pain and disability. The primary aim of this randomised, controlled trial is to investigate the effectiveness of combined trauma-focused cognitive behavioural therapy, delivered by a psychologist, and physiotherapy exercise to decrease pain and disability of individuals with chronic whiplash and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). The trial also aims to investigate the effectiveness of the combined therapy in decreasing post-traumatic stress symptoms, anxiety and depression. A total of 108 participants with chronic whiplash-associated disorder (WAD) grade II of > 3 months and < 5 years duration and PTSD (diagnosed with the Clinician Administered PTSD Scale (CAPS) according to the DSM-5) will be recruited for the study. Participants

  4. Responding to Exercise Deficit Disorder in Youth: Integrating Wellness Care into Pediatric Physical Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Faigenbaum, Avery D.; Chu, Donald A.; Paterno, Mark V.; Myer, Gregory D.

    2012-01-01

    The Problem The decline and disinterest in regular physical activity among contemporary youth has created an immediate need to identify and treat these youngsters before they become resistant to our interventions. Key Points Exercise deficit disorder is a term used to describe a condition characterized by reduced levels of physical activity that are inconsistent with current public health recommendations. Pediatric physical therapists are in an enviable position to identify and treat exercise deficit disorder in youth regardless of body size or physical ability. Recommendation If pediatric physical therapists want to become advocates for children’s health and wellness, there is a need to address limitations in the physical therapist professional curriculum, educate families on the benefits of wellness programming, and initiate preventive strategies that identify youth who are inactive, promote daily physical activity and encourage healthy lifestyle choices. PMID:23288000

  5. Effects of a home-exercise therapy programme on cervical and lumbar range of motion among nurses with neck and lower back pain: a quasi-experimental study.

    PubMed

    Freimann, Tiina; Merisalu, Eda; Pääsuke, Mati

    2015-01-01

    Cervical and lumbar range of motion limitations are usually associated with musculoskeletal pain in the neck and lower back, and are a major health problem among nurses. Physical exercise has been evaluated as an effective intervention method for improving cervical and lumbar range of motion, and for preventing and reducing musculoskeletal pain. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of a home-exercise therapy programme on cervical and lumbar range of motion among intensive care unit nurses who had experienced mild to moderate musculoskeletal pain in the neck and or lower back during the previous six months. A quasi-experimental study was conducted among intensive care unit nurses at Tartu University Hospital (Estonia) between May and July 2011. Thirteen nurses who had suffered musculoskeletal pain episodes in the neck and or lower back during the previous six months underwent an 8-week home-exercise therapy programme. Eleven nurses without musculoskeletal pain formed a control group. Questions from the Nordic Musculoskeletal Questionnaire and the 11-point Visual Analogue Scale were used to select potential participants for the experimental group via an assessment of the prevalence and intensity of musculoskeletal pain. Cervical range of motion and lumbar range of motion in flexion, extension, lateral flexion and (cervical range of motion only) rotation were measured with a digital goniometer. A paired t-test was used to compare the measured parameters before and after the home-exercise therapy programme. A Student's t-test was used to analyse any differences between the experimental and control groups. After the home-exercise therapy, there was a significant increase (p < 0.05) in cervical range of motion in flexion, extension, lateral flexion and rotation, and in lumbar range of motion in lateral flexion. Cervical range of motion in flexion was significantly higher (p < 0.01) in the experimental group compared to the control group after

  6. Obesity, diabetes and OSAS induce of sleep disorders: exercise as therapy.

    PubMed

    Alves, Eduardo S; Lira, Fabio S; Santos, Ronaldo V T; Tufik, Sergio; de Mello, Marco T

    2011-08-23

    Sleep is an integral part of good health. Sleep disorders and variations in sleep habits are associated with a low-grade inflammatory status, which may be either a cause or consequence of other conditions, including obesity, diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Several strategies are available to counteract these conditions including continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP), pharmacological and nutritional interventions, and even surgery. At present, our group is investigating the effect of chronic endurance exercise on sleep alterations.

  7. The health benefits and constraints of exercise therapy for wheelchair users: A clinical commentary

    PubMed Central

    Hammill, Henriëtte V.; Strydom, Gert L.

    2017-01-01

    Background There are approximately 1 billion people living with chronic lower limb disability, many of whom are wheelchair users. Objectives Review cardiometabolic and neuromuscular risk profiles of wheelchair users, benefits of regular exercise and the causes of neuromuscular upper limb and hip injuries that hinder regular adherence. Method Literature published between 2013 and 2017 was adopted according to the standard practices for systematic reviews (PRISMA) through Crossref Metadata and Google Scholar searches. Individual paper quality was evaluated using a modified Downs and Black Appraisal Scale. Results The literature search identified 16 600 papers which were excluded if they were non-English, non-peer-reviewed or published before 2013. Finally, 25 papers were accepted, indicating that sedentary wheelchair users have poor cardiometabolic risk profiles (PCMRP) because of a lack of physical activity, limiting their quality of life, characterised by low self-esteem, social isolation and depression. Their predominant mode of physical activity is through upper limb exercises, which not only improves their cardiometabolic risk profiles but also precipitates neuromuscular upper limb overuse injuries. The primary cause of upper limb injuries was attributed to poor wheelchair propulsion related to incorrect chair setup and poor cardiorespiratory fitness. Conclusion Wheelchair users have a high body mass index, body fat percentage and serum lipid, cholesterol and blood glucose concentrations. Empirical investigations illustrate exercise improves their PCMRP and cardiorespiratory fitness levels. Although literature encourages regular exercise, none discusses the need to individualise chair setup in order to eliminate wheelchair pathomechanics and upper limb neuromuscular injuries. Wheelchair users must be encouraged to consult a biokineticist or physiotherapist to review their wheelchair setup so as to eliminate possible incorrect manual wheelchair propulsion

  8. Effects of low-level laser therapy applied before or after plyometric exercise on muscle damage markers: randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Fritsch, Carolina Gassen; Dornelles, Maurício Pinto; Severo-Silveira, Lucas; Marques, Vanessa Bernardes; Rosso, Isabele de Albuquerque; Baroni, Bruno Manfredini

    2016-12-01

    Promising effects of phototherapy on markers of exercise-induced muscle damage has been already demonstrated in constant load or isokinetic protocols. However, its effects on more functional situations, such as plyometric exercises, and when is the best moment to apply this treatment (pre- or post-exercise) remain unclear. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of low-level laser therapy (LLLT) before or after plyometric exercise on quadriceps muscle damage markers. A randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled trial was conducted with 24 healthy men, 12 at pre-exercise treatment group and 12 at post-exercise treatment group. Placebo and LLLT (810 nm, 200 mW per diode, 6 J per diode, 240 J per leg) were randomly applied on right/left knee extensor muscles of each volunteer before/after a plyometric exercise protocol. Muscular echo intensity (ultrasonography images), soreness (visual analogue scale - VAS), and strength impairment (maximal voluntary contraction - MVC) were assessed at baseline, 24, 48, and 72 h post-exercise. Legs treated with LLLT before or after exercise presented significantly smaller increments of echo intensity (values up to 1 %) compared to placebo treatments (increased up to ∼7 %). No significant treatment effect was found for VAS and MVC, although a trend toward better results on LLLT legs have been found for VAS (mean values up to 30 % lesser than placebo leg). In conclusion, LLLT applied before or after plyometric exercise reduces the muscle echo intensity response and possibly attenuates the muscle soreness. However, these positive results were not observed on strength impairment.

  9. Experiences of Older Adults With Mobile Phone Text Messaging as Reminders of Home Exercises After Specialized Manual Therapy for Recurrent Low Back Pain: A Qualitative Study.

    PubMed

    Lilje, Stina Charlotta; Olander, Ewy; Berglund, Johan; Skillgate, Eva; Anderberg, Peter

    2017-03-30

    Clinical experience of manual therapy for musculoskeletal pain is that patients often suffer from recurrent pain and disorders, but that they do not continue to perform their physical home exercises when they are free from symptoms. The chance of positive long-term effects of manual therapy would probably increase if patients were reminded that they are to continue to perform their exercises. Mobile phone text messaging (short messaging service, SMS) is increasingly used as an innovative intervention to remind patient to exercise. However, there are only a few studies on such interventions in the field of low back pain (LBP). Qualitative studies of patients' experiences of receiving text messages as reminders of home exercises after manual treatment for recurrent LBP have to the best of our knowledge never been published. The aim of this study was to explore older persons' common experiences of receiving reminders of home exercises through mobile phone text messaging after specialized manual therapy for recurrent LBP. A total of 7 men and 8 women (67-86 years), who had sought specialized manual therapy (Naprapathic manual therapy) for recurrent LBP were included in the study. Individual one-way text messages as reminders of home exercises (to be performed on a daily basis) were sent to each patient every third day for 3 weeks, then once a week for another 2 weeks. Semistructured interviews with 2 broad, open-ended questions were held and data were analyzed with systematic text condensation, based on Giorgi's principles of psychological phenomenological analysis. The participants appreciated the messages, which were perceived as timely and usable, and also stimulated memorizing. The messages made the participants reflect on the aim of the exercise, value of being reminded, and on their improvement in pain. During the interviews, the participants created their own routines for continued adherence to the exercises. It seems plausible that mobile phone text messaging

  10. Effect of diabetes mellitus on walking distance parameters after supervised exercise therapy for intermittent claudication: A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Hageman, David; Gommans, Lindy Nm; Scheltinga, Marc Rm; Teijink, Joep Aw

    2017-02-01

    Some believe that certain patients with intermittent claudication may be unsuitable for supervised exercise therapy (SET), based on the presence of comorbidities and the possibly increased risks. We conducted a systematic review (MEDLINE, EMBASE and CENTRAL) to summarize evidence on the potential influence of diabetes mellitus (DM) on the response to SET. Randomized and nonrandomized studies that investigated the effect of DM on walking distance after SET in patients with IC were included. Considered outcome measures were maximal, pain-free and functional walking distance (MWD, PFWD and FWD). Three articles met the inclusion criteria ( n = 845). In one study, MWD was 111 meters (128%) longer in the non-DM group compared to the DM group after 3 months of follow-up ( p = 0.056). In a second study, the non-DM group demonstrated a significant increase in PFWD (114 meters, p ⩽ 0.05) after 3 months of follow-up, whereas there was no statistically significant increase for the DM group (54 meters). On the contrary, the largest study of this review did not demonstrate any adverse effect of DM on MWD and FWD after SET. In conclusion, the data evaluating the effects of DM on SET were inadequate to determine if DM impairs the exercise response. While trends in the data do not suggest an impairment, they are not conclusive. Practitioners should consider this limitation when making clinical decisions.

  11. Manual therapy in joint and nerve structures combined with exercises in the treatment of recurrent ankle sprains: A randomized, controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Plaza-Manzano, Gustavo; Vergara-Vila, Marta; Val-Otero, Sandra; Rivera-Prieto, Cristina; Pecos-Martin, Daniel; Gallego-Izquierdo, Tomás; Ferragut-Garcías, Alejandro; Romero-Franco, Natalia

    2016-12-01

    Recurrent ankle sprains often involve residual symptoms for which subjects often perform proprioceptive or/and strengthening exercises. However, the effectiveness of mobilization to influence important nerve structures due to its anatomical distribution like tibial and peroneal nerves is unclear. To analyze the effects of proprioceptive/strengthening exercises versus the same exercises and manual therapy including mobilizations to influence joint and nerve structures in the management of recurrent ankle sprains. A randomized single-blind controlled clinical trial. Fifty-six patients with recurrent ankle sprains and regular sports practice were randomly assigned to experimental or control group. The control group performed 4 weeks of proprioceptive/strengthening exercises; the experimental group performed 4 weeks of the same exercises combined with manual therapy (mobilizations to influence joint and nerve structures). Pain, self-reported functional ankle instability, pressure pain threshold (PPT), ankle muscle strength, and active range of motion (ROM) were evaluated in the ankle joint before, just after and one month after the interventions. The within-group differences revealed improvements in all of the variables in both groups throughout the time. Between-group differences revealed that the experimental group exhibited lower pain levels and self-reported functional ankle instability and higher PPT, ankle muscle strength and ROM values compared to the control group immediately after the interventions and one month later. A protocol involving proprioceptive and strengthening exercises and manual therapy (mobilizations to influence joint and nerve structures) resulted in greater improvements in pain, self-reported functional joint stability, strength and ROM compared to exercises alone. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Effects of lifestyle changes and high-dose β-blocker therapy on exercise capacity in children, adolescents, and young adults with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Bratt, Ewa-Lena; Östman-Smith, Ingegerd

    2015-03-01

    The use of β-blocker therapy in asymptomatic patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy is controversial. This study evaluates the effect of lifestyle changes and high-dose β-blocker therapy on their exercise capacity. A total of 29 consecutive newly diagnosed asymptomatic patients with familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, median age 15 years (range 7-25), were recruited. In all, 16 patients with risk factors for sudden death were treated with propranolol if no contraindications, or equivalent doses of metoprolol; 13 with no risk factors were randomised to metoprolol or no active treatment. Thus, there were three treatment groups, non-selective β-blockade (n=10, propranolol 4.0-11.6 mg/kg/day), selective β-blockade (n=9, metoprolol 2.7-5.9 mg/kg/day), and randomised controls (n=10). All were given recommendations for lifestyle modifications, and reduced energetic exercise significantly (p=0.002). Before study entry, and after 1 year, all underwent bicycle exercise tests with a ramp protocol. There were no differences in exercise capacity between the groups at entry, or follow-up, when median exercise capacity in the groups were virtually identical (2.4, 2.3, and 2.3 watt/kg and 55, 55, and 55 watt/(height in metre) 2 in control, selective, and non-selective groups, respectively. Maximum heart rate decreased in the selective (-29%, p=0.04) and non-selective (-24%, p=0.002) groups. No patient developed a pathological blood-pressure response to exercise because of β-blocker therapy. Boys were more frequently risk-factor positive than girls (75% versus 33%, p=0.048) and had higher physical activity scores than girls at study-entry (p=0.011). Neither selective nor non-selective β-blockade causes significant reductions in exercise capacity in patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy above that induced by lifestyle changes.

  13. Combined aerobic exercise and enzyme replacement therapy rejuvenates the mitochondrial-lysosomal axis and alleviates autophagic blockage in Pompe disease.

    PubMed

    Nilsson, M I; MacNeil, L G; Kitaoka, Y; Suri, R; Young, S P; Kaczor, J J; Nates, N J; Ansari, M U; Wong, T; Ahktar, M; Brandt, L; Hettinga, B P; Tarnopolsky, M A

    2015-10-01

    A unifying feature in the pathogenesis of aging, neurodegenerative disease, and lysosomal storage disorders is the progressive deposition of macromolecular debris impervious to enzyme catalysis by cellular waste disposal mechanisms (e.g., lipofuscin). Aerobic exercise training (AET) has pleiotropic effects and stimulates mitochondrial biogenesis, antioxidant defense systems, and autophagic flux in multiple organs and tissues. Our aim was to explore the therapeutic potential of AET as an ancillary therapy to mitigate autophagic buildup and oxidative damage and rejuvenate the mitochondrial-lysosomal axis in Pompe disease (GSD II/PD). Fourteen weeks of combined recombinant acid α-glucosidase (rhGAA) and AET polytherapy attenuated mitochondrial swelling, fortified antioxidant defense systems, reduced oxidative damage, and augmented glycogen clearance and removal of autophagic debris/lipofuscin in fast-twitch skeletal muscle of GAA-KO mice. Ancillary AET potently augmented the pool of PI4KA transcripts and exerted a mild restorative effect on Syt VII and VAMP-5/myobrevin, collectively suggesting improved endosomal transport and Ca(2+)- mediated lysosomal exocytosis. Compared with traditional rhGAA monotherapy, AET and rhGAA polytherapy effectively mitigated buildup of protein carbonyls, autophagic debris/lipofuscin, and P62/SQSTM1, while enhancing MnSOD expression, nuclear translocation of Nrf-2, muscle mass, and motor function in GAA-KO mice. Combined AET and rhGAA therapy reactivates cellular clearance pathways, mitigates mitochondrial senescence, and strengthens antioxidant defense systems in GSD II/PD. Aerobic exercise training (or pharmacologic targeting of contractile-activity-induced pathways) may have therapeutic potential for mitochondrial-lysosomal axis rejuvenation in lysosomal storage disorders and related conditions (e.g., aging and neurodegenerative disease).

  14. Effects of an exercise therapy protocol on inflammatory markers, perception of pain, and physical performance in individuals with knee osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Aguiar, Grazielle Cordeiro; Do Nascimento, Marcela Rêgo; De Miranda, Aline Silva; Rocha, Natalia Pessoa; Teixeira, Antônio Lúcio; Scalzo, Paula Luciana

    2015-03-01

    Establishing prevention and therapeutic strategies for osteoarthritis (OA) is necessary to minimize functional disability and the impact of the disease on society. The aim of this study was to determine the effects of an exercise therapy protocol on inflammatory markers, perception of pain, and physical performance in individuals with OA of the knee. The protocol consisted of flexibility training and muscle strengthening over 12 weeks with three 80-min sessions per week. Peripheral blood was collected to determine serum levels of interleukin-6 (IL-6), tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), and soluble forms of the TNF-α receptor (sTNFR1 and sTNFR2). A clinical assessment of the musculoskeletal system and Western Ontario and McMaster Universities (WOMAC) questionnaire were applied to evaluate the specific symptoms of knee OA. Pain intensity was evaluated using a visual analog scale (VAS). All measurements were taken before and after the intervention. Twenty-two individuals (mean age 58.8 ± 6.4 years) completed the protocol. A decrease in the perception of pain was evident on VAS (p < 0.001) and pain subscale of the WOMAC (p < 0.001). In addition, there was a reduction in serum levels of IL-6 (p < 0.001). However, changes in the levels of the TNF-α and its soluble receptors were not statistically significant. Physical function subscale score and the WOMAC global score improved significantly (p < 0.001). The training also promoted an increase in the progression load for all muscles groups analyzed (p < 0.001). Our data suggest that the exercise therapy protocol could be a strategy for reducing IL-6 levels, managing pain, and improving function in individuals with OA of the knee. However, more studies are necessary to investigate the issue.

  15. Ezetimibe combined with standard diet and exercise therapy improves insulin resistance and atherosclerotic markers in patients with metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ohbu-Murayama, Kyoko; Adachi, Hisashi; Hirai, Yuji; Enomoto, Mika; Fukami, Ako; Obuchi, Aya; Yoshimura, Ayako; Nakamura, Sachiko; Nohara, Yume; Nakao, Erika; Umeki, Yoko; Fukumoto, Yoshihiro

    2015-05-01

    Ezetimibe lowers serum lipid levels by inhibiting intestinal absorption of dietary and biliary cholesterol. However, the effect of ezetimibe on insulin resistance remains unclear. The aim of the present study was to examine this issue in patients with metabolic syndrome in local-dwelling Japanese, who were not being treated with lipid-lowering drugs. In 2009, 1,943 participants received a health examination in the Tanushimaru Study, a Japanese cohort of the Seven Countries Study, of whom 490 participants had metabolic syndrome. Among them, 61 participants (41 men and 20 women) were examined in the present study. They were treated with 10 mg of ezetimibe once a day for 24 weeks, combined with standard diet and exercise therapy. Bodyweight (P < 0.001), body mass index (P < 0.001), systolic blood pressure (P = 0.003), diastolic blood pressure (P < 0.001), triglycerides (P = 0.002), non-high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (P = 0.001), low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (P < 0.001) and homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (P = 0.011) significantly decreased after the observational period. There were no statistically significant differences in the effects of ezetimibe between men and women. Univariate analysis showed that the reduction of homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance was not associated with the improvement of other metabolic components. Ezetimibe combined with standard diet and exercise therapy improves not only bodyweight and atherogenic lipid profiles, but also insulin resistance, blood pressure and anthropometric factors in metabolic syndrome in local-dwelling Japanese. Interestingly, the improvement of insulin resistance had no correlation with other metabolic components.

  16. Case report of exercise and statin-fibrate combination therapy-caused myopathy in a patient with metabolic syndrome: contradictions between the two main therapeutic pathways.

    PubMed

    László, Andrea; Kalabay, László; Nemcsik, János

    2013-02-06

    Lifestyle modifications including exercise are beneficial and fundamentally part of the therapy of metabolic syndrome, although in most of the cases medical interventions are also required to reach the target values in the laboratory parameters. Statin and fibrate combination therapy is considered to be safe and effective in dyslipidaemia and metabolic syndrome. However, increased physical activity can enhance the statin and fibrate-associated myopathy. Myositis and the rare but life-threatening rhabdomyolysis are causing a conflict between exercise and statin-fibrate therapy, which is yet to be resolved. We present a case of a 43-year-old Caucasian man with metabolic syndrome who had the side-effect of exercise and drug-associated myositis. The patient had only transient moderate complaints and rhabdomyolysis could be avoided with the one-month creatine kinase control, a test which is not recommended routinely by the new guidelines. We would like to turn the spotlight on the possible complications of statin-fibrate therapy and exercise, when strict follow-up is recommended. In this condition high number of patients can be affected and the responsibility of general practitioners is accentuated.

  17. A comparison of home-based exercise programs with and without self-manual therapy in individuals with knee osteoarthritis in community.

    PubMed

    Cheawthamai, Kornkamon; Vongsirinavarat, Mantana; Hiengkaew, Vimonwan; Saengrueangrob, Sasithorn

    2014-07-01

    The present study aimed to compare the effectiveness of the treatment programs of home-based exercise with and without self-manual therapy in individuals with knee osteoarthritis (knee OA) in community. Forty-three participants with knee OA were randomly assigned in groups. All participants received the same home-based exercise program with or without self-manual therapy over 12 weeks. Outcome measures were pain intensity, range of motions, six-minute walk test distance, the knee injury and osteoarthritis outcome score (KOOS), short-form 36 (SF-36) and satisfaction. The results showed that the self-manual therapy program significantly decreased pain at 4 weeks, increased flexion and extension at 4 and 12 weeks, and improved the KOOS in pain item and SF-36 in physical function and mental health items. The home-based exercise group showed significant increase of the six-minute walk distance at 4 and 12 weeks, improvements in the KOOS in pain and symptom items and SF-36 in the physical function and role-emotional items. Overall, the results favored a combination of self-manual therapy and home-based exercise for patients with knee OA, which apparently showed superior benefits in decreasing pain and improving active knee range of motions.

  18. Effect of Home Exercise Program Performance in Patients with Osteoarthritis of the Knee or the Spine on the Visual Analog Scale after Discharge from Physical Therapy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Hamilton; Onishi, Kentaro

    2012-01-01

    The aim of our study was to assess the effect of the frequency of home exercise program (HEP) performance on pain [10-point visual analog scale (VAS)] in patients with osteoarthritis of the spine or knee after more than 6 months discharge from physical therapy (PT). We performed a retrospective chart review of 48 adult patients with a clinical…

  19. Effect of Home Exercise Program Performance in Patients with Osteoarthritis of the Knee or the Spine on the Visual Analog Scale after Discharge from Physical Therapy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Hamilton; Onishi, Kentaro

    2012-01-01

    The aim of our study was to assess the effect of the frequency of home exercise program (HEP) performance on pain [10-point visual analog scale (VAS)] in patients with osteoarthritis of the spine or knee after more than 6 months discharge from physical therapy (PT). We performed a retrospective chart review of 48 adult patients with a clinical…

  20. Chest physical therapy, breathing techniques and exercise in children with CF.

    PubMed

    McIlwaine, Maggie

    2007-03-01

    Chest physiotherapy in the form of airway clearance techniques and exercise has played an important role in the treatment of cystic fibrosis. Until the 1990s the primary airway clearance technique used was postural drainage combined with percussion and vibration (PD&P). It was introduced into the treatment of CF with little evidence to support its efficacy and once established, it has been difficult ethically to perform a study comparing PD&P to no treatment. A common question, yet unanswered is when should it be commenced, especially for the newly diagnosed asymptomatic CF patient? Recently, the technique of PD&P has been modified to include only non-dependant head-down positioning due to the detrimental effects of placing a person in a Trendelenburg position. In the 1990s other airway clearance techniques gained popularity, in that they could be performed independently, in a sitting position and avoided many of the detrimental effects of PD&P. These techniques include the Active cycle of breathing technique, formally called the Forced expiration technique and Autogenic drainage. Both these breathing techniques aim at using expiratory airflow to mobilize secretions up the airways and incorporate breathing strategies to assist in the homogeneity of ventilation. Studies suggest that both these techniques are as effective if not more effective than as PD&P and offer many advantages over PD&P. It has been suggested that exercise can be used as an airway clearance technique; however the literature does not support this. Rather, when exercise is used in addition to an airway clearance technique there is enhanced secretion removal and an overall benefit to the patient. Further research needs to be directed at assessing the effects of an airway clearance technique on the individual patient using appropriate outcome measures.

  1. High-intensity Exercise in Men with Type 1 Diabetes and Mode of Insulin Therapy.

    PubMed

    Gawrecki, Andrzej; Naskret, Dariusz; Niedzwiecki, Pawel; Duda-Sobczak, Anna; Araszkiewicz, Aleksandra; Zozulinska-Ziolkiewicz, Dorota

    2017-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the impact of high intensity exercise on glucose levels and risk of metabolic decompensation in males with type 1 diabetes (T1D), depending on the method of insulin administration. The study comprised 29 males (aged 25.3±5.1 years; duration of diabetes 10.3±3.2 years) treated with continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (CSII) or multiple daily insulin injections (MDI). Treadmill exercise test was performed twice in each patient until subjective exhaustion as maximum according to the Borg scale. All the patients achieved ≥85% of the maximal heart rate. Distance during the test was 4 500±1 400 m and 4 473±1 559 m in the MDI and CSII groups, respectively, which was achieved in 31±8 min. During the test and in the 6 h after, no clinically significant episodes of hypoglycemia occurred. Mean glucose levels did not exceed 10 mmol/L in most patients. The risk of the composite endpoint (hypoglycemia<3.8 mmol/L, hyperglycemia≥16.6 mmol/L, ketones≥0.6 mmol/L, and lactate>2.2 mmol/L) was higher in patients treated with MDI than CSII (OR3.75, 95%CI:1.22-11.52, p=0.02). In conclusion, planned high intensity physical effort in men with well-controlled T1D is metabolically safe. CSII shows greater metabolic advantage over MDI during and after high intensity exercise in men with T1D. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  2. Delaying ACL reconstruction and treating with exercise therapy alone may alter prognostic factors for 5-year outcome: an exploratory analysis of the KANON trial.

    PubMed

    Filbay, Stephanie R; Roos, Ewa M; Frobell, Richard B; Roemer, Frank; Ranstam, Jonas; Lohmander, L Stefan

    2017-05-17

    Identify injury-related, patient-reported and treatment-related prognostic factors for 5-year outcomes in acutely ACL-ruptured individuals managed with early reconstruction plus exercise therapy, exercise therapy plus delayed reconstruction or exercise therapy alone. Exploratory analysis of the Knee Anterior Cruciate Ligament, Nonsurgical versus Surgical Treatment (KANON) trial (ISRCTN84752559). Relationships between prognostic factors (baseline cartilage, meniscus and osteochondral damage, baseline extension deficit, baseline patient-reported outcomes, number of rehabilitation visits, graft/contralateral ACL rupture, non-ACL surgery and ACL treatment strategy) and 5-year Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS) pain, symptoms, sport/recreation and quality of life (QOL) scores were explored using multivariable linear regression. Estimates were adjusted for sex, age, body mass index, preinjury activity level, education and smoking. For all participants (n=118), graft/contralateral ACL rupture, non-ACL surgery and worse baseline 36-item Short-Form Mental Component Scores were associated with worse outcomes. Treatment with exercise therapy alone was a prognostic factor for less knee symptoms compared with early reconstruction plus exercise therapy (regression coefficient 10.1, 95% CI 2.3 to 17.9). Baseline meniscus lesion was associated with worse sport/recreation function (-14.4, 95% CI -27.6 to -1.3) and osteochondral lesions were associated with worse QOL (-12.3, 95% CI -24.3 to -0.4) following early reconstruction plus exercise therapy. In the same group, undergoing additional non-ACL surgery and worse baseline KOOS scores were prognostic for worse outcome on all KOOS subscales. Following delayed reconstruction, baseline meniscus damage was a prognostic factor for less pain (14.3, 95% CI 0.7 to 27.9). Following exercise therapy alone, undergoing non-ACL surgery was prognostic for worse pain. Treatment-dependent differences in prognostic factors

  3. Adaptive pacing, cognitive behaviour therapy, graded exercise, and specialist medical care for chronic fatigue syndrome: a cost-effectiveness analysis.

    PubMed

    McCrone, Paul; Sharpe, Michael; Chalder, Trudie; Knapp, Martin; Johnson, Anthony L; Goldsmith, Kimberley A; White, Peter D

    2012-01-01

    The PACE trial compared the effectiveness of adding adaptive pacing therapy (APT), cognitive behaviour therapy (CBT), or graded exercise therapy (GET), to specialist medical care (SMC) for patients with chronic fatigue syndrome. This paper reports the relative cost-effectiveness of these treatments in terms of quality adjusted life years (QALYs) and improvements in fatigue and physical function. Resource use was measured and costs calculated. Healthcare and societal costs (healthcare plus lost production and unpaid informal care) were combined with QALYs gained, and changes in fatigue and disability; incremental cost-effectiveness ratios (ICERs) were computed. SMC patients had significantly lower healthcare costs than those receiving APT, CBT and GET. If society is willing to value a QALY at £30,000 there is a 62.7% likelihood that CBT is the most cost-effective therapy, a 26.8% likelihood that GET is most cost effective, 2.6% that APT is most cost-effective and 7.9% that SMC alone is most cost-effective. Compared to SMC alone, the incremental healthcare cost per QALY was £18,374 for CBT, £23,615 for GET and £55,235 for APT. From a societal perspective CBT has a 59.5% likelihood of being the most cost-effective, GET 34.8%, APT 0.2% and SMC alone 5.5%. CBT and GET dominated SMC, while APT had a cost per QALY of £127,047. ICERs using reductions in fatigue and disability as outcomes largely mirrored these findings. Comparing the four treatments using a health care perspective, CBT had the greatest probability of being the most cost-effective followed by GET. APT had a lower probability of being the most cost-effective option than SMC alone. The relative cost-effectiveness was even greater from a societal perspective as additional cost savings due to reduced need for informal care were likely.

  4. Evaluating the Training Effects of Two Swallowing Rehabilitation Therapies Using Surface Electromyography--Chin Tuck Against Resistance (CTAR) Exercise and the Shaker Exercise.

    PubMed

    Sze, Wei Ping; Yoon, Wai Lam; Escoffier, Nicolas; Rickard Liow, Susan J

    2016-04-01

    In this study, the efficacy of two dysphagia interventions, the Chin Tuck against Resistance (CTAR) and Shaker exercises, were evaluated based on two principles in exercise science-muscle-specificity and training intensity. Both exercises were developed to strengthen the suprahyoid muscles, whose contractions facilitate the opening of the upper esophageal sphincter, thereby improving bolus transfer. Thirty-nine healthy adults performed two trials of both exercises in counter-balanced order. Surface electromyography (sEMG) recordings were simultaneously collected from suprahyoid muscle group and sternocleidomastoid muscle during the exercises. Converging results using sEMG amplitude analyses suggested that the CTAR was more specific in targeting the suprahyoid muscles than the Shaker exercise. Fatigue analyses on sEMG signals further indicated that the suprahyoid muscle group were equally or significantly fatigued (depending on metric), when participants carried out CTAR compared to the Shaker exercise. Importantly, unlike during Shaker exercise, the sternocleidomastoid muscles were significantly less activated and fatigued during CTAR. Lowering the chin against resistance is therefore sufficiently specific and intense to fatigue the suprahyoid muscles.

  5. Cost-effectiveness of exercise therapy versus general practitioner care for osteoarthritis of the hip: design of a randomised clinical trial.

    PubMed

    van Es, Pauline P; Luijsterburg, Pim A J; Dekker, Joost; Koopmanschap, Marc A; Bohnen, Arthur M; Verhaar, Jan A N; Koes, Bart W; Bierma-Zeinstra, Sita M A

    2011-10-12

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is the most common joint disease, causing pain and functional impairments. According to international guidelines, exercise therapy has a short-term effect in reducing pain/functional impairments in knee OA and is therefore also generally recommended for hip OA. Because of its high prevalence and clinical implications, OA is associated with considerable (healthcare) costs. However, studies evaluating cost-effectiveness of common exercise therapy in hip OA are lacking. Therefore, this randomised controlled trial is designed to investigate the cost-effectiveness of exercise therapy in conjunction with the general practitioner's (GP) care, compared to GP care alone, for patients with hip OA. Patients aged ≥ 45 years with OA of the hip, who consulted the GP during the past year for hip complaints and who comply with the American College of Rheumatology criteria, are included. Patients are randomly assigned to either exercise therapy in addition to GP care, or to GP care alone. Exercise therapy consists of (maximally) 12 treatment sessions with a physiotherapist, and home exercises. These are followed by three additional treatment sessions in the 5th, 7th and 9th month after the first treatment session. GP care consists of usual care for hip OA, such as general advice or prescribing pain medication. Primary outcomes are hip pain and hip-related activity limitations (measured with the Hip disability Osteoarthritis Outcome Score [HOOS]), direct costs, and productivity costs (measured with the PROductivity and DISease Questionnaire). These parameters are measured at baseline, at 6 weeks, and at 3, 6, 9 and 12 months follow-up. To detect a 25% clinical difference in the HOOS pain score, with a power of 80% and an alpha 5%, 210 patients are required. Data are analysed according to the intention-to-treat principle. Effectiveness is evaluated using linear regression models with repeated measurements. An incremental cost-effectiveness analysis and an

  6. Effect of low-level laser therapy (808 nm) on skeletal muscle after endurance exercise training in rats

    PubMed Central

    Assis, Livia; Yamashita, Fernanda; Magri, Angela M. P.; Fernandes, Kelly R.; Yamauchi, Liria; Renno, Ana C. M.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Low-level laser therapy (LLLT) has been demonstrated to be effective in optimizing skeletal muscle performance in animal experiments and in clinical trials. However, little is known about the effects of LLLT on muscle recovery after endurance training. OBJECTIVE: This study evaluates the effects of low-level laser therapy (LLLT) applied after an endurance training protocol on biochemical markers and morphology of skeletal muscle in rats. METHOD: Wistar rats were divided into control group (CG), trained group (TG), and trained and laser irradiated group (TLG). The endurance training was performed on a treadmill, 1 h/day, 5 days/wk, for 8 wk at 60% of the maximal speed reached during the maximal effort test (Tmax) and laser irradiation was applied after training. RESULTS: Both trained groups showed significant increase in speed compared to the CG. The TLG demonstrated a significantly reduced lactate level, increased tibialis anterior (TA) fiber cross-section area, and decreased TA fiber density. Myogenin expression was higher in soleus and TA muscles in both trained groups. In addition, LLLT produced myogenin downregulation in the TA muscle of trained animals. CONCLUSION: These results suggest that LLLT could be an effective therapeutic approach for stimulating recovery during an endurance exercise protocol. PMID:26647747

  7. Exercise: Benefits of Exercise

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... show that people with arthritis, heart disease, or diabetes benefit from regular exercise. Exercise also helps people ... or difficulty walking. To learn about exercise and diabetes, see "Exercise and Type 2 Diabetes" from Go4Life®, ...

  8. Competency-Based Training: Objective Structured Clinical Exercises (OSCE) in Marriage and Family Therapy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, John K.

    2010-01-01

    The field of marriage and family therapy (MFT) has recently engaged in the process of defining core competencies for the profession. Many MFT training programs are adapting their curriculum to develop more competency-based training strategies. The Objective Structured Clinical "Examination" (OSCE) is widely used in the medical profession to assess…

  9. Competency-Based Training: Objective Structured Clinical Exercises (OSCE) in Marriage and Family Therapy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, John K.

    2010-01-01

    The field of marriage and family therapy (MFT) has recently engaged in the process of defining core competencies for the profession. Many MFT training programs are adapting their curriculum to develop more competency-based training strategies. The Objective Structured Clinical "Examination" (OSCE) is widely used in the medical profession to assess…

  10. The role of spinal manipulation, soft-tissue therapy, and exercise in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: a review of the literature and proposal of an anatomical explanation.

    PubMed

    Engel, Roger; Vemulpad, Subramanyam

    2011-09-01

    The premise that lung function can regulate chest wall mobility is an accepted concept. Descriptions of the primary and accessory respiratory structures do not usually include spinal components as a part of these classifications. The case for including these components as a part of the respiratory mechanism and their role in the development of dyspnea and chest wall rigidity in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is reviewed. Mechanical impairment of the chest wall is a contributing factor in the prognosis of COPD. Reducing this impairment improves prognosis. Because spinal manipulation and soft-tissue therapy increase joint mobility and decrease muscle hypertonicity, respectively, applying these interventions to the chest wall in COPD could reduce chest wall rigidity, thereby improving breathing mechanics. Improvements in breathing mechanics reduce the work of the respiratory muscles and delay the onset of dyspnea. Exercise capacity is reliant on the ability to overcome activity-limiting dyspnea, which usually occurs prior to maximum exercise capacity being reached. Delaying the onset of dyspnea permits more exercise to be performed before dyspnea develops. Spinal manipulation and soft-tissue therapy have the potential to deliver such a delay. Because exercise tolerance is considered to be a strong predictor of quality of life and survival in COPD, any increase in exercise capacity would therefore improve prognosis for the disease.

  11. Effect of dance therapy on blood pressure and exercise capacity of individuals with hypertension: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Conceição, Lino Sergio Rocha; Neto, Mansueto Gomes; do Amaral, Mayra Alves Soares; Martins-Filho, Paulo Ricardo Saquete; Oliveira Carvalho, Vitor

    2016-10-01

    Dance therapy is a less conventional modality of physical activity in cardiovascular rehabilitation. We performed a systematic review and meta-analysis to investigate the effects of dance therapy in hypertensive patients. Pubmed, Scopus, LILACS, IBECS, MEDLINE and SciELO via Virtual Health Library (Bireme) (from the earliest data available to February 2016) for controlled trials that investigated the effects of dance therapy on exercise capacity, systolic (SBP) and diastolic (DBP) blood pressure in hypertensive patients. Weighted mean differences (WMD) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated, and heterogeneity was assessed using the I(2) test. Four studies met the eligibility criteria. Dance therapy resulted in a significant reduction in systolic blood pressure (WMD -12.01mmHg; 95% CI: -16.08, -7.94mmHg; P<0.0001) when compared with control subjects. Significant reduction in diastolic blood pressure were also found (WMD -3.38mmHg; 95% CI: -4.81, -1.94mmHg; P<0.0001), compared with control group. Exercise capacity showed a significant improvement (WMD 1.31; 95% CI: 0.16, 2.47; P<0.03). A moderate to high heterogeneity was observed in our analysis: I(2)=92% to SBP, I(2)=55% to DBP, and I(2)=82% to exercise capacity. Our meta-analysis showed a positive effect of dance therapy on exercise capacity and reduction of SBP and DBP in individuals with hypertension. However, the moderate to high heterogeneity found in our analysis limits a pragmatic recommendation of dance therapy in individuals with hypertension. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Attenuation of mania-like behavior in Na(+),K(+)-ATPase α3 mutant mice by prospective therapies for bipolar disorder: melatonin and exercise.

    PubMed

    Kirshenbaum, G S; Burgess, C R; Déry, N; Fahnestock, M; Peever, J H; Roder, J C

    2014-02-28

    Bipolar disorder is a neuropsychiatric disease characterized by states of mania with or without depression. Pharmacological treatments can be inadequate at regulating mood for many individuals. Melatonin therapy and aerobic exercise are independent prospective therapies for bipolar disorder that have shown potential as mood stabilizers in humans. Myshkin mice (Myk/+) carry a heterozygous missense mutation in the neuronal Na(+),K(+)-ATPase α3 and model mania-related symptoms of bipolar disorder including increased activity, risk-taking behavior and reductions in sleep. One cohort of Myk/+ and wild-type littermates (+/+) was treated with melatonin and a separate cohort was treated with voluntary exercise. Mania-related behavior was assessed in both cohorts. The effect of melatonin on sleep and the effect of exercise on brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) expression in the hippocampus were assayed. Melatonin and voluntary wheel running were both effective at reducing mania-related behavior in Myk/+ but did not affect behavior in +/+. Melatonin increased sleep in Myk/+ and did not change sleep in +/+. Myk/+ showed higher baseline levels of BDNF protein in the hippocampus than +/+. Exercise increased BDNF protein in +/+ hippocampus, while it did not significantly affect BDNF levels in Myk/+ hippocampus. These findings support initial studies in humans indicating that melatonin and exercise are useful independent adjunct therapies for bipolar disorder. Their effects on mood regulation should be further examined in randomized clinical trials. Our results also suggest that hippocampal BDNF may not mediate the effects of exercise on mania-related behavior in the Myk/+ model of mania.

  13. Physical therapy and active exercises--an adequate treatment for prevention of late whiplash syndrome? Randomized controlled trial in 200 patients.

    PubMed

    Vassiliou, Timon; Kaluza, Gert; Putzke, Caroline; Wulf, Hinnerk; Schnabel, Michael

    2006-09-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the effect of a physical therapy regimen including active exercises with the current standard treatment on reduction of pain 6 weeks and 6 months after whiplash injury caused by motor vehicle collision. Two hundred patients were enrolled in a prospective randomized controlled trial. In the standard group, treatment consisted of immobilization with a soft collar over 7 days. In the physical therapy group, patients were scheduled for 10 physical therapy appointments including active exercises within 14 days after enrollment. Pain intensity was rated by all patients daily during the first week, the sixth week, and 6 months after recruitment, using a numeric rating scale (0-10). Data analyses were performed by comparing the mean (over 1 week) pain scores between the two different treatment groups. Ninety-seven patients were randomly assigned to the standard treatment group and 103 to the physical therapy group. During the first week, there was no significant difference in mean pain intensity between the standard treatment group (4.76+/-2.15) and the physical therapy group (4.36+/-2.14). However, after 6 weeks, mean pain intensity was significantly (p=0.002) lower in the physical therapy group (1.49+/-2.26 versus 2.7+/-2.78). Similarly, after 6 months, significantly (p<0.001) less pain was reported in the physical therapy group (1.17+/-2.13) than the standard treatment group (2.33+/-2.56). We conclude that a physical therapy regimen which includes active exercises is superior in reducing pain 6 weeks and 6 months after whiplash injury compared to the current standard treatment with a soft collar.

  14. Experiences and perspectives of patients with post-polio syndrome and therapists with exercise and cognitive behavioural therapy.

    PubMed

    Bakker, Minne; Schipper, Karen; Koopman, Fieke S; Nollet, Frans; Abma, Tineke A

    2016-02-10

    Many persons affected with poliomyelitis develop post-polio syndrome (PPS) later in their life. Recently, the effectiveness of Exercise Therapy (ET) and Cognitive Behavioural Therapy (CBT) for PPS has been evaluated in a randomized controlled trial, but did not show a decrease in fatigue or improvement in secondary endpoints like Quality of Life and self-perceived activity limitations. The aim of this explorative study was to gain insight in the perceived effects and experiences of the interventions from the perspectives of the patients and therapists. Qualitative data were collected through semi-structured interviews with 17 patients and 7 therapists. All participants were involved in the trial. A thematic analysis of the data was performed. Some patients experienced a short term enhanced endurance and a better use of energy during the day. However, in general patients did not experience a long lasting reduction of fatigue from the CBT or ET. Mainly patients of the CBT, but also some patients of the ET described an increase of self-esteem and self-acceptance. As a result, patients were sometimes better able to perform physical activities during the day. In contrast to the CBT, the ET was in general perceived by the patients as an intensive therapy, which was difficult to fit into their daily routine. Therapists of both the CBT and the ET struggled with a low intrinsic motivation of the patients in the study. This made it sometimes difficult for the therapists to follow the protocol. Confirming the negative quantitative study outcome, the qualitative results did not demonstrate lasting effects on fatigue. Patients did, however, experience some benefits on self-esteem and acceptance of the disease. This study showed that it is of great importance to work with feasible interventions; they should fit the patients' needs on a practical (fit into their daily routine) and mental (fit their need for support) level.

  15. Effectiveness of conservative interventions including exercise, manual therapy and medical management in adults with shoulder impingement: a systematic review and meta-analysis of RCTs

    PubMed Central

    Steuri, Ruedi; Sattelmayer, Martin; Elsig, Simone; Kolly, Chloé; Tal, Amir; Taeymans, Jan

    2017-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effectiveness of conservative interventions for pain, function and range of motion in adults with shoulder impingement. Design Systematic review and meta-analysis of randomised trials. Data sources Medline, CENTRAL, CINAHL, Embase and PEDro were searched from inception to January 2017. Study selection criteria Randomised controlled trials including participants with shoulder impingement and evaluating at least one conservative intervention against sham or other treatments. Results For pain, exercise was superior to non-exercise control interventions (standardised mean difference (SMD) −0.94, 95% CI −1.69 to −0.19). Specific exercises were superior to generic exercises (SMD −0.65, 95% CI −0.99 to −0.32). Corticosteroid injections were superior to no treatment (SMD −0.65, 95% CI −1.04 to −0.26), and ultrasound guided injections were superior to non-guided injections (SMD −0.51, 95% CI −0.89 to −0.13). Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDS) had a small to moderate SMD of −0.29 (95% CI −0.53 to −0.05) compared with placebo. Manual therapy was superior to placebo (SMD −0.35, 95% CI −0.69 to −0.01). When combined with exercise, manual therapy was superior to exercise alone, but only at the shortest follow-up (SMD −0.32, 95% CI −0.62 to −0.01). Laser was superior to sham laser (SMD −0.88, 95% CI −1.48 to −0.27). Extracorporeal shockwave therapy (ECSWT) was superior to sham (−0.39, 95% CI −0.78 to –0.01) and tape was superior to sham (−0.64, 95% CI −1.16 to −0.12), with small to moderate SMDs. Conclusion Although there was only very low quality evidence, exercise should be considered for patients with shoulder impingement symptoms and tape, ECSWT, laser or manual therapy might be added. NSAIDS and corticosteroids are superior to placebo, but it is unclear how these treatments compare to exercise. PMID:28630217

  16. Protocol for: Sheffield Obesity Trial (SHOT): A randomised controlled trial of exercise therapy and mental health outcomes in obese adolescents [ISRCNT83888112

    PubMed Central

    Daley, Amanda J; Copeland, Robert J; Wright, Neil P; Wales, Jerry KH

    2005-01-01

    Background While obesity is known to have many physiological consequences, the psychopathology of this condition has not featured prominently in the literature. Cross-sectional studies have indicated that obese children have increased odds of experiencing poor quality of life and mental health. However, very limited trial evidence has examined the efficacy of exercise therapy for enhancing mental health outcomes in obese children, and the Sheffield Obesity Trial (SHOT) will provide evidence of the efficacy of supervised exercise therapy in obese young people aged 11–16 years versus usual care and an attention-control intervention. Method/design SHOT is a randomised controlled trial where obese young people are randomised to receive; (1) exercise therapy, (2) attention-control intervention (involving body-conditioning exercises and games that do not involve aerobic activity), or (3) usual care. The exercise therapy and attention-control sessions will take place three times per week for eight weeks and a six-week home programme will follow this. Ninety adolescents aged between 11–16 years referred from a children's hospital for evaluation of obesity or via community advertisements will need to complete the study. Participants will be recruited according to the following criteria: (1) clinically obese and aged 11–16 years (Body Mass Index Centile > 98th UK standard) (2) no medical condition that would restrict ability to be active three times per week for eight weeks and (3) not diagnosed with insulin dependent diabetes or receiving oral steroids. Assessments of outcomes will take place at baseline, as well as four (intervention midpoint) and eight weeks (end of intervention) from baseline. Participants will be reassessed on outcome measures five and seven months from baseline. The primary endpoint is physical self-perceptions. Secondary outcomes include physical activity, self-perceptions, depression, affect, aerobic fitness and BMI. PMID:16259624

  17. Effects of aerobic exercise therapy and cognitive behavioural therapy on functioning and quality of life in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis: protocol of the FACTS-2-ALS trial

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a fatal progressive neurodegenerative disorder affecting motor neurons in the spinal cord, brainstem and motor cortex, leading to muscle weakness. Muscle weakness may result in the avoidance of physical activity, which exacerbates disuse weakness and cardiovascular deconditioning. The impact of the grave prognosis may result in depressive symptoms and hopelessness. Since there is no cure for ALS, optimal treatment is based on symptom management and preservation of quality of life (QoL), provided in a multidisciplinary setting. Two distinctly different therapeutic interventions may be effective to improve or preserve daily functioning and QoL at the highest achievable level: aerobic exercise therapy (AET) to maintain or enhance functional capacity and cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) to improve coping style and cognitions in patients with ALS. However, evidence to support either approach is still insufficient, and the underlying mechanisms of the approaches remain poorly understood. The primary aim of the FACTS-2-ALS trial is to study the effects of AET and CBT, in addition to usual care, compared to usual care alone, on functioning and QoL in patients with ALS. Methods / Design A multicentre, single-blinded, randomized controlled trial with a postponed information model will be conducted. A sample of 120 patients with ALS (1 month post diagnosis) will be recruited from 3 university hospitals and 1 rehabilitation centre. Patients will be randomized to one of three groups i.e. (1) AET + usual care, (2) CBT + usual care, (3) Usual care. AET consists of a 16-week aerobic exercise programme, on 3 days a week. CBT consists of individual psychological support of patients in 5 to 10 sessions over a 16-week period. QoL, functioning and secondary outcome measures will be assessed at baseline, immediately post intervention and at 3- and 6-months follow-up. Discussion The FACTS-2-ALS study is the first theory

  18. Education, progressive muscle relaxation therapy, and exercise for the treatment of night eating syndrome. A pilot study.

    PubMed

    Vander Wal, Jillon S; Maraldo, Toni M; Vercellone, Allison C; Gagne, Danielle A

    2015-06-01

    Night eating syndrome (NES) is a circadian rhythm disorder in which food intake is shifted toward the end of the day, interfering with sleep. According to the biobehavioral model of NES, the disorder is the result of a genetic predisposition that, coupled with stress, leads to enhanced reuptake of serotonin, thereby dysregulating circadian rhythms and decreasing satiety. Using the biobehavioral model as a guide, we developed a brief behavioral intervention using education, relaxation strategies, and exercise to address the core symptoms of NES. In this pilot randomized controlled clinical trial, 44 participants with NES were randomly assigned to an educational group (E; n = 14), E plus progressive muscle relaxation therapy (PMR; n = 15); or PMR plus exercise (PMR Plus, n = 15). Participants received a baseline intervention with 1- and 3-week follow-up sessions. Effectiveness analyses showed that participants in all three groups evidenced significant reductions on measures of NES symptoms (p < .001), depression (p < .05), anxiety (p < .01), and perceived stress (p < .05). However, the only significant between group change was for the percent of food eaten after the evening meal, with the PMR group showing the greatest reduction (-30.54%), followed by the PMR Plus group (-20.42%) and the E group (-9.5%); only the difference between the PMR and E groups was statistically significant (p = .012). Reductions in NES scores were significantly associated with reductions on measures of depression (r = .47; p < .01) and perceived stress (r = .37; p < .05), but not anxiety (r = .26, p = ns). Results support the role of education and relaxation in the behavioral treatment of NES. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Efficacy and safety of hyaluronan treatment in combination therapy with home exercise for knee osteoarthritis pain.

    PubMed

    Stitik, Todd P; Blacksin, Marcia F; Stiskal, Doreen M; Kim, Jong H; Foye, Patrick M; Schoenherr, Lisa; Choi, Eun-Seok; Chen, Boqing; Saunders, Howard J; Nadler, Scott F

    2007-02-01

    To assess the efficacy and safety of intra-articular injections of sodium hyaluronate combined with a home exercise program (HEP) in the management of pain associated with osteoarthritis (OA) of the knee. Single-blinded, parallel-design, 1-year clinical study with sequential enrollment. University-based outpatient physiatric practice. Sixty patients (18 men, 42 women; age, > or =50 y) with moderate-to-severe pain associated with OA of the knee. (1) Five weekly intra-articular hyaluronate injections (5-HYL); (2) 3 weekly intra-articular hyaluronate injections (3-HYL); or (3) a combination of an HEP with 3 weekly intra-articular hyaluronate injections (3-HYL+HEP). The primary outcome measure was a 100-mm visual analog scale for pain after a 50-foot walk (15.24 m). Secondary measures included the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index subscales. The 3-HYL+HEP group had significantly faster onset of pain relief compared with the 3-HYL (P<.01) and 5-HYL groups (P=.01). All groups showed a mean symptomatic improvement from baseline (reduction in baseline pain at 3 mo was 59%, 49%, and 48% for the 3-HYL+HEP, 3-HYL, and 5-HYL groups, respectively) that was clinically and statistically significant. There were no between-group differences in the incidence or nature of adverse events. The combined use of hyaluronate injections with HEP should be considered for management of moderate-to-severe pain in patients with knee OA.

  20. Exercise therapy improves aerobic capacity of inpatients with major depressive disorder.

    PubMed

    Kerling, Arno; von Bohlen, Anne; Kück, Momme; Tegtbur, Uwe; Grams, Lena; Haufe, Sven; Gützlaff, Elke; Kahl, Kai G

    2016-06-01

    Unipolar depression is one of the most common diseases worldwide and is associated with a higher cardiovascular risk partly due to reduced aerobic capacity. Therefore, the aim of our study was to examine whether a structured aerobic training program can improve aerobic capacity in inpatients with MDD (major depressive disorder). Overall, 25 patients (13 women, 12 men) diagnosed with MDD were included in the study. Parameters of aerobic capacity, such as maximum performance, maximum oxygen consumption, and VAT (ventilatory anaerobic threshold), were assessed on a bicycle ergometer before and 6 weeks after a training period (three times per week for 45 min on two endurance machines). In addition, a constant load test was carried out at 50% of the maximum performance prior to and after the training period. The performance data were compared with 25 healthy controls matched for sex, age, and body mass index before and after the training period. Compared to controls, patients with MDD had significantly lower aerobic capacity. After training, there was a significant improvement in their performance data. A significant difference remained only for VAT between patients with MDD and healthy controls. With regard to the coincidence of MDD with cardiovascular and cardiometabolic disorders, a structured supervised exercise program carried out during hospitalization is a useful supplement for patients with MDD.

  1. The effect of massage therapy and/or exercise therapy on subacute or long-lasting neck pain--the Stockholm neck trial (STONE): study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Skillgate, Eva; Bill, Anne-Sylvie; Côté, Pierre; Viklund, Peter; Peterson, Anna; Holm, Lena W

    2015-09-16

    Neck pain is a major health problem in populations worldwide and an economic burden in modern societies due to its high prevalence and costs in terms of health care expenditures and lost productivity. Massage and exercise therapy are widely used management options for neck pain. However, there is a lack of scientific evidence regarding their effectiveness for subacute and long-lasting neck pain. This study protocol describes a randomized controlled trial aiming to determine the effect of massage and/or exercise therapy on subacute and long-lasting neck pain over the course of 1 year. A randomized controlled trial in which at least 600 study participants with subacute or long-lasting nonspecific neck pain will be recruited and randomly allocated to one of four treatment arms: massage therapy (A), exercise therapy (B), exercise therapy plus massage therapy (C) and advice to stay active (D). The study has an E-health approach, and study participants are being recruited through advertising with a mix of traditional and online marketing channels. Web-based self-report questionnaires measure the main outcomes at 7, 12, 26 and 52 weeks after inclusion. The primary outcomes are a clinically important improvement in pain intensity and pain-related disability at follow-up, measured with a modified version of the Chronic Pain Questionnaire (CPQ). The secondary outcomes are global improvement, health-related quality of life (EQ-5D), sick leave, drug consumption and healthcare utilization. Adverse events are measured by questionnaires at return visits to the clinic, and automated text messages (SMSes) survey neck pain intensity and pain-related disability every week over one year. The results of this study will provide clinicians and stakeholders much needed knowledge to plan medical care for subacute and long-lasting neck pain disorders. Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN01453590. Date of registration: 3 July 2014.

  2. [Social participation and activities of daily living of patients with inflammatory rheumatic diseases : support by self-help, exercise therapy and new media].

    PubMed

    Mattukat, K; Thyrolf, A

    2014-02-01

    Rheumatic patients are at risk of social isolation and physical inactivity which can have a significant impact on physical and mental health. Only every seventh patient is organized in a self-help group (SHG), most of them in the German League Against Rheumatism (GLAR). Members of a SHG are socially and physically more active and take part in exercise therapy (ET) more often. Depending on the study, the utilization of ET ranges from 25 % to 71 %. The functional training as the most attended offer of the GLAR showed positive effects at the physical and psychological levels. To motivate difficult to reach patients to engage in self-help and regular exercise, further development of exercise programs with individually tailored intensive strength and endurance elements as well as the increased use of new media seems promising. The Internet provides various opportunities for networking and social participation especially for severely impaired and temporally less flexible patients.

  3. Adaptive Pacing, Cognitive Behaviour Therapy, Graded Exercise, and Specialist Medical Care for Chronic Fatigue Syndrome: A Cost-Effectiveness Analysis

    PubMed Central

    McCrone, Paul; Sharpe, Michael; Chalder, Trudie; Knapp, Martin; Johnson, Anthony L.; Goldsmith, Kimberley A.; White, Peter D.

    2012-01-01

    Background The PACE trial compared the effectiveness of adding adaptive pacing therapy (APT), cognitive behaviour therapy (CBT), or graded exercise therapy (GET), to specialist medical care (SMC) for patients with chronic fatigue syndrome. This paper reports the relative cost-effectiveness of these treatments in terms of quality adjusted life years (QALYs) and improvements in fatigue and physical function. Methods Resource use was measured and costs calculated. Healthcare and societal costs (healthcare plus lost production and unpaid informal care) were combined with QALYs gained, and changes in fatigue and disability; incremental cost-effectiveness ratios (ICERs) were computed. Results SMC patients had significantly lower healthcare costs than those receiving APT, CBT and GET. If society is willing to value a QALY at £30,000 there is a 62.7% likelihood that CBT is the most cost-effective therapy, a 26.8% likelihood that GET is most cost effective, 2.6% that APT is most cost-effective and 7.9% that SMC alone is most cost-effective. Compared to SMC alone, the incremental healthcare cost per QALY was £18,374 for CBT, £23,615 for GET and £55,235 for APT. From a societal perspective CBT has a 59.5% likelihood of being the most cost-effective, GET 34.8%, APT 0.2% and SMC alone 5.5%. CBT and GET dominated SMC, while APT had a cost per QALY of £127,047. ICERs using reductions in fatigue and disability as outcomes largely mirrored these findings. Conclusions Comparing the four treatments using a health care perspective, CBT had the greatest probability of being the most cost-effective followed by GET. APT had a lower probability of being the most cost-effective option than SMC alone. The relative cost-effectiveness was even greater from a societal perspective as additional cost savings due to reduced need for informal care were likely. PMID:22870204

  4. Heart rate recovery improvement in patients following acute myocardial infarction: exercise training, β-blocker therapy or both.

    PubMed

    Medeiros, Wladimir M; de Luca, Fabio A; de Figueredo Júnior, Alcides R; Mendes, Felipe A R; Gun, Carlos

    2017-04-12

    Heart rate recovery (HRR) is a strong mortality predictor. Exercise training (ET) and β-blocker therapy have significant impact on the HRR of patients following myocardial infarction (MI). However, the combination of ET and β-blocker therapy, as well as its effectiveness in patients with a more compromised HRR (≤12 bpm), has been under-studied. Male patients (n = 64) post-MI were divided: Training + β-blocker (n = 19), Training (n = 15), β-blocker (n = 11) and Control (n = 19). Participants performed an ergometric test before and after 3 months of intervention. HRR was obtained during 5 min of recovery and corrected by the cardiac reserve (HRRcorrCR ). Compared to pre-intervention, HRRcorrCR was significantly increased during the 1st and 2nd minutes of recovery in the Training + β-blocker group (70·5% and 37·5%, respectively; P<0·05). A significant improvement, lasting from the 1st to the 4th minute of recovery, was also observed in the Training group (47%, 50%, 25% and 8·7%, respectively; P<0·05). In contrast, the β-blocker group showed a reduction in HRRcorrCR during the 2nd and 3rd minutes of recovery (-21·2% and -16·3%, respectively; P<0·05). In addition, interventions involving ET (Training + βb, Training) were significantly more effective in patients with a pre-intervention HRR ≤ 12 bpm than for patients with HRR > 12 bpm. Combination of β-blocker therapy with ET does not compromise the effect of training and instead promotes HRR and aerobic capacity improvement. In addition, this combination is particularly beneficial for individuals presenting with a more compromised HRR. However, chronic administration of β-blocker therapy alone did not promote improvement in HRR or aerobic capacity.

  5. Submaximal exercise thallium-201 SPECT for assessment of interventional therapy in patients with acute myocardial infarction

    SciTech Connect

    Stewart, R.E.; Kander, N.; Juni, J.E.; Ellis, S.G.; O'Neill, W.W.; Schork, M.A.; Topol, E.J.; Schwaiger, M. )

    1991-04-01

    Submaximal thallium-201 stress testing has been shown to provide important diagnostic and prognostic information in patients with acute myocardial infarction. The purpose of this investigation was to evaluate the diagnostic value of early submaximal stress testing and thallium-201 single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) after interventional therapy. Scintigraphic results from 56 patients with infarctions, who underwent acute thrombolytic therapy, angioplasty, or both, were compared with late (6 weeks) functional outcome as assessed by radionuclide ventriculography and with results of discharge coronary angiography. A linear correlation was found between the extent of thallium-201 SPECT perfusion defect and late ventricular function (r = 0.74, p less than 0.01). Forty-two percent of patients with large SPECT perfusion defects had normal left ventricular ejection fractions, suggesting an overestimation of infarct size by early imaging. Sensitivity and specificity of thallium-201 SPECT for detection of coronary artery stenosis in noninfarct territories was 57% and 46%, respectively, indicating limited diagnostic definition of extent of underlying coronary artery disease. Results of follow-up coronary angiography showed a significant relationship between the size of the initial perfusion defect and early restenosis or reocclusion of the infarct artery. Thus the extent of early thallium-201 perfusion defects correlates with late functional outcome but appears to overestimate the degree of injury. Submaximal thallium-201 stress testing allows only limited characterization of underlying coronary artery disease. Early assessment of infarct size may identify a patient population at high risk for reocclusion of the infarct artery.

  6. Comparison between cold water immersion therapy (CWIT) and light emitting diode therapy (LEDT) in short-term skeletal muscle recovery after high-intensity exercise in athletes--preliminary results.

    PubMed

    Leal Junior, Ernesto Cesar; de Godoi, Vanessa; Mancalossi, José Luis; Rossi, Rafael Paolo; De Marchi, Thiago; Parente, Márcio; Grosselli, Douglas; Generosi, Rafael Abeche; Basso, Maira; Frigo, Lucio; Tomazoni, Shaiane Silva; Bjordal, Jan Magnus; Lopes-Martins, Rodrigo Alvaro Brandão

    2011-07-01

    In the last years, phototherapy has becoming a promising tool to improve skeletal muscle recovery after exercise, however, it was not compared with other modalities commonly used with this aim. In the present study we compared the short-term effects of cold water immersion therapy (CWIT) and light emitting diode therapy (LEDT) with placebo LEDT on biochemical markers related to skeletal muscle recovery after high-intensity exercise. A randomized double-blind placebo-controlled crossover trial was performed with six male young futsal athletes. They were treated with CWIT (5°C of temperature [SD ±1°]), active LEDT (69 LEDs with wavelengths 660/850 nm, 10/30 mW of output power, 30 s of irradiation time per point, and 41.7 J of total energy irradiated per point, total of ten points irradiated) or an identical placebo LEDT 5 min after each of three Wingate cycle tests. Pre-exercise, post-exercise, and post-treatment measurements were taken of blood lactate levels, creatine kinase (CK) activity, and C-reactive protein (CRP) levels. There were no significant differences in the work performed during the three Wingate tests (p > 0.05). All biochemical parameters increased from baseline values (p < 0.05) after the three exercise tests, but only active LEDT decreased blood lactate levels (p = 0.0065) and CK activity (p = 0.0044) significantly after treatment. There were no significant differences in CRP values after treatments. We concluded that treating the leg muscles with LEDT 5 min after the Wingate cycle test seemed to inhibit the expected post-exercise increase in blood lactate levels and CK activity. This suggests that LEDT has better potential than 5 min of CWIT for improving short-term post-exercise recovery.

  7. Agility and Perturbation Training Techniques in Exercise Therapy for Reducing Pain and Improving Function in People With Knee Osteoarthritis: A Randomized Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Piva, Sara R.; Gil, Alexandra B.; Wisniewski, Stephen R.; Oddis, Chester V.; Irrgang, James J.

    2011-01-01

    Background Impairment-based exercise programs have yielded only small to moderate benefits in reducing pain and improving function in people with knee osteoarthritis (OA). It has previously been proposed that adding agility and perturbation training to exercise programs for people with knee OA may improve treatment effects for pain and function. Objective The purpose of this study was to examine the effectiveness of adding agility and perturbation techniques to standard exercise therapy compared with the standard exercise program alone for people with knee OA. Design This was a single-blinded randomized controlled trial. Setting The study was conducted in the outpatient physical therapy clinic of a large, university-based health center. Participants One hundred eighty-three people with knee OA (122 women, 61 men) participated. Interventions Participants were randomly assigned to either a group that received agility and perturbation training with standard exercise therapy or a group that received only the standard exercise program. Measurements The outcome measures were self-reported knee pain and function, self-reported knee instability, a performance-based measure of function, and global rating of change. Results Although both groups exhibited improvement in self-reported function and in the global rating of change at the 2-, 6-, and 12-month follow-up periods, there were no differences between groups on these outcomes. There was no reduction in knee pain or improvement in performance-based function in either group. Limitations It is possible that more-intense application of the interventions or application of the interventions to participants with knee OA who were at greater risk for falling may have yielded additive effects of the agility and perturbation training approach. Conclusions Both intervention groups exhibited improvement in self-reported function and the global rating of change. Our results, however, did not support an additive effect of agility and

  8. Attenuation of Ca2+ homeostasis, oxidative stress, and mitochondrial dysfunctions in diabetic rat heart: insulin therapy or aerobic exercise?

    PubMed

    da Silva, Márcia F; Natali, Antônio J; da Silva, Edson; Gomes, Gilton J; Teodoro, Bruno G; Cunha, Daise N Q; Drummond, Lucas R; Drummond, Filipe R; Moura, Anselmo G; Belfort, Felipe G; de Oliveira, Alessandro; Maldonado, Izabel R S C; Alberici, Luciane C

    2015-07-15

    We tested the effects of swimming training and insulin therapy, either alone or in combination, on the intracellular calcium ([Ca(2+)]i) homeostasis, oxidative stress, and mitochondrial functions in diabetic rat hearts. Male Wistar rats were separated into control, diabetic, or diabetic plus insulin groups. Type 1 diabetes mellitus was induced by streptozotocin (STZ). Insulin-treated groups received 1 to 4 UI of insulin daily for 8 wk. Each group was divided into sedentary or exercised rats. Trained groups were submitted to swimming (90 min/day, 5 days/wk, 8 wk). [Ca(2+)]i transient in left ventricular myocytes (LVM), oxidative stress in LV tissue, and mitochondrial functions in the heart were assessed. Diabetes reduced the amplitude and prolonged the times to peak and to half decay of the [Ca(2+)]i transient in LVM, increased NADPH oxidase-4 (Nox-4) expression, decreased superoxide dismutase (SOD), and increased carbonyl protein contents in LV tissue. In isolated mitochondria, diabetes increased Ca(2+) uptake, susceptibility to permeability transition pore (MPTP) opening, uncoupling protein-2 (UCP-2) expression, and oxygen consumption but reduced H2O2 release. Swimming training corrected the time course of the [Ca(2+)]i transient, UCP-2 expression, and mitochondrial Ca(2+) uptake. Insulin replacement further normalized [Ca(2+)]i transient amplitude, Nox-4 expression, and carbonyl content. Alongside these benefits, the combination of both therapies restored the LV tissue SOD and mitochondrial O2 consumption, H2O2 release, and MPTP opening. In conclusion, the combination of swimming training with insulin replacement was more effective in attenuating intracellular Ca(2+) disruptions, oxidative