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Sample records for exogenous fibrolytic enzymes

  1. Considerations on the Use of Exogenous Fibrolytic Enzymes to Improve Forage Utilization

    PubMed Central

    Mendoza, Germán D.; Plata-Pérez, Fernando X.

    2014-01-01

    Digestion of cell wall fractions of forage in the rumen is incomplete due to the complex links which limit their degradation. It is therefore necessary to find options to optimize the use of forages in ruminant production systems. One alternative is to use exogenous enzymes. Exogenous fibrolytic enzymes are of fungal or bacterial origin and increase nutrient availability from the cell wall, which consists of three fractions in different proportions depending on the species of forage: digestible, potentially digestible, and indigestible. The response to addition of exogenous enzymes varies with the type of forage; many researchers infer that there are enzyme-forage interactions but fail to explain the biological mechanism. We hypothesize that the response is related to the proportion of the potentially digestible fraction. The exogenous enzyme activity depends on several factors but if the general conditions for enzyme action are available, the potentially digestible fraction may determine the magnitude of the response. Results of experiments with exogenous fibrolytic enzymes in domestic ruminants are inconsistent. This, coupled with their high cost, has made their use unattractive to farmers. Development of cheaper products exploring other microorganisms with fibrolytic activity, such as Fomes fomentarius or Cellulomonas flavigena, is required. PMID:25379525

  2. Effect of exogenous fibrolytic enzymes on ruminal fermentation and nutrient digestion in dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Peters, Anja; Lebzien, Peter; Meyer, Ulrich; Borchert, Ulrike; Bulang, Michael; Flachowsky, Gerhard

    2010-06-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine the effects of an exogenous fibrolytic enzyme product applied to a total mixed ration (TMR) prior to feeding on ruminal fermentation, microbial protein synthesis, nutrient digestion, and milk yield and composition. Six multiparous lactating Holstein cows (598 +/- 29 kg initial live weight and 98 +/- 30 days in milk) fitted with rumen and duodenal cannulae were allocated to two treatments in a crossover design over three consecutive 28-d periods. The TMR containing 50% concentrates, 30% corn silage and 20% grass silage on dry matter (DM) basis, was mixed once daily and fed twice a day. Treatments were TMR alone (Control) or TMR with an enzyme product containing primarily cellulase and xylanase activities (9000 U endo-1,4-beta glucanase, 24000 U endo-1,3(4)-beta glucanase and 40000 U 1,4-beta xylanase per ml). The enzyme product was applied at a rate of 6.2 ml/kg TMR (DM basis). It was diluted at a rate of 1:5 with water and applied daily to the TMR. During the control period the cows received a TMR supplemented with 36 ml water/kg TMR on DM basis. Duodenal digesta flow was measured using Cr2O3 as flow marker and microbial protein in the duodenal digesta was estimated by near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS). There were no significant differences in ruminal pH-values, NH3-N concentrations, total SCFA concentrations and molar proportions of SCFA. No treatment effects on microbial N flow to the duodenum and efficiency of microbial protein synthesis were observed. The apparent ruminal digestibilities of DM, organic matter, NDF and ADF, milk yield and composition were also not affected by the enzyme supplementation. In this study the application of exogenous fibrolytic enzymes fed to dairy cows did not show a significant effect on any parameter tested.

  3. In vitro gas production of foliage from three browse tree species treated with different dose levels of exogenous fibrolytic enzymes.

    PubMed

    López, D; Vázquez-Armijo, J F; López-Villalobos, N; Lee-Rangel, H A; Salem, A Z M; Borquez-Gastelum, J L; Domínguez-Vara, I A; Rojo-Rubio, R

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of different dose levels of exogenous fibrolytic enzymes (EFE) on in vitro ruminal fermentation kinetics and energy utilization of foliages from three browse trees (Pithecellobium dulce, Heliocarpus velutinus and Guazuma ulmifolia). Mixture of EFE product was added to the leaves of the three browse tree species at three dose levels: 0 (control), 3.5 and 7.0 mg/g of DM. Chemical composition of the foliages, including plant secondary metabolites such as total phenolics (TP), saponins (SAP) and aqueous fraction (AF), was determined. In addition, in vitro assaying of ruminal gas production kinetics was determined for the three browse three foliages treated with EFE. P. dulce had the highest crude protein content (p < 0.05), whereas G. ulmifolia had the highest content of neutral detergent fibre and SAP (p < 0.05) and H. velutinus had the lowest content of TP (p < 0.05). The interaction between tree species and dose level of EFE was significant (p < 0.05) for gas production (GP) at 24 h of incubation, parameters b and c of the accumulated GP curve, short-chain fatty acids (SCFA) and metabolizable energy (ME). The lowest (p < 0.01) extent of accumulated GP as well as the b and c values occurred in G. ulmifolia at 0 mg EFE/g DM. P. dulce had the highest (p < 0.05) values for ME and SCFA at the highest dose of EFE. Tree species and dose level had significant (p < 0.05) effects on all parameters describing in vitro ruminal fermentation kinetics and energy utilization. Addition of EFE improved the fermentation kinetics of the browse species considered in this study.

  4. Effect of Exogenous Fibrolytic Enzyme Application on the Microbial Attachment and Digestion of Barley Straw In vitro

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Y.; Ramirez-Bribiesca, J. E.; Yanke, L. J.; Tsang, A.; McAllister, T. A.

    2012-01-01

    The effects of exogenous fibrolytic enzymes (EFE; a mixture of two preparations from Trichoderma spp., with predominant xylanase and β-glucanase activities, respectively) on colonization and digestion of ground barley straw and alfalfa hay by Fibrobacter succinogenes S85 and Ruminococcus flavefaciens FD1 were studied in vitro. The two levels (28 and 280 μg/ml) of EFE tested and both bacteria were effective at digesting NDF of hay and straw. With both substrates, more NDF hydrolysis (p<0.01) was achieved with EFE alone at 280 than at 28 μg/ml. A synergistic effect (p<0.01) of F. succinogenes S85 and EFE on straw digestion was observed at 28 but not 280 μg/ml of EFE. Strain R. flavefaciens FD1 digested more (p<0.01) hay and straw with higher EFE than with lower or no EFE, but the effect was additive rather than synergistic. Included in the incubation medium, EFE showed potential to improve fibre digestion by cellulolytic ruminal bacteria. In a second batch culture experiment using mixed rumen microbes, DM disappearance (DMD), gas production and incorporation of 15N into particle-associated microbial N (15N-PAMN) were higher (p<0.001) with ammoniated (5% w/w; AS) than with native (S) ground barley straw. Application of EFE to the straws increased (p<0.001) DMD and gas production at 4 and 12 h, but not at 48 h of the incubation. EFE applied onto S increased (p<0.01) 15N-PAMN at 4 h only, but EFE on AS increased (p<0.001) 15N-PAMN at all time points. Prehydrolysis increased (p<0.01) DMD from both S and AS at 4 and 12 h, but reduced (p<0.01) 15N-PAMN in the early stage (4 h) of the incubation, as compared to non-prehydrolyzed samples. Application of EFE to barley straw increased rumen bacterial colonization of the substrate, but excessive hydrolytic action of EFE prior to incubation decreased it. PMID:25049480

  5. Effect of adding cofactors to exogenous fibrolytic enzymes on preingestive hydrolysis, in vitro digestibility, and fermentation of bermudagrass haylage.

    PubMed

    Romero, J J; Ma, Z X; Gonzalez, C F; Adesogan, A T

    2015-07-01

    Our objectives were to examine if adding metal ion cofactors (COF) to exogenous fibrolytic enzymes (EFE) would increase the beneficial effects of the EFE on the preingestive hydrolysis and in vitro digestibility and fermentation of bermudagrass haylage. In experiment 1, 5 COF (Mn(2+), Co(2+), Fe(2+), Ca(2+), and Mg(2+)) were screened to select the best candidates for synergistically enhancing release of water-soluble carbohydrates (WSC) from bermudagrass haylage by 5 EFE. The 5 EFE (1A, 2A, 11C, 13D, and 15D) were sourced from Trichoderma reesei and Aspergillus oryzae and they were the most effective of 12 EFE at increasing the neutral detergent fiber digestibility of bermudagrass haylage in a previous trial. Adding 1mM of each of the COF to EFE 2A or 11C synergistically increased release of WSC from bermudagrass haylage, as did adding (1mM) Fe(2+) to 1A, Mn(2+), Co(2+), or Fe(2+) to 13D, or Co(2+)or Fe(2+) to 15D. The greatest release of WSC responses were obtained by adding Mn(2+) to 11C (38%) or by adding Fe(2+) to 2A or 13D (10 and 21.9%, respectively). In experiment 2, the effect of increasing the COF dose on in vitro digestibility and fermentation of bermudagrass haylage was examined using the best EFE-COF combinations from experiment 1. Effects of adding increasing doses of these COF on EFE-mediated changes in vitro digestibility depended on the COF-EFE combination. Adding 10mM Mn(2+) alone to bermudagrass haylage increased DMD and NDFD by 2.7 and 6.3% and adding 11C alone increased these measures by 6.6 and 15.5%, respectively. However, adding 10mM Mn(2+) with 11C resulted in 3.5 and 8.1% increases in DMD and NDFD, respectively, beyond the increases caused by adding 11C alone. Adding Fe(2+) to 2A had no effects on EFE-mediated digestibility responses, but 2A prevented adverse effects of adding Fe(2+) alone on DMD and NDFD. In contrast, adding Fe(2+) to 13D reduced the increases in DMD and NDFD caused by adding the EFE alone. This study shows that adding COF

  6. A meta-analysis on the effect of dietary application of exogenous fibrolytic enzymes on the performance of dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Arriola, Kathy G; Oliveira, Andre S; Ma, Zhengxin X; Lean, Ian J; Giurcanu, Mihai C; Adesogan, Adegbola T

    2017-03-29

    The aim of this study was to use meta-analytical methods to estimate effects of adding exogenous fibrolytic enzymes (EFE) to dairy cow diets on their performance and to determine which factors affect the response. Fifteen studies with 17 experiments and 36 observations met the study selection criteria for inclusion in the meta-analysis. The effects were compared by using random-effect models to examine the raw mean difference (RMD) and standardized mean difference between EFE and control treatments after both were weighted with the inverse of the study variances. Heterogeneity sources evaluated by meta-regression included experimental duration, EFE type and application rate, form (liquid or solid), and method (application to the forage, concentrate, or total mixed ration). Only the cellulase-xylanase (C-X) enzymes had a substantial number of observations (n = 13 studies). Application of EFE, overall, did not affect dry matter intake, feed efficiency but tended to increase total-tract dry matter digestibility and neutral detergent fiber digestibility (NDFD) by relatively small amounts (1.36 and 2.30%, respectively, or <0.31 standard deviation units). Application of EFE increased yields of milk (0.83 kg/d), 3.5% fat-corrected milk (0.55 kg/d), milk protein (0.03 kg/d), and milk lactose (0.05 kg/d) by moderate to small amounts (<0.30 standard deviation units). Low heterogeneity (I (2) statistic <25%) was present for yields and concentrations of milk fat and protein and lactose yield. Moderate heterogeneity (I (2) = 25 to 50%) was detected for dry matter intake, milk yield, 3.5% fat-corrected milk, and feed efficiency (kg of milk/kg of dry matter intake), whereas high heterogeneity (I (2) > 50%) was detected for total-tract dry matter digestibility and NDFD. Milk production responses were higher for the C-X enzymes (RMD = 1.04 kg/d; 95% confidence interval: 0.33 to 1.74), but were still only moderate, about 0.35 standardized mean difference. A 24% numerical

  7. Effect of the dose of exogenous fibrolytic enzyme preparations on preingestive fiber hydrolysis, ruminal fermentation, and in vitro digestibility of bermudagrass haylage.

    PubMed

    Romero, J J; Zarate, M A; Adesogan, A T

    2015-01-01

    Our objectives were to evaluate the effects of the dose rates of 5 Trichoderma reesei and Aspergillus oryzae exogenous fibrolytic enzymes (EFE; 1A, 2A, 11C, 13D, and 15D) on in vitro digestibility, fermentation characteristics, and preingestive hydrolysis of bermudagrass haylage and to identify the optimal dose of each EFE for subsequent in vitro and in vivo studies. In experiment 1, EFE were diluted in citrate-phosphate buffer (pH 6) and applied in quadruplicate in each of 2 runs at 0× (control), 0.5×, 1×, 2×, and 3×; where 1× was the respective manufacturer-recommended dose (2.25, 2.25, 10, 15, and 15g of EFE/kg of dry matter). The suspension was incubated for 24h at 25°C and for a further 24h at 39°C after the addition of ruminal fluid. In experiment 2, a similar approach to that in experiment 1 was used to evaluate simulated preingestive effects, except that sodium azide (0.02% wt/vol) was added to the EFE solution. The suspension was incubated for 24h at 25°C and then 15mL of water was added before filtration to extract water-soluble compounds. For both experiments, data for each enzyme were analyzed separately as a completely randomized block design with a model that included effects of EFE dose, run, and their interaction. In experiment 1, increasing the EFE dose rate nonlinearly increased the DM digestibility of 1A, 2A, 11C, and 13D and the neutral detergent fiber digestibility (NDFD) of 1A, 2A, 11C, and 13D. Optimal doses of 1A, 2A, 11C, 13D, and 15D, as indicated by the greatest increases in NDFD at the lowest dose tested, were 2×, 2×, 1×, 0.5×, and 0.5×, respectively. Increasing the dose rate of 2A, 11C, and 13D nonlinearly increased concentrations of total volatile fatty acids and propionate (mM), decreased their acetate-to-propionate ratios and linearly decreased those of samples treated with 1A and 15D. In experiment 2, increasing the dose rate of each EFE nonlinearly decreased concentrations of netural detergent fiber; also, increasing

  8. Influence of supplementary fibrolytic enzymes on the fermentation of corn and grass silages by mixed ruminal microorganisms in vitro.

    PubMed

    Wallace, R J; Wallace, S J; McKain, N; Nsereko, V L; Hartnell, G F

    2001-07-01

    activity, probably a type of endo-(beta-1,4)-glucanase activity, limits the rate of fermentation of corn and grass silage in the rumen. Enzyme supplements of the type used in these experiments are unlikely to possess sufficient activity to overcome this limitation by direct application to ruminal digesta, implying that treatment of the ration prefeeding will be key to harnessing the potential of exogenous fibrolytic enzymes in ruminant nutrition.

  9. Effects of yeast culture and fibrolytic enzyme supplementation on in vitro fermentation characteristics of low-quality cereal straws.

    PubMed

    Tang, S X; Tayo, G O; Tan, Z L; Sun, Z H; Shen, L X; Zhou, C S; Xiao, W J; Ren, G P; Han, X F; Shen, S B

    2008-05-01

    The effects of yeast culture and fibrolytic enzyme preparation (containing cellulase and xylanase) on in vitro fermentation characteristics of rice straw, wheat straw, maize stover, and maize stover silage were examined using an in vitro gas production technique. Four levels of yeast culture and fibrolytic enzyme supplements (0, 2.5, 5.0, and 7.5 g/kg of straw DM, respectively) were tested in a 4 x 4 factorial arrangement. Supplementation of yeast culture increased the cumulative gas production, theoretical maximum of gas production, rate of gas production, IVDMD, and in vitro OM disappearance (IVOMD), and decreased the lag time for each type of straw. Fibrolytic enzyme supplementation tended to increase cumulative gas production, theoretical maximum of gas production, and rate of gas production; prolonged lag time of gas production; and enhanced IVDMD and IVOMD for 4 types of cereal straws, with the significance of this effect being dependent on the level of supplemented enzymes. There were significant interactions between fibrolytic enzymes and yeast on all in vitro gas production parameters, IVDMD, and IVOMD of each type of straw. The outcome of this research indicated that the application of fibrolytic enzyme preparation and yeast culture could improve in vitro gas production fermentation of cereal straws.

  10. Fibrolytic enzyme and ammonia application effects on the nutritive value, intake, and digestion kinetics of bermudagrass hay in beef cattle.

    PubMed

    Romero, J J; Zarate, M A; Queiroz, O C M; Han, J H; Shin, J H; Staples, C R; Brown, W F; Adesogan, A T

    2013-09-01

    The objectives were to compare the effect of exogenous fibrolytic enzyme (Biocellulase A20) or anhydrous ammonia (4% DM) treatment on the nutritive value, voluntary intake, and digestion kinetics of bermudagrass (Cynodon dactylon cultivar Coastal) hay harvested after 2 maturities (5- and 13-wk regrowths). Six individually housed, ruminally cannulated Brangus steers (BW 325 ± 10 kg) were used in an experiment with a 6 × 6 Latin square design with a 3 (additives) × 2 (maturities) factorial arrangement of treatments. Each period consisted of 14 d of adaptation and 7, 4, 1, 1, and 4 d for measuring in vivo digestibility, in situ degradability, no measurements, rumen liquid fermentation and passage indices, and rate of solid passage, respectively. Steers were fed hay for ad libitum intake and supplemented with sugarcane molasses and distillers grain (supplement total of 2.88 kg DM/d). Enzyme did not affect the nutritional composition of hay but ammonia treatment decreased hay NDF, hemicellulose, and ADL concentrations and increased the CP concentration particularly for the mature lignified 13-wk hay. The enzyme increased NDF and hemicellulose digestibility of the 5-wk hay but decreased those of the 13-wk hay. Ammoniation decreased intake of hay but increased digestibility of DM, OM, NDF, hemicellulose, ADF, and cellulose and increased the ruminal in situ soluble and potentially digestible fractions and the rate of DM degradation of the 13-wk hay. Also, ammoniation increased the concentrations of ruminal NH3, total VFA, acetate, and butyrate but enzyme treatment did not. Neither enzyme addition nor ammoniation affected rate of liquid and solid passage. In conclusion, ammoniation decreased the concentration of most fiber fractions, decreased the intake of hays, and increased their CP concentration, in vivo digestibility, and in situ degradability at both maturities whereas enzyme application increased fiber digestibility of the 5-wk hay but decreased it in the case of

  11. Influence of direct-fed fibrolytic enzymes on diet digestibility and ruminal activity in sheep fed a grass hay-based diet.

    PubMed

    Giraldo, L A; Tejido, M L; Ranilla, M J; Ramos, S; Carro, M D

    2008-07-01

    Six rumen-fistulated Merino sheep were used in a crossover design experiment to evaluate the effects of an exogenous fibrolytic enzyme preparation (12 g/d; ENZ), delivered directly into the rumen, on diet digestibility, ruminal fermentation, and microbial protein synthesis. The enzyme contained endoglucanase and xylanase activities. Sheep were fed a mixed grass hay:concentrate (70:30; DM basis) diet at a daily rate of 46.1 g/kg of BW(0.75). Samples of grass hay were incubated in situ in the rumen of each sheep to measure DM and NDF degradation. The supplementation with ENZ did not affect diet digestibility (P = 0.30 to 0.66), urinary excretion of purine derivatives (P = 0.34), ruminal pH (P = 0.46), or concentrations of NH(3)-N (P = 0.69) and total VFA (P = 0.97). In contrast, molar proportion of propionate were greater (P = 0.001) and acetate:propionate ratio was lower (P < 0.001) in ENZ-supplemented sheep. In addition, ENZ supplementation tended to increase (P = 0.06) numbers of cellulolytic bacteria at 4 h after feeding. Both the ruminally insoluble potentially degradable fraction of grass hay DM and its fractional rate of degradation were increased (P = 0.002 and 0.05, respectively) by ENZ treatment. Supplementation with ENZ also increased (P = 0.01 to 0.02) effective and potential degradability of grass hay DM and NDF. Ruminal fluid endoglucanase and xylanase activities were greater (P < 0.001 and 0.03, respectively) in ENZ-supplemented sheep than in control animals. It was found that ENZ supplementation did not affect either exoglucanase (P = 0.12) or amylase (P = 0.83) activity. The results indicate that supplementing ENZ directly into the rumen increased the fibrolytic activity and stimulated the growth of cellulolytic bacteria without a prefeeding feed-enzyme interaction.

  12. Development of Appropriate Fibrolytic Enzyme Combination for Maize Stover and Its Effect on Rumen Fermentation in Sheep

    PubMed Central

    Bhasker, T. Vijay; Nagalakshmi, D.; Rao, D. Srinivasa

    2013-01-01

    In vitro studies were undertaken to develop an appropriate fibrolytic enzymes cocktail comprising of cellulase, xylanase and β-D-glucanase for maize stover with an aim to increase its nutrient utilization in sheep. Cellulase and xylanase added individually to ground maize stover at an increasing dose rates (0, 100, 200, 400, 800, 1,600, 3,200, 6,400, 12,800, 25,600, 32,000, 38,400, and 44,800 IU/g DM), increased (p<0.01) the in vitro dry matter digestibility and in vitro sugar release. The doses selected for studying the combination effect of enzymes were 6,400 to 32,000 IU/g of cellulase and 12,800 to 44,800 IU/g of xylanase. At cellulase concentration of 6,400 IU/g, IVDMD % was higher (p<0.01) at higher xylanase doses (25,600 to 44,800 IU/g). While at cellulase doses (12,800 to 32,000 IU/g), IVDMD % was higher at lower xylanase doses (12,800 and 25,600 IU/g) compared to higher xylanase doses (32,000 to 44,800 IU/g). At cellulase concentration of the 6,400 to 32,000 IU/g, the amount of sugar released increased (p<0.01) with increasing levels of xylanase concentrations except for the concentration of 44,800 IU/g. No effect of β-D-glucanase (100 to 300 IU/g) was observed at lower cellulase-xylanase dose (cellulase-xylanase 12,800 to 12,800 IU/g). Based on the IVDMD, the enzyme combination cellulase-xylanase 12,800 to 12,800 IU/g was selected to study its effect on feed intake and rumen fermentation pattern, conducted on 12 rams (6 to 8 months; 20.34±2.369 kg body weight) fed 50% maize stover based TMR. The total volatile fatty acids (p<0.01) and ammonia-N concentration was higher in enzyme supplemented group, while no effect was observed on dry matter intake, ruminal pH and total nitrogen concentration. PMID:25049872

  13. Using a fibrolytic enzyme in barley-based diets containing wheat dried distillers grains with solubles: ruminal fermentation, digestibility, and growth performance of feedlot steers.

    PubMed

    He, Z X; He, M L; Walker, N D; McAllister, T A; Yang, W Z

    2014-09-01

    Two experiments were conducted to evaluate the effects of adding an exogenous fibrolytic enzyme (FE) on ruminal pH and fermentation, digestibility, and growth performance of feedlot beef cattle fed a finishing diet containing wheat dried distillers grains with solubles (DDGS). In Exp. 1, 4 ruminally cannulated Angus heifers (average BW of 807 ± 93.9 kg) were used in a replicated 4 × 4 Latin square design. Treatments were 1) control (CON; 10% barley silage and 90% barley grain-based concentrate), 2) CON diet substituting 30% wheat DDGS for barley grain (WDG), 3) WDG diet supplemented with low FE (WDGL), and 4) WDG diet supplemented with high FE (WDGH). Heifers fed WDG had less (P = 0.01) total tract DM digestibility than heifers fed CON. Increasing FE linearly (P < 0.05) increased starch digestibility without affecting digestibility of other nutrients. Addition of FE also reduced (P = 0.03) ruminal ammonia-N (NH3-N) concentration but did not affect VFA concentration. Moreover, application of FE to wheat DDGS linearly increased in situ ruminal DM (P < 0.01) and NDF (P = 0.02) disappearance after 48 h of incubation. In Exp. 2, 160 yearling steers (initial BW = 495 ± 37.9 kg) were fed the same diets as in Exp. 1. No differences in DMI, final BW, ADG, dietary NEg, or carcass characteristics were observed among diets. However, the steers fed WDG had less (P < 0.05) G:F and greater number of (P < 0.01) abscessed livers than steers fed CON. Increasing FE application in wheat DDGS diets did not affect DMI, final BW, or ADG but tended (P < 0.09) to linearly improve feed efficiency and decreased (P = 0.03) the incidence of abscessed livers. These results demonstrated adverse effects of including wheat DDGS in finishing diets on feed digestion, feed efficiency, and animal health. Application of FE in wheat DDGS-based diets potentially improved starch digestion, protein metabolism in the rumen, feed efficiency, and animal health.

  14. Effects of an exogenous enzyme preparation on microbial protein synthesis, enzyme activity and attachment to feed in the Rumen Simulation Technique (Rusitec).

    PubMed

    Wang, Y; McAllister, T A; Rode, L M; Beauchemin, K A; Morgavi, D P; Nsereko, V L; Iwaasa, A D; Yang, W

    2001-03-01

    The effects of an exogenous enzyme preparation, the application method and feed type on ruminal fermentation and microbial protein synthesis were investigated using the rumen simulation technique (Rusitec). Steam-rolled barley grain and chopped alfalfa hay were sprayed with water (control, C), an enzyme preparation with a predominant xylanase activity (EF), or autoclaved enzyme (AEF) 24 h prior to feeding, or the enzyme was supplied in the buffer infused into the Rusitec (EI). Microbial N incorporation was measured using (15NH4)2SO4 in the buffer. Spent feed bags were pummelled mechanically in buffer to segregate the feed particle-associated (FPA) and feed particle-bound (FPB) bacterial fractions. Enzymes applied to feed reduced neutral-detergent fibre content, and increased the concentration of reducing sugars in barley grain, but not alfalfa hay. Ruminal cellulolytic bacteria were more numerous with EF than with C. Disappearance of DM from barley grain was higher with EF than with C, but alfalfa was unaffected by EF. Treatment EF increased incorporation of 15N into FPA and FPB fractions at 24 and 48 h. In contrast, AEF reduced the 24 h values, relative to C; AEF and C were similar at 48 h. Infused enzyme (EI) did not affect 15N incorporation. Xylanase activity in effluent was increased by EF and EI, compared to C, but not by AEF. Xylanase activity in FPA was higher at 48 h than at 24 h with all treatments; it was higher with EF than C at 24 and 48 h, but was not altered by AEF or EI. Applying enzymes onto feeds before feeding was more effective than dosing directly into the artificial rumen for increasing ruminal fibrolytic activity.

  15. Controlled exogenous enzyme imbibition and activation in whole chickpea seed enzyme reactor (SER).

    PubMed

    Kliger, Eynav; Fischer, Lutz; Lutz-Wahl, Sabine; Saguy, I Sam

    2011-05-01

    Chickpeas are of excellent quality (protein, vitamins, minerals, unsaturated fatty acids) and very low in phytoestrogen, making them a potentially promising source for vegetarian-based infant formula (VBIF). However, their high starch and fiber concentration could hinder their utilization for infants. To overcome this natural shortcoming, a solid-state "enzymation" (SSE) process was developed in which imbibition of exogenous enzyme facilitates hydrolysis within the intact chickpea seed. The process was termed seed enzyme reactor (SER). Liquid imbibition data of dry chickpeas during soaking were fitted with the Weibull distribution model. The derived Weibull shape parameter, β, value (0.77 ± 0.11) indicated that the imbibition mechanism followed Fickian diffusion. Imbibition occurred through the coat and external layers. The process was tested using green fluorescent protein (GFP) as an exogenous marker, and involved soaking, thermal treatment, peeling, microwave partial drying, rehydration in enzyme solution, and SSE at an adjusted pH, time, and temperature. Amylases, or a combination of amylases and cellulases, resulted in significant carbohydrate hydrolysis (23% and 47% of the available starch, respectively). In addition, chickpea initial raffinose and stachyose concentration was significantly reduced (91% and 92%, respectively). The process could serve as a proof of concept, requiring additional development and optimization to become a full industrial application.

  16. Intraruminal supplementation with increasing levels of exogenous polysaccharide-degrading enzymes: effects on nutrient digestion in cattle fed a barley grain diet.

    PubMed

    Hristov, A N; McAllister, T A; Cheng, K J

    2000-02-01

    The effects of supplying increasing ruminal doses of exogenous polysaccharide-degrading enzymes (EPDE) on rumen fermentation and nutrient digestion were studied using eight ruminally cannulated heifers, four of which were also duodenally cannulated, in a replicated Latin square. The heifers were fed a diet of 85.5% rolled barley grain and 14% barley silage (DM basis), and once daily they were given intraruminal doses of 0 (Control), 100, 200, or 400 g of a preparation containing polysaccharide-degrading enzymes. Enzyme treatment decreased ruminal pH (linear, P<.001) and increased ammonia N (quadratic, P<.001) concentration. The ruminally soluble fraction and effective degradability of feed DM in situ were increased (quadratic response, P<.001) by enzyme treatment. Ruminal administration of EPDE increased ruminal fluid carboxymethylcellulase and xylanase activities linearly (P<.001) and beta-glucanase activity quadratically (P<.01), decreased (quadratic response, P<.05) ruminal fluid viscosity, and did not affect (P>.05) ruminal fluid amylase activity. Elevated levels of fibrolytic activities in the rumen resulted in increased (quadratic, P<.001) carboxymethylcellulase, xylanase, and beta-glucanase (P<.01) activities in duodenal digesta. Duodenal amylase activity and reducing sugar concentration were also increased (quadratic responses, P<.001 and P<.05, respectively) by EPDE. Xylanase activity of fecal DM was increased linearly (P<.05) with increasing ruminal EPDE levels. Apparent digestibilities of DM, crude protein, and NDF were not affected by EPDE supplementation. Enzyme treatment did not affect (P>.05) urinary excretion of allantoin and uric acid, or concentrations of glucose and urea in blood.

  17. Effects of treating sorghum wet distillers grains with solubles with fibrolytic enzymes on nutrient digestibility and performance in finishing beef steers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Two experiments were conducted to determine the effects of treating sorghum WDG with solubles (SWDG) with an enzyme, or enzyme-buffer combination on diet digestibility and feedlot performance. Experimental treatments are; 1) untreated SWDG (control), 2) addition of an enzyme complex to SWDG (enzyme...

  18. Exogenous DNA internalisation by sperm cells is improved by combining lipofection and restriction enzyme mediated integration.

    PubMed

    Churchil, R R; Gupta, J; Singh, A; Sharma, D

    2011-06-01

    1. Three types of exogenous DNA inserts, i.e. complete linearised pVIVO2-GFP/LacZ vector (9620 bp), the LacZ gene (5317 bp) and the GFP gene (2152 bp) were used to transfect chicken spermatozoa through simple incubation of sperm cells with insert. 2. PCR assay, Dot Blot hybridisation and Southern hybridisation showed the successful internalisation of exogenous DNA by chicken sperm cells. 3. Lipofection and Restriction Enzyme Mediated Integration (REMI) were used to improve the rate of internalisation of exogenous DNA by sperm cells. 4. Results from dot blot as well as Southern hybridisation were semi-quantified and improved exogenous DNA uptake by sperm cells through lipofection and REMI. Stronger signals were observed from hybridisation of LacZ as well as GFP specific probe with the DNA from lipofected exogenous DNA transfected sperm DNA in comparison with those transfected with nude exogenous DNA.

  19. Production of fibrolytic enzymes by Aspergillus japonicus C03 using agro-industrial residues with potential application as additives in animal feed.

    PubMed

    Facchini, Fernanda Dell Antonio; Vici, Ana Claudia; Reis, Victor Ricardo Amin; Jorge, João Atilio; Terenzi, Héctor Francisco; Reis, Ricardo Andrade; Polizeli, Maria de Lourdes Teixeira de Moraes

    2011-03-01

    Solid-state fermentation obtained from different and low-cost carbon sources was evaluated to endocellulases and endoxylanases production by Aspergillus japonicus C03. Regarding the enzymatic production the highest levels were observed at 30 °C, using soy bran added to crushed corncob or wheat bran added to sugarcane bagasse, humidified with salt solutions, and incubated for 3 days (xylanase) or 6 days (cellulase) with 70% relative humidity. Peptone improved the xylanase and cellulase activities in 12 and 29%, respectively. The optimum temperature corresponded to 60 °C and 50-55 °C for xylanase and cellulase, respectively, both having 4.0 as optimum pH. Xylanase was fully stable up to 40 °C, which is close to the rumen temperature. The enzymes were stable in pH 4.0-7.0. Cu++ and Mn++ increased xylanase and cellulase activities by 10 and 64%, respectively. A. japonicus C03 xylanase was greatly stable in goat rumen fluid for 4 h during in vivo and in vitro experiments.

  20. Exogenous enzymes upgrade transgenesis and genetic engineering of farm animals.

    PubMed

    Bosch, Pablo; Forcato, Diego O; Alustiza, Fabrisio E; Alessio, Ana P; Fili, Alejandro E; Olmos Nicotra, María F; Liaudat, Ana C; Rodríguez, Nancy; Talluri, Thirumala R; Kues, Wilfried A

    2015-05-01

    Transgenic farm animals are attractive alternative mammalian models to rodents for the study of developmental, genetic, reproductive and disease-related biological questions, as well for the production of recombinant proteins, or the assessment of xenotransplants for human patients. Until recently, the ability to generate transgenic farm animals relied on methods of passive transgenesis. In recent years, significant improvements have been made to introduce and apply active techniques of transgenesis and genetic engineering in these species. These new approaches dramatically enhance the ease and speed with which livestock species can be genetically modified, and allow to performing precise genetic modifications. This paper provides a synopsis of enzyme-mediated genetic engineering in livestock species covering the early attempts employing naturally occurring DNA-modifying proteins to recent approaches working with tailored enzymatic systems.

  1. Management of pain in chronic pancreatitis with emphasis on exogenous pancreatic enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Hobbs, Paul M; Johnson, William G; Graham, David Y

    2016-01-01

    One of the most challenging issues arising in patients with chronic pancreatitis is the management of abdominal pain. Many competing theories exist to explain pancreatic pain including ductal hypertension from strictures and stones, increased interstitial pressure from glandular fibrosis, pancreatic neuritis, and ischemia. This clinical problem is superimposed on a background of reduced enzyme secretion and altered feedback mechanisms. Throughout history, investigators have used these theories to devise methods to combat chronic pancreatic pain including: Lifestyle measures, antioxidants, analgesics, administration of exogenous pancreatic enzymes, endoscopic drainage procedures, and surgical drainage and resection procedures. While the value of each modality has been debated over the years, pancreatic enzyme therapy remains a viable option. Enzyme therapy restores active enzymes to the small bowel and targets the altered feedback mechanism that lead to increased pancreatic ductal and tissue pressures, ischemia, and pain. Here, we review the mechanisms and treatments for chronic pancreatic pain with a specific focus on pancreatic enzyme replacement therapy. We also discuss different approaches to overcoming a lack of clinical response update ideas for studies needed to improve the clinical use of pancreatic enzymes to ameliorate pancreatic pain. PMID:27602238

  2. Exogenous enzyme complex prevents intestinal soybean meal-induced enteritis in Mugil liza (Valenciennes, 1836) juvenile.

    PubMed

    Ramos, Leonardo R V; Pedrosa, Virgínia F; Mori, Agnes; Andrade, Carlos F F DE; Romano, Luis A; Abreu, Paulo C; Tesser, Marcelo B

    2017-02-09

    Four soybean meal-based diets containing increasing levels of an enzyme complex (E50, E100, E150 and E200 at 50, 100, 150 and 200 g ton-1, respectively) and one soybean meal-based diet without the enzyme complex (E0) were fed in triplicate to M. liza juveniles in a semi-static flow system with 20 fish per tank for 75 days. There were no differences between the treatments for animal performance parameters, but fish fed the enzyme complex treatment exhibited significantly (P<0.05) higher values of calcium bone retention compared with control fish. Although there was no relationship between bacterial counts in different sections of the gastrointestinal tract or enzyme levels, filamentous bacteria were increased in E50 compared with E150. All of the treatments resulted in higher bacterial counts in the stomach than in intestinal segments. Histological screening showed serious to moderate infiltration of inflammatory cells, modification in villus morphology and necrosis in some cases in fish fed the E0 diet. In addition, fish from the E0 treatment exhibited significantly (P<0.05) lower lipid deposition in the peritoneal cavity. Therefore, the use of low levels of exogenous enzyme is recommended in diets for M. liza when soybean meal is used as the main source of protein.

  3. Chitosan Nanoencapsulated Exogenous Trypsin Biomimics Zymogen-Like Enzyme in Fish Gastrointestinal Tract

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Arvind R.; Ferosekhan, S.; Kothari, Dushyant C.; Pal, Asim Kumar; Jadhao, Sanjay Balkrishna

    2013-01-01

    Exogenous proteolytic enzyme supplementation is required in certain disease conditions in humans and animals and due to compelling reasons on use of more plant protein ingredients and profitability in animal feed industry. However, limitations on their utility in diet are imposed by their pH specificity, thermolabile nature, inhibition due to a variety of factors and the possibility of intestinal damage. For enhancing the efficacy and safety of exogenous trypsin, an efficient chitosan (0.04%) nanoencapsulation-based controlled delivery system was developed. An experiment was conducted for 45 days to evaluate nanoencapsulated trypsin (0.01% and 0.02%) along with 0.02% bare trypsin and 0.4% chitosan nanoparticles against a control diet on productive efficiency (growth rate, feed conversion and protein efficiency ratio), organo-somatic indices, nutrient digestibility, tissue enzyme activities, hematic parameters and intestinal histology of the fish Labeo rohita. All the synthesized nanoparticles were of desired characteristics. Enhanced fish productive efficiency using nanoencapsulated trypsin over its bare form was noticed, which corresponded with enhanced (P<0.01) nutrient digestibility, activity of intestinal protease, liver and muscle tissue transaminases (alanine and aspartate) and dehydrogenases (lactate and malate), serum blood urea nitrogen and serum protein profile. Intestinal tissues of fish fed with 0.02% bare trypsin showed broadened, marked foamy cells with lipid vacuoles. However, villi were healthier in appearance with improved morphological features in fish fed with nanoencapsulated trypsin than with bare trypsin, and the villi were longer in fish fed with 0.01% nanoencapsulated trypsin than with 0.02% nanoencapsulated trypsin. The result of this premier experiment shows that nanoencapsulated trypsin mimics zymogen-like proteolytic activity via controlled release, and hence the use of 0.01% nanoencapsulated trypsin (in chitosan nanoparticles) over bare

  4. The effects of exogenous hormones on rooting process and the activities of key enzymes of Malus hupehensis stem cuttings.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wangxiang; Fan, Junjun; Tan, Qianqian; Zhao, Mingming; Zhou, Ting; Cao, Fuliang

    2017-01-01

    Malus hupehensis is an excellent Malus rootstock species, known for its strong adverse-resistance and apomixes. In the present study, stem cuttings of M. hupehensis were treated with three types of exogenous hormones, including indole acetic acid (IAA), naphthalene acetic acid (NAA), or green growth regulator (GGR). The effects and mechanisms of exogenous hormone treatment and antioxidant enzyme activity on adventitious root formation were investigated. The results showed that the apparent morphology of the adventitious root had four stages, including root pre-emergence stage (S0), early stage of root formation (S1), massive root formation stage (S2), and later stage of root formation (S3). The suitable concentrations of the three exogenous hormones, IAA, NAA and GGR, were 100 mg·L-1, 300 mg·L-1, and 300 mg·L-1, respectively. They shortened the rooting time by 25-47.4% and increased the rooting percentages of cuttings by 0.9-1.3 times, compared with that in the control. The dispersion in S0 stage was 3.6 times of that in the S1 stage after exogenous hormone application. The earlier the third critical point (P3) appeared, the shorter the rooting time and the greater the rooting percentage of the cuttings. During rhizogenesis, the activities of three antioxidant enzymes (POD, SOD, and PPO) showed an A-shaped trend. However, peak values of enzyme activity appeared at different points, which were 9 d before the P3, P3, and the fourth critical point (P4), respectively. Exogenous hormone treatment reduced the time to reach the peak value by 18 days, although the peak values of the enzymatic activities did not significantly changed. Our results suggested that exogenous hormone treatment mainly acted during the root pre-emergence stage, accelerated the synthesis of antioxidant enzymes, reduced the rooting time, and consequently promoted root formation. The three kinds of antioxidant enzymes acted on different stages of rooting.

  5. The effect of exogenous calcium on mitochondria, respiratory metabolism enzymes and ion transport in cucumber roots under hypoxia.

    PubMed

    He, Lizhong; Li, Bin; Lu, Xiaomin; Yuan, Lingyun; Yang, Yanjuan; Yuan, Yinghui; Du, Jing; Guo, Shirong

    2015-08-25

    Hypoxia induces plant stress, particularly in cucumber plants under hydroponic culture. In plants, calcium is involved in stress signal transmission and growth. The ultimate goal of this study was to shed light on the mechanisms underlying the effects of exogenous calcium on the mitochondrial antioxidant system, the activity of respiratory metabolism enzymes, and ion transport in cucumber (Cucumis sativus L. cv. Jinchun No. 2) roots under hypoxic conditions. Our experiments revealed that exogenous calcium reduces the level of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and increases the activity of antioxidant enzymes in mitochondria under hypoxia. Exogenous calcium also enhances the accumulation of enzymes involved in glycolysis and the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle. We utilized fluorescence and ultrastructural cytochemistry methods to observe that exogenous calcium increases the concentrations of Ca(2+) and K(+) in root cells by increasing the activity of plasma membrane (PM) H(+)-ATPase and tonoplast H(+)-ATPase and H(+)-PPase. Overall, our results suggest that hypoxic stress has an immediate and substantial effect on roots. Exogenous calcium improves metabolism and ion transport in cucumber roots, thereby increasing hypoxia tolerance in cucumber.

  6. Effects of exogenous enzymes and dietary energy on performance and digestive physiology of broilers

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The study was conducted to compare the effects of XG with AG and BM at different metabolizable energy diets on growth performance, digestive physiology and energy utilization of broilers fed with corn-SBM diet. A 2 × 4 factorial design was used with two basal diets (the positive control group, PC; negative control with ME reduction 100 kcal/kg, NC) and with or without the addition of three exogenous enzymes (0.02% BM; 0.01% AG; 0.05% XG) respectively. 1,200 one-day-old broilers were randomly allocated to 8 treatments with 10 pens of 15 broilers. There was no significant difference on BW, BWG, and FI at 0-21d, 21-42d or 0-42d for diet, enzymes or their interactions, but FI at 22-42d and 0-42d were tend to be decreased with the addition of enzymes. The F/G was significantly improved by the addition of enzymes especially in NC diet. The dietary AME and TME in PC or NC diet were significantly increased by XG or AG in NC diet. The villus length and V/C of ileum were significantly increased by the addition of BM or XG. XG improved the activities of trypsin, chymotrypsin and amylase, BM improved the activity of trypsin at 21d, and AG improved the activity of chymotrypsin at 21d. Comparing to PC diet, the addition of enzymes in PC or NC diet decreased feed cost per kg body weight gain especially in NC diet (except AG in PC diet) with the highest profits for XG in NC diet. In conclusion, supplementation of 0.02% BM or 0.01% AG or 0.05% XG could improve feed conversion of broilers in corn-soybean meal diet by improving energy utilization and digestive physiology, and also supplementation of 0.05% XG had a preferable efficacy in low energy diet. PMID:23556436

  7. The effects of exogenous hormones on rooting process and the activities of key enzymes of Malus hupehensis stem cuttings

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Qianqian; Zhao, Mingming; Zhou, Ting; Cao, Fuliang

    2017-01-01

    Malus hupehensis is an excellent Malus rootstock species, known for its strong adverse-resistance and apomixes. In the present study, stem cuttings of M. hupehensis were treated with three types of exogenous hormones, including indole acetic acid (IAA), naphthalene acetic acid (NAA), or green growth regulator (GGR). The effects and mechanisms of exogenous hormone treatment and antioxidant enzyme activity on adventitious root formation were investigated. The results showed that the apparent morphology of the adventitious root had four stages, including root pre-emergence stage (S0), early stage of root formation (S1), massive root formation stage (S2), and later stage of root formation (S3). The suitable concentrations of the three exogenous hormones, IAA, NAA and GGR, were 100 mg·L-1, 300 mg·L-1, and 300 mg·L-1, respectively. They shortened the rooting time by 25–47.4% and increased the rooting percentages of cuttings by 0.9–1.3 times, compared with that in the control. The dispersion in S0 stage was 3.6 times of that in the S1 stage after exogenous hormone application. The earlier the third critical point (P3) appeared, the shorter the rooting time and the greater the rooting percentage of the cuttings. During rhizogenesis, the activities of three antioxidant enzymes (POD, SOD, and PPO) showed an A-shaped trend. However, peak values of enzyme activity appeared at different points, which were 9 d before the P3, P3, and the fourth critical point (P4), respectively. Exogenous hormone treatment reduced the time to reach the peak value by 18 days, although the peak values of the enzymatic activities did not significantly changed. Our results suggested that exogenous hormone treatment mainly acted during the root pre-emergence stage, accelerated the synthesis of antioxidant enzymes, reduced the rooting time, and consequently promoted root formation. The three kinds of antioxidant enzymes acted on different stages of rooting. PMID:28231330

  8. Ultrasensitive self-powered cytosensors based on exogenous redox-free enzyme biofuel cells as point-of-care tools for early cancer diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Gai, Panpan; Song, Rongbin; Zhu, Cheng; Ji, Yusheng; Wang, Wengjing; Zhang, Jian-Rong; Zhu, Jun-Jie

    2015-12-07

    An exogenous redox-free, membrane-less enzyme biofuel cell-based ultrasensitive self-powered cytosensing platform was fabricated. With the ultrahigh sensitivity and the merits of not requiring external power sources or exogenous reagents, the device has great potential as a point-of-care tool for early diagnosis of cancer in vivo.

  9. Effect of Dietary Exogenous Enzyme Supplementation on Enteric Mucosal Morphological Development and Adherent Mucin Thickness in Turkeys

    PubMed Central

    Ayoola, Ayuub A.; Malheiros, Ramon D.; Grimes, Jesse L.; Ferket, Peter R.

    2015-01-01

    Anti-nutritional factors (ANFs) in feed ingredients can challenge gut health and reduce nutrient utilization. Birds typically activate their innate immune system as a protective response against the adverse effects of ANF, which often involves the secretion of mucin. Although dietary supplementation of exogenous enzymes are commonly used to alleviate the adverse effects of ANF on apparent nutrient digestibility, little is known about how they affect gut health, particularly in relation to the morphological development and mucin secretion of enteric mucosa. We carried out two trials to examine the effect of dietary supplementation of different types of exogenous enzymes on gut health of by accessing the effect of jejunum morphological development and ileal enteric adherent mucin thickness layer in turkeys. Dietary β-mannanase supplementation reduced ileal adherent mucin thickness layer (804 vs 823 μg/g; p < 0.05), while a commercial blend of xylanase, amylase, and protease (XAP) reduced ileal adherent mucin layer thickness (589 vs 740 μg/g; p < 0.05); thus reducing the apparent endogenous loss of nutrients. Both enzyme supplements also affected gut morphological characteristics. In comparison to the control treatment, dietary β-mannanase supplementation improved the jejunum tip width (219 vs 161; p < 0.05), base width (367 vs 300; p < 0.05), surface area (509,870 vs 380, 157; p < 0.05) and villi height/crypt depth ratio (7.49 vs 5.70; p < 0.05), and XAP improved the crypt depth (p < 0.05). In conclusion, dietary supplementation of exogenous enzymes may help alleviate the adverse effects of ANF on nutrient utilization by directly or indirectly removing the mucosal irritation that stimulates enteric mucin secretion. PMID:26664972

  10. The effectiveness of dietary sunflower meal and exogenous enzyme on growth, digestive enzymes, carcass traits, and blood chemistry of broilers.

    PubMed

    Alagawany, Mahmoud; Attia, Adel I; Ibrahim, Zenat A; Mahmoud, Reda A; El-Sayed, Sabry A

    2017-03-29

    High costs of conventional protein feed sources including soybean meal (SBM) generated the need for finding other alternatives. Thus, the present study was designed to evaluate the impact of graded replacements of SBM by sunflower seed meal (SFM) with or without enzyme supplementation on growth performance, digestive enzymes, carcass traits, and blood profile of broiler chickens. A total of 240 unsexed 1-week-old broiler chicks (Hubbard) were randomly divided into eight treatment groups of 30 chicks each in five replicates each of six chicks in a factorial design (4 × 2) arrangement, including four levels of SFM (0, 25, 50, and 75% replacing SBM) and two levels of enzyme (0- or 0.1-g/kg diet) supplementation. Performance traits including feed conversion ratio, body weight, and weight gain were significantly (P < 0.01) improved with increasing SFM up to 50% substitution for SBM or with enzyme supplementation in broiler diet during the experiment. However, feed intake of broiler chicks was decreased with enzyme supplementation (P < 0.05). The activities of digestive enzymes (protease and amylase) were significantly (P < 0.05) influenced and enhanced by SFM and enzyme inclusion in diets, respectively. The activities of protease and amylase were improved with SFM diet supplemented with 0.1 g/kg enzyme in comparison with those with the un-supplemented diet. The evaluated carcass traits were not statistically (P > 0.05) influenced by feeding SFM meal or enzyme addition. Biochemical blood parameters were significantly (P < 0.01) affected by SFM, enzyme, or their interaction in broiler diets, except for globulin that was not affected by dietary enzyme. It is concluded that increasing SFM level in the diet up to 50% replacing SBM with the supplementation of enzyme improved the growth performance and enhanced positively carcass traits as well as the activity of digestive enzymes in broiler chickens.

  11. [Impact of exogenous proteolytic enzymes on immunogenesis in patients with urogenital infections].

    PubMed

    Khrianin, A A; Reshetnikov, O V; Safronov, I D

    2012-01-01

    The use of systemic enzyme therapy in combination with antibiotics in the treatment of urogenital chlamydia infection in patients of both sexes proved to improve the therapeutic efficacy and to reduce the risk of the side effects.

  12. Effect of dietary or abomasal supplementation of exogenous polysaccharide-degrading enzymes on rumen fermentation and nutrient digestibility.

    PubMed

    Hristov, A N; McAllister, T A; Cheng, K J

    1998-12-01

    The effect of site of supplementation of a mixture of two crude preparations (Enzyme C and Enzyme X) of exogenous polysaccharide-degrading enzymes (EPDE) was studied in vivo using four ruminally and duodenally cannulated heifers (Exp. 1). The treatments were as follows: control (no EPDE), EPDE supplied through the diet (EF, 47.0 g/d), and EPDE infused continuously into the abomasum (EA, 41.6 g/d). Enzyme treatment increased the concentration of soluble reducing sugars (P < .05) and decreased NDF content (P < .05) in the treated feed, but this did not increase the rate or extent of in sacco disappearance of DM from the feed. Compared with control, ruminal fermentation was not affected by EF, but abomasal infusion increased (P < .05) rumen ammonia levels and shifted ruminal VFA patterns. Ruminal carboxymethylcellulase (CMCase) and xylanase activities were not affected by treatment. Abomasal infusion increased (P < .05) duodenal xylanase activity as compared with control and EF, but apparent digestion of DM, NDF, and CP were not affected by treatment. Negligible levels of CMCase and amylase reached the duodenum. During an in vitro experiment (Exp. 2), abomasal stability of the two EPDE was studied over a range of pH from 3.39 to .85, with or without pepsin. Carboxymethylcellulase activity (in Enzymes C and X) and beta-glucanase activity (in Enzyme C) were largely unstable against pepsin proteolysis (P < .001) and low pH (P < .001). Xylanase and amylase activities were resistant to pepsin but irreversibly inactivated at low pH. These two experiments showed that abomasal supplementation of EPDE did not successfully supply cellulases and amylases to the intestine, due partially to their limited resistance to low pH and pepsin proteolysis. Although EPDE significantly increased the level of xylanase activity at the duodenum, this did not significantly improve total tract digestion.

  13. Metatranscriptomics Reveals the Active Bacterial and Eukaryotic Fibrolytic Communities in the Rumen of Dairy Cow Fed a Mixed Diet

    PubMed Central

    Comtet-Marre, Sophie; Parisot, Nicolas; Lepercq, Pascale; Chaucheyras-Durand, Frédérique; Mosoni, Pascale; Peyretaillade, Eric; Bayat, Ali R.; Shingfield, Kevin J.; Peyret, Pierre; Forano, Evelyne

    2017-01-01

    Ruminants have a unique ability to derive energy from the degradation of plant polysaccharides through the activity of the rumen microbiota. Although this process is well studied in vitro, knowledge gaps remain regarding the relative contribution of the microbiota members and enzymes in vivo. The present study used RNA-sequencing to reveal both the expression of genes encoding carbohydrate-active enzymes (CAZymes) by the rumen microbiota of a lactating dairy cow and the microorganisms forming the fiber-degrading community. Functional analysis identified 12,237 CAZymes, accounting for 1% of the transcripts. The CAZyme profile was dominated by families GH94 (cellobiose-phosphorylase), GH13 (amylase), GH43 and GH10 (hemicellulases), GH9 and GH48 (cellulases), PL11 (pectinase) as well as GH2 and GH3 (oligosaccharidases). Our data support the pivotal role of the most characterized fibrolytic bacteria (Prevotella, Ruminocccus and Fibrobacter), and highlight a substantial, although most probably underestimated, contribution of fungi and ciliate protozoa to polysaccharide degradation. Particularly these results may motivate further exploration of the role and the functions of protozoa in the rumen. Moreover, an important part of the fibrolytic bacterial community remains to be characterized since one third of the CAZyme transcripts originated from distantly related strains. These findings are used to highlight limitations of current metatranscriptomics approaches to understand the functional rumen microbial community and opportunities to circumvent them. PMID:28197133

  14. Effects of exogenous enzymes and application method on nutrient intake, digestibility and growth performance of Pelibuey lambs.

    PubMed

    López-Aguirre, Daniel; Hernández-Meléndez, Javier; Rojo, Rolando; Sánchez-Dávila, Fernando; López-Villalobos, Nicolás; Salem, Abdel-Fattah Z M; Martínez-González, Juan Carlos; Vázquez-Armijo, José Fernando; Ruíz, Salomón

    2016-01-01

    Pelibuey sheep is the main breed in the tropical and subtropical regions of Mexico, and high demand of sheep meat has favored the finishing of lambs in feedlots with diets containing high levels of grains. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of exogenous enzymes (EE) and application method on nutrient intake and digestibility and performance of growing Pelibuey lambs. Treatments were based on comparison of two different methods of adding an enzyme product (sprayed on the total mixed ration or applied orally to the lambs) versus control treatment (no added enzyme). Twenty-one Pelibuey lambs, weighing 15.7 kg (SD = 1.8 kg) initial body weight, were individually housed in shaded pens and assigned randomly to one of the three enzyme treatments. At the end of study (lasting for 45 days), three lambs from each treatment were randomly selected and adapted to a pants and harness designed for fecal collection to measure nutrient digestibilities. Total body gain and average daily gain were affected (P < 0.05) by supplemental EE. The application method of EE had significant (P < 0.05) effect on FCE and FCR, but no effects were observed on nutrient intake. Supplemental EE did improve (P < 0.05) the digestibilities of dry matter, organic matter, neutral and acid detergent fiber, but no differences were observed in crude protein digestibility. The application method of EE had significant (P < 0.05) effect on the digestibility of acid detergent fiber. Supplemental EE can improve body weight gain and nutrient digestibilities without affecting nutrient intake in Pelibuey lambs, but the results of feed conversion efficiency and acid detergent fiber digestibility depend on the application method used of the EE.

  15. Effect of exogenous hormones on transcription levels of pyridoxal 5'-phosphate biosynthetic enzymes in the silkworm (Bombyx mori).

    PubMed

    Huang, ShuoHao; Yang, HuanHuan; Yao, LiLi; Zhang, JianYun; Huang, LongQuan

    2016-01-01

    Vitamin B6 includes 6 pyridine derivatives, among which pyridoxal 5'-phosphate is a coenzyme for over 140 enzymes. Animals acquire their vitamin B6 from food. Through a salvage pathway, pyridoxal 5'-phosphate is synthesized from pyridoxal, pyridoxine or pyridoxamine, in a series of reactions catalyzed by pyridoxal kinase and pyridoxine 5'-phosphate oxidase. The regulation of pyridoxal 5'-phospahte biosynthesis and pyridoxal 5'-phospahte homeostasis are at the center of study for vitamin B6 nutrition. How pyridoxal 5'-phosphate biosynthesis is regulated by hormones has not been reported so far. Our previous studies have shown that pyridoxal 5'-phosphate level in silkworm larva displays cyclic developmental changes. In the current study, effects of exogenous juvenile hormone and molting hormone on the transcription level of genes coding for the enzymes involved in the biosynthesis of pyridoxal 5'-phospahte were examined. Results show that pyridoxal kinase and pyridoxine 5'-phosphate oxidase are regulated at the transcription level by development and are responsive to hormones. Molting hormone stimulates the expression of genes coding for pyridoxal kinase and pyridoxine 5'-phosphate oxidase, and juvenile hormone appears to work against molting hormone. Whether pyridoxal 5'-phosphate biosynthesis is regulated by hormones in general is an important issue for further studies.

  16. Effects of exogenous enzymes (phytase, non-starch polysaccharide enzyme) in diets on growth, feed utilization, nitrogen and phosphorus excretion of Japanese seabass, Lateolabrax japonicus.

    PubMed

    Ai, Qinghui; Mai, Kangsen; Zhang, Wenbing; Xu, Wei; Tan, Beiping; Zhang, Chunxiao; Li, Huitao

    2007-06-01

    A feeding experiment was conducted to investigate the effects of exogenous enzymes (phytase, non-starch polysaccharide enzymes: WX and VP, supplied by DSM) on growth performance and excretion of Japanese seabass (Lateolabrax japonicus) (initial mass 6.26+/-0.10 g). A basal diet was used as a control that contained a mixed protein source, and lysine, methionine and valine were supplemented to simulate the essential amino acid pattern of fish meal. Four other diets were supplemented with 200 mg phytase (500 IU), 400 mg VP, 800 mg WX, or a combination of 800 mg WX and 400 mg VP per kg diet, respectively. Each diet was assigned to triplicate groups of fish in floating sea cages, and each cage was stocked with 60 fish. The results showed specific growth rate (SGR) and feed efficiency ratio (FER) were not significantly improved by the phytase supplementation. However, supplementations with WX and VP significantly enhanced the SGR and FER (P<0.05). Phosphorus retention was significantly increased by the supplementation with phytase, whereas nitrogen retention was also enhanced by supplementations of non-starch polysaccharide enzymes (P<0.05). The excretion experiment showed that the soluble phosphorus and ammonia nitrogen in starved fish were constant, irrespective of dietary treatments. The total phosphorus effluent in fish fed the diet with phytase supplementation was significantly lower compared with the control group after feeding to satiation (P<0.05), but soluble phosphorus excretion was still independent of dietary treatments. The ammonia excretion in satiated fish significantly decreased with supplementations of non-starch polysaccharide enzymes.

  17. Effect of exogenous sucrose on the enzymes of starch degradation and sucrose metabolism in cowpea (Vigna unguiculata L.) seedlings.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Narinder; Kaur, Harpreet; Gupta, Anil K

    2005-10-01

    Addition of exogenous sucrose and mannitol in the growth medium decreased the germination and growth of cowpea (Vigna unguiculata L. cv C-88) seedlings. The reduced seedling growth appeared to be due to the decreased acid invertase activity in growing parts of the seedlings. An exogenous supply of sucrose upregulated the sucrose phosphate synthase (SPS) activity in different parts of seedlings. Decreased amylase activity in cotyledons and the mobilization of starch from cotyledons to the growing axis was observed in the presence of exogenous sucrose and mannitol. High sucrose content observed in different tissues in the presence of exogenous sucrose and mannitol was possibly due to high SPS and low acid invertase activities and reduced conversion of sucrose to starch. It appears that exogenous sucrose acts mainly as an osmoticum, rather than a source of carbon for the growing seedlings.

  18. Exogenous proline mediates alleviation of cadmium stress by promoting photosynthetic activity, water status and antioxidative enzymes activities of young date palm (Phoenix dactylifera L.).

    PubMed

    Zouari, M; Ben Ahmed, Ch; Zorrig, W; Elloumi, N; Rabhi, M; Delmail, D; Ben Rouina, B; Labrousse, P; Ben Abdallah, F

    2016-06-01

    The ability of exogenous compatible solutes, such as proline, to counteract cadmium (Cd) inhibitory effects in young date palm plants (Phoenix dactylifera L. cv Deglet Nour) was investigated. Two-year-old date palm plants were subjected for five months at different Cd stress levels (0, 10 and 30 mg CdCl2 kg(-1) soil) whether supplied or not with exogenous proline (20mM) added through the irrigation water. Different levels of Cd stress altered plant growth, gas exchanges and chlorophyll content as well as water status, but at different extent among them. In contrast, an increase of antioxidant enzymes activities of Cd-treated plants in association with high amounts of proline content, hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) and electrolyte leakage (EL) were observed. Interestingly, exogenous proline mitigated the adverse effects of Cd on young date palm. Indeed, it alleviated the oxidative damage induced by Cd accumulation and established better levels of plant growth, water status and photosynthetic activity. Moreover, proline-treated plants showed high antioxidant enzymes activities (superoxide dismutase, catalase and glutathione peroxydase) in roots and leaves as compared to Cd-treated plants.

  19. Influence of Palm Kernel Meal Inclusion and Exogenous Enzyme Supplementation on Growth Performance, Energy Utilization, and Nutrient Digestibility in Young Broilers

    PubMed Central

    Abdollahi, M. R.; Hosking, B. J.; Ning, D.; Ravindran, V.

    2016-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to investigate the influence of palm kernel meal (PKM) inclusion and exogenous enzyme supplementation on growth performance, nitrogen-corrected apparent metabolizable energy (AMEn), coefficient of apparent ileal digestibility (CAID) and total tract retention of nutrients in young broilers fed corn-based diets. Four inclusion levels of PKM (no PKM [PKM0], 8% [PKM8], 16% [PKM16], and 24% [PKM24]) and two enzyme additions were evaluated in a 4×2 factorial arrangement of treatments. A total of 384, one-d-old male broilers (Ross 308) were individually weighed and allocated to 48 cages (eight broilers/cage), and cages were randomly assigned to eight dietary treatments. Results indicated that the inclusion of 8% and 16% PKM increased (p<0.05) the weight gain compared to the PKM0 diet. Birds fed the PKM8 diets had the highest (p<0.05) feed intake. Weight gain and feed intake were severely reduced (p<0.05) by feeding the PKM24 diet. Enzyme supplementation increased weight gain (p<0.05), independent of PKM inclusion level. In PKM0 and PKM8 diets, enzyme addition significantly (p<0.05) lowered feed conversion ratio (FCR); whereas enzyme addition had no effect on FCR of birds fed PKM16 and PKM24 diets. In PKM0 and PKM16 diets, enzyme addition significantly (p<0.05) increased CAID of nitrogen and energy but had no effect in the PKM8 and PKM24 diets. Inclusion of PKM into the basal diet, irrespective of inclusion level, enhanced (p<0.05) starch and fat digestibility. Inclusion of PKM at 16% and 24% resulted in similar CAID of neutral detergent fiber (NDF) but higher (p<0.05) than that of the PKM0 and PKM8 diets. Enzyme addition, regardless of the level of PKM inclusion, significantly (p<0.05) increased CAID of NDF. There was a significant (p<0.05) decrease in AMEn with PKM inclusion of 24%. The present data suggest that inclusion of PKM in broiler diets could be optimized if PKM-containing diets are formulated based on digestible amino

  20. Exogenous calcium induces tolerance to atrazine stress in Pennisetum seedlings and promotes photosynthetic activity, antioxidant enzymes and psbA gene transcripts.

    PubMed

    Erinle, Kehinde Olajide; Jiang, Zhao; Ma, Bingbing; Li, Jinmei; Chen, Yukun; Ur-Rehman, Khalil; Shahla, Andleeb; Zhang, Ying

    2016-10-01

    Calcium (Ca) has been reported to lessen oxidative damages in plants by upregulating the activities of antioxidant enzymes. However, atrazine mediated reactive oxygen species (ROS) reduction by Ca is limited. This study therefore investigated the effect of exogenously applied Ca on ROS, antioxidants activity and gene transcripts, the D1 protein (psbA gene), and chlorophyll contents in Pennisetum seedlings pre-treated with atrazine. Atrazine toxicity increased ROS production and enzyme activities (ascorbate peroxidase APX, peroxidase POD, Superoxide dismutase SOD, glutathione-S-transferase GST); but decreased antioxidants (APX, POD, and Cu/Zn SOD) and psbA gene transcripts. Atrazine also decreased the chlorophyll contents, but increased chlorophyll (a/b) ratio. Contrarily, Ca application to atrazine pre-treated seedlings lowered the harmful effects of atrazine by reducing ROS levels, but enhancing the accumulation of total chlorophyll contents. Ca-protected seedlings in the presence of atrazine manifested reduced APX and POD activity, whereas SOD and GST activity was further increased with Ca application. Antioxidant gene transcripts that were down-regulated by atrazine toxicity were up-regulated with the application of Ca. Calcium application also resulted in up-regulation of the D1 protein. In conclusion, ability of calcium to reverse atrazine-induced oxidative damage and calcium regulatory role on GST in Pennisetum was presented.

  1. [Alleviated affect of exogenous CaCl2 on the growth, antioxidative enzyme activities and cadmium absorption efficiency of Wedelia trilobata hairy roots under cadmium stress].

    PubMed

    Shi, Heping; Wang, Yunling; Tsang, PoKeung Eric; Chan, LeeWah Andrew

    2012-06-01

    In order to study the physiological mechanism of exogenous calcium on the toxicity of heavy metal cadmium (Cd) to Wedelia trilobata hairy roots, the effects of Cd alone, and in combination with different concentrations of Ca on growth, contents of soluble protein and malondialdehyde (MDA), activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and peroxidase (POD), Cd2+ absorption in W. trilobata hairy roots were investigated. Cd concentrations lower than 50 micromol/L enhanced the growth of hairy roots, while concentrations higher than 100 micromol/L inhibited growth, making the branched roots short and small, and also turning the root tips brown, even black. In comparison with the control (0 micromol/L Cd), the soluble protein content in hairy roots was found to increase when cultured with 10-50 micromol/L Cd, and decrease when exposed to a cadmium concentration higher than 100 micromol/L Cd. In addition, the activities of POD and SOD activity and MDA content were significantly higher than the control. Compared to the control (hairy roots cultured without 10-30 mmol/L Ca), 100 micromol/L Cd or 300 micromol/L Cd in combination with 10-30 mmol/L Ca resulted in increased growth, causing the main root and secondary roots thicker and also an increase in soluble protein content. On the contrary, MDA content and POD and SOD activities decreased. Quantitative analysis by Atomic Absorption Spectrophotometry showed that W. trilobata hairy roots can absorb and adsorb heavy metal Cd in the ionic form of Cd2+. The maximum content of Cd2+ absorbed by the hairy roots was obtained with a concentration 100 micromol/L Cd2+ while that of Cd2+ adsorbed by hairy roots was achieved with a concentration of 300 micromol/L Cd2+. The exogenous addition of 10-30 mmol/L Ca2+ was found to reduce the absorption, adsorption of Cd2+ and the toxicity of Cd significantly. This reduction in toxicity was caused by the reduction in the absorption of Cd and decreasing the lipid peroxidation through regulating the

  2. Exogenous Ochronosis.

    PubMed

    Bhattar, Prachi A; Zawar, Vijay P; Godse, Kiran V; Patil, Sharmila P; Nadkarni, Nitin J; Gautam, Manjyot M

    2015-01-01

    Exogenous ochronosis (EO) is a cutaneous disorder characterized by blue-black pigmentation resulting as a complication of long-term application of skin-lightening creams containing hydroquinone but may also occur due to topical contact with phenol or resorcinol in dark-skinned individuals. It can also occur following the use of systemic antimalarials such as quinine. EO is clinically and histologically similar to its endogenous counterpart viz., alkaptonuria, which, however, exhibits systemic effects and is an inherited disorder. Dermoscopy and in vivo skin reflectance confocal microscopy are noninvasive in vivo diagnostic tools. It is very difficult to treat EO, a cosmetically disfiguring and troubling disorder with disappointing treatment options.

  3. Exogenous Ochronosis

    PubMed Central

    Bhattar, Prachi A; Zawar, Vijay P; Godse, Kiran V; Patil, Sharmila P; Nadkarni, Nitin J; Gautam, Manjyot M

    2015-01-01

    Exogenous ochronosis (EO) is a cutaneous disorder characterized by blue-black pigmentation resulting as a complication of long-term application of skin-lightening creams containing hydroquinone but may also occur due to topical contact with phenol or resorcinol in dark-skinned individuals. It can also occur following the use of systemic antimalarials such as quinine. EO is clinically and histologically similar to its endogenous counterpart viz., alkaptonuria, which, however, exhibits systemic effects and is an inherited disorder. Dermoscopy and in vivo skin reflectance confocal microscopy are noninvasive in vivo diagnostic tools. It is very difficult to treat EO, a cosmetically disfiguring and troubling disorder with disappointing treatment options. PMID:26677264

  4. Enzyme

    MedlinePlus

    Enzymes are complex proteins that cause a specific chemical change in all parts of the body. For ... use them. Blood clotting is another example of enzymes at work. Enzymes are needed for all body ...

  5. Human T cell microparticles circulate in blood of hepatitis patients and induce fibrolytic activation of hepatic stellate cells

    PubMed Central

    Kornek, Miroslaw; Popov, Yury; Libermann, Towia A.; Afdhal, Nezam H.; Schuppan, Detlef

    2010-01-01

    Microparticles (MP) are small cell membrane vesicles which are released from cells during apoptosis or activation. While circulating platelet MP have been studied in some detail, the existence and functional role of T cell MP remain elusive. We show that blood from patients with active hepatitis C (ALT>100 IU/ml) contains elevated numbers of T cell MP compared to patients with mild hepatitis C (ALT<40 IU/ml) and healthy controls. T cell MP fuse with cell membranes of hepatic stellate cells (HSC), the major effector cells for excess matrix deposition in liver fibrosis and cirrhosis. MP uptake is partly ICAM-1 dependent and leads to activation of NFkB and ERK1/2 and subsequent upregulation of fibrolytic genes in HSC, to downregulation of procollagen α1(I) mRNA, and blunting of profibrogenic activities of TGFβ1. Ex vivo the induced fibrolytic activity is evident in MP derived from activated CD4+ T cells, and highest with MP from activated and apoptotic CD8+ T cells. Mass spectrometry, FACS analysis and function blocking antibodies revealed CD147/Emmprin as candidate transmembrane molecule in HSC fibrolytic activation by CD8+ T cell MP. We conclude that 1) circulating T cell MP are a novel diagnostic marker for inflammatory liver diseases, and 2) in vivo induction of T cell MP may be a novel strategy to induce regression of liver fibrosis. PMID:20979056

  6. Short communication: The effect of an exogenous enzyme with amylolytic activity on gas production and in vitro rumen starch degradability of small and large particles of corn or barley meals.

    PubMed

    Gallo, A; Giuberti, G; Duval, S; Moschini, M; Masoero, F

    2016-05-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of exogenous amylase supplementation on gas production and on in vitro rumen starch degradability (IVSD) of different sized particles of corn and barley meals (Cm and Bm, respectively). An aqueous liquid amylase formulation from Bacillus licheniformis was tested at 3 enzyme doses (EnzD; 0, 300 and 1,500 kilo novo units/kg of dry matter) on small (<750 µm) and large (≥750 µm) particle size (PS) of Cm and Bm. Data were analyzed according to a randomized complete block design with a factorial arrangement of treatments; the main tested effects were PS, EnzD, and their interaction. Fermentation run entered in the model as random effect. The mixed rumen fluid was collected from 2 rumen-fistulated Holstein dry dairy cows fed at maintenance (forage:concentrate ratio of 80:20; 12% crude protein; 55% amylase-treated neutral detergent fiber). Small particles of both Cm and Bm had a greater rate of fermentation and shorter lag time than large particles. The rate of starch degradation was greater for small than for large particles of Bm, being 0.187 and 0.125 1/h, respectively. Conversely, the rate of starch degradation of Cm averaged 0.063 1/h and was similar among treatments. Enzyme supplementation tended to reduce lag time and to increase rate of fermentation for both PS of Cm and Bm, with a more pronounced effect for small PS. A limited EnzD effect was measured for IVSD data and rate of starch degradation; PS influenced fermentation parameters and the magnitude of starch degradation more than EnzD. Supplementation with exogenous amylase influenced the rumen fermentation pattern of small and large PS of Cm and Bm, even if the effect of the enzyme supplementation differed according to the PS of cereal meals.

  7. Characterization of fibrolytic and lipid accumulating fungi isolated from fresh cattle feces.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yupei; Tan, Hongming; Deng, Qingli; Cao, Lixiang

    2014-01-01

    To characterize coprophilous fungi for converting lignocellulose into lipids, four fungal strains utilizing cellulose microcrystalline and xylan were screened. The fungi were identified as Cladosporium sp. F1, Circinella sp. F6, Mycocladus sp. F49, and Byssochlamys sp. F52 based on the ITS1-5.8S-ITS2 sequence similarity. The strain F52 accumulated 336.0 mg/L reducing sugars on cottonseed shells treated with ethanol. The combination of F1+F52 increased the reducing sugar accumulating rates. However, the activities of avicelase and xylanase were not correlated with the reducing sugars accumulated by the test strains. Strains F6 and F52 produced higher cellular lipids (above 530.7 mg/L) than other strains. However, the strain F52 could produce more cellular lipids with xylose and mannose as the sole carbon sources. The results indicated that the reducing sugar contents accumulated by the different strains were influenced by the fungal taxa and ligocellulosic types. With fibrolytic and lipid accumulating activities, diverse fungi harboring in herbivore feces need to be further characterized.

  8. Stunting syndrome in broilers: effect of age and exogenous amylase and protease on performance, development of the digestive tract, digestive enzyme activity, and apparent digestibility.

    PubMed

    Shapiro, F; Nir, I

    1995-12-01

    Day-old male, meat-type chicks raised in brooder batteries were infected by orally administering an inoculum prepared from intestines of broiler chicks infected with stunting syndrome (SS). Naive controls were kept in a parallel room. The chicks were fed a commercial starter diet supplemented with two levels of enzyme preparations to 14 d of age. The experiment was continued to the age of 6 wk in order to estimate compensatory feed intake and growth. In a parallel study, digestibility of the feed was determined from 1 to 3 wk of age with control or inoculated chicks. The enzymes amylase and proteases were produced by Bacillus subtilis and Penicillium emersonii. Enzyme supplementation had no effect on feed intake, growth, or feed utilization, or on digestibility of fat, starch, protein, or energy. Because enzyme supplementation did not consistently affect performance of chicks and no interactions were observed between enzyme supplementation and infection status, data are presented for effects of infection only. Inoculation of SS-infective material reduced performance to 4 wk. Compensatory growth and feed intake were observed from the age of 4 wk onward. At the age of 6 wk the slight retardation of the inoculated chicks was not significant. On Week 1, retention of fat, starch, protein, and energy was significantly depressed in the inoculated chicks. At the age of 2 wk, retention of starch was not depressed, and at the age of 3 wk, the only consistent depression was that observed for fat. The proventriculus weight and content were consistently higher in inoculated chicks, as were the small intestine and intestinal content. The pH of the gizzard content was higher, and that of the small intestine content was lower, in the inoculated birds than in their control counterparts. Stunting syndrome infection was accompanied by a significant depression of trypsin activity in the pancreas at the age of 1 and 2 wk. At these periods, amylase and chymotrypsin were not affected. At

  9. Influence of canola meal-based diets supplemented with exogenous enzyme and digestible lysine on performance, digestibility, carcass, and immunity responses of broiler chickens.

    PubMed

    Mushtaq, T; Sarwar, M; Ahmad, G; Mirza, M A; Nawaz, H; Mushtaq, M M Haroon; Noreen, U

    2007-10-01

    The response of broiler chickens to 2 levels of endo-1,4-beta xylanase and endo-1,3-beta glucanase combination (with and without), 3 levels of digestible Lys (0.8, 0.9, and 1.0%), and 2 levels of canola meal (CM; 20 and 30%) were evaluated in 2 x 3 x 2 factorial arrangement. A total of 2,448 male Hubbard broiler chicks were fed on practical mash diets having 2,750 kcal of ME.kg(-1) and 19.6% CP from 1 to 42 d of age. The BW gain was significantly reduced when 30% CM was added in the diets during 1 to 21 d. Feed:gain and mortality were also observed to be high. No significant effect of enzyme addition or Lys level was observed on feed intake, BW gain, feed:gain, and mortality during the starter phase. When the data were pooled for 42 d, BW gain and feed:gain were unaffected by enzyme addition or Lys levels. A depression in breast weight was observed due to 30% CM or 0.8 and 0.9% digestible Lys at 43 d. Leg weights were significantly depressed by enzyme addition or increasing digestible Lys to 1.0% of the diets. The AME, nitrogen digestibility, and antibody titers against Newcastle and infectious bursal diseases were also unaffected by the dietary treatments. In conclusion, the 30% CM is not recommended in broiler diets especially during starter phase (1 to 21 d). However, the CM may be used up to 30% of the diets during finishing phase. The digestible Lys can be lowered to 0.8% when amino acids in proportion to digestible Lys follow the ideal AA ratio. The glucanase and xylanase cocktail have no pronounced effect on the growth performance, nutrient digestibility, and carcass characteristics.

  10. Presence of Selected Methanogens, Fibrolytic Bacteria, and Proteobacteria in the Gastrointestinal Tract of Neonatal Dairy Calves from Birth to 72 Hours

    PubMed Central

    Guzman, Cesar E.; Bereza-Malcolm, Lara T.; De Groef, Bert; Franks, Ashley E.

    2015-01-01

    The microbial communities in the gastrointestinal tract of a young calf are essential for the anatomical and physiological development that permits a transition from milk to solid feed. Selected methanogens, fibrolytic bacteria, and proteobacteria were quantified in the rumen fluid and tissue, abomasum fluid, cecum fluid and tissue, and feces of Holstein bull calves on day 0 (0–20 mins after birth), day 1 (24 ± 1 h after birth), day 2 (48 ± 1 h after birth), and day 3 (72 ± 1 h after birth). Methanogens, fibrolytic bacteria, and Geobacter spp. were found to be already present from birth, indicating that microbial colonization of the gastrointestinal tract occurred before or during delivery. The abundance of methanogens and Geobacter spp. differed between the days tested and between compartments of the digestive tract and feces, but such difference was not observed for fibrolytic bacteria. Our findings suggests that methanogens might have an alternative hydrogen provider such as Geobacter spp. during these early stages of postnatal development. In addition, fibrolytic bacteria were present in the rumen well before the availability of fibrous substrates, suggesting that they might use nutrients other than cellulose and hemicellose. PMID:26186002

  11. Modulation of GSH with exogenous agents leads to changes in glyoxalase 1 enzyme activity in VL-17A cells exposed to chronic alcohol plus high glucose.

    PubMed

    Kumar, S Mathan; Swaminathan, Kavitha; Clemens, Dahn L; Dey, Aparajita

    2014-02-01

    Gluthathione (GSH) is a major cellular antioxidant. The present study utilizing VL-17A cells exposed to chronic alcohol plus high glucose investigated the changes in oxidative stress, toxicity, and glyoxalase 1 activity as a detoxification pathway due to changes in GSH level through GSH supplementation with N-acetyl cysteine (NAC) or ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA) and its depletion through buthionine sulfoximine (BSO) or diethyl maleate (DEM). Glyoxalase 1 plays an important role in detoxification of methylglyoxal which is formed as a precursor of advanced glycated end products formed due to high glucose mediated oxidative stress. Significant changes in glyoxalase 1 activity utilizing methylglyoxal or glyoxal as substrates occurred with NAC or UDCA or BSO or DEM supplementation in chronic alcohol plus high glucose treated VL-17A cells. NAC or UDCA administration in chronic alcohol plus high glucose treated VL-17A cells increased viability and decreased ROS levels, lipid peroxidation and 3-nitrotyrosine adduct formation. Similarly, GSH depletion with BSO or DEM had an opposite effect on the parameters in chronic alcohol plus high glucose treated VL-17A cells. In conclusion, modulation of GSH with NAC or UDCA or BSO or DEM leads to significant changes in oxidative stress, glyoxalase 1 enzyme activity and toxicity in chronic alcohol plus high glucose treated VL-17A cells.

  12. Effect of beta-glucans contained in barley- and oat-based diets and exogenous enzyme supplementation on gastrointestinal fermentation of finisher pigs and subsequent manure odor and ammonia emissions.

    PubMed

    O'Shea, C J; Sweeney, T; Lynch, M B; Gahan, D A; Callan, J J; O'Doherty, J V

    2010-04-01

    The objective of the current experiment was to evaluate the influence of dietary cereal sources of beta(1,3)(1,4)-d-glucan (beta-glucan) and enzyme supplementation on indices of environmental pollution from finisher pigs. An experiment with a 2 x 2 factorial arrangement of treatments was initiated to investigate the effect of dietary source of beta-glucan (barley vs. oats) and enzyme supplementation (no vs. yes) on nutrient digestibility, N utilization, intestinal fermentation, and manure odor and ammonia emissions from finisher boars (n = 4; BW = 73.9 kg; SD = 4.7). Sixteen boars were assigned to 1 of 4 dietary treatments (n = 4/treatment): 1) barley-based diet, 2) barley-based diet + exogenous enzyme, 3) oat-based diet, and 4) oat-based diet + enzyme. The enzyme supplement used contained endo-1,3(4)-beta-glucanase and endo-1,4-beta-xylanase. Experimental diets were formulated to contain similar concentrations of DE (13.5 MJ/kg) and digestible lysine (8.8 g/kg). Pigs offered oat-based diets had reduced digestibility of DM (0.795 vs. 0.849; SEM 0.007; P = 0.001), OM (0.808 vs. 0.865; SEM 0.007; P = 0.001), GE (0.806 vs. 0.845; SEM 0.006; P = 0.002), and NDF (0.233 vs. 0.423; SEM 0.033; P < 0.003) compared with those offered barley-based diets. Oat-based diets increased populations of Bifidobacterium spp. (7.26 vs. 6.38 log cfu/g of digesta; SEM 0.201; P = 0.005) and Lactobacillus spp. (6.99 vs. 6.18 log cfu/g of digesta; SEM 0.234; P = 0.022) in the proximal colon and decreased manure odor emissions [2,179.6 vs. 4,984.6 Ou(E)/m(3) (where Ou(E) refers to European odor units); SEM 653.7; P < 0.011] compared with barley-based diets. There was an interaction between cereal type and enzyme inclusion on manure ammonia emissions from 0 to 96 h (P = 0.050). Pigs offered barley-based diets containing an enzyme supplement had increased manure ammonia emissions compared with those offered unsupplemented barley-based diets. However, there was no effect of enzyme inclusion on

  13. The rumen: a unique source of enzymes for enhancing livestock production.

    PubMed

    Selinger, L B; Forsberg, C W; Cheng, K J

    1996-10-01

    Increasing competition in the livestock industry has forced producers to cut costs by adopting new technologies aimed at increasing production efficiency. One particularly promising technology is feeding enzymes as supplements for animal diets. Supplementation of diets for non-ruminants (e.g., swine and poultry) with fibrolytic enzymes, such as cellulases, xylanases and beta-glucanases, increases the feed conversion efficiency and growth rate of the animals. Enzymatic hydrolysis of plant cell wall polymers (e.g., cellulose, xylan, beta-glucans) releases glucose and xylose and eliminates the antinutritional effects of beta-glucans and arabinoxylans. Enzyme supplementation of diets for ruminants has also been shown to improve growth performance, even though the rumen itself represents the most potent fibrolytic fermentation system known. Implementation of this technology in the livestock industry has been limited largely because of the cost of development and production of enzymes. Over the last decade, however, developments in recombinant DNA technology have increased the efficiency of existing microbial production systems and facilitated exploitation of alternative sources of industrial enzymes. The ruminal ecosystem is among the novel enzyme sources currently being explored. Understanding the role of enzymes in feed digestion through characterization of the enzymology and genetics involved in digestion of feedstuffs by ruminants will provide insight required to improve the products currently available to producers. Characterization of genes encoding a variety of hydrolytic enzymes, such as cellulases, xylanases, beta-glucanases, amylases, pectinases, proteases, phytases and tannases, will foster the development of more efficacious enzyme supplements and enzyme expression systems for enhancing nutrient utilization by domestic animals. Characteristics of the original source organism need no longer restrict the production of a useful enzyme. Recent reports of

  14. Effect of non-starch-polysaccharide-degrading enzymes as feed additive on the rumen bacterial population in non-lactating cows quantified by real-time PCR.

    PubMed

    Zeitz, J O; Guertler, P; Pfaffl, M W; Eisenreich, R; Wiedemann, S; Schwarz, F J

    2013-12-01

    The effects of non-starch-polysaccharide-degrading enzymes, added to a maize silage- and grass silage-based total mixed ration (TMR) at least 14 h before feeding, on the rumen bacterial population were investigated. Six non-lactating Holstein Friesian cows were allocated to three treatment groups using a duplicate 3 × 3 Latin square design with three 31-day periods (29 days of adaptation and 2 days of sampling). Treatments were control TMR [69% forage and 31% concentrates on a dry matter (DM) basis] or TMR with 13.8 or 27.7 ml/kg of feed DM of Roxazyme G2 liquid with activities (U/ml enzyme preparation) of xylanase 260 000, β-glucanase 180 000 and cellulase 8000 (DSM Nutritional Products, Basel, Switzerland). The concentrations of 16S rDNA of Anaerovibrio lipolytica, Fibrobacter succinogenes, Prevotella ruminicola, Ruminococcus flavefaciens, Selenomonas ruminantium and Treponema bryantii, and their relative percentage of total bacteria in rumen samples obtained before feeding and 3 and 7 h after feeding and from two rumen fractions were determined using real-time PCR. Sampling time had only little influence, but bacterial numbers and the composition of the population differed between the transition layer between rumen fluid and the fibre mat (fraction A) and the rumen fluid (fraction B) highlighting the importance to standardize sampling. The 16S rDNA copies of total bacteria and the six bacterial species as well as the population composition were mainly unaffected by the high levels of exogenous enzymes supplemented at all sampling times and in both rumen fractions. Occasionally, the percentages of the non-fibrolytic species P. ruminicola and A. lipolytica changed in response to enzyme supplementation. Some increases in the potential degradability of the diet and decreases in lag time which occurred collaterally indicate that other factors than changes in numbers of non-particle-associated bacteria are mainly responsible for the effects of

  15. Fibrolytic Bacteria Isolated from the Rumen of North American Moose (Alces alces) and Their Use as a Probiotic in Neonatal Lambs

    PubMed Central

    Ishaq, Suzanne L.; Kim, Christina J.; Reis, Doug; Wright, André-Denis G.

    2015-01-01

    Fibrolytic bacteria were isolated from the rumen of North American moose (Alces alces), which eat a high-fiber diet of woody browse. It was hypothesized that fibrolytic bacteria isolated from the moose rumen could be used as probiotics to improve fiber degradation and animal production. Thirty-one isolates (Bacillus, n = 26; Paenibacillus, n = 1; and Staphylococcus, n = 4) were cultured from moose rumen digesta samples collected in Vermont. Using Sanger sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene, culturing techniques, and optical densities, isolates were identified and screened for biochemical properties important to plant carbohydrate degradation. Five isolates were selected as candidates for use as a probiotic, which was administered daily to neonate lambs for 9 weeks. It was hypothesized that regular administration of a probiotic to improve fibrolysis to neonate animals through weaning would increase the developing rumen bacterial diversity, increase animal production, and allow for long-term colonization of the probiotic species. Neither weight gain nor wool quality was improved in lambs given a probiotic, however, dietary efficiency was increased as evidenced by the reduced feed intake (and rearing costs) without a loss to weight gain. Experimental lambs had a lower acetate to propionate ratio than control lambs, which was previously shown to indicate increased dietary efficiency. Fibrolytic bacteria made up the majority of sequences, mainly Prevotella, Butyrivibrio, and Ruminococcus. While protozoal densities increased over time and were stable, methanogen densities varied greatly in the first six months of life for lambs. This is likely due to the changing diet and bacterial populations in the developing rumen. PMID:26716685

  16. Fibrolytic Bacteria Isolated from the Rumen of North American Moose (Alces alces) and Their Use as a Probiotic in Neonatal Lambs.

    PubMed

    Ishaq, Suzanne L; Kim, Christina J; Reis, Doug; Wright, André-Denis G

    2015-01-01

    Fibrolytic bacteria were isolated from the rumen of North American moose (Alces alces), which eat a high-fiber diet of woody browse. It was hypothesized that fibrolytic bacteria isolated from the moose rumen could be used as probiotics to improve fiber degradation and animal production. Thirty-one isolates (Bacillus, n = 26; Paenibacillus, n = 1; and Staphylococcus, n = 4) were cultured from moose rumen digesta samples collected in Vermont. Using Sanger sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene, culturing techniques, and optical densities, isolates were identified and screened for biochemical properties important to plant carbohydrate degradation. Five isolates were selected as candidates for use as a probiotic, which was administered daily to neonate lambs for 9 weeks. It was hypothesized that regular administration of a probiotic to improve fibrolysis to neonate animals through weaning would increase the developing rumen bacterial diversity, increase animal production, and allow for long-term colonization of the probiotic species. Neither weight gain nor wool quality was improved in lambs given a probiotic, however, dietary efficiency was increased as evidenced by the reduced feed intake (and rearing costs) without a loss to weight gain. Experimental lambs had a lower acetate to propionate ratio than control lambs, which was previously shown to indicate increased dietary efficiency. Fibrolytic bacteria made up the majority of sequences, mainly Prevotella, Butyrivibrio, and Ruminococcus. While protozoal densities increased over time and were stable, methanogen densities varied greatly in the first six months of life for lambs. This is likely due to the changing diet and bacterial populations in the developing rumen.

  17. Use of bean husk as an easily digestible fiber source for activating the fibrolytic rumen bacterium Fibrobacter succinogenes and rice straw digestion.

    PubMed

    Fuma, Ryosuke; Oyaizu, Shinya; Nukui, Yoko; Ngwe, Tin; Shinkai, Takumi; Koike, Satoshi; Kobayashi, Yasuo

    2012-10-01

    A series of in sacco and in vitro studies were carried out to evaluate bean husks for activation of fibrolytic rumen bacteria and rice straw digestion. First, lablab bean husk, chickpea husk and rice straw were suspended in the rumen of sheep to analyze the bacterial consortium developed on each fiber source. Known members of fiber-associating bacteria were found on both lablab bean husk and rice straw, but some of these bacteria were lacking on chickpea husk. Second, a pure culture study was carried out using six strains of Fibrobacter succinogenes. Both husks stimulated the growth of all tested strains, including a strain that did not grow on rice straw. The strain OS128 that showed the highest growth on rice straw displayed even higher growth on lablab bean husk without a time lag. Finally, two-step incubations were carried out to determine whether prior incubation of rumen fluid with husks stimulates subsequent rice straw digestion. Higher digestibility of rice straw was recorded in the second-round incubation following the first incubation with bean husks. These results suggest that the tested bean husks improve the digestion of rice straw by activating fibrolytic F. succinogenes and other associated bacteria.

  18. Effect of ciliate protozoa on the activity of polysaccharide-degrading enzymes and fibre breakdown in the rumen ecosystem.

    PubMed

    Williams, A G; Withers, S E

    1991-02-01

    The effect of ciliate protozoa on the activity of polysaccharide-degrading enzymes in microbial populations from the digesta solids and liquor fractions of rumen contents was examined after the refaunation of ciliate-free sheep with an A-type rumen protozoal population. Although the culturable rumen bacterial population was reduced after refaunation the number of fibrolytic micro-organisms detected was higher; the xylanolytic bacterial population and numbers of fungal zoospores were increased after refaunation. The proportion of propionic acid was lower in the refaunated animals, whereas the concentration of ammonia and the acidic metabolites acetate, butyrate and valerate were all increased. The range of enzyme activities present in the digesta subpopulations were the same in defaunated and refaunated animals. The activities of the polysaccharide-degrading enzymes, however, were increased in the microbial populations associated with the digesta solids after refaunation, and at 16 h after feeding the activities were 4-8 times (beta-D-xylosidase 20 times) higher than the levels detected in the adherent population from defaunated sheep. The protozoa, either directly through their own enzymes or indirectly as a consequence of their effects on the population size and activity of the other fibrolytic micro-organisms present, have an important role in determining the level of activity of polysaccharide-degrading enzymes in the rumen ecosystem. Although the extent of ryegrass (Lolium perenne) hay digestion was similar after 24 h in the absence or presence of protozoa, the initial ruminal degradation was higher in refaunated sheep.

  19. Effect of exogenous xylanase on rumen in vitro gas production and degradability of wheat straw.

    PubMed

    Togtokhbayar, Norovsambuu; Cerrillo, María A; Rodríguez, Germán Buendía; Elghandour, Mona M M Y; Salem, Abdelfattah Z M; Urankhaich, Chuluunbaatar; Jigjidpurev, Sukhbaatar; Odongo, Nicholas E; Kholif, Ahmed E

    2015-08-01

    The objective of this study was to determine effects of xylanase on in vitro gas production (GP) and in sacco degradability of wheat straw. Rumen fluid was obtained from three Mongolian native goats fitted with permanent rumen cannulas. The trial consisted of five doses (0, 0.5, 1.0, 1.5, 2.0 μL/g of substrate) of a commercial xylanase (Dyadic® xylanase PLUS, Dyadic International, Inc., Jupiter, FL, USA). For the in sacco degradability, different levels of xylanase enzyme were added directly onto 2 g of wheat straw in nylon bags and incubated in the rumen for 3, 6, 12, 24 and 48 h to estimate degradability of wheat straw. Total GP increased (P < 0.001) at all times of incubation at intermediate levels of xylanase. Methane production had a similar pattern at 3 and 12 h of incubation; increased linearly at 24 h of incubation, and was unaffected at 6 and 48 h of incubation. Rumen NH3 -N concentration increased linearly at 3 h and the highest values were observed with intermediate enzyme levels. All ruminal volatile fatty acids increased linearly with intermediate levels of the fibrolytic enzyme. The in sacco rate of dry matter degradation decreased linearly (P = 0.020) with increasing enzymes. Intermediate levels of xylanase improved rumen kinetic fermentation and degradability. The outcome of this research indicated that the application of xylanase enzyme could improve in vitro GP fermentation of wheat straw.

  20. Exogenous Attention Enables Perceptual Learning.

    PubMed

    Szpiro, Sarit F A; Carrasco, Marisa

    2015-12-01

    Practice can improve visual perception, and these improvements are considered to be a form of brain plasticity. Training-induced learning is time-consuming and requires hundreds of trials across multiple days. The process of learning acquisition is understudied. Can learning acquisition be potentiated by manipulating visual attentional cues? We developed a protocol in which we used task-irrelevant cues for between-groups manipulation of attention during training. We found that training with exogenous attention can enable the acquisition of learning. Remarkably, this learning was maintained even when observers were subsequently tested under neutral conditions, which indicates that a change in perception was involved. Our study is the first to isolate the effects of exogenous attention and to demonstrate its efficacy to enable learning. We propose that exogenous attention boosts perceptual learning by enhancing stimulus encoding.

  1. Expressing exogenous genes in newts by transgenesis.

    PubMed

    Casco-Robles, Martin Miguel; Yamada, Shouta; Miura, Tomoya; Nakamura, Kenta; Haynes, Tracy; Maki, Nobuyasu; Del Rio-Tsonis, Katia; Tsonis, Panagiotis A; Chiba, Chikafumi

    2011-05-01

    The great regenerative abilities of newts provide the impetus for studies at the molecular level. However, efficient methods for gene regulation have historically been quite limited. Here we describe a protocol for transgenically expressing exogenous genes in the newt Cynops pyrrhogaster. This method is simple: a reaction mixture of I-SceI meganuclease and a plasmid DNA carrying a transgene cassette flanked by the enzyme recognition sites is directly injected into fertilized eggs. The protocol achieves a high efficiency of transgenesis, comparable to protocols used in other animal systems, and it provides a practical number of transgenic newts (∼20% of injected embryos) that survive beyond metamorphosis and that can be applied to regenerative studies. The entire protocol for obtaining transgenic adult newts takes 4-5 months.

  2. Improvement in Saccharification Yield of Mixed Rumen Enzymes by Identification of Recalcitrant Cell Wall Constituents Using Enzyme Fingerprinting.

    PubMed

    Badhan, Ajay; Wang, Yu-Xi; Gruninger, Robert; Patton, Donald; Powlowski, Justin; Tsang, Adrian; McAllister, Tim A

    2015-01-01

    Identification of recalcitrant factors that limit digestion of forages and the development of enzymatic approaches that improve hydrolysis could play a key role in improving the efficiency of meat and milk production in ruminants. Enzyme fingerprinting of barley silage fed to heifers and total tract indigestible fibre residue (TIFR) collected from feces was used to identify cell wall components resistant to total tract digestion. Enzyme fingerprinting results identified acetyl xylan esterases as key to the enhanced ruminal digestion. FTIR analysis also suggested cross-link cell wall polymers as principal components of indigested fiber residues in feces. Based on structural information from enzymatic fingerprinting and FTIR, enzyme pretreatment to enhance glucose yield from barley straw and alfalfa hay upon exposure to mixed rumen-enzymes was developed. Prehydrolysis effects of recombinant fungal fibrolytic hydrolases were analyzed using microassay in combination with statistical experimental design. Recombinant hemicellulases and auxiliary enzymes initiated degradation of plant structural polysaccharides upon application and improved the in vitro saccharification of alfalfa and barley straw by mixed rumen enzymes. The validation results showed that microassay in combination with statistical experimental design can be successfully used to predict effective enzyme pretreatments that can enhance plant cell wall digestion by mixed rumen enzymes.

  3. Exogenous attention to unseen objects?

    PubMed

    Norman, Liam J; Heywood, Charles A; Kentridge, Robert W

    2015-09-01

    Attention and awareness are closely related phenomena, but recent evidence has shown that not all attended stimuli give rise to awareness. Controversy still remains over whether, and the extent to which, a dissociation between attention and awareness encompasses all forms of attention. For example, it has been suggested that attention without awareness is more readily demonstrated for voluntary, endogenous attention than its reflexive, exogenous counterpart. Here we examine whether exogenous attentional cueing can have selective behavioural effects on stimuli that nevertheless remain unseen. Using a task in which object-based attention has been shown in the absence of awareness, we remove all possible contingencies between cues and target stimuli to ensure that any cueing effects must be under purely exogenous control, and find evidence of exogenous object-based attention without awareness. In a second experiment we address whether this dissociation crucially depends on the method used to establish that the objects indeed remain unseen. Specifically, to confirm that objects are unseen we adopt appropriate signal detection task procedures, including those that retain parity with the primary attentional task (by requiring participants to discriminate the two types of trial that are used to measure an effect of attention). We show a significant object-based attention effect is apparent under conditions where the selected object indeed remains undetectable.

  4. Exogenous melatonin improves Malus resistance to Marssonina apple blotch.

    PubMed

    Yin, Lihua; Wang, Ping; Li, Mingjun; Ke, Xiwang; Li, Cuiying; Liang, Dong; Wu, Shan; Ma, Xinli; Li, Chao; Zou, Yangjun; Ma, Fengwang

    2013-05-01

    We examined whether exogenously applied melatonin could improve resistance to Marssonina apple blotch (Diplocarpon mali) by apple [Malus prunifolia (Willd.) Borkh. cv. Donghongguo]. This serious disease leads to premature defoliation in the main regions of apple production. When plants were pretreated with melatonin, resistance was increased in the leaves. We investigated the potential roles for melatonin in modulating levels of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), as well the activities of antioxidant enzymes and pathogenesis-related proteins during these plant-pathogen interactions. Pretreatment enabled plants to maintain intracellular H2O2 concentrations at steady-state levels and enhance the activities of plant defence-related enzymes, possibly improving disease resistance. Because melatonin is safe and beneficial to animals and humans, exogenous pretreatment might represent a promising cultivation strategy to protect plants against this pathogen infection.

  5. Motivation sharpens exogenous spatial attention.

    PubMed

    Engelmann, Jan B; Pessoa, Luiz

    2007-08-01

    Although both attention and motivation affect behavior, how these 2 systems interact is currently unknown. To address this question, 2 experiments were conducted in which participants performed a spatially cued forced-choice localization task under varying levels of motivation. Participants were asked to indicate the location of a peripherally cued target while ignoring a distracter. Motivation was manipulated by varying magnitude and valence (reward and punishment) of an incentive linked to task performance. Attention was manipulated via a peripheral cue, which correctly predicted the presence of a target stimulus on 70% of the trials. Taken together, our findings revealed that the signal detection measure, reflecting perceptual sensitivity, increased as a function of incentive value during both valid and invalid trials. In addition, trend analyses revealed a linear increase in detection sensitivity as a function of incentive magnitude for both reward and punishment conditions. Our results suggest that elevated motivation leads to improved efficiency in orienting and reorienting of exogenous spatial attention and that one mechanism by which attention and motivation interact involves the sharpening of attention during motivationally salient conditions.

  6. [Effect of cadmium stress on physiological characteristics of garlic seedlings and the alleviation effects of exogenous calcium].

    PubMed

    Li, He; Lian, Hai-feng; Liu, Shi-qi; Yu, Xin-hui; Sun, Ya-li; Guo, Hui-ping

    2015-04-01

    In the experiment, the effects of exogenous cadmium (Cd2+) and calcium (Ca2+) in nutrient solution on growth, photosynthetic characteristics, enzymes activities, main mineral elements absorption of garlic seedlings were studied. The results showed that cadmium could obviously inhibit the growth of garlic seedlings, decrease the pigment contents and photosynthetic parameters (P(n), E, g(s)) of leaves, reduced the enzymes (SOD, POD, CAT) activities and increase the MDA content of leaves, and also could reduce the N, P, K, Ca, Mg contents and increase the Cd content of roots. The growth was promoted after adding exogenous calcium to garlic seedlings under cadmium stress, which reflected that the morphological indexes were increased at first and then decreased with the increase of exogenous calcium concentrations, and were maximized when the exogenous calcium was 2 or 3 mmol x L(-1). At the same time, the pigment contents and photosynthetic parameters (P(n), E, g(s)) of leaves showed a similar tendency with the morphological indexes, and they were the highest when the exogenous calcium was 2 or 3 mmol x L(-1). In addition, adding exogenous calcium to garlic seedlings under cadmium stress enhanced the enzymes (SOD, POD, CAT) activities and decreased the MDA content of leaves, also added the N, P, K, Ca, Mg contents and reduced the Cd content of roots, and the effect was best when the exogenous calcium concentration was 2 or 3 mmol x L(-1).

  7. Exogenous spatial attention decreases audiovisual integration.

    PubMed

    Van der Stoep, N; Van der Stigchel, S; Nijboer, T C W

    2015-02-01

    Multisensory integration (MSI) and spatial attention are both mechanisms through which the processing of sensory information can be facilitated. Studies on the interaction between spatial attention and MSI have mainly focused on the interaction between endogenous spatial attention and MSI. Most of these studies have shown that endogenously attending a multisensory target enhances MSI. It is currently unclear, however, whether and how exogenous spatial attention and MSI interact. In the current study, we investigated the interaction between these two important bottom-up processes in two experiments. In Experiment 1 the target location was task-relevant, and in Experiment 2 the target location was task-irrelevant. Valid or invalid exogenous auditory cues were presented before the onset of unimodal auditory, unimodal visual, and audiovisual targets. We observed reliable cueing effects and multisensory response enhancement in both experiments. To examine whether audiovisual integration was influenced by exogenous spatial attention, the amount of race model violation was compared between exogenously attended and unattended targets. In both Experiment 1 and Experiment 2, a decrease in MSI was observed when audiovisual targets were exogenously attended, compared to when they were not. The interaction between exogenous attention and MSI was less pronounced in Experiment 2. Therefore, our results indicate that exogenous attention diminishes MSI when spatial orienting is relevant. The results are discussed in terms of models of multisensory integration and attention.

  8. Exogenous polyamines promote osteogenic differentiation by reciprocally regulating osteogenic and adipogenic gene expression.

    PubMed

    Lee, Mon-Juan; Chen, Yuhsin; Huang, Yuan-Pin; Hsu, Yi-Chiang; Chiang, Lan-Hsin; Chen, Tzu-Yu; Wang, Gwo-Jaw

    2013-12-01

    Polyamines are naturally occurring organic polycations that are ubiquitous in all organisms, and are essential for cell proliferation and differentiation. Although polyamines are involved in various cellular processes, their roles in stem cell differentiation are relatively unexplored. In this study, we found that exogenous polyamines, putrescine, spermidine, and spermine, promoted osteogenic differentiation of human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hBMSCs) without inducing cell death or apoptosis. Alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity and the mRNA level of osteogenic genes, including Runx2, ALP, osteopontin, and osteocalcin, were up-regulated by exogenous polyamines. When hBMSCs were cultured at high cell density favoring adipocyte formation, exogenous polyamines resulted in down-regulation of adipogenic genes such as PPARγ, aP2, and adipsin. Extracellular matrix mineralization, a marker for osteoblast maturation, was enhanced in the presence of exogenous polyamines, while lipid accumulation, an indication of adipogenic differentiation, was attenuated. Exogenous polyamines increased the mRNA expression of polyamine-modulated factor 1 (PMF-1) and its downstream effector, spermidine/spermine N(1)-acetyltransferase (SSAT), while that of ornithine decarboxylase (ODC), the rate-limiting enzyme in polyamine biosynthesis, was suppressed. These results lead to possible connections between polyamine metabolism and osteogenic differentiation pathways. To summarize, this study provides evidence for the involvement of polyamines in osteogenic differentiation of hBMSCs, and is the first to demonstrate that osteogenic and adipogenic differentiation are reciprocally regulated by exogenous polyamines.

  9. Endogenous versus Exogenous Origins of Crises

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sornette, Didier

    Are large biological extinctions such as the Cretaceous/Tertiary KT boundary due to a meteorite, extreme volcanic activity or self-organized critical extinction cascades? Are commercial successes due to a progressive reputation cascade or the result of a well orchestrated advertisement? Determining the chain of causality for Xevents in complex systems requires disentangling interwoven exogenous and endogenous contributions with either no clear signature or too many signatures. Here, I review several efforts carried out with collaborators which suggest a general strategy for understanding the organizations of several complex systems under the dual effect of endogenous and exogenous fluctuations. The studied examples are: internet download shocks, book sale shocks, social shocks, financial volatility shocks, and financial crashes. Simple models are offered to quantitatively relate the endogenous organization to the exogenous response of the system. Suggestions for applications of these ideas to many other systems are offered.

  10. Improved abiotic stress tolerance of bermudagrass by exogenous small molecules.

    PubMed

    Chan, Zhulong; Shi, Haitao

    2015-01-01

    As a widely used warm-season turfgrass in landscapes and golf courses, bermudagrass encounters multiple abiotic stresses during the growth and development. Physiology analysis indicated that abiotic stresses induced the accumulation of ROS and decline of photosynthesis, resulting in increased cell damage and inhibited growth. Proteomic and metabolomic approaches showed that antioxidant enzymes and osmoprotectant contents (sugar, sucrose, dehydrin, proline) were extensively changed under abiotic stress conditions. Exogenous application of small molecules, such as ABA, NO, CaCl2, H2S, polyamine and melatonin, could effectively alleviate damages caused by multiple abiotic stresses, including drought, salt, heat and cold. Based on high through-put RNA seq analysis, genes involved in ROS, transcription factors, hormones, and carbohydrate metabolisms were largely enriched. The data indicated that small molecules induced the accumulation of osmoprotectants and antioxidants, kept cell membrane integrity, increased photosynthesis and kept ion homeostasis, which protected bermudagrass from damages caused by abiotic stresses.

  11. Enzyme assays.

    PubMed

    Reymond, Jean-Louis; Fluxà, Viviana S; Maillard, Noélie

    2009-01-07

    Enzyme assays are analytical tools to visualize enzyme activities. In recent years a large variety of enzyme assays have been developed to assist the discovery and optimization of industrial enzymes, in particular for "white biotechnology" where selective enzymes are used with great success for economically viable, mild and environmentally benign production processes. The present article highlights the aspects of fluorogenic and chromogenic substrates, sensors, and enzyme fingerprinting, which are our particular areas of interest.

  12. [Exogenous NO mediated GSH-PCs synthesis pathway in tomato under copper stress].

    PubMed

    Wang, Jian; Yu, Shi-Xin; Zhang, Min; Cui, Xiu-Min

    2014-09-01

    Nitric oxide (NO), as a biologically active molecule, widely involved in the biotic and abiotic stresses. By using solution culture, this paper reported the dynamic changes in enzyme activity and metabolites related to GSH-PCs synthesis way mediated by exogenous NO in tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum). The results showed that exogenous NO could affect the metabolic pathway of GSH-PCs in tomato seedlings under copper stress. Compared with CK, the activity of γ-ECS and GS was significantly activated, consequently resulting in a sharp rise in GSH and PCs contents in tomato root. Moreover, γ-ECS and GS activity, GSH and PCs contents constantly rise with the extension of processing time under copper stress. Adding exogenous SNP could further improve γ-ECS and GS activity in tomato, and promote the production of GSH and PCs, which contributed to enhancing the ability of removing superoxide and chelating excess Cu2+ to reduce its biological toxicity. To a certain extent, GSH-PCs metabolic changes in leaf lagged behind that in roots. Exogenous BSO could significantly inhibit γ-ECS activity, and applying SNP could significantly reverse the inhibition on GSH and PCs synthesis by BSO. BSO had little effects on PCs content in leaf. Under copper stress, exogenous NO may initiate a signal mechanism and reduce the biotoxicity and oxidative damage caused by excessive Cu2+ by activating or enhancing the enzymatic and non-enzymatic systems in the GSH-PCs synthesis path.

  13. Spotlight failure effect in exogenous orienting.

    PubMed

    Milán, E G; Tornay, F J

    2001-12-01

    Many experimental results about spatial attention have been explained by assuming the existence of an attentional "spotlight" which can move from one location in visual space to another. Such an account has been recently challenged by findings which show the influence of nonspatial factors in spatial attention. In particular, the so-called "spotlight failure" effect refers to the influence of the probability of occurrence of different stimuli. However, such an effect has only been reported in the case of endogenous (or central) orientation, rather than on exogenous (or peripheral) orienting. We present evidence showing that the spotlight failure effect can be obtained with exogenous orienting, even at a short SOA (100 ms). Besides, experimental instructions can modulate the effect, which agrees with theoretical accounts proposing that top-down factors can influence attentional capture.

  14. Elongation of exogenous fatty acids by the bioluminescent bacterium Vibrio harveyi

    SciTech Connect

    Byers, D.M.

    1989-01-01

    Bioluminescent bacteria require myristic acid (C14:0) to produce the myristaldehyde substrate of the light-emitting luciferase reaction. Since both endogenous and exogenous C14:0 can be used for this purpose, the metabolism of exogenous fatty acids by luminescent bacteria has been investigated. Both Vibrio harveyi and Vibrio fischeri incorporated label from (1-14C)myristic acid (C14:0) into phospholipid acyl chains as well as into CO2. In contrast, Photobacterium phosphoreum did not exhibit phospholipid acylation or beta-oxidation using exogenous fatty acids. Unlike Escherichia coli, the two Vibrio species can directly elongate fatty acids such as octanoic (C8:0), lauric (C12:0), and myristic acid, as demonstrated by radio-gas liquid chromatography. The induction of bioluminescence in late exponential growth had little effect on the ability of V. harveyi to elongate fatty acids, but it did increase the amount of C14:0 relative to C16:0 labeled from (14C)C8:0. This was not observed in a dark mutant of V. harveyi that is incapable of supplying endogenous C14:0 for luminescence. Cerulenin preferentially decreased the labeling of C16:0 and of unsaturated fatty acids from all 14C-labeled fatty acid precursors as well as from (14C)acetate, suggesting that common mechanisms may be involved in elongation of fatty acids from endogenous and exogenous sources. Fatty acylation of the luminescence-related synthetase and reductase enzymes responsible for aldehyde synthesis exhibited a chain-length preference for C14:0, which also was indicated by reverse-phase thin-layer chromatography of the acyl groups attached to these enzymes. The ability of V. harveyi to activate and elongate exogenous fatty acids may be related to an adaptive requirement to metabolize intracellular C14:0 generated by the luciferase reaction during luminescence development.

  15. Effect of Exogenous Phytase Addition on Soil Phosphatase Activities: a Fluorescence Spectroscopy Study.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiao-zhu; Chen, Zhen-hua; Zhang, Yu-lan; Chen, Li-jun

    2015-05-01

    The utilization of organic phosphorus (P) has directly or indirectly improved after exogenous phytase was added to soil. However, the mechanism by which exogenous phytase affected the soil phosphatases (phosphomonoesterase and phosphodiesterase) activities was not clear. The present work was aimed to study red soil, brown soil and cinnamon soil phosphomonoesterase (acid and alkaline) (AcP and AlP) and phosphodiesterase (PD) activities responding to the addition of exogenous phytase (1 g phytase/50 g air dry soil sample) based on the measurements performed via a fluorescence detection method combined with 96 microplates using a TECAN Infinite 200 Multi-Mode Microplate Reader. The results indicated that the acid phosphomonoesterase activity was significantly enhanced in red soil (p≤0. 01), while it was significantly reduced in cinnamon soil; alkaline phosphomonoesterase activity was significantly enhanced in cinnamon soil (p≤ 0. 01), while it was significantly reduced in red soil; phosphodiesterase activity was increased in three soils but it was significantly increased in brown soil (p≤0. 01) after the addition of exogenous phytase. The activities still remained strong after eight days in different soils, which indicated that exogenous phytase addition could be enhance soil phosphatases activities effectively. This effect was not only related to soil properties, such as pH and phosphorus forms, but might also be related to the excreted enzyme amount of the stimulating microorganism. Using fluorescence spectroscopy to study exogenous phytase addition influence on soil phosphatase activities was the first time at home and abroad. Compared with the conventional spectrophotometric method, the fluorescence microplate method is an accurate, fast and simple to use method to determine the relationships among the soil phosphatases activities.

  16. Enzyme Kinetics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moe, Owen; Cornelius, Richard

    1988-01-01

    Conveys an appreciation of enzyme kinetic analysis by using a practical and intuitive approach. Discusses enzyme assays, kinetic models and rate laws, the kinetic constants (V, velocity, and Km, Michaels constant), evaluation of V and Km from experimental data, and enzyme inhibition. (CW)

  17. [Effects of exogenous AsA and GSH on the growth of Dianthus chinensis seedlings exposed to Cd].

    PubMed

    Ding, Ji-Jun; Liu, Shi-Liang; Pan, Yuan-Zhi; Li, Li

    2014-02-01

    A pot experiment was carried out under greenhouse condition to investigate the effects of different concentrations (0, 20, 40, 60, 80 and 100 mg x L(-1)) of exogenous AsA, GSH on Dianthus chinensis seedlings which were stressed by 50 mg x kg(-1) Cd in the soil. The results indicated that 50 mg x kg(-1) of Cd significantly inhibited the growth of D. chinensis seedlings. An appropriate concentration of exogenous AsA significantly improved the biomass, plant height, tiller number, GAT and APX activities, and AsA and GSH contents. However, with the increase of exogenous AsA concentration, the ameliorating effect decreased and prooxidant effect occurred. Exogenous GSH could replenish the non-enzymatic antioxidants of D. chinensis seedlings, but the changes of antioxidant enzyme activities were relatively slight. The main mechanisms of GSH to alleviate Cd toxicity might be promoting root PCs synthesis, thereby reducing the Cd concentration in the seedlings. Both 35-45 mg x L(-1) exogenous AsA and 55-65 mg x L(-1) exogenous GSH could alleviate the Cd toxicity on D. chinensis seedlings, and the former was superior to the latter.

  18. Exogenous kallikrein protects against diabetic nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wenjuan; Yang, Yeping; Liu, Yemei; Lu, Xiaolan; Guo, Shizhe; Wu, Meng; Wang, Meng; Yan, Linling; Wang, Qinghua; Zhao, Xiaolong; Tong, Xian; Hu, Ji; Li, Yiming; Hu, Renming; Stanton, Robert C; Zhang, Zhaoyun

    2016-11-01

    The kallikrein-kinin system has been shown to be involved in the development of diabetic nephropathy, but specific mechanisms are not fully understood. Here, we determined the renal-protective role of exogenous pancreatic kallikrein in diabetic mice and studied potential mechanisms in db/db type 2 diabetic and streptozotocin-induced type 1 diabetic mice. After the onset of diabetes, mice were treated with either pancreatic kallikrein (db/db+kallikrein, streptozotocin+kallikrein) or saline (db/db+saline, streptozotocin+saline) for 16 weeks, while another group of streptozotocin-induced diabetic mice received the same treatment after onset of albuminuria (streptozotocin'+kallikrein, streptozotocin'+saline). Db/m littermates or wild type mice were used as non-diabetic controls. Pancreatic kallikrein had no effects on body weight, blood glucose and blood pressure, but significantly reduced albuminuria among all three groups. Pathological analysis showed that exogenous kallikrein decreased the thickness of the glomerular basement membrane, protected against the effacement of foot process, the loss of endothelial fenestrae, and prevented the loss of podocytes in diabetic mice. Renal fibrosis, inflammation and oxidative stress were reduced in kallikrein-treated mice compared to diabetic controls. The expression of kininogen1, tissue kallikrein, kinin B1 and B2 receptors were all increased in the kallikrein-treated compared to saline-treated mice. Thus, exogenous pancreatic kallikrein both prevented and ameliorated diabetic nephropathy, which may be mediated by activating the kallikrein-kinin system.

  19. Marine enzymes.

    PubMed

    Debashish, Ghosh; Malay, Saha; Barindra, Sana; Joydeep, Mukherjee

    2005-01-01

    Marine enzyme biotechnology can offer novel biocatalysts with properties like high salt tolerance, hyperthermostability, barophilicity, cold adaptivity, and ease in large-scale cultivation. This review deals with the research and development work done on the occurrence, molecular biology, and bioprocessing of marine enzymes during the last decade. Exotic locations have been accessed for the search of novel enzymes. Scientists have isolated proteases and carbohydrases from deep sea hydrothermal vents. Cold active metabolic enzymes from psychrophilic marine microorganisms have received considerable research attention. Marine symbiont microorganisms growing in association with animals and plants were shown to produce enzymes of commercial interest. Microorganisms isolated from sediment and seawater have been the most widely studied, proteases, carbohydrases, and peroxidases being noteworthy. Enzymes from marine animals and plants were primarily studied for their metabolic roles, though proteases and peroxidases have found industrial applications. Novel techniques in molecular biology applied to assess the diversity of chitinases, nitrate, nitrite, ammonia-metabolizing, and pollutant-degrading enzymes are discussed. Genes encoding chitinases, proteases, and carbohydrases from microbial and animal sources have been cloned and characterized. Research on the bioprocessing of marine-derived enzymes, however, has been scanty, focusing mainly on the application of solid-state fermentation to the production of enzymes from microbial sources.

  20. Enzymes, Industrial

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Enzymes serve key roles in numerous biotechnology processes and products that are commonly encountered in the forms of food and beverages, cleaning supplies, clothing, paper products, transportation fuels, pharmaceuticals, and monitoring devices. Enzymes can display regio- and stereo-specificity, p...

  1. Exogenous amino acids as fuel in shock.

    PubMed

    Daniel, A M; Kapadia, B; MacLean, L D

    1982-01-01

    It has been suggested that in shock branched-chain amino acids are preferentially oxidized resulting in continued proteolysis and stimulated gluconeogenesis. To determine if exogenous amino acids could be used as fuel in shock, dogs rendered hypotensive by controlled cardiac tamponade and normotensive controls were infused with amino acid mixtures and individual amino acids. When Nephramine, a mixture rich in branched-chain amino acids, was infused, plasma alpha-amino nitrogen levels rose but urea output did not increase in either the control state or in shock, suggesting that these amino acids were not rapidly deaminated to serve as fuels. Travasol, which in addition contained large amounts of alanine and glycine, tripled urea output in the controls and doubled it in shock. The limit of urea production was reached in both groups at 35 mumoles urea/minute/kg. In the Travasol-infused animals plasma alpha-amino nitrogen levels were maintained in normotension but rose sharply in shock. When glycine alone was infused into five dogs in shock urea production rate was 30.6 + 2.1 mumoles/minute/kg; with alanine the same value was 22.5 + 2.2 mumoles/minute/kg. In both cases plasma alpha-amino nitrogen levels were high, suggesting that transport of these amino acids into the cell was slow in shock. In four dogs in shock glycine-14C was added to the glycine infusate as a tracer. At radioactive equilibrium 28% of the label infused appeared in CO2; another 22% appeared in glucose. It is concluded that of all the amino acids tested only glycine and alanine are deaminated rapidly enough to serve as exogenous fuels in shock.

  2. Exogenous glutathione improves high root-zone temperature tolerance by modulating photosynthesis, antioxidant and osmolytes systems in cucumber seedlings

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Xiaotao; Jiang, Yuping; He, Lizhong; Zhou, Qiang; Yu, Jizhu; Hui, Dafeng; Huang, Danfeng

    2016-01-01

    To investigate the physiological responses of plants to high root-zone temperature (HT, 35 °C) stress mitigated by exogenous glutathione (GSH), cucumber (Cucumis sativus L.) seedlings were exposed to HT with or without GSH treatment for 4 days and following with 4 days of recovery. Plant physiological variables, growth, and gene expression related to antioxidant enzymes and Calvin cycle were quantified. The results showed that HT significantly decreased GSH content, the ratio of reduced to oxidized glutathione (GSH/GSSG), chlorophyll content, photosynthesis and related gene expression, shoot height, stem diameter, as well as dry weight. The exogenous GSH treatment clearly lessened the HT stress by increasing the above variables. Meanwhile, HT significantly increased soluble protein content, proline and malondialdehyde (MDA) content as well as O2•− production rate, the gene expression and activities of antioxidant enzymes. The GSH treatment remarkably improved soluble protein content, proline content, antioxidant enzymes activities, and antioxidant enzymes related gene expression, and reduced the MDA content and O2•− production rate compared to no GSH treatment in the HT condition. Our results suggest that exogenous GSH enhances cucumber seedling tolerance of HT stress by modulating the photosynthesis, antioxidant and osmolytes systems to improve physiological adaptation. PMID:27752105

  3. Interactions between endogenous and exogenous attention on cortical visual processing.

    PubMed

    Hopfinger, Joseph B; West, Vicki M

    2006-06-01

    Sensory processing is affected by both endogenous and exogenous mechanisms of attention, although how these mechanisms interact in the brain has remained unclear. In the present study, we recorded event-related potentials (ERPs) to investigate how multiple stages of information processing in the brain are affected when endogenous and exogenous mechanisms are concurrently engaged. We found that the earliest stage of cortical visual processing, the striate-cortex-generated C1, was immune to attentional modulation, even when endogenous and exogenous attention converged on a common location. The earliest stage of processing to be affected in this experiment was the late phase of the extrastriate-cortex-generated P1 component, which was dominated by exogenous attention. Processing at this stage was enhanced by exogenous attention, regardless of where endogenous attention had been oriented. Endogenous attention, however, dominated a later, higher-order stage of processing indexed by an enhancement of the P300 that was unaffected by exogenous attention. Critically, between these early and late stages, an interaction was found wherein endogenous and exogenous attention produced distinct, and overlapping, effects on information processing. At the same time that exogenous attention was producing an extended enhancement of the late-P1, endogenous attention was enhancing the occipital-parietal N1 component. These results provide neurophysiological support for theories suggesting that endogenous and exogenous mechanisms represent two attention systems that can affect information processing in the brain in distinct ways. Furthermore, these data provide new evidence regarding the precise stages of neural processing that are, and are not, affected when endogenous and exogenous attentions interact.

  4. Human CD4+ T cells require exogenous cystine for glutathione and DNA synthesis.

    PubMed

    Levring, Trine B; Kongsbak, Martin; Rode, Anna K O; Woetmann, Anders; Ødum, Niels; Bonefeld, Charlotte Menné; Geisler, Carsten

    2015-09-08

    Adaptive immune responses require activation and expansion of antigen-specific T cells. Whereas early T cell activation is independent of exogenous cystine (Cys2), T cell proliferation is dependent of Cys2. However, the exact roles of Cys2 in T cell proliferation still need to be determined. The aim of this study was to elucidate why activated human T cells require exogenous Cys2 in order to proliferate. We activated purified naïve human CD4+ T cells and found that glutathione (GSH) levels and DNA synthesis were dependent on Cys2 and increased in parallel with increasing concentrations of Cys2. Vice-versa, the GSH synthesis inhibitor L-buthionine-sulfoximine (BSO) and inhibition of Cys2 uptake with glutamate inhibited GSH and DNA synthesis in parallel. We further found that thioredoxin (Trx) can partly substitute for GSH during DNA synthesis. Finally, we show that GSH or Trx is required for the activity of ribonucleotide reductase (RNR), the enzyme responsible for generation of the deoxyribonucleotide DNA building blocks. In conclusion, we show that activated human T cells require exogenous Cys2 to proliferate and that this is partly explained by the fact that Cys2 is required for production of GSH, which in turn is required for optimal RNR-mediated deoxyribonucleotide synthesis and DNA replication.

  5. The Effect of Exogenous Spermidine Concentration on Polyamine Metabolism and Salt Tolerance in Zoysiagrass (Zoysia japonica Steud) Subjected to Short-Term Salinity Stress

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shucheng; Jin, Han; Zhang, Qiang

    2016-01-01

    Salt stress, particularly short-term salt stress, is among the most serious abiotic factors limiting plant survival and growth in China. It has been established that exogenous spermidine (Spd) stimulates plant tolerance to salt stress. The present study utilized two zoysiagrass cultivars commonly grown in China that exhibit either sensitive (cv. Z081) or tolerant (cv. Z057) adaptation capacity to salt stress. The two cultivars were subjected to 200 mM salt stress and treated with different exogenous Spd concentrations for 8 days. Polyamine [diamine putrescine (Put), tetraamine spermine (Spm), and Spd], H2O2 and malondialdehyde (MDA) contents and polyamine metabolic (ADC, ODC, SAMDC, PAO, and DAO) and antioxidant (superoxide dismutase, catalase, and peroxidase) enzyme activities were measured. The results showed that salt stress induced increases in Spd and Spm contents and ornithine decarboxylase (ODC), S-adenosylmethionine decarboxylase (SAMDC), and diamine oxidase (DAO) activities in both cultivars. Exogenous Spd application did not alter polyamine contents via regulation of polyamine-degrading enzymes, and an increase in polyamine biosynthetic enzyme levels was observed during the experiment. Increasing the concentration of exogenous Spd resulted in a tendency of the Spd and Spm contents and ODC, SAMDC, DAO, and antioxidant enzyme activities to first increase and then decrease in both cultivars. H2O2 and MDA levels significantly decreased in both cultivars treated with Spd. Additionally, in both cultivars, positive correlations between polyamine biosynthetic enzymes (ADC, SAMDC), DAO, and antioxidant enzymes (SOD, POD, CAT), but negative correlations with H2O2 and MDA levels, and the Spd + Spm content were observed with an increase in the concentration of exogenous Spd. PMID:27582752

  6. P450 enzymes of estrogen metabolism.

    PubMed

    Martucci, C P; Fishman, J

    1993-01-01

    Endogenous and exogenous estrogens undergo extensive oxidative metabolism by specific cytochrome P450 enzymes. Certain drugs and xenobiotics have been found to be potent inducers of estrogen hydroxylating enzymes with C-2 hydroxylase induction being greater than that of C-16 hydroxylase. Oxygenated estrogen metabolites have different biological activities, with C-2 metabolites having limited or no activity and C-4 and C-16 metabolites having similar potency to estradiol. Pathophysiological roles for some of the oxygenated estrogen metabolites have been proposed, e.g. 16 alpha-hydroxyestrone and 4-hydroxyestrone. These reactive estrogens are capable of damaging cellular proteins and DNA and may be carcinogenic in specific cells.

  7. Food Enzymes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McBroom, Rachel; Oliver-Hoyo, Maria T.

    2007-01-01

    Many students view biology and chemistry as two unrelated, separate sciences; how these courses are generally taught in high schools may do little to change that impression. The study of enzymes provide a great opportunity for both biology and chemistry teachers to share with students the interdisciplinary nature of science. This article describes…

  8. Zinc Enzymes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bertini, I.; And Others

    1985-01-01

    Discusses the role of zinc in various enzymes concerned with hydration, hydrolysis, and redox reactions. The binding of zinc to protein residues, properties of noncatalytic zinc(II) and catalytic zinc, and the reactions catalyzed by zinc are among the topics considered. (JN)

  9. Functional annotation of Fibrobacter succinogenes S85 carbohydrate active enzymes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fibrobacter succinogenes is a cellulolytic bacterium that degrades plant cell wall biomass in ruminant animals and is among the most rapidly fibrolytic of all mesophilic bacteria. The complete genome sequence of Fisuc was completed by the DOE Joint Genome Institute in late 2009. Using new expression...

  10. Functional annotation of Fibrobacter succinogenes carbohydrate active enzymes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fibrobacter succinogenes (Fisuc) is a cellulolytic bacterium that degrades plant cell wall biomass in ruminant animals, and is among the most rapidly fibrolytic of all mesophilic bacteria. The complete genome sequence of Fisuc was completed by the DOE Joint Genome Institute in late 2009. Using new e...

  11. Impact of exogenous ascorbic acid on biochemical activities of rice callus treated with salt stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alhasnawi, Arshad Naji; Zain, Che Radziah Che Mohd; Kadhimi, Ahsan A.; Isahak, Anizan; Mohamad, Azhar; Ashraf, Mehdi Farshad; Doni, Febri; Yusoff, Wan Mohtar Wan

    2016-11-01

    The application of in vitro systems can lead to new methods of crop amelioration. This method has been widely utilized for breeding tenacities, particularly for stress tolerance selection. Salinity causes oxidative stress in callus by enhancing the production of Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS), resulting in an efficient antioxidant system. The exogenous application of ascorbic acid (AsA) is an important requirement for tolerance. The present study aimed to examine in vitro selection strategy for callus induction in rice mature embryo culture on MS culture medium and to produce salt-tolerant callus under sodium chloride (NaCl) and AsA conditions in callus rice variety, MR269. This study also highlights changes in the activities of proline and antioxidants peroxidase (POD), catalase (CAT) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) of callus under NaCl stress to understand their possible role in salt tolerance. However, various levels of exogenously applied AsA under saline conditions improved callus, and the antioxidant enzyme activities of AsA are related to resistance to oxidative stress. Our results provide strong support for the hypothesis that AsA-dependent antioxidant enzymes play a significant role in the salinity tolerance of callus rice.

  12. Functional Analyses of Multiple Lichenin-Degrading Enzymes from the Rumen Bacterium Ruminococcus albus 8▿†

    PubMed Central

    Iakiviak, Michael; Mackie, Roderick I.; Cann, Isaac K. O.

    2011-01-01

    Ruminococcus albus 8 is a fibrolytic ruminal bacterium capable of utilization of various plant cell wall polysaccharides. A bioinformatic analysis of a partial genome sequence of R. albus revealed several putative enzymes likely to hydrolyze glucans, including lichenin, a mixed-linkage polysaccharide of glucose linked together in β-1,3 and β-1,4 glycosidic bonds. In the present study, we demonstrate the capacity of four glycoside hydrolases (GHs), derived from R. albus, to hydrolyze lichenin. Two of the genes encoded GH family 5 enzymes (Ra0453 and Ra2830), one gene encoded a GH family 16 enzyme (Ra0505), and the last gene encoded a GH family 3 enzyme (Ra1595). Each gene was expressed in Escherichia coli, and the recombinant protein was purified to near homogeneity. Upon screening on a wide range of substrates, Ra0453, Ra2830, and Ra0505 displayed different hydrolytic properties, as they released unique product profiles. The Ra1595 protein, predicted to function as a β-glucosidase, preferred cleavage of a nonreducing end glucose when linked by a β-1,3 glycosidic bond to the next glucose residue. The major product of Ra0505 hydrolysis of lichenin was predicted to be a glucotriose that was degraded only by Ra0453 to glucose and cellobiose. Most importantly, the four enzymes functioned synergistically to hydrolyze lichenin to glucose, cellobiose, and cellotriose. This lichenin-degrading enzyme mix should be of utility as an additive to feeds administered to monogastric animals, especially those high in fiber. PMID:21890664

  13. Isolating Exogenous and Endogenous Modes of Temporal Attention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lawrence, Michael A.; Klein, Raymond M.

    2013-01-01

    The differential allocation of information processing resources over time, here termed "temporal attention," may be achieved by relatively automatic "exogenous" or controlled "endogenous" mechanisms. Over 100 years of research has confounded these theoretically distinct dimensions of temporal attention. The current…

  14. Exogenic and endogenic albedo and color patterns on Europa

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcewen, A. S.

    1986-01-01

    New global and high-resolution multispectral mosaics of Europa have been produced from the Voyager imaging data. Photometric normalizations are based on multiple-image techniques that explicitly account for intrinsic albedo variations through pixel-by-pixel solutions. The exogenic color and albedo pattern on Europa is described by a second-order function of the cosine of the angular distance from the apex of orbital motion. On the basis of this second-order function and of color trends that are different on the leading and trailing hemispheres, the exogenic pattern is interpreted as being due to equilibrium between two dominant processes: (1) impact gardening and (2) magnetospheric interactions, including sulfur-ion implantation and sputtering redistribution. Removal of the model exogenic pattern in the mosaics reveals the endogenic variations, consisting of only two major units: darker (redder) and bright materials. Therefore Europa's visual spectral reflectivity is simple, having one continuous exogenic pattern and two discrete endogenic units.

  15. Proteomic Analysis Reveals the Positive Effect of Exogenous Spermidine in Tomato Seedlings' Response to High-Temperature Stress

    PubMed Central

    Sang, Qinqin; Shan, Xi; An, Yahong; Shu, Sheng; Sun, Jin; Guo, Shirong

    2017-01-01

    Polyamines are phytohormones that regulate plant growth and development as well as the response to environmental stresses. To evaluate their functions in high-temperature stress responses, the effects of exogenous spermidine (Spd) were determined in tomato leaves using two-dimensional electrophoresis and MALDI-TOF/TOF MS. A total of 67 differentially expressed proteins were identified in response to high-temperature stress and/or exogenous Spd, which were grouped into different categories according to biological processes. The four largest categories included proteins involved in photosynthesis (27%), cell rescue, and defense (24%), protein synthesis, folding and degradation (22%), and energy and metabolism (13%). Exogenous Spd up-regulated most identified proteins involved in photosynthesis, implying an enhancement in photosynthetic capacity. Meanwhile, physiological analysis showed that Spd could improve net photosynthetic rate and the biomass accumulation. Moreover, an increased high-temperature stress tolerance by exogenous Spd would contribute to the higher expressions of proteins involved in cell rescue and defense, and Spd regulated the antioxidant enzymes activities and related genes expression in tomato seedlings exposed to high temperature. Taken together, these findings provide a better understanding of the Spd-induced high-temperature resistance by proteomic approaches, providing valuable insight into improving the high-temperature stress tolerance in the global warming epoch. PMID:28220137

  16. Exogenous proline application ameliorates toxic effects of arsenate in Solanum melongena L. seedlings.

    PubMed

    Singh, Madhulika; Pratap Singh, Vijay; Dubey, Gunjan; Mohan Prasad, Sheo

    2015-07-01

    Hydroponic experiments were conducted to investigate an effect of exogenous application of proline (Pro; 25 µM) in alleviating arsenate (As(V); 5 and 25 µM) toxicity in Solanum melongena L. (eggplant) seedlings. Exposure of As(V) declined growth of eggplant, which was coincided with an enhanced accumulation of As. However, exogenous Pro application alleviated As(V) toxicity in eggplant seedlings by reducing the accumulation of As. The fluorescence characteristics (JIP-test): φP0, Ψ0, φE0, PIABS, ABS/RC, TR0/RC, ET0/RC, DI0/RC, NPQ and qP were also affected by As(V). However, the effects of As(V) were more prominent on PIABS DI0/RC and NPQ. In Pro treated seedlings, following parameters viz. φP0, Ψ0, φE0 and PIABS were stimulated, while, energy flux parameters (ABS/RC, TR0/RC, ET0/RC and DI0/RC) were inhibited. Toxic effects of As(V) on photochemistry of photosystem II (PS II) were ameliorated by an exogenous application of Pro. Oxidative stress markers: superoxide radical, hydrogen peroxide and malondialdehyde (lipid peroxidation) were enhanced by As(V) exposure, however, their levels were significantly diminished by an exogenous application of Pro. Treatment of As(V) stimulated the activities of superoxide dismutase, peroxidase and catalase except that of glutathione-S-transferase. Exogenous Pro application improved the activities of enzymatic antioxidants. The level of endogenous Pro was higher in As(V) treated as well as in Pro fed seedlings. The activity of a key enzyme of Pro biosynthesis: Δ(1)-pyrroline-5-carboxylate synthetase was higher in Pro fed seedlings. The activity of Pro dehydrogenase was inhibited under As(V) stress, and its activity was minimum in case of Pro+As(V) combination. These results indicate that Pro metabolism could play a key role in regulating the accumulation of As and levels of antioxidants, which concomitantly result into a better growth of eggplant seedlings when compared to the As(V) treatments alone.

  17. Production of Bacteriolytic Enzymes by Streptomyces globisporus Regulated by Exogenous Bacterial Cell Walls

    PubMed Central

    Brönneke, Volker; Fiedler, Franz

    1994-01-01

    Mutanolysin biosynthesis and pigment production in Streptomyces globisporus ATCC 21553 were stimulated by adding bacterial cell walls to the medium. The increased bacteriolytic activity in the supernatant correlated with an increased de novo synthesis of mutanolysin and was between 4- and 20-fold higher than in cultures grown without bacterial cell walls. The increase in mutanolysin synthesis was brought about by enhanced transcription of the mutanolysin gene. The stimulation was only observed in medium which contained dextrin or starch as the carbon source. Glucose abolished the stimulation and also inhibited the low constitutive synthesis of mutanolysin. The induction of lytic activity was observed to require minimally 0.4 mg of bacterial cell walls per ml, whereas 0.6 mg of bacterial cell walls per ml yielded maximal lytic activity. Further supplements of bacterial cell walls did not result in enhanced lytic activity. The stimulation could be achieved independently of the phase of growth of the Streptomyces strain. Cultures grown in the presence of bacterial cell walls exhibited a higher growth yield. However, the accelerated growth was not the reason for the increased amount of mutanolysin produced. The growth of cultures with peptidoglycan monomers added to the medium instead of cell walls was similarly increased, but an effect on the biosynthesis of mutanolysin was not observed. All bacterial cell walls tested were capable of eliciting the stimulation of lytic activity, including cell walls of archaea, which contained pseudomurein. Images PMID:16349213

  18. Primary enzyme quantitation

    DOEpatents

    Saunders, G.C.

    1982-03-04

    The disclosure relates to the quantitation of a primary enzyme concentration by utilizing a substrate for the primary enzyme labeled with a second enzyme which is an indicator enzyme. Enzyme catalysis of the substrate occurs and results in release of the indicator enzyme in an amount directly proportional to the amount of primary enzyme present. By quantifying the free indicator enzyme one determines the amount of primary enzyme present.

  19. Interactions between endogenous and exogenous attention during vigilance.

    PubMed

    MacLean, Katherine A; Aichele, Stephen R; Bridwell, David A; Mangun, George R; Wojciulik, Ewa; Saron, Clifford D

    2009-07-01

    The ability to remain vigilant over long periods of time is critical for many everyday tasks, but controlled studies of visual sustained attention show that performance declines over time when observers are required to respond to rare stimulus events (targets) occurring in a sequence of standard stimulus events (nontargets). When target discrimination is perceptually difficult, this vigilance decrement manifests as a decline in perceptual sensitivity. We examined whether sudden-onset stimuli could act as exogenous attentional cues to improve sensitivity during a traditional sustained attention task. Sudden-onset cues presented immediately before each stimulus attenuated the sensitivity decrement, but only when stimulus timing (the interstimulus interval [ISI]) was constant. When stimulus timing was variable, exogenous cues increased overall sensitivity but did not prevent performance decline. Finally, independent of the effects of sudden onsets, a constant ISI improved vigilance performance. Our results demonstrate that exogenous attention enhances perceptual sensitivity during vigilance performance, but that this effect is dependent on observers' being able to predict the timing of stimulus events. Such a result indicates a strong interaction between endogenous and exogenous attention during vigilance. We relate our findings to a resource model of vigilance, as well as to theories of endogenous and exogenous attention over short time periods.

  20. Exogenous (automatic) attention to emotional stimuli: a review.

    PubMed

    Carretié, Luis

    2014-12-01

    Current knowledge on the architecture of exogenous attention (also called automatic, bottom-up, or stimulus-driven attention, among other terms) has been mainly obtained from studies employing neutral, anodyne stimuli. Since, from an evolutionary perspective, exogenous attention can be understood as an adaptive tool for rapidly detecting salient events, reorienting processing resources to them, and enhancing processing mechanisms, emotional events (which are, by definition, salient for the individual) would seem crucial to a comprehensive understanding of this process. This review, focusing on the visual modality, describes 55 experiments in which both emotional and neutral irrelevant distractors are presented at the same time as ongoing task targets. Qualitative and, when possible, meta-analytic descriptions of results are provided. The most conspicuous result is that, as confirmed by behavioral and/or neural indices, emotional distractors capture exogenous attention to a significantly greater extent than do neutral distractors. The modulatory effects of the nature of distractors capturing attention, of the ongoing task characteristics, and of individual differences, previously proposed as mediating factors, are also described. Additionally, studies reviewed here provide temporal and spatial information-partially absent in traditional cognitive models-on the neural basis of preattention/evaluation, reorienting, and sensory amplification, the main subprocesses involved in exogenous attention. A model integrating these different levels of information is proposed. The present review, which reveals that there are several key issues for which experimental data are surprisingly scarce, confirms the relevance of including emotional distractors in studies on exogenous attention.

  1. Exogenous hydrogen peroxide reversibly inhibits root gravitropism and induces horizontal curvature of primary root during grass pea germination.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Jinglong; Su, Miao; Wang, Liyan; Jiao, Chengjin; Sun, Zhengxi; Cheng, Wei; Li, Fengmin; Wang, Chongying

    2012-04-01

    During germination in distilled water (dH(2)O) on a horizontally positioned Petri dish, emerging primary roots of grass pea (Lathyrus sativus L.) grew perpendicular to the bottom of the Petri dish, due to gravitropism. However, when germinated in exogenous hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)), the primary roots grew parallel to the bottom of the Petri dish and asymmetrically, forming a horizontal curvature. Time-course experiments showed that the effect was strongest when H(2)O(2) was applied prior to the emergence of the primary root. H(2)O(2) failed to induce root curvature when applied post-germination. Dosage studies revealed that the frequency of primary root curvature was significantly enhanced with increased H(2)O(2) concentrations. This curvature could be directly counteracted by dimethylthiourea (DMTU), a scavenger of H(2)O(2), but not by diphenylene iodonium (DPI) and pyridine, inhibitors of H(2)O(2) production. Exogenous H(2)O(2) treatment caused both an increase in the activities of H(2)O(2)-scavenging enzymes [including ascorbate peroxidase (APX: EC 1.11.1.11), catalase (CAT: EC 1.11.1.6) and peroxidase (POD: EC 1.11.1.7)] and a reduction in endogenous H(2)O(2) levels and root vitality. Although grass pea seeds absorbed exogenous H(2)O(2) during seed germination, DAB staining of paraffin sections revealed that exogenous H(2)O(2) only entered the root epidermis and not inner tissues. These data indicated that exogenously applied H(2)O(2) could lead to a reversible loss of the root gravitropic response and a horizontal curvature in primary roots during radicle emergence of the seedling.

  2. The effect of enzyme treatment on the in vitro fermentation of lucerne incubated with equine faecal inocula.

    PubMed

    Murray, Jo-Anne M D; Longland, Annette C; Moore-Colyer, Meriel J S; Dunnett, Catherine

    2005-11-01

    A series of experiments was conducted to determine the effects of a fibrolytic enzyme preparation (enzyme 1; E1) on the in vitro fermentation of lucerne incubated with equine faecal inocula. In experiment 1, high-temperature-dried (HT) lucerne was treated with five levels of E1 (0 to 2.4 ml/g DM) and incubated at 50 degrees C for 20 h. Samples then received a simulated foregut digestion (SFD) treatment before DM and NSP analysis. In experiment 2, HT lucerne was treated with the same enzyme levels used in experiment 1. Samples were then split into two groups; plus or minus an SFD treatment before in vitro fermentation using an equine faecal inoculum. In experiment 3, fresh and wilted lucerne were treated with the same levels of E1 as experiments 1 and 2, incubated at 50 degrees C for 20 h, then fermented in vitro. For experiment 4, fresh and wilted lucerne were treated with low levels (0 to 0.008 ml/g DM) of E1 before fermentation. E1 significantly (P<0.05) enhanced DM and NSP losses from HT lucerne following SFD treatment compared with the control. High levels of E1 significantly (P<0.05) enhanced the rate, but not extent, of fermentation of HT, wilted and fresh lucerne; however, low levels of E1 were ineffective. At higher application levels, E1 appears to have considerable potential to enhance the nutritive value of lucerne for horses. Information on the fermentation kinetics of the substrates was valuable; all end-point measurements showed no effect of enzyme treatment.

  3. Alleviating CTAC and Flu combined pollution damage in Chlorella vulgaris by exogenous nitric oxide.

    PubMed

    Li, Qi; Liang, Zhijie; Ge, Fei; Xu, Yin; Yang, Liang; Zeng, Hui

    2014-02-01

    This study investigates the effect of sodium nitroprussiate (SNP), an exogenous NO-donor, on the joint toxicity of binary mixtures of cetyltrimethylammonium chloride (CTAC) and fluoranthene (Flu) (CTAC/Flu), which are representatives for surfactants and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) respectively, in a unicellular green alga Chlorella vulgaris (C. vulgaris). The results showed that the addition of low SNP (20μM) alleviated the CTAC/Flu combined pollution damage in C. vulgaris. Supplement of low SNP significantly increased the algae biomass, chlorophyll content, soluble protein content and the activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD), peroxidase (POD) and catalase (CAT) as compared to CTAC/Flu treatment alone. SNP also reduced the content of malondialdehyde (MDA) and the reactive oxygen species (ROS), as compared with CTAC/Flu treated alone. On the contrary, the above phenomena were reversed when high concentration of SNP (100μM) was added. Our study indicated that the damage of the joint action of surfactants and PAHs on hydrobios can be alleviated through protecting against oxidant substances and increasing the activity of antioxidant enzymes with an exogenous supply of NO in certain concentration range.

  4. Exogenous lipoid pneumonia (ELP): when radiologist makes the difference

    PubMed Central

    Rea, G; Perna, F; Calabrese, G; Molino, A; Valente, T; Vatrella, A

    2016-01-01

    Lipoid pneumonia is an uncommon disorder characterized by accumulation of lipid components into the interstitial and alveolar compartment. The usual classification distinguishes endogenous and exogenous and acute or chronic forms, related to the type of fats, the amount of damage and the time of exposure. We describe a case of exogenous lipoid pneumonia by inhalation of vaseline used for cleaning of the tracheostoma in a 63-year-old female, presenting as cough, worsening dyspnea in few weeks. The diagnosis was finally established with a re-evaluation of BAL with specific staining for lipids, revealing the presence of foamy macrophages lipids rich, according to HRCT findings. PMID:27326397

  5. Uptake and accumulation of exogenous docosahexaenoic acid by Chlorella.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, M; Yukino, T; Maruyama, I; Kido, S; Kitaoka, S

    2001-01-01

    Tuna oil or its hydrolysate was added to a culture of Chlorella for its nutritional fortification as a feed for rotifer. Exogenous docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) in its free form was taken up by the cells of Chlorella vulgaris strain K-22 and by other strains, but tuna oil was not taken up by the cells. Accumulated DHA was found by electron microscopy in the cells in oil droplets. All strains of Chlorella used in these experiments took up exogenous DHA into the cells. It seems that the structure of the cell wall did not affect the uptake of DHA into the Chlorella cells.

  6. Neuropsychiatric findings in Cushing syndrome and exogenous glucocorticoid administration.

    PubMed

    Starkman, Monica N

    2013-09-01

    This article reviews the neuropsychiatric presentations elicited by spontaneous hypercortisolism and exogenous supraphysiologic glucocorticoids. Patients with Cushing disease and syndrome develop a depressive syndrome: irritable and depressed mood, decreased libido, disrupted sleep and cognitive decrements. Exogenous short-term glucocorticoid administration may elicit a hypomanic syndrome with mood, sleep and cognitive disruptions. Treatment options are discussed. Brain imaging and neuropsychological studies indicate elevated cortisol and other glucocorticoids are especially deleterious to hippocampus and frontal lobe. The research findings also shed light on neuropsychiatric abnormalities in conditions that have substantial subgroups exhibiting elevated and dysregulated cortisol: aging, major depressive disorder and Alzheimer's disease.

  7. Altering the phenolics profile of a green tea leaves extract using exogenous oxidases.

    PubMed

    Verloop, Annewieke J W; Gruppen, Harry; Bisschop, Robbin; Vincken, Jean-Paul

    2016-04-01

    Transformation from green tea leaves into black tea involves oxidation of catechins into theaflavins and other complex phenolics by endogenous enzymes in tea leaves. By employing tyrosinase and laccase, both from Agaricus bisporus, on green tea catechins, the oxidation process was directed towards a higher theaflavins content, which is considered an important quality parameter in tea. The main tea catechins were incubated with tyrosinase and laccase, and product formation was monitored by RP-UHPLC-PDA-ESI-MS. The kind of catechin, their substitution with a galloyl group, and the type of oxidase used were important factors determining theaflavin concentrations. In particular, incubation of epicatechin with epigallocatechin with tyrosinase gave a high, stable theaflavin content. In a green tea extract, tyrosinase increased the proportion of theaflavins by twofold compared to black tea. Laccase mainly formed insoluble complexes. Our results indicate that the phenolic profile of tea can be modulated by using commercially available exogenous oxidases.

  8. Targeted disruption of exogenous EGFP gene in medaka using zinc-finger nucleases.

    PubMed

    Ansai, Satoshi; Ochiai, Hiroshi; Kanie, Yuta; Kamei, Yasuhiro; Gou, Yuki; Kitano, Takeshi; Yamamoto, Takashi; Kinoshita, Masato

    2012-06-01

    Zinc-finger nucleases (ZFNs) are artificial enzymes that create site-specific double-strand breaks and thereby induce targeted genome editing. Here, we demonstrated successful gene disruption in somatic and germ cells of medaka (Oryzias latipes) using ZFN to target exogenous EGFP genes. Embryos that were injected with an RNA sequence pair coding for ZFNs showed mosaic loss of green fluorescent protein fluorescence in skeletal muscle. A number of mutations that included both deletions and insertions were identified within the ZFN target site in each embryo, whereas no mutations were found at the non-targeted sites. In addition, ZFN-induced mutations were introduced in germ cells and efficiently transmitted to the next generation. The mutation frequency varied (6-100%) in the germ cells from each founder, and a founder carried more than two types of mutation in germ cells. Our results have introduced the possibility of targeted gene disruption and reverse genetics in medaka.

  9. Molecular pharmacology of aromatase and its regulation by endogenous and exogenous agents.

    PubMed

    Brueggemeier, R W; Richards, J A; Joomprabutra, S; Bhat, A S; Whetstone, J L

    2001-12-01

    Aromatase (estrogen synthase) is the cytochrome P450 enzyme complex that converts C19 androgens to C18 estrogens. Aromatase activity has been demonstrated in breast tissue in vitro, and expression of aromatase is highest in or near breast tumor sites. Thus, local regulation of aromatase by both endogenous factors as well as exogenous medicinal agents will influence the levels of estrogen available for breast cancer growth. The prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) increases intracellular cAMP levels and stimulates estrogen biosynthesis, and our recent studies have shown a strong linear association between CYP19 expression and the sum of COX-1 and COX-2 expression in breast cancer specimens. PGE2 can bind to four receptor subtypes, EP1-EP4, which are coupled to different intracellular signaling pathways. In primary human breast stromal cell cultures, aromatase activity was significantly induced by PGE2, dexamethasone, and agonists for the EP1 and EP2 receptor subtypes. An EP1 antagonist, SC-19220, inhibited the induction of enzyme activity by PGE2 or 17-phenyltrinor-PGE2, an EP1 agonist. Sulprostone, an EP3 agonist, did not alter aromatase activity levels. Investigations are also underway on the regulation of aromatase by exogenous medicinal agents. Selective steroidal and nonsteroidal agents are effective in inhibiting breast tissue aromatase. The benzopyranone ring system is a molecular scaffold of considerable interest, and this scaffold is found in certain flavonoid natural products that have weak aromatase inhibitory activity. Our novel synthetic route for benzopyranones utilizes readily available salicylic acids and terminal alkynes as starting materials. The synthesis of flavones with diversity on the benzopyranone moiety and at the C-2 position occurs with good to excellent yields using these reaction conditions, resulting in an initial benzopyranone library of thirty compounds exhibiting enhanced and differential aromatase inhibition. Current medicinal chemistry efforts

  10. Exogenous malic acid alleviates cadmium toxicity in Miscanthus sacchariflorus through enhancing photosynthetic capacity and restraining ROS accumulation.

    PubMed

    Guo, Haipeng; Chen, Houming; Hong, Chuntao; Jiang, Dean; Zheng, Bingsong

    2017-03-18

    Malic acid (MA) plays an important role in the regulation of plant growth, stomatal aperture, nutrition elements homeostasis and toxic metals tolerance. However, little is known about the effects of exogenous MA on physiological and biochemical responses to toxic metals in plants. To measure the alleviation roles of exogenous MA against cadmium (Cd), we determined the effects of MA on plant growth, net photosynthetic rate (Pn), reactive oxygen species (ROS) accumulation and the activities of anti-oxidant enzymes in the leaves of Miscanthus sacchariflorus (M. sacchariflorus) under Cd stress. The Cd exposure alone significantly inhibited plant growth and Pn, but increased the accumulation of ROS even though the anti-oxidant enzymes were markedly activated in the leaves of M. sacchariflorus. Treatment with MA significantly enhanced plant growth and decreased Cd accumulation accompanied by increasing Pn under Cd stress as compared to Cd stress alone, especially when treatment with high concentration of MA (200μM) was used. In addition, Cd and MA indicated synergistic effects by further increasing the activities and genes expression of partial anti-oxidant enzymes, thus resulting in higher glutathione accumulation and reduction of ROS production. The results showed that application of MA alleviated Cd-induced phytotoxicity and oxidant damage through the regulation of both enzymatic and non-enzymatic anti-oxidants under Cd stress in M. sacchariflorus.

  11. Double agents and secret agents: the emerging fields of exogenous chemical exchange saturation transfer and T2-exchange magnetic resonance imaging contrast agents for molecular imaging.

    PubMed

    Daryaei, Iman; Pagel, Mark D

    2015-01-01

    Two relatively new types of exogenous magnetic resonance imaging contrast agents may provide greater impact for molecular imaging by providing greater specificity for detecting molecular imaging biomarkers. Exogenous chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) agents rely on the selective saturation of the magnetization of a proton on an agent, followed by chemical exchange of a proton from the agent to water. The selective detection of a biomarker-responsive CEST signal and an unresponsive CEST signal, followed by the ratiometric comparison of these signals, can improve biomarker specificity. We refer to this improvement as a "double-agent" approach to molecular imaging. Exogenous T2-exchange agents also rely on chemical exchange of protons between the agent and water, especially with an intermediate rate that lies between the slow exchange rates of CEST agents and the fast exchange rates of traditional T1 and T2 agents. Because of this intermediate exchange rate, these agents have been relatively unknown and have acted as "secret agents" in the contrast agent research field. This review exposes these secret agents and describes the merits of double agents through examples of exogenous agents that detect enzyme activity, nucleic acids and gene expression, metabolites, ions, redox state, temperature, and pH. Future directions are also provided for improving both types of contrast agents for improved molecular imaging and clinical translation. Therefore, this review provides an overview of two new types of exogenous contrast agents that are becoming useful tools within the armamentarium of molecular imaging.

  12. Double agents and secret agents: the emerging fields of exogenous chemical exchange saturation transfer and T2-exchange magnetic resonance imaging contrast agents for molecular imaging

    PubMed Central

    Daryaei, Iman; Pagel, Mark D

    2016-01-01

    Two relatively new types of exogenous magnetic resonance imaging contrast agents may provide greater impact for molecular imaging by providing greater specificity for detecting molecular imaging biomarkers. Exogenous chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) agents rely on the selective saturation of the magnetization of a proton on an agent, followed by chemical exchange of a proton from the agent to water. The selective detection of a biomarker-responsive CEST signal and an unresponsive CEST signal, followed by the ratiometric comparison of these signals, can improve biomarker specificity. We refer to this improvement as a “double-agent” approach to molecular imaging. Exogenous T2-exchange agents also rely on chemical exchange of protons between the agent and water, especially with an intermediate rate that lies between the slow exchange rates of CEST agents and the fast exchange rates of traditional T1 and T2 agents. Because of this intermediate exchange rate, these agents have been relatively unknown and have acted as “secret agents” in the contrast agent research field. This review exposes these secret agents and describes the merits of double agents through examples of exogenous agents that detect enzyme activity, nucleic acids and gene expression, metabolites, ions, redox state, temperature, and pH. Future directions are also provided for improving both types of contrast agents for improved molecular imaging and clinical translation. Therefore, this review provides an overview of two new types of exogenous contrast agents that are becoming useful tools within the armamentarium of molecular imaging. PMID:27747191

  13. The Development of Exogenous Orienting: Mechanisms of Control.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wainwright, Ann; Bryson, Susan E.

    2002-01-01

    Examined which of the attentional operations underlying exogenous orienting (disengaging, shifting, and/or engaging) improves with age in children from 6 to 14 years old. Found that disengaging attention alone distinguished between younger and older children's performance, regardless of whether attention alone or attention and associated sensory…

  14. Accounting for Exogenous Influences in Performance Evaluations of Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    De Witte, Kristof; Rogge, Nicky

    2011-01-01

    Students' evaluations of teacher performance (SETs) are increasingly used by universities. However, SETs are controversial mainly due to two issues: (1) teachers value various aspects of excellent teaching differently, and (2) SETs should not be determined on exogenous influences. Therefore, this paper constructs SETs using a tailored version of…

  15. EFFECTS OF EXOGENOUS ESTROGEN ON MATE SELECTION OF HOUSE FINCHES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Concern about the potential for endocrine disrupting chemicals to interfere with normal breeding behaviors of wildlife has prompted this study of effects of exogenous estrogen on mate selection in songbirds. The house finch (Carpodacus mexicanus) was selected as a model as it is ...

  16. Exogenous low-dose hydrogen peroxide enhances drought tolerance of soybean (Glycine max L.) through inducing antioxidant system.

    PubMed

    Guler, Neslihan Saruhan; Pehlivan, Necla

    2016-06-01

    Hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) functions as a signal molecule in plants under abiotic and biotic stress. In this study, the role of exogenous H(2)O(2) in improving drought tolerance in two soybean cultivars (Glycine max L. Merrill) differing in their tolerance to drought was evaluated. Plants were grown in plastic pots with normal irrigation in a phytotron. Four weeks after radicle emergence, either 1 mM H(2)O(2) or distilled water was sprayed as foliar onto the leaves of each plant, after drought stress was applied. Leaf samples were harvested on the 4(th) and 7(th) days of the drought. Antioxidant-related enzyme activity, such as the superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), ascorbate peroxidase (APX), glutathione reductase (GR), monodehydroascorbate reductase (MDHAR), dehydroascorbate reductase (DHAR), hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) and malondialdehyde (MDA) content was measured during the drought period. Drought stress decreased leaf water potential, relative water content and photosynthetic pigment content but enhanced lipid peroxidation and endogenous H(2)O(2) concentration. By contrast, exogenous low dose H(2)O(2) improved water status, pigment content and lipid peroxidation under drought stress. Endogenous H(2)O(2) concentration was reduced by exogenous H(2)O(2) as compared to drought treatment alone. H(2)O(2) pre-treatment induced all the antioxidant enzyme activities, to a greater extent than the control leaves, during drought. H(2)O(2) pretreatment further enhanced the activities of antioxidant enzymes in the tolerant cultivar compared to the sensitive cultivar. Results suggested that low dose H(2)O(2) pre-treatment alleviated water loss and H(2)O(2) content and increased drought stress tolerance by inducing the antioxidant system.

  17. The analgesic effects of exogenous melatonin in humans.

    PubMed

    Andersen, Lars Peter Holst

    2016-10-01

    The hormone, melatonin is produced with circadian rhythm by the pineal gland in humans. The melatonin rhythm provides an endogenous synchronizer, modulating e.g. blood pressure, body temperature, cortisol rhythm, sleep-awake-cycle, immune function and anti-oxidative defence. Interestingly, a number of experimental animal studies demonstrate significant dose-dependent anti-nociceptive effects of exogenous melatonin. Similarly, recent experimental- and clinical studies in humans indicate significant analgesic effects. In study I, we systematically reviewed all randomized studies investigating clinical effects of perioperative melatonin. Meta-analyses demonstrated significant analgesic and anxiolytic effects of melatonin in surgical patients, equating reductions of 20 mm and 19 mm, respectively on a VAS, compared with placebo. Profound heterogeneity between the included studies was, however, present. In study II, we aimed to investigate the analgesic, anti-hyperalgesic and anti-inflammatory effects of exogenous melatonin in a validated human inflammatory pain model, the human burn model. The study was performed as a randomized, double blind placebo-controlled crossover study. Primary outcomes were pain during the burn injury and areas of secondary hyperalgesia. No significant effects of exogenous melatonin were observed with respect to primary or secondary outcomes, compared to placebo. Study III and IV estimated the pharmacokinetic variables of exogenous melatonin. Oral melatonin demonstrated a tmax value of 41 minutes. Bioavailability of oral melatonin was only 3%. Elimination t1/2 were approximately 45 minutes following both oral and intravenous administration, respectively. High-dose intravenous melatonin was not associated with increased sedation, in terms of simple reaction times, compared to placebo. Similarly, no other adverse effects were reported. In Study V, we aimed to re-analyse data obtained from a randomized analgesic drug trial by a selection of

  18. A combination of He-Ne laser irradiation and exogenous NO application efficiently protect wheat seedling from oxidative stress caused by elevated UV-B stress.

    PubMed

    Li, Yongfeng; Gao, Limei; Han, Rong

    2016-12-01

    The elevated ultraviolet-B (UV-B) stress induces the accumulation of a variety of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS), which seems to cause oxidative stress for plants. To date, very little work has been done to evaluate the biological effects of a combined treatment with He-Ne laser irradiation and exogenous nitric oxide (NO) application on oxidative stress resulting from UV-B radiation. Thus, our study investigated the effects of a combination with He-Ne laser irradiation and exogenous NO treatment on oxidative damages in wheat seedlings under elevated UV-B stress. Our data showed that the reductions in ROS levels, membrane damage parameters, while the increments in antioxidant contents and antioxidant enzyme activity caused by a combination with He-Ne laser and exogenous NO treatment were greater than those of each individual treatment. Furthermore, these treatments had a similar effect on transcriptional activities of plant antioxidant enzymes. This implied that the protective effects of a combination with He-Ne laser irradiation and exogenous NO treatment on oxidative stress resulting from UV-B radiation was more efficient than each individual treatment with He-Ne laser or NO molecule. Our findings might provide beneficial theoretical references for identifying some effective new pathways for plant UV-B protection.

  19. Exogenous 3,3'-diindolylmethane increases Brassica napus L. seedling shoot growth through modulation of superoxide and hydrogen peroxide content.

    PubMed

    Gokul, Arun; Roode, Enrico; Klein, Ashwil; Keyster, Marshall

    2016-06-01

    Brassica napus L. (cv. AV Garnet) seeds were pre-treated with 15μM 3,3'-diindolylmethane (DIM) to investigate whether DIM could enhance seed germination. Further treatment of seedlings with 15μM DIM for 14days explored the effects on seedling shoot growth. Exogenous DIM led to improved germination percentage, increased seedling shoot lengths, and increased fresh and dry weights. Furthermore, DIM triggered induction of superoxide radical (O2(-)) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) content however, no change in malondialdehyde (MDA) content and cell death (assessed with Evans Blue assay) was detected for both the control and DIM treated seedling shoots. We also observed increases in superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity and ascorbate peroxidase (APX) activity in response to exogenous DIM, two fundamental enzymes in the control of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in plants. These results indicate that exogenous DIM treatment enhances seed germination and improves seedling shoot growth through possible activation of a reactive oxygen species signalling pathway involving O2(-) and H2O2 in B. napus.

  20. Alleviation of exogenous 6-benzyladenine on two genotypes of eggplant (Solanum melongena Mill.) growth under salt stress.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xuexia; He, Jie; Chen, Jianlin; Yang, Shaojun; Zha, Dingshi

    2014-01-01

    Cytokinins were recently shown to control plant adaptation to environmental stresses. To characterize the roles of cytokinins in the tolerance of eggplant (Solanum melongena Mill.) to salt stress, the protective effects of 6-benzyladenine (6-BA) on the growth, photosynthesis, and antioxidant capacity in the leaves of two eggplant cultivars Huqie12 (salt-sensitive) and Huqie4 (salt-tolerant) were investigated. Under 90 mM NaCl stress, Huqie4 showed higher biomass accumulation and less oxidative damage compared to the Huqie12. Application of exogenous 10 μM 6-BA significantly alleviated the growth suppression caused by salt stress in two eggplant genotypes. In parallel with the growth, 6-BA application in salt-stressed plants resulted in enhanced chlorophyll contents, as well as photosynthetic parameters such as net CO2 assimilation rate (P n), stomatal conductance (g s), transpiration rate (E), and intercellular CO2 concentration (C i). Furthermore, exogenous 6-BA also significantly reduced the O2 (-) production rate and malondialdehyde content and markedly increased the antioxidant enzymes superoxide dismutase and peroxidase, the antioxidant metabolites ascorbate and reduced glutathione (GSH), and proline in both genotypes under salt stress. The results indicate that exogenous 6-BA is useful to improve the salt resistance of eggplant, which is most likely related to the increase in photosynthesis and antioxidant capacity.

  1. [Interaction between CYP450 enzymes and metabolism of traditional Chinese medicine as well as enzyme activity assay].

    PubMed

    Lu, Tu-lin; Su, Lian-lin; Ji, De; Gu, Wei; Mao, Chun-qin

    2015-09-01

    Drugs are exogenous compounds for human bodies, and will be metabolized by many enzymes after administration. CYP450 enzyme, as a major metabolic enzyme, is an important phase I drug metabolizing enzyme. In human bodies, about 75% of drug metabolism is conducted by CYP450 enzymes, and CYP450 enzymes is the key factor for drug interactions between traditional Chinese medicine( TCM) -TCM, TCM-medicine and other drug combination. In order to make clear the interaction between metabolic enzymes and TCM metabolism, we generally chose the enzymatic activity as an evaluation index. That is to say, the enhancement or reduction of CYP450 enzyme activity was used to infer the inducing or inhibitory effect of active ingredients and extracts of traditional Chinese medicine on enzymes. At present, the common method for measuring metabolic enzyme activity is Cocktail probe drugs, and it is the key to select the suitable probe substrates. This is of great significance for study drug's absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion (ADME) process in organisms. The study focuses on the interaction between TCMs, active ingredients, herbal extracts, cocktail probe substrates as well as CYP450 enzymes, in order to guide future studies.

  2. Fructose and Sucrose Intake Increase Exogenous Carbohydrate Oxidation during Exercise

    PubMed Central

    Trommelen, Jorn; Fuchs, Cas J.; Beelen, Milou; Lenaerts, Kaatje; Jeukendrup, Asker E.; Cermak, Naomi M.; van Loon, Luc J. C.

    2017-01-01

    Peak exogenous carbohydrate oxidation rates typically reach ~1 g·min−1 during exercise when ample glucose or glucose polymers are ingested. Fructose co-ingestion has been shown to further increase exogenous carbohydrate oxidation rates. The purpose of this study was to assess the impact of fructose co-ingestion provided either as a monosaccharide or as part of the disaccharide sucrose on exogenous carbohydrate oxidation rates during prolonged exercise in trained cyclists. Ten trained male cyclists (VO2peak: 65 ± 2 mL·kg−1·min−1) cycled on four different occasions for 180 min at 50% Wmax during which they consumed a carbohydrate solution providing 1.8 g·min−1 of glucose (GLU), 1.2 g·min−1 glucose + 0.6 g·min−1 fructose (GLU + FRU), 0.6 g·min−1 glucose + 1.2 g·min−1 sucrose (GLU + SUC), or water (WAT). Peak exogenous carbohydrate oxidation rates did not differ between GLU + FRU and GLU + SUC (1.40 ± 0.06 vs. 1.29 ± 0.07 g·min−1, respectively, p = 0.999), but were 46% ± 8% higher when compared to GLU (0.96 ± 0.06 g·min−1: p < 0.05). In line, exogenous carbohydrate oxidation rates during the latter 120 min of exercise were 46% ± 8% higher in GLU + FRU or GLU + SUC compared with GLU (1.19 ± 0.12, 1.13 ± 0.21, and 0.82 ± 0.16 g·min−1, respectively, p < 0.05). We conclude that fructose co-ingestion (0.6 g·min−1) with glucose (1.2 g·min−1) provided either as a monosaccharide or as sucrose strongly increases exogenous carbohydrate oxidation rates during prolonged exercise in trained cyclists. PMID:28230742

  3. Elevated Liver Enzymes

    MedlinePlus

    Symptoms Elevated liver enzymes By Mayo Clinic Staff Elevated liver enzymes may indicate inflammation or damage to cells in the liver. Inflamed or ... than normal amounts of certain chemicals, including liver enzymes, into the bloodstream, which can result in elevated ...

  4. Exogenous Lipoid Pneumonia in Laryngectomy Patients: Radiological Findings.

    PubMed

    García Latorre, Raquel; Rodríguez Díaz, Ricardo; Barrios Barreto, Deisy; Ayala Carbonero, Ana; García Gómez-Muriel, María Isabel; Gorospe Sarasúa, Luis

    2015-07-01

    Exogenous lipoid pneumonia (ELP) is a rare (incidence 1.0%-2.5%), often under-diagnosed disease, caused by the aspiration and accumulation of exogenous lipids within the pulmonary alveoli. Various cases have been described due to inhalation of lubricants via the nasal passages and oropharynx, aspiration of mineral oils in laxatives in patients with eating disorders, application of lip gloss, occupational exposure to liquid paraffin or mineral oils ("fire-eaters", industrial use in washing of machinery, automobile workshops, plastic paints, etc.) and application of Vaseline during the insertion of nasogastric tubes and in the care of tracheotomy patients. ELP usually presents radiologically as areas of low-attenuation peribronchial consolidation and ground glass opacities, with a predominantly bibasal distribution. We present 5 cases of long-standing laryngectomy patients diagnosed with ELP who admitted using Vaseline in their tracheal stoma care.

  5. Exogenous folates stimulate growth and budding of Candida glabrata

    PubMed Central

    Porzoor, Afsaneh; Macreadie, Ian G.

    2015-01-01

    Folate, vitamin B9, is well recognized as being essential for cell growth. The utilization of folate is common to all cells, but the source of it may be quite different. For example, mammalian cells depend on exogenous uptake of folates, while plants and microbes can synthesize them. There has been little consideration of uptake of folate in microbial cells, and studies on the effects of folates in mammalian cells, where conditions are restricted. This study shows that exogenous folates (folic acid or folinic acid), causes Candida glabrata cells suspended in water alone to undergo two cycles of cell division and to form multiple buds. The effect was limited to cells in the stationary phase and more profound in quiescent cells. These data indicate a novel response of yeast to folates that may increase the utility of yeast as a model to study folate transport and signaling. PMID:28357288

  6. Chemical-shift MRI of exogenous lipoid pneumonia

    SciTech Connect

    Cox, J.E.; Choplin, R.H.; Chiles, C.

    1996-05-01

    Exogenous lipoid pneumonia results from the aspiration or inhalation of fatty substances, such as mineral oil found in laxatives or nasal medications containing liquid paraffin. We present standard and lipid-sensitive (chemical-shift) MR findings in a patient with histologically confirmed lipoid pneumonia. The loss of signal intensity in an area of airspace disease on opposed-phase imaging was considered specific for the presence of lipid. 14 refs., 3 figs.

  7. Intestinal microbiota as a tetrahydrobiopterin exogenous source in hph-1 mice

    PubMed Central

    Belik, Jaques; Shifrin, Yulia; Arning, Erland; Bottiglieri, Teodoro; Pan, Jingyi; Daigneault, Michelle C.; Allen-Vercoe, Emma

    2017-01-01

    Tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4) is a cofactor of a number of regulatory enzymes. Although there are no known BH4 exogenous sources, the tissue content of this biopterin increases with age in GTP cyclohydrolase 1-deficient hyperphenylalaninemia-1 (hph-1) mice. Since certain bacteria are known to generate BH4, we hypothesize that generation of this biopterin by the intestinal microbiota contributes to its tissue increase in hph-1 adult mice. The goal of this study was to comparatively evaluate hph-1 mice and wild-type C57Bl/6 controls for the presence of intestinal BH4-producing bacteria. Newborn and adult mice fecal material was screened for 6-pyruvoyltetrahydropterin synthase (PTPS-2) an enzyme only present in BH4-generating bacteria. Adult, but not newborn, wild-type control and hph-1 mouse fecal material contained PTPS-2 mRNA indicative of the presence of BH4-generating bacteria. Utilizing chemostat-cultured human fecal bacteria, we identified the PTPS-2-producing bacteria as belonging to the Actinobacteria phylum. We further confirmed that at least two PTPS-2-producing species, Aldercreutzia equolifaciens and Microbacterium schleiferi, generate BH4 and are present in hph-1 fecal material. In conclusion, intestinal Actinobacteria generate BH4. This finding has important translational significance, since manipulation of the intestinal flora in individuals with congenital biopterin deficiency may allow for an increase in total body BH4 content. PMID:28079055

  8. [Exogenous Sr2+ sedimentation on otolith of chum salmon embryos].

    PubMed

    Wang, Chen; Liu, Wei; Zhan, Pei-rong; Wang, Ji-long; Li, Pei-lun

    2015-10-01

    To explore the exogenous Sr2+ sedimentation on otolith of chum salmon embryos, chum salmon embryos were exposed to culture water contained Sr2+ at Sr2+ concentration of 50, 100, 200 or 400 mg . L-1 for 48 h to imitate Sr2+ sedimentation. After a culturing period of 12 d and 100 d, the otoliths of the chum salmon were taken to detect exogenous Sr2+ sedimentation with electro-probe microanalyzer (EPMA). The results showed that obvious deep red strontium signatures were produced in the otolith of chum salmon at different concentrations of Sr2+. The mean and extreme values of peak strontium area were not stable for the same Sr2+ dose, but the lowest of all the peak values was 35.1 times as much as that of control. Overall, the strontium value increased with the increase of Sr2+concentration. The strontium peak had no signs of abating after a culture period of 100 d. The results also showed that strontium was gradually deposited in the otolith, and had obvious hysteresis to immersion. Strontium sedimentation could also return to a normal level after the peak. These characteristics accorded exactly with the requirement of discharge tag technology, which indicated that exogenous Sr2+ was suitable in the marking of salmon otolith.

  9. Exogenous Glutamine in Respiratory Diseases: Myth or Reality?

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira, Gisele P.; de Abreu, Marcelo Gama; Pelosi, Paolo; Rocco, Patricia R. M.

    2016-01-01

    Several respiratory diseases feature increased inflammatory response and catabolic activity, which are associated with glutamine depletion; thus, the benefits of exogenous glutamine administration have been evaluated in clinical trials and models of different respiratory diseases. Recent reviews and meta-analyses have focused on the effects and mechanisms of action of glutamine in a general population of critical care patients or in different models of injury. However, little information is available about the role of glutamine in respiratory diseases. The aim of the present review is to discuss the evidence of glutamine depletion in cystic fibrosis (CF), asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), and lung cancer, as well as the results of exogenous glutamine administration in experimental and clinical studies. Exogenous glutamine administration might be beneficial in ARDS, asthma, and during lung cancer treatment, thus representing a potential therapeutic tool in these conditions. Further experimental and large randomized clinical trials focusing on the development and progression of respiratory diseases are necessary to elucidate the effects and possible therapeutic role of glutamine in this setting. PMID:26861387

  10. Exogenous γ-aminobutyric Acid (GABA) Application Improved Early Growth, Net Photosynthesis, and Associated Physio-Biochemical Events in Maize

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wu; Liu, Jianhua; Ashraf, Umair; Li, Gaoke; Li, Yuliang; Lu, Wenjia; Gao, Lei; Han, Fuguang; Hu, Jianguang

    2016-01-01

    γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) is an endogenous signaling molecule and involved in growth regulations and plant development, however, a little information is available on the consequences of exogenous GABA application on growth, development, and associated physio-biochemical processes in maize. The present study examined the GABA-induced regulations in early growth, net photosynthetic rate, gas exchange, osmoregulation, and enzymatic activities in three maize cultivars, i.e., Yuecainuo 6, Zhengtian 68, and Yuecainuo 2. Two levels of GABA, i.e., 0 mg L-1 and 50 mg L-1, in solution form, with total application volume of 100 ml per pot containing 15 maize seedlings were exogenously applied. Results revealed that exogenous GABA application improved seedling growth in terms of seedling length and biomass accumulation in all maize cultivars at both 3 and 7 days after treatment (DAT). It also promoted net photosynthesis and variably affected gas exchange attributes, i.e., stomatal conductance (Gs), intercellular CO2 concentration (Ci), and transpiration rate (Tr), as well as leaves SPAD value. Furthermore, lipid peroxidation [in terms of malondialdehyde (MDA)] under GABA treated maize seedlings were also remained variable; however, osmolyte accumulation (protein and proline) and activities of anti-oxidants enzymes, i.e., super-oxide dismutase and peroxidase were also affected differently at both 3 and 7 DAT in all maize cultivars. Furthermore, enzymes involved in nitrogen metabolism, e.g., nitrate reductase and glutamine synthetase were improved. These results suggest the involvement of GABA in various physio-metablical mechanisms which might lead to improvement in morphological growth of maize. In future, research is still needed at molecular and genetic levels to unravel the involvement of GABA-mediated regulations in growth and its associated physio-biochemical mechanisms. PMID:27446149

  11. Exogenous γ-aminobutyric Acid (GABA) Application Improved Early Growth, Net Photosynthesis, and Associated Physio-Biochemical Events in Maize.

    PubMed

    Li, Wu; Liu, Jianhua; Ashraf, Umair; Li, Gaoke; Li, Yuliang; Lu, Wenjia; Gao, Lei; Han, Fuguang; Hu, Jianguang

    2016-01-01

    γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) is an endogenous signaling molecule and involved in growth regulations and plant development, however, a little information is available on the consequences of exogenous GABA application on growth, development, and associated physio-biochemical processes in maize. The present study examined the GABA-induced regulations in early growth, net photosynthetic rate, gas exchange, osmoregulation, and enzymatic activities in three maize cultivars, i.e., Yuecainuo 6, Zhengtian 68, and Yuecainuo 2. Two levels of GABA, i.e., 0 mg L(-1) and 50 mg L(-1), in solution form, with total application volume of 100 ml per pot containing 15 maize seedlings were exogenously applied. Results revealed that exogenous GABA application improved seedling growth in terms of seedling length and biomass accumulation in all maize cultivars at both 3 and 7 days after treatment (DAT). It also promoted net photosynthesis and variably affected gas exchange attributes, i.e., stomatal conductance (Gs), intercellular CO2 concentration (Ci), and transpiration rate (Tr), as well as leaves SPAD value. Furthermore, lipid peroxidation [in terms of malondialdehyde (MDA)] under GABA treated maize seedlings were also remained variable; however, osmolyte accumulation (protein and proline) and activities of anti-oxidants enzymes, i.e., super-oxide dismutase and peroxidase were also affected differently at both 3 and 7 DAT in all maize cultivars. Furthermore, enzymes involved in nitrogen metabolism, e.g., nitrate reductase and glutamine synthetase were improved. These results suggest the involvement of GABA in various physio-metablical mechanisms which might lead to improvement in morphological growth of maize. In future, research is still needed at molecular and genetic levels to unravel the involvement of GABA-mediated regulations in growth and its associated physio-biochemical mechanisms.

  12. Application of Exogenous Ethylene Inhibits Postharvest Peel Browning of ‘Huangguan’ Pear

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Yurong; Yang, Mengnan; Wang, Jingjing; Jiang, Cai-Zhong; Wang, Qingguo

    2017-01-01

    Peel browning disorder has an enormous impact on the exterior quality of ‘Huangguan’ pear whereas the underlying mechanism is still unclear. Although different methods have been applied for inhibiting the peel browning of ‘Huangguan’ pear, there are numerous issues associated with these approaches, such as time cost, efficacy, safety and stability. In this study, to develop a rapid, efficient and safe way to protect ‘Huangguan’ pear from skin browning, the effect of exogenous ethylene on peel browning of pear fruits stored at 0°C was evaluated. Results showed that ethylene treatments at 0.70–1.28 μL/L significantly decreased the browning rate and browning index from 73.80% and 0.30 to 6.80% and 0.02 after 20 days storage at 0°C, respectively, whereas ethylene treatments at 5 μL/L completely inhibited the occurrence of browning. In addition, ethylene treatments at 5 μL/L decreased the electrolyte leakage and respiration rate, delayed the loss of total phenolic compounds. Furthermore, ethylene (5 μL/L) treatment significantly enhanced the activity of catalase (CAT), ascorbate peroxidase (APX) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) and increased the 1, 1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl inhibition rate, but inhibited the activity of polyphenol oxidase (PPO) and peroxidase (POD). Our data revealed that ethylene prevented the peel browning through improving antioxidant enzymes (CAT, APX and SOD) activities and reducing PPO activity, electrolyte leakage rate and respiration rate. This study demonstrates that exogenous ethylene application may provide a safe and effective alternative method for controlling browning, and contributes to the understanding of peel browning of ‘Huangguan’ pear. PMID:28149298

  13. Poliovirus polypeptide precursors: expression in vitro and processing by exogenous 3C and 2A proteinases.

    PubMed Central

    Nicklin, M J; Kräusslich, H G; Toyoda, H; Dunn, J J; Wimmer, E

    1987-01-01

    Plasmids have been constructed to generate substrates for the study of proteinases 2A and 3C of poliovirus. They contain the P1 (capsomer precursor) region of the poliovirus genome or P1 and part of P2 (a nonstructural precursor), which can be transcribed and translated in vitro. A transcript containing the entire 5' nontranslated region and the P1 region of the viral RNA gave poor translation in a reticulocyte translation system. Truncation of the 5' nontranslated region to its 3'-most segment gave acceptably good yields of radiolabeled P1. P1 was specifically processed to yield capsomer proteins by enzymes supplied in a postmitochondrial supernatant from poliovirus-infected cells. Thus, proteinase 3C can be supplied exogenously (in trans) and effect processing. This system may be used to provide P1 for the assay of proteinase 3C. Precursors that lacked either the 1A or 1D regions were poor substrates for proteinase 3C--observations that demonstrated a stringent structural requirement in processing by 3C. The translation product of a transcript encoding P1 and part of P2 was rapidly cleaved at the P1-P2 site in the absence of infected-cell extract. A transcript that contained a mutated 2A region gave a stable P1-P2 precursor that could be processed specifically by exogenous proteinase from infected-cell fractions. Processing of P1 appeared to require cleavage of the P1-P2 bond. These results support our previous data that 2A is the second polioviral proteinase and also provides a means of assaying proteinase 2A in vitro. Images PMID:3035560

  14. Exogenous jasmonic acid can enhance tolerance of wheat seedlings to salt stress.

    PubMed

    Qiu, ZongBo; Guo, JunLi; Zhu, AiJing; Zhang, Liang; Zhang, ManMan

    2014-06-01

    Jasmonic acid (JA) is regarded as endogenous regulator that plays an important role in regulating stress responses, plant growth and development. To investigate the physiological mechanisms of salt stress mitigated by exogenous JA, foliar application of 2mM JA was done to wheat seedlings for 3days and then they were subjected to 150mM NaCl. Our results showed that 150mM NaCl treatment significantly decreased plant height, root length, shoot dry weight, root dry weight, the concentration of glutathione (GSH), chlorophyll b (Chl b) and carotenoid (Car), the activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD), peroxidase (POD), catalase (CAT), ascorbate peroxidase (APX), enhanced the concentration of malondialdehyde (MDA), hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and the rate of superoxide radical (O2•-) generation in the wheat seedlings when compared with the control. However, treatments with exogenous JA for 3 days significantly enhanced salt stress tolerance in wheat seedlings by decreasing the concentration of MDA and H2O2, the production rate of O2•- and increasing the transcript levels and activities of SOD, POD, CAT and APX and the contents of GSH, Chl b and Car, which, in turn, enhanced the growth of salt stressed seedlings. These results suggested that JA could effectively protect wheat seedlings from salt stress damage by enhancing activities of antioxidant enzymes and the concentration of antioxidative compounds to quench the excessive reactive oxygen species caused by salt stress and presented a practical implication for wheat cultivation in salt-affected soils.

  15. Fundamentals of enzyme kinetics.

    PubMed

    Seibert, Eleanore; Tracy, Timothy S

    2014-01-01

    This chapter provides a general introduction to the kinetics of enzyme-catalyzed reactions, with a focus on drug-metabolizing enzymes. A prerequisite to understanding enzyme kinetics is having a clear grasp of the meanings of "enzyme" and "catalysis." Catalysts are reagents that can increase the rate of a chemical reaction without being consumed in the reaction. Enzymes are proteins that form a subset of catalysts. These concepts are further explored below.

  16. Static magnetic field reduced exogenous oligonucleotide uptake by spermatozoa using magnetic nanoparticle gene delivery system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katebi, Samira; Esmaeili, Abolghasem; Ghaedi, Kamran

    2016-03-01

    Spermatozoa could introduce exogenous oligonucleotides of interest to the oocyte. The most important reason of low efficiency of sperm mediated gene transfer (SMGT) is low uptake of exogenous DNA by spermatozoa. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of static magnetic field on exogenous oligonucleotide uptake of spermatozoa using magnetofection method. Magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) associated with the labeled oligonucleotides were used to increase the efficiency of exogenous oligonucleotide uptake by rooster spermatozoa. We used high-field/high-gradient magnet (NdFeB) to enhance and accelerate exogenous DNA sedimentation at the spermatozoa surface. Flow cytometry analysis was performed to measure viability and percentage of exogenous oligonucleotide uptake by sperm. Flow cytometry analysis showed a significant increase in exogenous oligonucleotide uptake by rooster spermatozoa (P<0.001) when spermatozoa were incubated in exogenous oligonucleotide solution and MNPs. However, by applying static magnetic field during magnetofection method, a significant decrease in exogenous oligonucleotide uptake was observed (P<0.05). Findings of this study showed that MNPs were effective to increase exogenous oligonucleotide uptake by rooster spermatozoa; however unlike others studies, static magnetic field, was not only ineffective to enhance exogenous oligonucleotide uptake by rooster spermatozoa but also led to reduction in efficiency of magnetic nanoparticles in gene transfer.

  17. [Response of reactive oxygen metabolism in melon chloroplasts to short-term salinity-alkalinity stress regulated by exogenous γ-aminobutyric acid].

    PubMed

    Xiang, Li-xia; Hu, Li-pan; Hu, Xiao-hui; Pan, Xiong-bo; Ren, Wen-qi

    2015-12-01

    The regulatory effect of exogenous γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) on metabolism of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in melon chloroplasts under short-term salinity-alkalinity stress were investigated in melon variety 'Jinhui No. 1', which was cultured with deep flow hydroponics. The result showed that under salinity-alkalinity stress, the photosynthetic pigment content, MDA content, superoxide anion (O₂·) production rate and hydrogen peroxide (H₂O₂) content in chloroplast increased significantly, the contents of antioxidants ascorbic acid (AsA) and glutathione (GSH) increased, and the activities of H⁺-ATPase and H⁺-PPiase were inhibited obviously. With exogenous GABA application, the accumulations of O₂·, MDA and H₂O₂ induced by salinity-alkalinity stress were inhibited. Exogenous GABA alleviated the increase of photosynthetic pigment content, improved the activity of SOD, enzymes of AsA-GSH cycle, total AsA and total GSH while decreased the AsA/DHA ratio and GSH/GSSH ratio. Foliar GABA could enhance the H⁺-ATPase and H⁺-PPiase activities. Our results suggested that the exogenous GABA could accelerate the ROS metabolism in chloroplast, promote the recycle of AsA-GSH, and maintain the permeability of cell membrane to improve the ability of melon chloroplast against salinity-alkalinity stress.

  18. Exogenous ammonium inhibits petal pigmentation and expansion in Gerbera hybrida.

    PubMed

    Huang, Zhigang; Liang, Minting; Peng, Jianzong; Xing, Tim; Wang, Xiaojing

    2008-06-01

    Petal pigmentation is the most important aspect in natural flower coloration. In the present study, the inhibition of petal pigmentation by exogenous ammonium was investigated. Ray floret petals detached from inflorescences of Gerbera hybrida (Shenzhen No. 5) were cultured in vitro on media supplied with different forms of nitrogen and its assimilated compounds. The expression of a set of genes involved in anthocyanin biosynthesis and regulation was determined by Northern blotting assay. It was found that ammonium (NH4+), not nitrate (NO3-), in millimolar concentrations inhibited anthocyanin accumulation. The expressions of Gerbera chalcone synthase 1 (GCHS1), Gerbera chalcone synthase 2 (GCHS2) and Gerbera dihydroflavonol-4-reductase (GDFR) decreased, while six other related genes showed no significant changes after NH4+ treatment. Further studies on NH4+ function indicated that glutamine (Gln) acted as a downstream factor of NH4+ to suppress petal pigmentation. Both exogenous Gln and NH4+ were found to inhibit anthocyanin accumulation in the petals, and the application of Gln was also found to inhibit the expressions of GCHS1, GCHS2 and GDFR. The application of NH4+ also resulted in an increase in the activity of Gerbera glutamine synthetase (EC 6.3.1.2) along with a rapid increase of Gln content. When methionine sulfoximine, an inhibitor of glutamine synthetase (GS), was added, it was found to block the NH4+-induced inhibition of pigmentation. From these experiments, we conclude that the NH4+-induced suppression of petal pigmentation is not because of NH4+ toxicity, and the inhibition of pigmentation caused by the addition of exogenous NH4+ is the result of its assimilation into Gln.

  19. Improved control of exogenous attention in action video game players.

    PubMed

    Cain, Matthew S; Prinzmetal, William; Shimamura, Arthur P; Landau, Ayelet N

    2014-01-01

    Action video game players (VGPs) have demonstrated a number of attentional advantages over non-players. Here, we propose that many of those benefits might be underpinned by improved control over exogenous (i.e., stimulus-driven) attention. To test this we used an anti-cueing task, in which a sudden-onset cue indicated that the target would likely appear in a separate location on the opposite side of the fixation point. When the time between the cue onset and the target onset was short (40 ms), non-players (nVGPs) showed a typical exogenous attention effect. Their response times were faster to targets presented at the cued (but less probable) location compared with the opposite (more probable) location. VGPs, however, were less likely to have their attention drawn to the location of the cue. When the onset asynchrony was long (600 ms), VGPs and nVGPs were equally able to endogenously shift their attention to the likely (opposite) target location. In order to rule out processing-speed differences as an explanation for this result, we also tested VGPs and nVGPs on an attentional blink (AB) task. In a version of the AB task that minimized demands on task switching and iconic memory, VGPs and nVGPs did not differ in second target identification performance (i.e., VGPs had the same magnitude of AB as nVGPs), suggesting that the anti-cueing results were due to flexible control over exogenous attention rather than to more general speed-of-processing differences.

  20. Development of a universal RNA beacon for exogenous gene detection.

    PubMed

    Guo, Yuanjian; Lu, Zhongju; Cohen, Ira Stephen; Scarlata, Suzanne

    2015-05-01

    Stem cell therapy requires a nontoxic and high-throughput method to achieve a pure cell population to prevent teratomas that can occur if even one cell in the implant has not been transformed. A promising method to detect and separate cells expressing a particular gene is RNA beacon technology. However, developing a successful, specific beacon to a particular transfected gene can take months to develop and in some cases is impossible. Here, we report on an off-the-shelf universal beacon that decreases the time and cost of applying beacon technology to select any living cell population transfected with an exogenous gene.

  1. Exogenous agents that target transmembrane domains of proteins.

    PubMed

    Yin, Hang

    2008-01-01

    Although membrane proteins account for approximately one third of all proteins encoded in the human genome, the functions and structures of their transmembrane domains are much less understood than the water-soluble regions. A major hurdle in studying these transmembrane domains is the lack of appropriate exogenous agents that can be used as specific probes. Despite the daunting challenges, major strides have recently been made in targeting the transmembrane domains of a variety of membrane proteins. High affinity and selectivity have been achieved in model biophysical systems, membranes of bacteria, and mammalian cells.

  2. Switched linear model predictive controllers for periodic exogenous signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Liuping; Gawthrop, Peter; Owens, David. H.; Rogers, Eric

    2010-04-01

    This article develops switched linear controllers for periodic exogenous signals using the framework of a continuous-time model predictive control. In this framework, the control signal is generated by an algorithm that uses receding horizon control principle with an on-line optimisation scheme that permits inclusion of operational constraints. Unlike traditional repetitive controllers, applying this method in the form of switched linear controllers ensures bumpless transfer from one controller to another. Simulation studies are included to demonstrate the efficacy of the design with or without hard constraints.

  3. Comparative proteomic and physiological analyses reveal the protective effect of exogenous calcium on the germinating soybean response to salt stress.

    PubMed

    Yin, Yongqi; Yang, Runqiang; Han, Yongbin; Gu, Zhenxin

    2015-01-15

    Calcium enhances salt stress tolerance of soybeans. Nevertheless, the molecular mechanism of calcium's involvement in resistance to salt stress is unclear. A comparative proteomic approach was used to investigate protein profiles in germinating soybeans under NaCl-CaCl2 and NaCl-LaCl3 treatments. A total of 80 proteins affected by calcium in 4-day-old germinating soybean cotyledons and 71 in embryos were confidently identified. The clustering analysis showed proteins were subdivided into 5 and 6 clusters in cotyledon and embryo, respectively. Among them, proteins involved in signal transduction and energy pathways, in transportation, and in protein biosynthesis were largely enriched while those involved in proteolysis were decreased. Abundance of nucleoside diphosphate kinase and three antioxidant enzymes were visibly increased by calcium. Accumulation of gamma-aminobutyric acid and polyamines was also detected after application of exogenous calcium. This was consistent with proteomic results, which showed that proteins involved in the glutamate and methionine metabolism were mediated by calcium. Calcium could increase the salt stress tolerance of germinating soybeans via enriching signal transduction, energy pathway and transportation, promoting protein biosynthesis, inhibiting proteolysis, redistributing storage proteins, regulating protein processing in endoplasmic reticulum, enriching antioxidant enzymes and activating their activities, accumulating secondary metabolites and osmolytes, and other adaptive responses. Biological significance Soybean (Glycine max L.), as a traditional edible legume, is being targeted for designing functional foods. During soybean germination under stressful conditions especially salt stress, newly discovered functional components such as gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) are rapidly accumulated. However, soybean plants are relatively salt-sensitive and the growth, development and biomass of germinating soybeans are significantly

  4. Exogenous spermidine improves seed germination of white clover under water stress via involvement in starch metabolism, antioxidant defenses and relevant gene expression.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhou; Peng, Yan; Zhang, Xin-Quan; Ma, Xiao; Huang, Lin-Kai; Yan, Yan-Hong

    2014-11-05

    This study was designed to determine the effect of exogenous spermidine (Spd) (30 μM) on white clover seed germination under water stress induced by polyethylene glycol 6000. Use of seed priming with Spd improved seed germination percentage, germination vigor, germination index, root viability and length, and shortened mean germination time under different water stress conditions. Seedling fresh weight and dry weight also increased significantly in Spd-treated seeds compared with control (seeds primed with distilled water). Improved starch metabolism was considered a possible reason for this seed invigoration, since seeds primed with Spd had significantly increased α-amylase/β-amylase activities, reducing sugar, fructose and glucose content and transcript level of β-amylase gene but not transcript level of α-amylase gene. In addition, the physiological effects of exogenous Spd on improving seeds' tolerance to water deficit during germination were reflected by lower lipid peroxidation levels, better cell membrane stability and significant higher seed vigour index in seedlings. Enhanced antioxidant enzyme activities (superoxide dismutase, peroxidase, catalase and ascorbate peroxidase), ascorbate-glutathione cycle (ASC-GSH cycle) and transcript level of genes encoding antioxidant enzymes induced by exogenous Spd may be one of the critical reasons behind acquired drought tolerance through scavenging of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in water-stressed white clover seeds. The results indicate that Spd plays an important function as a stress-protective compound or physiological activator.

  5. Exogenously applied nitrate improves the photosynthetic performance and nitrogen metabolism in tomato (Solanumlycopersicum L. cv Pusa Rohini) under arsenic (V) toxicity.

    PubMed

    Agnihotri, Ashish; Seth, Chandra Shekhar

    2016-07-01

    Tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.) being a widespread and most commonly consumed vegetable all over the world has an important economic value for its producers and related food industries. It is a serious matter of concern as its production is affected by arsenic present in soil. So, the present study, investigated the toxicity of As(V) on photosynthetic performance along with nitrogen metabolism and its alleviation by exogenous application of nitrate. Plants were grown under natural conditions using soil spiked with 25 mg and 20 mM, As(V) and nitrate, respectively. Our results revealed that plant growth indices, photosynthetic pigments, and other major photosynthetic parameters like net photosynthetic rate and maximum quantum efficiency (Fv/Fm ) of photosystem II (PSII) were significantly (P ≤ 0.05) reduced under As(V) stress. However, nitrate application significantly (P ≤ 0.05) alleviated As(V) toxicity by improving the aforesaid plant responses and also restored the abnormal shape of guard cells. Nitrogen metabolism was assessed by studying the key nitrogen-metabolic enzymes. Exogenous nitrate revamped nitrogen metabolism through a major impact on activities of NR, NiR, GS and GOGAT enzymes and also enhanced the total nitrogen and NO content while malondialdehyde content, and membrane electrolytic leakage were remarkably reduced. Our study suggested that exogenous nitrate application could be considered as a cost effective approach in ameliorating As(V) toxicity.

  6. Dynamic Financial Constraints: Distinguishing Mechanism Design from Exogenously Incomplete Regimes*

    PubMed Central

    Karaivanov, Alexander; Townsend, Robert M.

    2014-01-01

    We formulate and solve a range of dynamic models of constrained credit/insurance that allow for moral hazard and limited commitment. We compare them to full insurance and exogenously incomplete financial regimes (autarky, saving only, borrowing and lending in a single asset). We develop computational methods based on mechanism design, linear programming, and maximum likelihood to estimate, compare, and statistically test these alternative dynamic models with financial/information constraints. Our methods can use both cross-sectional and panel data and allow for measurement error and unobserved heterogeneity. We estimate the models using data on Thai households running small businesses from two separate samples. We find that in the rural sample, the exogenously incomplete saving only and borrowing regimes provide the best fit using data on consumption, business assets, investment, and income. Family and other networks help consumption smoothing there, as in a moral hazard constrained regime. In contrast, in urban areas, we find mechanism design financial/information regimes that are decidedly less constrained, with the moral hazard model fitting best combined business and consumption data. We perform numerous robustness checks in both the Thai data and in Monte Carlo simulations and compare our maximum likelihood criterion with results from other metrics and data not used in the estimation. A prototypical counterfactual policy evaluation exercise using the estimation results is also featured. PMID:25246710

  7. Role of Exogenous Hsp72 on Liver Dysfunction during Sepsis.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Tsen-Ni; Ho, Jia-Jing; Liu, Maw-Shung; Lee, Tzu-Ying; Lu, Mei-Chin; Liu, Chia-Jen; Huang, Li-Ju; Lue, Sheng-I; Yang, Rei-Chen

    2015-01-01

    This study examined the role of exogenous heat shock protein 72 (Hsp72) in reversing sepsis-induced liver dysfunction. Sepsis was induced by cecal ligation and puncture. Liver function was determined on the basis of the enzymatic activities of serum glutamate oxaloacetate transaminase (GOT) and glutamate pyruvate transaminase (GPT). Apoptosis was determined using terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling staining. B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2), Bcl-2-associated X protein (Bax), cleaved caspase-3 and caspase-9, and cleaved poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) protein expressions were analyzed using Western blotting. Results showed GOT and GPT levels increased during sepsis, and levels were restored following the administration of human recombinant Hsp72 (rhHsp72). Increased liver tissue apoptosis was observed during sepsis, and normal apoptosis resumed on rhHsp72 administration. The Bcl-2/Bax ratio, cleaved caspase-3, caspase-9, and PARP protein expressions in the liver tissues were upregulated during sepsis and normalized after rhHsp72 treatment. We conclude that, during sepsis, exogenous Hsp72 restored liver dysfunction by inhibiting apoptosis via the mitochondria-initiated caspase pathway.

  8. The interactions of multisensory integration with endogenous and exogenous attention.

    PubMed

    Tang, Xiaoyu; Wu, Jinglong; Shen, Yong

    2016-02-01

    Stimuli from multiple sensory organs can be integrated into a coherent representation through multiple phases of multisensory processing; this phenomenon is called multisensory integration. Multisensory integration can interact with attention. Here, we propose a framework in which attention modulates multisensory processing in both endogenous (goal-driven) and exogenous (stimulus-driven) ways. Moreover, multisensory integration exerts not only bottom-up but also top-down control over attention. Specifically, we propose the following: (1) endogenous attentional selectivity acts on multiple levels of multisensory processing to determine the extent to which simultaneous stimuli from different modalities can be integrated; (2) integrated multisensory events exert top-down control on attentional capture via multisensory search templates that are stored in the brain; (3) integrated multisensory events can capture attention efficiently, even in quite complex circumstances, due to their increased salience compared to unimodal events and can thus improve search accuracy; and (4) within a multisensory object, endogenous attention can spread from one modality to another in an exogenous manner.

  9. Saccade latency indexes exogenous and endogenous object-based attention.

    PubMed

    Şentürk, Gözde; Greenberg, Adam S; Liu, Taosheng

    2016-10-01

    Classic studies of object-based attention have utilized keypress responses as the main dependent measure. However, people typically make saccades to fixate important objects. Recent work has shown that attention may act differently when it is deployed covertly versus in advance of a saccade. We further investigated the link between saccades and attention by examining whether object-based effects can be observed for saccades. We adapted the classical double-rectangle cueing paradigm of Egly, Driver, and Rafal (1994), and measured both the first saccade latency and the keypress reaction time (RT) to a target that appeared at the end of one of the two rectangles. Our results showed that saccade latencies exhibited higher sensitivity than did RTs for detecting effects of attention. We also assessed the generality of the attention effects by testing three types of cues: hybrid (predictive and peripheral), exogenous (nonpredictive and peripheral), and endogenous (predictive and central). We found that both RTs and saccade latencies exhibited effects of both space-based and object-based attentional selection. However, saccade latencies showed a more robust attentional modulation than RTs. For the exogenous cues, we observed a spatial inhibition of return along with an object-based effect, implying that object-based attention is independent of space-based attention. Overall, our results revealed an oculomotor correlate of object-based attention, suggesting that, in addition to spatial priority, object-level priority also affects saccade planning.

  10. Partial Granger causality--eliminating exogenous inputs and latent variables.

    PubMed

    Guo, Shuixia; Seth, Anil K; Kendrick, Keith M; Zhou, Cong; Feng, Jianfeng

    2008-07-15

    Attempts to identify causal interactions in multivariable biological time series (e.g., gene data, protein data, physiological data) can be undermined by the confounding influence of environmental (exogenous) inputs. Compounding this problem, we are commonly only able to record a subset of all related variables in a system. These recorded variables are likely to be influenced by unrecorded (latent) variables. To address this problem, we introduce a novel variant of a widely used statistical measure of causality--Granger causality--that is inspired by the definition of partial correlation. Our 'partial Granger causality' measure is extensively tested with toy models, both linear and nonlinear, and is applied to experimental data: in vivo multielectrode array (MEA) local field potentials (LFPs) recorded from the inferotemporal cortex of sheep. Our results demonstrate that partial Granger causality can reveal the underlying interactions among elements in a network in the presence of exogenous inputs and latent variables in many cases where the existing conditional Granger causality fails.

  11. The interactions of multisensory integration with endogenous and exogenous attention

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Xiaoyu; Wu, Jinglong; Shen, Yong

    2016-01-01

    Stimuli from multiple sensory organs can be integrated into a coherent representation through multiple phases of multisensory processing; this phenomenon is called multisensory integration. Multisensory integration can interact with attention. Here, we propose a framework in which attention modulates multisensory processing in both endogenous (goal-driven) and exogenous (stimulus-driven) ways. Moreover, multisensory integration exerts not only bottom-up but also top-down control over attention. Specifically, we propose the following: (1) endogenous attentional selectivity acts on multiple levels of multisensory processing to determine the extent to which simultaneous stimuli from different modalities can be integrated; (2) integrated multisensory events exert top-down control on attentional capture via multisensory search templates that are stored in the brain; (3) integrated multisensory events can capture attention efficiently, even in quite complex circumstances, due to their increased salience compared to unimodal events and can thus improve search accuracy; and (4) within a multisensory object, endogenous attention can spread from one modality to another in an exogenous manner. PMID:26546734

  12. Insolubilization process increases enzyme stability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Billingham, J.; Lyn, J.

    1971-01-01

    Enzymes complexed with polymeric matrices contain properties suggesting application to enzyme-controlled reactions. Stability of insolubilized enzyme derivatives is markedly greater than that of soluble enzymes and physical form of insolubilized enzymes is useful in column and batch processes.

  13. Exogenous sucrose supply changes sugar metabolism and reduces photosynthesis of sugarcane through the down-regulation of Rubisco abundance and activity.

    PubMed

    Lobo, Ana Karla Moreira; de Oliveira Martins, Marcio; Lima Neto, Milton Costa; Machado, Eduardo Caruso; Ribeiro, Rafael Vasconcelos; Silveira, Joaquim Albenisio Gomes

    2015-05-01

    Photosynthetic modulation by sugars has been known for many years, but the biochemical and molecular comprehension of this process is lacking. We studied how the exogenous sucrose supplied to leaves could affect sugar metabolism in leaf, sheath and stalk and inhibit photosynthesis in four-month old sugarcane plants. Exogenous sucrose 50mM sprayed on attached leaves strongly impaired the net CO2 assimilation (PN) and decreased the instantaneous carboxylation efficiency (PN/Ci), suggesting that the impairment in photosynthesis was caused by biochemical restrictions. The photosystem II activity was also affected by excess sucrose as indicated by the reduction in the apparent electron transport rate, effective quantum yield and increase in non-photochemical quenching. In leaf segments, sucrose accumulation was related to increases in the activities of soluble acid and neutral invertases, sucrose synthase and sucrose phosphate synthase, whereas the contents of fructose increased and glucose slightly decreased. Changes in the activities of sucrose hydrolyzing and synthesizing enzymes in leaf, sheath and stalk and sugar profile in intact plants were not enough to identify which sugar(s) or enzyme(s) were directly involved in photosynthesis modulation. However, exogenous sucrose was able to trigger down-regulation in the Rubisco abundance, activation state and enzymatic activity. Despite the fact that PN/Ci had been notably decreased by sucrose, in vitro activity and abundance of PEPCase did not change, suggesting an in vivo modulation of this enzyme. The data reveal that sucrose and/or other derivative sugars in leaves inhibited sugarcane photosynthesis by down-regulation of Rubisco synthesis and activity. Our data also suggest that sugar modulation was not exerted by a feedback mechanism induced by the accumulation of sugars in immature sugarcane stalk.

  14. Exogenous γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) affects pollen tube growth via modulating putative Ca2+-permeable membrane channels and is coupled to negative regulation on glutamate decarboxylase

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Guang-Hui; Zou, Jie; Feng, Jing; Peng, Xiong-Bo; Wu, Ju-You; Wu, Ying-Liang; Palanivelu, Ravishankar; Sun, Meng-Xiang

    2014-01-01

    γ-Aminobutyric acid (GABA) is implicated in pollen tube growth, but the molecular and cellular mechanisms that it mediates are largely unknown. Here, it is shown that exogenous GABA modulates putative Ca2+-permeable channels on the plasma membranes of tobacco pollen grains and pollen tubes. Whole-cell voltage-clamp experiments and non-invasive micromeasurement technology (NMT) revealed that the influx of Ca2+ increases in pollen tubes in response to exogenous GABA. It is also demonstrated that glutamate decarboxylase (GAD), the rate-limiting enzyme of GABA biosynthesis, is involved in feedback controls of Ca2+-permeable channels to fluctuate intracellular GABA levels and thus modulate pollen tube growth. The findings suggest that GAD activity linked with Ca2+-permeable channels relays an extracellular GABA signal and integrates multiple signal pathways to modulate tobacco pollen tube growth. Thus, the data explain how GABA mediates the communication between the style and the growing pollen tubes. PMID:24799560

  15. Developments in Enzyme Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chaplin, M. F.

    1984-01-01

    Enzyme technology has a well-established industrial base, with applications that have survived competition. The most prominent applications of enzymes in biotechnology are examined with an explanation of some theoretical background. Topics include extending an enzyme's useful life, partition and diffusion, industrial uses, and therapeutic uses.…

  16. Exogenous Application of Citric Acid Ameliorates the Adverse Effect of Heat Stress in Tall Fescue (Lolium arundinaceum)

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Longxing; Zhang, Zhifei; Xiang, Zuoxiang; Yang, Zhijian

    2016-01-01

    Citric acid may be involved in plant response to high temperature. The objective of this study was to investigate whether exogenous citric acid could improve heat tolerance in a cool-season turfgrass species, tall fescue (Lolium arundinaceum), and to determine the physiological mechanisms of citric acid effects on heat stress tolerance. The grasses were subjected to four citric acid levels (0, 0.2, 2, and 20 mM) and two temperature levels (25/20 and 35/30 ± 0.5°C, day/night) treatments in growth chambers. Heat stress increased an electrolyte leakage (EL) and malonaldehyde (MDA) content, while reduced plant growth, chlorophyll (Chl) content, photochemical efficiency (Fv/Fm), root activity and antioxidant enzyme activities (superoxide dismutase, SOD; catalase, CAT; peroxidase, POD). External citric acid alleviated the detrimental effects of heat stress on tall fescue, which was evidenced by decreased EL and MDA content, and improved plant growth under stress conditions. Additionally, the reduction in Chl content, Fv/Fm, SOD, POD, CAT and root activity were ameliorated in citric acid treated plants under heat stressed conditions. High temperature induced the expression of heat shock protein (HSP) genes, which exhibited greater expression levels after citric acid treatment under heat stress. These results suggest that exogenous citric acid application may alleviate growth and physiological damage caused by high temperature. In addition, the exogenously applied citric acid might be responsible for maintaining membrane stability, root activity, and activation of antioxidant response and HSP genes which could contribute to the protective roles of citric acid in tall fescue responses to heat stress. PMID:26925085

  17. Exogenous Melatonin Mitigates Photoinhibition by Accelerating Non-photochemical Quenching in Tomato Seedlings Exposed to Moderate Light during Chilling.

    PubMed

    Ding, Fei; Wang, Meiling; Liu, Bin; Zhang, Shuoxin

    2017-01-01

    Melatonin plays an important role in tolerance to multiple stresses in plants. Recent studies have shown that melatonin relieves photoinhibition in plants under cold stress; however, the mechanisms are not fully understood. Non-photochemical quenching (NPQ) is a key process thermally dissipating excess light energy that plants employ as a protective mechanism to prevent the over reduction of photosystem II. Here, we report the effects of exogenous melatonin on NPQ and mitigation of photoinhibition in tomato seedlings exposed to moderate light during chilling. In response to moderate light during chilling, the maximum quantum yield (Fv/Fm) and the effective photochemical efficiency (F'v/F'm) of PSII were both substantially reduced, showing severe photoinhibition in tomato seedlings, whereas exogenous application of melatonin effectively alleviated the photoinhibition. Further experiment showed that melatonin accelerated the induction of NPQ in response to moderate light and maintained higher level of NPQ upon longer exposure to light during chilling. Consistent with the increased NPQ was the elevated de-epoxidation state of xanthophyll pigments in melatonin-pretreated seedlings exposed to light during chilling. Enzyme activity assay showed that violaxanthin de-epoxidase (VDE), which catalyzes the de-epoxidation reaction in the xanthophyll cycle, was activated by light and the activity was further enhanced by application of melatonin. Further analysis revealed that melatonin induced the expression of VDE gene in tomato seedlings under moderate light and chilling conditions. Ascorbic acid is an essential cofactor of VDE and the level of it was found to be increased in melatonin-pretreated seedlings. Feeding tomato seedlings with dithiothreitol, an inhibitor of VDE, blocked the effects of melatonin on the de-epoxidation state of xanthophyll pigments and the induction of NPQ. Collectively, these results suggest that exogenous melatonin mitigates photoinhibition by

  18. Exogenous Melatonin Mitigates Photoinhibition by Accelerating Non-photochemical Quenching in Tomato Seedlings Exposed to Moderate Light during Chilling

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Fei; Wang, Meiling; Liu, Bin; Zhang, Shuoxin

    2017-01-01

    Melatonin plays an important role in tolerance to multiple stresses in plants. Recent studies have shown that melatonin relieves photoinhibition in plants under cold stress; however, the mechanisms are not fully understood. Non-photochemical quenching (NPQ) is a key process thermally dissipating excess light energy that plants employ as a protective mechanism to prevent the over reduction of photosystem II. Here, we report the effects of exogenous melatonin on NPQ and mitigation of photoinhibition in tomato seedlings exposed to moderate light during chilling. In response to moderate light during chilling, the maximum quantum yield (Fv/Fm) and the effective photochemical efficiency (F′v/F′m) of PSII were both substantially reduced, showing severe photoinhibition in tomato seedlings, whereas exogenous application of melatonin effectively alleviated the photoinhibition. Further experiment showed that melatonin accelerated the induction of NPQ in response to moderate light and maintained higher level of NPQ upon longer exposure to light during chilling. Consistent with the increased NPQ was the elevated de-epoxidation state of xanthophyll pigments in melatonin-pretreated seedlings exposed to light during chilling. Enzyme activity assay showed that violaxanthin de-epoxidase (VDE), which catalyzes the de-epoxidation reaction in the xanthophyll cycle, was activated by light and the activity was further enhanced by application of melatonin. Further analysis revealed that melatonin induced the expression of VDE gene in tomato seedlings under moderate light and chilling conditions. Ascorbic acid is an essential cofactor of VDE and the level of it was found to be increased in melatonin-pretreated seedlings. Feeding tomato seedlings with dithiothreitol, an inhibitor of VDE, blocked the effects of melatonin on the de-epoxidation state of xanthophyll pigments and the induction of NPQ. Collectively, these results suggest that exogenous melatonin mitigates photoinhibition by

  19. Photosynthesis is improved by exogenous calcium in heat-stressed tobacco plants.

    PubMed

    Tan, Wei; Meng, Qing wei; Brestic, Marian; Olsovska, Katarina; Yang, Xinghong

    2011-11-15

    Effects of exogenous calcium chloride (CaCl(2)) (20 mM) on photosynthetic gas exchange, photosystem II photochemistry, and the activities of antioxidant enzymes in tobacco plants under high temperature stress (43°C for 2 h) were investigated. Heat stress resulted in a decrease in net photosynthetic rate (P(n)), stomatal conductance as well as the apparent quantum yield (AQY) and carboxylation efficiency (CE) of photosynthesis. Heat stress also caused a decrease of the maximal photochemical efficiency of primary photochemistry (F(v)/F(m)). On the other hand, CaCl(2) application improved P(n), AQY, and CE as well as F(v)/F(m) under high temperature stress. Heat stress reduced the activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), ascorbate peroxidase (APX), peroxidase (POD), whereas the activities of these enzymes either decreased less or increased in plants pretreated with CaCl(2); glutathione reductase (GR) activity increased under high temperature, and it increased more in plants pretreated with CaCl(2). There was an obvious accumulation of H(2)O(2) and O(2)(-) under high temperature, but CaCl(2) application decreased the contents of H(2)O(2) and O(2)(-) under heat stress conditions. Heat stress induced the level of heat shock protein 70 (HSP70), while CaCl(2) pretreatment enhanced it. These results suggested that photosynthesis was improved by CaCl(2) application in heat-stressed plants and such an improvement was associated with an improvement in stomatal conductance and the thermostability of oxygen-evolving complex (OEC), which might be due to less accumulation of reactive oxygen species.

  20. Exogenous salicylic acid alleviates the toxicity of chlorpyrifos in wheat plants (Triticum aestivum).

    PubMed

    Wang, Caixia; Zhang, Qingming

    2017-03-01

    The role of exogenous salicylic acid (SA) in protecting wheat plants (Triticum aestivum) from contamination by the insecticide chlorpyrifos was investigated in this study. The wheat plants were grown in soils with different concentrations (5, 10, 20, and 40mgkg(-1)) of chlorpyrifos. When the third leaf emerged, the wheat leaves were sprayed with 1, 2, 4, 8, and 16mgL(-1) of SA once a day for 6 days. The results showed that wheat exposed to higher concentrations of chlorpyrifos (≥20mgkg(-1)) caused declines in growth and chlorophyll content and altered the activities of a series of antioxidant enzymes including superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), peroxidase (POD), and ascorbate peroxidase (APX). Interestingly, treatments with different concentrations of SA mitigated the stress generated by chlorpyrifos and improved the measured parameters to varying degrees. Furthermore, a reverse transcription and quantitative PCR experiment revealed that the activities of SOD and CAT can be regulated by their target gene in wheat when treated with SA. We also found that SA is able to block the accumulation of chlorpyrifos in wheat. However, the effect of SA was related to its concentration. In this study, the application of 2mgL(-1) of SA had the greatest ameliorating effect on chlorpyrifos toxicity in wheat plants.

  1. The mitigation effects of exogenous melatonin on salinity-induced stress in Malus hupehensis.

    PubMed

    Li, Chao; Wang, Ping; Wei, Zhiwei; Liang, Dong; Liu, Changhai; Yin, Lihua; Jia, Dongfeng; Fu, Mingyang; Ma, Fengwang

    2012-10-01

    As an indoleamine molecule, melatonin mediates many physiological processes in plants. We investigated its role in regulating growth, ion homeostasis, and the response to oxidative stress in Malus hupehensis Rehd. under high-salinity conditions. Stressed plants had reduced growth and a marked decline in their net photosynthetic rates and chlorophyll contents. However, pretreatment with 0.1μm melatonin significantly alleviated this growth inhibition and enabled plants to maintain an improved photosynthetic capacity. The addition of melatonin also lessened the amount of oxidative damage brought on by salinity, perhaps by directly scavenging H(2) O(2) or enhancing the activities of antioxidative enzymes such as ascorbate peroxidase, catalase, and peroxidase. We also investigated whether melatonin might control the expression of ion-channel genes under salinity. Here, MdNHX1 and MdAKT1 were greatly up-regulated in the leaves, which possibly contributed to the maintenance of ion homeostasis and, thus, improved salinity resistance in plants exposed to exogenous melatonin.

  2. Catabolism of exogenously supplied thymidine to thymine and dihydrothymine by platelets in human peripheral blood

    SciTech Connect

    Pero, R.W.; Johnson, D.; Olsson, A.

    1984-11-01

    The interference of platelets with the estimation of unscheduled DNA synthesis in human peripheral mononuclear leukocytes following genotoxic exposure was studied. A 96% reduction in the unscheduled DNA synthesis value was achieved by incubating (/sup 3/H)thymidine with platelet-rich plasma for 5 hr at 37 degrees. Using radioactive thymine-containing compounds, together with quantitative analyses based on thin-layer and ion-exchange chromatographies, we have shown that thymidine was converted to thymine which, in turn, was converted to dihydrothymine in platelet-rich plasma. The enzymes responsible were separated from platelet lysates by gel filtration and were identified as thymidine phosphorylase and dihydrothymine dehydrogenase. The phosphorylase reversibly catalyzed the formation of thymine from thymidine and converted bromodeoxyuridine to bromouracil. The dehydrogenase reversibly catalyzed the interconversion of thymine and dihydrothymine in a reaction dependent on NADP(H), and it was inhibited by diazouracil and by thymine. Nearly all the thymidine-catabolizing activity found in whole blood samples supplied exogenously with thymidine was accounted for by the platelets. Since most genetic toxicological tests that use blood samples do not involve removing platelets from the blood cell cultures, then it is concluded that precautions should be taken in the future to determine the influence of platelets on these test systems. This is particularly true for methods dependent on thymidine pulses such as unscheduled DNA synthesis, or those dependent on bromodeoxyuridine, such as sister chromatid exchanges, since this nucleoside is also a substrate for thymidine phosphorylase.

  3. Exogenous Melatonin Confers Salt Stress Tolerance to Watermelon by Improving Photosynthesis and Redox Homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Li, Hao; Chang, Jingjing; Chen, Hejie; Wang, Zhongyuan; Gu, Xiurong; Wei, Chunhua; Zhang, Yong; Ma, Jianxiang; Yang, Jianqiang; Zhang, Xian

    2017-01-01

    Melatonin, a pleiotropic signal molecule, has been shown to play important roles in the regulation of plant growth, development, and responses to environmental stresses. Since a few species have been investigated to unveil the effect of exogenous melatonin on salt stress, the underlying mechanism of melatonin-mediated salt stress tolerance in other plant species still remains largely unknown. In this study, the effects of melatonin on leaf photosynthesis and redox homeostasis in watermelon were examined under salt stress (300 mM NaCl) along with different doses of melatonin (50, 150, and 500 μM) pretreatment. NaCl stress inhibited photosynthesis and increased accumulation of reactive oxygen species and membrane damage in leaves of watermelon seedlings. However, pretreatment with melatonin on roots alleviated NaCl-induced decrease in photosynthetic rate and oxidative stress in a dose-dependent manner. The protection of photosynthesis by melatonin was closely associated with the inhibition of stomatal closure and improved light energy absorption and electron transport in photosystem II, while the reduction of oxidative stress by melatonin was attributed to the improved redox homeostasis coupled with the enhanced activities of antioxidant enzymes. This study unraveled crucial role of melatonin in salt stress mitigation and thus can be implicated in the management of salinity in watermelon cultivation.

  4. Exogenous Melatonin Confers Salt Stress Tolerance to Watermelon by Improving Photosynthesis and Redox Homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hao; Chang, Jingjing; Chen, Hejie; Wang, Zhongyuan; Gu, Xiurong; Wei, Chunhua; Zhang, Yong; Ma, Jianxiang; Yang, Jianqiang; Zhang, Xian

    2017-01-01

    Melatonin, a pleiotropic signal molecule, has been shown to play important roles in the regulation of plant growth, development, and responses to environmental stresses. Since a few species have been investigated to unveil the effect of exogenous melatonin on salt stress, the underlying mechanism of melatonin-mediated salt stress tolerance in other plant species still remains largely unknown. In this study, the effects of melatonin on leaf photosynthesis and redox homeostasis in watermelon were examined under salt stress (300 mM NaCl) along with different doses of melatonin (50, 150, and 500 μM) pretreatment. NaCl stress inhibited photosynthesis and increased accumulation of reactive oxygen species and membrane damage in leaves of watermelon seedlings. However, pretreatment with melatonin on roots alleviated NaCl-induced decrease in photosynthetic rate and oxidative stress in a dose-dependent manner. The protection of photosynthesis by melatonin was closely associated with the inhibition of stomatal closure and improved light energy absorption and electron transport in photosystem II, while the reduction of oxidative stress by melatonin was attributed to the improved redox homeostasis coupled with the enhanced activities of antioxidant enzymes. This study unraveled crucial role of melatonin in salt stress mitigation and thus can be implicated in the management of salinity in watermelon cultivation. PMID:28298921

  5. Homologous recombination of exogenous DNA with the Sulfolobus acidocaldarius genome: properties and uses.

    PubMed

    Kurosawa, Norio; Grogan, Dennis W

    2005-12-01

    In order to quantify recombination between exogenous DNA and the Sulfolobus acidocaldarius chromosome, we electroporated pyrE (uracil-auxtotrophic) recipient strains with functional pyrE sequences and counted Pyr+ transformants by direct plating. Certain culture and post-electroporation conditions increased the yield of Pyr+ recombinants from non-replicating pyrE plasmid, whereas cognate methylation of SuaI restriction sites in the plasmid decreased it. Recombination of linear DNAs with the S. acidocaldarius genome was proportional to the length of a limiting overlap, but even synthetic oligonucleotides produced reasonable numbers of recombinants with appropriate recipient strains. To investigate uses of this latter property, we electroporated an 18-bp pyrE deletion mutant with mixtures of synthetic oligonucleotides altering glycine-55 of the orotate phosphoribosyl transferase encoded by pyrE. Pyr+ transformants were recovered in which this codon was converted to each of the alternatives encoded by the oligonucleotide mixtures, thereby identifying five amino acid substitutions tolerated at this position of the thermostable enzyme.

  6. Cold stratification and exogenous nitrates entail similar functional proteome adjustments during Arabidopsis seed dormancy release.

    PubMed

    Arc, Erwann; Chibani, Kamel; Grappin, Philippe; Jullien, Marc; Godin, Béatrice; Cueff, Gwendal; Valot, Benoit; Balliau, Thierry; Job, Dominique; Rajjou, Loïc

    2012-11-02

    Despite having very similar initial pools of stored mRNAs and proteins in the dry state, mature Arabidopsis seeds can either proceed toward radicle protrusion or stay in a dormant state upon imbibition. Dormancy breaking, a prerequisite to germination completion, can be induced by different treatments though the underlying mechanisms remain elusive. Thus, we investigated the consequence of such treatments on the seed proteome. Two unrelated dormancy-releasing treatments were applied to dormant seeds, namely, cold stratification and exogenous nitrates, in combination with differential proteomic tools to highlight the specificities of the imbibed dormant state. The results reveal that both treatments lead to highly similar proteome adjustments. In the imbibed dormant state, enzymes involved in reserve mobilization are less accumulated and it appears that several energetically costly processes associated to seed germination and preparation for subsequent seedling establishment are repressed. Our data suggest that dormancy maintenance is associated to an abscisic-acid-dependent recapitulation of the late maturation program resulting in a higher potential to cope with environmental stresses. The comparison of the present results with previously published -omic data sets reinforces and extends the assumption that post-transcriptional, translational, and post-translational regulations are determinant for seed germination.

  7. Exogenous methyl jasmonate regulates cytokinin content by modulating cytokinin oxidase activity in wheat seedlings under salinity.

    PubMed

    Avalbaev, Azamat; Yuldashev, Ruslan; Fedorova, Kristina; Somov, Kirill; Vysotskaya, Lidiya; Allagulova, Chulpan; Shakirova, Farida

    2016-02-01

    The treatment of 4-days-old wheat seedlings with methyl jasmonate (MeJA) in concentration optimal for their growth (0.1 μM) resulted in a rapid transient almost two-fold increase in the level of cytokinins (CKs). MeJA-induced accumulation of CKs was due to inhibition of both cytokinin oxidase (CKX) (cytokinin oxidase/dehydrogenase, EC 1.5.99.12) gene expression and activity of this enzyme. Pretreatment of wheat seedlings with MeJA decreased the growth-retarding effect of sodium chloride salinity and accelerated growth recovery after withdrawal of NaCl from the incubation medium. We speculate that this protective effect of the hormone might be due to MeJA's ability to prevent the salinity-induced decline in CK concentration that was caused by inhibition of gene expression and activity of CKX in wheat seedlings. The data might indicate an important role for endogenous cytokinins in the implementation of growth-promoting and protective effects of exogenous MeJA application on wheat plants.

  8. The average enzyme principle

    PubMed Central

    Reznik, Ed; Chaudhary, Osman; Segrè, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    The Michaelis-Menten equation for an irreversible enzymatic reaction depends linearly on the enzyme concentration. Even if the enzyme concentration changes in time, this linearity implies that the amount of substrate depleted during a given time interval depends only on the average enzyme concentration. Here, we use a time re-scaling approach to generalize this result to a broad category of multi-reaction systems, whose constituent enzymes have the same dependence on time, e.g. they belong to the same regulon. This “average enzyme principle” provides a natural methodology for jointly studying metabolism and its regulation. PMID:23892076

  9. Exogenous gene integration mediated by genome editing technologies in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Morita, Hitoshi; Taimatsu, Kiyohito; Yanagi, Kanoko; Kawahara, Atsuo

    2017-03-08

    Genome editing technologies, such as transcription activator-like effector nuclease (TALEN) and the clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR)/ CRISPR-associated protein (Cas) systems, can induce DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) at the targeted genomic locus, leading to frameshift-mediated gene disruption in the process of DSB repair. Recently, the technology-induced DSBs followed by DSB repairs are applied to integrate exogenous genes into the targeted genomic locus in various model organisms. In addition to a conventional knock-in technology mediated by homology-directed repair (HDR), novel knock-in technologies using refined donor vectors have also been developed with the genome editing technologies based on other DSB repair mechanisms, including non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) and microhomology-mediated end joining (MMEJ). Therefore, the improved knock-in technologies would contribute to freely modify the genome of model organisms.

  10. Transient expression of exogenous gus gene in Porphyra yezoensis (Rhodophyta)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuang, Mei; Wang, Su-Juan; Li, Yao; Shen, Da-Leng; Zeng, Cheng-Kui

    1998-03-01

    Electroporation, PEC, PEG plus electroporation and Biolistics methods were tested in gene transformation of P. yezoensis. The exogenous gus was from plasmid of pBI121 and pCAMBIA1301, both contain the CaMV35S promoter. The receptors included the protoplasts, tissues and free-living conchocelis filaments of P. yezoensis. Several factors, for example, the voltage, capacitance and bivalent cations, etc., were studied. Results show that these four methods are all efficient for gene transformation in P. yezoensis; and that PEG is the best one, with transformation efficiency of up to 4×10-5. GUS activity was detected 26 days after transformation by using PEG method.

  11. The phytotoxic effect of exogenous ethanol on Euphorbia heterophylla L.

    PubMed

    Kern, Kátia Aparecida; Pergo, Erica Marusa; Kagami, Fernanda Lima; Arraes, Luis Saraiva; Sert, Maria Aparecida; Ishii-Iwamoto, Emy Luiza

    2009-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of exogenously applied ethanol on Euphorbia heterophylla L., a troublesome weed in field and plantation crops. Ethanol at concentrations ranging from 0.25 to 1.5% caused a dose-dependent inhibition of germination and growth of E. heterophylla. Measurements of respiratory activity and alcohol dehydrogenase (E.C. 1.1.1.1) activity during seed imbibition and initial seedling growth revealed that ethanol induces a prolongation of hypoxic conditions in the growing tissues. In isolated mitochondria, ethanol inhibited the respiration coupled to ADP phosphorylation, an action that probably contributed to modifications observed in the respiratory activity of embryos. A comparison of the effects of methanol, ethanol, propanol and acetaldehyde on germination and growth of E. heterophylla indicates that alcohol dehydrogenase activity is required for the observed effects, with the conversion of ethanol to acetaldehyde playing a role in the ethanol-induced injuries.

  12. Subdividing tinnitus into bruits and endogenous, exogenous, and other forms.

    PubMed

    Claussen, Claus F

    2005-01-01

    Tinnitus is an important complaint or disease or a combination, especially within our aging population. Neurootologists clinically deal with many different disorders of the human cranial senses, of which tinnitus is a very frequent type. With respect to neurootological clinical work, we delineate at least three groups of tinnitus. In bruits, patients complain of noise within the head (e.g., bubbling, hissing, pulsating); the bruit can be recorded as a physically existing sound in the human skull and is heard by patients. Endogenous tinnitus can be treated by external masking to suppress noise within the ears, whereas in exogenous tinnitus, patients seek to avoid any outside noise or sounds; they report that tinnitus decreases as soon as they go, for instance, into the cellar of a house or other soundproof place.

  13. Exogenous melatonin affects photosynthesis in characeae Chara australis

    PubMed Central

    Lazár, Dušan; Murch, Susan J.; Beilby, Mary J.; Al Khazaaly, Sabah

    2013-01-01

    Melatonin was found in the fresh water characeae Chara australis. The concentrations (~4 μg/g of tissue) were similar in photosynthesizing cells, independent of their position on the plant and rhizoids (roots) without chloroplasts. Exogenous melatonin, added at 10 μM to the artificial pond water, increased quantum yield of photochemistry of photosystem II by 34%. The increased efficiency appears to be due to the amount of open reaction centers of photosystem II, rather than increased efficiency of each reaction center. More open reaction centers reflect better functionality of all photosynthetic transport chain constituents. We suggest that melatonin protection against reactive oxygen species covers not only chlorophyll, but also photosynthetic proteins in general. PMID:23299331

  14. Exogenous application of hydrogen sulfide donor sodium hydrosulfide enhanced multiple abiotic stress tolerance in bermudagrass (Cynodon dactylon (L). Pers.).

    PubMed

    Shi, Haitao; Ye, Tiantian; Chan, Zhulong

    2013-10-01

    As a gaseous molecule, hydrogen sulfide (H2S) has been recently found to be involved in plant responses to multiple abiotic stress. In this study, salt (150 and 300 mM NaCl), osmotic (15% and 30% PEG6000) and cold (4 °C) stress treatments induced accumulation of endogenous H2S level, indicating that H2S might play a role in bermudagrass responses to salt, osmotic and cold stresses. Exogenous application of H2S donor (sodium hydrosulfide, NaHS) conferred improved salt, osmotic and freezing stress tolerances in bermudagrass, which were evidenced by decreased electrolyte leakage and increased survival rate under stress conditions. Additionally, NaHS treatment alleviated the reactive oxygen species (ROS) burst and cell damage induced by abiotic stress, via modulating metabolisms of several antioxidant enzymes [catalase (CAT), peroxidase (POD) and GR (glutathione reductase)] and non-enzymatic glutathione antioxidant pool and redox state. Moreover, exogenous NaHS treatment led to accumulation of osmolytes (proline, sucrose and soluble total sugars) in stressed bermudagrass plants. Taken together, all these data indicated the protective roles of H2S in bermudagrass responses to salt, osmotic and freezing stresses, via activation of the antioxidant response and osmolyte accumulation. These findings might be applicable to grass and crop engineering to improve abiotic stress tolerance.

  15. Evaluation of photosynthetic electrons derivation by exogenous redox mediators.

    PubMed

    Longatte, Guillaume; Fu, Han-Yi; Buriez, Olivier; Labbé, Eric; Wollman, Francis-André; Amatore, Christian; Rappaport, Fabrice; Guille-Collignon, Manon; Lemaître, Frédéric

    2015-10-01

    Oxygenic photosynthesis is the complex process that occurs in plants or algae by which the energy from the sun is converted into an electrochemical potential that drives the assimilation of carbon dioxide and the synthesis of carbohydrates. Quinones belong to a family of species commonly found in key processes of the Living, like photosynthesis or respiration, in which they act as electron transporters. This makes this class of molecules a popular candidate for biofuel cell and bioenergy applications insofar as they can be used as cargo to ship electrons to an electrode immersed in the cellular suspension. Nevertheless, such electron carriers are mostly selected empirically. This is why we report on a method involving fluorescence measurements to estimate the ability of seven different quinones to accept photosynthetic electrons downstream of photosystem II, the first protein complex in the light-dependent reactions of oxygenic photosynthesis. To this aim we use a mutant of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, a unicellular green alga, impaired in electron downstream of photosystem II and assess the ability of quinones to restore electron flow by fluorescence. In this work, we defined and extracted a "derivation parameter" D that indicates the derivation efficiency of the exogenous quinones investigated. D then allows electing 2,6-dichlorobenzoquinone, 2,5-dichlorobenzoquinone and p-phenylbenzoquinone as good candidates. More particularly, our investigations suggested that other key parameters like the partition of quinones between different cellular compartments and their propensity to saturate these various compartments should also be taken into account in the process of selecting exogenous quinones for the purpose of deriving photoelectrons from intact algae.

  16. Impact of Exogenous Galectin-9 on Human T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lhuillier, Claire; Barjon, Clément; Niki, Toshiro; Gelin, Aurore; Praz, Françoise; Morales, Olivier; Souquere, Sylvie; Hirashima, Mitsuomi; Wei, Ming; Dellis, Olivier; Busson, Pierre

    2015-01-01

    Galectin-9 (gal-9) is a multifunctional β-galactoside-binding lectin, frequently released in the extracellular medium, where it acts as a pleiotropic immune modulator. Despite its overall immunosuppressive effects, a recent study has reported bimodal action of gal-9 on human resting blood T cells with apoptosis occurring in the majority of them, followed by a wave of activation and expansion of Th1 cells in the surviving population. Our knowledge of the signaling events triggered by exogenous gal-9 in T cells remains limited. One of these events is cytosolic calcium (Ca2+) release reported in some murine and human T cells. The aim of this study was to investigate the contribution of Ca2+ mobilization to apoptotic and nonapoptotic effects of exogenous gal-9 in human T cells. We found that the T cell receptor (TCR)-CD3 complex and the Lck kinase were required for Ca2+ mobilization but not for apoptosis induction in Jurkat cells. These data were confirmed in human CD4+ T cells from peripheral blood as follows: a specific Lck chemical inhibitor abrogated Ca2+ mobilization but not apoptosis induction. Moreover, Lck activity was also required for the production of Th1-type cytokines, i.e. interleukin-2 and interferon-γ, which resulted from gal-9 stimulation in peripheral CD4+ T cells. These findings indicate that gal-9 acts on T cells by two distinct pathways as follows: one mimicking antigen-specific activation of the TCR with a mandatory contribution of proximal elements of the TCR complex, especially Lck, and another resulting in apoptosis that is independent of this complex. PMID:25947381

  17. Profiling the orphan enzymes.

    PubMed

    Sorokina, Maria; Stam, Mark; Médigue, Claudine; Lespinet, Olivier; Vallenet, David

    2014-06-06

    The emergence of Next Generation Sequencing generates an incredible amount of sequence and great potential for new enzyme discovery. Despite this huge amount of data and the profusion of bioinformatic methods for function prediction, a large part of known enzyme activities is still lacking an associated protein sequence. These particular activities are called "orphan enzymes". The present review proposes an update of previous surveys on orphan enzymes by mining the current content of public databases. While the percentage of orphan enzyme activities has decreased from 38% to 22% in ten years, there are still more than 1,000 orphans among the 5,000 entries of the Enzyme Commission (EC) classification. Taking into account all the reactions present in metabolic databases, this proportion dramatically increases to reach nearly 50% of orphans and many of them are not associated to a known pathway. We extended our survey to "local orphan enzymes" that are activities which have no representative sequence in a given clade, but have at least one in organisms belonging to other clades. We observe an important bias in Archaea and find that in general more than 30% of the EC activities have incomplete sequence information in at least one superkingdom. To estimate if candidate proteins for local orphans could be retrieved by homology search, we applied a simple strategy based on the PRIAM software and noticed that candidates may be proposed for an important fraction of local orphan enzymes. Finally, by studying relation between protein domains and catalyzed activities, it appears that newly discovered enzymes are mostly associated with already known enzyme domains. Thus, the exploration of the promiscuity and the multifunctional aspect of known enzyme families may solve part of the orphan enzyme issue. We conclude this review with a presentation of recent initiatives in finding proteins for orphan enzymes and in extending the enzyme world by the discovery of new activities.

  18. Structural and functional comparison of polysaccharide-degrading enzymes.

    PubMed

    Jedrzejas, M J

    2000-01-01

    Sugar molecules as well as enzymes degrading them are ubiquitously present in physiological systems, especially for vertebrates. Polysaccharides have at least two aspects to their function, one due to their mechanical properties and the second one involves multiple regulatory processes or interactions between molecules, cells, or extracellular space. Various bacteria exert exogenous pressures on their host organism to diversity glycans and their structures in order for the host organism to evade the destructive function of such microbes. Many bacterial organism produce glycan-degrading enzymes in order to facilitate their invasion of host tissues. Such polysaccharide degrading enzymes utilize mainly two modes of polysaccharide-degradation, a hydrolysis and a beta-elimination process. The three-dimensional structures of several of these enzymes have been elucidated recently using X-ray crystallography. There are many common structural motifs among these enzymes, mainly the presence of an elongated cleft transversing these molecules which functions as a polysaccharide substrate binding site as well as the catalytic site for these enzymes. The detailed structural information obtained about these enzymes allowed formulation of proposed mechanisms of their action. The polysaccharide lyases utilize a proton acceptance and donation mechanism (PAD), whereas polysaccharide hydrolases use a direct double displacement (DD) mechanism to degrade their substrates.

  19. Enzyme kinetics of conjugating enzymes: PAPS sulfotransferase.

    PubMed

    James, Margaret O

    2014-01-01

    The sulfotransferase (SULT) enzymes catalyze the formation of sulfate esters or sulfamates from substrates that contain hydroxy or amine groups, utilizing 3'-phosphoadenosyl-5'-phosphosulfate (PAPS) as the donor of the sulfonic group. The rate of product formation depends on the concentrations of PAPS and substrate as well as the sulfotransferase enzyme; thus, if PAPS is held constant while varying substrate concentration (or vice versa), the kinetic constants derived are apparent constants. When studied over a narrow range of substrate concentrations, classic Michaelis-Menten kinetics can be observed with many SULT enzymes and most substrates. Some SULT enzymes exhibit positive or negative cooperativity during conversion of substrate to product, and the kinetics fit the Hill plot. A characteristic feature of most sulfotransferase-catalyzed reactions is that, when studied over a wide range of substrate concentrations, the rate of product formation initially increases as substrate concentration increases, then decreases at high substrate concentrations, i.e., they exhibit substrate inhibition or partial substrate inhibition. This chapter gives an introduction to sulfotransferases, including a historical note, the nomenclature, a description of the function of SULTs with different types of substrates, presentation of examples of enzyme kinetics with SULTs, and a discussion of what is known about mechanisms of substrate inhibition in the sulfotransferases.

  20. Incorporation of molybdenum in rubredoxin: models for mononuclear molybdenum enzymes.

    PubMed

    Maiti, Biplab K; Maia, Luisa B; Silveira, Célia M; Todorovic, Smilja; Carreira, Cintia; Carepo, Marta S P; Grazina, Raquel; Moura, Isabel; Pauleta, Sofia R; Moura, José J G

    2015-07-01

    Molybdenum is found in the active site of enzymes usually coordinated by one or two pyranopterin molecules. Here, we mimic an enzyme with a mononuclear molybdenum-bis pyranopterin center by incorporating molybdenum in rubredoxin. In the molybdenum-substituted rubredoxin, the metal ion is coordinated by four sulfurs from conserved cysteine residues of the apo-rubredoxin and two other exogenous ligands, oxygen and thiol, forming a Mo((VI))-(S-Cys)4(O)(X) complex, where X represents -OH or -SR. The rubredoxin molybdenum center is stabilized in a Mo(VI) oxidation state, but can be reduced to Mo(IV) via Mo(V) by dithionite, being a suitable model for the spectroscopic properties of resting and reduced forms of molybdenum-bis pyranopterin-containing enzymes. Preliminary experiments indicate that the molybdenum site built in rubredoxin can promote oxo transfer reactions, as exemplified with the oxidation of arsenite to arsenate.

  1. [Effects of exogenous nitric oxide on physiological characteristics of longan (Dimocarpus longana) seedlings under acid rain stress].

    PubMed

    Liu, Jian-fu; Wang, Ming-yuan; Yang, Chen; Zhu, Ai-jun

    2013-08-01

    This paper studied the effects of exogenous nitric oxide donor sodium nitroprusside (SNP) on the chlorophyll content, antioxidant enzyme activities, and osmotic regulation substances of longan (Dimocarpus longana 'Fuyan') seedlings under acid rain (pH 3.0) stress. Under the acid rain stress, the seedling leaf superoxide dismutase (SOD), peroxidase (POD) and catalase (CAT) activities and chlorophyll, soluble protein and soluble sugar contents decreased obviously, while the leaf malondialdedyde content had a remarkable increase, suggesting the toxic effect of the acid rain on the seedlings. Exogenous nitric oxide had dual nature on the physiological characteristics of longan seedlings under acid rain stress. Applying 0.1-0.5 mmol x L(-1) of SNP improved the SOD, POD and CAT activities and the chlorophyll, soluble protein and soluble sugar contents significantly, and decreased the malondialdedyde content. Low concentrations SNP reduced the oxidative damage caused by the acid rain stress, and 0.5 mmol x L(-1) of SNP had the best effect. Under the application of 0.5 mmol x L(-1) of SNP, the total chlorophyll, soluble protein, and soluble sugar contents and the SOD, POD and CAT activities increased by 76.0%, 107.0%, 216.1%, 150. 0%, 350.9% and 97.1%, respectively, and the malondialdedyde content decreased by 46.4%. It was suggested that low concentration (0.1-0.5 mmol x L(-1)) SNP could alleviate the toxic effect of acid rain stress on longan seedlings via activating the leaf antioxidant enzyme activities and reducing oxidative stress, while high concentration SNP (1.0 mmol x L(-1)) lowered the mitigation effect.

  2. Effect of exogenous phytase on feed inositol phosphate hydrolysis in an in vitro rumen fluid buffer system.

    PubMed

    Brask-Pedersen, D N; Glitsø, L V; Skov, L K; Lund, P; Sehested, J

    2011-02-01

    Three in vitro experiments using a rumen fluid buffer system were performed to investigate the effect of addition of 4 experimental phytases (Phy1, Phy2, Phy3, and Phy4) compared with no addition of phytase on feed inositol phosphate hydrolysis in wheat and rapeseed cake to determine which of the 4 phytases was most suitable under rumen-like conditions. The feedstuffs were incubated with a mixture of physiological buffer, ruminal fluid, and exogenous phytase at pH 6.2, after which the samples were incubated for different periods. Incubations were stopped using HCl, and the samples were analyzed for inositol phosphates via high performance ion chromatography. Addition of phytase (Phy1) resulted in enhanced degradation of myo-inositol hexakisphosphate (InsP(6)) in rapeseed cake, whereas addition of exogenous phytase did not improve the degradation of InsP(6) in wheat. Only rapeseed cake was therefore used subsequently. All 4 phytases increased degradation of InsP(6) in rapeseed cake in the in vitro system, and degradability of InsP(6) increased with higher incubation time and higher phytase dosages, independent of phytase. Addition of 2 units of phytase per gram of substrate of the phytases Phy1, Phy2, Phy3, and Phy4 led to an undegraded InsP(6) content of 56, 49, 70, and 18%, respectively, when incubated with rapeseed cake for 6h, indicating that Phy2 and Phy4 were the most effective phytases. However, Phy2 had a higher specific activity than Phy4, as 60% of the original InsP(6) content was remaining after 3h when 5mg of enzyme protein per gram of substrate of Phy2 was added to rapeseed cake, whereas 150 mg of enzyme protein per gram of substrate of Phy4 was necessary to achieve a similar result. Therefore, Phy2 appeared to be most applicable under rumen-like conditions.

  3. Evolutionary dynamics of enzymes.

    PubMed

    Demetrius, L

    1995-08-01

    This paper codifies and rationalizes the large diversity in reaction rates and substrate specificity of enzymes in terms of a model which postulates that the kinetic properties of present-day enzymes are the consequence of the evolutionary force of mutation and selection acting on a class of primordial enzymes with poor catalytic activity and broad substrate specificity. Enzymes are classified in terms of their thermodynamic parameters, activation enthalpy delta H* and activation entropy delta S*, in their kinetically significant transition states as follows: type 1, delta H* > 0, delta S* < 0; type 2, delta H* < or = 0, delta S* < or = 0; type 3, delta H* > 0, delta S* > 0. We study the evolutionary dynamics of these three classes of enzymes subject to mutation, which acts at the level of the gene which codes for the enzyme and selection, which acts on the organism that contains the enzyme. Our model predicts the following evolutionary trends in the reaction rate and binding specificity for the three classes of molecules. In type 1 enzymes, evolution results in random, non-directional changes in the reaction rate and binding specificity. In type 2 and 3 enzymes, evolution results in a unidirectional increase in both the reaction rate and binding specificity. We exploit these results in order to codify the diversity in functional properties of present-day enzymes. Type 1 molecules will be described by intermediate reaction rates and broad substrate specificity. Type 2 enzymes will be characterized by diffusion-controlled rates and absolute substrate specificity. The type 3 catalysts can be further subdivided in terms of their activation enthalpy into two classes: type 3a (delta H* small) and type 3b (delta H* large). We show that type 3a will be represented by the same functional properties that identify type 2, namely, diffusion-controlled rates and absolute substrate specificity, whereas type 3b will be characterized by non-diffusion-controlled rates and absolute

  4. Catalyzed enzyme electrodes

    DOEpatents

    Zawodzinski, Thomas A.; Wilson, Mahlon S.; Rishpon, Judith; Gottesfeld, Shimshon

    1993-01-01

    An enzyme electrode is prepared with a composite coating on an electrical conductor. The composite coating is formed from a casting solution of a perfluorosulfonic acid polymer, an enzyme, and a carbon supported catalyst. The solution may be cast directly on the conductor surface or may be formed as a membrane and applied to the surface. The perfluorosulfonic acid ionomer formed from the casting solution provides an insoluble biocompatible protective matrix for the enzyme and acts to retain the enzyme for long term availability in the electrode structure. The carbon supported catalyst provides catalytic sites throughout the layer for the oxidation of hydrogen peroxide from the enzyme reactions. The carbon support then provides a conductive path for establishing an electrical signal to the electrical conductor. In one embodiment, the electrical conductor is a carbon cloth that permits oxygen or other gas to be introduced to the perfluorosulfonic polymer to promote the enzyme reaction independent of oxygen in the solution being tested.

  5. Magnetically responsive enzyme powders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pospiskova, Kristyna; Safarik, Ivo

    2015-04-01

    Powdered enzymes were transformed into their insoluble magnetic derivatives retaining their catalytic activity. Enzyme powders (e.g., trypsin and lipase) were suspended in various liquid media not allowing their solubilization (e.g., saturated ammonium sulfate and highly concentrated polyethylene glycol solutions, ethanol, methanol, 2-propanol) and subsequently cross-linked with glutaraldehyde. Magnetic modification was successfully performed at low temperature in a freezer (-20 °C) using magnetic iron oxides nano- and microparticles prepared by microwave-assisted synthesis from ferrous sulfate. Magnetized cross-linked enzyme powders were stable at least for two months in water suspension without leakage of fixed magnetic particles. Operational stability of magnetically responsive enzymes during eight repeated reaction cycles was generally without loss of enzyme activity. Separation of magnetically modified cross-linked powdered enzymes from reaction mixtures was significantly simplified due to their magnetic properties.

  6. Rational enzyme redesign

    SciTech Connect

    Ornstein, R.L.

    1994-05-01

    Protein engineering is first a means of elucidating structure-function relations in an enzyme, and second, a means of changing a protein to make it serve a different, but generally related, purpose. In principle, one may change the functional characteristics of an enzyme by altering its substrate specificity, kinetics, optimum range of activity, and chemical mechanism. Obviously one cannot make all possible combinations of amino acid changes for even the smallest enzyme, so the essential question is which changes to make. The intent of rational protein/enzyme redesign is to alter a protein/enzyme in a timely and premeditated fashion. This article provides an outline of the process of rational enzyme redesign.

  7. Enzymes for improved biomass conversion

    SciTech Connect

    Brunecky, Roman; Himmel, Michael E.

    2016-02-02

    Disclosed herein are enzymes and combinations of the enzymes useful for the hydrolysis of cellulose and the conversion of biomass. Methods of degrading cellulose and biomass using enzymes and cocktails of enzymes are also disclosed.

  8. [Disappearance of ALS from Guam: implications for exogenous causes].

    PubMed

    Chen, K M

    1995-12-01

    The author reports the disappearance of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) from Guam over past 30 years, which coincided with rapid changes in the ecology, socioeconomy, and westernization of the life style. This slow but steady decline is believed to be the consequences of radical changes from food collection to wage-based life style and dietary improvement in recent years and elimination of exogenous factors. Those risk factor(s) are believed to be the environmental trace metals which must have triggered the accelerated oxidative stresses in the motor neurons of genetically susceptible population. Changing Epidermiology: 1. The annual incidence of 70/100,000 in 1960s down to 7/100,000 in 1990s, and remained unchanged for past 15 years. 2. Upward shift of age at onset by 10 years and at death by 8 years and even out of sex ratio. 3. Birth cohort analysis showed less risks for those born after 1920. No ALS cases born after 1945. 4. No increase in the incidence of ALS among non-Chamorros transients of Guam and Marianas during W.W.II. 5. Long-term resident non-Charmorro and half-Chamorros on Guam are also affected. 6. Charmorro migrants to U.S. Mainland are affected after long absence from Guam. 7. Incubation period for both ways is estimated to be 18 approximately 20 years. 8. Other forms of dementias like Alzheimer disease (AD) and vascular dementias are on the rise and the leading cause of death is cerebro- and cardiovascular diseases. 9. ALS is also declining in past 10 approximately 15 years in Kii peninsula, and West New Guinea. Changing Ecology of Guam: 1. One third of Island land was used for construction of huge military bases after W.W.II. 2. Urbanization of villages including concrete houses, deep well water supply, sewage, and electrification. 3. Tourism boom: high-rise hotels, development of 7 golf courses and other recreational facilities resulted in loss of flora and erosions of soil. Socioeconomic Changes: 1. Shift in population demography; Efflux of

  9. Structurally stable gel bead containing entrapped enzyme and method for manufacture thereof

    DOEpatents

    Woodward, J.

    1998-12-08

    This research provides a structurally stable gel bead containing an entrapped enzyme and a method for its manufacture. The enzyme is covalently cross-linked to gelatin in the presence of glutaraldehyde prior to the formation of the gel bead, to prevent leakage of the enzyme. Propylene glycol alginate is then added to the mixture. Once the gel beads are formed, they are then soaked in glutaraldehyde, which imparts structural stability to the gel beads. This method can be used with many types of enzymes, such as proteases, carbohydrases, proteases, ligases, isomerases, oxidoreductases, and specialty enzymes. These and other enzymes can be immobilized in the gel beads and utilized in a number of enzymatic processes. Exogenously added ions are not required to maintain the structural stability of these gel beads. 7 figs.

  10. Structurally stable gel bead containing entrapped enzyme and method for manufacture thereof

    DOEpatents

    Woodward, Jonathan

    1998-01-01

    A structurally stable gel bead containing an entrapped enzyme and a method for its manufacture. The enzyme is covalently cross-linked to gelatin in the presence of glutaraldehyde prior to the formation of the gel bead, to prevent leakage of the enzyme. Propylene glycol alginate is then added to the mixture. Once the gel beads are formed, they are then soaked in glutaraldehyde, which imparts structural stability to the gel beads. This method can be used with many types of enzymes, such as proteases, carbohydrases, proteases, ligases, isomerases, oxidoreductases, and specialty enzymes. These and other enzymes can be immobilized in the gel beads and utilized in a number of enzymatic processes. Exogenously added ions are not required to maintain the structural stability of these gel beads.

  11. Enzymes on material surfaces.

    PubMed

    Talbert, Joey N; Goddard, Julie M

    2012-05-01

    Enzyme interactions with material surfaces are of interest for industrial food and pharmaceutical transformations, biosensors, artificial cells, cell free reactions, drug and nutrition delivery technologies, and imaging. When in contact with a material surface, an enzyme may lose or appear to lose activity due to the nature of the enzyme, the nature of the material, and/or the nature of the interface between the enzyme, material, and substrate environment. The purpose of this review is to survey recent advances that have been made towards the preservation, optimization, and enhancement of enzyme activity on material surfaces within the context of well-known concepts that describe the loss of activity after immobilization. This review breaks down the immobilized enzyme system to look at the individual components of the system-namely the enzyme, the material, and the interface. For each piece, possible causes for the loss of enzyme activity are described as well as strategies that have been applied to limit the affect. At the conclusion we identify areas of future research needed to overcome limitations in the current state-of-the art for immobilized enzyme systems.

  12. Food and feed enzymes.

    PubMed

    Fraatz, Marco Alexander; Rühl, Martin; Zorn, Holger

    2014-01-01

    Humans have benefited from the unique catalytic properties of enzymes, in particular for food production, for thousands of years. Prominent examples include the production of fermented alcoholic beverages, such as beer and wine, as well as bakery and dairy products. The chapter reviews the historic background of the development of modern enzyme technology and provides an overview of the industrial food and feed enzymes currently available on the world market. The chapter highlights enzyme applications for the improvement of resource efficiency, the biopreservation of food, and the treatment of food intolerances. Further topics address the improvement of food safety and food quality.

  13. Exploring exogenic sources for the olivine on Asteroid (4) Vesta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Corre, Lucille; Reddy, Vishnu; Sanchez, Juan A.; Dunn, Tasha; Cloutis, Edward A.; Izawa, Matthew R. M.; Mann, Paul; Nathues, Andreas

    2015-09-01

    The detection of olivine on Vesta is interesting because it may provide critical insights into planetary differentiation early in our Solar System's history. Ground-based and Hubble Space Telescope (HST) observations of Asteroid (4) Vesta have suggested the presence of olivine on the surface. These observations were reinforced by the discovery of olivine-rich HED meteorites from Vesta in recent years. However, analysis of data from NASA's Dawn spacecraft has shown that this "olivine-bearing unit" is actually impact melt in the ejecta of Oppia crater. The lack of widespread mantle olivine, exposed during the formation of the 19 km deep Rheasilvia basin on Vesta's South Pole, further complicated this picture. Ammannito et al. (Ammannito, E. et al. [2013a]. Nature 504, 122-125) reported the discovery of local scale olivine-rich units in the form of excavated material from the mantle using the Visible and InfraRed spectrometer (VIR) on Dawn. These sites are concentrated in the walls and ejecta of craters Arruntia (10.5 km in diameter) and Bellicia (41.7 km in diameter), located in the northern hemisphere, 350-430 km from Rheasilvia basin's rim. Here we explore alternative sources for the olivine in the northern hemisphere of Vesta by reanalyzing the data from the VIR instrument using laboratory spectral measurements of meteorites. Our rationale for using the published dataset was to bypass calibration issues and ensure a consistent dataset between the two studies. Our analysis of the VIR data shows that while the interpretation of their spectra as an olivine-rich unit is correct, the nature and origin of that olivine could be more complicated. We suggest that these olivine exposures could also be explained by the delivery of olivine-rich exogenic material. This hypothesis is supported by meteoritical evidence in the form of exogenic xenoliths containing significant amount of olivine in some of the HED meteorites from Vesta. Previous laboratory work on HEDs show that

  14. Endogenous and exogenous progesterone influence body temperature in dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Suthar, V S; Burfeind, O; Bonk, S; Dhami, A J; Heuwieser, W

    2012-05-01

    Three experiments were conducted to determine the effect of endogenous progesterone (P4) on body temperature comparing lactating, pregnant with lactating, nonpregnant cows, and to study the effect of exogenous P4 administered via a controlled internal drug release (CIDR) insert on body temperature in lactating dairy cows. Body temperature was measured vaginally and rectally using temperature loggers and a digital thermometer, respectively. In experiment 1, 10 cyclic lactating cows (3 primiparous, 7 multiparous) and 10 lactating, pregnant cows (3 primiparous, 7 multiparous) were included. Vaginal temperatures and serum P4 concentrations were greater in pregnant cows (vaginal: 0.3±0.01°C; P4: 5.5±0.4 ng/mL) compared with nonpregnant cows. In experiment 2, estrous cycles of 14 postpartum healthy, cyclic, lactating cows (10 primiparous, 4 multiparous) were synchronized, and cows were assigned randomly to 1 of 2 treatments (CIDR-P4 or CIDR-blank). A temperature logger was inserted 1 d after ovulation using a P4-free CIDR (CIDR-blank) and a CIDR containing 1.38g of P4 (CIDR-P4) in the control (n=7) and the P4-treated group (n=7), respectively. On d 3 after P4 treatment, vaginal temperature was 0.3±0.03°C greater compared with that on d 1 and d 5. In experiment 3, 9 cyclic multiparous lactating cows were enrolled 1±1 d after confirmed ovulation and a temperature logger inserted. Two days later, a CIDR-P4 was inserted on top of the CIDR-blank. On d 5±1 and d 7±1, respectively, the CIDR-P4 and CIDR-blank with the temperature logger were removed. During the CIDR-P4 treatment (48h), vaginal temperature was 0.2±0.05°C and 0.1±0.05°C greater than during the pre- and post-treatment periods (48h), respectively. Serum P4 concentration peaked during CIDR-P4 treatment (2.2±0.8 ng/mL) and was greater than during the pre-treatment period (0.2±0.2 ng/mL) for 48h. An increase in vaginal temperature could be due to endogenous and exogenous P4. However, a correlation between

  15. [Pneumonia or drug-related exogenic allergic alveolitis? Key role of anamnesis in differential diagnosis].

    PubMed

    Skipskiĭ, I M; Efimov, N V; Dantsig, I I; Matiukhina, L M; Kostina, O Ia

    2011-01-01

    A case is reported of an old female patient with exogenic allergic alveolitis which was first diagnosed as pneumonia progressing in the presence of long-term and intensive antibiotic treatment. Detailed analysis of the case history gave grounds for suspected drug-related exogenic allergic alveolitis. Discontinuation of antibiotics, administration of glucocorticoids and antiplatelet drugs led to recovery.

  16. [Cytologic features of bronchoalveolar lavage in evaluation of course of exogenous allergic alveolitis].

    PubMed

    Lepekha, L N; Aleksandrova, E A; Evgushchenko, G V; Makar'iants, N N; Lovacheva, O V

    2012-01-01

    Application of complex of modern cytologic methods of research bronchoalveolar lavage allowed to allocate most characteristics of development of lymphocytic and macrophagic reaction of bronchial tree in different course of exogenous allergic alveolitis. The most indicative in assessment of origin of exogenous allergic alveolitis development is the characteristics of macrophagic population. In acute course of exogenous allergic alveolitis the considerable number of young activated and non-activated macrophages, increased number of mature phagocytes is observed. Even more significant increase of phagocytic macrophages is observed at dissemination which is primarily is connected with participation of these cells in lymphocytic apoptosis which takes place in high percentage of lymphocytes (up to 49%). Increased number of mature phagocytes is observed at chronic course of exogenous allergic alveolitis that is an important diagnostic pattern of this option of development of exogenous allergic alveolitis in association with the lowest T-helpers/T-supressors index.

  17. Drug-metabolizing enzymes: mechanisms and functions.

    PubMed

    Sheweita, S A

    2000-09-01

    Drug-metabolizing enzymes are called mixed-function oxidase or monooxygenase and containing many enzymes including cytochrome P450, cytochrome b5, and NADPH-cytochrome P450 reductase and other components. The hepatic cytochrome P450s (Cyp) are a multigene family of enzymes that play a critical role in the metabolism of many drugs and xenobiotics with each cytochrome isozyme responding differently to exogenous chemicals in terms of its induction and inhibition. For example, Cyp 1A1 is particularly active towards polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), activating them into reactive intermediates those covalently bind to DNA, a key event in the initiation of carcinogenesis. Likewise, Cyp 1A2 activates a variety of bladder carcinogens, such as aromatic amines and amides. Also, some forms of cytochrome P450 isozymes such as Cyp 3A and 2E1 activate the naturally occurring carcinogens (e.g. aflatoxin B1) and N-nitrosamines respectively into highly mutagenic and carcinogenic agents. The carcinogenic potency of PAHs, and other carcinogens and the extent of binding of their ultimate metabolites to DNA and proteins are correlated with the induction of cytochrome P450 isozymes. Phase II drug-metabolizing enzymes such as glutathione S-transferase, aryl sulfatase and UDP-glucuronyl transferase inactivate chemical carcinogens into less toxic or inactive metabolites. Many drugs change the rate of activation or detoxification of carcinogens by changing the activities of phases I and II drug-metabolizing enzymes. The balance of detoxification and activation reactions depends on the chemical structure of the agents, and is subjected to many variables that are a function of this structure, or genetic background, sex, endocrine status, age, diet, and the presence of other chemicals. It is important to realize that the enzymes involved in carcinogen metabolism are also involved in the metabolism of a variety of substrates, and thus the introduction of specific xenobiotics may change

  18. The metabolic fate of exogenous sorbitol in the rat

    SciTech Connect

    Ertel, N.H.; Akgun, S.; Kemp, F.W.; Mittler, J.C.

    1983-03-01

    Dietary sorbitol is rapidly converted to fructose and other carbohydrates in the liver, but its metabolic fate has not been studied rigorously. Twenty-four rats were given 20.4 muCi (/sup 14/C)sorbitol with 100 mg of sorbitol, and groups of six were killed at 1, 3, 6, and 24 hours after sorbitol administration. Rats were also fed 6.9 muCi (/sup 14/C)sorbitol for 7 or 14 days. Serum, liver, and lens were analyzed for /sup 14/C-labeled sorbitol, fructose, and glucose by using high-performance liquid chromatography. Negligible radioactivity (1.1%) was found in the gastrointestinal content at 24 hours indicating virtually complete absorption. Most of the radioactivity was recovered in the glucose fraction in serum, liver and lens. Glucose and fructose concentrations showed some decline by day 14 compared with day 7 in serum and liver. However, in the lens, sorbitol showed a peak value at the end of the 14th day (37.5 +/- 9.9 micrograms/pair). These findings suggest that: 1) after oral administration, sorbitol is completely absorbed, and 2) that there is a finite accumulation of sorbitol and fructose in the lens in 14 days. Although the radioactive label indicated the exogenous origin of these carbohydrates, it is not certain whether the sorbitol is converted to glucose before entering and accumulating in the lens.

  19. Method for collecting mouse milk without exogenous oxytocin stimulation.

    PubMed

    Muranishi, Yuki; Parry, Laurent; Averous, Julien; Terrisse, Anne; Maurin, Anne-Catherine; Chaveroux, Cédric; Mesclon, Florent; Carraro, Valérie; Bruhat, Alain; Fafournoux, Pierre; Jousse, Céline

    2016-01-01

    It has been reported that breast-feeding more than 6 months strongly decreases the risk of allergy, diabetes, obesity, and hypertension in humans. In order to understand the mechanisms responsible for this benefit, it is important to evaluate precisely the composition of maternal milk, especially in response to environmental cues. Mouse models offer a unique opportunity to study the impact of maternal milk composition on the development and health of offspring. Oxytocin injection of the dam is usually used to stimulate milk ejection; however, exogenous oxytocin might have deleterious effects under some experimental conditions by modifying milk content as well as the physiology and behavior of the dam. Taking advantage of the natural stimulation of the mammary gland that occurs after the reunion of a dam that has been separated from her pups, we developed a new procedure to collect mouse milk without the injection of oxytocin. This method is easy to use, low-cost ,and non-invasive. Moreover, it provides a sufficient amount of milk for use in a wide range of biological analyses.

  20. Endogenous and exogenous fluorescence of gastrointestinal tumors: initial clinical observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borisova, Ekaterina; Plamenova, Lilia; Keremedchiev, Momchil; Vladimirov, Borislav; Avramov, Latchezar

    2013-03-01

    The limitations of standard endoscopy for detection and evaluation of cancerous changes in gastrointestinal tract (GIT) are significant challenge and initiate development of new diagnostic modalities. Therefore many spectral and optical techniques are applied recently into the clinical practice for obtaining qualitatively and quantitatively new data from gastrointestinal neoplasia with different level of clinical applicability and diagnostic success. One of the most promising approaches is fluorescence detection using naturally existing fluorescent molecules or added fluorescent markers. Deltaaminolevulinic acid / protoporphyrin IX is applied for exogenous fluorescent tumor detection in the upper part of gastrointestinal tract. The 5-ALA is administered per os six hours before measurements at dose 20mg/kg weight. Highpower light-emitting diode at 405 nm is used as a source and the excitation light is passed through the light-guide of standard video-endoscopic system to obtain 2-D visualization. Both kinds of spectra - autofluorescence signals and protoporphyrin IX signal are recorded and stored using a fiber-optic microspectrometer, as in endoscopy instrumental channel a fiber is applied to return information about fluorescence signals. In such way 1-D detection and 2-D visualization of the lesions' fluorescence are received. The results from in vivo detection show significant differentiation between normal and abnormal tissues in 1-D spectroscopic regime, but only moderate discrimination in 2-D imaging.

  1. Exogenous plant hormones and cyclotide expression in Viola uliginosa (Violaceae).

    PubMed

    Slazak, Blazej; Jacobsson, Erik; Kuta, Elżbieta; Göransson, Ulf

    2015-09-01

    Plants from Violaceae produce cyclotides, peptides characterized by a circular peptide backbone and a cystine knot. This signature motif gives stability that can harness a wide spectrum of biological activities, with implications in plant defense and with applications in medicine and biotechnology. In the current work, cyclotide expressing in vitro cultures were established from Viola uliginosa. These cultures are useful models for studying biosynthesis of cyclotides and can also be used in their production. The cyclotide expression pattern is shown to be dependent on exogenous plant growth regulators, both on peptide and gene expression levels. The highest yields of cyclotides were obtained on media containing only a cytokinin and were correlated with storage material accumulation. Exposure to auxins decreased cyclotide production and caused shifting of the biosynthesis pattern to root specific cyclotides. The response to stimuli in terms of cyclotide expression pattern appears to be developmental, and related to polar auxin transportation and the auxin/cytokinin ratio regulating tissue differentiation. By the use of whole transcriptome shotgun sequencing (WTSS) and peptidomics, 20 cyclotide sequences from V. uliginosa (including 12 new) and 12 complete precursor proteins could be identified. The most abundant cyclotides were cycloviolacin O3 (CyO3), CyO8 and CyO13. A suspension culture was obtained that grew exponentially with a doubling time of approximately 3 days. After ten days of growth, the culture provided a yield of more than 4 mg CyO13 per gram dry mass.

  2. Exogenous application of glycinebetaine increases chilling tolerance in tomato plants.

    PubMed

    Park, Eung-Jun; Jeknic, Zoran; Chen, Tony H H

    2006-06-01

    Tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill. cv. Moneymaker) plants are chilling sensitive, and do not naturally accumulate glycinebetaine (GB), a metabolite that functions as a stress protectant. We reported previously that exogenous GB application enhanced chilling tolerance in tomato. To understand its protective role better, we have further evaluated various parameters associated with improved tolerance. Although its effect was most pronounced in younger plants, this benefit was diminished 1 week after GB application. When administered by foliar spray, GB was readily taken up and translocated to various organs, with the highest levels being measured in meristematic tissues, including the shoot apices and flower buds. In leaves, the majority of endogenous GB was found in the cytosol; only 0.6-22.0% of the total leaf GB was localized in chloroplasts. Immediately after GB application, levels of H(2)O(2), catalase activity and expression of the catalase gene (CAT1) were all higher in GB-treated than in control plants. One day after exposure to chilling stress, the treated plants had significantly greater catalase activity and CAT1 expression, although their H(2)O(2) levels remained unchanged. During the following 2 d of this chilling treatment, GB-treated plants maintained lower H(2)O(2) levels but had higher catalase activity than the controls. These results suggest that, in addition to protecting macromolecules and membranes directly, GB-enhanced chilling tolerance may involve the induction of H(2)O(2)-mediated antioxidant mechanisms, e.g. enhanced catalase expression and catalase activity.

  3. Dynamic structural transformations of coordination supramolecular systems upon exogenous stimulation.

    PubMed

    Li, Cheng-Peng; Chen, Jing; Liu, Chun-Sen; Du, Miao

    2015-02-18

    Reactions in the solid state, especially single-crystal-to-single-crystal (SC-SC) transformations, provide an appealing pathway to obtain target crystalline materials with modified properties via a solvent-free green chemistry approach. This feature article focuses on the progress to date in the context of coordination supramolecular systems (CSSs), especially coordination polymers (CPs) or metal-organic frameworks (MOFs), which show interesting dynamic natures upon exposure to various exogenous stimuli, including concentration, temperature, light and mechanical force, as well as their synergic effect. In essence, dynamic CSSs normally possess crucial crystalline-reactive characteristics: (i) metal ions or clusters with unstable or metastable electronic configurations and coordination geometries; (ii) organic ligands bearing physicochemically active functional groups for subsequent reactions; (iii) polymeric networks of high flexibility for structural bending, rotation, swelling, or shrinking; (iv) guest moieties to be freely exchanged or eliminated by varying the environmental conditions. The significant changes in catalytic, sorption, magnetic, or luminescent properties accompanied by the structural transformations will also be discussed, which reveal the proof-of-concept thereof in designing new functional crystalline materials.

  4. Omori Law After Exogenous Shocks on Supplier-Customer Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujiwara, Yoshi

    We study the relaxation process of a supplier-customer network after mass destruction due to two giant earthquakes, Kobe 1995 and East Japan 2011, by investigating the number of chained failures. Firstly, a mass destruction and intervention of business activities in the damaged areas can be considered as a main shock. The exogenous shock was propagated on the supplier-customer network deteriorating financial states of other firms, even if they are not located in geographical neighbors. To quantify such aftershocks, we use chained failures on the network assuming that they indicate the trace of propagation of shocks. We show that the number of chained failures in its temporal change obeys an Omori-law, a power-law relaxation. This finding implies that the relaxation is much more sluggish than one would naively expect, and that it might be possible to estimate the extent and duration of aftershocks by using the empirical law. Several issues are discussed including the origin of the long-time relaxation.

  5. Lung Regeneration: Endogenous and Exogenous Stem Cell Mediated Therapeutic Approaches.

    PubMed

    Akram, Khondoker M; Patel, Neil; Spiteri, Monica A; Forsyth, Nicholas R

    2016-01-19

    The tissue turnover of unperturbed adult lung is remarkably slow. However, after injury or insult, a specialised group of facultative lung progenitors become activated to replenish damaged tissue through a reparative process called regeneration. Disruption in this process results in healing by fibrosis causing aberrant lung remodelling and organ dysfunction. Post-insult failure of regeneration leads to various incurable lung diseases including chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. Therefore, identification of true endogenous lung progenitors/stem cells, and their regenerative pathway are crucial for next-generation therapeutic development. Recent studies provide exciting and novel insights into postnatal lung development and post-injury lung regeneration by native lung progenitors. Furthermore, exogenous application of bone marrow stem cells, embryonic stem cells and inducible pluripotent stem cells (iPSC) show evidences of their regenerative capacity in the repair of injured and diseased lungs. With the advent of modern tissue engineering techniques, whole lung regeneration in the lab using de-cellularised tissue scaffold and stem cells is now becoming reality. In this review, we will highlight the advancement of our understanding in lung regeneration and development of stem cell mediated therapeutic strategies in combating incurable lung diseases.

  6. Endogenous or exogenous origin of vaginal candidiasis in Polish women?

    PubMed

    Mnichowska-Polanowskai, Magdalena; Wojciechowska-Koszko, Iwona; Klimowicz, Bogumia; Szymaniak, Ludmia; Krasnodebska-Szponder, Barbara; Szych, Zbigniew; Giedrys-Kalemba, Stefania

    2013-01-01

    Vaginal candidiasis is a common problem of clinical practice. Many studies have been conducted to explain its origin but only a few have included Polish women. The aim of the study was to determine the prevalence and similarity of oral, anal and vaginal Candida albicans strains isolated from Polish women with vaginal candidiasis. The study involved 20 from 37 recruited women. Swab samples were collected from their vagina, anus, and oral cavity at two-month intervals. All the women were treated with nystatin. Yeast were recovered and identified by the germ-tube test, API /Vitek system, typed by API ZYM and RAPD-PCR. Chi-square test was used to analyze the data. A total of 170 Candida albicans isolates were recovered from 180 samples collected 3 times from 3 sites of 20 women. Positive yeast vaginal cultures were found in all patients before administration of nystatin. Vaginal yeast recovery rate was decreased statistically significant in both follow-up visits (p= 0.001; p= 0.003). The same and different genotypes/biotypes were found concomitantly in a few body sites and/ or repeatedly at time interval from the same body site. The results support the concept of dynamic exchange of yeast within one woman and endogenous or exogenous origin of vaginal candidiasis.

  7. Lung protection by inhalation of exogenous solubilized extracellular matrix

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jinglei; Ravikumar, Priya; Nguyen, Kytai T.; Hsia, Connie C. W.

    2017-01-01

    Decellularized extracellular matrix (ECM) contains complex tissue-specific components that work in concert to promote tissue repair and constructive remodeling and has been used experimentally and clinically to accelerate epithelial wound repair, leading us to hypothesize that lung-derived ECM could mitigate acute lung injury. To explore the therapeutic potential of ECM for noninvasive delivery to the lung, we decellularized and solubilized porcine lung ECM, then characterized the composition, concentration, particle size and stability of the preparation. The ECM preparation at 3.2 mg/mL with average particle size <3 μm was tested in vitro on human A549 lung epithelial cells exposed to 95% O2 for 24 hours, and in vivo by tracheal instillation or nebulization into the lungs of rats exposed intermittently or continuously to 90% O2 for a cumulative 72 hours. Our results showed that the preparation was enriched in collagen, reduced in glycosaminoglycans, and contained various bioactive molecules. Particle size was concentration-dependent. Compared to the respective controls treated with cell culture medium in vitro or saline in vivo, ECM inhalation normalized cell survival and alveolar morphology, and reduced hyperoxia-induced apoptosis and oxidative damage. This proof-of-concept study established the methodology, feasibility and therapeutic potential of exogenous solubilized ECM for pulmonary cytoprotection, possibly as an adjunct or potentiator of conventional therapy. PMID:28151947

  8. Acquisition of exogenous haem is essential for tick reproduction

    PubMed Central

    Perner, Jan; Sobotka, Roman; Sima, Radek; Konvickova, Jitka; Sojka, Daniel; de Oliveira, Pedro Lagerblad; Hajdusek, Ondrej; Kopacek, Petr

    2016-01-01

    Haem and iron homeostasis in most eukaryotic cells is based on a balanced flux between haem biosynthesis and haem oxygenase-mediated degradation. Unlike most eukaryotes, ticks possess an incomplete haem biosynthetic pathway and, together with other (non-haematophagous) mites, lack a gene encoding haem oxygenase. We demonstrated, by membrane feeding, that ticks do not acquire bioavailable iron from haemoglobin-derived haem. However, ticks require dietary haemoglobin as an exogenous source of haem since, feeding with haemoglobin-depleted serum led to aborted embryogenesis. Supplementation of serum with haemoglobin fully restored egg fertility. Surprisingly, haemoglobin could be completely substituted by serum proteins for the provision of amino-acids in vitellogenesis. Acquired haem is distributed by haemolymph carrier protein(s) and sequestered by vitellins in the developing oocytes. This work extends, substantially, current knowledge of haem auxotrophy in ticks and underscores the importance of haem and iron metabolism as rational targets for anti-tick interventions. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.12318.001 PMID:26949258

  9. Tracing exogenous Gd and its effects in single Chang cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altissimo, Matteo; Pascolo, Lorella; Delfino, Riccarda; Salome, Murielle; Lorusso, Vito

    2010-07-01

    X-ray fluorescence (XRF) is rapidly becoming one of the tools of choice in tracing the presence of both endogenous and exogenous chemical elements in biological samples. The sub-micron spatial resolution routinely obtainable at multi-keV energies at third generation light sources, combined with the high brilliance of the photon beam, allows mapping the presence of biologically relevant elements at sub-cell resolution by means of their fluorescent signature. The fluorescent signal also lends itself for a semi-quantitative analysis of the elements composing the specimen. In this work we employed synchrotron-based XRF to analyze two lines of cultured Chang cells. One of them was treated with a Gd-containing magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agents (CA), and the other was left untreated for control purposes. The experiments highlighted a peri-nuclear distribution of Gd inside the cells, as well as a distinct variation in the distribution and concentration of several elements (P, S, Cl, K, Ca and Fe), with respect to the control line.

  10. Lung Regeneration: Endogenous and Exogenous Stem Cell Mediated Therapeutic Approaches

    PubMed Central

    Akram, Khondoker M.; Patel, Neil; Spiteri, Monica A.; Forsyth, Nicholas R.

    2016-01-01

    The tissue turnover of unperturbed adult lung is remarkably slow. However, after injury or insult, a specialised group of facultative lung progenitors become activated to replenish damaged tissue through a reparative process called regeneration. Disruption in this process results in healing by fibrosis causing aberrant lung remodelling and organ dysfunction. Post-insult failure of regeneration leads to various incurable lung diseases including chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. Therefore, identification of true endogenous lung progenitors/stem cells, and their regenerative pathway are crucial for next-generation therapeutic development. Recent studies provide exciting and novel insights into postnatal lung development and post-injury lung regeneration by native lung progenitors. Furthermore, exogenous application of bone marrow stem cells, embryonic stem cells and inducible pluripotent stem cells (iPSC) show evidences of their regenerative capacity in the repair of injured and diseased lungs. With the advent of modern tissue engineering techniques, whole lung regeneration in the lab using de-cellularised tissue scaffold and stem cells is now becoming reality. In this review, we will highlight the advancement of our understanding in lung regeneration and development of stem cell mediated therapeutic strategies in combating incurable lung diseases. PMID:26797607

  11. Exogenous delta⁹-tetrahydrocannabinol influences circulating endogenous cannabinoids in humans.

    PubMed

    Walter, Carmen; Ferreirós, Nerea; Bishay, Philipp; Geisslinger, Gerd; Tegeder, Irmgard; Lötsch, Jörn

    2013-10-01

    Delta⁹-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) competes with the endogenous cannabinoids arachidonoyl ethanolamide (anandamide) and 2-arachidonoyl glycerol (2-AG) at cannabinoid receptors. This may cause adaptive changes in the endocannabinoid signaling cascade with possible consequences for the biological functions of the endocannabinoid system. We show that administration of a single oral dose of 20 mg THC to 30 healthy volunteers resulted in higher circulating concentrations of anandamide, 2-AG, palmitoyl ethanolamide, and oleoylethanolamide at 2 and 3 hours after administration as compared with placebo. At 2 hours after THC administration, changes in oleoylethanolamide plasma concentrations from baseline were linearly related to the THC plasma concentrations. In rats, treatment with the CB₁/CB₂ agonist WIN 55,212 also increased plasma endocannabinoid concentrations. However, this was associated with a decrease of ethanolamide endocannabinoids in specific brain regions including spinal cord, cortex, and hypothalamus; whereas 2-arachidonoyl glycerol increased in the cortex. Thus, administration of THC to human volunteers influenced the concentrations of circulating endocannabinoids, which was mimicked by WIN-55,212 in rats, suggesting that exogenous cannabinoids may lead to changes in the endocannabinoid system that can be detected in plasma.

  12. Exogenous specific fluorescence marker location reconstruction using surface fluorescence imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avital, Garashi; Gannot, Israel; Chernomordik, Victor V.; Gannot, Gallya; Gandjbakhche, Amir H.

    2003-07-01

    Diseased tissue may be specifically marked by an exogenous fluorescent marker and then, following laser activation of the marker, optically and non-invasively detected through fluorescence imaging. Interaction of a fluorophore, conjugated to an appropriate antibody, with the antigen expressed by the diseased tissue, can indicate the presence of a specific disease. Using an optical detection system and a reconstruction algorithm, we were able to determine the fluorophore"s position in the tissue. We present 3D reconstructions of the location of a fluorescent marker, FITC, in the tongues of mice. One group of BALB/c mice was injected with squamous cell carcinoma (SqCC) cell line to the tongue, while another group served as the control. After tumor development, the mice"s tongues were injected with FITC conjugated to anti-CD3 and anti-CD 19 antibodies. An Argon laser excited the marker at 488 nm while a high precision fluorescent camera collected the emitted fluorescence. Measurements were performed with the fluorescent marker embedded at various simulated depths. The simulation was performed using agarose-based gel slabs applied to the tongue as tissue-like phantoms. A biopsy was taken from every mouse after the procedure and the excised tissue was histologically evaluated. We reconstruct the fluorescent marker"s location in 3D using an algorithm based on the random walk theory.

  13. Endogenous and exogenous control of gametogenesis and spawning in echinoderms.

    PubMed

    Mercier, Annie; Hamel, Jean-François

    2009-01-01

    Most echinoderms display seasonal or other temporal cycles of reproduction that presumably result from the complex interplay of endogenous and exogenous signals. Various environmental, chemical and hormonal factors, acting directly or indirectly, individually or in combination, have been proposed to cue, favour or modulate a suite of reproductive functions from the onset of gametogenesis to gamete release. From as early as the nineteenth century, an astonishing array of studies has been published on topics related to the control of reproduction in echinoderms, ranging from fortuitous behavioural observations to complex experimental demonstrations and molecular analyses. Although the exact pathways involved in the perception of external signals and their transduction into coordinated spawning events remain obscure for most species, significant advances have been made that shed new light on the information gathered over decades of research. By compiling the existing literature (over 1000 references), interpreting the main results, critically assessing the methodologies used and reviewing the emerging hypotheses, we endeavour to draw a clearer picture of the existing knowledge and to provide a framework for future investigation of the mechanisms that underlie reproductive strategies in echinoderms and, by extension, in other marine invertebrates.

  14. SAR11 marine bacteria require exogenous reduced sulphur for growth.

    PubMed

    Tripp, H James; Kitner, Joshua B; Schwalbach, Michael S; Dacey, John W H; Wilhelm, Larry J; Giovannoni, Stephen J

    2008-04-10

    Sulphur is a universally required cell nutrient found in two amino acids and other small organic molecules. All aerobic marine bacteria are known to use assimilatory sulphate reduction to supply sulphur for biosynthesis, although many can assimilate sulphur from organic compounds that contain reduced sulphur atoms. An analysis of three complete 'Candidatus Pelagibacter ubique' genomes, and public ocean metagenomic data sets, suggested that members of the ubiquitous and abundant SAR11 alphaproteobacterial clade are deficient in assimilatory sulphate reduction genes. Here we show that SAR11 requires exogenous sources of reduced sulphur, such as methionine or 3-dimethylsulphoniopropionate (DMSP) for growth. Titrations of the algal osmolyte DMSP in seawater medium containing all other macronutrients in excess showed that 1.5 x 10(8) SAR11 cells are produced per nanomole of DMSP. Although it has been shown that other marine alphaproteobacteria use sulphur from DMSP in preference to sulphate, our results indicate that 'Cand. P. ubique' relies exclusively on reduced sulphur compounds that originate from other plankton.

  15. Exogenous Spermidine Alleviates Low Temperature Injury in Mung Bean (Vigna radiata L.) Seedlings by Modulating Ascorbate-Glutathione and Glyoxalase Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Nahar, Kamrun; Hasanuzzaman, Mirza; Alam, Md. Mahabub; Fujita, Masayuki

    2015-01-01

    The role of exogenous spermidine (Spd) in alleviating low temperature (LT) stress in mung bean (Vigna radiata L. cv. BARI Mung-3) seedlings has been investigated. Low temperature stress modulated the non-enzymatic and enzymatic components of ascorbate-glutathione (AsA-GSH) cycle, increased H2O2 content and lipid peroxidation, which indicate oxidative damage of seedlings. Low temperature reduced the leaf relative water content (RWC) and destroyed leaf chlorophyll, which inhibited seedlings growth. Exogenous pretreatment of Spd in LT-affected seedlings significantly increased the contents of non-enzymatic antioxidants of AsA-GSH cycle, which include AsA and GSH. Exogenous Spd decreased dehydroascorbate (DHA), increased AsA/DHA ratio, decreased glutathione disulfide (GSSG) and increased GSH/GSSG ratio under LT stress. Activities of AsA-GSH cycle enzymes such as ascorbate peroxidase (APX), monodehydroascorbate reductase (MDHAR), dehydroascorbate reductase (DHAR) and glutathione reductase (GR) increased after Spd pretreatment in LT affected seedlings. Thus, the oxidative stress was reduced. Protective effects of Spd are also reflected from reduction of methylglyoxal (MG) toxicity by improving glyoxalase cycle components, and by maintaining osmoregulation, water status and improved seedlings growth. The present study reveals the vital roles of AsA-GSH and glyoxalase cycle in alleviating LT injury. PMID:26694373

  16. Exogenous ethylene influences flower opening of cut roses (Rosa hybrida) by regulating the genes encoding ethylene biosynthesis enzymes.

    PubMed

    Ma, Nan; Cai, Lei; Lu, Wangjin; Tan, Hui; Gao, Junping

    2005-10-01

    The purpose of this paper is to investigate the differential responses of flower opening to ethylene in two cut rose cultivars, 'Samantha', whose opening process is promoted, and 'Kardinal', whose opening process is inhibited by ethylene. Ethylene production and 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate (ACC) synthase and oxidase activities were determined first. After ethylene treatment, ethylene production, ACC synthase (ACS) and ACC oxidase (ACO) activities in petals increased and peaked at the earlier stage (stage 3) in 'Samantha', and they were much more dramatically enhanced and peaked at the later stage (stage 4) in 'Kardinal' than control during vasing. cDNA fragments of three Rh-ACSs and one Rh-ACO genes were cloned and designated as Rh-ACS1, Rh-ACS2, Rh-ACS3 and Rh-ACO1 respectively. Northern blotting analysis revealed that, among three genes of ACS, ethylene-in- duced expression patterns of Rh-ACS3 gene corresponded to ACS activity and ethylene production in both cultivars. A more dramatic accumulation of Rh-ACS3 mRNA was induced by ethylene in 'Kardinal' than that of 'Samantha'. As an ethylene action inhibitor, STS at concentration of 0.2 mmol/L generally inhibited the expression of Rh-ACSs and Rh-ACO in both cultivars, although it induced the expression of Rh-ACS3 transiently in 'Kardinal'. Our results suggests that 'Kardinal' is more sensitive to ethylene than 'Samantha'; and the changes of Rh-ACS3 expression caused by ethylene might be related to the acceleration of flower opening in 'Samantha' and the inhibition in 'Kardinal'. Additional results indicated that three Rh-ACSs genes were differentially associated with flower opening and senescence as well as wounding

  17. Structural comparison of chromosomal and exogenous dihydrofolate reductase from Staphylococcus aureus in complex with the potent inhibitor trimethoprim

    SciTech Connect

    Heaslet, Holly; Harris, Melissa; Fahnoe, Kelly; Sarver, Ronald; Putz, Henry; Chang, Jeanne; Subramanyam, Chakrapani; Barreiro, Gabriela; Miller, J. Richard; Pfizer

    2010-09-02

    Dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) is the enzyme responsible for the NADPH-dependent reduction of 5,6-dihydrofolate to 5,6,7,8-tetrahydrofolate, an essential cofactor in the synthesis of purines, thymidylate, methionine, and other key metabolites. Because of its importance in multiple cellular functions, DHFR has been the subject of much research targeting the enzyme with anticancer, antibacterial, and antimicrobial agents. Clinically used compounds targeting DHFR include methotrexate for the treatment of cancer and diaminopyrimidines (DAPs) such as trimethoprim (TMP) for the treatment of bacterial infections. DAP inhibitors of DHFR have been used clinically for >30 years and resistance to these agents has become widespread. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), the causative agent of many serious nosocomial and community acquired infections, and other gram-positive organisms can show resistance to DAPs through mutation of the chromosomal gene or acquisition of an alternative DHFR termed 'S1 DHFR.' To develop new therapies for health threats such as MRSA, it is important to understand the molecular basis of DAP resistance. Here, we report the crystal structure of the wild-type chromosomal DHFR from S. aureus in complex with NADPH and TMP. We have also solved the structure of the exogenous, TMP resistant S1 DHFR, apo and in complex with TMP. The structural and thermodynamic data point to important molecular differences between the two enzymes that lead to dramatically reduced affinity of DAPs to S1 DHFR. These differences in enzyme binding affinity translate into reduced antibacterial activity against strains of S. aureus that express S1 DHFR.

  18. Industrial Enzymes and Biocatalysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McAuliffe, Joseph C.; Aehle, Wolfgang; Whited, Gregory M.; Ward, Donald E.

    All life processes are the result of enzyme activity. In fact, life itself, whether plant or animal, involves a complex network of enzymatic reactions. An enzyme is a protein that is synthesized in a living cell. It catalyzes a thermodynamically possible reaction so that the rate of the reaction is compatible with the numerous biochemical processes essential for the growth and maintenance of a cell. The synthesis of an enzyme thus is under tight metabolic regulations and controls that can be genetically or environmentally manipulated sometimes to cause the overproduction of an enzyme by the cell. An enzyme, like chemical catalysts, in no way modifies the equilibrium constant or the free energy change of a reaction.

  19. Exogenous Melatonin Improves Antioxidant Defense in Cucumber Seeds (Cucumis sativus L.) Germinated under Chilling Stress

    PubMed Central

    Marta, Bałabusta; Szafrańska, Katarzyna; Posmyk, Małgorzata M.

    2016-01-01

    The relationship between exogenous melatonin applied into cucumber seeds during osmopriming and modifications of their antioxidant defense was studied. Accumulation of hydrogen peroxide, antioxidant enzyme activities and glutathione pool were investigated in embryonic axes isolated from the control, osmoprimed, and osmoprimed with melatonin seeds. Germinating cucumber seeds are very sensitive to chilling. Temperature 10°C causes oxidative stress in young seedlings. Seed pre-treatment with melatonin seemed to limit H2O2 accumulation during germination under optimal condition as well as during chilling stress and recovery period. Melatonin affected superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity and its isoforms during stress and recovery period but did not influence CAT and POX activities. Thus it is possible that in cucumber this indoleamine could act mostly as a direct H2O2 scavenger, but superoxide anion combat via SOD stimulation. The GSH/GSSG ratio is considered as an indirect determinant of oxidative stress. When the cells are exposed to oxidative stress GSSG is accumulated and the ratio of GSH to GSSG decreases. In our research pre-sowing melatonin application into the cucumber seeds caused high beneficial value of GSH/GSSG ratio that could be helpful for stress countering. Glutathione reductase (GSSG-R) activity in the axes isolated from these seeds was two fold higher than in those isolated from the control and from the osmoprimed without melatonin ones. Additional isoforms of GSSG-R in melatonin treated seeds were also observed. It explains high and effective GSH pool restoration in the seeds pre-treated with melatonin. We confirmed that melatonin could protect cucumber seeds and young seedlings against oxidative stress directly and indirectly detoxifying ROS, thereby plants grown better even in harmful environmental conditions. This work is the first that investigated on plant in vivo model and documented melatonin influence on redox state during seed germination

  20. Targetable fluorescent probe for monitoring exogenous and endogenous NO in mitochondria of living cells.

    PubMed

    Yu, Haibo; Zhang, Xinfu; Xiao, Yi; Zou, Wei; Wang, Liping; Jin, Liji

    2013-08-06

    Nitric oxide (NO) is a ubiquitous cellular messenger molecule in the cardiovascular, nervous, and immune systems. Mitochondrion is the main area where endogenous NO is synthesized by inducible NOS enzymes in mammalian cells. Thus, real-time monitoring NO in mitochondria is very meaningful for NO chemical biology. Although a variety of fluorescent probes for NO have been successfully developed, they are not suited for detecting mitochondrial NO because none of them can specifically localize in mitochondria. Herein, Mito-Rh-NO, the first mitochondria-targetable "turn-on" fluorescent probe for NO, has been developed through attaching a triphenylphosphonium to a rhodamine spirolactam. The characteristics of this probe are as following: (1) Mito-Rh-NO exhibits high sensitivity toward NO. In solution, Mito-Rh-NO responds to NO by significant fluorescence enhancement up to 60-fold, and its NO detection limit is as low as 4.0 nM. (2) The NO sensing of Mito-Rh-NO is highly selective, which will not interfere with the other reactive oxygen and nitrogen species. (3) Mito-Rh-NO has a low cytotoxic effect: after being treated with 10 μM Mito-Rh-NO for 24 h, the survival rate is higher than 90%. (4) Mito-Rh-NO specifically localizing in mitochondria: colocalization experiment of Mito-Rh-NO and Rh 123, a typical mitotracker, shows the merged fluorescent microcopy image with a high Pearson's colocalization coefficient 0.92 and overlap coefficient 0.99. (5) Mito-Rh-NO demonstrates high applicability for real-time monitoring of mitochondrial NO in live cells. Both the exogenous NO released by the donor NOC13 and endogenous NO generated in cells under stimulation have been visualized under confocal microscopy.

  1. Exogenous phosphorus inputs alter complexity of soil-dissolved organic carbon in agricultural riparian wetlands.

    PubMed

    Liu, Meng; Zhang, Zhijian; He, Qiang; Wang, Hang; Li, Xia; Schoer, Jonathan

    2014-01-01

    High-strengthened farmland fertilization leads to mass inputs of nutrients and elements to agricultural riparian wetlands. The dissolved organic carbon (DOC) of such wetland sediments is an important intermediate in global carbon (C) cycling due to its role in connecting soil C pools with atmospheric CO2. But the impact of phosphorus (P) on sediment DOC is still largely unknown, despite increasing investigations to emphasize P interception by riparian wetlands. Here, we simulated the temporal influences of exogenous P on sediment DOC of riparian wetlands by integrating gradient P loading at rates of 0%, 5%, 10%, 20%, 30%, and 60% relative to the initial total phosphorus content of the sediment with the purpose of illustrating the role of external P on the complexity of soil DOC in terms of its amount and composition. After incubating for nine months, a dramatic linear correlation between Olsen-P and fluorescent and ultraviolet spectral indices considered DOC skeleton was observed. Together with a more microbial-derived origin of DOC and a reduction of DOC aromaticity or humicity, the excitation-emission matrix had shown a blue shift reflecting a trend towards a simpler molecular structure of sediment DOC after P addition. Meanwhile, the content of soil DOC and its ratio with total organic carbon (TOC) were also increased by P loading, coupled with enhanced values of highly labile organic carbon and two C-related enzymes. While TOC and recalcitrant organic carbon decreased significantly. Such implications of DOC amounts and composition stimulated by external P loading may enhance its bioavailability, thereby inducing an accelerated effect on soil C cycling and a potential C loss in response to global climate change.

  2. Cotton cellulose: enzyme adsorption and enzymic hydrolysis

    SciTech Connect

    Beltrame, P.L.; Carniti, P.; Focher, B.; Marzetti, A.; Cattaneo, M.

    1982-01-01

    The adsorption of a crude cellulase complex from Trichoderma viride on variously pretreated cotton cellulose samples was studied in the framework of the Langmuir approach at 2-8 degrees. The saturation amount of adsorbed enzyme was related to the susceptibility of the substrates to hydrolysis. In every case the adsorption process was faster by 2-3 orders of magnitude than the hydrolysis step to give end products. For ZnCl/sub 2/-treated cotton cellulose the Langmuir parameters correlated fairly well with the value of the Michaelis constant, measured for its enzymic hydrolysis, and the adsorptive complex was indistinguishable from the complex of the Michaelis-Menten model for the hydrolysis.

  3. Replacing corn with pearl millet (raw and sprouted) with and without enzyme in chickens' diet.

    PubMed

    Afsharmanesh, M; Ghorbani, N; Mehdipour, Z

    2016-04-01

    An experiment was conducted to compare a commercial corn-soya bean meal diet with a pearl millet (raw and sprouted) diet containing less soya bean meal, alone or in combination with exogenous enzyme, on growth performance and ileal villus development of chicks. Two-hundred-and-forty-one-day-old male broilers (10/pen) were randomly allocated to one of the following dietary treatments: (i) a standard corn-soya bean meal control diet (CTL); (ii) a raw pearl millet-soya bean meal diet (PM); (iii) a sprouted pearl millet-soya bean meal diet (SPM); (iv) CTL + exogenous enzymes (CE); (v) PM + exogenous enzymes (PE); and (vi) SPM + exogenous enzymes (SPE) with four replicate pens/treatment. Body weight of birds at day 21 did not differ between those fed the CTL, and SPM and PE diets. In comparison with feeding broilers the CTL diet, feeding the PE and SPM diets caused significant decrease in feed intake, but with equivalent growth and feed efficiency. However, at day 21, feed conversion ratio did not differ between birds fed the CTL diet and those fed the PM, PE and SPM diets. At day 21, broilers fed the PM and PE diets had longer villi (p < 0.05) than those fed the CTL diet. At day 21, villi width was reduced (p < 0.05) by raw pearl millet supplementation than CTL diet. It is concluded that, in comparison with corn, broiler diets formulated with sprouted pearl millet or pearl millet with enzyme require less soya bean meal and can be used to improve growth performance traits and villus development.

  4. Exogenic olivine on Vesta from Dawn Framing Camera color data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nathues, Andreas; Hoffmann, Martin; Schäfer, Michael; Thangjam, Guneshwar; Le Corre, Lucille; Reddy, Vishnu; Christensen, Ulrich; Mengel, Kurt; Sierks, Holger; Vincent, Jean-Baptist; Cloutis, Edward A.; Russell, Christopher T.; Schäfer, Tanja; Gutierrez-Marques, Pablo; Hall, Ian; Ripken, Joachim; Büttner, Irene

    2015-09-01

    In this paper we present the results of a global survey of olivine-rich lithologies on (4) Vesta. We investigated Dawn Framing Camera (FC) High Altitude Mapping Orbit (HAMO) color cubes (∼60 m/pixel resolution) by using a method described in Thangjam et al. (Thangjam, G., Nathues, A., Mengel, K., Hoffmann, M., Schäfer, M., Reddy, V., Cloutis, E.A., Christensen, U., Sierks, H., Le Corre, L., Vincent, J.-B, Russell, C.T. [2014b]. Meteorit. Planet. Sci. arXiv:1408.4687 [astro-ph.EP]). In total we identified 15 impact craters exhibiting olivine-rich (>40 wt.% ol) outcrops on their inner walls, some showing olivine-rich material also in their ejecta and floors. Olivine-rich sites are concentrated in the Bellicia, Arruntia and Pomponia region on Vesta's northern hemisphere. From our multi-color and stratigraphic analysis, we conclude that most, if not all, of the olivine-rich material identified is of exogenic origin, i.e. remnants of A- or/and S-type projectiles. The olivine-rich lithologies in the north are possibly ejecta of the ∼90 km diameter Albana crater. We cannot draw a final conclusion on their relative stratigraphic succession, but it seems that the dark material (Nathues, A., Hoffmann, M., Cloutis, E.A., Schäfer, M., Reddy, V., Christensen, U., Sierks, H., Thangjam, G.S., Le Corre, L., Mengel, K., Vincent, J.-B., Russell, C.T., Prettyman, T., Schmedemann, N., Kneissl, T., Raymond, C., Gutierrez-Marques, P., Hall, I. Büttner, I. [2014b]. Icarus (239, 222-237)) and the olivine-rich lithologies are of a similar age. The origin of some potential olivine-rich sites in the Rheasilvia basin and at crater Portia are ambiguous, i.e. these are either of endogenic or exogenic origin. However, the small number and size of these sites led us to conclude that olivine-rich mantle material, containing more than 40 wt.% of olivine, is basically absent on the present surface of Vesta. In combination with recent impact models of Veneneia and Rheasilvia (Clenet, H., Jutzi

  5. Chemotactic separation of enzymes.

    PubMed

    Dey, Krishna Kanti; Das, Sambeeta; Poyton, Matthew F; Sengupta, Samudra; Butler, Peter J; Cremer, Paul S; Sen, Ayusman

    2014-12-23

    We demonstrate a procedure for the separation of enzymes based on their chemotactic response toward an imposed substrate concentration gradient. The separation is observed within a two-inlet, five-outlet microfluidic network, designed to allow mixtures of active (ones that catalyze substrate turnover) and inactive (ones that do not catalyze substrate turnover) enzymes, labeled with different fluorophores, to flow through one of the inlets. Substrate solution prepared in phosphate buffer was introduced through the other inlet of the device at the same flow rate. The steady-state concentration profiles of the enzymes were obtained at specific positions within the outlets of the microchannel using fluorescence microscopy. In the presence of a substrate concentration gradient, active enzyme molecules migrated preferentially toward the substrate channel. The excess migration of the active enzyme molecules was quantified in terms of an enrichment coefficient. Experiments were carried out with different pairs of enzymes. Coupling the physics of laminar flow of liquid and molecular diffusion, multiphysics simulations were carried out to estimate the extent of the chemotactic separation. Our results show that, with appropriate microfluidic arrangement, molecular chemotaxis leads to spontaneous separation of active enzyme molecules from their inactive counterparts of similar charge and size.

  6. Estimating distributions of endogenous and exogenous Pb in soils by using Pb isotopic ratios.

    PubMed

    Semlali, R M; van Oort, F; Denaix, L; Loubet, M

    2001-11-01

    Metal contamination of soils by diffuse atmospheric deposition is a worldwide phenomenon. The assessment of incorporation of exogenous metal contaminants in soils is of major environmental importance. Once entering in the soil's biogeochemical cycling, specific pedogenetic soil processes govern metal distribution patterns with depth. In this paper, we attempt to estimate the distribution of endogenous and exogenous Pb in two soils with contrasting pedogenesis, both representative of undisturbed ecosystems. Pb isotope analyses were performed using high-precision thermal ionization mass spectrometry. Endogenous and exogenous Pb concentrations and exogenous 206Pb/207Pb ratios of the samples were calculated using bulk Pb and Sc concentrations and bulk 206Pb/207Pb ratios. Endogenous Pb distribution was in agreementwith dominant soil characteristics, almost constant in the young Andosol and with a clear minimum and maximum in the eluvial and illuvial horizons of the Podzol. The distribution of exogenous Pb was closely related to that of organic C in both soils. Exogenous Pb was evidenced in significant amounts at depth. Using moderate dispersive particle-size fractionation allowed us to evidence the presence of exogenous Pb in functional soil compartments and to highlight preferential distributions of Pb, according to pedology.

  7. Synthesis of nitrogen and sulfur macrocycles with cis exogenous oxygen and sulfur donor atoms.

    PubMed

    White, Vivienne A; Long, Nicholas J; Robertson, Neil

    2005-12-07

    A series of new N4 and N8 macrocycles has been prepared, that includes cis-exogenous O2, S2 and S/O atoms to allow chelation to a metal external to the macrocyclic ring. We found that thioamide units within the macrocycles were unstable to attack by secondary amines and thus alkylated precursors containing only tertiary amines could lead to exogenous-S2 macrocycles. Cyclisation of alkylated tetraamine precursors with dimethyloxalate or dithiooxamide led to both N4 and N8 macrocycles via 1 + 1 and 2 + 2 cyclisation reactions with exogenous-O2 or S2 respectively. Alkylation of preformed exogenous-O2 macrocycles was explored and led to alkyl substitution at the secondary amine nitrogens in the ring, however synthesis of these species was overall lower yielding than cyclisation using alkylated tetraamine precursors. Thionation of an exo-O2 macrocycle using an analogue of Lawesson's Reagent led to formation of the analogous exogenous-S2 and exogenous-O,S macrocycles. Related S2N2 macrocycles with exogenous-O2 were prepared by a cyclisation route but could not be isolated free of larger ring analogues.

  8. Preventive effects of chronic exogenous growth hormone levels on diet-induced hepatic steatosis in rats

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), which is characterized by hepatic steatosis, can be reversed by early treatment. Several case reports have indicated that the administration of recombinant growth hormone (GH) could improve fatty liver in GH-deficient patients. Here, we investigated whether chronic exogenous GH levels could improve hepatic steatosis induced by a high-fat diet in rats, and explored the underlying mechanisms. Results High-fat diet-fed rats developed abdominal obesity, fatty liver and insulin resistance. Chronic exogenous GH improved fatty liver, by reversing dyslipidaemia, fat accumulation and insulin resistance. Exogenous GH also reduced serum tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) levels, and ameliorated hepatic lipid peroxidation and oxidative stress. Hepatic fat deposition was also reduced by exogenous GH levels, as was the expression of adipocyte-derived adipokines (adiponectin, leptin and resistin), which might improve lipid metabolism and hepatic steatosis. Exogenous GH seems to improve fatty liver by reducing fat weight, improving insulin sensitivity and correcting oxidative stress, which may be achieved through phosphorylation or dephosphorylation of a group of signal transducers and activators of hepatic signal transduction pathways. Conclusions Chronic exogenous GH has positive effects on fatty liver and may be a potential clinical application in the prevention or reversal of fatty liver. However, chronic secretion of exogenous GH, even at a low level, may increase serum glucose and insulin levels in rats fed a standard diet, and thus increase the risk of insulin resistance. PMID:20653983

  9. Endogenous and exogenous glucocorticoids in experimental enterococcal infection.

    PubMed

    Papasian, Christopher J; Qureshi, Nilofer; Morrison, David C

    2006-03-01

    The potentially protective role of the host adrenal-glucocorticoid response to enterococcal infection was evaluated in an experimental model in which mice were infected intraperitoneally with two distinct Enterococcus faecalis strains (K9 and CP-1). We demonstrated that corticosterone levels in serum and peritoneal-lavage fluid were elevated within 1 hour of infection with either E. faecalis strain. We also demonstrated that adrenalectomized mice generated a more robust localized peritoneal tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) response to both E. faecalis strains than did sham-adrenalectomized mice but that neither E. faecalis strain induced a systemic TNF-alpha response. Further, peritoneal TNF-alpha production in adrenalectomized mice infected with either E. faecalis K9 or CP-1 was suppressed by prior treatment with an exogenous glucocorticoid (dexamethasone). The potential clinical significance of these results was suggested by our findings that adrenalectomy markedly increased susceptibility (a>100-fold decrease in the 50% lethal dose) to lethal infections with E. faecalis CP-1 and that prior dexamethasone treatment partially compensated for adrenalectomy. In marked contrast to these findings, however, adrenalectomy did not substantially increase susceptibility to lethal E. faecalis K9 infection. Further, preinfection with E. faecalis CP-1 1 hour before infection with E. faecalis K9 did not protect mice from lethal E. faecalis K9 infections. Collectively, these studies indicate that the host can generate a glucocorticoid response to E. faecalis infection that suppresses TNF-alpha production. Further, this glucocorticoid response can protect the host from potentially lethal E. faecalis infections, but different strains show heterogeneity with respect to the extent of protection afforded by the adrenal-glucocorticoid response.

  10. Magnetic hyperthermia enhances cell toxicity with respect to exogenous heating.

    PubMed

    Sanz, Beatriz; Calatayud, M Pilar; Torres, Teobaldo E; Fanarraga, Mónica L; Ibarra, M Ricardo; Goya, Gerardo F

    2017-01-01

    Magnetic hyperthermia is a new type of cancer treatment designed for overcoming resistance to chemotherapy during the treatment of solid, inaccessible human tumors. The main challenge of this technology is increasing the local tumoral temperature with minimal side effects on the surrounding healthy tissue. This work consists of an in vitro study that compared the effect of hyperthermia in response to the application of exogenous heating (EHT) sources with the corresponding effect produced by magnetic hyperthermia (MHT) at the same target temperatures. Human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells were loaded with magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) and packed into dense pellets to generate an environment that is crudely similar to that expected in solid micro-tumors, and the above-mentioned protocols were applied to these cells. These experiments showed that for the same target temperatures, MHT induces a decrease in cell viability that is larger than the corresponding EHT, up to a maximum difference of approximately 45% at T = 46 °C. An analysis of the data in terms of temperature efficiency demonstrated that MHT requires an average temperature that is 6 °C lower than that required with EHT to produce a similar cytotoxic effect. An analysis of electron microscopy images of the cells after the EHT and MHT treatments indicated that the enhanced effectiveness observed with MHT is associated with local cell destruction triggered by the magnetic nano-heaters. The present study is an essential step toward the development of innovative adjuvant anti-cancer therapies based on local hyperthermia treatments using magnetic particles as nano-heaters.

  11. Causal mediation analysis for longitudinal data with exogenous exposure

    PubMed Central

    Bind, M.-A. C.; Vanderweele, T. J.; Coull, B. A.; Schwartz, J. D.

    2016-01-01

    Mediation analysis is a valuable approach to examine pathways in epidemiological research. Prospective cohort studies are often conducted to study biological mechanisms and often collect longitudinal measurements on each participant. Mediation formulae for longitudinal data have been developed. Here, we formalize the natural direct and indirect effects using a causal framework with potential outcomes that allows for an interaction between the exposure and the mediator. To allow different types of longitudinal measures of the mediator and outcome, we assume two generalized mixed-effects models for both the mediator and the outcome. The model for the mediator has subject-specific random intercepts and random exposure slopes for each cluster, and the outcome model has random intercepts and random slopes for the exposure, the mediator, and their interaction. We also expand our approach to settings with multiple mediators and derive the mediated effects, jointly through all mediators. Our method requires the absence of time-varying confounding with respect to the exposure and the mediator. This assumption is achieved in settings with exogenous exposure and mediator, especially when exposure and mediator are not affected by variables measured at earlier time points. We apply the methodology to data from the Normative Aging Study and estimate the direct and indirect effects, via DNA methylation, of air pollution, and temperature on intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1) protein levels. Our results suggest that air pollution and temperature have a direct effect on ICAM-1 protein levels (i.e. not through a change in ICAM-1 DNA methylation) and that temperature has an indirect effect via a change in ICAM-1 DNA methylation. PMID:26272993

  12. Enzyme molecules as nanomotors.

    PubMed

    Sengupta, Samudra; Dey, Krishna K; Muddana, Hari S; Tabouillot, Tristan; Ibele, Michael E; Butler, Peter J; Sen, Ayusman

    2013-01-30

    Using fluorescence correlation spectroscopy, we show that the diffusive movements of catalase enzyme molecules increase in the presence of the substrate, hydrogen peroxide, in a concentration-dependent manner. Employing a microfluidic device to generate a substrate concentration gradient, we show that both catalase and urease enzyme molecules spread toward areas of higher substrate concentration, a form of chemotaxis at the molecular scale. Using glucose oxidase and glucose to generate a hydrogen peroxide gradient, we induce the migration of catalase toward glucose oxidase, thereby showing that chemically interconnected enzymes can be drawn together.

  13. Where do the immunostimulatory effects of oral proteolytic enzymes ('systemic enzyme therapy') come from? Microbial proteolysis as a possible starting point.

    PubMed

    Biziulevicius, Gediminas A

    2006-01-01

    Enteric-coated proteolytic enzyme preparations like Wobenzym and Phlogenzym are widely used for the so-called 'systemic enzyme therapy' both in humans and animals. Numerous publications reveal that oral proteolytic enzymes are able to stimulate directly the activity of immune competent cells as well as to increase efficiency of some of their products. But origins of the immunostimulatory effects of oral proteolytic enzymes are still unclear. The hypothesis described here suggests that it may be proteolysis of intestinal microorganisms that makes the immune competent cells to work in the immunostimulatory manner. The hypothesis was largely formed by several scientific observations: First, microbial lysis products (lipopolysaccharides, muropeptides and other peptidoglycan fragments, beta-glucans, etc.) are well known for their immunostimulatory action. Second, a normal human being hosts a mass of intestinal microorganisms equivalent to about 1 kg. The biomass (mainly due to naturally occurring autolysis) continuously supplies the host's organism with immunostimulatory microbial cell components. Third, the immunostimulatory effects resulting from the oral application of exogenously acting antimicrobial (lytic) enzyme preparations, such as lysozyme and lysosubtilin, are likely to be a result of the action of microbial lysis products. Fourth, cell walls of most microorganisms contain a considerable amount of proteins/peptides, a possible target for exogenous proteolytic enzymes. In fact, several authors have already shown that a number of proteases possess an ability to lyse the microbial cells in vitro. Fifth, the pretreatment of microbial cells (at least of some species) in vitro with proteolytic enzymes makes them more sensitive to the lytic action of lysozyme and, otherwise, pretreatment with lysozyme makes them more susceptible to proteolytic degradation. Sixth, exogenous proteases, when in the intestines, may participate in final steps of food-protein digestion

  14. Molecular phylogenomic study and the role of exogenous spermidine in the metabolic adjustment of endogenous polyamine in two rice cultivars under salt stress.

    PubMed

    Saha, Jayita; Giri, Kalyan

    2017-04-20

    Compelling evidences anticipated the well acclamation of involvement of exogenous and endogenous polyamines (PAs) in conferring salt tolerance in plants. Intracellular PA's anabolism and catabolism should have contributed to maintain endogenous PAs homeostasis to induce stress signal networks. In this report, the evolutionary study has been conducted to reveal the phylogenetic relationship of genes encoding enzymes of the anabolic and catabolic pathway of PAs among the five plant lineages including green algae, moss, lycophyte, dicot and monocot along with their respective exon-intron structural patterns. Our results indicated that natural selection pressure had considerable influence on the ancestral PA metabolic pathway coding genes of land plants. PA metabolic genes have undergone gradual evolution by duplication and diversification process leading to subsequent structural modification through exon-intron gain and loss events to acquire specific function under environmental stress conditions. We have illuminated on the potential regulation of both the pathways by investigating the real-time expression analyses of PA metabolic pathway related enzyme coding genes at the transcriptional level in root and shoot tissues of two indica rice varieties, namely IR 36 (salt sensitive) and Nonabokra (salt-tolerant) in response to salinity in presence or absence of exogenous spermidine (Spd) treatment. Additionally, we have performed tissue specific quantification of the intracellular PAs and tried to draw probable connection between the PA metabolic pathway activation and endogenous PAs accumulation. Our results successfully enlighten the fact that how exogenous Spd in presence or absence of salt stress adjust the intracellular PA pathways to equilibrate the cellular PAs that would have been attributed to plant salt tolerance.

  15. Commercial production of microbial enzymes

    SciTech Connect

    Munro, I.G.

    1985-01-01

    The advantages and uses of industrially produced microbial enzymes are described. The processes involved in the production of these enzymes, cultivation techniques, enzyme extraction, enzyme purification and immobilization are outlined. Both the history of enzyme technology and its future development are discussed.

  16. Exogenous thyroid hormones regulate the activity of citrate synthase and cytochrome c oxidase in warm- but not cold-acclimated lake whitefish (Coregonus clupeaformis).

    PubMed

    Zak, Megan A; Regish, Amy M; McCormick, Stephen D; Manzon, Richard G

    2017-02-14

    Thermal acclimation is known to elicit metabolic adjustments in ectotherms, but the cellular mechanisms and endocrine control of these shifts have not been fully elucidated. Here we examined the relationship between thermal acclimation, thyroid hormones and oxidative metabolism in juvenile lake whitefish. Impacts of thermal acclimation above (19°C) or below (8°C) the thermal optimum (13°C) and exposure to exogenous thyroid hormone (60µg T4/g body weight) were assessed by quantifying citrate synthase and cytochrome c oxidase activities in liver, red muscle, white muscle and heart. Warm acclimation decreased citrate synthase activity in liver and elevated both citrate synthase and cytochrome c oxidase activities in red muscle. In contrast, induction of hyperthyroidism in warm-acclimated fish stimulated a significant increase in liver citrate synthase and heart cytochrome c oxidase activities, and a decrease in the activity of both enzymes in red muscle. No change in citrate synthase or cytochrome c oxidase activities was observed following cold acclimation in either the presence or absence of exogenous thyroid hormones. Collectively, our results indicate that thyroid hormones influence the activity of oxidative enzymes more strongly in warm-acclimated than in cold-acclimated lake whitefish, and they may play a role in mediating metabolic adjustments observed during thermal acclimation.

  17. RNA as an Enzyme.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cech, Thomas R.

    1986-01-01

    Reviews current findings that explain RNA's function as an enzyme in addition to being an informational molecule. Highlights recent research efforts and notes changes in the information base on RNA activity. Includes models and diagrams of RNA activity. (ML)

  18. Indicators: Sediment Enzymes

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Sediment enzymes are proteins that are produced by microorganisms living in the sediment or soil. They are indicators of key ecosystem processes and can help determine which nutrients are affecting the biological community of a waterbody.

  19. Co‐immobilized Phosphorylated Cofactors and Enzymes as Self‐Sufficient Heterogeneous Biocatalysts for Chemical Processes

    PubMed Central

    Velasco‐Lozano, Susana; Benítez‐Mateos, Ana I.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Enzyme cofactors play a major role in biocatalysis, as many enzymes require them to catalyze highly valuable reactions in organic synthesis. However, the cofactor recycling is often a hurdle to implement enzymes at the industrial level. The fabrication of heterogeneous biocatalysts co‐immobilizing phosphorylated cofactors (PLP, FAD+, and NAD+) and enzymes onto the same solid material is reported to perform chemical reactions without exogeneous addition of cofactors in aqueous media. In these self‐sufficient heterogeneous biocatalysts, the immobilized enzymes are catalytically active and the immobilized cofactors catalytically available and retained into the solid phase for several reaction cycles. Finally, we have applied a NAD+‐dependent heterogeneous biocatalyst to continuous flow asymmetric reduction of prochiral ketones, thus demonstrating the robustness of this approach for large scale biotransformations. PMID:28000978

  20. Co-immobilized Phosphorylated Cofactors and Enzymes as Self-Sufficient Heterogeneous Biocatalysts for Chemical Processes.

    PubMed

    Velasco-Lozano, Susana; Benítez-Mateos, Ana I; López-Gallego, Fernando

    2017-01-16

    Enzyme cofactors play a major role in biocatalysis, as many enzymes require them to catalyze highly valuable reactions in organic synthesis. However, the cofactor recycling is often a hurdle to implement enzymes at the industrial level. The fabrication of heterogeneous biocatalysts co-immobilizing phosphorylated cofactors (PLP, FAD(+) , and NAD(+) ) and enzymes onto the same solid material is reported to perform chemical reactions without exogeneous addition of cofactors in aqueous media. In these self-sufficient heterogeneous biocatalysts, the immobilized enzymes are catalytically active and the immobilized cofactors catalytically available and retained into the solid phase for several reaction cycles. Finally, we have applied a NAD(+) -dependent heterogeneous biocatalyst to continuous flow asymmetric reduction of prochiral ketones, thus demonstrating the robustness of this approach for large scale biotransformations.

  1. Overproduction of ligninolytic enzymes

    SciTech Connect

    Elisashvili, Vladimir; Kachlishvili, Eva; Torok, Tamas

    2014-06-17

    Methods, compositions, and systems for overproducing ligninolytic enzymes from the basidiomycetous fungus are described herein. As described, the method can include incubating a fungal strain of Cerrena unicolor IBB 303 in a fermentation system having growth medium which includes lignocellulosic material and then cultivating the fungal strain in the fermentation system under conditions wherein the fungus expresses the ligninolytic enzymes. In some cases, the lignocellulosic material is mandarin peel, ethanol production residue, walnut pericarp, wheat bran, wheat straw, or banana peel.

  2. Regulation of Chloroplast Photosynthetic Activity by Exogenous Magnesium 1

    PubMed Central

    Huber, Steven C.

    1978-01-01

    Magnesium was most inhibitory to photosynthetic reactions by intact chloroplasts when the magnesium was added in the dark before illumination. Two millimolar MgCl2, added in the dark, inhibited CO2-dependent O2 evolution by Hordeum vulgare L. and Spinacia oleracea L. (C3 plants) chloroplasts 70 to 100% and inhibited (pyruvate + oxaloacetate)-dependent O2 evolution by Digitaria sanguinalis L. (C4 plant) mesophyll chloroplasts from 80 to 100%. When Mg2+ was added in the light, O2 evolution was reduced only slightly. O2 evolution in the presence of phosphoglycerate was less sensitive to Mg2+ inhibition than was CO2-dependent O2 evolution. Magnesium prevented the light activation of several photosynthetic enzymes. Two millimolar Mg2+ blocked the light activation of NADP-malate dehydrogenase in D. sanguinalis mesophyll chloroplasts, and the light activation of phosphoribulokinase, NADP-linked glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, and fructose 1,6-diphosphatase in barley chloroplasts. The results suggest that Mg2+ inhibits chloroplast photosynthesis by preventing the light activation of certain enzymes. PMID:16660509

  3. [Biological activities of exogenous polysaccharides via controlling endogenous proteoglycan metabolism in vascular endothelial cells].

    PubMed

    Sato, Tomoko; Yamamoto, Chika; Fujiwara, Yasuyuki; Kaji, Toshiyuki

    2008-05-01

    Proteoglycan contains glycosmainoglycans, which are endogenous sulfated polysaccharides, in the molecule. The metabolism of proteoglycans regulates cell behavior and cellular events. It is possible that exogenous polysaccharide-related molecules exhibit their biological activities by two mechanisms. One is the interaction with cells and the other is the interaction with growth factors/cytokines that regulate proteoglycans. In this review, we describe sodium spirulan, a sulfated polysaccharide obtained from a hot-water extract of the blue-green alga Spirulina platensis, as an exogenous polysaccharide that stimulates the release of proteoglycans from vascular endothelial cells. Factors that regulate endothelial proteoglycan metabolism are also being described as possible target molecules of exogenous polysaccharides. Further research is required to obtain exogenous polysaccharide-related molecules that exhibit useful biological activities through controlling endothelial proteoglycan metabolism for protection against vascular lesions such as atheroslcerosis.

  4. Clinical breath analysis: Discriminating between human endogenous compounds and exogenous (environmental) chemical confounders

    EPA Science Inventory

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in exhaled breath originate from current or previous environmental exposures (exogenous compounds) and internal metabolic anabolic and catabolic) production (endogenous compounds). The origins of certain VOCs in breath presumed to be endogenous ...

  5. Exogenously produced CO2 doubles the CO2 efflux from three north temperate lakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilkinson, Grace M.; Buelo, Cal D.; Cole, Jonathan J.; Pace, Michael L.

    2016-03-01

    It is well established that lakes are typically sources of CO2 to the atmosphere. However, it remains unclear what portion of CO2 efflux is from endogenously processed organic carbon or from exogenously produced CO2 transported into lakes. We estimated high-frequency CO2 and O2 efflux from three north temperate lakes in summer to determine the proportion of the total CO2 efflux that was exogenously produced. Two of the lakes were amended with nutrients to experimentally enhance endogenous CO2 uptake. In the unfertilized lake, 50% of CO2 efflux was from exogenous sources and hydrology had a large influence on efflux. In the fertilized lakes, endogenous CO2 efflux was negative (into the lake) yet exogenous CO2 made the lakes net sources of CO2 to the atmosphere. Shifts in hydrologic regimes and nutrient loading have the potential to change whether small lakes act primarily as reactors or vents in the watershed.

  6. Quantifying the time scales over which exogenous and endogenous conditions affect soil respiration

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Understanding how exogenous and endogenous factors and aboveground-belowground linkages modulate carbon dynamics is difficult because of influences of antecedent conditions. For example, there are variable lags between aboveground assimilation and belowground efflux, and the duration of antecedent p...

  7. Pinocytosis and intracellular degradation of exogenous protein: modulation by amino acids

    PubMed Central

    1983-01-01

    Intracellular degradation of exogenous (serum) proteins provides a source of amino acids for cellular protein synthesis. Pinocytosis serves as the mechanism for delivering exogenous protein to the lysosomes, the major site of intracellular degradation of exogenous protein. To determine whether the availability of extracellular free amino acids altered pinocytic function, we incubated monolayers of pulmonary alveolar macrophages with the fluid-phase marker, [14C]sucrose, and we dissected the pinocytic process by kinetic analysis. Additionally, intracellular degradation of endogenous and exogenous protein was monitored by measuring phenylalanine released from the cell monolayers in the presence of cycloheximide. Results revealed that in response to a subphysiological level of essential amino acids or to amino acid deprivation, (a) the rate of fluid-phase pinocytosis increased in such a manner as to preferentially increase both delivery to and size of an intracellular compartment believed to be the lysosomes, (b) the degradation of exogenously supplied albumin increased, and (c) the fraction of phenylalanine derived from degradation of exogenous albumin and reutilized for de novo protein synthesis increased. Thus, modulation of the pinosome-lysosome pathway may represent a homeostatic mechanism sensitive to the availability of extracellular free amino acids. PMID:6853596

  8. [Adsorption behavior of exogenous thorium on soil contaminated by rare earth industries].

    PubMed

    Guo, Peng-ran; Jia, Xiao-yu; Duan, Tai-cheng; Qiu, Rong-liang; Chen, Hang-ting

    2009-10-15

    The adsorption behavior of exogenous thorium on soil was studied to evaluate the contaminated risk on soil. The adsorption capacity, equilibrium time, distribution coefficient and desorption ability were investigated by the experiments of static adsorption. The strong adsorption ability of exogenous thorium on soil samples was observed by high adsorption ratio (> 92%) and low desorption ratio (< 5%) in equilibrium, and the biggest distribution coefficient was over 10(4). The adsorption capacity and equilibrium time were related to soil properties. According to the results of adsorption, Freundlich equation (r > or = 0.9167) and Elovich equation (R2 > or = 0.8980) were primely fit for describing the thermodynamics and kinetics of the adsorption of exogenous thorium on soil samples, respectively, which indicated that the adsorption was belonged to the nonlinear adsorption, and was affected by the diffusion of thorium on soil surface and in mineral interbed. Sequential extraction procedure was employed to evaluate the bound fractions of exogenous thorium adsorbed on soil samples. Based on the extracted results of thorium fractions, exogenous thorium was presented in the labile nonresidual fractions (over 58%) at the low initial concentration (10(-7) - 10(-6) mol x L(-1)), and nonresidual fractions enhanced with the increase of the initial amount, meanwhile more exogenous throium was transferred to the stable residual fractions.

  9. Effect of exogenous selenium on nicotine induced hyperlipidemia in rats.

    PubMed

    Sreekala, S; Indira, M

    2008-01-01

    The effect of two different doses (1 microg Se/Kg and 50 microg Se/Kg Body wt) of selenium on nicotine induced hyperlipidemia was investigated in rats. Results revealed that nicotine intake caused an increase in concentration of cholesterol, triglycerides, free fatty acids, phospholipids and low density lipoprotein compared to control group. Coadministration of selenium along with nicotine reduced the levels of lipids compared to nicotine group. This reduction was due to reduction in the biosynthesis of lipids as evidenced by the reduced activity of HMGCoA reductase and lipogenic enzymes. Nicotine intake also reduced the absorption of selenium in the intestine. Histopathological studies revealed that selenium at a dose of 1 microg was more effective in reducing lipid levels and higher dose of selenium was toxic.

  10. Effects of exogenous glucose on carotenoid accumulation in tomato leaves.

    PubMed

    Mortain-Bertrand, Anne; Stammitti, Linda; Telef, Nadège; Colardelle, Patrice; Brouquisse, Renaud; Rolin, Dominique; Gallusci, Philippe

    2008-10-01

    To investigate the effect of carbohydrate on carotenoid accumulation in leaves, excised plants of tomato (Lycopersicum esculentum var. cerasiformae, wva 106) were supplied with glucose through the transpiration stream for 48 h. We report here that sugar accumulation in leaves led to a decrease of carotenoid content, which was related to the reduction of Chl. The decrease in carotenoid amount correlated with a sugar-induced repression of genes encoding enzymes of the carotenoid and of the Rohmer pathways. The lower 1-deoxy-D-xylulose-5-phosphate synthase transcript level probably leads to a decreased metabolic flux through the methylerythritol pathway and subsequently to a lower amount of substrate available for plastidic isoprenoid synthesis. Differences between responses of young (sink) and mature (source) leaves to carbohydrate accumulation are discussed.

  11. Lignin-degrading enzymes.

    PubMed

    Pollegioni, Loredano; Tonin, Fabio; Rosini, Elena

    2015-04-01

    A main goal of green biotechnology is to reduce our dependence on fossil reserves and to increase the use of renewable materials. For this, lignocellulose, which is composed of cellulose, hemicellulose and lignin, represents the most promising feedstock. The latter is a complex aromatic heteropolymer formed by radical polymerization of guaiacyl, syringyl, and p-hydroxyphenyl units linked by β-aryl ether linkages, biphenyl bonds and heterocyclic linkages. Accordingly, lignin appears to be a potentially valuable renewable aromatic chemical, thus representing a main pillar in future biorefinery. The resistance of lignin to breakdown is the main bottleneck in this process, although a variety of white-rot fungi, as well as bacteria, have been reported to degrade lignin by employing different enzymes and catabolic pathways. Here, recent investigations have expanded the range of natural biocatalysts involved in lignin degradation/modification and significant progress related to enzyme engineering and recombinant expression has been made. The present review is focused primarily on recent trends in ligninolytic green biotechnology to suggest the potential (industrial) application of ligninolytic enzymes. Future perspectives could include synergy between natural enzymes from different sources (as well as those obtained by protein engineering) and other pretreatment methods that may be required for optimal results in enzyme-based, environmentally friendly, technologies.

  12. Aminoglycoside Modifying Enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Ramirez, Maria S.; Tolmasky, Marcelo E.

    2010-01-01

    Aminoglycosides have been an essential component of the armamentarium in the treatment of life-threatening infections. Unfortunately, their efficacy has been reduced by the surge and dissemination of resistance. In some cases the levels of resistance reached the point that rendered them virtually useless. Among many known mechanisms of resistance to aminoglycosides, enzymatic modification is the most prevalent in the clinical setting. Aminoglycoside modifying enzymes catalyze the modification at different −OH or −NH2 groups of the 2-deoxystreptamine nucleus or the sugar moieties and can be nucleotidyltranferases, phosphotransferases, or acetyltransferases. The number of aminoglycoside modifying enzymes identified to date as well as the genetic environments where the coding genes are located is impressive and there is virtually no bacteria that is unable to support enzymatic resistance to aminoglycosides. Aside from the development of new aminoglycosides refractory to as many as possible modifying enzymes there are currently two main strategies being pursued to overcome the action of aminoglycoside modifying enzymes. Their successful development would extend the useful life of existing antibiotics that have proven effective in the treatment of infections. These strategies consist of the development of inhibitors of the enzymatic action or of the expression of the modifying enzymes. PMID:20833577

  13. Random-walk enzymes.

    PubMed

    Mak, Chi H; Pham, Phuong; Afif, Samir A; Goodman, Myron F

    2015-09-01

    Enzymes that rely on random walk to search for substrate targets in a heterogeneously dispersed medium can leave behind complex spatial profiles of their catalyzed conversions. The catalytic signatures of these random-walk enzymes are the result of two coupled stochastic processes: scanning and catalysis. Here we develop analytical models to understand the conversion profiles produced by these enzymes, comparing an intrusive model, in which scanning and catalysis are tightly coupled, against a loosely coupled passive model. Diagrammatic theory and path-integral solutions of these models revealed clearly distinct predictions. Comparison to experimental data from catalyzed deaminations deposited on single-stranded DNA by the enzyme activation-induced deoxycytidine deaminase (AID) demonstrates that catalysis and diffusion are strongly intertwined, where the chemical conversions give rise to new stochastic trajectories that were absent if the substrate DNA was homogeneous. The C→U deamination profiles in both analytical predictions and experiments exhibit a strong contextual dependence, where the conversion rate of each target site is strongly contingent on the identities of other surrounding targets, with the intrusive model showing an excellent fit to the data. These methods can be applied to deduce sequence-dependent catalytic signatures of other DNA modification enzymes, with potential applications to cancer, gene regulation, and epigenetics.

  14. Random-walk enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Mak, Chi H.; Pham, Phuong; Afif, Samir A.; Goodman, Myron F.

    2015-01-01

    Enzymes that rely on random walk to search for substrate targets in a heterogeneously dispersed medium can leave behind complex spatial profiles of their catalyzed conversions. The catalytic signatures of these random-walk enzymes are the result of two coupled stochastic processes: scanning and catalysis. Here we develop analytical models to understand the conversion profiles produced by these enzymes, comparing an intrusive model, in which scanning and catalysis are tightly coupled, against a loosely coupled passive model. Diagrammatic theory and path-integral solutions of these models revealed clearly distinct predictions. Comparison to experimental data from catalyzed deaminations deposited on single-stranded DNA by the enzyme activation-induced deoxycytidine deaminase (AID) demonstrates that catalysis and diffusion are strongly intertwined, where the chemical conversions give rise to new stochastic trajectories that were absent if the substrate DNA was homogeneous. The C → U deamination profiles in both analytical predictions and experiments exhibit a strong contextual dependence, where the conversion rate of each target site is strongly contingent on the identities of other surrounding targets, with the intrusive model showing an excellent fit to the data. These methods can be applied to deduce sequence-dependent catalytic signatures of other DNA modification enzymes, with potential applications to cancer, gene regulation, and epigenetics. PMID:26465508

  15. Random-walk enzymes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mak, Chi H.; Pham, Phuong; Afif, Samir A.; Goodman, Myron F.

    2015-09-01

    Enzymes that rely on random walk to search for substrate targets in a heterogeneously dispersed medium can leave behind complex spatial profiles of their catalyzed conversions. The catalytic signatures of these random-walk enzymes are the result of two coupled stochastic processes: scanning and catalysis. Here we develop analytical models to understand the conversion profiles produced by these enzymes, comparing an intrusive model, in which scanning and catalysis are tightly coupled, against a loosely coupled passive model. Diagrammatic theory and path-integral solutions of these models revealed clearly distinct predictions. Comparison to experimental data from catalyzed deaminations deposited on single-stranded DNA by the enzyme activation-induced deoxycytidine deaminase (AID) demonstrates that catalysis and diffusion are strongly intertwined, where the chemical conversions give rise to new stochastic trajectories that were absent if the substrate DNA was homogeneous. The C →U deamination profiles in both analytical predictions and experiments exhibit a strong contextual dependence, where the conversion rate of each target site is strongly contingent on the identities of other surrounding targets, with the intrusive model showing an excellent fit to the data. These methods can be applied to deduce sequence-dependent catalytic signatures of other DNA modification enzymes, with potential applications to cancer, gene regulation, and epigenetics.

  16. Entropy and Enzyme Catalysis.

    PubMed

    Åqvist, Johan; Kazemi, Masoud; Isaksen, Geir Villy; Brandsdal, Bjørn Olav

    2017-02-21

    The role played by entropy for the enormous rate enhancement achieved by enzymes has been debated for many decades. There are, for example, several confirmed cases where the activation free energy is reduced by around 10 kcal/mol due to entropic effects, corresponding to a rate enhancement of ∼10(7) compared to the uncatalyzed reaction. However, despite substantial efforts from both the experimental and theoretical side, no real consensus has been reached regarding the origin of such large entropic contributions to enzyme catalysis. Another remarkable instance of entropic effects is found in enzymes that are adapted by evolution to work at low temperatures, near the freezing point of water. These cold-adapted enzymes invariably show a more negative entropy and a lower enthalpy of activation than their mesophilic orthologs, which counteracts the exponential damping of reaction rates at lower temperature. The structural origin of this universal phenomenon has, however, remained elusive. The basic problem with connecting macroscopic thermodynamic quantities, such as activation entropy and enthalpy derived from Arrhenius plots, to the 3D protein structure is that the underlying detailed (microscopic) energetics is essentially inaccessible to experiment. Moreover, attempts to calculate entropy contributions by computer simulations have mostly focused only on substrate entropies, which do not provide the full picture. We have recently devised a new approach for accessing thermodynamic activation parameters of both enzyme and solution reactions from computer simulations, which turns out to be very successful. This method is analogous to the experimental Arrhenius plots and directly evaluates the temperature dependence of calculated reaction free energy profiles. Hence, by extensive molecular dynamics simulations and calculations of up to thousands of independent free energy profiles, we are able to extract activation parameters with sufficient precision for making

  17. Evolution of enzyme superfamilies.

    PubMed

    Glasner, Margaret E; Gerlt, John A; Babbitt, Patricia C

    2006-10-01

    Enzyme evolution is often constrained by aspects of catalysis. Sets of homologous proteins that catalyze different overall reactions but share an aspect of catalysis, such as a common partial reaction, are called mechanistically diverse superfamilies. The common mechanistic steps and structural characteristics of several of these superfamilies, including the enolase, Nudix, amidohydrolase, and haloacid dehalogenase superfamilies have been characterized. In addition, studies of mechanistically diverse superfamilies are helping to elucidate mechanisms of functional diversification, such as catalytic promiscuity. Understanding how enzyme superfamilies evolve is vital for accurate genome annotation, predicting protein functions, and protein engineering.

  18. [Micro fabricated enzyme battery].

    PubMed

    Sasaki, S; Karube, I

    1996-10-01

    Although various work has been done in the field of implantable micro actuators such as artificial organs and micro surgery robots, a suitable electric power supply for these is yet to be developed. For this purpose a micro fabricated enzyme fuel cell was developed which uses glucose contained in the human body as a fuel. In order to obtain enough voltage each cell was formed as part of a serial array on a silicon wafer. Glucose solution enters the cells by a capillary effect. In this article fuel cells already developed using biocatalysts are described, and the future possibility of a micro fabricated enzyme battery is discussed.

  19. Enzyme kinetics in drug metabolism: fundamentals and applications.

    PubMed

    Nagar, Swati; Argikar, Upendra A; Tweedie, Donald J

    2014-01-01

    Enzymes are protein catalysts that lower the energy barrier for a reaction and speed the rate of a chemical change. The kinetics of reactions catalyzed by enzymes, as well as several mechanisms underlying the kinetics, have been comprehensively studied and written in textbooks (1, 2). The importance of quantitative evaluation of enzymatic processes has been recognized in many fields of study, including biochemistry, molecular biology, and pharmaceutical sciences to name a few. In pharmaceutical sciences, the applications of enzyme kinetics range from hit finding efforts for new chemical entities on a pharmacological target to concentration effect relationships to large-scale biosynthesis. The study of the science of drug metabolism has two principal concepts-rate and extent. While understanding disposition pathways and identification of metabolites provides an insight into the extent of metabolism, kinetics of depletion of substrates (endogenous or exogenous) and formation of metabolites deals with the rate of metabolism. The current textbook specifically focuses on kinetics of drug-metabolizing enzymes, detailing specific enzyme classes, and discusses kinetics as they apply to drug transporters. This textbook also outlines additional factors that contribute to the kinetics of reactions catalyzed by these proteins such as variability in isoforms (pharmacogenomics) and experimental factors including key concepts such as alterations of substrate concentrations due to binding. Applications of these approaches in predicting kinetic parameters and alternative approaches for enzymes (systems biology) and transporters are also discussed. The final section focuses on real-life examples (case studies) to try and exemplify the applications of enzyme kinetic principles. This chapter provides a brief overview outlining some key concepts within each of the sections and the chapters within this textbook.

  20. Elongator Plays a Positive Role in Exogenous NAD-Induced Defense Responses in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    An, Chuanfu; Ding, Yezhang; Zhang, Xudong; Wang, Chenggang; Mou, Zhonglin

    2016-05-01

    Extracellular NAD is emerging as an important signal molecule in animal cells, but its role in plants has not been well-established. Although it has been shown that exogenous NAD(+) activates defense responses in Arabidopsis, components in the exogenous NAD(+)-activated defense pathway remain to be fully discovered. In a genetic screen for mutants insensitive to exogenous NAD(+) (ien), we isolated a mutant named ien2. Map-based cloning revealed that IEN2 encodes ELONGATA3 (ELO3)/AtELP3, a subunit of the Arabidopsis Elongator complex, which functions in multiple biological processes, including histone modification, DNA (de)methylation, and transfer RNA modification. Mutations in the ELO3/AtELP3 gene compromise exogenous NAD(+)-induced expression of pathogenesis-related (PR) genes and resistance to the bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv. maculicola ES4326, and transgenic expression of the coding region of ELO3/AtELP3 in elo3/Atelp3 restores NAD(+) responsiveness to the mutant plants, demonstrating that ELO3/AtELP3 is required for exogenous NAD(+)-induced defense responses. Furthermore, mutations in genes encoding the other five Arabidopsis Elongator subunits (ELO2/AtELP1, AtELP2, ELO1/AtELP4, AtELP5, and AtELP6) also compromise exogenous NAD(+)-induced PR gene expression and resistance to P. syringae pv. maculicola ES4326. These results indicate that the Elongator complex functions as a whole in exogenous NAD(+)-activated defense signaling in Arabidopsis.

  1. Quorum quenching enzymes.

    PubMed

    Fetzner, Susanne

    2015-05-10

    Bacteria use cell-to-cell communication systems based on chemical signal molecules to coordinate their behavior within the population. These quorum sensing systems are potential targets for antivirulence therapies, because many bacterial pathogens control the expression of virulence factors via quorum sensing networks. Since biofilm maturation is also usually influenced by quorum sensing, quenching these systems may contribute to combat biofouling. One possibility to interfere with quorum sensing is signal inactivation by enzymatic degradation or modification. Such quorum quenching enzymes are wide-spread in the bacterial world and have also been found in eukaryotes. Lactonases and acylases that hydrolyze N-acyl homoserine lactone (AHL) signaling molecules have been investigated most intensively, however, different oxidoreductases active toward AHLs or 2-alkyl-4(1H)-quinolone signals as well as other signal-converting enzymes have been described. Several approaches have been assessed which aim at alleviating virulence, or biofilm formation, by reducing the signal concentration in the bacterial environment. These involve the application or stimulation of signal-degrading bacteria as biocontrol agents in the protection of crop plants against soft-rot disease, the use of signal-degrading bacteria as probiotics in aquaculture, and the immobilization or entrapment of quorum quenching enzymes or bacteria to control biofouling in membrane bioreactors. While most approaches to use quorum quenching as antivirulence strategy are still in the research phase, the growing number of organisms and enzymes known to interfere with quorum sensing opens up new perspectives for the development of innovative antibacterial strategies.

  2. Photoperiodism and Enzyme Activity

    PubMed Central

    Queiroz, Orlando; Morel, Claudine

    1974-01-01

    Metabolic readjustments after a change from long days to short days appear, in Kalanchoe blossfeldiana, to be achieved through the operation of two main mechanisms: variation in enzyme capacity, and circadian rhythmicity. After a lag time, capacity in phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase and capacity in aspartate aminotransferase increase exponentially and appear to be allometrically linked during 50 to 60 short days; then a sudden fall takes place in the activity of the former. Malic enzyme and alanine aminotransferase behave differently. Thus, the operation of the two sections of the pathway (before and after the malate step) give rise to a continuously changing functional compartmentation in the pathway. Circadian rhythmicity, on the other hand, produces time compartmentation through phase shifts and variation in amplitude, independently for each enzyme. These characteristics suggest that the operation of a so-called biological clock would be involved. We propose the hypothesis that feedback regulation would be more accurate and efficient when applied to an already oscillating, clock-controlled enzyme system. PMID:16658749

  3. Amperometric Enzyme Electrodes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-12-01

    form of carbon (glascy carbon, graphite, reticulated vitreous carbon, carbon paste, fiber or foil). Carbon is favored for enzyme immoblization...interference from spurious electroactive species in blood, t proprietary multilayer membranie that includes a cellulose acetate memirane and a Nucleopore

  4. Synthetic Helizyme Enzymes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-08-18

    Enzymes START DATE: 1 August 1986; END DATE: 31 July 1989 RESEARCH OBSCTE: The goal of this project as to design, synthesize and test totally new...the peptide from the resin by HF. Coupling reactions were monitored at nearly all steps using qualitative and quantitative ninhydrin reactions

  5. Toying with Enzyme Catalysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richards, Debbie

    1998-01-01

    Describes a set of manipulatives that are used to establish a secure understanding of the concepts related to the environmental factors that affect the activities of enzymes. Includes a description of the model components and procedures for construction of the model. (DDR)

  6. Computational enzyme design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolon, Daniel N.

    2002-08-01

    The long-term objective of computational enzyme design is the ability to generate efficient protein catalysts for any chemical reaction. This thesis develops and experimentally validates a general computational approach for the design of enzymes with novel function. In order to include catalytic mechanism in protein design, a high-energy state (HES) rotamer (side chain representation) was constructed. In this rotamer, substrate atoms are in a HES. In addition, at least one amino acid side chain is positioned to interact favorably with substrate atoms in their HES and facilitate the reaction. Including an amino acid side chain in the HES rotamer automatically positions substrate relative to a protein scaffold and allows protein design algorithms to search for sequences capable of interacting favorably with the substrate. Because chemical similarity exists between the transition state and the high-energy state, optimizing the protein sequence to interact favorably with the HES rotamer should lead to transition state stabilization. In addition, the HES rotamer model focuses the subsequent computational active site design on a relevant phase space where an amino acid is capable of interacting in a catalytically active geometry with substrate. Using a HES rotamer model of the histidine mediated nucleophilic hydrolysis of p-nitrophenyl acetate, the catalytically inert 108 residue E. coli thioredoxin as a scaffold, and the ORBIT protein design software to compute sequences, an active site scan identified two promising active site designs. Experimentally, both candidate ?protozymes? demonstrated catalytic activity significantly above background. In addition, the rate enhancement of one of these ?protozymes? was the same order of magnitude as the first catalytic antibodies. Because polar groups are frequently buried at enzyme-substrate interfaces, improved modeling of buried polar interactions may benefit enzyme design. By studying native protein structures, rules have been

  7. Peroxisomal bifunctional enzyme deficiency.

    PubMed Central

    Watkins, P A; Chen, W W; Harris, C J; Hoefler, G; Hoefler, S; Blake, D C; Balfe, A; Kelley, R I; Moser, A B; Beard, M E

    1989-01-01

    Peroxisomal function was evaluated in a male infant with clinical features of neonatal adrenoleukodystrophy. Very long chain fatty acid levels were elevated in both plasma and fibroblasts, and beta-oxidation of very long chain fatty acids in cultured fibroblasts was significantly impaired. Although the level of the bile acid intermediate trihydroxycoprostanoic acid was slightly elevated in plasma, phytanic acid and L-pipecolic acid levels were normal, as was plasmalogen synthesis in cultured fibroblasts. The latter three parameters distinguish this case from classical neonatal adrenoleukodystrophy. In addition, electron microscopy and catalase subcellular distribution studies revealed that, in contrast to neonatal adrenoleukodystrophy, peroxisomes were present in the patient's tissues. Immunoblot studies of peroxisomal beta-oxidation enzymes revealed that the bifunctional enzyme (enoyl-CoA hydratase/3-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase) was deficient in postmortem liver samples, whereas acyl-CoA oxidase and the mature form of beta-ketothiolase were present. Density gradient centrifugation of fibroblast homogenates confirmed that intact peroxisomes were present. Immunoblots of fibroblasts peroxisomal fractions showed that they contained acyl-CoA oxidase and beta-ketothiolase, but bifunctional enzyme was not detected. Northern analysis, however, revealed that mRNA coding for the bifunctional enzyme was present in the patient's fibroblasts. These results indicate that the primary biochemical defect in this patient is a deficiency of peroxisomal bifunctional enzyme. It is of interest that the phenotype of this patient resembled neonatal adrenoleukodystrophy and would not have been distinguished from this disorder by clinical study alone. Images PMID:2921319

  8. The Enzyme Function Initiative†

    PubMed Central

    Gerlt, John A.; Allen, Karen N.; Almo, Steven C.; Armstrong, Richard N.; Babbitt, Patricia C.; Cronan, John E.; Dunaway-Mariano, Debra; Imker, Heidi J.; Jacobson, Matthew P.; Minor, Wladek; Poulter, C. Dale; Raushel, Frank M.; Sali, Andrej; Shoichet, Brian K.; Sweedler, Jonathan V.

    2011-01-01

    The Enzyme Function Initiative (EFI) was recently established to address the challenge of assigning reliable functions to enzymes discovered in bacterial genome projects; in this Current Topic we review the structure and operations of the EFI. The EFI includes the Superfamily/Genome, Protein, Structure, Computation, and Data/Dissemination Cores that provide the infrastructure for reliably predicting the in vitro functions of unknown enzymes. The initial targets for functional assignment are selected from five functionally diverse superfamilies (amidohydrolase, enolase, glutathione transferase, haloalkanoic acid dehalogenase, and isoprenoid synthase), with five superfamily-specific Bridging Projects experimentally testing the predicted in vitro enzymatic activities. The EFI also includes the Microbiology Core that evaluates the in vivo context of in vitro enzymatic functions and confirms the functional predictions of the EFI. The deliverables of the EFI to the scientific community include: 1) development of a large-scale, multidisciplinary sequence/structure-based strategy for functional assignment of unknown enzymes discovered in genome projects (target selection, protein production, structure determination, computation, experimental enzymology, microbiology, and structure-based annotation); 2) dissemination of the strategy to the community via publications, collaborations, workshops, and symposia; 3) computational and bioinformatic tools for using the strategy; 4) provision of experimental protocols and/or reagents for enzyme production and characterization; and 5) dissemination of data via the EFI’s website, enzymefunction.org. The realization of multidisciplinary strategies for functional assignment will begin to define the full metabolic diversity that exists in nature and will impact basic biochemical and evolutionary understanding, as well as a wide range of applications of central importance to industrial, medicinal and pharmaceutical efforts. PMID

  9. Monitoring enzyme kinetic behavior of enzyme-quantum dot bioconjugates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Claussen, Jonathan C.; Walper, Scott A.; Susumu, Kimihiro; Ancona, Mario G.; Medintz, Igor L.

    2014-05-01

    Luminescent semiconductor nanocrystals or quantum dots (QDs) hold tremendous promise for in vivo biosensing, cellular imaging, theranostics, and smart molecular sensing probes due to their small size and favorable photonic properties such as resistance to photobleaching, size-tunable PL, and large effective Stokes shifts. Herein, we demonstrate how QD-based bioconjugates can be used to enhance enzyme kinetics. Enzyme-substrate kinetics are analyzed for solutions containing both alkaline phosphatase enzymes and QDs with enzyme-to- QD molar ratios of 2, 12, and 24 as well as for a solution containing the same concentration of enzymes but without QDs. The enzyme kinetic paramters Vmax, KM, and Kcat/KM are extracted from the enzyme progress curves via the Lineweaver-Burk plot. Results demonstrate an approximate increase in enzyme efficiency of 5 - 8% for enzymes immobilized on the QD versus free in solution without QD immobilization.

  10. The Moderately Efficient Enzyme: Futile Encounters and Enzyme Floppiness.

    PubMed

    Bar-Even, Arren; Milo, Ron; Noor, Elad; Tawfik, Dan S

    2015-08-18

    The pioneering model of Henri, Michaelis, and Menten was based on the fast equilibrium assumption: the substrate binds its enzyme reversibly, and substrate dissociation is much faster than product formation. Here, we examine this assumption from a somewhat different point of view, asking what fraction of enzyme-substrate complexes are futile, i.e., result in dissociation rather than product formation. In Knowles' notion of a "perfect" enzyme, all encounters of the enzyme with its substrate result in conversion to product. Thus, the perfect enzyme's catalytic efficiency, kcat/KM, is constrained by only the diffusion on-rate, and the fraction of futile encounters (defined as φ) approaches zero. The available data on >1000 different enzymes suggest that for ≥90% of enzymes φ > 0.99 and for the "average enzyme" φ ≥ 0.9999; namely, <1 of 10(4) encounters is productive. Thus, the "fast equilibrium" assumption holds for the vast majority of enzymes. We discuss possible molecular origins for the dominance of futile encounters, including the coexistence of multiple sub-states of an enzyme's active site (enzyme floppiness) and/or its substrate. Floppiness relates to the inherent flexibility of proteins, but also to conflicting demands, or trade-offs, between rate acceleration (the rate-determining chemical step) and catalytic turnover, or between turnover rate and accuracy. The study of futile encounters and active-site floppiness may contribute to a better understanding of enzyme catalysis, enzyme evolution, and improved enzyme design.

  11. Efficient production and evaluation of lignocellulolytic enzymes using a constitutive protein expression system in Penicillium oxalicum.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yibo; Xue, Haizhao; Liu, Guodong; Song, Xin; Qu, Yinbo

    2015-06-01

    Native lignocellulolytic enzyme systems secreted by filamentous fungi can be further optimized by protein engineering or supplementation of exogenous enzyme components. We developed a protein production and evaluation system in cellulase-producing fungus Penicillium oxalicum. First, by deleting the major amylase gene amy15A, a strain Δ15A producing few extracellular proteins on starch was constructed. Then, three lignocellulolytic enzymes (BGL4, Xyn10B, and Cel12A) with originally low expression levels were successfully expressed with selected constitutive promoters in strain Δ15A. BGL4 and Cel12A overexpression resulted in increased specific filter paper activity (FPA), while the overexpression of Xyn10B improved volumetric FPA but not specific FPA. By switching the culture medium, this platform is convenient to produce originally low-expressed lignocellulolytic enzymes in relatively high purities on starch and to evaluate the effect of their supplementation on the performance of a complex cellulase system on cellulose.

  12. [Effects of exogenous dimethylarsinic acid on Brassica campestris growth and soil arsenic bioavailability].

    PubMed

    Bai, Ling-Yu; Zeng, Xi-Bai; Hu, Liu-Jie; Li, Lian-Fang; He, Qiu-Hong

    2011-02-01

    A pot experiment was conducted to study the effects of exogenous dimethylarsinic acid (DMA) on the growth of Brassica campestris and the bioavailability of soil arsenic (As). With the increasing concentration of applied DMA, the emergence rate and biomass of B. campestris increased at low concentration DMA, but decreased at high concentration DMA. When the DMA concentration reached 90 mg x kg(-1), the emergence rate and biomass of B. campestris in the second cropping decreased by 9.5% and 57.0%, respectively, compared with those in the control, indicating that exogenous DMA had longer-term effects on the growth of B. campestris. The soil available As and the As uptake by B. campestris all increased with increasing concentration of exogenous DMA, and there existed significant correlations among them. After applied into soil, the exogenous DMA demethylated, with As(V) as the main product and lesser amount of As (III), and the concentrations of soil As(V) and As(III) increased with increasing application rate of exogenous DMA.

  13. An Exogenous Surfactant-Producing Bacillus subtilis Facilitates Indigenous Microbial Enhanced Oil Recovery

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Peike; Li, Guoqiang; Li, Yanshu; Li, Yan; Tian, Huimei; Wang, Yansen; Zhou, Jiefang; Ma, Ting

    2016-01-01

    This study used an exogenous lipopeptide-producing Bacillus subtilis to strengthen the indigenous microbial enhanced oil recovery (IMEOR) process in a water-flooded reservoir in the laboratory. The microbial processes and driving mechanisms were investigated in terms of the changes in oil properties and the interplay between the exogenous B. subtilis and indigenous microbial populations. The exogenous B. subtilis is a lipopeptide producer, with a short growth cycle and no oil-degrading ability. The B. subtilis facilitates the IMEOR process through improving oil emulsification and accelerating microbial growth with oil as the carbon source. Microbial community studies using quantitative PCR and high-throughput sequencing revealed that the exogenous B. subtilis could live together with reservoir microbial populations, and did not exert an observable inhibitory effect on the indigenous microbial populations during nutrient stimulation. Core-flooding tests showed that the combined exogenous and indigenous microbial flooding increased oil displacement efficiency by 16.71%, compared with 7.59% in the control where only nutrients were added, demonstrating the application potential in enhanced oil recovery in water-flooded reservoirs, in particular, for reservoirs where IMEOR treatment cannot effectively improve oil recovery. PMID:26925051

  14. An Exogenous Surfactant-Producing Bacillus subtilis Facilitates Indigenous Microbial Enhanced Oil Recovery.

    PubMed

    Gao, Peike; Li, Guoqiang; Li, Yanshu; Li, Yan; Tian, Huimei; Wang, Yansen; Zhou, Jiefang; Ma, Ting

    2016-01-01

    This study used an exogenous lipopeptide-producing Bacillus subtilis to strengthen the indigenous microbial enhanced oil recovery (IMEOR) process in a water-flooded reservoir in the laboratory. The microbial processes and driving mechanisms were investigated in terms of the changes in oil properties and the interplay between the exogenous B. subtilis and indigenous microbial populations. The exogenous B. subtilis is a lipopeptide producer, with a short growth cycle and no oil-degrading ability. The B. subtilis facilitates the IMEOR process through improving oil emulsification and accelerating microbial growth with oil as the carbon source. Microbial community studies using quantitative PCR and high-throughput sequencing revealed that the exogenous B. subtilis could live together with reservoir microbial populations, and did not exert an observable inhibitory effect on the indigenous microbial populations during nutrient stimulation. Core-flooding tests showed that the combined exogenous and indigenous microbial flooding increased oil displacement efficiency by 16.71%, compared with 7.59% in the control where only nutrients were added, demonstrating the application potential in enhanced oil recovery in water-flooded reservoirs, in particular, for reservoirs where IMEOR treatment cannot effectively improve oil recovery.

  15. Lipid phosphate phosphohydrolase-1 degrades exogenous glycerolipid and sphingolipid phosphate esters.

    PubMed Central

    Jasinska, R; Zhang, Q X; Pilquil, C; Singh, I; Xu, J; Dewald, J; Dillon, D A; Berthiaume, L G; Carman, G M; Waggoner, D W; Brindley, D N

    1999-01-01

    Lipid phosphate phosphohydrolase (LPP)-1 cDNA was cloned from a rat liver cDNA library. It codes for a 32-kDa protein that shares 87 and 82% amino acid sequence identities with putative products of murine and human LPP-1 cDNAs, respectively. Membrane fractions of rat2 fibroblasts that stably expressed mouse or rat LPP-1 exhibited 3.1-3. 6-fold higher specific activities for phosphatidate dephosphorylation compared with vector controls. Increases in the dephosphorylation of lysophosphatidate, ceramide 1-phosphate, sphingosine 1-phosphate and diacylglycerol pyrophosphate were similar to those for phosphatidate. Rat2 fibroblasts expressing mouse LPP-1 cDNA showed 1.6-2.3-fold increases in the hydrolysis of exogenous lysophosphatidate, phosphatidate and ceramide 1-phosphate compared with vector control cells. Recombinant LPP-1 was located partially in plasma membranes with its C-terminus on the cytosolic surface. Lysophosphatidate dephosphorylation was inhibited by extracellular Ca2+ and this inhibition was diminished by extracellular Mg2+. Changing intracellular Ca2+ concentrations did not alter exogenous lysophosphatidate dephosphorylation significantly. Permeabilized fibroblasts showed relatively little latency for the dephosphorylation of exogenous lysophosphatidate. LPP-1 expression decreased the activation of mitogen-activated protein kinase and DNA synthesis by exogenous lysophosphatidate. The product of LPP-1 cDNA is concluded to act partly to degrade exogenous lysophosphatidate and thereby regulate its effects on cell signalling. PMID:10359651

  16. On the relative contributions of multisensory integration and crossmodal exogenous spatial attention to multisensory response enhancement.

    PubMed

    Van der Stoep, N; Spence, C; Nijboer, T C W; Van der Stigchel, S

    2015-11-01

    Two processes that can give rise to multisensory response enhancement (MRE) are multisensory integration (MSI) and crossmodal exogenous spatial attention. It is, however, currently unclear what the relative contribution of each of these is to MRE. We investigated this issue using two tasks that are generally assumed to measure MSI (a redundant target effect task) and crossmodal exogenous spatial attention (a spatial cueing task). One block of trials consisted of unimodal auditory and visual targets designed to provide a unimodal baseline. In two other blocks of trials, the participants were presented with spatially and temporally aligned and misaligned audiovisual (AV) targets (0, 50, 100, and 200ms SOA). In the integration block, the participants were instructed to respond to the onset of the first target stimulus that they detected (A or V). The instruction for the cueing block was to respond only to the onset of the visual targets. The targets could appear at one of three locations: left, center, and right. The participants were instructed to respond only to lateral targets. The results indicated that MRE was caused by MSI at 0ms SOA. At 50ms SOA, both crossmodal exogenous spatial attention and MSI contributed to the observed MRE, whereas the MRE observed at the 100 and 200ms SOAs was attributable to crossmodal exogenous spatial attention, alerting, and temporal preparation. These results therefore suggest that there may be a temporal window in which both MSI and exogenous crossmodal spatial attention can contribute to multisensory response enhancement.

  17. Effect of exogenous selenium supply on photosynthesis, Na(+) accumulation and antioxidative capacity of maize (Zea mays L.) under salinity stress.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Chaoqiang; Zu, Chaolong; Lu, Dianjun; Zheng, Qingsong; Shen, Jia; Wang, Huoyan; Li, Decheng

    2017-02-07

    The mechanism of selenium-mediated salt tolerance has not been fully clarified. This study investigated the possible role of selenium (Se) in regulating maize salt tolerance. A pot experiment was conducted to investigate the role of Se (0, 1, 5 and 25 μM Na2SeO3) in photosynthesis, antioxidative capacity and ion homeostasis in maize under salinity. The results showed that Se (1 μM) relieved the salt-induced inhibitory effects on the plant growth and development of 15-day-old maize plants. Se application (1 μM) also increased the net photosynthetic rate and alleviated the damage to chloroplast ultrastructure induced by NaCl. The superoxide dismutase (SOD) and ascorbate peroxidase (APX) activities were increased, and ZmMPK5, ZmMPK7 and ZmCPK11 were markedly up-regulated in the roots of Se-treated plants, likely contributing to the improvement of antioxidant defence systems under salinity. Moreover, 1 μM Se increased K(+) in the shoots while decreasing Na(+) in the roots, indicating that Se up-regulates ZmNHX1 in the roots, which may be involved in Na(+) compartmentalisation under salinity. The findings from this single experiment require repetition together with measurement of reactive oxygen species (ROS), but nevertheless suggest that exogenous Se alleviates salt stress in maize via the improvement of photosynthetic capacity, the activities of antioxidant enzymes and the regulation of Na(+) homeostasis.

  18. Effect of exogenous selenium supply on photosynthesis, Na+ accumulation and antioxidative capacity of maize (Zea mays L.) under salinity stress

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Chaoqiang; Zu, Chaolong; Lu, Dianjun; Zheng, Qingsong; Shen, Jia; Wang, Huoyan; Li, Decheng

    2017-01-01

    The mechanism of selenium-mediated salt tolerance has not been fully clarified. This study investigated the possible role of selenium (Se) in regulating maize salt tolerance. A pot experiment was conducted to investigate the role of Se (0, 1, 5 and 25 μM Na2SeO3) in photosynthesis, antioxidative capacity and ion homeostasis in maize under salinity. The results showed that Se (1 μM) relieved the salt-induced inhibitory effects on the plant growth and development of 15-day-old maize plants. Se application (1 μM) also increased the net photosynthetic rate and alleviated the damage to chloroplast ultrastructure induced by NaCl. The superoxide dismutase (SOD) and ascorbate peroxidase (APX) activities were increased, and ZmMPK5, ZmMPK7 and ZmCPK11 were markedly up-regulated in the roots of Se-treated plants, likely contributing to the improvement of antioxidant defence systems under salinity. Moreover, 1 μM Se increased K+ in the shoots while decreasing Na+ in the roots, indicating that Se up-regulates ZmNHX1 in the roots, which may be involved in Na+ compartmentalisation under salinity. The findings from this single experiment require repetition together with measurement of reactive oxygen species (ROS), but nevertheless suggest that exogenous Se alleviates salt stress in maize via the improvement of photosynthetic capacity, the activities of antioxidant enzymes and the regulation of Na+ homeostasis. PMID:28169318

  19. Adverse cardiac effects of exogenous angiotensin 1-7 in rats with subtotal nephrectomy are prevented by ACE inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Griggs, Karen; Patel, Sheila K.

    2017-01-01

    We previously reported that exogenous angiotensin (Ang) 1–7 has adverse cardiac effects in experimental kidney failure due to its action to increase cardiac angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) activity. This study investigated if the addition of an ACE inhibitor (ACEi) to Ang 1–7 infusion would unmask any beneficial effects of Ang 1–7 on the heart in experimental kidney failure. Male Sprague–Dawley rats underwent subtotal nephrectomy (STNx) and were treated with vehicle, the ACEi ramipril (oral 1mg/kg/day), Ang 1–7 (subcutaneous 24 μg/kg/h) or dual therapy (all groups, n = 12). A control group (n = 10) of sham-operated rats were also studied. STNx led to hypertension, renal impairment, cardiac hypertrophy and fibrosis, and increased both left ventricular ACE2 activity and ACE binding. STNx was not associated with changes in plasma levels of ACE, ACE2 or angiotensin peptides. Ramipril reduced blood pressure, improved cardiac hypertrophy and fibrosis and inhibited cardiac ACE. Ang 1–7 infusion increased blood pressure, cardiac interstitial fibrosis and cardiac ACE binding compared to untreated STNx rats. Although in STNx rats, the addition of ACEi to Ang 1–7 prevented any deleterious cardiac effects of Ang 1–7, a limitation of the study is that the large increase in plasma Ang 1–7 with ramipril may have masked any effect of infused Ang 1–7. PMID:28192475

  20. Proteomic and biochemical responses of canola (Brassica napus L.) exposed to salinity stress and exogenous lipoic acid.

    PubMed

    Yıldız, Mustafa; Akçalı, Nermin; Terzi, Hakan

    2015-05-01

    To evaluate the mitigating effects of exogenous lipoic acid (LA) on NaCl toxicity, proteomic, biochemical and physiological changes were investigated in the leaves of canola (Brassica napus L.) seedlings. Salinity stress decreased the growth parameters and contents of ascorbate (AsA) and glutathione (GSH), and increased the contents of malondialdehyde (MDA), proline, cysteine and the activities of antioxidant enzymes such as superoxide dismutase (SOD), guaiacol peroxidase (POD), catalase (CAT) and ascorbate peroxidase (APX). The foliar application of LA alleviated the toxic effects of salinity stress on canola seedlings and notably decreased MDA content and increased growth parameters, cysteine content, and activities of CAT and POD. In the proteomic analyses, total proteins from the leaves of control, LA, NaCl and NaCl+LA treated-seedlings were separated using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE). A total of 28 proteins were differentially expressed. Of these, 21 proteins were successfully identified by MALDI-TOF/TOF MS. These proteins had functions related to photosynthesis, stress defense, energy metabolism, signal transduction, protein folding and stabilization indicating that LA might play important roles in salinity through the regulation of photosynthesis, stress defense and signal transduction related proteins. The proteomic findings have provided new insight to reveal the effect of LA on salinity stress for the first time.

  1. Halophilic adaptation of enzymes.

    PubMed

    Madern, D; Ebel, C; Zaccai, G

    2000-04-01

    It is now clear that the understanding of halophilic adaptation at a molecular level requires a strategy of complementary experiments, combining molecular biology, biochemistry, and cellular approaches with physical chemistry and thermodynamics. In this review, after a discussion of the definition and composition of halophilic enzymes, the effects of salt on their activity, solubility, and stability are reviewed. We then describe how thermodynamic observations, such as parameters pertaining to solvent-protein interactions or enzyme-unfolding kinetics, depend strongly on solvent composition and reveal the important role played by water and ion binding to halophilic proteins. The three high-resolution crystal structures now available for halophilic proteins are analyzed in terms of haloadaptation, and finally cellular response to salt stress is discussed briefly.

  2. Enzyme catalysis "reilluminated".

    PubMed

    Gärtner, Wolfgang

    2009-01-01

    In a new light: The NADPH:protochlorophyllide (Pchlide) oxidoreductase (POR; see structure, green Pchlide, yellow NADPH) is a good model to investigate catalytical processes in enzymes, as its light activation allows an immediate start of the catalyzed reaction. By irradiation with weak, short laser pulses it is possible to detect conformation changes during the reaction and thus to uncover the elementary steps of the catalytic process.

  3. The influence of acute intense exercise on exogenous spatial attention depends on physical fitness level.

    PubMed

    Llorens, Francesc; Sanabria, Daniel; Huertas, Florentino

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the effect of a previous bout of intense exercise on exogenous spatial attention. In Experiment 1, a group of participants performed an exogenous spatial task at rest (without prior effort), immediately after intense exercise, and after recovering from an intense exercise. The analyses revealed that the typical "facilitation effect" (i.e., faster reaction times on cued than on uncued trials) immediately after exercise was positively correlated with participants' fitness level. In Experiment 2, a high-fit and a low-fit group performed the same task at rest (without prior effort) and immediately after an intense exercise. Results revealed that, after the bout of exercise, only low-fit participants showed reduced attentional effects compared to the rest condition. We argue that the normal functioning of exogenous attention was influenced by intense effort, affecting low-fit participants to a larger extent than to high-fit participants. As a consequence, target processing was prioritized over irrelevant stimuli.

  4. Restoring the encoding properties of a stochastic neuron model by an exogenous noise

    PubMed Central

    Paffi, Alessandra; Camera, Francesca; Apollonio, Francesca; d'Inzeo, Guglielmo; Liberti, Micaela

    2015-01-01

    Here we evaluate the possibility of improving the encoding properties of an impaired neuronal system by superimposing an exogenous noise to an external electric stimulation signal. The approach is based on the use of mathematical neuron models consisting of stochastic HH-like circuit, where the impairment of the endogenous presynaptic inputs is described as a subthreshold injected current and the exogenous stimulation signal is a sinusoidal voltage perturbation across the membrane. Our results indicate that a correlated Gaussian noise, added to the sinusoidal signal can significantly increase the encoding properties of the impaired system, through the Stochastic Resonance (SR) phenomenon. These results suggest that an exogenous noise, suitably tailored, could improve the efficacy of those stimulation techniques used in neuronal systems, where the presynaptic sensory neurons are impaired and have to be artificially bypassed. PMID:25999845

  5. Robust Consensus of Multi-Agent Systems with Uncertain Exogenous Disturbances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Hong-Yong; Guo, Lei; Han, Chao

    2011-12-01

    The objective of this paper is to investigate the consensus of the multi-agent systems with nonlinear coupling function and external disturbances. The disturbance includes two parts, one part is supposed to be generated by an exogenous system, which is not required to be neutrally stable as in the output regulation theory, the other part is the modeling uncertainty in the exogenous disturbance system. A novel composite disturbance observer based control (DOBC) and H∞ control scheme is presented so that the disturbance with the exogenous system can be estimated and compensated and the consensus of the multi-agent systems with fixed and switching graph can be reached by using H∞ control law. Simulations demonstrate the advantages of the proposed DOBC and H∞ control scheme.

  6. Uronic polysaccharide degrading enzymes.

    PubMed

    Garron, Marie-Line; Cygler, Miroslaw

    2014-10-01

    In the past several years progress has been made in the field of structure and function of polysaccharide lyases (PLs). The number of classified polysaccharide lyase families has increased to 23 and more detailed analysis has allowed the identification of more closely related subfamilies, leading to stronger correlation between each subfamily and a unique substrate. The number of as yet unclassified polysaccharide lyases has also increased and we expect that sequencing projects will allow many of these unclassified sequences to emerge as new families. The progress in structural analysis of PLs has led to having at least one representative structure for each of the families and for two unclassified enzymes. The newly determined structures have folds observed previously in other PL families and their catalytic mechanisms follow either metal-assisted or Tyr/His mechanisms characteristic for other PL enzymes. Comparison of PLs with glycoside hydrolases (GHs) shows several folds common to both classes but only for the β-helix fold is there strong indication of divergent evolution from a common ancestor. Analysis of bacterial genomes identified gene clusters containing multiple polysaccharide cleaving enzymes, the Polysaccharides Utilization Loci (PULs), and their gene complement suggests that they are organized to process completely a specific polysaccharide.

  7. BAF is a cytosolic DNA sensor that leads to exogenous DNA avoiding autophagy

    PubMed Central

    Kobayashi, Shouhei; Koujin, Takako; Kojidani, Tomoko; Osakada, Hiroko; Mori, Chie; Hiraoka, Yasushi; Haraguchi, Tokuko

    2015-01-01

    Knowledge of the mechanisms by which a cell detects exogenous DNA is important for controlling pathogen infection, because most pathogens entail the presence of exogenous DNA in the cytosol, as well as for understanding the cell’s response to artificially transfected DNA. The cellular response to pathogen invasion has been well studied. However, spatiotemporal information of the cellular response immediately after exogenous double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) appears in the cytosol is lacking, in part because of difficulties in monitoring when exogenous dsDNA enters the cytosol of the cell. We have recently developed a method to monitor endosome breakdown around exogenous materials using transfection reagent-coated polystyrene beads incorporated into living human cells as the objective for microscopic observations. In the present study, using dsDNA-coated polystyrene beads (DNA-beads) incorporated into living cells, we show that barrier-to-autointegration factor (BAF) bound to exogenous dsDNA immediately after its appearance in the cytosol at endosome breakdown. The BAF+ DNA-beads then assembled a nuclear envelope (NE)-like membrane and avoided autophagy that targeted the remnants of the endosome membranes. Knockdown of BAF caused a significant decrease in the assembly of NE-like membranes and increased the formation of autophagic membranes around the DNA-beads, suggesting that BAF-mediated assembly of NE-like membranes was required for the DNA-beads to evade autophagy. Importantly, BAF-bound beads without dsDNA also assembled NE-like membranes and avoided autophagy. We propose a new role for BAF: remodeling intracellular membranes upon detection of dsDNA in mammalian cells. PMID:25991860

  8. Coping with an exogenous glucose overload: glucose kinetics of rainbow trout during graded swimming.

    PubMed

    Choi, Kevin; Weber, Jean-Michel

    2016-03-15

    This study examines how chronically hyperglycemic rainbow trout modulate glucose kinetics in response to graded exercise up to critical swimming speed (Ucrit), with or without exogenous glucose supply. Our goals were 1) to quantify the rates of hepatic glucose production (Ra glucose) and disposal (Rd glucose) during graded swimming, 2) to determine how exogenous glucose affects the changes in glucose fluxes caused by exercise, and 3) to establish whether exogenous glucose modifies Ucrit or the cost of transport. Results show that graded swimming causes no change in Ra and Rd glucose at speeds below 2.5 body lengths per second (BL/s), but that glucose fluxes may be stimulated at the highest speeds. Excellent glucoregulation is also achieved at all exercise intensities. When exogenous glucose is supplied during exercise, trout suppress hepatic production from 16.4 ± 1.6 to 4.1 ± 1.7 μmol·kg(-1)·min(-1) and boost glucose disposal to 40.1 ± 13 μmol·kg(-1)·min(-1). These responses limit the effects of exogenous glucose to a 2.5-fold increase in glycemia, whereas fish showing no modulation of fluxes would reach dangerous levels of 114 mM of blood glucose. Exogenous glucose reduces metabolic rate by 16% and, therefore, causes total cost of transport to decrease accordingly. High glucose availability does not improve Ucrit because the fish are unable to take advantage of this extra fuel during maximal exercise and rely on tissue glycogen instead. In conclusion, trout have a remarkable ability to adjust glucose fluxes that allows them to cope with the cumulative stresses of a glucose overload and graded exercise.

  9. Differences between endogenous and exogenous emotion inhibition in the human brain.

    PubMed

    Kühn, Simone; Haggard, Patrick; Brass, Marcel

    2014-05-01

    The regulation of emotions is an integral part of our mental health. It has only recently been investigated using brain imaging techniques. In most studies, participants are instructed by a cue to inhibit a specific emotional reaction. The aim of the present study was to investigate the alternative situation where a person decides to inhibit an emotion as an act of endogenous self-control. Healthy participants viewed highly arousing pictures with negative valence. In the endogenous condition, participants could freely choose on each trial to inhibit or feel the emotions elicited by the picture. In an exogenous condition, a visual cue instructed them to either feel or inhibit the emotion elicited by the picture. Participants' subjective ratings of intensity of experienced emotion showed an interaction effect between source of control (endogenous/exogenous) and feel/inhibit based on a stronger modulation between feel and inhibition for the endogenous compared to the exogenous condition. Endogenous inhibition of emotions was associated with dorso-medial prefrontal cortex activation, whereas exogenous inhibition was found associated with lateral prefrontal cortex activation. Thus, the brain regions for both endogenous and exogenous inhibition of emotion are highly similar to those for inhibition of motor actions in Brass and Haggard (J Neurosci 27:9141-9145, 2007), Kühn et al. (Hum Brain Mapp 30:2834-2843, 2009). Functional connectivity analyses showed that dorsofrontomedial cortex exerts greater control onto pre-supplementary motor area during endogenous inhibition compared to endogenous feel. This functional dissociation between an endogenous, fronto-medial and an exogenous, fronto-lateral inhibition centre has important implications for our understanding of emotion regulation in health and psychopathology.

  10. Exogenous pyruvate facilitates cancer cell adaptation to hypoxia by serving as an oxygen surrogate

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Chengqian; He, Dan; Chen, Shuyang; Tan, Xiaoling; Sang, Nianli

    2016-01-01

    Molecular oxygen is the final electron acceptor in cellular metabolism but cancer cells often become adaptive to hypoxia, which promotes resistance to chemotherapy and radiation. The reduction of endogenous glycolytic pyruvate to lactate is known as an adaptive strategy for hypoxic cells. Whether exogenous pyruvate is required for hypoxic cell proliferation by either serving as an electron acceptor or a biosynthetic substrate remains unclear. By using both hypoxic and ρ0 cells defective in electron transfer chain, we show that exogenous pyruvate is required to sustain proliferation of both cancer and non-cancer cells that cannot utilize oxygen. Particularly, we show that absence of pyruvate led to glycolysis inhibition and AMPK activation along with decreased NAD+ levels in ρ0 cells; and exogenous pyruvate increases lactate yield, elevates NAD+/NADH ratio and suppresses AMPK activation. Knockdown of lactate dehydrogenase significantly inhibits the rescuing effects of exogenous pyruvate. In contrast, none of pyruvate-derived metabolites tested (including acetyl-CoA, α-ketoglutarate, succinate and alanine) can replace pyruvate in supporting ρ0 cell proliferation. Knockdown of pyruvate carboxylase, pyruvate dehydrogenase and citrate synthase do not impair exogenous pyruvate to rescue ρ0 cells. Importantly, we show that exogenous pyruvate relieves ATP insufficiency and mTOR inhibition and promotes proliferation of hypoxic cells, and that well-oxygenated cells release pyruvate, providing a potential in vivo source of pyruvate. Taken together, our data support a novel pyruvate cycle model in which oxygenated cells release pyruvate for hypoxic cells as an oxygen surrogate. The pyruvate cycle may be targeted as a new therapy of hypoxic cancers. PMID:27374086

  11. Improved cold tolerance in Elymus nutans by exogenous application of melatonin may involve ABA-dependent and ABA-independent pathways

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Juanjuan; Wu, Ye; Miao, Yanjun; Xu, Yamei; Zhao, Enhua; Wang, Jin; Sun, Huaien; Liu, Qian; Xue, Yongwei; Xu, Yuefei; Hu, Tianming

    2017-01-01

    Melatonin is an important secondary messenger that plays a central role in plant growth, as well as abiotic and biotic stress tolerance. However, the underlying physiological and molecular mechanisms of melatonin-mediated cold tolerance, especially interactions between melatonin and other key molecules in the plant stress response, remain unknown. Here, the interrelation between melatonin and abscisic acid (ABA) was investigated in two genotypes of Elymus nutans Griseb., the cold-tolerant Damxung (DX) and the cold-sensitive Gannan (GN) under cold stress. Pre-treatment with exogenous melatonin or ABA alleviated oxidative injury via scavenging ROS, while enhancing both antioxidant enzyme activities and non-enzymatic antioxidant contents. Treatment of fluridone, an ABA biosynthesis inhibitor caused membrane lipid peroxidation and lowered melatonin-induced antioxidant defense responses. It is worth noting that cold stress significantly induced both endogenous melatonin and ABA levels in both genotypes. Application of melatonin increased ABA production, while fluridone significantly suppressed melatonin-induced ABA accumulation. ABA and fluridone pre-treatments failed to affect the endogenous melatonin concentration. Moreover, exogenous melatonin up-regulated the expression of cold-responsive genes in an ABA-independent manner. These results indicate that both ABA-dependent and ABA-independent pathways may contribute to melatonin-induced cold tolerance in E. nutans. PMID:28045095

  12. Micellar Polymer Encapsulation of Enzymes.

    PubMed

    Besic, Sabina; Minteer, Shelley D

    2017-01-01

    Although enzymes are highly efficient and selective catalysts, there have been problems incorporating them into fuel cells. Early enzyme-based fuel cells contained enzymes in solution rather than immobilized on the electrode surface. One problem utilizing an enzyme in solution is an issue of transport associated with long diffusion lengths between the site of bioelectrocatalysis and the electrode. This issue drastically decreases the theoretical overall power output due to the poor electron conductivity. On the other hand, enzymes immobilized at the electrode surface have eliminated the issue of poor electron conduction due to close proximity of electron transfer between electrode and the biocatalyst. Another problem is inefficient and short term stability of catalytic activity within the enzyme that is suspended in free flowing solution. Enzymes in solutions are only stable for hours to days, whereas immobilized enzymes can be stable for weeks to months and now even years. Over the last decade, there has been substantial research on immobilizing enzymes at electrode surfaces for biofuel cell and sensor applications. The most commonly used techniques are sandwich or wired. Sandwich techniques are powerful and successful for enzyme immobilization; however, the enzymes optimal activity is not retained due to the physical distress applied by the polymer limiting its applications as well as the non-uniform distribution of the enzyme and the diffusion of analyte through the polymer is slowed significantly. Wired techniques have shown to extend the lifetime of an enzyme at the electrode surface; however, this technique is very hard to master due to specific covalent bonding of enzyme and polymer which changes the three-dimensional configuration of enzyme and with that decreases the optimal catalytic activity. This chapter details encapsulation techniques where an enzyme will be immobilized within the pores/pockets of the hydrophobically modified micellar polymers such as

  13. Exogenous and endogenous market crashes as phase transitions in complex financial systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fry, J. M.

    2012-12-01

    In this paper we provide a unifying framework for a set of seemingly disparate models for exogenous and endogenous shocks in complex financial systems. Markets operate by balancing intrinsic levels of risk and return. This remains true even in the midst of transitory exogenous and endogenous shocks. Changes in market regime (bearish to bullish and bullish to bearish) can be explicitly shown to represent a phase transition from random to deterministic behaviour in prices. The resulting models refine the empirical analysis in a number of previous papers.

  14. Enzyme linked immunoassay with stabilized polymer saccharide enzyme conjugates

    DOEpatents

    Callstrom, Matthew R.; Bednarski, Mark D.; Gruber, Patrick R.

    1997-01-01

    An improvement in enzyme linked immunoassays is disclosed wherein the enzyme is in the form of a water soluble polymer saccharide conjugate which is stable in hostile environments. The conjugate comprises the enzyme which is linked to the polymer at multiple points through saccharide linker groups.

  15. Enzyme linked immunoassay with stabilized polymer saccharide enzyme conjugates

    DOEpatents

    Callstrom, M.R.; Bednarski, M.D.; Gruber, P.R.

    1997-11-25

    An improvement in enzyme linked immunoassays is disclosed wherein the enzyme is in the form of a water soluble polymer saccharide conjugate which is stable in hostile environments. The conjugate comprises the enzyme which is linked to the polymer at multiple points through saccharide linker groups. 19 figs.

  16. Enzyme Molar Fractions: A Powerful Tool for Understanding Enzyme Kinetics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Serra, Juan L.; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Deduces the relationship between reduced velocity and molar fractions for productive enzyme complexes; obtains the mathematical expression of molar fractions for an enzyme with two specific binding sites per molecule; and proposes a useful plot to follow the dependence of enzyme molar fractions with the concentration of one of its ligands. (JN)

  17. [Effect of exogenous sucrose on growth and active ingredient content of licorice seedlings under salt stress conditions].

    PubMed

    Liu, Fu-zhi; Yang, Jun

    2015-11-01

    Licorice seedlings were taken as experimental materials, an experiment was conducted to study the effects of exogenous sucrose on growth and active ingredient content of licorice seedlings under NaCl stress conditions. The results of this study showed that under salt stress conditions, after adding a certain concentration of exogenous sucrose, the licorice seedlings day of relative growth rate was increasing, and this stress can be a significant weakening effect, indicating that exogenous sucrose salt stress-relieving effect. The total flavonoids and phenylalanine ammonia lyase (PAL) activity were significantly increased, the exogenous sucrose can mitigated the seedling roots under salt stress, the licorice flavonoid content in the enhanced growth was largely due to the activity of PAL an increased, when the concentration of exogenous sucrose wae 10 mmol x L(-1), PAL activity reaching a maximum, when the concentration of exogenous sucrose was 15 mmol x L(-1), PAL activity turned into a downward trend, the results indicating that this mitigation has concentration effect. After applying different concentrations of exogenous sugar, the contents of liquiritin changes with the change of flavonoids content was similar. After applying different concentrations of exogenous sucrose, the content of licorice acid under salt stress was higher than the levels were not reached during salt stress, the impact of exogenous sucrose concentration gradient of licorice acid accumulation was not obvious.

  18. Chloridazon-catechol dioxygenases, a distinct group of meta-cleaving enzymes.

    PubMed

    Schmitt, S; Müller, R; Wegst, W; Lingens, F

    1984-02-01

    We previously described a new meta-cleaving enzyme, termed chloridazon-catechol dioxygenase. The present paper describes the comparison of this enzyme with the meta-cleaving enzymes of eighteen strains of soil bacteria isolated with various aromatic compounds. Four of these strains were isolated with the herbicide chloridazon, six with the analgeticum aminopyrine and one with the analgeticum antipyrine as sole carbon source. These strains all belonged to a new type of bacteria, called Phenylobacteria. The seven other strains were isolated with aromatic compounds such as toluene, 3-phenylpropionate, benzoate, papaverine and 4-chlorobenzoate, and belonged to various species including Pseudomonas, Acinetobacter and Nocardia. In double diffusion experiments with antibodies, prepared against chloridazon-catechol dioxygenase, extracts from the eleven strains of Phenylobacteria gave a cross reaction, whereas the extracts of the seven other strains showed no reaction. The enzymes of the eleven positive strains showed the same characteristic kinetic behaviour as the previously described enzyme. In contrast to catechol 2, 3-dioxygenase they needed the addition of exogenous Fe2+ ions for activity. On ion-exchange chromatography they emerged at the same buffer concentration as chloridazon-catechol dioxygenase. In polyacrylamide electrophoresis they migrated identically. The linkage map derived from the activities of the various enzymes with 10 different substrates revealed an identity of more than 80% for these eleven enzymes. So the meta-cleaving enzymes of the Phenylobacteria seem to form a distinct group among the non-heme iron-containing dioxygenases.

  19. Treating Wastewater With Immobilized Enzymes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jolly, Clifford D.

    1991-01-01

    Experiments show enzymes are immobilized on supporting materials to make biocatalyst beds for treatment of wastewater. With suitable combination of enzymes, concentrations of various inorganic and organic contaminants, including ammonia and urea, reduced significantly.

  20. CYP4 enzymes as potential drug targets: focus on enzyme multiplicity, inducers and inhibitors, and therapeutic modulation of 20-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid (20-HETE) synthase and fatty acid ω-hydroxylase activities.

    PubMed

    Edson, Katheryne Z; Rettie, Allan E

    2013-01-01

    The Cytochrome P450 4 (CYP4) family of enzymes in humans is comprised of thirteen isozymes that typically catalyze the ω-oxidation of endogenous fatty acids and eicosanoids. Several CYP4 enzymes can biosynthesize 20- hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid, or 20-HETE, an important signaling eicosanoid involved in regulation of vascular tone and kidney reabsorption. Additionally, accumulation of certain fatty acids is a hallmark of the rare genetic disorders, Refsum disease and X-ALD. Therefore, modulation of CYP4 enzyme activity, either by inhibition or induction, is a potential strategy for drug discovery. Here we review the substrate specificities, sites of expression, genetic regulation, and inhibition by exogenous chemicals of the human CYP4 enzymes, and discuss the targeting of CYP4 enzymes in the development of new treatments for hypertension, stroke, certain cancers and the fatty acid-linked orphan diseases.

  1. Exogenous γ-aminobutyric acid treatment affects citrate and amino acid accumulation to improve fruit quality and storage performance of postharvest citrus fruit.

    PubMed

    Sheng, Ling; Shen, Dandan; Luo, Yi; Sun, Xiaohua; Wang, Jinqiu; Luo, Tao; Zeng, Yunliu; Xu, Juan; Deng, Xiuxin; Cheng, Yunjiang

    2017-02-01

    The loss of organic acids during postharvest storage is one of the major factors that reduces the fruit quality and economic value of citrus. Citrate is the most important organic acid in citrus fruits. Molecular evidence has proved that γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) shunt plays a key role in citrate metabolism. Here, we investigated the effects of exogenous GABA treatment on citrate metabolism and storage quality of postharvest citrus fruit. The content of citrate was significantly increased, which was primarily attributed to the inhibition of the expression of glutamate decarboxylase (GAD). Amino acids, including glutamate, alanine, serine, aspartate and proline, were also increased. Moreover, GABA treatment decreased the fruit rot rate. The activities of antioxidant enzymes and the content of energy source ATP were affected by the treatment. Our results indicate that GABA treatment is a very effective approach for postharvest quality maintenance and improvement of storage performance in citrus production.

  2. Role of exogenously supplied ferulic and p-coumaric acids in mimicking the mode of action of acetolactate synthase inhibiting herbicides.

    PubMed

    Orcaray, Luis; Igal, María; Zabalza, Ana; Royuela, Mercedes

    2011-09-28

    Chlorsulfuron and imazethapyr (herbicides that inhibit acetolactate synthase; ALS, EC 4.1.3.18) produced a strong accumulation of hydroxycinnamic acids that was related to the induction of the first enzyme of the shikimate pathway, 3-deoxy-d-arabino-heptulosonate 7-phosphate synthase (EC 2.5.2.54). The exogenous application of two hydroxycinnamic acids, ferulic and p-coumaric acids, to pea plants resulted in their internal accumulation, arrested growth, carbohydrate and quinate accumulation in the leaves, and the induction of ethanolic fermentation. These effects resemble some of the physiological effects detected after acetolactate synthase inhibition and suggest important roles for ferulic and p-coumaric acids in the mode of action of herbicides inhibiting the biosynthesis of branched chain amino acids.

  3. The Catalytic Function of Enzymes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Splittgerber, Allan G.

    1985-01-01

    Discusses: structure of the enzyme molecule; active site; reaction mechanism; transition state; factors affecting enzyme reaction rates, concentration of enzyme; concentration of substrate; product concentration; temperature effects and pH effects; factors causing a lowering of activation energy; proximity and orientation effects; substrate strain…

  4. Targeting Cytochrome P450 Enzymes: A New Approach in Anti-cancer Drug Development

    PubMed Central

    Bruno, Robert D.; Njar, Vincent C.O.

    2007-01-01

    Cytochrome P450s (CYPs) represent a large class of heme-containing enzymes that catalyze the metabolism of multitudes of substrates both endogenous and exogenous. Until recently, however, CYPs have been largely overlooked in cancer drug development, acknowledged only for their role in Phase I metabolism of chemotherapeutics. The first successful strategy targeting CYP enzymes in cancer therapy was the development of potent inhibitors of CYP19 (aromatase) for the treatment of breast cancer. Aromatase inhibitors ushered in a new era in hormone ablation therapy for estrogen dependent cancers, and have paved the way for similar strategies (i.e. inhibition of CYP17) that combat androgen dependent prostate cancer. Identification of CYPs involved in the inactivation of anti-cancer metabolites of Vitamin D3 and Vitamin A has triggered development of agents that target these enzymes as well. The discovery of the over-expression of exogenous metabolizing CYPs, such as CYP1B1, in cancer cells has roused interest in the development of inhibitors for chemoprevention and of prodrugs designed to be activated by CYPs only in cancer cells. Finally, the expression of CYPs within tumors has been utilized in the development of bioreductive molecules that are activated by CYPs only under hypoxic conditions. This review offers the first comprehensive analysis of strategies in drug development that either inhibit or exploit CYP enzymes for the treatment of cancer. PMID:17544277

  5. Protein Crystal Malic Enzyme

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    Malic Enzyme is a target protein for drug design because it is a key protein in the life cycle of intestinal parasites. After 2 years of effort on Earth, investigators were unable to produce any crystals that were of high enough quality and for this reason the structure of this important protein could not be determined. Crystals obtained from one STS-50 were of superior quality allowing the structure to be determined. This is just one example why access to space is so vital for these studies. Principal Investigator is Larry DeLucas.

  6. Bacteriolytic Enzymes from Streptomycetes

    PubMed Central

    Welsch, Maurice

    1962-01-01

    A study of the bacteriolytic properties of streptomycetes has progressively uncovered the production by these microorganisms of a large number of different enzymes acting upon various bacterial constituents, especially on some of them located in the cell wall. Although the mechanism of the bacteriolysis is far from being completely elucidated at present, it can, however, be stated that, in two instances at least, it can be regarded as an osmotic explosion following upon the destruction of the structure responsible for the rigidity of the cell wall. PMID:14006056

  7. Phosphatidylserine biosynthesis in cultured Chinese hamster ovary cells. I. Inhibition of de novo phosphatidylserine biosynthesis by exogenous phosphatidylserine and its efficient incorporation

    SciTech Connect

    Nishijima, M.; Kuge, O.; Akamatsu, Y.

    1986-05-05

    The effect of phosphatidylserine exogenously added to the medium on de novo biosynthesis of phosphatidylserine was investigated in cultured Chinese hamster ovary cells. When cells were cultured for several generations in medium supplemented with phosphatidylserine and /sup 32/Pi, the incorporation of /sup 32/Pi into cellular phosphatidylserine was remarkably inhibited, the degree of inhibition being dependent upon the concentration of added phosphatidylserine. /sup 32/Pi uptake into cellular phosphatidylethanolamine was also partly reduced by the addition of exogenous phosphatidylserine, consistent with the idea that phosphatidylethanolamine is biosynthesized via decarboxylation of phosphatidylserine. However, incorporation of /sup 32/Pi into phosphatidylcholine, sphingomyelin, and phosphatidylinositol was not significantly affected. In contrast, the addition of either phosphatidylcholine, sphingomyelin, phosphatidylethanolamine, or phosphatidylinositol to the medium did not inhibit endogenous biosynthesis of the corresponding phospholipid. Radiochemical and chemical analyses of the cellular phospholipid composition revealed that phosphatidylserine in cells grown with 80 microM phosphatidylserine was almost entirely derived from the added phospholipid. Phosphatidylserine uptake was also directly determined by using (/sup 3/H)serine-labeled phospholipid. Pulse and pulse-chase experiments with L-(U-/sup 14/C) serine showed that when cells were cultured with 80 microM phosphatidylserine, the rate of synthesis of phosphatidylserine was reduced 3-5-fold. Enzyme assaying of extracts prepared from cells grown with and without phosphatidylserine indicated that the inhibition of de novo phosphatidylserine biosynthesis by the added phosphatidylserine appeared not to be caused by a reduction in the level of the enzyme involved in the base-exchange reaction between phospholipids and serine.

  8. Transgenic Plant-Produced Hydrolytic Enzymes and the Potential of Insect Gut-Derived Hydrolases for Biofuels

    PubMed Central

    Willis, Jonathan D.; Mazarei, Mitra; Stewart, C. Neal

    2016-01-01

    Various perennial C4 grass species have tremendous potential for use as lignocellulosic biofuel feedstocks. Currently available grasses require costly pre-treatment and exogenous hydrolytic enzyme application to break down complex cell wall polymers into sugars that can then be fermented into ethanol. It has long been hypothesized that engineered feedstock production of cell wall degrading (CWD) enzymes would be an efficient production platform for of exogenous hydrolytic enzymes. Most research has focused on plant overexpression of CWD enzyme-coding genes from free-living bacteria and fungi that naturally break down plant cell walls. Recently, it has been found that insect digestive tracts harbor novel sources of lignocellulolytic biocatalysts that might be exploited for biofuel production. These CWD enzyme genes can be located in the insect genomes or in symbiotic microbes. When CWD genes are transformed into plants, negative pleiotropic effects are possible such as unintended cell wall digestion. The use of codon optimization along with organelle and tissue specific targeting improves CWD enzyme yields. The literature teaches several important lessons on strategic deployment of CWD genes in transgenic plants, which is the focus of this review. PMID:27303411

  9. Kinetic Measurements for Enzyme Immobilization.

    PubMed

    Cooney, Michael J

    2017-01-01

    Enzyme kinetics is the study of the chemical reactions that are catalyzed by enzymes, with a focus on their reaction rates. The study of an enzyme's kinetics considers the various stages of activity, reveals the catalytic mechanism of this enzyme, correlates its value to assay conditions, and describes how a drug or a poison might inhibit the enzyme. Victor Henri initially reported that enzyme reactions were initiated by a bond between the enzyme and the substrate. By 1910, Michaelis and Menten were advancing their work by studying the kinetics of an enzyme saccharase which catalyzes the hydrolysis of sucrose into glucose and fructose. They published their analysis and ever since the Michaelis-Menten equation has been used as the standard to describe the kinetics of many enzymes. Unfortunately, soluble enzymes must generally be immobilized to be reused for long times in industrial reactors. In addition, other critical enzyme properties have to be improved like stability, activity, inhibition by reaction products, and selectivity towards nonnatural substrates. Immobilization is by far the chosen process to achieve these goals.Although the Michaelis-Menten approach has been regularly adapted to the analysis of immobilized enzyme activity, its applicability to the immobilized state is limited by the barriers the immobilization matrix places upon the measurement of compounds that are used to model enzyme kinetics. That being said, the estimated value of the Michaelis-Menten coefficients (e.g., V max, K M) can be used to evaluate effects of immobilization on enzyme activity in the immobilized state when applied in a controlled manner. In this review enzyme activity and kinetics are discussed in the context of the immobilized state, and a few novel protocols are presented that address some of the unique constraints imposed by the immobilization barrier.

  10. Kinetic measurements for enzyme immobilization.

    PubMed

    Cooney, Michael J

    2011-01-01

    Enzyme kinetics is the study of the chemical reactions that are catalyzed by enzymes, with a focus on their reaction rates. The study of an enzyme's kinetics considers the various stages of activity, reveals the catalytic mechanism of the enzyme, correlates its value to assay conditions, and describes how a drug or a poison might inhibit the enzyme. Victor Henri initially reported that enzyme reactions were initiated by a bond between the enzyme and the substrate. By 1910, Michaelis and Menten had advanced this work by studying the kinetics of the enzyme saccharase, which catalyzes the hydrolysis of sucrose into glucose and fructose. They published their analysis, and ever since, the Michaelis-Menten equation has been used as the standard to describe the kinetics of many enzymes. Unfortunately, soluble enzymes must generally be immobilized to be reused for long times in industrial reactors. In addition, other critical enzyme properties have to be improved like stability, activity, inhibition by reaction products, selectivity toward nonnatural substrates. Immobilization is by far the chosen process to achieve these goals.Although the Michaelis-Menten approach has been regularly adopted for the analysis of immobilized enzyme activity, its applicability to the immobilized state is limited by the barriers the immobilization matrix places upon the measurement of compounds that are used to model enzyme kinetics. That being said, the estimated value of the Michaelis-Menten coefficients (e.g., V(max), K(M)) can be used to evaluate effects of immobilization on enzyme activity in the immobilized state when applied in a controlled manner. In this review, enzyme activity and kinetics are discussed in the context of the immobilized state, and a few novel protocols are presented that address some of the unique constraints imposed by the immobilization barrier.

  11. Transurethral lithotripsy with holmium-YAG laser of a large exogenous prostatic calculus.

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, Masanori; Ohara, Rei; Kanao, Kent; Nakajima, Yosuke

    2011-04-01

    Prostatic calculi are classified into two types, endogenous and exogenous calculi, based on their origin. Endogenous calculi are commonly observed in elderly men; however, exogenous prostatic calculi are extremely rare. We report here the case of a 51-year-old man who suffered incontinence and pollakiuria with a giant exogenous prostatic calculus almost completely replacing the prostatic tissue. X-rays and computed tomography demonstrated a large calculus of 65 × 58 mm in the small pelvic cavity. The patient underwent a transurethral lithotripsy with a holmium-YAG laser and a total of 85 g of disintegrated stones was retrieved and chemical stone analysis revealed the presence of magnesium ammonium phosphate. The incontinence improved and the voiding volume increased dramatically, and no stone recurrence in the prostatic fossa occurred at the 2 years follow-up. The etiology of this stone formation seemed to be based on some exogenous pathways combined with urinary stasis and chronic urinary infection due to compression fracture of the lumbar vertebra.

  12. Exogenous Social Identity Cues Differentially Affect the Dynamic Tracking of Individual Target Faces

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allen, Roy; Gabbert, Fiona

    2013-01-01

    We report on an experiment to investigate the top-down effect of exogenous social identity cues on a multiple-identity tracking task, a paradigm well suited to investigate the processes of binding identity to spatial locations. Here we simulated an eyewitness event in which dynamic targets, all to be tracked with equal effort, were identified from…

  13. Effects of Exogenous and Endogenous Distracters on Immediate and Long-Term Recall in Toddlers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dixon, Wallace E., Jr.; Lawman, Hannah G.; Johnson, Elizabeth B. H.; May, Sarah; Patton, Leslie A.; Lowe, Allison K.; Snyder, Courtney M.

    2012-01-01

    We explored the role that exogenous and endogenous competitors for attention play in infants' abilities to encode and retain information over a 6-month period. Sixty-six children visited the laboratory at 15 months, and 32 returned for a second visit at 21 months. Children observed models of conventional- relation and enabling-relation action…

  14. Hypoxia Potentiates Anabolic Effects of Exogenous Hyaluronic Acid in Rat Articular Cartilage

    PubMed Central

    Ichimaru, Shohei; Nakagawa, Shuji; Arai, Yuji; Kishida, Tsunao; Shin-Ya, Masaharu; Honjo, Kuniaki; Tsuchida, Shinji; Inoue, Hiroaki; Fujiwara, Hiroyoshi; Shimomura, Seiji; Mazda, Osam; Kubo, Toshikazu

    2016-01-01

    Hyaluronic acid (HA) is used clinically to treat osteoarthritis (OA), but its pharmacological effects under hypoxic conditions remain unclear. Articular chondrocytes in patients with OA are exposed to a hypoxic environment. This study investigated whether hypoxia could potentiate the anabolic effects of exogenous HA in rat articular cartilage and whether these mechanisms involved HA receptors. HA under hypoxic conditions significantly enhanced the expression of extracellular matrix genes and proteins in explant culture, as shown by real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), Western blotting, and dimethylmethylene blue (DMMB) assays. Staining with Safranin-O and immunohistochemical staining with antibody to type II collagen were also enhanced in pellet culture. The expression of CD44 was increased by hypoxia and significantly suppressed by transfection with siRNAs targeting hypoxia-inducible factor 1 alpha (siHIF-1α). These findings indicate that hypoxia potentiates the anabolic effects of exogenous HA by a mechanism in which HIF-1α positively regulates the expression of CD44, enhancing the binding affinity for exogenous HA. The anabolic effects of exogenous HA may increase as OA progresses. PMID:27347945

  15. Hydroquinone-induced exogenous ochronosis: a report of four cases and usefulness of dermoscopy.

    PubMed

    Charlín, Raúl; Barcaui, Carlos B; Kac, Bernard Kawa; Soares, Deborah Brazuna; Rabello-Fonseca, Rosa; Azulay-Abulafia, Luna

    2008-01-01

    Hydroquinone is the first choice of topical bleaching agents used in treatment of melasma. In Brazil, hydroquinone is widely prescribed by physicians and often used by patients without a prescription. The principal adverse effects of its chronic use are confetti-like depigmentation and exogenous ochronosis. The latter manifests clinically with gray-brown or blue-black hyperpigmentation, as well as pinpoint hyperchromic papules that look like caviar, and therefore called caviar-like. On histopathology, curved ochre-colored structures, 'banana-shaped' fibers, appear in the papillary dermis. No description of dermoscopy in ochronosis is found in the literature. We report four cases of hydroquinone-induced exogenous ochronosis. Dermoscopy was performed in two patients on the areas with ochronosis, and in addition to the melasma findings, amorphous densely pigmented structures obliterating some follicular openings were observed. Exogenous ochronosis is an avoidable dermatosis that is difficult to treat. Dermatologists should be able to differentiate it from melasma and immediately discontinue hydroquinone. Dermoscopy might become a valuable resource in approaching exogenous ochronosis.

  16. Influence of exogenous melatonin administration on Salmonella enteritidis colonization in molted layers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Two studies were conducted to evaluate the effects of exogenous melatonin on Salmonella enteritidis (SE) infection in experimentally-challenged laying hens subjected to a forced molt. Single Comb White Leghorn hens (W-36) over 50-wk-of-age were randomly placed in one of two rooms, allowed to acclima...

  17. Endogenously and exogenously driven selective sustained attention: Contributions to learning in kindergarten children.

    PubMed

    Erickson, Lucy C; Thiessen, Erik D; Godwin, Karrie E; Dickerson, John P; Fisher, Anna V

    2015-10-01

    Selective sustained attention is vital for higher order cognition. Although endogenous and exogenous factors influence selective sustained attention, assessment of the degree to which these factors influence performance and learning is often challenging. We report findings from the Track-It task, a paradigm that aims to assess the contribution of endogenous and exogenous factors to selective sustained attention within the same task. Behavioral accuracy and eye-tracking data on the Track-It task were correlated with performance on an explicit learning task. Behavioral accuracy and fixations to distractors during the Track-It task did not predict learning when exogenous factors supported selective sustained attention. In contrast, when endogenous factors supported selective sustained attention, fixations to distractors were negatively correlated with learning. Similarly, when endogenous factors supported selective sustained attention, higher behavioral accuracy was correlated with greater learning. These findings suggest that endogenously and exogenously driven selective sustained attention, as measured through different conditions of the Track-It task, may support different kinds of learning.

  18. S-ketamine influences strategic allocation of attention but not exogenous capture of attention.

    PubMed

    Fuchs, Isabella; Ansorge, Ulrich; Huber-Huber, Christoph; Höflich, Anna; Lanzenberger, Rupert

    2015-09-01

    We investigated whether s-ketamine differentially affects strategic allocation of attention. In Experiment 1, (1) a less visible cue was weakly masked by the onsets of competing placeholders or (2) a better visible cue was not masked because it was presented in isolation. Both types of cue appeared more often opposite of the target (75%) than at target position (25%). With this setup, we tested for strategic attention shifts to the opposite side of the cues and for exogenous attentional capture toward the cue's side in a short cue-target interval, as well as for (reverse) cueing effects in a long cue-target interval after s-ketamine and after placebo treatment in a double-blind within-participant design. We found reduced strategic attention shifts after cues presented without placeholders for the s-ketamine compared to the placebo treatment in the short interval, indicating an early effect on the strategic allocation of attention. No differences between the two treatments were found for exogenous attentional capture by less visible cues, suggesting that s-ketamine does not affect exogenous attentional capture in the presence of competing distractors. Experiment 2 confirmed that the competing onsets of the placeholders prevented the strategic cueing effect. Taken together, the results indicate that s-ketamine affects strategic attentional capture, but not exogenous attentional capture. The findings point to a more prominent role of s-ketamine during top-down controlled forms of attention that require suppression of automatic capture than during automatic capture itself.

  19. Endogenously- and Exogenously-Driven Selective Sustained Attention: Contributions to Learning in Kindergarten Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Erickson, Lucy C.; Thiessen, Erik D.; Godwin, Karrie E.; Dickerson, John P.; Fisher, Anna V.

    2015-01-01

    Selective sustained attention is vital for higher order cognition. Although endogenous and exogenous factors influence selective sustained attention, assessment of the degree to which these factors influence performance and learning is often challenging. We report findings from the Track-It task, a paradigm that aims to assess the contribution of…

  20. Metabolism of exogenously applied fructose 1,6-bisphosphate in hypoxic vascular smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Hardin, C D; Roberts, T M

    1994-12-01

    Exogenously administered fructose 1,6-bisphosphate reportedly protects ischemic or hypoxic tissue and facilitates metabolic recovery. The mechanism of action of exogenous fructose 1,6-bisphosphate has been an issue of considerable debate, since there is a lack of direct evidence that fructose 1,6-bisphosphate can cross the cell membrane and act as an intermediate in glycolysis. We synthesized [1,6-13C]fructose 1,6-bisphosphate and directly examined its cellular metabolism in hog carotid artery segments using 13C-nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. [1,6-13C]fructose 1,6-bisphosphate (2.1 mM) was metabolized by hog carotid artery during normoxia and hypoxia with a major metabolic product being [3-13C]lactate. The production of [3-13C]lactate was greater during hypoxia than during normoxia, indicating that fructose 1,6-bisphosphate metabolism responded to the energetic state of the tissue. We found that exogenously added fructose 1,6-bisphosphate at 2.1 mM did not significantly improve the ability of hypoxic hog carotid artery to maintain isometric force, whereas 20 mM fructose 1,6-bisphosphate did significantly, although modestly, improve isometric force maintenance. These results indicate that exogenously added fructose 1,6-bisphosphate is capable of entering cells and serving as a glycolytic intermediate.

  1. The effects of exogenous putrescine on sex-specific responses of Populus cathayana to copper stress.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lianghua; Wang, Ling; Chen, Fugui; Korpelainen, Helena; Li, Chunyang

    2013-11-01

    We used the dioecious tree, Populus cathayana, as a model species to study plants' physiological and biochemical responses to copper (Cu) stress, exogenous putrescine (Put) treatment and their interaction. Although males accumulated higher Cu concentrations in leaves than did females under Cu stress, they did not suffer more damage than females, as reflected by changes in gas exchange, pigment contents, membrane lipid peroxidation (thiobarbituric acid reactive substances, TBARS) and protein oxidation (carbonyl). Higher Cu tolerance of males was correlated with a higher H2O2 scavenging ability and proline responses, and a better maintenance of non-protein thiols (NP-SHs) and spermine (Spm) contents. We also discovered that mitigation effects of exogenous Put on Cu stress occurred, as visible as a recovery of the total chlorophyll content, and lower TBARS and carbonyl under interaction treatment when compared to Cu stress alone. Exogenous Put decreased the Cu concentration in leaves of both sexes, but to different degrees. Such effects of exogenous Put suggested that Put may play important roles in the stabilization of membrane integrity and protein structures, and it may modulate the uptake and transportation of Cu. Our results indicated that (1) males are more tolerant to Cu stress than females; (2) Put could mitigate Cu toxicity in P. cathayana, but to a different degree in males and females; (3) males are better candidates than females for Cu extraction and phytoremediation.

  2. QUANTITATIVE AND QUALITATIVE ANALYSES OF EXOGENOUS AND ENDOGENOUS CHILDREN IN SOME READING PROCESSES.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    CAPOBIANCO, RUDOLPH J.; MILLER, DONALD Y.

    THE PURPOSE OF THE PRESENT STUDY WAS TO INVESTIGATE THESE ASPECTS OF THE READING PROCESS--(1) SILENT AND ORAL READING ACHIEVEMENT, (2) PATTERN OF READING ERRORS, (3) AND AUDITORY AND VISUAL PERCEPTION TECHNIQUES. THE FACT THAT COMPARISONS BETWEEN THE EXOGENOUS AND ENDOGENOUS GROUPS ON THE QUANTITATIVE AND MOST OF THE QUALITATIVE ASPECTS OF TEST…

  3. Exogenous attention to facial vs non-facial emotional visual stimuli

    PubMed Central

    Kessel, Dominique; Carboni, Alejandra; López-Martín, Sara; Albert, Jacobo; Tapia, Manuel; Mercado, Francisco; Capilla, Almudena; Hinojosa, José A.

    2013-01-01

    The capacity of the two types of non-symbolic emotional stimuli most widely used in research on affective processes, faces and (non-facial) emotional scenes, to capture exogenous attention, was compared. Negative, positive and neutral faces and affective scenes were presented as distracters to 34 participants while they carried out a demanding digit categorization task. Behavioral (reaction times and number of errors) and electrophysiological (event-related potentials—ERPs) indices of exogenous attention were analyzed. Globally, facial expressions and emotional scenes showed similar capabilities to attract exogenous attention. Electrophysiologically, attentional capture was reflected in the P2a component of ERPs at the scalp level, and in left precentral areas at the source level. Negatively charged faces and scenes elicited maximal P2a/precentral gyrus activity. In the case of scenes, this negativity bias was also evident at the behavioral level. Additionally, a specific effect of facial distracters was observed in N170 at the scalp level, and in the fusiform gyrus and inferior parietal lobule at the source level. This effect revealed maximal attention to positive expressions. This facial positivity offset was also observed at the behavioral level. Taken together, the present results indicate that faces and non-facial scenes elicit partially different and, to some extent, complementary exogenous attention mechanisms. PMID:22689218

  4. Managing chronic bladder diseases with the administration of exogenous glycosaminoglycans: an update on the evidence

    PubMed Central

    Lazzeri, Massimo; Hurle, Rodolfo; Casale, Paolo; Buffi, NicolòMaria; Lughezzani, Giovanni; Fiorini, Girolamo; Peschechera, Roberto; Pasini, Luisa; Zandegiacomo, Silvia; Benetti, Alessio; Taverna, Gianluigi; Guazzoni, Giorgio; Barbagli, Guido

    2015-01-01

    Although the pathophysiology of acute chronic cystitis and other ‘sensory’ disorders, i.e. painful bladder syndrome (PBS) or interstitial cystitis (IC), often remains multifactorial, there is a wide consensus that such clinical conditions may arise from a primary defective urothelium lining or from damaged glycosaminoglycans (GAGs). A ‘cascade’ of events starting from GAG injury, which fails to heal, may lead to chronic bladder epithelial damage and neurogenic inflammation. To restore the GAG layer is becoming the main aim of new therapies for the treatment of chronic cystitis and PBS/IC. Preliminary experiences with GAG replenishment for different pathological conditions involving the lower urinary tract have been reported. There is a range of commercially available intravesical formulations of these components, alone or in combination. Literature evidence shows that exogenous intravesical hyaluronic acid markedly reduces recurrences of urinary tract infections (UTIs). Patients treated with exogenous GAGs have fewer UTI recurrences, a longer time to recurrence and a greater improvement in quality of life. Exogenous intravesical GAGs have been used for the treatment of PBS/IC. Despite the limitations of most of the studies, findings confirmed the role of combination therapy with hyaluronic acid and chondroitin sulfate as a safe and effective option for the treatment of PBS/IC. To prevent and/or treat radiotherapy and chemotherapy induced cystitis, GAG replenishment therapy has been used showing preliminary encouraging results. The safety profile of exogenous GAGs has been reported to be very favourable, without adverse events of particular significance. PMID:27034722

  5. The relative importance of exogenous and substrate-derived nitrogen for microbial growth during leaf decomposition.

    PubMed

    Cheever, B M; Webster, J R; Bilger, E E; Thomas, S A

    2013-07-01

    Heterotrophic microbes colonizing detritus obtain nitrogen (N) for growth by assimilating N from their substrate or immobilizing exogenous inorganic N. Microbial use of these two pools has different implications for N cycling and organic matter decomposition in the face of the global increase in biologically available N. We used sugar maple leaves labeled with 15N to differentiate between microbial N that had been assimilated from the leaf substrate (enriched with 15N) or immobilized from the water (natural abundance 15N:14N) in five Appalachian streams ranging in ambient NO3(-)N concentrations from about 5 to 900 microg NO3(-)N/L. Ambient NO3(-) concentration increased sugar maple decomposition rate but did not influence the proportion of microbial N derived from substrate or exogenous pools. Instead, these proportions were strongly influenced by the percentage of detrital ash-free dry mass (AFDM) remaining. Substrate-derived N made up a large proportion of the microbial N after the first 24 h in all streams. Detrital and microbial isotopic 15N signatures approached that of the water as decomposition progressed in all streams, suggesting that exogenous N may be the predominant source of N for meeting microbial requirements even when exogenous N concentrations are low. Our results support predictions of more rapid decomposition of organic matter in response to increased N availability and highlight the tight coupling of processes driving microbial N cycling and organic matter decomposition.

  6. Quantifying the timescales over which exogenous and endogenous conditions affect soil respiration.

    PubMed

    Barron-Gafford, Greg A; Cable, Jessica M; Bentley, Lisa Patrick; Scott, Russell L; Huxman, Travis E; Jenerette, G Darrel; Ogle, Kiona

    2014-04-01

    Understanding how exogenous and endogenous factors and above-ground-below-ground linkages modulate carbon dynamics is difficult because of the influences of antecedent conditions. For example, there are variable lags between above-ground assimilation and below-ground efflux, and the duration of antecedent periods are often arbitrarily assigned. Nonetheless, developing models linking above- and below-ground processes is crucial for estimating current and future carbon dynamics. We collected data on leaf-level photosynthesis (Asat ) and soil respiration (Rsoil ) in different microhabitats (under shrubs vs under bunchgrasses) in the Sonoran Desert. We evaluated timescales over which endogenous and exogenous factors control Rsoil by analyzing data in the context of a semimechanistic temperature-response model of Rsoil that incorporated effects of antecedent exogenous (soil water) and endogenous (Asat ) conditions. For both microhabitats, antecedent soil water and Asat significantly affected Rsoil , but Rsoil under shrubs was more sensitive to Asat than that under bunchgrasses. Photosynthetic rates 1 and 3 d before the Rsoil measurement were most important in determining current-day Rsoil under bunchgrasses and shrubs, respectively, indicating a significant lag effect. Endogenous and exogenous controls are critical drivers of Rsoil , but the relative importance and the timescale over which each factor affects Rsoil depends on above-ground vegetation and ecosystem structure characteristics.

  7. A paradigm for virus-host coevolution: Sequential counter-adaptations between endogenous and exogenous retroviruses

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Endogenous retroviruses (ERVs) are remnants of ancient retroviral infections of the host germline transmitted vertically from generation to generation. It is hypothesized that during evolution some ERVs were used by the host to drive extinction of exogenous horizontally-transmitted retroviruses. Se...

  8. Role of Peers in Student Academic Achievement in Exogenously Formed University Groups

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Androushchak, Gregory; Poldin, Oleg; Yudkevich, Maria

    2013-01-01

    We estimate the influence of classmates' ability characteristics on student achievement in exogenously formed university student groups. The study uses administrative data on undergraduate students at a large selective university in Russia. The presence of high-ability classmates has a significant positive effect on individual grades in key…

  9. Exogenous attention to fear: Differential behavioral and neural responses to snakes and spiders.

    PubMed

    Soares, Sandra C; Kessel, Dominique; Hernández-Lorca, María; García-Rubio, María J; Rodrigues, Paulo; Gomes, Nuno; Carretié, Luis

    2017-03-06

    Research has consistently shown that threat stimuli automatically attract attention in order to activate the defensive response systems. Recent findings have provided evidence that snakes tuned the visual system of evolving primates for their astute detection, particularly under challenging perceptual conditions. The goal of the present study was to measure behavioral and electrophysiological indices of exogenous attention to snakes, compared with spiders - matched for rated fear levels but for which sources of natural selection are less well grounded, and to innocuous animals (birds), which were presented as distracters, while participants were engaged in a letter discrimination task. Duration of stimuli, consisting in a letter string and a concurrent distracter, was either presented for 180 or 360ms to explore if the stimulus duration was a modulating effect of snakes in capturing attention. Results showed a specific early (P1) exogenous attention-related brain potential with maximal amplitude to snakes in both durations, which was followed by an enhanced late attention-related potential (LPP) showing enhanced amplitudes to spiders, particularly under the longer exposure durations. These results suggest that exogenous attention to different classes of threat stimuli follows a gradual process, with the most evolutionary-driven stimulus, i.e., snakes, being more efficient at attracting early exogenous attention, thus more dependent on bottom-up processes.

  10. Exogenous rhTRX reduces lipid accumulation under LPS-induced inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Han, Gi-Yeon; Lee, Eun-Kyung; Park, Hey-won; Kim, Hyun-Jung; Kim, Chan-Wha

    2014-01-01

    Redox-regulating molecule, recombinant human thioredoxin (rhTRX) which shows anti-inflammatory, and anti-oxidative effects against lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated inflammation and regulate protein expression levels. LPS-induced reactive oxygen intermediates (ROI) and NO production were inhibited by exogenous rhTRX. We identified up/downregulated intracellular proteins under the LPS-treated condition in exogenous rhTRX-treated A375 cells compared with non-LPS-treated cells via 2-DE proteomic analysis. Also, we quantitatively measured cytokines of in vivo mouse inflammation models using cytometry bead array. Exogenous rhTRX inhibited LPS-stimulated production of ROI and NO levels. TIP47 and ATP synthase may influence the inflammation-related lipid accumulation by affecting lipid metabolism. The modulation of skin redox environments during inflammation is most likely to prevent alterations in lipid metabolism through upregulation of TIP47 and ATP synthase and downregulation of inflammatory cytokines. Our results demonstrate that exogenous rhTRX has anti-inflammatory properties and intracellular regulatory activity in vivo and in vitro. Monitoring of LPS-stimulated pro-inflammatory conditions treated with rhTRX in A375 cells could be useful for diagnosis and follow-up of inflammation reduction related with candidate proteins. These results have a therapeutic role in skin inflammation therapy. PMID:24406320

  11. Scaling the relative dominance of exogenous drivers in structuring desert small mammal assemblages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez, Daniela; Ojeda, Ricardo A.

    2015-11-01

    Assemblage patterns could be primarily generated by two types of drivers: exogenous (such as environmental and climatic factors) and endogenous (interactions such as competition, predation, mutualism or herbivory). The most widely accepted hypothesis states that at smaller scales (such as patch scale), interspecific interactions are the major drivers structuring communities, whereas at larger regional scales, factors such as climate, topography and soil act as ecological filters that determine assemblage composition. The general aim of this paper is to compare different exogenous drivers in terms of their relative dominance in structuring desert small mammal communities across a range of spatial scales, from patch to regional, and compare them with previous results on endogenous drivers. Our results show that as spatial scale increases, the explanatory power of exogenous factors also increases, e.g. from 17% at the patch scale (i.e. abundance) to 99% at the regional scale (i.e. diversity). Moreover, environmental drivers vary in type and strength depending on the community estimator across several spatial scales. On the other hand, endogenous drivers such as interspecific interactions are more important at the patch scale, diminishing in importance towards the regional scale. Therefore, the relative importance of exogenous versus endogenous drivers affects small mammal assemblage structure at different spatial scales. Our results fill up a knowledge gap concerning ecological drivers of assemblage structure at intermediate spatial scales for Monte desert small mammals, and highlight the importance of dealing with multi-causal factors in explaining ecological patterns of assemblages.

  12. Application of Exogenous Ethylene Inhibits Postharvest Peel Browning of ‘Huangguan’ Pear

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Peel browning disorder has an enormous impact on the exterior quality of ‘Huangguan’ pear whereas the underlying mechanism is still unclear. In this study, the effect of exogenous ethylene on peel browning of pear fruits stored at 0' was evaluated. Results showed that ethylene effectively inhibited ...

  13. Reference Pricing with Endogenous or Exogenous Payment Limits: Impacts on Insurer and Consumer Spending.

    PubMed

    Brown, Timothy T; Robinson, James C

    2016-06-01

    Reference pricing (RP) theories predict different outcomes when reference prices are fixed (exogenous) versus being a function of market prices (MPs) (endogenous). Exogenous RP results in MPs at both high-price and low-price firms converging towards the reference price from above and below, respectively. Endogenous RP results in MPs at both high-price and low-price firms decreasing, with low-price firms acting strategically to decrease the reference price in order to gain market share. We extend these models to a hospital context focusing on insurer and consumer payments. Under exogenous RP, insurer and consumer payments to low-price hospitals increase, and insurer payments to high-price hospitals decrease, but predictions regarding consumer payments are ambiguous for high-price hospitals. Under endogenous RP, insurer payments to high-price and low-price hospitals decrease, and consumer payments to low-price hospitals decrease, but predictions regarding consumer payments are ambiguous for high-price hospitals. We test these predictions with difference-in-differences specifications using 2008-2013 data on patients undergoing joint replacement. For 2 years following RP implementation, insurer payments to high-price and low-price hospitals moved downward, consistent with endogenous RP. However, when the reference price was not reset to account for changes in MPs, insurer payments to low-price hospitals reverted to pre-implementation levels, consistent with exogenous RP. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  14. Exogenous IAA differentially affects growth, oxidative stress and antioxidants system in Cd stressed Trigonella foenum-graecum L. seedlings: Toxicity alleviation by up-regulation of ascorbate-glutathione cycle.

    PubMed

    Bashri, Gausiya; Prasad, Sheo Mohan

    2016-10-01

    In the present study, effect of exogenous indole-3-acetic acid at their different levels (i.e. low; IAAL, 10µM and high; IAAH, 100µM) were studied on growth, oxidative stress biomarkers and antioxidant enzymes (SOD, POD, CAT and GST), and metabolites (AsA and GSH) as well as enzymes (APX, GR and DHAR) of ascorbate-glutathione cycle in Trigonella foenum-graecum L. seedlings grown under cadmium (Cd1, 3mgCd kg(-1) soil and Cd2, 9mgCd kg(-1) soil) stress. Cadmium (Cd) at both doses caused reduction in growth which was correlated with enhanced lipid peroxidation and damage to membrane as a result of excess accumulation of O2(•-) and H2O2. Cd also enhanced the oxidation of AsA and GSH to DHA and GSSG, respectively which give a clear sign of oxidative stress, despite of accelerated activity of enzymatic antioxidants: SOD, CAT, POD, GST as well as APX, DHAR (except in Cd2 stress) and GR. Exogenous application of IAAL resulted further rise in the activities of these enzymes, and maintained the redox status (> ratios: AsA/DHA and GSH/GSSG) of cells. The maintained redox status of cells under IAAL treatment declined the level of ROS in Cd1 and Cd2 treated seedlings thereby alleviated the Cd toxicity and this effect was more pronounced under Cd1 stress. Contrary to this, exogenous IAAH suppressed the activity of DHAR and GR and disturbed the redox status (< ratios: AsA/DHA and GSH/GSSG) of cells, hence excess accumulation of ROS further aggravated the Cd induced damage. Thus, overall results suggest that IAA at low (IAAL) and high (IAAH) doses affected the Cd toxicity differently by regulating the ascorbate-glutathione cycle as well as activity of other antioxidants in Trigonella seedlings.

  15. Enzymes, embryos, and ancestors.

    PubMed

    Gerhart, John

    2010-01-01

    In the 1950s, cellular regulatory mechanisms were newly recognized; with Arthur Pardee I investigated the initial enzyme of pyrimidine biosynthesis, which he discovered is controlled by feedback inhibition. The protein proved unusual in having separate but interacting sites for substrates and regulators. Howard Schachman and I dissociated the protein into different subunits, one binding regulators and one substrates. The enzyme became an early prime example of allostery. In developmental biology I studied the egg of the frog, Xenopus laevis, characterizing early processes of axis formation. My excellent students and I described cortical rotation, a 30° movement of the egg's cortex over tracks of parallel microtubules anchored to the underlying cytoplasmic core, and we perturbed it to alter Spemann's organizer and effect spectacular phenotypes. The entire sequence of events has been elucidated by others at the molecular level, making Xenopus a prime example of vertebrate axis formation. Marc Kirschner, Christopher Lowe, and I then compared hemichordate (half-chordate) and chordate early development. Despite anatomical-physiological differences, these groups share numerous steps of axis formation, ones that were probably already in use in their pre-Cambrian ancestor. I've thoroughly enjoyed exploring these areas during a 50-year period of great advances in biological sciences by the worldwide research community.

  16. Chemical Rescue of Enzymes: Proton Transfer in Mutants of Human Carbonic Anhydrase II

    PubMed Central

    Maupin, C. Mark; Castillo, Norberto; Taraphder, Srabani; Tu, Chingkuang; McKenna, Robert; Silverman, David N.; Voth, Gregory A.

    2011-01-01

    In human carbonic anhydrase II (HCA II) the mutation of position 64 from histidine to alanine (H64A) disrupts the rate limiting proton transfer (PT) event, resulting in a reduction of the catalytic activity of the enzyme as compared to the wild-type. Potential of mean force (PMF) calculations utilizing the multistate empirical valence bond (MS-EVB) methodology for H64A HCA II give a PT free energy barrier significantly higher than that found in the wild-type enzyme. This high barrier, determined in the absence of exogenous buffer and assuming no additional ionizable residues in the PT pathway, indicates the likelihood of alternate enzyme pathways that utilize either ionizable enzyme residues (self-rescue) and/or exogenous buffers (chemical rescue). It has been shown experimentally that the catalytic activity of H64A HCA II can be chemically rescued to near wild type levels by the addition of the exogenous buffer 4-methylimidazole (4MI). Crystallographic studies have identified two 4MI binding sites, yet site specific mutations intended to disrupt 4MI binding have demonstrated these sites to be non-productive. In the present work MS-EVB simulations show that binding of 4MI near Thr199 in the H64A HCA II mutant, a binding site determined by NMR spectroscopy, results in a viable chemical rescue pathway. Additional viable rescue pathways are also identified where 4MI acts as a proton transport intermediary from the active site to ionizable residues on the rim of the active site, revealing a probable mode of action for the chemical rescue pathway PMID:21452838

  17. Enzyme-Responsive Liposomes for the Delivery of Anticancer Drugs.

    PubMed

    Fouladi, Farnaz; Steffen, Kristine J; Mallik, Sanku

    2017-03-08

    Liposomes are nanocarriers that deliver the payloads at the target site, leading to therapeutic drug concentrations at the diseased site and reduced toxic effects in healthy tissues. Several approaches have been used to enhance the ability of the nanocarrier to target the specific tissues, including ligand-targeted liposomes and stimuli-responsive liposomes. Ligand-targeted liposomes exhibit higher uptake by the target tissue due to the targeting ligand attached to the surface, while the stimuli-responsive liposomes do not release their cargo unless they expose to an endogenous or exogenous stimulant at the target site. In this review, we mainly focus on the liposomes that are responsive to pathologically increased levels of enzymes at the target site. Enzyme-responsive liposomes release their cargo upon contact with the enzyme through several destabilization mechanisms: (1) structural perturbation in the lipid bilayer, (2) removal of a shielding polymer from the surface and increased cellular uptake, (3) cleavage of a lipopeptide or lipopolymer incorporated in the bilayer, and (4) activation of a prodrug in the liposomes.

  18. The effects of exogenous antioxidant germanium (Ge) on seed germination and growth of Lycium ruthenicum Murr subjected to NaCl stress.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yan; Hou, Long-yu; Li, Qing-mei; Jiang, Ze-ping; Liu, Duo; Zhu, Yan

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we present the results of a study on the effects of exogenous antioxidant germanium (Ge) on seed germination and seedling growth, and its role as a radical scavenger that regulates related enzymes, including superoxide dismutase (SOD), peroxidase (POD) and catalase (CAT), under salt stress. Seeds were incubated in 0, 50, 100, 150, 200, 250 and 300 mM NaCl to determine the salt tolerance of the Lycium ruthenicum Murr seedlings and from the results, the critical and ultimate salt concentrations were chosen for the next experiment. Subsequently, two treatments (seeds soaked in Ge and Ge added to salt) with four concentrations of GeO2 (0, 5, 10 and 20 μM) were used with the critical (150 mM) and ultimate salt concentrations (250 mM). The results demonstrated that salt alone inhibited seed germination significantly (≥150 mM) and reduced seedling growth (≥200 mM). The addition of exogenous Ge to the salt solution, as well as soaking the seeds in Ge, attenuated the salt stress effects in a manner dependent on the dose of Ge, as indicated by the increased percentage of seeds that germinated and improved seedling growth. The addition of Ge also showed a significant reversal of salt stress on the activities of antioxidant enzymes, with a decrease in SOD and POD activity, but an increase in CAT activity with 150 mM NaCl, and enhancement of SOD, POD and CAT with 250 mM NaCl. Correspondingly, the level of malondialdehyde was decreased significantly by each Ge treatment under salt stress. Further, for L. ruthenicum, adding 10 Ge and seeds soaked in 5 Ge were the most effective treatments. To our knowledge, this is the first report to show the protective effects of exogenous Ge against salt-induced oxidative damage in L. ruthenicum seed germination and seedling growth. Thus, L. ruthenicum can be used in areas with salty soil and Ge can promote the plants' salt tolerance.

  19. Industrial use of immobilized enzymes.

    PubMed

    DiCosimo, Robert; McAuliffe, Joseph; Poulose, Ayrookaran J; Bohlmann, Gregory

    2013-08-07

    Although many methods for enzyme immobilization have been described in patents and publications, relatively few processes employing immobilized enzymes have been successfully commercialized. The cost of most industrial enzymes is often only a minor component in overall process economics, and in these instances, the additional costs associated with enzyme immobilization are often not justified. More commonly the benefit realized from enzyme immobilization relates to the process advantages that an immobilized catalyst offers, for example, enabling continuous production, improved stability and the absence of the biocatalyst in the product stream. The development and attributes of several established and emerging industrial applications for immobilized enzymes, including high-fructose corn syrup production, pectin hydrolysis, debittering of fruit juices, interesterification of food fats and oils, biodiesel production, and carbon dioxide capture are reviewed herein, highlighting factors that define the advantages of enzyme immobilization.

  20. Enhancement of microbial 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene transformation with increased toxicity by exogenous nutrient amendment.

    PubMed

    Liang, Shih-Hsiung; Hsu, Duen-Wei; Lin, Chia-Ying; Kao, Chih-Ming; Huang, Da-Ji; Chien, Chih-Ching; Chen, Ssu-Ching; Tsai, Isheng Jason; Chen, Chien-Cheng

    2017-04-01

    In this study, the bacterial strain Citrobacter youngae strain E4 was isolated from 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT)-contaminated soil and used to assess the capacity of TNT transformation with/without exogenous nutrient amendments. C. youngae E4 poorly degraded TNT without an exogenous amino nitrogen source, whereas the addition of an amino nitrogen source considerably increased the efficacy of TNT transformation in a dose-dependent manner. The enhanced TNT transformation of C. youngae E4 was mediated by increased cell growth and up-regulation of TNT nitroreductases, including NemA, NfsA and NfsB. This result indicates that the increase in TNT transformation by C. youngae E4 via nitrogen nutrient stimulation is a cometabolism process. Consistently, TNT transformation was effectively enhanced when C. youngae E4 was subjected to a TNT-contaminated soil slurry in the presence of an exogenous amino nitrogen amendment. Thus, effective enhancement of TNT transformation via the coordinated inoculation of the nutrient-responsive C. youngae E4 and an exogenous nitrogen amendment might be applicable for the remediation of TNT-contaminated soil. Although the TNT transformation was significantly enhanced by C. youngae E4 in concert with biostimulation, the 96-h LC50 value of the TNT transformation product mixture on the aquatic invertebrate Tigriopus japonicas was higher than the LC50 value of TNT alone. Our results suggest that exogenous nutrient amendment can enhance microbial TNT transformation; however, additional detoxification processes may be needed due to the increased toxicity after reduced TNT transformation.

  1. Exogenous lactate supply affects lactate kinetics of rainbow trout, not swimming performance

    PubMed Central

    Omlin, Teye; Langevin, Karolanne

    2014-01-01

    Intense swimming causes circulatory lactate accumulation in rainbow trout because lactate disposal (Rd) is not stimulated as strongly as lactate appearance (Ra). This mismatch suggests that maximal Rd is limited by tissue capacity to metabolize lactate. This study uses exogenous lactate to investigate what constrains maximal Rd and minimal Ra. Our goals were to determine how exogenous lactate affects: 1) Ra and Rd of lactate under baseline conditions or during graded swimming, and 2) exercise performance (critical swimming speed, Ucrit) and energetics (cost of transport, COT). Results show that exogenous lactate allows swimming trout to boost maximal Rd lactate by 40% and reach impressive rates of 56 μmol·kg−1·min−1. This shows that the metabolic capacity of tissues for lactate disposal is not responsible for setting the highest Rd normally observed after intense swimming. Baseline endogenous Ra (resting in normoxic water) is not significantly reduced by exogenous lactate supply. Therefore, trout have an obligatory need to produce lactate, either as a fuel for oxidative tissues and/or from organs relying on glycolysis. Exogenous lactate does not affect Ucrit or COT, probably because it acts as a substitute for glucose and lipids rather than extra fuel. We conclude that the observed 40% increase in Rd lactate is made possible by accelerating lactate entry into oxidative tissues via monocarboxylate transporters (MCTs). This observation together with the weak expression of MCTs and the phenomenon of white muscle lactate retention show that lactate metabolism of rainbow trout is significantly constrained by transmembrane transport. PMID:25121611

  2. Two cognitive and neural systems for endogenous and exogenous spatial attention.

    PubMed

    Chica, Ana B; Bartolomeo, Paolo; Lupiáñez, Juan

    2013-01-15

    Orienting of spatial attention is a family of phylogenetically old mechanisms developed to select information for further processing. Information can be selected via top-down or endogenous mechanisms, depending on the goals of the observers or on the task at hand. Moreover, salient and potentially dangerous events also attract spatial attention via bottom-up or exogenous mechanisms, allowing a rapid and efficient reaction to unexpected but important events. Fronto-parietal brain networks have been demonstrated to play an important role in supporting spatial attentional orienting, although there is no consensus on whether there is a single attentional system supporting both endogenous and exogenous attention, or two anatomical and functionally different attentional systems. In the present paper we review behavioral evidence emphasizing the differential characteristics of both systems, as well as their possible interactions for the control of the final orienting response. Behavioral studies reporting qualitative differences between the effects of both systems as well as double dissociations of the effects of endogenous and exogenous attention on information processing, suggest that they constitute two independent attentional systems, rather than a single one. Recent models of attentional orienting in humans have put forward the hypothesis of a dorsal fronto-parietal network for orienting spatial attention, and a more ventral fronto-parietal network for detecting unexpected but behaviorally relevant events. Non-invasive neurostimulation techniques, as well as neuropsychological data, suggest that endogenous and exogenous attention are implemented in overlapping, although partially segregated, brain circuits. Although more research is needed in order to refine our anatomical and functional knowledge of the brain circuits underlying spatial attention, we conclude that endogenous and exogenous spatial orienting constitute two independent attentional systems, with

  3. Silver resistance in Gram-negative bacteria: a dissection of endogenous and exogenous mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Randall, Christopher P.; Gupta, Arya; Jackson, Nicole; Busse, David; O'Neill, Alex J.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To gain a more detailed understanding of endogenous (mutational) and exogenous (horizontally acquired) resistance to silver in Gram-negative pathogens, with an emphasis on clarifying the genetic bases for resistance. Methods A suite of microbiological and molecular genetic techniques was employed to select and characterize endogenous and exogenous silver resistance in several Gram-negative species. Results In Escherichia coli, endogenous resistance arose after 6 days of exposure to silver, a consequence of two point mutations that were both necessary and sufficient for the phenotype. These mutations, in ompR and cusS, respectively conferred loss of the OmpC/F porins and derepression of the CusCFBA efflux transporter, both phenotypic changes previously linked to reduced intracellular accumulation of silver. Exogenous resistance involved derepression of the SilCFBA efflux transporter as a consequence of mutation in silS, but was additionally contingent on expression of the periplasmic silver-sequestration protein SilE. Silver resistance could be selected at high frequency (>10−9) from Enterobacteriaceae lacking OmpC/F porins or harbouring the sil operon and both endogenous and exogenous resistance were associated with modest fitness costs in vitro. Conclusions Both endogenous and exogenous silver resistance are dependent on the derepressed expression of closely related efflux transporters and are therefore mechanistically similar phenotypes. The ease with which silver resistance can become selected in some bacterial pathogens in vitro suggests that there would be benefit in improved surveillance for silver-resistant isolates in the clinic, along with greater control over use of silver-containing products, in order to best preserve the clinical utility of silver. PMID:25567964

  4. Microsomal detoxification enzymes in yam bean [Pachyrhizus erosus (L.) urban].

    PubMed

    Belford, Ebenezer J D; Dörfler, Ulrike; Stampfl, Andreas; Schröder, Peter

    2004-01-01

    Cytochrome P450s and glutathione-S-transferases (GSTs) constitute two of the largest groups of enzyme families that are responsible for detoxification of exogenous molecules in plants. Their activities differ from plant to plant with respect to metabolism and substrate specificity which is one of the reasons for herbicide selectivity. In the tuber forming yam bean, the legume Pachyrhizus erosus, their activities at the microsomal level were investigated to determine the detoxification status of the plant. The breakdown of the herbicide isoproturon (IPU) to two distinct metabolites, 1-OH-IPU and monodesmethyl-IPU, was demonstrated. GST activity was determined with model substrates, but also by the catalysed formation of the fluorescent glutathione bimane conjugate. This study demonstrates for the first time microsomal detoxification activity in Pachyrhizus and the fluorescence image description of microsomal GST catalysed reaction in a legume.

  5. Mammary gland morphology and gene expression signature of prepubertal male and female rats following exposure to exogenous estradiol

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In order to characterize the actions of xenoestrogens, it is essential to possess a solid portrait of the physiological effects of exogenous estradiol. We assessed effects of three doses of exogenous estradiol (E2) (0.1, 1.0 and 10 micrograms/kg/day) on the mammary gland morphology and gene expressi...

  6. Nucleic-acid-programmed Ag-nanoclusters as a generic platform for visualization of latent fingerprints and exogenous substances.

    PubMed

    Ran, Xiang; Wang, Zhenzhen; Zhang, Zhijun; Pu, Fang; Ren, Jinsong; Qu, Xiaogang

    2016-01-11

    We display a nucleic acid controlled AgNC platform for latent fingerprint visualization. The versatile emission of aptamer-modified AgNCs was regulated by the nearby DNA regions. Multi-color images for simultaneous visualization of fingerprints and exogenous components were successfully obtained. A quantitative detection strategy for exogenous substances in fingerprints was also established.

  7. DNA cleavage enzymes for treatment of persistent viral infections: Recent advances and the pathway forward

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, Nicholas D.; Aubert, Martine; Dang, Chung H.; Stone, Daniel; Jerome, Keith R.

    2014-04-15

    Treatment for most persistent viral infections consists of palliative drug options rather than curative approaches. This is often because long-lasting viral DNA in infected cells is not affected by current antivirals, providing a source for viral persistence and reactivation. Targeting latent viral DNA itself could therefore provide a basis for novel curative strategies. DNA cleavage enzymes can be used to induce targeted mutagenesis of specific genes, including those of exogenous viruses. Although initial in vitro and even in vivo studies have been carried out using DNA cleavage enzymes targeting various viruses, many questions still remain concerning the feasibility of these strategies as they transition into preclinical research. Here, we review the most recent findings on DNA cleavage enzymes for human viral infections, consider the most relevant animal models for several human viral infections, and address issues regarding safety and enzyme delivery. Results from well-designed in vivo studies will ideally provide answers to the most urgent remaining questions, and allow continued progress toward clinical application. - Highlights: • Recent in vitro and in vivo results for DNA cleavage enzymes targeting persistent viral infections. • Analysis of the best animal models for testing enzymes for HBV, HSV, HIV and HPV. • Challenges facing in vivo delivery of therapeutic enzymes for persistent viral infections. • Safety issues to be addressed with proper animal studies.

  8. Relevance of induction of human drug-metabolizing enzymes: pharmacological and toxicological implications

    PubMed Central

    PARK, B. K.; KITTERINGHAM, N. R.; PIRMOHAMED, M.; TUCKER, G. T.

    1996-01-01

    1Human drug-metabolizing systems can be induced, or activated, by a large number of exogenous agents including drugs, alcohol, components in the diet and cigarette smoke, as well as by endogenous factors. 2Such perturbation of enzyme activity undoubtedly contributes to both intra- and inter-individual variation both with respect to the rate and route of metabolism for a particular drug. Induction may, in theory, either attenuate the pharmacological response or exacerbate the toxicity of a particular drug, or both. 3The clinical impact of enzyme induction will depend upon the number of different enzyme isoforms affected and the magnitude of the inductive response within an individual, and also on the therapeutic indices of the affected substrates. 4The toxicological implications will be determined either by any change in the route of metabolism, or by a disturbance of the balance between activation and detoxication processes, which may be isozyme selective. PMID:8799511

  9. Evolution of Enzyme Kinetic Mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Ulusu, Nuriye Nuray

    2015-06-01

    This review paper discusses the reciprocal kinetic behaviours of enzymes and the evolution of structure-function dichotomy. Kinetic mechanisms have evolved in response to alterations in ecological and metabolic conditions. The kinetic mechanisms of single-substrate mono-substrate enzyme reactions are easier to understand and much simpler than those of bi-bi substrate enzyme reactions. The increasing complexities of kinetic mechanisms, as well as the increasing number of enzyme subunits, can be used to shed light on the evolution of kinetic mechanisms. Enzymes with heterogeneous kinetic mechanisms attempt to achieve specific products to subsist. In many organisms, kinetic mechanisms have evolved to aid survival in response to changing environmental factors. Enzyme promiscuity is defined as adaptation to changing environmental conditions, such as the introduction of a toxin or a new carbon source. Enzyme promiscuity is defined as adaptation to changing environmental conditions, such as the introduction of a toxin or a new carbon source. Enzymes with broad substrate specificity and promiscuous properties are believed to be more evolved than single-substrate enzymes. This group of enzymes can adapt to changing environmental substrate conditions and adjust catalysing mechanisms according to the substrate's properties, and their kinetic mechanisms have evolved in response to substrate variability.

  10. Plasma exogenous creatinine clearance in clinically healthy cats: comparison with urinary exogenous creatinine clearance, tentative reference intervals and indexation to bodyweight.

    PubMed

    Reynolds, B S; Massal, M R; Nguyen, P; Grégoire, L L; Périgaud, A E; Concordet, D; Biourge, V; Lefebvre, H P

    2014-10-01

    Glomerular filtration rate (GFR) is considered to be the best indicator of overall kidney function. The major objectives of this study were to compare plasma exogenous creatinine clearance (PECC) with a reference method, to establish reference intervals (RIs) for PECC and to assess the effects of indexation of GFR to bodyweight (BW) in cats. PECC was compared with urinary clearance of exogenous creatinine (UECC) in six clinically healthy domestic shorthair cats (experiment 1). Tentative RIs were determined according to current guidelines and the effects of indexation to BW and of covariables on GFR were assessed in 43 clinically healthy cats of various breeds (experiment 2). PECC was 15% higher than UECC (P <0.01), but the two estimates were strongly correlated (r(2)=0.97, P = 0.001). RIs for PECC were 6.4-21.3 mL/min or 1.2-4.9 mL/min/kg. The absolute (i.e. non-indexed) GFR value was not dependent on BW. Thus, indexation of GFR to BW in cats would not standardize the GFR value, but could introduce bias in clinical interpretation. Significant effects of breed, plasma protein concentration and plasma albumin concentration on GFR were demonstrated. Plasma concentrations of urea and creatinine, when assessed separately, were also weakly correlated with GFR in healthy cats. These combined findings contribute to a better understanding of renal function assessment in cats.

  11. DNase-activatable fluorescence probes visualizing the degradation of exogenous DNA in living cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Ping; Shi, Bihua; Zhang, Pengfei; Hu, Dehong; Zheng, Mingbin; Zheng, Cuifang; Gao, Duyang; Cai, Lintao

    2012-03-01

    This work presents a method to visualize the degradation of exogenous DNA in living cells using a novel type of activatable fluorescence imaging probe. Deoxyribonuclease (DNase)-activatable fluorescence probes (DFProbes) are composed of double strands deoxyribonucleic acid (dsDNA) which is labeled with fluorophore (ROX or Cy3) and quencher on the end of one of its strands, and stained with SYBR Green I. In the absence of DNase, DFProbes produce the green fluorescence signal of SYBR Green I. In the presence of DNase, SYBR Green I is removed from the DFProbes and the labeled fluorophore is separated from the quencher owing to the degradation of DFProbes by DNase, resulting in the decrease of the green fluorescence signal and the occurrence of a red fluorescence signal due to fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET). DNase in biological samples was detected using DFProbes and the fluorescence imaging in living cells was performed using DFprobe-modified Au nanoparticles. The results show that DFProbes have good responses to DNase, and can clearly visualize the degradation of exogenous DNA in cells in real time. The well-designed probes might be useful in tracing the dynamic changes of exogenous DNA and nanocarriers in vitro and in vivo.This work presents a method to visualize the degradation of exogenous DNA in living cells using a novel type of activatable fluorescence imaging probe. Deoxyribonuclease (DNase)-activatable fluorescence probes (DFProbes) are composed of double strands deoxyribonucleic acid (dsDNA) which is labeled with fluorophore (ROX or Cy3) and quencher on the end of one of its strands, and stained with SYBR Green I. In the absence of DNase, DFProbes produce the green fluorescence signal of SYBR Green I. In the presence of DNase, SYBR Green I is removed from the DFProbes and the labeled fluorophore is separated from the quencher owing to the degradation of DFProbes by DNase, resulting in the decrease of the green fluorescence signal and the

  12. [Alleviation of salt stress during maize seed germination by presoaking with exogenous sugar].

    PubMed

    Zhao, Ying; Yang, Ke-jun; Li, Zuo-tong; Zhao, Chang-jiang; Xu, Jing-yu; Hu, Xue- wei; Shi, Xin-xin; Ma, Li-feng

    2015-09-01

    The maize variety Kenyu 6 was used to study the effects of exogenous glucose (Glc) and sucrose (Suc) on salt tolerance of maize seeds at germination stage under 150 mmol · L(-1) NaCl treatment. Results showed that under salt stress condition, 0.5 mmol · L(-1) exogenous Glc and Suc presoaking could promote seed germination and early seedling growth. Compared with the salt treatment, Glc presoaking increased the shoot length, radicle length and corresponding dry mass up to 1.5, 1.3, 2.1 and 1.8 times, and those of the Suc presoaking treatment increased up to 1.7, 1.3. 2.7 and 1.9 times, respectively. Exogenous Glc and Suc presoaking resulted in decreased levels of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) content of maize shoot under salt stress, which were lowered by 24.9% and 20.6% respectively. Exogenous Glc and Suc presoaking could increase the activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD), ascorbate peroxidase (APX), glutathione peroxidase (GPX), glutathione reductase (GR) and induce glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PDH) activity of maize shoot under salt stress. Compared with the salt treatment. Glc presoaking increased the activity of SOD, APX, GPX, GR and G6PDH by 66.2%, 62.9%, 32.0%, 38.5% and 50.5%, and those of the Suc presoaking increased by 67.5%, 59.8%, 30.0%, 38.5% and 50.4%, respectively. Glc and Suc presoaking also significantly increased the contents of ascorbic acid (ASA) and glutathione (GSH), ASA/DHA and GSH/GSSG. The G6PDH activity was found closely related with the strong antioxidation capacity induced by exogenous sugars. In addition, Glc and Suc presoaking enhanced K+/Na+ in maize shoot by 1.3 and 1.4 times of water soaking salt treatment, respectively. These results indicated that exogenous Glc and Suc presoaking could improve antioxidation capacity of maize seeds and maintain the in vivo K+/Na+ ion balance to alleviate the inhibitory effect of salt stress on maize seed germination.

  13. Heterogeneous effects of exogenous IL-2 on HIV-specific cell-mediated immunity (CMI).

    PubMed Central

    Bell, S J; Cooper, D A; Kemp, B E; Doherty, R R; Penny, R

    1992-01-01

    A characteristic feature associated with HIV-1 infection of the human host is a chronic decline in circulating CD4+ T helper/inducer cell numbers. Impaired cell-mediated immune functions usually occur in parallel with the decline in CD4+ T cells. Activated CD4+ T helper cells are a major source of endogenous IL-2 which is required for the immunoregulation of both antigen-specific B cells and CD8+ T cells. HIV-specific T cell proliferative responses are said to be weak and inconsistent, even during the asymptomatic phase of disease. We thus wished to determine how exogenous IL-2 affected HIV-specific T cell proliferation at different stages of the disease. Our cohort of 81 included both asymptomatic and symptomatic HIV-infected patients as well as uninfected normal donors. Proliferative responses of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) that were elicited during culture with an immunodominant gp41-derived synthetic peptide, gp41[8], and which were known to be CD8+ cell-associated in asymptomatics only, were used to analyse the effects of exogenous IL-2. IL-2 had three main effects on HIV-specific proliferation, namely (i) an additive effect, (ii) a synergistic effect, and (iii) an induced effect. More specifically, low dose exogenous IL-2 frequently augmented lymphoproliferation in both asymptomatic and symptomatic gp41[8] responders. In most symptomatics, however, who were predominantly gp41[8] non-responders, exogenous IL-2 induced lymphoproliferation. Flow cytometric analyses using dual immunofluorescence were used to analyse the T cell subset distribution of proliferating PBMC cultures. During culture with gp41[8], both CD4+ and CD8+ T cell numbers increased. However, after the addition of exogenous IL-2 to gp41[8]-containing cultures, CD8+ cell-associated lymphoproliferative responses were preferentially augmented. These results suggest that in symptomatics there is an inadequate supply of endogenous IL-2 to help maintain the strong and effective CD8+ cell

  14. Enzyme molecules in solitary confinement.

    PubMed

    Liebherr, Raphaela B; Gorris, Hans H

    2014-09-12

    Large arrays of homogeneous microwells each defining a femtoliter volume are a versatile platform for monitoring the substrate turnover of many individual enzyme molecules in parallel. The high degree of parallelization enables the analysis of a statistically representative enzyme population. Enclosing individual enzyme molecules in microwells does not require any surface immobilization step and enables the kinetic investigation of enzymes free in solution. This review describes various microwell array formats and explores their applications for the detection and investigation of single enzyme molecules. The development of new fabrication techniques and sensitive detection methods drives the field of single molecule enzymology. Here, we introduce recent progress in single enzyme molecule analysis in microwell arrays and discuss the challenges and opportunities.

  15. Enzyme actuated bioresponsive hydrogels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Andrew Nolan

    Bioresponsive hydrogels are emerging with technological significance in targeted drug delivery, biosensors and regenerative medicine. Conferred with the ability to respond to specific biologically derived stimuli, the design challenge is in effectively linking the conferred biospecificity with an engineered response tailored to the needs of a particular application. Moreover, the fundamental phenomena governing the response must support an appropriate dynamic range and limit of detection. The design of these systems is inherently complicated due to the high interdependency of the governing phenomena that guide the sensing, transduction, and the actuation response of hydrogels. To investigate the dynamics of these materials, model systems may be used which seek to interrogate the system dynamics by uni-variable experimentation and limit confounding phenomena such as: polymer-solute interactions, polymer swelling dynamics and biomolecular reaction-diffusion concerns. To this end, a model system, alpha-chymotrypsin (Cht) (a protease) and a cleavable peptide-chromogen (pro-drug) covalently incorporated into a hydrogel, was investigated to understand the mechanisms of covalent loading and release by enzymatic cleavage in bio-responsive delivery systems. Using EDC and Sulfo-NHS, terminal carboxyl groups of N-succinyl-Ala-Ala-Pro-Phe p-nitroanilide, a cleavable chromogen, were conjugated to primary amines of a hydrated poly(HEMA)-based hydrogel. Hydrogel discs were incubated in buffered Cht causing enzyme-mediated cleavage of the peptide and concomitant release of the chromophore for monitoring. To investigate substrate loading and the effects of hydrogel morphology on the system, the concentration of the amino groups (5, 10, 20, and 30 mol%) and the cross-linked density (1, 5, 7, 9 and 12 mol%) were independently varied. Loading-Release Efficiency of the chromogen was shown to exhibit a positive relation to increasing amino groups (AEMA). The release rates demonstrated a

  16. Associations of common variants in genes involved in metabolism and response to exogenous chemicals with risk of multiple myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Gold, Laura S.; De Roos, Anneclaire J.; Brown, Elizabeth E.; Lan, Qing; Milliken, Kevin; Davis, Scott; Chanock, Stephen J.; Zhang, Yawei; Severson, Richard; Zahm, Sheila H.; Zheng, Tongzhang; Rothman, Nat; Baris, Dalsu

    2009-01-01

    Background We examined risk of multiple myeloma (MM) associated with variants in genes involved in metabolism and response to exogenous chemicals [cytochrome P450 enzymes (CYP1B1, CYP2C9), epoxide hydrolase (EPHX1), paraoxonase 1 (PON1), arylhydrocarbon hydroxylase receptor (AHR), and NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase (NQO1)]. Methods This study included 279 MM cases and 782 controls in a pooled analysis of two population-based case control studies. One common variant from each candidate gene was genotyped using DNA from blood or buccal cells. We estimated risk of MM associated with each genotype, controlling for race, gender, study site, and age, using odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI). Results Evaluations of the CYP1B1 V432L variant (rs1056836) suggested increased risk of MM among persons with the CG and GG genotypes compared to the CC genotype [OR (95% CI) = 1.4 (1.0–2.0)]. Similar results were seen in analyses stratified by race and gender. We did not find any associations between MM and the CYP2C9, EPHX1, NQO1, or PON1 genes. Conclusions CYP1B1 activates chemicals such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and dioxins to create oxidized, reactive intermediates, and higher gene activity has been shown for the G allele. We conducted the largest analysis to date on MM and these genetic variants and our results provide preliminary evidence that variation in CYP1B1 may influence susceptibility to MM. PMID:19736056

  17. Effects of exogenous spermine on chlorophyll fluorescence, antioxidant system and ultrastructure of chloroplasts in Cucumis sativus L. under salt stress.

    PubMed

    Shu, Sheng; Yuan, Ling-Yun; Guo, Shi-Rong; Sun, Jin; Yuan, Ying-Hui

    2013-02-01

    The effects of exogenous spermine (Spm) on plant growth, chlorophyll fluorescence, ultrastructure and anti-oxidative metabolism of chloroplasts were investigated in Cucumis sativus L. under NaCl stress. Salt stress significantly reduced plant growth, chlorophylls content and F(v)/F(m). These changes could be alleviated by foliar spraying with Spm. Salt stress caused an increase in malondialdehyde (MDA) content and superoxide anion [Formula: see text] generation rate in chloroplasts. Application of Spm significantly increased activities of superoxidase dismutase (SOD, EC 1.15.1.1), peroxidase (POD, EC 1.11.1.7), and ascorbate peroxidase (APX, EC 1.11.1.11) which decreased the levels of [Formula: see text] and MDA in the salt-stressed chloroplasts. Salt stress decreased the activities of dehydroascorbate reductase (DHAR, EC 1.8.5.1) and glutathione reductase (GR, EC 1.6.4.2) in the chloroplasts and reduced the contents of dehydroascorbate (DAsA) and glutathione (GSH), but increased monodehydroascorbate reductase (MDAR, EC 1.6.5.4) activity. On the other hand, Spm significantly increased the activities of antioxidant enzymes and levels of antioxidants in the salt-stressed chloroplasts. Further analysis of the ultrastructure of chloroplasts indicated that salinity induced destruction of the chloroplast envelope and increased the number of plastoglobuli with aberrations in thylakoid membranes. However, Spm application to salt-stressed plant leaves counteracted the adverse effects of salinity on the structure of the photosynthetic apparatus. These results suggest that Spm alleviates salt-induced oxidative stress through regulating antioxidant systems in chloroplasts of cucumber seedlings, which is associated with an improvement of the photochemical efficiency of PSII.

  18. Phage lytic enzymes: a history.

    PubMed

    Trudil, David

    2015-02-01

    There are many recent studies regarding the efficacy of bacteriophage-related lytic enzymes: the enzymes of 'bacteria-eaters' or viruses that infect bacteria. By degrading the cell wall of the targeted bacteria, these lytic enzymes have been shown to efficiently lyse Gram-positive bacteria without affecting normal flora and non-related bacteria. Recent studies have suggested approaches for lysing Gram-negative bacteria as well (Briersa Y, et al., 2014). These enzymes include: phage-lysozyme, endolysin, lysozyme, lysin, phage lysin, phage lytic enzymes, phageassociated enzymes, enzybiotics, muralysin, muramidase, virolysin and designations such as Ply, PAE and others. Bacteriophages are viruses that kill bacteria, do not contribute to antimicrobial resistance, are easy to develop, inexpensive to manufacture and safe for humans, animals and the environment. The current focus on lytic enzymes has been on their use as anti-infectives in humans and more recently in agricultural research models. The initial translational application of lytic enzymes, however, was not associated with treating or preventing a specific disease but rather as an extraction method to be incorporated in a rapid bacterial detection assay (Bernstein D, 1997).The current review traces the translational history of phage lytic enzymes-from their initial discovery in 1986 for the rapid detection of group A streptococcus in clinical specimens to evolving applications in the detection and prevention of disease in humans and in agriculture.

  19. Enzyme therapeutics for systemic detoxification.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yang; Li, Jie; Lu, Yunfeng

    2015-08-01

    Life relies on numerous biochemical processes working synergistically and correctly. Certain substances disrupt these processes, inducing living organism into an abnormal state termed intoxication. Managing intoxication usually requires interventions, which is referred as detoxification. Decades of development on detoxification reveals the potential of enzymes as ideal therapeutics and antidotes, because their high substrate specificity and catalytic efficiency are essential for clearing intoxicating substances without adverse effects. However, intrinsic shortcomings of enzymes including low stability and high immunogenicity are major hurdles, which could be overcome by delivering enzymes with specially designed nanocarriers. Extensive investigations on protein delivery indicate three types of enzyme-nanocarrier architectures that show more promise than others for systemic detoxification, including liposome-wrapped enzymes, polymer-enzyme conjugates, and polymer-encapsulated enzymes. This review highlights recent advances in these nano-architectures and discusses their applications in systemic detoxifications. Therapeutic potential of various enzymes as well as associated challenges in achieving effective delivery of therapeutic enzymes will also be discussed.

  20. Digestive Enzyme Replacement Therapy: Pancreatic Enzymes and Lactase.

    PubMed

    Felicilda-Reynaldo, Rhea Faye D; Kenneally, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Maldigestion occurs when digestive enzymes are lacking to help break complex food components into absorbable nutrients within the gastrointestinal tract. Education is needed to help patients manage the intricacies of digestive enzyme replacement therapies and ensure their effectiveness in reducing symptoms of maldigestion.

  1. [The rise of enzyme engineering in China].

    PubMed

    Li, Gaoxiang

    2015-06-01

    Enzyme engineering is an important part of the modern biotechnology. Industrial biocatalysis is considered the third wave of biotechnology following pharmaceutical and agricultural waves. In 25 years, China has made a mighty advances in enzyme engineering research. This review focuses on enzyme genomics, enzyme proteomics, biosynthesis, microbial conversion and biosensors in the Chinese enzyme engineering symposiums and advances in enzyme preparation industry in China.

  2. Exogenous acetaldehyde as a tool for modulating wine color and astringency during fermentation.

    PubMed

    Sheridan, Marlena K; Elias, Ryan J

    2015-06-15

    Wine tannins undergo modifications during fermentation and storage that can decrease their perceived astringency and increase color stability. Acetaldehyde acts as a bridging compound to form modified tannins and polymeric pigments that are less likely to form tannin-protein complexes than unmodified tannins. Red wines are often treated with oxygen in order to yield acetaldehyde, however this approach can lead to unintended consequences due to the generation of reactive oxygen species. The present study employs exogenous acetaldehyde at relatively low and high treatment concentrations during fermentation to encourage tannin modification without promoting potentially deleterious oxidation reactions. The high acetaldehyde treatment significantly increased polymeric pigments in the wine without increasing concentrations of free and sulfite-bound acetaldehyde. Protein-tannin precipitation was also significantly decreased with the addition of exogenous acetaldehyde. These results indicate a possible treatment of wines early in their production to increase color stability and lower astringency of finished wines.

  3. Induction of spermatogenesis by exogenous gonadotrophins during nonbreeding season in Calotes versicolor.

    PubMed

    Sonar, A; Patil, S B

    1994-07-01

    Treatment of exogenous gonadotrophins(PMSG, hCG and PMSG+hCG) to male C. versicolor during nonbreeding phase resulted in increased weight of testis and its diameter. The seminiferous tubular diameter was also increased and tubules were filled with spermatogenic elements like spermatogonia, primary and secondary spermatocytes and spermatids. The results suggest that mammalian nonpituitary gonadotrophins(PMSG and hCG) also posses the potency to stimulate spermatogenesis in reptilian testis. Lowered cholesterol levels of testis, increased weight and protein content of epididymis after gonadotrophins treatment indicate that the exogenous gonadotrophins could initiate the steroidogenesis in testis. Interstitial space was enlarged and filled with active Leydig cells. Spermatogenesis was not complete as no spermatozoa were observed in the lumen of seminiferous tubule. The factors essential for the completion of spermatogenesis are discussed.

  4. Effects of endogenous and exogenous attention on visual processing: an Inhibition of Return study.

    PubMed

    Chica, Ana B; Lupiáñez, Juan

    2009-06-30

    We investigate early (P1) and late (P3) modulations of event-related potentials produced by endogenous (expected vs. unexpected location trials) and exogenous (cued vs. uncued location trials) orienting of spatial attention. A 75% informative peripheral cue was presented 1000 ms before the target in order to study Inhibition of Return (IOR), a mechanism that produces slower responses to peripherally cued versus uncued locations. Endogenous attention produced its effects more strongly at later stages of processing, while IOR (an index of exogenous orienting) was found to modulate both early and late stages of processing. The amplitude of P1 was reduced for cued versus uncued location trials, even when endogenous attention was maintained at the cued location. This result indicates that the perceptual effects of IOR are not eliminated by endogenous attention, suggesting that the IOR mechanism produces a perceptual decrement on the processing of stimuli at the cued location that cannot be counteracted by endogenous attention.

  5. Endogenous Versus Exogenous Shocks in Complex Networks: An Empirical Test Using Book Sale Rankings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sornette, D.; Deschâtres, F.; Gilbert, T.; Ageon, Y.

    2004-11-01

    We study the precursory and recovery signatures accompanying shocks in complex networks, that we test on a unique database of the Amazon.com ranking of book sales. We find clear distinguishing signatures classifying two types of sales peaks. Exogenous peaks occur abruptly and are followed by a power law relaxation, while endogenous peaks occur after a progressively accelerating power law growth followed by an approximately symmetrical power law relaxation which is slower than for exogenous peaks. These results are rationalized quantitatively by a simple model of epidemic propagation of interactions with long memory within a network of acquaintances. The observed relaxation of sales implies that the sales dynamics is dominated by cascades rather than by the direct effects of news or advertisements, indicating that the social network is close to critical.

  6. Genetic Dissection of an Exogenously Induced Biofilm in Laboratory and Clinical Isolates of E. coli

    PubMed Central

    Amini, Sasan; Goodarzi, Hani; Tavazoie, Saeed

    2009-01-01

    Microbial biofilms are a dominant feature of many human infections. However, developing effective strategies for controlling biofilms requires an understanding of the underlying biology well beyond what currently exists. Using a novel strategy, we have induced formation of a robust biofilm in Escherichia coli by utilizing an exogenous source of poly-N-acetylglucosamine (PNAG) polymer, a major virulence factor of many pathogens. Through microarray profiling of competitive selections, carried out in both transposon insertion and over-expression libraries, we have revealed the genetic basis of PNAG-based biofilm formation. Our observations reveal the dominance of electrostatic interactions between PNAG and surface structures such as lipopolysaccharides. We show that regulatory modulation of these surface structures has significant impact on biofilm formation behavior of the cell. Furthermore, the majority of clinical isolates which produced PNAG also showed the capacity to respond to the exogenously produced version of the polymer. PMID:19436718

  7. Effect of exogenous methanol on glycolate oxidase and photorespiratory intermediates in cotton

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Yan-Ru; Yang, Ping; Su, Yuan-Yuan; He, Zong-Ling; Ti, Xiao-Nan

    2014-01-01

    Application of methanol (MeOH) inhibits photorespiration and enhances growth and yield in C3 plants. However, the underlying cellular and molecular mechanisms are not clear. In this study, we investigated the effects of foliar application of MeOH (30%, v/v) on glycolate oxidase (GO) activity and photorespiratory intermediates in cotton leaves in a field experiment. MeOH treatment significantly inhibited GO activity (by 30% compared with the controls). We also found that endogenous glyoxylate, a photorespiratory intermediate, increased and glycine decreased significantly in MeOH-treated plants. Serine increased significantly in MeOH-treated plants. These results thus demonstrated that exogenous MeOH can modulate GO activity and the production of photorespiratory intermediates, and sheds new lights on our current understanding of how exogenous MeOH inhibits photorespiration and enhances the growth and yield of C3 plants such as cotton. PMID:25053644

  8. Site-Specific Integration of Exogenous Genes Using Genome Editing Technologies in Zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Kawahara, Atsuo; Hisano, Yu; Ota, Satoshi; Taimatsu, Kiyohito

    2016-05-13

    The zebrafish (Danio rerio) is an ideal vertebrate model to investigate the developmental molecular mechanism of organogenesis and regeneration. Recent innovation in genome editing technologies, such as zinc finger nucleases (ZFNs), transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) and the clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)/CRISPR associated protein 9 (Cas9) system, have allowed researchers to generate diverse genomic modifications in whole animals and in cultured cells. The CRISPR/Cas9 and TALEN techniques frequently induce DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) at the targeted gene, resulting in frameshift-mediated gene disruption. As a useful application of genome editing technology, several groups have recently reported efficient site-specific integration of exogenous genes into targeted genomic loci. In this review, we provide an overview of TALEN- and CRISPR/Cas9-mediated site-specific integration of exogenous genes in zebrafish.

  9. Site-Specific Integration of Exogenous Genes Using Genome Editing Technologies in Zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Kawahara, Atsuo; Hisano, Yu; Ota, Satoshi; Taimatsu, Kiyohito

    2016-01-01

    The zebrafish (Danio rerio) is an ideal vertebrate model to investigate the developmental molecular mechanism of organogenesis and regeneration. Recent innovation in genome editing technologies, such as zinc finger nucleases (ZFNs), transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) and the clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)/CRISPR associated protein 9 (Cas9) system, have allowed researchers to generate diverse genomic modifications in whole animals and in cultured cells. The CRISPR/Cas9 and TALEN techniques frequently induce DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) at the targeted gene, resulting in frameshift-mediated gene disruption. As a useful application of genome editing technology, several groups have recently reported efficient site-specific integration of exogenous genes into targeted genomic loci. In this review, we provide an overview of TALEN- and CRISPR/Cas9-mediated site-specific integration of exogenous genes in zebrafish. PMID:27187373

  10. Exogenous attention and color perception: performance and appearance of saturation and hue.

    PubMed

    Fuller, Stuart; Carrasco, Marisa

    2006-11-01

    Exogenous covert attention is an automatic, transient form of attention that can be triggered by sudden changes in the periphery. Here we test for the effects of attention on color perception. We used the methodology developed by Carrasco, Ling, and Read [Carrasco, M., Ling, S., & Read, S. (2004). Attention alters appearance. Nature Neuroscience, 7 (3) 308-313] to explore the effects of exogenous attention on appearance of saturation (Experiment 1) and of hue (Experiment 2). We also tested orientation discrimination performance for single stimuli defined by saturation or hue (Experiment 3). The results indicate that attention increases apparent saturation, but does not change apparent hue, notwithstanding the fact that it improves orientation discrimination for both saturation and hue stimuli.

  11. Exogenous IL-33 overcomes T cell tolerance in murine acute myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Lei; Dominguez, Donye; Chen, Siqi; Fan, Jie; Long, Alan; Zhang, Minghui; Fang, Deyu; Zhang, Yi; Kuzel, Timothy M.; Zhang, Bin

    2016-01-01

    Emerging studies suggest that dominant peripheral tolerance is a major mechanism of immune escape in disseminated leukemia. Using an established murine acute myeloid leukemia (AML) model, we here show that systemic administration of recombinant IL-33 dramatically inhibits the leukemia growth and prolongs the survival of leukemia-bearing mice in a CD8+ T cell dependent manner. Exogenous IL-33 treatment enhanced anti-leukemia activity by increasing the expansion and IFN-γ production of leukemia-reactive CD8+ T cells. Moreover, IL-33 promoted dendritic cell (DC) maturation and activation in favor of its cross presentation ability to evoke a vigorous anti-leukemia immune response. Finally, we found that the combination of PD-1 blockade with IL-33 further prolonged the survival, with half of the mice achieving complete regression. Our data establish a role of exogenous IL-33 in reversing T cell tolerance, and suggest its potential clinical implication into leukemia immunotherapy. PMID:27517629

  12. Computational enzyme design: transitioning from catalytic proteins to enzymes.

    PubMed

    Mak, Wai Shun; Siegel, Justin B

    2014-08-01

    The widespread interest in enzymes stem from their ability to catalyze chemical reactions under mild and ecologically friendly conditions with unparalleled catalytic proficiencies. While thousands of naturally occurring enzymes have been identified and characterized, there are still numerous important applications for which there are no biological catalysts capable of performing the desired chemical transformation. In order to engineer enzymes for which there is no natural starting point, efforts using a combination of quantum chemistry and force-field based protein molecular modeling have led to the design of novel proteins capable of catalyzing chemical reactions not catalyzed by naturally occurring enzymes. Here we discuss the current status and potential avenues to pursue as the field of computational enzyme design moves forward.

  13. Development and Validation of an Exogenous Metabolic Activation System for FETAX

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1997-06-01

    feasibility of the system (1). Results indicated that cyclophosphamide was bioactivated into an embryotoxic form using the exogenous MAS. Also, addition of...DPH-induced embryotoxicity decreasing the 96-hour LC50 from approximately 74.5 to 38.6 mg/L. These results suggested that unmetabolized DPH and an... embryotoxic epoxide intermediate served as the teratogenic species in FETAX. In a separate study, the developmental toxicity of isoniazid (INH) and the

  14. Associations among personal care product use patterns and exogenous hormone use in the NIEHS Sister Study.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Kyla W; Baird, Donna D; Herring, Amy H; Engel, Lawrence S; Nichols, Hazel B; Sandler, Dale P; Troester, Melissa A

    2017-01-25

    It is hypothesized that certain chemicals in personal care products may alter the risk of adverse health outcomes. The primary aim of this study was to use a data-centered approach to classify complex patterns of exposure to personal care products and to understand how these patterns vary according to use of exogenous hormone exposures, oral contraceptives (OCs) and post-menopausal hormone therapy (HT). The NIEHS Sister Study is a prospective cohort study of 50,884 US women. Limiting the sample to non-Hispanic blacks and whites (N=47,019), latent class analysis (LCA) was used to identify groups of individuals with similar patterns of personal care product use based on responses to 48 survey questions. Personal care products were categorized into three product types (beauty, hair, and skincare products) and separate latent classes were constructed for each type. Adjusted prevalence differences (PD) were calculated to estimate the association between exogenous hormone use, as measured by ever/never OC or HT use, and patterns of personal care product use. LCA reduced data dimensionality by grouping of individuals with similar patterns of personal care product use into mutually exclusive latent classes (three latent classes for beauty product use, three for hair, and four for skin care. There were strong differences in personal care usage by race, particularly for haircare products. For both blacks and whites, exogenous hormone exposures were associated with higher levels of product use, especially beauty and skincare products. Relative to individual product use questions, latent class variables capture complex patterns of personal care product usage. These patterns differed by race and were associated with ever OC and HT use. Future studies should consider personal care product exposures with other exogenous exposures when modeling health risks.Journal of Exposure Science and Environmental Epidemiology advance online publication, 25 January 2017; doi:10.1038/jes.2016.82.

  15. Mechanism and analyses for extracting photosynthetic electrons using exogenous quinones - what makes a good extraction pathway?

    PubMed

    Longatte, G; Rappaport, F; Wollman, F-A; Guille-Collignon, M; Lemaître, F

    2016-08-04

    Plants or algae take many benefits from oxygenic photosynthesis by converting solar energy into chemical energy through the synthesis of carbohydrates from carbon dioxide and water. However, the overall yield of this process is rather low (about 4% of the total energy available from sunlight is converted into chemical energy). This is the principal reason why recently many studies have been devoted to extraction of photosynthetic electrons in order to produce a sustainable electric current. Practically, the electron transfer occurs between the photosynthetic organism and an electrode and can be assisted by an exogenous mediator, mainly a quinone. In this regard, we recently reported on a method involving fluorescence measurements to estimate the ability of different quinones to extract photosynthetic electrons from a mutant of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. In the present work, we used the same kind of methodology to establish a zone diagram for predicting the most suitable experimental conditions to extract photoelectrons from intact algae (quinone concentration and light intensity) as a function of the purpose of the study. This will provide further insights into the extraction mechanism of photosynthetic electrons using exogenous quinones. Indeed fluorescence measurements allowed us to model the capacity of photosynthetic algae to donate electrons to an exogenous quinone by considering a numerical parameter called "open center ratio" which is related to the Photosystem II acceptor redox state. Then, using it as a proxy for investigating the extraction of photosynthetic electrons by means of an exogenous quinone, 2,6-DCBQ, we suggested an extraction mechanism that was globally found consistent with the experimentally extracted parameters.

  16. Proinflammatory effects of exogenously administered IL-10 in experimental autoimmune orchitis.

    PubMed

    Kaneko, Tetsushi; Itoh, Masahiro; Nakamura, Yoichi; Iimura, Akira; Hayashi, Shogo; Takahashi, Kodo; Stivala, Franca; Bendtzen, Klaus; Nicoletti, Ferdinando

    2003-04-01

    We studied the effects of exogenously administered recombinant murine interleukin (IL)-10 on the development of experimental autoimmune orchitis (EAO) in C3H/He mice. IL-10 significantly augments histological signs of EAO when administered for 6 consecutive days from days 15 to 20 after primary immunisations with testicular germ cells. These data demonstrate that IL-10, in addition to its well-known antiinflammatory property, also has proinflammatory functions capable of up-regulating testicular immunoinflammatory processes in vivo.

  17. Exogenous abscisic acid significantly affects proteome in tea plant (Camellia sinensis) exposed to drought stress.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Lin; Xu, Hui; Mischke, Sue; Meinhardt, Lyndel W; Zhang, Dapeng; Zhu, Xujun; Li, Xinghui; Fang, Wanping

    2014-01-01

    Tea [Camellia sinensis (L.) O. Kuntze] is an important economic crop, and drought is the most important abiotic stress affecting yield and quality. Abscisic acid (ABA) is an important phytohormone responsible for activating drought resistance. Increased understanding of ABA effects on tea plant under drought stress is essential to develop drought-tolerant tea genotypes, along with crop management practices that can mitigate drought stress. The objective of the present investigation is evaluation of effects of exogenous ABA on the leaf proteome in tea plant exposed to drought stress. Leaf protein patterns of tea plants under simulated drought stress [(polyethylene glycol (PEG)-treated] and exogenous ABA treatment were analyzed in a time-course experiment using two-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE), followed by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectrometry (MS). Among the 72 protein spots identified by MALDI-TOF MS, 16 proteins were downregulated and two were upregulated by exogenous ABA. The upregulated proteins have roles in glycolysis and photosystem II stabilization. Twenty-one protein spots were responsive to drought stress and most participate in carbohydrate and nitrogen metabolism, control of reactive oxygen species (ROS), defense, signaling or nucleic acid metabolism. The combined treatments of exogenous ABA and drought showed upregulation of 10 protein spots at 12 h and upregulation of 11 proteins at 72 h after initiation of drought stress. The results support the importance of the role that ABA plays in the tea plant during drought stress, by improving protein transport, carbon metabolism and expression of resistance proteins.

  18. Exogenous polyamines elicit herbivore-induced volatiles in lima bean leaves: involvement of calcium, H2O2 and Jasmonic acid.

    PubMed

    Ozawa, Rika; Bertea, Cinzia M; Foti, Maria; Narayana, Ravishankar; Arimura, Gen-Ichiro; Muroi, Atsushi; Horiuchi, Jun-Ichiro; Nishioka, Takaaki; Maffei, Massimo E; Takabayashi, Junji

    2009-12-01

    We investigated the role of polyamines (PAs) in lima bean (Phaseolus lunatus) leaves on the production of herbivorous mite (Tetranychus urticae)-induced plant volatiles that attract carnivorous natural enemies of the herbivores. To do this, we focused on the effects of the exogenous PAs [cadaverine, putrescine, spermidine and spermine (Spm)] on the production of volatiles, H(2)O(2) and jasmonic acid (JA) and the levels of defensive genes, cytosolic calcium and reactive oxygen species (ROS). Among the tested PAs, Spm was the most active in inducing the production of volatile terpenoids known to be induced by T. urticae. An increase in JA levels was also found after Spm treatment, indicating that Spm induces the biosynthesis of JA, which has been shown elsewhere to regulate the production of some volatile terpenoids. Further, treatment with JA and Spm together resulted in greater volatile emission than that with JA alone. In a Y-tube olfactometer, leaves treated with Spm + JA attracted more predatory mites (Phytoseiulus persimilis) than those treated with JA alone. After treatment with Spm + JA, no effects were found on the enzyme activity of polyamine oxidase and copper amine oxidase. However, induction of calcium influx and ROS production, and increased enzyme activities and gene expression for NADPH oxidase complex, superoxide dismutase, catalase, ascorbate peroxidase, glutathione reductase and glutathione peroxidase were found after treatment with Spm + JA. These results indicate that Spm plays an important role in the production of T. urticae-induced lima bean leaf volatiles.

  19. A severe case of acute exogenous lipoid pneumonia treated with systemic corticosteroid

    PubMed Central

    Yasui, Hideki; Yokomura, Koshi; Suda, Takafumi

    2016-01-01

    Acute exogenous lipoid pneumonia is a rare disorder in adults. A treatment of choice for lipoid pneumonia has not been established, and systemic corticosteroid use remains controversial. We report the case of a 32-year-old man with schizophrenia who presented with kerosene-induced acute exogenous lipoid pneumonia that was treated with a systemic corticosteroid. In this case, supportive therapy did not improve the patient's condition, so systemic corticosteroid therapy was commenced four days after he ingested the kerosene. After corticosteroid commencement, the patient's symptoms and hypoxia improved within a few days. Although some radiological characteristics of this disorder have been reported previously, the process of radiological improvement of exogenous lipoid pneumonia is not well known. In this case, computed tomography findings changed dramatically after corticosteroid therapy was initiated. Extensive bilateral consolidations that were observed on admission improved. Although pneumatoceles developed two weeks after corticosteroid commencement, they were nearly gone after two months of the treatment. While corticosteroid therapy is not suitable for all cases, it should be considered for severe or refractory cases. PMID:27222789

  20. The use of stable isotopes in quantitative determinations of exogenous water and added ethanol in wines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magdas, D. A.; Moldovan, Z.; Cristea, G.

    2012-02-01

    The application of oxygen isotope ratios analysis to wine water according to EU regulation no. 822/97 to determine wine's origin and also, the possible water addition to wines, gained great importance in wines authenticity control. In the natural cycle of water isotopic fractionation, during water evaporation process, the water vapors are depleted in heavy isotopes. On the other hand inside the plants take place an isotope enrichment of heavy stable isotopes of water compared with meteoric water due to photosynthesis and plants transpiration. This process makes possible the detection of exogenous water from wines 18O/16O ratios. Carbon isotopic ratios were used to estimate the supplementary addition of ethanol obtained from C4 plants (sugar cane or corn). This work presents the way in which the isotopic fingerprints (δ13C and δ18O) were used to determine the content of exogenous water from wines and the added supplementary ethanol coming from C4 plants. By using this method, the calculated values obtained for the degree of wine adulteration were in a good agreement with the real exogenous percent of water and ethanol from investigated samples.

  1. Exogenous nerve growth factor protects the hypoglossal nerve against crush injury

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Li-yuan; Wang, Zhong-chao; Wang, Pin; Lan, Yu-yan; Tu, Ling

    2015-01-01

    Studies have shown that sensory nerve damage can activate the p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway, but whether the same type of nerve injury after exercise activates the p38MAPK pathway remains unclear. Several studies have demonstrated that nerve growth factor may play a role in the repair process after peripheral nerve injury, but there has been little research focusing on the hypoglossal nerve injury and repair. In this study, we designed and established rat models of hypoglossal nerve crush injury and gave intraperitoneal injections of exogenous nerve growth factor to rats for 14 days. p38MAPK activity in the damaged neurons was increased following hypoglossal nerve crush injury; exogenous nerve growth factor inhibited this increase in acitivity and increased the survival rate of motor neurons within the hypoglossal nucleus. Under transmission electron microscopy, we found that the injection of nerve growth factor contributed to the restoration of the morphology of hypoglossal nerve after crush injury. Our experimental findings indicate that exogenous nerve growth factor can protect damaged neurons and promote hypoglossal nerve regeneration following hypoglossal nerve crush injury. PMID:26889186

  2. INTRANEURAL DISTRIBUTION OF EXOGENOUS NOREPINEPHRINE IN THE CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM OF THE RAT

    PubMed Central

    Descarries, Laurent; Droz, Bernard

    1970-01-01

    Catecholaminergic neurons, which take up and retain exogenous norepinephrine labeled with tritium, were studied by means of high resolution radioautography, in the substantia nigra, the substantia grisea periventricularis, and the locus coeruleus of the rat. Under the conditions required for the radioautographic detection of exogenous norepinephrine-3H, it was established that (1) glutaraldehyde was the most suitable fixative for preserving the labeled amine in situ; (2) norepinephrine-3H itself, rather than metabolites, accounted for most of the reactions detected in catecholaminergic neurons. At various time intervals after an intraventricular injection of norepinephrine-3H, the tracer reached a concentration 15–100 times higher, and disappeared at a slower rate, in presynaptic axons (t½:4 hr) than in nerve cell bodies (t½:0.8–1.3 hr). After pretreatment with a monoamine oxidase inhibitor, the radioautographic reactions increased and persisted longer, especially in the preterminal axons. Within neurons, the labeled amine was ubiquitously distributed in the nerve cell body and concentrated in presynaptic axons and synaptic terminals of various morphological types. Although large granular vesicles were usually present in the labeled axonal bulbs, no structural characteristic could be specifically ascribed to catecholaminergic neurons. It is suggested that exogenous norepinephrine bound to macromolecular complexes is present in all parts of catecholaminergic neurons and mainly concentrated within presynaptic axons. PMID:5411080

  3. Increases in the amounts of Vibrio spp. in oysters upon addition of exogenous bacteria.

    PubMed

    Froelich, Brett; Oliver, James

    2013-09-01

    The bacterial pathogen Vibrio vulnificus is found naturally in brackish coastal waters but can be greatly concentrated by filter-feeding organisms such as shellfish. Numerous experiments in which exogenous V. vulnificus cells are added to oysters in an attempt to measure uptake and depuration have been performed. In nearly all cases, results have shown that laboratory-grown bacteria are rapidly taken up by the oysters but ultimately eliminated, while naturally present Vibrio populations in oysters are resistant to depuration. In this study, oysters harvested during winter months, with low culturable Vibrio concentrations, were incubated in aquaria supplemented with strains of V. vulnificus that were either genotypically or phenotypically distinct from the background bacteria. These exogenous cells were eliminated from the oysters, as previously seen, but other vibrios already inhabiting the oysters responded to the V. vulnificus inoculum by rapidly increasing in number and maintaining a large stable population. The presence of such an oyster-adapted Vibrio population would be expected to prevent colonization by exogenous V. vulnificus cells, thus explaining the rapid depuration of these added bacteria.

  4. Comparative Transcriptome Analysis Reveals Effects of Exogenous Hematin on Anthocyanin Biosynthesis during Strawberry Fruit Ripening

    PubMed Central

    Li, Huayin; Li, Jingjuan; Zhang, Yihui

    2016-01-01

    Anthocyanin in strawberries has a positive effect on fruit coloration. In this study, the role of exogenous hematin on anthocyanin biosynthesis was investigated. Our result showed that the white stage of strawberries treated with exogenous hematin had higher anthocyanin content, compared to the control group. Among all treatments, 5 μM of hematin was the optimal condition to promote color development. In order to explore the molecular mechanism of fruit coloring regulated by hematin, transcriptomes in the hematin- and non-hematin-treated fruit were analyzed. A large number of differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were identified in regulating anthocyanin synthesis, including the DEGs involved in anthocyanin biosynthesis, hormone signaling transduction, phytochrome signaling, starch and sucrose degradation, and transcriptional pathways. These regulatory networks may play an important role in regulating the color process of strawberries treated with hematin. In summary, exogenous hematin could promote fruit coloring by increasing anthocyanin content in the white stage of strawberries. Furthermore, transcriptome analysis suggests that hematin-promoted fruit coloring occurs through multiple related metabolic pathways, which provides valuable information for regulating fruit color via anthocyanin biosynthesis in strawberries. PMID:28074176

  5. Fiber optic-based fluorescence detection system for in vivo studies of exogenous chromophore pharmacokinetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doiron, Daniel R.; Dunn, J. B.; Mitchell, W. L.; Dalton, Brian K.; Garbo, Greta M.; Warner, Jon A.

    1995-05-01

    The detection and quantification of the concentration of exogenous chromophores in-vivo by their fluorescence is complicated by many physical and geometrical parameters. Measurement of such signals is advantageous in determining the pharmacokinetics of photosensitizers such as those used in photodynamic therapy (PDT) or to assist in the diagnosis of tissue histological state. To overcome these difficulties a ratio based fiber optic contact fluorometer has been developed. This fluorescence detection system (FDS) uses the ratio of the fluorescence emission peak of the exogenous chromophore to that of endogenous chromophores, i.e. autofluorescence, to correct for a variety of parameters affecting the magnitude of the measured signals. By doing so it also minimizes the range of baseline measurements prior to exogenous drug injection, for various tissue types. Design of the FDS and results of its testing in animals and patients using the second generation photosensitizer Tin ethyletiopurpurin (SnET2) are presented. These results support the feasibility and usefulness of the Ratio FDS system.

  6. Exogenous spatial attention: Evidence for intact functioning in adults with autism spectrum disorder

    PubMed Central

    Grubb, Michael A.; Behrmann, Marlene; Egan, Ryan; Minshew, Nancy J.; Heeger, David J.; Carrasco, Marisa

    2013-01-01

    Deficits or atypicalities in attention have been reported in individuals with autism spectrum disorder (ASD), yet no consensus on the nature of these deficits has emerged. We conducted three experiments that paired a peripheral precue with a covert discrimination task, using protocols for which the effects of covert exogenous spatial attention on early vision have been well established in typically developing populations. Experiment 1 assessed changes in contrast sensitivity, using orientation discrimination of a contrast-defined grating; Experiment 2 evaluated the reduction of crowding in the visual periphery, using discrimination of a letter-like figure with flanking stimuli at variable distances; and Experiment 3 assessed improvements in visual search, using discrimination of the same letter-like figure with a variable number of distractor elements. In all three experiments, we found that exogenous attention modulated visual discriminability in a group of high-functioning adults with ASD and that it did so in the same way and to the same extent as in a matched control group. We found no evidence to support the hypothesis that deficits in exogenous spatial attention underlie the emergence of core ASD symptomatology. PMID:24326863

  7. Photoinactivation of Eight Health-Relevant Bacterial Species: Determining the Importance of the Exogenous Indirect Mechanism.

    PubMed

    Maraccini, Peter A; Wenk, Jannis; Boehm, Alexandria B

    2016-05-17

    It is presently unknown to what extent the endogenous direct, endogenous indirect, and exogenous indirect mechanisms contribute to bacterial photoinactivation in natural surface waters. In this study, we investigated the importance of the exogenous indirect mechanism by conducting photoinactivation experiments with eight health-relevant bacterial species (Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron, Campylobacter jejuni, Enterococcus faecalis, Escherichia coli K12, E. coli O157:H7, Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium LT2, Staphylococcus aureus, and Streptococcus bovis). We used three synthetic photosensitizers (methylene blue, rose bengal, and nitrite) and two model natural photosensitizers (Suwannee River natural organic matter and dissolved organic matter isolated from a wastewater treatment wetland) that generated singlet oxygen and hydroxyl radical. B. thetaiotaomicron had larger first order rate constants than all other organisms under all conditions tested. The presence of the synthetic photosensitizers generally enhanced photoinactivation of Gram-positive facultative anaerobes (Ent. faecalis, Staph. aureus, and Strep. bovis). Among Gram-negative bacteria, only methylene blue with E. coli K12 and rose bengal with C. jejuni showed an enhancing effect. The presence of model natural photosensitizers either reduced or did not affect photoinactivation rate constants. Our findings highlight the importance of the cellular membrane and photosensitizer properties in modulating the contribution of the exogenous indirect mechanism to the overall bacterial photoinactivation.

  8. Enhancing tolerance of rice (Oryza sativa) to simulated acid rain by exogenous abscisic acid.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xi; Liang, Chanjuan

    2017-02-01

    Abscisic acid (ABA) regulates much important plant physiological and biochemical processes and induces tolerance to different stresses. Here, we studied the regulation of exogenous ABA on adaptation of rice seedlings to simulated acid rain (SAR) stress by measuring biomass dry weight, stomatal conductance, net photosynthesis rate, nutrient elements, and endogenous hormones. The application of 10 μM ABA alleviated the SAR-induced inhibition on growth, stomatal conductance, net photosynthesis rate, and decreases in contents of nutrient (K, Mg, N, and P) and hormone (auxin, gibberellins, and zeatin). Moreover, 10 μM ABA could stimulate the Ca content as signaling molecules under SAR stress. Contrarily, the application of 100 μM ABA aggravated the SAR-induced inhibition on growth, stomatal conductance, net photosynthesis rate, and contents of nutrient and hormone. The results got after a 5-day recovery (without SAR) show that exogenous 10 μM ABA can promote self-restoration process in rice whereas 100 μM ABA hindered the restoration by increasing deficiency of nutrients and disturbing the balance of hormones. These results confirmed that exogenous ABA at proper concentration could enhance the tolerance of rice to SAR stress.

  9. Dual roles of endogenous and exogenous galectin-1 in the control of testicular immunopathology

    PubMed Central

    Pérez, Cecilia V.; Gómez, Leticia G.; Gualdoni, Gisela S.; Lustig, Livia; Rabinovich, Gabriel A.; Guazzone, Vanesa A.

    2015-01-01

    Galectin-1 (Gal-1), a proto-type member of galectin family, is highly expressed in immune privileged sites, including the testis. However, in spite of considerable progress the relevance of endogenous and exogenous Gal-1 in testis pathophysiology have not yet been explored. Here we evaluated the in vivo roles of Gal-1 in experimental autoimmune orchitis (EAO), a well-established model of autoimmune testicular inflammation associated with subfertility and infertility. A significant reduction in the incidence and severity of EAO was observed in mice genetically deficient in Gal-1 (Lgals1−/−) versus wild-type (WT) mice. Testicular histopathology revealed the presence of multifocal testicular damage in WT mice characterized by an interstitial mononuclear cell infiltrate and different degrees of germ cell sloughing of seminiferous tubules. TUNEL assay and assessment of active caspase-3 expression, revealed the prevalence of apoptotic spermatocytes mainly localized in the adluminal compartment of seminiferous tubules in EAO mice. A significant increased number of TUNEL-positive germ cells was detected in EAO testis from WT compared with Lgals1−/− mice. In contrast, exogenous administration of recombinant Gal-1 to WT mice undergoing EAO attenuated the severity of the disease. Our results unveil a dual role of endogenous versus exogenous Gal-1 in the control of autoimmune testis inflammation. PMID:26223819

  10. Exogenous Pulmonary Surfactant as a Vehicle for Antimicrobials: Assessment of Surfactant-Antibacterial Interactions In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Owing to its unique surface-active properties, an exogenous pulmonary surfactant may become a promising drug delivery agent, in particular, acting as a vehicle for antibiotics in topical treatment of pneumonia. The purpose of this study was to assess a mutual influence of natural surfactant preparation and three antibiotics (amikacin, cefepime, and colistimethate sodium) in vitro and to identify appropriate combination(s) for subsequent in vivo investigations of experimental surfactant/antibiotic mixtures. Influence of antibiotics on surface-active properties of exogenous surfactant was assessed using the modified Pattle method. Effects of exogenous surfactant on antibacterial activity of antimicrobials against Staphylococcus aureus, Klebsiella pneumoniae, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa were evaluated using conventional microbiologic procedures. Addition of amikacin or cefepime to surfactant had no significant influence on surface-active properties of the latter. Obvious reduction of surface-active properties was confirmed for surfactant/colistimethate composition. When suspended with antibiotics, surfactant either had no impact on their antimicrobial activity (amikacin) or exerted mild to moderate influence (reduction of cefepime bactericidal activity and increase of colistimethate bacteriostatic activity against S. aureus and P. aeruginosa). Considering favorable compatibility profile, the surfactant/amikacin combination is advisable for subsequent investigation of joint surfactant/antibacterial therapy in animals with bacterial pneumonia. PMID:24876994

  11. Comprehensive RNA-Seq Analysis on the Regulation of Tomato Ripening by Exogenous Auxin

    PubMed Central

    Li, Li; Mao, Linchun; Luo, Zisheng; Khan, Zia Ullah; Ying, Tiejin

    2016-01-01

    Auxin has been shown to modulate the fruit ripening process. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying auxin regulation of fruit ripening are still not clear. Illumina RNA sequencing was performed on mature green cherry tomato fruit 1 and 7 days after auxin treatment, with untreated fruit as a control. The results showed that exogenous auxin maintained system 1 ethylene synthesis and delayed the onset of system 2 ethylene synthesis and the ripening process. At the molecular level, genes associated with stress resistance were significantly up-regulated, but genes related to carotenoid metabolism, cell degradation and energy metabolism were strongly down-regulated by exogenous auxin. Furthermore, genes encoding DNA demethylases were inhibited by auxin, whereas genes encoding cytosine-5 DNA methyltransferases were induced, which contributed to the maintenance of high methylation levels in the nucleus and thus inhibited the ripening process. Additionally, exogenous auxin altered the expression patterns of ethylene and auxin signaling-related genes that were induced or repressed in the normal ripening process, suggesting significant crosstalk between these two hormones during tomato ripening. The present work is the first comprehensive transcriptome analysis of auxin-treated tomato fruit during ripening. Our results provide comprehensive insights into the effects of auxin on the tomato ripening process and the mechanism of crosstalk between auxin and ethylene. PMID:27228127

  12. Effects of exogenous agents on brain development: stress, abuse and therapeutic compounds.

    PubMed

    Archer, Trevor

    2011-10-01

    The range of exogenous agents likely to affect, generally detrimentally, the normal development of the brain and central nervous system defies estimation although the amount of accumulated evidence is enormous. The present review is limited to certain types of chemotherapeutic and "use-and-abuse" compounds and environmental agents, exemplified by anesthetic, antiepileptic, sleep-inducing and anxiolytic compounds, nicotine and alcohol, and stress as well as agents of infection; each of these agents have been investigated quite extensively and have been shown to contribute to the etiopathogenesis of serious neuropsychiatric disorders. To greater or lesser extent, all of the exogenous agents discussed in the present treatise have been investigated for their influence upon neurodevelopmental processes during the period of the brain growth spurt and during other phases uptill adulthood, thereby maintaining the notion of critical phases for the outcome of treatment whether prenatal, postnatal, or adolescent. Several of these agents have contributed to the developmental disruptions underlying structural and functional brain abnormalities that are observed in the symptom and biomarker profiles of the schizophrenia spectrum disorders and the fetal alcohol spectrum disorders. In each case, the effects of the exogenous agents upon the status of the affected brain, within defined parameters and conditions, is generally permanent and irreversible.

  13. Hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemia associated with insulin antibodies caused by exogenous insulin analog

    PubMed Central

    Su, Chih-Ting

    2016-01-01

    Summary Insulin antibodies (IA) associated with exogenous insulin administration seldom caused hypoglycemia and had different characteristics from insulin autoantibodies (IAA) found in insulin autoimmune syndrome (IAS), which was first described by Dr Hirata in 1970. The characteristic of IAS is the presence of insulin-binding autoantibodies and related fasting or late postprandial hypoglycemia. Here, we report a patient with type 1 diabetes mellitus under insulin glargine and insulin aspart treatment who developed recurrent spontaneous post-absorptive hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemia with the cause probably being insulin antibodies induced by exogenous injected insulin. Examinations of serial sera disclosed a high titre of insulin antibodies (33%, normal <5%), high insulin concentration (111.9 IU/mL) and undetectable C-peptide when hypoglycemia occurred. An oral glucose tolerance test revealed persistent high serum levels of total insulin and undetectable C-peptide. Image studies of the pancreas were unremarkable, which excluded the diagnosis of insulinoma. The patient does not take any of the medications containing sulfhydryl compounds, which had been reported to cause IAS. After administering oral prednisolone for 3 weeks, hypoglycemic episodes markedly improved, and he was discharged smoothly. Learning points: Insulin autoimmune syndrome (IAS) or IAS-like situation should be one of the differential diagnosis in patients with hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemia. Although less reported, insulin antibodies (IA) caused by exogenous insulin analog should be considered as the cause of hypoglycemia. Patients with suspected insulin autoimmune syndrome (IAS) should be screened for drugs related to autoimmunity to endogenous insulin. PMID:27933175

  14. Role of Endogenous and Exogenous Tocopherols in the Lipid Stability of Marine Oil Systems: A Review.

    PubMed

    Suárez-Jiménez, Guadalupe Miroslava; López-Saiz, Carmen María; Ramírez-Guerra, Hugo Enrique; Ezquerra-Brauer, Josafat Marina; Ruiz-Cruz, Saul; Torres-Arreola, Wilfrido

    2016-11-24

    In marine organisms primarily intended for human consumption, the quality of the muscle and the extracted oils may be affected by lipid oxidation during storage, even at low temperatures. This has led to a search for alternatives to maintain quality. In this sense, antioxidant compounds have been used to prevent such lipid deterioration. Among the most used compounds are tocopherols, which, due to their natural origin, have become an excellent alternative to prevent or retard lipid oxidation and maintain the quality of marine products. Tocopherols as antioxidants have been studied both exogenously and endogenously. Exogenous tocopherols are often used by incorporating them into plastic packaging films or adding them directly to fish oil. It has been observed that exogenous tocopherols incorporated in low concentrations maintain the quality of both muscle and the extracted oils during food storage. However, it has been reported that tocopherols applied at higher concentrations act as a prooxidant molecule, probably because their reactions with singlet oxygen may generate free radicals and cause the oxidation of polyunsaturated fatty acids in fish oils. However, when tocopherols are included in a fish diet (endogenous tocopherols), the antioxidant effect on the muscle lipids is more effective due to their incorporation into the membrane lipids, which can help extend the shelf life of seafood by reducing the lipid deterioration that occurs due to antioxidant synergy with other phenolic compounds used supplements in fish muscle. This review focuses on the most important studies in this field and highlights the potential of using tocopherols as antioxidants in marine oils.

  15. The Role of Low and High Spatial Frequencies in Exogenous Attention to Biologically Salient Stimuli

    PubMed Central

    Carretié, Luis; Ríos, Marcos; Periáñez, José A.; Kessel, Dominique; Álvarez-Linera, Juan

    2012-01-01

    Exogenous attention can be understood as an adaptive tool that permits the detection and processing of biologically salient events even when the individual is engaged in a resource-consuming task. Indirect data suggest that the spatial frequency of stimulation may be a crucial element in this process. Behavioral and neural data (both functional and structural) were analyzed for 36 participants engaged in a digit categorization task in which distracters were presented. Distracters were biologically salient or anodyne images, and had three spatial frequency formats: intact, low spatial frequencies only, and high spatial frequencies only. Behavior confirmed enhanced exogenous attention to biologically salient distracters. The activity in the right and left intraparietal sulci and the right middle frontal gyrus was associated with this behavioral pattern and was greater in response to salient than to neutral distracters, the three areas presenting strong correlations to each other. Importantly, the enhanced response of this network to biologically salient distracters with respect to neutral distracters relied on low spatial frequencies to a significantly greater extent than on high spatial frequencies. Structural analyses suggested the involvement of internal capsule, superior longitudinal fasciculus and corpus callosum in this network. Results confirm that exogenous attention is preferentially captured by biologically salient information, and suggest that the architecture and function underlying this process are low spatial frequency-biased. PMID:22590649

  16. Exogenous Reelin modifies the migratory behavior of neurons depending on cortical location.

    PubMed

    Britto, Joanne M; Tait, Karen J; Lee, Ean Phing; Gamble, Robin S; Hattori, Mitsuharu; Tan, Seong-Seng

    2014-11-01

    Malformations of cortical development can arise when projection neurons generated in the germinal zones fail to migrate properly into the cortical plate. This process is critically dependent on the Reelin glycoprotein, which when absent leads to an inversion of cortical layers and blurring of borders. Reelin has other functions including supporting neuron migration and maintaining their trajectories; however, the precise role on glial fiber-dependent or -independent migration of neurons remains controversial. In this study, we wish to test the hypothesis that migrating cortical neurons at different levels of the cortical wall have differential responses to Reelin. We exposed neurons migrating across the cortical wall to exogenous Reelin and monitored their migratory behavior using time-lapse imaging. Our results show that, in the germinal zones, exogenous Reelin retarded neuron migration and altered their trajectories. This behavior is in contrast to the response of neurons located in the intermediate zone (IZ), possibly because Reelin receptors are not expressed in this zone. In the reeler cortex, Reelin receptors are expressed in the IZ and exposure to exogenous Reelin was able to rescue the migratory defect. These studies demonstrate that migrating neurons have nonequivalent responses to Reelin depending on their location within the cortical wall.

  17. Exogenous surfactant therapy and mucus rheology in chronic obstructive airway diseases.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, R; Puniyani, R R

    2000-01-01

    Exogenous surfactant is a specialized biomaterial used for substitution of the lipoprotein mixture normally present in the lungs-pulmonary surfactant. Respiratory Distress Syndrome is a disease of preterm infants mainly caused by pulmonary immaturity as evidenced by a deficiency of mature lung surfactant. Pulmonary surfactant is known to stabilize small alveoli and prevent them from collapsing during expiration. However, apart from alveoli, surfactant also lines the narrow conducting airways of the tracheobronchial tree. This paper reviews the role of this surfactant in the airways and its effect on mucus rheology and mucociliary clearance. Its potential role as a therapeutic biomaterial in chronic obstructive airway diseases, namely asthma, chronic bronchitis, and respiratory manifestations of cystic fibrosis, are discussed. This paper also attempts to elucidate the exact steps in the pathogenic pathway of these diseases which could be reversed by supplementation of exogenous surfactant formulations. It is shown that there is great potential for the use of present day surfactants (which are actually formulated for use in Respiratory Disease Syndrome) as therapy in the aforementioned diseases of altered mucus viscoelasticity and mucociliary clearance. However, for improved effectiveness, specific surfactant formulations satisfying certain specific criteria should be tailor-made for the clinical condition for which they are intended. The properties required to be fulfilled by the optimal exogenous surfactant in each of the above clinical conditions are enumerated in this paper.

  18. Dual roles of endogenous and exogenous galectin-1 in the control of testicular immunopathology.

    PubMed

    Pérez, Cecilia V; Gómez, Leticia G; Gualdoni, Gisela S; Lustig, Livia; Rabinovich, Gabriel A; Guazzone, Vanesa A

    2015-07-30

    Galectin-1 (Gal-1), a proto-type member of galectin family, is highly expressed in immune privileged sites, including the testis. However, in spite of considerable progress the relevance of endogenous and exogenous Gal-1 in testis pathophysiology have not yet been explored. Here we evaluated the in vivo roles of Gal-1 in experimental autoimmune orchitis (EAO), a well-established model of autoimmune testicular inflammation associated with subfertility and infertility. A significant reduction in the incidence and severity of EAO was observed in mice genetically deficient in Gal-1 (Lgals1(-/-)) versus wild-type (WT) mice. Testicular histopathology revealed the presence of multifocal testicular damage in WT mice characterized by an interstitial mononuclear cell infiltrate and different degrees of germ cell sloughing of seminiferous tubules. TUNEL assay and assessment of active caspase-3 expression, revealed the prevalence of apoptotic spermatocytes mainly localized in the adluminal compartment of seminiferous tubules in EAO mice. A significant increased number of TUNEL-positive germ cells was detected in EAO testis from WT compared with Lgals1(-/-) mice. In contrast, exogenous administration of recombinant Gal-1 to WT mice undergoing EAO attenuated the severity of the disease. Our results unveil a dual role of endogenous versus exogenous Gal-1 in the control of autoimmune testis inflammation.

  19. Transcriptomic Profiling Analysis of Arabidopsis thaliana Treated with Exogenous Myo-Inositol

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Wenxing; Ren, Weibo; Kong, Lingqi; Zhang, Wanjun; Wang, Tao

    2016-01-01

    Myo-insositol (MI) is a crucial substance in the growth and developmental processes in plants. It is commonly added to the culture medium to promote adventitious shoot development. In our previous work, MI was found in influencing Agrobacterium-mediated transformation. In this report, a high-throughput RNA sequencing technique (RNA-Seq) was used to investigate differently expressed genes in one-month-old Arabidopsis seedling grown on MI free or MI supplemented culture medium. The results showed that 21,288 and 21,299 genes were detected with and without MI treatment, respectively. The detected genes included 184 new genes that were not annotated in the Arabidopsis thaliana reference genome. Additionally, 183 differentially expressed genes were identified (DEGs, FDR ≤0.05, log2 FC≥1), including 93 up-regulated genes and 90 down-regulated genes. The DEGs were involved in multiple pathways, such as cell wall biosynthesis, biotic and abiotic stress response, chromosome modification, and substrate transportation. Some significantly differently expressed genes provided us with valuable information for exploring the functions of exogenous MI. RNA-Seq results showed that exogenous MI could alter gene expression and signaling transduction in plant cells. These results provided a systematic understanding of the functions of exogenous MI in detail and provided a foundation for future studies. PMID:27603208

  20. Tissue coloring with exogenous chromophores to extend surgical use of 808-nm diode lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marangoni, Ovidio; Melato, Mauro

    2000-06-01

    Lasers with a wavelength between 351-1064nm, preset fluence and pulse duration induce a selective thermolysis of tissue chromophores. Specific exogenous chromophores, such as indocyanine green, are used in ophthalmology, in photodynamic therapy, in welding, and more recently for epilation. The aim of our study was to assess the effectiveness of a wavelength of 808nm on tissues stained with different exogenous chromophores whose absorption curves we studied by spectrophotometer. Out of five chromophores, methylene blue proved to be effective at 808nm. We tested the diode laser 808nm, at focused powers of 1, 2, 3, 5, 7 W in cw, for 1, 2, 3, 5, 7, 10 sec on skin specimens stained with 1 percent methylene blue in a small- spot sequence. At low powers the destructive effect was highly concentrated, both in depth and laterally, while greater intensities result in marked destruction even after a short irradiation time. The use of exogeneous chromophores increases absorption and reduces laser energy transmission and scatter. This study confirms that the selectivity of 808nm lasers can be 'tricked' since thermolysis is confined to the stained areas and there is less risk of damaging surrounding areas in the event of abrupt movements by either the surgeon or the patient, especially in the case of emotionally unstable or very young patients.

  1. Making the Rate: Enzyme Dynamics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ragsdale, Frances R.

    2004-01-01

    An enzyme exercise to address the problem of students inability to visualize chemical reaction at the molecular level is described. This exercise is designed as a dry lab exercise but can be modified into a classroom activity then can be augmented by a wet lab procedure, thereby providing students with a practical exposure to enzyme function.

  2. Moonlighting enzymes in parasitic protozoa.

    PubMed

    Collingridge, Peter W; Brown, Robert W B; Ginger, Michael L

    2010-08-01

    Enzymes moonlight in a non-enzymatic capacity in a diverse variety of cellular processes. The discovery of these non-enzymatic functions is generally unexpected, and moonlighting enzymes are known in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes. Importantly, this unexpected multi-functionality indicates that caution might be needed on some occasions in interpreting phenotypes that result from the deletion or gene-silencing of some enzymes, including some of the best known enzymes from classic intermediary metabolism. Here, we provide an overview of enzyme moonlighting in parasitic protists. Unequivocal and putative examples of moonlighting are discussed, together with the possibility that the unusual biological characteristics of some parasites either limit opportunities for moonlighting to arise or perhaps contribute to the evolution of novel proteins with clear metabolic ancestry.

  3. Positron emitter labeled enzyme inhibitors

    DOEpatents

    Fowler, Joanna S.; MacGregor, Robert R.; Wolf, Alfred P.; Langstrom, Bengt

    1990-01-01

    This invention involves a new strategy for imaging and mapping enzyme activity in the living human and animal body using positron emitter-labeled suicide enzyme inactivators or inhibitors which become covalently bound to the enzyme as a result of enzymatic catalysis. Two such suicide inactivators for monoamine oxidase have been labeled with carbon-11 and used to map the enzyme subtypes in the living human and animal body using PET. By using positron emission tomography to image the distribution of radioactivity produced by the body penetrating radiation emitted by carbon-11, a map of functionally active monoamine oxidase activity is obtained. Clorgyline and L-deprenyl are suicide enzyme inhibitors and irreversibly inhibit monoamine oxidase. When these inhibitors are labeled with carbon-11 they provide selective probes for monoamine oxidase localization and reactivity in vivo using positron emission tomography.

  4. Enzyme-carrying electrospun nanofibers.

    PubMed

    Jia, Hongfei

    2011-01-01

    Compared to other nanomaterials as supports for enzyme immobilization, nanofibers provide a promising configuration in balancing the key factors governing the catalytic performance of the immobilized enzymes including surface area-to-volume ratio, mass transfer resistance, effective loading, and the easiness to recycle. Synthetic and natural polymers can be fabricated into nanofibers via a physical process called electrospinning. The process requires only simple apparatus to operate, yet has proved to be very flexible in the selection of feedstock materials and also effective to control and manipulate the properties of the resulting nanofibers such as size and surface morphology, which are typically important parameters for enzyme immobilization supports. This chapter describes a protocol for the preparation of nanofibrous enzyme, involving the synthesis and end-group functionalization of polystyrene, production of electrospun nanofibers, and surface immobilization of enzyme via covalent attachment.

  5. Positron emitter labeled enzyme inhibitors

    SciTech Connect

    Fowler, J.S.; MacGregor, R.R.; Wolf, A.P.; Langstrom, B.

    1990-04-03

    This invention involves a new strategy for imaging and mapping enzyme activity in the living human and animal body using positron emitter-labeled suicide enzyme inactivators or inhibitors which become covalently bound to the enzyme as a result of enzymatic catalysis. Two such suicide inactivators for monoamine oxidase have been labeled with carbon-11 and used to map the enzyme subtypes in the living human and animal body using PET. By using positron emission tomography to image the distribution of radioactivity produced by the body penetrating radiation emitted by carbon-11, a map of functionally active monoamine oxidase activity is obtained. Clorgyline and L-deprenyl are suicide enzyme inhibitors and irreversibly inhibit monoamine oxidase. When these inhibitors are labeled with carbon-11 they provide selective probes for monoamine oxidase localization and reactivity in vivo using positron emission tomography.

  6. Positron emitter labeled enzyme inhibitors

    DOEpatents

    Fowler, J.S.; MacGregor, R.R.; Wolf, A.P.

    1987-05-22

    This invention involved a new strategy for imaging and mapping enzyme activity in the living human and animal body using positron emitter-labeled suicide enzyme inactivators or inhibitors which become covalently bound to the enzyme as a result of enzymatic catalysis. Two such suicide in activators for monoamine oxidase have been labeled with carbon-11 and used to map the enzyme subtypes in the living human and animal body using PET. By using positron emission tomography to image the distribution of radioactivity produced by the body penetrating radiation emitted by carbon-11, a map of functionally active monoamine oxidase activity is obtained. Clorgyline and L-deprenyl are suicide enzyme inhibitors and irreversibly inhibit monoamine oxidase. When these inhibitors are labeled with carbon-11 they provide selective probes for monoamine oxidase localization and reactivity in vivo using positron emission tomography. 2 figs.

  7. Exogenous Cortisol Administration; Effects on Risk Taking Behavior, Exercise Performance, and Physiological and Neurophysiological Responses

    PubMed Central

    Robertson, Caroline V.; Immink, Maarten A.; Marino, Frank E.

    2016-01-01

    Rationale: Exogenous cortisol is a modulator of behavior related to increased motivated decision making (Putman et al., 2010), where risky choices yield potentially big reward. Making risk based judgments has been shown to be important to athletes in optimizing pacing during endurance events (Renfree et al., 2014; Micklewright et al., 2015). Objectives: Therefore, the aims of this study were to examine the effect of 50 mg exogenous cortisol on neurophysiological responses and risk taking behavior in nine healthy men. Further to this, to examine the effect of exogenous cortisol on exercise performance. Methods: Using a double blind counterbalanced design, cyclists completed a placebo (PLA), and a cortisol (COR) trial (50 mg cortisol), with drug ingestion at 0 min. Each trial consisted of a rest period from 0 to 60 min, followed by a risk taking behavior task, a 30 min time trial (TT) with 5 × 30 s sprints at the following time intervals; 5, 11, 17, 23, and 29 min. Salivary cortisol (SaCOR), Electroencephalography (EEG) and Near Infrared Spectroscopy (NIRs) were measured at 15, 30, 45, and 60 min post-ingestion. Glucose and lactate samples were taken at 0 and 60 min post-ingestion. During exercise, power output (PO), heart rate (HR), EEG, and NIRS were measured. SaCOR was measured 10 min post-exercise. Results: Cortisol increased risk taking behavior from baseline testing. This was in line with significant neurophysiological changes at rest and during exercise. At rest, SaCOR levels were higher (P < 0.01) in COR compared to PLA (29.7 ± 22.7 and 3.27 ± 0.7 nmol/l, respectively). At 60 min alpha slow EEG response was higher in COR than PLA in the PFC (5.5 ± 6.4 vs. −0.02 ± 8.7% change; P < 0.01). During the TT there was no difference in total km, average power or average sprint power, although Peak power (PP) achieved was lower in COR than PLA (465.3 ± 83.4 and 499.8 ± 104.3; P < 0.05) and cerebral oxygenation was lower in COR (P < 0.05). Conclusion: This is

  8. Effects of Exogenous Enzymatic Treatment During Processing on the Sensory Quality of Summer Tieguanyin Oolong Tea from the Chinese Anxi County

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xue-Bo

    2015-01-01

    Summary In order to attenuate the bitter taste and improve the aroma of the summer tieguanyin oolong tea from the Chinese Anxi county, the effects of processing treatment with exogenous laccase and α-galactosidase on tea sensory quality and related compounds were investigated. The solutions of laccase and/or α-galactosidase were sprayed on the tea leaves before the first drying process. The sensory evaluation results showed that the sensory quality of the tea was significantly enhanced with the enzymatic treatment. The combined application of laccase at 8.25 and α-galactosidase at 22 U per kg of fresh tea shoots achieved the most satisfying sensory quality. Further analysis of flavour-related constituents was carried out by HPLC and GC-MS. The HPLC analysis showed that the contents of catechins and total polyphenols were reduced, compared to the untreated group, by 11.9 and 13.3% respectively, and the total soluble sugars and water extract content were increased by 19.4 and 6.6% respectively, after the treatment with both enzymes. The decrease of catechins and total polyphenols reduced the bitterness and astringency of the summer tea, while the increase of total soluble sugars and water extract content improved the sweetness and mellow taste. The aromatic compound data from GC-MS showed that the total essential oil content in these tea samples co-treated with laccase and α-galactosidase increased significantly, in which aldehydes, alcohols, esters and alkenes increased by 23.28, 37.05, 20.10 and 38.99%, respectively. Our data suggest that the exogenous enzymatic treatment can enhance the summer oolong tea quality, especially its taste and aroma. PMID:27904347

  9. Effects of Exogenous Enzymatic Treatment During Processing on the Sensory Quality of Summer Tieguanyin Oolong Tea from the Chinese Anxi County.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xue-Bo; Du, Xian-Feng

    2015-06-01

    In order to attenuate the bitter taste and improve the aroma of the summer tieguanyin oolong tea from the Chinese Anxi county, the effects of processing treatment with exogenous laccase and α-galactosidase on tea sensory quality and related compounds were investigated. The solutions of laccase and/or α-galactosidase were sprayed on the tea leaves before the first drying process. The sensory evaluation results showed that the sensory quality of the tea was significantly enhanced with the enzymatic treatment. The combined application of laccase at 8.25 and α-galactosidase at 22 U per kg of fresh tea shoots achieved the most satisfying sensory quality. Further analysis of flavour-related constituents was carried out by HPLC and GC-MS. The HPLC analysis showed that the contents of catechins and total polyphenols were reduced, compared to the untreated group, by 11.9 and 13.3% respectively, and the total soluble sugars and water extract content were increased by 19.4 and 6.6% respectively, after the treatment with both enzymes. The decrease of catechins and total polyphenols reduced the bitterness and astringency of the summer tea, while the increase of total soluble sugars and water extract content improved the sweetness and mellow taste. The aromatic compound data from GC-MS showed that the total essential oil content in these tea samples co-treated with laccase and α-galactosidase increased significantly, in which aldehydes, alcohols, esters and alkenes increased by 23.28, 37.05, 20.10 and 38.99%, respectively. Our data suggest that the exogenous enzymatic treatment can enhance the summer oolong tea quality, especially its taste and aroma.

  10. TGF-β and opioid receptor signaling crosstalk results in improvement of endogenous and exogenous opioid analgesia under pathological pain conditions.

    PubMed

    Lantero, Aquilino; Tramullas, Mónica; Pílar-Cuellar, Fuencisla; Valdizán, Elsa; Santillán, Rosa; Roques, Bernard P; Hurlé, María A

    2014-04-09

    Transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) protects against neuroinflammatory events underlying neuropathic pain. TGF-β signaling enhancement is a phenotypic characteristic of mice lacking the TGF-β pseudoreceptor BAMBI (BMP and activin membrane-bound inhibitor), which leads to an increased synaptic release of opioid peptides and to a naloxone-reversible hypoalgesic/antiallodynic phenotype. Herein, we investigated the following: (1) the effects of BAMBI deficiency on opioid receptor expression, functional efficacy, and analgesic responses to endogenous and exogenous opioids; and (2) the involvement of the opioid system in the antiallodynic effect of TGF-β1. BAMBI-KO mice were subjected to neuropathic pain by sciatic nerve crash injury (SNI). Gene (PCR) and protein (Western blot) expressions of μ- and δ-opioid receptors were determined in the spinal cord. The inhibitory effects of agonists on the adenylyl cyclase pathway were investigated. Two weeks after SNI, wild-type mice developed mechanical allodynia and the functionality of μ-opioid receptors was reduced. By this time, BAMBI-KO mice were protected against allodynia and exhibited increased expression and function of opioid receptors. Four weeks after SNI, when mice of both genotypes had developed neuropathic pain, the analgesic responses induced by morphine and RB101 (an inhibitor of enkephalin-degrading enzymes, which increases the synaptic levels of enkephalins) were enhanced in BAMBI-KO mice. Similar results were obtained in the formalin-induced chemical-inflammatory pain model. Subcutaneous TGF-β1 infusion prevented pain development after SNI. The antiallodynic effect of TGF-β1 was naloxone-sensitive. In conclusion, modulation of the endogenous opioid system by TGF-β signaling improves the analgesic effectiveness of exogenous and endogenous opioids under pathological pain conditions.

  11. Human breast cancer cells contain a phosphoramidon-sensitive metalloproteinase which can process exogenous big endothelin-1 to endothelin-1: a proposed mitogen for human breast fibroblasts.

    PubMed Central

    Patel, K. V.; Schrey, M. P.

    1995-01-01

    Endothelin-1 (ET-1) levels are elevated in human breast tumours compared with normal and benign tissues, and in the presence of insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-I) ET-1 is a potent mitogen for human breast fibroblasts. In this study we have examined the ability of intact human breast cancer cell lines to process exogenously added big ET-1 (1-38) to the active mature ET-1 peptide by using a specific radioimmunometric assay. In both hormome-dependent (MCF-7, T47-D) and hormone-independent (MDA-MB-231) breast cancer cell lines the putative endothelin-converting enzyme (ECE) exhibited apparent Michaelis-Menten kinetics when converting added big ET-1 to ET-1. Both basal ET-1 production and exogenously added big ET-1 to ET-1 conversion were greatly reduced in all three cell lines in response to the metalloproteinase inhibitor phosphoramidon but were insensitive to other classes of protease inhibitors. Inhibition was also observed when cells were incubated in the presence of the divalent cation chelators 1,10-phenanthroline and EDTA. In MCF-7 cells the optimal pH for the ECE activity using a saponin cell permeabilisation procedure was found to residue within a narrow range of 6.2-7.26. Our results indicate that human breast cancer cells contain a neutral phosphoramidon-sensitive metalloproteinase which can process big ET-1 to ET-1. In the breast this conversion could contribute substantially to the local extracellular levels of this proposed paracrine breast fibroblast mitogen. PMID:7880721

  12. Effects of protease and non-starch polysaccharide enzyme on performance, digestive function, activity and gene expression of endogenous enzyme of broilers.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Lin; Wang, Mingfa; Zhang, Xiaotu; Wang, Zhixiang

    2017-01-01

    Three hundred one-day-old male broiler chickens (Ross-308) were fed corn-soybean basal diets containing non-starch polysaccharide (NSP) enzyme and different levels of acid protease from 1 to 42 days of age to investigate the effects of exogenous enzymes on growth performance, digestive function, activity of endogenous digestive enzymes in the pancreas and mRNA expression of pancreatic digestive enzymes. For days 1-42, compared to the control chickens, average daily feed intake (ADFI) and average daily gain (ADG) were significantly enhanced by the addition of NSP enzyme in combination with protease supplementation at 40 or 80 mg/kg (p<0.05). Feed-to-gain ratio (FGR) was significantly improved by supplementation with NSP enzymes or NSP enzyme combined with 40 or 80 mg/kg protease compared to the control diet (p<0.05). Apparent digestibility of crude protein (ADCP) was significantly enhanced by the addition of NSP enzyme or NSP enzyme combined with 40 or 80 mg/kg protease (p<0.05). Cholecystokinin (CCK) level in serum was reduced by 31.39% with NSP enzyme combined with protease supplementation at 160 mg/kg (p<0.05), but the CCK level in serum was increased by 26.51% with NSP enzyme supplementation alone. After 21 days, supplementation with NSP enzyme and NSP enzyme combined with 40 or 80 mg/kg protease increased the activity of pancreatic trypsin by 74.13%, 70.66% and 42.59% (p<0.05), respectively. After 42 days, supplementation with NSP enzyme and NSP enzyme combined with 40 mg/kg protease increased the activity of pancreatic trypsin by 32.45% and 27.41%, respectively (p<0.05). However, supplementation with NSP enzyme and 80 or 160 mg/kg protease decreased the activity of pancreatic trypsin by 10.75% and 25.88%, respectively (p<0.05). The activities of pancreatic lipase and amylase were significantly higher in treated animals than they were in the control group (p<0.05). Supplementation with NSP enzyme, NSP enzyme combined with 40 or 80 mg/kg protease increased

  13. Effects of protease and non-starch polysaccharide enzyme on performance, digestive function, activity and gene expression of endogenous enzyme of broilers

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Mingfa; Zhang, Xiaotu; Wang, Zhixiang

    2017-01-01

    Three hundred one-day-old male broiler chickens (Ross-308) were fed corn-soybean basal diets containing non-starch polysaccharide (NSP) enzyme and different levels of acid protease from 1 to 42 days of age to investigate the effects of exogenous enzymes on growth performance, digestive function, activity of endogenous digestive enzymes in the pancreas and mRNA expression of pancreatic digestive enzymes. For days 1-42, compared to the control chickens, average daily feed intake (ADFI) and average daily gain (ADG) were significantly enhanced by the addition of NSP enzyme in combination with protease supplementation at 40 or 80 mg/kg (p<0.05). Feed-to-gain ratio (FGR) was significantly improved by supplementation with NSP enzymes or NSP enzyme combined with 40 or 80 mg/kg protease compared to the control diet (p<0.05). Apparent digestibility of crude protein (ADCP) was significantly enhanced by the addition of NSP enzyme or NSP enzyme combined with 40 or 80 mg/kg protease (p<0.05). Cholecystokinin (CCK) level in serum was reduced by 31.39% with NSP enzyme combined with protease supplementation at 160 mg/kg (p<0.05), but the CCK level in serum was increased by 26.51% with NSP enzyme supplementation alone. After 21 days, supplementation with NSP enzyme and NSP enzyme combined with 40 or 80 mg/kg protease increased the activity of pancreatic trypsin by 74.13%, 70.66% and 42.59% (p<0.05), respectively. After 42 days, supplementation with NSP enzyme and NSP enzyme combined with 40 mg/kg protease increased the activity of pancreatic trypsin by 32.45% and 27.41%, respectively (p<0.05). However, supplementation with NSP enzyme and 80 or 160 mg/kg protease decreased the activity of pancreatic trypsin by 10.75% and 25.88%, respectively (p<0.05). The activities of pancreatic lipase and amylase were significantly higher in treated animals than they were in the control group (p<0.05). Supplementation with NSP enzyme, NSP enzyme combined with 40 or 80 mg/kg protease increased

  14. Early peptidic enzymes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brack, André; Barbier, Bernard

    Oligopeptides supposed to be essential to primitive living cells could not be obtained by a prebiotic organic chemistry working mainly at random. Selection pathways were required. Experimental evidence is given for selective condensation of amino-acids in water as well as for selective resistance to degradation. Polycationic polypeptides containing lysyl (or arginyl) and hydrophobic residues strongly accelerate the hydrolysis of oligoribonucleotides. A ionic complex is first formed and the polypeptides are particularly active when they adopt a stable conformation, β-sheet or α-helix, in the complex. Well-defined short peptides were synthesized in order to determine the critical chain-length required for chemical activity. In a contemporary cell, proteins represent about 40 % of the dry weight. They fulfil a structural role and they are particularly helpful as chemical catalysts (enzymes). They can be represented as long chains made of twenty different building blocks, the amino-acids NH2-CHR-COOH, which differ by the side-chain R. Proteins are remarkable in the sense that they use amino-acids having only one carbon atom between the -NH2 and -COOH functions. The central carbon atom has always the same spatial asymmetry (chirality) and always bears a hydrogen atom. When the side-chain R is a hydrocarbon, it is branched. When R contains a chemical function, the side functions do not participate to the peptide bond construction. The protein chain results from the condensation of amino-acids, i.e. water molecules are removed between molecules in a medium which is mainly aqueous (the cell contains 75 % of water). The protein chains adopt rigid asymmetric conformations (α-helices, β-sheet structures) which are essential for the protein functions. Proteins, even the smallest ones, are too sophisticated entities to be considered as the products of an organic chemistry working at random, without any chemical selection. The chemist has therefore to understand, with simple

  15. Selective neutrality and enzyme kinetics.

    PubMed

    Demetrius, L

    1997-10-01

    This article appeals to a recent theory of enzyme evolution to show that the properties, neutral or adaptive, which characterize the observed allelic variation in natural populations can be inferred from the functional parameters, substrate specificity, and reaction rate. This study delineates the following relations between activity variables, and the forces--adaptive or neutral--determining allelic variation: (1) Enzymes with broad substrate specificity: The observed polymorphism is adaptive; mutations in this class of enzymes can result in increased fitness of the organism and hence be relevant for positive selection. (2) Enzymes with absolute substrate specificity and diffusion-controlled rates: Observed allelic variation will be absolutely neutral; mutations in this class of enzymes will be either deleterious or have no effect on fitness. (3) Enzymes with absolute or group specificity and nondiffusion-controlled rates: Observed variation will be partially neutral; mutants which are selectively neutral may become advantageous under an appropriate environmental condition or different genetic background. We illustrate each of the relations between kinetic properties and evolutionary states with examples drawn from enzymes whose evolutionary dynamics have been intensively studied.

  16. Exogenous ochronosis in a Chinese patient: use of dermoscopy aids early diagnosis and selection of biopsy site.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wen Chun; Tey, Hong Liang; Lee, Joyce Siong See; Goh, Boon Kee

    2014-01-01

    The diagnosis of exogenous ochronosis is often challenging and requires a high index of suspicion. Herein, we report a case of exogenous ochronosis in a Chinese patient. The condition was caused by the use of bleaching agents, including creams containing hydroquinone. We demonstrate the use of dermoscopy as an invaluable tool for the early recognition of the condition, as well as in the selection of an appropriate site for a skin biopsy.

  17. Exogenous ochronosis in a Chinese patient: use of dermoscopy aids early diagnosis and selection of biopsy site

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Wen Chun; Tey, Hong Liang; Lee, Joyce Siong See; Goh, Boon Kee

    2014-01-01

    The diagnosis of exogenous ochronosis is often challenging and requires a high index of suspicion. Herein, we report a case of exogenous ochronosis in a Chinese patient. The condition was caused by the use of bleaching agents, including creams containing hydroquinone. We demonstrate the use of dermoscopy as an invaluable tool for the early recognition of the condition, as well as in the selection of an appropriate site for a skin biopsy. PMID:24452981

  18. Asymptotic Expansion in Enzyme Reactions with High Enzyme Concentrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bersani, Alberto Maria; Dell'Acqua, Guido

    2010-09-01

    In this paper we find a new asymptotic expansion valid in enzymatic reactions where the total amount of enzyme exceeds greatly the total amount of substrate. In such case it is well known that the Michelis-Menten approximation is no longer valid; therefore our asymptotic expansion is a new tool to approximate in a closed form the concentrations of the reactants in presence of an enzyme excess.

  19. Metabolic regulation via enzyme filamentation

    PubMed Central

    Aughey, Gabriel N.; Liu, Ji-Long

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Determining the mechanisms of enzymatic regulation is central to the study of cellular metabolism. Regulation of enzyme activity via polymerization-mediated strategies has been shown to be widespread, and plays a vital role in mediating cellular homeostasis. In this review, we begin with an overview of the filamentation of CTP synthase, which forms filamentous structures termed cytoophidia. We then highlight other important examples of the phenomenon. Moreover, we discuss recent data relating to the regulation of enzyme activity by compartmentalization into cytoophidia. Finally, we hypothesize potential roles for enzyme filament formation in the regulation of metabolism, development and disease. PMID:27098510

  20. Enzyme catalysis on solid surfaces.

    PubMed

    Laurent, Nicolas; Haddoub, Rose; Flitsch, Sabine L

    2008-06-01

    Enzyme-catalysed reactions in which substrates are bound (immobilised) to solid surfaces are becoming increasingly important in biotechnology. There is a general drive for miniaturisation and automation in chemistry and biology, and immobilisation of the reaction intermediates and substrates, for example on microarrays or nanoparticles, helps to address technical challenges in this area. In bionanotechnology, enzyme catalysis can provide highly selective and biocompatible tools for the modification of surfaces on the nano-scale. Here, we review the range of enzyme-catalysed reactions that have been successfully performed on the solid phase and discuss their application in biotechnology.

  1. Paramagnetic Intermediates Generated by Radical S-Adenosylmethionine (SAM) Enzymes

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Conspectus A [4Fe–4S]+ cluster reduces a bound S-adenosylmethionine (SAM) molecule, cleaving it into methionine and a 5′-deoxyadenosyl radical (5′-dA•). This step initiates the varied chemistry catalyzed by each of the so-called radical SAM enzymes. The strongly oxidizing 5′-dA• is quenched by abstracting a H-atom from a target species. In some cases, this species is an exogenous molecule of substrate, for example, l-tyrosine in the [FeFe] hydrogenase maturase, HydG. In other cases, the target is a proteinaceous residue as in all the glycyl radical forming enzymes. The generation of this initial radical species and the subsequent chemistry involving downstream radical intermediates is meticulously controlled by the enzyme so as to prevent unwanted reactions. But the manner in which this control is exerted is unknown. Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy has proven to be a valuable tool used to gain insight into these mechanisms. In this Account, we summarize efforts to trap such radical intermediates in radical SAM enzymes and highlight four examples in which EPR spectroscopic results have shed significant light on the corresponding mechanism. For lysine 2,3-aminomutase, nearly each possible intermediate, from an analogue of the initial 5′-dA• to the product radical l-β-lysine, has been explored. A paramagnetic intermediate observed in biotin synthase is shown to involve an auxiliary [FeS] cluster whose bridging sulfide is a co-substrate for the final step in the biosynthesis of vitamin B7. In HydG, the l-tyrosine substrate is converted in unprecedented fashion to a 4-oxidobenzyl radical on the way to generating CO and CN– ligands for the [FeFe] cluster of hydrogenase. And finally, EPR has confirmed a mechanistic proposal for the antibiotic resistance protein Cfr, which methylates the unactivated sp2-hybridized C8-carbon of an adenosine base of 23S ribosomal RNA. These four systems provide just a brief survey of the ever-growing set

  2. Exogenous orienting of crossmodal attention in 3-D space: support for a depth-aware crossmodal attentional system.

    PubMed

    Van der Stoep, Nathan; Nijboer, Tanja C W; Van der Stigchel, Stefan

    2014-06-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate exogenous crossmodal orienting of attention in three-dimensional (3-D) space. Most studies in which the orienting of attention has been examined in 3-D space concerned either exogenous intramodal or endogenous crossmodal attention. Evidence for exogenous crossmodal orienting of attention in depth is lacking. Endogenous and exogenous attention are behaviorally different, suggesting that they are two different mechanisms. We used the orthogonal spatial-cueing paradigm and presented auditory exogenous cues at one of four possible locations in near or far space before the onset of a visual target. Cues could be presented at the same (valid) or at a different (invalid) depth from the target (radial validity), and on the same (valid) or on a different (invalid) side (horizontal validity), whereas we blocked the depth at which visual targets were presented. Next to an overall validity effect (valid RTs < invalid RTs) in horizontal space, we observed an interaction between the horizontal and radial validity of the cue: The horizontal validity effect was present only when the cue and the target were presented at the same depth. No horizontal validity effect was observed when the cue and the target were presented at different depths. These results suggest that exogenous crossmodal attention is "depth-aware," and they are discussed in the context of the supramodal hypothesis of attention.

  3. Molybdenum enzymes in higher organisms

    PubMed Central

    Hille, Russ; Nishino, Takeshi; Bittner, Florian

    2010-01-01

    Recent progress in our understanding of the structural and catalytic properties of molybdenum-containing enzymes in eukaryotes is reviewed, along with aspects of the biosynthesis of the cofactor and its insertion into apoprotein. PMID:21516203

  4. The origins of enzyme kinetics.

    PubMed

    Cornish-Bowden, Athel

    2013-09-02

    The equation commonly called the Michaelis-Menten equation is sometimes attributed to other authors. However, although Victor Henri had derived the equation from the correct mechanism, and Adrian Brown before him had proposed the idea of enzyme saturation, it was Leonor Michaelis and Maud Menten who showed that this mechanism could also be deduced on the basis of an experimental approach that paid proper attention to pH and spontaneous changes in the product after formation in the enzyme-catalysed reaction. By using initial rates of reaction they avoided the complications due to substrate depletion, product accumulation and progressive inactivation of the enzyme that had made attempts to analyse complete time courses very difficult. Their methodology has remained the standard approach to steady-state enzyme kinetics ever since.

  5. Engineering the ligninolytic enzyme consortium.

    PubMed

    Alcalde, Miguel

    2015-03-01

    The ligninolytic enzyme consortium is one of the most-efficient oxidative systems found in nature, playing a pivotal role during wood decay and coal formation. Typically formed by high redox-potential oxidoreductases, this array of enzymes can be used within the emerging lignocellulose biorefineries in processes that range from the production of bioenergy to that of biomaterials. To ensure that these versatile enzymes meet industry standards and needs, they have been subjected to directed evolution and hybrid approaches that surpass the limits imposed by nature. This Opinion article analyzes recent achievements in this field, including the incipient groundbreaking research into the evolution of resurrected enzymes, and the engineering of ligninolytic secretomes to create consolidated bioprocessing microbes with synthetic biology applications.

  6. Enzyme immobilisation in permselective microcapsules.

    PubMed

    Pachariyanon, Pavadee; Barth, Ekkehard; Agar, David W

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this investigation was to study the permselective behaviour of calcium alginate membranes, including the modifying effects of silica additives, which were subsequently used as microcapsule shells. Diffusion experiments and HPLC were carried out to ascertain the size-exclusion property of the membranes for a mixed molecular-weight dextran solution. Hollow microcapsules containing the enzyme dextranase were prepared using double concentric nozzles and the encapsulation performance was evaluated based on an analysis of the enzyme reactivity and stability. To improve mass transport within the microcapsules, magnetic nanoparticles were introduced into the liquid core and agitated using an alternating external magnetic field. The modified membranes exhibited better size-exclusion behaviour than the unmodified membranes. The magnetic nanoparticles slightly improved mass transport inside the microcapsule. The encapsulated enzyme yielded nearly 80% of the free enzyme activity and retained about 80% of the initial catalytic activity even after being used for eight reaction cycles.

  7. Enzymes: principles and biotechnological applications.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Peter K

    2015-01-01

    Enzymes are biological catalysts (also known as biocatalysts) that speed up biochemical reactions in living organisms, and which can be extracted from cells and then used to catalyse a wide range of commercially important processes. This chapter covers the basic principles of enzymology, such as classification, structure, kinetics and inhibition, and also provides an overview of industrial applications. In addition, techniques for the purification of enzymes are discussed.

  8. Enzymes: principles and biotechnological applications

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Peter K.

    2015-01-01

    Enzymes are biological catalysts (also known as biocatalysts) that speed up biochemical reactions in living organisms, and which can be extracted from cells and then used to catalyse a wide range of commercially important processes. This chapter covers the basic principles of enzymology, such as classification, structure, kinetics and inhibition, and also provides an overview of industrial applications. In addition, techniques for the purification of enzymes are discussed. PMID:26504249

  9. Immobilized Enzymes for Automated Analyses.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-12-01

    by others. Reaction velocity was found to increase with temperature at a rate of about 5%/’C. Three distinct types of immobilization processes were...trifunctional silane ........... 10 2 Linearity of protein assay ............................. 14 3 Reaction rate for native and oxygenated enzyme solu...in a clinical chemistry analyzer enables catalysis of the analyzer reactions with retention of active enzyme by the system for subsequent reuse. When a

  10. A taxonomy of endogenous and exogenous uncertainty in high-risk, high-impact contexts.

    PubMed

    Alison, Laurence; Power, Nicola; van den Heuvel, Claudia; Waring, Sara

    2015-07-01

    By reference to a live hostage negotiation exercise, this study presents a taxonomy of uncertainty that can be usefully applied to assist in the categorization and application of findings from decision-making research conducted in naturalistic (specifically critical incident) settings. Uncertainty was measured via observational methods (during the exercise and by reference to video footage), decision logs, and postincident simulated recall interviews with trainee police officers. Transcripts were coded and analyzed thematically. Uncertainty was dichotomized as deriving from either endogenous sources (about the problem situation itself) or exogenous sources (about the operating system that is dealing with the incident). Overall, exogenous uncertainty (75%) was more prevalent than endogenous uncertainty (25%), specifically during discussions on plan formulation and execution. It was also qualitatively associated with poor role understanding and trust. Endogenous uncertainty was more prevalent during discussions on situation assessment and plan formulation. The taxonomy provides a useful way for organizational researchers to categorize uncertainty during the naturalistic observations of workplace interactions and decision making. It reduces the complexity associated with observational research to allow organizational psychologists to better tailor their recommendations for reducing uncertainty. Dealing with endogenous uncertainties would entail targeting decision making specific to the problem incident (e.g., introduce training or policy to reduce redundant fixation on rote-repetitive superordinate goals and focus on more short-term actionable goals during situation assessments). Dealing with exogenous uncertainties would entail improving decision making relating to management and team processes across critical incidents (e.g., training to clarify distributed roles in critical incident teams to aid plan formulation and execution). Organizational researchers interested

  11. Exogenous glucagon-like peptide 1 reduces contractions in human colon circular muscle.

    PubMed

    Amato, Antonella; Baldassano, Sara; Liotta, Rosa; Serio, Rosa; Mulè, Flavia

    2014-04-01

    Glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP1) is a naturally occurring peptide secreted by intestinal L-cells. Though its primary function is to serve as an incretin, GLP1 reduces gastrointestinal motility. However, only a handful of animal studies have specifically evaluated the influence of GLP1 on colonic motility. Consequently, the aims of this study were to investigate the effects induced by exogenous GLP1, to analyze the mechanism of action, and to verify the presence of GLP1 receptors (GLP1Rs) in human colon circular muscular strips. Organ bath technique, RT-PCR, western blotting, and immunofluorescence were used. In human colon, exogenous GLP1 reduced, in a concentration-dependent manner, the amplitude of the spontaneous contractions without affecting the frequency and the resting basal tone. This inhibitory effect was significantly reduced by exendin (9-39), a GLP1R antagonist, which per se significantly increased the spontaneous mechanical activity. Moreover, it was abolished by tetrodotoxin, a neural blocker, or Nω-nitro-l-arginine - a blocker of neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS). The biomolecular analysis revealed a genic and protein expression of the GLP1R in the human colon. The double-labeling experiments with anti-neurofilament or anti-nNOS showed, for the first time, that immunoreactivity for the GLP1R was expressed in nitrergic neurons of the myenteric plexus. In conclusion, the results of this study suggest that GLP1R is expressed in the human colon and, once activated by exogenous GLP1, mediates an inhibitory effect on large intestine motility through NO neural release.

  12. Role of Endogenous and Exogenous Tocopherols in the Lipid Stability of Marine Oil Systems: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Suárez-Jiménez, Guadalupe Miroslava; López-Saiz, Carmen María; Ramírez-Guerra, Hugo Enrique; Ezquerra-Brauer, Josafat Marina; Ruiz-Cruz, Saul; Torres-Arreola, Wilfrido

    2016-01-01

    In marine organisms primarily intended for human consumption, the quality of the muscle and the extracted oils may be affected by lipid oxidation during storage, even at low temperatures. This has led to a search for alternatives to maintain quality. In this sense, antioxidant compounds have been used to prevent such lipid deterioration. Among the most used compounds are tocopherols, which, due to their natural origin, have become an excellent alternative to prevent or retard lipid oxidation and maintain the quality of marine products. Tocopherols as antioxidants have been studied both exogenously and endogenously. Exogenous tocopherols are often used by incorporating them into plastic packaging films or adding them directly to fish oil. It has been observed that exogenous tocopherols incorporated in low concentrations maintain the quality of both muscle and the extracted oils during food storage. However, it has been reported that tocopherols applied at higher concentrations act as a prooxidant molecule, probably because their reactions with singlet oxygen may generate free radicals and cause the oxidation of polyunsaturated fatty acids in fish oils. However, when tocopherols are included in a fish diet (endogenous tocopherols), the antioxidant effect on the muscle lipids is more effective due to their incorporation into the membrane lipids, which can help extend the shelf life of seafood by reducing the lipid deterioration that occurs due to antioxidant synergy with other phenolic compounds used supplements in fish muscle. This review focuses on the most important studies in this field and highlights the potential of using tocopherols as antioxidants in marine oils. PMID:27886145

  13. A novel fibre-ensemble level constitutive model for exogenous cross-linked collagenous tissues

    PubMed Central

    Sacks, Michael S.; Wognum, Silvia

    2016-01-01

    Exogenous cross-linking of soft collagenous tissues is a common method for biomaterial development and medical therapies. To enable improved applications through computational methods, physically realistic constitutive models are required. Yet, despite decades of research, development and clinical use, no such model exists. In this study, we develop the first rigorous full structural model (i.e. explicitly incorporating various features of the collagen fibre architecture) for exogenously cross-linked soft tissues. This was made possible, in-part, with the use of native to cross-linked matched experimental datasets and an extension to the collagenous structural constitutive model so that the uncross-linked collagen fibre responses could be mapped to the cross-linked configuration. This allowed us to separate the effects of cross-linking from kinematic changes induced in the cross-linking process, which in turn allowed the non-fibrous tissue matrix component and the interaction effects to be identified. It was determined that the matrix could be modelled as an isotropic material using a modified Yeoh model. The most novel findings of this study were that: (i) the effective collagen fibre modulus was unaffected by cross-linking and (ii) fibre-ensemble interactions played a large role in stress development, often dominating the total tissue response (depending on the stress component and loading path considered). An important utility of the present model is its ability to separate the effects of exogenous cross-linking on the fibres from changes due to the matrix. Applications of this approach include the utilization in the design of novel chemical treatments to produce specific mechanical responses and the study of fatigue damage in bioprosthetic heart valve biomaterials. PMID:26855761

  14. Effects of exogenous abscisic acid on yield, antioxidant capacities, and phytochemical contents of greenhouse grown lettuces.

    PubMed

    Li, Zheng; Zhao, Xin; Sandhu, Amandeep K; Gu, Liwei

    2010-05-26

    Antioxidants and phytochemicals in vegetables are known to provide health benefits. Strategies that enhance these properties are expected to increase the nutritional values of vegetables. The objective of this research is to assess the effects of exogenous abscisic acid (ABA) on yield, antioxidant capacities, and phytochemical content of lettuces grown in a greenhouse. Red loose leaf lettuce (cv. Galactic) and green loose leaf lettuce (cv. Simpson Elite) were cultivated using a randomized complete block design. Three concentrations of ABA in water [0 (control), 150, 300 ppm] were sprayed on the 30th and 39th days after sowing, and lettuces were harvested on the 46th day. Exogenous ABA significantly decreased yield of green and red lettuces. Total phenolic and total anthocyanin contents in red lettuce treated with ABA were significantly higher than in controls, whereas no significant differences were observed in green lettuce. ABA significantly induced the accumulation of chlorophyll b and total carotenoids in lettuces. The phenolic compounds identified and quantified in red and green lettuces included caffeoyltartaric acid, 5-O-caffeoylquinic acid, dicaffeoyltartaric acid, 3,5-dicaffeoylquinic acid, and quercetin 3-(6''-malonyl)-glucoside. Additionally, cyanidin 3-glucoside, cyanidin 3-(3''-malonoyl)-glucoside, and cyanidin 3-(6''-malonoyl)-glucoside in red lettuces were quantified. No significant effects of ABA on these individual phytochemicals were observed in green lettuces, whereas ABA significantly elevated the content of individual phytochemicals in red lettuces except for 5-O-caffeoylquinic acid. Differences among red lettuces with or without exogenous ABA were visualized on the score plots of principal component analyses. Loading plot indicated that multiple phenolic compounds contributed to the observed differences in red lettuces.

  15. A novel fibre-ensemble level constitutive model for exogenous cross-linked collagenous tissues.

    PubMed

    Sacks, Michael S; Zhang, Will; Wognum, Silvia

    2016-02-06

    Exogenous cross-linking of soft collagenous tissues is a common method for biomaterial development and medical therapies. To enable improved applications through computational methods, physically realistic constitutive models are required. Yet, despite decades of research, development and clinical use, no such model exists. In this study, we develop the first rigorous full structural model (i.e. explicitly incorporating various features of the collagen fibre architecture) for exogenously cross-linked soft tissues. This was made possible, in-part, with the use of native to cross-linked matched experimental datasets and an extension to the collagenous structural constitutive model so that the uncross-linked collagen fibre responses could be mapped to the cross-linked configuration. This allowed us to separate the effects of cross-linking from kinematic changes induced in the cross-linking process, which in turn allowed the non-fibrous tissue matrix component and the interaction effects to be identified. It was determined that the matrix could be modelled as an isotropic material using a modified Yeoh model. The most novel findings of this study were that: (i) the effective collagen fibre modulus was unaffected by cross-linking and (ii) fibre-ensemble interactions played a large role in stress development, often dominating the total tissue response (depending on the stress component and loading path considered). An important utility of the present model is its ability to separate the effects of exogenous cross-linking on the fibres from changes due to the matrix. Applications of this approach include the utilization in the design of novel chemical treatments to produce specific mechanical responses and the study of fatigue damage in bioprosthetic heart valve biomaterials.

  16. Thyroid functions and trace elements in pediatric patients with exogenous obesity.

    PubMed

    Cayir, Atilla; Doneray, Hakan; Kurt, Nezahat; Orbak, Zerrin; Kaya, Avni; Turan, Mehmet Ibrahim; Yildirim, Abdulkadir

    2014-02-01

    Obesity is a multifactorial disease developing following impairment of the energy balance. The endocrine system is known to be affected by the condition. Serum thyroid hormones and trace element levels have been shown to be affected in obese children. Changes in serum thyroid hormones may result from alterations occurring in serum trace element levels. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether or not changes in serum thyroid hormone levels in children with exogenous obesity are associated with changes in trace element levels. Eighty-five children diagnosed with exogenous obesity constituted the study group, and 24 age- and sex-matched healthy children made up the control group. Serum thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH), free thyroxine (fT4), free triiodothyronine (fT3), thyroglobulin (TG), selenium (Se), zinc (Zn), copper (Cu), and manganese (Mn) levels in the study group were measured before and at the third and sixth months of treatment, and once only in the control group. Pretreatment fT4 levels in the study group rose significantly by the sixth month (p = 0.006). Zn levels in the patient group were significantly low compared to the control group (p = 0.009). Mn and Se levels in the obese children before and at the third and sixth months of treatment were significantly higher than those of the control group (p = 0.001, p = 0.001). In conclusion, fT4, Zn, Cu, Mn, and Se levels are significantly affected in children diagnosed with exogenous obesity. The change in serum fT4 levels is not associated with changes in trace element concentrations.

  17. ProtEx: a novel technology to display exogenous proteins on the cell surface for immunomodulation.

    PubMed

    Singh, Narendra P; Yolcu, Esma S; Askenasy, Nadir; Shirwan, Haval

    2005-11-01

    Gene therapy as an immunomodulatory approach has the potential to treat various inherited and acquired immune-based human diseases. However, its clinical application has several challenges, varying from the efficiency of gene transfer, control of gene expression, cell and tissue targeting, and safety concerns associated with the introduction of exogenous DNA into cells/tissues. Gene therapy is also a time- and labor-intensive procedure. As an alternative, we recently developed a novel technology, ProtEx, that allows for rapid, efficient, and durable display of exogenous proteins on the surface of cells, tissues, and organs without detectable toxicity. This technology exploits the strong binding affinity (Kd = 10(-15) M) of streptavidin with biotin and involves generation of chimeric molecules composed of the extracellular portions of immunological proteins of interest and a modified form of streptavidin, biotinylation of biological surfaces, and decoration of the modified surface with chimeric proteins. Biotin persists on the cell surface for weeks both in vitro and in vivo, thereby providing a platform to display exogenous proteins with extended cell surface kinetics. Two chimeric proteins, rat FasL (SA-FasL) and human CD80 (CD80-SA), were generated and tested for cell surface display and immunomodulatory functions. SA-FasL and CD80-SA molecules persisted on the surface of various cell types for extended periods, varying from days to weeks in vitro and in vivo. The cell surface kinetics, however, were protein and cell type dependent. SA-FasL showed potent apoptotic activity against Fas+ cells as a soluble protein or displayed on the cell surface and effectively blocked alloreactive responses. The display of CD80-SA on the surface of tumor cells, however, converted them into antigen-presenting cells for effective stimulation of autologous and allogeneic T-cell responses. ProtEx technology, therefore, represents a practical and effective alternative to DNA

  18. Survival of tissue-resident memory T cells requires exogenous lipid uptake and metabolism.

    PubMed

    Pan, Youdong; Tian, Tian; Park, Chang Ook; Lofftus, Serena Y; Mei, Shenglin; Liu, Xing; Luo, Chi; O'Malley, John T; Gehad, Ahmed; Teague, Jessica E; Divito, Sherrie J; Fuhlbrigge, Robert; Puigserver, Pere; Krueger, James G; Hotamisligil, Gökhan S; Clark, Rachael A; Kupper, Thomas S

    2017-03-09

    Tissue-resident memory T (TRM) cells persist indefinitely in epithelial barrier tissues and protect the host against pathogens. However, the biological pathways that enable the long-term survival of TRM cells are obscure. Here we show that mouse CD8(+) TRM cells generated by viral infection of the skin differentially express high levels of several molecules that mediate lipid uptake and intracellular transport, including fatty-acid-binding proteins 4 and 5 (FABP4 and FABP5). We further show that T-cell-specific deficiency of Fabp4 and Fabp5 (Fabp4/Fabp5) impairs exogenous free fatty acid (FFA) uptake by CD8(+) TRM cells and greatly reduces their long-term survival in vivo, while having no effect on the survival of central memory T (TCM) cells in lymph nodes. In vitro, CD8(+) TRM cells, but not CD8(+) TCM cells, demonstrated increased mitochondrial oxidative metabolism in the presence of exogenous FFAs; this increase was not seen in Fabp4/Fabp5 double-knockout CD8(+) TRM cells. The persistence of CD8(+) TRM cells in the skin was strongly diminished by inhibition of mitochondrial FFA β-oxidation in vivo. Moreover, skin CD8(+) TRM cells that lacked Fabp4/Fabp5 were less effective at protecting mice from cutaneous viral infection, and lung Fabp4/Fabp5 double-knockout CD8(+) TRM cells generated by skin vaccinia virus (VACV) infection were less effective at protecting mice from a lethal pulmonary challenge with VACV. Consistent with the mouse data, increased FABP4 and FABP5 expression and enhanced extracellular FFA uptake were also demonstrated in human CD8(+) TRM cells in normal and psoriatic skin. These results suggest that FABP4 and FABP5 have a critical role in the maintenance, longevity and function of CD8(+) TRM cells, and suggest that CD8(+) TRM cells use exogenous FFAs and their oxidative metabolism to persist in tissue and to mediate protective immunity.

  19. Preparation of enzyme calibration materials.

    PubMed

    Férard, G; Lessinger, J M

    1998-12-01

    Standardisation in clinical enzymology needs not only reference methods but also reference materials. While single-enzyme reference enzymes have been developed, a multienzyme certified reference material (MECRM) available in high amount remains to be produced. To transfer trueness from the value of the reference system to patients' results, validated enzyme calibrators (EC) are also needed. Both the MECRM and the ECs must exhibit the same catalytic properties as the corresponding enzymes in human plasma. Moreover, commutability of these materials with patients' samples must be experimentally tested for one or a set of methods defined by an analytical specificity equal to that of the reference method. Various experimental studies have shown that the commutability of an enzyme material depends on the source of enzyme and its purification process, the matrix (including cofactors, effectors, additives, stabilisers... ) and the mode of processing of the final material. To promote intermethod calibration in clinical enzymology, a collaborative programme between the International Federation of Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine (IFCC), Institute for Reference Materials and Measurements (IRMM, Geel, Belgium) and IFCC corporate members is in progress for the development of a MECRM containing amylase, ALT, AST, ALP, CK, GGT, LDH, and lipase and exhibiting a wide and defined commutability.

  20. Effect of endogenously synthesized and exogenously applied ethanol on tomato fruit ripening

    SciTech Connect

    Kelly, M.O.; Saltveit, M.E. Jr.

    1988-09-01

    Tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill. var Castlemart) fruit ripening was inhibited by tissue concentrations of ethanol that were produced by either exposure to exogenous ethanol vapors or synthesis under anaerobic atmospheres. Ethanol was not detected in aerobically ripened tomato fruit. Ripening was not inhibited by exposure to methanol at an equivalent molar concentration to inhibitory concentrations of ethanol, while ripening was slightly more inhibited by n-propanol than by equivalent molar concentrations of ethanol. The mottled appearance of a few ripened ethanol-treated fruit was not observed in n-propanol-treated fruit.

  1. Quantification of endogenous and exogenous feline leukemia virus sequences by real-time PCR assays.

    PubMed

    Tandon, Ravi; Cattori, Valentino; Willi, Barbara; Lutz, Hans; Hofmann-Lehmann, Regina

    2008-05-15

    Endogenous retroviruses are integrated in the genome of most vertebrates. They represent footprints of ancient retroviral infection and are vertically transmitted from parents to their offspring. In the genome of all domestic cats, sequences closely related to exogenous FeLV known as endogenous feline leukemia virus (enFeLV), are present. enFeLV are incapable of giving rise to infectious virus particles. However, transcription and translation of enFeLV have been demonstrated in tissues of healthy cats and in feline cell lines. The presence of enFeLV-env has been shown in specific embryonic tissues and adult thymic cells. In addition, the enFeLV-env region recombines with FeLV subgroup A giving rise to an infectious FeLV-B virus. enFeLV envelope protein, FeLIX (FeLV infectivity X-essory protein) is also involved in mediating FeLV-T infection. In order to test the hypothesis that the enFeLV loads play a role in exogenous FeLV-A infection and pathogenesis, quantitative real-time PCR and RT-PCR assays were developed. An assay, specific to U3 region of all different subtypes of exogenous FeLV, was designed and applied to quantify exogenous FeLV proviral or viral load in cats, while three real-time PCR assays were designed to quantify U3 and env enFeLV loads (two within U3 amplifying different sequences; one within env). enFeLV loads were investigated in blood samples derived from Swiss privately owned domestic cats, specific pathogen-free (SPF) cats and European wildcats (Felis silvestris silvestris). Significant differences in enFeLV loads were observed between privately owned cats and SPF cats as well as among SPF cats originating from different catteries and among domestic cats of different breeds. When privately owned cats were compared, FeLV-infected cats had higher loads than uninfected cats. In addition, wildcats had higher enFeLV loads than domestic cats. In conclusion, the quantitative real-time PCR assays described herein are important prerequisites to

  2. Modulation of Neuronal Responses by Exogenous Attention in Macaque Primary Visual Cortex.

    PubMed

    Wang, Feng; Chen, Minggui; Yan, Yin; Zhaoping, Li; Li, Wu

    2015-09-30

    Visual perception is influenced by attention deployed voluntarily or triggered involuntarily by salient stimuli. Modulation of visual cortical processing by voluntary or endogenous attention has been extensively studied, but much less is known about how involuntary or exogenous attention affects responses of visual cortical neurons. Using implanted microelectrode arrays, we examined the effects of exogenous attention on neuronal responses in the primary visual cortex (V1) of awake monkeys. A bright annular cue was flashed either around the receptive fields of recorded neurons or in the opposite visual field to capture attention. A subsequent grating stimulus probed the cue-induced effects. In a fixation task, when the cue-to-probe stimulus onset asynchrony (SOA) was <240 ms, the cue induced a transient increase of neuronal responses to the probe at the cued location during 40-100 ms after the onset of neuronal responses to the probe. This facilitation diminished and disappeared after repeated presentations of the same cue but recurred for a new cue of a different color. In another task to detect the probe, relative shortening of monkey's reaction times for the validly cued probe depended on the SOA in a way similar to the cue-induced V1 facilitation, and the behavioral and physiological cueing effects remained after repeated practice. Flashing two cues simultaneously in the two opposite visual fields weakened or diminished both the physiological and behavioral cueing effects. Our findings indicate that exogenous attention significantly modulates V1 responses and that the modulation strength depends on both novelty and task relevance of the stimulus. Significance statement: Visual attention can be involuntarily captured by a sudden appearance of a conspicuous object, allowing rapid reactions to unexpected events of significance. The current study discovered a correlate of this effect in monkey primary visual cortex. An abrupt, salient, flash enhanced neuronal

  3. Independent effects of endogenous and exogenous spatial cueing: inhibition of return at endogenously attended target locations.

    PubMed

    Lupiáñez, Juan; Decaix, Caroline; Siéroff, Eric; Chokron, Sylvie; Milliken, Bruce; Bartolomeo, Paolo

    2004-12-01

    Inhibition of return (IOR) is thought to reflect a bias against returning attention to previously attended locations. According to this view, IOR should occur only if attention is withdrawn from the target location prior to target appearance. In the present study, endogenous attention and exogenous cueing were manipulated orthogonally. IOR was observed both when a target appeared at an unexpected location, and when a target appeared at the expected location. A similar pattern of results was obtained in a reanalysis of data from a study with Neglect patients. These results suggest that IOR is independent of endogenous orienting.

  4. Protection by exogenous glutathione against hypoxic and cyanide-induced damage to isolated perfused rat livers.

    PubMed

    Younes, M; Strubelt, O

    1990-02-01

    In experiments with isolated perfused livers from fasted rats, addition of 2 mmol/l glutathione (GSH) to the perfusion medium protected against hepatic damage induced by cyanide or hypoxia and reoxygenation as evidenced by leakage of lactate dehydrogenase and hepatic calcium accumulation. In control experiments as well as in experiments with cyanide or hypoxia and reoxygenation, exogenous glutathione resulted in an augmentation of cellular glutathione content, indicating either direct uptake of GSH or stimulation of its intracellular synthesis. The protective effects of glutathione against hypoxic and cyanide-induced hepatotoxicity substantiate the role of oxidative stress in both types of injury.

  5. Optimal Control for TB disease with vaccination assuming endogeneous reactivation and exogeneous reinfection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anggriani, N.; Wicaksono, B. C.; Supriatna, A. K.

    2016-06-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is one of the deadliest infectious disease in the world which caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The disease is spread through the air via the droplets from the infectious persons when they are coughing. The World Health Organization (WHO) has paid a special attention to the TB by providing some solution, for example by providing BCG vaccine that prevent an infected person from becoming an active infectious TB. In this paper we develop a mathematical model of the spread of the TB which assumes endogeneous reactivation and exogeneous reinfection factors. We also assume that some of the susceptible population are vaccinated. Furthermore we investigate the optimal vaccination level for the disease.

  6. [Development of uncompetitive exogenous internal amplification control for real-time PCR based on UFA method].

    PubMed

    Ivanov, M K; Bragin, A G; Prasolova, M A; Vedernikov, V E; Dymshits, G M

    2009-01-01

    An uncompetitive exogenous internal amplification control method (EIAC) was developed on the basis of short synthetic DNA segment, whose amplification can be detected in real time by UFA spectroscopy principle. The EIAC was shown to be useful as internal control in diagnostic test systems based on DNA or RNA detection by multiplex real-time PCR. It can be applied to assess the quality of extracted DNA or RNA, and also to detect and study the factors causing PCR inhibition and earlier plateau effect.

  7. [The role of endogenous and exogenous factors in the development of paroxysmal schizophrenia].

    PubMed

    Agranovskiĭ, M L

    1992-01-01

    Clinical and epidemiological examinations of 347 patients with attack-like schizophrenia and their relatives of the first degree kinship (2688 persons) have demonstrated that the lack of hereditary load and pathological character traits in the premorbid period, and the middle age at which the disease becomes manifest are favourable factors of the development of this pathology debut. The following factors are unfavourable: hereditary load with regard to schizophrenia, the schizoid type of the premorbid condition, the presence of "exogenous" provocation" and early disease onset.

  8. Exogenous-Base-Free Palladacycle-Catalyzed Highly Enantioselective Arylation of Imines with Arylboroxines.

    PubMed

    Schrapel, Carmen; Peters, René

    2015-08-24

    Enantiomerically pure benzylic amines are important for the development of new drugs. A readily accessible planar-chiral ferrocene-derived palladacycle is shown to be a highly efficient catalyst for the formation of N-substituted benzylic stereocenters; this catalyst accelerates the 1,2-addition of arylboroxines to aromatic and aliphatic imines with exceptional levels of enantioselectivity. Using aldimines an exogenous base was not necessary for the activation of the boroxines, when acetate was used as an anionic ligand. Common problems such as aryl-aryl homocouplings and imine hydrolysis were fully overcome, the latter even in the absence of molecular sieves.

  9. Engineering Cellulase Enzymes for Bioenergy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atreya, Meera Elizabeth

    Sustainable energy sources, such as biofuels, offer increasingly important alternatives to fossil fuels that contribute less to global climate change. The energy contained within cellulosic biofuels derives from sunlight energy stored in the form of carbon-carbon bonds comprising sugars such as glucose. Second-generation biofuels are produced from lignocellulosic biomass feedstocks, including agricultural waste products and non-food crops like Miscanthus, that contain lignin and the polysaccharides hemicellulose and cellulose. Cellulose is the most abundant biological material on Earth; it is a polymer of glucose and a structural component of plant cell walls. Accessing the sugar is challenging, as the crystalline structure of cellulose resists degradation; biochemical and thermochemical means can be used to depolymerize cellulose. Cellulase enzymes catalyze the biochemical depolymerization of cellulose into glucose. Glucose can be used as a carbon source for growth of a biofuel-producing microorganism. When it converts glucose to a hydrocarbon fuel, this microbe completes the biofuels process of transforming sunlight energy into accessible, chemical energy capable of replacing non-renewable transportation fuels. Due to strong intermolecular interactions between polymer chains, cellulose is significantly more challenging to depolymerize than starch, a more accessible polymer of glucose utilized in first-generation biofuels processes (often derived from corn). While most mammals cannot digest cellulose (dietary fiber), certain fungi and bacteria produce cellulase enzymes capable of hydrolyzing it. These organisms secrete a wide variety of glycoside hydrolase and other classes of enzymes that work in concert. Because cellulase enzymes are slow-acting and expensive to produce, my aim has been to improve the properties of these enzymes as a means to make a cellulosic biofuels process possible that is more efficient and, consequently, more economical than current

  10. Insights on Cytochrome P450 Enzymes and Inhibitors Obtained Through QSAR Studies

    PubMed Central

    Sridhar, Jayalakshmi; Liu, Jiawang; Foroozesh, Maryam; Stevens, Cheryl L. Klein

    2013-01-01

    The cytochrome P450 (CYP) superfamily of heme enzymes play an important role in the metabolism of a large number of endogenous and exogenous compounds, including most of the drugs currently on the market. Inhibitors of CYP enzymes have important roles in the treatment of several disease conditions such as numerous cancers and fungal infections in addition to their critical role in drug-drug interactions. Structure activity relationships (SAR), and three-dimensional quantitative structure activity relationships (3D-QSAR) represent important tools in understanding the interactions of the inhibitors with the active sites of the CYP enzymes. A comprehensive account of the QSAR studies on the major human CYPs 1A1, 1A2, 1B1, 2A6, 2B6, 2C9, 2C19, 2D6, 2E1, 3A4 and a few other CYPs are detailed in this review which will provide us with an insight into the individual/common characteristics of the active sites of these enzymes and the enzyme-inhibitor interactions. PMID:22864238

  11. Genetic ontogeny of pancreatic enzymes in Labrus bergylta larvae and the effect of feed type on enzyme activities and gene expression.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Truls Wergeland; Folkvord, Arild; Grøtan, Espen; Sæle, Øystein

    2013-03-01

    A newly cultivated wrasse species, Labrus bergylta, have shown great potential for use in Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) farms in the battle against sea lice (Lepeoptheirus salmonis) infections. Hatchery reared L. bergylta were studied from 2 to 55 DPH to examine the molecular basis of digestive ontogeny related to the pancreas. An isolated feeding trial was performed on 27-34 DPH larvae to compare the effect of diet on enzyme activity and the possible exogenous contribution by live feed. The following genes coding for key pancreatic enzymes were analyzed by qPCR: trypsin, Cyp7 A1, BAL, sPLA(2) 1B, amylase and pancreatic chitinase. Enzyme activity was measured on trypsin, neutral lipase, sPLA(2), amylase and chitinase in fed and unfed larvae. We did not observe any effects of the formulated diet v.s. rotifers on enzyme activities of neutral lipase, chitinase and sPLA(2). However, a probable feed-dependency was observed at a transcriptional level, where rotifers seem to stimulate upregulation. The regulation of BAL was the only exception, where an upregulation was observed after weaning both in the ontogeny series and the experimental part. Our data on pancreatic chitinase and amylase mRNA levels suggest the importance of carbohydrates in the diet of early larval and juvenile L. bergylta.

  12. [Effects of chlorophyllin-iron on osmotic adjustment and activities of antioxidantive enzymes in cucumber seedlings under suboptimal temperature].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Meng; Wang, Xiu-feng; Zhang, Fan-yang; Wei, Min; Shi, Qing-hua; Yang, Feng-juan; Li, Yan

    2014-12-01

    Cucumber cultivar 'Jinyan 4' was subjected to suboptimal temperature treatment of 18/12 degrees C (day/night) in the growth chambers. A solution culture experiment was conducted to study the effect of exogenously spraying 5 mg x L(-1) chlorophyllin-iron solution on plant growth, the content of proline, soluble sugar, MDA and activity of peroxidase in the leaves of cucumber seedling under suboptimal temperature. Application of chlorophyllin-iron showed prominent effects on mitigating the stress of suboptimal temperature on growth of the cucumber seedlings, significantly increasing the plant height, leaf area, shoot dry mass, the contents of soluble sugar and proline and the activities of SOD, POD, CAT and APX. Exogenously spraying chlorophyllin-iron could promote the accumulation of proline and soluble sugar, raise the activities of antioxidant enzymes, decrease the membrane lipid peroxidation and improve the adaptability of cucumber seedlings under suboptimal temperature.

  13. Imaging enzymes at work: metabolic mapping by enzyme histochemistry.

    PubMed

    Van Noorden, Cornelis J F

    2010-06-01

    For the understanding of functions of proteins in biological and pathological processes, reporter molecules such as fluorescent proteins have become indispensable tools for visualizing the location of these proteins in intact animals, tissues, and cells. For enzymes, imaging their activity also provides information on their function or functions, which does not necessarily correlate with their location. Metabolic mapping enables imaging of activity of enzymes. The enzyme under study forms a reaction product that is fluorescent or colored by conversion of either a fluorogenic or chromogenic substrate or a fluorescent substrate with different spectral characteristics. Most chromogenic staining methods were developed in the latter half of the twentieth century but still find new applications in modern cell biology and pathology. Fluorescence methods have rapidly evolved during the last decade. This review critically evaluates the methods that are available at present for metabolic mapping in living animals, unfixed cryostat sections of tissues, and living cells, and refers to protocols of the methods of choice.

  14. [Preface for special issue on enzyme engineering].

    PubMed

    Jin, Cheng

    2009-12-01

    Enzyme engineering is a combined technology of enzymology and engineering, which is becoming one of the major fields of modem biotechnology. In recent years, China has made some advances in enzyme engineering research. To promote enzyme engineering research in China, invited reviews and selected research articles were published in this special issue of "Enzyme Engineering". The reviews and research articles focus on the fields of enzymatic conversion, therapeutic enzymes, enzymes as additives to animal feedstuff, enzymes for degradation of organic pollutes, and enzymes for biofuel and biorefinery.

  15. [Effects of exogenous silicon on the pollination and fertility characteristics of hybrid rice under heat stress during anthesis].

    PubMed

    Wu, Chen-Yang; Chen, Dan; Luo, Hai-Wei; Yao, Yi-min; Wang, Zhi-Wei; Tsutomu, Matsui; Tian, Xiao-Hai

    2013-11-01

    Taking two medium-maturing indica rice hybrids Jinyou 63 and Shanyou 63 as test materials, this paper studied the effects of applying silicon fertilizer on the flag leaf chlorophyll content, photosynthetic properties, antioxidant enzyme activities, malondialdehyde (MDA) content, pollen vigor, anther acid invertase activity, pollination, and seed-setting of hybrid rice under the heat stress during anthesis. This study was conducted in pots and under growth chamber. Soluble solution of silicon fertilizer applied as Na2SiO3 x 9H2O was sprayed on the growing plants after early jointing stage, with three times successively and at an interval of one week. The pots were then moved into growth chamber to subject to normal temperature vs. high temperature (termed as heat stress) for five days. In treatment normal temperature, the average daily temperature was set at 26.6 degrees C, and the maximum daily temperature was set at 29.4 degres C; in treatment high temperature, the average and the maximum daily temperature were set at 33.2 degrees C and 40.1 degrees C, respectively. As compared with the control, applying silicon increased the flag leaf chlorophyll content significantly, improved the net photosynthetic rate and stomatal conductance, decreased the accumulative inter- cellular CO2 concentration, improved the leaf photosynthesis, reduced the MDA content, and improved the activities of SOD, POD and CAT under heat stress. In addition, applying silicon improved the anther acid invertase activity and the pollen vigor, increased the anther basal dehiscence width, total number of pollination per stigma, germinated number, germination rate of pollen, and percentage of florets with more than 10 germinated pollen grains, decreased the percentage of florets with fewer than 20 germinated pollen grains, and thus, alleviated the fertility loss of Jinyou 63 and Shanyou 63 under heat stress by 13.4% and 14.1%, respectively. It was suggested that spraying exogenous silicon in the

  16. Transient cardiogenic shock during a crisis of pheochromocytoma triggered by high-dose exogenous corticosteroids

    PubMed Central

    Ibrahim, Majd; Banga, Sandeep; Venkatapuram, Suneetha; Mungee, Sudhir

    2015-01-01

    We report a case of a 39-year-old woman who presented to the emergency department (ED) with symptoms of pharyngitis and fever. Diagnosed with streptococcal pharyngitis, she received antibiotics and dexamethasone, and was discharged. Within 24 h she returned to the ED with signs and symptoms of an acute coronary syndrome; she was thus given β-blockers. Her coronary angiogram was normal. She developed cardiogenic shock with an ejection fraction (EF) of 10% and apical ballooning on echocardiography. Her condition improved with optimal medical therapy. Subsequent testing weeks later confirmed the presence of a pheochromocytoma. Following prazosin and an adrenalectomy, all her antihypertensive medications were weaned and her EF normalised. We believe the high-dose exogenous corticosteroids triggered a pheochromocytoma crisis. The concomitant use of β-blockers without preceding α blockade resulted in cardiovascular collapse. Pheochromocytoma crisis must be included in the differential diagnosis of any dramatic haemodynamic collapse after administration of exogenous corticosteroid or β-blockers. PMID:25694646

  17. Effects of Supplemental Exogenous Emulsifier on Performance, Nutrient Metabolism, and Serum Lipid Profile in Broiler Chickens

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Amitava; Haldar, Sudipto; Mondal, Souvik; Ghosh, Tapan Kumar

    2010-01-01

    The effects of an exogenous emulsifier, glyceryl polyethylene glycol ricinoleate, on performance and carcass traits of broiler chickens were assessed. The emulsifier was added to the diet at dose rates of 0 (control), 1 (E1) and 2 (E2) % of added fat (saturated palm oil). Live weight gain (P < .07) and feed conversion ratio (P < .05) in 39 days were higher in the E1 dietary group. Gain: ME intake and gain: protein intake during the grower phase improved quadratically (P < .05). Gross carcass traits were not affected. Body fat content and fat accretion increased (P < .05) and liver fat content decreased (P < .05) linearly with the level of emulsifier in diet. Fat excretion decreased (P < .001) leading to increased ileal fat digestibility (P < .06) in the E1 group (quadratic response). Metabolizable intake of N (P < .1) and fat (P < .05) increased quadratically due to supplementation of emulsifier in diet. Metabolism of trace elements and serum lipid profiles were not affected. The study revealed that supplementation of exogenous emulsifiers in diets containing moderate quantities of added vegetable fats may substantially improve broiler performance. PMID:20671938

  18. THE RELATION OF ENZYMATIC ADAPTATION TO THE METABOLISM OF ENDOGENOUS AND EXOGENOUS SUBSTRATES

    PubMed Central

    Spiegelman, S.; Reiner, John M.; Cohnberg, Rosellen

    1947-01-01

    The source of energy for enzymatic adaptation has been investigated. Aerobically, it is found that the endogenous carbohydrate reserves may be used as such a source. In cells depleted of their reserves, the adaptive substrate itself can be oxidized even while it cannot be fermented, and so can serve as a source of energy for the adaptation to a fermentative mode of utilization. Anaerobically, adaptation may occur at the expense of stored energy-rich compounds, while the reserves and the adaptive substrate are now useless as fuel. Such compounds appear to be more plentiful in young than in old cells. The addition of any fermentable substrate, such as glucose, leads to rapid anaerobic adaptation. Experiments in which maltose-adapted cells are adapted anaerobically to galactose with the aid of a little added maltose, and conversely, show that fermentability is the criterion of usefulness for an exogenous substrate in aiding the adaptive process. None of the endogenous and exogenous energy sources which have been investigated will facilitate adaptation unless the adaptive substrate is present while they are being consumed. The significance of these findings and the adequacy of "activation" hypotheses to explain enzymatic adaptation has been discussed. PMID:19873518

  19. Accumulation of exogenous 45Ca after middle cerebral artery occlusion in rats.

    PubMed

    Tomabechi, M; Sako, K; Yonemasu, Y

    1994-02-01

    The distribution of exogenous 45Ca in the focal ischemia rat model (middle cerebral artery occlusion) was studied using 45Ca autoradiography. High 45Ca accumulations were observed in the frontal cortex and caudate-putamen corresponding with morphological damage shown by HE staining. Regional 45Ca concentrations were calculated from the optical density on the 45Ca autoradiograms. Rapid uptake of 45Ca in the ischemic brain occurred during the first 5 hours, and continued more slowly between 5 and 24 hours after ischemia. The area of 45Ca accumulation was also expanded between 5 and 24 hours. An area of low 45Ca concentration around the area of high accumulation developed 5 hours after ischemia, which presumably accumulated 45Ca between 5 and 24 hours after ischemia. The lower concentration of 45Ca in the periphery of ischemia may result from: 1) a decrease in the total amount of calcium due to narrowing of extracellular space accompanied by cytotoxic edema, and 2) delayed accumulation of exogenous 45Ca due to reduced clearance of extracellular fluid.

  20. Additive effects of exogenous IL-12 supplementation and antibiotic treatment in infection prophylaxis.

    PubMed

    Boyce, Brandon M; Lindsey, Brock A; Clovis, Nina B; Smith, E Suzanne; Hobbs, Gerald R; Hubbard, David F; Emery, Sanford E; Barnett, John B; Li, Bingyun

    2012-02-01

    The increasing clinical incidence and host risk of open fracture-associated infections, as well as the reduced effectiveness of conventional antibiotics to treat such infections, have driven the development of new therapies for the prophylaxis of open fracture-associated infections. We investigated percutaneous supplementation of a natural cytokine (i.e., interleukin 12p70 or IL-12) at an open fracture site to reduce open fracture-associated infections. We also determined the efficacy of the combination therapy of IL-12 and conventional antibiotic therapy in the prophylaxis of open fracture-associated infections. An open femur fracture infection model was produced by direct inoculation of a clinical isolate of Staphylococcus aureus after creating a femur fracture using rats. The animals were assigned to one of four groups: no drug administration, percutaneous supplementation of IL-12, intraperitoneal administration of the antibiotic ampicillin, or percutaneous IL-12 in combination with intraperitoneal ampicillin. Animals were euthanized at postoperative days 6, 10, 14, and 21. Percutaneous IL-12 led to a reduction in infection at postoperative days 6 and 10. For the first time, exogenous IL-12 was found to have additive effects in the prevention of infection when combined with conventional treatment (i.e., antibiotic therapy). Combination therapy of ampicillin and IL-12 substantially reduced the infection rate at postoperative day 6 and also decreased the time needed for complete inhibition of infection. Therefore, exogenous IL-12, providing a mechanism of protection independent of antibiotic resistance, complements the routine use of antibiotics.

  1. Temperature dependence of electrical properties of mixture of exogenous neurotransmitters dopamine and epinephrine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patki, Mugdha; Patil, Vidya

    2016-05-01

    Neurotransmitters are chemical messengers that support the communication between the neurons. In vitro study of exogenous neurotransmitters Dopamine and Epinephrine and their mixture, carried out to learn about their electrical properties being dielectric constant and conductivity amongst others. Dielectric constant and conductivity of the selected neurotransmitters are found to increase with temperature. As a result, the time constant of the system increases with temperature. This change leads to increase in the time taken by the synapse to transport the action potential. The correlation between physical properties of exogenous neurotransmitters and psychological and physiological behaviour of human being may be understood with the help of current study. The response time of Epinephrine is in microseconds whereas response time of Dopamine is in milliseconds. The response time for both the neurotransmitters and their mixture is found to be increasing with temperature indicating the symptoms such as depression, apathy, chronic fatigue and low physical energy with no desire to exercise the body, which are observed during the fever.

  2. Dynamics of book sales: Endogenous versus exogenous shocks in complex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deschâtres, F.; Sornette, D.

    2005-07-01

    We present an extensive study of the foreshock and aftershock signatures accompanying peaks of book sales. The time series of book sales are derived from the ranking system of Amazon.com. We present two independent ways of classifying peaks, one based on the acceleration pattern of sales and the other based on the exponent of the relaxation. They are found to be consistent and reveal the coexistence of two types of sales peaks: exogenous peaks occur abruptly and are followed by a power law relaxation, while endogenous sale peaks occur after a progressively accelerating power law growth followed by an approximately symmetrical power law relaxation which is slower than for exogenous peaks. We develop a simple epidemic model of buyers connected within a network of acquaintances which propagates rumors and opinions on books. The comparison between the predictions of the model and the empirical data confirms the validity of the model and suggests in addition that social networks have evolved to converge very close to criticality (here in the sense of critical branching processes of opinion spreading). We test in detail the evidence for a power law distribution of book sales and confirm a previous indirect study suggesting that the fraction of books (density distribution) P(S) of sales S is a power law P(S)˜1/S1+μ with μ≈2 .

  3. The role of endogenous and exogenous mechanisms in the formation of R&D networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomasello, Mario V.; Perra, Nicola; Tessone, Claudio J.; Karsai, Márton; Schweitzer, Frank

    2014-07-01

    We develop an agent-based model of strategic link formation in Research and Development (R&D) networks. Empirical evidence has shown that the growth of these networks is driven by mechanisms which are both endogenous to the system (that is, depending on existing alliances patterns) and exogenous (that is, driven by an exploratory search for newcomer firms). Extant research to date has not investigated both mechanisms simultaneously in a comparative manner. To overcome this limitation, we develop a general modeling framework to shed light on the relative importance of these two mechanisms. We test our model against a comprehensive dataset, listing cross-country and cross-sectoral R&D alliances from 1984 to 2009. Our results show that by fitting only three macroscopic properties of the network topology, this framework is able to reproduce a number of micro-level measures, including the distributions of degree, local clustering, path length and component size, and the emergence of network clusters. Furthermore, by estimating the link probabilities towards newcomers and established firms from the data, we find that endogenous mechanisms are predominant over the exogenous ones in the network formation, thus quantifying the importance of existing structures in selecting partner firms.

  4. Transport Kinetics and Metabolism of Exogenously Applied Putrescine in Roots of Intact Maize Seedlings

    PubMed Central

    DiTomaso, Joseph M.; Hart, Jonathan J.; Kochian, Leon V.

    1992-01-01

    Putrescine metabolism, uptake, and compartmentation were studied in roots of hydroponically grown intact maize (Zea mays L.) seedlings. In vivo analysis of exogenously applied putrescine indicated that the diamine is primarily metabolized by a cell wall-localized diamine oxidase. Time-dependent kinetics for putrescine uptake could be resolved into a rapid phase of uptake and binding within the root apoplasm, followed by transport across the plasma membrane that was linear for 30 to 40 minutes. Concentration-dependent kinetics for putrescine uptake (between 0.05 and 1.0 millimolar putrescine) appeared to be nonsaturating but could be resolved into a saturable (Vmax 0.397 micromoles per gram fresh weight per hour; Km 120 micromolar) and a linear component. The linear component was determined to be cell wall-bound putrescine that was not removed during the desorption period following uptake of [3H]putrescine. These results suggest that a portion of the exogenously applied putrescine can be metabolized in maize root cell walls by diamine oxidase activity, but the bulk of the putrescine is transported across the plasmalemma by a carrier-mediated process, similar to that proposed for animal systems. PMID:16668685

  5. Procurement of exogenous ammonia by the swallowtail butterfly, Papilio polytes, for protein biosynthesis and sperm production.

    PubMed

    Honda, Keiichi; Takase, Hiroyuki; Ômura, Hisashi; Honda, Hiroshi

    2012-09-01

    How to acquire sufficient quantity of nitrogen is a pivotal issue for herbivores, particularly for lepidopterans (butterflies and moths) of which diet quality greatly differs among their life stages. Male Lepidoptera often feed from mud puddles, dung, and carrion, a behavior known as puddling, which is thought to be supplementary feeding targeted chiefly at sodium. During copulation, males transfer a spermatophore to females that contains, besides sperm, nutrients (nuptial gifts) rich in sodium, proteins, and amino acids. However, it is still poorly understood how adults, mostly nectarivores, extract nitrogen from the environment. We examined the availability of two ubiquitous inorganic nitrogenous ions in nature, viz. ammonium (or ammonia) and nitrate ions, as nutrients in a butterfly, and show that exogenous ammonia ingested by adult males of the swallowtail, Papilio polytes, can serve as a resource for protein biosynthesis. Feeding experiments with (15)N-labeled ammonium chloride revealed that nitrogen was incorporated into eupyrene spermatozoa, seminal protein, and thoracic muscle. Ammonia uptake by males significantly increased the number of eupyrene sperms in the reproductive tract tissues. The females also had the capacity to assimilate ammonia into egg protein. Consequently, it is evident that acquired ammonia is utilized for the replenishment of proteins allocable for reproduction and somatic maintenance. The active exploitation of exogenous ammonia as a nutrient by a butterfly would foster better understanding of the foraging and reproductive strategies in insects.

  6. Exogenous alanine and/or glucose plus kanamycin kills antibiotic-resistant bacteria.

    PubMed

    Peng, Bo; Su, Yu-Bin; Li, Hui; Han, Yi; Guo, Chang; Tian, Yao-Mei; Peng, Xuan-Xian

    2015-02-03

    Multidrug-resistant bacteria are an increasingly serious threat to human and animal health. However, novel drugs that can manage infections by multidrug-resistant bacteria have proved elusive. Here we show that glucose and alanine abundances are greatly suppressed in kanamycin-resistant Edwardsiella tarda by GC-MS-based metabolomics. Exogenous alanine or glucose restores susceptibility of multidrug-resistant E. tarda to killing by kanamycin, demonstrating an approach to killing multidrug-resistant bacteria. The mechanism underlying this approach is that exogenous glucose or alanine promotes the TCA cycle by substrate activation, which in turn increases production of NADH and proton motive force and stimulates uptake of antibiotic. Similar results are obtained with other Gram-negative bacteria (Vibrio parahaemolyticus, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa) and Gram-positive bacterium (Staphylococcus aureus), and the results are also reproduced in a mouse model for urinary tract infection. This study establishes a functional metabolomics-based strategy to manage infection by antibiotic-resistant bacteria.

  7. Does partial Granger causality really eliminate the influence of exogenous inputs and latent variables?

    PubMed

    Roelstraete, Bjorn; Rosseel, Yves

    2012-04-30

    Partial Granger causality was introduced by Guo et al. (2008) who showed that it could better eliminate the influence of latent variables and exogenous inputs than conditional G-causality. In the recent literature we can find some reviews and applications of this type of Granger causality (e.g. Smith et al., 2011; Bressler and Seth, 2010; Barrett et al., 2010). These articles apparently do not take into account a serious flaw in the original work on partial G-causality, being the negative F values that were reported and even proven to be plausible. In our opinion, this undermines the credibility of the obtained results and thus the validity of the approach. Our study is aimed to further validate partial G-causality and to find an answer why negative partial Granger causality estimates were reported. Time series were simulated from the same toy model as used in the original paper and partial and conditional causal measures were compared in the presence of confounding variables. Inference was done parametrically and using non-parametric block bootstrapping. We counter the proof that partial Granger F values can be negative, but the main conclusion of the original article remains. In the presence of unknown latent and exogenous influences, it appears that partial G-causality will better eliminate their influence than conditional G-causality, at least when non-parametric inference is used.

  8. Procurement of exogenous ammonia by the swallowtail butterfly, Papilio polytes, for protein biosynthesis and sperm production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Honda, Keiichi; Takase, Hiroyuki; Ômura, Hisashi; Honda, Hiroshi

    2012-09-01

    How to acquire sufficient quantity of nitrogen is a pivotal issue for herbivores, particularly for lepidopterans (butterflies and moths) of which diet quality greatly differs among their life stages. Male Lepidoptera often feed from mud puddles, dung, and carrion, a behavior known as puddling, which is thought to be supplementary feeding targeted chiefly at sodium. During copulation, males transfer a spermatophore to females that contains, besides sperm, nutrients (nuptial gifts) rich in sodium, proteins, and amino acids. However, it is still poorly understood how adults, mostly nectarivores, extract nitrogen from the environment. We examined the availability of two ubiquitous inorganic nitrogenous ions in nature, viz. ammonium (or ammonia) and nitrate ions, as nutrients in a butterfly, and show that exogenous ammonia ingested by adult males of the swallowtail, Papilio polytes, can serve as a resource for protein biosynthesis. Feeding experiments with 15N-labeled ammonium chloride revealed that nitrogen was incorporated into eupyrene spermatozoa, seminal protein, and thoracic muscle. Ammonia uptake by males significantly increased the number of eupyrene sperms in the reproductive tract tissues. The females also had the capacity to assimilate ammonia into egg protein. Consequently, it is evident that acquired ammonia is utilized for the replenishment of proteins allocable for reproduction and somatic maintenance. The active exploitation of exogenous ammonia as a nutrient by a butterfly would foster better understanding of the foraging and reproductive strategies in insects.

  9. Possible relationship between exogenous parameters and seismicity: Ultra-Low Frequency (ULF) of Magnetic Pulsation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huzaimy, J. M.; Adilah, M. K. F.; Aisyah, A. S. N.; Liu, H.; Yumoto, K.; Asillam, F.; Pathy, N. B.; Yoshikawa, A.; Magdas/Cpmn Group

    2015-12-01

    The physical processes of transferring electromagnetic energy from sun to the earth can be referred as Solar - Terrestrial system. It involves terrestrial atmosphere, the outer part of geomagnetic field, and the solar events, which influence them. To further investigate this coupling mechanism, we propose another exogenous source to be analysed which is cosmic ray. In this study, the investigation on possible relationship between geomagnetic ULF pulsation and seismicity due to exogenous parameters has been focused. Unlike other frequency range, ULF waves can propagate through the crust and reach the earth surface, thus produce reliable precursors to large impending earthquakes. In this analysis, solar activity data were obtained from the Goddard Space Flight Center, NASA via the OMNIWeb Data Explorer and the Space Physics Data Facility. Earthquake events were retrieved from the Advanced National Seismic System (ANSS) database. The variability of horizontal component of the geomagnetic field at two different stations; Ashibetsu (Japan) and Langkawi (Malaysia) extracted from Magnetic Data Acquisition System/Circum-pan Pacific Magnetometer Network (MAGDAS/CPMN) were investigated in order to study correlation between the local earthquake epicenter depth at north Japan and north Sumatera and the geomagnetic ULF pulsations. From the results, the significant correlations between solar wind speed, ULF average amplitude (nT) and earthquake's epicenter depth (km) was observed. Higher ULF amplitude Pc 5 corresponds to the high solar wind speed (km/s) and deeper epicenter depth of localized earthquake.

  10. Exogenous tyrosol inhibits planktonic cells and biofilms of Candida species and enhances their susceptibility to antifungals.

    PubMed

    Cordeiro, Rossana de A; Teixeira, Carlos E C; Brilhante, Raimunda S N; Castelo-Branco, Débora S C M; Alencar, Lucas P; de Oliveira, Jonathas S; Monteiro, André J; Bandeira, Tereza J P G; Sidrim, José J C; Moreira, José Luciano Bezerra; Rocha, Marcos F G

    2015-06-01

    Tyrosol is a quorum-sensing molecule of Candida albicans able to induce hyphal development in the early and intermediate stages of biofilm growth. In the present study, we evaluated the effect of high concentrations of exogenous tyrosol on planktonic cells and biofilms of C. albicans (n = 10) and C. tropicalis (n = 10), and investigated whether tyrosol could be synergic to antifungals that target cellular ergosterol. Antifungal susceptibility and drug interaction against planktonic cells were investigated by the broth microdilution method. Tyrosol was able to inhibit planktonic cells, with MIC values ranging from 2.5 to 5.0 mM for both species. Synergism was observed between tyrosol/amphotericin B (11/20 strains), tyrosol/itraconazole (18/20 strains) and tyrosol/fluconazole (18/20 strains). Exogenous tyrosol alone or combined with antifungals at both 10 × MIC and 50 × MIC were able to reduce biofilm of both Candida species. Mature biofilms were susceptible to tyrosol alone at 50 × MIC or combined with amphotericin at both 10 × MIC and 50 × MIC. On the other hand, tyrosol plus azoles at both 10 × MIC and 50 × MIC enhanced biofilm growth.

  11. Exogenous melatonin for sleep disorders in neurodegenerative diseases: a meta-analysis of randomized clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wei; Chen, Xue-yan; Su, Su-wen; Jia, Qing-zhong; Ding, Tao; Zhu, Zhong-ning; Zhang, Tong

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this work is to investigate the efficacy of exogenous melatonin in the treatment of sleep disorders in patients with neurodegenerative disease. We searched Pubmed, the Cochrane Library, and ClinicalTrials.gov, from inception to July 2015. We included randomized clinical trials (RCTs) that compared melatonin with placebo and that had the primary aim of improving sleep in people with neurodegenerative diseases, particularly Alzheimer's disease (AD) and Parkinson's disease (PD). We pooled data with the weighted mean difference in sleep outcomes. To assess heterogeneity in results of individual studies, we used Cochran's Q statistic and the I (2) statistic. 9 RCTs were included in this research. We found that the treatment with exogenous melatonin has positive effects on sleep quality as assessed by the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) in PD patients (MD: 4.20, 95 % CI: 0.92-7.48; P = 0.01), and by changes in PSQI component 4 in AD patients (MD: 0.67, 95 % CI: 0.04-1.30; P = 0.04), but not on objective sleep outcomes in both AD and PD patients. Treatment with melatonin effectively improved the clinical and neurophysiological aspects of rapid eye movement (REM) sleep behavior disorder (RBD), especially elderly individuals with underlying neurodegenerative disorders. This meta-analysis provided some evidence that melatonin improves sleep quality in patients with AD and PD, and melatonin can be considered as a possible sole or add-on therapy in neurodegenerative disorders patients with RBD.

  12. Exogenous Testosterone, Aging, and Changes in Behavioral Response of Gonadally Intact Male Mice

    PubMed Central

    Onaolapo, Olakunle J.; Onaolapo, Adejoke Y.; Omololu, Tope A.; Oludimu, Adedunke T.; Segun-Busari, Toluwalase; Omoleke, Taofeeq

    2016-01-01

    This study tested the hypothesis that aging significantly affects the influence of exogenous testosterone on neurobehavior in gonadally intact male mice. Groups of prepubertal and aged male mice received daily vehicle or testosterone propionate (TP; 2.5 or 5.0 mg/kg intraperitoneal [i.p.]) for 21 days. Behaviors were assessed on days 1 and 21. Weight gain was significant in prepubertal mice. Locomotion and rearing increased in prepubertal mice after first dose and decreased after last dose of TP. Rearing was suppressed in aged mice throughout. Suppression of grooming occurred in both age groups at day 21. Significant increase in working memory in both age groups was seen in the radial-arm maze (at specific doses) and in prepubertal mice in the Y-maze. Elevated plus maze test showed mixed anxiolytic/anxiogenic effects. Aged mice had higher serum testosterone. In conclusion, age is an important determinant for the influence of exogenous testosterone on behavior in gonadally intact male mice. PMID:27158222

  13. Exogenous Hormone Use: Oral Contraceptives, Postmenopausal Hormone Therapy, and Health Outcomes in the Nurses’ Health Study

    PubMed Central

    Grodstein, Francine; Stampfer, Meir J.; Willett, Walter C.; Hu, Frank B.; Manson, JoAnn E.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. To review the contribution of the Nurses’ Health Study (NHS) to our understanding of the complex relationship between exogenous hormones and health outcomes in women. Methods. We performed a narrative review of the publications of the NHS and NHS II from 1976 to 2016. Results. Oral contraceptive and postmenopausal hormone use were studied in relation to major health outcomes, including cardiovascular disease and cancer. Current or recent oral contraceptive use is associated with a higher risk of cardiovascular disease (mainly among smokers), melanoma, and breast cancer, and a lower risk of colorectal and ovarian cancer. Although hormone therapy is not indicated primarily for chronic disease prevention, findings from the NHS and a recent analysis of the Women’s Health Initiative indicate that younger women who are closer to menopause onset have a more favorable risk–benefit profile than do older women from use of hormone therapy for relief of vasomotor symptoms. Conclusions. With updated information on hormone use, lifestyle factors, and other variables, the NHS and NHS II continue to contribute to our understanding of the complex relationship between exogenous hormones and health outcomes in women. PMID:27459451

  14. Exogenous Sonic hedgehog modulates the pool of GABAergic interneurons during cerebellar development.

    PubMed

    De Luca, A; Parmigiani, E; Tosatto, G; Martire, S; Hoshino, M; Buffo, A; Leto, K; Rossi, F

    2015-04-01

    All cerebellar GABAergic interneurons were derived from a common pool of precursor cells residing in the embryonic ventricular zone (VZ) and migrating in the prospective white matter (PWM) after birth, where both intrinsic and extrinsic factors contribute to regulate their amplification. Among the environmental factors, we focused on Sonic hedgehog (Shh), a morphogen well known to regulate neural progenitor cell proliferation. We asked if and how exogenous Shh treatment affects the lineage of cerebellar GABAergic interneurons. To address these issues, exogenous Shh was administered to embryonic and postnatal organotypic slices. We found that Shh is able to expand the pool of interneuron progenitors residing in the embryonic epithelium and in the postnatal PWM. In particular, Shh signalling pathway was highly mitogenic at early developmental stages of interneuron production, whereas its effect decreased after the first postnatal week. Gene expression analysis of sorted cells and in situ hybridization further showed that immature interneurons express both the Shh receptor patched and the Shh target gene Gli1. Thus, within the interneuron lineage, Shh might exert regulatory functions also in postmitotic cells. On the whole, our data enlighten the role of Shh during cerebellar maturation and further broaden our knowledge on the amplification mechanisms of the interneuron progenitor pool.

  15. [Effects of exogenous spermidine on mitochondrial function of tomato seedling roots under salinity-alkalinity stress].

    PubMed

    Pan, Xiong-bo; Xiang, Li-xia; Hu, Xiao-hui; Ren, Wen-qi; Zhang, Li; Ni, Xin-xin

    2016-02-01

    Two cultivars of tomato (Solanum lycopersicum, cvs. 'Jinpengchaoguan' and 'Zhongza No. 9', with the former being more tolerant to saline-alkaline stress) seedlings grown hydroponically were subjected to salinity-alkalinity stress condition (NaCl: Na2SO4:NaHCO3:Na2CO3 = 1:9:9:1) without or with foliar application of 0.25 mmol . L-1 spermidine (Spd), and the root morphology and physiological characteristics of mitochondrial membrane were analyzed 8 days after treatment, to explore the protective effects of exogenous Spd on mitochondrial function in tomato roots under salinity-alkalinity stress. The results showed that the salinity-alkalinity stress increased the concentrations of both mitochondrial H2O2 and MDA as well as the mitochondrial membrane permeability in the roots of the two cultivars, while it decreased the mitochondrial membrane fluidity, membrane potential, Cyt c/a and H+-ATPase activity, which impaired the mitochondria and therefore inhibited the root growth; and these effects were more obvious in 'Zhongza No. 9' than in 'Jinpengechaoguan'. Under the salinity-alkalinity stress, foliar application Spd could effectively decrease the concentrations of mitochondrial H2O2 and MDA and mitochondrial membrane permeability, while increased the mitochondrial membrane fluidity, membrane potential, Cyt c/a and H+-ATPase activity. These results suggested that exogenous Spd could effectively mitigate the damage on mitochondria induced by salinity-alkalinity stress, and the alleviation effect was more obvious in 'Zhongza No. 9' than in 'Jinpengchaoguan'.

  16. Ensemble Nonlinear Autoregressive Exogenous Artificial Neural Networks for Short-Term Wind Speed and Power Forecasting.

    PubMed

    Men, Zhongxian; Yee, Eugene; Lien, Fue-Sang; Yang, Zhiling; Liu, Yongqian

    2014-01-01

    Short-term wind speed and wind power forecasts (for a 72 h period) are obtained using a nonlinear autoregressive exogenous artificial neural network (ANN) methodology which incorporates either numerical weather prediction or high-resolution computational fluid dynamics wind field information as an exogenous input. An ensemble approach is used to combine the predictions from many candidate ANNs in order to provide improved forecasts for wind speed and power, along with the associated uncertainties in these forecasts. More specifically, the ensemble ANN is used to quantify the uncertainties arising from the network weight initialization and from the unknown structure of the ANN. All members forming the ensemble of neural networks were trained using an efficient particle swarm optimization algorithm. The results of the proposed methodology are validated using wind speed and wind power data obtained from an operational wind farm located in Northern China. The assessment demonstrates that this methodology for wind speed and power forecasting generally provides an improvement in predictive skills when compared to the practice of using an "optimal" weight vector from a single ANN while providing additional information in the form of prediction uncertainty bounds.

  17. Ensemble Nonlinear Autoregressive Exogenous Artificial Neural Networks for Short-Term Wind Speed and Power Forecasting

    PubMed Central

    Lien, Fue-Sang; Yang, Zhiling; Liu, Yongqian

    2014-01-01

    Short-term wind speed and wind power forecasts (for a 72 h period) are obtained using a nonlinear autoregressive exogenous artificial neural network (ANN) methodology which incorporates either numerical weather prediction or high-resolution computational fluid dynamics wind field information as an exogenous input. An ensemble approach is used to combine the predictions from many candidate ANNs in order to provide improved forecasts for wind speed and power, along with the associated uncertainties in these forecasts. More specifically, the ensemble ANN is used to quantify the uncertainties arising from the network weight initialization and from the unknown structure of the ANN. All members forming the ensemble of neural networks were trained using an efficient particle swarm optimization algorithm. The results of the proposed methodology are validated using wind speed and wind power data obtained from an operational wind farm located in Northern China. The assessment demonstrates that this methodology for wind speed and power forecasting generally provides an improvement in predictive skills when compared to the practice of using an “optimal” weight vector from a single ANN while providing additional information in the form of prediction uncertainty bounds. PMID:27382627

  18. Exogenous nitrate induces root branching and inhibits primary root growth in Capsicum chinense Jacq.

    PubMed

    Celis-Arámburo, Teresita de Jesús; Carrillo-Pech, Mildred; Castro-Concha, Lizbeth A; Miranda-Ham, María de Lourdes; Martínez-Estévez, Manuel; Echevarría-Machado, Ileana

    2011-12-01

    The effects of nitrate (NO₃⁻) on the root system are complex and depend on several factors, such as the concentration available to the plant, endogenous nitrogen status and the sensitivity of the species. Though these effects have been widely documented on Arabidopsis and cereals, no reports are available in the Capsicum genus. In this paper, we have determined the effect of an exogenous in vitro application of this nutrient on root growth in habanero pepper (Capsicum chinense Jacq.). Exposure to NO₃⁻ inhibited primary root growth in both, dose- and time-dependent manners. The highest inhibition was attained with 0.1 mM NO₃⁻ between the fourth and fifth days of treatment. Inhibition of primary root growth was observed by exposing the root to both homogeneous and heterogeneous conditions of the nutrient; in contrast, ammonium was not able to induce similar changes. NO₃⁻-induced inhibition of primary root growth was reversed by treating the roots with IAA or NPA, a polar auxin transport inhibitor. Heterogeneous NO₃⁻ application stimulated the formation and elongation of lateral roots in the segment where the nutrient was present, and this response was influenced by exogenous phytohormones. These results demonstrate that habanero pepper responds to NO₃⁻ in a similar fashion to other species with certain particular differences. Therefore, studies in this model could help to elucidate the mechanisms by which roots respond to NO₃⁻ in fluctuating soil environments.

  19. Solvation structure and transport properties of alkali cations in dimethyl sulfoxide under exogenous static electric fields

    SciTech Connect

    Kerisit, Sebastien; Vijayakumar, M. E-mail: karl.mueller@pnnl.gov; Han, Kee Sung; Mueller, Karl T. E-mail: karl.mueller@pnnl.gov

    2015-06-14

    A combination of molecular dynamics simulations and pulsed field gradient nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy is used to investigate the role of exogenous electric fields on the solvation structure and dynamics of alkali ions in dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) and as a function of temperature. Good agreement was obtained, for select alkali ions in the absence of an electric field, between calculated and experimentally determined diffusion coefficients normalized to that of pure DMSO. Our results indicate that temperatures of up to 400 K and external electric fields of up to 1 V nm{sup −1} have minimal effects on the solvation structure of the smaller alkali cations (Li{sup +} and Na{sup +}) due to their relatively strong ion-solvent interactions, whereas the solvation structures of the larger alkali cations (K{sup +}, Rb{sup +}, and Cs{sup +}) are significantly affected. In addition, although the DMSO exchange dynamics in the first solvation shell differ markedly for the two groups, the drift velocities and mobilities are not significantly affected by the nature of the alkali ion. Overall, although exogenous electric fields induce a drift displacement, their presence does not significantly affect the random diffusive displacement of the alkali ions in DMSO. System temperature is found to have generally a stronger influence on dynamical properties, such as the DMSO exchange dynamics and the ion mobilities, than the presence of electric fields.

  20. Partitioning of exogenous delta-tocopherol between the triacylglycerol and membrane lipid fractions of chicken muscle.

    PubMed

    Sigfusson, Halldor; Hultin, Herbert O

    2002-11-20

    The partitioning of exogenous delta-tocopherol, added dissolved in ethanol, between the neutral triacylglycerols and membranes of chicken leg muscles was investigated. The two lipid fractions were separated using differential ultracentrifugation techniques. Triacylglycerols were obtained after high-speed centrifugation of the minced muscle at 130000 g for 30 min. Membranes were collected from a muscle-buffer homogenate (pH 7.5) between 10000 g for 20 min and 130000 g for 30 min. The triacylglycerols collected represented from 15 to 80% of the total triacylglycerols of the minced muscle, the yields increasing with increasing muscle triacylglycerol content. The phospholipids in the isolated membrane fraction represented from 20 to 35% of the total phospholipids of the muscle. At low muscle total lipid contents (3-5%), the added delta-tocopherol was present in approximately the same concentration in both muscle lipid fractions. At higher total lipid contents, achieved by adding exogenous triacylglycerols, the delta-tocopherol concentration in the membranes increased relative to that in the triacylglycerols.

  1. The Insertion Green Monster (iGM) Method for Expression of Multiple Exogenous Genes in Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Labunskyy, Vyacheslav M.; Suzuki, Yo; Hanly, Timothy J.; Murao, Ayako; Roth, Frederick P.; Gladyshev, Vadim N.

    2014-01-01

    Being a simple eukaryotic organism, Saccharomyces cerevisiae provides numerous advantages for expression and functional characterization of proteins from higher eukaryotes, including humans. However, studies of complex exogenous pathways using yeast as a host have been hampered by the lack of tools to engineer strains expressing a large number of genetic components. In addition to inserting multiple genes, it is often desirable to knock out or replace multiple endogenous genes that might interfere with the processes studied. Here, we describe the “insertion Green Monster” (iGM) set of expression vectors that enable precise insertion of many heterologous genes into the yeast genome in a rapid and reproducible manner and permit simultaneous replacement of selected yeast genes. As a proof of principle, we have used the iGM method to replace components of the yeast pathway for methionine sulfoxide reduction with genes encoding the human selenoprotein biosynthesis machinery and generated a single yeast strain carrying 11 exogenous components of the selenoprotein biosynthetic pathway in precisely engineered loci. PMID:24776987

  2. Endogenous field feedback promotes the detectability for exogenous electric signal in the hybrid coupled population

    SciTech Connect

    Wei, Xile; Zhang, Danhong; Wang, Jiang; Yu, Haitao; Lu, Meili; Che, Yanqiu

    2015-01-15

    This paper presents the endogenous electric field in chemical or electrical synaptic coupled networks, aiming to study the role of endogenous field feedback in the signal propagation in neural systems. It shows that the feedback of endogenous fields to network activities can reduce the required energy of the noise and enhance the transmission of input signals in hybrid coupled populations. As a common and important nonsynaptic interactive method among neurons, particularly, the endogenous filed feedback can not only promote the detectability of exogenous weak signal in hybrid coupled neural population but also enhance the robustness of the detectability against noise. Furthermore, with the increasing of field coupling strengths, the endogenous field feedback is conductive to the stochastic resonance by facilitating the transition of cluster activities from the no spiking to spiking regions. Distinct from synaptic coupling, the endogenous field feedback can play a role as internal driving force to boost the population activities, which is similar to the noise. Thus, it can help to transmit exogenous weak signals within the network in the absence of noise drive via the stochastic-like resonance.

  3. Block of the Mevalonate Pathway Triggers Oxidative and Inflammatory Molecular Mechanisms Modulated by Exogenous Isoprenoid Compounds

    PubMed Central

    Tricarico, Paola Maura; Kleiner, Giulio; Valencic, Erica; Campisciano, Giuseppina; Girardelli, Martina; Crovella, Sergio; Knowles, Alessandra; Marcuzzi, Annalisa

    2014-01-01

    Deregulation of the mevalonate pathway is known to be involved in a number of diseases that exhibit a systemic inflammatory phenotype and often neurological involvements, as seen in patients suffering from a rare disease called mevalonate kinase deficiency (MKD). One of the molecular mechanisms underlying this pathology could depend on the shortage of isoprenoid compounds and the subsequent mitochondrial damage, leading to oxidative stress and pro-inflammatory cytokines’ release. Moreover, it has been demonstrated that cellular death results from the balance between apoptosis and pyroptosis, both driven by mitochondrial damage and the molecular platform inflammasome. In order to rescue the deregulated pathway and decrease inflammatory markers, exogenous isoprenoid compounds were administered to a biochemical model of MKD obtained treating a murine monocytic cell line with a compound able to block the mevalonate pathway, plus an inflammatory stimulus. Our results show that isoprenoids acted in different ways, mainly increasing the expression of the evaluated markers [apoptosis, mitochondrial dysfunction, nucleotide-binding oligomerization-domain protein-like receptors 3 (NALP3), cytokines and nitric oxide (NO)]. Our findings confirm the hypothesis that inflammation is triggered, at least partially, by the shortage of isoprenoids. Moreover, although further studies are necessary, the achieved results suggest a possible role for exogenous isoprenoids in the treatment of MKD. PMID:24758928

  4. Block of the mevalonate pathway triggers oxidative and inflammatory molecular mechanisms modulated by exogenous isoprenoid compounds.

    PubMed

    Tricarico, Paola Maura; Kleiner, Giulio; Valencic, Erica; Campisciano, Giuseppina; Girardelli, Martina; Crovella, Sergio; Knowles, Alessandra; Marcuzzi, Annalisa

    2014-04-22

    Deregulation of the mevalonate pathway is known to be involved in a number of diseases that exhibit a systemic inflammatory phenotype and often neurological involvements, as seen in patients suffering from a rare disease called mevalonate kinase deficiency (MKD). One of the molecular mechanisms underlying this pathology could depend on the shortage of isoprenoid compounds and the subsequent mitochondrial damage, leading to oxidative stress and pro-inflammatory cytokines' release. Moreover, it has been demonstrated that cellular death results from the balance between apoptosis and pyroptosis, both driven by mitochondrial damage and the molecular platform inflammasome. In order to rescue the deregulated pathway and decrease inflammatory markers, exogenous isoprenoid compounds were administered to a biochemical model of MKD obtained treating a murine monocytic cell line with a compound able to block the mevalonate pathway, plus an inflammatory stimulus. Our results show that isoprenoids acted in different ways, mainly increasing the expression of the evaluated markers [apoptosis, mitochondrial dysfunction, nucleotide-binding oligomerization-domain protein-like receptors 3 (NALP3), cytokines and nitric oxide (NO)]. Our findings confirm the hypothesis that inflammation is triggered, at least partially, by the shortage of isoprenoids. Moreover, although further studies are necessary, the achieved results suggest a possible role for exogenous isoprenoids in the treatment of MKD.

  5. Heavy enzymes--experimental and computational insights in enzyme dynamics.

    PubMed

    Swiderek, Katarzyna; Ruiz-Pernía, J Javier; Moliner, Vicent; Tuñón, Iñaki

    2014-08-01

    The role of protein motions in the chemical step of enzyme-catalyzed reactions is the subject of an open debate in the scientific literature. The systematic use of isotopically substituted enzymes has been revealed as a useful tool to quantify the role of these motions. According to the Born-Oppenheimer approximation, changing the mass of the protein does not change the forces acting on the system but alters the frequencies of the protein motions, which in turn can affect the rate constant. Experimental and theoretical studies carried out in this field are presented in this article and discussed in the framework of Transition State Theory.

  6. Distinct roles of exogenous opioid agonists and endogenous opioid peptides in the peripheral control of neuropathy-triggered heat pain

    PubMed Central

    Labuz, Dominika; Celik, Melih Ö.; Zimmer, Andreas; Machelska, Halina

    2016-01-01

    Neuropathic pain often results from peripheral nerve damage, which can involve immune response. Local leukocyte-derived opioid peptides or exogenous opioid agonists inhibit neuropathy-induced mechanical hypersensitivity in animal models. Since neuropathic pain can also be augmented by heat, in this study we investigated the role of opioids in the modulation of neuropathy-evoked heat hypersensitivity. We used a chronic constriction injury of the sciatic nerve in wild-type and opioid peptide-knockout mice, and tested opioid effects in heat and mechanical hypersensitivity using Hargreaves and von Frey tests, respectively. We found that although perineural exogenous opioid agonists, including peptidergic ligands, were effective, the endogenous opioid peptides β-endorphin, Met-enkephalin