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Sample records for exercise-induced mitochondrial biogenesis

  1. Utilizing small nutrient compounds as enhancers of exercise-induced mitochondrial biogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Craig, Daniel M.; Ashcroft, Stephen P.; Belew, Micah Y.; Stocks, Ben; Currell, Kevin; Baar, Keith; Philp, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Endurance exercise, when performed regularly as part of a training program, leads to increases in whole-body and skeletal muscle-specific oxidative capacity. At the cellular level, this adaptive response is manifested by an increased number of oxidative fibers (Type I and IIA myosin heavy chain), an increase in capillarity and an increase in mitochondrial biogenesis. The increase in mitochondrial biogenesis (increased volume and functional capacity) is fundamentally important as it leads to greater rates of oxidative phosphorylation and an improved capacity to utilize fatty acids during sub-maximal exercise. Given the importance of mitochondrial biogenesis for skeletal muscle performance, considerable attention has been given to understanding the molecular cues stimulated by endurance exercise that culminate in this adaptive response. In turn, this research has led to the identification of pharmaceutical compounds and small nutritional bioactive ingredients that appear able to amplify exercise-responsive signaling pathways in skeletal muscle. The aim of this review is to discuss these purported exercise mimetics and bioactive ingredients in the context of mitochondrial biogenesis in skeletal muscle. We will examine proposed modes of action, discuss evidence of application in skeletal muscle in vivo and finally comment on the feasibility of such approaches to support endurance-training applications in humans. PMID:26578969

  2. PGC-1alpha plays a functional role in exercise-induced mitochondrial biogenesis and angiogenesis but not fiber-type transformation in mouse skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Geng, Tuoyu; Li, Ping; Okutsu, Mitsuharu; Yin, Xinhe; Kwek, Jyeyi; Zhang, Mei; Yan, Zhen

    2010-03-01

    Endurance exercise stimulates peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator-1alpha (PGC-1alpha) expression in skeletal muscle, and forced expression of PGC-1alpha changes muscle metabolism and exercise capacity in mice. However, it is unclear if PGC-1alpha is indispensible for endurance exercise-induced metabolic and contractile adaptations in skeletal muscle. In this study, we showed that endurance exercise-induced expression of mitochondrial enzymes (cytochrome oxidase IV and cytochrome c) and increases of platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule-1 (PECAM-1, CD31)-positive endothelial cells in skeletal muscle, but not IIb-to-IIa fiber-type transformation, were significantly attenuated in muscle-specific Pgc-1alpha knockout mice. Interestingly, voluntary running effectively restored the compromised mitochondrial integrity and superoxide dismutase 2 (SOD2) protein expression in skeletal muscle in Pgc-1alpha knockout mice. Thus, PGC-1alpha plays a functional role in endurance exercise-induced mitochondrial biogenesis and angiogenesis, but not IIb-to-IIa fiber-type transformation in mouse skeletal muscle, and the improvement of mitochondrial morphology and antioxidant defense in response to endurance exercise may occur independently of PGC-1alpha function. We conclude that PGC-1alpha is required for complete skeletal muscle adaptations induced by endurance exercise in mice. PMID:20032509

  3. MYC and Mitochondrial Biogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Morrish, Fionnuala; Hockenbery, David

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondria, the powerhouses of the cell, face two imperatives concerning biogenesis. The first is the requirement for dividing cells to replicate their mitochondrial content by growth of existing mitochondria. The second is the dynamic regulation of mitochondrial content in response to organismal and cellular cues (e.g., exercise, caloric restriction, energy status, temperature). MYC provides the clearest example of a programmed expansion of mitochondrial content linked to the cell cycle. As an oncogene, MYC also presents intriguing questions about the role of its mitochondrial targets in cancer-related phenotypes, such as the Warburg effect and MYC-dependent apoptosis. PMID:24789872

  4. Mitochondrial biogenesis: pharmacological approaches.

    PubMed

    Valero, Teresa

    2014-01-01

    Organelle biogenesis is concomitant to organelle inheritance during cell division. It is necessary that organelles double their size and divide to give rise to two identical daughter cells. Mitochondrial biogenesis occurs by growth and division of pre-existing organelles and is temporally coordinated with cell cycle events [1]. However, mitochondrial biogenesis is not only produced in association with cell division. It can be produced in response to an oxidative stimulus, to an increase in the energy requirements of the cells, to exercise training, to electrical stimulation, to hormones, during development, in certain mitochondrial diseases, etc. [2]. Mitochondrial biogenesis is therefore defined as the process via which cells increase their individual mitochondrial mass [3]. Recent discoveries have raised attention to mitochondrial biogenesis as a potential target to treat diseases which up to date do not have an efficient cure. Mitochondria, as the major ROS producer and the major antioxidant producer exert a crucial role within the cell mediating processes such as apoptosis, detoxification, Ca2+ buffering, etc. This pivotal role makes mitochondria a potential target to treat a great variety of diseases. Mitochondrial biogenesis can be pharmacologically manipulated. This issue tries to cover a number of approaches to treat several diseases through triggering mitochondrial biogenesis. It contains recent discoveries in this novel field, focusing on advanced mitochondrial therapies to chronic and degenerative diseases, mitochondrial diseases, lifespan extension, mitohormesis, intracellular signaling, new pharmacological targets and natural therapies. It contributes to the field by covering and gathering the scarcely reported pharmacological approaches in the novel and promising field of mitochondrial biogenesis. There are several diseases that have a mitochondrial origin such as chronic progressive external ophthalmoplegia (CPEO) and the Kearns- Sayre syndrome (KSS

  5. Mitochondrial biogenesis: pharmacological approaches.

    PubMed

    Valero, Teresa

    2014-01-01

    Organelle biogenesis is concomitant to organelle inheritance during cell division. It is necessary that organelles double their size and divide to give rise to two identical daughter cells. Mitochondrial biogenesis occurs by growth and division of pre-existing organelles and is temporally coordinated with cell cycle events [1]. However, mitochondrial biogenesis is not only produced in association with cell division. It can be produced in response to an oxidative stimulus, to an increase in the energy requirements of the cells, to exercise training, to electrical stimulation, to hormones, during development, in certain mitochondrial diseases, etc. [2]. Mitochondrial biogenesis is therefore defined as the process via which cells increase their individual mitochondrial mass [3]. Recent discoveries have raised attention to mitochondrial biogenesis as a potential target to treat diseases which up to date do not have an efficient cure. Mitochondria, as the major ROS producer and the major antioxidant producer exert a crucial role within the cell mediating processes such as apoptosis, detoxification, Ca2+ buffering, etc. This pivotal role makes mitochondria a potential target to treat a great variety of diseases. Mitochondrial biogenesis can be pharmacologically manipulated. This issue tries to cover a number of approaches to treat several diseases through triggering mitochondrial biogenesis. It contains recent discoveries in this novel field, focusing on advanced mitochondrial therapies to chronic and degenerative diseases, mitochondrial diseases, lifespan extension, mitohormesis, intracellular signaling, new pharmacological targets and natural therapies. It contributes to the field by covering and gathering the scarcely reported pharmacological approaches in the novel and promising field of mitochondrial biogenesis. There are several diseases that have a mitochondrial origin such as chronic progressive external ophthalmoplegia (CPEO) and the Kearns- Sayre syndrome (KSS

  6. Exercise-induced mitochondrial dysfunction: a myth or reality?

    PubMed

    Ostojic, Sergej M

    2016-08-01

    Beneficial effects of physical activity on mitochondrial health are well substantiated in the scientific literature, with regular exercise improving mitochondrial quality and quantity in normal healthy population, and in cardiometabolic and neurodegenerative disorders and aging. However, several recent studies questioned this paradigm, suggesting that extremely heavy or exhaustive exercise fosters mitochondrial disturbances that could permanently damage its function in health and disease. Exercise-induced mitochondrial dysfunction (EIMD) might be a key proxy for negative outcomes of exhaustive exercise, being a pathophysiological substrate of heart abnormalities, chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) or muscle degeneration. Here, we overview possible factors that mediate negative effects of exhaustive exercise on mitochondrial function and structure, and put forward alternative solutions for the management of EIMD. PMID:27389587

  7. Mitochondrial biogenesis in plants during seed germination.

    PubMed

    Law, Simon R; Narsai, Reena; Whelan, James

    2014-11-01

    Mitochondria occupy a central role in the eukaryotic cell. In addition to being major sources of cellular energy, mitochondria are also involved in a diverse range of functions including signalling, the synthesis of many essential organic compounds and a role in programmed cell death. The active proliferation and differentiation of mitochondria is termed mitochondrial biogenesis and necessitates the coordinated communication of mitochondrial status within an integrated cellular network. Two models of mitochondrial biogenesis have been defined previously, the growth and division model and the maturation model. The former describes the growth and division of pre-existing mature organelles through a form of binary fission, while the latter describes the propagation of mitochondria from structurally and biochemically simple promitochondrial structures that upon appropriate stimuli, mature into fully functional mitochondria. In the last decade, a number of studies have utilised seed germination in plants as a platform for the examination of the processes occurring during mitochondrial biogenesis. These studies have revealed many new aspects of the tightly regulated procession of events that define mitochondrial biogenesis during this period of rapid development. A model for mitochondrial biogenesis that supports the maturation of mitochondria from promitochondrial structures has emerged, where mitochondrial signalling plays a crucial role in the early steps of seed germination. PMID:24727594

  8. Rosiglitazone induces mitochondrial biogenesis in mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Strum, Jay C; Shehee, Ron; Virley, David; Richardson, Jill; Mattie, Michael; Selley, Paula; Ghosh, Sujoy; Nock, Christina; Saunders, Ann; Roses, Allen

    2007-03-01

    Rosiglitazone was found to simulate mitochondrial biogenesis in mouse brain in an apolipoprotein (Apo) E isozyme-independent manner. Rosiglitazone induced both mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) and estrogen-stimulated related receptor alpha (ESRRA) mRNA, a key regulator of mitochondrial biogenesis. Transcriptomics and proteomics analysis suggested the mitochondria produced in the presence of human ApoE3 and E4 were not as metabolically efficient as those in the wild type or ApoE knockout mice. Thus, we propose that PPARgamma agonism induces neuronal mitochondrial biogenesis and improves glucose utilization leading to improved cellular function and provides mechanistic support for the improvement in cognition observed in treatment of Alzheimer's patients with rosiglitazone.

  9. Unravelling the mechanisms regulating muscle mitochondrial biogenesis.

    PubMed

    Hood, David A; Tryon, Liam D; Carter, Heather N; Kim, Yuho; Chen, Chris C W

    2016-08-01

    Skeletal muscle is a tissue with a low mitochondrial content under basal conditions, but it is responsive to acute increases in contractile activity patterns (i.e. exercise) which initiate the signalling of a compensatory response, leading to the biogenesis of mitochondria and improved organelle function. Exercise also promotes the degradation of poorly functioning mitochondria (i.e. mitophagy), thereby accelerating mitochondrial turnover, and preserving a pool of healthy organelles. In contrast, muscle disuse, as well as the aging process, are associated with reduced mitochondrial quality and quantity in muscle. This has strong negative implications for whole-body metabolic health and the preservation of muscle mass. A number of traditional, as well as novel regulatory pathways exist in muscle that control both biogenesis and mitophagy. Interestingly, although the ablation of single regulatory transcription factors within these pathways often leads to a reduction in the basal mitochondrial content of muscle, this can invariably be overcome with exercise, signifying that exercise activates a multitude of pathways which can respond to restore mitochondrial health. This knowledge, along with growing realization that pharmacological agents can also promote mitochondrial health independently of exercise, leads to an optimistic outlook in which the maintenance of mitochondrial and whole-body metabolic health can be achieved by taking advantage of the broad benefits of exercise, along with the potential specificity of drug action. PMID:27470593

  10. MITOCHONDRIAL BIOGENESIS IN NEUROSPORA CRASSA

    PubMed Central

    Howell, Neil; Zuiches, Carol A.; Munkres, Kenneth D.

    1971-01-01

    The isolation of a new class of mutants permitting facultative anaerobiosis in Neurospora crassa is described. Backcross analyses to the obligate aerobe prototroph (An-) indicate single nuclear gene inheritance (An-/An+). An+ and An- are indistinguishable in morphology and growth rates under aerobic conditions. Anaerobic growth requires nutritional supplements that are dispensable for aerobic growth. Conidiogenesis, conidial germination, and vegetative growth rate are suppressed by anaerobiosis. An+ mutants produce substantial quantities of ethanol under anaerobic conditions. Anaerobiosis and chloramphenicol both affect mitochondrial enzyme activity and morphology. Chloramphenicol inhibition leads to reduction in cytochrome oxidase and swollen mitochondria with few cristae. Anaerobiosis leads to reduction in both cytochrome oxidase and malate dehydrogenase activities, enlarged mitochondria with fewer cristae, enlarged nuclei, and other alterations in cellular morphology. The fine structure of anaerobically grown cells changes with the time of anaerobic growth. We conclude that either inhibition of mitochondrial membrane synthesis or inhibition of respiration might lead to the observed alterations in mitochondria. PMID:4329155

  11. High-fat feeding inhibits exercise-induced increase in mitochondrial respiratory flux in skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Skovbro, Mette; Boushel, Robert; Hansen, Christina Neigaard; Helge, Jørn Wulff; Dela, Flemming

    2011-06-01

    Twenty one healthy untrained male subjects were randomized to follow a high-fat diet (HFD; 55-60E% fat, 25-30E% carbohydrate, and 15E% protein) or a normal diet (ND; 25-35E% fat, 55-60E% carbohydrate, and 10-15E% protein) for 2(1/2) wk. Diets were isocaloric and tailored individually to match energy expenditure. At 2(1/2) wk of diet, one 60-min bout of bicycle exercise (70% of maximal oxygen uptake) was performed. Muscle biopsies were obtained before and after the diet, immediately after exercise, and after 3-h recovery. Insulin sensitivity (hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp) and intramyocellular triacylglycerol content did not change with the intervention in either group. Indexes of mitochondrial density were similar across the groups and intervention. Mitochondrial respiratory rates, measured in permeabilized muscle fibers, showed a 31 ± 11 and 26 ± 9% exercise-induced increase (P < 0.05) in state 3 (glycolytic substrates) and uncoupled respiration, respectively. However, in HFD this increase was abolished. At recovery, no change from resting respiration was seen in either group. With a lipid substrate (octanoyl-carnitine with or without ADP), similar exercise-induced increases (31-62%) were seen in HFD and ND, but only in HFD was an elevated (P < 0.05) respiratory rate seen at recovery. With HFD complex I and IV protein expression decreased (P < 0.05 and P = 0.06, respectively). A fat-rich diet induces marked changes in the mitochondrial electron transport system protein content and in exercise-induced mitochondrial substrate oxidation rates, with the effects being present hours after the exercise. The effect of HFD is present even without effects on insulin sensitivity and intramyocellular lipid accumulation. An isocaloric high-fat diet does not cause insulin resistance.

  12. Hyperglycemia decreases mitochondrial function: The regulatory role of mitochondrial biogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Palmeira, Carlos M. Rolo, Anabela P.; Berthiaume, Jessica; Bjork, James A.; Wallace, Kendall B.

    2007-12-01

    Increased generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) is implicated in 'glucose toxicity' in diabetes. However, little is known about the action of glucose on the expression of transcription factors in hepatocytes, especially those involved in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) replication and transcription. Since mitochondrial functional capacity is dynamically regulated, we hypothesized that stressful conditions of hyperglycemia induce adaptations in the transcriptional control of cellular energy metabolism, including inhibition of mitochondrial biogenesis and oxidative metabolism. Cell viability, mitochondrial respiration, ROS generation and oxidized proteins were determined in HepG2 cells cultured in the presence of either 5.5 mM (control) or 30 mM glucose (high glucose) for 48 h, 96 h and 7 days. Additionally, mtDNA abundance, plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1), mitochondrial transcription factor A (TFAM) and nuclear respiratory factor-1 (NRF-1) transcripts were evaluated by real time PCR. High glucose induced a progressive increase in ROS generation and accumulation of oxidized proteins, with no changes in cell viability. Increased expression of PAI-1 was observed as early as 96 h of exposure to high glucose. After 7 days in hyperglycemia, HepG2 cells exhibited inhibited uncoupled respiration and decreased MitoTracker Red fluorescence associated with a 25% decrease in mtDNA and 16% decrease in TFAM transcripts. These results indicate that glucose may regulate mtDNA copy number by modulating the transcriptional activity of TFAM in response to hyperglycemia-induced ROS production. The decrease of mtDNA content and inhibition of mitochondrial function may be pathogenic hallmarks in the altered metabolic status associated with diabetes.

  13. Targeting mitochondrial biogenesis to overcome drug resistance to MAPK inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Gao; Frederick, Dennie T.; Wu, Lawrence; Wei, Zhi; Krepler, Clemens; Srinivasan, Satish; Chae, Young Chan; Xu, Xiaowei; Choi, Harry; Dimwamwa, Elaida; Shannan, Batool; Basu, Devraj; Zhang, Dongmei; Guha, Manti; Xiao, Min; Randell, Sergio; Sproesser, Katrin; Xu, Wei; Liu, Jephrey; Karakousis, Giorgos C.; Schuchter, Lynn M.; Gangadhar, Tara C.; Amaravadi, Ravi K.; Gu, Mengnan; Xu, Caiyue; Ghosh, Abheek; Xu, Weiting; Tian, Tian; Zhang, Jie; Zha, Shijie; Brafford, Patricia; Weeraratna, Ashani; Davies, Michael A.; Wargo, Jennifer A.; Avadhani, Narayan G.; Lu, Yiling; Mills, Gordon B.; Altieri, Dario C.; Flaherty, Keith T.

    2016-01-01

    Targeting multiple components of the MAPK pathway can prolong the survival of patients with BRAFV600E melanoma. This approach is not curative, as some BRAF-mutated melanoma cells are intrinsically resistant to MAPK inhibitors (MAPKi). At the systemic level, our knowledge of how signaling pathways underlie drug resistance needs to be further expanded. Here, we have shown that intrinsically resistant BRAF-mutated melanoma cells with a low basal level of mitochondrial biogenesis depend on this process to survive MAPKi. Intrinsically resistant cells exploited an integrated stress response, exhibited an increase in mitochondrial DNA content, and required oxidative phosphorylation to meet their bioenergetic needs. We determined that intrinsically resistant cells rely on the genes encoding TFAM, which controls mitochondrial genome replication and transcription, and TRAP1, which regulates mitochondrial protein folding. Therefore, we targeted mitochondrial biogenesis with a mitochondrium-targeted, small-molecule HSP90 inhibitor (Gamitrinib), which eradicated intrinsically resistant cells and augmented the efficacy of MAPKi by inducing mitochondrial dysfunction and inhibiting tumor bioenergetics. A subset of tumor biopsies from patients with disease progression despite MAPKi treatment showed increased mitochondrial biogenesis and tumor bioenergetics. A subset of acquired drug-resistant melanoma cell lines was sensitive to Gamitrinib. Our study establishes mitochondrial biogenesis, coupled with aberrant tumor bioenergetics, as a potential therapy escape mechanism and paves the way for a rationale-based combinatorial strategy to improve the efficacy of MAPKi. PMID:27043285

  14. Echinochrome A Increases Mitochondrial Mass and Function by Modulating Mitochondrial Biogenesis Regulatory Genes

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Seung Hun; Kim, Hyoung Kyu; Song, In-Sung; Noh, Su Jin; Marquez, Jubert; Ko, Kyung Soo; Rhee, Byoung Doo; Kim, Nari; Mishchenko, Natalia P.; Fedoreyev, Sergey A.; Stonik, Valentin A.; Han, Jin

    2014-01-01

    Echinochrome A (Ech A) is a natural pigment from sea urchins that has been reported to have antioxidant properties and a cardio protective effect against ischemia reperfusion injury. In this study, we ascertained whether Ech A enhances the mitochondrial biogenesis and oxidative phosphorylation in rat cardio myoblast H9c2 cells. To study the effects of Ech A on mitochondrial biogenesis, we measured mitochondrial mass, level of oxidative phosphorylation, and mitochondrial biogenesis regulatory gene expression. Ech A treatment did not induce cytotoxicity. However, Ech A treatment enhanced oxygen consumption rate and mitochondrial ATP level. Likewise, Ech A treatment increased mitochondrial contents in H9c2 cells. Furthermore, Ech A treatment up-regulated biogenesis of regulatory transcription genes, including proliferator-activated receptor gamma co-activator (PGC)-1α, estrogen-related receptor (ERR)-α, peroxisome proliferator-activator receptor (PPAR)-γ, and nuclear respiratory factor (NRF)-1 and such mitochondrial transcription regulatory genes as mitochondrial transcriptional factor A (TFAM), mitochondrial transcription factor B2 (TFB2M), mitochondrial DNA direct polymerase (POLMRT), single strand binding protein (SSBP) and Tu translation elongation factor (TUFM). In conclusion, these data suggest that Ech A is a potentiated marine drug which enhances mitochondrial biogenesis. PMID:25196935

  15. Markers of Human Skeletal Muscle Mitochondrial Biogenesis and Quality Control: Effects of Age and Aerobic Exercise Training

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Perturbations in mitochondrial health may foster age-related losses of aerobic capacity (VO2peak) and skeletal muscle size. However, limited data exist regarding mitochondrial dynamics in aging human skeletal muscle and the influence of exercise. The purpose of this study was to examine proteins regulating mitochondrial biogenesis and dynamics, VO2peak, and skeletal muscle size before and after aerobic exercise training in young men (20 ± 1 y) and older men (74 ± 3 y). Exercise-induced skeletal muscle hypertrophy occurred independent of age, whereas the improvement in VO2peak was more pronounced in young men. Aerobic exercise training increased proteins involved with mitochondrial biogenesis, fusion, and fission, independent of age. This is the first study to examine pathways of mitochondrial quality control in aging human skeletal muscle with aerobic exercise training. These data indicate normal aging does not influence proteins associated with mitochondrial health or the ability to respond to aerobic exercise training at the mitochondrial and skeletal muscle levels. PMID:23873965

  16. Markers of human skeletal muscle mitochondrial biogenesis and quality control: effects of age and aerobic exercise training.

    PubMed

    Konopka, Adam R; Suer, Miranda K; Wolff, Christopher A; Harber, Matthew P

    2014-04-01

    Perturbations in mitochondrial health may foster age-related losses of aerobic capacity (VO2peak) and skeletal muscle size. However, limited data exist regarding mitochondrial dynamics in aging human skeletal muscle and the influence of exercise. The purpose of this study was to examine proteins regulating mitochondrial biogenesis and dynamics, VO2peak, and skeletal muscle size before and after aerobic exercise training in young men (20 ± 1 y) and older men (74 ± 3 y). Exercise-induced skeletal muscle hypertrophy occurred independent of age, whereas the improvement in VO2peak was more pronounced in young men. Aerobic exercise training increased proteins involved with mitochondrial biogenesis, fusion, and fission, independent of age. This is the first study to examine pathways of mitochondrial quality control in aging human skeletal muscle with aerobic exercise training. These data indicate normal aging does not influence proteins associated with mitochondrial health or the ability to respond to aerobic exercise training at the mitochondrial and skeletal muscle levels.

  17. Increases in Mitochondrial Biogenesis Impair Carcinogenesis at Multiple Levels

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiao; Moraes, Carlos T.

    2011-01-01

    Although mitochondrial respiration is decreased in most cancer cells, the role of this decrease in carcinogenesis and cancer progression is still unclear. To better understand this phenomenon, instead of further inhibiting mitochondrial function, we induced mitochondrial biogenesis in transformed cells by activating the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs)/ peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma co-activator 1α (PGC-1α) pathways. This was achieved by treating the cells with bezafibrate, a PPARs panagonist that also enhances PGC-1α expression. We confirmed that bezafibrate treatment led to increased mitochondrial proteins and enzyme functions. We found that cells with increased mitochondrial biogenesis had decreased growth rates in glucose-containing medium. In addition, they became less invasive, which was directly linked to the reduced lactate levels. Surprisingly, even though bezafibrate-treated cells had higher levels of mitochondrial markers, total respiration was not significantly altered. However, respiratory coupling, and ATP levels were. Our data show that by increasing the efficiency of the mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation system, cancer progression is hampered by decreases in cell proliferation and invasiveness. PMID:21855427

  18. The mitochondrial acyl carrier protein (ACP) coordinates mitochondrial fatty acid synthesis with iron sulfur cluster biogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Van Vranken, Jonathan G; Jeong, Mi-Young; Wei, Peng; Chen, Yu-Chan; Gygi, Steven P; Winge, Dennis R; Rutter, Jared

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial fatty acid synthesis (FASII) and iron sulfur cluster (FeS) biogenesis are both vital biosynthetic processes within mitochondria. In this study, we demonstrate that the mitochondrial acyl carrier protein (ACP), which has a well-known role in FASII, plays an unexpected and evolutionarily conserved role in FeS biogenesis. ACP is a stable and essential subunit of the eukaryotic FeS biogenesis complex. In the absence of ACP, the complex is destabilized resulting in a profound depletion of FeS throughout the cell. This role of ACP depends upon its covalently bound 4’-phosphopantetheine (4-PP)-conjugated acyl chain to support maximal cysteine desulfurase activity. Thus, it is likely that ACP is not simply an obligate subunit but also exploits the 4-PP-conjugated acyl chain to coordinate mitochondrial fatty acid and FeS biogenesis. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.17828.001 PMID:27540631

  19. The mitochondrial acyl carrier protein (ACP) coordinates mitochondrial fatty acid synthesis with iron sulfur cluster biogenesis.

    PubMed

    Van Vranken, Jonathan G; Jeong, Mi-Young; Wei, Peng; Chen, Yu-Chan; Gygi, Steven P; Winge, Dennis R; Rutter, Jared

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial fatty acid synthesis (FASII) and iron sulfur cluster (FeS) biogenesis are both vital biosynthetic processes within mitochondria. In this study, we demonstrate that the mitochondrial acyl carrier protein (ACP), which has a well-known role in FASII, plays an unexpected and evolutionarily conserved role in FeS biogenesis. ACP is a stable and essential subunit of the eukaryotic FeS biogenesis complex. In the absence of ACP, the complex is destabilized resulting in a profound depletion of FeS throughout the cell. This role of ACP depends upon its covalently bound 4'-phosphopantetheine (4-PP)-conjugated acyl chain to support maximal cysteine desulfurase activity. Thus, it is likely that ACP is not simply an obligate subunit but also exploits the 4-PP-conjugated acyl chain to coordinate mitochondrial fatty acid and FeS biogenesis. PMID:27540631

  20. Aβ25-35 Suppresses Mitochondrial Biogenesis in Primary Hippocampal Neurons.

    PubMed

    Dong, Weiguo; Wang, Feng; Guo, Wanqing; Zheng, Xuehua; Chen, Yue; Zhang, Wenguang; Shi, Hong

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial biogenesis is involved in the regulation of mitochondrial content, morphology, and function. Impaired mitochondrial biogenesis has been observed in Alzheimer's disease. Amyloid-β (Aβ) has been shown to cause mitochondrial dysfunction in cultured neurons, but its role in mitochondrial biogenesis in neurons remains poorly defined. AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and sirtuin 1 (SIRT1) are key energy-sensing molecules regulating mitochondrial biogenesis. In addition, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ coactivator 1-alpha (PGC-1α), the master regulator of mitochondrial biogenesis, is a target for SIRT1 deacetylase activity. In this study, we investigated the effects of Aβ25-35 on mitochondrial biogenesis in cultured hippocampal neurons and the underlying mechanisms. In primary hippocampal neurons, we found that 24-h incubation with Aβ25-35 suppressed both phosphorylations of AMPK and SIRT1 expression and increased PGC-1α acetylation expression. In addition, Aβ25-35 also resulted in a decrease in mitochondrial DNA copy number, as well as decreases in the expression of mitochondrial biogenesis factors (PGC-1α, NRF 1, NRF 2, and Tfam). Taken together, these data show that Aβ25-35 suppresses mitochondrial biogenesis in hippocampal neurons. Aβ25-35-induced impairment of mitochondrial biogenesis may be associated with the inhibition of the AMPK-SIRT1-PGC-1α pathway.

  1. Staphylococcus aureus Sepsis Induces Early Renal Mitochondrial DNA Repair and Mitochondrial Biogenesis in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Bartz, Raquel R.; Fu, Ping; Suliman, Hagir B.; Crowley, Stephen D.; MacGarvey, Nancy Chou; Welty-Wolf, Karen; Piantadosi, Claude A.

    2014-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) contributes to the high morbidity and mortality of multi-system organ failure in sepsis. However, recovery of renal function after sepsis-induced AKI suggests active repair of energy-producing pathways. Here, we tested the hypothesis in mice that Staphyloccocus aureus sepsis damages mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) in the kidney and activates mtDNA repair and mitochondrial biogenesis. Sepsis was induced in wild-type C57Bl/6J and Cox-8 Gfp-tagged mitochondrial-reporter mice via intraperitoneal fibrin clots embedded with S. aureus. Kidneys from surviving mice were harvested at time zero (control), 24, or 48 hours after infection and evaluated for renal inflammation, oxidative stress markers, mtDNA content, and mitochondrial biogenesis markers, and OGG1 and UDG mitochondrial DNA repair enzymes. We examined the kidneys of the mitochondrial reporter mice for changes in staining density and distribution. S. aureus sepsis induced sharp amplification of renal Tnf, Il-10, and Ngal mRNAs with decreased renal mtDNA content and increased tubular and glomerular cell death and accumulation of protein carbonyls and 8-OHdG. Subsequently, mtDNA repair and mitochondrial biogenesis was evidenced by elevated OGG1 levels and significant increases in NRF-1, NRF-2, and mtTFA expression. Overall, renal mitochondrial mass, tracked by citrate synthase mRNA and protein, increased in parallel with changes in mitochondrial GFP-fluorescence especially in proximal tubules in the renal cortex and medulla. Sub-lethal S. aureus sepsis thus induces widespread renal mitochondrial damage that triggers the induction of the renal mtDNA repair protein, OGG1, and mitochondrial biogenesis as a conspicuous resolution mechanism after systemic bacterial infection. PMID:24988481

  2. Hydroxytyrosol promotes mitochondrial biogenesis and mitochondrial function in 3T3-L1 adipocytes.

    PubMed

    Hao, Jiejie; Shen, Weili; Yu, Guangli; Jia, Haiqun; Li, Xuesen; Feng, Zhihui; Wang, Ying; Weber, Peter; Wertz, Karin; Sharman, Edward; Liu, Jiankang

    2010-07-01

    Hydroxytyrosol (HT) in extra-virgin olive oil is considered one of the most important polyphenolic compounds responsible for the health benefits of the Mediterranean diet for lowering incidence of cardiovascular disease, the most common and most serious complication of diabetes. We propose that HT may prevent these diseases by a stimulation of mitochondrial biogenesis that leads to enhancement of mitochondrial function and cellular defense systems. In the present study, we investigated effects of HT that stimulate mitochondrial biogenesis and promote mitochondrial function in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. HT over the concentration range of 0.1-10 micromol/L stimulated the promoter transcriptional activation and protein expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) coactivator 1 alpha (PPARGC1 alpha, the central factor for mitochondrial biogenesis) and its downstream targets; these included nuclear respiration factors 1 and 2 and mitochondrial transcription factor A, which leads to an increase in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) and in the number of mitochondria. Knockdown of Ppargc1 alpha by siRNA blocked HT's stimulating effect on Complex I expression and mtDNA copy number. The HT treatment resulted in an enhancement of mitochondrial function, including an increase in activity and protein expression of Mitochondrial Complexes I, II, III and V; increased oxygen consumption; and a decrease in free fatty acid contents in the adipocytes. The mechanistic study of the PPARGC1 alpha activation signaling pathway demonstrated that HT is an activator of 5'AMP-activated protein kinase and also up-regulates gene expression of PPAR alpha, CPT-1 and PPAR gamma. These data suggest that HT is able to promote mitochondrial function by stimulating mitochondrial biogenesis. PMID:19576748

  3. Promotion of mitochondrial biogenesis by necdin protects neurons against mitochondrial insults

    PubMed Central

    Hasegawa, Koichi; Yasuda, Toru; Shiraishi, Chinatsu; Fujiwara, Kazushiro; Przedborski, Serge; Mochizuki, Hideki; Yoshikawa, Kazuaki

    2016-01-01

    Neurons rely heavily on mitochondria for their function and survival. Mitochondrial dysfunction contributes to the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases such as Parkinson's disease. PGC-1α is a master regulator of mitochondrial biogenesis and function. Here we identify necdin as a potent PGC-1α stabilizer that promotes mitochondrial biogenesis via PGC-1α in mammalian neurons. Expression of genes encoding mitochondria-specific proteins decreases significantly in necdin-null cortical neurons, where mitochondrial function and expression of the PGC-1α protein are reduced. Necdin strongly stabilizes PGC-1α by inhibiting its ubiquitin-dependent degradation. Forced expression of necdin enhances mitochondrial function in primary cortical neurons and human SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells to prevent mitochondrial respiratory chain inhibitor-induced degeneration. Moreover, overexpression of necdin in the substantia nigra in vivo of adult mice protects dopaminergic neurons against degeneration in experimental Parkinson's disease. These data reveal that necdin promotes mitochondrial biogenesis through stabilization of endogenous PGC-1α to exert neuroprotection against mitochondrial insults. PMID:26971449

  4. Promotion of mitochondrial biogenesis by necdin protects neurons against mitochondrial insults.

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, Koichi; Yasuda, Toru; Shiraishi, Chinatsu; Fujiwara, Kazushiro; Przedborski, Serge; Mochizuki, Hideki; Yoshikawa, Kazuaki

    2016-01-01

    Neurons rely heavily on mitochondria for their function and survival. Mitochondrial dysfunction contributes to the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases such as Parkinson's disease. PGC-1α is a master regulator of mitochondrial biogenesis and function. Here we identify necdin as a potent PGC-1α stabilizer that promotes mitochondrial biogenesis via PGC-1α in mammalian neurons. Expression of genes encoding mitochondria-specific proteins decreases significantly in necdin-null cortical neurons, where mitochondrial function and expression of the PGC-1α protein are reduced. Necdin strongly stabilizes PGC-1α by inhibiting its ubiquitin-dependent degradation. Forced expression of necdin enhances mitochondrial function in primary cortical neurons and human SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells to prevent mitochondrial respiratory chain inhibitor-induced degeneration. Moreover, overexpression of necdin in the substantia nigra in vivo of adult mice protects dopaminergic neurons against degeneration in experimental Parkinson's disease. These data reveal that necdin promotes mitochondrial biogenesis through stabilization of endogenous PGC-1α to exert neuroprotection against mitochondrial insults.

  5. Mitochondrial cytochrome c biogenesis: no longer an enigma

    PubMed Central

    Babbitt, Shalon E.; Sutherland, Molly C.; Francisco, Brian San; Mendez, Deanna L.; Kranz, Robert G.

    2015-01-01

    Cytochromes c and c1are heme proteins that are essential for aerobic respiration. Release of cytochrome c from mitochondria is an important signal in apoptosis initiation. Biogenesis of c-type cytochromes involves covalent attachment of heme to two cysteines (at a conserved CXXCH sequence) in the apocytochrome. Heme attachment is catalyzed in most mitochondria by holocytochrome c synthase (HCCS), which is also necessary for import of apocytochrome c. Thus, HCCS affects cellular levels of cytochrome c, impacting mitochondrial physiology and cell death. Here, we review the mechanisms of HCCS function and the roles played by heme and residues in the CXXCH motif. Additionally, we consider concepts emerging within the two prokaryotic cytochrome c biogenesis pathways. PMID:26073510

  6. Impaired Muscle Mitochondrial Biogenesis and Myogenesis in Spinal Muscular Atrophy

    PubMed Central

    Ripolone, Michela; Ronchi, Dario; Violano, Raffaella; Vallejo, Dionis; Fagiolari, Gigliola; Barca, Emanuele; Lucchini, Valeria; Colombo, Irene; Villa, Luisa; Berardinelli, Angela; Balottin, Umberto; Morandi, Lucia; Mora, Marina; Bordoni, Andreina; Fortunato, Francesco; Corti, Stefania; Parisi, Daniela; Toscano, Antonio; Sciacco, Monica; DiMauro, Salvatore; Comi, Giacomo P.; Moggio, Maurizio

    2016-01-01

    , implying depression of the entire mitochondrial biogenesis. Results of Western blot analysis confirmed the reduced levels of the respiratory chain subunits that included mitochondrially encoded COX1 (47.5%; P = .004), COX2 (32.4%; P < .001), COX4 (26.6%; P < .001), and succinate dehydrogenase complex subunit A (65.8%; P = .03) as well as the structural outer membrane mitochondrial porin (33.1%; P < .001). Conversely, the levels of expression of 3 myogenic regulatory factors—muscle-specificmyogenic factor 5, myoblast determination 1, and myogenin—were higher in muscles from patients with SMA compared with muscles from age-matched controls (P < .05). CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE Our results strongly support the conclusion that an altered regulation of myogenesis and a downregulated mitochondrial biogenesis contribute to pathologic change in the muscle of patients with SMA. Therapeutic strategies should aim at counteracting these changes. PMID:25844556

  7. Mitochondrial biogenesis during differentiation of Artemia salina cysts.

    PubMed

    Schmitt, H; Grossfeld, H; Littauer, U Z

    1973-09-01

    Mitochondria isolated from cysts of Artemia salina (brine shrimp) were found to be devoid of cristae and to possess a low respiratory capability. Hydration of the cysts induces marked biochemical and morphological changes in the mitochondria. Their biogenesis proceeds in two stages. The first stage is completed within 1 h and is characterized by a rapid increase in the respiratory capability of the mitochondria, their cytochrome oxidase, cytochrome b, cytochrome c and perhaps some morphological changes. In the second stage there is an increase in the protein-synthesizing capacity of the mitochondria as well as striking changes in mitochondrial morphology leading to the formation of cristae. PMID:4355924

  8. Mitochondrial biogenesis in the pulmonary vasculature during inhalation lung injury and fibrosis

    EPA Science Inventory

    Cell survival and injury repair is facilitated by mitochondrial biogenesis; however, the role of this process in lung repair is unknown. We evaluated mitochondrial biogenesis in the mouse lung in two injuries that cause acute inflammation and in two that cause chronic inflammatio...

  9. Acute Exercise-Induced Mitochondrial Stress Triggers an Inflammatory Response in the Myocardium via NLRP3 Inflammasome Activation with Mitophagy.

    PubMed

    Li, Haiying; Miao, Weiguo; Ma, Jingfen; Xv, Zhen; Bo, Hai; Li, Jianyu; Zhang, Yong; Ji, Li Li

    2016-01-01

    Increasing evidence has indicated that acute strenuous exercise can induce a range of adverse reactions including oxidative stress and tissue inflammation. However, little is currently known regarding the mechanisms that underlie the regulation of the inflammatory response in the myocardium during acute heavy exercise. This study evaluated the mitochondrial function, NLRP3 inflammasome activation, and mitochondrial autophagy-related proteins to investigate the regulation and mechanism of mitochondrial stress regarding the inflammatory response of the rat myocardium during acute heavy exercise. The results indicated that the mitochondrial function of the myocardium was adaptively regulated to meet the challenge of stress during acute exercise. The exercise-induced mitochondrial stress also enhanced ROS generation and triggered an inflammatory reaction via the NLRP3 inflammasome activation. Moreover, the mitochondrial autophagy-related proteins including Beclin1, LC3, and Bnip3 were all significantly upregulated during acute exercise, which suggests that mitophagy was stimulated in response to the oxidative stress and inflammatory response in the myocardium. Taken together, our data suggest that, during acute exercise, mitochondrial stress triggers the rat myocardial inflammatory response via NLRP3 inflammasome activation and activates mitophagy to minimize myocardial injury.

  10. Regulation of Mitoflash Biogenesis and Signaling by Mitochondrial Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wenwen; Sun, Tao; Liu, Beibei; Wu, Di; Qi, Wenfeng; Wang, Xianhua; Ma, Qi; Cheng, Heping

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondria are highly dynamic organelles undergoing constant network reorganization and exhibiting stochastic signaling events in the form of mitochondrial flashes (mitoflashes). Here we investigate whether and how mitochondrial network dynamics regulate mitoflash biogenesis and signaling. We found that mitoflash frequency was largely invariant when network fragmentized or redistributed in the absence of mitofusin (Mfn) 1, Mfn2, or Kif5b. However, Opa1 deficiency decreased spontaneous mitoflash frequency due to superimposing changes in respiratory function, whereas mitoflash response to non-metabolic stimulation was unchanged despite network fragmentation. In Drp1- or Mff-deficient cells whose mitochondria hyperfused into a single whole-cell reticulum, the frequency of mitoflashes of regular amplitude and duration was again unaltered, although brief and low-amplitude “miniflashes” emerged because of improved detection ability. As the network reorganized, however, the signal mass of mitoflash signaling was dynamically regulated in accordance with the degree of network connectivity. These findings demonstrate a novel functional role of mitochondrial network dynamics and uncover a magnitude- rather than frequency-modulatory mechanism in the regulation of mitoflash signaling. In addition, our data support a stochastic trigger model for the ignition of mitoflashes. PMID:27623243

  11. Regulation of Mitoflash Biogenesis and Signaling by Mitochondrial Dynamics.

    PubMed

    Li, Wenwen; Sun, Tao; Liu, Beibei; Wu, Di; Qi, Wenfeng; Wang, Xianhua; Ma, Qi; Cheng, Heping

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondria are highly dynamic organelles undergoing constant network reorganization and exhibiting stochastic signaling events in the form of mitochondrial flashes (mitoflashes). Here we investigate whether and how mitochondrial network dynamics regulate mitoflash biogenesis and signaling. We found that mitoflash frequency was largely invariant when network fragmentized or redistributed in the absence of mitofusin (Mfn) 1, Mfn2, or Kif5b. However, Opa1 deficiency decreased spontaneous mitoflash frequency due to superimposing changes in respiratory function, whereas mitoflash response to non-metabolic stimulation was unchanged despite network fragmentation. In Drp1- or Mff-deficient cells whose mitochondria hyperfused into a single whole-cell reticulum, the frequency of mitoflashes of regular amplitude and duration was again unaltered, although brief and low-amplitude "miniflashes" emerged because of improved detection ability. As the network reorganized, however, the signal mass of mitoflash signaling was dynamically regulated in accordance with the degree of network connectivity. These findings demonstrate a novel functional role of mitochondrial network dynamics and uncover a magnitude- rather than frequency-modulatory mechanism in the regulation of mitoflash signaling. In addition, our data support a stochastic trigger model for the ignition of mitoflashes. PMID:27623243

  12. Resveratrol Induces Hepatic Mitochondrial Biogenesis Through the Sequential Activation of Nitric Oxide and Carbon Monoxide Production

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Seul-Ki; Joe, Yeonsoo; Zheng, Min; Kim, Hyo Jeong; Yu, Jae-Kyoung; Cho, Gyeong Jae; Chang, Ki Churl; Kim, Hyoung Kyu; Han, Jin; Ryter, Stefan W.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Aims: Nitric oxide (NO) can induce mitochondrial biogenesis in cultured cells, through increased guanosine 3′,5′-monophosphate (cGMP), and activation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator-1α (PGC-1α). We sought to determine the role of NO, heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), and its reaction product (carbon monoxide [CO]) in the induction of mitochondrial biogenesis by the natural antioxidant resveratrol. Results: S-nitroso-N-acetylpenicillamine (SNAP), an NO donor, induced mitochondrial biogenesis in HepG2 hepatoma cells, and in vivo, through stimulation of PGC-1α. NO-induced mitochondrial biogenesis required cGMP, and was mimicked by the cGMP analogue (8-bromoguanosine 3′,5′-cyclic monophosphate [8-Br-cGMP]). Activation of mitochondrial biogenesis by SNAP required HO-1, as it could be reversed by genetic interference of HO-1; and by treatment with the HO inhibitor tin-protoporphyrin-IX (SnPP) in vitro and in vivo. Cobalt protoporphyrin (CoPP)-IX, an HO-1 inducing agent, stimulated mitochondrial biogenesis in HepG2 cells, which could be reversed by the CO scavenger hemoglobin. Application of CO, using the CO-releasing molecule-3 (CORM-3), stimulated mitochondrial biogenesis in HepG2 cells, in a cGMP-dependent manner. Both CoPP and CORM-3-induced mitochondrial biogenesis required NF-E2-related factor-2 (Nrf2) activation and phosphorylation of Akt. The natural antioxidant resveratrol induced mitochondrial biogenesis in HepG2 cells, in a manner dependent on NO biosynthesis, cGMP synthesis, Nrf2-dependent HO-1 activation, and endogenous CO production. Furthermore, resveratrol preserved mitochondrial biogenesis during lipopolysaccharides-induced hepatic inflammation in vivo. Innovation and Conclusions: The complex interplay between endogenous NO and CO production may underlie the mechanism by which natural antioxidants induce mitochondrial biogenesis. Strategies aimed at improving mitochondrial biogenesis may be used as therapeutics

  13. Autophagy plays a role in skeletal muscle mitochondrial biogenesis in an endurance exercise-trained condition.

    PubMed

    Ju, Jeong-Sun; Jeon, Sei-Il; Park, Je-Young; Lee, Jong-Young; Lee, Seong-Cheol; Cho, Ki-Jung; Jeong, Jong-Moon

    2016-09-01

    Mitochondrial homeostasis is tightly regulated by two major processes: mitochondrial biogenesis and mitochondrial degradation by autophagy (mitophagy). Research in mitochondrial biogenesis in skeletal muscle in response to endurance exercise training has been well established, while the mechanisms regulating mitophagy and the interplay between mitochondrial biogenesis and degradation following endurance exercise training are not yet well defined. The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of a short-term inhibition of autophagy in response to acute endurance exercise on skeletal muscle mitochondrial biogenesis and dynamics in an exercise-trained condition. Male wild-type C57BL/6 mice performed five daily bouts of 1-h swimming per week for 8 weeks. In order to measure autophagy flux in mouse skeletal muscle, mice were treated with or without 2 days of 0.4 mg/kg/day intraperitoneal colchicine (blocking the degradation of autophagosomes) following swimming exercise training. The autophagic flux assay demonstrated that swimming training resulted in an increase in the autophagic flux (~100 % increase in LC3-II) in mouse skeletal muscle. Mitochondrial fusion proteins, Opa1 and MFN2, were significantly elevated, and mitochondrial fission protein, Drp1, was also increased in trained mouse skeletal muscle, suggesting that endurance exercise training promotes both mitochondrial fusion and fission processes. A mitochondrial receptor, Bnip3, was further increased in exercised muscle when treated with colchicine while Pink/Parkin protein levels were unchanged. The endurance exercise training induced increases in mitochondrial biogenesis marker proteins, SDH, COX IV, and a mitochondrial biogenesis promoting factor, PGC-1α but this effect was abolished in colchicine-treated mouse skeletal muscle. This suggests that autophagy plays an important role in mitochondrial biogenesis and this coordination between these opposing processes is involved in the cellular

  14. Strenuous exercise induces mitochondrial damage in skeletal muscle of old mice

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Sangho; Kim, Minjung; Lim, Wonchung; Kim, Taeyoung; Kang, Chounghun

    2015-05-29

    Strenuous exercise is known to cause excessive ROS generation and inflammation. However, the mechanisms responsible for the regulation of mitochondrial integrity in the senescent muscle during high-intensity exercise (HE) are not well studied. Here, we show that HE suppresses up-regulation of mitochondrial function despite increase in mitochondrial copy number, following excessive ROS production, proinflammatory cytokines and NFκB activation. Moreover, HE in the old group resulted in the decreasing of both fusion (Mfn2) and fission (Drp1) proteins that may contribute to alteration of mitochondrial morphology. This study suggests that strenuous exercise does not reverse age-related mitochondrial damage and dysfunction by the increased ROS and inflammation. - Highlights: • Effect of exercise on mitochondrial function of aged skeletal muscles was studied. • Strenuous exercise triggered excessive ROS production and inflammatory cytokines. • Strenuous exercise suppressed mitochondrial function in senescent muscle.

  15. Optimizing intramuscular adaptations to aerobic exercise: effects of carbohydrate restriction and protein supplementation on mitochondrial biogenesis.

    PubMed

    Margolis, Lee M; Pasiakos, Stefan M

    2013-11-01

    Mitochondrial biogenesis is a critical metabolic adaptation to aerobic exercise training that results in enhanced mitochondrial size, content, number, and activity. Recent evidence has shown that dietary manipulation can further enhance mitochondrial adaptations to aerobic exercise training, which may delay skeletal muscle fatigue and enhance exercise performance. Specifically, studies have demonstrated that combining carbohydrate restriction (endogenous and exogenous) with a single bout of aerobic exercise potentiates the beneficial effects of exercise on markers of mitochondrial biogenesis. Additionally, studies have demonstrated that high-quality protein supplementation enhances anabolic skeletal muscle intracellular signaling and mitochondrial protein synthesis following a single bout of aerobic exercise. Mitochondrial biogenesis is stimulated by complex intracellular signaling pathways that appear to be primarily regulated by 5'AMP-activated protein kinase and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase mediated through proliferator-activated γ receptor co-activator 1 α activation, resulting in increased mitochondrial DNA expression and enhanced skeletal muscle oxidative capacity. However, the mechanisms by which concomitant carbohydrate restriction and dietary protein supplementation modulates mitochondrial adaptations to aerobic exercise training remains unclear. This review summarizes intracellular regulation of mitochondrial biogenesis and the effects of carbohydrate restriction and protein supplementation on mitochondrial adaptations to aerobic exercise.

  16. Effects of Resveratrol and SIRT1 on PGC-1α Activity and Mitochondrial Biogenesis: A Reevaluation

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Su Ryun; Asaka, Meiko; Holloszy, John O.; Han, Dong-Ho

    2013-01-01

    It has been reported that feeding mice resveratrol activates AMPK and SIRT1 in skeletal muscle leading to deacetylation and activation of PGC-1α, increased mitochondrial biogenesis, and improved running endurance. This study was done to further evaluate the effects of resveratrol, SIRT1, and PGC-1α deacetylation on mitochondrial biogenesis in muscle. Feeding rats or mice a diet containing 4 g resveratrol/kg diet had no effect on mitochondrial protein levels in muscle. High concentrations of resveratrol lowered ATP concentration and activated AMPK in C2C12 myotubes, resulting in an increase in mitochondrial proteins. Knockdown of SIRT1, or suppression of SIRT1 activity with a dominant-negative (DN) SIRT1 construct, increased PGC-1α acetylation, PGC-1α coactivator activity, and mitochondrial proteins in C2C12 cells. Expression of a DN SIRT1 in rat triceps muscle also induced an increase in mitochondrial proteins. Overexpression of SIRT1 decreased PGC-1α acetylation, PGC-1α coactivator activity, and mitochondrial proteins in C2C12 myotubes. Overexpression of SIRT1 also resulted in a decrease in mitochondrial proteins in rat triceps muscle. We conclude that, contrary to some previous reports, the mechanism by which SIRT1 regulates mitochondrial biogenesis is by inhibiting PGC-1α coactivator activity, resulting in a decrease in mitochondria. We also conclude that feeding rodents resveratrol has no effect on mitochondrial biogenesis in muscle. PMID:23874150

  17. The fusogenic lipid phosphatidic acid promotes the biogenesis of mitochondrial outer membrane protein Ugo1

    PubMed Central

    Keller, Michael; Taskin, Asli A.; Horvath, Susanne E.; Guan, Xue Li; Prinz, Claudia; Opalińska, Magdalena; Zorzin, Carina; van der Laan, Martin; Wenk, Markus R.; Schubert, Rolf; Wiedemann, Nils; Holzer, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Import and assembly of mitochondrial proteins depend on a complex interplay of proteinaceous translocation machineries. The role of lipids in this process has been studied only marginally and so far no direct role for a specific lipid in mitochondrial protein biogenesis has been shown. Here we analyzed a potential role of phosphatidic acid (PA) in biogenesis of mitochondrial proteins in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. In vivo remodeling of the mitochondrial lipid composition by lithocholic acid treatment or by ablation of the lipid transport protein Ups1, both leading to an increase of mitochondrial PA levels, specifically stimulated the biogenesis of the outer membrane protein Ugo1, a component of the mitochondrial fusion machinery. We reconstituted the import and assembly pathway of Ugo1 in protein-free liposomes, mimicking the outer membrane phospholipid composition, and found a direct dependency of Ugo1 biogenesis on PA. Thus, PA represents the first lipid that is directly involved in the biogenesis pathway of a mitochondrial membrane protein. PMID:26347140

  18. Stimulatory Effects of Balanced Deep Sea Water on Mitochondrial Biogenesis and Function

    PubMed Central

    Ha, Byung Geun; Park, Jung-Eun; Cho, Hyun-Jung; Shon, Yun Hee

    2015-01-01

    The worldwide prevalence of metabolic diseases, including obesity and diabetes, is increasing. Mitochondrial dysfunction is recognized as a core feature of these diseases. Emerging evidence also suggests that defects in mitochondrial biogenesis, number, morphology, fusion, and fission, contribute to the development and progression of metabolic diseases. Our previous studies revealed that balanced deep-sea water (BDSW) has potential as a treatment for diabetes and obesity. In this study, we aimed to investigate the mechanism by which BDSW regulates diabetes and obesity by studying its effects on mitochondrial metabolism. To determine whether BDSW regulates mitochondrial biogenesis and function, we investigated its effects on mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) content, mitochondrial enzyme activity, and the expression of transcription factors and mitochondria specific genes, as well as on the phosphorylation of signaling molecules associated with mitochondria biogenesis and its function in C2C12 myotubes. BDSW increased mitochondrial biogenesis in a time and dose-dependent manner. Quantitative real-time PCR revealed that BDSW enhances gene expression of PGC-1α, NRF1, and TFAM for mitochondrial transcription; MFN1/2 and DRP1 for mitochondrial fusion; OPA1 for mitochondrial fission; TOMM40 and TIMM44 for mitochondrial protein import; CPT-1α and MCAD for fatty acid oxidation; CYTC for oxidative phosphorylation. Upregulation of these genes was validated by increased mitochondria staining, CS activity, CytC oxidase activity, NAD+ to NADH ratio, and the phosphorylation of signaling molecules such as AMPK and SIRT1. Moreover, drinking BDSW remarkably improved mtDNA content in the muscles of HFD-induced obese mice. Taken together, these results suggest that the stimulatory effect of BDSW on mitochondrial biogenesis and function may provide further insights into the regulatory mechanism of BDSW-induced anti-diabetic and anti-obesity action. PMID:26068191

  19. Stimulatory Effects of Balanced Deep Sea Water on Mitochondrial Biogenesis and Function.

    PubMed

    Ha, Byung Geun; Park, Jung-Eun; Cho, Hyun-Jung; Shon, Yun Hee

    2015-01-01

    The worldwide prevalence of metabolic diseases, including obesity and diabetes, is increasing. Mitochondrial dysfunction is recognized as a core feature of these diseases. Emerging evidence also suggests that defects in mitochondrial biogenesis, number, morphology, fusion, and fission, contribute to the development and progression of metabolic diseases. Our previous studies revealed that balanced deep-sea water (BDSW) has potential as a treatment for diabetes and obesity. In this study, we aimed to investigate the mechanism by which BDSW regulates diabetes and obesity by studying its effects on mitochondrial metabolism. To determine whether BDSW regulates mitochondrial biogenesis and function, we investigated its effects on mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) content, mitochondrial enzyme activity, and the expression of transcription factors and mitochondria specific genes, as well as on the phosphorylation of signaling molecules associated with mitochondria biogenesis and its function in C2C12 myotubes. BDSW increased mitochondrial biogenesis in a time and dose-dependent manner. Quantitative real-time PCR revealed that BDSW enhances gene expression of PGC-1α, NRF1, and TFAM for mitochondrial transcription; MFN1/2 and DRP1 for mitochondrial fusion; OPA1 for mitochondrial fission; TOMM40 and TIMM44 for mitochondrial protein import; CPT-1α and MCAD for fatty acid oxidation; CYTC for oxidative phosphorylation. Upregulation of these genes was validated by increased mitochondria staining, CS activity, CytC oxidase activity, NAD+ to NADH ratio, and the phosphorylation of signaling molecules such as AMPK and SIRT1. Moreover, drinking BDSW remarkably improved mtDNA content in the muscles of HFD-induced obese mice. Taken together, these results suggest that the stimulatory effect of BDSW on mitochondrial biogenesis and function may provide further insights into the regulatory mechanism of BDSW-induced anti-diabetic and anti-obesity action. PMID:26068191

  20. Curcumin Attenuates Gentamicin-Induced Kidney Mitochondrial Alterations: Possible Role of a Mitochondrial Biogenesis Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Negrette-Guzmán, Mario; García-Niño, Wylly Ramsés; Tapia, Edilia; Zazueta, Cecilia; Huerta-Yepez, Sara; León-Contreras, Juan Carlos; Hernández-Pando, Rogelio; Aparicio-Trejo, Omar Emiliano; Madero, Magdalena; Pedraza-Chaverri, José

    2015-01-01

    It has been shown that curcumin (CUR), a polyphenol derived from Curcuma longa, exerts a protective effect against gentamicin- (GM-) induced nephrotoxicity in rats, associated with a preservation of the antioxidant status. Although mitochondrial dysfunction is a hallmark in the GM-induced renal injury, the role of CUR in mitochondrial protection has not been studied. In this work, LLC-PK1 cells were preincubated 24 h with CUR and then coincubated 48 h with CUR and 8 mM GM. Treatment with CUR attenuated GM-induced drop in cell viability and led to an increase in nuclear factor (erythroid-2)-related factor 2 (Nrf2) nuclear accumulation and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator-1 alpha (PGC-1α) cell expression attenuating GM-induced losses in these proteins. In vivo, Wistar rats were injected subcutaneously with GM (75 mg/Kg/12 h) during 7 days to develop kidney mitochondrial alterations. CUR (400 mg/Kg/day) was administered orally 5 days before and during the GM exposure. The GM-induced mitochondrial alterations in ultrastructure and bioenergetics as well as decrease in activities of respiratory complexes I and IV and induction of calcium-dependent permeability transition were mostly attenuated by CUR. Protection of CUR against GM-induced nephrotoxicity could be in part mediated by maintenance of mitochondrial functions and biogenesis with some participation of the nuclear factor Nrf2. PMID:26345660

  1. The effect of ethidium bromide and chloramphenicol on mitochondrial biogenesis in primary human fibroblasts

    SciTech Connect

    Kao, Li-Pin; Ovchinnikov, Dmitry; Wolvetang, Ernst

    2012-05-15

    The expression of mitochondrial components is controlled by an intricate interplay between nuclear transcription factors and retrograde signaling from mitochondria. The role of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) and mtDNA-encoded proteins in mitochondrial biogenesis is, however, poorly understood and thus far has mainly been studied in transformed cell lines. We treated primary human fibroblasts with ethidium bromide (EtBr) or chloramphenicol for six weeks to inhibit mtDNA replication or mitochondrial protein synthesis, respectively, and investigated how the cells recovered from these insults two weeks after removal of the drugs. Although cellular growth and mitochondrial gene expression were severely impaired after both inhibitor treatments we observed marked differences in mitochondrial structure, membrane potential, glycolysis, gene expression, and redox status between fibroblasts treated with EtBr and chloramphenicol. Following removal of the drugs we further detected clear differences in expression of both mtDNA-encoded genes and nuclear transcription factors that control mitochondrial biogenesis, suggesting that the cells possess different compensatory mechanisms to recover from drug-induced mitochondrial dysfunction. Our data reveal new aspects of the interplay between mitochondrial retrograde signaling and the expression of nuclear regulators of mitochondrial biogenesis, a process with direct relevance to mitochondrial diseases and chloramphenicol toxicity in humans. -- Highlights: ► Cells respond to certain environmental toxins by increasing mitochondrial biogenesis. ► We investigated the effect of Chloramphenicol and EtBr in primary human fibroblasts. ► Inhibiting mitochondrial protein synthesis or DNA replication elicit different effects. ► We provide novel insights into the cellular responses toxins and antibiotics.

  2. Exercise-induced alterations in pancreatic oxidative stress and mitochondrial function in type 2 diabetic Goto-Kakizaki rats.

    PubMed

    Raza, Haider; John, Annie; Shafarin, Jasmin; Howarth, Frank C

    2016-04-01

    Progressive metabolic complications accompanied by oxidative stress are the hallmarks of type 2 diabetes. The precise molecular mechanisms of the disease complications, however, remain elusive. Exercise-induced nontherapeutic management of type 2 diabetes is the first line of choice to control hyperglycemia and diabetes associated complications. In this study, using 11-month-old type 2 Goto-Kakizaki (GK) rats, we have investigated the effects of exercise on mitochondrial metabolic and oxidative stress in the pancreas. Our results showed an increase in theNADPHoxidase enzyme activity and reactive oxygen species (ROS) production inGKrats, which was inhibited after exercise. Increased lipid peroxidation and protein carbonylation andSODactivity were also inhibited after exercise. Interestingly, glutathione (GSH) level was markedly high in the pancreas ofGKdiabetic rats even after exercise. However,GSH-peroxidase andGSH-reductase activities were significantly reduced. Exercise also induced energy metabolism as observed by increased hexokinase and glutamate dehydrogenase activities. A significant decrease in the activities of mitochondrial ComplexesII/IIIandIVwere observed in theGKrats. Exercise improved only ComplexIVactivity suggesting increased utilization of oxygen. We also observed increased activities of cytochrome P450s in the pancreas ofGKrats which was reduced significantly after exercise.SDS-PAGEresults have shown a decreased expression ofNF-κB, Glut-2, andPPAR-ϒ inGKrats which was markedly increased after exercise. These results suggest differential oxidative stress and antioxidant defense responses after exercise. Our results also suggest improved mitochondrial function and energy utilization in the pancreas of exercisingGKrats. PMID:27095835

  3. Aberrant cell proliferation by enhanced mitochondrial biogenesis via mtTFA in arsenical skin cancers.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chih-Hung; Wu, Shi-Bei; Hong, Chien-Hui; Liao, Wei-Ting; Wu, Ching-Ying; Chen, Gwo-Shing; Wei, Yau-Huei; Yu, Hsin-Su

    2011-05-01

    Arsenic-induced Bowen's disease (As-BD), a cutaneous carcinoma in situ, is thought to arise from gene mutation and uncontrolled proliferation. However, how mitochondria regulate the arsenic-induced cell proliferation remains unclear. The aim of this study was to clarify whether arsenic interfered with mitochondrial biogenesis and function, leading to aberrant cell proliferation in As-BD. Skin biopsy samples from patients with As-BD and controls were stained for cytochrome c oxidase (Complex IV), measured for mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) copy number and the expression levels of mitochondrial biogenesis-related genes, including peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator-1α (PGC-1α), nuclear respiratory factor 1 (NRF-1), and mitochondrial transcription factor A (mtTFA). The results showed that expression of cytochrome c oxidase, mtTFA, NRF-1, and PGC-1α was increased in As-BD compared with in healthy subjects. Treatment of primary keratinocytes with arsenic at concentrations lower than 1.0 μmol/L induced cell proliferation, along with enhanced mitochondrial biogenesis. Furthermore, we observed that the mitochondrial oxygen consumption rate and intracellular ATP level were increased in arsenic-treated keratinocytes. Blocking of mitochondrial function by oligomycin A (Complex V inhibitor) or knockdown of mtTFA by RNA interference abrogated arsenic-induced cell proliferation without affecting cyclin D1 expression. We concluded that mtTFA up-regulation, augmented mitochondrial biogenesis, and enhanced mitochondrial functions may contribute to arsenic-induced cell proliferation. Targeting mitochondrial biogenesis may help treat arsenical cancers at the stage of cell proliferation.

  4. Mitochondrial Biogenesis in the Pulmonary Vasculature During Inhalational Lung Injury and Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    CARRAWAY, MARTHA S.; SULIMAN, HAGIR B.; KLIMENT, CORRINE; WELTY-WOLF, KAREN E.; OURY, TIM D.; PIANTADOSI, CLAUDE A.

    2008-01-01

    Cell survival and injury repair is facilitated by mitochondrial biogenesis; however, the role of this process in lung repair is unknown. We evaluated mitochondrial biogenesis in the mouse lung in two injuries that cause acute inflammation and in two that cause chronic inflammation and pulmonary fibrosis. By using reporter mice that express green fluorescent protein (GFP) exclusively in mitochondria, we tracked mitochondrial biogenesis and correlated it with histologic lung injury, proliferation, and fibrosis. At 72 hours after acute LPS or continuous exposure to hyperoxia (Fio2, 1.0), the lungs showed diffuse infiltration by inflammatory cells in the alveolar region. In reporter mice, patchy new mitochondrial fluorescence was found in the alveolar region but was most prominent and unexpected in perivascular regions. At 14 days after instillation of asbestos or bleomycin, diffuse chronic inflammation had developed, and green fluorescence appeared in inflammatory cells in the expanded interstitium and was most intense in smooth muscle cells of pulmonary vessels. In all four lung injuries, mitochondrial fluorescence colocalized with mitochondrial superoxide dismutase, but not with proliferating cell nuclear antigen. These data indicate that vascular mitochondrial biogenesis is activated in diverse inhalational lung injuries along with oxidative stress. This finding indicates a unique and unexpected mechanism of metabolic adaptation to pulmonary fibrotic injuries. PMID:17999632

  5. Reactive oxygen species mediates homocysteine-induced mitochondrial biogenesis in human endothelial cells: Modulation by antioxidants

    SciTech Connect

    Perez-de-Arce, Karen; Foncea, Rocio . E-mail: rfoncea@med.puc.cl; Leighton, Federico

    2005-12-16

    It has been proposed that homocysteine (Hcy)-induces endothelial dysfunction and atherosclerosis by generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). A previous report has shown that Hcy promotes mitochondrial damage. Considering that oxidative stress can affect mitochondrial biogenesis, we hypothesized that Hcy-induced ROS in endothelial cells may lead to increased mitochondrial biogenesis. We found that Hcy-induced ROS (1.85-fold), leading to a NF-{kappa}B activation and increase the formation of 3-nitrotyrosine. Furthermore, expression of the mitochondrial biogenesis factors, nuclear respiratory factor-1 and mitochondrial transcription factor A, was significantly elevated in Hcy-treated cells. These changes were accompanied by increase in mitochondrial mass and higher mRNA and protein expression of the subunit III of cytochrome c oxidase. These effects were significantly prevented by pretreatment with the antioxidants, catechin and trolox. Taken together, our results suggest that ROS is an important mediator of mitochondrial biogenesis induced by Hcy, and that modulation of oxidative stress by antioxidants may protect against the adverse vascular effects of Hcy.

  6. Peroxynitrite induced mitochondrial biogenesis following MnSOD knockdown in normal rat kidney (NRK) cells.

    PubMed

    Marine, Akira; Krager, Kimberly J; Aykin-Burns, Nukhet; Macmillan-Crow, Lee Ann

    2014-01-01

    Superoxide is widely regarded as the primary reactive oxygen species (ROS) which initiates downstream oxidative stress. Increased oxidative stress contributes, in part, to many disease conditions such as cancer, atherosclerosis, ischemia/reperfusion, diabetes, aging, and neurodegeneration. Manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD) catalyzes the dismutation of superoxide into hydrogen peroxide which can then be further detoxified by other antioxidant enzymes. MnSOD is critical in maintaining the normal function of mitochondria, thus its inactivation is thought to lead to compromised mitochondria. Previously, our laboratory observed increased mitochondrial biogenesis in a novel kidney-specific MnSOD knockout mouse. The current study used transient siRNA mediated MnSOD knockdown of normal rat kidney (NRK) cells as the in vitro model, and confirmed functional mitochondrial biogenesis evidenced by increased PGC1α expression, mitochondrial DNA copy numbers and integrity, electron transport chain protein CORE II, mitochondrial mass, oxygen consumption rate, and overall ATP production. Further mechanistic studies using mitoquinone (MitoQ), a mitochondria-targeted antioxidant and L-NAME, a nitric oxide synthase (NOS) inhibitor demonstrated that peroxynitrite (at low micromolar levels) induced mitochondrial biogenesis. These findings provide the first evidence that low levels of peroxynitrite can initiate a protective signaling cascade involving mitochondrial biogenesis which may help to restore mitochondrial function following transient MnSOD inactivation. PMID:24563852

  7. Evidences that maternal swimming exercise improves antioxidant defenses and induces mitochondrial biogenesis in the brain of young Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Marcelino, T B; Longoni, A; Kudo, K Y; Stone, V; Rech, A; de Assis, A M; Scherer, E B S; da Cunha, M J; Wyse, A T S; Pettenuzzo, L F; Leipnitz, G; Matté, C

    2013-08-29

    Physical exercise during pregnancy has been considered beneficial to mother and child. Recent studies showed that maternal swimming improves memory in the offspring, increases hippocampal neurogenesis and levels of neurotrophic factors. The objective of this work was to investigate the effect of maternal swimming during pregnancy on redox status and mitochondrial parameters in brain structures from the offspring. Adult female Wistar rats were submitted to five swimming sessions (30 min/day) prior to mating with adult male Wistar rats, and then trained during the pregnancy (five sessions of 30-min swimming/week). The litter was sacrificed when 7 days old, when cerebellum, parietal cortex, hippocampus, and striatum were dissected. We evaluated the production of reactive species and antioxidant status, measuring the activities of superoxide-dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT) and glutathione-peroxidase (GPx), as well as non-enzymatic antioxidants. We also investigated a potential mitochondrial biogenesis regarding mitochondrion mass and membrane potential, through cytometric approaches. Our results showed that maternal swimming exercise promoted an increase in reactive species levels in cerebellum, parietal cortex, and hippocampus, demonstrated by an increase in dichlorofluorescein oxidation. Mitochondrial superoxide was reduced in cerebellum and parietal cortex, while nitrite levels were increased in cerebellum, parietal cortex, hippocampus, and striatum. Antioxidant status was improved in cerebellum, parietal cortex, and hippocampus. SOD activity was increased in parietal cortex, and was not altered in the remaining brain structures. CAT and GPx activities, as well as non-enzymatic antioxidant potential, were increased in cerebellum, parietal cortex, and hippocampus of rats whose mothers were exercised. Finally, we observed an increased mitochondrial mass and membrane potential, suggesting mitochondriogenesis, in cerebellum and parietal cortex of pups subjected to

  8. Exercise-Mediated Wall Shear Stress Increases Mitochondrial Biogenesis in Vascular Endothelium

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Boa; Lee, Hojun; Kawata, Keisuke; Park, Joon-Young

    2014-01-01

    Objective Enhancing structural and functional integrity of mitochondria is an emerging therapeutic option against endothelial dysfunction. In this study, we sought to investigate the effect of fluid shear stress on mitochondrial biogenesis and mitochondrial respiratory function in endothelial cells (ECs) using in vitro and in vivo complementary studies. Methods and Results Human aortic- or umbilical vein-derived ECs were exposed to laminar shear stress (20 dyne/cm2) for various durations using a cone-and-plate shear apparatus. We observed significant increases in the expression of key genes related to mitochondrial biogenesis and mitochondrial quality control as well as mtDNA content and mitochondrial mass under the shear stress conditions. Mitochondrial respiratory function was enhanced when cells were intermittently exposed to laminar shear stress for 72 hrs. Also, shear-exposed cells showed diminished glycolysis and decreased mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm). Likewise, in in vivo experiments, mice that were subjected to a voluntary wheel running exercise for 5 weeks showed significantly higher mitochondrial content determined by en face staining in the conduit (greater and lesser curvature of the aortic arch and thoracic aorta) and muscle feed (femoral artery) arteries compared to the sedentary control mice. Interestingly, however, the mitochondrial biogenesis was not observed in the mesenteric artery. This region-specific adaptation is likely due to the differential blood flow redistribution during exercise in the different vessel beds. Conclusion Taken together, our findings suggest that exercise enhances mitochondrial biogenesis in vascular endothelium through a shear stress-dependent mechanism. Our findings may suggest a novel mitochondrial pathway by which a chronic exercise may be beneficial for vascular function. PMID:25375175

  9. Artemisinin mimics calorie restriction to trigger mitochondrial biogenesis and compromise telomere shortening in mice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Da-Ting; He, Jiang; Wu, Ming; Li, Si-Ming; Gao, Qian; Zeng, Qing-Ping

    2015-01-01

    Calorie restriction is known to extend lifespan among organisms by a debating mechanism underlying nitric oxide-driven mitochondrial biogenesis. We report here that nitric oxide generators including artemisinin, sodium nitroprusside, and L-arginine mimics calorie restriction and resembles hydrogen peroxide to initiate the nitric oxide signaling cascades and elicit the global antioxidative responses in mice. The large quantities of antioxidant enzymes are correlated with the low levels of reactive oxygen species, which allow the down-regulation of tumor suppressors and accessory DNA repair partners, eventually leading to the compromise of telomere shortening. Accompanying with the up-regulation of signal transducers and respiratory chain signatures, mitochondrial biogenesis occurs with the elevation of adenosine triphosphate levels upon exposure of mouse skeletal muscles to the mimetics of calorie restriction. In conclusion, calorie restriction-triggered nitric oxide provides antioxidative protection and alleviates telomere attrition via mitochondrial biogenesis, thereby maintaining chromosomal stability and integrity, which are the hallmarks of longevity.

  10. N-acetylcysteine inhibits the up-regulation of mitochondrial biogenesis genes in livers from rats fed ethanol chronically

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background: Chronic ethanol (EtOH) administration to experimental animals induces hepatic oxidative stress and up-regulates mitochondrial biogenesis. The mechanisms by which chronic EtOH up-regulates mitochondrial biogenesis have not been fully explored. In this work, we hypothesized that oxidative ...

  11. Exercise-Induced Bronchoconstriction

    MedlinePlus

    ... Conditions & Treatments ▸ Conditions Dictionary ▸ Exercise-Induced Bronchoconstriction Share | Exercise-Induced Bronchoconstriction (EIB) « Back to A to Z Listing Exercise-Induced Bronchoconstriction, (EIB), often known as exercise-induced ...

  12. Mitochondrial OXA Translocase Plays a Major Role in Biogenesis of Inner-Membrane Proteins.

    PubMed

    Stiller, Sebastian B; Höpker, Jan; Oeljeklaus, Silke; Schütze, Conny; Schrempp, Sandra G; Vent-Schmidt, Jens; Horvath, Susanne E; Frazier, Ann E; Gebert, Natalia; van der Laan, Martin; Bohnert, Maria; Warscheid, Bettina; Pfanner, Nikolaus; Wiedemann, Nils

    2016-05-10

    The mitochondrial inner membrane harbors three protein translocases. Presequence translocase and carrier translocase are essential for importing nuclear-encoded proteins. The oxidase assembly (OXA) translocase is required for exporting mitochondrial-encoded proteins; however, different views exist about its relevance for nuclear-encoded proteins. We report that OXA plays a dual role in the biogenesis of nuclear-encoded mitochondrial proteins. First, a systematic analysis of OXA-deficient mitochondria led to an unexpected expansion of the spectrum of OXA substrates imported via the presequence pathway. Second, biogenesis of numerous metabolite carriers depends on OXA, although they are not imported by the presequence pathway. We show that OXA is crucial for the biogenesis of the Tim18-Sdh3 module of the carrier translocase. The export translocase OXA is thus required for the import of metabolite carriers by promoting assembly of the carrier translocase. We conclude that OXA is of central importance for the biogenesis of the mitochondrial inner membrane.

  13. Mitochondrial OXA Translocase Plays a Major Role in Biogenesis of Inner-Membrane Proteins.

    PubMed

    Stiller, Sebastian B; Höpker, Jan; Oeljeklaus, Silke; Schütze, Conny; Schrempp, Sandra G; Vent-Schmidt, Jens; Horvath, Susanne E; Frazier, Ann E; Gebert, Natalia; van der Laan, Martin; Bohnert, Maria; Warscheid, Bettina; Pfanner, Nikolaus; Wiedemann, Nils

    2016-05-10

    The mitochondrial inner membrane harbors three protein translocases. Presequence translocase and carrier translocase are essential for importing nuclear-encoded proteins. The oxidase assembly (OXA) translocase is required for exporting mitochondrial-encoded proteins; however, different views exist about its relevance for nuclear-encoded proteins. We report that OXA plays a dual role in the biogenesis of nuclear-encoded mitochondrial proteins. First, a systematic analysis of OXA-deficient mitochondria led to an unexpected expansion of the spectrum of OXA substrates imported via the presequence pathway. Second, biogenesis of numerous metabolite carriers depends on OXA, although they are not imported by the presequence pathway. We show that OXA is crucial for the biogenesis of the Tim18-Sdh3 module of the carrier translocase. The export translocase OXA is thus required for the import of metabolite carriers by promoting assembly of the carrier translocase. We conclude that OXA is of central importance for the biogenesis of the mitochondrial inner membrane. PMID:27166948

  14. Increased mitochondrial biogenesis in muscle improves aging phenotypes in the mtDNA mutator mouse.

    PubMed

    Dillon, Lloye M; Williams, Siôn L; Hida, Aline; Peacock, Jacqueline D; Prolla, Tomas A; Lincoln, Joy; Moraes, Carlos T

    2012-05-15

    Aging is an intricate process that increases susceptibility to sarcopenia and cardiovascular diseases. The accumulation of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations is believed to contribute to mitochondrial dysfunction, potentially shortening lifespan. The mtDNA mutator mouse, a mouse model with a proofreading-deficient mtDNA polymerase γ, was shown to develop a premature aging phenotype, including sarcopenia, cardiomyopathy and decreased lifespan. This phenotype was associated with an accumulation of mtDNA mutations and mitochondrial dysfunction. We found that increased expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator-1α (PGC-1α), a crucial regulator of mitochondrial biogenesis and function, in the muscle of mutator mice increased mitochondrial biogenesis and function and also improved the skeletal muscle and heart phenotypes of the mice. Deep sequencing analysis of their mtDNA showed that the increased mitochondrial biogenesis did not reduce the accumulation of mtDNA mutations but rather caused a small increase. These results indicate that increased muscle PGC-1α expression is able to improve some premature aging phenotypes in the mutator mice without reverting the accumulation of mtDNA mutations.

  15. Efficient mitochondrial biogenesis drives incomplete penetrance in Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Giordano, Carla; Iommarini, Luisa; Giordano, Luca; Maresca, Alessandra; Pisano, Annalinda; Valentino, Maria Lucia; Caporali, Leonardo; Liguori, Rocco; Deceglie, Stefania; Roberti, Marina; Fanelli, Francesca; Fracasso, Flavio; Ross-Cisneros, Fred N; D'Adamo, Pio; Hudson, Gavin; Pyle, Angela; Yu-Wai-Man, Patrick; Chinnery, Patrick F; Zeviani, Massimo; Salomao, Solange R; Berezovsky, Adriana; Belfort, Rubens; Ventura, Dora Fix; Moraes, Milton; Moraes Filho, Milton; Barboni, Piero; Sadun, Federico; De Negri, Annamaria; Sadun, Alfredo A; Tancredi, Andrea; Mancini, Massimiliano; d'Amati, Giulia; Loguercio Polosa, Paola; Cantatore, Palmiro; Carelli, Valerio

    2014-02-01

    Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy is a maternally inherited blinding disease caused as a result of homoplasmic point mutations in complex I subunit genes of mitochondrial DNA. It is characterized by incomplete penetrance, as only some mutation carriers become affected. Thus, the mitochondrial DNA mutation is necessary but not sufficient to cause optic neuropathy. Environmental triggers and genetic modifying factors have been considered to explain its variable penetrance. We measured the mitochondrial DNA copy number and mitochondrial mass indicators in blood cells from affected and carrier individuals, screening three large pedigrees and 39 independently collected smaller families with Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy, as well as muscle biopsies and cells isolated by laser capturing from post-mortem specimens of retina and optic nerves, the latter being the disease targets. We show that unaffected mutation carriers have a significantly higher mitochondrial DNA copy number and mitochondrial mass compared with their affected relatives and control individuals. Comparative studies of fibroblasts from affected, carriers and controls, under different paradigms of metabolic demand, show that carriers display the highest capacity for activating mitochondrial biogenesis. Therefore we postulate that the increased mitochondrial biogenesis in carriers may overcome some of the pathogenic effect of mitochondrial DNA mutations. Screening of a few selected genetic variants in candidate genes involved in mitochondrial biogenesis failed to reveal any significant association. Our study provides a valuable mechanism to explain variability of penetrance in Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy and clues for high throughput genetic screening to identify the nuclear modifying gene(s), opening an avenue to develop predictive genetic tests on disease risk and therapeutic strategies.

  16. Order within a mosaic distribution of mitochondrial c-type cytochrome biogenesis systems?

    PubMed

    Allen, James W A; Jackson, Andrew P; Rigden, Daniel J; Willis, Antony C; Ferguson, Stuart J; Ginger, Michael L

    2008-05-01

    Mitochondrial cytochromes c and c(1) are present in all eukaryotes that use oxygen as the terminal electron acceptor in the respiratory chain. Maturation of c-type cytochromes requires covalent attachment of the heme cofactor to the protein, and there are at least five distinct biogenesis systems that catalyze this post-translational modification in different organisms and organelles. In this study, we use biochemical data, comparative genomic and structural bioinformatics investigations to provide a holistic view of mitochondrial c-type cytochrome biogenesis and its evolution. There are three pathways for mitochondrial c-type cytochrome maturation, only one of which is present in prokaryotes. We analyze the evolutionary distribution of these biogenesis systems, which include the Ccm system (System I) and the enzyme heme lyase (System III). We conclude that heme lyase evolved once and, in many lineages, replaced the multicomponent Ccm system (present in the proto-mitochondrial endosymbiont), probably as a consequence of lateral gene transfer. We find no evidence of a System III precursor in prokaryotes, and argue that System III is incompatible with multi-heme cytochromes common to bacteria, but absent from eukaryotes. The evolution of the eukaryotic-specific protein heme lyase is strikingly unusual, given that this protein provides a function (thioether bond formation) that is also ubiquitous in prokaryotes. The absence of any known c-type cytochrome biogenesis system from the sequenced genomes of various trypanosome species indicates the presence of a third distinct mitochondrial pathway. Interestingly, this system attaches heme to mitochondrial cytochromes c that contain only one cysteine residue, rather than the usual two, within the heme-binding motif. The isolation of single-cysteine-containing mitochondrial cytochromes c from free-living kinetoplastids, Euglena and the marine flagellate Diplonema papillatum suggests that this unique form of heme attachment

  17. Mitochondrial Biogenesis: A Therapeutic Target for Neurodevelopmental Disorders and Neurodegenerative Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Uittenbogaard, Martine; Chiaramello, Anne

    2014-01-01

    In the developing and mature brain, mitochondria act as central hubs for distinct but interwined pathways, necessary for neural development, survival, activity, connectivity and plasticity. In neurons, mitochondria assume diverse functions, such as energy production in the form of ATP, calcium buffering and generation of reactive oxygen species. Mitochondrial dysfunction contributes to a range of neurodevelopmental and neurodegenerative diseases, making mitochondria a potential target for pharmacological-based therapies. Pathogenesis associated with these diseases is accompanied by an increase in mitochondrial mass, a quantitative increase to overcome a qualitative deficiency due to mutated mitochondrial proteins that are either nuclear- or mitochondrial-encoded. This compensatory biological response is maladaptive, as it fails to sufficiently augment the bioenergetically functional mitochondrial mass and correct for the ATP deficit. Since regulation of neuronal mitochondrial biogenesis has been scantily investigated, our current understanding on the network of transcriptional regulators, co-activators and signaling regulators mainly derives from other cellular systems. The purpose of this review is to present the current state of our knowledge and understanding of the transcriptional and signaling cascades controlling neuronal mitochondrial biogenesis and the various therapeutic approaches to enhance the functional mitochondrial mass in the context of neurodevelopmental disorders and adult-onset neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:24606804

  18. Cybrid Models of Parkinson's Disease Show Variable Mitochondrial Biogenesis and Genotype-Respiration Relationships

    PubMed Central

    Keeney, Paula M.; Dunham, Lisa D.; Quigley, Caitlin K.; Morton, Stephanie L.; Bergquist, Kristen E.; Bennett, James P.

    2009-01-01

    Sporadic Parkinson's disease (sPD) is a nervous system-wide disease that presents with a bradykinetic movement disorder and frequently progresses to include depression and cognitive impairment. Cybrid models of sPD are based on expression of sPD platelet mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) in neural cells and demonstrate some similarities to sPD brains. In sPD and CTL cybrids we characterized aspects of mitochondrial biogenesis, mtDNA genomics, composition of the respirasome and the relationships among isolated mitochondrial and intact cell respiration. Cybrid mtDNA levels varied and correlated with expression of PGC-1α a transcriptional co-activator regulator of mitochondrial biogenesis. Levels of mtDNA heteroplasmic mutations were asymmetrically distributed across the mitochondrial genome; numbers of heteroplasmies were more evenly distributed. Neither levels nor numbers of heteroplasmies distinguished sPD from CTL. sPD cybrid mitochondrial ETC subunit protein levels were not altered. Isolated mitochondrial complex I respiration rates showed limited correlation with whole cell complex I respiration rates in both sPD and CTL cybrids. Intact cell respiration during the normoxic-anoxic transition yielded Km values for oxygen that directly related to respiration rates in CTL but not in sPD cell lines. Both sPD and CTL cybrid cells are substantially heterogeneous in mitochondrial genomic and physiologic properties. Our results suggest that mtDNA depletion may occur in sPD neurons and could reflect impairment of mitochondrial biogenesis. Cybrids remain a valuable model for some aspects of sPD but their heterogeneity mitigates against a simple designation of sPD phenotype in this cell model. PMID:19815014

  19. Nebivolol stimulates mitochondrial biogenesis in 3T3-L1 adipocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Chenglin; Chen, Dongrui; Xie, Qihai; Yang, Ying; Shen, Weili

    2013-08-16

    Highlights: •Nebivolol may act as a partial agonist of β3-adrenergic receptor (AR). •Nebivolol stimulates mitochondrial DNA replication and protein expression. •Nebivolol promotes mitochondrial synthesis via activation of eNOS by β3-AR. -- Abstract: Nebivolol is a third-generation β-adrenergic receptor (β-AR) blocker with additional beneficial effects, including the improvement of lipid and glucose metabolism in obese individuals. However, the underlying mechanism of nebivolol’s role in regulating the lipid profile remains largely unknown. In this study, we investigated the role of nebivolol in mitochondrial biogenesis in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. Exposure of 3T3-L1 cells to nebivolol for 24 h increased mitochondrial DNA copy number, mitochondrial protein levels and the expression of transcription factors involved in mitochondrial biogenesis, including PPAR-γ coactivator-1α (PGC-1α), Sirtuin 3 (Sirt3), mitochondrial transcription factor A (Tfam) and nuclear related factor 1 (Nrf1). These changes were accompanied by an increase in oxygen consumption and in the expression of genes involved in fatty acid oxidation and antioxidant enzymes in 3T3-L1 adipocytes, including nebivolol-induced endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS), as well as an increase in the formation of cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP). Pretreatment with NG-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (l-NAME) attenuated nebivolol-induced mitochondrial biogenesis, as did the soluble guanylate cyclase inhibitor, ODQ. Treatment with nebivolol and β3-AR blocker SR59230A markedly attenuated PGC-1α, Sirt3 and manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD) protein levels in comparison to treatment with nebivolol alone. These data indicate that the mitochondrial synthesis and metabolism in adipocytes that is promoted by nebivolol is primarily mediated through the eNOS/cGMP-dependent pathway and is initiated by the activation of β3-AR receptors.

  20. Cybrid models of Parkinson's disease show variable mitochondrial biogenesis and genotype-respiration relationships.

    PubMed

    Keeney, Paula M; Dunham, Lisa D; Quigley, Caitlin K; Morton, Stephanie L; Bergquist, Kristen E; Bennett, James P

    2009-12-01

    Sporadic Parkinson's disease (sPD) is a nervous system-wide disease that presents with a bradykinetic movement disorder and frequently progresses to include depression and cognitive impairment. Cybrid models of sPD are based on expression of sPD platelet mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) in neural cells and demonstrate some similarities to sPD brains. In sPD and CTL cybrids we characterized aspects of mitochondrial biogenesis, mtDNA genomics, composition of the respirasome and the relationships among isolated mitochondrial and intact cell respiration. Cybrid mtDNA levels varied and correlated with expression of PGC-1 alpha, a transcriptional co-activator regulator of mitochondrial biogenesis. Levels of mtDNA heteroplasmic mutations were asymmetrically distributed across the mitochondrial genome; numbers of heteroplasmies were more evenly distributed. Neither levels nor numbers of heteroplasmies distinguished sPD from CTL. sPD cybrid mitochondrial ETC subunit protein levels were not altered. Isolated mitochondrial complex I respiration rates showed limited correlation with whole cell complex I respiration rates in both sPD and CTL cybrids. Intact cell respiration during the normoxic-anoxic transition yielded K(m) values for oxygen that directly related to respiration rates in CTL but not in sPD cell lines. Both sPD and CTL cybrid cells are substantially heterogeneous in mitochondrial genomic and physiologic properties. Our results suggest that mtDNA depletion may occur in sPD neurons and could reflect impairment of mitochondrial biogenesis. Cybrids remain a valuable model for some aspects of sPD but their heterogeneity mitigates against a simple designation of sPD phenotype in this cell model.

  1. Cilostazol promotes mitochondrial biogenesis in human umbilical vein endothelial cells through activating the expression of PGC-1α

    SciTech Connect

    Zuo, Luning; Li, Qiang; Sun, Bei; Xu, Zhiying; Ge, Zhiming

    2013-03-29

    Highlights: ► First time to show that cilostazol promotes the expressions of PGC-1α. ► First time to show that cilostazol stimulates mitochondrial biogenesis in HUVECs. ► PKA/CREB pathway mediates the effect of cilostazol on PGC-1α expression. ► Suggesting the roles of cilostazol in mitochondrial dysfunction related disease. -- Abstract: Mitochondrial dysfunction is frequently observed in vascular diseases. Cilostazol is a drug approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for the treatment of intermittent claudication. Cilostazol increases intracellular cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) levels through inhibition of type III phosphodiesterase. The effects of cilostazol in mitochondrial biogenesis in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) were investigated in this study. Cilostazol treated HUVECs displayed increased levels of ATP, mitochondrial DNA/nuclear DNA ratio, expressions of cytochrome B, and mitochondrial mass, suggesting an enhanced mitochondrial biogenesis induced by cilostazol. The promoted mitochondrial biogenesis could be abolished by Protein kinase A (PKA) specific inhibitor H-89, implying that PKA pathway played a critical role in increased mitochondrial biogenesis after cilostazol treatment. Indeed, expression levels of peroxisome proliferator activator receptor gamma-coactivator 1α (PGC-1α), NRF 1 and mitochondrial transcription factor A (TFAM) were significantly increased in HUVECs after incubation with cilostazol at both mRNA levels and protein levels. Importantly, knockdown of PGC-1α could abolish cilostazol-induced mitochondrial biogenesis. Enhanced expression of p-CREB and PGC-1α induced by cilostazol could be inhibited by H-89. Moreover, the increased expression of PGC-1α induced by cilostazol could be inhibited by downregulation of CREB using CREB siRNA at both mRNA and protein levels. All the results indicated that cilostazol promoted mitochondrial biogenesis through activating the expression of PGC-1α in

  2. Mitochondrial Biogenesis: Regulation By Endogenous Gases during Inflammation and Organ Stress

    PubMed Central

    Suliman, Hagir B.; Piantadosi, Claude A.

    2014-01-01

    The influence of mitochondrial dysfunction on pathological states involving inflammatory and/or oxidative stress in tissues that do not show frank cellular apoptosis or necrosis has been rather difficult to unravel, and the literature is replete with contradictory information. Although such discrepancies have many potential causes related to the type of injurious agent, the severity and duration of the injury, and the particular cells and tissues and the functions involved, it is the successful induction of cellular adaptive responses that ultimately governs the resolution of mitochondrial dysfunction and survival of the cell. Much recent attention has been devoted to unraveling the signaling pathways that activate mitochondrial biogenesis and other processes involved in mitochondrial quality control (QC) during inflammatory and oxidative stress with an eye towards the development of novel targets for therapeutic mitigation of the resultant tissue damage. This review provides a brief overview of this emerging field with an emphasis on the role of signaling through the endogenous gases (NO, CO and H2S) and a redox-based approach that brings transparency to key factors that contribute to the resolution of mitochondrial dysfunction and the maintenance of cell vitality. We make the case that targeted stimulation of mitochondrial biogenesis could be a potentially valuable approach for the development of new therapies for the treatment of diseases for which mitochondrial damage is a major consideration. PMID:24606800

  3. Augmentation of aerobic respiration and mitochondrial biogenesis in skeletal muscle by hypoxia preconditioning with cobalt chloride

    SciTech Connect

    Saxena, Saurabh; Shukla, Dhananjay; Bansal, Anju

    2012-11-01

    High altitude/hypoxia training is known to improve physical performance in athletes. Hypoxia induces hypoxia inducible factor-1 (HIF-1) and its downstream genes that facilitate hypoxia adaptation in muscle to increase physical performance. Cobalt chloride (CoCl{sub 2}), a hypoxia mimetic, stabilizes HIF-1, which otherwise is degraded in normoxic conditions. We studied the effects of hypoxia preconditioning by CoCl{sub 2} supplementation on physical performance, glucose metabolism, and mitochondrial biogenesis using rodent model. The results showed significant increase in physical performance in cobalt supplemented rats without (two times) or with training (3.3 times) as compared to control animals. CoCl{sub 2} supplementation in rats augmented the biological activities of enzymes of TCA cycle, glycolysis and cytochrome c oxidase (COX); and increased the expression of glucose transporter-1 (Glut-1) in muscle showing increased glucose metabolism by aerobic respiration. There was also an increase in mitochondrial biogenesis in skeletal muscle observed by increased mRNA expressions of mitochondrial biogenesis markers which was further confirmed by electron microscopy. Moreover, nitric oxide production increased in skeletal muscle in cobalt supplemented rats, which seems to be the major reason for peroxisome proliferator activated receptor-gamma coactivator-1α (PGC-1α) induction and mitochondrial biogenesis. Thus, in conclusion, we state that hypoxia preconditioning by CoCl{sub 2} supplementation in rats increases mitochondrial biogenesis, glucose uptake and metabolism by aerobic respiration in skeletal muscle, which leads to increased physical performance. The significance of this study lies in understanding the molecular mechanism of hypoxia adaptation and improvement of work performance in normal as well as extreme conditions like hypoxia via hypoxia preconditioning. -- Highlights: ► We supplemented rats with CoCl{sub 2} for 15 days along with training. ► Co

  4. Redox and Reactive Oxygen Species Regulation of Mitochondrial Cytochrome c Oxidase Biogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Bourens, Myriam; Fontanesi, Flavia; Soto, Iliana C.; Liu, Jingjing

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Cytochrome c oxidase (COX), the last enzyme of the mitochondrial respiratory chain, is the major oxygen consumer enzyme in the cell. COX biogenesis involves several redox-regulated steps. The process is highly regulated to prevent the formation of pro-oxidant intermediates. Recent Advances: Regulation of COX assembly involves several reactive oxygen species and redox-regulated steps. These include: (i) Intricate redox-controlled machineries coordinate the expression of COX isoenzymes depending on the environmental oxygen concentration. (ii) COX is a heme A-copper metalloenzyme. COX copper metallation involves the copper chaperone Cox17 and several other recently described cysteine-rich proteins, which are oxidatively folded in the mitochondrial intermembrane space. Copper transfer to COX subunits 1 and 2 requires concomitant transfer of redox power. (iii) To avoid the accumulation of reactive assembly intermediates, COX is regulated at the translational level to minimize synthesis of the heme A-containing Cox1 subunit when assembly is impaired. Critical Issues: An increasing number of regulatory pathways converge to facilitate efficient COX assembly, thus preventing oxidative stress. Future Directions: Here we will review on the redox-regulated COX biogenesis steps and will discuss their physiological relevance. Forthcoming insights into the precise regulation of mitochondrial COX biogenesis in normal and stress conditions will likely open future perspectives for understanding mitochondrial redox regulation and prevention of oxidative stress. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 19, 1940–1952. PMID:22937827

  5. Curcumin, mitochondrial biogenesis, and mitophagy: Exploring recent data and indicating future needs.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, Marcos Roberto; Jardim, Fernanda Rafaela; Setzer, William N; Nabavi, Seyed Mohammad; Nabavi, Seyed Fazel

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondria are dynamic double-membrane bound organelles which have key roles in a variety of cellular functions such as energy producing, regulation of calcium flux, cellular stress responses including autophagy and apoptosis. A growing body of evidence indicates that mitochondrial dysfunction is the main culprit in a myriad of diseases such as neurodegenerative disease. This fact opens a new therapeutic window based on targeting mitochondrial dysfunction for treatment of these diseases. Recently an abundance of evidence shows the promising role of polyphenolic compounds on mitochondrial structure and function. Curcumin, a well-known polyphenolic compound, is an abundant component of turmeric. The promising roles of curcumin against different diseases are highly publicized. The aim of the present work is to critically review the scientific evidence to provide a clear view of how curcumin improves mitochondrial dynamics regarding mitochondrial biogenesis and mitophagy. We also present curcumin biosynthesis, source, bioavailability and metabolism in order to give an overview of this compound. PMID:27143655

  6. Thyroid Hormone Stimulation of Autophagy Is Essential for Mitochondrial Biogenesis and Activity in Skeletal Muscle.

    PubMed

    Lesmana, Ronny; Sinha, Rohit A; Singh, Brijesh K; Zhou, Jin; Ohba, Kenji; Wu, Yajun; Yau, Winifred W Y; Bay, Boon-Huat; Yen, Paul M

    2016-01-01

    Thyroid hormone (TH) and autophagy share similar functions in regulating skeletal muscle growth, regeneration, and differentiation. Although TH recently has been shown to increase autophagy in liver, the regulation and role of autophagy by this hormone in skeletal muscle is not known. Here, using both in vitro and in vivo models, we demonstrated that TH induces autophagy in a dose- and time-dependent manner in skeletal muscle. TH induction of autophagy involved reactive oxygen species (ROS) stimulation of 5'adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK)-Mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR)-Unc-51-like kinase 1 (Ulk1) signaling. TH also increased mRNA and protein expression of key autophagy genes, microtubule-associated protein light chain 3 (LC3), Sequestosome 1 (p62), and Ulk1, as well as genes that modulated autophagy and Forkhead box O (FOXO) 1/3a. TH increased mitochondrial protein synthesis and number as well as basal mitochondrial O2 consumption, ATP turnover, and maximal respiratory capacity. Surprisingly, mitochondrial activity and biogenesis were blunted when autophagy was blocked in muscle cells by Autophagy-related gene (Atg)5 short hairpin RNA (shRNA). Induction of ROS and 5'adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) by TH played a significant role in the up-regulation of Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator 1-alpha (PPARGC1A), the key regulator of mitochondrial synthesis. In summary, our findings showed that TH-mediated autophagy was essential for stimulation of mitochondrial biogenesis and activity in skeletal muscle. Moreover, autophagy and mitochondrial biogenesis were coupled in skeletal muscle via TH induction of mitochondrial activity and ROS generation. PMID:26562261

  7. Phytoestrogens and mitochondrial biogenesis in breast cancer. Influence of estrogen receptors ratio.

    PubMed

    Roca, Pilar; Sastre-Serra, Jorge; Nadal-Serrano, Mercedes; Pons, Daniel Gabriel; Blanquer-Rosselló, Ma del Mar; Oliver, Jordi

    2014-01-01

    Phytoestrogens were originally identified as compounds having a close similarity in structure to estrogens and harboring weak estrogen activity. The interest in phytoestrogens as potential therapeutic agents has recently risen in the field of oncology, since population based studies have linked phytoestrogens consumption with a decreased risk of mortality due to several types of cancer. This review departs from the main focus of these articles by describing recent advances in our understanding of phytoestrogen potential action on mitochondria, specifically on mitochondrial biogenesis, dynamics and functionality, as well as mitoptosis in breast cancer. Further studies are necessary to explain the effects of individual phytoestrogens on mitochondrial biogenesis and dynamics and for designing of new therapy targets for cancer treatment, nevertheless area promising therapeutic approach.

  8. Triiodothyronine induces lipid oxidation and mitochondrial biogenesis in rat Harderian gland.

    PubMed

    Santillo, A; Burrone, L; Falvo, S; Senese, R; Lanni, A; Chieffi Baccari, G

    2013-10-01

    The rat Harderian gland (HG) is an orbital gland producing a copious lipid secretion. Recent studies indicate that its secretory activity is regulated by thyroid hormones. In this study, we found that both isoforms of the thyroid hormone receptor (Trα (Thra) and Trβ (Thrb)) are expressed in rat HGs. Although Thra is expressed at a higher level, only Thrb is regulated by triiodothyronine (T3). Because T3 induces an increase in lipid metabolism in rat HGs, we investigated the effects of an animal's thyroid state on the expression levels of carnitine palmitoyltransferase-1A (Cpt1a) and carnitine palmitoyltransferase-1B (Cpt1b) and acyl-CoA oxidase (Acox1) (rate-limiting enzymes in mitochondrial and peroxisomal fatty acid oxidation respectively), as well as on the mitochondrial compartment, thereby correlating mitochondrial activity and biogenesis with morphological analysis. We found that hypothyroidism decreased the expression of Cpt1b and Acox1 mRNA, whereas the administration of T3 to hypothyroid rats increased transcript levels. Respiratory parameters and catalase protein levels provided further evidence that T3 modulates mitochondrial and peroxisomal activities. Furthermore, in hypothyroid rat HGs, the mitochondrial number and their total area decreased with respect to the controls, whereas the average area of the individual mitochondrion did not change. However, the average area of the individual mitochondrion was reduced by ∼50% in hypothyroid T3-treated HGs, and the mitochondrial number and the total area of the mitochondrial compartment increased. The mitochondrial morphometric data correlated well with the molecular results. Indeed, hypothyroid status did not modify the expression of mitochondrial biogenesis genes such as Ppargc1a, Nrf1 and Tfam, whereas T3 treatment increased the expression level of these genes.

  9. Shear stress-induced mitochondrial biogenesis decreases the release of microparticles from endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ji-Seok; Kim, Boa; Lee, Hojun; Thakkar, Sunny; Babbitt, Dianne M.; Eguchi, Satoru; Brown, Michael D.

    2015-01-01

    The concept of enhancing structural integrity of mitochondria has emerged as a novel therapeutic option for cardiovascular disease. Flow-induced increase in laminar shear stress is a potent physiological stimulant associated with exercise, which exerts atheroprotective effects in the vasculature. However, the effect of laminar shear stress on mitochondrial remodeling within the vascular endothelium and its related functional consequences remain largely unknown. Using in vitro and in vivo complementary studies, here, we report that aerobic exercise alleviates the release of endothelial microparticles in prehypertensive individuals and that these salutary effects are, in part, mediated by shear stress-induced mitochondrial biogenesis. Circulating levels of total (CD31+/CD42a−) and activated (CD62E+) microparticles released by endothelial cells were significantly decreased (∼40% for both) after a 6-mo supervised aerobic exercise training program in individuals with prehypertension. In cultured human endothelial cells, laminar shear stress reduced the release of endothelial microparticles, which was accompanied by an increase in mitochondrial biogenesis through a sirtuin 1 (SIRT1)-dependent mechanism. Resveratrol, a SIRT1 activator, treatment showed similar effects. SIRT1 knockdown using small-interfering RNA completely abolished the protective effect of shear stress. Disruption of mitochondrial integrity by either antimycin A or peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ coactivator-1α small-interfering RNA significantly increased the number of total, and activated, released endothelial microparticles, and shear stress restored these back to basal levels. Collectively, these data demonstrate a critical role of endothelial mitochondrial integrity in preserving endothelial homeostasis. Moreover, prolonged laminar shear stress, which is systemically elevated during aerobic exercise in the vessel wall, mitigates endothelial dysfunction by promoting mitochondrial

  10. Cannabidiol Protects against Doxorubicin-Induced Cardiomyopathy by Modulating Mitochondrial Function and Biogenesis.

    PubMed

    Hao, Enkui; Mukhopadhyay, Partha; Cao, Zongxian; Erdélyi, Katalin; Holovac, Eileen; Liaudet, Lucas; Lee, Wen-Shin; Haskó, György; Mechoulam, Raphael; Pacher, Pál

    2015-01-06

    Doxorubicin (DOX) is a widely used, potent chemotherapeutic agent; however, its clinical application is limited because of its dose-dependent cardiotoxicity. DOX's cardiotoxicity involves increased oxidative/nitrative stress, impaired mitochondrial function in cardiomyocytes/endothelial cells and cell death. Cannabidiol (CBD) is a nonpsychotropic constituent of marijuana, which is well tolerated in humans, with antioxidant, antiinflammatory and recently discovered antitumor properties. We aimed to explore the effects of CBD in a well-established mouse model of DOX-induced cardiomyopathy. DOX-induced cardiomyopathy was characterized by increased myocardial injury (elevated serum creatine kinase and lactate dehydrogenase levels), myocardial oxidative and nitrative stress (decreased total glutathione content and glutathione peroxidase 1 activity, increased lipid peroxidation, 3-nitrotyrosine formation and expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase mRNA), myocardial cell death (apoptotic and poly[ADP]-ribose polymerase 1 [PARP]-dependent) and cardiac dysfunction (decline in ejection fraction and left ventricular fractional shortening). DOX also impaired myocardial mitochondrial biogenesis (decreased mitochondrial copy number, mRNA expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator 1-alpha, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha, estrogen-related receptor alpha), reduced mitochondrial function (attenuated complex I and II activities) and decreased myocardial expression of uncoupling protein 2 and 3 and medium-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase mRNA. Treatment with CBD markedly improved DOX-induced cardiac dysfunction, oxidative/nitrative stress and cell death. CBD also enhanced the DOX-induced impaired cardiac mitochondrial function and biogenesis. These data suggest that CBD may represent a novel cardioprotective strategy against DOX-induced cardiotoxicity, and the above-described effects on mitochondrial function and biogenesis may

  11. Turn up the power –pharmacological activation of mitochondrial biogenesis in mouse models

    PubMed Central

    Komen, J C; Thorburn, D R

    2014-01-01

    The oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) system in mitochondria is responsible for the generation of the majority of cellular energy in the form of ATP. Patients with genetic OXPHOS disorders form the largest group of inborn errors of metabolism. Unfortunately, there is still a lack of efficient therapies for these disorders other than management of symptoms. Developing therapies has been complicated because, although the total group of OXPHOS patients is relatively large, there is enormous clinical and genetic heterogeneity within this patient population. Thus there has been a lot of interest in generating relevant mouse models for the different kinds of OXPHOS disorders. The most common treatment strategies tested in these mouse models have aimed to up-regulate mitochondrial biogenesis, in order to increase the residual OXPHOS activity present in affected animals and thereby to ameliorate the energy deficiency. Drugs such as bezafibrate, resveratrol and AICAR target the master regulator of mitochondrial biogenesis PGC-1α either directly or indirectly to manipulate mitochondrial metabolism. This review will summarize the outcome of preclinical treatment trials with these drugs in mouse models of OXPHOS disorders and discuss similar treatments in a number of mouse models of common diseases in which pathology is closely linked to mitochondrial dysfunction. In the majority of these studies the pharmacological activation of the PGC-1α axis shows true potential as therapy; however, other effects besides mitochondrial biogenesis may be contributing to this as well. Linked Articles This article is part of a themed issue on Mitochondrial Pharmacology: Energy, Injury & Beyond. To view the other articles in this issue visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.2014.171.issue-8 PMID:24102298

  12. Cannabidiol Protects against Doxorubicin-Induced Cardiomyopathy by Modulating Mitochondrial Function and Biogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Hao, Enkui; Mukhopadhyay, Partha; Cao, Zongxian; Erdélyi, Katalin; Holovac, Eileen; Liaudet, Lucas; Lee, Wen-Shin; Haskó, György; Mechoulam, Raphael; Pacher, Pál

    2015-01-01

    Doxorubicin (DOX) is a widely used, potent chemotherapeutic agent; however, its clinical application is limited because of its dose-dependent cardiotoxicity. DOX’s cardiotoxicity involves increased oxidative/nitrative stress, impaired mitochondrial function in cardiomyocytes/endothelial cells and cell death. Cannabidiol (CBD) is a nonpsychotropic constituent of marijuana, which is well tolerated in humans, with antioxidant, antiinflammatory and recently discovered antitumor properties. We aimed to explore the effects of CBD in a well-established mouse model of DOX-induced cardiomyopathy. DOX-induced cardiomyopathy was characterized by increased myocardial injury (elevated serum creatine kinase and lactate dehydrogenase levels), myocardial oxidative and nitrative stress (decreased total glutathione content and glutathione peroxidase 1 activity, increased lipid peroxidation, 3-nitrotyrosine formation and expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase mRNA), myocardial cell death (apoptotic and poly[ADP]-ribose polymerase 1 [PARP]-dependent) and cardiac dysfunction (decline in ejection fraction and left ventricular fractional shortening). DOX also impaired myocardial mitochondrial biogenesis (decreased mitochondrial copy number, mRNA expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator 1-alpha, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha, estrogen-related receptor alpha), reduced mitochondrial function (attenuated complex I and II activities) and decreased myocardial expression of uncoupling protein 2 and 3 and medium-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase mRNA. Treatment with CBD markedly improved DOX-induced cardiac dysfunction, oxidative/nitrative stress and cell death. CBD also enhanced the DOX-induced impaired cardiac mitochondrial function and biogenesis. These data suggest that CBD may represent a novel cardioprotective strategy against DOX-induced cardiotoxicity, and the above-described effects on mitochondrial function and biogenesis may

  13. Cannabidiol Protects against Doxorubicin-Induced Cardiomyopathy by Modulating Mitochondrial Function and Biogenesis.

    PubMed

    Hao, Enkui; Mukhopadhyay, Partha; Cao, Zongxian; Erdélyi, Katalin; Holovac, Eileen; Liaudet, Lucas; Lee, Wen-Shin; Haskó, György; Mechoulam, Raphael; Pacher, Pál

    2015-01-01

    Doxorubicin (DOX) is a widely used, potent chemotherapeutic agent; however, its clinical application is limited because of its dose-dependent cardiotoxicity. DOX's cardiotoxicity involves increased oxidative/nitrative stress, impaired mitochondrial function in cardiomyocytes/endothelial cells and cell death. Cannabidiol (CBD) is a nonpsychotropic constituent of marijuana, which is well tolerated in humans, with antioxidant, antiinflammatory and recently discovered antitumor properties. We aimed to explore the effects of CBD in a well-established mouse model of DOX-induced cardiomyopathy. DOX-induced cardiomyopathy was characterized by increased myocardial injury (elevated serum creatine kinase and lactate dehydrogenase levels), myocardial oxidative and nitrative stress (decreased total glutathione content and glutathione peroxidase 1 activity, increased lipid peroxidation, 3-nitrotyrosine formation and expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase mRNA), myocardial cell death (apoptotic and poly[ADP]-ribose polymerase 1 [PARP]-dependent) and cardiac dysfunction (decline in ejection fraction and left ventricular fractional shortening). DOX also impaired myocardial mitochondrial biogenesis (decreased mitochondrial copy number, mRNA expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator 1-alpha, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha, estrogen-related receptor alpha), reduced mitochondrial function (attenuated complex I and II activities) and decreased myocardial expression of uncoupling protein 2 and 3 and medium-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase mRNA. Treatment with CBD markedly improved DOX-induced cardiac dysfunction, oxidative/nitrative stress and cell death. CBD also enhanced the DOX-induced impaired cardiac mitochondrial function and biogenesis. These data suggest that CBD may represent a novel cardioprotective strategy against DOX-induced cardiotoxicity, and the above-described effects on mitochondrial function and biogenesis may

  14. Short term exercise induces PGC-1α, ameliorates inflammation and increases mitochondrial membrane proteins but fails to increase respiratory enzymes in aging diabetic hearts.

    PubMed

    Botta, Amy; Laher, Ismail; Beam, Julianne; Decoffe, Daniella; Brown, Kirsty; Halder, Swagata; Devlin, Angela; Gibson, Deanna L; Ghosh, Sanjoy

    2013-01-01

    PGC-1α, a transcriptional coactivator, controls inflammation and mitochondrial gene expression in insulin-sensitive tissues following exercise intervention. However, attributing such effects to PGC-1α is counfounded by exercise-induced fluctuations in blood glucose, insulin or bodyweight in diabetic patients. The goal of this study was to investigate the role of PGC-1α on inflammation and mitochondrial protein expressions in aging db/db mice hearts, independent of changes in glycemic parameters. In 8-month-old db/db mice hearts with diabetes lasting over 22 weeks, short-term, moderate-intensity exercise upregulated PGC-1α without altering body weight or glycemic parameters. Nonetheless, such a regimen lowered both cardiac (macrophage infiltration, iNOS and TNFα) and systemic (circulating chemokines and cytokines) inflammation. Curiously, such an anti-inflammatory effect was also linked to attenuated expression of downstream transcription factors of PGC-1α such as NRF-1 and several respiratory genes. Such mismatch between PGC-1α and its downstream targets was associated with elevated mitochondrial membrane proteins like Tom70 but a concurrent reduction in oxidative phosphorylation protein expressions in exercised db/db hearts. As mitochondrial oxidative stress was predominant in these hearts, in support of our in vivo data, increasing concentrations of H2O2 dose-dependently increased PGC-1α expression while inhibiting expression of inflammatory genes and downstream transcription factors in H9c2 cardiomyocytes in vitro. We conclude that short-term exercise-induced oxidative stress may be key in attenuating cardiac inflammatory genes and impairing PGC-1α mediated gene transcription of downstream transcription factors in type 2 diabetic hearts at an advanced age.

  15. 14,15-EET promotes mitochondrial biogenesis and protects cortical neurons against oxygen/glucose deprivation-induced apoptosis

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Lai; Chen, Man; Yuan, Lin; Xiang, Yuting; Zheng, Ruimao; Zhu, Shigong

    2014-07-18

    Highlights: • 14,15-EET inhibits OGD-induced apoptosis in cortical neurons. • Mitochondrial biogenesis of cortical neurons is promoted by 14,15-EET. • 14,15-EET preserves mitochondrial function of cortical neurons under OGD. • CREB mediates effect of 14,15-EET on mitochondrial biogenesis and function. - Abstract: 14,15-Epoxyeicosatrienoic acid (14,15-EET), a metabolite of arachidonic acid, is enriched in the brain cortex and exerts protective effect against neuronal apoptosis induced by ischemia/reperfusion. Although apoptosis has been well recognized to be closely associated with mitochondrial biogenesis and function, it is still unclear whether the neuroprotective effect of 14,15-EET is mediated by promotion of mitochondrial biogenesis and function in cortical neurons under the condition of oxygen–glucose deprivation (OGD). In this study, we found that 14,15-EET improved cell viability and inhibited apoptosis of cortical neurons. 14,15-EET significantly increased the mitochondrial mass and the ratio of mitochondrial DNA to nuclear DNA. Key makers of mitochondrial biogenesis, peroxisome proliferator activator receptor gamma-coactivator 1 alpha (PGC-1α), nuclear respiratory factor 1 (NRF-1) and mitochondrial transcription factor A (TFAM), were elevated at both mRNA and protein levels in the cortical neurons treated with 14,15-EET. Moreover, 14,15-EET markedly attenuated the decline of mitochondrial membrane potential, reduced ROS, while increased ATP synthesis. Knockdown of cAMP-response element binding protein (CREB) by siRNA blunted the up-regulation of PGC-1α and NRF-1 stimulated by 14,15-EET, and consequently abolished the neuroprotective effect of 14,15-EET. Our results indicate that 14,15-EET protects neurons from OGD-induced apoptosis by promoting mitochondrial biogenesis and function through CREB mediated activation of PGC-1α and NRF-1.

  16. Mitophagy is required for mitochondrial biogenesis and myogenic differentiation of C2C12 myoblasts

    PubMed Central

    Sin, Jon; Andres, Allen M.; Taylor, David J. R.; Weston, Thomas; Hiraumi, Yoshimi; Stotland, Aleksandr; Kim, Brandon J.; Huang, Chengqun; Doran, Kelly S.; Gottlieb, Roberta A.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Myogenesis is a crucial process governing skeletal muscle development and homeostasis. Differentiation of primitive myoblasts into mature myotubes requires a metabolic switch to support the increased energetic demand of contractile muscle. Skeletal myoblasts specifically shift from a highly glycolytic state to relying predominantly on oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) upon differentiation. We have found that this phenomenon requires dramatic remodeling of the mitochondrial network involving both mitochondrial clearance and biogenesis. During early myogenic differentiation, autophagy is robustly upregulated and this coincides with DNM1L/DRP1 (dynamin 1-like)-mediated fragmentation and subsequent removal of mitochondria via SQSTM1 (sequestosome 1)-mediated mitophagy. Mitochondria are then repopulated via PPARGC1A/PGC-1α (peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma, coactivator 1 alpha)-mediated biogenesis. Mitochondrial fusion protein OPA1 (optic atrophy 1 [autosomal dominant]) is then briskly upregulated, resulting in the reformation of mitochondrial networks. The final product is a myotube replete with new mitochondria. Respirometry reveals that the constituents of these newly established mitochondrial networks are better primed for OXPHOS and are more tightly coupled than those in myoblasts. Additionally, we have found that suppressing autophagy with various inhibitors during differentiation interferes with myogenic differentiation. Together these data highlight the integral role of autophagy and mitophagy in myogenic differentiation. PMID:26566717

  17. Non-cytotoxic concentrations of acetaminophen induced mitochondrial biogenesis and antioxidant response in HepG2 cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Tingfen; Zhang, Qiang; Guo, Jiabin; Yuan, Haitao; Peng, Hui; Cui, Lan; Yin, Jian; Zhang, Li; Zhao, Jun; Li, Jin; White, Andrew; Carmichael, Paul L; Westmoreland, Carl; Peng, Shuangqing

    2016-09-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction has been implicated in acute, severe liver injury caused by overdose of acetaminophen (APAP). However, whether mitochondrial biogenesis is involved is unclear. Here we demonstrated that mitochondrial biogenesis, as indicated by the amounts of mitochondrial DNA and proteins, increased significantly in HepG2 cells exposed to low, non-cytotoxic concentrations of APAP. This heightened response was accompanied by upregulated expression of PGC-1α, NRF-1 and TFAM, which are key transcriptional regulators of mitochondrial biogenesis. Additionally, antioxidants including glutathione, MnSOD, HO-1, NQO1, and Nrf2 were also significantly upregulated. In contrast, for HepG2 cells exposed to high, cytotoxic concentration of APAP, mitochondrial biogenesis was inhibited and the expression of its regulatory proteins and antioxidants were concentration-dependently downregulated. In summary, our study indicated that mitochondrial biogenesis, along with antioxidant induction, may be an important cellular adaptive mechanism counteracting APAP-induced toxicity and overwhelming this cytoprotective capacity could result in liver injury. PMID:27438896

  18. Cardioprotection against doxorubicin by metallothionein Is associated with preservation of mitochondrial biogenesis involving PGC-1α pathway.

    PubMed

    Guo, Jiabin; Guo, Qian; Fang, Haiqing; Lei, Lei; Zhang, Tingfen; Zhao, Jun; Peng, Shuangqing

    2014-08-15

    Metallothionein (MT) has been shown to inhibit cardiac oxidative stress and protect against the cardiotoxicity induced by doxorubicin (DOX), a potent and widely used chemotherapeutic agent. However, the mechanism of MT׳s protective action against DOX still remains obscure. Mitochondrial biogenesis impairment has been implicated to play an important role in the etiology and progression of DOX-induced cardiotoxicity. Increasing evidence indicates an intimate link between MT-mediated cardioprotection and mitochondrial biogenesis. This study was aimed to explore the possible contribution of mitochondrial biogenesis in MT׳s cardioprotective action against DOX. Adult male MT-I/II-null (MT(-/-)) and wild-type (MT(+/+)) mice were given a single dose of DOX intraperitoneally. Our results revealed that MT deficiency significantly sensitized mice to DOX-induced cardiac dysfunction, ultrastructural alterations, and mortality. DOX disrupted cardiac mitochondrial biogenesis indicated by mitochondrial DNA copy number and decreased mitochondrial number, and these effects were greater in MT(-/-) mice. Basal MT effectively protected against DOX-induced inhibition on the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator-1α (PGC-1α), a key regulator of mitochondrial biogenesis, and its downstream factors including mitochondrial transcription factor A. Moreover, MT was found to preserve the protein expression of manganese superoxide dismutase, a transcriptional target of PGC-1α. in vitro study showed that MT absence augmented DOX-induced increase of mitochondrial superoxide production in primary cultured cardiomyocytes. These findings suggest that MT׳s cardioprotection against DOX is mediated, at least in part, by preservation of mitochondrial biogenesis involving PGC-1α pathway. PMID:24858368

  19. Neural stem cell transplantation enhances mitochondrial biogenesis in a transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer's disease-like pathology.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wei; Gu, Guo-Jun; Shen, Xing; Zhang, Qi; Wang, Gang-Min; Wang, Pei-Jun

    2015-03-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction, especially a defect in mitochondrial biogenesis, is an early and prominent feature of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Previous studies demonstrated that the number of mitochondria is significantly reduced in susceptible hippocampal neurons from AD patients. Neural stem cell (NSC) transplantation in AD-like mice can compensate for the neuronal loss resulting from amyloid-beta protein deposition. The effects of NSC transplantation on mitochondrial biogenesis and cognitive function in AD-like mice, however, are poorly understood. In this study, we injected NSCs or vehicle into 12-month-old amyloid precursor protein (APP)/PS1 transgenic mice, a mouse model of AD-like pathology. The effects of NSC transplantation on cognitive function, the amount of mitochondrial DNA, the expression of mitochondrial biogenesis factors and mitochondria-related proteins, and mitochondrial morphology were investigated. Our results show that in NSC-injected APP/PS1 (Tg-NSC) mice, the cognitive function, number of mitochondria, and expression of mitochondria-related proteins, specifically the mitochondrial fission factors (dynamin-related protein 1 [Drp1] and fission 1 [Fis1]) and the mitochondrial fusion factor optic atrophy 1 (OPA1), were significantly increased compared with those in age-matched vehicle-injected APP/PS1 (Tg-Veh) mice, whereas the expression of mitochondrial fusion factors mitofusion 1 (Mfn1) and Mfn2 was significantly decreased. These data indicate that NSC transplantation may enhance mitochondria biogenesis and further rescue cognitive deficits in AD-like mice. PMID:25582749

  20. Neural stem cell transplantation enhances mitochondrial biogenesis in a transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer's disease-like pathology.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wei; Gu, Guo-Jun; Shen, Xing; Zhang, Qi; Wang, Gang-Min; Wang, Pei-Jun

    2015-03-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction, especially a defect in mitochondrial biogenesis, is an early and prominent feature of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Previous studies demonstrated that the number of mitochondria is significantly reduced in susceptible hippocampal neurons from AD patients. Neural stem cell (NSC) transplantation in AD-like mice can compensate for the neuronal loss resulting from amyloid-beta protein deposition. The effects of NSC transplantation on mitochondrial biogenesis and cognitive function in AD-like mice, however, are poorly understood. In this study, we injected NSCs or vehicle into 12-month-old amyloid precursor protein (APP)/PS1 transgenic mice, a mouse model of AD-like pathology. The effects of NSC transplantation on cognitive function, the amount of mitochondrial DNA, the expression of mitochondrial biogenesis factors and mitochondria-related proteins, and mitochondrial morphology were investigated. Our results show that in NSC-injected APP/PS1 (Tg-NSC) mice, the cognitive function, number of mitochondria, and expression of mitochondria-related proteins, specifically the mitochondrial fission factors (dynamin-related protein 1 [Drp1] and fission 1 [Fis1]) and the mitochondrial fusion factor optic atrophy 1 (OPA1), were significantly increased compared with those in age-matched vehicle-injected APP/PS1 (Tg-Veh) mice, whereas the expression of mitochondrial fusion factors mitofusion 1 (Mfn1) and Mfn2 was significantly decreased. These data indicate that NSC transplantation may enhance mitochondria biogenesis and further rescue cognitive deficits in AD-like mice.

  1. Defects in mitochondrial fatty acid synthesis result in failure of multiple aspects of mitochondrial biogenesis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Kursu, V A Samuli; Pietikäinen, Laura P; Fontanesi, Flavia; Aaltonen, Mari J; Suomi, Fumi; Raghavan Nair, Remya; Schonauer, Melissa S; Dieckmann, Carol L; Barrientos, Antoni; Hiltunen, J Kalervo; Kastaniotis, Alexander J

    2013-11-01

    Mitochondrial fatty acid synthesis (mtFAS) shares acetyl-CoA with the Krebs cycle as a common substrate and is required for the production of octanoic acid (C8) precursors of lipoic acid (LA) in mitochondria. MtFAS is a conserved pathway essential for respiration. In a genetic screen in Saccharomyces cerevisiae designed to further elucidate the physiological role of mtFAS, we isolated mutants with defects in mitochondrial post-translational gene expression processes, indicating a novel link to mitochondrial gene expression and respiratory chain biogenesis. In our ensuing analysis, we show that mtFAS, but not lipoylation per se, is required for respiratory competence. We demonstrate that mtFAS is required for mRNA splicing, mitochondrial translation and respiratory complex assembly, and provide evidence that not LA per se, but fatty acids longer than C8 play a role in these processes. We also show that mtFAS- and LA-deficient strains suffer from a mild haem deficiency that may contribute to the respiratory complex assembly defect. Based on our data and previously published information, we propose a model implicating mtFAS as a sensor for mitochondrial acetyl-CoA availability and a co-ordinator of nuclear and mitochondrial gene expression by adapting the mitochondrial compartment to changes in the metabolic status of the cell.

  2. Amla Enhances Mitochondrial Spare Respiratory Capacity by Increasing Mitochondrial Biogenesis and Antioxidant Systems in a Murine Skeletal Muscle Cell Line

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Hirotaka; Morino, Katsutaro; Mengistu, Lemecha; Ishibashi, Taishi; Kiriyama, Kohei; Ikami, Takao; Maegawa, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    Amla is one of the most important plants in Indian traditional medicine and has been shown to improve various age-related disorders while decreasing oxidative stress. Mitochondrial dysfunction is a proposed cause of aging through elevated oxidative stress. In this study, we investigated the effects of Amla on mitochondrial function in C2C12 myotubes, a murine skeletal muscle cell model with abundant mitochondria. Based on cell flux analysis, treatment with an extract of Amla fruit enhanced mitochondrial spare respiratory capacity, which enables cells to overcome various stresses. To further explore the mechanisms underlying these effects on mitochondrial function, we analyzed mitochondrial biogenesis and antioxidant systems, both proposed regulators of mitochondrial spare respiratory capacity. We found that Amla treatment stimulated both systems accompanied by AMPK and Nrf2 activation. Furthermore, we found that Amla treatment exhibited cytoprotective effects and lowered reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels in cells subjected to t-BHP-induced oxidative stress. These effects were accompanied by increased oxygen consumption, suggesting that Amla protected cells against oxidative stress by using enhanced spare respiratory capacity to produce more energy. Thus we identified protective effects of Amla, involving activation of mitochondrial function, which potentially explain its various effects on age-related disorders. PMID:27340504

  3. Amla Enhances Mitochondrial Spare Respiratory Capacity by Increasing Mitochondrial Biogenesis and Antioxidant Systems in a Murine Skeletal Muscle Cell Line.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Hirotaka; Morino, Katsutaro; Mengistu, Lemecha; Ishibashi, Taishi; Kiriyama, Kohei; Ikami, Takao; Maegawa, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    Amla is one of the most important plants in Indian traditional medicine and has been shown to improve various age-related disorders while decreasing oxidative stress. Mitochondrial dysfunction is a proposed cause of aging through elevated oxidative stress. In this study, we investigated the effects of Amla on mitochondrial function in C2C12 myotubes, a murine skeletal muscle cell model with abundant mitochondria. Based on cell flux analysis, treatment with an extract of Amla fruit enhanced mitochondrial spare respiratory capacity, which enables cells to overcome various stresses. To further explore the mechanisms underlying these effects on mitochondrial function, we analyzed mitochondrial biogenesis and antioxidant systems, both proposed regulators of mitochondrial spare respiratory capacity. We found that Amla treatment stimulated both systems accompanied by AMPK and Nrf2 activation. Furthermore, we found that Amla treatment exhibited cytoprotective effects and lowered reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels in cells subjected to t-BHP-induced oxidative stress. These effects were accompanied by increased oxygen consumption, suggesting that Amla protected cells against oxidative stress by using enhanced spare respiratory capacity to produce more energy. Thus we identified protective effects of Amla, involving activation of mitochondrial function, which potentially explain its various effects on age-related disorders. PMID:27340504

  4. Standardized Boesenbergia pandurata Extract Stimulates Exercise Endurance Through Increasing Mitochondrial Biogenesis.

    PubMed

    Kim, Taeyoon; Kim, Mi-Bo; Kim, Changhee; Jung, Hoe-Yune; Hwang, Jae-Kwan

    2016-07-01

    In the present study, the effect of standardized Boesenbergia pandurata (Roxb.) Schltr. (fingerroot) ethanol extract on exercise endurance was investigated in L6 rat skeletal muscle cells and C57BL/6J mice. Standardized B. pandurata ethanol extract (BPE) increased mitochondrial mass and stimulated the mRNA expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator 1 alpha (PGC-1α) in vitro. BPE also elevated the mRNA expression of key factors of mitochondrial biogenesis and function, which are activated by PGC-1α, such as estrogen-related receptor α (ERRα), nuclear respiratory factor 1 (NRF-1), and mitochondrial transcription factor A (Tfam). In animal models, both normal and high-fat diet (HFD)-induced obese mice treated with BPE ran much longer than their respective controls. In addition, BPE increased the protein expressions of phosphorylated AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), sirtuin 1 (SIRT1), PGC-1α, and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor delta (PPARδ), which are stimulated by exercise. These results indicate that B. pandurata could be a potential nutraceutical candidate for enhancing exercise endurance based on its mitochondrial biogenesis and exercise-mimicking effects. PMID:27331877

  5. Rev-erb-α modulates skeletal muscle oxidative capacity by regulating mitochondrial biogenesis and autophagy

    PubMed Central

    Woldt, Estelle; Sebti, Yasmine; Solt, Laura A.; Duhem, Christian; Lancel, Steve; Eeckhoute, Jérôme; Hesselink, Matthijs K.C.; Paquet, Charlotte; Delhaye, Stéphane; Shin, Youseung; Kamenecka, Theodore M.; Schaart, Gert; Lefebvre, Philippe; Nevière, Rémi; Burris, Thomas P.; Schrauwen, Patrick; Staels, Bart; Duez, Hélène

    2013-01-01

    The nuclear receptor Rev-erb-α modulates hepatic lipid and glucose metabolism, adipogenesis and the inflammatory response in macrophages. We show here that Rev-erb-α is highly expressed in oxidative skeletal muscle and plays a role in mitochondrial biogenesis and oxidative function, in gain- and loss-of function studies. Rev-erb-α-deficiency in skeletal muscle leads to reduced mitochondrial content and oxidative function, resulting in compromised exercise capacity. This phenotype was recapitulated in isolated fibers and in muscle cells upon Rev-erbα knock-down, while Rev-erb-α over-expression increased the number of mitochondria with improved respiratory capacity. Rev-erb-α-deficiency resulted in deactivation of the Stk11–Ampk–Sirt1–Ppargc1-α signaling pathway, whereas autophagy was up-regulated, resulting in both impaired mitochondrial biogenesis and increased clearance. Muscle over-expression or pharmacological activation of Rev-erb-α increased respiration and exercise capacity. This study identifies Rev-erb-α as a pharmacological target which improves muscle oxidative function by modulating gene networks controlling mitochondrial number and function. PMID:23852339

  6. Developmental regulation of mitochondrial biogenesis and function in the mouse mammary gland during a prolonged lactation cycle

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The regulation of mitochondrial biogenesis and function in the lactating mammary cell is poorly understood. The goal of this study was to use proteomics to relate temporal changes in mammary cell mitochondrial function during lactation to changes in the proteins that make up this organelle. The hypo...

  7. Stimulatory effect of CSE-generated H2S on hepatic mitochondrial biogenesis and the underlying mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Untereiner, Ashley A; Fu, Ming; Módis, Katalin; Wang, Rui; Ju, YoungJun; Wu, Lingyun

    2016-08-31

    We previously showed that hydrogen sulfide (H2S) upregulates peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ coactivator (PGC)-1α in primary hepatocytes. PGC-1α is a crucial regulator of mitochondrial biogenesis, a process required to maintain cellular energy homeostasis. We investigated the regulation of hepatic mitochondrial biogenesis by cystathionine γ-lyase (CSE)-generated H2S under physiological conditions. Primary hepatocytes isolated from CSE knockout (KO) and wild-type (WT) mice were used in all experiments. Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) and mRNA levels were measured via real-time PCR. Protein S-sulfhydration was determined via a modified biotin switch assay. MitoTracker Green was used to quantify mitochondrial content and distribution. CSE-KO hepatocytes produced less mtDNA compared to WT hepatocytes. Mitochondrial content was reduced in CSE-KO hepatocytes compared to WT hepatocytes, which was restored with NaHS (an H2S donor) treatment. CSE-KO hepatocytes exhibited lower levels of mitochondrial transcription factors and the mitochondrial transcription coactivator, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ coactivator-related protein (PPRC) compared to WT hepatocytes. NaHS administration upregulated PPRC, yet downregulated PGC-1β protein level in mouse hepatocytes. Exogenous H2S induced the S-sulfhydration of PPRC, which was lower in untreated CSE-KO hepatocytes, but not that of PGC-1β. Finally, knockdown of either PGC-1α or PPRC significantly decreased NaHS-stimulated mitochondrial biogenesis in hepatocytes, where knockdown of both genes were required to abolish NaHS-induced mitochondrial biogenesis. Endogenous H2S-induced liver mitochondrial biogenesis is dependent upon PGC-1α and PPRC signaling in primary hepatocytes. This study may offer clues to the regulation of energy homeostasis under physiological conditions as well as mitochondrial dysregulation. PMID:27364855

  8. Perm1 enhances mitochondrial biogenesis, oxidative capacity, and fatigue resistance in adult skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Cho, Yoshitake; Hazen, Bethany C; Gandra, Paulo G; Ward, Samuel R; Schenk, Simon; Russell, Aaron P; Kralli, Anastasia

    2016-02-01

    Skeletal muscle mitochondrial content and oxidative capacity are important determinants of muscle function and whole-body health. Mitochondrial content and function are enhanced by endurance exercise and impaired in states or diseases where muscle function is compromised, such as myopathies, muscular dystrophies, neuromuscular diseases, and age-related muscle atrophy. Hence, elucidating the mechanisms that control muscle mitochondrial content and oxidative function can provide new insights into states and diseases that affect muscle health. In past studies, we identified Perm1 (PPARGC1- and ESRR-induced regulator, muscle 1) as a gene induced by endurance exercise in skeletal muscle, and regulating mitochondrial oxidative function in cultured myotubes. The capacity of Perm1 to regulate muscle mitochondrial content and function in vivo is not yet known. In this study, we use adeno-associated viral (AAV) vectors to increase Perm1 expression in skeletal muscles of 4-wk-old mice. Compared to control vector, AAV1-Perm1 leads to significant increases in mitochondrial content and oxidative capacity (by 40-80%). Moreover, AAV1-Perm1-transduced muscles show increased capillary density and resistance to fatigue (by 33 and 31%, respectively), without prominent changes in fiber-type composition. These findings suggest that Perm1 selectively regulates mitochondrial biogenesis and oxidative function, and implicate Perm1 in muscle adaptations that also occur in response to endurance exercise. PMID:26481306

  9. Mitochondrial and lysosomal biogenesis are activated following PINK1/parkin-mediated mitophagy.

    PubMed

    Ivankovic, Davor; Chau, Kai-Yin; Schapira, Anthony H V; Gegg, Matthew E

    2016-01-01

    Impairment of the autophagy-lysosome pathway is implicated with the changes in α-synuclein and mitochondrial dysfunction observed in Parkinson's disease (PD). Damaged mitochondria accumulate PINK1, which then recruits parkin, resulting in ubiquitination of mitochondrial proteins. These can then be bound by the autophagic proteins p62/SQSTM1 and LC3, resulting in degradation of mitochondria by mitophagy. Mutations in PINK1 and parkin genes are a cause of familial PD. We found a significant increase in the expression of p62/SQSTM1 mRNA and protein following mitophagy induction in human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells. p62 protein not only accumulated on mitochondria, but was also greatly increased in the cytosol. Increased p62/SQSMT1 expression was prevented in PINK1 knock-down cells, suggesting increased p62 expression was a consequence of mitophagy induction. The transcription factors Nrf2 and TFEB, which play roles in mitochondrial and lysosomal biogenesis, respectively, can regulate p62/SQSMT1. We report that both Nrf2 and TFEB translocate to the nucleus following mitophagy induction and that the increase in p62 mRNA levels was significantly impaired in cells with Nrf2 or TFEB knockdown. TFEB translocation also increased expression of itself and lysosomal proteins such as glucocerebrosidase and cathepsin D following mitophagy induction. We also report that cells with increased TFEB protein have significantly higher PGC-1α mRNA levels, a regulator of mitochondrial biogenesis, resulting in increased mitochondrial content. Our data suggests that TFEB is activated following mitophagy to maintain autophagy-lysosome pathway and mitochondrial biogenesis. Therefore, strategies to increase TFEB may improve both the clearance of α-synuclein and mitochondrial dysfunction in PD. Damaged mitochondria are degraded by the autophagy-lysosome pathway and is termed mitophagy. Following mitophagy induction, the transcription factors Nrf2 and TFEB translocate to the nucleus, inducing

  10. Aluminium induced oxidative stress results in decreased mitochondrial biogenesis via modulation of PGC-1α expression.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Deep Raj; Sunkaria, Aditya; Wani, Willayat Yousuf; Sharma, Reeta Kumari; Kandimalla, Ramesh J L; Bal, Amanjit; Gill, Kiran Dip

    2013-12-01

    The present investigation was carried out to elucidate a possible molecular mechanism related to the effects of aluminium-induced oxidative stress on various mitochondrial respiratory complex subunits with special emphasis on the role of Peroxisome proliferator activated receptor gamma co-activator 1α (PGC-1α) and its downstream targets i.e. Nuclear respiratory factor-1(NRF-1), Nuclear respiratory factor-2(NRF-2) and Mitochondrial transcription factor A (Tfam) in mitochondrial biogenesis. Aluminium lactate (10mg/kgb.wt./day) was administered intragastrically to rats for 12 weeks. After 12 weeks of exposure, we found an increase in ROS levels, mitochondrial DNA oxidation and decrease in citrate synthase activity in the Hippocampus (HC) and Corpus striatum (CS) regions of rat brain. On the other hand, there was a decrease in the mRNA levels of the mitochondrial encoded subunits-NADH dehydrogenase (ND) subunits i.e. ND1, ND2, ND3, Cytochrome b (Cytb), Cytochrome oxidase (COX) subunits i.e. COX1, COX3, ATP synthase (ATPase) subunit 6 along with reduced expression of nuclear encoded subunits COX4, COX5A, COX5B of Electron transport chain (ETC). Besides, a decrease in mitochondrial DNA copy number and mitochondrial content in both regions of rat brain was observed. The PGC-1α was down-regulated in aluminium treated rats along with NRF-1, NRF-2 and Tfam, which act downstream from PGC-1α in aluminium treated rats. Electron microscopy results revealed a significant increase in the mitochondrial swelling, loss of cristae, chromatin condensation and decreases in mitochondrial number in case of aluminium treated rats as compared to control. So, PGC-1α seems to be a potent target for aluminium neurotoxicity, which makes it an almost ideal target to control or limit the damage that has been associated with the defective mitochondrial function seen in neurodegenerative diseases.

  11. High-fat diet-induced mitochondrial biogenesis is regulated by mitochondrial-derived reactive oxygen species activation of CaMKII.

    PubMed

    Jain, Swati S; Paglialunga, Sabina; Vigna, Chris; Ludzki, Alison; Herbst, Eric A; Lally, James S; Schrauwen, Patrick; Hoeks, Joris; Tupling, A Russ; Bonen, Arend; Holloway, Graham P

    2014-06-01

    Calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase (CaMK) activation induces mitochondrial biogenesis in response to increasing cytosolic calcium concentrations. Calcium leak from the ryanodine receptor (RyR) is regulated by reactive oxygen species (ROS), which is increased with high-fat feeding. We examined whether ROS-induced CaMKII-mediated signaling induced skeletal muscle mitochondrial biogenesis in selected models of lipid oversupply. In obese Zucker rats and high-fat-fed rodents, in which muscle mitochondrial content was upregulated, CaMKII phosphorylation was increased independent of changes in calcium uptake because sarco(endo)plasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-ATPase (SERCA) protein expression or activity was not altered, implicating altered sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) calcium leak in the activation of CaMKII. In support of this, we found that high-fat feeding increased mitochondrial ROS emission and S-nitrosylation of the RyR, whereas hydrogen peroxide induced SR calcium leak from the RyR and activation of CaMKII. Moreover, administration of a mitochondrial-specific antioxidant, SkQ, prevented high-fat diet-induced phosphorylation of CaMKII and the induction of mitochondrial biogenesis. Altogether, these data suggest that increased mitochondrial ROS emission is required for the induction of SR calcium leak, activation of CaMKII, and induction of mitochondrial biogenesis in response to excess lipid availability. PMID:24520120

  12. Eriocitrin ameliorates diet-induced hepatic steatosis with activation of mitochondrial biogenesis.

    PubMed

    Hiramitsu, Masanori; Shimada, Yasuhito; Kuroyanagi, Junya; Inoue, Takashi; Katagiri, Takao; Zang, Liqing; Nishimura, Yuhei; Nishimura, Norihiro; Tanaka, Toshio

    2014-01-15

    Lemon (Citrus limon) contains various bioactive flavonoids, and prevents obesity and obesity-associated metabolic diseases. We focused on eriocitrin (eriodictyol 7-rutinoside), a powerful antioxidative flavonoid in lemon with lipid-lowering effects in a rat model of high-fat diet. To investigate the mechanism of action of eriocitrin, we conducted feeding experiments on zebrafish with diet-induced obesity. Oral administration of eriocitrin (32 mg/kg/day for 28 days) improved dyslipidaemia and decreased lipid droplets in the liver. DNA microarray analysis revealed that eriocitrin increased mRNA of mitochondrial biogenesis genes, such as mitochondria transcription factor, nuclear respiratory factor 1, cytochrome c oxidase subunit 4, and ATP synthase. In HepG2 cells, eriocitrin also induced the corresponding orthologues, and reduced lipid accumulation under conditions of lipid loading. Eriocitrin increased mitochondrial size and mtDNA content, which resulted in ATP production in HepG2 cells and zebrafish. In summary, dietary eriocitrin ameliorates diet-induced hepatic steatosis with activation of mitochondrial biogenesis.

  13. Nitric Oxide in Skeletal Muscle: Role on Mitochondrial Biogenesis and Function

    PubMed Central

    Tengan, Celia Harumi; Rodrigues, Gabriela Silva; Godinho, Rosely Oliveira

    2012-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) has been implicated in several cellular processes as a signaling molecule and also as a source of reactive nitrogen species (RNS). NO is produced by three isoenzymes called nitric oxide synthases (NOS), all present in skeletal muscle. While neuronal NOS (nNOS) and endothelial NOS (eNOS) are isoforms constitutively expressed, inducible NOS (iNOS) is mainly expressed during inflammatory responses. Recent studies have demonstrated that NO is also involved in the mitochondrial biogenesis pathway, having PGC-1α as the main signaling molecule. Increased NO synthesis has been demonstrated in the sarcolemma of skeletal muscle fiber and NO can also reversibly inhibit cytochrome c oxidase (Complex IV of the respiratory chain). Investigation on cultured skeletal myotubes treated with NO donors, NO precursors or NOS inhibitors have also showed a bimodal effect of NO that depends on the concentration used. The present review will discuss the new insights on NO roles on mitochondrial biogenesis and function in skeletal muscle. We will also focus on potential therapeutic strategies based on NO precursors or analogs to treat patients with myopathies and mitochondrial deficiency. PMID:23242154

  14. Aluminium induced oxidative stress results in decreased mitochondrial biogenesis via modulation of PGC-1α expression

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, Deep Raj; Sunkaria, Aditya; Wani, Willayat Yousuf; Sharma, Reeta Kumari; Kandimalla, Ramesh J.L.; Bal, Amanjit; Gill, Kiran Dip

    2013-12-01

    The present investigation was carried out to elucidate a possible molecular mechanism related to the effects of aluminium-induced oxidative stress on various mitochondrial respiratory complex subunits with special emphasis on the role of Peroxisome proliferator activated receptor gamma co-activator 1α (PGC-1α) and its downstream targets i.e. Nuclear respiratory factor-1(NRF-1), Nuclear respiratory factor-2(NRF-2) and Mitochondrial transcription factor A (Tfam) in mitochondrial biogenesis. Aluminium lactate (10 mg/kg b.wt./day) was administered intragastrically to rats for 12 weeks. After 12 weeks of exposure, we found an increase in ROS levels, mitochondrial DNA oxidation and decrease in citrate synthase activity in the Hippocampus (HC) and Corpus striatum (CS) regions of rat brain. On the other hand, there was a decrease in the mRNA levels of the mitochondrial encoded subunits–NADH dehydrogenase (ND) subunits i.e. ND1, ND2, ND3, Cytochrome b (Cytb), Cytochrome oxidase (COX) subunits i.e. COX1, COX3, ATP synthase (ATPase) subunit 6 along with reduced expression of nuclear encoded subunits COX4, COX5A, COX5B of Electron transport chain (ETC). Besides, a decrease in mitochondrial DNA copy number and mitochondrial content in both regions of rat brain was observed. The PGC-1α was down-regulated in aluminium treated rats along with NRF-1, NRF-2 and Tfam, which act downstream from PGC-1α in aluminium treated rats. Electron microscopy results revealed a significant increase in the mitochondrial swelling, loss of cristae, chromatin condensation and decreases in mitochondrial number in case of aluminium treated rats as compared to control. So, PGC-1α seems to be a potent target for aluminium neurotoxicity, which makes it an almost ideal target to control or limit the damage that has been associated with the defective mitochondrial function seen in neurodegenerative diseases. - Highlights: • Aluminium decreases the mRNA levels of mitochondrial and nuclear encoded

  15. Cilostazol attenuates murine hepatic ischemia and reperfusion injury via heme oxygenase-dependent activation of mitochondrial biogenesis.

    PubMed

    Joe, Yeonsoo; Zheng, Min; Kim, Hyo Jeong; Uddin, Md Jamal; Kim, Seul-Ki; Chen, Yingqing; Park, Jeongmin; Cho, Gyeong Jae; Ryter, Stefan W; Chung, Hun Taeg

    2015-07-01

    Hepatic ischemia-reperfusion (I/R) can cause hepatocellular injury associated with the inflammatory response and mitochondrial dysfunction. We studied the protective effects of the phosphodiesterase inhibitor cilostazol in hepatic I/R and the roles of mitochondria and the Nrf2/heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) system. Wild-type, Hmox1(-/-), or Nrf2(-/-) mice were subjected to hepatic I/R in the absence or presence of cilostazol followed by measurements of liver injury. Primary hepatocytes were subjected to cilostazol with the HO-1 inhibitor ZnPP, or Nrf2-specific siRNA, followed by assessment of mitochondrial biogenesis. Preconditioning with cilostazol prior to hepatic I/R protected against hepatocellular injury and mitochondrial dysfunction. Cilostazol reduced the serum levels of alanine aminotransferase, TNF-α, and liver myeloperoxidase content relative to control I/R-treated mice. In primary hepatocytes, cilostazol increased the expression of HO-1, and markers of mitochondrial biogenesis, PGC-1α, NRF-1, and TFAM, induced the mitochondrial proteins COX III and COX IV and increased mtDNA and mitochondria content. Pretreatment of primary hepatocytes with ZnPP inhibited cilostazol-induced PGC-1α, NRF-1, and TFAM mRNA expression and reduced mtDNA and mitochondria content. Genetic silencing of Nrf2 prevented the induction of HO-1 and mitochondrial biogenesis by cilostazol in HepG2 cells. Cilostazol induced hepatic HO-1 production and mitochondrial biogenesis in wild-type mice, but not in Hmox1(-/-) or Nrf2(-/-) mice, and failed to protect against liver injury in Nrf2(-/-) mice. These results suggest that I/R injury can impair hepatic mitochondrial function, which can be reversed by cilostazol treatment. These results also suggest that cilostazol-induced mitochondrial biogenesis was mediated by an Nrf-2- and HO-1-dependent pathway.

  16. Quercetin supplementation does not enhance cerebellar mitochondrial biogenesis and oxidative status in exercised rats.

    PubMed

    Casuso, Rafael A; Martínez-Amat, Antonio; Hita-Contreras, Fidel; Camiletti-Moirón, Daniel; Aranda, Pilar; Martínez-López, Emilio

    2015-07-01

    The present study tested the hypothesis that quercetin may inhibit the mitochondrial and antioxidant adaptations induced by exercise in cerebellar tissue. Thirty-five 6-week-old Wistar rats were randomly allocated into the following groups: quercetin, exercised (Q-Ex; n = 9); quercetin, sedentary (Q-Sed; n = 9); no quercetin, exercised (NQ-Ex; n = 9); and no quercetin, sedentary (NQ-Sed; n = 8). After 6 weeks of quercetin supplementation and/or exercise training, cerebellums were collected. Protein carbonyl content (PCC), sirtuin 1, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator 1α (PGC-1α), messenger RNA levels, citrate synthase (CS), and mitochondrial DNA were measured. When Q-Sed was compared with NQ-Sed, PCC (P < .005) showed decreased levels, whereas PGC-1α, sirtuin 1 (both, P < .01), mitochondrial DNA (P < .001), and CS (P < .01) increased. However, when Q-Ex was compared with Q-Sed, PCC showed increased levels (P < .001), whereas CS decreased (P < .01). Furthermore, the NQ-Ex group experienced an increase in PGC-1α messenger RNA levels in comparison with NQ-Sed (P > .01). This effect, however, did not appear in Q-Ex (P < .05). Therefore, we must hypothesize that either the dose (25 mg/kg) or the length of the quercetin supplementation period that was used in the present study (or perhaps both) may impair exercise-induced adaptations in cerebellar tissue. PMID:26032482

  17. Hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid axis hormones stimulate mitochondrial function and biogenesis in human hair follicles.

    PubMed

    Vidali, Silvia; Knuever, Jana; Lerchner, Johannes; Giesen, Melanie; Bíró, Tamás; Klinger, Matthias; Kofler, Barbara; Funk, Wolfgang; Poeggeler, Burkhard; Paus, Ralf

    2014-01-01

    Thyroid hormones regulate mitochondrial function. As other hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid (HPT) axis hormones, i.e., thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH) and thyrotropin (TSH), are expressed in human hair follicles (HFs) and regulate mitochondrial function in human epidermis, we investigated in organ-cultured human scalp HFs whether TRH (30 nM), TSH (10 mU ml(-1)), thyroxine (T4) (100 nM), and triiodothyronine (T3) (100 pM) alter intrafollicular mitochondrial energy metabolism. All HPT-axis members increased gene and protein expression of mitochondrial-encoded subunit 1 of cytochrome c oxidase (MTCO1), a subunit of respiratory chain complex IV, mitochondrial transcription factor A (TFAM), and Porin. All hormones also stimulated intrafollicular complex I/IV activity and mitochondrial biogenesis. The TSH effects on MTCO1, TFAM, and porin could be abolished by K1-70, a TSH-receptor antagonist, suggesting a TSH receptor-mediated action. Notably, as measured by calorimetry, T3 and TSH increased follicular heat production, whereas T3/T4 and TRH stimulated ATP production in cultured HF keratinocytes. HPT-axis hormones did not increase reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. Rather, T3 and T4 reduced ROS formation, and all tested HPT-axis hormones increased the transcription of ROS scavengers (catalase, superoxide dismutase 2) in HF keratinocytes. Thus, mitochondrial biology, energy metabolism, and redox state of human HFs are subject to profound (neuro-)endocrine regulation by HPT-axis hormones. The neuroendocrine control of mitochondrial biology in a complex human mini-organ revealed here may be therapeutically exploitable. PMID:23949722

  18. Mitochondria: Biogenesis and mitophagy balance in segregation and clonal expansion of mitochondrial DNA mutations.

    PubMed

    Carelli, Valerio; Maresca, Alessandra; Caporali, Leonardo; Trifunov, Selena; Zanna, Claudia; Rugolo, Michela

    2015-06-01

    Mitochondria are cytoplasmic organelles containing their own multi-copy genome. They are organized in a highly dynamic network, resulting from balance between fission and fusion, which maintains homeostasis of mitochondrial mass through mitochondrial biogenesis and mitophagy. Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutates much faster than nuclear DNA. In particular, mtDNA point mutations and deletions may occur somatically and accumulate with aging, coexisting with the wild type, a condition known as heteroplasmy. Under specific circumstances, clonal expansion of mutant mtDNA may occur within single cells, causing a wide range of severe human diseases when mutant overcomes wild type. Furthermore, mtDNA deletions accumulate and clonally expand as a consequence of deleterious mutations in nuclear genes involved in mtDNA replication and maintenance, as well as in mitochondrial fusion genes (mitofusin-2 and OPA1), possibly implicating mtDNA nucleoids segregation. We here discuss how the intricacies of mitochondrial homeostasis impinge on the intracellular propagation of mutant mtDNA. This article is part of a Directed Issue entitled: Energy Metabolism Disorders and Therapies.

  19. Dual control of mitochondrial biogenesis by sirtuin 1 and sirtuin 3.

    PubMed

    Brenmoehl, Julia; Hoeflich, Andreas

    2013-11-01

    In this review, we discuss the dual control of mitochondrial biogenesis and energy metabolism by silent information regulator-1 and -3 (SIRT1 and SIRT3). SIRT1 activates the peroxisome proliferator activated receptor γ co-activator 1α (PGC-1α)-mediated transcription of nuclear and mitochondrial genes encoding for proteins promoting mitochondria proliferation, oxidative phosphorylation and energy production, whereas SIRT3 directly acts as an activator of proteins important for oxidative phosphorylation, tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle and fatty-acid oxidation and indirectly of PGC-1α and AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK). The complex network involves different cellular compartments, transcriptional activation, post-translational modification and a plethora of secondary effectors. Overall, the mode of interaction between both sirtuin family members may be considered as a prominent case of molecular job-sharing. PMID:23583953

  20. Flavan-3-ol fraction from cocoa powder promotes mitochondrial biogenesis in skeletal muscle in mice

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Numerous clinical studies have reported that ingestion of chocolate has reduced risk of metabolic syndrome. In order to elucidate the mechanism, we evaluated the influence of flavan-3-ols derived from cocoa powder on energy metabolism in mice using an indirect calorimetric method. Method The mice were divided into two groups, and administered either distilled water or 50 mg/kg of flavan-3-ol fraction for 2 weeks. At the end of the experimental period, animals were sacrificed after blood pressure and the mean respiratory exchange ratio (RER) over 24 hours were measured. Results The mean respiratory exchange ratio (RER) over 24 hours was reduced significantly in the flavan-3-ols group. The mean blood pressure was significantly decreased in flavan-3-ols treatment group compared with control group. The protein level of carnitine palmitoyltransferase 2 (CPT2) was increased significantly by flavan-3-ols in skeletal muscle, but not in liver. Uncoupling protein (UCP) 1 was increased significantly in brown adipose tissue by flavan-3-ols. The mitochondria copy number in gastrocnemius and soleus muscles and brown adipose tissue were increased significantly by administration of flavan-3-ol fraction. Conclusion These results suggest that flavan-3-ols enhances lipolysis and promotes mitochondrial biogenesis. We conclude that improvement of metabolic syndrome risk factors following ingestion of chocolate may be induced, in part, by the mitochondrial biogenesis-promoting effect of flavan-3-ols. PMID:24708519

  1. SIRT1 facilitates hepatocellular carcinoma metastasis by promoting PGC-1α-mediated mitochondrial biogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jing; Zheng, Lu; Feng, Min; Wang, Xiaoya; Han, Keqiang; Pi, Huifeng; Li, Min; Huang, Xiaobing; You, Nan; Tian, Yewang; Zuo, Guohua; Li, Hongyan; Zhao, Hongzhi; Deng, Ping; Yu, Zhengping; Zhou, Zhou; Liang, Ping

    2016-01-01

    SIRT1 is a multifaceted NAD+-dependent protein deacetylase known to act as a tumor promoter or suppressor in different cancers. Here, we describe a novel mechanism of SIRT1-induced hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) metastasis. SIRT1 overexpression was frequently detected in human HCC specimens and was associated with microvascular invasion (P = 0.0039), advanced tumor node metastasis (TNM) stages (P = 0.0016), HCC recurrence (P = 0.021) and poor outcomes (P = 0.039). Lentivirus-mediated knockdown of SIRT1 in MHCC97H cells reduced invasion and metastasis in vitro and in vivo. SIRT1 depletion attenuated mitochondrial biogenesis and adenosine triphosphate (ATP) production but did not affect epithelial-mesenchymal transition. Elevated SIRT1 expression strongly correlated with the upregulation of PGC-1α in HCC specimens, and ectopic expression of SIRT1 increased PGC-1α levels. In cell assays and an orthotopic transplantation model, PGC-1α overexpression reversed the inhibitory effects of SIRT1 depletion on invasion and metastasis by enhancing mitochondrial biogenesis. These findings reveal the involvement of SIRT1 in HCC metastasis and provide a rationale for exploring therapeutic targets against the SIRT1/PGC-1α axis. PMID:27081083

  2. Oxaloacetate activates brain mitochondrial biogenesis, enhances the insulin pathway, reduces inflammation and stimulates neurogenesis.

    PubMed

    Wilkins, Heather M; Harris, Janna L; Carl, Steven M; E, Lezi; Lu, Jianghua; Eva Selfridge, J; Roy, Nairita; Hutfles, Lewis; Koppel, Scott; Morris, Jill; Burns, Jeffrey M; Michaelis, Mary L; Michaelis, Elias K; Brooks, William M; Swerdlow, Russell H

    2014-12-15

    Brain bioenergetic function declines in some neurodegenerative diseases, this may influence other pathologies and administering bioenergetic intermediates could have therapeutic value. To test how one intermediate, oxaloacetate (OAA) affects brain bioenergetics, insulin signaling, inflammation and neurogenesis, we administered intraperitoneal OAA, 1-2 g/kg once per day for 1-2 weeks, to C57Bl/6 mice. OAA altered levels, distributions or post-translational modifications of mRNA and proteins (proliferator-activated receptor-gamma coactivator 1α, PGC1 related co-activator, nuclear respiratory factor 1, transcription factor A of the mitochondria, cytochrome oxidase subunit 4 isoform 1, cAMP-response element binding, p38 MAPK and adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase) in ways that should promote mitochondrial biogenesis. OAA increased Akt, mammalian target of rapamycin and P70S6K phosphorylation. OAA lowered nuclear factor κB nucleus-to-cytoplasm ratios and CCL11 mRNA. Hippocampal vascular endothelial growth factor mRNA, doublecortin mRNA, doublecortin protein, doublecortin-positive neuron counts and neurite length increased in OAA-treated mice. (1)H-MRS showed OAA increased brain lactate, GABA and glutathione thereby demonstrating metabolic changes are detectable in vivo. In mice, OAA promotes brain mitochondrial biogenesis, activates the insulin signaling pathway, reduces neuroinflammation and activates hippocampal neurogenesis.

  3. Mitochondrial biogenesis is required for the anchorage-independent survival and propagation of stem-like cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Peiris-Pagès, Maria; Ozsvari, Bela; Smith, Duncan L.; Sanchez-Alvarez, Rosa; Martinez-Outschoorn, Ubaldo E.; Cappello, Anna Rita; Pezzi, Vincenzo; Lisanti, Michael P.; Sotgia, Federica

    2015-01-01

    Here, we show that new mitochondrial biogenesis is required for the anchorage independent survival and propagation of cancer stem-like cells (CSCs). More specifically, we used the drug XCT790 as an investigational tool, as it functions as a specific inhibitor of the ERRα-PGC1 signaling pathway, which governs mitochondrial biogenesis. Interestingly, our results directly demonstrate that XCT790 efficiently blocks both the survival and propagation of tumor initiating stem-like cells (TICs), using the MCF7 cell line as a model system. Mechanistically, we show that XCT790 suppresses the activity of several independent signaling pathways that are normally required for the survival of CSCs, such as Sonic hedgehog, TGFβ-SMAD, STAT3, and Wnt signaling. We also show that XCT790 markedly reduces oxidative mitochondrial metabolism (OXPHOS) and that XCT790-mediated inhibition of CSC propagation can be prevented or reversed by Acetyl-L-Carnitine (ALCAR), a mitochondrial fuel. Consistent with our findings, over-expression of ERRα significantly enhances the efficiency of mammosphere formation, which can be blocked by treatment with mitochondrial inhibitors. Similarly, mammosphere formation augmented by FOXM1, a downstream target of Wnt/β-catenin signaling, can also be blocked by treatment with three different classes of mitochondrial inhibitors (XCT790, oligomycin A, or doxycycline). In this context, our unbiased proteomics analysis reveals that FOXM1 drives the expression of >90 protein targets associated with mitochondrial biogenesis, glycolysis, the EMT and protein synthesis in MCF7 cells, processes which are characteristic of an anabolic CSC phenotype. Finally, doxycycline is an FDA-approved antibiotic, which is very well-tolerated in patients. As such, doxycycline could be re-purposed clinically as a ‘safe’ mitochondrial inhibitor, to target FOXM1 and mitochondrial biogenesis in CSCs, to prevent tumor recurrence and distant metastasis, thereby avoiding patient relapse

  4. Rg3 Improves Mitochondrial Function and the Expression of Key Genes Involved in Mitochondrial Biogenesis in C2C12 Myotubes

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Min Joo; Koo, Young Do; Kim, Min; Lim, Soo; Park, Young Joo; Chung, Sung Soo; Jang, Hak C.

    2016-01-01

    Background Panax ginseng has glucose-lowering effects, some of which are associated with the improvement in insulin resistance in skeletal muscle. Because mitochondria play a pivotal role in the insulin resistance of skeletal muscle, we investigated the effects of the ginsenoside Rg3, one of the active components of P. ginseng, on mitochondrial function and biogenesis in C2C12 myotubes. Methods C2C12 myotubes were treated with Rg3 for 24 hours. Insulin signaling pathway proteins were examined by Western blot. Cellular adenosine triphosphate (ATP) levels and the oxygen consumption rate were measured. The protein or mRNA levels of mitochondrial complexes were evaluated by Western blot and quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction analysis. Results Rg3 treatment to C2C12 cells activated the insulin signaling pathway proteins, insulin receptor substrate-1 and Akt. Rg3 increased ATP production and the oxygen consumption rate, suggesting improved mitochondrial function. Rg3 increased the expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator 1α, nuclear respiratory factor 1, and mitochondrial transcription factor, which are transcription factors related to mitochondrial biogenesis. Subsequent increased expression of mitochondrial complex IV and V was also observed. Conclusion Our results suggest that Rg3 improves mitochondrial function and the expression of key genes involved in mitochondrial biogenesis, leading to an improvement in insulin resistance in skeletal muscle. Rg3 may have the potential to be developed as an anti-hyperglycemic agent.

  5. Leptin Modulates Mitochondrial Function, Dynamics and Biogenesis in MCF-7 Cells.

    PubMed

    Blanquer-Rosselló, M Mar; Santandreu, Francisca M; Oliver, Jordi; Roca, Pilar; Valle, Adamo

    2015-09-01

    The adipokine leptin, known for its key role in the control of energy metabolism, has been shown to be involved in both normal and tumoral mammary growth. One of the hallmarks of cancer is an alteration of tumor metabolism since cancerous cells must rewire metabolism to satisfy the demands of growth and proliferation. Considering the sensibility of breast cancer cells to leptin, the objective of this study was to explore the effects of this adipokine on their metabolism. To this aim, we treated the MCF-7 breast cancer cell line with 50 ng/mL leptin and analyzed several features related to cellular and mitochondrial metabolism. As a result, leptin increased cell proliferation, shifted ATP production from glycolysis to mitochondria and decreased the levels of the glycolytic end-product lactate. We observed an improvement in ADP-dependent oxygen consumption and an amelioration of oxidative stress without changes in total mitochondrial mass or specific oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) complexes. Furthermore, RT-PCR and western blot showed an up-regulation for genes and proteins related to biogenesis and mitochondrial dynamics. This expression signature, together with an increased mitophagy observed by confocal microscopy suggests that leptin may improve mitochondrial quality and function. Taken together, our results propose that leptin may improve bioenergetic efficiency by avoiding the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and conferring benefits for growth and survival of MCF-7 breast cancer cells. PMID:25752935

  6. Leptin Modulates Mitochondrial Function, Dynamics and Biogenesis in MCF-7 Cells.

    PubMed

    Blanquer-Rosselló, M Mar; Santandreu, Francisca M; Oliver, Jordi; Roca, Pilar; Valle, Adamo

    2015-09-01

    The adipokine leptin, known for its key role in the control of energy metabolism, has been shown to be involved in both normal and tumoral mammary growth. One of the hallmarks of cancer is an alteration of tumor metabolism since cancerous cells must rewire metabolism to satisfy the demands of growth and proliferation. Considering the sensibility of breast cancer cells to leptin, the objective of this study was to explore the effects of this adipokine on their metabolism. To this aim, we treated the MCF-7 breast cancer cell line with 50 ng/mL leptin and analyzed several features related to cellular and mitochondrial metabolism. As a result, leptin increased cell proliferation, shifted ATP production from glycolysis to mitochondria and decreased the levels of the glycolytic end-product lactate. We observed an improvement in ADP-dependent oxygen consumption and an amelioration of oxidative stress without changes in total mitochondrial mass or specific oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) complexes. Furthermore, RT-PCR and western blot showed an up-regulation for genes and proteins related to biogenesis and mitochondrial dynamics. This expression signature, together with an increased mitophagy observed by confocal microscopy suggests that leptin may improve mitochondrial quality and function. Taken together, our results propose that leptin may improve bioenergetic efficiency by avoiding the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and conferring benefits for growth and survival of MCF-7 breast cancer cells.

  7. Twinkle overexpression prevents cardiac rupture after myocardial infarction by alleviating impaired mitochondrial biogenesis.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Takahiro; Ikeda, Masataka; Ide, Tomomi; Fujino, Takeo; Matsuo, Yuka; Arai, Shinobu; Saku, Keita; Sunagawa, Kenji

    2016-09-01

    Cardiac rupture is a fatal complication after myocardial infarction (MI). However, the detailed mechanism underlying cardiac rupture after MI remains to be fully elucidated. In this study, we investigated the role of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) and mitochondria in the pathophysiology of cardiac rupture by analyzing Twinkle helicase overexpression mice (TW mice). Twinkle overexpression increased mtDNA copy number approximately twofold and ameliorated ischemic cardiomyopathy at day 28 after MI. Notably, Twinkle overexpression markedly prevented cardiac rupture and improved post-MI survival, accompanied by the suppression of MMP-2 and MMP-9 in the MI border area at day 5 after MI when cardiac rupture frequently occurs. Additionally, these cardioprotective effects of Twinkle overexpression were abolished in transgenic mice overexpressing mutant Twinkle with an in-frame duplication of amino acids 353-365, which resulted in no increases in mtDNA copy number. Furthermore, although apoptosis and oxidative stress were induced and mitochondria were damaged in the border area, these injuries were improved in TW mice. Further analysis revealed that mitochondrial biogenesis, including mtDNA copy number, transcription, and translation, was severely impaired in the border area at day 5 In contrast, Twinkle overexpression maintained mtDNA copy number and restored the impaired transcription and translation of mtDNA in the border area. These results demonstrated that Twinkle overexpression alleviated impaired mitochondrial biogenesis in the border area through maintained mtDNA copy number and thereby prevented cardiac rupture accompanied by the reduction of apoptosis and oxidative stress, and suppression of MMP activity. PMID:27342873

  8. Overexpression of UCP1 in tobacco induces mitochondrial biogenesis and amplifies a broad stress response

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Uncoupling protein one (UCP1) is a mitochondrial inner membrane protein capable of uncoupling the electrochemical gradient from adenosine-5′-triphosphate (ATP) synthesis, dissipating energy as heat. UCP1 plays a central role in nonshivering thermogenesis in the brown adipose tissue (BAT) of hibernating animals and small rodents. A UCP1 ortholog also occurs in plants, and aside from its role in uncoupling respiration from ATP synthesis, thereby wasting energy, it plays a beneficial role in the plant response to several abiotic stresses, possibly by decreasing the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and regulating cellular redox homeostasis. However, the molecular mechanisms by which UCP1 is associated with stress tolerance remain unknown. Results Here, we report that the overexpression of UCP1 increases mitochondrial biogenesis, increases the uncoupled respiration of isolated mitochondria, and decreases cellular ATP concentration. We observed that the overexpression of UCP1 alters mitochondrial bioenergetics and modulates mitochondrial-nuclear communication, inducing the upregulation of hundreds of nuclear- and mitochondrial-encoded mitochondrial proteins. Electron microscopy analysis showed that these metabolic changes were associated with alterations in mitochondrial number, area and morphology. Surprisingly, UCP1 overexpression also induces the upregulation of hundreds of stress-responsive genes, including some involved in the antioxidant defense system, such as superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GPX) and glutathione-S-transferase (GST). As a consequence of the increased UCP1 activity and increased expression of oxidative stress-responsive genes, the UCP1-overexpressing plants showed reduced ROS accumulation. These beneficial metabolic effects may be responsible for the better performance of UCP1-overexpressing lines in low pH, high salt, high osmolarity, low temperature, and oxidative stress conditions. Conclusions

  9. Gene expression of key regulators of mitochondrial biogenesis is sex dependent in mice with growth hormone receptor deletion in liver.

    PubMed

    Zawada, Ilona; Masternak, Michal M; List, Edward O; Stout, Michael B; Berryman, Darlene E; Lewinski, Andrzej; Kopchick, John J; Bartke, Andrzej; Karbownik-Lewinska, Malgorzata; Gesing, Adam

    2015-03-01

    Mitochondrial biogenesis is an essential process for cell viability. Mice with disruption of the growth hormone receptor (GHR) gene (Ghr gene) in the liver (LiGHRKO), in contrast to long-lived mice with global deletion of the Ghr gene (GHRKO), are characterized by lack of improved insulin sensitivity and severe hepatic steatosis. Tissue-specific disruption of the GHR in liver results in a mouse model with dramatically altered GH/IGF1 axis. We have previously shown increased levels of key regulators of mitochondrial biogenesis in insulin-sensitive GHRKO mice. The aim of the present study is to assess, using real-time PCR, the gene expression of key regulators of mitochondrial biogenesis (Pgc1α, Ampk, Sirt1, Nrf2 and Mfn2) and a marker of mitochondrial activity (CoxIV) in brains, kidneys and livers of male and female LiGHRKO and wild-type (WT) mice. There were significant differences between males and females. In the brain, expression of Pgc1α, Ampk, Sirt1, Nrf2 and Mfn2 was lower in pooled females compared to pooled males. In the kidneys, expression of Ampk and Sirt1 was also lower in female mice. In the liver, no differences between males and females were observed. Sexual dimorphism may play an important role in regulating the biogenesis of mitochondria. PMID:25855408

  10. Carbon Monoxide Improves Neurologic Outcomes by Mitochondrial Biogenesis after Global Cerebral Ischemia Induced by Cardiac Arrest in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Peng; Yao, Lan; Zhou, Li-li; Liu, Yuan-shan; Chen, Ming-di; Wu, Hai-dong; Chang, Rui-ming; Li, Yi; Zhou, Ming-gen; Fang, Xiang-shao; Yu, Tao; Jiang, Long-yuan; Huang, Zi-tong

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction contributes to brain injury following global cerebral ischemia after cardiac arrest. Carbon monoxide treatment has shown potent cytoprotective effects in ischemia/reperfusion injury. This study aimed to investigate the effects of carbon monoxide-releasing molecules on brain mitochondrial dysfunction and brain injury following resuscitation after cardiac arrest in rats. A rat model of cardiac arrest was established by asphyxia. The animals were randomly divided into the following 3 groups: cardiac arrest and resuscitation group, cardiac arrest and resuscitation plus carbon monoxide intervention group, and sham control group (no cardiac arrest). After the return of spontaneous circulation, neurologic deficit scores (NDS) and S-100B levels were significantly decreased at 24, 48, and 72 h, but carbon monoxide treatment improved the NDS and S-100B levels at 24 h and the 3-day survival rates of the rats. This treatment also decreased the number of damaged neurons in the hippocampus CA1 area and increased the brain mitochondrial activity. In addition, it increased mitochondrial biogenesis by increasing the expression of biogenesis factors including peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ coactivator-1α, nuclear respiratory factor-1, nuclear respiratory factor-2 and mitochondrial transcription factor A. Thus, this study showed that carbon monoxide treatment alleviated brain injury after cardiac arrest in rats by increased brain mitochondrial biogenesis. PMID:27489503

  11. Carbon Monoxide Improves Neurologic Outcomes by Mitochondrial Biogenesis after Global Cerebral Ischemia Induced by Cardiac Arrest in Rats.

    PubMed

    Wang, Peng; Yao, Lan; Zhou, Li-Li; Liu, Yuan-Shan; Chen, Ming-di; Wu, Hai-Dong; Chang, Rui-Ming; Li, Yi; Zhou, Ming-Gen; Fang, Xiang-Shao; Yu, Tao; Jiang, Long-Yuan; Huang, Zi-Tong

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction contributes to brain injury following global cerebral ischemia after cardiac arrest. Carbon monoxide treatment has shown potent cytoprotective effects in ischemia/reperfusion injury. This study aimed to investigate the effects of carbon monoxide-releasing molecules on brain mitochondrial dysfunction and brain injury following resuscitation after cardiac arrest in rats. A rat model of cardiac arrest was established by asphyxia. The animals were randomly divided into the following 3 groups: cardiac arrest and resuscitation group, cardiac arrest and resuscitation plus carbon monoxide intervention group, and sham control group (no cardiac arrest). After the return of spontaneous circulation, neurologic deficit scores (NDS) and S-100B levels were significantly decreased at 24, 48, and 72 h, but carbon monoxide treatment improved the NDS and S-100B levels at 24 h and the 3-day survival rates of the rats. This treatment also decreased the number of damaged neurons in the hippocampus CA1 area and increased the brain mitochondrial activity. In addition, it increased mitochondrial biogenesis by increasing the expression of biogenesis factors including peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ coactivator-1α, nuclear respiratory factor-1, nuclear respiratory factor-2 and mitochondrial transcription factor A. Thus, this study showed that carbon monoxide treatment alleviated brain injury after cardiac arrest in rats by increased brain mitochondrial biogenesis.

  12. Carbon Monoxide Improves Neurologic Outcomes by Mitochondrial Biogenesis after Global Cerebral Ischemia Induced by Cardiac Arrest in Rats.

    PubMed

    Wang, Peng; Yao, Lan; Zhou, Li-Li; Liu, Yuan-Shan; Chen, Ming-di; Wu, Hai-Dong; Chang, Rui-Ming; Li, Yi; Zhou, Ming-Gen; Fang, Xiang-Shao; Yu, Tao; Jiang, Long-Yuan; Huang, Zi-Tong

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction contributes to brain injury following global cerebral ischemia after cardiac arrest. Carbon monoxide treatment has shown potent cytoprotective effects in ischemia/reperfusion injury. This study aimed to investigate the effects of carbon monoxide-releasing molecules on brain mitochondrial dysfunction and brain injury following resuscitation after cardiac arrest in rats. A rat model of cardiac arrest was established by asphyxia. The animals were randomly divided into the following 3 groups: cardiac arrest and resuscitation group, cardiac arrest and resuscitation plus carbon monoxide intervention group, and sham control group (no cardiac arrest). After the return of spontaneous circulation, neurologic deficit scores (NDS) and S-100B levels were significantly decreased at 24, 48, and 72 h, but carbon monoxide treatment improved the NDS and S-100B levels at 24 h and the 3-day survival rates of the rats. This treatment also decreased the number of damaged neurons in the hippocampus CA1 area and increased the brain mitochondrial activity. In addition, it increased mitochondrial biogenesis by increasing the expression of biogenesis factors including peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ coactivator-1α, nuclear respiratory factor-1, nuclear respiratory factor-2 and mitochondrial transcription factor A. Thus, this study showed that carbon monoxide treatment alleviated brain injury after cardiac arrest in rats by increased brain mitochondrial biogenesis. PMID:27489503

  13. Morinda citrifolia leaf enhanced performance by improving angiogenesis, mitochondrial biogenesis, antioxidant, anti-inflammatory & stress responses.

    PubMed

    Mohamad Shalan, Nor Aijratul Asikin; Mustapha, Noordin M; Mohamed, Suhaila

    2016-12-01

    Morinda citrifolia fruit, (noni), enhanced performances in athletes and post-menopausal women in clinical studies. This report shows the edible noni leaves water extract enhances performance in a weight-loaded swimming animal model better than the fruit or standardized green tea extract. The 4weeks study showed the extract (containing scopoletin and epicatechin) progressively prolonged the time to exhaustion by threefold longer than the control, fruit or tea extract. The extract improved (i) the mammalian antioxidant responses (MDA, GSH and SOD2 levels), (ii) tissue nutrient (glucose) and metabolite (lactate) management, (iii) stress hormone (cortisol) regulation; (iv) neurotransmitter (dopamine, noradrenaline, serotonin) expressions, transporter or receptor levels, (v) anti-inflammatory (IL4 & IL10) responses; (v) skeletal muscle angiogenesis (VEGFA) and (v) energy and mitochondrial biogenesis (via PGC, UCP3, NRF2, AMPK, MAPK1, and CAMK4). The ergogenic extract helped delay fatigue by enhancing energy production, regulation and efficiency, which suggests benefits for physical activities and disease recovery.

  14. Epigallocatechin-3-gallate prevents oxidative phosphorylation deficit and promotes mitochondrial biogenesis in human cells from subjects with Down's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Valenti, Daniela; De Rasmo, Domenico; Signorile, Anna; Rossi, Leonardo; de Bari, Lidia; Scala, Iris; Granese, Barbara; Papa, Sergio; Vacca, Rosa Anna

    2013-04-01

    A critical role for mitochondrial dysfunction has been proposed in the pathogenesis of Down's syndrome (DS), a human multifactorial disorder caused by trisomy of chromosome 21, associated with mental retardation and early neurodegeneration. Previous studies from our group demonstrated in DS cells a decreased capacity of the mitochondrial ATP production system and overproduction of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in mitochondria. In this study we have tested the potential of epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) - a natural polyphenol component of green tea - to counteract the mitochondrial energy deficit found in DS cells. We found that EGCG, incubated with cultured lymphoblasts and fibroblasts from DS subjects, rescued mitochondrial complex I and ATP synthase catalytic activities, restored oxidative phosphorylation efficiency and counteracted oxidative stress. These effects were associated with EGCG-induced promotion of PKA activity, related to increased cellular levels of cAMP and PKA-dependent phosphorylation of the NDUFS4 subunit of complex I. In addition, EGCG strongly promoted mitochondrial biogenesis in DS cells, as associated with increase in Sirt1-dependent PGC-1α deacetylation, NRF-1 and T-FAM protein levels and mitochondrial DNA content. In conclusion, this study shows that EGCG is a promoting effector of oxidative phosphorylation and mitochondrial biogenesis in DS cells, acting through modulation of the cAMP/PKA- and sirtuin-dependent pathways. EGCG treatment promises thus to be a therapeutic approach to counteract mitochondrial energy deficit and oxidative stress in DS. PMID:23291000

  15. AKT3 controls mitochondrial biogenesis and autophagy via regulation of the major nuclear export protein CRM-1.

    PubMed

    Corum, Daniel G; Tsichlis, Philip N; Muise-Helmericks, Robin C

    2014-01-01

    Our previous work has shown that Akt3 is required for mitochondrial biogenesis in primary human endothelial cells (ECs) and in Akt3-null mice; Akt3 affects subcellular localization of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator-1 (PGC-1α), the master regulator of mitochondrial biogenesis. The purpose of this study is to determine the mechanism by which Akt3 controls the subcellular distribution of PGC-1α and to explore the effect on mitochondrial biogenesis and turnover during angiogenesis. Here we use standard biochemical analyses and Akt3-knockdown strategies to show that Akt3 controls the stabilization of chromosome maintenance region-1 (CRM-1), the major nuclear export receptor. Site-directed mutagenesis and association analyses show that PGC-1α nuclear export is CRM-1 dependent. Akt3 knockdown and CRM-1 overexpression cause 3-fold reductions in PGC-1α target gene expression, compared to control levels. Akt3 inhibition causes autophagy, as measured by autophagosome formation, in a CRM-1-dependent, Akt1/mTOR-independent pathway. In vivo, Akt3-null and heterozygous mice show dose-dependent decreases in angiogenesis compared to wild-type littermates (~5- and 2.5-fold decreases, respectively), as assessed by Matrigel plug assays. This correlates with an ~1.5-fold decrease in mitochondrial Cox IV expression. Our studies suggest that Akt3 is a regulator of mitochondrial dynamics in the vasculature via regulation of CRM-1-dependent nuclear export.

  16. Quercetin protects against aluminium induced oxidative stress and promotes mitochondrial biogenesis via activation of the PGC-1α signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Deep Raj; Sunkaria, Aditya; Wani, Willayat Yousuf; Sharma, Reeta Kumari; Verma, Deepika; Priyanka, Kumari; Bal, Amanjit; Gill, Kiran Dip

    2015-12-01

    The present investigation was carried out to elucidate a possible molecular mechanism related to the protective effect of quercetin administration against aluminium-induced oxidative stress on various mitochondrial respiratory complex subunits with special emphasis on the role of PGC-1α and its downstream targets, i.e. NRF-1, NRF-2 and Tfam in mitochondrial biogenesis. Aluminium lactate (10mg/kg b.wt./day) was administered intragastrically to rats, which were pre-treated with quercetin 6h before aluminium (10mg/kg b.wt./day, intragastrically) for 12 weeks. We found a decrease in ROS levels, mitochondrial DNA oxidation and citrate synthase activity in the hippocampus (HC) and corpus striatum (CS) regions of rat brain treated with quercetin. Besides this an increase in the mRNA levels of the mitochondrial encoded subunits - ND1, ND2, ND3, Cyt b, COX1, COX3 and ATPase6 along with increased expression of nuclear encoded subunits COX4, COX5A and COX5B of electron transport chain (ETC). In quercetin treated group an increase in the mitochondrial DNA copy number and mitochondrial content in both the regions of rat brain was observed. The PGC-1α was up regulated in quercetin treated rats along with NRF-1, NRF-2 and Tfam, which act downstream from PGC-1α. Electron microscopy results revealed a significant decrease in the mitochondrial cross-section area, mitochondrial perimeter length and increase in mitochondrial number in case of quercetin treated rats as compared to aluminium treated ones. Therefore it seems quercetin increases mitochondrial biogenesis and makes it an almost ideal flavanoid to control or limit the damage that has been associated with the defective mitochondrial function seen in many neurodegenerative diseases.

  17. Dynamin-dependent biogenesis, cell cycle regulation and mitochondrial association of peroxisomes in fission yeast.

    PubMed

    Jourdain, Isabelle; Sontam, Dharani; Johnson, Chad; Dillies, Clément; Hyams, Jeremy S

    2008-03-01

    Peroxisomes were visualized for the first time in living fission yeast cells. In small, newly divided cells, the number of peroxisomes was low but increased in parallel with the increase in cell length/volume that accompanies cell cycle progression. In cells grown in oleic acid, both the size and the number of peroxisomes increased. The peroxisomal inventory of cells lacking the dynamin-related proteins Dnm1 or Vps1 was similar to that in wild type. By contrast, cells of the double mutant dnm1Delta vps1Delta contained either no peroxisomes at all or a small number of morphologically aberrant organelles. Peroxisomes exhibited either local Brownian movement or longer-range linear displacements, which continued in the absence of either microtubules or actin filaments. On the contrary, directed peroxisome motility appeared to occur in association with mitochondria and may be an indirect function of intrinsic mitochondrial dynamics. We conclude that peroxisomes are present in fission yeast and that Dnm1 and Vps1 act redundantly in peroxisome biogenesis, which is under cell cycle control. Peroxisome movement is independent of the cytoskeleton but is coupled to mitochondrial dynamics.

  18. Synergistic Effects of Cilostazol and Probucol on ER Stress-Induced Hepatic Steatosis via Heme Oxygenase-1-Dependent Activation of Mitochondrial Biogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yingqing; Pandiri, Indira; Joe, Yeonsoo; Kim, Hyo Jeong; Kim, Seul-Ki; Park, Jeongmin; Ryu, Jinhyun; Cho, Gyeong Jae; Park, Jeong Woo; Ryter, Stefan W.; Chung, Hun Taeg

    2016-01-01

    The selective type-3 phosphodiesterase inhibitor cilostazol and the antihyperlipidemic agent probucol have antioxidative, anti-inflammatory, and antiatherogenic properties. Moreover, cilostazol and probucol can regulate mitochondrial biogenesis. However, the combinatorial effect of cilostazol and probucol on mitochondrial biogenesis remains unknown. Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress is a well-known causative factor of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) which can impair mitochondrial function in hepatocytes. Here, we investigated the synergistic effects of cilostazol and probucol on mitochondrial biogenesis and ER stress-induced hepatic steatosis. A synergistic effect of cilostazol and probucol on HO-1 and mitochondrial biogenesis gene expression was found in human hepatocellular carcinoma cells (HepG2) and murine primary hepatocytes. Furthermore, in an animal model of ER stress involving tunicamycin, combinatorial treatment with cilostazol and probucol significantly increased the expression of HO-1 and mitochondrial biogenesis-related genes and proteins, whereas it downregulated serum ALT, eIF2 phosphorylation, and CHOP expression, as well as the lipogenesis-related genes SREBP-1c and FAS. Based on these results, we conclude that cilostazol and probucol exhibit a synergistic effect on the activation of mitochondrial biogenesis via upregulation of HO-1, which confers protection against ER stress-induced hepatic steatosis. PMID:27057275

  19. Nucleotide and RNA metabolism prime translational initiation in the earliest events of mitochondrial biogenesis during Arabidopsis germination.

    PubMed

    Law, Simon R; Narsai, Reena; Taylor, Nicolas L; Delannoy, Etienne; Carrie, Chris; Giraud, Estelle; Millar, A Harvey; Small, Ian; Whelan, James

    2012-04-01

    Mitochondria play a crucial role in germination and early seedling growth in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). Morphological observations of mitochondria revealed that mitochondrial numbers, typical size, and oval morphology were evident after 12 h of imbibition in continuous light (following 48 h of stratification). The transition from a dormant to an active metabolic state was punctuated by an early molecular switch, characterized by a transient burst in the expression of genes encoding mitochondrial proteins. Factors involved in mitochondrial transcription and RNA processing were overrepresented among these early-expressed genes. This was closely followed by an increase in the transcript abundance of genes encoding proteins involved in mitochondrial DNA replication and translation. This burst in the expression of factors implicated in mitochondrial RNA and DNA metabolism was accompanied by an increase in transcripts encoding components required for nucleotide biosynthesis in the cytosol and increases in transcript abundance of specific members of the mitochondrial carrier protein family that have previously been associated with nucleotide transport into mitochondria. Only after these genes peaked in expression and largely declined were typical mitochondrial numbers and morphology observed. Subsequently, there was an increase in transcript abundance for various bioenergetic and metabolic functions of mitochondria. The coordination of nucleus- and organelle-encoded gene expression was also examined by quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction, specifically for components of the mitochondrial electron transport chain and the chloroplastic photosynthetic machinery. Analysis of protein abundance using western-blot analysis and mass spectrometry revealed that for many proteins, patterns of protein and transcript abundance changes displayed significant positive correlations. A model for mitochondrial biogenesis during germination is proposed, in

  20. Genome-Wide Screens in Saccharomyces cerevisiae Highlight a Role for Cardiolipin in Biogenesis of Mitochondrial Outer Membrane Multispan Proteins.

    PubMed

    Sauerwald, Julia; Jores, Tobias; Eisenberg-Bord, Michal; Chuartzman, Silvia Gabriela; Schuldiner, Maya; Rapaport, Doron

    2015-09-01

    A special group of mitochondrial outer membrane (MOM) proteins spans the membrane several times via multiple helical segments. Such multispan proteins are synthesized on cytosolic ribosomes before their targeting to mitochondria and insertion into the MOM. Previous work recognized the import receptor Tom70 and the mitochondrial import (MIM) complex, both residents of the MOM, as required for optimal biogenesis of these proteins. However, their involvement is not sufficient to explain either the entire import pathway or its regulation. To identify additional factors that are involved in the biogenesis of MOM multispan proteins, we performed complementary high-throughput visual and growth screens in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Cardiolipin (CL) synthase (Crd1) appeared as a candidate in both screens. Our results indeed demonstrate lower steady-state levels of the multispan proteins Ugo1, Scm4, and Om14 in mitochondria from crd1Δ cells. Importantly, MOM single-span proteins were not affected by this mutation. Furthermore, organelles lacking Crd1 had a lower in vitro capacity to import newly synthesized Ugo1 and Scm4 molecules. Crd1, which is located in the mitochondrial inner membrane, condenses phosphatidylglycerol together with CDP-diacylglycerol to obtain de novo synthesized CL molecules. Hence, our findings suggest that CL is an important component in the biogenesis of MOM multispan proteins. PMID:26149385

  1. Testosterone Plus Low-Intensity Physical Training in Late Life Improves Functional Performance, Skeletal Muscle Mitochondrial Biogenesis, and Mitochondrial Quality Control in Male Mice

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Wen; Wong, Siu; Li, Michelle; Liang, Wentao; Liesa, Marc; Serra, Carlo; Jasuja, Ravi; Bartke, Andrzej; Kirkland, James L.; Shirihai, Orian; Bhasin, Shalender

    2012-01-01

    Testosterone supplementation increases muscle mass in older men but has not been shown to consistently improve physical function and activity. It has been hypothesized that physical exercise is required to induce the adaptations necessary for translation of testosterone-induced muscle mass gain into functional improvements. However, the effects of testosterone plus low intensity physical exercise training (T/PT) on functional performance and bioenergetics are unknown. In this pilot study, we tested the hypothesis that combined administration of T/PT would improve functional performance and bioenergetics in male mice late in life more than low-intensity physical training alone. 28-month old male mice were randomized to receive T/PT or vehicle plus physical training (V/PT) for 2 months. Compare to V/PT control, administration of T/PT was associated with improvements in muscle mass, grip strength, spontaneous physical movements, and respiratory activity. These changes were correlated with increased mitochondrial DNA copy number and expression of markers for mitochondrial biogenesis. Mice receiving T/PT also displayed increased expression of key elements for mitochondrial quality control, including markers for mitochondrial fission-and-fusion and mitophagy. Concurrently, mice receiving T/PT also displayed increased expression of markers for reduced tissue oxidative damage and improved muscle quality. Conclusion: Testosterone administered with low-intensity physical training improves grip strength, spontaneous movements, and respiratory activity. These functional improvements were associated with increased muscle mitochondrial biogenesis and improved mitochondrial quality control. PMID:23240002

  2. Exercise-Induced Changes in Caveolin-1, Depletion of Mitochondrial Cholesterol, and the Inhibition of Mitochondrial Swelling in Rat Skeletal Muscle but Not in the Liver.

    PubMed

    Flis, Damian Jozef; Olek, Robert Antoni; Kaczor, Jan Jacek; Rodziewicz, Ewa; Halon, Malgorzata; Antosiewicz, Jedrzej; Wozniak, Michal; Gabbianelli, Rosita; Ziolkowski, Wieslaw

    2016-01-01

    The reduction in cholesterol in mitochondria, observed after exercise, is related to the inhibition of mitochondrial swelling. Caveolin-1 (Cav-1) plays an essential role in the regulation of cellular cholesterol metabolism and is required by various signalling pathways. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate the effect of prolonged swimming on the mitochondrial Cav-1 concentration; additionally, we identified the results of these changes as they relate to the induction of changes in the mitochondrial swelling and cholesterol in rat skeletal muscle and liver. Male Wistar rats were divided into a sedentary control group and an exercise group. The exercised rats swam for 3 hours and were burdened with an additional 3% of their body weight. After the cessation of exercise, their quadriceps femoris muscles and livers were immediately removed for experimentation. The exercise protocol caused an increase in the Cav-1 concentration in crude muscle mitochondria; this was related to a reduction in the cholesterol level and an inhibition of mitochondrial swelling. There were no changes in rat livers, with the exception of increased markers of oxidative stress in mitochondria. These data indicate the possible role of Cav-1 in the adaptive change in the rat muscle mitochondria following exercise. PMID:26839631

  3. Morinda citrifolia leaf enhanced performance by improving angiogenesis, mitochondrial biogenesis, antioxidant, anti-inflammatory & stress responses.

    PubMed

    Mohamad Shalan, Nor Aijratul Asikin; Mustapha, Noordin M; Mohamed, Suhaila

    2016-12-01

    Morinda citrifolia fruit, (noni), enhanced performances in athletes and post-menopausal women in clinical studies. This report shows the edible noni leaves water extract enhances performance in a weight-loaded swimming animal model better than the fruit or standardized green tea extract. The 4weeks study showed the extract (containing scopoletin and epicatechin) progressively prolonged the time to exhaustion by threefold longer than the control, fruit or tea extract. The extract improved (i) the mammalian antioxidant responses (MDA, GSH and SOD2 levels), (ii) tissue nutrient (glucose) and metabolite (lactate) management, (iii) stress hormone (cortisol) regulation; (iv) neurotransmitter (dopamine, noradrenaline, serotonin) expressions, transporter or receptor levels, (v) anti-inflammatory (IL4 & IL10) responses; (v) skeletal muscle angiogenesis (VEGFA) and (v) energy and mitochondrial biogenesis (via PGC, UCP3, NRF2, AMPK, MAPK1, and CAMK4). The ergogenic extract helped delay fatigue by enhancing energy production, regulation and efficiency, which suggests benefits for physical activities and disease recovery. PMID:27374554

  4. Coordinated Upregulation of Mitochondrial Biogenesis and Autophagy in Breast Cancer Cells: The Role of Dynamin Related Protein-1 and Implication for Breast Cancer Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Zou, Peng; Liu, Longhua; Zheng, Louise D.; Payne, Kyle K.; Idowu, Michael O.; Zhang, Jinfeng; Schmelz, Eva M.

    2016-01-01

    Overactive mitochondrial fission was shown to promote cell transformation and tumor growth. It remains elusive how mitochondrial quality is regulated in such conditions. Here, we show that upregulation of mitochondrial fission protein, dynamin related protein-1 (Drp1), was accompanied with increased mitochondrial biogenesis markers (PGC1α, NRF1, and Tfam) in breast cancer cells. However, mitochondrial number was reduced, which was associated with lower mitochondrial oxidative capacity in breast cancer cells. This contrast might be owing to enhanced mitochondrial turnover through autophagy, because an increased population of autophagic vacuoles engulfing mitochondria was observed in the cancer cells. Consistently, BNIP3 (a mitochondrial autophagy marker) and autophagic flux were significantly upregulated, indicative of augmented mitochondrial autophagy (mitophagy). The upregulation of Drp1 and BNIP3 was also observed in vivo (human breast carcinomas). Importantly, inhibition of Drp1 significantly suppressed mitochondrial autophagy, metabolic reprogramming, and cancer cell viability. Together, this study reveals coordinated increase of mitochondrial biogenesis and mitophagy in which Drp1 plays a central role regulating breast cancer cell metabolism and survival. Given the emerging evidence of PGC1α contributing to tumor growth, it will be of critical importance to target both mitochondrial biogenesis and mitophagy for effective cancer therapeutics. PMID:27746856

  5. Convergence of multiple signaling pathways is required to coordinately up-regulate mtDNA and mitochondrial biogenesis during T cell activation.

    PubMed

    D'Souza, Anthony D; Parikh, Neal; Kaech, Susan M; Shadel, Gerald S

    2007-12-01

    The quantity and activity of mitochondria vary dramatically in tissues and are modulated in response to changing cellular energy demands and environmental factors. The amount of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA), which encodes essential subunits of the oxidative phosphorylation complexes required for cellular ATP production, is also tightly regulated, but by largely unknown mechanisms. Using murine T cells as a model system, we have addressed how specific signaling pathways influence mitochondrial biogenesis and mtDNA copy number. T cell receptor (TCR) activation results in a large increase in mitochondrial mass and membrane potential and a corresponding amplification of mtDNA, consistent with a vital role for mitochondrial function for growth and proliferation of these cells. Independent activation of protein kinase C (via PMA) or calcium-related pathways (via ionomycin) had differential and sub-maximal effects on these mitochondrial parameters, as did activation of naïve T cells with proliferative cytokines. Thus, the robust mitochondrial biogenesis response observed upon TCR activation requires synergy of multiple downstream signaling pathways. One such pathway involves AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), which we show has an unprecedented role in negatively regulating mitochondrial biogenesis that is mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR)-dependent. That is, inhibition of AMPK after TCR signaling commences results in excessive, but uncoordinated mitochondrial proliferation. Thus mitochondrial biogenesis is not under control of a single master regulatory circuit, but rather requires the convergence of multiple signaling pathways with distinct downstream consequences on the organelle's structure, composition, and function.

  6. Role of UCP3 in state 4 respiration during contractile activity-induced mitochondrial biogenesis.

    PubMed

    Ljubicic, Vladimir; Adhihetty, Peter J; Hood, David A

    2004-09-01

    In an effort to better characterize uncoupling protein-3 (UCP3) function in skeletal muscle, we assessed basal UCP3 protein content in rat intermyofibrillar (IMF) and subsarcolemmal (SS) mitochondrial subfractions in conjunction with measurements of state 4 respiration. UCP3 content was 1.3-fold (P < 0.05) greater in IMF compared with SS mitochondria. State 4 respiration was 2.6-fold greater (P < 0.05) in the IMF subfraction than in SS mitochondria. GDP attenuated state 4 respiration by approximately 40% (P < 0.05) in both subfractions. The UCP3 activator oleic acid (OA) significantly increased state 4 respiration in IMF mitochondria only. We used chronic electrical stimulation (3 h/day for 7 days) to investigate the relationship between changes in UCP3 protein expression and alterations in state 4 respiration during contractile activity-induced mitochondrial biogenesis. UCP3 content was increased by 1.9- and 2.3-fold in IMF and SS mitochondria, respectively, which exceeded the concurrent 40% (P < 0.05) increase in cytochrome-c oxidase activity. Chronic contractile activity increased state 4 respiration by 1.4-fold (P < 0.05) in IMF mitochondria, but no effect was observed in the SS subfraction. The uncoupling function of UCP3 accounted for 50-57% of the OA-induced increase in state 4 respiration in IMF mitochondria, which was independent of the induced twofold difference in UCP3 content due to chronic contractile activity. Thus modifications in UCP3 function are more important than changes in UCP3 expression in modifying state 4 respiration. This effect is evident in IMF but not SS mitochondria. We conclude that UCP3 at physiological concentrations accounts for a significant portion of state 4 respiration in both IMF and SS mitochondria, with the contribution being greater in the IMF subfraction. In addition, the contradiction between human and rat training studies with respect to UCP3 protein expression may partly be explained by the greater than twofold

  7. Mia40 and MINOS act in parallel with Ccs1 in the biogenesis of mitochondrial Sod1.

    PubMed

    Varabyova, Aksana; Topf, Ulrike; Kwiatkowska, Paulina; Wrobel, Lidia; Kaus-Drobek, Magdalena; Chacinska, Agnieszka

    2013-10-01

    Superoxide dismutase 1 (Sod1) is a major superoxide-scavenging enzyme in the eukaryotic cell, and is localized in the cytosol and intermembrane space of mitochondria. Sod1 requires its specific chaperone Ccs1 and disulfide bond formation in order to be retained in the intermembrane space. Our study identified a pool of Sod1 that is present in the reduced state in mitochondria that lack Ccs1. We created yeast mutants with mutations in highly conserved amino acid residues corresponding to human mutations that cause amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, and found that some of the mutant proteins were present in the reduced state. These mutant variants of Sod1 were efficiently localized in mitochondria. Localization of the reduced, Ccs1-independent forms of Sod1 relied on Mia40, an essential component of the mitochondrial intermembrane space import and assembly pathway that is responsible for the biogenesis of intermembrane space proteins. Furthermore, the mitochondrial inner membrane organizing system (MINOS), which is responsible for mitochondrial membrane architecture, differentially modulated the presence of reduced Sod1 in mitochondria. Thus, we identified novel mitochondrial players that are possibly involved in pathological conditions caused by changes in the biogenesis of Sod1.

  8. Exercise-induced asthma

    MedlinePlus

    Wheezing - exercise-induced; Reactive airway disease - exercise ... Having asthma symptoms when you exercise does not mean you cannot or should not exercise. But be aware of your EIA triggers. Cold or dry air may ...

  9. Enhanced oxidative stress and aberrant mitochondrial biogenesis in human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells during methamphetamine induced apoptosis

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, C.-W.; Ping, Y.-H.; Yen, J.-C.; Chang, C.-Y.; Wang, S.-F.; Yeh, C.-L.; Chi, C.-W.; Lee, H.-C. . E-mail: hclee2@ym.edu.tw

    2007-05-01

    Methamphetamine (METH) is an abused drug that may cause psychiatric and neurotoxic damage, including degeneration of monoaminergic terminals and apoptosis of non-monoaminergic cells in Brain. The cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying these METH-induced neurotoxic effects remain to be clarified. In this study, we performed a time course assessment to investigate the effects of METH on intracellular oxidative stress and mitochondrial alterations in a human dopaminergic neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cell line. We characterized that METH induces a temporal sequence of several cellular events including, firstly, a decrease in mitochondrial membrane potential within 1 h of the METH treatment, secondly, an extensive decline in mitochondrial membrane potential and increase in the level of reactive oxygen species (ROS) after 8 h of the treatment, thirdly, an increase in mitochondrial mass after the drug treatment for 24 h, and finally, a decrease in mtDNA copy number and mitochondrial proteins per mitochondrion as well as the occurrence of apoptosis after 48 h of the treatment. Importantly, vitamin E attenuated the METH-induced increases in intracellular ROS level and mitochondrial mass, and prevented METH-induced cell death. Our observations suggest that enhanced oxidative stress and aberrant mitochondrial biogenesis may play critical roles in METH-induced neurotoxic effects.

  10. Impaired mitochondrial biogenesis is a common feature to myocardial hypertrophy and end-stage ischemic heart failure

    PubMed Central

    Pisano, Annalinda; Cerbelli, Bruna; Perli, Elena; Pelullo, Maria; Bargelli, Valentina; Preziuso, Carmela; Mancini, Massimiliano; He, Langping; Bates, Matthew GD; Lucena, Joaquin R; Della Monica, Paola Lilla; Familiari, Giuseppe; Petrozza, Vincenzo; Nediani, Chiara; Taylor, Robert W; d’Amati, Giulia; Giordano, Carla

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial (mt) DNA depletion and oxidative mtDNA damage have been implicated in the process of pathological cardiac remodeling. Whether these features are present in the early phase of maladaptive cardiac remodeling, that is, during compensated cardiac hypertrophy, is still unknown. We compared the morphologic and molecular features of mt biogenesis and markers of oxidative stress in human heart from adult subjects with compensated hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and heart failure. We have shown that mtDNA depletion is a constant feature of both conditions. A quantitative loss of mtDNA content was associated with significant down-regulation of selected modulators of mt biogenesis and decreased expression of proteins involved in mtDNA maintenance. Interestingly, mtDNA depletion characterized also the end-stage phase of cardiomyopathies due to a primary mtDNA defect. Oxidative stress damage was detected only in failing myocardium. PMID:26764143

  11. Adipocyte-Specific Deletion of Manganese Superoxide Dismutase Protects From Diet-Induced Obesity Through Increased Mitochondrial Uncoupling and Biogenesis.

    PubMed

    Han, Yong Hwan; Buffolo, Márcio; Pires, Karla Maria; Pei, Shaobo; Scherer, Philipp E; Boudina, Sihem

    2016-09-01

    Obesity and insulin resistance are associated with oxidative stress (OS). The causal role of adipose OS in the pathogenesis of these conditions is unknown. To address this issue, we generated mice with an adipocyte-selective deletion of manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD). When fed a high-fat diet (HFD), the AdSod2 knockout (KO) mice exhibited less adiposity, reduced adipocyte hypertrophy, and decreased circulating leptin. The resistance to diet-induced adiposity was the result of an increased metabolic rate and energy expenditure. Furthermore, palmitate oxidation was elevated in the white adipose tissue (WAT) and brown adipose tissue of AdSod2 KO mice fed an HFD, and the expression of key fatty acid oxidation genes was increased. To gain mechanistic insight into the increased fat oxidation in HFD-fed AdSod2 KO mice, we quantified the mitochondrial function and mitochondrial content in WAT and found that MnSOD deletion increased mitochondrial oxygen consumption and induced mitochondrial biogenesis. This effect was preserved in cultured adipocytes from AdSod2 KO mice in vitro. As expected from the enhanced fat oxidation, circulating levels of free fatty acids were reduced in the HFD-fed AdSod2 KO mice. Finally, HFD-fed AdSod2 KO mice were protected from hepatic steatosis, adipose tissue inflammation, and glucose and insulin intolerance. Taken together, these results demonstrate that MnSOD deletion in adipocytes triggered an adaptive stress response that activated mitochondrial biogenesis and enhanced mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation, thereby preventing diet-induced obesity and insulin resistance. PMID:27284109

  12. Melatonin Improves Mitochondrial Function by Promoting MT1/SIRT1/PGC-1 Alpha-Dependent Mitochondrial Biogenesis in Cadmium-Induced Hepatotoxicity In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Pan; Pi, Huifeng; Xu, Shangcheng; Zhang, Lei; Li, Yuming; Li, Min; Cao, Zhengwang; Tian, Li; Xie, Jia; Li, Renyan; He, Mindi; Lu, Yonghui; Liu, Chuan; Duan, Weixia; Yu, Zhengping; Zhou, Zhou

    2014-01-01

    Melatonin is an indolamine synthesized in the pineal gland that has a wide range of physiological functions, and it has been under clinical investigation for expanded applications. Increasing evidence demonstrates that melatonin can ameliorate cadmium-induced hepatotoxicity. However, the potentially protective effects of melatonin against cadmium-induced hepatotoxicity and the underlying mechanisms of this protection remain unclear. This study investigates the protective effects of melatonin pretreatment on cadmium-induced hepatotoxicity and elucidates the potential mechanism of melatonin-mediated protection. We exposed HepG2 cells to different concentrations of cadmium chloride (2.5, 5, and 10μM) for 12 h. We found that Cd stimulated cytotoxicity, disrupted the mitochondrial membrane potential, increased reactive oxygen species production, and decreased mitochondrial mass and mitochondrial DNA content. Consistent with this finding, Cd exposure was associated with decreased Sirtuin 1 (SIRT1) protein expression and activity, thus promoted acetylation of PGC-1 alpha, a key enzyme involved in mitochondrial biogenesis and function, although Cd did not disrupt the interaction between SIRT1 and PGC-1 alpha. However, all cadmium-induced mitochondrial oxidative injuries were efficiently attenuated by melatonin pretreatment. Moreover, Sirtinol and SIRT1 siRNA each blocked the melatonin-mediated elevation in mitochondrial function by inhibiting SIRT1/ PGC-1 alpha signaling. Luzindole, a melatonin receptor antagonist, was found to partially block the ability of melatonin to promote SIRT1/ PGC-1 alpha signaling. In summary, our results indicate that SIRT1 plays an essential role in the ability of moderate melatonin to stimulate PGC-1 alpha and improve mitochondrial biogenesis and function at least partially through melatonin receptors in cadmium-induced hepatotoxicity. PMID:25159133

  13. The conserved interaction of C7orf30 with MRPL14 promotes biogenesis of the mitochondrial large ribosomal subunit and mitochondrial translation

    PubMed Central

    Fung, Stephen; Nishimura, Tamiko; Sasarman, Florin; Shoubridge, Eric A.

    2013-01-01

    Mammalian mitochondria harbor a dedicated translation apparatus that is required for the synthesis of 13 mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA)-encoded polypeptides, all of which are essential components of the oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) complexes. Little is known about the mechanism of assembly of the mitoribosomes that catalyze this process. Here we show that C7orf30, a member of the large family of DUF143 proteins, associates with the mitochondrial large ribosomal subunit (mt-LSU). Knockdown of C7orf30 by short hairpin RNA (shRNA) does not alter the sedimentation profile of the mt-LSU, but results in the depletion of several mt-LSU proteins and decreased monosome formation. This leads to a mitochondrial translation defect, involving the majority of mitochondrial polypeptides, and a severe OXPHOS assembly defect. Immunoprecipitation and mass spectrometry analyses identified mitochondrial ribosomal protein (MRP)L14 as the specific interacting protein partner of C7orf30 in the mt-LSU. Reciprocal experiments in which MRPL14 was depleted by small interfering RNA (siRNA) phenocopied the C7orf30 knockdown. Members of the DUF143 family have been suggested to be universally conserved ribosomal silencing factors, acting by sterically inhibiting the association of the small and large ribosomal subunits. Our results demonstrate that, although the interaction between C7orf30 and MRPL14 has been evolutionarily conserved, human C7orf30 is, on the contrary, essential for mitochondrial ribosome biogenesis and mitochondrial translation. PMID:23171548

  14. [Exercise-induced asthma].

    PubMed

    Dinh Xuan, A T; Marsac, J; Lockhart, A

    1988-12-10

    Exercise-induced asthma only differs from common asthma in its causative factor. It is a typical asthmatic attack which follows a strenuous and continuous physical exercise lasting 5 to 10 minutes, most often in cold and dry weather. The prevalence of exercise-induced asthma has not yet been firmly established; its pathophysiological mechanisms are still debated, and the respective roles of heat and water losses by the airways are not clearly defined. However, the influence of the type of exercise as a precipitating factor of exercise-induced asthma is now well-known. All things being equal, swimming generates less asthma than running and cycling. This enables the subjects to be directed towards the most suitable sports and encouraged to improve their physical fitness. Drug treatment of exercise-induced asthma must preferentially be preventive; it relies on cromoglycate and beta-2 adrenergic agonists, the latter being also capable of treating acute exercise-induced bronchial obstruction. Education of the patients and their family is also important.

  15. Roux-en-Y Gastric Bypass Acutely Decreases Protein Carbonylation and Increases Expression of Mitochondrial Biogenesis Genes in Subcutaneous Adipose Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Jahansouz, Cyrus; Serrot, Federico J.; Frohnert, Brigitte I.; Foncea, Rocio E.; Dorman, Robert B.; Slusarek, Bridget; Leslie, Daniel B.; Bernlohr, David A.; Ikramuddin, Sayeed

    2015-01-01

    Background Mitochondrial dysfunction in adipose tissue has been implicated as a pathogenic step in the development of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). In adipose tissue, chronic nutrient overload results in mitochondria driven increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) leading to carbonylation of proteins that impair mitochondrial function and downregulation of key genes linked to mitochondrial biogenesis. In patients with T2DM, Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) surgery leads to improvements in glycemic profile prior to significant weight loss. Consequently, we hypothesized that improved glycemia early after RYGB would be paralleled by decreased protein carbonylation and increased expression of genes related to mitochondrial biogenesis in adipose tissue. Methods To evaluate this hypothesis, 16 obese individuals were studied before and 7–8 days following RYGB and adjustable gastric banding (AGB). Subcutaneous adipose tissue was obtained pre- and post-bariatric surgery as well as from eight healthy, non-obese individual controls. Results Prior to surgery, adipose tissue expression of PGC1α, NRF1, Cyt C, and eNOS (but not Tfam) showed significantly lower expression in the obese bariatric surgery group when compared to lean controls (p<0.05). Following RYGB, but not after AGB, patients showed significant decrease in HOMA-IR, reduction in adipose protein carbonylation, and increased expression of genes linked to mitochondrial biogenesis. Conclusions These results suggest that rapid reduction in protein carbonylation and increased mitochondrial biogenesis may explain postoperative metabolic improvements following RYGB. PMID:25975200

  16. Decreased Levels of Proapoptotic Factors and Increased Key Regulators of Mitochondrial Biogenesis Constitute New Potential Beneficial Features of Long-lived Growth Hormone Receptor Gene–Disrupted Mice

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Decreased somatotrophic signaling is among the most important mechanisms associated with extended longevity. Mice homozygous for the targeted disruption of the growth hormone (GH) receptor gene (GH receptor knockout; GHRKO) are obese and dwarf, are characterized by a reduced weight and body size, undetectable levels of GH receptor, high concentration of serum GH, and greatly reduced plasma levels of insulin and insulin-like growth factor-I, and are remarkably long lived. Recent results suggest new features of GHRKO mice that may positively affect longevity—decreased levels of proapoptotic factors and increased levels of key regulators of mitochondrial biogenesis. The alterations in levels of the proapoptotic factors and key regulators of mitochondrial biogenesis were not further improved by two other potential life-extending interventions—calorie restriction and visceral fat removal. This may attribute the primary role to GH resistance in the regulation of apoptosis and mitochondrial biogenesis in GHRKO mice in terms of increased life span. PMID:23197187

  17. Exercise-induced rhabdomyolysis.

    PubMed

    Hutton, Joseph; Wellington, Daniel; Miller, Steven

    2016-01-01

    We report the case of a 34 year-old man who developed exercise-induced rhabdomyolysis after unaccustomed high-intensity exercise. Subclinical rhabdomyolysis is common after heavy exercise, yet it is uncommon for patients to seek medical advice. The presentation is variable and despite potentially life-threatening complications the diagnosis may be easily missed by patients and healthcare professionals. A high-index of suspicion is critical to avoid missing the diagnosis. We summarise the current knowledge, clinical course, complications and management of exercise-induced rhabdomyolysis. PMID:27657164

  18. Apelin Treatment Increases Complete Fatty Acid Oxidation, Mitochondrial Oxidative Capacity, and Biogenesis in Muscle of Insulin-Resistant Mice

    PubMed Central

    Attané, Camille; Foussal, Camille; Le Gonidec, Sophie; Benani, Alexandre; Daviaud, Danièle; Wanecq, Estelle; Guzmán-Ruiz, Rocío; Dray, Cédric; Bezaire, Veronic; Rancoule, Chloé; Kuba, Keiji; Ruiz-Gayo, Mariano; Levade, Thierry; Penninger, Josef; Burcelin, Rémy; Pénicaud, Luc; Valet, Philippe; Castan-Laurell, Isabelle

    2012-01-01

    Both acute and chronic apelin treatment have been shown to improve insulin sensitivity in mice. However, the effects of apelin on fatty acid oxidation (FAO) during obesity-related insulin resistance have not yet been addressed. Thus, the aim of the current study was to determine the impact of chronic treatment on lipid use, especially in skeletal muscles. High-fat diet (HFD)-induced obese and insulin-resistant mice treated by an apelin injection (0.1 μmol/kg/day i.p.) during 4 weeks had decreased fat mass, glycemia, and plasma levels of triglycerides and were protected from hyperinsulinemia compared with HFD PBS-treated mice. Indirect calorimetry experiments showed that apelin-treated mice had a better use of lipids. The complete FAO, the oxidative capacity, and mitochondrial biogenesis were increased in soleus of apelin-treated mice. The action of apelin was AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) dependent since all the effects studied were abrogated in HFD apelin-treated mice with muscle-specific inactive AMPK. Finally, the apelin-stimulated improvement of oxidative capacity led to decreased levels of acylcarnitines and enhanced insulin-stimulated glucose uptake in soleus. Thus, by promoting complete lipid use in muscle of insulin-resistant mice through mitochondrial biogenesis and tighter matching between FAO and the tricarboxylic acid cycle, apelin treatment could contribute to insulin sensitivity improvement. PMID:22210322

  19. The neurogenic basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor NeuroD6 enhances mitochondrial biogenesis and bioenergetics to confer tolerance of neuronal PC12-NeuroD6 cells to the mitochondrial stressor rotenone

    SciTech Connect

    Baxter, Kristin Kathleen; Uittenbogaard, Martine; Chiaramello, Anne

    2012-10-15

    The fundamental question of how and which neuronal specific transcription factors tailor mitochondrial biogenesis and bioenergetics to the need of developing neuronal cells has remained largely unexplored. In this study, we report that the neurogenic basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor NeuroD6 possesses mitochondrial biogenic properties by amplifying the mitochondrial DNA content and TFAM expression levels, a key regulator for mitochondrial biogenesis. NeuroD6-mediated increase in mitochondrial biogenesis in the neuronal progenitor-like PC12-NEUROD6 cells is concomitant with enhanced mitochondrial bioenergetic functions, including increased expression levels of specific subunits of respiratory complexes of the electron transport chain, elevated mitochondrial membrane potential and ATP levels produced by oxidative phosphorylation. Thus, NeuroD6 augments the bioenergetic capacity of PC12-NEUROD6 cells to generate an energetic reserve, which confers tolerance to the mitochondrial stressor, rotenone. We found that NeuroD6 induces an adaptive bioenergetic response throughout rotenone treatment involving maintenance of the mitochondrial membrane potential and ATP levels in conjunction with preservation of the actin network. In conclusion, our results support the concept that NeuroD6 plays an integrative role in regulating and coordinating the onset of neuronal differentiation with acquisition of adequate mitochondrial mass and energetic capacity to ensure energy demanding events, such as cytoskeletal remodeling, plasmalemmal expansion, and growth cone formation. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer NeuroD6 induces mitochondrial biogenesis in neuroprogenitor-like cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer NeuroD6 augments the bioenergetic reserve of the neuronal PC12-NeuroD6 cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer NeuroD6 increases the mitochondrial membrane potential and ATP levels. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer NeuroD6 confers tolerance to rotenone via an adaptive

  20. Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) biogenesis: visualization and duel incorporation of BrdU and EdU into newly synthesized mtDNA in vitro.

    PubMed

    Lentz, Stephen I; Edwards, James L; Backus, Carey; McLean, Lisa L; Haines, Kristine M; Feldman, Eva L

    2010-02-01

    Mitochondria are key regulators of cellular energy and are the focus of a large number of studies examining the regulation of mitochondrial dynamics and biogenesis in healthy and diseased conditions. One approach to monitoring mitochondrial biogenesis is to measure the rate of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) replication. We developed a sensitive technique to visualize newly synthesized mtDNA in individual cells to study mtDNA replication within subcellular compartments of neurons. The technique combines the incorporation of 5-bromo-2-deoxyuridine (BrdU) and/or 5-ethynyl-2'-deoxyuridine (EdU) into mtDNA, together with a tyramide signal amplification protocol. Employing this technique, we visualized and measured mtDNA biogenesis in individual cells. The labeling procedure for EdU allows for more comprehensive results by allowing the comparison of its incorporation with other intracellular markers, because it does not require the harsh acid or enzyme digests necessary to recover the BrdU epitope. In addition, the utilization of both BrdU and EdU permits sequential pulse-chase experiments to follow the intracellular localization of mtDNA replication. The ability to quantify mitochondrial biogenesis provides an essential tool for investigating the alterations in mitochondrial dynamics involved in the pathogenesis of multiple cellular disorders, including neuropathies and neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:19875847

  1. Mitochondria “fuel” breast cancer metabolism: Fifteen markers of mitochondrial biogenesis label epithelial cancer cells, but are excluded from adjacent stromal cells

    PubMed Central

    Sotgia, Federica; Whitaker-Menezes, Diana; Martinez-Outschoorn, Ubaldo E.; Salem, Ahmed F.; Tsirigos, Aristotelis; Lamb, Rebecca; Sneddon, Sharon; Hulit, James; Howell, Anthony; Lisanti, Michael P.

    2012-01-01

    Here, we present new genetic and morphological evidence that human tumors consist of two distinct metabolic compartments. First, re-analysis of genome-wide transcriptional profiling data revealed that > 95 gene transcripts associated with mitochondrial biogenesis and/or mitochondrial translation were significantly elevated in human breast cancer cells, as compared with adjacent stromal tissue. Remarkably, nearly 40 of these upregulated gene transcripts were mitochondrial ribosomal proteins (MRPs), functionally associated with mitochondrial translation of protein components of the OXPHOS complex. Second, during validation by immunohistochemistry, we observed that antibodies directed against 15 markers of mitochondrial biogenesis and/or mitochondrial translation (AKAP1, GOLPH3, GOLPH3L, MCT1, MRPL40, MRPS7, MRPS15, MRPS22, NRF1, NRF2, PGC1-α, POLRMT, TFAM, TIMM9 and TOMM70A) selectively labeled epithelial breast cancer cells. These same mitochondrial markers were largely absent or excluded from adjacent tumor stromal cells. Finally, markers of mitochondrial lipid synthesis (GOLPH3) and mitochondrial translation (POLRMT) were associated with poor clinical outcome in human breast cancer patients. Thus, we conclude that human breast cancers contain two distinct metabolic compartments—a glycolytic tumor stroma, which surrounds oxidative epithelial cancer cells—that are mitochondria-rich. The co-existence of these two compartments is indicative of metabolic symbiosis between epithelial cancer cells and their surrounding stroma. As such, epithelial breast cancer cells should be viewed as predatory metabolic “parasites,” which undergo anabolic reprogramming to amplify their mitochondrial “power.” This notion is consistent with the observation that the anti-malarial agent chloroquine may be an effective anticancer agent. New anticancer therapies should be developed to target mitochondrial biogenesis and/or mitochondrial translation in human cancer cells. PMID

  2. Induction of mitochondrial biogenesis and respiration is associated with mTOR regulation in hepatocytes of rats treated with the pan-PPAR activator tetradecylthioacetic acid (TTA)

    SciTech Connect

    Hagland, Hanne R.; Nilsson, Linn I.H.; Burri, Lena; Nikolaisen, Julie; Berge, Rolf K.; Tronstad, Karl J.

    2013-01-11

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We investigated mechanisms of mitochondrial regulation in rat hepatocytes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Tetradecylthioacetic acid (TTA) was employed to activate mitochondrial oxidation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mitochondrial biogenesis and respiration were induced. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer It was confirmed that PPAR target genes were induced. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The mechanism involved activation mTOR. -- Abstract: The hypolipidemic effect of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) activators has been explained by increasing mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation, as observed in livers of rats treated with the pan-PPAR activator tetradecylthioacetic acid (TTA). PPAR-activation does, however, not fully explain the metabolic adaptations observed in hepatocytes after treatment with TTA. We therefore characterized the mitochondrial effects, and linked this to signalling by the metabolic sensor, the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR). In hepatocytes isolated from TTA-treated rats, the changes in cellular content and morphology were consistent with hypertrophy. This was associated with induction of multiple mitochondrial biomarkers, including mitochondrial DNA, citrate synthase and mRNAs of mitochondrial proteins. Transcription analysis further confirmed activation of PPAR{alpha}-associated genes, in addition to genes related to mitochondrial biogenesis and function. Analysis of mitochondrial respiration revealed that the capacity of both electron transport and oxidative phosphorylation were increased. These effects coincided with activation of the stress related factor, ERK1/2, and mTOR. The protein level and phosphorylation of the downstream mTOR actors eIF4G and 4E-BP1 were induced. In summary, TTA increases mitochondrial respiration by inducing hypertrophy and mitochondrial biogenesis in rat hepatocytes, via adaptive regulation of PPARs as well as mTOR.

  3. Convergence of multiple signaling pathways is required to coordinately up-regulate mtDNA and mitochondrial biogenesis during T cell activation

    PubMed Central

    D’Souza, Anthony D.; Parikh, Neal; Kaech, Susan M.; Shadel, Gerald S.

    2009-01-01

    The quantity and activity of mitochondria vary dramatically in tissues and are modulated in response to changing cellular energy demands and environmental factors. The amount of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA), which encodes essential subunits of the oxidative phosphorylation complexes required for cellular ATP production, is also tightly regulated, but by largely unknown mechanisms. Using murine T cells as a model system, we have addressed how specific signaling pathways influence mitochondrial biogenesis and mtDNA levels. T cell receptor (TCR) activation results in a large increase in mitochondrial mass and membrane potential and a corresponding increase of mtDNA copy number, indicating the vital role for mitochondrial function for the growth and proliferation of these cells. Independent activation of protein kinase C (via PMA) or calcium-related pathways (via ionomycin) had differential and sub-maximal effects on these mitochondrial parameters, as did activation of naïve T cells with proliferative cytokines. Thus, the robust mitochondrial biogenesis response observed upon TCR activation requires synergy of multiple downstream signaling pathways. One such pathway involves AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), which we show has an unprecedented role in negatively regulating mitochondrial biogenesis that is mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR)-dependent. That is, inhibition of AMPK after TCR signaling commences results in excessive, but uncoordinated mitochondrial proliferation. We propose that mitochondrial biogenesis is not under control of a master regulatory circuit, but rather requires the convergence of multiple signaling pathways with distinct downstream consequences on the organelle’s structure, composition, and function. PMID:17890163

  4. Drosophila cyclin D/Cdk4 regulates mitochondrial biogenesis and aging and sensitizes animals to hypoxic stress

    PubMed Central

    Icreverzi, Amalia; Flor de la Cruz, Aida; Van Voorhies, Wayne A

    2012-01-01

    Drosophila cyclin D (CycD) is the single fly ortholog of the mammalian cyclin D1 and promotes both cell cycle progression and cellular growth. However, little is known about how CycD promotes cell growth. We show here that CycD/Cdk4 hyperactivity leads to increased mitochondrial biogenesis (mitobiogenesis), mitochondrial mass, NRF-1 activity (Tfam transcript levels) and metabolic activity in Drosophila, whereas loss of CycD/Cdk4 activity has the opposite effects. Surprisingly, both CycD/Cdk4 addition and loss of function increase mitochondrial superoxide production and decrease lifespan, indicating that an imbalance in mitobiogenesis may lead to oxidative stress and aging. In addition, we provide multiple lines of evidence indicating that CycD/Cdk4 activity affects the hypoxic status of cells and sensitizes animals to hypoxia. Both mitochondrial and hypoxia-related effects can be detected at global transcriptional level. We propose that mitobiogenesis and the hypoxic stress response have an antagonistic relationship, and that CycD/Cdk4 levels regulate mitobiogenesis contemporaneous to the cell cycle, such that only when cells are sufficiently oxygenated can they proliferate. PMID:22293404

  5. The disulfide relay system of mitochondria is required for the biogenesis of mitochondrial Ccs1 and Sod1.

    PubMed

    Reddehase, Silvia; Grumbt, Barbara; Neupert, Walter; Hell, Kai

    2009-01-16

    Cells protect themselves against oxygen stress and reactive oxygen species. An important enzyme in this process is superoxide dismutase, Sod1, which converts superoxide radicals into water and hydrogen peroxide. The biogenesis of functional Sod1 is dependent on its copper chaperone, Ccs1, which introduces a disulfide bond and a copper ion into Sod1. Ccs1 and Sod1 are present in the cytosol but are also found in the mitochondrial intermembrane space (IMS), the compartment between the outer and the inner membrane of mitochondria. Ccs1 mediates mitochondrial localization of Sod1. Here, we report on the biogenesis of the fractions of Ccs1 and Sod1 present in mitochondria of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The IMS of mitochondria harbors a disulfide relay system consisting of the import receptor Mia40 and the thiol oxidase Erv1, which drives the import of substrates with conserved cysteine residues arranged in typical twin Cx(3)C and twin Cx(9)C motifs. We show that depletion of Mia40 results in decreased levels of Ccs1 and Sod1. On the other hand, overexpression of Mia40 increased the mitochondrial fraction of both proteins. In addition, the import rates of Ccs1 were enhanced by increased levels of Mia40 and reduced upon depletion of Mia40. Mia40 forms mixed disulfides with Ccs1, suggesting a role of Mia40 for the generation of disulfide bonds in Ccs1. We suggest that the disulfide relay system transfers disulfide bonds via Mia40 to Ccs1, which then shuttles disulfide bonds to Sod1. In conclusion, the disulfide relay system is crucial for the import of Ccs1, thereby affecting the transport of Sod1, and it can control the distribution of Ccs1 and Sod1 between the IMS of mitochondria and the cytosol.

  6. Mitochondrial gene therapy improves respiration, biogenesis, and transcription in G11778A Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy and T8993G Leigh's syndrome cells.

    PubMed

    Iyer, Shilpa; Bergquist, Kristen; Young, Kisha; Gnaiger, Erich; Rao, Raj R; Bennett, James P

    2012-06-01

    Many incurable mitochondrial disorders result from mutant mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) and impaired respiration. Leigh's syndrome (LS) is a fatal neurodegenerative disorder of infants, and Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) causes blindness in young adults. Treatment of LHON and LS cells harboring G11778A and T8993G mutant mtDNA, respectively, by >90%, with healthy donor mtDNA complexed with recombinant human mitochondrial transcription factor A (rhTFAM), improved mitochondrial respiration by ∼1.2-fold in LHON cells and restored >50% ATP synthase function in LS cells. Mitochondrial replication, transcription, and translation of key respiratory genes and proteins were increased in the short term. Increased NRF1, TFAMB1, and TFAMA expression alluded to the activation of mitochondrial biogenesis as a mechanism for improving mitochondrial respiration. These results represent the development of a therapeutic approach for LHON and LS patients in the near future.

  7. Induction of mitochondrial biogenesis and respiration is associated with mTOR regulation in hepatocytes of rats treated with the pan-PPAR activator tetradecylthioacetic acid (TTA).

    PubMed

    Hagland, Hanne R; Nilsson, Linn I H; Burri, Lena; Nikolaisen, Julie; Berge, Rolf K; Tronstad, Karl J

    2013-01-11

    The hypolipidemic effect of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) activators has been explained by increasing mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation, as observed in livers of rats treated with the pan-PPAR activator tetradecylthioacetic acid (TTA). PPAR-activation does, however, not fully explain the metabolic adaptations observed in hepatocytes after treatment with TTA. We therefore characterized the mitochondrial effects, and linked this to signalling by the metabolic sensor, the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR). In hepatocytes isolated from TTA-treated rats, the changes in cellular content and morphology were consistent with hypertrophy. This was associated with induction of multiple mitochondrial biomarkers, including mitochondrial DNA, citrate synthase and mRNAs of mitochondrial proteins. Transcription analysis further confirmed activation of PPARα-associated genes, in addition to genes related to mitochondrial biogenesis and function. Analysis of mitochondrial respiration revealed that the capacity of both electron transport and oxidative phosphorylation were increased. These effects coincided with activation of the stress related factor, ERK1/2, and mTOR. The protein level and phosphorylation of the downstream mTOR actors eIF4G and 4E-BP1 were induced. In summary, TTA increases mitochondrial respiration by inducing hypertrophy and mitochondrial biogenesis in rat hepatocytes, via adaptive regulation of PPARs as well as mTOR. PMID:23228666

  8. CTRP9 induces mitochondrial biogenesis and protects high glucose-induced endothelial oxidative damage via AdipoR1 -SIRT1- PGC-1α activation.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Liang; Li, Bin; Chen, Xu; Su, Jie; Wang, Hongbing; Yu, Shiqiang; Zheng, Qijun

    2016-09-01

    Vascular lesions caused by endothelial dysfunction are the most common and serious complication of diabetes. The vasoactive potency of CTRP9 has been reported in our previous study via nitric oxide (NO) production. However, the effect of CTRP9 on vascular endothelial cells remains unknown. This study aimed to investigate the protection role of CTRP9 in the primary aortic vascular endothelial cells and HAECs under high-glucose condition. We found that the aortic vascular endothelial cells isolated from mice fed with a high fat diet generated more ROS production than normal cells, along with decreased mitochondrial biogenesis, which was also found in HAECs treated with high glucose. However, the treatment of CTPR9 significantly reduced ROS production and increased the activities of endogenous antioxidant enzymes, the expression of PGC-1α, NRF1, TFAM, ATP5A1 and SIRT1, and the activity of cytochrome c oxidase, indicating an induction of mitochondrial biogenesis. Furthermore, silencing the expression of SIRT1 in HAECs impeded the effect of CTRP9 on mitochondrial biogenesis, while silencing the expression of AdipoR1 in HAECs reversed the expression of SIRT1 and PGC-1α. Based on these findings, this study showed that CTRP9 might induce mitochondrial biogenesis and protect high glucose-induced endothelial oxidative damage via AdipoR1-SIRT1-PGC-1α signaling pathway. PMID:27349872

  9. Polyphenols decreased liver NADPH oxidase activity, increased muscle mitochondrial biogenesis and decreased gastrocnemius age-dependent autophagy in aged rats.

    PubMed

    Laurent, Caroline; Chabi, Beatrice; Fouret, Gilles; Py, Guillaume; Sairafi, Badie; Elong, Cecile; Gaillet, Sylvie; Cristol, Jean Paul; Coudray, Charles; Feillet-Coudray, Christine

    2012-09-01

    This study explored major systems of reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and their consequences on oxidative stress, mitochondriogenesis and muscle metabolism in aged rats, and evaluated the efficiency of 30-day oral supplementation with a moderate dose of a red grape polyphenol extract (RGPE) on these parameters. In the liver of aged rats, NADPH oxidase activity was increased and mitochondrial respiratory chain complex activities were altered, while xanthine oxidase activity remained unchanged. In muscles, only mitochondrial activity was modified with aging. The oral intake of RGPE decreased liver NADPH oxidase activity in the aged rats without affecting global oxidative stress, suggesting that NADPH oxidase was probably not the dominant detrimental source of production of O(2)·(-) in the liver. Interestingly, RGPE supplementation increased mitochondrial biogenesis and improved antioxidant status in the gastrocnemius of aged rats, while it had no significant effect in soleus. RGPE supplementation also decreased age-dependent autophagy in gastrocnemius of aged rats. These results extended existing findings on the beneficial effects of RGPE on mitochondriogenesis and muscle metabolism in aged rats.

  10. Protective Effects of Quercetin on Mitochondrial Biogenesis in Experimental Traumatic Brain Injury via the Nrf2 Signaling Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiang; Wang, Handong; Gao, Yongyue; Li, Liwen; Tang, Chao; Wen, Guodao; Zhou, Yuan; Zhou, Mengliang; Mao, Lei; Fan, Youwu

    2016-01-01

    The present investigation was carried out to elucidate a possible molecular mechanism related to the protective effect of quercetin administration against oxidative stress on various mitochondrial respiratory complex subunits with special emphasis on the role of nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) in mitochondrial biogenesis. Recently, quercetin has been proved to have a protective effect against mitochondria damage after traumatic brain injury (TBI). However, its precise role and underlying mechanisms in traumatic brain injury are not yet fully understood. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of quercetin on the potential mechanism of these effects in a weight-drop model of TBI in male mice that were treated with quercetin or vehicle via intraperitoneal injection administrated 30 min after TBI. In this experiment, ICR mice were divided into four groups: A sham group, TBI group, TBI + vehicle group, and TBI + quercetin group. Brain samples were collected 24 h later for analysis. Quercetin treatment resulted in an upregulation of Nrf2 expression and cytochrome c, malondialdehyde (MDA) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) levels were restored by quercetin treatment. Quercetin markedly promoted the translocation of Nrf2 protein from the cytoplasm to the nucleus. These observations suggest that quercetin improves mitochondrial function in TBI models, possibly by activating the Nrf2 pathway. PMID:27780244

  11. Exercise-Induced Neuroprotection of Hippocampus in APP/PS1 Transgenic Mice via Upregulation of Mitochondrial 8-Oxoguanine DNA Glycosylase

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Weimin; Jiang, Ning; Wang, Xun; Zhang, Yong; Ji, Li Li

    2014-01-01

    Improving mitochondrial function has been proposed as a reasonable therapeutic strategy to reduce amyloid-β (Aβ) load and to modify the progression of Alzheimer's disease (AD). However, the relationship between mitochondrial adaptation and brain neuroprotection caused by physical exercise in AD is poorly understood. This study was undertaken to investigate the effects of long-term treadmill exercise on mitochondrial 8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase-1 (OGG1) level, mtDNA oxidative damage, and mitochondrial function in the hippocampus of APP/PS1 transgenic mouse model of AD. In the present study, twenty weeks of treadmill training significantly improved the cognitive function and reduced the expression of Aβ-42 in APP/PS1 transgenic (Tg) mice. Training also ameliorated mitochondrial respiratory function by increasing the complexes I, and IV and ATP synthase activities, whereas it attenuated ROS generation and mtDNA oxidative damage in Tg mice. Furthermore, the impaired mitochondrial antioxidant enzymes and mitochondrial OGG1 activities seen in Tg mice were restored with training. Acetylation level of mitochondrial OGG1 and MnSOD was markedly suppressed in Tg mice after exercise training, in parallel with increased level of SIRT3. These findings suggest that exercise training could increase mtDNA repair capacity in the mouse hippocampus, which in turn would result in protection against AD-related mitochondrial dysfunction and phenotypic deterioration. PMID:25538817

  12. Mitochondrial biogenesis and increased uncoupling protein 1 in brown adipose tissue of mice fed a ketone ester diet

    PubMed Central

    Srivastava, Shireesh; Kashiwaya, Yoshihiro; King, M. Todd; Baxa, Ulrich; Tam, Joseph; Niu, Gang; Chen, Xiaoyuan; Clarke, Kieran; Veech, Richard L.

    2012-01-01

    We measured the effects of a diet in which d-β-hydroxybutyrate-(R)-1,3 butanediol monoester [ketone ester (KE)] replaced equicaloric amounts of carbohydrate on 8-wk-old male C57BL/6J mice. Diets contained equal amounts of fat, protein, and micronutrients. The KE group was fed ad libitum, whereas the control (Ctrl) mice were pair-fed to the KE group. Blood d-β-hydroxybutyrate levels in the KE group were 3-5 times those reported with high-fat ketogenic diets. Voluntary food intake was reduced dose dependently with the KE diet. Feeding the KE diet for up to 1 mo increased the number of mitochondria and doubled the electron transport chain proteins, uncoupling protein 1, and mitochondrial biogenesis-regulating proteins in the interscapular brown adipose tissue (IBAT). [18F]-Fluorodeoxyglucose uptake in IBAT of the KE group was twice that in IBAT of the Ctrl group. Plasma leptin levels of the KE group were more than 2-fold those of the Ctrl group and were associated with increased sympathetic nervous system activity to IBAT. The KE group exhibited 14% greater resting energy expenditure, but the total energy expenditure measured over a 24-h period or body weights was not different. The quantitative insulin-sensitivity check index was 73% higher in the KE group. These results identify KE as a potential antiobesity supplement.—Srivastava, S., Kashiwaya, Y., King, M. T. Baxa, U., Tam, J., Niu, G., Chen, X., Clarke, K., Veech, R. L. Mitochondrial biogenesis and increased uncoupling protein 1 in brown adipose tissue of mice fed a ketone ester diet. PMID:22362892

  13. Rosiglitazone Induces Mitochondrial Biogenesis in Differentiated Murine 3T3-L1 and C3H/10T1/2 Adipocytes.

    PubMed

    Rong, James X; Klein, Jean-Louis D; Qiu, Yang; Xie, Mi; Johnson, Jennifer H; Waters, K Michelle; Zhang, Vivian; Kashatus, Jennifer A; Remlinger, Katja S; Bing, Nan; Crosby, Renae M; Jackson, Tymissha K; Witherspoon, Sam M; Moore, John T; Ryan, Terence E; Neill, Sue D; Strum, Jay C

    2011-01-01

    Growing evidence indicates that PPARγ agonists, including rosiglitazone (RSG), induce adipose mitochondrial biogenesis. By systematically analyzing mitochondrial gene expression in two common murine adipocyte models, the current study aimed to further establish the direct role of RSG and capture temporal changes in gene transcription. Microarray profiling revealed that in fully differentiated 3T3-L1 and C3H/10T1/2 adipocytes treated with RSG or DMSO vehicle for 1, 2, 4, 7, 24, and 48 hrs, RSG overwhelmingly increased mitochondrial gene transcripts time dependently. The timing of the increases was consistent with the cascade of organelle biogenesis, that is, initiated by induction of transcription factor(s), followed by increases in the biosynthesis machinery, and then by increases in functional components. The transcriptional increases were further validated by increased mitochondrial staining, citrate synthase activity, and O(2) consumption, and were found to be associated with increased adiponectin secretion. The work provided further insight on the mechanism of PPARγ-induced mitochondrial biogenesis in differentiated adipocytes.

  14. Ammonium Chloride Ingestion Attenuates Exercise-Induced mRNA Levels in Human Muscle.

    PubMed

    Edge, Johann; Mündel, Toby; Pilegaard, Henriette; Hawke, Emma; Leikis, Murray; Lopez-Villalobos, Nicolas; Oliveira, Rodrigo S F; Bishop, David J

    2015-01-01

    Minimizing the decrease in intracellular pH during high-intensity exercise training promotes greater improvements in mitochondrial respiration. This raises the intriguing hypothesis that pH may affect the exercise-induced transcription of genes that regulate mitochondrial biogenesis. Eight males performed 10x2-min cycle intervals at 80% VO2speak intensity on two occasions separated by ~2 weeks. Participants ingested either ammonium chloride (ACID) or calcium carbonate (PLA) the day before and on the day of the exercise trial in a randomized, counterbalanced order, using a crossover design. Biopsies were taken from the vastus lateralis muscle before and after exercise. The mRNA level of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor co-activator 1α (PGC-1α), citrate synthase, cytochome c and FOXO1 was elevated at rest following ACID (P<0.05). During the PLA condition, the mRNA content of mitochondrial- and glucose-regulating proteins was elevated immediately following exercise (P<0.05). In the early phase (0-2 h) of post-exercise recovery during ACID, PGC-1α, citrate synthase, cytochome C, FOXO1, GLUT4, and HKII mRNA levels were not different from resting levels (P>0.05); the difference in PGC-1α mRNA content 2 h post-exercise between ACID and PLA was not significant (P = 0.08). Thus, metabolic acidosis abolished the early post-exercise increase of PGC-1α mRNA and the mRNA of downstream mitochondrial and glucose-regulating proteins. These findings indicate that metabolic acidosis may affect mitochondrial biogenesis, with divergent responses in resting and post-exercise skeletal muscle. PMID:26656911

  15. Ammonium Chloride Ingestion Attenuates Exercise-Induced mRNA Levels in Human Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Mündel, Toby; Pilegaard, Henriette; Hawke, Emma; Leikis, Murray; Lopez-Villalobos, Nicolas; Oliveira, Rodrigo S. F.; Bishop, David J.

    2015-01-01

    Minimizing the decrease in intracellular pH during high-intensity exercise training promotes greater improvements in mitochondrial respiration. This raises the intriguing hypothesis that pH may affect the exercise-induced transcription of genes that regulate mitochondrial biogenesis. Eight males performed 10x2-min cycle intervals at 80% V˙O2peak intensity on two occasions separated by ~2 weeks. Participants ingested either ammonium chloride (ACID) or calcium carbonate (PLA) the day before and on the day of the exercise trial in a randomized, counterbalanced order, using a crossover design. Biopsies were taken from the vastus lateralis muscle before and after exercise. The mRNA level of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor co-activator 1α (PGC-1α), citrate synthase, cytochome c and FOXO1 was elevated at rest following ACID (P<0.05). During the PLA condition, the mRNA content of mitochondrial- and glucose-regulating proteins was elevated immediately following exercise (P<0.05). In the early phase (0–2 h) of post-exercise recovery during ACID, PGC-1α, citrate synthase, cytochome C, FOXO1, GLUT4, and HKII mRNA levels were not different from resting levels (P>0.05); the difference in PGC-1α mRNA content 2 h post-exercise between ACID and PLA was not significant (P = 0.08). Thus, metabolic acidosis abolished the early post-exercise increase of PGC-1α mRNA and the mRNA of downstream mitochondrial and glucose-regulating proteins. These findings indicate that metabolic acidosis may affect mitochondrial biogenesis, with divergent responses in resting and post-exercise skeletal muscle. PMID:26656911

  16. Elucidation of separate, but collaborative functions of the rRNA methyltransferase-related human mitochondrial transcription factors B1 and B2 in mitochondrial biogenesis reveals new insight into maternally inherited deafness.

    PubMed

    Cotney, Justin; McKay, Sharen E; Shadel, Gerald S

    2009-07-15

    Mitochondrial biogenesis is controlled by signaling networks that relay information to and from the organelles. However, key mitochondrial factors that mediate such pathways and how they contribute to human disease are not understood fully. Here we demonstrate that the rRNA methyltransferase-related human mitochondrial transcription factors B1 and B2 are key downstream effectors of mitochondrial biogenesis that perform unique, yet cooperative functions. The primary function of h-mtTFB2 is mtDNA transcription and maintenance, which is independent of its rRNA methyltransferase activity, while that of h-mtTFB1 is mitochondrial 12S rRNA methylation needed for normal mitochondrial translation, metabolism and cell growth. Over-expression of h-mtTFB1 causes 12S rRNA hypermethylation, aberrant mitochondrial biogenesis and increased sorbitol-induced cell death. These phenotypes are recapitulated in cells harboring the pathogenic A1555G mtDNA mutation, implicating a deleterious rRNA methylation-dependent retrograde signal in maternally inherited deafness pathology and shedding significant insight into how h-mtTFB1 acts as a nuclear modifier of this disease.

  17. Elucidation of separate, but collaborative functions of the rRNA methyltransferase-related human mitochondrial transcription factors B1 and B2 in mitochondrial biogenesis reveals new insight into maternally inherited deafness

    PubMed Central

    Cotney, Justin; McKay, Sharen E.; Shadel, Gerald S.

    2009-01-01

    Mitochondrial biogenesis is controlled by signaling networks that relay information to and from the organelles. However, key mitochondrial factors that mediate such pathways and how they contribute to human disease are not understood fully. Here we demonstrate that the rRNA methyltransferase-related human mitochondrial transcription factors B1 and B2 are key downstream effectors of mitochondrial biogenesis that perform unique, yet cooperative functions. The primary function of h-mtTFB2 is mtDNA transcription and maintenance, which is independent of its rRNA methyltransferase activity, while that of h-mtTFB1 is mitochondrial 12S rRNA methylation needed for normal mitochondrial translation, metabolism and cell growth. Over-expression of h-mtTFB1 causes 12S rRNA hypermethylation, aberrant mitochondrial biogenesis and increased sorbitol-induced cell death. These phenotypes are recapitulated in cells harboring the pathogenic A1555G mtDNA mutation, implicating a deleterious rRNA methylation-dependent retrograde signal in maternally inherited deafness pathology and shedding significant insight into how h-mtTFB1 acts as a nuclear modifier of this disease. PMID:19417006

  18. Inhibition of akt phosphorylation diminishes mitochondrial biogenesis regulators, tricarboxylic acid cycle activity and exacerbates recognition memory deficit in rat model of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Shaerzadeh, Fatemeh; Motamedi, Fereshteh; Khodagholi, Fariba

    2014-11-01

    3-Methyladenine (3-MA), as a PI3K inhibitor, is widely used for inhibition of autophagy. Inhibition of PI3K class I leads to inhibition of Akt phosphorylation, a central molecule involved in diverse arrays of intracellular cascades in nervous system. Accordingly, in the present study, we aimed to determine the alterations of specific mitochondrial biogenesis markers and mitochondrial function in 3-MA-injected rats following amyloid beta (Aβ) insult. Our data revealed that inhibition of Akt phosphorylation downregulates master regulator of mitochondrial biogenesis, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator 1-alpha (PGC-1α). Our data also showed that decrease in PGC-1α level presumably is due to decrease in the phosphorylation of cAMP-response element binding and AMP-activated kinase, two upstream activators of PGC-1α. As a consequence, the level of some mitochondrial biogenesis factors including nuclear respiratory factor-1, mitochondrial transcription factor A, and Cytochrome c decreased significantly. Also, activities of tricarboxylic acid cycle (TCA) enzymes such as Aconitase, a-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase, and malate dehydrogenase reduced in the presence of 3-MA with or without Aβ insult. Decrease in mitochondrial biogenesis factors and TCA enzyme activity in the rats receiving 3-MA and Aβ were more compared to the rats that received either alone; indicating the additive destructive effects of these two agents. In agreement with our molecular results, data obtained from behavioral test (using novel objective recognition test) indicated that inhibition of Akt phosphorylation with or without Aβ injection impaired novel recognition (non-spatial) memory. Our results suggest that 3-MA amplified deleterious effects of Aβ by targeting central molecule Akt.

  19. Exercise-induced anaphylaxis.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Taro; Tokuda, Yasuharu

    2012-01-01

    A 23-year-old man presented with acute flushing, pruritus and warmth followed by collapse after vigorous exercise in a gymnasium. After resting for 30 min and receiving a rapid infusion of 0.9% sodium chloride, he was finally stable. He admitted that he had a similar experience 5 years earlier during exercise. Based on the patient's history, his symptoms were attributed to exercise-induced anaphylaxis. None of his episodes was associated with any suspicious co-triggers of anaphylaxis. He was successfully discharged from hospital without any complications after receiving guidance on how to prevent this condition. PMID:22669856

  20. Exercise-induced anaphylaxis.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Taro; Tokuda, Yasuharu

    2012-01-01

    A 23-year-old man presented with acute flushing, pruritus and warmth followed by collapse after vigorous exercise in a gymnasium. After resting for 30 min and receiving a rapid infusion of 0.9% sodium chloride, he was finally stable. He admitted that he had a similar experience 5 years earlier during exercise. Based on the patient's history, his symptoms were attributed to exercise-induced anaphylaxis. None of his episodes was associated with any suspicious co-triggers of anaphylaxis. He was successfully discharged from hospital without any complications after receiving guidance on how to prevent this condition.

  1. HIV and Cocaine Impact Glial Metabolism: Energy Sensor AMP-activated protein kinase Role in Mitochondrial Biogenesis and Epigenetic Remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Samikkannu, Thangavel; Atluri, Venkata S. R.; Nair, Madhavan P. N.

    2016-01-01

    HIV infection and cocaine use have been identified as risk factors for triggering neuronal dysfunction. In the central nervous system (CNS), energy resource and metabolic function are regulated by astroglia. Glia is the major reservoir of HIV infection and disease progression in CNS. However, the role of cocaine in accelerating HIV associated energy deficit and its impact on neuronal dysfunction has not been elucidated yet. The aim of this study is to elucidate the molecular mechanism of HIV associated neuropathogenesis in cocaine abuse and how it accelerates the energy sensor AMPKs and its subsequent effect on mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS), BRSKs, CDC25B/C, MAP/Tau, Wee1 and epigenetics remodeling complex SWI/SNF. Results showed that cocaine exposure during HIV infection significantly increased the level of p24, reactive oxygen species (ROS), ATP-utilization and upregulated energy sensor AMPKs, CDC25B/C, MAP/Tau and Wee1 protein expression. Increased ROS production subsequently inhibits OCR/ECAR ratio and OXPHOS, and eventually upregulate epigenetics remodeling complex SWI/SNF in CHME-5 cells. These results suggest that HIV infection induced energy deficit and metabolic dysfunction is accelerated by cocaine inducing energy sensor AMPKs, mitochondrial biogenesis and chromatin remodeling complex SWI/SNF activation, which may lead to neuroAIDS disease progression. PMID:27535703

  2. HIV and Cocaine Impact Glial Metabolism: Energy Sensor AMP-activated protein kinase Role in Mitochondrial Biogenesis and Epigenetic Remodeling.

    PubMed

    Samikkannu, Thangavel; Atluri, Venkata S R; Nair, Madhavan P N

    2016-01-01

    HIV infection and cocaine use have been identified as risk factors for triggering neuronal dysfunction. In the central nervous system (CNS), energy resource and metabolic function are regulated by astroglia. Glia is the major reservoir of HIV infection and disease progression in CNS. However, the role of cocaine in accelerating HIV associated energy deficit and its impact on neuronal dysfunction has not been elucidated yet. The aim of this study is to elucidate the molecular mechanism of HIV associated neuropathogenesis in cocaine abuse and how it accelerates the energy sensor AMPKs and its subsequent effect on mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS), BRSKs, CDC25B/C, MAP/Tau, Wee1 and epigenetics remodeling complex SWI/SNF. Results showed that cocaine exposure during HIV infection significantly increased the level of p24, reactive oxygen species (ROS), ATP-utilization and upregulated energy sensor AMPKs, CDC25B/C, MAP/Tau and Wee1 protein expression. Increased ROS production subsequently inhibits OCR/ECAR ratio and OXPHOS, and eventually upregulate epigenetics remodeling complex SWI/SNF in CHME-5 cells. These results suggest that HIV infection induced energy deficit and metabolic dysfunction is accelerated by cocaine inducing energy sensor AMPKs, mitochondrial biogenesis and chromatin remodeling complex SWI/SNF activation, which may lead to neuroAIDS disease progression. PMID:27535703

  3. A subcomplex of human mitochondrial RNase P is a bifunctional methyltransferase—extensive moonlighting in mitochondrial tRNA biogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Vilardo, Elisa; Nachbagauer, Christa; Buzet, Aurélie; Taschner, Andreas; Holzmann, Johann; Rossmanith, Walter

    2012-01-01

    Transfer RNAs (tRNAs) reach their mature functional form through several steps of processing and modification. Some nucleotide modifications affect the proper folding of tRNAs, and they are crucial in case of the non-canonically structured animal mitochondrial tRNAs, as exemplified by the apparently ubiquitous methylation of purines at position 9. Here, we show that a subcomplex of human mitochondrial RNase P, the endonuclease removing tRNA 5′ extensions, is the methyltransferase responsible for m1G9 and m1A9 formation. The ability of the mitochondrial tRNA:m1R9 methyltransferase to modify both purines is uncommon among nucleic acid modification enzymes. In contrast to all the related methyltransferases, the human mitochondrial enzyme, moreover, requires a short-chain dehydrogenase as a partner protein. Human mitochondrial RNase P, thus, constitutes a multifunctional complex, whose subunits moonlight in cascade: a fatty and amino acid degradation enzyme in tRNA methylation and the methyltransferase, in turn, in tRNA 5′ end processing. PMID:23042678

  4. Biogenesis of mitochondria: the mitochondrial gene (aap1) coding for mitochondrial ATPase subunit 8 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Macreadie, I G; Novitski, C E; Maxwell, R J; John, U; Ooi, B G; McMullen, G L; Lukins, H B; Linnane, A W; Nagley, P

    1983-01-01

    A mitochondrial gene (denoted aap1) in Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been characterized by nucleotide sequence analysis of a region of mtDNA between the oxi3 and oli2 genes. The reading frame of the aap1 gene specifies a hydrophobic polypeptide containing 48 amino acids. The functional nature of this reading frame was established by sequence analysis of a series of mit- mutants and revertants. Evidence is presented that the aap1 gene codes for a mitochondrially synthesized polypeptide associated with the mitochondrial ATPase complex. This polypeptide (denoted subunit 8) is a proteolipid whose size has been previously assumed to be 10 kilodaltons based on its mobility on SDS-polyacrylamide gels, but the sequence of the aap1 gene predicts a molecular weight of 5,815 for this protein. PMID:6223276

  5. Leucine stimulates PPARβ/δ-dependent mitochondrial biogenesis and oxidative metabolism with enhanced GLUT4 content and glucose uptake in myotubes.

    PubMed

    Schnuck, Jamie K; Sunderland, Kyle L; Gannon, Nicholas P; Kuennen, Matthew R; Vaughan, Roger A

    2016-01-01

    Leucine stimulates anabolic and catabolic processes in skeletal muscle, however little is known about the effects of leucine on peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) activity. This work characterized the effects of 24-h leucine treatment on metabolic parameters and protein expression in cultured myotubes. Leucine significantly increased PPARβ/δ expression as well as markers of mitochondrial biogenesis, leading to significantly increased mitochondrial content and oxidative metabolism in a PPARβ/δ-dependent manner. However, leucine-treated cells did not display significant alterations in uncoupling protein expression or oxygen consumed per relative mitochondrial content suggesting leucine-mediated increases in oxidative metabolism are a function of increased mitochondrial content and not altered mitochondrial efficiency. Leucine treatment also increased GLUT4 content and glucose uptake as well as PPARγ and FAS expression leading to increased total lipid content. Leucine appears to activate PPAR activity leading to increased mitochondrial biogenesis and elevated substrate oxidation, while simultaneously promoting substrate/lipid storage and protein synthesis. PMID:27345255

  6. Nucleotide and RNA Metabolism Prime Translational Initiation in the Earliest Events of Mitochondrial Biogenesis during Arabidopsis Germination1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Law, Simon R.; Narsai, Reena; Taylor, Nicolas L.; Delannoy, Etienne; Carrie, Chris; Giraud, Estelle; Millar, A. Harvey; Small, Ian; Whelan, James

    2012-01-01

    Mitochondria play a crucial role in germination and early seedling growth in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). Morphological observations of mitochondria revealed that mitochondrial numbers, typical size, and oval morphology were evident after 12 h of imbibition in continuous light (following 48 h of stratification). The transition from a dormant to an active metabolic state was punctuated by an early molecular switch, characterized by a transient burst in the expression of genes encoding mitochondrial proteins. Factors involved in mitochondrial transcription and RNA processing were overrepresented among these early-expressed genes. This was closely followed by an increase in the transcript abundance of genes encoding proteins involved in mitochondrial DNA replication and translation. This burst in the expression of factors implicated in mitochondrial RNA and DNA metabolism was accompanied by an increase in transcripts encoding components required for nucleotide biosynthesis in the cytosol and increases in transcript abundance of specific members of the mitochondrial carrier protein family that have previously been associated with nucleotide transport into mitochondria. Only after these genes peaked in expression and largely declined were typical mitochondrial numbers and morphology observed. Subsequently, there was an increase in transcript abundance for various bioenergetic and metabolic functions of mitochondria. The coordination of nucleus- and organelle-encoded gene expression was also examined by quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction, specifically for components of the mitochondrial electron transport chain and the chloroplastic photosynthetic machinery. Analysis of protein abundance using western-blot analysis and mass spectrometry revealed that for many proteins, patterns of protein and transcript abundance changes displayed significant positive correlations. A model for mitochondrial biogenesis during germination is proposed, in

  7. Genomic and non-genomic regulation of PGC1 isoforms by estrogen to increase cerebral vascular mitochondrial biogenesis and reactive oxygen species protection.

    PubMed

    Kemper, Martin F; Stirone, Chris; Krause, Diana N; Duckles, Sue P; Procaccio, Vincent

    2014-01-15

    We previously found that estrogen exerts a novel protective effect on mitochondria in brain vasculature. Here we demonstrate in rat cerebral blood vessels that 17β-estradiol (estrogen), both in vivo and ex vivo, affects key transcriptional coactivators responsible for mitochondrial regulation. Treatment of ovariectomized rats with estrogen in vivo lowered mRNA levels of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ coactivator-1 alpha (PGC-1α) but increased levels of the other PGC-1 isoforms: PGC-1β and PGC-1 related coactivator (PRC). In vessels ex vivo, estrogen decreased protein levels of PGC-1α via activation of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K). Estrogen treatment also increased phosphorylation of forkhead transcription factor, FoxO1, a known pathway for PGC-1α downregulation. In contrast to the decrease in PGC-1α, estrogen increased protein levels of nuclear respiratory factor 1, a known PGC target and mediator of mitochondrial biogenesis. The latter effect of estrogen was independent of PI3K, suggesting a separate mechanism consistent with increased expression of PGC-1β and PRC. We demonstrated increased mitochondrial biogenesis following estrogen treatment in vivo; cerebrovascular levels of mitochondrial transcription factor A and electron transport chain subunits as well as the mitochondrial/nuclear DNA ratio were increased. We examined a downstream target of PGC-1β, glutamate-cysteine ligase (GCL), the rate-limiting enzyme for glutathione synthesis. In vivo estrogen increased protein levels of both GCL subunits and total glutathione levels. Together these data show estrogen differentially regulates PGC-1 isoforms in brain vasculature, underscoring the importance of these coactivators in adapting mitochondria in specific tissues. By upregulating PGC-1β and/or PRC, estrogen appears to enhance mitochondrial biogenesis, function and reactive oxygen species protection.

  8. Chromosomal localization of mitochondrial transcription factor A (TCF6), single-stranded DNA-binding protein (SSBP), and endonuclease G (ENDOG), three human housekeeping genes involving in mitochondrial biogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Tiranti, V.; Rossi, G.; DiDonato, S.

    1995-01-20

    By using a PCR-based screening of a somatic cell hybrid panel and FISH, we have assigned the loci of mitochondrial single-stranded DNA-binding protein (SSBP), mitochondrial transcription factor A (TCF6), and mitochondrial endonuclease G (ENDOG) genes to human chromosomes 7q34, 10q21, and 9q34.1, respectively. The products of these three genes are involved in fundamental aspects of mitochondrial biogenesis, such as replication and transcription of the mitochondrial genome. The chromosomal localization of these genes is important to testing whether the corresponding proteins may play a role in the etiopathogenesis of human disorders associated with qualitative or quantitative abnormalities of mitochondrial DNA. 20 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  9. The CDP-Ethanolamine Pathway Regulates Skeletal Muscle Diacylglycerol Content and Mitochondrial Biogenesis without Altering Insulin Sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Selathurai, Ahrathy; Kowalski, Greg M; Burch, Micah L; Sepulveda, Patricio; Risis, Steve; Lee-Young, Robert S; Lamon, Severine; Meikle, Peter J; Genders, Amanda J; McGee, Sean L; Watt, Matthew J; Russell, Aaron P; Frank, Matthew; Jackowski, Suzanne; Febbraio, Mark A; Bruce, Clinton R

    2015-05-01

    Accumulation of diacylglycerol (DG) in muscle is thought to cause insulin resistance. DG is a precursor for phospholipids, thus phospholipid synthesis could be involved in regulating muscle DG. Little is known about the interaction between phospholipid and DG in muscle; therefore, we examined whether disrupting muscle phospholipid synthesis, specifically phosphatidylethanolamine (PtdEtn), would influence muscle DG content and insulin sensitivity. Muscle PtdEtn synthesis was disrupted by deleting CTP:phosphoethanolamine cytidylyltransferase (ECT), the rate-limiting enzyme in the CDP-ethanolamine pathway, a major route for PtdEtn production. While PtdEtn was reduced in muscle-specific ECT knockout mice, intramyocellular and membrane-associated DG was markedly increased. Importantly, however, this was not associated with insulin resistance. Unexpectedly, mitochondrial biogenesis and muscle oxidative capacity were increased in muscle-specific ECT knockout mice and were accompanied by enhanced exercise performance. These findings highlight the importance of the CDP-ethanolamine pathway in regulating muscle DG content and challenge the DG-induced insulin resistance hypothesis. PMID:25955207

  10. Short-Chain Fatty Acid Acetate Stimulates Adipogenesis and Mitochondrial Biogenesis via GPR43 in Brown Adipocytes.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jiamiao; Kyrou, Ioannis; Tan, Bee K; Dimitriadis, Georgios K; Ramanjaneya, Manjunath; Tripathi, Gyanendra; Patel, Vanlata; James, Sean; Kawan, Mohamed; Chen, Jing; Randeva, Harpal S

    2016-05-01

    Short-chain fatty acids play crucial roles in a range of physiological functions. However, the effects of short-chain fatty acids on brown adipose tissue have not been fully investigated. We examined the role of acetate, a short-chain fatty acid formed by fermentation in the gut, in the regulation of brown adipocyte metabolism. Our results show that acetate up-regulates adipocyte protein 2, peroxisomal proliferator-activated receptor-γ coactivator-1α, and uncoupling protein-1 expression and affects the morphological changes of brown adipocytes during adipogenesis. Moreover, an increase in mitochondrial biogenesis was observed after acetate treatment. Acetate also elicited the activation of ERK and cAMP response element-binding protein, and these responses were sensitive to G(i/o)-type G protein inactivator, Gβγ-subunit inhibitor, phospholipase C inhibitor, and MAPK kinase inhibitor, indicating a role for the G(i/o)βγ/phospholipase C/protein kinase C/MAPK kinase signaling pathway in these responses. These effects of acetate were mimicked by treatment with 4-chloro-α-(1-methylethyl)-N-2-thiazolylbenzeneacetamide, a synthetic G protein-coupled receptor 43 (GPR43) agonist and were impaired in GPR43 knockdown cells. Taken together, our results indicate that acetate may have important physiological roles in brown adipocytes through the activation of GPR43. PMID:26990063

  11. α-SNAP inhibits AMPK signaling to reduce mitochondrial biogenesis and dephosphorylates Thr172 in AMPKα in vitro.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lifu; Brautigan, David L

    2013-01-01

    The AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) regulates metabolism in normal and pathological conditions and responds to nutrients, hormones, anti-diabetic drugs and physical exercise. AMPK is activated by the kinase LKB1 and inactivated by phosphatases whose identities remain uncertain. Here we show that AMPK associates with α-SNAP, an adapter that enables disassembly of cis-SNARE complexes formed during membrane fusion. Knockdown of α-SNAP activates AMPK to phosphorylate its endogenous substrates acetyl CoA carboxylase and Raptor, and provokes mitochondrial biogenesis. AMPK phosphorylation is rescued from α-SNAP RNA interference by LKB1 knockdown or expression of wild-type but not mutated α-SNAP. Recombinant wild-type but not mutated α-SNAP dephosphorylates pThr172 in AMPKα in vitro. Overexpression of wild-type but not mutated α-SNAP prevents AMPK activation in cells treated with agents to elevate AMP concentration. The mouse α-SNAP mutant hyh (hydrocephalus with hop gait) shows enhanced binding and inhibition of AMPK. By negatively controlling AMPK, α-SNAP therefore potentially coordinates membrane trafficking and metabolism.

  12. The IMMUTANS variegation locus of Arabidopsis defines a mitochondrial alternative oxidase homolog that functions during early chloroplast biogenesis.

    PubMed Central

    Wu, D; Wright, D A; Wetzel, C; Voytas, D F; Rodermel, S

    1999-01-01

    Nuclear gene-induced variegation mutants provide a powerful system to dissect interactions between the genetic systems of the nucleus-cytoplasm, the chloroplast, and the mitochondrion. The immutans (im) variegation mutation of Arabidopsis is nuclear and recessive and results in the production of green- and white-sectored leaves. The green sectors contain cells with normal chloroplasts, whereas the white sectors are heteroplastidic and contain cells with abnormal, pigment-deficient plastids as well as some normal chloroplasts. White sector formation can be promoted by enhanced light intensities, but sectoring becomes irreversible early in leaf development. The white sectors accumulate the carotenoid precursor phytoene. We have positionally cloned IM and found that the gene encodes a 40.5-kD protein with sequence motifs characteristic of alternative oxidase, a mitochondrial protein that functions as a terminal oxidase in the respiratory chains of all plants. However, phylogenetic analyses revealed that the IM protein is only distantly related to these other alternative oxidases, suggesting that IM is a novel member of this protein class. We sequenced three alleles of im, and all are predicted to be null. Our data suggest a model of variegation in which the IM protein functions early in chloroplast biogenesis as a component of a redox chain responsible for phytoene desaturation but that a redundant electron transfer function is capable of compensating for IM activity in some plastids and cells. PMID:9878631

  13. Exercise-induced anaphylaxis.

    PubMed

    Sheffer, A L; Austen, K F

    1980-08-01

    Sixteen patients were seen because of possibly life-threatening exercise-associated symptoms similar to anaphylactic reactions. Asthma attacks, cholinergic urticaria and angioedema, and cardiac arrythmias are recognized as exertion-related phenomena in predisposed patients but are distinct from the syndrome described here. A syndrome characterized by the exertion-related onset of cutaneous pruritus and warmth, the development of generalized urticaria, and the appearance of such additional manifestations as collapse in 12 patients, gastrointestinal tract symptoms in five patients, and upper respiratory distress in 10 patients has been designated exercise-induced anaphylaxis, because of the striking similarity of this symptom complex to the anaphylactic syndrome elicited by ingestion or injection of a foreign antigenic substance. There is a family history of atopic desease for 11 patients and cold urticaria for two others and a personal history of atopy in six. The size of the wheals, the failure to develop an attack with a warm bath or shower or a fever, and the prominence of syncope rule against the diagnosis of conventional cholinergic urticaria. There is no history or evidence of an encounter with an environmental source of antigen during the exercise period. PMID:7400473

  14. Decreased ovarian reserve, dysregulation of mitochondrial biogenesis, and increased lipid peroxidation in female mouse offspring exposed to an obesogenic maternal diet

    PubMed Central

    Aiken, Catherine E.; Tarry-Adkins, Jane L.; Penfold, Naomi C.; Dearden, Laura; Ozanne, Susan E.

    2016-01-01

    Maternal diet during pregnancy influences the later life reproductive potential of female offspring. We investigate the molecular mechanisms underlying the depletion of ovarian follicular reserve in young adult females following exposure to obesogenic diet in early life. Furthermore, we explore the interaction between adverse maternal diet and postweaning diet in generating reduced ovarian reserve. Female mice were exposed to either maternal obesogenic (high fat/high sugar) or maternal control diet in utero and during lactation, then weaned onto either obesogenic or control diet. At 12 wk of age, the offspring ovarian reserve was depleted following exposure to maternal obesogenic diet (P < 0.05), but not postweaning obesogenic diet. Maternal obesogenic diet was associated with increased mitochondrial DNA biogenesis (copy number P < 0.05; transcription factor A, mitochondrial expression P < 0.05), increased mitochondrial antioxidant defenses [manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD) P < 0.05; copper/zinc superoxide dismutase P < 0.05; glutathione peroxidase 4 P < 0.01] and increased lipoxygenase expression (arachidonate 12-lipoxygenase P < 0.05; arachidonate 15-lipoxygenase P < 0.05) in the ovary. There was also significantly increased expression of the transcriptional regulator NF-κB (P < 0.05). There was no effect of postweaning diet on any measured ovarian parameters. Maternal diet thus plays a central role in determining follicular reserve in adult female offspring. Our observations suggest that lipid peroxidation and mitochondrial biogenesis are the key intracellular pathways involved in programming of ovarian reserve.—Aiken, C. E., Tarry-Adkins, J. L., Penfold, N. C., Dearden, L., Ozanne, S. E. Decreased ovarian reserve, dysregulation of mitochondrial biogenesis, and increased lipid peroxidation in female mouse offspring exposed to an obesogenic maternal diet. PMID:26700734

  15. Suppressing the activity of ERRalpha in 3T3-L1 adipocytes reduces mitochondrial biogenesis but enhances glycolysis and basal glucose uptake.

    PubMed

    Nie, Yaohui; Wong, Chiwai

    2009-09-01

    Estrogen-related receptor alpha (ERRalpha) is thought to primarily regulate lipid oxidation and control the transcription of genes in the oxidative phosphorylation pathway in skeletal and cardiac muscles. However, its role in white adipose tissue is not well studied. In this study, we aimed to establish a role for ERRalpha in adipocytes by down-regulating its activity through its inverse agonist XCT-790 in differentiated 3T3-L1 adipocytes. We found that XCT-790 differentially reduced the expression of ERRalpha target genes. Specifically, XCT-790 reduced the expressions of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma co-activator-1beta (PGC-1beta), resulting in reductions of mitochondrial biogenesis, adiogenesis and lipogeneis. Through suppressing the expression of another ERRalpha target gene pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase 2 (PDK2), we found that XCT-790 not only enhanced the conversion of pyruvate to acetyl-CoA and hyper-activated the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle, but also led to higher levels of mitochondrial membrane potential and reactive oxidant species (ROS) production. Additionally, XCT-790 treatment also resulted in enhanced rates of glycolysis and basal glucose uptake. Therefore, ERRalpha stands at the crossroad of glucose and fatty acid utilization and acts as a homeostatic switch to regulate the flux of TCA cycle, mitochondrial membrane potential and glycolysis to maintain a steady level of ATP production, particularly, when mitochondrial biogenesis is reduced. PMID:18544047

  16. Quercetin induces mitochondrial biogenesis in experimental traumatic brain injury via the PGC-1α signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiang; Wang, Handong; Gao, Yongyue; Li, Liwen; Tang, Chao; Wen, Guodao; Yang, Youqing; Zhuang, Zong; Zhou, Mengliang; Mao, Lei; Fan, Youwu

    2016-01-01

    Quercetin, a dietary flavonoid used as a food supplement, has been found to have protective effect against mitochondria damage after traumatic brain injury (TBI) in mice. However, the mechanisms underlying these effects are still not well understood. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of quercetin on the potential mechanism mediating these effects in the weight-drop model of TBI in male mice that were treated with quercetin or vehicle via intraperitoneal injection administration 30 min after TBI. Brain samples were collected 24 h later for analysis. Quercetin treatment upregulated the expression of PGC-1α and restored the level of cytochrome c, malondialdehyde (MDA) and superoxide dismutase (SOD). These results demonstrate that quercetin improves mitochondrial function in mice by improving the level of PGC-1α following TBI. PMID:27648146

  17. Quercetin induces mitochondrial biogenesis in experimental traumatic brain injury via the PGC-1α signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiang; Wang, Handong; Gao, Yongyue; Li, Liwen; Tang, Chao; Wen, Guodao; Yang, Youqing; Zhuang, Zong; Zhou, Mengliang; Mao, Lei; Fan, Youwu

    2016-01-01

    Quercetin, a dietary flavonoid used as a food supplement, has been found to have protective effect against mitochondria damage after traumatic brain injury (TBI) in mice. However, the mechanisms underlying these effects are still not well understood. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of quercetin on the potential mechanism mediating these effects in the weight-drop model of TBI in male mice that were treated with quercetin or vehicle via intraperitoneal injection administration 30 min after TBI. Brain samples were collected 24 h later for analysis. Quercetin treatment upregulated the expression of PGC-1α and restored the level of cytochrome c, malondialdehyde (MDA) and superoxide dismutase (SOD). These results demonstrate that quercetin improves mitochondrial function in mice by improving the level of PGC-1α following TBI.

  18. Quercetin induces mitochondrial biogenesis in experimental traumatic brain injury via the PGC-1α signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiang; Wang, Handong; Gao, Yongyue; Li, Liwen; Tang, Chao; Wen, Guodao; Yang, Youqing; Zhuang, Zong; Zhou, Mengliang; Mao, Lei; Fan, Youwu

    2016-01-01

    Quercetin, a dietary flavonoid used as a food supplement, has been found to have protective effect against mitochondria damage after traumatic brain injury (TBI) in mice. However, the mechanisms underlying these effects are still not well understood. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of quercetin on the potential mechanism mediating these effects in the weight-drop model of TBI in male mice that were treated with quercetin or vehicle via intraperitoneal injection administration 30 min after TBI. Brain samples were collected 24 h later for analysis. Quercetin treatment upregulated the expression of PGC-1α and restored the level of cytochrome c, malondialdehyde (MDA) and superoxide dismutase (SOD). These results demonstrate that quercetin improves mitochondrial function in mice by improving the level of PGC-1α following TBI. PMID:27648146

  19. Role of cAMP-responsive element-binding protein (CREB)-regulated transcription coactivator 3 (CRTC3) in the initiation of mitochondrial biogenesis and stress response in liver cells.

    PubMed

    Than, Tin Aung; Lou, Huan; Ji, Cheng; Win, Sanda; Kaplowitz, Neil

    2011-06-24

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α, coactivator 1α (PGC-1α) is the master regulator of mitochondrial biogenesis. PGC-1α expression is under the control of the transcription factor, cAMP-responsive element-binding protein (CREB). In searching for candidate transcription factors that mediate mitochondrial stress-initiated mitochondria-to-nucleus signaling in the regulation of mitochondrial biogenesis, we assessed the effect of silencing CREB-regulated transcription co-activators (CRTC). CRTC isoforms are co-activators of CREB-regulated transcription by a CREB phosphorylation-independent pathway. Using cultured HepG2 cells and primary mouse hepatocytes, we determined that mitochondrial stress imposed by the complex I inhibitor rotenone elicited mitochondrial biogenesis, which was dependent on an induction of PGC-1α, which was inhibited by silencing PGC-1α. PGC-1α induction in response to rotenone was inhibited by silencing the expression of CRTC3, which blocked downstream mitochondria biogenesis. In contrast, silencing CRTC2 did not affect the induction of this pathway in response to rotenone. Thus, CRTC3 plays a selective role in mitochondrial biogenesis in response to rotenone.

  20. Sestrin2 Silencing Exacerbates Cerebral Ischemia/Reperfusion Injury by Decreasing Mitochondrial Biogenesis through the AMPK/PGC-1α Pathway in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Li, Lingyu; Xiao, Lina; Hou, Yanghao; He, Qi; Zhu, Jin; Li, Yixin; Wu, Jingxian; Zhao, Jing; Yu, Shanshan; Zhao, Yong

    2016-01-01

    Sestrin2 (Sesn2) exerts neuroprotective properties in some neurodegenerative diseases. However, the role of Sesn2 in stroke is unclear. The AMP-activated protein kinase/peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator-1α (AMPK/PGC-1α) pathway plays an important role in regulating mitochondrial biogenesis, which helps prevent cerebral ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury. Here, we aimed to determine whether Sesn2 alleviated I/R damage by regulating mitochondrial biogenesis through the AMPK/PGC-1α signaling pathway. To be able to test this, Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) for 1 h with Sesn2 silencing. At 24 h after reperfusion, we found that neurological deficits were exacerbated, infarct volume was enlarged, and oxidative stress and neuronal damage were greater in the Sesn2 siRNA group than in the MCAO group. To explore protective mechanisms, an AMPK activator was used. Expression levels of Sesn2, p-AMPK, PGC-1α, NRF-1, TFAM, SOD2, and UCP2 were significantly increased following cerebral I/R. However, upregulation of these proteins was prevented by Sesn2 small interfering RNA (siRNA). In contrast, activation of AMPK with 5′-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide riboside weakened the effects of Sesn2 siRNA. These results suggest that Sesn2 silencing may suppress mitochondrial biogenesis, reduce mitochondrial biological activity, and finally aggravate cerebral I/R injury through inhibiting the AMPK/PGC-1α pathway. PMID:27453548

  1. Sestrin2 Silencing Exacerbates Cerebral Ischemia/Reperfusion Injury by Decreasing Mitochondrial Biogenesis through the AMPK/PGC-1α Pathway in Rats.

    PubMed

    Li, Lingyu; Xiao, Lina; Hou, Yanghao; He, Qi; Zhu, Jin; Li, Yixin; Wu, Jingxian; Zhao, Jing; Yu, Shanshan; Zhao, Yong

    2016-01-01

    Sestrin2 (Sesn2) exerts neuroprotective properties in some neurodegenerative diseases. However, the role of Sesn2 in stroke is unclear. The AMP-activated protein kinase/peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator-1α (AMPK/PGC-1α) pathway plays an important role in regulating mitochondrial biogenesis, which helps prevent cerebral ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury. Here, we aimed to determine whether Sesn2 alleviated I/R damage by regulating mitochondrial biogenesis through the AMPK/PGC-1α signaling pathway. To be able to test this, Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) for 1 h with Sesn2 silencing. At 24 h after reperfusion, we found that neurological deficits were exacerbated, infarct volume was enlarged, and oxidative stress and neuronal damage were greater in the Sesn2 siRNA group than in the MCAO group. To explore protective mechanisms, an AMPK activator was used. Expression levels of Sesn2, p-AMPK, PGC-1α, NRF-1, TFAM, SOD2, and UCP2 were significantly increased following cerebral I/R. However, upregulation of these proteins was prevented by Sesn2 small interfering RNA (siRNA). In contrast, activation of AMPK with 5'-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide riboside weakened the effects of Sesn2 siRNA. These results suggest that Sesn2 silencing may suppress mitochondrial biogenesis, reduce mitochondrial biological activity, and finally aggravate cerebral I/R injury through inhibiting the AMPK/PGC-1α pathway. PMID:27453548

  2. Fatty liver is associated with impaired activity of PPARγ-coactivator 1α (PGC1α) and mitochondrial biogenesis in mice.

    PubMed

    Aharoni-Simon, Michal; Hann-Obercyger, Michal; Pen, Svetlana; Madar, Zecharia; Tirosh, Oren

    2011-07-01

    Accumulating evidence indicates that mitochondria have a key role in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). C57BL/6J mice were fed a choline-deficient, ethionine-supplemented (CDE) diet. Histological studies demonstrated accumulation of fat vacuoles in up to 90% of hepatocytes in mice fed the CDE diet for 14 days. In addition, a decrease in mitochondrial levels, together with an increase in superoxide radicals' levels were observed, indicating elevation of oxidative stress in hepatocytes. ATP levels were decreased in livers from CDE-fed mice after overnight fasting. This was accompanied by a compensative and significant increase in peroxisome-proliferator-activated receptor-γ coactivator 1α (PGC1α) mRNA levels in comparison to control livers. However, there was a reduction in PGC1α protein levels in CDE-treated mice. Moreover, the expression of mitochondrial biogenesis genes nuclear respiratory factor 1 (NRF-1), mitochondrial transcription factor A (TFAM), mitochondrial transcription factor B1 (TFB1M) and mitochondrial transcription factor B2 (TFB2M), which are all regulated by PGC1α activity, remained unchanged in fasted CDE-treated mice. These results indicate impaired activity of PGC1α. The impaired activity was further confirmed by chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis, which demonstrated decreased interaction of PGC1α with promoters containing NRF-1 and NRF-2 response elements in mice fed the CDE diet. A decrease in PGC1α ability to activate the expression of the gluconeogenic gene phosphoenol-pyruvate carboxykinase was also observed. This study demonstrates, for the first time, that attenuated mitochondrial biogenesis in steatotic livers is associated with impaired biological activity of PGC1α.

  3. Decreased endothelial nitric oxide synthase expression and function contribute to impaired mitochondrial biogenesis and oxidative stress in fetal lambs with persistent pulmonary hypertension.

    PubMed

    Afolayan, Adeleye J; Eis, Annie; Alexander, Maxwell; Michalkiewicz, Teresa; Teng, Ru-Jeng; Lakshminrusimha, Satyan; Konduri, Girija G

    2016-01-01

    Impaired vasodilation in persistent pulmonary hypertension of the newborn (PPHN) is characterized by mitochondrial dysfunction. We investigated the hypothesis that a decreased endothelial nitric oxide synthase level leads to impaired mitochondrial biogenesis and function in a lamb model of PPHN induced by prenatal ductus arteriosus constriction. We ventilated PPHN lambs with 100% O2 alone or with inhaled nitric oxide (iNO). We treated pulmonary artery endothelial cells (PAECs) from normal and PPHN lambs with detaNONOate, an NO donor. We observed decreased mitochondrial (mt) DNA copy number, electron transport chain (ETC) complex subunit levels, and ATP levels in PAECs and lung tissue of PPHN fetal lambs at baseline compared with gestation matched controls. Phosphorylation of AMP-activated kinase (AMPK) and levels of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ coactivator 1-α (PGC-1α) and sirtuin-1, which facilitate mitochondrial biogenesis, were decreased in PPHN. Ventilation with 100% O2 was associated with larger decreases in ETC subunits in the lungs of PPHN lambs compared with unventilated PPHN lambs. iNO administration, which facilitated weaning of FiO2 , partly restored mtDNA copy number, ETC subunit levels, and ATP levels. DetaNONOate increased eNOS phosphorylation and its interaction with heat shock protein 90 (HSP90); increased levels of superoxide dismutase 2 (SOD2) mRNA, protein, and activity; and decreased the mitochondrial superoxide levels in PPHN-PAECs. Knockdown of eNOS decreased ETC protein levels in control PAECs. We conclude that ventilation with 100% O2 amplifies oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction in PPHN, which are partly improved by iNO and weaning of oxygen. PMID:26519208

  4. Overexpression of human selenoprotein H in neuronal cells enhances mitochondrial biogenesis and function through activation of protein kinase A, protein kinase B, and cyclic adenosine monophosphate response element-binding protein pathway.

    PubMed

    Mehta, Suresh L; Mendelev, Natalia; Kumari, Santosh; Andy Li, P

    2013-03-01

    Mitochondrial biogenesis is activated by nuclear encoded transcription co-activator peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator-1α (PGC-1α), which is regulated by several upstream factors including protein kinase A and Akt/protein kinase B. We have previously shown that selenoprotein H enhances the levels of nuclear regulators for mitochondrial biogenesis, increases mitochondrial mass and improves mitochondrial respiratory rate, under physiological condition. Furthermore, overexpression of selenoprotein H protects neuronal HT22 cells from ultraviolet B irradiation-induced cell damage by lowering reactive oxygen species production, and inhibiting activation of caspase-3 and -9, as well as p53. The objective of this study is to identify the cell signaling pathways by which selenoprotein H initiates mitochondrial biogenesis. We first confirmed our previous observation that selenoprotein H transfected HT22 cells increased the protein levels of nuclear-encoded mitochondrial biogenesis factors, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator-1α, nuclear respiratory factor 1 and mitochondrial transcription factor A. We then observed that total and phosphorylation of protein kinase A, Akt/protein kinase B and cyclic adenosine monophosphate response element-binding protein (CREB) were significantly increased in selenoprotein H transfected cells compared to vector transfected HT22 cells. To verify whether the observed stimulating effects on mitochondrial biogenesis pathways are caused by selenoprotein H and mediated through CREB, we knocked down selenoprotein H mRNA level using siRNA and inhibited CREB with napthol AS-E phosphate in selenoprotein H transfected cells and repeated the measurements of the aforementioned biomarkers. Our results revealed that silencing of selenoprotein H not only decreased the protein levels of PGC-1α, nuclear respiratory factor 1 and mitochondrial transcription factor A, but also decreased the total and

  5. Adolescents and Exercise Induced Asthma

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hansen, Pamela; Bickanse, Shanna; Bogenreif, Mike; VanSickle, Kyle

    2008-01-01

    This article defines asthma and exercise induced asthma, and provides information on the triggers, signs, and symptoms of an attack. It also gives treatments for these conditions, along with prevention guidelines on how to handle an attack in the classroom or on the practice field. (Contains 2 tables and 1 figure.)

  6. Indoxyl Sulfate-Induced Oxidative Stress, Mitochondrial Dysfunction, and Impaired Biogenesis Are Partly Protected by Vitamin C and N-Acetylcysteine

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Wen-Chin; Li, Lung-Chih; Chen, Jin-Bor; Chang, Hsueh-Wei

    2015-01-01

    Indoxyl sulfate (IS) contributes to oxidative stress and endothelial dysfunction in chronic kidney disease patients. However, the role of mitochondria in IS-induced oxidative stress is not very clear. In this study, we examined whether mitochondria play a pivotal role in modulating the effects of antioxidants during IS treatment. In the context of human umbilical vein endothelial cells, we found that IS had a dose-dependent antiproliferative effect. In addition, we used flow cytometry to demonstrate that the level of reactive oxygen species increased in a dose-dependent manner after treatment with IS. High doses of IS also corresponded to increased mitochondrial depolarization and decreased mitochondrial DNA copy number and mitochondrial mass. However, these effects could be reversed by the addition of antioxidants, namely, vitamin C and N-acetylcysteine. Thus, our results suggest that IS-induced oxidative stress and antiproliferative effect can be attributed to mitochondrial dysfunction and impaired biogenesis and that these processes can be protected by treatment with antioxidants. PMID:25839054

  7. Medium-chain TAG improve energy metabolism and mitochondrial biogenesis in the liver of intra-uterine growth-retarded and normal-birth-weight weanling piglets.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hao; Li, Yue; Hou, Xiang; Zhang, Lili; Wang, Tian

    2016-05-01

    We previously reported that medium-chain TAG (MCT) could alleviate hepatic oxidative damage in weanling piglets with intra-uterine growth retardation (IUGR). There is a relationship between oxidative status and energy metabolism, a process involved in substrate availability and glucose flux. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate the effects of IUGR and MCT on hepatic energy metabolism and mitochondrial function in weanling piglets. Twenty-four IUGR piglets and twenty-four normal-birth-weight (NBW) piglets were fed a diet of either soyabean oil (SO) or MCT from 21 d of postnatal age to 49 d of postnatal age. Then, the piglets' biochemical parameters and gene expressions related to energy metabolism and mitochondrial function were determined (n 4). Compared with NBW, IUGR decreased the ATP contents and succinate oxidation rates in the liver of piglets, and reduced hepatic mitochondrial citrate synthase (CS) activity (P<0·05). IUGR piglets exhibited reductions in hepatic mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) contents and gene expressions related to mitochondrial biogenesis compared with NBW piglets (P<0·05). The MCT diet increased plasma ghrelin concentration and hepatic CS and succinate dehydrogenase activities, but decreased hepatic pyruvate kinase activity compared with the SO diet (P<0·05). The MCT-fed piglets showed improved mtDNA contents and PPARγ coactivator-1α expression in the liver (P<0·05). The MCT diet alleviated decreased mRNA abundance of the hepatic PPARα induced by IUGR (P<0·05). It can therefore be postulated that MCT may have beneficial effects in improving energy metabolism and mitochondrial function in weanling piglets.

  8. Maternal stress predicts altered biogenesis and the profile of mitochondrial proteins in the frontal cortex and hippocampus of adult offspring rats.

    PubMed

    Głombik, Katarzyna; Stachowicz, Aneta; Ślusarczyk, Joanna; Trojan, Ewa; Budziszewska, Bogusława; Suski, Maciej; Kubera, Marta; Lasoń, Władysław; Wędzony, Krzysztof; Olszanecki, Rafał; Basta-Kaim, Agnieszka

    2015-10-01

    Currently, much attention is focused on the influence of mitochondrial disturbances at the onset of depression. The goal of this study was to investigate the impact of prenatal stress (an animal model of depression) on the mitochondrial biogenesis proteins and mitoproteome profile in the frontal cortex and hippocampus of adult 3-month-old male rats following a prenatal stress procedure. Our results show that rats that were exposed to prenatal stress stimuli displayed depression-like behaviors based on the sucrose preference and elevated plus maze tests. It has been found that the level of the PGC-1α protein was reduced in the frontal cortex and hippocampus of the adult offspring after the prenatal stress procedure. Moreover, in the frontal cortex, the level of the pro-apoptotic protein Bax was up-regulated. Two-dimensional electrophoresis coupled with mass spectrometry showed the statistically significant down-regulation of the mitochondrial ribosomal protein L12 (Mrpl12) and mitochondrial NADH dehydrogenase [ubiquinone] flavoprotein 2 (NDUFV2) as well as the up-regulation of the Tubulin Polymerization Promoting Proteins (Tppp/p25) in the frontal cortex. In contrast, in the hippocampus, the mitochondrial pyruvate dehydrogenase E1 component subunit beta, the voltage-dependent anion-selective channel protein 2 (VDAC2), and the GTP-binding nuclear protein RAN (RAN) were down-regulated and the expression of phosphatidylethanolamine-binding protein 1 (PEBP-1) was enhanced. These findings provide new evidence that stress during pregnancy may lead not only to behavioral deficits, but also to disturbances in the brain mitoproteome profile in adult rat offspring.

  9. Biogenesis of the protein import channel Tom40 of the mitochondrial outer membrane: intermembrane space components are involved in an early stage of the assembly pathway.

    PubMed

    Wiedemann, Nils; Truscott, Kaye N; Pfannschmidt, Sylvia; Guiard, Bernard; Meisinger, Chris; Pfanner, Nikolaus

    2004-04-30

    Tom40 forms the central channel of the preprotein translocase of the mitochondrial outer membrane (TOM complex). The precursor of Tom40 is encoded in the nucleus, synthesized in the cytosol, and imported into mitochondria via a multi-step assembly pathway that involves the mature TOM complex and the sorting and assembly machinery of the outer membrane (SAM complex). We report that opening of the mitochondrial intermembrane space by swelling blocks the assembly pathway of the beta-barrel protein Tom40. Mitochondria with defects in small Tim proteins of the intermembrane space are impaired in the Tom40 assembly pathway. Swelling as well as defects in the small Tim proteins inhibit an early stage of the Tom40 import pathway that is needed for formation of a Tom40-SAM intermediate. We propose that the biogenesis pathway of beta-barrel proteins of the outer mitochondrial membrane not only requires TOM and SAM components, but also involves components of the intermembrane space.

  10. Stage- and tissue-specific expression of rice OsIsu1 gene encoding a scaffold protein for mitochondrial iron-sulfur-cluster biogenesis.

    PubMed

    Tsugama, Daisuke; Liu, Shenkui; Takano, Tetsuo

    2009-08-01

    Isu is a scaffold protein involved in mitochondrial iron-sulfur-cluster biogenesis, which affects redox and iron homeostasis in human and yeast cells. A BLASTP search identified two putative Isu genes in rice, and we designated one of them as OsIsu1. When expressed in onion epidermal cells, OsIsu1::GFP was localized to the mitochondria. Northern analysis showed that OsIsu1 was down-regulated in iron-deficient rice root. OsIsu1 promoter-GUS was introduced into Arabidopsis thaliana and histochemical GUS-staining showed that OsIsu1 expression was regulated in a stage- and tissue-specific manner. OsIsu1 was expressed ectopically in Arabidopsis under the control of the CaMV35S promoter, which increased weight of plants. PMID:19396402

  11. Posttranslational modification of mitochondrial transcription factor A in impaired mitochondria biogenesis: implications in diabetic retinopathy and metabolic memory phenomenon.

    PubMed

    Santos, Julia M; Mishra, Manish; Kowluru, Renu A

    2014-04-01

    Mitochondrial transcription factor A (TFAM) is one of the key regulators of the transcription of mtDNA. In diabetes, despite increase in gene transcripts of TFAM, its protein levels in the mitochondria are decreased and mitochondria copy numbers become subnormal. The aim of this study is to investigate the mechanism(s) responsible for decreased mitochondrial TFAM in diabetes. Using retinal endothelial cells, we have investigated the effect of overexpression of cytosolic chaperone, Hsp70, and TFAM on glucose-induced decrease in mitochondrial TFAM levels, and the transcription of mtDNA-encoded genes, NADH dehydrogenase subunit 6 (ND6) and cytochrome b (Cytb). To investigate the role of posttranslational modifications in subnormal mitochondrial TFAM, ubiquitination of TFAM was assessed, and the results were confirmed in the retina from streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats. While overexpression of Hsp70 failed to prevent glucose-induced decrease in mitochondrial TFAM and transcripts of ND6 and Cytb, overexpression of TFAM ameliorated decrease in its mitochondrial protein levels and transcriptional activity. TFAM was ubiquitinated by high glucose, and PYR-41, an inhibitor of ubiquitination, prevented TFAM ubiquitination and restored the transcriptional activity. Similarly, TFAM was ubiquitinated in the retina from diabetic rats, and it continued to be modified after reinstitution of normal glycemia. Our results clearly imply that the ubiquitination of TFAM impedes its transport to the mitochondria resulting in subnormal mtDNA transcription and mitochondria dysfunction, and inhibition of ubiquitination restores mitochondrial homeostasis. Reversal of hyperglycemia does not provide any benefit to TFAM ubiquitination. Thus, strategies targeting posttranslational modification could provide an avenue to preserve mitochondrial homeostasis, and inhibit the development/progression of diabetic retinopathy.

  12. Posttranslational Modification of Mitochondrial Transcription Factor A in Impaired Mitochondria Biogenesis: Implications in Diabetic Retinopathy and Metabolic Memory Phenomenon

    PubMed Central

    Santos, Julia M.; Mishra, Manish; Kowluru, Renu A.

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondrial transcription factor A (TFAM) is one of the key regulators of the transcription of mtDNA. In diabetes, despite increase in gene transcripts of TFAM, its protein levels in the mitochondria are decreased and mitochondria copy numbers become subnormal. The aim of this study is to investigate the mechanism(s) responsible for decreased mitochondrial TFAM in diabetes. Using retinal endothelial cells, we have investigated the effect of overexpression of cytosolic chaperone, Hsp70, and TFAM on glucose-induced decrease in mitochondrial TFAM levels, and the transcription of mtDNA-encoded genes, NADH dehydrogenase subunit 6 (ND6) and cytochrome b (Cytb). To investigate the role of posttranslational modifications in subnormal mitochondrial TFAM, ubiquitination of TFAM was accessed, and the results were confirmed in the retina from streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats. While overexpression of Hsp70 failed to prevent glucose-induced decrease in mitochondrial TFAM and transcripts of ND6 and Cytb, overexpression of TFAM ameliorated decrease in its mitochondrial protein levels and transcriptional activity. TFAM was ubiquitinated by high glucose, and PYR-41, an inhibitor of ubiquitination, prevented TFAM ubiquitination and restored the transcriptional activity. Similarly, TFAM was ubiquitinated in the retina from diabetic rats, and it continued to be modified after reinstitution of normal glycemia. Our results clearly imply that the ubiquitination of TFAM impedes its transport to the mitochondria resulting in subnormal mtDNA transcription and mitochondria dysfunction, and inhibition of ubiquitination restores mitochondrial homeostasis. Reversal of hyperglycemia does not provide any benefit to TFAM ubiquitination. Thus, strategies targeting posttranslational modification could provide an avenue to preserve mitochondrial homeostasis, and inhibit the development/progression of diabetic retinopathy. PMID:24607487

  13. High-resolution genomic profiling of thyroid lesions uncovers preferential copy number gains affecting mitochondrial biogenesis loci in the oncocytic variants

    PubMed Central

    Kurelac, Ivana; de Biase, Dario; Calabrese, Claudia; Ceccarelli, Claudio; Ng, Charlotte KY; Lim, Raymond; MacKay, Alan; Weigelt, Britta; Porcelli, Anna Maria; Reis-Filho, Jorge S; Tallini, Giovanni; Gasparre, Giuseppe

    2015-01-01

    Oncocytic change is the result of aberrant mitochondrial hyperplasia, which may occur in both neoplastic and non-neoplastic cells and is not infrequent in the thyroid. Despite being a well-characterized histologic phenotype, the molecular causes underlying such a distinctive cellular change are poorly understood. To identify potential genetic causes for the oncocytic phenotype in thyroid, we analyzed copy number alterations in a set of oncocytic (n=21) and non-oncocytic (n=20) thyroid lesions by high-resolution microarray-based comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH). Each group comprised lesions of diverse histologic types, including hyperplastic nodules, adenomas and carcinomas. Unsupervised hierarchical clustering of categorical aCGH data resulted in two distinct branches, one of which was significantly enriched for samples with the oncocytic phenotype, regardless of histologic type. Analysis of aCGH events showed that the oncocytic group harbored a significantly higher number of genes involved in copy number gains, when compared to that of conventional thyroid lesions. Functional annotation demonstrated an enrichment for copy number gains that affect genes encoding activators of mitochondrial biogenesis in oncocytic cases but not in their non-oncocytic counterparts. Taken together, our data suggest that genomic alterations may represent additional/alternative mechanisms underlying the development of the oncocytic phenotype in the thyroid. PMID:26269756

  14. Methyl-Arginine Profile of Brain from Aged PINK1-KO+A53T-SNCA Mice Suggests Altered Mitochondrial Biogenesis.

    PubMed

    Auburger, Georg; Gispert, Suzana; Brehm, Nadine

    2016-01-01

    Hereditary Parkinson's disease can be triggered by an autosomal dominant overdose of alpha-Synuclein (SNCA) or the autosomal recessive deficiency of PINK1. We recently showed that the combination of PINK1-knockout with overexpression of A53T-SNCA in double mutant (DM) mice potentiates phenotypes and reduces survival. Now we studied brain hemispheres of DM mice at age of 18 months in a hypothesis-free approach, employing a quantitative label-free global proteomic mass spectrometry scan of posttranslational modifications focusing on methyl-arginine. The strongest effects were documented for the adhesion modulator CMAS, the mRNA decapping/deadenylation factor PATL1, and the synaptic plasticity mediator CRTC1/TORC1. In addition, an intriguing effect was observed for the splicing factor PSF/SFPQ, known to interact with the dopaminergic differentiation factor NURR1 as well as with DJ-1, the protein responsible for the autosomal recessive PARK7 variant of PD. CRTC1, PSF, and DJ-1 are modulators of PGC1alpha and of mitochondrial biogenesis. This pathway was further stressed by dysregulations of oxygen sensor EGLN3 and of nuclear TMPO. PSF and TMPO cooperate with dopaminergic differentiation factors LMX1B and NURR1. Further dysregulations concerned PRR18, TRIO, HNRNPA1, DMWD, WAVE1, ILDR2, DBNDD1, and NFM. Thus, we report selective novel endogenous stress responses in brain, which highlight early dysregulations of mitochondrial homeostasis and midbrain vulnerability.

  15. Methyl-Arginine Profile of Brain from Aged PINK1-KO+A53T-SNCA Mice Suggests Altered Mitochondrial Biogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Auburger, Georg; Gispert, Suzana

    2016-01-01

    Hereditary Parkinson's disease can be triggered by an autosomal dominant overdose of alpha-Synuclein (SNCA) or the autosomal recessive deficiency of PINK1. We recently showed that the combination of PINK1-knockout with overexpression of A53T-SNCA in double mutant (DM) mice potentiates phenotypes and reduces survival. Now we studied brain hemispheres of DM mice at age of 18 months in a hypothesis-free approach, employing a quantitative label-free global proteomic mass spectrometry scan of posttranslational modifications focusing on methyl-arginine. The strongest effects were documented for the adhesion modulator CMAS, the mRNA decapping/deadenylation factor PATL1, and the synaptic plasticity mediator CRTC1/TORC1. In addition, an intriguing effect was observed for the splicing factor PSF/SFPQ, known to interact with the dopaminergic differentiation factor NURR1 as well as with DJ-1, the protein responsible for the autosomal recessive PARK7 variant of PD. CRTC1, PSF, and DJ-1 are modulators of PGC1alpha and of mitochondrial biogenesis. This pathway was further stressed by dysregulations of oxygen sensor EGLN3 and of nuclear TMPO. PSF and TMPO cooperate with dopaminergic differentiation factors LMX1B and NURR1. Further dysregulations concerned PRR18, TRIO, HNRNPA1, DMWD, WAVE1, ILDR2, DBNDD1, and NFM. Thus, we report selective novel endogenous stress responses in brain, which highlight early dysregulations of mitochondrial homeostasis and midbrain vulnerability. PMID:27034888

  16. Human C4orf14 interacts with the mitochondrial nucleoid and is involved in the biogenesis of the small mitochondrial ribosomal subunit

    PubMed Central

    He, J.; Cooper, H. M.; Reyes, A.; Di Re, M.; Kazak, L.; Wood, S. R.; Mao, C. C.; Fearnley, I. M.; Walker, J. E.; Holt, I. J.

    2012-01-01

    The bacterial homologue of C4orf14, YqeH, has been linked to assembly of the small ribosomal subunit. Here, recombinant C4orf14 isolated from human cells, co-purified with the small, 28S subunit of the mitochondrial ribosome and the endogenous protein co-fractionated with the 28S subunit in sucrose gradients. Gene silencing of C4orf14 specifically affected components of the small subunit, leading to decreased protein synthesis in the organelle. The GTPase of C4orf14 was critical to its interaction with the 28S subunit, as was GTP. Therefore, we propose that C4orf14, with bound GTP, binds to components of the 28S subunit facilitating its assembly, and GTP hydrolysis acts as the release mechanism. C4orf14 was also found to be associated with human mitochondrial nucleoids, and C4orf14 gene silencing caused mitochondrial DNA depletion. In vitro C4orf14 is capable of binding to DNA. The association of C4orf14 with mitochondrial translation factors and the mitochondrial nucleoid suggests that the 28S subunit is assembled at the mitochondrial nucleoid, enabling the direct transfer of messenger RNA from the nucleoid to the ribosome in the organelle. PMID:22447445

  17. The role of heme and iron-sulfur clusters in mitochondrial biogenesis, maintenance, and decay with age.

    PubMed

    Atamna, Hani; Walter, Patrick B; Ames, Bruce N

    2002-01-15

    Mitochondria decay with age from oxidative damage and loss of protective mechanisms. Resistance, repair, and replacement mechanisms are essential for mitochondrial preservation and maintenance. Iron plays an essential role in the maintenance of mitochondria, through its two major functional forms: heme and iron-sulfur clusters. Both iron-based cofactors are formed and utilized in the mitochondria and then distributed throughout the cell. This is an important function of mitochondria that is not directly related to the production of ATP. Heme and iron-sulfur clusters are important for the normal assembly and for the optimal activity of the electron transfer complexes. Loss of mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase (complex IV), integrity of mtDNA, and function can result from abnormal homeostasis of iron. We review the physiological role of iron-sulfur clusters and heme in the integrity of the mitochondria and the generation of oxidants.

  18. Purple sweet potato color attenuates domoic acid-induced cognitive deficits by promoting estrogen receptor-α-mediated mitochondrial biogenesis signaling in mice.

    PubMed

    Lu, Jun; Wu, Dong-mei; Zheng, Yuan-lin; Hu, Bin; Cheng, Wei; Zhang, Zi-feng

    2012-02-01

    Recent findings suggest that endoplasmic reticulum stress may be involved in the pathogenesis of domoic acid-induced neurodegeneration. Purple sweet potato color, a class of naturally occurring anthocyanins, has beneficial health and biological effects. Recent studies have also shown that anthocyanins have estrogenic activity and can enhance estrogen receptor-α expression. In this study, we evaluated the effect of purple sweet potato color on cognitive deficits induced by hippocampal mitochondrial dysfunction in domoic acid-treated mice and explored the potential mechanisms underlying this effect. Our results showed that the oral administration of purple sweet potato color to domoic acid-treated mice significantly improved their behavioral performance in a step-through passive avoidance task and a Morris water maze task. These improvements were mediated, at least in part, by a stimulation of estrogen receptor-α-mediated mitochondrial biogenesis signaling and by decreases in the expression of p47phox and gp91phox. Decreases in reactive oxygen species and protein carbonylation were also observed, along with a blockade of the endoplasmic reticulum stress pathway. Furthermore, purple sweet potato color significantly suppressed endoplasmic reticulum stress-induced apoptosis, which prevented neuron loss and restored the expression of memory-related proteins. However, knockdown of estrogen receptor-α using short hairpin RNA only partially blocked the neuroprotective effects of purple sweet potato color in the hippocampus of mice cotreated with purple sweet potato color and domoic acid, indicating that purple sweet potato color acts through multiple pathways. These results suggest that purple sweet potato color could be a possible candidate for the prevention and treatment of cognitive deficits in excitotoxic and other brain disorders.

  19. Co-regulation of nuclear respiratory factor-1 by NFkappaB and CREB links LPS-induced inflammation to mitochondrial biogenesis.

    PubMed

    Suliman, Hagir B; Sweeney, Timothy E; Withers, Crystal M; Piantadosi, Claude A

    2010-08-01

    The nuclear respiratory factor-1 (NRF1) gene is activated by lipopolysaccharide (LPS), which might reflect TLR4-mediated mitigation of cellular inflammatory damage via initiation of mitochondrial biogenesis. To test this hypothesis, we examined NRF1 promoter regulation by NFκB, and identified interspecies-conserved κB-responsive promoter and intronic elements in the NRF1 locus. In mice, activation of Nrf1 and its downstream target, Tfam, by Escherichia coli was contingent on NFκB, and in LPS-treated hepatocytes, NFκB served as an NRF1 enhancer element in conjunction with NFκB promoter binding. Unexpectedly, optimal NRF1 promoter activity after LPS also required binding by the energy-state-dependent transcription factor CREB. EMSA and ChIP assays confirmed p65 and CREB binding to the NRF1 promoter and p65 binding to intron 1. Functionality for both transcription factors was validated by gene-knockdown studies. LPS regulation of NRF1 led to mtDNA-encoded gene expression and expansion of mtDNA copy number. In cells expressing plasmid constructs containing the NRF-1 promoter and GFP, LPS-dependent reporter activity was abolished by cis-acting κB-element mutations, and nuclear accumulation of NFκB and CREB demonstrated dependence on mitochondrial H(2)O(2). These findings indicate that TLR4-dependent NFκB and CREB activation co-regulate the NRF1 promoter with NFκB intronic enhancement and redox-regulated nuclear translocation, leading to downstream target-gene expression, and identify NRF-1 as an early-phase component of the host antibacterial defenses.

  20. The Signal Transducer and Activator of Transcription 1 (STAT1) Inhibits Mitochondrial Biogenesis in Liver and Fatty Acid Oxidation in Adipocytes.

    PubMed

    Sisler, Jennifer D; Morgan, Magdalena; Raje, Vidisha; Grande, Rebecca C; Derecka, Marta; Meier, Jeremy; Cantwell, Marc; Szczepanek, Karol; Korzun, William J; Lesnefsky, Edward J; Harris, Thurl E; Croniger, Colleen M; Larner, Andrew C

    2015-01-01

    The transcription factor STAT1 plays a central role in orchestrating responses to various pathogens by activating the transcription of nuclear-encoded genes that mediate the antiviral, the antigrowth, and immune surveillance effects of interferons and other cytokines. In addition to regulating gene expression, we report that STAT1-/- mice display increased energy expenditure and paradoxically decreased release of triglycerides from white adipose tissue (WAT). Liver mitochondria from STAT1-/- mice show both defects in coupling of the electron transport chain (ETC) and increased numbers of mitochondria. Consistent with elevated numbers of mitochondria, STAT1-/- mice expressed increased amounts of PGC1α, a master regulator of mitochondrial biogenesis. STAT1 binds to the PGC1α promoter in fed mice but not in fasted animals, suggesting that STAT1 inhibited transcription of PGC1α. Since STAT1-/- mice utilized more lipids we examined white adipose tissue (WAT) stores. Contrary to expectations, fasted STAT1-/- mice did not lose lipid from WAT. β-adrenergic stimulation of glycerol release from isolated STAT1-/- WAT was decreased, while activation of hormone sensitive lipase was not changed. These findings suggest that STAT1-/- adipose tissue does not release glycerol and that free fatty acids (FFA) re-esterify back to triglycerides, thus maintaining fat mass in fasted STAT1-/- mice.

  1. The Signal Transducer and Activator of Transcription 1 (STAT1) Inhibits Mitochondrial Biogenesis in Liver and Fatty Acid Oxidation in Adipocytes

    PubMed Central

    Sisler, Jennifer D.; Morgan, Magdalena; Raje, Vidisha; Grande, Rebecca C.; Derecka, Marta; Meier, Jeremy; Cantwell, Marc; Szczepanek, Karol; Korzun, William J.; Lesnefsky, Edward J.; Harris, Thurl E.; Croniger, Colleen M.; Larner, Andrew C.

    2015-01-01

    The transcription factor STAT1 plays a central role in orchestrating responses to various pathogens by activating the transcription of nuclear-encoded genes that mediate the antiviral, the antigrowth, and immune surveillance effects of interferons and other cytokines. In addition to regulating gene expression, we report that STAT1-/- mice display increased energy expenditure and paradoxically decreased release of triglycerides from white adipose tissue (WAT). Liver mitochondria from STAT1-/- mice show both defects in coupling of the electron transport chain (ETC) and increased numbers of mitochondria. Consistent with elevated numbers of mitochondria, STAT1-/- mice expressed increased amounts of PGC1α, a master regulator of mitochondrial biogenesis. STAT1 binds to the PGC1α promoter in fed mice but not in fasted animals, suggesting that STAT1 inhibited transcription of PGC1α. Since STAT1-/- mice utilized more lipids we examined white adipose tissue (WAT) stores. Contrary to expectations, fasted STAT1-/- mice did not lose lipid from WAT. β-adrenergic stimulation of glycerol release from isolated STAT1-/- WAT was decreased, while activation of hormone sensitive lipase was not changed. These findings suggest that STAT1-/- adipose tissue does not release glycerol and that free fatty acids (FFA) re-esterify back to triglycerides, thus maintaining fat mass in fasted STAT1-/- mice. PMID:26689548

  2. The evolution of ERMIONE in mitochondrial biogenesis and lipid homeostasis: An evolutionary view from comparative cell biology.

    PubMed

    Wideman, Jeremy G; Muñoz-Gómez, Sergio A

    2016-08-01

    The ER-mitochondria organizing network (ERMIONE) in Saccharomyces cerevisiae is involved in maintaining mitochondrial morphology and lipid homeostasis. ERMES and MICOS are two scaffolding complexes of ERMIONE that contribute to these processes. ERMES is ancient but has been lost in several lineages including animals, plants, and SAR (stramenopiles, alveolates and rhizaria). On the other hand, MICOS is ancient and has remained present in all organisms bearing mitochondrial cristae. The ERMIONE precursor evolved in the α-proteobacterial ancestor of mitochondria which had the central subunit of MICOS, Mic60. The subsequent evolution of ERMIONE and its interactors in eukaryotes reflects the integrative co-evolution of mitochondria and their hosts and the adaptive paths that some lineages have followed in their specialization to certain environments. By approaching the ERMIONE from a perspective of comparative evolutionary cell biology, we hope to shed light on not only its evolutionary history, but also how ERMIONE components may function in organisms other than S. cerevisiae. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: The cellular lipid landscape edited by Tim P. Levine and Anant K. Menon.

  3. Characterization of the metabolic effect of β-alanine on markers of oxidative metabolism and mitochondrial biogenesis in skeletal muscle

    PubMed Central

    Sunderland, Kyle L.; Kuennen, Matthew R.; Vaughan, Roger A.

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] β-alanine is a common component of numerous sports supplements purported to improve athletic performance through enhanced carnosine biosynthesis and related intracellular buffering. To date, the effects of β-alanine on oxidative metabolism remain largely unexplored. This work investigated the effects of β-alanine on the expression of proteins which regulate cellular energetics. [Methods] C2C12 myocytes were cultured and differentiated under standard conditions followed by treatment with either β-alanine or isonitrogenous non-metabolizable control D-alanine at 800μM for 24 hours. Metabolic gene and protein expression were quantified by qRT-PCR and immunoblotting, respectively. Glucose uptake and oxygen consumption were measured via fluorescence using commercially available kits. [Results] β-alanine-treated myotubes displayed significantly elevated markers of improved oxidative metabolism including elevated peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor β/δ (PPARβ/δ) and mitochondrial transcription factor a (TFAM) which led to increased mitochondrial content (evidenced by concurrent increases in cytochrome c content). Additionally, β-alanine-treated cells exhibited significantly increased oxygen consumption compared to control in a PPARβ/δ-dependent manner. β-alanine significantly enhanced expression of myocyte enhancer factor 2 (MEF-2) leading to increased glucose transporter 4 (GLUT4) content. [Conclusion] β-alanine appears to increase cellular oxygen consumption as well as the expression of several cellular proteins associated with improved oxidative metabolism, suggesting β-alanine supplementation may provide additional metabolic benefit (although these observations require in vivo experimental verification). PMID:27508152

  4. Uteroplacental insufficiency leads to hypertension, but not glucose intolerance or impaired skeletal muscle mitochondrial biogenesis, in 12-month-old rats

    PubMed Central

    Tran, Melanie; Young, Margaret E; Jefferies, Andrew J; Hryciw, Deanne H; Ward, Michelle M; Fletcher, Erica L; Wlodek, Mary E; Wadley, Glenn D

    2015-01-01

    Growth restriction impacts on offspring development and increases their risk of disease in adulthood which is exacerbated with “second hits.” The aim of this study was to investigate if blood pressure, glucose tolerance, and skeletal muscle mitochondrial biogenesis were altered in 12-month-old male and female offspring with prenatal or postnatal growth restriction. Bilateral uterine vessel ligation induced uteroplacental insufficiency and growth restriction in offspring (Restricted). A sham surgery was also performed during pregnancy (Control) and some litters from sham mothers had their litter size reduced (Reduced litter), which restricted postnatal growth. Growth-restricted females only developed hypertension at 12 months, which was not observed in males. In Restricted females only homeostasis model assessment for insulin resistance was decreased, indicating enhanced hepatic insulin sensitivity, which was not observed in males. Plasma leptin was increased only in the Reduced males at 12 months compared to Control and Restricted males, which was not observed in females. Compared to Controls, leptin, ghrelin, and adiponectin were unaltered in the Restricted males and females, suggesting that at 12 months of age the reduction in body weight in the Restricted offspring is not a consequence of circulating adipokines. Skeletal muscle PGC-1α levels were unaltered in 12-month-old male and female rats, which indicate improvements in lean muscle mass by 12 months of age. In summary, sex strongly impacts the cardiometabolic effects of growth restriction in 12-month-old rats and it is females who are at particular risk of developing long-term hypertension following growth restriction. PMID:26416974

  5. FGF21 represses cerebrovascular aging via improving mitochondrial biogenesis and inhibiting p53 signaling pathway in an AMPK-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiao-Mei; Xiao, Hang; Liu, Ling-Lin; Cheng, Dang; Li, Xue-Jun; Si, Liang-Yi

    2016-08-15

    Cerebrovascular aging has a high relationship with stroke and neurodegenerative disease. In the present study, we evaluated the influence of fibroblast growth factor 21 (FGF21) on angiotensin (Ang II)-mediated cerebrovascular aging in human brain vascular smooth muscle cells (hBVSMCs). Ang II induced remarkable aging-phenotypes in hBVSMCs, including enhanced SA-β-gal staining and NBS1 protein expression. First, we used immunoblotting assay to confirm protein expression of FGF21 receptor (FGFR1) and the co-receptor β-Klotho in cultured hBVSMCs. Second, we found that FGF21 treatment partly prevented the aging-related changes induced by Ang II. FGF21 inhibited Ang II-enhanced ROS production/superoxide anion levels, rescued the Ang II-reduced Complex IV and citrate synthase activities, and suppressed the Ang II-induced meprin protein expression. Third, we showed that FGF21 not only inhibited the Ang II-induced p53 activation, but also blocked the action of Ang II on Siah-1-TRF signaling pathway which is upstream factors for p53 activation. At last, either chemical inhibition of AMPK signaling pathway by a specific antagonist Compound C or knockdown of AMPKα1/2 isoform using siRNA, successfully abolished the anti-aging action of FGF21 in hBVSMCs. These results indicate that FGF21 protects against Ang II-induced cerebrovascular aging via improving mitochondrial biogenesis and inhibiting p53 activation in an AMPK-dependent manner, and highlight the therapeutic value of FGF21 in cerebrovascular aging-related diseases such as stroke and neurodegenerative disease. PMID:27364911

  6. Exercise-induced asthma: an overview.

    PubMed

    Cummiskey, J

    2001-10-01

    Asthmatic attack in exercise-induced asthma is brought about by hyperventilation (not necessarily to exercise), cold air, and low humidity of the air breathed. The effects are an increase in airway resistance, damage to bronchial mucosa, and an increase in bronchovascular permeability. The mechanism of these changes is the release of mediators such as histamine, leukotrienes, nitric oxide, sensory neuropeptides, the inhibition of neuronal activity, and bronchovascular permeability. The cause of asthma and exercise-induced asthma is unknown. It is probably an abnormality of vascular control in the peribronchium and/or an alteration in local adrenergic function. The importance of exercise-induced asthma definition and the use of stimulants in sport and antidoping in sport are discussed. PMID:11678516

  7. Carbohydrate restricted recovery from long term endurance exercise does not affect gene responses involved in mitochondrial biogenesis in highly trained athletes

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, Line; Gejl, Kasper D; Ørtenblad, Niels; Nielsen, Jakob L; Bech, Rune D; Nygaard, Tobias; Sahlin, Kent; Frandsen, Ulrik

    2015-01-01

    The aim was to determine if the metabolic adaptations, particularly PGC-1α and downstream metabolic genes were affected by restricting CHO following an endurance exercise bout in trained endurance athletes. A second aim was to compare baseline expression level of these genes to untrained. Elite endurance athletes (VO2max 66 ± 2 mL·kg−1·min−1, n = 15) completed 4 h cycling at ∼56% VO2max. During the first 4 h recovery subjects were provided with either CHO or only H2O and thereafter both groups received CHO. Muscle biopsies were collected before, after, and 4 and 24 h after exercise. Also, resting biopsies were collected from untrained subjects (n = 8). Exercise decreased glycogen by 67.7 ± 4.0% (from 699 ± 26.1 to 239 ± 29.5 mmol·kg−1·dw−1) with no difference between groups. Whereas 4 h of recovery with CHO partly replenished glycogen, the H2O group remained at post exercise level; nevertheless, the gene expression was not different between groups. Glycogen and most gene expression levels returned to baseline by 24 h in both CHO and H2O. Baseline mRNA expression of NRF-1, COX-IV, GLUT4 and PPAR-α gene targets were higher in trained compared to untrained. Additionally, the proportion of type I muscle fibers positively correlated with baseline mRNA for PGC-1α, TFAM, NRF-1, COX-IV, PPAR-α, and GLUT4 for both trained and untrained. CHO restriction during recovery from glycogen depleting exercise does not improve the mRNA response of markers of mitochondrial biogenesis. Further, baseline gene expression of key metabolic pathways is higher in trained than untrained. PMID:25677542

  8. Exercise-induced bronchospasm in children.

    PubMed

    Holbreich, M

    1981-03-01

    Exercise-induced bronchospasm (EIB) is common among asthmatic children. After vigorous exercise, about 80 percent of childhood asthmatics develop significant bronchoconstriction. The mechanism is probably related to heat loss from the respiratory tract during exercise. Jogging, soccer and basketball are the activities most often implicated. Adequate bronchodilator therapy can prevent most EIB episodes. Recognition and treatment of EIB will allow full participation in sports.

  9. Vitamin E and vitamin C do not reduce insulin sensitivity but inhibit mitochondrial protein expression in exercising obese rats.

    PubMed

    Picklo, Matthew J; Thyfault, John P

    2015-04-01

    Controversy exists as to whether supplementation with the antioxidants vitamin E and vitamin C blocks adaptation to exercise. Exercise is a first-line means to treat obesity and its complications. While diet-induced obesity alters mitochondrial function and induces insulin resistance (IR), no data exist as to whether supplementation with vitamin E and vitamin C modify responses to exercise in pre-existing obesity. We tested the hypothesis that dietary supplementation with vitamin E (0.4 g α-tocopherol acetate/kg) and vitamin C (0.5 g/kg) blocks exercise-induced improvements on IR and mitochondrial content in obese rats maintained on a high-fat (45% fat energy (en)) diet. Diet-induced obese, sedentary rats had a 2-fold higher homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance and larger insulin area under the curve following glucose tolerances test than rats fed a low-fat (10% fat en) diet. Exercising (12 weeks at 5 times per week in a motorized wheel) of obese rats normalized IR indices, an effect not modified by vitamin E and vitamin C. Vitamin E and vitamin C supplementation with exercise elevated mtDNA content in adipose and skeletal muscle to a greater extent (20%) than exercise alone in a depot-specific manner. On the other hand, vitamin C and vitamin E decreased exercise-induced increases in mitochondrial protein content for complex I (40%) and nicotinamide nucleotide transhydrogenase (35%) in a muscle-dependent manner. These data indicate that vitamin E and vitamin C supplementation in obese rodents does not modify exercise-induced improvements in insulin sensitivity but that changes in mitochondrial biogenesis and mitochondrial protein expression may be modified by antioxidant supplementation.

  10. Vitamin E and vitamin C do not reduce insulin sensitivity but inhibit mitochondrial protein expression in exercising obese rats

    PubMed Central

    Picklo, Matthew J.; Thyfault, John P.

    2016-01-01

    Controversy exists as to whether supplementation with the antioxidants vitamin E and vitamin C blocks adaptation to exercise. Exercise is a first-line means to treat obesity and its complications. While diet-induced obesity alters mitochondrial function and induces insulin resistance (IR), no data exist as to whether supplementation with vitamin E and vitamin C modify responses to exercise in pre-existing obesity. We tested the hypothesis that dietary supplementation with vitamin E (0.4 g α-tocopherol acetate/kg) and vitamin C (0.5 g/kg) blocks exercise-induced improvements on IR and mitochondrial content in obese rats maintained on a high-fat (45% fat energy (en)) diet. Diet-induced obese, sedentary rats had a 2-fold higher homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance and larger insulin area under the curve following glucose tolerances test than rats fed a low-fat (10% fat en) diet. Exercising (12 weeks at 5 times per week in a motorized wheel) of obese rats normalized IR indices, an effect not modified by vitamin E and vitamin C. Vitamin E and vitamin C supplementation with exercise elevated mtDNA content in adipose and skeletal muscle to a greater extent (20%) than exercise alone in a depot-specific manner. On the other hand, vitamin C and vitamin E decreased exercise-induced increases in mitochondrial protein content for complex I (40%) and nicotinamide nucleotide transhydrogenase (35%) in a muscle-dependent manner. These data indicate that vitamin E and vitamin C supplementation in obese rodents does not modify exercise-induced improvements in insulin sensitivity but that changes in mitochondrial biogenesis and mitochondrial protein expression may be modified by antioxidant supplementation. PMID:25761734

  11. Vitamin E and vitamin C do not reduce insulin sensitivity but inhibit mitochondrial protein expression in exercising obese rats.

    PubMed

    Picklo, Matthew J; Thyfault, John P

    2015-04-01

    Controversy exists as to whether supplementation with the antioxidants vitamin E and vitamin C blocks adaptation to exercise. Exercise is a first-line means to treat obesity and its complications. While diet-induced obesity alters mitochondrial function and induces insulin resistance (IR), no data exist as to whether supplementation with vitamin E and vitamin C modify responses to exercise in pre-existing obesity. We tested the hypothesis that dietary supplementation with vitamin E (0.4 g α-tocopherol acetate/kg) and vitamin C (0.5 g/kg) blocks exercise-induced improvements on IR and mitochondrial content in obese rats maintained on a high-fat (45% fat energy (en)) diet. Diet-induced obese, sedentary rats had a 2-fold higher homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance and larger insulin area under the curve following glucose tolerances test than rats fed a low-fat (10% fat en) diet. Exercising (12 weeks at 5 times per week in a motorized wheel) of obese rats normalized IR indices, an effect not modified by vitamin E and vitamin C. Vitamin E and vitamin C supplementation with exercise elevated mtDNA content in adipose and skeletal muscle to a greater extent (20%) than exercise alone in a depot-specific manner. On the other hand, vitamin C and vitamin E decreased exercise-induced increases in mitochondrial protein content for complex I (40%) and nicotinamide nucleotide transhydrogenase (35%) in a muscle-dependent manner. These data indicate that vitamin E and vitamin C supplementation in obese rodents does not modify exercise-induced improvements in insulin sensitivity but that changes in mitochondrial biogenesis and mitochondrial protein expression may be modified by antioxidant supplementation. PMID:25761734

  12. Imitators of exercise-induced bronchoconstriction

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Exercise-induced bronchoconstriction (EIB) is described by transient narrowing of the airways after exercise. It occurs in approximately 10% of the general population, while athletes may show a higher prevalence, especially in cold weather and ice rink athletes. Diagnosis of EIB is often made on the basis of self-reported symptoms without objective lung function tests, however, the presence of EIB can not be accurately determined on the basis of symptoms and may be under-, over-, or misdiagnosed. The goal of this review is to describe other clinical entities that mimic asthma or EIB symptoms and can be confused with EIB. PMID:20016690

  13. Suppression of Mitochondrial Biogenesis through Toll-Like Receptor 4–Dependent Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase Kinase/Extracellular Signal-Regulated Kinase Signaling in Endotoxin-Induced Acute Kidney Injury

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Joshua A.; Stallons, L. Jay; Collier, Justin B.; Chavin, Kenneth D.

    2015-01-01

    Although disruption of mitochondrial homeostasis and biogenesis (MB) is a widely accepted pathophysiologic feature of sepsis-induced acute kidney injury (AKI), the molecular mechanisms responsible for this phenomenon are unknown. In this study, we examined the signaling pathways responsible for the suppression of MB in a mouse model of lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced AKI. Downregulation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator-1α (PGC-1α), a master regulator of MB, was noted at the mRNA level at 3 hours and protein level at 18 hours in the renal cortex, and was associated with loss of renal function after LPS treatment. LPS-mediated suppression of PGC-1α led to reduced expression of downstream regulators of MB and electron transport chain proteins along with a reduction in renal cortical mitochondrial DNA content. Mechanistically, Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) knockout mice were protected from renal injury and disruption of MB after LPS exposure. Immunoblot analysis revealed activation of tumor progression locus 2/mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase/extracellular signal-regulated kinase (TPL-2/MEK/ERK) signaling in the renal cortex by LPS. Pharmacologic inhibition of MEK/ERK signaling attenuated renal dysfunction and loss of PGC-1α, and was associated with a reduction in proinflammatory cytokine (e.g., tumor necrosis factor-α [TNF-α], interleukin-1β) expression at 3 hours after LPS exposure. Neutralization of TNF-α also blocked PGC-1α suppression, but not renal dysfunction, after LPS-induced AKI. Finally, systemic administration of recombinant tumor necrosis factor-α alone was sufficient to produce AKI and disrupt mitochondrial homeostasis. These findings indicate an important role for the TLR4/MEK/ERK pathway in both LPS-induced renal dysfunction and suppression of MB. TLR4/MEK/ERK/TNF-α signaling may represent a novel therapeutic target to prevent mitochondrial dysfunction and AKI produced by sepsis. PMID:25503387

  14. Exercise-induced anaphylaxis: A clinical view

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Exercise-induced anaphylaxis (EIA) is a distinct form of physical allergy. The development of anaphylaxis during exertion often requires the concomitant exposure to triggering factors such as intake of foods (food dependent exercise-induced anaphylaxis) or drugs prior to exercise, extreme environmental conditions. EIA is a rare, but serious disorder, which is often undetected or inadequately treated. This article summarizes current evidences on pathophysiology, diagnosis and management. We reviewed recent advances in factors triggering the release of mediators from mast cells which seems to play a pathogenetic role. A correct diagnosis is essential to avoid unnecessary restricted diet, to allow physical activity in subjects with EIA dependent from triggering factors such as food, and to manage attacks. An algorithm for diagnosing EIA based on medical history, IgE tests and exercise challenge test has been provided. In the long-term management of EIA, there is a need for educating patients and care-givers to avoid exposure to precipitating factors and to recognize and treat episodes. Future researches on existing questions are discussed. PMID:22980517

  15. DEMONSTRATION BULLETIN: BIOGENESIS SOIL WASHING TECHNOLOGY - BIOGENESIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The BioGenesisSM soil washing technology was developed by BioGenesis Enterprises, Inc. to remove organic compounds from soil. The technology uses a proprietary solution (BioGenesisSM cleaner) to transfer organic compounds from the soil matrix to a liquid phase. BioGenesis claims...

  16. Exercise-induced anaphylaxis and antileukotriene montelukast

    PubMed Central

    Gajbhiye, Sapna; Agrawal, Rajendra Prasad; Atal, Shubham; Tiwari, Vikalp; Phadnis, Pradeep

    2015-01-01

    We report a rare case of exercise-induced anaphylaxis (EIA), occurring exclusively with exercise, without any other associated trigger, detected in the prodromal phase, and prevented from additional anaphylaxis episodes by treatment with cetirizine and 10 mg daily of antileukotriene montelukast to date. EIA is a syndrome in which patients experience a spectrum of the symptoms of anaphylaxis ranging from mild cutaneous signs to severe systemic manifestations such as hypotension, syncope, and even death after increased physical activity. Many people have triggers, such as, a variety of foods, various medications, alcohol, cold weather, humidity, and seasonal and hormonal changes along with exercise that cause the symptoms. Typically, either exercise or the specific trigger alone will rarely cause symptoms. It is differentiated from cholinergic urticaria by the absence of response to passive body warming and emotional stress. PMID:26312002

  17. Exercise-induced anaphylaxis and antileukotriene montelukast.

    PubMed

    Gajbhiye, Sapna; Agrawal, Rajendra Prasad; Atal, Shubham; Tiwari, Vikalp; Phadnis, Pradeep

    2015-01-01

    We report a rare case of exercise-induced anaphylaxis (EIA), occurring exclusively with exercise, without any other associated trigger, detected in the prodromal phase, and prevented from additional anaphylaxis episodes by treatment with cetirizine and 10 mg daily of antileukotriene montelukast to date. EIA is a syndrome in which patients experience a spectrum of the symptoms of anaphylaxis ranging from mild cutaneous signs to severe systemic manifestations such as hypotension, syncope, and even death after increased physical activity. Many people have triggers, such as, a variety of foods, various medications, alcohol, cold weather, humidity, and seasonal and hormonal changes along with exercise that cause the symptoms. Typically, either exercise or the specific trigger alone will rarely cause symptoms. It is differentiated from cholinergic urticaria by the absence of response to passive body warming and emotional stress. PMID:26312002

  18. Exercise-induced compartment syndrome: case report.

    PubMed

    Klodell, C T; Pokorny, R; Carrillo, E H; Heniford, B T

    1996-06-01

    Exercise-induced rhabdomyolysis is a frequent event occurring after severe forms of exercise. This is usually a short-lived, uncomplicated phenomenon that is seldom of any clinical significance. The rare progression of this muscle injury to compartment syndrome is, however, a limb- and life-threatening condition that typically presents in the anterior compartment of the lower leg. A case is reported of a young man who participated in physical activity well beyond his normal level of exertion and subsequently developed bilateral lower extremity compartment syndrome requiring surgical decompression. To our knowledge, this is the only description of this complication occurring in a multicompartment, bilateral distribution. The combination of the rarity and morbidity of this condition, as well as the multitude of very common benign injuries that present in the same manner as the problem discussed, make this insult especially dangerous.

  19. Nutritional Support for Exercise-Induced Injuries.

    PubMed

    Tipton, Kevin D

    2015-11-01

    Nutrition is one method to counter the negative impact of an exercise-induced injury. Deficiencies of energy, protein and other nutrients should be avoided. Claims for the effectiveness of many other nutrients following injuries are rampant, but the evidence is equivocal. The results of an exercise-induced injury may vary widely depending on the nature of the injury and severity. Injuries typically result in cessation, or at least a reduction, in participation in sport and decreased physical activity. Limb immobility may be necessary with some injuries, contributing to reduced activity and training. Following an injury, an inflammatory response is initiated and while excess inflammation may be harmful, given the importance of the inflammatory process for wound healing, attempting to drastically reduce inflammation may not be ideal for optimal recovery. Injuries severe enough for immobilization of a limb result in loss of muscle mass and reduced muscle strength and function. Loss of muscle results from reductions in basal muscle protein synthesis and the resistance of muscle to anabolic stimulation. Energy balance is critical. Higher protein intakes (2-2.5 g/kg/day) seem to be warranted during immobilization. At the very least, care should be taken not to reduce the absolute amount of protein intake when energy intake is reduced. There is promising, albeit preliminary, evidence for the use of omega-3 fatty acids and creatine to counter muscle loss and enhance hypertrophy, respectively. The overriding nutritional recommendation for injured exercisers should be to consume a well-balanced diet based on whole, minimally processed foods or ingredients made from whole foods. The diet composition should be carefully assessed and changes considered as the injury heals and activity patterns change. PMID:26553492

  20. Defects of mtDNA Replication Impaired Mitochondrial Biogenesis During Trypanosoma cruzi Infection in Human Cardiomyocytes and Chagasic Patients: The Role of Nrf1/2 and Antioxidant Response

    PubMed Central

    Wan, Xianxiu; Gupta, Shivali; Zago, Maria P.; Davidson, Mercy M.; Dousset, Pierre; Amoroso, Alejandro; Garg, Nisha Jain

    2012-01-01

    Background Mitochondrial dysfunction is a key determinant in chagasic cardiomyopathy development in mice; however, its relevance in human Chagas disease is not known. We determined if defects in mitochondrial biogenesis and dysregulation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ) coactivator-1 (PGC-1)–regulated transcriptional pathways constitute a mechanism or mechanisms underlying mitochondrial oxidative-phosphorylation (OXPHOS) deficiency in human Chagas disease. Methods and Results We utilized human cardiomyocytes and left-ventricular tissue from chagasic and other cardiomyopathy patients and healthy donors (n>6/group). We noted no change in citrate synthase activity, yet mRNA and/or protein levels of subunits of the respiratory complexes were significantly decreased in Trypanosoma cruzi–infected cardiomyocytes (0 to 24 hours) and chagasic hearts. We observed increased mRNA and decreased nuclear localization of PGC-1-coactivated transcription factors, yet the expression of genes for PPARγ-regulated fatty acid oxidation and nuclear respiratory factor (NRF1/2)–regulated mtDNA replication and transcription machinery was enhanced in infected cardiomyocytes and chagasic hearts. The D-loop formation was normal or higher, but mtDNA replication and mtDNA content were decreased by 83% and 40% to 65%, respectively. Subsequently, we noted that reactive oxygen species (ROS), oxidative stress, and mtDNA oxidation were significantly increased, yet NRF1/2-regulated antioxidant gene expression remained compromised in infected cardiomyocytes and chagasic hearts. Conclusions The replication of mtDNA was severely compromised, resulting in a significant loss of mtDNA and expression of OXPHOS genes in T cruzi–infected cardiomyocytes and chagasic hearts. Our data suggest increased ROS generation and selective functional incapacity of NRF2-mediated antioxidant gene expression played a role in the defects in mtDNA replication and unfitness of mtDNA for

  1. Biogenesis of the mitochondrial enzyme methylmalonyl-CoA mutase. Synthesis and processing of a precursor in a cell-free system and in cultured cells.

    PubMed

    Fenton, W A; Hack, A M; Helfgott, D; Rosenberg, L E

    1984-05-25

    Methylmalonyl-CoA mutase (EC 5.4.99.2; mutase), a cytoplasmically synthesized mitochondrial matrix enzyme, is translated in a cell-free system programmed with rat liver RNA as a larger precursor polypeptide, designated pre-mutase, which appears to be 3-4 kDa larger than the subunit of purified mutase (77.5 kDa). When pre-mutase is incubated with intact rat liver mitochondria, it is taken up by them and proteolytically processed to the size of the mature subunit. The overall reaction is inhibited by compounds such as dinitrophenol which disrupt mitochondrial energy metabolism. The final, proteolytic step can be carried out by the mitochondrial matrix in the presence of added Zn2+ and is inhibited by metal ion chelators and by certain protease inhibitors (e.g. leupeptin and p-aminobenzamidine). Newly synthesized mutase was also detected in intact, cultured Buffalo rat liver cells labeled with [3H] leucine in the presence of dinitrophenol. When dinitrophenol is removed in a pulse-chase protocol, the accumulated pre-mutase is rapidly (t1/2 = 6-9 min) converted to mutase. On the other hand, when the chase is performed in the presence of the inhibitor, the labeled pre-mutase persists for greater than 5 h. This long term stability of pre-mutase contrasts sharply with the instability previously reported for unprocessed precursors of two other mitochondrial enzymes.

  2. Exercise induced compartment syndrome in a professional footballer.

    PubMed

    Cetinus, E; Uzel, M; Bilgiç, E; Karaoguz, A; Herdem, M

    2004-04-01

    Recurrent pain in the lower leg caused by exercise is a common problem in athletes. The main causes are exercise induced compartment syndrome, periostitis of the tibia, stress fracture, venous diseases, obliterative arterial diseases, and shin splints. Exercise induced compartment syndrome is the least common. A recurrent tightening or tense sensation and aching in anatomically defined compartments is pathognomonic. The symptoms are caused by abnormally high pressure in compartments of the leg during and after exercise. In this report, a case of exercise induced compartment syndrome in a professional footballer is described.

  3. Wheat-dependent exercise-induced anaphylaxis.

    PubMed

    Scherf, K A; Brockow, K; Biedermann, T; Koehler, P; Wieser, H

    2016-01-01

    Wheat-dependent exercise-induced anaphylaxis (WDEIA) is a rare, but potentially severe food allergy exclusively occurring when wheat ingestion is accompanied by augmenting cofactors. It is clinically characterized by anaphylactic reactions ranging from urticaria and angioedema to dyspnoea, hypotension, collapse, and shock. WDEIA usually develops after ingestion of wheat products followed by physical exercise. Other cofactors are acetylsalicylic acid and other non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, alcohol, and infections. The precise mechanisms of WDEIA remain unclear; exercise and other cofactors might increase gastrointestinal allergen permeability and osmolality, redistribute blood flow, or lower the threshold for IgE-mediated mast cell degranulation. Among wheat proteins, ω5-gliadin and high-molecular-weight glutenin subunits have been reported to be the major allergens. In some patients, WDEIA has been discussed to be caused by epicutaneous sensitization with hydrolysed wheat gluten included in cosmetics. Diagnosis is made based on the patient's history in combination with allergy skin testing, determination of wheat-specific IgE serum antibodies, basophil activation test, histamine release test, and/or exercise challenge test. Acute treatment includes application of adrenaline or antihistamines. The most reliable prophylaxis of WDEIA is a gluten-free diet. In less severe cases, a strict limitation of wheat ingestion before exercise and avoidance of other cofactors may be sufficient.

  4. [Cereal-dependent exercise-induced anaphylaxis].

    PubMed

    Seoane-Rodríguez, Marta; Caralli, María Elisa; Morales-Cabeza, Cristina; Micozzi, Sarah; De Barrio-Fernández, Manuel; Rojas Pérez-Ezquerra, Patricia

    2016-01-01

    Wheat-dependent exercise-induced anaphylaxis (WDEIA) is increasing. In vitro test such as omega-5-gliadin levels are useful in the diagnosis, while oral single blind challenge tests (OCT) with wheat plus exercise continuous being the gold standard diagnostic method. This paper reports the case of a 38-year-old woman, with several episodes of anaphylaxis after eating different foods and doing exercise after ingestion. An allergy study was performed with positive skin prick tests for wheat, barley and rye. Total IgE 238.0KU/L, positive specific IgE (>100KU/L) to wheat, barley and rye, and negative to rTri-a-19 omega-5 gliadin. OCT with bread and exercise was positive. In this case of wheat-dependent exerciseinduced anaphylaxis (WDEIA) with negative serum specific IgE to omega-5-gliadin, negative results with gamma, alpha, bheta y omega-gliadin doesn't exclude the diagnosis of WDEIA. PMID:26943835

  5. Telocytes in exercise-induced cardiac growth.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Junjie; Chen, Ping; Qu, Yi; Yu, Pujiao; Yao, Jianhua; Wang, Hongbao; Fu, Siyi; Bei, Yihua; Chen, Yan; Che, Lin; Xu, Jiahong

    2016-05-01

    Exercise can induce physiological cardiac growth, which is featured by enlarged cardiomyocyte cell size and formation of new cardiomyocytes. Telocytes (TCs) are a recently identified distinct interstitial cell type, existing in many tissues and organs including heart. TCs have been shown to form a tandem with cardiac stem/progenitor cells in cardiac stem cell niches, participating in cardiac regeneration and repair. Although exercise-induced cardiac growth has been confirmed as an important way to promote cardiac regeneration and repair, the response of cardiac TCs to exercise is still unclear. In this study, 4 weeks of swimming training was used to induce robust healthy cardiac growth. Exercise can induce an increase in cardiomyocyte cell size and formation of new cardiomyocytes as determined by Wheat Germ Lectin and EdU staining respectively. TCs were identified by three immunofluorescence stainings including double labelling for CD34/vimentin, CD34/platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) receptor-α and CD34/PDGF receptor-β. We found that cardiac TCs were significantly increased in exercised heart, suggesting that TCs might help control the activity of cardiac stem/progenitor cells, cardiomyocytes or endothelial cells. Adding cardiac TCs might help promote cardiac regeneration and renewal. PMID:26987685

  6. [Cereal-dependent exercise-induced anaphylaxis].

    PubMed

    Seoane-Rodríguez, Marta; Caralli, María Elisa; Morales-Cabeza, Cristina; Micozzi, Sarah; De Barrio-Fernández, Manuel; Rojas Pérez-Ezquerra, Patricia

    2016-01-01

    Wheat-dependent exercise-induced anaphylaxis (WDEIA) is increasing. In vitro test such as omega-5-gliadin levels are useful in the diagnosis, while oral single blind challenge tests (OCT) with wheat plus exercise continuous being the gold standard diagnostic method. This paper reports the case of a 38-year-old woman, with several episodes of anaphylaxis after eating different foods and doing exercise after ingestion. An allergy study was performed with positive skin prick tests for wheat, barley and rye. Total IgE 238.0KU/L, positive specific IgE (>100KU/L) to wheat, barley and rye, and negative to rTri-a-19 omega-5 gliadin. OCT with bread and exercise was positive. In this case of wheat-dependent exerciseinduced anaphylaxis (WDEIA) with negative serum specific IgE to omega-5-gliadin, negative results with gamma, alpha, bheta y omega-gliadin doesn't exclude the diagnosis of WDEIA.

  7. Mitochondrial Dynamics and Mitochondrial Dysfunction in Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Wada, Jun; Nakatsuka, Atsuko

    2016-06-01

    The mitochondria are involved in active and dynamic processes, such as mitochondrial biogenesis, fission, fusion and mitophagy to maintain mitochondrial and cellular functions. In obesity and type 2 diabetes, impaired oxidation, reduced mitochondrial contents, lowered rates of oxidative phosphorylation and excessive reactive oxygen species (ROS) production have been reported. Mitochondrial biogenesis is regulated by various transcription factors such as peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator-1α (PGC-1α), peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs), estrogen-related receptors (ERRs), and nuclear respiratory factors (NRFs). Mitochondrial fusion is promoted by mitofusin 1 (MFN1), mitofusin 2 (MFN2) and optic atrophy 1 (OPA1), while fission is governed by the recruitment of dynamin-related protein 1 (DRP1) by adaptor proteins such as mitochondrial fission factor (MFF), mitochondrial dynamics proteins of 49 and 51 kDa (MiD49 and MiD51), and fission 1 (FIS1). Phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN)-induced putative kinase 1 (PINK1) and PARKIN promote DRP1-dependent mitochondrial fission, and the outer mitochondrial adaptor MiD51 is required in DRP1 recruitment and PARKIN-dependent mitophagy. This review describes the molecular mechanism of mitochondrial dynamics, its abnormality in diabetes and obesity, and pharmaceuticals targeting mitochondrial biogenesis, fission, fusion and mitophagy. PMID:27339203

  8. Acute β-Hydroxy-β-Methyl Butyrate Suppresses Regulators of Mitochondrial Biogenesis and Lipid Oxidation While Increasing Lipid Content in Myotubes.

    PubMed

    Schnuck, Jamie K; Johnson, Michele A; Gould, Lacey M; Gannon, Nicholas P; Vaughan, Roger A

    2016-10-01

    Leucine modulates synthetic and degradative pathways in muscle, possibly providing metabolic benefits for both athletes and diseased populations. Leucine has become popular among athletes for improving performance and body composition, however little is known about the metabolic effects of the commonly consumed leucine-derived metabolite β-hydroxy-β-methyl butyrate (HMB). Our work measured the effects of HMB on metabolic protein expression, mitochondrial content and metabolism, as well as lipid content in skeletal muscle cells. Specifically, cultured C2C12 myotubes were treated with either a control or HMB ranging from 6.25 to 25 μM for 24 h and mRNA and/or protein expression, oxygen consumption, glucose uptake, and lipid content were measured. Contrary to leucine's stimulatory effect on metabolism, HMB-treated cells exhibited significantly reduced regulators of lipid oxidation including peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARα) and PPARβ/δ, as well as downstream target carnitine palmitoyl transferase, without alterations in glucose or palmitate oxidation. Furthermore, HMB significantly inhibited activation of the master regulator of energetics, AMP-activated protein kinase. As a result, HMB-treated cells also displayed reduced total mitochondrial content compared with true control or cells equivocally treated with leucine. Additionally, HMB treatment amplified markers of lipid biosynthesis (PPARγ and fatty acid synthase) as well as consistently promoted elevated total lipid content versus control cells. Collectively, our results demonstrate that HMB did not improve mitochondrial metabolism or content, and may promote elevated cellular lipid content possibly through heightened PPARγ expression. These observations suggest that HMB may be most beneficial for populations interested in stimulating anabolic cellular processes.

  9. Acute β-Hydroxy-β-Methyl Butyrate Suppresses Regulators of Mitochondrial Biogenesis and Lipid Oxidation While Increasing Lipid Content in Myotubes.

    PubMed

    Schnuck, Jamie K; Johnson, Michele A; Gould, Lacey M; Gannon, Nicholas P; Vaughan, Roger A

    2016-10-01

    Leucine modulates synthetic and degradative pathways in muscle, possibly providing metabolic benefits for both athletes and diseased populations. Leucine has become popular among athletes for improving performance and body composition, however little is known about the metabolic effects of the commonly consumed leucine-derived metabolite β-hydroxy-β-methyl butyrate (HMB). Our work measured the effects of HMB on metabolic protein expression, mitochondrial content and metabolism, as well as lipid content in skeletal muscle cells. Specifically, cultured C2C12 myotubes were treated with either a control or HMB ranging from 6.25 to 25 μM for 24 h and mRNA and/or protein expression, oxygen consumption, glucose uptake, and lipid content were measured. Contrary to leucine's stimulatory effect on metabolism, HMB-treated cells exhibited significantly reduced regulators of lipid oxidation including peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARα) and PPARβ/δ, as well as downstream target carnitine palmitoyl transferase, without alterations in glucose or palmitate oxidation. Furthermore, HMB significantly inhibited activation of the master regulator of energetics, AMP-activated protein kinase. As a result, HMB-treated cells also displayed reduced total mitochondrial content compared with true control or cells equivocally treated with leucine. Additionally, HMB treatment amplified markers of lipid biosynthesis (PPARγ and fatty acid synthase) as well as consistently promoted elevated total lipid content versus control cells. Collectively, our results demonstrate that HMB did not improve mitochondrial metabolism or content, and may promote elevated cellular lipid content possibly through heightened PPARγ expression. These observations suggest that HMB may be most beneficial for populations interested in stimulating anabolic cellular processes. PMID:27600148

  10. Asthma Bronchiale and Exercise-Induced Bronchoconstriction.

    PubMed

    Jayasinghe, Harshani; Kopsaftis, Zoe; Carson, Kristin

    2015-01-01

    Exercising regularly has a wide range of beneficial health effects; in particular, it has been well documented to help in the management of chronic illnesses including asthma. However, in some individuals, exertion can also trigger an exacerbation of asthmatic episodes and subsequent acute attacks of breathlessness, coughing, tightness of the chest and wheezing. This physiological process is called exercise-induced bronchoconstriction (EIB) whereby post-exercise forced expiratory volume in 1 s is reduced by 10-15% from baseline. While EIB is highly prevalent in asthmatics and presents with similar respiratory symptoms, asthma and EIB are not mutually exclusive. The aim of this review is to present a broad overview of both conditions in order to enhance the understanding of the similarities and differences distinguishing them as two separate entities. The pathophysiology and mechanisms underlying asthma are well described with research now focussing on defining phenotypes for targeted management strategies. Conversely, the mechanistic understanding of EIB remains largely under-described. Diagnostic pathways for both are established and similar, as are pharmacologic and non-pharmacologic treatments and management approaches, which have enhanced success with early detection. Given the potential for exacerbation of asthma, exercise avoidance is common but counterproductive as current evidence indicates that it is well tolerated and improves quality of life. Literature supporting the benefit of exercise for EIB sufferers is at present favourable, yet extremely limited; therefore, future research should be directed in this area as well as towards further developing the understanding of the pathophysiology and mechanisms underpinning both EIB and asthma.

  11. Exercise-induced bronchoconstriction in Tunisian elite athletes is underdiagnosed

    PubMed Central

    Sallaoui, Ridha; Zendah², Ines; Ghedira², Habib; Belhaouz³, Mohcine; Ghrairi³, Mourad; Amri³, Mohamed

    2011-01-01

    Many studies have shown an increased risk of developing exercise-induced bronchoconstriction among the athletic population, particularly at the elite level. Subjective methods for assessing exercise-induced bronchoconstriction such as surveys and questionnaires have been used but have resulted in an underestimation of the prevalence of airway dysfunction when compared with objective measurements. The aim of the present study was to compare the prevalence of exercise-induced bronchoconstriction among Tunisian elite athletes obtained using an objective method with that using a subjective method, and to discuss the possible causes and implications of the observed discrepancy. As the objective method we used spirometry before and after exercise and for the subjective approach we used a medical history questionnaire. All of the recruited 107 elite athletes responded to the questionnaire about respiratory symptoms and medical history and underwent a resting spirometry testing before and after exercise. Post-exercise spirometry revealed the presence of exercise-induced bronchoconstriction in 14 (13%) of the elite athletes, while only 1.8% reported having previously been diagnosed with asthma. In conclusion, our findings indicate that medical history-based diagnoses of exercise-induced bronchoconstriction lead to underestimations of true sufferers. PMID:24198569

  12. Dietary supplementation with the microalga Galdieria sulphuraria (Rhodophyta) reduces prolonged exercise-induced oxidative stress in rat tissues.

    PubMed

    Carfagna, Simona; Napolitano, Gaetana; Barone, Daniela; Pinto, Gabriele; Pollio, Antonino; Venditti, Paola

    2015-01-01

    We studied the effects of ten-day 1% Galdieria sulphuraria dietary supplementation on oxidative damage and metabolic changes elicited by acute exercise (6-hour swimming) determining oxygen consumption, lipid hydroperoxides, protein bound carbonyls in rat tissue (liver, heart, and muscle) homogenates and mitochondria, tissue glutathione peroxidase and glutathione reductase activities, glutathione content, and rates of H2O2 mitochondrial release. Exercise increased oxidative damage in tissues and mitochondria and decreased tissue content of reduced glutathione. Moreover, it increased State 4 and decreased State 3 respiration in tissues and mitochondria. G. sulphuraria supplementation reduced the above exercise-induced variations. Conversely, alga supplementation was not able to modify the exercise-induced increase in mitochondrial release rate of hydrogen peroxide and in liver and heart antioxidant enzyme activities. The alga capacity to reduce lipid oxidative damage without reducing mitochondrial H2O2 release can be due to its high content of C-phycocyanin and glutathione, which are able to scavenge peroxyl radicals and contribute to phospholipid hydroperoxide metabolism, respectively. In conclusion, G. sulphuraria ability to reduce exercise-linked oxidative damage and mitochondrial dysfunction makes it potentially useful even in other conditions leading to oxidative stress, including hyperthyroidism, chronic inflammation, and ischemia/reperfusion. PMID:25874021

  13. Dietary Supplementation with the Microalga Galdieria sulphuraria (Rhodophyta) Reduces Prolonged Exercise-Induced Oxidative Stress in Rat Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Carfagna, Simona; Napolitano, Gaetana; Barone, Daniela; Pinto, Gabriele; Venditti, Paola

    2015-01-01

    We studied the effects of ten-day 1% Galdieria sulphuraria dietary supplementation on oxidative damage and metabolic changes elicited by acute exercise (6-hour swimming) determining oxygen consumption, lipid hydroperoxides, protein bound carbonyls in rat tissue (liver, heart, and muscle) homogenates and mitochondria, tissue glutathione peroxidase and glutathione reductase activities, glutathione content, and rates of H2O2 mitochondrial release. Exercise increased oxidative damage in tissues and mitochondria and decreased tissue content of reduced glutathione. Moreover, it increased State 4 and decreased State 3 respiration in tissues and mitochondria. G. sulphuraria supplementation reduced the above exercise-induced variations. Conversely, alga supplementation was not able to modify the exercise-induced increase in mitochondrial release rate of hydrogen peroxide and in liver and heart antioxidant enzyme activities. The alga capacity to reduce lipid oxidative damage without reducing mitochondrial H2O2 release can be due to its high content of C-phycocyanin and glutathione, which are able to scavenge peroxyl radicals and contribute to phospholipid hydroperoxide metabolism, respectively. In conclusion, G. sulphuraria ability to reduce exercise-linked oxidative damage and mitochondrial dysfunction makes it potentially useful even in other conditions leading to oxidative stress, including hyperthyroidism, chronic inflammation, and ischemia/reperfusion. PMID:25874021

  14. Rosa rugosa Aqueous Extract Alleviates Endurance Exercise-Induced Stress.

    PubMed

    Seo, Eunjin; You, Yanghee; Yoon, Ho-Geun; Kim, Boemjeong; Kim, Kyungmi; Lee, Yoo-Hyun; Lee, Jeongmin; Chung, Jin Woong; Shim, Sangin; Jun, Woojin

    2015-06-01

    This study was performed to investigate the effect of water extract from Rosa rugosa (RRW) on endurance exercise-induced stress in mice. The mice were orally administered with distilled water or RRW, respectively. The endurance capacity was evaluated by exhaustive swimming using an adjustable-current water pool. Mice administered RRW swam longer before becoming exhausted. Also, RRW administration resulted in less lipid peroxidation, lower muscular antioxidant enzyme activities, and lower cortisol level. The results suggest that RRW can prevent exercise-induced stress by decreasing oxidative stress levels.

  15. Regulation of mitochondrial biogenesis. Occurrence of non-functioning components of the mitochondrial respiratory chain in Saccharomyces cerevisiae grown in the presence of proteinase inhibitors: evidence for proteolytic control over assembly of the respiratory chain.

    PubMed

    Galkin, A V; Tsoi, T V; Luzikov, V N

    1980-07-15

    Yeast was grown in glucose- or galactose-containing media without or with proteinase inhibitors, phenylmethanesulphonyl fluoride and pepstatin. Culture growth was practically not affected by these compounds. Yeast growth on glucose in the presence of either phenylmethanesulphonyl fluoride or pepstatin entails accumulation of cytochromes c, c1, b and aa3 to a 25--30% excess above the control by the stationary phase, while cell respiration is unaffected. During growth on galactose the maximal cytochrome content (per unit weight of biomass) is reached in the mid-exponential phase and then decreases by 30--40% towards the stationary phase, while cell respiration remains constant. Addition of phenylmethanesulphonyl fluoride or pepstatin in the mid-exponential phase blocks the decrease in cytochrome levels and has no effect on cell respiration. Mitochondrial populations isolated from stationary-phase control and phenylmethanesulphonyl fluoride-grown cells glucose cultures display identical succinate oxidase and partial-respiratory-chain activities, despite the differences in cytochrome contents. However, the activities of individual respiratory complexes measured after maximal activation are nearly proportional to the amounts of corresponding components. The same situation holds true for mitochondrial populations from mid-exponential-phase, stationary-phase control and stationary-phase inhibitor-grown cells of galactose cultures. The findings suggest that the 'surplus' respiratory-chain components do not participate in electron flow because of the lack of interaction with adjacent carriers.

  16. EXERCISE-INDUCED PULMONARY HEMORRHAGE AFTER RUNNING A MARATHON

    EPA Science Inventory

    We report on a healthy 26-year-old male who had an exercise-induced pulmonary hemorrhage (EIPH) within 24 hours of running a marathon. There were no symptoms, abnormalities on exam, or radiographic infiltrates. He routinely participated in bronchoscopy research and the EIPH was e...

  17. Exercise-induced asthma. What family physicians should do.

    PubMed Central

    D'Urzo, A.

    1995-01-01

    Exercise-induced asthma is described as a transitory increase in airway resistance during or after vigorous exercise. Nearly 90% of patients with chronic asthma and 40% of allergic nonasthmatic patients have the condition. Family physicians should try to educate patients about their asthma and, barring contraindications, encourage them to participate in regular physical activity. PMID:8563507

  18. Coping with Exercise-Induced Asthma in Sports.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Katz, Roger M.

    1987-01-01

    This article reviews the history of research on exercise-induced asthma (EIA) and the pathophysiology of the condition, including its development and influencing factors. Four groups of drugs that are effective against EIA--theopyhlline, beta-adrenergic agents, cromolyn sodium, and anticholinergics--are discussed. (Author/CB)

  19. Human Cytomegalovirus Infection Upregulates the Mitochondrial Transcription and Translation Machineries

    PubMed Central

    Weekes, M. P.; Antrobus, R.; Rorbach, J.; van Haute, L.; Umrania, Y.; Smith, D. L.; Minczuk, M.; Lehner, P. J.; Sinclair, J. H.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Infection with human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) profoundly affects cellular metabolism. Like in tumor cells, HCMV infection increases glycolysis, and glucose carbon is shifted from the mitochondrial tricarboxylic acid cycle to the biosynthesis of fatty acids. However, unlike in many tumor cells, where aerobic glycolysis is accompanied by suppression of mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation, HCMV induces mitochondrial biogenesis and respiration. Here, we affinity purified mitochondria and used quantitative mass spectrometry to determine how the mitochondrial proteome changes upon HCMV infection. We found that the mitochondrial transcription and translation systems are induced early during the viral replication cycle. Specifically, proteins involved in biogenesis of the mitochondrial ribosome were highly upregulated by HCMV infection. Inhibition of mitochondrial translation with chloramphenicol or knockdown of HCMV-induced ribosome biogenesis factor MRM3 abolished the HCMV-mediated increase in mitochondrially encoded proteins and significantly impaired viral growth under bioenergetically restricting conditions. Our findings demonstrate how HCMV manipulates mitochondrial biogenesis to support its replication. PMID:27025248

  20. Acute Endurance Exercise Induces Nuclear p53 Abundance in Human Skeletal Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Tachtsis, Bill; Smiles, William J.; Lane, Steven C.; Hawley, John A.; Camera, Donny M.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The tumor suppressor protein p53 may have regulatory roles in exercise response-adaptation processes such as mitochondrial biogenesis and autophagy, although its cellular location largely governs its biological role. We investigated the subcellular localization of p53 and selected signaling targets in human skeletal muscle following a single bout of endurance exercise. Methods: Sixteen, untrained individuals were pair-matched for aerobic capacity (VO2peak) and allocated to either an exercise (EX, n = 8) or control (CON, n = 8) group. After a resting muscle biopsy, EX performed 60 min continuous cycling at ~70% of VO2peak during which time CON subjects rested. A further biopsy was obtained from both groups 3 h post-exercise (EX) or 4 h after the first biopsy (CON). Results: Nuclear p53 increased after 3 h recovery with EX only (~48%, p < 0.05) but was unchanged in the mitochondrial or cytoplasmic fractions in either group. Autophagy protein 5 (Atg-5) decreased in the mitochondrial protein fraction 3 h post-EX (~69%, P < 0.05) but remained unchanged in CON. There was an increase in cytoplasmic levels of the mitophagy marker PINK1 following 3 h of rest in CON only (~23%, P < 0.05). There were no changes in mitochondrial, nuclear, or cytoplasmic levels of PGC-1α post-exercise in either group. Conclusions: The selective increase in nuclear p53 abundance following endurance exercise suggests a potential pro-autophagy response to remove damaged proteins and organelles prior to initiating mitochondrial biogenesis and remodeling responses in untrained individuals. PMID:27199762

  1. Biogenesis of nuclear bodies.

    PubMed

    Dundr, Miroslav; Misteli, Tom

    2010-12-01

    The nucleus is unique amongst cellular organelles in that it contains a myriad of discrete suborganelles. These nuclear bodies are morphologically and molecularly distinct entities, and they host specific nuclear processes. Although the mode of biogenesis appears to differ widely between individual nuclear bodies, several common design principles are emerging, particularly, the ability of nuclear bodies to form de novo, a role of RNA as a structural element and self-organization as a mode of formation. The controlled biogenesis of nuclear bodies is essential for faithful maintenance of nuclear architecture during the cell cycle and is an important part of cellular responses to intra- and extracellular events.

  2. Human Mitochondrial Protein Database

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    SRD 131 Human Mitochondrial Protein Database (Web, free access)   The Human Mitochondrial Protein Database (HMPDb) provides comprehensive data on mitochondrial and human nuclear encoded proteins involved in mitochondrial biogenesis and function. This database consolidates information from SwissProt, LocusLink, Protein Data Bank (PDB), GenBank, Genome Database (GDB), Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM), Human Mitochondrial Genome Database (mtDB), MITOMAP, Neuromuscular Disease Center and Human 2-D PAGE Databases. This database is intended as a tool not only to aid in studying the mitochondrion but in studying the associated diseases.

  3. The effect of loratadine in exercise-induced asthma

    PubMed Central

    Baki, A; Orhan, F

    2002-01-01

    Aims: To assess the effect of loratadine in exercise induced asthma. Methods: Randomised, double blind, placebo controlled study of 10 mg oral loratadine, once daily for three days in 11 children. At the end of the treatment period FEV1 was measured, and patients were exercised on a treadmill. FEV1 measurements were repeated at intervals after exercise. Results: Loratadine significantly reduced the decrease in FEV1 after exercise at two, five, 10, 15, and 30 minutes, compared with placebo (p < 0.05). However, the mean decrease in FEV1 at five minutes was more than 15% of baseline in the loratadine group. Conclusions: Loratadine reduces, but does not prevent, exercise induced asthma in children. PMID:11806881

  4. Recognition and management of exercise-induced bronchospasm.

    PubMed

    Sinha, Taru; David, Alan K

    2003-02-15

    Exercise-induced bronchospasm is an obstruction of transient airflow that usually occurs five to 15 minutes after physical exertion. Although this condition is highly preventable, it is still underrecognized and affects aerobic fitness and quality of life. Diagnosis is based on the results of a detailed history, including assessment of asthma triggers, symptoms suggestive of exercise-induced bronchoconstriction, and a normal forced expiratory volume at one second at rest. A trial of therapy with an inhaled beta agonist may be instituted, with the subsequent addition of inhaled anti-inflammatory agents or ipratropium bromide. Nonpharmacologic measures, such as increased physical conditioning, warm-up exercises, and covering the mouth and nose, should be instituted. If symptoms persist, pulmonary function testing is warranted to rule out underlying lung disease. PMID:12613731

  5. Exercise-induced anaphylaxis related to specific foods.

    PubMed

    Tilles, S; Schocket, A; Milgrom, H

    1995-10-01

    We describe the case, documented by challenge results, of a 16-year-old girl with exercise-induced anaphylaxis associated with eating pizza and a cheese sandwich. Patients in whom a specific coprecipitating food has been identified should avoid it for at least 12 hours before exercise. All patients should be instructed to avoid eating 6 to 8 hours before exercise, discontinue exercise at the first sign of symptoms, and exercise only with a companion prepared to administer epinephrine.

  6. Exercise induces autophagy in peripheral tissues and in the brain.

    PubMed

    He, Congcong; Sumpter, Rhea; Levine, Beth

    2012-10-01

    We recently identified physical exercise as a newly defined inducer of autophagy in vivo. Exercise induced autophagy in multiple organs involved in metabolic regulation, such as muscle, liver, pancreas and adipose tissue. To study the physiological role of exercise-induced autophagy, we generated mice with a knock-in nonphosphorylatable mutation in BCL2 (Thr69Ala, Ser70Ala and Ser84Ala) (BCL2 AAA) that are defective in exercise- and starvation-induced autophagy but not in basal autophagy. We found that BCL2 AAA mice could not run on a treadmill as long as wild-type mice, and did not undergo exercise-mediated increases in skeletal glucose muscle uptake. Unlike wild-type mice, the BCL2 AAA mice failed to reverse high-fat diet-induced glucose intolerance after 8 weeks of exercise training, possibly due to defects in signaling pathways that regulate muscle glucose uptake and metabolism during exercise. Together, these findings suggested a hitherto unknown important role of autophagy in mediating exercise-induced metabolic benefits. In the present addendum, we show that treadmill exercise also induces autophagy in the cerebral cortex of adult mice. This observation raises the intriguing question of whether autophagy may in part mediate the beneficial effects of exercise in neurodegeneration, adult neurogenesis and improved cognitive function.

  7. Molecular Genetics of Mitochondrial Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wong, Lee-Jun C.

    2010-01-01

    Mitochondrial respiratory chain (RC) disorders (RCDs) are a group of genetically and clinically heterogeneous diseases because of the fact that protein components of the RC are encoded by both mitochondrial and nuclear genomes and are essential in all cells. In addition, the biogenesis, structure, and function of mitochondria, including DNA…

  8. Sinusitis and chronic progressive exercise-induced cough and dyspnea.

    PubMed

    Williams, Adam N; Simon, Ronald A; Woessner, Katharine M

    2008-01-01

    We present the case of a 47-year-old man with exercise-induced dyspnea, cough, chest tightness, and recalcitrant chronic rhinosinusitis. Evaluation revealed IgE sensitization to grass, tree, and weed pollen, no evidence of obstruction on spirometry, and a negative methacholine challenge. Diagnostic considerations included allergic and nonallergic rhinitis, asthma, aspirin-exacerbated respiratory disease, vocal cord dysfunction, extra-esophageal manifestations of acid reflux, and vasculitits. Further evaluation with sinus imaging, laryngoscopy, ambulatory pharyngeal pH testing, upper endoscopy, and bronchoscopy led to a diagnosis. Key issues surrounding the diagnostic and therapeutic approaches to this patient's condition are reviewed.

  9. Pathophysiology of Acute Exercise-Induced Muscular Injury: Clinical Implications

    PubMed Central

    Page, Phillip

    1995-01-01

    Acute muscular injury is the most common injury affecting athletes and those participating in exercise. Nearly everyone has experienced soreness after unaccustomed or intense exercise. Clinically, acute strains and delayed-onset muscle soreness are very similar. The purpose of this paper is to review the predisposing factors, mechanisms of injury, structural changes, and biochemical changes associated with these injuries. Laboratory and clinical findings are discussed to help athletic trainers differentiate between the two conditions and to provide a background knowledge for evaluation, prevention, and treatment of exercise-induced muscular injury. PMID:16558305

  10. The Curious Question of Exercise-Induced Pulmonary Edema

    PubMed Central

    Bates, Melissa L.; Farrell, Emily T.; Eldridge, Marlowe W.

    2011-01-01

    The question of whether pulmonary edema develops during exercise on land is controversial. Yet, the development of pulmonary edema during swimming and diving is well established. This paper addresses the current controversies that exist in the field of exercise-induced pulmonary edema on land and with water immersion. It also discusses the mechanisms by which pulmonary edema can develop during land exercise, swimming, and diving and the current gaps in knowledge that exist. Finally, this paper discusses how these fields can continue to advance and the areas where clinical knowledge is lacking. PMID:21660232

  11. Exercise-induced anaphylactic reaction to grain flours.

    PubMed

    Armentia, A; Martin-Santos, J M; Blanco, M; Carretero, L; Puyo, M; Barber, D

    1990-08-01

    On rare occasions, reproducible exercise-induced anaphylactic reactions (EIA) occur in some patients only after certain foods have been eaten before exercise, yet eating these foods alone or exercising alone causes no symptoms. This special response has been evident sometimes with shellfish, nuts, and wheat. We describe a patient in whom grain flour was a triggering factor for EIA. Skin tests and RAST were positive for grain flours. Normally, the patient tolerated grain flours without symptoms and IgE mechanisms had not been suspected. Testing for food hypersensitivity may be important in patients with EIA.

  12. Peroxisome Biogenesis and Function

    PubMed Central

    Kaur, Navneet; Reumann, Sigrun; Hu, Jianping

    2009-01-01

    Peroxisomes are small and single membrane-delimited organelles that execute numerous metabolic reactions and have pivotal roles in plant growth and development. In recent years, forward and reverse genetic studies along with biochemical and cell biological analyses in Arabidopsis have enabled researchers to identify many peroxisome proteins and elucidate their functions. This review focuses on the advances in our understanding of peroxisome biogenesis and metabolism, and further explores the contribution of large-scale analysis, such as in sillco predictions and proteomics, in augmenting our knowledge of peroxisome function In Arabidopsis. PMID:22303249

  13. Exercise-Induced Oxidative Stress and Dietary Antioxidants

    PubMed Central

    Yavari, Abbas; Javadi, Maryam; Mirmiran, Parvin; Bahadoran, Zahra

    2015-01-01

    Context: Overproduction of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species during physical exercise, exercise induced oxidative stress and antioxidant supplementation is interesting and controversial concepts that have been considered during the past decades. Evidence Acquisition: In this review, we aimed to summarize current evidence in relation to antioxidant supplementation outcomes during exercise and physical activity. For this aim, we obtained relevant articles through searches of the Medline and PubMed databases between 1980 to 2013. Although major studies have indicated that antioxidants could attenuate biomarkers of exercise-induced oxidative stress and the use of antioxidant supplement is a common phenomenon among athletes and physically active people, there are some doubts regarding the benefits of these. Results: It seems that the best recommendations regarding antioxidants and exercise are having a balanced diet rich in natural antioxidants and phytochemicals. Conclusions: Regular consumption of various fresh fruits and vegetables, whole grains, legumes and beans, sprouts and seeds is an effective and safe way to meet all antioxidant requirements in physically active persons and athletes. PMID:25883776

  14. Laser acupuncture in children and adolescents with exercise induced asthma

    PubMed Central

    Gruber, W; Eber, E; Malle-Scheid, D; Pfleger, A; Weinhandl, E; Dorfer, L; Zach, M

    2002-01-01

    Background: Laser acupuncture, a painless technique, is a widely used alternative treatment method for childhood asthma, although its efficacy has not been proved in controlled clinical studies. Methods: A double blind, placebo controlled, crossover study was performed to investigate the possible protective effect of a single laser acupuncture treatment on cold dry air hyperventilation induced bronchoconstriction in 44 children and adolescents of mean age 11.9 years (range 7.5–16.7) with exercise induced asthma. Laser acupuncture was performed on real and placebo points in random order on two consecutive days. Lung function was measured before laser acupuncture, immediately after laser acupuncture (just before cold dry air challenge (CACh)), and 3 and 15 minutes after CACh. CACh consisted of a 4 minute isocapnic hyperventilation of –10°C absolute dry air. Results: Comparison of real acupuncture with placebo acupuncture showed no significant differences in the mean maximum CACh induced decrease in forced expiratory volume in 1 second (27.2 (18.2)% v 23.8 (16.2)%) and maximal expiratory flow at 25% remaining vital capacity (51.6 (20.8)% v 44.4 (22.3)%). Conclusions: A single laser acupuncture treatment offers no protection against exercise induced bronchoconstriction in paediatric and adolescent patients. PMID:11867825

  15. Food-dependent exercise-induced anaphylaxis: is wheat unique?

    PubMed

    Wong, Gabriel K; Krishna, Mamidipudi T

    2013-12-01

    This review draws comparisons between wheat-dependent exercise-induced anaphylaxis (WDEIA) and other food-dependent exercise-induced anaphylaxis (FDEIAs) and discusses the importance of co-factors in its pathophysiology. FDEIA remains an enigmatic condition since it was first described 30 years ago. The sporadic and unpredictable nature of its reactions has puzzled clinicians and scientists for decades, but recent studies on WDEIA have enlightened us about the pathophysiology of this condition. The identification of defined allergic epitopes such as Tri a 19, α-gliadin, β-gliadin and γ-gliadin in WDEIA enables it to become the perfect model for studying FDEIA, but WDEIA is by no means a unique condition. On a larger scale, FDEIA represents a crucial link between IgE-mediated and anaphylactoid reactions and provides supportive evidence for the concept of 'summation anaphylaxis' and the need to overcome the 'allergen threshold'. Future work should focus on identifying more of the FDEIA epitopes and understanding their distinct molecular properties. The development of a biomarker in order to identify patients susceptible to co-factor influences would be invaluable.

  16. Effect of simulated weightlessness on exercise-induced anaerobic threshold

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Convertino, V. A.; Karst, G. M.; Kirby, C. R.; Goldwater, D. J.

    1986-01-01

    The effect of simulated weightlessness, induced by ten days of continuous bedrest (BR) in the -6 deg head-down position, on the exercise-induced anaerobic threshold (AT) was determined by comparing specific ventilatory and gas-exchange measurements during an incremental ergometer test performed before and after BR. The primary index for determining the exercise-induced AT values of each subject was visual identification of the workrate or oxygen uptake (VO2) at which the ratio of the expired minute ventilation volume (VE) to VO2 exhibited a systematic increase without a concomitant increase in the VE/VCO2 value. Following BR, the mean VO2max of the subjects decreased by 7.0 percent, and the AT decreased from a mean of 1.26 L/min VO2 before BR to 0.95 L/min VO2 after BR. The decrease in AT was manifested by a decrease in both absolute and relative workrates. The change in AT correlated significantly with the change in plasma volume but not with the change in VO2max. The results suggest that the reduction in AT cannot be completely explained by the reduction in VO2, and that the AT decrease is associated with the reduction in intravascular fluid volume.

  17. Acute exercise-induced bilateral thigh compartment syndrome.

    PubMed

    Boland, Michael R; Heck, Chris

    2009-03-01

    Acute compartment syndrome of the thigh is rare due to the space's ability to accommodate large volumes of fluid and, with the exception of the lateral septum, its thin compliant linings. This article describes a case of bilateral exercise-induced severe compartment syndrome treated with anterior and posterior fasciotomies. A 29-year-old man was admitted to intensive care with myoglobinuria. His left thigh was evaluated 18 hours later for compartment syndrome. The patient reported that 14 hours prior to initial presentation, he had participated in a 1-hour session of vigorous basketball. He gradually developed bilateral moderately severe thigh pain and tea-colored urine. Physical examination revealed pain secondary to passive stretch of both knees at 20 degrees flexion, plus firm anterior and posterior compartments to palpation. A handheld pressure monitor revealed the following compartment pressures: left anterior 80 mm Hg; left posterior 75 mm Hg; right anterior 45 mm Hg; and right posterior 50 mm Hg. Bilateral emergent anterior and posterior compartment fasciotomies were performed. The patient developed a significant severe distal motor and sensory neurological deficit on the left side, which recovered to 3/5 motor strength and protective sensation. At 6-month follow-up, he ambulated with the assistance of a left ankle foot orthosis. Acute severe compartment syndrome can occur following vigorous exercise. We recommend fasciotomies after exercise-induced acute compartment syndrome rather than initial observation because of the severity of morbidity associated with undertreated compartment syndrome.

  18. Biogenesis and Assembly of Eukaryotic Cytochrome c Oxidase Catalytic Core

    PubMed Central

    Soto, Ileana C.; Fontanesi, Flavia; Liu, Jingjing; Barrientos, Antoni

    2011-01-01

    Eukaryotic cytochrome c oxidase (COX) is the terminal enzyme of the mitochondrial respiratory chain. COX is a multimeric enzyme formed by subunits of dual genetic origin which assembly is intricate and highly regulated. The COX catalytic core is formed by three mitochondrial DNA encoded subunits, Cox1, Cox2 and Cox3, conserved in the bacterial enzyme. Their biogenesis requires the action of messenger-specific and subunit-specific factors which facilitate the synthesis, membrane insertion, maturation or assembly of the core subunits. The study of yeast strains and human cell lines from patients carrying mutations in structural subunits and COX assembly factors has been invaluable to identify these ancillary factors. Here we review the current state of knowledge of the biogenesis and assembly of the eukaryotic COX catalytic core and discuss the degree of conservation of the players and mechanisms operating from yeast to human. PMID:21958598

  19. Poxvirus Membrane Biogenesis

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Poxviruses differ from most DNA viruses by replicating entirely within the cytoplasm. The first discernible viral structures are crescents and spherical immature virions containing a single lipoprotein membrane bilayer with an external honeycomb lattice. Because this viral membrane displays no obvious continuity with a cellular organelle, a de novo origin was suggested. Nevertheless, transient connections between viral and cellular membranes could be difficult to resolve. Despite the absence of direct evidence, the intermediate compartment (ERGIC) between the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and Golgi apparatus and the ER itself were considered possible sources of crescent membranes. A break-through in understanding poxvirus membrane biogenesis has come from recent studies of the abortive replication of several vaccinia virus null mutants. Novel images showing continuity between viral crescents and the ER and the accumulation of immature virions in the expanded ER lumen provide the first direct evidence for a cellular origin of this poxvirus membrane. PMID:25728299

  20. Exercise-induced endobronchial hemorrhage: a rare clinical presentation.

    PubMed

    Kruavit, Anuk; Jain, Mukesh; Fielding, David; Heraganahally, Subash

    2016-07-01

    The phenomenon of exercise-induced hemoptysis is still relatively underrecognised in humans. We report a case of recurrent hemoptysis brought on by vigorous exercise. A 33-year-old male presented with several episodes of intermittent fresh small-volume hemoptysis reproducible on vigorous exercise. There was no other significant medical history other than a past history of testicular tumor, treated with orchidectomy and adjuvant Bleomycin-based chemotherapy 1 year prior to onset of symptoms. Computed tomography scan showed no major abnormalities other than few small bilateral non-specific nodules. Computed tomography aortogram and pulmonary angiogram, ventilation/perfusion scan, and echocardiography yielded no significant abnormalities. Infectious, autoimmune disease, coagulopathy, vasculitis, and malignant causes were excluded. Bronchoscopy showed possible endobronchial bleeding. This phenomenon is thought to be due to vulnerability of pulmonary capillaries to stress or mechanical failure during strenuous exercise at high cardiorespiratory workload. PMID:27512564

  1. Identification of exercise-induced asthma among intercollegiate athletes.

    PubMed

    Rice, S G; Bierman, C W; Shapiro, G G; Furukawa, C T; Pierson, W E

    1985-12-01

    Nine hundred eight-three new intercollegiate athletes were evaluated to estimate the frequency of exercise-induced asthma (EIA). Medical history was obtained using a specifically structured interview. Athletes were selected for exercise testing based on positive responses to questions regarding symptoms of respiratory distress after strenuous exercise. Exercise testing was performed in a controlled laboratory setting using a standard exercise protocol. A laboratory diagnosis of EIA was made if the forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1) fell greater than or equal to 10%, forced expiratory flow at 25% to 75% of vital capacity (FEF25-75%) fell greater than or equal to 20%, and/or peak expiratory flow rate (PEFR) fell greater than or equal to 12.5% after exercise. The frequency of EIA was 2.8%; only nine of the 28 athletes with EIA were detected prior to arrival at college.

  2. Familial Paroxysmal Exercise-Induced Dystonia: Atypical Presentation of Autosomal Dominant GTP-Cyclohydrolase 1 Deficiency

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dale, Russell C.; Melchers, Anna; Fung, Victor S. C.; Grattan-Smith, Padraic; Houlden, Henry; Earl, John

    2010-01-01

    Paroxysmal exercise-induced dystonia (PED) is one of the rarer forms of paroxysmal dyskinesia, and can occur in sporadic or familial forms. We report a family (male index case, mother and maternal grandfather) with autosomal dominant inheritance of paroxysmal exercise-induced dystonia. The dystonia began in childhood and was only ever induced…

  3. Exploring the Relationship between Exercise-Induced Arousal and Cognition Using Fractionated Response Time

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chang, Yu-Kai; Etnier, Jennifer L.; Barella, Lisa A.

    2009-01-01

    Although a generally positive effect of acute exercise on cognitive performance has been demonstrated, the specific nature of the relationship between exercise-induced arousal and cognitive performance remains unclear. This study was designed to identify the relationship between exercise-induced arousal and cognitive performance for the central…

  4. The inflammatory basis of exercise-induced bronchoconstriction.

    PubMed

    Brannan, John D; Turton, James A

    2010-12-01

    Exercise-induced bronchoconstriction (EIB) is common in individuals with asthma, and may be observed even in the absence of a clinical diagnosis of asthma. Exercise-induced bronchoconstriction can be diagnosed via standardized exercise protocols, and anti-inflammatory therapy with inhaled corticosteroids (ICS) is often warranted. Exercise-related symptoms are commonly reported in primary care; however, access to standardized exercise protocols to assess EIB are often restricted because of the need for specialized equipment, as well as time constraints. Symptoms and lung function remain the most accessible indicators of EIB, yet these are poor predictors of its presence and severity. Evidence suggests that exercise causes the airways to narrow as a result of the osmotic and thermal consequences of respiratory water loss. The increase in airway osmolarity leads to the release of bronchoconstricting mediators (eg, histamine, prostaglandins, leukotrienes) from inflammatory cells (eg, mast cells and eosinophils). The objective assessment of EIB suggests the presence of airway inflammation, which is sensitive to ICS in association with a responsive airway smooth muscle. Surrogate tests for EIB, such as eucapnic voluntary hyperpnea or the osmotic challenge tests, cause airway narrowing via a similar mechanism, and a response indicates likely benefit from ICS therapy. The complete inhibition of EIB with ICS therapy in individuals with asthma may be a useful marker of control of airway pathology. Furthermore, inhibition of EIB provides additional, useful information regarding the identification of clinical control based on symptoms and lung function. This article explores the inflammatory basis of EIB in asthma as well as the effect of ICS on the pathophysiology of EIB.

  5. Exercise-induced muscle cramp. Proposed mechanisms and management.

    PubMed

    Bentley, S

    1996-06-01

    Muscle cramp is a common, painful, physiological disturbance of skeletal muscle. Many athletes are regularly frustrated by exercise-induced muscle cramp yet the pathogenesis remains speculative with little scientific research on the subject. This has resulted in a perpetuation of myths as to the cause and treatment of it. There is a need for scientifically based protocols for the management of athletes who suffer exercise-related muscle cramp. This article reviews the literature and neurophysiology of muscle cramp occurring during exercise. Disturbances at various levels of the central and peripheral nervous system and skeletal muscle are likely to be involved in the mechanism of cramp and may explain the diverse range of conditions in which cramp occurs. The activity of the motor neuron is subject to a multitude of influences including peripheral receptor sensory input, spinal reflexes, inhibitory interneurons in the spinal cord, synaptic and neurotransmitter modulation and descending CNS input. The muscle spindle and golgi tendon organ proprioceptors are fundamental to the control of muscle length and tone and the maintenance of posture. Disturbance in the activity of these receptors may occur through faulty posture, shortened muscle length, intense exercise and exercise to fatigue, resulting in increased motor neuron activity and motor unit recruitment. The relaxation phase of muscle contraction is prolonged in a fatigued muscle, raising the likelihood of fused summation of action potentials if motor neuron activity delivers a sustained high firing frequency. Treatment of cramp is directed at reducing muscle spindle and motor neuron activity by reflex inhibition and afferent stimulation. There are no proven strategies for the prevention of exercise-induced muscle cramp but regular muscle stretching using post-isometric relaxation techniques, correction of muscle balance and posture, adequate conditioning for the activity, mental preparation for competition and

  6. Peroxisomal Biogenesis in Ischemic Brain

    PubMed Central

    Young, Jennifer M.; Nelson, Jonathan W.; Cheng, Jian; Zhang, Wenri; Mader, Sarah; Davis, Catherine M.; Morrison, Richard S.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Aims: Peroxisomes are highly adaptable and dynamic organelles, adjusting their size, number, and enzyme composition to changing environmental and metabolic demands. We determined whether peroxisomes respond to ischemia, and whether peroxisomal biogenesis is an adaptive response to cerebral ischemia. Results: Focal cerebral ischemia induced peroxisomal biogenesis in peri-infarct neurons, which was associated with a corresponding increase in peroxisomal antioxidant enzyme catalase. Peroxisomal biogenesis was also observed in primary cultured cortical neurons subjected to ischemic insult induced by oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD). A catalase inhibitor increased OGD-induced neuronal death. Moreover, preventing peroxisomal proliferation by knocking down dynamin-related protein 1 (Drp1) exacerbated neuronal death induced by OGD, whereas enhancing peroxisomal biogenesis pharmacologically using a peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-alpha agonist protected against neuronal death induced by OGD. Innovation: This is the first documentation of ischemia-induced peroxisomal biogenesis in mammalian brain using a combined in vivo and in vitro approach, electron microscopy, high-resolution laser-scanning confocal microscopy, and super-resolution structured illumination microscopy. Conclusion: Our findings suggest that neurons respond to ischemic injury by increasing peroxisome biogenesis, which serves a protective function, likely mediated by enhanced antioxidant capacity of neurons. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 22, 109–120. PMID:25226217

  7. Mitochondrial Therapeutics for Cardioprotection

    PubMed Central

    Carreira, Raquel S.; Lee, Pamela; Gottlieb, Roberta A.

    2013-01-01

    Mitochondria represent approximately one-third of the mass of the heart and play a critical role in maintaining cellular function—however, they are also a potent source of free radicals and pro-apoptotic factors. As such, maintaining mitochondrial homeostasis is essential to cell survival. As the dominant source of ATP, continuous quality control is mandatory to ensure their ongoing optimal function. Mitochondrial quality control is accomplished by the dynamic interplay of fusion, fission, autophagy, and mitochondrial biogenesis. This review examines these processes in the heart and considers their role in the context of ischemia-reperfusion injury. Interventions that modulate mitochondrial turnover, including pharmacologic agents, exercise, and caloric restriction are discussed as a means to improve mitochondrial quality control, ameliorate cardiovascular dysfunction, and enhance longevity. PMID:21718247

  8. Importing Mitochondrial Proteins: Machineries and Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Chacinska, Agnieszka; Koehler, Carla M.; Milenkovic, Dusanka; Lithgow, Trevor; Pfanner, Nikolaus

    2014-01-01

    Most mitochondrial proteins are synthesized on cytosolic ribosomes and must be imported across one or both mitochondrial membranes. There is an amazingly versatile set of machineries and mechanisms, and at least four different pathways, for the importing and sorting of mitochondrial precursor proteins. The translocases that catalyze these processes are highly dynamic machines driven by the membrane potential, ATP, or redox reactions, and they cooperate with molecular chaperones and assembly complexes to direct mitochondrial proteins to their correct destinations. Here, we discuss recent insights into the importing and sorting of mitochondrial proteins and their contributions to mitochondrial biogenesis. PMID:19703392

  9. Exercise-Induced Muscle Damage and Running Economy in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Assumpção, Cláudio de Oliveira; Lima, Leonardo Coelho Rabello; Oliveira, Felipe Bruno Dias; Greco, Camila Coelho; Denadai, Benedito Sérgio

    2013-01-01

    Running economy (RE), defined as the energy demand for a given velocity of submaximal running, has been identified as a critical factor of overall distance running performance. Plyometric and resistance trainings, performed during a relatively short period of time (~15–30 days), have been successfully used to improve RE in trained athletes. However, these exercise types, particularly when they are unaccustomed activities for the individuals, may cause delayed onset muscle soreness, swelling, and reduced muscle strength. Some studies have demonstrated that exercise-induced muscle damage has a negative impact on endurance running performance. Specifically, the muscular damage induced by an acute bout of downhill running has been shown to reduce RE during subsequent moderate and high-intensity exercise (>65% VO2max). However, strength exercise (i.e., jumps, isoinertial and isokinetic eccentric exercises) seems to impair RE only for subsequent high-intensity exercise (~90% VO2max). Finally, a single session of resistance exercise or downhill running (i.e., repeated bout effect) attenuates changes in indirect markers of muscle damage and blunts changes in RE. PMID:23431253

  10. Exercise-induced effects on a gym atmosphere.

    PubMed

    Žitnik, M; Bučar, K; Hiti, B; Barba, Ž; Rupnik, Z; Založnik, A; Žitnik, E; Rodrìguez, L; Mihevc, I; Žibert, J

    2016-06-01

    We report results of analysis of a month-long measurement of indoor air and environment quality parameters in one gym during sporting activities such as football, basketball, volleyball, badminton, boxing, and fitness. We have determined an average single person's contribution to the increase of temperature, humidity, and dust concentration in the gym air volume of 12500 m(3) : during 90-min exercise performed at an average heart rate of 143 ± 10 bpm, a single person evaporated 0.94 kg of water into the air by sweating, contributed 0.03 K to the air temperature rise and added 1.5 μg/m(3) and 5 ng/m(3) to the indoor concentration of inhalable particles (PM10 ) and Ca concentration, respectively. As the breathing at the observed exercise intensity was about three times faster with respect to the resting condition and as the exercise-induced PM10 concentration was about two times larger than outdoors, a sportsman in the gym would receive about a sixfold higher dose of PM10 inside than he/she would have received at rest outside. PMID:26095910

  11. Exercise-Induced Pulmonary Edema in a Triathlon.

    PubMed

    Yamanashi, Hirotomo; Koyamatsu, Jun; Nobuyoshi, Masaharu; Murase, Kunihiko; Maeda, Takahiro

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. Family physicians have more opportunities to attend athletic competitions as medical staff at first-aid centers because of the increasing popularity of endurance sports. Case. A 38-year-old man who participated in a triathlon race experienced difficulty in breathing after swimming and was moved to a first-aid center. His initial oxygen saturation was 82% and a thoracic computed tomography scan showed bilateral ground glass opacity in the peripheral lungs. His diagnosis was noncardiogenic pulmonary edema associated with exercise or swimming: exercise-induced pulmonary edema (EIPE) or swimming-induced pulmonary edema (SIPE). Treatment with furosemide and corticosteroid relieved his symptoms of pulmonary edema. Discussion. Noncardiogenic pulmonary edema associated with endurance sports is not common, but knowledge about EIPE/SIPE or neurogenic pulmonary edema associated with hyponatremia, which is called Ayus-Arieff syndrome, is crucial. Knowledge and caution for possible risk factors, such as exposure to cold water or overhydration, are essential for both medical staff and endurance athletes. Conclusion. To determine the presence of pulmonary edema associated with strenuous exercise, oxygen saturation should be used as a screening tool at a first-aid center. To avoid risks for EIPE/SIPE, knowledge about these diseases is essential for medical staff and for athletes who perform extreme exercise.

  12. [Exercise-induced urticaria and angioedema - case report].

    PubMed

    Stelmach, Iwona; Sztafińska, Anna; Lechańka, Joanna; Balcerak, Joanna; Jerzyńska, Joanna

    2014-01-01

    Urticaria is a heterogeneous group of disorders, with various clinical manifestations and intensity of symptoms. Urticaria can be induced with a wide variety of environmental stimuli, such as cold, pressure, vibration, sunlight, exercise, temperature changes, heat, and water. In a select group of patients, exercise can induce a spectrum of urticaria symptoms, ranging from cutaneous pruritus and warmth, generalised urticaria, angioedema, and the appearance of such additional manifestations as collapse, upper respiratory distress, and anaphylaxis. Specific provocation tests should be carried out on an individual basis to investigate the suspected cause and proper diagnosis. Modification of activities and behaviour is the mainstay of treatment in patients with physical urticaria. The aim of this study was to emphasise that primary care paediatricians should be able to recognise physical urticaria, supply a patient with rescue medications, and refer him/her to a specialist. In the article, the authors present a 13-year-old girl with typical urticaria lesions and angioedema after exercise. According to the history, physical examination, and provocation test, exercise-induced urticaria and angioedema were diagnosed. PMID:25133816

  13. Resistance to exercise-induced weight loss: compensatory behavioral adaptations.

    PubMed

    Melanson, Edward L; Keadle, Sarah Kozey; Donnelly, Joseph E; Braun, Barry; King, Neil A

    2013-08-01

    In many interventions that are based on an exercise program intended to induce weight loss, the mean weight loss observed is modest and sometimes far less than what the individual expected. The individual responses are also widely variable, with some individuals losing a substantial amount of weight, others maintaining weight, and a few actually gaining weight. The media have focused on the subpopulation that loses little weight, contributing to a public perception that exercise has limited utility to cause weight loss. The purpose of the symposium was to present recent, novel data that help explain how compensatory behaviors contribute to a wide discrepancy in exercise-induced weight loss. The presentations provide evidence that some individuals adopt compensatory behaviors, that is, increased energy intake and/or reduced activity, that offset the exercise energy expenditure and limit weight loss. The challenge for both scientists and clinicians is to develop effective tools to identify which individuals are susceptible to such behaviors and to develop strategies to minimize their effect. PMID:23470300

  14. Exercise-Induced Systemic Venous Hypertension in the Fontan Circulation.

    PubMed

    Navaratnam, Devaraj; Fitzsimmons, Samantha; Grocott, Michael; Rossiter, Harry B; Emmanuel, Yaso; Diller, Gerard-Paul; Gordon-Walker, Timothy; Jack, Sandy; Sheron, Nick; Pappachan, John; Pratap, Jayant Nick; Vettukattil, Joseph J; Veldtman, Gruschen

    2016-05-15

    Increasingly end-organ injury is being demonstrated late after institution of the Fontan circulation, particularly liver fibrosis and cirrhosis. The exact mechanisms for these late phenomena remain largely elusive. Hypothesizing that exercise induces precipitous systemic venous hypertension and insufficient cardiac output for the exercise demand, that is, a possible mechanism for end-organ injury, we sought to demonstrate the dynamic exercise responses in systemic venous perfusion (SVP) and concurrent end-organ perfusion. Ten stable Fontan patients and 9 control subjects underwent incremental cycle ergometry-based cardiopulmonary exercise testing. SVP was monitored in the right upper limb, and regional tissue oxygen saturation was monitored in the brain and kidney using near-infrared spectroscopy. SVP rose profoundly in concert with workload in the Fontan group, described by the regression equation 15.97 + 0.073 watts per mm Hg. In contrast, SVP did not change in healthy controls. Regional renal (p <0.01) and cerebral tissue saturations (p <0.001) were significantly lower and decrease more rapidly in Fontan patients. We conclude that in a stable group of adult patients with Fontan circulation, high-intensity exercise was associated with systemic venous hypertension and reduced systemic oxygen delivery. This physiological substrate has the potential to contribute to end-organ injury.

  15. [Exercise-induced urticaria and angioedema - case report].

    PubMed

    Stelmach, Iwona; Sztafińska, Anna; Lechańka, Joanna; Balcerak, Joanna; Jerzyńska, Joanna

    2014-01-01

    Urticaria is a heterogeneous group of disorders, with various clinical manifestations and intensity of symptoms. Urticaria can be induced with a wide variety of environmental stimuli, such as cold, pressure, vibration, sunlight, exercise, temperature changes, heat, and water. In a select group of patients, exercise can induce a spectrum of urticaria symptoms, ranging from cutaneous pruritus and warmth, generalised urticaria, angioedema, and the appearance of such additional manifestations as collapse, upper respiratory distress, and anaphylaxis. Specific provocation tests should be carried out on an individual basis to investigate the suspected cause and proper diagnosis. Modification of activities and behaviour is the mainstay of treatment in patients with physical urticaria. The aim of this study was to emphasise that primary care paediatricians should be able to recognise physical urticaria, supply a patient with rescue medications, and refer him/her to a specialist. In the article, the authors present a 13-year-old girl with typical urticaria lesions and angioedema after exercise. According to the history, physical examination, and provocation test, exercise-induced urticaria and angioedema were diagnosed.

  16. Exercise-induced effects on a gym atmosphere.

    PubMed

    Žitnik, M; Bučar, K; Hiti, B; Barba, Ž; Rupnik, Z; Založnik, A; Žitnik, E; Rodrìguez, L; Mihevc, I; Žibert, J

    2016-06-01

    We report results of analysis of a month-long measurement of indoor air and environment quality parameters in one gym during sporting activities such as football, basketball, volleyball, badminton, boxing, and fitness. We have determined an average single person's contribution to the increase of temperature, humidity, and dust concentration in the gym air volume of 12500 m(3) : during 90-min exercise performed at an average heart rate of 143 ± 10 bpm, a single person evaporated 0.94 kg of water into the air by sweating, contributed 0.03 K to the air temperature rise and added 1.5 μg/m(3) and 5 ng/m(3) to the indoor concentration of inhalable particles (PM10 ) and Ca concentration, respectively. As the breathing at the observed exercise intensity was about three times faster with respect to the resting condition and as the exercise-induced PM10 concentration was about two times larger than outdoors, a sportsman in the gym would receive about a sixfold higher dose of PM10 inside than he/she would have received at rest outside.

  17. Exercise-Induced Pulmonary Edema in a Triathlon

    PubMed Central

    Yamanashi, Hirotomo; Koyamatsu, Jun; Nobuyoshi, Masaharu; Murase, Kunihiko; Maeda, Takahiro

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. Family physicians have more opportunities to attend athletic competitions as medical staff at first-aid centers because of the increasing popularity of endurance sports. Case. A 38-year-old man who participated in a triathlon race experienced difficulty in breathing after swimming and was moved to a first-aid center. His initial oxygen saturation was 82% and a thoracic computed tomography scan showed bilateral ground glass opacity in the peripheral lungs. His diagnosis was noncardiogenic pulmonary edema associated with exercise or swimming: exercise-induced pulmonary edema (EIPE) or swimming-induced pulmonary edema (SIPE). Treatment with furosemide and corticosteroid relieved his symptoms of pulmonary edema. Discussion. Noncardiogenic pulmonary edema associated with endurance sports is not common, but knowledge about EIPE/SIPE or neurogenic pulmonary edema associated with hyponatremia, which is called Ayus-Arieff syndrome, is crucial. Knowledge and caution for possible risk factors, such as exposure to cold water or overhydration, are essential for both medical staff and endurance athletes. Conclusion. To determine the presence of pulmonary edema associated with strenuous exercise, oxygen saturation should be used as a screening tool at a first-aid center. To avoid risks for EIPE/SIPE, knowledge about these diseases is essential for medical staff and for athletes who perform extreme exercise. PMID:26229538

  18. Iron–sulfur cluster biogenesis and human disease

    PubMed Central

    Rouault, Tracey A.; Tong, Wing Hang

    2008-01-01

    Iron–sulfur (Fe–S) clusters are essential for numerous biological processes, including mitochondrial respiratory chain activity and various other enzymatic and regulatory functions. Human Fe–S cluster assembly proteins are frequently encoded by single genes, and inherited defects in some of these genes cause disease. Recently, the spectrum of diseases attributable to abnormal Fe–S cluster biogenesis has extended beyond Friedreich ataxia to include a sideroblastic anemia with deficiency of glutaredoxin 5 and a myopathy associated with a deficiency of a Fe–S cluster assembly scaffold protein, ISCU. Mutations within other mammalian Fe–S cluster assembly genes could be causative for human diseases that manifest distinctive combinations of tissue-specific impairments. Thus, defects in the iron–sulfur cluster biogenesis pathway could underlie many human diseases. PMID:18606475

  19. Biogenesis of iron-sulfur clusters in mammalian cells: new insights and relevance to human disease

    PubMed Central

    Rouault, Tracey A.

    2012-01-01

    Iron-sulfur (Fe-S) clusters are ubiquitous cofactors composed of iron and inorganic sulfur. They are required for the function of proteins involved in a wide range of activities, including electron transport in respiratory chain complexes, regulatory sensing, photosynthesis and DNA repair. The proteins involved in the biogenesis of Fe-S clusters are evolutionarily conserved from bacteria to humans, and many insights into the process of Fe-S cluster biogenesis have come from studies of model organisms, including bacteria, fungi and plants. It is now clear that several rare and seemingly dissimilar human diseases are attributable to defects in the basic process of Fe-S cluster biogenesis. Although these diseases –which include Friedreich’s ataxia (FRDA), ISCU myopathy, a rare form of sideroblastic anemia, an encephalomyopathy caused by dysfunction of respiratory chain complex I and multiple mitochondrial dysfunctions syndrome – affect different tissues, a feature common to many of them is that mitochondrial iron overload develops as a secondary consequence of a defect in Fe-S cluster biogenesis. This Commentary outlines the basic steps of Fe-S cluster biogenesis as they have been defined in model organisms. In addition, it draws attention to refinements of the process that might be specific to the subcellular compartmentalization of Fe-S cluster biogenesis proteins in some eukaryotes, including mammals. Finally, it outlines several important unresolved questions in the field that, once addressed, should offer important clues into how mitochondrial iron homeostasis is regulated, and how dysfunction in Fe-S cluster biogenesis can contribute to disease. PMID:22382365

  20. Magnetosome biogenesis in magnetotactic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Uebe, René; Schüler, Dirk

    2016-09-13

    Magnetotactic bacteria derive their magnetic orientation from magnetosomes, which are unique organelles that contain nanometre-sized crystals of magnetic iron minerals. Although these organelles have evident potential for exciting biotechnological applications, a lack of genetically tractable magnetotactic bacteria had hampered the development of such tools; however, in the past decade, genetic studies using two model Magnetospirillum species have revealed much about the mechanisms of magnetosome biogenesis. In this Review, we highlight these new insights and place the molecular mechanisms of magnetosome biogenesis in the context of the complex cell biology of Magnetospirillum spp. Furthermore, we discuss the diverse properties of magnetosome biogenesis in other species of magnetotactic bacteria and consider the value of genetically 'magnetizing' non-magnetotactic bacteria. Finally, we discuss future prospects for this highly interdisciplinary and rapidly advancing field. PMID:27620945

  1. Exercise-induced hypoalgesia - interval versus continuous mode.

    PubMed

    Kodesh, Einat; Weissman-Fogel, Irit

    2014-07-01

    Aerobic exercise at approximately 70% of maximal aerobic capacity moderately reduces pain sensitivity and attenuates pain, even after a single session. If the analgesic effects depend on exercise intensity, then high-intensity interval exercise at 85% of maximal aerobic capacity should further reduce pain. The aim of this study was to explore the exercise-induced analgesic effects of high-intensity interval aerobic exercise and to compare them with the analgesic effects of moderate continuous aerobic exercise. Twenty-nine young untrained healthy males were randomly assigned to aerobic-continuous (70% heart rate reserve (HRR)) and interval (4 × 4 min at 85% HRR and 2 min at 60% HRR between cycles) exercise modes, each lasting 30 min. Psychophysical pain tests, pressure and heat pain thresholds (HPT), and tonic heat pain (THP) were conducted before and after exercise sessions. Repeated measures ANOVA was used for data analysis. HPT increased (p = 0.056) and THP decreased (p = 0.013) following exercise unrelated to exercise type. However, the main time effect (pre-/postexercise) was a trend of increased HPT (45.6 ± 1.9 °C to 46.2 ± 1.8 °C; p = 0.082) and a significant reduction in THP (from 50.7 ± 25 to 45.9 ± 25.4 numeric pain scale; p = 0.043) following interval exercise. No significant change was found for the pressure pain threshold following either exercise type. In conclusion, interval exercise (85% HRR) has analgesic effects on experimental pain perception. This, in addition to its cardiovascular, muscular, and metabolic advantages may promote its inclusion in pain management programs. PMID:24773287

  2. Air quality and temperature effects on exercise-induced bronchoconstriction.

    PubMed

    Rundell, Kenneth W; Anderson, Sandra D; Sue-Chu, Malcolm; Bougault, Valerie; Boulet, Louis-Philippe

    2015-04-01

    Exercise-induced bronchoconstriction (EIB) is exaggerated constriction of the airways usually soon after cessation of exercise. This is most often a response to airway dehydration in the presence of airway inflammation in a person with a responsive bronchial smooth muscle. Severity is related to water content of inspired air and level of ventilation achieved and sustained. Repetitive hyperpnea of dry air during training is associated with airway inflammatory changes and remodeling. A response during exercise that is related to pollution or allergen is considered EIB. Ozone and particulate matter are the most widespread pollutants of concern for the exercising population; chronic exposure can lead to new-onset asthma and EIB. Freshly generated emissions particulate matter less than 100 nm is most harmful. Evidence for acute and long-term effects from exercise while inhaling high levels of ozone and/or particulate matter exists. Much evidence supports a relationship between development of airway disorders and exercise in the chlorinated pool. Swimmers typically do not respond in the pool; however, a large percentage responds to a dry air exercise challenge. Studies support oxidative stress mediated pathology for pollutants and a more severe acute response occurs in the asthmatic. Winter sport athletes and swimmers have a higher prevalence of EIB, asthma and airway remodeling than other athletes and the general population. Because of fossil fuel powered ice resurfacers in ice rinks, ice rink athletes have shown high rates of EIB and asthma. For the athlete training in the urban environment, training during low traffic hours and in low traffic areas is suggested. PMID:25880506

  3. Supraglottoplasty as treatment of exercise induced laryngeal obstruction (EILO).

    PubMed

    Mehlum, Camilla Slot; Walsted, Emil Schwarz; Godballe, Christian; Backer, Vibeke

    2016-04-01

    Breathing difficulties during exertion may be caused by exercise-induced laryngeal obstruction (EILO). The diagnosis depends on visualization of the larynx during exercise, i.e. by continuous laryngoscopic exercise (CLE) test. In case of severe supraglottic collapse and pronounced symptoms during strenuous exertion, surgical treatment (supraglottoplasty) has been suggested. The aims of this study were to evaluate outcome and patient satisfaction after supraglottoplasty for EILO and to compare our results with previously reported data. During the period December 2010 to October 2013, 17 patients diagnosed with moderate to severe supraglottic EILO were treated by supraglottoplasty with microlaryngoscopic laser technique at our institutions. The severity of patients symptoms (VAS score) and CLE scores was evaluated pre- and postoperatively. We found a decrease in patients symptoms from median 80 points VAS score preoperatively to 20 points postoperatively (p < 0.001) and a decrease in CLE sum score from median 4.0 points to 2.5 points (p < 0.05). Several previous studies have recommended surgery for selected patients with supraglottic involvement, but these have mainly been based on case reports or on very few patients. This study is the second larger-scale study that documents the positive effect of supraglottoplasty as treatment of EILO in terms of reduced respiratory symptoms and decreased laryngeal obstruction assessed by post-operative CLE test. We suggest that surgery is a well-tolerated and effective treatment option for selected EILO patients with moderate to severe supraglottic obstruction during exercise and a high level of physical activity. PMID:26541712

  4. Circulating androgens in women: exercise-induced changes.

    PubMed

    Enea, Carina; Boisseau, Nathalie; Fargeas-Gluck, Marie Agnès; Diaz, Véronique; Dugué, Benoit

    2011-01-01

    Physical exercise is known to strongly stimulate the endocrine system in both sexes. Among these hormones, androgens (e.g. testosterone, androstenedione, dehydroepiandrosterone) play key roles in the reproductive system, muscle growth and the prevention of bone loss. In female athletes, excessive physical exercise may lead to disorders, including delay in the onset of puberty, amenorrhoea and premature osteoporosis. The free and total fractions of circulating androgens vary in response to acute and chronic exercise/training (depending on the type), but the physiological role of these changes is not completely understood. Although it is commonly accepted that only the free fraction of steroids has a biological action, this hypothesis has recently been challenged. Indeed, a change in the total fraction of androgen concentration may have a significant impact on cells (inducing genomic or non-genomic signalling). The purpose of this review, therefore, is to visit the exercise-induced changes in androgen concentrations and emphasize their potential effects on female physiology. Despite some discrepancies in the published studies (generally due to differences in the types and intensities of the exercises studied, in the hormonal status of the group of women investigated and in the methods for androgen determination), exercise is globally able to induce an increase in circulating androgens. This can be observed after both resistance and endurance acute exercises. For chronic exercise/training, the picture is definitely less clear and there are even circumstances where exercise leads to a decrease of circulating androgens. We suggest that those changes have significant impact on female physiology and physical performance. PMID:21142281

  5. Alveolar epithelial integrity in athletes with exercise-induced hypoxemia.

    PubMed

    Edwards, M R; Hunte, G S; Belzberg, A S; Sheel, A W; Worsley, D F; McKenzie, D C

    2000-10-01

    The effect of incremental exercise to exhaustion on the change in pulmonary clearance rate (k) of aerosolized (99m)Tc-labeled diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid ((99m)Tc-DTPA) and the relationship between k and arterial PO(2) (Pa(O(2))) during heavy work were investigated. Ten male cyclists (age = 25 +/- 2 yr, height = 180.9 +/- 4.0 cm, mass = 80.1 +/- 9.5 kg, maximal O(2) uptake = 5. 25 +/- 0.35 l/min, mean +/- SD) completed a pulmonary clearance test shortly (39 +/- 8 min) after a maximal O(2) uptake test. Resting pulmonary clearance was completed >/=24 h before or after the exercise test. Arterial blood was sampled at rest and at 1-min intervals during exercise. Minimum Pa(O(2)) values and maximum alveolar-arterial PO(2) difference ranged from 73 to 92 Torr and from 30 to 55 Torr, respectively. No significant difference between resting k and postexercise k for the total lung (0.55 +/- 0.20 vs. 0. 57 +/- 0.17 %/min, P > 0.05) was observed. Pearson product-moment correlation indicated no significant linear relationship between change in k for the total lung and minimum Pa(O(2)) (r = -0.26, P > 0.05). These results indicate that, averaged over subjects, pulmonary clearance of (99m)Tc-DTPA after incremental maximal exercise to exhaustion in highly trained male cyclists is unchanged, although the sampling time may have eliminated a transient effect. Lack of a linear relationship between k and minimum Pa(O(2)) during exercise suggests that exercise-induced hypoxemia occurs despite maintenance of alveolar epithelial integrity.

  6. Exercise-induced albuminuria is related to metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Greenberg, Sharon; Shenhar-Tsarfaty, Shani; Rogowski, Ori; Shapira, Itzhak; Zeltser, David; Weinstein, Talia; Lahav, Dror; Vered, Jaffa; Tovia-Brodie, Oholi; Arbel, Yaron; Berliner, Shlomo; Milwidsky, Assi

    2016-06-01

    Microalbuminuria (MA) is a known marker for endothelial dysfunction and future cardiovascular events. Exercise-induced albuminuria (EiA) may precede the appearance of MA. Associations between EiA and metabolic syndrome (MS) have not been assessed so far. Our aim was to investigate this association in a large sample of apparently healthy individuals with no baseline albuminuria. This was a cross-sectional study of 2,027 adults with no overt cardiovascular diseases who took part in a health survey program and had no baseline MA. Diagnosis of MS was based on harmonized criteria. All patients underwent an exercise test (Bruce protocol), and urinary albumin was measured before and after the examination. Urinary albumin-to-creatinine ratio (ACR) values before and after exercise were 0.40 (0.21-0.89) and 1.06 (0.43-2.69) mg/g for median (interquartile range) respectively. A total of 394 (20%) subjects had EiA; ACR rose from normal rest values (0.79 mg/g) to 52.28 mg/g after exercise (P < 0.001); this effect was not shown for the rest of the study population. EiA was related to higher prevalence of MS (13.8% vs. 27.1%, P < 0.001), higher metabolic equivalents (P < 0.001), higher baseline blood pressure (P < 0.001), and higher levels of fasting plasma glucose, triglycerides, and body mass index (P < 0.001). Multivariate binary logistic regression model showed that subjects with MS were 98% more likely to have EiA (95% confidence interval: 1.13-3.46, P = 0.016). In conclusion, EiA in the absence of baseline MA is independently related to MS.

  7. Air quality and temperature effects on exercise-induced bronchoconstriction.

    PubMed

    Rundell, Kenneth W; Anderson, Sandra D; Sue-Chu, Malcolm; Bougault, Valerie; Boulet, Louis-Philippe

    2015-04-01

    Exercise-induced bronchoconstriction (EIB) is exaggerated constriction of the airways usually soon after cessation of exercise. This is most often a response to airway dehydration in the presence of airway inflammation in a person with a responsive bronchial smooth muscle. Severity is related to water content of inspired air and level of ventilation achieved and sustained. Repetitive hyperpnea of dry air during training is associated with airway inflammatory changes and remodeling. A response during exercise that is related to pollution or allergen is considered EIB. Ozone and particulate matter are the most widespread pollutants of concern for the exercising population; chronic exposure can lead to new-onset asthma and EIB. Freshly generated emissions particulate matter less than 100 nm is most harmful. Evidence for acute and long-term effects from exercise while inhaling high levels of ozone and/or particulate matter exists. Much evidence supports a relationship between development of airway disorders and exercise in the chlorinated pool. Swimmers typically do not respond in the pool; however, a large percentage responds to a dry air exercise challenge. Studies support oxidative stress mediated pathology for pollutants and a more severe acute response occurs in the asthmatic. Winter sport athletes and swimmers have a higher prevalence of EIB, asthma and airway remodeling than other athletes and the general population. Because of fossil fuel powered ice resurfacers in ice rinks, ice rink athletes have shown high rates of EIB and asthma. For the athlete training in the urban environment, training during low traffic hours and in low traffic areas is suggested.

  8. mCSF1, a nucleus-encoded CRM protein required for the processing of many mitochondrial introns, is involved in the biogenesis of respiratory complexes I and IV in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Zmudjak, Michal; Colas des Francs-Small, Catherine; Keren, Ido; Shaya, Felix; Belausov, Eduard; Small, Ian; Ostersetzer-Biran, Oren

    2013-07-01

    The coding regions of many mitochondrial genes in plants are interrupted by intervening sequences that are classified as group II introns. Their splicing is essential for the expression of the genes they interrupt and hence for respiratory function, and is facilitated by various protein cofactors. Despite the importance of these cofactors, only a few of them have been characterized. CRS1-YhbY domain (CRM) is a recently recognized RNA-binding domain that is present in several characterized splicing factors in plant chloroplasts. The Arabidopsis genome encodes 16 CRM proteins, but these are largely uncharacterized. Here, we analyzed the intracellular location of one of these hypothetical proteins in Arabidopsis, mitochondrial CAF-like splicing factor 1 (mCSF1; At4 g31010), and analyzed the growth phenotypes and organellar activities associated with mcsf1 mutants in plants. Our data indicated that mCSF1 resides within mitochondria and its functions are essential during embryogenesis. Mutant plants with reduced mCSF1 displayed inhibited germination and retarded growth phenotypes that were tightly associated with reduced complex I and IV activities. Analogously to the functions of plastid-localized CRM proteins, analysis of the RNA profiles in wildtype and mcsf1 plants showed that mCSF1 acts in the splicing of many of the group II intron RNAs in Arabidopsis mitochondria.

  9. Cellulose biogenesis in Dictyostelium discoideum

    SciTech Connect

    Blanton, R.L.

    1993-12-31

    Organisms that synthesize cellulose can be found amongst the bacteria, protistans, fungi, and animals, but it is in plants that the importance of cellulose in function (as the major structural constituent of plant cell walls) and economic use (as wood and fiber) can be best appreciated. The structure of cellulose and its biosynthesis have been the subjects of intense investigation. One of the most important insights gained from these studies is that the synthesis of cellulose by living organisms involves much more than simply the polymerization of glucose into a (1{r_arrow}4)-{beta}-linked polymer. The number of glucoses in a polymer (the degree of polymerization), the crystalline form assumed by the glucan chains when they crystallize to form a microfibril, and the dimensions and orientation of the microfibrils are all subject to cellular control. Instead of cellulose biosynthesis, a more appropriate term might be cellulose biogenesis, to emphasize the involvement of cellular structures and mechanisms in controlling polymerization and directing crystallization and deposition. Dictyostelium discoideum is uniquely suitable for the study of cellulose biogenesis because of its amenability to experimental study and manipulation and the extent of our knowledge of its basic cellular mechanisms (as will be evident from the rest of this volume). In this chapter, I will summarize what is known about cellulose biogenesis in D. discoideum, emphasizing its potential to illuminate our understanding both of D. discoideum development and plant cellulose biogenesis.

  10. Nitric oxide regulates vascular adaptive mitochondrial dynamics.

    PubMed

    Miller, Matthew W; Knaub, Leslie A; Olivera-Fragoso, Luis F; Keller, Amy C; Balasubramaniam, Vivek; Watson, Peter A; Reusch, Jane E B

    2013-06-15

    Cardiovascular disease risk factors, such as diabetes, hypertension, dyslipidemia, obesity, and physical inactivity, are all correlated with impaired endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) function and decreased nitric oxide (NO) production. NO-mediated regulation of mitochondrial biogenesis has been established in many tissues, yet the role of eNOS in vascular mitochondrial biogenesis and dynamics is unclear. We hypothesized that genetic eNOS deletion and 3-day nitric oxide synthase (NOS) inhibition in rodents would result in impaired mitochondrial biogenesis and defunct fission/fusion and autophagy profiles within the aorta. We observed a significant, eNOS expression-dependent decrease in mitochondrial electron transport chain (ETC) protein subunits from complexes I, II, III, and V in eNOS heterozygotes and eNOS null mice compared with age-matched controls. In response to NOS inhibition with NG-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME) treatment in Sprague Dawley rats, significant decreases were observed in ETC protein subunits from complexes I, III, and IV as well as voltage-dependent anion channel 1. Decreased protein content of upstream regulators of mitochondrial biogenesis, cAMP response element-binding protein and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ coactivator-1α, were observed in response to 3-day L-NAME treatment. Both genetic eNOS deletion and NOS inhibition resulted in decreased manganese superoxide dismutase protein. L-NAME treatment resulted in significant changes to mitochondrial dynamic protein profiles with decreased fusion, increased fission, and minimally perturbed autophagy. In addition, L-NAME treatment blocked mitochondrial adaptation to an exercise intervention in the aorta. These results suggest that eNOS/NO play a role in basal and adaptive mitochondrial biogenesis in the vasculature and regulation of mitochondrial turnover. PMID:23585138

  11. Oxidants, Antioxidants, and the Beneficial Roles of Exercise-Induced Production of Reactive Species

    PubMed Central

    Gomes, Elisa Couto; Silva, Albená Nunes; de Oliveira, Marta Rubino

    2012-01-01

    This review offers an overview of the influence of reactive species produced during exercise and their effect on exercise adaptation. Reactive species and free radicals are unstable molecules that oxidize other molecules in order to become stable. Although they play important roles in our body, they can also lead to oxidative stress impairing diverse cellular functions. During exercise, reactive species can be produced mainly, but not exclusively, by the following mechanisms: electron leak at the mitochondrial electron transport chain, ischemia/reperfusion and activation of endothelial xanthine oxidase, inflammatory response, and autooxidation of catecholamines. Chronic exercise also leads to the upregulation of the body's antioxidant defence mechanism, which helps minimize the oxidative stress that may occur after an acute bout of exercise. Recent studies show a beneficial role of the reactive species, produced during a bout of exercise, that lead to important training adaptations: angiogenesis, mitochondria biogenesis, and muscle hypertrophy. The adaptations occur depending on the mechanic, and consequently biochemical, stimulus within the muscle. This is a new area of study that promises important findings in the sphere of molecular and cellular mechanisms involved in the relationship between oxidative stress and exercise. PMID:22701757

  12. Short and longer-term effects of creatine supplementation on exercise induced muscle damage

    PubMed Central

    Rosene, John; Matthews, Tracey; Ryan, Christine; Belmore, Keith; Bergsten, Alisa; Blaisdell, Jill; Gaylord, James; Love, Rebecca; Marrone, Michael; Ward, Kristine; Wilson, Eric

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to determine if creatine supplementation assisted with reducing the amount of exercise induced muscle damage and if creatine supplementation aided in recovery from exercise induced muscle damage. Two groups of subjects (group 1 = creatine; group 2 = placebo) participated in an eccentric exercise protocol following 7 and 30 days of creatine or placebo supplementation (20 g.d-1 for 7 d followed by 6g.d-1 for 23 d = 30 d). Prior to the supplementation period, measurements were obtained for maximal dynamic strength, maximal isometric force, knee range of motion, muscle soreness, and serum levels of creatine kinase (CK) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH). Following 7 days of creatine supplementation, on day 8, subjects began consuming 6 g.d-1 of creatine for 23 days. Additionally on days 8 and 31, subjects performed an eccentric exercise protocol using the knee extensors to induce muscle damage. Indirect markers of muscle damage, including maximal isometric force, knee range of motion, muscle soreness, and serum levels of CK and LDH, were collected at 12, 24, and 48 hours following each exercise bout. The results indicated that acute bouts of creatine have no effect on indirect markers of muscle damage for the acute (7 days) bout. However, maximal isometric force was greater for the creatine group versus placebo for the chronic (30 days) bout. This suggests that the ergogenic effect of creatine following 30 days of supplementation may have a positive impact on exercise induced muscle damage. Key points Eccentric muscle actions highly associated with exercise induced muscle damage. Creatine supplementation has ergogenic effect to increase protein synthesis. Creatine supplementation does not attenuate exercise induced muscle damage with short term supplementation (7 days). Increased maximal isometric force seen with creatine supplementation after 30 days following exercise induced muscle damage. Ergogenic effect of creatine

  13. Rescue of Heart Failure by Mitochondrial Recovery

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Heart failure (HF) is a multifactorial disease brought about by numerous, and oftentimes complex, etiological mechanisms. Although well studied, HF continues to affect millions of people worldwide and current treatments can only prevent further progression of HF. Mitochondria undoubtedly play an important role in the progression of HF, and numerous studies have highlighted mitochondrial components that contribute to HF. This review presents an overview of the role of mitochondrial biogenesis, mitochondrial oxidative stress, and mitochondrial permeability transition pore in HF, discusses ongoing studies that attempt to address the disease through mitochondrial targeting, and provides an insight on how these studies can affect future research on HF treatment. PMID:27032551

  14. Upregulation of Mitochondrial Content in Cytochrome c Oxidase Deficient Fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Kogot-Levin, Aviram; Saada, Ann; Leibowitz, Gil; Soiferman, Devorah; Douiev, Liza; Raz, Itamar; Weksler-Zangen, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    Cytochrome-c-oxidase (COX) deficiency is a frequent cause of mitochondrial disease and is associated with a wide spectrum of clinical phenotypes. We studied mitochondrial function and biogenesis in fibroblasts derived from the Cohen (CDs) rat, an animal model of COX deficiency. COX activity in CDs-fibroblasts was 50% reduced compared to control rat fibroblasts (P<0.01). ROS-production in CDs fibroblasts increased, along with marked mitochondrial fragmentation and decreased mitochondrial membrane-potential, indicating mitochondrial dysfunction. Surprisingly, cellular ATP content, oxygen consumption rate (OCR) and the extracellular acidification rate (ECAR) were unchanged. To clarify the discrepancy between mitochondrial dysfunction and ATP production, we studied mitochondrial biogenesis and turnover. The content of mitochondria was higher in CDs-fibroblasts. Consistently, AMPK activity and the expression of NRF1-target genes, NRF2 and PGC1-α that mediate mitochondrial biogenesis were increased (P<0.01 vs control fibroblast). In CDs-fibrobalsts, the number of autophagosomes (LC3+ puncta) containing mitochondria in CDs fibroblasts was similar to that in control fibroblasts, suggesting that mitophagy was intact. Altogether, our findings demonstrate that mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress are associated with an increase in mitochondrial biogenesis, resulting in preservation of ATP generation. PMID:27780242

  15. Myoglobin A79G polymorphism association with exercise-induced skeletal muscle damage.

    PubMed

    Cui, T; Jiang, M S

    2016-01-01

    We assessed the role of A79G, a polymorphism of the myoglobin gene (MB), in susceptibility to exercise-induced skeletal muscle damage. Between January 2012 and December 2014, a total of 166 cases with exercise-induced skeletal muscle damage and 166 controls were recruited into our study. Genotyping of MB A79G was carried out using polymerase chain reaction coupled with restriction fragment length polymorphism. Using unconditional logistic regression analysis, we found that the GG genotype of MB A79G was associated with higher risk of exercise-induced muscle damage compared with the wild-type genotype, and the OR (95%CI) was 2.91 (1.20-7.59). Compared with the AA genotype, the AG+GG genotype was associated with a significantly increased risk of exercise-induced muscle damage for those with blood lactic acid ≥1.80 mM (OR = 2.05; 95%CI = 1.09-3.88). In conclusion, we found that the A79G polymorphism of the MB gene plays an important role in influencing the development of exercise-induced skeletal muscle damage. PMID:27323063

  16. Chromoplast biogenesis and carotenoid accumulation.

    PubMed

    Li, Li; Yuan, Hui

    2013-11-15

    Chromoplasts are special organelles that possess superior ability to synthesize and store massive amounts of carotenoids. They are responsible for the distinctive colors found in fruits, flowers, and roots. Chromoplasts exhibit various morphologies and are derived from either pre-existing chloroplasts or other non-photosynthetic plastids such as proplastids, leucoplasts or amyloplasts. While little is known about the molecular mechanisms underlying chromoplast biogenesis, research progress along with proteomics study of chromoplast proteomes signifies various processes and factors important for chromoplast differentiation and development. Chromoplasts act as a metabolic sink that enables great biosynthesis and high storage capacity of carotenoids. The formation of chromoplasts enhances carotenoid metabolic sink strength and controls carotenoid accumulation in plants. The objective of this review is to provide an integrated view on our understanding of chromoplast biogenesis and carotenoid accumulation in plants.

  17. Organelle biogenesis and interorganellar connections

    PubMed Central

    Daniele, Tiziana; Schiaffino, Maria Vittoria

    2014-01-01

    Membrane contact sites (MCSs) allow the exchange of molecules and information between organelles, even when their membranes cannot fuse directly. In recent years, a number of functions have been attributed to these contacts, highlighting their critical role in cell homeostasis. Although inter-organellar connections typically involve the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), we recently reported the presence of a novel MCSs between melanosomes and mitochondria. Melanosome-mitochondrion contacts appear mediated by fibrillar bridges resembling the protein tethers linking mitochondria and the ER, both for their ultrastructural features and the involvement of Mitofusin 2. The frequency of these connections correlates spatially and timely with melanosome biogenesis, suggesting a functional link between the 2 processes and in general that organelle biogenesis in the secretory pathway requires interorganellar crosstalks at multiple steps. Here, we summarize the different functions attributed to MCSs, and discuss their possible relevance for the newly identified melanosome-mitochondrion liaison. PMID:25346798

  18. Deuterosome-mediated centriole biogenesis.

    PubMed

    Klos Dehring, Deborah A; Vladar, Eszter K; Werner, Michael E; Mitchell, Jennifer W; Hwang, Peter; Mitchell, Brian J

    2013-10-14

    The ability of cells to faithfully duplicate their two centrioles once per cell cycle is critical for proper mitotic progression and chromosome segregation. Multiciliated cells represent an interesting variation of centriole duplication in that these cells generate greater than 100 centrioles, which form the basal bodies of their motile cilia. This centriole amplification is proposed to require a structure termed the deuterosome, thought to be capable of promoting de novo centriole biogenesis. Here, we begin to molecularly characterize the deuterosome and identify it as a site for the localization of Cep152, Plk4, and SAS6. Additionally we identify CCDC78 as a centriole-associated and deuterosome protein that is essential for centriole amplification. Overexpression of Cep152, but not Plk4, SAS6, or CCDC78, drives overamplification of centrioles. However, in CCDC78 morphants, Cep152 fails to localize to the deuterosome and centriole biogenesis is impaired, indicating that CCDC78-mediated recruitment of Cep152 is required for deuterosome-mediated centriole biogenesis.

  19. Mitochondrial dysfunction in heart failure.

    PubMed

    Rosca, Mariana G; Hoppel, Charles L

    2013-09-01

    Heart failure (HF) is a complex chronic clinical syndrome. Energy deficit is considered to be a key contributor to the development of both cardiac and skeletal myopathy. In HF, several components of cardiac and skeletal muscle bioenergetics are altered, such as oxygen availability, substrate oxidation, mitochondrial ATP production, and ATP transfer to the contractile apparatus via the creatine kinase shuttle. This review focuses on alterations in mitochondrial biogenesis and respirasome organization, substrate oxidation coupled with ATP synthesis in the context of their contribution to the chronic energy deficit, and mechanical dysfunction of the cardiac and skeletal muscle in HF. We conclude that HF is associated with decreased mitochondrial biogenesis and function in both heart and skeletal muscle, supporting the concept of a systemic mitochondrial cytopathy. The sites of mitochondrial defects are located within the electron transport and phosphorylation apparatus and differ with the etiology and progression of HF in the two mitochondrial populations (subsarcolemmal and interfibrillar) of cardiac and skeletal muscle. The roles of adrenergic stimulation, the renin-angiotensin system, and cytokines are evaluated as factors responsible for the systemic energy deficit. We propose a cyclic AMP-mediated mechanism by which increased adrenergic stimulation contributes to the mitochondrial dysfunction.

  20. Mitochondrial dysfunction in heart failure

    PubMed Central

    Rosca, Mariana G.; Hoppel, Charles L.

    2013-01-01

    Heart failure (HF) is a complex chronic clinical syndrome. Energy deficit is considered to be a key contributor to the development of both cardiac and skeletal myopathy. In HF several components of cardiac and skeletal muscle bioenergetics are altered, such as oxygen availability, substrate oxidation, mitochondrial ATP production, and ATP transfer to the contractile apparatus via the creatine kinase shuttle. This review focuses on alterations in mitochondrial biogenesis and respirasome organization, substrate oxidation coupled with ATP synthesis in the context of their contribution to the chronic energy deficit, and mechanical dysfunction of the cardiac and skeletal muscle in HF. We conclude that HF is associated with decreased mitochondrial biogenesis and function in both heart and skeletal muscle, supporting the concept of a systemic mitochondrial cytopathy. The sites of mitochondrial defects are located within the electron transport and phosphorylation apparatus, and differ with the etiology and progression of HF in the two mitochondrial populations (subsarcolemmal and interfibrillar) of cardiac and skeletal muscle. The roles of adrenergic stimulation, the renin-angiotensin system, and cytokines are evaluated as factors responsible for the systemic energy deficit. We propose a cylic AMP-mediated mechanism by which increased adrenergic stimulation contributes to the mitochondrial dysfunction. PMID:22948484

  1. Exercise training and immune crosstalk in breast cancer microenvironment: exploring the paradigms of exercise-induced immune modulation and exercise-induced myokines

    PubMed Central

    Goh, Jorming; Niksirat, Negin; Campbell, Kristin L

    2014-01-01

    Observational research suggests that exercise may reduce the risk of breast cancer and improve survival. One proposed mechanism for the protective effect of aerobic exercise related to cancer risk and outcomes, but has not been examined definitively, is the immune response to aerobic exercise. Two prevailing paradigms are proposed. The first considers the host immune response as modifiable by aerobic exercise training. This exercise-modulated immune-tumor crosstalk in the mammary microenvironment may alter the balance between tumor initiation and progression versus tumor suppression. The second paradigm considers the beneficial role of exercise-induced, skeletal muscle-derived cytokines, termed “myokines”. These myokines exert endocrine-like effects on multiple organs, including the mammary glands. In this systematic review, we i) define the role of macrophages and T-cells in breast cancer initiation and progression; ii) address the two paradigms that support exercise-induced immunomodulation; iii) systematically assessed the literature for exercise intervention that assessed biomarkers relevant to both paradigms in human intervention trials of aerobic exercise training, in healthy women and women with breast cancer; iv) incorporated pre-clinical animal studies and non-RCTs for background discussion of putative mechanisms, through which aerobic exercise training modulates the immunological crosstalk, or the myokine-tumor interaction in the tumor microenvironment; and v) speculated on the potential biomarkers and mechanisms that define an exercise-induced, anti-tumor “signature”, with a view toward developing relevant biomarkers for future aerobic exercise intervention trials. PMID:25360210

  2. Pharmacological approaches to restore mitochondrial function

    PubMed Central

    Andreux, Pénélope A.; Houtkooper, Riekelt H.; Auwerx, Johan

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction is not only a hallmark of rare inherited mitochondrial disorders, but is also implicated in age-related diseases, including those that affect the metabolic and nervous system, such as type 2 diabetes and Parkinson’s disease. Numerous pathways maintain and/or restore proper mitochondrial function, including mitochondrial biogenesis, mitochondrial dynamics, mitophagy, and the mitochondrial unfolded protein response. New and powerful phenotypic assays in cell-based models, as well as multicellular organisms, have been developed to explore these different aspects of mitochondrial function. Modulating mitochondrial function has therefore emerged as an attractive therapeutic strategy for a range of diseases, which has spurred active drug discovery efforts in this area. PMID:23666487

  3. Coronary arteriography and left ventriculography during spontaneous and exercise-induced ST segment elevation in patients with variant angina

    SciTech Connect

    Matsuda, Y.; Ozaki, M.; Ogawa, H.; Naito, H.; Yoshino, F.; Katayama, K.; Fujii, T.; Matsuzaki, M.; Kusukawa, R.

    1983-09-01

    The present study is an angiographic demonstration of coronary artery spasm during both spontaneous and exercise-induced angina in three patients with variant angina. In each case, clinical, ECG, coronary angiographic, and left ventriculographic observations were made at rest, during spontaneous angina, and during exercise-induced angina. The character of chest pain was similar during spontaneous and exercise-induced episodes. ST segment elevation was present in the anterior ECG leads during both episodes. The left anterior descending coronary artery became partially or totally obstructed during both types of attacks. When coronary spasm was demonstrated during both types of attacks, left ventriculography disclosed akinetic or dyskinetic wall motion in the area supplied by the involved artery. In those patients with reproducible exercise-induced ST segment elevation and chest pain, thallium-201 scintigraphy showed areas of reversible anteroseptal hypoperfusion. Thus in selected patients exercise-induced attacks of angina were similar to spontaneous episodes.

  4. Cardiopulmonary exercise testing in children and adolescents with asthma who report symptoms of exercise-induced bronchoconstriction.

    PubMed

    Joyner, Benny L; Fiorino, Elizabeth K; Matta-Arroyo, Esther; Needleman, Joshua P

    2006-11-01

    Patients with asthma often report symptoms of exercise-induced bronchoconstriction. We performed cardiopulmonary exercise testing to establish the cause of exercise limitation in patients with asthma, under treatment, who reported symptoms of exercise-induced bronchoconstriction. Ten of the 42 patients meeting criteria for inclusion in our study (24%) developed exercise-induced bronchoconstriction. Exercise limitation without exercise-induced bronchoconstriction was found in both obese and non-obese patients, suggesting that poor fitness is a problem independent of body habitus. Including cardiopulmonary exercise testing in the management of children with suspected exercise-induced bronchoconstriction would provide a better understanding of the etiology of their symptoms and facilitate more appropriate treatment.

  5. Unusual Case of Exercise-Induced ST Segment Elevation Alternans: Successful Treatment with Transluminal Angioplasty

    PubMed Central

    Mammen, George; Krajcer, Zvonimir; Leachman, Robert D.

    1983-01-01

    Alternans of the ST segment is sometimes observed in experimental studies but is rarely seen in the clinical setting. Described is a case of exercise-induced ST segment elevation alternans that was successfully treated with transluminal coronary artery angioplasty. Theories regarding the cause and mechanism of this phenomenon are discussed. Images PMID:15227140

  6. Thyroid hormone and estrogen regulate exercise-induced growth hormone release.

    PubMed

    Ignacio, Daniele Leão; da S Silvestre, Diego H; Cavalcanti-de-Albuquerque, João Paulo Albuquerque; Louzada, Ruy Andrade; Carvalho, Denise P; Werneck-de-Castro, João Pedro

    2015-01-01

    Growth hormone (GH) regulates whole body metabolism, and physical exercise is the most potent stimulus to induce its secretion in humans. The mechanisms underlying GH secretion after exercise remain to be defined. The aim of this study was to elucidate the role of estrogen and pituitary type 1 deiodinase (D1) activation on exercise-induced GH secretion. Ten days after bilateral ovariectomy, animals were submitted to 20 min of treadmill exercise at 75% of maximum aerobic capacity and tissues were harvested immediately or 30 min after exercise. Non-exercised animals were used as controls. A significant increase in D1 activity occurred immediately after exercise (~60%) in sham-operated animals and GH was higher (~6-fold) 30 min after exercise. Estrogen deficient rats exhibited basal levels of GH and D1 activity comparable to those found in control rats. However, after exercise both D1 activity and serum GH levels were blunted compared to sedentary rats. To understand the potential cause-effect of D1 activation in exercise-induced GH release, we pharmacologically blocked D1 activity by propylthiouracil (PTU) injection into intact rats and submitted them to the acute exercise session. D1 inhibition blocked exercise-induced GH secretion, although basal levels were unaltered. In conclusion, estrogen deficiency impairs the induction of thyroid hormone activating enzyme D1 in the pituitary, and GH release by acute exercise. Also, acute D1 activation is essential for exercise-induced GH response. PMID:25874614

  7. The Effects of Creatine Supplementation on Exercise-Induced Muscle Damage.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rawson, Eric S.; Gunn, Bridget; Clarkson, Priscilla M.

    2001-01-01

    Investigated the effects of oral creatine (Cr) supplementation on markers of exercise-induced muscle damage following high-force eccentric exercise in men randomly administered Cr or placebo. Results indicated that 5 days of Cr supplementation did not reduce indirect makers of muscle damage or enhance recovery from high-force eccentric exercise.…

  8. Influence of artistic gymnastics on iron nutritional status and exercise-induced hemolysis in female athletes.

    PubMed

    Sureira, Thaiz Mattos; Amancio, Olga Silverio; Pellegrini Braga, Josefina Aparecida

    2012-08-01

    This study evaluates the relationship between body iron losses and gains in artistic gymnastics female athletes. It shows that despite the low iron intake and exercise-induced hemolysis, iron deficiency or iron-deficiency anemia does not occur, but partial changes in the hematological profile do. The hypothesis that gymnasts' nutritional behavior contributes to anemia, which may be aggravated by exercise-induced hemolysis, led to this cross-sectional study, conducted with 43 female artistic gymnasts 6-16 yr old. The control group was formed by 40 nontraining girls, paired by age. Hemogram, serum iron, ferritin, soluble transferrin receptor, haptoglobin, total and fractional bilirubin, Type I urine, and parasitologic and occult fecal blood tests were evaluated. The athletes presented mean hematimetric and serum iron values (p = .020) higher than those of the control group. The bilirubin result discarded any hemolytic alteration in both groups. The haptoglobin results were lower in the athlete group (p = .002), confirming the incidence of exercise-induced hemolysis. Both groups presented low iron intake. The results suggest that artistic gymnastics practice leads to exercise-induced hemolysis and partially changes the hematological profile, although not causing iron deficiency or iron-deficiency anemia, even in the presence of low iron intake. PMID:22645172

  9. Influence of artistic gymnastics on iron nutritional status and exercise-induced hemolysis in female athletes.

    PubMed

    Sureira, Thaiz Mattos; Amancio, Olga Silverio; Pellegrini Braga, Josefina Aparecida

    2012-08-01

    This study evaluates the relationship between body iron losses and gains in artistic gymnastics female athletes. It shows that despite the low iron intake and exercise-induced hemolysis, iron deficiency or iron-deficiency anemia does not occur, but partial changes in the hematological profile do. The hypothesis that gymnasts' nutritional behavior contributes to anemia, which may be aggravated by exercise-induced hemolysis, led to this cross-sectional study, conducted with 43 female artistic gymnasts 6-16 yr old. The control group was formed by 40 nontraining girls, paired by age. Hemogram, serum iron, ferritin, soluble transferrin receptor, haptoglobin, total and fractional bilirubin, Type I urine, and parasitologic and occult fecal blood tests were evaluated. The athletes presented mean hematimetric and serum iron values (p = .020) higher than those of the control group. The bilirubin result discarded any hemolytic alteration in both groups. The haptoglobin results were lower in the athlete group (p = .002), confirming the incidence of exercise-induced hemolysis. Both groups presented low iron intake. The results suggest that artistic gymnastics practice leads to exercise-induced hemolysis and partially changes the hematological profile, although not causing iron deficiency or iron-deficiency anemia, even in the presence of low iron intake.

  10. Green Tea Catechin Consumption Enhances Exercise-Induced Abdominal Fat Loss

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aim: This study evaluated the influence of a green tea catechin beverage on body composition and fat distribution in overweight and obese adults during exercised-induced weight loss. Methods: Participants (N=132) were randomly assigned to receive a 500 mL beverage containing approximately 625 mg of...

  11. High protein diet maintains glucose production during exercise-induced energy deficit: a controlled trial

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Inadequate energy intake induces changes in endogenous glucose production (GP) to preserve muscle mass. Whether addition provision of dietary protein modulates GP response to energy deficit is unclear. The objective was to determine whether exercise-induced energy deficit effects on glucose metaboli...

  12. Thyroid Hormone and Estrogen Regulate Exercise-Induced Growth Hormone Release

    PubMed Central

    Ignacio, Daniele Leão; da S. Silvestre, Diego H.; Cavalcanti-de-Albuquerque, João Paulo Albuquerque; Louzada, Ruy Andrade

    2015-01-01

    Growth hormone (GH) regulates whole body metabolism, and physical exercise is the most potent stimulus to induce its secretion in humans. The mechanisms underlying GH secretion after exercise remain to be defined. The aim of this study was to elucidate the role of estrogen and pituitary type 1 deiodinase (D1) activation on exercise-induced GH secretion. Ten days after bilateral ovariectomy, animals were submitted to 20 min of treadmill exercise at 75% of maximum aerobic capacity and tissues were harvested immediately or 30 min after exercise. Non-exercised animals were used as controls. A significant increase in D1 activity occurred immediately after exercise (~60%) in sham-operated animals and GH was higher (~6-fold) 30 min after exercise. Estrogen deficient rats exhibited basal levels of GH and D1 activity comparable to those found in control rats. However, after exercise both D1 activity and serum GH levels were blunted compared to sedentary rats. To understand the potential cause-effect of D1 activation in exercise-induced GH release, we pharmacologically blocked D1 activity by propylthiouracil (PTU) injection into intact rats and submitted them to the acute exercise session. D1 inhibition blocked exercise-induced GH secretion, although basal levels were unaltered. In conclusion, estrogen deficiency impairs the induction of thyroid hormone activating enzyme D1 in the pituitary, and GH release by acute exercise. Also, acute D1 activation is essential for exercise-induced GH response. PMID:25874614

  13. EVALUATION OF THE BIOGENESIS SOIL WASHING TECHNOLOGY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The BioGenesis Enterprises, Inc. (BioGenesis) soil washing technology was demonstrated as part of the US Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) Superfund Innovative Technology Evaluation (SITE) program in November 1992. The demonstration was conducted over three days at a petrol...

  14. Membrane dynamics in autophagosome biogenesis.

    PubMed

    Carlsson, Sven R; Simonsen, Anne

    2015-01-15

    Bilayered phospholipid membranes are vital to the organization of the living cell. Based on fundamental principles of polarity, membranes create borders allowing defined spaces to be encapsulated. This compartmentalization is a prerequisite for the complex functional design of the eukaryotic cell, yielding localities that can differ in composition and operation. During macroautophagy, cytoplasmic components become enclosed by a growing double bilayered membrane, which upon closure creates a separate compartment, the autophagosome. The autophagosome is then primed for fusion with endosomal and lysosomal compartments, leading to degradation of the captured material. A large number of proteins have been found to be essential for autophagy, but little is known about the specific lipids that constitute the autophagic membranes and the membrane modeling events that are responsible for regulation of autophagosome shape and size. In this Commentary, we review the recent progress in our understanding of the membrane shaping and remodeling events that are required at different steps of the autophagy pathway. This article is part of a Focus on Autophagosome biogenesis. For further reading, please see related articles: 'ERES: sites for autophagosome biogenesis and maturation?' by Jana Sanchez-Wandelmer et al. (J. Cell Sci. 128, 185-192) and 'WIPI proteins: essential PtdIns3P effectors at the nascent autophagosome' by Tassula Proikas-Cezanne et al. (J. Cell Sci. 128, 207-217). PMID:25568151

  15. Peroxisome biogenesis in mammalian cells

    PubMed Central

    Fujiki, Yukio; Okumoto, Kanji; Mukai, Satoru; Honsho, Masanori; Tamura, Shigehiko

    2014-01-01

    To investigate peroxisome assembly and human peroxisome biogenesis disorders (PBDs) such as Zellweger syndrome, thirteen different complementation groups (CGs) of Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell mutants defective in peroxisome biogenesis have been isolated and established as a model research system. Successful gene-cloning studies by a forward genetic approach utilized a rapid functional complementation assay of CHO cell mutants led to isolation of human peroxin (PEX) genes. Search for pathogenic genes responsible for PBDs of all 14 CGs is now completed together with the homology search by screening the human expressed sequence tag database using yeast PEX genes. Peroxins are divided into three groups: (1) peroxins including Pex3p, Pex16p, and Pex19p, are responsible for peroxisome membrane biogenesis via classes I and II pathways; (2) peroxins that function in matrix protein import; (3) those such as three forms of Pex11p, Pex11pα, Pex11pβ, and Pex11pγ, are involved in peroxisome proliferation where DLP1, Mff, and Fis1 coordinately function. In membrane assembly, Pex19p forms complexes in the cytosol with newly synthesized PMPs including Pex16p and transports them to the receptor Pex3p, whereby peroxisomal membrane is formed (Class I pathway). Pex19p likewise forms a complex with newly made Pex3p and translocates it to the Pex3p receptor, Pex16p (Class II pathway). In matrix protein import, newly synthesized proteins harboring peroxisome targeting signal type 1 or 2 are recognized by Pex5p or Pex7p in the cytoplasm and are imported to peroxisomes via translocation machinery. In regard to peroxisome-cytoplasmic shuttling of Pex5p, Pex5p initially targets to an 800-kDa docking complex consisting of Pex14p and Pex13p and then translocates to a 500-kDa RING translocation complex. At the terminal step, Pex1p and Pex6p of the AAA family mediate the export of Pex5p, where Cys-ubiquitination of Pex5p is essential for the Pex5p exit. PMID:25177298

  16. All-trans retinoic acid induces oxidative phosphorylation and mitochondria biogenesis in adipocytes[S

    PubMed Central

    Tourniaire, Franck; Musinovic, Hana; Gouranton, Erwan; Astier, Julien; Marcotorchino, Julie; Arreguin, Andrea; Bernot, Denis; Palou, Andreu; Bonet, M. Luisa; Ribot, Joan; Landrier, Jean-François

    2015-01-01

    A positive effect of all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) on white adipose tissue (WAT) oxidative and thermogenic capacity has been described and linked to an in vivo fat-lowering effect of ATRA in mice. However, little is known about the effects of ATRA on mitochondria in white fat. Our objective has been to characterize the effect of ATRA on mitochondria biogenesis and oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) capacity in mature white adipocytes. Transcriptome analysis, oxygraphy, analysis of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA), and flow cytometry-based analysis of mitochondria density were performed in mature 3T3-L1 adipocytes after 24 h incubation with ATRA (2 µM) or vehicle. Selected genes linked to mitochondria biogenesis and function and mitochondria immunostaining were analyzed in WAT tissues of ATRA-treated as compared with vehicle-treated mice. ATRA upregulated the expression of a large set of genes linked to mtDNA replication and transcription, mitochondrial biogenesis, and OXPHOS in adipocytes, as indicated by transcriptome analysis. Oxygen consumption rate, mtDNA content, and staining of mitochondria were increased in the ATRA-treated adipocytes. Similar results were obtained in WAT depots of ATRA-treated mice. We conclude that ATRA impacts mitochondria in adipocytes, leading to increased OXPHOS capacity and mitochondrial content in these cells. PMID:25914170

  17. All-trans retinoic acid induces oxidative phosphorylation and mitochondria biogenesis in adipocytes.

    PubMed

    Tourniaire, Franck; Musinovic, Hana; Gouranton, Erwan; Astier, Julien; Marcotorchino, Julie; Arreguin, Andrea; Bernot, Denis; Palou, Andreu; Bonet, M Luisa; Ribot, Joan; Landrier, Jean-François

    2015-06-01

    A positive effect of all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) on white adipose tissue (WAT) oxidative and thermogenic capacity has been described and linked to an in vivo fat-lowering effect of ATRA in mice. However, little is known about the effects of ATRA on mitochondria in white fat. Our objective has been to characterize the effect of ATRA on mitochondria biogenesis and oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) capacity in mature white adipocytes. Transcriptome analysis, oxygraphy, analysis of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA), and flow cytometry-based analysis of mitochondria density were performed in mature 3T3-L1 adipocytes after 24 h incubation with ATRA (2 µM) or vehicle. Selected genes linked to mitochondria biogenesis and function and mitochondria immunostaining were analyzed in WAT tissues of ATRA-treated as compared with vehicle-treated mice. ATRA upregulated the expression of a large set of genes linked to mtDNA replication and transcription, mitochondrial biogenesis, and OXPHOS in adipocytes, as indicated by transcriptome analysis. Oxygen consumption rate, mtDNA content, and staining of mitochondria were increased in the ATRA-treated adipocytes. Similar results were obtained in WAT depots of ATRA-treated mice. We conclude that ATRA impacts mitochondria in adipocytes, leading to increased OXPHOS capacity and mitochondrial content in these cells.

  18. The mitochondrial nucleoid: integrating mitochondrial DNA into cellular homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Gilkerson, Robert; Bravo, Liliana; Garcia, Iraselia; Gaytan, Norma; Herrera, Alan; Maldonado, Alicia; Quintanilla, Brandi

    2013-05-01

    The packaging of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) into DNA-protein assemblies called nucleoids provides an efficient segregating unit of mtDNA, coordinating mtDNA's involvement in cellular metabolism. From the early discovery of mtDNA as "extranuclear" genetic material, its organization into nucleoids and integration into both the mitochondrial organellar network and the cell at large via a variety of signal transduction pathways, mtDNA is a crucial component of the cell's homeostatic network. The mitochondrial nucleoid is composed of a set of DNA-binding core proteins involved in mtDNA maintenance and transcription, and a range of peripheral factors, which are components of signaling pathways controlling mitochondrial biogenesis, metabolism, apoptosis, and retrograde mitochondria-to-nucleus signaling. The molecular interactions of nucleoid components with the organellar network and cellular signaling pathways provide exciting clues to the dynamic integration of mtDNA into cellular metabolic homeostasis.

  19. Plant Peroxisomes: Biogenesis and Function

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Jianping; Baker, Alison; Bartel, Bonnie; Linka, Nicole; Mullen, Robert T.; Reumann, Sigrun; Zolman, Bethany K.

    2012-01-01

    Peroxisomes are eukaryotic organelles that are highly dynamic both in morphology and metabolism. Plant peroxisomes are involved in numerous processes, including primary and secondary metabolism, development, and responses to abiotic and biotic stresses. Considerable progress has been made in the identification of factors involved in peroxisomal biogenesis, revealing mechanisms that are both shared with and diverged from non-plant systems. Furthermore, recent advances have begun to reveal an unexpectedly large plant peroxisomal proteome and have increased our understanding of metabolic pathways in peroxisomes. Coordination of the biosynthesis, import, biochemical activity, and degradation of peroxisomal proteins allows for highly dynamic responses of peroxisomal metabolism to meet the needs of a plant. Knowledge gained from plant peroxisomal research will be instrumental to fully understanding the organelle’s dynamic behavior and defining peroxisomal metabolic networks, thus allowing the development of molecular strategies for rational engineering of plant metabolism, biomass production, stress tolerance, and pathogen defense. PMID:22669882

  20. Biogenesis of light harvesting proteins.

    PubMed

    Dall'Osto, Luca; Bressan, Mauro; Bassi, Roberto

    2015-09-01

    The LHC family includes nuclear-encoded, integral thylakoid membrane proteins, most of which coordinate chlorophyll and xanthophyll chromophores. By assembling with the core complexes of both photosystems, LHCs form a flexible peripheral moiety for enhancing light-harvesting cross-section, regulating its efficiency and providing protection against photo-oxidative stress. Upon its first appearance, LHC proteins underwent evolutionary diversification into a large protein family with a complex genetic redundancy. Such differentiation appears as a crucial event in the adaptation of photosynthetic organisms to changing environmental conditions and land colonization. The structure of photosystems, including nuclear- and chloroplast-encoded subunits, presented the cell with a number of challenges for the control of the light harvesting function. Indeed, LHC-encoding messages are translated in the cytosol, and pre-proteins imported into the chloroplast, processed to their mature size and targeted to the thylakoids where are assembled with chromophores. Thus, a tight coordination between nuclear and plastid gene expression, in response to environmental stimuli, is required to adjust LHC composition during photoacclimation. In recent years, remarkable progress has been achieved in elucidating structure, function and regulatory pathways involving LHCs; however, a number of molecular details still await elucidation. In this review, we will provide an overview on the current knowledge on LHC biogenesis, ranging from organization of pigment-protein complexes to the modulation of gene expression, import and targeting to the photosynthetic membranes, and regulation of LHC assembly and turnover. Genes controlling these events are potential candidate for biotechnological applications aimed at optimizing light use efficiency of photosynthetic organisms. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Chloroplast biogenesis.

  1. Mitochondrial Plasticity in Obesity and Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Jelenik, Tomas

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Insulin resistance and its related diseases, obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), have been linked to changes in aerobic metabolism, pointing to a possible role of mitochondria in the development of insulin resistance. Recent Advances: Refined methodology of ex vivo high-resolution respirometry and in vivo magnetic resonance spectroscopy now allows describing several features of mitochondria in humans. In addition to measuring mitochondrial function at baseline and after exercise-induced submaximal energy depletion, the response of mitochondria to endocrine and metabolic challenges, termed mitochondrial plasticity, can be assessed using hyperinsulinemic clamp tests. While insulin resistant states do not uniformly relate to baseline and post-exercise mitochondrial function, mitochondrial plasticity is typically impaired in insulin resistant relatives of T2DM, in overt T2DM and even in type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM). Critical Issues: The variability of baseline mitochondrial function in the main target tissue of insulin action, skeletal muscle and liver, may be attributed to inherited and acquired changes in either mitochondrial quantity or quality. In addition to certain gene polymorphisms and aging, circulating glucose and lipid concentrations correlate with both mitochondrial function and plasticity. Future Directions: Despite the associations between features of mitochondrial function and insulin sensitivity, the question of a causal relationship between compromised mitochondrial plasticity and insulin resistance in the development of obesity and T2DM remains to be resolved. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 19, 258–268. PMID:22938510

  2. Mitochondrial Dysfunction in Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Boland, Michelle L.; Chourasia, Aparajita H.; Macleod, Kay F.

    2013-01-01

    A mechanistic understanding of how mitochondrial dysfunction contributes to cell growth and tumorigenesis is emerging beyond Warburg as an area of research that is under-explored in terms of its significance for clinical management of cancer. Work discussed in this review focuses less on the Warburg effect and more on mitochondria and how dysfunctional mitochondria modulate cell cycle, gene expression, metabolism, cell viability, and other established aspects of cell growth and stress responses. There is increasing evidence that key oncogenes and tumor suppressors modulate mitochondrial dynamics through important signaling pathways and that mitochondrial mass and function vary between tumors and individuals but the significance of these events for cancer are not fully appreciated. We explore the interplay between key molecules involved in mitochondrial fission and fusion and in apoptosis, as well as in mitophagy, biogenesis, and spatial dynamics of mitochondria and consider how these distinct mechanisms are coordinated in response to physiological stresses such as hypoxia and nutrient deprivation. Importantly, we examine how deregulation of these processes in cancer has knock on effects for cell proliferation and growth. We define major forms of mitochondrial dysfunction and address the extent to which the functional consequences of such dysfunction can be determined and exploited for cancer diagnosis and treatment. PMID:24350057

  3. NAD(+)-dependent activation of Sirt1 corrects the phenotype in a mouse model of mitochondrial disease.

    PubMed

    Cerutti, Raffaele; Pirinen, Eija; Lamperti, Costanza; Marchet, Silvia; Sauve, Anthony A; Li, Wei; Leoni, Valerio; Schon, Eric A; Dantzer, Françoise; Auwerx, Johan; Viscomi, Carlo; Zeviani, Massimo

    2014-06-01

    Mitochondrial disorders are highly heterogeneous conditions characterized by defects of the mitochondrial respiratory chain. Pharmacological activation of mitochondrial biogenesis has been proposed as an effective means to correct the biochemical defects and ameliorate the clinical phenotype in these severely disabling, often fatal, disorders. Pathways related to mitochondrial biogenesis are targets of Sirtuin1, a NAD(+)-dependent protein deacetylase. As NAD(+) boosts the activity of Sirtuin1 and other sirtuins, intracellular levels of NAD(+) play a key role in the homeostatic control of mitochondrial function by the metabolic status of the cell. We show here that supplementation with nicotinamide riboside, a natural NAD(+) precursor, or reduction of NAD(+) consumption by inhibiting the poly(ADP-ribose) polymerases, leads to marked improvement of the respiratory chain defect and exercise intolerance of the Sco2 knockout/knockin mouse, a mitochondrial disease model characterized by impaired cytochrome c oxidase biogenesis. This strategy is potentially translatable into therapy of mitochondrial disorders in humans. PMID:24814483

  4. Exercise-induced neuroprotective effects on neurodegenerative diseases: the key role of trophic factors.

    PubMed

    Campos, Carlos; Rocha, Nuno Barbosa F; Lattari, Eduardo; Paes, Flávia; Nardi, António E; Machado, Sérgio

    2016-06-01

    Age-related neurodegenerative disorders, like Alzheimer's or Parkinson's disease, are becoming a major issue to public health care. Currently, there is no effective pharmacological treatment to address cognitive impairment in these patients. Here, we aim to explore the role of exercise-induced trophic factor enhancement in the prevention or delay of cognitive decline in patients with neurodegenerative diseases. There is a significant amount of evidence from animal and human studies that links neurodegenerative related cognitive deficits with changes on brain and peripheral trophic factor levels. Several trials with elderly individuals and patients with neurodegenerative diseases report exercise induced cognitive improvements and changes on trophic factor levels including BDNF, IGF-I, among others. Further studies with healthy aging and clinical populations are needed to understand how diverse exercise interventions produce different variations in trophic factor signaling. Genetic profiles and potential confounders regarding trophic factors should also be addressed in future trials. PMID:27086703

  5. Exercise-induced central fatigue: a review of the literature with implications for dance science research.

    PubMed

    Batson, Glenna

    2013-01-01

    The complex interplay between cortical and subcortical networks essential to motor performance is altered when muscles fatigue. The construct of exercise-induced human muscle fatigue has been attributed largely to the loss of a peripheral muscle's ability to produce force. Far less understood is "central fatigue," the result of alterations in central nervous system function. Central fatigue manifests as inadequate motor drive to the muscles and can occur even at sub-maximal levels of voluntary force. This study reviews the literature on exercise-induced central fatigue and its impact on motor performance. In reviewing conditions that may contributed to central fatigue, it addresses perceived exertion and repetitive strain and their relationship to central fatigue. Evidence supporting possible training protocols designed to offset central fatigue, while speculative, will be cited as potential areas of investigation for dance scientists.

  6. Polyphenols in Exercise Performance and Prevention of Exercise-Induced Muscle Damage

    PubMed Central

    Hrelia, Silvana

    2013-01-01

    Although moderate physical exercise is considered an essential component of a healthy lifestyle that leads the organism to adapt itself to different stresses, exercise, especially when exhaustive, is also known to induce oxidative stress, inflammation, and muscle damage. Many efforts have been carried out to identify dietary strategies or micronutrients able to prevent or at least attenuate the exercise-induced muscle damage and stress. Unfortunately most studies have failed to show protection, and at the present time data supporting the protective effect of micronutrients, as antioxidant vitamins, are weak and trivial. This review focuses on those polyphenols, present in the plant kingdom, that have been recently suggested to exert some positive effects on exercise-induced muscle damage and oxidative stress. In the last decade flavonoids as quercetin, catechins, and other polyphenols as resveratrol have caught the scientists attention. However, at the present time drawing a clear and definitive conclusion seems to be untimely. PMID:23983900

  7. Impact of Metformin on Exercise-Induced Metabolic Adaptations to Lower Type 2 Diabetes Risk.

    PubMed

    Malin, Steven K; Braun, Barry

    2016-01-01

    Combining metformin with exercise has been proposed to improve glucose homeostasis. However, we primarily discuss evidence suggesting that metformin and other pharmacological agents/dietary supplements (e.g., statins, resveratol, or antioxidants) may in fact oppose exercise-induced benefits on insulin sensitivity and cardiometabolic health. We explore the novel hypothesis that attenuation of oxidative stress from exercise by these exogenous compounds blunts metabolic adaptation. PMID:26583801

  8. The influence of β-alanine supplementation on markers of exercise-induced oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Smith-Ryan, Abbie E; Fukuda, David H; Stout, Jeffrey R; Kendall, Kristina L

    2014-01-01

    β-Alanine (BA) has been linked with oxidative protection. This study evaluated antioxidant properties of BA. Twenty-five men consumed BA or placebo for 4 weeks, and completed a 40-min run to induce oxidative stress. Blood draws were taken to measure 8-isoprostane, total antioxidant capacity, superoxide dismutase, and glutathione. BA had no significant influence on reducing exercise-induced oxidative stress. Confidence intervals suggest a reduction in lipid peroxidation. BA supplementation may have little influence as an antioxidant.

  9. The Role of Exercise-Induced Cardiovascular Adaptation in Brain Health.

    PubMed

    Tarumi, Takashi; Zhang, Rong

    2015-10-01

    Regular aerobic exercise improves brain health; however, a potential dose-response relationship and the underling physiological mechanisms remain unclear. Existing data support the following hypotheses: 1) exercise-induced cardiovascular adaptation plays an important role in improving brain perfusion, structure, and function, and 2) a hormetic relation seems to exist between the intensity of exercise and brain health, which needs to be further elucidated.

  10. Nedocromil sodium in the treatment of exercise-induced asthma: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Spooner, C; Rowe, B H; Saunders, L D

    2000-07-01

    Exercise-induced asthma (or bronchoconstriction) afflicts millions of people worldwide. While generally self-limiting, it can hinder performance and reduce activity levels, thus it is an important condition to diagnose and treat. The objective of this review was to assess the prophylactic effect of a single dose of nedocromil sodium on exercise-induced asthma. The Cochrane Airways Group trials register, the Cochrane Controlled Trials Register, Current Contents, reference lists of relevant articles, review articles and textbooks were searched for randomized trials comparing a single dose of nedocromil to placebo to prevent exercise-induced asthma in people >6 yrs of age. Authors and the drug manufacturer were contacted for additional trials. Trial quality assessments and data extraction were conducted independently by two reviewers. Authors were contacted when possible. Twenty trials were included. All were rated as having good methodological quality. Nedocromil inhibited bronchoconstriction in all age groups. The pooled weighted mean difference for the maximum percentage fall in forced expiratory volume in one second was 15.6%, (95% confidence interval (95% CI): 13.2-18.1) and for the peak expiratory flow was 15.0% (95% CI: 8.3-21.6). These differences are both statistically and clinically significant. After nedocromil the time to recover normal lung function was <10 min compared to >30 min with placebo. Nedocromil had a greater effect on people with a fall in lung function of >30% from baseline. There were no significant adverse effects reported with this short-term use. In conclusion, Nedocromil taken before exercise appears to reduce the severity and duration of exercise-induced bronchoconstriction. This effect appears to be more pronounced as severity increases.

  11. Suppression of exercise-induced angina by magnesium sulfate in patients with variant angina

    SciTech Connect

    Kugiyama, K.; Yasue, H.; Okumura, K.; Goto, K.; Minoda, K.; Miyagi, H.; Matsuyama, K.; Kojima, A.; Koga, Y.; Takahashi, M.

    1988-11-01

    The effects of intravenous magnesium on exercise-induced angina were examined in 15 patients with variant angina and in 13 patients with stable effort angina and were compared with those of placebo. Symptom-limited bicycle exercise and thallium-201 myocardial scintigraphy were performed after intravenous administration of 0.27 mmol/kg body weight of magnesium sulfate and after placebo on different days. In all patients, serum magnesium levels after administration of magnesium sulfate were about twofold higher than levels after placebo. Exercise-induced angina associated with transient ST segment elevation occurred in 11 patients with variant angina receiving placebo and in only 2 of these patients receiving magnesium (p less than 0.005). On the other hand, exercise-induced angina was not suppressed by magnesium in any patient with stable effort angina. In these patients there was no significant difference in exercise duration after administration of placebo versus after administration of magnesium. The size of the perfusion defect as measured by thallium-201 scintigraphy was significantly less in patients with variant angina receiving magnesium than that in those receiving placebo (p less than 0.001), whereas it was not significantly different in patients with stable effort angina receiving placebo versus magnesium. In conclusion, exercise-induced angina is suppressed by intravenous magnesium in patients with variant angina but not in patients with stable effort angina. This beneficial effect of magnesium in patients with variant angina is most likely due to improvement of regional myocardial blood flow by suppression of coronary artery spasm.

  12. Primary renal magnesium wasting: an unusual clinical picture of exercise-induced symptoms.

    PubMed

    Stark, Christopher M; Nylund, Cade M; Gorman, Gregory H; Lechner, Brent L

    2016-04-01

    Magnesium is one of the most abundant cations in the human body and plays a key role as a metabolic enzyme cofactor and regulatory ion for neurons and cardiomyocytes. Hypomagnesemia due to isolated primary renal magnesium wasting is a rare clinical condition typically associated with neurological hyperexcitability. Exercise-related gastrointestinal symptoms are caused by ischemic, mechanical, or neurohormonal changes. The role of hypomagnesemia in gastrointestinal symptoms is not well understood. We present a case of a 15-year-old male who presented with exercise-induced abdominal pain, nausea, and vomiting, who was found to have profound hypomagnesemia and inappropriately elevated fractional excretion of magnesium (FEMg). Testing for multiple intrinsic and extrinsic etiologies of renal magnesium wasting was inconclusive. He was diagnosed with primary renal magnesium wasting and his symptoms resolved acutely with intravenous magnesium sulfate and with long-term oral magnesium chloride. Primary renal magnesium wasting is a rare clinical entity that can cause extreme hypomagnesemia. It has not been associated previously with exercise-induced gastrointestinal symptoms. The effects of hypomagnesemia on the human gastrointestinal tract are not well established. This case offers unique insights into the importance of magnesium homeostasis in the gastrointestinal tract. Exercise-induced splanchnic hypoperfusion may contribute to gastrointestinal symptoms observed in this chronically hypomagnesemic patient. PMID:27117800

  13. The 5-HT3 receptor is essential for exercise-induced hippocampal neurogenesis and antidepressant effects.

    PubMed

    Kondo, M; Nakamura, Y; Ishida, Y; Shimada, S

    2015-11-01

    Exercise has a variety of beneficial effects on brain structure and function, such as hippocampal neurogenesis, mood and memory. Previous studies have shown that exercise enhances hippocampal neurogenesis, induces antidepressant effects and improves learning behavior. Brain serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT) levels increase following exercise, and the 5-HT system has been suggested to have an important role in these exercise-induced neuronal effects. However, the precise mechanism remains unclear. In this study, analysis of the 5-HT type 3A receptor subunit-deficient (htr3a(-/-)) mice revealed that lack of the 5-HT type 3 (5-HT3) receptor resulted in loss of exercise-induced hippocampal neurogenesis and antidepressant effects, but not of learning enhancement. Furthermore, stimulation of the 5-HT3 receptor promoted neurogenesis. These findings demonstrate that the 5-HT3 receptor is the critical target of 5-HT action in the brain following exercise, and is indispensable for hippocampal neurogenesis and antidepressant effects induced by exercise. This is the first report of a pivotal 5-HT receptor subtype that has a fundamental role in exercise-induced morphological changes and psychological effects.

  14. Food-dependent exercise-induced anaphylaxis due to wheat in a young woman.

    PubMed

    Ahanchian, Hamid; Farid, Reza; Ansari, Elham; Kianifar, Hamid Reza; Jabbari Azad, Farahzad; Jafari, Seyed Ali; Purreza, Reza; Noorizadeh, Shadi

    2013-03-01

    Food Dependent Exercise-Induced Allergy is a rare condition. However, the occurrence of anaphylaxis is increasing especially in young people. The diagnosis of anaphylaxis is based on clinical criteria and can be supported by laboratory tests such as serum tryptase and positive skin test results for specific IgE to potential triggering allergens. Anaphylaxis prevention needs strict avoidance of confirmed relevant allergen. Food-exercise challenge test may be an acceptable method for diagnosis of Food Dependent Exercise-Induced Allergy and dietary elimination of food is recommended to manage it. In this study, a 32 year-old woman visited the allergy clinic with a history of several episodes of hives since 11 years ago and 3 life-threatening attacks of anaphylaxis during the previous 6 months. The onsets of majority of these attacks were due to physical activity after breakfast. On Blood RAST test, the panel of common food Allergens was used and she had positive test only to wheat flour. On skin prick tests for common food allergens she showed a 6 millimeter wheal with 14 mm flare to Wheat Extract. The rest of allergens were negative.The patient was diagnosed as wheat-dependent exercise-induced, and all foods containing wheat were omitted from her diet. In this report we emphasized on the importance of careful history taking in anaphylaxis diagnosis.

  15. Hemodynamic effects of high intensity interval training in COPD patients exhibiting exercise-induced dynamic hyperinflation.

    PubMed

    Nasis, I; Kortianou, E; Vasilopoulou, Μ; Spetsioti, S; Louvaris, Z; Kaltsakas, G; Davos, C H; Zakynthinos, S; Koulouris, N G; Vogiatzis, I

    2015-10-01

    Dynamic hyperinflation (DH) has a significant adverse effect on cardiovascular function during exercise in COPD patients. COPD patients with (n = 25) and without (n = 11) exercise-induced DH undertook an incremental (IET) and a constant-load exercise test (CLET) sustained at 75% peak work (WRpeak) prior to and following an interval cycling exercise training regime (set at 100% WRpeak with 30-s work/30-s rest intervals) lasting for 12 weeks. Cardiac output (Q) was assessed by cardio-bio-impedance (PhysioFlow, enduro, PF-O7) to determine Q mean response time (QMRT) at onset (QMRT(ON)) and offset (QMRT(OFF)) of CLET. Post-rehabilitation only those patients exhibiting exercise-induced DH demonstrated significant reductions in QMRT(ON) (from 82.2 ± 4.3 to 61.7 ± 4.2 s) and QMRT(OFF) (from 80.5 ± 3.8 to 57.2 ± 4.9 s ). These post-rehabilitation adaptations were associated with improvements in inspiratory capacity, thereby suggesting that mitigation of the degree of exercise-induced DH improves central hemodynamic responses in COPD patients.

  16. The basic chemistry of exercise-induced DNA oxidation: oxidative damage, redox signaling, and their interplay

    PubMed Central

    Cobley, James N.; Margaritelis, Nikos V.; Morton, James P.; Close, Graeme L.; Nikolaidis, Michalis G.; Malone, John K.

    2015-01-01

    Acute exercise increases reactive oxygen and nitrogen species generation. This phenomenon is associated with two major outcomes: (1) redox signaling and (2) macromolecule damage. Mechanistic knowledge of how exercise-induced redox signaling and macromolecule damage are interlinked is limited. This review focuses on the interplay between exercise-induced redox signaling and DNA damage, using hydroxyl radical (·OH) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) as exemplars. It is postulated that the biological fate of H2O2 links the two processes and thus represents a bifurcation point between redox signaling and damage. Indeed, H2O2 can participate in two electron signaling reactions but its diffusion and chemical properties permit DNA oxidation following reaction with transition metals and ·OH generation. It is also considered that the sensing of DNA oxidation by repair proteins constitutes a non-canonical redox signaling mechanism. Further layers of interaction are provided by the redox regulation of DNA repair proteins and their capacity to modulate intracellular H2O2 levels. Overall, exercise-induced redox signaling and DNA damage may be interlinked to a greater extent than was previously thought but this requires further investigation. PMID:26136689

  17. The U.S. Olympic Committee experience with exercise-induced bronchospasm, 1984.

    PubMed

    Voy, R O

    1986-06-01

    Exercise-induced bronchospasm is a medical deterrent to an athlete's natural ability to perform. The U.S. Olympic Committee has met the challenge of recognizing and dealing with this common yet unappreciated medical complication aggravated by athletic exertion. Prior to the 1984 Los Angeles Olympic Games the U.S. Olympic Committee developed a screening program to identify members of its Olympic team who suffered from asthma or exercise-induced bronchospasm. The screening identified 67 of 597 Olympic athletes with asthma or exercise-induced bronchospasm. Coordination of medical care by contact between members of the American Academy of Allergy and Immunology, the U.S. Olympic Committee Chief Medical Officer, the athlete's personal physician, and the athlete was done. Medications approved for use in these conditions by the International Olympic Committee Medical Commission policies were prescribed. Forty-one medals were won by this group of handicapped athletes. Their example will raise the hopes and aspirations of countless young allergic and asthmatic children who dream of the thrills and health benefits of physical performance at almost any level of competition. PMID:3088378

  18. Acute exercise induces biphasic increase in respiratory mRNA in skeletal muscle

    SciTech Connect

    Ikeda, Shin-ichi; Kizaki, Takako; Haga, Shukoh; Ohno, Hideki; Takemasa, Tohru

    2008-04-04

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor {gamma} coactivator-1{alpha} (PGC-1{alpha}) promotes the expression of oxidative enzymes in skeletal muscle. We hypothesized that activation of the p38 MAPK (mitogen-activated protein kinase) in response to exercise was associated with exercise-induced PGC-1{alpha} and respiratory enzymes expression and aimed to demonstrate this under the physiological level. We subjected mice to a single bout of treadmill running and found that the exercise induced a biphasic increase in the expression of respiratory enzymes mRNA. The second phase of the increase was accompanied by an increase in PGC-1{alpha} protein, but the other was not. Administration of SB203580 (SB), an inhibitor of p38 MAPK, suppressed the increase in PGC-1{alpha} expression and respiratory enzymes mRNA in both phases. These data suggest that p38 MAPK is associated with the exercise-induced expression of PGC-1{alpha} and biphasic increase in respiratory enzyme mRNAs in mouse skeletal muscle under physiological conditions.

  19. [Exercise-induced asthma in children and oral terbutaline. A dose-response relationship study].

    PubMed

    Hertz, B; Fuglsang, G; Holm, E B

    1994-09-26

    We wanted to assess the protective effects on exercise-induced asthma as well as the clinical efficacy and safety of increasing doses of a new sustained-release formulation of terbutaline sulphate in 17 asthmatic children aged 6-12 years (mean 9 years). Placebo, 2, 4, and 6 mg terbutaline were given b.i.d. for 14 days in a randomized, double-blind, cross-over design. At the end of each two week period, an exercise test was performed and plasma terbutaline was measured. Compared with placebo, no significant effect was seen on asthma symptoms monitored at home, or on exercise-induced asthma. The percentage falls in FEV1 after the exercise test were 36, 35, 27 and 28%, after placebo, 4, 8 and 12 mg terbutaline/day, respectively. A small but statistically significant dose-related increase was seen in morning and evening peak expiratory flow (PEF) recordings. It is concluded that continuous treatment, even with high doses or oral terbutaline, does not offer clinically useful protection against exercise-induced asthma. PMID:7985255

  20. Contribution of endothelium-derived hyperpolarizing factor to exercise-induced vasodilation in health and hypercholesterolemia.

    PubMed

    Ozkor, Muhiddin A; Hayek, Salim S; Rahman, Ayaz M; Murrow, Jonathan R; Kavtaradze, Nino; Lin, Ji; Manatunga, Amita; Quyyumi, Arshed A

    2015-02-01

    The role of endothelium-derived hyperpolarizing factor (EDHF) in either the healthy circulation or in those with hypercholesterolemia is unknown. In healthy and hypercholesterolemic subjects, we measured forearm blood flow (FBF) using strain-gauge plethysmography at rest, during graded handgrip exercise, and after sodium nitroprusside infusion. Measurements were repeated after l-NMMA, tetraethylammonium (TEA), and combined infusions. At rest, l-NMMA infusion reduced FBF in healthy but not hypercholesterolemic subjects. At peak exercise, vasodilation was lower in hypercholesterolemic compared to healthy subjects (274% vs 438% increase in FBF, p=0.017). TEA infusion reduced exercise-induced vasodilation in both healthy and hypercholesterolemic subjects (27%, p<0.0001 and -20%, p<0.0001, respectively). The addition of l-NMMA to TEA further reduced FBF in healthy (-14%, p=0.012) but not in hypercholesterolemic subjects, indicating a reduced nitric oxide and greater EDHF-mediated contribution to exercise-induced vasodilation in hypercholesterolemia. In conclusion, exercise-induced vasodilation is impaired and predominantly mediated by EDHF in hypercholesterolemic subjects. CLINICAL TRIAL REGISTRATION IDENTIFIER NCT00166166: PMID:25648989

  1. The transcriptional coactivator PGC-1alpha mediates exercise-induced angiogenesis in skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Chinsomboon, Jessica; Ruas, Jorge; Gupta, Rana K; Thom, Robyn; Shoag, Jonathan; Rowe, Glenn C; Sawada, Naoki; Raghuram, Srilatha; Arany, Zoltan

    2009-12-15

    Peripheral arterial disease (PAD) affects 5 million people in the US and is the primary cause of limb amputations. Exercise remains the single best intervention for PAD, in part thought to be mediated by increases in capillary density. How exercise triggers angiogenesis is not known. PPARgamma coactivator (PGC)-1alpha is a potent transcriptional co-activator that regulates oxidative metabolism in a variety of tissues. We show here that PGC-1alpha mediates exercise-induced angiogenesis. Voluntary exercise induced robust angiogenesis in mouse skeletal muscle. Mice lacking PGC-1alpha in skeletal muscle failed to increase capillary density in response to exercise. Exercise strongly induced expression of PGC-1alpha from an alternate promoter. The induction of PGC-1alpha depended on beta-adrenergic signaling. beta-adrenergic stimulation also induced a broad program of angiogenic factors, including vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). This induction required PGC-1alpha. The orphan nuclear receptor ERRalpha mediated the induction of VEGF by PGC-1alpha, and mice lacking ERRalpha also failed to increase vascular density after exercise. These data demonstrate that beta-adrenergic stimulation of a PGC-1alpha/ERRalpha/VEGF axis mediates exercise-induced angiogenesis in skeletal muscle.

  2. Mitochondrial Retrograde Signaling: Triggers, Pathways, and Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    da Cunha, Fernanda Marques; Torelli, Nicole Quesada; Kowaltowski, Alicia J.

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondria are essential organelles for eukaryotic homeostasis. Although these organelles possess their own DNA, the vast majority (>99%) of mitochondrial proteins are encoded in the nucleus. This situation makes systems that allow the communication between mitochondria and the nucleus a requirement not only to coordinate mitochondrial protein synthesis during biogenesis but also to communicate eventual mitochondrial malfunctions, triggering compensatory responses in the nucleus. Mitochondria-to-nucleus retrograde signaling has been described in various organisms, albeit with differences in effector pathways, molecules, and outcomes, as discussed in this review. PMID:26583058

  3. HDL biogenesis, remodeling, and catabolism.

    PubMed

    Zannis, Vassilis I; Fotakis, Panagiotis; Koukos, Georgios; Kardassis, Dimitris; Ehnholm, Christian; Jauhiainen, Matti; Chroni, Angeliki

    2015-01-01

    In this chapter, we review how HDL is generated, remodeled, and catabolized in plasma. We describe key features of the proteins that participate in these processes, emphasizing how mutations in apolipoprotein A-I (apoA-I) and the other proteins affect HDL metabolism. The biogenesis of HDL initially requires functional interaction of apoA-I with the ATP-binding cassette transporter A1 (ABCA1) and subsequently interactions of the lipidated apoA-I forms with lecithin/cholesterol acyltransferase (LCAT). Mutations in these proteins either prevent or impair the formation and possibly the functionality of HDL. Remodeling and catabolism of HDL is the result of interactions of HDL with cell receptors and other membrane and plasma proteins including hepatic lipase (HL), endothelial lipase (EL), phospholipid transfer protein (PLTP), cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP), apolipoprotein M (apoM), scavenger receptor class B type I (SR-BI), ATP-binding cassette transporter G1 (ABCG1), the F1 subunit of ATPase (Ecto F1-ATPase), and the cubulin/megalin receptor. Similarly to apoA-I, apolipoprotein E and apolipoprotein A-IV were shown to form discrete HDL particles containing these apolipoproteins which may have important but still unexplored functions. Furthermore, several plasma proteins were found associated with HDL and may modulate its biological functions. The effect of these proteins on the functionality of HDL is the topic of ongoing research. PMID:25522986

  4. Increased Insulin Sensitivity and Distorted Mitochondrial Adaptations during Muscle Unloading

    PubMed Central

    Qi, Zhengtang; Zhang, Yuan; Guo, Wei; Ji, Liu; Ding, Shuzhe

    2012-01-01

    We aimed to further investigate mitochondrial adaptations to muscle disuse and the consequent metabolic disorders. Male rats were submitted to hindlimb unloading (HU) for three weeks. Interestingly, HU increased insulin sensitivity index (ISI) and decreased blood level of triglyceride and insulin. In skeletal muscle, HU decreased expression of pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase 4 (PDK4) and its protein level in mitochondria. HU decreased mtDNA content and mitochondrial biogenesis biomarkers. Dynamin-related protein (Drp1) in mitochondria and Mfn2 mRNA level were decreased significantly by HU. Our findings provide more extensive insight into mitochondrial adaptations to muscle disuse, involving the shift of fuel utilization towards glucose, the decreased mitochondrial biogenesis and the distorted mitochondrial dynamics. PMID:23443131

  5. Protective and biogenesis effects of sodium hydrosulfide on brain mitochondria after cardiac arrest and resuscitation.

    PubMed

    Pan, Hao; Xie, Xuemeng; Chen, Di; Zhang, Jincheng; Zhou, Yaguang; Yang, Guangtian

    2014-10-15

    Mitochondrial dysfunction plays a critical role in brain injury after cardiac arrest and cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). Recent studies demonstrated that hydrogen sulfide (H2S) donor compounds preserve mitochondrial morphology and function during ischemia-reperfusion injury. In this study, we sought to explore the effects of sodium hydrosulfide (NaHS) on brain mitochondria 24h after cardiac arrest and resuscitation. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to 6min cardiac arrest and then resuscitated successfully. Rats received NaHS (0.5mg/kg) or vehicle (0.9% NaCl, 1.67ml/kg) 1min before the start of CPR intravenously, followed by a continuous infusion of NaHS (1.5mg/kg/h) or vehicle (5ml/kg/h) for 3h. Neurological deficit was evaluated 24h after resuscitation and then cortex was collected for assessments. As a result, we found that rats treated with NaHS revealed an improved neurological outcome and cortex mitochondrial morphology 24h after resuscitation. We also observed that NaHS therapy reduced intracellular reactive oxygen species generation and calcium overload, inhibited mitochondrial permeability transition pores, preserved mitochondrial membrane potential, elevated ATP level and ameliorated the cytochrome c abnormal distribution. Further studies indicated that NaHS administration increased mitochondrial biogenesis in cortex at the same time. Our findings suggested that administration of NaHS 1min prior CPR and followed by a continuous infusion ameliorated neurological dysfunction 24h after resuscitation, possibly through mitochondria preservation as well as by promoting mitochondrial biogenesis.

  6. All-Trans-Retinoic Acid Enhances Mitochondrial Function in Models of Human Liver.

    PubMed

    Tripathy, Sasmita; Chapman, John D; Han, Chang Y; Hogarth, Cathryn A; Arnold, Samuel L M; Onken, Jennifer; Kent, Travis; Goodlett, David R; Isoherranen, Nina

    2016-05-01

    All-trans-retinoic acid (atRA) is the active metabolite of vitamin A. The liver is the main storage organ of vitamin A, but activation of the retinoic acid receptors (RARs) in mouse liver and in human liver cell lines has also been shown. AlthoughatRA treatment improves mitochondrial function in skeletal muscle in rodents, its role in modulating mitochondrial function in the liver is controversial, and little data are available regarding the human liver. The aim of this study was to determine whetheratRA regulates hepatic mitochondrial activity.atRA treatment increased the mRNA and protein expression of multiple components of mitochondrialβ-oxidation, tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle, and respiratory chain. Additionally,atRA increased mitochondrial biogenesis in human hepatocytes and in HepG2 cells with and without lipid loading based on peroxisome proliferator activated receptor gamma coactivator 1αand 1βand nuclear respiratory factor 1 mRNA and mitochondrial DNA quantification.atRA also increasedβ-oxidation and ATP production in HepG2 cells and in human hepatocytes. Knockdown studies of RARα, RARβ, and PPARδrevealed that the enhancement of mitochondrial biogenesis andβ-oxidation byatRA requires peroxisome proliferator activated receptor delta. In vivo in mice,atRA treatment increased mitochondrial biogenesis markers after an overnight fast. Inhibition ofatRA metabolism by talarozole, a cytochrome P450 (CYP) 26 specific inhibitor, increased the effects ofatRA on mitochondrial biogenesis markers in HepG2 cells and in vivo in mice. These studies show thatatRA regulates mitochondrial function and lipid metabolism and that increasingatRA concentrations in human liver via CYP26 inhibition may increase mitochondrial biogenesis and fatty acidβ-oxidation and provide therapeutic benefit in diseases associated with mitochondrial dysfunction. PMID:26921399

  7. Aerobic training suppresses exercise-induced lipid peroxidation and inflammation in overweight/obese adolescent girls.

    PubMed

    Youssef, Hala; Groussard, Carole; Lemoine-Morel, Sophie; Pincemail, Joel; Jacob, Christophe; Moussa, Elie; Fazah, Abdallah; Cillard, Josiane; Pineau, Jean-Claude; Delamarche, Arlette

    2015-02-01

    This study aimed to determine whether aerobic training could reduce lipid peroxidation and inflammation at rest and after maximal exhaustive exercise in overweight/obese adolescent girls. Thirty-nine adolescent girls (14-19 years old) were classified as nonobese or overweight/obese and then randomly assigned to either the nontrained or trained group (12-week multivariate aerobic training program). Measurements at the beginning of the experiment and at 3 months consisted of body composition, aerobic fitness (VO2peak) and the following blood assays: pre- and postexercise lipid peroxidation (15F2a-isoprostanes [F2-Isop], lipid hydroperoxide [ROOH], oxidized LDL [ox-LDL]) and inflammation (myeloperoxidase [MPO]) markers. In the overweight/ obese group, the training program significantly increased their fat-free mass (FFM) and decreased their percentage of fat mass (%FM) and hip circumference but did not modify their VO2peak. Conversely, in the nontrained overweight/obese group, weight and %FM increased, and VO2peak decreased, during the same period. Training also prevented exercise-induced lipid peroxidation and/or inflammation in overweight/obese girls (F2-Isop, ROOH, ox-LDL, MPO). In addition, in the trained overweight/obese group, exercise-induced changes in ROOH, ox-LDL and F2-Isop were correlated with improvements in anthropometric parameters (waist-to-hip ratio, %FM and FFM). In conclusion aerobic training increased tolerance to exercise-induced oxidative stress in overweight/obese adolescent girls partly as a result of improved body composition. PMID:25387489

  8. Aerobic training suppresses exercise-induced lipid peroxidation and inflammation in overweight/obese adolescent girls.

    PubMed

    Youssef, Hala; Groussard, Carole; Lemoine-Morel, Sophie; Pincemail, Joel; Jacob, Christophe; Moussa, Elie; Fazah, Abdallah; Cillard, Josiane; Pineau, Jean-Claude; Delamarche, Arlette

    2015-02-01

    This study aimed to determine whether aerobic training could reduce lipid peroxidation and inflammation at rest and after maximal exhaustive exercise in overweight/obese adolescent girls. Thirty-nine adolescent girls (14-19 years old) were classified as nonobese or overweight/obese and then randomly assigned to either the nontrained or trained group (12-week multivariate aerobic training program). Measurements at the beginning of the experiment and at 3 months consisted of body composition, aerobic fitness (VO2peak) and the following blood assays: pre- and postexercise lipid peroxidation (15F2a-isoprostanes [F2-Isop], lipid hydroperoxide [ROOH], oxidized LDL [ox-LDL]) and inflammation (myeloperoxidase [MPO]) markers. In the overweight/ obese group, the training program significantly increased their fat-free mass (FFM) and decreased their percentage of fat mass (%FM) and hip circumference but did not modify their VO2peak. Conversely, in the nontrained overweight/obese group, weight and %FM increased, and VO2peak decreased, during the same period. Training also prevented exercise-induced lipid peroxidation and/or inflammation in overweight/obese girls (F2-Isop, ROOH, ox-LDL, MPO). In addition, in the trained overweight/obese group, exercise-induced changes in ROOH, ox-LDL and F2-Isop were correlated with improvements in anthropometric parameters (waist-to-hip ratio, %FM and FFM). In conclusion aerobic training increased tolerance to exercise-induced oxidative stress in overweight/obese adolescent girls partly as a result of improved body composition.

  9. Loss of functional endothelial connexin40 results in exercise-induced hypertension in mice.

    PubMed

    Morton, Susan K; Chaston, Daniel J; Howitt, Lauren; Heisler, Jillian; Nicholson, Bruce J; Fairweather, Stephen; Bröer, Stefan; Ashton, Anthony W; Matthaei, Klaus I; Hill, Caryl E

    2015-03-01

    During activity, coordinated vasodilation of microcirculatory networks with upstream supply vessels increases blood flow to skeletal and cardiac muscles and reduces peripheral resistance. Endothelial dysfunction in humans attenuates activity-dependent vasodilation, resulting in exercise-induced hypertension in otherwise normotensive individuals. Underpinning activity-dependent hyperemia is an ascending vasodilation in which the endothelial gap junction protein, connexin (Cx)40, plays an essential role. Because exercise-induced hypertension is proposed as a forerunner to clinical hypertension, we hypothesized that endothelial disruption of Cx40 function in mice may create an animal model of this condition. To this end, we created mice in which a mutant Cx40T152A was expressed alongside wildtype Cx40 selectively in the endothelium. Expression of the Cx40T152A transgene in Xenopus oocytes and mouse coronary endothelial cells in vitro impaired both electric and chemical conductance and acted as a dominant-negative against wildtype Cx40, Cx43, and Cx45, but not Cx37. Endothelial expression of Cx40T152A in Cx40T152ATg mice attenuated ascending vasodilation, without effect on radial coupling through myoendothelial gap junctions. Using radiotelemetry, Cx40T152ATg mice showed an activity-dependent increase in blood pressure, which was significantly greater than in wildtype mice, but significantly less than in chronically hypertensive, Cx40knockout mice. The increase in heart rate with activity was also greater than in wildtype or Cx40knockout mice. We conclude that the endothelial Cx40T152A mutation attenuates activity-dependent vasodilation, producing a model of exercise-induced hypertension. These data highlight the importance of endothelial coupling through Cx40 in regulating blood pressure during activity.

  10. Acute Calcium Ingestion Attenuates Exercise-induced Disruption of Calcium Homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Barry, Daniel W; Hansen, Kent C; Van Pelt, Rachael E; Witten, Michael; Wolfe, Pamela; Kohrt, Wendy M

    2011-01-01

    Purpose Exercise is associated with a decrease in bone mineral density under certain conditions. One potential mechanism is increased bone resorption due to an exercise-induced increase in parathyroid hormone (PTH), possibly triggered by dermal calcium loss. The purpose of this investigation was to determine whether calcium supplementation either before or during exercise attenuates exercise-induced increases in PTH and C-terminal telopeptide of type I collagen (CTX; a marker of bone resorption). Methods Male endurance athletes (n=20) completed three 35-km cycling time trials under differing calcium supplementation conditions: 1) 1000 mg calcium 20 minutes before exercise and placebo during, 2) placebo before and 250 mg calcium every 15 minutes during exercise (1000 mg total), or 3) placebo before and during exercise. Calcium was delivered in a 1000 mg/L solution. Supplementation was double-blinded and trials were performed in random order. PTH, CTX, bone-specific alkaline phosphatase (BAP; a marker of bone formation), and ionized calcium (iCa) were measured before and immediately after exercise. Results CTX increased and iCa decreased similarly in response to exercise under all test conditions. When compared to placebo, calcium supplementation before exercise attenuated the increase in PTH (55.8 ± 15.0 vs. 74.0 ± 14.2; mean ± SE; p=0.04); there was a similar trend (58.0 ± 17.4; p=0.07) for calcium supplementation during exercise. There were no effects of calcium on changes in CTX, BAP, and iCa. Conclusions Calcium supplementation before exercise attenuated the disruption of PTH. Further research is needed to determine the effects of repeated increases in PTH and CTX on bone (i.e., exercise training), and whether calcium supplementation can diminish any exercise-induced demineralization. PMID:20798655

  11. Genetic influences on exercise-induced adult hippocampal neurogenesis across 12 divergent mouse strains

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Peter J.; Kohman, Rachel A.; Miller, Daniel S.; Bhattacharya, Tushar K.; Brzezinska, Weronika J.; Rhodes, Justin S.

    2011-01-01

    New neurons are continuously born in the hippocampus of several mammalian species throughout adulthood. Adult neurogenesis represents a natural model for understanding how to grow and incorporate new nerve cells into pre-existing circuits in the brain. Finding molecules or biological pathways that increase neurogenesis has broad potential for regenerative medicine. One strategy is to identify mouse strains that display large versus small increases in neurogenesis in response to wheel running so the strains can be contrasted to find common genes or biological pathways associated with enhanced neuron formation. Therefore, mice from 12 different isogenic strains were housed with or without running wheels for 43 days to measure the genetic regulation of exercise-induced neurogenesis. The first 10 days mice received daily injections of BrdU to label dividing cells. Neurogenesis was measured as the total number of BrdU cells co-expressing NeuN mature neuronal marker in the hippocampal granule cell layer by immunohistochemistry. Exercise increased neurogenesis in all strains, but the magnitude significantly depended on genotype. Strain means for distance run on wheels, but not distance traveled in cages without wheels, were significantly correlated with strain mean level of neurogenesis. Further, certain strains displayed greater neurogenesis than others for a fixed level of running. Strain means for neurogenesis under sedentary conditions were not correlated with neurogenesis under runner conditions suggesting that different genes influence baseline versus exercise-induced neurogenesis. Genetic contributions to exercise-induced hippocampal neurogenesis suggest that it may be possible to identify genes and pathways associated with enhanced neuroplastic responses to exercise. PMID:21223504

  12. Personality Does not Influence Exercise-Induced Mood Enhancement Among Female Exercisers.

    PubMed

    Lane, Andrew M; Milton, Karen E; Terry, Peter C

    2005-09-01

    The present study investigated the influence of personality on exercise-induced mood changes. It was hypothesised that (a) exercise would be associated with significant mood enhancement across all personality types, (b) extroversion would be associated with positive mood and neuroticism with negative mood both pre- and post-exercise, and (c) personality measures would interact with exercise-induced mood changes. Participants were 90 female exercisers (M = 25.8 yr, SD = 9.0 yr) who completed the Eysenck Personality Inventory (EPI) once and the Brunel Mood Scale (BRUMS) before and after a 60-minute exercise session. Median splits were used to group participants into four personality types: stable introverts (n = 25), stable extroverts (n = 20), neurotic introverts (n = 26), and neurotic extroverts (n = 19). Repeated measures MANOVA showed significant mood enhancement following exercise across all personality types. Neuroticism was associated with negative mood scores pre- and post-exercise but the effect of extroversion on reported mood was relatively weak. There was no significant interaction effect between exercise-induced mood enhancement and personality. In conclusion, findings lend support to the notion that exercise is associated with improved mood. However, findings show that personality did not influence this effect, although neuroticism was associated with negative mood. Key PointsResearch in general psychology has found that stable personality trait are associated changes in mood states. Ninety females exercisers completed a personality test and mood scales before and after exercise. Results indicated mood changes were not associated with personality, although neuroticism was associated with negative mood.

  13. BDNF Expression in Perirhinal Cortex is Associated with Exercise-Induced Improvement in Object Recognition Memory

    PubMed Central

    Hopkins, Michael E.; Bucci, David J.

    2010-01-01

    Physical exercise induces widespread neurobiological adaptations and improves learning and memory. Most research in this field has focused on hippocampus-based spatial tasks and changes in brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) as a putative substrate underlying exercise-induced cognitive improvements. Chronic exercise can also be anxiolytic and causes adaptive changes in stress reactivity. The present study employed a perirhinal cortex-dependent object recognition task as well as the elevated plus maze to directly test for interactions between the cognitive and anxiolytic effects of exercise in male Long Evans rats. Hippocampal and perirhinal cortex tissue was collected to determine whether the relationship between BDNF and cognitive performance extends to this non-spatial and non-hippocampal-dependent task. We also examined whether the cognitive improvements persisted once the exercise regimen was terminated. Our data indicate that 4 weeks of voluntary exercise every-other-day improved object recognition memory. Importantly, BDNF expression in the perirhinal cortex of exercising rats was strongly correlated with object recognition memory. Exercise also decreased anxiety-like behavior, however there was no evidence to support a relationship between anxiety-like behavior and performance on the novel object recognition task. There was a trend for a negative relationship between anxiety-like behavior and hippocampal BDNF. Neither the cognitive improvements nor the relationship between cognitive function and perirhinal BDNF levels persisted after 2 weeks of inactivity. These are the first data demonstrating that region-specific changes in BDNF protein levels are correlated with exercise-induced improvements in non-spatial memory, mediated by structures outside the hippocampus and are consistent with the theory that, with regard to object recognition, the anxiolytic and cognitive effects of exercise may be mediated through separable mechanisms. PMID:20601027

  14. BDNF expression in perirhinal cortex is associated with exercise-induced improvement in object recognition memory.

    PubMed

    Hopkins, Michael E; Bucci, David J

    2010-09-01

    Physical exercise induces widespread neurobiological adaptations and improves learning and memory. Most research in this field has focused on hippocampus-based spatial tasks and changes in brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) as a putative substrate underlying exercise-induced cognitive improvements. Chronic exercise can also be anxiolytic and causes adaptive changes in stress-reactivity. The present study employed a perirhinal cortex-dependent object recognition task as well as the elevated plus maze to directly test for interactions between the cognitive and anxiolytic effects of exercise in male Long Evans rats. Hippocampal and perirhinal cortex tissue was collected to determine whether the relationship between BDNF and cognitive performance extends to this non-spatial and non-hippocampal-dependent task. We also examined whether the cognitive improvements persisted once the exercise regimen was terminated. Our data indicate that 4weeks of voluntary exercise every-other-day improved object recognition memory. Importantly, BDNF expression in the perirhinal cortex of exercising rats was strongly correlated with object recognition memory. Exercise also decreased anxiety-like behavior, however there was no evidence to support a relationship between anxiety-like behavior and performance on the novel object recognition task. There was a trend for a negative relationship between anxiety-like behavior and hippocampal BDNF. Neither the cognitive improvements nor the relationship between cognitive function and perirhinal BDNF levels persisted after 2weeks of inactivity. These are the first data demonstrating that region-specific changes in BDNF protein levels are correlated with exercise-induced improvements in non-spatial memory, mediated by structures outside the hippocampus and are consistent with the theory that, with regard to object recognition, the anxiolytic and cognitive effects of exercise may be mediated through separable mechanisms.

  15. Insights into chloroplast biogenesis and development.

    PubMed

    Pogson, Barry J; Ganguly, Diep; Albrecht-Borth, Verónica

    2015-09-01

    In recent years many advances have been made to obtain insight into chloroplast biogenesis and development. In plants several plastids types exist such as the proplastid (which is the progenitor of all plastids), leucoplasts (group of colourless plastids important for storage including elaioplasts (lipids), amyloplasts (starch) or proteinoplasts (proteins)), chromoplasts (yellow to orange-coloured due to carotenoids, in flowers or in old leaves as gerontoplasts), and the green chloroplasts. Chloroplasts are indispensable for plant development; not only by performing photosynthesis and thus rendering the plant photoautotrophic, but also for biochemical processes (which in some instances can also take place in other plastids types), such as the synthesis of pigments, lipids, and plant hormones and sensing environmental stimuli. Although we understand many aspects of these processes there are gaps in our understanding of the establishment of functional chloroplasts and their regulation. Why is that so? Even though chloroplast function is comparable in all plants and most of the algae, ferns and moss, detailed analyses have revealed many differences, specifically with respect to its biogenesis. As an update to our prior review on the genetic analysis of chloroplast biogenesis and development [1] herein we will focus on recent advances in Angiosperms (monocotyledonous and dicotyledonous plants) that provide novel insights and highlight the challenges and prospects for unravelling the regulation of chloroplast biogenesis specifically during the establishment of the young plants. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Chloroplast Biogenesis.

  16. Redox Regulation of Mitochondrial Function

    PubMed Central

    Handy, Diane E.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Redox-dependent processes influence most cellular functions, such as differentiation, proliferation, and apoptosis. Mitochondria are at the center of these processes, as mitochondria both generate reactive oxygen species (ROS) that drive redox-sensitive events and respond to ROS-mediated changes in the cellular redox state. In this review, we examine the regulation of cellular ROS, their modes of production and removal, and the redox-sensitive targets that are modified by their flux. In particular, we focus on the actions of redox-sensitive targets that alter mitochondrial function and the role of these redox modifications on metabolism, mitochondrial biogenesis, receptor-mediated signaling, and apoptotic pathways. We also consider the role of mitochondria in modulating these pathways, and discuss how redox-dependent events may contribute to pathobiology by altering mitochondrial function. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 16, 1323–1367. PMID:22146081

  17. Role of creatine supplementation in exercise-induced muscle damage: A mini review.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jooyoung; Lee, Joohyung; Kim, Seungho; Yoon, Daeyoung; Kim, Jieun; Sung, Dong Jun

    2015-10-01

    Muscle damage is induced by both high-intensity resistance and endurance exercise. Creatine is a widely used dietary supplement to improve exercise performance by reducing exercise-induced muscle damage. Many researchers have suggested that taking creatine reduces muscle damage by decreasing the inflammatory response and oxidative stress, regulating calcium homeostasis, and activating satellite cells. However, the underlying mechanisms of creatine and muscle damage have not been clarified. Therefore, this review discusses the regulatory effects of creatine on muscle damage by compiling the information collected from basic science and sports science research. PMID:26535213

  18. Two cases of food-dependent exercise-induced anaphylaxis with different culprit foods

    PubMed Central

    Mobayed, Hassan M.S.; Ali Al-Nesf, Maryam

    2014-01-01

    Food-dependent exercise-induced anaphylaxis (FDEIA) is one of the severe allergic reactions in which symptoms develop only if exercise takes place within a few hours of eating a specific food. It is important to consider FDEIA in cases of unexplained anaphylaxis as reactions can occur several hours after ingesting the culprit food(s). We herein report the first two cases of FDEIA in the Middle East. The first one is induced by wheat, while the other by peanut. The pathophysiology, predisposing factors, diagnosis, and treatment of FDEIA are also summarized here. PMID:24551018

  19. Effect of Antioxidant Supplementation on Exercise-Induced Cardiac Troponin Release in Cyclists: A Randomized Trial

    PubMed Central

    Haenen, Guido R.; Bast, Aalt; van Loon, Luc J. C.; van Dieijen-Visser, Marja P.; Meex, Steven J.R.

    2013-01-01

    Background Cardiac troponin is the biochemical gold standard to diagnose acute myocardial infarction. Interestingly however, elevated cardiac troponin concentrations are also frequently observed during and after endurance-type exercise. Oxidative stress associated with prolonged exercise has been proposed to contribute to cardiac troponin release. Therefore, the aim of this study was to assess the effect of 4 week astaxanthin supplementation (a potent cartenoid antioxidant) on antioxidant capacity and exercise-induced cardiac troponin release in cyclists. Methods Thirty-two well-trained male cyclists (age 25±5, weight 73±7 kg, maximum O2 uptake 60±5 mL·kg−1·min−1, Wmax 5.4±0.5 W·kg−1; mean ± SD) were repeatedly subjected to a laboratory based standardized exercise protocol before and after 4 weeks of astaxanthin (20 mg/day), or placebo supplementation in a double-blind randomized manner. Blood samples were obtained at baseline, at 60 min of cycling and immediately post-exercise (≈ 120 min). Results The pre-supplementation cycling trial induced a significant rise of median cardiac troponin T concentrations from 3.2 (IQR 3.0–4.2) to 4.7 ng/L (IQR 3.7–6.7), immediately post-exercise (p<0.001). Four weeks of astaxanthin supplementation significantly increased mean basal plasma astaxanthin concentrations from non-detectable values to 175±86 µg·kg−1. However, daily astaxanthin supplementation had no effect on exercise-induced cardiac troponin T release (p = 0.24), as measured by the incremental area under the curve. Furthermore, the elevation in basal plasma astaxanthin concentrations was not reflected in changes in antioxidant capacity markers (trolox equivalent antioxidant capacity, uric acid, and malondialdehyde). Markers of inflammation (high-sensitivity C-reactive protein) and exercise-induced skeletal muscle damage (creatine kinase) were equally unaffected by astaxanthin supplementation. Conclusion Despite substantial increases in

  20. Exercise-induced acute compartment syndrome in a young man, occurring after a short race

    PubMed Central

    Matar, Mousa; Vaitilingham, Siddharthan; Chalise, Shyam; Irooegbu, Nkem; Bang, Jane

    2016-01-01

    We describe a case of exercise-induced acute compartment syndrome (ACS) in a 23-year-old man who presented to his primary care physician 48 hours after he attempted to run a 5K race. He noticed searing pain in his left leg after the first half mile but had no other symptoms. He was referred to the emergency department and diagnosed with ACS, and a fasciotomy was done. A presentation of limb pain that is out of proportion to a known or suspected injury should prompt consideration of ACS. Early recognition and surgical management are essential to achieving the best possible outcome. PMID:27034546

  1. Acute Exercise-Induced Compartment Syndrome of the Leg- Don’t Miss It

    PubMed Central

    Khare, Manish Kumar; Mishra, Sumanta; Marhual, Jogesh Chandra

    2016-01-01

    Acute exercise induced compartment syndrome of leg is a very rare and very oftenly missed entity which leads to delay in its management. We are presenting such case in which diagnosis was established two days after the onset of symptoms. Urgent decompressive fasciotomy was done. After 3 months of follow up, patient has got full functional recovery of his affected limb. This case highlights the importance of keeping high index of clinical suspicion to diagnose the problem and manage promptly. We have reviewed the English literature and found only about 40 cases since 1945. PMID:27042521

  2. [About the ribosomal biogenesis in human].

    PubMed

    Tafforeau, Lionel

    2015-01-01

    Ribosomes are cellular ribonucleoprotein particles required for a fundamental mechanism, translation of the genetic information into proteins. Ribosome biogenesis is a highly complex pathway involving many maturation steps: ribosomal RNA (rRNA) synthesis, rRNA processing, pre-rRNA modifications, its assembly with ribosomal proteins in the nuceolus, export of the subunit precursors to the nucleoplasm and the cytoplasm. Ribosome biogenesis has mainly being investigated in yeast during these last 25 years. However, recent works have shown that, despite many similarities between yeast and human ribosome structure and biogenesis, human pre-rRNA processing is far more complex than in yeast. In order to better understand diseases related to a malfunction in ribosome synthesis, the ribosomopathies, research should be conducted directly in human cells and animal models. PMID:26152166

  3. Iron-sulfur cluster biogenesis in mammalian cells: new insights into the molecular mechanisms of cluster delivery

    PubMed Central

    Maio, Nunziata; Rouault, Tracey. A.

    2014-01-01

    Iron-sulfur (Fe-S) clusters are ancient, ubiquitous cofactors composed of iron and inorganic sulfur. The combination of the chemical reactivity of iron and sulfur, together with many variations of cluster composition, oxidation states and protein environments, enables Fe-S clusters to participate in numerous biological processes. Fe-S clusters are essential to redox catalysis in nitrogen fixation, mitochondrial respiration and photosynthesis, to regulatory sensing in key metabolic pathways (i. e. cellular iron homeostasis and oxidative stress response), and to the replication and maintenance of the nuclear genome. Fe-S cluster biogenesis is a multistep process that involves a complex sequence of catalyzed protein- protein interactions and coupled conformational changes between the components of several dedicated multimeric complexes. Intensive studies of the assembly process have clarified key points in the biogenesis of Fe-S proteins. However several critical questions still remain, such as: what is the role of frataxin? Why do some defects of Fe-S cluster biogenesis cause mitochondrial iron overload? How are specific Fe-S recipient proteins recognized in the process of Fe-S transfer? This review focuses on the basic steps of Fe-S cluster biogenesis, drawing attention to recent advances achieved on the identification of molecular features that guide selection of specific subsets of nascent Fe-S recipients by the cochaperone HSC20. Additionally, it outlines the distinctive phenotypes of human diseases due to mutations in the components of the basic pathway. PMID:25245479

  4. Exercise improves mitochondrial and redox-regulated stress responses in the elderly: better late than never!

    PubMed

    Cobley, James N; Moult, Peter R; Burniston, Jatin G; Morton, James P; Close, Graeme L

    2015-04-01

    Ageing is associated with several physiological declines to both the cardiovascular (e.g. reduced aerobic capacity) and musculoskeletal system (muscle function and mass). Ageing may also impair the adaptive response of skeletal muscle mitochondria and redox-regulated stress responses to an acute exercise bout, at least in mice and rodents. This is a functionally important phenomenon, since (1) aberrant mitochondrial and redox homeostasis are implicated in the pathophysiology of musculoskeletal ageing and (2) the response to repeated exercise bouts promotes exercise adaptations and some of these adaptations (e.g. improved aerobic capacity and exercise-induced mitochondrial remodelling) offset age-related physiological decline. Exercise-induced mitochondrial remodelling is mediated by upstream signalling events that converge on downstream transcriptional co-factors and factors that orchestrate a co-ordinated nuclear and mitochondrial transcriptional response associated with mitochondrial remodelling. Recent translational human investigations have demonstrated similar exercise-induced mitochondrial signalling responses in older compared with younger skeletal muscle, regardless of training status. This is consistent with data indicating normative mitochondrial remodelling responses to long-term exercise training in the elderly. Thus, human ageing is not accompanied by diminished mitochondrial plasticity to acute and chronic exercise stimuli, at least for the signalling pathways measured to date. Exercise-induced increases in reactive oxygen and nitrogen species promote an acute redox-regulated stress response that manifests as increased heat shock protein and antioxidant enzyme content. In accordance with previous reports in rodents and mice, it appears that sedentary ageing is associated with a severely attenuated exercise-induced redox stress response that might be related to an absent redox signal. In this regard, regular exercise training affords some protection

  5. Mitochondrial respiration regulates adipogenic differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yanmin; Marsboom, Glenn; Toth, Peter T; Rehman, Jalees

    2013-01-01

    Human mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are adult multipotent stem cells which can be isolated from bone marrow, adipose tissue as well as other tissues and have the capacity to differentiate into a variety of mesenchymal cell types such as adipocytes, osteoblasts and chondrocytes. Differentiation of stem cells into mature cell types is guided by growth factors and hormones, but recent studies suggest that metabolic shifts occur during differentiation and can modulate the differentiation process. We therefore investigated mitochondrial biogenesis, mitochondrial respiration and the mitochondrial membrane potential during adipogenic differentiation of human MSCs. In addition, we inhibited mitochondrial function to assess its effects on adipogenic differentiation. Our data show that mitochondrial biogenesis and oxygen consumption increase markedly during adipogenic differentiation, and that reducing mitochondrial respiration by hypoxia or by inhibition of the mitochondrial electron transport chain significantly suppresses adipogenic differentiation. Furthermore, we used a novel approach to suppress mitochondrial activity using a specific siRNA-based knockdown of the mitochondrial transcription factor A (TFAM), which also resulted in an inhibition of adipogenic differentiation. Taken together, our data demonstrates that increased mitochondrial activity is a prerequisite for MSC differentiation into adipocytes. These findings suggest that metabolic modulation of adult stem cells can maintain stem cell pluripotency or direct adult stem cell differentiation.

  6. Food-dependent exercise-induced anaphylaxis: a case related to chickpea ingestion and review.

    PubMed

    Wong, Chet G; Mace, Sean R

    2007-12-15

    : Food-dependent exercise-induced anaphylaxis (FDEIA) is recognized as a distinct category of exercise-induced anaphylaxis (EIA) but is very likely underdiagnosed. This report describes a 41-year-old Indian woman who experienced two separate episodes of anaphylaxis while dancing after she had eaten chickpea-containing foods. The chickpea, a small legume, is a staple ingredient in culinary traditions from around the world, especially in India, the Middle East, and North Africa. Chickpea-containing dishes are also becoming more widespread in the Western world with the growing popularity of South Asian, Middle Eastern, and African cuisines. It is important to consider FDEIA in cases of unexplained anaphylaxis as reactions can occur several hours after ingesting the culprit food(s). Furthermore, no reaction occurs if a sensitized individual eats the culprit food(s) without exercising afterward; therefore, triggering foods can easily be overlooked. Current ideas on the pathophysiology, predisposing factors, workup, and treatment of FDEIA are also summarized here.

  7. Comparison between two assessment methods for exercise-induced laryngeal obstructions.

    PubMed

    Norlander, Katarina; Christensen, Pernille M; Maat, Robert C; Halvorsen, Thomas; Heimdal, John Helge; Morén, Staffan; Rasmussen, Niels; Nordang, Leif

    2016-02-01

    Exercise-induced laryngeal obstructions (E-ILOs) are important differential diagnoses to exercise-induced asthma and are diagnosed by the continuous laryngoscopy exercise (CLE) test. There are two different methods for evaluating the severity of E-ILOs using recordings from the CLE test; the CLE score and EILOMEA. The aim of this study was to investigate the consistency between these methods. Using their respective method, the developers of each method evaluated 60 laryngoscopic recordings from patients with different subtypes and various levels of severity of E-ILOs. The CLE score evaluates glottic and supraglottic obstructions on a 4-grade scale. EILOMEA uses software to calculate the obstruction severity on continuous scales from a still frame of the larynx during maximal obstruction giving three parameters reflecting glottic and supraglottic obstruction. The means of the EILOMEA measures differed significantly for CLE score 1 vs. 2 and 2 vs. 3, but not for 0 vs. 1 for glottic as well as supraglottic obstructions. The EILOMEA method does not distinguish between CLE score 0 and 1, but otherwise the methods correlate. Since previous studies have suggested that only CLE scores of 2 and 3 reflect a severity of E-ILOs of clinical importance, this lack of the EILOMEA method is not crucial for a correct medical evaluation. PMID:26351037

  8. Benefits of dietary phytochemical supplementation on eccentric exercise-induced muscle damage: Is including antioxidants enough?

    PubMed

    Pereira Panza, Vilma Simões; Diefenthaeler, Fernando; da Silva, Edson Luiz

    2015-09-01

    The purpose of this review was to critically discuss studies that investigated the effects of supplementation with dietary antioxidant phytochemicals on recovery from eccentric exercise-induced muscle damage. The performance of physical activities that involve unaccustomed eccentric muscle actions-such as lowering a weight or downhill walking-can result in muscle damage, oxidative stress, and inflammation. These events may be accompanied by muscle weakness and delayed-onset muscle soreness. According to the current evidences, supplementation with dietary antioxidant phytochemicals appears to have the potential to attenuate symptoms associated with eccentric exercise-induced muscle damage. However, there are inconsistencies regarding the relationship between muscle damage and blood markers of oxidative stress and inflammation. Furthermore, the effectiveness of strategies appear to depend on a number of aspects inherent to phytochemical compounds as well as its food matrix. Methodological issues also may interfere with the proper interpretation of supplementation effects. Thus, the study may contribute to updating professionals involved in sport nutrition as well as highlighting the interest of scientists in new perspectives that can widen dietary strategies applied to training. PMID:26233864

  9. Wheat-dependent exercise-induced anaphylaxis in mice is caused by gliadin and glutenin treatments.

    PubMed

    Kozai, Hana; Yano, Hiromi; Matsuda, Tsukasa; Kato, Yasuko

    2006-01-15

    Various foods may be associated with food-dependent exercise-induced anaphylaxis (FDEIAn). However, although the most frequently reported cause of FDEIAn has been wheat, the mechanism of FDEIAn for wheat has remained largely uninvestigated. To investigate the effect of wheat-fractionated proteins on FDEIAn, female B10.A mice (16-20 g) were divided into four groups; i.e. salt-soluble (S-group), gliadin-rich (GLI-group), and glutenin-rich (GLU-group)-sensitized mice, and unsensitized mice. The three sensitized groups were run on a treadmill after oral intake of each wheat-fractionated protein. The mice showed a significant increase in serum IgE, especially in the GLI- and GLU-group. After oral administration of each wheat-fractionated protein, the running time until exhaustion was remarkably shorter for the GLI- and GLU-group than for the S-group and unsensitized mice. The level of intestinal erosion was higher in all the sensitized mice than that in the unsensitized ones after exhaustive running. Furthermore, moderate exercise for 30 min after oral ingestion of each wheat-fractionated protein also induced intestinal erosion in the GLI- and GLU-group. In addition, we observed leaking of gliadin and glutenin proteins out of the intestine into the liver. These results indicated that the main factor involved in wheat-dependent exercise-induced anaphylaxis might be the gliadin and glutenin in wheat proteins.

  10. Food-dependent, exercise-induced anaphylaxis: a study on 11 Japanese cases.

    PubMed

    Dohi, M; Suko, M; Sugiyama, H; Yamashita, N; Tadokoro, K; Juji, F; Okudaira, H; Sano, Y; Ito, K; Miyamoto, T

    1991-01-01

    Eleven patients with food-dependent, exercise-induced anaphylaxis were studied. Seven patients experienced anaphylactic symptoms only after eating certain foods, such as shellfish, wheat, and grape before exercise. In the remaining four patients, no specific food could be identified, but the act of eating itself predisposed to anaphylaxis. Their anaphylactic symptoms were all clearly distinguished from cholinergic urticaria by history. Patients who developed anaphylactic symptoms before 20 years of age (N = 7) were atopic themselves or had atopic first-degree relatives. Six patients had increased serum IgE levels, and IgE antibodies against the causative food allergens were detected by the skin prick test or RAST in four cases. In contrast, patients who developed the symptoms after 30 years of age (N = 4) appeared to have a less atopic background, and IgE levels were within normal range except in one case. Three of four patients in the latter group developed symptoms after ingesting food made of wheat followed by exercise. All patients were sensitive to wheat as determined by the skin prick test. In six of 11 patients, a considerable rise in plasma histamine concentration was observed after exercise challenge with treadmill alone, and food intake followed by exercise induced a further increase in one patient.

  11. Skin testing with food, codeine, and histamine in exercise-induced anaphylaxis.

    PubMed

    Lin, R Y; Barnard, M

    1993-06-01

    A 33-year-old Chinese woman with exercise-induced anaphylaxis after ingesting Chinese seafood noodle soup, was studied for skin test reactivity to food, histamine, and codeine. Prick skin tests were negative for shrimp, wheat, and chicken soup base, but were positive at 5 to 6 mm (wheal diameter) to the whole broth after it had been combined with the other ingredients. No significant (> 3 mm) wheals were observed in eight controls who were simultaneously tested with the broth. To assess the role of exercise, three series of skin tests were performed with histamine, codeine, and whole broth before and after aerobic exercise on two occasions. Codeine elicited consistent increases in wheal size after exercise compared with pre-exercise skin tests. Histamine and whole broth wheal sizes did not increase significantly. Three control subjects also had codeine and histamine skin tests before and after exercise, No exercise-associated increases were noted for codeine. Potential insights into mast cell abnormalities in exercise-induced anaphylaxis may be gained by skin testing patterns with codeine and other mast cell degranulating agents.

  12. Proposed new mechanism for food and exercise induced anaphylaxis based on case studies

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    We present two cases of food and exercise-induced anaphylaxis (FEIA) in patients with a diagnosis of oral allergy syndrome (OAS) to the implicated foods. Patient A had FEIA attributed to fresh coriander and tomato and Patient B to fresh celery. These food allergens have been implicated in OAS and have structural antigenic similarity to that of birch and/or grass. Both patients’ allergies were confirmed by fresh skin prick tests. In both cases, strenuous exercise was antecedent to the systemic anaphylaxis reaction and subsequent ingestion without exercise produced only local symptoms of perioral pruritus. We review the current proposed mechanisms for food and exercise induced anaphylaxis to oral allergens and propose a novel and more biologically plausible mechanism. We hypothesize that the inhibitory effects of exercise on gastric acid secretion decreases the digestion of oral allergens and preserves structural integrity, thereby allowing continued systemic absorption of the allergen whether it be profilins, lipid transfer proteins, or other antigenic determinants. PMID:23509907

  13. Bricanyl Turbuhaler and Ventolin Rotahaler in exercise-induced asthma in children.

    PubMed

    dos Santos, J M; Costa, H; Ståhl, E; Wirén, J E

    1991-04-01

    Bricanyl Turbuhaler (0.5 mg terbutaline sulphate) and Ventolin Rotahaler (0.4 mg salbutamol) were compared in a randomized double-blind placebo controlled study on exercise-induced asthma in 19 children (14 boys) aged 7-14 years. The study was carried out on 3 separate days. Asthmatic attacks were provoked by free range running. Peak expiratory flow (PEF) was measured before and after exercise. If PEF decreased by greater than 20%, one inhalation from each of the inhalers was given under supervision of the investigator. Only one of the inhalers (none on the placebo day) delivered active drug. PEF was measured again 5 and 10 min after treatment. Already 5 min after treatment PEF had returned to baseline after active treatment. There was no statistically significant difference between the two active treatments. After placebo treatment, PEF did not return to baseline even at the 10 min post-exercise measurement. Ten children needed extra medication after the last PEF measurement on the placebo day, whereas no child needed extra medication after any of the active treatments. No adverse events were reported in this study. In conclusion, Bricanyl Turbuhaler (0.5 mg) and Ventolin Rotahaler (0.4 mg) were equally efficacious in the treatment of exercise-induced asthma in children. PMID:2058816

  14. Effect of glutamine supplementation on exercise-induced changes in lymphocyte function.

    PubMed

    Krzywkowski, K; Petersen, E W; Ostrowski, K; Kristensen, J H; Boza, J; Pedersen, B K

    2001-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the possible role of glutamine in exercise-induced impairment of lymphocyte function. Ten male athletes participated in a randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind crossover study. Each athlete performed bicycle exercise for 2 h at 75% of maximum O(2) consumption on 2 separate days. Glutamine or placebo supplements were given orally during and up to 2 h postexercise. The trial induced postexercise neutrocytosis that lasted at least 2 h. The total lymphocyte count increased by the end of exercise due to increase of both CD3(+)TCR alpha beta(+) and CD3(+)TCR gamma delta(+) T cells as well as CD3(-)CD16(+)CD56(+) natural killer (NK) cells. Concentrations of CD8(+) and CD4(+) T cells lacking CD28 and CD95 on their surface increased more than those of cells expressing these receptors. Within the CD4(+) cells, only CD45RA(-) memory cells, but not CD45RA(+) naive cells, increased in response to exercise. Most lymphocyte subpopulations decreased 2 h after exercise. Glutamine supplementation abolished the postexercise decline in plasma glutamine concentration but had no effect on lymphocyte trafficking, NK and lymphokine-activated killer cell activities, T cell proliferation, catecholamines, growth hormone, insulin, or glucose. Neutrocytosis was less pronounced in the glutamine-supplemented group, but it is unlikely that this finding is of any clinical significance. This study does not support the idea that glutamine plays a mechanistic role in exercise-induced immune changes.

  15. An in vivo correlate of exercise-induced neurogenesis in the adult dentate gyrus.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Ana C; Huddleston, Dan E; Brickman, Adam M; Sosunov, Alexander A; Hen, Rene; McKhann, Guy M; Sloan, Richard; Gage, Fred H; Brown, Truman R; Small, Scott A

    2007-03-27

    With continued debate over the functional significance of adult neurogenesis, identifying an in vivo correlate of neurogenesis has become an important goal. Here we rely on the coupling between neurogenesis and angiogenesis and test whether MRI measurements of cerebral blood volume (CBV) provide an imaging correlate of neurogenesis. First, we used an MRI approach to generate CBV maps over time in the hippocampal formation of exercising mice. Among all hippocampal subregions, exercise was found to have a primary effect on dentate gyrus CBV, the only subregion that supports adult neurogenesis. Moreover, exercise-induced increases in dentate gyrus CBV were found to correlate with postmortem measurements of neurogenesis. Second, using similar MRI technologies, we generated CBV maps over time in the hippocampal formation of exercising humans. As in mice, exercise was found to have a primary effect on dentate gyrus CBV, and the CBV changes were found to selectively correlate with cardiopulmonary and cognitive function. Taken together, these findings show that dentate gyrus CBV provides an imaging correlate of exercise-induced neurogenesis and that exercise differentially targets the dentate gyrus, a hippocampal subregion important for memory and implicated in cognitive aging.

  16. Exercise induced release of von Willebrand factor: evidence for hypoxic reperfusion microvascular injury in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed Central

    Farrell, A J; Williams, R B; Stevens, C R; Lawrie, A S; Cox, N L; Blake, D R

    1992-01-01

    Experimental evidence suggests that rheumatoid synovitis may be perpetuated by the generation of reactive oxygen species during hypoxic reperfusion injury. The latter occurs because increased intra-articular pressure during exercise exceeds synovial capillary perfusion pressure, impairing blood flow. The object of this study was to establish a marker for and the mechanism of synovial hypoxic reperfusion injury. Von Willebrand factor (vWF) is only released from endothelial cells and platelets and is an in vivo and in vitro marker of endothelial injury. In vivo exercise induced changes in plasma vWF were therefore investigated in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) compared with controls and in vitro vWF release by human umbilical vein endothelial cells subjected to hypoxia reperfusion. Pre-exercise plasma vWF levels were 1001 and 817 IU/l, increasing after exercise to 1658 and 845 IU/l in patients with RA and controls respectively. Von Willebrand factor release from human umbilical vein endothelial cells followed a biphasic pattern, occurring during both hypoxia and reperfusion. Hypoxia reperfusion induced vWF release by human umbilical vein endothelial cells in vitro suggests that exercise induced vWF release in patients with RA is best explained by synovial hypoxic reperfusion injury. This study supports evidence that generation of reactive oxygen species plays a principal part in synovial hypoxic reperfusion injury and suggests vWF as a useful marker of this phenomenon. Images PMID:1444624

  17. What is the current status of management of the patient with exercise-induced asthma?

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, R H; Mellion, M B; Kobayashi, A L

    1994-07-01

    Exercise-induced asthma (EIA) is a very common and troublesome disease frequently impairing optimal athletic performance. Although described as early as the second century A.D. and widely known since 1972, EIA often goes unrecognized by both patient and physician. The goals of treatment are to minimize symptoms thus allowing the athlete to participate fully in a broad array of activities and to utilize the most effective pharmacologic drugs available. The recognition and treatment of exercise-induced asthma (EIA) have made significant progress since 1972 when United States swimmer, Rick Demont had his Olympic gold medal award rescinded because of traces of ephedrine were detected in his urine. Lessons from this episode paid dividends subsequently; in preparation for the 1984 Olympic games in Los Angeles, the U.S. Olympic Committee developed a screening program which identified 67 U.S. team members with EIA. Astoundingly, several of these world-class athletes did not realize they had asthma. Affected individuals were counseled on the prevention of asthma and also on the effective use of medications; 41 won medals in various competitions including track and field, wrestling, basketball, cycling, swimming and rowing. Despite this resounding success, many athletes at all levels of competition still suffer from unrecognized or under-treated EIA despite knowledge of the problem since the second century A.D.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  18. Tissue-specific implications of mitochondrial alterations in aging

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Danhui; Li, Hongzhi; Lu, Jianxin; Bai, Yidong

    2016-01-01

    Aging is a multifactorial process during which physiological alterations occur in all tissues. A decline in mitochondrial function plays an important role in the process of aging and in aging-associated diseases. The mitochondrial genome encodes 13 essential subunits of protein complexes belonging to the oxidative phosphorylation system, while most of the mitochondria-related genes are encoded by the nuclear genome. Coordination between the nucleus and mitochondria is crucial for the regulation of mitochondrial biogenesis and function. In this review, we will discuss aging-related mitochondrial dysfunction in various tissues and its implication in aging-related diseases and the aging process. PMID:23277028

  19. Distinct Pathways Mediate the Sorting of Tail-anchored Mitochondrial Outer Membrane Proteins

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Little is known about the biogenesis of tail-anchored (TA) proteins localized to the mitochondrial outer membrane in plant cells. To address this issue, we screened all of the (>500) known and predicted TA proteins in Arabidopsis for those annotated, based on Gene Ontology, to possess mitochondrial...

  20. Mitochondrial Metabolism in Aging Heart.

    PubMed

    Lesnefsky, Edward J; Chen, Qun; Hoppel, Charles L

    2016-05-13

    Altered mitochondrial metabolism is the underlying basis for the increased sensitivity in the aged heart to stress. The aged heart exhibits impaired metabolic flexibility, with a decreased capacity to oxidize fatty acids and enhanced dependence on glucose metabolism. Aging impairs mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation, with a greater role played by the mitochondria located between the myofibrils, the interfibrillar mitochondria. With aging, there is a decrease in activity of complexes III and IV, which account for the decrease in respiration. Furthermore, aging decreases mitochondrial content among the myofibrils. The end result is that in the interfibrillar area, there is ≈50% decrease in mitochondrial function, affecting all substrates. The defective mitochondria persist in the aged heart, leading to enhanced oxidant production and oxidative injury and the activation of oxidant signaling for cell death. Aging defects in mitochondria represent new therapeutic targets, whether by manipulation of the mitochondrial proteome, modulation of electron transport, activation of biogenesis or mitophagy, or the regulation of mitochondrial fission and fusion. These mechanisms provide new ways to attenuate cardiac disease in elders by preemptive treatment of age-related defects, in contrast to the treatment of disease-induced dysfunction. PMID:27174952

  1. Abnormal movement of the arytenoid region during exercise presenting as exercise-induced asthma in an adolescent athlete.

    PubMed

    Bittleman, D B; Smith, R J; Weiler, J M

    1994-08-01

    A 16-year-old female basketball player presented with a 2 1/2-year history of exercise-induced severe dyspnea, stridor, and mild wheezing that did not respond to prophylactic treatment with beta-agonists and cromolyn. Spirometric data at rest were normal, but flow-volume loops during exercise suggested a variable extrathoracic obstruction. Laryngoscopic evaluation while the patient was riding an exercise bicycle demonstrated an abnormal motion of the arytenoid region causing obstruction of the airway during inspiration. The vocal cords moved normally. This patient demonstrates the capacity of supraglottic tissue to obstruct the airway during exercise as a cause for exercise-induced dyspnea and stridor. Patients with this disorder may be misdiagnosed as having exercise-induced asthma.

  2. Temperature- and exercise-induced gene expression and metabolic enzyme changes in skeletal muscle of adult zebrafish (Danio rerio)

    PubMed Central

    McClelland, Grant B; Craig, Paul M; Dhekney, Kalindi; Dipardo, Shawn

    2006-01-01

    (i.e. HOAD and PK activities). While similar changes in NRF-1 mRNA suggest that common responses might underlie aerobic muscle remodelling there are distinct changes (i.e. CS and PPAR-β1 mRNA) that contribute to specific temperature- and exercise-induced phenotypes. PMID:16990399

  3. Prevalence and Associated Clinical Characteristics of Exercise-Induced ST-Segment Elevation in Lead aVR

    PubMed Central

    Pitcher, Ian; Fordyce, Christopher B.; Yousefi, Masoud; Yeo, Tee Joo; Ignaszewski, Andrew; Isserow, Saul; Chan, Sammy; Ramanathan, Krishnan; Taylor, Carolyn M.

    2016-01-01

    Background Exercise-induced ST-segment elevation (STE) in lead aVR may be an important indicator of prognostically important coronary artery disease (CAD). However, the prevalence and associated clinical features of exercise-induced STE in lead aVR among consecutive patients referred for exercise stress electrocardiography (ExECG) is unknown. Methods All consecutive patients receiving a Bruce protocol ExECG for the diagnosis of CAD at a tertiary care academic center were included over a two-year period. Clinical characteristics, including results of coronary angiography, were compared between patients with and without exercise-induced STE in lead aVR. Results Among 2227 patients undergoing ExECG, exercise-induced STE ≥1.0mm in lead aVR occurred in 3.4% of patients. Patients with STE in lead aVR had significantly lower Duke Treadmill Scores (DTS) (-0.5 vs. 7.0, p<0.01) and a higher frequency of positive test results (60.2% vs. 7.3%, p<0.01). Furthermore, patients with STE in lead aVR were more likely to undergo subsequent cardiac catheterization than those without STE in lead aVR (p<0.01, odds ratio = 4.2). Conclusions Among patients referred for ExECG for suspected CAD, exercise-induced STE in lead aVR was associated with a higher risk DTS, an increased likelihood of a positive ExECG, and referral for subsequent coronary angiography. These results suggest that exercise-induced STE in lead aVR may represent a useful ECG feature among patients undergoing ExECG in the risk stratification of patients. PMID:27467388

  4. [Molecular mechanisms of peroxisome biogenesis in yeasts].

    PubMed

    Sibirnyĭ, A A

    2012-01-01

    Peroxisomes contain oxidases generating hydrogen peroxide, and catalase degrading this toxic compound. Another characteristic function of each eukaryotic peroxisome, from yeast to man, is fatty acid beta-oxidation. However, in peroxisomes a variety of other metabolic pathways are located. In fungi, peroxisomes contain enzymes involved in catabolism of unusual carbon and nitrogen sources (methanol, purines, D-amino acids, pipecolynic acid, sarcosine, glycolate, spermidine etc) as well as biosynthesis of lysine in yeasts and penicillin in mycelial fungi. Impairment of peroxisomal structure and functions causes many human disorders. The similar defects have been identified in yeast mutants defective in peroxisomal biogenesis. Peroxisomal biogenesis is actively studied during last two decades using uni- and multicellular model systems. It was observed that many aspects of peroxisomal biogenesis and proteins involved in this process display striking similarity between all eukaryotes, from yeasts to humans. Yeast is a convenient model system for this kind of research. Current review summarizes data on molecular events of peroxisomal biogenesis, functions of peroxine proteins, import of peroxisomal matrix and membrane proteins and on mechanisms of peroxisomedivision and inheritance. PMID:22642098

  5. Hierarchical RNA Processing Is Required for Mitochondrial Ribosome Assembly.

    PubMed

    Rackham, Oliver; Busch, Jakob D; Matic, Stanka; Siira, Stefan J; Kuznetsova, Irina; Atanassov, Ilian; Ermer, Judith A; Shearwood, Anne-Marie J; Richman, Tara R; Stewart, James B; Mourier, Arnaud; Milenkovic, Dusanka; Larsson, Nils-Göran; Filipovska, Aleksandra

    2016-08-16

    The regulation of mitochondrial RNA processing and its importance for ribosome biogenesis and energy metabolism are not clear. We generated conditional knockout mice of the endoribonuclease component of the RNase P complex, MRPP3, and report that it is essential for life and that heart and skeletal-muscle-specific knockout leads to severe cardiomyopathy, indicating that its activity is non-redundant. Transcriptome-wide parallel analyses of RNA ends (PARE) and RNA-seq enabled us to identify that in vivo 5' tRNA cleavage precedes 3' tRNA processing, and this is required for the correct biogenesis of the mitochondrial ribosomal subunits. We identify that mitoribosomal biogenesis proceeds co-transcriptionally because large mitoribosomal proteins can form a subcomplex on an unprocessed RNA containing the 16S rRNA. Taken together, our data show that RNA processing links transcription to translation via assembly of the mitoribosome. PMID:27498866

  6. [Exercise and aging: regulation of mitochondrial function and redox system].

    PubMed

    Sun, Li-Juan; Zhang, Yong; Liu, Jian-Kang

    2014-10-01

    Evidence shows that aging is closely related to mitochondrial decay and redox imbalance. With aging, both mitochondrial content and protein synthesis declined and free radicals, the by-products of mitochondrial metabolism and their oxidation to lipids, proteins and nuclear acids increased. The age-related declines in mitochondrial function and redox imbalance affect physical function, induce insulin resistance and neurodegenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's disease, thus, play a major role in regulation of life span. Therefore, mitochondrion may be the most important determinant of life span. Increasing evidence demonstrates that long-term aerobic exercise could prevent age-related diseases and improve life quality of aged people. Exercise may possibly stimulate mitochondrial biogenesis and phase II antioxidant defense system to regulate mitochondrial function and balance of redox system. Therefore, regular aerobic exercise may prevent age-related diseases, increase life quality and prolong life span through regulation of mitochondrial function and redox balance. PMID:25764789

  7. Irisin Controls Growth, Intracellular Ca2+ Signals, and Mitochondrial Thermogenesis in Cardiomyoblasts

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Chao; Zhang, Yuan; Tran, Tran D. N.; Wang, Hai; Li, Shiwu; George, Eva Vertes; Zhuang, Haoyang; Zhang, Peilan; Kandel, Avi; Lai, Yimu; Tang, Dongqi; Reeves, Westley H.; Cheng, Henrique; Ding, Yousong; Yang, Li-Jun

    2015-01-01

    Exercise offers short-term and long-term health benefits, including an increased metabolic rate and energy expenditure in myocardium. The newly-discovered exercise-induced myokine, irisin, stimulates conversion of white into brown adipocytes as well as increased mitochondrial biogenesis and energy expenditure. Remarkably, irisin is highly expressed in myocardium, but its physiological effects in the heart are unknown. The objective of this work is to investigate irisin’s potential multifaceted effects on cardiomyoblasts and myocardium. For this purpose, H9C2 cells were treated with recombinant irisin produced in yeast cells (r-irisin) and in HEK293 cells (hr-irisin) for examining its effects on cell proliferation by MTT [3-(4, 5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide] assay and on gene transcription profiles by qRT-PCR. R-irisin and hr-irisin both inhibited cell proliferation and activated genes related to cardiomyocyte metabolic function and differentiation, including myocardin, follistatin, smooth muscle actin, and nuclear respiratory factor-1. Signal transduction pathways affected by r-irisin in H9C2 cells and C57BL/6 mice were examined by detecting phosphorylation of PI3K-AKT, p38, ERK or STAT3. We also measured intracellular Ca2+ signaling and mitochondrial thermogenesis and energy expenditure in r-irisin-treated H9C2 cells. The results showed that r-irisin, in a certain concentration rage, could activate PI3K-AKT and intracellular Ca2+ signaling and increase cellular oxygen consumption in H9C2 cells. Our study also suggests the existence of irisin-specific receptor on the membrane of H9C2 cells. In conclusion, irisin in a certain concentration rage increased myocardial cell metabolism, inhibited cell proliferation and promoted cell differentiation. These effects might be mediated through PI3K-AKT and Ca2+ signaling, which are known to activate expression of exercise-related genes such as follistatin and myocardin. This work supports the value

  8. The influence of ice slushy on voluntary contraction force following exercise-induced hyperthermia.

    PubMed

    Burdon, Catriona A; Easthope, Christopher S; Johnson, Nathan A; Chapman, Phillip G; O'Connor, Helen

    2014-07-01

    This study aimed to investigate the effect of exercise-induced hyperthermia on central fatigue and force decline in exercised and nonexercised muscles and whether ingestion of ice slushy (ICE) ameliorates fatigue. Eight participants (5 males, 3 females) completed 45 s maximal voluntary isometric contractions (MVIC) with elbow flexors and knee extensors at baseline and following an exercise-induced rectal temperature (Trec) of 39.3 ± 0.2 °C. Percutaneous electrical muscle stimulation was superimposed at 15, 30 and 44 s during MVICs to assess muscle activation. To increase Trec to 39.3 °C, participants cycled at 60% maximum power output for 42 ± 11 min in 40 °C and 50% relative humidity. Immediately prior to each MVIC, participants consumed 50 g of ICE (-1 °C) or thermoneutral drink (38 °C, CON) made from 7.4% carbohydrate beverage. Participants consumed water (19 °C) during exercise to prevent hypohydration. Voluntary muscle force production and activation in both muscle groups were unchanged at Trec 39.3 °C with ICE (knee extensors: 209 ± 152 N) versus CON (knee extensors: 255 ± 157 N, p = 0.19). At Trec 39.3 °C, quadriceps mean force (232 ± 151 N) decreased versus baseline (302 ± 180 N, p < 0.001) and mean voluntary activation was also decreased (by 15% ± 11%, p < 0.001). Elbow flexor mean force decreased from 179 ± 67 N to 148 ± 65 N when Trec was increased to 39.3 °C (p < 0.001) but mean voluntary activation was not reduced at 39.3 °C (5% ± 25%, p = 0.79). After exercise-induced hyperthermia, ICE had no effect on voluntary activation or force production; however, both were reduced from baseline in the exercised muscle group. Peripheral fatigue was greater than the central component and limited the ability of an intervention designed to alter central fatigue.

  9. The influence of ice slushy on voluntary contraction force following exercise-induced hyperthermia.

    PubMed

    Burdon, Catriona A; Easthope, Christopher S; Johnson, Nathan A; Chapman, Phillip G; O'Connor, Helen

    2014-07-01

    This study aimed to investigate the effect of exercise-induced hyperthermia on central fatigue and force decline in exercised and nonexercised muscles and whether ingestion of ice slushy (ICE) ameliorates fatigue. Eight participants (5 males, 3 females) completed 45 s maximal voluntary isometric contractions (MVIC) with elbow flexors and knee extensors at baseline and following an exercise-induced rectal temperature (Trec) of 39.3 ± 0.2 °C. Percutaneous electrical muscle stimulation was superimposed at 15, 30 and 44 s during MVICs to assess muscle activation. To increase Trec to 39.3 °C, participants cycled at 60% maximum power output for 42 ± 11 min in 40 °C and 50% relative humidity. Immediately prior to each MVIC, participants consumed 50 g of ICE (-1 °C) or thermoneutral drink (38 °C, CON) made from 7.4% carbohydrate beverage. Participants consumed water (19 °C) during exercise to prevent hypohydration. Voluntary muscle force production and activation in both muscle groups were unchanged at Trec 39.3 °C with ICE (knee extensors: 209 ± 152 N) versus CON (knee extensors: 255 ± 157 N, p = 0.19). At Trec 39.3 °C, quadriceps mean force (232 ± 151 N) decreased versus baseline (302 ± 180 N, p < 0.001) and mean voluntary activation was also decreased (by 15% ± 11%, p < 0.001). Elbow flexor mean force decreased from 179 ± 67 N to 148 ± 65 N when Trec was increased to 39.3 °C (p < 0.001) but mean voluntary activation was not reduced at 39.3 °C (5% ± 25%, p = 0.79). After exercise-induced hyperthermia, ICE had no effect on voluntary activation or force production; however, both were reduced from baseline in the exercised muscle group. Peripheral fatigue was greater than the central component and limited the ability of an intervention designed to alter central fatigue. PMID:24971678

  10. The effect of exercise-induced hypoxemia on blood redox status in well-trained rowers.

    PubMed

    Kyparos, Antonios; Riganas, Christos; Nikolaidis, Michalis G; Sampanis, Michalis; Koskolou, Maria D; Grivas, Gerasimos V; Kouretas, Dimitrios; Vrabas, Ioannis S

    2012-06-01

    Exercise-induced arterial hypoxemia (EIAH), characterized by decline in arterial oxyhemoglobin saturation (SaO(2)), is a common phenomenon in endurance athletes. Acute intensive exercise is associated with the generation of reactive species that may result in redox status disturbances and oxidation of cell macromolecules. The purpose of the present study was to investigate whether EIAH augments oxidative stress as determined in blood plasma and erythrocytes in well-trained male rowers after a 2,000-m rowing ergometer race. Initially, athletes were assigned into either the normoxemic (n = 9, SaO(2) >92%, [Formula: see text]: 62.0 ± 1.9 ml kg(-1) min(-1)) or hypoxemic (n = 12, SaO(2) <92%, [Formula: see text]: 60.5 ± 2.2 ml kg(-1 )min(-1), mean ± SEM) group, following an incremental [Formula: see text] test on a wind resistance braked rowing ergometer. On a separate day the rowers performed a 2,000-m all-out effort on the same rowing ergometer. Following an overnight fast, blood samples were drawn from an antecubital vein before and immediately after the termination of the 2,000-m all-out effort and analyzed for selective oxidative stress markers. In both the normoxemic (SaO(2): 94.1 ± 0.9%) and hypoxemic (SaO(2): 88.6 ± 2.4%) rowers similar and significant exercise increase in serum thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances, protein carbonyls, catalase and total antioxidant capacity concentration were observed post-2,000 m all-out effort. Exercise significantly increased the oxidized glutathione concentration and decreased the ratio of reduced (GSH)-to-oxidized (GSSG) glutathione in the normoxemic group only, whereas the reduced form of glutathione remained unaffected in either groups. The increased oxidation of GSH to GSSG in erythrocytes of normoxemic individuals suggest that erythrocyte redox status may be affected by the oxygen saturation degree of hemoglobin. Our findings indicate that exercise-induced hypoxemia did not further affect the increased blood

  11. Exercise training-induced regulation of mitochondrial quality.

    PubMed

    Yan, Zhen; Lira, Vitor A; Greene, Nicholas P

    2012-07-01

    Mitochondria are dynamic organelles in skeletal muscle critical in physical performance and disease. The mitochondrial life cycle spans biogenesis, maintenance, and clearance. Exercise training may promote each of these processes, conferring positive impacts on skeletal muscle contractile and metabolic functions. This review focuses on the regulation of these processes by endurance exercise and discusses potential benefits in health and disease.

  12. The role of mitochondria in cytosolic-nuclear iron–sulfur protein biogenesis and in cellular iron regulation.

    PubMed

    Lill, Roland; Srinivasan, Vasundara; Mühlenhoff, Ulrich

    2014-12-01

    Mitochondria are indispensable in eukaryotes because of their function in the maturation of cytosolic and nuclear iron–sulfur proteins that are essential for DNA synthesis and repair, tRNA modification, and protein translation. The mitochondrial Fe/S cluster assembly machinery not only generates the organelle's iron–sulfur proteins, but also extra-mitochondrial ones. Biogenesis of the latter proteins requires the mitochondrial ABC transporter Atm1 that exports a sulfur-containing compound in a glutathione-dependent fashion. The process is further assisted by the cytosolic iron–sulfur protein assembly machinery. Here, we discuss the knowns and unknowns of the mitochondrial export process that is also crucial for signaling the cellular iron status to the regulatory systems involved in the maintenance of cellular iron homeostasis.

  13. Estrogen receptor-β in mitochondria: implications for mitochondrial bioenergetics and tumorigenesis.

    PubMed

    Liao, Tien-Ling; Tzeng, Chii-Ruey; Yu, Chao-Lan; Wang, Yi-Pei; Kao, Shu-Huei

    2015-09-01

    Estrogen enhances mitochondrial function by enhancing mitochondrial biogenesis and sustaining mitochondrial energy-transducing capacity. Shifts in mitochondrial bioenergetic pathways from oxidative phosphorylation to glycolysis have been hypothesized to be involved in estrogen-induced tumorigenesis. Studies have shown that mitochondria are an important target of estrogen. Estrogen receptor-β (ERβ) has been shown to localize to mitochondria in a ligand-dependent or -independent manner and can affect mitochondrial bioenergetics and anti-apoptotic signaling. However, the functional role of mitochondrial ERβ in tumorigenesis remains unclear. Clinical studies of ERβ-related tumorigenesis have shown that ERβ stimulates mitochondrial metabolism to meet the high energy demands of processes such as cell proliferation, cell survival, and transformation. Thus, in elucidating the precise role of mitochondrial ERβ in cell transformation and tumorigenesis, it will be particularly valuable to explore new approaches for the development of medical treatments targeting mitochondrial ERβ-mediated mitochondrial function and preventing apoptosis.

  14. Evidence of a bigenomic regulation of mitochondrial gene expression by thyroid hormone during rat brain development

    SciTech Connect

    Sinha, Rohit Anthony; Pathak, Amrita; Mohan, Vishwa; Babu, Satish; Pal, Amit; Khare, Drirh; Godbole, Madan M.

    2010-07-02

    Hypothyroidism during early mammalian brain development is associated with decreased expression of various mitochondrial encoded genes along with evidence for mitochondrial dysfunction. However, in-spite of the similarities between neurological disorders caused by perinatal hypothyroidism and those caused by various genetic mitochondrial defects we still do not know as to how thyroid hormone (TH) regulates mitochondrial transcription during development and whether this regulation by TH is nuclear mediated or through mitochondrial TH receptors? We here in rat cerebellum show that hypothyroidism causes reduction in expression of nuclear encoded genes controlling mitochondrial biogenesis like PGC-1{alpha}, NRF-1{alpha} and Tfam. Also, we for the first time demonstrate a mitochondrial localization of thyroid hormone receptor (mTR) isoform in developing brain capable of binding a TH response element (DR2) present in D-loop region of mitochondrial DNA. These results thus indicate an integrated nuclear-mitochondrial cross talk in regulation of mitochondrial transcription by TH during brain development.

  15. Development of pharmacological strategies for mitochondrial disorders.

    PubMed

    Kanabus, M; Heales, S J; Rahman, S

    2014-04-01

    Mitochondrial diseases are an unusually genetically and phenotypically heterogeneous group of disorders, which are extremely challenging to treat. Currently, apart from supportive therapy, there are no effective treatments for the vast majority of mitochondrial diseases. Huge scientific effort, however, is being put into understanding the mechanisms underlying mitochondrial disease pathology and developing potential treatments. To date, a variety of treatments have been evaluated by randomized clinical trials, but unfortunately, none of these has delivered breakthrough results. Increased understanding of mitochondrial pathways and the development of many animal models, some of which are accurate phenocopies of human diseases, are facilitating the discovery and evaluation of novel prospective treatments. Targeting reactive oxygen species has been a treatment of interest for many years; however, only in recent years has it been possible to direct antioxidant delivery specifically into the mitochondria. Increasing mitochondrial biogenesis, whether by pharmacological approaches, dietary manipulation or exercise therapy, is also currently an active area of research. Modulating mitochondrial dynamics and mitophagy and the mitochondrial membrane lipid milieu have also emerged as possible treatment strategies. Recent technological advances in gene therapy, including allotopic and transkingdom gene expression and mitochondrially targeted transcription activator-like nucleases, have led to promising results in cell and animal models of mitochondrial diseases, but most of these techniques are still far from clinical application.

  16. Platelet activation during exercise induced asthma: effect of prophylaxis with cromoglycate and salbutamol.

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, C E; Belfield, P W; Davis, S; Cooke, N J; Spencer, A; Davies, J A

    1986-01-01

    Peak expiratory flow (PEF) and plasma concentrations of platelet factor 4 and beta thromboglobulin were measured before and after exercise in nine asthmatic patients and 12 non-asthmatic volunteers. Exercise was preceded by administration in random order of either placebo, salbutamol 200 micrograms, or sodium cromoglycate 2 mg from a pressurised inhaler. In control subjects there were minimal changes in PEF and plasma concentrations of platelet factor 4 and beta thromboglobulin. In the asthmatic patients the typical changes in PEF were seen on exercise; plasma concentrations of platelet factor 4 and beta thromboglobulin rose significantly in parallel, the rise preceding the fall in PEF. The changes in peak flow and platelet activation induced by exercise were attenuated by prior administration of salbutamol or cromoglycate. These results indicate that exercise induced asthma is associated with a rise in platelet release products similar to that observed in antigen induced asthma. PMID:2943049

  17. Exercise-Induced Cognitive Plasticity, Implications for Mild Cognitive Impairment and Alzheimer’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Foster, Philip P.; Rosenblatt, Kevin P.; Kuljiš, Rodrigo O.

    2011-01-01

    Lifestyle factors such as intellectual stimulation, cognitive and social engagement, nutrition, and various types of exercise appear to reduce the risk for common age-associated disorders such as Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and vascular dementia. In fact, many studies have suggested that promoting physical activity can have a protective effect against cognitive deterioration later in life. Slowing or a deterioration of walking speed is associated with a poor performance in tests assessing psychomotor speed and verbal fluency in elderly individuals. Fitness training influences a wide range of cognitive processes, and the largest positive impact observed is for executive (a.k.a. frontal lobe) functions. Studies show that exercise improves additional cognitive functions such as tasks mediated by the hippocampus, and result in major changes in plasticity in the hippocampus. Interestingly, this exercise-induced plasticity is also pronounced in APOE ε4 carriers who express a risk factor for late-onset AD that may modulate the effect of treatments. Based on AD staging by Braak and Braak (1991) and Braak et al. (1993) we propose that the effects of exercise occur in two temporo-spatial continua of events. The “inward” continuum from isocortex (neocortex) to entorhinal cortex/hippocampus for amyloidosis and a reciprocal “outward” continuum for neurofibrillary alterations. The exercise-induced hypertrophy of the hippocampus at the core of these continua is evaluated in terms of potential for prevention to stave off neuronal degeneration. Exercise-induced production of growth factors such as the brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) has been shown to enhance neurogenesis and to play a key role in positive cognitive effects. Insulin-like growth factor (IGF-1) may mediate the exercise-induced response to exercise on BDNF, neurogenesis, and cognitive performance. It is also postulated to regulate brain amyloid β (Aβ) levels by increased clearance via the choroid

  18. Exercise-induced bronchocontriction, skin sensitivity, and serum IgE in children with eczema.

    PubMed Central

    Price, J F; Cogswell, J J; Joseph, M C; Cochrane, G M

    1976-01-01

    Forty-two children with eczema were studied for exercise-induced astham (EIA), skin sensitivity to prick testing, blood eosinophil count, and immunoglobulins. 29 had a fall in peak expiratory flow rate after exercise greater than 20% and of these, 23 had symptoms of wheezing. 13 of the eczematous children showed a fall of less than 20%. The children with EIA showed greater cutaneous sensitivity (p less than 0.001) and a higher total serum IgE (p less than 0.025). 3 of the group with a fall of less than 20% had allergic rhinitis with skin sensitivity to grass pollen. The remaining 10 had no clinical evidence of allergic disease, other than eczema and skin sensitivity, and total IgE fell within the normal range. It is suggested that in a proportion of chilren with eczema there is little evidence of reaginic allergy. PMID:1015843

  19. Exercise-induced oxidatively damaged DNA in humans: evaluation in plasma or urine?

    PubMed

    Karpouzi, Christina; Nikolaidis, Stefanos; Kabasakalis, Athanasios; Tsalis, George; Mougios, Vassilis

    2016-01-01

    Physical exercise can induce oxidative damage in humans. 8-Hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) is a widely known biomarker of DNA oxidation, which can be determined in blood and urine. The aim of the present study was to compare these two biological fluids in terms of which is more suitable for the estimation of the oxidative damage of DNA by measuring the concentration of 8-OHdG one hour after maximal exercise by enzyme immunoassay. The concentration of 8-OHdG increased with exercise only in plasma (p < 0.001), and values differed between exercise tests in both plasma and urine (p < 0.05). In conclusion, plasma appears to be more sensitive to exercise-induced 8-OHdG changes than urine and, hence, a more appropriate medium for assessing oxidative damage of DNA, although the poor repeatability of the measurement needs to be addressed in future studies. PMID:26849281

  20. Titin, a Central Mediator for Hypertrophic Signaling, Exercise-Induced Mechanosignaling and Skeletal Muscle Remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Krüger, Martina; Kötter, Sebastian

    2016-01-01

    Titin is a giant scaffold protein with multiple functions in striated muscle physiology. Due to the elastic I-band domains and the filament-like integration in the half-sarcomere titin is an important factor for sarcomere assembly and serves as an adaptable molecular spring that determines myofilament distensibility. Protein-interactions e.g., with muscle ankyrin repeat proteins or muscle LIM-protein link titin to hypertrophic signaling and via p62 and Muscle Ring Finger proteins to mechanisms that control protein quality control. This review summarizes our current knowledge on titin as a central node for exercise-induced mechanosignaling and remodeling and further highlights the pathophysiological implications. PMID:26973541

  1. Prevention of exercised induced cardiomyopathy following Pip-PMO treatment in dystrophic mdx mice

    PubMed Central

    Betts, Corinne A.; Saleh, Amer F.; Carr, Carolyn A.; Hammond, Suzan M.; Coenen-Stass, Anna M. L.; Godfrey, Caroline; McClorey, Graham; Varela, Miguel A.; Roberts, Thomas C.; Clarke, Kieran; Gait, Michael J.; Wood, Matthew J. A.

    2015-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a fatal neuromuscular disorder caused by mutations in the Dmd gene. In addition to skeletal muscle wasting, DMD patients develop cardiomyopathy, which significantly contributes to mortality. Antisense oligonucleotides (AOs) are a promising DMD therapy, restoring functional dystrophin protein by exon skipping. However, a major limitation with current AOs is the absence of dystrophin correction in heart. Pip peptide-AOs demonstrate high activity in cardiac muscle. To determine their therapeutic value, dystrophic mdx mice were subject to forced exercise to model the DMD cardiac phenotype. Repeated peptide-AO treatments resulted in high levels of cardiac dystrophin protein, which prevented the exercised induced progression of cardiomyopathy, normalising heart size as well as stabilising other cardiac parameters. Treated mice also exhibited significantly reduced cardiac fibrosis and improved sarcolemmal integrity. This work demonstrates that high levels of cardiac dystrophin restored by Pip peptide-AOs prevents further deterioration of cardiomyopathy and pathology following exercise in dystrophic DMD mice. PMID:25758104

  2. Nedocromil sodium in the prevention of exercise-induced bronchospasm in athletes with asthma.

    PubMed

    Todaro, A; Faina, M; Alippi, B; Dal Monte, A; Ruggieri, F

    1993-06-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the efficacy of nedocromil sodium in the prevention of exercise-induced bronchospasm (EIB) in 13 top athletes affected by bronchial asthma. At a dose of 4 mg the drug significantly reduced the fall in FEV1 compared with placebo but not with respect to basal values. In 9 athletes, 4 mg nedocromil sodium produced a good protective effect and reduced the mean fall in FEV1 to 4% with respect to baseline values, while in the remaining 4 subjects, the protective effect was not satisfactory. In these 4 "non responders" 6 mg nedocromil was effective, and in 2 cases induced prolonged bronchodilatation. In conclusion, the effect of nedocromil sodium in the prevention of EIB may be dose-dependent in relation to the degree of bronchial hyperreactivity or to interference of other factors.

  3. Short- and Long-term exercise induced alterations in haemostasis: a review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Posthuma, Jelle J; van der Meijden, Paola E J; Ten Cate, Hugo; Spronk, Henri M H

    2015-05-01

    Although regular exercise is beneficial for health, exercise-related thrombotic events, such as venous thromboembolism and myocardial infarctions, are occasionally observed. These events are characterized by a prothrombotic condition in which interactions between coagulation factors, the vessel wall and the fibrinolytic system play an important role. Apparently, various durations and intensities of exercise have different effects on haemostasis and especially high intensity exercise tends to increase the risk of thrombotic events. However, the mechanisms behind this have not been entirely established. In this review we provide an overview of the various effects of the different intensities and durations of exercise on haemostasis. Overall, the haemostatic profile is mainly affected by the intensity of exercise; and is more pronounced after high (>80%) compared to low intensity (<60%), as reflected by increased platelet and coagulant activity. These findings are in line with the increased risk of exercise-induced thrombotic events during high intensity exercise.

  4. Exercise-induced up-regulation of MMP-1 and IL-8 genes in endurance horses

    PubMed Central

    Cappelli, Katia; Felicetti, Michela; Capomaccio, Stefano; Pieramati, Camillo; Silvestrelli, Maurizio; Verini-Supplizi, Andrea

    2009-01-01

    Background The stress response is a critical factor in the training of equine athletes; it is important for performance and for protection of the animal against physio-pathological disorders. In this study, the molecular mechanisms involved in the response to acute and strenuous exercise were investigated using peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). Results Quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) was used to detect modifications in transcription levels of the genes for matrix metalloproteinase-1 (MMP-1) and interleukin 8 (IL-8), which were derived from previous genome-wide expression analysis. Significant up-regulation of these two genes was found in 10 horses that had completed a race of 90–120 km in a time-course experimental design. Conclusion These results suggest that MMP-1 and IL-8 are both involved in the exercise-induced stress response, and this represents a starting point from which to understand the adaptive responses to this phenomenon. PMID:19552796

  5. Exercise-induced cramp, myoglobinuria, and tubular aggregates in phosphoglycerate mutase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Oh, Shin J; Park, Kyung-Seok; Ryan, Hewitt F; Danon, Moris J; Lu, Jiesheng; Naini, Ali B; DiMauro, Salvatore

    2006-11-01

    We report two patients in whom phosphoglycerate mutase (PGAM) deficiency was associated with the triad of exercise-induced cramps, recurrent myoglobinuria, and tubular aggregates in the muscle biopsy. Serum creatine kinase (CK) levels were elevated between attacks of myoglobinuria. Forearm ischemic exercise tests produced subnormal increases of venous lactate. Muscle biopsies showed subsarcolemmal tubular aggregates in type 2 fibers. Muscle PGAM activities were markedly decreased (3% of the normal mean) and molecular genetic studies showed that both patients were homozygous for a described missense mutation (W78X). A review of 15 cases with tubular aggregates in the muscle biopsies from our laboratory and 15 cases with PGAM deficiency described in the literature showed that this clinicopathological triad is highly suggestive of PGAM deficiency. PMID:16881065

  6. Effects of Massage on Muscular Strength and Proprioception After Exercise-Induced Muscle Damage.

    PubMed

    Shin, Mal-Soon; Sung, Yun-Hee

    2015-08-01

    Exercise-induced muscle damage (EIMD), which is commonly associated with eccentric exercise, unaccustomed exercise, and resistance training, may lead to delayed onset muscle soreness, swelling, decreased muscle strength, and range of motion. Many researchers have evaluated various interventions to treat the signs and symptoms of EIMD. However, the effects of massage after EIMD are unclear. Here, we investigated the effect of massage on muscle strength and proprioception after EIMD. All subjects randomly were divided into an EIMD-treated control group (n = 10) and a massage-treated after EIMD experimental group (n = 11). Exercise-induced muscle damage was induced by repeated exercise. Massage treatment was provided by physiotherapist for 15 minutes. It consists of light stroking, milking, friction, and skin rolling. Lactate was evaluated by Lactate Pro analyzer in pre- and postexercise. Surface electromyography (muscle activity) and sonography (muscle thickness) were used to confirm the muscular characteristics. Proprioception was investigated by dual inclinometer. As a result, massage treatment on the gastrocnemius after EIMD increased activation of the medial gastrocnemius during contraction (p ≤ 0.05). In the lateral and medial gastrocnemius, the θs, which is the angle between muscle fibers and superficial aponeurosis, showed a significant change (p ≤ 0.05). However, there are no differences in the θd, which is the angle between muscle fibers and deep aponeurosis. We also found that proprioceptive acuity in the ankle joint was significantly greater in the massage-treated experimental group compared with that in the control group (p ≤ 0.05). These findings suggest that massage of the gastrocnemius after EIMD can improve muscle strength and proprioception by influencing the superficial layer of the gastrocnemius. PMID:25226328

  7. Exercise-induced dehydration with and without environmental heat stress results in increased oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Hillman, Angela R; Vince, Rebecca V; Taylor, Lee; McNaughton, Lars; Mitchell, Nigel; Siegler, Jason

    2011-10-01

    While in vitro work has revealed that dehydration and hyperthermia can elicit increased cellular and oxidative stress, in vivo research linking dehydration, hyperthermia, and oxidative stress is limited. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of exercise-induced dehydration with and without hyperthermia on oxidative stress. Seven healthy male, trained cyclists (power output (W) at lactate threshold (LT): 199 ± 19 W) completed 90 min of cycling exercise at 95% LT followed by a 5-km time trial (TT) in 4 trials: (i) euhydration in a warm environment (EU-W, control), (ii) dehydration in a warm environment (DE-W), (iii) euhydration in a thermoneutral environment (EU-T), and (iv) dehydration in a thermoneutral environment (DE-T) (W: 33.9 ± 0.9 °C; T: 23.0 ± 1.0 °C). Oxidized glutathione (GSSG) increased significantly postexercise in dehydration trials only (DE-W: p < 0.01, DE-T: p = 0.03), and while not significant, total glutathione (TGSH) and thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) tended to increase postexercise in dehydration trials (p = 0.08 for both). Monocyte heat shock protein 72 (HSP72) concentration was increased (p = 0.01) while lymphocyte HSP32 concentration was decreased for all trials (p = 0.02). Exercise-induced dehydration led to an increase in GSSG concentration while maintenance of euhydration attenuated these increases regardless of environmental condition. Additionally, we found evidence of increased cellular stress (measured via HSP) during all trials independent of hydration status and environment. Finally, both 90-min and 5-km TT performances were reduced during only the DE-W trial, likely a result of combined cellular stress, hyperthermia, and dehydration. These findings highlight the importance of fluid consumption during exercise to attenuate thermal and oxidative stress during prolonged exercise in the heat.

  8. Green tea catechin consumption enhances exercise-induced abdominal fat loss in overweight and obese adults.

    PubMed

    Maki, Kevin C; Reeves, Matthew S; Farmer, Mildred; Yasunaga, Koichi; Matsuo, Noboru; Katsuragi, Yoshihisa; Komikado, Masanori; Tokimitsu, Ichiro; Wilder, Donna; Jones, Franz; Blumberg, Jeffrey B; Cartwright, Yolanda

    2009-02-01

    This study evaluated the influence of a green tea catechin beverage on body composition and fat distribution in overweight and obese adults during exercise-induced weight loss. Participants (n = 132 with 107 completers) were randomly assigned to receive a beverage containing approximately 625 mg of catechins with 39 mg caffeine or a control beverage (39 mg caffeine, no catechins) for 12 wk. Participants were asked to maintain constant energy intake and engage in >or=180 min/wk moderate intensity exercise, including >or=3 supervised sessions per week. Body composition (dual X-ray absorptiometry), abdominal fat areas (computed tomography), and clinical laboratory tests were measured at baseline and wk 12. There was a trend (P = 0.079) toward greater loss of body weight in the catechin group compared with the control group; least squares mean (95% CI) changes, adjusted for baseline value, age, and sex, were -2.2 (-3.1, -1.3) and -1.0 (-1.9, -0.1) kg, respectively. Percentage changes in fat mass did not differ between the catechin [5.2 (-7.0, -3.4)] and control groups [-3.5 (-5.4, 1.6)] (P = 0.208). However, percentage changes in total abdominal fat area [-7.7 (-11.7, -3.8) vs. -0.3 (-4.4, 3.9); P = 0.013], subcutaneous abdominal fat area [-6.2 (-10.2, -2.2) vs. 0.8 (-3.3, 4.9); P = 0.019], and fasting serum triglycerides (TG) [-11.2 (-18.8, -3.6) vs. 1.9 (-5.9, 9.7); P = 0.023] were greater in the catechin group. These findings suggest that green tea catechin consumption enhances exercise-induced changes in abdominal fat and serum TG.

  9. Ivabradine reduces myocardial stunning in patients with exercise-inducible ischaemia.

    PubMed

    Maranta, F; Tondi, L; Agricola, E; Margonato, A; Rimoldi, O; Camici, Paolo G

    2015-11-01

    Ivabradine is an effective treatment for angina in patients with stable coronary artery disease (CAD) and for heart failure. Experiments in a canine model have shown that ivabradine reduces both acute left ventricular (LV) dysfunction and post-ischaemic stunning. Aim of this study was to investigate the effect of ivabradine on LV dysfunction and stunning in patients with CAD and exercise-inducible ischaemia. Fifteen patients with ejection fraction >40 % and heart rate >70 bpm were enrolled. After pharmacologic washout, echocardiography was performed at rest, at peak treadmill exercise and during recovery until return to baseline. After 2 weeks of ivabradine (7.5 mg bid) stress echocardiography was repeated at the same workload achieved during washout. Peak global and segmental (ischaemic vs. remote normal segments) LV longitudinal strain (LS) was assessed by 2D speckle tracking analysis. At washout, LS was significantly impaired in ischaemic compared to remote segments at peak stress and for several minutes during recovery. After ivabradine a smaller, albeit still significant, impairment of LS in ischaemic segments was observed at peak whilst no difference with remote segments was present during recovery. Furthermore, the average global LS value improved significantly after treatment. In conclusion, ivabradine reduces both acute LV dysfunction and stunning in patients with CAD and exercise-inducible ischaemia. We hypothesise that this mechanism might contribute to reduce chronic LV dysfunction in patients with CAD. In this setting the drug might limit the development of hibernating myocardium which is believed to result from repeated episodes of ischaemia and stunning. PMID:26419678

  10. Effect of naltrexone treatment on the treadmill exercise-induced hormone release in amenorrheic women.

    PubMed

    Botticelli, G; Bacchi Modena, A; Bresciani, D; Villa, P; Aguzzoli, L; Florio, P; Nappi, R E; Petraglia, F; Genazzani, A R

    1992-12-01

    The effect of an acute physical stress on hormone secretions before and after a 10-day naltrexone treatment in untrained healthy and amenorrheic women was investigated. Plasma levels of pituitary (LH, FSH, prolactin, GH, ACTH, beta-endorphin) and adrenal (cortisol, androstenedione, testosterone) hormones were measured at rest and in response to 60 min of physical exercise. The test was done both before and after a 10-day naltrexone (50 mg/day) treatment. Graded levels of treadmill exercise (50, 70 and 90% of maximal oxygen uptake (VO2) every 20 min) was used as physical stressor. While mean +/- SE plasma LH levels in control women were higher than in amenorrheic patients and increased following the naltrexone treatment (p < 0.01), no significant differences of basal plasma hormonal levels were observed between amenorrheic and eumenorrheic women, both before and after naltrexone treatment. Physical exercise at 90% VO2 induced a significant increase in plasma GH, ACTH, beta-endorphin, cortisol, androstenedione and testosterone levels in controls before naltrexone treatment (p < 0.01). The mean increase in plasma androstenedione and testosterone levels in control women was significantly higher after naltrexone treatment (p < 0.01). In amenorrheic patients before naltrexone, physical exercise induced an increase in plasma prolactin and GH levels, but not in plasma ACTH, beta-endorphin, cortisol, testosterone and androstenedione. After naltrexone treatment, the exercise induced a significant plasma ACTH, beta-endorphin and cortisol levels, while the increase of plasma prolactin levels was significantly higher than before treatment (p < 0.01).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1291596

  11. Serotonin aggravates exercise-induced cardiac ischemia in the dog: effect of serotonin receptor antagonists.

    PubMed

    Guilbert, Frédérique; Lainée, Pierre; Dubreuil, Brigitte; McCort, Gary; O'Connor, Stephen E; Janiak, Philip; Herbert, Jean-Marc

    2004-08-16

    We investigated the effects of serotonin (5-HT), SL65.0472 (7-fluoro-2-oxo-4-[2-[4-thieno[3,2-c]pyridine-4-yl)piperazin-1-yl]ethyl]-1,2-dihydroquinoline-1-acetamide, a 5-HT(1B)/5-HT(2A) receptor antagonist) and ketanserin (a 5-HT(2A) receptor antagonist) during exercise-induced cardiac ischemia in conscious dogs. Dogs were administered a hypercholesterolemic diet and an inhibitor of nitric oxide synthetase to produce chronic endothelial dysfunction. Myocardial ischemia was induced by a treadmill exercise test associated with limitation of left anterior descending coronary blood flow. Infusion of serotonin during exercise produced dose-related cardiovascular changes (after 10 microg/kg/min; heart rate +27+/-6 bpm, systolic blood pressure +18+/-3 mm Hg, left circumflex coronary blood flow +64+/-8 ml/min, myocardial segment length shortening in the ischemic zone -5.9+/-1.9%, P<0.05). SL65.0472 blocked serotonin-induced increases in blood pressure, rate pressure product and circumflex coronary artery flow (100 microg/kg i.v., P<0.05) and reduced serotonin-induced ischemic myocardial segment length shortening (300 microg/kg i.v., P<0.05). Ketanserin (30-300 microg/kg i.v.) had no significant effect on any serotonin-induced changes during exercise. Thus, SL65.0472 opposes serotonin-induced myocardial dysfunction in a dog model of exercise-induced ischemia.

  12. Exercise-induced rise in glucagon and ketogenesis during prolonged muscular work.

    PubMed

    Wasserman, D H; Spalding, J A; Bracy, D; Lacy, D B; Cherrington, A D

    1989-06-01

    These experiments examined the role of the exercise-induced increment in glucagon in the control of ketogenesis during prolonged moderate-intensity (100 m/min, 12% grade) treadmill exercise. Dogs were studied during 150 min of exercise with saline infusion alone (C; n = 6) with the glucagon levels clamped at basal values (somatostatin infusion with basal glucagon replacement and the normal fall in insulin simulated; BG; n = 5) or with the normal exercise-induced rise in glucagon simulated (somatostatin infusion with the rise in glucagon and the fall in insulin simulated; SG; n = 5). Glucose was infused as needed in SG and BG to maintain the glycemic response seen in C. In all dogs, catheters were inserted into the carotid artery and the portal and hepatic veins for blood sampling and the vena cava and the splenic vein for infusions. Glucagon rose from 62 +/- 5 and 57 +/- 4 pg/ml at rest to 104 +/- 20 and 120 +/- 12 pg/ml during exercise in C and SG but did not deviate from basal in BG (56 +/- 3 pg/ml). Insulin fell similarly from rest to the end of exercise in C (13 +/- 2 to 5 +/- 1 microU/ml), SG (11 +/- 1 to 6 +/- 1 microU/ml), and BG (10 +/- 1 to 6 +/- 1 microU/ml). In C, SG, and BG, free-fatty acid (FFA) levels rose from 941 +/- 81, 1240 +/- 155, and 938 +/- 36 mu eq/L at rest to 1615 +/- 149, 1558 +/- 175, and 1391 +/- 160 mu eq/L with exercise.2+n C, PMID:2566546

  13. Attenuated exercise induced hyperaemia with age: mechanistic insight from passive limb movement

    PubMed Central

    McDaniel, John; Hayman, Melissa A; Ives, Steve; Fjeldstad, Anette S; Trinity, Joel D; Wray, D Walter; Richardson, Russell S

    2010-01-01

    The influence of age on the central and peripheral contributors to exercise-induced hyperaemia is unclear. Utilizing a reductionist approach, we compared the peripheral and central haemodynamic responses to passive limb movement (exercise without an increase in metabolism) in 11 old (71 ± 9 years of age s.d.) and 11 young (24 ± 2 years of age) healthy subjects. Cardiac output (CO), heart rate (HR), stroke volume (SV), mean arterial pressure (MAP), and femoral blood flow of the passively moved and control legs were evaluated second-by-second during 2 min of passive knee extension at a rate of 1 Hz. Compared to the young, the old group exhibited a significantly attenuated increase in HR (7 ± 4%vs. 13 ± 7%s.d.), CO (10 ± 6%vs. 18 ± 8%) and femoral blood flow in the passively moved (123 ± 55%vs. 194 ± 57%) and control legs (47 ± 43%vs. 77 ± 96%). In addition, the change in vascular conductance in the passively moving limb was also significantly attenuated in the old (2.4 ± 1.2 ml min−1 mmHg−1) compared to the young (4.3 ± 1.7 ml min−1 mmHg−1). In both groups all main central and peripheral changes that occurred at the onset of passive knee extension were transient, lasting only 45 s. In a paradigm where metabolism does not play a role, these data reveal that both central and peripheral haemodynamic mechanisms are likely to be responsible for the 30% reduction in exercise-induced hyperaemia with age. PMID:20876201

  14. Effects of Massage on Muscular Strength and Proprioception After Exercise-Induced Muscle Damage.

    PubMed

    Shin, Mal-Soon; Sung, Yun-Hee

    2015-08-01

    Exercise-induced muscle damage (EIMD), which is commonly associated with eccentric exercise, unaccustomed exercise, and resistance training, may lead to delayed onset muscle soreness, swelling, decreased muscle strength, and range of motion. Many researchers have evaluated various interventions to treat the signs and symptoms of EIMD. However, the effects of massage after EIMD are unclear. Here, we investigated the effect of massage on muscle strength and proprioception after EIMD. All subjects randomly were divided into an EIMD-treated control group (n = 10) and a massage-treated after EIMD experimental group (n = 11). Exercise-induced muscle damage was induced by repeated exercise. Massage treatment was provided by physiotherapist for 15 minutes. It consists of light stroking, milking, friction, and skin rolling. Lactate was evaluated by Lactate Pro analyzer in pre- and postexercise. Surface electromyography (muscle activity) and sonography (muscle thickness) were used to confirm the muscular characteristics. Proprioception was investigated by dual inclinometer. As a result, massage treatment on the gastrocnemius after EIMD increased activation of the medial gastrocnemius during contraction (p ≤ 0.05). In the lateral and medial gastrocnemius, the θs, which is the angle between muscle fibers and superficial aponeurosis, showed a significant change (p ≤ 0.05). However, there are no differences in the θd, which is the angle between muscle fibers and deep aponeurosis. We also found that proprioceptive acuity in the ankle joint was significantly greater in the massage-treated experimental group compared with that in the control group (p ≤ 0.05). These findings suggest that massage of the gastrocnemius after EIMD can improve muscle strength and proprioception by influencing the superficial layer of the gastrocnemius.

  15. Increased renal tubular sodium reabsorption during exercise-induced hypervolemia in humans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nagashima, K.; Wu, J.; Kavouras, S. A.; Mack, G. W.

    2001-01-01

    We tested the hypothesis that renal tubular Na(+) reabsorption increased during the first 24 h of exercise-induced plasma volume expansion. Renal function was assessed 1 day after no-exercise control (C) or intermittent cycle ergometer exercise (Ex, 85% of peak O(2) uptake) for 2 h before and 3 h after saline loading (12.5 ml/kg over 30 min) in seven subjects. Ex reduced renal blood flow (p-aminohippurate clearance) compared with C (0.83 +/- 0.12 vs. 1.49 +/- 0.24 l/min, P < 0.05) but did not influence glomerular filtration rates (97 +/- 10 ml/min, inulin clearance). Fractional tubular reabsorption of Na(+) in the proximal tubules was higher in Ex than in C (P < 0.05). Saline loading decreased fractional tubular reabsorption of Na(+) from 99.1 +/- 0.1 to 98.7 +/- 0.1% (P < 0.05) in C but not in Ex (99.3 +/- 0.1 to 99.4 +/- 0.1%). Saline loading reduced plasma renin activity and plasma arginine vasopressin levels in C and Ex, although the magnitude of decrease was greater in C (P < 0.05). These results indicate that, during the acute phase of exercise-induced plasma volume expansion, increased tubular Na(+) reabsorption is directed primarily to the proximal tubules and is associated with a decrease in renal blood flow. In addition, saline infusion caused a smaller reduction in fluid-regulating hormones in Ex. The attenuated volume-regulatory response acts to preserve distal tubular Na(+) reabsorption during saline infusion 24 h after exercise.

  16. Myosin Light Chain Kinase (MLCK) Gene Influences Exercise Induced Muscle Damage during a Competitive Marathon.

    PubMed

    Del Coso, Juan; Valero, Marjorie; Lara, Beatriz; Salinero, Juan José; Gallo-Salazar, César; Areces, Francisco

    2016-01-01

    Myosin light chain kinase (MLCK) phosphorylates the regulatory light chain (RLC) of myosin producing increases in force development during skeletal muscle contraction. It has been suggested that MLCK gene polymorphisms might alter RLC phosphorylation thereby decreasing the ability to produce force and to resist strain during voluntary muscle contractions. Thus, the genetic variations in the MLCK gene might predispose some individuals to higher values of muscle damage during exercise, especially during endurance competitions. The aim of this investigation was to determine the influence of MLCK genetic variants on exercise-induced muscle damage produced during a marathon. Sixty-seven experienced runners competed in a marathon race. The MLCK genotype (C37885A) of these marathoners was determined. Before and after the race, a sample of venous blood was obtained to assess changes in serum myoglobin concentrations and leg muscle power changes were measured during a countermovement jump. Self-reported leg muscle pain and fatigue were determined by questionnaires. A total of 59 marathoners (88.1%) were CC homozygotes and 8 marathoners (11.9%) were CA heterozygotes. The two groups of participants completed the race with a similar time (228 ± 33 vs 234 ± 39 min; P = 0.30) and similar self-reported values for fatigue (15 ± 2 vs 16 ± 2 A.U.; P = 0.21) and lower-limb muscle pain (6.2 ± 1.7 vs 6.6 ± 1.8 cm; P = 0.29). However, CC marathoners presented higher serum myoglobin concentrations (739 ± 792 vs 348 ± 144 μg·mL-1; P = 0.03) and greater pre-to-post- race leg muscle power reduction (-32.7 ± 15.7 vs -21.2 ± 21.6%; P = 0.05) than CA marathoners. CA heterozygotes for MLCK C37885A might present higher exercise-induced muscle damage after a marathon competition than CC counterparts.

  17. Iron-sulfur cluster biogenesis in mammalian cells: New insights into the molecular mechanisms of cluster delivery.

    PubMed

    Maio, Nunziata; Rouault, Tracey A

    2015-06-01

    Iron-sulfur (Fe-S) clusters are ancient, ubiquitous cofactors composed of iron and inorganic sulfur. The combination of the chemical reactivity of iron and sulfur, together with many variations of cluster composition, oxidation states and protein environments, enables Fe-S clusters to participate in numerous biological processes. Fe-S clusters are essential to redox catalysis in nitrogen fixation, mitochondrial respiration and photosynthesis, to regulatory sensing in key metabolic pathways (i.e. cellular iron homeostasis and oxidative stress response), and to the replication and maintenance of the nuclear genome. Fe-S cluster biogenesis is a multistep process that involves a complex sequence of catalyzed protein-protein interactions and coupled conformational changes between the components of several dedicated multimeric complexes. Intensive studies of the assembly process have clarified key points in the biogenesis of Fe-S proteins. However several critical questions still remain, such as: what is the role of frataxin? Why do some defects of Fe-S cluster biogenesis cause mitochondrial iron overload? How are specific Fe-S recipient proteins recognized in the process of Fe-S transfer? This review focuses on the basic steps of Fe-S cluster biogenesis, drawing attention to recent advances achieved on the identification of molecular features that guide selection of specific subsets of nascent Fe-S recipients by the cochaperone HSC20. Additionally, it outlines the distinctive phenotypes of human diseases due to mutations in the components of the basic pathway. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Fe/S proteins: Analysis, structure, function, biogenesis and diseases. PMID:25245479

  18. Iron-sulfur cluster biogenesis in mammalian cells: New insights into the molecular mechanisms of cluster delivery.

    PubMed

    Maio, Nunziata; Rouault, Tracey A

    2015-06-01

    Iron-sulfur (Fe-S) clusters are ancient, ubiquitous cofactors composed of iron and inorganic sulfur. The combination of the chemical reactivity of iron and sulfur, together with many variations of cluster composition, oxidation states and protein environments, enables Fe-S clusters to participate in numerous biological processes. Fe-S clusters are essential to redox catalysis in nitrogen fixation, mitochondrial respiration and photosynthesis, to regulatory sensing in key metabolic pathways (i.e. cellular iron homeostasis and oxidative stress response), and to the replication and maintenance of the nuclear genome. Fe-S cluster biogenesis is a multistep process that involves a complex sequence of catalyzed protein-protein interactions and coupled conformational changes between the components of several dedicated multimeric complexes. Intensive studies of the assembly process have clarified key points in the biogenesis of Fe-S proteins. However several critical questions still remain, such as: what is the role of frataxin? Why do some defects of Fe-S cluster biogenesis cause mitochondrial iron overload? How are specific Fe-S recipient proteins recognized in the process of Fe-S transfer? This review focuses on the basic steps of Fe-S cluster biogenesis, drawing attention to recent advances achieved on the identification of molecular features that guide selection of specific subsets of nascent Fe-S recipients by the cochaperone HSC20. Additionally, it outlines the distinctive phenotypes of human diseases due to mutations in the components of the basic pathway. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Fe/S proteins: Analysis, structure, function, biogenesis and diseases.

  19. An open-label study examining the effect of pharmacological treatment on mannitol- and exercise-induced airway hyperresponsiveness in asthmatic children and adolescents with exercise-induced bronchoconstriction

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Mannitol- and exercise bronchial provocation tests are both used to diagnose exercise-induced bronchoconstriction. The study aim was to compare the short-term treatment response to budesonide and montelukast on airway hyperresponsiveness to mannitol challenge test and to exercise challenge test in children and adolescents with exercise-induced bronchoconstriction. Methods Patients were recruited from a paediatric asthma rehabilitation clinic located in the Swiss Alps. Individuals with exercise-induced bronchoconstriction and a positive result in the exercise challenge test underwent mannitol challenge test on day 0. All subjects then received a treatment with 400 μg budesonide and bronchodilators as needed for 7 days, after which exercise- and mannitol-challenge tests were repeated (day 7). Montelukast was then added to the previous treatment and both tests were repeated again after 7 days (day 14). Results Of 26 children and adolescents with exercise-induced bronchoconstriction, 14 had a positive exercise challenge test at baseline and were included in the intervention study. Seven of 14 (50%) also had a positive mannitol challenge test. There was a strong correlation between airway responsiveness to exercise and to mannitol at baseline (r = 0.560, p = 0.037). Treatment with budesonide and montelukast decreased airway hyperresponsiveness to exercise challenge test and to a lesser degree to mannitol challenge test. The fall in forced expiratory volume in one second during exercise challenge test was 21.7% on day 0 compared to 6.7% on day 14 (p = 0.001) and the mannitol challenge test dose response ratio was 0.036%/mg on day 0 compared to 0.013%/mg on day 14 (p = 0.067). Conclusion Short-term treatment with an inhaled corticosteroid and an additional leukotriene receptor antagonist in children and adolescents with exercise-induced bronchoconstriction decreases airway hyperresponsiveness to exercise and to mannitol. PMID:25084607

  20. The Mitochondrial-Derived Peptide Humanin Protects RPE Cells From Oxidative Stress, Senescence, and Mitochondrial Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Sreekumar, Parameswaran G.; Ishikawa, Keijiro; Spee, Chris; Mehta, Hemal H.; Wan, Junxiang; Yen, Kelvin; Cohen, Pinchas; Kannan, Ram; Hinton, David R.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the expression of humanin (HN) in human retinal pigment epithelial (hRPE) cells and its effect on oxidative stress–induced cell death, mitochondrial bioenergetics, and senescence. Methods Humanin localization in RPE cells and polarized RPE monolayers was assessed by confocal microscopy. Human RPE cells were treated with 150 μM tert-Butyl hydroperoxide (tBH) in the absence/presence of HN (0.5–10 μg/mL) for 24 hours. Mitochondrial respiration was measured by XF96 analyzer. Retinal pigment epithelial cell death and caspase-3 activation, mitochondrial biogenesis and senescence were analyzed by TUNEL, immunoblot analysis, mitochondrial DNA copy number, SA-β-Gal staining, and p16INK4a expression and HN levels by ELISA. Oxidative stress–induced changes in transepithelial resistance were studied in RPE monolayers with and without HN cotreatment. Results A prominent localization of HN was found in the cytoplasmic and mitochondrial compartments of hRPE. Humanin cotreatment inhibited tBH-induced reactive oxygen species formation and significantly restored mitochondrial bioenergetics in hRPE cells. Exogenous HN was taken up by RPE and colocalized with mitochondria. The oxidative stress–induced decrease in mitochondrial bioenergetics was prevented by HN cotreatment. Humanin treatment increased mitochondrial DNA copy number and upregulated mitochondrial transcription factor A, a key biogenesis regulator protein. Humanin protected RPE cells from oxidative stress–induced cell death by STAT3 phosphorylation and inhibiting caspase-3 activation. Humanin treatment inhibited oxidant-induced senescence. Polarized RPE demonstrated elevated cellular HN and increased resistance to cell death. Conclusions Humanin protected RPE cells against oxidative stress–induced cell death and restored mitochondrial function. Our data suggest a potential role for HN therapy in the prevention of retinal degeneration, including AMD. PMID:26990160

  1. Level of dietary protein does not impact whole body protein turnover during an exercise induced energy deficit

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Introduction: This study examined the effect of a high protein diet on whole body protein turnover during an exercise-induced energy deficit. A sustained energy deficit induced by energy intake restriction increases protein catabolism which can cause lean-body mass loss. A high-protein diet has be...

  2. Increased dietary protein attenuates C-reactive protein and creatine kinase responses to exercise-induced energy deficit

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We determined if dietary protein (P) modulates responses of C-reactive protein (CRP) and creatine kinase (CK), biomarkers of inflammation and muscle damage, during exercise-induced energy deficit (DEF). Thirteen healthy men (22 +/- 1 y, VO2peak 60 +/- 2 ml.kg-1.min-1) balanced energy expenditure (EE...

  3. A Systematic Review of the Literature on Screening for Exercise-Induced Asthma: Considerations for School Nurses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Worrell, Kelly; Shaw, Michele R.; Postma, Julie; Katz, Janet R.

    2015-01-01

    Asthma is a major cause of illness, missed school days, and hospitalization in children. One type of asthma common in children is exercise-induced asthma (EIA). EIA causes airway narrowing with symptoms of cough and shortness of breath during exercise. The purpose of this article is to review the literature relevant to screening children and…

  4. The Free-Running Asthma Screening Test: An Approach to Screening for Exercise-Induced Asthma in Rural Alabama.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heaman, Doris J.; Estes, Jenny

    1997-01-01

    This study documented the prevalence of exercise-induced asthma (EIA) in rural elementary schools, examining the use of a free-running asthma screening test and peak expiratory flow-rate measurement for school screening. Results indicated that 5.7% of the students had EIA. Absenteeism and poverty were related to EIA. (SM)

  5. Rapamycin increases mitochondrial efficiency by mtDNA-dependent reprogramming of mitochondrial metabolism in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Villa-Cuesta, Eugenia; Holmbeck, Marissa A; Rand, David M

    2014-05-15

    Downregulation of the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway by its inhibitor rapamycin is emerging as a potential pharmacological intervention that mimics the beneficial effects of dietary restriction. Modulation of mTOR has diverse effects on mitochondrial metabolism and biogenesis, but the role of the mitochondrial genotype in mediating these effects remains unknown. Here, we use novel mitochondrial genome replacement strains in Drosophila to test the hypothesis that genes encoded in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) influence the mTOR pathway. We show that rapamycin increases mitochondrial respiration and succinate dehydrogenase activity, decreases H2O2 production and generates distinct shifts in the metabolite profiles of isolated mitochondria versus whole Drosophila. These effects are disabled when divergent mitochondrial genomes from D. simulans are placed into a common nuclear background, demonstrating that the benefits of rapamycin to mitochondrial metabolism depend on genes encoded in the mtDNA. Rapamycin is able to enhance mitochondrial respiration when succinate dehydrogenase activity is blocked, suggesting that the beneficial effects of rapamycin on these two processes are independent. Overall, this study provides the first evidence for a link between mitochondrial genotype and the effects of rapamycin on mitochondrial metabolic pathways. PMID:24610944

  6. Centriole biogenesis and function in multiciliated cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Siwei; Mitchell, Brian J.

    2016-01-01

    The use of Xenopus embryonic skin as a model system for the development of ciliated epithelia is well established. This tissue is comprised of numerous cell types, most notably the multiciliated cells (MCCs) that each contain approximately 150 motile cilia. At the base of each cilium lies the centriole-based structure called the basal body. Centriole biogenesis is typically restricted to two new centrioles per cell cycle, each templating from an existing “mother” centriole. In contrast, MCCs are post-mitotic cells in which the majority of centrioles arise “de novo” without templating from a mother centriole, instead, these centrioles nucleate from an electron-dense structure termed the deuterostome. How centriole number is regulated in these cells and the mechanism by which the deuterosome templates nascent centrioles is still poorly understood. Here, we describe methods for regulating MCC cell fate as well as for visualizing and manipulating centriole biogenesis. PMID:26175436

  7. Analysis of photosystem II biogenesis in cyanobacteria.

    PubMed

    Heinz, Steffen; Liauw, Pasqual; Nickelsen, Jörg; Nowaczyk, Marc

    2016-03-01

    Photosystem II (PSII), a large multisubunit membrane protein complex found in the thylakoid membranes of cyanobacteria, algae and plants, catalyzes light-driven oxygen evolution from water and reduction of plastoquinone. Biogenesis of PSII requires coordinated assembly of at least 20 protein subunits, as well as incorporation of various organic and inorganic cofactors. The stepwise assembly process is facilitated by numerous protein factors that have been identified in recent years. Further analysis of this process requires the development or refinement of specific methods for the identification of novel assembly factors and, in particular, elucidation of the unique role of each. Here we summarize current knowledge of PSII biogenesis in cyanobacteria, focusing primarily on the impact of methodological advances and innovations. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Organization and dynamics of bioenergetic systems in bacteria, edited by Conrad Mullineaux.

  8. PPARα in lysosomal biogenesis: A perspective

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Arunava; Pahan, Kalipada

    2016-01-01

    Lysosomes are membrane-bound vesicles containing hydrolytic enzymes, ubiquitously present in all eukaryotic cells. Classically considered to be central to the cellular waste management machinery, recent studies revealed the role of lysosomes in a wide array of cellular processes like, degradation, cellular development, programmed cell death, secretion, plasma membrane repair, nutritional responses, and lipid metabolism. We recently studied the regulation of TFEB, considered to be the master regulator of lysosomal biogenesis, by activation of peroxisomal proliferator activated receptor α (PPARα), one of the key regulators of lipid metabolism. In this article, we discuss how the recent finding could be put in to perspective with the previous findings that relate lysosomal biogenesis to lipid metabolism, and comment on the possibility of a bi-directional interplay between these two distinct cellular processes upon activation of PPARα. PMID:26621249

  9. Centriole biogenesis and function in multiciliated cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Siwei; Mitchell, Brian J

    2015-01-01

    The use of Xenopus embryonic skin as a model system for the development of ciliated epithelia is well established. This tissue is comprised of numerous cell types, most notably the multiciliated cells (MCCs) that each contain approximately 150 motile cilia. At the base of each cilium lies the centriole-based structure called the basal body. Centriole biogenesis is typically restricted to two new centrioles per cell cycle, each templating from an existing "mother" centriole. In contrast, MCCs are post-mitotic cells in which the majority of centrioles arise "de novo" without templating from a mother centriole, instead, these centrioles nucleate from an electron-dense structure termed the deuterostome. How centriole number is regulated in these cells and the mechanism by which the deuterosome templates nascent centrioles is still poorly understood. Here, we describe methods for regulating MCC cell fate as well as for visualizing and manipulating centriole biogenesis.

  10. Cholesterol in myelin biogenesis and hypomyelinating disorders.

    PubMed

    Saher, Gesine; Stumpf, Sina Kristin

    2015-08-01

    The largest pool of free cholesterol in mammals resides in myelin membranes. Myelin facilitates rapid saltatory impulse propagation by electrical insulation of axons. This function is achieved by ensheathing axons with a tightly compacted stack of membranes. Cholesterol influences myelination at many steps, from the differentiation of myelinating glial cells, over the process of myelin membrane biogenesis, to the functionality of mature myelin. Cholesterol emerged as the only integral myelin component that is essential and rate-limiting for the development of myelin in the central and peripheral nervous system. Moreover, disorders that interfere with sterol synthesis or intracellular trafficking of cholesterol and other lipids cause hypomyelination and neurodegeneration. This review summarizes recent results on the roles of cholesterol in CNS myelin biogenesis in normal development and under different pathological conditions. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Brain Lipids.

  11. Integrated analysis of the involvement of nitric oxide synthesis in mitochondrial proliferation, mitochondrial deficiency and apoptosis in skeletal muscle fibres

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigues, Gabriela Silva; Godinho, Rosely Oliveira; Kiyomoto, Beatriz Hitomi; Gamba, Juliana; Oliveira, Acary Souza Bulle; Schmidt, Beny; Tengan, Célia Harumi

    2016-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is an important signaling messenger involved in different mitochondrial processes but only few studies explored the participation of NO in mitochondrial abnormalities found in patients with genetic mitochondrial deficiencies. In this study we verified whether NO synthase (NOS) activity was altered in different types of mitochondrial abnormalities and whether changes in mitochondrial function and NOS activity could be associated with the induction of apoptosis. We performed a quantitative and integrated analysis of NOS activity in individual muscle fibres of patients with mitochondrial diseases, considering mitochondrial function (cytochrome-c-oxidase activity), mitochondrial content, mitochondrial DNA mutation and presence of apoptotic nuclei. Our results indicated that sarcolemmal NOS activity was increased in muscle fibres with mitochondrial proliferation, supporting the relevance of neuronal NOS in the mitochondrial biogenesis process. Sarcoplasmic NOS activity was reduced in cytochrome-c-oxidase deficient fibres, probably as a consequence of the involvement of NO in the regulation of the respiratory chain. Alterations in NOS activity or mitochondrial abnormalities were not predisposing factors to apoptotic nuclei. Taken together, our results show that NO can be considered a potential molecular target for strategies to increase mitochondrial content and indicate that this approach may not be associated with increased apoptotic events. PMID:26856437

  12. Hematologic and hemorheological determinants of resting and exercise-induced hemoglobin oxygen desaturation in children with sickle cell disease

    PubMed Central

    Waltz, Xavier; Romana, Marc; Lalanne-Mistrih, Marie-Laure; Machado, Roberto F.; Lamarre, Yann; Tarer, Vanessa; Hardy-Dessources, Marie-Dominique; Tressières, Benoît; Divialle-Doumdo, Lydia; Petras, Marie; Maillard, Frederic; Etienne-Julan, Maryse; Connes, Philippe

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the study was to determine the factors associated with resting and exercise-induced hemoglobin oxygen desaturation. The well-established six-minute walk test was conducted in 107 sickle cell children (50 with sickle hemoglobin C disease and 57 with sickle cell anemia) at steady state. Hemoglobin oxygen saturation was measured before and immediately after the six-minute walk test. Blood samples were obtained on the same day to measure hematologic and hemorheological parameters. Exercise-induced hemoglobin oxygen desaturation was defined as a drop in hemoglobin oxygen saturation of 3% or more at the end of the six-minute walk test compared to resting levels. No children with sickle hemoglobin C disease, but approximately 50% of children with sickle cell anemia showed mild or moderate oxygen desaturation at rest, which was independently associated with the percentage of reticulocytes. Exercise-induced hemoglobin oxygen desaturation was observed in 18% of children with sickle hemoglobin C disease and 34% of children with sickle cell anemia, and was independently associated with the six-minute walk test, acute chest syndrome rate and the strength of red blood cell aggregates in children with sickle cell anemia. No association was found in children with sickle hemoglobin C disease between exercise-induced hemoglobin oxygen desaturation and the measured parameters. Hemoglobin oxygen desaturation at rest was common in children with sickle cell anemia but not in children with sickle hemoglobin C disease, and was mainly associated with greater hemolysis. Physiological strain during exercise and red blood cell aggregation properties may predict the occurrence of exercise-induced hemoglobin oxygen desaturation in children with sickle cell anemia. PMID:23539539

  13. Acute and chronic watercress supplementation attenuates exercise-induced peripheral mononuclear cell DNA damage and lipid peroxidation.

    PubMed

    Fogarty, Mark C; Hughes, Ciara M; Burke, George; Brown, John C; Davison, Gareth W

    2013-01-28

    Pharmacological antioxidant vitamins have previously been investigated for a prophylactic effect against exercise-induced oxidative stress. However, large doses are often required and may lead to a state of pro-oxidation and oxidative damage. Watercress contains an array of nutritional compounds such as β-carotene and α-tocopherol which may increase protection against exercise-induced oxidative stress. The present randomised controlled investigation was designed to test the hypothesis that acute (consumption 2 h before exercise) and chronic (8 weeks consumption) watercress supplementation can attenuate exercise-induced oxidative stress. A total of ten apparently healthy male subjects (age 23 (SD 4) years, stature 179 (SD 10) cm and body mass 74 (SD 15) kg) were recruited to complete the 8-week chronic watercress intervention period (and then 8 weeks of control, with no ingestion) of the experiment before crossing over in order to compete the single-dose acute phase (with control, no ingestion). Blood samples were taken at baseline (pre-supplementation), at rest (pre-exercise) and following exercise. Each subject completed an incremental exercise test to volitional exhaustion following chronic and acute watercress supplementation or control. The main findings show an exercise-induced increase in DNA damage and lipid peroxidation over both acute and chronic control supplementation phases (P< 0.05 v. supplementation), while acute and chronic watercress attenuated DNA damage and lipid peroxidation and decreased H₂O₂ accumulation following exhaustive exercise (P< 0.05 v. control). A marked increase in the main lipid-soluble antioxidants (α-tocopherol, γ-tocopherol and xanthophyll) was observed following watercress supplementation (P< 0.05 v. control) in both experimental phases. These findings suggest that short- and long-term watercress ingestion has potential antioxidant effects against exercise-induced DNA damage and lipid peroxidation.

  14. Meta-Analysis of Prognostic Implications of Exercise-Induced Ventricular Premature Complexes in the General Population.

    PubMed

    Kim, Joonseok; Kwon, Minkyung; Chang, Jinsoo; Harris, David; Gerson, Myron C; Hwang, Seung-Sik; Oh, Seung-Won

    2016-09-01

    Ventricular premature complexes (VPCs) during stress testing in the general population are commonly seen in clinical practice, but their prognostic value is not well understood. A comprehensive literature search of MEDLINE, Embase, and the Cochrane Library from January 1970 to May 2015 was conducted. Observational cohort studies on general populations evaluating the association between exercise-induced VPCs and all-cause or cardiovascular mortality were included in the analysis. Nine studies comprising 62,488 participants comparing clinical outcomes of patients with and without exercise-induced VPCs were included. The overall combined relative risks (RRs) for all-cause mortality and cardiovascular mortality in patients with exercise-induced VPCs were 1.41 (95% CI 1.23 to 1.61) and 1.86 (95% CI 1.51 to 2.30), respectively. In subgroup analysis, both frequent VPCs (RR 1.35, 95% CI 1.14 to 1.60) and infrequent VPCs (RR 1.57, 95% CI 1.13 to 2.18) were associated with an adverse outcome. VPCs during recovery were associated with an increased risk of death (RR 1.55, 95% CI 1.22 to 1.96). VPCs during exercise did not achieve statistical significance (RR 1.14, 95% CI 0.96 to 1.34), but only a few studies were included in the analysis. In conclusion, our meta-analysis suggests that exercise-induced VPCs in the general population significantly increase the risk of total mortality and cardiovascular mortality. Our study calls for further studies to assess the prognostic significance of exercise-induced VPCs and the utility of efforts to reduce the VPC burden to improve the clinical outcome. PMID:27394411

  15. Enantiomeric Natural Products: Occurrence and Biogenesis**

    PubMed Central

    Finefield, Jennifer M.; Sherman, David H.; Kreitman, Martin; Williams, Robert M.

    2012-01-01

    In Nature, chiral natural products are usually produced in optically pure form; however, on occasion Nature is known to produce enantiomerically opposite metabolites. These enantiomeric natural products can arise in Nature from a single species, or from different genera and/or species. Extensive research has been carried out over the years in an attempt to understand the biogenesis of naturally occurring enantiomers, however, many fascinating puzzles and stereochemical anomalies still remain. PMID:22555867

  16. Anatomy, biogenesis and regeneration of salivary glands.

    PubMed

    Holmberg, Kyle V; Hoffman, Matthew P

    2014-01-01

    An overview of the anatomy and biogenesis of salivary glands is important in order to understand the physiology, functions and disorders associated with saliva. A major disorder of salivary glands is salivary hypofunction and resulting xerostomia, or dry mouth, which affects hundreds of thousands of patients each year who suffer from salivary gland diseases or undergo head and neck cancer treatment. There is currently no curative therapy for these patients. To improve these patients' quality of life, new therapies are being developed based on findings in salivary gland cell and developmental biology. Here we discuss the anatomy and biogenesis of the major human salivary glands and the rodent submandibular gland, which has been used extensively as a research model. We also include a review of recent research on the identification and function of stem cells in salivary glands, and the emerging field of research suggesting that nerves play an instructive role during development and may be essential for adult gland repair and regeneration. Understanding the molecular mechanisms involved in gland biogenesis provides a template for regenerating, repairing or reengineering diseased or damaged adult human salivary glands. We provide an overview of 3 general approaches currently being developed to regenerate damaged salivary tissue, including gene therapy, stem cell-based therapy and tissue engineering. In the future, it may be that a combination of all three will be used to repair, regenerate and reengineer functional salivary glands in patients to increase the secretion of their saliva, the focus of this monograph. PMID:24862590

  17. Erythropoietin Activates Mitochondrial Biogenesis and Couples Red Cell Mass to Mitochondrial Mass in the Heart

    EPA Science Inventory

    RATIONALE: Erythropoietin (EPO) is often administered to cardiac patients with anemia, particularly from chronic kidney disease, and stimulation of erythropoiesis may stabilize left ventricular and renal function by recruiting protective effects beyond the correction of anemia. O...

  18. Mitochondria Biogenesis and Bioenergetics Gene Profiles in Isogenic Prostate Cells with Different Malignant Phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Burch, Tanya C.; Rhim, Johng S.

    2016-01-01

    Background. The most significant hallmarks of cancer are directly or indirectly linked to deregulated mitochondria. In this study, we sought to profile mitochondria associated genes in isogenic prostate cell lines with different tumorigenic phenotypes from the same patient. Results. Two isogenic human prostate cell lines RC77N/E (nonmalignant cells) and RC77T/E (malignant cells) were profiled for expression of mitochondrial biogenesis and energy metabolism genes by qRT-PCR using the Human Mitochondria and the Mitochondrial Energy Metabolism RT2 PCR arrays. Forty-seven genes were differentially regulated between the two cell lines. The interaction and regulatory networks of these genes were generated by Ingenuity Pathway Analysis. UCP2 was the most significantly upregulated gene in primary adenocarcinoma cells in the current study. The overexpression of UCP2 upon malignant transformation was further validated using human prostatectomy clinical specimens. Conclusions. This study demonstrates the overexpression of multiple genes that are involved in mitochondria biogenesis, bioenergetics, and modulation of apoptosis. These genes may play a role in malignant transformation and disease progression. The upregulation of some of these genes in clinical samples indicates that some of the differentially transcribed genes could be the potential targets for therapeutic interventions. PMID:27478826

  19. Mitochondria Biogenesis and Bioenergetics Gene Profiles in Isogenic Prostate Cells with Different Malignant Phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Burch, Tanya C; Rhim, Johng S; Nyalwidhe, Julius O

    2016-01-01

    Background. The most significant hallmarks of cancer are directly or indirectly linked to deregulated mitochondria. In this study, we sought to profile mitochondria associated genes in isogenic prostate cell lines with different tumorigenic phenotypes from the same patient. Results. Two isogenic human prostate cell lines RC77N/E (nonmalignant cells) and RC77T/E (malignant cells) were profiled for expression of mitochondrial biogenesis and energy metabolism genes by qRT-PCR using the Human Mitochondria and the Mitochondrial Energy Metabolism RT(2) PCR arrays. Forty-seven genes were differentially regulated between the two cell lines. The interaction and regulatory networks of these genes were generated by Ingenuity Pathway Analysis. UCP2 was the most significantly upregulated gene in primary adenocarcinoma cells in the current study. The overexpression of UCP2 upon malignant transformation was further validated using human prostatectomy clinical specimens. Conclusions. This study demonstrates the overexpression of multiple genes that are involved in mitochondria biogenesis, bioenergetics, and modulation of apoptosis. These genes may play a role in malignant transformation and disease progression. The upregulation of some of these genes in clinical samples indicates that some of the differentially transcribed genes could be the potential targets for therapeutic interventions. PMID:27478826

  20. Mitochondrial Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    ... disorder, something goes wrong with this process. Mitochondrial diseases are a group of metabolic disorders. Mitochondria are ... cells and cause damage. The symptoms of mitochondrial disease can vary. It depends on how many mitochondria ...

  1. Leucine modulation of mitochondrial mass and oxygen consumption in skeletal muscle cells and adipocytes

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Xiaocun; Zemel, Michael B

    2009-01-01

    Background The effects of dairy on energy metabolism appear to be mediated, in part, by leucine and calcium which regulate both adipocyte and skeletal muscle energy metabolism. We recently demonstrated that leucine and calcitriol regulate fatty acid oxidation in skeletal muscle cells in vitro, with leucine promoting and calcitriol suppressing fatty acid oxidation. Moreover, leucine coordinately regulated adipocyte lipid metabolism to promote flux of lipid to skeletal muscle and regulate metabolic flexibility. We have now investigated the role of mitochondrial biogenesis in mediating these effects. Methods We tested the effect of leucine, calcitriol and calcium in regulation of mitochondrial mass using a fluorescence method and tested mitochondrial biogenesis regulatory genes as well mitochondrial component genes using real-time PCR. We also evaluated the effect of leucine on oxygen consumption with a modified perfusion system. Results Leucine (0.5 mM) increased mitochondrial mass by 30% and 53% in C2C12 myocytes and 3T3-L1 adipocytes, respectively, while calcitriol (10 nM) decreased mitochondrial abundance by 37% and 27% (p < 0.02). Leucine also stimulated mitochondrial biogenesis genes SIRT-1, PGC-1α and NRF-1 as well as mitochondrial component genes UCP3, COX, and NADH expression by 3–5 fold in C2C12 cells (p < 0.003). Adipocyte-conditioned medium reduced mitochondrial abundance (p < 0.001) and decreased UCP3 but increased PGC-1α expression in myocytes, suggesting a feedback stimulation of mitochondrial biogenesis. Similar data were observed in C2C12 myocytes co-cultured with adipocytes, with co-culture markedly suppressing mitochondrial abundance (p < 0.02). Leucine stimulated oxygen consumption in both C2C12 cells and adipocytes compared with either control or valine-treated cells. Transfection of C2C12 myocytes with SIRT-1 siRNA resulted in parallel suppression of SIRT-1 expression and leucine-induced stimulation of PGC-1α and NRF-1, indicating that SIRT

  2. Effects of oral glutamine supplementation on exercise-induced gastrointestinal permeability and tight junction protein expression.

    PubMed

    Zuhl, Micah N; Lanphere, Kathryn R; Kravitz, Len; Mermier, Christine M; Schneider, Suzanne; Dokladny, Karol; Moseley, Pope L

    2014-01-15

    The objectives of this study are threefold: 1) to assess whether 7 days of oral glutamine (GLN) supplementation reduces exercise-induced intestinal permeability; 2) whether supplementation prevents the proinflammatory response; and 3) whether these changes are associated with upregulation of the heat shock response. On separate occasions, eight human subjects participated in baseline testing and in GLN and placebo (PLA) supplementation trials, followed by a 60-min treadmill run. Intestinal permeability was higher in the PLA trial compared with baseline and GLN trials (0.0604 ± 0.047 vs. 0.0218 ± 0.008 and 0.0272 ± 0.007, respectively; P < 0.05). IκBα expression in peripheral blood mononuclear cells was higher 240 min after exercise in the GLN trial compared with the PLA trial (1.411 ± 0.523 vs. 0.9839 ± 0.343, respectively; P < 0.05). In vitro using the intestinal epithelial cell line Caco-2, we measured effects of GLN supplementation (0, 4, and 6 mM) on heat-induced (37° or 41.8°C) heat shock protein 70 (HSP70), heat shock factor-1 (HSF-1), and occludin expression. HSF-1 and HSP70 levels increased in 6 mM supplementation at 41°C compared with 0 mM at 41°C (1.785 ± 0.495 vs. 0.6681 ± 0.290, and 1.973 ± 0.325 vs. 1.133 ± 0.129, respectively; P < 0.05). Occludin levels increased after 4 mM supplementation at 41°C and 6 mM at 41°C compared with 0 mM at 41°C (1.236 ± 0.219 and 1.849 ± 0.564 vs. 0.7434 ± 0.027, respectively; P < 0.001). GLN supplementation prevented exercise-induced permeability, possibly through HSF-1 activation. PMID:24285149

  3. Myosin Light Chain Kinase (MLCK) Gene Influences Exercise Induced Muscle Damage during a Competitive Marathon

    PubMed Central

    Valero, Marjorie; Lara, Beatriz; Salinero, Juan José; Gallo-Salazar, César; Areces, Francisco

    2016-01-01

    Myosin light chain kinase (MLCK) phosphorylates the regulatory light chain (RLC) of myosin producing increases in force development during skeletal muscle contraction. It has been suggested that MLCK gene polymorphisms might alter RLC phosphorylation thereby decreasing the ability to produce force and to resist strain during voluntary muscle contractions. Thus, the genetic variations in the MLCK gene might predispose some individuals to higher values of muscle damage during exercise, especially during endurance competitions. The aim of this investigation was to determine the influence of MLCK genetic variants on exercise-induced muscle damage produced during a marathon. Sixty-seven experienced runners competed in a marathon race. The MLCK genotype (C37885A) of these marathoners was determined. Before and after the race, a sample of venous blood was obtained to assess changes in serum myoglobin concentrations and leg muscle power changes were measured during a countermovement jump. Self-reported leg muscle pain and fatigue were determined by questionnaires. A total of 59 marathoners (88.1%) were CC homozygotes and 8 marathoners (11.9%) were CA heterozygotes. The two groups of participants completed the race with a similar time (228 ± 33 vs 234 ± 39 min; P = 0.30) and similar self-reported values for fatigue (15 ± 2 vs 16 ± 2 A.U.; P = 0.21) and lower-limb muscle pain (6.2 ± 1.7 vs 6.6 ± 1.8 cm; P = 0.29). However, CC marathoners presented higher serum myoglobin concentrations (739 ± 792 vs 348 ± 144 μg·mL-1; P = 0.03) and greater pre-to-post- race leg muscle power reduction (-32.7 ± 15.7 vs -21.2 ± 21.6%; P = 0.05) than CA marathoners. CA heterozygotes for MLCK C37885A might present higher exercise-induced muscle damage after a marathon competition than CC counterparts. PMID:27483374

  4. Myosin Light Chain Kinase (MLCK) Gene Influences Exercise Induced Muscle Damage during a Competitive Marathon.

    PubMed

    Del Coso, Juan; Valero, Marjorie; Lara, Beatriz; Salinero, Juan José; Gallo-Salazar, César; Areces, Francisco

    2016-01-01

    Myosin light chain kinase (MLCK) phosphorylates the regulatory light chain (RLC) of myosin producing increases in force development during skeletal muscle contraction. It has been suggested that MLCK gene polymorphisms might alter RLC phosphorylation thereby decreasing the ability to produce force and to resist strain during voluntary muscle contractions. Thus, the genetic variations in the MLCK gene might predispose some individuals to higher values of muscle damage during exercise, especially during endurance competitions. The aim of this investigation was to determine the influence of MLCK genetic variants on exercise-induced muscle damage produced during a marathon. Sixty-seven experienced runners competed in a marathon race. The MLCK genotype (C37885A) of these marathoners was determined. Before and after the race, a sample of venous blood was obtained to assess changes in serum myoglobin concentrations and leg muscle power changes were measured during a countermovement jump. Self-reported leg muscle pain and fatigue were determined by questionnaires. A total of 59 marathoners (88.1%) were CC homozygotes and 8 marathoners (11.9%) were CA heterozygotes. The two groups of participants completed the race with a similar time (228 ± 33 vs 234 ± 39 min; P = 0.30) and similar self-reported values for fatigue (15 ± 2 vs 16 ± 2 A.U.; P = 0.21) and lower-limb muscle pain (6.2 ± 1.7 vs 6.6 ± 1.8 cm; P = 0.29). However, CC marathoners presented higher serum myoglobin concentrations (739 ± 792 vs 348 ± 144 μg·mL-1; P = 0.03) and greater pre-to-post- race leg muscle power reduction (-32.7 ± 15.7 vs -21.2 ± 21.6%; P = 0.05) than CA marathoners. CA heterozygotes for MLCK C37885A might present higher exercise-induced muscle damage after a marathon competition than CC counterparts. PMID:27483374

  5. Effect of age on exercise-induced alterations in cognitive executive function: relationship to cerebral perfusion.

    PubMed

    Lucas, Samuel J E; Ainslie, Philip N; Murrell, Carissa J; Thomas, Kate N; Franz, Elizabeth A; Cotter, James D

    2012-08-01

    Regular exercise improves the age-related decline in cerebral blood flow (CBF) and is associated with improved cognitive function; however, less is known about the direct relationship between CBF and cognitive function. We examined the influence of healthy aging on the capability of acute exercise to improve cognition, and whether exercise-induced improvements in cognition are related to CBF and cortical hemodynamics. Middle cerebral artery blood flow velocity (MCAv; Doppler) and cortical hemodynamics (NIRS) were measured in 13 young (24±5 y) and 9 older (62±3 y) participants at rest and during cycling at 30% and 70% of heart rate range (HRR). Cognitive performance was assessed using a computer-adapted Stroop task (i.e., test of executive function cognition) at rest and during exercise. Average response times on the Stroop task were slower for the older compared to younger group for both simple and difficult tasks (P<0.01). Independent of age, difficult-task response times improved during exercise (P<0.01), with the improvement greater at 70% HRR exercise (P=0.04 vs. 30% HRR). Higher MCAv was correlated with faster response times for simple and difficult tasks at rest (R(2)=0.47 and R(2)=0.47, respectively), but this relation uncoupled progressively during exercise. Exercise-induced increases in MCAv were similar and unaltered during cognitive tasks for both age groups. In contrast, prefrontal cortical hemodynamic NIRS measures [oxyhemoglobin (O(2)Hb) and total hemoglobin (tHb)] were differentially affected by exercise intensity, age and cognitive task; e.g., there were smaller increases in [O(2)Hb] and [tHb] in the older group between exercise intensities (P<0.05). These data indicate that: 1) Regardless of age, cognitive (executive) function is improved while exercising; 2) while MCAv is strongly related to cognition at rest, this relation becomes uncoupled during exercise, and 3) there is dissociation between global CBF and regional cortical oxygenation and

  6. Dysfunctional breathing and reaching one’s physiological limit as causes of exercise-induced dyspnoea

    PubMed Central

    Everard, Mark L.

    2016-01-01

    Key points Excessive exercise-induced shortness of breath is a common complaint. For some, exercise-induced bronchoconstriction is the primary cause and for a small minority there may be an alternative organic pathology. However for many, the cause will be simply reaching their physiological limit or be due to a functional form of dysfunctional breathing, neither of which require drug therapy. The physiological limit category includes deconditioned individuals, such as those who have been through intensive care and require rehabilitation, as well as the unfit and the fit competitive athlete who has reached their limit with both of these latter groups requiring explanation and advice. Dysfunctional breathing is an umbrella term for an alteration in the normal biomechanical patterns of breathing that result in intermittent or chronic symptoms, which may be respiratory and/or nonrespiratory. This alteration may be due to structural causes or, much more commonly, be functional as exemplified by thoracic pattern disordered breathing (PDB) and extrathoracic paradoxical vocal fold motion disorder (pVFMD). Careful history and examination together with spirometry may identify those likely to have PDB and/or pVFMD. Where there is doubt about aetiology, cardiopulmonary exercise testing may be required to identify the deconditioned, unfit or fit individual reaching their physiological limit and PDB, while continuous laryngoscopy during exercise is increasingly becoming the benchmark for assessing extrathoracic causes. Accurate assessment and diagnosis can prevent excessive use of drug therapy and result in effective management of the cause of the individual’s complaint through cost-effective approaches such as reassurance, advice, breathing retraining and vocal exercises. This review provides an overview of the spectrum of conditions that can present as exercise-­induced breathlessness experienced by young subjects participating in sport and aims to promote understanding of

  7. Mitochondrial protein sorting as a therapeutic target for ATP synthase disorders.

    PubMed

    Aiyar, Raeka S; Bohnert, Maria; Duvezin-Caubet, Stéphane; Voisset, Cécile; Gagneur, Julien; Fritsch, Emilie S; Couplan, Elodie; von der Malsburg, Karina; Funaya, Charlotta; Soubigou, Flavie; Courtin, Florence; Suresh, Sundari; Kucharczyk, Roza; Evrard, Justine; Antony, Claude; St Onge, Robert P; Blondel, Marc; di Rago, Jean-Paul; van der Laan, Martin; Steinmetz, Lars M

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondrial diseases are systemic, prevalent and often fatal; yet treatments remain scarce. Identifying molecular intervention points that can be therapeutically targeted remains a major challenge, which we confronted via a screening assay we developed. Using yeast models of mitochondrial ATP synthase disorders, we screened a drug repurposing library, and applied genomic and biochemical techniques to identify pathways of interest. Here we demonstrate that modulating the sorting of nuclear-encoded proteins into mitochondria, mediated by the TIM23 complex, proves therapeutic in both yeast and patient-derived cells exhibiting ATP synthase deficiency. Targeting TIM23-dependent protein sorting improves an array of phenotypes associated with ATP synthase disorders, including biogenesis and activity of the oxidative phosphorylation machinery. Our study establishes mitochondrial protein sorting as an intervention point for ATP synthase disorders, and because of the central role of this pathway in mitochondrial biogenesis, it holds broad value for the treatment of mitochondrial diseases. PMID:25519239

  8. Mitochondrial protein sorting as a therapeutic target for ATP synthase disorders

    PubMed Central

    Aiyar, Raeka S.; Bohnert, Maria; Duvezin-Caubet, Stéphane; Voisset, Cécile; Gagneur, Julien; Fritsch, Emilie S.; Couplan, Elodie; von der Malsburg, Karina; Funaya, Charlotta; Soubigou, Flavie; Courtin, Florence; Suresh, Sundari; Kucharczyk, Roza; Evrard, Justine; Antony, Claude; St.Onge, Robert P.; Blondel, Marc; di Rago, Jean-Paul; van der Laan, Martin; Steinmetz, Lars M.

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondrial diseases are systemic, prevalent and often fatal; yet treatments remain scarce. Identifying molecular intervention points that can be therapeutically targeted remains a major challenge, which we confronted via a screening assay we developed. Using yeast models of mitochondrial ATP synthase disorders, we screened a drug repurposing library, and applied genomic and biochemical techniques to identify pathways of interest. Here we demonstrate that modulating the sorting of nuclear-encoded proteins into mitochondria, mediated by the TIM23 complex, proves therapeutic in both yeast and patient-derived cells exhibiting ATP synthase deficiency. Targeting TIM23-dependent protein sorting improves an array of phenotypes associated with ATP synthase disorders, including biogenesis and activity of the oxidative phosphorylation machinery. Our study establishes mitochondrial protein sorting as an intervention point for ATP synthase disorders, and because of the central role of this pathway in mitochondrial biogenesis, it holds broad value for the treatment of mitochondrial diseases. PMID:25519239

  9. Redox mechanisms of cardiomyocyte mitochondrial protection

    PubMed Central

    Bartz, Raquel R.; Suliman, Hagir B.; Piantadosi, Claude A.

    2015-01-01

    Oxidative and nitrosative stress are primary contributors to the loss of myocardial tissue in insults ranging from ischemia/reperfusion injury from coronary artery disease and heart transplantation to sepsis-induced myocardial dysfunction and drug-induced myocardial damage. This cell damage caused by oxidative and nitrosative stress leads to mitochondrial protein, DNA, and lipid modifications, which inhibits energy production and contractile function, potentially leading to cell necrosis and/or apoptosis. However, cardiomyocytes have evolved an elegant set of redox-sensitive mechanisms that respond to and contain oxidative and nitrosative damage. These responses include the rapid induction of antioxidant enzymes, mitochondrial DNA repair mechanisms, selective mitochondrial autophagy (mitophagy), and mitochondrial biogenesis. Coordinated cytoplasmic to nuclear cell-signaling and mitochondrial transcriptional responses to the presence of elevated cytoplasmic oxidant production, e.g., H2O2, allows nuclear translocation of the Nfe2l2 transcription factor and up-regulation of downstream cytoprotective genes such as heme oxygenase-1 which generates physiologic signals, such as CO that up-regulates Nfe212 gene transcription. Simultaneously, a number of other DNA binding transcription factors are expressed and/or activated under redox control, such as Nuclear Respiratory Factor-1 (NRF-1), and lead to the induction of genes involved in both intracellular and mitochondria-specific repair mechanisms. The same insults, particularly those related to vascular stress and inflammation also produce elevated levels of nitric oxide, which also has mitochondrial protein thiol-protective functions and induces mitochondrial biogenesis through cyclic GMP-dependent and perhaps other pathways. This brief review provides an overview of these pathways and interconnected cardiac repair mechanisms. PMID:26578967

  10. The effect of exercise-induced arousal on chosen tempi for familiar melodies.

    PubMed

    Jakubowski, Kelly; Halpern, Andrea R; Grierson, Mick; Stewart, Lauren

    2015-04-01

    Many previous studies have shown that arousal affects time perception, suggesting a direct influence of arousal on the speed of the pacemaker of the internal clock. However, it is unknown whether arousal influences the mental representation of tempo (speed) for highly familiar and complex stimuli, such as well-known melodies, that have long-term representations in memory. Previous research suggests that mental representations of the tempo of familiar melodies are stable over time; the aim of the present study was to investigate whether these representations can be systematically altered via an increase in physiological arousal. Participants adjusted the tempo of 14 familiar melodies in real time until they found a tempo that matched their internal representation of the appropriate tempo for that piece. The task was carried out before and after a physiologically arousing (exercise) or nonarousing (anagrams) manipulation. Participants completed this task both while hearing the melodies aloud and while imagining them. Chosen tempi increased significantly following exercise-induced arousal, regardless of whether a melody was heard aloud or imagined. These findings suggest that a change in internal clock speed affects temporal judgments even for highly familiar and complex stimuli such as music. PMID:25056004

  11. Improving screening and diagnosis of exercise-induced bronchoconstriction: a call to action.

    PubMed

    Weiler, John M; Hallstrand, Teal S; Parsons, Jonathan P; Randolph, Christopher; Silvers, William S; Storms, William W; Bronstone, Amy

    2014-01-01

    This article summarizes the findings of an expert panel of nationally recognized allergists and pulmonologists who met to discuss how to improve detection and diagnosis of exercise-induced bronchoconstriction (EIB), a transient airway narrowing that occurs during and most often after exercise in people with and without underlying asthma. EIB is both commonly underdiagnosed and overdiagnosed. EIB underdiagnosis may result in habitual avoidance of sports and physical activity, chronic deconditioning, weight gain, poor asthma control, low self-esteem, and reduced quality of life. Routine use of a reliable and valid self-administered EIB screening questionnaire by professionals best positioned to screen large numbers of people could substantially improve the detection of EIB. The authors conducted a systematic review of the literature that evaluated the accuracy of EIB screening questionnaires that might be adopted for widespread EIB screening in the general population. Results of this review indicated that no existing EIB screening questionnaire had adequate sensitivity and specificity for this purpose. The authors present a call to action to develop a new EIB screening questionnaire, and discuss the rigorous qualitative and quantitative research necessary to develop and validate such an instrument, including key methodological pitfalls that must be avoided.

  12. Music can enhance exercise-induced sympathetic dominancy assessed by heart rate variability.

    PubMed

    Urakawa, Kayoko; Yokoyama, Kazuhito

    2005-07-01

    Many studies have been conducted on physiological responses of music, yielding controversial results. In the present study, we examined whether music affects the exercise-induced changes in the autonomic nervous system activity in twelve healthy female college students. On the first day, the subjects were asked to rest, exercise, and then rest for 15 min, respectively. On the second day, they were asked to rest with music, exercise, and then rest with music for 15 min, respectively. Heart rate variability was measured for the pre- and post-exercise periods. Music was given according to subjects' preferences using a vibroacoustic apparatus (body sonic system), i.e. a chair on which subjects laid and felt low-pitch sounds by their body in addition to listening music. With music, ratio of low frequency to high frequency component of heart rate variability (LH/HF) was significantly increased after exercise as compared with before exercise (p < 0.01). By contrast, the changes in LH/HF were not significant without music (p > 0.05). It is suggested that after exercise in which sympathetic nerve activity is dominant, preferred music synchronizes with the activated physical response, further promoting the response and increasing sympathetic nerve activity. Combining music with exercise is therefore not only enjoyable in terms of mood but also may promote physiological excitation and enhance physical activation. PMID:15942147

  13. Treadmill exercise induces age and protocol-dependent epigenetic changes in prefrontal cortex of Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Cechinel, Laura Reck; Basso, Carla Giovana; Bertoldi, Karine; Schallenberger, Bruna; de Meireles, Louisiana Carolina Ferreira; Siqueira, Ionara Rodrigues

    2016-10-15

    Some studies have linked age-related beneficial effects of exercise and epigenetic mechanisms. Although, the impact of treadmill exercise on histone acetylation, histone and DNA methylation marks in aged cortices yet remains poorly understood. Considering the role of frontal cortex on brain functions, we investigated the potential of different exercise protocols, single session and daily exercise, to modulate epigenetic marks, namely global H4 acetylation, histone methyltransferase activity (HMT H3K27) and levels of DNA methytransferase (DNMT1 and DNMT3b) in prefrontal cortices from 3 and 21-months aged Wistar rats. The animals were submitted to two treadmill exercise protocols, single session (20min) or daily moderate (20min/day during 14days). The daily exercise protocol induced an increased in histone H4 acetylation levels in prefrontal cortices of 21-months-old rats, without any effects in young adult group. DNMT3b levels were increased in aged cortices of animals submitted to single session of exercise. These results indicate that prefrontal cortex is susceptible to epigenetic changes in a protocol dependent-manner and that H4 acetylation levels and DNMT3b content changes might be linked at least in part to exercise-induced effects on brain functions. PMID:27418438

  14. Exercise-induced dehydration does not alter time trial or neuromuscular performance.

    PubMed

    Stewart, C J; Whyte, D G; Cannon, J; Wickham, J; Marino, F E

    2014-08-01

    This study examined the effect of exercise-induced dehydration by ~4% body mass loss on 5-km cycling time trial (TT) performance and neuromuscular drive, independent of hyperthermia. 7 active males were dehydrated on 2 occasions, separated by 7 d. Participants remained dehydrated (DEH, -3.8±0.5%) or were rehydrated (REH, 0.2±0.6%) over 2 h before completing the TT at 18-25 °C, 20-30% relative humidity. Neuromuscular function was determined before dehydration and immediately prior the TT. The TT started at the same core temperature (DEH, 37.3±0.3°C; REH, 37.0±0.2 °C (P>0.05). Neither TT performance (DEH, 7.31±1.5 min; REH, 7.10±1.3 min (P>0.05)) or % voluntary activation were affected by dehydration (DEH, 88.7±6.4%; REH, 90.6±6.1% (P>0.05)). Quadriceps peak torque was significantly elevated in both trials prior to the TT (P<0.05), while a 19% increase in the rate of potentiated peak twitch torque development (P<0.05) was observed in the DEH trial only. All other neuromuscular measures were similar between trials. Short duration TT performance and neuromuscular function are not reduced by dehydration, independent of hyperthermia.

  15. Improving screening and diagnosis of exercise-induced bronchoconstriction: a call to action.

    PubMed

    Weiler, John M; Hallstrand, Teal S; Parsons, Jonathan P; Randolph, Christopher; Silvers, William S; Storms, William W; Bronstone, Amy

    2014-01-01

    This article summarizes the findings of an expert panel of nationally recognized allergists and pulmonologists who met to discuss how to improve detection and diagnosis of exercise-induced bronchoconstriction (EIB), a transient airway narrowing that occurs during and most often after exercise in people with and without underlying asthma. EIB is both commonly underdiagnosed and overdiagnosed. EIB underdiagnosis may result in habitual avoidance of sports and physical activity, chronic deconditioning, weight gain, poor asthma control, low self-esteem, and reduced quality of life. Routine use of a reliable and valid self-administered EIB screening questionnaire by professionals best positioned to screen large numbers of people could substantially improve the detection of EIB. The authors conducted a systematic review of the literature that evaluated the accuracy of EIB screening questionnaires that might be adopted for widespread EIB screening in the general population. Results of this review indicated that no existing EIB screening questionnaire had adequate sensitivity and specificity for this purpose. The authors present a call to action to develop a new EIB screening questionnaire, and discuss the rigorous qualitative and quantitative research necessary to develop and validate such an instrument, including key methodological pitfalls that must be avoided. PMID:24811017

  16. ED 07-4 IS EXERCISE-INDUCED HYPERTENSION ASSOCIATED WITH ADVERSE CARDIOVASCULAR OUTCOMES?

    PubMed

    Sharman, James

    2016-09-01

    Millions of clinical exercise stress tests are conducted annually worldwide. The fundamental rationale underlying the conduct of these tests is that cardiovascular irregularities may be revealed during an exercise bout that would otherwise remain unnoticed if testing was only conducted under resting conditions. In order to reveal electrocardiographic abnormalities indicative of cardiac disease, maximal intensity exercise may need to be undertaken, whereas the presence of hypertension can be revealed by the blood pressure response at low to moderate intensity exercise. Therefore, exercise blood pressure measured carefully under standardised conditions should be a useful tool to identify individuals at increased cardiovascular risk. Independent investigators have consistently shown that exercise blood pressure at low to moderate intensities predicts adverse cardiovascular outcomes independent from resting blood pressure and conventional cardiovascular risk factors. This talk will present evidence in support of exercise-induced hypertension as a clinical observation requiring additional follow up care. Future needs in terms of better understanding the mechanisms of exercise hypertension and determination of exercise hypertension thresholds will also be detailed. PMID:27642909

  17. Vascular and central hemodynamic changes following exercise-induced heat stress.

    PubMed

    Lefferts, Wesley K; Heffernan, Kevin S; Hultquist, Eric M; Fehling, Patricia C; Smith, Denise L

    2015-06-01

    This study examined the effects of moderate exercise-induced heat stress (EIHS) on vascular function, central hemodynamic load and indices of coronary perfusion. Vascular-hemodynamic measures were collected in 12 healthy men (aged 22±3 years) pre and post 100 minutes of moderate, intermittent exercise in two randomized conditions: heat stress (HS; wearing firefighter personal protective equipment (PPE)), and no heat stress (NHS; wearing a cooling shirt and equivalent PPE weight). Aortic blood pressure, reflected wave pressure (Pb), systolic (SPTI) and diastolic pressure time-integral (DPTI), and aortic stiffness were assessed before and after each condition. SPTI was significantly greater, and DPTI and Pb were significantly lower for HS-post compared to NHS-post (p<0.05). Pulse wave velocity was not different between conditions. In conclusion, EIHS does not affect aortic stiffness, but increases indices of myocardial work and reduces indices of coronary perfusion which may be related to chronotropic responses to EIHS. The mismatch between oxygen demand and oxygen supply may increase cardiac vulnerability to ischemia during strenuous work in the heat. PMID:25939655

  18. [SIX CASES OF WHEAT-DEPENDENT EXERCISE-INDUCED ANAPHYLAXIS IN CHILDREN].

    PubMed

    Nakagawa, Tomoko; Sakai, Kazunori; Hayashi, Naofumi; Sato, Arisa; Sasaki, Kemal; Matsui, Teruaki; Sugiura, Shiro; Kando, Naoyuki; Ito, Komei

    2015-08-01

    Wheat-dependent exercise-induced anaphylaxis (WDEIA) is often reported in adults for whom the specific IgE to ω-5 gliadin can be a useful diagnostic test. However, few cases of WDEIA in children have been reported. We herein report six cases (aged 7-16 years) of children with WDEIA, who had no clinical history of immediate-type wheat allergy but who were diagnosed by a wheat ingestion + exercise provocation test. The specific IgE to wheat ranged <0.35-3.49 (median 1.64) UA/ml. Skin prick tests using wheat extract were performed on 3 patients who showed either a negative or low specific IgE titer to wheat, and all of them resulted in negative findings. The specific IgE to ω-5 gliadin was below the detection limit in all cases. Aspirin-supplemented provocation tests were performed to 4 cases who had negative results in the wheat + exercise test. All of these resulted in a positive reaction, and two of them provoked the occurrence of anaphylactic shock, which was relieved by the intramuscular injection of adrenaline. WDEIA in children cannot be ruled out by serological tests alone. On the other hand, severe symptoms might be provoked by the provocation test. Therefore, a safe procedure is warranted for the diagnosis of WDEIA in children.

  19. Exercise-induced gene expression changes in the rat spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Perreau, Victoria M; Adlard, Paul A; Anderson, Aileen J; Cotman, Carl W

    2005-01-01

    There is growing evidence that exercise benefits recovery of neuromuscular function from spinal cord injury (SCI). However, the effect of exercise on gene expression in the spinal cord is poorly understood. We used oligonucleotide microarrays to compare thoracic and lumbar regions of spinal cord of either exercising (voluntary wheel running for 21 days) or sedentary rats. The expression data were filtered using statistical tests for significance, and K-means clustering was then used to segregate lists of significantly changed genes into sets based upon expression patterns across all experimental groups. Levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) protein were also measured after voluntary exercise, across different regions of the spinal cord. BDNF mRNA increased with voluntary exercise, as has been previously shown for other forms of exercise, contributed to by increases in both exon I and exon III. The exercise-induced gene expression changes identified by microarray analysis are consistent with increases in pathways promoting neuronal health, signaling, remodeling, cellular transport, and development of oligodendrocytes. Taken together these data suggest cellular pathways through which exercise may promote recovery in the SCI population.

  20. Utility of Exercise-Induced Zero TBI Sign in Patients on Maintenance Hemodialysis

    PubMed Central

    Kohno, Kenji; Ebine, Kunio; Tamura, Susumu; Ohzeki, Yasuhiro; Murase, Toshifumi; Ohara, Takehiro; Kunugi, Yujin; Iida, Fumihiko; Mochizuki, Yoshie; Sorimachi, Mutsumi; Watanabe, Shinichi

    2016-01-01

    It is uncertain whether exercise-induced zero toe brachial index sign (e-ZETS) is beneficial to prevent advanced perfusion disturbance in maintenance hemodialysis (HD) patients. In HD patients, we compared the clinical findings and prognoses among 22 toes in a resting zero toe brachial index sign (r-ZETS) group, 22 toes in an e-ZETS group, and 63 toes in a non-e-ZETS group. The hemodynamics of the lower extremities in the e-ZETS group is intermediate between the r-ZETS and non-e-ZETS groups. As the result of a 36-month follow- up observation, the r-ZETS avoidance rate was significantly lower in the e-ZETS group (63.6%; P <0.001) than the non-e-ZETS group (98.4%), showing that it was difficult to avoid advanced perfusion disturbance. The e-ZETS in HD patients may appear before r-ZETS, being beneficial as a predictor for advanced perfusion disturbance. (This is a translation of J Jpn Coll Angiol 2015; 55: 125–129.)

  1. Wheat-dependent exercise-induced anaphylaxis sensitized with hydrolyzed wheat protein in soap.

    PubMed

    Chinuki, Yuko; Morita, Eishin

    2012-12-01

    Wheat-dependent exercise-induced anaphylaxis (WDEIA) is a specific form of wheat allergy typically induced by exercise after ingestion of wheat products. Wheat ω-5 gliadin is a major allergen associated with conventional WDEIA, and detection of serum immunoglobulin E (IgE) specific to recombinant ω-5 gliadin is a reliable method for its diagnosis. Recently, an increased incidence of a new subtype of WDEIA, which is likely to be sensitized via a percutaneous and/or rhinoconjunctival route to hydrolyzed wheat protein (HWP), has been observed. All of the patients with this new subtype had used the same brand of soap, which contained HWP. Approximately half of these patients developed contact allergy several months later and subsequently developed WDEIA. In each of these patients, contact allergy with soap exposure preceded food ingestion-induced reactions. Other patients directly developed generalized symptoms upon ingestion of wheat products. The predominant observed symptom of the new WDEIA subtype was angioedema of the eyelids; a number of patients developed anaphylaxis. This new subtype of WDEIA has little serum ω-5 gliadin-specific serum IgE.

  2. Effect of pharmacological lowering of plasma urate on exercise-induced oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    McAnulty, S R; Hosick, P A; McAnulty, L S; Quindry, J C; Still, L; Hudson, M B; Dibarnardi, A N; Milne, G L; Morrow, J D; Austin, M D

    2007-12-01

    Urate is a metabolic end product of purine metabolism that contributes about 66% of the antioxidant capacity of plasma. The objective of this study was to evaluate the importance of plasma urate as an antioxidant using pharmacological lowering and examining the impact on plasma antioxidant capacity and oxidative stress after intense exercise. Fifteen subjects ran for 45 min at approximately 80% VO2 max under the influence of probenecid (1 g/d) (PRO) or placebo (PLA) in a double-blind, crossover design. Blood samples obtained at baseline, pre-exercise, and immediately post-exercise were analyzed for F2-isoprostanes, lipid hydroperoxides (LHs), ferric-reducing ability of plasma (FRAP), urate, ascorbate (AA), and nitrite. A 2 (group)x2 (time) repeated-measures analysis of variance (ANOVA), one-way ANOVA, Tukey-Kramer multiple comparison tests, and Student's t tests were used for statistical analysis. PRO exhibited lowered urate and FRAP compared with baseline (pexercise-induced oxidative stress were not affected by below-normal physiological concentrations of urate and a diminished antioxidant capacity within the plasma compartment.

  3. Syndecan-4 Signaling Is Required for Exercise-Induced Cardiac Hypertrophy

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Jun; He, Guixin; Chen, Qinhua; Sun, Jiayin; Dai, Qin; Lu, Jianrong; Li, Guannan; Wu, Han; Li, Ran; Chen, Jianzhou; Xu, Wei; Xu, Biao

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac hypertrophy can be broadly classified as either physiological or pathological. Physiological stimuli such as exercise cause adaptive cardiac hypertrophy and normal heart function. Pathological stimuli including hypertension and aortic valvular stenosis cause maladaptive cardiac remodeling and ultimately heart failure. Syndecan-4 (synd4) is a transmembrane proteoglycan identified as being involved in cardiac adaptation after injury, but whether it takes part in physiological cardiac hypertrophy is unclear. We observed upregulation of synd4 in exercise-induced hypertrophic myocardium. To evaluate the role of synd4 in the physiological form of cardiac hypertrophy, mice lacking synd4 (synd4–/–) were exercised by swimming for 4 wks. Ultrasonic cardiogram (UCG) and histological analysis revealed that swimming induced the hypertrophic phenotype but was blunted in synd4–/– compared with wild-type (WT) mice. The swimming-induced activation of Akt, a key molecule in physiological hypertrophy was also more decreased than in WT controls. In cultured cardiomyocytes, synd4 overexpression could induce cell enlargement, protein synthesis and distinct physiological molecular alternation. Akt activation also was observed in synd4-overexpressed cardiomyocytes. Furthermore, inhibition of protein kinase C (PKC) prevented the synd4-induced hypertrophic phenotype and Akt phosphorylation. This study identified an essential role of synd4 in mediation of physiological cardiac hypertrophy. PMID:26835698

  4. [Exercised-induced asthma in soccer players ages from 8 to 13 years].

    PubMed

    Sidiropoulou, M; Tsimaras, V; Fotiadou, E; Aggelopoulou-Sakadami, N

    2005-04-01

    The purpose of this study was the detection of exercise induced asthma in soccer players aged 8-13 years. Thirty boys, 8-13 years old participated in the study. They were coming from an athletic team of north of Thessaloniki. The study included clinical examination, administration of a respiratory health questionnaire and the exercise -- free running -- test with spirometric measurements. Spirometric measurements were performed by using a microspirometer, before exercise and 2, 5, 10, 15 and 30 min after a 6 min free running exercise (80 - 90 % max heart rate). The highest forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV (1)) value before exercise was compared with the lowest of post exercise values. The results showed a decline in FEV (1) > 15 % in 12 out of 30 children. Particularly, decline in FEV (1) was present in 1 (11 %) out of 9 children with free personal medical history but positive family history for asthma, in 3 (25 %) out of 12 children with allergies, and in 8 (89 %) out of 9 children with asthma. Symptoms were reported by 9 of 12 children with fall in FEV (1) > 15 %, during the 6 min exercise test, who had no symptoms during the soccer games. Identification of EIA by exercise challenge test in young athletes is a useful component for the diagnosis of bronchial hyperresponsiveness. Similar studies should be performed on older and younger athletes who participate in different sports and games.

  5. Could a vegetarian diet reduce exercise-induced oxidative stress? A review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Trapp, Denise; Knez, Wade; Sinclair, Wade

    2010-10-01

    Oxidative stress is a natural physiological process that describes an imbalance between free radical production and the ability of the antioxidant defence system of the body to neutralize free radicals. Free radicals can be beneficial as they may promote wound healing and contribute to a healthy immune response. However, free radicals can have a detrimental impact when they interfere with the regulation of apoptosis and thus play a role in the promotion of some cancers and conditions such as cardiovascular disease. Antioxidants are molecules that reduce the damage associated with oxidative stress by counteracting free radicals. Regular exercise is a vital component of a healthy lifestyle, although it can increase oxidative stress. As a typical vegetarian diet comprises a wide range of antioxidant-rich foods, it is plausible that the consumption of these foods will result in an enhanced antioxidant system capable of reducing exercise-induced oxidative stress. In addition, a relationship between a vegetarian diet and lower risks of cardiovascular disease and some cancers has been established. This review explores the current available evidence linking exercise, vegetarians, antioxidants, and oxidative stress.

  6. The effects of rehydration on cycling performance after exercise-induced dehydration.

    PubMed

    Singh, R; Brouns, F; Kovacs, E

    2002-06-01

    The effects of 7.6% carbohydrate-electrolyte solution (CES) and placebos (P) on rehydration (R) after exercise-induced dehydration and on a subsequent time-trial (TT) of cycling performance were studied. Thirteen male subjects exercised in a thermally-controlled environment (28 degrees C, 63% RH) until 3% of their body weight was lost. After exercise, the subjects moved to a neutral environment (22 degrees C) and rested for 30 minutes prior to a 2-hour R period. During R, subjects were fed CES or P to a maximum volume of 120% of previous body mass loss at 0, 30, and 60 minutes, in bolus-doses of 50%, 40% and 30% respectively. After R, subjects performed a 1-hour TT with no further fluid intake. % R with CES was significantly higher than with P (70 +/- 3% vs 60 +/- 5%; p < 0.01). During the TT, blood glucose dropped in the CES group but not in the P group. It was found that, despite a more effective R with CES, the performance results did not differ between groups (65.1 +/- 2.2 minutes and 65.2 +/- 2.3 minutes for CES and P respectively). It is suggested that an insulin-mediated rebound effect on CHO metabolism during TT, in which no further CHO was supplied, nullified the benefits of rehydration.

  7. Exercise-induced promotion of hippocampal cell proliferation requires beta-endorphin.

    PubMed

    Koehl, M; Meerlo, P; Gonzales, D; Rontal, A; Turek, F W; Abrous, D N

    2008-07-01

    Adult hippocampal neurogenesis is influenced by a variety of stimuli, including exercise, but the mechanisms by which running affects neurogenesis are not yet fully understood. Because beta-endorphin, which is released in response to exercise, increases cell proliferation in vitro, we hypothesized that it could exert a similar effect in vivo and mediate the stimulatory effects of running on neurogenesis. We thus analyzed the effects of voluntary wheel-running on adult neurogenesis (proliferation, differentiation, survival/death) in wild-type and beta-endorphin-deficient mice. In wild-type mice, exercise promoted cell proliferation evaluated by sacrificing animals 24 h after the last 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU) pulse and by using endogenous cell cycle markers (Ki67 and pH(3)). This was accompanied by an increased survival of 4-wk-old BrdU-labeled cells, leading to a net increase of neurogenesis. Beta-endorphin deficiency had no effect in sedentary mice, but it completely blocked the running-induced increase in cell proliferation; this blockade was accompanied by an increased survival of 4-wk-old cells and a decreased cell death. Altogether, adult neurogenesis was increased in response to exercise in knockout mice. We conclude that beta-endorphin released during running is a key factor for exercise-induced cell proliferation and that a homeostatic balance may regulate the final number of new neurons. PMID:18263701

  8. Attenuation of eccentric exercise-induced muscle damage conferred by maximal isometric contractions: a mini review

    PubMed Central

    Lima, Leonardo C. R.; Denadai, Benedito S.

    2015-01-01

    Although, beneficial in determined contexts, eccentric exercise-induced muscle damage (EIMD) might be unwanted during training regimens, competitions and daily activities. There are a vast number of studies investigating strategies to attenuate EIMD response after damaging exercise bouts. Many of them consist of performing exercises that induce EIMD, consuming supplements or using equipment that are not accessible for most people. It appears that performing maximal isometric contractions (ISOs) 2–4 days prior to damaging bouts promotes significant attenuation of EIMD symptoms that are not related to muscle function. It has been shown that the volume of ISOs, muscle length in which they are performed, and interval between them and the damaging bout influence the magnitude of this protection. In addition, it appears that this protection is not long-lived, lasting no longer than 4 days. Although no particular mechanisms for these adaptations were identified, professionals should consider applying this non-damaging stimulus before submitting their patients to unaccustomed exercised. However, it seems not to be the best option for athletes or relatively trained individuals. Future, studies should focus on establishing if ISOs protect other populations (i.e., trained individuals) or muscle groups (i.e., knee extensors) against EIMD, as well as investigate different mechanisms for ISO-induced protection. PMID:26578972

  9. Effects of vitamin E supplementation on exercise-induced oxidative stress: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Stepanyan, Vahan; Crowe, Melissa; Haleagrahara, Nagaraja; Bowden, Bruce

    2014-09-01

    Tocopherols (commonly referred to as "vitamin E") are frequently studied antioxidants in exercise research. However, the studies are highly heterogeneous, which has resulted in contradicting opinions. The aim of this review is to identify similar studies investigating the effects of tocopherol supplementation on exercise performance and oxidative stress and to perform minimally biased qualitative comparisons and meta-analysis. The literature search and study selection were performed according to Cochrane guidelines. A 2-dimensional study execution process was developed to enable selection of similar and comparable studies. Twenty relevant studies were identified. The high variability of study designs resulted in final selection of 6 maximally relevant studies. Markers of lipid peroxidation (malondialdehyde) and muscle damage (creatine kinase) were the 2 most frequently and similarly measured variables. Meta comparison showed that tocopherol supplementation did not result in significant protection against either exercise-induced lipid peroxidation or muscle damage. The complex antioxidant nature of tocopherols and low accumulation rates in muscle tissues could underlie an absence o