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Sample records for exhibit non-classical effects

  1. Non classical effects in planar waveguides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bertolotti, M.; Jansky, J.; Perina, J.; Pernova, V.; Sibilia, C.

    1993-01-01

    The quantum description of light propagation inside a planar waveguide is given. In particular, the description describes the behavior of the field inside a directions coupler. Nonclassical effects are presented and discussed.

  2. A double-slit experiment for non-classical interference effects in decision making.

    PubMed

    La Mura, Pierfrancesco

    2014-01-01

    We discuss the possible nature and role of non-physical entanglement, and the classical vs. non-classical interface, in models of human decision-making. We also introduce an experimental setting designed after the double-slit experiment in physics, and discuss how it could be used to discriminate between classical and non-classical interference effects in human decisions. Copyright © 2013 Cognitive Science Society, Inc.

  3. A non-classical Mindlin plate model incorporating microstructure, surface energy and foundation effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, X.-L.; Zhang, G. Y.

    2016-07-01

    A non-classical model for a Mindlin plate resting on an elastic foundation is developed in a general form using a modified couple stress theory, a surface elasticity theory and a two-parameter Winkler-Pasternak foundation model. It includes all five kinematic variables possible for a Mindlin plate. The equations of motion and the complete boundary conditions are obtained simultaneously through a variational formulation based on Hamilton's principle, and the microstructure, surface energy and foundation effects are treated in a unified manner. The newly developed model contains one material length-scale parameter to describe the microstructure effect, three surface elastic constants to account for the surface energy effect, and two foundation parameters to capture the foundation effect. The current non-classical plate model reduces to its classical elasticity-based counterpart when the microstructure, surface energy and foundation effects are all suppressed. In addition, the new model includes the Mindlin plate models considering the microstructure dependence or the surface energy effect or the foundation influence alone as special cases, recovers the Kirchhoff plate model incorporating the microstructure, surface energy and foundation effects, and degenerates to the Timoshenko beam model including the microstructure effect. To illustrate the new Mindlin plate model, the static bending and free vibration problems of a simply supported rectangular plate are analytically solved by directly applying the general formulae derived.

  4. A non-classical Mindlin plate model incorporating microstructure, surface energy and foundation effects

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, G. Y.

    2016-01-01

    A non-classical model for a Mindlin plate resting on an elastic foundation is developed in a general form using a modified couple stress theory, a surface elasticity theory and a two-parameter Winkler–Pasternak foundation model. It includes all five kinematic variables possible for a Mindlin plate. The equations of motion and the complete boundary conditions are obtained simultaneously through a variational formulation based on Hamilton's principle, and the microstructure, surface energy and foundation effects are treated in a unified manner. The newly developed model contains one material length-scale parameter to describe the microstructure effect, three surface elastic constants to account for the surface energy effect, and two foundation parameters to capture the foundation effect. The current non-classical plate model reduces to its classical elasticity-based counterpart when the microstructure, surface energy and foundation effects are all suppressed. In addition, the new model includes the Mindlin plate models considering the microstructure dependence or the surface energy effect or the foundation influence alone as special cases, recovers the Kirchhoff plate model incorporating the microstructure, surface energy and foundation effects, and degenerates to the Timoshenko beam model including the microstructure effect. To illustrate the new Mindlin plate model, the static bending and free vibration problems of a simply supported rectangular plate are analytically solved by directly applying the general formulae derived. PMID:27493578

  5. Viscous effects on the non-classical Rayleigh-Taylor instability of spherical material interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mankbadi, M. R.; Balachandar, S.

    2013-11-01

    The viscous and conductivity effects on the instability of a rapidly expanding material interface produced by a spherical shock tube are investigated through the employment of a high-order WENO scheme. The instability is influenced by various mechanisms, which include (a) classical Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) effects, (b) Bell-Plesset or geometry/curvature effects, (c) the effects of impulsively accelerating the interface, (d) compressibility effects, (e) finite thickness effects, and (f) viscous effects. Henceforth, the present instability studied is more appropriately referred to as non-classical RT instability to distinguish it from classical RT instability. The linear regime is examined and the development of the viscous three-dimensional perturbations is obtained by solving a one-dimensional system of partial differential equations. Numerical simulations are performed to illustrate the viscous effects on the growth of the disturbances for various conditions. The inviscid analysis does not show the existence of a maximum amplification rate. The present viscous analysis, however, shows that the growth rate increases with increasing the wave number, but there exists a peak wavenumber beyond which the growth rate decreases with increasing the wave number due to viscous effects.

  6. Strong non-classical induction forces in ion-surface interactions: general origin of Hofmeister effects.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xinmin; Li, Hang; Li, Rui; Xie, Deti; Ni, Jiupai; Wu, Laosheng

    2014-05-23

    Hofmeister effects continue to defy all-encompassing theories, and their origin is still a matter of debate. We observed strong Hofmeister effects in Ca2+/Na+ exchange on a permanently charged surface over a wide range of ionic strengths. They could not be attributed to dispersion forces, classical induction forces, ionic size, or hydration effects. We demonstrated that another stronger force was active in the ion-surface interactions, and which would create Hofmeister effects in general. The strength of this force was up to 10(4) times that of the classical induction force, and could be comparable to the Coulomb force. Coulomb, dispersion and hydration effects appeared to be interwined to affect the force. The presence of the observed strong non-classical induction force implied that energies of non-valence electrons of ions/atoms at the interface might be heavily underestimated in current theories, and possibly just those underestimated energies of non-valence electrons determined Hofmeister effects.

  7. EFFECTS OF PARAMETRIC VARIATIONS ON SEISMIC ANALYSIS METHODS FOR NON-CLASSICALLY DAMPED COUPLED SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect

    XU,J.; DEGRASSI,G.

    2000-04-02

    A comprehensive benchmark program was developed by Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) to perform an evaluation of state-of-the-art methods and computer programs for performing seismic analyses of coupled systems with non-classical damping. The program, which was sponsored by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), was designed to address various aspects of application and limitations of these state-of-the-art analysis methods to typical coupled nuclear power plant (NPP) structures with non-classical damping, and was carried out through analyses of a set of representative benchmark problems. One objective was to examine the applicability of various analysis methods to problems with different dynamic characteristics unique to coupled systems. The examination was performed using parametric variations for three simple benchmark models. This paper presents the comparisons and evaluation of the program participants' results to the BNL exact solutions for the applicable ranges of modeling dynamic characteristic parameters.

  8. Non-classical effects in photon-statistics of atomic optical bistability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erenso, Daniel; Vyas, Reeta; Singh, Surendra

    2000-10-01

    Homodyne statistics of light generated by an atomic system exhibiting optical bistability are analyzed. The dynamical equations for the homodyne field are derived using the results for a single-atom optical bistability in the good cavity limit [Wang and Vyas, Phys. Rev. A 54, 4453 (1996)]. We use positive-P representation to map operator quantum dynamics onto a set of c-number stochastic equations. It is shown that field radiated by the atomic system can be described in terms of two independent real Gaussian stochastic processes and a coherent component. By making Karhunen-Loeve expansion of the field variables we derive the generating function for the photoelectron statistics. From this generating function photoelectron counting distribution, factorial moments, and waiting time distribution are obtained analytically. These quantities are directly measurable in photon counting experiments. We show that the homodyne field can exhibit many interesting nonclassical features including novel nonclassical effects in higher order factorial moments.

  9. The "Ram Effect": A "Non-Classical" Mechanism for Inducing LH Surges in Sheep.

    PubMed

    Fabre-Nys, Claude; Chanvallon, Audrey; Dupont, Joëlle; Lardic, Lionel; Lomet, Didier; Martinet, Stéphanie; Scaramuzzi, Rex J

    2016-01-01

    During spring sheep do not normally ovulate but exposure to a ram can induce ovulation. In some ewes an LH surge is induced immediately after exposure to a ram thus raising questions about the control of this precocious LH surge. Our first aim was to determine the plasma concentrations of oestradiol (E2) E2 in anoestrous ewes before and after the "ram effect" in ewes that had a "precocious" LH surge (starting within 6 hours), a "normal" surge (between 6 and 28h) and "late» surge (not detected by 56h). In another experiment we tested if a small increase in circulating E2 could induce an LH surge in anoestrus ewes. The concentration of E2 significantly was not different at the time of ram introduction among ewes with the three types of LH surge. "Precocious" LH surges were not preceded by a large increase in E2 unlike "normal" surges and small elevations of circulating E2 alone were unable to induce LH surges. These results show that the "precocious" LH surge was not the result of E2 positive feedback. Our second aim was to test if noradrenaline (NA) is involved in the LH response to the "ram effect". Using double labelling for Fos and tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) we showed that exposure of anoestrous ewes to a ram induced a higher density of cells positive for both in the A1 nucleus and the Locus Coeruleus complex compared to unstimulated controls. Finally, the administration by retrodialysis into the preoptic area, of NA increased the proportion of ewes with an LH response to ram odor whereas treatment with the α1 antagonist Prazosin decreased the LH pulse frequency and amplitude induced by a sexually active ram. Collectively these results suggest that in anoestrous ewes NA is involved in ram-induced LH secretion as observed in other induced ovulators.

  10. Non-classicality of the molecular vibrations assisting exciton energy transfer at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Reilly, Edward J.; Olaya-Castro, Alexandra

    2014-01-01

    Advancing the debate on quantum effects in light-initiated reactions in biology requires clear identification of non-classical features that these processes can exhibit and utilize. Here we show that in prototype dimers present in a variety of photosynthetic antennae, efficient vibration-assisted energy transfer in the sub-picosecond timescale and at room temperature can manifest and benefit from non-classical fluctuations of collective pigment motions. Non-classicality of initially thermalized vibrations is induced via coherent exciton-vibration interactions and is unambiguously indicated by negativities in the phase-space quasi-probability distribution of the effective collective mode coupled to the electronic dynamics. These quantum effects can be prompted upon incoherent input of excitation. Our results therefore suggest that investigation of the non-classical properties of vibrational motions assisting excitation and charge transport, photoreception and chemical sensing processes could be a touchstone for revealing a role for non-trivial quantum phenomena in biology.

  11. Non-classicality of the molecular vibrations assisting exciton energy transfer at room temperature.

    PubMed

    O'Reilly, Edward J; Olaya-Castro, Alexandra

    2014-01-01

    Advancing the debate on quantum effects in light-initiated reactions in biology requires clear identification of non-classical features that these processes can exhibit and utilize. Here we show that in prototype dimers present in a variety of photosynthetic antennae, efficient vibration-assisted energy transfer in the sub-picosecond timescale and at room temperature can manifest and benefit from non-classical fluctuations of collective pigment motions. Non-classicality of initially thermalized vibrations is induced via coherent exciton-vibration interactions and is unambiguously indicated by negativities in the phase-space quasi-probability distribution of the effective collective mode coupled to the electronic dynamics. These quantum effects can be prompted upon incoherent input of excitation. Our results therefore suggest that investigation of the non-classical properties of vibrational motions assisting excitation and charge transport, photoreception and chemical sensing processes could be a touchstone for revealing a role for non-trivial quantum phenomena in biology.

  12. Non-Classical Inhibition of Carbonic Anhydrase

    PubMed Central

    Lomelino, Carrie L.; Supuran, Claudiu T.; McKenna, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Specific isoforms from the carbonic anhydrase (CA) family of zinc metalloenzymes have been associated with a variety of diseases. Isoform-specific carbonic anhydrase inhibitors (CAIs) are therefore a major focus of attention for specific disease treatments. Classical CAIs, primarily sulfonamide-based compounds and their bioisosteres, are examined as antiglaucoma, antiepileptic, antiobesity, antineuropathic pain and anticancer compounds. However, many sulfonamide compounds inhibit all CA isoforms nonspecifically, diluting drug effectiveness and causing undesired side effects due to off-target inhibition. In addition, a small but significant percentage of the general population cannot be treated with sulfonamide-based compounds due to a sulfa allergy. Therefore, CAIs must be developed that are not only isoform specific, but also non-classical, i.e. not based on sulfonamides, sulfamates, or sulfamides. This review covers the classes of non-classical CAIs and the recent advances in the development of isoform-specific inhibitors based on phenols, polyamines, coumarins and their derivatives. PMID:27438828

  13. Non-classicality of the molecular vibrations assisting exciton energy transfer at room temperature

    PubMed Central

    O’Reilly, Edward J.; Olaya-Castro, Alexandra

    2014-01-01

    Advancing the debate on quantum effects in light-initiated reactions in biology requires clear identification of non-classical features that these processes can exhibit and utilize. Here we show that in prototype dimers present in a variety of photosynthetic antennae, efficient vibration-assisted energy transfer in the sub-picosecond timescale and at room temperature can manifest and benefit from non-classical fluctuations of collective pigment motions. Non-classicality of initially thermalized vibrations is induced via coherent exciton–vibration interactions and is unambiguously indicated by negativities in the phase–space quasi-probability distribution of the effective collective mode coupled to the electronic dynamics. These quantum effects can be prompted upon incoherent input of excitation. Our results therefore suggest that investigation of the non-classical properties of vibrational motions assisting excitation and charge transport, photoreception and chemical sensing processes could be a touchstone for revealing a role for non-trivial quantum phenomena in biology. PMID:24402469

  14. Maxwellian distribution in non-classical regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohazzabi, Pirooz; L. Helvey, Shannon; McCumber, Jeremy

    2002-12-01

    A molecular dynamics investigation shows that the assumption of molecular chaos remains valid in the non-classical regime. Consequently, the velocity distribution function of an extremely dense system of spinless particles relaxes into Maxwellian, even in the presence of arbitrary interactions between the particles of the system. Systems with densities exceeding 30 times solid densities are investigated using a soft Lennard-Jones interparticle potential energy function.

  15. Weak measurements and nonClassical correlations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lekshmi, S.; Shaji, N.; Shaji, Anil

    2017-01-01

    We extend the definition of quantum discord as a quantifier of nonClassical correlations in a quantum state to the case where weak measurements are performed on subsystem A of a bipartite system AB. The properties of weak discord are explored for several families of quantum states. We find that in many cases weak quantum discord is identical to normal discord and in general the values of the two are very close to each other. Weak quantum discord reduces to discord in the appropriate limits as well. We also discuss the implications of these observations on the interpretations of quantum discord.

  16. Non-classical types of loess

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iriondo, M. H.; Kröhling, D. M.

    2007-12-01

    The purpose of this contribution is to describe the sequence of physical and chemical processes resulting in the sediment-type named loess, a fine-grained sediment deposit of universal occurrence. Owing to historical causes, loess has been (and still is) implicitly linked to glacial/periglacial environments among most naturalists. However it is known today that most eolian dust is deflated from tropical deserts. Hence, that sequence of processes is more comprehensive than the former narrow cold scenario. Six examples of different "non-classical" cases (from South America and Europe) that fit well to the loess definition are developed: 1) volcanic loess in Ecuador: pyroclastic eruptions/valley wind/mountain praire/silica structuring; 2) tropical loess in northeastern Argentina, Brazil and Uruguay: deflation of river and fan splays/savanna/iron sesquioxide structuring; 3) gypsum loess in northern Spain: destruction of anhydrite/gypsiferous layers in a dry climate/valley wind/Saharian shrub peridesert/gypsum structuring; 4) trade-wind deposits in Venezuela and Brazil: deflation in tidal flats/trade wind into the continent/savanna/iron hydroxide structuring; 5) anticyclonic gray loess in Argentina: continental anticyclone on plains/anti-clockwise winds and whirls/steppe/carbonate structuring. All these non-classical types conform to the accepted loess definitions and they also share the most important field characteristics of loess such as grain size, friability, vertical or sub-vertical slopes in outcrops, subfusion and others. Other cases can probably be recognized when systematically scrutinized.

  17. Effect of diets containing soy protein isolate on bone formation are mediated through non-classical estrogenic signaling in pre-pubertal rats

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Most soy foods contain isoflavones which under certain conditions may have estrogen-like actions. We have studied the effects of soy protein isolate (SPI) on bone quality and compared these effects to 17 ß-estradiol (E2). Weanling male and female rats were either fed a SPI-containing diet, or admini...

  18. [Taxonomic theory for non-classical systematics].

    PubMed

    Pavlinov, I Ia

    2012-01-01

    Outlined briefly are basic principles of construing general taxonomic theory for biological systematics considered in the context of non-classical scientific paradigm. The necessity of such kind of theory is substantiated, and some key points of its elaboration are exposed: its interpretation as a framework concept for the partial taxonomic theories in various schools of systematics; elaboration of idea of cognitive situation including three interrelated components, namely subject, object, and epistemic ones; its construing as a content-wisely interpreted quasi-axiomatics, with strong structuring of its conceptual space including demarcation between axioms and inferring rules; its construing as a "conceptual pyramid" of concepts of various levels of generality; inclusion of a basic model into definition of the taxonomic system (classification) regulating its content. Two problems are indicated as fundamental: definition of taxonomic diversity as a subject domain for the systematics as a whole; definition of onto-epistemological status of taxonomic system (classification) in general and of taxa in particular.

  19. Traveling Exhibitions: translating current science into effective science exhibitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dusenbery, P.; Morrow, C.; Harold, J.

    The Space Science Institute (SSI) of Boulder, Colorado has recently developed two museum exhibits called the Space Weather Center and MarsQuest. It is currently planning to develop two other exhibitions called Cosmic Origins and InterActive Earth. Museum exhibitions provide research scientists the opportunity to engage in a number of activities that are vital to the success of earth and space outreach programs. The Space Weather Center was developed in partnership with various research missions at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center. The focus of the presentation will be on the Institute's MarsQuest exhibition. This project is a 5000 square-foot, 2.5M, traveling exhibition that is now touring the country. The exhibit's 3-year tour is enabling millions of Americans to share in the excitement of the scientific exploration of Mars and learn more about their own planet in the process. The associated planetarium show and education program will also be described, with particular emphasis on workshops to orient host museum staff (e.g. museum educators and docents). The workshops make innovative connections between the exhibitions interactive experiences and lesson plans aligned with the National Science Education Standards. SSI is also developing an interactive web site called MarsQuest On-line. The linkage between the web site, education program and exhibit will be discussed. MarsQuest and SSI's other exhibitions are good models for actively involving scientists and their discoveries to help improve informal science education in the museum community and for forging a stronger connection between formal and informal education.

  20. A Non-Classical LysR-Type Transcriptional Regulator PA2206 Is Required for an Effective Oxidative Stress Response in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Mooij, Marlies J.; O'Gara, Fergal

    2013-01-01

    LysR-type transcriptional regulators (LTTRs) are emerging as key circuit components in regulating microbial stress responses and are implicated in modulating oxidative stress in the human opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The oxidative stress response encapsulates several strategies to overcome the deleterious effects of reactive oxygen species. However, many of the regulatory components and associated molecular mechanisms underpinning this key adaptive response remain to be characterised. Comparative analysis of publically available transcriptomic datasets led to the identification of a novel LTTR, PA2206, whose expression was altered in response to a range of host signals in addition to oxidative stress. PA2206 was found to be required for tolerance to H2O2 in vitro and lethality in vivo in the Zebrafish embryo model of infection. Transcriptomic analysis in the presence of H2O2 showed that PA2206 altered the expression of 58 genes, including a large repertoire of oxidative stress and iron responsive genes, independent of the master regulator of oxidative stress, OxyR. Contrary to the classic mechanism of LysR regulation, PA2206 did not autoregulate its own expression and did not influence expression of adjacent or divergently transcribed genes. The PA2214-15 operon was identified as a direct target of PA2206 with truncated promoter fragments revealing binding to the 5′-ATTGCCTGGGGTTAT-3′ LysR box adjacent to the predicted −35 region. PA2206 also interacted with the pvdS promoter suggesting a global dimension to the PA2206 regulon, and suggests PA2206 is an important regulatory component of P. aeruginosa adaptation during oxidative stress. PMID:23382903

  1. Quantitative characterization of non-classic polarization of cations on clay aggregate stability.

    PubMed

    Hu, Feinan; Li, Hang; Liu, Xinmin; Li, Song; Ding, Wuquan; Xu, Chenyang; Li, Yue; Zhu, Longhui

    2015-01-01

    Soil particle interactions are strongly influenced by the concentration, valence and ion species and the pH of the bulk solution, which will also affect aggregate stability and particle transport. In this study, we investigated clay aggregate stability in the presence of different alkali ions (Li+, Na+, K+, and Cs+) at concentrations from10-5 to 10-1 mol L-1. Strong specific ion effects on clay aggregate stability were observed, and showed the order Cs+>K+>Na+>Li+. We found that it was not the effects of ion size, hydration, and dispersion forces in the cation-surface interactions but strong non-classic polarization of adsorbed cations that resulted in these specific effects. In this study, the non-classic dipole moments of each cation species resulting from the non-classic polarization were estimated. By comparing non-classic dipole moments with classic values, the observed dipole moments of adsorbed cations were up to 104 times larger than the classic values for the same cation. The observed non-classic dipole moments sharply increased with decreasing electrolyte concentration. We conclude that strong non-classic polarization could significantly suppress the thickness of the diffuse layer, thereby weakening the electric field near the clay surface and resulting in improved clay aggregate stability. Even though we only demonstrated specific ion effects on aggregate stability with several alkali ions, our results indicate that these effects could be universally important in soil aggregate stability.

  2. Quantitative Characterization of Non-Classic Polarization of Cations on Clay Aggregate Stability

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Feinan; Li, Hang; Liu, Xinmin; Li, Song; Ding, Wuquan; Xu, Chenyang; Li, Yue; Zhu, Longhui

    2015-01-01

    Soil particle interactions are strongly influenced by the concentration, valence and ion species and the pH of the bulk solution, which will also affect aggregate stability and particle transport. In this study, we investigated clay aggregate stability in the presence of different alkali ions (Li+, Na+, K+, and Cs+) at concentrations from10−5 to 10−1 mol L−1. Strong specific ion effects on clay aggregate stability were observed, and showed the order Cs+>K+>Na+>Li+. We found that it was not the effects of ion size, hydration, and dispersion forces in the cation–surface interactions but strong non-classic polarization of adsorbed cations that resulted in these specific effects. In this study, the non-classic dipole moments of each cation species resulting from the non-classic polarization were estimated. By comparing non-classic dipole moments with classic values, the observed dipole moments of adsorbed cations were up to 104 times larger than the classic values for the same cation. The observed non-classic dipole moments sharply increased with decreasing electrolyte concentration. We conclude that strong non-classic polarization could significantly suppress the thickness of the diffuse layer, thereby weakening the electric field near the clay surface and resulting in improved clay aggregate stability. Even though we only demonstrated specific ion effects on aggregate stability with several alkali ions, our results indicate that these effects could be universally important in soil aggregate stability. PMID:25874864

  3. Strategies for Determining Exhibit Effectiveness. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shettel, Harris H.; And Others

    This project was designed to develop research strategies and hypotheses for evaluating the effectiveness of exhibits. An exhibit on the role of the Federal Government in science and technology was used as the subject matter. Two basic groups of viewers were used, casual viewers and paid experimental viewers. Both were tested on knowledge gained…

  4. Non-classical transpeptidases yield insight into new antibacterials.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Pankaj; Kaushik, Amit; Lloyd, Evan P; Li, Shao-Gang; Mattoo, Rohini; Ammerman, Nicole C; Bell, Drew T; Perryman, Alexander L; Zandi, Trevor A; Ekins, Sean; Ginell, Stephan L; Townsend, Craig A; Freundlich, Joel S; Lamichhane, Gyanu

    2017-01-01

    Bacterial survival requires an intact peptidoglycan layer, a three-dimensional exoskeleton that encapsulates the cytoplasmic membrane. Historically, the final steps of peptidoglycan synthesis are known to be carried out by D,D-transpeptidases, enzymes that are inhibited by the β-lactams, which constitute >50% of all antibacterials in clinical use. Here, we show that the carbapenem subclass of β-lactams are distinctly effective not only because they inhibit D,D-transpeptidases and are poor substrates for β-lactamases, but primarily because they also inhibit non-classical transpeptidases, namely the L,D-transpeptidases, which generate the majority of linkages in the peptidoglycan of mycobacteria. We have characterized the molecular mechanisms responsible for inhibition of L,D-transpeptidases of Mycobacterium tuberculosis and a range of bacteria including ESKAPE pathogens, and used this information to design, synthesize and test simplified carbapenems with potent antibacterial activity.

  5. Non-classical transpeptidases yield insight into new antibacterials

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Pankaj; Kaushik, Amit; Lloyd, Evan P.; Li, Shao-Gang; Mattoo, Rohini; Ammerman, Nicole C.; Bell, Drew T.; Perryman, Alexander L.; Zandi, Trevor A.; Ekins, Sean; Ginell, Stephan L.; Townsend, Craig A.; Freundlich, Joel S.; Lamichhane, Gyanu

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial survival requires an intact peptidoglycan layer, a 3-dimensional exoskeleton that encapsulates the cytoplasmic membrane. Historically, the final steps of peptidoglycan synthesis are known to be carried out by d,d-transpeptidases, enzymes that are inhibited by the β-lactams which constitute >50% of all antibacterials in clinical use. Here, we show that the carbapenem subclass of β-lactams is distinctly effective not only because they inhibit d,d-transpeptidases and are poor substrates for β-lactamases, but primarily because they also inhibit non-classical transpeptidases, namely the l,d-transpeptidases, that generate the majority of linkages in the peptidoglycan of mycobacteria. We have characterized the molecular mechanisms responsible for inhibition of l,d-transpeptidases of M. tuberculosis and a range of bacteria, including ESKAPE pathogens, and utilized this information to design, synthesize and test simplified carbapenems with potent antibacterial activity. PMID:27820797

  6. Electrostatic and structural similarity of classical and non-classical lactam compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coll, Miguel; Frau, Juan; Vilanova, Bartolomé; Donoso, Josefa; Muñoz, Francisco

    2001-09-01

    Various electrostatic and structural parameters for a series of classical and non-classical β-lactams were determined and compared in order to ascertain whether some specific β-lactams possess antibacterial or β-lactamase inhibitory properties. The electrostatic parameters obtained, based on the Distributed Multipole Analysis (DMA) of high-quality wavefunctions for the studied structures, suggest that some non-classical β-lactams effectively inhibit the action of β-lactamases. As shown in this work, such electrostatic parameters provide much more reliable information about the antibacterial and inhibitory properties of β-lactams than do structural parameters.

  7. Bumblebees exhibit the memory spacing effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toda, Nicholas R. T.; Song, Jeremy; Nieh, James C.

    2009-10-01

    Associative learning is key to how bees recognize and return to rewarding floral resources. It thus plays a major role in pollinator floral constancy and plant gene flow. Honeybees are the primary model for pollinator associative learning, but bumblebees play an important ecological role in a wider range of habitats, and their associative learning abilities are less well understood. We assayed learning with the proboscis extension reflex (PER), using a novel method for restraining bees (capsules) designed to improve bumblebee learning. We present the first results demonstrating that bumblebees exhibit the memory spacing effect. They improve their associative learning of odor and nectar reward by exhibiting increased memory acquisition, a component of long-term memory formation, when the time interval between rewarding trials is increased. Bombus impatiens forager memory acquisition (average discrimination index values) improved by 129% and 65% at inter-trial intervals (ITI) of 5 and 3 min, respectively, as compared to an ITI of 1 min. Memory acquisition rate also increased with increasing ITI. Encapsulation significantly increases olfactory memory acquisition. Ten times more foragers exhibited at least one PER response during training in capsules as compared to traditional PER harnesses. Thus, a novel conditioning assay, encapsulation, enabled us to improve bumblebee-learning acquisition and demonstrate that spaced learning results in better memory consolidation. Such spaced learning likely plays a role in forming long-term memories of rewarding floral resources.

  8. Non-classical Phase-dependent Fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bali, Samir

    2000-06-01

    A simple two-level atom, radiating in free space, is a canonical system in quantum optics. Historically, resonance fluorescence provided the first experimental evidence for photon antibunching, sub-Poisson statistics, and quantum jumps. However, it is well known that observation of phase-dependent nonclassical effects in resonance fluorescence presents severe experimental challenges. In particular, the phenomenon of squeezing in resonance fluorescence, first predicted in 1981footnote D. F. Walls and P. Zoller, Phys. Rev. Lett. 47, 709 (1981), long eluded observation despite receiving considerable attention. In this talk I will describe how we recently overcame these challenges to make the first measurements of single-atom squeezing spectra in the phase-dependent fluorescence of a beam of driven two-level atoms in free space(Z. H. Lu, S. Bali, and J. E. Thomas, Phys. Rev. Lett. 81), 3635 (1998). The experimental scheme permits a valid comparison of these measurements with our predictions, thus yielding a new and simple physical picture of phase-dependent resonance fluorescence. Results of a direct measurement of the two-time field correlation function will also be presented. Our measurements enable important insights into the basic atomic processes underlying squeezing, and help elucidate the role of quantum jumps in phase-dependent resonance fluorescence.

  9. Non-classical inhibition of uricase by cyanide.

    PubMed Central

    Conley, T G; Priest, D G

    1980-01-01

    The interactions of Aspergillus flavus uricase with the substrates O2 and urate and the inhibitors xanthine, cyanide, periodate and hydroxylamine were investigated. Under equilibrium conditions O2 does not bind directly to the enzyme, and the absence of O2 had no effect on either the binding stoicheiometry or binding constant for xanthine, as measured by equilibrium dialysis and microcalorimetry. Cyanide, periodate and hydroxylamine inhibit uricase in a non-classical manner. A decrease in initial velocity to a steady-state inhibited velocity can be observed on a time scale of minutes. The time-dependence, which is unaltered by prior incubation with the inhibitors, is consistent with a first-order transition. Rate constants for induction of inhibition are linearly dependent on inhibitor concentration, but independent of urate and O2 concentrations. Radioactively labelled urate forms a stable but reversible complex with uricase in the presence of cyanide and O2. These results were used to deduce the nature of enzyme-bound intermediates and thus for the proposal of a novel mechanism for cyanide inhibition. PMID:6821368

  10. Non-classical method of modelling of vibrating mechatronic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Białas, K.; Buchacz, A.

    2016-08-01

    This work presents non-classical method of modelling of mechatronic systems by using polar graphs. The use of such a method enables the analysis and synthesis of mechatronic systems irrespective of the type and number of the elements of such a system. The method id connected with algebra of structural numbers. The purpose of this paper is also introduces synthesis of mechatronic system which is the reverse task of dynamics. The result of synthesis is obtaining system meeting the defined requirements. This approach is understood as design of mechatronic systems. The synthesis may also be applied to modify the already existing systems in order to achieve a desired result. The system was consisted from mechanical and electrical elements. Electrical elements were used as subsystem reducing unwanted vibration of mechanical system. The majority of vibration occurring in devices and machines is harmful and has a disadvantageous effect on their condition. Harmful impact of vibration is caused by the occurrence of increased stresses and the loss of energy, which results in faster wear machinery. Vibration, particularly low-frequency vibration, also has a negative influence on the human organism. For this reason many scientists in various research centres conduct research aimed at the reduction or total elimination of vibration.

  11. Non-Classical Congenital Adrenal Hyperplasia in Childhood

    PubMed Central

    Kurtoğlu, Selim; Hatipoğlu, Nihal

    2017-01-01

    Congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH) is classified as classical CAH and non-classical CAH (NCCAH). In the classical type, the most severe form comprises both salt-wasting and simple virilizing forms. In the non-classical form, diagnosis can be more confusing because the patient may remain asymptomatic or the condition may be associated with signs of androgen excess in the postnatal period or in the later stages of life. This review paper will include information on clinical findings, symptoms, diagnostic approaches, and treatment modules of NCCAH. PMID:27354284

  12. Mistaken gender identity in non-classical congenital adrenal hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Kukreti, Prerna; Kandpal, Manish; Jiloha, R C

    2014-04-01

    Gender identity is the sense of belonging that one feels for a particular sex psychologically and socially, independent of one's biological sex. There is much less systematic data on gender identity in females with congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH). We report a case of non-classical CAH presenting as a case of gender identity disorder.

  13. Mistaken gender identity in non-classical congenital adrenal hyperplasia

    PubMed Central

    Kukreti, Prerna; Kandpal, Manish; Jiloha, R. C.

    2014-01-01

    Gender identity is the sense of belonging that one feels for a particular sex psychologically and socially, independent of one's biological sex. There is much less systematic data on gender identity in females with congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH). We report a case of non-classical CAH presenting as a case of gender identity disorder. PMID:24891708

  14. Investigating the non-classical boundary conditions relevant to strain gradient theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jafari, Akbar; Ezzati, Meysam

    2017-02-01

    In the present study, two classes of non-classical constitutive equations consisting of the first and the second order strain gradients theories (FSG and SSG) were applied in order to develop the governing equations of static and free vibrational behavior of beam structures. The governing equations in orders of six and eight were constructed for FSG and SSG theories, respectively. Therefore, higher order or in other words non-classical boundary conditions (HOBCs or NCBCs) came into play in addition to the classical ones (CBCs). Some explanations were presented about the concept of the non-classical boundary conditions. Analytical and finite element (FE) approaches were employed to solve the governing equations. The analytical solutions were utilized in validation and convergence study of FE results. Comparisons were made with the relevant data reported in the open literature; however, to the best of the authors' knowledge, few references have been published on SSG theory and HOBCs. In the numerical studies, the effects of applying different combinations of CBCs and HOBCs to the static and free vibration behaviors of the beam were investigated. Moreover, the impacts of non-classical elastic constants and the beam size on its behavior were also studied.

  15. Study of higher order non-classical properties of squeezed Kerr state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, Devendra Kumar

    2010-09-01

    Recently, Prakash and Mishra [J. Phys. B: at. Mol. Opt. Phys., 39, 2291(2006); 40, 2531(2007)] have studied higher order sub-Poissonian photon statistic conditions for non-classicality in the form of general inequalities for expectation values of products of arbitrary powers of photon number and of photon-number fluctuation. It is, therefore, vital to study the generation of these higher order sub-Poissonian photon statistics (phase-insensitive behavior) in a physically realizable medium and their relations to higher order squeezing (phase-sensitive behavior). In the present paper, we study higher order non-classical properties, such as Hong and Mandel squeezing, amplitude-squared squeezing and higher order sub-Poissonian photon statistics, of squeezed Kerr state which is generated by squeezing the output of a Kerr medium whose input is coherent light. Such states can be realized if laser light is sent through an optical fiber and then into a degenerate parametric amplifier. It is established that the squeezed Kerr state can exhibit higher order non-classical properties.

  16. Beyond iron: non-classical biological functions of bacterial siderophores.

    PubMed

    Johnstone, Timothy C; Nolan, Elizabeth M

    2015-04-14

    Bacteria secrete small molecules known as siderophores to acquire iron from their surroundings. For over 60 years, investigations into the bioinorganic chemistry of these molecules, including fundamental coordination chemistry studies, have provided insight into the crucial role that siderophores play in bacterial iron homeostasis. The importance of understanding the fundamental chemistry underlying bacterial life has been highlighted evermore in recent years because of the emergence of antibiotic-resistant bacteria and the need to prevent the global rise of these superbugs. Increasing reports of siderophores functioning in capacities other than iron transport have appeared recently, but reports of "non-classical" siderophore functions have long paralleled those of iron transport. One particular non-classical function of these iron chelators, namely antibiotic activity, was documented before the role of siderophores in iron transport was established. In this Perspective, we present an exposition of past and current work into non-classical functions of siderophores and highlight the directions in which we anticipate that this research is headed. Examples include the ability of siderophores to function as zincophores, chalkophores, and metallophores for a variety of other metals, sequester heavy metal toxins, transport boron, act as signalling molecules, regulate oxidative stress, and provide antibacterial activity.

  17. Preparation of Entangled Coherent States and Correspondence Between Entanglement and Non-Classical Properties in Circuit QED

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Juju; Xu, Lin

    2015-07-01

    We demonstrate the controllable generation of entangled coherent states in circuit quantum electrodynamics (circuit QED). In our scheme, the easy integration of solid-state quantum circuit is exploited. In particular, through manipulating the external capacitor or external classical microwave impulse, the coupling between superconducting qubits and cavity can be manipulated, the entanglement effect between qubit and field modes can be enhanced and the decoherence effect can be effectively suppressed. We further discuss the correspondence between quantum entanglement and some non-classical effects such as the squeezing of entangled coherent state field, the anti-buching effect. The results show that the time evolution of the quantum entanglement between field modes is always accompanied by the synchronous changes of certain non-classical effect. When the quantum entanglement reaches maximum, the anti-bunching (or compression effect) almost reaches maximum synchronously. Once entanglement sudden death occurs, the non-classical effects disappear.

  18. Kaempferol Exhibits Progestogenic Effects in Ovariectomized Rats

    PubMed Central

    Toh, May Fern; Mendonca, Emma; Eddie, Sharon L.; Endsley, Michael P.; Lantvit, Daniel D.; Petukhov, Pavel A.; Burdette, Joanna E.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Progesterone (P4) plays a central role in women's health. Synthetic progestins are used clinically in hormone replacement therapy (HRT), oral contraceptives, and for the treatment of endometriosis and infertility. Unfortunately, synthetic progestins are associated with side effects, including cardiovascular disease and breast cancer. Botanical dietary supplements are widely consumed for the alleviation of a variety of gynecological issues, but very few studies have characterized natural compounds in terms of their ability to bind to and activate progesterone receptors (PR). Kaempferol is a flavonoid that functions as a non-steroidal selective progesterone receptor modulator (SPRM) in vitro. This study investigated the molecular and physiological effects of kaempferol in the ovariectomized rat uteri. Methods Since genistein is a phytoestrogen that was previously demonstrated to increase uterine weight and proliferation, the ability of kaempferol to block genistein action in the uterus was investigated. Analyses of proliferation, steroid receptor expression, and induction of well-established PR-regulated targets Areg and Hand2 were completed using histological analysis and qPCR gene induction experiments. In addition, kaempferol in silico binding analysis was completed for PR. The activation of estrogen and androgen receptor signalling was determined in vitro. Results Molecular docking analysis confirmed that kaempferol adopts poses that are consistent with occupying the ligand-binding pocket of PRA. Kaempferol induced expression of PR regulated transcriptional targets in the ovariectomized rat uteri, including Hand2 and Areg. Consistent with progesterone-l ke activity, kaempferol attenuated genistein-induced uterine luminal epithelial proliferation without increasing uterine weight. Kaempferol signalled without down regulating PR expression in vitro and in vivo and without activating estrogen and androgen receptors. Conclusion Taken together, these data

  19. Beyond Iron: Non-Classical Biological Functions of Bacterial Siderophores

    PubMed Central

    Johnstone, Timothy C.; Nolan, Elizabeth M.

    2015-01-01

    Bacteria secrete small molecules known as siderophores to acquire iron from their surroundings. For over 60 years, investigations into the bioinorganic chemistry of these molecules, including fundamental coordination chemistry studies, have provided insight into the crucial role that siderophores play in bacterial iron homeostasis. The importance of understanding the fundamental chemistry underlying bacterial life has been highlighted evermore in recent years because of the emergence of antibiotic-resistant bacteria and the need to prevent the global rise of these superbugs. Increasing reports of siderophores functioning in capacities other than iron transport have appeared recently, but reports of “non-classical” siderophore functions have long paralleled those of iron transport. One particular non-classical function of these iron chelators, namely antibiotic activity, was even documented before the role of siderophores in iron transport was established. In this Perspective, we present an exposition of past and current work into non-classical functions of siderophores and highlight the directions in which we anticipate that this research is headed. Examples include the ability of siderophores to function as zincophores, chalkophores, and metallophores for a variety of other metals, sequester heavy metal toxins, transport boron, act as signalling molecules, regulate oxidative stress, and provide antibacterial activity. PMID:25764171

  20. Cats exhibit the Franssen Effect illusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dent, Micheal L.; Tollin, Daniel J.; Yin, Tom C. T.

    2004-11-01

    The Franssen Effect (FE) is a striking auditory illusion previously demonstrated only in humans. To elicit the FE, subjects are presented with two spatially-separated sounds; one a transient tone with an abrupt onset and immediate ramped offset and the other a sustained tone of the same frequency with a ramped onset which remains on for several hundred ms. The FE illusion occurs when listeners localize the tones at the location of the transient signal, even though that sound has ended and the sustained one is still present. The FE illusion occurs most readily in reverberant environments and with pure tones of ~1-2.5 kHz in humans, conditions where sound localization is difficult in humans. Here, we demonstrate this illusion in domestic cats using, for the first time, localization procedures. Previous studies in humans employed discrimination procedures, making it difficult to link the FE to sound localization mechanisms. The frequencies for eliciting the FE in cats were higher than in humans, corresponding to frequencies where cats have difficulty localizing pure tones. These findings strengthen the hypothesis that difficulty in accurately localizing sounds is the basis for the FE. .

  1. Coherent control of atomic qubits by non-classical light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balybin, Stepan N.; Sharapova, Polina R.; Tikhonova, Olga V.

    2017-05-01

    In this work we investigate analytically the interaction between a quantum atomic model system and non-classical light and suggest a method to transfer phase information from the field qubit to the atomic one. A rather realistic atomic system with bound levels and the continuum is considered. The influence of ionization on the possibility of the phase transfer is analyzed. The atomic state formed during the interaction is shown to be controlled by the relative phase of the field qubit. The possibility to measure the transferred phase is demonstrated. Contribution to the Topical Issue "Many Particle Spectroscopy of Atoms, Molecules, Clusters and Surfaces", edited by A.N. Grum-Grzhimailo, E.V. Gryzlova, Yu V. Popov, and A.V. Solov'yov.

  2. New fundamental evidence of non-classical structure in the combination of natural concepts.

    PubMed

    Aerts, D; Sozzo, S; Veloz, T

    2016-01-13

    We recently performed cognitive experiments on conjunctions and negations of two concepts with the aim of investigating the combination problem of concepts. Our experiments confirmed the deviations (conceptual vagueness, underextension, overextension etc.) from the rules of classical (fuzzy) logic and probability theory observed by several scholars in concept theory, while our data were successfully modelled in a quantum-theoretic framework developed by ourselves. In this paper, we isolate a new, very stable and systematic pattern of violation of classicality that occurs in concept combinations. In addition, the strength and regularity of this non-classical effect leads us to believe that it occurs at a more fundamental level than the deviations observed up to now. It is our opinion that we have identified a deep non-classical mechanism determining not only how concepts are combined but, rather, how they are formed. We show that this effect can be faithfully modelled in a two-sector Fock space structure, and that it can be exactly explained by assuming that human thought is the superposition of two processes, a 'logical reasoning', guided by 'logic', and a 'conceptual reasoning', guided by 'emergence', and that the latter generally prevails over the former. All these findings provide new fundamental support to our quantum-theoretic approach to human cognition.

  3. Investigation of non-classical states of atoms and photons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuzmich, Alexander M.

    2000-08-01

    This dissertation deals with theoretical and experimental research on nonclassical, or entangled, states of atoms and photons. In the first part, I describe two approaches to the preparation of entangled states of a large number of atoms. The first approach is based on the transfer of quantum correlations from non-classical light to the atomic spins. I consider three different situations: (a)the atoms are placed in a loss-free cavity and no relaxation of any kind is present; (b)the atoms are placed in a cavity with input and output for the electromagnetic field and the atoms spontaneously decay from the upper state; (c)there is no cavity around the atoms and spontaneous emission is present. I show that in all three situations with judicious choice of parameters, entangled samples of atoms can be produced. The second approach is based on quantum-nondemolition (QND) measurements of collective atomic operators. I describe experiments with pulsed and cw light as the probe, that result in squeezed spin states of atoms. When a rf magnetic field is applied to the atomic sample, sub- shot noise performance of an atomic spin interferometer is demonstrated. In the second part of the thesis I describe investigations of phase properties of two-photon and single-photon states. These experiments make use of spontaneous type-II down-conversion in a nonlinear crystal. First, interferometric measurement of a phase shift at the Heisenberg limit for a two-photon state is described. Next, a violation of Bell-type inequalities in phase space is demonstrated for the quantum optical version of the Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen state. Finally, some recent work directed toward homodyning a single photon against a strong local oscillator field is described.

  4. Immunomodulation of classical and non-classical HLA molecules by ionizing radiation.

    PubMed

    Gallegos, Cristina E; Michelin, Severino; Dubner, Diana; Carosella, Edgardo D

    2016-05-01

    Radiotherapy has been employed for the treatment of oncological patients for nearly a century, and together with surgery and chemotherapy, radiation oncology constitutes one of the three pillars of cancer therapy. Ionizing radiation has complex effects on neoplastic cells and on tumor microenvironment: beyond its action as a direct cytotoxic agent, tumor irradiation triggers a series of alterations in tumoral cells, which includes the de novo synthesis of particular proteins and the up/down-regulation of cell surface molecules. Additionally, ionizing radiation may induce the release of "danger signals" which may, in turn lead to cellular and molecular responses by the immune system. This immunomodulatory action of ionizing radiation highlights the importance of the combined use (radiotherapy plus immunotherapy) for cancer healing. Major histocompatibility complex antigens (also called Human Leukocyte Antigens, HLA in humans) are one of those molecules whose expression is modulated after irradiation. This review summarizes the modulatory properties of ionizing radiation on the expression of HLA class I (classical and non-classical) and class II molecules, with special emphasis in non-classical HLA-I molecules.

  5. On the non-classical contribution in lone-pair-π interaction: IQA perspective.

    PubMed

    Badri, Zahra; Foroutan-Nejad, Cina; Kozelka, Jiri; Marek, Radek

    2015-10-21

    In the present work the nature of lone-pair-π interactions between water molecules and a number of π-rings with different substituents/hetero-atoms in the light of quantum chemical topology approaches is studied. The Quantum Theory of Atoms in Molecules (QTAIM) and Interacting Quantum Atoms (IQA) were employed for distinguishing the role of heteroatoms and electron withdrawing substituents in the complex formation between water and π-rings. Our IQA study identified three classes of water-π complexes on the basis of the relative role of electrostatics (classical) and exchange-correlation (non-classical) factors in the interaction energy between the oxygen of water (the lone-pair donor) and the sp(2) atoms of the π-ring, i.e. the primary lp-π interaction. Considering both the primary and secondary (the rest of interatomic interactions except Owater-π-ring atoms) interactions demonstrates that the exchange-correlation is the dominant contributor to the binding energy. This proves a non-negligible contribution of non-classical factors in the stabilization of the lone-pair-π complexes. However, in spite of a relatively large contribution of the exchange-correlation, this part of the interaction energy is virtually counterbalanced by the deformation energy, i.e. the increase in atomic kinetic energy upon complexation. This finding clarifies why water-π interactions can be modelled by simple electrostatics without the need to invoke quantum effects.

  6. The Thermodynamics Of Calcite Nucleation On Organic Surfaces: Classical Vs. Non-Classical Pathways

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nielsen, M.; Hu, Q.; Hamm, L. M.; Lee, J. R.; Becker, U.; Dove, P. M.; De Yoreo, J.

    2012-12-01

    Nucleation in the natural world often occurs at organic surfaces. During biomineralization, living organisms use macromolecular matrices to direct nucleation of a variety of inorganic materials by controlling the timing, polymorphism, morphology, and crystallographic orientation of mineral nuclei. In geochemical settings, mineral surfaces, which are often covered with organic layers or biofilms, surround the volume within which nucleation occurs. Despite the importance of nucleation phenomena in these natural settings, our understanding of the reaction dynamics and energetics of the process is limited. Issues such as the role of pre-nucleation clusters, formation of amorphous precursors, and polymorph selection during the initial stages of nucleation, as well as the structural relationships between the organic matrix and the emerging nucleus are poorly understood. Using self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) of alkanethiols as simple models for macromolecular matrices and organic films, we address the gaps in our understanding by employing a suite of in situ methods to investigate CaCO3 nucleation. From optical measurements of calcite nucleation rates on alkanethiol SAMs, we find that for two carboxyl-terminated alkanethiol SAMs with odd (mercaptoundecanoic acid) and even (mercaptohexadecanoic acid) carbon chains, the rate exhibits the supersaturation dependence expected from classical theory and the effective interfacial energy is reduced from about 109 mJ/m2 in bulk solution to 81 mJ/m2 and 72 mJ/m2, respectively. Theoretical analysis shows that the corresponding free energy barrier is reduced from 105kT for homogeneous nucleation in bulk solution to 27KT and 19kT, respectively. The results demonstrate that calcite nucleation on these carboxyl SAMs is described well in purely classical terms through a reduction in the thermodynamic barrier due to decreased interfacial free energy. In addition, although amorphous particles form prior to crystal nucleation on hydroxyl

  7. The uncertainty principle enables non-classical dynamics in an interferometer.

    PubMed

    Dahlsten, Oscar C O; Garner, Andrew J P; Vedral, Vlatko

    2014-08-08

    The quantum uncertainty principle stipulates that when one observable is predictable there must be some other observables that are unpredictable. The principle is viewed as holding the key to many quantum phenomena and understanding it deeper is of great interest in the study of the foundations of quantum theory. Here we show that apart from being restrictive, the principle also plays a positive role as the enabler of non-classical dynamics in an interferometer. First we note that instantaneous action at a distance should not be possible. We show that for general probabilistic theories this heavily curtails the non-classical dynamics. We prove that there is a trade-off with the uncertainty principle that allows theories to evade this restriction. On one extreme, non-classical theories with maximal certainty have their non-classical dynamics absolutely restricted to only the identity operation. On the other extreme, quantum theory minimizes certainty in return for maximal non-classical dynamics.

  8. Interferometry with non-classical motional states of a Bose–Einstein condensate

    PubMed Central

    van Frank, S.; Negretti, A.; Berrada, T.; Bücker, R.; Montangero, S.; Schaff, J.-F.; Schumm, T.; Calarco, T.; Schmiedmayer, J.

    2014-01-01

    The Ramsey interferometer is a prime example of precise control at the quantum level. It is usually implemented using internal states of atoms, molecules or ions, for which powerful manipulation procedures are now available. Whether it is possible to control external degrees of freedom of more complex, interacting many-body systems at this level remained an open question. Here we demonstrate a two-pulse Ramsey-type interferometer for non-classical motional states of a Bose–Einstein condensate in an anharmonic trap. The control sequences used to manipulate the condensate wavefunction are obtained from optimal control theory and are directly optimized to maximize the interferometric contrast. They permit a fast manipulation of the atomic ensemble compared to the intrinsic decay processes and many-body dephasing effects. This allows us to reach an interferometric contrast of 92% in the experimental implementation. PMID:24874019

  9. Interferometry with non-classical motional states of a Bose-Einstein condensate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Frank, S.; Negretti, A.; Berrada, T.; Bücker, R.; Montangero, S.; Schaff, J.-F.; Schumm, T.; Calarco, T.; Schmiedmayer, J.

    2014-05-01

    The Ramsey interferometer is a prime example of precise control at the quantum level. It is usually implemented using internal states of atoms, molecules or ions, for which powerful manipulation procedures are now available. Whether it is possible to control external degrees of freedom of more complex, interacting many-body systems at this level remained an open question. Here we demonstrate a two-pulse Ramsey-type interferometer for non-classical motional states of a Bose-Einstein condensate in an anharmonic trap. The control sequences used to manipulate the condensate wavefunction are obtained from optimal control theory and are directly optimized to maximize the interferometric contrast. They permit a fast manipulation of the atomic ensemble compared to the intrinsic decay processes and many-body dephasing effects. This allows us to reach an interferometric contrast of 92% in the experimental implementation.

  10. Interferometry with non-classical motional states of a Bose-Einstein condensate.

    PubMed

    van Frank, S; Negretti, A; Berrada, T; Bücker, R; Montangero, S; Schaff, J-F; Schumm, T; Calarco, T; Schmiedmayer, J

    2014-05-30

    The Ramsey interferometer is a prime example of precise control at the quantum level. It is usually implemented using internal states of atoms, molecules or ions, for which powerful manipulation procedures are now available. Whether it is possible to control external degrees of freedom of more complex, interacting many-body systems at this level remained an open question. Here we demonstrate a two-pulse Ramsey-type interferometer for non-classical motional states of a Bose-Einstein condensate in an anharmonic trap. The control sequences used to manipulate the condensate wavefunction are obtained from optimal control theory and are directly optimized to maximize the interferometric contrast. They permit a fast manipulation of the atomic ensemble compared to the intrinsic decay processes and many-body dephasing effects. This allows us to reach an interferometric contrast of 92% in the experimental implementation.

  11. Multimer recognition and secretion by the non-classical secretion pathway in Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Liuqun; Chen, Jingqi; Sun, Jibin; Zhang, Dawei

    2017-03-09

    Non-classical protein secretion in bacteria is a common phenomenon. However, the selection principle for non-classical secretion pathways remains unclear. Here, our experimental data, to our knowledge, are the first to show that folded multimeric proteins can be recognized and excreted by a non-classical secretion pathway in Bacillus subtilis. We explored the secretion pattern of a typical cytoplasmic protein D-psicose 3-epimerase from Ruminococcus sp. 5_1_39BFAA (RDPE), and showed that its non-classical secretion is not simply due to cell lysis. Analysis of truncation variants revealed that the C- and N-terminus, and two hydrophobic domains, are required for structural stability and non-classical secretion of RDPE. Alanine scanning mutagenesis of the hydrophobic segments of RDPE revealed that hydrophobic residues mediated the equilibrium between its folded and unfolded forms. Reporter mCherry and GFP fusions with RDPE regions show that its secretion requires an intact tetrameric protein complex. Using cross-linked tetramers, we show that folded tetrameric RDPE can be secreted as a single unit. Finally, we provide evidence that the non-classical secretion pathway has a strong preference for multimeric substrates, which accumulate at the poles and septum region. Altogether, these data show that a multimer recognition mechanism is likely applicable across the non-classical secretion pathway.

  12. Multimer recognition and secretion by the non-classical secretion pathway in Bacillus subtilis

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Liuqun; Chen, Jingqi; Sun, Jibin; Zhang, Dawei

    2017-01-01

    Non-classical protein secretion in bacteria is a common phenomenon. However, the selection principle for non-classical secretion pathways remains unclear. Here, our experimental data, to our knowledge, are the first to show that folded multimeric proteins can be recognized and excreted by a non-classical secretion pathway in Bacillus subtilis. We explored the secretion pattern of a typical cytoplasmic protein D-psicose 3-epimerase from Ruminococcus sp. 5_1_39BFAA (RDPE), and showed that its non-classical secretion is not simply due to cell lysis. Analysis of truncation variants revealed that the C- and N-terminus, and two hydrophobic domains, are required for structural stability and non-classical secretion of RDPE. Alanine scanning mutagenesis of the hydrophobic segments of RDPE revealed that hydrophobic residues mediated the equilibrium between its folded and unfolded forms. Reporter mCherry and GFP fusions with RDPE regions show that its secretion requires an intact tetrameric protein complex. Using cross-linked tetramers, we show that folded tetrameric RDPE can be secreted as a single unit. Finally, we provide evidence that the non-classical secretion pathway has a strong preference for multimeric substrates, which accumulate at the poles and septum region. Altogether, these data show that a multimer recognition mechanism is likely applicable across the non-classical secretion pathway. PMID:28276482

  13. The Non-Classical Renin-Angiotensin System and Renal Function

    PubMed Central

    Chappell, Mark C.

    2014-01-01

    The renin-angiotensin-system (RAS) constitutes one of the most important hormonal systems in the physiological regulation of blood pressure through renal and non-renal mechanisms. Indeed, dysregulation of the RAS is considered a major factor in the development of cardiovascular pathologies including kidney injury and blockade of this system by the inhibition of angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) or blockade of the angiotensin type 1 receptor (AT1R) by selective antagonists constitutes an effective therapeutic regimen. It is now apparent with the identification of multiple components of the RAS within the kidney and other tissues that the system is actually composed of different angiotensin peptides with diverse biological actions mediated by distinct receptor subtypes. The classic RAS can be defined as the ACE-Ang II AT1R axis that promotes vasoconstriction, water intake, sodium retention and other mechanisms to maintain blood pressure, as well as increase oxidative stress, fibrosis, cellular growth and inflammation in pathological conditions. In contrast, the non-classical RAS composed primarily of the AngII/Ang III–AT2R pathway and the ACE2-Ang-(1-7)-AT7R axis generally opposes the actions of a stimulated Ang II-AT1R axis through an increase in nitric oxide and prostaglandins and mediates vasodilation, natriuresis, diuresis, and a reduced oxidative stress. Moreover, increasing evidence suggests that these non-classical RAS components contribute to the therapeutic blockade of the classical system to reduce blood pressure and attenuate various indices of renal injury, as well as contribute to normal renal function. PMID:23720263

  14. Non-classical structures of organic compounds: unusual stereochemistry and hypercoordination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minkin, Vladimir I.; Minyaev, Ruslan M.; Hoffmann, Roald

    2002-11-01

    Non-classical structures of organic compounds are defined as molecules containing non-tetrahedral tetracoordinate and/or hypercoordinate carbon atoms. The evolution of the views on this subject is considered and the accumulated theoretical and experimental data on the structures and dynamic transformations of non-classical organic compounds are systematised. It is shown that computational analysis using the methods and the software potential of modern quantum chemistry has now acquired high predictive capacity and is the most important source of data on the structures of non-classical compounds. The bibliography includes 227 references.

  15. New neptunium(V) borates that exhibit the alexandrite effect.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shuao; Alekseev, Evgeny V; Depmeier, Wulf; Albrecht-Schmitt, Thomas E

    2012-01-02

    A new neptunium(V) borate, K[(NpO(2))B(10)O(14)(OH)(4)], was synthesized using boric acid as a reactive flux. The compound possesses a layered structure in which Np(V) resides in triangular holes, creating a hexagonal-bipyramidal environment around neptunium. This compound is unusual in that it exhibits the Alexandrite effect, a property that is typically restricted to neptunium(IV) compounds.

  16. Molecular and antimicrobial analyses of non-classical Bordetella isolated from a laboratory mouse

    PubMed Central

    LOONG, Shih Keng; MAHFODZ, Nur Hidayana; WALI, Haryanti Azura Mohamad; TALIB, Siti Aisyah A.; NASRAH, Siti Noraisah Ahmad; WONG, Pooi Fong; ABUBAKAR, Sazaly

    2016-01-01

    Accurate identification and separation of non-classical Bordetella species is very difficult. These species have been implicated in animal infections. B. hinzii, a non-classical Bordetella, has been isolated from mice in experimental facilities recently. We isolated and characterized one non-classical Bordetella isolate from the trachea and lung of an ICR mouse. Isolate BH370 was initially identified as B. hinzii by 16S ribosomal DNA and ompA sequencing. Additionally, isolate BH370 also displayed antimicrobial sensitivity profiles similar to B. hinzii. However, analyses of nrdA sequences determined its identity as Bordetella genogroup 16. The isolation of BH370 from a healthy mouse suggests the possibility of it being a commensal. The nrdA gene was demonstrated to possess greater phylogenetic resolution as compared with 16S ribosomal DNA and ompA for the discrimination of non-classical Bordetella species. PMID:26782013

  17. Homogeneous illusion device exhibiting transformed and shifted scattering effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mei, Jin-Shuo; Wu, Qun; Zhang, Kuang; He, Xun-Jun; Wang, Yue

    2016-06-01

    Based on the theory of transformation optics, a type of homogeneous illusion device exhibiting transformed and shifted scattering effect is proposed in this paper. The constitutive parameters of the proposed device are derived, and full-wave simulations are performed to validate the electromagnetic properties of transformed and shifted scattering effect. The simulation results show that the proposed device not only can visually shift the image of target in two dimensions, but also can visually transform the shape of target. It is expected that such homogeneous illusion device could possess potential applications in military camouflage and other field of electromagnetic engineering.

  18. Transcription of non-classic major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I in the bovine placenta throughout gestation and after Brucella abortus infection.

    PubMed

    Dos Santos, Larissa Sarmento; da Silva Mol, Juliana Pinto; de Macedo, Auricélio Alves; Silva, Ana Patrícia Carvalho; Dos Santos Ribeiro, Diego Luiz; Santos, Renato Lima; da Paixão, Tatiane Alves; de Carvalho Neta, Alcina Vieira

    2015-10-15

    Transcription of non-classical major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC-I) was assessed in the bovine placenta throughout gestation. Additionally, the effect of Brucella abortus infection on expression of non-classical MHC-I was also evaluated using a chorioallantoic membrane explant model of infection. The non-classical MHC-I genes MICB and NC3 had higher levels of transcription in the intercotyledonary region when compared to the placentome, which had higher levels of transcription at the second trimester of gestation. NC1 and classical MHC-I had very low levels of transcription throughout gestation. Trophoblastic cells of B. abortus-infected chorioallantoic membrane explants had an increase in transcription of non-classical MHC-I at 4h post infection. Therefore, this study provides an analysis of non-classical MHC-I transcription at different stages of gestation and different placental tissues, and during B. abortus infection. These findings provide additional knowledge on immune regulation in placental tissues, a known immune-privileged site.

  19. Imidazolines as Non-Classical Bioisosteres of N-Acyl Homoserine Lactones and Quorum Sensing Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Reyes-Arellano, Alicia; Bucio-Cano, Alejandro; Montenegro-Sustaita, Mabel; Curiel-Quesada, Everardo; Salgado-Zamora, Héctor

    2012-01-01

    A series of selected 2-substituted imidazolines were synthesized in moderate to excellent yields by a modification of protocols reported in the literature. They were evaluated as potential non-classical bioisosteres of AHL with the aim of counteracting bacterial pathogenicity. Imidazolines 18a, 18e and 18f at various concentrations reduced the violacein production by Chromobacterium violaceum, suggesting an anti-quorum sensing profile against Gram-negative bacteria. Imidazoline 18b did not affect the production of violacein, but had a bacteriostatic effect at 100 μM and a bactericidal effect at 1 mM. Imidazoline 18a bearing a hexyl phenoxy moiety was the most active compound of the series, rendering a 72% inhibitory effect of quorum sensing at 100 μM. Imidazoline 18f bearing a phenyl nonamide substituent presented an inhibitory effect on quorum sensing at a very low concentration (1 nM), with a reduction percentage of 28%. This compound showed an irregular performance, decreasing inhibition at concentrations higher than 10 μM, until reaching 100 μM, at which concentration it increased the inhibitory effect with a 49% reduction percentage. When evaluated on Serratia marcescens, compound 18f inhibited the production of prodigiosin by 40% at 100 μM. PMID:22408391

  20. Hydrogenation of Liquid Styrene by Alumina Supported Nickel Catalysts: Comparison between Classical and Non-Classical Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Y. C.; Abu Bakar, N. H. H.; Tan, W. L.; Abu Bakar, M.

    2016-06-01

    Almina supported Ni catalysts (Ni/Al2O3) with different Ni weight percentages (wt%) were prepared via classical and non-classical methods. All samples were prepared via impregnation technique. The samples prepared via non-classical methods were reduced using KBH4 as the reducing agent. The catalysts were tested for the hydrogenation of styrene in liquid phase. Optimum activation conditions for the hydrogenation reaction were found to be 633 K for 2 hours. Comparison of the catalytic reactivity for all catalysts at these activation conditions showed that catalysts prepared via classical methods exhibited better activity. Furthermore the 7.6wt% Ni-Al2O3/C showed enhanced activity when compared to the 5.9wt% and 13.8wt% Ni-Al2O3/C catalyst. This phenomenon is mainly attributed to the type of Ni active sites available on the catalyst. The surface properties of the catalysts investigated via H2- temperature programmed reduction (H2-TPR), H2-chemisorption and H2-temperature programmed desorption (H2-TPD) confirm this.

  1. Generating non-classical states from spin coherent states via interaction with ancillary spins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dooley, Shane; Joo, Jaewoo; Proctor, Timothy; Spiller, Timothy P.

    2015-02-01

    The generation of non-classical states of large quantum systems has attracted much interest from a foundational perspective, but also because of the significant potential of such states in emerging quantum technologies. In this paper we consider the possibility of generating non-classical states of a system of spins by interaction with an ancillary system, starting from an easily prepared initial state. We extend previous results for an ancillary system comprising a single spin to bigger ancillary systems and the interaction strength is enhanced by a factor of the number of ancillary spins. Depending on initial conditions, we find - by a combination of approximation and numerics - that the system of spins can evolve to spin cat states, spin squeezed states or to multiple cat states. We also discuss some candidate systems for implementation of the Hamiltonian necessary to generate these non-classical states.

  2. Non-classical adhesive-bonded joints in practical aerospace construction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hart-Smith, L. J.

    1973-01-01

    Solutions are derived for adhesive-bonded joints of non-classical geometries. Particular attention is given to bonded doublers and to selective reinforcement by unidirectional composites. Non-dimensionalized charts are presented for the efficiency limit imposed on the skin as the result of the eccentricity in the load path through the doubler. It is desirable to employ a relativly large doubler to minimize the effective eccentricity in the load path. The transfer stresses associated with selective reinforcement of metal structures by advanced composites are analyzed. Reinforcement of bolt holes in composites by bonded metal doublers is covered quantitatively. Also included is the adhesive joint analysis for shear flow in a multi-cell torque box, in which the bond on one angle becomes more critical sooner than those on the others, thereby restricting the strength to less than the total of each maximum strength when acting alone. Adhesive plasticity and adherend stiffness and thermal imbalances are included. A simple analysis/design technique of solution in terms of upper and lower bounds on an all-plastic adhesive analysis is introduced.

  3. A framework for iterative analysis of non-classically damped dynamical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aureli, Matteo

    2014-12-01

    In this paper, we propose a general iterative framework to solve the dynamic problem for linear systems with non-classical viscous damping. A systematic approach is used to derive families of stationary iterative schemes that, as an instance of particular interest, decouple the equations of motion for numerical study of the system response. For such schemes, we present a detailed convergence analysis and propose several solution strategies suitable for a broad class of systems. These techniques are based on spectral analysis of particular iteration matrices arising in the derivation and aim at optimizing the convergence performance of the method. We demonstrate that the proposed systematic framework, based on a novel application of the homotopy analysis method, generalizes iterative schemes previously reported in the literature and, importantly, provides a unified perspective for the study of iterative solutions of dynamic problems. Further, we establish a connection between our results and the theory of iterative schemes for algebraic linear systems, thus providing insights on convergence results and applicability of the method. Numerical examples illustrate the effectiveness of the approach and indicate future research directions.

  4. Language Proficiency Modulates the Recruitment of Non-Classical Language Areas in Bilinguals

    PubMed Central

    Leonard, Matthew K.; Torres, Christina; Travis, Katherine E.; Brown, Timothy T.; Hagler, Donald J.; Dale, Anders M.; Elman, Jeffrey L.; Halgren, Eric

    2011-01-01

    Bilingualism provides a unique opportunity for understanding the relative roles of proficiency and order of acquisition in determining how the brain represents language. In a previous study, we combined magnetoencephalography (MEG) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to examine the spatiotemporal dynamics of word processing in a group of Spanish-English bilinguals who were more proficient in their native language. We found that from the earliest stages of lexical processing, words in the second language evoke greater activity in bilateral posterior visual regions, while activity to the native language is largely confined to classical left hemisphere fronto-temporal areas. In the present study, we sought to examine whether these effects relate to language proficiency or order of language acquisition by testing Spanish-English bilingual subjects who had become dominant in their second language. Additionally, we wanted to determine whether activity in bilateral visual regions was related to the presentation of written words in our previous study, so we presented subjects with both written and auditory words. We found greater activity for the less proficient native language in bilateral posterior visual regions for both the visual and auditory modalities, which started during the earliest word encoding stages and continued through lexico-semantic processing. In classical left fronto-temporal regions, the two languages evoked similar activity. Therefore, it is the lack of proficiency rather than secondary acquisition order that determines the recruitment of non-classical areas for word processing. PMID:21455315

  5. Language proficiency modulates the recruitment of non-classical language areas in bilinguals.

    PubMed

    Leonard, Matthew K; Torres, Christina; Travis, Katherine E; Brown, Timothy T; Hagler, Donald J; Dale, Anders M; Elman, Jeffrey L; Halgren, Eric

    2011-03-24

    Bilingualism provides a unique opportunity for understanding the relative roles of proficiency and order of acquisition in determining how the brain represents language. In a previous study, we combined magnetoencephalography (MEG) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to examine the spatiotemporal dynamics of word processing in a group of Spanish-English bilinguals who were more proficient in their native language. We found that from the earliest stages of lexical processing, words in the second language evoke greater activity in bilateral posterior visual regions, while activity to the native language is largely confined to classical left hemisphere fronto-temporal areas. In the present study, we sought to examine whether these effects relate to language proficiency or order of language acquisition by testing Spanish-English bilingual subjects who had become dominant in their second language. Additionally, we wanted to determine whether activity in bilateral visual regions was related to the presentation of written words in our previous study, so we presented subjects with both written and auditory words. We found greater activity for the less proficient native language in bilateral posterior visual regions for both the visual and auditory modalities, which started during the earliest word encoding stages and continued through lexico-semantic processing. In classical left fronto-temporal regions, the two languages evoked similar activity. Therefore, it is the lack of proficiency rather than secondary acquisition order that determines the recruitment of non-classical areas for word processing.

  6. Bonobos and chimpanzees exhibit human-like framing effects.

    PubMed

    Krupenye, Christopher; Rosati, Alexandra G; Hare, Brian

    2015-02-01

    Humans exhibit framing effects when making choices, appraising decisions involving losses differently from those involving gains. To directly test for the evolutionary origin of this bias, we examined decision-making in humans' closest living relatives: bonobos (Pan paniscus) and chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes). We presented the largest sample of non-humans to date (n = 40) with a simple task requiring minimal experience. Apes made choices between a 'framed' option that provided preferred food, and an alternative option that provided a constant amount of intermediately preferred food. In the gain condition, apes experienced a positive 'gain' event in which the framed option was initially presented as one piece of food but sometimes was augmented to two. In the loss condition, apes experienced a negative 'loss' event in which they initially saw two pieces but sometimes received only one. Both conditions provided equal pay-offs, but apes chose the framed option more often in the positive 'gain' frame. Moreover, male apes were more susceptible to framing than were females. These results suggest that some human economic biases are shared through common descent with other apes and highlight the importance of comparative work in understanding the origins of individual differences in human choice.

  7. Pimecrolimus micelle exhibits excellent therapeutic effect for Keratoconjunctivitis Sicca.

    PubMed

    Yingfang, Fan; Zhuang, Bo; Wang, Cheng; Xu, Xuelian; Xu, Wei; Lv, Zhihua

    2016-04-01

    Poor corneal penetration and short residence time on the ocular surface are two major bottlenecks for conventional ophthalmic formulations. To overcome the foregoing dilemmas, we prepared two novel formulations of pimecrolimus nanomicelles (PNM) with particle size of 37.85 ± 1.21 nm and thermosensitive hydrogel (PTH) for treating Keratoconjunctivitis Sicca (KCS). PNM were investigated by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Malvern laser particle size analyzer, X-ray diffraction (XRD) system, and the content of drug in PNM was measured by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The drug loading and encapsulation efficiency reached to 7.57% ± 0.10% and 97.9% ± 1.26%, respectively. PTH displayed special gel-sol transition behavior with temperature increasing from 4 °C to 37 °C. The in vitro release profile demonstrated that PNM and PTH exhibited sustained-release behavior compared with free pimecrolimus oil-based eye drop (FPO). In addition, we established a mouse model of KCS induced by benzalkonium chloride to evaluate the therapeutic outcome of different pimecrolimus formulations. The production of tear, fluorescein staining scores and histopathologic examinations of the cornea were assessed in detail. The results confirmed that PNM had the best therapeutic effect among all formulations based on its higher drug encapsulation capability, favourable permeability and sustained release. All these indicated that PNM could serve as a potent ophthalmologic agent for KCS. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Non-classical testosterone signaling mediated through ZIP9 stimulates claudin expression and tight junction formation in Sertoli cells.

    PubMed

    Bulldan, Ahmed; Dietze, Raimund; Shihan, Mazen; Scheiner-Bobis, Georgios

    2016-08-01

    In the classical signaling pathway, testosterone regulates gene expression by activating the cytosolic/nuclear androgen receptor. In the non-classical pathway, testosterone activates cytosolic signaling cascades that are normally triggered by growth factors. The nature of the receptor involved in this signaling pathway is a source of controversy. In the Sertoli cell line 93RS2, which lacks the classical AR, we determined that testosterone stimulates the non-classical signaling pathway, characterized by the phosphorylation of Erk1/2 and transcription factors CREB and ATF-1. We also demonstrated that testosterone increases the expression of the tight junction (TJ) proteins claudin-1 and claudin-5. Both of these proteins are known to be essential constituents of TJs between Sertoli cells, and as a consequence of their increased expression transepithelial resistance across Sertoli cell monolayers is increased. ZIP9 is a Zn(2+)transporter that was recently shown to be a membrane-bound testosterone receptor. Silencing its expression in 93RS2 Sertoli cells by siRNA completely prevents Erk1/2, CREB, and ATF-1 phosphorylation as well the stimulation of claudin-1 and -5 expression and TJ formation between neighboring cells. The study presented here demonstrates for the first time that in Sertoli cells testosterone acts through the receptor ZIP9 to trigger the non-classical signaling cascade, resulting in increased claudin expression and TJ formation. Since TJ formation is a prerequisite for the maintenance of the blood-testis barrier, the testosterone/ZIP9 effects might be significant for male physiology. Further assessment of these interactions will help to supplement our knowledge concerning the mechanism by which testosterone plays a role in male fertility.

  9. Sulfur dioxide effects on plants exhibiting Crassulacean Acid Metabolism.

    PubMed

    Olszyk, D M; Bytnerowicz, A; Fox, C A

    1987-01-01

    The effects of SO(2) on species exhibiting Crassulacean Acid Metabolism (CAM) were determined with short term-high concentration 'acute' greenhouse exposures (0.6 to 3.0 microl liter(-1) (ppm) SO(2) for 2 and 8 h), and long term-low concentration 'chronic' field exposures (0.35 to 0.90 microl liter(-1) SO(2) for 32 to 79 h periodically over 7 to 13 days). In the acute greenhouse exposures, visible injury was observed on Opuntia basilaris Engelm. & Bigel., exposed to 2.0 microl liter(-1) SO(2), but no injury was observed on Ananas comosus (L.) Merr., Bryophyllum blossfeldiana Poelln., Bryophyllum pinnata (Lam.) Pers., or Bryophyllum tubiflora (Harv.) Hamet, exposed to up to 2.8 microl liter(-1) SO(2) for 8 h. Stomatal conductance during the exposures averaged 0.067+/-0.021mol(-2)s(-1) for Opuntia basilaris, 0.029+/-0.008mol(-2)s(-1) for Ananas comosus, and 0.029+/-0.008mol m(-2)s(-1) for Bryophyllum pinnata. Opuntia basilaris was injured early during the day, but not at night; with the injury appearing as a white necrotic banding across just fully expanded pads. Moderately injured pads would regreen beginning 1 to 2 weeks after exposure. In chronic field exposures, no visible injury from SO(2) was observed on Opuntia basilaris, Dudleya arizonica Rose or Agave deserti Engelm. plants, grown either with supplemental irrigation or natural rainfall. In addition, in the field SO(2) had no effect on CO(2) uptake, total sulfur content, transpiration, or tissue acidity in either the light or the dark, or in irrigated vs natural rainfall plots.

  10. Influences on the Talent Development Process of Non-Classical Musicians: Psychological, Social and Environmental Influences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kamin, Sara; Richards, Hugh; Collins, Dave

    2007-01-01

    Twelve professional, non-classical musicians were interviewed about the impact of internal and external factors on their development as musicians. The data were qualitatively analyzed, and observations concerning psychological characteristics of developing excellence (PCDEs), social and environmental influences are reported. The insights of the…

  11. Influences on the Talent Development Process of Non-Classical Musicians: Psychological, Social and Environmental Influences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kamin, Sara; Richards, Hugh; Collins, Dave

    2007-01-01

    Twelve professional, non-classical musicians were interviewed about the impact of internal and external factors on their development as musicians. The data were qualitatively analyzed, and observations concerning psychological characteristics of developing excellence (PCDEs), social and environmental influences are reported. The insights of the…

  12. Non-classical response of solid helium confined in Vycor glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Duk Young; Kim, Hyung Chan; Kim, Eunseong

    2008-03-01

    The non-classical rotational inertia of solid ^4He was observed by a series of torsional oscillator experiments[1]. Probable heat capacity signature of the supersolid transition which coincides with the non-classical mass decoupling is also observed[2]. Recent torsional oscillator experiments suggest that disorder and the orientation of a helium crystal may play an important role in the appearance of non-classical rotational inertia. Accordingly, the investigation on the role of defects and crystal orientation may provide crucial clues to understand supersolidity. Solid helium confined in porous media cannot possess well-defined crystal orientation and is likely heavily populated with defects. Here we will present the pressure dependence of the non-classical rotational inertia in solid helium confined in Vycor glass by torsional oscillator techniques. [1] E. Kim and M. H. W. Chan, Science 305, 1941 (2004); Nature 425, 227 (2004); J. Low Temp. Phys. 138, 859 (2005); Phys. Rev. Lett. 97, 115302 (2006). [2] X. Lin, A. C. Clark, M. H. W. Chan, Nature 449,1025(2007).

  13. A non-classical view of the modulation of mineral precipitation by organic additives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruiz-Agudo, Encarnacion; Ruiz-Agudo, Cristina; Burgos-Cara, Alejandro; Putnis, Christine; Rodriguez-Navarro, Carlos; Putnis, Andrew

    2016-04-01

    Questions persist on the mechanisms of crystallization of sparingly soluble minerals such as calcium carbonate, calcium oxalate or barium sulphate. Compared to CaCO3, the mechanisms of nucleation and growth in the CaC2O4-H2O or BaSO4-H2O systems have received less attention. These phases are important due to their relevance as biominerals and/or unwanted mineral deposits in technological applications. Growing evidence suggests that sparingly soluble salts form by non-classical nucleation and growth pathways, where pre-nucleation ion associates and amorphous (solid or liquid) precursor phase(s) play a critical role (e.g. Rodríguez-Navarro et al. (2015), Ruiz-Agudo et al. (2015)). Indeed the identification of pre-nucleation species in these systems and their strong interactions with organic compounds (Verch et al. 2011) raises the possibility that the control of organics on biomineralization may begin even earlier than previously thought. A sound knowledge of the physical mechanisms by which acidic macromolecules affect nucleation and early growth may offer general insights concerning the molecular control of biomineralization, as well as being critical for improving strategies to control unwanted mineral deposition or for the synthesis of biomimetic materials. Here we present investigations on the initial stages of the precipitation of these relevant minerals in organic-free solutions to identify the precipitation pathway and to look for any potential precursor phase(s) to the final, crystalline polymorph. As well, we explore the effects that several acidic organic compounds have on the different precipitation stages identified. We find that organic additives such as citric acid, polyacrilic acid or a commercial copolymer of maleic acid/allyl sulfonic acid with phosphonate groups can be active at modifying pre-nucleation stages (destabilizing of pre-nucleation species or hampering the aggregation and growth of pre-nucleation associates) and subsequently strongly

  14. Electrical stimulation of non-classical photon emission from diamond color centers by means of sub-superficial graphitic electrodes.

    PubMed

    Forneris, Jacopo; Traina, Paolo; Monticone, Daniele Gatto; Amato, Giampiero; Boarino, Luca; Brida, Giorgio; Degiovanni, Ivo P; Enrico, Emanuele; Moreva, Ekaterina; Grilj, Veljko; Skukan, Natko; Jakšić, Milko; Genovese, Marco; Olivero, Paolo

    2015-10-29

    Focused MeV ion beams with micrometric resolution are suitable tools for the direct writing of conductive graphitic channels buried in an insulating diamond bulk, as already demonstrated for different device applications. In this work we apply this fabrication method to the electrical excitation of color centers in diamond, demonstrating the potential of electrical stimulation in diamond-based single-photon sources. Differently from optically-stimulated light emission from color centers in diamond, electroluminescence (EL) requires a high current flowing in the diamond subgap states between the electrodes. With this purpose, buried graphitic electrode pairs, 10 μm spaced, were fabricated in the bulk of a single-crystal diamond sample using a 6 MeV C microbeam. The electrical characterization of the structure showed a significant current injection above an effective voltage threshold of 150 V, which enabled the stimulation of a stable EL emission. The EL imaging allowed to identify the electroluminescent regions and the residual vacancy distribution associated with the fabrication technique. Measurements evidenced isolated electroluminescent spots where non-classical light emission in the 560-700 nm spectral range was observed. The spectral and auto-correlation features of the EL emission were investigated to qualify the non-classical properties of the color centers.

  15. Electrical stimulation of non-classical photon emission from diamond color centers by means of sub-superficial graphitic electrodes

    PubMed Central

    Forneris, Jacopo; Traina, Paolo; Monticone, Daniele Gatto; Amato, Giampiero; Boarino, Luca; Brida, Giorgio; Degiovanni, Ivo P.; Enrico, Emanuele; Moreva, Ekaterina; Grilj, Veljko; Skukan, Natko; Jakšić, Milko; Genovese, Marco; Olivero, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    Focused MeV ion beams with micrometric resolution are suitable tools for the direct writing of conductive graphitic channels buried in an insulating diamond bulk, as already demonstrated for different device applications. In this work we apply this fabrication method to the electrical excitation of color centers in diamond, demonstrating the potential of electrical stimulation in diamond-based single-photon sources. Differently from optically-stimulated light emission from color centers in diamond, electroluminescence (EL) requires a high current flowing in the diamond subgap states between the electrodes. With this purpose, buried graphitic electrode pairs, 10 μm spaced, were fabricated in the bulk of a single-crystal diamond sample using a 6 MeV C microbeam. The electrical characterization of the structure showed a significant current injection above an effective voltage threshold of 150 V, which enabled the stimulation of a stable EL emission. The EL imaging allowed to identify the electroluminescent regions and the residual vacancy distribution associated with the fabrication technique. Measurements evidenced isolated electroluminescent spots where non-classical light emission in the 560–700 nm spectral range was observed. The spectral and auto-correlation features of the EL emission were investigated to qualify the non-classical properties of the color centers. PMID:26510889

  16. Electrical stimulation of non-classical photon emission from diamond color centers by means of sub-superficial graphitic electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forneris, Jacopo; Traina, Paolo; Monticone, Daniele Gatto; Amato, Giampiero; Boarino, Luca; Brida, Giorgio; Degiovanni, Ivo P.; Enrico, Emanuele; Moreva, Ekaterina; Grilj, Veljko; Skukan, Natko; Jakšić, Milko; Genovese, Marco; Olivero, Paolo

    2015-10-01

    Focused MeV ion beams with micrometric resolution are suitable tools for the direct writing of conductive graphitic channels buried in an insulating diamond bulk, as already demonstrated for different device applications. In this work we apply this fabrication method to the electrical excitation of color centers in diamond, demonstrating the potential of electrical stimulation in diamond-based single-photon sources. Differently from optically-stimulated light emission from color centers in diamond, electroluminescence (EL) requires a high current flowing in the diamond subgap states between the electrodes. With this purpose, buried graphitic electrode pairs, 10 μm spaced, were fabricated in the bulk of a single-crystal diamond sample using a 6 MeV C microbeam. The electrical characterization of the structure showed a significant current injection above an effective voltage threshold of 150 V, which enabled the stimulation of a stable EL emission. The EL imaging allowed to identify the electroluminescent regions and the residual vacancy distribution associated with the fabrication technique. Measurements evidenced isolated electroluminescent spots where non-classical light emission in the 560-700 nm spectral range was observed. The spectral and auto-correlation features of the EL emission were investigated to qualify the non-classical properties of the color centers.

  17. Non-Classical Stress Concentration Behavior in a Radically Stretched Hyperelastic Sheet Containing a Circular Hole

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ko, William L.; Lung, Shun-Fat

    2017-01-01

    Non-classical stress concentration behavior in a stretched circular hyperelastic sheet (outer radius b = 10 in., thickness t = 0.0625 in.) containing a central hole (radius a = 0.5 in.) was analyzed. The hyperelastic sheet was subjected to different levels of remote radial stretchings. Nastran large-strain large-deformation analysis and the Blatz-Ko large deformation theory were used to calculate the equal-biaxial stress concentration factors K. The results show that the values of K calculated from the Blatz-Ko theory and Nastran are extremely close. Unlike the classical linear elasticity theory, which gives the constant K = 2 for the equal-biaxial stress field, the hyperelastic K values were found to increase with increased stretching and can exceed the value K = 6 at a remote radial extension ratio of 2.35. The present K-values compare fairly well with the K-values obtained by previous works. The effect of the hole-size on K-values was investigated. The values of K start to decrease from a hole radius a = 0.125 in. down to K = 1 (no stress concentration) as a shrinks to a = 0 in. (no hole). Also, the newly introduced stretch and strain magnification factors {K(sub ?),K(sub e) } are also material- and deformation-dependent, and can increase from linear levels of {1.0, 4.0} and reaching {3.07, 4.61}, respectively at a remote radial extension ratio of 2.35.

  18. A critical role of non-classical MHC in tumor immune evasion in the amphibian Xenopus model

    PubMed Central

    Haynes-Gilmore, Nikesha; Banach, Maureen; Edholm, Eva-Stina; Lord, Edith; Robert, Jacques

    2014-01-01

    Non-classical class Ib (class Ib) genes are found in all jawed vertebrates, including the amphibian Xenopus, which possesses at least 20 distinct Xenopus non-classical class Ib genes (XNCs). As an immune evasion strategy, tumors often downregulate surface expression of classical major histocompatibility complex class Ia molecules. In contrast, cancers commonly express class Ib molecules, presenting an alternative for tumor immune recognition. We characterized a novel XNC, XNC10, functionally similar to CD1d from a class Ia-deficient thymic lymphoid tumor (15/0), which grows aggressively in Xenopus LG-15 cloned animals. To investigate the roles of XNC10 in antitumor immunity, we generated stable 15/0-transfectants with silenced XNC10 mRNA and protein expression. Notably, XNC10 silencing resulted in acute tumor rejection by naturally class Ia-deficient syngeneic tadpoles, with greater potency of rejection in tumors with more efficient XNC10 knockdown. In vivo killing assays shows that the rejection of XNC10-deficient tumors is due to a cell-mediated cytotoxic immune response elicited by the tadpole host. Importantly, priming enhances XNC10-deficient tumor rejection. Flow cytometry reveals that XNC10-deficient tumor rejection is associated with an accumulation of XNC10-restricted invariant T cells and conventional CD8 T cells as well as other leukocytes. Similarly, semisolid tumor grafts in tadpoles also exhibit leukocytes infiltration. These findings suggest that XNC10 allows the 15/0-tumor to escape immune recognition and class Ia-independent cytotoxicity, thus emphasizing the critical roles of class Ibs in tumor immunity. PMID:24776220

  19. Characterisation of non-classical MHC class I genes in the Tasmanian devil (Sarcophilus harrisii).

    PubMed

    Cheng, Yuanyuan; Belov, Katherine

    2014-12-01

    The Tasmanian devil (Sarcophilus harrisii) is a carnivorous marsupial that is under threat of extinction due to an unusual transmissible disease called Devil Facial Tumour Disease (DFTD). Previous studies on the classical MHC genes have provided important insights into immune responses in this endangered species; however, so far, very little is known about the non-classical MHC genes of this species, which can also play significant roles in the immune system. Here, we report characterisation of five non-classical class I genes in the Tasmanian devil, including Saha-UD, -UK, -UM, -MR1 and -CD1. Saha-UD has been isolated previously and is known to have low genetic polymorphism, though its categorisation as classical or non-classical gene has remained undetermined. In this study, we observed tissue-specific expression of Saha-UD, suggesting that it is more characteristic of a non-classical gene. Restricted tissue expression patterns were also observed for other genes, with an exception of Saha-MR1 being ubiquitously expressed in all examined tissues. Saha-UK, -UM and -MR1 were found to be genetically monomorphic, while four alleles were found at Saha-CD1 with signs of positive selection detected within the α1 domain. Among the four Saha-CD1 alleles, one predominant allele (Saha-CD1*01) showed a high allele frequency of 0.906 in the Tasmanian devil population, resulting in a low heterozygosity (0.188) at this locus. Alternative splicing takes place in Saha-CD1, giving rise to a full-length transcript and a splice variant lacking intact antigen-binding, β2m-binding, transmembrane and cytoplasmic domains.

  20. [A non-classical approach to medical practices: Michel Foucault and Actor-Network Theory].

    PubMed

    Bińczyk, E

    2001-01-01

    The text presents an analysis of medical practices stemming from two sources: Michel Foucault's conception and the research of Annemarie Mol and John Law, representatives of a trend known as Actor-Network Theory. Both approaches reveal significant theoretical kinship: they can be successfully consigned to the framework of non-classical sociology of science. I initially refer to the cited conceptions as a version of non-classical sociology of medicine. The identity of non-classical sociology of medicine hinges on the fact that it undermines the possibility of objective definitions of disease, health and body. These are rather approached as variable social and historical phenomena, co-constituted by medical practices. To both Foucault and Mol the main object of interest was not medicine as such, but rather the network of medical practices. Mol and Law sketch a new theoretical perspective for the analysis of medical practices. They attempt to go beyond the dichotomous scheme of thinking about the human body as an object of medical research and the subject of private experience. Research on patients suffering blood-sugar deficiency provide the empirical background for the thesis of Actor-Network Theory representatives. Michel Foucault's conceptions are extremely critical of medical practices. The French researcher describes the processes of 'medicalising' Western society as the emergence of a new type of power. He attempts to sensitise the reader to the ethical dimension of the processes of medicalising society.

  1. Tyrosol exhibits negative regulatory effects on LPS response and endotoxemia.

    PubMed

    Lu, Jing; Huang, Guoren; Wang, Zhenning; Zhuang, Shuang; Xu, Linli; Song, Bocui; Xiong, Ying; Guan, Shuang

    2013-12-01

    Tyrosol, a phenolic compound, was isolated from wine, olive oil and other plant-derived products. In the present study, we first investigated the negative regulatory effects of tyrosol on cytokine production by lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated RAW 264.7 macrophages in vitro, and the results showed that tyrosol reduced tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin-6 (IL-6) and interleukin-1β (IL-1β) secretion. This inspired us to further study the effects of tyrosol in vivo. Tyrosol significantly attenuated TNF-α, IL-1β and IL-6 production in serum from mice challenged with LPS, and consistent with the results in vitro. In the murine model of endotoxemia, mice were treated with tyrosol prior to or after LPS challenge. The results showed that tyrosol significantly increased mice survival. We further investigated signal transduction ways to determine how tyrosol works. The data revealed that tyrosol shocked LPS-induced mitogen activated protein kinases (MAPKs) and nuclear transcription factor-κB (NF-κB) signal transduction pathways in RAW 264.7 macrophages. These observations indicated that tyrosol exerted negative regulatory effects on LPS response in vitro and in vivo through suppressing NF-κB and p38/ERK MAPK signaling pathways.

  2. Non-classical logic inverter coupling a ZnO nanowire-based Schottky barrier transistor and adjacent Schottky diode.

    PubMed

    Hosseini Shokouh, Seyed Hossein; Raza, Syed Raza Ali; Lee, Hee Sung; Im, Seongil

    2014-08-21

    On a single ZnO nanowire (NW), we fabricated an inverter-type device comprising a Schottky diode (SD) and field-effect transistor (FET), aiming at 1-dimensional (1D) electronic circuits with low power consumption. The SD and adjacent FET worked respectively as the load and driver, so that voltage signals could be easily extracted as the output. In addition, NW FET with a transparent conducting oxide as top gate turned out to be very photosensitive, although ZnO NW SD was blind to visible light. Based on this, we could achieve an array of photo-inverter cells on one NW. Our non-classical inverter is regarded as quite practical for both logic and photo-sensing due to its performance as well as simple device configuration.

  3. Olive oil exhibits osteoprotection in ovariectomized rats without estrogenic effects

    PubMed Central

    ZHENG, XIAOHUA; HUANG, HUIJUAN; ZHENG, XIAOBING; LI, BAOHENG

    2016-01-01

    The present study was designed to evaluate the effect of olive oil on bone and uterus in ovariectomized rats. A total of 34 surgically ovariectomized or sham-operated virgin Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into four groups: i) Sham-operated control rats (sham group); ii) Ovariectomized rats (OVX group); iii) Olive oil-supplemented ovariectomized rats (olive group); and iv) Diethylstilbestrol-supplemented ovariectomized rats (E2 group). At 12 weeks following left ventricular blood sacrificed to detect plasma estradiol (E2), interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and IL-6 levels. Bone mineral density (BMD) of the lumbar spine was evaluated using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry, and the left femur proximal 1/3 slices were observed using transmission electron microscopy. Uterine wet weight and the uterus index (ratio of uterine wet weight and body weight) were compared, and the uterine endometrium was observed using a light microscope. In the OVX group, serum E2 was significantly lower and IL-1β and IL-6 levels were significantly higher compared with the sham group. By contrast, serum E2 levels increased and IL-1β levels decreased in the olive group, but showed no significant difference compared with the sham group. The lumbar spine BMD in the olive group was increased compared with OVX group. Electron microscopy revealed sparse collagen fibers in the OVX group, with decreased density and multi-cavity, showing pathological features of osteoporosis. By contrast, the situation was improved in the E2 and olive groups, in which organelles such as the rough endoplasmic reticulum, mitochondria and Golgi apparatus were visible and active. Compared with the sham group rats, the uterine wet weight and uterine index decreased in the OVX and olive groups; however, no statistically significant difference was observed in the E2 group. Furthermore, endometrial hyperplasia was not observed in the olive group, which were apparently different from E2 group. The present results suggest that olive

  4. Rabeprazole exhibits antiproliferative effects on human gastric cancer cell lines

    PubMed Central

    GU, MENGLI; ZHANG, YAN; ZHOU, XINXIN; MA, HAN; YAO, HANGPING; JI, FENG

    2014-01-01

    Intracellular proton extrusion in gastric cancer cells has been reported to promote cancer cell survival under acidic conditions via hydrogen/potassium adenosine triphosphatase (H+/K+-ATPase). Rabeprazole is a frequently used second-generation proton pump inhibitor (PPI) that irreversibly inactivates gastric H+/K+-ATPase. Therefore, we hypothesized that rabeprazole could reduce the viability of gastric cancer cells. In the present study, four human gastric cancer cell lines and one non-cancer gastric cell line were cultured. Cell viability, the α- and β-subunits of H+/K+-ATPase and cellular apoptosis were analyzed by dye exclusion assay, reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and annexin V-fluorescein isothiocyanate/propidium iodide staining, respectively. The expression level of total extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase 1/2 (ERK 1/2) and phosphorylated-ERK protein was detected by western blot analysis. Gastric cancer cell lines were more tolerant of the acidic culture media than non-cancer cells. Administration of rabeprazole led to a marked decrease in the viability of MKN-28 cells. Exposure to rabeprazole induced significant apoptosis in AGS cells. Rabeprazole completely inhibited the phosphorylation of ERK 1/2 in the MKN-28 cells, whereas the same effect was not observed in either the KATO III or MKN-45 cells. The ERK 1/2 inhibitor, PD98059, attenuated the viability of the AGS cells. A similar antiproliferative effect was observed in the rabeprazole treatment group. In addition, PD98059 and rabeprazole were able to efficaciously inhibit the phosphorylation of ERK 1/2 in the gastric cancer cells. Therefore, it was concluded that rabeprazole can attenuate the cell viability of human gastric cancer cells through inactivation of the ERK1/2 signaling pathway. The results of the present study demonstrate that rabeprazole inhibits the viability of gastric cancer cells in vitro and may serve as a novel antineoplastic agent. PMID:25202402

  5. Investigation of Non-classical Under lap Design on Linearity of a Folded Cascode Operational Transconductance Amplifier (OTA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alam, M. S.; Kranti, A.; Armstrong, G. A.

    2011-08-01

    The significance of optimization of gate-source/drain extension region (also known as a non-classical underlap design) in double gate (DG) silicon-on-insulator (SOI) FETs to improve the linearity performance of a low power folded cascode operational transconductance amplifier (OTA) is described. Based on a new figure-of-merit (FoM) involving AV, linearity, unity gain bandwidth fT and dc power consumption PDC, this article presents guideline for optimum design for underlap spacer s and film thickness Tsi to maximize the performance of OTA. It has been shown that FoM exhibited by an underlap DG MOSFET OTA gives significantly higher value (≅9) compared to a conventional single gate bulk MOSFET OTA. This is due to a combination of both higher fT, and higher gain AV for the same linearity at low power consumption of 360 μW. With gate length scaling, FoM continues to improve, primarily due to higher value of fT. A scaled bulk MOSFET OTA exhibits similar but much smaller enhancement in trend for FoM.

  6. Treatment of beta amyloid 1–42 (Aβ1–42)-induced basal forebrain cholinergic damage by a non-classical estrogen signaling activator in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Kwakowsky, Andrea; Potapov, Kyoko; Kim, SooHyun; Peppercorn, Katie; Tate, Warren P.; Ábrahám, István M.

    2016-01-01

    In Alzheimer’s disease (AD), there is a loss in cholinergic innervation targets of basal forebrain which has been implicated in substantial cognitive decline. Amyloid beta peptide (Aβ1–42) accumulates in AD that is highly toxic for basal forebrain cholinergic (BFC) neurons. Although the gonadal steroid estradiol is neuroprotective, the administration is associated with risk of off-target effects. Previous findings suggested that non-classical estradiol action on intracellular signaling pathways has ameliorative potential without estrogenic side effects. After Aβ1–42 injection into mouse basal forebrain, a single dose of 4-estren-3α, 17β-diol (estren), the non-classical estradiol pathway activator, restored loss of cholinergic cortical projections and also attenuated the Aβ1–42-induced learning deficits. Estren rapidly and directly phosphorylates c-AMP-response–element-binding-protein and extracellular-signal-regulated-kinase-1/2 in BFC neurons and restores the cholinergic fibers via estrogen receptor-α. These findings indicated that selective activation of non-classical intracellular estrogen signaling has a potential to treat the damage of cholinergic neurons in AD. PMID:26879842

  7. Heat control in opto-mechanical system using quantum non-classicality

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, Sushamana Senwar, Subash

    2016-05-06

    Cooling of matter to the quantum ground state is a primary directive of quantum control. In other words, to extract entropy from a quantum system, efficient indirect quantum measurements may be implemented. The main objective is the cooling of the oscillator either to its motional ground state or to non-classical states, such as low-number Fock states, squeezed states or entangled states. It is shown that the use of quantum control procedure is better choice for even experimental realizations because it leads to a squeezed steady state with less than one phonon on average. The steady state of system corresponds to cooling of the system.

  8. Heat control in opto-mechanical system using quantum non-classicality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Sushamana; Senwar, Subash

    2016-05-01

    Cooling of matter to the quantum ground state is a primary directive of quantum control. In other words, to extract entropy from a quantum system, efficient indirect quantum measurements may be implemented. The main objective is the cooling of the oscillator either to its motional ground state or to non-classical states, such as low-number Fock states, squeezed states or entangled states. It is shown that the use of quantum control procedure is better choice for even experimental realizations because it leads to a squeezed steady state with less than one phonon on average. The steady state of system corresponds to cooling of the system.

  9. A novel strategy for protein production using non-classical secretion pathway in Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jingqi; Zhao, Liuqun; Fu, Gang; Zhou, Wenjuan; Sun, Yuanxia; Zheng, Ping; Sun, Jibin; Zhang, Dawei

    2016-04-28

    The Gram-positive bacterium Bacillus subtilis has been widely used as a cell factory for the production of proteins due to its generally regarded as safe (GRAS) nature and secretion capability. Of the known secretory pathways in B. subtilis, the majority of proteins are exported from the cytoplasm by Sec pathway, Tat pathway and ABC transporters, etc. However, the production of heterologous proteins by B. subtilis is unfortunately not that straight forward because of the bottlenecks in classical secretion pathways. The aim of this work is to explore a new method for protein production based on non-classical secretion pathway. One D-psicose 3-epimerase (RDPE) which converts D-fructose into D-psicose from Ruminococcus sp. 5_1_39BFAA was successfully and substantially secreted into the extracellular milieu without the direction of signal peptide. Subsequently, we demonstrated that RDPE contained no native signal peptide, and the secretion of RDPE was not dependent on Sec or Tat pathway or due to cell lysis, which indicated that RDPE is a non-classically secreted protein. Then, we attempted to evaluate the possibility of using RDPE as a signal to export eighteen reporter proteins into the culture medium. Five of eleven homologous proteins, two of five heterologous proteins from other bacterium and two heterologous proteins of eukaryotic source were successfully secreted into the extracellular milieu at different secretion levels when they were fused to RDPE mediated by a flexible 21-bp linker to keep a distance between two single proteins. Furthermore, the secretion rates of two fusion proteins (RDPE-DnaK and RDPE-RFP) reached more than 50 %. In addition, most of the fusion proteins retained enzyme or biological activity of their corresponding target proteins, and all of the fusions still had the activity of RDPE. We found and identified a heterologous non-classically secreted protein RDPE, and showed that RDPE could direct proteins of various types into the culture

  10. Non-classical Ly6C− monocytes drive the development of inflammatory arthritis in mice

    PubMed Central

    Misharin, Alexander V; Cuda, Carla M; Saber, Rana; Turner, Jason D; Gierut, Angelica K; Haines, G. Kenneth; Berdnikovs, Sergejs; Filer, Andrew; Clark, Andrew R; Buckley, Christopher D; Mutlu, Gökhan M; Budinger, G.R. Scott; Perlman, Harris

    2014-01-01

    Summary Different subsets and/or polarized phenotypes of monocytes and macrophages may play distinct roles during the development and resolution of inflammation. Here, we demonstrate in a murine model of rheumatoid arthritis that non-classical Ly6C− monocytes are required for the initiation and progression of sterile joint inflammation. Moreover, non-classical Ly6C− monocytes differentiate into inflammatory macrophages (M1), which drive disease pathogenesis and display plasticity during the resolution phase. During the development of arthritis, these cells polarize toward an alternatively activated phenotype (M2), promoting the resolution of joint inflammation. The influx of Ly6C− monocytes and their subsequent classical and then alternative activation occurs without changes in synovial tissue-resident macrophages, which express markers of M2 polarization throughout the course of the arthritis and attenuate joint inflammation during the initiation phase. These data suggest that circulating Ly6C− monocytes recruited to the joint upon injury orchestrate the development and resolution of autoimmune joint inflammation. PMID:25373902

  11. Non-classical correlations between single photons and phonons from a mechanical oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riedinger, Ralf; Hong, Sungkun; Norte, Richard A.; Slater, Joshua A.; Shang, Juying; Krause, Alexander G.; Anant, Vikas; Aspelmeyer, Markus; Gröblacher, Simon

    2016-02-01

    Interfacing a single photon with another quantum system is a key capability in modern quantum information science. It allows quantum states of matter, such as spin states of atoms, atomic ensembles or solids, to be prepared and manipulated by photon counting and, in particular, to be distributed over long distances. Such light-matter interfaces have become crucial to fundamental tests of quantum physics and realizations of quantum networks. Here we report non-classical correlations between single photons and phonons—the quanta of mechanical motion—from a nanomechanical resonator. We implement a full quantum protocol involving initialization of the resonator in its quantum ground state of motion and subsequent generation and read-out of correlated photon-phonon pairs. The observed violation of a Cauchy-Schwarz inequality is clear evidence for the non-classical nature of the mechanical state generated. Our results demonstrate the availability of on-chip solid-state mechanical resonators as light-matter quantum interfaces. The performance we achieved will enable studies of macroscopic quantum phenomena as well as applications in quantum communication, as quantum memories and as quantum transducers.

  12. ERAAP shapes the peptidome associated with classical and non-classical MHC class I molecules1

    PubMed Central

    Nagarajan, Niranjana A.; de Verteuil, Danielle A.; Sriranganadane, Dev; Yahyaoui, Wafaa; Thibault, Pierre; Perreault, Claude; Shastri, Nilabh

    2016-01-01

    The peptide repertoire presented by classical as well as non-classical MHC I molecules is altered in the absence of the ER aminopeptidase associated with antigen processing (ERAAP). To characterize the extent of these changes, peptides from cells lacking ERAAP were eluted from the cell surface and analyzed by high-throughput mass spectrometry. We found that the majority of peptides found in WT cells were retained in the absence of ERAAP. In contrast, a subset of “ERAAP-edited” peptides was lost in WT cells, and ERAAP-deficient cells presented an unique “unedited” repertoire. A substantial fraction of MHC-associated peptides from ERAAP-deficient cells contained N-terminal extensions and had a different molecular composition than those from WT cells. We found that the number and immunogenicity of peptides associated with non-classical MHC I was increased in the absence of ERAAP. Conversely, only peptides presented by classical MHC I were immunogenic in ERAAP-sufficient cells. Finally, MHC I peptides were also derived from different intracellular sources in ERAAP-deficient cells. PMID:27371725

  13. Non-classical correlations between single photons and phonons from a mechanical oscillator.

    PubMed

    Riedinger, Ralf; Hong, Sungkun; Norte, Richard A; Slater, Joshua A; Shang, Juying; Krause, Alexander G; Anant, Vikas; Aspelmeyer, Markus; Gröblacher, Simon

    2016-02-18

    Interfacing a single photon with another quantum system is a key capability in modern quantum information science. It allows quantum states of matter, such as spin states of atoms, atomic ensembles or solids, to be prepared and manipulated by photon counting and, in particular, to be distributed over long distances. Such light-matter interfaces have become crucial to fundamental tests of quantum physics and realizations of quantum networks. Here we report non-classical correlations between single photons and phonons--the quanta of mechanical motion--from a nanomechanical resonator. We implement a full quantum protocol involving initialization of the resonator in its quantum ground state of motion and subsequent generation and read-out of correlated photon-phonon pairs. The observed violation of a Cauchy-Schwarz inequality is clear evidence for the non-classical nature of the mechanical state generated. Our results demonstrate the availability of on-chip solid-state mechanical resonators as light-matter quantum interfaces. The performance we achieved will enable studies of macroscopic quantum phenomena as well as applications in quantum communication, as quantum memories and as quantum transducers.

  14. Non-classical amine recognition evolved in a large clade of olfactory receptors

    PubMed Central

    Li, Qian; Tachie-Baffour, Yaw; Liu, Zhikai; Baldwin, Maude W; Kruse, Andrew C; Liberles, Stephen D

    2015-01-01

    Biogenic amines are important signaling molecules, and the structural basis for their recognition by G Protein-Coupled Receptors (GPCRs) is well understood. Amines are also potent odors, with some activating olfactory trace amine-associated receptors (TAARs). Here, we report that teleost TAARs evolved a new way to recognize amines in a non-classical orientation. Chemical screens de-orphaned eleven zebrafish TAARs, with agonists including serotonin, histamine, tryptamine, 2-phenylethylamine, putrescine, and agmatine. Receptors from different clades contact ligands through aspartates on transmembrane α-helices III (canonical Asp3.32) or V (non-canonical Asp5.42), and diamine receptors contain both aspartates. Non-classical monoamine recognition evolved in two steps: an ancestral TAAR acquired Asp5.42, gaining diamine sensitivity, and subsequently lost Asp3.32. Through this transformation, the fish olfactory system dramatically expanded its capacity to detect amines, ecologically significant aquatic odors. The evolution of a second, alternative solution for amine detection by olfactory receptors highlights the tremendous structural versatility intrinsic to GPCRs. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.10441.001 PMID:26519734

  15. Ranking Gene Ontology terms for predicting non-classical secretory proteins in eukaryotes and prokaryotes.

    PubMed

    Huang, Wen-Lin

    2012-11-07

    Protein secretion is an important biological process for both eukaryotes and prokaryotes. Several sequence-based methods mainly rely on utilizing various types of complementary features to design accurate classifiers for predicting non-classical secretory proteins. Gene Ontology (GO) terms are increasing informative in predicting protein functions. However, the number of used GO terms is often very large. For example, there are 60,020 GO terms used in the prediction method Euk-mPLoc 2.0 for subcellular localization. This study proposes a novel approach to identify a small set of m top-ranked GO terms served as the only type of input features to design a support vector machine (SVM) based method Sec-GO to predict non-classical secretory proteins in both eukaryotes and prokaryotes. To evaluate the Sec-GO method, two existing methods and their used datasets are adopted for performance comparisons. The Sec-GO method using m=436 GO terms yields an independent test accuracy of 96.7% on mammalian proteins, much better than the existing method SPRED (82.2%) which uses frequencies of tri-peptides and short peptides, secondary structure, and physicochemical properties as input features of a random forest classifier. Furthermore, when applying to Gram-positive bacterial proteins, the Sec-GO with m=158 GO terms has a test accuracy of 94.5%, superior to NClassG+ (90.0%) which uses SVM with several feature types, comprising amino acid composition, di-peptides, physicochemical properties and the position specific weighting matrix. Analysis of the distribution of secretory proteins in a GO database indicates the percentage of the non-classical secretory proteins annotated by GO is larger than that of classical secretory proteins in both eukaryotes and prokaryotes. Of the m top-ranked GO features, the top-four GO terms are all annotated by such subcellular locations as GO:0005576 (Extracellular region). Additionally, the method Sec-GO is easily implemented and its web tool of

  16. Model Condensation for Non-Classically Damped SYSTEMS—PART i: Static Condensation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qu, Z.-Q.; Jung, Y.; Selvam, R. P.

    2003-09-01

    Three condensation methods for the model reduction of non-classically damped systems are presented. One is defined in the displacement space and the other two are defined in the state space. Since the damping and inertia forces on all degrees of freedom of the full model are ignored, these algorithms are considered as the static condensation. One advantage of these condensation methods is that the explicit forms of the reduced stiffness, mass, and damping matrices can be directly obtained from the reduced model. These explicit reduced system matrices are very useful in further dynamic analyses. These approaches are compared from the assumptions, condensation matrices, computational work and the reduced system matrices. With the introduction of the generalised inverse of matrix, the method defined in the displacement space is extended and one variant is derived. Numerical examples, one three-degree-of-freedom discrete system and one floating raft isolation system, are applied to demonstrate the features of these methods.

  17. Ashwagandha root in the treatment of non-classical adrenal hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Kalani, Amir; Bahtiyar, Gul; Sacerdote, Alan

    2012-09-17

    Congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH) is a well-characterised family of disorders of the adrenal cortices, resulting in varying degrees of cortisol, aldosterone and androgen deficiency or androgen excess, depending on the enzyme(s) affected and the degree of quantitative or functional enzyme deficit. Withania somnifera (WS), commonly known as Ashwagandha, is a medicinal plant that has been employed for centuries in ayurvedic medicine. Preclinical studies have shown that WS increases circulating cortisol levels and improves insulin sensitivity. We report the case of a 57-year-old woman with non-classical adrenal hyperplasia due to both 3-β-ol dehydrogenase deficiency and aldosterone synthase deficiency who was self-treated with WS for 6 months. After 6 months of treatment her serum 18-OH-hydroxycorticoserone, 17-OH-pregnenolone, corticosterone and 11-deoxycortisol decreased by 31%, 66%, 69% and 55%, respectively. The biochemical improvement was accompanied by a noticeable reduction in scalp hair loss.

  18. Non-classical photon correlation in a two-dimensional photonic lattice.

    PubMed

    Gao, Jun; Qiao, Lu-Feng; Lin, Xiao-Feng; Jiao, Zhi-Qiang; Feng, Zhen; Zhou, Zheng; Gao, Zhen-Wei; Xu, Xiao-Yun; Chen, Yuan; Tang, Hao; Jin, Xian-Min

    2016-06-13

    Quantum interference and quantum correlation, as two main features of quantum optics, play an essential role in quantum information applications, such as multi-particle quantum walk and boson sampling. While many experimental demonstrations have been done in one-dimensional waveguide arrays, it remains unexplored in higher dimensions due to tight requirement of manipulating and detecting photons in large-scale. Here, we experimentally observe non-classical correlation of two identical photons in a fully coupled two-dimensional structure, i.e. photonic lattice manufactured by three-dimensional femtosecond laser writing. Photon interference consists of 36 Hong-Ou-Mandel interference and 9 bunching. The overlap between measured and simulated distribution is up to 0.890 ± 0.001. Clear photon correlation is observed in the two-dimensional photonic lattice. Combining with controllably engineered disorder, our results open new perspectives towards large-scale implementation of quantum simulation on integrated photonic chips.

  19. Non-classical crystallization of silicon thin films during hot wire chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Jae-Soo; Lee, Sang-Hoon; Kim, Da-Seul; Kim, Kun-Su; Park, Soon-Won; Hwang, Nong-Moon

    2017-01-01

    The deposition behavior of silicon films by hot wire chemical vapor deposition (HWCVD) was approached by non-classical crystallization, where the building block of deposition is a nanoparticle generated in the gas phase of the reactor. The puzzling phenomenon of the formation of an amorphous incubation layer on glass could be explained by the liquid-like property of small charged nanoparticles (CNPs), which are generated in the initial stage of the HWCVD process. Using the liquid-like property of small CNPs, homo-epitaxial growth as thick as 150 nm could be successfully grown on a silicon wafer at 600 °C under the processing condition where CNPs as small as possible could be supplied steadily by a cyclic process which periodically resets the process. The size of CNPs turned out to be an important parameter in the microstructure evolution of thin films.

  20. Genotype, phenotype and hormonal levels correlation in non-classical congenital adrenal hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Einaudi, S; Napolitano, E; Restivo, F; Motta, G; Baldi, M; Tuli, G; Grosso, E; Migone, N; Menegatti, E; Manieri, C

    2011-10-01

    Non-classical congenital adrenal hyperplasia (NCAH) is a morbid condition sustained by the reduced function of one of the enzymes involved in the adrenal steroid biosynthesis pathway, mainly the 21-hydroxylase. Different degrees of enzyme activity impairment determine different clinical pictures, with childhood or post-pubertal onset. The aim of this study was to evaluate the relationship between genotype, phenotype, and adrenal hormonal levels in a group of 66 patients affected by NCAH attending outpatient pediatric or endocrinological Clinics. Our findings show that age at pubarche/menarche was significantly younger, height SD score) and Δ bone age-chronological age were significantly higher in patients with a more severe enzyme activity impairment, while cutaneous androgenization and menstrual irregularities in post-pubertal girls were not related to the grading of genotype.

  1. Non-classical nuclei and growth kinetics of Cr precipitates in FeCr alloys during ageing

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Yulan; Hu, Shenyang Y.; Zhang, Lei; Sun, Xin

    2014-01-10

    In this manuscript, we quantitatively calculated the thermodynamic properties of critical nuclei of Cr precipitates in FeCr alloys. The concentration profiles of the critical nuclei and nucleation energy barriers were predicted by the constrained shrinking dimer dynamics (CSDD) method. It is found that Cr concentration distribution in the critical nuclei strongly depend on the overall Cr concentration as well as temperature. The critical nuclei are non-classical because the concentration in the nuclei is smaller than the thermodynamic equilibrium value. These results are in agreement with atomic probe observation. The growth kinetics of both classical and non-classical nuclei was investigated by the phase field approach. The simulations of critical nucleus evolution showed a number of interesting phenomena: 1) a critical classical nucleus first shrinks toward its non-classical nucleus and then grows; 2) a non-classical nucleus has much slower growth kinetics at its earlier growth stage compared to the diffusion-controlled growth kinetics. 3) a critical classical nucleus grows faster at the earlier growth stage than the non-classical nucleus. All of these results demonstrate that it is critical to introduce the correct critical nuclei in order to correctly capture the kinetics of precipitation.

  2. The generation of arbitrary order, non-classical, Gauss-type quadrature for transport applications

    SciTech Connect

    Spence, Peter J.

    2015-09-01

    A method is presented, based upon the Stieltjes method (1884), for the determination of non-classical Gauss-type quadrature rules, and the associated sets of abscissae and weights. The method is then used to generate a number of quadrature sets, to arbitrary order, which are primarily aimed at deterministic transport calculations. The quadrature rules and sets detailed include arbitrary order reproductions of those presented by Abu-Shumays in [4,8] (known as the QR sets, but labelled QRA here), in addition to a number of new rules and associated sets; these are generated in a similar way, and we label them the QRS quadrature sets. The method presented here shifts the inherent difficulty (encountered by Abu-Shumays) associated with solving the non-linear moment equations, particular to the required quadrature rule, to one of the determination of non-classical weight functions and the subsequent calculation of various associated inner products. Once a quadrature rule has been written in a standard form, with an associated weight function having been identified, the calculation of the required inner products is achieved using specific variable transformations, in addition to the use of rapid, highly accurate quadrature suited to this purpose. The associated non-classical Gauss quadrature sets can then be determined, and this can be done to any order very rapidly. In this paper, instead of listing weights and abscissae for the different quadrature sets detailed (of which there are a number), the MATLAB code written to generate them is included as Appendix D. The accuracy and efficacy (in a transport setting) of the quadrature sets presented is not tested in this paper (although the accuracy of the QRA quadrature sets has been studied in [12,13]), but comparisons to tabulated results listed in [8] are made. When comparisons are made with one of the azimuthal QRA sets detailed in [8], the inherent difficulty in the method of generation, used there, becomes apparent

  3. Examining the Effect of Our World Exhibit on Student Visitors: A Science Center Case

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ayar, Mehmet C.

    2016-01-01

    This study is about the effect of the Our World exhibit at a science center on student visitors. It elicits students' views about the exhibits, zones, and activities, along with their level of interest and experiences. Data from students (n = 346) through a survey, field notes, observations and interviews (n = 18) were collected. The findings…

  4. Non-classical continuum theory for solids incorporating internal rotations and rotations of Cosserat theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Surana, K. S.; Joy, A. D.; Reddy, J. N.

    2017-03-01

    This paper presents a non-classical continuum theory in Lagrangian description for solids in which the conservation and the balance laws are derived by incorporating both the internal rotations arising from the Jacobian of deformation and the rotations of Cosserat theories at a material point. In particular, in this non-classical continuum theory, we have (i) the usual displacements ( ±b \\varvec{u}) and (ii) three internal rotations ({}_i ±b \\varvec{Θ}) about the axes of a triad whose axes are parallel to the x-frame arising from the Jacobian of deformation (which are completely defined by the skew-symmetric part of the Jacobian of deformation), and (iii) three additional rotations ({}_e ±b \\varvec{Θ}) about the axes of the same triad located at each material point as additional three degrees of freedom referred to as Cosserat rotations. This gives rise to ±b \\varvec{u} and {}_e ±b \\varvec{{Θ} as six degrees of freedom at a material point. The internal rotations ({}_i ±b \\varvec{Θ}), often neglected in classical continuum mechanics, exist in all deforming solid continua as these are due to Jacobian of deformation. When the internal rotations {}_i ±b \\varvec{Θ} are resisted by the deforming matter, conjugate moment tensor arises that together with {}_i ±b \\varvec{Θ} may result in energy storage and/or dissipation, which must be accounted for in the conservation and the balance laws. The Cosserat rotations {}_e ±b \\varvec{Θ} also result in conjugate moment tensor which, together with {}_e ±b \\varvec{Θ}, may also result in energy storage and/or dissipation. The main focus of the paper is a consistent derivation of conservation and balance laws that incorporate aforementioned physics and associated constitutive theories for thermoelastic solids. The mathematical model derived here has closure, and the constitutive theories derived using two alternate approaches are in agreement with each other as well as with the condition resulting from the

  5. Spatial-Temporal Expression of Non-classical MHC Class I Molecules in the C57 Mouse Brain.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jiane; Shen, Yuqing; Li, Mingli; Lv, Dan; Zhang, Aifeng; Peng, Yaqin; Miao, Fengqin; Zhang, Jianqiong

    2015-07-01

    Recent studies clearly demonstrate major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I expression in the brain plays an important functional role in neural development and plasticity. A previous study from our laboratory demonstrated the temporal and spatial expression patterns of classical MHC class I molecules in the brain of C57 mice. Studies regarding non-classical MHC class I molecules remain limited. Here we examine the expression of non-classical MHC class I molecules in mouse central nervous system (CNS) during embryonic and postnatal developmental stages using in situ hybridization and immunofluorescence. We find non-classical MHC class I molecules, M3/T22/Q1, are expressed in the cerebral cortex, neuroepithelium of the lateral ventricle, neuroepithelium of aquaeductus and developing cerebellum during embryonic developmental stages. During the postnatal period from P0 to adult, non-classical MHC class I mRNAs are detected in olfactory bulb, hippocampus, cerebellum and some nerve nuclei. Overall, the expression patterns of non-classical MHC class I molecules are similar to those of classical MHC class I molecules in the developing mouse brain. In addition, non-classical MHC class I molecules are present in the H2-K(b) and H2-D(b) double knock-out mice where their expression levels are greatly increased within the same locations as compared to wild type mice. The elucidation and discovery of the expression profile of MHC class I molecules during development is important for supporting an enhanced understanding of their physiological and potential pathological roles within the CNS.

  6. SPRED: A machine learning approach for the identification of classical and non-classical secretory proteins in mammalian genomes

    SciTech Connect

    Kandaswamy, Krishna Kumar; Pugalenthi, Ganesan; Hartmann, Enno; Kalies, Kai-Uwe; Moeller, Steffen; Suganthan, P.N.; Martinetz, Thomas

    2010-01-15

    Eukaryotic protein secretion generally occurs via the classical secretory pathway that traverses the ER and Golgi apparatus. Secreted proteins usually contain a signal sequence with all the essential information required to target them for secretion. However, some proteins like fibroblast growth factors (FGF-1, FGF-2), interleukins (IL-1 alpha, IL-1 beta), galectins and thioredoxin are exported by an alternative pathway. This is known as leaderless or non-classical secretion and works without a signal sequence. Most computational methods for the identification of secretory proteins use the signal peptide as indicator and are therefore not able to identify substrates of non-classical secretion. In this work, we report a random forest method, SPRED, to identify secretory proteins from protein sequences irrespective of N-terminal signal peptides, thus allowing also correct classification of non-classical secretory proteins. Training was performed on a dataset containing 600 extracellular proteins and 600 cytoplasmic and/or nuclear proteins. The algorithm was tested on 180 extracellular proteins and 1380 cytoplasmic and/or nuclear proteins. We obtained 85.92% accuracy from training and 82.18% accuracy from testing. Since SPRED does not use N-terminal signals, it can detect non-classical secreted proteins by filtering those secreted proteins with an N-terminal signal by using SignalP. SPRED predicted 15 out of 19 experimentally verified non-classical secretory proteins. By scanning the entire human proteome we identified 566 protein sequences potentially undergoing non-classical secretion. The dataset and standalone version of the SPRED software is available at (http://www.inb.uni-luebeck.de/tools-demos/spred/spred).

  7. Generation of non-classical correlated photon pairs via a ladder-type atomic configuration: theory and experiment.

    PubMed

    Ding, Dong-Sheng; Zhou, Zhi-Yuan; Shi, Bao-Sen; Zou, Xu-Bo; Guo, Guang-Can

    2012-05-07

    We experimentally generate a non-classical correlated two-color photon pair at 780 and 1529.4 nm in a ladder-type configuration using a hot 85Rb atomic vapor with the production rate of ~10(7)/s. The non-classical correlation between these two photons is demonstrated by strong violation of Cauchy-Schwarz inequality by the factor R = 48 ± 12. Besides, we experimentally investigate the relations between the correlation and some important experimental parameters such as the single-photon detuning, the powers of pumps. We also make a theoretical analysis in detail and the theoretical predictions are in reasonable agreement with our experimental results.

  8. cyclo-P4 Building Blocks: Achieving Non-Classical Fullerene Topology and Beyond.

    PubMed

    Dielmann, Fabian; Peresypkina, Eugenia V; Krämer, Barbara; Hastreiter, Florian; Johnson, Brian P; Zabel, Manfred; Heindl, Claudia; Scheer, Manfred

    2016-11-14

    The cyclo-P4 complexes [Cp(R) Ta(CO)2 (η(4) -P4 )] (Cp(R) : Cp''=1,3-C5 H3 tBu2 , Cp'''=1,2,4-C5 H2 tBu3 ) turned out to be predestined for the formation of hollow spherical supramolecules with non-classical fullerene-like topology. The resulting assemblies constructed with CuX (X=Cl, Br) showed a highly symmetric 32-vertex core of solely four- and six-membered rings. In some supramolecules, the inner cavity was occupied by an additional CuX unit. On the other hand, using CuI, two different supramolecules with either peanut- or pear-like shapes and outer diameters in the range of 2-2.5 nm were isolated. Furthermore, the spherical supramolecules containing Cp''' ligands at tantalum are soluble in CH2 Cl2 . NMR spectroscopic investigations in solution revealed the formation of isomeric supramolecules owing to the steric hindrance caused by the third tBu group on the Cp''' ligand. In addition, a 2D coordination polymer was obtained and structurally characterized. © 2016 The Authors. Published by Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA.

  9. Endocrinology and auxology of sibships with non-classical congenital adrenal hyperplasia.

    PubMed Central

    Cameron, F J; Tebbutt, N; Montalto, J; Yong, A B; Zacharin, M; Best, J D; Warne, G L

    1996-01-01

    The symptoms, auxological characteristics, and stimulated 17-hydroxyprogesterone (17-OHP) concentrations in a group of patients with non-classical 21-hydroxylase deficiency (NCCAH) were compared with those of their siblings. Ten index cases consisting of nine females and one male patient aged 3-33 years and 16 siblings were studied. In the sibling group five subjects were slightly virilised and of these, two females were found to have NCCAH according to their stimulated 17-OHP concentrations. The remaining nine siblings, who were not virilised, all had normal stimulated 17-OHP concentrations. Among the total NCCAH group (index cases and affected siblings) eight patients had the diagnosis made within two years of the onset of symptoms. In four patients diagnosis was delayed until adulthood. In seven patients investigated, bone age was significantly increased before treatment. The mean height and body mass index Z scores of the affected patients as a total group or when divided according to skeletal maturity were not significantly different from either the normal mean or from their unaffected siblings. Virilised siblings of patients with NCCAH should have stimulated 17-OHP levels measured to exclude the disease. Patients with NCCAH do not appear to be at risk of short adult stature despite increased bone age in childhood. PMID:8669955

  10. Ashwagandha root in the treatment of non-classical adrenal hyperplasia

    PubMed Central

    Kalani, Amir; Bahtiyar, Gul; Sacerdote, Alan

    2012-01-01

    Congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH) is a well-characterised family of disorders of the adrenal cortices, resulting in varying degrees of cortisol, aldosterone and androgen deficiency or androgen excess, depending on the enzyme(s) affected and the degree of quantitative or functional enzyme deficit. Withania somnifera (WS), commonly known as Ashwagandha, is a medicinal plant that has been employed for centuries in ayurvedic medicine. Preclinical studies have shown that WS increases circulating cortisol levels and improves insulin sensitivity. We report the case of a 57-year-old woman with non-classical adrenal hyperplasia due to both 3-β-ol dehydrogenase deficiency and aldosterone synthase deficiency who was self-treated with WS for 6 months. After 6 months of treatment her serum 18-OH-hydroxycorticoserone, 17-OH-pregnenolone, corticosterone and 11-deoxycortisol decreased by 31%, 66%, 69% and 55%, respectively. The biochemical improvement was accompanied by a noticeable reduction in scalp hair loss. PMID:22987912

  11. Linear problem of the shock wave disturbance in a non-classical case

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semenko, Evgeny V.

    2017-06-01

    A linear problem of the shock wave disturbance for a special (non-classical) case, where both pre-shock and post-shock flows are subsonic, is considered. The phase transition for the van der Waals gas is an example of this problem. Isentropic solutions are constructed. In addition, the stability of the problem is investigated and the known result is approved: the only neutral stability case occurs here. A strictly algebraic representation of the solution in the plane of the Fourier transform is obtained. This representation allows the solution to be studied both analytically and numerically. In this way, any solution can be decomposed into a sum of acoustic and vorticity waves and into a sum of initial (generated by initial perturbations), transmitted (through the shock) and reflected (from the shock) waves. Thus, the wave incidence/refraction/reflection is investigated. A principal difference of the refraction/reflection from the classical case is found, namely, the waves generated by initial pre-shock perturbations not only pass through the shock (i.e., generate post-shock transmitted waves) but also are reflected from it (i.e., generate pre-shock reflected waves). In turn, the waves generated by the initial post-shock perturbation are not only reflected from the shock (generate post-shock reflected waves) but also pass through it (generate pre-shock transmitted waves).

  12. Comparison of the transcriptional regulation of classical and non-classical MHC class II genes.

    PubMed

    Hake, Sandra B; Tobin, Helen M; Steimle, Viktor; Denzin, Lisa K

    2003-09-01

    The class II transactivator (CIITA) regulates expression of the classical and non-classical MHC class II genes, HLA-DR, -DP, -DQ and -DM, but not the B cell-specific HLA-DO (DO). Here we show that only HLA-DR expression is completely dependent on CIITA, since residual expression of HLA-DM, -DP and the beta chain of DQ was observed in CIITA-deficient RJ2.2.5 cells. Although DO shows a unique expression pattern compared to other MHC class II genes, prolonged IFN-gamma treatment of HeLa cells induced DOB expression. Similar to all MHC class II promoters, the DOB promoter contains the highly conserved W, X1, and Y boxes in addition to a putative OCT box. Mutational analysis of the DOB promoter demonstrated that the X1, Y and OCT boxes are necessary for maximum promoter activity.Furthermore, our results demonstrate that CREB-1, RFXANK and Oct-2 occupy the DOB promoter in vivo, However, CIITA and Bob-1 were only minimally recruited. Finally, fusion of Bjab, a DOB-negative B cell line, with.174 B cells that lack the complete MHC class II region (including the DO genes), lead to DO expression. These data indicate that the expression of DO is regulated by an unidentified factor in B cells.

  13. NH3 as unique non-classical content-former within clathrate hydrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maşlakcı, Zafer; Devlin, J. Paul; Uras-Aytemiz, Nevin

    2017-06-01

    High quality FTIR spectra of aerosols of NH3-THF and NH3-TMO binary clathrate hydrates (CHs) have been measured. Our recently developed all-vapor sub-second approach to clathrate-hydrate formation combined with computational studies has been used to identify vibrational spectroscopic signatures of NH3 within the gas hydrates. The present study shows that there are three distinct NH3 types, namely, classical small-cage NH3, nonclassical small-cage NH3, and NH3 within the hydrate network. The network ammonia does not directly trigger the non-classical CH structure. Rather, the ammonia within the network structure perturbs the water bonding, introducing orientational defects that are stabilized by small and/or large cage guest molecules through H-bonding. This unusual behavior of NH3 within CHs opens a possibility for catalytic action of NH3 during CH-formation. Furthermore, impacts over time of the small-cage NH3-replacement molecules CO2 and CH4 on the structure and composition of the ternary CHs have been noted.

  14. Transcription variants of SLA-7, a swine non classical MHC class I gene.

    PubMed

    Hu, Rui; Lemonnier, Gaëtan; Bourneuf, Emmanuelle; Vincent-Naulleau, Silvia; Rogel-Gaillard, Claire

    2011-06-03

    In pig, very little information is available on the non classical class I (Ib) genes of the Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) i.e. SLA-6, -7 and -8. Our aim was to focus on the transcription pattern of the SLA-7 gene. RT-PCR experiments were carried out with SLA-7 specific primers targeting either the full coding sequence (CDS) from exon 1 to the 3 prime untranslated region (3UTR) or a partial CDS from exon 4 to the 3UTR. We show that the SLA-7 gene expresses a full length transcript not yet identified that refines annotation of the gene with eight exons instead of seven as initially described from the existing RefSeq RNA. These two RNAs encode molecules that differ in cytoplasmic tail length. In this study, another SLA-7 transcript variant was characterized, which encodes a protein with a shorter alpha 3 domain, as a consequence of a splicing site within exon 4. Surprisingly, a cryptic non canonical GA-AG splicing site is used to generate this transcript variant. An additional SLA-7 variant was also identified in the 3UTR with a splicing site occurring 31 nucleotides downstream to the stop codon. In conclusion, the pig SLA-7 MHC class Ib gene presents a complex transcription pattern with two transcripts encoding various molecules and transcripts that do not alter the CDS and may be subject to post-transcriptional regulation.

  15. Transcription variants of SLA-7, a swine non classical MHC class I gene

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    In pig, very little information is available on the non classical class I (Ib) genes of the Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) i.e. SLA-6, -7 and -8. Our aim was to focus on the transcription pattern of the SLA-7 gene. RT-PCR experiments were carried out with SLA-7 specific primers targeting either the full coding sequence (CDS) from exon 1 to the 3 prime untranslated region (3UTR) or a partial CDS from exon 4 to the 3UTR. We show that the SLA-7 gene expresses a full length transcript not yet identified that refines annotation of the gene with eight exons instead of seven as initially described from the existing RefSeq RNA. These two RNAs encode molecules that differ in cytoplasmic tail length. In this study, another SLA-7 transcript variant was characterized, which encodes a protein with a shorter alpha 3 domain, as a consequence of a splicing site within exon 4. Surprisingly, a cryptic non canonical GA-AG splicing site is used to generate this transcript variant. An additional SLA-7 variant was also identified in the 3UTR with a splicing site occurring 31 nucleotides downstream to the stop codon. In conclusion, the pig SLA-7 MHC class Ib gene presents a complex transcription pattern with two transcripts encoding various molecules and transcripts that do not alter the CDS and may be subject to post-transcriptional regulation. PMID:21645289

  16. Observation of Non-Classical Rotational Inertia in Bulk Solid 4He

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kondo, Motoshi; Takada, Shunichi; Shibayama, Yoshiyuki; Shirahama, Keiya

    2007-09-01

    In recent torsional oscillator experiments by Kim and Chan (KC), a decrease of rotational inertia has been observed in solid 4He in porous materials (Kim, E., Chan, M.H.W. in Nature 427:225, 2004; J. Low Temp. Phys. 138:859, 2005) and in a bulk annular channel (Kim, E., Chan, M.H.W. in Science 305:1941, 2004). This observation strongly suggests the existence of “non-classical rotational inertia” (NCRI), i.e. superflow, in solid 4He. In order to study such a possible “supersolid” phase, we perform torsional oscillator experiments for cylindrical solid 4He samples. We have observed decreases in rotational inertia below 200 mK for two solid samples (pressures P=4.1 and 3.0 MPa). The observed NCRI fraction at 70 mK is 0.14%, which is about 1/3 of the fraction observed in the annulus by KC. Our observation is the first experimental confirmation of the possible supersolid finding by KC.

  17. Simultaneous Measurement of Non-Classical Rotational Inertia and Shear Modulus of Solid ^4He

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Wonsuk; Shin, Jaeho; Kim, Hyoung Chan; Shirahama, Keiya; Kim, Eunseong

    2012-02-01

    A failure to rotate or oscillate is the essential nature of low temperature superfluid helium, and more technically known as non-classical rotational inertia (NCRI). It is counter-intuitive, but NCRI is also found in solid helium-4 below ˜200 mK [1,2]. Recently, shear modulus showed unusual increase with striking resemblance to those of NCRI [3]. Extended measurements show the NCRI occurs only in a stiffened Bose solid, but it is not understood how they are related. Here we report the first simultaneous measurement of shear modulus and NCRI in solid helium to elucidate the fundamental connection between them. Both emerge at remarkably similar temperatures, whereas no quantitative agreement between the increase of the shear modulus and the magnitude of NCRI is found. The increase of shear modulus seems to be the necessary condition for the onset of NCRI.[4pt] [1] E. Kim and M. H. W. Chan Nature 427, 225-227 (2004)[0pt] [2] E. Kim and M. H. W. Chan Science 305, 1942 (2004)[0pt] [3] J. Day and J. Beamish Nature 450, 853-856 (2007)

  18. Multiscale Geometry of the Olsen Model and Non-classical Relaxation Oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuehn, Christian; Szmolyan, Peter

    2015-06-01

    We study the Olsen model for the peroxidase-oxidase reaction. The dynamics is analyzed using a geometric decomposition based on multiple timescales. The Olsen model is four-dimensional, not in a standard form required by geometric singular perturbation theory and contains multiple small parameters. These three obstacles are the main challenges we resolve by our analysis. Scaling and the blow-up method are used to identify several subsystems. The results presented here provide a rigorous analysis for two oscillatory modes. In particular, we prove the existence of non-classical relaxation oscillations in two cases. The analysis is based on desingularization of lines of transcritical and submanifolds of fold singularities in combination with an integrable relaxation phase. In this context, our analysis also explains an assumption that has been utilized, based purely on numerical reasoning, in a previous bifurcation analysis by Desroches et al. (Discret Contin Dyn Syst S 2(4):807-827, 2009). Furthermore, the geometric decomposition we develop forms the basis to prove the existence of mixed-mode and chaotic oscillations in the Olsen model, which will be discussed in more detail in future work.

  19. Observations on non-classical behavior of solid 4He with compound torsional oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keiderling, M. C.; Aoki, Y.; Kojima, H.

    2009-02-01

    The response of oscillating hcp solid 4He samples was studied with a unique compound torsional oscillator a dummy mass and a sample (cylindrical or annular) container connected by two torsion rods. Identical solid sample could be probed within the same apparatus at two different frequencies (~ 0.5 and 1.2 kHz) separately or simultaneously. The apparent onset of the non-classical rotational inertia (NCRI) occurred at a higher temperature in the higher frequency mode. The peak in dissipation of the higher mode also occurred at higher temperature. Surprisingly, the mechanical dissipation was significantly greater in the lower mode. When the lower mode was driven at high levels to induce "critical state" in the sample and the higher mode was simultaneously driven at a low level for probing, the critical state seen in the lower mode did not entirely appear. Conversely, if a critical state was induced by the higher mode, it also did not appear in the lower mode. These preliminary results are contrary to the simple expectation from identifying the critical state as indication of suppressed superfluid density.

  20. Arctigenin exhibits relaxation effect on bronchus by affecting transmembrane flow of calcium.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Zhenying; Yin, Yongqiang; Wang, Zengyong; Fang, Runping; Wu, Hong; Jiang, Min; Bai, Gang; Luo, Guo'an

    2013-12-01

    Arctigenin, a lignan extract from Arctium lappa (L.), exhibits anti-inflammation, antioxidation, vasodilator effects, etc. However, the effects of arctigenin on bronchus relaxation are not well investigated. This study aimed to investigate how arctigenin regulates bronchus tone and calcium ion (Ca(2+)) flow. Trachea strips of guinea pigs were prepared for testing the relaxation effect of arctigenin to acetylcholine, histamine, KCl, and CaCl2, respectively. Furthermore, L-type calcium channel currents were detected by patch-clamp, and intracellular Ca(2+) concentration was detected by confocal microscopy. The results showed that arctigenin exhibited relaxation effect on tracheae to different constrictors, and this was related to decreasing cytoplasmic Ca(2+) concentration by inhibiting Ca(2+) influx partly through L-type calcium channel as well as promoting Ca(2+) efflux. In summary, this study provides new insight into the mechanisms by which arctigenin exhibits relaxation effect on bronchus and suggests its potential use for airway disease therapy.

  1. An improved non-classical method for the solution of fractional differential equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birk, Carolin; Song, Chongmin

    2010-10-01

    A procedure to construct temporally local schemes for the computation of fractional derivatives is proposed. The frequency-domain counterpart (i ω) α of the fractional differential operator of order α is expressed as an improper integral of a rational function in i ω. After applying a quadrature rule, the improper integral is approximated by a series of partial fractions. Each term of the partial fractions corresponds to an exponential kernel in the time domain. The convolution integral in a fractional derivative can be evaluated recursively leading to a local scheme. As the arguments of the exponential functions are always real and negative, the scheme is stable. The present procedure provides a convenient way to evaluate the quality of a given algorithm by examining its accuracy in fitting the function (i ω) α . It is revealed that the non-classical solution methods for fractional differential equations proposed by Yuan and Agrawal (ASME J Vib Acoust 124:321-324, 2002) and by Diethelm (Numer Algorithms 47:361-390, 2008) can also be interpreted as applying specific quadrature rules to evaluate the improper integral numerically. Over a wider range of frequencies, Diethelm’s algorithm provides a more accurate fitting than the YA algorithm. Therefore, it leads to better performance. Further exploiting this advantage of the proposed derivation, a novel quadrature rule leading to an even better performance than Diethelm’s algorithm is proposed. Significant gains in accuracy are achieved at the extreme ends of the frequency range. This results in significant improvements in accuracy for late time responses. Several numerical examples, including fractional differential equations of degree α = 0.3 and α = 1.5, demonstrate the accuracy and efficiency of the proposed method.

  2. HESS J1943+213: A Non-classical High-frequency-peaked BL Lac Object

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Straal, S. M.; Gabányi, K. É.; van Leeuwen, J.; Clarke, T. E.; Dubner, G.; Frey, S.; Giacani, E.; Paragi, Z.

    2016-05-01

    HESS J1943+213 is an unidentified TeV source that is likely a high-frequency-peaked BL Lac (HBL) object, but that is also compatible with a pulsar wind nebula (PWN) nature. Each of these enormously different astronomical interpretations is supported by some of the observed unusual characteristics. In order to finally classify and understand this object, we took a three-pronged approach, through time-domain, high angular resolution, and multi-frequency radio studies. First, our deep time-domain observations with the Arecibo telescope failed to uncover the putative pulsar powering the proposed PWN. We conclude with ˜70% certainty that HESS J1943+213 does not host a pulsar. Second, long-baseline interferometry of the source with e-MERLIN at 1.5 and 5 GHz shows only a core, that is, a point source at ˜ 1-100 mas resolution. Its 2013 flux density is about one-third lower than that detected in the 2011 observations with similar resolution. This radio variability of the core strengthens the HBL object hypothesis. Third, additional evidence against the PWN scenario comes from the radio spectrum we compiled. The extended structure follows a power-law behavior with spectral index α \\=\\-0.54+/- 0.04 while the core component displays a flat spectrum (α \\=\\-0.03+/- 0.03). In contrast, the radio synchrotron emission of PWNe predicts a single power-law distribution. Overall, we rule out the PWN hypothesis and conclude that the source is a BL Lac object. The consistently high fraction (70%) of the flux density from the extended structure then leads us to conclude that HESS J1943+213 must be a non-classical HBL object.

  3. Transcriptional profiling reveals functional dichotomy between human slan(+) non-classical monocytes and myeloid dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    van Leeuwen-Kerkhoff, Nathalie; Lundberg, Kristina; Westers, Theresia M; Kordasti, Shahram; Bontkes, Hetty J; de Gruijl, Tanja D; Lindstedt, Malin; van de Loosdrecht, Arjan A

    2017-10-01

    Human 6-sulfo LacNac-positive (slan(+)) cells have been subject to a paradigm debate. They have previously been classified as a distinct dendritic cell (DC) subset. However, evidence has emerged that they may be more related to monocytes than to DCs. To gain deeper insight into the functional specialization of slan(+) cells, we have compared them with both conventional myeloid DC subsets (CD1c(+) and CD141(+)) in human peripheral blood (PB). With the use of genome-wide transcriptional profiling, as well as functional tests, we clearly show that slan(+) cells form a distinct, non-DC-like population. They cluster away from both DC subsets, and their gene-expression profile evidently suggests involvement in distinct inflammatory processes. An extensive transcriptional meta-analysis confirmed the relationship of slan(+) cells with the monocytic compartment rather than with DCs. From a functional perspective, their ability to prime CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells is relatively low. Combined with the finding that "antigen presentation by MHC class II" is at the top of under-represented pathways in slan(+) cells, this points to a minimal role in directing adaptive T cell immunity. Rather, the higher expression levels of complement receptors on their cell surface, together with their high secretion of IL-1β and IL-6, imply a specific role in innate inflammatory processes, which is consistent with their recent identification as non-classical monocytes. This study extends our knowledge on DC/monocyte subset biology under steady-state conditions and contributes to our understanding of their role in immune-mediated diseases and their potential use in immunotherapeutic strategies. © Society for Leukocyte Biology.

  4. An Investigation into the Life Experiences and Beliefs of Teachers Exhibiting Highly Effective Classroom Management Behaviors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holt, Chuck; Hargrove, Pauline; Harris, Sandra

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the life experiences and beliefs of highly effective teachers exhibiting effective classroom management. This study explores the beliefs, background, and experiences of exemplary teachers in the area of classroom management. The goal of this study was to develop a deeper understanding of how individuals…

  5. An Investigation into the Life Experiences and Beliefs of Teachers Exhibiting Highly Effective Classroom Management Behaviors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holt, Chuck; Hargrove, Pauline; Harris, Sandra

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the life experiences and beliefs of highly effective teachers exhibiting effective classroom management. This study explores the beliefs, background, and experiences of exemplary teachers in the area of classroom management. The goal of this study was to develop a deeper understanding of how individuals…

  6. 45 CFR 150.439 - Effect of submission of proposed hearing exhibits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Effect of submission of proposed hearing exhibits. 150.439 Section 150.439 Public Welfare DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES REQUIREMENTS RELATING TO HEALTH CARE ACCESS CMS ENFORCEMENT IN GROUP AND INDIVIDUAL INSURANCE MARKETS Administrative Hearings § 150.439 Effect of submission of...

  7. Characterization of SLCO5A1/OATP5A1, a Solute Carrier Transport Protein with Non-Classical Function

    PubMed Central

    Sebastian, Katrin; Detro-Dassen, Silvia; Rinis, Natalie; Fahrenkamp, Dirk; Müller-Newen, Gerhard; Merk, Hans F.; Schmalzing, Günther

    2013-01-01

    Organic anion transporting polypeptides (OATP/SLCO) have been identified to mediate the uptake of a broad range of mainly amphipathic molecules. Human OATP5A1 was found to be expressed in the epithelium of many cancerous and non-cancerous tissues throughout the body but protein characterization and functional analysis have not yet been performed. This study focused on the biochemical characterization of OATP5A1 using Xenopus laevis oocytes and Flp-In T-REx-HeLa cells providing evidence regarding a possible OATP5A1 function. SLCO5A1 is highly expressed in mature dendritic cells compared to immature dendritic cells (∼6.5-fold) and SLCO5A1 expression correlates with the differentiation status of primary blood cells. A core- and complex- N-glycosylated polypeptide monomer of ∼105 kDa and ∼130 kDa could be localized in intracellular membranes and on the plasma membrane, respectively. Inducible expression of SLCO5A1 in HeLa cells led to an inhibitory effect of ∼20% after 96 h on cell proliferation. Gene expression profiling with these cells identified immunologically relevant genes (e.g. CCL20) and genes implicated in developmental processes (e.g. TGM2). A single nucleotide polymorphism leading to the exchange of amino acid 33 (L→F) revealed no differences regarding protein expression and function. In conclusion, we provide evidence that OATP5A1 might be a non-classical OATP family member which is involved in biological processes that require the reorganization of the cell shape, such as differentiation and migration. PMID:24376674

  8. Composition-structure-property relationships for non-classical ionomer cements formulated with zinc-boron germanium-based glasses.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaofang; Werner-Zwanziger, Ulrike; Boyd, Daniel

    2015-04-01

    Non-classical ionomer glasses like those based on zinc-boron-germanium glasses are of special interest in a variety of medical applications owning to their unique combination of properties and potential therapeutic efficacy. These features may be of particular benefit with respect to the utilization of glass ionomer cements for minimally invasive dental applications such as the atruamatic restorative treatment, but also for expanded clinical applications in orthopedics and oral-maxillofacial surgery. A unique system of zinc-boron-germanium-based glasses (10 compositions in total) has been designed using a Design of Mixtures methodology. In the first instance, ionomer glasses were examined via differential thermal analysis, X-ray diffraction, and (11)B MAS NMR spectroscopy to establish fundamental composition - structure-property relationships for the unique system. Secondly, cements were synthesized based on each glass and handling characteristics (working time, Wt, and setting time, St) and compression strength were quantified to facilitate the development of both experimental and mathematical composition-structure-property relationships for the new ionomer cements. The novel glass ionomer cements were found to provide Wt, St, and compression strength in the range of 48-132 s, 206-602 s, and 16-36 MPa, respectively, depending on the ZnO/GeO2 mol fraction of the glass phase. A lower ZnO mol fraction in the glass phase provides higher glass transition temperature, higher N4 rate, and in combination with careful modulation of GeO2 mol fraction in the glass phase provides a unique approach to extending the Wt and St of glass ionomer cement without compromising (in fact enhancing) compression strength. The data presented in this work provide valuable information for the formulation of alternative glass ionomer cements for applications within and beyond the dental clinic, especially where conventional approaches to modulating working time and strength exhibit co

  9. The origin of non-classical effects in a one-dimensional superposition of coherent states

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buzek, V.; Knight, P. L.; Barranco, A. Vidiella

    1992-01-01

    We investigate the nature of the quantum fluctuations in a light field created by the superposition of coherent fields. We give a physical explanation (in terms of Wigner functions and phase-space interference) why the 1-D superposition of coherent states in the direction of the x-quadrature leads to the squeezing of fluctuations in the y-direction, and show that such a superposition can generate the squeezed vacuum and squeezed coherent states.

  10. Predictive models for drugs exhibiting negative food effects based on their biopharmaceutical characteristics.

    PubMed

    Marasanapalle, Venugopal P; Crison, John R; Devarakonda, Krishna R; Li, Xiaoling; Jasti, Bhaskara R

    2011-12-01

    A drug is defined to exhibit food effects if its pharmacokinetic parameter, area under the curve (AUC₀₋∞) is different when co-administered with food in comparison with its administration on a fasted stomach. Food effects of drugs administered in immediate release dosage forms were classified as positive, negative, and no food effects. In this study, predictive models for negative food effects of drugs that are stable in the gastrointestinal tract and do not complex with Ca²⁺ are reported. An empirical model was developed using five drugs exhibiting negative food effects and seven drugs exhibiting no food effects by multiple regression analysis, based on biopharmaceutical properties generated from in vitro experiments. An oral absorption model was adopted for simulating negative food effects of model compounds using in situ rat intestinal permeability. Analysis of selected model drugs indicated that percent food effects correlated to their dissociation constant, K (K(a) or K(b)) and Caco-2 permeabilities. The obtained predictive equation was: Food effect (%)=(2.60 x 10⁵·P(app))--(2.91 x 10⁵·K)--8.50. Applying the oral absorption model, the predicted food effects matched the trends of published negative food effects when the two experimental pH conditions of fed and fasted state intestinal environment were used. A predictive model for negative food effects based on the correlation of food effects with dissociation constant and Caco-2 permeability was established and simulations of food effects using rat intestinal permeability supported the drugs? published negative food effects. Thus, an empirical and a mechanistic model as potential tools for predicting negative food effects are reported.

  11. Characterization of a non-classical MHC class II gene in the vulnerable Chinese egret (Egretta eulophotes).

    PubMed

    Lei, Wei; Fang, Wenzhen; Lin, Qingxian; Zhou, Xiaoping; Chen, Xiaolin

    2015-08-01

    Genes of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) are valuable makers of adaptive genetic variation in evolutionary ecology research, yet the non-classical MHC genes remain largely unstudied in wild vertebrates. In this study, we have characterized the non-classical MHC class II gene, Egeu-DAB4, in the vulnerable Chinese egret (Ciconiiformes, Ardeidae, Egretta eulophotes). Gene expression analyses showed that Egeu-DAB4 gene had a restricted tissue expression pattern, being expressed in seven examined tissues including the liver, heart, kidney, esophagus, stomach, gallbladder, and intestine, but not in muscle. With respect to polymorphism, only one allele of exon 2 was obtained from Egeu-DAB4 using asymmetric PCR, indicating that Egeu-DAB4 is genetically monomorphic in exon 2. Comparative analyses showed that Egeu-DAB4 had an unusual sequence, with amino acid differences suggesting that its function may differ from those of classical MHC genes. Egeu-DAB4 gene was only found in 30.56-36.56 % of examined Chinese egret individuals. Phylogenetic analysis showed a closer relationship between Egeu-DAB4 and the DAB2 genes in nine other ardeid species. These new findings provide a foundation for further studies to clarify the immunogenetics of non-classical MHC class II gene in the vulnerable Chinese egret and other ciconiiform birds.

  12. Intragenic CFTR Duplication and 5T/12TG Variant in a Patient with Non-Classic Cystic Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Celestino-Soper, Patricia B. S.; Simpson, Edward; Tumbleson Brink, Danika; Lynnes, Ty C.; Dlouhy, Stephen; Vatta, Matteo; Yeley, Jana; Brown, Cynthia; Bai, Shaochun

    2016-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by the accumulation of sticky and heavy mucus that can damage several organs. CF shows variable expressivity in affected individuals, but it typically causes respiratory and digestive complications as well as congenital bilateral absence of the vas deferens in males. Individuals with classic CF usually have variants that produce a defective protein from both alleles of the CFTR gene. Individuals with other variants may present with classic, non-classic, or milder forms of CF due to lower levels of functional CFTR protein. This article reports the genetic analysis of a female with features of asthma and mild or non-classic CF. CFTR sequencing demonstrated that she is a carrier for a maternally derived 5T/12TG variant. Deletion/duplication analysis by multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) showed the presence of an intragenic paternally derived duplication involving exons 7–11 of the CFTR gene. This duplication is predicted to result in the production of a truncated CFTR protein lacking the terminal part of the nucleotide-binding domain 1 (NBD1) and thus is likely to be a non-functioning allele. The combination of this large intragenic duplication and 5T/12TG is the probable cause of the mild or non-classic CF features in this individual. PMID:27996019

  13. Properties of epitaxial (210) iron garnet films exhibiting the magnetoelectric effect

    SciTech Connect

    Arzamastseva, G. V.; Balbashov, A. M.; Lisovskii, F. V. Mansvetova, E. G.; Temiryazev, A. G.; Temiryazeva, M. P.

    2015-04-15

    The properties of epitaxial magnetic (LuBi){sub 3}(FeGa){sub 5}O{sub 12} iron garnet films grown on (210) substrates, which exhibit the magnetoelectric effect, are experimentally studied. The induced anisotropy and the behavior of the domain structure in the films are investigated in uniform and nonuniform external fields. The existing hypotheses about the nature of the magnetoelectric coupling in such films are critically analyzed.

  14. Accurate modal superposition method for harmonic frequency response sensitivity of non-classically damped systems with lower-higher-modal truncation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Weiwei; Li, Li; Lei, Sheng

    2017-02-01

    Frequency response and their sensitivities analysis are of fundamental importance. Due to the fact that the mode truncation errors of frequency response functions (FRFs) are introduced for two times, the errors of frequency response sensitivities may be larger than other dynamic analysis. Many modal correction approaches (such as modal acceleration methods, dynamic correction methods, force derivation methods and accurate modal superposition methods) have been presented to eliminate the modal-truncation error. However, these approaches are just suitable to the case of un-damped or classically damped systems. The state-space equation based approaches can extend these approaches to non-classically damped systems, but it may be not only computationally expensive, but also lack physical insight provided by the superposition of the complex modes of the equation of motion with original space. This paper is aimed at dealing with the lower-higher-modal truncation problem of harmonic frequency response sensitivity of non-classically damped systems. Based on the Neumann expansion and the frequency shifting technique, the contribution of the truncated lower and higher modes to the harmonic frequency response sensitivity is explicitly expressed only by the available middle modes and system matrices. An extended hybrid expansion method (EHEM) is then proposed by expressing harmonic frequency response sensitivity as the explicit expression of the middle modes and system matrices. The EHEM maintains original-space without having to involve the state-space equation of motion such that it is efficient in computational effort and storage capacity. Finally, a rail specimen is used to illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  15. Multiple expressed MHC class II loci in salmonids; details of one non-classical region in Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar)

    PubMed Central

    Harstad, Håvard; Lukacs, Morten F; Bakke, Hege G; Grimholt, Unni

    2008-01-01

    Background In teleosts, the Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) class I and class II molecules reside on different linkage groups as opposed to tetrapods and shark, where the class I and class II genes reside in one genomic region. Several teleost MHC class I regions have been sequenced and show varying number of class I genes. Salmonids have one major expressed MHC class I locus (UBA) in addition to varying numbers of non-classical genes. Two other more distant lineages are also identifyed denoted L and ZE. For class II, only one major expressed class II alpha (DAA) and beta (DAB) gene has been identified in salmonids so far. Results We sequenced a genomic region of 211 kb encompassing divergent MHC class II alpha (Sasa-DBA) and beta (Sasa-DBB) genes in addition to NRGN, TIPRL, TBCEL and TECTA. The region was not linked to the classical class II genes and had some synteny to genomic regions from other teleosts. Two additional divergent and expressed class II sequences denoted DCA and DDA were also identified in both salmon and trout. Expression patterns and lack of polymorphism make these genes non-classical class II analogues. Sasa-DBB, Sasa-DCA and Sasa-DDA had highest expression levels in liver, hindgut and spleen respectively, suggestive of distinctive functions in these tissues. Phylogenetic studies revealed more yet undescribed divergent expressed MHC class II molecules also in other teleosts. Conclusion We have characterised one genomic region containing expressed non-classical MHC class II genes in addition to four other genes not involved in immune function. Salmonids contain at least two expressed MHC class II beta genes and four expressed MHC class II alpha genes with properties suggestive of new functions for MHC class II in vertebrates. Collectively, our data suggest that the class II is worthy of more elaborate studies also in other teleost species. PMID:18439319

  16. A Synthetic 7,8-Dihydroxyflavone Derivative Promotes Neurogenesis and Exhibits Potent Antidepressant Effect

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xia; Chan, Chi-Bun; Jang, Sung-Wuk; Pradoldej, Sompol; Huang, Junjian; He, Kunyan; Phun, Lien H.; France, Stefan; Xiao, Ge; Jia, Yonghui; Luo, Hongbo R.; Ye, Keqiang

    2011-01-01

    7,8-Dihydroxyflavone is a recently identified small molecular tropomyosin-receptor-kinase B (TrkB) agonist. Our preliminary structural activity relationship (SAR) study showed that the 7,8-dihydroxy groups are essential for the agonistic effect. To improve the lead compound's agonistic activity, we have conducted an extensive SAR study and synthesized numerous derivatives. We have successfully identified 4'-dimethylamino-7,8-dihydroxyflavone that displays higher TrkB agonistic activity than the lead. This novel compound also exhibits a more robust and longer TrkB activation effect in animals. Consequently, this new compound reveals more potent anti-apoptotic activity. Interestingly, chronic oral administration of 4'-dimethylamino-7,8-dihydroxyflavone and its lead strongly promotes neurogenesis in dentate gyrus and demonstrates marked antidepressant effects. Hence, our data support that the synthetic 4'-dimethylamino-7,8-dihydroxyflavone and its lead both are orally bioavailable TrkB agonists and possess potent antidepressant effects. PMID:21073191

  17. A protocol for evaluating cost-effectiveness of butterflies in live exhibits.

    PubMed

    Brewster, Adrienne L E; Otis, Gard W

    2009-02-01

    Butterfly species used for live exhibition differ in life span, encounter rate, behavior, and cost. By knowing which species are more cost-effective, exhibitors can customize their butterfly imports and purchase butterfly species that provide the best return on their investment. We used mark-recapture techniques to estimate mean life span and encounter rates for 39 butterfly species commonly purchased by exhibitors. In addition, the behavior of 29 species was quantified and characterized as suitable versus unsuitable by direct observation. The data were combined to calculate 1) the total number of days of suitable performance to be expected from a species, and 2) the cost per individual per day based on the number of expected suitable days. The most cost-effective butterfly relative to others in this study was Heliconius hecale F. (total suitable days, 33.4; cost per day, $0.05); the least cost-effective species was Doleschallia bisaltide Cramer (total suitable days, 0.1; cost per day, $13.15). By using this protocol, exhibitors can selectively incorporate more cost-effective species, save money on imports, and improve the visual appeal of their live exhibits.

  18. Polydimethylsiloxane Droplets Exhibit Extraordinarily High Antioxidative Effects in Deep-Frying.

    PubMed

    Totani, Nagao; Yazaki, Naoko; Yawata, Miho

    2017-04-03

    The addition of more than about 1 ppm polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) into oil results in PDMS forming both a layer at the oil-air interface and droplets suspended in the oil. It is widely accepted that the extraordinarily strong and stable antioxidative effects of PDMS are due to the PDMS layer. However, the PDMS layer showed no antioxidative effects when canola oil did not contain droplets but rather was covered with a layer of PDMS, then subjected to heating under high agitation to mimic deep-frying. Furthermore, no antioxidative effect was exhibited by oil-soluble methylphenylsiloxane (PMPS) in canola oil or by PDMS in PDMS-soluble canola oil fatty acid ester during heating, suggesting that PDMS must be insoluble and droplets in oil in order for PDMS to exhibit an antioxidative effect during deep-frying. The zeta potential of PDMS droplets suspended in canola oil was very high and thus the negatively charged PDMS droplets should attract nearby low molecular weight compounds. It was suggested that this attraction disturbed the motion of oxygen molecules and prevented their attack against unsaturated fatty acid moiety. This would be the reason in the deep-frying why PDMS suppressed the oxidation reaction of oil. PDMS droplets also attracted volatile compounds (molecular weight below 125 Da) generated by heating canola oil. Thus, adding PDMS to oil after heating the oil resulted in the heated oil smelling less than heated oil without PDMS.

  19. Impressive electromagnetic shielding effects exhibited by highly ordered, micrometer thick polyaniline films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohan, Ranjini R.; Varma, Sreekanth J.; Sankaran, Jayalekshmi

    2016-04-01

    The present work highlights the remarkably high shielding effectiveness of about 68 dB, exhibited by highly ordered and doped polyaniline films, in the microwave frequency range 4-12 GHz, obtained by self-stabilized dispersion polymerization as the synthesis route. The observed shielding effectiveness is found to depend quite sensitively on the electrical conducting properties, which are predominantly controlled by the nature and concentration of the dopants. The structural and morphological characterization of the films using XRD and TEM techniques reveals surprisingly high extent of crystallinity, which contributes significantly towards enhancing the electrical conductivity of the films. Most of the available reports on the microwave response of conducting polymer film samples deal with much thicker films, compared to the micrometer thick films of the present studies. The shielding effectiveness of acid doped, micrometer thick polyaniline films reported in the present work far exceeds most of the previously reported values and meets the commercial requirements.

  20. Comparative effectiveness of isolation techniques for contemporary Influenza A virus strains circulating in exhibition swine.

    PubMed

    Bowman, Andrew S; Nelson, Sarah W; Edwards, Jody L; Hofer, Christian C; Nolting, Jacqueline M; Davis, Ian C; Slemons, Richard D

    2013-01-01

    The current study sought to compare the effectiveness of 2 virus isolation methods for the recovery of contemporary Influenza A virus (FLUAV) strains circulating in swine at agricultural exhibitions. Following the emergence of the influenza A (H1N1)pdm09 virus, increased surveillance of FLUAV strains among swine was recommended for early detection of emerging strains that threaten animal and human health. The increase in genetic drift and genomic reassortment among FLUAV strains infecting swine since 1998 necessitates that detection protocols be periodically validated for contemporary FLUAV strains. During 2009, nasal swabs were collected from 221 clinically healthy pigs at 12 agricultural exhibitions in Ohio. Nasal swabs were tested in parallel for the presence of FLUAV strains using 3 methodologies: 2 passages through Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells adapted to serum-free medium (SFM), 2 passages through embryonated chicken eggs (ECEs), and real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (real-time RT-PCR). Of the 221 samples, 40 (18.1%) were positive for FLUAV recovery in MDCK cell culture and 13 (5.9%) were positive in ECEs (P = 0.015). All samples positive in ECEs were also positive in MDCK cell culture. MDCK cell culture virus isolation results were in perfect agreement with results of the real-time RT-PCR. Hemagglutinin and neuraminidase combinations of the recovered isolates were H1N2 and H3N2, which were consistent with FLUAV strains circulating in U.S. pigs. Effectiveness and cost savings justify the use of SFM-adapted MDCK cell culture over ECEs for the recovery of contemporary FLUAV strains from exhibition swine.

  1. hBolA, novel non-classical secreted proteins, belonging to different BolA family with functional divergence.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yu-Bo; Cao, Jia-Bing; Wan, Bing-Bing; Wang, Xin-Rong; Ding, Guo-Hui; Zhu, Hong; Yang, Hong-Meng; Wang, Ke-Sheng; Zhang, Xin; Han, Ze-Guang

    2008-10-01

    This study reported that all three human BolA proteins (hBolA1, hBolA2, and hBolA3) are novel non-classical secreted proteins identified with bioinformatics and molecular biology experiments. The three BolA fusion proteins with c-Myc tag could be secreted into the culture medium of the transfected Cos-7 cells, although they could not be colocalized with Golgi apparatus. And the secretion of three BolA proteins could not be inhibited after BFA treatment. Furthermore, the secretion was not dependent on its predicted signal peptide. All the experiment results suggested that the secretion was a non-classical export. Phylogenetic analysis showed that the human BolAs belong to three different groups with functional divergence of BolA subfamily, where the different helix-turn-helix motif among hBolA1, hBolA2, and hBolA3 could be responsible for their functional divergence. Our data provided a basis for functional studies of BolA protein family.

  2. Non-classical localization of androgen receptor in the C2C12 skeletal muscle cell line.

    PubMed

    Pronsato, Lucía; Boland, Ricardo; Milanesi, Lorena

    2013-02-01

    The classical model of testosterone action has been traditionally described as being mediated by the androgen receptor (AR) localized exclusively in the nucleus. However, there is increasing functional evidence for extranuclear localization of AR. We present biochemical and immunological data supporting mitochondrial and microsomal localization of AR in the C2C12 skeletal muscle cell line. As a first approach AR was detected by immunoblotting, using specific antibodies after subcellular fractionation, not only in nucleus and cytosol, but also in mitochondria and microsomes. We then established [(3)H] testosterone binding characteristics in total homogenates and subcellular fractions. Specific and saturable [(3)H] testosterone binding sites were detected in mitochondria and microsomes. Immunolocalization of the non-classical AR was also confirmed using confocal microscopy. Sucrose gradient fractionation demonstrated the presence of the AR in lipid rafts and caveolae. Besides, the AR interacts physically with Caveolin-1, association that is lost after testosterone treatment. Accordingly, Western blot analysis revealed a decrease of AR expression in the microsomal fraction after testosterone treatment, suggesting translocation of the membrane AR to another subcellular compartment. The non-classical distribution of native pools of AR in skeletal muscle cells suggests an alternative mode of AR localization/function. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Mechanisms involved in vitamin D mediated intestinal calcium absorption and in non-classical actions of vitamin D.

    PubMed

    Christakos, Sylvia; Dhawan, Puneet; Ajibade, Dare; Benn, Bryan S; Feng, Jingjing; Joshi, Sneha S

    2010-07-01

    Recent studies in our laboratory using calbindin-D9k null mutant mice as well as mice lacking the 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1,25(OH)2D3) inducible epithelial calcium channel TRPV6 provide evidence for calbindin-D9k and TRPV6 independent regulation of active intestinal calcium absorption. These findings suggest that in the knock out (KO) mice there is compensation by another calcium channel or protein and that other novel factors are involved in 1,25(OH)2D3 mediated active intestinal calcium absorption. In addition, 1,25(OH)2D3 mediated paracellular transport of calcium may have contributed to the normalization of serum calcium in the null mutant mice. 1,25(OH)2D3 downregulates cadherin-17 and upregulates claudin-2 and claudin-12 in the intestine, suggesting that 1,25(OH)2D3, by regulating these epithelial cell junction proteins, can route calcium through the paracellular path. With regard to non-classical actions, 1,25(OH)2D3 has been reported to inhibit the proliferation of a number of malignant cells and to regulate adaptive as well as innate immunity. This article will review new developments related to the function and regulation of vitamin D target proteins in classical and non-classical vitamin D target tissues that have provided novel insight into mechanisms of vitamin D action.

  4. The mitogaligin protein is addressed to the nucleus via a non-classical localization signal

    SciTech Connect

    Robinet, Pauline; Mollet, Lucile; Gonzalez, Patrick; Normand, Thierry; Charpentier, Stephane; Brule, Fabienne; Dubois, Martine; Legrand, Alain

    2010-01-29

    Mitogaligin, a protein encoded by galig, an internal cytotoxic gene of the galectin-3 locus, is mostly a mitochondrial protein. Mitochondrial targeting is due to an already identified mitochondrial localization signal. Interaction of mitogaligin with mitochondria leads to cytochrome c cytosolic leakage and ultimately to cell death. We have previously pointed out that mitogaligin can also be directed to the nucleus when the mitochondrial addressing signal is inactivated, indicating a possible dual intracellular localization of the protein. When expressed in the nucleus, mitogaligin exhibits also apoptotic properties leading to cell death. In this report, we show that nuclear addressing of mitogaligin depends on a sequence differing from classical signals containing basic, lysine or proline-tyrosine rich residues. The signal consists of a long sequence of amino acids residues based on a series of a short repetitive degenerated sequence.

  5. Montivipera bornmuelleri venom selectively exhibits high cytotoxic effects on keratinocytes cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    Sawan, Saly; Yaacoub, Tania; Hraoui-Bloquet, Souad; Sadek, Riyad; Hleihel, Walid; Fajloun, Ziad; Karam, Marc

    2017-04-04

    The Viperidae family venom is a rich source of bioactive compounds such as many proteases, which cause tissue necrosis and affect mostly the vascular system. However, the venom exhibits therapeutic potentials and has contributed to the development of some medical drugs. Specifically, the Montivipera bornmuelleri venom has shown to exhibit antibacterial, pro-inflammatory and antifungal activities. This work evaluates the cytotoxic effect of the M. bornmuelleri venom on human-derived keratinocytes including the non-tumorigenic HaCaT, the benign A5 and the low-grade malignant II4 cells. The toxicity of different venom concentrations (0.9, 1.87, 3.75, 7.5, 15, 30 and 60μg/mL) and their effect on the viability of the cells lines were assessed using the Lactate Dehydrogenase (LDH) activity and the Trypan blue tests after 24h of incubation. The venom was able to reduce the viability of all cell lines in a dose dependent manner with the HaCat cells being the least affected. For example, the 60μg/mL dose induced a more significant decrease the viability of A5 (44%) and II4 (21.33%) keratinocytes as compared to HaCaT cells (70.63%). Also, this venom showed a higher cytotoxic activity on the A5 (52.45%) and II4 (98.67%) cells as compared to HaCaT cells (30.14%) with an IC50 estimated at 10μg/mL on II4 and at 60μg/mL on benign A5. Those differential cytotoxic effects of the M. bornmuelleri venom pave the road for more advanced studies which might unravel the potential anticancer effects of this venom. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  6. Interpreting a Museum Exhibit: The Message Effectiveness and Cost Effectiveness of Alternative Audio Messages.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hambleton, Susan K.

    In this Masters Thesis, the message effectiveness and cost effectiveness (in terms of costs and monetary benefits) of two interpretive audio messages were evaluated. Ninety-nine randomly selected visitors to a Central Ohio interpretive museum were exposed to one of two audio tape recorded messages. One message used interpretive technique; the…

  7. Structure and Magnetic Property Control of Copper Hydroxide Acetate by Non-Classical Crystallization.

    PubMed

    Song, RuiQi; Krasia-Christoforou, Theodora; Debus, Christian; Cölfen, Helmut

    2017-03-01

    Copper hydroxide acetate (CHA), one layered hydroxide compound with tunable magnetism, attracts great interest because of its potential applications in memory devices. However, ferromagnetism for CHA is only demonstrated by means of GPa pressure. Herein, a new method is reported, involving the combination of different crystallization pathways to control crystallization of amorphous CHA toward the formation of CHA/polymer composites with tunable magnetic properties and even a tunability that can be tested at room temperature. By using poly[(ethylene glycol)6 methyl ether methacrylate]-block-poly[2-(acetoacetoxy) ethyl methacrylate] (PEGMA-b-PAEMA) diblock copolymers as additives in combination with a post-treatment process by ultracentrifugation, it is demonstrated that CHA and PEGMA-b-PAEMA form composites exhibiting different magnetic properties, depending on CHA in-plane nanostructures. Analytical characterization reveals that crystallization of CHA is induced by ultracentrifugation, during which CHA nanostructures can be well controlled by changing the degrees of polymerization of the PEGMA and PAEMA blocks and their block length ratios. These findings not only present the first example of using crystallization from polymer stabilized amorphous precursors toward the generation of magnetic nanomaterials with tunable magnetism but also pave the way for the future design of functional composite materials.

  8. Increasing awareness and preparedness by an exhibition and studying the effect of visuals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charrière, Marie; Bogaard, Thom; Malet, Jean-Philippe; Mostert, Erik

    2013-04-01

    Damages caused by natural hazards can be reduced not only by protection, management and intervention activities, but also by information and communication to improve awareness and preparedness of local communities and tourists. Risk communication is particularly crucial for mountainous areas, such as the Ubaye Valley (France), as they are affected by multiple hazards and are particularly sensitive to the potential effects of climate and socio-economic changes which may increase the risk associated with natural hazards significantly. An exhibition is a powerful tool to communicate with the general public. It allows1: (1) targeting specific audiences, (2) transmitting technical and scientific knowledge using a suitable language, (3) anchoring the collective memory of past events, (4) visualize and emotionalize the topic of natural hazards, (5) strengthening the communication between peers, and (6) highlighting local resources and knowledge. In addition to these theoretical advantages, an exhibition may fulfill the requirements of a community. In the Ubaye Valley (France), this tool was proposed by the stakeholders themselves to increase awareness and preparedness of the general public. To meet this demand, the exhibition was designed following three general topics: (1) the natural phenomena and their potential consequences on the elements at risk, (2) the management and protection measures (individual and collective) and (3) the evolution of events and knowledge throughout past up to the present and the anticipation of the future situations. Besides being a real risk communication practice, this exhibition will be the setting for an extensive research project studying the effect of the use of visualization tools on the awareness and preparedness of a community. A wide range of visuals (photos, videos, maps, models, animations, multimedia, etc.) will present many dimensions of locally occurring natural hazards and risk problems. The aim of the research is (1) to

  9. Computational design of donor-bridge-acceptor systems exhibiting pronounced quantum interference effects.

    PubMed

    Gorczak, Natalie; Renaud, Nicolas; Galan, Elena; Eelkema, Rienk; Siebbeles, Laurens D A; Grozema, Ferdinand C

    2016-03-07

    Quantum interference is a well-known phenomenon that dictates charge transport properties of single molecule junctions. However, reports on quantum interference in donor-bridge-acceptor molecules are scarce. This might be due to the difficulties in meeting the conditions for the presence of quantum interference in a donor-bridge-acceptor system. The electronic coupling between the donor, bridge, and acceptor moieties must be weak in order to ensure localised initial and final states for charge transfer. Yet, it must be strong enough to allow all bridge orbitals to mediate charge transfer. We present the computational route to the design of a donor-bridge-acceptor molecule that features the right balance between these contradicting requirements and exhibits pronounced interference effects.

  10. Photoluminescent logic gate controlled by the optical Kerr effect exhibited by porous silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de la Mora, M. B.; Torres-Torres, C.; Nava, R.; Trejo-Valdez, M.; Reyes-Esqueda, J. A.

    2014-07-01

    The magnitude of the third order optical susceptibility exhibited by porous silicon monolayers was measured by a non-degenerated vectorial two-wave interaction. Optical irradiations at 488 nm and 532 nm wavelengths were employed to carry out the nonlinear optical experiments. Compared to bulk silicon material, a noticeable enhancement in the third order nonlinear optical response was identified. Photoluminescence and photoconductive properties were evaluated for the two studied wavelengths. The photoluminescent logic gate function AND was experimentally demonstrated using as a control a reflective optical Kerr gate configuration. A perceptible contribution for the third order optical nonlinearities seems to be related to the optical Kerr effect originated by excited states population. A two-level model was considered in order to describe the observed optical behavior.

  11. Korean red ginseng extract exhibits neuroprotective effects through inhibition of apoptotic cell death.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sunyoung; Lee, Youngmoon; Cho, Jungsook

    2014-01-01

    Red ginseng has long been used as a traditional medicine in many East Asian countries including Korea. It is known to exhibit various pharmacological effects, including anti-oxidant, anti-cancer, anti-stress and anti-diabetes activities. To further explore its actions, the present study evaluated effects of Korean red ginseng (KRG) extract on neuronal injury induced by various types of insults using primary cultured rat cortical cells. KRG extract inhibited neuronal damage and generation of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) induced by excitatory amino acids, such as glutamate and N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA), or by Aβ(25-35). To elucidate possible mechanism(s) by which KRG extract exerts neuroprotective action, its effects on apoptosis and apoptosis-related signaling molecules in neurons were assessed. KRG extract markedly increased phosphorylation of Bad at Ser 112 and inhibited Bax expression and caspase 3 activity. It also inhibited DNA fragmentation induced by NMDA or Aβ(25-35). These results indicate that KRG extract protects cultured neurons from excitotoxicity and Aβ(25-35)-induced toxicity through inhibition of ROS generation and apoptotic cell death. In addition, KRG extract inhibited β-secretase activity, implying that it may reduce Aβ peptide formation. Taken together, these findings suggest that KRG extract may be beneficial for the prevention and/or treatment of neurodegenerative disorders including Alzheimer's disease.

  12. Regulatory T cells exhibit neuroprotective effect in a mouse model of traumatic brain injury

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Yunhu; Cao, Fang; Ran, Qishan; Sun, Xiaochuan

    2016-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a major health and socioeconomic problem as it is associated with high rates of mortality and morbidity worldwide. Regulatory T cells (Tregs) have been reported to reduce inflammatory response in several diseases, including myasthenia gravis, viral myocarditis and cerebral infarction. The present study investigated the role of Tregs in mediating neuro-protective effects in a mouse model of TBI. Initially, Treg levels were determined, and compared between the controlled cortical impact (CCI) model for moderate TBI and the sham group, by using flow cytometry and ELISA. Afterwards, the number of Tregs was upregulated (by injection) and downregulated (by depletion), respectively, to elucidate the effect of Tregs in the presence of an inflammatory reaction and a deficient neurological function and consequently, in the prognosis of TBI in the mouse. The expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines [tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6)] and anti-inflammatory cytokines [IL-10, transforming growth factor (TGF)-β] in blood and brain tissues was also measured in the five groups: Μice receiving a saline injection, mice experiencing Treg depletion, small-dose (SD Tregs, 1.25×105), and mice receiving different doses of Tregs: Moderate-dose (MD Tregs, 2.5×105) and large-dose (LD Tregs, 5×105), using ELISA and PCR. Co-cultures of Tregs and microglia were performed to evaluate the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines and observe the interaction between the two types of cells. The regulation patterns in JNK-NF-κB pathway by Tregs were also evaluated by western blot analysis. Treg levels were significantly reduced in TBI mouse group on the 3rd day after TBI (P<0.05). In the mouse model of TBI, the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines (TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6) was enhanced, while the expression of anti-inflammatory cytokines (IL-10, TGF-β) was reduced (P<0.05). Tregs exhibited a suppressive effect on inflammatory reactions

  13. Regulatory T cells exhibit neuroprotective effect in a mouse model of traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yunhu; Cao, Fang; Ran, Qishan; Sun, Xiaochuan

    2016-12-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a major health and socioeconomic problem as it is associated with high rates of mortality and morbidity worldwide. Regulatory T cells (Tregs) have been reported to reduce inflammatory response in several diseases, including myasthenia gravis, viral myocarditis and cerebral infarction. The present study investigated the role of Tregs in mediating neuro‑protective effects in a mouse model of TBI. Initially, Treg levels were determined, and compared between the controlled cortical impact (CCI) model for moderate TBI and the sham group, by using flow cytometry and ELISA. Afterwards, the number of Tregs was upregulated (by injection) and downregulated (by depletion), respectively, to elucidate the effect of Tregs in the presence of an inflammatory reaction and a deficient neurological function and consequently, in the prognosis of TBI in the mouse. The expression of pro‑inflammatory cytokines [tumor necrosis factor (TNF)‑α, interleukin (IL)‑1β, IL‑6)] and anti‑inflammatory cytokines [IL‑10, transforming growth factor (TGF)‑β] in blood and brain tissues was also measured in the five groups: Μice receiving a saline injection, mice experiencing Treg depletion, small‑dose (SD Tregs, 1.25x105), and mice receiving different doses of Tregs: Moderate‑dose (MD Tregs, 2.5x105) and large‑dose (LD Tregs, 5x105), using ELISA and PCR. Co‑cultures of Tregs and microglia were performed to evaluate the expression of pro‑inflammatory cytokines and observe the interaction between the two types of cells. The regulation patterns in JNK‑NF‑κB pathway by Tregs were also evaluated by western blot analysis. Treg levels were significantly reduced in TBI mouse group on the 3rd day after TBI (P<0.05). In the mouse model of TBI, the expression of pro‑inflammatory cytokines (TNF‑α, IL‑1β, IL‑6) was enhanced, while the expression of anti‑inflammatory cytokines (IL‑10, TGF‑β) was reduced (P<0.05). Tregs exhibited a

  14. Cannabinoids in pain management: CB1, CB2 and non-classic receptor ligands.

    PubMed

    Davis, Mellar P

    2014-08-01

    Commercially available cannabinoids are subject to psychotomimetic and addiction (cannabinomimetic) adverse effects largely through activation of the cannabinoid 1 receptor (CB1r). The available commercial cannabinoids have a narrow therapeutic index. Recently developed peripherally restricted cannabinoids, regionally administered cannabinoids, bifunctional cannabinoid ligands and cannabinoid enzyme inhibitors, endocannabinoids, which do not interact with classic cannabinoid receptors (CB1r and CB2r), cannabinoid receptor antagonists and selective CB1r agonists hold promise as analgesics. This author provides a review of the current investigational cannabinoids currently in development for pain management. The author also provides their perspective on the future of the field. Regional and peripherally restricted cannabinoids will reduce cannabinomimetic side effects. Spinal cannabinoids may increase the therapeutic index by limiting the dose necessary for response and minimize drugs exposure to supraspinal sites where cannabinomimetic side effects originate. Cannabinoid bifunctional ligands should be further explored. The combination of a CB2r agonist with a transient receptor potential vanilloid (TRPV-1) antagonist may improve the therapeutic index of the CB2r agonist. Enzyme inhibitors plus TRPV-1 blockers should be further explored. The development of analgesic tolerance with enzyme inhibitors and the pronociceptive effects of prostamides limit the benefits to cannabinoid hydrolyzing enzyme inhibitors. Most clinically productive development of cannabinoids over the next 5 years will be in the area of selective CB2r agonists. These agents will be tested in various inflammatory, osteoarthritis and neuropathic pains.

  15. Nuclear translocation of glutathione S-transferase {pi} is mediated by a non-classical localization signal

    SciTech Connect

    Kawakatsu, Miho; Goto, Shinji; Yoshida, Takako; Urata, Yoshishige; Li, Tao-Sheng

    2011-08-12

    Highlights: {yields} Nuclear translocation of GST{pi} is abrogated by the deletion of the last 16 amino acid residues in the carboxy-terminal region, indicating that residues 195-208 of GST{pi} are required for nuclear translocation. {yields} The lack of a contiguous stretch of positively charged amino acid residues within the carboxy-terminal region of GST{pi}, suggests that the nuclear translocation of GST{pi} is mediated by a non-classical nuclear localization signal. {yields} An in vitro transport assay shows that the nuclear translocation of GST{pi} is dependent on cytosolic factors and ATP. -- Abstract: Glutathione S-transferase {pi} (GST{pi}), a member of the GST family of multifunctional enzymes, is highly expressed in human placenta and involved in the protection of cellular components against electrophilic compounds or oxidative stress. We have recently found that GST{pi} is expressed in the cytoplasm, mitochondria, and nucleus in some cancer cells, and that the nuclear expression of GST{pi} appears to correlate with resistance to anti-cancer drugs. Although the mitochondrial targeting signal of GST{pi} was previously identified in the amino-terminal region, the mechanism of nuclear translocation remains completely unknown. In this study, we find that the region of GST{pi}195-208 is critical for nuclear translocation, which is mediated by a novel and non-classical nuclear localization signal. In addition, using an in vitro transport assay, we demonstrate that the nuclear translocation of GST{pi} depends on the cytosolic extract and ATP. Although further experiments are needed to understand in depth the precise mechanism of nuclear translocation of GST{pi}, our results may help to establish more efficient anti-cancer therapy, especially with respect to resistance to anti-cancer drugs.

  16. Characterization of novel StAR (steroidogenic acute regulatory protein) mutations causing non-classic lipoid adrenal hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Flück, Christa E; Pandey, Amit V; Dick, Bernhard; Camats, Núria; Fernández-Cancio, Mónica; Clemente, María; Gussinyé, Miquel; Carrascosa, Antonio; Mullis, Primus E; Audi, Laura

    2011-01-01

    Steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR) is crucial for transport of cholesterol to mitochondria where biosynthesis of steroids is initiated. Loss of StAR function causes lipoid congenital adrenal hyperplasia (LCAH). StAR gene mutations causing partial loss of function manifest atypical and may be mistaken as familial glucocorticoid deficiency. Only a few mutations have been reported. To report clinical, biochemical, genetic, protein structure and functional data on two novel StAR mutations, and to compare them with published literature. Collaboration between the University Children's Hospital Bern, Switzerland, and the CIBERER, Hospital Vall d'Hebron, Autonomous University, Barcelona, Spain. Two subjects of a non-consanguineous Caucasian family were studied. The 46,XX phenotypic normal female was diagnosed with adrenal insufficiency at the age of 10 months, had normal pubertal development and still has no signs of hypergonodatropic hypogonadism at 32 years of age. Her 46,XY brother was born with normal male external genitalia and was diagnosed with adrenal insufficiency at 14 months. Puberty was normal and no signs of hypergonadotropic hypogonadism are present at 29 years of age. StAR gene analysis revealed two novel compound heterozygote mutations T44HfsX3 and G221S. T44HfsX3 is a loss-of-function StAR mutation. G221S retains partial activity (∼30%) and is therefore responsible for a milder, non-classic phenotype. G221S is located in the cholesterol binding pocket and seems to alter binding/release of cholesterol. StAR mutations located in the cholesterol binding pocket (V187M, R188C, R192C, G221D/S) seem to cause non-classic lipoid CAH. Accuracy of genotype-phenotype prediction by in vitro testing may vary with the assays employed.

  17. Genetic screening of non-classic CAH females with hyperandrogenemia identifies a novel CYP11B1 gene mutation.

    PubMed

    Shammas, Christos; Byrou, Stefania; Phelan, Marie M; Toumba, Meropi; Stylianou, Charilaos; Skordis, Nicos; Neocleous, Vassos; Phylactou, Leonidas A

    2016-04-01

    Congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH) is an endocrine autosomal recessive disorder with various symptoms of diverse severity. Mild hyperandrogenemia is the most commonclinical feature in non-classic CAH patients and 95% of the cases are identified by mutations in the CYP21A2 gene. In the present study, the second most common cause for non-classic CAH (NC-CAH), 11β-hydroxylase deficiency due to mutations in the CYP11B1 gene, is investigated. Screening of the CYP21A2 and CYP11B1 genes by direct sequencing was carried out for the detection of possible genetic defects in patients with suspected CAH. It wasobserved that CYP11B1 variants co-exist only in rare cases along with mutations in CYP21A2 in patients clinically diagnosed with CAH. A total of 23 NC-CAH female patients out of 75 were identified with only one mutation in the CYP21A2 gene. The novel CYP11B1 gene mutation, p.Val484Asp, was identified in a patient with CAH in the heterozygous state. The structural characterization of the novel p.Val484Asp was found to likely cause distortion of the surrounding beta sheet and indirect destabilization of the cavity that occurs on the opposite face of the structural elements, leading to partial impairment of the enzymatic activity. CYP21A2 gene mutations are the most frequent genetic defects in cases of NC-CAH even when these patients are in the heterozygous state. These mutations have a diverse phenotype giving rise to a variable extent of cortisol synthesis impairment; it is also clear that CYP11B1 mutants are a rare type of defects causing CAH.

  18. Characterization of Novel StAR (Steroidogenic Acute Regulatory Protein) Mutations Causing Non-Classic Lipoid Adrenal Hyperplasia

    PubMed Central

    Flück, Christa E.; Pandey, Amit V.; Dick, Bernhard; Camats, Núria; Fernández-Cancio, Mónica; Clemente, María; Gussinyé, Miquel; Carrascosa, Antonio; Mullis, Primus E.; Audi, Laura

    2011-01-01

    Context Steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR) is crucial for transport of cholesterol to mitochondria where biosynthesis of steroids is initiated. Loss of StAR function causes lipoid congenital adrenal hyperplasia (LCAH). Objective StAR gene mutations causing partial loss of function manifest atypical and may be mistaken as familial glucocorticoid deficiency. Only a few mutations have been reported. Design To report clinical, biochemical, genetic, protein structure and functional data on two novel StAR mutations, and to compare them with published literature. Setting Collaboration between the University Children's Hospital Bern, Switzerland, and the CIBERER, Hospital Vall d'Hebron, Autonomous University, Barcelona, Spain. Patients Two subjects of a non-consanguineous Caucasian family were studied. The 46,XX phenotypic normal female was diagnosed with adrenal insufficiency at the age of 10 months, had normal pubertal development and still has no signs of hypergonodatropic hypogonadism at 32 years of age. Her 46,XY brother was born with normal male external genitalia and was diagnosed with adrenal insufficiency at 14 months. Puberty was normal and no signs of hypergonadotropic hypogonadism are present at 29 years of age. Results StAR gene analysis revealed two novel compound heterozygote mutations T44HfsX3 and G221S. T44HfsX3 is a loss-of-function StAR mutation. G221S retains partial activity (∼30%) and is therefore responsible for a milder, non-classic phenotype. G221S is located in the cholesterol binding pocket and seems to alter binding/release of cholesterol. Conclusions StAR mutations located in the cholesterol binding pocket (V187M, R188C, R192C, G221D/S) seem to cause non-classic lipoid CAH. Accuracy of genotype-phenotype prediction by in vitro testing may vary with the assays employed. PMID:21647419

  19. Simvastatin exhibits antiproliferative effects on spheres derived from canine mammary carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Torres, Cristian G; Olivares, Araceli; Stoore, Caroll

    2015-05-01

    Mammary cancer is the most frequent type of tumor in the female canine. Treatments are mainly limited to surgery and chemotherapy; however, these tumors may develop clinical recurrence, metastasis and chemoresistance. The existence of a subpopulation of cancer cells with stemness features called cancer stem-like cells, may explain in part these characteristics of tumor progression. The statins, potent blockers of cholesterol synthesis, have also shown antitumor effects on cancer mammary cells, changes mediated by a decrease in the isoprenylation of specific proteins. Few studies have shown that simvastatin, a lipophilic statin, sensitizes cancer stem-like cells eliminating drug resistance. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effects of simvastatin on spheres derived from CF41.Mg canine mammary tumor cells, which were characterized by phenotypic and functional analyses. Spheres exhibited characteristics of stemness, primarily expressing a CD44⁺/CD24⁻/low phenotype, displaying auto-renewal and relative chemoresistance. Exposure to simvastatin induced a decrease in the sphere-forming capacity and cell viability, accompanied by a concentration- and time-dependent increase in caspase-3/7 activity. In addition, modulation of β-catenin and p53 expression was observed. Simvastatin triggered a synergistic effect with doxorubicin, sensitizing the spheres to the cytotoxic effect exerted by the drug. Invasiveness of spheres was decreased in response to simvastatin and this effect was counteracted by the presence of geranylgeranyl pyrophosphate. Our results suggest that simvastatin targets canine mammary cancer stem-like cells, supporting its therapeutical application as a novel agent to treat canine mammary cancer.

  20. Room-temperature amorphous alloy field-effect transistor exhibiting particle and wave electronic transport

    SciTech Connect

    Fukuhara, M.; Kawarada, H.

    2015-02-28

    The realization of room-temperature macroscopic field effect transistors (FETs) will lead to new epoch-making possibilities for electronic applications. The I{sub d}-V{sub g} characteristics of the millimeter-sized aluminum-oxide amorphous alloy (Ni{sub 0.36}Nb{sub 0.24}Zr{sub 0.40}){sub 90}H{sub 10} FETs were measured at a gate-drain bias voltage of 0–60 μV in nonmagnetic conditions and under a magnetic fields at room temperature. Application of dc voltages to the gate electrode resulted in the transistor exhibiting one-electron Coulomb oscillation with a period of 0.28 mV, Fabry-Perot interference with a period of 2.35 μV under nonmagnetic conditions, and a Fano effect with a period of 0.26 mV for Vg and 0.2 T under a magnetic field. The realization of a low-energy controllable device made from millimeter-sized Ni-Nb-Zr-H amorphous alloy throws new light on cluster electronics.

  1. Arsenite and insulin exhibit opposing effects on epidermal growth factor receptor and keratinocyte proliferative potential

    SciTech Connect

    Patterson, Timothy J.; Rice, Robert H. . E-mail: rhrice@ucdavis.edu

    2007-05-15

    Previous work has suggested that arsenic exposure contributes to skin carcinogenesis by preserving the proliferative potential of human epidermal keratinocytes, thereby slowing the exit of putative target stem cells into the differentiation pathway. To find a molecular basis for this action, present work has explored the influence of arsenite on keratinocyte responses to epidermal growth factor (EGF). The ability of cultured keratinocytes to found colonies upon passaging several days after confluence was preserved by arsenite and EGF in an additive fashion, but neither was effective when the receptor tyrosine kinase activity was inhibited. Arsenite prevented the loss of EGF receptor protein and phosphorylation of tyrosine 1173, preserving its capability to signal. The level of nuclear {beta}-catenin was higher in cells treated with arsenite and EGF in parallel to elevated colony forming ability, and expression of a dominant negative {beta}-catenin suppressed the increase in both colony forming ability and yield of putative stem cells induced by arsenite and EGF. As judged by expression of three genes regulated by {beta}-catenin, this transcription factor had substantially higher activity in the arsenite/EGF-treated cells. Trivalent antimony exhibited the same effects as arsenite. A novel finding is that insulin in the medium induced the loss of EGF receptor protein, which was largely prevented by arsenite exposure.

  2. [D-Lys3]-GHRP-6 exhibits pro-autophagic effects on skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Yu, Angus P; Pei, Xiao M; Sin, Thomas K; Yip, Shea P; Yung, Benjamin Y; Chan, Lawrence W; Wong, Cesar S; Siu, Parco M

    2015-02-05

    [D-Lys3]-GHRP-6 is regarded as a highly selective growth-hormone secretagogue receptor (GHSR) antagonist and has been widely used to investigate the dependency of GHSR-1a signalling mediated by acylated ghrelin. However, [D-Lys3]-GHRP-6 has been reported to influence other cellular processes which are unrelated to GHSR-1a. This study aimed to examine the effects of [D-Lys3]-GHRP-6 on autophagic and apoptotic cellular signalling in skeletal muscle. [D-Lys3]-GHRP-6 enhanced the autophagic signalling demonstrated by the increases in protein abundances of beclin-1 and LC3 II-to-LC3 1 ratio in both normal muscle and doxorubicin-injured muscle. [D-Lys3]-GHRP-6 reduced the activation of muscle apoptosis induced by doxorubicin. No histological abnormalities were observed in the [D-Lys3]-GHRP-6-treated muscle. Intriguingly, the doxorubicin-induced increase in centronucleated muscle fibres was not observed in muscle treated with [D-Lys3]-GHRP-6, suggesting the myoprotective effects of [D-Lys3]-GHRP-6 against doxorubicin injury. The [D-Lys3]-GHRP-6-induced activation of autophagy was found to be abolished by the co-treatment of CXCR4 antagonist, suggesting that the pro-autophagic effects of [D-Lys3]-GHRP-6 might be mediated through CXCR4. In conclusion, [D-Lys3]-GHRP-6 exhibits pro-autophagic effects on skeletal muscle under both normal and doxorubicin-injured conditions.

  3. Exhibiting Lives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Golden, Deborah; Elbaz-Luwisch, Freema

    2007-01-01

    This paper examines some of the dilemmas that accompany the emergence of the personal voice in scholarly work, by taking a close, grounded look at the way in which these unfolded in a specific academic course. As part of the course, entitled "A cultural approach to the life cycle", students were asked to participate in a group exhibition in which…

  4. Exhibiting Lives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Golden, Deborah; Elbaz-Luwisch, Freema

    2007-01-01

    This paper examines some of the dilemmas that accompany the emergence of the personal voice in scholarly work, by taking a close, grounded look at the way in which these unfolded in a specific academic course. As part of the course, entitled "A cultural approach to the life cycle", students were asked to participate in a group exhibition in which…

  5. Calea zacatechichi dichloromethane extract exhibits antidiarrheal and antinociceptive effects in mouse models mimicking irritable bowel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Sałaga, M; Kowalczuk, A; Zielinska, M; Błażewicz, A; Fichna, J

    2015-10-01

    Calea zacatechichi Schltdl. (Asteraceae alt. Compositae) is a Mexican plant commonly used in folk medicine to treat respiratory and gastrointestinal (GI) disorders. The objective of this study is to characterize the effect of C. zacatechichi extracts in mouse models mimicking the symptoms of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). Powdered C. zacatechichi herb (leaves, stems, and flowers) was extracted with methanol. Methanolic extract was filtered and evaporated giving methanolic fraction. The residue was extracted with dichloromethane (DCM). Methanolic and DCM (200 mg/kg, per os) extracts were screened for their effect on GI motility in several in vitro tests, and the antidiarrheal and antinociceptive effects were assessed using mouse models. The influence of the DCM extract on motoric parameters and exploratory behaviors was also assessed. Finally, the composition of C. zacatechichi DCM extract was qualitatively analyzed using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) method. C. zacatechichi DCM extract significantly inhibited the contractility of mouse colon in vitro (IC50 = 17 ± 2 μg/ml). Administration of the DCM extract in vivo (200 mg/kg, per os) significantly prolonged the time of whole GI transit (46 ± 1 vs. 117 ± 27 min for control and DCM-treated animals, respectively; P = 0.0023), inhibited hypermotility, and reduced pain in mouse models mimicking functional GI disorders. Our findings suggest that constituents of the C. zacatechichi DCM extract exhibit antidiarrheal and analgesic activity. The extract may thus become an attractive material for isolation of compounds that may be used as a supplementary treatment for pain and diarrhea associated with IBS in the future.

  6. A dental implant: aluminium trioxide exhibited no effect on mouse reproductive and mutanogenic potential.

    PubMed

    Zelić, O; Dimitrijević, B; Vasilijevska, M; Dujić, A; Lekić, P C

    1998-11-01

    Several diseases as well as trauma can affect the composition and integrity of periodontal tissues leading eventually to the destruction of connective tissue matrix and cells, loss of attachment and resorption of alveolar bone, often followed by tooth loss. Replacement of the missing tooth could then be provided by endosseous dental implants healing in a form of osseo- or fibrosteal integration to the alveolar bone. Aluminium oxide ceramics, a form of endosseous implant, allows osseointegration type of healing and has demonstrated excellent biocompatibility. However, potential aluminium toxicity has been implicated in the pathogenesis of a number of clinical disorders and for this reason we examined the reproductive and mutagenic effect of aluminium trioxide ceramic implant in experimental mice. 720 female and 45 fertile male BALB-cAn NCR mice were included in the study. 3 experimental groups of fertile male mice (15 for each group) were treated with an intraperitoneal injection of aluminium trioxide (1 g/ kg of body weight, group I), with ethyl-methane-sulphonate as a positive control (200 mg/kg, group II) and with Tween-80 (10 mg/kg as a negative control, Group III). Each of the labeled male mice fertilized previously uncoupled female mice during 8 weeks (a pair per week) to facilitate appropriate pre- and post-meiotic conditions of spermatogenesis to occur. Female mice were sacrificed with cervical dislocation at day 13 after fertilization. Immediately upon sacrifice the uterus was removed and the number of alive and healthy, or alive but mutated and/or dead embryos was computed to determine the dominant lethal or mutagenic effect. Animals treated with aluminium trioxide demonstrated similar effects on the reproductive and mutagenic capacity as the negative control, whereas the animals treated as positive controls exhibited significantly reduced reproductive and mutagenic capacity. Collectively, we concluded that aluminium trioxide has a very low rate of

  7. Non-classical azoreductase secretion in Clostridium perfringens in response to sulfonated azo dye exposure.

    PubMed

    Morrison, Jessica M; John, Gilbert H

    2015-08-01

    Clostridium perfringens, a strictly anaerobic microorganism and inhabitant of the human intestine, has been shown to produce an azoreductase enzyme (AzoC), an NADH-dependent flavin oxidoreductase. This enzyme reduces azo dyes into aromatic amines, which can be carcinogenic. A significant amount of work has been completed on the activity of AzoC. Despite this, much is still unknown, including whether azoreduction of these dyes occurs intracellularly or extracellulary. A physiological study of C. perfringens involving the effect of azo dye exposure was completed to answer this question. Through exposure studies, azo dyes were found to cause cytoplasmic protein release, including AzoC, from C. perfringens in dividing and non-dividing cells. Sulfonation (negative charge) of azo dyes proved to be the key to facilitating protein release of AzoC and was found to be azo-dye-concentration-dependent. Additionally, AzoC was found to localize to the Gram-positive periplasmic region. Using a ΔazoC knockout mutant, the presence of additional azoreductases in C. perfringens was suggested. These results support the notion that the azoreduction of these dyes may occur extracellularly for the commensal C. perfringens in the intestine. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Non-Classical Creep Behavior of Fusion-Cast Alumina Refractories

    SciTech Connect

    Hemrick, James Gordon; Wereszczak, Andrew A

    2009-01-01

    The compressive creep behavior of a typical 50% -/50% -alumina fusion-cast refractory block was examined as a function of temperature. Test temperatures (1450-1650oC) were chosen to correspond to those typical of service conditions, while relatively high compressive test stresses (0.6 and 1.0 MPa compared to 0.2-0.4 MPa which is typical of service) were chosen to promote exaggerated deformation and to more accurately measure the resulting creep strain. It was found that the measured creep strain responses in this alumina were a sum of (contracting) compressive creep strain and expansion strain due to time and temperature dependent microcracking. Long term, isothtermal expansion tests were also conducted, and their results allowed for the deconvolution of the compressive creep and expansion strains present in the measured creep strain test data. The analysis shows that despite complications associated with conflicting expansion and contraction effects, classical creep analysis may be used with this alumina refractory after the strains associated with the non-steady-state mechanism are considered and accounted for.

  9. Classical androgen receptors in non-classical sites in the brain

    PubMed Central

    Sarkey, Sara; Azcoitia, Iñigo; Garcia-Segura, Luis Miguel; Garcia-Ovejero, Daniel; DonCarlos, Lydia L.

    2008-01-01

    Androgen receptors are expressed in many different neuronal populations in the central nervous system where they often act as transcription factors in the cell nucleus. However, recent studies have detected androgen receptor immunoreactivity in neuronal and glial processes of the adult rat neocortex, hippocampal formation, and amygdala as well as in the telencephalon of Eastern Fence and green anole lizards. This review discusses previously published findings on extranuclear androgen receptors, as well as new experimental results that begin to establish a possible functional role for androgen receptors in axons within cortical regions. Electron microscopic studies have revealed that androgen receptor immunoreactive processes in the rat brain correspond to axons, dendrites and glial processes. New results show that lesions of the dorsal CA1 region by local administration of ibotenic acid reduce the density of androgen receptor immunoreactive axons in the cerebral cortex and the amygdala, suggesting that these axons may originate in the hippocampus. Androgen receptor immunoreactivity in axons is also decreased by the intracerebroventricular administration of colchicine, suggesting that androgen receptor protein is transported from the perikaryon to the axons by fast axonal transport. Androgen receptors in axons located in the cerebral cortex and amygdala and originating in the hippocampus may play an important role in the rapid behavioral effects of androgens. PMID:18402960

  10. The study of oriented aggregation: A non-classical nanocrystal growth mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burrows, Nathan Dennis

    Oriented aggregation is a nonclassical crystal growth mechanism resulting in new secondary nanoparticles composed of crystallographically aligned primary crystallites. These secondary crystals often have unique and symmetry-defying morphologies, can be twinned, and can contain stacking faults and other significant defects. A wide range of important materials, such as titanium dioxide, iron oxides, selenides and sulfides, and metal oxyhydroxides, are known to grow by oriented aggregation under certain conditions. Evidence for oriented aggregation also has been observed in natural materials. However questions remain about what conditions are the most importing in facilitating purposeful control over nanoparticle size, size distribution, and morphology. Kinetic models for oriented aggregation point to important variables such as ionic strength, pH, temperature, and choice of dispersing solvent as being the key or keys to gaining control of this natural phenomenon and moving it towards a tool to be used in designing novel nanomaterials. The main technique used in this research is transmission electron microscopy with temporal resolution to characterize the population of growing nanocrystals. Cryogenic transmission electron microscopy is employed to observe the various stages of crystal growth. With extensive image analysis, it is possible to determine the kinetics of growth and the effects of systematically changing these key growth conditions. Additional complimentary techniques are employed, such as dynamic light scattering as well as various methods of characterization, such as powder X-ray diffraction. As our fundamental understanding of oriented aggregation improves, novel and complex functional materials are expected to emerge.

  11. Diagnosis and molecular characterization of non-classic forms of Tay-Sachs disease in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Rozenberg, R; Kok, F; Burin, M G; Sá Miranda, M C; Vasques, C; Henriques-Souza, A M M; Giugliani, R; Vainzof, Mariz; Pereira, L V

    2006-06-01

    Molecular analysis of five Brazilian families, including eight patients presenting with nonclassic Tay-Sachs disease, was performed to identify frequent causative mutations and their correlation with clinical course. Three patients were affected by the B1 subacute variant and were shown to carry the R178H mutation (the DN allele), which is also common among Portuguese patients. Two of them were compound heterozygotes, whereas the third presented with the mutation in both alleles. Since Brazil was a Portuguese colony for over two centuries, common ancestry might be the probable explanation. The fourth patient presented with a juvenile phenotype and carries the R499H mutation, which has been reported only once worldwide and is associated with residual enzyme activity, responsible for a slower clinical course. The fifth family, of an Ashkenazi Jewish background, showed an extensive intrafamilial clinical variability among three affected sibs presenting with muscle atrophy, ataxia, and psychiatric symptoms. They were first diagnosed as having atypical spinal muscular atrophy and, subsequently, spinocerebellar ataxia, but, recently, the diagnosis of late-onset Tay-Sachs disease was confirmed based on reduced plasma hexosaminidase A activity and the G269S/InsTATC1278 genotype. It is therefore highly recommended to test patients with a similar clinical history for Tay-Sachs disease. In the same family, one first cousin committed suicide at the age of 24 years, presenting with a clinical phenotype that suggested an undiagnosed case and highlighting the effect of the intrafamilial clinical variability in delaying a prompt diagnosis. It is now recognized that his parents are, in fact, a carrier couple. Additionally, another relative had been previously identified as a heterozygote in a Tay-Sachs disease screening program, but the information was not shared among the family. Since this information might anticipate diagnosis and genetic counseling, it is advisable that

  12. S100A13-C2A binary complex structure-a key component in the acidic fibroblast growth factor for the non-classical pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Mohan, Sepuru K.; Rani, Sandhya G.; Kumar, Sriramoju M.; Yu Chin

    2009-03-13

    Fibroblast growth factors (FGFs) are key regulators of cell proliferation, differentiation, tumor-induced angiogenesis and migration. FGFs are essential for early embryonic development, organ formation and angiogenesis. They play important roles in tumor formation, inflammation, wound healing and restenosis. The biological effects of FGFs are mediated through the activation of the four transmembrane phosphotyrosine kinase receptors (FGFRs) in the presence of heparin sulfate proteoglycans (HSPGs) and therefore require the release of FGFs into the extracellular space. However, FGF-1 lacks the signal peptide required for the releasing of these proteins through the classical endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-Golgi secretary pathway. Maciag et al. demonstrated that FGF-1 is exported through a non-classical release pathway involving the formation of a specific multiprotein complex [M. Landriscina, R. Soldi, C. Bagala, I. Micucci, S. Bellum, F. Tarantini, I. Prudovsky, T. Maciag, S100A13 participates in the release of fibroblast growth factor 1 in response to heat shock in vitro, J. Biol. Chem. 276 (2001) 22544-22552; C.M. Carreira, T.M. LaVallee, F. Tarantini, A. Jackson, J.T. Lathrop, B. Hampton, W.H. Burgess, T. Maciag, S100A13 is involved in the regulation of fibroblast growth factor-1 and p40 synaptotagmin-1 release in vitro, J. Biol. Chem. 273 (1998) 22224-22231; T.M. LaValle, F. Tarantini, S. Gamble, C.M. Carreira, A. Jackson, T. Maciag, Synaptotagmin-1 is required for fibroblast growth factor-1 release, J. Biol. Chem. 273 (1998) 22217-22223; C. Bagala, V. Kolev, A. Mandinova, R. Soldi, C. Mouta, I. Graziani, I, Prudovsky, T. Maciag, The alternative translation of synaptotagmin 1 mediates the non-classical release of FGF1, Biochem. Biophys. Res. Commun. 310 (2003) 1041-1047]. The protein constituents of this complex include FGF-1, S100A13 (a Ca{sup 2+}-binding protein), and the p40 form of synaptotagmin 1 (Syt1). To understand the molecular events in the FGF-1 releasing

  13. [Effect of preparations exhibiting cytokinin-like activity on the specific density of leaf in grasses].

    PubMed

    Cherniad'ev, I I

    2002-01-01

    The effects of synthetic preparations exhibiting cytokinin-like activity (6-benzylaminopurine, Thidiazuron, and kartolin-2) on the specific leaf area (SLA) were studied in plants of the family Gramineae (wheat, Triticum aestivum L.; meadow fescue, Festuca pratensis Huds.; and reed fescue, F. arindinacea Schreb.). At the early stages of ontogeny (until the leaf area reached 50-60% of the maximum value), treatment of plants of the three species with cytokinin-like preparations caused an increase in SLA. The SLA value in these plants was correlated with the rate of photosynthetic assimilation of carbon dioxide and activities of carbon metabolism enzymes: ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (EC 4.1.1.39), NAD-malate dehydrogenase (EC 1.1.1.37), and NADP-glyceraldehydrophosphate dehydrogenase complex, which includes phosphoglycerate kinase (EC 2.7.2.3) and glyceraldehydrophosphate dehydrogenase (EC 1.2.1.13). However, there was no correlation of SLA with the activity of phospho(enol)pyruvate carboxylase (EC 4.1.1.31), an anaplerotic carboxylation enzyme of grasses. SLA is suggested to reflect the state and activity of the photosynthetic apparatus and can be recommended as a characteristic of photosynthesis variability (e.g., caused by cytokinin-like preparations).

  14. Toward Effective Shell Modeling of Wrinkled Thin-Film Membranes Exhibiting Stress Concentrations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tessler, Alexander; Sleight, David W.

    2004-01-01

    Geometrically nonlinear shell finite element analysis has recently been applied to solar-sail membrane problems in order to model the out-of-plane deformations due to structural wrinkling. Whereas certain problems lend themselves to achieving converged nonlinear solutions that compare favorably with experimental observations, solutions to tensioned membranes exhibiting high stress concentrations have been difficult to obtain even with the best nonlinear finite element codes and advanced shell element technology. In this paper, two numerical studies are presented that pave the way to improving the modeling of this class of nonlinear problems. The studies address the issues of mesh refinement and stress-concentration alleviation, and the effects of these modeling strategies on the ability to attain converged nonlinear deformations due to wrinkling. The numerical studies demonstrate that excessive mesh refinement in the regions of stress concentration may be disadvantageous to achieving wrinkled equilibrium states, causing the nonlinear solution to lock in the membrane response mode, while totally discarding the very low-energy bending response that is necessary to cause wrinkling deformation patterns. An element-level, strain-energy density criterion is suggested for facilitating automated, adaptive mesh refinements specifically aimed at the modeling of thin-film membranes undergoing wrinkling deformations.

  15. Hemodynamic effects of high intensity interval training in COPD patients exhibiting exercise-induced dynamic hyperinflation.

    PubMed

    Nasis, I; Kortianou, E; Vasilopoulou, Μ; Spetsioti, S; Louvaris, Z; Kaltsakas, G; Davos, C H; Zakynthinos, S; Koulouris, N G; Vogiatzis, I

    2015-10-01

    Dynamic hyperinflation (DH) has a significant adverse effect on cardiovascular function during exercise in COPD patients. COPD patients with (n = 25) and without (n = 11) exercise-induced DH undertook an incremental (IET) and a constant-load exercise test (CLET) sustained at 75% peak work (WRpeak) prior to and following an interval cycling exercise training regime (set at 100% WRpeak with 30-s work/30-s rest intervals) lasting for 12 weeks. Cardiac output (Q) was assessed by cardio-bio-impedance (PhysioFlow, enduro, PF-O7) to determine Q mean response time (QMRT) at onset (QMRT(ON)) and offset (QMRT(OFF)) of CLET. Post-rehabilitation only those patients exhibiting exercise-induced DH demonstrated significant reductions in QMRT(ON) (from 82.2 ± 4.3 to 61.7 ± 4.2 s) and QMRT(OFF) (from 80.5 ± 3.8 to 57.2 ± 4.9 s ). These post-rehabilitation adaptations were associated with improvements in inspiratory capacity, thereby suggesting that mitigation of the degree of exercise-induced DH improves central hemodynamic responses in COPD patients. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. TCRγ4δ1-Engineered αβT Cells Exhibit Effective Antitumor Activity

    PubMed Central

    He, Kangxia; You, Hongqin; Li, Yuxia; Cui, Lianxian; Zhang, Jianmin; He, Wei

    2016-01-01

    T cell engineering with T cell receptors (TCRs) specific for tumors plays an important role in adoptive T cell transfer (ATC) therapy for cancer. Here, we present a novel strategy to redirect peripheral blood-derived αβT cells against tumors via TCRγ4δ1 gene transduction. The broad-spectrum antitumor activity of TCRδ1 cells in innate immunity is dependent on CDR3δ1. TCRγ4δ1-engineered αβT cells were prepared by lentiviral transduction and characterized by analyzing in vitro and in vivo cytotoxicity to tumors, ability of proliferation and cytokine production, and potential role in autoimmunity. Results show that TCRγ4δ1 genes were transduced to approximately 36% of polyclonal αβT cells. TCRγ4δ1-engineered αβT cells exhibited effective in vitro TCRγδ-dependent cytotoxicity against various tumor cells via the perforin-granzyme pathway. They also showed a strong proliferative capacity and robust cytokine production. TCRγ4δ1-engineered αβT cells neither expressed mixed TCR dimers nor bound/killed normal cells in vitro. More important, adoptive transfer of TCRγ4δ1-engineered αβT cells into nude mice bearing a human HepG2 cell line significantly suppressed tumor growth. Our results demonstrate a novel role for TCRγ4δ1 in gene therapy and ATC for cancer. PMID:27463149

  17. Tricarboxylate-based Gd(III) coordination polymers exhibiting large magnetocaloric effects.

    PubMed

    Liu, Sui-Jun; Cao, Chen; Xie, Chen-Chao; Zheng, Teng-Fei; Tong, Xiao-Lan; Liao, Jin-Sheng; Chen, Jing-Lin; Wen, He-Rui; Chang, Ze; Bu, Xian-He

    2016-05-31

    Two Gd(III) coordination polymers with the formula [Gd(cit)(H2O)]∞ () and [Gd(nta)(H2O)2]∞ () (H4cit = citric acid, H3nta = nitrilotriacetic acid) have been successfully prepared under hydrothermal conditions. Complex exhibits a three-dimensional (3D) structure based on carboxylate-bridged layers, while complex is a double-layer structure containing eight-coordinated Gd(III). Magnetic investigations reveal that weak antiferromagnetic couplings between adjacent Gd(III) ions in both and with different Weiss values result in large cryogenic magnetocaloric effects. It is notable that the maximum entropy changes (-ΔS) of and reach 31.3 J kg(-1) K(-1) and 32.2 J kg(-1) K(-1) at 2 K for a moderate field change (ΔH = 3 T), and a remarkable -ΔS (41.5 J kg(-1) K(-1) for and 42.0 J kg(-1) K(-1) for ) could be obtained for ΔH = 7 T.

  18. MtDNA depleted PC3 cells exhibit Warburg effect and cancer stem cell features

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiaoran; Zhong, Yali; Lu, Jie; Axcrona, Karol; Eide, Lars; Syljuåsen, Randi G.; Peng, Qian; Wang, Junbai; Zhang, Hongquan; Goscinski, Mariusz Adam; Kvalheim, Gunnar; Nesland, Jahn M.; Suo, Zhenhe

    2016-01-01

    Reducing mtDNA content was considered as a critical step in the metabolism restructuring for cell stemness restoration and further neoplastic development. However, the connections between mtDNA depletion and metabolism reprograming-based cancer cell stemness in prostate cancers are still lack of studies. Here, we demonstrated that human CRPC cell line PC3 tolerated high concentration of the mtDNA replication inhibitor ethidium bromide (EtBr) and the mtDNA depletion triggered a universal metabolic remodeling process. Failure in completing that process caused lethal consequences. The mtDNA depleted (MtDP) PC3 cells could be steadily maintained in the special medium in slow cycling status. The MtDP PC3 cells contained immature mitochondria and exhibited Warburg effect. Furthermore, the MtDP PC3 cells were resistant to therapeutic treatments and contained greater cancer stem cell-like subpopulations: CD44+, ABCG2+, side-population and ALDHbright. In conclusion, these results highlight the association of mtDNA content, mitochondrial function and cancer cell stemness features. PMID:27248169

  19. A glucose carbonate apatite complex exhibits in vitro and in vivo anti-tumour effects.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Hirofumi; Wu, Xin; Nakanishi, Hiroyuki; Yamamoto, Yuki; Uemura, Mamoru; Hata, Taishi; Nishimura, Junichi; Takemasa, Ichiro; Mizushima, Tsunekazu; Sasaki, Jun-Ichi; Imazato, Satoshi; Matsuura, Nariaki; Doki, Yuichiro; Mori, Masaki

    2015-01-13

    Tumour targeting nanotechnology has recently made therapeutic progress and several therapeutic nanoparticles have been approved for clinical application. However, an ideal nanotechnology based therapeutic for solid tumours, particularly for systemic administration, still remains a challenge in clinical cancer therapy. We previously reported a pH sensitive in vivo delivery system of doxorubicin, or microRNA, using carbonate apatite (CA) nanoparticles. To further explore utility of CA in cancer therapy, we attempted to transport excess glucose into tumour cells by conjugating glucose (Glc) to the nanoparticle. Despite the non-toxicity of CA and Glc, the complex (CA-[Glc]) exhibited an unexpected anti-cancer effect in vitro and in vivo. CA-[Glc] significantly reduced the growth of colon cancer cell lines. Intravenous injections successfully suppressed solid tumour growth. In mice and monkeys, intravenously injected CA-[Glc] complex resulted in no serious abnormalities in body weight or blood chemistry. Because cancer cells intensively metabolise glucose than normal cells, treatment of cancer using glucose seems paradoxical. However, with the aid of CA, this safe and 'sweet' complex may be a novel anti-cancer reagent.

  20. Flavonoids exhibit diverse effects on CYP11B1 expression and cortisol synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Li-Chuan; Li, Lih-Ann

    2012-02-01

    CYP11B1 catalyzes the final step of cortisol biosynthesis. The effects of flavonoids on transcriptional expression and enzyme activity of CYP11B1 were investigated using the human adrenocortical H295R cell model. All tested nonhydroxylated flavones including 3′,4′-dimethoxyflavone, α-naphthoflavone, and β-naphthoflavone upregulated CYP11B1 expression and cortisol production, whereas apigenin and quercetin exhibited potent cytotoxicity and CYP11B1 repression at high concentrations. Nonhydroxylated flavones stimulated CYP11B1-catalyzed cortisol formation at transcriptional level. Resveratrol increased endogenous and substrate-supported cortisol production like nonhydroxylated flavones tested, but it had no effect on CYP11B1 gene expression and enzyme activity. Resveratrol appeared to alter cortisol biosynthesis at an earlier step. The Ad5 element situated in the − 121/− 106 region was required for basal and flavone-induced CYP11B1 expression. Overexpression of COUP-TFI did not improve the responsiveness of Ad5 to nonhydroxylated flavones. Although COUP-TFI overexpression increased CYP11B1 and CYP11B2 promoter activation, its effect was not mediated through the common Ad5 element. Treating cells with PD98059 (a flavone-type MEK1 inhibitor) increased CYP11B1 promoter activity, but not involving ERK signaling because phosphorylation of ERK1/2 remained unvarying throughout the course of treatment. Likewise, AhR was not responsible for the CYP11B1-modulating effects of flavonoids because inconsistency with their effects on AhR activation. 3′,4′-dimethoxyflavone and 8-Br-cAMP additively activated CYP11B1 promoter activity. H-89 reduced 3′,4′-dimethoxyflavone-induced CYP11B1 promoter activation but to a lesser extent as compared to its inhibition on cAMP-induced transactivation. Our data suggest that constant exposure to nonhydroxylated flavones raises a potential risk of high basal and cAMP-induced cortisol synthesis in consequence of increased CYP11B1

  1. Isobenzofuranone derivatives exhibit antileishmanial effect by inhibiting type II DNA topoisomerase and inducing host response

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, Amartya; Vinayagam, Jayaraman; Saha, Sourav; Chowdhury, Sayan; Roychowdhury, Somenath; Jaisankar, Parasuraman; Majumder, Hemanta K

    2014-01-01

    Leishmania, a protozoan parasite, causes a wide range of human diseases ranging from the localized self-healing cutaneous lesions to fatal visceral leishmaniasis. Toxicity of traditional first line drugs and emergence of drug-resistant strains have worsened the situation. DNA topoisomerase II in kinetoplastid protozoan parasites are of immense interest as drug target because they take part in replication of unusual kinetoplast DNA network. In this study, we have taken target-based therapeutic approaches to combat leishmaniasis. Two isobenzofuranone compounds, viz., (1) 3,5-bis(4-chlorophenyl)-7-hydroxyisobenzofuran-1(3H)-one (JVPH3) and (2) (4-bromo)-3′-hydroxy-5′-(4-bromophenyl)-benzophenone(JVPH4) were synthesized chemically and characterized by NMR and mass spectrometry analysis. Activity of type II DNA topoisomerase of leishmania (LdTOPII) was monitored by decatenation assay and plasmid cleavage assay. The antiparasitic activity of these compounds was checked in experimental BALB/c mice model of visceral leishmaniasis. Isobenzofuranone derivatives exhibited potent antileishmanial effect on both antimony (Sb) sensitive and resistant parasites. Treatment with isobenzofuranone derivatives on promastigotes caused induction of reactive oxygen species (ROS)-mediated apoptosis like cell death in leishmania. Both the compounds inhibited the decatenation activity of LdTOPII but have no effect on bi-subunit topoisomerase IB. Treatment of LdTOPII with isobenzofuranone derivatives did not stabilize cleavage complex formation both in vitro and in vivo. Moreover, treatment with isobenzofuranone derivatives on Leishmania donovani-infected mice resulted in clearance of parasites in liver and spleen by induction of Th1 cytokines. Taken together, our data suggest that these compounds can be exploited as potential antileishmanial agents targeted to DNA topoisomerase II of the parasite. PMID:25505614

  2. Oil-in-Water Emulsion Exhibits Bitterness-Suppressing Effects in a Sensory Threshold Study.

    PubMed

    Torrico, Damir Dennis; Sae-Eaw, Amporn; Sriwattana, Sujinda; Boeneke, Charles; Prinyawiwatkul, Witoon

    2015-06-01

    Little is known about how emulsion characteristics affect saltiness/bitterness perception. Sensory detection and recognition thresholds of NaCl, caffeine, and KCl in aqueous solution compared with oil-in-water emulsion systems were evaluated. For emulsions, NaCl, KCl, or caffeine were dissolved in water + emulsifier and mixed with canola oil (20% by weight). Two emulsions were prepared: emulsion 1 (viscosity = 257 cP) and emulsion 2 (viscosity = 59 cP). The forced-choice ascending concentration series method of limits (ASTM E-679-04) was used to determine detection and/or recognition thresholds at 25 °C. Group best estimate threshold (GBET) geometric means were expressed as g/100 mL. Comparing NaCl with KCl, there were no significant differences in detection GBET values for all systems (0.0197 - 0.0354). For saltiness recognition thresholds, KCl GBET values were higher compared with NaCl GBET (0.0822 - 0.1070 compared with 0.0471 - 0.0501). For NaCl and KCl, emulsion 1 and/or emulsion 2 did not significantly affect the saltiness recognition threshold compared with that of the aqueous solution. However, the bitterness recognition thresholds of caffeine and KCl in solution were significantly lower than in the emulsions (0.0242 - 0.0586 compared with 0.0754 - 0.1025). Gender generally had a marginal effect on threshold values. This study showed that, compared with the aqueous solutions, emulsions did not significantly affect the saltiness recognition threshold of NaCl and KCl, but exhibited bitterness-suppressing effects on KCl and/or caffeine. © 2015 Institute of Food Technologists®

  3. Museum Exhibit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    A TSP from NASA Tech Briefs provided the solution to an electrical problem at a Florida museum. When a model train would not start without a jerk, a Marshall Space Flight Center development called pulse width control was adapted. The new circuit enables the train to start smoothly and reduces construction and maintenance costs. The same technology is also used in another hands-on exhibit. Applications of other TSPs are anticipated.

  4. Loss of CCR2 expressing non-classical monocytes are associated with cognitive impairment in antiretroviral therapy-naïve HIV-infected Thais.

    PubMed

    Ndhlovu, Lishomwa C; D'Antoni, Michelle L; Ananworanich, Jintanat; Byron, Mary Margaret; Chalermchai, Thep; Sithinamsuwan, Pasiri; Tipsuk, Somporn; Ho, Erika; Slike, Bonnie M; Schuetz, Alexandra; Zhang, Guangxiang; Agsalda-Garcia, Melissa; Shiramizu, Bruce; Shikuma, Cecilia M; Valcour, Victor

    2015-11-15

    HIV DNA in monocytes has been linked to HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND), however, characterization of monocyte subsets associated with HAND remains unclear. We completed a prospective study of antiretroviral therapy-naïve, HIV-infected Thais, with varying degrees of cognitive impairment, compared to HIV-uninfected controls. Monocyte subsets' CCR2, CCR5 and CD163 expression were profiled and inflammatory markers in plasma and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), measured. Lower numbers of CCR2(+)non-classical monocytes were associated with worse neuropsychological test performance (r=0.43, p=0.024). CCR2(+)non-classical monocyte count inversely correlated with CSF neopterin (r=-0.43, p=0.035) and plasma TNF-α levels (r=-0.40, p=0.041). These data benchmark CCR2(+)non-classical monocytes as an independent index of cognitive impairment.

  5. Airship Observations of Formaldehyde in the Po Valley as a Probe of Boundary Layer Development and Non-Classical Radical Chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaiser, J.; Wolfe, G. M.; Keutsch, F. N.

    2012-12-01

    Stagnant meteorological conditions and high anthropogenic emissions make the Po Valley in Northern Italy one of Europe's most polluted regions. Understanding the processes controlling ozone production in this environment is essential for developing effective mitigation strategies. As both a source of HO2 radicals and an intermediate in the oxidation of most volatile organic compounds (VOCs), formaldehyde (HCHO) is a useful tracer for the oxidative processing of hydrocarbons that leads to ozone production. During the Pan-European Gas-AeroSOls Climate Interaction Study (PEGASOS), HCHO measurements were acquired via a Fiber Laser-Induced Fluorescence (FiLIF) instrument onboard a Zeppelin airship. This mission represents the first successful airborne deployment of the FiLIF instrument. With low flight speeds and vertical profiling capabilities, these Zeppelin-based observations in conjunction with other measurements may offer new insights into the spatial and temporal variability of atmospheric composition within the Po Valley region. Preliminary comparisons of modeled and measured HCHO concentrations at various altitudes and VOC/NOx regimes will be presented. Analysis will focus on 1) the transition from nocturnal to daytime boundary layers, and 2) the potential role of "non-classical" radical chemistry in ozone production.

  6. Metabolic Substrates Exhibit Differential Effects on Functional Parameters of Mouse Sperm Capacitation1

    PubMed Central

    Goodson, Summer G.; Qiu, Yunping; Sutton, Keith A.; Xie, Guoxiang; Jia, Wei; O'Brien, Deborah A.

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT Although substantial evidence exists that sperm ATP production via glycolysis is required for mammalian sperm function and male fertility, conflicting reports involving multiple species have appeared regarding the ability of individual glycolytic or mitochondrial substrates to support the physiological changes that occur during capacitation. Several mouse models with defects in the signaling pathways required for capacitation exhibit reductions in sperm ATP levels, suggesting regulatory interactions between sperm metabolism and signal transduction cascades. To better understand these interactions, we conducted quantitative studies of mouse sperm throughout a 2-h in vitro capacitation period and compared the effects of single substrates assayed under identical conditions. Multiple glycolytic and nonglycolytic substrates maintained sperm ATP levels and comparable percentages of motility, but only glucose and mannose supported hyperactivation. These monosaccharides and fructose supported the full pattern of tyrosine phosphorylation, whereas nonglycolytic substrates supported at least partial tyrosine phosphorylation. Inhibition of glycolysis impaired motility in the presence of glucose, fructose, or pyruvate but not in the presence of hydroxybutyrate. Addition of an uncoupler of oxidative phosphorylation reduced motility with pyruvate or hydroxybutyrate as substrates but unexpectedly stimulated hyperactivation with fructose. Investigating differences between glucose and fructose in more detail, we demonstrated that hyperactivation results from the active metabolism of glucose. Differences between glucose and fructose appeared to be downstream of changes in intracellular pH, which rose to comparable levels during incubation with either substrate. Sperm redox pathways were differentially affected, with higher levels of associated metabolites and reactive oxygen species generated during incubations with fructose than during incubations with glucose. PMID

  7. Characterization and comparative 3D modeling of CmPI-II, a novel 'non-classical' Kazal-type inhibitor from the marine snail Cenchritis muricatus (Mollusca).

    PubMed

    González, Yamile; Pons, Tirso; Gil, Jeovanis; Besada, Vladimir; Alonso-del-Rivero, Maday; Tanaka, Aparecida S; Araujo, Mariana S; Chávez, María A

    2007-11-01

    The complete amino acid sequence obtained by electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry of the proteinase inhibitor CmPI-II isolated from Cenchritis muricatus is described. CmPI-II is a 5480-Da protein with three disulfide bridges that inhibits human neutrophil elastase (HNE) (K(i) 2.6+/-0.2 nM), trypsin (K(i) 1.1+/-0.9 nM), and other serine proteinases such as subtilisin A (K(i) 30.8+/-1.2 nM) and pancreatic elastase (K(i) 145.0+/-4.4 nM); chymotrypsin, pancreatic and plasma kallikreins, thrombin and papain are not inhibited. CmPI-II shares homology with the Kazal-type domain and may define a new group of 'non-classical' Kazal inhibitors according to its Cys(I)-Cys(V) disulfide bridge position. The 3D model of CmPI-II exhibits similar secondary structure characteristics to Kazal-type inhibitors and concurs with circular dichroism experiments. A 3D model of the CmPI-II/HNE complex provides a structural framework for the interpretation of its experimentally determined K(i) value. The model shows both similar and different contacts at the primary binding sites in comparison with the structure of turkey ovomucoid third domain (OMTKY3)/HNE used as template. Additional contacts calculated at the protease-inhibitor interface could also contribute to the association energy of the complex. This inhibitor represents an exception in terms of specificity owing to its ability to strongly inhibit elastases and trypsin.

  8. Outdoor Exhibits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    The National Data Buoy Center (NDBC) at the John C. Stennis Space Center has exhibits located in front of the Visitors Center. These boat-shaped buoys are moored in areas of the ocean that experience hostile environmental conditions. The instruments installed gather information and relay it to the National Weather Service by satellite. Nomad buoys are 20 feet long and weigh 13,900 pounds. They provide information on wind speed and direction, humidity levels, air and sea surface temperature and air pressure. U.S. Coast Guard ships transport buoys to their mooring sites.

  9. Outdoor Exhibits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    The National Data Buoy Center (NDBC) at the John C. Stennis Space Center has exhibits located in front of the Visitors Center. These boat-shaped buoys are moored in areas of the ocean that experience hostile environmental conditions. The instruments installed gather information and relay it to the National Weather Service by satellite. Nomad buoys are 20 feet long and weigh 13,900 pounds. They provide information on wind speed and direction, humidity levels, air and sea surface temperature and air pressure. U.S. Coast Guard ships transport buoys to their mooring sites.

  10. In Vitro Characterization of the Two-Stage Non-Classical Reassembly Pathway of S-Layers

    PubMed Central

    Breitwieser, Andreas; Iturri, Jagoba; Toca-Herrera, Jose-Luis; Sleytr, Uwe B.; Pum, Dietmar

    2017-01-01

    The recombinant bacterial surface layer (S-layer) protein rSbpA of Lysinibacillus sphaericus CCM 2177 is an ideal model system to study non-classical nucleation and growth of protein crystals at surfaces since the recrystallization process may be separated into two distinct steps: (i) adsorption of S-layer protein monomers on silicon surfaces is completed within 5 min and the amount of bound S-layer protein sufficient for the subsequent formation of a closed crystalline monolayer; (ii) the recrystallization process is triggered—after washing away the unbound S-layer protein—by the addition of a CaCl2 containing buffer solution, and completed after approximately 2 h. The entire self-assembly process including the formation of amorphous clusters, the subsequent transformation into crystalline monomolecular arrays, and finally crystal growth into extended lattices was investigated by quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation (QCM-D) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). Moreover, contact angle measurements showed that the surface properties of S-layers change from hydrophilic to hydrophobic as the crystallization proceeds. This two-step approach is new in basic and application driven S-layer research and, most likely, will have advantages for functionalizing surfaces (e.g., by spray-coating) with tailor-made biological sensing layers. PMID:28216572

  11. On-chip detection of non-classical light by scalable integration of single-photon detectors

    PubMed Central

    Najafi, Faraz; Mower, Jacob; Harris, Nicholas C.; Bellei, Francesco; Dane, Andrew; Lee, Catherine; Hu, Xiaolong; Kharel, Prashanta; Marsili, Francesco; Assefa, Solomon; Berggren, Karl K.; Englund, Dirk

    2015-01-01

    Photonic-integrated circuits have emerged as a scalable platform for complex quantum systems. A central goal is to integrate single-photon detectors to reduce optical losses, latency and wiring complexity associated with off-chip detectors. Superconducting nanowire single-photon detectors (SNSPDs) are particularly attractive because of high detection efficiency, sub-50-ps jitter and nanosecond-scale reset time. However, while single detectors have been incorporated into individual waveguides, the system detection efficiency of multiple SNSPDs in one photonic circuit—required for scalable quantum photonic circuits—has been limited to <0.2%. Here we introduce a micrometer-scale flip-chip process that enables scalable integration of SNSPDs on a range of photonic circuits. Ten low-jitter detectors are integrated on one circuit with 100% device yield. With an average system detection efficiency beyond 10%, and estimated on-chip detection efficiency of 14–52% for four detectors operated simultaneously, we demonstrate, to the best of our knowledge, the first on-chip photon correlation measurements of non-classical light. PMID:25575346

  12. Non-classical nuclear localization signal peptides for high efficiency lipofection of primary neurons and neuronal cell lines.

    PubMed

    Ma, H; Zhu, J; Maronski, M; Kotzbauer, P T; Lee, V M-Y; Dichter, M A; Diamond, S L

    2002-01-01

    Gene transfer into CNS is critical for potential therapeutic applications as well as for the study of the genetic basis of neural development and nerve function. Unfortunately, lipid-based gene transfer to CNS cells is extremely inefficient since the nucleus of these post-mitotic cells presents a significant barrier to transfection. We report the development of a simple and highly efficient lipofection method for primary embryonic rat hippocampal neurons (up to 25% transfection) that exploits the M9 sequence of the non-classical nuclear localization signal of heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein A1 for targeting beta(2)-karyopherin (transportin-1). M9-assistant lipofection resulted in 20-100-fold enhancement of transfection over lipofection alone for embryonic-derived retinal ganglion cells, rat pheochromocytoma (PC12) cells, embryonic rat ventral mesencephalon neurons, as well as the clinically relevant human NT2 cells or retinoic acid-differentiated NT2 neurons. This technique can facilitate the implementation of promoter construct experiments in post-mitotic cells, stable transformant generation, and dominant-negative mutant expression techniques in CNS cells.

  13. CD95 maintains stem cell-like and non-classical EMT programs in primary human glioblastoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Drachsler, M; Kleber, S; Mateos, A; Volk, K; Mohr, N; Chen, S; Cirovic, B; Tüttenberg, J; Gieffers, C; Sykora, J; Wirtz, C R; Mueller, W; Synowitz, M; Martin-Villalba, A

    2016-01-01

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is one of the most aggressive types of cancer with limited therapeutic options and unfavorable prognosis. Stemness and non-classical epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (ncEMT) features underlie the switch from normal to neoplastic states as well as resistance of tumor clones to current therapies. Therefore, identification of ligand/receptor systems maintaining this privileged state is needed to devise efficient cancer therapies. In this study, we show that the expression of CD95 associates with stemness and EMT features in GBM tumors and cells and serves as a prognostic biomarker. CD95 expression increases in tumors and with tumor relapse as compared with non-tumor tissue. Recruitment of the activating PI3K subunit, p85, to CD95 death domain is required for maintenance of EMT-related transcripts. A combination of the current GBM therapy, temozolomide, with a CD95 inhibitor dramatically abrogates tumor sphere formation. This study molecularly dissects the role of CD95 in GBM cells and contributes the rational for CD95 inhibition as a GBM therapy. PMID:27124583

  14. Ion-association complexes unite classical and non-classical theories for the biomimetic nucleation of calcium phosphate.

    PubMed

    Habraken, Wouter J E M; Tao, Jinhui; Brylka, Laura J; Friedrich, Heiner; Bertinetti, Luca; Schenk, Anna S; Verch, Andreas; Dmitrovic, Vladimir; Bomans, Paul H H; Frederik, Peter M; Laven, Jozua; van der Schoot, Paul; Aichmayer, Barbara; de With, Gijsbertus; DeYoreo, James J; Sommerdijk, Nico A J M

    2013-01-01

    Despite its importance in many industrial, geological and biological processes, the mechanism of crystallization from supersaturated solutions remains a matter of debate. Recent discoveries show that in many solution systems nanometre-sized structural units are already present before nucleation. Still little is known about the structure and role of these so-called pre-nucleation clusters. Here we present a combination of in situ investigations, which show that for the crystallization of calcium phosphate these nanometre-sized units are in fact calcium triphosphate complexes. Under conditions in which apatite forms from an amorphous calcium phosphate precursor, these complexes aggregate and take up an extra calcium ion to form amorphous calcium phosphate, which is a fractal of Ca(2)(HPO(4))(3)(2-) clusters. The calcium triphosphate complex also forms the basis of the crystal structure of octacalcium phosphate and apatite. Finally, we demonstrate how the existence of these complexes lowers the energy barrier to nucleation and unites classical and non-classical nucleation theories.

  15. Blending Effective Behavior Management and Literacy Strategies for Preschoolers Exhibiting Negative Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Jaime

    2009-01-01

    Sometimes students will exhibit various aggressive behaviors in the preschool classroom. Early childhood educators need to have behavior management strategies to manage the students' negative behaviors within the classroom setting. This article will provide a rationale for embedding literacy instruction within behavior management strategies to…

  16. Simple Exhibits, Effective Learning: Presenting the United Farm Workers' Experience on the World Wide Web.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Golodner, Daniel

    2002-01-01

    Describes the design of an online exhibit about the history of the United Farm Workers union that was created on the World Wide Web by the Walter P. Reuther Library/Archives of Labor and Urban History. Discusses Web design, hypertext links, and ease of navigation. (Author/LRW)

  17. Blending Effective Behavior Management and Literacy Strategies for Preschoolers Exhibiting Negative Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Jaime

    2009-01-01

    Sometimes students will exhibit various aggressive behaviors in the preschool classroom. Early childhood educators need to have behavior management strategies to manage the students' negative behaviors within the classroom setting. This article will provide a rationale for embedding literacy instruction within behavior management strategies to…

  18. Comparative studies between species that do and do not exhibit the washout effect.

    PubMed

    Scott, Patrick A; Overby, Darryl R; Freddo, Thomas F; Gong, Haiyan

    2007-03-01

    Ocular perfusion studies from all non-human species performed to date consistently demonstrate a perfusion-volume-dependent increase in aqueous outflow facility known as the "washout" effect. However, this "washout" effect does not occur in human eyes. We have recently documented that, in bovine eyes, the washout associated increase in facility correlates with the extent of physical separation between the juxtacanalicular connective tissue (JCT) and the inner wall endothelium lining the aqueous plexus (the bovine equivalent of Schlemm's canal). We hypothesize that if washout truly correlates with inner wall/JCT separation then this separation should not occur in human eyes that do not exhibit the washout effect, even after prolonged perfusion. Eight enucleated human and eight bovine eyes were used in this study. Aqueous humor outflow facility was measured at 15 mmHg for long-duration (3 h) or short-duration (30 min to 1 h) perfusion (n=4 for each group). All eyes were perfusion-fixed at 15 mmHg, and examined morphologically with both light and electron microscopy. In bovine eyes, outflow facility increased 81% (p=0.049) from 1.06 +/- 0.06 microl/min per mmHg (mean+/-SEM) at baseline to 1.92 +/- 0.30 microl/min per mmHg after 3 h due to washout. The pre-fixation outflow facility in long-duration eyes (1.92 +/- 0.30 microl/min per mmHg) was 2-fold greater than pre-fixation facility in short-duration eyes (0.92 +/- 0.11 microl/min per mmHg; p=0.0387). In human eyes, washout was not observed; baseline outflow facility was similar between both groups (0.18 +/- 0.02 vs. 0.25 +/- 0.08 microl/min per mmHg; p=0.518); however, pre-fixation outflow facility in long-duration eyes showed a 40% decrease compared to baseline outflow facility in those same eyes (p=0.017, paired Student's t-test). In bovine eyes, significant expansion and rarefaction of the JCT and inner wall/JCT separation was much more prevalent in long-duration eyes, and data from all bovine eyes revealed a

  19. COMPARATIVE STUDIES BETWEEN SPECIES THAT DO AND DO NOT EXHIBIT THE WASHOUT EFFECT

    PubMed Central

    Scott, Patrick A.; Overby, Darryl R.; Freddo, Thomas F.; Gong, Haiyan

    2007-01-01

    Ocular perfusion studies from all non-human species performed to date consistently demonstrate a perfusion-volume-dependent increase in aqueous outflow facility known as the “washout” effect. However, this “washout” effect does not occur in human eyes. We have recently documented that, in bovine eyes, the washout associated increase in facility correlates with the extent of physical separation between the juxtacanalicular connective tissue (JCT) and the inner wall endothelium lining the aqueous plexus (the bovine equivalent of Schlemm’s canal). We hypothesize that if washout truly correlates with inner wall/JCT separation then this separation should not occur in human eyes that do not exhibit the washout effect, even after prolonged perfusion. Eight enucleated human and eight bovine eyes were used in this study. Aqueous outflow facility was measured at 15 mmHg for long-duration (3 hr) or short-duration (30 min – 1 hr) perfusion (n=4 for each group). All eyes were perfusion-fixed at 15 mmHg, and examined morphologically with both light and electron microscopy. In bovine eyes, outflow facility increased 81% (p=0.049) from 1.06 ± 0.06 μl/min/mmHg at baseline to 1.92 ± 0.30 μl/min/mmHg after 3 hrs due to washout. The pre-fixation outflow facility in long-duration eyes (1.92 ± 0.30 μl/min/mmHg) (mean ± SEM) was 2-fold greater than pre-fixation facility in short-duration eyes (0.92 ± 0.11 μl/min/mmHg; p = 0.0387). In human eyes, washout was not observed; baseline outflow facility was similar between both groups (0.18 ± 0.02 vs. 0.25 ± 0.08 μl/min/mmHg; p=0.518); however, pre-fixation outflow facility in long-duration eyes showed a 40% decrease compared to baseline outflow facility in those same eyes (p = 0.017, paired Student’s t-test). In bovine eyes, significant expansion and rarefaction of the JCT and inner wall/JCT separation was much more prevalent in long-duration eyes, and data from all bovine eyes revealed a correlation between the

  20. [Forensic-medical examination of the effect of current synthetic detergents on the exhibits].

    PubMed

    Galitskiĭ, F A; Musabekova, S A

    2007-01-01

    A test for trace quantities of synthetic detergents on fabric is described in detail. Feasibility of detergents identification in the spots on the exhibits with thin-layer chromatography on silufol is shown and cases of such identification in biological material are given for illustration. Adequacy of the results is confirmed. Such investigation in forensic-medical practice will raise informative value of expert certification in cases when standard biological methods are unable to provide necessary precision.

  1. NF-κB Inhibitors from Brucea javanica Exhibiting Intracellular Effects on Reactive Oxygen Species

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jeong-Ah; Lau, Edward K.; Pan, Li; Carcache de Blanco, Esperanza J.

    2010-01-01

    Aim Brucea javanica was studied to identify Nuclear Factor kappaB (NF-κB) inhibitors exhibiting Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) intracellular amplification. Material and Methods Eight compounds were evaluated for selective cytotoxicity using HT-29, HeLa, and HL-60 cells, and in a NF-κB assay. Active compounds were then tested using ROS and Mitochondria Transmembrane Potential (MTP) assays. NF-κB and Nuclear Factor Activated T cell (NFAT) translocation were also assessed using their respective whole cell assays. Results Bruceajavanone B, bruceantin, bruceine A, (−)-hydnocarpin, and chrysoeriol exhibited cytotoxic potential and NF-κB p65 inhibition. Chrysoeriol exhibited selective cytotoxicity against leukemia cells with greater potency and also showed an ability to up-regulate NFAT transcriptional pathways through the amplification of intracellular ROS, in the presence of H2O2, to a greater degree than bruceantin and bruceine. Conclusion Chrysoeriol selectively kills leukemic cells and potentiates the amplification of ROS levels. Therefore, chrysoeriol could serve as a potential chemotherapeutic modifier for leukemia chemotherapy since leukemia cells have a higher susceptibility to elevated ROS levels. PMID:20944100

  2. Expression of bovine non-classical major histocompatibility complex class 1 proteins in mouse P815 and human K562 cells

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC-I) proteins can be expressed as cell surface or secreted proteins. To investigate whether bovine non-classical MHC-I proteins are expressed as cell surface or secreted proteins, and to assess the reactivity pattern of monoclonal antibodies with non-class...

  3. GPR30, the Non-Classical Membrane G Protein Related Estrogen Receptor, Is Overexpressed in Human Seminoma and Promotes Seminoma Cell Proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Chevalier, Nicolas; Vega, Aurélie; Bouskine, Adil; Siddeek, Bénazir; Michiels, Jean-François; Chevallier, Daniel; Fénichel, Patrick

    2012-01-01

    Background Testicular germ cell tumours are the most frequent cancer of young men with an increasing incidence all over the world. Pathogenesis and reasons of this increase remain unknown but epidemiological and clinical data have suggested that fetal exposure to environmental endocrine disruptors (EEDs) with estrogenic effects, could participate to testicular germ cell carcinogenesis. However, these EEDs (like bisphenol A) are often weak ligands for classical nuclear estrogen receptors. Several research groups recently showed that the non classical membrane G-protein coupled estrogen receptor (GPER/GPR30) mediates the effects of estrogens and several xenoestrogens through rapid non genomic activation of signal transduction pathways in various human estrogen dependent cancer cells (breast, ovary, endometrium). The aim of this study was to demonstrate that GPER was overexpressed in testicular tumours and was able to trigger JKT-1 seminoma cell proliferation. Results We report here for the first time a complete morphological and functional characterization of GPER in normal and malignant human testicular germ cells. In normal adult human testes, GPER was expressed by somatic (Sertoli cells) and germ cells (spermatogonia and spermatocytes). GPER was exclusively overexpressed in seminomas, the most frequent testicular germ cell cancer, localized at the cell membrane and triggered a proliferative effect on JKT-1 cells in vitro, which was completely abolished by G15 (a GPER selective antagonist) and by siRNA invalidation. Conclusion These results demonstrate that GPER is expressed by human normal adult testicular germ cells, specifically overexpressed in seminoma tumours and able to trigger seminoma cell proliferation in vitro. It should therefore be considered rather than classical ERs when xeno-estrogens or other endocrine disruptors are assessed in testicular germ cell cancers. It may also represent a prognosis marker and/or a therapeutic target for seminomas. PMID

  4. Factors influencing effectiveness of exhibit displays on family learning in a public aquarium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeffery, Kodi Rae

    An important goal in science education reform is to create a scientifically literate society. The American Association for the Advancement of Science (1989b) has stated that for people to understand biology, they must first have personal experiences with it. There are severe limitations on the types of firsthand biology experiences available in the classroom. Informal learning institutions, however, are not limited by these constraints. Visitors enjoy a free-choice environment, where they can thoroughly explore things unavailable in most classrooms. Thus, museums are key resources that may help society achieve scientific literacy. This study asked what aspects of the Aquarium of the America's labeling system promote visitor learning. I looked at characteristics of both the text and the displays themselves. By using open-ended interviews rather than formal questionnaires, I allowed visitors to identify information pertinent to them. After observing families viewing the Aquarium's "Living in Water" exhibit, I interviewed them to learn what had made an impact on them. One to two months later, I conducted follow-up interviews with each family member. Although families did not come away with the strong cognitive gains we might desire, they did come away with some strong episodic memories. Visitors tended to describe their interactions with each other and the displays rather than the actual label content---except for cartoon labels. Nevertheless, when visitors found displays that raised questions, they were curious to find answers and more likely to mention them. Families also described more details of interactive displays, particularly those that used various senses and emotions. Such potentially powerful interactives must be carefully tested, or we may create tenacious misconceptions rather than greater understanding. Based on my observations, I developed an Exhibit Interactivity Rubric (EIR) which may be useful in developing meaningful exhibits. Some families created

  5. The covalent structure of the elastase inhibitor from Anemonia sulcata--a "non-classical" Kazal-type protein.

    PubMed

    Tschesche, H; Kolkenbrock, H; Bode, W

    1987-10-01

    The amino-acid sequence of the proteinase inhibitor specific for elastases from the sea anemone Anemonia sulcata was determined from performic-acid oxidized inhibitor and from three cyanogen bromide fragments of reduced and carboxymethylated inhibitor. The molecule consists of a single polypeptide chain formed from 48 amino-acid residues and is stabilized by three intramolecular disulfide bridges. After cyanogen bromide cleavage of the native protein at methionines 10 and 28 followed by chymotryptic cleavage two fragments each containing a single disulfide bridge were isolated. These indicated the location of three intramolecular disulfide linkages between Cys4 and Cys34 (part of A-loop), Cys8 and Cys27 (B-loop) and Cys16 and Cys48 (C-loop). The sequential homology and the disulfide pattern identified the elastase inhibitor as a Kazal-type inhibitor in which, however, not only the CysI-CysII segment is rather short but interestingly the Cys4-Cys34 disulfide anchoring point (i.e. CysI-CysV) in the C-loop is shifted by one turn in the alpha-helical segment towards the C-terminus. Thus, the elastase inhibitor is a non-classical Kazal-type inhibitor with respect to the positioning of the half-cystines. The inhibitor molecule was modelled based on the known three-dimensional structure of the silver pheasant ovomucoid third domain. The shortened amino-terminal segment was arranged in such a manner to allow disulfide bridge formation between the first cysteine Cys4 and the replaced Cys34 under maintenance of a suitable binding loop conformation. The characteristic ovomucoid scaffold consisting of a central alpha-helix, an adjacent three-stranded beta-sheet and the proteinase-binding loop cross-connected through disulfide bridges CysI-CysV and CysIII-CysVI was conserved.

  6. INFANT RATS EXHIBIT AVERSIVE LEARNING MEDIATED BY ETHANOL'S OROSENSORY EFFECTS BUT ARE POSITIVELY REINFORCED BY ETHANOL'S POSTINGESTIVE EFFECTS

    PubMed Central

    Pautassi, Ricardo Marcos; Molina, Juan Carlos; Spear, Norman

    2008-01-01

    Previous work suggests aversive and appetitive hedonic effects of intraorally delivered EtOH in preweanling rats. Pups are reluctant to perform an operant response when reinforced with intraoral EtOH infusions, a result suggesting aversive orosensory properties of EtOH. Yet, postabsorptive effects of ethanol seem capable of supporting appetitive conditioning. Two experiments were conducted to test this phenomenon. Both included a pre-exposure phase (postnatal day 13, PD13) comprising intraoral stimulation with water or EtOH. In Experiment 1, pups were given pairings between a tactile conditioned stimulus (CS) and intraoral infusions of EtOH or water. A subsequent tactile preference test revealed that pups spent significantly less on the EtOH-related CS relative to time spent on the alternative CS. In Experiment 2 pups were exposed to a texture CS (sandpaper) while intraorally infused with EtOH or during a later EtOH postinfusion interval. A tactile locational test conducted on PD16 indicated that EtOH-preexposed animals that experienced sandpaper paired with EtOH's postabsorptive effects exhibited a significant preference for the CS, even relative to a control group that experienced non-reinforced exposure to the tactile CS during conditioning. These results confirm that intraoral ethanol acts as an aversive tastant. A brief pre-exposure to EtOH allows later expression of appetitive learning mediated by the drug's postingestive effects. PMID:17936347

  7. Judgement heuristics and bias in evidence interpretation: The effects of computer generated exhibits.

    PubMed

    Norris, Gareth

    2015-01-01

    The increasing use of multi-media applications, trial presentation software and computer generated exhibits (CGE) has raised questions as to the potential impact of the use of presentation technology on juror decision making. A significant amount of the commentary on the manner in which CGE exerts legal influence is largely anecdotal; empirical examinations too are often devoid of established theoretical rationalisations. This paper will examine a range of established judgement heuristics (for example, the attribution error, representativeness, simulation), in order to establish their appropriate application for comprehending legal decisions. Analysis of both past cases and empirical studies will highlight the potential for heuristics and biases to be restricted or confounded by the use of CGE. The paper will conclude with some wider discussion on admissibility, access to justice, and emerging issues in the use of multi-media in court.

  8. Non-classical FCGR2C haplotype is associated with protection from red blood cell allo-immunization in sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Meinderts, Sanne M; Sins, Joep W R; Fijnvandraat, Karin; Nagelkerke, Sietse Q; Geissler, Judy; Tanck, Michael W; Bruggeman, Christine; Biemond, Bart J; Rijneveld, Anita W; Kerkhoffs, Jean-Louis H; Pakdaman, Sadaf; Habibi, Anoosha; van Bruggen, Robin; Kuijpers, Taco W; Pirenne, France; van den Berg, Timo K

    2017-09-12

    Red blood cell (RBC) transfusions are of vital importance in patients with sickle cell disease (SCD). However, a major complication of transfusion therapy is allo-immunization. The low-affinity Fc gamma receptors (FcγRs), expressed on immune cells, are important regulators of antibody responses. Genetic variation in FCGR genes has been associated with various auto- and allo-immune diseases. The aim of this study was to evaluate the association between genetic variation of FCGR and RBC allo-immunization in SCD. In this case-control study, DNA samples from 2 cohorts of transfused SCD patients were combined (France and the Netherlands). Cases had a positive history of allo-immunization, having received ≥1 RBC unit. Controls had a negative history of allo-immunization, having received ≥20 RBC units. Single nucleotide polymorphisms and copy number variation of the FCGR2/3 gene cluster were studied in a FCGR-specific multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification assay. Frequencies were compared using logistic regression. Two-hundred-seventy-two patients were included (130 controls, 142 cases). The non-classical open reading frame in the FCGR2C gene (FCGR2C.nc-ORF) was strongly associated with a decreased allo-immunization risk (OR 0.26, 95% CI 0.11-0.64). This association persisted when only including controls with exposure to ≥100 units (OR 0.30, CI 0.11-0.85), and appeared even stronger when excluding cases with Rh or K antibodies only (OR 0.19, CI 0.06-0.59). In conclusion, SCD patients with the FCGR2Cnc-ORF polymorphism have over a threefold lower risk for RBC allo-immunization compared to patients without this mutation. This protective effect was strongest for exposure to antigens other than the immunogenic Rh or K antigens. Copyright © 2017 American Society of Hematology.

  9. Ouabain interactions with the α4 isoform of the sodium pump trigger non-classical steroid hormone signaling and integrin expression in spermatogenic cells.

    PubMed

    Upmanyu, Neha; Dietze, Raimund; Kirch, Ulrike; Scheiner-Bobis, Georgios

    2016-11-01

    In addition to the ubiquitous α1 isoform of the sodium pump, sperm cells also express a male-specific α4 isoform whose function has been associated with sperm motility, fertility, and capacitation. Here we investigate in the murine spermatogenic cell line GC-2 interactions of the α4 isoform with the cardiotonic steroid ouabain in signaling cascades involved in the non-classical action of steroid hormones. Exposure of GC-2 cells to low concentrations of ouabain stimulates the phosphorylation of Erk1/2 and of the transcription factors CREB and ATF-1. As a consequence of this signaling cascade, ouabain stimulates on the mRNA level the expression of integrins αv, β3 and α5, whose expression is also modulated by the cAMP response element. Increased expression of integrins αv and β3 is also seen in cultures of seminiferous tubules exposed to 10nM ouabain. At the protein level we observed a significant stimulation of β3 integrin expression by ouabain. Abrogation of α4 isoform expression by siRNA leads to the complete suppression of all ouabain-induced signaling mentioned above, including its stimulatory effect on the expression of β3 integrin. The results presented here demonstrate for the first time the induction of signaling cascades through the interaction of ouabain with the α4 isoform in a germ-cell derived cell line. The novel finding that these interactions lead to increased expression of integrins in GC-2 cells and the confirmation of these results in the ex vivo experiments indicate that hormone/receptor-like interactions of ouabain with the α4 isoform might be of significance for male physiology.

  10. Theoretical description of magnetocaloric effect in the shape memory alloy exhibiting metamagnetic behavior

    SciTech Connect

    L'vov, Victor A.; Kosogor, Anna; Barandiaran, Jose M.

    2016-01-07

    A simple thermodynamic theory is proposed for the quantitative description of giant magnetocaloric effect observed in metamagnetic shape memory alloys. Both the conventional magnetocaloric effect at the Curie temperature and the inverse magnetocaloric effect at the transition from the ferromagnetic austenite to a weakly magnetic martensite are considered. These effects are evaluated from the Landau-type free energy expression involving exchange interactions in a system of a two magnetic sublattices. The findings of the thermodynamic theory agree with first-principles calculations and experimental results from Ni-Mn-In-Co and Ni-Mn-Sn alloys, respectively.

  11. Non-classical behaviour of higher valence dopants in chromium (III) oxide by a Cr vacancy compensation mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carey, John J.; Nolan, Michael

    2017-10-01

    Modification of metal oxides with dopants that have a stable oxidation in their parent oxides which is higher than the host system is expected to introduce extra electrons into the material to improve carrier mobility. This is essential for applications in catalysis, SOFCs and solar energy materials. Density functional theory calculations are used to investigate the change in electronic and geometric structure of chromium (III) oxide by higher valence dopants, namely; Ce, Ti, V and Zr. For single metal doping, we find that the dopants with variable oxidation states, Ce, Ti and V, adopt a valence state of  +3, while Zr dopant has a  +4 oxidation state and reduces a neighbouring Cr cation. Chromium vacancy formation is greatly enhanced for all dopants, and favoured over oxygen vacancy formation. The Cr vacancies generate holes which oxidise Ce, Ti and V from  +3 to  +4, while also oxidising lattice oxygen sites. For Zr doping, the generated holes oxidise the reduced Cr2+ cation back to Cr3+ and also two lattice oxygen atoms. Three metal atoms in the bulk lattice facilitate spontaneous Cr vacancy from charge compensation. A non-classical compensation mechanism is observed for Ce, Ti and V; all three metals are oxidised from  +3 to  +4, which explains experimental observations that these metals have a  +4 oxidation state in Cr2O3. Charge compensation of the three Zr metals proceeds by a classical higher valence doping mechanism; the three dopants reduce three Cr cations, which are subsequently charge compensated by a Cr vacancy oxidising three Cr2+ to Cr3+. The compensated structures are the correct ground state electronic structure for these doped systems, and used as a platform to investigate cation/anion vacancy formation. Unlike the single metal doped bulks, preference is now given for oxygen vacancy formation over Cr vacancy formation, indicating that the dopants increase the reducibility of Cr2O3 with Ce doping showing the strongest

  12. Cinnamon extract exhibits insulin-like and independent effects on gene expression in adipocytes

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Cinnamon is beneficial to people with insulin resistance due in part to the insulin-like activity of the cinnamon extract (CE). Molecular effects of CE are limited. This study tested the hypothesis that CE has insulin-like and insulin-independent effects at the molecular level. Quantitative real-tim...

  13. An Investigation of the Life Experiences and Beliefs of High School Teachers Exhibiting Effective Classroom Management Behaviors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Byron

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative study was to explore the life experiences and beliefs of high school teachers exhibiting highly effective classroom management skills. The research for this phenomenological study utilized the narrative inquiry method of data collection. This study investigates the life experiences and beliefs of nine teachers…

  14. If You Change Yourself, the World Changes: The Effect of Exhibition on Preservice Science Teachers' Views about Global Climate Change

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aksüt, Pelin; Dogan, Nihal; Bahar, Mehmet

    2016-01-01

    Although learning can occur in many environments e.g. science museum or zoo, some studies reported that teachers are prone to avoid outdoor activities since they lack of field trip training. For that reason; this study aims to explore the effect of the exhibition on preservice science teachers' views about global climate change (GCC) as well as…

  15. If You Change Yourself, the World Changes: The Effect of Exhibition on Preservice Science Teachers' Views about Global Climate Change

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aksüt, Pelin; Dogan, Nihal; Bahar, Mehmet

    2016-01-01

    Although learning can occur in many environments e.g. science museum or zoo, some studies reported that teachers are prone to avoid outdoor activities since they lack of field trip training. For that reason; this study aims to explore the effect of the exhibition on preservice science teachers' views about global climate change (GCC) as well as…

  16. Implementation of a School/Home Based Model to Promote Effective Management of Problem Behaviors Exhibited by Preschool Handicapped Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caldwell-Fifer, Edith

    The project was designed to develop, implement, and evaluate an effective management system to modify and reduce inappropriate behaviors exhibited by preschool handicapped children. The writer (1) provided in-service training to school personnel to increase their expertise and skills in changing behavior, (2) encouraged parent education and…

  17. Dietary Phenolic Acids Act as Effective Antioxidants in Membrane Models and in Cultured Cells, Exhibiting Proapoptotic Effects in Leukaemia Cells

    PubMed Central

    Zambonin, Laura; Caliceti, Cristiana; Vieceli Dalla Sega, Francesco; Fiorentini, Diana; Hrelia, Silvana; Landi, Laura; Prata, Cecilia

    2012-01-01

    Caffeic, syringic, and protocatechuic acids are phenolic acids derived directly from food intake or come from the gut metabolism of polyphenols. In this study, the antioxidant activity of these compounds was at first evaluated in membrane models, where caffeic acid behaved as a very effective chain-breaking antioxidant, whereas syringic and protocatechuic acids were only retardants of lipid peroxidation. However, all three compounds acted as good scavengers of reactive species in cultured cells subjected to exogenous oxidative stress produced by low level of H2O2. Many tumour cells are characterised by increased ROS levels compared with their noncancerous counterparts. Therefore, we investigated whether phenolic acids, at low concentrations, comparable to those present in human plasma, were able to decrease basal reactive species. Results show that phenolic acids reduced ROS in a leukaemia cell line (HEL), whereas no effect was observed in normal cells, such as HUVEC. The compounds exhibited no toxicity to normal cells while they decreased proliferation in leukaemia cells, inducing apoptosis. In the debate on optimal ROS-manipulating strategies in cancer therapy, our work in leukaemia cells supports the antioxidant ROS-depleting approach. PMID:22792417

  18. Ni-Mn-Ga Single Crystal Exhibiting Multiple Magnetic Shape Memory Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heczko, Oleg; Veřtát, Petr; Vronka, Marek; Kopecky, Vít; Perevertov, Oleksiy

    2016-09-01

    Both magnetically induced phase transformation and magnetically induced reorientation (MIR) effects were observed in one Ni50Mn28Ga22 single crystal sample by direct measurement of the magnetic field-induced strain. We investigated various twinning microstructures ranged from single twin interface to fine twinning and crossing twins to evaluate what controls the apparent twinning stress crucial for MIR. The main challenges for the applications of these effects are outlined.

  19. Insulin Exhibits an Antiproliferative and Hypertrophic Effect in First Trimester Human Extravillous Trophoblasts.

    PubMed

    Silva, Cláudia; Nunes, Catarina; Correia-Branco, Ana; Araújo, João R; Martel, Fátima

    2017-04-01

    Our aim was to investigate the effect of high levels of glucose, insulin, leptin, and tumor necrosis factor alpha, biomarkers of diabetes in pregnancy, in the process of placentation, using as a cell model a first trimester extravillous human trophoblast cell line (HTR8/SVneo cells). Exposure of HTR8/SVneo cells for 24 hours to either glucose (20 mmol/L) or leptin (25-100 ng/mL) did not cause significant changes in cell proliferation and viability. Tumor necrosis factor alpha (24 hours; 10-100 ng/L) caused a small decrease (10%) in cell proliferation and an increase (9%) in cell viability; however, both effects disappeared when exposure time was increased. Insulin (24 hours; 1-10 nmol/L) caused a concentration- and time-dependent decrease (10%-20%) in cell proliferation; the effect of insulin (10 nmol/L) was more pronounced after a 48 hours exposure (35%). In contrast, exposure to insulin (10 nmol/L; 48 hours) showed no significant effect on cell viability, apoptosis, and migration capacity. Insulin appears to cause hypertrophy of HTR8/SVneo cells as it reduces the cell mitotic index while increasing the culture protein content. The antiproliferative effect of insulin seems to involve activation of mammalian target of rapamycin, phosphoinositide 3-kinase, and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase. Finally, simvastatin and the polyphenol quercetin potentiated the antiproliferative effect of insulin; on the contrary, the polyphenol resveratrol, the polyunsaturated fatty acids eicosapentaenoic and docosahexaenoic acids, and folic acid were not able to change it. In conclusion, we show that insulin has an antiproliferative and hypertrophic effect on a first trimester extravillous human trophoblast cell line. So insulin might affect the process of placentation.

  20. Fluoxetine Exhibits Pharmacological Effects and Trait-Based Sensitivity in a Marine Worm.

    PubMed

    Hird, Cameron M; Urbina, Mauricio A; Lewis, Ceri N; Snape, Jason R; Galloway, Tamara S

    2016-08-02

    Global production of pharmacologically active compounds exceeds 100 000 tons annually, a proportion of which enters aquatic environments through patient use, improper medicine disposal, and production. These compounds are designed to have mode-of-action (MoA) effects on specific biological pathways, with potential to impact nontarget species. Here, we used MoA and trait-based approaches to quantify uptake and biological effects of fluoxetine, a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor, in filter and deposit feeding marine worms (Hediste diversicolor). Worms exposed to 10 μg L(-1), accumulated fluoxetine with a body burden over 270 times greater than exposure concentrations, resulting in ∼10% increased coelomic fluid serotonin, a pharmacological effect. Observed effects included weight loss (up to 2% at 500 μg L(-1)), decreased feeding rate (68% at 500 μg L(-1)), and altered metabolism (oxygen consumption, ammonia excretion, and O/N from 10 μg L(-1)). Bioconcentration of fluoxetine was dependent on route of uptake, with filter feeding worms experiencing up to 130 times greater body burden ratios and increased magnitudes of effects than deposit feeders, a trait-based sensitivity likely as a consequence of fluoxetine partitioning to sediment. This study highlights how novel approaches such as MoA and trait-based methods can supplement environmental risk assessments of pharmaceuticals.

  1. Inner speech slips exhibit lexical bias, but not the phonemic similarity effect

    PubMed Central

    Oppenheim, Gary M.; Dell, Gary S.

    2008-01-01

    Inner speech, that little voice that people often hear inside their heads while thinking, is a form of mental imagery. The properties of inner speech errors can be used to investigate the nature of inner speech, just as overt slips are informative about overt speech production. Overt slips tend to create words (lexical bias) and involve similar exchanging phonemes (phonemic similarity effect). We examined these effects in inner and overt speech via a tongue-twister recitation task. While lexical bias was present in both inner and overt speech errors, the phonemic similarity effect was evident only for overt errors, producing a significant overtness by similarity interaction. We propose that inner speech is impoverished at lower (featural) levels, but robust at higher (phonemic)levels. PMID:17407776

  2. Oestrogen exhibits type II collagen protective effects and attenuates collagen-induced arthritis in rats.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, R H; Christiansen, C; Stolina, M; Karsdal, M A

    2008-04-01

    As anti-inflammatory treatments used in rheumatoid arthritis, such as glucocorticoids, often result in secondary detrimental effects on bone health, the objective of this study was to investigate the effects of oestrogen therapy (ET) on the development and activity of collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) in rats, with a focus on assessment of chondroprotective effects using biomarkers of type II collagen degradation. Forty female Lewis rats were allocated into four intervention groups: (i) control + vehicle; (ii) CIA + vehicle; (iii) CIA + ET; and (iv) CIA + prednisolone. During the 28-day intervention period we monitored body weight, time-point of disease onset, incidence of manifest disease and paw volume. Levels of the type II collagen degradation marker (CTX-II) were measured in serum. At euthanasia, hind paws were isolated, extracted for proteins and measured for the concentration of CTX-II. Matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) activity was evaluated using gelatinase zymography. Oestrogen treatment delayed the time-point of disease onset and reduced the incidence and degree of manifest immunoarthritis significantly, assessed by macroscopic evaluation of hind paw inflammation and paw volume. Measures of serum or tissue levels of CTX-II showed significantly reduced type II collagen degradation elicited by oestrogen treatment. In alignment, a decreased activity of MMP-2 and MMP-9 was found in the paw protein extracts. We have demonstrated that the anti-inflammatory effect of ET is linked to chondroprotective effects in an animal model of systemic immunoarthritis. As ET has positive rather than negative effects on bone health in contrast to prednisolone, these observations may be important for potential combination therapy.

  3. Spirulina exhibits hepatoprotective effects against lead induced oxidative injury in newborn rats.

    PubMed

    Gargouri, M; Ben Saad, H; Ben Amara, I; Magné, C; El Feki, A

    2016-08-31

    Lead is a toxic metal that induces a wide range of biochemical and physiological effects. The present investigation was designed at evaluating the toxic effects of a prenatal exposure to lead of mothers on hepatic tissue of newborn rats, and potent protective effects of spirulina. Female rats were randomly divided into 4 groups which were given a normal diet (control),a diet enriched with spirulina (S), lead acetate administered through drinking water (Pb), or a diet enriched with spirulina and lead contaminated water (S Pb), respectively. The duration of treatments was from the 5th day of gestation to 14 days postpartum. Lead toxicity was assessed by measuring body and liver weights, blood and stomach lead levels, hepatic DNA, RNA and protein amounts, blood enzyme activities (AST and ALT), as well as lipid peroxidation level and activities of antioxidant enzymes in hepatic tissues of neonates. Lead intoxication of mothers caused reduction of liver weight as well as of hepatic DNA, mRNA and protein levels in newborns. Moreover, oxidative stress and changes in antioxidant enzyme activities were recorded. Conversely, supplementation of mothers with spirulina mitigated these effects induced by lead. These results substantiated the potential hepatoprotective and antioxidant activity of spirulina.

  4. The flavonol isorhamnetin exhibits cytotoxic effects on human colon cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Jaramillo, Sara; Lopez, Sergio; Varela, Lourdes M; Rodriguez-Arcos, Rocio; Jimenez, Ana; Abia, Rocio; Guillen, Rafael; Muriana, Francisco J G

    2010-10-27

    The aim of this study was to determine whether isorhamnetin, an immediate 3'-O-methylated metabolite of quercetin, affects proliferation, cell death, and the cell cycle of human colon carcinoma (HCT-116) cells. Isorhamnetin was found to be a potent antiproliferative agent in a dose- and time-dependent manner, with an IC50 of 72 μM after 48 h of incubation as estimated by MTT assay. Flow cytometry and fluorescence microscopy analysis showed that isorhamnetin exerted a stimulatory effect on apoptosis and necrosis. Isorhamnetin also increased the number of cells in G2/M phase. Serum deprivation appeared to potentiate the effects of isorhamnetin on cell death and facilitated cell cycle progression to G0/G1 phase. These results suggest that isorhamnetin might mediate inhibition of HCT-116 cell growth through the perturbation of cell cycle progression and are consistent with the notion that G2/M checkpoints could be a conserved target for flavonoids in human colon cancer cells, leading to apoptotic and necrotic death. These antiproliferative, apoptotic, necrotic, and cell cycle effects suggest that isorhamnetin may have clinically significant therapeutic and chemopreventive capabilities. To our knowledge, this is the first report of the effect of isorhamnetin on human colon cancer cells.

  5. Mitochondria-Targeted Analogues of Metformin Exhibit Enhanced Antiproliferative and Radiosensitizing Effects in Pancreatic Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Gang; Zielonka, Jacek; Ouari, Olivier; Lopez, Marcos; McAllister, Donna; Boyle, Kathleen; Barrios, Christy S; Weber, James J; Johnson, Bryon D; Hardy, Micael; Dwinell, Michael B; Kalyanaraman, Balaraman

    2016-07-01

    Metformin (Met) is an approved antidiabetic drug currently being explored for repurposing in cancer treatment based on recent evidence of its apparent chemopreventive properties. Met is weakly cationic and targets the mitochondria to induce cytotoxic effects in tumor cells, albeit not very effectively. We hypothesized that increasing its mitochondria-targeting potential by attaching a positively charged lipophilic substituent would enhance the antitumor activity of Met. In pursuit of this question, we synthesized a set of mitochondria-targeted Met analogues (Mito-Mets) with varying alkyl chain lengths containing a triphenylphosphonium cation (TPP(+)). In particular, the analogue Mito-Met10, synthesized by attaching TPP(+) to Met via a 10-carbon aliphatic side chain, was nearly 1,000 times more efficacious than Met at inhibiting cell proliferation in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC). Notably, in PDAC cells, Mito-Met10 potently inhibited mitochondrial complex I, stimulating superoxide and AMPK activation, but had no effect in nontransformed control cells. Moreover, Mito-Met10 potently triggered G1 cell-cycle phase arrest in PDAC cells, enhanced their radiosensitivity, and more potently abrogated PDAC growth in preclinical mouse models, compared with Met. Collectively, our findings show how improving the mitochondrial targeting of Met enhances its anticancer activities, including aggressive cancers like PDAC in great need of more effective therapeutic options. Cancer Res; 76(13); 3904-15. ©2016 AACR. ©2016 American Association for Cancer Research.

  6. Verteporfin exhibits YAP-independent anti-proliferative and cytotoxic effects in endometrial cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Dasari, Venkata Ramesh; Mazack, Virginia; Feng, Wen; Nash, John; Carey, David J; Gogoi, Radhika

    2017-04-25

    Endometrial Carcinoma (EMCA) is the most common gynecologic malignancy and the fourth most common malignancy in women in the United States. Yes-associated protein (YAP) is a potent transcription coactivator acting via binding to the TEAD transcription factor, and plays a critical role in organ size regulation. Verteporfin (VP), a benzoporphyrin derivative, was identified as an inhibitor of YAP-TEAD interaction. We investigated the therapeutic efficacy and mechanism of VP in EMCA. The efficacy of VP on cell viability, cytotoxicity and invasion was assayed in EMCA cell lines. An organoid model system was also developed to test the effect of VP on apoptotic markers in an in vitro model system. Treatment with VP resulted in a decrease in cell viability, invasion and an increase in cytotoxicity of EMCA cells. These effects occurred as early as 15 minutes following treatment. Similarly, VP treatment versus vehicle control increased apoptosis in human organoid model systems. Quantitative RT-PCR, cDNA based RTPCR array analysis and western blotting were performed to investigate the mechanism of VP action. The cytotoxic and anti-proliferative effects appeared to be independent of its effect on YAP. Our results suggest that VP is a promising chemotherapeutic agent for the treatment of endometrial cancer.

  7. The effect of gravitational lensing on pulsed emission from neutron stars exhibiting quasi-periodic oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wood, K. S.; Ftaclas, C.; Kearney, M.

    1988-01-01

    Some quasi-periodic oscillation models are based on accretion onto a neutron star possessing a weak magnetic field. These models successfully explain many aspects of the observed oscillations, yet they acquire a rapidly rotating neutron star possessing a magnetic field that can channel accretion flow, leading to uneven heating of the star surface. This is similar to what happens in accreting binary pulsars, yet modulation of X-ray flux at the spin period has not been observed. It is suggested that gravitational deflection of photons can be very effective in reducing this pulsed flux under exactly the conditions required in these QPO models. Gravitational effects appear to be essential to reducing the pulsed flux to levels consistent with observation. Implications for QPO observations and for the theory of binary pulsars are discussed.

  8. Antiinflammatory glucocorticoid receptor ligand with reduced side effects exhibits an altered protein-protein interaction profile.

    PubMed

    Miner, Jeffrey N; Ardecky, Bob; Benbatoul, Khalid; Griffiths, Kimberly; Larson, Christopher J; Mais, Dale E; Marschke, Keith; Rosen, Jon; Vajda, Eric; Zhi, Lin; Negro-Vilar, Andres

    2007-12-04

    Glucocorticoids are commonly used antiinflammatory agents whose use is limited by side effects. We have developed a series of glucocorticoid receptor (GR) ligands that retain the strong antiinflammatory activity of conventional glucocorticoids with reduced side effects. We present a compound, LGD5552, that binds the receptor efficiently and strongly represses inflammatory gene expression. LGD5552 bound to GR activates gene expression somewhat differently than glucocorticoids. It activates some genes with an efficacy similar to that of the glucocorticoids. However, other glucocorticoid-activated genes are not regulated by LGD5552. These differences may be because of the more efficient binding of corepressor in the presence of LGD5552, compared with glucocorticoid agonists. This class of nonsteroidal, GR-dependent antiinflammatory drugs may offer a safer alternative to steroidal glucocorticoids in the treatment of inflammatory disease.

  9. Antiinflammatory glucocorticoid receptor ligand with reduced side effects exhibits an altered protein–protein interaction profile

    PubMed Central

    Miner, Jeffrey N.; Ardecky, Bob; Benbatoul, Khalid; Griffiths, Kimberly; Larson, Christopher J.; Mais, Dale E.; Marschke, Keith; Rosen, Jon; Vajda, Eric; Zhi, Lin; Negro-Vilar, Andres

    2007-01-01

    Glucocorticoids are commonly used antiinflammatory agents whose use is limited by side effects. We have developed a series of glucocorticoid receptor (GR) ligands that retain the strong antiinflammatory activity of conventional glucocorticoids with reduced side effects. We present a compound, LGD5552, that binds the receptor efficiently and strongly represses inflammatory gene expression. LGD5552 bound to GR activates gene expression somewhat differently than glucocorticoids. It activates some genes with an efficacy similar to that of the glucocorticoids. However, other glucocorticoid-activated genes are not regulated by LGD5552. These differences may be because of the more efficient binding of corepressor in the presence of LGD5552, compared with glucocorticoid agonists. This class of nonsteroidal, GR-dependent antiinflammatory drugs may offer a safer alternative to steroidal glucocorticoids in the treatment of inflammatory disease. PMID:18032610

  10. Carbamate nerve agent prophylatics exhibit distinct toxicological effects in the zebrafish embryo model.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Audrey; Wolman, Marc; Granato, Michael; Parsons, Michael; McCallion, Andrew S; Proescher, Jody; English, Emily

    2015-01-01

    Pyridostigmine bromide (PB) is an FDA-approved drug for the treatment of myasthenia gravis and a prophylactic pre-treatment for organophosphate nerve agent poisoning. Current methods for evaluating nerve agent treatments include enzymatic studies and mammalian models. Rapid whole animal screening tools for assessing the effects of nerve agent pre-treatment and post-exposure drugs represent an underdeveloped area of research. We used zebrafish as a model for acute and chronic developmental exposure to PB and two related carbamate acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibitors, neostigmine bromide (NB) and physostigmine (PS). Lethal doses and gross morphological phenotypes resulting from exposure to sub-lethal doses of these compounds were determined. Quantitative analyses of motility impairment and AChE enzyme inhibition were used to determine optimal dosing conditions for evaluation of the effects of carbamate exposures on neuronal development; ~50% impairment of response to startle stimuli and >50% inhibition of AChE activity were observed at 80 mMPB, 20 mM NB and 0.1 mM PS. PB induced stunted somite length, but no other phenotypic effects were observed. In contrast, NB and PS induced more severe phenotypic morphological defects than PB as well as neurite outgrowth mislocalization. Additionally, NB induced mislocalization of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors, resulting in impaired synapse formation. Taken together, these data suggest that altered patterns of neuronal connectivity contribute to the developmental neurotoxicity of carbamates and demonstrate the utility of the zebrafish model for distinguishing subtle structure-based differential effects of AChE inhibitors, which include nerve agents, pesticides and drugs. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Anisotropy of the magnetoviscous effect in ferrofluids containing nanoparticles exhibiting magnetic dipole interaction.

    PubMed

    Gerth-Noritzsch, M; Borin, D Yu; Odenbach, S

    2011-08-31

    The aim of this work has been the investigation of the anisotropy of the viscosity of a ferrofluid with magnetically interacting particles which are able to form structures in an applied magnetic field. The results of the experiments show a significant deviation from the case of a fluid without strong dipolar interactions. Furthermore, we have determined the dependence of the ratio of the viscosity coefficients on shear rate providing an insight into the microstructural reasons for the observed effects.

  12. Alcoholic Extract of Eclipta alba Shows In Vitro Antioxidant and Anticancer Activity without Exhibiting Toxicological Effects.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Navneet Kumar; Arya, Rakesh Kumar; Dev, Kapil; Sharma, Chetan; Hossain, Zakir; Meena, Sanjeev; Arya, K R; Gayen, J R; Datta, Dipak; Singh, R K

    2017-01-01

    As per WHO estimates, 80% of people around the world use medicinal plants for the cure and prevention of various diseases including cancer owing to their easy availability and cost effectiveness. Eclipta alba has long been used in Ayurveda to treat liver diseases, eye ailments, and hair related disorders. The promising medicinal value of E. alba prompted us to study the antioxidant, nontoxic, and anticancer potential of its alcoholic extract. In the current study, we evaluated the in vitro cytotoxic and antioxidant effect of the alcoholic extract of Eclipta alba (AEEA) in multiple cancer cell lines along with control. We have also evaluated its effect on different in vivo toxicity parameters. Here, we found that AEEA was found to be most active in most of the cancer cell lines but it significantly induced apoptosis in human breast cancer cell lines by disrupting mitochondrial membrane potential and DNA damage. Moreover, AEEA treatment inhibited migration in both MCF 7 and MDA-MB-231 cells in a dose dependent manner. Further, AEEA possesses robust in vitro antioxidant activity along with high total phenolic and flavonoid contents. In summary, our results indicate that Eclipta alba has enormous potential in complementary and alternative medicine for the treatment of cancer.

  13. Rhesus Macaques (Macaca mulatta) Exhibit the Decoy Effect in a Perceptual Discrimination Task

    PubMed Central

    Parrish, Audrey E.; Evans, Theodore A.; Beran, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    The asymmetric dominance effect (or decoy effect) is a form of context-dependent choice bias in which the probability of choosing one of two options is impacted by the introduction of a third option, also known as the decoy. Decoy effects are documented widely within the human consumer choice literature and even extend to preference testing within nonhuman animals. Here, we extended this line of research to a perceptual discrimination task with rhesus monkeys to determine whether decoy stimuli would impact size judgments of rectangular stimuli. In a computerized task, monkeys attempted to choose the larger of two rectangles that varied in their size and orientation (horizontally or vertically oriented). In probe trials, a third stimulus (the decoy) was presented that was smaller than the other two rectangles but matched the orientation of one of them. Half of the probe trials presented a decoy that matched the orientation of the larger stimulus, and the other half presented a decoy that matched the orientation of the smaller stimulus. Monkeys rarely selected the decoy stimulus. However, their performance (selection of the largest rectangle) increased relative to the baseline trials (with only two choices) when the decoy was congruent in its orientation with the largest rectangle, but decreased relative to baseline when the decoy was incongruent with the largest rectangle. Thus, a decoy stimulus impacted monkeys’ perceptual choice behavior even when it was not a viable choice option itself. These results are explained with regard to comparative evaluation mechanisms. PMID:25832189

  14. Alcoholic Extract of Eclipta alba Shows In Vitro Antioxidant and Anticancer Activity without Exhibiting Toxicological Effects

    PubMed Central

    Arya, Rakesh Kumar; Dev, Kapil; Sharma, Chetan; Hossain, Zakir; Meena, Sanjeev; Arya, K. R.; Gayen, J. R.

    2017-01-01

    As per WHO estimates, 80% of people around the world use medicinal plants for the cure and prevention of various diseases including cancer owing to their easy availability and cost effectiveness. Eclipta alba has long been used in Ayurveda to treat liver diseases, eye ailments, and hair related disorders. The promising medicinal value of E. alba prompted us to study the antioxidant, nontoxic, and anticancer potential of its alcoholic extract. In the current study, we evaluated the in vitro cytotoxic and antioxidant effect of the alcoholic extract of Eclipta alba (AEEA) in multiple cancer cell lines along with control. We have also evaluated its effect on different in vivo toxicity parameters. Here, we found that AEEA was found to be most active in most of the cancer cell lines but it significantly induced apoptosis in human breast cancer cell lines by disrupting mitochondrial membrane potential and DNA damage. Moreover, AEEA treatment inhibited migration in both MCF 7 and MDA-MB-231 cells in a dose dependent manner. Further, AEEA possesses robust in vitro antioxidant activity along with high total phenolic and flavonoid contents. In summary, our results indicate that Eclipta alba has enormous potential in complementary and alternative medicine for the treatment of cancer. PMID:28250894

  15. Rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta) exhibit the decoy effect in a perceptual discrimination task.

    PubMed

    Parrish, Audrey E; Evans, Theodore A; Beran, Michael J

    2015-07-01

    The asymmetric dominance effect (or decoy effect) is a form of context-dependent choice bias in which the probability of choosing one of two options is impacted by the introduction of a third option, also known as the decoy. Decoy effects are documented widely within the human consumer choice literature, and even extend to preference testing within nonhuman animals. Here, we extended this line of research to a perceptual discrimination task with rhesus monkeys to determine whether decoy stimuli would impact size judgments of rectangular stimuli. In a computerized task, monkeys attempted to choose the larger of two rectangles that varied in size and orientation (horizontally or vertically oriented). In probe trials, a third stimulus (the decoy) was presented that was smaller than the other two rectangles but matched the orientation of one of them. On half of the probe trials, the presented decoy matched the orientation of the larger stimulus, and on the other half, the decoy matched the orientation of the smaller stimulus. Monkeys rarely selected the decoy stimulus. However, their performance (selection of the largest rectangle) increased relative to the baseline trials (with only two choices) when the decoy was congruent in its orientation with the largest rectangle, but decreased relative to baseline when the decoy was incongruent with the largest rectangle. Thus, a decoy stimulus impacted monkeys' perceptual choice behavior even when it was not a viable choice option itself. These results are explained with regard to comparative evaluation mechanisms.

  16. TPGS-Stabilized Curcumin Nanoparticles Exhibit Superior Effect on Carrageenan-Induced Inflammation in Wistar Rat

    PubMed Central

    Rachmawati, Heni; Safitri, Dewi; Pradana, Aditya Trias; Adnyana, I Ketut

    2016-01-01

    Curcumin, a hydrophobic polyphenol compound derived from the rhizome of the Curcuma genus, has a wide spectrum of biological and pharmacological applications. Previously, curcumin nanoparticles with different stabilizers had been produced successfully in order to enhance solubility and per oral absorption. In the present study, we tested the anti-inflammatory effect of d-α-Tocopheryl polyethylene glycol 1000 succinate (TPGS)-stabilized curcumin nanoparticles in vivo. Lambda-carrageenan (λ-carrageenan) was used to induce inflammation in rats; it was given by an intraplantar route and intrapelurally through surgery in the pleurisy test. In the λ-carrageenan-induced edema model, TPGS-stabilized curcumin nanoparticles were given orally one hour before induction and at 0.5, 4.5, and 8.5 h after induction with two different doses (1.8 and 0.9 mg/kg body weight (BW)). Sodium diclofenac with a dose of 4.5 mg/kg BW was used as a standard drug. A physical mixture of curcumin-TPGS was also used as a comparison with a higher dose of 60 mg/kg BW. The anti-inflammatory effect was assessed on the edema in the carrageenan-induced paw edema model and by the volume of exudate as well as the number of leukocytes reduced in the pleurisy test. TPGS-stabilized curcumin nanoparticles with lower doses showed better anti-inflammatory effects, indicating the greater absorption capability through the gastrointestinal tract. PMID:27537907

  17. Hop bitter acids exhibit anti-fibrogenic effects on hepatic stellate cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Saugspier, Michael; Dorn, Christoph; Thasler, Wolfgang E; Gehrig, Manfred; Heilmann, Jörg; Hellerbrand, Claus

    2012-04-01

    Female inflorescences of the hop plant Humulus lupulus L. contain a variety of secondary metabolites with bitter acids (BA) as quantitatively dominating secondary metabolites. The use of hops in beer brewing has a long history due to the antibacterial effects of the BA and their typical bitter taste. Furthermore, hop cones are used in traditional medicine and for pharmaceutical purposes. Recent studies indicate that BA may affect activity of the transcription factor NFκB. NFκB plays a key role in the activation process of hepatic stellate cells (HSC), which is the key event of hepatic fibrosis. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of BA on HSC (activation) and their potential to inhibit molecular processes involved in the pathogenesis of hepatic fibrosis. HSC were isolated from murine and human liver tissue and incubated with a characterized fraction of bitter acids purified from a CO(2) hop extract. At a concentration of 25μg/ml BA started to induce LDH leakage. Already at lower concentrations BA lead to a dose dependent inhibition of HSC proliferation and inhibited IκB-α-phosphorylation, nuclear p65 translocation and binding activity in a dose dependent way (up to 10μg/ml). Accordingly, the same BA-doses inhibited the expression of pro-inflammatory and NFκB regulated genes as MCP-1 and RANTES, but did not affect expression of genes not related to NFκB signaling. In addition to the effect on activated HSC, BA inhibited the in vitro activation process of freshly isolated HSC as evidenced by delayed expression of collagen I and α-SMA mRNA and protein. Together, these findings indicate that BA inhibit NFκB activation, and herewith the activation and development of profibrogenic phenotype of HSC. Thus, bitter acids appear as potential functional nutrients for the prevention or treatment hepatic fibrosis in chronic liver disease.

  18. Myrtucommulone from Myrtus communis exhibits potent anti-inflammatory effectiveness in vivo.

    PubMed

    Rossi, Antonietta; Di Paola, Rosanna; Mazzon, Emanuela; Genovese, Tiziana; Caminiti, Rocco; Bramanti, Placido; Pergola, Carlo; Koeberle, Andreas; Werz, Oliver; Sautebin, Lidia; Cuzzocrea, Salvatore

    2009-04-01

    Myrtucommulone (MC), a nonprenylated acylphloroglucinol contained in the leaves of myrtle (Myrtus communis), has been reported to suppress the biosynthesis of eicosanoids by inhibition of 5-lipoxygenase and cyclooxygenase-1 in vitro and to inhibit the release of elastase and the formation of reactive oxygen species in activated polymorphonuclear leukocytes. Here, in view of the ability of MC to suppress typical proinflammatory cellular responses in vitro, we have investigated the effects of MC in in vivo models of inflammation. MC was administered to mice intraperitoneally, and paw edema and pleurisy were induced by the subplantar and intrapleural injection of carrageenan, respectively. MC (0.5, 1.5, and 4.5 mg/kg i.p.) reduced the development of mouse carrageenan-induced paw edema in a dose-dependent manner. Moreover, MC (4.5 mg/kg i.p. 30 min before and after carrageenan) exerted anti-inflammatory effects in the pleurisy model. In particular, 4 h after carrageenan injection in the pleurisy model, MC reduced: 1) the exudate volume and leukocyte numbers; 2) lung injury (histological analysis) and neutrophil infiltration (myeloperoxidase activity); 3) the lung intercellular adhesion molecule-1 and P-selectin immunohistochemical localization; 4) the cytokine levels (tumor necrosis factor-alpha and interleukin-1beta) in the pleural exudate and their immunohistochemical localization in the lung; 5) the leukotriene B(4), but not prostaglandin E(2), levels in the pleural exudates; and 6) lung peroxidation (thiobarbituric acid-reactant substance) and nitrotyrosine and poly (ADP-ribose) immunostaining. In conclusion, our results demonstrate that MC exerts potent anti-inflammatory effects in vivo and offer a novel therapeutic approach for the management of acute inflammation.

  19. MC-002 exhibits positive effects against platelets aggregation and endothelial dysfunction through thromboxane A2 inhibition.

    PubMed

    Fang, Weirong; Wei, Jie; Han, Dan; Chen, Xi; He, Guangwei; Wu, Qiang; Chu, Shaoxing; Li, Yunman

    2014-04-01

    Thromboxane A2 (TXA2) induces platelet aggregation and vasoconstriction, and agents that inhibit TXA2 production or interaction with receptors may exert potential application in stroke therapy. To illustrate the platelet aggregation antagonistic and endothelial protective effect of (E) - 3 - (3 - methoxy - 4 - ((3, 5, 6 - trimethylpyrazin - 2 - yl) methoxy) phenyl) sodium acrylate (MC-002) through TXA2 inhibition and underline mechanisms. Platelets aggregation and thoracic aorta ring contraction of rabbits were induced by U46619. Human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) were further applied to explore the protective effect of MC-002 on endothelium when exposed to tumor necrosis factor - α (TNF-α). MTT method was used to assess cell damage, and ELISA analysis was exerted to estimate nitrogen monoxide (NO), endothelin-1 (ET-1), thromboxane B2 (TXB2) and 6-keto-prostaglandin F1α (6-keto-PGF1α) releasing. Fluorescence spectrophotometry was conducted to determine intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca(2+)]i), and western blotting method was applied to evaluate the protein expressions of intracellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1), P-selectin and nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB). TXA2 analog U46619 mediated obvious platelet aggregation and vasoconstriction. MC-002 inhibited platelet aggregation through administration in vivo and incubation with platelet in vitro, and relaxed aorta ring in endothelium dependent manner. MC-002 alleviated cell damage, [Ca(2+)]i overload, ET-1 overexcretion and TXB2 activation, but improved NO availability reduction in HUVECs treated with TNF-α. Furthermore, MC-002 downregulated ICAM-1, P-selectin and NF-κB overexpression induced by TNF-α. In conclusion, MC-002 exerted antiplatelet aggregation effect through TXA2 inhibition and relieved inflammatory injury of endothelial cells through NF-κB signal pathway. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Ocimum basilicum extract exhibits antidiabetic effects via inhibition of hepatic glucose mobilization and carbohydrate metabolizing enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Ezeani, Chinelo; Ezenyi, Ifeoma; Okoye, Theophine; Okoli, Charles

    2017-01-01

    Aim: Ocimum basilicum L (Lamiaceae) is used as a traditional remedy for different ailments, including diabetes mellitus. This study investigated the antidiabetic effects of an extract of aerial parts of O. basilicum. Methods: Antihyperglycemic effect of the extract was determined by its effects on α-amylase and α-glucosidase in vitro, while antidiabetic properties were studied in alloxan induced diabetic rats treated for 28 days with extract and compared to those treated with oral metformin (150 mg/kg). The study and analysis was conducted between 2014 and 2015. Results: The treatment with 100 and 200 mg/kg extract significantly (P < 0.05) reduced fasting blood glucose concentration and slightly increased mean body weight in treated groups. Oral glucose tolerance was also significantly (P < 0.05, 0.001) improved in 100 and 400 mg/kg extract-treated groups. The extract caused a dose-dependent increase in liver glycogen content, while it decreased alanine transferase (18.9-30.56%) and aspartate transferase (6.48-34.3%) levels in a non-dose-dependent manner. A dose of 100 mg/kg also reduced serum cholesterol and triglycerides by 19.3 and 39.54%, compared to a 2.6% reduction of cholesterol seen in the metformin-treated group. The extract was observed to produce significant (P < 0.001) concentration-dependent inhibition of α-glucosidase (35.71-100%) and also α-amylase (23.55-81.52%), with estimated inhibitory concentration values of 1.62 and 3.86 mg/mL, respectively. Conclusions: The antidiabetic properties of the extract may be due to its ability to suppress endogenous glucose release, inhibit glycogenolysis and/or stimulate glycogenesis. PMID:28163956

  1. Tenuifolin, a saponin derived from Radix Polygalae, exhibits sleep-enhancing effects in mice.

    PubMed

    Cao, Qing; Jiang, Yong; Cui, Su-Ying; Tu, Peng-Fei; Chen, Yue-Mei; Ma, Xiao-Li; Cui, Xiang-Yu; Huang, Yuan-Li; Ding, Hui; Song, Jin-Zhi; Yu, Bin; Sheng, Zhao-Fu; Wang, Zi-Jun; Xu, Ya-Ping; Yang, Guang; Ye, Hui; Hu, Xiao; Zhang, Yong-He

    2016-12-15

    Radix Polygalae, the dried root of Polygala tenuifolia, has been extensively used as a traditional Chinese medicine for promoting intelligence and tranquilization. Polygalasaponins extracted from the root of P. tenuifolia possess evident anxiolytic and sedative-hypnotic activities. Previous studies have reported that tenuifolin was a major constituent of polygalasaponins. The currently study aims to investigate the hypnotic effect and possible mechanism of tenuifolin in freely moving mice. The hypnotic effects of tenuifolin (20, 40 and 80mg/kg, p.o.) were assessed by electroencephalographic (EEG) and electromyographic (EMG) analysis. Double-staining immunohistochemistry test was performed to evaluate the neuronal activity of sleep-wake regulating brain areas. High performance liquid chromatograph- electrochemical detection (HPLC-ECD) and ultrafast liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (UFLC-MS) were used for the detection of neurotransmitters. Locomotor activity was measured by Open-field Test. Tenuifolin at doses of 40 and 80mg/kg (p.o.) significantly prolonged the total sleep time by increasing the amount of non-rapid eye movement (NREM) and rapid eye movement (REM) sleep, associated with the significant increase in the bouts of episodes respectively. After administration of tenuifolin, the cortical EEG power spectral densities during NREM and REM sleep were similar to that of natural sleep (vehicle) and thus compatible with physiological sleep. Double-immunohistochemistry staining test showed that tenuifolin increased the c-Fos positive ratios of GABAergic NREM sleep-promoting neurons in ventrolateral preoptic area (VLPO), cholinergic REM sleep-promoting neurons in laterodorsal tegmental area (LDT) and pontomesencephalic tegmental area (PPT) and decreased the c-Fos positive ratios in wake-promoting neurons (locus coeruleus (LC) and perifornical area (Pef)). Neurotransmitter detections revealed that tenuifolin significantly reduced the noradrenaline (NA) levels

  2. DIRECT AND DISTAL EFFECTS OF NONCONTINGENT JUICE ON RUMINATION EXHIBITED BY A CHILD WITH AUTISM

    PubMed Central

    Kliebert, Megan L; Tiger, Jeffrey H

    2011-01-01

    Previous research has demonstrated the efficacy of the noncontingent delivery of foods and liquids at suppressing rumination, the repeated regurgitation and rechewing of partially digested food. However, it is unclear how long this reduction is maintained after caregivers terminate this procedure. The current study examined the direct and distal effects of noncontingent juice on rumination by measuring the duration of rumination during juice delivery and immediately following the termination of juice delivery. Noncontingent juice suppressed rumination, but this suppression was not maintained after delivery termination. PMID:22219547

  3. Direct and distal effects of noncontingent juice on rumination exhibited by a child with autism.

    PubMed

    Kliebert, Megan L; Tiger, Jeffrey H

    2011-01-01

    Previous research has demonstrated the efficacy of the noncontingent delivery of foods and liquids at suppressing rumination, the repeated regurgitation and rechewing of partially digested food. However, it is unclear how long this reduction is maintained after caregivers terminate this procedure. The current study examined the direct and distal effects of noncontingent juice on rumination by measuring the duration of rumination during juice delivery and immediately following the termination of juice delivery. Noncontingent juice suppressed rumination, but this suppression was not maintained after delivery termination.

  4. Investigation of the ageing effects exhibited by AR coatings exposed to ultraviolet laser irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Botha, Roelene; Bischof, David; Vetsch, Bernhard; Scherrer, Ueli; Michler, Markus; Rinner, Stefan J.; Ettemeyer, Andreas; Ziolek, Carsten

    2016-12-01

    Optical coatings used in ultraviolet applications are often exposed to harsh environments operating at elevated temperatures. In order to study the impact of the ageing effects optical coatings experience at various operating temperatures, an ultraviolet laser-induced degradation test system has been developed. It allows for flexible use in both a long-term stability test bench as well as in an LIDT measurement system. This work contains the preliminary results of optical degradation tests at 355 nm performed on anti-reflective coatings. As a subsequent step, the LIDT of the samples were measured using a Q-Switched Nd:YAG laser operating at 1064nm.

  5. Alocasia cucullata exhibits strong antitumor effect in vivo by activating antitumor immunity.

    PubMed

    Peng, Qiuxian; Cai, Hongbing; Sun, Xuegang; Li, Xin; Mo, Zhixian; Shi, Jue

    2013-01-01

    Chinese herbal medicines have long been used to treat various illnesses by modulating the human immune response. In this study, we investigate the immuno-modulating effect and antitumor activity of Alocasia Cucullata (AC), a Chinese herb traditionally used to treat infection and cancer. We found that the whole water extract of AC roots could significantly attenuate tumor growth in mouse tumor models. The median survival time of the AC-treated mice was 43 days, 16 days longer than that of the control group. Moreover, the AC-treated mice showed substantially higher induction of key antitumor cytokines, such as IL-2, IFN-γ, and TNF-α, indicating that AC may exert antitumor effect by activating antitumor immunity. To further pinpoint the cellular and molecular mechanism of AC, we studied the dose response of a human monocytic cell line, THP-1, to the whole water extract of AC. Treatment of the AC extract significantly induced THP-1 differentiation into macrophage-like cells and the differentiated THP-1 showed expression of specific macrophage surface markers, such as CD11b and CD14, as well as productions of antitumor cytokines, e.g. IFN-γ and TNF-α. Our data thus point to AC as potentially a new, alternative immuno-modulating herbal remedy for anticancer treatment.

  6. MicroRNAs-449a and -449b exhibit tumor suppressive effects in retinoblastoma

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, Alissa; Jones, Aunica; Bryar, Paul J.; Mets, Marilyn; Weinstein, Joanna; Zhang, Gang; Laurie, Nikia A.

    2013-11-01

    Highlights: •We validate miR-449a/b expression in primary human retinoblastomas and cell lines. •Exogenous miRs-449a/b inhibited proliferation in retinoblastoma cell lines. •Exogenous miRs-449a/b increased apoptosis in retinoblastoma cell lines. •miRs-449a/b could serve as viable therapeutic targets for retinoblastoma treatment. -- Abstract: Retinoblastoma is the most common pediatric cancer of the eye. Currently, the chemotherapeutic treatments for retinoblastoma are broad-based drugs such as vincristine, carboplatin, or etoposide. However, therapies targeted directly to aberrant signaling pathways may provide more effective therapy for this disease. The purpose of our study is to illustrate the relationship between the expressions of miRs-449a and -449b to retinoblastoma proliferation and apoptosis. We are the first to confirm an inhibitory effect of miR-449a and -449b in retinoblastoma by demonstrating significantly impaired proliferation and increased apoptosis of tumor cells when these miRNAs are overexpressed. This study suggests that these miRNAs could serve as viable therapeutic targets for retinoblastoma treatment.

  7. Alocasia cucullata Exhibits Strong Antitumor Effect In Vivo by Activating Antitumor Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Qiuxian; Cai, Hongbing; Sun, Xuegang; Li, Xin; Mo, Zhixian; Shi, Jue

    2013-01-01

    Chinese herbal medicines have long been used to treat various illnesses by modulating the human immune response. In this study, we investigate the immuno-modulating effect and antitumor activity of Alocasia Cucullata (AC), a Chinese herb traditionally used to treat infection and cancer. We found that the whole water extract of AC roots could significantly attenuate tumor growth in mouse tumor models. The median survival time of the AC-treated mice was 43 days, 16 days longer than that of the control group. Moreover, the AC-treated mice showed substantially higher induction of key antitumor cytokines, such as IL-2, IFN-γ, and TNF-α, indicating that AC may exert antitumor effect by activating antitumor immunity. To further pinpoint the cellular and molecular mechanism of AC, we studied the dose response of a human monocytic cell line, THP-1, to the whole water extract of AC. Treatment of the AC extract significantly induced THP-1 differentiation into macrophage-like cells and the differentiated THP-1 showed expression of specific macrophage surface markers, such as CD11b and CD14, as well as productions of antitumor cytokines, e.g. IFN-γ and TNF-α. Our data thus point to AC as potentially a new, alternative immuno-modulating herbal remedy for anticancer treatment. PMID:24086508

  8. Exercise preconditioning exhibits neuroprotective effects on hippocampal CA1 neuronal damage after cerebral ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Shamsaei, Nabi; Khaksari, Mehdi; Erfani, Sohaila; Rajabi, Hamid; Aboutaleb, Nahid

    2015-01-01

    Recent evidence has suggested the neuroprotective effects of physical exercise on cerebral ischemic injury. However, the role of physical exercise in cerebral ischemia-induced hippocampal damage remains controversial. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effects of pre-ischemia treadmill training on hippocampal CA1 neuronal damage after cerebral ischemia. Male adult rats were randomly divided into control, ischemia and exercise + ischemia groups. In the exercise + ischemia group, rats were subjected to running on a treadmill in a designated time schedule (5 days per week for 4 weeks). Then rats underwent cerebral ischemia induction through occlusion of common carotids followed by reperfusion. At 4 days after cerebral ischemia, rat learning and memory abilities were evaluated using passive avoidance memory test and rat hippocampal neuronal damage was detected using Nissl and TUNEL staining. Pre-ischemic exercise significantly reduced the number of TUNEL-positive cells and necrotic cell death in the hippocampal CA1 region as compared to the ischemia group. Moreover, pre-ischemic exercise significantly prevented ischemia-induced memory dysfunction. Pre-ischemic exercise mighct prevent memory deficits after cerebral ischemia through rescuing hippocampal CA1 neurons from ischemia-induced degeneration. PMID:26487851

  9. Plasmonic copper sulfide nanocrystals exhibiting near-infrared photothermal and photodynamic therapeutic effects.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shunhao; Riedinger, Andreas; Li, Hongbo; Fu, Changhui; Liu, Huiyu; Li, Linlin; Liu, Tianlong; Tan, Longfei; Barthel, Markus J; Pugliese, Giammarino; De Donato, Francesco; Scotto D'Abbusco, Marco; Meng, Xianwei; Manna, Liberato; Meng, Huan; Pellegrino, Teresa

    2015-02-24

    Recently, plasmonic copper sulfide (Cu2-xS) nanocrystals (NCs) have attracted much attention as materials for photothermal therapy (PTT). Previous reports have correlated photoinduced cell death to the photothermal heat mechanism of these NCs, and no evidence of their photodynamic properties has been reported yet. Herein we have prepared physiologically stable near-infrared (NIR) plasmonic copper sulfide NCs and analyzed their photothermal and photodynamic properties, including therapeutic potential in cultured melanoma cells and a murine melanoma model. Interestingly, we observe that, besides a high PTT efficacy, these copper sulfide NCs additionally possess intrinsic NIR induced photodynamic activity, whereupon they generate high levels of reactive oxygen species. Furthermore, in vitro and in vivo acute toxic responses of copper sulfide NCs were also elicited. This study highlights a mechanism of NIR light induced cancer therapy, which could pave the way toward more effective nanotherapeutics.

  10. Controlled self-assembly of multiferroic core-shell nanoparticles exhibiting strong magneto-electric effects

    SciTech Connect

    Sreenivasulu, Gollapudi; Hamilton, Sean L.; Lehto, Piper R.; Srinivasan, Gopalan; Popov, Maksym; Chavez, Ferman A.

    2014-02-03

    Ferromagnetic-ferroelectric composites show strain mediated coupling between the magnetic and electric sub-systems due to magnetostriction and piezoelectric effects associated with the ferroic phases. We have synthesized core-shell multiferroic nano-composites by functionalizing 10–100 nm barium titanate and nickel ferrite nanoparticles with complementary coupling groups and allowing them to self-assemble in the presence of a catalyst. The core-shell structure was confirmed by electron microscopy and magnetic force microscopy. Evidence for strong strain mediated magneto-electric coupling was obtained by static magnetic field induced variations in the permittivity over 16–18 GHz and polarization and by electric field induced by low-frequency ac magnetic fields.

  11. Do weight and shape concerns exhibit genetic effects? Investigating discrepant findings.

    PubMed

    Spanos, Alexia; Burt, S Alexandra; Klump, Kelly L

    2010-01-01

    Unlike twin studies of general weight and shape concerns, studies examining the heritability of the undue influence of weight and shape concerns on self-evaluation have found little evidence for genetic effects. The present study sought to resolve these discrepancies by examining the heritability of both types of weight and shape concerns in a young adult twin sample. Participants included 270 female twins from the Michigan State University Twin Registry. General weight and shape concerns were assessed with subscales from the Eating Disorder Examination Questionnaire (EDEQ). Similar to previous research, the undue influence of weight and shape on self-evaluation was assessed using averaged scores from two EDEQ items. The heritability of all weight and shape measures was estimated at 49-66%. General weight and shape concerns and the undue influence of these concerns on self-evaluation are influenced by genetic factors in young adult female twins.

  12. Non-classical binding of a polyreactive α-type anti-idiotypic antibody to B cells.

    PubMed

    Hernández, Tays; de Acosta, Cristina Mateo; López-Requena, Alejandro; Moreno, Ernesto; Alonso, Ruby; Fernández-Marrero, Yuniel; Pérez, Rolando

    2010-01-01

    Detailed information on the immunological relevance of α-type anti-idiotypic antibodies is lacking after more than 30 years since Jerne postulated his Idiotypic Network Theory. The B7Y33 mutant is a mouse-human chimeric version of the B7 MAb, a polyreactive α-type anti-idiotypic antibody, generated against an anti-GM2 ganglioside IgM Ab1 antibody. It retained the unusual self-binding activity and multispecificity of the parental murine antibody, being able to recognize several anti-ganglioside IgM antibodies as well as non-immunoglobulin antigens. Previous work with the murine B7 MAb suggested that this antibody might have immunoregulatory properties, and therefore we investigated the possible interaction of B7Y33 with immune cells. We found that B7Y33 binds to human and murine B lymphocytes. Inhibition assays using flow cytometry indicated that this antibody is capable of binding the Fc γ receptor II (FcγRII). The recognition of FcγRII-expressing K562, Raji and Daudi human cell lines, together with the capability of inhibiting the binding of an anti-human FcγRII antibody to these cells, suggest that B7Y33 interacts with both the FcγRIIa and FcγRIIb isoforms. We evaluated the contribution to the binding of different surface-exposed residues at the top of the heavy chain variable region (VH) CDR loops through the construction of mutants with substitutions in the three conventional VH CDRs (HCDRs) and the "HCDR4", located in the framework 3 (HFR3). In addition, we assessed the involvement of the Fc region by performing key mutations in the CH2 domain. Furthermore, chimeric hybrid molecules were obtained by combining the B7Y33 heavy chain with unrelated light chains. Our results indicate that the multispecificity and self-binding properties of B7Y33 are not linked to its recognition of B lineage cells, and that this phenomenon occurs in a non-classical way with the participation of both the variable and constant regions of the antibody. Two possible models for

  13. Individual domains of Tensin2 exhibit distinct subcellular localisations and migratory effects.

    PubMed

    Hafizi, Sassan; Sernstad, Emma; Swinny, Jerome D; Gomez, Maria F; Dahlbäck, Björn

    2010-01-01

    Tensins are large intracellular proteins believed to link the extracellular matrix to the cytoskeleton via integrins. Tensins are multidomain proteins consisting of homologous C1, PTPase, C2, SH2 and PTB domains. Full-length Tensin proteins can undergo cleavage inside cells, thus yielding domains in isolation that may have discrete subcellular localisations and downstream effects. We expressed different isoforms of Tensin2 and their individual domains as recombinant green fluorescent protein (GFP)-fusion constructs in DU145 human prostate cancer cells. Under fluorescence confocal microscopy, the isolated domains of Tensin2 all displayed discrete distributions throughout the cytoplasm and the nucleus. In particular, partial constructs containing the C1 domain localised preferentially to the nucleus, including the isolated C1 domain and the PTPase domain. In contrast, all three full-length isoforms of Tensin2 were present exclusively in discrete punctate bodies throughout the cytoplasm. This punctate staining showed colocalisation with the tumour suppressor protein DLC-1 as well as with actin (phalloidin). Furthermore, DU145 cells transiently expressing partial Tensin2 constructs containing the PTB domain showed an increased haptotactic migration. In addition, stimulation of renal carcinoma cells stably expressing Tensin2 by the survival factor Gas6 caused phosphorylation of its receptor Axl, but no effect on Tensin2, which was already maximally phosphorylated at time 0. In conclusion, our results indicate that differential proteolytic cleavage of Tensin2 can liberate domains with discrete localisations and functions, which has implications for the role of Tensins in cancer cell survival and motility.

  14. Wedelolactone exhibits anti-fibrotic effects on human hepatic stellate cell line LX-2.

    PubMed

    Xia, Yanzhe; Chen, Jie; Cao, Yuan; Xu, Chenshu; Li, Ruiming; Pan, Yuhua; Chen, Xiao

    2013-08-15

    Wedelolactone is a major coumarin of Eclipta prostrata, which is used for preventing liver damage. However the effects of wedelolactone on hepatic fibrosis remained unexplored. The purpose of this study was to demonstrate the anti-fibrotic effects of wedelolactone on activated human hepatic stellate cell (HSC) line LX-2 and the possible underlying mechanisms by means of MTT assay, Hoechst staining, as well as real-time quantitative PCR and western blot. The results showed that wedelolactone reduced the cellular viability of LX-2 in a time and dose-dependent manner. After treatment of wedelolactone, the expressions of collagen I and α-smooth muscle actin, two biomarkers of LX-2 activation, were remarkably decreased. The apoptosis of LX-2 cells was induced by wedelolactone accompanied with the decreasing expression of anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 and increasing expression of pro-apoptotic Bax. In addition, phosphorylated status of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) was up-regulated, but not in p38. Moreover, wedelolactone significantly repressed the level of phosphorylated inhibitor of nuclear factor κB (IκB) and p65 in nucleus in spite of tumor necrosis factor-α stimulation. In conclusion, wedelolactone could significantly inhibit the activation of LX-2 cells, the underlying mechanisms of which included inducing Bcl-2 family involved apoptosis, up-regulating phosphorylated status of ERK and JNK expressions, and inhibiting nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) mediated activity. Wedelolactone might present as a useful tool for the prevention and treatment of hepatic fibrosis. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Trichuris suis induces human non-classical patrolling monocytes via the mannose receptor and PKC: implications for multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Kooij, Gijs; Braster, Rens; Koning, Jasper J; Laan, Lisa C; van Vliet, Sandra J; Los, Tamara; Eveleens, Anne Marieke; van der Pol, Susanne M A; Förster-Waldl, Elisabeth; Boztug, Kaan; Belot, Alexandre; Szilagyi, Katka; van den Berg, Timo K; van Buul, Jaap D; van Egmond, Marjolein; de Vries, Helga E; Cummings, Richard D; Dijkstra, Christine D; van Die, Irma

    2015-07-25

    The inverse correlation between prevalence of auto-immune disorders like the chronic neuro-inflammatory disease multiple sclerosis (MS) and the occurrence of helminth (worm) infections, suggests that the helminth-trained immune system is protective against auto-immunity. As monocytes are regarded as crucial players in the pathogenesis of auto-immune diseases, we explored the hypothesis that these innate effector cells are prime targets for helminths to exert their immunomodulatory effects. Here we show that soluble products of the porcine nematode Trichuris suis (TsSP) are potent in changing the phenotype and function of human monocytes by skewing classical monocytes into anti-inflammatory patrolling cells, which exhibit reduced trans-endothelial migration capacity in an in vitro model of the blood-brain barrier. Mechanistically, we identified the mannose receptor as the TsSP-interacting monocyte receptor and we revealed that specific downstream signalling occurs via protein kinase C (PKC), and in particular PKCδ. This study provides comprehensive mechanistic insight into helminth-induced immunomodulation, which can be therapeutically exploited to combat various auto-immune disorders.

  16. Sperm Hy-Liter™: an effective tool for the detection of spermatozoa in sexual assault exhibits.

    PubMed

    De Moors, Anick; Georgalis, Tina; Armstrong, Gail; Modler, Jeff; Frégeau, Chantal J

    2013-05-01

    A fluorescence-based assay specifically targeting human spermatozoa was tested and optimized for best staining results using a variety of mock sexual assault samples. Swab clippings versus whole swabs were evaluated for best sample preparation and to simplify workflow (direct application versus swab extraction). The practicality and sensitivity of Sperm Hy-Liter™ was compared to our current phase contrast microscopy protocol for searching for the presence of spermatozoa. Sperm Hy-Liter™ was more sensitive than phase contrast microscopy and was able to detect spermatozoa more effectively in actual sexual assault samples (recent [N=240] or 24 years old [N=4]) containing few spermatozoa. Correlations were drawn between the Sperm Hy-Liter™ spermatozoa counts and the AmpFlSTR(®) Profiler(®) Plus male profiles generated from the sperm cell DNA fractions of semen containing swabs and swab clippings. In addition, recovered spermatozoa from Sperm Hy-Liter™-stained slides with greater than 40 spermatozoa produced full STR male profiles in 20.3% of slides tested and partial STR male profiles in 52.8% of slides tested. The adoption of Sperm Hy-Liter™ offers a means to standardize and improve the efficiency of the microscopic screening of sexual assault evidence.

  17. Hydroxytyrosyl ethyl ether exhibits stronger intestinal anticarcinogenic potency and effects on transcript profiles compared to hydroxytyrosol.

    PubMed

    Pereira-Caro, G; Mateos, R; Traka, M H; Bacon, J R; Bongaerts, R; Sarriá, B; Bravo, L; Kroon, P A

    2013-06-01

    The anticarcinogenic activity of hydroxytyrosyl ethyl ether (HTy-Et) compared to its precursor hydroxytyrosol (HTy) has been studied in human Caco-2 colon adenocarcinoma cells. 451 and 977 genes were differentially expressed in Caco-2 cells exposed to HTy or HTy-Et for 24h, respectively, compared with untreated cells (P<0.005; FDR=0), using Affymetrix microarrays. Results showed that both HTy and HTy-Et inhibited cell proliferation and arrested the cell cycle by up-regulating p21 and CCNG2 and down-regulating CCNB1 protein expression. HTy and HTy-Et also altered the transcription of specific genes involved in apoptosis, as suggested by the up-regulation of BNIP3, BNIP3L, PDCD4 and ATF3 and the activation of caspase-3. Moreover, these polyphenols up-regulated xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes UGT1A10 and CYP1A1, enhancing carcinogen detoxification. In conclusion, these results highlight that HTy and its derivative HTy-Et modulate molecular mechanisms involved in colon cancer, with HTy-Et being more effective than HTy.

  18. High-corrosion-resistance Fe-Mn-Si-based alloys exhibiting nearly perfect shape memory effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Zhizhong; Kajiwara, Setsuo; Kikuchi, Takehiko; Shinya, Norio

    2004-07-01

    Recently our group has succeeded, by producing very small particles of NbC carbides in austenite, in improvement of shape memory effect (SME) of the low-cost conventional Fe-Mn-Si based SMAs to such an extent that the so-called "training" treatment is no longer necessary. It was also found that the shape memory properties of the Fe-Mn-Si based SMAs were further improved by pre-rolling at 870K. The present paper describes similar improvement of shape memory properties of an Fe-15Mn-5Si-9Cr-5Ni-0.5NbC (mass %) by more convenient way of pre-extension at room temperature. This alloy is high corrosion-resistant (equivalent to SUS430) as well as low cost material, which is also one of the important requisites for industry application in various fields. A nearly perfect shape recover (90%) of an initial 4% strain was achieved when the alloy was pre-extended 12% at room temperature and then aged at 1070K for 10min. The origin of this improvement of SME has been studied by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and trasmission electron microscopy (TEM). It is concluded that uniform distribution of fine martensite plates with the same variant on the primary system is the key factor to obtain a perfect shape memory recovery.

  19. The effects of the interaction between cognitive style and instructional strategy on the educational outcomes for a science exhibit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knappenberger, Naomi

    This dissertation examines factors which may affect the educational effectiveness of science exhibits. Exhibit effectiveness is the result of a complex interaction among exhibit features, cognitive characteristics of the museum visitor, and educational outcomes. The purpose of this study was to determine the relative proportions of field-dependent and field-independent visitors in the museum audience, and to ascertain if the cognitive style of visitors interacted with instructional strategies to affect the educational outcomes for a computer-based science exhibit. Cognitive style refers to the self-consistent modes of selecting and processing information that an individual employs throughout his or her perceptual and intellectual activities. It has a broad influence on many aspects of personality and behavior, including perception, memory, problem solving, interest, and even social behaviors and self-concept. As such, it constitutes essential dimensions of individual differences among museum visitors and has important implications for instructional design in the museum. The study was conducted in the spring of 1998 at the Adler Planetarium and Astronomy Museum in Chicago. Two experimental treatments of a computer-based exhibit were tested in the study. The first experimental treatment utilized strategies designed for field-dependent visitors that limited the text and provided more structure and cueing than the baseline treatment of the computer program. The other experimental treatment utilized strategies designed for field-independent visitors that provided hypothesis-testing and more contextual information. Approximately two-thirds of the visitors were field-independent. The results of a multiple regression analysis indicated that there was a significant interaction between cognitive style and instructional strategy that affected visitors' posttest scores on a multiple-choice test of the content. Field-independent visitors out- performed the field

  20. Self-assembly of a novel beta-In2S3 nanostructure exhibiting strong quantum confinement effects.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wu; Ma, Dekun; Huang, Zhen; Tang, Qun; Xie, Qin; Qian, Yitai

    2005-05-01

    The 3D beta-In2S3 flowerlike architecture assembled from nanoflakes was prepared via a novel complex-precursor assisted (CPA) solvothermal route. The as-prepared beta-In2S3 powder was characterized by X-ray diffraction pattern (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectra (XPS), transition electron microscopy (TEM), field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM), ultraviolet-visible light (UV-vis) spectra, and photoluminescence spectrum. The novel 3D beta-In2S3 nanostructure exhibit a strong quantum confinement effect. FT-IR spectra were used to investigate the coordinative chemical effect in the complex. A possible mechanism was discussed.

  1. Optical Stark Effects in J -Aggregate-Metal Hybrid Nanostructures Exhibiting a Strong Exciton-Surface-Plasmon-Polariton Interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasa, P.; Wang, W.; Pomraenke, R.; Maiuri, M.; Manzoni, C.; Cerullo, G.; Lienau, C.

    2015-01-01

    We report on the observation of optical Stark effects in J -aggregate-metal hybrid nanostructures exhibiting strong exciton-surface-plasmon-polariton coupling. For redshifted nonresonant excitation, pump-probe spectra show short-lived dispersive line shapes of the exciton-surface-plasmon-polariton coupled modes caused by a pump-induced Stark shift of the polariton resonances. For larger coupling strengths, the sign of the Stark shift is reversed by a transient reduction in normal mode splitting. Our studies demonstrate an approach to coherently control and largely enhance optical Stark effects in strongly coupled hybrid systems. This may be useful for applications in ultrafast all-optical switching.

  2. New Hurricane Exhibit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    A new exhibit in StenniSphere depicting NASA's role in hurricane prediction and research and SSC's role in helping the region recover from Hurricane Katrina. The cyclone-shaped exhibit focuses on the effects of the Aug. 29, 2005 storm and outlines how NASA is working to improve weather forecasting. Through photos, 3-D models and digital animations, the exhibit tells the story of what happened inside the storm and how NASA's scientific research can increase the accuracy of hurricane tracking and modeling.

  3. New Hurricane Exhibit

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2007-08-29

    A new exhibit in StenniSphere depicting NASA's role in hurricane prediction and research and SSC's role in helping the region recover from Hurricane Katrina. The cyclone-shaped exhibit focuses on the effects of the Aug. 29, 2005 storm and outlines how NASA is working to improve weather forecasting. Through photos, 3-D models and digital animations, the exhibit tells the story of what happened inside the storm and how NASA's scientific research can increase the accuracy of hurricane tracking and modeling.

  4. New Hurricane Exhibit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    A new exhibit in StenniSphere depicting NASA's role in hurricane prediction and research and SSC's role in helping the region recover from Hurricane Katrina. The cyclone-shaped exhibit focuses on the effects of the Aug. 29, 2005 storm and outlines how NASA is working to improve weather forecasting. Through photos, 3-D models and digital animations, the exhibit tells the story of what happened inside the storm and how NASA's scientific research can increase the accuracy of hurricane tracking and modeling.

  5. Curcumin Analogue CA15 Exhibits Anticancer Effects on HEp-2 Cells via Targeting NF-κB

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Linlin; Chen, Liping; Zhu, Min; Yao, Song; Wang, Jiabing; Wu, Jianzhang; Liang, Guang

    2017-01-01

    Laryngeal carcinoma remains one of the most common malignancies, and curcumin has been proven to be effective against head and neck cancers in vitro. However, it has not yet been applied in clinical settings due to its low stability. In the current study, we synthesized 34 monocarbonyl analogues of curcumin with stable structures. CA15, which exhibited a stronger inhibited effect on laryngeal cancer cells HEp-2 but a lower toxicity on hepatic cells HL-7702 in MTT assay, was selected for further analysis. The effects of CA15 on cell viability, proliferation, migration, apoptosis, and NF-κB activation were measured using MTT, Transwell migration, flow cytometry, Western blot, and immunofluorescence assays in HEp-2 cells. An NF-κB inhibitor, BMS-345541, as well as curcumin was also tested. Results showed that CA15 induced decreased toxicity towards HL-7702 cells compared to curcumin and BMS-345541. However, similar to BMS-345541 and curcumin, CA15 not only significantly inhibited proliferation and migration and induced caspase-3-dependent apoptosis but also attenuated TNF-α-induced NF-κB activation in HEp-2 cells. These results demonstrated that curcumin analogue CA15 exhibited anticancer effects on laryngeal cancer cells via targeting of NF-κB. PMID:28409156

  6. ZLM-7 exhibits anti-angiogenic effects via impaired endothelial cell function and blockade of VEGF/VEGFR-2 signaling.

    PubMed

    Su, Min; Huang, Jingjia; Li, Jijia; Qin, Xiyuan; Tang, Xiaoning; Jin, Fang; Chen, Shali; Jiang, Chuanming; Zou, Zizheng; Peng, Kunjian; Nuruzzaman, Mohammed; Zhang, Jianting; Luo, Junli; Liu, Suyou; Luo, Zhiyong

    2016-04-05

    Inhibition of angiogenesis is a promising therapeutic strategy against cancer. In this study, we reported that ZLM-7, a combretastain A-4 (CA-4) derivative, exhibited anti-angiogenic activity in vitro and in vivo. In vitro, ZLM-7 induced microtubule cytoskeletal disassembly. It decreased VEGF-induced proliferation, migration, invasion and tube formation in endothelial cells, which are critical steps in angiogenesis. In vivo, ZLM-7 significantly inhibited neovascularization in a chicken chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) model and reduced the microvessel density in tumor tissues of MCF-7 xenograft mouse model. ZLM-7 also displayed comparable antiangiogenic and anti-tumor activities associated with the lead compound CA-4, but exhibited lower toxicity compared with CA-4. The anti-angiogenic effect of ZLM-7 was exerted via blockade of VEGF/VEGFR-2 signaling. ZLM-7 treatment suppressed the expression and secretion of VEGF in endothelial cells and MCF-7 cells under hypoxia. Further, ZLM-7 suppressed the VEGF-induced phosphorylation of VEGFR-2 and its downstream signaling mediators including activated AKT, MEK and ERK in endothelial cells. Overall, these results demonstrate that ZLM-7 exhibits anti-angiogenic activities by impairing endothelial cell function and blocking VEGF/VEGFR-2 signaling, suggesting that ZLM-7 might be a potential angiogenesis inhibitor.

  7. Method of growing composites of the type exhibiting the Soret effect. [improved structure of eutectic alloy crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhat, B. N. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    A predetermine amount of segregation is introduced into a molten sample of a composite that exhibits the Soret effect, such amount approximating the amount of segregation resulting from directional solidification of the sample. The molten sample is then directionally solidified starting at the end opposite the end richer in the constituent that would migrate toward the cooler part of a liquid solution of the composite maintained in a temperature gradient. Since solidification commences at the end deficient in such constituent, its migration toward the interface between the solid and liquid during the solidification will compensate for the deficiency, yielding a more homogeneous product.

  8. Non-Classical Monocytes and Monocyte Chemoattractant Protein-1 (MCP-1) Correlate with Coronary Artery Calcium Progression in Chronically HIV-1 Infected Adults on Stable Antiretroviral Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Zungsontiporn, Nath; Tello, Raquel R.; Zhang, Guangxiang; Mitchell, Brooks I.; Budoff, Matthew; Kallianpur, Kalpana J.; Nakamoto, Beau K.; Keating, Sheila M.; Norris, Philip J.; Ndhlovu, Lishomwa C.; Souza, Scott A.; Shikuma, Cecilia M.; Chow, Dominic C.

    2016-01-01

    Background Persistent inflammation and immune activation has been hypothesized to contribute to increased prevalence of subclinical atherosclerosis and cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk in patients with chronic HIV infection. In this study, we examined the correlation of peripheral monocyte subsets and soluble biomarkers of inflammation to coronary artery calcium (CAC) progression, as measured by cardiac computed tomography scan. Methods We conducted a longitudinal analysis utilizing baseline data of 78 participants with HIV infection on stable antiretroviral therapy (ART) in the Hawaii Aging with HIV-Cardiovascular study who had available baseline monocyte subset analysis as well as CAC measurement at baseline and at 2-year follow up. Monocyte phenotypes were assessed from cryopreserved blood by flow cytometry and plasma was assayed for soluble biomarkers using antibody-coated beads in a high sensitivity Milliplex Luminex platform. Change in CAC over 2 years was analyzed as the primary outcome variable. Results Of all monocyte subsets and biomarkers tested, higher non-classical monocyte percentage (ρ = 0.259, p = 0.022), interleukin (IL)-6 (ρ = 0.311, p = 0.012), and monocyte chemoattractant protein (MCP)-1 (ρ = 0.524, p = <0.001) were significantly correlated to higher 2-year CAC progression in unadjusted Spearman’s correlation. Non-classical monocyte percentage (ρ = 0.247, p = 0.039), and MCP-1 (ρ = 0.487, p = <0.001), remained significantly correlated to 2-year CAC progression, while IL-6 was not (ρ = 0.209, p = 0.120) after adjustment for age, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, total/HDL cholesterol ratio, smoking history, and BMI. Conclusion The percentage of non-classical monocytes and plasma MCP-1 levels were independently associated with CAC progression and may be related to the progression of atherosclerosis and increased CVD risk associated with chronic HIV infection on stable ART. PMID:26867220

  9. Communicating Science through Exhibitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dusenbery, P.; Harold, J.; Morrow, C.

    It is critically important for the public to better understand the scientific process. Museum exhibitions are an important part of informal science education that can effectively reach public audiences as well as school groups. They provide an important gateway for the public to learn about compelling scientific endeavors. There are many ways for scientists to help develop science exhibitions. The Space Science Institute (SSI) is a national leader in producing traveling science exhibitions and their associated educational programming (i.e. interactive websites, educator workshops, public talks, instructional materials). Two of its exhibitions, Space Weather Center and MarsQuest, are currently on tour. Another exhibition, Alien Earths, is in development. The Space Weather Center was developed in partnership with various research missions at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center. MarsQuest is a 5000 square-foot traveling exhibition. The exhibit's second 3-year tour began this January at the Detroit Science Center. It is enabling millions of Americans to share in the excitement of the scientific exploration of Mars and to learn more about their own planet in the process. The 3,000 square-foot traveling exhibition, called Alien Earths, will bring origins-related research and discoveries to students and the American public. Alien Earths has four interrelated exhibit areas: Our Place in Space, Star Birth, PlanetQuest, and Search for Life. Exhibit visitors will explore the awesome events surrounding the birth of stars and planets; they will join scientists in the hunt for planets outside our solar system including those that may be in ``habitable zones'' around other stars; and finally they will be able to learn about how scientists are looking for signs of life beyond Earth. Besides the exhibits, SSI is also developing interactive web sites based on exhibit themes. New technologies are transforming the Web from a static medium to an interactive environment with tremendous

  10. Communicating Science through Exhibitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dusenbery, Paul

    2005-04-01

    It is critically important for the public to better understand the scientific process. Museum exhibitions are an important part of informal science education that can effectively reach public audiences as well as school groups. They provide an important gateway for the public to learn about compelling scientific endeavors. Science exhibitions also provide a marvelous opportunity for scientists to become engaged in the exhibit development process. The Space Science Institute (SSI) is a national leader in producing traveling science exhibitions and their associated educational programming (i.e. interactive websites, educator workshops, public talks, instructional materials). The focus of this presentation will be on two of its exhibit projects: MarsQuest (on tour for four years) and Alien Earths (its tour began early in 2005). MarsQuest is enabling millions of Americans to share in the excitement of the scientific exploration of Mars and to learn more about their own planet in the process. Alien Earths will bring origins-related research and discoveries to students and the American public. It has four interrelated exhibit areas: Our Place in Space, Star Birth, Planet Quest, and Search for Life. Exhibit visitors will explore the awesome events surrounding the birth of stars and planets; they will join scientists in the hunt for planets outside our solar system including those that may be in ``habitable zones'' around other stars; and finally they will be able to learn about how scientists are looking for signs of life beyond Earth. SSI is also developing interactive web sites based on exhibit themes. New technologies are transforming the Web from a static medium to an interactive environment with tremendous potential for informal education and inquiry-based investigations. This talk will focus on the role informal science projects play in effectively communicating science to a broad, public audience.

  11. Gyroscopic behavior exhibited by the optical Kerr effect in bimetallic Au-Pt nanoparticles suspended in ethanol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández-Valdés, D.; Torres-Torres, C.; Martínez-González, C. L.; Trejo-Valdez, M.; Hernández-Gómez, L. H.; Torres-Martínez, R.

    2016-07-01

    The modification in the third-order nonlinear optical response exhibited by rotating bimetallic Au-Pt nanoparticles in an ethanol solution was analyzed. The samples were prepared by a sol-gel processing route. The anisotropy associated to the elemental composition of the nanoparticles was confirmed by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy measurements. The size of the nanoparticles varies in the range from 9 to 13 nm, with an average size of 11 nm. Changes in the spatial orientation of the nanomaterials automatically generated a variation in their plasmonic response evaluated by UV-Vis spectroscopy. A two-wave mixing experiment was conducted to explore an induced birefringence at 532 nm wavelength with nanosecond pulses interacting with the samples. A strong optical Kerr effect was identified to be the main responsible effect for the third-order nonlinear optical phenomenon exhibited by the nanoparticles. It was estimated that the rotation of inhomogeneous nanostructures can provide a remarkable change in the participation of different surface plasmon resonances, if they correspond to multimetallic nanoparticles. Potential applications for developing low-dimensional gyroscopic systems can be contemplated.

  12. High-energy coordination polymers (CPs) exhibiting good catalytic effect on the thermal decomposition of ammonium dinitramide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xin; Han, Jing; Zhang, Sheng; Zhai, Lianjie; Wang, Bozhou; Yang, Qi; Wei, Qing; Xie, Gang; Chen, Sanping; Gao, Shengli

    2017-09-01

    High-energy coordination polymers (CPs) not only exhibit good energetic performances but also have a good catalytic effect on the thermal decomposition of energetic materials. In this contribution, two high-energy CPs Cu2(DNBT)2(CH3OH)(H2O)3·3H2O (1) and [Cu3(DDT)2(H2O)2]n (2) (H2DNBT = 3,3‧-dinitro-5,5‧-bis(1H-1,2,4-triazole and H3DDT = 4,5-bis(1H-tetrazol-5-yl)-2H-1,2,3-triazole) were synthesized and structurally characterized. Furthermore, 1 was thermos-dehydrated to produce Cu2(DNBT)2(CH3OH)(H2O)3 (1a). The thermal decomposition kinetics of 1, 1a and 2 were studied by Kissinger's method and Ozawa's method. Thermal analyses and sensitivity tests show that all compounds exhibit high thermal stability and low sensitivity for external stimuli. Meanwhile, all compounds have large positive enthalpy of formation, which are calculated as being (1067.67 ± 2.62) kJ mol-1 (1), (1464.12 ± 3.12) kJ mol-1 (1a) and (3877.82 ± 2.75) kJ mol-1 (2), respectively. The catalytic effects of 1a and 2 on the thermal decomposition of ammonium dinitramide (ADN) were also investigated.

  13. Saraca indica Bark Extract Shows In Vitro Antioxidant, Antibreast Cancer Activity and Does Not Exhibit Toxicological Effects

    PubMed Central

    Yadav, Navneet Kumar; Saini, Karan Singh; Hossain, Zakir; Omer, Ankur; Sharma, Chetan; Gayen, Jiaur R.; Singh, Poonam; Arya, K. R.; Singh, R. K.

    2015-01-01

    Medicinal plants are used as a complementary and alternative medicine in treatment of various diseases including cancer worldwide, because of their ease of accessibility and cost effectiveness. Multicomposed mixture of compounds present in a plant extract has synergistic activity, increases the therapeutic potential many folds, compensates toxicity, and increases bioavailability. Saraca indica (family Caesalpiniaceae) is one of the most ancient sacred plants with medicinal properties, exhibiting a number of pharmacological effects. Antioxidant, antibreast cancer activity and toxicological evaluation of Saraca indica bark extract (SIE) were carried out in the present study. The results of the study indicated that this herbal preparation has antioxidant and antibreast cancer activity. Toxicological studies suggest that SIE is safer to use and may have a potential to be used as complementary and alternative medicine for breast cancer therapy. PMID:25861411

  14. Non-Classic Congenital Lipoid Adrenal Hyperplasia: A New Disorder of the Steroidogenic Acute Regulatory Protein With Very Late Presentation and Normal Male Genitalia

    PubMed Central

    2007-01-01

    Context Congenital lipoid adrenal hyperplasia (lipoid CAH) is a severe disorder of adrenal and gonadal steroidogenesis caused by mutations in the steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR). Affected children typically present with life-threatening adrenal insufficiency in early infancy due to a failure of glucocorticoid (cortisol) and mineralocorticoid (aldosterone) biosynthesis, and 46,XY genetic males have complete lack of androgenization and appear phenotypically female due to impaired testicular androgen secretion in utero. Objective The objective of this study was to investigate whether non-classic forms of this condition exist. Patients & Methods Sequence analysis of the gene encoding StAR was undertaken in three children from two families who presented with primary adrenal insufficiency at 2-4 years of age; the males had normal genital development. Identified mutants were tested in a series of biochemical assays. Results DNA sequencing identified homozygous StAR mutations Val187Met and Arg188Cys in these two families. Functional studies of StAR activity in cells and in vitro, and cholesterol-binding assays showed these mutants retained ∼20% of wild type activity. Conclusions These patients define a new disorder, “non-classic lipoid CAH”, and represent a new cause of non-autoimmune Addison disease (primary adrenal failure). PMID:16968793

  15. Efficient isolation of human metapneumovirus using MNT-1, a human malignant melanoma cell line exhibiting early and distinct cytopathic effect.

    PubMed

    Sato, Ko; Watanabe, Oshi; Ohmiya, Suguru; Chiba, Fumiko; Suzuki, Akira; Okamoto, Michiko; Younghuang, Jiang; Hata, Akihiro; Nonaka, Hiroyuki; Kitaoka, Setsuko; Nagai, Yukio; Kawamura, Kazuhisa; Hayashi, Masahiro; Kumaki, Satoru; Suzuki, Tamio; Kawakami, Kazuyoshi; Nishimura, Hidekazu

    2017-09-20

    Isolation of human metapneumovirus (HMPV) from clinical specimens is currently inefficient due to the lack of a cell culture system exhibiting a distinct cytopathic effect (CPE). The cell lines LLC-MK2, Vero, and Vero E6 are used for isolation of HMPV; however, the CPE in these cell lines is subtle and usually requires a long observation period and sometimes blind passages. Thus, a cell line that exhibits an early and distinct CPE following HMPV inoculation is highly desired by clinical virology laboratories. We demonstrate that the human malignant melanoma cell line MNT-1 shows obvious syncytium formation shortly after inoculation with HMPV-positive clinical specimens. In addition, the growth and isolation efficiency of HMPV was higher using MNT-1 than any other conventional cell line. Addition of this cell line to our routine viral isolation system for clinical specimens markedly enhanced isolation frequency, allowing isolation-based surveillance. MNT-1 has the potential to facilitate clinical and epidemiological studies of HMPV. © 2017 The Societies and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  16. Cost-effective alternative to nano-encapsulation: Amorphous curcumin-chitosan nanoparticle complex exhibiting high payload and supersaturation generation.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Minh Hiep; Yu, Hong; Kiew, Tie Yi; Hadinoto, Kunn

    2015-10-01

    While the wide-ranging therapeutic activities of curcumin have been well established, its successful delivery to realize its true therapeutic potentials faces a major challenge due to its low oral bioavailability. Even though nano-encapsulation has been widely demonstrated to be effective in enhancing the bioavailability of curcumin, it is not without drawbacks (i.e. low payload and costly preparation). Herein we present a cost-effective bioavailability enhancement strategy of curcumin in the form of amorphous curcumin-chitosan nanoparticle complex (or curcumin nanoplex in short) exhibiting a high payload (>80%). The curcumin nanoplex was prepared by a simple yet highly efficient drug-polysaccharide complexation method that required only mixing of the curcumin and chitosan solutions under ambient condition. The effects of (1) pH and (2) charge ratio of chitosan to curcumin on the (i) physical characteristics of the nanoplex (i.e. size, colloidal stability and payload), (ii) complexation efficiency, and (iii) production yield were investigated from which the optimal preparation condition was determined. The nanoplex formation was found to favor low acidic pH and charge ratio below unity. At the optimal condition (i.e. pH 4.4. and charge ratio=0.8), stable curcumin nanoplex (≈260nm) was prepared at >90% complexation efficiency and ≈50% production yield. The amorphous state stability, colloidal stability, and in vitro non-cytotoxicity of the nanoplex were successfully established. The curcumin nanoplex produced prolonged supersaturation (3h) in the presence of hydroxypropyl methylcellulose (HPMC) at five times of the saturation solubility of curcumin. In addition, curcumin released from the nanoplex exhibited improved chemical stability owed to the presence of chitosan. Both results (i.e. high supersaturation and improved chemical stability) bode well for the ability of the curcumin nanoplex to enhance the bioavailability of curcumin clinically. Copyright © 2015

  17. The Effect of Live Interpretation with Theater on Attitudes and Learning of Children in the Mythbusters Exhibit

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Price, C. Aaron; Gean, Katherine; Barnes, Heather

    2015-01-01

    "Mythbusters: The Explosive Exhibition" is a traveling exhibit based on the popular television show. When housed at the Museum of Science and Industry, Chicago, it included a traditional, interactive free flow exhibition space followed by a live facilitated show. This paper describes results from an experimental study about the effects…

  18. The Effect of Live Interpretation with Theater on Attitudes and Learning of Children in the Mythbusters Exhibit

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Price, C. Aaron; Gean, Katherine; Barnes, Heather

    2015-01-01

    "Mythbusters: The Explosive Exhibition" is a traveling exhibit based on the popular television show. When housed at the Museum of Science and Industry, Chicago, it included a traditional, interactive free flow exhibition space followed by a live facilitated show. This paper describes results from an experimental study about the effects…

  19. Subtle Changes in Peptide Conformation Profoundly Affect Recognition of the Non-Classical MHC Class I Molecule HLA-E by the CD94-NKG2 Natural Killer Cell Receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Hoare, Hilary L; Sullivan, Lucy C; Clements, Craig S; Ely, Lauren K; Beddoe, Travis; Henderson, Kate N; Lin, Jie; Reid, Hugh H; Brooks, Andrew G; Rossjohn, Jamie

    2008-03-31

    Human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-E is a non-classical major histocompatibility complex class I molecule that binds peptides derived from the leader sequences of other HLA class I molecules. Natural killer cell recognition of these HLA-E molecules, via the CD94-NKG2 natural killer family, represents a central innate mechanism for monitoring major histocompatibility complex expression levels within a cell. The leader sequence-derived peptides bound to HLA-E exhibit very limited polymorphism, yet subtle differences affect the recognition of HLA-E by the CD94-NKG2 receptors. To better understand the basis for this peptide-specific recognition, we determined the structure of HLA-E in complex with two leader peptides, namely, HLA-Cw*07 (VMAPRALLL), which is poorly recognised by CD94-NKG2 receptors, and HLA-G*01 (VMAPRTLFL), a high-affinity ligand of CD94-NKG2 receptors. A comparison of these structures, both of which were determined to 2.5-Å resolution, revealed that allotypic variations in the bound leader sequences do not result in conformational changes in the HLA-E heavy chain, although subtle changes in the conformation of the peptide within the binding groove of HLA-E were evident. Accordingly, our data indicate that the CD94-NKG2 receptors interact with HLA-E in a manner that maximises the ability of the receptors to discriminate between subtle changes in both the sequence and conformation of peptides bound to HLA-E.

  20. A new synthetic route to a family of non-classical addition-type thermoplastics. I - Concept and demonstration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pater, Ruth H.

    1988-01-01

    A synthesis scheme was developed for a host of nonclassical addition-type thermoplastics (ATT) that can be cured by an addition reaction, leading to a linear polymer structure. The synthesis involves the reaction of an acetylene-terminated prepolymer with either a bismaleimide (BMI) or a biscitraconimide. A new polymer, designated LaRC-RP80, synthesized using this scheme, was found to exhibit several significantly improved properties over the commercial BMI, Kerimid 601, including an eight-fold increase in toughness while maintaining a high Tg, a higher (by 167 C) heat stability, and a 50-percent increase in moisture resistance. In addition, LaRC-RP80 has good hot/wet lap shear strength and processes easily at 288 C without voids in the finished product.

  1. A Tetrameric Peptide Derived from Bovine Lactoferricin Exhibits Specific Cytotoxic Effects against Oral Squamous-Cell Carcinoma Cell Lines.

    PubMed

    Solarte, Víctor A; Rosas, Jaiver E; Rivera, Zuly J; Arango-Rodríguez, Martha L; García, Javier E; Vernot, Jean-Paul

    2015-01-01

    Several short linear peptides derived from cyclic bovine lactoferricin were synthesized and tested for their cytotoxic effect against the oral cavity squamous-cell carcinoma (OSCC) cell lines CAL27 and SCC15. As a control, an immortalized and nontumorigenic cell line, Het-1A, was used. Linear peptides based on the RRWQWR core sequence showed a moderate cytotoxic effect and specificity towards tumorigenic cells. A tetrameric peptide, LfcinB(20-25)4, containing the RRWQWR motif, exhibited greater cytotoxic activity (>90%) in both OSCC cell lines compared to the linear lactoferricin peptide or the lactoferrin protein. Additionally, this tetrameric peptide showed the highest specificity towards tumorigenic cells among the tested peptides. Interestingly, this effect was very fast, with cell shrinkage, severe damage to cell membrane permeability, and lysis within one hour of treatment. Our results are consistent with a necrotic effect rather than an apoptotic one and suggest that this tetrameric peptide could be considered as a new candidate for the therapeutic treatment of OSCC.

  2. A Tetrameric Peptide Derived from Bovine Lactoferricin Exhibits Specific Cytotoxic Effects against Oral Squamous-Cell Carcinoma Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Solarte, Víctor A.; Rosas, Jaiver E.; Rivera, Zuly J.; Arango-Rodríguez, Martha L.; García, Javier E.; Vernot, Jean-Paul

    2015-01-01

    Several short linear peptides derived from cyclic bovine lactoferricin were synthesized and tested for their cytotoxic effect against the oral cavity squamous-cell carcinoma (OSCC) cell lines CAL27 and SCC15. As a control, an immortalized and nontumorigenic cell line, Het-1A, was used. Linear peptides based on the RRWQWR core sequence showed a moderate cytotoxic effect and specificity towards tumorigenic cells. A tetrameric peptide, LfcinB(20–25)4, containing the RRWQWR motif, exhibited greater cytotoxic activity (>90%) in both OSCC cell lines compared to the linear lactoferricin peptide or the lactoferrin protein. Additionally, this tetrameric peptide showed the highest specificity towards tumorigenic cells among the tested peptides. Interestingly, this effect was very fast, with cell shrinkage, severe damage to cell membrane permeability, and lysis within one hour of treatment. Our results are consistent with a necrotic effect rather than an apoptotic one and suggest that this tetrameric peptide could be considered as a new candidate for the therapeutic treatment of OSCC. PMID:26609531

  3. Withanolide D Exhibits Similar Cytostatic Effect in Drug-Resistant and Drug-Sensitive Multiple Myeloma Cells.

    PubMed

    Issa, Mark E; Wijeratne, E M K; Gunatilaka, A A L; Cuendet, Muriel

    2017-01-01

    In spite of recent therapeutic advances, multiple myeloma (MM) remains a malignancy with very low curability. This has been partly attributed to the existence of a drug-resistant subpopulation known as cancer stem cells (CSCs). MM-CSCs are equipped with the necessary tools that render them highly resistant to virtually all conventional therapies. In this study, the growth inhibitory effects of withanolide D (WND), a steroidal lactone isolated from Withania somnifera, on drug-sensitive tumoral plasma cells and drug-resistant MM cells have been investigated. In MTT/XTT assays, WND exhibited similar cytostatic effects between drug-resistant and drug-sensitive cell lines in the nM range. WND also induced cell death and apoptosis in MM-CSCs and RPMI 8226 cells, as examined by the calcein/ethidium homodimer and annexin V/propidium iodide stainings, respectively. To determine whether P-glycoprotein (P-gp) efflux affected the cytostatic activity of WND, P-gp was inhibited with verapamil and results indicated that the WND cytostatic effect in MM-CSCs was independent of P-gp efflux. Furthermore, WND did not increase the accumulation of the fluorescent P-gp substrate rhodamine 123 in MM-CSCs, suggesting that WND may not inhibit P-gp at the tested relevant doses. Therefore, the WND-induced cytostatic effect may be independent of P-gp efflux. These findings warrant further investigation of WND in MM-CSC animal models.

  4. Combined use of vitamin D3and metformin exhibits synergistic chemopreventive effects on colorectal neoplasia in rats and mice

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wan; Wang, Qi-Long; Liu, Xia; Dong, Shu-Hong; Li, Hong-Xia; Li, Chun-Yang; Guo, Li-Shu; Gao, Jing-Miao; Berger, Nathan A.; Li, Li; Ma, Lan; Wu, Yong-Jie

    2015-01-01

    Vitamin D3 and metformin are widely used in humans for regulating mineral metabolism and as an anti-diabetic drug respectively; and both of them have been shown to have chemopreventive effects against various tumors. This study was designed to investigate the potential synergistic chemopreventive effects of vitamin D3 and metformin against the development of early colon neoplasia in two models. The first model was a 1, 2-dimethylhydrazine dihydrochloride (DMH) induced colon cancer rat model and the second, a DMH-dextran sodium sulfate (DSS) induced colitis-associated colon neoplasia mouse model. Compared to either vitamin D3 or metformin alone, combined use of vitamin D3 and metformin showed more pronounced effect in reducing the numbers of aberrant crypt foci (ACF) and tumor in the colon. The most prominent inhibitory effects were observed in the vitamin D3 medium dose (100 IU/kg/day) and metformin medium dose (120 mg/kg/day) combination group. Furthermore, our results showed that enhancement of metformin’s chemopreventive effects by vitamin D3 was associated with down-regulation of S6P expression, via the AMPK (IGF-1)/mTOR pathway. In addition, and enhancement of vitamin D3’s chemopreventive effects by metformin was associated with inhibition of the protein expressions of c-Myc and Cyclin D1, via the vitamin D receptor/β-catenin pathway. These findings show that combined use of vitamin D3 and metformin exhibits synergistic effects against the development of early colon neoplasia. They suggest that the combined use of vitamin D3 and metformin may represent a novel strategy for chemoprevention of colorectal cancer. PMID:25416412

  5. Proteins from the Rhinella schneideri parotoid gland secretion exhibit anti-nociceptive effect against nociception induced by inflammation.

    PubMed

    Freitas, Cleverson Diniz Teixeira de; Sousa-Filho, Luís Mesquita; Lima, Mauro Sérgio Cruz Souza; Pereira, Anna Carolina Toledo Cunha; Ferreira, Gustavo Portela; Lopes, Francisco Eilton Sousa; Silva, Renan Oliveira; Barbosa, André Luiz Dos Reis; Oliveira, Jefferson Soares de

    2017-09-01

    As proteins isolated from the Rhinella schneideri parotoid gland secretion (RsPP) exhibit anti-inflammatory activity, the goal of this work was to investigate their anti-nociceptive effects using acetic acid-induced writhing, formalin, and hot-plate tests. The intraperitoneal administration of RsPP (2.5 or 5mg/kg) one hour prior to stimuli significantly reduced the abdominal constrictions induced by acetic acid (73.06 and 72.69% inhibition, respectively) and the inflammatory phase of paw licking time induced by formalin (69.3% inhibition, at 2.5mg/kg). However, RsPP (1, 2.5 or 5mg/kg) did not change the latency in response at the hot-plate test. The involvement of inflammatory mediators on the anti-nociceptive effect of RsPP was further demonstrated. RsPP (2.5mg/kg) significantly inhibited the inflammatory peak of paw edema induced by histamine (44.0%), bradykinin (51.3%), or prostaglandin E2 (53.7%). Our data indicate that RsPP may act on the pain process by inhibiting the effect of inflammatory mediators. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  6. Apigenin exhibits protective effects in a mouse model of d-galactose-induced aging via activating the Nrf2 pathway.

    PubMed

    Sang, Ying; Zhang, Fan; Wang, Heng; Yao, Jianqiao; Chen, Ruichuan; Zhou, Zhengdao; Yang, Kun; Xie, Yan; Wan, Tianfeng; Ding, Hong

    2017-06-21

    The aim of the present research was to study the protective effects and underlying mechanisms of apigenin on d-galactose-induced aging mice. Firstly, apigenin exhibited a potent antioxidant activity in vitro. Secondly, d-galactose was administered by subcutaneous injection once daily for 8 weeks to establish an aging mouse model to investigate the protective effect of apigenin. We found that apigenin supplementation significantly ameliorated aging-related changes such as behavioral impairment, decreased organic index, histopathological injury, increased senescence-associated β-galactosidase (SAβ-gal) activity and advanced glycation end product (AGE) level. Further data showed that apigenin facilitated Nrf2 nuclear translocation both in aging mice and normal young mice, and the Nrf2 expression of normal young mice was higher than that of natural senile mice. In addition, the expressions of Nrf2 downstream gene targets, including HO-1 and NQO1, were also promoted by apigenin administration. Moreover, apigenin also decreased the MDA level and elevated SOD and CAT activities. In conclusion, focusing on the Nrf2 pathway is a suitable strategy to delay the aging process, and apigenin may exert an anti-senescent effect process via activating the Nrf2 pathway.

  7. Cell-specific expression of artificial microRNAs targeting essential genes exhibit potent antitumor effect on hepatocellular carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Mao, Chenyu; Liu, Hao; Chen, Ping; Ye, Jingjia; Teng, Lisong; Jia, Zhenyu; Cao, Jiang

    2015-03-20

    To achieve specific and potent antitumor effect of hepatocyte carcinoma cells, replication defective adenoviral vectors, namely rAd/AFP-amiRG, rAd/AFP-amiRE and rAd/AFP-amiRP, were constructed which were armed with artificial microRNAs (amiRs) targeting essential functional genes glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4E and DNA polymerase α respectively under the control of a recombinant promoter comprised of human α-fetoprotein enhancer and basal promoter. The AFP enhancer/promoter showed specific high transcription activity in AFP-positive HCC cells Hep3B, HepG2 and SMMC7721, while low in AFP-negative cell Bcap37. All artificial microRNAs exhibited efficient knockdown of target genes. Decreased ATP production and protein synthesis was observed in rAd/AFP-amiRG and rAd/AFP-amiRE treated HCC cells. All three recombinant adenoviruses showed efficient blockage of cell cycle progression and significant suppression of HCC cells in vitro. In nude mice model bearing Hep3B xenograft, administration of rAd/AFP-amiRG showed potent antitumor effect. The strategy of tumor-specific knockdown of genes essential for cell survival and proliferation may suggest a novel promising approach for HCC gene therapy.

  8. Synthesis of New 2-Halo-2-(1H-tetrazol-5-yl)-2H-azirines via a Non-Classical Wittig Reaction.

    PubMed

    Cardoso, Ana L; Sousa, Carmo; Henriques, Marta S C; Paixão, José A; Pinho e Melo, Teresa M V D

    2015-12-12

    The synthesis and reactivity of tetrazol-5-yl-phosphorus ylides towards N-halosuccinimide/TMSN₃ reagent systems was explored, opening the way to new haloazidoalkenes bearing a tetrazol-5-yl substituent. These compounds were obtained as single isomers, except in one case. X-ray crystal structures were determined for three derivatives, establishing that the non-classical Wittig reaction leads to the selective synthesis of haloazidoalkenes with (Z)-configuration. The thermolysis of the haloazidoalkenes afforded new 2-halo-2-(tetrazol-5-yl)-2H-azirines in high yields. Thus, the reported synthetic methodologies gave access to important building blocks in organic synthesis, vinyl tetrazoles and 2-halo-2-(tetrazol-5-yl)-2H-azirine derivatives.

  9. Tetrandrine, an alkaloid from S. tetrandra exhibits anti-hypertensive and sleep-enhancing effects in SHR via different mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yuan-Li; Cui, Su-Ying; Cui, Xiang-Yu; Cao, Qing; Ding, Hui; Song, Jin-Zhi; Hu, Xiao; Ye, Hui; Yu, Bin; Sheng, Zhao-Fu; Wang, Zi-Jun; Zhang, Yong-He

    2016-12-15

    Sleep disorders have been found to be associated with hypertension in both cross-sectional and longitudinal epidemiological studies. Tetrandrine, a major component of Stephania tetrandra, is well known as an antihypertensive agent. The anti-hypertension mechanism mainly relies on its L-type calcium channel blocking property. In the previous study, tetrandrine revealed both anti-hypertension and hypnotic effects in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRs). This study aims to elucidate whether the antihypertensive mechanism of tetrandrine in SHRs is relevant to its hypnotic effect. Sleep-wake behavior of the SHRs was detected by electroencephalography (EEG) and electromyography (EMG) recordings. Blood pressure was measured by noninvasive blood pressure tail cuff test. Immunohistochemistry was performed to evaluate the noradrenergic neuronal activity. The level of norepinephrine (NE) was detected by HPLC-ECD. Amlodipine (100mg/kg, i.g.), the well-known L-type Ca(2+) channel blockers (CCBs) exhibited remarkable antihypertensive activities in SHRs, but did not show effects on sleep of SHRs. Tetrandrine (30 and 60mg/kg/day, i.g.) significantly suppressed blood pressure of SHRs. Meanwhile, tetrandrine (60mg/kg/day, i.g.) remarkably increased non-rapid eye movement sleep (NREMS) time, bouts and mean duration. The hypnotic effect of tetrandrine was potentiated by prazosin (0.5mg/kg, i.p.) but attenuated by yohimbine (2mg/kg, i.p.). Administration of tetrandrine (60mg/kg/day, i.g.) not only significantly decreased c-Fos positive ratio of noradrenergic neurons in the locus coeruleus (LC), but also significantly decrease NE in the endogenous sleep-wake regulating pathways including LC, hypothalamus and ventrolateral preoptic nucleus (VLPO). In spite of a good potency in blocking L-type Ca(2+) channel, the hypnotic effects of tetrandrine may be related to its suppressing effects on the noradrenergic system other than to block calcium channels. As a multi-targets drug, tetrandrine

  10. Catalysis of hydrolysis and aminolysis of non-classical beta-lactam antibiotics by metal ions and metal chelates.

    PubMed

    Méndez, R; Alemany, T; Martín-Villacorta, J

    1992-12-01

    The Zn(2+)-tris (hydroxymethyl)aminomethane (Tris) system has a great catalytic effect on the hydrolysis and aminolysis of some beta-lactam antibiotics. In order to ascertain the mechanism of this catalysis we have analysed the effects of the beta-lactam antibiotic structure. First we studied the kinetics of the decomposition of imipenem, SCH 29482, aztreonam and nocardicin A in aqueous solution of Tris at 35.0 degrees C, 0.5 mol.dm-3 ionic strength and in the presence of metal ions (Zn2+, Cd2+, Co2+, Cu2+, Ni2+ and Mn2+). From these studies, we conclude that Tris and metal ions (in separate solutions) exert a great catalytic effect on the hydrolysis of imipenem and SCH 29482. We suggest that in metal ion solutions a 1:1 complex is formed between the metal ion and beta-lactam antibiotic, which is attacked by hydroxide ions. Studies of the degradation of the antibiotics studied in solutions of Tris and metal ions together indicate that the systems Cd(2+)-Tris and Zn(2+)-Tris have a great catalytic effect on the hydrolysis and aminolysis of imipenem and SCH 29482. We suggest that this catalysis takes place via a ternary complex in which the metal ion plays a double role by (a) placing the antibiotic and the Tris in the right position for the reaction and (b) lowering the pKa of the hydroxide group of Tris, which is coordinated with the metal ion, generating a strong nucleophile.

  11. Rottlerin exhibits anti-cancer effect through inactivation of S phase kinase-associated protein 2 in pancreatic cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Su, Jingna; Wang, Lixia; Yin, Xuyuan; Zhao, Zhe; Hou, Yingying; Ye, Xiantao; Zhou, Xiuxia; Wang, Zhiwei

    2016-01-01

    Rottlerin, a natural product isolated from Mallotus philippinensis, has been characterized as an effective chemoprevention agent in inhibiting tumor cell growth. Although multiple studies have revealed the role of rottlerin in tumorigenesis, the molecular mechanism of rottlerin-mediated anti-tumor activity has not been fully elucidated. It has been reported that Skp2 (S-phase kinase associated protein 2) plays an oncogenic role in human malignancies, indicating that inactivation of Skp2 could be a promising approach for the treatment of cancers. Therefore, in this study, we aim to investigate whether rottlerin exhibits its anti-tumor activities via targeting Skp2 pathway in pancreatic cancer. We found that rottlerin inhibited cell growth, induced apoptosis, arrested cell cycle, and retarded cell invasion and migration. Notably, we observed that the expression of Skp2 was significantly decreased in rottlerin-treated pancreatic cancer cells. Importantly, overexpression of Skp2 abrogated the anti-tumor function induced by rottlerin in pancreatic cancer cells. Consistently, depletion of Skp2 promoted rottlerin-mediated inhibition of cell growth and invasion. Collectively, our study demonstrated that rottlerin could suppress Skp2 expression and subsequently exert its tumor suppressive function in pancreatic cancer cells, suggesting that rottlerin might be a potential therapeutic compound for treating pancreatic cancer. PMID:27822410

  12. Nanometer-size hard magnetic ferrite exhibiting high optical-transparency and nonlinear optical-magnetoelectric effect

    PubMed Central

    Ohkoshi, Shin-ichi; Namai, Asuka; Imoto, Kenta; Yoshikiyo, Marie; Tarora, Waka; Nakagawa, Kosuke; Komine, Masaya; Miyamoto, Yasuto; Nasu, Tomomichi; Oka, Syunsuke; Tokoro, Hiroko

    2015-01-01

    Development of nanometer-sized magnetic particles exhibiting a large coercive field (Hc) is in high demand for densification of magnetic recording. Herein, we report a single-nanosize (i.e., less than ten nanometers across) hard magnetic ferrite. This magnetic ferrite is composed of ε-Fe2O3, with a sufficiently high Hc value for magnetic recording systems and a remarkably high magnetic anisotropy constant of 7.7 × 106 erg cm−3. For example, 8.2-nm nanoparticles have an Hc value of 5.2 kOe at room temperature. A colloidal solution of these nanoparticles possesses a light orange color due to a wide band gap of 2.9 eV (430 nm), indicating a possibility of transparent magnetic pigments. Additionally, we have observed magnetization-induced second harmonic generation (MSHG). The nonlinear optical-magnetoelectric effect of the present polar magnetic nanocrystal was quite strong. These findings have been demonstrated in a simple iron oxide, which is highly significant from the viewpoints of economic cost and mass production. PMID:26439914

  13. Glycyrrhetinic acid exhibits strong inhibitory effects towards UDP-glucuronosyltransferase (UGT) 1A3 and 2B7.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yin-Peng; Cao, Yun-Feng; Fang, Zhong-Ze; Zhang, Yan-Yan; Hu, Cui-Min; Sun, Xiao-Yu; Yu, Zhen-Wen; Zhu, Xu; Hong, Mo; Yang, Lu; Sun, Hong-Zhi

    2013-09-01

    The aim of the present study is to evaluate the inhibitory effects of liver UDP-glucuronosyltransferases (UGTs) by glycyrrhizic acid and glycyrrhetinic acid, which are the bioactive ingredients isolated from licorice. The results showed that glycyrrhetinic acid exhibited stronger inhibition towards all the tested UGT isoforms, indicating that the deglycosylation process played an important role in the inhibitory potential towards UGT isoforms. Furthermore, the inhibition kinetic type and parameters were determined for the inhibition of glycyrrhetinic acid towards UGT1A3 and UGT2B7. Data fitting using Dixon and Lineweaver-Burk plots demonstrated that the inhibition of UGT1A3 and UGT2B7 by glycyrrhetinic acid was best fit to competitive and noncompetitive type, respectively. The second plot using the slopes from Lineweaver-Burk plots versus glycyrrhetinic acid concentrations was employed to calculate the inhibition kinetic parameters (K(i)), and the values were calculated to be 0.2 and 1.7 μM for UGT1A3 and UGT2B7, respectively. All these results remind us the possibility of UGT inhibition-based herb-drug interaction. However, the explanation of these in vitro parameters should be paid more caution due to complicated factors, including the probe substrate-dependent UGT inhibition behaviour, environmental factors affecting the abundance of herbs' ingredients, and individual difference of pharmacokinetic factors.

  14. Echinacea purpurea-derived alkylamides exhibit potent anti-inflammatory effects and alleviate clinical symptoms of atopic eczema.

    PubMed

    Oláh, Attila; Szabó-Papp, Judit; Soeberdt, Michael; Knie, Ulrich; Dähnhardt-Pfeiffer, Stephan; Abels, Christoph; Bíró, Tamás

    2017-05-27

    Atopic eczema (AE) is a chronic inflammatory and pruritic skin disease. There is still an unmet need for topical anti-inflammatory and anti-pruritic substances exhibiting an excellent safety profile. The endocannabinoid system is known to regulate various aspects of cutaneous barrier and immune functions, thus targeting it may be a valid approach for alleviating the symptoms of AE. To assess the putative efficacy of Echinacea purpurea-derived alkylamides (Ec. extract) activating cannabinoid (CB)-2 receptors in exerting anti-inflammatory effects and alleviating symptoms of AE. In vitro anti-inflammatory efficiency was investigated by monitoring the effects of Ec. extract on poly-(I:C)-induced pro-inflammatory cytokine expression (Q-PCR) and release (ELISA) of HaCaT keratinocytes. Irritancy and sensitization potential (assessed by Human Repeat Insult Patch Test; Clinical trial 1); clinical efficiency in alleviating symptoms of AE (Clinical trial 2) as well as effects on human skin structure and lipid content (Clinical trial 3 followed by transmission electron microscopy and HPTLC) were investigated in randomized double blind clinical trials. Ec. extract significantly reduced mRNA expression as well as release of poly-(I:C)-induced pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL-6 and IL-8) in keratinocytes. Thus, not surprisingly, the well-tolerated (Clinical trial 1) Ec. extract-based cream reduced local SCORAD statistically significantly, not only compared to baseline, but also compared to the comparator (Clinical trial 2). Of great importance, besides the in vitro anti-inflammatory effects, administration of the Ec. extract-based cream also resulted in significantly higher levels of overall epidermal lipids, ceramide EOS (ω-esterified fatty acid+sphingosine sphingoid base), and cholesterol at Day 15 compared to baseline as well as significantly greater numbers of intercellular lipid lamellae in the intercellular space (Clinical trial 3). The investigated Ec. extract shows great

  15. Ergosteryl 2-naphthoate, An Ergosterol Derivative, Exhibits Antidepressant Effects Mediated by the Modification of GABAergic and Glutamatergic Systems.

    PubMed

    Lin, Mingzhu; Li, Haijun; Zhao, Yan; Cai, Enbo; Zhu, Hongyan; Gao, Yugang; Liu, Shuangli; Yang, He; Zhang, Lianxue; Tang, Guosheng; Wang, Ruiqing

    2017-03-31

    Phytosterols are a kind of natural component including sitosterol, campesterol, avenasterol, ergosterol (Er) and others. Their main natural sources are vegetable oils and their processed products, followed by grains, by-products of cereals and nuts, and small amounts of fruits, vegetables and mushrooms. In this study, three new Er monoester derivatives were obtained from the reflux reaction with Er: organic acids (furoic acid, salicylic acid and 2-naphthoic acid), 1-Ethylethyl-3-(3-dimethyllaminopropyl) carbodiimide hydrochloride (EDCI) and 4-dimethylaminopyridine (DMAP) in dichloromethane. Their chemical structures were defined by IR and NMR. The present study was also undertaken to investigate the antidepressant-like effects of Er and its derivatives in male adult mice models of depression, and their probable involvement of GABAergic and glutamatergic systems by the forced swim test (FST). The results indicated that Er and its derivatives display antidepressant effects. Moreover, one derivative of Er, ergosteryl 2-naphthoate (ErN), exhibited stronger antidepressant activity in vivo compared to Er. Acute administration of ErN (5 mg/kg, i.p.) and a combination of ErN (0.5 mg/kg, i.p.), reboxetine (2.5 mg/kg, i.p.), and tianeptine (15 mg/kg, i.p.) reduced the immobility time in the FST. Pretreatment with bicuculline (a competitive γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) antagonist, 4 mg/kg, i.p.) and N-methyl-d-aspartic acid (NMDA, an agonist at the glutamate site, 75 mg/kg, i.p.) effectively reversed the antidepressant-like effect of ErN (5 mg/kg, i.p.). However, prazosin (a α1-adrenoceptor antagonist, 1 mg/kg, i.p.) and haloperidol (a non-selective D2 receptor antagonist, 0.2 mg/kg, i.p.) did not eliminate the reduced immobility time. Altogether, these results indicated that ErN produced antidepressant-like activity, which might be mediated by GABAergic and glutamatergic systems.

  16. Wogonin, a natural flavonoid, intercalates with genomic DNA and exhibits protective effects in IL-1β stimulated osteoarthritis chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Khan, Nazir M; Ahmad, Imran; Ansari, Mohammad Y; Haqqi, Tariq M

    2017-08-25

    Wogonin has recently been shown to possess anti-inflammatory and chondroprotective properties and is of considerable interest due to its broad pharmacological activities. The present study highlights that Wogonin binds DNA and exerts chondroprotective effects in vitro. Wogonin showed strong binding with chondrocytes genomic DNA in vitro. The mode of binding of Wogonin to genomic-DNA was assessed by competing Wogonin with EtBr or DAPI, known DNA intercalator and a minor groove binder, respectively. EtBr fluorescence reduced significantly with increase in Wogonin concentration suggesting possible DNA intercalation of Wogonin. Further, in silico molecular docking of Wogonin on mammalian DNA also indicated possible intercalation of Wogonin with DNA. The denaturation and FRET studies revealed that Wogonin prevents denaturation of DNA strands and provide stability to genomic DNA against a variety of chemical denaturants. The cellular uptake study showed that Wogonin enters osteoarthritis chondrocytes and was mainly localized in the nucleus. Wogonin treatment to OA chondrocytes protects the fragmentation of genomic DNA in response to IL-1β as evaluated by DNA ladder and TUNEL assay. Treatment of chondrocytes with Wogonin resulted in significant suppression of IL-1β-mediated induction of ROS. Further, Wogonin exhibited protective potential through potent suppression of extrinsic and intrinsic apoptotic pathways and induction of anti-apoptotic proteins in IL-1β-stimulated osteoarthritis chondrocytes. Our data thus suggest that DNA intercalation by Wogonin may result in the stabilization of genomic DNA leading to protective activity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Novel curcumin analogue IHCH exhibits potent anti‑proliferative effects by inducing autophagy in A549 lung cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Guang-Zhou; Xu, Su-Li; Sun, Gang-Chun; Chen, Xiao-Bing

    2014-07-01

    Curcumin is a natural polyphenolic compound that exhibits strong antioxidant and anticancer activities; however, low bioavailability has restricted its application in chemotherapeutic trials. The present study aimed to investigate the anticancer effect of the novel curcumin derivative 2E,6E‑2‑(1H‑indol‑3‑yl) methylene)‑6‑(4‑hydroxy‑3‑methoxy benzylidene)‑cyclohexanone (IHCH) on A549 lung cancer cells. Cells were treated with IHCH at different concentrations (1‑40 µM) for different time periods (1‑36 h). Microscopic analysis revealed that IHCH inhibited A549 cell growth and induced the formation of characteristic autophagolysosomes in a dose‑ and time‑dependent manner. Furthermore, the inhibitory rate of IHCH (40 µM) on A549 cell viability was 77.34% after 36 h of treatment. Acridine orange staining revealed an increase in autophagic vacuoles in the IHCH‑treated A549 cells. Monodansylcadaverine staining was used to analyze autophagy rate. Immunocytochemistry revealed an increase in light chain (LC) 3 protein expression in the IHCH‑treated cells and western blot analysis detected the conversion of LC3‑I to LC3‑II, as well as the recruitment of LC3 to autophagosomes in the cytoplasmatic compartment, suggesting the occurrence of autophagy. These findings show that IHCH induced autophagy in A549 cells, which is a novel cell death mechanism induced by curcumin derivatives.

  18. (+)-isradipine but not (-)-Bay-K-8644 exhibits voltage-dependent effects on cat adrenal catecholamine release.

    PubMed Central

    López, M. G.; Michelena, P.; Gandía, L.; García, A. G.

    1991-01-01

    1. Catecholamine release from cat adrenal glands perfused at a high rate (4 ml min-1) at 37 degrees C with polarizing (1.2 or 5.9 mM K+) or depolarizing (17.7, 35, 59 or 118 mM K+) solutions, was triggered by 5 or 10 s pulses of Ca2+ (0.5 or 2.5 mM) in the presence of various concentrations of K+. 2. In polarized glands, secretion was greater the higher the K+ concentration present during the secretory K+/Ca2+ test pulse. Thus, in 17.7 mM K+, catecholamine released was 162 +/- 27 ng per pulse, while in 118 mM K+ secretion rose to 1839 +/- 98 ng per pulse. In depolarized glands, secretion reached a peak of around 1000 ng per pulse in 35-59 mM K+; in 118 mM K+, secretion did not increase further, suggesting that voltage changes are implicated in the control of the secretory process. 3. Blockade of secretion by increased concentrations of (+)-isradipine was much more manifest in polarized glands. The higher the degree of depolarization was (35, 59 or 118 mM K+), the lower the IC50 s were. So, the ratios between the IC50 s in polarized and depolarized glands rose from 3.92 in 35 mM K+ to 26.7 in 118 mM K+. 4. In contrast, the Ca2+ channel activator (-)-Bay K 8644 potentiated catecholamine release evoked by K+/Ca2+ pulses equally well in polarized or depolarized glands. The ratios between EC50 s in polarized or depolarized glands were, respectively, 0.30, 0.59 and 0.69 for 17.7, 35 and 118 mM K+. 5. In simultaneous experiments, the two enantiomers of Bay K 8644 exhibited opposite effects on secretion.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1707711

  19. Conservation of Complex Nuclear Localization Signals Utilizing Classical and Non-Classical Nuclear Import Pathways in LANA Homologs of KSHV and RFHV

    PubMed Central

    Rose, Timothy M.

    2011-01-01

    ORF73 latency-associated nuclear antigen (LANA) of the Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) is targeted to the nucleus of infected cells where it binds to chromatin and mediates viral episome persistence, interacts with cellular proteins and plays a role in latency and tumorigenesis. A structurally related LANA homolog has been identified in the retroperitoneal fibromatosis herpesvirus (RFHV), the macaque homolog of KSHV. Here, we report the evolutionary and functional conservation of a novel bi-functional nuclear localization signal (NLS) in KSHV and RFHV LANA. N-terminal peptides from both proteins were fused to EGFP or double EGFP fusions to examine their ability to induce nuclear transport of a heterologous protein. In addition, GST-pull down experiments were used to analyze the ability of LANA peptides to interact with members of the karyopherin family of nuclear transport receptors. Our studies revealed that both LANA proteins contain an N-terminal arginine/glycine (RG)-rich domain spanning a conserved chromatin-binding motif, which binds directly to importin β1 in a RanGTP-sensitive manner and serves as an NLS in the importin β1-mediated non-classical nuclear import pathway. Embedded within this domain is a conserved lysine/arginine-(KR)-rich bipartite motif that binds directly to multiple members of the importin α family of nuclear import adaptors in a RanGTP-insensitive manner and serves as an NLS in the classical importin α/β-mediated nuclear import pathway. The positioning of a classical bipartite kr-NLS embedded within a non-classical rg-NLS is a unique arrangement in these viral proteins, whose nuclear localization is critical to their functionality and to the virus life cycle. The ability to interact with multiple import receptors provides alternate pathways for nuclear localization of LANA. Since different import receptors can import cargo to distinct subnuclear compartments, a multifunctional NLS may provide LANA with an increased

  20. The effects of directive and nondirective prompts on noncompliant vocal behavior exhibited by a child with autism.

    PubMed

    Peyton, Robert T; Lindauer, Steven E; Richman, David M

    2005-01-01

    Results of an analogue functional analysis indicated that noncompliant vocal behavior exhibited by a young girl with autism was maintained by negative reinforcement. Follow-up analyses suggested that the immediate escape contingency assessed in the demand condition did not appear to maintain the behavior. Instead, noncompliant vocal behavior occurred in response to directive prompts. Nondirective prompts reduced noncompliant vocal behavior to near zero.

  1. Effects of a Peer Competition-based Mobile Learning Approach on Students' Affective Domain Exhibition in Social Studies Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hwang, Gwo-Jen; Chang, Shao-Chen

    2016-01-01

    One of the important and challenging objectives of social studies courses is to promote students' affective domain exhibition, including learning interest, positive attitudes and local culture identity. In this paper, a location-aware mobile learning approach was proposed based on a competition strategy for conducting local cultural activities in…

  2. Effects of a Peer Competition-based Mobile Learning Approach on Students' Affective Domain Exhibition in Social Studies Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hwang, Gwo-Jen; Chang, Shao-Chen

    2016-01-01

    One of the important and challenging objectives of social studies courses is to promote students' affective domain exhibition, including learning interest, positive attitudes and local culture identity. In this paper, a location-aware mobile learning approach was proposed based on a competition strategy for conducting local cultural activities in…

  3. The Effects of Directive and Nondirective Prompts on Noncompliant Vocal Behavior Exhibited by a Child with Autism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peyton, Robert T.; Lindauer, Steven E.; ichman, David M.

    2005-01-01

    Results of an analogue functional analysis indicated that noncompliant vocal behavior exhibited by a young girl with autism was maintained by negative reinforcement. Follow-up analyses suggested that the immediate escape contingency assessed in the demand condition did nor appear to maintain the behavior. Instead, noncompliant vocal behavior…

  4. Effects of an Informal Energy Exhibit on Knowledge and Attitudes of Fourth- and Fifth-Grade Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodman, David Wayne

    2009-01-01

    This dissertation addresses the growing need for renewable energy education by looking at the design, development, and implementation of an informal energy education exhibit that was developed for placement into a regional science museum, school, and community center. This study examined several research questions related to the concept that an…

  5. Effects of an Informal Energy Exhibit on Knowledge and Attitudes of Fourth- and Fifth-Grade Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodman, David Wayne

    2009-01-01

    This dissertation addresses the growing need for renewable energy education by looking at the design, development, and implementation of an informal energy education exhibit that was developed for placement into a regional science museum, school, and community center. This study examined several research questions related to the concept that an…

  6. Online Exhibits & Concept Maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Douma, M.

    2009-12-01

    , teachers, artists, and web designers, a smaller scale collaborative effort can result in an effective mini-exhibit. Online concept maps can present a large quantity of information in bite-size chunks, demonstrating interrelationships between pieces of information without inundating visitors. SpicyNodes uses radial mapping technology to enable visitors to learn about a topic or search for information in intuitive and organic ways. This online concept mapping tool can be used as a portal to invite exploration into topics, or as a means of displaying hierarchies of information. With nodes that contain text, audio, video, and links, interactive online concept maps especially engage visual, kinesthetic, and nonlinear learners. SpicyNodes is also useful for scientists who wish to complement papers, chapters, and books with an online interface that is especially appealing to nonlinear learners. Essentially, SpicyNodes shifts the burden of discovery from the reader to the author. For example, the author may create a nodemap on climate change with hundreds of nodes, but as visitors drill through the nodemap for information (e.g. from climate change to atmospheric gases to carbon dioxide), they see only a few nodes at a time and are not overwhelmed.

  7. Convective storms and non-classical low-level jets during high ozone level episodes in the Amazon region: An ARM/GOAMAZON case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dias-Junior, Cléo Q.; Dias, Nelson Luís; Fuentes, José D.; Chamecki, Marcelo

    2017-04-01

    In this work, we investigate the ozone dynamics during the occurrence of both downdrafts associated with mesoscale convective storms and non-classical low-level jets. Extensive data sets, comprised of air chemistry and meteorological observations made in the Amazon region of Brazil over the course of 2014-15, are analyzed to address several questions. A first objective is to investigate the atmospheric thermodynamic and dynamic conditions associated with storm-generated ozone enhancements in the Amazon region. A second objective is to determine the magnitude and the frequency of ground-level ozone enhancements related to low-level jets. Ozone enhancements are analyzed as a function of wind shear, low-level jet maximum wind speed, and altitude of jet core. Strong and sudden increases in ozone levels are associated with simultaneous changes in variables such as horizontal wind speed, convective available potential energy, turbulence intensity and vertical velocity skewness. Rapid increases in vertical velocity skewness give support to the hypothesis that the ozone enhancements are directly related to downdrafts. Low-level jets associated with advancing density currents are often present during and after storm downdrafts that transport ozone-enriched air from aloft to the surface.

  8. Dynamics of States in the Nonlinear Interaction Regime Between a Three-Level Atom and Generalized Coherent States and Their Non-Classical Features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tavassoly, M. K.; Yadollahi, F.

    The present study investigates the interaction of an equidistant three-level atom and a single-mode cavity field that has been initially prepared in a generalized coherent state. The atom-field interaction is considered to be, in general, intensity-dependent. We suppose that the nonlinearity of the initial generalized coherent state of the field and the intensity-dependent coupling between atom and field are distinctly chosen. Interestingly, an exact analytical solution for the time evolution of the state of atom-field system can be found in this general regime in terms of the nonlinearity functions. Finally, the presented formalism has been applied to a few known physical systems such as Gilmore-Perelomov and Barut-Girardello coherent states of SU(1,1) group, as well as a few special cases of interest. Mean photon number and atomic population inversion will be calculated, in addition to investigating particular non-classicality features such as revivals, sub-Poissonian statistics and quadratures squeezing of the obtained states of the entire system. Also, our results will be compared with some of the earlier works in this particular subject.

  9. Expression and roles of steroidogenic acute regulatory (StAR) protein in 'non-classical', extra-adrenal and extra-gonadal cells and tissues.

    PubMed

    Anuka, Eli; Gal, Michael; Stocco, Douglas M; Orly, Joseph

    2013-05-22

    The activity of the steroidogenic acute regulatory (StAR) protein is indispensable and rate limiting for high output synthesis of steroid hormones in the adrenal cortex and the gonads, known as the 'classical' steroidogenic organs (StAR is not expressed in the human placenta). In addition, studies of recent years have shown that StAR is also expressed in many tissues that produce steroid hormones for local use, potentially conferring some functional advantage by acting via intracrine, autocrine or paracrine fashion. Others hypothesized that StAR might also function in non-steroidogenic roles in specific tissues. This review highlights the evidence for the presence of StAR in 17 extra-adrenal and extra-gonadal organs, cell types and malignancies. Provided is the physiological context and the rationale for searching for the presence of StAR in such cells. Since in many of the tissues the overall level of StAR is relatively low, we also reviewed the methods used for StAR detection. The gathered information suggests that a comprehensive understanding of StAR activity in 'non-classical' tissues will require the use of experimental approaches that are able to analyze StAR presence at single-cell resolution.

  10. A case of recurrent labial adhesions in a 15-month-old child with asymptomatic non-classic congenital adrenal hyperplasia due to 21-hydroxylase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Janus, Dominika; Wojcik, Malgorzata; Malunowicz, Ewa; Starzyk, Jerzy B

    2012-01-01

    Labial adhesions (synechia vulvae) are a relatively common disorder of the external genitalia in prepubertal girls. They usually occur between 3 months and 6 years of age, with a peak between 13 and 23 months of life. In the majority of cases, labial adhesions are asymptomatic and noticed by the parents or a physician during a routine physical examination. Frequently, they cause recurrent urinary tract infections. This report presents the case of a 15-month-old girl with recurrent labial adhesions and urinary tract infections. She was followed-up by a urologist from the age of 3 months, treated topically (estriol cream 1 mg/g and emollients) and surgically. No signs of androgenization were seen apart from advanced bone age. Urinary steroid profile and molecular analysis confirmed the diagnosis of non-classic congenital adrenal hyperplasia (NCCAH) due to 21-hydroxylase deficiency. In the described case, a coincidence of NCCAH and labial adhesion cannot be excluded particularly in view of the resolving of urinary tract infections at the same time as resolving of labial adhesions. However, it seems that in cases of recurrent labial adhesion/synechia that require repeated surgical interventions in view of ineffectiveness of conservative treatment - as it was observed in the presented case - one should consider searching for NCCAH. This may allow not only for the causal treatment of labial adhesions but, above all, NCCAH and, in consequence, the prevention of intensification of virilization, hirsutism, menstrual cycle, and fertility disturbances that are observed starting from puberty.

  11. Human Leukocyte Antigen (HLA) and Immune Regulation: How Do Classical and Non-Classical HLA Alleles Modulate Immune Response to Human Immunodeficiency Virus and Hepatitis C Virus Infections?

    PubMed Central

    Crux, Nicole B.; Elahi, Shokrollah

    2017-01-01

    The genetic factors associated with susceptibility or resistance to viral infections are likely to involve a sophisticated array of immune response. These genetic elements may modulate other biological factors that account for significant influence on the gene expression and/or protein function in the host. Among them, the role of the major histocompatibility complex in viral pathogenesis in particular human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV), is very well documented. We, recently, added a novel insight into the field by identifying the molecular mechanism associated with the protective role of human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-B27/B57 CD8+ T cells in the context of HIV-1 infection and why these alleles act as a double-edged sword protecting against viral infections but predisposing the host to autoimmune diseases. The focus of this review will be reexamining the role of classical and non-classical HLA alleles, including class Ia (HLA-A, -B, -C), class Ib (HLA-E, -F, -G, -H), and class II (HLA-DR, -DQ, -DM, and -DP) in immune regulation and viral pathogenesis (e.g., HIV and HCV). To our knowledge, this is the very first review of its kind to comprehensively analyze the role of these molecules in immune regulation associated with chronic viral infections. PMID:28769934

  12. Ethics on Exhibit

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vick, Randy M.

    2011-01-01

    This article discusses ethical questions raised by an exhibition of work by an artist with a history of mental illness and the exhibition's relevance to art therapy and “outsider art” discourse on the subject. Considerations for how such an exhibit could be handled had the circumstances included an art therapist and art therapy client are…

  13. Ethics on Exhibit

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vick, Randy M.

    2011-01-01

    This article discusses ethical questions raised by an exhibition of work by an artist with a history of mental illness and the exhibition's relevance to art therapy and “outsider art” discourse on the subject. Considerations for how such an exhibit could be handled had the circumstances included an art therapist and art therapy client are…

  14. Kefir exhibits anti‑proliferative and pro‑apoptotic effects on colon adenocarcinoma cells with no significant effects on cell migration and invasion.

    PubMed

    Khoury, Nathalie; El-Hayek, Stephany; Tarras, Omayr; El-Sabban, Marwan; El-Sibai, Mirvat; Rizk, Sandra

    2014-11-01

    Kefir, a fermented milk product, exhibits anti‑tumoral activity in vivo; yet its mechanism of action remains elusive. Recent studies have focused on the mechanism of action of kefir on cancer cells in vitro. The current study aims at examining the effect of kefir on cell survival, proliferation, and motility of colorectal cancer (CRC) cells. Kefir's anti‑cancer potential was tested on CRC cell lines, Caco‑2 and HT‑29, through cytotoxicity, proliferation, and apoptotic assays. The expression of certain genes involved in proliferation and apoptosis was measured using reverse transcriptase‑polymerase chain reaction (RT‑PCR) and western blotting. To assess the effect of kefir on cancer metastasis, wound‑healing and time‑lapse movies, in addition to collagen‑based invasion assay, were used. The results show that cell‑free fractions of kefir exhibit an anti‑proliferative effect on Caco‑2 and HT‑29 cells. Analysis of DNA content by flow cytometry revealed the ability of kefir to induce cell cycle arrest at the G1 phase. Kefir was also found to induce apoptosis, as seen by cell death ELISA. Results from RT‑PCR showed that kefir decreases the expression of transforming growth factor α (TGF‑α); and transforming growth factor‑β1 (TGF‑β1) in HT‑29 cells. Western blotting results revealed an upregulation in Bax:Bcl‑2 ratio, confirming the pro‑apoptotic effect of kefir, and an increase in p53 independent‑p21 expression upon kefir treatment. MMP expression was not altered by kefir treatment. Furthermore, results from time‑lapse motility movies, wound‑healing, and invasion assays showed no effect on the motility of colorectal as well as breast (MCF‑7 and MB‑MDA‑231) cancer cells upon kefir treatment. Our data suggest that kefir is able to inhibit the proliferation and induce apoptosis in HT‑29 and Caco‑2 CRC cells, yet it does not exhibit a significant effect on the motility and invasion of these cells in vitro.

  15. Bathochromic and stabilising effects of sugar beet pectin and an isolated pectic fraction on anthocyanins exhibiting pyrogallol and catechol moieties.

    PubMed

    Buchweitz, M; Carle, R; Kammerer, D R

    2012-12-15

    The formation of anthocyanin-metal chelates, exhibiting intense blue colours was monitored over a period up to 10 weeks. Evaluating normalised absorption spectra in the range of 580-700 nm and their proportion of the total area under the curve (AUC), provided information about the blue colour hue, intensity and stability. Colour stability in model solutions containing commercial sugar beet pectin or an isolated pectic polysaccharide fraction (PPF) therefrom, both being naturally enriched in aluminium and ferric ions, was assessed in a pH range of 3.6-7.0. The pectic structures stabilised anthocyanin-metal chelates, and thus blue colours by efficiently preventing complex precipitation. Highest bathochromic shifts and most intense blue colours were observed in PPF model solutions containing delphinidin-3-glucoside (Dpd-3-glc), exhibiting a pyrogallol moiety in the flavylium B-ring, compared to cyanidin- (Cyd-3-glc) and petunidin-3-glucoside (Pet-3-glc), both carrying a catechol substituted B-ring. Hue and intensity of the blue colour at pH 5.0 were only insignificantly influenced by the buffer system except for citrate and phosphate buffers, which both annihilated anthocyanin-metal chelate formation. The blue colours faded following first order kinetics. Best stabilities as deduced from storage experiments performed at 20 ± 2°C in the dark were observed for Dpd-3-glc. In contrast, Cyd-3-glc displayed shortened half-life values, whereas blue Pet-3-glc chelates decomposed rapidly. These results demonstrate that the solubilisation of anthocyanin-metal chelates by pectic structures is a promising option for developing water soluble natural blue food colourants.

  16. Galectin-3 is a non-classic RNA binding protein that stabilizes the mucin MUC4 mRNA in the cytoplasm of cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Coppin, Lucie; Vincent, Audrey; Frénois, Frédéric; Duchêne, Belinda; Lahdaoui, Fatima; Stechly, Laurence; Renaud, Florence; Villenet, Céline; Seuningen, Isabelle Van; Leteurtre, Emmanuelle; Dion, Johann; Grandjean, Cyrille; Poirier, Françoise; Figeac, Martin; Delacour, Delphine; Porchet, Nicole; Pigny, Pascal

    2017-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer cells express high levels of MUC1, MUC4 and MUC16 mRNAs that encode membrane-bound mucins. These mRNAs share unusual features such as a long half-life. However, it remains unknown how mucin mRNA stability is regulated. Galectin-3 (Gal-3) is an endogenous lectin playing important biological functions in epithelial cells. Gal-3 is encoded by LGALS3 which is up-regulated in pancreatic cancer. Despite the absence of a RNA-recognition motif, Gal-3 interacts indirectly with pre-mRNAs in the nucleus and promotes constitutive splicing. However a broader role of Gal-3 in mRNA fate is unexplored. We report herein that Gal-3 increases MUC4 mRNA stability through an intermediate, hnRNP-L which binds to a conserved CA repeat element in the 3′UTR in a Gal-3 dependent manner and also controls Muc4 mRNA levels in epithelial tissues of Gal3−/− mice. Gal-3 interacts with hnRNP-L in the cytoplasm, especially during cell mitosis, but only partly associates with protein markers of P-Bodies or Stress Granules. By RNA-IP plus RNA-seq analysis and imaging, we demonstrate that Gal-3 binds to mature spliced MUC4 mRNA in the perinuclear region, probably in hnRNP-L-containing RNA granules. Our findings highlight a new role for Gal-3 as a non-classic RNA-binding protein that regulates MUC4 mRNA post-transcriptionally. PMID:28262838

  17. Classic and non-classic 21-hydroxylase deficiency can be discriminated from P450 oxidoreductase deficiency in Japanese infants by urinary steroid metabolites.

    PubMed

    Koyama, Yuhei; Homma, Keiko; Fukami, Maki; Miwa, Masayuki; Ikeda, Kazushige; Ogata, Tsutomu; Murata, Mitsuru; Hasegawa, Tomonobu

    2016-04-01

    We previously reported a two-step biochemical diagnosis to discriminate classic 21-hydroxylase deficiency (C21OHD) from P450 oxidoreductase deficiency (PORD) by using urinary steroid metabolites: the pregnanetriolone/tetrahydrocortisone ratio (Ptl / the cortisol metabolites 5α- and 5β-tetrahydrocortisone (sum of these metabolites termed THEs), and 11β-hydroxyandrosterone (11OHAn). The objective of this study was to investigate whether both C21OHD and non-classic 21OHD (C+NC21OHD) could be biochemically differentiated from PORD. We recruited 55 infants with C21OHD, 8 with NC21OHD, 16 with PORD, 57 with transient hyper-17α-hydroxyprogesteronemia (TH17OHP), and 2,473 controls. All infants were Japanese with ages between 0-180 d. In addition to Ptl, THEs, and 11OHAn, we measured urinary tetrahydroaldosterone (THAldo) and pregnenediol (PD5). The first step: by Ptl with the age-specific cutoffs 0.06 mg/g creatinine (0-10 d of age) and 0.3 mg/g creatinine (11-180 d of age), we were able to differentiate C+NC21OHD and PORD from TH17OHP and controls (0-10 d of age: 0.065-31 vs. < 0.001-0.052, 11-180 d of age: 0.40-42 vs. < 0.001-0.086) with 100% sensitivity and specificity. The second step: by the 11OHAn/THAldo or 11OHAn/PD5 ratio with a cutoff of 0.80 or 1.0, we were able to discriminate between C+NC21OHD and PORD (1.0-720 vs. 0.021-0.61 or 1.8-160 vs. 0.005-0.32, respectively) with 100% sensitivity and specificity. Ptl, 11OHAn/THAldo, and 11OHAn/PD5 could differentiate between C+NC21OHD and PORD in Japanese infants.

  18. Structural Basis for Dual-Inhibition Mechanism of a Non-Classical Kazal-Type Serine Protease Inhibitor from Horseshoe Crab in Complex with Subtilisin

    SciTech Connect

    Shenoy, Rajesh T.; Thangamani, Saravanan; Velazquez-Campoy, Adrian; Ho, Bow; Ding, Jeak Ling; Sivaraman, J.; Kursula, Petri

    2011-04-26

    Serine proteases play a crucial role in host-pathogen interactions. In the innate immune system of invertebrates, multi-domain protease inhibitors are important for the regulation of host-pathogen interactions and antimicrobial activities. Serine protease inhibitors, 9.3-kDa CrSPI isoforms 1 and 2, have been identified from the hepatopancreas of the horseshoe crab, Carcinoscorpius rotundicauda. The CrSPIs were biochemically active, especially CrSPI-1, which potently inhibited subtilisin (Ki=1.43 nM). CrSPI has been grouped with the non-classical Kazal-type inhibitors due to its unusual cysteine distribution. Here we report the crystal structure of CrSPI-1 in complex with subtilisin at 2.6 Å resolution and the results of biophysical interaction studies. The CrSPI-1 molecule has two domains arranged in an extended conformation. These two domains act as heads that independently interact with two separate subtilisin molecules, resulting in the inhibition of subtilisin activity at a ratio of 1:2 (inhibitor to protease). Each subtilisin molecule interacts with the reactive site loop from each domain of CrSPI-1 through a standard canonical binding mode and forms a single ternary complex. In addition, we propose the substrate preferences of each domain of CrSPI-1. Domain 2 is specific towards the bacterial protease subtilisin, while domain 1 is likely to interact with the host protease, Furin. Elucidation of the structure of the CrSPI-1: subtilisin (1:2) ternary complex increases our understanding of host-pathogen interactions in the innate immune system at the molecular level and provides new strategies for immunomodulation.

  19. Hsp72 mediates stronger antigen-dependent non-classical MHC class Ib anti-tumor responses than hsc73 in Xenopus laevis.

    PubMed

    Nedelkovska, Hristina; Robert, Jacques

    2013-01-01

    The heat shock proteins (HSPs) gp96 and HSP70 mediate potent antigen-dependent anti-tumor T cell responses in both mammals and Xenopus laevis. We have shown that frogs immunized with total HSP70 generate CD8+ T cell responses against the Xenopus thymic lymphoid tumor 15/0 that expresses several non-classical MHC class Ib (class Ib) genes, but no classical MHC class Ia (class Ia). In the absence of class Ia, we hypothesized that hsp72 can prime class Ib-mediated anti-tumor unconventional CD8+ T cells in an antigen-dependent manner. To test this, we produced Xenopus recombinant HSP70 proteins (both the cognate hsc73 and the inducible hsp72) from stable 15/0 tumor transfectants. We used an in vivo cross-presentation assay to prime animals by adoptive transfer of HSP-pulsed antigen-presenting cells (APCs) and showed that both hsp72-and hsc73-Ag complexes have a similar potential to elicit class Ia-mediated T cell responses against minor histocompatibility (H) Ag skin grafts. In contrast, our in vivo cross-presentation assay revealed that hsp72 was more potent than hsc73 in generating protective immune responses against the class Ia-negative 15/0 tumors in an Ag-dependent and class Ib-mediated manner. These results suggest that hsp72 can stimulate class Ib-mediated immune responses and represents a promising candidate for immunotherapy against malignancies with downregulated class Ia expression.

  20. Structural basis for dual-inhibition mechanism of a non-classical Kazal-type serine protease inhibitor from horseshoe crab in complex with subtilisin.

    PubMed

    Shenoy, Rajesh T; Thangamani, Saravanan; Velazquez-Campoy, Adrian; Ho, Bow; Ding, Jeak Ling; Sivaraman, J

    2011-04-26

    Serine proteases play a crucial role in host-pathogen interactions. In the innate immune system of invertebrates, multi-domain protease inhibitors are important for the regulation of host-pathogen interactions and antimicrobial activities. Serine protease inhibitors, 9.3-kDa CrSPI isoforms 1 and 2, have been identified from the hepatopancreas of the horseshoe crab, Carcinoscorpius rotundicauda. The CrSPIs were biochemically active, especially CrSPI-1, which potently inhibited subtilisin (Ki = 1.43 nM). CrSPI has been grouped with the non-classical Kazal-type inhibitors due to its unusual cysteine distribution. Here we report the crystal structure of CrSPI-1 in complex with subtilisin at 2.6 Å resolution and the results of biophysical interaction studies. The CrSPI-1 molecule has two domains arranged in an extended conformation. These two domains act as heads that independently interact with two separate subtilisin molecules, resulting in the inhibition of subtilisin activity at a ratio of 1:2 (inhibitor to protease). Each subtilisin molecule interacts with the reactive site loop from each domain of CrSPI-1 through a standard canonical binding mode and forms a single ternary complex. In addition, we propose the substrate preferences of each domain of CrSPI-1. Domain 2 is specific towards the bacterial protease subtilisin, while domain 1 is likely to interact with the host protease, Furin. Elucidation of the structure of the CrSPI-1: subtilisin (1∶2) ternary complex increases our understanding of host-pathogen interactions in the innate immune system at the molecular level and provides new strategies for immunomodulation.

  1. Non-classical antigen processing pathways are required for MHC class II-restricted direct tumor recognition by NY-ESO-1-specific CD4+ T cells

    PubMed Central

    Matsuzaki, Junko; Tsuji, Takemasa; Luescher, Immanuel; Old, Lloyd J.; Shrikant, Protul; Gnjatic, Sacha; Odunsi, Kunle

    2014-01-01

    Tumor antigen-specific CD4+ T cells that directly recognize cancer cells are important for orchestrating antitumor immune responses at the local tumor sites. However, the mechanisms of direct MHC class II (MHC-II) presentation of intracellular tumor antigen by cancer cells are poorly understood. We found that two functionally distinct subsets of CD4+ T cells were expanded after HLA-DPB1*04 (DP04)-binding NY-ESO-1157–170 peptide vaccination in ovarian cancer patients. While both subsets similarly recognized exogenous NY-ESO-1 protein pulsed on DP04+ target cells, only one type recognized target cells with intracellular expression of NY-ESO-1. The tumor-recognizing CD4+ T cells more efficiently recognized the short 8–9-mer peptides than the non-tumor-recognizing CD4+ T cells. In addition to endosomal/lysosomal proteases that are typically involved in MHC-II antigen presentation, several pathways in the MHC class I presentation pathways such as the proteasomal degradation and transporter-associated with antigen-processing (TAP)-mediated peptide transport were also involved in the presentation of intracellular NY-ESO-1 on MHC-II. The presentation was inhibited significantly by primaquine, a small molecule that inhibits endosomal recycling, consistent with findings that pharmacological inhibition of new protein synthesis enhances antigen presentation. Together, our data demonstrated that cancer cells selectively present peptides from intracellular tumor antigens on MHC-II by multiple non-classical antigen-processing pathways. Harnessing direct tumor-recognizing ability of CD4+ T cells could be a promising strategy to enhance antitumor immune responses in the immunosuppressive tumor microenvironment. PMID:24764581

  2. Hsp72 mediates stronger antigen-dependent non-classical MHC class Ib anti-tumor responses than hsc73 in Xenopus laevis

    PubMed Central

    Nedelkovska, Hristina; Robert, Jacques

    2013-01-01

    The heat shock proteins (HSPs) gp96 and HSP70 mediate potent antigen-dependent anti-tumor T cell responses in both mammals and Xenopus laevis. We have shown that frogs immunized with total HSP70 generate CD8+ T cell responses against the Xenopus thymic lymphoid tumor 15/0 that expresses several non-classical MHC class Ib (class Ib) genes, but no classical MHC class Ia (class Ia). In the absence of class Ia, we hypothesized that hsp72 can prime class Ib-mediated anti-tumor unconventional CD8+ T cells in an antigen-dependent manner. To test this, we produced Xenopus recombinant HSP70 proteins (both the cognate hsc73 and the inducible hsp72) from stable 15/0 tumor transfectants. We used an in vivo cross-presentation assay to prime animals by adoptive transfer of HSP-pulsed antigen-presenting cells (APCs) and showed that both hsp72-and hsc73-Ag complexes have a similar potential to elicit class Ia-mediated T cell responses against minor histocompatibility (H) Ag skin grafts. In contrast, our in vivo cross-presentation assay revealed that hsp72 was more potent than hsc73 in generating protective immune responses against the class Ia-negative 15/0 tumors in an Ag-dependent and class Ib-mediated manner. These results suggest that hsp72 can stimulate class Ib-mediated immune responses and represents a promising candidate for immunotherapy against malignancies with downregulated class Ia expression. PMID:23390375

  3. Galectin-3 is a non-classic RNA binding protein that stabilizes the mucin MUC4 mRNA in the cytoplasm of cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Coppin, Lucie; Vincent, Audrey; Frénois, Frédéric; Duchêne, Belinda; Lahdaoui, Fatima; Stechly, Laurence; Renaud, Florence; Villenet, Céline; Seuningen, Isabelle Van; Leteurtre, Emmanuelle; Dion, Johann; Grandjean, Cyrille; Poirier, Françoise; Figeac, Martin; Delacour, Delphine; Porchet, Nicole; Pigny, Pascal

    2017-03-06

    Pancreatic cancer cells express high levels of MUC1, MUC4 and MUC16 mRNAs that encode membrane-bound mucins. These mRNAs share unusual features such as a long half-life. However, it remains unknown how mucin mRNA stability is regulated. Galectin-3 (Gal-3) is an endogenous lectin playing important biological functions in epithelial cells. Gal-3 is encoded by LGALS3 which is up-regulated in pancreatic cancer. Despite the absence of a RNA-recognition motif, Gal-3 interacts indirectly with pre-mRNAs in the nucleus and promotes constitutive splicing. However a broader role of Gal-3 in mRNA fate is unexplored. We report herein that Gal-3 increases MUC4 mRNA stability through an intermediate, hnRNP-L which binds to a conserved CA repeat element in the 3'UTR in a Gal-3 dependent manner and also controls Muc4 mRNA levels in epithelial tissues of Gal3(-/-) mice. Gal-3 interacts with hnRNP-L in the cytoplasm, especially during cell mitosis, but only partly associates with protein markers of P-Bodies or Stress Granules. By RNA-IP plus RNA-seq analysis and imaging, we demonstrate that Gal-3 binds to mature spliced MUC4 mRNA in the perinuclear region, probably in hnRNP-L-containing RNA granules. Our findings highlight a new role for Gal-3 as a non-classic RNA-binding protein that regulates MUC4 mRNA post-transcriptionally.

  4. Structural Basis for Dual-Inhibition Mechanism of a Non-Classical Kazal-Type Serine Protease Inhibitor from Horseshoe Crab in Complex with Subtilisin

    PubMed Central

    Shenoy, Rajesh T.; Thangamani, Saravanan; Velazquez-Campoy, Adrian; Ho, Bow; Ding, Jeak Ling; Sivaraman, J.

    2011-01-01

    Serine proteases play a crucial role in host-pathogen interactions. In the innate immune system of invertebrates, multi-domain protease inhibitors are important for the regulation of host-pathogen interactions and antimicrobial activities. Serine protease inhibitors, 9.3-kDa CrSPI isoforms 1 and 2, have been identified from the hepatopancreas of the horseshoe crab, Carcinoscorpius rotundicauda. The CrSPIs were biochemically active, especially CrSPI-1, which potently inhibited subtilisin (Ki = 1.43 nM). CrSPI has been grouped with the non-classical Kazal-type inhibitors due to its unusual cysteine distribution. Here we report the crystal structure of CrSPI-1 in complex with subtilisin at 2.6 Å resolution and the results of biophysical interaction studies. The CrSPI-1 molecule has two domains arranged in an extended conformation. These two domains act as heads that independently interact with two separate subtilisin molecules, resulting in the inhibition of subtilisin activity at a ratio of 1:2 (inhibitor to protease). Each subtilisin molecule interacts with the reactive site loop from each domain of CrSPI-1 through a standard canonical binding mode and forms a single ternary complex. In addition, we propose the substrate preferences of each domain of CrSPI-1. Domain 2 is specific towards the bacterial protease subtilisin, while domain 1 is likely to interact with the host protease, Furin. Elucidation of the structure of the CrSPI-1: subtilisin (1∶2) ternary complex increases our understanding of host-pathogen interactions in the innate immune system at the molecular level and provides new strategies for immunomodulation. PMID:21541315

  5. An Exhibit for Touching.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hunt, Susan

    1979-01-01

    An exhibit designed for visually handicapped persons presented by the Kalamazoo (Michigan) Institute of Art included bronze sculptures and oil paintings from the institute's permanent collection. (CL)

  6. An Exhibit for Touching.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hunt, Susan

    1979-01-01

    An exhibit designed for visually handicapped persons presented by the Kalamazoo (Michigan) Institute of Art included bronze sculptures and oil paintings from the institute's permanent collection. (CL)

  7. Getting the point across: exploring the effects of dynamic virtual humans in an interactive museum exhibit on user perceptions.

    PubMed

    Rivera-Gutierrez, Diego; Ferdig, Rick; Li, Jian; Lok, Benjamin

    2014-04-01

    We have created “You, M.D.”, an interactive museum exhibit in which users learn about topics in public health literacy while interacting with virtual humans. You, M.D. is equipped with a weight sensor, a height sensor and a Microsoft Kinect that gather basic user information. Conceptually, You, M.D. could use this user information to dynamically select the appearance of the virtual humans in the interaction attempting to improve learning outcomes and user perception for each particular user. For this concept to be possible, a better understanding of how different elements of the visual appearance of a virtual human affects user perceptions is required. In this paper, we present the results of an initial user study with a large sample size (n =333) ran using You, M.D. The study measured users’ reactions based on the user’s gender and body-mass index (BMI) when facing virtual humans with BMI either concordant or discordant from the user’s BMI. The results of the study indicate that concordance between the users’ BMI and the virtual human’s BMI affects male and female users differently. The results also show that female users rate virtual humans as more knowledgeable than male users rate the same virtual humans.

  8. Effects of critical medium components on the production of antifungal lipopeptides from Bacillus amyloliquefaciens Q-426 exhibiting excellent biosurfactant properties.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Pengchao; Quan, Chunshan; Jin, Liming; Wang, Lina; Wang, Jianhua; Fan, Shengdi

    2013-03-01

    In this study, influence of three critical parameters nitrogen sources, initial pH and metal ions was discussed in the production of antifungal lipopeptides from Bacillus amyloliquefaciens Q-426. The results revealed that lipopeptide biosynthesis might have relations with the population density of strain Q-426 and some special amino acids. Also, the alkali-resistant strain Q-426 could grow well in the presence of Fe(2+) ions below 0.8 M l(-1) and still maintain the competitive advantage below 0.2 M l(-1). Moreover, lipopeptides exhibited significant inhibitory activities against Curvularia lunata (Walk) Boed even at the extreme conditions of temperature, pH and salinity. Finally, biosurfactant properties of lipopeptides mixture were evaluated by use with totally six different methods including bacterial adhesion to hydrocarbons assay, lipase activity, hemolytic activity, emulsification activity, oil displacement test and surface tension measurement. The research suggested that B. amyloliquefaciens Q-426 may have great potential in agricultural and environmental fields.

  9. The Effects of the Family-Involved SDLMI on Academic Engagement and Goal Attainment of Middle School Students with Disabilities Who Exhibit Problem Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Nam Hee; Park, Jiyeon

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the effects of the Family-Involved Self-Determination Learning Model of Instruction (SDLMI) on academic engagement and goal attainment of middle school students with disabilities who exhibit problem behavior. Intervention was provided to the experimental group (12 students with their families and special…

  10. Clcn5 Knockout Mice Exhibit Novel Immunomodulatory Effects and Are More Susceptible to Dextran Sulfate Sodium-Induced Colitis

    PubMed Central

    Alex, Philip; Ye, Mei; Zachos, Nicholas C.; Sipes, Jennifer; Nguyen, Thuan; Suhodrev, Maxim; Gonzales, Liberty; Arora, Zubin; Zhang, Ting; Centola, Michael; Guggino, Sandra E.; Li, Xuhang

    2015-01-01

    Although the intracellular Cl−/H+ exchanger Clc-5 is expressed in apical intestinal endocytic compartments, its pathophysiological role in the gastrointestinal tract is unknown. In light of recent findings that CLC-5 is downregulated in active ulcerative colitis (UC), we tested the hypothesis that loss of CLC-5 modulates the immune response, thereby inducing susceptibility to UC. Acute dextran sulfate sodium (DSS) colitis was induced in Clcn5 knockout (KO) and wild-type (WT) mice. Colitis, monitored by disease activity index, histological activity index, and myeloperoxidase activity were significantly elevated in DSS-induced Clcn5 KO mice compared with those in WT mice. Comprehensive serum multiplex cytokine profiling demonstrated a heightened Th1–Th17 profile (increased TNF-α, IL-6, and IL-17) in DSS-induced Clcn5 KO mice compared with that in WT DSS colitis mice. Interestingly, Clcn5 KO mice maintained on a high vitamin D diet attenuated DSS-induced colitis. Immunofluorescence and Western blot analyses of colonic mucosa validated the systemic cytokine patterns and further revealed enhanced activation of the NF-κB pathway in DSS-induced Clcn5 KO mice compared with those in WT mice. Intriguingly, high baseline levels of IL-6 and phospho-IκB were observed in Clcn5 KO mice, suggesting a novel immunopathogenic role for the functional defects that result from the loss of Clc-5. Our studies demonstrate that the loss of Clc-5 1) exhibits IL-6–mediated immunopathogenesis, 2) significantly exacerbated DSS-induced colitis, which is influenced by dietary factors, including vitamin D, and 3) portrays distinct NF-κB–modulated Th1–Th17 immune dysregulation, implying a role for CLC-5 in the immunopathogenesis of UC. PMID:20181886

  11. Human periodontal ligament stem cells suppress T-cell proliferation via down-regulation of non-classical major histocompatibility complex-like glycoprotein CD1b on dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Shin, C; Kim, M; Han, J-A; Choi, B; Hwang, D; Do, Y; Yun, J-H

    2017-02-01

    Periodontal ligament stem cells (PDLSCs) from the periodontal ligament tissue were recently identified as mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). The capabilities of PDLSCs in periodontal tissue or bone regeneration have been reported, but their immunomodulatory role in T-cell immune responses via dendritic cells (DCs), known as the most potent antigen-presenting cell, has not been studied. The aim of this study is to understand the immunological function of homogeneous human STRO-1(+) CD146(+) PDLSCs in DC-mediated T-cell immune responses to modulate the periodontal disease process. We utilized highly purified (> 95%) human STRO-1(+) CD146(+) PDLSCs and human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs). Each stem cell was co-cultured with human monocyte-derived DCs in the presence of lipopolysaccharide isolated from Porphyromonas gingivalis, a major pathogenic bacterium responsible for periodontal disease, in vitro to examine the immunological effect of each stem cell on DCs and DC-mediated T-cell proliferation. We discovered that STRO-1(+) CD146(+) PDLSCs, as well as BMSCs, significantly decreased the level of non-classical major histocompatibility complex glycoprotein CD1b on DCs, resulting in defective T-cell proliferation, whereas most human leukocyte antigens and the co-stimulatory molecules CD80 and CD86 in/on DCs were not significantly affected by the presence of BMSCs or STRO-1(+) CD146(+) PDLSCs. This study unveiled an immunomodulatory role of STRO-1(+) CD146(+) PDLSCs in negatively regulating DC-mediated T-cell immune responses, demonstrating their potential to be utilized in promising new stem cell therapies. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. A Teaching Aids Exhibition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mahanja, Salah

    1985-01-01

    Describes an exhibition for the benefit of teachers of English in Arab Primary Schools, which was prepared by third-year students at the Teachers College for Arab Teachers. The exhibition included games, songs, audiovisual aids, crossword puzzles, vocabulary, spelling booklets, preposition aids, and worksheet and lesson planning aids. (SED)

  13. Volatile oils of Chinese crude medicines exhibit antiparasitic activity against human Demodex with no adverse effects in vivo.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ji-Xin; Sun, Yan-Hong; Li, Chao-Pin

    2015-04-01

    Demodex is a type of permanent obligatory parasite, which can be found on the human body surface. Currently, drugs targeting Demodex usually result in adverse effects and have a poor therapeutic effect. Thus, the aim of the present study was to investigate the use of Chinese crude medicine volatile oils for targeting and inhibiting Demodex in vitro. The volatile oils of six Chinese crude medicines were investigated, including clove, orange fruit, Manchurian wildginger, cinnamon bark, Rhizome Alpiniae Officinarum and pricklyash peel, which were extracted using a distillation method. The exercise status of Demodex folliculorum and Demodex brevis and the antiparasitic effects of the volatile oils against the two species were observed using microscopy. A skin irritation test was used to examine the irritation intensity of the volatile oils. In addition, an acute toxicity test was utilized to observe the toxicity effects of the volatile oils on the skin. Xin Fumanling ointment was employed as a positive control to identify the therapeutic effects of the volatile oils. The results indicated that all six volatile oils were able to kill Demodex efficiently. In particular, the clove volatile oil was effective in inducing optimized anti-Demodex activity. The lethal times of the volatile oils were significantly decreased compared with the Xin Fumanling ointment (P<0.05). Furthermore, the skin irritation test results indicated that the clove volatile oil did not trigger any irritation (0.2 and 0.3 points for intact and scratched skin, respectively), and had a safety equal to that of distilled water. There were not any adverse effects observed following application of the clove volatile oil on the intact or scratched skin. In conclusion, the volatile oils of Chinese crude medicines, particularly that of clove, demonstrated an evident anti-Demodex activity and were able to kill Demodex effectively and safely in vivo.

  14. Volatile oils of Chinese crude medicines exhibit antiparasitic activity against human Demodex with no adverse effects in vivo

    PubMed Central

    LIU, JI-XIN; SUN, YAN-HONG; LI, CHAO-PIN

    2015-01-01

    Demodex is a type of permanent obligatory parasite, which can be found on the human body surface. Currently, drugs targeting Demodex usually result in adverse effects and have a poor therapeutic effect. Thus, the aim of the present study was to investigate the use of Chinese crude medicine volatile oils for targeting and inhibiting Demodex in vitro. The volatile oils of six Chinese crude medicines were investigated, including clove, orange fruit, Manchurian wildginger, cinnamon bark, Rhizome Alpiniae Officinarum and pricklyash peel, which were extracted using a distillation method. The exercise status of Demodex folliculorum and Demodex brevis and the antiparasitic effects of the volatile oils against the two species were observed using microscopy. A skin irritation test was used to examine the irritation intensity of the volatile oils. In addition, an acute toxicity test was utilized to observe the toxicity effects of the volatile oils on the skin. Xin Fumanling ointment was employed as a positive control to identify the therapeutic effects of the volatile oils. The results indicated that all six volatile oils were able to kill Demodex efficiently. In particular, the clove volatile oil was effective in inducing optimized anti-Demodex activity. The lethal times of the volatile oils were significantly decreased compared with the Xin Fumanling ointment (P<0.05). Furthermore, the skin irritation test results indicated that the clove volatile oil did not trigger any irritation (0.2 and 0.3 points for intact and scratched skin, respectively), and had a safety equal to that of distilled water. There were not any adverse effects observed following application of the clove volatile oil on the intact or scratched skin. In conclusion, the volatile oils of Chinese crude medicines, particularly that of clove, demonstrated an evident anti-Demodex activity and were able to kill Demodex effectively and safely in vivo. PMID:25780426

  15. C-peptide exhibits a late induction effect on matrix metallopeptidase-9 in high glucose-stimulated rat mesangial cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Junxia; Li, Yanning; Xu, Mingzhi; Li, Dandan; Wang, Yu; Qi, Jinsheng; He, Kunyu

    2016-01-01

    Insufficient matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-9 and MMP-2 is considered to be a contributor of extracellular matrix (ECM) accumulation in diabetic nephropathy (DN). C-peptide can reverse fibrosis, thus exerting a beneficial effect on DN. Whether C-peptide induces MMP-9 and MMP-2 to reverse ECM accumulation is not clear. In the present study, in order to determine ECM metabolism, rat mesangial cells were treated with high glucose (HG) and C-peptide intervention, then the early and late effects of C-peptide on HG-affected MMP-9 and MMP-2 were evaluated. Firstly, it was confirmed that HG mainly suppressed MMP-9 expression levels. Furthermore, C-peptide treatment induced MMP-9 expression at 6 h and suppressed it at 24 h, revealing the early dual effects of C-peptide on MMP-9 expression. Subsequently, significant increase in MMP-9 expression at 72, 96 and 120 h C-peptide treatment was observed. These changes in MMP-9 protein content confirmed its expression changes following late C-peptide treatment. Furthermore, at 96 and 120 h C-peptide treatment reversed the HG-inhibited MMP-9 secretion, further indicating the late induction effect of C-peptide on MMP-9. The present results demonstrated that C-peptide exerted a late induction effect on MMP-9 in HG-stimulated rat mesangial cells, which may be associated with the underlying mechanism of C-peptide's reversal effects on DN. PMID:28101192

  16. Estrogen Exhibits a Biphasic Effect on Prostate Tumor Growth through the Estrogen Receptor β-KLF5 Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Osakabe, Asami; Waku, Tsuyoshi; Suzuki, Takashi; Akaogi, Kensuke; Fujimura, Tetsuya; Homma, Yukio; Inoue, Satoshi; Yanagisawa, Junn

    2015-01-01

    Estrogens are effective in the treatment of prostate cancer; however, the effects of estrogens on prostate cancer are enigmatic. In this study, we demonstrated that estrogen (17β-estradiol [E2]) has biphasic effects on prostate tumor growth. A lower dose of E2 increased tumor growth in mouse xenograft models using DU145 and PC-3 human prostate cancer cells, whereas a higher dose significantly decreased tumor growth. We found that anchorage-independent apoptosis in these cells was inhibited by E2 treatment. Similarly, in vivo angiogenesis was suppressed by E2. Interestingly, these effects of E2 were abolished by knockdown of either estrogen receptor β (ERβ) or Krüppel-like zinc finger transcription factor 5 (KLF5). Ιn addition, E2 suppressed KLF5-mediated transcription through ERβ, which inhibits proapoptotic FOXO1 and proangiogenic PDGFA expression. Furthermore, we revealed that a nonagonistic ER ligand GS-1405 inhibited FOXO1 and PDGFA expression through the ERβ-KLF5 pathway and regulated prostate tumor growth without ERβ transactivation. Therefore, these results suggest that E2 biphasically modulates prostate tumor formation by regulating KLF5-dependent transcription through ERβ and provide a new strategy for designing ER modulators, which will be able to regulate prostate cancer progression with minimal adverse effects due to ER transactivation. PMID:26483416

  17. Estrogen Exhibits a Biphasic Effect on Prostate Tumor Growth through the Estrogen Receptor β-KLF5 Pathway.

    PubMed

    Nakajima, Yuka; Osakabe, Asami; Waku, Tsuyoshi; Suzuki, Takashi; Akaogi, Kensuke; Fujimura, Tetsuya; Homma, Yukio; Inoue, Satoshi; Yanagisawa, Junn

    2016-01-01

    Estrogens are effective in the treatment of prostate cancer; however, the effects of estrogens on prostate cancer are enigmatic. In this study, we demonstrated that estrogen (17β-estradiol [E2]) has biphasic effects on prostate tumor growth. A lower dose of E2 increased tumor growth in mouse xenograft models using DU145 and PC-3 human prostate cancer cells, whereas a higher dose significantly decreased tumor growth. We found that anchorage-independent apoptosis in these cells was inhibited by E2 treatment. Similarly, in vivo angiogenesis was suppressed by E2. Interestingly, these effects of E2 were abolished by knockdown of either estrogen receptor β (ERβ) or Krüppel-like zinc finger transcription factor 5 (KLF5). Ιn addition, E2 suppressed KLF5-mediated transcription through ERβ, which inhibits proapoptotic FOXO1 and proangiogenic PDGFA expression. Furthermore, we revealed that a nonagonistic ER ligand GS-1405 inhibited FOXO1 and PDGFA expression through the ERβ-KLF5 pathway and regulated prostate tumor growth without ERβ transactivation. Therefore, these results suggest that E2 biphasically modulates prostate tumor formation by regulating KLF5-dependent transcription through ERβ and provide a new strategy for designing ER modulators, which will be able to regulate prostate cancer progression with minimal adverse effects due to ER transactivation. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  18. Glucagon-like peptide-2 but not imipramine exhibits antidepressant-like effects in ACTH-treated mice.

    PubMed

    Iwai, Takashi; Ohnuki, Tomoko; Sasaki-Hamada, Sachie; Saitoh, Akiyoshi; Sugiyama, Azusa; Oka, Jun-Ichiro

    2013-04-15

    We investigated the effectiveness of glucagon-like peptide-2 (GLP-2) against refractory depression in adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH)-treated mice as a model of tricyclic antidepressant (TCA)-resistant depression. Chronic ACTH treatment (0.45 mg/kg, s.c., 14 days) weakened the antidepressant-like effects of imipramine (20 mg/kg, i.p., 6 days) in the forced-swim test (FST). Conversely, GLP-2 (3 μg/mice, i.c.v., 6 days) induced antidepressant-like effects in the ACTH-treated mice in the FST. ACTH-treatment increased basal serum corticosterone levels, with an additional increase induced by the FST. Imipramine or GLP-2 had no effect on the basal corticosterone level, but GLP-2 attenuated the additional increase caused by the FST. Moreover, GLP-2 increased 5-HT levels, but not 5-HIAA. These results suggest that GLP-2 induced antidepressant-like effects under imipramine-resistant conditions through increase in 5-HT levels.

  19. N-palmitoylethanolamide, an endocannabinoid, exhibits antidepressant effects in the forced swim test and the tail suspension test in mice.

    PubMed

    Yu, Hai-Ling; Deng, Xian-Qing; Li, Ying-Jun; Li, Ying-Chun; Quan, Zhe-Shan; Sun, Xian-Yu

    2011-01-01

    The antidepressant-like effects of N-palmitoylethanolamide (PEA), a putative endocannabinoid, was investigated in mice using the tail suspension test (TST) and the forced swimming test (FST). In TST, PEA (10, 20, and 40 mg/kg) produced a statistically significant reduction in immobility (50, 32, and 34%, respectively, vs. the control group), whereas fluoxetine (20 mg/kg) reduced immobility by 38%. In FST, PEA (5, 10, and 20 mg/kg) produced a statistically significant reduction in immobility (15, 21, and 36%, respectively), whereas fluoxetine (20 mg/kg) reduced immobility by 18%. Moreover, PEA (20 mg/kg) did not significantly change motor activity in a spontaneous behavioral test. In conclusion, PEA (dose range of 5-40 mg/kg) administered orally reduced immobility in TST and FST, comparable to the antidepressant effect of fluoxetine, and had no effect on spontaneous activity in mice.

  20. Fermented green tea extract exhibits hypolipidaemic effects through the inhibition of pancreatic lipase and promotion of energy expenditure.

    PubMed

    Seo, Dae-Bang; Jeong, Hyun Woo; Kim, Yeon-Ji; Kim, Sukyung; Kim, Jeongkee; Lee, Ji Hae; Joo, Kyungmi; Choi, Jin Kyu; Shin, Song Seok; Lee, Sung-Joon

    2017-01-01

    Hyperlipidaemia is a major cause of atherosclerosis and related CVD and can be prevented with natural substances. Previously, we reported that a novel Bacillus-fermented green tea (FGT) exerts anti-obesity and hypolipidaemic effects. This study further investigated the hypotriglyceridaemic and anti-obesogenic effects of FGT and its underlying mechanisms. FGT effectively inhibited pancreatic lipase activity in vitro (IC50, 0·48 mg/ml) and ameliorated postprandial lipaemia in rats (26 % reduction with 500 mg/kg FGT). In hypertriglyceridaemic hamsters, FGT administration significantly reduced plasma TAG levels. In mice, FGT administration (500 mg/kg) for 2 weeks augmented energy expenditure by 22 % through the induction of plasma serotonin, a neurotransmitter that modulates energy expenditure and mRNA expressions of lipid metabolism genes in peripheral tissues. Analysis of the gut microbiota showed that FGT reduced the proportion of the phylum Firmicutes in hamsters, which could further contribute to its anti-obesity effects. Collectively, these data demonstrate that FGT decreases plasma TAG levels via multiple mechanisms including inhibition of pancreatic lipase, augmentation of energy expenditure, induction of serotonin secretion and alteration of gut microbiota. These results suggest that FGT may be a useful natural agent for preventing hypertriglyceridaemia and obesity.

  1. The hop constituent xanthohumol exhibits hepatoprotective effects and inhibits the activation of hepatic stellate cells at different levels

    PubMed Central

    Weiskirchen, Ralf; Mahli, Abdo; Weiskirchen, Sabine; Hellerbrand, Claus

    2015-01-01

    Xanthohumol is the principal prenylated flavonoid of the female inflorescences of the hop plant. In recent years, various beneficial xanthohumol effects including anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, hypoglycemic activities, and anticancer effects have been revealed. This review summarizes present studies indicating that xanthohumol also inhibits several critical pathophysiological steps during the development and course of chronic liver disease, including the activation and pro-fibrogenic genotype of hepatic stellate cells. Also the various mechanism of action and molecular targets of the beneficial xanthohumol effects will be described. Furthermore, the potential use of xanthohumol or a xanthohumol-enriched hop extract as therapeutic agent to combat the progression of chronic liver disease will be discussed. It is notable that in addition to its hepatoprotective effects, xanthohumol also holds promise as a therapeutic agent for treating obesity, dysregulation of glucose metabolism and other components of the metabolic syndrome including hepatic steatosis. Thus, therapeutic xanthohumol application appears as a promising strategy, particularly in obese patients, to inhibit the development as well as the progression of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. PMID:25999863

  2. An Investigation of the Life Experiences and Beliefs of Teachers Exhibiting Effective Classroom Management Behaviors in Diverse Urban Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hargrove, Pauline Colburn

    2008-01-01

    In order to meet the growing demands being placed on teachers and students, it is incumbent upon educators to understand how the teachers who are highly effective became so. It is through understanding the experiences of the developmental process as well as the beliefs that guide behaviors that we can enable, equip, and empower others to become…

  3. An Investigation of the Life Experiences and Beliefs of Teachers Exhibiting Effective Classroom Management Behaviors in Diverse Rural Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holt, William Charles

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative study was to investigate the life experiences and beliefs of highly effective teachers regarding classroom management in diverse rural school populations. The research for this phenomenological study utilized the narrative inquiry method of data collection. This study explores the beliefs, background and experiences…

  4. Effects of Activity Schedules on Challenging Behavior Exhibited in Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders: A Systematic Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lequia, Jenna; Machalicek, Wendy; Rispoli, Mandy J.

    2012-01-01

    We reviewed studies implementing activity schedules to decrease challenging behavior of children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD). Systematic searches of electronic databases, journals, and reference lists identified 18 studies meeting the inclusion criteria. These studies were evaluated in terms of the effectiveness of activity schedules to…

  5. Does School Board Training Encourage and Equip School Board Members to Exhibit the Behaviors of Effective Governance?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gates, Issaic

    2013-01-01

    This study applied 3 theoretical frameworks--Lee Bolman and Terrence Deal's four frames, the Lighthouse Inquiry of the Iowa Association of School Boards, and effective governance characteristics--to examine the impact of the Masters in Governance (MIG) training offered by the California School Boards Association on the ability of school board…

  6. The hop constituent xanthohumol exhibits hepatoprotective effects and inhibits the activation of hepatic stellate cells at different levels.

    PubMed

    Weiskirchen, Ralf; Mahli, Abdo; Weiskirchen, Sabine; Hellerbrand, Claus

    2015-01-01

    Xanthohumol is the principal prenylated flavonoid of the female inflorescences of the hop plant. In recent years, various beneficial xanthohumol effects including anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, hypoglycemic activities, and anticancer effects have been revealed. This review summarizes present studies indicating that xanthohumol also inhibits several critical pathophysiological steps during the development and course of chronic liver disease, including the activation and pro-fibrogenic genotype of hepatic stellate cells. Also the various mechanism of action and molecular targets of the beneficial xanthohumol effects will be described. Furthermore, the potential use of xanthohumol or a xanthohumol-enriched hop extract as therapeutic agent to combat the progression of chronic liver disease will be discussed. It is notable that in addition to its hepatoprotective effects, xanthohumol also holds promise as a therapeutic agent for treating obesity, dysregulation of glucose metabolism and other components of the metabolic syndrome including hepatic steatosis. Thus, therapeutic xanthohumol application appears as a promising strategy, particularly in obese patients, to inhibit the development as well as the progression of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease.

  7. Does School Board Training Encourage and Equip School Board Members to Exhibit the Behaviors of Effective Governance?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gates, Issaic

    2013-01-01

    This study applied 3 theoretical frameworks--Lee Bolman and Terrence Deal's four frames, the Lighthouse Inquiry of the Iowa Association of School Boards, and effective governance characteristics--to examine the impact of the Masters in Governance (MIG) training offered by the California School Boards Association on the ability of school board…

  8. Effects of Activity Schedules on Challenging Behavior Exhibited in Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders: A Systematic Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lequia, Jenna; Machalicek, Wendy; Rispoli, Mandy J.

    2012-01-01

    We reviewed studies implementing activity schedules to decrease challenging behavior of children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD). Systematic searches of electronic databases, journals, and reference lists identified 18 studies meeting the inclusion criteria. These studies were evaluated in terms of the effectiveness of activity schedules to…

  9. Cariprazine Exhibits Anxiolytic and Dopamine D3 Receptor-Dependent Antidepressant Effects in the Chronic Stress Model.

    PubMed

    Duric, Vanya; Banasr, Mounira; Franklin, Tina; Lepack, Ashley; Adham, Nika; Kiss, Béla; Gyertyán, István; Duman, Ronald S

    2017-05-22

    Cariprazine, a D3-preferring dopamine D2/D3 receptor partial agonist, is a new antipsychotic drug recently approved in the US for the treatment of schizophrenia and bipolar mania. We recently demonstrated that cariprazine also has significant anti-anhedonic-like effects in rats subjected to chronic stress; however, the exact mechanism of action for cariprazine's antidepressant-like properties is not known. Thus, in this study we examined whether the effects of cariprazine are mediated by dopamine D3 receptors. Wild-type and D3-knockout (D3-KO) mice were exposed to chronic unpredictable stress (CUS) for up to 26 days, treated daily with vehicle, imipramine (20 mg/kg), aripiprazole (1 and 5 mg/kg), or cariprazine (0.03, 0.1, 0.2, and 0.4 mg/kg), and tested in behavioral assays measuring anhedonia and anxiety-like behaviors. Results showed that cariprazine significantly attenuated CUS-induced anhedonic-like behavior in wild-type mice, demonstrating potent antidepressant-like effects comparable to aripiprazole and the tricyclic antidepressant imipramine. This anti-anhedonic-like effect of cariprazine was not observed in D3-KO mice, suggesting that the cariprazine antidepressant-like activity is mediated by dopamine D3 receptors. Moreover, cariprazine significantly reduced drinking latency in the novelty-induced hypophagia test in wild-type mice, further confirming its anti-anhedonic-like effect and showing that it also has anxiolytic-like activity. In combination with previous studies, these results suggest that cariprazine has a unique pharmacological profile and distinct dopamine D3 receptor-dependent mechanism of action that may be beneficial in the treatment of schizophrenia, bipolar disorder and major depressive disorder.

  10. Classic and non-classic 21-hydroxylase deficiency can be discriminated from P450 oxidoreductase deficiency in Japanese infants by urinary steroid metabolites

    PubMed Central

    Koyama, Yuhei; Homma, Keiko; Fukami, Maki; Miwa, Masayuki; Ikeda, Kazushige; Ogata, Tsutomu; Murata, Mitsuru; Hasegawa, Tomonobu

    2016-01-01

    Abstract. We previously reported a two-step biochemical diagnosis to discriminate classic 21-hydroxylase deficiency (C21OHD) from P450 oxidoreductase deficiency (PORD) by using urinary steroid metabolites: the pregnanetriolone/tetrahydrocortisone ratio (Ptl / the cortisol metabolites 5α- and 5β-tetrahydrocortisone (sum of these metabolites termed THEs), and 11β-hydroxyandrosterone (11OHAn). The objective of this study was to investigate whether both C21OHD and non-classic 21OHD (C+NC21OHD) could be biochemically differentiated from PORD. We recruited 55 infants with C21OHD, 8 with NC21OHD, 16 with PORD, 57 with transient hyper-17α-hydroxyprogesteronemia (TH17OHP), and 2,473 controls. All infants were Japanese with ages between 0–180 d. In addition to Ptl, THEs, and 11OHAn, we measured urinary tetrahydroaldosterone (THAldo) and pregnenediol (PD5). The first step: by Ptl with the age-specific cutoffs 0.06 mg/g creatinine (0–10 d of age) and 0.3 mg/g creatinine (11–180 d of age), we were able to differentiate C+NC21OHD and PORD from TH17OHP and controls (0–10 d of age: 0.065–31 vs. < 0.001–0.052, 11–180 d of age: 0.40–42 vs. < 0.001–0.086) with 100% sensitivity and specificity. The second step: by the 11OHAn/THAldo or 11OHAn/PD5 ratio with a cutoff of 0.80 or 1.0, we were able to discriminate between C+NC21OHD and PORD (1.0–720 vs. 0.021–0.61 or 1.8–160 vs. 0.005–0.32, respectively) with 100% sensitivity and specificity. Ptl, 11OHAn/THAldo, and 11OHAn/PD5 could differentiate between C+NC21OHD and PORD in Japanese infants. PMID:27212795

  11. Non-classic congenital adrenal hyperplasia due to 21-hydroxylase deficiency revisited: an update with a special focus on adolescent and adult women.

    PubMed

    Carmina, Enrico; Dewailly, Didier; Escobar-Morreale, Héctor F; Kelestimur, Fahrettin; Moran, Carlos; Oberfield, Sharon; Witchel, Selma F; Azziz, Ricardo

    2017-09-01

    Non-classic congenital hyperplasia (NCAH) due to 21-hydroxylase deficiency is a common autosomal recessive disorder characterized by androgen excess. We conducted a systematic review and critical assessment of the available evidence pertaining to the epidemiology, pathophysiology, diagnosis and management of NCAH. A meta-analysis of epidemiological data was also performed. Peer-reviewed studies evaluating NCAH published up to October 2016 were reviewed. Multiple databases were searched including MEDLINE, EMBASE, Cochrane, ERIC, EBSCO, dissertation abstracts, and current contents. The worldwide prevalence of NCAH amongst women presenting with signs and symptoms of androgen excess is 4.2% (95% confidence interval: 3.2-5.4%). The clinical consequences of NCAH expand from infancy, i.e. accelerated growth, to adolescence and adulthood, i.e. premature pubarche, cutaneous symptoms and oligo-ovulation in a polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS)-like clinical picture. The diagnosis of NCAH relies on serum 17-hydroxyprogesterone (17-OHP) concentrations. A basal 17-OHP concentration ≥2 ng/ml (6 nmol/l) should be used for screening if more appropriate in-house cut-off values are not available. Definitive diagnosis requires a 17-OHP concentration ≥10 ng/ml (30 nmol/l), either basally or after cosyntropin-stimulation. Molecular genetic analysis of the CYP21A2 gene, which is responsible for 21-hydroxylase activity, may be used for confirmation purposes and should be offered to all patients with NCAH along with genetic counseling because these patients frequently carry alleles that may result in classic CAH, the more severe form of the disease, in their progeny. Treatment must be individualized. Glucocorticoid replacement therapy may benefit pediatric patients with accelerated growth or advanced bone age or adult women seeking fertility, whereas adequate control of menstrual irregularity, hirsutism and other cutaneous symptoms is best served by the use of oral contraceptive pills

  12. Polymer ferroelectric field-effect memory device with SnO channel layer exhibits record hole mobility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caraveo-Frescas, J. A.; Khan, M. A.; Alshareef, H. N.

    2014-06-01

    Here we report for the first time a hybrid p-channel polymer ferroelectric field-effect transistor memory device with record mobility. The memory device, fabricated at 200°C on both plastic polyimide and glass substrates, uses ferroelectric polymer P(VDF-TrFE) as the gate dielectric and transparent p-type oxide (SnO) as the active channel layer. A record mobility of 3.3 cm2V-1s-1, large memory window (~16 V), low read voltages (~-1 V), and excellent retention characteristics up to 5000 sec have been achieved. The mobility achieved in our devices is over 10 times higher than previously reported polymer ferroelectric field-effect transistor memory with p-type channel. This demonstration opens the door for the development of non-volatile memory devices based on dual channel for emerging transparent and flexible electronic devices.

  13. A new family of diamagnetic macrocyclic Fe(II) compounds exhibiting the LIESST effect at high temperatures.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hongfeng; Desplanches, Cédric; Dagault, Philippe; Létard, Jean-François

    2014-11-07

    The photomagnetic properties of a new Fe(II) macrocyclic family [Fe(L(xyz)N5)(CN)2]·nH2O were investigated with respect to the T(LIESST) versus T(1/2) relationship. These compounds are diamagnetic below 400 K with T(LIESST) values above 100 K, which indicates that this family presents an unconventional LIESST effect that is much higher than the expected T0 = 180 K line for macrocyclic complexes.

  14. Novel GPR40 agonist AS2575959 exhibits glucose metabolism improvement and synergistic effect with sitagliptin on insulin and incretin secretion.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Hirotsugu; Yoshida, Shigeru; Minoura, Hideaki; Negoro, Kenji; Shimaya, Akiyoshi; Shimokawa, Teruhiko; Shibasaki, Masayuki

    2014-01-17

    GPR40 is a free fatty acid receptor that regulates glucose-dependent insulin secretion at pancreatic β-cells and glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1), one of the major incretins, secretion at the endocrine cells of the gastrointestinal tract. We investigated the synergistic effect of AS2575959, a novel GPR40 agonist, in combination with sitagliptin, a major dipeptidyl peptidase-IV (DPP-IV) inhibitor, on glucose-dependent insulin secretion and GLP-1 secretion. In addition, we investigated the chronic effects of AS2575959 on whole-body glucose metabolism. We evaluated acute glucose metabolism on insulin and GLP-1 secretion using an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) as well as assessed the chronic glucose metabolism in diabetic ob/ob mice following the repeated administration of AS2575959. We discovered the novel GPR40 agonist sodium [(3S)-6-({4'-[(3S)-3,4-dihydroxybutoxy]-2,2',6'-trimethyl[1,1'-biphenyl]-3-yl}methoxy)-3H-spiro[1-benzofuran-2,1'-cyclopropan]-3-yl]acetate (AS2575959) and found that the compound influenced glucose-dependent insulin secretion both in vitro pancreas β-cell-derived cells and in vivo mice OGTT. Further, we observed a synergistic effect of AS2575959 and DPP-IV inhibitor on insulin secretion and plasma GLP-1 level. In addition, we discovered the improvement in glucose metabolism on repeated administration of AS2575959. To our knowledge, this study is the first to demonstrate the synergistic effect of a GPR40 agonist and DPP-IV inhibitor on the glucose-dependent insulin secretion and GLP-1 concentration increase. These findings suggest that GPR40 agonists may represent a promising therapeutic strategy for the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus, particularly when used in combination with DPP-IV inhibitors. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. D-Amino acid oxidase-induced oxidative stress, 3-bromopyruvate and citrate inhibit angiogenesis, exhibiting potent anticancer effects.

    PubMed

    El Sayed, S M; El-Magd, R M Abou; Shishido, Y; Yorita, K; Chung, S P; Tran, D H; Sakai, T; Watanabe, H; Kagami, S; Fukui, K

    2012-10-01

    Angiogenesis is critical for cancer growth and metastasis. Steps of angiogenesis are energy consuming, while vascular endothelial cells are highly glycolytic. Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is a highly vascular tumor and this enhances its aggressiveness. D-amino acid oxidase (DAO) is a promising therapeutic protein that induces oxidative stress upon acting on its substrates. Oxidative stress-energy depletion (OSED) therapy was recently reported (El Sayed et al., Cancer Gene Ther, 19, 1-18, 2012). OSED combines DAO-induced oxidative stress with energy depletion caused by glycolytic inhibitors such as 3-bromopyruvate (3BP), a hexokinase II inhibitor that depleted ATP in cancer cells and induced production of hydrogen peroxide. 3BP disturbs the Warburg effect and antagonizes effects of lactate and pyruvate (El Sayed et al., J Bioenerg Biomembr, 44, 61-79, 2012). Citrate is a natural organic acid capable of inhibiting glycolysis by targeting phosphofructokinase. Here, we report that DAO, 3BP and citrate significantly inhibited angiogenesis, decreased the number of vascular branching points and shortened the length of vascular tubules. OSED delayed the growth of C6/DAO glioma cells. 3BP combined with citrate delayed the growth of C6 glioma cells and decreased significantly the number and size of C6 glioma colonies in soft agar. Human GBM cells (U373MG) were resistant to chemotherapy e.g. cisplatin and cytosine arabinoside, while 3BP was effective in decreasing the viability and disturbing the morphology of U373MG cells.

  16. Quercetin and EGCG exhibit chemopreventive effects in cholangiocarcinoma cells via suppression of JAK/STAT signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Senggunprai, Laddawan; Kukongviriyapan, Veerapol; Prawan, Auemduan; Kukongviriyapan, Upa

    2014-06-01

    Quercetin and epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) are dietary phytochemicals with antiinflammatory and antitumor effects. In the present study, we examined the effects of these two compounds on Janus-like kinase (JAK)/signal transduction and transcription (STAT) pathway of cholangiocarcinoma (CCA) cells, because CCA is one of the aggressive cancers with very poor prognosis and JAK/STAT pathway is critically important in inflammation and carcinogenesis. The results showed that the JAK/STAT pathway activation by proinflammatory cytokine interleukin-6 and interferon-γ in CCA cells was suppressed by pretreatment with quercetin and EGCG, evidently by a decrease of the elevated phosphorylated-STAT1 and STAT3 proteins in a dose-dependent manner. The cytokine-mediated up-regulation of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) via JAK/STAT cascade was abolished by both quercetin and EGCG pretreatment. Moreover, these flavonoids also could inhibit growth and cytokine-induced migration of CCA cells. Pretreatment with specific JAK inhibitors, AG490 and piceatannol, abolished cytokine-induced iNOS and ICAM-1 expression. These results demonstrate beneficial effects of quercetin and EGCG in the suppression of JAK/STAT cascade of CCA cells. Quercetin and EGCG would be potentially useful as cancer chemopreventive agents against CCA. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  17. Rhein exhibits antitumorigenic effects by interfering with the interaction between prolyl isomerase Pin1 and c-Jun.

    PubMed

    Cho, Jin Hyoung; Chae, Jung-Il; Shim, Jung-Hyun

    2017-03-01

    The Pin1 protein (or peptidyl-prolyl cis/trans isomerase) specifically catalyzes the cis/trans isomerization of phosphorylated serine/threonine-proline (Ser/Thr-Pro) bonds and plays an important role in many cellular events through the effects of conformational change in the function of c-Jun, its biological substrate. Pin1 expression is involved in essential cellular pathways that mediate cell proliferation, cell cycle progression, tumorigenesis and apoptosis by altering their stability and function, and it is overexpressed in various types of tumors. Pin1 phosphorylation has been regarded as a marker of Pin1 isomerase activity, and the phosphorylation of Ser/Thr-Pro on protein substrates is prerequisite for its binding activity with Pin1 and subsequent isomerization. Since phosphorylation of proteins on Ser/Thr-Pro is a key regulatory mechanism in the control of cell proliferation and transformation, Pin1 has become an attractive molecule in cancer research. Many inhibitors of Pin1 have been discovered, including several classes of both designed inhibitors and natural products. Anthraquinone compounds possess antitumor properties and have therefore been applied in human and veterinary therapeutics as active substances in medicinal products. Among the anthraquinones, rhein (4,5-dihydroxy-9,10-dioxoanthracene-2-carboxylic acid) is a monomeric anthraquinone derivative found mainly in plants in the Polygonaceae family, such as rhubarb and Polygonum cuspidatum. Recent studies have shown that rhein has numerous pharmacological activities, including antitumor effects. Here, we demonstrated the antitumorigenic effect of rhein using cell proliferation assay, anchorage-independent cell transformation, pull-down assay, luciferase promoter activity, fluorescence-activated cell sorting and western blot analysis. The rhein/Pin1 association was found to play a regulatory role in cell proliferation and neoplastic cell transformation and the binding of phosphorylated c-Jun (Ser

  18. Glutathione-Disrupted Biofilms of Clinical Pseudomonas aeruginosa Strains Exhibit an Enhanced Antibiotic Effect and a Novel Biofilm Transcriptome

    PubMed Central

    Das, Theerthankar; Ibugo, Amaye; Buckle, Edwina; Manefield, Mike; Manos, Jim

    2016-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections result in high morbidity and mortality rates for individuals with cystic fibrosis (CF), with premature death often occurring. These infections are complicated by the formation of biofilms in the sputum. Antibiotic therapy is stymied by antibiotic resistance of the biofilm matrix, making novel antibiofilm strategies highly desirable. Within P. aeruginosa biofilms, the redox factor pyocyanin enhances biofilm integrity by intercalating with extracellular DNA. The antioxidant glutathione (GSH) reacts with pyocyanin, disrupting intercalation. This study investigated GSH disruption by assaying the physiological effects of GSH and DNase I on biofilms of clinical CF isolates grown in CF artificial sputum medium (ASMDM+). Confocal scanning laser microscopy showed that 2 mM GSH, alone or combined with DNase I, significantly disrupted immature (24-h) biofilms of Australian epidemic strain (AES) isogens AES-1R and AES-1M. GSH alone greatly disrupted mature (72-h) AES-1R biofilms, resulting in significant differential expression of 587 genes, as indicated by RNA-sequencing (RNA-seq) analysis. Upregulated systems included cyclic diguanylate and pyoverdine biosynthesis, the type VI secretion system, nitrate metabolism, and translational machinery. Biofilm disruption with GSH revealed a cellular physiology distinct from those of mature and dispersed biofilms. RNA-seq results were validated by biochemical and quantitative PCR assays. Biofilms of a range of CF isolates disrupted with GSH and DNase I were significantly more susceptible to ciprofloxacin, and increased antibiotic effectiveness was achieved by increasing the GSH concentration. This study demonstrated that GSH, alone or with DNase I, represents an effective antibiofilm treatment when combined with appropriate antibiotics, pending in vivo studies. PMID:27161630

  19. Glutathione-Disrupted Biofilms of Clinical Pseudomonas aeruginosa Strains Exhibit an Enhanced Antibiotic Effect and a Novel Biofilm Transcriptome.

    PubMed

    Klare, William; Das, Theerthankar; Ibugo, Amaye; Buckle, Edwina; Manefield, Mike; Manos, Jim

    2016-08-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections result in high morbidity and mortality rates for individuals with cystic fibrosis (CF), with premature death often occurring. These infections are complicated by the formation of biofilms in the sputum. Antibiotic therapy is stymied by antibiotic resistance of the biofilm matrix, making novel antibiofilm strategies highly desirable. Within P. aeruginosa biofilms, the redox factor pyocyanin enhances biofilm integrity by intercalating with extracellular DNA. The antioxidant glutathione (GSH) reacts with pyocyanin, disrupting intercalation. This study investigated GSH disruption by assaying the physiological effects of GSH and DNase I on biofilms of clinical CF isolates grown in CF artificial sputum medium (ASMDM+). Confocal scanning laser microscopy showed that 2 mM GSH, alone or combined with DNase I, significantly disrupted immature (24-h) biofilms of Australian epidemic strain (AES) isogens AES-1R and AES-1M. GSH alone greatly disrupted mature (72-h) AES-1R biofilms, resulting in significant differential expression of 587 genes, as indicated by RNA-sequencing (RNA-seq) analysis. Upregulated systems included cyclic diguanylate and pyoverdine biosynthesis, the type VI secretion system, nitrate metabolism, and translational machinery. Biofilm disruption with GSH revealed a cellular physiology distinct from those of mature and dispersed biofilms. RNA-seq results were validated by biochemical and quantitative PCR assays. Biofilms of a range of CF isolates disrupted with GSH and DNase I were significantly more susceptible to ciprofloxacin, and increased antibiotic effectiveness was achieved by increasing the GSH concentration. This study demonstrated that GSH, alone or with DNase I, represents an effective antibiofilm treatment when combined with appropriate antibiotics, pending in vivo studies. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  20. Phytoestrogen Bakuchiol Exhibits In Vitro and In Vivo Anti-breast Cancer Effects by Inducing S Phase Arrest and Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Li; Chen, Xueping; Liu, Chi C.; Lee, Lai S.; Man, Cornelia; Cheng, Shuk H.

    2016-01-01

    Phytoestrogen has been proposed as an alternative to hormone replacement therapy, which has been demonstrated to promote a high risk of breast cancer. However, the effect of phytoestrogen on breast cancer development has not been fully understood. Bakuchiol is an active ingredient of a traditional Chinese herbal medicine Fructus Psoraleae, the dried ripe fruit of Psoralea corylifolia L. (Fabaceae). The in vitro and in vivo estrogenic activities and anti-breast cancer effects of bakuchiol have not been well-studied. We found that bakuchiol induced the GFP expression in transgenic medaka (Oryzias melastigma, Tg, Chg:GFP) dose-dependently (0–1 μg/ml), demonstrating its in vivo estrogenic activity. Low dose of bakuchiol (1 μg/ml) induced the cell proliferation and ERα expression in MCF-7 cells, which could be blocked by the anti-estrogen ICI 182780, suggesting the in vitro estrogenic activity of bakuchiol. Our data indicated that high doses of bakuchiol (>2 μg/ml) inhibited breast cancer cell growth, with a stronger anti-proliferative effect than resveratrol, a widely studied analog of bakuchiol. High doses of bakuchiol (4, 7, and 10 μg/ml) were used for the further in vitro anti-breast cancer studies. Bakuchiol induced ERβ expression and suppressed ERα expression in MCF-7 cells. It also induced S phase arrest in both MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 cells, which could be rescued by caffeine. Knock-down of p21 also marginally rescued S phase arrest in MCF-7 cells. The S phase arrest was accompanied by the upregulation of ATM, P-Cdc2 (Tyr15), Myt1, P-Wee1 (Ser642), p21 and Cyclin B1, suggesting that blocking of Cdc2 activation may play an important role in bakuchiol-induced S phase arrest. Furthermore, bakuchiol induced cell apoptosis and disturbed mitochondrial membrane potential in MCF-7 cells. The bakuchiol-induced apoptosis was associated with increased expression of Caspase family and Bcl-2 family proteins, suggesting that bakuchiol may induce apoptosis via intrinsic

  1. Test Control Center exhibit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Have you ever wondered how the engineers at John C. Stennis Space Center in Hancock County, Miss., test fire a Space Shuttle Main Engine? The Test Control Center exhibit at StenniSphere can answer your questions by simulating the test firing of a Space Shuttle Main Engine. A recreation of one of NASA's test control centers, the exhibit explains and portrays the 'shake, rattle and roar' that happens during a real test firing.

  2. One exhibition, many goals. A case study on how to combine scientific questions with stakeholder views on effective communication of risks.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charriere, M. K. M.; Junier, S.; Bogaard, T.; Mostert, E.; Malet, J. P.

    2014-12-01

    How effective is visual communication to increase awareness of natural hazards and risks? To answer this research question, we developed a research design that was at the same time an experimental setting and an actual communication effort. This contribution will address the scientists-stakeholders interaction that was involved, the resulting exhibition, the lessons learned and the value it had for the researchers and for the other stakeholders. Throughout the full length of the 2-years project held in the Ubaye valley (southeastern France) we collaborated with local and regional stakeholders (politicians and technicians). Informal meetings with local stakeholders were organized to determine what they perceived as the needs in term of risk communication and to investigate the potential to develop activities that would benefit both them and us. We were offered the opportunity to design an exhibition for the local public library. We proposed the content and this was adjusted in interaction with the stakeholders. Later local technicians and inhabitants contributed to the content of the exhibition and regional stakeholders helped with the funding of the exhibition. Finally, employees of the public library took the lead in advertising the activity, gathering participants and they helped designing the scientific survey. This survey was the key activity from a scientific point of view as it allowed us to measure the impact of this communication activity on risk awareness. Moreover, the principal scientist was present during all opening hours of the exhibition. This allowed direct and indirect contact with the visitors. The benefits of this exhibition for the community included triggering memories, encouraging exchanges, especially inter-generational, reinforcing stakeholders-to-stakeholders relationships and promote further communication on the topic. The scientific benefits are that we have an experiment that allows us to measure the impact of a communication effort, not

  3. Combining metformin and nelfinavir exhibits synergistic effects against the growth of human cervical cancer cells and xenograft in nude mice

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Chenglai; Chen, Ruihong; Chen, Jinman; Qi, Qianqian; Pan, Yanbin; Du, Lanying; Xiao, Guohong; Jiang, Shibo

    2017-01-01

    Human cervical cancer is the fourth most common carcinoma in women worldwide. However, the emergence of drug resistance calls for continuously developing new anticancer drugs and combination chemotherapy regimens. The present study aimed to investigate the anti-cervical cancer effects of metformin, a first-line therapeutic drug for type 2 diabetes mellitus, and nelfinavir, an HIV protease inhibitor, when used alone or in combination. We found that both metformin and nelfinavir, when used alone, were moderately effective in inhibiting proliferation, inducing apoptosis and suppressing migration and invasion of human cervical cell lines HeLa, SiHa and CaSki. When used in combination, these two drugs acted synergistically to inhibit the growth of human cervical cancer cells in vitro and cervical cancer cell xenograft in vivo in nude mice, and suppress cervical cancer cell migration and invasion. The protein expression of phosphoinositide 3-kinase catalytic subunit PI3K(p110α), which can promote tumor growth, was remarkably downregulated, while the tumor suppressor proteins p53 and p21 were substantially upregulated following the combinational treatment in vitro and in vivo. These results suggest that clinical use of metformin and nelfinavir in combination is expected to have synergistic antitumor efficacy and significant potential for the treatment of human cervical cancer. PMID:28252027

  4. The SSRI fluoxetine exhibits mild effects on the reproductive axis in the cichlid fish Cichlasoma dimerus (Teleostei, Cichliformes).

    PubMed

    Dorelle, Luciana S; Da Cuña, Rodrigo H; Rey Vázquez, Graciela; Höcht, Christian; Shimizu, Akio; Genovese, Griselda; Lo Nostro, Fabiana L

    2017-03-01

    Among the wide variety of pharmaceuticals released into the environment, Fluoxetine (FLX), a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor, is one of the most prescribed for the treatment of major depression. It inhibits serotonin (5-HT) reuptake at the presinaptic membrane, increasing serotonergic activity. In vertebrates, including fish, the serotonergic system is closely related to the Hypothalamic Pituitary Gonadal (HPG) axis which regulates reproduction. As FLX can act as an endocrine disrupting compound (EDC) by affecting several reproductive parameters in fish, the aim of this study was to provide an integral assessment of the potential effect of FLX on the reproductive axis of the Neotropical freshwater fish Cichlasoma dimerus. Adult fish were intraperitoneally injected with 2 μg g(-1) FLX or saline every third day for 15 days. No significant differences were found on serotonergic turnover (5-HIAA/5-HT ratio). Pituitary βLH content in FLX injected females was significantly higher than control females; no significant differences were seen for βFSH content. Sex steroids remained unaltered, both in males and females fish, after FLX treatment. No plasma vitellogenin was induced in treated males. Some alterations were seen in testes of FLX injected males, such as the presence of foam cells and an acidophilic PAS positive, Alcian-Blue negative secretion in the lobular lumen. Although there is no clear consensus about the effect of this drug on reproductive physiology, these results indicate that FLX is acting as a mild EDC in adults of C. dimerus.

  5. The effect of Cepheids exhibitting blending, bumps, eclipses and period changes on the Period-Luminosity relation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muñoz, J. R.; García-Varela, A.; Sabogal, B. E.; Vargas Domínguez, S.; Martínez, J.

    2017-07-01

    The study of structural breaks (non-linearity) on the Period-Luminosity relation began more than seven decades ago. Since then, some studies has found breaks in the Period-Luminosity relation. The objective in this work is to look for possible statistical causes of these breaks by means of robust techniques, instead of Ordinary Least Squares, to fit linear regression to OGLE-II and OGLE-IV data. These robust methods allow us to deal with influential points whose presence is a violation to the Ordinary Least Squares assumptions. In fact, fitting the models using M and MM-regressions, we do not find evidence to say that Period-Luminosity relation is non-linear in the LMC. Therefore, light curves of Cepheids suggesting blending, bumps, eclipses and period changes do not have an effect on the Period-Luminosity relation in this galaxy. On the contrary, for SMC, maybe, because of the geometry of the galaxy, there is a possible effect these stars and adequate models could not be found.

  6. Chamomile and oregano extracts synergistically exhibit antihyperglycemic, antihyperlipidemic, and renal protective effects in alloxan-induced diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Prasanna, Rajagopalan; Ashraf, Elbessoumy A; Essam, Mahmoud A

    2017-01-01

    The bio-activities of separate Matricaria chamomilla (chamomile) and Origanum vulgare (oregano) are well studied; however, the combined effects of both natural products in animal diabetic models are not well characterized. In this study, alloxan-induced male albino rats were treated with single dose aqueous suspension of chamomile or oregano at dose level of either 150 or 300 mg/kg body mass or as equal parts as combination by stomach tube for 6 weeks. After treatment, blood samples were assessed for diabetic, renal, and lipid profiles. Insulin, amylase activity, and diabetic renal apoptosis were further evaluated. Treatment with higher dose of the extracts (300 mg/kg) as individual or as mixture of low doses (150 mg/kg of both the extracts) had significant mass gain, hypoglycemic effect (p ≤ 0.05) with decreased amylase activity and increased serum insulin levels. Restoration of renal profile, lipid profile with increase in HDL-c (p ≤ 0.05) along with reversal of pro-apoptotic Bax and anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 were well observed with 300 mg/kg mixture, showing synergistic activity of the extracts compared with individual low dose of 150 mg/kg. Collectively, our results indicate that combination of chamomile and oregano extracts will form a new class of drugs to treat diabetic complications.

  7. Multiplex gene editing via CRISPR/Cas9 exhibits desirable muscle hypertrophy without detectable off-target effects in sheep

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaolong; Niu, Yiyuan; Zhou, Jiankui; Yu, Honghao; Kou, Qifang; Lei, Anmin; Zhao, Xiaoe; Yan, Hailong; Cai, Bei; Shen, Qiaoyan; Zhou, Shiwei; Zhu, Haijing; Zhou, Guangxian; Niu, Wenzhi; Hua, Jinlian; Jiang, Yu; Huang, Xingxu; Ma, Baohua; Chen, Yulin

    2016-01-01

    The CRISPR/Cas9 system provides a flexible approach for genome engineering of genetic loci. Here, we successfully achieved precise gene targeting in sheep by co-injecting one-cell-stage embryos with Cas9 mRNA and RNA guides targeting three genes (MSTN, ASIP, and BCO2). We carefully examined the sgRNAs:Cas9-mediated targeting effects in injected embryos, somatic tissues, as well as gonads via cloning and sequencing. The targeting efficiencies in these three genes were within the range of 27–33% in generated lambs, and that of simultaneously targeting the three genes was 5.6%, which demonstrated that micro-injection of zygotes is an efficient approach for generating gene-modified sheep. Interestingly, we observed that disruption of the MSTN gene resulted in the desired muscle hypertrophy that is characterized by enlarged myofibers, thereby providing the first detailed evidence supporting that gene modifications had occurred at both the genetic and morphological levels. In addition, prescreening for the off-target effect of sgRNAs was performed on fibroblasts before microinjection, to ensure that no detectable off-target mutations from founder animals existed. Our findings suggested that the CRISPR/Cas9 method can be exploited as a powerful tool for livestock improvement by simultaneously targeting multiple genes that are responsible for economically significant traits. PMID:27562433

  8. Extracts of Coreopsis tinctoria Nutt. Flower Exhibit Antidiabetic Effects via the Inhibition of α-Glucosidase Activity

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Wujie; Yu, Lijing; Zhang, Yu; Feng, Li; Kong, Siyuan; Tan, Hongsheng; Xu, Hongxi; Huang, Cheng

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assay the effects of Coreopsis tinctoria Nutt. flower extracts on hyperglycemia of diet-induced obese mice and the underlying mechanisms. Coreopsis tinctoria flower was extracted with ethanol and water, respectively. The total phenol, flavonoid levels, and the constituents of the extracts were measured. For the animal experiments, C57BL/6 mice were fed with a chow diet, high-fat diet, or high-fat diet mixed with 0.4% (w/w) water and ethanol extracts of Coreopsis tinctoria flower for 8 weeks. The inhibitory effects of the extracts on α-glucosidase activity and the antioxidant properties were assayed in vitro. We found that the extracts blocked the increase of fasting blood glucose, serum triglyceride (TG), insulin, leptin, and liver lipid levels and prevented the development of glucose tolerance impairment and insulin resistance in the C57BL/6 mice induced by a high-fat diet. The extracts inhibited α-glycosidase activity and increased oxidant activity in vitro. In conclusion, Coreopsis tinctoria flower extracts may ameliorate high-fat diet-induced hyperglycemia and insulin resistance. The underling mechanism may be via the inhibition of α-glucosidase activity. Our data indicate that Coreopsis tinctoria flower could be used as a beverage supplement and a potential source of drugs for treatment of diabetics. PMID:27088095

  9. Extracts of Coreopsis tinctoria Nutt. Flower Exhibit Antidiabetic Effects via the Inhibition of α-Glucosidase Activity.

    PubMed

    Cai, Wujie; Yu, Lijing; Zhang, Yu; Feng, Li; Kong, Siyuan; Tan, Hongsheng; Xu, Hongxi; Huang, Cheng

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assay the effects of Coreopsis tinctoria Nutt. flower extracts on hyperglycemia of diet-induced obese mice and the underlying mechanisms. Coreopsis tinctoria flower was extracted with ethanol and water, respectively. The total phenol, flavonoid levels, and the constituents of the extracts were measured. For the animal experiments, C57BL/6 mice were fed with a chow diet, high-fat diet, or high-fat diet mixed with 0.4% (w/w) water and ethanol extracts of Coreopsis tinctoria flower for 8 weeks. The inhibitory effects of the extracts on α-glucosidase activity and the antioxidant properties were assayed in vitro. We found that the extracts blocked the increase of fasting blood glucose, serum triglyceride (TG), insulin, leptin, and liver lipid levels and prevented the development of glucose tolerance impairment and insulin resistance in the C57BL/6 mice induced by a high-fat diet. The extracts inhibited α-glycosidase activity and increased oxidant activity in vitro. In conclusion, Coreopsis tinctoria flower extracts may ameliorate high-fat diet-induced hyperglycemia and insulin resistance. The underling mechanism may be via the inhibition of α-glucosidase activity. Our data indicate that Coreopsis tinctoria flower could be used as a beverage supplement and a potential source of drugs for treatment of diabetics.

  10. Mesenchymal stem cells exhibit firm adhesion, crawling, spreading and transmigration across aortic endothelial cells: effects of chemokines and shear.

    PubMed

    Chamberlain, Giselle; Smith, Helen; Rainger, G Ed; Middleton, Jim

    2011-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have anti-inflammatory and immunosuppressive properties and may be useful in the therapy of diseases such as arteriosclerosis. MSCs have some ability to traffic into inflamed tissues, however to exploit this therapeutically their migratory mechanisms need to be elucidated. This study examines the interaction of murine MSCs (mMSCs) with, and their migration across, murine aortic endothelial cells (MAECs), and the effects of chemokines and shear stress. The interaction of mMSCs with MAECs was examined under physiological flow conditions. mMSCs showed lack of interaction with MAECs under continuous flow. However, when the flow was stopped (for 10 min) and then started, mMSCs adhered and crawled on the endothelial surface, extending fine microvillous processes (filopodia). They then spread extending pseudopodia in multiple directions. CXCL9 significantly enhanced the percentage of mMSCs adhering, crawling and spreading and shear forces markedly stimulated crawling and spreading. CXCL9, CXCL16, CCL20 and CCL25 significantly enhanced transendothelial migration across MAECs. The transmigrated mMSCs had down-regulated receptors CXCR3, CXCR6, CCR6 and CCR9. This study furthers the knowledge of MSC transendothelial migration and the effects of chemokines and shear stress which is of relevance to inflammatory diseases such as arteriosclerosis.

  11. Resveratrol exhibits differential protective effects on fast- and slow-twitch muscles in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Chang, Chih-Chun; Yang, Meng-Hsuan; Tung, Hung-Chun; Chang, Chieh-Yu; Tsai, Yu-Lin; Huang, Jiung-Pang; Yen, Tzung-Hai; Hung, Li-Man

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the differential protective effect of resveratrol (RSV) on oxidative stress and metabolic signaling pathways in fast- and slow-twitch skeletal muscles of rats with diabetes. Diabetic rats were induced by streptozotocin (STZ) for 2 weeks and then administered with RSV (1, 10 and 100 μg/kg per day) for 1 week. We determined oxidative stress and protein expression by lucigenin-mediated chemiluminescence and Western immunoblot. The superoxide anion production and copper-zinc superoxide dismutase (CuZnSOD) protein level were increased in fast-twitch muscle than in slow-twitch muscle of diabetes. The Akt and glycogen synthase kinase 3 (GSK-3) phosphorylations were reduced in both fast- and slow-twitch muscles of diabetes. Oxidative stress and GSK-3 dephosphorylation were corrected by RSV treatment in both fast- and slow-twitch muscles of diabetes. Furthermore, RSV treatment downregulated CuZnSOD protein level in diabetic fast-twitch muscle. In diabetic slow-twitch muscle, RSV treatment elevated manganese SOD (MnSOD) and phosphorylated Akt protein levels and reduced acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC) phosphorylation. Our results suggested that fast-twitch muscle incurred more oxidative stress, whereas slow-twitch muscle altered metabolic signaling molecules activities under diabetic status. The antidiabetic effect of RSV on fast- and slow-twitch skeletal muscles was mediated by different antioxidative and metabolic signals. © 2013 Ruijin Hospital, Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  12. Genome Survey and Characterization of Endophytic Bacteria Exhibiting a Beneficial Effect on Growth and Development of Poplar Trees ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Taghavi, Safiyh; Garafola, Craig; Monchy, Sébastien; Newman, Lee; Hoffman, Adam; Weyens, Nele; Barac, Tanja; Vangronsveld, Jaco; van der Lelie, Daniel

    2009-01-01

    The association of endophytic bacteria with their plant hosts has a beneficial effect for many different plant species. Our goal is to identify endophytic bacteria that improve the biomass production and the carbon sequestration potential of poplar trees (Populus spp.) when grown in marginal soil and to gain an insight in the mechanisms underlying plant growth promotion. Members of the Gammaproteobacteria dominated a collection of 78 bacterial endophytes isolated from poplar and willow trees. As representatives for the dominant genera of endophytic gammaproteobacteria, we selected Enterobacter sp. strain 638, Stenotrophomonas maltophilia R551-3, Pseudomonas putida W619, and Serratia proteamaculans 568 for genome sequencing and analysis of their plant growth-promoting effects, including root development. Derivatives of these endophytes, labeled with gfp, were also used to study the colonization of their poplar hosts. In greenhouse studies, poplar cuttings (Populus deltoides × Populus nigra DN-34) inoculated with Enterobacter sp. strain 638 repeatedly showed the highest increase in biomass production compared to cuttings of noninoculated control plants. Sequence data combined with the analysis of their metabolic properties resulted in the identification of many putative mechanisms, including carbon source utilization, that help these endophytes to thrive within a plant environment and to potentially affect the growth and development of their plant hosts. Understanding the interactions between endophytic bacteria and their host plants should ultimately result in the design of strategies for improved poplar biomass production on marginal soils as a feedstock for biofuels. PMID:19060168

  13. Genome survey and characterization of endophytic bacteria exhibiting a beneficial effect on growth and development of poplar trees.

    PubMed

    Taghavi, Safiyh; Garafola, Craig; Monchy, Sébastien; Newman, Lee; Hoffman, Adam; Weyens, Nele; Barac, Tanja; Vangronsveld, Jaco; van der Lelie, Daniel

    2009-02-01

    The association of endophytic bacteria with their plant hosts has a beneficial effect for many different plant species. Our goal is to identify endophytic bacteria that improve the biomass production and the carbon sequestration potential of poplar trees (Populus spp.) when grown in marginal soil and to gain an insight in the mechanisms underlying plant growth promotion. Members of the Gammaproteobacteria dominated a collection of 78 bacterial endophytes isolated from poplar and willow trees. As representatives for the dominant genera of endophytic gammaproteobacteria, we selected Enterobacter sp. strain 638, Stenotrophomonas maltophilia R551-3, Pseudomonas putida W619, and Serratia proteamaculans 568 for genome sequencing and analysis of their plant growth-promoting effects, including root development. Derivatives of these endophytes, labeled with gfp, were also used to study the colonization of their poplar hosts. In greenhouse studies, poplar cuttings (Populus deltoides x Populus nigra DN-34) inoculated with Enterobacter sp. strain 638 repeatedly showed the highest increase in biomass production compared to cuttings of noninoculated control plants. Sequence data combined with the analysis of their metabolic properties resulted in the identification of many putative mechanisms, including carbon source utilization, that help these endophytes to thrive within a plant environment and to potentially affect the growth and development of their plant hosts. Understanding the interactions between endophytic bacteria and their host plants should ultimately result in the design of strategies for improved poplar biomass production on marginal soils as a feedstock for biofuels.

  14. Identification of Yeast Mutants Exhibiting Altered Sensitivity to Valinomycin and Nigericin Demonstrate Pleiotropic Effects of Ionophores on Cellular Processes.

    PubMed

    Jakubkova, Michaela; Dzugasova, Vladimira; Truban, Dominika; Abelovska, Lenka; Bhatia-Kissova, Ingrid; Valachovic, Martin; Klobucnikova, Vlasta; Zeiselova, Lucia; Griac, Peter; Nosek, Jozef; Tomaska, Lubomir

    2016-01-01

    Ionophores such as valinomycin and nigericin are potent tools for studying the impact of ion perturbance on cellular functions. To obtain a broader picture about molecular components involved in mediating the effects of these drugs on yeast cells under respiratory growth conditions, we performed a screening of the haploid deletion mutant library covering the Saccharomyces cerevisiae nonessential genes. We identified nearly 130 genes whose absence leads either to resistance or to hypersensitivity to valinomycin and/or nigericin. The processes affected by their protein products range from mitochondrial functions through ribosome biogenesis and telomere maintenance to vacuolar biogenesis and stress response. Comparison of the results with independent screenings performed by our and other laboratories demonstrates that although mitochondria might represent the main target for both ionophores, cellular response to the drugs is very complex and involves an intricate network of proteins connecting mitochondria, vacuoles, and other membrane compartments.

  15. Effect of Omega-3 and -6 Supplementation on Language in Preterm Toddlers Exhibiting Autism Spectrum Disorder Symptoms.

    PubMed

    Sheppard, Kelly W; Boone, Kelly M; Gracious, Barbara; Klebanoff, Mark A; Rogers, Lynette K; Rausch, Joseph; Bartlett, Christopher; Coury, Daniel L; Keim, Sarah A

    2017-07-26

    Delayed language development may be an early indicator of autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Early intervention is critical for children with ASD, and the present study presents pilot data on a clinical trial of omega-3 and -6 fatty acid supplementation and language development, a secondary trial outcome, in children at risk for ASD. We randomized 31 children to receive an omega-3 and -6 supplement or a placebo for 3 months, and measured their language abilities at baseline and after supplementation. Gesture use, but not word production, increased for children in the treatment group more than children in the placebo group. These results suggest possible effectiveness of omega-3 and -6 supplementation for language development in children at risk for ASD.

  16. Identification of Yeast Mutants Exhibiting Altered Sensitivity to Valinomycin and Nigericin Demonstrate Pleiotropic Effects of Ionophores on Cellular Processes

    PubMed Central

    Bhatia-Kissova, Ingrid; Valachovic, Martin; Klobucnikova, Vlasta; Zeiselova, Lucia; Griac, Peter; Nosek, Jozef

    2016-01-01

    Ionophores such as valinomycin and nigericin are potent tools for studying the impact of ion perturbance on cellular functions. To obtain a broader picture about molecular components involved in mediating the effects of these drugs on yeast cells under respiratory growth conditions, we performed a screening of the haploid deletion mutant library covering the Saccharomyces cerevisiae nonessential genes. We identified nearly 130 genes whose absence leads either to resistance or to hypersensitivity to valinomycin and/or nigericin. The processes affected by their protein products range from mitochondrial functions through ribosome biogenesis and telomere maintenance to vacuolar biogenesis and stress response. Comparison of the results with independent screenings performed by our and other laboratories demonstrates that although mitochondria might represent the main target for both ionophores, cellular response to the drugs is very complex and involves an intricate network of proteins connecting mitochondria, vacuoles, and other membrane compartments. PMID:27711131

  17. Ab initio calculation of spin-orbit coupling for an NV center in diamond exhibiting dynamic Jahn-Teller effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thiering, Gergő; Gali, Adam

    2017-08-01

    Point defects in solids may realize solid state quantum bits. The spin-orbit coupling in these point defects plays a key role in the magneto-optical properties that determine the conditions of quantum bit operation. However, experimental data and methods do not directly yield these highly important data, particularly for such complex systems where the dynamic Jahn-Teller (DJT) effect damps the spin-orbit interaction. Here, we show for an exemplary quantum bit, the nitrogen-vacancy (NV) center in diamond, that ab initio supercell density functional theory provides a quantitative prediction for the spin-orbit coupling damped by DJT. We show that DJT is responsible for the multiple intersystem crossing rates of the NV center at cryogenic temperatures. Our results pave the way toward optimizing solid state quantum bits for quantum information processing and metrology applications.

  18. The Quorum-Quenching Metallo-gamma-lactonase from Bacillus thuringiensis Exhibits a Leaving Group Thio Effect

    SciTech Connect

    Momb,J.; Thomas, P.; Breece, R.; Tierney, D.; Fast, W.

    2006-01-01

    Lactone-hydrolyzing enzymes derived from some Bacillus species are capable of disrupting quorum sensing in bacteria that use N-acyl-L-homoserine lactones (AHLs) as intercellular signaling molecules. Despite the promise of these quorum-quenching enzymes as therapeutic and anti-biofouling agents, the ring opening mechanism and the role of metal ions in catalysis have not been elucidated. Labeling studies using {sup 18}O, {sup 2}H, and the AHL lactonase from Bacillus thuringiensis implicate an addition-elimination pathway for ring opening in which a solvent-derived oxygen is incorporated into the product carboxylate, identifying the alcohol as the leaving group. {sup 1}H NMR is used to show that metal binding is required to maintain proper folding. A thio effect is measured for hydrolysis of N-hexanoyl-L-homoserine lactone and the corresponding thiolactone by AHL lactonase disubstituted with alternative metal ions, including Mn{sup 2+}, Co{sup 2+}, Zn{sup 2+}, and Cd{sup 2+}. The magnitude of the thio effect on k{sub cat} values and the thiophilicity of the metal ion substitutions vary in parallel and are consistent with a kinetically significant interaction between the leaving group and the active site metal center during turnover. X-ray absorption spectroscopy confirms that dicobalt substitution does not result in large structural perturbations at the active site. Finally, substitution of the dinuclear metal site with Cd{sup 2+} results in a greatly enhanced catalyst that can hydrolyze AHLs 1600-24000-fold faster than other reported quorum-quenching enzymes.

  19. Humulus japonicus extract exhibits antioxidative and anti-aging effects via modulation of the AMPK-SIRT1 pathway

    PubMed Central

    SUNG, BOKYUNG; CHUNG, JI WON; BAE, HA RAM; CHOI, JAE SUE; KIM, CHEOL MIN; KIM, NAM DEUK

    2015-01-01

    The perennial herb, Humulus japonicus, has been previously described as possessing potential antituberculosis and anti-inflammatory properties. In the present study, the anti-aging activity of ethanol extracts from the leaves of H. japonicus (HJE) was evaluated in yeast and human fibroblast cells. In addition, the antioxidant activity of HJE was analyzed using free radical scavenging assays. Furthermore, the mechanism underlying the hypothesized HJE-associated extension of lifespan was investigated, and the results indicated that HJE was able to extend the lifespan of yeast cells. Further experiments demonstrated that HJE upregulated the longevity-associated proteins, sirtuin 1 and AMP-activated protein kinase, and effectively inhibited the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). In addition, the antioxidative potential of the active constituents of HJE, including luteolin, luteolin 7-glycoside, quercetin and quercitrin, was evaluated and the results demonstrated that these flavonoids were able to scavenge ROS in cell-free and intracellular systems. In summary, the results revealed that HJE possessed the potential for antioxidative activity; however, further in vivo investigations are required with the aim of developing safe, high-efficacy anti-aging agents. PMID:26136899

  20. RGD-modifided oncolytic adenovirus exhibited potent cytotoxic effect on CAR-negative bladder cancer-initiating cells.

    PubMed

    Yang, Y; Xu, H; Shen, J; Yang, Y; Wu, S; Xiao, J; Xu, Y; Liu, X-Y; Chu, L

    2015-05-14

    Cancer-initiating cell (CIC) is critical in cancer development, maintenance and recurrence. The reverse expression pattern of coxsackie and adenovirus receptor (CAR) and αν integrin in bladder cancer decreases the infection efficiency of adenovirus. We constructed Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD)-modified oncolytic adenovirus, carrying EGFP or TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) gene (Onco(Ad).RGD-hTERT-EGFP/TRAIL), and applied them to CAR-negative bladder cancer T24 cells and cancer-initiating T24 sphere cells. Onco(Ad).RGD-hTERT-EGFP had enhanced infection ability and cytotoxic effect on T24 cells and T24 sphere cells, but little cytoxicity on normal urothelial SV-HUC-1 cells compared with the unmodified virus Onco(Ad).hTERT-EGFP. Notably, Onco(Ad).RGD-hTERT-TRAIL induced apoptosis in T24 cells and T24 sphere cells. Furthermore, it completely inhibited xenograft initiation established by the oncolytic adenovirus-pretreated T24 sphere cells, and significantly suppressed tumor growth by intratumoral injection. These results provided a promising therapeutic strategy for CAR-negative bladder cancer through targeting CICs.

  1. Humulus japonicus extract exhibits antioxidative and anti-aging effects via modulation of the AMPK-SIRT1 pathway.

    PubMed

    Sung, Bokyung; Chung, Ji Won; Bae, Ha Ram; Choi, Jae Sue; Kim, Cheol Min; Kim, Nam Deuk

    2015-05-01

    The perennial herb, Humulus japonicus, has been previously described as possessing potential antituberculosis and anti-inflammatory properties. In the present study, the anti-aging activity of ethanol extracts from the leaves of H. japonicus (HJE) was evaluated in yeast and human fibroblast cells. In addition, the antioxidant activity of HJE was analyzed using free radical scavenging assays. Furthermore, the mechanism underlying the hypothesized HJE-associated extension of lifespan was investigated, and the results indicated that HJE was able to extend the lifespan of yeast cells. Further experiments demonstrated that HJE upregulated the longevity-associated proteins, sirtuin 1 and AMP-activated protein kinase, and effectively inhibited the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). In addition, the antioxidative potential of the active constituents of HJE, including luteolin, luteolin 7-glycoside, quercetin and quercitrin, was evaluated and the results demonstrated that these flavonoids were able to scavenge ROS in cell-free and intracellular systems. In summary, the results revealed that HJE possessed the potential for antioxidative activity; however, further in vivo investigations are required with the aim of developing safe, high-efficacy anti-aging agents.

  2. Th17 Cells Exhibit Antitumor Effects in MDS Possibly through Augmenting Functions of CD8+ T Cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Jing; Yue, Lanzhu; Wang, Huaquan; Liu, Chunyan; Liu, Hui; Tao, Jinglian; Qi, Weiwei; Wang, Yihao; Zhang, Wei; Fu, Rong; Shao, Zonghong

    2016-01-01

    Th17 cells are a newly found subset of distinct CD4+ Th effector cells' family and are found to play an important role in cancers. Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) are a common malignant hematological disease. Here, we showed that both the percentage and the function of Th17 cells were elevated in low-risk MDS while being decreased in high-risk MDS. Levels of upstream molecules of Th17 cells, IL-6 and IL-23, were higher in low-risk MDS but lower in high-risk MDS patients. The abnormal percentage of Th17 cells was closely related to clinical parameters including karyotype, morphologic blast percentage of bone marrow, peripheral absolute neutrophil count, and hemoglobin concentration. Furthermore, expression rates of perforin and granzyme B in BM CD3+CD8+ cells (cytotoxic T lymphocyte, CTL) positively correlated with levels of IL-17 but negatively correlated with BM blast percentage and could be significantly increased after stimulation with human recombinant IL-17 (rhIL-17). Our results suggested that Th17 cells might play an antitumor effect in the pathogenesis of MDS through IL-17/CTL pathway.

  3. The other face of miR-17-92a cluster, exhibiting tumor suppressor effects in prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Ottman, Richard; Levy, Jenna; Grizzle, William E; Chakrabarti, Ratna

    2016-11-08

    miR-17-92a cluster miRNAs are transcribed from a polycistronic transcription unit C13orf25 that generates six mature miRNAs, miR-17, miR-18a, miR-19a, miR-19b, miR-20a and miR-92a that are overexpressed in lung and colon cancers. Here we show that the expression of miR-17-92a miRNAs are reduced in cancerous prostate tissues compared to uninvolved areas and also in aggressive prostate cancer cells. Restoration of expression of all members of miR-17-92a cluster showed, decreased expression of cell cycle regulatory proteins cyclin D1 and SSH1; and LIMK1 and FGD4 of RhoGTPase signaling pathway. Expression of miR-17-92a miRNAs caused decreased cell proliferation, reduced activation of AKT and MAP kinases, delayed tumorigenicity and reduced tumor growth in animals. Expression of miR-17-92a miRNAs inhibited EMT via reduced cell migration and expression of mesenchymal markers while elevating expression and surface localization of the epithelial marker E-Cadherin. Expression of miR-17-92a miRNAs improved sensitivity of androgen dependent LNCaP 104-S prostate cancer cells to anti-androgen drug Casodex, AKT inhibitor MK-2206 2HCl, and docetaxel. The androgen refractory PC-3 cells also showed increased sensitivity to docetaxel, MK-2206 2HCl and Aurora kinase inhibitor VX680 upon ectopic expression of miR-17-92a cluster miRNAs. Our data demonstrate a tumor suppressor effect of miR-17-92a cluster miRNAs in prostate cancer cells and restoration of expression of these miRNAs has a therapeutic benefit for both androgen-dependent and -independent prostate cancer cells.

  4. The other face of miR-17-92a cluster, exhibiting tumor suppressor effects in prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ottman, Richard; Levy, Jenna; Grizzle, William E.; Chakrabarti, Ratna

    2016-01-01

    miR-17-92a cluster miRNAs are transcribed from a polycistronic transcription unit C13orf25 that generates six mature miRNAs, miR-17, miR-18a, miR-19a, miR-19b, miR-20a and miR-92a that are overexpressed in lung and colon cancers. Here we show that the expression of miR-17-92a miRNAs are reduced in cancerous prostate tissues compared to uninvolved areas and also in aggressive prostate cancer cells. Restoration of expression of all members of miR-17-92a cluster showed, decreased expression of cell cycle regulatory proteins cyclin D1 and SSH1; and LIMK1 and FGD4 of RhoGTPase signaling pathway. Expression of miR-17-92a miRNAs caused decreased cell proliferation, reduced activation of AKT and MAP kinases, delayed tumorigenicity and reduced tumor growth in animals. Expression of miR-17-92a miRNAs inhibited EMT via reduced cell migration and expression of mesenchymal markers while elevating expression and surface localization of the epithelial marker E-Cadherin. Expression of miR-17-92a miRNAs improved sensitivity of androgen dependent LNCaP 104-S prostate cancer cells to anti-androgen drug Casodex, AKT inhibitor MK-2206 2HCl, and docetaxel. The androgen refractory PC-3 cells also showed increased sensitivity to docetaxel, MK-2206 2HCl and Aurora kinase inhibitor VX680 upon ectopic expression of miR-17-92a cluster miRNAs. Our data demonstrate a tumor suppressor effect of miR-17-92a cluster miRNAs in prostate cancer cells and restoration of expression of these miRNAs has a therapeutic benefit for both androgen-dependent and -independent prostate cancer cells. PMID:27650539

  5. Mixtures of hemoglobin-based oxygen carriers and perfluorocarbons exhibit a synergistic effect in oxygenating hepatic hollow fiber bioreactors.

    PubMed

    Chen, Guo; Palmer, Andre F

    2010-02-15

    Hepatic hollow fiber (HF) bioreactors are being developed for use as bioartificial liver assist devices (BLADs). In general, BLADs suffer from O(2) limited transport, which reduces their performance. This modeling study seeks to investigate if O(2) carrying solutions consisting of mixtures of hemoglobin-based oxygen carriers (HBOCs) and perfluorocarbons (PFCs) can enhance O(2) transport to hepatocytes cultured in the extra capillary space (ECS) of HF bioreactors. We simulated supplementing the circulating cell culture media stream of the HF bioreactor with a mixture containing these two types of oxygen carriers (HBOCs and PFCs). A mathematical model was developed based on the dimensions and physical characteristics of a commercial HF bioreactor. The resulting set of partial differential equations, which describes fluid transport; as well as, mass transport of dissolved O(2) in the pseudo-homogeneous PFC/water phase and oxygenated HBOC, was solved to yield the O(2) concentration field in the three HF domains (lumen, membrane and ECS). Our results show that mixtures of HBOC and PFC display a synergistic effect in oxygenating the ECS. Therefore, the presence of both HBOC and PFC in the circulating cell culture media dramatically improves transport of O(2) to cultured hepatocytes. Moreover, the in vivo O(2) spectrum in a liver sinusoid can be recapitulated by supplementing the HF bioreactor with a mixture of HBOCs and PFCs at an inlet pO(2) of 80 mmHg. Therefore, we expect that PFC-based oxygen carriers will be more efficient at transporting O(2) at higher O(2) levels (e.g., at an inlet pO(2) of 760 mmHg, which corresponds to pure O(2) in equilibrium with aqueous cell culture media at 1 atm). 2009 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. MiR-145 regulates PAK4 via the MAPK pathway and exhibits an antitumor effect in human colon cells

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Zhigang; Zhang, Xiaoping; Yang, Zhili; Du, Hangxiang; Wu, Zhenqian; Gong, Jianfeng; Yan, Jun; Zheng, Qi

    2012-10-26

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer MiR-145 targets a putative binding site in the 3 Prime UTR of PAK4. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer MiR-145 played an important role in inhibiting cell growth by directly targeting PAK4. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer MiR-145 may function as tumor suppressors. -- Abstract: MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are regulators of numerous cellular events; accumulating evidence indicates that miRNAs play a key role in a wide range of biological functions, such as cellular proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis in cancer. Down-regulated expression of miR-145 has been reported in colon cancer tissues and cell lines. The molecular mechanisms underlying miR-145 and the regulation of colon carcinogenesis remain unclear. In this study, we investigated the levels of miR-145 in human colon cancer cells using qRT-PCR and found markedly decreased levels compared to normal epithelial cells. We identified PAK4 as a novel target of miR-145 using informatics screening. Additionally, we demonstrated that miR-145 targets a putative binding site in the 3 Prime UTR of PAK4 and that its abundance is inversely associated with miR-145 expression in colon cancer cells; we confirmed this relationship using the luciferase reporter assay. Furthermore, restoration of miR-145 by mimics in SW620 cells significantly attenuated cell growth in vitro, in accordance with the inhibitory effects induced by siRNA mediated knockdown of PAK4. Taken together, these findings demonstrate that miR-145 downregulates P-ERK expression by targeting PAK4 and leads to inhibition of tumor growth.

  7. In Vivo Acute on Chronic Ethanol Effects in Liver: A Mouse Model Exhibiting Exacerbated Injury, Altered Metabolic and Epigenetic Responses.

    PubMed

    Shukla, Shivendra D; Aroor, Annayya R; Restrepo, Ricardo; Kharbanda, Kusum K; Ibdah, Jamal A

    2015-11-20

    Chronic alcoholics who also binge drink (i.e., acute on chronic) are prone to an exacerbated liver injury but its mechanism is not understood. We therefore investigated the in vivo effects of chronic and binge ethanol ingestion and compared to chronic ethanol followed by three repeat binge ethanol on the liver of male C57/BL6 mice fed ethanol in liquid diet (4%) for four weeks followed by binge ethanol (intragastric administration, 3.5 g/kg body weight, three doses, 12h apart). Chronic followed by binge ethanol exacerbated fat accumulation, necrosis, decrease in hepatic SAM and SAM:SAH ratio, increase in adenosine levels, and elevated CYP2E1 levels. Histone H3 lysine acetylation (H3AcK9), dually modified phosphoacetylated histone H3 (H3AcK9/PS10), and phosphorylated H2AX increased after binge whereas phosphorylation of histone H3 ser 10 (H3S10) and H3 ser 28 (H3S28) increased after chronic ethanol-binge. Histone H3 lysine 4 and 9 dimethylation increased with a marked dimethylation in H3K9 in chronic ethanol binge group. Trimethylated histone H3 levels did not change. Nuclear levels of histone acetyl transferase GCN5 and histone deacetylase HDAC3 were elevated whereas phospho-CREB decreased in a distinctive manner. Taken together, acute on chronic ethanol ingestion caused amplification of liver injury and elicited characteristic profiles of histone modifications, metabolic alterations, and changes in nuclear protein levels. These findings demonstrate that chronic ethanol exposure renders liver more susceptible to repeat acute/binge ethanol induced acceleration of alcoholic liver disease.

  8. Deep Sea Water Modulates Blood Pressure and Exhibits Hypolipidemic Effects via the AMPK-ACC Pathway: An in Vivo Study

    PubMed Central

    Sheu, Ming-Jyh; Chou, Pei-Yu; Lin, Wen-Hsin; Pan, Chun-Hsu; Chien, Yi-Chung; Chung, Yun-Lung; Liu, Fon-Chang; Wu, Chieh-Hsi

    2013-01-01

    Deep sea water (DSW), originally pumped from the Pacific Rim off the coast of Hualien County (Taiwan), and its mineral constituents, were concentrated by a low-temperature vacuum evaporation system to produce a hardness of approximately 400,000 mg/L of seawater mineral concentrate. The primary composition of this seawater mineral concentrate was ionic magnesium (Mg2+), which was approximately 96,000 mg/L. Referring to the human recommended daily allowance (RDA) of magnesium, we diluted the mineral concentrate to three different dosages: 0.1 × DSW (equivalent to 3.75 mg Mg2+/kg DSW); 1 × DSW (equivalent to 37.5 mg Mg2+/kg DSW); and 2 × DSW (equivalent to 75 mg Mg2+/kg DSW). Additionally, a magnesium chloride treatment was conducted for comparison with the DSW supplement. The study indicated that 0.1 × DSW, 1 × DSW and 2 × DSW decreased the systolic and diastolic pressures in spontaneous hypertensive rats in an eight-week experiment. DSW has been shown to reduce serum lipids and prevent atherogenesis in a hypercholesterolemic rabbit model. Our results demonstrated that 1 × DSW and 2 × DSW significantly suppressed the serum cholesterol levels, reduced the lipid accumulation in liver tissues, and limited aortic fatty streaks. These findings indicated that the antiatherogenic effects of DSW are associated with 5′-adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) stimulation and the consequent inhibition of phosphorylation of acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC) in atherosclerotic rabbits. We hypothesize that DSW could potentially be used as drinking water because it modulates blood pressure, reduces lipids, and prevents atherogenesis. PMID:23774889

  9. Deep sea water modulates blood pressure and exhibits hypolipidemic effects via the AMPK-ACC pathway: an in vivo study.

    PubMed

    Sheu, Ming-Jyh; Chou, Pei-Yu; Lin, Wen-Hsin; Pan, Chun-Hsu; Chien, Yi-Chung; Chung, Yun-Lung; Liu, Fon-Chang; Wu, Chieh-Hsi

    2013-06-17

    Deep sea water (DSW), originally pumped from the Pacific Rim off the coast of Hualien County (Taiwan), and its mineral constituents, were concentrated by a low-temperature vacuum evaporation system to produce a hardness of approximately 400,000 mg/L of seawater mineral concentrate. The primary composition of this seawater mineral concentrate was ionic magnesium (Mg²⁺), which was approximately 96,000 mg/L. Referring to the human recommended daily allowance (RDA) of magnesium, we diluted the mineral concentrate to three different dosages: 0.1 × DSW (equivalent to 3.75 mg Mg²⁺/kg DSW); 1 × DSW (equivalent to 37.5 mg Mg²⁺/kg DSW); and 2 × DSW (equivalent to 75 mg Mg²⁺/kg DSW). Additionally, a magnesium chloride treatment was conducted for comparison with the DSW supplement. The study indicated that 0.1 × DSW, 1 × DSW and 2 × DSW decreased the systolic and diastolic pressures in spontaneous hypertensive rats in an eight-week experiment. DSW has been shown to reduce serum lipids and prevent atherogenesis in a hypercholesterolemic rabbit model. Our results demonstrated that 1 × DSW and 2 × DSW significantly suppressed the serum cholesterol levels, reduced the lipid accumulation in liver tissues, and limited aortic fatty streaks. These findings indicated that the antiatherogenic effects of DSW are associated with 5'-adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) stimulation and the consequent inhibition of phosphorylation of acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC) in atherosclerotic rabbits. We hypothesize that DSW could potentially be used as drinking water because it modulates blood pressure, reduces lipids, and prevents atherogenesis.

  10. Stem cell factor and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor exhibit therapeutic effects in a mouse model of CADASIL.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiao-Yun; Gonzalez-Toledo, Maria E; Fagan, Austin; Duan, Wei-Ming; Liu, Yanying; Zhang, Siyuan; Li, Bin; Piao, Chun-Shu; Nelson, Lila; Zhao, Li-Ru

    2015-01-01

    Cerebral autosomal dominant arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leukoencephalopathy (CADASIL), a Notch3 dominant mutation-induced cerebral small vascular disease, is characterized by progressive degeneration of vascular smooth muscle cells (vSMCs) of small arteries in the brain, leading to recurrent ischemic stroke, vascular dementia and death. To date, no treatment can stop or delay the progression of this disease. Herein, we determined the therapeutic effects of stem cell factor (SCF) in combination with granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) (SCF+G-CSF) in a mouse model of CADASIL carrying the human mutant Notch3 gene. SCF+G-CSF was subcutaneously administered for 5 days and repeated 4 times with 1-4 month intervals. We found through water maze testing that SCF+G-CSF treatment improved cognitive function. SCF+G-CSF also attenuated vSMC degeneration in small arteries, increased cerebral blood vascular density, and inhibited apoptosis in CADASIL mice. We also discovered that loss of cerebral capillary endothelial cells and neural stem cells/neural progenitor cells (NSCs/NPCs) occurred in CADASIL mice. SCF+G-CSF treatment inhibited the CADASIL-induced cell loss in the endothelia and NSCs/NPCs and promoted neurogenesis. In an in vitro model of apoptosis, SCF+G-CSF prevented apoptotic cell death in vSMCs through AKT signaling and by inhibiting caspase-3 activity. These data suggest that SCF+G-CSF restricts the pathological progression of CADASIL. This study offers new insights into developing therapeutic strategies for CADASIL.

  11. Lactobacillus johnsonii CRL1647, isolated from Apis mellifera L. bee-gut, exhibited a beneficial effect on honeybee colonies.

    PubMed

    Audisio, M C; Benítez-Ahrendts, M R

    2011-03-01

    Lactobacillus johnsonii CRL1647, isolated from the intestinal tract of a honeybee and selected due to its high lactic acid production, was assayed as a monoculture on bee colony performance. It was delivered to the bees on a one litre of 125 g/l sugar-cane syrup with a final concentration of 105 cfu/ml lactobacilli. The bees accepted the new nourishment, which was consumed within 24-48 h and was administered in two independent trials (every 14-15 days for 3 consecutive months in one case, and once a month for 13 consecutive months in the other). From late spring - early summer (2008) the photo-records and statistical analyses revealed significant differences in the open and the operculated brood areas in the treated group compared with the control. This stimulation was observed after the first administration of the lactobacilli and maintained throughout. Also, a higher number of bees were measured in the treated group (54%) and the control (18%) with respect to the initial bees' number. Furthermore, honey storage was higher, 40% and 19%, for the treated and control groups, respectively. From December 2008 to December 2009, a similar situation was observed even though, in this trial, the lactobacilli cells were administered once a month. The in vivo results of this study are promising and indicate that a L. johnsonii CRL1647 supplement to beehives favours mainly open and operculated brood areas, demonstrating a stronger stimulation of egg-laying and will become a natural product which will assist the beekeeper both in colony management and the creation of late nuclei and/or bee packages due to its beneficial effects in the beehive colony.

  12. Enhancement of the optical Kerr effect exhibited by an integrated configuration of silicon quantum dots and silver nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López-Suárez, A.; R, Rangel-Rojo; Torres-Torres, C.; Benami, A.; L, Tamayo-Rivera; Reyes-Esqueda, J. A.; Cheang-Wong, J. C.; Rodríguez-Fernández, L.; Crespo-Sosa, A.; Oliver, A.

    2011-01-01

    We present nonlinear refractive results for three different systems produced by ion implantation: high purity silica substrates with silicon quantum dots (Si-QDs), silver nanoparticles (Ag-NPs), and one sample containing both. We used a femtosecond optical Kerr gate (OKG) with 80 fs pulses at 830 nm to investigate the magnitude and response time of their nonlinear response. The Ag-NPs samples were prepared implanting 2 MeV Ag2+ ions at different fluencies. A sample with 1×1017 ions/cm2 showed no discernible Kerr signal, while for one with 2.4×1017 ions/cm2 we measured |χ(3)|1111 = 5.1×10-11 esu. The Si-QDs sample required irradiation with 1.5 MeV Si2+ ions, at a 2.5×1017 ions/cm2 fluence in order that the OKG results for this sample yielded a similar |χ(3)|1111 value. The sample containing the Si-QDs was then irradiated by 1 MeV Ag2+ ions at a 4.44 × 1016 ions/cm2 fluence and thermally treated, for which afterward we measured |χ(3)|1111 = 1.7×10-10 esu. In all cases the response time was quasi-instantaneous. These results imply that the inclusion of Ag-NPs at low fluence, enhances the nonlinearity of the composite by a factor of around three, and that this is purely electronic in nature. Pump-probe results show that there is not any nonlinear absorption present. We estimate that the confinement effect of the Si-QDs in the sample plays an important role for the excitation of the Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR) related to the Ag-NPs. A theoretical model that describes the modification of the third order nonlinearity is also presented.

  13. Optimal Experimental Condition of IR pMAIRS Calibrated by Using an Optically Isotropic Thin Film Exhibiting the Berreman Effect.

    PubMed

    Shioya, Nobutaka; Norimoto, Shingo; Izumi, Naoki; Hada, Miyako; Shimoaka, Takafumi; Hasegawa, Takeshi

    2016-07-08

    Infrared (IR) p-polarized multiple-angle incidence resolution spectrometry (pMAIRS) is a useful spectroscopic tool for revealing the molecular anisotropic structure in a thin film, which is used for the molecular orientation analysis of many functionalized organic thin films. Infrared pMAIRS provides both in-plane (IP) and out-of-plane (OP) vibrational mode spectra, which are influenced by the choice of the angles of incidence, i.e., angle set. To obtain quantitatively reliable pMAIRS spectra, therefore, the optimal angle set must be revealed. In a former study, an optimization study was carried out on a silicon substrate by using the band intensity ratio of the IP and OP spectra of highly oriented molecules in a thin film, which has a problem that the optimized results cannot be used for another substrate. In the present study, a totally new idea using an optically isotropic thin film as a standard sample is proposed to comprehensively explore the optimal angle set on various substrates: the band shift due to the Berreman effect of a strongly absorbing compound is used, instead of the band intensity. This new approach makes the pMAIRS calibration for various substrates a much easier task. With the optimal angle set, the molecular orientation angle in the film calculated by the pMAIRS spectra is also found to be reliable quantitatively. This technique opens a user-friendly way to a reliable molecular orientation analysis in an ultrathin film using IR pMAIRS.

  14. Estrogen and cigarette sidestream smoke particulate matter exhibit ERα-dependent tumor-promoting effects in lung adenocarcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Lun-Cheng; Cheng, Li-Chuan; Lee, Chia-Huei; Lin, Chun-Ju; Chen, Pei-Yu; Li, Lih-Ann

    2017-09-01

    Estrogen and secondhand smoke are key risk factors for nonsmoking female lung cancer patients who frequently have lung adenocarcinoma and show tumor estrogen receptor α (ERα) expression. We speculated that estrogen and secondhand smoke might cause harmful effects via ERα signaling. Our results showed that 17β-estradiol (E2), the primary form of endogenous estrogen, exacerbated proliferation, migration, and granzyme B resistance of lung adenocarcinoma cells in an ERα-dependent manner. Cigarette sidestream smoke particulate matter (CSSP), the major component of secondhand smoke, could activate ERα activity dose dependently in human lung adenocarcinoma cells. The estrogenic activity of CSSP was abolished by an ERα-selective antagonist. CSSP regulated the nuclear entry, phosphorylation, and turnover of ERα similarly to E2. Furthermore, CSSP enhanced E2-stimulated ERα activity and Ser118 phosphorylation even when ERα became saturated with E2. Activation of ERα by CSSP required GSK3β activity, but not involving polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, reactive oxygen species, calcium, epidermal growth factor receptor, and PI3K/Akt. Although CSSP possessed cytotoxicity, ERα-expressing cells grew and migrated faster than nonexpressing cells on recovery from CSSP exposure as observed in E2-pretreated cells. Knockdown of ERα by siRNA diminished E2- and CSSP-stimulated cell migration. Twenty-one genes, including SERPINB9, were identified to be upregulated by both E2 and CSSP via ERα. Increased SERPINB9 expression was accompanied with increased resistance to granzyme B-mediated apoptosis. This study demonstrates that estrogen has ERα-dependent tumor-promoting activity. CSSP acts like estrogen and shows a potential to enhance estrogen-induced ERα action. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  15. Sodium Butyrate, a Histone Deacetylase Inhibitor, Exhibits Neuroprotective/Neurogenic Effects in a Rat Model of Neonatal Hypoxia-Ischemia.

    PubMed

    Ziemka-Nalecz, Malgorzata; Jaworska, Joanna; Sypecka, Joanna; Polowy, Rafał; Filipkowski, Robert K; Zalewska, Teresa

    2017-09-01

    Neonatal hypoxic-ischemic (HI) injury still remains an important issue as it is a major cause of neonatal death and neurological dysfunctions. Currently, there are no well-established treatments to reduce brain damage and its long-term sequel in infants. Recently, reported data show that histone deacetylase inhibitors provide neuroprotection in adult stroke models. However, the proof of their relevance in vivo after neonatal HI brain injury remains particularly limited. In the present study, we show neuroprotective/neurogenic effect of sodium butyrate (SB), one of histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACis), in the dentate gyrus of HI-injured immature rats. Postnatal day 7 (P7) rats underwent left carotid artery ligation followed by 7.6 % O2 exposure for 1 h. SB (300 mg/kg) was administered in a 5-day regime with the first injection given immediately after the onset of HI. The damage of the ipsilateral hemisphere was evaluated by weight deficit. Newly produced cells were labeled with BrdU, at 50 mg/kg, injected twice daily for 3 consecutive days. Subsequent differentiation of the newborn cells was investigated 2 and 4 weeks after the insult by immunohistochemistry using neuronal and glial cell-lineage markers and BrdU incorporation. Finally, we performed several behavioral tests to evaluate functional outcome. In summary, SB led to a remarkable reduction of the brain damage caused by HI. Moreover, the application of this HDACi protected against HI-induced loss of neuroblasts and oligodendrocyte precursor cells, as well as against neuroinflammation. The observed neuroprotective action suggests that SB may serve as a potential candidate for future treatment of HI-evoked injury in neonates.

  16. Both superficial and deep zone articular chondrocyte subpopulations exhibit the Crabtree effect but have different basal oxygen consumption rates.

    PubMed

    Heywood, Hannah K; Knight, Martin M; Lee, David A

    2010-06-01

    In the absence of in vivo measurements, the oxygen concentration within articular cartilage is calculated from the balance between cellular oxygen consumption and mass transfer. Current estimates of the oxygen tension within articular cartilage are based on oxygen consumption data from full-depth tissue samples. However, superficial and deep cell subpopulations of articular cartilage express intrinsic metabolic differences. We test the hypothesis that the subpopulations differ with respect to their intrinsic oxygen consumption rate. Chondrocytes from the full cartilage thickness demonstrate enhanced oxygen consumption when deprived of glucose, consistent with the Crabtree phenomena. Chondrocyte subpopulations differ in the prevailing availability of oxygen and glucose, which decrease with distance from the cartilage-synovial fluid interface. Thus, we tested the hypothesis that the oxygen consumption of each subpopulation is modulated by nutrient availability, by examining the expression of the Crabtree effect. The deep cells had a greater oxygen consumption than the superficial cells (V(max) of 6.6 compared to 3.2 fmol/cell/h), consistent with our observations of mitochondrial volume (mean values 52.0 vs. 36.4 microm(3)/cell). Both populations expressed the Crabtree phenomena, with oxygen consumption increasing approximately 2.5-fold in response to glycolytic inhibition by glucose deprivation or 2-deoxyglucose. Over 90% of this increase was oligomycin-sensitive and thus accounted for by oxidative phosphorylation. The data contributes towards our understanding of chondrocyte energy metabolism and provides information valuable for the accurate calculation of the oxygen concentration that the cells experience in vivo. The work has further application to the optimisation of bioreactor design and engineered tissues.

  17. Probiotic Lactobacillus rhamnosus GR-1 and Lactobacillus reuteri RC-14 exhibit strong antifungal effects against vulvovaginal candidiasis-causing Candida glabrata isolates

    PubMed Central

    Chew, SY; Cheah, YK; Seow, HF; Sandai, D; Than, LTL

    2015-01-01

    Aims This study investigates the antagonistic effects of the probiotic strains Lactobacillus rhamnosus GR-1 and Lactobacillus reuteri RC-14 against vulvovaginal candidiasis (VVC)-causing Candida glabrata. Methods and Results Growth inhibitory activities of Lact. rhamnosus GR-1 and Lact. reuteri RC-14 strains against C. glabrata were demonstrated using a spot overlay assay and a plate-based microtitre assay. In addition, these probiotic lactobacilli strains also exhibited potent candidacidal activity against C. glabrata, as demonstrated by a LIVE/DEAD yeast viability assay performed using confocal laser scanning microscopy. The metabolic activities of all C. glabrata strains were completely shut down in response to the challenges by the probiotic lactobacilli strains. In addition, both probiotic lactobacilli strains exhibited strong autoaggregation and coaggregation phenotypes in the presence of C. glabrata, which indicate that these lactobacilli strains may exert their probiotic effects through the formation of aggregates and, thus the consequent prevention of colonization by C. glabrata. Conclusions Probiotic Lact. rhamnosus GR-1 and Lact. reuteri RC-14 strains exhibited potent antagonistic activities against all of the tested C. glabrata strains. These lactobacilli exhibited antifungal effects, including those attributed to their aggregation abilities, and their presence caused the cessation of growth and eventual cell death of C. glabrata. Significance and Impact of the Study This is the first study to report on the antagonistic effects of these probiotic lactobacilli strains against the non-Candida albicans Candida (NCAC) species C. glabrata. PMID:25688886

  18. Probiotic Lactobacillus rhamnosus GR-1 and Lactobacillus reuteri RC-14 exhibit strong antifungal effects against vulvovaginal candidiasis-causing Candida glabrata isolates.

    PubMed

    Chew, S Y; Cheah, Y K; Seow, H F; Sandai, D; Than, L T L

    2015-05-01

    This study investigates the antagonistic effects of the probiotic strains Lactobacillus rhamnosus GR-1 and Lactobacillus reuteri RC-14 against vulvovaginal candidiasis (VVC)-causing Candida glabrata. Growth inhibitory activities of Lact. rhamnosus GR-1 and Lact. reuteri RC-14 strains against C. glabrata were demonstrated using a spot overlay assay and a plate-based microtitre assay. In addition, these probiotic lactobacilli strains also exhibited potent candidacidal activity against C. glabrata, as demonstrated by a LIVE/DEAD yeast viability assay performed using confocal laser scanning microscopy. The metabolic activities of all C. glabrata strains were completely shut down in response to the challenges by the probiotic lactobacilli strains. In addition, both probiotic lactobacilli strains exhibited strong autoaggregation and coaggregation phenotypes in the presence of C. glabrata, which indicate that these lactobacilli strains may exert their probiotic effects through the formation of aggregates and, thus the consequent prevention of colonization by C. glabrata. Probiotic Lact. rhamnosus GR-1 and Lact. reuteri RC-14 strains exhibited potent antagonistic activities against all of the tested C. glabrata strains. These lactobacilli exhibited antifungal effects, including those attributed to their aggregation abilities, and their presence caused the cessation of growth and eventual cell death of C. glabrata. This is the first study to report on the antagonistic effects of these probiotic lactobacilli strains against the non-Candida albicans Candida (NCAC) species C. glabrata. © 2015 The Authors published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Society for Applied Microbiology.

  19. Plant-derived SAC domain of PAR-4 (Prostate Apoptosis Response 4) exhibits growth inhibitory effects in prostate cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Sarkar, Shayan; Jain, Sumeet; Rai, Vineeta; Sahoo, Dipak K.; Raha, Sumita; Suklabaidya, Sujit; Senapati, Shantibhusan; Rangnekar, Vivek M.; Maiti, Indu B.; Dey, Nrisingha

    2015-01-01

    The gene Par-4 (Prostate Apoptosis Response 4) was originally identified in prostate cancer cells undergoing apoptosis and its product Par-4 showed cancer specific pro-apoptotic activity. Particularly, the SAC domain of Par-4 (SAC-Par-4) selectively kills cancer cells leaving normal cells unaffected. The therapeutic significance of bioactive SAC-Par-4 is enormous in cancer biology; however, its large scale production is still a matter of concern. Here we report the production of SAC-Par-4-GFP fusion protein coupled to translational enhancer sequence (5′ AMV) and apoplast signal peptide (aTP) in transgenic Nicotiana tabacum cv. Samsun NN plants under the control of a unique recombinant promoter M24. Transgene integration was confirmed by genomic DNA PCR, Southern and Northern blotting, Real-time PCR, and Nuclear run-on assays. Results of Western blot analysis and ELISA confirmed expression of recombinant SAC-Par-4-GFP protein and it was as high as 0.15% of total soluble protein. In addition, we found that targeting of plant recombinant SAC-Par-4-GFP to the apoplast and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) was essential for the stability of plant recombinant protein in comparison to the bacterial derived SAC-Par-4. Deglycosylation analysis demonstrated that ER-targeted SAC-Par-4-GFP-SEKDEL undergoes O-linked glycosylation unlike apoplast-targeted SAC-Par-4-GFP. Furthermore, various in vitro studies like mammalian cells proliferation assay (MTT), apoptosis induction assays, and NF-κB suppression suggested the cytotoxic and apoptotic properties of plant-derived SAC-Par-4-GFP against multiple prostate cancer cell lines. Additionally, pre-treatment of MAT-LyLu prostate cancer cells with purified SAC-Par-4-GFP significantly delayed the onset of tumor in a syngeneic rat prostate cancer model. Taken altogether, we proclaim that plant made SAC-Par-4 may become a useful alternate therapy for effectively alleviating cancer in the new era. PMID:26500666

  20. Mice deficient in endothelin-converting enzyme-2 exhibit abnormal responses to morphine and altered peptide levels in the spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Miller, Lydia K; Hou, Xiaowen; Rodriguiz, Ramona M; Gagnidze, Khatuna; Sweedler, Jonathan V; Wetsel, William C; Devi, Lakshmi A

    2011-12-01

    An increasing body of evidence suggests that endothelin-converting enzyme-2 (ECE-2) is a non-classical neuropeptide processing enzyme. Similar to other neuropeptide processing enzymes, ECE-2 exhibits restricted neuroendocrine distribution, intracellular localization, and an acidic pH optimum. However, unlike classical neuropeptide processing enzymes, ECE-2 exhibits a non-classical cleavage site preference for aliphatic and aromatic residues. We previously reported that ECE-2 cleaves a number of neuropeptides at non-classical sites in vitro; however its role in peptide processing in vivo is poorly understood. Given the recognized roles of neuropeptides in pain and opiate responses, we hypothesized that ECE-2 knockout (KO) mice might show altered pain and morphine responses compared with wild-type mice. We find that ECE-2 KO mice show decreased response to a single injection of morphine in hot-plate and tail-flick tests. ECE-2 KO mice also show more rapid development of tolerance with prolonged morphine treatment and fewer signs of naloxone-precipitated withdrawal. Peptidomic analyses revealed changes in the levels of a number of spinal cord peptides in ECE-2 KO as compared to wild-type mice. Taken together, our findings suggest a role for ECE-2 in the non-classical processing of spinal cord peptides and morphine responses; however, the precise mechanisms through which ECE-2 influences morphine tolerance and withdrawal remain unclear. © 2011 The Authors. Journal of Neurochemistry © 2011 International Society for Neurochemistry.

  1. Mice deficient in Endothelin-Converting Enzyme-2 exhibit abnormal responses to morphine and altered peptide levels in the spinal cord

    PubMed Central

    Miller, L.K.; Hou, X.; Rodriguiz, R.M.; Gagnidze, K.; Sweedler, J. V.; Wetsel, W.C.; Devi, L.A.

    2011-01-01

    An increasing body of evidence suggests that Endothelin-converting enzyme-2 (ECE-2) is a non-classical neuropeptide processing enzyme. Similar to other neuropeptide processing enzymes, ECE-2 exhibits restricted neuroendocrine distribution, intracellular localization, and an acidic pH optimum. However, unlike classical neuropeptide processing enzymes, ECE-2 exhibits a non-classical cleavage site preference for aliphatic and aromatic residues. We previously reported that ECE-2 cleaves a number of neuropeptides at non-classical sites in vitro; however its role in peptide processing in vivo is poorly understood. Given the recognized roles of neuropeptides in pain and opiate responses, we hypothesized that ECE-2 knockout (KO) mice might show altered pain and morphine responses compared to wild-type (WT) mice. We find that ECE-2 KO mice show decreased response to a single injection of morphine in hot-plate and tail-flick tests. ECE-2 KO mice also show more rapid development of tolerance with prolonged morphine treatment and fewer signs of naloxone-precipitated withdrawal. Peptidomic analyses revealed changes in the levels of a number of spinal cord peptides in ECE-2 KO as compared to WT mice. Taken together, our findings suggest a role for ECE-2 in the non-classical processing of spinal cord peptides and morphine responses; however, the precise mechanisms through which ECE-2 influences morphine tolerance and withdrawal remain unclear. PMID:21972895

  2. Swamp to Space exhibit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    The menacing-looking alligator is really harmless. It is one of the realistic props to help convince visitors that the feel of the swamp is real in StenniSphere's Swamp to Space exhibit at John C. Stennis Space Center in Hancock County, Miss. The historical section of the Swamp to Space exhibit tells the story of why and how Stennis Space Center came to be. It also pays tribute to the families who moved their homes to make way for the space age in Mississippi.

  3. 1989 Architectural Exhibition Winners.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Business Affairs, 1990

    1990-01-01

    Winners of the 1989 Architectural Exhibition sponsored annually by the ASBO International's School Facilities Research Committee include the Brevard Performing Arts Center (Melbourne, Florida), the Capital High School (Santa Fe, New Mexico), Gage Elementary School (Rochester, Minnesota), the Lakewood (Ohio) High School Natatorium, and three other…

  4. "Rocket Park" - exhibits

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1979-12-20

    Overall view at JSC lookin west from atop of Bldg. 1 showing rockets, parking lot and all threee stages of Saturn V. first stage of Saturn V exhibit in "Rocket Park" on west side of center little joe and mercury models are seen 1. JSC- Aerials

  5. 1989 Architectural Exhibition Winners.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Business Affairs, 1990

    1990-01-01

    Winners of the 1989 Architectural Exhibition sponsored annually by the ASBO International's School Facilities Research Committee include the Brevard Performing Arts Center (Melbourne, Florida), the Capital High School (Santa Fe, New Mexico), Gage Elementary School (Rochester, Minnesota), the Lakewood (Ohio) High School Natatorium, and three other…

  6. Exhibitions in Sight.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wasserman, Burton

    1978-01-01

    Early in the eighteenth century, Pompeii was discovered, a city that had been hidden for sixteen centuries by volcanic lava. There is a traveling exhibition of the sculptures, friezes, mosaics, and paintings being shown around the United States. Described is the history and contents of "Pompeii--A.D. 79." (RK)

  7. Exhibitions in Sight.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wasserman, Burton

    1978-01-01

    Early in the eighteenth century, Pompeii was discovered, a city that had been hidden for sixteen centuries by volcanic lava. There is a traveling exhibition of the sculptures, friezes, mosaics, and paintings being shown around the United States. Described is the history and contents of "Pompeii--A.D. 79." (RK)

  8. Exhibitions in Sight

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wasserman, Burton

    1977-01-01

    Today, few artists make serving vessels on a monumental scale. Here artists compete in this unique area of specialization prompted by the Campbell Museum in Camden, New Jersey, which is dedicated to collecting and exhibiting the very best in soup tureens. (Author/RK)

  9. Pictures at an Exhibition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kunz, Walter S., Jr.

    1997-01-01

    Describes the Youth Art Month exhibit in Howard County (Maryland) where students submitted their art focusing on school buildings and their interiors. Their art reveals concerns and desires about overcrowding, space utilization, school building height, outside lighting, solitude needs, and visual stimulation. The artwork is discussed in terms of…

  10. Alan Bean Art Exhibit

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-07-19

    Former NASA Astronaut and U.S. Senator John Glenn is seen at the opening of the exhibit "Alan Bean: Painting Apollo, First Artist on Another World" at the National Air and Space Museum, Monday, July 20, 2009 in Washington. The show opening coincided with the 40th anniversary celebration of Apollo. Photo Credit: (NASA/Carla Cioffi)

  11. Alan Bean Art Exhibit

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-07-19

    NASA Apollo 12 Astronaut and Artist Alan Bean gives remarks at the opening of the exhibit "Alan Bean: Painting Apollo, First Artist on Another World" at the National Air and Space Museum, Monday, July 20, 2009 in Washington. The show opening coincided with the 40th anniversary celebration of Apollo. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  12. Exhibition in Sight

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wasserman, Burton

    1978-01-01

    Ludwig Mies van der Rohe is known primarily as an architect. However, he also designed chairs and tables. Discusses an exhibit held in New York City a few months ago which showed how well the famous architect achieved his goals in the area of furniture design. (Author/RK)

  13. Greenhouse Earth: A Traveling Exhibition

    SciTech Connect

    Booth, W.H.; Caesar, S.

    1992-09-01

    The Franklin Institute Science Museum provided an exhibit entitled the Greenhouse Earth: A Traveling Exhibition. This 3500 square-foot exhibit on global climate change was developed in collaboration with the Association of Science-Technology Centers. The exhibit opened at The Franklin Institute on February 14, 1992, welcoming 291,000 visitors over its three-month stay. During its three-year tour, Greenhouse Earth will travel to ten US cities, reaching two million visitors. Greenhouse Earth aims to deepen public understanding of the scientific issues of global warming and the conservation measures that can be taken to slow its effects. The exhibit features hands-on exhibitry, interactive computer programs and videos, a theater production, a demonstration cart,'' guided tours, and lectures. supplemental educational programs at the Institute included a teachers preview, a symposium on climate change, and a satellite field trip.'' The development of Greenhouse Earth included front-end and formative evaluation procedures. Evaluation includes interviews with visitors, prototypes, and summative surveys for participating museums. During its stay in Philadelphia, Greenhouse Earth was covered by the local and national press, with reviews in print and broadcast media. Greenhouse Earth is the first large-scale museum exhibit to address global climate change.

  14. Antibacterial Synthetic Peptides Derived from Bovine Lactoferricin Exhibit Cytotoxic Effect against MDA-MB-468 and MDA-MB-231 Breast Cancer Cell Lines.

    PubMed

    Vargas Casanova, Yerly; Rodríguez Guerra, Jorge Antonio; Umaña Pérez, Yadi Adriana; Leal Castro, Aura Lucía; Almanzar Reina, Giovanni; García Castañeda, Javier Eduardo; Rivera Monroy, Zuly Jenny

    2017-09-29

    Linear, dimeric, tetrameric, and cyclic peptides derived from lactoferricin B, containing the RRWQWR motif, were designed, synthesized, purified, and characterized using RP-HPLC chromatography and MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry. The antibacterial activity of the designed peptides against E. coli (ATCC 11775 and 25922) and their cytotoxic effect against MDA-MB-468 and MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cell lines were evaluated. Dimeric and tetrameric peptides showed higher antibacterial activity in both bacteria strains than linear peptides. The dimeric peptide (RRWQWR)₂K-Ahx exhibited the highest antibacterial activity against the tested bacterial strains. Furthermore, the peptides with high antibacterial activity exhibited significant cytotoxic effect against the tested breast cancer cell lines. This cytotoxic effect was fast and dependent on the peptide concentration. The tetrameric molecule containing RRWQWR motif has an optimal cytotoxic effect at a concentration of 22 µM. The evaluated dimeric and tetrameric peptides could be considered as candidates for developing new therapeutic agents against breast cancer. Polyvalence of linear sequences could be considered as a novel and versatile strategy for obtaining molecules with high anticancer activity.

  15. Phaseolus acutifolius Lectin Fractions Exhibit Apoptotic Effects on Colon Cancer: Preclinical Studies Using Dimethilhydrazine or Azoxi-Methane as Cancer Induction Agents.

    PubMed

    Moreno-Celis, Ulisses; López-Martínez, Josué; Blanco-Labra, Alejandro; Cervantes-Jiménez, Ricardo; Estrada-Martínez, Laura Elena; García-Pascalin, Alejandro Eduardo; Guerrero-Carrillo, María De Jesús; Rodríguez-Méndez, Adriana Jheny; Mejía, Carmen; Ferríz-Martínez, Roberto Augusto; García-Gasca, Teresa

    2017-10-08

    Phaseolus acutifolius (Tepary bean) lectins have been studied as cytotoxic molecules on colon cancer cells. The toxicological profile of a Tepary bean lectin fraction (TBLF) has shown low toxicity in experimental animals; exhibiting anti-nutritional effects such as a reduction in body weight gain and a decrease in food intake when using a dose of 50 mg/kg on alternate days for six weeks. Taking this information into account, the focus of this work was to evaluate the effect of the TBLF on colon cancer using 1,2-dimethylhydrazine (DMH) or azoxy-methane/dextran sodium sulfate (AOM/DSS) as colon cancer inductors. Rats were treated with DMH or AOM/DSS and then administered with TBFL (50 mg/kg) for six weeks. TBLF significantly decreased early tumorigenesis triggered by DMH by 70%, but without any evidence of an apoptotic effect. In an independent experiment, AOM/DSS was used to generate aberrant cryptic foci, which decreased by 50% after TBLF treatment. TBLF exhibited antiproliferative and proapoptotic effects related to a decrease of the signal transduction pathway protein Akt in its activated form and an increase of caspase 3 activity, but not to p53 activation. Further studies will deepen our knowledge of specific apoptosis pathways and cellular stress processes such as oxidative damage.

  16. Starship 2040 Exhibit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    This photograph shows the Starship 2040 leaving the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) for the exhibit site. Developed by the Space Transportation Directorate at MSFC, the Starship 2040 exhibit is housed in a 48-ft (14.6-m) tractor and trailer rig, permitting it to travel around the Nation, demonstrating NASA's vision of what commercial spaceflight might be like 40 years from now. All the irnovations suggested aboard the exhibit, automated vehicle health monitoring systems, high-energy propulsion drive, navigational aids and emergency and safety systems, are based on concepts and technologies now being studied at NASA Centers and partner institutions around the Nation. NASA is the nation's premier agency for development of the space transportation system, including future-generation reusable launch vehicles. Such systems, the keys to a 'real' Starship 2040, require revolutionary advances in critical aerospace technologies, from thermal, magnetic, chemical, and propellantless propulsion systems to new energy sources such as space solar power or antimatter propulsion. These and other advances are now being studied, developed, and tested at NASA field centers and partner institutions all over the Nation.

  17. Starship 2040 Exhibit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    This photograph shows onlookers viewing displays within the Starship 2040 exhibit on display at Joe Davis Stadium in Huntsville, Alabama. Developed by the Space Transportation Directorate at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC), the Starship 2040 exhibit is housed in a 48-ft (14.6-m) tractor and trailer rig, permitting it to travel around the Nation, demonstrating NASA's vision of what commercial spaceflight might be like 40 years from now. All the irnovations suggested aboard the exhibit (automated vehicle health monitoring systems, high-energy propulsion drive, navigational aids, and emergency and safety systems) are based on concepts and technologies now being studied at NASA Centers and partner institutions around the Nation. NASA is the Nation's premier agency for development of the space transportation system, including future-generation reusable launch vehicles. Such systems, the keys to a 'real' Starship 2040, require revolutionary advances in critical aerospace technologies, from thermal, magnetic, chemical, and propellantless propulsion systems to new energy sources such as space solar power or antimatter propulsion. These and other advances are now being studied, developed, and tested at NASA field centers and partner institutions all over the Nation.

  18. Starship 2040 Exhibit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    This photograph shows Justin Varnadore, son of a Marshall TV employee, at the controls of one of the many displays within the Starship 2040 exhibit on display at Joe Davis Stadium in Huntsville, Alabama. Developed by the Space Transportation Directorate at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC), the Starship 2040 exhibit is housed in a 48-ft (14.6-m) tractor and trailer rig, permitting it to travel around the Nation, demonstrating NASA's vision of what commercial spaceflight might be like 40 years from now. All the irnovations suggested aboard the exhibit (automated vehicle health monitoring systems, high-energy propulsion drive, navigational aids, and emergency and safety systems) are based on concepts and technologies now being studied at NASA Centers and partner institutions around the Nation. NASA is the Nation's premier agency for development of the space transportation system, including future-generation reusable launch vehicles. Such systems, the keys to a 'real' Starship 2040, require revolutionary advances in critical aerospace technologies, from thermal, magnetic, chemical, and propellantless propulsion systems to new energy sources such as space solar power or antimatter propulsion. These and other advances are now being studied, developed, and tested at NASA field centers and partner institutions all over the Nation.

  19. Starship 2040 Exhibit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    This photograph shows onlookers viewing displays within the Starship 2040 exhibit on display at Joe Davis Stadium in Huntsville, Alabama. Developed by the Space Transportation Directorate at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC), the Starship 2040 exhibit is housed in a 48-ft (14.6-m) tractor and trailer rig, permitting it to travel around the Nation, demonstrating NASA's vision of what commercial spaceflight might be like 40 years from now. All the irnovations suggested aboard the exhibit (automated vehicle health monitoring systems, high-energy propulsion drive, navigational aids, and emergency and safety systems) are based on concepts and technologies now being studied at NASA Centers and partner institutions around the Nation. NASA is the Nation's premier agency for development of the space transportation system, including future-generation reusable launch vehicles. Such systems, the keys to a 'real' Starship 2040, require revolutionary advances in critical aerospace technologies, from thermal, magnetic, chemical, and propellantless propulsion systems to new energy sources such as space solar power or antimatter propulsion. These and other advances are now being studied, developed, and tested at NASA field centers and partner institutions all over the Nation.

  20. Starship 2040 Exhibit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    This photograph shows Justin Varnadore, son of a Marshall TV employee, at the controls of one of the many displays within the Starship 2040 exhibit on display at Joe Davis Stadium in Huntsville, Alabama. Developed by the Space Transportation Directorate at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC), the Starship 2040 exhibit is housed in a 48-ft (14.6-m) tractor and trailer rig, permitting it to travel around the Nation, demonstrating NASA's vision of what commercial spaceflight might be like 40 years from now. All the irnovations suggested aboard the exhibit (automated vehicle health monitoring systems, high-energy propulsion drive, navigational aids, and emergency and safety systems) are based on concepts and technologies now being studied at NASA Centers and partner institutions around the Nation. NASA is the Nation's premier agency for development of the space transportation system, including future-generation reusable launch vehicles. Such systems, the keys to a 'real' Starship 2040, require revolutionary advances in critical aerospace technologies, from thermal, magnetic, chemical, and propellantless propulsion systems to new energy sources such as space solar power or antimatter propulsion. These and other advances are now being studied, developed, and tested at NASA field centers and partner institutions all over the Nation.

  1. Effect of Ion Trapping Films on the Electrooptic Characteristics of Polymer-Stabilized Ferroelectric Liquid Crystal Display Exhibiting V-Shaped Switching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furuichi, Keiji; Xu, Jun; Inoue, Masaru; Furuta, Hirokazu; Yoshida, Nobuaki; Tounai, Atsushi; Tanaka, Yoshiki; Mochizuki, Akihiro; Kobayashi, Shunsuke

    2003-07-01

    Ion trapping films TOP-COAT TA606B20 are installed beneath the polyimide alignment films, which are coated over the ITO electrode films, in a polymer-stabilized ferroelectric liquid crystal display exhibiting V-shaped switching. The ion trapping films are shown to play the following two roles: one is to remove zigzag-defects owing to their planarizing function and the other is to remove mobile ions. The latter effect gives rise to the reduction of the operational voltage and an increase of the voltage holding ratio owing to the removal of the depolarization field.

  2. Space Shuttle Cockpit exhibit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Want to sit in the cockpit of the Space Shuttle and watch astronauts work in outer space? At StenniSphere, you can do that and much more. StenniSphere, the visitor center at John C. Stennis Space Center in Hancock County, Miss., presents 14,000-square-feet of interactive exhibits that depict America's race for space as well as a glimpse of the future. StenniSphere is open free of charge from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. daily.

  3. Space Shuttle Cockpit exhibit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Want to sit in the cockpit of the Space Shuttle and watch astronauts work in outer space? At StenniSphere, you can do that and much more. StenniSphere, the visitor center at John C. Stennis Space Center in Hancock County, Miss., presents 14,000-square-feet of interactive exhibits that depict America's race for space as well as a glimpse of the future. StenniSphere is open free of charge from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. daily.

  4. Repairing Hubble Exhibit Reception

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-04-23

    Individuals in attendance who had a hand in the development or servicing of the Hubble Space Telescope pose for a group photo at an event unveiling a new exhibit featuring Hubble's Corrective Optics Space Telescope Axial Replacement (COSTAR) and the WFPC2 on Wednesday, April 23, 2014 at the Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum in Washington, DC. COSTAR and WFPC2 were installed in Hubble during the first space shuttle servicing mission in 1993 and returned to Earth on the fifth and final servicing mission in 2009. Photo Credit: (NASA/Joel Kowsky)

  5. A Novel Bufalin Derivative Exhibited Stronger Apoptosis-Inducing Effect than Bufalin in A549 Lung Cancer Cells and Lower Acute Toxicity in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Miao; Feng, Li-Xing; Sun, Peng; Liu, Wang; Wu, Wan-Ying; Jiang, Bao-Hong; Yang, Min; Hu, Li-Hong; Guo, De-An; Liu, Xuan

    2016-01-01

    BF211 is a synthetic molecule derived from bufalin (BF). The apoptosis-inducing effect of BF211 was stronger than that of BF while the acute toxicity of BF211 was much lower than that of BF. BF211 exhibited promising concentration-dependent anti-cancer effects in nude mice inoculated with A549 cells in vivo. The growth of A549 tumor xenografts was almost totally blocked by treatment with BF211 at 6 mg/kg. Notably, BF and BF211 exhibited differences in their binding affinity and kinetics to recombinant proteins of the α subunits of Na+/K+-ATPase. Furthermore, there was a difference in the effects of BF or BF211 on inhibiting the activity of porcine cortex Na+/K+-ATPase and in their time-dependent effects on intracellular Ca2+ levels in A549 cells. The time-dependent effects of BF or BF211 on the activation of Src, which was mediated by the Na+/K+-ATPase signalosome, in A549 cells were also different. Both BF and BF211 could induce apoptosis-related cascades, such as activation of caspase-3 and the cleavage of PARP (poly ADP-ribose polymerase) in A549 cells, in a concentration-dependent manner; however, the effects of BF211 on apoptosis-related cascades was stronger than that of BF. The results of the present study supported the importance of binding to the Na+/K+-ATPase α subunits in the mechanism of cardiac steroids and also suggested the possibility of developing new cardiac steroids with a stronger anti-cancer activity and lower toxicity as new anti-cancer agents. PMID:27459387

  6. A Novel Bufalin Derivative Exhibited Stronger Apoptosis-Inducing Effect than Bufalin in A549 Lung Cancer Cells and Lower Acute Toxicity in Mice.

    PubMed

    Liu, Miao; Feng, Li-Xing; Sun, Peng; Liu, Wang; Wu, Wan-Ying; Jiang, Bao-Hong; Yang, Min; Hu, Li-Hong; Guo, De-An; Liu, Xuan

    2016-01-01

    BF211 is a synthetic molecule derived from bufalin (BF). The apoptosis-inducing effect of BF211 was stronger than that of BF while the acute toxicity of BF211 was much lower than that of BF. BF211 exhibited promising concentration-dependent anti-cancer effects in nude mice inoculated with A549 cells in vivo. The growth of A549 tumor xenografts was almost totally blocked by treatment with BF211 at 6 mg/kg. Notably, BF and BF211 exhibited differences in their binding affinity and kinetics to recombinant proteins of the α subunits of Na+/K+-ATPase. Furthermore, there was a difference in the effects of BF or BF211 on inhibiting the activity of porcine cortex Na+/K+-ATPase and in their time-dependent effects on intracellular Ca2+ levels in A549 cells. The time-dependent effects of BF or BF211 on the activation of Src, which was mediated by the Na+/K+-ATPase signalosome, in A549 cells were also different. Both BF and BF211 could induce apoptosis-related cascades, such as activation of caspase-3 and the cleavage of PARP (poly ADP-ribose polymerase) in A549 cells, in a concentration-dependent manner; however, the effects of BF211 on apoptosis-related cascades was stronger than that of BF. The results of the present study supported the importance of binding to the Na+/K+-ATPase α subunits in the mechanism of cardiac steroids and also suggested the possibility of developing new cardiac steroids with a stronger anti-cancer activity and lower toxicity as new anti-cancer agents.

  7. Starship 2040 Exhibit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    This photograph shows the Starship 2040 on display at Joe Davis Stadium in Huntsville, Alabama. Developed by the Space Transportation Directorate at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC), the Starship 2040 exhibit is housed in a 48-ft (14.6-m) tractor and trailer rig, permitting it to travel around the Nation, demonstrating NASA's vision of what commercial spaceflight might be like 40 years from now. All the irnovations suggested aboard the exhibit (automated vehicle health monitoring systems, high-energy propulsion drive, navigational aids, and emergency and safety systems) are based on concepts and technologies now being studied at NASA Centers and partner institutions around the Nation. NASA is the Nation's premier agency for development of the space transportation system, including future-generation reusable launch vehicles. Such systems, the keys to a 'real' Starship 2040, require revolutionary advances in critical aerospace technologies, from thermal, magnetic, chemical, and propellantless propulsion systems to new energy sources such as space solar power or antimatter propulsion. These and other advances are now being studied, developed, and tested at NASA field centers and partner institutions all over the Nation.

  8. Starship 2040 Exhibit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    This photograph shows the Starship 2040 on display at Joe Davis Stadium in Huntsville, Alabama. Developed by the Space Transportation Directorate at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC), the Starship 2040 exhibit is housed in a 48-ft (14.6-m) tractor and trailer rig, permitting it to travel around the Nation, demonstrating NASA's vision of what commercial spaceflight might be like 40 years from now. All the irnovations suggested aboard the exhibit (automated vehicle health monitoring systems, high-energy propulsion drive, navigational aids, and emergency and safety systems) are based on concepts and technologies now being studied at NASA Centers and partner institutions around the Nation. NASA is the Nation's premier agency for development of the space transportation system, including future-generation reusable launch vehicles. Such systems, the keys to a 'real' Starship 2040, require revolutionary advances in critical aerospace technologies, from thermal, magnetic, chemical, and propellantless propulsion systems to new energy sources such as space solar power or antimatter propulsion. These and other advances are now being studied, developed, and tested at NASA field centers and partner institutions all over the Nation.

  9. Glutathione reductase: Comparison of steady-state and rapid reaction primary kinetic isotope effects exhibited by the yeast, spinach, and Escherichia coli enzymes

    SciTech Connect

    Vanoni, M.A.; Wong, K.K.; Ballou, D.P.; Blanchard, J.S. )

    1990-06-19

    Kinetic parameters for NADPH and NADH have been determined at pH 8.1 for spinach, yeast, and E. coli glutathione reductases. NADPH exhibited low Km values for all enzymes (3-6 microM), while the Km values for NADH were 100 times higher (approximately 400 microM). Under our experimental conditions, the percentage of maximal velocities with NADH versus those measured with NADPH were 18.4, 3.7, and 0.13% for the spinach, yeast, and E. coli enzymes, respectively. Primary deuterium kinetic isotope effects were independent of GSSG concentration between Km and 15Km levels, supporting a ping-pong kinetic mechanism. For each of the three enzymes, NADPH yielded primary deuterium kinetic isotope effects on Vmax only, while NADH exhibited primary deuterium kinetic isotope effects on both V and V/K. The magnitude of DV/KNADH at pH 8.1 is 4.3 for the spinach enzyme, 2.7 for the yeast enzyme, and 1.6 for the E. coli glutathione reductase. The experimentally determined values of TV/KNADH of 7.4, 4.2, and 2.2 for the spinach, yeast, and E. coli glutathione reductases agree well with those calculated from the corresponding DV/KNADH using the Swain-Schaad expression. This suggests that the intrinsic primary kinetic isotope effect on NADH oxidation is fully expressed. In order to confirm this conclusion, single-turnover experiments have been performed. The measured primary deuterium kinetic isotope effects on the enzyme reduction half-reaction using NADH match those measured in the steady state for each of the three glutathione reductases.

  10. Collective optical Kerr effect exhibited by an integrated configuration of silicon quantum dots and gold nanoparticles embedded in ion-implanted silica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torres-Torres, C.; López-Suárez, A.; Can-Uc, B.; Rangel-Rojo, R.; Tamayo-Rivera, L.; Oliver, A.

    2015-07-01

    The study of the third-order optical nonlinear response exhibited by a composite containing gold nanoparticles and silicon quantum dots nucleated by ion implantation in a high-purity silica matrix is presented. The nanocomposites were explored as an integrated configuration containing two different ion-implanted distributions. The time-resolved optical Kerr gate and z-scan techniques were conducted using 80 fs pulses at a 825 nm wavelength; while the nanosecond response was investigated by a vectorial two-wave mixing method at 532 nm with 1 ns pulses. An ultrafast purely electronic nonlinearity was associated to the optical Kerr effect for the femtosecond experiments, while a thermal effect was identified as the main mechanism responsible for the nonlinear optical refraction induced by nanosecond pulses. Comparative experimental tests for examining the contribution of the Au and Si distributions to the total third-order optical response were carried out. We consider that the additional defects generated by consecutive ion irradiations in the preparation of ion-implanted samples do not notably modify the off-resonance electronic optical nonlinearities; but they do result in an important change for near-resonant nanosecond third-order optical phenomena exhibited by the closely spaced nanoparticle distributions.

  11. Heroes and Legends Exhibit

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-11-07

    Inside the Heroes and Legends attraction at the Kennedy Space Center Visitor Complex, the Sigma 7 Mercury spacecraft in this exhibit was piloted by astronaut Wally Schirra during his six-orbit mission on Oct. 3, 1962. For display purposes, it is shown here attached to a Redstone launch vehicle like the one that boosted astronauts Alan Shepard and Gus Grissom on sub-orbital flights in 1961. Schirra's capsule was actually launched by the more powerful Atlas rocket in order to reach orbit. The new facility looks back to the pioneering efforts of Mercury, Gemini and Apollo. It sets the stage by providing the background and context for space exploration and the legendary men and women who pioneered the nation's journey into space.

  12. Koumine exhibits anxiolytic properties without inducing adverse neurological effects on functional observation battery, open-field and Vogel conflict tests in rodents.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chao-Jie; Zhong, Zhi-Feng; Xin, Zhi-Ming; Hong, Long-Hui; Su, Yan-Ping; Yu, Chang-Xi

    2017-04-01

    Koumine, an active alkaloid of neurotoxic plant Gelsemium, has been focused on its therapeutic uses, especially in central nervous system. Nevertheless, less is known about the neurological effects of koumine, which hampers its potential therapeutic exploitation. Moreover, as the anxiolytic potential of Gelsemium has raised many critical issues, its active principles on the anxiolytic and other neurological effects need to be further investigated. Here, we used functional observation battery (FOB) of mice to systematically measure the neurological effects of koumine at the effective doses, and then further confirmed its anxiolytic properties in open-field test (OFT) of mice and Vogel conflict test (VCT) of rats. Koumine exhibited anxiolytic-like activities but did not affect other autonomic, neurological and physical functions in FOB. Furthermore, koumine released anxiolytic responses and anti-punishment action in a manner similar to diazepam in OFT and VCT, respectively. The results constitutes solid set of fundamental data further demonstrating anxiolytic properties of koumine at the therapeutic doses without inducing adverse neurological effects, which supports the perspectives for the development of safe and effective koumine medicine against pathological anxiety.

  13. Efficacy of Ceftaroline against Methicillin-Susceptible Staphylococcus aureus Exhibiting the Cefazolin High-Inoculum Effect in a Rat Model of Endocarditis.

    PubMed

    Singh, Kavindra V; Tran, Truc T; Nannini, Esteban C; Tam, Vincent H; Arias, Cesar A; Murray, Barbara E

    2017-07-01

    Certain Staphylococcus aureus strains exhibit an inoculum effect (InE) with cefazolin (CFZ) that has been associated with therapeutic failures in high-inoculum infections. We assessed the in vitro activities of ceftaroline (CPT), CFZ, and nafcillin (NAF) against 17 type A β-lactamase (βla)-producing, methicillin-susceptible S. aureus (MSSA) strains, including the previously reported TX0117, which exhibits the CFZ InE, and its βla-cured derivative, TX0117c. Additionally, we determined the pharmacokinetics of CPT in rats after single intramuscular doses of 20 and 40 mg/kg of body weight and evaluated the activities of CPT (40 mg/kg every 8 h [q8h]), CFZ, and NAF against TX0117 and TX0117c in a rat model of infective endocarditis. No InE was observed for CPT or NAF, whereas a marked InE was detected for CFZ (MIC, 8 to ≥128 μg/ml). CPT and NAF treatment against TX0117 resulted in mean bacterial counts of 2.3 and 2.1 log10 CFU/g in vegetations, respectively, compared to a mean of 5.9 log10 CFU/g in the CFZ-treated group (CPT and NAF versus CFZ, P = 0.001; CPT versus NAF, P = 0.9830). Both CFZ and CPT were efficacious against the βla-cured derivative, TX0117c, compared to time zero (t0) (P = <0.0001 and 0.0015, respectively). Our data reiterate the in vivo consequences of the CFZ InE and show that CPT is not affected by this phenomenon. CPT might be considered for high-inoculum infections caused by MSSA exhibiting the CFZ InE. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  14. Thiocolchicoside Exhibits Anticancer Effects through Downregulation of NF-κB Pathway and Its Regulated Gene Products Linked to Inflammation and Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Reuter, Simone; Prasad, Sahdeo; Phromnoi, Kanokkarn; Ravindran, Jayaraj; Sung, Bokyung; Yadav, Vivek R.; Kannappan, Ramaswamy; Chaturvedi, Madan M.; Aggarwal, Bharat B.

    2011-01-01

    The discovery of new uses for older, clinically approved drugs is one way to expedite drug development for cancer. Thiocolchicoside, a semisynthetic colchicoside from the plant Gloriosa superba, is a muscle relaxant and used to treat rheumatologic and orthopedic disorders because of its analgesic and anti-inflammatory mechanisms. Given that activation of the transcription factor NF-κB plays a major role in inflammation and tumorigenesis, we postulated that thiocolchicoside would inhibit NF-κB and exhibit anticancer effects through the modulation of NF-κB–regulated proteins. We show that thiocolchicoside inhibited proliferation of leukemia, myeloma, squamous cell carcinoma, breast, colon, and kidney cancer cells. Formation of tumor colonies was also suppressed by thiocolchicoside. The colchicoside induced apoptosis, as indicated by caspase-3 and poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase cleavage, and suppressed the expression of cell survival [e.g., Bcl-2, X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis (XIAP), MCL-1, bcl-xL, cIAP-1, cIAP-2, and cFLIP] proteins. Cell proliferation biomarkers such as c-MYC and phosphorylation of phosphoinositide 3-kinase and glycogen synthase kinase 3β were also blocked by thiocolchicoside. Because most cell survival and proliferation gene products are regulated by NF-κB, we studied the effect of thiocolchicoside on this transcription factor and found that thiocolchicoside inhibited NF-κB activation, degradation of inhibitory κBα (IκBα), IκBα ubiquitination, and phosphorylation, abolished the activation of IκBα kinase, and suppressed p65 nuclear translocation. This effect of thiocolchicoside on the NF-κB pathway led to inhibition of NF-κB reporter activity and cyclooxygenase-2 promoter activity. Our results indicate that thiocolchicoside exhibits anticancer activity through inhibition of NF-κB and NF-κB–regulated gene products, which provides novel insight into a half-century old drug. PMID:20978115

  15. Thiocolchicoside exhibits anticancer effects through downregulation of NF-κB pathway and its regulated gene products linked to inflammation and cancer.

    PubMed

    Reuter, Simone; Prasad, Sahdeo; Phromnoi, Kanokkarn; Ravindran, Jayaraj; Sung, Bokyung; Yadav, Vivek R; Kannappan, Ramaswamy; Chaturvedi, Madan M; Aggarwal, Bharat B

    2010-11-01

    The discovery of new uses for older, clinically approved drugs is one way to expedite drug development for cancer. Thiocolchicoside, a semisynthetic colchicoside from the plant Gloriosa superba, is a muscle relaxant and used to treat rheumatologic and orthopedic disorders because of its analgesic and anti-inflammatory mechanisms. Given that activation of the transcription factor NF-κB plays a major role in inflammation and tumorigenesis, we postulated that thiocolchicoside would inhibit NF-κB and exhibit anticancer effects through the modulation of NF-κB-regulated proteins. We show that thiocolchicoside inhibited proliferation of leukemia, myeloma, squamous cell carcinoma, breast, colon, and kidney cancer cells. Formation of tumor colonies was also suppressed by thiocolchicoside. The colchicoside induced apoptosis, as indicated by caspase-3 and poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase cleavage, and suppressed the expression of cell survival [e.g., Bcl-2, X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis (XIAP), MCL-1, bcl-xL, cIAP-1, cIAP-2, and cFLIP] proteins. Cell proliferation biomarkers such as c-MYC and phosphorylation of phosphoinositide 3-kinase and glycogen synthase kinase 3β were also blocked by thiocolchicoside. Because most cell survival and proliferation gene products are regulated by NF-κB, we studied the effect of thiocolchicoside on this transcription factor and found that thiocolchicoside inhibited NF-κB activation, degradation of inhibitory κBα (IκBα), IκBα ubiquitination, and phosphorylation, abolished the activation of IκBα kinase, and suppressed p65 nuclear translocation. This effect of thiocolchicoside on the NF-κB pathway led to inhibition of NF-κB reporter activity and cyclooxygenase-2 promoter activity. Our results indicate that thiocolchicoside exhibits anticancer activity through inhibition of NF-κB and NF-κB-regulated gene products, which provides novel insight into a half-century old drug.

  16. Short-term thermophilic treatment cannot remove tetracycline resistance genes in pig manures but exhibits controlling effects on their accumulation and spread in soil.

    PubMed

    Kang, Yijun; Li, Qing; Xia, Dan; Shen, Min; Mei, Lijuan; Hu, Jian

    2017-10-15

    In this work, a microcosm experiment was conducted to merely mimic thermophilic phase in aerobic composting with pig manures in order to explore: (i) the effect of thermophilic phase in composting on the abundances of tetracycline resistance genes (TRGs); and (ii) the impacts of the treated manures on the abundances of TRGs in soil. It was found that 4days of thermophilic process reduced the abundance of TRGs in pig manures by ∼1 lg unit compared to the samples without treatments, suggesting that other phases in composting may play significant roles in removal of TRGs. Once pig manures with thermophilic treatment were applied to soil, TRGs abundances decreased to the levels in unfertilized soil. With correlation analyses, it was concluded that pig manure derived tetracycline-resistant bacteria (TRB) and nutrients exerted different effects on TRGs abundances in soil. In conclusion, short-term thermophilic treatment cannot remove tetracycline resistance genes in pig manures but exhibits controlling effects on their accumulation and spread in soil. Nutrients enrichment in soil following manuring of treated pig manures, together with a large proportion of gram-positive TRB left in treated pig manures with less risk to TRGs spread, contributed to the controlling effects. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Mitotane exhibits dual effects on steroidogenic enzymes gene transcription under basal and cAMP-stimulating microenvironments in NCI-H295 cells.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chia-Wen; Chang, Yen-Hwa; Pu, Hsiao-Fung

    2012-08-16

    Adrenocortical carcinoma (ACC) is an extremely rare and aggressive endocrine malignancy with a poor prognosis. The most common symptom of ACC is hypercortisolism (Cushing's syndrome), which has the highest mortality. Mitotane is used as a steroidogenesis inhibitor for Cushing's syndrome or as a chemical adrenalectomy drug for ACC. Mitotane induces adrenal cortex necrosis, mitochondrial membrane impairment, and irreversible binding to CYP proteins. In this study, we explored the molecular effect of mitotane on steroidogenesis in human adrenocortical cancer NCI-H295 cells. Mitotane (10-40μM) inhibited basal and cAMP-induced cortisol secretion but did not cause cell death. Mitotane exhibited an inhibitory effect on the basal expression of StAR and P450scc protein. Furthermore, 40μM of mitotane significantly diminished StAR, CYP11A1 and CYP21 mRNA expression. HSD3B2 and CYP17 seem to be insensitive to mitotane. The stimulatory effects of mitotane on CYP11B1 were more remarkable than its inhibitory effects. In contrast, the activation of cAMP signaling strongly elevated the expression of all these genes. Mitotane (40μM) almost completely neutralized this positive effect and returned 8-Br-cAMP-induced StAR, CYP11A1, CYP17 and CYP21 mRNA to control levels. After cAMP activation, mitotane did not change the levels of CYP11B1 mRNA. The present study demonstrates that mitotane can inhibit cortisol biosynthesis due to a non-specific interference with the gene transcription of steroidogenic enzymes under both basal and 8-Br-cAMP-activated conditions in NCI-H295 cells. We also identified that StAR and CYP11A1 key enzymes that participate in the rate-limiting step of steroidogenesis, were more sensitive to mitotane. In addition, the biphasic effect of mitotane on CYP11B1 was also elucidated.

  18. Mitragyna speciosa Leaf Extract Exhibits Antipsychotic-Like Effect with the Potential to Alleviate Positive and Negative Symptoms of Psychosis in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Vijeepallam, Kamini; Pandy, Vijayapandi; Kunasegaran, Thubasni; Murugan, Dharmani D.; Naidu, Murali

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the antipsychotic-like effect of methanolic extract of Mitragyna speciosa leaf (MMS) using in vivo and ex vivo studies. In vivo studies comprised of apomorphine-induced climbing behavior, haloperidol-induced catalepsy, and ketamine-induced social withdrawal tests in mice whereas the ex vivo study was conducted utilizing isolated rat vas deferens preparation. Acute oral administration of MMS (50–500 mg/kg) showed an inverted bell-shaped dose-response in apomorphine-induced cage climbing behavior in mice. The effective inhibitory doses of MMS (75 and 100 mg/kg, p.o.) obtained from the apomorphine study was further tested on haloperidol (subcataleptic dose; 0.1 mg/kg, i.p.)-induced catalepsy in the mouse bar test. MMS (75 and 100 mg/kg, p.o.) significantly potentiated the haloperidol-induced catalepsy in mice. Interestingly, MMS at the same effective doses (75 and 100 mg/kg, p.o.) significantly facilitated the social interaction in ketamine-induced social withdrawal mice. Furthermore, MMS inhibited the dopamine-induced contractile response dose-dependently in the isolated rat vas deferens preparations. In conclusion, this investigation provides first evidence that MMS exhibits antipsychotic-like activity with potential to alleviate positive as well as negative symptoms of psychosis in mice. This study also suggests the antidopaminergic activity of MMS that could be responsible for alleviating positive symptoms of psychosis. PMID:27999544

  19. Laboratory-grown coccoliths exhibit no vital effect in clumped isotope (Δ47) composition on a range of geologically relevant temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katz, Amandine; Bonifacie, Magali; Hermoso, Michaël; Cartigny, Pierre; Calmels, Damien

    2017-07-01

    The carbonate clumped isotope (or Δ47) thermometer relies on the temperature dependence of the abundance of 13C18O16O22- ion groups within the mineral lattice. This proxy shows tremendous promise to reconstruct past sea surface temperatures (SSTs), but requires calibration of the relationship between Δ47 and calcification temperatures. Specifically, it is important to determine whether biologically-driven fractionation (the so-called ;vital effect;) overprints Δ47 values, as reported in some biominerals such as the foraminifera and the coccoliths for the carbon and oxygen isotope systems. Despite their abundance in the pelagic environment, coccolithophores have not been comprehensively investigated to test the reliability of coccolith Δ47-inferred temperatures. In this study, we cultured three geologically-relevant coccolith species (Emiliania huxleyi, Coccolithus pelagicus, and Calcidiscus leptoporus) at controlled temperatures between 7 and 25 ± 0.2 °C. Other variables such as pCO2, pH, alkalinity, nutrient concentrations and salinity were kept constant at mean present-day oceanic conditions. Although cultured coccoliths exhibit substantial species-specific oxygen and carbon isotope vital effects, we found that their Δ47 composition follows a statistically indistinguishable relationship with 1/T2 for all three species, indicating a lack of interspecific vital effects in coccoliths. Further, the Δ47 composition of coccolith calcite is identical to inorganic calcite precipitated at the same temperature, indicating an overall absence of clumped isotope vital effect in coccolith biominerals. From a paleoceanographic perspective, this study indicates that the Δ47 values of sedimentary coccoliths - even from highly diverse/mixed assemblages - can be analyzed to reconstruct SSTs with confidence, as such temperature estimates are not biased by taxonomic content or changing interspecies vital effects through time.

  20. The quetiapine active metabolite N-desalkylquetiapine and the neurotensin NTS₁ receptor agonist PD149163 exhibit antidepressant-like effects on operant responding in male rats.

    PubMed

    Hillhouse, Todd M; Shankland, Zachary; Matazel, Katelin S; Keiser, Ashley A; Prus, Adam J

    2014-12-01

    Major depressive disorder is the most common mood disorder in the United States and European Union; however, the limitations of clinically available antidepressant drugs have led researchers to pursue novel pharmacological treatments. Clinical studies have reported that monotherapy with the atypical antipsychotic drug quetiapine produces a rapid reduction in depressive symptoms that is apparent after 1 week of treatment, and it is possible that the active metabolite N-desalkylquetiapine, which structurally resembles an antidepressant drug, produces antidepressant effects. Neuropharmacological evaluations of the neurotensin NTS1 receptor agonist PD149163 suggest antidepressant efficacy, but the effects of a NTS₁ receptor agonist in an antidepressant animal model have yet to be reported. The present study examined the antidepressant-like effects of N-desalkylquetiapine, PD14916, quetiapine, the tricyclic antidepressant drug imipramine, the atypical antipsychotic drug risperidone, and the typical antipsychotic drug raclopride on responding in male Sprague-Dawley rats trained on a differential-reinforcement-of-low-rate 72-s operant schedule, a procedure used for screening antidepressant drugs. Quetiapine, PD149163, risperidone, and imipramine exhibited antidepressant-like effects by increasing the number of reinforcers earned, decreasing the number of responses emitted, and shifting the interresponse time (IRT) distributions to the right. N-Desalkylquetiapine produced a partial antidepressant-like effect by decreasing the number of responses emitted and producing a rightward shift in the IRT distributions, but it did not significantly alter the number of reinforcers earned. Raclopride decreased reinforcers and responses. These data suggest that N-desalkylquetiapine likely contributes to quetiapine's antidepressant efficacy and identify NTS₁ receptor activation as a potential novel pharmacologic strategy for antidepressant drugs.

  1. Combination of vorinostat and adenovirus-TRAIL exhibits a synergistic antitumor effect by increasing transduction and transcription of TRAIL in lung cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, D R; Park, M-Y; Lee, C-S; Shim, S-H; Yoon, H-I; Lee, J H; Sung, M-W; Kim, Y-S; Lee, C-T

    2011-07-01

    Soluble TRAIL and adenovirus (ad)-TRAIL exhibit a strong antitumor effect by inducing apoptosis. Vorinostat is the histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor that induces cell death in cancer cell lines and regulates the expression of epigenetically silenced genes, such as Coxackie adenoviral receptor (CAR), the receptor for adenoviral entry. We propose a new strategy in which vorinostat will induce high expression of ad-TRAIL and a strong antitumor response, and investigated the mechanism involved. The effect of vorinostat on transcription and expression of TRAIL from ad-TRAIL-transduced lung cancer cells were confirmed by reverse transciption-PCR (RT-PCR), quantitative real time-PCR and western blot assay. Anti-tumor effects were measured after cotreatment of vorinostat and ad-TRAIL, and the drug interactions were analyzed. After combined treatment of vorinostat and ad-TRAIL, apoptosis and western blot assays for Akt, Bcl-2 and caspase were performed. Vorinostat increased the expression of CAR in lung cancer cell lines and increased the expression of luciferase (luc) from ad-luc-transduced cells and TRAIL from ad-TRAIL-transduced cells. RT-PCR and quantitative real time-PCR, after sequential vorinostat treatment, revealed that vorinostat may enhance TRAIL expression from ad-TRAIL by increasing transduction through enhanced CAR expression and increasing adenoviral transgene transcription. Combined vorinostat and ad-TRAIL treatment showed the synergistic anti-tumor effect in lung cancer cell lines. Combined vorinostat and ad-TRAIL induced stronger apoptosis induction, suppression of NF-κB activation and breakdown of the anti-apoptotic molecule Bcl-2. In conclusion, the vorinostat synergistically enhanced the anti-tumor effect of ad-TRAIL by (1) increasing adenoviral transduction through the increased expression of CAR and (2) increasing adenoviral transgene (TRAIL) transcription in lung cancer cell lines.

  2. Recombinant human IgG antibodies recognizing distinct extracellular domains of EGF receptor exhibit different degrees of growth inhibitory effects on human A431 cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Chang, Chialun; Takayanagi, Atsushi; Yoshida, Tetsuhiko; Shimizu, Nobuyoshi

    2013-05-01

    Recently, we isolated 4 distinct kinds of single chain antibody against human EGF receptor (EGFR) after screening the Keio phage display scFv library by using two methods of target-guided proximity labeling. In the current study, these monovalent scFv antibodies were converted to bivalent IgGs of humanized forms (hIgGs) by recombinant technology using the specially designed expression vectors followed by protein production in CHO cells. The resulting recombinant hIgGs were examined for their binding specificity using several different transformed human BJ cell lines that express deletion mutants of EGFR, each lacking one of 4 distinct extracellular domains (L1, L2, C1 and C2). Immuno-fluorescent microscopy and immuno-precipitation assay on these cells indicated that 4 distinct kinds of hIgGs bind to one of 3 different domains (L1, C1 and C2). Then, these hIgGs were further examined for biological effects on human A431 cancer cells, which overexpress EGFR. The results indicated that hIgG38 binding to L1 and hIgG45 binding to C2 substantially suppressed the EGF-induced phosphorylation of EGFR, resulting in the growth inhibition of A431 cancer cells. On the contrary, hIgG40 binding to C1 and hIgG42 binding to another site (epitope) of C2 exhibited no such inhibitory effects. Thus, the newly produced four recombinant hIgG antibodies recognize 4 different sites (epitopes) in 3 different extracellular domains of EGFR and exhibit different biological effects on cancer cells. These characteristics are somewhat different from the currently utilized therapeutic anti-EGFR antibodies. Hence, these hIgG antibodies will be invaluable as a research tool for the detailed molecular analysis of the EGFR-mediated signal transduction mechanism and more importantly a possible application as new therapeutic agents to treat certain types of cancers.

  3. Simvastatin, an HMG-CoA reductase inhibitor, exhibits anti-metastatic and anti-tumorigenic effects in endometrial cancer1

    PubMed Central

    Schointuch, Monica N.; Gilliam, Timothy P.; Stine, Jessica E.; Han, Xiaoyun; Zhou, Chunxiao; Gehrig, Paola A.; Kim, Kenneth; Bae-Jump, Victoria L.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Our goal was to evaluate the effects of simvastatin on endometrial cancer cell lines and primary cultures of endometrial cancer cells. METHODS Cell proliferation in the ECC-1 and Ishikawa endometrial cancer cell lines and primary cultures of endometrial cancer cells was assessed by MTT assay. Apoptosis and cell cycle were detected by Annexin V assay and propidium iodide staining, respectively. Reactive oxygen species and cell adhesion were assessed using ELISA assays. Invasion was analyzed using a transwell invasion assay. Mitochondrial DNA damage was confirmed using qPCR. The effects of simvastatin on the AKT/mTOR and MAPK pathways were determined by Western blotting. RESULTS Simvastatin inhibited cell proliferation in a dose-dependent manner in both endometrial cancer cell lines and 5/8 primary cultures of endometrial cancer cells. Simvastatin treatment resulted in G1 cell cycle arrest, a reduction in the enzymatic activity of HMG-CoA, induction of apoptosis as well as DNA damage and cellular stress. Treatment with simvastatin resulted in inhibition of the MAPK pathway and exhibited differential effects on the AKT/mTOR pathway in the ECC-1 and Ishikawa cells. Minimal change in AKT phosphorylation was seen in both cell lines. An increase in phosphorylated S6 was seen in ECC-1 and a decrease was seen in Ishikawa. Treatment with simvastatin reduced cell adhesion and invasion (p<0.01) in both cell lines. CONCLUSION Simvastatin had significant anti-proliferative and anti-metastatic effects in endometrial cancer cells, possibly through modulation of the MAPK and AKT/mTOR pathways, suggesting that statins may be a promising treatment strategy for endometrial cancer. PMID:24880141

  4. It's the Way You Tell It! What Conversations of Elementary School Groups Tell Us about the Effectiveness of Animatronic Animal Exhibits.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tunnicliffe, Sue Dale

    1999-01-01

    Compares the content of conversations generated by elementary school groups at animatronic animal displays in a temporary zoo exhibit and in a permanent natural-history museum exhibit. Finds that moving animal models in themselves are insufficient to induce many visitors to talk about them in other than a superficial, cursory manner. Contains 17…

  5. It's the Way You Tell It! What Conversations of Elementary School Groups Tell Us about the Effectiveness of Animatronic Animal Exhibits.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tunnicliffe, Sue Dale

    1999-01-01

    Compares the content of conversations generated by elementary school groups at animatronic animal displays in a temporary zoo exhibit and in a permanent natural-history museum exhibit. Finds that moving animal models in themselves are insufficient to induce many visitors to talk about them in other than a superficial, cursory manner. Contains 17…

  6. Macrolide Antibiotics Exhibit Cytotoxic Effect under Amino Acid-Depleted Culture Condition by Blocking Autophagy Flux in Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Hirasawa, Kazuhiro; Moriya, Shota; Miyahara, Kana; Kazama, Hiromi; Hirota, Ayako; Takemura, Jun; Abe, Akihisa; Inazu, Masato; Hiramoto, Masaki; Tsukahara, Kiyoaki

    2016-01-01

    Autophagy, a self-digestive system for cytoplasmic components, is required to maintain the amino acid pool for cellular homeostasis. We previously reported that the macrolide antibiotics azithromycin (AZM) and clarithromycin (CAM) have an inhibitory effect on autophagy flux, and they potently enhance the cytocidal effect of various anticancer reagents in vitro. This suggests that macrolide antibiotics can be used as an adjuvant for cancer chemotherapy. Since cancer cells require a larger metabolic demand than normal cells because of their exuberant growth, upregulated autophagy in tumor cells has now become the target for cancer therapy. In the present study, we examined whether macrolides exhibit cytotoxic effect under an amino acid-starving condition in head and neck squamous cancer cell lines such as CAL 27 and Detroit 562 as models of solid tumors with an upregulated autophagy in the central region owing to hypovascularity. AZM and CAM induced cell death under the amino acid-depleted (AAD) culture condition in these cell lines along with CHOP upregulation, although they showed no cytotoxicity under the complete culture medium. CHOP knockdown by siRNA in the CAL 27 cells significantly suppressed macrolide-induced cell death under the AAD culture condition. CHOP-/- murine embryonic fibroblast (MEF) cell lines also attenuated AZM-induced cell death compared with CHOP+/+ MEF cell lines. Using a tet-off atg5 MEF cell line, knockout of atg5, an essential gene for autophagy, also induced cell death and CHOP in the AAD culture medium but not in the complete culture medium. This suggest that macrolide-induced cell death via CHOP induction is dependent on autophagy inhibition. The cytotoxicity of macrolide with CHOP induction was completely cancelled by the addition of amino acids in the culture medium, indicating that the cytotoxicity is due to the insufficient amino acid pool. These data suggest the possibility of using macrolides for “tumor-starving therapy”. PMID

  7. ETAR antagonist ZD4054 exhibits additive effects with aromatase inhibitors and fulvestrant in breast cancer therapy, and improves in vivo efficacy of anastrozole.

    PubMed

    Smollich, Martin; Götte, Martin; Fischgräbe, Jeanett; Macedo, Luciana F; Brodie, Angela; Chen, Shiuan; Radke, Isabel; Kiesel, Ludwig; Wülfing, Pia

    2010-09-01

    Endothelin-1 (ET-1) and endothelin A receptor (ETAR) contribute to the development and progression of breast carcinomas by modulating cell proliferation, angiogenesis, and anti-apoptosis. We investigated antitumoral effects of the specific ETAR antagonist ZD4054 in breast cancer cells and xenografts, and assessed antitumoral efficacy of the combinations of ZD4054 with aromatase inhibitors and fulvestrant. Gene expression changes were assessed by quantitative real-time PCR. Cell proliferation was measured using alamarBlue; migration and invasion assays were performed using modified Boyden chambers. Evaluating the antitumoral efficacy of ZD4054 in vivo, different breast cancer models were employed using nude mice xenografts. ZD4054 reduced ET-1 and ETAR expression in MCF-7, MDA-MB-231, and MDA-MB-468 breast cancer cells in a concentration-dependent manner. ZD4054 inhibited invasion by up to 37.1% (P = 0.022). Combinations of ZD4054 with either anastrozole or letrozole produced significant reductions in migration of aromatase-overexpressing MCF-7aro cells (P < 0.05). Combination of ZD4054 with fulvestrant reduced MCF-7 cell migration and invasion by 36.0% (P = 0.027) and 56.7% (P < 0.001), respectively, with effects significantly exceeding those seen with either compound alone. Regarding tumor volume reduction in vivo, ZD4054 (10 mg/kg) was equipotent to fulvestrant (200 mg/kg) and exhibited additive effects with anastrozole (0.5 mg/kg). These data are the first indicating that selective ETAR antagonism by ZD4054 displays antitumoral activity on breast cancer cells in vitro and in vivo. Our data strongly support a rationale for the clinical use of ZD4054 in combination with endocrine therapies.

  8. Sleeve gastrectomy and Roux-en-Y gastric bypass exhibit differential effects on food preferences, nutrient absorption and energy expenditure in obese rats.

    PubMed

    Saeidi, N; Nestoridi, E; Kucharczyk, J; Uygun, M K; Yarmush, M L; Stylopoulos, N

    2012-11-01

    All available treatments directed towards obesity and obesity-related complications are associated with suboptimal effectiveness/invasiveness ratios. Pharmacological, behavioral and lifestyle modification treatments are the least invasive, but also the least effective options, leading to modest weight loss that is difficult to maintain long-term. Gastrointestinal weight loss surgery (GIWLS) is the most effective, leading to >60-70% of excess body weight loss, but also the most invasive treatment available. Sleeve gastrectomy (SGx) and Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) are the two most commonly performed GIWLS procedures. The fundamental anatomic difference between SGx and RYGB is that in the former procedure, only the anatomy of the stomach is altered, without surgical reconfiguration of the intestine. Therefore, comparing these two operations provides a unique opportunity to study the ways that different parts of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract contribute to the regulation of physiological processes, such as the regulation of body weight, food intake and metabolism. To explore the physiologic mechanisms of the two procedures, we used rodent models of SGx and RYGB to study the effects of these procedures on body weight, food intake and metabolic function. Both SGx and RYGB induced a significant weight loss that was sustained over the entire study period. SGx-induced weight loss was slightly lower compared with that observed after RYGB. SGx-induced weight loss primarily resulted from a substantial decrease in food intake and a small increase in locomotor activity. In contrast, rats that underwent RYGB exhibited a substantial increase in non-activity-related (resting) energy expenditure and a modest decrease in nutrient absorption. Additionally, while SGx-treated animals retained their preoperative food preferences, RYGB-treated rats experienced a significant alteration in their food preferences. These results indicate a fundamental difference in the mechanisms of

  9. Sleeve gastrectomy and Roux-en-Y gastric bypass exhibit differential effects on food preferences, nutrient absorption and energy expenditure in obese rats

    PubMed Central

    Saeidi, N; Nestoridi, E; Kucharczyk, J; Uygun, MK; Yarmush, ML; Stylopoulos, N

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE All available treatments directed towards obesity and obesity-related complications are associated with suboptimal effectiveness/invasiveness ratios. Pharmacological, behavioral and lifestyle modification treatments are the least invasive, but also the least effective options, leading to modest weight loss that is difficult to maintain long-term. Gastrointestinal weight loss surgery (GIWLS) is the most effective, leading to >60–70% of excess body weight loss, but also the most invasive treatment available. Sleeve gastrectomy (SGx) and Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) are the two most commonly performed GIWLS procedures. The fundamental anatomic difference between SGx and RYGB is that in the former procedure, only the anatomy of the stomach is altered, without surgical reconfiguration of the intestine. Therefore, comparing these two operations provides a unique opportunity to study the ways that different parts of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract contribute to the regulation of physiological processes, such as the regulation of body weight, food intake and metabolism. DESIGN To explore the physiologic mechanisms of the two procedures, we used rodent models of SGx and RYGB to study the effects of these procedures on body weight, food intake and metabolic function. RESULTS Both SGx and RYGB induced a significant weight loss that was sustained over the entire study period. SGx-induced weight loss was slightly lower compared with that observed after RYGB. SGx-induced weight loss primarily resulted from a substantial decrease in food intake and a small increase in locomotor activity. In contrast, rats that underwent RYGB exhibited a substantial increase in non-activity-related (resting) energy expenditure and a modest decrease in nutrient absorption. Additionally, while SGx-treated animals retained their preoperative food preferences, RYGB-treated rats experienced a significant alteration in their food preferences. CONCLUSIONS These results indicate a

  10. Antitumor activity of 7RH, a discoidin domain receptor 1 inhibitor, alone or in combination with dasatinib exhibits antitumor effects in nasopharyngeal carcinoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Qiu-Ping; Chen, Wen-Dan; Peng, Jie-Ren; Xu, Yao-Dong; Cai, Qian; Feng, Gong-Kan; Ding, Ke; Zhu, Xiao-Feng; Guan, Zhong

    2016-01-01

    Dysregulation of the discoidin domain receptors (DDRs) has been implicated in the development of numerous types of tumors, including head and neck cancer, and nasopharyngeal, breast, ovarian and esophageal carcinomas. Furthermore, agents that inhibit DDR1 activity are hypothesized to be useful for the treatment of nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of the DDR1 inhibitory (3-(2-(pyrazolo(1,5-a)pyrimidin-6-yl)-ethynyl)benzamide compound, 7RH, in NPC cells both in vitro and in vivo, and its effect when used in combination with dasatinib, a SRC family kinase (SFK) inhibitor. The effects of 7RH alone or in combination with dasatinib on cell viability were assessed using MTT assays and apoptosis was detected by flow cytometry. In addition, western blotting was performed to analyze the relative protein expression levels of cell cycle-associated genes in human NPC cell lines (CNE1, CNE2, HONE1 and SUNE1). Cell migration was also assessed using cell adhesion assays. Furthermore, tumor xenografts of CNE2 NPC cells were established in nude mice and the growth inhibitory effects of 7RH treatment alone or in combination with dasatinib were evaluated. Finally, knockdown of DDR1 protein expression was achieved by transfection of CNE2 cells with DDR1-specific small interfering RNA. Treatment with 7RH effectively suppressed the proliferation and induced the apoptosis of NPC cells. In addition, the Janus kinase 1 (JAK1)/signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT3) signaling pathway was downregulated by 7RH, whereas the activities of the Ras/Raf/mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase (MEK)/extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)/AKT signaling pathways were upregulated in response to 7RH treatment. Furthermore, the expression levels of phosphorylated SRC were increased in NPC cells treated with 7RH; thus indicating that SRC exhibits a vital function in the resistance of NPC cells

  11. Antitumor activity of 7RH, a discoidin domain receptor 1 inhibitor, alone or in combination with dasatinib exhibits antitumor effects in nasopharyngeal carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Lu, Qiu-Ping; Chen, Wen-Dan; Peng, Jie-Ren; Xu, Yao-Dong; Cai, Qian; Feng, Gong-Kan; Ding, Ke; Zhu, Xiao-Feng; Guan, Zhong

    2016-11-01

    Dysregulation of the discoidin domain receptors (DDRs) has been implicated in the development of numerous types of tumors, including head and neck cancer, and nasopharyngeal, breast, ovarian and esophageal carcinomas. Furthermore, agents that inhibit DDR1 activity are hypothesized to be useful for the treatment of nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of the DDR1 inhibitory (3-(2-(pyrazolo(1,5-a)pyrimidin-6-yl)-ethynyl)benzamide compound, 7RH, in NPC cells both in vitro and in vivo, and its effect when used in combination with dasatinib, a SRC family kinase (SFK) inhibitor. The effects of 7RH alone or in combination with dasatinib on cell viability were assessed using MTT assays and apoptosis was detected by flow cytometry. In addition, western blotting was performed to analyze the relative protein expression levels of cell cycle-associated genes in human NPC cell lines (CNE1, CNE2, HONE1 and SUNE1). Cell migration was also assessed using cell adhesion assays. Furthermore, tumor xenografts of CNE2 NPC cells were established in nude mice and the growth inhibitory effects of 7RH treatment alone or in combination with dasatinib were evaluated. Finally, knockdown of DDR1 protein expression was achieved by transfection of CNE2 cells with DDR1-specific small interfering RNA. Treatment with 7RH effectively suppressed the proliferation and induced the apoptosis of NPC cells. In addition, the Janus kinase 1 (JAK1)/signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT3) signaling pathway was downregulated by 7RH, whereas the activities of the Ras/Raf/mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase (MEK)/extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)/AKT signaling pathways were upregulated in response to 7RH treatment. Furthermore, the expression levels of phosphorylated SRC were increased in NPC cells treated with 7RH; thus indicating that SRC exhibits a vital function in the resistance of NPC cells

  12. Morphine and oxycodone, but not fentanyl, exhibit antinociceptive effects mediated by G-protein inwardly rectifying potassium (GIRK) channels in an oxaliplatin-induced neuropathy rat model.

    PubMed

    Kanbara, Tomoe; Nakamura, Atsushi; Shibasaki, Masahiro; Mori, Tomohisa; Suzuki, Tsutomu; Sakaguchi, Gaku; Kanemasa, Toshiyuki

    2014-09-19

    It has begun to be understood that μ-opioid receptor (MOR) produces ligand-biased agonism, which contributes to differential physiological functions of MOR agonists. We previously demonstrated that in oxaliplatin-induced neuropathy in rats, morphine and oxycodone exhibited antinociceptive effects while antinociception of fentanyl was partial, and such different efficacies might result from the different level of Gi/o protein activation. Based on our background, to reveal further mechanism, we focused on the role of Gi/o protein-related downstream signaling, the G-protein inwardly rectifying K(+)1 (GIRK1) channel. The GIRK1 channel blocker tertiapin-Q (30pmol) was intracerebroventricularly (i.c.v.) or intrathecally (i.t.) administered to rats with oxaliplatin-induced neuropathy. The antinociception of systemic morphine (3mg/kg, subcutaneously (s.c.)) was suppressed only by pretreatment of i.t. tertiapin-Q, while supraspinal tertiapin-Q suppressed only the antinociception of systemic oxycodone (0.56mg/kg, s.c.). Partial antinocicpetion of fentanyl (0.017mg/kg, s.c.) was neither affected by i.c.v nor i.t. tertiapin-Q. These results demonstrated that GIRK1 channels differentially contribute to antinociceptive effects of MOR agonists, and that action site of GIRK1 channels is also different between morphine and oxycodone in oxaliplatin model. This study suggests the possibility that GIRK1 channels have a crucial role for antinociception of MOR agonists in oxaliplatin-induced neuropathy.

  13. Adults with dyslexia exhibit large effects of crowding, increased dependence on cues, and detrimental effects of distractors in visual search tasks.

    PubMed

    Moores, Elisabeth; Cassim, Rizan; Talcott, Joel B

    2011-12-01

    Difficulties in visual attention are increasingly being linked to dyslexia. To date, the majority of studies have inferred functionality of attention from response times to stimuli presented for an indefinite duration. However, in paradigms that use reaction times to investigate the ability to orient attention, a delayed reaction time could also indicate difficulties in signal enhancement or noise exclusion once oriented. Thus, in order to investigate attention modulation and visual crowding effects in dyslexia, this study measured stimulus discrimination accuracy to rapidly presented displays. Adults with dyslexia (AwD) and controls discriminated the orientation of a target in an array of different numbers of - and differently spaced - vertically orientated distractors. Results showed that AwD: were disproportionately impacted by (i) close spacing and (ii) increased numbers of stimuli, (iii) did use pre-cues to modulate attention, but (iv) used cues less successfully to counter effects of increasing numbers of distractors. A greater dependence on pre-cues, larger effects of crowding and the impact of increased numbers of distractors all correlated significantly with measures of literacy. These findings extend previous studies of visual crowding of letters in dyslexia to non-complex stimuli. Overall, AwD do not use cues less, but they do use cues less successfully. We conclude that visual attention is an important factor to consider in the aetiology of dyslexia. The results challenge existing theoretical accounts of visual attention deficits, which alone are unable to comprehensively explain the pattern of findings demonstrated here.

  14. Combined treatment with fenretinide and indomethacin induces AIF-mediated, non-classical cell death in human acute T-cell leukemia Jurkat cells

    SciTech Connect

    Hojka-Osinska, Anna; Ziolo, Ewa; Rapak, Andrzej

    2012-03-16

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The combination of fenretinide and indomethacin induces a high level of cell death. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Apoptotic pathway is caspase-independent. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Jurkat cells undergo AIF-mediated cell death. -- Abstract: Currently used cytotoxic drugs in cancer therapy have a similar mechanism of action and low specificity. Applied simultaneously, they show an additive effect with strong side effects. Clinical trials with the use of different agents in cancer therapy show that the use of these compounds alone is not very effective in fighting cancer. An alternative solution could be to apply a combination of these agents, because their combination has a synergistic effect on some cancer cells. Therefore, in our investigations we examined the effects of a synthetic retinoid-fenretinide when combined with a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug-indomethacin on the process of apoptosis in the acute human T-cell leukemia cell line Jurkat. We demonstrate that treatment with the combination of the tested compounds induces the death of cells, that is peculiar and combines features of apoptosis as well as non-apoptotic cell death. In detail we observed, cell membrane permeabilization, phosphatydylserine exposure, no oligonucleosomal DNA fragmentation, no caspase-3 activation, but apoptosis inducing factor (AIF) nuclear translocation. Taken together these results indicate, that Jurkat cells after treatment with a combination of fenretinide and indomethacin undergo AIF-mediated programmed cell death.

  15. Combined treatment with fenretinide and indomethacin induces AIF-mediated, non-classical cell death in human acute T-cell leukemia Jurkat cells.

    PubMed

    Hojka-Osinska, Anna; Ziolo, Ewa; Rapak, Andrzej

    2012-03-16

    Currently used cytotoxic drugs in cancer therapy have a similar mechanism of action and low specificity. Applied simultaneously, they show an additive effect with strong side effects. Clinical trials with the use of different agents in cancer therapy show that the use of these compounds alone is not very effective in fighting cancer. An alternative solution could be to apply a combination of these agents, because their combination has a synergistic effect on some cancer cells. Therefore, in our investigations we examined the effects of a synthetic retinoid-fenretinide when combined with a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug-indomethacin on the process of apoptosis in the acute human T-cell leukemia cell line Jurkat. We demonstrate that treatment with the combination of the tested compounds induces the death of cells, that is peculiar and combines features of apoptosis as well as non-apoptotic cell death. In detail we observed, cell membrane permeabilization, phosphatydylserine exposure, no oligonucleosomal DNA fragmentation, no caspase-3 activation, but apoptosis inducing factor (AIF) nuclear translocation. Taken together these results indicate, that Jurkat cells after treatment with a combination of fenretinide and indomethacin undergo AIF-mediated programmed cell death. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Preclinical characterization of toluene as a non-classical hallucinogen drug in rats: participation of 5-HT, dopamine and glutamate systems.

    PubMed

    Rivera-García, María Teresa; López-Rubalcava, Carolina; Cruz, Silvia L

    2015-10-01

    Toluene is a misused inhalant with hallucinogenic properties and complex effects. Toluene blocks N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors, releases dopamine (DA), and modifies several neurotransmitter levels; nonetheless, the mechanism by which it produces hallucinations is not well characterized. This study aims (a) to study toluene's effects on the 5-HT2A-mediated head-twitch response (HTR), dopamine (DA), and serotonin (5-HT) tissue levels in discrete brain regions; (b) to compare the actions of toluene, ketamine, and 1-[2,5-dimethoxy-4-iodophenyl]-2-aminopropane (DOI) on HTR; and (c) to study the pharmacological blockade of toluene's and ketamine's effects by selective drugs. Independent groups of rats inhaled toluene (500-12,000 ppm) for 30 min during which the occurrence of serotonergic signs was analyzed. Brains were obtained after exposure to determine DA and 5-HT levels by HPLC. Toluene concentration-dependently induced HTR. Other serotonin syndrome signs were evident at high concentrations. Toluene (4000 and 8000 ppm), and ketamine (3 and 10 mg/kg), significantly increased 5-HT levels in the frontal cortex (FC) striatum, hippocampus, and brain stem, as well as DA levels in the striatum and FC. Pretreatment with ketanserin (5HT2A/2C receptor antagonist), M100907 (selective 5-HT2A receptor antagonist), D-serine (co-agonist of the NMDA receptor glycine site), and haloperidol (D2 receptor antagonist) significantly decreased toluene's and ketamine's actions. The 5HT1A receptor antagonist WAY100635 had no effect. Toluene stimulates 5HT2A and 5HT2C receptors, and increases 5-HT and DA levels. These actions are similar to those produced by ketamine and involve activation of a complex neurotransmitter network that includes NMDA receptor antagonism.

  17. Elastic-like deformation and elastocaloric effect of a partly ordered iron-platinum alloy exhibiting a weak first-order martensitic transformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukuda, Takashi; Kakeshita, Tomoyuki

    2017-10-01

    We have studied the temperature dependencies of elastic-like deformation and the elastocaloric effect in an L12-type Fe3Pt alloy with degree of order S  =  0.75, which exhibits a weak first-order martensitic transformation (MT) near 85 K (T M). The stress–strain curve under a compressive stress applied in the [0 0 1] direction shows a small stage in the vicinity of T M due to the stress-induced MT. The transformation strain is 0.17% at T M; it decreases linearly as temperature decreases and disappears at 130 K. Thereseems to be a critical point of the MT in the stress–temperature phase diagram at (20 MPa, 130 K). The latent heat of the MT is estimated to be 0.52 J mol‑1 from the Clausius–Clapeyron equation. The adiabatic temperature change ΔT adi caused by the latent heat is 0.04 K at 90 K. In contrast, experimentally obtained ΔT is approximately 1 K at 90 K when the applied stress is 100 MPa. The main contribution to ΔT is the temperature dependence of elastic strain caused by softening; the Young’s modulus at 288 K is 55 GPa and it decreases linearly with a slope of 0.28 GPa K‑1 as temperature decreases.

  18. A prototypic modified risk tobacco product exhibits reduced effects on chemotaxis and transendothelial migration of monocytes compared with a reference cigarette.

    PubMed

    van der Toorn, Marco; Frentzel, Stefan; Goedertier, Didier; Peitsch, Manuel; Hoeng, Julia; De Leon, Hector

    2015-06-01

    Monocyte adhesion and migration to the subendothelial space represent critical steps in atherogenesis. Here, we investigated whether extracts from the aerosol of a prototypic modified risk tobacco product (pMRTP), based on heating rather than combusting tobacco, exhibited differential effects on the migratory behavior of monocytes compared with that from the reference cigarette, 3R4F. THP-1 cells, a monocytic cell line, and human coronary arterial endothelial cells (HCAECs) were used to investigate chemotaxis and transendothelial migration (TEM) of monocytes in conventional and impedance-based systems. THP-1 cells migrated through a monolayer of HCAECs in response to C-X-C motif ligand 12 (CXCL12), a chemokine involved in diverse cellular functions including chemotaxis and survival of stem cells. Treatment of THP-1 cells with extracts from 3R4F or pMRTP induced concentration-dependent increases in cytotoxicity (7-aminoactinomycin D), and inflammation (IL-8 and TNF-α). CXCL12-mediated chemotaxis and TEM were decreased in extract-treated THP-1 cells. Extracts from 3R4F were ~21 times more potent than those from pMRTP in all examined endpoints. Extracts from 3R4F and pMRTP induced concentration-dependent responses in assays of inflammation, cytotoxicity, chemotaxis, and TEM. Furthermore, our findings indicate that extracts from a pMRTP are significantly less cytotoxic and induce less inflammation than those from the reference cigarette, 3R4F. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  19. Intravaginally applied metronidazole is as effective as orally applied in the treatment of bacterial vaginosis, but exhibits significantly less side effects.

    PubMed

    Brandt, M; Abels, C; May, T; Lohmann, K; Schmidts-Winkler, I; Hoyme, U B

    2008-12-01

    Metronidazole is the drug of choice for the treatment of bacterial vaginosis (BV). However, so far the oral administration has not been clinically compared to the intravaginal application regarding efficacy, side effects and patient satisfaction in a scientific sound fashion. Therefore, this randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial was designed to demonstrate non-inferiority of short-term intravaginal (i.vag.) application of metronidazole (2x 1000 mg pessaries 24h apart) vs. a single oral dose (p.o.) of metronidazole (1 x 2000 mg tablets) in 263 patients with BV (double-dummy design). The follow-up period was 12 weeks. In addition, the number and the type of adverse events induced by the two regimens were compared, assuming better tolerability of the intravaginal application. Following the diagnosis of BV a total of 129 women (mean age 36.2 years) was orally treated with a single dose of 2g metronidazole whereas a total of 134 patients (mean age 35.5 years) was treated intravaginally with 1g metronidazole each day on two consecutive days and included in the per-protocol analysis. Non-inferiority of i.vag. application compared to p.o. administration was statistically significant regarding efficacy: Following intravaginal application the cure rate, assessed on day 8 after starting of the treatment, was 92.5% as compared to 89.9% after oral administration. Nausea was the most common adverse event reported in 10.2% i.vag. vs. 30.4% p.o. of all cases (p<0.001), abdominal pain in 16.8% i.vag. vs. 31.9% p.o. (p<0.01), a "metallic taste" in 8.8% i.vag. vs. 17.9% p.o. (p<0.05). Women treated i.vag. were highly satisfied with the treatment and more content as compared to the women treated p.o. with metronidazole (p<0.05, intent-to-treat analysis). In this clinical trial the intravaginal application was as effective as the oral administration of metronidazole in treating BV. However, significantly less adverse events were reported after short

  20. Existence of weak solutions for a non-classical sharp interface model for a two-phase flow of viscous, incompressible fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abels, Helmut; Röger, Matthias

    2009-11-01

    We introduce a new sharp interface model for the flow of two immiscible, viscous, incompressible fluids. In contrast to classical models for two-phase flows we prescribe an evolution law for the interfaces that takes diffusional effects into account. This leads to a coupled system of Navier-Stokes and Mullins-Sekerka type parts that coincides with the asymptotic limit of a diffuse interface model. We prove the long-time existence of weak solutions, which is an open problem for the classical two-phase model. We show that the phase interfaces have in almost all points a generalized mean curvature.

  1. Silver Nanoparticles Exhibit the Dose-Dependent Anti-Proliferative Effect against Human Squamous Carcinoma Cells Attenuated in the Presence of Berberine.

    PubMed

    Dziedzic, Arkadiusz; Kubina, Robert; Bułdak, Rafał J; Skonieczna, Magda; Cholewa, Krzysztof

    2016-03-17

    The biological activity of nanosize silver particles towards oral epithelium-derived carcinoma seems to be still underinvestigated. We evaluated the influence of low doses of nanosize scale silver particles on the proliferation and viability of malignant oral epithelial keratinocytes in vitro, alone and in conjunction with the plant alkaloid berberine. Cells of human tongue squamous carcinoma SCC-25 (ATCC CRL-1628), cultivated with the mixture of Dulbecco's modified Eagle's medium, were exposed to silver nanoparticles alone (AgNPs, concentrations from 0.31 to 10 μg/mL) and to a combination of AgNPs with berberine chloride (BER, 1/2 IC50 concentration) during 24 h and 48 h. The cytotoxic activity of AgNPs with diameters of 10 nm ± 4 nm was measured by 3-(4,5-dimethyl-2-thiazyl)-2,5-diphenyl-2H-tetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay. Cell cycle analysis was performed by treating cells with propidium iodide followed by flow-activated cell sorting. RT-QPCR reaction was used to assess expression of anti-apoptotic proteins Bcl-2 and pro-apoptotic protein Bcl-2-associated X protein Bax genes expression. Monodisperse silver nanoparticles at a concentration of 10 μg/mL arrested SCC-25 cells cycle after 48 h at the G0/G1 phase in a dose- and time-dependent manner through disruption G0/G1 checkpoint, with increase of Bax/Bcl-2 ratio gene expression. AgNPs exhibit cytotoxic effects on SCC-25 malignant oral epithelial keratinocytes, which is diminished when combined with BER. The AgNPs concentration required to inhibit the growth of carcinoma cells by 50% (IC50) after 48 h was estimated at 5.19 μg/mL. AgNPs combined with BER increased the expression of Bcl-2 while decreasing the ratio of Bax/Bcl-2 in SCC-25 cells. Silver particles at low doses therefore reduce the proliferation and viability of oral squamous cell carcinoma cells. SCC-25 cells are susceptible to damage from AgNPs-induced stress, which can be regulated by the natural alkaloid berberine, suggesting that nanoparticles

  2. An Empirical Analysis of the Effects of a Possible Sinus Infection and Weighted Vest on Functional Analysis Outcomes of Self-Injury Exhibited by a Child with Autism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carter, Stacy L.

    2005-01-01

    Analogue functional analysis methodology was used to assess potential maintaining contingencies of episodic self-injurious behavior (SIB) of a 4-year-old child diagnosed with autism. Analogue conditions were presented within a multielement design when the child did, and did not exhibit signs of a possible sinus infection, and when the participant,…

  3. Crows spontaneously exhibit analogical reasoning.

    PubMed

    Smirnova, Anna; Zorina, Zoya; Obozova, Tanya; Wasserman, Edward

    2015-01-19

    Analogical reasoning is vital to advanced cognition and behavioral adaptation. Many theorists deem analogical thinking to be uniquely human and to be foundational to categorization, creative problem solving, and scientific discovery. Comparative psychologists have long been interested in the species generality of analogical reasoning, but they initially found it difficult to obtain empirical support for such thinking in nonhuman animals (for pioneering efforts, see [2, 3]). Researchers have since mustered considerable evidence and argument that relational matching-to-sample (RMTS) effectively captures the essence of analogy, in which the relevant logical arguments are presented visually. In RMTS, choice of test pair BB would be correct if the sample pair were AA, whereas choice of test pair EF would be correct if the sample pair were CD. Critically, no items in the correct test pair physically match items in the sample pair, thus demanding that only relational sameness or differentness is available to support accurate choice responding. Initial evidence suggested that only humans and apes can successfully learn RMTS with pairs of sample and test items; however, monkeys have subsequently done so. Here, we report that crows too exhibit relational matching behavior. Even more importantly, crows spontaneously display relational responding without ever having been trained on RMTS; they had only been trained on identity matching-to-sample (IMTS). Such robust and uninstructed relational matching behavior represents the most convincing evidence yet of analogical reasoning in a nonprimate species, as apes alone have spontaneously exhibited RMTS behavior after only IMTS training. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Non-classical diffusion in ionic liquids.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Alasdair W; Licence, Peter; Abbott, Andrew P

    2011-06-07

    In this study the diffusion coefficient of neutral and cationic ferrocenyl-derivatives have been characterised in a range of 1-alkyl-3-methylimidazolium ionic liquids of the general form [C(n)C(1)Im](+)[X](-). The electrochemistry of ferrocene, 1-ferrocenylmethylimidazole (FcC(1)Im), 1-ferrocenylmethylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide ([FcC(1)C(1)Im][Tf(2)N]) and N,N,N,N-trimethylferrocenyl-methylammonium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide ([FcC(1)NMe(3)][Tf(2)N]), in 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide ([C(2)C(1)Im][Tf(2)N]) was investigated. It was shown that the diffusion coefficients of each were not significantly affected by the presence and location of a positive charge on the ferrocenyl-derivative, suggesting that coulombic solvent-solute interactions did not hinder motion of these species in ionic liquids. The diffusion coefficients for [FcC(1)C(1)Im][Tf(2)N] in five [C(n)C(1)Im][X] ionic liquids were determined as a function of temperature and the data shown to disobey the Stokes-Einstein equation. This observation is consistent with the fact that ionic liquids are glass formers, systems in which non-Stokesian behaviour is well documented. Measured diffusion coefficient data was used to determine correlation length in the ionic liquid and was found to correlate with the average size of holes, or voids, within the ionic liquid. This interpretation suggests that a model by which a migrating species can jump between voids or holes within the liquid is highly appropriate and is consistent with the observed behaviour measured across a range of temperatures.

  5. Organometallic chemistry in non-classical environments.

    PubMed

    Dyson, Paul J

    2011-01-01

    A summary of our on-going research on organometallic chemistry is provided with an emphasis on the function, reactivity and mechanisms of organometallic compounds in water, ionic liquids and in living systems. The role of organometallic compounds in both catalysis and medicinal chemistry are briefly described.

  6. A survey of non-classical polyandry.

    PubMed

    Starkweather, Katherine E; Hames, Raymond

    2012-06-01

    We have identified a sample of 53 societies outside of the classical Himalayan and Marquesean area that permit polyandrous unions. Our goal is to broadly describe the demographic, social, marital, and economic characteristics of these societies and to evaluate some hypotheses of the causes of polyandry. We demonstrate that although polyandry is rare it is not as rare as commonly believed, is found worldwide, and is most common in egalitarian societies. We also argue that polyandry likely existed during early human history and should be examined from an evolutionary perspective. Our analysis reveals that it may be a predictable response to a high operational sex ratio favoring males and may also be a response to high rates of male mortality and, possibly, male absenteeism. Other factors may contribute, but our within-polyandry sample limits analysis.

  7. NMR studies of solid pentachlorophenol-4-methylpyridine complexes exhibiting strong OHN hydrogen bonds: geometric H/D isotope effects and hydrogen bond coupling cause isotopic polymorphism.

    PubMed

    Ip, Brenda C K; Shenderovich, Ilya G; Tolstoy, Peter M; Frydel, Jaroslaw; Denisov, Gleb S; Buntkowsky, Gerd; Limbach, Hans-Heinrich

    2012-11-26

    We have studied the hydrogen bond interactions of (15)N labeled 4-methylpyridine (4-MP) with pentachlorophenol (PCP) in the solid state and in polar solution using various NMR techniques. Previous spectroscopic, X-ray, and neutron crystallographic studies showed that the triclinic 1:1 complex (4-MPPCP) exhibits the strongest known intermolecular OHN hydrogen bond in the solid state. By contrast, deuteration of the hydrogen bond gives rise to the formation of a monoclinic structure exhibiting a weaker hydrogen bond. By performing NMR experiments at different deuterium fractions and taking advantage of dipolar (1)H-(15)N recoupling under combined fast MAS and (1)H decoupling, we provide an explanation of the origin of the isotopic polymorphism of 4-MPPCP and improve previous chemical shift correlations for OHN hydrogen bonds. Because of anharmonic ground state vibrations, an ODN hydrogen bond in the triclinic form exhibits a shorter oxygen-hydron and a longer oxygen-nitrogen distance as compared to surrounding OHN hydrogen bonds, which also implies a reduction of the local dipole moment. The dipole-dipole interaction between adjacent coupled OHN hydrogen bonds which determines the structure of triclinic 4-MPPCP is then reduced by deuteration, and other interactions become dominant, leading to the monoclinic form. Finally, the observation of stronger OHN hydrogen bonds by (1)H NMR in polar solution as compared to the solid state is discussed.

  8. Science Fiction Exhibits as STEM Gateways

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robie, Samantha

    Women continue to hold less than a quarter of all STEM jobs in the United States, prompting many museums to develop programs and exhibits with the express goal of interesting young girls in scientific fields. At the same time, a number of recent museum exhibits have harnessed the popularity of pop culture and science fiction in order to interest general audiences in STEM subject matter, as well as using the exhibits as springboards to expand or shift mission goals and focus. Because science fiction appears to be successful at raising interest in STEM fields, it may be an effective way to garner the interest of young girls in STEM in particular. This research seeks to describe the ways in which museums are currently using science fiction exhibits to interest young girls in STEM fields and careers. Research focused on four institutions across the country hosting three separate exhibits, and included staff interviews and content analysis of exhibit descriptions, promotional materials, a summative evaluation and supplementary exhibit productions. In some ways, science fiction exhibits do serve young girls, primarily through the inclusion of female role models, staff awareness, and prototype testing to ensure interactives are attractive to girls as well as to boys. However, STEM appears to be underutilized, which may be partly due to a concern within the field that the outcome of targeting a specific gender could be construed as "stereotyping".

  9. ORF73 LANA homologs of RRV and MneRV2 contain an extended RGG/RG-rich nuclear and nucleolar localization signal that interacts directly with importin β1 for non-classical nuclear import.

    PubMed

    Howard, Kellie; Cherezova, Lidia; DeMaster, Laura K; Rose, Timothy M

    2017-11-01

    The latency-associated nuclear antigens (LANA) of KSHV and macaque RFHVMn, members of the RV1 rhadinovirus lineage, are closely related with conservation of complex nuclear localization signals (NLS) containing bipartite KR-rich motifs and RG-rich domains, which interact distinctly with importins α and ß1 for nuclear import via classical and non-classical pathways, respectively. RV1 LANAs are expressed in the nucleus of latently-infected cells where they inhibit replication and establish a dominant RV1 latency. Here we show that LANA homologs of macaque RRV and MneRV2 from the more distantly-related RV2 lineage, lack the KR-rich NLS, and instead have a large RG-rich NLS with multiple RG dipeptides and a conserved RGG motif. The RG-NLS interacts uniquely with importin β1, which mediates nuclear import and accumulation of RV2 LANA in the nucleolus. The alternative nuclear import and localization of RV2 LANA homologs may contribute to the dominant RV2 lytic replication phenotype. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  10. Disruption of a rice gene for α-glucan water dikinase, OsGWD1, leads to hyperaccumulation of starch in leaves but exhibits limited effects on growth

    PubMed Central

    Hirose, Tatsuro; Aoki, Naohiro; Harada, Yusuke; Okamura, Masaki; Hashida, Yoichi; Ohsugi, Ryu; Akio, Miyao; Hirochika, Hirohiko; Terao, Tomio

    2013-01-01

    To identify potential regulators of photoassimilate partitioning, we screened for rice mutant plants that accumulate high levels of starch in the leaf blades, and a mutant line leaf starch excess 1 (LSE1) was obtained and characterized. The starch content in the leaf blades of LSE1 was more than 10-fold higher than that in wild-type plants throughout the day, while the sucrose content was unaffected. The gene responsible for the LSE1 phenotype was identified by gene mapping to be a gene encoding α-glucan water dikinase, OsGWD1 (Os06g0498400), and a 3.4-kb deletion of the gene was found in the mutant plant. Despite the hyperaccumulation of starch in their leaf blades, LSE1 plants exhibited no significant change in vegetative growth, presenting a clear contrast to the reported mutants of Arabidopsis thaliana and Lotus japonicus in which disruption of the genes for α-glucan water dikinase leads to marked inhibition of vegetative growth. In reproductive growth, however, LSE1 exhibited fewer panicles per plant, lower percentage of ripened grains and smaller grains; consequently, the grain yield was lower in LSE1 plants than in wild-type plants by 20~40%. Collectively, although α-glucan water dikinase was suggested to have universal importance in leaf starch degradation in higher plants, the physiological priority of leaf starch in photoassimilate allocation may vary among plant species. PMID:23750161

  11. Against the Odds Exhibition Opens

    MedlinePlus

    ... LA and Vox Populi organizations. Photo courtesy of Bill Branson At the exhibition, HIV and AIDS were topics addressed by Dr. Victoria Cargill (right), Director of Clinical Studies and Director of Minority ...

  12. Changes in magnetic domain structure during twin boundary motion in single crystal Ni-Mn-Ga exhibiting magnetic shape memory effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopecký, V.; Fekete, L.; Perevertov, O.; Heczko, O.

    2016-05-01

    The complexity of Ni-Mn-Ga single crystal originates from the interplay between ferromagnetic domain structure and ferroelastic twinned microstructure. Magnetic domain structure in the vicinity of single twin boundary was studied using magneto-optical indicator film and magnetic force microscopy technique. The single twin boundary of Type I was formed mechanically and an initial magnetization state in both variants were restored by local application of magnetic field (≈40 kA/m). The differently oriented variants exhibited either stripe or labyrinth magnetic domain pattern in agreement with the uniaxial magnetocrystalline anisotropy of the martensite. The twin boundary was then moved by compressive or tensile stress. The passage of the boundary resulted in the formation of granular or rake domains, respectively. Additionally, the specific magnetic domains pattern projected by twin boundary gradually vanished during twin boundary motion.

  13. 'Candidatus Liberibacter solanacearum' Titers in and Infection Effects on Potato Tuber Chemistry of Promising Germplasm Exhibiting Tolerance to Zebra Chip Disease.

    PubMed

    Wallis, C M; Munyaneza, J E; Chen, J; Novy, R; Bester, G; Buchman, J L; Nordgaard, J; van Hest, P

    2015-12-01

    Long-term sustainable management of zebra chip (ZC) disease of potato requires development of tolerant or resistant germplasm. To this end, 283 potato varieties and breeding clones were infected with the ZC putative causal agent 'Candidatus Liberibacter solanacearum' (Lso) by potato psyllid vector inoculations in 2010, 2011, 2012, and 2013. Potato germplasm was then examined for development of fresh and fried ZC symptoms. Over multiple years 29 breeding clones exhibited little to no symptoms in freshly cut tuber slices, and five exhibited little to no symptoms in fried slices. These five presumed tolerant breeding clones were chosen for further screening to determine whether the lack of physiological responses to Lso infection was the cause of observed tolerance. To this end, tuber amino acid, sugar, and phenolic levels were compared between noninfected and Lso-infected plants. The five putative tolerant clones had less dramatic shifts in host physiology following Lso infection than the susceptible Atlantic cultivar. This suggested lack of host responses to Lso infection that result in major changes in tuber biochemistry is a potential mechanism of ZC resistance. However, the susceptible Atlantic cultivar did have consistently greater Lso titers compared with two of the tolerant entries, so for these reductions in Lso pathogen progression also might be a factor. Regardless, lack of host responses could still remain one trait that could be used to aid in selection of ZC-resistant potato varieties, as other tolerant lines had infection levels consistent with susceptible Atlantic cultivar. These results also suggest that germplasm derived from relatives of cultivated potato plants are viable sources of ZC disease resistance.

  14. Effects of An Integrated Format for Reading Instruction on the Comprehension and Word-Recognition Performance of Fourth- and Fifth-Grade Students Who Exhibit Severe Reading Problems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parmer, Lavada Jacumin; Thames, Dana G.; Kazelskis, Richard

    A study examined the effectiveness of an integrated language arts instructional format for teaching reading compared with the effectiveness of the typical traditional reading program. The study investigated the effectiveness of approaches that are representative of both viewpoints of the reading process (i.e., word recognition and the construction…

  15. Communicating Complex Sciences by Means of Exhibitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, S.

    2011-12-01

    Earth Sciences will have to take over the leading role in global sustainable policy and in discussions about climate change. Efforts to raise attention within the politically responsible communities as well as in the public are getting more and more support by executive and advisory boards all over the world. But how can you successfully communicate complex sciences? For example, to start communication about climate change, the first step is to encourage people to be concerned about climate change. After that, one has to start thinking about how to present data and how to include the presented data into an unprejudiced context. Therefore, the communication toolbox offers various methods to reach diverse audiences. The R&D programme GEOTECHNOLOGIEN conducts roving exhibitions as one of its most successful communication tools. With roving exhibitions GEOTECHNOLOGIEN is able to get in touch with different audiences at once. The main purpose and theme of these exhibitions is to convey the everyday means of climate change to the visitors. It is within the responsibility of science to communicate the effects of a phenomenon like climate change as well as the impact of research results to the everyday life of people. Currently, a GEOTECHNOLOGIEN roving exhibition on remote sensing with satellites deals with various issues of environmental research, including a chapter on climate change. By following the 3M-concept (Meaning - Memorable - Moving), exhibitions allow to connect the visitors daily environment and personal experiences with the presented issues and objects. Therefore, hands-on exhibits, exciting multimedia effects and high-tech artefacts have to be combined with interpretive text elements to highlight the daily significance of the scientific topics and the exhibition theme respectively. To create such an exhibition, strong conceptual planning has to be conducted. This includes the specification of stern financial as well as time wise milestones. In addition

  16. Carbapenem-Resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae Strains Exhibit Diversity in Aminoglycoside-Modifying Enzymes, Which Exert Differing Effects on Plazomicin and Other Agents

    PubMed Central

    Almaghrabi, Reem; Doi, Yohei; Hao, Binghua; Chen, Liang; Shields, Ryan K.; Press, Ellen G.; Iovine, Nicole M.; Townsend, Bethany M.; Wagener, Marilyn M.; Kreiswirth, Barry; Nguyen, M. Hong

    2014-01-01

    We measured in vitro activity of plazomicin, a next-generation aminoglycoside, and other aminoglycosides against 50 carbapenem-resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae strains from two centers and correlated the results with the presence of various aminoglycoside-modifying enzymes (AMEs). Ninety-four percent of strains were sequence type 258 (ST258) clones, which exhibited 5 ompK36 genotypes; 80% and 10% of strains produced Klebsiella pneumoniae carbapenemase 2 (KPC-2) and KPC-3, respectively. Ninety-eight percent of strains possessed AMEs, including AAC(6′)-Ib (98%), APH(3′)-Ia (56%), AAC(3)-IV (38%), and ANT(2″)-Ia (2%). Gentamicin, tobramycin, and amikacin nonsusceptibility rates were 40, 98, and 16%, respectively. Plazomicin MICs ranged from 0.25 to 1 μg/ml. Tobramycin and plazomicin MICs correlated with gentamicin MICs (r = 0.75 and 0.57, respectively). Plazomicin exerted bactericidal activity against 17% (1× MIC) and 94% (4× MIC) of strains. All strains with AAC(6′)-Ib were tobramycin-resistant; 16% were nonsusceptible to amikacin. AAC(6′)-Ib combined with another AME was associated with higher gentamicin, tobramycin, and plazomicin MICs than AAC(6′)-Ib alone (P = 0.01, 0.0008, and 0.046, respectively). The presence of AAC(3)-IV in a strain was also associated with higher gentamicin, tobramycin, and plazomicin MICs (P = 0.0006, P < 0.0001, and P = 0.01, respectively). The combination of AAC(6′)-Ib and another AME, the presence of AAC(3)-IV, and the presence of APH(3′)-Ia were each associated with gentamicin resistance (P = 0.0002, 0.003, and 0.01, respectively). In conclusion, carbapenem-resistant K. pneumoniae strains (including ST258 clones) exhibit highly diverse antimicrobial resistance genotypes and phenotypes. Plazomicin may offer a treatment option against strains resistant to other aminoglycosides. The development of molecular assays that predict antimicrobial responses among carbapenem-resistant K. pneumoniae strains should be a research

  17. Carbapenem-resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae strains exhibit diversity in aminoglycoside-modifying enzymes, which exert differing effects on plazomicin and other agents.

    PubMed

    Almaghrabi, Reem; Clancy, Cornelius J; Doi, Yohei; Hao, Binghua; Chen, Liang; Shields, Ryan K; Press, Ellen G; Iovine, Nicole M; Townsend, Bethany M; Wagener, Marilyn M; Kreiswirth, Barry; Nguyen, M Hong

    2014-08-01

    We measured in vitro activity of plazomicin, a next-generation aminoglycoside, and other aminoglycosides against 50 carbapenem-resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae strains from two centers and correlated the results with the presence of various aminoglycoside-modifying enzymes (AMEs). Ninety-four percent of strains were sequence type 258 (ST258) clones, which exhibited 5 ompK36 genotypes; 80% and 10% of strains produced Klebsiella pneumoniae carbapenemase 2 (KPC-2) and KPC-3, respectively. Ninety-eight percent of strains possessed AMEs, including AAC(6')-Ib (98%), APH(3')-Ia (56%), AAC(3)-IV (38%), and ANT(2")-Ia (2%). Gentamicin, tobramycin, and amikacin nonsusceptibility rates were 40, 98, and 16%, respectively. Plazomicin MICs ranged from 0.25 to 1 μg/ml. Tobramycin and plazomicin MICs correlated with gentamicin MICs (r = 0.75 and 0.57, respectively). Plazomicin exerted bactericidal activity against 17% (1× MIC) and 94% (4× MIC) of strains. All strains with AAC(6')-Ib were tobramycin-resistant; 16% were nonsusceptible to amikacin. AAC(6')-Ib combined with another AME was associated with higher gentamicin, tobramycin, and plazomicin MICs than AAC(6')-Ib alone (P = 0.01, 0.0008, and 0.046, respectively). The presence of AAC(3)-IV in a strain was also associated with higher gentamicin, tobramycin, and plazomicin MICs (P = 0.0006, P < 0.0001, and P = 0.01, respectively). The combination of AAC(6')-Ib and another AME, the presence of AAC(3)-IV, and the presence of APH(3')-Ia were each associated with gentamicin resistance (P = 0.0002, 0.003, and 0.01, respectively). In conclusion, carbapenem-resistant K. pneumoniae strains (including ST258 clones) exhibit highly diverse antimicrobial resistance genotypes and phenotypes. Plazomicin may offer a treatment option against strains resistant to other aminoglycosides. The development of molecular assays that predict antimicrobial responses among carbapenem-resistant K. pneumoniae strains should be a research priority

  18. Acitretin exhibits inhibitory effects towards UDP-glucuronosyltransferase (UGT)1A9-mediated 4-methylumbelliferone (4-MU) and propofol glucuronidation reaction.

    PubMed

    Yu, Ming-Lian; Yang, Yue; Wang, Cong-Min; Zhang, Meng-Meng; Bai, Miao-Chun; Guo, Yue-Ling

    2013-06-01

    The present study aimed to evaluate the potential risk of drug-drug interactions associated with acitretin which is a drug for therapy of psoriasis approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). The initial screening of acitretin's inhibition towards 4-methylumbelliferone (4-MU) glucuronidation catalyzed by important UDP-glucuronosyltransferase (UGT) isoforms in the liver showed that UGT1A9 activity was strongly inhibited by acitretin with other UGT isoforms negligibly influenced. The inhibition type is best fit to competitive inhibition, and the inhibition kinetic parameter (K(i)) was determined to be 3.5 microM. The inhibition behaviour of acitretin towards UGT1A9 activity did not exhibit probe substrate-dependent behaviour when selecting human liver microsomes (HLMs)-catalyzed propofol-O-glucuronidation as probe reaction of UGT1A9. The same inhibition type and similar inhibition parameters (K(i) = 3.2 microM) were obtained. Using the maximum plasma exposure dose of acitretin (C(max)), the C(max)/K(i) values were calculated to be 0.23 and 0.25 when selecting 4-MU and propofol as probe substrates, respectively. All these results indicate a potential clinical drug-drug interaction between acitretin and 4-MU or propofol.

  19. The desert moss Pterygoneurum lamellatum (Pottiaceae) exhibits an inducible ecological strategy of desiccation tolerance: effects of rate of drying on shoot damage and regeneration.

    PubMed

    Stark, Lloyd R; Greenwood, Joshua L; Brinda, John C; Oliver, Melvin J

    2013-08-01

    Bryophytes include clades that incorporate constitutive desiccation tolerance, especially terrestrial species. Here we test the hypothesis that the opposing ecological strategy of desiccation tolerance, inducibility, is present in a desert moss, and address this hypothesis by varying rates of drying in a laboratory study. Desiccation tolerance is arguably the most important evolutionary innovation relevant to the colonization of land by plants; increased understanding of the ecological drivers of this trait will eventually illuminate the responsible mechanisms and ultimately open doors to the potential for the application of this trait in cultivated plants. Plants were cloned, grown in continuous culture (dehardened) for several months, and subjected to rates of drying (drying times) ranging from 30 min to 53 h, rehydrated and tested for recovery using chlorophyll fluorescence, leaf damage, and regeneration of protonema and shoots. Rate of drying significantly affected all recovery responses, with very rapid drying rates severely damaging the entire shoot except the shoot apex and resulting in slower growth rates, fewer regenerative shoots produced, and a compromised photosynthetic system as inferred from fluorescence parameters. For the first time, a desert moss is shown to exhibit an ecological strategy of desiccation tolerance that is inducible, challenging the assumption that arid-land bryophytes rely exclusively on constitutive protection. Results indicate that previous considerations defining a slow-dry event in bryophytes need reevaluation, and that the ecological strategy of inducible desiccation tolerance is probably more common than currently understood among terrestrial bryophytes.

  20. Anti-vascular endothelial growth factor antibody single therapy for pancreatic neuroendocrine carcinoma exhibits a marked tumor growth-inhibitory effect.

    PubMed

    Kasuya, Kazuhiko; Nagakawa, Yuichi; Suzuki, Minako; Tanaka, Hiroaki; Ohta, Hiroshi; Itoi, Takao; Tsuchida, Akihiko

    2011-11-01

    At present, no effective chemotherapy for pancreatic neuroendocrine carcinoma (PNEC) exists. However, anti-angiogenic therapy is expected to be effective for PNEC, a hypervascular tumor. We treated PNEC and hypovascular pancreatic ductal cell carcinoma (DCC) cell lines with the anti-vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) antibody bevacizumab, and compared the antitumor effect between the two different types of cell lines. The PNEC cell line QGP-1 and the DCC cell lines BxPC-3 and AsPC-1 were used. We evaluated the ability of the cell lines to proliferate and secrete VEGF in vitro, the antitumor effect of bevacizumab administration in vivo and the side effects of bevacizumab on the pancreas in a caerulein-induced pancreatitis model. Comparison of the QGP-1 and DCC cell lines showed that QGP-1 secreted a higher level of VEGF under a hypoxic environment than the DCC cell line, and bevacizumab exerted the most marked growth-inhibitory effect on QGP-1; the number of intratumoral blood vessels decreased and the percentage of proliferating cells was approximately the same. In the pancreatitis model, bevacizumab administration did not adversely affect the pancreatitis or the associated hypoxic environment. Bevacizumab does not affect the pancreas itself; therefore, its potent inhibitory effect on the growth of pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors alone can be expected.

  1. Anti-vascular endothelial growth factor antibody single therapy for pancreatic neuroendocrine carcinoma exhibits a marked tumor growth-inhibitory effect

    PubMed Central

    KASUYA, KAZUHIKO; NAGAKAWA, YUICHI; SUZUKI, MINAKO; TANAKA, HIROAKI; OHTA, HIROSHI; ITOI, TAKAO; TSUCHIDA, AKIHIKO

    2011-01-01

    At present, no effective chemotherapy for pancreatic neuroendocrine carcinoma (PNEC) exists. However, anti-angiogenic therapy is expected to be effective for PNEC, a hypervascular tumor. We treated PNEC and hypovascular pancreatic ductal cell carcinoma (DCC) cell lines with the anti-vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) antibody bevacizumab, and compared the antitumor effect between the two different types of cell lines. The PNEC cell line QGP-1 and the DCC cell lines BxPC-3 and AsPC-1 were used. We evaluated the ability of the cell lines to proliferate and secrete VEGF in vitro, the antitumor effect of bevacizumab administration in vivo and the side effects of bevacizumab on the pancreas in a caerulein-induced pancreatitis model. Comparison of the QGP-1 and DCC cell lines showed that QGP-1 secreted a higher level of VEGF under a hypoxic environment than the DCC cell line, and bevacizumab exerted the most marked growth-inhibitory effect on QGP-1; the number of intratumoral blood vessels decreased and the percentage of proliferating cells was approximately the same. In the pancreatitis model, bevacizumab administration did not adversely affect the pancreatitis or the associated hypoxic environment. Bevacizumab does not affect the pancreas itself; therefore, its potent inhibitory effect on the growth of pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors alone can be expected. PMID:22977618

  2. Two short-acting kappa opioid receptor antagonists (zyklophin and LY2444296) exhibited different behavioral effects from the long-acting antagonist norbinaltorphimine in mouse anxiety tests.

    PubMed

    Huang, Peng; Yakovleva, Tatyana; Aldrich, Jane V; Tunis, Julia; Parry, Christopher; Liu-Chen, Lee-Yuan

    2016-02-26

    Prototypical long-acting kappa opioid receptor (KOPR) antagonists [e.g., norbinaltorphimine (norBNI)] have been reported to exert anxiolytic-like effects in several commonly used anxiety tests in rodents including the novelty-induced hypophagia (NIH) and elevated plus maze (EPM) tests. It remains unknown if the short-acting KOPR antagonists (e.g., zyklophin and LY2444296) have similar effects. In this study effects of zyklophin and LY2444296 (s.c.) were investigated in the NIH and EPM tests in mice 1h post-injection and compared with norBNI (i.p.) 48h post-administration. In the NIH test, zyklophin at 3 and 1mg/kg, but not 0.3mg/kg, or LY2444296 at 30mg/kg decreased the latency of palatable food consumption in novel cages, but had no effect in training cages, similar to norBNI (10mg/kg). Zyklophin at 3 or 1mg/kg increased or had a trend of increasing the amount of palatable food consumption in novel cages, with no effects in training cages, further indicating its anxiolytic-like effect, but norBNI (10mg/kg) and LY2444296 (30mg/kg) did not. In the EPM test, norBNI (10mg/kg) increased open arm time and % open arm entries or time, but zyklophin at all three doses and LY2444296 (30mg/kg) had no effects. In addition, zyklophin at 3mg/kg increased numbers of close and total arm entries on EPM, suggesting increased activity; however, norBNI and LY2444296 had no effects on close and total arm entries. Thus, all three KOPR antagonists had anxiolytic-like effects in the NIH test. However, only the long-acting one (norBNI), but not the short-acting ones (zyklophin and LY2444296), demonstrated anti-anxiety like effects in the EPM test. It remains to be investigated if the differences are due to the differences in their durations of action and/or pharmacodynamic properties. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Two short-acting kappa opioid receptor antagonists (zyklophin and LY2444296) exhibited different behavioral effects from the long-acting antagonist norbinaltorphimine in mouse anxiety tests

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Peng; Yakovleva, Tatyana; Aldrich, Jane V.; Tunis, Julia; Parry, Christopher; Liu-Chen, Lee-Yuan

    2016-01-01

    Prototypical long-acting kappa opioid receptor (KOPR) antagonists [e.g., norbinaltorphimine (norBNI)] have been reported to exert anxiolytic-like effects in several commonly used anxiety tests in rodents including the novelty-induced hypophagia (NIH) and elevated plus maze (EPM) tests. It remains unknown if the short-acting KOPR antagonists (e.g., zyklophin and LY2444296) have similar effects. In this study effects of zyklophin and LY2444296 (s.c.) were investigated in the NIH and EPM tests in mice 1 h post-injection and compared with norBNI (i.p.) 48 h post-administration. In the NIH test, zyklophin at 3 and 1 mg/kg, but not 0.3 mg/kg, or LY2444296 at 30 mg/kg decreased the latency of palatable food consumption in novel cages, but had no effect in training cages, similar to norBNI (10 mg/kg). Zyklophin at 3 or 1 mg/kg increased or had a trend of increasing the amount of palatable food consumption in novel cages, with no effects in training cages, further indicating its anxiolytic-like effect, but norBNI (10mg/kg) and LY2444296 (30 mg/kg) did not. In the EPM test, norBNI (10 mg/kg) increased open arm time and % open arm entries or time, but zyklophin at all three doses and LY2444296 (30 mg/kg) had no effects. In addition, zyklophin at 3 mg/kg increased numbers of close and total arm entries on EPM, suggesting increased activity; however, norBNI and LY2444296 had no effects on close and total arm entries. Thus, all three KOPR antagonists had anxiolytic-like effects in the NIH test. However, only the long-acting one (norBNI), but not the short-acting ones (zyklophin and LY2444296), demonstrated anti-anxiety like effects in the EPM test. It remains to be investigated if the differences are due to the differences in their durations of action and/or pharmacodynamic properties. PMID:26780565

  4. Sex differences in science museum exhibit attraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arámbula Greenfield, Teresa

    This study examines the relative attraction of hands-on, interactive science museum exhibits fo