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Sample records for exhibiting monomer-dimer equilibrium

  1. Measurement of the Second Osmotic Virial Coefficient for Protein Solutions Exhibiting Monomer-Dimer Equilibrium

    PubMed Central

    Alford, John R.; Kendrick, Brent S.; Carpenter, John F.; Randolph, Theodore W.

    2008-01-01

    The second osmotic virial coefficient (B) is a measure of solution nonideality that is useful for predicting conditions favorable for protein crystallization and for inhibiting aggregation. Static light scattering (SLS) is the most common technique to determine B values, typically using protein concentrations less than 5 mg/mL. When performing SLS experiments at low protein concentrations, frequently the protein is either assumed to exist as a single non-associating species or a combination of assembly states independent of protein concentration. This manuscript examines the limit for ignoring weak reversible dimerization (Kd≥1 mM) by comparing B values calculated with and without accounting for self-association. Light scattering effects for equilibrium dimer systems with Kd < 20 mM and Kd < 1 mM will significantly affect apparent B values measured for 20 kDa and 150 kDa proteins, respectively. To interpret correctly light scattering data for monomer-dimer equilibrium systems, we use an expanded coefficient model to account for separate monomer-monomer (B22), monomer-dimer (B23), and dimer-dimer (B33) interactions. PMID:18395000

  2. Measurement of the second osmotic virial coefficient for protein solutions exhibiting monomer-dimer equilibrium.

    PubMed

    Alford, John R; Kendrick, Brent S; Carpenter, John F; Randolph, Theodore W

    2008-06-15

    The second osmotic virial coefficient (B) is a measure of solution nonideality that is useful for predicting conditions favorable for protein crystallization and for inhibition of aggregation. Static light scattering is the technique most commonly used to determine B values, typically using protein concentrations less than 5 mg/mL. During static light scattering experiments at low protein concentrations, frequently the protein is assumed to exist either as a single nonassociating species or as a combination of assembly states independent of protein concentration. In the work described here, we examined the limit for ignoring weak reversible dimerization (Kd > or =1 mM) by comparing B values calculated with and without accounting for self-association. Light scattering effects for equilibrium dimer systems with Kd <20 mM and Kd <1 mM will significantly affect apparent B values measured for 20 and 150-kDa proteins, respectively. To interpret correctly light scattering data for monomer-dimer equilibrium systems, we use an expanded coefficient model to account for separate monomer-monomer (B(22)), monomer-dimer (B(23)), and dimer-dimer (B(33)) interactions.

  3. SARS CoV main proteinase: The monomer-dimer equilibrium dissociation constant.

    PubMed

    Graziano, Vito; McGrath, William J; Yang, Lin; Mangel, Walter F

    2006-12-12

    The SARS coronavirus main proteinase (SARS CoV main proteinase) is required for the replication of the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS CoV), the virus that causes SARS. One function of the enzyme is to process viral polyproteins. The active form of the SARS CoV main proteinase is a homodimer. In the literature, estimates of the monomer-dimer equilibrium dissociation constant, KD, have varied more than 65,0000-fold, from <1 nM to more than 200 microM. Because of these discrepancies and because compounds that interfere with activation of the enzyme by dimerization may be potential antiviral agents, we investigated the monomer-dimer equilibrium by three different techniques: small-angle X-ray scattering, chemical cross-linking, and enzyme kinetics. Analysis of small-angle X-ray scattering data from a series of measurements at different SARS CoV main proteinase concentrations yielded KD values of 5.8 +/- 0.8 microM (obtained from the entire scattering curve), 6.5 +/- 2.2 microM (obtained from the radii of gyration), and 6.8 +/- 1.5 microM (obtained from the forward scattering). The KD from chemical cross-linking was 12.7 +/- 1.1 microM, and from enzyme kinetics, it was 5.2 +/- 0.4 microM. While each of these three techniques can present different, potential limitations, they all yielded similar KD values.

  4. SARS CoV Main Proteinase: The Monomer-Dimer Equilibrium Dissociation Constant

    SciTech Connect

    Graziano,V.; McGrath, W.; Yang, L.; Mangel, W.

    2006-01-01

    The SARS coronavirus main proteinase (SARS CoV main proteinase) is required for the replication of the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS CoV), the virus that causes SARS. One function of the enzyme is to process viral polyproteins. The active form of the SARS CoV main proteinase is a homodimer. In the literature, estimates of the monomer-dimer equilibrium dissociation constant, K{sub D}, have varied more than 650000-fold, from <1 nM to more than 200 {mu}M. Because of these discrepancies and because compounds that interfere with activation of the enzyme by dimerization may be potential antiviral agents, we investigated the monomer-dimer equilibrium by three different techniques: small-angle X-ray scattering, chemical cross-linking, and enzyme kinetics. Analysis of small-angle X-ray scattering data from a series of measurements at different SARS CoV main proteinase concentrations yielded K{sub D} values of 5.8 {+-} 0.8 {mu}M (obtained from the entire scattering curve), 6.5 {+-} 2.2 {mu}M (obtained from the radii of gyration), and 6.8 {+-} 1.5 {mu}M (obtained from the forward scattering). The K{sub D} from chemical cross-linking was 12.7 {+-} 1.1 {mu}M, and from enzyme kinetics, it was 5.2 {+-} 0.4 {mu}M. While each of these three techniques can present different, potential limitations, they all yielded similar K{sub D} values.

  5. Full characterization of GPCR monomer-dimer dynamic equilibrium by single molecule imaging.

    PubMed

    Kasai, Rinshi S; Suzuki, Kenichi G N; Prossnitz, Eric R; Koyama-Honda, Ikuko; Nakada, Chieko; Fujiwara, Takahiro K; Kusumi, Akihiro

    2011-02-07

    Receptor dimerization is important for many signaling pathways. However, the monomer-dimer equilibrium has never been fully characterized for any receptor with a 2D equilibrium constant as well as association/dissociation rate constants (termed super-quantification). Here, we determined the dynamic equilibrium for the N-formyl peptide receptor (FPR), a chemoattractant G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR), in live cells at 37°C by developing a single fluorescent-molecule imaging method. Both before and after liganding, the dimer-monomer 2D equilibrium is unchanged, giving an equilibrium constant of 3.6 copies/µm(2), with a dissociation and 2D association rate constant of 11.0 s(-1) and 3.1 copies/µm(2)s(-1), respectively. At physiological expression levels of ∼2.1 receptor copies/µm(2) (∼6,000 copies/cell), monomers continually convert into dimers every 150 ms, dimers dissociate into monomers in 91 ms, and at any moment, 2,500 and 3,500 receptor molecules participate in transient dimers and monomers, respectively. Not only do FPR dimers fall apart rapidly, but FPR monomers also convert into dimers very quickly.

  6. Intermediate monomer-dimer equilibrium structure of native ICAM-1: implication for enhanced cell adhesion.

    PubMed

    Oh, Hyun-Mee; Kwon, Min-Sung; Kim, Hyang-Jin; Jeon, Byeong-Hun; Kim, Hye-Ran; Choi, Hyang-Ok; Na, Bo-Ra; Eom, Soo-Hyun; Song, Nam Woong; Jun, Chang-Duk

    2011-01-15

    Dimeric intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) has been known to more efficiently mediate cell adhesion than monomeric ICAM-1. Here, we found that truncation of the intracellular domain of ICAM-1 significantly enhances surface dimerization based on the two criteria: 1) the binding degree of monomer-specific antibody CA-7 and 2) the ratio of dimer/monomer when a mutation (L42→C42) was introduced in the interface of domain 1. Mutation analysis revealed that the positively charged amino acids, including very membrane-proximal ⁵⁰⁵R, are essential for maintaining the structural transition between the monomer and dimer. Despite a strong dimer presentation, the ICAM-1 mutants lacking an intracellular domain (IC1ΔCTD) or containing R to A substitution in position 505 (⁵⁰⁵R/A) supported a lower degree of cell adhesion than did wild-type ICAM-1. Collectively, these results demonstrate that the native structure of surface ICAM-1 is not a dimer, but is an intermediate monomer-dimer equilibrium structure by which the effectiveness of ICAM-1 can be fully achieved.

  7. Adsorption equilibrium and kinetics of monomer-dimer monoclonal antibody mixtures on a cation exchange resin.

    PubMed

    Reck, Jason M; Pabst, Timothy M; Hunter, Alan K; Wang, Xiangyang; Carta, Giorgio

    2015-07-10

    Adsorption equilibrium and kinetics are determined for a monoclonal antibody (mAb) monomer and dimer species, individually and in mixtures, on a macroporous cation exchange resin both under the dilute limit of salt gradient elution chromatography and at high protein loads and low salt based on batch adsorption equilibrium and confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) experiments. In the dilute limit and weak binding conditions, the dimer/monomer selectivity in 10mM phosphate at pH 7 varies between 8.7 and 2.3 decreasing with salt concentration in the range of 170-230mM NaCl. At high protein loads and strong binding conditions (0-60mM NaCl), the selectivity in the same buffer is near unity with no NaCl added, but increases gradually with salt concentration reaching high values between 2 and 15 with 60mM added NaCl. For these conditions, the two-component adsorption kinetics is controlled by pore diffusion and is predicted approximately by a dual shrinking core model using parameters based on single component equilibrium and kinetics measurements.

  8. Association-dissociation of the flavoprotein hog kidney D-amino acid oxidase. Determination of the monomer-dimer equilibrium constant and the energetics of subunit association.

    PubMed

    Horiike, K; Shiga, K; Nishina, Y; Isomoto, A; Yamano, T

    1977-11-01

    The enzyme concentration dependence of spectrophotometric titrations of hog kidney D-amino acid oxidase [EC 1.4.3.3] with p-aminobenzoate was studied. The monomer-dimer equilibrium constant of the oxidized holoenzyme at 25 degrees C was estimated to be 7 X 10(5)M-1 at pH 7.5 and 4X 10(6)M-1 at pH 8.3. The energetics of subunit association are discussed.

  9. A monomer-dimer equilibrium of a cellular prion protein (PrPC) not observed with recombinant PrP.

    PubMed

    Meyer, R K; Lustig, A; Oesch, B; Fatzer, R; Zurbriggen, A; Vandevelde, M

    2000-12-01

    Both the purified normal (protease-sensitive) isoform of the prion protein (PrP(C)) (Pergami, P., Jaffe, H., and Safar, J. (1996) Anal. Biochem. 236, 63-73) and recombinant prion protein (PrP) have been found to be in monomeric form (Mehlhorn, I., Groth, D., Stockel, J., Moffat, B., Reilly, D., Yansura, D., Willet, W. S., Baldwin, M., Fletterick, R., Cohen, F. E., Vandlen, R., Henner, D., and Prusiner, S. B. (1996) Biochemistry 35, 5528-5537; and this paper), and therefore PrP(C)-PrP(C) interactions were previously unknown. In this report we confirm recombinant PrP to be a monomer by analytical ultracentrifugation. However, by three lines of evidence (enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), cross-linking experiments, and size exclusion chromatography) we could also demonstrate that, under native conditions, at least part of the native bovine PrP(C) exists as a monomer-dimer equilibrium. A bovine PrP(C)-specific immuno-sandwich ELISA was developed and calibrated with recombinant PrP (Meyer, R. K., Oesch, B., Fatzer, R., Zurbriggen, A., and Vandevelde, M. (1999) J. Virol. 73, 9386-9392). By this ELISA we identified a distinct PrP(C) fraction and partially purified this protein. When serial dilutions of brain homogenate or partially purified PrP(C) were measured, using the peptide antibody C15S, a nonlinear dose-response curve was obtained. This nonlinearity was shown not to be due to an artifact of the procedure but to a monomer-dimer equilibrium of PrP(C) with preferential binding of the antibody to the dimer. From the curvature we could deduce the association constant (3.9 x 10(8) M(-1) at 37 degrees C). Accordingly, DeltaG degrees of the reaction was calculated (-48.6 kJ M(-1)), and DeltaH degrees (9.5 kJ M(-1)) as well as DeltaS degrees (0.2 kJ K(-1) M(-1)) were extrapolated from the van't Hoff plot. When serial dilutions of monomeric recombinant PrP were tested, only a straight line was obtained, supporting our hypothesis. Additional evidence of dimer

  10. The specific monomer/dimer equilibrium of the corticotropin-releasing factor receptor type 1 is established in the endoplasmic reticulum.

    PubMed

    Teichmann, Anke; Gibert, Arthur; Lampe, André; Grzesik, Paul; Rutz, Claudia; Furkert, Jens; Schmoranzer, Jan; Krause, Gerd; Wiesner, Burkhard; Schülein, Ralf

    2014-08-29

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) represent the most important drug targets. Although the smallest functional unit of a GPCR is a monomer, it became clear in the past decades that the vast majority of the receptors form dimers. Only very recently, however, data were presented that some receptors may in fact be expressed as a mixture of monomers and dimers and that the interaction of the receptor protomers is dynamic. To date, equilibrium measurements were restricted to the plasma membrane due to experimental limitations. We have addressed the question as to where this equilibrium is established for the corticotropin-releasing factor receptor type 1. By developing a novel approach to analyze single molecule fluorescence cross-correlation spectroscopy data for intracellular membrane compartments, we show that the corticotropin-releasing factor receptor type 1 has a specific monomer/dimer equilibrium that is already established in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). It remains constant at the plasma membrane even following receptor activation. Moreover, we demonstrate for seven additional GPCRs that they are expressed in specific but substantially different monomer/dimer ratios. Although it is well known that proteins may dimerize in the ER in principle, our data show that the ER is also able to establish the specific monomer/dimer ratios of GPCRs, which sheds new light on the functions of this compartment.

  11. Monomer-dimer equilibrium for the 5'-5' stacking of propeller-type parallel-stranded G-quadruplexes: NMR structural study.

    PubMed

    Do, Ngoc Quang; Phan, Anh Tuân

    2012-11-12

    Guanine-rich sequence motifs, which contain tracts of three consecutive guanines connected by single non-guanine nucleotides, are abundant in the human genome and can form a robust G-quadruplex structure with high stability. Herein, by using NMR spectroscopy, we investigate the equilibrium between monomeric and 5'-5' stacked dimeric propeller-type G-quadruplexes that are formed by DNA sequences containing GGGT motifs. We show that the monomer-dimer equilibrium depends on a number of parameters, including the DNA concentration, DNA flanking sequences, the concentration and type of cations, and the temperature. We report on the high-definition structure of a simple monomeric G-quadruplex containing three single-residue loops, which could serve as a reference for propeller-type G-quadruplex structures in solution.

  12. Fluorescent sensor for imidazole derivatives based on monomer-dimer equilibrium of a zinc porphyrin complex in a polymeric film.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ying; Yang, Ronghua; Liu, Feng; Li, Ke'an

    2004-12-15

    A new zinc(II) porphyrin conjugate with an appended pyrene subunit has been synthesized and shown to exhibit significant and analytical usefulness for fluorescence sensing toward imidazole derivatives. The molecular recognition was based on the bridging interaction of the imidazole ring of analyte with the zinc(II) center of the porphyrin, while the transduction signal for the recognition process was the pyrene excimer fluorescence. The sensor was constructed and applied for fluorescence assay of histidine in aqueous solution by immobilizing the sensing material in a plasticized PVC membrane. When the membrane was bathed in an alkaline solution void of histidine, zinc(II) porphyrin was present in the monomer form, and pyrene emitted monomer fluorescence at 378 and 397 nm. With the presence of histidine in the sample solution, histidine was extracted into the membrane phase and bridged with the Zn(II) center of the porphyrin, causing the monomer porphyrin to be converted to its dimeric species. Since the formation of porphyrin dimer was accompanied by the enhancement of pyrene excimer emission at 454 nm, the chemical recognition process could be directly translated into a fluorescent signal. With the optode membrane M1 described, histidine in sample solution from 6.76 x 10(-7) to 5.01 x 10(-3) M can be determined. The limit of detection was 1.34 x 10(-7) M. The optical selectivity coefficient obtained for histidine over biologically relevant amino acids and anions met the selectivity requirements for the determination of histidine in biological samples. Serum histidine values obtained by the optode membrane fell in the normal range of the content reported in the literature and were in good agreement with those obtained by HPLC.

  13. Monomer-dimer problem on some networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Ruijuan; Yan, Weigen

    2016-09-01

    Zhang et al. (2012) obtained the exact formula for the number of all possible monomer-dimer arrangements and the asymptotic growth constant on a scale-free small-world network. In this note, we generalize this result and obtain the exact solution on the monomer-dimer model on many networks. Particularly, we prove that these networks have the same asymptotic growth constant of the number of monomer-dimer arrangements.

  14. AB-type lectin (toxin/agglutinin) from mistletoe: differences in affinity of the two galactoside-binding Trp/Tyr-sites and regulation of their functionality by monomer/dimer equilibrium.

    PubMed

    Jiménez, Marta; André, Sabine; Siebert, Hans-C; Gabius, Hans-J; Solís, Dolores

    2006-10-01

    Viscumin of mistletoe (Viscum album L.) has a concentration-dependent activity profile unique to plant AB-toxins. It starts with lectin-dependent mitogenicity and then covers toxicity and cell agglutination, associated with shifts in the monomer/dimer equilibrium. Each lectin subunit harbors two sections for ligand contact. In the dimer, the B-chain sites in subdomain 2 gamma (designated as the Tyr-sites) appear fully accessible, whereas Trp-sites in subdomain 1 alpha are close to the dimer interface. It is unclear whether both types of sites operate similarly in binding glycoligands in solution. By systematically covering a broad range of lactose/lectin ratio in isothermal titration calorimetry, we obtained evidence for two sites showing dissimilar binding affinity. Intriguingly, the site with higher affinity was only partially occupied. To assign the observed properties to the Trp/Tyr-sites, we next performed chemically induced dynamic nuclear polarization measurements of Trp and Tyr accessibility. A Tyr signal, but not distinct Trp peaks, was recorded when testing the dimer. Lactose-quenchable Trp peaks became visible on the destabilization of the dimer by citraconylation, intimating Trp involvement in ligand contact in the monomer. Fittingly, Tyr acetylation but not mild Trp oxidation reduced the dimer hemagglutination activity and the extent of binding to asialofetuin-Sepharose 4B. Altogether, the results attribute lectin activity in the dimer primarily to Tyr-sites. Full access to Trp-sites is gained on dimer dissociation. Thus, the monomer/dimer equilibrium of viscumin regulates the operativity of these sites. Their structural divergence affords the possibility for differences in ligand selection when comparing monomers (Tyr- and Trp-sites) with dimers (primarily Tyr-sites).

  15. Mn(II) and Cu(II) complexes of a dithiadiazolyl radical ligand: monomer/dimer equilibria in solution.

    PubMed

    Britten, James; Hearns, Nigel G R; Preuss, Kathryn E; Richardson, John F; Bin-Salamon, Sofi

    2007-05-14

    Complexes of the 4-(2'-pyridyl)-1,2,3,5-dithiadiazolyl radical bidentate ligand with bis(hexafluoroacetylacetonato)manganese(II) and with bis(hexafluoroacetylacetonato)copper(II) have been prepared. Unlike the previously reported cobalt(II) complex, these complexes form dimers via intermolecular S...S contacts in the solid state. The spectroscopic and magnetic properties of these species in the solid state and in solution are reported and compared to the previously reported Co(II) complex, with emphasis on the elucidation of the a monomer/dimer equilibrium in the solution. The electrochemical properties of these species in solution are also presented and discussed.

  16. Das Lektin aus der Erbse Pisum sativum : Bindungsstudien, Monomer-Dimer-Gleichgewicht und Rückfaltung aus Fragmenten

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Küster, Frank

    2002-11-01

    nicht-denaturierenden Bedingungen die Untereinheiten zwischen den Dimeren ausgetauscht werden. Die Renaturierung der unprozessierten Variante ist unter stark nativen Bedingungen zu 100 % möglich. Das prozessierte Protein dagegen renaturiert nur zu etwa 50 %, und durch die Prozessierung ist die Faltung stark verlangsamt, der Faltungsprozess ist erst nach mehreren Tagen abgeschlossen. Im Laufe der Renaturierung wird ein Intermediat populiert, in dem die längere der beiden Polypeptidketten ein Homodimer mit nativähnlicher Untereinheitenkontaktfläche bildet. Der geschwindigkeitsbestimmende Schritt der Renaturierung ist die Assoziation der entfalteten kürzeren Kette mit diesem Dimer. The lectin from Pisum sativum (garden pea) is a member of the family of legume lectins. These proteins share a high sequence homology, and the structure of their monomers, an all-ß-motif, is highly conserved. Their quaternary structures, however, show a great diversity which has been subject to cristallographic and theoretical studies. Pea lectin is a dimeric legume lectin with a special structural feature: After folding is completed in the cell, a short amino acid sequence is cut out of a loop, resulting in two independent polypeptide chains in each subunit. Both chains are closely intertwined and form one contiguous structural domain. Like all lectins, pea lectin binds to complex oligosaccharides, but its physiological role and its natural ligand are unknown. In this study, experiments to establish a functional assay for pea lectin have been conducted, and its folding, stability and monomer-dimer-equilibrium have been characterized. To investigate the specific role of the processing for stability and folding, an unprocessed construct was expressed in E. coli and compared to the processed form. Both proteins have the same kinetic stability against chemical denaturant. They denature extremely slowly, because only the isolated subunits can unfold, and the monomer-dimer-equilibrium favors

  17. Monomer-dimer model on a scale-free small-world network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhongzhi; Sheng, Yibin; Jiang, Qiang

    2012-02-01

    The explicit determination of the number of monomer-dimer arrangements on a network is a theoretical challenge, and exact solutions to monomer-dimer problem are available only for few limiting graphs with a single monomer on the boundary, e.g., rectangular lattice and quartic lattice; however, analytical research (even numerical result) for monomer-dimer problem on scale-free small-world networks is still missing despite the fact that a vast variety of real systems display simultaneously scale-free and small-world structures. In this paper, we address the monomer-dimer problem defined on a scale-free small-world network and obtain the exact formula for the number of all possible monomer-dimer arrangements on the network, based on which we also determine the asymptotic growth constant of the number of monomer-dimer arrangements in the network. We show that the obtained asymptotic growth constant is much less than its counterparts corresponding to two-dimensional lattice and Sierpinski fractal having the same average degree as the studied network, which indicates from another aspect that scale-free networks have a fundamentally distinct architecture as opposed to regular lattices and fractals without power-law behavior.

  18. 1 / n Expansion for the Number of Matchings on Regular Graphs and Monomer-Dimer Entropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pernici, Mario

    2017-08-01

    Using a 1 / n expansion, that is an expansion in descending powers of n, for the number of matchings in regular graphs with 2 n vertices, we study the monomer-dimer entropy for two classes of graphs. We study the difference between the extensive monomer-dimer entropy of a random r-regular graph G (bipartite or not) with 2 n vertices and the average extensive entropy of r-regular graphs with 2 n vertices, in the limit n → ∞. We find a series expansion for it in the numbers of cycles; with probability 1 it converges for dimer density p < 1 and, for G bipartite, it diverges as |ln(1-p)| for p → 1. In the case of regular lattices, we similarly expand the difference between the specific monomer-dimer entropy on a lattice and the one on the Bethe lattice; we write down its Taylor expansion in powers of p through the order 10, expressed in terms of the number of totally reducible walks which are not tree-like. We prove through order 6 that its expansion coefficients in powers of p are non-negative.

  19. Free light chain monomer-dimer patterns in the diagnosis of multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, Batia; Golderman, Sizilia; Yahalom, Gilad; Yeskaraev, Regina; Ziv, Tamar; Aizenbud, Boris M; Sela, Ben-Ami; Livneh, Avi

    2013-04-30

    In our search of new biomarkers for multiple sclerosis (MS), we aimed to characterize the immunoglobulin (Ig) free light chains (FLC) in patients' cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and serum, and to evaluate the diagnostic utility of FLC monomer-dimer patterns for MS. FLC were analyzed by Western blotting and mass spectroscopy. CSF and serum samples were examined for the presence of oligoclonal Ig bands by a conventional laboratory test for MS. Three distinct pathological FLC monomer-dimer patterns, typical of MS but not of other neurological diseases, were revealed. In 31 out 56 MS patients the highly increased CSF levels of κ monomers and dimers were demonstrated. In 18 MS patients, the increased κ-FLC levels were accompanied by highly elevated λ dimers. Five MS cases showed no significant elevation in κ-FLC, but they displayed abnormally high λ dimer levels. The intensity of the immunoreactive FLC bands was measured to account for κ and λ monomer and dimer levels and their ratios in the CSF and serum. Combined usage of different FLC parameters allowed the determination of the appropriate FLC threshold values to diagnose MS. The developed method showed higher sensitivity and specificity (96% and 90%, respectively), as compared to those of the conventional OCB test (82% and 70%, respectively). Our study highlights the role of the differential analysis of monomeric and dimeric κ- and λ-FLC for the precise diagnosis of MS.

  20. Kinetic phase transitions in a contaminated monomer-dimer reaction model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bustos, V.; Uñac, R. O.; Zgrablich, G.

    2000-12-01

    The irreversible kinetics of a monomer-dimer reaction on a catalyst surface [the Ziff-Gulari-Barshad (ZGB) model] in the presence of a contaminant species is studied by means of Monte Carlo simulation. The only processes allowed to the contaminant are adsorption and desorption; it is otherwise inert. The reaction window, delimited by a second order irreversible phase transition at low monomer concentration (lower bound transition) and by a first order one at high monomer concentration (upper bound transition) in the ZGB model is found to shrink with increasing contaminant concentration in a way that depends on its adsorption-desorption kinetics. Through epidemic analysis, it is also found that the upper bound transition changes from first to second order and that the lower bound transition can also be affected depending on the contaminant adsorption-desorption kinetics. The results may provide alternative explanations for experimental observations.

  1. A mean-field monomer-dimer model with attractive interaction: Exact solution and rigorous results

    SciTech Connect

    Alberici, D. Contucci, P. Mingione, E.

    2014-06-15

    A mean-field monomer-dimer model which includes an attractive interaction among both monomers and dimers is introduced and its exact solution rigorously derived. The Heilmann-Lieb method for the pure hard-core interacting case is used to compute upper and lower bounds for the pressure. The bounds are shown to coincide in the thermodynamic limit for a suitable choice of the monomer density m. The computation of the monomer density is achieved by solving a consistency equation in the phase space (h, J), where h tunes the monomer potential and J the attractive potential. The critical point and exponents are computed and show that the model is in the mean-field ferromagnetic universality class.

  2. Kinetic phase transitions in a contaminated monomer-dimer reaction model

    PubMed

    Bustos; Unac; Zgrablich

    2000-12-01

    The irreversible kinetics of a monomer-dimer reaction on a catalyst surface [the Ziff-Gulari-Barshad (ZGB) model] in the presence of a contaminant species is studied by means of Monte Carlo simulation. The only processes allowed to the contaminant are adsorption and desorption; it is otherwise inert. The reaction window, delimited by a second order irreversible phase transition at low monomer concentration (lower bound transition) and by a first order one at high monomer concentration (upper bound transition) in the ZGB model is found to shrink with increasing contaminant concentration in a way that depends on its adsorption-desorption kinetics. Through epidemic analysis, it is also found that the upper bound transition changes from first to second order and that the lower bound transition can also be affected depending on the contaminant adsorption-desorption kinetics. The results may provide alternative explanations for experimental observations.

  3. Extracting equilibrium constants from kinetically limited reacting systems.

    PubMed

    Correia, John J; Stafford, Walter F

    2009-01-01

    It has been known for some time that slow kinetics will distort the shape of a reversible reaction boundary. Here we present a tutorial on direct boundary fitting of sedimentation velocity data for a monomer-dimer system that exhibits kinetic effects. Previous analysis of a monomer-dimer system suggested that rapid reaction behavior will persist until the relaxation time of the system exceeds 100 s (reviewed in Kegeles and Cann, 1978). Utilizing a kinetic integrator feature in Sedanal (Stafford and Sherwood, 2004), we can now fit for the k(off) values and measure the uncertainty at the 95% confidence interval. For the monomer-dimer system the range of well determined k(off) values is limited to 0.005 to 10(-5) s(-1) corresponding to relaxation times (at a loading concentration of the Kd) of approximately 70 to approximately 33,000 s. For shorter relaxation times the system is fast and only the equilibrium constant K but not k(off) can be uniquely determined. For longer relaxation times the system is irreversibly slow, and assuming the system was at initial equilibrium before the start of the run, only the equilibrium constant K but not k(off) can be uniquely determined.

  4. Self-association of oxime: electronic and vibrational structures of formaldoxime monomer, dimer, and trimer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akagi, Kazuo; Tanabe, Yukitoshi; Yamabe, Tokio

    1983-10-01

    The self-association of oxime is investigated from the aspect of intermolecular hydrogen bonding through ab initio SCF MO calculations on formaldoxime monomer, dimer, and trimer. It is understood from population analysis that formaldoxime monomer has inherently a suitable electronic distribution for constructing OH⋯3N hydrogen-bonded cyclic dimer and trimer. The formaldoxime trimer is characterized as the depressed nine membered ring. It is also confirmed to be more stable and preferable as a predominantly existing species than the dimer, which accounts for the experimental value of average association number for oximes. Vibrational analysis reveals that upon the self-association the OH stretching vibration is red-shifted, while both the OH in-plane and out-of-plane bending ones are blue-shifted, the results of which lead to a global feature of motion that ring wagging and ring puckering are activated. Largely enhanced intensities of IR-active OH stretching vibrations are well rationalized with more prominent charge polarization centered around =NOH sites in the formaldoxime dimer and trimer.

  5. Wire and extended ladder model predict THz oscillations in DNA monomers, dimers and trimers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lambropoulos, K.; Kaklamanis, K.; Morphis, A.; Tassi, M.; Lopp, R.; Georgiadis, G.; Theodorakou, M.; Chatzieleftheriou, M.; Simserides, C.

    2016-12-01

    We call monomer a B-DNA base pair and study, analytically and numerically, electron or hole oscillations in monomers, dimers and trimers. We employ two tight binding (TB) approaches: (I) at the base-pair level, using the on-site energies of the base pairs and the hopping parameters between successive base pairs i.e. a wire model, and (II) at the single-base level, using the on-site energies of the bases and the hopping parameters between neighbouring bases, specifically between (a) two successive bases in the same strand, (b) complementary bases that define a base pair, and (c) diagonally located bases of successive base pairs, i.e. an extended ladder model since it also includes the diagonal hoppings (c). For monomers, with TB II, we predict periodic carrier oscillations with frequency f≈ 50 -550 THz. For dimers, with TB I, we predict periodic carrier oscillations with f≈ 0.25 -100 THz. For trimers made of identical monomers, with TB I, we predict periodic carrier oscillations with f≈ 0.5 -33 THz. In other cases, either with TB I or TB II, the oscillations may be not strictly periodic, but Fourier analysis shows similar frequency content. For dimers and trimers, TB I and TB II are successfully compared giving complementary aspects of the oscillations.

  6. Asymptotics of the monomer-dimer model on two-dimensional semi-infinite lattices.

    PubMed

    Kong, Yong

    2007-05-01

    By using the asymptotic theory of Pemantle and Wilson [R. Pemantle and M. C. Wilson, J. Comb. Theory, Ser. A10.1006/jcta.2001.3201 97, 129 (2002)], asymptotic expansions of the free energy of the monomer-dimer model on two-dimensional semi-infinite infinity x n lattices in terms of dimer density are obtained for small values of n , at both high- and low-dimer-density limits. In the high-dimer-density limit, the theoretical results confirm the dependence of the free energy on the parity of n , a result obtained previously by computational methods by Y. Kong [Y. Kong, Phys. Rev. E10.1103/PhysRevE.74.061102 74, 061102 (2006); Phys. Rev. E10.1103/PhysRevE.73.016106 73, 016106 (2006);Phys. Rev. E10.1103/PhysRevE.74.011102 74, 011102 (2006)]. In the low-dimer-density limit, the free energy on a cylinder infinity x n lattice strip has exactly the same first n terms in the series expansion as that of an infinite infinity x infinity lattice.

  7. Photo-induced decolorization of dimethylmethylene blue with selenious acid: a novel method to examine selective monomer-dimer distribution of the dye in micelle.

    PubMed

    Nath, Sudip; Ghosh, Sujit Kumar; Panigrahi, Sudipa; Pal, Tarasankar

    2005-07-01

    In this report, selenious acid (H2SeO3) has been exploited to study the decolorization of a cationic dye, dimethylmethylene blue (DMMB) with UV-light. Micelles have effectively been employed as organized media to promote the rate of decolorization of the dye molecules. Micellar catalysis has been explained as a consequence of electrostatic, hydrophobic and charge transfer interactions. It has also been shown that strong charge transfer and electrostatic interaction lead to an appreciable enhancement of the reaction rate in micelle, whereas, weak hydrophobic interaction is of marginal importance. Existence of monomer-dimer equilibrium for the dye molecules under certain selective environments has been identified spectrophotometrically. Then the shift of dimer-monomer equilibrium of the dye has been successfully studied in aqueous and micellar environments exploiting photodecolorization process for the dye in solution. 'Salting-in' and 'salting-out' agents were introduced into the reaction mixture to examine the viability of the dye decolorization process for dye contaminated water samples.

  8. Molecular structure and vibrational analysis of 5-nitro-6-methyluracil molecule based on monomer, dimer and trimer calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alam, M. J.; Bhat, S. A.; Ahmad, S.

    2016-05-01

    Molecular structure and vibrational spectra of 5-nitro-6-methyluracil molecule have been studied by the simulation of its monomer, dimer and trimer forms using DFT and MP2 methods with 6-311G(d,p) basis set. Anharmonic force field calculations have been carried out for the isolated monomer, while the calculations on dimer and trimer have been done in the harmonic approximation. An accurate numerical integration grid has been used for geometry optimization as well as frequency calculation. Anharmonic vibrational frequencies have been computed using VPT2 algorithm (Barone's method) as well as VSCF and VSCF-PT2 approaches. These methods yield results that are in remarkable agreement with the experiment. The coupling strengths between pair of modes have been also calculated using coupling integral based on 2MR-QFF approximation. The vibrational assignments have been made with the help of potential energy distribution values and animated modes.

  9. (H2O)2(g): Monomer/dimer vibrational frequency shifts in Bopp-Jancsó-Heinzinger- and Matsuoka-Clementi-Yoshimine-Lie-type flexible potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slanina, Zdeněk

    1991-01-01

    Harmonic vibrational analysis of the water dimer is reported for four BJH- and four MCYL-type flexible water-water potentials. The calculated monomer/dimer frequency shifts correspond reasonably well to the available observed terms, the BJH-type flexible potentials (with the gas-phase intramolecular potential) yielding a slightly better agreement.

  10. Optical fluoride sensor based on monomer-dimer equilibrium of scandium(III)-octaethylporphyrin in a plasticized polymeric film.

    PubMed

    Kang, Youngjea; Kampf, Jeff W; Meyerhoff, Mark E

    2007-08-29

    A fluoride-selective optical sensor based on scandium(III)-octaethylporphyrin (Sc(III)OEP) as an ionophore within a plasticized PVC film is described. The presence of fluoride ion in the aqueous sample phase increases the formation of a difluoro-bridged Sc(III)OEP dimer species in the polymer film. The ability of the Sc(III) porphyrin to form the dimeric structure in the presence of fluoride is confirmed by UV-vis spectroscopy and X-ray crystallography. For more practical sensing applications, a pH chromoionophore (ETH 7075) is added to the plasticized PVC film along with Sc(III)OEP and the observed optical response is based on coextraction of protons with sample phase fluoride to create the dimeric porphyrin and a protonated chromoionophore species. The selectivity pattern observed is F- > ClO4(-), SCN-, NO3(-) > Br-, Cl-. Only organic salicylate is a significant interferent. Fast and reversible fluoride response is observed over the range of 10(-4) to 10(-2) M fluoride, allowing use of the sensing film in a waveguide configuration for flow-injection measurements.

  11. Optical Fluoride Sensor Based on Monomer-Dimer Equilibrium of Scandium(III)-Octaethylporphyrin in a Plasticized Polymeric Film

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Youngjea; Kampf, Jeff W.; Meyerhoff, Mark E.

    2007-01-01

    A fluoride-selective optical sensor based on scandium(III) octaethylporphyrin (Sc(III)OEP) as an ionophore within a plasticized PVC film is described. The presence of fluoride ion in the aqueous sample phase increases the formation of a difluoro-bridged Sc(III)OEP dimer species in the polymer film. The ability of the Sc(III) porphyrin to form the dimeric structure in the presence of fluoride is confirmed by UV-Vis spectroscopy and X-ray crystallography. For more practical sensing applications, a pH chromoionophore (ETH 7075) is added to the plasticized PVC film along with Sc(III)OEP and the observed optical response is based on co-extraction of protons with sample phase fluoride to create the dimeric porphyrin and a protonated chromoionophore species. The selectivity pattern observed is F-≫ClO4-, SCN-, NO3->Br-, Cl-. Only organic salicylate is a significant interferent. Fast and reversible fluoride response is observed over the range of 10-4 ~10-2 M fluoride, allowing use of the sensing film in a waveguide configuration for flow-injection measurements. PMID:17719905

  12. Protonation effect on the electronic properties of 2-pyridone monomer, dimer and its water clusters: A theoretical study

    SciTech Connect

    Saed, Behnaz; Omidyan, Reza E-mail: reza.omidyan@u-psud.fr

    2014-01-14

    The CC2 (second order approximate coupled cluster method) has been applied to investigate protonation effect on electronic transition energies of 2-pyridone (2PY), 2-pyridone dimer, and micro-solvated 2-pyridone (0-2 water molecules). The PE profiles of protonated 2-pyridone (2PYH{sup +}) as well as monohydrated 2PYH{sup +} at the different electronic states have been investigated. The {sup 1}πσ* state in protonated species (2PYH{sup +}) is a barrier free and dissociative state along the O-H stretching coordinate. In this reaction coordinate, the lowest lying {sup 1}πσ* predissociates the bound S{sub 1}({sup 1}ππ*) state, connecting the latter to a conical intersection with the S{sub 0} state. These conical intersections lead the {sup 1}ππ* state to proceed as predissociative state and finally direct the excited system to the ground state. Furthermore, in presence of water molecule, the {sup 1}πσ* state still remains dissociative but the conical intersection between {sup 1}πσ* and ground state disappears. In addition, according to the CC2 calculation results, it has been predicted that protonation significantly blue shifts the S{sub 1}-S{sub 0} electronic transition of monomer, dimer, and microhydrated 2-pyridone.

  13. Gas-phase H/D exchange and collision cross sections of hemoglobin monomers, dimers, and tetramers.

    PubMed

    Wright, P John; Douglas, D J

    2009-03-01

    The conformations of gas-phase ions of hemoglobin, and its dimer and monomer subunits have been studied with H/D exchange and cross section measurements. During the H/D exchange measurements, tetramers undergo slow dissociation to dimers, and dimers to monomers, but this did not prevent drawing conclusions about the relative exchange levels of monomers, dimers, and tetramers. Assembly of the monomers into tetramers, hexamers, and octamers causes the monomers to exchange a greater fraction of their hydrogens. Dimer ions, however, exchange a lower fraction of their hydrogens than monomers or tetramers. Solvation of tetramers affects the exchange kinetics. Solvation molecules do not appear to exchange, and solvation lowers the overall exchange level of the tetramers. Cross section measurements show that monomer ions in low charge states, and tetramer ions have compact structures, comparable in size to the native conformations in solution. Dimers have remarkably compact structures, considerably smaller than the native conformation in solution and smaller than might be expected from the monomer or tetramer cross sections. This is consistent with the relatively low level of exchange of the dimers.

  14. [Re(eta(5)-C5H5)(CO)3]+ family of 17-electron compounds: monomer/dimer equilibria and other reactions.

    PubMed

    Chong, Daesung; Laws, Derek R; Nafady, Ayman; Costa, Paulo Jorge; Rheingold, Arnold L; Calhorda, Maria José; Geiger, William E

    2008-02-27

    The anodic electrochemical oxidations of ReCp(CO)3 (1, Cp = eta(5)-C5H5), Re(eta(5)-C5H4NH2)(CO)3 (2), and ReCp*(CO)3 (3, Cp* = eta(5)-C5Me5), have been studied in CH2Cl2 containing [NBu4][TFAB] (TFAB = [B(C6F5)4]-) as supporting electrolyte. One-electron oxidations were observed with E(1/2) = 1.16, 0.79, and 0.91 V vs ferrocene for 1-3, respectively. In each case, rapid dimerization of the radical cation gave the dimer dication, [Re2Cp(gamma)2(CO)6]2+ (where Cp(gamma) represents a generic cyclopentadienyl ligand), which may be itself reduced cathodically back to the original 18-electron neutral complex ReCp(gamma)(CO)3. DFT calculations show that the SOMO of 1+ is highly Re-based and hybridized to point away from the metal, thereby facilitating the dimerization process and other reactions of the Re(II) center. The dimers, isolated in all three cases, have long metal-metal bonds that are unsupported by bridging ligands, the bond lengths being calculated as 3.229 A for [Re2Cp2(CO)6]2+ (1(2)2+) and measured as 3.1097 A for [Re2(C5H4NH2)2(CO)6]2+ (2(2)2+) by X-ray crystallography on [Re2(C5H4NH2)2(CO)6][TFAB]2. The monomer/dimer equilibrium constants are between K(dim) = 10(5) M(-1) and 10(7) M(-1) for these systems, so that partial dissociation of the dimers gives a modest amount of the corresponding monomer that is free to undergo radical cation reactions. The radical 1+ slowly abstracts a chlorine atom from dichloromethane to give the 18-electron complex [ReCp(CO)3Cl]+ as a side product. The radical cation 1+ acts as a powerful one-electron oxidant capable of effectively driving outer-sphere electron-transfer reactions with reagents having potentials of up to 0.9 V vs ferrocene.

  15. Efficient simulation of chemical potentials and phase equilibria in associating fluids: monomer/dimer insertion versus gradual particle insertion in primitive water models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vörtler, Horst L.; Kettler, Matthias

    Widom's test particle method for simulation of chemical potentials fails for associating (network forming) fluids. Therefore we study more sophisticated insertion methods, such as gradual particle insertion and the recent unbonded particle insertion of Tripathi and Chapman. We model strongly associating fluids by short-ranged primitive models (PMs) due to Nezbeda and co-workers. Recently, we showed that gradual insertion, in principle, is applicable to PM water. Here, we study systematically subcritical chemical potential isotherms, determine vapour-liquid coexistence densities and estimate the critical point density and temperature. For comparison we implement two variants of the Tripathi-Chapman algorithm. In the first case we use as unbonded test particles only particles which remain single molecules (monomers), when inserted and in the second case such test particles which remain as single molecules or form a two-particle cluster with an existing free molecule (monomer/dimer), when inserted. While monomer insertion improves Widom's method slightly, monomer/dimer insertion extends substantially the range of application to the subcritical temperatures studied by gradual insertion. But, for low temperatures monomer/dimer insertion requires extremely long Markov chains and significantly more computer time than gradual insertion. The Tripathi-Chapman algorithm - a direct extension of Widom's method - is much simpler than gradual insertion and therefore should be preferred at supercritical and critical conditions.

  16. Monomer-dimer CO-O 2 catalytic reaction on (0 0 1) surface and subsurface of a simple cubic structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, K. M.; Ahmed, N.

    2000-06-01

    The presence of subsurface oxygen has been observed experimentally in monomer-dimer (CO-O 2 and NO-CO) surface reactions. By the use of Monte Carlo simulation the effect of this subsurface oxygen in CO-O 2 catalytic reaction on (0 0 1) surface and subsurface of a simple cubic structure is studied. We have carried out detailed analysis of the effect of increasing the subsurface neighbours on the phase diagram of the CO-O 2 reaction. It is shown that the presence of subsurface completely eliminates the usual second-order phase transition of this reaction. It is also shown that increase in the number of subsurface neighbours shifts the single-transition point towards higher CO concentration value. When first, second and third subsurface nearest-neighbours are considered, the single-transition point is shifted to the stoichiometric ratio of 2/3.

  17. Effect of Eley-Rideal Process on the Phase Diagram of a Monomer-Dimer Catalytic Reaction on (001) Surface and Subsurface of a Simple Cubic Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qaisrani, A. U.; Khan, K. M.; Khalid, M.

    We have investigated the effects of the Eley-Rideal (ER) process on the phase diagram of the Langmuir-Hinshelwood (LH) type monomer-dimer (CO-O2) catalytic reaction on (001) surface and subsurface of a simple cubic structure. With the consideration of a new pathway in which a dimer is adsorbed in such a way that it takes one surface site whereas second site may be from a surface or from a subsurface, a situation close to experiments is observed, i.e., with slight introduction of the monomer (CO), the production of AB2 starts. In this case, the qualitative trend of surface oxygen coverage is consistent with the experimental situation.

  18. Higher-order expansions for the entropy of a dimer or a monomer-dimer system on d-dimensional lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butera, P.; Federbush, P.; Pernici, M.

    2013-06-01

    Recently, an expansion as a power series in 1/d has been presented for the specific entropy of a complete dimer covering of a d-dimensional hypercubic lattice. This paper extends from 3 to 10 the number of terms known in the series. Likewise, an expansion for the entropy, dependent on the dimer density p, of a monomer-dimer system, involving a sum ∑kak(d)pk, has been offered recently. We herein extend the number of known expansion coefficients from 6 to 20 for the hypercubic lattices of general dimensionality d and from 6 to 24 for the hypercubic lattices of dimensionalities d<5. We show that these extensions can lead to accurate numerical estimates of the p-dependent entropy for lattices with dimension d>2. The computations of this paper have led us to make the following marvelous conjecture: In the case of the hypercubic lattices, all the expansion coefficients ak(d) are positive. This paper results from a simple melding of two disparate research programs: one computing to high orders the Mayer series coefficients of a dimer gas and the other studying the development of entropy from these coefficients. An effort is made to make this paper self-contained by including a review of the earlier works.

  19. Photoionization of cold gas phase coronene and its clusters: Autoionization resonances in monomer, dimer, and trimer and electronic structure of monomer cation

    SciTech Connect

    Bréchignac, Philippe Falvo, Cyril; Parneix, Pascal; Pino, Thomas; Pirali, Olivier; Garcia, Gustavo A.; Nahon, Laurent; Joblin, Christine; Kokkin, Damian; Bonnamy, Anthony; Mulas, Giacomo

    2014-10-28

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are key species encountered in a large variety of environments such as the Interstellar Medium (ISM) and in combustion media. Their UV spectroscopy and photodynamics in neutral and cationic forms are important to investigate in order to learn about their structure, formation mechanisms, and reactivity. Here, we report an experimental photoelectron-photoion coincidence study of a prototypical PAH molecule, coronene, and its small clusters, in a molecular beam using the vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) photons provided by the SOLEIL synchrotron facility. Mass-selected high resolution threshold photoelectron (TPES) and total ion yield spectra were obtained and analyzed in detail. Intense series of autoionizing resonances have been characterized as originating from the monomer, dimer, and trimer neutral species, which may be used as spectral fingerprints for their detection in the ISM by VUV absorption spectroscopy. Finally, a full description of the electronic structure of the monomer cation was made and discussed in detail in relation to previous spectroscopic optical absorption data. Tentative vibrational assignments in the near-threshold TPES spectrum of the monomer have been made with the support of a theoretical approach based on density functional theory.

  20. Soluble monomers, dimers and HLA-G-expressing extracellular vesicles: the three dimensions of structural complexity to use HLA-G as a clinical biomarker.

    PubMed

    Nardi, F da Silva; König, L; Wagner, B; Giebel, B; Santos Manvailer, L F; Rebmann, V

    2016-09-01

    The HLA-G molecule belongs to the family of nonclassical human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I. At variance to classical HLA class I, HLA-G displays (i) a low number of nucleotide variations within the coding region, (ii) a high structural diversity, (iii) a restricted peptide repertoire, (iv) a limited tissue distribution and (v) strong immune-suppressive properties. The physiological HLA-G surface expression is restricted to the maternal-fetal interface and to immune-privileged adult tissues. Soluble forms of HLA-G (sHLA-G) are detectable in various body fluids. Cellular activation and pathological processes are associated with an aberrant or a neo-expression of HLA-G/sHLA-G. Functionally, HLA-G and its secreted forms are considered to be key players in the induction of short- and long-term tolerance. Thus, its unique expression profile and tolerance-inducing functions render HLA-G/sHLA-G an attractive biomarker to monitor the systemic health/disease status and disease activity/progression for clinical approaches in disease management and treatments. Here, we place emphasis on (i) the current status of the tolerance-inducing functions by HLA-G/sHLA-G, (ii) the current complexity to implement this molecule as a meaningful clinical biomarker regarding the three dimensions of structural diversity (monomers, dimers and HLA-G-expressing extracellular vesicles) with its functional implications, and (iii) novel and future approaches to detect and quantify sHLA-G structures and functions.

  1. The redox switch of gamma-glutamylcysteine ligase via a reversible monomer-dimer transition is a mechanism unique to plants.

    PubMed

    Gromes, Roland; Hothorn, Michael; Lenherr, Esther D; Rybin, Vladimir; Scheffzek, Klaus; Rausch, Thomas

    2008-06-01

    In plants, the first committed enzyme for glutathione biosynthesis, gamma-glutamylcysteine ligase (GCL), is under multiple controls. The recent elucidation of GCL structure from Brassica juncea (BjGCL) has revealed the presence of two intramolecular disulfide bridges (CC1, CC2), which both strongly impact on GCL activity in vitro. Here we demonstrate that cysteines of CC1 are confined to plant species from the Rosids clade, and are absent in other plant families. Conversely, cysteines of CC2 involved in the monomer-dimer transition in BjGCL are not only conserved in the plant kingdom, but are also conserved in the evolutionarily related alpha- (and some gamma-) proteobacterial GCLs. Focusing on the role of CC2 for GCL redox regulation, we have extended our analysis to all available plant (31; including moss and algal) and related proteobacterial GCL (46) protein sequences. Amino acids contributing to the homodimer interface in BjGCL are highly conserved among plant GCLs, but are not conserved in related proteobacterial GCLs. To probe the significance of this distinction, recombinant GCLs from Nicotiana tabacum (NtGCL), Agrobacterium tumefaciens (AtuGCL, alpha-proteobacteria) and Xanthomonas campestris (XcaGCL, gamma-proteobacteria) were analyzed for their redox response. As expected, NtGCL forms a homodimer under oxidizing conditions, and is activated more than threefold. Conversely, proteobacterial GCLs remain monomeric under oxidizing and reducing conditions, and their activities are not inhibited by DTT, despite the presence of CC2. We conclude that although plant GCLs are evolutionarily related to proteobacterial GCLs, redox regulation of their GCLs via CC2-dependent dimerization has been acquired later in evolution, possibly as a consequence of compartmentation in the redox-modulated plastid environment.

  2. Thermochromic Magnetic Ionic Liquids from Cationic Nickel(II) Complexes Exhibiting Intramolecular Coordination Equilibrium.

    PubMed

    Lan, Xue; Mochida, Tomoyuki; Funasako, Yusuke; Takahashi, Kazuyuki; Sakurai, Takahiro; Ohta, Hitoshi

    2017-01-18

    Among the various thermochromic materials, liquid thermochromic materials are comparatively rare. To produce functional thermochromic liquids, we have designed ionic liquids based on cationic nickel complexes with ether side chains, [Ni(acac)(Me2 NC2 H4 NR(1) R(2) )]Tf2 N ([1]Tf2 N: R(1) =C3 H6 OEt, R(2) =Me; [2]Tf2 N: R(1) =C3 H6 OMe, R(2) =Me; [3]Tf2 N: R(1) =R(2) =C3 H6 OMe), where acac=acetylacetonate and Tf2 N=(F3 CSO2 )2 N(-) . The side chains (R(1) , R(2) ) can moderately coordinate to the metal center, enabling temperature-dependent coordination equilibria in the liquid state. [1]Tf2 N is a liquid at room temperature. [2]Tf2 N is obtained as a solid (Tm =352.7 K) but remains liquid at room temperature after melting. [3]Tf2 N is a solid with a high melting point (Tm =422.3 K). These salts display thermochromism in the liquid state, appearing red at high temperatures and orange, light-blue, or bluish-green at lower temperatures, and exhibiting concomitant changes in their magnetic properties. This phenomenon is based on temperature-dependent equilibrium between a square-planar diamagnetic species and a paramagnetic species with intramolecular ether coordination.

  3. A Hydrodynamic Analysis of APOBEC3G Reveals a Monomer-Dimer-Tetramer Self-Association that has Implications for Anti-HIV Function†

    PubMed Central

    Salter, Jason D.; Krucinska, Jolanta; Raina, Jay; Smith, Harold C.; Wedekind, Joseph E.

    2009-01-01

    The innate antiviral factor APOBEC3G (A3G) possesses RNA binding activity and deaminates HIV-1 DNA. High-molecular-mass forms of A3G can be isolated from a variety of cell types, but exhibit limited deaminase activity relative to low-molecular-mass species prepared under RNA-depleted conditions. To investigate the fundamental oligomeric state and shape of A3G, we conducted sedimentation velocity analyses of the pure enzyme under RNA-deficient conditions. The results reveal a predominant dimer in equilibrium with minor monomeric and tetrameric species. Hydrodynamic modeling of the dimer supports an extended cylindrical shape that assembles into an elongated tetramer. Overall, the results provide physical restraints for the A3G quaternary structure that have implications for modulating antiviral function. PMID:19839647

  4. A hydrodynamic analysis of APOBEC3G reveals a monomer-dimer-tetramer self-association that has implications for anti-HIV function.

    PubMed

    Salter, Jason D; Krucinska, Jolanta; Raina, Jay; Smith, Harold C; Wedekind, Joseph E

    2009-11-17

    The innate antiviral factor APOBEC3G (A3G) possesses RNA binding activity and deaminates HIV-1 DNA. High-molecular mass forms of A3G can be isolated from a variety of cell types but exhibit limited deaminase activity relative to low-molecular mass species prepared under RNA-depleted conditions. To investigate the fundamental oligomeric state and shape of A3G, we conducted sedimentation velocity analyses of the pure enzyme under RNA-deficient conditions. The results reveal a predominant dimer in equilibrium with minor monomeric and tetrameric species. Hydrodynamic modeling of the dimer supports an extended cylindrical shape that assembles into an elongated tetramer. Overall, the results provide physical restraints for the A3G quaternary structure that have implications for modulating antiviral function.

  5. Modelling the equilibrium bed topography of submarine meanders that exhibit reversed secondary flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darby, Stephen E.; Peakall, Jeff

    2012-08-01

    Submarine meandering channels formed by turbidity currents are common; however, their location on the ocean floor and their inactive status make it difficult to measure process dynamics and bed morphology. Conceptual models have, therefore, instead been developed by analogy with the well understood mechanics of fluvial bends. However, unlike fluvial currents, in turbidity currents the downstream velocity maximum typically occurs near the bed and recent experimental and theoretical studies suggest that, under certain hydraulic and morphological conditions, this forces the secondary flow to exhibit the reverse sense to that encountered in fluvial bends. Herein the possible morphological implications of a reversal of secondary flow are explored by modelling the force balance on sediment grains moving through either (i) field and laboratory submarine meander bends that are known to exhibit ‘reversed' secondary flows, or (ii) inactive submarine meander bends where the nature of the secondary flow in the formative turbidity currents can be inferred to be reversed. Exploratory simulations are undertaken for a single hypothetical submarine bend with morphological properties based on nine relic meanders observed on the floor of the Gulf of Alaska. Reconstructions of secondary flow properties within the Gulf of Alaska bends indicate that they likely exhibited reversed secondary flows. Results of the exploratory simulations indicate that, unlike typical fluvial meanders, the transverse bed profile gradient of the hypothetical bend is very low and the point bar is located downstream of the bend apex.

  6. Equilibrium crossing exhibited by an ethynylhelicene (M)-nonamer during random-coil-to-double-helix thermal transition in solution.

    PubMed

    Miyagawa, Masamichi; Yagi, Atsushi; Shigeno, Masanori; Yamaguchi, Masahiko

    2014-11-28

    The structural change between the random-coil and the double-helix of an ethynylhelicene (M)-nonamer during heating crosses equilibrium. This is a phenomenon where a chemical reaction crosses equilibrium and returns to equilibrium. It is due to an accelerated rate of formation of the double-helix by self-catalysis and an equilibrium shift.

  7. Spin transfer torque in non-collinear magnetic tunnel junctions exhibiting quasiparticle bands: a non-equilibrium Green's function study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaya, Selvaraj Mathi

    2017-06-01

    A non-equilibrium Green's function formulation to study the spin transfer torque (STT) in non-collinear magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJs) exhibiting quasiparticle bands is developed. The formulation can be used to study the magnetoresistance and spin current too. The formulation is used to study the STT in model tunnel junctions exhibiting multiple layers and quasiparticle bands. The many body interaction that gives rise to quasiparticle bands is assumed to be a s - f exchange interaction at the electrode regions of the MTJ. The quasiparticle bands are obtained using a many body procedure and the single particle band structure is obtained using the tight binding model. The bias dependence of the STT as well as the influence of band occupancy and s - f exchange coupling strength on the STT are studied. We find from our studies that the band occupancy plays a significant role in deciding the STT and the s - f interaction strength too influences the STT significantly. Anomalous behavior in both the parallel and perpendicular components of the STT is obtained from our studies. Our results obtained for certain values of the band occupation are found to show the trend observed from the experimental measurements of STT.

  8. Fixed-point methods for computing the equilibrium composition of complex biochemical mixtures.

    PubMed Central

    Kuzmic, P

    1998-01-01

    The fixed-point algebraic method [Storer and Cornish-Bowden (1976) Biochem. J. 159, 1-5] for computing the concentrations at equilibrium of complex biochemical mixtures fails for many binding stoichiometries, especially those that include molecular self-association. A typical example is the monomer-dimer-tetramer equilibrium. This paper reports two main results. First, the above algorithm is analysed theoretically to predict for which binding stoichiometries it succeeds and for which it will fail. Secondly, an alternative algorithm is described for self-associating biochemical systems. Illustrative examples are based on the dimeric proteinase from HIV. PMID:9531499

  9. Spectrophotometric and thermodynamic study on the dimerization equilibrium of ionic dyes in water by chemometrics method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niazi, Ali; Yazdanipour, Ateesa; Ghasemi, Jahanbakhsh; Kubista, Mikael

    2006-09-01

    The monomer-dimer equilibrium and thermodynamic of several ionic dyes (Neutral Red, Nile Blue A, Safranine T and Thionine) has been investigated by means of spectrophotometric and chemometrics methods. The dimerization constants of these ionic dyes have been determined by studying the dependence of their absorption spectra on the temperature in the range 20-75 °C at concentrations of Neutral Red (1.73 × 10 -5 M), Nile Blue A (3.94 × 10 -5 M), Safranine (6.59 × 10 -5 M) and Thionine (6.60 × 10 -5 M). The monomer-dimer equilibrium of these dyes has been determined by chemometrics refinement of the absorption spectra obtained by thermometric titrations performed. The processing of the data carried out for quantitative analysis of undefined mixtures, based on simultaneous resolution of the overlapping bands in the whole set of absorption spectra. The enthalpy and entropy of the dimerization reactions were determined from the dependence of the equilibrium constants to the temperature (van't Hoff equation).

  10. TiO2 anatase nanorods with non-equilibrium crystallographic {001} facets and their coatings exhibiting high photo-oxidation of NO gas.

    PubMed

    Habran, Margarita; Krambrock, Klaus; Maia da Costa, M E H; Morgado, Edisson; Marinkovic, Bojan A

    2017-03-08

    Development of highly active photocatalysts is mandatory for more widespread application of this alternative environmental technology. Synthesis of photocatalysts, such as anatase TiO2, with more reactive, non-equilibrium, crystallographic facets is theoretically justified by a more efficient interfacial charge transfer to reactive adsorbed species, increasing quantum efficiency of photocatalyst. Air and vacuum calcinations of protonated trititanate nanotubes lead to their transformation to anatase nanorods. The nanorods synthesized by air calcination demonstrate photo-oxidation of NO gas more than three times superior to the one presented by the benchmark P-25 photocatalyst. This performance has been explained in terms of 50% higher specific surface area and, more importantly, through the predominance of more reactive, non-equilibrium, {001} crystallographic facets of the anatase nanorods. These facets present a high density of undercoordinated Ti cations, which favors adsorption of reactant species, and strained Ti-O-Ti bonds, leading to more efficient photo-oxidation reactions. Reduced Ti species, such as Ti(3+), were not observed in the as-obtained nanorods, while reactive adsorbed molecules are scarce on the nanorods obtained through vacuum calcination. Dip-coating of TiO2 anatase nanorods (air calcined) over soda-lime glass plates was used to prepare visible light transparent, superhydrophilic and highly adherent photocatalytic coatings with homogenously distributed nanopores.

  11. Solvent Effects on the Monomer/Hydrogen-Bonded Dimer Equilibrium in Carboxylic Acids: (+)-(S)-Ketopinic Acid as a Case Study.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez Ortega, Pilar Gema; Montejo Gámez, Manuel; Márquez López, Fernando; López González, Juan Jesús

    2016-06-21

    The hydrogen-bond-assisted self-association process of a chiral semirigid carboxylic acid, namely, (+)-(S)-ketopinic acid, has been studied. The multiconformational monomer/dimer equilibrium has been evaluated by means of a concentration-dependent FTIR study that enabled the experimental equilibrium constants of the dimer formation reaction (Kdim ) to be determined in two solvents of different polarity. In CDCl3 , dimeric forms predominate, even in diluted solutions (KdimCF =5.074), whereas in CD3 CN the self-association process is hindered and monomers are always the main species, irrespective of solute concentration (KdimAN =0.194). The reliability of the dimerization constants and the derived mono- and dimeric experimental fractions have been proven by means of accurate matching between the experimental vibrational circular dichroism spectra of the species and the theoretical spectra generated by considering the simultaneous weighted contributions of the concomitant monomers and dimers.

  12. Linear rate-equilibrium relations arising from ion channel-bilayer energetic coupling

    PubMed Central

    Greisen, Per; Lum, Kevin; Ashrafuzzaman, Md.; Greathouse, Denise V.; Andersen, Olaf S.; Lundbæk, Jens A.

    2011-01-01

    Linear rate-equilibrium (RE) relations, also known as linear free energy relations, are widely observed in chemical reactions, including protein folding, enzymatic catalysis, and channel gating. Despite the widespread occurrence of linear RE relations, the principles underlying the linear relation between changes in activation and equilibrium energy in macromolecular reactions remain enigmatic. When examining amphiphile regulation of gramicidin channel gating in lipid bilayers, we noted that the gating process could be described by a linear RE relation with a simple geometric interpretation. This description is possible because the gating process provides a well-understood reaction, in which structural changes in a bilayer-embedded model protein can be studied at the single-molecule level. It is thus possible to obtain quantitative information about the energetics of the reaction transition state and its position on a spatial coordinate. It turns out that the linear RE relation for the gramicidin monomer-dimer reaction can be understood, and the quantitative relation between changes in activation energy and equilibrium energy can be interpreted, by considering the effects of amphiphiles on the changes in bilayer elastic energy associated with channel gating. We are not aware that a similar simple mechanistic explanation of a linear RE relation has been provided for a chemical reaction in a macromolecule. RE relations generally should be useful for examining how amphiphile-induced changes in bilayer properties modulate membrane protein folding and function, and for distinguishing between direct (e.g., due to binding) and indirect (bilayer-mediated) effects. PMID:21768343

  13. Relative to quinine and quinidine, their 9-epimers exhibit decreased cytostatic activity and altered heme binding but similar cytocidal activity versus Plasmodium falciparum.

    PubMed

    Gorka, Alexander P; Sherlach, Katy S; de Dios, Angel C; Roepe, Paul D

    2013-01-01

    The 9-epimers of quinine (QN) and quinidine (QD) are known to exhibit poor cytostatic potency against P. falciparum (Karle JM, Karle IL, Gerena L, Milhous WK, Antimicrob. Agents Chemother. 36:1538-1544, 1992). We synthesized 9-epi-QN (eQN) and 9-epi-QD (eQD) via Mitsunobu esterification-saponification and evaluated both cytostatic and cytocidal antimalarial activities. Relative to the cytostatic activity of QN and QD, we observed a large decrease in cytostatic activity (higher 50% inhibitory concentration [IC(50)s]) against QN-sensitive strain HB3, QN-resistant strain Dd2, and QN-hypersensitive strain K76I, consistent with previous work. However, we observed relatively small changes in cytocidal activity (the 50% lethal dose), similar to observations with chloroquine (CQ) analogues with a wide range of IC(50)s (see the accompanying paper [A. P. Gorka, J. N. Alumasa, K. S. Sherlach, L. M. Jacobs, K. B. Nickley, J. P. Brower, A. C. de Dios, and P. D. Roepe, Antimicrob. Agents Chemother. 57:356-364, 2013]). Compared to QN and QD, the 9-epimers had significantly reduced hemozoin inhibition efficiency and did not affect pH-dependent aggregation of ferriprotoporphyrin IX (FPIX) heme. Magnetic susceptibility measurements showed that the 9-epimers perturb FPIX monomer-dimer equilibrium in favor of monomer, and UV-visible (VIS) titrations showed that eQN and eQD bind monomer with similar affinity relative to QN and QD. However, unique ring proton shifts in the presence of zinc(II) protoporphyrin IX (ZnPIX) indicate that binding of the 9-epimers to monomeric heme is via a distinct geometry. We isolated eQN- and eQD-FPIX complexes formed under aqueous conditions and analyzed them by mass, fluorescence, and UV-VIS spectroscopies. The 9-epimers produced low-fluorescent adducts with a 2:1 stoichiometry (drug to FPIX) which did not survive electrospray ionization, in contrast to QN and QD complexes. The data offer important insight into the relevance of heme interactions as a

  14. Relative to Quinine and Quinidine, Their 9-Epimers Exhibit Decreased Cytostatic Activity and Altered Heme Binding but Similar Cytocidal Activity versus Plasmodium falciparum

    PubMed Central

    Gorka, Alexander P.; Sherlach, Katy S.; de Dios, Angel C.

    2013-01-01

    The 9-epimers of quinine (QN) and quinidine (QD) are known to exhibit poor cytostatic potency against P. falciparum (Karle JM, Karle IL, Gerena L, Milhous WK, Antimicrob. Agents Chemother. 36:1538–1544, 1992). We synthesized 9-epi-QN (eQN) and 9-epi-QD (eQD) via Mitsunobu esterification-saponification and evaluated both cytostatic and cytocidal antimalarial activities. Relative to the cytostatic activity of QN and QD, we observed a large decrease in cytostatic activity (higher 50% inhibitory concentration [IC50s]) against QN-sensitive strain HB3, QN-resistant strain Dd2, and QN-hypersensitive strain K76I, consistent with previous work. However, we observed relatively small changes in cytocidal activity (the 50% lethal dose), similar to observations with chloroquine (CQ) analogues with a wide range of IC50s (see the accompanying paper [A. P. Gorka, J. N. Alumasa, K. S. Sherlach, L. M. Jacobs, K. B. Nickley, J. P. Brower, A. C. de Dios, and P. D. Roepe, Antimicrob. Agents Chemother. 57:356–364, 2013]). Compared to QN and QD, the 9-epimers had significantly reduced hemozoin inhibition efficiency and did not affect pH-dependent aggregation of ferriprotoporphyrin IX (FPIX) heme. Magnetic susceptibility measurements showed that the 9-epimers perturb FPIX monomer-dimer equilibrium in favor of monomer, and UV-visible (VIS) titrations showed that eQN and eQD bind monomer with similar affinity relative to QN and QD. However, unique ring proton shifts in the presence of zinc(II) protoporphyrin IX (ZnPIX) indicate that binding of the 9-epimers to monomeric heme is via a distinct geometry. We isolated eQN- and eQD-FPIX complexes formed under aqueous conditions and analyzed them by mass, fluorescence, and UV-VIS spectroscopies. The 9-epimers produced low-fluorescent adducts with a 2:1 stoichiometry (drug to FPIX) which did not survive electrospray ionization, in contrast to QN and QD complexes. The data offer important insight into the relevance of heme interactions as a

  15. Partition Equilibrium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feldman, Michal; Tennenholtz, Moshe

    We introduce partition equilibrium and study its existence in resource selection games (RSG). In partition equilibrium the agents are partitioned into coalitions, and only deviations by the prescribed coalitions are considered. This is in difference to the classical concept of strong equilibrium according to which any subset of the agents may deviate. In resource selection games, each agent selects a resource from a set of resources, and its payoff is an increasing (or non-decreasing) function of the number of agents selecting its resource. While it has been shown that strong equilibrium exists in resource selection games, these games do not possess super-strong equilibrium, in which a fruitful deviation benefits at least one deviator without hurting any other deviator, even in the case of two identical resources with increasing cost functions. Similarly, strong equilibrium does not exist for that restricted two identical resources setting when the game is played repeatedly. We prove that for any given partition there exists a super-strong equilibrium for resource selection games of identical resources with increasing cost functions; we also show similar existence results for a variety of other classes of resource selection games. For the case of repeated games we identify partitions that guarantee the existence of strong equilibrium. Together, our work introduces a natural concept, which turns out to lead to positive and applicable results in one of the basic domains studied in the literature.

  16. Exhibiting Lives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Golden, Deborah; Elbaz-Luwisch, Freema

    2007-01-01

    This paper examines some of the dilemmas that accompany the emergence of the personal voice in scholarly work, by taking a close, grounded look at the way in which these unfolded in a specific academic course. As part of the course, entitled "A cultural approach to the life cycle", students were asked to participate in a group exhibition in which…

  17. Exhibiting Lives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Golden, Deborah; Elbaz-Luwisch, Freema

    2007-01-01

    This paper examines some of the dilemmas that accompany the emergence of the personal voice in scholarly work, by taking a close, grounded look at the way in which these unfolded in a specific academic course. As part of the course, entitled "A cultural approach to the life cycle", students were asked to participate in a group exhibition in which…

  18. Museum Exhibit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    A TSP from NASA Tech Briefs provided the solution to an electrical problem at a Florida museum. When a model train would not start without a jerk, a Marshall Space Flight Center development called pulse width control was adapted. The new circuit enables the train to start smoothly and reduces construction and maintenance costs. The same technology is also used in another hands-on exhibit. Applications of other TSPs are anticipated.

  19. Outdoor Exhibits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    The National Data Buoy Center (NDBC) at the John C. Stennis Space Center has exhibits located in front of the Visitors Center. These boat-shaped buoys are moored in areas of the ocean that experience hostile environmental conditions. The instruments installed gather information and relay it to the National Weather Service by satellite. Nomad buoys are 20 feet long and weigh 13,900 pounds. They provide information on wind speed and direction, humidity levels, air and sea surface temperature and air pressure. U.S. Coast Guard ships transport buoys to their mooring sites.

  20. Outdoor Exhibits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    The National Data Buoy Center (NDBC) at the John C. Stennis Space Center has exhibits located in front of the Visitors Center. These boat-shaped buoys are moored in areas of the ocean that experience hostile environmental conditions. The instruments installed gather information and relay it to the National Weather Service by satellite. Nomad buoys are 20 feet long and weigh 13,900 pounds. They provide information on wind speed and direction, humidity levels, air and sea surface temperature and air pressure. U.S. Coast Guard ships transport buoys to their mooring sites.

  1. Informational Equilibrium.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-09-01

    that for variouis standard types of equilibria* they hold. In particular, if one uses the teaporary equilibrium framework one can use the standard ...T, the integral converges toward f’ia(da) f fU(b~dc)6(a,b,c)T( asdm ) A B C which is fR (da) f d(lib,c) U0 T (cab) A BxC Me converse Is obvious

  2. Equilibrium Shaping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izzo, Dario; Petazzi, Lorenzo

    2006-08-01

    We present a satellite path planning technique able to make identical spacecraft aquire a given configuration. The technique exploits a behaviour-based approach to achieve an autonomous and distributed control over the relative geometry making use of limited sensorial information. A desired velocity is defined for each satellite as a sum of different contributions coming from generic high level behaviours: forcing the final desired configuration the behaviours are further defined by an inverse dynamic calculation dubbed Equilibrium Shaping. We show how considering only three different kind of behaviours it is possible to acquire a number of interesting formations and we set down the theoretical framework to find the entire set. We find that allowing a limited amount of communication the technique may be used also to form complex lattice structures. Several control feedbacks able to track the desired velocities are introduced and discussed. Our results suggest that sliding mode control is particularly appropriate in connection with the developed technique.

  3. Tuning universality far from equilibrium

    PubMed Central

    Karl, Markus; Nowak, Boris; Gasenzer, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Possible universal dynamics of a many-body system far from thermal equilibrium are explored. A focus is set on meta-stable non-thermal states exhibiting critical properties such as self-similarity and independence of the details of how the respective state has been reached. It is proposed that universal dynamics far from equilibrium can be tuned to exhibit a dynamical transition where these critical properties change qualitatively. This is demonstrated for the case of a superfluid two-component Bose gas exhibiting different types of long-lived but non-thermal critical order. Scaling exponents controlled by the ratio of experimentally tuneable coupling parameters offer themselves as natural smoking guns. The results shed light on the wealth of universal phenomena expected to exist in the far-from-equilibrium realm. PMID:23928853

  4. A general equilibrium analysis of partial-equilibrium welfare measures: The case of climate change

    SciTech Connect

    Kokoski, M.F.; Smith, V.K. )

    1987-06-01

    This paper uses computable general equilibrium models to demonstrate that partial-equilibrium welfare measures can offer reasonable approximations of the true welfare changes for large exogenous changes. With consistency in the size and direction of the indirect price effects associated with large shocks, single sector partial-equilibrium measures will exhibit small errors. Otherwise the errors can be substantial and difficult to sign.

  5. Oncogenic Mutations Differentially Affect Bax Monomer, Dimer, and Oligomeric Pore Formation in the Membrane.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Mingzhen; Zheng, Jie; Nussinov, Ruth; Ma, Buyong

    2016-09-15

    Dysfunction of Bax, a pro-apoptotic regulator of cellular metabolism is implicated in neurodegenerative diseases and cancer. We have constructed the first atomistic models of the Bax oligomeric pore consisting with experimental residue-residue distances. The models are stable, capturing well double electron-electron resonance (DEER) spectroscopy measurements and provide structural details in line with the DEER data. Comparison with the latest experimental results revealed that our models agree well with both Bax and Bak pores, pointed to a converged structural arrangement for Bax and Bak pore formation. Using multi-scale molecular dynamics simulations, we probed mutational effects on Bax transformation from monomer → dimer → membrane pore formation at atomic resolution. We observe that two cancer-related mutations, G40E and S118I, allosterically destabilize the monomer and stabilize an off-pathway swapped dimer, preventing productive pore formation. This observation suggests a mechanism whereby the mutations may work mainly by over-stabilizing the monomer → dimer transformation toward an unproductive off-pathway swapped-dimer state. Our observations point to misfolded Bax states, shedding light on the molecular mechanism of Bax mutation-elicited cancer. Most importantly, the structure of the Bax pore facilitates future study of releases cytochrome C in atomic detail.

  6. Temperature influences epimerization and composition of flavanol monomers, dimers and trimers during cocoa bean roasting.

    PubMed

    Kothe, Lisa; Zimmermann, Benno F; Galensa, Rudolf

    2013-12-15

    Cocoa consumption is suggested to promote many health benefits, since cocoa is a rich source of flavanols; but amounts and profiles of flavanols depend strongly on the bean type, origin and manufacturing process. Roasting is known as a crucial step in technical treatment of cocoa, which leads to flavanol losses and modifications, especially the epimerization of (-)-epicatechin to (-)-catechin. This study monitors the influence of cocoa bean roasting on the composition of flavanol monomers to trimers, with special focus on epimerization, which was quantified for procyanidin dimers, and also observed for trimers for the first time. Five dimeric and two trimeric potential epimerization products were detected and the extent of epimerization during cocoa roasting was shown to be a function of temperature. The data also showed remarkable variations in the change of flavanol content. The quantified flavanols decreased about 50% in Java beans and increased about 30% in Ivory Coast beans, despite being roasted under equal conditions. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Surface-induced dissociations and reactions of acetonitrile monomer, dimer and trimer ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mair, C.; Herman, Z.; Fedor, J.; Lezius, M.; Märk, T. D.

    2003-01-01

    Dissociations and reactions induced by impact of acetonitrile monomer ions (CH3CN+,CD3CN+), dimer ions [(CH3CN)2+, (CD3CN)2+] and trimer ions [(CD3CN)3+] on a hydrocarbon-covered stainless-steel surface were investigated over the projectile energy range of 3-70 eV. Both simple dissociations of the projectile ion and chemical reactions of H-atom transfer from the surface material (followed by dissociations of the protonated projectile ion formed) were observed for the monomer ions. Results obtained for the dimer ions (CD3CN)2+ indicate the formation of the protonated acetonitrile ions via surface-induced reactions in two ways: (i) an intracluster ion-molecule reaction followed by dissociation to form CD3CND+, and (b) a hydrogen pick-up reaction from the surface material during the interaction of the dimer ion with the surface leading to CD3CNH+. A simple model based on the Brauman double-well potential—suggested earlier to explain the occurrence of analogous reactions in acetone cluster ion/surface interactions—accounts well for the formation of both product ions. Moreover, in adition to these protonated species, considerable amounts of nondissociated dimer ions were observed after acetonitrile dimer cation/surface collisions with energies up to 25 eV. Similarly, both trimer ions (up to 20 eV) and dimer ions (up to 30 eV) were observed in acetonitrile trimer cation/surface interactions. This indicates that unimolecular dissociation kinetics governs the product formation for these cluster ion/surface interactions.

  8. Mechanism for controlling the monomer-dimer conversion of SARS coronavirus main protease.

    PubMed

    Wu, Cheng Guo; Cheng, Shu Chun; Chen, Shiang Chuan; Li, Juo Yan; Fang, Yi Hsuan; Chen, Yau Hung; Chou, Chi Yuan

    2013-05-01

    The Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV) main protease (M(pro)) cleaves two virion polyproteins (pp1a and pp1ab); this essential process represents an attractive target for the development of anti-SARS drugs. The functional unit of M(pro) is a homodimer and each subunit contains a His41/Cys145 catalytic dyad. Large amounts of biochemical and structural information are available on M(pro); nevertheless, the mechanism by which monomeric M(pro) is converted into a dimer during maturation still remains poorly understood. Previous studies have suggested that a C-terminal residue, Arg298, interacts with Ser123 of the other monomer in the dimer, and mutation of Arg298 results in a monomeric structure with a collapsed substrate-binding pocket. Interestingly, the R298A mutant of M(pro) shows a reversible substrate-induced dimerization that is essential for catalysis. Here, the conformational change that occurs during substrate-induced dimerization is delineated by X-ray crystallography. A dimer with a mutual orientation of the monomers that differs from that of the wild-type protease is present in the asymmetric unit. The presence of a complete substrate-binding pocket and oxyanion hole in both protomers suggests that they are both catalytically active, while the two domain IIIs show minor reorganization. This structural information offers valuable insights into the molecular mechanism associated with substrate-induced dimerization and has important implications with respect to the maturation of the enzyme.

  9. Oncogenic Mutations Differentially Affect Bax Monomer, Dimer, and Oligomeric Pore Formation in the Membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Mingzhen; Zheng, Jie; Nussinov, Ruth; Ma, Buyong

    2016-09-01

    Dysfunction of Bax, a pro-apoptotic regulator of cellular metabolism is implicated in neurodegenerative diseases and cancer. We have constructed the first atomistic models of the Bax oligomeric pore consisting with experimental residue-residue distances. The models are stable, capturing well double electron-electron resonance (DEER) spectroscopy measurements and provide structural details in line with the DEER data. Comparison with the latest experimental results revealed that our models agree well with both Bax and Bak pores, pointed to a converged structural arrangement for Bax and Bak pore formation. Using multi-scale molecular dynamics simulations, we probed mutational effects on Bax transformation from monomer → dimer → membrane pore formation at atomic resolution. We observe that two cancer-related mutations, G40E and S118I, allosterically destabilize the monomer and stabilize an off-pathway swapped dimer, preventing productive pore formation. This observation suggests a mechanism whereby the mutations may work mainly by over-stabilizing the monomer → dimer transformation toward an unproductive off-pathway swapped-dimer state. Our observations point to misfolded Bax states, shedding light on the molecular mechanism of Bax mutation-elicited cancer. Most importantly, the structure of the Bax pore facilitates future study of releases cytochrome C in atomic detail.

  10. Oncogenic Mutations Differentially Affect Bax Monomer, Dimer, and Oligomeric Pore Formation in the Membrane

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Mingzhen; Zheng, Jie; Nussinov, Ruth; Ma, Buyong

    2016-01-01

    Dysfunction of Bax, a pro-apoptotic regulator of cellular metabolism is implicated in neurodegenerative diseases and cancer. We have constructed the first atomistic models of the Bax oligomeric pore consisting with experimental residue-residue distances. The models are stable, capturing well double electron-electron resonance (DEER) spectroscopy measurements and provide structural details in line with the DEER data. Comparison with the latest experimental results revealed that our models agree well with both Bax and Bak pores, pointed to a converged structural arrangement for Bax and Bak pore formation. Using multi-scale molecular dynamics simulations, we probed mutational effects on Bax transformation from monomer → dimer → membrane pore formation at atomic resolution. We observe that two cancer-related mutations, G40E and S118I, allosterically destabilize the monomer and stabilize an off-pathway swapped dimer, preventing productive pore formation. This observation suggests a mechanism whereby the mutations may work mainly by over-stabilizing the monomer → dimer transformation toward an unproductive off-pathway swapped-dimer state. Our observations point to misfolded Bax states, shedding light on the molecular mechanism of Bax mutation-elicited cancer. Most importantly, the structure of the Bax pore facilitates future study of releases cytochrome C in atomic detail. PMID:27630059

  11. Strange attractors with various equilibrium types

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sprott, J. C.

    2015-07-01

    Of the eight types of hyperbolic equilibrium points in three-dimensional flows, one is overwhelmingly dominant in dissipative chaotic systems. This paper shows examples of chaotic systems for each of the eight types as well as one without any equilibrium and two that are nonhyperbolic. The systems are a generalized form of the Nosé-Hoover oscillator with a single equilibrium point. Six of the eleven cases have hidden attractors, and six of them exhibit multistability for the chosen parameters.

  12. Universal Stress Protein Exhibits a Redox-Dependent Chaperone Function in Arabidopsis and Enhances Plant Tolerance to Heat Shock and Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Young Jun; Melencion, Sarah Mae Boyles; Lee, Eun Seon; Park, Joung Hun; Alinapon, Cresilda Vergara; Oh, Hun Taek; Yun, Dae-Jin; Chi, Yong Hun; Lee, Sang Yeol

    2015-01-01

    Although a wide range of physiological information on Universal Stress Proteins (USPs) is available from many organisms, their biochemical, and molecular functions remain unidentified. The biochemical function of AtUSP (At3g53990) from Arabidopsis thaliana was therefore investigated. Plants over-expressing AtUSP showed a strong resistance to heat shock and oxidative stress, compared with wild-type and Atusp knock-out plants, confirming the crucial role of AtUSP in stress tolerance. AtUSP was present in a variety of structures including monomers, dimers, trimers, and oligomeric complexes, and switched in response to external stresses from low molecular weight (LMW) species to high molecular weight (HMW) complexes. AtUSP exhibited a strong chaperone function under stress conditions in particular, and this activity was significantly increased by heat treatment. Chaperone activity of AtUSP was critically regulated by the redox status of cells and accompanied by structural changes to the protein. Over-expression of AtUSP conferred a strong tolerance to heat shock and oxidative stress upon Arabidopsis, primarily via its chaperone function. PMID:26734042

  13. Oligomer formation of the bacterial second messenger c-di-GMP: reaction rates and equilibrium constants indicate a monomeric state at physiological concentrations.

    PubMed

    Gentner, Martin; Allan, Martin G; Zaehringer, Franziska; Schirmer, Tilman; Grzesiek, Stephan

    2012-01-18

    Cyclic diguanosine-monophosphate (c-di-GMP) is a bacterial signaling molecule that triggers a switch from motile to sessile bacterial lifestyles. This mechanism is of considerable pharmaceutical interest, since it is related to bacterial virulence, biofilm formation, and persistence of infection. Previously, c-di-GMP has been reported to display a rich polymorphism of various oligomeric forms at millimolar concentrations, which differ in base stacking and G-quartet interactions. Here, we have analyzed the equilibrium and exchange kinetics between these various forms by NMR spectroscopy. We find that the association of the monomer into a dimeric form is in fast exchange (equilibrium constant of about 1 mM. At concentrations above 100 μM, higher oligomers are formed in the presence of cations. These are presumably tetramers and octamers, with octamers dominating above about 0.5 mM. Thus, at the low micromolar concentrations of the cellular environment and in the absence of additional compounds that stabilize oligomers, c-di-GMP should be predominantly monomeric. This finding has important implications for the understanding of c-di-GMP recognition by protein receptors. In contrast to the monomer/dimer exchange, formation and dissociation of higher oligomers occurs on a time scale of several hours to days. The time course can be described quantitatively by a simple kinetic model where tetramers are intermediates of octamer formation. The extremely slow oligomer dissociation may generate severe artifacts in biological experiments when c-di-GMP is diluted from concentrated stock solution. We present a simple method to quantify c-di-GMP monomers and oligomers from UV spectra and a procedure to dissolve the unwanted oligomers by an annealing step.

  14. Information-theoretic equilibrium and observable thermalization

    PubMed Central

    Anzà, F.; Vedral, V.

    2017-01-01

    A crucial point in statistical mechanics is the definition of the notion of thermal equilibrium, which can be given as the state that maximises the von Neumann entropy, under the validity of some constraints. Arguing that such a notion can never be experimentally probed, in this paper we propose a new notion of thermal equilibrium, focused on observables rather than on the full state of the quantum system. We characterise such notion of thermal equilibrium for an arbitrary observable via the maximisation of its Shannon entropy and we bring to light the thermal properties that it heralds. The relation with Gibbs ensembles is studied and understood. We apply such a notion of equilibrium to a closed quantum system and show that there is always a class of observables which exhibits thermal equilibrium properties and we give a recipe to explicitly construct them. Eventually, an intimate connection with the Eigenstate Thermalisation Hypothesis is brought to light. PMID:28266646

  15. Information-theoretic equilibrium and observable thermalization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anzà, F.; Vedral, V.

    2017-03-01

    A crucial point in statistical mechanics is the definition of the notion of thermal equilibrium, which can be given as the state that maximises the von Neumann entropy, under the validity of some constraints. Arguing that such a notion can never be experimentally probed, in this paper we propose a new notion of thermal equilibrium, focused on observables rather than on the full state of the quantum system. We characterise such notion of thermal equilibrium for an arbitrary observable via the maximisation of its Shannon entropy and we bring to light the thermal properties that it heralds. The relation with Gibbs ensembles is studied and understood. We apply such a notion of equilibrium to a closed quantum system and show that there is always a class of observables which exhibits thermal equilibrium properties and we give a recipe to explicitly construct them. Eventually, an intimate connection with the Eigenstate Thermalisation Hypothesis is brought to light.

  16. Information-theoretic equilibrium and observable thermalization.

    PubMed

    Anzà, F; Vedral, V

    2017-03-07

    A crucial point in statistical mechanics is the definition of the notion of thermal equilibrium, which can be given as the state that maximises the von Neumann entropy, under the validity of some constraints. Arguing that such a notion can never be experimentally probed, in this paper we propose a new notion of thermal equilibrium, focused on observables rather than on the full state of the quantum system. We characterise such notion of thermal equilibrium for an arbitrary observable via the maximisation of its Shannon entropy and we bring to light the thermal properties that it heralds. The relation with Gibbs ensembles is studied and understood. We apply such a notion of equilibrium to a closed quantum system and show that there is always a class of observables which exhibits thermal equilibrium properties and we give a recipe to explicitly construct them. Eventually, an intimate connection with the Eigenstate Thermalisation Hypothesis is brought to light.

  17. Ethics on Exhibit

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vick, Randy M.

    2011-01-01

    This article discusses ethical questions raised by an exhibition of work by an artist with a history of mental illness and the exhibition's relevance to art therapy and “outsider art” discourse on the subject. Considerations for how such an exhibit could be handled had the circumstances included an art therapist and art therapy client are…

  18. Ethics on Exhibit

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vick, Randy M.

    2011-01-01

    This article discusses ethical questions raised by an exhibition of work by an artist with a history of mental illness and the exhibition's relevance to art therapy and “outsider art” discourse on the subject. Considerations for how such an exhibit could be handled had the circumstances included an art therapist and art therapy client are…

  19. Getting Freshman in Equilibrium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Chemical Education, 1983

    1983-01-01

    Various aspects of chemical equilibrium were discussed in six papers presented at the Seventh Biennial Conference on Chemical Education (Stillwater, Oklahoma 1982). These include student problems in understanding hydrolysis, helping students discover/uncover topics, equilibrium demonstrations, instructional strategies, and flaws to kinetic…

  20. Getting Freshman in Equilibrium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Chemical Education, 1983

    1983-01-01

    Various aspects of chemical equilibrium were discussed in six papers presented at the Seventh Biennial Conference on Chemical Education (Stillwater, Oklahoma 1982). These include student problems in understanding hydrolysis, helping students discover/uncover topics, equilibrium demonstrations, instructional strategies, and flaws to kinetic…

  1. Equilibrium of KSTAR Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    You, K.-I.; Lee, D.-K.; Lee, S. G.; Bak, J. G.; Hahn, S. H.; Lao, L.; Kstar Team

    2011-10-01

    We have installed the EFIT code on our computing system and made some modification to reconstruct the plasma equilibrium of KSTAR (Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research). KSTAR PF and TF coil systems use a CICC (Cable-In-Conduit Conductor) type superconductor. The CICC jacket material for most PF and all TF coils is Incoloy 908, which is a magnetic material with relative magnetic permeability greater than 10 in low external field. We newly introduced Diamagnetic Loop and variational Motion Stark Effect signals to equilibrium reconstruction. In this paper, we present some results of equilibrium reconstruction with the EFIT code, assess the effects of newly introduced diagnsotics signal on the equilibrium reconstruction and compare the EFIT results with the various diagnostics data in various plasma conditions including H- and L- modes. In addition, we will show the Incoloy908 effects on the plasma equilibrium.

  2. An Exhibit for Touching.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hunt, Susan

    1979-01-01

    An exhibit designed for visually handicapped persons presented by the Kalamazoo (Michigan) Institute of Art included bronze sculptures and oil paintings from the institute's permanent collection. (CL)

  3. An Exhibit for Touching.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hunt, Susan

    1979-01-01

    An exhibit designed for visually handicapped persons presented by the Kalamazoo (Michigan) Institute of Art included bronze sculptures and oil paintings from the institute's permanent collection. (CL)

  4. Chemical Principles Revisited: Chemical Equilibrium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mickey, Charles D.

    1980-01-01

    Describes: (1) Law of Mass Action; (2) equilibrium constant and ideal behavior; (3) general form of the equilibrium constant; (4) forward and reverse reactions; (5) factors influencing equilibrium; (6) Le Chatelier's principle; (7) effects of temperature, changing concentration, and pressure on equilibrium; and (8) catalysts and equilibrium. (JN)

  5. A Teaching Aids Exhibition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mahanja, Salah

    1985-01-01

    Describes an exhibition for the benefit of teachers of English in Arab Primary Schools, which was prepared by third-year students at the Teachers College for Arab Teachers. The exhibition included games, songs, audiovisual aids, crossword puzzles, vocabulary, spelling booklets, preposition aids, and worksheet and lesson planning aids. (SED)

  6. Response reactions: equilibrium coupling.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, Eufrozina A; Nagypal, Istvan

    2006-06-01

    It is pointed out and illustrated in the present paper that if a homogeneous multiple equilibrium system containing k components and q species is composed of the reactants actually taken and their reactions contain only k + 1 species, then we have a unique representation with (q - k) stoichiometrically independent reactions (SIRs). We define these as coupling reactions. All the other possible combinations with k + 1 species are the coupled reactions that are in equilibrium when the (q - k) SIRs are in equilibrium. The response of the equilibrium state for perturbation is determined by the coupling and coupled equilibria. Depending on the circumstances and the actual thermodynamic data, the effect of coupled equilibria may overtake the effect of the coupling ones, leading to phenomena that are in apparent contradiction with Le Chatelier's principle.

  7. Thermodynamics "beyond" local equilibrium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vilar, Jose; Rubi, Miguel

    2002-03-01

    Nonequilibrium thermodynamics has shown its applicability in a wide variety of different situations pertaining to fields such as physics, chemistry, biology, and engineering. As successful as it is, however, its current formulation considers only systems close to equilibrium, those satisfying the so-called local equilibrium hypothesis. Here we show that diffusion processes that occur far away from equilibrium can be viewed as at local equilibrium in a space that includes all the relevant variables in addition to the spatial coordinate. In this way, nonequilibrium thermodynamics can be used and the difficulties and ambiguities associated with the lack of a thermodynamic description disappear. We analyze explicitly the inertial effects in diffusion and outline how the main ideas can be applied to other situations. [J.M.G. Vilar and J.M. Rubi, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 98, 11081-11084 (2001)].

  8. Communicating Science through Exhibitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dusenbery, P.; Harold, J.; Morrow, C.

    It is critically important for the public to better understand the scientific process. Museum exhibitions are an important part of informal science education that can effectively reach public audiences as well as school groups. They provide an important gateway for the public to learn about compelling scientific endeavors. There are many ways for scientists to help develop science exhibitions. The Space Science Institute (SSI) is a national leader in producing traveling science exhibitions and their associated educational programming (i.e. interactive websites, educator workshops, public talks, instructional materials). Two of its exhibitions, Space Weather Center and MarsQuest, are currently on tour. Another exhibition, Alien Earths, is in development. The Space Weather Center was developed in partnership with various research missions at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center. MarsQuest is a 5000 square-foot traveling exhibition. The exhibit's second 3-year tour began this January at the Detroit Science Center. It is enabling millions of Americans to share in the excitement of the scientific exploration of Mars and to learn more about their own planet in the process. The 3,000 square-foot traveling exhibition, called Alien Earths, will bring origins-related research and discoveries to students and the American public. Alien Earths has four interrelated exhibit areas: Our Place in Space, Star Birth, PlanetQuest, and Search for Life. Exhibit visitors will explore the awesome events surrounding the birth of stars and planets; they will join scientists in the hunt for planets outside our solar system including those that may be in ``habitable zones'' around other stars; and finally they will be able to learn about how scientists are looking for signs of life beyond Earth. Besides the exhibits, SSI is also developing interactive web sites based on exhibit themes. New technologies are transforming the Web from a static medium to an interactive environment with tremendous

  9. Computing Equilibrium Chemical Compositions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcbride, Bonnie J.; Gordon, Sanford

    1995-01-01

    Chemical Equilibrium With Transport Properties, 1993 (CET93) computer program provides data on chemical-equilibrium compositions. Aids calculation of thermodynamic properties of chemical systems. Information essential in design and analysis of such equipment as compressors, turbines, nozzles, engines, shock tubes, heat exchangers, and chemical-processing equipment. CET93/PC is version of CET93 specifically designed to run within 640K memory limit of MS-DOS operating system. CET93/PC written in FORTRAN.

  10. Computing Equilibrium Chemical Compositions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcbride, Bonnie J.; Gordon, Sanford

    1995-01-01

    Chemical Equilibrium With Transport Properties, 1993 (CET93) computer program provides data on chemical-equilibrium compositions. Aids calculation of thermodynamic properties of chemical systems. Information essential in design and analysis of such equipment as compressors, turbines, nozzles, engines, shock tubes, heat exchangers, and chemical-processing equipment. CET93/PC is version of CET93 specifically designed to run within 640K memory limit of MS-DOS operating system. CET93/PC written in FORTRAN.

  11. New Hurricane Exhibit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    A new exhibit in StenniSphere depicting NASA's role in hurricane prediction and research and SSC's role in helping the region recover from Hurricane Katrina. The cyclone-shaped exhibit focuses on the effects of the Aug. 29, 2005 storm and outlines how NASA is working to improve weather forecasting. Through photos, 3-D models and digital animations, the exhibit tells the story of what happened inside the storm and how NASA's scientific research can increase the accuracy of hurricane tracking and modeling.

  12. New Hurricane Exhibit

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2007-08-29

    A new exhibit in StenniSphere depicting NASA's role in hurricane prediction and research and SSC's role in helping the region recover from Hurricane Katrina. The cyclone-shaped exhibit focuses on the effects of the Aug. 29, 2005 storm and outlines how NASA is working to improve weather forecasting. Through photos, 3-D models and digital animations, the exhibit tells the story of what happened inside the storm and how NASA's scientific research can increase the accuracy of hurricane tracking and modeling.

  13. New Hurricane Exhibit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    A new exhibit in StenniSphere depicting NASA's role in hurricane prediction and research and SSC's role in helping the region recover from Hurricane Katrina. The cyclone-shaped exhibit focuses on the effects of the Aug. 29, 2005 storm and outlines how NASA is working to improve weather forecasting. Through photos, 3-D models and digital animations, the exhibit tells the story of what happened inside the storm and how NASA's scientific research can increase the accuracy of hurricane tracking and modeling.

  14. Communicating Science through Exhibitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dusenbery, Paul

    2005-04-01

    It is critically important for the public to better understand the scientific process. Museum exhibitions are an important part of informal science education that can effectively reach public audiences as well as school groups. They provide an important gateway for the public to learn about compelling scientific endeavors. Science exhibitions also provide a marvelous opportunity for scientists to become engaged in the exhibit development process. The Space Science Institute (SSI) is a national leader in producing traveling science exhibitions and their associated educational programming (i.e. interactive websites, educator workshops, public talks, instructional materials). The focus of this presentation will be on two of its exhibit projects: MarsQuest (on tour for four years) and Alien Earths (its tour began early in 2005). MarsQuest is enabling millions of Americans to share in the excitement of the scientific exploration of Mars and to learn more about their own planet in the process. Alien Earths will bring origins-related research and discoveries to students and the American public. It has four interrelated exhibit areas: Our Place in Space, Star Birth, Planet Quest, and Search for Life. Exhibit visitors will explore the awesome events surrounding the birth of stars and planets; they will join scientists in the hunt for planets outside our solar system including those that may be in ``habitable zones'' around other stars; and finally they will be able to learn about how scientists are looking for signs of life beyond Earth. SSI is also developing interactive web sites based on exhibit themes. New technologies are transforming the Web from a static medium to an interactive environment with tremendous potential for informal education and inquiry-based investigations. This talk will focus on the role informal science projects play in effectively communicating science to a broad, public audience.

  15. Test Control Center exhibit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Have you ever wondered how the engineers at John C. Stennis Space Center in Hancock County, Miss., test fire a Space Shuttle Main Engine? The Test Control Center exhibit at StenniSphere can answer your questions by simulating the test firing of a Space Shuttle Main Engine. A recreation of one of NASA's test control centers, the exhibit explains and portrays the 'shake, rattle and roar' that happens during a real test firing.

  16. Inferring unstable equilibrium configurations from experimental data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Virgin, L. N.; Wiebe, R.; Spottswood, S. M.; Beberniss, T.

    2016-09-01

    This research considers the structural behavior of slender, mechanically buckled beams and panels of the type commonly found in aerospace structures. The specimens were deflected and then clamped in a rigid frame in order to exhibit snap-through. That is, the initial equilibrium and the buckled (snapped-through) equilibrium configurations both co-existed for the given clamped conditions. In order to transit between these two stable equilibrium configurations (for example, under the action of an externally applied load), it is necessary for the structural component to pass through an intermediate unstable equilibrium configuration. A sequence of sudden impacts was imparted to the system, of various strengths and at various locations. The goal of this impact force was to induce relatively intermediate-sized transients that effectively slowed-down in the vicinity of the unstable equilibrium configuration. Thus, monitoring the velocity of the motion, and specifically its slowing down, should give an indication of the presence of an equilibrium configuration, even though it is unstable and not amenable to direct experimental observation. A digital image correlation (DIC) system was used in conjunction with an instrumented impact hammer to track trajectories and statistical methods used to infer the presence of unstable equilibria in both a beam and a panel.

  17. Immunity by equilibrium.

    PubMed

    Eberl, Gérard

    2016-08-01

    The classical model of immunity posits that the immune system reacts to pathogens and injury and restores homeostasis. Indeed, a century of research has uncovered the means and mechanisms by which the immune system recognizes danger and regulates its own activity. However, this classical model does not fully explain complex phenomena, such as tolerance, allergy, the increased prevalence of inflammatory pathologies in industrialized nations and immunity to multiple infections. In this Essay, I propose a model of immunity that is based on equilibrium, in which the healthy immune system is always active and in a state of dynamic equilibrium between antagonistic types of response. This equilibrium is regulated both by the internal milieu and by the microbial environment. As a result, alteration of the internal milieu or microbial environment leads to immune disequilibrium, which determines tolerance, protective immunity and inflammatory pathology.

  18. Swamp to Space exhibit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    The menacing-looking alligator is really harmless. It is one of the realistic props to help convince visitors that the feel of the swamp is real in StenniSphere's Swamp to Space exhibit at John C. Stennis Space Center in Hancock County, Miss. The historical section of the Swamp to Space exhibit tells the story of why and how Stennis Space Center came to be. It also pays tribute to the families who moved their homes to make way for the space age in Mississippi.

  19. Determination of nonaxisymmetric equilibrium

    SciTech Connect

    Elkin, D.

    1980-01-01

    The Princeton Equilibrium Code is modified to determine the equilibrium surfaces for a large aspect ratio toroidal system with helical magnetic fields. The code may easily be made to include any variety of modes. Verification of the code is made by comparison with an analytic solution for l = 3. Previously observed shifting of the magnetic axis with increasing pressure or with a changed externally applied vertical field is obtained. The case l = 0, a bumpy torus, gives convergence only for the lenient convergence tolerance of epsilon/sub b/ = 1.0 x 10-/sup 2/.

  20. Beyond Equilibrium Thermodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Öttinger, Hans Christian

    2005-01-01

    Beyond Equilibrium Thermodynamics fills a niche in the market by providing a comprehensive introduction to a new, emerging topic in the field. The importance of non-equilibrium thermodynamics is addressed in order to fully understand how a system works, whether it is in a biological system like the brain or a system that develops plastic. In order to fully grasp the subject, the book clearly explains the physical concepts and mathematics involved, as well as presenting problems and solutions; over 200 exercises and answers are included. Engineers, scientists, and applied mathematicians can all use the book to address their problems in modelling, calculating, and understanding dynamic responses of materials.

  1. 1989 Architectural Exhibition Winners.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Business Affairs, 1990

    1990-01-01

    Winners of the 1989 Architectural Exhibition sponsored annually by the ASBO International's School Facilities Research Committee include the Brevard Performing Arts Center (Melbourne, Florida), the Capital High School (Santa Fe, New Mexico), Gage Elementary School (Rochester, Minnesota), the Lakewood (Ohio) High School Natatorium, and three other…

  2. "Rocket Park" - exhibits

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1979-12-20

    Overall view at JSC lookin west from atop of Bldg. 1 showing rockets, parking lot and all threee stages of Saturn V. first stage of Saturn V exhibit in "Rocket Park" on west side of center little joe and mercury models are seen 1. JSC- Aerials

  3. 1989 Architectural Exhibition Winners.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Business Affairs, 1990

    1990-01-01

    Winners of the 1989 Architectural Exhibition sponsored annually by the ASBO International's School Facilities Research Committee include the Brevard Performing Arts Center (Melbourne, Florida), the Capital High School (Santa Fe, New Mexico), Gage Elementary School (Rochester, Minnesota), the Lakewood (Ohio) High School Natatorium, and three other…

  4. Exhibitions in Sight.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wasserman, Burton

    1978-01-01

    Early in the eighteenth century, Pompeii was discovered, a city that had been hidden for sixteen centuries by volcanic lava. There is a traveling exhibition of the sculptures, friezes, mosaics, and paintings being shown around the United States. Described is the history and contents of "Pompeii--A.D. 79." (RK)

  5. Exhibitions in Sight.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wasserman, Burton

    1978-01-01

    Early in the eighteenth century, Pompeii was discovered, a city that had been hidden for sixteen centuries by volcanic lava. There is a traveling exhibition of the sculptures, friezes, mosaics, and paintings being shown around the United States. Described is the history and contents of "Pompeii--A.D. 79." (RK)

  6. Exhibitions in Sight

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wasserman, Burton

    1977-01-01

    Today, few artists make serving vessels on a monumental scale. Here artists compete in this unique area of specialization prompted by the Campbell Museum in Camden, New Jersey, which is dedicated to collecting and exhibiting the very best in soup tureens. (Author/RK)

  7. Pictures at an Exhibition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kunz, Walter S., Jr.

    1997-01-01

    Describes the Youth Art Month exhibit in Howard County (Maryland) where students submitted their art focusing on school buildings and their interiors. Their art reveals concerns and desires about overcrowding, space utilization, school building height, outside lighting, solitude needs, and visual stimulation. The artwork is discussed in terms of…

  8. Alan Bean Art Exhibit

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-07-19

    Former NASA Astronaut and U.S. Senator John Glenn is seen at the opening of the exhibit "Alan Bean: Painting Apollo, First Artist on Another World" at the National Air and Space Museum, Monday, July 20, 2009 in Washington. The show opening coincided with the 40th anniversary celebration of Apollo. Photo Credit: (NASA/Carla Cioffi)

  9. Alan Bean Art Exhibit

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-07-19

    NASA Apollo 12 Astronaut and Artist Alan Bean gives remarks at the opening of the exhibit "Alan Bean: Painting Apollo, First Artist on Another World" at the National Air and Space Museum, Monday, July 20, 2009 in Washington. The show opening coincided with the 40th anniversary celebration of Apollo. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  10. Exhibition in Sight

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wasserman, Burton

    1978-01-01

    Ludwig Mies van der Rohe is known primarily as an architect. However, he also designed chairs and tables. Discusses an exhibit held in New York City a few months ago which showed how well the famous architect achieved his goals in the area of furniture design. (Author/RK)

  11. Development of a "First Principles" Water Potential with Flexible Monomers: Dimer Potential Energy Surface, VRT Spectrum, and Second Virial Coefficient.

    PubMed

    Babin, Volodymyr; Leforestier, Claude; Paesani, Francesco

    2013-12-10

    The development of a "first principles" water potential with flexible monomers (MB-pol) for molecular simulations of water systems from gas to condensed phases is described. MB-pol is built upon the many-body expansion of the intermolecular interactions, and the specific focus of this study is on the two-body term (V2B) representing the full-dimensional intermolecular part of the water dimer potential energy surface. V2B is constructed by fitting 40,000 dimer energies calculated at the CCSD(T)/CBS level of theory and imposing the correct asymptotic behavior at long-range as predicted from "first principles". The comparison of the calculated vibration-rotation tunneling (VRT) spectrum and second virial coefficient with the corresponding experimental results demonstrates the accuracy of the MB-pol dimer potential energy surface.

  12. An Updated Equilibrium Machine

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schultz, Emeric

    2008-01-01

    A device that can demonstrate equilibrium, kinetic, and thermodynamic concepts is described. The device consists of a leaf blower attached to a plastic container divided into two chambers by a barrier of variable size and form. Styrofoam balls can be exchanged across the barrier when the leaf blower is turned on and various air pressures are…

  13. An Updated Equilibrium Machine

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schultz, Emeric

    2008-01-01

    A device that can demonstrate equilibrium, kinetic, and thermodynamic concepts is described. The device consists of a leaf blower attached to a plastic container divided into two chambers by a barrier of variable size and form. Styrofoam balls can be exchanged across the barrier when the leaf blower is turned on and various air pressures are…

  14. Starship 2040 Exhibit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    This photograph shows the Starship 2040 leaving the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) for the exhibit site. Developed by the Space Transportation Directorate at MSFC, the Starship 2040 exhibit is housed in a 48-ft (14.6-m) tractor and trailer rig, permitting it to travel around the Nation, demonstrating NASA's vision of what commercial spaceflight might be like 40 years from now. All the irnovations suggested aboard the exhibit, automated vehicle health monitoring systems, high-energy propulsion drive, navigational aids and emergency and safety systems, are based on concepts and technologies now being studied at NASA Centers and partner institutions around the Nation. NASA is the nation's premier agency for development of the space transportation system, including future-generation reusable launch vehicles. Such systems, the keys to a 'real' Starship 2040, require revolutionary advances in critical aerospace technologies, from thermal, magnetic, chemical, and propellantless propulsion systems to new energy sources such as space solar power or antimatter propulsion. These and other advances are now being studied, developed, and tested at NASA field centers and partner institutions all over the Nation.

  15. Starship 2040 Exhibit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    This photograph shows onlookers viewing displays within the Starship 2040 exhibit on display at Joe Davis Stadium in Huntsville, Alabama. Developed by the Space Transportation Directorate at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC), the Starship 2040 exhibit is housed in a 48-ft (14.6-m) tractor and trailer rig, permitting it to travel around the Nation, demonstrating NASA's vision of what commercial spaceflight might be like 40 years from now. All the irnovations suggested aboard the exhibit (automated vehicle health monitoring systems, high-energy propulsion drive, navigational aids, and emergency and safety systems) are based on concepts and technologies now being studied at NASA Centers and partner institutions around the Nation. NASA is the Nation's premier agency for development of the space transportation system, including future-generation reusable launch vehicles. Such systems, the keys to a 'real' Starship 2040, require revolutionary advances in critical aerospace technologies, from thermal, magnetic, chemical, and propellantless propulsion systems to new energy sources such as space solar power or antimatter propulsion. These and other advances are now being studied, developed, and tested at NASA field centers and partner institutions all over the Nation.

  16. Starship 2040 Exhibit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    This photograph shows Justin Varnadore, son of a Marshall TV employee, at the controls of one of the many displays within the Starship 2040 exhibit on display at Joe Davis Stadium in Huntsville, Alabama. Developed by the Space Transportation Directorate at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC), the Starship 2040 exhibit is housed in a 48-ft (14.6-m) tractor and trailer rig, permitting it to travel around the Nation, demonstrating NASA's vision of what commercial spaceflight might be like 40 years from now. All the irnovations suggested aboard the exhibit (automated vehicle health monitoring systems, high-energy propulsion drive, navigational aids, and emergency and safety systems) are based on concepts and technologies now being studied at NASA Centers and partner institutions around the Nation. NASA is the Nation's premier agency for development of the space transportation system, including future-generation reusable launch vehicles. Such systems, the keys to a 'real' Starship 2040, require revolutionary advances in critical aerospace technologies, from thermal, magnetic, chemical, and propellantless propulsion systems to new energy sources such as space solar power or antimatter propulsion. These and other advances are now being studied, developed, and tested at NASA field centers and partner institutions all over the Nation.

  17. Starship 2040 Exhibit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    This photograph shows onlookers viewing displays within the Starship 2040 exhibit on display at Joe Davis Stadium in Huntsville, Alabama. Developed by the Space Transportation Directorate at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC), the Starship 2040 exhibit is housed in a 48-ft (14.6-m) tractor and trailer rig, permitting it to travel around the Nation, demonstrating NASA's vision of what commercial spaceflight might be like 40 years from now. All the irnovations suggested aboard the exhibit (automated vehicle health monitoring systems, high-energy propulsion drive, navigational aids, and emergency and safety systems) are based on concepts and technologies now being studied at NASA Centers and partner institutions around the Nation. NASA is the Nation's premier agency for development of the space transportation system, including future-generation reusable launch vehicles. Such systems, the keys to a 'real' Starship 2040, require revolutionary advances in critical aerospace technologies, from thermal, magnetic, chemical, and propellantless propulsion systems to new energy sources such as space solar power or antimatter propulsion. These and other advances are now being studied, developed, and tested at NASA field centers and partner institutions all over the Nation.

  18. Starship 2040 Exhibit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    This photograph shows Justin Varnadore, son of a Marshall TV employee, at the controls of one of the many displays within the Starship 2040 exhibit on display at Joe Davis Stadium in Huntsville, Alabama. Developed by the Space Transportation Directorate at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC), the Starship 2040 exhibit is housed in a 48-ft (14.6-m) tractor and trailer rig, permitting it to travel around the Nation, demonstrating NASA's vision of what commercial spaceflight might be like 40 years from now. All the irnovations suggested aboard the exhibit (automated vehicle health monitoring systems, high-energy propulsion drive, navigational aids, and emergency and safety systems) are based on concepts and technologies now being studied at NASA Centers and partner institutions around the Nation. NASA is the Nation's premier agency for development of the space transportation system, including future-generation reusable launch vehicles. Such systems, the keys to a 'real' Starship 2040, require revolutionary advances in critical aerospace technologies, from thermal, magnetic, chemical, and propellantless propulsion systems to new energy sources such as space solar power or antimatter propulsion. These and other advances are now being studied, developed, and tested at NASA field centers and partner institutions all over the Nation.

  19. Online Exhibits & Concept Maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Douma, M.

    2009-12-01

    Presenting the complexity of geosciences to the public via the Internet poses a number of challenges. For example, utilizing various - and sometimes redundant - Web 2.0 tools can quickly devour limited time. Do you tweet? Do you write press releases? Do you create an exhibit or concept map? The presentation will provide participants with a context for utilizing Web 2.0 tools by briefly highlighting methods of online scientific communication across several dimensions. It will address issues of: * breadth and depth (e.g. from narrow topics to well-rounded views), * presentation methods (e.g. from text to multimedia, from momentary to enduring), * sources and audiences (e.g. for experts or for the public, content developed by producers to that developed by users), * content display (e.g. from linear to non-linear, from instructive to entertaining), * barriers to entry (e.g. from an incumbent advantage to neophyte accessible, from amateur to professional), * cost and reach (e.g. from cheap to expensive), and * impact (e.g. the amount learned, from anonymity to brand awareness). Against this backdrop, the presentation will provide an overview of two methods of online information dissemination, exhibits and concept maps, using the WebExhibits online museum (www.webexhibits.org) and SpicyNodes information visualization tool (www.spicynodes.org) as examples, with tips on how geoscientists can use either to communicate their science. Richly interactive online exhibits can serve to engage a large audience, appeal to visitors with multiple learning styles, prompt exploration and discovery, and present a topic’s breadth and depth. WebExhibits, which was among the first online museums, delivers interactive information, virtual experiments, and hands-on activities to the public. While large, multidisciplinary exhibits on topics like “Color Vision and Art” or “Calendars Through the Ages” require teams of scholars, user interface experts, professional writers and editors

  20. Non-Equilibrium Molecular Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciccotti, Giovanni; Kapral, Raymond; Sergi, Alessandro

    Statistical mechanics provides a well-established link between microscopic equilibrium states and thermodynamics. If one considers systems out of equilibrium, the link between microscopic dynamical properties and non-equilibrium macroscopic states is more difficult to establish [1,2]. For systems lying near equilibrium, linear response theory provides a route to derive linear macroscopic laws and the microscopic expressions for the transport properties that enter the constitutive relations. If the system is displaced far from equilibrium, no fully general theory exists to treat such systems. By restricting consideration to a class of non-equilibrium states which arise from perturbations (linear or non-linear) of an equilibrium state, methods can be developed to treat non-equilibrium states. Furthermore, non-equilibrium molecular dynamics (NEMD) simulation methods can be devised to provide estimates for the transport properties of these systems.

  1. Space Shuttle Cockpit exhibit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Want to sit in the cockpit of the Space Shuttle and watch astronauts work in outer space? At StenniSphere, you can do that and much more. StenniSphere, the visitor center at John C. Stennis Space Center in Hancock County, Miss., presents 14,000-square-feet of interactive exhibits that depict America's race for space as well as a glimpse of the future. StenniSphere is open free of charge from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. daily.

  2. Space Shuttle Cockpit exhibit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Want to sit in the cockpit of the Space Shuttle and watch astronauts work in outer space? At StenniSphere, you can do that and much more. StenniSphere, the visitor center at John C. Stennis Space Center in Hancock County, Miss., presents 14,000-square-feet of interactive exhibits that depict America's race for space as well as a glimpse of the future. StenniSphere is open free of charge from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. daily.

  3. Repairing Hubble Exhibit Reception

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-04-23

    Individuals in attendance who had a hand in the development or servicing of the Hubble Space Telescope pose for a group photo at an event unveiling a new exhibit featuring Hubble's Corrective Optics Space Telescope Axial Replacement (COSTAR) and the WFPC2 on Wednesday, April 23, 2014 at the Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum in Washington, DC. COSTAR and WFPC2 were installed in Hubble during the first space shuttle servicing mission in 1993 and returned to Earth on the fifth and final servicing mission in 2009. Photo Credit: (NASA/Joel Kowsky)

  4. Absolute Equilibrium Entropy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shebalin, John V.

    1997-01-01

    The entropy associated with absolute equilibrium ensemble theories of ideal, homogeneous, fluid and magneto-fluid turbulence is discussed and the three-dimensional fluid case is examined in detail. A sigma-function is defined, whose minimum value with respect to global parameters is the entropy. A comparison is made between the use of global functions sigma and phase functions H (associated with the development of various H-theorems of ideal turbulence). It is shown that the two approaches are complimentary though conceptually different: H-theorems show that an isolated system tends to equilibrium while sigma-functions allow the demonstration that entropy never decreases when two previously isolated systems are combined. This provides a more complete picture of entropy in the statistical mechanics of ideal fluids.

  5. An Updated Equilibrium Machine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schultz, Emeric

    2008-08-01

    A device that can demonstrate equilibrium, kinetic, and thermodynamic concepts is described. The device consists of a leaf blower attached to a plastic container divided into two chambers by a barrier of variable size and form. Styrofoam balls can be exchanged across the barrier when the leaf blower is turned on and various air pressures are applied. Equilibrium can be approached from different distributions of balls in the container under different conditions. The Le Châtelier principle can be demonstrated. Kinetic concepts can be demonstrated by changing the nature of the barrier, either changing the height or by having various sized holes in the barrier. Thermodynamic concepts can be demonstrated by taping over some or all of the openings and restricting air flow into container on either side of the barrier.

  6. Solids Far from Equilibrium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godrèche, C.

    2011-03-01

    Preface; 1. Shape and growth of crystals P. Nozières; 2. Instabilities of planar solidification fronts B. Caroli, C. Caroli and B. Roulet; 3. An introduction to the kinetics of first-order phase transition J. S. Langer; 4. Dendritic growth and related topics Y. Pomeau and M. Ben Amar; 5. Growth and aggregation far from equilibrium L. M. Sander; 6. Kinetic roughening of growing surfaces J. Krug and H. Spohn; Acknowledgements; References; Index.

  7. Non-equilibrium proteins.

    PubMed

    Klonowski, W

    2001-07-01

    There exist no methodical studies concerning non-equilibrium systems in cellular biology. This paper is an attempt to partially fill this shortcoming. We have undertaken an extensive data-mining operation in the existing scientific literature to find scattered information about non-equilibrium subcellular systems, in particular concerning fast proteins, i.e. those with short turnover half-time. We have advanced the hypothesis that functionality in fast proteins emerges as a consequence of their intrinsic physical instability that arises due to conformational strains resulting from co-translational folding (the interdependence between chain elongation and chain folding during biosynthesis on ribosomes). Such intrinsic physical instability, a kind of conformon (Klonowski-Klonowska conformon, according to Ji, (Molecular Theories of Cell Life and Death, Rutgers University Press, New Brunswick, 1991)) is probably the most important feature determining functionality and timing in these proteins. If our hypothesis is true, the turnover half-time of fast proteins should be positively correlated with their molecular weight, and some experimental results (Ames et al., J. Neurochem. 35 (1980) 131) indeed demonstrated such a correlation. Once the native structure (and function) of a fast protein macromolecule is lost, it may not be recovered--denaturation of such proteins will always be irreversible; therefore, we searched for information on irreversible denaturation. Only simulation and modeling of protein co-translational folding may answer the questions concerning fast proteins (Ruggiero and Sacile, Med. Biol. Eng. Comp. 37 (Suppl. 1) (1999) 363). Non-equilibrium structures may also be built up of protein subunits, even if each one taken by itself is in thermodynamic equilibrium (oligomeric proteins; sub-cellular sol-gel dissipative network structures).

  8. Molecular equilibrium with condensation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharp, C. M.; Huebner, W. F.

    1990-02-01

    Minimization of the Gibbs energy of formation for species of chemical elements and compounds in their gas and condensed phases determines their relative abundances in a mixture in chemical equilibrium. The procedure is more general and more powerful than previous abundance determinations in multiphase astrophysical mixtures. Some results for astrophysical equations of state are presented, and the effects of condensation on opacity are briefly indicated.

  9. Starship 2040 Exhibit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    This photograph shows the Starship 2040 on display at Joe Davis Stadium in Huntsville, Alabama. Developed by the Space Transportation Directorate at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC), the Starship 2040 exhibit is housed in a 48-ft (14.6-m) tractor and trailer rig, permitting it to travel around the Nation, demonstrating NASA's vision of what commercial spaceflight might be like 40 years from now. All the irnovations suggested aboard the exhibit (automated vehicle health monitoring systems, high-energy propulsion drive, navigational aids, and emergency and safety systems) are based on concepts and technologies now being studied at NASA Centers and partner institutions around the Nation. NASA is the Nation's premier agency for development of the space transportation system, including future-generation reusable launch vehicles. Such systems, the keys to a 'real' Starship 2040, require revolutionary advances in critical aerospace technologies, from thermal, magnetic, chemical, and propellantless propulsion systems to new energy sources such as space solar power or antimatter propulsion. These and other advances are now being studied, developed, and tested at NASA field centers and partner institutions all over the Nation.

  10. Starship 2040 Exhibit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    This photograph shows the Starship 2040 on display at Joe Davis Stadium in Huntsville, Alabama. Developed by the Space Transportation Directorate at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC), the Starship 2040 exhibit is housed in a 48-ft (14.6-m) tractor and trailer rig, permitting it to travel around the Nation, demonstrating NASA's vision of what commercial spaceflight might be like 40 years from now. All the irnovations suggested aboard the exhibit (automated vehicle health monitoring systems, high-energy propulsion drive, navigational aids, and emergency and safety systems) are based on concepts and technologies now being studied at NASA Centers and partner institutions around the Nation. NASA is the Nation's premier agency for development of the space transportation system, including future-generation reusable launch vehicles. Such systems, the keys to a 'real' Starship 2040, require revolutionary advances in critical aerospace technologies, from thermal, magnetic, chemical, and propellantless propulsion systems to new energy sources such as space solar power or antimatter propulsion. These and other advances are now being studied, developed, and tested at NASA field centers and partner institutions all over the Nation.

  11. Equilibrium Electroconvective Instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubinstein, I.; Zaltzman, B.

    2015-03-01

    Since its prediction 15 years ago, hydrodynamic instability in concentration polarization at a charge-selective interface has been attributed to nonequilibrium electro-osmosis related to the extended space charge which develops at the limiting current. This attribution had a double basis. On the one hand, it has been recognized that neither equilibrium electro-osmosis nor bulk electroconvection can yield instability for a perfectly charge-selective solid. On the other hand, it has been shown that nonequilibrium electro-osmosis can. The first theoretical studies in which electro-osmotic instability was predicted and analyzed employed the assumption of perfect charge selectivity for the sake of simplicity and so did the subsequent studies of various time-dependent and nonlinear features of electro-osmotic instability. In this Letter, we show that relaxing the assumption of perfect charge selectivity (tantamount to fixing the electrochemical potential of counterions in the solid) allows for the equilibrium electroconvective instability. In addition, we suggest a simple experimental test for determining the true, either equilibrium or nonequilibrium, origin of instability in concentration polarization.

  12. Heroes and Legends Exhibit

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-11-07

    Inside the Heroes and Legends attraction at the Kennedy Space Center Visitor Complex, the Sigma 7 Mercury spacecraft in this exhibit was piloted by astronaut Wally Schirra during his six-orbit mission on Oct. 3, 1962. For display purposes, it is shown here attached to a Redstone launch vehicle like the one that boosted astronauts Alan Shepard and Gus Grissom on sub-orbital flights in 1961. Schirra's capsule was actually launched by the more powerful Atlas rocket in order to reach orbit. The new facility looks back to the pioneering efforts of Mercury, Gemini and Apollo. It sets the stage by providing the background and context for space exploration and the legendary men and women who pioneered the nation's journey into space.

  13. Structural design using equilibrium programming

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scotti, Stephen J.

    1992-01-01

    Multiple nonlinear programming methods are combined in the method of equilibrium programming. Equilibrium programming theory has been appied to problems in operations research, and in the present study it is investigated as a framework to solve structural design problems. Several existing formal methods for structural optimization are shown to actually be equilibrium programming methods. Additionally, the equilibrium programming framework is utilized to develop a new structural design method. Selected computational results are presented to demonstrate the methods.

  14. Cooperativity and specificity of association of a designed transmembrane peptide.

    PubMed Central

    Gratkowski, Holly; Dai, Qing-Hong; Wand, A Joshua; DeGrado, William F; Lear, James D

    2002-01-01

    Thermodynamics studies aimed at quantitatively characterizing free energy effects of amino acid substitutions are not restricted to two state systems, but do require knowing the number of states involved in the equilibrium under consideration. Using analytical ultracentrifugation and NMR methods, we show here that a membrane-soluble peptide, MS1, designed by modifying the sequence of the water-soluble coiled-coil GCN4-P1, exhibits a reversible monomer-dimer-trimer association in detergent micelles with a greater degree of cooperativity in C14-betaine than in dodecyl phosphocholine detergents. PMID:12202385

  15. Phenylalanine binding is linked to dimerization of the regulatory domain of phenylalanine hydroxylase.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shengnan; Roberts, Kenneth M; Fitzpatrick, Paul F

    2014-10-28

    Analytical ultracentrifugation has been used to analyze the oligomeric structure of the isolated regulatory domain of phenylalanine hydroxylase. The protein exhibits a monomer-dimer equilibrium with a dissociation constant of ~46 μM; this value is unaffected by the removal of the 24 N-terminal residues or by phosphorylation of Ser16. In contrast, phenylalanine binding (Kd = 8 μM) stabilizes the dimer. These results suggest that dimerization of the regulatory domain of phenylalanine hydroxylase is linked to allosteric activation of the enzyme.

  16. Thermal equilibrium of goats.

    PubMed

    Maia, Alex S C; Nascimento, Sheila T; Nascimento, Carolina C N; Gebremedhin, Kifle G

    2016-05-01

    The effects of air temperature and relative humidity on thermal equilibrium of goats in a tropical region was evaluated. Nine non-pregnant Anglo Nubian nanny goats were used in the study. An indirect calorimeter was designed and developed to measure oxygen consumption, carbon dioxide production, methane production and water vapour pressure of the air exhaled from goats. Physiological parameters: rectal temperature, skin temperature, hair-coat temperature, expired air temperature and respiratory rate and volume as well as environmental parameters: air temperature, relative humidity and mean radiant temperature were measured. The results show that respiratory and volume rates and latent heat loss did not change significantly for air temperature between 22 and 26°C. In this temperature range, metabolic heat was lost mainly by convection and long-wave radiation. For temperature greater than 30°C, the goats maintained thermal equilibrium mainly by evaporative heat loss. At the higher air temperature, the respiratory and ventilation rates as well as body temperatures were significantly elevated. It can be concluded that for Anglo Nubian goats, the upper limit of air temperature for comfort is around 26°C when the goats are protected from direct solar radiation.

  17. Equilibrium of nematic vesicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Napoli, Gaetano; Vergori, Luigi

    2010-11-01

    A variational scheme is proposed which allows the derivation of a concise and elegant formulation of the equilibrium equations for closed fluid membranes, endowed with a nematic microstructure. The nematic order is described by an in-plane nematic director and a degree of orientation, as customary in the theory of uniaxial nematics. The only constitutive ingredient in this scheme is a free-energy density which depends on the vesicle geometry and order parameters. The stress and the couple stress tensors related to this free-energy density are provided. As an application of the proposed scheme, a certain number of special theories are deduced: soap bubbles, lipid vesicles, chiral and achiral nematic membranes, and nematics on curved substrates.

  18. Statistical physics ""Beyond equilibrium

    SciTech Connect

    Ecke, Robert E

    2009-01-01

    The scientific challenges of the 21st century will increasingly involve competing interactions, geometric frustration, spatial and temporal intrinsic inhomogeneity, nanoscale structures, and interactions spanning many scales. We will focus on a broad class of emerging problems that will require new tools in non-equilibrium statistical physics and that will find application in new material functionality, in predicting complex spatial dynamics, and in understanding novel states of matter. Our work will encompass materials under extreme conditions involving elastic/plastic deformation, competing interactions, intrinsic inhomogeneity, frustration in condensed matter systems, scaling phenomena in disordered materials from glasses to granular matter, quantum chemistry applied to nano-scale materials, soft-matter materials, and spatio-temporal properties of both ordinary and complex fluids.

  19. Equilibrium Star Cluster Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Jonathan C.; Krumholz, Mark R.; McKee, Christopher F.

    2006-04-01

    We argue that rich star clusters take at least several local dynamical times to form and so are quasi-equilibrium structures during their assembly. Observations supporting this conclusion include morphologies of star-forming clumps, momentum flux of protostellar outflows from forming clusters, age spreads of stars in the Orion Nebula cluster (ONC) and other clusters, and the age of a dynamical ejection event from the ONC. We show that these long formation timescales are consistent with the expected star formation rate in turbulent gas, as recently evaluated by Krumholz & McKee. Finally, we discuss the implications of these timescales for star formation efficiencies, the disruption of gas by stellar feedback, mass segregation of stars, and the longevity of turbulence in molecular clumps.

  20. Equilibrium Policy Proposals with Abstentions.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-05-01

    AB I I I EQUILIBRIUM POLICY PROPOSALS WITH ABSTENTIONS* by Peter Coughlin** 1. Introduction Spatial analyses of economic policy formation in elections...alternative in S at which there is a local equilibrium when the incumbent must defend the status quo. 5. Applications to Related Spatial Voting Models...York: Holt, Rinehart and Winston. Hestenes, M. [19751, Optimization Theoy, New York: Wiley. Hinich, M. [1977], " Equilibrium in Spatial Voting: The Median

  1. Grinding kinetics and equilibrium states

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Opoczky, L.; Farnady, F.

    1984-01-01

    The temporary and permanent equilibrium occurring during the initial stage of cement grinding does not indicate the end of comminution, but rather an increased energy consumption during grinding. The constant dynamic equilibrium occurs after a long grinding period indicating the end of comminution for a given particle size. Grinding equilibrium curves can be constructed to show the stages of comminution and agglomeration for certain particle sizes.

  2. The Nash equilibrium: A perspective

    PubMed Central

    Holt, Charles A.; Roth, Alvin E.

    2004-01-01

    In 1950, John Nash contributed a remarkable one-page PNAS article that defined and characterized a notion of equilibrium for n- person games. This notion, now called the “Nash equilibrium,” has been widely applied and adapted in economics and other behavioral sciences. Indeed, game theory, with the Nash equilibrium as its centerpiece, is becoming the most prominent unifying theory of social science. In this perspective, we summarize the historical context and subsequent impact of Nash's contribution. PMID:15024100

  3. Collective behavior in out-of-equilibrium colloidal suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aranson, Igor S.

    2013-06-01

    Colloidal suspensions, heterogeneous fluids containing solid microscopic particles, play an important role in our everyday life, from food and pharmaceutical industries to medicine and nanotechnology. Colloidal suspensions can be divided in two major classes: equilibrium, and active, i.e. maintained out of thermodynamic equilibrium by external electric or magnetic fields, light, chemical reactions, or hydrodynamic shear flow. While the properties of equilibrium colloidal suspensions are fairly well understood, out-of-equilibrium colloids pose a formidable challenge and the research is in its early exploratory stage. The possibility of dynamic self-assembly, a natural tendency of simple building blocks to organize into complex functional architectures, is one of the most remarkable properties of out-of-equilibrium colloids. Examples range from tunable, self-healing colloidal crystals and membranes to self-assembled microswimmers and robots. In contrast to their equilibrium counterparts, out-of-equilibrium colloidal suspensions may exhibit novel material properties, e.g. reduced viscosity, enhanced self-diffusivity, etc. This work reviews recent developments in the field of self-assembly and collective behavior of out-of-equilibrium colloids, with the focus on the fundamental physical mechanisms.

  4. Convective quasi-equilibrium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yano, J.-I.; Plant, R. S.

    2012-12-01

    The concept of convective quasi-equilibrium (CQE) is a key ingredient in order to understand the role of deep moist convection in the atmosphere. It has been used as a guiding principle to develop almost all convective parameterizations and provides a basic theoretical framework for large-scale tropical dynamics. The CQE concept as originally proposed by Arakawa and Schubert (1974) is systematically reviewed from wider perspectives. Various interpretations and extensions of Arakawa and Schubert's CQE are considered both in terms of a thermodynamic analogy and as a dynamical balance. The thermodynamic interpretations can be more emphatically embraced as a homeostasis. The dynamic balance interpretations can be best understood by analogy with the slow manifold. Various criticisms of CQE can be avoided by taking the dynamic balance interpretation. Possible limits of CQE are also discussed, including the importance of triggering in many convective situations, as well as the possible self-organized criticality of tropical convection. However, the most intriguing aspect of the CQE concept is that in spite of many observational tests supporting and interpreting it in many different senses, it has never been established in a robust manner based on a systematic analysis of the cloud work function budget by observations as was originally defined.

  5. Napoleon Is in Equilibrium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, Rob

    2015-03-01

    It has been said that the cell is the test tube of the twenty-first century. If so, the theoretical tools needed to quantitatively and predictively describe what goes on in such test tubes lag sorely behind the stunning experimental advances in biology seen in the decades since the molecular biology revolution began. Perhaps surprisingly, one of the theoretical tools that has been used with great success on problems ranging from how cells communicate with their environment and each other to the nature of the organization of proteins and lipids within the cell membrane is statistical mechanics. A knee-jerk reaction to the use of statistical mechanics in the description of cellular processes is that living organisms are so far from equilibrium that one has no business even thinking about it. But such reactions are probably too hasty given that there are many regimes in which, because of a separation of timescales, for example, such an approach can be a useful first step. In this article, we explore the power of statistical mechanical thinking in the biological setting, with special emphasis on cell signaling and regulation. We show how such models are used to make predictions and describe some recent experiments designed to test them. We also consider the limits of such models based on the relative timescales of the processes of interest.

  6. Napoleon Is in Equilibrium.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Rob

    2015-03-01

    It has been said that the cell is the test tube of the twenty-first century. If so, the theoretical tools needed to quantitatively and predictively describe what goes on in such test tubes lag sorely behind the stunning experimental advances in biology seen in the decades since the molecular biology revolution began. Perhaps surprisingly, one of the theoretical tools that has been used with great success on problems ranging from how cells communicate with their environment and each other to the nature of the organization of proteins and lipids within the cell membrane is statistical mechanics. A knee-jerk reaction to the use of statistical mechanics in the description of cellular processes is that living organisms are so far from equilibrium that one has no business even thinking about it. But such reactions are probably too hasty given that there are many regimes in which, because of a separation of timescales, for example, such an approach can be a useful first step. In this article, we explore the power of statistical mechanical thinking in the biological setting, with special emphasis on cell signaling and regulation. We show how such models are used to make predictions and describe some recent experiments designed to test them. We also consider the limits of such models based on the relative timescales of the processes of interest.

  7. Thermodynamic efficiency out of equilibrium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sivak, David; Crooks, Gavin

    2011-03-01

    Molecular-scale machines typically operate far from thermodynamic equilibrium, limiting the applicability of equilibrium statistical mechanics to understand their efficiency. Thermodynamic length analysis relates a non-equilibrium property (dissipation) to equilibrium properties (equilibrium fluctuations and their relaxation time). Herein we demonstrate that the thermodynamic length framework follows directly from the assumptions of linear response theory. Uniting these two frameworks provides thermodynamic length analysis a firmer statistical mechanical grounding, and equips linear response theory with a metric structure to facilitate the prediction and discovery of optimal (minimum dissipation) paths in complicated free energy landscapes. To explore the applicability of this theoretical framework, we examine its accuracy for simple bistable systems, parametrized to model single-molecule force-extension experiments. Through analytic derivation of the equilibrium fluctuations and numerical calculation of the dissipation and relaxation time, we verify that thermodynamic length analysis (though derived in a near-equilibrium limit) provides a strikingly good approximation even far from equilibrium, and thus provides a useful framework for understanding molecular motor efficiency.

  8. Equilibrium states for hyperbolic potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramos, Vanessa; Viana, Marcelo

    2017-02-01

    We prove the existence of finitely many ergodic equilibrium states for local homeomorphisms and hyperbolic potentials. We also deal with partially hyperbolic skew-products over non-uniformly expanding maps with uniform contraction on the fibre. For these systems we prove the existence and finiteness of the equilibrium states associated with a class of Hölder continuous potentials.

  9. Rapid-Equilibrium Enzyme Kinetics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alberty, Robert A.

    2008-01-01

    Rapid-equilibrium rate equations for enzyme-catalyzed reactions are especially useful because if experimental data can be fit by these simpler rate equations, the Michaelis constants can be interpreted as equilibrium constants. However, for some reactions it is necessary to use the more complicated steady-state rate equations. Thermodynamics is…

  10. [Oculomotor equilibrium and aviation activities].

    PubMed

    Maille, M; Pedeprat Lamechinou, P; Corbe, C; Manent, P J

    1989-01-01

    A good oculomotor equilibrium warrants flight safety. It is indeed directly linked with depth vision an may decompensate, causing a deficit or a diplopia. It is therefore very important to screen pilots carefully and to have periodical examinations to check the oculomotor equilibrium.

  11. Rapid-Equilibrium Enzyme Kinetics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alberty, Robert A.

    2008-01-01

    Rapid-equilibrium rate equations for enzyme-catalyzed reactions are especially useful because if experimental data can be fit by these simpler rate equations, the Michaelis constants can be interpreted as equilibrium constants. However, for some reactions it is necessary to use the more complicated steady-state rate equations. Thermodynamics is…

  12. Equilibrium Shape of Colloidal Crystals.

    PubMed

    Sehgal, Ray M; Maroudas, Dimitrios

    2015-10-27

    Assembling colloidal particles into highly ordered configurations, such as photonic crystals, has significant potential for enabling a broad range of new technologies. Facilitating the nucleation of colloidal crystals and developing successful crystal growth strategies require a fundamental understanding of the equilibrium structure and morphology of small colloidal assemblies. Here, we report the results of a novel computational approach to determine the equilibrium shape of assemblies of colloidal particles that interact via an experimentally validated pair potential. While the well-known Wulff construction can accurately capture the equilibrium shape of large colloidal assemblies, containing O(10(4)) or more particles, determining the equilibrium shape of small colloidal assemblies of O(10) particles requires a generalized Wulff construction technique which we have developed for a proper description of equilibrium structure and morphology of small crystals. We identify and characterize fully several "magic" clusters which are significantly more stable than other similarly sized clusters.

  13. Updated Coronal Equilibrium Calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bryans, Paul; Badnell, N. R.; Gorczyca, T. W.; Laming, J. M.; Mitthumsiri, W.; Savin, D. W.

    2006-06-01

    Reliably interpreting solar spectra requires accurate ionization balance calculations. However, much of the atomic data needed for these calculations have not been generated using modern theoretical methods and are often highly suspect. This translates directly into the reliability of the collisional ionization equilibrium (CIE) calculations. We make use of state-of-the-art calculations of dielectronic recombination (DR) rate coefficients for the hydrogenic through Na-like ions of all elements from He through to Zn. We also make use of state-of-the-art radiative recombination (RR) rate coefficient calculations for the bar e through Na-like ions of all elements from H to Zn. Here we present improved CIE calculations for temperatures from 1e4 to 1e9 K using our data and the recommended electron impact ionization data of Mazzotta et al. (1998, A&AS, 133, 403) for elements up through Ni and Mazzotta (private communication) for Cu and Zn. DR and RR data for ionization stages that have not been updated are also taken from these two additional sources. We compare our calculated fractional ionic abundances using these data with those presented by Mazzotta et al. for all elements from H to Ni. The differences in peak fractional abundance are up to 60%. We also compare with the fractional ionic abundances for Mg, Si, S, Ar, Ca, Fe, and Ni derived from the modern DR calculations of Gu (2003a, ApJ, 590, 1131; 2004, ApJ, 153, 389) for the H-like through Na-like ions, and the RR calculations of Gu (2003b, ApJ, 589, 1085) for the bare through F-like ions. These results are in better agreement with our work, with differences in peak fractional abundance of less than 10%. This work was supported in part by the NASA Solar SR&T and LWS programs, theOffice of Naval Research, and PPARC.

  14. Bovine β-lactoglobulin is dimeric under imitative physiological conditions: dissociation equilibrium and rate constants over the pH range of 2.5-7.5.

    PubMed

    Mercadante, Davide; Melton, Laurence D; Norris, Gillian E; Loo, Trevor S; Williams, Martin A K; Dobson, Renwick C J; Jameson, Geoffrey B

    2012-07-18

    The oligomerization of β-lactoglobulin (βLg) has been studied extensively, but with somewhat contradictory results. Using analytical ultracentrifugation in both sedimentation equilibrium and sedimentation velocity modes, we studied the oligomerization of βLg variants A and B over a pH range of 2.5-7.5 in 100 mM NaCl at 25°C. For the first time, to our knowledge, we were able to estimate rate constants (k(off)) for βLg dimer dissociation. At pH 2.5 k(off) is low (0.008 and 0.009 s(-1)), but at higher pH (6.5 and 7.5) k(off) is considerably greater (>0.1 s(-1)). We analyzed the sedimentation velocity data using the van Holde-Weischet method, and the results were consistent with a monomer-dimer reversible self-association at pH 2.5, 3.5, 6.5, and 7.5. Dimer dissociation constants K(D)(2-1) fell close to or within the protein concentration range of ∼5 to ∼45 μM, and at ∼45 μM the dimer predominated. No species larger than the dimer could be detected. The K(D)(2-1) increased as |pH-pI| increased, indicating that the hydrophobic effect is the major factor stabilizing the dimer, and suggesting that, especially at low pH, electrostatic repulsion destabilizes the dimer. Therefore, through Poisson-Boltzmann calculations, we determined the electrostatic dimerization energy and the ionic charge distribution as a function of ionic strength at pH above (pH 7.5) and below (pH 2.5) the isoelectric point (pI∼5.3). We propose a mechanism for dimer stabilization whereby the added ionic species screen and neutralize charges in the vicinity of the dimer interface. The electrostatic forces of the ion cloud surrounding βLg play a key role in the thermodynamics and kinetics of dimer association/dissociation.

  15. Non-equilibrium supramolecular polymerization.

    PubMed

    Sorrenti, Alessandro; Leira-Iglesias, Jorge; Markvoort, Albert J; de Greef, Tom F A; Hermans, Thomas M

    2017-03-28

    Supramolecular polymerization has been traditionally focused on the thermodynamic equilibrium state, where one-dimensional assemblies reside at the global minimum of the Gibbs free energy. The pathway and rate to reach the equilibrium state are irrelevant, and the resulting assemblies remain unchanged over time. In the past decade, the focus has shifted to kinetically trapped (non-dissipative non-equilibrium) structures that heavily depend on the method of preparation (i.e., pathway complexity), and where the assembly rates are of key importance. Kinetic models have greatly improved our understanding of competing pathways, and shown how to steer supramolecular polymerization in the desired direction (i.e., pathway selection). The most recent innovation in the field relies on energy or mass input that is dissipated to keep the system away from the thermodynamic equilibrium (or from other non-dissipative states). This tutorial review aims to provide the reader with a set of tools to identify different types of self-assembled states that have been explored so far. In particular, we aim to clarify the often unclear use of the term "non-equilibrium self-assembly" by subdividing systems into dissipative, and non-dissipative non-equilibrium states. Examples are given for each of the states, with a focus on non-dissipative non-equilibrium states found in one-dimensional supramolecular polymerization.

  16. Helical axis stellarator equilibrium model

    SciTech Connect

    Koniges, A.E.; Johnson, J.L.

    1985-02-01

    An asymptotic model is developed to study MHD equilibria in toroidal systems with a helical magnetic axis. Using a characteristic coordinate system based on the vacuum field lines, the equilibrium problem is reduced to a two-dimensional generalized partial differential equation of the Grad-Shafranov type. A stellarator-expansion free-boundary equilibrium code is modified to solve the helical-axis equations. The expansion model is used to predict the equilibrium properties of Asperators NP-3 and NP-4. Numerically determined flux surfaces, magnetic well, transform, and shear are presented. The equilibria show a toroidal Shafranov shift.

  17. Equilibrium ignition for ICF capsules

    SciTech Connect

    Lackner, K.S.; Colgate, S.A.; Johnson, N.L.; Kirkpatrick, R.C.; Menikoff, R.; Petschek, A.G. )

    1994-10-05

    In comparing high-gain ICF targets using cryogenic DT for a pusher with equilibrium ignition targets using high-[ital Z] pushers which contain the radiation, we point to the intrinsic advantages of the latter. Equilibrium or volume ignition sacrifices high gain for lower losses, lower ignition temperature, lower implosion velocity, and lower sensitivity of the more robust capsule to small fluctuations and asymmetries in the drive system. The reduction in gain is about a factor of 2.5, which is small enough to make the more robust equilibrium ignition an atractive alternative. [copyright] 1994 [ital American] [ital Institute] [ital of] [ital Physics

  18. Interregional equilibrium with heterogeneous labor.

    PubMed

    Michel, P; Perrot, A; Thisse J-f

    1996-02-01

    "The impact of labor migration on interregional equilibrium is studied when workers are heterogeneous in productivity and regional mobility. The skilled respond to market disequilibrium by moving into the most attractive region. The unskilled are immobile in the short-run and move with the skilled in the long-run. Both regions have a neoclassical production function affected by an externality depending on the number of skilled. Workers move according to the utility differential when regional amenities vary with population or according to the wage differential. The equilibrium pattern depends on the unskilled's mobility and on migration incentives. Typically, regional imbalance characterizes the equilibrium which is often suboptimal."

  19. The Nash Equilibrium Revisited: Chaos and Complexity Hidden in Simplicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fellman, Philip V.

    The Nash Equilibrium is a much discussed, deceptively complex, method for the analysis of non-cooperative games (McLennan and Berg, 2005). If one reads many of the commonly available definitions the description of the Nash Equilibrium is deceptively simple in appearance. Modern research has discovered a number of new and important complex properties of the Nash Equilibrium, some of which remain as contemporary conundrums of extraordinary difficulty and complexity (Quint and Shubik, 1997). Among the recently discovered features which the Nash Equilibrium exhibits under various conditions are heteroclinic Hamiltonian dynamics, a very complex asymptotic structure in the context of two-player bi-matrix games and a number of computationally complex or computationally intractable features in other settings (Sato, Akiyama and Farmer, 2002). This paper reviews those findings and then suggests how they may inform various market prediction strategies.

  20. Equilibrium and Orientation in Cephalopods.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Budelmann, Bernd-Ulrich

    1980-01-01

    Describes the structure of the equilibrium receptor system in cephalopods, comparing it to the vertebrate counterpart--the vestibular system. Relates the evolution of this complex system to the competition of cephalopods with fishes. (CS)

  1. Equilibrium ignition for ICF capsules

    SciTech Connect

    Lackner, K.S.; Colgate, S.A.; Johnson, N.L.; Kirkpatrick, R.C.; Menikoff, R.; Petschek, A.G.

    1993-12-31

    There are two fundamentally different approaches to igniting DT fuel in an ICF capsule which can be described as equilibrium and hot spot ignition. In both cases, a capsule which can be thought of as a pusher containing the DT fuel is imploded until the fuel reaches ignition conditions. In comparing high-gain ICF targets using cryogenic DT for a pusher with equilibrium ignition targets using high-Z pushers which contain the radiation. The authors point to the intrinsic advantages of the latter. Equilibrium or volume ignition sacrifices high gain for lower losses, lower ignition temperature, lower implosion velocity and lower sensitivity of the more robust capsule to small fluctuations and asymmetries in the drive system. The reduction in gain is about a factor of 2.5, which is small enough to make the more robust equilibrium ignition an attractive alternative.

  2. Simulations for Teaching Chemical Equilibrium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huddle, Penelope A.; White, Margaret Dawn; Rogers, Fiona

    2000-07-01

    This paper outlines a systematic approach to teaching chemical equilibrium using simulation experiments that address most known alternate conceptions in the topic. Graphs drawn using the data from the simulations are identical to those obtained using real experimental data for reactions that go to equilibrium. This allows easy mapping of the analogy to the target. The requirements for the simulations are simple and inexpensive, making them accessible to even the poorest schools. The simulations can be adapted for all levels, from pupils who are first encountering equilibrium through students in tertiary education to qualified teachers who have experienced difficulty in teaching the topic. The simulations were piloted on four very different audiences. Minor modifications were then made before the Equilibrium Games as reported in this paper were tested on three groups of subjects: a Grade 12 class, college students, and university Chemistry I students. Marked improvements in understanding of the concept were shown in two of the three sets of subjects.

  3. Equilibrium Constants You Can Smell.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Michael; Buckley, Amy

    1996-01-01

    Presents a simple experiment involving the sense of smell that students can accomplish during a lecture. Illustrates the important concepts of equilibrium along with the acid/base properties of various ions. (JRH)

  4. Equilibrium and Orientation in Cephalopods.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Budelmann, Bernd-Ulrich

    1980-01-01

    Describes the structure of the equilibrium receptor system in cephalopods, comparing it to the vertebrate counterpart--the vestibular system. Relates the evolution of this complex system to the competition of cephalopods with fishes. (CS)

  5. A search for equilibrium states

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zeleznik, F. J.

    1982-01-01

    An efficient search algorithm is described for the location of equilibrium states in a search set of states which differ from one another only by the choice of pure phases. The algorithm has three important characteristics: (1) it ignores states which have little prospect for being an improved approximation to the true equilibrium state; (2) it avoids states which lead to singular iteration equations; (3) it furnishes a search history which can provide clues to alternative search paths.

  6. Edge equilibrium code for tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Xujing; Drozdov, Vladimir V.

    2014-01-15

    The edge equilibrium code (EEC) described in this paper is developed for simulations of the near edge plasma using the finite element method. It solves the Grad-Shafranov equation in toroidal coordinate and uses adaptive grids aligned with magnetic field lines. Hermite finite elements are chosen for the numerical scheme. A fast Newton scheme which is the same as implemented in the equilibrium and stability code (ESC) is applied here to adjust the grids.

  7. Traveling Exhibitions: translating current science into effective science exhibitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dusenbery, P.; Morrow, C.; Harold, J.

    The Space Science Institute (SSI) of Boulder, Colorado has recently developed two museum exhibits called the Space Weather Center and MarsQuest. It is currently planning to develop two other exhibitions called Cosmic Origins and InterActive Earth. Museum exhibitions provide research scientists the opportunity to engage in a number of activities that are vital to the success of earth and space outreach programs. The Space Weather Center was developed in partnership with various research missions at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center. The focus of the presentation will be on the Institute's MarsQuest exhibition. This project is a 5000 square-foot, 2.5M, traveling exhibition that is now touring the country. The exhibit's 3-year tour is enabling millions of Americans to share in the excitement of the scientific exploration of Mars and learn more about their own planet in the process. The associated planetarium show and education program will also be described, with particular emphasis on workshops to orient host museum staff (e.g. museum educators and docents). The workshops make innovative connections between the exhibitions interactive experiences and lesson plans aligned with the National Science Education Standards. SSI is also developing an interactive web site called MarsQuest On-line. The linkage between the web site, education program and exhibit will be discussed. MarsQuest and SSI's other exhibitions are good models for actively involving scientists and their discoveries to help improve informal science education in the museum community and for forging a stronger connection between formal and informal education.

  8. Relevance of equilibrium in multifragmentation

    SciTech Connect

    Furuta, Takuya; Ono, Akira

    2009-01-15

    The relevance of equilibrium in a multifragmentation reaction of very central {sup 40}Ca + {sup 40}Ca collisions at 35 MeV/nucleon is investigated by using simulations of antisymmetrized molecular dynamics (AMD). Two types of ensembles are compared. One is the reaction ensemble of the states at each reaction time t in collision events simulated by AMD, and the other is the equilibrium ensemble prepared by solving the AMD equation of motion for a many-nucleon system confined in a container for a long time. The comparison of the ensembles is performed for the fragment charge distribution and the excitation energies. Our calculations show that there exists an equilibrium ensemble that well reproduces the reaction ensemble at each reaction time t for the investigated period 80{<=}t{<=}300 fm/c. However, there are some other observables that show discrepancies between the reaction and equilibrium ensembles. These may be interpreted as dynamical effects in the reaction. The usual static equilibrium at each instant is not realized since any equilibrium ensemble with the same volume as that of the reaction system cannot reproduce the fragment observables.

  9. Equilibrium Moisture Content of Common Fine Fuels in Southeastern Forests

    Treesearch

    W.H. Blackmarr

    1971-01-01

    Nine different kinds of forest litter found in ground fuel complexes of southeastern forests were subjected to step-wise changes in relative humidity to determine their equilibrium moisture content (EMC) at different levels of relative humidity. The adsorption and desorption EMC curves for these fuels exhibited the typical hysteresis loop...

  10. Shape characteristics of equilibrium and non-equilibrium fractal clusters.

    PubMed

    Mansfield, Marc L; Douglas, Jack F

    2013-07-28

    It is often difficult in practice to discriminate between equilibrium and non-equilibrium nanoparticle or colloidal-particle clusters that form through aggregation in gas or solution phases. Scattering studies often permit the determination of an apparent fractal dimension, but both equilibrium and non-equilibrium clusters in three dimensions frequently have fractal dimensions near 2, so that it is often not possible to discriminate on the basis of this geometrical property. A survey of the anisotropy of a wide variety of polymeric structures (linear and ring random and self-avoiding random walks, percolation clusters, lattice animals, diffusion-limited aggregates, and Eden clusters) based on the principal components of both the radius of gyration and electric polarizability tensor indicates, perhaps counter-intuitively, that self-similar equilibrium clusters tend to be intrinsically anisotropic at all sizes, while non-equilibrium processes such as diffusion-limited aggregation or Eden growth tend to be isotropic in the large-mass limit, providing a potential means of discriminating these clusters experimentally if anisotropy could be determined along with the fractal dimension. Equilibrium polymer structures, such as flexible polymer chains, are normally self-similar due to the existence of only a single relevant length scale, and are thus anisotropic at all length scales, while non-equilibrium polymer structures that grow irreversibly in time eventually become isotropic if there is no difference in the average growth rates in different directions. There is apparently no proof of these general trends and little theoretical insight into what controls the universal anisotropy in equilibrium polymer structures of various kinds. This is an obvious topic of theoretical investigation, as well as a matter of practical interest. To address this general problem, we consider two experimentally accessible ratios, one between the hydrodynamic and gyration radii, the other

  11. A Novel No-Equilibrium Chaotic System with Multiwing Butterfly Attractors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tahir, Fadhil Rahma; Jafari, Sajad; Pham, Viet-Thanh; Volos, Christos; Wang, Xiong

    Discovering unknown features of no-equilibrium systems with hidden strange attractors is an attractive research topic. This paper presents a novel no-equilibrium chaotic system that is constructed by using a state feedback controller. Interestingly, the new system can exhibit multiwing butterfly attractors. Moreover, a new chaotic system with an infinite number of equilibrium points, which can generate multiscroll attractors, is also proposed by applying the introduced methodology.

  12. Against the Odds Exhibition Opens

    MedlinePlus

    ... LA and Vox Populi organizations. Photo courtesy of Bill Branson At the exhibition, HIV and AIDS were topics addressed by Dr. Victoria Cargill (right), Director of Clinical Studies and Director of Minority ...

  13. Greenhouse Earth: A Traveling Exhibition

    SciTech Connect

    Booth, W.H.; Caesar, S.

    1992-09-01

    The Franklin Institute Science Museum provided an exhibit entitled the Greenhouse Earth: A Traveling Exhibition. This 3500 square-foot exhibit on global climate change was developed in collaboration with the Association of Science-Technology Centers. The exhibit opened at The Franklin Institute on February 14, 1992, welcoming 291,000 visitors over its three-month stay. During its three-year tour, Greenhouse Earth will travel to ten US cities, reaching two million visitors. Greenhouse Earth aims to deepen public understanding of the scientific issues of global warming and the conservation measures that can be taken to slow its effects. The exhibit features hands-on exhibitry, interactive computer programs and videos, a theater production, a demonstration cart,'' guided tours, and lectures. supplemental educational programs at the Institute included a teachers preview, a symposium on climate change, and a satellite field trip.'' The development of Greenhouse Earth included front-end and formative evaluation procedures. Evaluation includes interviews with visitors, prototypes, and summative surveys for participating museums. During its stay in Philadelphia, Greenhouse Earth was covered by the local and national press, with reviews in print and broadcast media. Greenhouse Earth is the first large-scale museum exhibit to address global climate change.

  14. Strongly Non-equilibrium Dynamics of Nanochannel Confined DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reisner, Walter

    Nanoconfined DNA exhibits a wide-range of fascinating transient and steady-state non-equilibrium phenomena. Yet, while experiment, simulation and scaling analytics are converging on a comprehensive picture regarding the equilibrium behavior of nanochannel confined DNA, non-equilibrium behavior remains largely unexplored. In particular, while the DNA extension along the nanochannel is the key observable in equilibrium experiments, in the non-equilibrium case it is necessary to measure and model not just the extension but the molecule's full time-dependent one-dimensional concentration profile. Here, we apply controlled compressive forces to a nanochannel confined molecule via a nanodozer assay, whereby an optically trapped bead is slid down the channel at a constant speed. Upon contact with the molecule, a propagating concentration ``shockwave'' develops near the bead and the molecule is dynamically compressed. This experiment, a single-molecule implementation of a macroscopic cylinder-piston apparatus, can be used to observe the molecule response over a range of forcings and benchmark theoretical description of non-equilibrium behavior. We show that the dynamic concentration profiles, including both transient and steady-state response, can be modelled via a partial differential evolution equation combining nonlinear diffusion and convection. Lastly, we present preliminary results for dynamic compression of multiple confined molecules to explore regimes of segregation and mixing for multiple chains in confinement.

  15. Detecting temperature fluctuations at equilibrium.

    PubMed

    Dixit, Purushottam D

    2015-05-21

    The Gibbs and the Boltzmann definition of temperature agree only in the macroscopic limit. The ambiguity in identifying the equilibrium temperature of a finite-sized 'small' system exchanging energy with a bath is usually understood as a limitation of conventional statistical mechanics. We interpret this ambiguity as resulting from a stochastically fluctuating temperature coupled with the phase space variables giving rise to a broad temperature distribution. With this ansatz, we develop the equilibrium statistics and dynamics of small systems. Numerical evidence using an analytically tractable model shows that the effects of temperature fluctuations can be detected in the equilibrium and dynamical properties of the phase space of the small system. Our theory generalizes statistical mechanics to small systems relevant in biophysics and nanotechnology.

  16. Equilibrium in a Production Economy

    SciTech Connect

    Chiarolla, Maria B.; Haussmann, Ulrich G.

    2011-06-15

    Consider a closed production-consumption economy with multiple agents and multiple resources. The resources are used to produce the consumption good. The agents derive utility from holding resources as well as consuming the good produced. They aim to maximize their utility while the manager of the production facility aims to maximize profits. With the aid of a representative agent (who has a multivariable utility function) it is shown that an Arrow-Debreu equilibrium exists. In so doing we establish technical results that will be used to solve the stochastic dynamic problem (a case with infinite dimensional commodity space so the General Equilibrium Theory does not apply) elsewhere.

  17. Adiabatic evolution of plasma equilibrium

    PubMed Central

    Grad, H.; Hu, P. N.; Stevens, D. C.

    1975-01-01

    A new theory of plasma equilibrium is introduced in which adiabatic constraints are specified. This leads to a mathematically nonstandard structure, as compared to the usual equilibrium theory, in which prescription of pressure and current profiles leads to an elliptic partial differential equation. Topologically complex configurations require further generalization of the concept of adiabaticity to allow irreversible mixing of plasma and magnetic flux among islands. Matching conditions across a boundary layer at the separatrix are obtained from appropriate conservation laws. Applications are made to configurations with planned islands (as in Doublet) and accidental islands (as in Tokamaks). Two-dimensional, axially symmetric, helically symmetric, and closed line equilibria are included. PMID:16578729

  18. EXPLORING TRANSITIONS OF SPACE PLASMAS OUT OF EQUILIBRIUM

    SciTech Connect

    Livadiotis, G.; McComas, D. J.

    2010-05-01

    Space plasmas from the solar wind to planetary magnetospheres and the outer heliosphere are systems in stationary states out of equilibrium. Empirical kappa distributions, which naturally emerge from Tsallis Statistics, successfully describe these space plasmas. The Tsallis formalism offers a solid statistical foundation and provides a set of proven tools for understanding these distributions, including a consistent definition of temperature-the physical temperature, which characterizes the non-equilibrium stationary states. Here, we develop a measure of the 'thermodynamic distance' of stationary states away from equilibrium. The stationary states are labeled by the value of the entropic q-index, lying in a spectrum from q = 1 (equilibrium) to the maximum value of q, which specifies the furthest possible stationary state from equilibrium. We call this the 'q-frozen state', because as a system approaches this state, it behaves analogously to when its temperature approaches absolute zero. We also introduce a novel isothermal procedure that describes a system's transition into different stationary states by varying the q-index, and show how the variation of temperature can be realized using an 'iso-metastability' procedure, in which the system remains in a fixed stationary state. These innovations allow a generalization of the zeroth law of thermodynamics to cover stationary states out of equilibrium. By expressing the entropy in terms of the q-index, we show the detailed paths by which the transition of stationary states evolves toward equilibrium following the dynamics of a characteristic difference equation along the q-indices. This naturally exhibits certain stationary states out of equilibrium that are frequently observed in space plasmas.

  19. Exploring Transitions of Space Plasmas Out of Equilibrium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Livadiotis, G.; McComas, D. J.

    2010-05-01

    Space plasmas from the solar wind to planetary magnetospheres and the outer heliosphere are systems in stationary states out of equilibrium. Empirical kappa distributions, which naturally emerge from Tsallis Statistics, successfully describe these space plasmas. The Tsallis formalism offers a solid statistical foundation and provides a set of proven tools for understanding these distributions, including a consistent definition of temperature—the physical temperature, which characterizes the non-equilibrium stationary states. Here, we develop a measure of the "thermodynamic distance" of stationary states away from equilibrium. The stationary states are labeled by the value of the entropic q-index, lying in a spectrum from q = 1 (equilibrium) to the maximum value of q, which specifies the furthest possible stationary state from equilibrium. We call this the "q-frozen state," because as a system approaches this state, it behaves analogously to when its temperature approaches absolute zero. We also introduce a novel isothermal procedure that describes a system's transition into different stationary states by varying the q-index, and show how the variation of temperature can be realized using an "iso-metastability" procedure, in which the system remains in a fixed stationary state. These innovations allow a generalization of the zeroth law of thermodynamics to cover stationary states out of equilibrium. By expressing the entropy in terms of the q-index, we show the detailed paths by which the transition of stationary states evolves toward equilibrium following the dynamics of a characteristic difference equation along the q-indices. This naturally exhibits certain stationary states out of equilibrium that are frequently observed in space plasmas.

  20. Chemical Principles Revisited: Using the Equilibrium Concept.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mickey, Charles D., Ed.

    1981-01-01

    Discusses the concept of equilibrium in chemical systems, particularly in relation to predicting the position of equilibrium, predicting spontaneity of a reaction, quantitative applications of the equilibrium constant, heterogeneous equilibrium, determination of the solubility product constant, common-ion effect, and dissolution of precipitates.…

  1. Equilibrium Principles: A Game for Students

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edmonson, Lionel J., Jr.; Lewis, Don L.

    1999-04-01

    The laboratory exercise is a game using marked sugar cubes as dice. The game emphasizes the dynamic character of equilibrium. Forward and reverse rate-constant values are used to calculate an equilibrium constant and to predict equilibrium populations. Predicted equilibrium populations are compared with experimental results.

  2. Thermodynamic theory of equilibrium fluctuations

    SciTech Connect

    Mishin, Y.

    2015-12-15

    The postulational basis of classical thermodynamics has been expanded to incorporate equilibrium fluctuations. The main additional elements of the proposed thermodynamic theory are the concept of quasi-equilibrium states, a definition of non-equilibrium entropy, a fundamental equation of state in the entropy representation, and a fluctuation postulate describing the probability distribution of macroscopic parameters of an isolated system. Although these elements introduce a statistical component that does not exist in classical thermodynamics, the logical structure of the theory is different from that of statistical mechanics and represents an expanded version of thermodynamics. Based on this theory, we present a regular procedure for calculations of equilibrium fluctuations of extensive parameters, intensive parameters and densities in systems with any number of fluctuating parameters. The proposed fluctuation formalism is demonstrated by four applications: (1) derivation of the complete set of fluctuation relations for a simple fluid in three different ensembles; (2) fluctuations in finite-reservoir systems interpolating between the canonical and micro-canonical ensembles; (3) derivation of fluctuation relations for excess properties of grain boundaries in binary solid solutions, and (4) derivation of the grain boundary width distribution for pre-melted grain boundaries in alloys. The last two applications offer an efficient fluctuation-based approach to calculations of interface excess properties and extraction of the disjoining potential in pre-melted grain boundaries. Possible future extensions of the theory are outlined.

  3. Magnetospheric equilibrium with anisotropic pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, C.Z.

    1991-07-01

    Self-consistent magnetospheric equilibrium with anisotropic pressure is obtained by employing an iterative metric method for solving the inverse equilibrium equation in an optimal flux coordinate system. A method of determining plasma parallel and perpendicular pressures from either analytic particle distribution or particle distribution measured along the satellite's path is presented. The numerical results of axisymmetric magnetospheric equilibrium including the effects of finite beta, pressure anisotropy, and boundary conditions are presented for a bi-Maxwellian particle distribution. For the isotropic pressure cases, the finite beta effect produces an outward expansion of the constant magnetic flux surfaces in relation to the dipole field lines, and along the magnetic field the toroidal ring current is maximum at the magnetic equator. The effect of pressure anisotropy is found to further expand the flux surfaces outward. Along the magnetic field lines the westward ring current can be peak away from the equator due to an eastward current contribution resulting from pressure anisotropy. As pressure anisotropy increases, the peak westward current can become more singular. The outer boundary flux surface has significant effect on the magnetospheric equilibrium. For the outer flux boundary resembling dayside compressed flux surface due to solar wind pressure, the deformation of the magnetic field can be quite different from that for the outer flux boundary resembling the tail-like surface. 23 refs., 17 figs.

  4. Understanding Thermal Equilibrium through Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pathare, Shirish; Huli, Saurabhee; Nachane, Madhura; Ladage, Savita; Pradhan, Hemachandra

    2015-01-01

    Thermal equilibrium is a basic concept in thermodynamics. In India, this concept is generally introduced at the first year of undergraduate education in physics and chemistry. In our earlier studies (Pathare and Pradhan 2011 "Proc. episteme-4 Int. Conf. to Review Research on Science Technology and Mathematics Education" pp 169-72) we…

  5. An investigation of equilibrium concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prozan, R. J.

    1982-01-01

    A different approach to modeling of the thermochemistry of rocket engine combustion phenomena is presented. The methodology described is based on the hypothesis of a new variational principle applicable to compressible fluid mechanics. This hypothesis is extended to treat the thermochemical behavior of a reacting (equilibrium) gas in an open system.

  6. Understanding Thermal Equilibrium through Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pathare, Shirish; Huli, Saurabhee; Nachane, Madhura; Ladage, Savita; Pradhan, Hemachandra

    2015-01-01

    Thermal equilibrium is a basic concept in thermodynamics. In India, this concept is generally introduced at the first year of undergraduate education in physics and chemistry. In our earlier studies (Pathare and Pradhan 2011 "Proc. episteme-4 Int. Conf. to Review Research on Science Technology and Mathematics Education" pp 169-72) we…

  7. Equilibrium Distribution Functions: Another Look.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waite, Boyd A.

    1986-01-01

    Discusses equilibrium distribution functions and provides an alternative "derivation" that allows the student, with the help of a computer, to gain intuitive insight as to the nature of distributions in general and the precise nature of the dominance of the Boltzmann distribution. (JN)

  8. Quantifying mixing using equilibrium reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wheat, Philip M.; Posner, Jonathan D.

    2009-03-01

    A method of quantifying equilibrium reactions in a microchannel using a fluorometric reaction of Fluo-4 and Ca2+ ions is presented. Under the proper conditions, equilibrium reactions can be used to quantify fluid mixing without the challenges associated with constituent mixing measures such as limited imaging spatial resolution and viewing angle coupled with three-dimensional structure. Quantitative measurements of CaCl and calcium-indicating fluorescent dye Fluo-4 mixing are measured in Y-shaped microchannels. Reactant and product concentration distributions are modeled using Green's function solutions and a numerical solution to the advection-diffusion equation. Equilibrium reactions provide for an unambiguous, quantitative measure of mixing when the reactant concentrations are greater than 100 times their dissociation constant and the diffusivities are equal. At lower concentrations and for dissimilar diffusivities, the area averaged fluorescence signal reaches a maximum before the species have interdiffused, suggesting that reactant concentrations and diffusivities must be carefully selected to provide unambiguous, quantitative mixing measures. Fluorometric equilibrium reactions work over a wide range of pH and background concentrations such that they can be used for a wide variety of fluid mixing measures including industrial or microscale flows.

  9. Concurrent fractional and equilibrium crystallisation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sha, Lian-Kun

    2012-06-01

    This paper proposes the concept of concurrent fractional and equilibrium crystallisation (CFEC) in a multi-phase magmatic system in light of experimental results on diffusivities of elements and other species in minerals and melts. A group of equations are presented to describe how the concentrations of an element or isotope change in fractionated solid, equilibrated solid, melt, liquid, and gas phases, as well as in magma, as a function of distribution coefficients and mass fractions during the CFEC process. CFEC model is a generalised and unified formulation that is valid, not only for pure fractional crystallisation (FC) and perfect equilibrium crystallisation (EC) singly, as two of its limiting end-member cases, but also for the geologically more important process of concurrent fractional and equilibrium crystallisation. The concept that both fractional and equilibrium crystallisation can operate concurrently in a magmatic system, for a given element, among different minerals, and even within different-sized crystal grains of the very same mineral phase, is of fundamental importance in deepening our current understanding of magmatic differentiation processes. CFEC probably occurs more frequently in the natural world than either pure fractional or perfect equilibrium crystallisation alone, as a result of the interplay of varying diffusivities of elements under diverse physicochemical conditions, different residence time and growth rates of mineral phases in magmas, and varying grain sizes within each phase and among different phases. The marked systematic variations in trace element concentrations in the melts of the Bishop Tuff have long been perplexing and difficult to reconcile with existing models of differentiation. CFEC, which is able to better explain the scatter trends in a systematic way than fractional crystallisation, is considered to be the cause.

  10. Equilibrium and non-equilibrium concentration fluctuations in a critical binary mixture.

    PubMed

    Giavazzi, Fabio; Fornasieri, Alessandro; Vailati, Alberto; Cerbino, Roberto

    2016-10-01

    When a macroscopic concentration gradient is present across a binary mixture, long-ranged non-equilibrium concentration fluctuations (NCF) appear as a consequence of the coupling between the gradient and spontaneous equilibrium velocity fluctuations. Long-ranged equilibrium concentration fluctuations (ECF) may be also observed when the mixture is close to a critical point. Here we study the interplay between NCF and critical ECF in a near-critical mixture aniline/cyclohexane in the presence of a vertical concentration gradient. To this aim, we exploit a commercial optical microscope and a simple, custom-made, temperature-controlled cell to obtain simultaneous static and dynamic scattering information on the fluctuations. We first characterise the critical ECF at fixed temperature T above the upper critical solution temperature Tc, in the wide temperature range [Formula: see text] (°)C. In this range, we observe the expected critical scaling behaviour for both the scattering intensity and the mass diffusion coefficient and we determine the critical exponents [Formula: see text], [Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text], which are found in agreement with the 3D Ising values. We then study the system in the two-phase region (T < T c). In particular, we characterise the interplay between ECF and NCF when the mixture, initially at a temperature Ti, is rapidly brought to a temperature T f > T i. During the transient, a vertical diffusive mass flux is present that causes the onset of NCF, whose amplitude vanishes with time, as the flux goes to zero. We also study the time dependence of the equilibrium scattering intensity I eq, of the crossover wave vector q co and of the diffusion coefficient D during diffusion and find that all these quantities exhibit an exponential relaxation enslaved to the diffusive kinetics.

  11. Detection of Non-Equilibrium Fluctuations in Active Gels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bacanu, Alexandru; Broedersz, Chase; Gladrow, Jannes; Mackintosh, Fred; Schmidt, Christoph; Fakhri, Nikta

    Active force generation at the molecular scale in cells can result in stochastic non-equilibrium dynamics on mesoscpopic scales. Molecular motors such as myosin can drive steady-state stress fluctuations in cytoskeletal networks. Here, we present a non-invasive technique to probe non-equilibrium fluctuations in an active gel using single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs). SWNTs are semiflexible polymers with intrinsic fluorescence in the near infrared. Both thermal and active motor-induced forces in the network induce transverse fluctuations of SWNTs. We demonstrate that active driven shape fluctuations of the SWNTs exhibit dynamics that reflect the non-equilibrium activity, in particular the emergence of correlations between the bending modes. We discuss the observation of breaking of detailed balance in this configurational space of the SWNT probes. Supported by National Defense Science and Engineering Graduate Student Fellowship (NDSEG).

  12. Non-Equilibrium Properties from Equilibrium Free Energy Calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pohorille, Andrew; Wilson, Michael A.

    2012-01-01

    Calculating free energy in computer simulations is of central importance in statistical mechanics of condensed media and its applications to chemistry and biology not only because it is the most comprehensive and informative quantity that characterizes the eqUilibrium state, but also because it often provides an efficient route to access dynamic and kinetic properties of a system. Most of applications of equilibrium free energy calculations to non-equilibrium processes rely on a description in which a molecule or an ion diffuses in the potential of mean force. In general case this description is a simplification, but it might be satisfactorily accurate in many instances of practical interest. This hypothesis has been tested in the example of the electrodiffusion equation . Conductance of model ion channels has been calculated directly through counting the number of ion crossing events observed during long molecular dynamics simulations and has been compared with the conductance obtained from solving the generalized Nernst-Plank equation. It has been shown that under relatively modest conditions the agreement between these two approaches is excellent, thus demonstrating the assumptions underlying the diffusion equation are fulfilled. Under these conditions the electrodiffusion equation provides an efficient approach to calculating the full voltage-current dependence routinely measured in electrophysiological experiments.

  13. Science on a Sphere exhibit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2009-01-01

    Students from Xavier University Preparatory School in New Orleans view the newest exhibit at StenniSphere, the visitor center at NASA's John C. Stennis Space Center - Science on a Sphere, a 68-inch global presentation of planetary data. StenniSphere is only the third NASA visitor center to offer the computer system, which uses four projectors to display data on a globe and present a dynamic, revolving, animated view of Earth and other planets.

  14. Science on a Sphere exhibit

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-03-31

    Students from Xavier University Preparatory School in New Orleans view the newest exhibit at StenniSphere, the visitor center at NASA's John C. Stennis Space Center - Science on a Sphere, a 68-inch global presentation of planetary data. StenniSphere is only the third NASA visitor center to offer the computer system, which uses four projectors to display data on a globe and present a dynamic, revolving, animated view of Earth and other planets.

  15. Non-equilibrium in cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pietroni, M.

    2009-02-01

    All the non-trivial features of the Universe we see around us, such as particles, stars, galaxies, and clusters of galaxies, are the result of non-equilibrium processes in the cosmic evolution. These lectures aim to provide some general background in cosmology and to examine specific, and notable, examples of departures from thermal equilibrium. They are organized as follows: 1) Overview of the thermal history of the Universe after the Big Bang: the relevant time-scales and the mechanism of particle decoupling from the themal bath; 2) Explicit examples of cosmic relics: nucleosynthesis, photons and the cosmic microwave background, neutrinos, and cold dark matter; 3) Baryogenesis: the generation of the baryon asymmetry of the Universe; 4) The formation of cosmic structures (galaxies, clusters of galaxies): from the Vlasov equation to the renormalization group.

  16. Korshunov instantons out of equilibrium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Titov, M.; Gutman, D. B.

    2016-04-01

    Zero-dimensional dissipative action possesses nontrivial minima known as Korshunov instantons. They have been known so far only for imaginary time representation that is limited to equilibrium systems. In this work we reconstruct and generalise Korshunov instantons using real-time Keldysh approach. This allows us to formulate the dissipative action theory for generic nonequilibrium conditions. Possible applications of the theory to transport in strongly biased quantum dots are discussed.

  17. Local equilibrium in bird flocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mora, Thierry; Walczak, Aleksandra M.; Del Castello, Lorenzo; Ginelli, Francesco; Melillo, Stefania; Parisi, Leonardo; Viale, Massimiliano; Cavagna, Andrea; Giardina, Irene

    2016-12-01

    The correlated motion of flocks is an example of global order emerging from local interactions. An essential difference with respect to analogous ferromagnetic systems is that flocks are active: animals move relative to each other, dynamically rearranging their interaction network. This non-equilibrium characteristic has been studied theoretically, but its impact on actual animal groups remains to be fully explored experimentally. Here, we introduce a novel dynamical inference technique, based on the principle of maximum entropy, which accommodates network rearrangements and overcomes the problem of slow experimental sampling rates. We use this method to infer the strength and range of alignment forces from data of starling flocks. We find that local bird alignment occurs on a much faster timescale than neighbour rearrangement. Accordingly, equilibrium inference, which assumes a fixed interaction network, gives results consistent with dynamical inference. We conclude that bird orientations are in a state of local quasi-equilibrium over the interaction length scale, providing firm ground for the applicability of statistical physics in certain active systems.

  18. Local equilibrium in bird flocks.

    PubMed

    Mora, Thierry; Walczak, Aleksandra M; Castello, Lorenzo Del; Ginelli, Francesco; Melillo, Stefania; Parisi, Leonardo; Viale, Massimiliano; Cavagna, Andrea; Giardina, Irene

    2016-12-01

    The correlated motion of flocks is an instance of global order emerging from local interactions. An essential difference with analogous ferromagnetic systems is that flocks are active: animals move relative to each other, dynamically rearranging their interaction network. The effect of this off-equilibrium element is well studied theoretically, but its impact on actual biological groups deserves more experimental attention. Here, we introduce a novel dynamical inference technique, based on the principle of maximum entropy, which accodomates network rearrangements and overcomes the problem of slow experimental sampling rates. We use this method to infer the strength and range of alignment forces from data of starling flocks. We find that local bird alignment happens on a much faster timescale than neighbour rearrangement. Accordingly, equilibrium inference, which assumes a fixed interaction network, gives results consistent with dynamical inference. We conclude that bird orientations are in a state of local quasi-equilibrium over the interaction length scale, providing firm ground for the applicability of statistical physics in certain active systems.

  19. Mixed quantum-classical equilibrium in global flux surface hopping

    SciTech Connect

    Sifain, Andrew E.; Wang, Linjun; Prezhdo, Oleg V.

    2015-06-14

    Global flux surface hopping (GFSH) generalizes fewest switches surface hopping (FSSH)—one of the most popular approaches to nonadiabatic molecular dynamics—for processes exhibiting superexchange. We show that GFSH satisfies detailed balance and leads to thermodynamic equilibrium with accuracy similar to FSSH. This feature is particularly important when studying electron-vibrational relaxation and phonon-assisted transport. By studying the dynamics in a three-level quantum system coupled to a classical atom in contact with a classical bath, we demonstrate that both FSSH and GFSH achieve the Boltzmann state populations. Thermal equilibrium is attained significantly faster with GFSH, since it accurately represents the superexchange process. GFSH converges closer to the Boltzmann averages than FSSH and exhibits significantly smaller statistical errors.

  20. Large holograms in traveling exhibitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christakis, Anne-Marie

    1994-01-01

    The presentation of large holograms in travelling exhibitions has always posed problems, mainly due to lack of space. The Museum of Holography was consequently required to develop, with Jean-Francois Moreau, display consoles which are light, affordable and completely detachable. In a permanent exposition at the Forum des Halles in Paris, the Museum displays a room with 22 holograms, each measuring 1 m X 1 m, in a structure designed by the architect Fabien Vienne. The different systems used by the Museum are presented here.

  1. Thermoelectric device exhibiting decreased stress

    SciTech Connect

    Heath, D.L.; Chou, D.J.

    1985-02-05

    A thermoelectric device exhibiting both structural integrity and decreased stress across the device notwithstanding the application of thermally cycled temperature differentials thereacross includes, electrically interconnected thermoelectric elements and a rigidly affixed substrate. Thermal stress is relieved by using flexible conductors to interconnect the thermoelectric elements, and by the use of a flexile joint to attach a second substrate to the remainder of the device. Complete elimination of the second substrate may also be used to eliminate stress. Presence of the rigidly affixed substrate gives the device sufficient structural integrity to enable it to withstand rugged conditions.

  2. Equilibrium and kinetics in metamorphism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pattison, D. R.

    2012-12-01

    The equilibrium model for metamorphism is founded on the metamorphic facies principle, the repeated association of the same mineral assemblages in rocks of different bulk composition that have been metamorphosed together. Yet, for any metamorphic process to occur, there must be some degree of reaction overstepping (disequilibrium) to initiate reaction. The magnitude and variability of overstepping, and the degree to which it is either a relatively minor wrinkle or a more substantive challenge to the interpretation of metamorphic rocks using the equilibrium model, is an active area of current research. Kinetic barriers to reaction generally diminish with rising temperature due to the Arrhenius relation. In contrast, the rate of build-up of the macroscopic energetic driving force needed to overcome kinetic barriers to reaction, reaction affinity, does not vary uniformly with temperature, instead varying from reaction to reaction. High-entropy reactions that release large quantities of H2O build up reaction affinity more rapidly than low-entropy reactions that release little or no H2O, such that the former are expected to be overstepped less than the latter. Some consequences include: (1) metamorphic reaction intervals may be discrete rather than continuous, initiating at the point that sufficient reaction affinity has built up to overcome kinetic barriers; (2) metamorphic reaction intervals may not correspond in a simple way to reaction boundaries in an equilibrium phase diagram; (3) metamorphic reactions may involve metastable reactions; (4) metamorphic 'cascades' are possible, in which stable and metastable reactions involving the same reactant phases may proceed simultaneously; and (5) fluid generation, and possibly fluid presence in general, may be episodic rather than continuous, corresponding to discrete intervals of reaction. These considerations bear on the interpretation of P-T-t paths from metamorphic mineral assemblages and textures. The success of the

  3. Morphodynamic equilibrium of alluvial estuaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tambroni, Nicoletta; Bolla Pittaluga, Michele; Canestrelli, Alberto; Lanzoni, Stefano; Seminara, Giovanni

    2014-05-01

    The evolution of the longitudinal bed profile of an estuary, with given plan-form configuration, subject to given tidal forcing at the mouth and prescribed values of water and sediment supply from the river is investigated numerically. Our main goal is to ascertain whether, starting from some initial condition, the bed evolution tends to reach a unique equilibrium configuration asymptotically in time. Also, we investigate the morphological response of an alluvial estuary to changes in the tidal range and hydrologic forcing (flow and sediment supply). Finally, the solution helps characterizing the transition between the fluvially dominated region and the tidally dominated region of the estuary. All these issues play an important role also in interpreting how the facies changes along the estuary, thus helping to make correct paleo-environmental and sequence-stratigraphic interpretations of sedimentary successions (Dalrymple and Choi, 2007). Results show that the model is able to describe a wide class of settings ranging from tidally dominated estuaries to fluvially dominated estuaries. In the latter case, the solution is found to compare satisfactory with the analytical asymptotic solution recently derived by Seminara et al. (2012), under the hypothesis of fairly 'small' tidal oscillations. Simulations indicate that the system always moves toward an equilibrium configuration in which the net sediment flux in a tidal cycle is constant throughout the estuary and equal to the constant sediment flux discharged from the river. For constant width, the bed equilibrium profile of the estuarine channel is characterized by two distinct regions: a steeper reach seaward, dominated by the tide, and a less steep upstream reach, dominated by the river and characterized by the undisturbed bed slope. Although the latter reach, at equilibrium, is not directly affected by the tidal wave, however starting from an initial uniform stream with the constant 'fluvial' slope, the final

  4. Collaborative virtual environments art exhibition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolinsky, Margaret; Anstey, Josephine; Pape, Dave E.; Aguilera, Julieta C.; Kostis, Helen-Nicole; Tsoupikova, Daria

    2005-03-01

    This panel presentation will exhibit artwork developed in CAVEs and discuss how art methodologies enhance the science of VR through collaboration, interaction and aesthetics. Artists and scientists work alongside one another to expand scientific research and artistic expression and are motivated by exhibiting collaborative virtual environments. Looking towards the arts, such as painting and sculpture, computer graphics captures a visual tradition. Virtual reality expands this tradition to not only what we face, but to what surrounds us and even what responds to our body and its gestures. Art making that once was isolated to the static frame and an optimal point of view is now out and about, in fully immersive mode within CAVEs. Art knowledge is a guide to how the aesthetics of 2D and 3D worlds affect, transform, and influence the social, intellectual and physical condition of the human body through attention to psychology, spiritual thinking, education, and cognition. The psychological interacts with the physical in the virtual in such a way that each facilitates, enhances and extends the other, culminating in a "go together" world. Attention to sharing art experience across high-speed networks introduces a dimension of liveliness and aliveness when we "become virtual" in real time with others.

  5. Torque equilibrium attitude control for Skylab reentry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glaese, J. R.; Kennel, H. F.

    1979-01-01

    All the available torque equilibrium attitudes (most were useless from the standpoint of lack of electrical power) and the equilibrium seeking method are presented, as well as the actual successful application during the 3 weeks prior to Skylab reentry.

  6. Accelerating Multiagent Reinforcement Learning by Equilibrium Transfer.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yujing; Gao, Yang; An, Bo

    2015-07-01

    An important approach in multiagent reinforcement learning (MARL) is equilibrium-based MARL, which adopts equilibrium solution concepts in game theory and requires agents to play equilibrium strategies at each state. However, most existing equilibrium-based MARL algorithms cannot scale due to a large number of computationally expensive equilibrium computations (e.g., computing Nash equilibria is PPAD-hard) during learning. For the first time, this paper finds that during the learning process of equilibrium-based MARL, the one-shot games corresponding to each state's successive visits often have the same or similar equilibria (for some states more than 90% of games corresponding to successive visits have similar equilibria). Inspired by this observation, this paper proposes to use equilibrium transfer to accelerate equilibrium-based MARL. The key idea of equilibrium transfer is to reuse previously computed equilibria when each agent has a small incentive to deviate. By introducing transfer loss and transfer condition, a novel framework called equilibrium transfer-based MARL is proposed. We prove that although equilibrium transfer brings transfer loss, equilibrium-based MARL algorithms can still converge to an equilibrium policy under certain assumptions. Experimental results in widely used benchmarks (e.g., grid world game, soccer game, and wall game) show that the proposed framework: 1) not only significantly accelerates equilibrium-based MARL (up to 96.7% reduction in learning time), but also achieves higher average rewards than algorithms without equilibrium transfer and 2) scales significantly better than algorithms without equilibrium transfer when the state/action space grows and the number of agents increases.

  7. Equilibrium and non-equilibrium metal-ceramic interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, Y.; Merkle, K.L.

    1991-01-01

    Metal-ceramic interfaces in thermodynamic equilibrium (Au/ZrO{sub 2}) and non-equilibrium (Au/MgO) have been studied by TEM and HREM. In the Au/ZrO{sub 2} system, ZrO{sub 2} precipitates formed by internal oxidation of a 7%Zr-Au alloy show a cubic ZrO{sub 2} phase. It appears that formation of the cubic ZrO{sub 2} is facilitated by alignment with the Au matrix. Most of the ZrO{sub 2} precipitates have a perfect cube-on-cube orientation relationship with the Au matrix. The large number of interfacial steps observed in a short-time annealing experiment indicate that the precipitates are formed by the ledge growth mechanism. The lowest interfacial energy is indicated by the dominance of closed-packed (111) Au/ZrO{sub 2} interfaces. In the Au/MgO system, composite films with small MgO smoke particles embedded in a Au matrix were prepared by a thin film technique. HREM observations show that most of the Au/MgO interfaces have a strong tendency to maintain a dense lattice structure across the interfaces irrespective of whether the interfaces are incoherent of semi-coherent. This indicates that there may be relatively strong bond between MgO and Au.

  8. Equilibrium and non-equilibrium metal-ceramic interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, Y.; Merkle, K.L.

    1991-12-31

    Metal-ceramic interfaces in thermodynamic equilibrium (Au/ZrO{sub 2}) and non-equilibrium (Au/MgO) have been studied by TEM and HREM. In the Au/ZrO{sub 2} system, ZrO{sub 2} precipitates formed by internal oxidation of a 7%Zr-Au alloy show a cubic ZrO{sub 2} phase. It appears that formation of the cubic ZrO{sub 2} is facilitated by alignment with the Au matrix. Most of the ZrO{sub 2} precipitates have a perfect cube-on-cube orientation relationship with the Au matrix. The large number of interfacial steps observed in a short-time annealing experiment indicate that the precipitates are formed by the ledge growth mechanism. The lowest interfacial energy is indicated by the dominance of closed-packed [111] Au/ZrO{sub 2} interfaces. In the Au/MgO system, composite films with small MgO smoke particles embedded in a Au matrix were prepared by a thin film technique. HREM observations show that most of the Au/MgO interfaces have a strong tendency to maintain a dense lattice structure across the interfaces irrespective of whether the interfaces are incoherent of semi-coherent. This indicates that there may be relatively strong bond between MgO and Au.

  9. Open problems in non-equilibrium physics

    SciTech Connect

    Kusnezov, D.

    1997-09-22

    The report contains viewgraphs on the following: approaches to non-equilibrium statistical mechanics; classical and quantum processes in chaotic environments; classical fields in non-equilibrium situations: real time dynamics at finite temperature; and phase transitions in non-equilibrium conditions.

  10. Crows spontaneously exhibit analogical reasoning.

    PubMed

    Smirnova, Anna; Zorina, Zoya; Obozova, Tanya; Wasserman, Edward

    2015-01-19

    Analogical reasoning is vital to advanced cognition and behavioral adaptation. Many theorists deem analogical thinking to be uniquely human and to be foundational to categorization, creative problem solving, and scientific discovery. Comparative psychologists have long been interested in the species generality of analogical reasoning, but they initially found it difficult to obtain empirical support for such thinking in nonhuman animals (for pioneering efforts, see [2, 3]). Researchers have since mustered considerable evidence and argument that relational matching-to-sample (RMTS) effectively captures the essence of analogy, in which the relevant logical arguments are presented visually. In RMTS, choice of test pair BB would be correct if the sample pair were AA, whereas choice of test pair EF would be correct if the sample pair were CD. Critically, no items in the correct test pair physically match items in the sample pair, thus demanding that only relational sameness or differentness is available to support accurate choice responding. Initial evidence suggested that only humans and apes can successfully learn RMTS with pairs of sample and test items; however, monkeys have subsequently done so. Here, we report that crows too exhibit relational matching behavior. Even more importantly, crows spontaneously display relational responding without ever having been trained on RMTS; they had only been trained on identity matching-to-sample (IMTS). Such robust and uninstructed relational matching behavior represents the most convincing evidence yet of analogical reasoning in a nonprimate species, as apes alone have spontaneously exhibited RMTS behavior after only IMTS training. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Equilibrium figures of dwarf planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rambaux, Nicolas; Chambat, Frederic; Castillo-Rogez, Julie; Baguet, Daniel

    2016-10-01

    Dwarf planets including transneptunian objects (TNO) and Ceres are >500 km large and display a spheroidal shape. These protoplanets are left over from the formation of the solar System about 4.6 billion years ago and their study could improve our knowledge of the early solar system. They could be formed in-situ or migrated to their current positions as a consequence of large-scale solar system dynamical evolution. Quantifying their internal composition would bring constraints on their accretion environment and migration history. That information may be inferred from studying their global shapes from stellar occultations or thermal infrared imaging. Here we model the equilibrium shapes of isolated dwarf planets under the assumption of hydrostatic equilibrium that forms the basis for interpreting shape data in terms of interior structure. Deviations from hydrostaticity can shed light on the thermal and geophysical history of the bodies. The dwarf planets are generally fast rotators spinning in few hours, so their shape modeling requires numerically integration with Clairaut's equations of rotational equilibrium expanded up to third order in a small parameter m, the geodetic parameter, to reach an accuracy better than a few kilometers depending on the spin velocity and mean density. We also show that the difference between a 500-km radius homogeneous model described by a MacLaurin ellipsoid and a stratified model assuming silicate and ice layers can reach several kilometers in the long and short axes, which could be measurable. This type of modeling will be instrumental in assessing hydrostaticity and thus detecting large non-hydrostatic contributions in the observed shapes.

  12. Equilibrium Sampling in Biomolecular Simulation

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Equilibrium sampling of biomolecules remains an unmet challenge after more than 30 years of atomistic simulation. Efforts to enhance sampling capability, which are reviewed here, range from the development of new algorithms to parallelization to novel uses of hardware. Special focus is placed on classifying algorithms — most of which are underpinned by a few key ideas — in order to understand their fundamental strengths and limitations. Although algorithms have proliferated, progress resulting from novel hardware use appears to be more clear-cut than from algorithms alone, partly due to the lack of widely used sampling measures. PMID:21370970

  13. Conformations of Proteins in Equilibrium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Micheletti, Cristian; Banavar, Jayanth R.; Maritan, Amos

    2001-08-01

    We introduce a simple theoretical approach for an equilibrium study of proteins with known native-state structures. We test our approach with results on well-studied globular proteins, chymotrypsin inhibitor (2ci2), barnase, and the alpha spectrin SH3 domain, and present evidence for a hierarchical onset of order on lowering the temperature with significant organization at the local level even at high temperatures. A further application to the folding process of HIV-1 protease shows that the model can be reliably used to identify key folding sites that are responsible for the development of drug resistance.

  14. Princeton spectral equilibrium code: PSEC

    SciTech Connect

    Ling, K.M.; Jardin, S.C.

    1984-03-01

    A fast computer code has been developed to calculate free-boundary solutions to the plasma equilibrium equation that are consistent with the currents in external coils and conductors. The free-boundary formulation is based on the minimization of a mean-square error epsilon while the fixed-boundary solution is based on a variational principle and spectral representation of the coordinates x(psi,theta) and z(psi,theta). Specific calculations using the Columbia University Torus II, the Poloidal Divertor Experiment (PDX), and the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) geometries are performed.

  15. Nanoparticle-nanoparticle vs. nanoparticle-substrate hot spot contributions to the SERS signal: studying Raman labelled monomers, dimers and trimers.

    PubMed

    Sergiienko, Sergii; Moor, Kamila; Gudun, Kristina; Yelemessova, Zarina; Bukasov, Rostislav

    2017-02-08

    We used a combination of Raman microscopy, AFM and TEM to quantify the influence of dimerization on the surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) signal for gold and silver nanoparticles (NPs) modified with Raman reporters and situated on gold, silver, and aluminum films and a silicon wafer. The overall increases in the mean SERS enhancement factor (EF) upon dimerization (up by 43% on average) and trimerisation (up by 96% on average) of AuNPs and AgNPs on the studied metal films are within a factor of two, which is moderate when compared to most theoretical models. However, the maximum ratio of EFs for some dimers to the mean EF of monomers can be as high as 5.5 for AgNPs on a gold substrate. In contrast, for dimerization and trimerization of gold and silver NPs on silicon, the mean EF increases by 1-2 orders of magnitude relative to the mean EF of single NPs. Therefore, hot spots in the interparticle gap between gold nanoparticles rather than hot spots between Au nanoparticles and the substrate dominate SERS enhancement for dimers and trimers on a silicon substrate. However, Raman labeled noble metal nanoparticles on plasmonic metal films generate on average SERS enhancement of the same order of magnitude for both types of hot spot zones (e.g. NP/NP and NP/metal film).

  16. [Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium in genetic epidemiology].

    PubMed

    Liu, Hong; Hu, Yonghua

    2010-01-01

    Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium test is the base of genetic epidemiology. The new methods for Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium test involve: X chromosome-linked single nucleotide polymorphism Hardy-Weinberg test, inbreeding coefficient (F) test, an incomplete enumeration algorithm for an exact test of Hardy-Weinberg proportions with multiple alleles, and graphical tests for Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium based on the ternary plot. It is necessary to conduct Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium test in genetic epidemiology studies and adjust the associations as deviation of Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium occurs.

  17. Are the Concepts of Dynamic Equilibrium and the Thermodynamic Criteria for Spontaneity, Nonspontaneity, and Equilibrium Compatible?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silverberg, Lee J.; Raff, Lionel M.

    2015-01-01

    Thermodynamic spontaneity-equilibrium criteria require that in a single-reaction system, reactions in either the forward or reverse direction at equilibrium be nonspontaneous. Conversely, the concept of dynamic equilibrium holds that forward and reverse reactions both occur at equal rates at equilibrium to the extent allowed by kinetic…

  18. Are the Concepts of Dynamic Equilibrium and the Thermodynamic Criteria for Spontaneity, Nonspontaneity, and Equilibrium Compatible?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silverberg, Lee J.; Raff, Lionel M.

    2015-01-01

    Thermodynamic spontaneity-equilibrium criteria require that in a single-reaction system, reactions in either the forward or reverse direction at equilibrium be nonspontaneous. Conversely, the concept of dynamic equilibrium holds that forward and reverse reactions both occur at equal rates at equilibrium to the extent allowed by kinetic…

  19. The geometry of structural equilibrium.

    PubMed

    McRobie, Allan

    2017-03-01

    Building on a long tradition from Maxwell, Rankine, Klein and others, this paper puts forward a geometrical description of structural equilibrium which contains a procedure for the graphic analysis of stress resultants within general three-dimensional frames. The method is a natural generalization of Rankine's reciprocal diagrams for three-dimensional trusses. The vertices and edges of dual abstract 4-polytopes are embedded within dual four-dimensional vector spaces, wherein the oriented area of generalized polygons give all six components (axial and shear forces with torsion and bending moments) of the stress resultants. The relevant quantities may be readily calculated using four-dimensional Clifford algebra. As well as giving access to frame analysis and design, the description resolves a number of long-standing problems with the incompleteness of Rankine's description of three-dimensional trusses. Examples are given of how the procedure may be applied to structures of engineering interest, including an outline of a two-stage procedure for addressing the equilibrium of loaded gridshell rooves.

  20. Non-equilibrium Majorana fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smirnov, Sergey

    2017-06-01

    Non-equilibrium physics of random events, or fluctuations, is a unique fingerprint of a given system. Here we demonstrate that in non-interacting systems with dynamics driven essentially by Majorana states the effective charge {e}* , characterizing the electric current fluctuations, is fractional. This is in contrast to non-interacting Dirac systems with the trivial electronic charge {e}* =e. In the Majorana state, however, we predict two different fractional effective charges at low and high energies, {e}{{l}}* =e/2 and {e}{{h}}* =3e/2, accessible at low and high bias voltages, respectively. We show that while the low-energy effective charge {e}{{l}}* is sensitive to thermal fluctuations of the current, the high-energy effective charge {e}{{h}}* is robust against thermal noise. A unique fluctuation signature of Majorana fermions is therefore encoded in the high-voltage tails of the electric current noise easily accessible in experiments on strongly non-equilibrium systems even at high temperatures.

  1. The geometry of structural equilibrium

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Building on a long tradition from Maxwell, Rankine, Klein and others, this paper puts forward a geometrical description of structural equilibrium which contains a procedure for the graphic analysis of stress resultants within general three-dimensional frames. The method is a natural generalization of Rankine’s reciprocal diagrams for three-dimensional trusses. The vertices and edges of dual abstract 4-polytopes are embedded within dual four-dimensional vector spaces, wherein the oriented area of generalized polygons give all six components (axial and shear forces with torsion and bending moments) of the stress resultants. The relevant quantities may be readily calculated using four-dimensional Clifford algebra. As well as giving access to frame analysis and design, the description resolves a number of long-standing problems with the incompleteness of Rankine’s description of three-dimensional trusses. Examples are given of how the procedure may be applied to structures of engineering interest, including an outline of a two-stage procedure for addressing the equilibrium of loaded gridshell rooves. PMID:28405361

  2. Concentration-Induced Association in a Protein System Caused by a Highly Directional Patch Attraction.

    PubMed

    Li, Weimin; Persson, Björn A; Lund, Mikael; Bergenholtz, Johan; Zackrisson Oskolkova, Malin

    2016-09-01

    Self-association of the protein lactoferrin is studied in solution using small-angle X-ray scattering techniques. Effective static structure factors have been shown to exhibit either a monotonic or a nonmonotonic dependence on protein concentration in the small wavevector limit, depending on salt concentration. The behavior correlates with a nonmonotonic dependence of the second virial coefficient on salt concentration, such that a maximum appears in the structure factor at a low protein concentration when the second virial coefficient is negative and close to a minimum. The results are interpreted in terms of an integral equation theory with explicit dimers, formulated by Wertheim, which provides a consistent framework able to explain the behavior in terms of a monomer-dimer equilibrium that appears because of a highly directional patch attraction. Short attraction ranges preclude trimer formation, which explains why the protein system behaves as if it were subject to a concentration-dependent isotropic protein-protein attraction. Superimposing an isotropic interaction, comprising screened Coulomb repulsion and van der Waals attraction, on the patch attraction allows for a semiquantitative modeling of the complete transition pathway from monomers in the dilute limit to monomer-dimer systems at somewhat higher protein concentrations.

  3. Dimerization of the type IV pilin from Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain K122-4 results in increased helix stability as measured by time-resolved hydrogen-deuterium exchange

    PubMed Central

    Lento, Cristina; Wilson, Derek J.; Audette, Gerald F.

    2015-01-01

    Truncated pilin monomers from Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain K122-4 (ΔK122) have been shown to enter a monomer-dimer equilibrium in solution prior to oligomerization into protein nanotubes. Here, we examine the structural changes occurring between the monomeric and dimeric states of ΔK122 using time-resolved hydrogen-deuterium exchange mass spectrometry. Based on levels of deuterium uptake, the N-terminal α-helix and the loop connecting the second and third strands of the anti-parallel β-sheet contribute significantly to pilin dimerization. Conversely, the antiparallel β-sheet and αβ loop region exhibit increased flexibility, while the receptor binding domain retains a rigid conformation in the equilibrium state. PMID:26798830

  4. Equilibrium sampling by re-weighting non-equilibrium simulation trajectories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Cheng; Wan, Biao; Xu, Shun; Wang, Yanting

    2015-12-01

    With the traditional equilibrium molecular simulations, it is usually difficult to efficiently visit the whole conformational space in complex systems, which are separated into some metastable conformational regions by high free energy barriers. The applied non-equilibrium process in simulations could enhance the transitions among these conformational regions, and the associated non-equilibrium effects can be removed by employing the Jarzynski equality (JE), then the global equilibrium distribution can be reproduced. However, the original JE requires the initial distribution of the non-equilibrium process is equilibrium, which largely limits the application of the non-equilibrium method in equilibrium sampling. By extending the previous method, the reweighted ensemble dynamics (RED), which re-weights many equilibrium simulation trajectories from arbitrary initial distribution to reproduce the global equilibrium, to non-equilibrium simulations, we present a method, named as re-weighted non-equilibrium ensemble dynamics (RNED), to generalize the JE in the non-equilibrium trajectories started from an arbitrary initial distribution, thus provide an efficient method to reproduce the equilibrium distribution based on multiple independent (short) non-equilibrium trajectories. We have illustrated the validity of the RNED in a one-dimensional toy model and in a Lennard-Jones system to detect the liquid-solid phase coexistence.

  5. Nematic-like stable glasses without equilibrium liquid crystal phases.

    PubMed

    Gómez, Jaritza; Gujral, Ankit; Huang, Chengbin; Bishop, Camille; Yu, Lian; Ediger, M D

    2017-02-07

    We report the thermal and structural properties of glasses of posaconazole, a rod-like molecule, prepared using physical vapor deposition (PVD). PVD glasses of posaconazole can show substantial molecular orientation depending upon the choice of substrate temperature, Tsubstrate, during deposition. Ellipsometry and IR measurements indicate that glasses prepared at Tsubstrate very near the glass transition temperature (Tg) are highly ordered. For these posaconazole glasses, the orientation order parameter is similar to that observed in macroscopically aligned nematic liquid crystals, indicating that the molecules are mostly parallel to one another and perpendicular to the interface. To our knowledge, these are the most anisotropic glasses ever prepared by PVD from a molecule that does not form equilibrium liquid crystal phases. These results are consistent with a previously proposed mechanism in which molecular orientation in PVD glasses is inherited from the orientation present at the free surface of the equilibrium liquid. This mechanism suggests that molecular orientation at the surface of the equilibrium liquid of posaconazole is nematic-like. Posaconazole glasses can show very high kinetic stability; the isothermal transformation of a 400 nm glass into the supercooled liquid occurs via a propagating front that originates at the free surface and requires ∼10(5) times the structural relaxation time of the liquid (τα). We also studied the kinetic stability of PVD glasses of itraconazole, which is a structurally similar molecule with equilibrium liquid crystal phases. While itraconazole glasses can be even more anisotropic than posaconazole glasses, they exhibit lower kinetic stability.

  6. Nematic-like stable glasses without equilibrium liquid crystal phases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gómez, Jaritza; Gujral, Ankit; Huang, Chengbin; Bishop, Camille; Yu, Lian; Ediger, M. D.

    2017-02-01

    We report the thermal and structural properties of glasses of posaconazole, a rod-like molecule, prepared using physical vapor deposition (PVD). PVD glasses of posaconazole can show substantial molecular orientation depending upon the choice of substrate temperature, Tsubstrate, during deposition. Ellipsometry and IR measurements indicate that glasses prepared at Tsubstrate very near the glass transition temperature (Tg) are highly ordered. For these posaconazole glasses, the orientation order parameter is similar to that observed in macroscopically aligned nematic liquid crystals, indicating that the molecules are mostly parallel to one another and perpendicular to the interface. To our knowledge, these are the most anisotropic glasses ever prepared by PVD from a molecule that does not form equilibrium liquid crystal phases. These results are consistent with a previously proposed mechanism in which molecular orientation in PVD glasses is inherited from the orientation present at the free surface of the equilibrium liquid. This mechanism suggests that molecular orientation at the surface of the equilibrium liquid of posaconazole is nematic-like. Posaconazole glasses can show very high kinetic stability; the isothermal transformation of a 400 nm glass into the supercooled liquid occurs via a propagating front that originates at the free surface and requires ˜105 times the structural relaxation time of the liquid (τα). We also studied the kinetic stability of PVD glasses of itraconazole, which is a structurally similar molecule with equilibrium liquid crystal phases. While itraconazole glasses can be even more anisotropic than posaconazole glasses, they exhibit lower kinetic stability.

  7. Nematic-like stable glasses without equilibrium liquid crystal phases

    DOE Data Explorer

    Gomez, Jaritza [Department of Chemistry, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53706, USA; Gujral, Ankit [Department of Chemistry, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53706, USA; Huang, Chengbin [School of Pharmacy, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 777 Highland Avenue, Madison, Wisconsin 53705-2222, USA; Bishop, Camille [Department of Chemistry, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53706, USA; Yu, Lian [School of Pharmacy, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 777 Highland Avenue, Madison, Wisconsin 53705-2222, USA; Ediger, Mark [Department of Chemistry, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53706, USA

    2017-02-01

    We report the thermal and structural properties of glasses of posaconazole, a rod-like molecule, prepared using physical vapor deposition (PVD). PVD glasses of posaconazole can show substantial molecular orientation depending upon the choice of substrate temperature, Tsubstrate, during deposition.Ellipsometry and IR measurements indicate that glasses prepared at Tsubstrate very near the glass transition temperature (Tg) are highly ordered. For these posaconazole glasses, the orientation order parameter is similar to that observed in macroscopically aligned nematic liquid crystals, indicating that the molecules are mostly parallel to one another and perpendicular to the interface. To our knowledge, these are the most anisotropic glasses ever prepared by PVD from a molecule that does not form equilibrium liquid crystal phases. These results are consistent with a previously proposed mechanism in which molecular orientation in PVD glasses is inherited from the orientation present at the free surface of the equilibrium liquid. This mechanism suggests that molecular orientation at the surface of the equilibrium liquid of posaconazole is nematic-like. Posaconazole glasses can show very high kinetic stability; the isothermal transformation of a 400 nm glass into the supercooled liquid occurs via a propagating front that originates at the free surface and requires ~105 times the structural relaxation time of the liquid (τα). We also studied the kinetic stability of PVD glasses of itraconazole, which is a structurally similar molecule with equilibrium liquid crystal phases. While itraconazole glasses can be even more anisotropic than posaconazole glasses, they exhibit lower kinetic stability.

  8. Local non-equilibrium thermodynamics.

    PubMed

    Jinwoo, Lee; Tanaka, Hajime

    2015-01-16

    Local Shannon entropy lies at the heart of modern thermodynamics, with much discussion of trajectory-dependent entropy production. When taken at both boundaries of a process in phase space, it reproduces the second law of thermodynamics over a finite time interval for small scale systems. However, given that entropy is an ensemble property, it has never been clear how one can assign such a quantity locally. Given such a fundamental omission in our knowledge, we construct a new ensemble composed of trajectories reaching an individual microstate, and show that locally defined entropy, information, and free energy are properties of the ensemble, or trajectory-independent true thermodynamic potentials. We find that the Boltzmann-Gibbs distribution and Landauer's principle can be generalized naturally as properties of the ensemble, and that trajectory-free state functions of the ensemble govern the exact mechanism of non-equilibrium relaxation.

  9. Neoclassical equilibrium in gyrokinetic simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Garbet, X.; Dif-Pradalier, G.; Nguyen, C.; Sarazin, Y.; Grandgirard, V.; Ghendrih, Ph.

    2009-06-15

    This paper presents a set of model collision operators, which reproduce the neoclassical equilibrium and comply with the constraints of a full-f global gyrokinetic code. The assessment of these operators is based on an entropy variational principle, which allows one to perform a fast calculation of the neoclassical diffusivity and poloidal velocity. It is shown that the force balance equation is recovered at lowest order in the expansion parameter, the normalized gyroradius, hence allowing one to calculate correctly the radial electric field. Also, the conventional neoclassical transport and the poloidal velocity are reproduced in the plateau and banana regimes. The advantages and drawbacks of the various model operators are discussed in view of the requirements for neoclassical and turbulent transport.

  10. Equilibrium calculations of firework mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Hobbs, M.L.; Tanaka, Katsumi; Iida, Mitsuaki; Matsunaga, Takehiro

    1994-12-31

    Thermochemical equilibrium calculations have been used to calculate detonation conditions for typical firework components including three report charges, two display charges, and black powder which is used as a fuse or launch charge. Calculations were performed with a modified version of the TIGER code which allows calculations with 900 gaseous and 600 condensed product species at high pressure. The detonation calculations presented in this paper are thought to be the first report on the theoretical study of firework detonation. Measured velocities for two report charges are available and compare favorably to predicted detonation velocities. However, the measured velocities may not be true detonation velocities. Fast deflagration rather than an ideal detonation occurs when reactants contain significant amounts of slow reacting constituents such as aluminum or titanium. Despite such uncertainties in reacting pyrotechnics, the detonation calculations do show the complex nature of condensed phase formation at elevated pressures and give an upper bound for measured velocities.

  11. Local non-equilibrium thermodynamics

    PubMed Central

    Jinwoo, Lee; Tanaka, Hajime

    2015-01-01

    Local Shannon entropy lies at the heart of modern thermodynamics, with much discussion of trajectory-dependent entropy production. When taken at both boundaries of a process in phase space, it reproduces the second law of thermodynamics over a finite time interval for small scale systems. However, given that entropy is an ensemble property, it has never been clear how one can assign such a quantity locally. Given such a fundamental omission in our knowledge, we construct a new ensemble composed of trajectories reaching an individual microstate, and show that locally defined entropy, information, and free energy are properties of the ensemble, or trajectory-independent true thermodynamic potentials. We find that the Boltzmann-Gibbs distribution and Landauer's principle can be generalized naturally as properties of the ensemble, and that trajectory-free state functions of the ensemble govern the exact mechanism of non-equilibrium relaxation. PMID:25592077

  12. Equilibrium structure of ferrofluid aggregates.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Mina; Tománek, David

    2010-11-17

    We study the equilibrium structure of large but finite aggregates of magnetic dipoles, representing a colloidal suspension of magnetite particles in a ferrofluid. With increasing system size, the structural motif evolves from chains and rings to multi-chain and multi-ring assemblies. Very large systems form single- and multi-wall coils, tubes and scrolls. These structural changes result from a competition between various energy terms, which can be approximated analytically within a continuum model. We also study the effect of external parameters such as magnetic field on the relative stability of these structures. Our results may give insight into experimental data obtained during solidification of ferrofluid aggregates at temperatures where thermal fluctuations become negligible in comparison to inter-particle interactions. These data may also help to experimentally control the aggregation of magnetic particles.

  13. Equilibrium structure of ferrofluid aggregates

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, Mina; Tomanek, David

    2010-01-01

    We study the equilibrium structure of large but finite aggregates of magnetic dipoles, representing a colloidal suspension of magnetite particles in a ferrofluid. With increasing system size, the structural motif evolves from chains and rings to multi-chain and multi-ring assemblies. Very large systems form single- and multi-wall coils, tubes and scrolls. These structural changes result from a competition between various energy terms, which can be approximated analytically within a continuum model. We also study the effect of external parameters such as magnetic field on the relative stability of these structures. Our results may give insight into experimental data obtained during solidification of ferrofluid aggregates at temperatures where thermal fluctuations become negligible in comparison to inter-particle interactions. These data may also help to experimentally control the aggregation of magnetic particles.

  14. Nanomechanics Model for Static Equilibrium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Sunghoon

    2002-09-01

    This study presented a computational technique to model and simulate atomistic behavior of materials under static loads, Interatomic potential energy was used to maintain equilibrium among atoms under static loads and constraints, In addition, the atomistic model was coupled with the finite element analysis model so that more flexible loads and constraints could be applied to the atomistic model A multi-scale technique was also presented for some single wall nanotubes of both zigzag and armchair and then their effective stiffness were estimated Those designed nanotubes are woven into fabric composites, which can be used in various military applications including body armored, vehicles, and infantry transportation vehicles because advanced nano- composites could be much lighter and stronger than current ones, Some example problems were presented to illustrate the developed technique for the nano-composites and SWNTs, The proposed technique for nanomechanics can be used for design and analysis of materials at the atomic or molecular level,

  15. Neoclassical equilibrium in gyrokinetic simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garbet, X.; Dif-Pradalier, G.; Nguyen, C.; Sarazin, Y.; Grandgirard, V.; Ghendrih, Ph.

    2009-06-01

    This paper presents a set of model collision operators, which reproduce the neoclassical equilibrium and comply with the constraints of a full-f global gyrokinetic code. The assessment of these operators is based on an entropy variational principle, which allows one to perform a fast calculation of the neoclassical diffusivity and poloidal velocity. It is shown that the force balance equation is recovered at lowest order in the expansion parameter, the normalized gyroradius, hence allowing one to calculate correctly the radial electric field. Also, the conventional neoclassical transport and the poloidal velocity are reproduced in the plateau and banana regimes. The advantages and drawbacks of the various model operators are discussed in view of the requirements for neoclassical and turbulent transport.

  16. Modeling rocky coastline evolution and equilibrium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Limber, P. W.; Murray, A. B.

    2010-12-01

    Many of the world’s rocky coastlines exhibit planform roughness in the form of alternating headlands and embayments. Along cliffed coasts, it is often assumed that headlands consist of rock that is more resistant to wave attack than in neighboring bays, because of either structural or lithologic variations. Bays would then retreat landward faster than headlands, creating the undulating planform profiles characteristic of a rocky coastal landscape. While the interplay between alongshore rock strength and nearshore wave energy is, in some circumstances, a fundamental control on coastline shape, beach sediment is also important. Laboratory experiments and field observations have shown that beach sediment, in small volumes, can act as an abrasive tool to encourage sea cliff retreat. In large volumes, though, sediment discourages wave attack on the cliff face, acting as a protective barrier. This nonlinearity suggests a means for headland persistence, even without alongshore variations in rock strength: bare-rock headlands could retreat more slowly than, or at the same rate as, neighboring sediment-filled embayments because of alongshore variations in the availability of beach sediment. Accordingly, nearshore sediment dynamics (i.e. sediment production from sea cliff retreat and alongshore sediment transport) could promote the development of autogenic planform geometry. To explore these ideas, we present numerical and analytical modeling of large-scale (> one kilometer) and long-term (millennial-scale) planform rocky coastline evolution, in which sediment is supplied by both sea cliff erosion and coastal rivers and is distributed by alongshore sediment transport. We also compare model predictions with real landscapes. Previously, our modeling exercises focused on a basic rocky coastline configuration where lithologically-homogeneous sea cliffs supplied all beach sediment and maintained a constant alongshore height. Results showed that 1) an equilibrium alongshore

  17. Equilibrium avalanches in spin glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Doussal, Pierre; Müller, Markus; Wiese, Kay Jörg

    2012-06-01

    We study the distribution of equilibrium avalanches (shocks) in Ising spin glasses which occur at zero temperature upon small changes in the magnetic field. For the infinite-range Sherrington-Kirkpatrick (SK) model, we present a detailed derivation of the density ρ(ΔM) of the magnetization jumps ΔM. It is obtained by introducing a multicomponent generalization of the Parisi-Duplantier equation, which allows us to compute all cumulants of the magnetization. We find that ρ(ΔM)˜ΔM-τ with an avalanche exponent τ=1 for the SK model, originating from the marginal stability (criticality) of the model. It holds for jumps of size 1≪ΔMequilibrium dynamics of the SK model. For finite-range models, using droplet arguments, we obtain the prediction τ=(df+θ)/dm where df,dm, and θ are the fractal dimension, magnetization exponent, and energy exponent of a droplet, respectively. This formula is expected to apply to other glassy disordered systems, such as the random-field model and pinned interfaces. We make suggestions for further numerical investigations, as well as experimental studies of the Barkhausen noise in spin glasses.

  18. On the ortho-para equilibrium of H2 in the atmospheres of the Jovian planets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, W. H.

    1978-01-01

    The ratio for the equivalent widths for the unsaturated H2 quadrupole transitions observed in the Jovian planets is calculated and compared with a large number of observations. The comparison indicates that equilibrium hydrogen may be present in Jupiter and Saturn, while Uranus and Neptune exhibit ratios not in accord with equilibrium hydrogen. Observations which can differentiate among the possible states of H2 are proposed.

  19. Testing Punctuated Equilibrium Theory Using Evolutionary Activity Statistics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woodberry, O. G.; Korb, K. B.; Nicholson, A. E.

    The Punctuated Equilibrium hypothesis (Eldredge and Gould,1972) asserts that most evolutionary change occurs during geologically rapid speciation events, with species exhibiting stasis most of the time. Punctuated Equilibrium is a natural extension of Mayr's theories on peripatric speciation via the founder effect, (Mayr, 1963; Eldredge and Gould, 1972) which associates changes in diversity to a population bottleneck. That is, while the formation of a foundation bottleneck brings an initial loss of genetic variation, it may subsequently result in the emergence of a child species distinctly different from its parent species. In this paper we adapt Bedau's evolutionary activity statistics (Bedau and Packard, 1991) to test these effects in an ALife simulation of speciation. We find a relative increase in evolutionary activity during speciations events, indicating that punctuation is occurring.

  20. Numerical Study of Tokamak Equilibrium with Toroidal Flow on EAST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Qilong; Zhang, Cheng

    2006-09-01

    The effect of the toroidal flow on the equilibrium of tokamak plasmas is a sensitive point for high performance plasma and its precise control. In this paper the effect is studied numerically using the EFIT (Equilibrium Fitting) code on EAST (Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak). Firstly, the numerical calculation exhibits a clear outward shift of pressure contour from the magnetic surfaces in the plasma core and the shift grows with the increase of the toroidal velocity. The peak shift of 8% is observed when the ratio between the plasma velocity and the Alfvén speed equals to 0.15. Secondly, it is shown that the magnetic surfaces shift outwards from those without flow. With a certain plasma current the safety factor on the magnetic axis decreases as the plasma flow velocity increases. The magnetic shear increases about 10% on the plasma boundary compared with the case without flow.

  1. Philicities, Fugalities, and Equilibrium Constants.

    PubMed

    Mayr, Herbert; Ofial, Armin R

    2016-05-17

    The mechanistic model of Organic Chemistry is based on relationships between rate and equilibrium constants. Thus, strong bases are generally considered to be good nucleophiles and poor nucleofuges. Exceptions to this rule have long been known, and the ability of iodide ions to catalyze nucleophilic substitutions, because they are good nucleophiles as well as good nucleofuges, is just a prominent example for exceptions from the general rule. In a reaction series, the Leffler-Hammond parameter α = δΔG(⧧)/δΔG° describes the fraction of the change in the Gibbs energy of reaction, which is reflected in the change of the Gibbs energy of activation. It has long been considered as a measure for the position of the transition state; thus, an α value close to 0 was associated with an early transition state, while an α value close to 1 was considered to be indicative of a late transition state. Bordwell's observation in 1969 that substituent variation in phenylnitromethanes has a larger effect on the rates of deprotonation than on the corresponding equilibrium constants (nitroalkane anomaly) triggered the breakdown of this interpretation. In the past, most systematic investigations of the relationships between rates and equilibria of organic reactions have dealt with proton transfer reactions, because only for few other reaction series complementary kinetic and thermodynamic data have been available. In this Account we report on a more general investigation of the relationships between Lewis basicities, nucleophilicities, and nucleofugalities as well as between Lewis acidities, electrophilicities, and electrofugalities. Definitions of these terms are summarized, and it is suggested to replace the hybrid terms "kinetic basicity" and "kinetic acidity" by "protophilicity" and "protofugality", respectively; in this way, the terms "acidity" and "basicity" are exclusively assigned to thermodynamic properties, while "philicity" and "fugality" refer to kinetics

  2. Equilibrium sampling by reweighting nonequilibrium simulation trajectories.

    PubMed

    Yang, Cheng; Wan, Biao; Xu, Shun; Wang, Yanting; Zhou, Xin

    2016-03-01

    Based on equilibrium molecular simulations, it is usually difficult to efficiently visit the whole conformational space of complex systems, which are separated into some metastable regions by high free energy barriers. Nonequilibrium simulations could enhance transitions among these metastable regions and then be applied to sample equilibrium distributions in complex systems, since the associated nonequilibrium effects can be removed by employing the Jarzynski equality (JE). Here we present such a systematical method, named reweighted nonequilibrium ensemble dynamics (RNED), to efficiently sample equilibrium conformations. The RNED is a combination of the JE and our previous reweighted ensemble dynamics (RED) method. The original JE reproduces equilibrium from lots of nonequilibrium trajectories but requires that the initial distribution of these trajectories is equilibrium. The RED reweights many equilibrium trajectories from an arbitrary initial distribution to get the equilibrium distribution, whereas the RNED has both advantages of the two methods, reproducing equilibrium from lots of nonequilibrium simulation trajectories with an arbitrary initial conformational distribution. We illustrated the application of the RNED in a toy model and in a Lennard-Jones fluid to detect its liquid-solid phase coexistence. The results indicate that the RNED sufficiently extends the application of both the original JE and the RED in equilibrium sampling of complex systems.

  3. Equilibrium sampling by reweighting nonequilibrium simulation trajectories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Cheng; Wan, Biao; Xu, Shun; Wang, Yanting; Zhou, Xin

    2016-03-01

    Based on equilibrium molecular simulations, it is usually difficult to efficiently visit the whole conformational space of complex systems, which are separated into some metastable regions by high free energy barriers. Nonequilibrium simulations could enhance transitions among these metastable regions and then be applied to sample equilibrium distributions in complex systems, since the associated nonequilibrium effects can be removed by employing the Jarzynski equality (JE). Here we present such a systematical method, named reweighted nonequilibrium ensemble dynamics (RNED), to efficiently sample equilibrium conformations. The RNED is a combination of the JE and our previous reweighted ensemble dynamics (RED) method. The original JE reproduces equilibrium from lots of nonequilibrium trajectories but requires that the initial distribution of these trajectories is equilibrium. The RED reweights many equilibrium trajectories from an arbitrary initial distribution to get the equilibrium distribution, whereas the RNED has both advantages of the two methods, reproducing equilibrium from lots of nonequilibrium simulation trajectories with an arbitrary initial conformational distribution. We illustrated the application of the RNED in a toy model and in a Lennard-Jones fluid to detect its liquid-solid phase coexistence. The results indicate that the RNED sufficiently extends the application of both the original JE and the RED in equilibrium sampling of complex systems.

  4. Equilibrium coexistence of three amphiboles

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Robinson, P.; Jaffe, H.W.; Klein, C.; Ross, M.

    1969-01-01

    Electron probe and wet chemical analyses of amphibole pairs from the sillimanite zone of central Massachusetts and adjacent New Hampshire indicated that for a particular metamorphic grade there should be a restricted composition range in which three amphiboles can coexist stably. An unequivocal example of such an equilibrium three amphibole rock has been found in the sillimanite-orthoclase zone. It contains a colorless primitive clinoamphibole, space group P21/m, optically and chemically like cummingtonite with blue-green hornblende exsolution lamellae on (100) and (-101) of the host; blue-green hornblende, space group C2/m, with primitive cummingtonite exsolution lamellae on (100) and (-101) of the host; and pale pinkish tan anthophyllite, space group Pnma, that is free of visible exsolution lamellae but is a submicroscopic intergrowth of two orthorhombic amphiboles. Mutual contacts and coarse, oriented intergrowths of two and three host amphiboles indicate the three grew as an equilibrium assemblage prior to exsolution. Electron probe analyses at mutual three-amphibole contacts showed little variation in the composition of each amphibole. Analyses believed to represent most closely the primary amphibole compositions gave atomic proportions on the basis of 23 oxygens per formula unit as follows: for primitive cummingtonite (Na0.02Ca0.21- Mn0.06Fe2+2.28Mg4.12Al0.28) (Al0.17Si7.83), for hornblende (Na0.35Ca1.56Mn0.02Fe1.71Mg2.85Al0.92) (Al1.37Si6.63), and for anthophyllite (Na0.10Ca0.06Mn0.06Fe2.25Mg4.11Al0.47) (Al0.47Si7.53). The reflections violating C-symmetry, on X-ray single crystal photographs of the primitive cummingtonite, are weak and diffuse, and suggest a partial inversion from a C-centered to a primitive clinoamphibole. Single crystal photographs of the anthophyllite show split reflections indicating it is an intergrowth of about 80% anthophyllite and about 20% gedrite which differ in their b crystallographic dimensions. Split reflections are

  5. EASI - EQUILIBRIUM AIR SHOCK INTERFERENCE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glass, C. E.

    1994-01-01

    New research on hypersonic vehicles, such as the National Aero-Space Plane (NASP), has raised concerns about the effects of shock-wave interference on various structural components of the craft. State-of-the-art aerothermal analysis software is inadequate to predict local flow and heat flux in areas of extremely high heat transfer, such as the surface impingement of an Edney-type supersonic jet. EASI revives and updates older computational methods for calculating inviscid flow field and maximum heating from shock wave interference. The program expands these methods to solve problems involving the six shock-wave interference patterns on a two-dimensional cylindrical leading edge with an equilibrium chemically reacting gas mixture (representing, for example, the scramjet cowl of the NASP). The inclusion of gas chemistry allows for a more accurate prediction of the maximum pressure and heating loads by accounting for the effects of high temperature on the air mixture. Caloric imperfections and specie dissociation of high-temperature air cause shock-wave angles, flow deflection angles, and thermodynamic properties to differ from those calculated by a calorically perfect gas model. EASI contains pressure- and temperature-dependent thermodynamic and transport properties to determine heating rates, and uses either a calorically perfect air model or an 11-specie, 7-reaction reacting air model at equilibrium with temperatures up to 15,000 K for the inviscid flowfield calculations. EASI solves the flow field and the associated maximum surface pressure and heat flux for the six common types of shock wave interference. Depending on the type of interference, the program solves for shock-wave/boundary-layer interaction, expansion-fan/boundary-layer interaction, attaching shear layer or supersonic jet impingement. Heat flux predictions require a knowledge (from experimental data or relevant calculations) of a pertinent length scale of the interaction. Output files contain flow

  6. Exhibits Enhanced by Stand-Alone Computers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Rennes, Eve C.

    Both the development and evaluation of one of a set of computer programs designed for use by visitors as adjuncts to museum exhibits are described. Museum displays used were (1) a static, behind-glass exhibit on evolution; (2) a hands-on primitive stone age tools exhibit; and (3) a Foucault pendulum. A computer placed next to each exhibit served…

  7. Exhibits Enhanced by Stand-Alone Computers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Rennes, Eve C.

    Both the development and evaluation of one of a set of computer programs designed for use by visitors as adjuncts to museum exhibits are described. Museum displays used were (1) a static, behind-glass exhibit on evolution; (2) a hands-on primitive stone age tools exhibit; and (3) a Foucault pendulum. A computer placed next to each exhibit served…

  8. RINGED ACCRETION DISKS: EQUILIBRIUM CONFIGURATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Pugliese, D.; Stuchlík, Z. E-mail: zdenek.stuchlik@physics.cz

    2015-12-15

    We investigate a model of a ringed accretion disk, made up by several rings rotating around a supermassive Kerr black hole attractor. Each toroid of the ringed disk is governed by the general relativity hydrodynamic Boyer condition of equilibrium configurations of rotating perfect fluids. Properties of the tori can then be determined by an appropriately defined effective potential reflecting the background Kerr geometry and the centrifugal effects. The ringed disks could be created in various regimes during the evolution of matter configurations around supermassive black holes. Therefore, both corotating and counterrotating rings have to be considered as being a constituent of the ringed disk. We provide constraints on the model parameters for the existence and stability of various ringed configurations and discuss occurrence of accretion onto the Kerr black hole and possible launching of jets from the ringed disk. We demonstrate that various ringed disks can be characterized by a maximum number of rings. We present also a perturbation analysis based on evolution of the oscillating components of the ringed disk. The dynamics of the unstable phases of the ringed disk evolution seems to be promising in relation to high-energy phenomena demonstrated in active galactic nuclei.

  9. Equilibrium limit of thermal conduction and boundary scattering in nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Haskins, Justin B; Kınacı, Alper; Sevik, Cem; Çağın, Tahir

    2014-06-28

    Determining the lattice thermal conductivity (κ) of nanostructures is especially challenging in that, aside from the phonon-phonon scattering present in large systems, the scattering of phonons from the system boundary greatly influences heat transport, particularly when system length (L) is less than the average phonon mean free path (MFP). One possible route to modeling κ in these systems is through molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, inherently including both phonon-phonon and phonon-boundary scattering effects in the classical limit. Here, we compare current MD methods for computing κ in nanostructures with both L ⩽ MFP and L ≫ MFP, referred to as mean free path constrained (cMFP) and unconstrained (uMFP), respectively. Using a (10,0) CNT (carbon nanotube) as a benchmark case, we find that while the uMFP limit of κ is well-defined through the use of equilibrium MD and the time-correlation formalism, the standard equilibrium procedure for κ is not appropriate for the treatment of the cMFP limit because of the large influence of boundary scattering. To address this issue, we define an appropriate equilibrium procedure for cMFP systems that, through comparison to high-fidelity non-equilibrium methods, is shown to be the low thermal gradient limit to non-equilibrium results. Further, as a means of predicting κ in systems having L ≫ MFP from cMFP results, we employ an extrapolation procedure based on the phenomenological, boundary scattering inclusive expression of Callaway [Phys. Rev. 113, 1046 (1959)]. Using κ from systems with L ⩽ 3 μm in the extrapolation, we find that the equilibrium uMFP κ of a (10,0) CNT can be predicted within 5%. The equilibrium procedure is then applied to a variety of carbon-based nanostructures, such as graphene flakes (GF), graphene nanoribbons (GNRs), CNTs, and icosahedral fullerenes, to determine the influence of size and environment (suspended versus supported) on κ. Concerning the GF and GNR systems, we find that

  10. SOME MODELS OF STEADY STATE DYNAMIC EQUILIBRIUM,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    output is maximized, interest rate equals population growth rate and real wage equals output per worker. The second equilibrium called here a sigma...equilibrium because it depends on, peoples propensity to save, has output less than maximum and interest rate either greater than (deflationary) or less than

  11. Zeroth Law, Entropy, Equilibrium, and All That

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Canagaratna, Sebastian G.

    2008-01-01

    The place of the zeroth law in the teaching of thermodynamics is examined in the context of the recent discussion by Gislason and Craig of some problems involving the establishment of thermal equilibrium. The concept of thermal equilibrium is introduced through the zeroth law. The relation between the zeroth law and the second law in the…

  12. Spin equilibrium in strongly magnetized accreting stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Angelo, C. R.

    2017-09-01

    Strongly magnetized accreting stars are often hypothesized to be in 'spin equilibrium' with their surrounding accretion flows, which requires that the accretion rate changes more slowly than it takes the star to reach spin equilibrium. This is not true for most magnetically accreting stars, which have strongly variable accretion outbursts on time-scales much shorter than the time it would take to reach spin equilibrium. This paper examines how accretion outbursts affect the time a star takes to reach spin equilibrium and its final equilibrium spin period. I consider several different models for angular momentum loss - either carried away in an outflow, lost to a stellar wind, or transferred back to the accretion disc (the 'trapped disc'). For transient sources, the outflow scenario leads to significantly longer times to reach spin equilibrium (∼10 ×), and shorter equilibrium spin periods than would be expected from spin equilibrium arguments, while the 'trapped disc' does not. The results suggest that disc trapping plays a significant role in the spin evolution of strongly magnetic stars, with some caveats for young stellar objects.

  13. Zeroth Law, Entropy, Equilibrium, and All That

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Canagaratna, Sebastian G.

    2008-01-01

    The place of the zeroth law in the teaching of thermodynamics is examined in the context of the recent discussion by Gislason and Craig of some problems involving the establishment of thermal equilibrium. The concept of thermal equilibrium is introduced through the zeroth law. The relation between the zeroth law and the second law in the…

  14. Far from Equilibrium: The Gas Pendulum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Soltzberg, Leonard J.

    1986-01-01

    Discusses the importance of studying the far-from-equilibrium phenomena in college chemistry. Presents a system using the gas pendulum which displays all of the essential characteristics of dissipative systems. Promotes the use of the gas pendulum as a teaching example of a nonlinear far-from-equilibrium process. (TW)

  15. Far from Equilibrium: The Gas Pendulum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Soltzberg, Leonard J.

    1986-01-01

    Discusses the importance of studying the far-from-equilibrium phenomena in college chemistry. Presents a system using the gas pendulum which displays all of the essential characteristics of dissipative systems. Promotes the use of the gas pendulum as a teaching example of a nonlinear far-from-equilibrium process. (TW)

  16. Equilibrium theory of island biogeography: A review

    Treesearch

    Angela D. Yu; Simon A. Lei

    2001-01-01

    The topography, climatic pattern, location, and origin of islands generate unique patterns of species distribution. The equilibrium theory of island biogeography creates a general framework in which the study of taxon distribution and broad island trends may be conducted. Critical components of the equilibrium theory include the species-area relationship, island-...

  17. Equilibrium Tail Distribution Due to Touschek Scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Nash,B.; Krinsky, S.

    2009-05-04

    Single large angle Coulomb scattering is referred to as Touschek scattering. In addition to causing particle loss when the scattered particles are outside the momentum aperture, the process also results in a non-Gaussian tail, which is an equilibrium between the Touschek scattering and radiation damping. Here we present an analytical calculation for this equilibrium distribution.

  18. Implementing an Equilibrium Law Teaching Sequence for Secondary School Students to Learn Chemical Equilibrium

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ghirardi, Marco; Marchetti, Fabio; Pettinari, Claudio; Regis, Alberto; Roletto, Ezio

    2015-01-01

    A didactic sequence is proposed for the teaching of chemical equilibrium law. In this approach, we have avoided the kinetic derivation and the thermodynamic justification of the equilibrium constant. The equilibrium constant expression is established empirically by a trial-and-error approach. Additionally, students learn to use the criterion of…

  19. Implementing an Equilibrium Law Teaching Sequence for Secondary School Students to Learn Chemical Equilibrium

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ghirardi, Marco; Marchetti, Fabio; Pettinari, Claudio; Regis, Alberto; Roletto, Ezio

    2015-01-01

    A didactic sequence is proposed for the teaching of chemical equilibrium law. In this approach, we have avoided the kinetic derivation and the thermodynamic justification of the equilibrium constant. The equilibrium constant expression is established empirically by a trial-and-error approach. Additionally, students learn to use the criterion of…

  20. Disturbances in equilibrium function after major earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Honma, Motoyasu; Endo, Nobutaka; Osada, Yoshihisa; Kim, Yoshiharu; Kuriyama, Kenichi

    2012-10-01

    Major earthquakes were followed by a large number of aftershocks and significant outbreaks of dizziness occurred over a large area. However it is unclear why major earthquake causes dizziness. We conducted an intergroup trial on equilibrium dysfunction and psychological states associated with equilibrium dysfunction in individuals exposed to repetitive aftershocks versus those who were rarely exposed. Greater equilibrium dysfunction was observed in the aftershock-exposed group under conditions without visual compensation. Equilibrium dysfunction in the aftershock-exposed group appears to have arisen from disturbance of the inner ear, as well as individual vulnerability to state anxiety enhanced by repetitive exposure to aftershocks. We indicate potential effects of autonomic stress on equilibrium function after major earthquake. Our findings may contribute to risk management of psychological and physical health after major earthquakes with aftershocks, and allow development of a new empirical approach to disaster care after such events.

  1. Probing local equilibrium in nonequilibrium fluids.

    PubMed

    del Pozo, J J; Garrido, P L; Hurtado, P I

    2015-08-01

    We use extensive computer simulations to probe local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) in a quintessential model fluid, the two-dimensional hard-disks system. We show that macroscopic LTE is a property much stronger than previously anticipated, even in the presence of important finite-size effects, revealing a remarkable bulk-boundary decoupling phenomenon in fluids out of equilibrium. This allows us to measure the fluid's equation of state in simulations far from equilibrium, with an excellent accuracy comparable to the best equilibrium simulations. Subtle corrections to LTE are found in the fluctuations of the total energy which strongly point to the nonlocality of the nonequilibrium potential governing the fluid's macroscopic behavior out of equilibrium.

  2. How Far from Equilibrium Is Active Matter?

    PubMed

    Fodor, Étienne; Nardini, Cesare; Cates, Michael E; Tailleur, Julien; Visco, Paolo; van Wijland, Frédéric

    2016-07-15

    Active matter systems are driven out of thermal equilibrium by a lack of generalized Stokes-Einstein relation between injection and dissipation of energy at the microscopic scale. We consider such a system of interacting particles, propelled by persistent noises, and show that, at small but finite persistence time, their dynamics still satisfy a time-reversal symmetry. To do so, we compute perturbatively their steady-state measure and show that, for short persistent times, the entropy production rate vanishes. This endows such systems with an effective fluctuation-dissipation theorem akin to that of thermal equilibrium systems. Last, we show how interacting particle systems with viscous drags and correlated noises can be seen as in equilibrium with a viscoelastic bath but driven out of equilibrium by nonconservative forces, hence providing energetic insight into the departure of active systems from equilibrium.

  3. How Far from Equilibrium Is Active Matter?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fodor, Étienne; Nardini, Cesare; Cates, Michael E.; Tailleur, Julien; Visco, Paolo; van Wijland, Frédéric

    2016-07-01

    Active matter systems are driven out of thermal equilibrium by a lack of generalized Stokes-Einstein relation between injection and dissipation of energy at the microscopic scale. We consider such a system of interacting particles, propelled by persistent noises, and show that, at small but finite persistence time, their dynamics still satisfy a time-reversal symmetry. To do so, we compute perturbatively their steady-state measure and show that, for short persistent times, the entropy production rate vanishes. This endows such systems with an effective fluctuation-dissipation theorem akin to that of thermal equilibrium systems. Last, we show how interacting particle systems with viscous drags and correlated noises can be seen as in equilibrium with a viscoelastic bath but driven out of equilibrium by nonconservative forces, hence providing energetic insight into the departure of active systems from equilibrium.

  4. Simple Chaotic Flow with Circle and Square Equilibrium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gotthans, Tomas; Sprott, Julien Clinton; Petrzela, Jiri

    Simple systems of third-order autonomous nonlinear differential equations can exhibit chaotic behavior. In this paper, we present a new class of chaotic flow with a square-shaped equilibrium. This unique property has apparently not yet been described. Such a system belongs to a newly introduced category of chaotic systems with hidden attractors that are interesting and important in engineering applications. The mathematical model is accompanied by an electrical circuit implementation, demonstrating structural stability of the strange attractor. The circuit is simulated with PSpice, constructed, and analyzed (measured).

  5. Equilibrium polymerization on the equivalent-neighbor lattice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufman, Miron

    1989-01-01

    The equilibrium polymerization problem is solved exactly on the equivalent-neighbor lattice. The Flory-Huggins (Flory, 1986) entropy of mixing is exact for this lattice. The discrete version of the n-vector model is verified when n approaches 0 is equivalent to the equal reactivity polymerization process in the whole parameter space, including the polymerized phase. The polymerization processes for polymers satisfying the Schulz (1939) distribution exhibit nonuniversal critical behavior. A close analogy is found between the polymerization problem of index the Schulz r and the Bose-Einstein ideal gas in d = -2r dimensions, with the critical polymerization corresponding to the Bose-Einstein condensation.

  6. Learning by Doing, Creating a Museum Exhibit.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Main, Sarah; Kallquist, Dierdre

    2000-01-01

    Describes an exhibit called Kid's Kitchen, built within a major exhibit called Biodiversity: Life Supporting Life, in order to discuss environmental prompts hidden within the kitchen designed to surprise students and get them thinking. (ASK)

  7. Learning by Doing, Creating a Museum Exhibit.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Main, Sarah; Kallquist, Dierdre

    2000-01-01

    Describes an exhibit called Kid's Kitchen, built within a major exhibit called Biodiversity: Life Supporting Life, in order to discuss environmental prompts hidden within the kitchen designed to surprise students and get them thinking. (ASK)

  8. Science Education Through a Museum Exhibit

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chaparian, Azad; And Others

    1973-01-01

    Describes the polywater exhibit at the Worcester Science Center in Massachusetts. Curiosity and interest are stimulated in young people by allowing them to handle the materials in the exhibit and by providing them with instructions for making polywater. (JR)

  9. Science Education Through a Museum Exhibit

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chaparian, Azad; And Others

    1973-01-01

    Describes the polywater exhibit at the Worcester Science Center in Massachusetts. Curiosity and interest are stimulated in young people by allowing them to handle the materials in the exhibit and by providing them with instructions for making polywater. (JR)

  10. Formation of large micellar aggregates before equilibrium in diluted solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Moraes, J. N. B.; Figueiredo, W.

    2013-06-01

    We study the formation of premicelles for different values of the concentration of amphiphile molecules in water. Our model consists of a square lattice with water molecules occupying one cell of the lattice while the amphiphilic molecules, represented by chains of five interconnected sites, occupy five cells of the lattice. We perform Monte Carlo simulations in the NVT ensemble, for a fixed temperature and different concentration of amphiphiles, ranging from below to above the critical micelle concentration. We start our simulations from a monomeric state and follow in time all the aggregates sizes until the equilibrium state is reached. We pay particular attention to two aggregate sizes, one related to the minimum and the other to the maximum of the aggregate-size distribution curve obtained at equilibrium. We show that these aggregates evolve in time exhibiting a maximum concentration well before the equilibrium state, revealing the formation of premicelles. The times to reach these maximum concentrations decrease exponentially with the total concentration of the system.

  11. Kinetics of faceting of crystals in growth, etching, and equilibrium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vlachos, D. G.; Schmidt, L. D.; Aris, R.

    1993-03-01

    The faceting of crystals in equilibrium with the gas phase and also during crystal growth and etching conditions is studied using the Monte Carlo method. The dynamics of the transformation of unstable crystallographic orientations into hill and valley structures and the spatial patterns that develop are examined as functions of surface temperature, crystallographic orientation, and strength of interatomic potential for two transport processes: adsorption-desorption and surface diffusion. The results are compared with the continuum theory for facet formation. Thermodynamically unstable orientations break into hill and valley structures, and faceting exhibits three time regimes: disordering, facet nucleation, and coarsening of small facets to large facets. Faceting is accelerated as temperature increases, but thermal roughening can occur at high temperatures. Surface diffusion is the dominant mechanism at short times and small facets but adsorption-desorption becomes important at long times and large facets. Growth and etching promote faceting for conditions close to equilibrium but induce kinetic roughening for conditions far from equilibrium. Simultaneous irreversible growth and etching conditions with fast surface diffusion result in enhanced faceting.

  12. Scalar Fluctuations from Extended Non-equilibrium Thermodynamic States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nettleton, R. E.

    1985-10-01

    In the framework of extended non-equilibrium thermodynamics, the local non-equilibrium state of a liquid is described by the density, temperature, and a structural variable, ζ, and its rate-of-change. ζ is the ensemble average of a function A (Q) of the configuration co-ordinates, and it is assumed to relax to local equilibrium in a time short compared to the time for diffusion of an appreciable number of particles into the system. By a projection operator technique of Grabert, an equation is derived from the Liouville equation for the distribution of fluctuations in TV, the particle number, and in A and Ȧ. An approximate solution is proposed which exhibits nonequilibrium corrections to the Einstein function in the form of a sum of thermodynamic forces. For a particular structural model, the corresponding non-Einstein contributions to correlation functions are estimated to be very small. For variables of the type considered here, the thermodynamic pressure is found to equal the pressure trace.

  13. 29 CFR 2200.70 - Exhibits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH REVIEW COMMISSION RULES OF PROCEDURE Hearings... separate file designated for rejected exhibits. (e) Return of physical exhibits. A party may on motion request the return of a physical exhibit within 30 days after expiration of the time for filing a petition...

  14. 29 CFR 2200.70 - Exhibits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH REVIEW COMMISSION RULES OF PROCEDURE Hearings... separate file designated for rejected exhibits. (e) Return of physical exhibits. A party may on motion request the return of a physical exhibit within 30 days after expiration of the time for filing a petition...

  15. 29 CFR 2200.70 - Exhibits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH REVIEW COMMISSION RULES OF PROCEDURE Hearings... separate file designated for rejected exhibits. (e) Return of physical exhibits. A party may on motion request the return of a physical exhibit within 30 days after expiration of the time for filing a petition...

  16. 18 CFR 50.7 - Applications: exhibits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Applications: exhibits. 50.7 Section 50.7 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION... elements or matters contained in the exhibit. (a) Exhibit A—Articles of incorporation and bylaws. If the...

  17. 18 CFR 50.7 - Applications: exhibits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Applications: exhibits. 50.7 Section 50.7 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION... elements or matters contained in the exhibit. (a) Exhibit A—Articles of incorporation and bylaws. If the...

  18. 18 CFR 50.7 - Applications: exhibits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Applications: exhibits. 50.7 Section 50.7 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION... elements or matters contained in the exhibit. (a) Exhibit A—Articles of incorporation and bylaws. If the...

  19. 18 CFR 50.7 - Applications: exhibits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Applications: exhibits. 50.7 Section 50.7 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION... elements or matters contained in the exhibit. (a) Exhibit A—Articles of incorporation and bylaws. If the...

  20. Local Nash Equilibrium in Social Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yichao; Aziz-Alaoui, M. A.; Bertelle, Cyrille; Guan, Jihong

    2014-08-01

    Nash equilibrium is widely present in various social disputes. As of now, in structured static populations, such as social networks, regular, and random graphs, the discussions on Nash equilibrium are quite limited. In a relatively stable static gaming network, a rational individual has to comprehensively consider all his/her opponents' strategies before they adopt a unified strategy. In this scenario, a new strategy equilibrium emerges in the system. We define this equilibrium as a local Nash equilibrium. In this paper, we present an explicit definition of the local Nash equilibrium for the two-strategy games in structured populations. Based on the definition, we investigate the condition that a system reaches the evolutionary stable state when the individuals play the Prisoner's dilemma and snow-drift game. The local Nash equilibrium provides a way to judge whether a gaming structured population reaches the evolutionary stable state on one hand. On the other hand, it can be used to predict whether cooperators can survive in a system long before the system reaches its evolutionary stable state for the Prisoner's dilemma game. Our work therefore provides a theoretical framework for understanding the evolutionary stable state in the gaming populations with static structures.

  1. Local Nash equilibrium in social networks.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yichao; Aziz-Alaoui, M A; Bertelle, Cyrille; Guan, Jihong

    2014-08-29

    Nash equilibrium is widely present in various social disputes. As of now, in structured static populations, such as social networks, regular, and random graphs, the discussions on Nash equilibrium are quite limited. In a relatively stable static gaming network, a rational individual has to comprehensively consider all his/her opponents' strategies before they adopt a unified strategy. In this scenario, a new strategy equilibrium emerges in the system. We define this equilibrium as a local Nash equilibrium. In this paper, we present an explicit definition of the local Nash equilibrium for the two-strategy games in structured populations. Based on the definition, we investigate the condition that a system reaches the evolutionary stable state when the individuals play the Prisoner's dilemma and snow-drift game. The local Nash equilibrium provides a way to judge whether a gaming structured population reaches the evolutionary stable state on one hand. On the other hand, it can be used to predict whether cooperators can survive in a system long before the system reaches its evolutionary stable state for the Prisoner's dilemma game. Our work therefore provides a theoretical framework for understanding the evolutionary stable state in the gaming populations with static structures.

  2. Teaching Chemical Equilibrium with the Jigsaw Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doymus, Kemal

    2008-03-01

    This study investigates the effect of cooperative learning (jigsaw) versus individual learning methods on students’ understanding of chemical equilibrium in a first-year general chemistry course. This study was carried out in two different classes in the department of primary science education during the 2005-2006 academic year. One of the classes was randomly assigned as the non-jigsaw group (control) and other as the jigsaw group (cooperative). Students participating in the jigsaw group were divided into four “home groups” since the topic chemical equilibrium is divided into four subtopics (Modules A, B, C and D). Each of these home groups contained four students. The groups were as follows: (1) Home Group A (HGA), representin g the equilibrium state and quantitative aspects of equilibrium (Module A), (2) Home Group B (HGB), representing the equilibrium constant and relationships involving equilibrium constants (Module B), (3) Home Group C (HGC), representing Altering Equilibrium Conditions: Le Chatelier’s principle (Module C), and (4) Home Group D (HGD), representing calculations with equilibrium constants (Module D). The home groups then broke apart, like pieces of a jigsaw puzzle, and the students moved into jigsaw groups consisting of members from the other home groups who were assigned the same portion of the material. The jigsaw groups were then in charge of teaching their specific subtopic to the rest of the students in their learning group. The main data collection tool was a Chemical Equilibrium Achievement Test (CEAT), which was applied to both the jigsaw and non-jigsaw groups The results indicated that the jigsaw group was more successful than the non-jigsaw group (individual learning method).

  3. Natural gas at thermodynamic equilibrium. Implications for the origin of natural gas.

    PubMed

    Mango, Frank D; Jarvie, Daniel; Herriman, Eleanor

    2009-06-16

    It is broadly accepted that so-called 'thermal' gas is the product of thermal cracking, 'primary' thermal gas from kerogen cracking, and 'secondary' thermal gas from oil cracking. Since thermal cracking of hydrocarbons does not generate products at equilibrium and thermal stress should not bring them to equilibrium over geologic time, we would not expect methane, ethane, and propane to be at equilibrium in subsurface deposits. Here we report compelling evidence of natural gas at thermodynamic equilibrium. Molecular compositions are constrained to equilibrium, [Formula in text] and isotopic compositions are also under equilibrium constraints: [Formula in text].The functions [(CH4)*(C3H8)] and [(C2H6)2] exhibit a strong nonlinear correlation (R2 = 0.84) in which the quotient Q progresses to K as wet gas progresses to dry gas. There are striking similarities between natural gas and catalytic gas generated from marine shales. A Devonian/Mississippian New Albany shale generates gas with Q converging on K over time as wet gas progresses to dry gas at 200 degrees C. The position that thermal cracking is the primary source of natural gas is no longer tenable. It is challenged by its inability to explain the composition of natural gas, natural gases at thermodynamic equilibrium, and by the existence of a catalytic path to gas that better explains gas compositions.

  4. Natural gas at thermodynamic equilibrium Implications for the origin of natural gas

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    It is broadly accepted that so-called 'thermal' gas is the product of thermal cracking, 'primary' thermal gas from kerogen cracking, and 'secondary' thermal gas from oil cracking. Since thermal cracking of hydrocarbons does not generate products at equilibrium and thermal stress should not bring them to equilibrium over geologic time, we would not expect methane, ethane, and propane to be at equilibrium in subsurface deposits. Here we report compelling evidence of natural gas at thermodynamic equilibrium. Molecular compositions are constrained to equilibrium, and isotopic compositions are also under equilibrium constraints: The functions [(CH4)*(C3H8)] and [(C2H6)2] exhibit a strong nonlinear correlation (R2 = 0.84) in which the quotient Q progresses to K as wet gas progresses to dry gas. There are striking similarities between natural gas and catalytic gas generated from marine shales. A Devonian/Mississippian New Albany shale generates gas with Q converging on K over time as wet gas progresses to dry gas at 200°C. The position that thermal cracking is the primary source of natural gas is no longer tenable. It is challenged by its inability to explain the composition of natural gas, natural gases at thermodynamic equilibrium, and by the existence of a catalytic path to gas that better explains gas compositions. PMID:19531233

  5. Imaging the equilibrium state and magnetization dynamics of partially built hard disk write heads

    SciTech Connect

    Valkass, R. A. J. Yu, W.; Shelford, L. R.; Keatley, P. S.; Loughran, T. H. J.; Hicken, R. J.; Cavill, S. A.; Laan, G. van der; Dhesi, S. S.; Bashir, M. A.; Gubbins, M. A.; Czoschke, P. J.; Lopusnik, R.

    2015-06-08

    Four different designs of partially built hard disk write heads with a yoke comprising four repeats of NiFe (1 nm)/CoFe (50 nm) were studied by both x-ray photoemission electron microscopy (XPEEM) and time-resolved scanning Kerr microscopy (TRSKM). These techniques were used to investigate the static equilibrium domain configuration and the magnetodynamic response across the entire structure, respectively. Simulations and previous TRSKM studies have made proposals for the equilibrium domain configuration of similar structures, but no direct observation of the equilibrium state of the writers has yet been made. In this study, static XPEEM images of the equilibrium state of writer structures were acquired using x-ray magnetic circular dichroism as the contrast mechanism. These images suggest that the crystalline anisotropy dominates the equilibrium state domain configuration, but competition with shape anisotropy ultimately determines the stability of the equilibrium state. Dynamic TRSKM images were acquired from nominally identical devices. These images suggest that a longer confluence region may hinder flux conduction from the yoke into the pole tip: the shorter confluence region exhibits clear flux beaming along the symmetry axis, whereas the longer confluence region causes flux to conduct along one edge of the writer. The observed variations in dynamic response agree well with the differences in the equilibrium magnetization configuration visible in the XPEEM images, confirming that minor variations in the geometric design of the writer structure can have significant effects on the process of flux beaming.

  6. The Conceptual Change Approach to Teaching Chemical Equilibrium

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Canpolat, Nurtac; Pinarbasi, Tacettin; Bayrakceken, Samih; Geban, Omer

    2006-01-01

    This study investigates the effect of a conceptual change approach over traditional instruction on students' understanding of chemical equilibrium concepts (e.g. dynamic nature of equilibrium, definition of equilibrium constant, heterogeneous equilibrium, qualitative interpreting of equilibrium constant, changing the reaction conditions). This…

  7. The Conceptual Change Approach to Teaching Chemical Equilibrium

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Canpolat, Nurtac; Pinarbasi, Tacettin; Bayrakceken, Samih; Geban, Omer

    2006-01-01

    This study investigates the effect of a conceptual change approach over traditional instruction on students' understanding of chemical equilibrium concepts (e.g. dynamic nature of equilibrium, definition of equilibrium constant, heterogeneous equilibrium, qualitative interpreting of equilibrium constant, changing the reaction conditions). This…

  8. Equilibrium and non-equilibrium emission of complex fragments

    SciTech Connect

    Bowman, D.R.

    1989-08-01

    Complex fragment emission (Z{gt}2) has been studied in the reactions of 50, 80, and 100 MeV/u {sup 139}La + {sup 12}C, and 80 MeV/u {sup 139}La + {sup 27}Al, {sup nat}Cu, and {sup 197}Au. Charge, angle, and energy distributions were measured inclusively and in coincidence with other complex fragments, and were used to extract the source rapidities, velocity distributions, and cross sections. The experimental emission velocity distributions, charge loss distributions, and cross sections have been compared with calculations based on statistical compound nucleus decay. The binary signature of the coincidence events and the sharpness of the velocity distributions illustrate the primarily 2-body nature of the {sup 139}La + {sup 12}C reaction mechanism between 50 and 100 MeV/u. The emission velocities, angular distributions, and absolute cross sections of fragments of 20{le}Z{le}35 at 50 MeV/u, 19{le}Z{le}28 at 80 MeV/u, and 17{le}Z{le}21 at 100 MeV/u indicate that these fragments arise solely from the binary decay of compound nuclei formed in incomplete fusion reactions in which the {sup 139}La projectile picks up about one-half of the {sup 12}C target. In the 80 MeV/u {sup 139}La + {sup 27}Al, {sup nat}Cu, and {sup 197}Au reactions, the disappearance of the binary signature in the total charge and velocity distributions suggests and increase in the complex fragment and light charged particle multiplicity with increasing target mass. As in the 80 and 100 MeV/u {sup 139}La + {sup 12}C reactions, the lighter complex fragments exhibit anisotropic angular distributions and cross sections that are too large to be explained exclusively by statistical emission. 143 refs., 67 figs.

  9. Turbulence as a Problem in Non-equilibrium Statistical Mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldenfeld, Nigel; Shih, Hong-Yan

    2016-12-01

    The transitional and well-developed regimes of turbulent shear flows exhibit a variety of remarkable scaling laws that are only now beginning to be systematically studied and understood. In the first part of this article, we summarize recent progress in understanding the friction factor of turbulent flows in rough pipes and quasi-two-dimensional soap films, showing how the data obey a two-parameter scaling law known as roughness-induced criticality, and exhibit power-law scaling of friction factor with Reynolds number that depends on the precise form of the nature of the turbulent cascade. These results hint at a non-equilibrium fluctuation-dissipation relation that applies to turbulent flows. The second part of this article concerns the lifetime statistics in smooth pipes around the transition, showing how the remarkable super-exponential scaling with Reynolds number reflects deep connections between large deviation theory, extreme value statistics, directed percolation and the onset of coexistence in predator-prey ecosystems. Both these phenomena reflect the way in which turbulence can be fruitfully approached as a problem in non-equilibrium statistical mechanics.

  10. Turbulence as a Problem in Non-equilibrium Statistical Mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldenfeld, Nigel; Shih, Hong-Yan

    2017-05-01

    The transitional and well-developed regimes of turbulent shear flows exhibit a variety of remarkable scaling laws that are only now beginning to be systematically studied and understood. In the first part of this article, we summarize recent progress in understanding the friction factor of turbulent flows in rough pipes and quasi-two-dimensional soap films, showing how the data obey a two-parameter scaling law known as roughness-induced criticality, and exhibit power-law scaling of friction factor with Reynolds number that depends on the precise form of the nature of the turbulent cascade. These results hint at a non-equilibrium fluctuation-dissipation relation that applies to turbulent flows. The second part of this article concerns the lifetime statistics in smooth pipes around the transition, showing how the remarkable super-exponential scaling with Reynolds number reflects deep connections between large deviation theory, extreme value statistics, directed percolation and the onset of coexistence in predator-prey ecosystems. Both these phenomena reflect the way in which turbulence can be fruitfully approached as a problem in non-equilibrium statistical mechanics.

  11. Space exhibitions: the science encounters the public

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coliolo, F.; Menendez, M.

    The widespread dissemination of science has always been one pillar of the development of human knowledge. There are several methods to structure interaction with the public: media, conferences, various written genres, and exhibitions. But: how to attract the public? How to arouse interest among future generation, insatiable for knowledge? In this paper we focus on space exhibitions, whose content combines mystery, discovery and science. The preparation of an exhibition is based on guidelines discussed between an interdisciplinary team and the exhibition project manager, the purpose of which is to find a coherent "strategy" to select information and to choose a concise, efficient, smart and original way to "visualize" the messages. Exhibition visitors are "privileged" because the interactivity is first emotive, then mental and cultural; the audience is universal. The goal of an exhibition is not to explain the content, but to stimulate the audience's curiosity in an attractive environment. We show some photos of ESA exhibitions, and try to understand if the visual impact is the first step towards a "multi-sensory" approach to communication. "A good exhibition can never be replaced by a book, a film or a lecture. A good exhibition creates a thirst for books, film, lectures. A good exhibition changes the visitors"(J. Wagensberg, Modern scientific museology")

  12. An Elementary Discussion of Chemical Equilibrium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    David, Carl W.

    1988-01-01

    This discussion uses a more difficult reaction as the prototype to derive the standard equation for chemical equilibrium. It can be used by students who can understand and use partial derivatives. (CW)

  13. Spreadsheet Templates for Chemical Equilibrium Calculations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Joshi, Bhairav D.

    1993-01-01

    Describes two general spreadsheet templates to carry out all types of one-equation chemical equilibrium calculations encountered by students in undergraduate chemistry courses. Algorithms, templates, macros, and representative examples are presented to illustrate the approach. (PR)

  14. Stochastic approach to equilibrium and nonequilibrium thermodynamics.

    PubMed

    Tomé, Tânia; de Oliveira, Mário J

    2015-04-01

    We develop the stochastic approach to thermodynamics based on stochastic dynamics, which can be discrete (master equation) and continuous (Fokker-Planck equation), and on two assumptions concerning entropy. The first is the definition of entropy itself and the second the definition of entropy production rate, which is non-negative and vanishes in thermodynamic equilibrium. Based on these assumptions, we study interacting systems with many degrees of freedom in equilibrium or out of thermodynamic equilibrium and how the macroscopic laws are derived from the stochastic dynamics. These studies include the quasiequilibrium processes; the convexity of the equilibrium surface; the monotonic time behavior of thermodynamic potentials, including entropy; the bilinear form of the entropy production rate; the Onsager coefficients and reciprocal relations; and the nonequilibrium steady states of chemical reactions.

  15. Equilibrium Reconstruction on the Large Helical Device

    SciTech Connect

    Samuel A. Lazerson, D. Gates, D. Monticello, H. Neilson, N. Pomphrey, A. Reiman S. Sakakibara, and Y. Suzuki

    2012-07-27

    Equilibrium reconstruction is commonly applied to axisymmetric toroidal devices. Recent advances in computational power and equilibrium codes have allowed for reconstructions of three-dimensional fields in stellarators and heliotrons. We present the first reconstructions of finite beta discharges in the Large Helical Device (LHD). The plasma boundary and magnetic axis are constrained by the pressure profile from Thomson scattering. This results in a calculation of plasma beta without a-priori assumptions of the equipartition of energy between species. Saddle loop arrays place additional constraints on the equilibrium. These reconstruction utilize STELLOPT, which calls VMEC. The VMEC equilibrium code assumes good nested flux surfaces. Reconstructed magnetic fields are fed into the PIES code which relaxes this constraint allowing for the examination of the effect of islands and stochastic regions on the magnetic measurements.

  16. Radiative-dynamical equilibrium states for Jupiter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trafton, L. M.; Stone, P. H.

    1974-01-01

    In order to obtain accurate estimates of the radiative heating that drives motions in Jupiter's atmosphere, previous radiative equilibrium calculations are improved by including the NH3 opacities and updated results for the pressure-induced opacities. These additions increase the radiative lapse rate near the top of the statically unstable region and lead to a fairly constant radiative lapse rate below the tropopause. The radiative-convective equilibrium temperature structure consistent with these changes is calculated, but it differs only slightly from earlier calculations. The radiative equilibrium calculations are used to calculate whether equilibrium states can occur on Jupiter which are similar to the baroclinic instability regimes on the earth and Mars. The results show that Jupiter's dynamical regime cannot be of this kind, except possibly at very high latitudes, and that its regime must be a basically less stable one than this kind.

  17. Rapid Equilibrium-Ordered Enzyme Mechanisms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chauncey, Thomas R.; And Others

    1985-01-01

    Discusses: (1) characteristic initial velocity behavior (considering the five-step reaction sequence for rapid equilibrium-order bisubstrate mechanisms); (2) dead-end inhibition; (3) inhibition by single products; and (4) an activator as a leading reactant. (JN)

  18. Intermittent many-body dynamics at equilibrium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danieli, C.; Campbell, D. K.; Flach, S.

    2017-06-01

    The equilibrium value of an observable defines a manifold in the phase space of an ergodic and equipartitioned many-body system. A typical trajectory pierces that manifold infinitely often as time goes to infinity. We use these piercings to measure both the relaxation time of the lowest frequency eigenmode of the Fermi-Pasta-Ulam chain, as well as the fluctuations of the subsequent dynamics in equilibrium. The dynamics in equilibrium is characterized by a power-law distribution of excursion times far off equilibrium, with diverging variance. Long excursions arise from sticky dynamics close to q -breathers localized in normal mode space. Measuring the exponent allows one to predict the transition into nonergodic dynamics. We generalize our method to Klein-Gordon lattices where the sticky dynamics is due to discrete breathers localized in real space.

  19. Points of Equilibrium in Electrostatic Fields.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rogers, Peter J.

    1979-01-01

    Discusses the electric field line pattern for four equal charges of the same sign placed at the corners of a square. The electric field intensity and the point of equilibrium are interpreted, taking into account three dimensions. (HM)

  20. Edge Equilibrium Code (EEC) For Tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Xujling

    2014-02-24

    The edge equilibrium code (EEC) described in this paper is developed for simulations of the near edge plasma using the finite element method. It solves the Grad-Shafranov equation in toroidal coordinate and uses adaptive grids aligned with magnetic field lines. Hermite finite elements are chosen for the numerical scheme. A fast Newton scheme which is the same as implemented in the equilibrium and stability code (ESC) is applied here to adjust the grids

  1. The Theory of Variances in Equilibrium Reconstruction

    SciTech Connect

    Zakharov, Leonid E.; Lewandowski, Jerome; Foley, Elizabeth L.; Levinton, Fred M.; Yuh, Howard Y.; Drozdov, Vladimir; McDonald, Darren

    2008-01-14

    The theory of variances of equilibrium reconstruction is presented. It complements existing practices with information regarding what kind of plasma profiles can be reconstructed, how accurately, and what remains beyond the abilities of diagnostic systems. The σ-curves, introduced by the present theory, give a quantitative assessment of quality of effectiveness of diagnostic systems in constraining equilibrium reconstructions. The theory also suggests a method for aligning the accuracy of measurements of different physical nature.

  2. Equilibrium capillary forces with atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Sprakel, J; Besseling, N A M; Leermakers, F A M; Cohen Stuart, M A

    2007-09-07

    We present measurements of equilibrium forces resulting from capillary condensation. The results give access to the ultralow interfacial tensions between the capillary bridge and the coexisting bulk phase. We demonstrate this with solutions of associative polymers and an aqueous mixture of gelatin and dextran, with interfacial tensions around 10 microN/m. The equilibrium nature of the capillary forces is attributed to the combination of a low interfacial tension and a microscopic confinement geometry, based on nucleation and growth arguments.

  3. An analytical model of crater count equilibrium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirabayashi, Masatoshi; Minton, David A.; Fassett, Caleb I.

    2017-06-01

    Crater count equilibrium occurs when new craters form at the same rate that old craters are erased, such that the total number of observable impacts remains constant. Despite substantial efforts to understand this process, there remain many unsolved problems. Here, we propose an analytical model that describes how a heavily cratered surface reaches a state of crater count equilibrium. The proposed model formulates three physical processes contributing to crater count equilibrium: cookie-cutting (simple, geometric overlap), ejecta-blanketing, and sandblasting (diffusive erosion). These three processes are modeled using a degradation parameter that describes the efficiency for a new crater to erase old craters. The flexibility of our newly developed model allows us to represent the processes that underlie crater count equilibrium problems. The results show that when the slope of the production function is steeper than that of the equilibrium state, the power law of the equilibrium slope is independent of that of the production function slope. We apply our model to the cratering conditions in the Sinus Medii region and at the Apollo 15 landing site on the Moon and demonstrate that a consistent degradation parameterization can successfully be determined based on the empirical results of these regions. Further developments of this model will enable us to better understand the surface evolution of airless bodies due to impact bombardment.

  4. Approaches to the Treatment of Equilibrium Perturbations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canagaratna, Sebastian G.

    2003-10-01

    Perturbations from equilibrium are treated in the textbooks by a combination of Le Châtelier's principle, the comparison of the equilibrium constant K with the reaction quotient Q,and the kinetic approach. Each of these methods is briefly reviewed. This is followed by derivations of the variation of the equilibrium value of the extent of reaction, ξeq, with various parameters on which it depends. Near equilibrium this relationship can be represented by a straight line. The equilibrium system can be regarded as moving on this line as the parameter is varied. The slope of the line depends on quantities like enthalpy of reaction, volume of reaction and so forth. The derivation shows that these quantities pertain to the equilibrium system, not the standard state. Also, the derivation makes clear what kind of assumptions underlie our conclusions. The derivation of these relations involves knowledge of thermodynamics that is well within the grasp of junior level physical chemistry students. The conclusions that follow from the derived relations are given as subsidiary rules in the form of the slope of ξeq, with T, p, et cetera. The rules are used to develop a visual way of predicting the direction of shift of a perturbed system. This method can be used to supplement one of the other methods even at the introductory level.

  5. Universality Far from Equilibrium: From Superfluid Bose Gases to Heavy-Ion Collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berges, J.; Boguslavski, K.; Schlichting, S.; Venugopalan, R.

    2015-02-01

    Isolated quantum systems in extreme conditions can exhibit unusually large occupancies per mode. This overpopulation gives rise to new universality classes of many-body systems far from equilibrium. We present theoretical evidence that important aspects of non-Abelian plasmas in the ultrarelativistic limit admit a dual description in terms of a Bose condensed scalar field theory.

  6. Universality far from equilibrium: From superfluid Bose gases to heavy-ion collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Schlichting, S.; Venugopalan, R.; Berges, J.; Boguslavski, K.

    2015-02-10

    Isolated quantum systems in extreme conditions can exhibit unusually large occupancies per mode. In addition, this over-population gives rise to new universality classes of many-body systems far from equilibrium. We present theoretical evidence that important aspects of non-Abelian plasmas in the ultra-relativistic limit admit a dual description in terms of a Bose condensed scalar field theory.

  7. Universality far from equilibrium: From superfluid Bose gases to heavy-ion collisions

    DOE PAGES

    Schlichting, S.; Venugopalan, R.; Berges, J.; ...

    2015-02-10

    Isolated quantum systems in extreme conditions can exhibit unusually large occupancies per mode. In addition, this over-population gives rise to new universality classes of many-body systems far from equilibrium. We present theoretical evidence that important aspects of non-Abelian plasmas in the ultra-relativistic limit admit a dual description in terms of a Bose condensed scalar field theory.

  8. Superconductive microstrip exhibiting negative differential resistivity

    DOEpatents

    Huebener, R.P.; Gallus, D.E.

    1975-10-28

    A device capable of exhibiting negative differential electrical resistivity over a range of values of current and voltage is formed by vapor- depositing a thin layer of a material capable of exhibiting superconductivity on an insulating substrate, establishing electrical connections at opposite ends of the deposited strip, and cooling the alloy into its superconducting range. The device will exhibit negative differential resistivity when biased in the current- induced resistive state.

  9. Support of the extremal measure in a vector equilibrium problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lapik, M. A.

    2006-08-01

    A generalization of the Mhaskar-Saff functional is obtained for a vector equilibrium problem with an external field. As an application, the supports of the equilibrium measures are found in a special vector equilibrium problem with Nikishin matrix.

  10. On the transition of a non-equilibrium system to an equilibrium system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, E. G. D.

    2015-07-01

    It is shown that the most important feature of Non-Equilibrium Thermodynamics is not the entropy production, but the organization of the currents in order to flow. This is also needed to obtain the maximum entropy in the equilibrium state, as is required by Equilibrium Thermodynamics. This article is supplemented with comments by Hong Qian and Yves Pomeau and a final reply by the author.

  11. 49 CFR 1331.2 - Required exhibits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... organization chart; and (3) As Exhibit 4, a schedule of its charges to members or a statement showing how the... agreement pertains to a conference, bureau, committee, or other organization: (1) As Exhibit 2, a copy of the constitution, bylaws, or other documents or writings specifying the organization's powers, duties...

  12. 49 CFR 1331.2 - Required exhibits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... organization chart; and (3) As Exhibit 4, a schedule of its charges to members or a statement showing how the... agreement pertains to a conference, bureau, committee, or other organization: (1) As Exhibit 2, a copy of the constitution, bylaws, or other documents or writings specifying the organization's powers, duties...

  13. Encountering Nanotechnology in an Interactive Exhibition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murriello, Sandra E.; Knobel, Marcelo

    2008-01-01

    This article offers findings from a learning sciences-informed evaluation of a nanoscience and nanotechnology exhibition called Nano-Aventura (NanoAdventure), based on four interactive-collaborative games and two narrated videos. This traveling exhibition was developed in Brazil by the Museu Exploratorio de Ciencias for children and teenagers…

  14. Science Fiction Exhibits as STEM Gateways

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robie, Samantha

    Women continue to hold less than a quarter of all STEM jobs in the United States, prompting many museums to develop programs and exhibits with the express goal of interesting young girls in scientific fields. At the same time, a number of recent museum exhibits have harnessed the popularity of pop culture and science fiction in order to interest general audiences in STEM subject matter, as well as using the exhibits as springboards to expand or shift mission goals and focus. Because science fiction appears to be successful at raising interest in STEM fields, it may be an effective way to garner the interest of young girls in STEM in particular. This research seeks to describe the ways in which museums are currently using science fiction exhibits to interest young girls in STEM fields and careers. Research focused on four institutions across the country hosting three separate exhibits, and included staff interviews and content analysis of exhibit descriptions, promotional materials, a summative evaluation and supplementary exhibit productions. In some ways, science fiction exhibits do serve young girls, primarily through the inclusion of female role models, staff awareness, and prototype testing to ensure interactives are attractive to girls as well as to boys. However, STEM appears to be underutilized, which may be partly due to a concern within the field that the outcome of targeting a specific gender could be construed as "stereotyping".

  15. Memory and Mourning: An Exhibit History

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eberle, Scott G.

    2005-01-01

    Mounted by the Strong Museum in Rochester, New York, in 1993, and traveling nationally thereafter, the exhibit Memory and Mourning provided historical and contemporary perspectives to help museum guests explore their own reactions to loss and grief. In the process the exhibit's development team encountered a range of philosophical, historical,…

  16. 32 CFR 705.24 - Exhibits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... PUBLIC AFFAIRS REGULATIONS § 705.24 Exhibits. (a) Navy exhibits are representations or collections of... concerned, via the chain of command. (3) The official OASD(PA) Request Form for Armed Forces Participation will be used. See Armed Forces Request Form, § 705.36. (4) Requests for exceptions to policy...

  17. Learning4Life on the Exhibit Floor

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sullivan, Margaret

    2009-01-01

    The exhibit floor is a wealth of knowledge. One can read, view, and listen to information presented in many formats. Somewhere on the exhibit floor there are experts on every topic, ready and waiting for one's questions. But like any research topic, frequently a structured search is required to find the best answers. This article discusses how to…

  18. Evaluation of Clientele Impact of Science Exhibits.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Talisayon, Vivien M.

    1998-01-01

    Explores the use of an impact evaluation model across time and clientele groups that is used to evaluate exhibits from two science centers in Manila. Questionnaire and interview data indicate that students prefer exhibits that produce sound, light, and motion. (DDR)

  19. 18 CFR 34.4 - Required exhibits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... the statement of corporate purposes from its articles of incorporation. (b) Exhibit B. A copy of all... stockholders has been obtained. (c) Exhibit C. The Balance Sheet and attached notes for the most recent 12... for the most recent 12-month period for which financial statements have been published, provided that...

  20. 18 CFR 34.4 - Required exhibits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... the statement of corporate purposes from its articles of incorporation. (b) Exhibit B. A copy of all... stockholders has been obtained. (c) Exhibit C. The Balance Sheet and attached notes for the most recent 12... for the most recent 12-month period for which financial statements have been published, provided that...

  1. 18 CFR 34.4 - Required exhibits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... the statement of corporate purposes from its articles of incorporation. (b) Exhibit B. A copy of all... stockholders has been obtained. (c) Exhibit C. The Balance Sheet and attached notes for the most recent 12... for the most recent 12-month period for which financial statements have been published, provided that...

  2. Encountering Nanotechnology in an Interactive Exhibition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murriello, Sandra E.; Knobel, Marcelo

    2008-01-01

    This article offers findings from a learning sciences-informed evaluation of a nanoscience and nanotechnology exhibition called Nano-Aventura (NanoAdventure), based on four interactive-collaborative games and two narrated videos. This traveling exhibition was developed in Brazil by the Museu Exploratorio de Ciencias for children and teenagers…

  3. An Attention Model for Museum Exhibits.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lightner, John W.

    A qualitative study determined which factors in the museum exhibit environment or within the museum visitor may influence the visitor to attend an exhibit. Observations and interviews were conducted of 14 groups that visited a Chesapeake & Ohio steam locomotive at the Henry Ford Museum in Dearborn, Michigan. An inductive or grounded theory…

  4. Strategies for Determining Exhibit Effectiveness. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shettel, Harris H.; And Others

    This project was designed to develop research strategies and hypotheses for evaluating the effectiveness of exhibits. An exhibit on the role of the Federal Government in science and technology was used as the subject matter. Two basic groups of viewers were used, casual viewers and paid experimental viewers. Both were tested on knowledge gained…

  5. 7 CFR Exhibit G to Subpart E of... - Exhibit G to Subpart E of Part 1980

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 14 2010-01-01 2009-01-01 true Exhibit G to Subpart E of Part 1980 G Exhibit G to Subpart E of Part 1980 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) RURAL HOUSING... Program Pt. 1980, Subpt. E, Exh. G Exhibit G to Subpart E of Part 1980 Note: The Exhibit is not published...

  6. 7 CFR Exhibit G to Subpart E of... - Exhibit G to Subpart E of Part 1980

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 14 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Exhibit G to Subpart E of Part 1980 G Exhibit G to Subpart E of Part 1980 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) RURAL HOUSING... Program Pt. 1980, Subpt. E, Exh. G Exhibit G to Subpart E of Part 1980 Note: The Exhibit is not published...

  7. 7 CFR Exhibit G to Subpart E of... - Exhibit G to Subpart E of Part 1980

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 14 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Exhibit G to Subpart E of Part 1980 G Exhibit G to Subpart E of Part 1980 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) RURAL HOUSING... Program Pt. 1980, Subpt. E, Exh. G Exhibit G to Subpart E of Part 1980 Note: The Exhibit is not published...

  8. 7 CFR Exhibit G to Subpart E of... - Exhibit G to Subpart E of Part 1980

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 14 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Exhibit G to Subpart E of Part 1980 G Exhibit G to Subpart E of Part 1980 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) RURAL HOUSING... Program Pt. 1980, Subpt. E, Exh. G Exhibit G to Subpart E of Part 1980 Note: The Exhibit is not published...

  9. On equilibrium structures of the water molecule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Császár, Attila G.; Czakó, Gábor; Furtenbacher, Tibor; Tennyson, Jonathan; Szalay, Viktor; Shirin, Sergei V.; Zobov, Nikolai F.; Polyansky, Oleg L.

    2005-06-01

    Equilibrium structures are fundamental entities in molecular sciences. They can be inferred from experimental data by complicated inverse procedures which often rely on several assumptions, including the Born-Oppenheimer approximation. Theory provides a direct route to equilibrium geometries. A recent high-quality ab initio semiglobal adiabatic potential-energy surface (PES) of the electronic ground state of water, reported by Polyansky et al. [Polyansky et al.Science 299, 539 (2003)] and called CVRQD here, is analyzed in this respect. The equilibrium geometries resulting from this direct route are deemed to be of higher accuracy than those that can be determined by analyzing experimental data. Detailed investigation of the effect of the breakdown of the Born-Oppenheimer approximation suggests that the concept of an isotope-independent equilibrium structure holds to about 3×10-5Å and 0.02° for water. The mass-independent [Born-Oppenheimer (BO)] equilibrium bond length and bond angle on the ground electronic state PES of water is reBO=0.95782Å and θeBO=104.485°, respectively. The related mass-dependent (adiabatic) equilibrium bond length and bond angle of H2O16 is read=0.95785Å and θead=104.500°, respectively, while those of D2O16 are read=0.95783Å and θead=104.490°. Pure ab initio prediction of J =1 and 2 rotational levels on the vibrational ground state by the CVRQD PESs is accurate to better than 0.002cm-1 for all isotopologs of water considered. Elaborate adjustment of the CVRQD PESs to reproduce all observed rovibrational transitions to better than 0.05cm-1 (or the lower ones to better than 0.0035cm-1) does not result in noticeable changes in the adiabatic equilibrium structure parameters. The expectation values of the ground vibrational state rotational constants of the water isotopologs, computed in the Eckart frame using the CVRQD PESs and atomic masses, deviate from the experimentally measured ones only marginally, especially for A0 and B0. The

  10. Museum Exhibitions: Optimizing Development Using Evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dusenbery, P. B.

    2002-12-01

    The Space Science Institute (SSI) of Boulder, Colorado, has recently developed two museum exhibits called the Space Weather Center and MarsQuest. It is currently planning to develop a third exhibit called InterActive Earth. The Space Weather Center was developed in partnership with various research missions at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center. The development of these exhibitions included a comprehensive evaluation plan. I will report on the important role evaluation plays in exhibit design and development using MarsQuest and InterActive Earth as models. The centerpiece of SSI's Mars Education Program is the 5,000-square-foot traveling exhibition, MarsQuest: Exploring the Red Planet, which was developed with support from the National Science Foundation (NSF), NASA, and several corporate donors. The MarsQuest exhibit is nearing the end of a highly successful, fully-booked three-year tour. The Institute plans to send an enhanced and updated MarsQuest on a second three-year tour and is also developing Destination: Mars, a mini-version of MarsQuest designed for smaller venues. They are designed to inspire and empower participants to extend the excitement and science content of the exhibitions into classrooms and museum-based education programs in an ongoing fashion. The centerpiece of the InterActive Earth project is a traveling exhibit that will cover about 4,000 square feet. The major goal of the proposed exhibit is to introduce students and the public to the complexity of the interconnections in the Earth system, and thereby, to inspire them to better understand planet Earth. Evaluation must be an integral part of the exhibition development process. For MarsQuest, a 3-phase evaluation (front end, formative and summative) was conducted by Randi Korn and Associates in close association with the development team. Sampling procedures for all three evaluation phases ensured the participation of all audiences, including family groups, students, and adults. Each phase of

  11. Aerospace Applications of Non-Equilibrium Plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blankson, Isaiah M.

    2016-01-01

    Nonequilibrium plasma/non-thermal plasma/cold plasmas are being used in a wide range of new applications in aeronautics, active flow control, heat transfer reduction, plasma-assisted ignition and combustion, noise suppression, and power generation. Industrial applications may be found in pollution control, materials surface treatment, and water purification. In order for these plasma processes to become practical, efficient means of ionization are necessary. A primary challenge for these applications is to create a desired non-equilibrium plasma in air by preventing the discharge from transitioning into an arc. Of particular interest is the impact on simulations and experimental data with and without detailed consideration of non-equilibrium effects, and the consequences of neglecting non-equilibrium. This presentation will provide an assessment of the presence and influence of non-equilibrium phenomena for various aerospace needs and applications. Specific examples to be considered will include the forward energy deposition of laser-induced non-equilibrium plasmoids for sonic boom mitigation, weakly ionized flows obtained from pulsed nanosecond discharges for an annular Hall type MHD generator duct for turbojet energy bypass, and fundamental mechanisms affecting the design and operation of novel plasma-assisted reactive systems in dielectric liquids (water purification, in-pipe modification of fuels, etc.).

  12. Under What Conditions Can Equilibrium Gas-Particle Partitioning Be Expected to Hold in the Atmosphere?

    PubMed

    Mai, Huajun; Shiraiwa, Manabu; Flagan, Richard C; Seinfeld, John H

    2015-10-06

    The prevailing treatment of secondary organic aerosol formation in atmospheric models is based on the assumption of instantaneous gas-particle equilibrium for the condensing species, yet compelling experimental evidence indicates that organic aerosols can exhibit the properties of highly viscous, semisolid particles, for which gas-particle equilibrium may be achieved slowly. The approach to gas-particle equilibrium partitioning is controlled by gas-phase diffusion, interfacial transport, and particle-phase diffusion. Here we evaluate the controlling processes and the time scale to achieve gas-particle equilibrium as a function of the volatility of the condensing species, its surface accommodation coefficient, and its particle-phase diffusivity. For particles in the size range of typical atmospheric organic aerosols (∼50-500 nm), the time scale to establish gas-particle equilibrium is generally governed either by interfacial accommodation or particle-phase diffusion. The rate of approach to equilibrium varies, depending on whether the bulk vapor concentration is constant, typical of an open system, or decreasing as a result of condensation into the particles, typical of a closed system.

  13. Communication: Microphase equilibrium and assembly dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhuang, Yuan; Charbonneau, Patrick

    2017-09-01

    Despite many attempts, ordered equilibrium microphases have yet to be obtained in experimental colloidal suspensions. The recent computation of the equilibrium phase diagram of a microscopic, particle-based microphase former [Zhuang et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 116, 098301 (2016)] has nonetheless found such mesoscale assemblies to be thermodynamically stable. Here, we consider their equilibrium and assembly dynamics. At intermediate densities above the order-disorder transition, we identify four different dynamical regimes and the structural changes that underlie the dynamical crossovers from one disordered regime to the next. Below the order-disorder transition, we also find that periodic lamellae are the most dynamically accessible of the periodic microphases. Our analysis thus offers a comprehensive view of the dynamics of disordered microphases and a route to the assembly of periodic microphases in a putative well-controlled, experimental system.

  14. Analytic prediction of airplane equilibrium spin characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, W. M., Jr.

    1972-01-01

    The nonlinear equations of motion are solved algebraically for conditions for which an airplane is in an equilibrium spin. Constrained minimization techniques are employed in obtaining the solution. Linear characteristics of the airplane about the equilibrium points are also presented and their significance in identifying the stability characteristics of the equilibrium points is discussed. Computer time requirements are small making the method appear potentially applicable in airplane design. Results are obtained for several configurations and are compared with other analytic-numerical methods employed in spin prediction. Correlation with experimental results is discussed for one configuration for which a rather extensive data base was available. A need is indicated for higher Reynolds number data taken under conditions which more accurately simulate a spin.

  15. Interfaces at equilibrium: A guide to fundamentals.

    PubMed

    Marmur, Abraham

    2016-05-20

    The fundamentals of the thermodynamics of interfaces are reviewed and concisely presented. The discussion starts with a short review of the elements of bulk thermodynamics that are also relevant to interfaces. It continues with the interfacial thermodynamics of two-phase systems, including the definition of interfacial tension and adsorption. Finally, the interfacial thermodynamics of three-phase (wetting) systems is discussed, including the topic of non-wettable surfaces. A clear distinction is made between equilibrium conditions, in terms of minimizing energies (internal, Gibbs or Helmholtz), and equilibrium indicators, in terms of measurable, intrinsic properties (temperature, chemical potential, pressure). It is emphasized that the equilibrium indicators are the same whatever energy is minimized, if the boundary conditions are properly chosen. Also, to avoid a common confusion, a distinction is made between systems of constant volume and systems with drops of constant volume.

  16. Non-equilibrium quantum heat machines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alicki, Robert; Gelbwaser-Klimovsky, David

    2015-11-01

    Standard heat machines (engine, heat pump, refrigerator) are composed of a system (working fluid) coupled to at least two equilibrium baths at different temperatures and periodically driven by an external device (piston or rotor) sometimes called the work reservoir. The aim of this paper is to go beyond this scheme by considering environments which are stationary but cannot be decomposed into a few baths at thermal equilibrium. Such situations are important, for example in solar cells, chemical machines in biology, various realizations of laser cooling or nanoscopic machines driven by laser radiation. We classify non-equilibrium baths depending on their thermodynamic behavior and show that the efficiency of heat machines powered by them is limited by the generalized Carnot bound.

  17. Answer Sets in a Fuzzy Equilibrium Logic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schockaert, Steven; Janssen, Jeroen; Vermeir, Dirk; de Cock, Martine

    Since its introduction, answer set programming has been generalized in many directions, to cater to the needs of real-world applications. As one of the most general “classical” approaches, answer sets of arbitrary propositional theories can be defined as models in the equilibrium logic of Pearce. Fuzzy answer set programming, on the other hand, extends answer set programming with the capability of modeling continuous systems. In this paper, we combine the expressiveness of both approaches, and define answer sets of arbitrary fuzzy propositional theories as models in a fuzzification of equilibrium logic. We show that the resulting notion of answer set is compatible with existing definitions, when the syntactic restrictions of the corresponding approaches are met. We furthermore locate the complexity of the main reasoning tasks at the second level of the polynomial hierarchy. Finally, as an illustration of its modeling power, we show how fuzzy equilibrium logic can be used to find strong Nash equilibria.

  18. KSTAR Equilibrium Reconstruction with EFIT Code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    You, Kwang-Il; Lee, D. K.; Hahn, S. H.; Lao, L. L.

    2007-11-01

    For application to the KSTAR (Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research) device, we have made some modification to the EFIT code and installed it on our computing system. The main function of EFIT is reconstruction of plasma equilibrium using discharge data. After every discharge, the code will be automatically run for a chosen time array and the results will be stored in the same way as experimental data will be. An MDSplus system will be used as the data storage for KSTAR; therefore, the EFIT reads experimental data from the MDSplus server and writes the results to it. We have added some subroutines to EFIT for direct link with the MDSplus server and also converted EFIT to Fortran 95 form. Test runs of the code will be made by using plasma simulator in the KSTAR plasma control system. This paper will also present some results of equilibrium data obtained with the equilibrium mode of EFIT.

  19. Equilibrium reconstruction using EFIT code for KSTAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    You, Kwang-Il; Lee, D. K.; Jeon, Y. M.; Hahn, S. H.; Lao, L. L.

    2006-10-01

    For application to the KSTAR (Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research) device, we have made some modification to the EFIT code and installed it on our computing system. The main function of EFIT is reconstruction of plasma equilibrium using discharge data. After every discharge, the code will be run for a chosen time array and the results will be stored in the same way as experimental data will be. An MDSplus system will be used as the data storage for KSTAR; therefore, the EFIT reads experimental data from the MDSplus server and writes the results to it. We have added some subroutines to EFIT for direct link with the MDSplus server and also converted it to Fortran 95 form. Test runs of the code will be made by using the KSTAR plasma control system. This paper will also present results of equilibrium data obtained with the equilibrium mode of EFIT.

  20. The transformation dynamics towards equilibrium in non-equilibrium w/w/o double emulsions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chao, Youchuang; Mak, Sze Yi; Shum, Ho Cheung

    2016-10-01

    We use a glass-based microfluidic device to generate non-equilibrium water-in-water-in-oil (w/w/o) double emulsions and study how they transform into equilibrium configurations. The method relies on using three immiscible liquids, with two of them from the phase-separated aqueous two-phase systems. We find that the transformation is accompanied by an expansion rim, while the characteristic transformation speed of the rim mainly depends on the interfacial tension between the innermost and middle phases, as well as the viscosity of the innermost phase when the middle phase is non-viscous. Remarkably, the viscosity of the outermost phase has little effect on the transformation speed. Our results account for the dynamics of non-equilibrium double emulsions towards their equilibrium structure and suggest a possibility to utilize the non-equilibrium drops to synthesize functional particles.

  1. The Making of a Museum Exhibition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bleecker, Samuel E.

    1979-01-01

    Discusses the preparation of the Reptile and Amphibian exhibition at the American Museum of Natural History. Various steps involved in developing the ten showcases in a six-year period are presented. (SA)

  2. The Making of a Museum Exhibition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bleecker, Samuel E.

    1979-01-01

    Discusses the preparation of the Reptile and Amphibian exhibition at the American Museum of Natural History. Various steps involved in developing the ten showcases in a six-year period are presented. (SA)

  3. 43 CFR 4.824 - Exhibits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Procedural Rules Applicable to Practice and Procedure for Hearings, Decisions, and Administrative Review... Interior-Effectuation of Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 Procedures § 4.824 Exhibits....

  4. 18 CFR 32.2 - Required exhibits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... of operating such facilities. Exhibit B. A general or key map on a scale not greater than 20 miles to... facilities used for the generation and transmission of electric energy, indicating on said map the...

  5. 18 CFR 153.8 - Required exhibits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...) Exhibit D. If the proposal is for a pipeline interconnection to import or export natural gas, a copy of... authority, that will issue each required authorization; the date each request for authorization...

  6. Isodynamic axisymmetric equilibrium near the magnetic axis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arsenin, V. V.

    2013-08-01

    Plasma equilibrium near the magnetic axis of an axisymmetric toroidal magnetic confinement system is described in orthogonal flux coordinates. For the case of a constant current density in the vicinity of the axis and magnetic surfaces with nearly circular cross sections, expressions for the poloidal and toroidal magnetic field components are obtained in these coordinates by using expansion in the reciprocal of the aspect ratio. These expressions allow one to easily derive relationships between quantities in an isodynamic equilibrium, in which the absolute value of the magnetic field is constant along the magnetic surface (Palumbo's configuration).

  7. Asymptotic stability estimates near an equilibrium point

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dumas, H. Scott; Meyer, Kenneth R.; Palacián, Jesús F.; Yanguas, Patricia

    2017-07-01

    We use the error bounds for adiabatic invariants found in the work of Chartier, Murua and Sanz-Serna [3] to bound the solutions of a Hamiltonian system near an equilibrium over exponentially long times. Our estimates depend only on the linearized system and not on the higher order terms as in KAM theory, nor do we require any steepness or convexity conditions as in Nekhoroshev theory. We require that the equilibrium point where our estimate applies satisfy a type of formal stability called Lie stability.

  8. Isodynamic axisymmetric equilibrium near the magnetic axis

    SciTech Connect

    Arsenin, V. V.

    2013-08-15

    Plasma equilibrium near the magnetic axis of an axisymmetric toroidal magnetic confinement system is described in orthogonal flux coordinates. For the case of a constant current density in the vicinity of the axis and magnetic surfaces with nearly circular cross sections, expressions for the poloidal and toroidal magnetic field components are obtained in these coordinates by using expansion in the reciprocal of the aspect ratio. These expressions allow one to easily derive relationships between quantities in an isodynamic equilibrium, in which the absolute value of the magnetic field is constant along the magnetic surface (Palumbo’s configuration)

  9. The theory of variances in equilibrium reconstruction

    SciTech Connect

    Zakharov, Leonid E.; Lewandowski, Jerome; Foley, Elizabeth L.; Levinton, Fred M.; Yuh, Howard Y.; Drozdov, Vladimir; McDonald, D. C.

    2008-09-15

    The theory of variances of equilibrium reconstruction is presented. It complements existing practices with information regarding what kind of plasma characteristics can be reconstructed, how accurately, and what remains beyond the abilities of diagnostic systems. The {sigma}-curves, introduced by the present theory, give a quantitative assessment of quality of effectiveness of diagnostic systems in constraining equilibrium reconstructions. The theory also suggests a method for aligning the accuracy of measurements of different physical nature and for improvements of numerical algorithms used in reconstruction.

  10. Algorithm For Hypersonic Flow In Chemical Equilibrium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palmer, Grant

    1989-01-01

    Implicit, finite-difference, shock-capturing algorithm calculates inviscid, hypersonic flows in chemical equilibrium. Implicit formulation chosen because overcomes limitation on mathematical stability encountered in explicit formulations. For dynamical portion of problem, Euler equations written in conservation-law form in Cartesian coordinate system for two-dimensional or axisymmetric flow. For chemical portion of problem, equilibrium state of gas at each point in computational grid determined by minimizing local Gibbs free energy, subject to local conservation of molecules, atoms, ions, and total enthalpy. Major advantage: resulting algorithm naturally stable and captures strong shocks without help of artificial-dissipation terms to damp out spurious numerical oscillations.

  11. Computing Properties Of Chemical Mixtures At Equilibrium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcbride, B. J.; Gordon, S.

    1995-01-01

    Scientists and engineers need data on chemical equilibrium compositions to calculate theoretical thermodynamic properties of chemical systems. Information essential in design and analysis of such equipment as compressors, turbines, nozzles, engines, shock tubes, heat exchangers, and chemical-processing equipment. CET93 is general program that calculates chemical equilibrium compositions and properties of mixtures for any chemical system for which thermodynamic data are available. Includes thermodynamic data for more than 1,300 gaseous and condensed species and thermal-transport data for 151 gases. Written in FORTRAN 77.

  12. Putting A Human Face on Equilibrium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glickstein, Neil

    2005-03-01

    A short biography of chemist Fritz Haber is used to personalize the abstract concepts of equilibrium chemistry for high school students in an introductory course. In addition to giving the Haber Bosch process an historic, an economic, and a scientific background the reading and subsequent discussion allows students for whom the human perspective is of paramount importance a chance to investigate the irony of balance or equilibrium in Haber's life story. Since the inclusion of the Haber biography, performance in the laboratory and on examinations for those students who are usually only partially engaged has dramatically improved.

  13. Quantum gambling based on Nash-equilibrium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Pei; Zhou, Xiao-Qi; Wang, Yun-Long; Liu, Bi-Heng; Shadbolt, Pete; Zhang, Yong-Sheng; Gao, Hong; Li, Fu-Li; O'Brien, Jeremy L.

    2017-06-01

    The problem of establishing a fair bet between spatially separated gambler and casino can only be solved in the classical regime by relying on a trusted third party. By combining Nash-equilibrium theory with quantum game theory, we show that a secure, remote, two-party game can be played using a quantum gambling machine which has no classical counterpart. Specifically, by modifying the Nash-equilibrium point we can construct games with arbitrary amount of bias, including a game that is demonstrably fair to both parties. We also report a proof-of-principle experimental demonstration using linear optics.

  14. Computing Properties Of Chemical Mixtures At Equilibrium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcbride, B. J.; Gordon, S.

    1995-01-01

    Scientists and engineers need data on chemical equilibrium compositions to calculate theoretical thermodynamic properties of chemical systems. Information essential in design and analysis of such equipment as compressors, turbines, nozzles, engines, shock tubes, heat exchangers, and chemical-processing equipment. CET93 is general program that calculates chemical equilibrium compositions and properties of mixtures for any chemical system for which thermodynamic data are available. Includes thermodynamic data for more than 1,300 gaseous and condensed species and thermal-transport data for 151 gases. Written in FORTRAN 77.

  15. Equilibrium properties of hybrid field reversed configurations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuszewski, M.; Gupta, D.; Gupta, S.; Onofri, M.; Osin, D.; Deng, B. H.; Dettrick, S. A.; Hubbard, K.; Gota, H.

    2017-01-01

    Field Reversed Configurations (FRCs) heated by neutral beam injection may include a large fast ion pressure that significantly modifies the equilibrium. A new analysis is required to characterize such hybrid FRCs, as the simple relations used up to now prove inaccurate. The substantial contributions of fast ions to FRC radial pressure balance and diamagnetism are described. A simple model is offered to reconstruct more accurately the equilibrium parameters of elongated hybrid FRCs. Further modeling requires new measurements of either the magnetic field or the plasma pressure.

  16. Equilibrium stellar systems with genetic algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gularte, E.; Carpintero, D. D.

    In 1979, M Schwarzschild showed that it is possible to build an equilibrium triaxial stellar system. However, the linear programmation used to that goal was not able to determine the uniqueness of the solution, nor even if that solution was the optimum one. Genetic algorithms are ideal tools to find a solution to this problem. In this work, we use a genetic algorithm to reproduce an equilibrium spherical stellar system from a suitable set of predefined orbits, obtaining the best solution attainable with the provided set. FULL TEXT IN SPANISH

  17. Pions in and out of equilibrium

    SciTech Connect

    Gavin, S.

    1991-12-01

    Can final state scattering wrestle the secondaries in nucleus-nucleus collisions into a fluid state near local thermal equilibrium What do the pion p{sub T} spectra measured in pp, pA and SPS light ion experiments already tell us about the approach to equilibrium To begin to address these questions, we must face the nonequilibrium nature of hadronic evolution in the late stages of these collisions. I will outline efforts to apply transport theory to the nonequilibrium pion fluid at midrapidity focusing on two phenomena: partial thermalization and pion conservation.

  18. Pions in and out of equilibrium

    SciTech Connect

    Gavin, S.

    1991-12-01

    Can final state scattering wrestle the secondaries in nucleus-nucleus collisions into a fluid state near local thermal equilibrium? What do the pion p{sub T} spectra measured in pp, pA and SPS light ion experiments already tell us about the approach to equilibrium? To begin to address these questions, we must face the nonequilibrium nature of hadronic evolution in the late stages of these collisions. I will outline efforts to apply transport theory to the nonequilibrium pion fluid at midrapidity focusing on two phenomena: partial thermalization and pion conservation.

  19. Communicating Complex Sciences by Means of Exhibitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, S.

    2011-12-01

    Earth Sciences will have to take over the leading role in global sustainable policy and in discussions about climate change. Efforts to raise attention within the politically responsible communities as well as in the public are getting more and more support by executive and advisory boards all over the world. But how can you successfully communicate complex sciences? For example, to start communication about climate change, the first step is to encourage people to be concerned about climate change. After that, one has to start thinking about how to present data and how to include the presented data into an unprejudiced context. Therefore, the communication toolbox offers various methods to reach diverse audiences. The R&D programme GEOTECHNOLOGIEN conducts roving exhibitions as one of its most successful communication tools. With roving exhibitions GEOTECHNOLOGIEN is able to get in touch with different audiences at once. The main purpose and theme of these exhibitions is to convey the everyday means of climate change to the visitors. It is within the responsibility of science to communicate the effects of a phenomenon like climate change as well as the impact of research results to the everyday life of people. Currently, a GEOTECHNOLOGIEN roving exhibition on remote sensing with satellites deals with various issues of environmental research, including a chapter on climate change. By following the 3M-concept (Meaning - Memorable - Moving), exhibitions allow to connect the visitors daily environment and personal experiences with the presented issues and objects. Therefore, hands-on exhibits, exciting multimedia effects and high-tech artefacts have to be combined with interpretive text elements to highlight the daily significance of the scientific topics and the exhibition theme respectively. To create such an exhibition, strong conceptual planning has to be conducted. This includes the specification of stern financial as well as time wise milestones. In addition

  20. When Do Children Exhibit a "Yes" Bias?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Okanda, Mako; Itakura, Shoji

    2010-01-01

    This study investigated whether one hundred and thirty-five 3- to 6-year-old children exhibit a yes bias to various yes-no questions and whether their knowledge status affects the production of a yes bias. Three-year-olds exhibited a yes bias to all yes-no questions such as "preference-object" and "knowledge-object" questions pertaining to…

  1. An Astrobiology Microbes Exhibit and Education Module

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lindstrom, Marilyn M.; Allen, Jaclyn S.; Stocco, Karen; Tobola, Kay; Olendzenski, Lorraine

    2001-01-01

    Telling the story of NASA-sponsored scientific research to the public in exhibits is best done by partnerships of scientists and museum professionals. Likewise, preparing classroom activities and training teachers to use them should be done by teams of teachers and scientists. Here we describe how we used such partnerships to develop a new astrobiology augmentation to the Microbes! traveling exhibit and a companion education module. "Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract."

  2. Reaching the Public through Traveling Exhibitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dusenbery, P. B.; Harold, J. B.; Morrow, C. A.

    2004-11-01

    The Space Science Institute (SSI) of Boulder, Colorado has recently developed two museum exhibits called Alien Earths and MarsQuest. It has just started to develop another exhibit called Giant Planets. These exhibitions provide research scientists the opportunity to engage in a number of activities that are vital to the success of these major outreach programs. Alien Earths was developed in partnership with various research missions. The focus of the presentation will be on MarsQuest and Giant Planets. MarsQuest is a 5000 square-foot, \\$3M, traveling exhibition that is now touring the country. The exhibit's second 3-year tour will enable millions of Americans to share in the excitement of the scientific exploration of Mars and learn more about their own planet in the process. The associated planetarium show and education program will also be described, with particular emphasis on workshops to orient museum staff (e.g. museum educators and docents) and workshops for master educators near host museums and science centers. The workshops make innovative connections between the exhibition's interactive experiences and lesson plans aligned with the National Science Education Standards. These exhibit programs are good models for actively involving scientists and their discoveries to help improve informal science education in the museum community and for forging a stronger connection between formal and informal education. The presentation will also discuss how Giant Planets, a proposed 3500 square-foot traveling exhibition on the mysteries and discoveries of the outer planets, will be able to take advantage of the connections and resources that have been developed by the MarsQuest project.

  3. When Do Children Exhibit a "Yes" Bias?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Okanda, Mako; Itakura, Shoji

    2010-01-01

    This study investigated whether one hundred and thirty-five 3- to 6-year-old children exhibit a yes bias to various yes-no questions and whether their knowledge status affects the production of a yes bias. Three-year-olds exhibited a yes bias to all yes-no questions such as "preference-object" and "knowledge-object" questions pertaining to…

  4. An Astrobiology Microbes Exhibit and Education Module

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lindstrom, Marilyn M.; Allen, Jaclyn S.; Stocco, Karen; Tobola, Kay; Olendzenski, Lorraine

    2001-01-01

    Telling the story of NASA-sponsored scientific research to the public in exhibits is best done by partnerships of scientists and museum professionals. Likewise, preparing classroom activities and training teachers to use them should be done by teams of teachers and scientists. Here we describe how we used such partnerships to develop a new astrobiology augmentation to the Microbes! traveling exhibit and a companion education module. "Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract."

  5. Effect of Sediment Availability in Bedload-Dominated Rivers on Fluvial Geomorphic Equilibrium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marti, M.

    2016-12-01

    Channels are known to compensate for changes in sediment supply via covariate changes in channel properties, yet the timescale for adjustment remains poorly constrained. We propose that reductions in sediment flux inhibit equilibrium re-establishment and thus impact the timescale of system adjustment. Using run-of-river dams as natural experiments, this study quantifies the geomorphic response of channels to sediment supply reduction. Channel traits that facilitate increased sediment trapping behind the dam, such as large reservoir storage capacity relative to annual inflow and low slope, were expected to inhibit a channel's ability to re-establish equilibrium following impoundment, lengthening the equilibrium establishment timescale to tens or hundreds of years. Reaches associated with increased trapping were therefore anticipated to exhibit non-equilibrium forms. Channel equilibrium was evaluated downstream of 8 ROR dams in New England with varying degrees of sediment trapping. Sites cover a range of watershed sizes (3-155 km2), channel slopes (.05-5%), 2-year discharges (1.5-60 m3/s) and storage capacity volumes. Because equilibrium channel form is just sufficient to mobilize grains under bankfull conditions in bedload-dominated rivers, the Shields parameter was used to assess equilibrium form. Unregulated, upstream Shields values and regulated, downstream values were calculated at 14 total cross-sections extending 300-450 m upstream and downstream of each dam. Sediment trapping was estimated using Brune's curve (1953). On the Charles Brown Brook (VT), a marginally significant (p=0.08) increase in Shields values from a mean of 0.14 upstream to 0.41 downstream of a 100+ year old dam was observed. In contrast, reaches downstream of the 100+ year old Pelham dam (MA) exhibit significantly lower Shields values. This suggests that trapping behind the dam inhibits the downstream channel from reaching an equilibrium state, but not always in the same way. Better

  6. Universal Self-Similar Scaling of Spatial Wilson Loops Out of Equilibrium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berges, J.; Mace, M.; Schlichting, S.

    2017-05-01

    We investigate strongly correlated non-Abelian plasmas out of equilibrium. Based on numerical simulations, we establish a self-similar scaling property for the time evolution of spatial Wilson loops that characterizes a universal state of matter far from equilibrium. Most remarkably, it exhibits a generalized area law which holds for a sufficiently large ratio of spatial area and fractional power of time. Performing calculations also for the perturbative regime at higher momenta, we are able to characterize the full nonthermal scaling properties of S U (2 ) and S U (3 ) symmetric plasmas from short to large distance scales in terms of two independent universal exponents and associated scaling functions.

  7. Far-from-equilibrium Ostwald ripening in electrostatically driven granular powders.

    PubMed

    Sapozhnikov, M V; Peleg, A; Meerson, B; Aranson, I S; Kohlstedt, K L

    2005-01-01

    We report an experimental study of cluster size distributions in electrostatically driven granular submonolayers. The cluster size distribution in this far-from-equilibrium process exhibits dynamic scaling behavior characteristic of the (nearly equilibrium) Ostwald ripening, controlled by the attachment and detachment of the "gas" particles. The scaled size distribution, however, is different from the classical Wagner distribution obtained in the limit of a vanishingly small area fraction of the clusters. A much better agreement is found with the theory of Phys. Rev. E 65, 046117 (2002)] which accounts for the cluster merger.

  8. Sex differences in science museum exhibit attraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arámbula Greenfield, Teresa

    This study examines the relative attraction of hands-on, interactive science museum exhibits for females and males. Studies have demonstrated that such exhibits can be effective learning experiences for children, with both academic and affective benefits. Other studies have shown that girls and boys do not always experience the same science-related educational opportunities and that, even when they do, they do not necessarily receive the same benefits from them. These early differences can lead to more serious educational and professional disparities later in life. As interactive museum exhibits represent a science experience that is-readily available to both girls and boys, the question arose as to whether they were being used similarly by the two groups as well as by adult women and men. It was found that both girls and boys used all types of exhibits, but that girls were more likely than boys to use puzzles and exhibits focusing on the human body; boys were more likely than girls to use computers and exhibits illustrating physical science principles. However, this was less true of children accompanied by adults (parents) than it was of unaccompanied children on school field trips who roamed the museum more freely.Received: 16 February 1994; Revised: 3 February 1995;

  9. 14 CFR 67.305 - Ear, nose, throat, and equilibrium.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Ear, nose, throat, and equilibrium. 67.305..., nose, throat, and equilibrium. Ear, nose, throat, and equilibrium standards for a third-class airman... by, or that may reasonably be expected to be manifested by, vertigo or a disturbance of equilibrium....

  10. 46 CFR 42.20-12 - Conditions of equilibrium.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Conditions of equilibrium. 42.20-12 Section 42.20-12... BY SEA Freeboards § 42.20-12 Conditions of equilibrium. The following conditions of equilibrium are... stability. Through an angle of 20 degrees beyond its position of equilibrium, the vessel must meet...

  11. 14 CFR 67.205 - Ear, nose, throat, and equilibrium.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Ear, nose, throat, and equilibrium. 67.205..., nose, throat, and equilibrium. Ear, nose, throat, and equilibrium standards for a second-class airman..., vertigo or a disturbance of equilibrium....

  12. 14 CFR 67.205 - Ear, nose, throat, and equilibrium.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Ear, nose, throat, and equilibrium. 67.205..., nose, throat, and equilibrium. Ear, nose, throat, and equilibrium standards for a second-class airman..., vertigo or a disturbance of equilibrium....

  13. 46 CFR 42.20-12 - Conditions of equilibrium.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Conditions of equilibrium. 42.20-12 Section 42.20-12... BY SEA Freeboards § 42.20-12 Conditions of equilibrium. The following conditions of equilibrium are... stability. Through an angle of 20 degrees beyond its position of equilibrium, the vessel must meet...

  14. 14 CFR 67.105 - Ear, nose, throat, and equilibrium.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Ear, nose, throat, and equilibrium. 67.105..., nose, throat, and equilibrium. Ear, nose, throat, and equilibrium standards for a first-class airman... may reasonably be expected to be manifested by, vertigo or a disturbance of equilibrium....

  15. 14 CFR 67.305 - Ear, nose, throat, and equilibrium.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Ear, nose, throat, and equilibrium. 67.305..., nose, throat, and equilibrium. Ear, nose, throat, and equilibrium standards for a third-class airman... by, or that may reasonably be expected to be manifested by, vertigo or a disturbance of equilibrium....

  16. 46 CFR 42.20-12 - Conditions of equilibrium.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Conditions of equilibrium. 42.20-12 Section 42.20-12... BY SEA Freeboards § 42.20-12 Conditions of equilibrium. The following conditions of equilibrium are... stability. Through an angle of 20 degrees beyond its position of equilibrium, the vessel must meet...

  17. 14 CFR 67.305 - Ear, nose, throat, and equilibrium.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Ear, nose, throat, and equilibrium. 67.305..., nose, throat, and equilibrium. Ear, nose, throat, and equilibrium standards for a third-class airman... by, or that may reasonably be expected to be manifested by, vertigo or a disturbance of equilibrium....

  18. 14 CFR 67.105 - Ear, nose, throat, and equilibrium.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Ear, nose, throat, and equilibrium. 67.105..., nose, throat, and equilibrium. Ear, nose, throat, and equilibrium standards for a first-class airman... may reasonably be expected to be manifested by, vertigo or a disturbance of equilibrium....

  19. 46 CFR 42.20-12 - Conditions of equilibrium.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Conditions of equilibrium. 42.20-12 Section 42.20-12... BY SEA Freeboards § 42.20-12 Conditions of equilibrium. The following conditions of equilibrium are... stability. Through an angle of 20 degrees beyond its position of equilibrium, the vessel must meet...

  20. 46 CFR 42.20-12 - Conditions of equilibrium.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Conditions of equilibrium. 42.20-12 Section 42.20-12... BY SEA Freeboards § 42.20-12 Conditions of equilibrium. The following conditions of equilibrium are... stability. Through an angle of 20 degrees beyond its position of equilibrium, the vessel must meet...

  1. 14 CFR 67.205 - Ear, nose, throat, and equilibrium.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Ear, nose, throat, and equilibrium. 67.205..., nose, throat, and equilibrium. Ear, nose, throat, and equilibrium standards for a second-class airman..., vertigo or a disturbance of equilibrium....

  2. 14 CFR 67.105 - Ear, nose, throat, and equilibrium.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Ear, nose, throat, and equilibrium. 67.105..., nose, throat, and equilibrium. Ear, nose, throat, and equilibrium standards for a first-class airman... may reasonably be expected to be manifested by, vertigo or a disturbance of equilibrium....

  3. Phase diagram of KHF2 and non-equilibrium effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hobson, M. C.; Kellner, J. D.

    1978-01-01

    The equilibrium diagram for the KHF2-H2O system was constructed from cooling and heating curves for the compositions between 5 wt% and 40 wt% KHF2 and the results are shown. The phase diagrams shown is typical of that of a two component system with miscible liquid phases and whole solid phases consist of pure components. A eutectic point was found at approximately 15% KHF2 which remains completely liquid down to a temperature of -9.0 C. No hydrate formation was observed and no anomalous behavior such as the occurrence of solid transitions or metastable states was observed. The effect of rapid freezing on the equilibrium diagram did not appear, and cooling curves exhibited only one halt. Also, at rapid freezing rates, the supercooling of the solutions was smaller than those observed at the slow cooling rates. The existence of a eutectic composition and the slow rate of dissolution of the salt are used to interpret heat absorption behavior in practical applications of the KHF2-H2O system.

  4. Nonlinear equilibrium states in viscoelastic Taylor-Couette flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicolaou, Laura; Page, Jacob; Zaki, Tamer

    2016-11-01

    Viscoelastic Taylor-Couette flow exhibits a variety of instabilities, some of which can arise in the absence of inertia altogether. Nonlinear solutions of the equilibrium states are sought, where the distorted mean flow is unchanged and the finite-amplitude instability waves are saturated. A key assumption in the theory is that nonlinearity is restricted to the action of the perturbations on the mean flow. Therefore, the perturbation shape is preserved throughout its growth and saturation, and is specified as a weighted sum of the unstable, linear eigenmodes. At low elasticity, a single unstable mode exists in the form of a stationary Taylor vortex, and the predicted saturated state compares favourably with direct numerical simulation (DNS). DNS reveals that the higher harmonics are an order of magnitude weaker than the fundamental frequency, which substantiates the assumption adopted in the theory. At moderate elasticity, multiple modes become unstable, including axially-travelling elastic rolls and stationary vortices. Equilibrium solutions built from superpositions of these modes explain observations from experiments in the literature over a range of shear rates.

  5. Equilibrium swelling of elastomeric materials in solvent environments

    SciTech Connect

    Green, P.F.

    1990-03-01

    The equilibrium swelling of silicones, fluorosilicones, VITON and ethylene-propylene-diene (EPDM) elastomers in an environment of the jet fuel JP4 was investigated. The volume of silicone and DPDM elastomers increased by approximately 100% when they were placed in a saturated environment of JP4. Conversely, the volume of the fluorosilicone elastomer increased by approximately 15% and that of VITON less than 1%. In acetone, a commonly used solvent, the equilibrium swelling of VITON and the fluorosilicone elastomer was excessive, on the order of 100%, wheras the silicone and EPDM elastomers exhibited small changes in dimensions. Reasons for these observations are discussed in detail. We also present a simple scheme by which one may, qualitatively, determine the dimensional stability of these elastomers in different solvents if the cohesive energy density of the solvent, which is readily available in a number of handbooks, is known. We also evaluated the vulnerability of some commonly used engineering thermoplastics to JP4. The results are tabulated. 13 refs., 6 figs., 3 tab.

  6. Using Comparative Planetology in Exhibit Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dusenbery, P. B.; Harold, J. B.; Morrow, C. A.

    2004-12-01

    It is critically important for the public to better understand the scientific process. Museum exhibitions are an important part of informal science education that can effectively reach public audiences as well as school groups. They provide an important gateway for the public to learn about compelling scientific endeavors. The Space Science Institute (SSI) is a national leader in producing traveling science exhibitions and their associated educational programming (i.e. interactive websites, educator workshops, public talks, instructional materials). The focus of this presentation will be on three of its exhibit projects: MarsQuest (currently on tour), Alien Earths (in fabrication), and Giant Planets (in development). MarsQuest is enabling millions of Americans to share in the excitement of the scientific exploration of Mars and to learn more about their own planet in the process. Alien Earths will bring origins-related research and discoveries to students and the American public. It has four interrelated exhibit areas: Our Place in Space, Star Birth, PlanetQuest, and Search for Life. Exhibit visitors will explore the awesome events surrounding the birth of stars and planets; they will join scientists in the hunt for planets outside our solar system including those that may be in "habitable zones" around other stars; and finally they will be able to learn about how scientists are looking for signs of life beyond Earth. Giant Planets: Exploring the Outer Solar System will take advantage of the excitement generated by the Cassini mission and bring planetary and origins research and discoveries to students and the public. It will be organized around four thematic areas: Our Solar System; Colossal Worlds; Moons, Rings, and Fields; and Make Space for Kids. Giant Planets will open in 2007. This talk will focus on the importance of making Earth comparisons in the conceptual design of each exhibit and will show several examples of how these comparisons were manifested in

  7. Teaching Chemical Equilibrium with the Jigsaw Technique

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doymus, Kemal

    2008-01-01

    This study investigates the effect of cooperative learning (jigsaw) versus individual learning methods on students' understanding of chemical equilibrium in a first-year general chemistry course. This study was carried out in two different classes in the department of primary science education during the 2005-2006 academic year. One of the classes…

  8. Assessing Students' Conceptual Understanding of Solubility Equilibrium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raviolo, Andres

    2001-01-01

    Presents a problem on solubility equilibrium which involves macroscopic, microscopic, and symbolic levels of representation as a resource for the evaluation of students, and allows for assessment as to whether students have acquired an adequate conceptual understanding of the phenomenon. Also diagnoses difficulties with regard to previous…

  9. Payload specialists Patrick Baudry conducts equilibrium experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    Payload specialists Patrick Baudry participates in an experiment involving equilibrium and vertigo. He is anchored to the orbiter floor by foot restraints and is wearing a device over his eyes to measure angular head movement and up and down eye movement.

  10. Recency, consistent learning, and Nash equilibrium

    PubMed Central

    Fudenberg, Drew; Levine, David K.

    2014-01-01

    We examine the long-term implication of two models of learning with recency bias: recursive weights and limited memory. We show that both models generate similar beliefs and that both have a weighted universal consistency property. Using the limited-memory model we produce learning procedures that both are weighted universally consistent and converge with probability one to strict Nash equilibrium. PMID:25024197

  11. Generalized convective quasi-equilibrium principle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yano, Jun-Ichi; Plant, Robert S.

    2016-03-01

    A generalization of Arakawa and Schubert's convective quasi-equilibrium principle is presented for a closure formulation of mass-flux convection parameterization. The original principle is based on the budget of the cloud work function. This principle is generalized by considering the budget for a vertical integral of an arbitrary convection-related quantity. The closure formulation includes Arakawa and Schubert's quasi-equilibrium, as well as both CAPE and moisture closures as special cases. The formulation also includes new possibilities for considering vertical integrals that are dependent on convective-scale variables, such as the moisture within convection. The generalized convective quasi-equilibrium is defined by a balance between large-scale forcing and convective response for a given vertically-integrated quantity. The latter takes the form of a convolution of a kernel matrix and a mass-flux spectrum, as in the original convective quasi-equilibrium. The kernel reduces to a scalar when either a bulk formulation is adopted, or only large-scale variables are considered within the vertical integral. Various physical implications of the generalized closure are discussed. These include the possibility that precipitation might be considered as a potentially-significant contribution to the large-scale forcing. Two dicta are proposed as guiding physical principles for the specifying a suitable vertically-integrated quantity.

  12. Phase equilibrium measurements on twelve binary mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Giles, N.F.; Wilson, H.L.; Wilding, W.V.

    1996-11-01

    Phase equilibrium measurements have been performed on twelve binary mixtures. The PTx method was used to obtain vapor-liquid equilibrium data for the following binary systems at two temperatures each: ethanethiol + propylene; nitrobenzene + methanol; pyridine + ethyl acetate; octane + tert-amyl methyl ether; diisopropyl ether + butane; 1,3-dichloro-2-propanol + epichlorohydrin; 2,3-dichloro-1-propanol + epichlorohydrin; 2,3-epoxy-1-propanol + epichlorohydrin; 3-chloro-1,2-propanediol + epichlorohydrin; methanol + hydrogen cyanide. For these systems, equilibrium vapor and liquid phase compositions were derived from the PTx data using the Soave equation of state to represent the vapor phase and the Wilson, NRTL, or Redlich-Kister activity coefficient model to represent the liquid phase. The infinite dilution activity coefficient of methylamine in N-methyl-2-pyrrolidone was determined at three temperatures by performing PTx measurements on the N-methyl-2-pyrrolidone was determined at three temperatures by performing PTx measurements on the N-methyl-2-pyrrolidone-rich half of the binary. Liquid-liquid equilibrium studies were made on the triethylene glycol + 1-pentene system at two temperatures by directly analyzing samples taken from each liquid phase.

  13. Isotopic equilibrium between shells and their environement.

    PubMed

    Mook, W G; Vogel, J C

    1968-02-23

    The carbon-isotopic composition of shell carbonate is shown to be in isotopic equilibrium with bicarbonate dissolved in the water. By measurement of both 13C and 18O in a series of brackish-water shells a mean growth temperature can be deduced.

  14. A Progression of Static Equilibrium Laboratory Exercises

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kutzner, Mickey; Kutzner, Andrew

    2013-01-01

    Although simple architectural structures like bridges, catwalks, cantilevers, and Stonehenge have been integral in human societies for millennia, as have levers and other simple tools, modern students of introductory physics continue to grapple with Newton's conditions for static equilibrium. As formulated in typical introductory physics…

  15. General Equilibrium Models: Improving the Microeconomics Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nicholson, Walter; Westhoff, Frank

    2009-01-01

    General equilibrium models now play important roles in many fields of economics including tax policy, environmental regulation, international trade, and economic development. The intermediate microeconomics classroom has not kept pace with these trends, however. Microeconomics textbooks primarily focus on the insights that can be drawn from the…

  16. Equilibrium molecular thermodynamics from Kirkwood sampling.

    PubMed

    Somani, Sandeep; Okamoto, Yuko; Ballard, Andrew J; Wales, David J

    2015-05-21

    We present two methods for barrierless equilibrium sampling of molecular systems based on the recently proposed Kirkwood method (J. Chem. Phys. 2009, 130, 134102). Kirkwood sampling employs low-order correlations among internal coordinates of a molecule for random (or non-Markovian) sampling of the high dimensional conformational space. This is a geometrical sampling method independent of the potential energy surface. The first method is a variant of biased Monte Carlo, where Kirkwood sampling is used for generating trial Monte Carlo moves. Using this method, equilibrium distributions corresponding to different temperatures and potential energy functions can be generated from a given set of low-order correlations. Since Kirkwood samples are generated independently, this method is ideally suited for massively parallel distributed computing. The second approach is a variant of reservoir replica exchange, where Kirkwood sampling is used to construct a reservoir of conformations, which exchanges conformations with the replicas performing equilibrium sampling corresponding to different thermodynamic states. Coupling with the Kirkwood reservoir enhances sampling by facilitating global jumps in the conformational space. The efficiency of both methods depends on the overlap of the Kirkwood distribution with the target equilibrium distribution. We present proof-of-concept results for a model nine-atom linear molecule and alanine dipeptide.

  17. Spontaneity and Equilibrium II: Multireaction Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raff, Lionel M.

    2014-01-01

    The thermodynamic criteria for spontaneity and equilibrium in multireaction systems are developed and discussed. When N reactions are occurring simultaneously, it is shown that G and A will depend upon N independent reaction coordinates, ?a (a = 1,2, ..., N), in addition to T and p for G or T and V for A. The general criteria for spontaneity and…

  18. The Equilibrium Structure of Silyl Fluoride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boulaftali, N.; Sari-Zizi, N. Ben; Graner, G.; Demaison, J.

    2002-12-01

    The experimental equilibrium structure of silyl fluoride has been determined using new sets of accurate rotational constants that have recently been obtained by taking into account the most important interactions between the excited vibrational states. The equilibrium structure has also been calculated at the CCSD(T) level of theory with the cc-pVQZ+1 basis set (including corrections for the core correlation). The anharmonic force field up to semidiagonal quartic terms has been calculated at the MP2 level of theory and the equilibrium structure has been derived from the experimental rotational constants and the ab initio rovibrational interaction parameters. Finally, the average structure of both 28SiH 3F and 28SiD 3F has been reevaluated and used to derive the equilibrium structure. These structures are compared and the experimental structure is found to be in slight disagreement with the other ones. The preferred structure is obtained by calculating the median value of the different structures. The results are re(SiF)=1.5907 (9) Å, re(SiH)=1.4696 (13) Å, ∠ e(HSiF)=108.32(15)°, and ∠ e(HSiH)=110.60(14)°.

  19. Chemical Equilibrium Composition of Aqueous Systems

    SciTech Connect

    1996-12-30

    MINEQL is a subroutine package to calculate equilibrium composition of an aqueous system, accounting for mass transfer. MINEQL-EIR contains an additional base on enthalpy and heat capacity data and has the option to do calculations at temperatures different from 25 degrees C.

  20. Calculating Shocks In Flows At Chemical Equilibrium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eberhardt, Scott; Palmer, Grant

    1988-01-01

    Boundary conditions prove critical. Conference paper describes algorithm for calculation of shocks in hypersonic flows of gases at chemical equilibrium. Although algorithm represents intermediate stage in development of reliable, accurate computer code for two-dimensional flow, research leading up to it contributes to understanding of what is needed to complete task.

  1. Teaching Chemical Equilibrium with the Jigsaw Technique

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doymus, Kemal

    2008-01-01

    This study investigates the effect of cooperative learning (jigsaw) versus individual learning methods on students' understanding of chemical equilibrium in a first-year general chemistry course. This study was carried out in two different classes in the department of primary science education during the 2005-2006 academic year. One of the classes…

  2. Group Contribution Methods for Phase Equilibrium Calculations.

    PubMed

    Gmehling, Jürgen; Constantinescu, Dana; Schmid, Bastian

    2015-01-01

    The development and design of chemical processes are carried out by solving the balance equations of a mathematical model for sections of or the whole chemical plant with the help of process simulators. For process simulation, besides kinetic data for the chemical reaction, various pure component and mixture properties are required. Because of the great importance of separation processes for a chemical plant in particular, a reliable knowledge of the phase equilibrium behavior is required. The phase equilibrium behavior can be calculated with the help of modern equations of state or g(E)-models using only binary parameters. But unfortunately, only a very small part of the experimental data for fitting the required binary model parameters is available, so very often these models cannot be applied directly. To solve this problem, powerful predictive thermodynamic models have been developed. Group contribution methods allow the prediction of the required phase equilibrium data using only a limited number of group interaction parameters. A prerequisite for fitting the required group interaction parameters is a comprehensive database. That is why for the development of powerful group contribution methods almost all published pure component properties, phase equilibrium data, excess properties, etc., were stored in computerized form in the Dortmund Data Bank. In this review, the present status, weaknesses, advantages and disadvantages, possible applications, and typical results of the different group contribution methods for the calculation of phase equilibria are presented.

  3. [Good laboratory practice of equilibrium solubility measurement].

    PubMed

    Baka, Edit

    2011-01-01

    The biggest part of my PhD work was the standardization of the classical saturation shake-flask solubility method. During the experiments we examined systematically which parameters have significant influence on the solubility value and how large experimental error (standard deviation) is caused by them in the solubility method. Hydrochlorothiazide was used as model compound. Modification in temperature, sedimentation time, composition of aqueous buffer and the technique of separation of solid and liquid phases were found to influence the equilibrium solubility results strongly. However, variations in the amount of solid excess and stirring time were found to have less influence. Based on this standardization study, we developed a new shorter (36 hours) protocol for measurements of equilibrium solubility of drug molecules. The new protocol was validated with the aid of 6 structurally different compounds. The equilibrium solubility was measured by both (standard and new) protocols. The results were in good agreement, so the shorter protocol can be applied to measure the equilibrium solubility of drug compounds.

  4. Spontaneity and Equilibrium II: Multireaction Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raff, Lionel M.

    2014-01-01

    The thermodynamic criteria for spontaneity and equilibrium in multireaction systems are developed and discussed. When N reactions are occurring simultaneously, it is shown that G and A will depend upon N independent reaction coordinates, ?a (a = 1,2, ..., N), in addition to T and p for G or T and V for A. The general criteria for spontaneity and…

  5. ON THE EQUILIBRIUM STRUCTURE OF SIMPLE LIQUIDS

    DTIC Science & Technology

    It is shown that the repulsive (not merely the positive) portion of the Lennard - Jones potential quantitatively dominates the equilibrium structure of...the Lennard - Jones liquid. A simple and accurate approximation for the radial distribution function at high densities is presented.

  6. Exploring Equilibrium Chemistry for Hot Exoplanets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blumenthal, Sarah; Harrington, Joseph; Mandell, Avi; Hébrard, Eric; Venot, Olivia; Cubillos, Patricio; Challener, Ryan

    2015-11-01

    It has been established that equilibrium chemistry is usually achieved deep in the atmosphere of hot Jovians where timescales are short (Line and Young 2013). Thus, equilibrium chemistry has been used as a starting point (setting initial conditions) for evaluating disequilibrium processes. We explore parameters of setting these initial conditions including departures from solar metallicity, the number of species allowed in a system, the types of species allowed in a system, and different thermodynamic libraries in an attempt to create a standard for evaluating equilibrium chemistry. NASA's open source code Chemical Equilibrium and Applications (CEA) is used to calculate model planet abundances by varying the metallicity, in the pressure regime of 0.1 to 1 bar. These results are compared to a variety of exoplanets (Teq between 600 and 2100K) qualitatively by color maps of the dayside with different temperature redistributions. Additionally, CEA (with an updated thermodynamic library) is validated with the thermochemical model presented in Venot et al. (2012) for HD 209458b and HD 189733b. This same analysis has then been extended to the cooler planet HD 97658b. Spectra are generated from both models’ abundances using the open source code transit (https://github.com/exosports/transit) using the opacities of 15 molecules. We make the updated CEA thermodyanamic library and supporting Python scripts to do the CEA analyses available open source. This work was supported by NASA Planetary Atmospheres grant NNX12AI69G.

  7. Exploring Chemical Equilibrium in Hot Jovians

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blumenthal, Sarah; Harrington, Joseph; Mandell, Avi; Hébrard, Eric; Venot, Olivia; Cubillos, Patricio; Blecic, Jasmina; Challener, Ryan

    2016-01-01

    It has been established that equilibrium chemistry is usually achieved deep in the atmosphere of hot Jovians where timescales are short (Line and Yung 2013). Thus, equilibrium chemistry has been used as a starting point (setting initial conditions) for evaluating disequilibrium processes. We explore parameters of setting these initial conditions including departures from solar metallicity, the number of species allowed in a system, the types of species allowed in a system, and different thermodynamic libraries in an attempt to create a standard for evaluating equilibrium chemistry. NASA's open source code Chemical Equilibrium and Applications (CEA) is used to calculate model planet abundances by varying the metallicity, in the pressure regime 0.1 to 1 bar. These results are compared to a variety of exoplanets(Teq between 600 and 2100K) qualitatively by color maps of the dayside with different temperature redistributions. Additionally, CEA (with an up-dated thermodynamic library) is compared with the thermochemical model presented in Venotet al. (2012) for HD 209458b and HD 189733b. This same analysis is then applied to the cooler planet HD 97658b. Spectra are generated and we compare both models' outputs using the open source codetransit (https://github.com/exosports/transit) using the opacities of 15 molecules. We make the updated CEA thermodyanamic library and supporting Python scripts to do the CEA analyses available open source. Thiswork was supported by NASA Planetary Atmospheres grant NNX12AI69G.

  8. Non-equilibrium spatial dynamics of ecosystems.

    PubMed

    Guichard, Frederic; Gouhier, Tarik C

    2014-09-01

    Ecological systems show tremendous variability across temporal and spatial scales. It is this variability that ecologists try to predict and that managers attempt to harness in order to mitigate risk. However, the foundations of ecological science and its mainstream agenda focus on equilibrium dynamics to describe the balance of nature. Despite a rich body of literature on non-equilibrium ecological dynamics, we lack a well-developed set of predictions that can relate the spatiotemporal heterogeneity of natural systems to their underlying ecological processes. We argue that ecology needs to expand its current toolbox for the study of non-equilibrium ecosystems in order to both understand and manage their spatiotemporal variability. We review current approaches and outstanding questions related to the study of spatial dynamics and its application to natural ecosystems, including the design of reserves networks. We close by emphasizing the importance of ecosystem function as a key component of a non-equilibrium ecological theory, and of spatial synchrony as a central phenomenon for its inference in natural systems.

  9. General Equilibrium Models: Improving the Microeconomics Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nicholson, Walter; Westhoff, Frank

    2009-01-01

    General equilibrium models now play important roles in many fields of economics including tax policy, environmental regulation, international trade, and economic development. The intermediate microeconomics classroom has not kept pace with these trends, however. Microeconomics textbooks primarily focus on the insights that can be drawn from the…

  10. The 'Schwarzschild-Kerr' Equilibrium Configurations

    SciTech Connect

    Manko, V. S.; Ruiz, E.

    2010-12-07

    We discuss the possibility of equilibrium between a Schwarzschild black hole possessing zero intrinsic angular momentum and a hyperextreme Kerr source. The balance occurs due to frame-dragging exerted by the latter source on the black-hole constituent, thus giving rise to a non-zero horizon's angular velocity parallel to the angular momentum of the Kerr object.

  11. Assessing Students' Conceptual Understanding of Solubility Equilibrium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raviolo, Andres

    2001-01-01

    Presents a problem on solubility equilibrium which involves macroscopic, microscopic, and symbolic levels of representation as a resource for the evaluation of students, and allows for assessment as to whether students have acquired an adequate conceptual understanding of the phenomenon. Also diagnoses difficulties with regard to previous…

  12. Equilibrium Molecular Thermodynamics from Kirkwood Sampling

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    We present two methods for barrierless equilibrium sampling of molecular systems based on the recently proposed Kirkwood method (J. Chem. Phys.2009, 130, 134102). Kirkwood sampling employs low-order correlations among internal coordinates of a molecule for random (or non-Markovian) sampling of the high dimensional conformational space. This is a geometrical sampling method independent of the potential energy surface. The first method is a variant of biased Monte Carlo, where Kirkwood sampling is used for generating trial Monte Carlo moves. Using this method, equilibrium distributions corresponding to different temperatures and potential energy functions can be generated from a given set of low-order correlations. Since Kirkwood samples are generated independently, this method is ideally suited for massively parallel distributed computing. The second approach is a variant of reservoir replica exchange, where Kirkwood sampling is used to construct a reservoir of conformations, which exchanges conformations with the replicas performing equilibrium sampling corresponding to different thermodynamic states. Coupling with the Kirkwood reservoir enhances sampling by facilitating global jumps in the conformational space. The efficiency of both methods depends on the overlap of the Kirkwood distribution with the target equilibrium distribution. We present proof-of-concept results for a model nine-atom linear molecule and alanine dipeptide. PMID:25915525

  13. A Progression of Static Equilibrium Laboratory Exercises

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kutzner, Mickey; Kutzner, Andrew

    2013-01-01

    Although simple architectural structures like bridges, catwalks, cantilevers, and Stonehenge have been integral in human societies for millennia, as have levers and other simple tools, modern students of introductory physics continue to grapple with Newton's conditions for static equilibrium. As formulated in typical introductory physics…

  14. Equilibrium and nonequilibrium dynamics of soft sphere fluids.

    PubMed

    Ding, Yajun; Mittal, Jeetain

    2015-07-14

    We use computer simulations to test the freezing-point scaling relationship between equilibrium transport coefficients (self-diffusivity, viscosity) and thermodynamic parameters for soft sphere fluids. The fluid particles interact via the inverse-power potential (IPP), and the particle softness is changed by modifying the exponent of the distance-dependent potential term. In the case of IPP fluids, density and temperature are not independent variables and can be combined to obtain a coupling parameter to define the thermodynamic state of the system. We find that the rescaled coupling parameter, based on its value at the freezing point, can approximately collapse the diffusivity and viscosity data for IPP fluids over a wide range of particle softness. Even though the collapse is far from perfect, the freezing-point scaling relationship provides a convenient and effective way to compare the structure and dynamics of fluid systems with different particle softness. We further show that an alternate scaling relationship based on two-body excess entropy can provide an almost perfect collapse of the diffusivity and viscosity data below the freezing transition. Next, we perform nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulations to calculate the shear-dependent viscosity and to identify the distinct role of particle softness in underlying structural changes associated with rheological properties. Qualitatively, we find a similar shear-thinning behavior for IPP fluids with different particle softness, though softer particles exhibit stronger shear-thinning tendency. By investigating the distance and angle-dependent pair correlation functions in these systems, we find different structural features in the case of IPP fluids with hard-sphere like and softer particle interactions. Interestingly, shear-thinning in hard-sphere like fluids is accompanied by enhanced translational order, whereas softer fluids exhibit loss of order with shear. Our results provide a systematic evaluation

  15. Equilibrium and Sudden Events in Chemical Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weinberg, David H.; Andrews, Brett H.; Freudenburg, Jenna

    2017-03-01

    We present new analytic solutions for one-zone (fully mixed) chemical evolution models that incorporate a realistic delay time distribution for Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) and can therefore track the separate evolution of α-elements produced by core collapse supernovae (CCSNe) and iron peak elements synthesized in both CCSNe and SNe Ia. Our solutions allow constant, exponential, or linear–exponential ({{te}}-t/{τ {sfh}}) star formation histories, or combinations thereof. In generic cases, α and iron abundances evolve to an equilibrium at which element production is balanced by metal consumption and gas dilution, instead of continuing to increase over time. The equilibrium absolute abundances depend principally on supernova yields and the outflow mass loading parameter η, while the equilibrium abundance ratio [α /{Fe}] depends mainly on yields and secondarily on star formation history. A stellar population can be metal-poor either because it has not yet evolved to equilibrium or because high outflow efficiency makes the equilibrium abundance itself low. Systems with ongoing gas accretion develop metallicity distribution functions (MDFs) that are sharply peaked, while “gas starved” systems with rapidly declining star formation, such as the conventional “closed box” model, have broadly peaked MDFs. A burst of star formation that consumes a significant fraction of a system’s available gas and retains its metals can temporarily boost [α /{Fe}] by 0.1–0.3 dex, a possible origin for rare, α-enhanced stars with intermediate age and/or high metallicity. Other sudden transitions in system properties can produce surprising behavior, including backward evolution of a stellar population from high to low metallicity.

  16. The Gravity- Powered Calculator, a Galilean Exhibit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cerreta, Pietro

    2014-04-01

    The Gravity-Powered Calculator is an exhibit of the Exploratorium in San Francisco. It is presented by its American creators as an amazing device that extracts the square roots of numbers, using only the force of gravity. But if you analyze his concept construction one can not help but recall the research of Galileo on falling bodies, the inclined plane and the projectile motion; exactly what the American creators did not put into prominence with their exhibit. Considering the equipment only for what it does, in my opinion, is very reductive compared to the historical roots of the Galilean mathematical physics contained therein. Moreover, if accurate deductions are contained in the famous study of S. Drake on the Galilean drawings and, in particular on Folio 167 v, the parabolic paths of the ball leaping from its launch pad after descending a slope really actualize Galileo's experiments. The exhibit therefore may be best known as a `Galilean calculator'.

  17. Localized pulses exhibiting a missilelike slow decay.

    PubMed

    Shaarawi, Amr M; Maged, Maha A; Besieris, Ioannis M; Hashish, Essam

    2006-08-01

    We investigate the quasi-missile behavior of known localized wave solutions, such as the modified power spectrum and splash pulses. We demonstrate that source-free localized waves can exhibit slow decay rates analogous to Wu's missile solutions, which are characterized by an amplitude decay rate slower than 1/R over an unlimited range. When excited from a finite aperture, the missilelike decay is not exhibited by all localized waves showing such behavior in the source-free situation. On the other hand, localized wave missiles generated from a finite aperture have peaks that exhibit quasi-missile decay. In an extended intermediate range between the near- and the far-field regions, these pulses decay at a rate slower than 1/R before switching to the usual 1/R decay.

  18. Localized pulses exhibiting a missilelike slow decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaarawi, Amr M.; Maged, Maha A.; Besieris, Ioannis M.; Hashish, Essam

    2006-08-01

    We investigate the quasi-missile behavior of known localized wave solutions, such as the modified power spectrum and splash pulses. We demonstrate that source-free localized waves can exhibit slow decay rates analogous to Wu's missile solutions, which are characterized by an amplitude decay rate slower than 1/R over an unlimited range. When excited from a finite aperture, the missilelike decay is not exhibited by all localized waves showing such behavior in the source-free situation. On the other hand, localized wave missiles generated from a finite aperture have peaks that exhibit quasi-missile decay. In an extended intermediate range between the near- and the far-field regions, these pulses decay at a rate slower than 1/R before switching to the usual 1/R decay.

  19. Non-equilibrium statistical mechanics of geophysical flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouchet, F.; Simonnet, E.

    2010-12-01

    We describe the dynamics of two-dimensional and quasi-geostrophic flows with stochastic forces. It exhibits extremely long correlations times, related to multi-scale dynamics, and collective behaviors such as bistability and multistability. We show that in regimes of weak forces and dissipation, dominated by the large scales inertial dynamics, equilibrium statistical mechanics provides extremely precise predictions for the self-organized large scale flows. This is true for amuch larger range of parameters than would have been expected, explaining a renewed interest for statistical mechanics approaches. Non-equilibrium theory, based on kinetic theories (or equivalently Mori-Zwanzig projections) gives explicit predictions for algebraic correlations of the velocity field, and for the large scale mean flow. We also describe briefly recent applications to ocean jets and vortices, explaining the detailed structure of inertial mid-basin jets and both the structure, and westward and poleward drifts of oceans rings and eddies. References: F. BOUCHET and E. SIMONNET, Random Changes of Flow Topology in Two-Dimensional and Geophysical Turbulence, Physical Review Letters 102 (2009), no. 9, 094504-+. F. BOUCHET and J. SOMMERIA, Emergence of intense jets and Jupiter's Great Red Spot as maximum-entropy structures, Journal of Fluid Mechanics 464 (2002), 165-207. A. VENAILLE and F. BOUCHET, Ocean rings and jets as statistical equilibrium states, submitted to JPO F. BOUCHET and A. VENAILLE, Statistical mechanics of two-dimensional and geophysical flows, submitted to Physics Reports Non-equilibrium phase transitions in the dynamics of the 2D Navier-Stokes equations with stochastic forces in a doubly periodic domain of aspect ratio d. The two main plots are the time series and probability density functions (PDFs) of the modulus of the largest scale Fourrier component, illustrating random changes between dipoles (|z1| close to 0.55) and unidirectional flows (|z1| close to 0.). The small

  20. The exploration of the exhibition informatization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jiankang

    2017-06-01

    The construction and management of exhibition informatization is the main task and choke point during the process of Chinese exhibition industry’s transformation and promotion. There are three key points expected to realize a breakthrough during the construction of Chinese exhibition informatization, and the three aspects respectively are adopting service outsourcing to construct and maintain the database, adopting advanced chest card technology to collect various kinds of information, developing statistics analysis to maintain good cutomer relations. The success of Chinese exhibition informatization mainly calls for mature suppliers who can provide construction and maintenance of database, the proven technology, a sense of data security, advanced chest card technology, the ability of data mining and analysis and the ability to improve the exhibition service basing on the commercial information got from the data analysis. Several data security measures are expected to apply during the process of system developing, including the measures of the terminal data security, the internet data security, the media data security, the storage data security and the application data security. The informatization of this process is based on the chest card designing. At present, there are several types of chest card technology: bar code chest card; two-dimension code card; magnetic stripe chest card; smart-chip chest card. The information got from the exhibition data will help the organizers to make relevant service strategies, quantify the accumulated indexes of the customers, and improve the level of the customer’s satisfaction and loyalty, what’s more, the information can also provide more additional services like the commercial trips, VIP ceremonial reception.

  1. Ultrafast dynamics of fluctuations in high-temperature superconductors far from equilibrium.

    PubMed

    Perfetti, L; Sciolla, B; Biroli, G; van der Beek, C J; Piovera, C; Wolf, M; Kampfrath, T

    2015-02-13

    Despite extensive work on high-temperature superconductors, the critical behavior of an incipient condensate has so far been studied exclusively under equilibrium conditions. Here, we excite Bi(2)Sr(2)CaCu(2)O(8+δ) with a femtosecond laser pulse and monitor the subsequent nonequilibrium dynamics of the midinfrared conductivity. Our data allow us to discriminate temperature regimes where superconductivity is either coherent, fluctuating or vanishingly small. Above the transition temperature T(c), we make the striking observation that the relaxation to equilibrium exhibits power-law dynamics and scaling behavior, both for optimally and underdoped superconductors. Our findings can in part be modeled using time-dependent Ginzburg-Landau theory, and they provide strong indication of universality in systems far from equilibrium.

  2. Emergence of an enslaved phononic bandgap in a non-equilibrium pseudo-crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bachelard, Nicolas; Ropp, Chad; Dubois, Marc; Zhao, Rongkuo; Wang, Yuan; Zhang, Xiang

    2017-08-01

    Material systems that reside far from thermodynamic equilibrium have the potential to exhibit dynamic properties and behaviours resembling those of living organisms. Here we realize a non-equilibrium material characterized by a bandgap whose edge is enslaved to the wavelength of an external coherent drive. The structure dynamically self-assembles into an unconventional pseudo-crystal geometry that equally distributes momentum across elements. The emergent bandgap is bestowed with lifelike properties, such as the ability to self-heal to perturbations and adapt to sudden changes in the drive. We derive an exact analytical solution for both the spatial organization and the bandgap features, revealing the mechanism for enslavement. This work presents a framework for conceiving lifelike non-equilibrium materials and emphasizes the potential for the dynamic imprinting of material properties through external degrees of freedom.

  3. Collective Flocking Dynamics: Long Rang Order in a Non-Equilibrium 2D XY Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tu, Yuhai

    1996-03-01

    We propose and study a non-equilibrium continuum dynamical model for the collective motion of large groups of biological organisms (e.g., flocks of birds, slime molds, schools of fishs, etc.) (J. Toner and Y. Tu, Phys. Rev. Lett.), 75(23), 4326(1995) Our model becomes highly non-trivial, and different from the equilibrium model, for dequilibrium systems, our model exhibits a broken continuous symmetry even in d=2. Our model describes a large universality class of microscopic rules, including those recently simulated by Vicsek et. al.( T. Vicsek et. al. , Phys. Rev. Lett.) 75, 1226(95).

  4. Pseudospectral Solution of the Fokker-Planck Equation with Equilibrium Bistable States: the Eigenvalue Spectrum and the Approach to Equilibrium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shizgal, Bernie D.

    2016-09-01

    The Fokker-Planck equation with a constant diffusion coefficient and a particular polynomial drift coefficient can exhibit a bistable equilibrium distribution. Such model systems have been used to study chemical reactions, nucleation, climate, optical bistability and other phenomena. In this paper, we consider a particular choice for the drift coefficient of the form A(x) = x^5 - x^3 to exemplify the statistical behaviour of such systems. The transformation of the Fokker-Planck equation to a Schrödinger equation leads to a potential that belongs to the class of potentials in supersymmetric (SUSY) quantum mechanics. A pseudospectral method based on nonclassical polynomials is used to determine the spectrum of the Fokker-Planck operator and of the Schrödinger equation. The converged numerical eigenvalues are compared with WKB and SWKB approximations of the eigenvalues.

  5. Evaluating the reliability of equilibrium dissolution assumption from residual gasoline in contact with water saturated sands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lekmine, Greg; Sookhak Lari, Kaveh; Johnston, Colin D.; Bastow, Trevor P.; Rayner, John L.; Davis, Greg B.

    2017-01-01

    Understanding dissolution dynamics of hazardous compounds from complex gasoline mixtures is a key to long-term predictions of groundwater risks. The aim of this study was to investigate if the local equilibrium assumption for BTEX and TMBs (trimethylbenzenes) dissolution was valid under variable saturation in two dimensional flow conditions and evaluate the impact of local heterogeneities when equilibrium is verified at the scale of investigation. An initial residual gasoline saturation was established over the upper two-thirds of a water saturated sand pack. A constant horizontal pore velocity was maintained and water samples were recovered across 38 sampling ports over 141 days. Inside the residual NAPL zone, BTEX and TMBs dissolution curves were in agreement with the TMVOC model based on the local equilibrium assumption. Results compared to previous numerical studies suggest the presence of small scale dissolution fingering created perpendicular to the horizontal dissolution front, mainly triggered by heterogeneities in the medium structure and the local NAPL residual saturation. In the transition zone, TMVOC was able to represent a range of behaviours exhibited by the data, confirming equilibrium or near-equilibrium dissolution at the scale of investigation. The model locally showed discrepancies with the most soluble compounds, i.e. benzene and toluene, due to local heterogeneities exhibiting that at lower scale flow bypassing and channelling may have occurred. In these conditions mass transfer rates were still high enough to fall under the equilibrium assumption in TMVOC at the scale of investigation. Comparisons with other models involving upscaled mass transfer rates demonstrated that such approximations with TMVOC could lead to overestimate BTEX dissolution rates and underestimate the total remediation time.

  6. Evaluating the reliability of equilibrium dissolution assumption from residual gasoline in contact with water saturated sands.

    PubMed

    Lekmine, Greg; Sookhak Lari, Kaveh; Johnston, Colin D; Bastow, Trevor P; Rayner, John L; Davis, Greg B

    2017-01-01

    Understanding dissolution dynamics of hazardous compounds from complex gasoline mixtures is a key to long-term predictions of groundwater risks. The aim of this study was to investigate if the local equilibrium assumption for BTEX and TMBs (trimethylbenzenes) dissolution was valid under variable saturation in two dimensional flow conditions and evaluate the impact of local heterogeneities when equilibrium is verified at the scale of investigation. An initial residual gasoline saturation was established over the upper two-thirds of a water saturated sand pack. A constant horizontal pore velocity was maintained and water samples were recovered across 38 sampling ports over 141days. Inside the residual NAPL zone, BTEX and TMBs dissolution curves were in agreement with the TMVOC model based on the local equilibrium assumption. Results compared to previous numerical studies suggest the presence of small scale dissolution fingering created perpendicular to the horizontal dissolution front, mainly triggered by heterogeneities in the medium structure and the local NAPL residual saturation. In the transition zone, TMVOC was able to represent a range of behaviours exhibited by the data, confirming equilibrium or near-equilibrium dissolution at the scale of investigation. The model locally showed discrepancies with the most soluble compounds, i.e. benzene and toluene, due to local heterogeneities exhibiting that at lower scale flow bypassing and channelling may have occurred. In these conditions mass transfer rates were still high enough to fall under the equilibrium assumption in TMVOC at the scale of investigation. Comparisons with other models involving upscaled mass transfer rates demonstrated that such approximations with TMVOC could lead to overestimate BTEX dissolution rates and underestimate the total remediation time.

  7. 18 CFR 156.5 - Exhibits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... such enterprises or operations, a detailed explanation of each such relationship, including the... relationship. (5) Exhibit F—Location of facilities. A geographical map of suitable scale and detail showing all... proposed customers; derivation of numbers of customers proposed to be served; individual consumer peak...

  8. 18 CFR 32.2 - Required exhibits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... facilities used for the generation and transmission of electric energy, indicating on said map the points... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Required exhibits. 32.2 Section 32.2 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT...

  9. 18 CFR 32.2 - Required exhibits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... facilities used for the generation and transmission of electric energy, indicating on said map the points... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Required exhibits. 32.2 Section 32.2 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT...

  10. 49 CFR 250.2 - Required exhibits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...; number of units of locomotives, freight cars, and passenger cars owned and leased; principal commodities... for each of the last 5 calendar years and for each month of the current year to latest available date... to the date of the latest balance sheet furnished as Exhibit 8, together with a monthly forecast...

  11. 49 CFR 250.2 - Required exhibits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...; number of units of locomotives, freight cars, and passenger cars owned and leased; principal commodities... for each of the last 5 calendar years and for each month of the current year to latest available date... to the date of the latest balance sheet furnished as Exhibit 8, together with a monthly forecast...

  12. 49 CFR 250.2 - Required exhibits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...; number of units of locomotives, freight cars, and passenger cars owned and leased; principal commodities... for each of the last 5 calendar years and for each month of the current year to latest available date... to the date of the latest balance sheet furnished as Exhibit 8, together with a monthly forecast...

  13. 49 CFR 250.2 - Required exhibits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...; number of units of locomotives, freight cars, and passenger cars owned and leased; principal commodities... for each of the last 5 calendar years and for each month of the current year to latest available date... to the date of the latest balance sheet furnished as Exhibit 8, together with a monthly forecast...

  14. 49 CFR 250.2 - Required exhibits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...; number of units of locomotives, freight cars, and passenger cars owned and leased; principal commodities... for each of the last 5 calendar years and for each month of the current year to latest available date... to the date of the latest balance sheet furnished as Exhibit 8, together with a monthly forecast...

  15. Creating Cross-Cultural Exhibits in Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nakamura, Kazuyo; Erickson, Virginia; Ford, Viktoria

    Theory and practice of the Cross-Cultural Arts Exhibit project initiated by the Krannert Art Museum at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign (Illinois) is described in this paper. The project was developed based on the concept of post-museum. Instead of transmitting values and knowledge, communication in the post-museum stresses the…

  16. After Terror Charges, Artist Exhibits Academic Freedom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Robin

    2008-01-01

    Steven Kurtz, a professor of visual studies at the State University of New York, has been working with various bacteria as part of his counterculture exhibit artworks for nearly 20 years. Four years ago, federal agents raided his home in a bioterrorism investigation. The federal agents had been called to the house by local police officers…

  17. The medial prefrontal cortex exhibits money illusion

    PubMed Central

    Weber, Bernd; Rangel, Antonio; Wibral, Matthias; Falk, Armin

    2009-01-01

    Behavioral economists have proposed that money illusion, which is a deviation from rationality in which individuals engage in nominal evaluation, can explain a wide range of important economic and social phenomena. This proposition stands in sharp contrast to the standard economic assumption of rationality that requires individuals to judge the value of money only on the basis of the bundle of goods that it can buy—its real value—and not on the basis of the actual amount of currency—its nominal value. We used fMRI to investigate whether the brain's reward circuitry exhibits money illusion. Subjects received prizes in 2 different experimental conditions that were identical in real economic terms, but differed in nominal terms. Thus, in the absence of money illusion there should be no differences in activation in reward-related brain areas. In contrast, we found that areas of the ventromedial prefrontal cortex (vmPFC), which have been previously associated with the processing of anticipatory and experienced rewards, and the valuation of goods, exhibited money illusion. We also found that the amount of money illusion exhibited by the vmPFC was correlated with the amount of money illusion exhibited in the evaluation of economic transactions. PMID:19307555

  18. Graduation by Exhibition: Assessing Genuine Achievement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDonald, Joseph P.; And Others

    This book describes a strategy for school reform, "planning backwards from exhibitions," which is a collective invention of the Coalition of Essential Schools. The strategy is based on the principle that graduation from high school should be based on genuine achievement. The first article, by Joseph P. McDonald, explains that the purpose of…

  19. 32 CFR 705.24 - Exhibits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Exhibits. 705.24 Section 705.24 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE NAVY UNITED STATES NAVY REGULATIONS AND OFFICIAL RECORDS... be displayed in any appropriate location or event (including commercially owned spaces such as...

  20. 18 CFR 153.8 - Required exhibits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... LNG, evidence that an appropriate and qualified concern will properly and safely receive or deliver such LNG, including a report containing detailed engineering and design information. The Commission... Office of Energy Projects, 888 First Street, NE., Washington, DC 20426; (6) Exhibit E-1. If the...

  1. FluxBase: An Interactive Art Exhibition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huntley, Joan S.; Partridge, Michael

    1992-01-01

    Describes a computer program that gives Fluxus exhibition attendees an opportunity to experience the Flux objects in the spirit in which they were originally created. Suggests that the computer program provides a virtual approximation to the original art works without damaging them. (RS)

  2. 32 CFR 705.24 - Exhibits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... be displayed in any appropriate location or event (including commercially owned spaces such as... for Navy exhibits in events of international or national scope, or those requiring major coordination... will be used. See Armed Forces Request Form, § 705.36. (4) Requests for exceptions to policy...

  3. 32 CFR 705.24 - Exhibits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... be displayed in any appropriate location or event (including commercially owned spaces such as... for Navy exhibits in events of international or national scope, or those requiring major coordination... will be used. See Armed Forces Request Form, § 705.36. (4) Requests for exceptions to policy...

  4. 18 CFR 34.4 - Required exhibits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Required exhibits. 34.4 Section 34.4 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY REGULATIONS UNDER THE FEDERAL POWER ACT APPLICATION FOR AUTHORIZATION OF THE ISSUANCE...

  5. Comic Strips to Accompany Science Museum Exhibits

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chung, Beom Sun; Park, Eun-mi; Kim, Sang-Hee; Cho, Sook-kyoung; Chung, Min Suk

    2016-01-01

    Science museums make the effort to create exhibits with amusing explanations. However, existing explanation signs with lengthy text are not appealing, and as such, visitors do not pay attention to them. In contrast, conspicuous comic strips composed of simple drawings and humors can attract science museum visitors. This study attempted to reveal…

  6. Do Online Students Exhibit Different Learning Styles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hausler, Joel; Sanders, John W.; Young, Barbara

    2007-01-01

    We examined the relationship between learning styles and student type. This research seeks to examine if online students exhibit different learning styles from onsite students; and, if so, what accommodations relating to learning style differences may be made for online students? Students (N = 80) were asked to complete an online survey in order…

  7. Do Online Students Exhibit Different Learning Styles?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hausler, Joel; Sanders, John W.; Young, Barbara

    2007-01-01

    Do online students exhibit different learning styles from onsite students; and if so, what accommodations relating to learning style differences may be made for online students? Our ideas of best practices within this area have been evolving to keep up with our students. Various tactics have been used to make sure students understand what kinds of…

  8. 18 CFR 153.8 - Required exhibits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... LNG, evidence that an appropriate and qualified concern will properly and safely receive or deliver such LNG, including a report containing detailed engineering and design information. The Commission... Office of Energy Projects, 888 First Street, NE., Washington, DC 20426; (6) Exhibit E-1. If the...

  9. 18 CFR 156.5 - Exhibits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... separate volume or volumes shall indicate on the cover thereof applicant's name and bear Docket No. CP... an equivalent Btu basis. (12) Exhibit K—Cost of facilities. A detailed estimate of total capital cost.... (vii) A balance sheet and income statement (12 months) of most recent date available....

  10. 18 CFR 156.5 - Exhibits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... separate volume or volumes shall indicate on the cover thereof applicant's name and bear Docket No. CP... an equivalent Btu basis. (12) Exhibit K—Cost of facilities. A detailed estimate of total capital cost.... (vii) A balance sheet and income statement (12 months) of most recent date available....

  11. After Terror Charges, Artist Exhibits Academic Freedom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Robin

    2008-01-01

    Steven Kurtz, a professor of visual studies at the State University of New York, has been working with various bacteria as part of his counterculture exhibit artworks for nearly 20 years. Four years ago, federal agents raided his home in a bioterrorism investigation. The federal agents had been called to the house by local police officers…

  12. Equilibrium and non-equilibrium dynamics simultaneously operate in the Galápagos islands.

    PubMed

    Valente, Luis M; Phillimore, Albert B; Etienne, Rampal S

    2015-08-01

    Island biotas emerge from the interplay between colonisation, speciation and extinction and are often the scene of spectacular adaptive radiations. A common assumption is that insular diversity is at a dynamic equilibrium, but for remote islands, such as Hawaii or Galápagos, this idea remains untested. Here, we reconstruct the temporal accumulation of terrestrial bird species of the Galápagos using a novel phylogenetic method that estimates rates of biota assembly for an entire community. We show that species richness on the archipelago is in an ascending phase and does not tend towards equilibrium. The majority of the avifauna diversifies at a slow rate, without detectable ecological limits. However, Darwin's finches form an exception: they rapidly reach a carrying capacity and subsequently follow a coalescent-like diversification process. Together, these results suggest that avian diversity of remote islands is rising, and challenge the mutual exclusivity of the non-equilibrium and equilibrium ecological paradigms.

  13. MarsQuest: A National Traveling Exhibition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, S. W.; Dusenbery, P. B.

    1998-09-01

    With the successful landing of Mars Pathfinder and the arrival of Mars Global Surveyor, a new decade of Mars exploration has commenced. MarsQuest, a 5000 square foot traveling exhibition, is being developed to further bring the excitement and discoveries of this "Decade of Mars Exploration" to the public. MarsQuest is partially funded by the Informal Science Education Program of the National Science Foundation and NASA's Office of Space Science. The Space Science Institute (SSI) in Boulder, CO, is leading the project. Scientific and educational advisors from many different universities and government laboratories, most of whom are directly involved in the active and planned Mars missions, will ensure the scientific accuracy, timeliness, and relevance of the key concepts presented in the exhibition and accompanying programs. The traveling exhibit is the primary element of the MarsQuest project. The exhibition experience, carefully keyed to current events in Mars exploration, will transport visitors to the surface of the Red Planet via large murals, dioramas, and numerous interactive displays. There they will have the opportunity to share in the spirit and thrill of exploration, and come to appreciate the similarities and differences between Earth and Mars. A planetarium show, geared to the goals of the MarsQuest project, will be an important sensory addition to the traveling exhibit. The planetarium/star-theater venue presents a unique environment where audience members can literally be surrounded by Mars images. Education and outreach programs comprise the remainder of the MarsQuest project. The goal of these is to make scientific concepts and scientific and engineering processes understandable to students via Mars-inspired curricula. MarsQuest will open in late-1999, traveling to about nine sites throughout the United States and reaching an estimated two to three million children and adults during its planned three-year tour. Mars - coming soon to a museum near

  14. Growth states of catalytic reaction networks exhibiting energy metabolism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kondo, Yohei; Kaneko, Kunihiko

    2011-07-01

    All cells derive nutrition by absorbing some chemical and energy resources from the environment; these resources are used by the cells to reproduce the chemicals within them, which in turn leads to an increase in their volume. In this study we introduce a protocell model exhibiting catalytic reaction dynamics, energy metabolism, and cell growth. Results of extensive simulations of this model show the existence of four phases with regard to the rates of both the influx of resources and cell growth. These phases include an active phase with high influx and high growth rates, an inefficient phase with high influx but low growth rates, a quasistatic phase with low influx and low growth rates, and a death phase with negative growth rate. A mean field model well explains the transition among these phases as bifurcations. The statistical distribution of the active phase is characterized by a power law, and that of the inefficient phase is characterized by a nearly equilibrium distribution. We also discuss the relevance of the results of this study to distinct states in the existing cells.

  15. Finding equilibrium in the spatiotemporal chaos of the complex Ginzburg-Landau equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballard, Christopher C.; Esty, C. Clark; Egolf, David A.

    2016-11-01

    Equilibrium statistical mechanics allows the prediction of collective behaviors of large numbers of interacting objects from just a few system-wide properties; however, a similar theory does not exist for far-from-equilibrium systems exhibiting complex spatial and temporal behavior. We propose a method for predicting behaviors in a broad class of such systems and apply these ideas to an archetypal example, the spatiotemporal chaotic 1D complex Ginzburg-Landau equation in the defect chaos regime. Building on the ideas of Ruelle and of Cross and Hohenberg that a spatiotemporal chaotic system can be considered a collection of weakly interacting dynamical units of a characteristic size, the chaotic length scale, we identify underlying, mesoscale, chaotic units and effective interaction potentials between them. We find that the resulting equilibrium Takahashi model accurately predicts distributions of particle numbers. These results suggest the intriguing possibility that a class of far-from-equilibrium systems may be well described at coarse-grained scales by the well-established theory of equilibrium statistical mechanics.

  16. Finding equilibrium in the spatiotemporal chaos of the complex Ginzburg-Landau equation.

    PubMed

    Ballard, Christopher C; Esty, C Clark; Egolf, David A

    2016-11-01

    Equilibrium statistical mechanics allows the prediction of collective behaviors of large numbers of interacting objects from just a few system-wide properties; however, a similar theory does not exist for far-from-equilibrium systems exhibiting complex spatial and temporal behavior. We propose a method for predicting behaviors in a broad class of such systems and apply these ideas to an archetypal example, the spatiotemporal chaotic 1D complex Ginzburg-Landau equation in the defect chaos regime. Building on the ideas of Ruelle and of Cross and Hohenberg that a spatiotemporal chaotic system can be considered a collection of weakly interacting dynamical units of a characteristic size, the chaotic length scale, we identify underlying, mesoscale, chaotic units and effective interaction potentials between them. We find that the resulting equilibrium Takahashi model accurately predicts distributions of particle numbers. These results suggest the intriguing possibility that a class of far-from-equilibrium systems may be well described at coarse-grained scales by the well-established theory of equilibrium statistical mechanics.

  17. Out-of-equilibrium fluctuations in stochastic long-range interacting systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Shamik; Dauxois, Thierry; Ruffo, Stefano

    2016-03-01

    For a many-particle system with long-range interactions and evolving under stochastic dynamics, we study for the first time the out-of-equilibrium fluctuations of the work done on the system by a time-dependent external force. For equilibrium initial conditions, the work distributions for a given protocol of variation of the force in time and the corresponding time-reversed protocol exhibit a remarkable scaling and a symmetry when expressed in terms of the average and the standard deviation of the work. The distributions of the work per particle predict, by virtue of the Crooks fluctuation theorem, the equilibrium free-energy density of the system. For a large number N of particles, the latter is in excellent agreement with the value computed by considering the Langevin dynamics of a single particle in a self-consistent mean field generated by its interaction with other particles. The agreement highlights the effective mean-field nature of the original many-particle dynamics for large N. For initial conditions in non-equilibrium stationary states (NESSs), we study the distribution of a quantity similar to dissipated work that satisfies the non-equilibrium generalization of the Clausius inequality, namely, the Hatano-Sasa equality, for transitions between NESSs. Besides illustrating the validity of the equality, we show that the distribution has exponential tails that decay differently on the left and on the right.

  18. Spatial distribution of thermal energy in equilibrium.

    PubMed

    Bar-Sinai, Yohai; Bouchbinder, Eran

    2015-06-01

    The equipartition theorem states that in equilibrium, thermal energy is equally distributed among uncoupled degrees of freedom that appear quadratically in the system's Hamiltonian. However, for spatially coupled degrees of freedom, such as interacting particles, one may speculate that the spatial distribution of thermal energy may differ from the value predicted by equipartition, possibly quite substantially in strongly inhomogeneous or disordered systems. Here we show that for systems undergoing simple Gaussian fluctuations around an equilibrium state, the spatial distribution is universally bounded from above by 1/2k(B)T. We further show that in one-dimensional systems with short-range interactions, the thermal energy is equally partitioned even for coupled degrees of freedom in the thermodynamic limit and that in higher dimensions nontrivial spatial distributions emerge. Some implications are discussed.

  19. Adaptive resolution simulation in equilibrium and beyond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, H.; Agarwal, A.

    2015-09-01

    In this paper, we investigate the equilibrium statistical properties of both the force and potential interpolations of adaptive resolution simulation (AdResS) under the theoretical framework of grand-canonical like AdResS (GC-AdResS). The thermodynamic relations between the higher and lower resolutions are derived by considering the absence of fundamental conservation laws in mechanics for both branches of AdResS. In order to investigate the applicability of AdResS method in studying the properties beyond the equilibrium, we demonstrate the accuracy of AdResS in computing the dynamical properties in two numerical examples: The velocity auto-correlation of pure water and the conformational relaxation of alanine dipeptide dissolved in water. Theoretical and technical open questions of the AdResS method are discussed in the end of the paper.

  20. Instability of quantum equilibrium in Bohm's dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Colin, Samuel; Valentini, Antony

    2014-01-01

    We consider Bohm's second-order dynamics for arbitrary initial conditions in phase space. In principle, Bohm's dynamics allows for ‘extended’ non-equilibrium, with initial momenta not equal to the gradient of phase of the wave function (as well as initial positions whose distribution departs from the Born rule). We show that extended non-equilibrium does not relax in general and is in fact unstable. This is in sharp contrast with de Broglie's first-order dynamics, for which non-standard momenta are not allowed and which shows an efficient relaxation to the Born rule for positions. On this basis, we argue that, while de Broglie's dynamics is a tenable physical theory, Bohm's dynamics is not. In a world governed by Bohm's dynamics, there would be no reason to expect to see an effective quantum theory today (even approximately), in contradiction with observation. PMID:25383020

  1. Cosmic curvature from de Sitter equilibrium cosmology.

    PubMed

    Albrecht, Andreas

    2011-10-07

    I show that the de Sitter equilibrium cosmology generically predicts observable levels of curvature in the Universe today. The predicted value of the curvature, Ω(k), depends only on the ratio of the density of nonrelativistic matter to cosmological constant density ρ(m)(0)/ρ(Λ) and the value of the curvature from the initial bubble that starts the inflation, Ω(k)(B). The result is independent of the scale of inflation, the shape of the potential during inflation, and many other details of the cosmology. Future cosmological measurements of ρ(m)(0)/ρ(Λ) and Ω(k) will open up a window on the very beginning of our Universe and offer an opportunity to support or falsify the de Sitter equilibrium cosmology.

  2. Spectra from pair-equilibrium plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zdziarski, A. A.

    1984-01-01

    A numerical model of relativistic nonmagnetized plasma with uniform temperature and electron density distributions is considered, and spectra from plasma in pair equilibrium are studied. A range of dimensionless temperature (T) greater than about 0.2 is considered. The spectra from low pair density plasmas in pair equilibrium vary from un-Comptonized bremsstrahlung spectra at Thomson cross section tau(N) much less than one to Comptonized bremsstrahlung spectra with tau(N) over one. For high pair density plasmas the spectra are flat for T greater than about one, and have broad intensity peaks at energy roughly equal to 3T for T less than one. In the latter region the total luminosity is approximately twice the annihilation luminosity. All spectra are flat in the X-ray region, in contradiction to observed AGN spectra. For dimensionless luminosity greater than about 100, the cooling time becomes shorter than the Thomson time.

  3. Fluctuation theorem for constrained equilibrium systems.

    PubMed

    Gilbert, Thomas; Dorfman, J Robert

    2006-02-01

    We discuss the fluctuation properties of equilibrium chaotic systems with constraints such as isokinetic and Nosé-Hoover thermostats. Although the dynamics of these systems does not typically preserve phase-space volumes, the average phase-space contraction rate vanishes, so that the stationary states are smooth. Nevertheless, finite-time averages of the phase-space contraction rate have nontrivial fluctuations which we show satisfy a simple version of the Gallavotti-Cohen fluctuation theorem, complementary to the usual fluctuation theorem for nonequilibrium stationary states and appropriate to constrained equilibrium states. Moreover, we show that these fluctuations are distributed according to a Gaussian curve for long enough times. Three different systems are considered here: namely, (i) a fluid composed of particles interacting with Lennard-Jones potentials, (ii) a harmonic oscillator with Nosé-Hoover thermostatting, and (iii) a simple hyperbolic two-dimensional map.

  4. Fluctuation theorem for constrained equilibrium systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilbert, Thomas; Dorfman, J. Robert

    2006-02-01

    We discuss the fluctuation properties of equilibrium chaotic systems with constraints such as isokinetic and Nosé-Hoover thermostats. Although the dynamics of these systems does not typically preserve phase-space volumes, the average phase-space contraction rate vanishes, so that the stationary states are smooth. Nevertheless, finite-time averages of the phase-space contraction rate have nontrivial fluctuations which we show satisfy a simple version of the Gallavotti-Cohen fluctuation theorem, complementary to the usual fluctuation theorem for nonequilibrium stationary states and appropriate to constrained equilibrium states. Moreover, we show that these fluctuations are distributed according to a Gaussian curve for long enough times. Three different systems are considered here: namely, (i) a fluid composed of particles interacting with Lennard-Jones potentials, (ii) a harmonic oscillator with Nosé-Hoover thermostatting, and (iii) a simple hyperbolic two-dimensional map.

  5. Equilibrium properties on the EAST superconducting tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, J. P.; Wan, B. N.; Lao, L. L.; Shen, B.; Sabbagh, S. A.; Menard, J.; Sun, Y. W.; Duan, Y. M.; Li, J. H.; Xiao, B. J.; Gong, X. Z.; Gong

    2009-06-01

    The Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak (EAST) has a major radius of R0 = 1.75 m and a midplane halfwidth of 0.5 m. It has been operated with a toroidal magnetic field B0 = 2 T and Ip ≤ 500 kA. The evolution of the plasma equilibrium is analysed between discharges by Equilibrium Fitting Code (EFIT). Limiter, single-null and double-null diverted configurations have been produced. A plasma elongation in the range 1.3 ≤ κ ≤ 1.9 and a triangularity in the range 0.1 ≤ δ ≤ 0.55 have been sustained. The operation space of elongated discharges is also presented based on the EAST database.

  6. Phase Equilibrium Investigations of Planetary Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grove, T. L.

    2005-01-01

    This grant provided funds to carry out phase equilibrium studies on the processes of chemical differentiation of the moon and the meteorite parent bodies, during their early evolutionary history. Several experimental studies examined processes that led to the formation of lunar ultramafic glasses. Phase equilibrium studies were carried out on selected low-Ti and high-Ti lunar ultramafic glass compositions to provide constraints on the depth range, temperature and processes of melt generation and/or assimilation. A second set of experiments examined the role of sulfide melts in core formation processes in the earth and terrestrial planets. The major results of each paper are discussed, and copies of the papers are attached as Appendix I.

  7. Equilibrium Reconstruction of KSTAR First Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    You, K.-I.; Lee, D. K.; Park, B. H.; Lee, S. G.; Bak, J. G.; Seo, S. H.; Hahn, S. H.; Lao, L. L.

    2008-11-01

    To reconstruct the plasma equilibrium of KSTAR (Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research), we have made some modification to the EFIT code and installed it on our computing system. An MDSplus system is used for the data storage of KSTAR; thus, the EFIT reads experimental data from the MDSplus server and writes the results to it. We have modified some subroutines of the EFIT code for direct link with the MDSplus server. KSTAR PF and TF coil systems use a CICC (Cable-In-Conduit Conductor) type superconductor. The CICC jacket material for most PF and all TF coils is Incoloy 908, which is a magnetic material with relative magnetic permeability greater than 10 in low external field. The Incoloy 908 effects should, therefore, be considered in analyzing the magnetic diagnostics data. In this paper, we present our efforts to reconstruct the plasma equilibrium with EFIT code, including the compensation of Incoloy 908 effects.

  8. Gliding flight in snakes: non-equilibrium trajectory dynamics and kinematics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Socha, Jake; Miklasz, Kevin; Jafari, Farid; Vlachos, Pavlos

    2010-11-01

    For animal gliders that live in trees, a glide trajectory begins in free fall and, given sufficient space, transitions to equilibrium gliding with no net forces on the body. However, the dynamics of non-equilibrium gliding are not well understood. Of any terrestrial animal glider, snakes may exhibit the most complicated glide patterns resulting from their highly active undulatory behavior. Our aim was to determine the characteristics of snake gliding during the transition to equilibrium. We launched "flying" snakes (Chrysopelea paradisi) from a 15 m tower and recorded the mid-to-end portion of trajectories with four videocameras to reconstruct the snake's 3D body position. Additionally, we developed a simple analytical model of gliding assuming only steady-state forces of lift, drag and weight acting on the body and used it to explore effects of wing loading, lift-to-drag ratio, and initial velocity on trajectory dynamics. Despite the vertical space provided to transition to steady-state gliding, snakes did not exhibit equilibrium gliding and in fact displayed a net positive acceleration in the vertical axis.

  9. Stationary equilibrium singularity distributions in the plane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newton, P. K.; Ostrovskyi, V.

    2012-02-01

    We characterize all stationary equilibrium point singularity distributions in the plane of logarithmic type, allowing for real, imaginary or complex singularity strengths. The dynamical system follows from the assumption that each of the N singularities moves according to the flow field generated by all the others at that point. For strength vector \\vec{\\Gamma} \\in {\\Bbb R}^N , the dynamical system is the classical point vortex system obtained from a singular discrete representation of the vorticity field from ideal, incompressible fluid flow. When \\vec{\\Gamma} \\in \\Im , it corresponds to a system of sources and sinks, whereas when \\vec{\\Gamma} \\in {\\Bbb C}^N the system consists of spiral sources and sinks discussed in Kochin et al (1964 Theoretical Hydromechanics 1 (London: Interscience)). We formulate the equilibrium problem as one in linear algebra, A \\vec{\\Gamma} = 0 , A \\in {\\Bbb C}^{N \\times N} , \\vec{\\Gamma} \\in {\\Bbb C}^N , where A is a N × N complex skew-symmetric configuration matrix which encodes the geometry of the system of interacting singularities. For an equilibrium to exist, A must have a kernel and \\vec{\\Gamma} must be an element of the nullspace of A. We prove that when N is odd, A always has a kernel, hence there is a choice of \\vec{\\Gamma} for which the system is a stationary equilibrium. When N is even, there may or may not be a non-trivial nullspace of A, depending on the relative position of the points in the plane. We provide examples of evenly and randomly distributed points on curves such as circles, figure eights, flower-petal configurations and spirals. We then show how to classify the stationary equilibria in terms of the singular spectrum of A.

  10. Contact angle measurements under thermodynamic equilibrium conditions.

    PubMed

    Lages, Carol; Méndez, Eduardo

    2007-08-01

    The precise control of the ambient humidity during contact angle measurements is needed to obtain stable and valid data. For a such purpose, a simple low-cost device was designed, and several modified surfaces relevant to biosensor design were studied. Static contact angle values for these surfaces are lower than advancing contact angles published for ambient conditions, indicating that thermodynamic equilibrium conditions are needed to avoid drop evaporation during the measurements.

  11. Extended local equilibrium approach to stochastic thermodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Decker, Y.; Garcia Cantú Ros, A.; Nicolis, G.

    2015-07-01

    A new approach to stochastic thermodynamics is developed, in which the local equilibrium hypothesis is extended to incorporate the effect of fluctuations. A fluctuating entropy in the form of a random functional of the fluctuating state variables is introduced, whose balance equation allows to identify the stochastic entropy flux and stochastic entropy production. The statistical properties of these quantities are analyzed and illustrated on representative examples.

  12. Non-equilibrium microrheology of living cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Ming-Tzo; Ou-Yang, H. Daniel

    2011-03-01

    Intracellular stresses generated by molecular motors can actively modify cytoskeletal network and change intracellular mechanical properties. We study the out-of-equilibrium microrheology in living cells using endogenous organelle particles as probes. This paper reports measurements of the intracellular mechanical properties using passive, particle-tracking and active, optical tweezers-based microrheology approaches. Using arguments based on the fluctuation-dissipation theorem, we compared the results from both approaches to distinguish thermal and non-thermal mechanical fluctuations in living cells.

  13. Flux Jacobian Matrices For Equilibrium Real Gases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vinokur, Marcel

    1990-01-01

    Improved formulation includes generalized Roe average and extension to three dimensions. Flux Jacobian matrices derived for use in numerical solutions of conservation-law differential equations of inviscid flows of ideal gases extended to real gases. Real-gas formulation of these matrices retains simplifying assumptions of thermodynamic and chemical equilibrium, but adds effects of vibrational excitation, dissociation, and ionization of gas molecules via general equation of state.

  14. Equilibrium Configuration of Φ4 Oscillatons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valdez-Alvarado, Susana; Becerril, Ricardo; Ureña-López, L. Arturo

    2010-07-01

    We search for equilibrium configurations of the (coupled) Einstein-Klein-Gordon equations for the case of a real scalar field endowed with a quartic self-interaction potential. The resulting solutions are the generalizations of the (massive) oscillating soliton stars, the so-called oscillatons. Among other parameters, we estimate the mass curve of the configurations, and determine their critical mass for different values of the quartic interaction.

  15. Flux Jacobian Matrices For Equilibrium Real Gases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vinokur, Marcel

    1990-01-01

    Improved formulation includes generalized Roe average and extension to three dimensions. Flux Jacobian matrices derived for use in numerical solutions of conservation-law differential equations of inviscid flows of ideal gases extended to real gases. Real-gas formulation of these matrices retains simplifying assumptions of thermodynamic and chemical equilibrium, but adds effects of vibrational excitation, dissociation, and ionization of gas molecules via general equation of state.

  16. Oxygen equilibrium of brachiopod Lingula hemerythrin.

    PubMed

    MANWELL, C

    1960-08-26

    In contrast to hemerythrin from five different species of sipunculid worms, ecardine brachiopod Lingula hemerythrin has an oxygen equilibrium which is reversibly altered by pH changes, both the oxygen affinity (Bohr effect) and the interactions between oxygen-binding centers being a function of pH. The significance of these phenomena is discussed in view of the phylogenetic distribution of hemerythrin and the function of respiratory pigments.

  17. Molecular equilibrium with condensation. [in astrophysics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharp, C. M.; Huebner, W. F.

    1990-01-01

    Minimization of the Gibbs energy of formation for species of chemical elements and compounds in their gas and condensed phases determines their relative abundances in a mixture in chemical equilibrium. The procedure is more general and more powerful than previous abundance determinations in multiphase astrophysical mixtures. Some results for astrophysical equations of state are presented, and the effects of condensation on opacity are briefly indicated.

  18. Equilibrium-based bipolar neurological modeling.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wen-Ran; Pandurangi, Anand K; Peace, Karl E

    2006-01-01

    This work introduces an equilibrium-based dynamic model for the characterization, classification, and diagnostic analysis of bipolar disorder, a psychiatric syndrome with manic and depressive phases. The new model extends the traditional spectrum model of mood states from a static and closed world to a dynamic open-world of equilibria with a bipolar universal modus ponens (BUMP). The utility of the new model is illustrated in diagnostic analysis of depression and clinical psychopharmacology of different phases of this disorder.

  19. Uniform Convergence to Equilibrium for Granular Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolley, François; Gentil, Ivan; Guillin, Arnaud

    2013-05-01

    We study the long time asymptotics of a nonlinear, nonlocal equation used in the modelling of granular media. We prove a uniform exponential convergence to equilibrium for degenerately convex and nonconvex interaction or confinement potentials, improving in particular results by J. A. Carrillo, R. J. McCann and C. Villani. The method is based on studying the dissipation of the Wasserstein distance between a solution and the steady state.

  20. Equilibrium Partitioning Sediment Benchmarks (ESBs) for the ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This document describes procedures to determine the concentrations of nonionic organic chemicals in sediment interstitial waters. In previous ESB documents, the general equilibrium partitioning (EqP) approach was chosen for the derivation of sediment benchmarks because it accounts for the varying bioavailability of chemicals in different sediments and allows for the incorporation of the appropriate biological effects concentration. This provides for the derivation of benchmarks that are causally linked to the specific chemical, applicable across sediments, and appropriately protective of benthic organisms.  This equilibrium partitioning sediment benchmark (ESB) document was prepared by scientists from the Atlantic Ecology Division, Mid-Continent Ecology Division, and Western Ecology Division, the Office of Water, and private consultants. The document describes procedures to determine the interstitial water concentrations of nonionic organic chemicals in contaminated sediments. Based on these concentrations, guidance is provided on the derivation of toxic units to assess whether the sediments are likely to cause adverse effects to benthic organisms. The equilibrium partitioning (EqP) approach was chosen because it is based on the concentrations of chemical(s) that are known to be harmful and bioavailable in the environment.  This document, and five others published over the last nine years, will be useful for the Program Offices, including Superfund, a

  1. Equilibrium Gold Nanoclusters Quenched with Biodegradable Polymers

    PubMed Central

    Murthy, Avinash K.; Stover, Robert J.; Borwankar, Ameya U.; Nie, Golay D.; Gourisankar, Sai; Truskett, Thomas M.; Sokolov, Konstantin V.; Johnston, Keith P.

    2013-01-01

    Although sub-100 nm nanoclusters of metal nanoparticles are of interest in many fields including biomedical imaging, sensors and catalysis, it has been challenging to control their morphologies and chemical properties. Herein, a new concept is presented to assemble equilibrium Au nanoclusters of controlled size by tuning the colloidal interactions with a polymeric stabilizer, PLA(1k)-b-PEG(10k)-b-PLA(1k). The nanoclusters form upon mixing a dispersion of ~5 nm Au nanospheres with a polymer solution followed by partial solvent evaporation. A weakly adsorbed polymer quenches the equilibrium nanocluster size and provides steric stabilization. Nanocluster size is tuned from ~20 nm to ~40 nm by experimentally varying the final Au nanoparticle concentration and the polymer/Au ratio, along with the charge on the initial Au nanoparticle surface. Upon biodegradation of the quencher, the nanoclusters reversibly and fully dissociate to individual ~5 nm primary particles. Equilibrium cluster size is predicted semi-quantitatively with a free energy model that balances short-ranged depletion and van der Waals attractions with longer-ranged electrostatic repulsion, as a function of the Au and polymer concentrations. The close spacings of the Au nanoparticles in the clusters produce strong NIR extinction over a broad range of wavelengths from 650 to 900 nm, which is of practical interest in biomedical imaging. PMID:23230905

  2. Recovery of postural equilibrium control following spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paloski, W. H.; Reschke, M. F.; Black, F. O.; Doxey, D. D.; Harm, D. L.

    1992-01-01

    Decreased postural stability is observed in most astronauts immediately following spaceflight. Because ataxia may present postflight operational hazards, it is important to determine the incidence of postural instability immediately following landing and the dynamics of recovery of normal postural equilibrium control. It is postulated that postflight postural instability results from in-flight adaptive changes in central nervous system (CNS) processing of sensory information from the visual, vestibular, and proprioceptive systems. The purpose of the present investigation was to determine the magnitude and time course of postflight recovery of postural equilibrium control and, hence, readaptation of CNS processing of sensory information. Thirteen crew members from six spaceflight missions were studied pre- and postflight using a modified commercial posturography system. Postural equilibrium control was found to be seriously disrupted immediately following spaceflight in all subjects. Readaptation to the terrestrial environment began immediately upon landing, proceeded rapidly for the first 10-12 hours, and then proceeded much more slowly for the subsequent 2-4 days until preflight stability levels were reachieved. It is concluded that the overall postflight recovery of postural stability follows a predictable time course.

  3. Generalized Convective Quasi-Equilibrium Closure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yano, Jun-Ichi; Plant, Robert

    2016-04-01

    Arakawa and Schubert proposed convective quasi-equilibrium as a basic principle for closing their spectrum mass-flux convection parameterization. In deriving this principle, they show that the cloud work function is a key variable that controls the growth of convection. Thus, this closure hypothesis imposes a steadiness of the cloud work function tendency. This presentation shows how this principle can be generalized so that it can also encompasses both the CAPE and the moisture-convergence closures. Note that the majority of the current mass-flux convection parameterization invokes a CAPE closure, whereas the moisture-convergence closure was extremely popular historically. This generalization, in turn, includes both closures as special cases of convective quasi-equilibrium. This generalization further suggests wide range of alternative possibilities for convective closure. In general, a vertical integral of any function depending on both large-scale and convective-scale variables can be adopted as an alternative closure variables, leading to an analogous formulation as Arakawa and Schubert's convective quasi-equilibrium formulation. Among those, probably the most fascinating possibility is to take a vertical integral of the convective-scale moisture for the closure. Use of a convective-scale variable for closure has a particular appeal by not suffering from a loss of predictability of any large-scale variables. That is a main problem with any of the current convective closures, not only for the moisture-convergence based closure as often asserted.

  4. Recovery of postural equilibrium control following spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paloski, W. H.; Reschke, M. F.; Black, F. O.; Doxey, D. D.; Harm, D. L.

    1992-01-01

    Decreased postural stability is observed in most astronauts immediately following spaceflight. Because ataxia may present postflight operational hazards, it is important to determine the incidence of postural instability immediately following landing and the dynamics of recovery of normal postural equilibrium control. It is postulated that postflight postural instability results from in-flight adaptive changes in central nervous system (CNS) processing of sensory information from the visual, vestibular, and proprioceptive systems. The purpose of the present investigation was to determine the magnitude and time course of postflight recovery of postural equilibrium control and, hence, readaptation of CNS processing of sensory information. Thirteen crew members from six spaceflight missions were studied pre- and postflight using a modified commercial posturography system. Postural equilibrium control was found to be seriously disrupted immediately following spaceflight in all subjects. Readaptation to the terrestrial environment began immediately upon landing, proceeded rapidly for the first 10-12 hours, and then proceeded much more slowly for the subsequent 2-4 days until preflight stability levels were reachieved. It is concluded that the overall postflight recovery of postural stability follows a predictable time course.

  5. Analytical Ultracentrifugation: Sedimentation Velocity and Sedimentation Equilibrium

    PubMed Central

    Cole, James L.; Lary, Jeffrey W.; Moody, Thomas; Laue, Thomas M.

    2009-01-01

    Analytical ultracentrifugation (AUC) is a versatile and powerful method for the quantitative analysis of macromolecules in solution. AUC has broad applications for the study of biomacromolecules in a wide range of solvents and over a wide range of solute concentrations. Three optical systems are available for the analytical ultracentrifuge (absorbance, interference and fluorescence) that permit precise and selective observation of sedimentation in real time. In particular, the fluorescence system provides a new way to extend the scope of AUC to probe the behavior of biological molecules in complex mixtures and at high solute concentrations. In sedimentation velocity, the movement of solutes in high centrifugal fields is interpreted using hydrodynamic theory to define the size, shape and interactions of macromolecules. Sedimentation equilibrium is a thermodynamic method where equilibrium concentration gradients at lower centrifugal fields are analyzed to define molecule mass, assembly stoichiometry, association constants and solution nonideality. Using specialized sample cells and modern analysis software, researchers can use sedimentation velocity to determine the homogeneity of a sample and define whether it undergoes concentration-dependent association reactions. Subsequently, more thorough model-dependent analysis of velocity and equilibrium experiments can provide a detailed picture of the nature of the species present in solution and their interactions. PMID:17964931

  6. Analytical ultracentrifugation: sedimentation velocity and sedimentation equilibrium.

    PubMed

    Cole, James L; Lary, Jeffrey W; P Moody, Thomas; Laue, Thomas M

    2008-01-01

    Analytical ultracentrifugation (AUC) is a versatile and powerful method for the quantitative analysis of macromolecules in solution. AUC has broad applications for the study of biomacromolecules in a wide range of solvents and over a wide range of solute concentrations. Three optical systems are available for the analytical ultracentrifuge (absorbance, interference, and fluorescence) that permit precise and selective observation of sedimentation in real time. In particular, the fluorescence system provides a new way to extend the scope of AUC to probe the behavior of biological molecules in complex mixtures and at high solute concentrations. In sedimentation velocity (SV), the movement of solutes in high centrifugal fields is interpreted using hydrodynamic theory to define the size, shape, and interactions of macromolecules. Sedimentation equilibrium (SE) is a thermodynamic method where equilibrium concentration gradients at lower centrifugal fields are analyzed to define molecule mass, assembly stoichiometry, association constants, and solution nonideality. Using specialized sample cells and modern analysis software, researchers can use SV to determine the homogeneity of a sample and define whether it undergoes concentration-dependent association reactions. Subsequently, more thorough model-dependent analysis of velocity and equilibrium experiments can provide a detailed picture of the nature of the species present in solution and their interactions.

  7. TEA: A Code Calculating Thermochemical Equilibrium Abundances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blecic, Jasmina; Harrington, Joseph; Bowman, M. Oliver

    2016-07-01

    We present an open-source Thermochemical Equilibrium Abundances (TEA) code that calculates the abundances of gaseous molecular species. The code is based on the methodology of White et al. and Eriksson. It applies Gibbs free-energy minimization using an iterative, Lagrangian optimization scheme. Given elemental abundances, TEA calculates molecular abundances for a particular temperature and pressure or a list of temperature-pressure pairs. We tested the code against the method of Burrows & Sharp, the free thermochemical equilibrium code Chemical Equilibrium with Applications (CEA), and the example given by Burrows & Sharp. Using their thermodynamic data, TEA reproduces their final abundances, but with higher precision. We also applied the TEA abundance calculations to models of several hot-Jupiter exoplanets, producing expected results. TEA is written in Python in a modular format. There is a start guide, a user manual, and a code document in addition to this theory paper. TEA is available under a reproducible-research, open-source license via https://github.com/dzesmin/TEA.

  8. Why Non-Equilibrium is Different

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorfman, J. Robert; Kirkpatrick, Theodore R.; Sengers, Jan V.

    The 1970 paper, "Decay of the Velocity Correlation Function" [Phys. Rev. A1, 18 (1970), see also Phys. Rev. Lett. 18, 988, (1967)] by Berni Alder and Tom Wainwright, demonstrated, by means of computer simulations, that the velocity autocorrelation function for a particle moving diffusively in a gas of hard disks decays algebraically in time as t-1, and as t-3/2 for a gas of hard spheres. These decays appear in non-equilibrium fluids and have no counterpart in fluids in thermodynamic equilibrium. The work of Alder and Wainwright stimulated theorists to find explanations for these "long time tails" using kinetic theory or a mesoscopic mode-coupling theory. This paper has had a profound influence on our understanding of the non-equilibrium properties of fluid systems. Here we discuss the kinetic origins of the long time tails, the microscopic foundations of modecoupling theory, and the implications of these results for the physics of fluids. We also mention applications of the long time tails and mode-coupling theory to other, seemingly unrelated, fields of physics. We are honored to dedicate this short review to Berni Alder on the occasion of his 90th birthday!

  9. Bifurcated helical core equilibrium states in tokamaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, W. A.; Chapman, I. T.; Schmitz, O.; Turnbull, A. D.; Tobias, B. J.; Lazarus, E. A.; Turco, F.; Lanctot, M. J.; Evans, T. E.; Graves, J. P.; Brunetti, D.; Pfefferlé, D.; Reimerdes, H.; Sauter, O.; Halpern, F. D.; Tran, T. M.; Coda, S.; Duval, B. P.; Labit, B.; Pochelon, A.; Turnyanskiy, M. R.; Lao, L.; Luce, T. C.; Buttery, R.; Ferron, J. R.; Hollmann, E. M.; Petty, C. C.; van Zeeland, M.; Fenstermacher, M. E.; Hanson, J. M.; Lütjens, H.

    2013-07-01

    Tokamaks with weak to moderate reversed central shear in which the minimum inverse rotational transform (safety factor) qmin is in the neighbourhood of unity can trigger bifurcated magnetohydrodynamic equilibrium states, one of which is similar to a saturated ideal internal kink mode. Peaked prescribed pressure profiles reproduce the ‘snake’ structures observed in many tokamaks which has led to a novel explanation of the snake as a bifurcated equilibrium state. Snake equilibrium structures are computed in simulations of the tokamak à configuration variable (TCV), DIII-D and mega amp spherical torus (MAST) tokamaks. The internal helical deformations only weakly modulate the plasma-vacuum interface which is more sensitive to ripple and resonant magnetic perturbations. On the other hand, the external perturbations do not alter the helical core deformation in a significant manner. The confinement of fast particles in MAST simulations deteriorate with the amplitude of the helical core distortion. These three-dimensional bifurcated solutions constitute a paradigm shift that motivates the applications of tools developed for stellarator research in tokamak physics investigations.

  10. Radioactive equilibrium in ancient marine sediments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Breger, I.A.

    1955-01-01

    Radioactive equilibrium in eight marine sedimentary formations has been studied by means of direct determinations of uranium, radium and thorium. Alpha-particle counting has also been carried out in order to cross-calibrate thick-source counting techniques. The maximum deviation from radioactive equilibrium that has been noted is 11 per cent-indicating that there is probably equilibrium in all the formations analyzed. Thick-source alpha-particle counting by means of a proportional counter or an ionization chamber leads to high results when the samples contain less than about 10 p.p.m. of uranium. For samples having a higher content of uranium the results are in excellent agreement with each other and with those obtained by direct analytical techniques. The thorium contents that have been obtained correspond well to the average values reported in the literature. The uranium content of marine sediments may be appreciably higher than the average values that have been reported for sedimentary rocks. Data show that there is up to fourteen times the percentage of uranium as of thorium in the formations studied and that the percentage of thorium never exceeds that of uranium. While the proximity of a depositional environment to a land mass may influence the concentration of uranium in a marine sediment, this is not true with thorium. ?? 1955.

  11. The Dynamical Equilibrium of Galaxy Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlberg, R. G.; Yee, H. K. C.; Ellingson, E.; Morris, S. L.; Abraham, R.; Gravel, P.; Pritchet, C. J.; Smecker-Hane, T.; Hartwick, F. D. A.; Hesser, J. E.; Hutchings, J. B.; Oke, J. B.

    1997-02-01

    If a galaxy cluster is effectively in dynamical equilibrium, then all galaxy populations within the cluster must have distributions in velocity and position that individually reflect the same underlying mass distribution, although the derived virial masses can be quite different. Specifically, within the Canadian Network for Observational Cosmology cluster sample, the virial radius of the red galaxy population is, on the average, a factor of 2.05 +/- 0.34 smaller than that of the blue population. The red galaxies also have a smaller rms velocity dispersion, a factor of 1.31 +/- 0.13 within our sample. Consequently, the virial mass calculated from the blue galaxies is 3.5 +/- 1.3 times larger than from the red galaxies. However, applying the Jeans equation of stellar hydrodynamic equilibrium to the red and blue subsamples separately gives statistically identical cluster mass profiles. This is strong evidence that these clusters are effectively equilibrium systems and therefore demonstrates empirically that the masses in the virialized region are reliably estimated using dynamical techniques.

  12. Equilibrium Partitioning Sediment Benchmarks (ESBs) for the ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This document describes procedures to determine the concentrations of nonionic organic chemicals in sediment interstitial waters. In previous ESB documents, the general equilibrium partitioning (EqP) approach was chosen for the derivation of sediment benchmarks because it accounts for the varying bioavailability of chemicals in different sediments and allows for the incorporation of the appropriate biological effects concentration. This provides for the derivation of benchmarks that are causally linked to the specific chemical, applicable across sediments, and appropriately protective of benthic organisms.  This equilibrium partitioning sediment benchmark (ESB) document was prepared by scientists from the Atlantic Ecology Division, Mid-Continent Ecology Division, and Western Ecology Division, the Office of Water, and private consultants. The document describes procedures to determine the interstitial water concentrations of nonionic organic chemicals in contaminated sediments. Based on these concentrations, guidance is provided on the derivation of toxic units to assess whether the sediments are likely to cause adverse effects to benthic organisms. The equilibrium partitioning (EqP) approach was chosen because it is based on the concentrations of chemical(s) that are known to be harmful and bioavailable in the environment.  This document, and five others published over the last nine years, will be useful for the Program Offices, including Superfund, a

  13. Multi-period equilibrium/near-equilibrium in electricity markets based on locational marginal prices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia Bertrand, Raquel

    In this dissertation we propose an equilibrium procedure that coordinates the point of view of every market agent resulting in an equilibrium that simultaneously maximizes the independent objective of every market agent and satisfies network constraints. Therefore, the activities of the generating companies, consumers and an independent system operator are modeled: (1) The generating companies seek to maximize profits by specifying hourly step functions of productions and minimum selling prices, and bounds on productions. (2) The goals of the consumers are to maximize their economic utilities by specifying hourly step functions of demands and maximum buying prices, and bounds on demands. (3) The independent system operator then clears the market taking into account consistency conditions as well as capacity and line losses so as to achieve maximum social welfare. Then, we approach this equilibrium problem using complementarity theory in order to have the capability of imposing constraints on dual variables, i.e., on prices, such as minimum profit conditions for the generating units or maximum cost conditions for the consumers. In this way, given the form of the individual optimization problems, the Karush-Kuhn-Tucker conditions for the generating companies, the consumers and the independent system operator are both necessary and sufficient. The simultaneous solution to all these conditions constitutes a mixed linear complementarity problem. We include minimum profit constraints imposed by the units in the market equilibrium model. These constraints are added as additional constraints to the equivalent quadratic programming problem of the mixed linear complementarity problem previously described. For the sake of clarity, the proposed equilibrium or near-equilibrium is first developed for the particular case considering only one time period. Afterwards, we consider an equilibrium or near-equilibrium applied to a multi-period framework. This model embodies binary

  14. Barium hexaferrite (M-phase) exhibiting superstructure

    SciTech Connect

    Ganapathi, L.; Gopalakrishnan, J.; Rao, C.N.R.

    1984-05-01

    Barium hexaferrite (M-phase) prepared by the flux method is found to exhibit a ..sqrt..3a x ..sqrt..3a superstructure similar to barium hexaaluminate. Morgan and Shaw as well as Iyi et al have recently reported the formation of a barium-rich phase of barium hexaaluminate possessing a ..sqrt..3a x ..sqrt..3a superstructure of the magnetoplumbite structure. In view of the similarities between the layer structures of ..beta..-aluminas and the corresponding ferrites the authors have been carrying out electron microscopic investigations of potassium ..beta..-alumina and BaA1/sub 12/O/sub 19/ along with ferrites of similar compositions. They have obtained electron diffraction patterns of barium hexaaluminate identical to those obtained by Morgan and Shaw and Iyi et al, but more interestingly, they have found a phase of barium hexaferrite (M-phase) exhibiting the ..sqrt..3a x ..sqrt..3a superstructure.

  15. The palaeontological exhibition: a venue for dialogue.

    PubMed

    Murriello, Sandra

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the dialogue between museums and their visitors enables museums to subsist, undergo transformations and become consolidated as socially valued cultural venues. The Museo de La Plata (Argentina) was created in the late nineteenth century as a natural history museum, and this study shows that currently the museum is valued socially as a venue for family leisure and education, at which people make sense to the objects exhibited through characteristics conferred upon them by both the institution and the visitor. Nevertheless, such dialogue is somehow affected by the museographic proposal and the public interpretation of the institutional narrative, which could be analysed within the frame of contextual learning. As a consequence, the evolutionary idea that the museum aims to communicate is distorted by the public. This article highlights the importance of considering the visitors' interpretations when planning museum exhibitions, a perspective that has been rather absent in the Argentinian museums. © The Author(s) 2014.

  16. Naval Meteorology and Oceanography Command exhibit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Designed to entertain while educating, StenniSphere at the John C. Stennis Space Center in Hancock County, Miss., includes informative displays and exhibits from NASA and other agencies located at Stennis, such as this one from the Naval Meteorology and Oceanography Command. Visitors can 'travel' three-dimensionally under the sea and check on the weather back home in the Weather Center. StenniSphere is open free of charge from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. daily.

  17. Naval Meteorology and Oceanography Command exhibit entrance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    StenniSphere at NASA's John C. Stennis Space Center in Hancock County, Miss., invites visitors to discover why America comes to Stennis Space Center before going into space. Designed to entertain while educating, StenniSphere includes informative displays and exhibits from NASA and other agencies located at Stennis, such as this one from the Naval Meteorology and Oceanography Command. Visitors can 'travel' three-dimensionally under the sea and check on the weather back home in the Weather Center.

  18. 2005 Armaments Technology Seminar and Exhibition

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-06-13

    collaboration with COCOMS(s) and all JFHQ-State, takes lead and stands up JCCSE JCCSE evolves as part of the larger DoD enterprise, leveraging the GIG and...Regiment LTC Andre Kirnes, USA, Program Manager, Mortar Systems Dr. Raymond M. Bateman , Science Advisor to Commander III Corps, US Army Research Laboratory... Bateman , Science Advisor to the Commander III Corps Report from the Field Break in Exhibit Area Ms. Angela Messer, Booz Allen Hamilton Mr. Brian Newman

  19. Hidden Hyperchaotic Attractors in a Modified Lorenz-Stenflo System with Only One Stable Equilibrium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Zhouchao; Zhang, Wei

    This paper reports the finding of a four-dimensional (4D) non-Sil'nikov autonomous system with three quadratic nonlinearities, which exhibits some behavior previously unobserved: hidden hyperchaotic attractors with only one stable equilibrium. The algebraical form of the non-Sil'nikov chaotic attractor is very similar to the hyperchaotic Lorenz-Stenflo system but they are different and, in fact, nonequivalent in topological structures. Of particular interest is the fact this system has only one stable equilibrium, but can exhibit hidden hyperchaos, chaos, periodic orbit. Moreover, the coexistence of attracting sets can be obtained in the system for some parameter values and different initial conditions, such as hyperchaotic attractor and point, hyperchaotic attractor and period orbit. To further analyze the new system, the ultimate bound and positively invariant set for the modified hyperchaotic Lorenz-Stenflo system are also obtained. Moreover, the complete mathematical characterizations for 4D Hopf bifurcation are rigorously derived and studied.

  20. Non-equilibrium steady states in two-temperature Ising models with Kawasaki dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borchers, Nick; Pleimling, Michel; Zia, R. K. P.

    2013-03-01

    From complex biological systems to a simple simmering pot, thermodynamic systems held out of equilibrium are exceedingly common in nature. Despite this, a general theory to describe these types of phenomena remains elusive. In this talk, we explore a simple modification of the venerable Ising model in hopes of shedding some light on these issues. In both one and two dimensions, systems attached to two distinct heat reservoirs exhibit many of the hallmarks of phase transition. When such systems settle into a non-equilibrium steady-state they exhibit numerous interesting phenomena, including an unexpected ``freezing by heating.'' There are striking and surprising similarities between the behavior of these systems in one and two dimensions, but also intriguing differences. These phenomena will be explored and possible approaches to understanding the behavior will be suggested. Supported by the US National Science Foundation through Grants DMR-0904999, DMR-1205309, and DMR-1244666