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Sample records for existing microscopic skyrme

  1. Sub-barrier fusion of stable and unstable nuclei with a microscopic interaction and Skyrme-Hartree-Fock densities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rashdan, M.

    2013-08-01

    The fusion cross sections, barrier, and spin distributions of stable and unstable nuclei are investigated through a coupled-channel approach using a density and energy-dependent effective Brueckner G-matrix interaction. Calculations are carried out for the fusion reactions 16,18,20,22,24O+58Ni and 28Si+58,62,64Ni. Microscopic Skyrme-Hartree-Fock proton and neutron density distributions are used in the calculations. It is found that the energy dependence of the interaction potential enhances the fusion cross section, where it increases with increasing energy due to the decrease in the interaction barrier. The density dependence of the interaction is found to be of great importance, especially for unstable nuclei, since it directly relates the fusion cross section with the nuclear structure. The effect of the neutron skin is found to largely increase the fusion cross section and spin distribution due to the increase in the overlap region. The coupling to the inelastic excited states strongly enhances the fusion cross sections. The effect of the difference between the nuclear and charge deformations is also investigated.

  2. Sub-barrier fusion calculations for the neutron star crust using the microscopic Brueckner G -matrix and Skyrme energy density functionals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rashdan, M.

    2015-05-01

    Sub-barrier fusion cross sections for reactions involving stable and very neutron-rich nuclei, which may be important in determining the composition and heating of the crust of accreting neutron stars, are calculated using internuclear potentials derived from the microscopic Brueckner G -matrix and Skyrme SKM* and SLy4 energy density functionals. Microscopic Skyrme-Hartree-Fock proton and neutron density distributions are used. No parameters have been fit to fusion data. Calculations are performed for the isotopic reactions 16O+16O,16O+24O,16O+28O,24O+24O,12C+16O,12C+24O , and 12C+12C , which are of great astrophysical importance for the understanding of the time scale and the nucleosynthesis during late stellar evolution. The coupling to the low lying excited states is considered through the ccfull code. I compare my results with the time-dependent-Hartree-Fock calculations and with the São Paulo model as well as the experimental data. I found a remarkable agreement with the fusion cross sections for stable nuclei.

  3. The Skyrme Model in the BPS Limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adam, C.; Naya, C.; Sánchez-Guillén, J.; Vazquez, R.; Wereszczyński, A.

    In this review, we summarize the main features of the BPS Skyrme model which provides a physically well-motivated idealization of atomic nuclei and nuclear matter: (1) it leads to zero binding energies for classical solitons (while realistic binding energies emerge owing to the semiclassical corrections, the Coulomb interaction and isospin breaking); (2) it describes a perfect non-barotropic fluid already at the microscopic (field theoretical) level which allows to study thermodynamics beyond the mean-field limit. These properties allow for an approximate but analytical calculation of binding energies of the most abundant nuclei, for a determination of the equation of state of skyrmionic matter (both in the full field theory and in a mean-field approximation) as well as the description of neutron stars as Skyrme solitons with a very good agreement with available observational data. All these results suggest that the proper low energy effective model of QCD should be close to the BPS Skyrme model in a certain sense (a "near-BPS Skyrme model"), with a prominent role played by the BPS part.

  4. Properties of the Skyrme soliton configuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ananias Neto, Jorge; Galain, Ramón Méndez; Ferreira, Erasmo

    1991-07-01

    Properties of the Euler-Lagrange differential equation for cos F, where F is the chiral angle of the classical Skyrme soliton in the hedgehog ansatz, are investigated. The power series solution for y=cos F, is obtained that presents the behavior of an almost geometric series, and the existence of single poles located at imaginary values of the radial variable r is shown. Padé approximants are built to the series expansion about the origin, and its terms are modified in order to incorporate the main features of the asymptotic behavior of the field configuration. Thus rational fractions are constructed which provide very good and practical analytical representations of the Skyrme soliton profile function.

  5. Wormholes in the Skyrme model

    SciTech Connect

    Iwazaki, A. )

    1990-05-15

    We present wormhole solutions in the Skyrme model coupled with gravity. The wormholes have topological numbers which are identical to those of Skyrmions; they are baryon numbers. We discuss the physical implications of the wormholes.

  6. Conservation laws in Skyrme-type models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adam, C.; Sánchez-Guillén, J.; Wereszczyński, A.

    2007-03-01

    The zero curvature representation of Zakharov and Shabat [V. E. Zakharov and A. B. Shabat, Soviet Phys. JETP 34, 62 (1972)] has been generalized recently to higher dimensions and has been used to construct nonlinear field theories which are integrable or contain integrable submodels. The Skyrme model, for instance, contains an integrable subsector with infinitely many conserved currents, and the simplest Skyrmion with baryon number 1 belongs to this subsector. Here we use a related method, based on the geometry of target space, to construct a whole class of theories which are integrable or contain integrable subsectors (where integrability means the existence of infinitely many conservation laws). These models have three-dimensional target space, like the Skyrme model, and their infinitely many conserved currents turn out to be Noether currents of the volume-preserving diffeomorphisms on target space. Specifically for the Skyrme model, we find both weak and strong integrability conditions, where the conserved currents form a subset of the algebra of volume-preserving diffeomorphisms in both cases, but this subset is a subalgebra only for the weak integrable submodel.

  7. Metastability of solitons in a generalized Skyrme model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pottinger, D. E. L.; Rathske, E.

    1986-04-01

    We consider soliton solutions in the generalized chirally symmetric Skyrme model which includes, in addition to the usual commutator term, a symmetric term of fourth order in the field derivatives. The classical energy of static hedgehog field configurations is determined numerically as a function of the angle characterizing the relative contribution of these two terms. Next to the Skyrme combination, we find a region where numerical solutions either are metastable (due to the energy being unbounded from below) or do not exist at all. We also study the exact quantization of the isorotational collective coordinates. Our conclusion is that, demanding consistency with meson phenomenology for the signs of the parameters, the model discussed in this paper can lead to reliable physical results only for small deviations from Skyrme's original stabilizing term.

  8. A gauged baby Skyrme model and a novel BPS bound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adam, C.; Naya, C.; Sanchez-Guillen, J.; Wereszczynski, A.

    2013-02-01

    The baby Skyrme model is a well-known nonlinear field theory supporting topological solitons in two space dimensions. Its action functional consist of a potential term, a kinetic term quadratic in derivatives (the "nonlinear sigma model term") and the Skyrme term quartic in first derivatives. The limiting case of vanishing sigma model term (the so-called BPS baby Skyrme model) is known to support exact soliton solutions saturating a BPS bound which exists for this model. Further, the BPS model has infinitely many symmetries and conservation laws. Recently it was found that the gauged version of the BPS baby Skyrme model with gauge group U(1) and the usual Maxwell term, too, has a BPS bound and BPS solutions saturating this bound. This BPS bound is determined by a superpotential which has to obey a superpotential equation, in close analogy to the situation in supergravity. Further, the BPS bound and the corresponding BPS solitons only may exist for potentials such that the superpotential equation has a global solution. We also briefly describe some properties of soliton solutions.

  9. Skyrme tensor force in heavy ion collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stevenson, P. D.; Suckling, E. B.; Fracasso, S.; Barton, M. C.; Umar, A. S.

    2016-05-01

    Background: It is generally acknowledged that the time-dependent Hartree-Fock (TDHF) method provides a useful foundation for a fully microscopic many-body theory of low-energy heavy ion reactions. The TDHF method is also known in nuclear physics in the small-amplitude domain, where it provides a useful description of collective states, and is based on the mean-field formalism, which has been a relatively successful approximation to the nuclear many-body problem. Currently, the TDHF theory is being widely used in the study of fusion excitation functions, fission, and deep-inelastic scattering of heavy mass systems, while providing a natural foundation for many other studies. Purpose: With the advancement of computational power it is now possible to undertake TDHF calculations without any symmetry assumptions and incorporate the major strides made by the nuclear structure community in improving the energy density functionals used in these calculations. In particular, time-odd and tensor terms in these functionals are naturally present during the dynamical evolution, while being absent or minimally important for most static calculations. The parameters of these terms are determined by the requirement of Galilean invariance or local gauge invariance but their significance for the reaction dynamics have not been fully studied. This work addresses this question with emphasis on the tensor force. Method: The full version of the Skyrme force, including terms arising only from the Skyrme tensor force, is applied to the study of collisions within a completely symmetry-unrestricted TDHF implementation. Results: We examine the effect on upper fusion thresholds with and without the tensor force terms and find an effect on the fusion threshold energy of the order several MeV. Details of the distribution of the energy within terms in the energy density functional are also discussed. Conclusions: Terms in the energy density functional linked to the tensor force can play a non

  10. Baby Skyrme models without a potential term

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashcroft, Jennifer; Haberichter, Mareike; Krusch, Steffen

    2015-05-01

    We develop a one-parameter family of static baby Skyrme models that do not require a potential term to admit topological solitons. This is a novel property as the standard baby Skyrme model must contain a potential term in order to have stable soliton solutions, though the Skyrme model does not require this. Our new models satisfy an energy bound that is linear in terms of the topological charge and can be saturated in an extreme limit. They also satisfy a virial theorem that is shared by the Skyrme model. We calculate the solitons of our new models numerically and observe that their form depends significantly on the choice of parameter. In one extreme, we find compactons while at the other there is a scale invariant model in which solitons can be obtained exactly as solutions to a Bogomolny equation. We provide an initial investigation into these solitons and compare them with the baby Skyrmions of other models.

  11. Topological solitons in the supersymmetric Skyrme model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gudnason, Sven Bjarke; Nitta, Muneto; Sasaki, Shin

    2017-01-01

    A supersymmetric extension of the Skyrme model was obtained recently, which consists of only the Skyrme term in the Nambu-Goldstone (pion) sector complemented by the same number of quasi-Nambu-Goldstone bosons. Scherk-Schwarz dimensional reduction yields a kinetic term in three or lower dimensions and a potential term in two dimensions, preserving supersymmetry. Euclidean solitons (instantons) are constructed in the supersymmetric Skyrme model. In four dimensions, the soliton is an instanton first found by Speight. Scherk-Schwarz dimensional reduction is then performed once to get a 3-dimensional theory in which a 3d Skyrmion-instanton is found and then once more to get a 2d theory in which a 2d vortex-instanton is obtained. Although the last one is a global vortex it has finite action in contrast to conventional theory. All of them are non-BPS states breaking all supersymmetries.

  12. Gamow-Teller strength and the spin-isospin coupling constants of the Skyrme energy functional

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bender, M.; Dobaczewski, J.; Engel, J.; Nazarewicz, W.

    2002-05-01

    We investigate the effects of the spin-isospin channel of the Skyrme energy functional on predictions for Gamow-Teller distributions and superdeformed rotational bands. We use the generalized Skyrme interaction SkO' to describe even-even ground states and then analyze the effects of time-odd spin-isospin couplings, first term by term and then together via linear regression. Some terms affect the strength and energy of the Gamow-Teller resonance in finite nuclei without altering the Landau parameter g'0 that to leading order determines spin-isospin properties of nuclear matter. Though the existing data are not sufficient to uniquely determine all the spin-isospin couplings, we are able to fit them locally. Altering these coupling constants does not change the quality with which the Skyrme functional describes rotational bands.

  13. Search for the Skyrme-Hartree-Fock solutions for chiral rotation in N=75 isotones

    SciTech Connect

    Olbratowski, P.; Dobaczewski, J.; Dudek, J.

    2006-05-15

    A search for self-consistent solutions for the chiral rotational bands in the N=75 isotones {sup 130}Cs, {sup 132}La, {sup 134}Pr, and {sup 136}Pm is performed within the Skyrme-Hartree-Fock cranking approach using SKM* and SLy4 parametrizations. The dependence of the solutions on the time-odd contributions in the energy functional is studied. From among the four isotones considered, self-consistent chiral solutions are obtained only in {sup 132}La. The microscopic calculations are compared with the {sup 132}La experimental data and with results of a classical model that contains all the mechanisms underlying the chirality of the collective rotational motion. Strong similarities between the Hartree-Fock and classical model results are found. The suggestion formulated earlier by the authors that the chiral rotation cannot exist below a certain critical frequency is further illustrated and discussed, together with the microscopic origin of a transition from planar to chiral rotation in nuclei. We also formulate the separability rule by which the tilted-axis-cranking solutions can be inferred from three independent principal-axis-cranking solutions corresponding to three different axes of rotation.

  14. Eigenenergies of fermions bound in Skyrme fields

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, M. ); Hiller, J.R.

    1989-08-15

    A numerical method is applied to the calculation of bound-state energies of fermions in Skyrme fields. The models considered for the field are smoothed one- and two-step wells and a numerical approximation to the exact hedgehog soliton. The results for the smoothed wells confirm earlier work that showed the fermion spectrum to be sensitive to local variations in the Skyrme field. The spectrum for the hedgehog Skyrmion is similar to the spectra obtained by others for linear and exponential models.

  15. Breathing mode in the extended Skyrme model

    SciTech Connect

    Abada, A.; Merabet, H. )

    1993-09-01

    We study an extended Skyrme model which includes fourth- and sixth-order terms. We explore some static properties such as the [Delta]-nucleon mass splitting and investigate the Skyrmion breathing mode in the framework of the linear response theory. We find that the monopole response function has a pronounced peak located at [similar to]400 MeV, which we identify as the Roper resonance [ital N](1440). As compared to the standard one, the extended Skyrme model provides a more accurate description of baryon properties.

  16. Towards the establishment of nonlinear hidden symmetries of the Skyrme model

    SciTech Connect

    Herrera-Aguilar, A.; Kanakoglou, K.; Paschalis, J. E.

    2006-09-25

    We present a preliminary attempt to establish the existence of hidden nonlinear symmetries of the SU(N) Skyrme model which could, in principle, lead to the further integration of the system. An explicit illustration is given for the SU(2) symmetry group.

  17. Skyrme-Einstein closed cosmic chiral strings

    SciTech Connect

    Rybakov, Yu. P. Ivanova, I. S.

    2007-07-15

    Within the theory of general relativity, the configuration of a closed string (vortex) characterized by a topological charge of the degree type is described for the Skyrme-Einstein SU (2) chiral model. In the approximation of a large vortex-closure radius (a), a solution to equations of motion is obtained, along with estimates for the vortex energy and radius.

  18. Two-current nucleon observables in Skyrme model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chemtob, Marc

    1987-11-01

    Three independent two-current nucléon observables are studied within the two-flavor Skyrme model for the παω system. The effective lagrangian is that of the gauged chiral symmetry approach, consistent with the vector meson dominance, in the linear realization (for the vector mesons) of the global chiral symmetry. The first application deals with the nucleon electric polarizability and magnetic susceptibilty. Both seagull and dispersive contributions appear and we evaluate the latter in terms of the sums over intermediate states. The results are compared with existing quark model results as well as with empirical determinations. The second application concerns the zero-point quantum correction to the skyrmion mass. We apply a chiral perturbation theory approach to evaluate the pion loop contribution to the nucleon mass. The comparison with the conventional Skyrme model result reveals an important sensitivity to the stabilization mechanism. The third application is to lepton-nucleon deep inelastic scattering in the Bjorken scaling limit. The structure tensor is calculated in terms of the representation as a commutator product of two currents. Numerical results are presented for the scaling function F2( x). An essential use is made of the large Nc. (number of colors) approximation in all these applications. In the numerical computations we ignore the distortion effects, relative to the free plane wave limit, on the pionic fluctuations.

  19. Exotic Baryon Resonances in the Skyrme Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diakonov, Dmitri; Petrov, Victor

    We outline how one can understand the Skyrme model from the modern perspective. We review the quantization of the SU(3) rotations of the Skyrmion, leading to the exotic baryons that cannot be made of three quarks. It is shown that in the limit of large number of colors the lowest-mass exotic baryons can be studied from the kaon-Skyrmion scattering amplitudes, an approach known after Callan and Klebanov. We follow this approach and find, both analytically and numerically, a strong Θ+ resonance in the scattering amplitude that is traced to the rotational mode. The Skyrme model does predict an exotic resonance Θ+ but grossly overestimates the width. To understand better the factors affecting the width, it is computed by several methods giving, however, identical results. In particular, we show that insofar as the width is small, it can be found from the transition axial constant. The physics leading to a narrow Θ+ resonance is briefly reviewed and affirmed.

  20. Microscopically-Based Energy Density Functionals for Nuclei Using the Density Matrix Expansion. I: Implementation and Pre-Optimization

    SciTech Connect

    Stoitsov, M. V.; Kortelainen, Erno M; Bogner, S. K.; Duguet, T.; Furnstahl, R. J.; Gebremariam, B.; Schunck, N.

    2010-01-01

    In a recent series of papers, Gebremariam, Bogner, and Duguet derived a microscopically-based nuclear energy density functional by applying the Density Matrix Expansion (DME) to the Hartree-Fock energy obtained from chiral effective field theory (EFT) two- and three-nucleon interactions. Due to the structure of the chiral interactions, each coupling in the DME functional is given as the sum of a coupling constant arising from zero-range contact interactions and a coupling function of the density arising from the finite-range pion exchanges. Since the contact contributions have essentially the same structure as those entering empirical Skyrme functionals, a microscopically guided Skyrme phenomenology has been suggested in which the contact terms in the DME functional are released for optimization to finite-density observables to capture short-range correlation energy contributions from beyond Hartree-Fock. The present paper is the first attempt to assess the ability of the newly suggested DME functional, which has a much richer set of density dependencies than traditional Skyrme functionals, to generate sensible and stable results for nuclear applications. The results of the first proof-of-principle calculations are given, and numerous practical issues related to the implementation of the new functional in existing Skyrme codes are discussed. Using a restricted singular value decomposition (SVD) optimization procedure, it is found that the new DME functional gives numerically stable results and exhibits a small but systematic reduction in {chi}^{2} compared to standard Skyrme functionals, thus justifying its suitability for future global optimizations and large-scale calculations.

  1. Microscopically based energy density functionals for nuclei using the density matrix expansion: Implementation and pre-optimization

    SciTech Connect

    Stoitsov, M.; Kortelainen, M.; Schunck, N.; Bogner, S. K.; Gebremariam, B.; Duguet, T.

    2010-11-15

    In a recent series of articles, Gebremariam, Bogner, and Duguet derived a microscopically based nuclear energy density functional by applying the density matrix expansion (DME) to the Hartree-Fock energy obtained from chiral effective field theory two- and three-nucleon interactions. Owing to the structure of the chiral interactions, each coupling in the DME functional is given as the sum of a coupling constant arising from zero-range contact interactions and a coupling function of the density arising from the finite-range pion exchanges. Because the contact contributions have essentially the same structure as those entering empirical Skyrme functionals, a microscopically guided Skyrme phenomenology has been suggested in which the contact terms in the DME functional are released for optimization to finite-density observables to capture short-range correlation energy contributions from beyond Hartree-Fock. The present article is the first attempt to assess the ability of the newly suggested DME functional, which has a much richer set of density dependencies than traditional Skyrme functionals, to generate sensible and stable results for nuclear applications. The results of the first proof-of-principle calculations are given, and numerous practical issues related to the implementation of the new functional in existing Skyrme codes are discussed. Using a restricted singular value decomposition optimization procedure, it is found that the new DME functional gives numerically stable results and exhibits a small but systematic reduction of our test {chi}{sup 2} function compared to standard Skyrme functionals, thus justifying its suitability for future global optimizations and large-scale calculations.

  2. BPS submodels of the Skyrme model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adam, C.; Sanchez-Guillen, J.; Wereszczynski, A.

    2017-06-01

    We show that the standard Skyrme model without pion mass term can be expressed as a sum of two BPS submodels, i.e., of two models whose static field equations, independently, can be reduced to first order equations. Further, these first order (BPS) equations have nontrivial solutions, at least locally. These two submodels, however, cannot have common solutions. Our findings also shed some light on the rational map approximation. Finally, we consider certain generalisations of the BPS submodels.

  3. Exact kink solitons in Skyrme crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Shouxin; Li, Yijun; Yang, Yisong

    2014-01-01

    We present an explicit integration of the kink soliton equation obtained in a recent interesting study of the classical Skyrme model where the field configurations are of a generalized hedgehog form which is of a domain-wall type. We also show that in such a reduced one-dimensional setting the first-order and second-order equations are equivalent. Consequently, in such a context, all finite-energy solitons are Bogomolnyi-Prasad-Sommerfield type and precisely known.

  4. Immunoelectron Microscopic Studies Indicate the Existence of a Cell Shape Preserving Cytoskeleton in Prokaryotes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayer, F.; Vogt, B.; Poc, C.

    1998-06-01

    , Ralstonia eutropha, Thermoanaerobacterium thermosulfurigenes, T. thermosaccharolyticum, and Methanococcus jannaschii. Substantial label also in the cytoplasm was observed in Bacillus sp., Methanococcus voltae, and Methanobacterium thermoautotrophicum. Only very minor amounts of label were found in the nucleoid region of the cells. Whole-mount immunogold studies, combined with negative staining, revealed the existence of an intracellular network of fibrils which could be labeled by anti-actin antibodies. This network is assumed to be located below the cytoplasmic membrane all around the cytoplasm. It appears to have properties that would allow its function as a cytoskeletonlike structure preserving cell shape.

  5. Towards Skyrmion stars: Large baryon configurations in the Einstein-Skyrme model

    SciTech Connect

    Piette, Bernard M. A. G.; Probert, Gavin I.

    2007-06-15

    We investigate the large baryon number sector of the Einstein-Skyrme model as a possible model for baryon stars. Gravitating hedgehog skyrmions have been investigated previously and the existence of stable solitonic stars excluded due to energy considerations [P. Bizon and T. Chmaj, Phys. Lett. B 297, 55 (1992).]. However, in this paper we demonstrate that by generating gravitating Skyrmions using rational maps, we can achieve multibaryon bound states while recovering spherical symmetry in the limit where B becomes large.

  6. The decay of Hopf solitons in the Skyrme model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foster, David

    2017-10-01

    It is understood that the Skyrme model has a topologically interesting baryonic excitation which can model nuclei. So far no stable knotted solutions, of the Skyrme model, have been found. Here we investigate the dynamics of Hopf solitons decaying to the vacuum solution in the Skyrme model. In doing this we develop a matrix-free numerical method to identify the minimum eigenvalue of the Hessian of the corresponding energy functional. We also show that as isospinning Hopf solitons decay, they emit a cloud of isospinning radiation.

  7. Stability of quantized chiral soliton with the Skyrme term

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sawada, Shoji; Yang, Keyan

    1991-09-01

    Stability of the chiral soliton with the Skyrme term that is quantized by taking account of breathing modes in addition to the spin-isospin rotation is examined on the basis of a family of trial functions for the profile function of the hedgehog ansatz. It is shown that when the effects of the Skyrme term are sufficiently strong (small Skyrme term constant e), the eigenstates of lower spin-isospin are stable, having finite contributions both from the rotational and breathing modes. On the other hand when the effects of the Skyrme term are weak (e>5), the spin-isospin rotational and the breathing modes are completely frozen and all states tend to infinitely degenerate states labeled by the constant SU(2) matrices.

  8. Stability of quantized chiral soliton with the Skyrme term

    SciTech Connect

    Sawada, S.; Yang, K. )

    1991-09-01

    Stability of the chiral soliton with the Skyrme term that is quantized by taking account of breathing modes in addition to the spin-isospin rotation is examined on the basis of a family of trial functions for the profile function of the hedgehog ansatz. It is shown that when the effects of the Skyrme term are sufficiently strong (small Skyrme term constant {ital e}), the eigenstates of lower spin-isospin are stable, having finite contributions both from the rotational and breathing modes. On the other hand when the effects of the Skyrme term are weak ({ital e}{gt}5), the spin-isospin rotational and the breathing modes are completely frozen and all states tend to infinitely degenerate states labeled by the constant SU(2) matrices.

  9. Perturbative quantization of the breathing mode in the Skyrme model

    SciTech Connect

    Kostyuk, A.P.; Kobushkin, A.P.; Chepilko, N.M.

    1995-08-01

    A detailed analysis of the quantization of the breathing mode in the Skyrme model is presented. It is shown that breathing strongly affects the behavior of the chiral angle of the hedgehog-like soliton. 7 refs.

  10. Skyrme black holes in the isolated horizons formalism

    SciTech Connect

    Nielsen, Alex B.

    2006-08-15

    We study static, spherically symmetric, Skyrme black holes in the context of the assumption that they can be viewed as bound states between ordinary bare black holes and solitons. This assumption and results stemming from the isolated horizons formalism lead to several conjectures about the static black hole solutions. These conjectures are tested against the Skyrme black hole solutions. It is shown that, while there is in general good agreement with the conjectures, a crucial aspect seems to violate one of the conjectures.

  11. Kantowski-Sachs universes sourced by a Skyrme fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parisi, Luca; Radicella, Ninfa; Vilasi, Gaetano

    2015-03-01

    The Kantowski-Sachs cosmological model sourced by a Skyrme field and a cosmological constant is considered in the framework of general relativity. Assuming a constant radial profile function α =π /2 for the hedgehog ansatz, the Skyrme contribution to Einstein equations is shown to be equivalent to an anisotropic fluid. Using dynamical system techniques, a qualitative analysis of the cosmological equations is presented. Physically interesting features of the model such as isotropization, bounce and recollapse are discussed.

  12. Gauged baby Skyrme model with a Chern-Simons term

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samoilenka, A.; Shnir, Ya.

    2017-02-01

    The properties of the multisoliton solutions of the (2 +1 )-dimensional Maxwell-Chern-Simons-Skyrme model are investigated numerically. Coupling to the Chern-Simons term allows for existence of the electrically charge solitons which may also carry magnetic fluxes. Two particular choices of the potential term is considered: (i) the weakly bounded potential and (ii) the double vacuum potential. In the absence of gauge interaction in the former case the individual constituents of the multisoliton configuration are well separated, while in the latter case the rotational invariance of the configuration remains unbroken. It is shown that coupling of the planar multi-Skyrmions to the electric and magnetic field strongly affects the pattern of interaction between the constituents. We analyze the dependency of the structure of the solutions, the energies, angular momenta, electric and magnetic fields of the configurations on the gauge coupling constant g , and the electric potential. It is found that, generically, the coupling to the Chern-Simons term strongly affects the usual pattern of interaction between the skyrmions, in particular the electric repulsion between the solitons may break the multisoliton configuration into partons. We show that as the gauge coupling becomes strong, both the magnetic flux and the electric charge of the solutions become quantized although they are not topological numbers.

  13. A higher-order Skyrme model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gudnason, Sven Bjarke; Nitta, Muneto

    2017-09-01

    We propose a higher-order Skyrme model with derivative terms of eighth, tenth and twelfth order. Our construction yields simple and easy-to-interpret higher-order Lagrangians. We first show that a Skyrmion with higher-order terms proposed by Marleau has an instability in the form of a baby-Skyrmion string, while the static energies of our construction are positive definite, implying stability against time-independent perturbations. However, we also find that the Hamiltonians of our construction possess two kinds of dynamical instabilities, which may indicate the instability with respect to time-dependent perturbations. Different from the well-known Ostrogradsky instability, the instabilities that we find are intrinsically of nonlinear nature and also due to the fact that even powers of the inverse metric gives a ghost-like higher-order kinetic-like term. The vacuum state is, however, stable. Finally, we show that at sufficiently low energies, our Hamiltonians in the simplest cases, are stable against time-dependent perturbations.

  14. Exact self-duality in a modified Skyrme model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferreira, L. A.

    2017-07-01

    We propose a modification of the Skyrme model that supports a self-dual sector possessing exact non-trivial finite energy solutions. The action of such a theory possesses the usual quadratic and quartic terms in field derivatives, but the couplings of the components of the Maurer-Cartan form of the Skyrme model is made by a non-constant symmetric matrix, instead of the usual Killing form of the SU(2) Lie algebra. The introduction of such a matrix make the self-duality equations conformally invariant in three space dimensions, even though it may break the global internal symmetries of the original Skyrme model. For the case where that matrix is proportional to the identity we show that the theory possesses exact self-dual Skyrmions of unity topological charges.

  15. Bimodal Fission in the Skyrme-Hartree-Fock Approach

    SciTech Connect

    Staszczak, A.; Dobaczewski, J.; Nazarewicz, Witold

    2007-01-01

    Spontaneous fission properties of 256Fm, 258Fm, and 260Fm isotopes are studied within the Skyrme-Hartree-Fock+BCS framework. In the particle-hole channel we take the Skyrme SkM* effective force, while in the particle-particle channel we employ the seniority pairing interaction. Three static fission paths for all investigated heavy fermium isotopes are found. The analysis of these fission modes allows to describe observed asymmetric fission of 256Fm, as well as bimodal fission of 258Fm and symmetric fission in 260Fm.

  16. Structure of topological solitons in the Skyrme model

    SciTech Connect

    Kozhevnikov, I.R.; Rybakov, Yu.P.; Fomin, M.B.

    1988-12-01

    The types of invariant configurations admitted by the field equations in four-dimensional SU(2) chiral models are studied. It is shown that in the Skyrme model in the second and higher homotopy classes the fields that realize an absolute minimum of the energy are axisymmetric, while those in the first class are spherically symmetric.

  17. Spin-isospin and pairing properties of modified Skyrme interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Giai, Nguyen; Sagawa, H.

    1981-11-01

    New sets of parameters for Skyrme interactions have been determined. In addition to the ground-state properties, they give satisfactory values for the compression modulus, spin and spin-isospin Landau parameters, and pairing matrix elements. Gamow-Teller states are calculated and compared with experimental data.

  18. Tensor Part of the Skyrme Energy Density Functional. II: Deformation Properties of Magic and Semi-Magic Nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Bender, M.; Bennaceur, K.; Duguet, T.; Heenen, P.-H.; Lesinski, Thomas; Meyer, J.

    2009-01-01

    We study systematically the impact of the time-even tensor terms of the Skyrme energy density functional, i.e., terms bilinear in the spin-current tensor density, on deformation properties of closed-shell nuclei corresponding to 20, 28, 40, 50, 82, and 126 neutron or proton shell closures. We compare results obtained with three different families of Skyrme parameterizations whose tensor terms have been adjusted on properties of spherical nuclei(i)TIJ interactions proposed in the first paper of this series [T. Lesinski et al., Phys. Rev. C 76, 014312 (2007)] which were constructed through a complete readjustment of the rest of the functional (ii) parameterizations whose tensor terms have been added perturbatively to existing Skyrme interactions, with or without readjusting the spin-orbit coupling constant. We analyze in detail the mechanisms at play behind the impact of tensor terms on deformation properties and how studying the latter can help screen out unrealistic parameterizations. It is expected that findings of the present paper are, to a large extent, independent of remaining deficiencies of the central and spin-orbit interactions, and will be of great value for the construction of future improved energy functionals.

  19. Probing the role of Skyrme interactions on the fission dynamics of the 6Li + 238U reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Ishita; Kumar, Raj; Sharma, Manoj K.

    2017-06-01

    The performance of selected five Skyrme forces (out of a set of 240), tested by Dutra et al., is analyzed in view of fusion-fission dynamics. These forces are assumed to perform better for neutron-rich systems, so the choice of the reaction is accordingly made by opting for a neutron-rich target in 6Li + 238U reaction. This reaction is diagnosed further in reference to fusion hindrance within the dynamical approach of the cluster-decay model (DCM). In order to reduce the computational time, three Skyrme forces are figured out with the criteria that these forces cover the barrier characteristics of the remaining two forces as well. The fission cross-sections are successfully addressed at low energies for the 6Li + 238U reaction. However, at relatively higher energies, the excitation functions show theoretical suppression with respect to experimental data, which may be associated with the possible existence of incomplete fusion (ICF). For ICF, we have considered that the 6Li broke into 4He + 2H, as mentioned in the experimental work. The calculations of ICF are carried out for the 4He + 238U reaction with the selected Skyrme forces at E_{c.m.} = 26.20 and 27.51 MeV. These forces address the data nicely for the compound nucleus (CN) as well as ICF processes. Here, the NRAPR force seems to require lesser barrier modification as compared to the other forces, therefore it can be used as an alternate choice for calculating the interaction potential. Additionally, the prediction of cross-sections at lower energies has been done with DCM using the NRAPR force. The ℓ-dependent % barrier modification of the Skyrme forces undertaken is also worked out in reference to fusion hindrance at below barrier energies.

  20. Genesis and evolution of the Skyrme model from 1954 to the present

    SciTech Connect

    San Yuk, V.I. . Dept. of Physics)

    1992-01-10

    Not widely known facts on the genesis of the Skyrme model are presented in a historical survey, based on Skyrme's earliest papers and on his own published remembrance. This paper considers the evolution of Skyrme's model description of nuclear matter from the Mesonic Fluid model up to its final version, known as the baryon model. We pay special tribute to some well-known ideas in contemporary particle physics which one can find in Skyrme's earlier papers, such as: Nuclear Democracy, the Solitonic Mechanism, the Nonlinear Realization of Chiral Symmetry, Topological Charges, Fermi-Bose Transmutations, etc. It is curious to note in the final version of the Skyrme model gleams of Kelvin's Vortex Atoms theory. In conclusion we make a brief analysis of the validity of Skyrme's conjectures in view of recent results and pinpoint some questions which still remain.

  1. Exploration of a modified density dependence in the Skyrme functional

    SciTech Connect

    Erler, J.; Reinhard, P.-G.; Kluepfel, P.

    2010-10-15

    A variant of the basic Skyrme-Hartree-Fock functional is considered dealing with a new form of density dependence. It employs only integer powers and thus will allow a more sound basis for projection schemes (particle number, angular momentum). We optimize the new functional with exactly the same adjustment strategy as used in an earlier study with a standard Skyrme functional. This allows direct comparisons of the performance of the new functional relative to the standard one. We discuss various observables: bulk properties of finite nuclei, nuclear matter, giant resonances, superheavy elements, and energy systematics. The new functional performs at least as well as the standard one, but offers a wider range of applicability (e.g., for projection) and more flexibility in the regime of high densities.

  2. Generalized Skyrme model with the loosely bound potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gudnason, Sven Bjarke; Zhang, Baiyang; Ma, Nana

    2016-12-01

    We study a generalization of the loosely bound Skyrme model which consists of the Skyrme model with a sixth-order derivative term—motivated by its fluidlike properties—and the second-order loosely bound potential—motivated by lowering the classical binding energies of higher-charged Skyrmions. We use the rational map approximation for the Skyrmion of topological charge B =4 , calculate the binding energy of the latter, and estimate the systematic error in using this approximation. In the parameter space that we can explore within the rational map approximation, we find classical binding energies as low as 1.8%, and once taking into account the contribution from spin-isospin quantization, we obtain binding energies as low as 5.3%. We also calculate the contribution from the sixth-order derivative term to the electric charge density and axial coupling.

  3. Isovector response function of hot nuclear matter with Skyrme interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Braghin, F.L.; Vautherin, D.; Abada, A.

    1995-11-01

    We investigate the role of the effective nucleon-nucleon interaction in the description of giant dipole resonances in hot nuclei. For this purpose we calculate the response function of hot nuclear matter to a small isovector external perturbation using various effective Skyrme interactions. We find that for Skyrme forces with an effective mass close to unity an undamped zero sound mode occurs at zero temperature. This mode gives rise in finite nuclei (calculated via the Steinwedel-Jenssen model) to a resonance whose energy agrees with the observed value. We find that zero sound disappears at a temperature of a few MeV, leaving only a broad peak in the dipole strength. For Skyrme forces with a small value of the effective mass (0.4), there is no zero sound at zero temperature but only a weak peak located too high in energy. The strength distribution in this case is nearly independent of temperature and shows small collective effects. The relevance of these results for the saturation of photon multiplicities observed in recent experiments is pointed out.

  4. Integrability and chemical potential in the (3 + 1)-dimensional Skyrme model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alvarez, P. D.; Canfora, F.; Dimakis, N.; Paliathanasis, A.

    2017-10-01

    Using a remarkable mapping from the original (3 + 1)dimensional Skyrme model to the Sine-Gordon model, we construct the first analytic examples of Skyrmions as well as of Skyrmions-anti-Skyrmions bound states within a finite box in 3 + 1 dimensional flat space-time. An analytic upper bound on the number of these Skyrmions-anti-Skyrmions bound states is derived. We compute the critical isospin chemical potential beyond which these Skyrmions cease to exist. With these tools, we also construct topologically protected time-crystals: time-periodic configurations whose time-dependence is protected by their non-trivial winding number. These are striking realizations of the ideas of Shapere and Wilczek. The critical isospin chemical potential for these time-crystals is determined.

  5. α -decay spectra of odd nuclei using the effective Skyrme interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ward, D. E.; Carlsson, B. G.; Åberg, S.

    2015-07-01

    Background: For nuclei heavier than 208Pb α decay is a dominating decay mode. α decay of odd nuclei can give spectroscopic information because different states in the daughter nucleus can be populated in the decay. Purpose: To explore and test microscopic descriptions of α decay of odd nuclei based on self-consistent models with effective nuclear interactions. To predict the hindrance of α decay of odd-A superheavy nuclei. Methods: We apply the method of our previous work [15e D. E. Ward, B. G. Carlsson, and S. Åberg, Phys. Rev. C 88, 064316 (2013), 10.1103/PhysRevC.88.064316] to the case of odd-A near-spherical nuclei. The Skyrme effective interaction SLy4 is used. Starting from the obtained Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov vacuum and quasiparticle excitations, the α -particle formation amplitude is calculated giving the decay rates and hindrance of different α -decay channels. Result: The calculated relative decay rates show good agreement with available data. The hindrance of decay channels where the odd nucleon changes orbital is reasonably described by the microscopic calculation. Several hindered ground-state decays of superheavy nuclei are predicted, implying possible α -γ coincidences. Conclusions: The approach offers a practical method of making quantitative predictions for the relative hindrance of different α -decay channels.

  6. Effect of the tensor part of Skyrme interaction on the description of elastic nucleon-nucleus scattering on the basis of the optical model

    SciTech Connect

    Kuprikov, V. I.; Pilipenko, V. V.

    2013-01-15

    A microscopic optical nucleon-nucleus potential constructed on the basis of calculating the mass operator for the single-particle Green's function with Skyrme nucleon-nucleon forces was used to study the effect of the tensor part of Skyrme forces on describing differential cross sections for elastic nucleon-nucleus scattering and the structure of nuclei within a self-consistent approach. It was shown that an increase in the tensor terms of nucleon-nucleon forces impaired the description of nucleon-nucleus scattering within the model being considered. The parameters of Skyrme forces were optimized on the basis of an analysis of cross sections for neutron-nucleus scattering, the properties of nuclear matter and the structure of nuclei being tested in doing this. This optimization led to nucleon-nucleon force versions where the tensor part was small or zero and which described satisfactorily the structure of nuclei and cross sections for elastic neutron and proton scattering on nuclei over a broad range of target mass numbers.

  7. Description of induced nuclear fission with Skyrme energy functionals: Static potential energy surfaces and fission fragment properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schunck, N.; Duke, D.; Carr, H.; Knoll, A.

    2014-11-01

    Eighty years after its experimental discovery, a description of induced nuclear fission based solely on the interactions between neutrons and protons and quantum many-body methods still poses formidable challenges. The goal of this paper is to contribute to the development of a predictive microscopic framework for the accurate calculation of static properties of fission fragments for hot fission and thermal or slow neutrons. To this end, we focus on the 239Pu(n ,f ) reaction and employ nuclear density functional theory with Skyrme energy densities. Potential energy surfaces are computed at the Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov approximation with up to five collective variables. We find that the triaxial degree of freedom plays an important role, both near the fission barrier and at scission. The impact of the parametrization of the Skyrme energy density and the role of pairing correlations on deformation properties from the ground state up to scission are also quantified. We introduce a general template for the quantitative description of fission fragment properties. It is based on the careful analysis of scission configurations, using both advanced topological methods and recently proposed quantum many-body techniques. We conclude that an accurate prediction of fission fragment properties at low incident neutron energies, although technologically demanding, should be within the reach of current nuclear density functional theory.

  8. Speed of sound in nuclear matter and Skyrme effective interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Su, R.K.; Kuo, T.T.S.

    1987-02-01

    Using a nuclear equation of state derived from a finite-temperature Green's function method and the Skyrme effective interactions SkI, SkIII and SkM*, the authors have calculated the speed of sound in symmetric nuclear matter. For certain densities and temperatures, this speed is found to become super-luminous. Causal boundaries in the density-temperature plane are determined, and they indicate that SkM* is a more desirable effective interaction than SkI and SkIII. Comparison with a similar calculation by Osnes and Strottman is made.

  9. The phonon-coupling model for Skyrme forces

    SciTech Connect

    Lyutorovich, N.; Tselyaev, V.; Speth, J. Krewald, S.; Reinhard, P.-G.

    2016-11-15

    A short review on the self-consistent RPA based on the energy-density functional of the Skyrme type is given. We also present an extension of the RPA where the coupling of phonons to the single-particle states is considered. Within this approach we present numerical results which are compared with data. The self-consistent approach is compared with the Landau–Migdal theory. Here we derive from the self-consistent ph interaction, the Landau–Migdal parameters as well as their density dependence. In the Appendix a new derivation of the reduced matrix elements of the ph interaction is presented.

  10. beta. -Decay in the Skyrme-Witten representation of QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Snyderman, N.J.

    1991-05-01

    The renormalized coupling strength of the {beta}-decay axial vector current is related to {pi}{plus minus} p cross sections through the Adler-Weisberger sum rule, that follows from chiral symmetry. We attempt to understand the Adler-Weisberger sum rule in the 1/N{sub c} expansion in QCD, and in the Skyrme-Witten model that realizes the 1/N{sub c} expansion in the low energy limit, using it to explicitly calculate both g{sub A} and the {pi}{plus minus} p cross sections. 32 refs.

  11. Microscopic nature of the radiative strength function: Structures, coupling with phonons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamerdzhiev, S. P.; Achakovskii, O. I.; Avdeenkov, A. V.

    2015-06-01

    The microscopic nature of the radiative strength function, which is the most important characteristic necessary for the description of nuclear reactions involving gamma-ray photons both in astrophysics and in the theory of nuclear reactors, has been discussed. It has been shown that, in contrast to phenomenological approaches based on various modifications of the Lorentzian dependence for this function, the microscopic approach gives structures that are due to the effects both within the standard random phase approximation and of coupling with low-lying collective excitations (phonons), i.e., beyond the standard random phase approximation. Microscopic calculations of the strength function for several Sn and Ni isotopes have been performed within the self-consistent version of the extended theory of finite Fermi systems, where both of these effects are taken into account and the SLy4 Skyrme forces are used to calculate the mean field, effective interaction between nucleons, and characteristics of phonons. Microscopic radiative E1 strength functions have been used in the modern EMPIRE 3.1 code for the calculation of the cross sections for the radiative capture of neutrons and average radiative widths of neutron resonances. Reasonable agreement with the existing experimental data has been obtained with allowance for coupling with phonons. The integral characteristics of the pygmy dipole resonance in the unstable 68Ni nucleus have been explained. The existence of this resonance has been predicted in the unstable 72Ni nucleus.

  12. Rotational-vibrational coupling in the BPS Skyrme model of baryons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adam, C.; Naya, C.; Sanchez-Guillen, J.; Wereszczynski, A.

    2013-11-01

    We calculate the rotational-vibrational spectrum in the BPS Skyrme model for the hedgehog skyrmion with baryon number one. The resulting excitation energies for the nucleon and delta Roper resonances are slightly above their experimental values. Together with the fact that in the standard Skyrme model these excitation energies are significantly lower than the experimental ones, this provides strong evidence for the conjecture that the inclusion of the BPS Skyrme model is required for a successful quantitative description of physical properties of baryons and nuclei.

  13. The Skyrme-TQRPA calculations of electron capture on hot nuclei in pre-supernova environment

    SciTech Connect

    Dzhioev, Alan A. Vdovin, A. I.; Stoyanov, Ch.

    2016-11-15

    We combine the thermal QRPA approach with the Skyrme energy density functional theory (Skyrme–TQRPA) for modelling the process of electron capture on nuclei in supernova environment. For a sample nucleus, {sup 56}Fe, the Skyrme–TQRPA approach is applied to analyze thermal effects on the strength function of GT{sub +} transitions which dominate electron capture at E{sub e} ≤ 30 MeV. Several Skyrme interactions are used in order to verify the sensitivity of the obtained results to the Skyrme force parameters. Finite-temperature cross sections are calculated and the results are comparedwith those of the other model calculations.

  14. Nuclear Mass Predictions within the Skyrme HFB Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samyn, M.; Goriely, S.; Pearson, J. M.

    2005-05-01

    To increase the reliability of predictions of highly neutron-rich nuclear masses we systematically analyze the sensitivity of Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov (HFB) mass formulae to various physical inputs, such as a density dependence of the pairing interaction, a low effective mass, the particle-number projection, the symmetry energy, … We typically use a 10-parameter Skyrme force and a 4-parameter δ-function pairing force. The 14 degrees of freedom are adjusted to the masses of all measured nuclei with N,Z ⩾ 8 given in the 2001 and 2003 Audi et al. compilations. The masses of light and proton-rich nuclei are corrected by a 4-parameter phenomenological Wigner term. With more than ten such parameter sets complete mass tables are constructed, going from one drip line to the other, up to Z = 120.

  15. Nuclear Mass Predictions within the Skyrme HFB Theory

    SciTech Connect

    Samyn, M.; Goriely, S.; Pearson, J.M.

    2005-05-24

    To increase the reliability of predictions of highly neutron-rich nuclear masses we systematically analyze the sensitivity of Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov (HFB) mass formulae to various physical inputs, such as a density dependence of the pairing interaction, a low effective mass, the particle-number projection, the symmetry energy, ... We typically use a 10-parameter Skyrme force and a 4-parameter {delta}-function pairing force. The 14 degrees of freedom are adjusted to the masses of all measured nuclei with N,Z {>=} 8 given in the 2001 and 2003 Audi et al. compilations. The masses of light and proton-rich nuclei are corrected by a 4-parameter phenomenological Wigner term. With more than ten such parameter sets complete mass tables are constructed, going from one drip line to the other, up to Z = 120.

  16. The structure of the B=2 manifold in the Skyrme model

    SciTech Connect

    Walet, N.R.

    1993-04-01

    The Skyrme model has been used as a tool to derive the basic properties of the nucleon-nucleon interaction for over 10 years. Only recently, however, have attempts been made to use the distortion of the mean-field solutions for small separations in this discussion. The authors shall discuss the properties of the low-energy collective manifold of baryon number two in the Skyrme model. They apply the techniques of Large-Maplitude Collective Motion to the Skyrme model, and shall discuss the geometry of the B=2 manifold. They show how the adiabatic manifold evolves as they move away from the stable {open_quotes}donut{close_quotes} configuration. A similar study will be made for the B=2 hedgehog. They comment on the inertial parameters for the adiabatic hamiltonian, the missing link in the discussion of the nucleon-nucleon force derived from the Skyrme model.

  17. A New Open-Source Nuclear Equation of State Framework based on the Liquid-Drop Model with Skyrme Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    da Silva Schneider, Andre; Roberts, Luke; Ott, Christian

    2017-01-01

    The equation of state (EOS) of dense matter is an essential ingredient for numerical simulations of many astrophysical phenomena. We implement a modular open-source Fortran 90 code to construct the EOS of hot dense matter for astrophysical applications. For high density matter we use a non-relativistic liquid-drop description of nuclei that includes surface effects in a single nucleus approximation (SNA). The model is based on the work of Lattimer and Swesty and has been generalized to accommodate most Skyrme parametrizations available in the literature. Low density matter is described as an ensemble of nuclei in nuclear statistical equilibrium (NSE). The transition between the SNA and NSE regimes is performed via a continuous function that smoothly blends their Helmholtz free energy. To account for the existence of 2 solar mass neutron stars, we extend the formalism to allow for a stiffening of the EOS at densities above 3 times nuclear saturation density, where the properties of matter are presently poorly constrained. We study how different Skyrme parametrizations affect the EOS, neutron star mass-radius relationships, and the spherically symmetric collapse and post-bounce supernova evolution of massive stars.

  18. A New Open-Source Nuclear Equation of State Framework based on the Liquid-Drop Model with Skyrme Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    da Silva Schneider, Andre; Roberts, Luke F.; Ott, Christian D.

    2016-09-01

    The equation of state (EoS) of dense matter is an essential ingredient for numerical simulations of many astrophysical phenomena. We implement a modular open-source Fortran 90 code to construct EoS of hot dense matter for astrophysical applications. For high density matter we use a non-relativistic liquid-drop description of nuclei that includes surface effects in a single nucleus approximation (SNA). The model is based on the work of Lattimer and Swesty and has been generalized to accommodate most Skyrme parametrizations available in the literature. Low density matter is described as an ensemble of nuclei in nuclear statistical equilibrium (NSE). The transition between the two regimes is performed via a continuous function that smoothly blends their Helmholtz free energy. To account for the existence of 2 solar mass neutron stars, we extend the formalism to allow for a stiffening of the EoS at densities above 3 times nuclear saturation density, where the properties of matter are presently poorly constrained. We study how different Skyrme parametrizations affect the EoS, neutron star mass-radius relationships, and the spherically symmetric collapse and post-bounce supernova evolution of massive stars.

  19. Collective Inertia and Fission Barriers Within the Skyrme-Hartree-Fock Theory

    SciTech Connect

    Baran, A.; Staszczak, A.; Dobaczewski, J.; Nazarewicz, Witold

    2007-01-01

    Spontaneous fission barriers, quadrupole inertia tensor, and zero-point quadrupole correlation energy are calculated for 252,256,258Fm in the framework of the self-consistent Skyrme-Hartree-Fock+BCS theory. Two ways of computing collective inertia are employed: the Gaussian Overlap Approximation to the Generator Coordinate Method and cranking ansatz. The Skyrme results are compared with those of the Gogny-Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov model.

  20. Constraining the surface properties of effective Skyrme interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jodon, R.; Bender, M.; Bennaceur, K.; Meyer, J.

    2016-08-01

    Background: Deformation energy surfaces map how the total binding energy of a nuclear system depends on the geometrical properties of intrinsic configurations, thereby providing a powerful tool to interpret nuclear spectroscopy and large-amplitude collective-motion phenomena such as fission. The global behavior of the deformation energy is known to be directly connected to the surface properties of the effective interaction used for its calculation. Purpose: The precise control of surface properties during the parameter adjustment of an effective interaction is key to obtain a reliable and predictive description of nuclear properties. The most relevant indicator is the surface-energy coefficient asurf. There are several possibilities for its definition and estimation, which are not fully equivalent and require a computational effort that can differ by orders of magnitude. The purpose of this study is threefold: first, to identify a scheme for the determination of asurf that offers the best compromise between robustness, precision, and numerical efficiency; second, to analyze the correlation between values for asurf and the characteristic energies of the fission barrier of 240Pu; and third, to lay out an efficient and robust procedure for how the deformation properties of the Skyrme energy density functional (EDF) can be constrained during the parameter fit. Methods: There are several frequently used possibilities to define and calculate the surface energy coefficient asurf of effective interactions built for the purpose of self-consistent mean-field calculations. The most direct access is provided by the model system of semi-infinite nuclear matter, but asurf can also be extracted from the systematics of binding energies of finite nuclei. Calculations can be carried out either self-consistently [Hartree-Fock (HF)], which incorporates quantal shell effects, or in one of the semiclassical extended Thomas-Fermi (ETF) or modified Thomas-Fermi (MTF) approximations. The

  1. Particle-vibration coupling: Recent advances in microscopic calculations with the Skyrme Hamiltonian

    SciTech Connect

    Colò, G.; Baldo, M.; Bortignon, P. F.; Rizzo, D.; Bocchi, G.

    2016-11-15

    In this contribution, we report some recent progress in our understanding of particle-vibration coupling (PVC) in nuclei. In particular, we first review the formal development that has allowed some of us to deduce the PVC equations within the Green’s functionmethod. Applications are then discussed, both in the case of single-particle states and giant resonances in magic nuclei. We also present a new model that extends the PVC ansatz and is meant to account for the complete low-lying spectra of odd nuclei.

  2. Particle-vibration coupling: Recent advances in microscopic calculations with the Skyrme Hamiltonian

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colò, G.; Baldo, M.; Bortignon, P. F.; Rizzo, D.; Bocchi, G.

    2016-11-01

    In this contribution, we report some recent progress in our understanding of particle-vibration coupling (PVC) in nuclei. In particular, we first review the formal development that has allowed some of us to deduce the PVC equations within the Green's functionmethod. Applications are then discussed, both in the case of single-particle states and giant resonances in magic nuclei. We also present a new model that extends the PVC ansatz and is meant to account for the complete low-lying spectra of odd nuclei.

  3. Skyrme insulators: insulators at the brink of superconductivity

    DOE PAGES

    Ertem, Onur; Chang, Po -Yao; Coleman, Piers; ...

    2017-08-04

    Current theories of superfluidity are based on the idea of a coherent quantum state with topologically protected, quantized circulation. When this topological protection is absent, as in the case of 3He-A, the coherent quantum state no longer supports persistent superflow. In this paper, we argue that the loss of topological protection in a superconductor gives rise to an insulating ground state. Specifically, we introduce the concept of a Skyrme insulator to describe the coherent dielectric state that results from the topological failure of superflow carried by a complex vector order parameter. Here, we apply this idea to the case ofmore » SmB6, arguing that the observation of a diamagnetic Fermi surface within an insulating bulk can be understood as a realization of this state. Our theory enables us to understand the linear specific heat of SmB6 in terms of a neutral Majorana Fermi sea and leads us to predict that in low fields of order a Gauss, SmB6 will develop a Meissner effect.« less

  4. Vortices in the extended Skyrme-Faddeev model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferreira, L. A.; Jäykkä, J.; Sawado, Nobuyuki; Toda, Kouichi

    2012-05-01

    We construct analytical and numerical vortex solutions for an extended Skyrme-Faddeev model in a (3+1) dimensional Minkowski space-time. The extension is obtained by adding to the Lagrangian a quartic term, which is the square of the kinetic term, and a potential which breaks the SO(3) symmetry down to SO(2). The construction makes use of an ansatz, invariant under the joint action of the internal SO(2) and three commuting U(1) subgroups of the Poincaré group, and which reduces the equations of motion to an ordinary differential equation for a profile function depending on the distance to the x3 axis. The vortices have finite energy per unit length, and have waves propagating along them with the speed of light. The analytical vortices are obtained for a special choice of potentials, and the numerical ones are constructed using the successive over relaxation method for more general potentials. The spectrum of solutions is analyzed in detail, especially its dependence upon special combinations of coupling constants.

  5. Skyrme Insulators: Insulators at the Brink of Superconductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erten, Onur; Chang, Po-Yao; Coleman, Piers; Tsvelik, Alexei M.

    2017-08-01

    Current theories of superfluidity are based on the idea of a coherent quantum state with topologically protected quantized circulation. When this topological protection is absent, as in the case of 3He -A , the coherent quantum state no longer supports persistent superflow. Here, we argue that the loss of topological protection in a superconductor gives rise to an insulating ground state. We specifically introduce the concept of a Skyrme insulator to describe the coherent dielectric state that results from the topological failure of superflow carried by a complex-vector order parameter. We apply this idea to the case of SmB6 , arguing that the observation of a diamagnetic Fermi surface within an insulating bulk can be understood as a realization of this state. Our theory enables us to understand the linear specific heat of SmB6 in terms of a neutral Majorana Fermi sea and leads us to predict that in low fields of order a Gauss, SmB6 will develop a Meissner effect.

  6. Description of induced nuclear fission with Skyrme energy functionals. II. Finite temperature effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schunck, N.; Duke, D.; Carr, H.

    2015-03-01

    Understanding the mechanisms of induced nuclear fission for a broad range of neutron energies could help resolve fundamental science issues, such as the formation of elements in the universe, but could have also a large impact on societal applications in energy production or nuclear waste management. The goal of this paper is to set up the foundations of a microscopic theory to study the static aspects of induced fission as a function of the excitation energy of the incident neutron, from thermal to fast neutrons. To account for the high excitation energy of the compound nucleus, we employ a statistical approach based on finite temperature nuclear density functional theory with Skyrme energy densities, which we benchmark on the 239Pu(n ,f ) reaction. We compute the evolution of the least-energy fission pathway across multidimensional potential energy surfaces with up to five collective variables as a function of the nuclear temperature and predict the evolution of both the inner and the outer fission barriers as a function of the excitation energy of the compound nucleus. We show that the coupling to the continuum induced by the finite temperature is negligible in the range of neutron energies relevant for many applications of neutron-induced fission. We prove that the concept of quantum localization introduced recently can be extended to T >0 , and we apply the method to study the interaction energy and total kinetic energy of fission fragments as a function of the temperature for the most probable fission. While large uncertainties in theoretical modeling remain, we conclude that a finite temperature nuclear density functional may provide a useful framework to obtain accurate predictions of fission fragment properties.

  7. New topological structures of Skyrme theory: baryon number and monopole number

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Y. M.; Kimm, Kyoungtae; Yoon, J. H.; Zhang, Pengming

    2017-02-01

    Based on the observation that the skyrmion in Skyrme theory can be viewed as a dressed monopole, we show that the skyrmions have two independent topology, the baryon topology π _3(S^3) and the monopole topology π _2(S^2). With this we propose to classify the skyrmions by two topological numbers ( m, n), the monopole number m and the shell (radial) number n. In this scheme the popular (non spherically symmetric) skyrmions are classified as the ( m, 1) skyrmions but the spherically symmetric skyrmions are classified as the (1, n) skyrmions, and the baryon number B is given by B=mn. Moreover, we show that the vacuum of the Skyrme theory has the structure of the vacuum of the Sine-Gordon theory and QCD combined together, which can also be classified by two topological numbers ( p, q). This puts the Skyrme theory in a totally new perspective.

  8. An Outline of the Life and Work of Tony Hilton Royle Skyrme (1922-1987)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalitz, R. H.

    1922-43: Youth and Education - Tony Hilton Royle Skyrme was born on 5 December 1922 at 7 Blessington Road, Lewisham (Kent), London, the family house occupied by his maternal grandparents. His parents were John (sometimes Jack) Hilton Royle Skyrme, a bank clerk, and Muriel May née Roberts, who had been married at St. Margaret's Church in the parish of St. Margaret's and Eastney, in Portsmouth (Hants.), on 25 March 1922. Tony's paternal grandparents were James Henry Rowland Skyrme and Minnie née Hilton, the former being a schoolmaster at Combwitch, near Bridgewater (Somerset), when Tony's father was born in 1896. Tony's maternal grandfather was Herbert William Thomson Roberts, a tidal computer for the Admiralty by profession. The inclusion of Lord Kelvin's baptismal name (William Thomson) among his forenames reflects the professional contact which Tony's great - grandfather had with Lord Kelvin and the high regard in which he held the latter …

  9. Renormalizability of the nuclear many-body problem with the Skyrme interaction beyond mean field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, C. J.; Grasso, M.; Moghrabi, K.; van Kolck, U.

    2017-05-01

    Phenomenological effective interactions like Skyrme forces are currently used in mean-field calculations in nuclear physics. Mean-field models have strong analogies with the first order of the perturbative many-body problem and the currently used effective interactions are adjusted at the mean-field level. In this work, we analyze the renormalizability of the nuclear many-body problem in the case where the effective Skyrme interaction is employed in its standard form and the perturbative problem is solved up to second order. We focus on symmetric nuclear matter and its equation of state, which can be calculated analytically at this order. It is shown that only by applying specific density dependence and constraints to the interaction parameters can renormalizability be guaranteed in principle. This indicates that the standard Skyrme interaction does not in general lead to a renormalizable theory. To achieve renormalizability, other terms should be added to the interaction and employed perturbatively only at first order.

  10. Skyrme RPA description of γ-vibrational states in rare-earth nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nesterenko, V. O.; Kartavenko, V. G.; Kleinig, W.; Kvasil, J.; Repko, A.; Jolos, R. V.; Reinhard, P.-G.

    2016-01-01

    The lowest γ-vibrational states with Kπ = 2+γ in well-deformed Dy, Er and Yb isotopes are investigated within the self-consistent separable quasiparticle random-phase-approximation (QRPA) approach based on the Skyrme functional. The energies Eγ and reduced transition probabilities B(E2)γ of the states are calculated with the Skyrme force SV-mas10. We demonstrate the strong effect of the pairing blocking on the energies of γ-vibrational states. It is also shown that collectivity of γ-vibrational states is strictly determined by keeping the Nilsson selection rules in the corresponding lowest 2qp configurations.

  11. Baryon exotics in the quark model, the skyrme model, and QCD.

    PubMed

    Jenkins, Elizabeth; Manohar, Aneesh V

    2004-07-09

    We derive the quantum numbers of baryon exotics in the quark model and the Skyrme model and show that they agree for arbitrary colors and flavors. We define exoticness E, which can be used to classify the states. The exotic baryons include the recently discovered qqqqq pentaquarks (E=1), as well as exotic baryons with additional qq pairs (E>/=1). The mass formula for nonexotic and exotic baryons is given as an expansion in 1/N(c) and allows one to relate the moment of inertia of the Skyrme soliton to the mass of a constituent quark.

  12. Born term of the {pi}N scattering amplitude in the Skyrme model

    SciTech Connect

    Itoh, Tomoaki; Arima, Masaki

    2011-04-15

    The Skyrme model is applied to the study of the {pi}N scattering amplitude. The useful expression of amplitude given by the chiral reduction formula is employed. The calculation is performed in the lowest order of 1/N{sub c}: a source of interaction is a classical soliton taking a hedgehog configuration. It is important to consider the zero modes both for the translation invariance and for the isospin symmetry simultaneously. Despite the former negative impression, the Skyrme model correctly produces the Born term in the scattering amplitude.

  13. Comparison of global phenomenological and microscopic optical potentials for nuclear data predictions

    SciTech Connect

    Cai, C. ); Shen, Q.; Zhuo, Y. )

    1991-10-01

    In this paper the chi-square ({chi}{sup 2}) values, which represent the degree of agreement between the calculated total, nonelastic, and differential elastic cross sections and their experimental values, are calculated for seven kinds of optical potentials: the phenomenological optimal optical potential (OOP) for a specific element, the global phenomenological optical potentials given by Becchetti and Greenlees (BGP) and by Varner et al. (CH86) for a large number of target nuclei, and the microscopic optical potentials based on conventional Skyrme force (SII and SIII), generalized Skyrme force (GS2), and modified Skyrme force (SKa). Fourteen natural elements (each containing one to four isotopes) are calculated with 12 to 20 neutron incident energies, which are in the 0.1- to 24-MeV energy region for each element. The calculated average total chi-square values are {bar {chi}}{sub OOP}{sup 2} - 0.309, {bar {chi}}{sub BGP}{sup 2} = 0.807, {bar {chi}}{sub CH86}{sup 2} = 0.684, {bar {chi}}{sub GS2}{sup 2} = 0.600, {bar {chi}}{sub SKa}{sup 2} = 0.646, {bar {chi}}{sub SII}{sup 2} = 2.587, and {bar {chi}}{sub SIII}{sup 2} = 1.368. The conclusion is that the microscopic optical potential based on generalized and modified Skyrme force (GS2 and SKa), which has an analytical formalism without any free parameters, is useful in nuclear data calculation and evaluation.

  14. Microscopic colitis

    PubMed Central

    Ianiro, Gianluca; Cammarota, Giovanni; Valerio, Luca; Annicchiarico, Brigida Eleonora; Milani, Alessandro; Siciliano, Massimo; Gasbarrini, Antonio

    2012-01-01

    Microscopic colitis may be defined as a clinical syndrome, of unknown etiology, consisting of chronic watery diarrhea, with no alterations in the large bowel at the endoscopic and radiologic evaluation. Therefore, a definitive diagnosis is only possible by histological analysis. The epidemiological impact of this disease has become increasingly clear in the last years, with most data coming from Western countries. Microscopic colitis includes two histological subtypes [collagenous colitis (CC) and lymphocytic colitis (LC)] with no differences in clinical presentation and management. Collagenous colitis is characterized by a thickening of the subepithelial collagen layer that is absent in LC. The main feature of LC is an increase of the density of intra-epithelial lymphocytes in the surface epithelium. A number of pathogenetic theories have been proposed over the years, involving the role of luminal agents, autoimmunity, eosinophils, genetics (human leukocyte antigen), biliary acids, infections, alterations of pericryptal fibroblasts, and drug intake; drugs like ticlopidine, carbamazepine or ranitidine are especially associated with the development of LC, while CC is more frequently linked to cimetidine, non-steroidal antiinflammatory drugs and lansoprazole. Microscopic colitis typically presents as chronic or intermittent watery diarrhea, that may be accompanied by symptoms such as abdominal pain, weight loss and incontinence. Recent evidence has added new pharmacological options for the treatment of microscopic colitis: the role of steroidal therapy, especially oral budesonide, has gained relevance, as well as immunosuppressive agents such as azathioprine and 6-mercaptopurine. The use of anti-tumor necrosis factor-α agents, infliximab and adalimumab, constitutes a new, interesting tool for the treatment of microscopic colitis, but larger, adequately designed studies are needed to confirm existing data. PMID:23180940

  15. Microscopic colitis.

    PubMed

    Ianiro, Gianluca; Cammarota, Giovanni; Valerio, Luca; Annicchiarico, Brigida Eleonora; Milani, Alessandro; Siciliano, Massimo; Gasbarrini, Antonio

    2012-11-21

    Microscopic colitis may be defined as a clinical syndrome, of unknown etiology, consisting of chronic watery diarrhea, with no alterations in the large bowel at the endoscopic and radiologic evaluation. Therefore, a definitive diagnosis is only possible by histological analysis. The epidemiological impact of this disease has become increasingly clear in the last years, with most data coming from Western countries. Microscopic colitis includes two histological subtypes [collagenous colitis (CC) and lymphocytic colitis (LC)] with no differences in clinical presentation and management. Collagenous colitis is characterized by a thickening of the subepithelial collagen layer that is absent in LC. The main feature of LC is an increase of the density of intra-epithelial lymphocytes in the surface epithelium. A number of pathogenetic theories have been proposed over the years, involving the role of luminal agents, autoimmunity, eosinophils, genetics (human leukocyte antigen), biliary acids, infections, alterations of pericryptal fibroblasts, and drug intake; drugs like ticlopidine, carbamazepine or ranitidine are especially associated with the development of LC, while CC is more frequently linked to cimetidine, non-steroidal antiinflammatory drugs and lansoprazole. Microscopic colitis typically presents as chronic or intermittent watery diarrhea, that may be accompanied by symptoms such as abdominal pain, weight loss and incontinence. Recent evidence has added new pharmacological options for the treatment of microscopic colitis: the role of steroidal therapy, especially oral budesonide, has gained relevance, as well as immunosuppressive agents such as azathioprine and 6-mercaptopurine. The use of anti-tumor necrosis factor-α agents, infliximab and adalimumab, constitutes a new, interesting tool for the treatment of microscopic colitis, but larger, adequately designed studies are needed to confirm existing data.

  16. Using 4th order Runge-Kutta method for solving a twisted Skyrme string equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hadi, Miftachul; Anderson, Malcolm; Husein, Andri

    2016-03-01

    We study numerical solution, especially using 4th order Runge-Kutta method, for solving a twisted Skyrme string equation. We find numerically that the value of minimum energy per unit length of vortex solution for a twisted Skyrmion string is 20.37 × 1060 eV/m.

  17. Recalculation of electromagnetic polarizabilities of the nucleon in the Skyrme model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, Sakae; Uehara, Masayuki

    1994-04-01

    We recalculate the electromagnetic polarizabilities of the nucleon within the Skyrme model in terms of the full field consisting both of the Skyrmion field and the fluctuating pion field. We prove that the seagull-term contribution to the electric polarizability should vanish contrary to previous results, and that this holds for a wide class of models.

  18. Fission barriers for neutron-rich nuclei by means of Skyrme-Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov calculation

    SciTech Connect

    Hashizume, K.; Wada, T.; Ohta, M.; Samyn, M.; Goriely, S.

    2007-02-26

    The nuclear fission barrier height has been estimated by means of the constraint Skyrme Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov method. The potential energy surfaces obtained by the method are analyzed with the flooding method to find several saddle points. The results for U, Np, Bk isotopes are compared with the barrier derived from the extended Thomas-Fermi plus Strutinsky integral method.

  19. Properties of nuclear matter from macroscopic-microscopic mass formulas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ning; Liu, Min; Ou, Li; Zhang, Yingxun

    2015-12-01

    Based on the standard Skyrme energy density functionals together with the extended Thomas-Fermi approach, the properties of symmetric and asymmetric nuclear matter represented in two macroscopic-microscopic mass formulas: Lublin-Strasbourg nuclear drop energy (LSD) formula and Weizsäcker-Skyrme (WS*) formula, are extracted through matching the energy per particle of finite nuclei. For LSD and WS*, the obtained incompressibility coefficients of symmetric nuclear matter are K∞ = 230 ± 11 MeV and 235 ± 11 MeV, respectively. The slope parameter of symmetry energy at saturation density is L = 41.6 ± 7.6 MeV for LSD and 51.5 ± 9.6 MeV for WS*, respectively, which is compatible with the liquid-drop analysis of Lattimer and Lim [4]. The density dependence of the mean-field isoscalar and isovector effective mass, and the neutron-proton effective masses splitting for neutron matter are simultaneously investigated. The results are generally consistent with those from the Skyrme Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov calculations and nucleon optical potentials, and the standard deviations are large and increase rapidly with density. A better constraint for the effective mass is helpful to reduce uncertainties of the depth of the mean-field potential.

  20. Nuclear charge and neutron radii and nuclear matter: Trend analysis in Skyrme density-functional-theory approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reinhard, P.-G.; Nazarewicz, W.

    2016-05-01

    Background: Radii of charge and neutron distributions are fundamental nuclear properties. They depend on both nuclear interaction parameters related to the equation of state of infinite nuclear matter and on quantal shell effects, which are strongly impacted by the presence of nuclear surface. Purpose: In this work, by studying the correlation of charge and neutron radii, and neutron skin, with nuclear matter parameters, we assess different mechanisms that drive nuclear sizes. Method: We apply nuclear density functional theory using a family of Skyrme functionals obtained by means of optimization protocols, which do not include any radius information. By performing the Monte Carlo sampling of reasonable functionals around the optimal parametrization, we scan all correlations between nuclear matter properties and observables characterizing charge and neutron distributions of spherical closed-shell nuclei 48Ca,208Pb, and 298Fl. Results: By considering the influence of various nuclear matter properties on charge and neutron radii in a multidimensional parameter space of Skyrme functionals, we demonstrate the existence of two strong relationships: (i) between the nuclear charge radii and the saturation density of symmetric nuclear matter ρ0, and (ii) between the neutron skins and the slope of the symmetry energy L . The impact of other nuclear matter properties on nuclear radii is weak or nonexistent. For functionals optimized to experimental binding energies only, proton and neutron radii are found to be weakly correlated due to canceling trends from different nuclear matter characteristics. Conclusion: The existence of only two strong relations connecting nuclear radii with nuclear matter properties has important consequences. First, by requiring that the nuclear functional reproduces the empirical saturation point of symmetric nuclear matter practically fixes the charge (or proton) radii, and vice versa. This explains the recent results of ab initio calculations

  1. Exact solution of the Einstein-Skyrme model in a Kantowski-Sachs spacetime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paliathanasis, Andronikos; Tsamparlis, Michael

    2017-04-01

    We consider a Skyrme fluid with a constant radial profile in locally rotational Kantowski-Sachs spacetime. The Skyrme fluid is an anisotropic fluid with zero heat flux and with an equation of state parameter wS that |ws | ≤ 1/3. From the Einstein field equations we define the Wheeler-DeWitt equation. For the last equation we perform a Lie symmetry classification and we determine the invariant solutions for the wavefunction of the model. Moreover from the Lie symmetries of the Wheeler-DeWitt equation we construct Noetherian conservation laws for the field equations which we use in order to write the solution in closed form. We show that all of the cosmological parameters are expressed in terms of the scale factor of the two dimensional sphere of the Kantowski-Sachs spacetime. Finally from the application of Noether's theorem for the Wheeler-DeWitt equation we derive conservation laws for the wavefunction of the universe.

  2. Stochastic approach to correlations beyond the mean field with the Skyrme interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Fukuoka, Y.; Nakatsukasa, T.; Funaki, Y.; Yabana, K.

    2012-10-20

    Large-scale calculation based on the multi-configuration Skyrme density functional theory is performed for the light N=Z even-even nucleus, {sup 12}C. Stochastic procedures and the imaginary-time evolution are utilized to prepare many Slater determinants. Each state is projected on eigenstates of parity and angular momentum. Then, performing the configuration mixing calculation with the Skyrme Hamiltonian, we obtain low-lying energy-eigenstates and their explicit wave functions. The generated wave functions are completely free from any assumption and symmetry restriction. Excitation spectra and transition probabilities are well reproduced, not only for the ground-state band, but for negative-parity excited states and the Hoyle state.

  3. A review on the Skyrme Hartree-Fock model and related topics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdullah, Nooraihan; Khazali, Khairul Anwar Mohamad; Sauli, Zaliman

    2017-04-01

    There is no analytical solution to the Schrödinger equation for the many-electron systems. Whereas a numerical solution, which perfectly possible in theory, is impossible in practice for systems containing multiple nuclei and electrons due to the finite speed and memory of computers. The Skyrme interaction is an effective density-dependent nucleon-nucleon force which has been widely employed in the past decades by the nuclear-physics community within the non-relativistic Hartree-Fock framework. Hartree-Fock calculations with this interaction have been performed over a wide range of the periodic table, providing results compatible to the experimental values for total binding energies, nuclear radii, deformations and single-particle level ordering. Here we briefly review the recent progress on the Skyrme Hartree-Fock Model and current applications in nuclear physics.

  4. Pion photoproduction in the Skyrme model and low-energy theorem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakae, Saito; Fuminaka, Takeuchi; Masayuki, Uehara

    1993-05-01

    We investigate pion photoproduction on the nucleon in the Skyrme model. We employ the formulation, which was recently developed by Hayashi et al., that the full pion field is treated as an interpolating field between asymptotic in and out fields. It is shown that the amplitude of the pion photoproduction is correctly given by the direct and the crossed baryon-pole terms, and the equal-time commutator terms between the axial-vector current and the electromagnetic current and between the pion field and the latter. We show that the lowest-order Kroll-Ruderman and the pion pole terms are reproduced, and that the seagull terms inherent to the Skyrme model are present. Further, the threshold behavior of the amplitude is discussed.

  5. Fission Half Lives of Fermium Isotopes Within Skyrme Hartree-Fock Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baran, A.; Staszczak, A.; Nazarewicz, W.

    Nuclear fission barriers, mass parameters and spontaneous fission half lives of fermium isotopes calculated in a framework of the Skyrme Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov model with the SkM* force are discussed. Zero-point energy corrections in the ground state are determined for each nucleus using the Gaussian overlap approximation of the generator coordinate method and in the cranking formalism. Results of spontaneous fission half lives are compared to experimental data.

  6. FISSION HALF LIVES OF FERMIUM ISOTOPES WITHIN SKYRME HARTREE-FOCK-BOGOLIUBOV THEORY

    SciTech Connect

    Baran, A.; Staszczak, Andrzej; Nazarewicz, A.

    2011-01-01

    Nuclear fission barriers, mass parameters and spontaneous fission half lives of fermium isotopes calculated in a framework of the Skyrme Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov model with the SkM* force are discussed. Zero-point energy corrections in the ground state are determined for each nucleus using the Gaussian overlap approximation of the generator coordinate method and in the cranking formalism. Results of spontaneous fission half lives are compared to experimental data.

  7. Do Skyrme forces that fit nuclear matter work well in finite nuclei?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stevenson, P. D.; Goddard, P. M.; Stone, J. R.; Dutra, M.

    2013-05-01

    A short list of Skyrme force parameterizations, recently found to have passed a series of constraints relating to nuclear matter properties is analyzed for their ability to reproduce data in finite nuclei. We analyse binding energies, isotope shifts, neutron skin thicknesses and fission barriers. We find that the subset of forces have no common ability to reproduce(or otherwise)properties of finite nuclei, despite passing the extensive range of nuclear matter constraints.

  8. Extended Skyrme interactions for nuclear matter, finite nuclei, and neutron stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhen; Chen, Lie-Wen

    2016-12-01

    Recent progress in theory, experiment, and observation challenges the mean-field models by using the conventional Skyrme interaction, suggesting that the extension of the conventional Skyrme interaction is necessary. In this work, by fitting the experimental data of a number of finite nuclei together with a few additional constraints on nuclear matter using the simulated annealing method, we construct three Skyrme interaction parameter sets; namely, eMSL07, eMSL08, and eMSL09, based on an extended Skyrme interaction which includes additional momentum and density-dependent two-body forces to effectively simulate the momentum dependence of the three-body force. The three new interactions (i) can reasonably describe the ground-state properties and the isoscalar giant monopole resonance energies of various spherical nuclei used in the fit as well as the ground-state properties of many other spherical nuclei, (ii) nicely conform to the current knowledge on the equation of state of asymmetric nuclear matter, (iii) eliminate the notorious unphysical instabilities of symmetric nuclear matter and pure neutron matter up to a very high density of 1.2 fm-3 , and (iv) simultaneously support heavier neutron stars with mass larger than two times the solar mass. One important difference of the three new interactions involves the prediction of the symmetry energy at supra-saturation densities, and these new interactions are thus potentially useful for the future determination of the largely uncertain high-density symmetry energy. In addition, the predictions of nuclear matter, finite nuclei, and neutron stars made using the three new interactions are compared with those made using the three typical interactions BSk22, BSk24, and BSk26 from the Brussels group.

  9. New parametrization of Skyrme's interaction for regularized multireference energy density functional calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Washiyama, K.; Bennaceur, K.; Avez, B.; Bender, M.; Heenen, P.-H.; Hellemans, V.

    2012-11-01

    Background: Symmetry restoration and configuration mixing in the spirit of the generator coordinate method based on energy density functionals have become widely used techniques in low-energy nuclear structure physics. Recently, it has been pointed out that these techniques are ill defined for standard Skyrme functionals, and a regularization procedure has been proposed to remove the resulting spuriosities from such calculations. This procedure imposes an integer power of the density for the density-dependent terms of the functional. At present, only dated parametrizations of the Skyrme interaction fulfill this condition.Purpose: To construct a set of parametrizations of the Skyrme energy density functional for multireference energy density functional calculations with regularization using the state-of-the-art fitting protocols.Method: The parametrizations were adjusted to reproduce ground-state properties of a selected set of doubly magic nuclei and properties of nuclear matter. Subsequently, these parameter sets were validated against properties of spherical and deformed nuclei.Results: Our parameter sets successfully reproduce the experimental binding energies and charge radii for a wide range of singly magic nuclei. Compared to the widely used SLy5 and to the SIII parametrization that has integer powers of the density, a significant improvement of the reproduction of the data is observed. Similarly, a good description of the deformation properties at A˜80 was obtained.Conclusions: We have constructed new Skyrme parametrizations with integer powers of the density and validated them against a broad set of experimental data for spherical and deformed nuclei. These parametrizations are tailor-made for regularized multireference energy density functional calculations and can be used to study correlations beyond the mean field in atomic nuclei.

  10. Generalization of the Skyrme model for the unified theory of pions and nucleons

    SciTech Connect

    Kindo, T.; Yukawa, T.

    1988-09-01

    Skyrme's Lagrangian is generalized within the pion field alone to include all possible terms which appear in the chiral perturbation theory up to fourth order in the field derivative and the symmetry-breaking mass. The parameters entering in the Lagrangian are fixed from the low-energy pion properties. Adding a sixth-order term to the Lagrangian for stabilization the hedgehog soliton is quantized semiclassically. Static properties of the soliton reproduce those of the nucleon with fairly good accuracy.

  11. Skyrme-Landau parameterization of effective interactions (I). Hartree-Fock ground states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Keh-Fei; Luo, Hongde; Ma, Zhongyu; Shen, Qingbiao; Moszkowski, S. A.

    1991-11-01

    An extended Skyrme-Landau interaction - SL1, which includes velocity-dependent three-body forces and a tensor force is developed. Unlike the effective interactions with density-dependent two-body forces, this form of the interaction yields, in finite nuclei, an anti-symmetric particle-particle interaction from the particle-hole interaction with the phonon-induced interaction included. The interaction parameters are determined by the better known Landau-Migdal parameters in nuclear matter and other physical quantities like the surface energy and the dipole sum rule. Due to the fact that sufficient degrees of freedom are introduced, previous problems with the high compression modulus K∞ and spin instability, which plagued the earlier Skyrme interactions are thus removed. We present results on the Hartree-Fock ground states of spherical nuclei : 16O, 40Ca, 48Ca, 90Zr and 208Pb. The fitted binding energies, the radii and the single-particle energies are all comparable to those of the earlier Skyrme interactions. Comparison with experiments is also made. The self-consistent RPA calculation of the electric and magnetic resonances, Fermi and Gamow-Teller transitions will be presented in the sequel of the present paper.

  12. Nuclear binding energies from a Bogomol'nyi-Prasad-Sommerfield Skyrme model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adam, C.; Naya, C.; Sanchez-Guillen, J.; Wereszczynski, A.

    2013-11-01

    Recently, within the space of generalized Skyrme models, a submodel with a Bogomol'nyi-Prasad-Sommerfield (BPS) bound was identified that reproduces some bulk properties of nuclear matter already on a classical level and, as such, constitutes a promising field theory candidate for the detailed and reliable description of nuclei and hadrons. Here we extend and further develop these investigations by applying the model to the calculation of nuclear binding energies. Concretely, we calculate these binding energies by including the classical soliton energies, the excitation energies from the collective coordinate quantization of spin and isospin, the electrostatic Coulomb energies, and a small explicit isospin symmetry breaking, which accounts for the mass difference between proton and neutron. The integrability properties of the BPS Skyrme model allow, in fact, for an analytical calculation of all contributions, which may then be compared with the semi-empirical mass formula. We find that for heavier nuclei, where the model is expected to be more accurate on theoretical grounds, the resulting binding energies are already in excellent agreement with their physical values. This result provides further strong evidence for the viability of the BPS Skyrme model as a distinguished starting point and lowest-order approximation for the detailed quantitative investigation of nuclear and hadron physics.

  13. Exact results in the Skyrme model in (3+1) dimensions via the generalized hedgehog ansatz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canfora, Fabrizio

    2016-09-01

    We present exact results in the (3 + 1) -dimensional Skyrme model. First of all, it will be shown that, in the Pionic sector, a quite remarkable phenomenon for a non-integrable (3 + 1) -dimensional field theory appears: a non-linear superposition law is available allowing the composition of solutions in order to generate new solutions of the full field equations keeping alive, at the same time, the interactions terms in the energy-density. Secondly, it will be shown that the generalized hedgehog ansatz can be extended to suitable curved backgrounds. Interestingly, one can choose the background metric in such a way to describe finite-volume effects and, at the same time, to simplify the Skyrme field equations. In this way, it is possible to construct the first exact multi-Skyrmionic configurations of the (3 + 1) -dimensional Skyrme model with arbitrary high winding number and living at finite volume. Last but not least, a novel BPS bound (which is sharper than the usual one in term of the winding number) will be derived which can be saturated and reduces the field equations to a first-order equation for the profile.

  14. Shell evolution above Z ,N =50 within Skyrme density functional theory: The impact of deformation and tensor interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Yue

    2017-03-01

    Background: Recent years have seen considerable effort in associating the shell evolution (SE) for a chain of isotones or isotopes with the underlying nuclear interactions. In particular, it has been fairly well established that the tensor part of the Skyrme interaction is indispensable for understanding certain SE above Z ,N =50 shell closures, as a function of nucleon numbers. Purpose: The purpose of the present work is twofold: (1) to study the effect of deformation due to blocking on the SE above Z ,N =50 shell closures and (2) to examine the optimal parametrizations in the tensor part which gives a proper description of the SE above Z ,N =50 shell closures. Methods: I use the Skyrme-Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov (SHFB) method to compute the even-even vacua of the Z =50 isotopes and N =50 isotones. For Sb and odd-A Sn isotopes, I perform calculations with a blocking procedure which accounts for the polarization effects, including deformations. Results: The blocking SHFB calculations show that the light odd-A Sb isotopes, with only one valence proton occupying down-sloping Ω =11 /2- and Ω =7 /2+ Nilsson orbits, assume finite oblate deformations. This reduces the energy differences between 11 /2- and 7 /2+ states by about 500 keV for 51Sb56 -66 , bringing the energy-difference curve closer to the experimental one. With une2t1 energy density functional (EDF), which differs from unedf2 parametrization by tensor terms, a better description of the slope of Δ e (π 1 h11 /2-π 1 g7 /2) as a function of neutron number has been obtained. However, the trend of Δ e (π 1 g7 /2-π 2 d5 /2) curve is worse using une2t1 EDF. Δ e (ν 3 s1 /2-ν 2 d5 /2) and Δ e (ν 1 g7 /2-ν 2 d5 /2) curve for N =50 isotones using une2t1 seems to be consistent with experimental data. The neutron SE of Δ e (ν 1 h11 /2-ν 1 g7 /2) and Δ e (ν 1 g7 /2-ν 2 d5 /2) for Sn isotopes are shown to be sensive to αT tensor parameter. Conclusions: Within the Skyrme self-consistent mean-field model

  15. Microscope basics.

    PubMed

    Sluder, Greenfield; Nordberg, Joshua J

    2013-01-01

    This chapter provides information on how microscopes work and discusses some of the microscope issues to be considered in using a video camera on the microscope. There are two types of microscopes in use today for research in cell biology-the older finite tube-length (typically 160mm mechanical tube length) microscopes and the infinity optics microscopes that are now produced. The objective lens forms a magnified, real image of the specimen at a specific distance from the objective known as the intermediate image plane. All objectives are designed to be used with the specimen at a defined distance from the front lens element of the objective (the working distance) so that the image formed is located at a specific location in the microscope. Infinity optics microscopes differ from the finite tube-length microscopes in that the objectives are designed to project the image of the specimen to infinity and do not, on their own, form a real image of the specimen. Three types of objectives are in common use today-plan achromats, plan apochromats, and plan fluorite lenses. The concept of mounting video cameras on the microscope is also presented in the chapter.

  16. [Microscopic colitis].

    PubMed

    Bohr, Johan

    2002-02-11

    Microscopic colitis is an umbrella term for a newly described group of colitides, belonging to the inflammatory bowel diseases, which are only diagnosable by microscopic evaluation of a macroscopically normal colon mucosa. Collagenous colitis and lymphocytic colitis are the most common of these colitides. Microscopic colitis is characterised clinically by chronic non-bloody watery diarrhoea. Crampy abdominal pain, nocturnal diarrhoea, urgency, and initial weight loss are usual. Concomitant diseases of autoimmune origin and arthralgia are commonly seen. Treatment of microscopic colitis follows the guidelines for treatment of other inflammatory bowel diseases, but a substantial part of the patients with microscopic colitis enter spontaneous remission after some years. A minor part, however, have very troublesome symptoms and are almost refractory to treatment. Microscopic colitis has apparently no malignant potential.

  17. Skyrme forces and decay of the Rf266*104 nucleus synthesized via different incoming channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niyti, Deep, Aman; Kharab, Rajesh; Chopra, Sahila; Gupta, Raj K.

    2017-03-01

    The excitation functions for the production of 262Rf, 261Rf, and 260Rf isotopes via 4 n -, 5 n -, and 6 n -decay channels from the *266Rf compound nucleus are studied within the dynamical cluster-decay model (DCM), including deformations β2 i and so-called hot-optimum orientations θi which support symmetric fission, in agreement with experiments. The data are available for 18O+248Cm and 22Ne+244Pu reactions, respectively, at the energy ranges of Elab=88.2 to 101.3 and 109.0 to 124.8 MeV. For the nuclear interaction potentials, we use the Skyrme energy density functional (SEDF) based on semiclassical extended Thomas Fermi (ETF) approach, which means an extension of the earlier study of excitation functions of *266Rf formed in 18O+248Cm reaction, based on the DCM using the pocket formula for nuclear proximity potential, showing interaction dependence. The Skyrme forces used here are the old SIII and SIV and new GSkI and KDE0(v1) given for both normal and isospin-rich nuclei, with densities added in frozen density approximation. Interestingly, the DCM gives an excellent fit to the measured data on fusion evaporation residue (ER) for both the incoming channels (18O+248Cm and 22Ne+244Pu ) at the energy range Elab=88.2 to 124.8 MeV, independent of the entrance channel and Skyrme force used. The possible fusion-fission (ff) and quasifission (qf) mass regions of fragments on DCM are also predicted. The DCM with Skyrme forces is further used to look for all the possible target-projectile (t-p) combinations forming the cold compound nucleus (CN) *266Rf at the CN excitation energy of Elab for hot compact configurations. The fusion evaporation residue cross sections, for the proposed new reactions in synthesizing the CN *266Rf, are also estimated for the future experiments, and role of mass asymmetry of nuclei is indicated.

  18. Rotational 2+ states of superheavy elements in the Skyrme-Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baran, A.; Staszczak, A.

    2013-05-01

    The Skyrme-Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov calculations of the energies of first 2+ rotational states of deformed superheavy (SH) elements in the region of 108 ⩽ Z ⩽ 126 and 148 ⩽ N ⩽ 180 are reported. The results agree well in the case of fermium isotopes after a proper scaling of the moment of inertia. The scaling factor equals 1.3. The extension of the model to the region of SH elements gives a possibility of better estimation of the Q-values of α-decay, which is a dominant decay mode of SH elements.

  19. Constraints on the Skyrme equations of state from properties of doubly magic nuclei.

    PubMed

    Brown, B Alex

    2013-12-06

    I use properties of doubly magic nuclei to constrain symmetric nuclear matter and neutron matter equations of state. I conclude that these data determine the value of the neutron equation of state at a density of ρ(on)=0.10  nucleons/fm3 to be 11.4(10) MeV. The slope at that point is constrained by the value of the neutron skin. Analytical equations are given that show the dependence of the Skyrme equations of state on the neutron skin.

  20. Skyrme-Landau parameterization of effective interactions (II). Self-consistent description of giant multipole resonances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Keh-Fei; Luo, Hongde; Ma, Zhongyu; Shen, Qingbiao

    1991-11-01

    The positions and the transition strengths of giant multipole resonances (including electric, magnetic, Fermi and Gamow-Teller transitions of the spherical nuclei 16O, 40Ca, 48Ca, 90Zr, 208Pb) are calculated using the random phase approximation based on the Hartree-Fock ground states with our new extended Skyrme-Landau interaction - SL1. The method of calculating Green function in coordinate space is extended to included spin dependence; this makes it possible to calculate M1 and Gamow-Teller transitions. The predicted resonance positions agree well with the experimental results. The Thouless sum rules are checked to within 10-15% in most cases.

  1. Sum rules for nuclear excitations with the Skyrme-Landau interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Keh-Fei; Luo, Hong-De; Ma, Zhongyu; Feng, Man; Shen, Qing-Biao

    1991-11-01

    The energy-weighted sum rules for electric, magnetic, Fermi and Gamow-Teller transitions with the Skyrme-Landau interaction are derived from the double commutators and numerically calculated in a HF+RPA formalism. As a numerical check of the Thouless theorem, our self-consistent calculations show that the calculated RPA strengths exhaust more than 85% of the sum rules in most cases. The well known non-energy-weighted sum rules for Fermi and Gamow-Teller transitions are also checked numerically. The sum rules are exhausted by more than 94% in these cases.

  2. Toroidal Nuclear Matter Distributions of Superheavy Nuclei from Constrained Skyrme-HFB Calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Kosior, Amelia; Staszczak, A.; Wong, Cheuk-Yin

    2017-01-01

    Using the Hartree Fock Bogoliubov (HFB) self-consistent mean-field theory with the SkM* Skyrme energy-density functional, we study nuclear structure properties of even even superheavy nuclei (SHN) of Z = 120 isotopes and N = 184 isotones. The shape of the nucleus along the lowest energy curve as a function of the quadrupole moment Q20 makes a sud- den transition from the oblate spheroids (biconcave discs) to the toroidal shapes, in the region of large oblate quadrupole moments.

  3. Quantum SU(3) Skyrme model with noncanonical embedded SO(3) soliton

    SciTech Connect

    Jurciukonis, D.; Norvaisas, E.

    2007-05-15

    The new ansatz which is the SO(3) group soliton was defined for the SU(3) Skyrme model. The model is considered in noncanonical bases SU(3) superset of SO(3) for the state vectors. A complete canonical quantization of the model has been investigated in the collective coordinate formalism for the fundamental SU(3) representation of the unitary field. The independent quantum variable manifold covers all the eight dimension SU(3) group manifold due to the new ansatz. The explicit expressions of the Lagrangian and Hamiltonian densities are derived for this modified quantum skyrmion.

  4. Equation of state of hot polarized nuclear matter using the generalized Skyrme interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abd-Alla, M.; Hager, S. A.

    2000-04-01

    We used the generalized Skyrme potential to study the equation of state of polarized nuclear matter in the frame of the Thomas-Fermi model. The critical temperature of the liquid-gas phase transition is found to be Tc=16.2 MeV. This critical temperature was found to decease with the asymmetry, spin, and spin-isospin excess parameters. The isothermal compressibility of polarized nuclear matter was also studied. The volume compressibility Kv was found to decrease with temperature. The symmetry compressibility Kx, the spin symmetry compressibility Ky, and the spin-isospin symmetry compressibility Kz were found to have a little increasing behavior with temperature.

  5. Self-consistent theory of finite Fermi systems and Skyrme-Hartree-Fock method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saperstein, E. E.; Tolokonnikov, S. V.

    2016-11-01

    Recent results obtained on the basis of the self-consistent theory of finite Fermi systems by employing the energy density functional proposed by Fayans and his coauthors are surveyed. These results are compared with the predictions of Skyrme-Hartree-Fock theory involving several popular versions of the Skyrme energy density functional. Spherical nuclei are predominantly considered. The charge radii of even and odd nuclei and features of low-lying 2+ excitations in semimagic nuclei are discussed briefly. The single-particle energies ofmagic nuclei are examined inmore detail with allowance for corrections to mean-field theory that are induced by particle coupling to low-lying collective surface excitations (phonons). The importance of taking into account, in this problem, nonpole (tadpole) diagrams, which are usually disregarded, is emphasized. The spectroscopic factors of magic and semimagic nuclei are also considered. In this problem, only the surface term stemming from the energy dependence induced in the mass operator by the exchange of surface phonons is usually taken into account. The volume contribution associated with the energy dependence initially present in the mass operator within the self-consistent theory of finite Fermi systems because of the exchange of high-lying particle-hole excitations is also included in the spectroscopic factor. The results of the first studies that employed the Fayans energy density functional for deformed nuclei are also presented.

  6. New Skyrme energy density functional for a better description of the Gamow-Teller resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roca-Maza, X.; Colò, G.; Sagawa, H.

    2013-05-01

    We present a new Skyrme energy density functional named SAMi [1]. This interaction has been accurately calibrated to reproduce properties of doubly magic nuclei and infinite nuclear matter. The novelties introduced in the model and fitting protocol of SAMi are crucial for a better description of the Gamow-Teller resonance (GTR). Those are, on the one hand, the two-component spin-orbit potential needed for describing different proton high-angular momentum spin-orbit splittings and, on the other hand, the careful description of the empirical hierarchy and positive values found in previous analysis of the spin (G0) and spin-isospin (G0‧) Landau-Migdal parameters: 0 < G0 < G0‧, a feature that many of the available Skyrme forces fail to reproduce. When employed within the self-consistent Hartree-Fock plus random phase approximation, SAMi produces results on ground and excited state nuclear properties that are in good agreement with experimental findings. This is true not only for the GTR, but also for the spin dipole resonance and the isobaric analogue resonance as well as for the non-charge-exchange isoscalar giant monopole and isovector giant dipole and quadrupole resonances.

  7. Exploring the extended density-dependent Skyrme effective forces for normal and isospin-rich nuclei to neutron stars

    SciTech Connect

    Agrawal, B.K.; Dhiman, Shashi K.; Kumar, Raj

    2006-03-15

    We parametrize the recently proposed generalized Skyrme effective force (GSEF) containing extended density dependence. The parameters of the GSEF are determined by the fit to several properties of the normal and isospin-rich nuclei. We also include in our fit a realistic equation of state for the pure neutron matter up to high densities so that the resulting Skyrme parameters can be suitably used to model the neutron star with the 'canonical' mass ({approx}1.4M{sub {center_dot}}). For the appropriate comparison, we generate a parameter set for the standard Skyrme effective force (SSEF) using exactly the same set data as employed to determine the parameters of the GSEF. We find that the GSEF yields larger values for the neutron skin thickness which are closer to the recent predictions based on the isospin diffusion data. The Skyrme parameters so obtained are employed to compute the strength function for the isoscalar giant monopole, dipole, and quadrupole resonances. It is found that in the case of GSEF, because of the larger value of the nucleon effective mass, the values of centroid energies for the isoscalar giant resonances are in better agreement with the corresponding experimental data than those obtained using the SSEF. We also present results for some of the key properties associated with the neutron star of canonical mass and for the one with the maximum mass.

  8. Microscopic Polyangiitis

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Sharon A.; Seo, Philip

    2010-01-01

    Synopsis In 1923, Friedrich Wohlwill described two patients with a “microscopic form of periarteritis nodosa”, which was distinct from classical polyarteritis nodosa. This disease, now known as microscopic polyangiitis (MPA), is a primary systemic vasculitis characterized by inflammation of the small-caliber blood vessels and the presence of circulating antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCA). Typically, microscopic polyangiitis presents with glomerulonephritis and pulmonary capillaritis, although involvement of the skin, nerves, and gastrointestinal tract is not uncommon. Treatment of MPA generally requires use of a cytotoxic agent (such as cyclophosphamide) in addition to high-dose glucocorticoids. Recent research has focused on identifying alternate treatment strategies that minimize or eliminate exposure to cytotoxic agents. This article will review the history, pathogenesis, clinical manifestations, and treatment of MPA. PMID:20688249

  9. Martian Microscope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    The microscopic imager (circular device in center) is in clear view above the surface at Meridiani Planum, Mars, in this approximate true-color image taken by the panoramic camera on the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity. The image was taken on the 9th sol of the rover's journey. The microscopic imager is located on the rover's instrument deployment device, or arm. The arrow is pointing to the lens of the instrument. Note the dust cover, which flips out to the left of the lens, is open. This approximated color image was created using the camera's violet and infrared filters as blue and red.

  10. Martian Microscope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    The microscopic imager (circular device in center) is in clear view above the surface at Meridiani Planum, Mars, in this approximate true-color image taken by the panoramic camera on the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity. The image was taken on the 9th sol of the rover's journey. The microscopic imager is located on the rover's instrument deployment device, or arm. The arrow is pointing to the lens of the instrument. Note the dust cover, which flips out to the left of the lens, is open. This approximated color image was created using the camera's violet and infrared filters as blue and red.

  11. Multidimensional Skyrme-density-functional study of the spontaneous fission of 238U

    SciTech Connect

    Sadhukhan, J.; Mazurek, K.; Dobaczewski, J.; Nazarewicz, W.; Sheikh, J. A.; Baran, A.

    2015-01-01

    We determined the spontaneous fission lifetime of 238U by a minimization of the action integral in a three-dimensional space of collective variables. Apart from the mass-distribution multipole moments Q20 (elongation) and Q30 (left–right asymmetry), we also considered the pairing-fluctuation parameter λ2 as a collective coordinate. The collective potential was obtained self-consistently using the Skyrme energy density functional SkM*. The inertia tensor was obtained within the nonperturbative cranking approximation to the adiabatic time-dependent Hartree–Fock–Bogoliubov approach. As a result, the pairing-fluctuation parameter λ2 allowed us to control the pairing gap along the fission path, which significantly changed the spontaneous fission lifetime.

  12. Structure of neutron star crusts from new Skyrme effective interactions constrained by chiral effective field theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Yeunhwan; Holt, Jeremy W.

    2017-06-01

    We investigate the structure of neutron star crusts, including the crust-core boundary, based on new Skyrme mean field models constrained by the bulk-matter equation of state from chiral effective field theory and the ground-state energies of doubly-magic nuclei. Nuclear pasta phases are studied using both the liquid drop model as well as the Thomas-Fermi approximation. We compare the energy per nucleon for each geometry (spherical nuclei, cylindrical nuclei, nuclear slabs, cylindrical holes, and spherical holes) to obtain the ground state phase as a function of density. We find that the size of the Wigner-Seitz cell depends strongly on the model parameters, especially the coefficients of the density gradient interaction terms. We employ also the thermodynamic instability method to check the validity of the numerical solutions based on energy comparisons.

  13. The Analytical Parametrization of Fusion Barrier by Using the Skyrme Energy-Density Function Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zanganeh, V.; Mirzaei, M.; N., Wang

    2015-08-01

    Using the skyrme energy density formalism, a pocket formula is introduced for barrier heights and positions of 95 fusion reactions (48 ≤ ZP ZT ≤ 1520) with respect to the charge and mass numbers of the interacting nuclei. It is shown that the parameterized values of RB and VB are able to reproduce the corresponding experimental data with good accuracy. Moreover, the absolute errors of our formulas are less than those obtained using the analytical parametrization forms of the fusion barrier based on the proximity versions. The ability of the parameterized forms of the barrier heights and its positions to reproduce the experimental data of the fusion cross section have been analyzed using the Wong model.

  14. Multidimensional Skyrme-density-functional study of the spontaneous fission of 238U

    DOE PAGES

    Sadhukhan, J.; Mazurek, K.; Dobaczewski, J.; ...

    2015-01-01

    We determined the spontaneous fission lifetime of 238U by a minimization of the action integral in a three-dimensional space of collective variables. Apart from the mass-distribution multipole moments Q20 (elongation) and Q30 (left–right asymmetry), we also considered the pairing-fluctuation parameter λ2 as a collective coordinate. The collective potential was obtained self-consistently using the Skyrme energy density functional SkM*. The inertia tensor was obtained within the nonperturbative cranking approximation to the adiabatic time-dependent Hartree–Fock–Bogoliubov approach. As a result, the pairing-fluctuation parameter λ2 allowed us to control the pairing gap along the fission path, which significantly changed the spontaneous fission lifetime.

  15. Kaon-Nucleon systems and their interactions in the Skyrme model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ezoe, Takashi; Hosaka, Atsushi

    2016-08-01

    We study kaon-nucleon systems in the Skyrme model in a method based on the bound state approach of Callan-Klebanov but with the kaon around the physical nucleon of the rotating hedgehog. This corresponds to the variation after projection, reversing the order of semiclassical quantization of 1 /Nc expansion. The method, however, is considered to be suited to the study of weakly interacting kaon-nucleon systems including loosely K ¯N bound states such as Λ (1405 ). We have found a bound state with binding energy of order 10 MeV, consistent with the observed state. We also discuss the K ¯N interaction and find that it consists of an attraction in the middle range and a repulsion in the short range.

  16. On the spin excitation energy of the nucleon in the Skyrme model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adam, C.; Sanchez-Guillen, J.; Wereszczynski, A.

    2016-11-01

    In the Skyrme model of nucleons and nuclei, the spin excitation energy of the nucleon is traditionally calculated by a fit of the rigid rotor quantization of spin/isospin of the fundamental Skyrmion (the hedgehog) to the masses of the nucleon and the Delta resonance. The resulting, quite large spin excitation energy of the nucleon of about 73MeV is, however, rather difficult to reconcile with the small binding energies of physical nuclei, among other problems. Here, we argue that a more reliable interval of values for the spin excitation energy of the nucleon, compatible with many physical constraints is between 15MeV and 30MeV. The fit of the rigid rotor to the Delta, on the other hand, is problematic in any case, because it implies the use of a nonrelativistic method for a highly relativistic system.

  17. Microscopic colitis.

    PubMed

    Delgado, Jorge; Delgado, Bertha; Fich, Alex; Odes, Shmuel

    2004-08-01

    Microscopic colitis is an idiopathic chronic inflammatory bowel disease presenting with watery diarrhea. While colonoscopy and radiology findings are normal, the colon shows striking pathologic findings, including lymphocytic colitis and collagenous colitis. The clinical course is usually benign with sustained remission. Recent medical evidence shows that bismuth and budesonide are effective treatments.

  18. Skyrme random-phase-approximation description of lowest Kπ=2γ+ states in axially deformed nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nesterenko, V. O.; Kartavenko, V. G.; Kleinig, W.; Kvasil, J.; Repko, A.; Jolos, R. V.; Reinhard, P.-G.

    2016-03-01

    The lowest quadrupole γ -vibrational Kπ=2+ states in axially deformed rare-earth (Nd, Sm, Gd, Dy, Er, Yb, Hf, W) and actinide (U) nuclei are systematically investigated within the separable random-phase-approximation (SRPA) based on the Skyrme functional. The energies Eγ and reduced transition probabilities B (E 2 ) of 2γ+ states are calculated with the Skyrme forces SV-bas and SkM*. The energies of two-quasiparticle configurations forming the SRPA basis are corrected by using the pairing blocking effect. This results in a systematic downshift of Eγ by 0.3-0.5 MeV and thus in a better agreement with the experiment, especially in Sm, Gd, Dy, Hf, and W regions. For other isotopic chains, a noticeable overestimation of Eγ and too weak collectivity of 2γ+ states still persist. It is shown that domains of nuclei with low and high 2γ+ collectivity are related to the structure of the lowest two-quasiparticle states and conservation of the Nilsson selection rules. The description of 2γ+ states with SV-bas and SkM* is similar in light rare-earth nuclei but deviates in heavier nuclei. However SV-bas much better reproduces the quadrupole deformation and energy of the isoscalar giant quadrupole resonance. The accuracy of SRPA is justified by comparison with exact RPA. The calculations suggest that a further development of the self-consistent calculation schemes is needed for a systematic satisfactory description of the 2γ+ states.

  19. Terahertz Microscope

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-05-01

    bases and bacterial spores , etc. Recently, biomolecular nanoparticles have been successfully imaged using a THz microscope by the group of Prof. Han...compounds, pharmaceutical materials, illegal drugs, amino acids, nuclei-bases and 30 bacterial spores , etc. THz waves can also penetrate through many...Am. B, vol. 7, pp. 2006-2015, 1990. 25. J. D. Joannopoulos, R. D. Meade, and J. N. Winn, Photonic Crystals: Molding the Flow of Light, Princeton U

  20. Microscopic study of superdeformation in the A = 150 mass region

    SciTech Connect

    Rigollet, C.; Gall, B.; Bonche, P.

    1996-12-31

    The authors are presently investigating the properties of superdeformed (SD) nuclear states in the A=150 mass region. For that purpose, they use the cranked HFB method in which pairing correlations are treated dynamically by means of the Lipkin-Nogami prescription. Their goal is to take advantage of the large amount of experimental data to test the predictive power of their microscopic approach and of the effective interaction. In the present communication, they focus on {sup 152}Dy and {sup 153}Dy for which there are recent experimental data. In particular lifetime measurements have allowed to extract electric quadrupole moments. The new Skyrme effective force SLy4 is used to describe the nucleon-nucleon interaction, while for the pairing channel the authors use a density-dependent zero-range interaction.

  1. A new Skyrme energy density functional for a better description of spin-isospin resonances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roca-Maza, X.; Colò, G.; Cao, Li-Gang; Sagawa, H.

    2015-10-01

    A correct determination of the isospin and spin-isospin properties of the nuclear effective interaction should lead to an accurate description of the Gamow-Teller resonance (GT), the Spin Dipole Resonance (SDR), the Giant Dipole Resonance (GDR) or the Antianalog Giant Dipole Resonance (AGDR), among others. A new Skyrme energy density functional named SAMi is introduced with the aim of going a step forward in setting the bases for a more precise description of spin-isospin resonances [1, 2]. In addition, we will discuss some new features of our analysis on the AGDR in 208Pb [3] as compared with available experimental data on this resonance [4, 5, 6], and on the GDR [7]. Such study, guided by a simple yet physical pocket formula, has been developed by employing the so called SAMi-J family of systematically varied interactions. This set of interactions is compatible with experimental data for values of the symmetry energy at saturation J and slope parameter L falling in the ranges 31-33 MeV and 75-95 MeV, respectively.

  2. A new Skyrme energy density functional for a better description of spin-isospin resonances

    SciTech Connect

    Roca-Maza, X.; Colò, G.; Cao, Li-Gang; Sagawa, H.

    2015-10-15

    A correct determination of the isospin and spin-isospin properties of the nuclear effective interaction should lead to an accurate description of the Gamow-Teller resonance (GT), the Spin Dipole Resonance (SDR), the Giant Dipole Resonance (GDR) or the Antianalog Giant Dipole Resonance (AGDR), among others. A new Skyrme energy density functional named SAMi is introduced with the aim of going a step forward in setting the bases for a more precise description of spin-isospin resonances [1, 2]. In addition, we will discuss some new features of our analysis on the AGDR in {sup 208}Pb [3] as compared with available experimental data on this resonance [4, 5, 6], and on the GDR [7]. Such study, guided by a simple yet physical pocket formula, has been developed by employing the so called SAMi-J family of systematically varied interactions. This set of interactions is compatible with experimental data for values of the symmetry energy at saturation J and slope parameter L falling in the ranges 31−33 MeV and 75−95 MeV, respectively.

  3. Dipole response in neutron-rich nuclei with new Skyrme interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, H.; Burrello, S.; Colonna, M.; Baran, V.

    2016-07-01

    We investigate the isoscalar and isovector E 1 response of neutron-rich nuclei, within a semiclassical transport model employing effective interactions for the nuclear mean field. In particular, we adopt the recently introduced SAMi-J Skyrme interactions, whose parameters are specifically tuned to improve the description of spin-isospin properties of nuclei. Our analysis evidences a relevant degree of isoscalar-isovector mixing of the collective excitations developing in neutron-rich systems. Focusing on the low-lying strength emerging in the isovector response, we show that this energy region essentially corresponds to the excitation of isoscalar-like modes, which also contribute to the isovector response owing to their mixed character. Considering effective interactions which mostly differ in the isovector channels, we observe that these mixing effects increase with the slope L of the symmetry energy at saturation density, leading to a larger strength in the low-energy region of the isovector response. This result appears connected to the increase, with L , of the neutron-proton asymmetry at the surface of the considered nuclei, i.e., to the neutron skin thickness.

  4. Crustal moment of inertia of glitching pulsars with the KDE0v1 Skyrme interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madhuri, K.; Basu, D. N.; Routray, T. R.; Pattnaik, S. P.

    2017-07-01

    The mass, radius and crustal fraction of moment of inertia in neutron stars are calculated using β-equilibrated nuclear matter obtained from the Skyrme effective interaction. The transition density, pressure and proton fraction at the inner edge separating the liquid core from the solid crust of the neutron stars are determined from the thermodynamic stability conditions using the KDE0v1 set. The neutron star masses obtained by solving the Tolman-Oppenheimer-Volkoff equations using neutron star matter obtained from this set are able to describe highly massive compact stars ˜ 2M_{⊙}. The crustal fraction of the moment of inertia can be extracted from studying pulsar glitches. This fraction is highly dependent on the core-crust transition pressure and corresponding density. These results for pressure and density at core-crust transition together with the observed minimum crustal fraction of the total moment of inertia provide a limit for the radius of the Vela pulsar, R≥ 3.69 + 3.44M/M_{⊙}. Present calculations suggest that the crustal fraction of the total moment of inertia can be ˜ 6.3% due to crustal entrainment caused by the Bragg reflection of unbound neutrons by lattice ions.

  5. Fractional Hopfions in the Faddeev-Skyrme model with a symmetry breaking potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samoilenka, A.; Shnir, Ya.

    2017-09-01

    We construct new solutions of the Faddeev-Skyrme model with a symmetry breaking potential admitting S 1 vacuum. It includes, as a limiting case, the usual SO(3) symmetry breaking mass term, another limit corresponds to the potential m 2 ϕ 1 2 , which gives a mass to the corresponding component of the scalar field. However we find that the spacial distribution of the energy density of these solutions has more complicated structure, than in the case of the usual Hopfions, typically it represents two separate linked tubes with different thicknesses and positions. In order to classify these configurations we define a counterpart of the usual position curve, which represents a collection of loops C_1,C_{-1} corresponding to the preimages of the points \\overrightarrow{φ}=(± 1,0,0) , respectively. Then the Hopf invariant can be defined as Q=link(C_1,C_{-1}) . In this model, in the sectors of degrees Q = 5,6,7 we found solutions of new type, for which one or both of these tubes represent trefoil knots. Further, some of these solutions possess different types of curves C_1 and C_{-1}.

  6. Virtual pinhole confocal microscope

    SciTech Connect

    George, J.S.; Rector, D.M.; Ranken, D.M.; Peterson, B.; Kesteron, J.

    1999-06-01

    Scanned confocal microscopes enhance imaging capabilities, providing improved contrast and image resolution in 3-D, but existing systems have significant technical shortcomings and are expensive. Researchers at Los Alamos National Laboratory have developed a novel approach--virtual pinhole confocal microscopy--that uses state of the art illumination, detection, and data processing technologies to produce an imager with a number of advantages: reduced cost, faster imaging, improved efficiency and sensitivity, improved reliability and much greater flexibility. Work at Los Alamos demonstrated proof of principle; prototype hardware and software have been used to demonstrate technical feasibility of several implementation strategies. The system uses high performance illumination, patterned in time and space. The authors have built functional confocal imagers using video display technologies (LCD or DLP) and novel scanner based on a micro-lens array. They have developed a prototype system for high performance data acquisition and processing, designed to support realtime confocal imaging. They have developed algorithms to reconstruct confocal images from a time series of spatially sub-sampled images; software development remains an area of active development. These advances allow the collection of high quality confocal images (in fluorescence, reflectance and transmission modes) with equipment that can inexpensively retrofit to existing microscopes. Planned future extensions to these technologies will significantly enhance capabilities for microscopic imaging in a variety of applications, including confocal endoscopy, and confocal spectral imaging.

  7. Phase transitions of dense neutron matter with generalized Skyrme interaction to superfluid states with triplet pairing in strong magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarasov, A. N.

    2012-12-01

    A generalized non-relativistic Fermi-liquid approach was used to find analytical formulas for temperatures Tc1(n, H) and Tc2(n, H) (which are functions nonlinear of density n and linear of magnetic field H) of phase transitions in spatially uniform dense pure neutron matter from normal to superfluid states with spin-triplet p-wave pairing (similar to anisotropic superfluid phases 3He-A1 and 3He-A2) in steady and homogeneous strong magnetic field (but |μn| H ll Ec < ɛF(n), where μn is the magnetic dipole moment of a neutron, Ec is the cutoff energy and ɛF(n) is the Fermi energy in neutron matter). General formulas for Tc1, 2 (n, H) (valid for arbitrary parameterization of the effective Skyrme interaction in neutron matter) are specified here for generalized BSk18 parameterization of the Skyrme forces (with additional terms dependent on density n) on the interval 0.3 n0 < n < nc (BSk18) ≍ 2.7952 · n0, where n0 = 0.17 fm-3 is nuclear density and at critical density nc(BSk18) triplet superfluidity disappears, Tc0(n, cH = 0) = 0. Expressions for phase transition temperatures Tc0(n)<0.09MeV (at Ec = 10MeV) and Tc1, 2(n, H) are realistic non-monotone functions of density n for BSk18 parameterization of the Skyrme forces (contrary to their monotone increase for all previous BSk parameterizations). Phase transitions to superfluid states of such type might occur in liquid outer core of magnetars (strongly magnetized neutron stars).

  8. Applications of Skyrme energy-density functional to fusion reactions for synthesis of superheavy nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Ning; Scheid, Werner; Wu Xizhen; Liu Min; Li Zhuxia

    2006-10-15

    The Skyrme energy-density functional approach has been extended to study massive heavy-ion fusion reactions. Based on the potential barrier obtained and the parametrized barrier distribution the fusion (capture) excitation functions of a lot of heavy-ion fusion reactions are studied systematically. The average deviations of fusion cross sections at energies near and above the barriers from experimental data are less than 0.05 for 92% of 76 fusion reactions with Z{sub 1}Z{sub 2}<1200. For the massive fusion reactions, for example, the {sup 238}U-induced reactions and {sup 48}Ca+{sup 208}Pb, the capture excitation functions have been reproduced remarkably well. The influence of structure effects in the reaction partners on the capture cross sections is studied with our parametrized barrier distribution. By comparing the reactions induced by double-magic nucleus {sup 48}Ca and by {sup 32}S and {sup 35}Cl, the ''threshold-like'' behavior in the capture excitation function for {sup 48}Ca-induced reactions is explored and an optimal balance between the capture cross section and the excitation energy of the compound nucleus is studied. Finally, the fusion reactions with {sup 36}S, {sup 37}Cl, {sup 48}Ca, and {sup 50}Ti bombarding {sup 248}Cm, {sup 247,249}Bk, {sup 250,252,254}Cf, and {sup 252,254}Es, as well as the reactions leading to the same compound nucleus with Z=120 and N=182, are studied further. The calculation results for these reactions are useful for searching for the optimal fusion configuration and suitable incident energy in the synthesis of superheavy nuclei.

  9. Remarks on the use of projected densities in the density-dependent part of Skyrme or Gogny functionals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robledo, L. M.

    2010-06-01

    I discuss the inadequacy of the 'projected density' prescription to be used in density-dependent forces/functionals when calculations beyond mean field are pursued. The case of calculations aimed at the symmetry restoration of mean fields obtained with effective realistic forces of the Skyrme or Gogny type is considered in detail. It is shown that, at least for the restoration of spatial symmetries like rotations, translations or parity, the above prescription yields catastrophic results for the energy that drive the intrinsic wave-function to configurations with infinite deformation, thereby preventing its use both in projection after and before variation.

  10. Properties of nuclei in the nobelium region studied within the covariant, Skyrme, and Gogny energy density functionals

    SciTech Connect

    Dobaczewski, J.; Afanasjev, A. V.; Bender, M.; Shi, Yue

    2015-07-29

    In this study, we calculate properties of the ground and excited states of nuclei in the nobelium region for proton and neutron numbers of 92 ≤ Z ≤ 104 and 144 ≤ N ≤ 156, respectively. We use three different energy-density-functional (EDF) approaches, based on covariant, Skyrme, and Gogny functionals, each with two different parameter sets. A comparative analysis of the results obtained for quasiparticle spectra, odd–even and two-particle mass staggering, and moments of inertia allows us to identify single-particle and shell effects that are characteristic to these different models and to illustrate possible systematic uncertainties related to using the EDF modelling.

  11. Mars Life? - Microscopic Tubular Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    This electron microscope image shows extremely tiny tubular structures that are possible microscopic fossils of bacteria-like organisms that may have lived on Mars more than 3.6 billion years ago. A two-year investigation by a NASA research team found organic molecules, mineral features characteristic of biological activity and possible microscopic fossils such as these inside of an ancient Martian rock that fell to Earth as a meteorite. The largest possible fossils are less than 1/100th the diameter of a human hair in size while most are ten times smaller. The fossil-like structures were found in carbonate minerals formed along pre-existing fractures in the meteorite in a fashion similar to the way fossils occur in limestone on Earth, although on a microscopic scale.

  12. On microscopic theory of radiative nuclear reaction characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamerdzhiev, S. P.; Achakovskiy, O. I.; Avdeenkov, A. V.; Goriely, S.

    2016-07-01

    A survey of some results in the modern microscopic theory of properties of nuclear reactions with gamma rays is given. First of all, we discuss the impact of Phonon Coupling (PC) on the Photon Strength Function (PSF) because it represents the most natural physical source of additional strength found for Sn isotopes in recent experiments that could not be explained within the standard HFB + QRPA approach. The self-consistent version of the Extended Theory of Finite Fermi Systems in the Quasiparticle Time Blocking Approximation is applied. It uses the HFB mean field and includes both the QRPA and PC effects on the basis of the SLy4 Skyrme force. With our microscopic E1 PSFs, the following properties have been calculated for many stable and unstable even-even semi-magic Sn and Ni isotopes as well as for double-magic 132Sn and 208Pb using the reaction codes EMPIRE and TALYS with several Nuclear Level Density (NLD) models: (1) the neutron capture cross sections; (2) the corresponding neutron capture gamma spectra; (3) the average radiative widths of neutron resonances. In all the properties considered, the PC contribution turned out to be significant, as compared with the standard QRPA one, and necessary to explain the available experimental data. The results with the phenomenological so-called generalized superfluid NLD model turned out to be worse, on the whole, than those obtained with the microscopic HFB + combinatorial NLD model. The very topical question about the M1 resonance contribution to PSFs is also discussed. Finally, we also discuss the modern microscopic NLD models based on the self-consistent HFB method and show their relevance to explain the experimental data as compared with the phenomenological models. The use of these self-consistent microscopic approaches is of particular relevance for nuclear astrophysics, but also for the study of double-magic nuclei.

  13. On microscopic theory of radiative nuclear reaction characteristics

    SciTech Connect

    Kamerdzhiev, S. P.; Achakovskiy, O. I. Avdeenkov, A. V.; Goriely, S.

    2016-07-15

    A survey of some results in the modern microscopic theory of properties of nuclear reactions with gamma rays is given. First of all, we discuss the impact of Phonon Coupling (PC) on the Photon Strength Function (PSF) because it represents the most natural physical source of additional strength found for Sn isotopes in recent experiments that could not be explained within the standard HFB + QRPA approach. The self-consistent version of the Extended Theory of Finite Fermi Systems in the Quasiparticle Time Blocking Approximation is applied. It uses the HFB mean field and includes both the QRPA and PC effects on the basis of the SLy4 Skyrme force. With our microscopic E1 PSFs, the following properties have been calculated for many stable and unstable even–even semi-magic Sn and Ni isotopes as well as for double-magic {sup 132}Sn and {sup 208}Pb using the reaction codes EMPIRE and TALYS with several Nuclear Level Density (NLD) models: (1) the neutron capture cross sections; (2) the corresponding neutron capture gamma spectra; (3) the average radiative widths of neutron resonances. In all the properties considered, the PC contribution turned out to be significant, as compared with the standard QRPA one, and necessary to explain the available experimental data. The results with the phenomenological so-called generalized superfluid NLD model turned out to be worse, on the whole, than those obtained with the microscopic HFB + combinatorial NLD model. The very topical question about the M1 resonance contribution to PSFs is also discussed.Finally, we also discuss the modern microscopic NLD models based on the self-consistent HFB method and show their relevance to explain the experimental data as compared with the phenomenological models. The use of these self-consistent microscopic approaches is of particular relevance for nuclear astrophysics, but also for the study of double-magic nuclei.

  14. Single-wavelength STED microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baer, Stephen C.

    2011-03-01

    The zero-point STED microscope (US Pat. 5,866,911)1 was the first far-field microscope to overcome the diffraction limit, but optimally it requires two expensive synchronized short-pulsed lasers. Replacing the synchronized pulsed lasers with CW lasers had been proposed to reduce costs1, but this seriously reduced resolution compared to a similarly powered pulsed STED microscope. A recent theoretical and experimental study (Nat. Methods 4, 915 (2007))3 argued that CW STED has better resolution than previously believed, but there appear to be flaws in the theory sufficient to raise questions about its reported experimental confirmation. We describe an alternative approach to reducing cost of the STED microscope while preserving resolution. A portion of the beam from a femtosecond pulsed laser of a wavelength able to excite fluorescence by multiphoton absorption, is passed through a long optical fiber to stretch the pulses to reduce their peak power so they can no longer excite but can quench by stimulated emission. The stretched pulses are shaped into a doughnut profile and then recombined with the first beam for interaction with the specimen. With suitable fluorophores, this instrument should be able to match the resolution performance of the pulsed laser STED microscope using separate lasers. Particularly when added to an existing multiphoton microscope, such performance should be achievable at extremely low added cost.

  15. Octupole deformation in the nuclear chart based on the 3D Skyrme Hartree-Fock plus BCS model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebata, Shuichiro; Nakatsukasa, Takashi

    2017-06-01

    We have performed a systematic study of the ground state for 1002 even-even nuclei in which 28 octupole-deformed nuclei are found. The interplay between the spatial deformation and the pairing correlation plays an important role in the nuclear structure. Our model is based on the Skyrme Hartree-Fock plus BCS model represented in the three-dimensional Cartesian coordinate space, which can describe any kind of nuclear shape. The quadrupole and octupole deformed nuclei appear in the mass region with characteristic neutron and proton numbers which are consistent with previous studies. In our results, there appear only pear shapes (β 30) in the octupole deformed nuclei. We investigate the potential energy surfaces as functions of the octupole deformations (β 3m ; m = 0, 1, 2, 3), which tells us that 220Rn also has local minima in the β 31 and β 32 potential energy surfaces.

  16. Properties of nuclei in the nobelium region studied within the covariant, Skyrme, and Gogny energy density functionals

    DOE PAGES

    Dobaczewski, J.; Afanasjev, A. V.; Bender, M.; ...

    2015-07-29

    In this study, we calculate properties of the ground and excited states of nuclei in the nobelium region for proton and neutron numbers of 92 ≤ Z ≤ 104 and 144 ≤ N ≤ 156, respectively. We use three different energy-density-functional (EDF) approaches, based on covariant, Skyrme, and Gogny functionals, each with two different parameter sets. A comparative analysis of the results obtained for quasiparticle spectra, odd–even and two-particle mass staggering, and moments of inertia allows us to identify single-particle and shell effects that are characteristic to these different models and to illustrate possible systematic uncertainties related to using themore » EDF modelling.« less

  17. Further explorations of Skyrme-Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov mass formulas. XIII. The 2012 atomic mass evaluation and the symmetry coefficient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goriely, S.; Chamel, N.; Pearson, J. M.

    2013-08-01

    Our family of three Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov (HFB) mass models, labeled BSk19, BSk20, and BSk21, is here extended by (a) refitting to the 2012 Atomic Mass Evaluation (AME), and (b) varying the symmetry coefficient J. Five new models, labeled BSk22 to BSk26, along with their mass tables, HFB-22 to HFB-26, respectively, are presented. These models are characterized by unconventional Skyrme forces containing t4 and t5 terms, i.e., density-dependent generalizations of the usual t1 and t2 terms, respectively. Highly realistic contact pairing forces are used. The Skyrme forces are constrained to fit realistic equations of state of neutron matter stiff enough to support the massive neutron stars PSR J1614-2230 and PSR J0348+0432. Unphysical spin and spin-isospin instabilities of homogeneous nuclear matter, including the transition to a polarized state in neutron-star matter, are eliminated with the new forces. The best fits to the new database of 2353 nuclei are found for models BSk24 (J=30 MeV) and BSk25 (J=29 MeV), for which the root-mean square (rms) deviations are 0.55 and 0.54 MeV, respectively. Despite the larger database this is even better than the rms deviation of 0.58 MeV that we found with our fits to the 2003 AME. With J=32 MeV the rms deviation rises to 0.63 MeV. The neutron-skin thicknesses derived from antiproton scattering are shown to be consistent with the conclusions that we have drawn from masses.

  18. Fermi Gas Microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Setiawan, Widagdo

    Recent advances in using microscopes in ultracold atom experiment have allowed experimenters for the first time to directly observe and manipulate individual atoms in individual lattice sites. This technique enhances our capability to simulate strongly correlated systems such as Mott insulator and high temperature superconductivity. Currently, all ultracold atom experiments with high resolution imaging capability use bosonic atoms. In this thesis, I present our progress towards creating the fermionic version of the microscope experiment which is more suitable for simulating real condensed matter systems. Lithium is ideal due to the existence of both fermionic and bosonic isotopes, its light mass, which means faster experiment time scales that suppresses many sources of technical noise, and also due to the existence of a broad Feshbach resonance, which can be used to tune the inter-particle interaction strength over a wide range from attractive, non-interacting, and repulsive interactions. A high numerical aperture objective will be used to image and manipulate the atoms with single lattice site resolution. This setup should allow us to implement the Hubbard hamiltonian which could describe interesting quantum phases such as antiferromagnetism, d-wave superfluidity, and high temperature superconductivity. I will also discuss the feasibility of the Raman sideband cooling method for cooling the atoms during the imaging process. We have also developed a new electronic control system to control the sequence of the experiment. This electronic system is very scalable in order to keep up with the increasing complexity of atomic physics experiments. Furthermore, the system is also designed to be more precise in order to keep up with the faster time scale of lithium experiment.

  19. The Scanning Optical Microscope.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sheppard, C. J. R.

    1978-01-01

    Describes the principle of the scanning optical microscope and explains its advantages over the conventional microscope in the improvement of resolution and contrast, as well as the possibility of producing a picture from optical harmonies generated within the specimen.

  20. TEAM Electron Microscope Animation

    SciTech Connect

    2012-01-01

    The TEAM Electron Microscope, a device that enables atomic-scale imaging in 3-D, has a rotating stage that can hold and position samples inside electron microscopes with unprecedented stability, position-control accuracy, and range of motion.The TEAM Stage makes one of the world's most powerful electron microscopes even better, and enables previously impossible experiments.

  1. The microscopes of Antoni van Leeuwenhoek.

    PubMed

    van Zuylen, J

    1981-03-01

    The seventeenth-century Dutch microscopist, Antoni van Leeuwenhoek, was the first man to make a protracted study of microscopical objects, and, unlike his contemporary Robert Hooke, he viewed by transmitted light. Leeuwenhoek made over 500 of his own, curious, simple microscopes, but now only nine are known to exist. The exact nature of the lenses Leeuwenhoek made, has for long been a puzzle. The existing microscopes have now been examined in detail, and their optical characteristics measured and tabulated. It is proposed that the lens of highest magnification, x 266, was made using a special blown bubble technique.

  2. Quantum preequilibrium multistep direct calculations for nucleon scattering on deformed nuclei: a microscopic approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dupuis, Marc; Bonneau, Ludovic; Kawano, Toshihiko

    2008-04-01

    An introduction of the different quantum mechanics models is given for the calculation of pre-equilibrium multistep direct process for nucleon induced reaction. A practical application is presented for 238U neutron induced reaction at medium energy (10-20 MeV). The double differential cross-sections are calculated with no adjustable parameter and reproduced the data very well. The cross-sections are expressed as a sum of DWBA transition amplitudes computed with a microscopic two-body interaction. The exited states of the target are expressed as particle-hole excitations built from single particle states obtained with the HF+BCS calculation with a Skyrme force. We also perform a sensitivity study our calculations with respect to the ingredients of the model, namely the two-body interaction which generates the transitions and the target states description.

  3. Quantum preequilibrium multistep direct calculations for nucleon scattering on deformed nuclei: a microscopic approach

    SciTech Connect

    Dupuis, Marc; Kawano, Toshihiko; Bonneau, Ludovic

    2008-04-17

    An introduction of the different quantum mechanics models is given for the calculation of pre-equilibrium multistep direct process for nucleon induced reaction. A practical application is presented for {sup 238}U neutron induced reaction at medium energy (10-20 MeV). The double differential cross-sections are calculated with no adjustable parameter and reproduced the data very well. The cross-sections are expressed as a sum of DWBA transition amplitudes computed with a microscopic two-body interaction. The exited states of the target are expressed as particle-hole excitations built from single particle states obtained with the HF+BCS calculation with a Skyrme force. We also perform a sensitivity study our calculations with respect to the ingredients of the model, namely the two-body interaction which generates the transitions and the target states description.

  4. Cryogenic immersion microscope

    DOEpatents

    Le Gros, Mark; Larabell, Carolyn A.

    2010-12-14

    A cryogenic immersion microscope whose objective lens is at least partially in contact with a liquid reservoir of a cryogenic liquid, in which reservoir a sample of interest is immersed is disclosed. When the cryogenic liquid has an index of refraction that reduces refraction at interfaces between the lens and the sample, overall resolution and image quality are improved. A combination of an immersion microscope and x-ray microscope, suitable for imaging at cryogenic temperatures is also disclosed.

  5. Thermal-Wave Microscope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Robert E.; Kramarchuk, Ihor; Williams, Wallace D.; Pouch, John J.; Gilbert, Percy

    1989-01-01

    Computer-controlled thermal-wave microscope developed to investigate III-V compound semiconductor devices and materials. Is nondestructive technique providing information on subsurface thermal features of solid samples. Furthermore, because this is subsurface technique, three-dimensional imaging also possible. Microscope uses intensity-modulated electron beam of modified scanning electron microscope to generate thermal waves in sample. Acoustic waves generated by thermal waves received by transducer and processed in computer to form images displayed on video display of microscope or recorded on magnetic disk.

  6. Towards a Microscopic Reaction Description Based on Energy Density Functionals

    SciTech Connect

    Nobre, G A; DIetrich, F S; Escher, J E; Thompson, I J; Dupuis, M; Terasaki, J; Engel, J

    2011-09-26

    A microscopic calculation of reaction cross sections for nucleon-nucleus scattering has been performed by explicitly coupling the elastic channel to all particle-hole excitations in the target and one-nucleon pickup channels. The particle-hole states may be regarded as doorway states through which the flux flows to more complicated configurations, and subsequently to long-lived compound nucleus resonances. Target excitations for {sup 40,48}Ca, {sup 58}Ni, {sup 90}Zr and {sup 144}Sm were described in a random-phase framework using a Skyrme functional. Reaction cross sections obtained agree very well with experimental data and predictions of a state-of-the-art fitted optical potential. Couplings between inelastic states were found to be negligible, while the pickup channels contribute significantly. The effect of resonances from higher-order channels was assessed. Elastic angular distributions were also calculated within the same method, achieving good agreement with experimental data. For the first time observed absorptions are completely accounted for by explicit channel coupling, for incident energies between 10 and 70 MeV, with consistent angular distribution results.

  7. Microscopic method for E 0 transition matrix elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, B. A.; Garnsworthy, A. B.; Kibédi, T.; Stuchbery, A. E.

    2017-01-01

    We present a microscopic model for electric monopole (E 0 ) transition matrix elements by combining a configuration interaction model for orbital occupations with an energy-density functional model for the single-particle potential and radial wave functions. The configuration interaction model is used to constrain the orbital occupations for the diagonal and off-diagonal matrix elements. These are used in an energy-density functional calculation to obtain a self-consistent transition density. This density contains the valence contribution, as well as the polarization of the protons by the valence protons and neutrons. We show connections between E 0 matrix elements and isomer and isotope shifts of the charge radius. The spin-orbit correction to the charge density is important in some cases. This model accounts for a large part of the data over a wide region of the nuclear chart. It also accounts for the shape of the observed electron scattering form factors. The results depend on the Skyrme parameters used for the energy-density functional and might be used to provide new constraints for them.

  8. Weizsäcker-Skyrme-type nuclear mass formula incorporating two combinatorial radial basis function prescriptions and their application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Na Na; Zhang, Hai Fei; Yin, Peng; Bao, Xiao Jun; Zhang, Hong Fei

    2017-08-01

    Within the improved Weizsäcker-Skyrme (WS)-type nuclear mass formulas, we systematically calculated one-nucleon and two-nucleon separated energy, α-decay and β-decay energies, and the odd-even staggering (OES) of nuclear binding energies. As a result, the root-mean-square (rms) deviations of 2267 nuclei within the new improved WS-type mass formula are dropped from 493 to 167 keV, where 2267 nuclei are extracted from the atomic mass evaluation of 2012. Simultaneously, all the rms deviations of one-nucleon and two-nucleon separation energies and decay energies Qα,Qβ-,Qβ+, and QEC for more than 3000 nuclei are cut down by about 100-400 keV. Further, some basic physical observations of 988 boundary nuclei are predicted for providing reference to experiments. Finally, the overall neutron OESs and proton OESs have been systemically investigated and the residual error satisfies a normal distribution. The pairing gaps Δn and Δp of the isotopes of O, Ca, Ni, Zr, Sn, Gd, Qs, Pb, Pa, Ds and the isotonic magic chains of N =28 ,50 ,82 ,126 and even-even nuclei are also studied with dramatic improvements obtained. Especially, the rms of Δn and Δp in these nuclei have been reduced by about 200 keV. The above physical quantities show important information for nuclear charts and the features of nuclear structure.

  9. Microscopic Theory of Nuclear Fission: A Review

    DOE PAGES

    Schunck, N.; Robledo, L. M.

    2016-10-11

    This paper reviews how nuclear fission is described within nuclear density functional theory. A distinction should be made between spontaneous fission, where half-lives are the main observables and quantum tunnelling the essential concept, and induced fission, where the focus is on fragment properties and explicitly time-dependent approaches are often invoked. Overall, the cornerstone of the density functional theory approach to fission is the energy density functional formalism. The basic tenets of this method, including some well-known tools such as the Hartree–Fock–Bogoliubov (HFB) theory, effective two-body nuclear potentials such as the Skyrme and Gogny force, finite-temperature extensions and beyond mean-field corrections,more » are presented succinctly. The energy density functional approach is often combined with the hypothesis that the time-scale of the large amplitude collective motion driving the system to fission is slow compared to typical time-scales of nucleons inside the nucleus. In practice, this hypothesis of adiabaticity is implemented by introducing (a few) collective variables and mapping out the many-body Schrödinger equation into a collective Schrödinger-like equation for the nuclear wave-packet. The region of the collective space where the system transitions from one nucleus to two (or more) fragments defines what are called the scission configurations. The inertia tensor that enters the kinetic energy term of the collective Schrödinger-like equation is one of the most essential ingredients of the theory, since it includes the response of the system to small changes in the collective variables. For this reason, the two main approximations used to compute this inertia tensor, the adiabatic time-dependent HFB and the generator coordinate method, are presented in detail, both in their general formulation and in their most common approximations. The collective inertia tensor enters also the Wentzel–Kramers–Brillouin (WKB) formula

  10. Microscopic theory of nuclear fission: a review.

    PubMed

    Schunck, N; Robledo, L M

    2016-11-01

    This article reviews how nuclear fission is described within nuclear density functional theory. A distinction should be made between spontaneous fission, where half-lives are the main observables and quantum tunnelling the essential concept, and induced fission, where the focus is on fragment properties and explicitly time-dependent approaches are often invoked. Overall, the cornerstone of the density functional theory approach to fission is the energy density functional formalism. The basic tenets of this method, including some well-known tools such as the Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov (HFB) theory, effective two-body nuclear potentials such as the Skyrme and Gogny force, finite-temperature extensions and beyond mean-field corrections, are presented succinctly. The energy density functional approach is often combined with the hypothesis that the time-scale of the large amplitude collective motion driving the system to fission is slow compared to typical time-scales of nucleons inside the nucleus. In practice, this hypothesis of adiabaticity is implemented by introducing (a few) collective variables and mapping out the many-body Schrödinger equation into a collective Schrödinger-like equation for the nuclear wave-packet. The region of the collective space where the system transitions from one nucleus to two (or more) fragments defines what are called the scission configurations. The inertia tensor that enters the kinetic energy term of the collective Schrödinger-like equation is one of the most essential ingredients of the theory, since it includes the response of the system to small changes in the collective variables. For this reason, the two main approximations used to compute this inertia tensor, the adiabatic time-dependent HFB and the generator coordinate method, are presented in detail, both in their general formulation and in their most common approximations. The collective inertia tensor enters also the Wentzel-Kramers-Brillouin (WKB) formula used to extract

  11. Microscopic theory of nuclear fission: a review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schunck, N.; Robledo, L. M.

    2016-11-01

    This article reviews how nuclear fission is described within nuclear density functional theory. A distinction should be made between spontaneous fission, where half-lives are the main observables and quantum tunnelling the essential concept, and induced fission, where the focus is on fragment properties and explicitly time-dependent approaches are often invoked. Overall, the cornerstone of the density functional theory approach to fission is the energy density functional formalism. The basic tenets of this method, including some well-known tools such as the Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov (HFB) theory, effective two-body nuclear potentials such as the Skyrme and Gogny force, finite-temperature extensions and beyond mean-field corrections, are presented succinctly. The energy density functional approach is often combined with the hypothesis that the time-scale of the large amplitude collective motion driving the system to fission is slow compared to typical time-scales of nucleons inside the nucleus. In practice, this hypothesis of adiabaticity is implemented by introducing (a few) collective variables and mapping out the many-body Schrödinger equation into a collective Schrödinger-like equation for the nuclear wave-packet. The region of the collective space where the system transitions from one nucleus to two (or more) fragments defines what are called the scission configurations. The inertia tensor that enters the kinetic energy term of the collective Schrödinger-like equation is one of the most essential ingredients of the theory, since it includes the response of the system to small changes in the collective variables. For this reason, the two main approximations used to compute this inertia tensor, the adiabatic time-dependent HFB and the generator coordinate method, are presented in detail, both in their general formulation and in their most common approximations. The collective inertia tensor enters also the Wentzel-Kramers-Brillouin (WKB) formula used to extract

  12. Microscopic Theory of Nuclear Fission: A Review

    SciTech Connect

    Schunck, N.; Robledo, L. M.

    2016-10-11

    This paper reviews how nuclear fission is described within nuclear density functional theory. A distinction should be made between spontaneous fission, where half-lives are the main observables and quantum tunnelling the essential concept, and induced fission, where the focus is on fragment properties and explicitly time-dependent approaches are often invoked. Overall, the cornerstone of the density functional theory approach to fission is the energy density functional formalism. The basic tenets of this method, including some well-known tools such as the Hartree–Fock–Bogoliubov (HFB) theory, effective two-body nuclear potentials such as the Skyrme and Gogny force, finite-temperature extensions and beyond mean-field corrections, are presented succinctly. The energy density functional approach is often combined with the hypothesis that the time-scale of the large amplitude collective motion driving the system to fission is slow compared to typical time-scales of nucleons inside the nucleus. In practice, this hypothesis of adiabaticity is implemented by introducing (a few) collective variables and mapping out the many-body Schrödinger equation into a collective Schrödinger-like equation for the nuclear wave-packet. The region of the collective space where the system transitions from one nucleus to two (or more) fragments defines what are called the scission configurations. The inertia tensor that enters the kinetic energy term of the collective Schrödinger-like equation is one of the most essential ingredients of the theory, since it includes the response of the system to small changes in the collective variables. For this reason, the two main approximations used to compute this inertia tensor, the adiabatic time-dependent HFB and the generator coordinate method, are presented in detail, both in their general formulation and in their most common approximations. The collective inertia tensor enters also the Wentzel–Kramers–Brillouin (WKB) formula used to

  13. Mailing microscope slides

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Many insects feed agriculturally important crops, trees, and ornamental plants and cause millions of dollars of damage annually. Identification for some of these require the preparation of a microscope slide for examination. There are times when a microscope slide may need to be sent away to a speci...

  14. The Homemade Microscope.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, Roger C., Jr.

    1991-01-01

    Directions for the building of a pocket microscope that will make visible the details of insect structure and living bacteria are described. Background information on the history of microscopes and lenses is provided. The procedures for producing various types of lenses are included. (KR)

  15. The Light Microscope.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, W. L.

    1995-01-01

    Describes the function of the various parts of the microscope and their integration in the formation of an optical image. Presents a procedure for setting up a microscope to obtain maximum resolution and contrast for each objective lens at all magnifications. (JRH)

  16. The Homemade Microscope.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, Roger C., Jr.

    1991-01-01

    Directions for the building of a pocket microscope that will make visible the details of insect structure and living bacteria are described. Background information on the history of microscopes and lenses is provided. The procedures for producing various types of lenses are included. (KR)

  17. Photography through the Microscope.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McNeil, D. W.

    1992-01-01

    Describes how to illuminate and optically stain slides for microscope use and how to interface a 35mm camera with a microscope using an adaptor. Provides equipment descriptions and sources, details about illumination, image formation, darkfield adaptors, centerable filter adaptors, darkfield stops, rheinburg filters, and choosing specimens to…

  18. Mars Life? - Microscopic Structures

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1996-08-09

    In the center of this electron microscope image of a small chip from a meteorite are several tiny structures that are possible microscopic fossils of primitive, bacteria-like organisms that may have lived on Mars more than 3.6 billion years ago. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA00283

  19. [Microscopic colitis: update 2014].

    PubMed

    Burgmann, Konstantin; Fraga, Montserrat; Schoepfer, Alain M; Yun, Pu

    2014-09-03

    Microscopic colitis, which includes lymphocytic colitis and collagenous colitis, represents a frequent cause of chronic watery diarrhea especially in the elderly population. Several medications, such as nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs, proton pump inhibitors or antidepressants, as well as cigarette smoking have been recognized as risk factors for microscopic colitis. The diagnosis of microscopic colitis is based on a macroscopically normal ileo-colonoscopy and several biopsies from the entire colon, which demonstrate the pathognomonic histopathologic findings. Therapy is mainly based on the use of budesonide. Other medications, such as mesalazine, cholestyramine and bismuth, have been evaluated as well but the evidence is less solid.

  20. Mars Life? - Microscopic Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    In the center of this electron microscope image of a small chip from a meteorite are several tiny structures that are possible microscopic fossils of primitive, bacteria-like organisms that may have lived on Mars more than 3.6 billion years ago. A two-year investigation by a NASA research team found organic molecules, mineral features characteristic of biological activity and possible microscopic fossils such as these inside of an ancient Martian rock that fell to Earth as a meteorite. The largest possible fossils are less than 1/100th the diameter of a human hair in size while most are ten times smaller.

  1. Compact Microscope Imaging System Developed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McDowell, Mark

    2001-01-01

    The Compact Microscope Imaging System (CMIS) is a diagnostic tool with intelligent controls for use in space, industrial, medical, and security applications. The CMIS can be used in situ with a minimum amount of user intervention. This system, which was developed at the NASA Glenn Research Center, can scan, find areas of interest, focus, and acquire images automatically. Large numbers of multiple cell experiments require microscopy for in situ observations; this is only feasible with compact microscope systems. CMIS is a miniature machine vision system that combines intelligent image processing with remote control capabilities. The software also has a user-friendly interface that can be used independently of the hardware for post-experiment analysis. CMIS has potential commercial uses in the automated online inspection of precision parts, medical imaging, security industry (examination of currency in automated teller machines and fingerprint identification in secure entry locks), environmental industry (automated examination of soil/water samples), biomedical field (automated blood/cell analysis), and microscopy community. CMIS will improve research in several ways: It will expand the capabilities of MSD experiments utilizing microscope technology. It may be used in lunar and Martian experiments (Rover Robot). Because of its reduced size, it will enable experiments that were not feasible previously. It may be incorporated into existing shuttle orbiter and space station experiments, including glove-box-sized experiments as well as ground-based experiments.

  2. Terrestrial Clay under Microscope

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2008-09-30

    A scanning electron microscope captured this image of terresterial soil containing a phyllosilicate mineral from Koua Bocca, Ivory Coast, West Africa. This soil shares some similarities with Martian soil scooped by NASA Phoenix Lander.

  3. Assessment of Petrological Microscopes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mathison, Charter Innes

    1990-01-01

    Presented is a set of procedures designed to check the design, ergonomics, illumination, function, optics, accessory equipment, and image quality of a microscope being considered for purchase. Functions for use in a petrology or mineralogy laboratory are stressed. (CW)

  4. Microscope collision protection apparatus

    DOEpatents

    DeNure, Charles R.

    2001-10-23

    A microscope collision protection apparatus for a remote control microscope which protects the optical and associated components from damage in the event of an uncontrolled collision with a specimen, regardless of the specimen size or shape. In a preferred embodiment, the apparatus includes a counterbalanced slide for mounting the microscope's optical components. This slide replaces the rigid mounts on conventional upright microscopes with a precision ball bearing slide. As the specimen contacts an optical component, the contacting force will move the slide and the optical components mounted thereon. This movement will protect the optical and associated components from damage as the movement causes a limit switch to be actuated, thereby stopping all motors responsible for the collision.

  5. Assessment of Petrological Microscopes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mathison, Charter Innes

    1990-01-01

    Presented is a set of procedures designed to check the design, ergonomics, illumination, function, optics, accessory equipment, and image quality of a microscope being considered for purchase. Functions for use in a petrology or mineralogy laboratory are stressed. (CW)

  6. Infrared microscope inspection apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Forman, S.E.; Caunt, J.W.

    1985-02-26

    Apparatus and system for inspecting infrared transparents, such as an array of photovoltaic modules containing silicon solar cells, includes an infrared microscope, at least three sources of infrared light placed around and having their axes intersect the center of the object field and means for sending the reflected light through the microscope. The apparatus is adapted to be mounted on an X-Y translator positioned adjacent the object surface. 4 figs.

  7. Hypoxia in Microscopic Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiao-Feng; O’Donoghue, Joseph A

    2008-01-01

    Tumor hypoxia has been commonly observed in a broad spectrum of primary solid malignancies. Hypoxia is associated with tumor progression, increased aggressiveness, enhanced metastatic potential and poor prognosis. Hypoxic tumor cells are resistant to radiotherapy and some forms of chemotherapy. Using an animal model, we recently showed that microscopic tumors less than 1 mm diameter were severely hypoxic. In this review, models and techniques for the study of hypoxia in microscopic tumors are discussed. PMID:18384940

  8. Infrared microscope inspection apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Forman, Steven E.; Caunt, James W.

    1985-02-26

    Apparatus and system for inspecting infrared transparents, such as an array of photovoltaic modules containing silicon solar cells, includes an infrared microscope, at least three sources of infrared light placed around and having their axes intersect the center of the object field and means for sending the reflected light through the microscope. The apparatus is adapted to be mounted on an X-Y translator positioned adjacent the object surface.

  9. [Stereo microscope, neglected tool].

    PubMed

    Gacek, Grzegorz

    2017-01-01

    Stereoscopes, in author opinion, are neglected tools in modern biology. This article shortly describes technical and application capabilities of the present stereomicroscopes. The two main types of stereomicroscope construction are depicted: Greenough microscope and Common Main Objective microscope. The technological breakthrough, asymmetrical optical design of stereomicroscopes, the Fusion Optics, is presented too. Because of very wide offer of a stereomicroscope platforms, illumination systems, software and imaging systems, the article contains also very useful factors to consider when selecting a stereomicroscope.

  10. Microscopic Theory of Fission

    SciTech Connect

    Younes, W.; Gogny, D.

    2008-04-17

    In recent years, the microscopic method has been applied to the notoriously difficult problem of nuclear fission with unprecedented success. In this paper, we discuss some of the achievements and promise of the microscopic method, as embodied in the Hartree-Fock method using the Gogny finite-range effective interaction, and beyond-mean-field extensions to the theory. The nascent program to describe induced fission observables using this approach at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is presented.

  11. Microscopic colitis: a review.

    PubMed

    Farrukh, A; Mayberry, J F

    2014-12-01

    In recent years, microscopic colitis has been increasingly diagnosed. This review was carried out to evaluate demographic factors for microscopic colitis and to perform a systematic assessment of available treatment options. Relevant publications up to December 2013 were identified following searches of PubMed and Google Scholar using the key words 'microscopic colitis', 'collagenous colitis' and 'lymphocytic colitis'. Two-hundred and forty-eight articles were identified. The term microscopic colitis includes lymphocytic colitis and collagenous colitis. Both have common clinical symptoms but are well defined histopathologically. The clinical course is usually benign, but serious complications, including death, may occur. A peak incidence from 60 to 70 years of age with a female preponderance is observed. Although most cases are idiopathic, associations with autoimmune disorders, such as coeliac disease and hypothyroidism, as well as with exposure to nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and proton-pump inhibitors, have been observed. The incidence and prevalence of microscopic colitis is rising and good-quality epidemiological research is needed. Treatment is currently largely based on anecdotal evidence and on results from limited clinical trials of budesonide. Long-term follow-up of these patients is not well established. The review synthesizes work on the definition of microscopic colitis and the relationship between collagenous and lymphocytic colitis. It reviews the international epidemiology and work on aetiology. In addition, it critically considers the efficacy of a range of treatments. Colorectal Disease © 2014 The Association of Coloproctology of Great Britain and Ireland.

  12. Assessing and benchmarking multiphoton microscopes for biologists

    PubMed Central

    Corbin, Kaitlin; Pinkard, Henry; Peck, Sebastian; Beemiller, Peter; Krummel, Matthew F.

    2017-01-01

    Multiphoton microscopy has become staple tool for tracking cells within tissues and organs due to superior depth of penetration, low excitation volumes, and reduced phototoxicity. Many factors, ranging from laser pulse width to relay optics to detectors and electronics, contribute to the overall ability of these microscopes to excite and detect fluorescence deep within tissues. However, we have found that there are few standard ways already described in the literature to distinguish between microscopes or to benchmark existing microscopes to measure the overall quality and efficiency of these instruments. Here, we discuss some simple parameters and methods that can either be used within a multiphoton facility or by a prospective purchaser to benchmark performance. This can both assist in identifying decay in microscope performance and in choosing features of a scope that are suited to experimental needs. PMID:24974026

  13. Assessing and benchmarking multiphoton microscopes for biologists.

    PubMed

    Corbin, Kaitlin; Pinkard, Henry; Peck, Sebastian; Beemiller, Peter; Krummel, Matthew F

    2014-01-01

    Multiphoton microscopy has become staple tool for tracking cells within tissues and organs due to superior depth of penetration, low excitation volumes, and reduced phototoxicity. Many factors, ranging from laser pulse width to relay optics to detectors and electronics, contribute to the overall ability of these microscopes to excite and detect fluorescence deep within tissues. However, we have found that there are few standard ways already described in the literature to distinguish between microscopes or to benchmark existing microscopes to measure the overall quality and efficiency of these instruments. Here, we discuss some simple parameters and methods that can either be used within a multiphoton facility or by a prospective purchaser to benchmark performance. This can both assist in identifying decay in microscope performance and in choosing features of a scope that are suited to experimental needs. © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. The virtual microscope.

    PubMed

    Catalyürek, Umit; Beynon, Michael D; Chang, Chialin; Kurc, Tahsin; Sussman, Alan; Saltz, Joel

    2003-12-01

    We present the design and implementation of the Virtual Microscope, a software system employing a client/server architecture to provide a realistic emulation of a high power light microscope. The system provides a form of completely digital telepathology, allowing simultaneous access to archived digital slide images by multiple clients. The main problem the system targets is storing and processing the extremely large quantities of data required to represent a collection of slides. The Virtual Microscope client software runs on the end user's PC or workstation, while database software for storing, retrieving and processing the microscope image data runs on a parallel computer or on a set of workstations at one or more potentially remote sites. We have designed and implemented two versions of the data server software. One implementation is a customization of a database system framework that is optimized for a tightly coupled parallel machine with attached local disks. The second implementation is component-based, and has been designed to accommodate access to and processing of data in a distributed, heterogeneous environment. We also have developed caching client software, implemented in Java, to achieve good response time and portability across different computer platforms. The performance results presented show that the Virtual Microscope systems scales well, so that many clients can be adequately serviced by an appropriately configured data server.

  15. Purchase of a Transmission Electron Microscope for Xavier University of Louisiana

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-05-15

    SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: We solicited and received three price quotations for a research-grade transmission electron microscope : FEI, Inc... Electron Microscope (TEM). Delivery and installation were completed in December, 2014. The new TEM joins and complements an existing microscopic ...imaging facility on the second floor of the Pharmacy Addition at Xavier University that already includes two scanning electron microscopes . The new TEM

  16. Integrated elastic microscope device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, W. M.; Wright, D.; Watkins, R.; Cen, Zi

    2015-03-01

    The growing power of imaging and computing power of smartphones is creating the possibility of converting your smartphone into a high power pocket microscopy system. High quality miniature microscopy lenses attached to smartphone are typically made with glass or plastics that can only be produce at low cost with high volume. To revise the paradigm of microscope lenses, we devised a simple droplet lens fabrication technique that which produces low cost and high performance lens. Each lens is integrated into thin 3-D printed holder with complimentary light emitted diode (LEDs) that clips onto majority of smartphones. The integrated device converts a smartphone into a high power optical microscope/dermatoscope at around $2. This low cost device has wide application in a multitude of practical uses such as material inspection, dermascope and educational microscope.

  17. Electron microscope studies

    SciTech Connect

    Crewe, A.V.; Kapp, O.H.

    1992-07-01

    This is a report covering the research performed in the Crewe laboratory between 1964 and 1992. Because of limitations of space we have provided relatively brief summaries of the major research directions of the facility during these years. A complete bibliography has been included and we have referenced groups of pertinent publications at the beginning of each section. This report summarizes our efforts to develop better electron microscopes and chronicles many of the experimental programs, in materials science and biology, that acted both as a stimulus to better microscope design and also as a testing ground for many instrumental innovations.

  18. Making Art with Microscopes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benedis-Grab, Gregory

    2011-01-01

    Interdisciplinary teaching is a great way to focus on overarching concepts and help students make connections across disciplines. Historically, art and science have been connected disciplines. The botanical prints of the 18th and 19th centuries and early work with microscopes are two examples of a need for strong artistic skills in the science…

  19. Microscope on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This image taken at Meridiani Planum, Mars by the panoramic camera on the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity shows the rover's microscopic imager (circular device in center), located on its instrument deployment device, or 'arm.' The image was acquired on the ninth martian day or sol of the rover's mission.

  20. Microscope on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This image taken at Meridiani Planum, Mars by the panoramic camera on the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity shows the rover's microscopic imager (circular device in center), located on its instrument deployment device, or 'arm.' The image was acquired on the ninth martian day or sol of the rover's mission.

  1. Making Art with Microscopes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benedis-Grab, Gregory

    2011-01-01

    Interdisciplinary teaching is a great way to focus on overarching concepts and help students make connections across disciplines. Historically, art and science have been connected disciplines. The botanical prints of the 18th and 19th centuries and early work with microscopes are two examples of a need for strong artistic skills in the science…

  2. Soft x-ray laser microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Suckewer, P.I.

    1990-10-01

    The program consisted of two phases (Phase I and Phase II). The goal of the Phase I (first year program) was to design and construct the Soft X-ray Laser Contact Microscope. Such microscope was constructed and adapted to PPL's 18.2nm soft X-ray Laser (SXL), which in turn was modified and prepared for microscopy experiments. Investigation of the photoresist response to 18.2nm laser radiation and transmissivity of 0.1m thick silicion-nitride (Si[sub 3]N[sub 4]) windows were important initial works. The goal of the first year of Phase II was to construct X-ray contact microscope in combination with existing optical phase microscope, already used by biologists. In the second year of Phase II study of dehydrated Horeseshoe Crab and Hela cancer cells were performed with COXRALM. Also during Phase II, the Imaging X-Ray Laser Microscope (IXRALM) was designed and constructed. This paper describes the development of each of the microscopes and their application for research.

  3. Acoustic imaging microscope

    DOEpatents

    Deason, Vance A.; Telschow, Kenneth L.

    2006-10-17

    An imaging system includes: an object wavefront source and an optical microscope objective all positioned to direct an object wavefront onto an area of a vibrating subject surface encompassed by a field of view of the microscope objective, and to direct a modulated object wavefront reflected from the encompassed surface area through a photorefractive material; and a reference wavefront source and at least one phase modulator all positioned to direct a reference wavefront through the phase modulator and to direct a modulated reference wavefront from the phase modulator through the photorefractive material to interfere with the modulated object wavefront. The photorefractive material has a composition and a position such that interference of the modulated object wavefront and modulated reference wavefront occurs within the photorefractive material, providing a full-field, real-time image signal of the encompassed surface area.

  4. Femtosecond scanning tunneling microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, A.J.; Donati, G.P.; Rodriguez, G.; Gosnell, T.R.; Trugman, S.A.; Some, D.I.

    1998-11-01

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). By combining scanning tunneling microscopy with ultrafast optical techniques we have developed a novel tool to probe phenomena on atomic time and length scales. We have built and characterized an ultrafast scanning tunneling microscope in terms of temporal resolution, sensitivity and dynamic range. Using a novel photoconductive low-temperature-grown GaAs tip, we have achieved a temporal resolution of 1.5 picoseconds and a spatial resolution of 10 nanometers. This scanning tunneling microscope has both cryogenic and ultra-high vacuum capabilities, enabling the study of a wide range of important scientific problems.

  5. Ion photon emission microscope

    DOEpatents

    Doyle, Barney L.

    2003-04-22

    An ion beam analysis system that creates microscopic multidimensional image maps of the effects of high energy ions from an unfocussed source upon a sample by correlating the exact entry point of an ion into a sample by projection imaging of the ion-induced photons emitted at that point with a signal from a detector that measures the interaction of that ion within the sample. The emitted photons are collected in the lens system of a conventional optical microscope, and projected on the image plane of a high resolution single photon position sensitive detector. Position signals from this photon detector are then correlated in time with electrical effects, including the malfunction of digital circuits, detected within the sample that were caused by the individual ion that created these photons initially.

  6. Electron microscope aperture system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heinemann, K. (Inventor)

    1976-01-01

    An electron microscope including an electron source, a condenser lens having either a circular aperture for focusing a solid cone of electrons onto a specimen or an annular aperture for focusing a hollow cone of electrons onto the specimen, and an objective lens having an annular objective aperture, for focusing electrons passing through the specimen onto an image plane are described. The invention also entails a method of making the annular objective aperture using electron imaging, electrolytic deposition and ion etching techniques.

  7. Microscopic enteritis: Bucharest consensus.

    PubMed

    Rostami, Kamran; Aldulaimi, David; Holmes, Geoffrey; Johnson, Matt W; Robert, Marie; Srivastava, Amitabh; Fléjou, Jean-François; Sanders, David S; Volta, Umberto; Derakhshan, Mohammad H; Going, James J; Becheanu, Gabriel; Catassi, Carlo; Danciu, Mihai; Materacki, Luke; Ghafarzadegan, Kamran; Ishaq, Sauid; Rostami-Nejad, Mohammad; Peña, A Salvador; Bassotti, Gabrio; Marsh, Michael N; Villanacci, Vincenzo

    2015-03-07

    Microscopic enteritis (ME) is an inflammatory condition of the small bowel that leads to gastrointestinal symptoms, nutrient and micronutrient deficiency. It is characterised by microscopic or sub-microscopic abnormalities such as microvillus changes and enterocytic alterations in the absence of definite macroscopic changes using standard modern endoscopy. This work recognises a need to characterize disorders with microscopic and submicroscopic features, currently regarded as functional or non-specific entities, to obtain further understanding of their clinical relevance. The consensus working party reviewed statements about the aetiology, diagnosis and symptoms associated with ME and proposes an algorithm for its investigation and treatment. Following the 5(th) International Course in Digestive Pathology in Bucharest in November 2012, an international group of 21 interested pathologists and gastroenterologists formed a working party with a view to formulating a consensus statement on ME. A five-step agreement scale (from strong agreement to strong disagreement) was used to score 21 statements, independently. There was strong agreement on all statements about ME histology (95%-100%). Statements concerning diagnosis achieved 85% to 100% agreement. A statement on the management of ME elicited agreement from the lowest rate (60%) up to 100%. The remaining two categories showed general agreement between experts on clinical presentation (75%-95%) and pathogenesis (80%-90%) of ME. There was strong agreement on the histological definition of ME. Weaker agreement on management indicates a need for further investigations, better definitions and clinical trials to produce quality guidelines for management. This ME consensus is a step toward greater recognition of a significant entity affecting symptomatic patients previously labelled as non-specific or functional enteropathy.

  8. Microscopic enteritis: Bucharest consensus

    PubMed Central

    Rostami, Kamran; Aldulaimi, David; Holmes, Geoffrey; Johnson, Matt W; Robert, Marie; Srivastava, Amitabh; Fléjou, Jean-François; Sanders, David S; Volta, Umberto; Derakhshan, Mohammad H; Going, James J; Becheanu, Gabriel; Catassi, Carlo; Danciu, Mihai; Materacki, Luke; Ghafarzadegan, Kamran; Ishaq, Sauid; Rostami-Nejad, Mohammad; Peña, A Salvador; Bassotti, Gabrio; Marsh, Michael N; Villanacci, Vincenzo

    2015-01-01

    Microscopic enteritis (ME) is an inflammatory condition of the small bowel that leads to gastrointestinal symptoms, nutrient and micronutrient deficiency. It is characterised by microscopic or sub-microscopic abnormalities such as microvillus changes and enterocytic alterations in the absence of definite macroscopic changes using standard modern endoscopy. This work recognises a need to characterize disorders with microscopic and submicroscopic features, currently regarded as functional or non-specific entities, to obtain further understanding of their clinical relevance. The consensus working party reviewed statements about the aetiology, diagnosis and symptoms associated with ME and proposes an algorithm for its investigation and treatment. Following the 5th International Course in Digestive Pathology in Bucharest in November 2012, an international group of 21 interested pathologists and gastroenterologists formed a working party with a view to formulating a consensus statement on ME. A five-step agreement scale (from strong agreement to strong disagreement) was used to score 21 statements, independently. There was strong agreement on all statements about ME histology (95%-100%). Statements concerning diagnosis achieved 85% to 100% agreement. A statement on the management of ME elicited agreement from the lowest rate (60%) up to 100%. The remaining two categories showed general agreement between experts on clinical presentation (75%-95%) and pathogenesis (80%-90%) of ME. There was strong agreement on the histological definition of ME. Weaker agreement on management indicates a need for further investigations, better definitions and clinical trials to produce quality guidelines for management. This ME consensus is a step toward greater recognition of a significant entity affecting symptomatic patients previously labelled as non-specific or functional enteropathy. PMID:25759526

  9. Color Laser Microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Awamura, D.; Ode, T.; Yonezawa, M.

    1987-04-01

    A color laser microscope utilizing a new color laser imaging system has been developed for the visual inspection of semiconductors. The light source, produced by three lasers (Red; He-Ne, Green; Ar, Blue; He-Cd), is deflected horizontally by an AOD (Acoustic Optical Deflector) and vertically by a vibration mirror. The laser beam is focused in a small spot which is scanned over the sample at high speed. The light reflected back from the sample is reformed to contain linear information by returning to the original vibration mirror. The linear light is guided to the CCD image sensor where it is converted into a video signal. Individual CCD image sensors are used for each of the three R, G, or B color image signals. The confocal optical system with its laser light source yields a color TV monitor image with no flaring and a much sharper resolution than that of the conventional optical microscope. The AOD makes possible a high speed laser scan and a NTSC or PAL TV video signal is produced in real time without any video memory. Since the light source is composed of R, G, and B laser beams, color separation superior to that of white light illumination is achieved. Because of the photometric linearity of the image detector, the R, G, and B outputs of the system are most suitably used for hue analysis. The CCD linear image sensors in the optical system produce no geometrical distortion, and good color registration is available principally. The output signal can be used for high accuracy line width measuring. The many features of the color laser microscope make it ideally suited for the visual inspection of semiconductor processing. A number of these systems have already been installed in such a capacity. The Color Laser Microscope can also be a very useful tool for the fields of material engineering and biotechnology.

  10. Microscopic Image Inside 'Endurance'

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This magnified view of a rock surface inside 'Endurance Crater' combines four frames taken by the microscopic imager on NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity during the rover's 142nd martian day, or sol, on June 17, 2004. This patch of rock is in a region of contact between a layer of rock corresponding to bedrock that Opportunity examined earlier at 'Eagle Crater' and the next-lower layer. The area imaged is about 6 centimeters (2.4 inches) on each side.

  11. Thermal Lens Microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uchiyama, Kenji; Hibara, Akihide; Kimura, Hiroko; Sawada, Tsuguo; Kitamori, Takehiko

    2000-09-01

    We developed a novel laser microscope based on the thermal lens effect induced by a coaxial beam comprised of excitation and probe beams. The signal generation mechanism was confirmed to be an authentic thermal lens effect from the measurement of signal and phase dependences on optical configurations between the sample and the probe beam focus, and therefore, the thermal lens effect theory could be applied. Two-point spatial resolution was determined by the spot size of the excitation beam, not by the thermal diffusion length. Sensitivity was quite high, and the detection ability, evaluated using a submicron microparticle containing dye molecules, was 0.8 zmol/μm2, hence a distribution image of trace chemical species could be obtained quantitatively. In addition, analytes are not restricted to fluorescent species, therefore, the thermal lens microscope is a promising analytical microscope. A two-dimensional image of a histamine molecule distribution, which was produced in mast cells at the femtomole level in a human nasal mucous polyp, was obtained.

  12. Thimble microscope system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamal, Tahseen; Rubinstein, Jaden; Watkins, Rachel; Cen, Zijian; Kong, Gary; Lee, W. M.

    2016-12-01

    Wearable computing devices, e.g. Google Glass, Smart watch, embodies the new human design frontier, where technology interfaces seamlessly with human gestures. During examination of any subject in the field (clinic, surgery, agriculture, field survey, water collection), our sensory peripherals (touch and vision) often go hand-in-hand. The sensitivity and maneuverability of the human fingers are guided with tight distribution of biological nerve cells, which perform fine motor manipulation over a range of complex surfaces that is often out of sight. Our sight (or naked vision), on the other hand, is generally restricted to line of sight that is ill-suited to view around corner. Hence, conventional imaging methods are often resort to complex light guide designs (periscope, endoscopes etc) to navigate over obstructed surfaces. Using modular design strategies, we constructed a prototype miniature microscope system that is incorporated onto a wearable fixture (thimble). This unique platform allows users to maneuver around a sample and take high resolution microscopic images. In this paper, we provide an exposition of methods to achieve a thimble microscopy; microscope lens fabrication, thimble design, integration of miniature camera and liquid crystal display.

  13. Q: How do Microscopes Work?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zimov, Sarah

    2004-01-01

    Microscopes allow scientists to examine everyday objects in extraordinary ways. They provide high-resolution images that show objects in fine detail. This brief article describes the many types of microscopes and how they are used in different scientific venues.

  14. Q: How do Microscopes Work?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zimov, Sarah

    2004-01-01

    Microscopes allow scientists to examine everyday objects in extraordinary ways. They provide high-resolution images that show objects in fine detail. This brief article describes the many types of microscopes and how they are used in different scientific venues.

  15. Theoretical model of the helium pinhole microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palau, Adrià Salvador; Bracco, Gianangelo; Holst, Bodil

    2016-12-01

    In recent years, the development of neutral helium microscopes has gained increasing interest. The low energy, charge neutrality, and inertness of the helium atoms makes helium microscopy an attractive candidate for the imaging of a range of samples. The simplest neutral helium microscope is the so-called pinhole microscope. It consists of a supersonic expansion helium beam collimated by two consecutive apertures (skimmer and pinhole), which together determine the beam spot size and hence the resolution at a given working distance to the sample. Due to the high ionization potential of neutral helium atoms, it is difficult to build efficient helium detectors. Therefore, it is crucial to optimize the microscope design to maximize the intensity for a given resolution and working distance. Here we present an optimization model for the helium pinhole microscope system. We show that for a given resolution and working distance, there is a single intensity maximum. Further we show that with present-day state-of-the-art detector technology (ionization efficiency 1 ×10-3 ), a resolution of the order of 600 nm at a working distance of 3 mm is possible. In order to make this quantification, we have assumed a Lambertian reflecting surface and calculated the beam spot size that gives a signal 100 cts/s within a solid angle of 0.02 π sr, following an existing design. Reducing the working distance to the micron range leads to an improved resolution of around 40 nm.

  16. Light Microscopy Microscope Experiment

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-02-04

    Ground testing for the first confocal Light Microscopy Microscope (LMM) Experiment. Procter and Gamble is working with NASA Glenn scientists to prepare for a study that examines product stabilizers in a microgravity environment. The particles in the tube glow orange because they have been fluorescently tagged with a dye that reacts to green laser lights to allow construction of a 3D image point by point. The experiment, which will be sent to the ISS later this year, will help P&G develop improved product stabilizers to extend shelf life and develop more environmentally friendly packaging.

  17. Low frequency acoustic microscope

    DOEpatents

    Khuri-Yakub, Butrus T.

    1986-11-04

    A scanning acoustic microscope is disclosed for the detection and location of near surface flaws, inclusions or voids in a solid sample material. A focused beam of acoustic energy is directed at the sample with its focal plane at the subsurface flaw, inclusion or void location. The sample is scanned with the beam. Detected acoustic energy specularly reflected and mode converted at the surface of the sample and acoustic energy reflected by subsurface flaws, inclusions or voids at the focal plane are used for generating an interference signal which is processed and forms a signal indicative of the subsurface flaws, inclusions or voids.

  18. Nanosecond electron microscopes

    PubMed

    Bostanjoglo; Elschner; Mao; Nink; Weingartner

    2000-04-01

    Combining electron optics, fast electronics and pulsed lasers, a transmission and a photoelectron emission microscope were built, which visualize events in thin films and on surfaces with a time resolution of several nanoseconds. The high-speed electron microscopy is capable to track fast laser-induced processes in metals below the ablation threshold, which are difficult to detect by other imaging techniques. The material response to nano- and femtosecond laser pulses was found to be very different. It was dominated by thermo/chemocapillary flow and chemical reactions in the case of nanosecond pulses, and by mechanical deformations and non-thermal electron emission after a femtosecond pulse.

  19. Atomic Force Microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Day, R.D.; Russell, P.E.

    1988-12-01

    The Atomic Force Microscope (AFM) is a recently developed instrument that has achieved atomic resolution imaging of both conducting and non- conducting surfaces. Because the AFM is in the early stages of development, and because of the difficulty of building the instrument, it is currently in use in fewer than ten laboratories worldwide. It promises to be a valuable tool for obtaining information about engineering surfaces and aiding the .study of precision fabrication processes. This paper gives an overview of AFM technology and presents plans to build an instrument designed to look at engineering surfaces.

  20. Adirondack Under the Microscope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This image was taken by the Mars Exploration Rover Spirit front hazard-identification camera after the rover's first post-egress drive on Mars Sunday, Jan. 15, 2004. Engineers drove the rover approximately 3 meters (10 feet) from the Columbia Memorial Station toward the first rock target, seen in the foreground. The football-sized rock was dubbed Adirondack because of its mountain-shaped appearance. Scientists have begun using the microscopic imager instrument at the end of the rover's robotic arm to examine the rock and understand how it formed.

  1. Adirondack Under the Microscope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This image was taken by the Mars Exploration Rover Spirit front hazard-identification camera after the rover's first post-egress drive on Mars Sunday, Jan. 15, 2004. Engineers drove the rover approximately 3 meters (10 feet) from the Columbia Memorial Station toward the first rock target, seen in the foreground. The football-sized rock was dubbed Adirondack because of its mountain-shaped appearance. Scientists have begun using the microscopic imager instrument at the end of the rover's robotic arm to examine the rock and understand how it formed.

  2. Solid state optical microscope

    DOEpatents

    Young, I.T.

    1983-08-09

    A solid state optical microscope wherein wide-field and high-resolution images of an object are produced at a rapid rate by utilizing conventional optics with a charge-coupled photodiode array. A galvanometer scanning mirror, for scanning in one of two orthogonal directions is provided, while the charge-coupled photodiode array scans in the other orthogonal direction. Illumination light from the object is incident upon the photodiodes, creating packets of electrons (signals) which are representative of the illuminated object. The signals are then processed, stored in a memory, and finally displayed as a video signal. 2 figs.

  3. Solid state optical microscope

    DOEpatents

    Young, Ian T.

    1983-01-01

    A solid state optical microscope wherein wide-field and high-resolution images of an object are produced at a rapid rate by utilizing conventional optics with a charge-coupled photodiode array. A galvanometer scanning mirror, for scanning in one of two orthogonal directions is provided, while the charge-coupled photodiode array scans in the other orthogonal direction. Illumination light from the object is incident upon the photodiodes, creating packets of electrons (signals) which are representative of the illuminated object. The signals are then processed, stored in a memory, and finally displayed as a video signal.

  4. Microscopic Tribotactic Walkers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steimel, Joshua; Aragones, Juan; Alexander-Katz, Alfredo

    2014-03-01

    The translational motion of a rotating object near a surface is strongly dependent on the friction between the object and the surface. The process of friction is inherently directional and the friction coefficient can be anisotropic even in the absence of a net friction coefficient gradient. This is macroscopically observed in the ordering motif of some animal hair or scales and a microscopic analog can be imagined where the friction coefficient is determined by the strength and density of reversible bonds between a rotating object and the substrate. For high friction coefficients most of the rotational motion is converted into translational motion; conversely for low friction coefficients the object primarily rotates in place. We exploited this property to design and test a new class of motile system that displays tribotaxis, which is the process by which an object detects differences in the local friction coefficient and moves accordingly either to regions of higher or lower friction. These synthetic tribotactic microscopic walkers, composed of a pair of functionalized superparamagnetic beads, detect gradients in the spatial friction coefficient and migrate towards high friction areas when actuated in a random fashion. The effective friction between the walkers and the substrate is controlled by the local density of active receptors in the substrate. The tribotactic walkers also displayed trapping in high friction areas where the density of free receptors is higher.

  5. Forensic Scanning Electron Microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keeley, R. H.

    1983-03-01

    The scanning electron microscope equipped with an x-ray spectrometer is a versatile instrument which has many uses in the investigation of crime and preparation of scientific evidence for the courts. Major applications include microscopy and analysis of very small fragments of paint, glass and other materials which may link an individual with a scene of crime, identification of firearms residues and examination of questioned documents. Although simultaneous observation and chemical analysis of the sample is the most important feature of the instrument, other modes of operation such as cathodoluminescence spectrometry, backscattered electron imaging and direct x-ray excitation are also exploited. Marks on two bullets or cartridge cases can be compared directly by sequential scanning with a single beam or electronic linkage of two instruments. Particles of primer residue deposited on the skin and clothing when a gun is fired can be collected on adhesive tape and identified by their morphology and elemental composition. It is also possible to differentiate between the primer residues of different types of ammunition. Bullets may be identified from the small fragments left behind as they pass through the body tissues. In the examination of questioned documents the scanning electron microscope is used to establish the order in which two intersecting ink lines were written and to detect traces of chemical markers added to the security inks on official documents.

  6. Electron microscope phase enhancement

    DOEpatents

    Jin, Jian; Glaeser, Robert M.

    2010-06-15

    A microfabricated electron phase shift element is used for modifying the phase characteristics of an electron beam passing though its center aperture, while not affecting the more divergent portion of an incident beam to selectively provide a ninety-degree phase shift to the unscattered beam in the back focal plan of the objective lens, in order to realize Zernike-type, in-focus phase contrast in an electron microscope. One application of the element is to increase the contrast of an electron microscope for viewing weakly scattering samples while in focus. Typical weakly scattering samples include biological samples such as macromolecules, or perhaps cells. Preliminary experimental images demonstrate that these devices do apply a ninety degree phase shift as expected. Electrostatic calculations have been used to determine that fringing fields in the region of the scattered electron beams will cause a negligible phase shift as long as the ratio of electrode length to the transverse feature-size aperture is about 5:1. Calculations are underway to determine the feasibility of aspect smaller aspect ratios of about 3:1 and about 2:1.

  7. Microscopic Rayleigh Droplet Beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doak, R. B.

    2005-11-01

    A periodically triggered Rayleigh Droplet Beam (RDB) delivers a perfectly linear and periodic stream of identical, monoenergetic droplets that are phase-locked to the trigger signal. The droplet diameter and spacing are easily adjusted of choice of nozzle diameter and trigger frequency. Any liquid of low viscosity may be emloyed as the beam fluid. Although the field of nanofluidics is expanding rapidly, little effort has yet been devoted to ``external flows'' such as RDB's. At ASU we have generated RDB's of water and methanol down to 2 microns in droplet diameter. Nozzle clogging is the sole impediment to smaller droplets. Microscopic Rayleigh droplet beams offer tremendous potential for fundamental physical measurements, fluid dynamics research, and nanofabrication. This talk will describe the apparatus and techniques used at ASU to generate RDB's (surprisingly simple and inexpensive), discuss the triboelectric phenomena that play a role (surprisingly significant), present some initial experimental fluid dynamics measurements, and briefly survey RDB applications. Our particular interest in RDB's is as microscopic transport systems to deliver hydrated, undenatured proteins into vacuum for structure determination via serial diffraction of x-rays or electrons. This may offer the first general method for structure determination of non-crystallizable proteins.

  8. Microscopic description of production cross sections including deexcitation effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sekizawa, Kazuyuki

    2017-07-01

    Background: At the forefront of the nuclear science, production of new neutron-rich isotopes is continuously pursued at accelerator laboratories all over the world. To explore the currently unknown territories in the nuclear chart far away from the stability, reliable theoretical predictions are inevitable. Purpose: To provide a reliable prediction of production cross sections taking into account secondary deexcitation processes, both particle evaporation and fission, a new method called TDHF+GEMINI is proposed, which combines the microscopic time-dependent Hartree-Fock (TDHF) theory with a sophisticated statistical compound-nucleus deexcitation model, GEMINI++. Methods: Low-energy heavy ion reactions are described based on three-dimensional Skyrme-TDHF calculations. Using the particle-number projection method, production probabilities, total angular momenta, and excitation energies of primary reaction products are extracted from the TDHF wave function after collision. Production cross sections for secondary reaction products are evaluated employing GEMINI++. Results are compared with available experimental data and widely used grazing calculations. Results: The method is applied to describe cross sections for multinucleon transfer processes in 40Ca+124Sn (Ec .m .≃128.54 MeV ), 48Ca+124Sn (Ec .m .≃125.44 MeV ), 40Ca+208Pb (Ec .m .≃208.84 MeV ), 58Ni+208Pb (Ec .m .≃256.79 MeV ), 64Ni+238U (Ec .m .≃307.35 MeV ), and 136Xe+198Pt (Ec .m .≃644.98 MeV ) reactions at energies close to the Coulomb barrier. It is shown that the inclusion of secondary deexcitation processes, which are dominated by neutron evaporation in the present systems, substantially improves agreement with the experimental data. The magnitude of the evaporation effects is very similar to the one observed in grazing calculations. TDHF+GEMINI provides better description of the absolute value of the cross sections for channels involving transfer of more than one proton, compared to the grazing

  9. Anisotropic contrast optical microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peev, D.; Hofmann, T.; Kananizadeh, N.; Beeram, S.; Rodriguez, E.; Wimer, S.; Rodenhausen, K. B.; Herzinger, C. M.; Kasputis, T.; Pfaunmiller, E.; Nguyen, A.; Korlacki, R.; Pannier, A.; Li, Y.; Schubert, E.; Hage, D.; Schubert, M.

    2016-11-01

    An optical microscope is described that reveals contrast in the Mueller matrix images of a thin, transparent, or semi-transparent specimen located within an anisotropic object plane (anisotropic filter). The specimen changes the anisotropy of the filter and thereby produces contrast within the Mueller matrix images. Here we use an anisotropic filter composed of a semi-transparent, nanostructured thin film with sub-wavelength thickness placed within the object plane. The sample is illuminated as in common optical microscopy but the light is modulated in its polarization using combinations of linear polarizers and phase plate (compensator) to control and analyze the state of polarization. Direct generalized ellipsometry data analysis approaches permit extraction of fundamental Mueller matrix object plane images dispensing with the need of Fourier expansion methods. Generalized ellipsometry model approaches are used for quantitative image analyses. These images are obtained from sets of multiple images obtained under various polarizer, analyzer, and compensator settings. Up to 16 independent Mueller matrix images can be obtained, while our current setup is limited to 11 images normalized by the unpolarized intensity. We demonstrate the anisotropic contrast optical microscope by measuring lithographically defined micro-patterned anisotropic filters, and we quantify the adsorption of an organic self-assembled monolayer film onto the anisotropic filter. Comparison with an isotropic glass slide demonstrates the image enhancement obtained by our method over microscopy without the use of an anisotropic filter. In our current instrument, we estimate the limit of detection for organic volumetric mass within the object plane of ≈49 fg within ≈7 × 7 μm2 object surface area. Compared to a quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation instrumentation, where contemporary limits require a total load of ≈500 pg for detection, the instrumentation demonstrated here improves

  10. Anisotropic contrast optical microscope.

    PubMed

    Peev, D; Hofmann, T; Kananizadeh, N; Beeram, S; Rodriguez, E; Wimer, S; Rodenhausen, K B; Herzinger, C M; Kasputis, T; Pfaunmiller, E; Nguyen, A; Korlacki, R; Pannier, A; Li, Y; Schubert, E; Hage, D; Schubert, M

    2016-11-01

    An optical microscope is described that reveals contrast in the Mueller matrix images of a thin, transparent, or semi-transparent specimen located within an anisotropic object plane (anisotropic filter). The specimen changes the anisotropy of the filter and thereby produces contrast within the Mueller matrix images. Here we use an anisotropic filter composed of a semi-transparent, nanostructured thin film with sub-wavelength thickness placed within the object plane. The sample is illuminated as in common optical microscopy but the light is modulated in its polarization using combinations of linear polarizers and phase plate (compensator) to control and analyze the state of polarization. Direct generalized ellipsometry data analysis approaches permit extraction of fundamental Mueller matrix object plane images dispensing with the need of Fourier expansion methods. Generalized ellipsometry model approaches are used for quantitative image analyses. These images are obtained from sets of multiple images obtained under various polarizer, analyzer, and compensator settings. Up to 16 independent Mueller matrix images can be obtained, while our current setup is limited to 11 images normalized by the unpolarized intensity. We demonstrate the anisotropic contrast optical microscope by measuring lithographically defined micro-patterned anisotropic filters, and we quantify the adsorption of an organic self-assembled monolayer film onto the anisotropic filter. Comparison with an isotropic glass slide demonstrates the image enhancement obtained by our method over microscopy without the use of an anisotropic filter. In our current instrument, we estimate the limit of detection for organic volumetric mass within the object plane of ≈49 fg within ≈7 × 7 μm(2) object surface area. Compared to a quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation instrumentation, where contemporary limits require a total load of ≈500 pg for detection, the instrumentation demonstrated here improves

  11. Mars Under the Microscope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This magnified look at the martian soil near the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity's landing site, Meridiani Planum, shows coarse grains sprinkled over a fine layer of sand. The image was captured by the rover's microscopic imager on the 10th day, or sol, of its mission. Scientists are intrigued by the spherical rocks, which can be formed by a variety of geologic processes, including cooling of molten lava droplets and accretion of concentric layers of material around a particle or 'seed.'

    The examined patch of soil is 3 centimeters (1.2 inches) across. The circular grain in the lower left corner is approximately 3 millimeters (.12 inches) across, or about the size of a sunflower seed.

  12. Imaging arrangement and microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Pertsinidis, Alexandros; Chu, Steven

    2015-12-15

    An embodiment of the present invention is an imaging arrangement that includes imaging optics, a fiducial light source, and a control system. In operation, the imaging optics separate light into first and second tight by wavelength and project the first and second light onto first and second areas within first and second detector regions, respectively. The imaging optics separate fiducial light from the fiducial light source into first and second fiducial light and project the first and second fiducial light onto third and fourth areas within the first and second detector regions, respectively. The control system adjusts alignment of the imaging optics so that the first and second fiducial light projected onto the first and second detector regions maintain relatively constant positions within the first and second detector regions, respectively. Another embodiment of the present invention is a microscope that includes the imaging arrangement.

  13. Embryos, microscopes, and society.

    PubMed

    Maienschein, Jane

    2016-06-01

    Embryos have different meanings for different people and in different contexts. Seen under the microscope, the biological embryo starts out as one cell and then becomes a bunch of cells. Gradually these divide and differentiate to make up the embryo, which in humans becomes a fetus at eight weeks, and then eventually a baby. At least, that happens in those cases that carry through normally and successfully. Yet a popular public perception imagines the embryo as already a little person in the very earliest stages of development, as if it were predictably to become an adult. In actuality, cells can combine, pull apart, and recombine in a variety of ways and still produce embryos, whereas most embryos never develop into adults at all. Biological embryos and popular imaginations of embryos diverge. This paper looks at some of the historical reasons for and social implications of that divergence.

  14. Visualizing the Microscopic World.

    PubMed

    Cerqueira, Nuno M F S A; Fernandes, Pedro A; Ramos, Maria João

    2017-08-09

    Visualization can be a motivating way of teaching students about the microscopic world. This can become even more exciting if the information is based on accurate computational results rather than on crude approximations that eventually might create unreal alternative perceptions. Here, we report on a VMD plug-in, named vmdMagazine, which can turn computational simulations into stunning high-impact video presentations, suitable for classes/lectures and even conferences. The software will help students/audience to understand atoms and molecules better and learn to like them. The present paper is meant to give a general idea of the software's potential, showing how it works and how it can be used for educational purposes. The software is freely available at: http://www.fc.up.pt/PortoBioComp/database/doku.php?id=vmdmagazine .

  15. Atomic Force Microscope Operation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Click on image for animation (large file)

    This animation is a scientific illustration of the operation of NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander's Atomic Force Microscope, or AFM. The AFM is part of Phoenix's Microscopy, Electrochemistry, and Conductivity Analyzer, or MECA.

    The AFM is used to image the smallest Martian particles using a very sharp tip at the end of one of eight beams.

    The beam of the AFM is set into vibration and brought up to the surface of a micromachined silicon substrate. The substrate has etched in it a series of pits, 5 micrometers deep, designed to hold the Martian dust particles.

    The microscope then maps the shape of particles in three dimensions by scanning them with the tip.

    At the end of the animation is a 3D representation of the AFM image of a particle that was part of a sample informally called 'Sorceress.' The sample was delivered to the AFM on the 38th Martian day, or sol, of the mission (July 2, 2008).

    The image shows four round pits, only 5 microns in depth, that were micromachined into the silicon substrate.

    A Martian particle only one micrometer, or one millionth of a meter, across is held in the upper left pit.

    The rounded particle shown at the highest magnification ever seen from another world is a particle of the dust that cloaks Mars. Such dust particles color the Martian sky pink, feed storms that regularly envelop the planet and produce Mars' distinctive red soil.

    The AFM was developed by a Swiss-led consortium, with Imperial College London producing the silicon substrate that holds sampled particles.

    The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  16. A vertical coarse approach scanning tunneling microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drevniok, Benedict

    A Pan-style scanning tunneling microscope (STM), with a vertical coarse approach mechanism, was designed, built and tested. The microscope will be operated in ultra-high vacuum and also at cryogenic temperatures (8 K) inside a continuous flow cryostat. Fundamental differences in operating principle exist between the new microscope and the beetle-type inertial sliders [1] that have been the mainstay of the group for the last eight years. While Pan-style microscopes do already exist [2], they remain challenging to build, and an active area of research [3]. This system represents a bold departure from well-trodden paths, and will greatly expand the range of experiments that our group can perform. The operating principles of inertial piezoelectric motors are detailed. Design guidelines for a piezoelectric motor are given, and used in the design of the vertical coarse approach motor. A simple, inexpensive implementation for creating waveforms with an extremely fast fall time is discussed. Motor performance is tested, and a minimum step size of 20nm is found for frequencies ranging from 0 Hz to 3 kHz. The motor operates with high dynamic range: individual 20nm steps can be taken, as well as being able to move at a velocity of 0.4mm s-1. Little is known about the vibrational properties of Pan-style microscopes. Vibrational testing of the microscope revealed the expected scanner bending mode at 1.6 kHz (above the scanner bending mode of our beetles at 1.2 kHz), and a complicated response signal above this frequency. Custom extension springs for an eddy-current damping system are built and tested. A low resonant frequency of 1.8 Hz is found, which is ideal for the application. Initial testing of the STM in ambient conditions is performed on two different surfaces. A moire supermesh [4] with periodicity 3nm is observed on a highly-oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) surface, and agrees well with previously published results. Using a flame-annealed Gold on mica surface, a low

  17. Femtosecond photoelectron point projection microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Quinonez, Erik; Handali, Jonathan; Barwick, Brett

    2013-10-15

    By utilizing a nanometer ultrafast electron source in a point projection microscope we demonstrate that images of nanoparticles with spatial resolutions of the order of 100 nanometers can be obtained. The duration of the emission process of the photoemitted electrons used to make images is shown to be of the order of 100 fs using an autocorrelation technique. The compact geometry of this photoelectron point projection microscope does not preclude its use as a simple ultrafast electron microscope, and we use simple analytic models to estimate temporal resolutions that can be expected when using it as a pump-probe ultrafast electron microscope. These models show a significant increase in temporal resolution when comparing to ultrafast electron microscopes based on conventional designs. We also model the microscopes spectroscopic abilities to capture ultrafast phenomena such as the photon induced near field effect.

  18. Greening Existing Tribal Buildings

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Guidance about improving sustainability in existing tribal casinos and manufactured homes. Many steps can be taken to make existing buildings greener and healthier. They may also reduce utility and medical costs.

  19. Solution of the Skyrme-Hartree-Fock-Bogolyubov equations in the Cartesian deformed harmonic-oscillator basis. (VII) HFODD (v2.49t): A new version of the program

    SciTech Connect

    Schunck, Nicolas F; McDonnell, J.; Sheikh, J. A.; Staszczak, A.; Stoitsov, Mario; Dobaczewski, J.; Toivanen, P.

    2012-01-01

    We describe the new version (v2.49t) of the code HFODD which solves the nuclear Skyrme Hartree-Fock (HF) or Skyrme Hartree-Fock-Bogolyubov (HFB) problem by using the Cartesian deformed harmonic-oscillator basis. In the new version, we have implemented the following physics features: (i) the isospin mixing and projection, (ii) the finite temperature formalism for the HFB and HF+BCS methods, (iii) the Lipkin translational energy correction method, (iv) the calculation of the shell correction. A number of specific numerical methods have also been implemented in order to deal with large-scale multi-constraint calculations and hardware limitations: (i) the two-basis method for the HFB method, (ii) the Augmented Lagrangian Method (ALM) for multi-constraint calculations, (iii) the linear constraint method based on the approximation of the RPA matrix for multi-constraint calculations, (iv) an interface with the axial and parity-conserving Skyrme-HFB code HFBTHO, (v) the mixing of the HF or HFB matrix elements instead of the HF fields. Special care has been paid to using the code on massively parallel leadership class computers. For this purpose, the following features are now available with this version: (i) the Message Passing Interface (MPI) framework, (ii) scalable input data routines, (iii) multi-threading via OpenMP pragmas, (iv) parallel diagonalization of the HFB matrix in the simplex breaking case using the ScaLAPACK library. Finally, several little significant errors of the previous published version were corrected.

  20. Solution of the Skyrme-Hartree-Fock-Bogolyubovequations in the Cartesian deformed harmonic-oscillator basis. (VIII) HFODD (v2.73y): A new version of the program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schunck, N.; Dobaczewski, J.; Satuła, W.; Bączyk, P.; Dudek, J.; Gao, Y.; Konieczka, M.; Sato, K.; Shi, Y.; Wang, X. B.; Werner, T. R.

    2017-07-01

    We describe the new version (v2.73y) of the code HFODD which solves the nuclear Skyrme Hartree-Fock or Skyrme Hartree-Fock-Bogolyubov problem by using the Cartesian deformed harmonic-oscillator basis. In the new version, we have implemented the following new features: (i) full proton-neutron mixing in the particle-hole channel for Skyrme functionals, (ii) the Gogny force in both particle-hole and particle-particle channels, (iii) linear multi-constraint method at finite temperature, (iv) fission toolkit including the constraint on the number of particles in the neck between two fragments, calculation of the interaction energy between fragments, and calculation of the nuclear and Coulomb energy of each fragment, (v) the new version 200d of the code HFBTHO, together with an enhanced interface between HFBTHO and HFODD, (vi) parallel capabilities, significantly extended by adding several restart options for large-scale jobs, (vii) the Lipkin translational energy correction method with pairing, (viii) higher-order Lipkin particle-number corrections, (ix) interface to a program plotting single-particle energies or Routhians, (x) strong-force isospin-symmetry-breaking terms, and (xi) the Augmented Lagrangian Method for calculations with 3D constraints on angular momentum and isospin. Finally, an important bug related to the calculation of the entropy at finite temperature and several other little significant errors of the previous published version were corrected.

  1. Solution of the Skyrme-Hartree–Fock–Bogolyubov equations in the Cartesian deformed harmonic-oscillator basis. (VIII) HFODD (v2.73y): A new version of the program

    DOE PAGES

    Schunck, N.; Dobaczewski, J.; Satuła, W.; ...

    2017-03-27

    Here, we describe the new version (v2.73y) of the code hfodd which solves the nuclear Skyrme Hartree–Fock or Skyrme Hartree–Fock–Bogolyubov problem by using the Cartesian deformed harmonic-oscillator basis. In the new version, we have implemented the following new features: (i) full proton–neutron mixing in the particle–hole channel for Skyrme functionals, (ii) the Gogny force in both particle–hole and particle–particle channels, (iii) linear multi-constraint method at finite temperature, (iv) fission toolkit including the constraint on the number of particles in the neck between two fragments, calculation of the interaction energy between fragments, and calculation of the nuclear and Coulomb energy ofmore » each fragment, (v) the new version 200d of the code hfbtho, together with an enhanced interface between HFBTHO and HFODD, (vi) parallel capabilities, significantly extended by adding several restart options for large-scale jobs, (vii) the Lipkin translational energy correction method with pairing, (viii) higher-order Lipkin particle-number corrections, (ix) interface to a program plotting single-particle energies or Routhians, (x) strong-force isospin-symmetry-breaking terms, and (xi) the Augmented Lagrangian Method for calculations with 3D constraints on angular momentum and isospin. Finally, an important bug related to the calculation of the entropy at finite temperature and several other little significant errors of the previous published version were corrected.« less

  2. Robotic tele-existence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tachi, Susumu; Arai, Hirohiko; Maeda, Taro

    1989-01-01

    Tele-existence is an advanced type of teleoperation system that enables a human operator at the controls to perform remote manipulation tasks dexterously with the feeling that he or she exists in the remote anthropomorphic robot in the remote environment. The concept of a tele-existence is presented, the principle of the tele-existence display method is explained, some of the prototype systems are described, and its space application is discussed.

  3. Transmission electron microscope CCD camera

    DOEpatents

    Downing, Kenneth H.

    1999-01-01

    In order to improve the performance of a CCD camera on a high voltage electron microscope, an electron decelerator is inserted between the microscope column and the CCD. This arrangement optimizes the interaction of the electron beam with the scintillator of the CCD camera while retaining optimization of the microscope optics and of the interaction of the beam with the specimen. Changing the electron beam energy between the specimen and camera allows both to be optimized.

  4. Proper alignment of the microscope.

    PubMed

    Rottenfusser, Rudi

    2013-01-01

    The light microscope is merely the first element of an imaging system in a research facility. Such a system may include high-speed and/or high-resolution image acquisition capabilities, confocal technologies, and super-resolution methods of various types. Yet more than ever, the proverb "garbage in-garbage out" remains a fact. Image manipulations may be used to conceal a suboptimal microscope setup, but an artifact-free image can only be obtained when the microscope is optimally aligned, both mechanically and optically. Something else is often overlooked in the quest to get the best image out of the microscope: Proper sample preparation! The microscope optics can only do its job when its design criteria are matched to the specimen or vice versa. The specimen itself, the mounting medium, the cover slip, and the type of immersion medium (if applicable) are all part of the total optical makeup. To get the best results out of a microscope, understanding the functions of all of its variable components is important. Only then one knows how to optimize these components for the intended application. Different approaches might be chosen to discuss all of the microscope's components. We decided to follow the light path which starts with the light source and ends at the camera or the eyepieces. To add more transparency to this sequence, the section up to the microscope stage was called the "Illuminating Section", to be followed by the "Imaging Section" which starts with the microscope objective. After understanding the various components, we can start "working with the microscope." To get the best resolution and contrast from the microscope, the practice of "Koehler Illumination" should be understood and followed by every serious microscopist. Step-by-step instructions as well as illustrations of the beam path in an upright and inverted microscope are included in this chapter. A few practical considerations are listed in Section 3.

  5. Microscopic structure of gelatin coacervates.

    PubMed

    Mohanty, Biswaranjan; Bohidar, H B

    2005-07-01

    Microscopic structure of simple coacervates of gelatin having concentration approximately 130 g/l were studied at 25 degrees C by atomic force microscopy (AFM), rheology, small angle neutron scattering (SANS), UV absorption and circular dichroism (CD) techniques. The behavior of viscoelastic exponents Delta' and Delta'' of storage and loss modulii (G'(omega) approximately omega Delta', G''(omega) approximately omega Delta") revealed that, Delta' = 0.25+/-0.01 and Delta'' = 0.78+/-0.1 for coacervates. The mass fractal dimension 'd(f)' for coacervate was found to be 2.27, which attributed a compact heterogeneous network structure to the coacervates. This is supported by AFM pictures. The CD and UV absorption data indicated presence of helical structures inside the coacervates phase. SANS results showed the existence of a single length scale associated with this system identified as gelatin persistence length, zeta = 27+/-2 A. These studies indicate that the coacervate phase is a low dimensional dense heterogeneous material comprised of strongly interconnected triple helices which imparts a large storage modulus to this material.

  6. Quantitative analysis of the fusion cross sections using different microscopic nucleus-nucleus interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adel, A.; Alharbi, T.

    2017-01-01

    The fusion cross sections for reactions involving medium and heavy nucleus-nucleus systems are investigated near and above the Coulomb barrier using the one-dimensional barrier penetration model. The microscopic nuclear interaction potential is computed by four methods, namely: the double-folding model based on a realistic density-dependent M3Y NN interaction with a finite-range exchange part, the Skyrme energy density functional in the semiclassical extended Thomas-Fermi approximation, the generalized Proximity potential, and the Akyüz-Winther interaction. The comparison between the calculated and the measured values of the fusion excitation functions indicates that the calculations of the DFM give quite satisfactory agreement with the experimental data, being much better than the other methods. New parameterized forms for the fusion barrier heights and positions are presented. Furthermore, the effects of deformation and orientation degrees of freedom on the distribution of the Coulomb barrier characteristics as well as the fusion cross sections are studied for the reactions 16 O + 70 Ge and 28 Si + 100 Mo. The calculated values of the total fusion cross sections are compared with coupled channel calculations using the code CCFULL and compared with the experimental data. Our results reveal that the inclusion of deformations and orientation degrees of freedom improves the comparison with the experimental data.

  7. Athena microscopic Imager investigation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Herkenhoff, K. E.; Squyres, S. W.; Bell, J.F.; Maki, J.N.; Arneson, H.M.; Bertelsen, P.; Brown, D.I.; Collins, S.A.; Dingizian, A.; Elliott, S.T.; Goetz, W.; Hagerott, E.C.; Hayes, A.G.; Johnson, M.J.; Kirk, R.L.; McLennan, S.; Morris, R.V.; Scherr, L.M.; Schwochert, M.A.; Shiraishi, L.R.; Smith, G.H.; Soderblom, L.A.; Sohl-Dickstein, J. N.; Wadsworth, M.V.

    2003-01-01

    The Athena science payload on the Mars Exploration Rovers (MER) includes the Microscopic Imager (MI). The MI is a fixed-focus camera mounted on the end of an extendable instrument arm, the Instrument Deployment Device (IDD). The MI was designed to acquire images at a spatial resolution of 30 microns/pixel over a broad spectral range (400-700 nm). The MI uses the same electronics design as the other MER cameras but has optics that yield a field of view of 31 ?? 31 mm across a 1024 ?? 1024 pixel CCD image. The MI acquires images using only solar or skylight illumination of the target surface. A contact sensor is used to place the MI slightly closer to the target surface than its best focus distance (about 66 mm), allowing concave surfaces to be imaged in good focus. Coarse focusing (???2 mm precision) is achieved by moving the IDD away from a rock target after the contact sensor has been activated. The MI optics are protected from the Martian environment by a retractable dust cover. The dust cover includes a Kapton window that is tinted orange to restrict the spectral bandpass to 500-700 nm, allowing color information to be obtained by taking images with the dust cover open and closed. MI data will be used to place other MER instrument data in context and to aid in petrologic and geologic interpretations of rocks and soils on Mars. Copyright 2003 by the American Geophysical Union.

  8. Equilibrium solutions for microscopic stochastic systems in population dynamics.

    PubMed

    Lachowicz, Mirosław; Ryabukha, Tatiana

    2013-06-01

    The present paper deals with the problem of existence of equilibrium solutions of equations describing the general population dynamics at the microscopic level of modified Liouville equation (individually--based model) corresponding to a Markov jump process. We show the existence of factorized equilibrium solutions and discuss uniqueness. The conditions guaranteeing uniqueness or non-uniqueness are proposed under the assumption of periodic structures.

  9. Scientists View Battery Under Microscope

    SciTech Connect

    2015-04-10

    PNNL researchers use a special microscope setup that shows the inside of a battery as it charges and discharges. This battery-watching microscope is located at EMSL, DOE's Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory that resides at PNNL. Researchers the world over can visit EMSL and use special instruments like this, many of which are the only one of their kind available to scientists.

  10. The Latest in Handheld Microscopes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wighting, Mervyn J.; Lucking, Robert A.; Christmann, Edwin P.

    2004-01-01

    Around 1590, Zacharias Jansenn of Holland invented the microscope. Jansenn, an eyeglass maker by trade, experimented with lenses and discovered that things appeared closer with combinations of lenses. Over the past 400 years, several refinements to microscopes have occurred, making it possible to magnify objects between 200 and 1,500 times their…

  11. Mars Life? - Microscopic Tubular Structures

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1996-08-09

    This electron microscope image shows extremely tiny tubular structures that are possible microscopic fossils of bacteria-like organisms that may have lived on Mars more than 3.6 billion years ago. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA00285

  12. The Latest in Handheld Microscopes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wighting, Mervyn J.; Lucking, Robert A.; Christmann, Edwin P.

    2004-01-01

    Around 1590, Zacharias Jansenn of Holland invented the microscope. Jansenn, an eyeglass maker by trade, experimented with lenses and discovered that things appeared closer with combinations of lenses. Over the past 400 years, several refinements to microscopes have occurred, making it possible to magnify objects between 200 and 1,500 times their…

  13. Scientists View Battery Under Microscope

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    PNNL researchers use a special microscope setup that shows the inside of a battery as it charges and discharges. This battery-watching microscope is located at EMSL, DOE's Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory that resides at PNNL. Researchers the world over can visit EMSL and use special instruments like this, many of which are the only one of their kind available to scientists.

  14. Microscopic anatomy: normal structure.

    PubMed

    King, Rosalind

    2013-01-01

    A peripheral nerve trunk is composed of nerve fascicles supported in a fibrous collagenous sheath and defined by concentric layers of cells (the perineurium) that separate the contents (the endoneurium) from its fibrous collagen support (the epineurium). In the endoneurium are myelinated and unmyelinated fibers that are axons combined with their supporting Schwann cells to provide physical and electrical connections with end-organs such as muscle fibers and sensory endings. Axons are tubular neuronal extensions with a cytoskeleton of neurotubules and tubulin along which organelles and proteins can travel between the neuronal cell body and the axon terminal. During development some axons enlarge and are covered by a chain of Schwann cells each associated with just one axon. As the axons grow in diameter, the Schwann cells wrap round them to produce a myelin sheath. This consists of many layers of compacted Schwann cell membrane plus some additional proteins. Adjacent myelin segments connect at highly specialized structures, the nodes of Ranvier. Myelin insulates the axon so that the nerve impulse can jump from one node to the next. The region adjacent to the node, the paranodal segment, is the site of myelin terminations on the axolemma. There are connections here between the Schwann cell and the axon via a complex chain of proteins. The Schwann cell cytoplasm in the adjacent segment, the juxtaparanode, contains most of the Schwann cell mitochondria. In addition to the node, continuity of myelin lamellae is broken at intervals along the internode by helical regions of decompaction known as Schmidt-Lanterman incisures; these are seen as paler conical segments in suitably stained microscopical preparations and provide a pathway between the adaxonal and abaxonal cytoplasm. Smaller axons without a myelin sheath conduct very much more slowly and have a more complex relationship with their supporting Schwann cells that has important implications for repair. Copyright

  15. Biofilm Formation in Microscopic Double Emulsion Droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Connie; Weitz, David

    2012-02-01

    In natural, medical, and industrial settings, there exist surface-associated communities of bacteria known as biofilms. These highly structured films are composed of bacterial cells embedded within self-produced extracellular matrix, usually composed of exopolysaccharides, proteins, and nucleic acids; this matrix serves to protect the bacterial community from antibiotics and environmental stressors. Here, we form biofilms encapsulated within monodisperse, microscopically-sized double emulsion droplets using microfluidics. The bacteria self-organize at the inner liquid-liquid droplet interfaces, multiply, and differentiate into extracellular matrix-producing cells, forming manifold three-dimensional shell-within-a-shell structures of biofilms, templated upon the inner core of spherical liquid droplets. By using microfluidics to encapsulate bacterial cells, we have the ability to view individual cells multiplying in microscopically-sized droplets, which allows for high-throughput analysis in studying the genetic program leading to biofilm development, or cell signaling that induces differentiation.

  16. Radiological and microscopic aspects of the denticles.

    PubMed

    Deva, V; Mogoantă, L; Manolea, H; Pancă, Oana Adina; Vătu, Mihaela; Vătăman, Maria

    2006-01-01

    In this paper we have realized a study on 43 patients on which the retro-alveolar radiological exam has shown the existence of a calcareous structure within the pulp chamber having in view a better knowledge of this structure and its etiology, way of forming and pathological implications. For 16 of the patients the radiological exam was supplemented by a microscopic examination. Radiologically, the denticles were noticed more often in the pulp chamber of the molars. The examination of the histological samples has evidenced aspects such as the size, shape and structure of the denticles. The concentric disposition of the tissue elements shows that in the formation of a denticle there is a "center" around which a conjunctive substance avid of calcium salts is deposited. The microscopic aspects noticed on large denticles allowed us to sustain the hypothesis that in a large pulp chamber many denticles form simultaneously and grow up and merge generating a large-sized unique calcareous structure.

  17. Microscopic mass formulas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duflo, J.; Zuker, A. P.

    1995-07-01

    By assuming the existence of a pseudopotential smooth enough to do Hartree-Fock variations and good enough to describe nuclear structure, we construct mass formulas that rely on general scaling arguments and on a schematic reading of shell model calculations. Fits to 1751 known binding energies for N,Z>=8 lead to rms errors of 375 keV with 28 parameters. Tests of the extrapolation properties are passed successfully. The Bethe-Weizsäcker formula is shown to be the asymptotic limit of the present one(s). The surface energy of nuclear matter turns out to be probably smaller than currently accepted.

  18. The head-mounted microscope.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ting; Dailey, Seth H; Naze, Sawyer A; Jiang, Jack J

    2012-04-01

    Microsurgical equipment has greatly advanced since the inception of the microscope into the operating room. These advancements have allowed for superior surgical precision and better post-operative results. This study focuses on the use of the Leica HM500 head-mounted microscope for the operating phonosurgeon. The head-mounted microscope has an optical zoom from 2× to 9× and provides a working distance from 300 mm to 700 mm. The headpiece, with its articulated eyepieces, adjusts easily to head shape and circumference, and offers a focus function, which is either automatic or manually controlled. We performed five microlaryngoscopic operations utilizing the head-mounted microscope with successful results. By creating a more ergonomically favorable operating posture, a surgeon may be able to obtain greater precision and success in phonomicrosurgery. Phonomicrosurgery requires the precise manipulation of long-handled cantilevered instruments through the narrow bore of a laryngoscope. The head-mounted microscope shortens the working distance compared with a stand microscope, thereby increasing arm stability, which may improve surgical precision. Also, the head-mounted design permits flexibility in head position, enabling operator comfort, and delaying musculoskeletal fatigue. A head-mounted microscope decreases the working distance and provides better ergonomics in laryngoscopic microsurgery. These advances provide the potential to promote precision in phonomicrosurgery.

  19. Microscopic Primordial Black Holes and Extra Dimensions

    SciTech Connect

    Conley, John A.; Wizansky, Tommer

    2006-11-15

    We examine the production and evolution of microscopic black holes in the early universe in the large extra dimensions scenario. We demonstrate that, unlike in the standard four-dimensional cosmology, in large extra dimensions absorption of matter from the primordial plasma by the black holes is significant and can lead to rapid growth of the black hole mass density. This effect can be used to constrain the conditions present in the very early universe. We demonstrate that this constraint is applicable in regions of parameter space not excluded by existing bounds.

  20. Microscopic primordial black holes and extra dimensions

    SciTech Connect

    Conley, John; Wizansky, Tommer

    2007-02-15

    We examine the production and evolution of microscopic black holes in the early universe in the large extra dimensions scenario. We demonstrate that, unlike in the standard four-dimensional cosmology, in large extra dimensions absorption of matter from the primordial plasma by the black holes is significant and can lead to rapid growth of the black hole mass density. This effect can be used to constrain the conditions present in the very early universe. We demonstrate that this constraint is applicable in regions of parameter space not excluded by existing bounds.

  1. Disorder-induced microscopic magnetic memory.

    PubMed

    Pierce, M S; Buechler, C R; Sorensen, L B; Turner, J J; Kevan, S D; Jagla, E A; Deutsch, J M; Mai, T; Narayan, O; Davies, J E; Liu, K; Dunn, J Hunter; Chesnel, K M; Kortright, J B; Hellwig, O; Fullerton, E E

    2005-01-14

    Using coherent x-ray speckle metrology, we have measured the influence of disorder on major loop return point memory (RPM) and complementary point memory (CPM) for a series of perpendicular anisotropy Co/Pt multilayer films. In the low disorder limit, the domain structures show no memory with field cycling--no RPM and no CPM. With increasing disorder, we observe the onset and the saturation of both the RPM and the CPM. These results provide the first direct ensemble-sensitive experimental study of the effects of varying disorder on microscopic magnetic memory and are compared against the predictions of existing theories.

  2. Adirondack Under the Microscope-2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This overhead look at the martian rock dubbed Adirondack was captured by the Mars Exploration Rover Spirit's panoramic camera. It shows the approximate region where the rover's microscopic imager began its first close-up inspection.

  3. Microscopic derivation of discrete hydrodynamics.

    PubMed

    Español, Pep; Anero, Jesús G; Zúñiga, Ignacio

    2009-12-28

    By using the standard theory of coarse graining based on Zwanzig's projection operator, we derive the dynamic equations for discrete hydrodynamic variables. These hydrodynamic variables are defined in terms of the Delaunay triangulation. The resulting microscopically derived equations can be understood, a posteriori, as a discretization on an arbitrary irregular grid of the Navier-Stokes equations. The microscopic derivation provides a set of discrete equations that exactly conserves mass, momentum, and energy and the dissipative part of the dynamics produces strict entropy increase. In addition, the microscopic derivation provides a practical implementation of thermal fluctuations in a way that the fluctuation-dissipation theorem is satisfied exactly. This paper points toward a close connection between coarse-graining procedures from microscopic dynamics and discretization schemes for partial differential equations.

  4. Microscopic Procedures for Plant Meiosis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Braselton, James P.

    1997-01-01

    Describes laboratory techniques designed to familiarize students with meiosis and how microscopic preparations of meiosis are made. These techniques require the use of fresh or fixed flowers. Contains 18 references. (DDR)

  5. Recent Athena Microscopic Imager Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herkenhoff, K. E.; Ashley, J. W.; Johnson, J. R.; Parker, T. J.; Athena Science Team

    2012-03-01

    The Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity arrived at the rim of Endeavour Crater in August 2011. This presentation summarizes Opportunity Microscopic Imager observations of ejecta, bedrock, a gypsum vein, and other materials in the crater rim rocks.

  6. Adirondack Under the Microscope-2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This overhead look at the martian rock dubbed Adirondack was captured by the Mars Exploration Rover Spirit's panoramic camera. It shows the approximate region where the rover's microscopic imager began its first close-up inspection.

  7. Mars Life? - Microscopic Tubular Structures

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1996-08-09

    This electron microscope image shows tubular structures of likely Martian origin. These structures are very similar in size and shape to extremely tiny microfossils found in some Earth rocks. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA00287

  8. Microscopic Procedures for Plant Meiosis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Braselton, James P.

    1997-01-01

    Describes laboratory techniques designed to familiarize students with meiosis and how microscopic preparations of meiosis are made. These techniques require the use of fresh or fixed flowers. Contains 18 references. (DDR)

  9. Magnetic Resonance Force Microscope Development

    SciTech Connect

    Hammel, P.C.; Zhang, Z.; Suh, B.J.; Roukes, M.L.; Midzor, M.; Wigen, P.E.; Childress, J.R.

    1999-06-03

    Our objectives were to develop the Magnetic Resonance Force Microscope (MRFM) into an instrument capable of scientific studies of buried structures in technologically and scientifically important electronic materials such as magnetic multilayer materials. This work resulted in the successful demonstration of MRFM-detected ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) as a microscopic characterization tool for thin magnetic films. Strong FMR spectra obtained from microscopic Co thin films (500 and 1000 angstroms thick and 40 x 200 microns in lateral extent) allowed us to observe variations in sample inhomogeneity and magnetic anisotropy field. We demonstrated lateral imaging in microscopic FMR for the first time using a novel approach employing a spatially selective local field generated by a small magnetically polarized spherical crystallite of yttrium iron garnet. These successful applications of the MRFM in materials studies provided the basis for our successful proposal to DOE/BES to employ the MRF M in studies of buried interfaces in magnetic materials.

  10. (Center of excellence: Microlaser microscope)

    SciTech Connect

    Webb, R.H.

    1992-01-01

    This Center-of-Excellence grant has two components: development of an imaging system based on microlaser arrays forms a central project among a group of laser diagnostic and therapeutic efforts primarily funded outside the grant. In these first 8 months we have set up the Microlaser Microscope using small microlaser arrays. We have emphasized the basics of microlaser handling and electronic addressing and the optics of the microscope. Details of electronics and optics given here will be used in the larger arrays which should be available soon. After a description of the central Microlaser Microscope project, we touch briefly on the other projects of the Center, which have been outstandingly fruitful this year. Publications are necessarily concerned with the smaller projects, since the Microlaser Microscope is in its early stages.

  11. HIGH TEMPERATURE MICROSCOPE AND FURNACE

    DOEpatents

    Olson, D.M.

    1961-01-31

    A high-temperature microscope is offered. It has a reflecting optic situated above a molten specimen in a furnace and reflecting the image of the same downward through an inert optic member in the floor of the furnace, a plurality of spaced reflecting plane mirrors defining a reflecting path around the furnace, a standard microscope supported in the path of and forming the end terminus of the light path.

  12. On thermodynamic and microscopic reversibility

    SciTech Connect

    Crooks, Gavin E.

    2011-07-12

    The word 'reversible' has two (apparently) distinct applications in statistical thermodynamics. A thermodynamically reversible process indicates an experimental protocol for which the entropy change is zero, whereas the principle of microscopic reversibility asserts that the probability of any trajectory of a system through phase space equals that of the time reversed trajectory. However, these two terms are actually synonymous: a thermodynamically reversible process is microscopically reversible, and vice versa.

  13. Taking Photographs with a Microscope

    PubMed Central

    Maude, Richard J.; Koh, Gavin C. K. W.; Silamut, Kamolrat

    2008-01-01

    We describe a simple, economical, and highly practical technique for taking digital photographs of specimens visualized through a light microscope. Most models of light microscope and compact digital camera, and even some cameraphones, can be used. The technique is quick to learn and can easily be performed in a resource-poor setting. It can be used to assist with diagnosis in remote areas and can be extremely useful for teaching. PMID:18784246

  14. Taking photographs with a microscope.

    PubMed

    Maude, Richard J; Koh, Gavin C K W; Silamut, Kamolrat

    2008-09-01

    We describe a simple, economical, and highly practical technique for taking digital photographs of specimens visualized through a light microscope. Most models of light microscope and compact digital camera, and even some cameraphones, can be used. The technique is quick to learn and can easily be performed in a resource-poor setting. It can be used to assist with diagnosis in remote areas and can be extremely useful for teaching.

  15. [MICROSCOPIC COLITIS: THE CLINICAL CASE].

    PubMed

    Kulygina, Y A; Skalinskaya, M I; Ageeva, T A

    2015-01-01

    During past years incidence and prevalence of microscopic colitis (MC) have increased, that is possible caused to the improvement of knowledge of doctors about the disease. This article contain modern views on epidemiology, diagnostic and variant of microscopic colitis treatment. A typical clinical picture of MC in the form of recurrent a watery diarrhea, with the absence of pathologic changes at roentgenologic and endoscopic investigations is described with the example of a clinical case.

  16. STM-SQUID probe microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayashi, Tadayuki; Tachiki, Minoru; Itozaki, Hideo

    2007-11-01

    We have developed a STM-SQUID probe microscope. A high TC SQUID probe microscope was combined with a scanning tunneling microscope for investigation of samples at room temperature in air. A high permeability probe needle was used as a magnetic flux guide to improve the spatial resolution. The probe with tip radius of less than 100 nm was prepared by microelectropolishing. The probe was also used as a scanning tunneling microscope tip. Topography of the sample surface could be measured by the scanning tunneling microscope with high spatial resolution prior to observation by SQUID microscopy. The SQUID probe microscope image could be observed while keeping the distance from the sample surface to the probe tip constant. We observed a topographic image and a magnetic image of Ni fine pattern and also a magnetically recorded hard disk. Furthermore we have investigated a sample vibration method of the static magnetic field emanating from a sample with the aim of achieving a higher signal-to-noise (S/N) ratio.

  17. Ultrafast superresolution fluorescence imaging with spinning disk confocal microscope optics.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Shinichi; Okada, Yasushi

    2015-05-01

    Most current superresolution (SR) microscope techniques surpass the diffraction limit at the expense of temporal resolution, compromising their applications to live-cell imaging. Here we describe a new SR fluorescence microscope based on confocal microscope optics, which we name the spinning disk superresolution microscope (SDSRM). Theoretically, the SDSRM is equivalent to a structured illumination microscope (SIM) and achieves a spatial resolution of 120 nm, double that of the diffraction limit of wide-field fluorescence microscopy. However, the SDSRM is 10 times faster than a conventional SIM because SR signals are recovered by optical demodulation through the stripe pattern of the disk. Therefore a single SR image requires only a single averaged image through the rotating disk. On the basis of this theory, we modified a commercial spinning disk confocal microscope. The improved resolution around 120 nm was confirmed with biological samples. The rapid dynamics of micro-tubules, mitochondria, lysosomes, and endosomes were observed with temporal resolutions of 30-100 frames/s. Because our method requires only small optical modifications, it will enable an easy upgrade from an existing spinning disk confocal to a SR microscope for live-cell imaging.

  18. Ultrafast superresolution fluorescence imaging with spinning disk confocal microscope optics

    PubMed Central

    Hayashi, Shinichi; Okada, Yasushi

    2015-01-01

    Most current superresolution (SR) microscope techniques surpass the diffraction limit at the expense of temporal resolution, compromising their applications to live-cell imaging. Here we describe a new SR fluorescence microscope based on confocal microscope optics, which we name the spinning disk superresolution microscope (SDSRM). Theoretically, the SDSRM is equivalent to a structured illumination microscope (SIM) and achieves a spatial resolution of 120 nm, double that of the diffraction limit of wide-field fluorescence microscopy. However, the SDSRM is 10 times faster than a conventional SIM because SR signals are recovered by optical demodulation through the stripe pattern of the disk. Therefore a single SR image requires only a single averaged image through the rotating disk. On the basis of this theory, we modified a commercial spinning disk confocal microscope. The improved resolution around 120 nm was confirmed with biological samples. The rapid dynamics of micro­tubules, mitochondria, lysosomes, and endosomes were observed with temporal resolutions of 30–100 frames/s. Because our method requires only small optical modifications, it will enable an easy upgrade from an existing spinning disk confocal to a SR microscope for live-cell imaging. PMID:25717185

  19. Scanning Miniature Microscopes without Lenses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Yu

    2009-01-01

    The figure schematically depicts some alternative designs of proposed compact, lightweight optoelectronic microscopes that would contain no lenses and would generate magnified video images of specimens. Microscopes of this type were described previously in Miniature Microscope Without Lenses (NPO - 20218), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 22, No. 8 (August 1998), page 43 and Reflective Variants of Miniature Microscope Without Lenses (NPO 20610), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 26, No. 9 (September 1999), page 6a. To recapitulate: In the design and construction of a microscope of this type, the focusing optics of a conventional microscope are replaced by a combination of a microchannel filter and a charge-coupled-device (CCD) image detector. Elimination of focusing optics reduces the size and weight of the instrument and eliminates the need for the time-consuming focusing operation. The microscopes described in the cited prior articles contained two-dimensional CCDs registered with two-dimensional arrays of microchannels and, as such, were designed to produce full two-dimensional images, without need for scanning. The microscopes of the present proposal would contain one-dimensional (line image) CCDs registered with linear arrays of microchannels. In the operation of such a microscope, one would scan a specimen along a line perpendicular to the array axis (in other words, one would scan in pushbroom fashion). One could then synthesize a full two-dimensional image of the specimen from the line-image data acquired at one-pixel increments of position along the scan. In one of the proposed microscopes, a beam of unpolarized light for illuminating the specimen would enter from the side. This light would be reflected down onto the specimen by a nonpolarizing beam splitter attached to the microchannels at their lower ends. A portion of the light incident on the specimen would be reflected upward, through the beam splitter and along the microchannels, to form an image on the CCD. If the

  20. Coordinate-space solution of the Skyrme-Hartree-Fock- Bogolyubov equations within spherical symmetry. The program HFBRAD (v1.00)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennaceur, K.; Dobaczewski, J.

    2005-06-01

    We describe the first version (v1.00) of the code HFBRAD which solves the Skyrme-Hartree-Fock or Skyrme-Hartree-Fock-Bogolyubov equations in the coordinate representation with spherical symmetry. A realistic representation of the quasiparticle wave functions on the space lattice allows calculations to be performed up to the particle drip lines. Zero-range density-dependent interactions are used in the pairing channel. The pairing energy is calculated by either using a cut-off energy in the quasiparticle spectrum or the regularization scheme proposed by A. Bulgac and Y. Yu. Program summaryTitle of the program:HFBRAD (v1.00) Catalogue indentifier:ADVM Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/ADVM Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University of Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: none Computers on which the program has been tested: Pentium-III, Pentium-IV Operating systems: LINUX, Windows Programming language used:FORTRAN-95 Memory required to execute with typical data: 30 MBytes No. of bits in a word: The code is written with a type real and uses the intrinsic function selected_real_kind at the beginning of the code to ask for at least 12 significant digits. This can be easily modified by asking for more significant digits if the architecture of the computer can handle it. No. of processors used:1 Has the code been vectorized?:No No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 40 308 No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 5370 Distribution format:tar.gz Nature of physical problem: For a self-consistent description of nuclear pair correlations, both the particle-hole (field) and particle-particle (pairing) channels of the nuclear mean field must be treated within a common approach, which is the Hartree-Fock-Bogolyubov theory. By expressing these fields in spatial coordinates one can obtain the best possible solutions of the problem; however, without assuming specific symmetries the

  1. Does Unconscious Racism Exist?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quillian, Lincoln

    2008-01-01

    This essay argues for the existence of a form of unconscious racism. Research on implicit prejudice provides good evidence that most persons have deeply held negative associations with minority groups that can lead to subtle discrimination without conscious awareness. The evidence for implicit attitudes is briefly reviewed. Criticisms of the…

  2. Relativity, Dimensionality, and Existence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petkov, Vesselin

    A 100 years have passed since the advent of special relativity and 2008 will mark another important to all relativists anniversary - 100 years since Minkowski gave his talk "Space and Time" on September 21, 1908 in which he proposed the unifi- cation of space and time into an inseparable entity - space-time. Although special relativity has been an enormously successful physical theory no progress has been made in clarifying the question of existence of the objects represented by two of its basic concepts - space-time and world lines (or worldtubes in the case of extended bodies). The major reason for this failure appears to be the physicists' tradition to call such questions of existence philosophical. This tradition, however, is not quite consistent. In Newtonian mechanics physicists believe that they describe real objects whenever they talk about particles - one of the basic concepts of Newtonian physics. The situation is the same in quantum physics - no one questions the existence of electrons, protons, etc. Then why should the question of existence of worldtubes (representing particles in relativity) be regarded as a philosophical question?

  3. Does Unconscious Racism Exist?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quillian, Lincoln

    2008-01-01

    This essay argues for the existence of a form of unconscious racism. Research on implicit prejudice provides good evidence that most persons have deeply held negative associations with minority groups that can lead to subtle discrimination without conscious awareness. The evidence for implicit attitudes is briefly reviewed. Criticisms of the…

  4. Solution of the Skyrme Hartree Fock Bogolyubov equations in the Cartesian deformed harmonic-oscillator basis. (V) HFODD(v2.08k)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobaczewski, J.; Olbratowski, P.

    2005-05-01

    We describe the new version (v2.08k) of the code HFODD which solves the nuclear Skyrme-Hartree-Fock or Skyrme-Hartree-Fock-Bogolyubov problem by using the Cartesian deformed harmonic-oscillator basis. Similarly as in the previous version (v2.08i), all symmetries can be broken, which allows for calculations with angular frequency and angular momentum tilted with respect to the mass distribution. In the new version, three minor errors have been corrected. New Version Program SummaryTitle of program: HFODD; version: 2.08k Catalogue number: ADVA Catalogue number of previous version: ADTO (Comput. Phys. Comm. 158 (2004) 158) Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/ADVA Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University of Belfast, N. Ireland Does the new version supersede the previous one: yes Computers on which this or another recent version has been tested: SG Power Challenge L, Pentium-II, Pentium-III, AMD-Athlon Operating systems under which the program has been tested: UNIX, LINUX, Windows-2000 Programming language used: Fortran Memory required to execute with typical data: 10M words No. of bits in a word: 64 No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 52 631 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 266 885 Distribution format:tar.gz Nature of physical problem: The nuclear mean-field and an analysis of its symmetries in realistic cases are the main ingredients of a description of nuclear states. Within the Local Density Approximation, or for a zero-range velocity-dependent Skyrme interaction, the nuclear mean-field is local and velocity dependent. The locality allows for an effective and fast solution of the self-consistent Hartree-Fock equations, even for heavy nuclei, and for various nucleonic ( n-particle n-hole) configurations, deformations, excitation energies, or angular momenta. Similar Local Density Approximation in the particle-particle channel, which is equivalent to using a zero

  5. Microscopic functional anatomy: Integumentary system: Chapter 17

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Elliott, Diane G.; Ostrander, Gary K.

    2000-01-01

    Many of the features of the fish integument can only be observed microscopically. Because there are over 20,000 living fishes, mostly higher bony fishes (teleosts), a great diversity exists in the microscopic anatomy of the integument. This chapter presents several examples from varied taxonomic groups to illustrate the variation in morphological features. As in all vertebrate epidermis, the fundamental structural unit is the epithelial cell. This is the only constant feature, as a great diversity of cell types exists in the various fish taxa. Some of these include apocrine mucous cells and a variety of other secretory cells, ionocytes, sensory cells, and wandering cells such as leukocytes. The dermis consists essentially of two sets of collagen fibers arranged in opposing geodesic spirals around the body. The dermis of most fishes is divided into two major layers. The upper (outer) layer, the stratum spongiosum or stratum laxum, is a loose network of connective tissue, whereas the lower layer, the stratum compactum, is a dense layer consisting primarily of orthogonal collagen bands. There are also specialized dermal elements such as chromatophores scales, and fin rays.

  6. The Problem of Existence

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-01-01

    envisionment ) produced by GIZMO . ? In the envisionment , I s indicates the set of quantity—conditioned individuals that exists during a situa- tion... envisionment step by step . In START, the initial state, GIZMO deduces that heat flow occurs, since there is assumed to be a temperature difference between the...stov e GIZMO implements the basic operations of qualitative process theory, including an envisioner for makin g predictions and a program for

  7. An entanglement-enhanced microscope.

    PubMed

    Ono, Takafumi; Okamoto, Ryo; Takeuchi, Shigeki

    2013-01-01

    Among the applications of optical phase measurement, the differential interference contrast microscope is widely used for the evaluation of opaque materials or biological tissues. However, the signal-to-noise ratio for a given light intensity is limited by the standard quantum limit, which is critical for measurements where the probe light intensity is limited to avoid damaging the sample. The standard quantum limit can only be beaten by using N quantum correlated particles, with an improvement factor of √N. Here we report the demonstration of an entanglement-enhanced microscope, which is a confocal-type differential interference contrast microscope where an entangled photon pair (N=2) source is used for illumination. An image of a Q shape carved in relief on the glass surface is obtained with better visibility than with a classical light source. The signal-to-noise ratio is 1.35±0.12 times better than that limited by the standard quantum limit.

  8. Ergonomic microscope comfort and control.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Elizabeth Anne

    2011-03-01

    Microscope use in the inspection phase of computer chip manufacturing is a major cause of worker discomfort and injury. A two-phase ergonomics project to reduce employee fatigue and discomfort was planned, implemented, and evaluated in a microscope user environment within a high-technology manufacturing environment. Total Quality Management methodology and tools were employed by a multidisciplinary team led by an occupational health nurse practitioner to accomplish the project goals. A multifaceted approach including equipment changes, administrative changes, and focused training for behavior changes achieved the desired reduction in reports of fatigue and discomfort among microscope users. Occupational health nurses are ideal candidates to lead teams to accomplish meaningful health and safety goals consistent with corporate quality initiatives and strategic objectives. Copyright 2011, SLACK Incorporated.

  9. Microscopic characterization of peptide nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Mammadov, Rashad; Tekinay, Ayse B; Dana, Aykutlu; Guler, Mustafa O

    2012-02-01

    Peptide-based nanomaterials have been utilized for various applications from regenerative medicine to electronics since they provide several advantages including easy synthesis methods, numerous routes for functionalization and biomimicry of secondary structures of proteins which leads to design of self-assembling peptide molecules to form nanostructures. Microscopic characterization at nanoscale is critical to understand processes directing peptide molecules to self-assemble and identify structure-function relationship of the nanostructures. Here, fundamental studies in microscopic characterization of peptide nanostructures are discussed to provide insights in widely used microscopy tools. In this review, we will encompass characterization studies of peptide nanostructures with modern microscopes, such as TEM, SEM, AFM, and advanced optical microscopy techniques. We will also mention specimen preparation methods and describe interpretation of the images.

  10. Scanning thermal-conductivity microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarid, Dror; McCarthy, Brendan; Grover, Ranjan

    2006-02-01

    This article describes a novel implementation of an atomic force microscope that can map thermal-conductivity features across a sample with a high spatial resolution. The microscope employs a single-sided, metal-coated cantilever, which acts as a bimetallic strip together with a heating laser whose beam is focused on the cantilever's free end, on the opposite side of its tip. Subtracting the topography obtained by the unheated and heated cantilevers yields a map of thermal conductivity across the surface of a sample. The article presents (a) the theory of operation of the microscope and (b) the experimental results obtained on a silicon sample with oxide features, showing good agreement between the two.

  11. Microscope and method of use

    SciTech Connect

    Bongianni, W.L.

    1981-08-18

    A method and apparatus for electronically focusing and electronically scanning microscopic specimens are given. In the invention, visual images of even moving, living, opaque specimens can be acoustically obtained and viewed with virtually no time needed for processing (i.e., real time processing is used). And planar samples are not required. The specimens (if planar) need not be moved during scanning, although it will be desirable and possible to move or rotate nonplanar specimens (e.g., laser fusion targets) against the lens of the apparatus. No coupling fluid is needed, so specimens need not be wetted. A phase acoustic microscope is also made from the basic microscope components together with electronic mixers.

  12. Microscope and method of use

    DOEpatents

    Bongianni, Wayne L.

    1984-01-01

    A method and apparatus for electronically focusing and electronically scanning microscopic specimens are given. In the invention, visual images of even moving, living, opaque specimens can be acoustically obtained and viewed with virtually no time needed for processing (i.e., real time processing is used). And planar samples are not required. The specimens (if planar) need not be moved during scanning, although it will be desirable and possible to move or rotate nonplanar specimens (e.g., laser fusion targets) against the lens of the apparatus. No coupling fluid is needed, so specimens need not be wetted. A phase acoustic microscope is also made from the basic microscope components together with electronic mixers.

  13. Microscope and method of use

    DOEpatents

    Bongianni, W.L.

    1984-04-17

    A method and apparatus for electronically focusing and electronically scanning microscopic specimens are given. In the invention, visual images of even moving, living, opaque specimens can be acoustically obtained and viewed with virtually no time needed for processing (i.e., real time processing is used). And planar samples are not required. The specimens (if planar) need not be moved during scanning, although it will be desirable and possible to move or rotate nonplanar specimens (e.g., laser fusion targets) against the lens of the apparatus. No coupling fluid is needed, so specimens need not be wetted. A phase acoustic microscope is also made from the basic microscope components together with electronic mixers. 7 figs.

  14. Macroscopic-microscopic mass models

    SciTech Connect

    Nix, J.R.; Moller, P.

    1995-07-01

    We discuss recent developments in macroscopic-microscopic mass models, including the 1992 finite-range droplet model, the 1992 extended- Thomas-Fermi Strutinsky-integral model, and the 1994 Thomas-Fermi model, with particular emphasis on how well they extrapolate to new regions of nuclei. We also address what recent developments in macroscopic-microscopic mass models are teaching us about such physically relevant issues as the nuclear curvature energy, a new congruence energy arising from a greater-than-average overlap of neutron and proton wave functions, the nuclear incompressibility coefficient, and the coulomb redistribution energy arising from a central density depression. We conclude with a brief discussion of the recently discovered rock of metastable superheavy nuclei near {sup 272}110 that had been correctly predicted by macroscopic-microscopic models, along with a possible new tack for reaching an island near {sup 290}110 beyond our present horizon.

  15. Mosaic of Commemorative Microscope Substrate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    Written by electron beam lithography in the Microdevices Laboratory of NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, this Optical Microscope substrate helps the Phoenix Mars Mission science team learn how to assemble individual microscope images into a mosaic by aligning rows of text.

    Each line is about 0.1 millimeter tall, the average thickness of a human hair. Except for the Mogensen twins, the names are of babies born and team members lost during the original development of MECA (the Microscopy, Electrochemistry and Conductivity Analyzer) for the canceled 2001 Mars lander mission. The plaque also acknowledges the MECA 2001 principal investigator, now retired.

    This image was taken by the MECA Optical Microscope on Sol 111, or the 111th day of the Phoenix mission (Sept. 16, 2008).

    The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by JPL, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development was by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  16. Mosaic of Commemorative Microscope Substrate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    Written by electron beam lithography in the Microdevices Laboratory of NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, this Optical Microscope substrate helps the Phoenix Mars Mission science team learn how to assemble individual microscope images into a mosaic by aligning rows of text.

    Each line is about 0.1 millimeter tall, the average thickness of a human hair. Except for the Mogensen twins, the names are of babies born and team members lost during the original development of MECA (the Microscopy, Electrochemistry and Conductivity Analyzer) for the canceled 2001 Mars lander mission. The plaque also acknowledges the MECA 2001 principal investigator, now retired.

    This image was taken by the MECA Optical Microscope on Sol 111, or the 111th day of the Phoenix mission (Sept. 16, 2008).

    The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by JPL, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development was by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  17. Sample holder support for microscopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berry, Anthony (Inventor); Nerren, Billy H. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    A sample filter holder is disclosed for use with a microscope for holding the filter in a planar condition on the stage of the microscope so that automatic focusing of the microscope can be performed on particle samples dispersed on the filter. The holder includes a base having a well that communicates with an inlet port which is connected to a suction pump. A screen assembly is positioned within the well. The screen assembly includes a disk having a screen positioned on its top surface and secured to the disk at the peripheral edge of the screen. Small bores allow the outer surface of the screen to communicate with the well. The filter is placed on the screen and is held in a flat disposition by the suction forces.

  18. Microscopic Materials on a Magnet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    These images show a comparison of the weak magnet OM7 from the Optical Microscope on NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander before (left) and after (right) soil deposition.

    The microscope took the left image during Phoenix's Sol 15 (June 10, 2008) and the right image during Sol 21 (Jun 16, 2008).

    The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  19. Advanced Microscopic Integrated Thermocouple Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pettigrew, Penny J.

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to develop and refine a technique for making microscopic thermocouple arrays for use in measuring the temperature gradient across a solid-liquid interface during the solidification process. Current thermocouple technology does not allow for real-time measurements across the interface due to the prohibitive size of available thermocouples. Microscopic thermocouple arrays will offer a much greater accuracy and resolution of temperature measurements across the solid-liquid interface which will lead to a better characterization of the solidification process and interface reaction which affect the properties of the resulting material.

  20. Microscopic Materials on a Magnet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    These images show a comparison of the weak magnet OM7 from the Optical Microscope on NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander before (left) and after (right) soil deposition.

    The microscope took the left image during Phoenix's Sol 15 (June 10, 2008) and the right image during Sol 21 (Jun 16, 2008).

    The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  1. Long working distance interference microscope

    DOEpatents

    Sinclair, Michael B.; DeBoer, Maarten P.; Smith, Norman F.

    2004-04-13

    Disclosed is a long working distance interference microscope suitable for three-dimensional imaging and metrology of MEMS devices and test structures on a standard microelectronics probe station. The long working distance of 10-30 mm allows standard probes or probe cards to be used. This enables nanometer-scale 3-D height profiles of MEMS test structures to be acquired across an entire wafer. A well-matched pair of reference/sample objectives is not required, significantly reducing the cost of this microscope, as compared to a Linnik microinterferometer.

  2. Evaluation of Existing Structures

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1974-12-01

    EVALUATION OF EXISTING STRUCTURES Final Report 6 PERFORMING ORG . REPORT NUMBER 7 AUTHOR(s) 8 CONTRACT OR GRANT NUMBERls) C. K. Wiehie IDAHC20-71-C-0292 9...43,F:9J 4).IC A-44) S ’t 1001 iC 310140’ Cl144 PcC.0 4,:,(F <R49,10.- 1.y 10. . . U .A 30G150 4 -L4T-’P-.T’Ii𔃻J 4’ IARA (4.PS4*IC).P4)FC 30R100: RFAL R

  3. Existence of hyperbolic calorons

    PubMed Central

    Sibner, Lesley; Sibner, Robert; Yang, Yisong

    2015-01-01

    Recent work of Harland shows that the SO(3)-symmetric, dimensionally reduced, charge-N self-dual Yang–Mills calorons on the hyperbolic space H3×S1 may be obtained through constructing N-vortex solutions of an Abelian Higgs model as in the study of Witten on multiple instantons. In this paper, we establish the existence of such minimal action charge-N calorons by constructing arbitrarily prescribed N-vortex solutions of the Witten type equations. PMID:27547084

  4. Switch on Micro*scope!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roland, Sarah; Bahr, Michele; Olendzenski, Lorraine; Patterson, David J.

    2005-01-01

    Scientists at the Marine Biological Laboratory in Woods Hole, Massachusetts, have created micro*scope, a free, searchable knowledge environment for exploring the microbial world. Microbiology can easily be incorporated into the curriculum, because microbial communities are easy to access. Organisms grow quickly, making certain arrays of…

  5. Curriculum Guidelines for Microscopic Anatomy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Dental Education, 1993

    1993-01-01

    The American Association of Dental Schools' guidelines for curricula in microscopic anatomy offer an overview of the histology curriculum, note primary educational goals, outline specific content for general and oral histology, suggest prerequisites, and make recommendations for sequencing. Appropriate faculty and facilities are also suggested.…

  6. High-resolution electron microscope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nathan, R.

    1977-01-01

    Employing scanning transmission electron microscope as interferometer, relative phases of diffraction maximums can be determined by analysis of dark field images. Synthetic aperture technique and Fourier-transform computer processing of amplitude and phase information provide high resolution images at approximately one angstrom.

  7. Nature Study with the Microscope.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sollberger, Dwight E.

    1991-01-01

    Identifies specific instruction difficulties, potential problems, solutions, and activities for successful use of microscopes in the classroom. Procedures are outlined for guiding students in creating their own slides with monocotyledon and dicotyledon stems, fern spores, stomata, lichens, and red onions. (MCO)

  8. Chasing Meteors With a Microscope.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Richard C.

    1993-01-01

    Describes types of meteors and micrometeorites that enter the Earth's atmosphere. Presents an activity where students collect micrometeorites with a strip of tape in an undisturbed outdoor area. After 24 hours, they examine the tape by sandwiching it between 2 glass slides and view through a microscope at 100X. (PR)

  9. Switch on Micro*scope!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roland, Sarah; Bahr, Michele; Olendzenski, Lorraine; Patterson, David J.

    2005-01-01

    Scientists at the Marine Biological Laboratory in Woods Hole, Massachusetts, have created micro*scope, a free, searchable knowledge environment for exploring the microbial world. Microbiology can easily be incorporated into the curriculum, because microbial communities are easy to access. Organisms grow quickly, making certain arrays of…

  10. Nature Study with the Microscope.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sollberger, Dwight E.

    1991-01-01

    Identifies specific instruction difficulties, potential problems, solutions, and activities for successful use of microscopes in the classroom. Procedures are outlined for guiding students in creating their own slides with monocotyledon and dicotyledon stems, fern spores, stomata, lichens, and red onions. (MCO)

  11. Chasing Meteors With a Microscope.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Richard C.

    1993-01-01

    Describes types of meteors and micrometeorites that enter the Earth's atmosphere. Presents an activity where students collect micrometeorites with a strip of tape in an undisturbed outdoor area. After 24 hours, they examine the tape by sandwiching it between 2 glass slides and view through a microscope at 100X. (PR)

  12. The Biggest Microscopic Image Ever

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This is a mosaic of four individual frames taken by the microscopic imager that have been very carefully stitched together to reveal the entire 5-centimeter-diameter (almost 2-inch) hole left on the rock dubbed 'Humphrey.' The holes were created by the Mars Exploration Rover Spirit's rock abrasion tool. The mosaic, created on March 7, 2004, is the first of its kind of an abraded surface on Mars, and gave scientists their first ever microscopic imager view of the entire drilled area. While it is easy for the panoramic camera and the navigation cameras to fit an area this size into their field of view, the microscopic imager can only capture a portion of the ground area with each image.

    Scientists are interested in many of the small features on 'Humphrey' uncovered by the rock abrasion tool and made visible by the microscopic imager. The sinuous veins within the rock could be evidence that water was trickling through the material while it was deep underground, whereas the dark 'age spots' in the center of the hole may be crystals of the mineral olivine.

  13. Scanning tunneling microscope nanoetching method

    DOEpatents

    Li, Yun-Zhong; Reifenberger, Ronald G.; Andres, Ronald P.

    1990-01-01

    A method is described for forming uniform nanometer sized depressions on the surface of a conducting substrate. A tunneling tip is used to apply tunneling current density sufficient to vaporize a localized area of the substrate surface. The resulting depressions or craters in the substrate surface can be formed in information encoding patterns readable with a scanning tunneling microscope.

  14. Curriculum Guidelines for Microscopic Anatomy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Dental Education, 1993

    1993-01-01

    The American Association of Dental Schools' guidelines for curricula in microscopic anatomy offer an overview of the histology curriculum, note primary educational goals, outline specific content for general and oral histology, suggest prerequisites, and make recommendations for sequencing. Appropriate faculty and facilities are also suggested.…

  15. The microscope in the hatchery

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fish, F.F.

    1935-01-01

    Without the aid of the microscope, it is safe to assume that fish Culture would now stand exactly where it did seventy-five years ago when methods of artificial fertilization were first applied. It is also safe to assume that the results from fish culture would be as unsatisfactory as they were at that time when the fishery resources were steadily declining in spite of the increased liberation of advanced fry from the hatcheries. During the past few years the microscope has saved millions of fish in our hatcheries which otherwise would have been sacrificed to disease. Moreover, the microscope has permitted all of the recent work in selective breeding, nutritional requirements, and disease control. This work marks most of the progress fish culture has made during the past twenty-five years. This progress forms the first definite step away from the old system of hatching and distributing fish, a system which was founded by the ancient Chinese. The microscope has been the key which enabled the fish culturist to solve the riddle of success which has stood, unanswered, for 2,500 years.

  16. The Biggest Microscopic Image Ever

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This is a mosaic of four individual frames taken by the microscopic imager that have been very carefully stitched together to reveal the entire 5-centimeter-diameter (almost 2-inch) hole left on the rock dubbed 'Humphrey.' The holes were created by the Mars Exploration Rover Spirit's rock abrasion tool. The mosaic, created on March 7, 2004, is the first of its kind of an abraded surface on Mars, and gave scientists their first ever microscopic imager view of the entire drilled area. While it is easy for the panoramic camera and the navigation cameras to fit an area this size into their field of view, the microscopic imager can only capture a portion of the ground area with each image.

    Scientists are interested in many of the small features on 'Humphrey' uncovered by the rock abrasion tool and made visible by the microscopic imager. The sinuous veins within the rock could be evidence that water was trickling through the material while it was deep underground, whereas the dark 'age spots' in the center of the hole may be crystals of the mineral olivine.

  17. Soft x-ray laser microscope. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Suckewer, P.I.

    1990-10-01

    The program consisted of two phases (Phase I and Phase II). The goal of the Phase I (first year program) was to design and construct the Soft X-ray Laser Contact Microscope. Such microscope was constructed and adapted to PPL`s 18.2nm soft X-ray Laser (SXL), which in turn was modified and prepared for microscopy experiments. Investigation of the photoresist response to 18.2nm laser radiation and transmissivity of 0.1m thick silicion-nitride (Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}) windows were important initial works. The goal of the first year of Phase II was to construct X-ray contact microscope in combination with existing optical phase microscope, already used by biologists. In the second year of Phase II study of dehydrated Horeseshoe Crab and Hela cancer cells were performed with COXRALM. Also during Phase II, the Imaging X-Ray Laser Microscope (IXRALM) was designed and constructed. This paper describes the development of each of the microscopes and their application for research.

  18. Microscope sterility during spine surgery.

    PubMed

    Bible, Jesse E; O'Neill, Kevin R; Crosby, Colin G; Schoenecker, Jonathan G; McGirt, Matthew J; Devin, Clinton J

    2012-04-01

    Prospective study. Assess the contamination rates of sterile microscope drapes after spine surgery. The use of the operating microscope has become more prevalent in certain spine procedures, providing superior magnification, visualization, and illumination of the operative field. However, it may represent an additional source of bacterial contamination and increase the risk of developing a postoperative infection. This study included 25 surgical spine cases performed by a single spine surgeon that required the use of the operative microscope. Sterile culture swabs were used to obtain samples from 7 defined locations on the microscope drape after its use during the operation. The undraped technician's console was sampled in each case as a positive control, and an additional 25 microscope drapes were swabbed immediately after they were applied to the microscope to obtain negative controls. Swab samples were assessed for bacterial growth on 5% sheep blood Columbia agar plates using a semiquantitative technique. No growth was observed on any of the 25 negative control drapes. In contrast, 100% of preoperative and 96% of postoperative positive controls demonstrated obvious contamination. In the postoperative group, all 7 sites of evaluation were found to be contaminated with rates of 12% to 44%. Four of the 7 evaluated locations were found to have significant contamination rates compared with negative controls, including the shafts of the optic eyepieces on the main surgeon side (24%, P = 0.022), "forehead" portion on both the main surgeon (24%, P = 0.022) and assistant sides (28%, P = 0.010), and "overhead" portion of the drape (44%, P = 0.0002). Bacterial contamination of the operative microscope was found to be significant after spine surgery. Contamination was more common around the optic eyepieces, likely due to inadvertent touching of unsterile portions. Similarly, all regions above the eyepieces also have a propensity for contamination because of unknown contact

  19. Luttinger liquids from a microscopic perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valiente, Manuel; Phillips, Lawrence G.; Zinner, Nikolaj T.; Öhberg, Patrik

    2017-09-01

    Luttinger liquid theory is a powerful and widely applicable framework for modelling one-dimensional many-body quantum systems. Within this framework, one supposes that the macroscopic behaviour of such systems is entirely determined by two phenomenological parameters, g 2 and g 4. While there exists an intuitive and seemingly sensible physical interpretation of these parameters in terms of the scattering of the system’s constituent particles, g 2 and g 4 are traditionally either fixed by experiment or calculated using heavy-duty numerical techniques, rather than inferred using scattering theory, and for this reason the interpretation remains untested. By applying Luttinger liquid theory in a simple setting, we show that a widely-held and repeatedly-stated belief, namely that the intrabranch terms appearing in Luttinger’s model originate from microscopic intrabranch interactions, is a misconception. We begin with the microscopic model of an interacting one-dimensional, spin-polarized Fermi gas, which we systematically transform into a Luttinger model by introducing an effective interaction, linearizing the dispersion, and renormalizing. By this method, we are able to show that the usual interpretation of g 4 as a measure of intrabranch scattering implies that it must vanish in the dilute limit. Since this runs contrary to conservation of particle number, we conclude that g 4 cannot be related to intrabranch scattering. Rather, we show that g 4 interactions must be included in the effective model in order to compensate for the deleterious effect that introducing an effective interaction has upon the model’s energetics. We explicitly calculate an approximation to this correction for our simple system, and find that it agrees with the value of g 4 found in the literature. We therefore propose a new fermionic Hamiltonian which agrees with the traditional model after bosonisation, but which better reflects the underlying microscopic physics.

  20. Does 'mental kinesiophobia' exist?

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Anton J M

    2003-10-01

    In this study the relevance of the concept of mental kinesiophobia (respectively cogniphobia or fear of mental exertion) for clients with chronic stress problems was explored. It was hypothesized that cognitive, chronic stress complaints, such as concentration problems or decreased problem solving abilities, could be catastrophized as signs of heightened personal vulnerability, with a chance of becoming permanent. As a consequence, mental exertion is avoided. This line of reasoning comes from the existing concept of kinesiophobia. This concept describes the avoidance behavior in chronic benign pain patients and refers to their fear of inflicting irreversible bodily damage due to physical exertion.An illustrative case of cogniphobia is presented. In an explorative pilot-study it was demonstrated that chronically stressed clients scored significantly higher on an experimental questionnaire measuring avoidance tendencies for mental exertion, compared with actively working employees. Consequences for treatment and suggestions for further study are discussed.

  1. Recent Opportunity Microscopic Imager Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herkenhoff, K. E.; Arvidson, R. E.; Jolliff, B. L.; Yingst, R.; Team, A.

    2013-12-01

    Opportunity arrived at exposures of Endeavour crater rim rocks in August 2011, on a hill dubbed 'Cape York.' These rocks have been the goal of exploration by Opportunity for the past few years because spectral evidence for phyllosilicates was observed at this location in orbital remote sensing data. As Opportunity circum¬navigated Cape York, the Microscopic Imager (MI) was used to examine the fine-scale textures of various soils and rocky outcrops. As reported previously, Opportunity discovered multiple bright linear features along the western periphery of Cape York that have been interpreted as veins of Ca sulfate deposited in fractures within the bedrock of Cape York. Opportunity then explored the northern and eastern sides of Cape York, including the area around 'Matijevic Hill' that shows evidence for phyllosilicates in CRISM data acquired from the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter. One of the first outcrops examined near Matijevic Hill, dubbed 'Kirkwood,' is dominated by millimeter-size spherules. Unlike the hematite-rich concretions observed by Opportunity on Meridiani Planum, the aggregated 'newberries' in the Kirkwood exposure display internal structure and resistant rims. Compositionally, the spherule-rich rock is very similar to a nearby spherule-poor outcrop dubbed 'Whitewater Lake.' Thus these spherules have a more basalt-like composition compared to the hematite-rich concretions of the Burns Formation. The origin of the Kirkwood outcrop is uncertain, but the setting on the rim of the 22-km diameter Endeavour crater suggests that perhaps impact melting was involved in lapilli formation, possibly followed by mobilization and sorting in the ejecta blanket. Alternatively, the newberries may be diagenetic iron oxide concretions that are less well cemented than the 'blueberries' of the younger sulfate-rich Burns Formation. The Whitewater Lake outcrops contain the phyllosilicate phases observed from orbit, and are the oldest materials yet investigated by

  2. Microscopic optical buffering in a harmonic potential

    PubMed Central

    Sumetsky, M.

    2015-01-01

    In the early days of quantum mechanics, Schrödinger noticed that oscillations of a wave packet in a one-dimensional harmonic potential well are periodic and, in contrast to those in anharmonic potential wells, do not experience distortion over time. This original idea did not find applications up to now since an exact one-dimensional harmonic resonator does not exist in nature and has not been created artificially. However, an optical pulse propagating in a bottle microresonator (a dielectric cylinder with a nanoscale-high bump of the effective radius) can exactly imitate a quantum wave packet in the harmonic potential. Here, we propose a tuneable microresonator that can trap an optical pulse completely, hold it as long as the material losses permit, and release it without distortion. This result suggests the solution of the long standing problem of creating a microscopic optical buffer, the key element of the future optical signal processing devices. PMID:26689546

  3. Hyperbaric Hydrothermal Atomic Force Microscope

    DOEpatents

    Knauss, Kevin G.; Boro, Carl O.; Higgins, Steven R.; Eggleston, Carrick M.

    2003-07-01

    A hyperbaric hydrothermal atomic force microscope (AFM) is provided to image solid surfaces in fluids, either liquid or gas, at pressures greater than normal atmospheric pressure. The sample can be heated and its surface imaged in aqueous solution at temperatures greater than 100.degree. C. with less than 1 nm vertical resolution. A gas pressurized microscope base chamber houses the stepper motor and piezoelectric scanner. A chemically inert, flexible membrane separates this base chamber from the sample cell environment and constrains a high temperature, pressurized liquid or gas in the sample cell while allowing movement of the scanner. The sample cell is designed for continuous flow of liquid or gas through the sample environment.

  4. Differential magnetic force microscope imaging.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ying; Wang, Zuobin; Liu, Jinyun; Hou, Liwei

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a method for differential magnetic force microscope imaging based on a two-pass scanning procedure to extract differential magnetic forces and eliminate or significantly reduce background forces with reversed tip magnetization. In the work, the difference of two scanned images with reversed tip magnetization was used to express the local magnetic forces. The magnetic sample was first scanned with a low lift distance between the MFM tip and the sample surface, and the magnetization direction of the probe was then changed after the first scan to perform the second scan. The differential magnetic force image was obtained through the subtraction of the two images from the two scans. The theoretical and experimental results have shown that the proposed method for differential magnetic force microscope imaging is able to reduce the effect of background or environment interference forces, and offers an improved image contrast and signal to noise ratio (SNR). © Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Nanocarpets for Trapping Microscopic Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noca, Flavio; Chen, Fei; Hunt, Brian; Bronikowski, Michael; Hoenk, Michael; Kowalczyk, Robert; Choi, Daniel

    2004-01-01

    Nanocarpets that is, carpets of carbon nanotubes are undergoing development as means of trapping microscopic particles for scientific analysis. Examples of such particles include inorganic particles, pollen, bacteria, and spores. Nanocarpets can be characterized as scaled-down versions of ordinary macroscopic floor carpets, which trap dust and other particulate matter, albeit not purposefully. Nanocarpets can also be characterized as mimicking both the structure and the particle-trapping behavior of ciliated lung epithelia, the carbon nanotubes being analogous to cilia. Carbon nanotubes can easily be chemically functionalized for selective trapping of specific particles of interest. One could, alternatively, use such other three-dimensionally-structured materials as aerogels and activated carbon for the purposeful trapping of microscopic particles. However, nanocarpets offer important advantages over these alternative materials: (1) Nanocarpets are amenable to nonintrusive probing by optical means; and (2) Nanocarpets offer greater surface-to-volume ratios.

  6. Shear Brillouin light scattering microscope

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Moonseok; Besner, Sebastien; Ramier, Antoine; Kwok, Sheldon J. J.; An, Jeesoo; Scarcelli, Giuliano; Yun, Seok Hyun

    2016-01-01

    Brillouin spectroscopy has been used to characterize shear acoustic phonons in materials. However, conventional instruments had slow acquisition times over 10 min per 1 mW of input optical power, and they required two objective lenses to form a 90° scattering geometry necessary for polarization coupling by shear phonons. Here, we demonstrate a confocal Brillouin microscope capable of detecting both shear and longitudinal phonons with improved speeds and with a single objective lens. Brillouin scattering spectra were measured from polycarbonate, fused quartz, and borosilicate in 1-10 s at an optical power level of 10 mW. The elastic constants, phonon mean free path and the ratio of the Pockels coefficients were determined at microscopic resolution. PMID:26832263

  7. Mars Life? - Microscopic Tubular Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    This electron microscope image shows tubular structures of likely Martian origin. These structures are very similar in size and shape to extremely tiny microfossils found in some Earth rocks. This photograph is part of a report by a NASA research team published in the Aug. 16, 1996, issue of the journal Science. A two-year investigation by the team found organic molecules, mineral features characteristic of biological activity and possible microscopic fossils such as these inside of an ancient Martian rock that fell to Earth as a meteorite. The largest possible fossils are less than 1/100th the diameter of a human hair in size while most are ten times smaller.

  8. Hyperbaric hydrothermal atomic force microscope

    DOEpatents

    Knauss, Kevin G.; Boro, Carl O.; Higgins, Steven R.; Eggleston, Carrick M.

    2002-01-01

    A hyperbaric hydrothermal atomic force microscope (AFM) is provided to image solid surfaces in fluids, either liquid or gas, at pressures greater than normal atmospheric pressure. The sample can be heated and its surface imaged in aqueous solution at temperatures greater than 100.degree. C. with less than 1 nm vertical resolution. A gas pressurized microscope base chamber houses the stepper motor and piezoelectric scanner. A chemically inert, flexible membrane separates this base chamber from the sample cell environment and constrains a high temperature, pressurized liquid or gas in the sample cell while allowing movement of the scanner. The sample cell is designed for continuous flow of liquid or gas through the sample environment.

  9. Apparatus Would Stain Microscope Slides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Breeding, James D.

    1993-01-01

    Proposed apparatus meters specific amounts of fluid out of containers at specific times to stain microscope slides. Intended specifically for semiautomated staining of microbiological and hematological samples in microgravity, leakproof apparatus used in other environments in which technicians have little time to allocate to staining procedures and/or exposure to toxic staining agents or to micro-organisms to be stained hazardous. Apparatus adapted to perform almost any staining procedure and accommodates multiple staining reagents, useful for small or remote clinical laboratories.

  10. Microscopic Description of Scission Configurations

    SciTech Connect

    Dubray, N.; Goutte, H.; Berger, J. F.

    2007-02-26

    Properties of 226Th, 256Fm, 258Fm and 260Fm nuclei in the scission region are described using a full-microscopic Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov approach with the effective Gogny nucleon-nucleon interaction. In a first step, the Potential Energy Surfaces are computed in the (q 20, q30) plane, the scission lines are found, fulfilling a given criterion on the density in the nuclear neck. Finally a few properties of the fragments along this line are presented.

  11. Apparatus Would Stain Microscope Slides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Breeding, James D.

    1993-01-01

    Proposed apparatus meters specific amounts of fluid out of containers at specific times to stain microscope slides. Intended specifically for semiautomated staining of microbiological and hematological samples in microgravity, leakproof apparatus used in other environments in which technicians have little time to allocate to staining procedures and/or exposure to toxic staining agents or to micro-organisms to be stained hazardous. Apparatus adapted to perform almost any staining procedure and accommodates multiple staining reagents, useful for small or remote clinical laboratories.

  12. Optical Analysis of Microscope Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biles, Jonathan R.

    Microscope images were analyzed with coherent and incoherent light using analog optical techniques. These techniques were found to be useful for analyzing large numbers of nonsymbolic, statistical microscope images. In the first part phase coherent transparencies having 20-100 human multiple myeloma nuclei were simultaneously photographed at 100 power magnification using high resolution holographic film developed to high contrast. An optical transform was obtained by focussing the laser onto each nuclear image and allowing the diffracted light to propagate onto a one dimensional photosensor array. This method reduced the data to the position of the first two intensity minima and the intensity of successive maxima. These values were utilized to estimate the four most important cancer detection clues of nuclear size, shape, darkness, and chromatin texture. In the second part, the geometric and holographic methods of phase incoherent optical processing were investigated for pattern recognition of real-time, diffuse microscope images. The theory and implementation of these processors was discussed in view of their mutual problems of dimness, image bias, and detector resolution. The dimness problem was solved by either using a holographic correlator or a speckle free laser microscope. The latter was built using a spinning tilted mirror which caused the speckle to change so quickly that it averaged out during the exposure. To solve the bias problem low image bias templates were generated by four techniques: microphotography of samples, creation of typical shapes by computer graphics editor, transmission holography of photoplates of samples, and by spatially coherent color image bias removal. The first of these templates was used to perform correlations with bacteria images. The aperture bias was successfully removed from the correlation with a video frame subtractor. To overcome the limited detector resolution it is necessary to discover some analog nonlinear intensity

  13. One-Angstrom microscope update

    SciTech Connect

    O'Keefe, Michael A.

    1999-04-04

    The One-Angstrom Microscope project has attained its goal, and is now producing images down to 1 Angstrom resolution. We have demonstrated transmission electron microscopy of defect structures down to a resolution of 1.1 Angstrom, with evidence that 0.89 Angstrom will be possible. This level of resolution will soon be made available to all those NCEM users who have a requirement for sub-Angstrom resolution.

  14. Duties to Extraterrestrial Microscopic Organisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cockell, C. S.

    Formulating a normative axiology for the treatment of extraterrestrial microscopic organisms, should they ever be found, requires an extension of environmental ethics to beyond the Earth. Using an ethical framework for the treatment of terrestrial micro-organisms, this paper elaborates a similar ethic for the treatment of extraterrestrial microscopic organisms. An ethic of `teloempathy' allows for the moral considerability of any organism that has `interests', based on rudimentary qualities of conativism, and therefore allows for an identical treatment of all life, related or not related to life on Earth. Although, according to this ethic, individual extraterrestrial microscopic organisms have a good of their own and even `rights', at this level the ethic can only be theoretical, allowing for the inevitable destruction of many individual organisms during the course of human exploratory missions, similarly to the daily destruction of microbes by humans on Earth. A holistic teloempathy, an operative ethic, not only provides a framework for human exploration, but it also has important implications for planetary protection and proposals to implement planetary-scale atmospheric alterations on other bodies. Even prior to the discovery of extraterrestrial life, or the discovery of a complete absence of such life, this exercise yields important insights into the moral philosophy that guides our treatment of terrestrial micro-organisms.

  15. Microscope Image of Scavenged Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    This image from NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander's Optical Microscope shows a strongly magnetic surface which has scavenged particles from within the microscope enclosure before a sample delivery from the lander's Robotic Arm. The particles correspond to the larger grains seen in fine orange material that makes up most of the soil at the Phoenix site. They vary in color, but are of similar size, about one-tenth of a millimeter.

    As the microscope's sample wheel moved during operation, these particles also shifted, clearing a thin layer of the finer orange particles that have also been collected. Together with the previous image, this shows that the larger grains are much more magnetic than the fine orange particles with a much larger volume of the grains being collected by the magnet. The image is 2 milimeters across.

    It is speculated that the orange material particles are a weathering product from the larger grains, with the weathering process both causing a color change and a loss of magnetism.

    The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by JPL, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development was by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  16. Scanned probe microscope for biological applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baiburin, Vil B.; Konnov, Nikolai P.; Shcherbakov, Anatolyi A.; Malakhaeva, Alina N.; Zadnova, Svetlana P.; Volkov, Yuri P.

    1997-12-01

    In our biophysical laboratory has been developed a new scanned probe microscope (SPM) for biological application. The SPM allows to investigate a biological samples' surface by means of three different near field microscopes: scanning tunneling microscope (STM), atomic force microscope (AFM) and near field scanning optical microscope (NSOM). The SPM is very rigid and can be operated in ordinary laboratory without any vibration isolation. The scanning area of the microscope is about 10 by 10 micrometers. Some different biological objects were visualized by means of the SPM viz. bacteria (E. Coli, plague, cholera, staphylococcus), macromolecules (DNA, plague proteins) and phage (T2).

  17. 21 CFR 884.6190 - Assisted reproductive microscopes and microscope accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES OBSTETRICAL AND GYNECOLOGICAL DEVICES Assisted Reproduction.... Assisted reproduction microscopes and microscope accessories (excluding microscope stage warmers, which are classified under assisted reproduction accessories) are optical instruments used to enlarge images of...

  18. 21 CFR 884.6190 - Assisted reproductive microscopes and microscope accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES OBSTETRICAL AND GYNECOLOGICAL DEVICES Assisted Reproduction.... Assisted reproduction microscopes and microscope accessories (excluding microscope stage warmers, which are classified under assisted reproduction accessories) are optical instruments used to enlarge images of...

  19. 21 CFR 884.6190 - Assisted reproductive microscopes and microscope accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES OBSTETRICAL AND GYNECOLOGICAL DEVICES Assisted Reproduction.... Assisted reproduction microscopes and microscope accessories (excluding microscope stage warmers, which are classified under assisted reproduction accessories) are optical instruments used to enlarge images of...

  20. 21 CFR 884.6190 - Assisted reproductive microscopes and microscope accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES OBSTETRICAL AND GYNECOLOGICAL DEVICES Assisted Reproduction.... Assisted reproduction microscopes and microscope accessories (excluding microscope stage warmers, which are classified under assisted reproduction accessories) are optical instruments used to enlarge images of...

  1. 21 CFR 884.6190 - Assisted reproductive microscopes and microscope accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES OBSTETRICAL AND GYNECOLOGICAL DEVICES Assisted Reproduction.... Assisted reproduction microscopes and microscope accessories (excluding microscope stage warmers, which are classified under assisted reproduction accessories) are optical instruments used to enlarge images of...

  2. Live Imaging of Shoot Meristems on an Inverted Confocal Microscope Using an Objective Lens Inverter Attachment.

    PubMed

    Nimchuk, Zachary L; Perdue, Tony D

    2017-01-01

    Live imaging of above ground meristems can lead to new insights in plant development not possible from static imaging of fixed tissue. The use of an upright confocal microscope offers several technical and biological advantages for live imaging floral or shoot meristems. However, many departments and core facilities possess only inverted confocal microscopes and lack the funding for an additional upright confocal microscope. Here we show that imaging of living apical meristems can be performed on existing inverted confocal microscopes with the use of an affordable and detachable InverterScope accessory.

  3. Live Imaging of Shoot Meristems on an Inverted Confocal Microscope Using an Objective Lens Inverter Attachment

    PubMed Central

    Nimchuk, Zachary L.; Perdue, Tony D.

    2017-01-01

    Live imaging of above ground meristems can lead to new insights in plant development not possible from static imaging of fixed tissue. The use of an upright confocal microscope offers several technical and biological advantages for live imaging floral or shoot meristems. However, many departments and core facilities possess only inverted confocal microscopes and lack the funding for an additional upright confocal microscope. Here we show that imaging of living apical meristems can be performed on existing inverted confocal microscopes with the use of an affordable and detachable InverterScope accessory. PMID:28579995

  4. Development of a Tele-Micro-Robot for Telemanipulation of a Microscopic Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldfarb, Michael

    1998-01-01

    The objective of the proposed work was to design and develop the mechanical equivalent of a stereomicroscope in order to eliminate the mismatch that currently exists between one's ability to observe a microscopic environment and one's ability to manipulate it.

  5. New Microscope Scans Breast Tumors During Surgery

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_166925.html New Microscope Scans Breast Tumors During Surgery The instrument ... 2017 WEDNESDAY, June 28, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- A new microscope could help surgeons remove breast tumors completely, ...

  6. Mars Life? - Microscopic Egg-shaped Structures

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1996-08-09

    This electron microscope image shows egg-shaped structures, some of which may be possible microscopic fossils of Martian origin as discussed by NASA research published in the Aug. 16, 1996. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA00286

  7. Microscopic information processing and communication in crowd dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henein, Colin Marc; White, Tony

    2010-11-01

    Due, perhaps, to the historical division of crowd dynamics research into psychological and engineering approaches, microscopic crowd models have tended toward modelling simple interchangeable particles with an emphasis on the simulation of physical factors. Despite the fact that people have complex (non-panic) behaviours in crowd disasters, important human factors in crowd dynamics such as information discovery and processing, changing goals and communication have not yet been well integrated at the microscopic level. We use our Microscopic Human Factors methodology to fuse a microscopic simulation of these human factors with a popular microscopic crowd model. By tightly integrating human factors with the existing model we can study the effects on the physical domain (movement, force and crowd safety) when human behaviour (information processing and communication) is introduced. In a large-room egress scenario with ample exits, information discovery and processing yields a crowd of non-interchangeable individuals who, despite close proximity, have different goals due to their different beliefs. This crowd heterogeneity leads to complex inter-particle interactions such as jamming transitions in open space; at high crowd energies, we found a freezing by heating effect (reminiscent of the disaster at Central Lenin Stadium in 1982) in which a barrier formation of naïve individuals trying to reach blocked exits prevented knowledgeable ones from exiting. Communication, when introduced, reduced this barrier formation, increasing both exit rates and crowd safety.

  8. Automatic analysis for neuron by confocal laser scanning microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Satou, Kouhei; Aoki, Yoshimitsu; Mataga, Nobuko; Hensh, Takao K.; Taki, Katuhiko

    2005-12-01

    The aim of this study is to develop a system that recognizes both the macro- and microscopic configurations of nerve cells and automatically performs the necessary 3-D measurements and functional classification of spines. The acquisition of 3-D images of cranial nerves has been enabled by the use of a confocal laser scanning microscope, although the highly accurate 3-D measurements of the microscopic structures of cranial nerves and their classification based on their configurations have not yet been accomplished. In this study, in order to obtain highly accurate measurements of the microscopic structures of cranial nerves, existing positions of spines were predicted by the 2-D image processing of tomographic images. Next, based on the positions that were predicted on the 2-D images, the positions and configurations of the spines were determined more accurately by 3-D image processing of the volume data. We report the successful construction of an automatic analysis system that uses a coarse-to-fine technique to analyze the microscopic structures of cranial nerves with high speed and accuracy by combining 2-D and 3-D image analyses.

  9. Human organisms begin to exist at fertilization.

    PubMed

    Miller, Calum; Pruss, Alexander

    2017-09-01

    Eugene Mills has recently argued that human organisms cannot begin to exist at fertilization because the evidence suggests that egg cells persist through fertilization and simply turn into zygotes. He offers two main arguments for this conclusion: that 'fertilized egg' commits no conceptual fallacy, and that on the face of it, it looks as though egg cells survive fertilization when the process is watched through a microscope. We refute these arguments and offer several reasons of our own to think that egg cells do not survive fertilization, appealing to various forms of essentialism regarding persons, fission cases, and a detailed discussion of the biological facts relevant to fertilization and genetics. We conclude that it is plausible, therefore, that human organisms begin to exist at fertilization - or, at the very least, that there are grounds for thinking that they existed as zygotes which do not apply to the prior egg cells. While this does not entail that human persons begin to exist at this point, it nevertheless has considerable significance for this latter question. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. A Student-Built Scanning Tunneling Microscope

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ekkens, Tom

    2015-01-01

    Many introductory and nanotechnology textbooks discuss the operation of various microscopes including atomic force (AFM), scanning tunneling (STM), and scanning electron microscopes (SEM). In a nanotechnology laboratory class, students frequently utilize microscopes to obtain data without a thought about the detailed operation of the tool itself.…

  11. A Student-Built Scanning Tunneling Microscope

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ekkens, Tom

    2015-01-01

    Many introductory and nanotechnology textbooks discuss the operation of various microscopes including atomic force (AFM), scanning tunneling (STM), and scanning electron microscopes (SEM). In a nanotechnology laboratory class, students frequently utilize microscopes to obtain data without a thought about the detailed operation of the tool itself.…

  12. Microscopic Analysis of Activated Sludge. Training Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Office of Water Program Operations (EPA), Cincinnati, OH. National Training and Operational Technology Center.

    This training manual presents material on the use of a compound microscope to analyze microscope communities, present in wastewater treatment processes, for operational control. Course topics include: sampling techniques, sample handling, laboratory analysis, identification of organisms, data interpretation, and use of the compound microscope.…

  13. Discovery Through the Computational Microscope

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Eric H.; Hsin, Jen; Sotomayor, Marcos; Comellas, Gemma; Schulten, Klaus

    2010-01-01

    Summary All-atom molecular dynamics simulations have become increasingly popular as a tool to investigate protein function and dynamics. However, researchers are concerned about the short time scales covered by simulations, the apparent impossibility to model large and integral biomolecular systems, and the actual predictive power of the molecular dynamics methodology. Here we review simulations that were in the past both hotly disputed and considered key successes, namely of proteins with mainly mechanical functions (titin, fibrinogen, ankyrin, and cadherin). The simulation work covered shows how state-of-the-art modeling alleviates some of the prior concerns, and how unrefuted discoveries are made through the “computational microscope". PMID:19836330

  14. Stimulated Parametric Emission Microscope Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itoh, Kazuyoshi; Isobe, Keisuke

    2006-10-01

    We present a novel microscopy technique based on the fourwave mixing (FWM) process that is enhanced by two-photon electronic resonance induced by a pump pulse along with stimulated emission induced by a dump pulse. A Ti:sapphire laser and an optical parametric oscillator are used as light sources for the pump and dump pulses, respectively. We demonstrate that our FWM technique can be used to obtain two-dimensional microscopic images of an unstained leaf of Camellia sinensis and an unlabeled tobacco BY2 Cell.

  15. Stimulated Brillouin Scattering Microscopic Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Ballmann, Charles W.; Thompson, Jonathan V.; Traverso, Andrew J.; Meng, Zhaokai; Scully, Marlan O.; Yakovlev, Vladislav V.

    2015-01-01

    Two-dimensional stimulated Brillouin scattering microscopy is demonstrated for the first time using low power continuous-wave lasers tunable around 780 nm. Spontaneous Brillouin spectroscopy has much potential for probing viscoelastic properties remotely and non-invasively on a microscopic scale. Nonlinear Brillouin scattering spectroscopy and microscopy may provide a way to tremendously accelerate the data aquisition and improve spatial resolution. This general imaging setup can be easily adapted for specific applications in biology and material science. The low power and optical wavelengths in the water transparency window used in this setup provide a powerful bioimaging technique for probing the mechanical properties of hard and soft tissue. PMID:26691398

  16. Microscopic tubes in igneous rocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richter, D.; Simmons, G.

    1977-01-01

    Microscopic tubes have been observed in several igneous rocks and may be quite common. They occur in single crystals and have either elliptical or circular cross-sections 1 to 5 microns in diameter and are ten to hundreds of microns long. Microtubes may be hollow or partially or completely filled with another phase, but are distinct from acicular crystals of accessory minerals such as rutile. Microtubes can form by at least three processes: (1) the partial annealing of microcracks, (2) the natural etching of dislocations, or (3) the primary inclusion of fluid material during crystal growth.

  17. Ballistic-Electron-Emission Microscope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaiser, William J.; Bell, L. Douglas

    1990-01-01

    Ballistic-electron-emission microscope (BEEM) employs scanning tunneling-microscopy (STM) methods for nondestructive, direct electrical investigation of buried interfaces, such as interface between semiconductor and thin metal film. In BEEM, there are at least three electrodes: emitting tip, biasing electrode, and collecting electrode, receiving current crossing interface under investigation. Signal-processing device amplifies electrode signals and converts them into form usable by computer. Produces spatial images of surface by scanning tip; in addition, provides high-resolution images of buried interface under investigation. Spectroscopic information extracted by measuring collecting-electrode current as function of one of interelectrode voltages.

  18. Solid-state optical microscope

    DOEpatents

    Young, I.T.

    1981-01-07

    A solid state optical microscope is described wherein wide-field and high-resolution images of an object are produced at a rapid rate by utilizing conventional optics with a charge-coupled photodiode array. Means for scanning in one of two orthogonal directions are provided, while the charge-coupled photodiode array scans in the other orthogonal direction. Illumination light from the object is incident upon the photodiodes, creating packets of electrons (signals) which are representative of the illuminated object. The signals are then processed, stored in a memory, and finally displayed as a video signal.

  19. Differential phase acoustic microscope for micro-NDE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waters, David D.; Pusateri, T. L.; Huang, S. R.

    1992-01-01

    A differential phase scanning acoustic microscope (DP-SAM) was developed, fabricated, and tested in this project. This includes the acoustic lens and transducers, driving and receiving electronics, scanning stage, scanning software, and display software. This DP-SAM can produce mechanically raster-scanned acoustic microscopic images of differential phase, differential amplitude, or amplitude of the time gated returned echoes of the samples. The differential phase and differential amplitude images provide better image contrast over the conventional amplitude images. A specially designed miniature dual beam lens was used to form two foci to obtain the differential phase and amplitude information of the echoes. High image resolution (1 micron) was achieved by applying high frequency (around 1 GHz) acoustic signals to the samples and placing two foci close to each other (1 micron). Tone burst was used in this system to obtain a good estimation of the phase differences between echoes from the two adjacent foci. The system can also be used to extract the V(z) acoustic signature. Since two acoustic beams and four receiving modes are available, there are 12 possible combinations to produce an image or a V(z) scan. This provides a unique feature of this system that none of the existing acoustic microscopic systems can provide for the micro-nondestructive evaluation applications. The entire system, including the lens, electronics, and scanning control software, has made a competitive industrial product for nondestructive material inspection and evaluation and has attracted interest from existing acoustic microscope manufacturers.

  20. Martian Magnets Under the Microscope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit acquired this microscopic imager view of its capture magnet on sol 92 (April 6, 2004). Both Spirit and the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity are equipped with a number of magnets. The capture magnet, as seen here, has a stronger charge than its sidekick, the filter magnet. The lower-powered filter magnet captures only the most magnetic airborne dust with the strongest charges, while the capture magnet picks up all magnetic airborne dust.

    The magnets' primary purpose is to collect the martian magnetic dust so that scientists can analyze it with the rovers' Moessbauer spectrometers. While there is plenty of dust on the surface of Mars, it is difficult to confirm where it came from, and when it was last airborne. Because scientists are interested in learning about the properties of the dust in the atmosphere, they devised this dust-collection experiment.

    The capture magnet is about 4.5 centimeters (1.8 inches) in diameter and is constructed with a central cylinder and three rings, each with alternating orientations of magnetization. Scientists have been monitoring the continual accumulation of dust since the beginning of the mission with panoramic camera and microscopic imager images. They had to wait until enough dust accumulated before they could get a Moessbauer spectrometer analysis. The results of that analysis, performed on sol 92, have not been sent back to Earth yet.

  1. Microscopic colitis: A literature review.

    PubMed

    Clara, Ana Paula Hamer Sousa; Magnago, Flávia Drago; Ferreira, Juliana Neves; Grillo, Thais Gagno

    2016-12-01

    Microscopic colitis (MC) refers to chronic inflammation of the colon which is characterized by histologic changes at the level of a radiologically and endoscopically normal mucosa. It is a common cause of chronic non-bloody diarrhea that occurs primarily in older individuals; however, there are few studies in the literature with strong scientific evidence compared to other inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD), which limits the knowledge of physicians and pathologists. This article aims to review the information on MC, describing diagnostic methods and drugs available for treatment. We conducted a search of the Pubmed database and CAPES Portal using the keywords "microscopic colitis", "collagenous colitis", "lymphocytic colitis", and "review" for selection of articles published between 1996 and 2015 related to the topic. Based on the studies discussed in this review, we conclude that MC is a relatively new gastrointestinal disorder, most studies are incipient particularly with respect to pathophysiology and immunology, and budesonide is the best documented short-term treatment. However, further studies are needed to elucidate the best strategy for treatment in the long term.

  2. Sensing mode atomic force microscope

    DOEpatents

    Hough, Paul V. C.; Wang, Chengpu

    2006-08-22

    An atomic force microscope is described having a cantilever comprising a base and a probe tip on an end opposite the base; a cantilever drive device connected to the base; a magnetic material coupled to the probe tip, such that when an incrementally increasing magnetic field is applied to the magnetic material an incrementally increasing force will be applied to the probe tip; a moveable specimen base; and a controller constructed to obtain a profile height of a specimen at a point based upon a contact between the probe tip and a specimen, and measure an adhesion force between the probe tip and the specimen by, under control of a program, incrementally increasing an amount of a magnetic field until a release force, sufficient to break the contact, is applied. An imaging method for atomic force microscopy involving measuring a specimen profile height and adhesion force at multiple points within an area and concurrently displaying the profile and adhesion force for each of the points is also described. A microscope controller is also described and is constructed to, for a group of points, calculate a specimen height at a point based upon a cantilever deflection, a cantilever base position and a specimen piezo position; calculate an adhesion force between a probe tip and a specimen at the point by causing an incrementally increasing force to be applied to the probe tip until the probe tip separates from a specimen; and move the probe tip to a new point in the group.

  3. Sensing mode atomic force microscope

    DOEpatents

    Hough, Paul V.; Wang, Chengpu

    2004-11-16

    An atomic force microscope is described having a cantilever comprising a base and a probe tip on an end opposite the base; a cantilever drive device connected to the base; a magnetic material coupled to the probe tip, such that when an incrementally increasing magnetic field is applied to the magnetic material an incrementally increasing force will be applied to the probe tip; a moveable specimen base; and a controller constructed to obtain a profile height of a specimen at a point based upon a contact between the probe tip and a specimen, and measure an adhesion force between the probe tip and the specimen by, under control of a program, incrementally increasing an amount of a magnetic field until a release force, sufficient to break the contact, is applied. An imaging method for atomic force microscopy involving measuring a specimen profile height and adhesion force at multiple points within an area and concurrently displaying the profile and adhesion force for each of the points is also described. A microscope controller is also described and is constructed to, for a group of points, calculate a specimen height at a point based upon a cantilever deflection, a cantilever base position and a specimen piezo position; calculate an adhesion force between a probe tip and a specimen at the point by causing an incrementally increasing force to be applied to the probe tip until the probe tip separates from a specimen; and move the probe tip to a new point in the group.

  4. Martian Magnets Under the Microscope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit acquired this microscopic imager view of its capture magnet on sol 92 (April 6, 2004). Both Spirit and the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity are equipped with a number of magnets. The capture magnet, as seen here, has a stronger charge than its sidekick, the filter magnet. The lower-powered filter magnet captures only the most magnetic airborne dust with the strongest charges, while the capture magnet picks up all magnetic airborne dust.

    The magnets' primary purpose is to collect the martian magnetic dust so that scientists can analyze it with the rovers' Moessbauer spectrometers. While there is plenty of dust on the surface of Mars, it is difficult to confirm where it came from, and when it was last airborne. Because scientists are interested in learning about the properties of the dust in the atmosphere, they devised this dust-collection experiment.

    The capture magnet is about 4.5 centimeters (1.8 inches) in diameter and is constructed with a central cylinder and three rings, each with alternating orientations of magnetization. Scientists have been monitoring the continual accumulation of dust since the beginning of the mission with panoramic camera and microscopic imager images. They had to wait until enough dust accumulated before they could get a Moessbauer spectrometer analysis. The results of that analysis, performed on sol 92, have not been sent back to Earth yet.

  5. Inspection with Robotic Microscopic Imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pedersen, Liam; Deans, Matthew; Kunz, Clay; Sargent, Randy; Chen, Alan; Mungas, Greg

    2005-01-01

    Future Mars rover missions will require more advanced onboard autonomy for increased scientific productivity and reduced mission operations cost. One such form of autonomy can be achieved by targeting precise science measurements to be made in a single command uplink cycle. In this paper we present an overview of our solution to the subproblems of navigating a rover into place for microscopic imaging, mapping an instrument target point selected by an operator using far away science camera images to close up hazard camera images, verifying the safety of placing a contact instrument on a sample or finding nearby safe points, and analyzing the data that comes back from the rover. The system developed includes portions used in the Multiple Target Single Cycle Instrument Placement demonstration at NASA Ames in October 2004, and portions of the MI Toolkit delivered to the Athena Microscopic Imager Instrument Team for the MER mission still operating on Mars today. Some of the component technologies are also under consideration for MSL mission infusion.

  6. Sensing mode atomic force microscope

    DOEpatents

    Hough, Paul V. C.; Wang, Chengpu

    2003-01-01

    An atomic force microscope utilizes a pulse release system and improved method of operation to minimize contact forces between a probe tip affixed to a flexible cantilever and a specimen being measured. The pulse release system includes a magnetic particle affixed proximate the probe tip and an electromagnetic coil. When energized, the electromagnetic coil generates a magnetic field which applies a driving force on the magnetic particle sufficient to overcome adhesive forces exhibited between the probe tip and specimen. The atomic force microscope includes two independently displaceable piezo elements operable along a Z-axis. A controller drives the first Z-axis piezo element to provide a controlled approach between the probe tip and specimen up to a point of contact between the probe tip and specimen. The controller then drives the first Z-axis piezo element to withdraw the cantilever from the specimen. The controller also activates the pulse release system which drives the probe tip away from the specimen during withdrawal. Following withdrawal, the controller adjusts the height of the second Z-axis piezo element to maintain a substantially constant approach distance between successive samples.

  7. Robotic autopositioning of the operating microscope.

    PubMed

    Oppenlander, Mark E; Chowdhry, Shakeel A; Merkl, Brandon; Hattendorf, Guido M; Nakaji, Peter; Spetzler, Robert F

    2014-06-01

    Use of the operating microscope has become pervasive since its introduction to the neurosurgical world. Neuronavigation fused with the operating microscope has allowed accurate correlation of the focal point of the microscope and its location on the downloaded imaging study. However, the robotic ability of the Pentero microscope has not been utilized to orient the angle of the microscope or to change its focal length to hone in on a predefined target. To report a novel technology that allows automatic positioning of the operating microscope onto a set target and utilization of a planned trajectory, either determined with the StealthStation S7 by using preoperative imaging or intraoperatively with the microscope. By utilizing the current motorized capabilities of the Zeiss OPMI Pentero microscope, a robotic autopositioning feature was developed in collaboration with Surgical Technologies, Medtronic, Inc. (StealthStation S7). The system is currently being tested at the Barrow Neurological Institute. Three options were developed for automatically positioning the microscope: AutoLock Current Point, Align Parallel to Plan, and Point to Plan Target. These options allow the microscope to pivot around the lesion, hover in a set plane parallel to the determined trajectory, or rotate and point to a set target point, respectively. Integration of automatic microscope positioning into the operative workflow has potential to increase operative efficacy and safety. This technology is best suited for precise trajectories and entry points into deep-seated lesions.

  8. A microscopic approach to the theory of polymer ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Jai; Itoh, N.

    1990-12-01

    A microscopic theory of polymer ablation is presented here. Our results suggest that the surface bonds of polymers are broken due to localisation of a pair of excitations on the same bond in a chain. A laser fluence that can create paired excitations on the same bond defines the threshold laser fluence which is observed experimentally. Other results of the present theory agree very well with experiments and the existing phenomenological theory of polymer ablation.

  9. Scanning Quantum Cryogenic Atom Microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Fan; Kollár, Alicia J.; Taylor, Stephen F.; Turner, Richard W.; Lev, Benjamin L.

    2017-03-01

    Microscopic imaging of local magnetic fields provides a window into the organizing principles of complex and technologically relevant condensed-matter materials. However, a wide variety of intriguing strongly correlated and topologically nontrivial materials exhibit poorly understood phenomena outside the detection capability of state-of-the-art high-sensitivity high-resolution scanning probe magnetometers. We introduce a quantum-noise-limited scanning probe magnetometer that can operate from room-to-cryogenic temperatures with unprecedented dc-field sensitivity and micron-scale resolution. The Scanning Quantum Cryogenic Atom Microscope (SQCRAMscope) employs a magnetically levitated atomic Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC), thereby providing immunity to conductive and blackbody radiative heating. The SQCRAMscope has a field sensitivity of 1.4 nT per resolution-limited point (approximately 2 μ m ) or 6 nT /√{Hz } per point at its duty cycle. Compared to point-by-point sensors, the long length of the BEC provides a naturally parallel measurement, allowing one to measure nearly 100 points with an effective field sensitivity of 600 pT /√{Hz } for each point during the same time as a point-by-point scanner measures these points sequentially. Moreover, it has a noise floor of 300 pT and provides nearly 2 orders of magnitude improvement in magnetic flux sensitivity (down to 10-6 Φ0/√{Hz } ) over previous atomic probe magnetometers capable of scanning near samples. These capabilities are carefully benchmarked by imaging magnetic fields arising from microfabricated wire patterns in a system where samples may be scanned, cryogenically cooled, and easily exchanged. We anticipate the SQCRAMscope will provide charge-transport images at temperatures from room temperature to 4 K in unconventional superconductors and topologically nontrivial materials.

  10. Adaptive noise Wiener filter for scanning electron microscope imaging system.

    PubMed

    Sim, K S; Teh, V; Nia, M E

    2016-01-01

    Noise on scanning electron microscope (SEM) images is studied. Gaussian noise is the most common type of noise in SEM image. We developed a new noise reduction filter based on the Wiener filter. We compared the performance of this new filter namely adaptive noise Wiener (ANW) filter, with four common existing filters as well as average filter, median filter, Gaussian smoothing filter and the Wiener filter. Based on the experiments results the proposed new filter has better performance on different noise variance comparing to the other existing noise removal filters in the experiments.

  11. Performance evaluation of image segmentation algorithms on microscopic image data.

    PubMed

    Beneš, Miroslav; Zitová, Barbara

    2015-01-01

    In our paper, we present a performance evaluation of image segmentation algorithms on microscopic image data. In spite of the existence of many algorithms for image data partitioning, there is no universal and 'the best' method yet. Moreover, images of microscopic samples can be of various character and quality which can negatively influence the performance of image segmentation algorithms. Thus, the issue of selecting suitable method for a given set of image data is of big interest. We carried out a large number of experiments with a variety of segmentation methods to evaluate the behaviour of individual approaches on the testing set of microscopic images (cross-section images taken in three different modalities from the field of art restoration). The segmentation results were assessed by several indices used for measuring the output quality of image segmentation algorithms. In the end, the benefit of segmentation combination approach is studied and applicability of achieved results on another representatives of microscopic data category - biological samples - is shown.

  12. [Methods and current significance of the evaluation of microscopic haematuria].

    PubMed

    Hüppe, P; Wawroschek, F

    2011-03-01

    Haematuria is the main symptom of malignant diseases of the urinary tract. Hence urine analysis for the detection of microscopic haematuria is an accepted diagnostic procedure in daily urologic practice. Until now there are neither international nor national agreements relating to the definition of microscopic haematuria, the choice of verification procedures and a diagnostic algorithm. As there are diverse reasons for microscopic haematuria the extent of continuative diagnostics should be adapted to the existence of risk factors for a clinically apparent disease. Low-risk patients with asymptomatic microscopic haematuria do not necessarily have to undergo primary cystoscopy if there are no pathological findings on urine cytology or ultrasound examination. Microhaematuria in high-risk patients should lead to a more intensive evaluation of the urinary tract, which should include cystoscopy and imaging of the upper urinary tract. In the diagnostics of microhaematuria you have to be aware of that intermittent bleeding is often characteristic of urothelial malignancies. Therefore, a single negative urine analysis should not lead to abandonment of further diagnostic procedures.

  13. The Athena Microscopic Imager Investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herkenhoff, K. E.; Aquyres, S. W.; Bell, J. F., III; Maki, J. N.; Arneson, H. M.; Brown, D. I.; Collins, S. A.; Dingizian, A.; Elliot, S. T.; Geotz, W.

    2003-01-01

    The Athena science payload on the Mars Exploration Rovers (MER) includes the Microscopic Imager (MI) [1]. The MI is a fixed-focus camera mounted on the end of an extendable instrument arm, the Instrument Deployment Device (IDD; see Figure 1).The MI was designed to acquire images at a spatial resolution of 30 microns/pixel over a broad spectral range (400 - 700 nm; see Table 1). Technically, the microscopic imager is not a microscope: it has a fixed magnification of 0.4 and is intended to produce images that simulate a geologist s view through a common hand lens. In photographers parlance, the system makes use of a macro lens. The MI uses the same electronics design as the other MER cameras [2, 3] but has optics that yield a field of view of 31 31 mm across a 1024 1024 pixel CCD image (Figure 2). The MI acquires images using only solar or skylightillumination of the target surface. A contact sensor is used to place the MI slightly closer to the target surface than its best focus distance (about 66 mm), allowing concave surfaces to be imaged in good focus. Because the MI has a relatively small depth of field (3 mm), a single MI image of a rough surface will contain both focused and unfocused areas. Coarse focusing will be achieved by moving the IDD away from a rock target after the contact sensor is activated. Multiple images taken at various distances will be acquired to ensure good focus on all parts of rough surfaces. By combining a set of images acquired in this way, a completely focused image can be assembled. Stereoscopic observations can be obtained by moving the MI laterally relative to its boresight. Estimates of the position and orientation of the MI for each acquired image will be stored in the rover computer and returned to Earth with the image data. The MI optics will be protected from the Martian environment by a retractable dust cover. The dust cover includes a Kapton window that is tinted orange to restrict the spectral bandpass to 500-700 nm

  14. Foldscope: Origami-Based Paper Microscope

    PubMed Central

    Cybulski, James S.; Clements, James; Prakash, Manu

    2014-01-01

    Here we describe an ultra-low-cost origami-based approach for large-scale manufacturing of microscopes, specifically demonstrating brightfield, darkfield, and fluorescence microscopes. Merging principles of optical design with origami enables high-volume fabrication of microscopes from 2D media. Flexure mechanisms created via folding enable a flat compact design. Structural loops in folded paper provide kinematic constraints as a means for passive self-alignment. This light, rugged instrument can survive harsh field conditions while providing a diversity of imaging capabilities, thus serving wide-ranging applications for cost-effective, portable microscopes in science and education. PMID:24940755

  15. Scanning evanescent electro-magnetic microscope

    DOEpatents

    Xiang, Xiao-Dong; Gao, Chen; Schultz, Peter G.; Wei, Tao

    2003-01-01

    A novel scanning microscope is described that uses near-field evanescent electromagnetic waves to probe sample properties. The novel microscope is capable of high resolution imaging and quantitative measurements of the electrical properties of the sample. The inventive scanning evanescent wave electromagnetic microscope (SEMM) can map dielectric constant, tangent loss, conductivity, complex electrical impedance, and other electrical parameters of materials. The quantitative map corresponds to the imaged detail. The novel microscope can be used to measure electrical properties of both dielectric and electrically conducting materials.

  16. Scanning evanescent electro-magnetic microscope

    DOEpatents

    Xiang, Xiao-Dong; Gao, Chen

    2001-01-01

    A novel scanning microscope is described that uses near-field evanescent electromagnetic waves to probe sample properties. The novel microscope is capable of high resolution imaging and quantitative measurements of the electrical properties of the sample. The inventive scanning evanescent wave electromagnetic microscope (SEMM) can map dielectric constant, tangent loss, conductivity, complex electrical impedance, and other electrical parameters of materials. The quantitative map corresponds to the imaged detail. The novel microscope can be used to measure electrical properties of both dielectric and electrically conducting materials.

  17. Mars Under the Microscope (stretched)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This magnified look at the martian soil near the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity's landing site, Meridiani Planum, shows coarse grains sprinkled over a fine layer of sand. The image was captured on the 10th day, or sol, of the rover's mission by its microscopic imager, located on the instrument deployment device, or 'arm.' Scientists are intrigued by the spherical rocks, which can be formed by a variety of geologic processes, including cooling of molten lava droplets and accretion of concentric layers of material around a particle or 'seed.'

    The examined patch of soil is 3 centimeters (1.2 inches) across. The circular grain in the lower left corner is approximately 3 millimeters (.12 inches) across, or about the size of a sunflower seed.

    This stretched color composite was obtained by merging images acquired with the orange-tinted dust cover open and closed. The varying hints of orange suggest differences in mineral composition. The blue tint at the lower right corner is a tag used by scientists to indicate that the dust cover is closed.

  18. Mars Under the Microscope (color)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This magnified look at the martian soil near the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity's landing site, Meridiani Planum, shows coarse grains sprinkled over a fine layer of sand. The image was captured by the rover's microscopic imager on the 10th day, or sol, of its mission and roughly approximates the color a human eye would see. Scientists are intrigued by the spherical rocks, which can be formed by a variety of geologic processes, including cooling of molten lava droplets and accretion of concentric layers of material around a particle or 'seed.'

    The examined patch of soil is 3 centimeters (1.2 inches) across. The circular grain in the lower left corner is approximately 3 millimeters (.12 inches) across, or about the size of a sunflower seed.

    This color composite was obtained by merging images acquired with the orange-tinted dust cover in both its open and closed positions. The blue tint at the lower right corner is a tag used by scientists to indicate that the dust cover is closed.

  19. Spectral Interferometry with Electron Microscopes.

    PubMed

    Talebi, Nahid

    2016-09-21

    Interference patterns are not only a defining characteristic of waves, but also have several applications; characterization of coherent processes and holography. Spatial holography with electron waves, has paved the way towards space-resolved characterization of magnetic domains and electrostatic potentials with angstrom spatial resolution. Another impetus in electron microscopy has been introduced by ultrafast electron microscopy which uses pulses of sub-picosecond durations for probing a laser induced excitation of the sample. However, attosecond temporal resolution has not yet been reported, merely due to the statistical distribution of arrival times of electrons at the sample, with respect to the laser time reference. This is however, the very time resolution which will be needed for performing time-frequency analysis. These difficulties are addressed here by proposing a new methodology to improve the synchronization between electron and optical excitations through introducing an efficient electron-driven photon source. We use focused transition radiation of the electron as a pump for the sample. Due to the nature of transition radiation, the process is coherent. This technique allows us to perform spectral interferometry with electron microscopes, with applications in retrieving the phase of electron-induced polarizations and reconstructing dynamics of the induced vector potential.

  20. Microscopic theory of rubber elasticity.

    PubMed

    Oyerokun, Folusho T; Schweizer, Kenneth S

    2004-05-15

    A microscopic integral equation theory of elasticity in polymer liquids and networks is developed which addresses the nonclassical problem of the consequences of interchain repulsive interactions and packing correlations on mechanical response. The theory predicts strain induced softening, and a nonclassical intermolecular contribution to the linear modulus. The latter is of the same magnitude as the classical single chain entropy contribution at low polymer concentrations, but becomes much more important in the melt state, and dominant as the isotropic-nematic liquid crystal phase transition is approached. Comparison of the calculated stress-strain curve and induced nematic order parameter with computer simulations show good agreement. A nearly quadratic dependence of the linear elastic modulus on segmental concentration is found, as well as a novel fractional power law dependence on degree of polymerization. Quantitative comparison of the theory with experiments on polydimethylsiloxane networks are presented and good agreement is found. However, a nonzero modulus in the long chain limit is not predicted since quenched chemical crosslinks and trapped entanglements are not explicitly taken into account. The theory is generalizable to treat the structure, thermodynamics and mechanical response of nematic elastomers.

  1. Spectral Interferometry with Electron Microscopes

    PubMed Central

    Talebi, Nahid

    2016-01-01

    Interference patterns are not only a defining characteristic of waves, but also have several applications; characterization of coherent processes and holography. Spatial holography with electron waves, has paved the way towards space-resolved characterization of magnetic domains and electrostatic potentials with angstrom spatial resolution. Another impetus in electron microscopy has been introduced by ultrafast electron microscopy which uses pulses of sub-picosecond durations for probing a laser induced excitation of the sample. However, attosecond temporal resolution has not yet been reported, merely due to the statistical distribution of arrival times of electrons at the sample, with respect to the laser time reference. This is however, the very time resolution which will be needed for performing time-frequency analysis. These difficulties are addressed here by proposing a new methodology to improve the synchronization between electron and optical excitations through introducing an efficient electron-driven photon source. We use focused transition radiation of the electron as a pump for the sample. Due to the nature of transition radiation, the process is coherent. This technique allows us to perform spectral interferometry with electron microscopes, with applications in retrieving the phase of electron-induced polarizations and reconstructing dynamics of the induced vector potential. PMID:27649932

  2. Mars Under the Microscope (stretched)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This magnified look at the martian soil near the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity's landing site, Meridiani Planum, shows coarse grains sprinkled over a fine layer of sand. The image was captured on the 10th day, or sol, of the rover's mission by its microscopic imager, located on the instrument deployment device, or 'arm.' Scientists are intrigued by the spherical rocks, which can be formed by a variety of geologic processes, including cooling of molten lava droplets and accretion of concentric layers of material around a particle or 'seed.'

    The examined patch of soil is 3 centimeters (1.2 inches) across. The circular grain in the lower left corner is approximately 3 millimeters (.12 inches) across, or about the size of a sunflower seed.

    This stretched color composite was obtained by merging images acquired with the orange-tinted dust cover open and closed. The varying hints of orange suggest differences in mineral composition. The blue tint at the lower right corner is a tag used by scientists to indicate that the dust cover is closed.

  3. Mars Under the Microscope (color)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This magnified look at the martian soil near the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity's landing site, Meridiani Planum, shows coarse grains sprinkled over a fine layer of sand. The image was captured by the rover's microscopic imager on the 10th day, or sol, of its mission and roughly approximates the color a human eye would see. Scientists are intrigued by the spherical rocks, which can be formed by a variety of geologic processes, including cooling of molten lava droplets and accretion of concentric layers of material around a particle or 'seed.'

    The examined patch of soil is 3 centimeters (1.2 inches) across. The circular grain in the lower left corner is approximately 3 millimeters (.12 inches) across, or about the size of a sunflower seed.

    This color composite was obtained by merging images acquired with the orange-tinted dust cover in both its open and closed positions. The blue tint at the lower right corner is a tag used by scientists to indicate that the dust cover is closed.

  4. Scanning Microscopes Using X Rays and Microchannels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Yu

    2003-01-01

    Scanning microscopes that would be based on microchannel filters and advanced electronic image sensors and that utilize x-ray illumination have been proposed. Because the finest resolution attainable in a microscope is determined by the wavelength of the illumination, the xray illumination in the proposed microscopes would make it possible, in principle, to achieve resolutions of the order of nanometers about a thousand times as fine as the resolution of a visible-light microscope. Heretofore, it has been necessary to use scanning electron microscopes to obtain such fine resolution. In comparison with scanning electron microscopes, the proposed microscopes would likely be smaller, less massive, and less expensive. Moreover, unlike in scanning electron microscopes, it would not be necessary to place specimens under vacuum. The proposed microscopes are closely related to the ones described in several prior NASA Tech Briefs articles; namely, Miniature Microscope Without Lenses (NPO-20218), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 22, No. 8 (August 1998), page 43; and Reflective Variants of Miniature Microscope Without Lenses (NPO-20610), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 26, No. 9 (September 2002) page 6a. In all of these microscopes, the basic principle of design and operation is the same: The focusing optics of a conventional visible-light microscope are replaced by a combination of a microchannel filter and a charge-coupled-device (CCD) image detector. A microchannel plate containing parallel, microscopic-cross-section holes much longer than they are wide is placed between a specimen and an image sensor, which is typically the CCD. The microchannel plate must be made of a material that absorbs the illuminating radiation reflected or scattered from the specimen. The microchannels must be positioned and dimensioned so that each one is registered with a pixel on the image sensor. Because most of the radiation incident on the microchannel walls becomes absorbed, the radiation that reaches the

  5. The scanning ion conductance microscope for cellular physiology.

    PubMed

    Lab, Max J; Bhargava, Anamika; Wright, Peter T; Gorelik, Julia

    2013-01-01

    The quest for nonoptical imaging methods that can surmount light diffraction limits resulted in the development of scanning probe microscopes. However, most of the existing methods are not quite suitable for studying biological samples. The scanning ion conductance microscope (SICM) bridges the gap between the resolution capabilities of atomic force microscope and scanning electron microscope and functional capabilities of conventional light microscope. A nanopipette mounted on a three-axis piezo-actuator, scans a sample of interest and ion current is measured between the pipette tip and the sample. The feedback control system always keeps a certain distance between the sample and the pipette so the pipette never touches the sample. At the same time pipette movement is recorded and this generates a three-dimensional topographical image of the sample surface. SICM represents an alternative to conventional high-resolution microscopy, especially in imaging topography of live biological samples. In addition, the nanopipette probe provides a host of added modalities, for example using the same pipette and feedback control for efficient approach and seal with the cell membrane for ion channel recording. SICM can be combined in one instrument with optical and fluorescent methods and allows drawing structure-function correlations. It can also be used for precise mechanical force measurements as well as vehicle to apply pressure with precision. This can be done on living cells and tissues for prolonged periods of time without them loosing viability. The SICM is a multifunctional instrument, and it is maturing rapidly and will open even more possibilities in the near future.

  6. Electron Microscope Center Opens at Berkeley.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robinson, Arthur L.

    1981-01-01

    A 1.5-MeV High Voltage Electron Microscope has been installed at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory which will help materials scientists and biologists study samples in more true-to-life situations. A 1-MeV Atomic Resolution Microscope will be installed at the same location in two years which will allow scientists to distinguish atoms. (DS)

  7. Electron Microscope Center Opens at Berkeley.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robinson, Arthur L.

    1981-01-01

    A 1.5-MeV High Voltage Electron Microscope has been installed at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory which will help materials scientists and biologists study samples in more true-to-life situations. A 1-MeV Atomic Resolution Microscope will be installed at the same location in two years which will allow scientists to distinguish atoms. (DS)

  8. Robotic CCD microscope for enhanced crystal recognition

    DOEpatents

    Segelke, Brent W.; Toppani, Dominique

    2007-11-06

    A robotic CCD microscope and procedures to automate crystal recognition. The robotic CCD microscope and procedures enables more accurate crystal recognition, leading to fewer false negative and fewer false positives, and enable detection of smaller crystals compared to other methods available today.

  9. Compact microscope-based 850-nm optical tweezers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frediani, Carlo; Grego, S.; Guidoni, L.; Arimondo, Ennio

    1996-01-01

    Emission from a single mode 100 mW laser diode at 850 nm is used for realizing optical tweezers: the laser beam is introduced into a microscope and focused by the objective into the object plane. Injection of the beam into a 40X microscope objective has been studied and the position and the size of the waist measured. The trap performance was studied as a function of the dimensions of the trapped particles. Trapping of polystyrene latex spheres of different size (from 0.2 micrometer to 6 micrometer) was observed in different conditions of laser power and transverse velocity of the spheres. Biological objects, Tetraselmis, of large dimension (around 10 micrometer) were also studied. We demonstrate the existence of an optimal range of size of the particles to be trapped. Furthermore we measure minimum trapping power required for trapping and the maximum speed of the trapped objects as a function of the dimensions.

  10. Imaging Schwarzschild multilayer X-ray microscope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoover, Richard B.; Baker, Phillip C.; Shealy, David L.; Core, David B.; Walker, Arthur B. C., Jr.; Barbee, Troy W., Jr.; Kerstetter, Ted

    1993-01-01

    We have designed, analyzed, fabricated, and tested Schwarzschild multilayer X-ray microscopes. These instruments use flow-polished Zerodur mirror substrates which have been coated with multilayers optimized for maximum reflectivity at normal incidence at 135 A. They are being developed as prototypes for the Water Window Imaging X-Ray Microscope. Ultrasmooth mirror sets of hemlite grade sapphire have been fabricated and they are now being coated with multilayers to reflect soft X-rays at 38 A, within the biologically important 'water window'. In this paper, we discuss the fabrication of the microscope optics and structural components as well as the mounting of the optics and assembly of the microscopes. We also describe the optical alignment, interferometric and visible light testing of the microscopes, present interferometrically measured performance data, and provide the first results of optical imaging tests.

  11. The current status of microscopical hair comparisons.

    PubMed

    Rowe, W F

    2001-12-08

    Although the microscopical comparison of human hairs has been accepted in courts of law for over a century, recent advances in DNA technology have called this type of forensic examination into question. In a number of cases, post-conviction DNA testing has exonerated defendants who were convicted in part on the results of microscopical hair comparisons. A federal judge has held a Daubert hearing on the microscopical comparison of human hairs and has concluded that this type of examination does not meet the criteria for admission of scientific evidence in federal courts. A review of the available scientific literature on microscopical hair comparisons (including studies conducted by the Royal Canadian Mounted Police and the Federal Bureau of Investigation) leads to three conclusions: (1) microscopical comparisons of human hairs can yield scientifically defensible conclusions that can contribute to criminal investigations and criminal prosecutions, (2) the reliability of microscopical hair comparisons is strongly affected by the training of the forensic hair examiner, (3) forensic hair examiners cannot offer estimates of the probability of a match of a questioned hair with a hair from a randomly selected person. In order for microscopical hair examinations to survive challenges under the U.S. Supreme Court's Daubert decision, hair microscopists must be better trained and undergo frequent proficiency testing. More research on the error rates of microscopical hair comparisons should be undertaken, and guidelines for the permissible interpretations of such comparisons should be established. Until these issues have been addressed and satisfactorily resolved, microscopical hair comparisons should be regarded by law enforcement agencies and courts of law as merely presumptive in nature, and all microscopical hair comparisons should be confirmed by nuclear DNA profiling or mitochondrial DNA sequencing.

  12. Solution of the Skyrme-Hartree-Fock-Bogolyubov equations in the Cartesian deformed harmonic-oscillator basis.. (VII) HFODD (v2.49t): A new version of the program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schunck, N.; Dobaczewski, J.; McDonnell, J.; Satuła, W.; Sheikh, J. A.; Staszczak, A.; Stoitsov, M.; Toivanen, P.

    2012-01-01

    We describe the new version (v2.49t) of the code HFODD which solves the nuclear Skyrme-Hartree-Fock (HF) or Skyrme-Hartree-Fock-Bogolyubov (HFB) problem by using the Cartesian deformed harmonic-oscillator basis. In the new version, we have implemented the following physics features: (i) the isospin mixing and projection, (ii) the finite-temperature formalism for the HFB and HF + BCS methods, (iii) the Lipkin translational energy correction method, (iv) the calculation of the shell correction. A number of specific numerical methods have also been implemented in order to deal with large-scale multi-constraint calculations and hardware limitations: (i) the two-basis method for the HFB method, (ii) the Augmented Lagrangian Method (ALM) for multi-constraint calculations, (iii) the linear constraint method based on the approximation of the RPA matrix for multi-constraint calculations, (iv) an interface with the axial and parity-conserving Skyrme-HFB code HFBTHO, (v) the mixing of the HF or HFB matrix elements instead of the HF fields. Special care has been paid to using the code on massively parallel leadership class computers. For this purpose, the following features are now available with this version: (i) the Message Passing Interface (MPI) framework, (ii) scalable input data routines, (iii) multi-threading via OpenMP pragmas, (iv) parallel diagonalization of the HFB matrix in the simplex-breaking case using the ScaLAPACK library. Finally, several little significant errors of the previous published version were corrected. New version program summaryProgram title:HFODD (v2.49t) Catalogue identifier: ADFL_v3_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/ADFL_v3_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: GNU General Public Licence v3 No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 190 614 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 985 898 Distribution

  13. The Scanning Optical Microscope: An Overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kino, G. S.; Corte, T. R.; Xiao, G. Q.

    1988-07-01

    In the last few years there has been a resurgence in research on optical microscopes. One reason stems from the invention of the acoustic microscope by Quate and Lemons,1 and the realization that some of the same principles could be applied to the optical microscope. The acoustic microscope has better transverse definition for the same wavelength than the standard optical microscope and at the same time has far better range definition. Consequently, Kompfner, who was involved with the work on the early acoustic microscope, decided to try out similar scanning microscope principles with optics, and started a group with Wilson and Sheppard to carry out such research at Oxford.2 Sometime earlier, Petran et a13 had invented the tandem scanning microscope which used many of the same principles. Now, in our laboratory at Stanford, these ideas on the tandem scanning microscope and the scanning optical microscope are converging. Another aspect of this work, which stems from the earlier experience with the acoustic microscope, involves measurement of both phase and amplitude of the optical beam. It is also possible to use scanned optical microscopy for other purposes. For instance, an optical beam can be used to excite electrons and holes in semiconductors, and the generated current can be measured. By scanning the optical beam over the semiconductor, an image can be obtained of the regions where there is strong or weak electron hole generation. This type of microscope is called OBIC (Optical Beam Induced Current). A second application involves fluorescent imaging of biological materials. Here we have the excellent range definition of a scanning optical microscope which eliminates unwanted glare from regions of the material where the beam is unfocused.3 A third application is focused on the heating effect of the light beam. With such a system, images can be obtained which are associated with changes in the thermal properties of a material, changes in recombination rates in

  14. Atomic Force Microscope Mediated Chromatography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Mark S.

    2013-01-01

    The atomic force microscope (AFM) is used to inject a sample, provide shear-driven liquid flow over a functionalized substrate, and detect separated components. This is demonstrated using lipophilic dyes and normal phase chromatography. A significant reduction in both size and separation time scales is achieved with a 25-micron-length column scale, and one-second separation times. The approach has general applications to trace chemical and microfluidic analysis. The AFM is now a common tool for ultra-microscopy and nanotechnology. It has also been demonstrated to provide a number of microfluidic functions necessary for miniaturized chromatography. These include injection of sub-femtoliter samples, fluidic switching, and sheardriven pumping. The AFM probe tip can be used to selectively remove surface layers for subsequent microchemical analysis using infrared and tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy. With its ability to image individual atoms, the AFM is a remarkably sensitive detector that can be used to detect separated components. These diverse functional components of microfluidic manipulation have been combined in this work to demonstrate AFM mediated chromatography. AFM mediated chromatography uses channel-less, shear-driven pumping. This is demonstrated with a thin, aluminum oxide substrate and a non-polar solvent system to separate a mixture of lipophilic dyes. In conventional chromatographic terms, this is analogous to thin-layer chromatography using normal phase alumina substrate with sheardriven pumping provided by the AFM tip-cantilever mechanism. The AFM detection of separated components is accomplished by exploiting the variation in the localized friction of the separated components. The AFM tip-cantilever provides the mechanism for producing shear-induced flows and rapid pumping. Shear-driven chromatography (SDC) is a relatively new concept that overcomes the speed and miniaturization limitations of conventional liquid chromatography. SDC is based on a

  15. Upgrade of a Scanning Confocal Microscope to a Single-Beam Path STED Microscope

    PubMed Central

    Klauss, André; König, Marcelle; Hille, Carsten

    2015-01-01

    By overcoming the diffraction limit in light microscopy, super-resolution techniques, such as stimulated emission depletion (STED) microscopy, are experiencing an increasing impact on life sciences. High costs and technically demanding setups, however, may still hinder a wider distribution of this innovation in biomedical research laboratories. As far-field microscopy is the most widely employed microscopy modality in the life sciences, upgrading already existing systems seems to be an attractive option for achieving diffraction-unlimited fluorescence microscopy in a cost-effective manner. Here, we demonstrate the successful upgrade of a commercial time-resolved confocal fluorescence microscope to an easy-to-align STED microscope in the single-beam path layout, previously proposed as “easy-STED”, achieving lateral resolution < λ/10 corresponding to a five-fold improvement over a confocal modality. For this purpose, both the excitation and depletion laser beams pass through a commercially available segmented phase plate that creates the STED-doughnut light distribution in the focal plane, while leaving the excitation beam unaltered when implemented into the joint beam path. Diffraction-unlimited imaging of 20 nm-sized fluorescent beads as reference were achieved with the wavelength combination of 635 nm excitation and 766 nm depletion. To evaluate the STED performance in biological systems, we compared the popular phalloidin-coupled fluorescent dyes Atto647N and Abberior STAR635 by labeling F-actin filaments in vitro as well as through immunofluorescence recordings of microtubules in a complex epithelial tissue. Here, we applied a recently proposed deconvolution approach and showed that images obtained from time-gated pulsed STED microscopy may benefit concerning the signal-to-background ratio, from the joint deconvolution of sub-images with different spatial information which were extracted from offline time gating. PMID:26091552

  16. Automatic Focus Adjustment of a Microscope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huntsberger, Terrance

    2005-01-01

    AUTOFOCUS is a computer program for use in a control system that automatically adjusts the position of an instrument arm that carries a microscope equipped with an electronic camera. In the original intended application of AUTOFOCUS, the imaging microscope would be carried by an exploratory robotic vehicle on a remote planet, but AUTOFOCUS could also be adapted to similar applications on Earth. Initially control software other than AUTOFOCUS brings the microscope to a position above a target to be imaged. Then the instrument arm is moved to lower the microscope toward the target: nominally, the target is approached from a starting distance of 3 cm in 10 steps of 3 mm each. After each step, the image in the camera is subjected to a wavelet transform, which is used to evaluate the texture in the image at multiple scales to determine whether and by how much the microscope is approaching focus. A focus measure is derived from the transform and used to guide the arm to bring the microscope to the focal height. When the analysis reveals that the microscope is in focus, image data are recorded and transmitted.

  17. Fast and Adaptive Auto-focusing Microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obara, Takeshi; Igarashi, Yasunobu; Hashimoto, Koichi

    Optical microscopes are widely used in biological and medical researches. By using the microscope, we can observe cellular movements including intracellular ions and molecules tagged with fluorescent dyes at a high magnification. However, a freely motile cell easily escapes from a 3D field of view of the typical microscope. Therefore, we propose a novel auto-focusing algorithm and develop a auto-focusing and tracking microscope. XYZ positions of a microscopic stage are feedback controlled to focus and track the cell automatically. A bright-field image is used to estimate a cellular position. XY centroids are used to estimate XY positions of the tracked cell. To estimate Z position, we use a diffraction pattern around the cell membrane. This estimation method is so-called Depth from Diffraction (DFDi). However, this method is not robust for individual differences between cells because the diffraction pattern depends on each cellular shape. Therefore, in this study, we propose a real-time correction of DFDi by using 2D Laplacian of an intracellular area as a goodness of the focus. To evaluate the performance of our developed algorithm and microscope, we auto-focus and track a freely moving paramecium. In this experimental result, the paramecium is auto-focused and kept inside the scope of the microscope during 45s. The evaluated focal error is within 5µm, while a length and a thickness of the paramecium are about 200µm and 50µm, respectively.

  18. Assessment of asymptomatic microscopic hematuria in adults.

    PubMed

    Sharp, Victoria J; Barnes, Kerri T; Erickson, Bradley A

    2013-12-01

    Although routine screening for bladder cancer is not recommended, microscopic hematuria is often incidentally discovered by primary care physicians. The American Urological Association has published an updated guideline for the management of asymptomatic microscopic hematuria, which is defined as the presence of three or more red blood cells per high-power field visible in a properly collected urine specimen without evidence of infection. The most common causes of microscopic hematuria are urinary tract infection, benign prostatic hyperplasia, and urinary calculi. However, up to 5% of patients with asymptomatic microscopic hematuria are found to have a urinary tract malignancy. The risk of urologic malignancy is increased in men, persons older than 35 years, and persons with a history of smoking. Microscopic hematuria in the setting of urinary tract infection should resolve after appropriate antibiotic treatment; persistence of hematuria warrants a diagnostic workup. Dysmorphic red blood cells, cellular casts, proteinuria, elevated creatinine levels, or hypertension in the presence of microscopic hematuria should prompt concurrent nephrologic and urologic referral. The upper urinary tract is best evaluated with multiphasic computed tomography urography, which identifies hydronephrosis, urinary calculi, and renal and ureteral lesions. The lower urinary tract is best evaluated with cystoscopy for urethral stricture disease, benign prostatic hyperplasia, and bladder masses. Voided urine cytology is no longer recommended as part of the routine evaluation of asymptomatic microscopic hematuria, unless there are risk factors for malignancy.

  19. Operating microscopes: past, present, and future.

    PubMed

    Uluç, Kutluay; Kujoth, Gregory C; Başkaya, Mustafa K

    2009-09-01

    The operating microscope is a fixture of modern surgical facilities, and it is a critically important factor in the success of many of the most complex and difficult surgical interventions used in medicine today. The rise of this key surgical tool reflects advances in understanding the principles of optics and vision that have occurred over centuries. The development of reading spectacles in the late 13th century led to the construction of early compound microscopes in the 16th and 17th centuries by Lippershey, Janssen, Galileo, Hooke, and others. Perhaps surprisingly, Leeuwenhoek's simple microscopes of this era offered improved performance over his contemporaries' designs. The intervening years saw improvements that reduced the spherical and chromatic aberrations present in compound microscopes. By the late 19th century, Carl Zeiss and Ernst Abbe ushered the compound microscope into the beginnings of the modern era of commercial design and production. The introduction of the microscope into the operating room by Nylén in 1921 initiated a revolution in surgical practice that gained momentum throughout the 1950s with multiple refinements, the introduction of the Zeiss OPMI series, and Kurze's application of the microscope to neurosurgery in 1957. Many of the refinements of the last 50 years have greatly improved the handling and practical operation of the surgical microscope, considerations which are equally important to its optical performance. Today's sophisticated operating microscopes allow for advanced real-time angiographic and tumor imaging. In this paper the authors discuss what might be found in the operating rooms of tomorrow.

  20. Dielectrophoretic spectroscopy using a microscopic electrode array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirmani, Syed Abdul Mannan; Gudagunti, Fleming Dackson; Velmanickam, Logeeshan; Nawarathna, Dharmakeerthi; Lima, Ivan T.

    2017-02-01

    Dielectrophoresis (DEP) is a commonly used technique in biomedical engineering to manipulate biomolecules. DEP is defined as the force acting on dielectric particles when they are exposed to non-uniform electric fields. DEP effect can be divided in three categories: positive (dielectric particles are attracted to the electrodes), negative, and zero force DEP. The cross-over frequency is the frequency in which the DEP force is equal to zero. The cross-over frequency depends on the conductivity and the permittivity of the particles and of the suspended medium. The DEP cross-over frequency has been utilized in detecting/quantifying biomolecules. A manual procedure is commonly used to estimate the cross-over frequency of biomolecules. Therefore, the accuracy of this detection method is significantly limited. To address this issue, we designed and tested an automated procedure to carry out DEP spectroscopy in dielectric particles dissolved in a biological buffer solution. Our method efficiently measures the effect of the DEP force through a live video feed from the microscope camera and performs real-time image processing. It records the change in the fluorescence emission as the system automatically scans the electric frequency of the function generator over a specified time interval. We demonstrated the effectiveness of the method by extracting the crossover frequencies and the DEP spectrum of polystyrene beads with blue color dye (1000 nm diameter) and green fluorescent polystyrene beads with 500 nm diameter using this procedure. This approach can lead to the development of a biosensor with significantly higher sensitivity than existing detection methods.

  1. A sub-cm micromachined electron microscope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feinerman, A. D.; Crewe, D. A.; Perng, D. C.; Shoaf, S. E.; Crewe, A. V.

    1993-01-01

    A new approach for fabricating macroscopic (approximately 10x10x10 mm(exp 3)) structures with micron accuracy has been developed. This approach combines the precision of semiconductor processing and fiber optic technologies. A (100) silicon wafer is anisotropically etched to create four orthogonal v-grooves and an aperture on each 10x12 mm die. Precision 308 micron optical fibers are sandwiched between the die to align the v-grooves. The fiber is then anodically bonded to the die above and below it. This procedure is repeated to create thick structures and a stack of 5 or 6 die will be used to create a miniature scanning electron microscope (MSEM). Two die in the structure will have a segmented electrode to deflect the beam and correct for astigmatism. The entire structure is UHV compatible. The performance of an SEM improves as its length is reduced and a sub-cm 2 keV MSEM with a field emission source should have approximately 1 nm resolution. A low voltage high resolution MSEM would be useful for the examination of biological specimens and semiconductors with a minimum of damage. The first MSEM will be tested with existing 6 micron thermionic sources. In the future a micromachined field emission source will be used. The stacking technology presented in this paper can produce an array of MSEMs 1 to 30 mm in length with a 1 mm or larger period. A key question being addressed by this research is the optimum size for a low voltage MSEM which will be determined by the required spatial resolution, field of view, and working distance.

  2. Seismic isolation of an electron microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Godden, W.G.; Aslam, M.; Scalise, D.T.

    1980-01-01

    A unique two-stage dynamic-isolation problem is presented by the conflicting design requirements for the foundations of an electron microscope in a seismic region. Under normal operational conditions the microscope must be isolated from ambient ground noise; this creates a system extremely vulnerable to seismic ground motions. Under earthquake loading the internal equipment forces must be limited to prevent damage or collapse. An analysis of the proposed design solution is presented. This study was motivated by the 1.5 MeV High Voltage Electron Microscope (HVEM) to be installed at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) located near the Hayward Fault in California.

  3. Microscopes for NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    One part of the Microscopy, Electrochemistry, and Conductivity Analyzer instrument for NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander is a pair of telescopes with a special wheel (on the right in this photograph) for presenting samples to be inspected with the microscopes. A horizontally mounted optical microscope (on the left in this photograph) and an atomic force microscope will examine soil particles and possibly ice particles.

    The shapes and the size distributions of soil particles may tell scientists about environmental conditions the material has experienced. Tumbling rounds the edges. Repeated wetting and freezing causes cracking. Clay minerals formed during long exposure to water have distinctive, platy particles shapes.

  4. Mars Life? - Microscopic Egg-shaped Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    This electron microscope image shows egg-shaped structures, some of which may be possible microscopic fossils of Martian origin as discussed by NASA research published in the Aug. 16, 1996, issue of the journal Science. A two-year investigation found organic molecules, mineral features characteristic of biological activity and possible microscopic fossils such as these inside of an ancient Martian rock that fell to Earth as a meteorite. The largest possible fossils are less than 1/100th the diameter of a human hair in size while most are ten times smaller.

  5. A large granite stage and measuring microscope.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alston-Garnjost, M.; Davis, J. W.; Dauber, P. M.; Smits, R. G.

    1971-01-01

    A stage and measuring microscope servocontrolled by a computer have been constructed. The travel of the stage is 0.5 x 0.5 m and the travel of the microscope objective is 7.5 cm. The measuring accuracy is 1 micron in the x-y plane and 5 microns along the z axis. The mechanical and optical construction of the stage and microscope, as well as the way in which the control electronics are organized, permit great flexibility of operation. Possible applications include the scanning and measuring of astronomical plates, the laying out of patterns of semiconductor devices of very large sizes, and the measurement of precision grids.

  6. Microscopes for NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    One part of the Microscopy, Electrochemistry, and Conductivity Analyzer instrument for NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander is a pair of telescopes with a special wheel (on the right in this photograph) for presenting samples to be inspected with the microscopes. A horizontally mounted optical microscope (on the left in this photograph) and an atomic force microscope will examine soil particles and possibly ice particles.

    The shapes and the size distributions of soil particles may tell scientists about environmental conditions the material has experienced. Tumbling rounds the edges. Repeated wetting and freezing causes cracking. Clay minerals formed during long exposure to water have distinctive, platy particles shapes.

  7. Mars Life? - Microscopic Egg-shaped Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    This electron microscope image shows egg-shaped structures, some of which may be possible microscopic fossils of Martian origin as discussed by NASA research published in the Aug. 16, 1996, issue of the journal Science. A two-year investigation found organic molecules, mineral features characteristic of biological activity and possible microscopic fossils such as these inside of an ancient Martian rock that fell to Earth as a meteorite. The largest possible fossils are less than 1/100th the diameter of a human hair in size while most are ten times smaller.

  8. Multiple Chirality in Nuclear Rotation: A Microscopic View

    DOE PAGES

    Zhao, P. W.

    2017-10-10

    Covariant density functional theory and three-dimensional tilted axis cranking are used to investigate multiple chirality in nuclear rotation for the first time in a fully self-consistent and microscopic way. Two distinct sets of chiral solutions with negative and positive parities, respectively, are found in the nucleus 106Rh. The negative-parity solutions reproduce well the corresponding experimental spectrum as well as the B(M1)/B(E2) ratios of the transition strengths. This indicates that a predicted positive-parity chiral band should also exist. Therefore, it provides a further strong hint that multiple chirality is realized in nuclei.

  9. Multiple chirality in nuclear rotation: A microscopic view

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, P. W.

    2017-10-01

    Covariant density functional theory and three-dimensional tilted axis cranking are used to investigate multiple chirality in nuclear rotation for the first time in a fully self-consistent and microscopic way. Two distinct sets of chiral solutions with negative and positive parities, respectively, are found in the nucleus 106Rh. The negative-parity solutions reproduce well the corresponding experimental spectrum as well as the B (M 1) / B (E 2) ratios of the transition strengths. This indicates that a predicted positive-parity chiral band should also exist. Therefore, it provides a further strong hint that multiple chirality is realized in nuclei.

  10. Thin laser light sheet microscope for microbial oceanography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuchs, Eran; Jaffe, Jules S.; Long, Richard A.; Azam, Farooq

    2002-01-01

    Despite a growing need, oceanographers are limited by existing technological constrains and are unable to observe aquatic microbes in their natural setting. In order to provide a simple and easy to implement solution for such studies, a new Thin Light Sheet Microscope (TLSM) has been developed. The TLSM utilizes a well-defined sheet of laser light, which has a narrow (23 micron) axial dimension over a 1 mm x 1 mm field of view. This light sheet is positioned precisely within the depth of field of the microscope’s objective lens. The technique thus utilizes conventional microscope optics but replaces the illumination system. The advantages of the TLSM are two-fold: First, it concentrates light only where excitation is needed, thus maximizing the efficiency of the illumination source. Secondly, the TLSM maximizes image sharpness while at the same time minimizing the level of background noise. Particles that are not located within the objective's depth of field are not illuminated and therefore do not contribute to an out-of-focus image. Images from a prototype system that used SYBR Green I fluorescence stain in order to localize single bacteria are reported. The bacteria were in a relatively large and undisturbed volume of 4ml, which contained natural seawater. The TLSM can be used for fresh water studies of bacteria with no modification. The microscope permits the observation of interactions at the microscale and has potential to yield insights into how microbes structure pelagic ecosystems.

  11. Microscopic hematuria and calculus-related ureteral obstruction.

    PubMed

    Stewart, D P; Kowalski, R; Wong, P; Krome, R

    1990-01-01

    The evaluation of patients with ureteral calculi in the emergency department has historically included urinalysis (UA) and intravenous pyelograms (IVP). This retrospective study was done to determine if a statistically significant relationship existed between the degree of calculus-related ureteral obstruction, proven by IVP, and the presence or absence of microscopic hematuria. Urine red blood cells were recorded as less than 3 rbc/hpf (negative) or greater than or equal to 3 rbc/hpf (positive). IVPs were recorded as nonsevere or severe. IVP criteria were based on the presence or absence of extravasation, greater than 2-hour ureteral filling times, and a numerical scoring system of 1 to 4 for ureteral or calyceal dilatation and nephrogenic effect. Eighty-nine men (72%) had non-severe obstructions and 34 (28%) had severe obstructions. Twenty-five women (68%) had nonsevere obstructions and 12 (32%) had severe obstructions. Of the 28 patients with normal UAs, 11 had severe ureteral obstructions and 17 had nonsevere ureteral obstructions. There were no statistically significant differences between the presence or absence of significant microscopic hematuria and the presence or absence of severe ureteral obstruction. Microscopic hematuria is neither sensitive nor specific in determining the degree of calculus-related ureteral obstruction.

  12. X ray imaging microscope for cancer research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoover, Richard B.; Shealy, David L.; Brinkley, B. R.; Baker, Phillip C.; Barbee, Troy W., Jr.; Walker, Arthur B. C., Jr.

    1991-01-01

    The NASA technology employed during the Stanford MSFC LLNL Rocket X Ray Spectroheliograph flight established that doubly reflecting, normal incidence multilayer optics can be designed, fabricated, and used for high resolution x ray imaging of the Sun. Technology developed as part of the MSFC X Ray Microscope program, showed that high quality, high resolution multilayer x ray imaging microscopes are feasible. Using technology developed at Stanford University and at the DOE Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Troy W. Barbee, Jr. has fabricated multilayer coatings with near theoretical reflectivities and perfect bandpass matching for a new rocket borne solar observatory, the Multi-Spectral Solar Telescope Array (MSSTA). Advanced Flow Polishing has provided multilayer mirror substrates with sub-angstrom (rms) smoothnesss for the astronomical x ray telescopes and x ray microscopes. The combination of these important technological advancements has paved the way for the development of a Water Window Imaging X Ray Microscope for cancer research.

  13. A Student-Built Scanning Tunneling Microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ekkens, Tom

    2015-12-01

    Many introductory and nanotechnology textbooks discuss the operation of various microscopes including atomic force (AFM), scanning tunneling (STM), and scanning electron microscopes (SEM). In a nanotechnology laboratory class, students frequently utilize microscopes to obtain data without a thought about the detailed operation of the tool itself. I wanted to give my students a deeper appreciation for the physics by having them build a simple scanning tunneling microscope. Initially, 15 hours of an upper-division laboratory class were devoted to building and operating the STM. As the build process was refined, the time commitment for this project has shrunk to nine hours. Using the method described in this paper, the project is now simple enough that it can be built and operated by students in the introductory class.

  14. Feedback regulation of microscopes by image processing.

    PubMed

    Tsukada, Yuki; Hashimoto, Koichi

    2013-05-01

    Computational microscope systems are becoming a major part of imaging biological phenomena, and the development of such systems requires the design of automated regulation of microscopes. An important aspect of automated regulation is feedback regulation, which is the focus of this review. As modern microscope systems become more complex, often with many independent components that must work together, computer control is inevitable since the exact orchestration of parameters and timings for these multiple components is critical to acquire proper images. A number of techniques have been developed for biological imaging to accomplish this. Here, we summarize the basics of computational microscopy for the purpose of building automatically regulated microscopes focus on feedback regulation by image processing. These techniques allow high throughput data acquisition while monitoring both short- and long-term dynamic phenomena, which cannot be achieved without an automated system.

  15. A pragmatic guide to multiphoton microscope design

    PubMed Central

    Young, Michael D.; Field, Jeffrey J.; Sheetz, Kraig E.; Bartels, Randy A.; Squier, Jeff

    2016-01-01

    Multiphoton microscopy has emerged as a ubiquitous tool for studying microscopic structure and function across a broad range of disciplines. As such, the intent of this paper is to present a comprehensive resource for the construction and performance evaluation of a multiphoton microscope that will be understandable to the broad range of scientific fields that presently exploit, or wish to begin exploiting, this powerful technology. With this in mind, we have developed a guide to aid in the design of a multiphoton microscope. We discuss source selection, optical management of dispersion, image-relay systems with scan optics, objective-lens selection, single-element light-collection theory, photon-counting detection, image rendering, and finally, an illustrated guide for building an example microscope. PMID:27182429

  16. A Live Specimen Cell for the Microscope.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McNeil, D. W.

    1991-01-01

    Provides background and instructions for the assembly of a microaquarium, or specimen cell, in which the dynamic world of living microorganisms can be viewed through a microscope overextended periods of time utilizing the simplest of materials in the process. (JJK)

  17. A Live Specimen Cell for the Microscope.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McNeil, D. W.

    1991-01-01

    Provides background and instructions for the assembly of a microaquarium, or specimen cell, in which the dynamic world of living microorganisms can be viewed through a microscope overextended periods of time utilizing the simplest of materials in the process. (JJK)

  18. A pragmatic guide to multiphoton microscope design.

    PubMed

    Young, Michael D; Field, Jeffrey J; Sheetz, Kraig E; Bartels, Randy A; Squier, Jeff

    2015-06-30

    Multiphoton microscopy has emerged as a ubiquitous tool for studying microscopic structure and function across a broad range of disciplines. As such, the intent of this paper is to present a comprehensive resource for the construction and performance evaluation of a multiphoton microscope that will be understandable to the broad range of scientific fields that presently exploit, or wish to begin exploiting, this powerful technology. With this in mind, we have developed a guide to aid in the design of a multiphoton microscope. We discuss source selection, optical management of dispersion, image-relay systems with scan optics, objective-lens selection, single-element light-collection theory, photon-counting detection, image rendering, and finally, an illustrated guide for building an example microscope.

  19. Attachment converts microscope to point source autocollimator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shlichta, P. J.

    1964-01-01

    A low-power microscope or telescope provides a simple means of autocollimation. This is done by fitting the instrument with a light source to permit alignment from a reflecting surface normal to the optic axis of the instrument.

  20. Surface-Finish Measurement with Interference Microscopes,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1977-02-01

    illuminated with white light in the M2 -M’, Figure 4. THE TWYMAN -GREEN INTERFEROMETER . (This Instrument Uses a Point Source, the Light is...vertical specimens mounted on a machine spindle. The double-beam microscope is a Twyman -Green interferometer in which microscope objectives have...characteristics of each instrument: the double and multiple-beam interferometer , the FECO fringe interferometer , and the Nomarski polarization contrast

  1. Existing Steel Railway Bridges Evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vičan, Josef; Gocál, Jozef; Odrobiňák, Jaroslav; Koteš, Peter

    2016-12-01

    The article describes general principles and basis of evaluation of existing railway bridges based on the concept of load-carrying capacity determination. Compared to the design of a new bridge, the modified reliability level for existing bridges evaluation should be considered due to implementation of the additional data related to bridge condition and behaviour obtained from regular inspections. Based on those data respecting the bridge remaining lifetime, a modification of partial safety factors for actions and materials could be respected in the bridge evaluation process. A great attention is also paid to the specific problems of determination of load-caring capacity of steel railway bridges in service. Recommendation for global analysis and methodology for existing steel bridge superstructure load-carrying capacity determination are described too.

  2. IMIS: An intelligence microscope imaging system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caputo, Michael; Hunter, Norwood; Taylor, Gerald

    1994-01-01

    Until recently microscope users in space relied on traditional microscopy techniques that required manual operation of the microscope and recording of observations in the form of written notes, drawings, or photographs. This method was time consuming and required the return of film and drawings from space for analysis. No real-time data analysis was possible. Advances in digital and video technologies along with recent developments in article intelligence will allow future space microscopists to have a choice of three additional modes of microscopy: remote coaching, remote control, and automation. Remote coaching requires manual operations of the microscope with instructions given by two-way audio/video transmission during critical phases of the experiment. When using the remote mode of microscopy, the Principal Investigator controls the microscope from the ground. The automated mode employs artificial intelligence to control microscope functions and is the only mode that can be operated in the other three modes as well. The purpose of this presentation is to discuss the advantages and disadvantages of the four modes of of microscopy and how the IMIS, a proposed intelligent microscope imaging system, can be used as a model for developing and testing concepts, operating procedures, and equipment design of specifications required to provide a comprehensive microscopy/imaging capability onboard Space Station Freedom.

  3. Water window imaging x ray microscope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoover, Richard B. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    A high resolution x ray microscope for imaging microscopic structures within biological specimens has an optical system including a highly polished primary and secondary mirror coated with identical multilayer coatings, the mirrors acting at normal incidence. The coatings have a high reflectivity in the narrow wave bandpass between 23.3 and 43.7 angstroms and have low reflectivity outside of this range. The primary mirror has a spherical concave surface and the secondary mirror has a spherical convex surface. The radii of the mirrors are concentric about a common center of curvature on the optical axis of the microscope extending from the object focal plane to the image focal plane. The primary mirror has an annular configuration with a central aperture and the secondary mirror is positioned between the primary mirror and the center of curvature for reflecting radiation through the aperture to a detector. An x ray filter is mounted at the stage end of the microscope, and film sensitive to x rays in the desired band width is mounted in a camera at the image plane of the optical system. The microscope is mounted within a vacuum chamber for minimizing the absorption of x rays in air from a source through the microscope.

  4. IMIS: An intelligence microscope imaging system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caputo, Michael; Hunter, Norwood; Taylor, Gerald

    1994-01-01

    Until recently microscope users in space relied on traditional microscopy techniques that required manual operation of the microscope and recording of observations in the form of written notes, drawings, or photographs. This method was time consuming and required the return of film and drawings from space for analysis. No real-time data analysis was possible. Advances in digital and video technologies along with recent developments in article intelligence will allow future space microscopists to have a choice of three additional modes of microscopy: remote coaching, remote control, and automation. Remote coaching requires manual operations of the microscope with instructions given by two-way audio/video transmission during critical phases of the experiment. When using the remote mode of microscopy, the Principal Investigator controls the microscope from the ground. The automated mode employs artificial intelligence to control microscope functions and is the only mode that can be operated in the other three modes as well. The purpose of this presentation is to discuss the advantages and disadvantages of the four modes of of microscopy and how the IMIS, a proposed intelligent microscope imaging system, can be used as a model for developing and testing concepts, operating procedures, and equipment design of specifications required to provide a comprehensive microscopy/imaging capability onboard Space Station Freedom.

  5. X-ray laser microscope apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Suckewer, Szymon; DiCicco, Darrell S.; Hirschberg, Joseph G.; Meixler, Lewis D.; Sathre, Robert; Skinner, Charles H.

    1990-01-01

    A microscope consisting of an x-ray contact microscope and an optical microscope. The optical, phase contrast, microscope is used to align a target with respect to a source of soft x-rays. The source of soft x-rays preferably comprises an x-ray laser but could comprise a synchrotron or other pulse source of x-rays. Transparent resist material is used to support the target. The optical microscope is located on the opposite side of the transparent resist material from the target and is employed to align the target with respect to the anticipated soft x-ray laser beam. After alignment with the use of the optical microscope, the target is exposed to the soft x-ray laser beam. The x-ray sensitive transparent resist material whose chemical bonds are altered by the x-ray beam passing through the target mater GOVERNMENT LICENSE RIGHTS This invention was made with government support under Contract No. De-FG02-86ER13609 awarded by the Department of Energy. The Government has certain rights in this invention.

  6. Solution of the Skyrme-Hartree-Fock-Bogolyubov equations in the Cartesian deformed harmonic-oscillator basis. (IV) HFODD (v2.08i): a new version of the program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobaczewski, J.; Olbratowski, P.

    2004-04-01

    We describe the new version (v2.08i) of the code HFODD which solves the nuclear Skyrme-Hartree-Fock or Skyrme-Hartree-Fock-Bogolyubov problem by using the Cartesian deformed harmonic-oscillator basis. In the new version, all symmetries can be broken, which allows for calculations with angular frequency and angular momentum tilted with respect to the mass distribution. The new version contains an interface to the LAPACK subroutine ZHPEVX. Program summaryTitle of the program:HFODD (v2.08i) Catalogue number: ADTO Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University of Belfast, N. Ireland Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/ADTO Reference in CPC for earlier version of program: J. Dobaczewski and J. Dudek, Comput. Phys. Commun. 131 (2000) 164 (v1.75r) Catalogue number of previous version: ADML Licensing provisions: none Does the new version supersede the previous one: yes Computers on which the program has been tested: SG Power Challenge L, Pentium-II, Pentium-III, AMD-Athlon Operating systems: UNIX, LINUX, Windows-2000 Programming language used: FORTRAN-77 and FORTRAN-90 Memory required to execute with typical data: 10 Mwords No. of bits in a word: The code is written in single-precision for the use on a 64-bit processor. The compiler option -r8 or +autodblpad (or equivalent) has to be used to promote all real and complex single-precision floating-point items to double precision when the code is used on a 32-bit machine. Has the code been vectorised?: Yes No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 265352 No. of lines in distributed program: 52656 Distribution format: tar gzip file Nature of physical problem: The nuclear mean-field and an analysis of its symmetries in realistic cases are the main ingredients of a description of nuclear states. Within the Local Density Approximation, or for a zero-range velocity-dependent Skyrme interaction, the nuclear mean-field is local and velocity dependent. The locality allows for

  7. Students' modeling of friction at the microscopic level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corpuz, Edgar De Guzman

    Research that investigates the dynamics of knowledge construction by students as they model phenomena at the microscopic level has not been extensively conducted in physics and science education in general. This research wherein I investigated the dynamics of knowledge construction of students in the context of microscopic friction is an attempt to do so. The study commenced with an investigation of the variations in the existing models of students about microscopic friction (phase I of the study). Clinical interviews were conducted with introductory physics students in order to elicit their models. A phenomenographic approach of data analysis was employed to establish the variations in students' models. Results show that students' mental models of friction at the atomic level are dominated by their macroscopic experiences. Friction at the atomic level according to most students is due to mechanical interactions (interlocking or rubbing of atoms). Can we build on these macroscopic ideas of students in order to help them construct more scientific explanations of friction at the atomic level? The second phase of the research was an investigation of the dynamics of knowledge construction of students as they constructed models of friction at the atomic level while building on their prior ideas. Individual as well as group teaching interviews were conducted with introductory physics students in order to investigate students learning trajectories and the processes they undergo as they created new models of friction at the atomic level. Results show that the span, zone of proximal development and the epistemological orientations of the students greatly influenced the extent to which they utilize scaffolding afforded to them during the model-building process. Moreover, results show that students undergo the process of incorporation and displacement during their model construction and reconstruction. In the third phase, an instructional material geared towards helping

  8. The importance of radiographic imaging in the microscopic assessment of bone tumors.

    PubMed

    Larousserie, F; Kreshak, J; Gambarotti, M; Alberghini, M; Vanel, D

    2013-12-01

    Primary bone tumors are rare and require a multidisciplinary approach. Diagnosis involves primarily the radiologist and the pathologist. Bone lesions are often heterogeneous and the microscopic diagnostic component(s) may be in the minority, especially on core needle biopsies. Reactive processes, benign, and malignant tumors may have similar microscopic aspects. For these challenging cases, the correlation of microscopic and radiologic information is critical, or diagnostic mistakes may be made with severe clinical consequences for the patient. The purpose of this article is to explain how pathologists can best use imaging studies to improve the diagnostic accuracy of bone lesions. Many bone lesions are microscopically and/or radiographically heterogeneous, especially those with both lytic and matrix components. Final diagnosis may require specific microscopic diagnostic features that may be present in the lesion, but not the biopsy specimen. A review of the imaging helps assess if sampling was adequate. The existence of a pre-existing bone lesion, syndrome (such as Ollier disease or multiple hereditary exostosis), or oncologic history may be of crucial importance. Finally, imaging information is very useful for the pathologist to perform accurate local and regional staging during gross examination. Close teamwork between pathologists, radiologists, and clinicians is of utmost importance in the evaluation and management of bone tumors. These lesions can be very difficult to interpret microscopically; imaging studies therefore play a crucial role in their accurate diagnosis. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. X ray microscope assembly and alignment support and advanced x ray microscope design and analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shealy, David L.

    1991-01-01

    Considerable efforts have been devoted recently to the design, analysis, fabrication, and testing of spherical Schwarzschild microscopes for soft x ray application in microscopy and projection lithography. The spherical Schwarzschild microscope consists of two concentric spherical mirrors configured such that the third order spherical aberration and coma are zero. Since multilayers are used on the mirror substrates for x ray applications, it is desirable to have only two reflecting surfaces in a microscope. In order to reduce microscope aberrations and increase the field of view, generalized mirror surface profiles have been considered in this investigation. Based on incoherent and sine wave modulation transfer function (MTF) calculations, the object plane resolution of a microscope has been analyzed as a function of the object height and numerical aperture (NA) of the primary for several spherical Schwarzschild, conic, and aspherical head reflecting two mirror microscope configurations.

  10. A Microscopic Optically Tracking Navigation System That Uses High-resolution 3D Computer Graphics.

    PubMed

    Yoshino, Masanori; Saito, Toki; Kin, Taichi; Nakagawa, Daichi; Nakatomi, Hirofumi; Oyama, Hiroshi; Saito, Nobuhito

    2015-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) computer graphics (CG) are useful for preoperative planning of neurosurgical operations. However, application of 3D CG to intraoperative navigation is not widespread because existing commercial operative navigation systems do not show 3D CG in sufficient detail. We have developed a microscopic optically tracking navigation system that uses high-resolution 3D CG. This article presents the technical details of our microscopic optically tracking navigation system. Our navigation system consists of three components: the operative microscope, registration, and the image display system. An optical tracker was attached to the microscope to monitor the position and attitude of the microscope in real time; point-pair registration was used to register the operation room coordinate system, and the image coordinate system; and the image display system showed the 3D CG image in the field-of-view of the microscope. Ten neurosurgeons (seven males, two females; mean age 32.9 years) participated in an experiment to assess the accuracy of this system using a phantom model. Accuracy of our system was compared with the commercial system. The 3D CG provided by the navigation system coincided well with the operative scene under the microscope. Target registration error for our system was 2.9 ± 1.9 mm. Our navigation system provides a clear image of the operation position and the surrounding structures. Systems like this may reduce intraoperative complications.

  11. A Microscopic Optically Tracking Navigation System That Uses High-resolution 3D Computer Graphics

    PubMed Central

    YOSHINO, Masanori; SAITO, Toki; KIN, Taichi; NAKAGAWA, Daichi; NAKATOMI, Hirofumi; OYAMA, Hiroshi; SAITO, Nobuhito

    2015-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) computer graphics (CG) are useful for preoperative planning of neurosurgical operations. However, application of 3D CG to intraoperative navigation is not widespread because existing commercial operative navigation systems do not show 3D CG in sufficient detail. We have developed a microscopic optically tracking navigation system that uses high-resolution 3D CG. This article presents the technical details of our microscopic optically tracking navigation system. Our navigation system consists of three components: the operative microscope, registration, and the image display system. An optical tracker was attached to the microscope to monitor the position and attitude of the microscope in real time; point-pair registration was used to register the operation room coordinate system, and the image coordinate system; and the image display system showed the 3D CG image in the field-of-view of the microscope. Ten neurosurgeons (seven males, two females; mean age 32.9 years) participated in an experiment to assess the accuracy of this system using a phantom model. Accuracy of our system was compared with the commercial system. The 3D CG provided by the navigation system coincided well with the operative scene under the microscope. Target registration error for our system was 2.9 ± 1.9 mm. Our navigation system provides a clear image of the operation position and the surrounding structures. Systems like this may reduce intraoperative complications. PMID:26226982

  12. ADD: Does It Really Exist?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Armstrong, Thomas

    1996-01-01

    Questions the existence of attention deficit disorder (ADD), a commonly diagnosed "disease" based on behavioral characteristics. There may be no medical or physiological basis for ADD. The National Association of School Psychologists deplores labeling children and creating categories of exclusion. Instead, educators should respond to individual…

  13. [Does Stendhal's syndrome exist really?].

    PubMed

    Valtueña Borque, Oscar

    2009-01-01

    The author, Medical Doctor and Master in Art History, dicusses the real existence of the so called by the Florentine MD Magherini Stendhal syndrome, first time published in 1980 to put out the sickness that some tourists in their Florentia visit suffered, because the big beauty they founded in the city, as the French writter Stendahl suffered two centuries ago.

  14. A desktop extreme ultraviolet microscope based on a compact laser-plasma light source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wachulak, P. W.; Torrisi, A.; Bartnik, A.; Węgrzyński, Ł.; Fok, T.; Fiedorowicz, H.

    2017-01-01

    A compact, desktop size microscope, based on laser-plasma source and equipped with reflective condenser and diffractive Fresnel zone plate objective, operating in the extreme ultraviolet (EUV) region at the wavelength of 13.8 nm, was developed. The microscope is capable of capturing magnified images of objects with 95-nm full-pitch spatial resolution (48 nm 25-75% KE) and exposure time as low as a few seconds, combining reasonable acquisition conditions with stand-alone desktop footprint. Such EUV microscope can be regarded as a complementary imaging tool to already existing, well-established ones. Details about the microscope, characterization, resolution estimation and real sample images are presented and discussed.

  15. Observation of a vacuum tunnel gap in a transmission electron microscope using a micromechanical tunneling microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lutwyche, M. I.; Wada, Y.

    1995-05-01

    This letter reports the observation of the vacuum tunnel gap between two conductors using a high resolution transmission electron microscope. A 2.5 mm square micromachined tunneling microscope chip has been fabricated with a minimum feature size of 0.4 μm. The chip fits into a modified side-entry type transmission electron microscope holder. The tunnel gap is controlled by a purpose-built feedback controller. The micromachines work reliably during observation of the tip apex in a transmission electron microscope, allowing the voltage and current to be changed while the tunnel gap is observed.

  16. First Atomic Force Microscope Image from Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    This calibration image presents three-dimensional data from the atomic force microscope on NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander, showing surface details of a substrate on the microscope station's sample wheel. It will be used as an aid for interpreting later images that will show shapes of minuscule Martian soil particles.

    The area imaged by the microscope is 40 microns by 40 microns, small enough to fit on an eyelash. The grooves in this substrate are 14 microns (0.00055 inch) apart, from center to center. The vertical dimension is exaggerated in the image to make surface details more visible. The grooves are 300 nanometers (0.00001 inch) deep.

    This is the first atomic force microscope image recorded on another planet. It was taken on July 9, 2008, during the 44th Martian day, or sol, of the Phoenix mission since landing.

    Phoenix's Swiss-made atomic force microscope builds an image of the surface shape of a particle by sensing it with a sharp tip at the end of a spring, all microfabricated out of a silicon wafer. A strain gauge records how far the spring flexes to follow the contour of the surface. It can provide details of soil-particle shapes smaller than one-hundredth the width of a human hair. This is about 20 times smaller than what can be resolved with Phoenix's optical microscope, which has provided much higher-magnification imaging than anything seen on Mars previously. Both microscopes are part of Phoenix's Microscopy, Electrochemistry and Conductivity Analyzer.

  17. Designs for a quantum electron microscope.

    PubMed

    Kruit, P; Hobbs, R G; Kim, C-S; Yang, Y; Manfrinato, V R; Hammer, J; Thomas, S; Weber, P; Klopfer, B; Kohstall, C; Juffmann, T; Kasevich, M A; Hommelhoff, P; Berggren, K K

    2016-05-01

    One of the astounding consequences of quantum mechanics is that it allows the detection of a target using an incident probe, with only a low probability of interaction of the probe and the target. This 'quantum weirdness' could be applied in the field of electron microscopy to generate images of beam-sensitive specimens with substantially reduced damage to the specimen. A reduction of beam-induced damage to specimens is especially of great importance if it can enable imaging of biological specimens with atomic resolution. Following a recent suggestion that interaction-free measurements are possible with electrons, we now analyze the difficulties of actually building an atomic resolution interaction-free electron microscope, or "quantum electron microscope". A quantum electron microscope would require a number of unique components not found in conventional transmission electron microscopes. These components include a coherent electron beam-splitter or two-state-coupler, and a resonator structure to allow each electron to interrogate the specimen multiple times, thus supporting high success probabilities for interaction-free detection of the specimen. Different system designs are presented here, which are based on four different choices of two-state-couplers: a thin crystal, a grating mirror, a standing light wave and an electro-dynamical pseudopotential. Challenges for the detailed electron optical design are identified as future directions for development. While it is concluded that it should be possible to build an atomic resolution quantum electron microscope, we have also identified a number of hurdles to the development of such a microscope and further theoretical investigations that will be required to enable a complete interpretation of the images produced by such a microscope.

  18. First Atomic Force Microscope Image from Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    This calibration image presents three-dimensional data from the atomic force microscope on NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander, showing surface details of a substrate on the microscope station's sample wheel. It will be used as an aid for interpreting later images that will show shapes of minuscule Martian soil particles.

    The area imaged by the microscope is 40 microns by 40 microns, small enough to fit on an eyelash. The grooves in this substrate are 14 microns (0.00055 inch) apart, from center to center. The vertical dimension is exaggerated in the image to make surface details more visible. The grooves are 300 nanometers (0.00001 inch) deep.

    This is the first atomic force microscope image recorded on another planet. It was taken on July 9, 2008, during the 44th Martian day, or sol, of the Phoenix mission since landing.

    Phoenix's Swiss-made atomic force microscope builds an image of the surface shape of a particle by sensing it with a sharp tip at the end of a spring, all microfabricated out of a silicon wafer. A strain gauge records how far the spring flexes to follow the contour of the surface. It can provide details of soil-particle shapes smaller than one-hundredth the width of a human hair. This is about 20 times smaller than what can be resolved with Phoenix's optical microscope, which has provided much higher-magnification imaging than anything seen on Mars previously. Both microscopes are part of Phoenix's Microscopy, Electrochemistry and Conductivity Analyzer.

  19. A subsurface add-on for standard atomic force microscopes.

    PubMed

    Verbiest, G J; van der Zalm, D J; Oosterkamp, T H; Rost, M J

    2015-03-01

    The application of ultrasound in an Atomic Force Microscope (AFM) gives access to subsurface information. However, no commercially AFM exists that is equipped with this technique. The main problems are the electronic crosstalk in the AFM setup and the insufficiently strong excitation of the cantilever at ultrasonic (MHz) frequencies. In this paper, we describe the development of an add-on that provides a solution to these problems by using a special piezo element with a lowest resonance frequency of 2.5 MHz and by separating the electronic connection for this high frequency piezo element from all other connections. In this sense, we support researches with the possibility to perform subsurface measurements with their existing AFMs and hopefully pave also the way for the development of a commercial AFM that is capable of imaging subsurface features with nanometer resolution.

  20. Evaluation of microscopic hematuria: a critical review and proposed algorithm.

    PubMed

    Niemi, Matthew A; Cohen, Robert A

    2015-07-01

    Microscopic hematuria (MH), often discovered incidentally, has many causes, including benign processes, kidney disease, and genitourinary malignancy. The clinician, therefore, must decide how intensively to investigate the source of MH and select which tests to order and referrals to make, aiming not to overlook serious conditions while simultaneously avoiding unnecessary tests. Existing professional guidelines for the evaluation of MH are largely based on expert opinion and have weak evidence bases. Existing data demonstrate associations between isolated MH and various diseases in certain populations, and these associations serve as the basis for our proposed approach to the evaluation of MH. Various areas of ongoing uncertainty regarding the appropriate evaluation should be the basis for ongoing research.

  1. A subsurface add-on for standard atomic force microscopes

    SciTech Connect

    Verbiest, G. J.; Zalm, D. J. van der; Oosterkamp, T. H.; Rost, M. J.

    2015-03-15

    The application of ultrasound in an Atomic Force Microscope (AFM) gives access to subsurface information. However, no commercially AFM exists that is equipped with this technique. The main problems are the electronic crosstalk in the AFM setup and the insufficiently strong excitation of the cantilever at ultrasonic (MHz) frequencies. In this paper, we describe the development of an add-on that provides a solution to these problems by using a special piezo element with a lowest resonance frequency of 2.5 MHz and by separating the electronic connection for this high frequency piezo element from all other connections. In this sense, we support researches with the possibility to perform subsurface measurements with their existing AFMs and hopefully pave also the way for the development of a commercial AFM that is capable of imaging subsurface features with nanometer resolution.

  2. 21 CFR 864.3600 - Microscopes and accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... enlarge images of specimens, preparations, and cultures for medical purposes. Variations of microscopes... light. (3) Inverted stage microscopes, which permit examination of tissue cultures or other...

  3. 21 CFR 864.3600 - Microscopes and accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... enlarge images of specimens, preparations, and cultures for medical purposes. Variations of microscopes... light. (3) Inverted stage microscopes, which permit examination of tissue cultures or other...

  4. Malaria Diagnosis Using a Mobile Phone Polarized Microscope.

    PubMed

    Pirnstill, Casey W; Coté, Gerard L

    2015-08-25

    Malaria remains a major global health burden, and new methods for low-cost, high-sensitivity, diagnosis are essential, particularly in remote areas with low-resource around the world. In this paper, a cost effective, optical cell-phone based transmission polarized light microscope system is presented for imaging the malaria pigment known as hemozoin. It can be difficult to determine the presence of the pigment from background and other artifacts, even for skilled microscopy technicians. The pigment is much easier to observe using polarized light microscopy. However, implementation of polarized light microscopy lacks widespread adoption because the existing commercial devices have complicated designs, require sophisticated maintenance, tend to be bulky, can be expensive, and would require re-training for existing microscopy technicians. To this end, a high fidelity and high optical resolution cell-phone based polarized light microscopy system is presented which is comparable to larger bench-top polarized microscopy systems but at much lower cost and complexity. The detection of malaria in fixed and stained blood smears is presented using both, a conventional polarized microscope and our cell-phone based system. The cell-phone based polarimetric microscopy design shows the potential to have both the resolution and specificity to detect malaria in a low-cost, easy-to-use, modular platform.

  5. Adaptation of commercial microscopes for advanced imaging applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brideau, Craig; Poon, Kelvin; Stys, Peter

    2015-03-01

    Today's commercially available microscopes offer a wide array of options to accommodate common imaging experiments. Occasionally, an experimental goal will require an unusual light source, filter, or even irregular sample that is not compatible with existing equipment. In these situations the ability to modify an existing microscopy platform with custom accessories can greatly extend its utility and allow for experiments not possible with stock equipment. Light source conditioning/manipulation such as polarization, beam diameter or even custom source filtering can easily be added with bulk components. Custom and after-market detectors can be added to external ports using optical construction hardware and adapters. This paper will present various examples of modifications carried out on commercial microscopes to address both atypical imaging modalities and research needs. Violet and near-ultraviolet source adaptation, custom detection filtering, and laser beam conditioning and control modifications will be demonstrated. The availability of basic `building block' parts will be discussed with respect to user safety, construction strategies, and ease of use.

  6. Malaria Diagnosis Using a Mobile Phone Polarized Microscope

    PubMed Central

    Pirnstill, Casey W.; Coté, Gerard L.

    2015-01-01

    Malaria remains a major global health burden, and new methods for low-cost, high-sensitivity, diagnosis are essential, particularly in remote areas with low-resource around the world. In this paper, a cost effective, optical cell-phone based transmission polarized light microscope system is presented for imaging the malaria pigment known as hemozoin. It can be difficult to determine the presence of the pigment from background and other artifacts, even for skilled microscopy technicians. The pigment is much easier to observe using polarized light microscopy. However, implementation of polarized light microscopy lacks widespread adoption because the existing commercial devices have complicated designs, require sophisticated maintenance, tend to be bulky, can be expensive, and would require re-training for existing microscopy technicians. To this end, a high fidelity and high optical resolution cell-phone based polarized light microscopy system is presented which is comparable to larger bench-top polarized microscopy systems but at much lower cost and complexity. The detection of malaria in fixed and stained blood smears is presented using both, a conventional polarized microscope and our cell-phone based system. The cell-phone based polarimetric microscopy design shows the potential to have both the resolution and specificity to detect malaria in a low-cost, easy-to-use, modular platform. PMID:26303238

  7. Malaria Diagnosis Using a Mobile Phone Polarized Microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pirnstill, Casey W.; Coté, Gerard L.

    2015-08-01

    Malaria remains a major global health burden, and new methods for low-cost, high-sensitivity, diagnosis are essential, particularly in remote areas with low-resource around the world. In this paper, a cost effective, optical cell-phone based transmission polarized light microscope system is presented for imaging the malaria pigment known as hemozoin. It can be difficult to determine the presence of the pigment from background and other artifacts, even for skilled microscopy technicians. The pigment is much easier to observe using polarized light microscopy. However, implementation of polarized light microscopy lacks widespread adoption because the existing commercial devices have complicated designs, require sophisticated maintenance, tend to be bulky, can be expensive, and would require re-training for existing microscopy technicians. To this end, a high fidelity and high optical resolution cell-phone based polarized light microscopy system is presented which is comparable to larger bench-top polarized microscopy systems but at much lower cost and complexity. The detection of malaria in fixed and stained blood smears is presented using both, a conventional polarized microscope and our cell-phone based system. The cell-phone based polarimetric microscopy design shows the potential to have both the resolution and specificity to detect malaria in a low-cost, easy-to-use, modular platform.

  8. The EXIST Mission Concept Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fishman, Gerald J.; Grindlay, J.; Hong, J.

    2008-01-01

    EXIST is a mission designed to find and study black holes (BHs) over a wide range of environments and masses, including: 1) BHs accreting from binary companions or dense molecular clouds throughout our Galaxy and the Local Group, 2) supermassive black holes (SMBHs) lying dormant in galaxies that reveal their existence by disrupting passing stars, and 3) SMBHs that are hidden from our view at lower energies due to obscuration by the gas that they accrete. 4) the birth of stellar mass BHs which is accompanied by long cosmic gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) which are seen several times a day and may be associated with the earliest stars to form in the Universe. EXIST will provide an order of magnitude increase in sensitivity and angular resolution as well as greater spectral resolution and bandwidth compared with earlier hard X-ray survey telescopes. With an onboard optical-infra red (IR) telescope, EXIST will measure the spectra and redshifts of GRBs and their utility as cosmological probes of the highest z universe and epoch of reionization. The mission would retain its primary goal of being the Black Hole Finder Probe in the Beyond Einstein Program. However, the new design for EXIST proposed to be studied here represents a significant advance from its previous incarnation as presented to BEPAC. The mission is now less than half the total mass, would be launched on the smallest EELV available (Atlas V-401) for a Medium Class mission, and most importantly includes a two-telescope complement that is ideally suited for the study of both obscured and very distant BHs. EXIST retains its very wide field hard X-ray imaging High Energy Telescope (HET) as the primary instrument, now with improved angular and spectral resolution, and in a more compact payload that allows occasional rapid slews for immediate optical/IR imaging and spectra of GRBs and AGN as well as enhanced hard X-ray spectra and timing with pointed observations. The mission would conduct a 2 year full sky survey in

  9. The EXIST Mission Concept Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fishman, Gerald J.; Grindlay, J.; Hong, J.

    2008-01-01

    EXIST is a mission designed to find and study black holes (BHs) over a wide range of environments and masses, including: 1) BHs accreting from binary companions or dense molecular clouds throughout our Galaxy and the Local Group, 2) supermassive black holes (SMBHs) lying dormant in galaxies that reveal their existence by disrupting passing stars, and 3) SMBHs that are hidden from our view at lower energies due to obscuration by the gas that they accrete. 4) the birth of stellar mass BHs which is accompanied by long cosmic gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) which are seen several times a day and may be associated with the earliest stars to form in the Universe. EXIST will provide an order of magnitude increase in sensitivity and angular resolution as well as greater spectral resolution and bandwidth compared with earlier hard X-ray survey telescopes. With an onboard optical-infra red (IR) telescope, EXIST will measure the spectra and redshifts of GRBs and their utility as cosmological probes of the highest z universe and epoch of reionization. The mission would retain its primary goal of being the Black Hole Finder Probe in the Beyond Einstein Program. However, the new design for EXIST proposed to be studied here represents a significant advance from its previous incarnation as presented to BEPAC. The mission is now less than half the total mass, would be launched on the smallest EELV available (Atlas V-401) for a Medium Class mission, and most importantly includes a two-telescope complement that is ideally suited for the study of both obscured and very distant BHs. EXIST retains its very wide field hard X-ray imaging High Energy Telescope (HET) as the primary instrument, now with improved angular and spectral resolution, and in a more compact payload that allows occasional rapid slews for immediate optical/IR imaging and spectra of GRBs and AGN as well as enhanced hard X-ray spectra and timing with pointed observations. The mission would conduct a 2 year full sky survey in

  10. Refining gold from existing data.

    PubMed

    Wade, Ted D

    2014-06-01

    The purpose is to review the arguments for increasing use of existing data in health research. The reuse of data in observational, exploratory and outcome studies, as well as in confirming other findings, is being justified on epistemological grounds as the major path to new knowledge and to the generalizing of findings to 'real world' populations. It is also justified on the grounds of cost, power, and efficiency, even though data reuse comes with real informatics, scientific culture, societal, and regulatory issues. Data reuse is becoming more compelling. When contemplating new research for any purpose other than RCTs for efficacy, it is prudent to consider whether partnership with existing data holders should be part of the optimal research plan.

  11. Cogeneration for existing alfalfa processing

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-01-01

    This study is designed to look at the application of gas-turbine generator cogeneration to a typical Nebraska alfalfa processing mill. The practicality is examined of installing a combustion turbine generator at a plant site and modifying existing facilities for generating electricity, utilizing the electricity generated, selling excess electricity to the power company and incorporating the turbine exhaust flow as a drying medium for the alfalfa. The results of this study are not conclusive but the findings are summarized.

  12. A Microscopic Theory of the Neutron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng-Johansson, J. X.

    2016-01-01

    A microscopic theory of the neutron, which consists in a neutron model constructed using key relevant experimental observations as input information and the first principles solutions for the basic properties of the model neutron, is proposed within a framework consistent with the Standard Model. The neutron is composed of an electron e and a proton p that are separated at a distance r1 of the order 10-18 m, and are in relative orbital angular motion and Thomas precession highly relativistically, with their reduced mass moving along a quantised circular orbit l = 1, j = ½ of radius vector r1½ = r1rˆ1½ about their mass centre. The associated rotational energy flux has a spin ½ and resembles a confined antineutrino. The particles e, p are attracted with one another predominantly by a central magnetic force produced as result of the particles’ relative precessional-orbital and intrinsic angular motions. The interaction force (resembling the weak force), potential (resembling the Higgs’ field), and a corresponding excitation Hamiltonian (HI), among others, are derived based directly on first principles laws of electromagnetism, quantum mechanics and relativistic mechanics within a unified framework. In particular, the equation for 4/3πr13HI, which is directly comparable with the Fermi constant GF, is predicted as GF = 4/3πr13HI = AoC0 ½/γeγp, where Ao = e2ℏ2/12π𝜖0m0em0pc2, m0em0p are the e, p rest masses, C0½ is a geo-magnetic factor, and γe, γp are the Lorentz factors. Quantitative solution for a stationary meta-stable neutron is found to exist at the extremal point r1m = 2.537 × 10-18 m, at which the GF is a minimum (whence the neutron lifetime is a maximum) and is equal to the experimental value. Solutions for the magnetic moment, effective spin (½), fine structure constant, and intermediate vector boson masses of the neutron are also given in this paper.

  13. Optical modeling of Fresnel zoneplate microscopes

    SciTech Connect

    Naulleau, Patrick; Mochi, Iacopo; Goldberg, Kenneth A.

    2011-04-06

    Defect free masks remain one of the most significant challenges facing the commercialization of extreme ultraviolet (EUV) lithography. Progress on this front requires high-performance wavelength-specific metrology of EUV masks, including high-resolution and aerial-image microscopy performed near the 13.5 nm wavelength. Arguably the most cost-effective and rapid path to proliferating this capability is through the development of Fresnel zoneplate-based microscopes. Given the relative obscurity of such systems, however, modeling tools are not necessarily optimized to deal with them and their imaging properties are poorly understood. Here we present a modeling methodology to analyze zoneplate microscopes based on commercially available optical modeling software and use the technique to investigate the imaging performance of an off-axis EUV microscope design. The modeling predicts that superior performance can be achieved by tilting the zoneplate, making it perpendicular to the chief ray at the center of the field, while designing the zoneplate to explicitly work in that tilted plane. Although the examples presented here are in the realm of EUV mask inspection, the methods described and analysis results are broadly applicable to zoneplate microscopes in general, including full-field soft-x-ray microscopes rou tinely used in the synchrotron community.

  14. Optical modeling of Fresnel zoneplate microscopes.

    PubMed

    Naulleau, Patrick P; Mochi, Iacopo; Goldberg, Kenneth A

    2011-07-10

    Defect free masks remain one of the most significant challenges facing the commercialization of extreme ultraviolet (EUV) lithography. Progress on this front requires high-performance wavelength-specific metrology of EUV masks, including high-resolution and aerial-image microscopy performed near the 13.5 nm wavelength. Arguably the most cost-effective and rapid path to proliferating this capability is through the development of Fresnel zoneplate-based microscopes. Given the relative obscurity of such systems, however, modeling tools are not necessarily optimized to deal with them and their imaging properties are poorly understood. Here we present a modeling methodology to analyze zoneplate microscopes based on commercially available optical modeling software and use the technique to investigate the imaging performance of an off-axis EUV microscope design. The modeling predicts that superior performance can be achieved by tilting the zoneplate, making it perpendicular to the chief ray at the center of the field, while designing the zoneplate to explicitly work in that tilted plane. Although the examples presented here are in the realm of EUV mask inspection, the methods described and analysis results are broadly applicable to zoneplate microscopes in general, including full-field soft-x-ray microscopes routinely used in the synchrotron community.

  15. Optical modeling of Fresnel zoneplate microscopes

    SciTech Connect

    Naulleau, Patrick P.; Mochi, Iacopo; Goldberg, Kenneth A.

    2011-07-10

    Defect free masks remain one of the most significant challenges facing the commercialization of extreme ultraviolet (EUV) lithography. Progress on this front requires high-performance wavelength-specific metrology of EUV masks, including high-resolution and aerial-image microscopy performed near the 13.5 nm wavelength. Arguably the most cost-effective and rapid path to proliferating this capability is through the development of Fresnel zoneplate-based microscopes. Given the relative obscurity of such systems, however, modeling tools are not necessarily optimized to deal with them and their imaging properties are poorly understood. Here we present a modeling methodology to analyze zoneplate microscopes based on commercially available optical modeling software and use the technique to investigate the imaging performance of an off-axis EUV microscope design. The modeling predicts that superior performance can be achieved by tilting the zoneplate, making it perpendicular to the chief ray at the center of the field, while designing the zoneplate to explicitly work in that tilted plane. Although the examples presented here are in the realm of EUV mask inspection, the methods described and analysis results are broadly applicable to zoneplate microscopes in general, including full-field soft-x-ray microscopes routinely used in the synchrotron community.

  16. Comparison of endoscopic and microscopic tympanoplasty.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Che-Hung; Wu, Hsing-Mei

    2017-07-01

    Tympanoplasty was conventionally performed using a microscope for decades. However, since the endoscope began to be used in middle ear surgery in the 1970s, endoscopic tympanoplasty has gained increasing attention. The main objective of this study was to compare endoscopic and microscopic tympanoplasty with and without ossiculoplasty, demonstrating the potential advantages, disadvantages, and outcomes of each. This retrospective study included 126 patients with chronic otitis media who received tympanoplasty from 2013 to 2015 in our hospital. The clinical follow-up continued for at least 3 months postoperatively. Otoscopy and audiometry were conducted before and after the procedure. The different variables affecting surgical outcomes were thoroughly documented in each case. A total of 126 patients (131 ears) were included in this retrospective study. Moreover, 74 and 57 ears underwent endoscopic and microscopic tympanoplasty, respectively. The overall endoscopic tympanoplasty graft uptake rate was 97.7% (128/131). The operation time was significantly shorter in the endoscopic group statistically. A paired t test was used to compare pre- and postoperative audiometry results and showed significant differences between the endoscopic and microscopic groups. However, no statistically significant difference was observed in audiometry improvement between the two groups. No major complications were observed in any of the patients. Our study demonstrated that endoscopic tympanoplasty can be feasibly applied in middle ear surgery. The success rate, audiometry improvement, and complication rate are comparable between endoscopic tympanoplasty and conventional microscopic tympanoplasty. Moreover, the endoscopic group had smaller operation wounds and lower medical expenditures.

  17. Microscopic colitis: clinical and pathologic perspectives.

    PubMed

    Münch, Andreas; Langner, Cord

    2015-02-01

    Microscopic colitis is a chronic inflammatory bowel disease characterized by chronic nonbloody diarrhea and specific histopathology features. Active disease, defined as 3 or more stools or 1 or more watery stools per day, significantly reduces quality of life. Epidemiologic studies have found the incidence and prevalence of microscopic colitis to be comparable with those of Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis. Nevertheless, microscopic colitis is still under-recognized in clinical practice-most health care workers know little about its etiology and pathophysiology. Furthermore, there are many challenges to the diagnosis and treatment of patients. We review the epidemiologic and clinical features of this disorder and discuss its pathogenesis. We also outline the criteria for histopathologic evaluation of microscopic colitis, recently published by the European Consensus on Inflammatory Bowel Disease, and discuss a treatment algorithm created by the European Microscopic Colitis Group. Treatment options for patients with budesonide-refractory disease are discussed. Copyright © 2015 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. The optics of microscope image formation.

    PubMed

    Wolf, David E

    2013-01-01

    Although geometric optics gives a good understanding of how the microscope works, it fails in one critical area, which is explaining the origin of microscope resolution. To accomplish this, one must consider the microscope from the viewpoint of physical optics. This chapter describes the theory of the microscope-relating resolution to the highest spatial frequency that a microscope can collect. The chapter illustrates how Huygens' principle or construction can be used to explain the propagation of a plane wave. It is shown that this limit increases with increasing numerical aperture (NA). As a corollary to this, resolution increases with decreasing wavelength because of how NA depends on wavelength. The resolution is higher for blue light than red light. Resolution is dependent on contrast, and the higher the contrast, the higher the resolution. This last point relates to issues of signal-to-noise and dynamic range. The use of video and new digital cameras has necessitated redefining classical limits such as those of Rayleigh's criterion.

  19. Microscopic features of moving traffic jams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerner, Boris S.; Klenov, Sergey L.; Hiller, Andreas; Rehborn, Hubert

    2006-04-01

    Empirical and numerical microscopic features of moving traffic jams are presented. Based on a single vehicle data analysis, it is found that within wide moving jams, i.e., between the upstream and downstream jam fronts there is a complex microscopic spatiotemporal structure. This jam structure consists of alternations of regions in which traffic flow is interrupted and flow states of low speeds associated with “moving blanks” within the jam. Moving blanks within a wide moving jam resemble electron holes in the valence band of semiconductors: As the moving blanks that propagate upstream appear due to downstream vehicle motion within the jam, so appearance of electron holes moving with the electric field results from electron motion against the electric field in the valence band of semiconductors. Empirical features of moving blanks are found. Based on microscopic models in the context of the Kerner’s three-phase traffic theory, physical reasons for moving blanks emergence within wide moving jams are disclosed. Microscopic nonlinear effects of moving jam emergence, propagation, and dissolution as well as a diverse variety of hysteresis effects in freeway traffic associated with phase transitions and congested traffic propagation are numerically investigated. Microscopic structure of moving jam fronts is numerically studied and compared with empirical results.

  20. Miniaturized integration of a fluorescence microscope

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Kunal K.; Burns, Laurie D.; Cocker, Eric D.; Nimmerjahn, Axel; Ziv, Yaniv; Gamal, Abbas El; Schnitzer, Mark J.

    2013-01-01

    The light microscope is traditionally an instrument of substantial size and expense. Its miniaturized integration would enable many new applications based on mass-producible, tiny microscopes. Key prospective usages include brain imaging in behaving animals towards relating cellular dynamics to animal behavior. Here we introduce a miniature (1.9 g) integrated fluorescence microscope made from mass-producible parts, including semiconductor light source and sensor. This device enables high-speed cellular-level imaging across ∼0.5 mm2 areas in active mice. This capability allowed concurrent tracking of Ca2+ spiking in >200 Purkinje neurons across nine cerebellar microzones. During mouse locomotion, individual microzones exhibited large-scale, synchronized Ca2+ spiking. This is a mesoscopic neural dynamic missed by prior techniques for studying the brain at other length scales. Overall, the integrated microscope is a potentially transformative technology that permits distribution to many animals and enables diverse usages, such as portable diagnostics or microscope arrays for large-scale screens. PMID:21909102

  1. “Breath figures” on leaf surfaces—formation and effects of microscopic leaf wetness

    PubMed Central

    Burkhardt, Juergen; Hunsche, Mauricio

    2013-01-01

    Microscopic leaf wetness” means minute amounts of persistent liquid water on leaf surfaces which are invisible to the naked eye. The water is mainly maintained by transpired water vapor condensing onto the leaf surface and to attached leaf surface particles. With an estimated average thickness of less than 1 μm, microscopic leaf wetness is about two orders of magnitude thinner than morning dewfall. The most important physical processes which reduce the saturation vapor pressure and promote condensation are cuticular absorption and the deliquescence of hygroscopic leaf surface particles. Deliquescent salts form highly concentrated solutions. Depending on the type and concentration of the dissolved ions, the physicochemical properties of microscopic leaf wetness can be considerably different from those of pure water. Microscopic leaf wetness can form continuous thin layers on hydrophobic leaf surfaces and in specific cases can act similar to surfactants, enabling a strong potential influence on the foliar exchange of ions. Microscopic leaf wetness can also enhance the dissolution, the emission, and the reaction of specific atmospheric trace gases e.g., ammonia, SO2, or ozone, leading to a strong potential role for microscopic leaf wetness in plant/atmosphere interaction. Due to its difficult detection, there is little knowledge about the occurrence and the properties of microscopic leaf wetness. However, based on the existing evidence and on physicochemical reasoning it can be hypothesized that microscopic leaf wetness occurs on almost any plant worldwide and often permanently, and that it significantly influences the exchange processes of the leaf surface with its neighboring compartments, i.e., the plant interior and the atmosphere. The omission of microscopic water in general leaf wetness concepts has caused far-reaching, misleading conclusions in the past. PMID:24167510

  2. "Breath figures" on leaf surfaces-formation and effects of microscopic leaf wetness.

    PubMed

    Burkhardt, Juergen; Hunsche, Mauricio

    2013-01-01

    "Microscopic leaf wetness" means minute amounts of persistent liquid water on leaf surfaces which are invisible to the naked eye. The water is mainly maintained by transpired water vapor condensing onto the leaf surface and to attached leaf surface particles. With an estimated average thickness of less than 1 μm, microscopic leaf wetness is about two orders of magnitude thinner than morning dewfall. The most important physical processes which reduce the saturation vapor pressure and promote condensation are cuticular absorption and the deliquescence of hygroscopic leaf surface particles. Deliquescent salts form highly concentrated solutions. Depending on the type and concentration of the dissolved ions, the physicochemical properties of microscopic leaf wetness can be considerably different from those of pure water. Microscopic leaf wetness can form continuous thin layers on hydrophobic leaf surfaces and in specific cases can act similar to surfactants, enabling a strong potential influence on the foliar exchange of ions. Microscopic leaf wetness can also enhance the dissolution, the emission, and the reaction of specific atmospheric trace gases e.g., ammonia, SO2, or ozone, leading to a strong potential role for microscopic leaf wetness in plant/atmosphere interaction. Due to its difficult detection, there is little knowledge about the occurrence and the properties of microscopic leaf wetness. However, based on the existing evidence and on physicochemical reasoning it can be hypothesized that microscopic leaf wetness occurs on almost any plant worldwide and often permanently, and that it significantly influences the exchange processes of the leaf surface with its neighboring compartments, i.e., the plant interior and the atmosphere. The omission of microscopic water in general leaf wetness concepts has caused far-reaching, misleading conclusions in the past.

  3. Image processing for HTS SQUID probe microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayashi, T.; Koetitz, R.; Itozaki, H.; Ishikawa, T.; Kawabe, U.

    2005-10-01

    An HTS SQUID probe microscope has been developed using a high-permeability needle to enable high spatial resolution measurement of samples in air even at room temperature. Image processing techniques have also been developed to improve the magnetic field images obtained from the microscope. Artifacts in the data occur due to electromagnetic interference from electric power lines, line drift and flux trapping. The electromagnetic interference could successfully be removed by eliminating the noise peaks from the power spectrum of fast Fourier transforms of line scans of the image. The drift between lines was removed by interpolating the mean field value of each scan line. Artifacts in line scans occurring due to flux trapping or unexpected noise were removed by the detection of a sharp drift and interpolation using the line data of neighboring lines. Highly detailed magnetic field images were obtained from the HTS SQUID probe microscope by the application of these image processing techniques.

  4. Automated monitoring to reduce electron microscope downtime.

    PubMed

    Brunner, Matthias J; Resch, Guenter P

    2009-10-01

    High-end transmission electron microscopes are complex and sensitive instruments. Failure of one of the external supplies, malfunction of the microscope hardware or maloperation are typical reasons for subsystems to fail. Especially if undiscovered for a longer period of time, this can cause unnecessary downtime, compromising user access and increasing operating costs. Utilizing the software introduced in this article ("MoniTEM"), we have succeeded to reduce downtime of an FEI Tecnai Polara by coupling constant monitoring of critical subsystems with automatic, remote feedback to the system supervisor, ensuring immediate problem solving. The software described here is freely available from http://www.imba.oeaw.ac.at/monitem/ and can be readily adapted for use with other FEI transmission electron microscopes.

  5. Links between microscopic and macroscopic fluid mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoover, Wm. G.; Hoover, C. G.

    2003-01-01

    The microscopic and macroscopic versions of fluid mechanics differ qualitatively. Microscopic particles obey time-reversible ordinary differential equations. The resulting particle trajectories {q(t)} may be time-averaged or ensemble-averaged so as to generate field quantities corresponding to macroscopic variables. On the other hand, the macroscopic continuum fields described by fluid mechanics follow irreversible partial differential equations. Smooth particle methods bridge the gap separating these two views of fluids by solving the macroscopic field equations with particle dynamics that resemble molecular dynamics. Recently, nonlinear dynamics have provided some useful tools for understanding the relationship between the microscopic and macroscopic points of view. Chaos and fractals play key roles in this new understanding. Non-equilibrium phase-space averages look very different from their equilibrium counterparts. Away from equilibrium the smooth phase-space distributions are replaced by fractional-dimensional singular distributions that exhibit time irreversibility.

  6. A two-dimensional Dirac fermion microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bøggild, Peter; Caridad, José M.; Stampfer, Christoph; Calogero, Gaetano; Papior, Nick Rübner; Brandbyge, Mads

    2017-06-01

    The electron microscope has been a powerful, highly versatile workhorse in the fields of material and surface science, micro and nanotechnology, biology and geology, for nearly 80 years. The advent of two-dimensional materials opens new possibilities for realizing an analogy to electron microscopy in the solid state. Here we provide a perspective view on how a two-dimensional (2D) Dirac fermion-based microscope can be realistically implemented and operated, using graphene as a vacuum chamber for ballistic electrons. We use semiclassical simulations to propose concrete architectures and design rules of 2D electron guns, deflectors, tunable lenses and various detectors. The simulations show how simple objects can be imaged with well-controlled and collimated in-plane beams consisting of relativistic charge carriers. Finally, we discuss the potential of such microscopes for investigating edges, terminations and defects, as well as interfaces, including external nanoscale structures such as adsorbed molecules, nanoparticles or quantum dots.

  7. CHAMP (Camera, Handlens, and Microscope Probe)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mungas, Greg S.; Boynton, John E.; Balzer, Mark A.; Beegle, Luther; Sobel, Harold R.; Fisher, Ted; Klein, Dan; Deans, Matthew; Lee, Pascal; Sepulveda, Cesar A.

    2005-01-01

    CHAMP (Camera, Handlens And Microscope Probe)is a novel field microscope capable of color imaging with continuously variable spatial resolution from infinity imaging down to diffraction-limited microscopy (3 micron/pixel). As a robotic arm-mounted imager, CHAMP supports stereo imaging with variable baselines, can continuously image targets at an increasing magnification during an arm approach, can provide precision rangefinding estimates to targets, and can accommodate microscopic imaging of rough surfaces through a image filtering process called z-stacking. CHAMP was originally developed through the Mars Instrument Development Program (MIDP) in support of robotic field investigations, but may also find application in new areas such as robotic in-orbit servicing and maintenance operations associated with spacecraft and human operations. We overview CHAMP'S instrument performance and basic design considerations below.

  8. Macroscopic model of scanning force microscope

    DOEpatents

    Guerra-Vela, Claudio; Zypman, Fredy R.

    2004-10-05

    A macroscopic version of the Scanning Force Microscope is described. It consists of a cantilever under the influence of external forces, which mimic the tip-sample interactions. The use of this piece of equipment is threefold. First, it serves as direct way to understand the parts and functions of the Scanning Force Microscope, and thus it is effectively used as an instructional tool. Second, due to its large size, it allows for simple measurements of applied forces and parameters that define the state of motion of the system. This information, in turn, serves to compare the interaction forces with the reconstructed ones, which cannot be done directly with the standard microscopic set up. Third, it provides a kinematics method to non-destructively measure elastic constants of materials, such as Young's and shear modules, with special application for brittle materials.

  9. Smartphone Magnification Attachment: Microscope or Magnifying Glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hergemöller, Timo; Laumann, Daniel

    2017-09-01

    Today smartphones and tablets do not merely pervade our daily life, but also play a major role in STEM education in general, and in experimental investigations in particular. Enabling teachers and students to make use of these new techniques in physics lessons requires supplying capable and affordable applications. Our article presents the improvement of a low-cost technique turning smartphones into powerful magnifying glasses or microscopes. Adding only a 3D-printed clip attached to the smartphone's camera and inserting a small glass bead in this clip enables smartphones to take pictures with up to 780x magnification (see Fig. 1). In addition, the construction of the smartphone attachments helps to explain and examine the differences between magnifying glasses and microscopes, and shows that the widespread term "smartphone microscope" for this technique is inaccurate from a physics educational perspective.

  10. Microscopic saw mark analysis: an empirical approach.

    PubMed

    Love, Jennifer C; Derrick, Sharon M; Wiersema, Jason M; Peters, Charles

    2015-01-01

    Microscopic saw mark analysis is a well published and generally accepted qualitative analytical method. However, little research has focused on identifying and mitigating potential sources of error associated with the method. The presented study proposes the use of classification trees and random forest classifiers as an optimal, statistically sound approach to mitigate the potential for error of variability and outcome error in microscopic saw mark analysis. The statistical model was applied to 58 experimental saw marks created with four types of saws. The saw marks were made in fresh human femurs obtained through anatomical gift and were analyzed using a Keyence digital microscope. The statistical approach weighed the variables based on discriminatory value and produced decision trees with an associated outcome error rate of 8.62-17.82%.

  11. A two-dimensional Dirac fermion microscope

    PubMed Central

    Bøggild, Peter; Caridad, José M.; Stampfer, Christoph; Calogero, Gaetano; Papior, Nick Rübner; Brandbyge, Mads

    2017-01-01

    The electron microscope has been a powerful, highly versatile workhorse in the fields of material and surface science, micro and nanotechnology, biology and geology, for nearly 80 years. The advent of two-dimensional materials opens new possibilities for realizing an analogy to electron microscopy in the solid state. Here we provide a perspective view on how a two-dimensional (2D) Dirac fermion-based microscope can be realistically implemented and operated, using graphene as a vacuum chamber for ballistic electrons. We use semiclassical simulations to propose concrete architectures and design rules of 2D electron guns, deflectors, tunable lenses and various detectors. The simulations show how simple objects can be imaged with well-controlled and collimated in-plane beams consisting of relativistic charge carriers. Finally, we discuss the potential of such microscopes for investigating edges, terminations and defects, as well as interfaces, including external nanoscale structures such as adsorbed molecules, nanoparticles or quantum dots. PMID:28598421

  12. A two-dimensional Dirac fermion microscope.

    PubMed

    Bøggild, Peter; Caridad, José M; Stampfer, Christoph; Calogero, Gaetano; Papior, Nick Rübner; Brandbyge, Mads

    2017-06-09

    The electron microscope has been a powerful, highly versatile workhorse in the fields of material and surface science, micro and nanotechnology, biology and geology, for nearly 80 years. The advent of two-dimensional materials opens new possibilities for realizing an analogy to electron microscopy in the solid state. Here we provide a perspective view on how a two-dimensional (2D) Dirac fermion-based microscope can be realistically implemented and operated, using graphene as a vacuum chamber for ballistic electrons. We use semiclassical simulations to propose concrete architectures and design rules of 2D electron guns, deflectors, tunable lenses and various detectors. The simulations show how simple objects can be imaged with well-controlled and collimated in-plane beams consisting of relativistic charge carriers. Finally, we discuss the potential of such microscopes for investigating edges, terminations and defects, as well as interfaces, including external nanoscale structures such as adsorbed molecules, nanoparticles or quantum dots.

  13. CHAMP - Camera, Handlens, and Microscope Probe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mungas, G. S.; Beegle, L. W.; Boynton, J.; Sepulveda, C. A.; Balzer, M. A.; Sobel, H. R.; Fisher, T. A.; Deans, M.; Lee, P.

    2005-01-01

    CHAMP (Camera, Handlens And Microscope Probe) is a novel field microscope capable of color imaging with continuously variable spatial resolution from infinity imaging down to diffraction-limited microscopy (3 micron/pixel). As an arm-mounted imager, CHAMP supports stereo-imaging with variable baselines, can continuously image targets at an increasing magnification during an arm approach, can provide precision range-finding estimates to targets, and can accommodate microscopic imaging of rough surfaces through a image filtering process called z-stacking. Currently designed with a filter wheel with 4 different filters, so that color and black and white images can be obtained over the entire Field-of-View, future designs will increase the number of filter positions to include 8 different filters. Finally, CHAMP incorporates controlled white and UV illumination so that images can be obtained regardless of sun position, and any potential fluorescent species can be identified so the most astrobiologically interesting samples can be identified.

  14. CHAMP (Camera, Handlens, and Microscope Probe)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mungas, Greg S.; Boynton, John E.; Balzer, Mark A.; Beegle, Luther; Sobel, Harold R.; Fisher, Ted; Klein, Dan; Deans, Matthew; Lee, Pascal; Sepulveda, Cesar A.

    2005-01-01

    CHAMP (Camera, Handlens And Microscope Probe)is a novel field microscope capable of color imaging with continuously variable spatial resolution from infinity imaging down to diffraction-limited microscopy (3 micron/pixel). As a robotic arm-mounted imager, CHAMP supports stereo imaging with variable baselines, can continuously image targets at an increasing magnification during an arm approach, can provide precision rangefinding estimates to targets, and can accommodate microscopic imaging of rough surfaces through a image filtering process called z-stacking. CHAMP was originally developed through the Mars Instrument Development Program (MIDP) in support of robotic field investigations, but may also find application in new areas such as robotic in-orbit servicing and maintenance operations associated with spacecraft and human operations. We overview CHAMP'S instrument performance and basic design considerations below.

  15. Universal tool microscope remanufacture based on CCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Jian; Hu, Zhongxiang; Zhang, Xunming; Zhang, Jiaying

    2006-02-01

    To overcome the drawback of traditional universal tool microscopes, a remanufacturing scheme based on charge coupled devices (CCD) is proposed. In this paper, the remanufacturing of old tool microscopes is replaced gradually by CCD and grating ruler and the development of a novel measuring system designed to directly analyze image of the screw to be measured is discussed. For the analysis of image, such novel image processing methods as adaptive switching median (ASM) filter and edge detection based on the modified Sobel operator are designed. For the line detection algorithm, HOUGH transform also is used to measure the screw parameter. Experiments on screw images demonstrate that the scheme of remanufactured universal tool microscope is of feasibility and the proposed measurement is of validity.

  16. Mars Life? - Microscopic Tube-like Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    This electron microscope image is a close-up of the center part of photo number S96-12301. While the exact nature of these tube-like structures is not known, one interpretation is that they may be microscopic fossils of primitive, bacteria-like organisms that may have lived on Mars more than 3.6 billion years ago. A two-year investigation by a NASA research team found organic molecules, mineral features characteristic of biological activity and possible microscopic fossils such as these inside of an ancient Martian rock that fell to Earth as a meteorite. The largest possible fossils are less than 1/100th the diameter of a human hair in size while most are ten times smaller.

  17. Compact Microscope Imaging System with Intelligent Controls

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McDowell, Mark

    2004-01-01

    The figure presents selected views of a compact microscope imaging system (CMIS) that includes a miniature video microscope, a Cartesian robot (a computer- controlled three-dimensional translation stage), and machine-vision and control subsystems. The CMIS was built from commercial off-the-shelf instrumentation, computer hardware and software, and custom machine-vision software. The machine-vision and control subsystems include adaptive neural networks that afford a measure of artificial intelligence. The CMIS can perform several automated tasks with accuracy and repeatability . tasks that, heretofore, have required the full attention of human technicians using relatively bulky conventional microscopes. In addition, the automation and control capabilities of the system inherently include a capability for remote control. Unlike human technicians, the CMIS is not at risk of becoming fatigued or distracted: theoretically, it can perform continuously at the level of the best human technicians. In its capabilities for remote control and for relieving human technicians of tedious routine tasks, the CMIS is expected to be especially useful in biomedical research, materials science, inspection of parts on industrial production lines, and space science. The CMIS can automatically focus on and scan a microscope sample, find areas of interest, record the resulting images, and analyze images from multiple samples simultaneously. Automatic focusing is an iterative process: The translation stage is used to move the microscope along its optical axis in a succession of coarse, medium, and fine steps. A fast Fourier transform (FFT) of the image is computed at each step, and the FFT is analyzed for its spatial-frequency content. The microscope position that results in the greatest dispersal of FFT content toward high spatial frequencies (indicating that the image shows the greatest amount of detail) is deemed to be the focal position.

  18. Development of an ultrasound microscope combined with optical microscope for multiparametric characterization of a single cell.

    PubMed

    Arakawa, Mototaka; Shikama, Joe; Yoshida, Koki; Nagaoka, Ryo; Kobayashi, Kazuto; Saijo, Yoshifumi

    2015-09-01

    Biomechanics of the cell has been gathering much attention because it affects the pathological status in atherosclerosis and cancer. In the present study, an ultrasound microscope system combined with optical microscope for characterization of a single cell with multiple ultrasound parameters was developed. The central frequency of the transducer was 375 MHz and the scan area was 80 × 80 μm with up to 200 × 200 sampling points. An inverted optical microscope was incorporated in the design of the system, allowing for simultaneous optical observations of cultured cells. Two-dimensional mapping of multiple ultrasound parameters, such as sound speed, attenuation, and acoustic impedance, as well as the thickness, density, and bulk modulus of specimen/cell under investigation, etc., was realized by the system. Sound speed and thickness of a 3T3-L1 fibroblast cell were successfully obtained by the system. The ultrasound microscope system combined with optical microscope further enhances our understanding of cellular biomechanics.

  19. An innovative approach in microscopic endodontics

    PubMed Central

    Mittal, Sunandan; Kumar, Tarun; Sharma, Jyotika; Mittal, Shifali

    2014-01-01

    The introduction of the dental operating microscope was a turning point in the history of dentistry. It triggered a rapid transition from the conventional world of macro-dentistry to the precise, detailed world of micro-dentistry. However, working at these higher-power magnifications brings the clinician into the realm where even slight hand movements are disruptive. Physiologic hand tremor is a problem resulting in difficulty in mouth mirror placement. Hence, in this paper, a new instrument was designed to overcome the drawback of hand tremors during microscopic endodontics. PMID:24944459

  20. A novel multimodal CARS miniaturized microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Brett; Naji, Majid; Murugkar, Sangeeta; Brideau, Craig; Stys, Peter; Anis, Hanan

    2012-03-01

    We demonstrate the operation of a novel portable, fibre delivery miniaturized multimodal microscope (exoscope) for coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering and two-photon excitation fluorescence imaging using a single Ti:sapphire femtosecond pulsed laser. This microscope features a large mode area photonic crystal fibre for light delivery, as well as biaxial scanning microelectromechanical system mirrors and custom miniaturized optics corrected for chromatic aberration. We demonstrate imaging of polystyrene beads, two photon excitation fluorescence beads in both forward and backward (epi) directions. This miniaturized exoscope will enable in-vivo imaging of rat spinal cord.

  1. The near-field scanning thermal microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wischnath, Uli F.; Welker, Joachim; Munzel, Marco; Kittel, Achim

    2008-07-01

    We report on the design, characterization, and performance of a near-field scanning thermal microscope capable to detect thermal heat currents mediated by evanescent thermal electromagnetic fields close to the surface of a sample. The instrument operates in ultrahigh vacuum and retains its scanning tunneling microscope functionality, so that its miniature, micropipette-based thermocouple sensor can be positioned with high accuracy. Heat currents on the order of 10-7W are registered in z spectroscopy at distances from the sample ranging from 1 to about 30nm. In addition, the device provides detailed thermographic images of a sample's surface.

  2. [Treatment of microscopic colitis - what's new?

    PubMed

    Gonciarz, Maciej; Szkudłapski, Dawid; Eszyk, Jerzy; Smagacz, Justyna; Kopała, Marek

    2016-10-19

    Microscopic colitis (MC) is frequent, although still uncommonly diagnosed, cause of chronic diarrhea. The etiopathology of MC is unknown but this disease has strong influence on patient's quality of life (measured by health-related quality of life - HRQoL). MC is characterized by microscopic abnormalities in large bowel's mucosa whereas endoscopic and radiological examination findings are normal. The treatment of MC is an essential social and financial problem due to its frequency in society. Thanks to the results of some controlled research which judged efficiency of some medicines as well as advisory groups recommendations, the MC therapy is nowadays going from empiric to accordance with evidence based medicine.

  3. Multiphoton cryo microscope with sample temperature control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breunig, H. G.; Uchugonova, A.; König, K.

    2013-02-01

    We present a multiphoton microscope system which combines the advantages of multiphoton imaging with precise control of the sample temperature. The microscope provides online insight in temperature-induced changes and effects in plant tissue and animal cells with subcellular resolution during cooling and thawing processes. Image contrast is based on multiphoton fluorescence intensity or fluorescence lifetime in the range from liquid nitrogen temperature up to +600°C. In addition, micro spectra from the imaged regions can be recorded. We present measurement results from plant leaf samples as well as Chinese hamster ovary cells.

  4. Turbulence: Does Energy Cascade Exist?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Josserand, Christophe; Le Berre, Martine; Lehner, Thierry; Pomeau, Yves

    2017-05-01

    To answer the question whether a cascade of energy exists or not in turbulence, we propose a set of correlation functions able to test if there is an irreversible transfert of energy, step by step, from large to small structures. These tests are applied to real Eulerian data of a turbulent velocity flow, taken in the wind grid tunnel of Modane, and also to a prototype model equation for wave turbulence. First we demonstrate the irreversible character of the flow by using multi-time correlation function at a given point of space. Moreover the unexpected behavior of the test function leads us to connect irreversibility and finite time singularities (intermittency). Secondly we show that turbulent cascade exists, and is a dynamical process, by using a test function depending on time and frequency. The cascade shows up only in the inertial domain where the kinetic energy is transferred more rapidly (on average) from the wavenumber k1 to k2 than from k1 to k'2 larger than k2.

  5. A modified micro chamber agar spot slide culture technique for microscopic examination of filamentous fungi.

    PubMed

    Prakash, Peralam Yegneswaran; Bhargava, Kanika

    2016-04-01

    The slide culture technique aids in the study of undisturbed microscopic morphological details of filamentous fungi. The existing methods for setting up of slide culture are quite cumbersome, time-consuming and require elaborate preparation. We describe a modified and easy to perform micro chamber agar spot slide culture technique. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Microscopic investigation of structural evolution in even-even N = 60 isotones

    SciTech Connect

    Oudih, M. R.; Fellah, M.; Allal, N. H.; Benhamouda, N.

    2012-10-20

    The ground state properties of even-even N=60 isotones from the neutron-rich to the proton-rich side are investigated within the self-consistent Skyrme-Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov theory in the triaxial landscape. Quantities such as binding energies and root-mean-square radii are investigated and compared with available experimental data. The evolution of the potential energy surfaces in the ({beta},{gamma}) deformation plane is presented and discussed.

  7. Solution of the Skyrme-Hartree-Fock-Bogolyubov equations in the Cartesian deformed harmonic-oscillator basis.. (VI) HFODD (v2.40h): A new version of the program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobaczewski, J.; Satuła, W.; Carlsson, B. G.; Engel, J.; Olbratowski, P.; Powałowski, P.; Sadziak, M.; Sarich, J.; Schunck, N.; Staszczak, A.; Stoitsov, M.; Zalewski, M.; Zduńczuk, H.

    2009-11-01

    We describe the new version (v2.40h) of the code HFODD which solves the nuclear Skyrme-Hartree-Fock or Skyrme-Hartree-Fock-Bogolyubov problem by using the Cartesian deformed harmonic-oscillator basis. In the new version, we have implemented: (i) projection on good angular momentum (for the Hartree-Fock states), (ii) calculation of the GCM kernels, (iii) calculation of matrix elements of the Yukawa interaction, (iv) the BCS solutions for state-dependent pairing gaps, (v) the HFB solutions for broken simplex symmetry, (vi) calculation of Bohr deformation parameters, (vii) constraints on the Schiff moments and scalar multipole moments, (viii) the DT2h transformations and rotations of wave functions, (ix) quasiparticle blocking for the HFB solutions in odd and odd-odd nuclei, (x) the Broyden method to accelerate the convergence, (xi) the Lipkin-Nogami method to treat pairing correlations, (xii) the exact Coulomb exchange term, (xiii) several utility options, and we have corrected three insignificant errors. New version program summaryProgram title: HFODD (v2.40h) Catalogue identifier: ADFL_v2_2 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/ADFL_v2_2.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 79 618 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 372 548 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: FORTRAN-77 and Fortran-90 Computer: Pentium-III, AMD-Athlon, AMD-Opteron Operating system: UNIX, LINUX, Windows XP Has the code been

  8. Science 101: How Does an Electron Microscope Work?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robertson, Bill

    2013-01-01

    Contrary to popular opinion, electron microscopes are not used to look at electrons. They are used to look for structure in things that are too small to observe with an optical microscope, or to obtain images that are magnified much more than is obtainable with an optical microscope. To understand how electron microscopes work, it will help to go…

  9. Science 101: How Does an Electron Microscope Work?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robertson, Bill

    2013-01-01

    Contrary to popular opinion, electron microscopes are not used to look at electrons. They are used to look for structure in things that are too small to observe with an optical microscope, or to obtain images that are magnified much more than is obtainable with an optical microscope. To understand how electron microscopes work, it will help to go…

  10. Miniature self-contained vacuum compatible electronic imaging microscope

    DOEpatents

    Naulleau, Patrick P.; Batson, Phillip J.; Denham, Paul E.; Jones, Michael S.

    2001-01-01

    A vacuum compatible CCD-based microscopic camera with an integrated illuminator. The camera can provide video or still feed from the microscope contained within a vacuum chamber. Activation of an optional integral illuminator can provide light to illuminate the microscope subject. The microscope camera comprises a housing with a objective port, modified objective, beam-splitter, CCD camera, and LED illuminator.

  11. Axially deformed solution of the Skyrme-Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov equations using the transformed harmonic oscillator basis (II) HFBTHO v2.00d: A new version of the program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoitsov, M. V.; Schunck, N.; Kortelainen, M.; Michel, N.; Nam, H.; Olsen, E.; Sarich, J.; Wild, S.

    2013-06-01

    We describe the new version 2.00d of the code HFBTHO that solves the nuclear Skyrme-Hartree-Fock (HF) or Skyrme-Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov (HFB) problem by using the cylindrical transformed deformed harmonic oscillator basis. In the new version, we have implemented the following features: (i) the modified Broyden method for non-linear problems, (ii) optional breaking of reflection symmetry, (iii) calculation of axial multipole moments, (iv) finite temperature formalism for the HFB method, (v) linear constraint method based on the approximation of the Random Phase Approximation (RPA) matrix for multi-constraint calculations, (vi) blocking of quasi-particles in the Equal Filling Approximation (EFA), (vii) framework for generalized energy density with arbitrary density-dependences, and (viii) shared memory parallelism via OpenMP pragmas. Program summaryProgram title: HFBTHO v2.00d Catalog identifier: ADUI_v2_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/ADUI_v2_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: GNU General Public License version 3 No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 167228 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 2672156 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: FORTRAN-95. Computer: Intel Pentium-III, Intel Xeon, AMD-Athlon, AMD-Opteron, Cray XT5, Cray XE6. Operating system: UNIX, LINUX, WindowsXP. RAM: 200 Mwords Word size: 8 bits Classification: 17.22. Does the new version supercede the previous version?: Yes Catalog identifier of previous version: ADUI_v1_0 Journal reference of previous version: Comput. Phys. Comm. 167 (2005) 43 Nature of problem: The solution of self-consistent mean-field equations for weakly-bound paired nuclei requires a correct description of the asymptotic properties of nuclear quasi-particle wave functions. In the present implementation, this is achieved by using the single-particle wave functions

  12. Optical and digital microscopic imaging techniques and applications in pathology.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiaodong; Zheng, Bin; Liu, Hong

    2011-01-01

    The conventional optical microscope has been the primary tool in assisting pathological examinations. The modern digital pathology combines the power of microscopy, electronic detection, and computerized analysis. It enables cellular-, molecular-, and genetic-imaging at high efficiency and accuracy to facilitate clinical screening and diagnosis. This paper first reviews the fundamental concepts of microscopic imaging and introduces the technical features and associated clinical applications of optical microscopes, electron microscopes, scanning tunnel microscopes, and fluorescence microscopes. The interface of microscopy with digital image acquisition methods is discussed. The recent developments and future perspectives of contemporary microscopic imaging techniques such as three-dimensional and in vivo imaging are analyzed for their clinical potentials.

  13. Straightening: existence, uniqueness and stability

    PubMed Central

    Destrade, M.; Ogden, R. W.; Sgura, I.; Vergori, L.

    2014-01-01

    One of the least studied universal deformations of incompressible nonlinear elasticity, namely the straightening of a sector of a circular cylinder into a rectangular block, is revisited here and, in particular, issues of existence and stability are addressed. Particular attention is paid to the system of forces required to sustain the large static deformation, including by the application of end couples. The influence of geometric parameters and constitutive models on the appearance of wrinkles on the compressed face of the block is also studied. Different numerical methods for solving the incremental stability problem are compared and it is found that the impedance matrix method, based on the resolution of a matrix Riccati differential equation, is the more precise. PMID:24711723

  14. Why do interstellar grains exist?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seab, C. G.; Hollenbach, D. J.; Mckee, C. F.; Tielens, Alexander G. G. M.

    1986-01-01

    There exists a discrepancy between calculated destruction rates of grains in the interstellar medium and postulated sources of new grains. This problem was examined by modelling the global life cycle of grains in the galaxy. The model includes: grain destruction due to supernovae shock waves; grain injection from cool stars, planetary nebulae, star formation, novae, and supernovae; grain growth by accretion in dark clouds; and a mixing scheme between phases of the interstellar medium. Grain growth in molecular clouds is considered as a mechanism or increasing the formation rate. To decrease the shock destruction rate, several new physical processes, such as partial vaporization effects in grain-grain collisions, breakdown of the small Larmor radius approximation for betatron acceleration, and relaxation of the steady-state shock assumption are included.

  15. Equality and selection for existence.

    PubMed Central

    Persson, I

    1999-01-01

    It is argued that the policy of excluding from further life some human gametes and pre-embryos as "unfit" for existence is not at odds with a defensible idea of human equality. Such an idea must be compatible with the obvious fact that the "functional" value of humans differs, that their "use" to themselves and others differs. A defensible idea of human equality is instead grounded in the fact that as this functional difference is genetically determined, it is nothing which makes humans deserve or be worthy of being better or worse off. Rather, nobody is worth a better life than anyone else. This idea of equality is, however, not applicable to gametes and pre-embryos, since they are not human beings, but something out of which human beings develop. PMID:10226918

  16. Does a quarterlife crisis exist?

    PubMed

    Rossi, Nicole E; Mebert, Carolyn J

    2011-01-01

    In this study, the authors examined quarterlife crisis, defined in the popular press as an identity crisis that leaves recent college graduates depressed, anxious, and full of doubt. To determine if a unique crisis exists, 4 groups of young adults (recent high school [n = 23] and college [n = 117] graduates in the workforce, present undergraduate [n = 75], and graduate [n = 57] students) completed self-report measures assessing identity development, future time perspective, social support, coping, depression, anxiety, and job and life satisfaction. No support was found for a quarterlife crisis among these 4 groups. Working high school graduates displayed the highest anxiety, followed by present undergraduates. Depression was predicted by family support and identity commitment. Job satisfaction was associated with income and support from friends. Life satisfaction was associated with income, social support from friends and family, and identity commitment.

  17. Straightening: existence, uniqueness and stability.

    PubMed

    Destrade, M; Ogden, R W; Sgura, I; Vergori, L

    2014-04-08

    One of the least studied universal deformations of incompressible nonlinear elasticity, namely the straightening of a sector of a circular cylinder into a rectangular block, is revisited here and, in particular, issues of existence and stability are addressed. Particular attention is paid to the system of forces required to sustain the large static deformation, including by the application of end couples. The influence of geometric parameters and constitutive models on the appearance of wrinkles on the compressed face of the block is also studied. Different numerical methods for solving the incremental stability problem are compared and it is found that the impedance matrix method, based on the resolution of a matrix Riccati differential equation, is the more precise.

  18. Formative Assessment Probes: Representing Microscopic Life

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keeley, Page

    2011-01-01

    This column focuses on promoting learning through assessment. The author discusses the formative assessment probe "Pond Water," which reveals how elementary children will often apply what they know about animal structures to newly discovered microscopic organisms, connecting their knowledge of the familiar to the unfamiliar through…

  19. Miniaturized 3D microscope imaging system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lan, Yung-Sung; Chang, Chir-Weei; Sung, Hsin-Yueh; Wang, Yen-Chang; Chang, Cheng-Yi

    2015-05-01

    We designed and assembled a portable 3-D miniature microscopic image system with the size of 35x35x105 mm3 . By integrating a microlens array (MLA) into the optical train of a handheld microscope, the biological specimen's image will be captured for ease of use in a single shot. With the light field raw data and program, the focal plane can be changed digitally and the 3-D image can be reconstructed after the image was taken. To localize an object in a 3-D volume, an automated data analysis algorithm to precisely distinguish profundity position is needed. The ability to create focal stacks from a single image allows moving or specimens to be recorded. Applying light field microscope algorithm to these focal stacks, a set of cross sections will be produced, which can be visualized using 3-D rendering. Furthermore, we have developed a series of design rules in order to enhance the pixel using efficiency and reduce the crosstalk between each microlens for obtain good image quality. In this paper, we demonstrate a handheld light field microscope (HLFM) to distinguish two different color fluorescence particles separated by a cover glass in a 600um range, show its focal stacks, and 3-D position.

  20. Mars Life? - Microscopic Tube-like Structures

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1996-08-09

    This high-resolution scanning electron microscope image shows an unusual tube-like structural form that is less than 1/100th the width of a human hair in size found in meteorite ALH84001, a meteorite believed to be of Martian origin. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA00288

  1. SLAC All Access: X-ray Microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, Johanna; Liu, Yijin

    2012-08-14

    SLAC physicists Johanna Nelson and Yijin Liu give a brief overview of the X-ray microscope at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource (SSRL) that is helping improve rechargeable-battery technology by letting researchers peek into the inner workings of batteries as they operate.

  2. SLAC All Access: X-ray Microscope

    ScienceCinema

    Nelson, Johanna; Liu, Yijin

    2016-07-12

    SLAC physicists Johanna Nelson and Yijin Liu give a brief overview of the X-ray microscope at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource (SSRL) that is helping improve rechargeable-battery technology by letting researchers peek into the inner workings of batteries as they operate.

  3. Fission Dynamics with Microscopic Level Densities

    SciTech Connect

    Ward, D.; Carlsson, B. G.; Dossing, Th.; Moller, P.; Randrup, J.; Aberg, S.

    2017-01-01

    We present a consistent framework for treating the energy and angularmomentum dependence of the shape evolution in the nuclear fission. It combines microscopically calculated level densities with the Metropolis-walk method, has no new parameters, and can elucidate the energy-dependent influence of pairing and shell effects on the dynamics of warm nuclei.

  4. Vertically aligned nanostructure scanning probe microscope tips

    DOEpatents

    Guillorn, Michael A.; Ilic, Bojan; Melechko, Anatoli V.; Merkulov, Vladimir I.; Lowndes, Douglas H.; Simpson, Michael L.

    2006-12-19

    Methods and apparatus are described for cantilever structures that include a vertically aligned nanostructure, especially vertically aligned carbon nanofiber scanning probe microscope tips. An apparatus includes a cantilever structure including a substrate including a cantilever body, that optionally includes a doped layer, and a vertically aligned nanostructure coupled to the cantilever body.

  5. Microscopic Description of Le Chatelier's Principle

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Novak, Igor

    2005-01-01

    A simple approach that "demystifies" Le Chatelier's principle (LCP) and simulates students to think about fundamental physical background behind the well-known principles is presented. The approach uses microscopic descriptors of matter like energy levels and populations and does not require any assumption about the fixed amount of substance being…

  6. Vibrational spectroscopy in the electron microscope.

    PubMed

    Krivanek, Ondrej L; Lovejoy, Tracy C; Dellby, Niklas; Aoki, Toshihiro; Carpenter, R W; Rez, Peter; Soignard, Emmanuel; Zhu, Jiangtao; Batson, Philip E; Lagos, Maureen J; Egerton, Ray F; Crozier, Peter A

    2014-10-09

    Vibrational spectroscopies using infrared radiation, Raman scattering, neutrons, low-energy electrons and inelastic electron tunnelling are powerful techniques that can analyse bonding arrangements, identify chemical compounds and probe many other important properties of materials. The spatial resolution of these spectroscopies is typically one micrometre or more, although it can reach a few tens of nanometres or even a few ångströms when enhanced by the presence of a sharp metallic tip. If vibrational spectroscopy could be combined with the spatial resolution and flexibility of the transmission electron microscope, it would open up the study of vibrational modes in many different types of nanostructures. Unfortunately, the energy resolution of electron energy loss spectroscopy performed in the electron microscope has until now been too poor to allow such a combination. Recent developments that have improved the attainable energy resolution of electron energy loss spectroscopy in a scanning transmission electron microscope to around ten millielectronvolts now allow vibrational spectroscopy to be carried out in the electron microscope. Here we describe the innovations responsible for the progress, and present examples of applications in inorganic and organic materials, including the detection of hydrogen. We also demonstrate that the vibrational signal has both high- and low-spatial-resolution components, that the first component can be used to map vibrational features at nanometre-level resolution, and that the second component can be used for analysis carried out with the beam positioned just outside the sample--that is, for 'aloof' spectroscopy that largely avoids radiation damage.

  7. The Nucleus and the Simple Microscope.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ford, Brian J.

    1982-01-01

    The 150th anniversary of the naming of the nucleus by Robert Brown in 1831 was commemorated by re-creating some of his most important observations using two of his microscopes. Comments on Brown's career and the microtechnique employed during his time are provided. (Author/JN)

  8. The Microscope and Nineteenth Century Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Milacek, Barbara Roads

    Studied were (1) the evolving use of the microscope in science education, and (2) its relationship to the changing teaching methods, content, and emphases of science courses and to the prevailing philosophies of education of nineteenth century American colleges. To establish the necessary background, the evolution and availability of the…

  9. Reasoning about Magnetism at the Microscopic Level

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cheng, Meng-Fei; Cheng, Yufang; Hung, Shuo-Hsien

    2014-01-01

    Based on our experience of teaching physics in middle and senior secondary school, we have found that students have difficulty in reasoning at the microscopic level. Their reasoning is limited to the observational level so they have problems in developing scientific models of magnetism. Here, we suggest several practical activities and the use of…

  10. Multi-compartment microscopic diffusion imaging.

    PubMed

    Kaden, Enrico; Kelm, Nathaniel D; Carson, Robert P; Does, Mark D; Alexander, Daniel C

    2016-10-01

    This paper introduces a multi-compartment model for microscopic diffusion anisotropy imaging. The aim is to estimate microscopic features specific to the intra- and extra-neurite compartments in nervous tissue unconfounded by the effects of fibre crossings and orientation dispersion, which are ubiquitous in the brain. The proposed MRI method is based on the Spherical Mean Technique (SMT), which factors out the neurite orientation distribution and thus provides direct estimates of the microscopic tissue structure. This technique can be immediately used in the clinic for the assessment of various neurological conditions, as it requires only a widely available off-the-shelf sequence with two b-shells and high-angular gradient resolution achievable within clinically feasible scan times. To demonstrate the developed method, we use high-quality diffusion data acquired with a bespoke scanner system from the Human Connectome Project. This study establishes the normative values of the new biomarkers for a large cohort of healthy young adults, which may then support clinical diagnostics in patients. Moreover, we show that the microscopic diffusion indices offer direct sensitivity to pathological tissue alterations, exemplified in a preclinical animal model of Tuberous Sclerosis Complex (TSC), a genetic multi-organ disorder which impacts brain microstructure and hence may lead to neurological manifestations such as autism, epilepsy and developmental delay. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Multi-compartment microscopic diffusion imaging

    PubMed Central

    Kaden, Enrico; Kelm, Nathaniel D.; Carson, Robert P.; Does, Mark D.; Alexander, Daniel C.

    2017-01-01

    This paper introduces a multi-compartment model for microscopic diffusion anisotropy imaging. The aim is to estimate microscopic features specific to the intra- and extra-neurite compartments in nervous tissue unconfounded by the effects of fibre crossings and orientation dispersion, which are ubiquitous in the brain. The proposed MRI method is based on the Spherical Mean Technique (SMT), which factors out the neurite orientation distribution and thus provides direct estimates of the microscopic tissue structure. This technique can be immediately used in the clinic for the assessment of various neurological conditions, as it requires only a widely available off-the-shelf sequence with two b-shells and high-angular gradient resolution achievable within clinically feasible scan times. To demonstrate the developed method, we use high-quality diffusion data acquired with a bespoke scanner system from the Human Connectome Project. This study establishes the normative values of the new biomarkers for a large cohort of healthy young adults, which may then support clinical diagnostics in patients. Moreover, we show that the microscopic diffusion indices offer direct sensitivity to pathological tissue alterations, exemplified in a preclinical animal model of Tuberous Sclerosis Complex (TSC), a genetic multi-organ disorder which impacts brain microstructure and hence may lead to neurological manifestations such as autism, epilepsy and developmental delay. PMID:27282476

  12. Making a Microscope with Readily Available Materials

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vannoni, Maurizio; Buah-Bassuah, Paul K.; Molesini, Giuseppe

    2007-01-01

    The making of microscope devices using inexpensive or recovered materials is demonstrated. Examples of images illustrating the performance of such devices are presented. As a project at the undergraduate level, the task is effective in acquiring familiarity with optical imaging concepts and their practical implementation in the laboratory.…

  13. Reasoning about Magnetism at the Microscopic Level

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cheng, Meng-Fei; Cheng, Yufang; Hung, Shuo-Hsien

    2014-01-01

    Based on our experience of teaching physics in middle and senior secondary school, we have found that students have difficulty in reasoning at the microscopic level. Their reasoning is limited to the observational level so they have problems in developing scientific models of magnetism. Here, we suggest several practical activities and the use of…

  14. Vibrational spectroscopy in the electron microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krivanek, Ondrej L.; Lovejoy, Tracy C.; Dellby, Niklas; Aoki, Toshihiro; Carpenter, R. W.; Rez, Peter; Soignard, Emmanuel; Zhu, Jiangtao; Batson, Philip E.; Lagos, Maureen J.; Egerton, Ray F.; Crozier, Peter A.

    2014-10-01

    Vibrational spectroscopies using infrared radiation, Raman scattering, neutrons, low-energy electrons and inelastic electron tunnelling are powerful techniques that can analyse bonding arrangements, identify chemical compounds and probe many other important properties of materials. The spatial resolution of these spectroscopies is typically one micrometre or more, although it can reach a few tens of nanometres or even a few ångströms when enhanced by the presence of a sharp metallic tip. If vibrational spectroscopy could be combined with the spatial resolution and flexibility of the transmission electron microscope, it would open up the study of vibrational modes in many different types of nanostructures. Unfortunately, the energy resolution of electron energy loss spectroscopy performed in the electron microscope has until now been too poor to allow such a combination. Recent developments that have improved the attainable energy resolution of electron energy loss spectroscopy in a scanning transmission electron microscope to around ten millielectronvolts now allow vibrational spectroscopy to be carried out in the electron microscope. Here we describe the innovations responsible for the progress, and present examples of applications in inorganic and organic materials, including the detection of hydrogen. We also demonstrate that the vibrational signal has both high- and low-spatial-resolution components, that the first component can be used to map vibrational features at nanometre-level resolution, and that the second component can be used for analysis carried out with the beam positioned just outside the sample--that is, for `aloof' spectroscopy that largely avoids radiation damage.

  15. Schematic Animation of Phoenix's Microscope Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Click on image for animation

    This animation shows the workings of the microscope station of the Microscopy, Electrochemistry and Conductivity Analyzer (MECA) instrument suite of NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander.

    Samples are delivered to the horizontal portion of the sample wheel (yellow) that pokes outside an opening in the box enclosure. The wheel rotates to present the sample to the microscopes. The Optical Microscope (red) can see particles a little smaller than one-tenth the diameter of a human hair. The Atomic Force Microscope (pink) can see particles forty time smaller. The samples are on a variety of substrate surfaces, the small circles on the beveled edge of the sample wheel. For scale, the diameter of the wheel is about 14 centimeters (5.5 inches). Each substrate is a circle 3 millimeters (0.1 inch) in diameter.

    The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  16. Making a Microscope with Readily Available Materials

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vannoni, Maurizio; Buah-Bassuah, Paul K.; Molesini, Giuseppe

    2007-01-01

    The making of microscope devices using inexpensive or recovered materials is demonstrated. Examples of images illustrating the performance of such devices are presented. As a project at the undergraduate level, the task is effective in acquiring familiarity with optical imaging concepts and their practical implementation in the laboratory.…

  17. Nano Robotic Manipulation inside Electron Microscopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukuda, Toshio; Nakajima, Masahiro; Liu, Pou

    We report nanomanipulation and nanoassembly through nanorobotic manipulation inside electron microscopes. A hybrid nanorobotic manipulation system, which is integrated with a nanorobotic manipulator inside a transmission electron microscope (TEM) and nanorobotic manipulators inside a scanning electron microscope (SEM), is used. The elasticity of a multi-walled CNT (MWNT) is measured inside a TEM. The telescoping MWNT is fabricated by peeling off outer layers through destructive fabrication process. The electrostatic actuation of telescoping MWNT is directly observed by a TEM. A cutting technique for CNTs assisted by the presence of oxygen gas is also presented. The cutting procedure was conducted in less than 1 minute using a low-energy electron beam inside a scanning electron microscope. A bending technique of a CNT assisted by the presence of oxygen gas is also applied for the 3-D fabrication of nanosturucture. We expect that these techniques will be applied for the rapid prototyping nanoassembly of various CNT nanodevices. For the nano-biological applications, environmental-SEM (E-SEM) nanomanipulation system is also presented with the direct observation of the hydroscopic samples with non-drying treatment.

  18. Formative Assessment Probes: Representing Microscopic Life

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keeley, Page

    2011-01-01

    This column focuses on promoting learning through assessment. The author discusses the formative assessment probe "Pond Water," which reveals how elementary children will often apply what they know about animal structures to newly discovered microscopic organisms, connecting their knowledge of the familiar to the unfamiliar through…

  19. Spin microscope based on optically detected magnetic resonance

    DOEpatents

    Berman, Gennady P [Los Alamos, NM; Chernobrod, Boris M [Los Alamos, NM

    2010-07-13

    The invention relates to scanning magnetic microscope which has a photoluminescent nanoprobe implanted in the tip apex of an atomic force microscope (AFM), a scanning tunneling microscope (STM) or a near-field scanning optical microscope (NSOM) and exhibits optically detected magnetic resonance (ODMR) in the vicinity of unpaired electron spins or nuclear magnetic moments in the sample material. The described spin microscope has demonstrated nanoscale lateral resolution and single spin sensitivity for the AFM and STM embodiments.

  20. Spin microscope based on optically detected magnetic resonance

    DOEpatents

    Berman, Gennady P.; Chernobrod, Boris M.

    2007-12-11

    The invention relates to scanning magnetic microscope which has a photoluminescent nanoprobe implanted in the tip apex of an atomic force microscope (AFM), a scanning tunneling microscope (STM) or a near-field scanning optical microscope (NSOM) and exhibits optically detected magnetic resonance (ODMR) in the vicinity of unpaired electron spins or nuclear magnetic moments in the sample material. The described spin microscope has demonstrated nanoscale lateral resolution and single spin sensitivity for the AFM and STM embodiments.