Science.gov

Sample records for exon p3a due

  1. Aminoacylase I deficiency due to ACY1 mRNA exon skipping.

    PubMed

    Ferri, L; Funghini, S; Fioravanti, A; Biondi, E G; la Marca, G; Guerrini, R; Donati, M A; Morrone, A

    2014-10-01

    Aminoacylase 1 (ACY1) deficiency is a rare inborn error of metabolism of which less than 20 observations have been described. Patients exhibit urinary excretion of specific N-acetyl amino acids and manifest a heterogeneous clinical spectrum including intellectual disability, motor delay, seizures, moderate to severe mental retardation, absent speech, growth delay, muscular hypotonia and autistic features. Here, we report the case of ACY1 enzyme deficiency in a 6-year-old girl presenting severe intellectual disability, motor retardation, absence of spontaneous locomotor activity and severe speech delay. Urinary excretion of N-acetylated amino acids was present. Mutational analysis of ACY1 gene identified the new homozygous c.1001_1001+5del6 mutation, which alters the mRNA transcription leading to exon 13 skipping and inclusion of a premature stop codon (p.Lys308Glufs*7). A quantitative fluorescent multiplex-polymerase chain reaction (QFM-PCR) assay has been set up and confirmed homozygosity of the mutation in the patient's DNA. Biochemical analysis showed absence of ACY1 enzyme activity in the patient's fibroblasts. The structure of the mutated protein has been defined by homology modeling (HM). Our data endorse the hypothesis of a link between this inborn error of metabolism and the neurological manifestations observed in patients with ACY1 deficiency.

  2. Hereditary vitamin D resistant rickets due to deletion of exon 3 of the vitamin D receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Rut, A.R.; O`Riordan, J.L.H.; Hughes, M.R.

    1994-09-01

    Hereditary vitamin D resistant rickets is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by severe rickets, hypolcalcaemia, secondary hyperparathyroidism and occasionally, the absence of body hair. The pathological process involves resistance of target tissues to the actions of calcitriol [1,25(OH{sub 2}D{sub 3})], the hormonal form of vitamin D. Calcitriol mediates its actions through a nuclear receptor (VDR) which has been cloned and shown to be a member of the superfamily of steriod/thyroid/retinoic acid receptors. Skin fibroblasts were obtained from a Greek child with characteristic features of the condition. Total RNA was extracted from rapidly dividing cells and reverse transcribed. The coding region was amplified by PCR with primers 31a in the 5{prime} untranslated region and 31b in the 3{prime} untranslated region of the VDR cDNA sequence. The 5{prime} and 3{prime} halves of VDR were further amplified using primers tagged with M13 forward and reverse primer sequences. The whole process was carried out in duplicate starting with RNA. Sequence data was obtained using Taq dye primer cycle sequencing (ABI). Agarose gel electrophoresis revealed that the 5{prime} product was approximately 100 bp shorter than control. This was confirmed by sequencing which demonstrated a 131 bp deletion of the C-terminal part of the DNA binding domain (bases 147-277). Bases 147-277 are coded for by exon 3 and this deletion is bounded by the splice junctions. This is the first report of a deletion in VDR in any patient with vitamin D-resistant rickets. Such a deletion not only removes the second zinc finger but also results in a frameshift that corrupts the remainder of the receptor. Such a deletion may have arisen as a result of a microdeletion of genomic DNA or, more likely, as a result of defective splicing.

  3. P3a from white noise.

    PubMed

    Frank, David W; Yee, Ryan B; Polich, John

    2012-08-01

    P3a and P3b event-related brain potentials (ERPs) were elicited with an auditory three-stimulus (target, distracter, and standard) discrimination task in which subjects responded only to the target. Distracter stimuli consisted of white noise or novel sounds with stimulus characteristics perceptually matched. Target/standard discrimination difficulty was manipulated by varying target/standard pitch differences to produce relatively easy, medium, and hard tasks. Error rate and response time increased with increases in task difficulty. P3a was larger for the white noise compared to novel sounds, maximum over the central/parietal recording sites, and did not differ in size across difficulty levels. P3b was unaffected by distracter type, decreased as task difficulty increased, and maximum over the parietal recording sites. The findings indicate that P3a from white noise is robust and should be useful for applied studies as it removes stimulus novelty variability. Theoretical perspectives are discussed.

  4. Novel PLA2G6 mutations associated with an exonic deletion due to non-allelic homologous recombination in a patient with infantile neuroaxonal dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Toshiyuki; Shimojima, Keiko; Shibata, Takashi; Akiyama, Mari; Oka, Makio; Akiyama, Tomoyuki; Yoshinaga, Harumi; Kobayashi, Katsuhiro

    2015-01-01

    Novel PLA2G6 mutations associated with p.Asp283Asn and a unique intragenic deletion of exons 4 and 5 due to non-allelic homologous recombination were identified in a Japanese female patient with typical infantile neuroaxonal dystrophy. The patient showed progressive tetraplegia beginning at 9 months. An electroencephalogram showed a diffuse increase in fast waves, and brain magnetic resonance imaging showed progressive brain atrophy and T2 hypointensity in the globus pallidus. PMID:27081553

  5. Novel PLA2G6 mutations associated with an exonic deletion due to non-allelic homologous recombination in a patient with infantile neuroaxonal dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Toshiyuki; Shimojima, Keiko; Shibata, Takashi; Akiyama, Mari; Oka, Makio; Akiyama, Tomoyuki; Yoshinaga, Harumi; Kobayashi, Katsuhiro

    2015-01-01

    Novel PLA2G6 mutations associated with p.Asp283Asn and a unique intragenic deletion of exons 4 and 5 due to non-allelic homologous recombination were identified in a Japanese female patient with typical infantile neuroaxonal dystrophy. The patient showed progressive tetraplegia beginning at 9 months. An electroencephalogram showed a diffuse increase in fast waves, and brain magnetic resonance imaging showed progressive brain atrophy and T2 hypointensity in the globus pallidus.

  6. Hereditary sideroblastic anaemia due to a mutation in exon 10 of the erythroid 5-aminolaevulinate synthase gene.

    PubMed

    Edgar, A J; Wickramasinghe, S N

    1998-02-01

    DNA sequencing of the coding region of the erythroid 5-aminolaevulinate synthase (ALAS2) cDNA from a male with pyridoxine-responsive sideroblastic anaemia revealed a missense mutation C1622G and a closely linked polymorphism C1612A in exon 10 of the gene. Sequence analysis of the genomic DNA from other family members revealed that the proband's mother and daughter were heterozygous carriers of the mutation, consistent with the X-linked inheritance. The C1622G mutation results in a histidine to aspartic acid substitution at amino acid residue 524. The histidine residue is conserved in both the erythroid and housekeeping ALAS proteins in vertebrates, all other known ALAS proteins and other oxamine synthases that have pyridoxal 5'-phosphate as a co-factor. This histidine is located in a predicted loop, preceding a long alpha-helix region near the carboxy-terminus.

  7. Infertility due to congenital absence of vas deferens in mainly caused by variable exon 9 skipping of the CFTR gene in heterozygous males for cystic fibrosis mutations

    SciTech Connect

    Chillon, M.; Casals, T.; Nunes, V.

    1994-09-01

    About 65% or the individuals with congenital bilateral absence of the vas deferens (CBAVD) have mutations in at least one of the CFTR alleles. We have studied the phenotypic effects of the CFTR gene intron 8 polyT tract 5T allele in 90 CBAVD subjects and in parents of CF patients. This group was compared with normal individuals, and with fathers and mothers of CF patients. Allele 5T was significantly associated with CBAVD (19.6%) when compared to the general population (5.2%) ({chi}{sup 2} = 33.3%; p<<0.0001). It was represented poorly in fathers of CF patients (1.3%). Mutations were identified in one (60%) or both CFTR alleles (8.9%) of CBAVD patients. Heterozygosity for the 5T allele was strongly associated with heterozygosity for CF mutations ({chi}{sup 2} = 10.9; p<0.0004). The strong correlation between allele 5T and CBAVD, together with the low frequency of this allele in fathers of CF patients, demonstrates that variable {Delta}exon 9 produces infertility in males if associated with a CF mutation on the other chromosome. The 30% of CBAVD cases with only one CFTR mutation and without a 5T-allele may be due to other molecular mechanisms involving CFTR, distinct from {Delta}exon 9. Since there is a relatively high proportion of CBAVD without CF mutations (25%), other gene(s), distinct from CFTR, may have a role in the CBAVD phenotype.

  8. Wilson's disease caused by alternative splicing and Alu exonization due to a homozygous 3039-bp deletion spanning from intron 1 to exon 2 of the ATP7B gene.

    PubMed

    Mameli, Eva; Lepori, Maria Barbara; Chiappe, Francesca; Ranucci, Giusy; Di Dato, Fabiola; Iorio, Raffaele; Loudianos, Georgios

    2015-09-15

    We describe a case of Wilson's disease (WD) diagnosed at 5 years after routine biochemical test showed increased aminotransferases. Mutation analysis of the ATP7B gene revealed a 3039-bp deletion in the homozygous state spanning from the terminal part of intron 1 to nt position 368 of exon 2. This deletion results in the activation of 3 cryptic splice sites: an AG acceptor splice site in nt positions 578-579 producing a different breakpoint and removing the first 577 nts of exon 2, an acceptor and a donor splice site in nt positions 20363-4 and 20456-7, respectively, in intron 1, resulting in the activation of a 94-bp cryptic Alu exon being incorporated into the mature transcript. The resulting alternative transcript contains a TAG stop codon in the first amino acid position of the cryptic exon, likely producing a truncated, non-functional protein. This study shows that intron exonization can also occur in humans through naturally occurring gross deletions. The results suggest that the combination of DNA and RNA analyses can be used for molecular characterization of gross ATP7B deletions, thus improving genetic counseling and diagnosis of WD. Moreover these studies help to better establish new molecular mechanisms producing Wilson's disease. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. FGFR2 exon IIIa and IIIc mutations in Crouzon, Jackson-Weiss, and Pfeiffer syndromes: Evidence for missense changes, insertions, and a deletion due to alternative RNA splicing

    SciTech Connect

    Meyers, G.A.; Przylepa, K.A.; Scott, A.F.

    1996-03-01

    Fibroblast growth factor receptor 2 (FGFR2) mutations have been associated with the craniosynostotic conditions Crouzon, Jackson-Weiss, and Pfeiffer syndromes. Previously, mutations were described in the exons IIIa and IIIc, which form the extracellular, third immunoglobulin-like domain (IgM) and adjacent linker regions, both of which are normally involved in ligand binding. For all three conditions, mutations were found in exon IIIc. Only in Crouzon syndrome were mutations identified in exon IIIa. In this study, 39 cases with one of these three conditions were screened for exon IIIa or IIIc mutations. Eleven mutations are reported in 17 unrelated cases. Mutations in exon IIIa are identified for not only Crouzon but also Jackson-Weiss and Pfeiffer syndromes. Four mutations in either exon IIIa or exon IIIc reported only in Crouzon syndrome are present also in one of the other two syndromes. Two insertions, one in exon IIIa in a Crouzon syndrome patient and the other in exon IIIc in a Pfeiffer syndrome patient, were observed. The latter mutation has the same alternative RNA splicing effect as a reported synonymous mutation for Crouzon syndrome. A missense mutation was detected in one Pfeiffer syndrome family in which two members had craniosynostosis without limb anomalies. The inter- and intrafamilial variability in expression of FGFR2 mutations suggests that these three syndromes, presumed to be clinically distinct, are instead representative of a spectrum of related craniosynostotic and digital disorders. 16 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  10. Somatic mutational analysis of FAK in breast cancer: A novel gain-of-function mutation due to deletion of exon 33

    SciTech Connect

    Fang, Xu-Qian; Liu, Xiang-Fan; Yao, Ling; Chen, Chang-Qiang; Gu, Zhi-Dong; Ni, Pei-Hua; Zheng, Xin-Min; Fan, Qi-Shi

    2014-01-10

    Highlights: •A novel FAK splicing mutation identified in breast tumor. •FAK-Del33 mutation promotes cell migration and invasion. •FAK-Del33 mutation regulates FAK/Src signal pathway. -- Abstract: Focal adhesion kinase (FAK) regulates cell adhesion, migration, proliferation, and survival. We identified a novel splicing mutant, FAK-Del33 (exon 33 deletion, KF437463), in both breast and thyroid cancers through colony sequencing. Considering the low proportion of mutant transcripts in samples, this mutation was detected by TaqMan-MGB probes based qPCR. In total, three in 21 paired breast tissues were identified with the FAK-Del33 mutation, and no mutations were found in the corresponding normal tissues. When introduced into a breast cell line through lentivirus infection, FAK-Del33 regulated cell motility and migration based on a wound healing assay. We demonstrated that the expression of Tyr397 (main auto-phosphorylation of FAK) was strongly increased in FAK-Del33 overexpressed breast tumor cells compared to wild-type following FAK/Src RTK signaling activation. These results suggest a novel and unique role of the FAK-Del33 mutation in FAK/Src signaling in breast cancer with significant implications for metastatic potential.

  11. Characterization of an Equine α-S2-Casein Variant Due to a 1.3 kb Deletion Spanning Two Coding Exons

    PubMed Central

    Brinkmann, Julia; Koudelka, Tomas; Keppler, Julia K.; Tholey, Andreas; Schwarz, Karin; Thaller, Georg; Tetens, Jens

    2015-01-01

    The production and consumption of mare’s milk in Europe has gained importance, mainly based on positive health effects and a lower allergenic potential as compared to cows’ milk. The allergenicity of milk is to a certain extent affected by different genetic variants. In classical dairy species, much research has been conducted into the genetic variability of milk proteins, but the knowledge in horses is scarce. Here, we characterize two major forms of equine αS2-casein arising from genomic 1.3 kb in-frame deletion involving two coding exons, one of which represents an equid specific duplication. Findings at the DNA-level have been verified by cDNA sequencing from horse milk of mares with different genotypes. At the protein-level, we were able to show by SDS-page and in-gel digestion with subsequent LC-MS analysis that both proteins are actually expressed. The comparison with published sequences of other equids revealed that the deletion has probably occurred before the ancestor of present-day asses and zebras diverged from the horse lineage. PMID:26444874

  12. Inhomogeneous DNA: Conducting exons and insulating introns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krokhin, A. A.; Bagci, V. M. K.; Izrailev, F. M.; Usatenko, O. V.; Yampol'Skii, V. A.

    2009-08-01

    Parts of DNA sequences known as exons and introns play very different roles in coding and storage of genetic information. Here we show that their conducting properties are also very different. Taking into account long-range correlations among four basic nucleotides that form double-stranded DNA sequence, we calculate electron localization length for exon and intron regions. Analyzing different DNA molecules, we obtain that the exons have narrow bands of extended states, unlike the introns where all the states are well localized. The band of extended states is due to a specific form of the binary correlation function of the sequence of basic DNA nucleotides.

  13. Isolation of exons from cloned DNA by exon trapping.

    PubMed

    Nisson, P E; Watkins, P C; Krizman, D B

    2001-05-01

    Exon trapping is an RNA polymerase chain reaction (PCR) method to clone expressed sequences or exons directly from mammalian genomic DNA. The basic protocol in this unit describes the method for trapping internal exons from cosmid clones and the second basic protocol describes trapping of 3 terminal exons. An describes 3 terminal exon trapping, which avoids subcloning of target DNA by ligating it to the vector for direct transfection. A describes a rapid cloning procedure using uracil DNA glycosylase.

  14. Updating P300: An Integrative Theory of P3a and P3b

    PubMed Central

    Polich, John

    2009-01-01

    The empirical and theoretical development of the P300 event-related brain potential (ERP) is reviewed by considering factors that contribute to its amplitude, latency, and general characteristics. The neuropsychological origins of the P3a and P3b subcomponents are detailed, and how target/standard discrimination difficulty modulates scalp topography is discussed. The neural loci of P3a and P3b generation are outlined, and a cognitive model is proffered: P3a originates from stimulus-driven frontal attention mechanisms during task processing, whereas P3b originates from temporal-parietal activity associated with attention and appears related to subsequent memory processing. Neurotransmitter actions associating P3a to frontal/dopaminergic and P3b to parietal/norepinephrine pathways are highlighted. Neuroinhibition is suggested as an overarching theoretical mechanism for P300, which is elicited when stimulus detection engages memory operations. PMID:17573239

  15. Splicing of phenylalanine hydroxylase (PAH) exon 11 is vulnerable: molecular pathology of mutations in PAH exon 11.

    PubMed

    Heintz, Caroline; Dobrowolski, Steven F; Andersen, Henriette Skovgaard; Demirkol, Mübeccel; Blau, Nenad; Andresen, Brage Storstein

    2012-08-01

    In about 20-30% of phenylketonuria (PKU) patients, phenylalanine (Phe) levels can be controlled by cofactor 6R-tetrahydrobiopterin (BH(4)) administration. The phenylalanine hydroxylase (PAH) genotype has a predictive value concerning BH(4)-response and therefore a correct assessment of the mutation molecular pathology is important. Mutations that disturb the splicing of exons (e.g. interplay between splice site strength and regulatory sequences like exon splicing enhancers (ESEs)/exon splicing silencers (ESSs)) may cause different severity of PKU. In this study, we identified PAH exon 11 as a vulnerable exon and used patient derived lymphoblast cell lines and PAH minigenes to study the molecular defect that impacted pre-mRNA processing. We showed that the c.1144T>C and c.1066-3C>T mutations cause exon 11 skipping, while the c.1139C>T mutation is neutral or slightly beneficial. The c.1144T>C mutation resides in a putative splicing enhancer motif and binding by splicing factors SF2/ASF, SRp20 and SRp40 is disturbed. Additional mutations in potential splicing factor binding sites contributed to elucidate the pathogenesis of mutations in PAH exon 11. We suggest that PAH exon 11 is vulnerable due to a weak 3' splice site and that this makes exon 11 inclusion dependent on an ESE spanning position c.1144. Importantly, this implies that other mutations in exon 11 may affect splicing, since splicing is often determined by a fine balance between several positive and negative splicing regulatory elements distributed throughout the exon. Finally, we identified a pseudoexon in intron 11, which would have pathogenic consequences if activated by mutations or improved splicing conditions. Exonic mutations that disrupt splicing are unlikely to facilitate response to BH(4) and may lead to inconsistent genotype-phenotype correlations. Therefore, recognizing such mutations enhances our ability to predict the BH(4)-response.

  16. Evolutionary history of exon shuffling.

    PubMed

    França, Gustavo S; Cancherini, Douglas V; de Souza, Sandro J

    2012-06-01

    Exon shuffling has been characterized as one of the major evolutionary forces shaping both the genome and the proteome of eukaryotes. This mechanism was particularly important in the creation of multidomain proteins during animal evolution, bringing a number of functional genetic novelties. Here, genome information from a variety of eukaryotic species was used to address several issues related to the evolutionary history of exon shuffling. By comparing all protein sequences within each species, we were able to characterize exon shuffling signatures throughout metazoans. Intron phase (the position of the intron regarding the codon) and exon symmetry (the pattern of flanking introns for a given exon or block of adjacent exons) were features used to evaluate exon shuffling. We confirmed previous observations that exon shuffling mediated by phase 1 introns (1-1 exon shuffling) is the predominant kind in multicellular animals. Evidence is provided that such pattern was achieved since the early steps of animal evolution, supported by a detectable presence of 1-1 shuffling units in Trichoplax adhaerens and a considerable prevalence of them in Nematostella vectensis. In contrast, Monosiga brevicollis, one of the closest relatives of metazoans, and Arabidopsis thaliana, showed no evidence of 1-1 exon or domain shuffling above what it would be expected by chance. Instead, exon shuffling events are less abundant and predominantly mediated by phase 0 introns (0-0 exon shuffling) in those non-metazoan species. Moreover, an intermediate pattern of 1-1 and 0-0 exon shuffling was observed for the placozoan T. adhaerens, a primitive animal. Finally, characterization of flanking intron phases around domain borders allowed us to identify a common set of symmetric 1-1 domains that have been shuffled throughout the metazoan lineage.

  17. Therapeutic exon skipping for dysferlinopathies?

    PubMed

    Aartsma-Rus, Annemieke; Singh, Kavita H K; Fokkema, Ivo F A C; Ginjaar, Ieke B; van Ommen, Gert-Jan; den Dunnen, Johan T; van der Maarel, Silvère M

    2010-08-01

    Antisense-mediated exon skipping is a promising therapeutic approach for Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) currently tested in clinical trials. The aim is to reframe dystrophin transcripts using antisense oligonucleotides (AONs). These hide an exon from the splicing machinery to induce exon skipping, restoration of the reading frame and generation of internally deleted, but partially functional proteins. It thus relies on the characteristic of the dystrophin protein, which has essential N- and C-terminal domains, whereas the central rod domain is largely redundant. This approach may also be applicable to limb-girdle muscular dystrophy type 2B (LGMD2B), Myoshi myopathy (MM) and distal myopathy with anterior tibial onset (DMAT), which are caused by mutations in the dysferlin-encoding DYSF gene. Dysferlin has a function in repairing muscle membrane damage. Dysferlin contains calcium-dependent C2 lipid binding (C2) domains and an essential transmembrane domain. However, mildly affected patients in whom one or a large number of DYSF exons were missing have been described, suggesting that internally deleted dysferlin proteins can be functional. Thus, exon skipping might also be applicable as a LGMD2B, MM and DMAT therapy. In this study we have analyzed the dysferlin protein domains and DYSF mutations and have described what exons are promising targets with regard to applicability and feasibility. We also show that DYSF exon skipping seems to be as straightforward as DMD exon skipping, as AONs to induce efficient skipping of four DYSF exons were readily identified.

  18. EasyExonPrimer: automated primer design for exon sequences.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xiaolin; Munroe, David J

    2006-01-01

    EasyExonPrimer is a web-based software that automates the design of PCR primers to amplify exon sequences from genomic DNA. EasyExonPrimer is written in Perl and uses Primer3 to design PCR primers based on the genome builds and annotation databases available at the University of California, Santa Cruz (UCSC) Genome Browser database (http://genome.ucsc.edu/). It masks repeats and known single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) sites in the genome and designs standardised primers using optimised conditions. Users can input genes by RefSeq mRNA ID, gene name or keyword. The primer design is optimised for large-scale resequencing of exons. For exons larger than 1 kb, the user has the option of breaking the exon sequence down into overlapping smaller fragments. All primer pairs are then verified using the In-Silico PCR software to test for uniqueness in the genome. We have designed >1000 pairs of primers for 90 genes; 95% of the primer pairs successfully amplified exon sequences under standard PCR conditions without requiring further optimisation. EasyExonPrimer is available from http://129.43.22.27/~primer/. The source code is also available upon request. Xiaolin Wu (forestwu@mail.nih.gov).

  19. Severe von Willebrand disease due to a defect at the level of von Willebrand factor mRNA expression: Detection by exonic PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Nichols, W.C.; Lyons, S.E.; Harrison, J.S.; Cody, R.L.; Ginsburg, D. )

    1991-05-01

    von Willebrand disease (vWD), the most common inherited bleeding disorder in humans, results from abnormalities in the plasma clotting protein von Willebrand factor (vWF). Severe (type III) vWD is autosomal recessive in inheritance and is associated with extremely low or undetectable vWF levels. The authors report a method designed to distinguish mRNA expression from the two vWF alleles by PCR analysis of peripheral blood platelet RNA using DNA sequence polymorphisms located within exons of the vWF gene. This approach was applied to a severe-vWD pedigree in which three of eight siblings are affected and the parents and additional siblings are clinically normal. Each parent was shown to carry a vWF allele that is silent at the mRNA level. Family members inheriting both abnormal alleles are affected with severe vWD, whereas individuals with only one abnormal allele are asymptomatic. Given the frequencies of the two exon polymorphisms reported here, this analysis should be applicable to {approx}70% of type I and type III vWD patients. This comparative DNA and RNA PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism approach may also prove useful in identifying defects at the level of gene expression associated with other genetic disorders.

  20. Exons, Introns, and DNA Thermodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlon, Enrico; Malki, Mehdi Lejard; Blossey, Ralf

    2005-05-01

    The genes of eukaryotes are characterized by protein coding fragments, the exons, interrupted by introns, i.e., stretches of DNA which do not carry useful information for protein synthesis. We have analyzed the melting behavior of randomly selected human cDNA sequences obtained from genomic DNA by removing all introns. A clear correspondence is observed between exons and melting domains. This finding may provide new insights into the physical mechanisms underlying the evolution of genes.

  1. Proteins, exons and molecular evolution.

    PubMed

    Holland, S K; Blake, C C

    1987-01-01

    The discovery of the eukaryotic gene structure has prompted research into the potential relationship between protein structure and function and the corresponding exon/intron patterns. The exon shuffling hypothesis put forward by Gilbert and Blake suggests the encodement of structural and functional protein elements by exons which can recombine to create novel proteins. This provides an explanation for the relatively rapid evolution of proteins from a few primordial molecules. As the number of gene and protein structures increases, evidence of exon shuffling is becoming more apparent and examples are presented both from modern multi-domain proteins and ancient proteins. Recent work into the chemical properties and catalytic functions of RNA have led to hypotheses based upon the early existence of RNA. These theories suggest that the split gene structure originated in the primordial soup as a result of random RNA synthesis. Stable regions of RNA, or exons, were utilised as primitive enzymes. In response to selective pressures for information storage, the activity was directly transferred from the RNA enzymes or ribozymes, to proteins. These short polypeptides fused together to create larger proteins with a wide range of functions. Recent research into RNA processing and exon size, discussed in this review, provides a clearer insight into the evolutionary development of the gene and protein structure.

  2. Short Exon Detection via Wavelet Transform Modulus Maxima

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiaolei; Shen, Zhiwei; Zhang, Guishan; Shen, Yuanyu; Chen, Miaomiao; Zhao, Jiaxiang; Wu, Renhua

    2016-01-01

    The detection of short exons is a challenging open problem in the field of bioinformatics. Due to the fact that the weakness of existing model-independent methods lies in their inability to reliably detect small exons, a model-independent method based on the singularity detection with wavelet transform modulus maxima has been developed for detecting short coding sequences (exons) in eukaryotic DNA sequences. In the analysis of our method, the local maxima can capture and characterize singularities of short exons, which helps to yield significant patterns that are rarely observed with the traditional methods. In order to get some information about singularities on the differences between the exon signal and the background noise, the noise level is estimated by filtering the genomic sequence through a notch filter. Meanwhile, a fast method based on a piecewise cubic Hermite interpolating polynomial is applied to reconstruct the wavelet coefficients for improving the computational efficiency. In addition, the output measure of a paired-numerical representation calculated in both forward and reverse directions is used to incorporate a useful DNA structural property. The performances of our approach and other techniques are evaluated on two benchmark data sets. Experimental results demonstrate that the proposed method outperforms all assessed model-independent methods for detecting short exons in terms of evaluation metrics. PMID:27635656

  3. Exon deletions of the phenylalanine hydroxylase gene in Italian hyperphenylalaninemics

    PubMed Central

    Calì, Francesco; Ruggeri, Giuseppa; Vinci, Mirella; Meli, Concetta; Carducci, Carla; Leuzzi, Vincenzo; Pozzessere, Simone; Schinocca, Pietro; Ragalmuto, Alda; Chiavetta, Valeria; Miccichè, Salvatore

    2010-01-01

    A consistent finding of many studies describing the spectrum of mutant phenylalanine hydroxylase (PAH) alleles underlying hyperphenylalaninemia is the impossibility of achieving a 100% mutation ascertainment rate using conventional gene-scanning methods. These methods include denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE), denaturing high performance liquid chromatography (DHPLC), and direct sequencing. In recent years, it has been shown that a significant proportion of undetermined alleles consist of large deletions overlapping one or more exons. These deletions have been difficult to detect in compound heterozygotes using gene-scanning methods due to a masking effect of the non-deleted allele. To date, no systematic search has been carried out for such exon deletions in Italian patients with phenylketonuria or mild hyperphenylalaninemia. We used multiplex ligation- dependent probe amplification (MLPA), comparative multiplex dosage analysis (CMDA), and real-time PCR to search for both large deletions and duplications of the phenylalanine hydroxylase gene in Italian hyperphenylalaninemia patients. Four deletions removing different phenylalanine hydroxylase (PAH) gene exons were identified in 12 patients. Two of these deletions involving exons 4-5-6-7-8 (systematic name c.353-?_912 + ?del) and exon 6 (systematic name c.510-?_706 + ?del) have not been reported previously. In this study, we show that exon deletion of the PAH gene accounts for 1.7% of all mutant PAH alleles in Italian hyperphenylalaninemics. PMID:19946181

  4. Evidence for a novel exon in the coding region of the adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) gene

    SciTech Connect

    Xia, Ling; St. Denis, K.A.; Bapat, B.

    1995-08-10

    Germline mutations of the tumor suppressor gene APC cause familial adenomatous polyposis. Somatic APC alterations are involved in several sporadic neoplasma, including colorectal, duodenal, gastric, and esophageal carcinoma. The APC mRNA is encoded by 15 exons. Additional transcripts have been reported, due to alternative splicing of coding as well as noncoding regions. Two mRNA isoforms occur due to a deletion of exon 7 or a partial deletion of exon 9. We have identified a novel exon, flanked by APC exons 10 and 11, which is expressed as an alternatively transcribed product of the gene. Further, we have shown that the novel exon consists of a heptad repeat motif and is conserved across species. 18 refs., 2 figs.

  5. P3a of event-related potential in chronic methamphetamine dependence.

    PubMed

    Iwanami, A; Kuroki, N; Iritani, S; Isono, H; Okajima, Y; Kamijima, K

    1998-12-01

    To investigate the psychophysiological features of methamphetamine (MAP) dependence, we recorded auditory event-related potentials (ERPs) in 15 patients with MAP dependence and in 15 age-matched normal controls. ERPs were recorded during a standard oddball task and a read task similar to those employed by Squires et al. (Squires NK, Squires KC, Hillyard SA [1975] Two varieties of long-latency positive waves evoked by unpredictable auditory stimuli in man. Electroenceph Clin Neurophysiol 38:387-401). The patients with MAP dependence showed reduced P3a amplitude and area in the read task and delayed P3b latency with normal P3b amplitude and area in the oddball task. These results suggest that central noradrenergic dysregulation may persist after the remission of acute psychotic symptoms in MAP psychosis and that chronic MAP dependence would produce impairment of the frontal cortex.

  6. Antisense-mediated exon skipping to reframe transcripts.

    PubMed

    Turczynski, Sandrina; Titeux, Matthias; Pironon, Nathalie; Hovnanian, Alain

    2012-01-01

    Numerous genetic disorders are caused by loss-of-function mutations that disrupt the open reading frame of the gene either by nonsense or by frameshift (insertion, deletion, indel, or splicing) mutations. Most of the time, the result is the absence of functional protein synthesis due to mRNA degradation by nonsense-mediated mRNA decay, or rapid degradation of a truncated protein. Antisense-based splicing modulation is a powerful tool that has the potential to treat genetic disorders by restoring the open reading frame through selective removal of the mutated exon, or by restoring correct splicing.We have developed this approach for a severe genetic skin disorder, recessive dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa, caused by mutations in the COL7A1 gene encoding type VII collagen. This gene is particularly suited for exon-skipping approaches due to its unique genomic structure. It is composed of 118 exons, 83 of which are in frame. Moreover, these exons encode a single repetitive collagenous domain.Using this gene as an example, we describe general methods that demonstrate the feasibility and efficacy of the antisense-mediated exon-skipping strategy to reframe transcripts.

  7. Total Syntheses of (−)-Pyrimidoblamic Acid and P-3A

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Total syntheses of (−)-pyrimidoblamic acid and P-3A are disclosed. Central to the convergent approach is a powerful inverse electron demand Diels–Alder reaction between substituted electron-deficient 1,2,3-triazines and a highly functionalized and chiral primary amidine, which forms the pyrimidine cores and introduces all necessary stereochemistry in a single step. Intrinsic in the convergent approach is the potential it provides for the late stage divergent synthesis of modified analogs bearing deep-seated changes in either the pyrimidine cores or the highly functionalized C2 side chain common to both natural products. The examination of the key cycloaddition reaction revealed that the inherent 1,2,3-triazine mode of cycloaddition (C4/N1 vs C5/N2) as well as the amidine regioselectivity were unaffected by introduction of two electron-withdrawing groups (−CO2R) at C4 and C6 of the 1,2,3-triazine even if C5 is unsubstituted (Me or H), highlighting the synthetic potential of the powerful pyrimidine synthesis. PMID:24410439

  8. Exon structure of the human dystrophin gene

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, R.G.; Coffey, A.J.; Bobrow, M.; Bentley, D.R.

    1993-05-01

    Application of a novel vectorette PCR approach to defining intron-exon boundaries has permitted completion of analysis of the exon structure of the largest and most complex known human gene. The authors present here a summary of the exon structure of the entire human dystrophin gene, together with the sizes of genomic HindIII fragments recognized by each exon, and (where available) GenBank accession numbers for adjacent intron sequences. 20 refs., 1 tab.

  9. Disruption of the splicing enhancer sequence within exon 27 of the dystrophin gene by a nonsense mutation induces partial skipping of the exon and is responsible for Becker muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed Central

    Shiga, N; Takeshima, Y; Sakamoto, H; Inoue, K; Yokota, Y; Yokoyama, M; Matsuo, M

    1997-01-01

    The mechanism of exon skipping induced by nonsense mutations has not been well elucidated. We now report results of in vitro splicing studies which disclosed that a particular example of exon skipping is due to disruption of a splicing enhancer sequence located within the exon. A nonsense mutation (E1211X) due to a G to T transversion at the 28th nucleotide of exon 27 (G3839T) was identified in the dystrophin gene of a Japanese Becker muscular dystrophy case. Partial skipping of the exon resulted in the production of truncated dystrophin mRNA, although the consensus sequences for splicing at both ends of exon 27 were unaltered. To determine how E1211X induced exon 27 skipping, the splicing enhancer activity of purine-rich region within exon 27 was examined in an in vitro splicing system using chimeric doublesex gene pre-mRNA. The mutant sequence containing G3839T abolished splicing enhancer activity of the wild-type purine-rich sequence for the upstream intron in this chimeric pre-mRNA. An artificial polypurine oligonucleotide mimicking the purine-rich sequence of exon 27 also showed enhancer activity that was suppressed by the introduction of a T nucleotide. Furthermore, the splicing enhancer activity was more markedly inhibited when a nonsense codon was created by the inserted T residue. This is the first evidence that partial skipping of an exon harboring a nonsense mutation is due to disruption of a splicing enhancer sequence. PMID:9410897

  10. Splicing of designer exons informs a biophysical model for exon definition

    PubMed Central

    Arias, Mauricio A.; Chasin, Lawrence A.

    2015-01-01

    Pre-mRNA molecules in humans contain mostly short internal exons flanked by longer introns. To explain the removal of such introns, exon recognition instead of intron recognition has been proposed. We studied this exon definition using designer exons (DEs) made up of three prototype modules of our own design: an exonic splicing enhancer (ESE), an exonic splicing silencer (ESS), and a Reference Sequence (R) predicted to be neither. Each DE was examined as the central exon in a three-exon minigene. DEs made of R modules showed a sharp size dependence, with exons shorter than 14 nt and longer than 174 nt splicing poorly. Changing the strengths of the splice sites improved longer exon splicing but worsened shorter exon splicing, effectively displacing the curve to the right. For the ESE we found, unexpectedly, that its enhancement efficiency was independent of its position within the exon. For the ESS we found a step-wise positional increase in its effects; it was most effective at the 3′ end of the exon. To apply these results quantitatively, we developed a biophysical model for exon definition of internal exons undergoing cotranscriptional splicing. This model features commitment to inclusion before the downstream exon is synthesized and competition between skipping and inclusion fates afterward. Collision of both exon ends to form an exon definition complex was incorporated to account for the effect of size; ESE/ESS effects were modeled on the basis of stabilization/destabilization. This model accurately predicted the outcome of independent experiments on more complex DEs that combined ESEs and ESSs. PMID:25492963

  11. Splicing of designer exons informs a biophysical model for exon definition.

    PubMed

    Arias, Mauricio A; Lubkin, Ashira; Chasin, Lawrence A

    2015-02-01

    Pre-mRNA molecules in humans contain mostly short internal exons flanked by longer introns. To explain the removal of such introns, exon recognition instead of intron recognition has been proposed. We studied this exon definition using designer exons (DEs) made up of three prototype modules of our own design: an exonic splicing enhancer (ESE), an exonic splicing silencer (ESS), and a Reference Sequence (R) predicted to be neither. Each DE was examined as the central exon in a three-exon minigene. DEs made of R modules showed a sharp size dependence, with exons shorter than 14 nt and longer than 174 nt splicing poorly. Changing the strengths of the splice sites improved longer exon splicing but worsened shorter exon splicing, effectively displacing the curve to the right. For the ESE we found, unexpectedly, that its enhancement efficiency was independent of its position within the exon. For the ESS we found a step-wise positional increase in its effects; it was most effective at the 3' end of the exon. To apply these results quantitatively, we developed a biophysical model for exon definition of internal exons undergoing cotranscriptional splicing. This model features commitment to inclusion before the downstream exon is synthesized and competition between skipping and inclusion fates afterward. Collision of both exon ends to form an exon definition complex was incorporated to account for the effect of size; ESE/ESS effects were modeled on the basis of stabilization/destabilization. This model accurately predicted the outcome of independent experiments on more complex DEs that combined ESEs and ESSs.

  12. Novel Nine-Exon AR Transcripts (Exon 1/Exon 1b/Exons 2-8) in Normal and Cancerous Breast and Prostate Cells.

    PubMed

    Hu, Dong Gui; McKinnon, Ross A; Hulin, Julie-Ann; Mackenzie, Peter I; Meech, Robyn

    2016-12-27

    Nearly 20 different transcripts of the human androgen receptor (AR) are reported with two currently listed as Refseq isoforms in the NCBI database. Isoform 1 encodes wild-type AR (type 1 AR) and isoform 2 encodes the variant AR45 (type 2 AR). Both variants contain eight exons: they share common exons 2-8 but differ in exon 1 with the canonical exon 1 in isoform 1 and the variant exon 1b in isoform 2. Splicing of exon 1 or exon 1b is reported to be mutually exclusive. In this study, we identified a novel exon 1b (1b/TAG) that contains an additional TAG trinucleotide upstream of exon 1b. Moreover, we identified AR transcripts in both normal and cancerous breast and prostate cells that contained either exon 1b or 1b/TAG spliced between the canonical exon 1 and exon 2, generating nine-exon AR transcripts that we have named isoforms 3a and 3b. The proteins encoded by these new AR variants could regulate androgen-responsive reporters in breast and prostate cancer cells under androgen-depleted conditions. Analysis of type 3 AR-GFP fusion proteins showed partial nuclear localization in PC3 cells under androgen-depleted conditions, supporting androgen-independent activation of the AR. Type 3 AR proteins inhibited androgen-induced growth of LNCaP cells. Microarray analysis identified a small set of type 3a AR target genes in LNCaP cells, including genes known to modulate growth and proliferation of prostate cancer (PCGEM1, PEG3, EPHA3, and EFNB2) or other types of human cancers (TOX3, ST8SIA4, and SLITRK3), and genes that are diagnostic/prognostic biomarkers of prostate cancer (GRINA3, and BCHE).

  13. Novel Nine-Exon AR Transcripts (Exon 1/Exon 1b/Exons 2–8) in Normal and Cancerous Breast and Prostate Cells

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Dong Gui; McKinnon, Ross A.; Hulin, Julie-Ann; Mackenzie, Peter I.; Meech, Robyn

    2016-01-01

    Nearly 20 different transcripts of the human androgen receptor (AR) are reported with two currently listed as Refseq isoforms in the NCBI database. Isoform 1 encodes wild-type AR (type 1 AR) and isoform 2 encodes the variant AR45 (type 2 AR). Both variants contain eight exons: they share common exons 2–8 but differ in exon 1 with the canonical exon 1 in isoform 1 and the variant exon 1b in isoform 2. Splicing of exon 1 or exon 1b is reported to be mutually exclusive. In this study, we identified a novel exon 1b (1b/TAG) that contains an additional TAG trinucleotide upstream of exon 1b. Moreover, we identified AR transcripts in both normal and cancerous breast and prostate cells that contained either exon 1b or 1b/TAG spliced between the canonical exon 1 and exon 2, generating nine-exon AR transcripts that we have named isoforms 3a and 3b. The proteins encoded by these new AR variants could regulate androgen-responsive reporters in breast and prostate cancer cells under androgen-depleted conditions. Analysis of type 3 AR-GFP fusion proteins showed partial nuclear localization in PC3 cells under androgen-depleted conditions, supporting androgen-independent activation of the AR. Type 3 AR proteins inhibited androgen-induced growth of LNCaP cells. Microarray analysis identified a small set of type 3a AR target genes in LNCaP cells, including genes known to modulate growth and proliferation of prostate cancer (PCGEM1, PEG3, EPHA3, and EFNB2) or other types of human cancers (TOX3, ST8SIA4, and SLITRK3), and genes that are diagnostic/prognostic biomarkers of prostate cancer (GRINA3, and BCHE). PMID:28035996

  14. Computational discovery of internal micro-exons.

    PubMed

    Volfovsky, Natalia; Haas, Brian J; Salzberg, Steven L

    2003-06-01

    Very short exons, also known as micro-exons, occur in large numbers in some eukaryotic genomes. Existing annotation tools have a limited ability to recognize these short sequences, which range in length up to 25 bp. Here, we describe a computational method for the identification of micro-exons using near-perfect alignments between cDNA and genomic DNA sequences. Using this method, we detected 319 micro-exons in 4 complete genomes, of which 224 were previously unknown, human (170), the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans (4), the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster (14), and the mustard plant Arabidopsis thaliana (36). Comparison of our computational method with popular cDNA alignment programs shows that the new algorithm is both efficient and accurate. The algorithm also aids in the discovery of micro-exon-skipping events and cross-species micro-exon conservation.

  15. Identification of protein features encoded by alternative exons using Exon Ontology.

    PubMed

    Tranchevent, Léon-Charles; Aubé, Fabien; Dulaurier, Louis; Benoit-Pilven, Clara; Rey, Amandine; Poret, Arnaud; Chautard, Emilie; Mortada, Hussein; Desmet, François-Olivier; Chakrama, Fatima Zahra; Moreno-Garcia, Maira Alejandra; Goillot, Evelyne; Janczarski, Stéphane; Mortreux, Franck; Bourgeois, Cyril F; Auboeuf, Didier

    2017-06-01

    Transcriptomic genome-wide analyses demonstrate massive variation of alternative splicing in many physiological and pathological situations. One major challenge is now to establish the biological contribution of alternative splicing variation in physiological- or pathological-associated cellular phenotypes. Toward this end, we developed a computational approach, named "Exon Ontology," based on terms corresponding to well-characterized protein features organized in an ontology tree. Exon Ontology is conceptually similar to Gene Ontology-based approaches but focuses on exon-encoded protein features instead of gene level functional annotations. Exon Ontology describes the protein features encoded by a selected list of exons and looks for potential Exon Ontology term enrichment. By applying this strategy to exons that are differentially spliced between epithelial and mesenchymal cells and after extensive experimental validation, we demonstrate that Exon Ontology provides support to discover specific protein features regulated by alternative splicing. We also show that Exon Ontology helps to unravel biological processes that depend on suites of coregulated alternative exons, as we uncovered a role of epithelial cell-enriched splicing factors in the AKT signaling pathway and of mesenchymal cell-enriched splicing factors in driving splicing events impacting on autophagy. Freely available on the web, Exon Ontology is the first computational resource that allows getting a quick insight into the protein features encoded by alternative exons and investigating whether coregulated exons contain the same biological information. © 2017 Tranchevent et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  16. Regulation of Dscam exon 17 alternative splicing by steric hindrance in combination with RNA secondary structures.

    PubMed

    Yue, Yuan; Li, Guoli; Yang, Yun; Zhang, Wenjing; Pan, Huawei; Chen, Ran; Shi, Feng; Jin, Yongfeng

    2013-12-01

    The gene Down syndrome cell adhesion molecule (Dscam) potentially encodes 38 016 distinct isoforms in Drosophila melanogaster via mutually exclusive splicing. Here we reveal a combinatorial mechanism of regulation of Dscam exon 17 mutually exclusive splicing through steric hindrance in combination with RNA secondary structure. This mutually exclusive behavior is enforced by steric hindrance, due to the close proximity of the exon 17.2 branch point to exon 17.1 in Diptera, and the interval size constraint in non-Dipteran species. Moreover, intron-exon RNA structures are evolutionarily conserved in 36 non-Drosophila species of six distantly related orders (Diptera, Lepidoptera, Coleoptera, Hymenoptera, Hemiptera, and Phthiraptera), which regulates the selection of exon 17 variants via masking the splice site. By contrast, a previously uncharacterized RNA structure specifically activated exon 17.1 by bringing splice sites closer together in Drosophila, while the other moderately suppressed exon 17.1 selection by hindering the accessibility of polypyrimidine sequences. Taken together, these data suggest a phylogeny of increased complexity in regulating alternative splicing of Dscam exon 17 spanning more than 300 million years of insect evolution. These results also provide models of the regulation of alternative splicing through steric hindrance in combination with dynamic structural codes.

  17. Regulation of Dscam exon 17 alternative splicing by steric hindrance in combination with RNA secondary structures

    PubMed Central

    Yue, Yuan; Li, Guoli; Yang, Yun; Zhang, Wenjing; Pan, Huawei; Chen, Ran; Shi, Feng; Jin, Yongfeng

    2013-01-01

    The gene Down syndrome cell adhesion molecule (Dscam) potentially encodes 38 016 distinct isoforms in Drosophila melanogaster via mutually exclusive splicing. Here we reveal a combinatorial mechanism of regulation of Dscam exon 17 mutually exclusive splicing through steric hindrance in combination with RNA secondary structure. This mutually exclusive behavior is enforced by steric hindrance, due to the close proximity of the exon 17.2 branch point to exon 17.1 in Diptera, and the interval size constraint in non-Dipteran species. Moreover, intron-exon RNA structures are evolutionarily conserved in 36 non-Drosophila species of six distantly related orders (Diptera, Lepidoptera, Coleoptera, Hymenoptera, Hemiptera, and Phthiraptera), which regulates the selection of exon 17 variants via masking the splice site. By contrast, a previously uncharacterized RNA structure specifically activated exon 17.1 by bringing splice sites closer together in Drosophila, while the other moderately suppressed exon 17.1 selection by hindering the accessibility of polypyrimidine sequences. Taken together, these data suggest a phylogeny of increased complexity in regulating alternative splicing of Dscam exon 17 spanning more than 300 million years of insect evolution. These results also provide models of the regulation of alternative splicing through steric hindrance in combination with dynamic structural codes. PMID:24448213

  18. Introns differ from exons by their redundancy

    SciTech Connect

    Popova, T.G.; Sadovskii, M.G.

    1995-10-01

    This paper is devoted to an analysis of the intrinsic structure of the gene from the point of view of the redundancy of different structural units - exons and introns. Human genes for which the exon-intron structure has been clearly established were studied. The redundancy of each exon and intron in the gene was determined. It was shown that, in human genes, introns are more redundant than exons. Redundancy is determined as the smallest length of a word (oliconucleotide) beginning with which all words in the studied nucleotide sequence are found exactly once. Mechanisms leading to the disruption of the general pattern of ratios of redundancy of exons and introns are studied. 12 refs., 3 tabs.

  19. Absolute pitch: evidence for early cognitive facilitation during passive listening as revealed by reduced P3a amplitudes.

    PubMed

    Rogenmoser, Lars; Elmer, Stefan; Jäncke, Lutz

    2015-03-01

    Absolute pitch (AP) is the rare ability to identify or produce different pitches without using reference tones. At least two sequential processing stages are assumed to contribute to this phenomenon. The first recruits a pitch memory mechanism at an early stage of auditory processing, whereas the second is driven by a later cognitive mechanism (pitch labeling). Several investigations have used active tasks, but it is unclear how these two mechanisms contribute to AP during passive listening. The present work investigated the temporal dynamics of tone processing in AP and non-AP (NAP) participants by using EEG. We applied a passive oddball paradigm with between- and within-tone category manipulations and analyzed the MMN reflecting the early stage of auditory processing and the P3a response reflecting the later cognitive mechanism during the second processing stage. Results did not reveal between-group differences in MMN waveforms. By contrast, the P3a response was specifically associated with AP and sensitive to the processing of different pitch types. Specifically, AP participants exhibited smaller P3a amplitudes, especially in between-tone category conditions, and P3a responses correlated significantly with the age of commencement of musical training, suggesting an influence of early musical exposure on AP. Our results reinforce the current opinion that the representation of pitches at the processing level of the auditory-related cortex is comparable among AP and NAP participants, whereas the later processing stage is critical for AP. Results are interpreted as reflecting cognitive facilitation in AP participants, possibly driven by the availability of multiple codes for tones.

  20. Remarkable selective constraints on exonic dinucleotide repeats.

    PubMed

    Haasl, Ryan J; Payseur, Bret A

    2014-09-01

    Long dinucleotide repeats found in exons present a substantial mutational hazard: mutations at these loci occur often and generate frameshifts. Here, we provide clear and compelling evidence that exonic dinucleotides experience strong selective constraint. In humans, only 18 exonic dinucleotides have repeat lengths greater than six, which contrasts sharply with the genome-wide distribution of dinucleotides. We genotyped each of these dinucleotides in 200 humans from eight 1000 Genomes Project populations and found a near-absence of polymorphism. More remarkably, divergence data demonstrate that repeat lengths have been conserved across the primate phylogeny in spite of what is likely considerable mutational pressure. Coalescent simulations show that even a very low mutation rate at these loci fails to explain the anomalous patterns of polymorphism and divergence. Our data support two related selective constraints on the evolution of exonic dinucleotides: a short-term intolerance for any change to repeat length and a long-term prevention of increases to repeat length. In general, our results implicate purifying selection as the force that eliminates new, deleterious mutants at exonic dinucleotides. We briefly discuss the evolution of the longest exonic dinucleotide in the human genome--a 10 x CA repeat in fibroblast growth factor receptor-like 1 (FGFRL1)--that should possess a considerably greater mutation rate than any other exonic dinucleotide and therefore generate a large number of deleterious variants. © 2014 The Author(s). Evolution © 2014 The Society for the Study of Evolution.

  1. Modeling exon expression using histone modifications.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Shijia; Wang, Guohua; Liu, Bo; Wang, Yadong

    2013-01-01

    Histones undergo numerous covalent modifications that play important roles in regulating gene expression. Previous investigations have focused on the effects of histone modifications on gene promoters, whereas efforts to unravel their effects on transcribed regions have lagged behind. To elucidate the effects of histone modification on transcribed regions, we constructed a quantitative model, which we suggest can predict the variation of gene expression more faithfully than the model constructed on promoters. Moreover, motivated by the fact that exon spicing is functionally coupled to transcription, we also devised a quantitative model to predict alternative exon expression using histone modifications on exons. This model was found to be general across different exon types and even cell types. Furthermore, an interaction network linking histone modifications to alternative exon expression was constructed using partial correlations. The network indicated that gene expression and specific histone modifications (H3K36me3 and H4K20me1) could directly influence the exon expression, while other modifications could act in an additive way to account for the stability and robustness. In addition, our results suggest that combinations of histone modifications contribute to exon splicing in a redundant and cumulative fashion. To conclude, this study provides a better understanding of the effects of histone modifications on gene transcribed regions.

  2. Modeling Exon Expression Using Histone Modifications

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Shijia; Wang, Guohua; Liu, Bo; Wang, Yadong

    2013-01-01

    Histones undergo numerous covalent modifications that play important roles in regulating gene expression. Previous investigations have focused on the effects of histone modifications on gene promoters, whereas efforts to unravel their effects on transcribed regions have lagged behind. To elucidate the effects of histone modification on transcribed regions, we constructed a quantitative model, which we suggest can predict the variation of gene expression more faithfully than the model constructed on promoters. Moreover, motivated by the fact that exon spicing is functionally coupled to transcription, we also devised a quantitative model to predict alternative exon expression using histone modifications on exons. This model was found to be general across different exon types and even cell types. Furthermore, an interaction network linking histone modifications to alternative exon expression was constructed using partial correlations. The network indicated that gene expression and specific histone modifications (H3K36me3 and H4K20me1) could directly influence the exon expression, while other modifications could act in an additive way to account for the stability and robustness. In addition, our results suggest that combinations of histone modifications contribute to exon splicing in a redundant and cumulative fashion. To conclude, this study provides a better understanding of the effects of histone modifications on gene transcribed regions. PMID:23825663

  3. An exonic splicing silencer in the testes-specific DNA ligase III β exon

    PubMed Central

    Chew, Shern L.; Baginsky, Lysa; Eperon, Ian C.

    2000-01-01

    Alternative pre-mRNA splicing of two terminal exons (α and β) regulates the expression of the human DNA ligase III gene. In most tissues, the α exon is expressed. In testes and during spermatogenesis, the β exon is used instead. The α exon encodes the interaction domain with a scaffold DNA repair protein, XRCC1, while the β exon-encoded C-terminal does not. Sequence elements regulating the alternative splicing pattern were mapped by in vitro splicing assays in HeLa nuclear extracts. Deletion of a region beginning in the β exon and extending into the downstream intron derepressed splicing to the β exon. Two silencing elements were found within this 101 nt region: a 16 nt exonic splicing silencer immediately upstream of the β exon polyadenylation signal and a 45 nt intronic splicing silencer. The exonic splicing silencer inhibited splicing, even when the polyadenylation signal was deleted or replaced by a 5′ splice site. This element also enhanced polyadenylation under conditions unfavourable to splicing. The splicing silencer partially inhibited assembly of spliceosomal complexes and functioned in an adenoviral pre-mRNA context. Silencing of splicing by the element was associated with cross-linking of a 37 kDa protein to the RNA substrate. The element exerts opposite functions in splicing and polyadenylation. PMID:10606636

  4. Periodic sequence patterns in human exons

    SciTech Connect

    Baldi, P.; Brunak, S.; Engelbrecht, J.; Chauvin, Y.; Krogh, A.

    1995-12-31

    We analyze the sequential structure of human exons and their flanking introns by hidden Markov models. Together, models of donor site regions, acceptor site regions and flanked internal exons, show that exons -- besides the reading frame -- hold a specific periodic pattern. The pattern, which has the consensus: non-T(A/T)G and a minimal periodicity of roughly 10 nucleotides, is not a consequence of the nucleotide statistics in the three codon positions, nor of the well known nucleosome positioning signal. We discuss the relation between the pattern and other known sequence elements responsible for the intrinsic bending or curvature of DNA.

  5. Genome-wide survey of ds exonization to enrich transcriptomes and proteomes in plants.

    PubMed

    Liu, Li-Yu Daisy; Charng, Yuh-Chyang

    2012-01-01

    Insertion of transposable elements (TEs) into introns can lead to their activation as alternatively spliced cassette exons, an event called exonization which can enrich the complexity of transcriptomes and proteomes. Previously, we performed the first experimental assessment of TE exonization by inserting a Ds element into each intron of the rice epsps gene. Exonization of Ds in plants was biased toward providing splice donor sites from the beginning of the inserted Ds sequence. Additionally, Ds inserted in the reverse direction resulted in a continuous splice donor consensus region by offering 4 donor sites in the same intron. The current study involved genome-wide computational analysis of Ds exonization events in the dicot Arabidopsis thaliana and the monocot Oryza sativa (rice). Up to 71% of the exonized transcripts were putative targets for the nonsense-mediated decay (NMD) pathway. The insertion patterns of Ds and the polymorphic splice donor sites increased the transcripts and subsequent protein isoforms. Protein isoforms contain protein sequence due to unspliced intron-TE region and/or a shift of the reading frame. The number of interior protein isoforms would be twice that of C-terminal isoforms, on average. TE exonization provides a promising way for functional expansion of the plant proteome.

  6. Protein domains correlate strongly with exons in multiple eukaryotic genomes--evidence of exon shuffling?

    PubMed

    Liu, Mingyi; Grigoriev, Andrei

    2004-09-01

    We conducted a multi-genome analysis correlating protein domain organization with the exon-intron structure of genes in nine eukaryotic genomes. We observed a significant correlation between the borders of exons and domains on a genomic scale for both invertebrates and vertebrates. In addition, we found that the more complex organisms displayed consistently stronger exon-domain correlation, with substantially more significant correlations detected in vertebrates compared with invertebrates. Our observations concur with the principles of exon shuffling theory, including the prediction of predominantly symmetric phase of introns flanking the borders of correlating exons. These results suggest that extensive exon shuffling events during evolution significantly contributed to the shaping of eukaryotic proteomes.

  7. Coincident indices of exons and introns.

    PubMed

    Xu, J; Chen, R; Ling, L; Shen, R; Sun, J

    1993-07-01

    In this paper, the coincident index, proposed by W. F. Friedman in cryptology, is made use of in DNA sequence analysis and exon prediction. The coincident index of exons exceeds that of introns by many times, and is mainly affected by window length, which is correlated negatively with the coincident index. An optimal exon prediction scheme was obtained by experimental analysis with an orthogonal table. Besides exons, many other special sites such as tandem repeats can be identified by using the coincident index approach. The application of this approach to the ARV-2 (AIDS associated retrovirus 2) genome found three new possible coding regions and some unusual base composition regions which are probably related to definite biological functions.

  8. Arousal-related P3a to novel auditory stimuli is abolished by a moderately low alcohol dose.

    PubMed

    Marinkovic, K; Halgren, E; Maltzman, I

    2001-01-01

    Concurrent measures of event-related potentials (ERPs) and skin conductance responses were obtained in an auditory oddball task consisting of rare target, rare non-signal unique novel and frequent standard tones. Twelve right-handed male social drinkers participated in all four cells of the balanced placebo design in which effects of beverage and instructions as to the beverage content (expectancy) were independently manipulated. The beverage contained either juice only, or vodka mixed with juice in the ratio that successfully disguised the taste of alcohol and raised average peak blood-alcohol level to 0.045% (45 mg/dl). ERPs were sensitive to adverse effects of mild inebriation, whereas behavioural measures were not affected. Alcohol ingestion reliably increased N2 amplitude and reduced the late positive complex (LPC). A large, fronto-central P3a (280 ms latency) was recorded to novel sounds in the placebo condition, but only on the trials that also evoked electrodermal-orienting responses. Both novel and target stimuli evoked a posterior P3b (340 ms), which was independent of orienting. Alcohol selectively attenuated the P3a to novel sounds on trials with autonomic arousal. This evidence confirms the previously suggested distinction between the subcomponents of the LPC: P3a may be a central index of orienting to novel, task-irrelevant but potentially significant stimuli and is an important component of the arousal system. P3b does not have a clear relationship with arousal and may embody voluntary cognitive processing of rare task-related stimuli. Overall, these results indicate that alcohol affects multiple brain systems concerned with arousal, attentional processes and cognitive-autonomic integration.

  9. High Resolution Melting Analysis for JAK2 Exon 14 and Exon 12 Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Rapado, Inmaculada; Grande, Silvia; Albizua, Enriqueta; Ayala, Rosa; Hernández, José-Angel; Gallardo, Miguel; Gilsanz, Florinda; Martinez-Lopez, Joaquin

    2009-01-01

    JAK2 mutations are important criteria for the diagnosis of Philadelphia chromosome-negative myeloproliferative neoplasms. We aimed to assess JAK2 exon 14 and exon 12 mutations by high-resolution melting (HRM) analysis, which allows variation screening. The exon 14 analysis included 163 patients with polycythemia vera, secondary erythrocytoses, essential thrombocythemia, or secondary thrombocytoses, and 126 healthy subjects. The study of exon 12 included 40 JAK2 V617F-negative patients (nine of which had polycythemia vera, and 31 with splanchnic vein thrombosis) and 30 healthy subjects. HRM analyses of JAK2 exons 14 and 12 gave analytical sensitivities near 1% and both intra- and interday coefficients of variation of less than 1%. For HRM analysis of JAK2 exon 14 in polycythemia vera and essential thrombocythemia, clinical sensitivities were 93.5% and 67.9%, clinical specificities were 98.8% and 97.0%, positive predictive values were 93.5% and 79.2%, and negative predictive values were 98.8% and 94.6, respectively. Correlations were observed between the results from HRM and three commonly used analytical methods. The JAK2 exon 12 HRM results agreed completely with those from sequencing analysis, and the three mutations in exon 12 were detected by both methods. Hence, HRM analysis of exons 14 and 12 in JAK2 shows better diagnostic values than three other routinely used methods against which it was compared. In addition, HRM analysis has the advantage of detecting unknown mutations. PMID:19225136

  10. Identification of a tyrosinase (TYR) exon 4 deletion in albino ferrets (Mustela putorius furo).

    PubMed

    Blaszczyk, W M; Distler, C; Dekomien, G; Arning, L; Hoffmann, K-P; Epplen, J T

    2007-08-01

    Albinism is due to a lack of pigmentation in hair, skin and eye, and has been shown to occur in several animal species. Mutations of the tyrosinase (TYR) gene account for albinism in domestic cats, rabbits, cattle, mice and rats. In this study, we demonstrate that a TYR mutation accounts for albinism in the ferret (Mustela putorius furo). The coding sequence of the five exons of TYR was determined in genomic DNA from wild-type pigmented 'sable' coloured and albino ferrets. It was not possible to amplify TYR exon 4 in albino ferrets originating from different breeds. The deletion of exon 4 in albino ferrets was confirmed by Southern blot hybridization of genomic DNA from albino and pigmented ferrets. This is the first report of a deletion of a TYR exon in a non-human mammal.

  11. Habituation of P3a and P3b brain potentials in men engaged in extreme sports.

    PubMed

    Fjell, Anders M; Aker, Martin; Bang, Karl Henrik; Bardal, Janne; Frogner, Heidi; Gangås, Oddny S; Otnes, Anneli; Sønderland, Nils M; Wisløff, Anne Kathrine; Walhovd, Kristine B

    2007-04-01

    Do person characteristics determine when novel, attention-grabbing stimuli loose their novelty? The aim of the present study was to investigate habituation of the visual event-related potentials (ERP) P3a and P3b in men that (1) were engaged in extreme sports, (2) had extremely high scores on the Impulsivity Sensation Seeking scale of the Zuckerman-Kuhlman Personality Questionnaire (ZKPQ), yet were not engaged in extreme sports, or (3) had extremely low scores on ZKPQ. The results showed that P3a habituated significantly more in extreme sporters than in the other groups. The same was not found in comparison of the high and the low ZKPQ scorers. There were not differences between the groups in overall amplitude. It is concluded that ERP habituation may be more relevant than mere amplitude to the sensation seeking trait in extreme sporters, and that they differ from others in ERPs related to automatic alerting-related processes, not controlled cognitive processing.

  12. Efficient selection of 3'-terminal exons from vertebrate DNA.

    PubMed Central

    Krizman, D B; Berget, S M

    1993-01-01

    Identification of expressed sequences within genomic DNA is a hurdle in the characterization of complex genomes. We developed an exon trapping scheme that provides a positive selection for vertebrate 3'-terminal exons. A copy of the trapped exon sequence is obtained by RT/PCR amplification. The technique detects valid terminal exons without interference from partial exons or non-specific sequences, including simple human repeated sequences. Application to random human cosmids yielded one unique trapped terminal exon per cosmid on average. Because vertebrate terminal exons average 600-700 nucleotides in length, the technique provides transcribed sequences of sufficient length to assist further mapping efforts. Images PMID:8255777

  13. Efficient selection of 3'-terminal exons from vertebrate DNA.

    PubMed

    Krizman, D B; Berget, S M

    1993-11-11

    Identification of expressed sequences within genomic DNA is a hurdle in the characterization of complex genomes. We developed an exon trapping scheme that provides a positive selection for vertebrate 3'-terminal exons. A copy of the trapped exon sequence is obtained by RT/PCR amplification. The technique detects valid terminal exons without interference from partial exons or non-specific sequences, including simple human repeated sequences. Application to random human cosmids yielded one unique trapped terminal exon per cosmid on average. Because vertebrate terminal exons average 600-700 nucleotides in length, the technique provides transcribed sequences of sufficient length to assist further mapping efforts.

  14. An Exon-Capture System for the Entire Class Ophiuroidea

    PubMed Central

    Hugall, Andrew F.; O’Hara, Timothy D.; Hunjan, Sumitha; Nilsen, Roger; Moussalli, Adnan

    2016-01-01

    Exon-capture studies have typically been restricted to relatively shallow phylogenetic scales due primarily to hybridization constraints. Here, we present an exon-capture system for an entire class of marine invertebrates, the Ophiuroidea, built upon a phylogenetically diverse transcriptome foundation. The system captures approximately 90% of the 1,552 exon target, across all major lineages of the quarter-billion-year-old extant crown group. Key features of our system are 1) basing the target on an alignment of orthologous genes determined from 52 transcriptomes spanning the phylogenetic diversity and trimmed to remove anything difficult to capture, map, or align; 2) use of multiple artificial representatives based on ancestral state reconstructions rather than exemplars to improve capture and mapping of the target; 3) mapping reads to a multi-reference alignment; and 4) using patterns of site polymorphism to distinguish among paralogy, polyploidy, allelic differences, and sample contamination. The resulting data give a well-resolved tree (currently standing at 417 samples, 275,352 sites, 91% data-complete) that will transform our understanding of ophiuroid evolution and biogeography. PMID:26474846

  15. Targeted Exon Sequencing in Usher Syndrome Type I

    PubMed Central

    Bujakowska, Kinga M.; Consugar, Mark; Place, Emily; Harper, Shyana; Lena, Jaclyn; Taub, Daniel G.; White, Joseph; Navarro-Gomez, Daniel; Weigel DiFranco, Carol; Farkas, Michael H.; Gai, Xiaowu; Berson, Eliot L.; Pierce, Eric A.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. Patients with Usher syndrome type I (USH1) have retinitis pigmentosa, profound congenital hearing loss, and vestibular ataxia. This syndrome is currently thought to be associated with at least six genes, which are encoded by over 180 exons. Here, we present the use of state-of-the-art techniques in the molecular diagnosis of a cohort of 47 USH1 probands. Methods. The cohort was studied with selective exon capture and next-generation sequencing of currently known inherited retinal degeneration genes, comparative genomic hybridization, and Sanger sequencing of new USH1 exons identified by human retinal transcriptome analysis. Results. With this approach, we were able to genetically solve 14 of the 47 probands by confirming the biallelic inheritance of mutations. We detected two likely pathogenic variants in an additional 19 patients, for whom family members were not available for cosegregation analysis to confirm biallelic inheritance. Ten patients, in addition to primary disease–causing mutations, carried rare likely pathogenic USH1 alleles or variants in other genes associated with deaf-blindness, which may influence disease phenotype. Twenty-one of the identified mutations were novel among the 33 definite or likely solved patients. Here, we also present a clinical description of the studied cohort at their initial visits. Conclusions. We found a remarkable genetic heterogeneity in the studied USH1 cohort with multiplicity of mutations, of which many were novel. No obvious influence of genotype on phenotype was found, possibly due to small sample sizes of the genotypes under study. PMID:25468891

  16. Exon expression profiling reveals stimulus-mediated exon use in neural cells

    PubMed Central

    McKee, Adrienne E; Neretti, Nicola; Carvalho, Luis E; Meyer, Clifford A; Fox, Edward A; Brodsky, Alexander S; Silver, Pamela A

    2007-01-01

    Background: Neuronal cells respond to changes in intracellular calcium ([Ca2+]i) by affecting both the abundance and architecture of specific mRNAs. Although calcium-induced transcription and transcript variation have both been recognized as important sources of gene regulation, the interplay between these two phenomena has not been evaluated on a genome-wide scale. Results: Here, we show that exon-centric microarrays can be used to resolve the [Ca2+]i-modulated gene expression response into transcript-level and exon-level regulation. Global assessments of affected transcripts reveal modulation within distinct functional gene categories. We find that transcripts containing calcium-modulated exons exhibit enrichment for calcium ion binding, calmodulin binding, plasma membrane associated, and metabolic proteins. Additionally, we uncover instances of regulated exon use in potassium channels, neuroendocrine secretory proteins and metabolic enzymes, and demonstrate that regulated changes in exon expression give rise to distinct transcript variants. Conclusion: Our findings connect extracellular stimuli to specific exon behavior, and suggest that changes in transcript and exon abundance are reflective of a coordinated gene expression response to elevated [Ca2+]i. The technology we describe here lends itself readily to the resolution of stimulus-induced gene expression at both the transcript and exon levels. PMID:17683528

  17. P3a and P3b components associated to the neurocognitive evaluation of invalidly cued targets.

    PubMed

    Gómez, Carlos M; Flores, Angélica; Digiacomo, Marcia R; Ledesma, Alfredo; González-Rosa, Javier

    2008-01-10

    The present report focuses on evaluating the neurocognitive consequences of the correct or incorrect spatial prediction induced by a spatial cue. Positions in the vertical meridian were cued in order to evaluate the cognitive consequences in the processing of the validly (VC) or invalidly cued (IC) targets. The behavioural responses and the 64 EEG channel were recorded. The late endogenous event-related potential (ERP) induced by target stimuli in VC and IC targets were compared in voltage amplitude, voltage and current source density topographies. The P3a and a late positive complex, possibly P3b were increased in a statistically significant manner in the IC targets with regard to the VC targets. The previous result suggests that subjects prepare to accomplish the task upon specification of the cue, and when the IC target appeared it is treated as a low probability stimulus in a similar manner to deviant stimuli in odd-ball paradigms.

  18. Bioinformatic analysis of exon repetition, exon scrambling and trans-splicing in humans.

    PubMed

    Shao, Xiang; Shepelev, Valery; Fedorov, Alexei

    2006-03-15

    Using bioinformatic approaches we aimed to characterize poorly understood abnormalities in splicing known as exon scrambling, exon repetition and trans-splicing. We developed a software package that allows large-scale comparison of all human expressed sequence tags (EST) sequences to the entire set of human gene sequences. Among 5,992,495 EST sequences, 401 cases of exon repetition and 416 cases of exon scrambling were found. The vast majority of identified ESTs contain fragments rather than full-length repeated or scrambled exons. Their structures suggest that the scrambled or repeated exon fragments may have arisen in the process of cDNA cloning and not from splicing abnormalities. Nevertheless, we found 11 cases of full-length exon repetition showing that this phenomenon is real yet very rare. In searching for examples of trans-splicing, we looked only at reproducible events where at least two independent ESTs represent the same putative trans-splicing event. We found 15 ESTs representing five types of putative trans-splicing. However, all 15 cases were derived from human malignant tissues and could have resulted from genomic rearrangements. Our results provide support for a very rare but physiological occurrence of exon repetition, but suggest that apparent exon scrambling and trans-splicing result, respectively, from in vitro artifact and gene-level abnormalities. Exon-Intron Database (EID) is available at http://www.meduohio.edu/bioinfo/eid. Programs are available at http://www.meduohio.edu/bioinfo/software.html. The Laboratory website is available at http://www.meduohio.edu/medicine/fedorov Supplementary file is available at http://www.meduohio.edu/bioinfo/software.html.

  19. Antisense-induced exon skipping restores dystrophin expression in DMD patient derived muscle cells.

    PubMed

    van Deutekom, J C; Bremmer-Bout, M; Janson, A A; Ginjaar, I B; Baas, F; den Dunnen, J T; van Ommen, G J

    2001-07-15

    Due to frame-shifting mutations in the DMD gene that cause dystrophin deficiency, Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) patients suffer from lethal muscle degeneration. In contrast, mutations in the allelic Becker muscular dystrophy (BMD) do not disrupt the translational reading frame, resulting in a less severe phenotype. In this study, we explored a genetic therapy aimed at restoring the reading frame in muscle cells from DMD patients through targeted modulation of dystrophin pre-mRNA splicing. Considering that exon 45 is the single most frequently deleted exon in DMD, whereas exon (45+46) deletions cause only a mild form of BMD, we set up an antisense-based system to induce exon 46 skipping from the transcript in cultured myotubes of both mouse and human origin. In myotube cultures from two unrelated DMD patients carrying an exon 45 deletion, the induced skipping of exon 46 in only approximately 15% of the mRNA led to normal amounts of properly localized dystrophin in at least 75% of myotubes. Our results provide first evidence of highly effective restoration of dystrophin expression from the endogenous gene in DMD patient-derived muscle cells. This strategy may be applicable to not only >65% of DMD mutations, but also many other genetic diseases.

  20. Lineage-specific splicing of a brain-enriched alternative exon promotes glioblastoma progression

    PubMed Central

    Ferrarese, Roberto; Harsh, Griffith R.; Yadav, Ajay K.; Bug, Eva; Maticzka, Daniel; Reichardt, Wilfried; Dombrowski, Stephen M.; Miller, Tyler E.; Masilamani, Anie P.; Dai, Fangping; Kim, Hyunsoo; Hadler, Michael; Scholtens, Denise M.; Yu, Irene L.Y.; Beck, Jürgen; Srinivasasainagendra, Vinodh; Costa, Fabrizio; Baxan, Nicoleta; Pfeifer, Dietmar; von Elverfeldt, Dominik; Backofen, Rolf; Weyerbrock, Astrid; Duarte, Christine W.; He, Xiaolin; Prinz, Marco; Chandler, James P.; Vogel, Hannes; Chakravarti, Arnab; Rich, Jeremy N.; Carro, Maria S.; Bredel, Markus

    2014-01-01

    Tissue-specific alternative splicing is critical for the emergence of tissue identity during development, yet the role of this process in malignant transformation is undefined. Tissue-specific splicing involves evolutionarily conserved, alternative exons that represent only a minority of the total alternative exons identified. Many of these conserved exons have functional features that influence signaling pathways to profound biological effect. Here, we determined that lineage-specific splicing of a brain-enriched cassette exon in the membrane-binding tumor suppressor annexin A7 (ANXA7) diminishes endosomal targeting of the EGFR oncoprotein, consequently enhancing EGFR signaling during brain tumor progression. ANXA7 exon splicing was mediated by the ribonucleoprotein PTBP1, which is normally repressed during neuronal development. PTBP1 was highly expressed in glioblastomas due to loss of a brain-enriched microRNA (miR-124) and to PTBP1 amplification. The alternative ANXA7 splicing trait was present in precursor cells, suggesting that glioblastoma cells inherit the trait from a potential tumor-initiating ancestor and that these cells exploit this trait through accumulation of mutations that enhance EGFR signaling. Our data illustrate that lineage-specific splicing of a tissue-regulated alternative exon in a constituent of an oncogenic pathway eliminates tumor suppressor functions and promotes glioblastoma progression. This paradigm may offer a general model as to how tissue-specific regulatory mechanisms can reprogram normal developmental processes into oncogenic ones. PMID:24865424

  1. Menzerath-Altmann law in mammalian exons reflects the dynamics of gene structure evolution.

    PubMed

    Nikolaou, Christoforos

    2014-12-01

    Genomic sequences exhibit self-organization properties at various hierarchical levels. One such is the gene structure of higher eukaryotes with its complex exon/intron arrangement. Exon sizes and exon numbers in genes have been shown to conform to a law derived from statistical linguistics and formulated by Menzerath and Altmann, according to which the mean size of the constituents of an entity is inversely related to the number of these constituents. We herein perform a detailed analysis of this property in the complete exon set of the mouse genome in correlation to the sequence conservation of each exon and the transcriptional complexity of each gene locus. We show that extensive linear fits, representative of accordance to Menzerath-Altmann law are restricted to a particular subset of genes that are formed by exons under low or intermediate sequence constraints and have a small number of alternative transcripts. Based on this observation we propose a hypothesis for the law of Menzerath-Altmann in mammalian genes being predominantly due to genes that are more versatile in function and thus, more prone to undergo changes in their structure. To this end we demonstrate one test case where gene categories of different functionality also show differences in the extent of conformity to Menzerath-Altmann law. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Plant Proteins Are Smaller Because They Are Encoded by Fewer Exons than Animal Proteins.

    PubMed

    Ramírez-Sánchez, Obed; Pérez-Rodríguez, Paulino; Delaye, Luis; Tiessen, Axel

    2016-12-01

    Protein size is an important biochemical feature since longer proteins can harbor more domains and therefore can display more biological functionalities than shorter proteins. We found remarkable differences in protein length, exon structure, and domain count among different phylogenetic lineages. While eukaryotic proteins have an average size of 472 amino acid residues (aa), average protein sizes in plant genomes are smaller than those of animals and fungi. Proteins unique to plants are ∼81aa shorter than plant proteins conserved among other eukaryotic lineages. The smaller average size of plant proteins could neither be explained by endosymbiosis nor subcellular compartmentation nor exon size, but rather due to exon number. Metazoan proteins are encoded on average by ∼10 exons of small size [∼176 nucleotides (nt)]. Streptophyta have on average only ∼5.7 exons of medium size (∼230nt). Multicellular species code for large proteins by increasing the exon number, while most unicellular organisms employ rather larger exons (>400nt). Among subcellular compartments, membrane proteins are the largest (∼520aa), whereas the smallest proteins correspond to the gene ontology group of ribosome (∼240aa). Plant genes are encoded by half the number of exons and also contain fewer domains than animal proteins on average. Interestingly, endosymbiotic proteins that migrated to the plant nucleus became larger than their cyanobacterial orthologs. We thus conclude that plants have proteins larger than bacteria but smaller than animals or fungi. Compared to the average of eukaryotic species, plants have ∼34% more but ∼20% smaller proteins. This suggests that photosynthetic organisms are unique and deserve therefore special attention with regard to the evolutionary forces acting on their genomes and proteomes.

  3. Oxidative Stress Triggers Body-Wide Skipping of Multiple Exons of the Spinal Muscular Atrophy Gene

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Joonbae; Singh, Natalia N.; Ottesen, Eric W.; Sivanesan, Senthilkumar; Shishimorova, Maria; Singh, Ravindra N.

    2016-01-01

    Humans carry two nearly identical copies of Survival Motor Neuron gene: SMN1 and SMN2. Loss of SMN1 leads to spinal muscular atrophy (SMA), the most frequent genetic cause of infant mortality. While SMN2 cannot compensate for the loss of SMN1 due to predominant skipping of exon 7, correction of SMN2 exon 7 splicing holds the promise of a cure for SMA. Previously, we used cell-based models coupled with a multi-exon-skipping detection assay (MESDA) to demonstrate the vulnerability of SMN2 exons to aberrant splicing under the conditions of oxidative stress (OS). Here we employ a transgenic mouse model and MESDA to examine the OS-induced splicing regulation of SMN2 exons. We induced OS using paraquat that is known to trigger production of reactive oxygen species and cause mitochondrial dysfunction. We show an overwhelming co-skipping of SMN2 exon 5 and exon 7 under OS in all tissues except testis. We also show that OS increases skipping of SMN2 exon 3 in all tissues except testis. We uncover several new SMN2 splice isoforms expressed at elevated levels under the conditions of OS. We analyze cis-elements and transacting factors to demonstrate the diversity of mechanisms for splicing misregulation under OS. Our results of proteome analysis reveal downregulation of hnRNP H as one of the potential consequences of OS in brain. Our findings suggest SMN2 as a sensor of OS with implications to SMA and other diseases impacted by low levels of SMN protein. PMID:27111068

  4. HEXEvent: a database of Human EXon splicing Events.

    PubMed

    Busch, Anke; Hertel, Klemens J

    2013-01-01

    HEXEvent (http://hexevent.mmg.uci.edu) is a new database that permits the user to compile genome-wide exon data sets of human internal exons showing selected splicing events. User queries can be customized based on the type and the frequency of alternative splicing events. For each splicing version of an exon, an ESTs count is given, specifying the frequency of the event. A user-specific definition of constitutive exons can be entered to designate an exon exclusion level still acceptable for an exon to be considered as constitutive. Similarly, the user has the option to define a maximum inclusion level for an exon to be called an alternatively spliced exon. Unlike other existing splicing databases, HEXEvent permits the user to easily extract alternative splicing information for individual, multiple or genome-wide human internal exons. Importantly, the generated data sets are downloadable for further analysis.

  5. Decoding of exon splicing patterns in the human RUNX1-RUNX1T1 fusion gene.

    PubMed

    Grinev, Vasily V; Migas, Alexandr A; Kirsanava, Aksana D; Mishkova, Olga A; Siomava, Natalia; Ramanouskaya, Tatiana V; Vaitsiankova, Alina V; Ilyushonak, Ilia M; Nazarov, Petr V; Vallar, Laurent; Aleinikova, Olga V

    2015-11-01

    The t(8;21) translocation is the most widespread genetic defect found in human acute myeloid leukemia. This translocation results in the RUNX1-RUNX1T1 fusion gene that produces a wide variety of alternative transcripts and influences the course of the disease. The rules of combinatorics and splicing of exons in the RUNX1-RUNX1T1 transcripts are not known. To address this issue, we developed an exon graph model of the fusion gene organization and evaluated its local exon combinatorics by the exon combinatorial index (ECI). Here we show that the local exon combinatorics of the RUNX1-RUNX1T1 gene follows a power-law behavior and (i) the vast majority of exons has a low ECI, (ii) only a small part is represented by "exons-hubs" of splicing with very high ECI values, and (iii) it is scale-free and very sensitive to targeted skipping of "exons-hubs". Stochasticity of the splicing machinery and preferred usage of exons in alternative splicing can explain such behavior of the system. Stochasticity may explain up to 12% of the ECI variance and results in a number of non-coding and unproductive transcripts that can be considered as a noise. Half-life of these transcripts is increased due to the deregulation of some key genes of the nonsense-mediated decay system in leukemia cells. On the other hand, preferred usage of exons may explain up to 75% of the ECI variability. Our analysis revealed a set of splicing-related cis-regulatory motifs that can explain "attractiveness" of exons in alternative splicing but only when they are considered together. Cis-regulatory motifs are guides for splicing trans-factors and we observed a leukemia-specific profile of expression of the splicing genes in t(8;21)-positive blasts. Altogether, our results show that alternative splicing of the RUNX1-RUNX1T1 transcripts follows strict rules and that the power-law component of the fusion gene organization confers a high flexibility to this process. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights

  6. Hardware accelerator for prediction of exons.

    PubMed

    Yusuf, Adeel; Khan, Shoab A

    2006-01-01

    Gene annotation is by nature a computationally intensive problem, as it needs to process huge data size of DNA sequences. This forces the need to look for alternate ways of implementing algorithms to predict exons. The paper presents an accelerator for indexing DNA sequences. The accelerator effectively exploits the 3-periodicity property exhibited by protein coding regions and indicates their presence in the sequence. Experimental results show superior performance compared with software-based approach for evaluating exons from DNA. The accelerator based PCI pluggable card offers a great utility to scientists and engineers actively involved in indexing DNA sequences.

  7. Exon skipping therapy for Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Kole, Ryszard; Krieg, Arthur M

    2015-06-29

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is caused mostly by internal deletions in the gene for dystrophin, a protein essential for maintaining muscle cell membrane integrity. These deletions abrogate the reading frame and the lack of dystrophin results in progressive muscle deterioration. DMD patients experience progressive loss of ambulation, followed by a need for assisted ventilation, and eventual death in mid-twenties. By the method of exon skipping in dystrophin pre-mRNA the reading frame is restored and the internally deleted but functional dystrophin is produced. Two oligonucleotide drugs that induce desired exon skipping are currently in advanced clinical trials.

  8. In-line capillary electrophoretic evaluation of the enantioselective metabolism of verapamil by cytochrome P3A4.

    PubMed

    Asensi-Bernardi, L; Martín-Biosca, Y; Escuder-Gilabert, L; Sagrado, S; Medina-Hernández, M J

    2013-07-12

    In this paper a methodology for the in-line evaluation of enantioselective metabolism by capillary electrophoresis has been developed and applied to the study of verapamil metabolism by cytochrome P3A4. The developed methodology comprises an in-capillary reaction step carried out by electrophoretically mediated microanalysis and a separation step in which highly sulfated β-cyclodextrin with partial filling technique has been employed as chiral selector for verapamil and norverapamil enantiomers resolution, joining the advantages of both methodologies in a unique assay. Kinetic parameters of the enzymatic reaction (Km and Vmax) have been evaluated for both verapamil enantiomers by non-linear fitting of experimental data obtained under intermediate precision conditions to Michaelis-Menten equation. Km and Vmax estimated values were 51±9 μM and 22±2 pmol min(-1) (pmol CYP)(-1) for S-VER and 47±9 μM and 21±2 pmol min(-1) (pmol CYP)(-1) for R-VER. Consequently, slight enantioselectivity was found for the CYP3A4 metabolism of verapamil. However, since confidence intervals of estimates overlap, we cannot assure a significant enantioselectivity. Intrinsic clearance values were also estimated from Km and Vmax for both enantiomers.

  9. A survey on intron and exon lengths.

    PubMed Central

    Hawkins, J D

    1988-01-01

    The lengths of introns and exons in various parts of genes of vertebrates, insects, plants and fungi are tabulated. Differences between the various groups of organisms are apparent. The results are discussed and support the idea that, generally speaking, introns were present in primitive genomes, though in some cases they may have been inserted into pre-existing genes. PMID:3057449

  10. Molecular effects of autoimmune-risk promoter polymorphisms on expression, exon choice, and translational efficiency of interferon regulatory factor 5.

    PubMed

    Clark, Daniel N; Lambert, Jared P; Till, Rodney E; Argueta, Lissenya B; Greenhalgh, Kathryn E; Henrie, Brandon; Bills, Trieste; Hawkley, Tyson F; Roznik, Marinya G; Sloan, Jason M; Mayhew, Vera; Woodland, Loc; Nelson, Eric P; Tsai, Meng-Hsuan; Poole, Brian D

    2014-05-01

    The rs2004640 single nucleotide polymorphism and the CGGGG copy-number variant (rs77571059) are promoter polymorphisms within interferon regulatory factor 5 (IRF5). They have been implicated as susceptibility factors for several autoimmune diseases. IRF5 uses alternative promoter splicing, where any of 4 first exons begin the mRNA. The CGGGG indel is in exon 1A's promoter; the rs2004640 allele creates a splicing recognition site, enabling usage of exon 1B. This study aimed at characterizing alterations in IRF5 mRNA due to these polymorphisms. Cells with risk polymorphisms exhibited ~2-fold higher levels of IRF5 mRNA and protein, but demonstrated no change in mRNA stability. Quantitative PCR demonstrated decreased usage of exons 1C and 1D in cell lines with the risk polymorphisms. RNA folding analysis revealed a hairpin in exon 1B; mutational analysis showed that the hairpin shape decreased translation 5-fold. Although translation of mRNA that uses exon 1B is low due to a hairpin, increased IRF5 mRNA levels in individuals with the rs2004640 risk allele lead to higher overall protein expression. In addition, several new splice variants of IRF5 were sequenced. IRF5's promoter polymorphisms alter first exon usage and increase transcription levels. High levels of IRF5 may bias the immune system toward autoimmunity.

  11. Detecting tissue-specific alternative splicing and disease-associated aberrant splicing of the PTCH gene with exon junction microarrays.

    PubMed

    Nagao, Kazuaki; Togawa, Naoyuki; Fujii, Katsunori; Uchikawa, Hideki; Kohno, Yoichi; Yamada, Masao; Miyashita, Toshiyuki

    2005-11-15

    Mutations in the human ortholog of Drosophila patched (PTCH) have been identified in patients with autosomal dominant nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome (NBCCS), characterized by minor developmental anomalies and an increased incidence of cancers such as medulloblastoma and basal cell carcinoma. We identified many isoforms of PTCH mRNA involving exons 1-5, exon 10 and a novel exon, 12b, generated by alternative splicing (AS), most of which have not been deposited in GenBank nor discussed earlier. To monitor splicing events of the PTCH gene, we designed oligonucleotide arrays on which exon probes and exon-exon junction probes as well as a couple of intron probes for the PTCH gene were placed in duplicate. Probe intensities were normalized on the basis of the total expression of PTCH and probe sensitivity. Tissue-specific regulation of AS identified with the microarrays closely correlated with the results obtained by RT-PCR. Of note, the novel exon, exon 12b, was specifically expressed in the brain and heart, especially in the cerebellum. Additionally, using these microarrays, we were able to detect disease-associated aberrant splicings of the PTCH gene in two patients with NBCCS. In both cases, cryptic splice donor sites located either in an exon or in an intron were activated because of the partial disruption of the consensus sequence for the authentic splice donor sites due to point mutations. Taken together, oligonucleotide microarrays containing exon junction probes are demonstrated to be a powerful tool to investigate tissue-specific regulation of AS and aberrant splicing taking place in genetic disorders.

  12. In vivo comparison of 2'-O-methyl phosphorothioate and morpholino antisense oligonucleotides for Duchenne muscular dystrophy exon skipping.

    PubMed

    Heemskerk, Hans A; de Winter, Christa L; de Kimpe, Sjef J; van Kuik-Romeijn, Petra; Heuvelmans, Niki; Platenburg, Gerard J; van Ommen, Gert-Jan B; van Deutekom, Judith C T; Aartsma-Rus, Annemieke

    2009-03-01

    Antisense-mediated exon skipping is a putative treatment for Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). Using antisense oligonucleotides (AONs), the disrupted DMD reading frame is restored, allowing generation of partially functional dystrophin and conversion of a severe Duchenne into a milder Becker muscular dystrophy phenotype. In vivo studies are mainly performed using 2'-O-methyl phosphorothioate (2OMePS) or morpholino (PMO) AONs. These compounds were never directly compared. mdx and humanized (h)DMD mice were injected intramuscularly and intravenously with short versus long 2OMePS and PMO for mouse exon 23 and human exons 44, 45, 46 and 51. Intramuscular injection showed that increasing the length of 2OMePS AONs enhanced skipping efficiencies of human exon 45, but decreased efficiency for mouse exon 23. Although PMO induced more mouse exon 23 skipping, PMO and 2OMePS were more comparable for human exons. After intravenous administration, exon skipping and novel protein was shown in the heart with both chemistries. Furthermore, PMO showed lower intramuscular concentrations with higher exon 23 skipping levels compared to 2OMePS, which may be due to sequestration in the extracellular matrix. Finally, two mismatches rendered 2OMePS but not PMO AONs nearly ineffective. The results obtained in the present study indicate that increasing AON length improves skipping efficiency in some but not all cases. It is feasible to induce exon skipping and dystrophin restoration in the heart after injection of 2OMePS and unconjugated PMO. Furthermore, differences in efficiency between PMO and 2OMePS appear to be sequence and not chemistry dependent. Finally, the results indicate that PMOs may be less sequence specific than 2OMePS.

  13. Music training enhances the rapid plasticity of P3a/P3b event-related brain potentials for unattended and attended target sounds.

    PubMed

    Seppänen, Miia; Pesonen, Anu-Katriina; Tervaniemi, Mari

    2012-04-01

    Neurocognitive studies have shown that extensive musical training enhances P3a and P3b event-related potentials for infrequent target sounds, which reflects stronger attention switching and stimulus evaluation in musicians than in nonmusicians. However, it is unknown whether the short-term plasticity of P3a and P3b responses is also enhanced in musicians. We compared the short-term plasticity of P3a and P3b responses to infrequent target sounds in musicians and nonmusicians during auditory perceptual learning tasks. Target sounds, deviating in location, pitch, and duration with three difficulty levels, were interspersed among frequently presented standard sounds in an oddball paradigm. We found that during passive exposure to sounds, musicians had habituation of the P3a, while nonmusicians showed enhancement of the P3a between blocks. Between active tasks, P3b amplitudes for duration deviants were reduced (habituated) in musicians only, and showed a more posterior scalp topography for habituation when compared to P3bs of nonmusicians. In both groups, the P3a and P3b latencies were shortened for deviating sounds. Also, musicians were better than nonmusicians at discriminating target deviants. Regardless of musical training, better discrimination was associated with higher working memory capacity. We concluded that music training enhances short-term P3a/P3b plasticity, indicating training-induced changes in attentional skills.

  14. The patterns of p53 gene mutations differ inside and outside of exons 5-8 in breast and other cancers

    SciTech Connect

    Hartmann, A.; Blaszyk, H.; McGovern, R.M.

    1994-09-01

    Most studies of the p53 gene in tumors examine only exons 5-8. In these exons, there is a predominance of missense mutations clustered in four regions of high evolutionary conservation. We previously found 64 mutations in exons 5-8 of the p53 gene in 194 primary breast cancers. Herein, we report 18 additional mutations found by analyzing the promotor region, the first noncoding exon, and the remaining coding exons. Mutations were found in exons 4, 9, and 10, and flanking splice junctions, but not in the promotor region or in exons 1, 2, 3, and 11. Outside of exons 5-8 not a single missense mutation was found. Microdeletions and microinsertions predominate but nonsense and splice site mutations also occur. In contrast, the majority of mutations in exons 5-8 were missense changes which exclusively occurred at amino acids that were identical in all known p53 sequences which represent about 1.6 billion years of evolutionary divergence. The difference in the mutational pattern between these two regions of the p53 gene is due to a lack of missense and inframe microdeletion mutations outside exons 5-8 (p<.0001), whereas frameshift deletions and insertions, nonsense mutations and splicing defects are equally distributed over the gene. A review of the literature shows that the difference in the patterns of mutation inside and outside of exons 5-8 we have found in breast cancer is present in other types of cancers as well. These data show the importance of comparing equivalent exons when examining the pattern of p53 gene mutation in different populations. In addition, the paucity of missense mutations in breast and other cancers (even at amino acids identical throughout p53 gene evolution) indicates that at least some of the missense mutations in exons 2-4 and 9-11 result in a phenotype other than malignant transformation.

  15. Association between polymorphisms of exon 12 and exon 24 of JHDM2A gene and male infertility

    PubMed Central

    Hojati, Zohreh; Nouri Emamzadeh, Fatemeh; Dehghanian, Fariba

    2016-01-01

    Background: Some dynamic changes occurs during spermatogenesis such as histone removal and its replacement with transition nuclear protein and protamine. These proteins are required for packing and condensation of sperm chromatin. JHDM2A is a histone demethylase that directly binds to promoter regions of Tnp1 and Prm1 genes and controls their expression by removing H3K9 at their promoters. Objective: The association between polymorphisms of exon 12 and exon 24 in JHDM2A gene and male infertility were evaluated for the first time. Materials and Methods: In this experimental study, 400 infertile men (oligospermia and azoospermia) and normal healthy fathers were evaluated (n=200). Single Strand Conformation Polymorphism (SSCP-PCR) and polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) methods were used for screening any polymorphisms that are exist in exon 12 and exon 24. Results: Exon 24 PCR products were analyzed by RFLP but no polymorphism was found in this exon at the restriction site of EcoRV enzyme. Our monitoring along the whole nucleotides of exon 12 and exon 24 were continued using SSCP method, but we found no change along these exons. Conclusion: Generally, this study evaluated the association between polymorphisms in exon 12 and exon 24 of JHDM2A gene and male infertility which suggests that polymorphisms of these exons may not be associated with the risk of male infertility. PMID:27525322

  16. Noncoder: a web interface for exon array-based detection of long non-coding RNAs

    PubMed Central

    Gellert, Pascal; Ponomareva, Yuliya; Braun, Thomas; Uchida, Shizuka

    2013-01-01

    Due to recent technical developments, a high number of long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) have been discovered in mammals. Although it has been shown that lncRNAs are regulated differently among tissues and disease statuses, functions of these transcripts are still unknown in most cases. GeneChip Exon 1.0 ST Arrays (exon arrays) from Affymetrix, Inc. have been used widely to profile genome-wide expression changes and alternative splicing of protein-coding genes. Here, we demonstrate that re-annotation of exon array probes can be used to profile expressions of tens of thousands of lncRNAs. With this annotation, a detailed inspection of lncRNAs and their isoforms is possible. To allow for a general usage to the research community, we developed a user-friendly web interface called ‘noncoder’. By uploading CEL files from exon arrays and with a few mouse clicks and parameter settings, exon array data will be normalized and analysed to identify differentially expressed lncRNAs. Noncoder provides the detailed annotation information of lncRNAs and is equipped with unique features to allow for an efficient search for interesting lncRNAs to be studied further. The web interface is available at http://noncoder.mpi-bn.mpg.de. PMID:23012263

  17. Exon4 amelogenin transcripts in enamel biomineralization.

    PubMed

    Stahl, J; Nakano, Y; Horst, J; Zhu, L; Le, M; Zhang, Y; Liu, H; Li, W; Den Besten, P K

    2015-06-01

    Amelogenins are proteins formed by alternative splicing of the amelogenin gene, and are essential for tooth enamel formation. However, the unique functions of various alternatively spliced amelogenins in enamel formation are not well understood. In this study, we determined the spatiotemporal location of amelogenins derived from transcripts containing exon4 (AMG+4) in the enamel matrix, and the relative binding of recombinant AMG+4 to hydroxyapatite (HAP). Immunohistochemistry and mass spectrometry analyses showed that AMG+4 proteins were secreted into the enamel matrix at the early maturation stage. A stage-specific increase in the synthesis of AMG+4 was further supported by our observation that in mice overexpressing leucine-rich amelogenin peptide (TgLRAP), in which ameloblasts differentiate earlier, AMG+4 transcripts were also upregulated earlier. In vitro binding studies, supported by in silico modeling of protein binding to calcium and phosphate, showed that more recombinant AMG+4 bound to hydroxyapatite (HAP) as compared with recombinant AMG-4. The temporal and spatial localization of amelogenins containing exon4 peptide, and their functional differences in HAP binding, suggests that the unique properties of amelogenins containing exon4 cause a specific enhancement of biomineralization related to stabilization of early-formed HAP at the maturation stage. © International & American Associations for Dental Research 2015.

  18. Skipping multiple exons of dystrophin transcripts using cocktail antisense oligonucleotides.

    PubMed

    Echigoya, Yusuke; Yokota, Toshifumi

    2014-02-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is one of the most common and lethal genetic disorders, with 20,000 children per year born with DMD globally. DMD is caused by mutations in the dystrophin (DMD) gene. Antisense-mediated exon skipping therapy is a promising therapeutic approach that uses short DNA-like molecules called antisense oligonucleotides (AOs) to skip over/splice out the mutated part of the gene to produce a shortened but functional dystrophin protein. One major challenge has been its limited applicability. Multiple exon skipping has recently emerged as a potential solution. Indeed, many DMD patients need exon skipping of multiple exons in order to restore the reading frame, depending on how many base pairs the mutated exon(s) and adjacent exons have. Theoretically, multiple exon skipping could be used to treat approximately 90%, 80%, and 98% of DMD patients with deletion, duplication, and nonsense mutations, respectively. In addition, multiple exon skipping could be used to select deletions that optimize the functionality of the truncated dystrophin protein. The proof of concept of systemic multiple exon skipping using a cocktail of AOs has been demonstrated in dystrophic dog and mouse models. Remaining challenges include the insufficient efficacy of systemic treatment, especially for therapies that target the heart, and limited long-term safety data. Here we review recent preclinical developments in AO-mediated multiple exon skipping and discuss the remaining challenges.

  19. The "alternative" choice of constitutive exons throughout evolution.

    PubMed

    Lev-Maor, Galit; Goren, Amir; Sela, Noa; Kim, Eddo; Keren, Hadas; Doron-Faigenboim, Adi; Leibman-Barak, Shelly; Pupko, Tal; Ast, Gil

    2007-11-01

    Alternative cassette exons are known to originate from two processes-exonization of intronic sequences and exon shuffling. Herein, we suggest an additional mechanism by which constitutively spliced exons become alternative cassette exons during evolution. We compiled a dataset of orthologous exons from human and mouse that are constitutively spliced in one species but alternatively spliced in the other. Examination of these exons suggests that the common ancestors were constitutively spliced. We show that relaxation of the 5' splice site during evolution is one of the molecular mechanisms by which exons shift from constitutive to alternative splicing. This shift is associated with the fixation of exonic splicing regulatory sequences (ESRs) that are essential for exon definition and control the inclusion level only after the transition to alternative splicing. The effect of each ESR on splicing and the combinatorial effects between two ESRs are conserved from fish to human. Our results uncover an evolutionary pathway that increases transcriptome diversity by shifting exons from constitutive to alternative splicing.

  20. The “Alternative” Choice of Constitutive Exons throughout Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Eddo; Keren, Hadas; Doron-Faigenboim, Adi; Leibman-Barak, Shelly; Pupko, Tal; Ast, Gil

    2007-01-01

    Alternative cassette exons are known to originate from two processes—exonization of intronic sequences and exon shuffling. Herein, we suggest an additional mechanism by which constitutively spliced exons become alternative cassette exons during evolution. We compiled a dataset of orthologous exons from human and mouse that are constitutively spliced in one species but alternatively spliced in the other. Examination of these exons suggests that the common ancestors were constitutively spliced. We show that relaxation of the 5′ splice site during evolution is one of the molecular mechanisms by which exons shift from constitutive to alternative splicing. This shift is associated with the fixation of exonic splicing regulatory sequences (ESRs) that are essential for exon definition and control the inclusion level only after the transition to alternative splicing. The effect of each ESR on splicing and the combinatorial effects between two ESRs are conserved from fish to human. Our results uncover an evolutionary pathway that increases transcriptome diversity by shifting exons from constitutive to alternative splicing. PMID:18020709

  1. Transposable elements in disease-associated cryptic exons.

    PubMed

    Vorechovsky, Igor

    2010-02-01

    Transposable elements (TEs) make up a half of the human genome, but the extent of their contribution to cryptic exon activation that results in genetic disease is unknown. Here, a comprehensive survey of 78 mutation-induced cryptic exons previously identified in 51 disease genes revealed the presence of TEs in 40 cases (51%). Most TE-containing exons were derived from short interspersed nuclear elements (SINEs), with Alus and mammalian interspersed repeats (MIRs) covering >18 and >16% of the exonized sequences, respectively. The majority of SINE-derived cryptic exons had splice sites at the same positions of the Alu/MIR consensus as existing SINE exons and their inclusion in the mRNA was facilitated by phylogenetically conserved changes that improved both traditional and auxiliary splicing signals, thus marking intronic TEs amenable for pathogenic exonization. The overrepresentation of MIRs among TE exons is likely to result from their high average exon inclusion levels, which reflect their strong splice sites, a lack of splicing silencers and a high density of enhancers, particularly (G)AA(G) motifs. These elements were markedly depleted in antisense Alu exons, had the most prominent position on the exon-intron gradient scale and are proposed to promote exon definition through enhanced tertiary RNA interactions involving unpaired (di)adenosines. The identification of common mechanisms by which the most dynamic parts of the genome contribute both to new exon creation and genetic disease will facilitate detection of intronic mutations and the development of computational tools that predict TE hot-spots of cryptic exon activation.

  2. Effects of Blocking D2/D3 Receptors on Mismatch Negativity and P3a Amplitude of Initially Antipsychotic Naïve, First Episode Schizophrenia Patients.

    PubMed

    Düring, Signe; Glenthøj, Birte Yding; Oranje, Bob

    2015-10-09

    Reduced mismatch negativity and P3a amplitude have been suggested to be among the core deficits in schizophrenia since the late 1970s. Blockade of dopamine D2 receptors play an important role in the treatment of schizophrenia. In addition, there is some evidence indicating that deficits in mismatch negativity and P3a amplitude are related to increased dopaminergic activity. This is the first study investigating the effect of amisulpride, a potent D2-antagonist, on mismatch negativity and P3a amplitude in a large group of antipsychotic-naïve, first-episode schizophrenia patients. Fifty-one antipsychotic-naïve, first-episode schizophrenia patients were tested in a mismatch negativity paradigm at baseline and after 6 weeks of treatment with amisulpride. We further examined 48 age- and gender-matched controls in this paradigm. At baseline, the patients showed significantly reduced P3a amplitude compared with healthy controls, but no differences in mismatch negativity. Although the treatment with amisulpride significantly improved the patients' psychopathological (PANSS) and functional (GAF) scores, it did not influence their mismatch negativity amplitude, while also their reduced P3a amplitude persisted. Our findings show that antipsychotic naïve, first-episode patients with schizophrenia have normal mismatch negativity yet reduced P3a amplitude compared with healthy controls. In spite of the fact that the 6-week amisulpride treatment improved the patients both clinically and functionally, it had no effect on either mismatch negativity or P3a amplitude. This suggests that even though there is a dopaminergic involvement in global functioning and symptomatology in schizophrenia, there is no such involvement in these particular measures of early information processing. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  3. EGFR exon 20 insertion mutation in Japanese lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Hidefumi; Endo, Katsuhiko; Takada, Minoru; Kawahara, Masaaki; Kitahara, Naoto; Tanaka, Hisaichi; Okumura, Meinoshin; Matsumura, Akihide; Iuchi, Keiji; Kawaguchi, Tomoya; Kawano, Osamu; Yukiue, Haruhiro; Yokoyama, Tomoki; Yano, Motoki; Fujii, Yoshitaka

    2007-12-01

    Mutations of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) gene have been reported in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), especially in female, never smoker patients with adenocarcinoma. Some common somatic mutations in EGFR, including deletion mutations in exon 19 and leucine to arginine substitution at amino acid position 858 (L858R) in exon 21, have been examined for their ability to predict sensitivity to gefitinib or erlotinib. On the other hand, previous report has shown that the insertion mutation at exon 20 is related to gefitinib resistance. We investigated the exon 20 EGFR mutation statuses in 322 surgically treated non-small cell lung cancer cases. Two hundred and five adenocarcinoma cases were included. The presence or absence of EGFR mutations of kinase domains was analyzed by direct sequences. EGFR insertion mutations at exon 20 were found from 7 of 322 (2.17%) lung cancer patients. We also detected the 18 deletion type mutations in exon 19, and 25 L858R type mutations in exon 21. There was a tendency towards higher exon 20 insertion ratio in never smoker (never smoker 4.4% versus smoker 1.3%, p=0.0996) and female (female 4.5% versus male 1.3%, p=0.0917). Two exon 20 insertion cases were treated with gefitinib and failed to response. EGFR insertion mutation in exon 20 could not be ignored from Japanese lung cancers.

  4. Auditory P3a and P3b neural generators in schizophrenia: An adaptive sLORETA P300 localization approach.

    PubMed

    Bachiller, Alejandro; Romero, Sergio; Molina, Vicente; Alonso, Joan F; Mañanas, Miguel A; Poza, Jesús; Hornero, Roberto

    2015-12-01

    The present study investigates the neural substrates underlying cognitive processing in schizophrenia (Sz) patients. To this end, an auditory 3-stimulus oddball paradigm was used to identify P3a and P3b components, elicited by rare-distractor and rare-target tones, respectively. Event-related potentials (ERP) were recorded from 31 Sz patients and 38 healthy controls. The P3a and P3b brain-source generators were identified by time-averaging of low-resolution brain electromagnetic tomography (LORETA) current density images. In contrast with the commonly used fixed window of interest (WOI), we proposed to apply an adaptive WOI, which takes into account subjects' P300 latency variability. Our results showed different P3a and P3b source activation patterns in both groups. P3b sources included frontal, parietal and limbic lobes, whereas P3a response generators were localized over bilateral frontal and superior temporal regions. These areas have been related to the discrimination of auditory stimulus and to the inhibition (P3a) or the initiation (P3b) of motor response in a cognitive task. In addition, differences in source localization between Sz and control groups were observed. Sz patients showed lower P3b source activity in bilateral frontal structures and the cingulate. P3a generators were less widespread for Sz patients than for controls in right superior, medial and middle frontal gyrus. Our findings suggest that target and distractor processing involves distinct attentional subsystems, both being altered in Sz. Hence, the study of neuroelectric brain information can provide further insights to understand cognitive processes and underlying mechanisms in Sz. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Preattentive sensory processing as indexed by the MMN and P3a brain responses is associated with cognitive and psychosocial functioning in healthy adults.

    PubMed

    Light, Gregory A; Swerdlow, Neal R; Braff, David L

    2007-10-01

    Understanding the basic neural processes that underlie complex higher order cognitive operations and psychosocial functioning is a fundamental goal of cognitive neuroscience. Event-related potentials allow investigators to probe the earliest stages of information processing. Mismatch negativity (MMN) and P3a are auditory event-related potential components that reflect automatic sensory discrimination. The aim of the present study was to determine if MMN and P3a are associated with higher order cognitive operations and psychosocial functioning in clinically normal healthy subjects. Twenty adults were assessed using standardized clinical, cognitive, and psychosocial functional instruments. All individuals were within the normal range on cognitive tests and functional ratings. Participants were also tested on a duration-deviant MMN/P3a paradigm (50-msec standard tones, p = .90; 100-msec deviant tones, p = .10; stimulus onset asynchrony [SOA] = 505 msec). Across fronto-central electrode regions, significant correlations were observed between psychosocial functioning and MMN (r = -.62, p < .01) and P3a (r = .63, p < .01) amplitudes. P3a amplitude was also highly associated with immediate and delayed recall of verbal information with robust correlations widely distributed across fronto-central recording areas (e.g., r = .72, p < .001). The latency of the P3a response was significantly associated with both working memory performance (r = -.53, p < .05) and functional ratings (r = -.48, p < .05). Neurophysiological measures of relatively automatic auditory sensory information processing are associated with higher order cognitive abilities and psychosocial functioning in normal subjects. Efficiency at elementary levels of information processing may underlie the successful encoding, retrieval, and discrimination of task-relevant information, which, in turn, facilitates the iterative and responsive processing necessary for adaptive cognitive and social functioning.

  6. Identification of conserved splicing motifs in mutually exclusive exons of 15 insect species.

    PubMed

    Buendia, Patricia; Tyree, John; Loredo, Robert; Hsu, Shu-Ning

    2012-04-12

    During alternative splicing, the inclusion of an exon in the final mRNA molecule is determined by nuclear proteins that bind cis-regulatory sequences in a target pre-mRNA molecule. A recent study suggested that the regulatory codes of individual RNA-binding proteins may be nearly immutable between very diverse species such as mammals and insects. The model system Drosophila melanogaster therefore presents an excellent opportunity for the study of alternative splicing due to the availability of quality EST annotations in FlyBase. In this paper, we describe an in silico analysis pipeline to extract putative exonic splicing regulatory sequences from a multiple alignment of 15 species of insects. Our method, ESTs-to-ESRs (E2E), uses graph analysis of EST splicing graphs to identify mutually exclusive (ME) exons and combines phylogenetic measures, a sliding window approach along the multiple alignment and the Welch's t statistic to extract conserved ESR motifs. The most frequent 100% conserved word of length 5 bp in different insect exons was "ATGGA". We identified 799 statistically significant "spike" hexamers, 218 motifs with either a left or right FDR corrected spike magnitude p-value < 0.05 and 83 with both left and right uncorrected p < 0.01. 11 genes were identified with highly significant motifs in one ME exon but not in the other, suggesting regulation of ME exon splicing through these highly conserved hexamers. The majority of these genes have been shown to have regulated spatiotemporal expression. 10 elements were found to match three mammalian splicing regulator databases. A putative ESR motif, GATGCAG, was identified in the ME-13b but not in the ME-13a of Drosophila N-Cadherin, a gene that has been shown to have a distinct spatiotemporal expression pattern of spliced isoforms in a recent study. Analysis of phylogenetic relationships and variability of sequence conservation as implemented in the E2E spikes method may lead to improved identification of ESRs

  7. Exon duplications in the ATP7A gene: Frequency and Transcriptional Behaviour

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Menkes disease (MD) is an X-linked, fatal neurodegenerative disorder of copper metabolism, caused by mutations in the ATP7A gene. Thirty-three Menkes patients in whom no mutation had been detected with standard diagnostic tools were screened for exon duplications in the ATP7A gene. Methods The ATP7A gene was screened for exon duplications using multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA). The expression level of ATP7A was investigated by real-time PCR and detailed analysis of the ATP7A mRNA was performed by RT-PCR followed by sequencing. In order to investigate whether the identified duplicated fragments originated from a single or from two different X-chromosomes, polymorphic markers located in the duplicated fragments were analyzed. Results Partial ATP7A gene duplication was identified in 20 unrelated patients including one patient with Occipital Horn Syndrome (OHS). Duplications in the ATP7A gene are estimated from our material to be the disease causing mutation in 4% of the Menkes disease patients. The duplicated regions consist of between 2 and 15 exons. In at least one of the cases, the duplication was due to an intra-chromosomal event. Characterization of the ATP7A mRNA transcripts in 11 patients revealed that the duplications were organized in tandem, in a head to tail direction. The reading frame was disrupted in all 11 cases. Small amounts of wild-type transcript were found in all patients as a result of exon-skipping events occurring in the duplicated regions. In the OHS patient with a duplication of exon 3 and 4, the duplicated out-of-frame transcript coexists with an almost equally represented wild-type transcript, presumably leading to the milder phenotype. Conclusions In general, patients with duplication of only 2 exons exhibit a milder phenotype as compared to patients with duplication of more than 2 exons. This study provides insight into exon duplications in the ATP7A gene. PMID:22074552

  8. Haplotype determination of the upstream regulatory region and the second exon of the BoLA-DRB3 gene in Holstein cattle.

    PubMed

    Goszczynski, D E; Ripoli, M V; Takeshima, S-N; Baltian, L; Aida, Y; Giovambattista, G

    2014-03-01

    Polymorphisms of the BoLA-DRB3 gene are located primarily in the second exon [antigen binding site (ABS)] and, to a lesser extent, in the upstream regulatory region (URR). It can be hypothesised that exon 2 and the URR are under different types of natural selection. The aim of this work was to determine the URR-exon 2 haplotypes; 34 Holstein samples were genotyped by direct sequencing. A total of 7 URR alleles and 23 exon 2 alleles were detected, and 3 of the URR alleles were novel. Our results may suggest that no relationship exists between the URR and exon 2 of the BoLA-DRB3 gene (linkage disequilibrium P value > 0.05), most likely due to recombination over time. Our results also suggest that both regions of class II genes may be included in the development of new genotyping methods based on next-generation DNA sequencing technologies.

  9. Dual Masking of Specific Negative Splicing Regulatory Elements Resulted in Maximal Exon 7 Inclusion of SMN2 Gene

    PubMed Central

    Pao, Peng Wen; Wee, Keng Boon; Yee, Woon Chee; DwiPramono, Zacharias Aloysius

    2014-01-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is a fatal autosomal recessive disease caused by survival motor neuron (SMN) protein insufficiency due to SMN1 mutations. Boosting SMN2 expression is a potential therapy for SMA. SMN2 has identical coding sequence as SMN1 except for a silent C-to-T transition at the 6th nucleotide of exon 7, converting a splicing enhancer to a silencer motif. Consequently, most SMN2 transcripts lack exon 7. More than ten putative splicing regulatory elements (SREs) were reported to regulate exon 7 splicing. To investigate the relative strength of each negative SRE in inhibiting exon 7 inclusion, antisense oligonucleotides (AONs) were used to mask each element, and the fold increase of full-length SMN transcripts containing exon 7 were compared. The most potent negative SREs are at intron 7 (in descending order): ISS-N1, 3′ splice site of exon 8 (ex8 3′ss) and ISS+100. Dual-targeting AONs were subsequently used to mask two nonadjacent SREs simultaneously. Notably, masking of both ISS-N1 and ex8 3′ss induced the highest fold increase of full-length SMN transcripts and proteins. Therefore, efforts should be directed towards the two elements simultaneously for the development of optimal AONs for SMA therapy. PMID:24317636

  10. Post-entrapment genome engineering: first exon size does not affect the expression of fusion transcripts generated by gene entrapment.

    PubMed

    Osipovich, Anna B; Singh, Aparna; Ruley, H Earl

    2005-03-01

    Gene trap mutagenesis in mouse embryonic stem cells has been widely used for genome-wide studies of mammalian gene function. However, while large numbers of genes can be disrupted, individual mutations may suffer from limitations due to the structure and/or placement of targeting vector. To extend the utility of gene trap mutagenesis, replaceable 3' [or poly(A)] gene trap vectors were developed that permit sequences inserted in individual entrapment clones to be engineered by Cre-mediated recombination. 3' traps incorporating different drug resistance genes could be readily exchanged, simply by selecting for the drug-resistance gene of the replacement vector. By substituting different 3' traps, we show that otherwise identical fusion genes containing a large first exon (804 nt) are not expressed at appreciably lower levels than genes expressing small first exons (384 and 151 nt). Thus, size appears to have less effect on the expression and processing of first exons than has been reported for internal exons. Finally, a retroviral poly(A) trap (consisting of a RNA polymerase II promoter, a neomycin-resistance gene, and 5'-splice site) typically produced mutagenized clones in which vector sequences spliced to the 3'-terminal exons of cellular transcription units, suggesting strong selection for fusion transcripts that evade nonsense-mediated decay. The efficient exchange of poly(A) traps should greatly extend the utility of mutant libraries generated by gene entrapment and provides new strategies to study the rules that govern the expression of exons inserted throughout the genome.

  11. TGF-beta(1) regulation of human AT(1) receptor mRNA splice variants harboring exon 2.

    PubMed

    Martin, Mickey M; Buckenberger, Jessica A; Knoell, Daren L; Strauch, Arthur R; Elton, Terry S

    2006-04-25

    At least four alternatively spliced mRNAs can be synthesized from the human AT(1)R (hAT(1)R) gene that differ only in the inclusion or exclusion of exon 2 and/or 3. RT-PCR experiments demonstrate that splice variants harboring exon 2 accounts for at least 30% of all the hAT(1)R mRNA transcripts expressed in the human tissues investigated. Since exon 2 contains two upstream AUGs or open reading frames (uORFs), we hypothesized that these AUGs would inhibit the translation of the downstream hAT(1)R protein ORF harbored in exon 4. This study demonstrates that the inclusion of exon 2 in hAT(1)R mRNA transcripts dramatically reduces hAT(1)R protein levels (nine-fold) and significantly attenuates Ang II responsiveness ( approximately four-fold). Interestingly, only when both AUGs were mutated in combination were the hAT(1)R density and Ang II signaling levels comparable with those values obtained using mRNA splice variants that did not include exon 2. This observation is consistent with a model where the majority of the ribosomes likely translate uORF#1 and are then unable to reinitiate at the downstream hAT(1)R ORF, in part due to the presence of AUG#2 and to the short intercistronic spacing. Importantly, TGF-beta(1) treatment (4ng/ml for 4h) of fibroblasts up-regulated hAT(1)R mRNA splice variants, which harbored exon 2, six-fold. Since AT(1)R activation is closely associated with cardiovascular disease, the inclusion of exon 2 by alternative splicing represents a novel mechanism to reduce the overall production of the hAT(1)R protein and possibly limit the potential pathological effects of AT(1)R activation.

  12. Auditory event-related potentials (P3a, P3b) and genetic variants within the dopamine and serotonin system in healthy females.

    PubMed

    Heitland, I; Kenemans, J L; Oosting, R S; Baas, J M P; Böcker, K B E

    2013-07-15

    The late positive components of the human event-related brain potential comprise electrocortical reflections of stimulus-driven attentional capture (the anteriorly distributed P3a) and top-down control detection of relevant events (the posteriorly distributed P3b). As of yet, the neuropharmacologic and neurogenetic origin of the P3a and P3b is not fully understood. In this study, we address the contribution of dopaminergic and serotoninergic mechanisms. Sixty healthy females completed an active auditory novelty oddball paradigm while EEG was recorded. In all subjects, genetic polymorphisms within the dopamine system (dopamine transporter [DAT1], catecholamine-O-methyltransferase val158met [COMT val158met]) and the serotonin system (serotonin transporter [5HTTLPR]) were assessed. Across genotypes, novels (relative to standards) elicited a fronto-centrally distributed P3a, and targets (relative to standards) a parieto-centrally distributed P3b. Genotypes effects were observed for both P3a (COMT, 5HTTPLR) and P3b (DAT1, COMT, 5HTTLPR) only at prefrontal electrode location (Fz). Specifically, the frontal P3a was enhanced in COMT met/met homozygotes, but not in DAT1 9R. The target-related P3b was enhanced in COMT met/met and DAT1 9R relative to its genetic counterparts, but only at frontal electrodes. This 'anteriorized' enhancement may reflect either an additional frontal component in the target-related P3 dependent on dopamine, or a more subtle shift in the neural ensemble that generates the target-related P3. Results for 5HTTLPR short allele homozygotes mimicked those in COMT met/met homozygotes. In all, the present findings suggest involvement of frontal-cortical dopaminergic and serotoninergic mechanisms in bottom-up attentional capture (COMT val158met, 5HTTLPR), with an additional top-down component sensitive to striatal signals (DAT1). Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Amblyopic-related frontal changes in an orientation discrimination task: a research of P3a event-related potentials in anisometropic amblyopia

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, J; Yang, XB; Wang, JL; Wang, SJ; Gong, R; Zheng, Z; Liu, LQ

    2016-01-01

    Background: Amblyopic deficits in the primary and secondary visual cortex have been demonstrated broadly. However, the cognitive process at late stage originating in higher brain area in amblyopes hasn’t been studied yet. The aim of this study was to investigate the late cognitive process at the frontal lobe in anisometropic amblyopes of a distinct degree, using visual event-related potential (ERP) techniques. Methods: Thirteen severe anisometropic amblyopes, 14 mild-to-moderate anisometropic amblyopes, and 13 control subjects participated in this study. Oddball paradigm (three stimuli: target, novel, and non-target stimuli) of low spatial frequency (1 cycle per degree, CPD) was used to elicit brain ERP waves. Reaction time, accuracy, latency, and amplitude of P3a waves evoked by novel stimuli at Fz electrode (the central electrode at frontal lobe), were analyzed statistically. Results: Neither accuracy nor reaction time showed significant difference among the three groups. The latency of N200 wave showed no significant difference. The latency of P3a wave was delayed in the amblyopes compared with healthy controls, but there was no significant difference between severe and mild-to-moderate amblyopes. P3a amplitude in mild-to-moderate amblyopes was significantly higher than in controls and severe amblyopes. Conclusions: Our findings indicated that the cognitive process in anisometropic amblyopes was impaired, and the compensative effect of P3a amplitude was shown in mild-to-moderate amblyopes. P3a visual ERP could become a useful tool to investigate cognitive processing in amblyopes. Hippokratia 2016, 20(1): 60-66 PMID:27895445

  14. Switching Attention Within Working Memory is Reflected in the P3a Component of the Human Event-Related Brain Potential

    PubMed Central

    Berti, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    The flexible access to information in working memory is crucial for adaptive behavior. It is assumed that this is realized by switching the focus of attention within working memory. Switching of attention is mirrored in the P3a component of the human event-related brain potential (ERP) and it has been argued that the processes reflected by the P3a are also relevant for selecting information within working memory. The aim of the present study was to further evaluate whether the P3a mirrors genuine switching of attention within working memory by applying an object switching task: Participants updated a memory list of four digits either by replacing one item with another digit or by processing the stored digit. ERPs were computed separately for two types of trials: (1) trials in which an object was repeated and (2) trials in which a switch to a new object was required in order to perform the task. Object-switch trials showed increased response times compared with repetition trials in both task conditions. In addition, switching costs were increased in the processing compared with the replacement condition. Pronounced P3a’s were obtained in switching trials but there were no difference between the two updating tasks (replacement or processing). These results were qualified by the finding that the magnitude of the visual location shift also affects the ERPs in the P3a time window. Taken together, the present pattern of results suggest that the P3a reflects an initial process of selecting information in working memory but not the memory updating itself. PMID:26779009

  15. Exon Exchange Approach to Repair Duchenne Dystrophin Transcripts

    PubMed Central

    Lorain, Stéphanie; Peccate, Cécile; Le Hir, Maëva; Garcia, Luis

    2010-01-01

    Background Trans-splicing strategies for mRNA repair involve engineered transcripts designed to anneal target mRNAs in order to interfere with their natural splicing, giving rise to mRNA chimeras where endogenous mutated exons have been replaced by exogenous replacement sequences. A number of trans-splicing molecules have already been proposed for replacing either the 5′ or the 3′ part of transcripts to be repaired. Here, we show the feasibility of RNA surgery by using a double trans-splicing approach allowing the specific substitution of a given mutated exon. Methodology/Principal Findings As a target we used a minigene encoding a fragment of the mdx dystrophin gene enclosing the mutated exon (exon 23). This minigene was cotransfected with a variety of exon exchange constructions, differing in their annealing domains. We obtained accurate and efficient replacement of exon 23 in the mRNA target. Adding up a downstream intronic splice enhancer DISE in the exon exchange molecule enhanced drastically its efficiency up to 25–45% of repair depending on the construction in use. Conclusions/Significance These results demonstrate the possibility to fix up mutated exons, refurbish deleted exons and introduce protein motifs, while keeping natural untranslated sequences, which are essential for mRNA stability and translation regulation. Conversely to the well-known exon skipping, exon exchange has the advantage to be compatible with almost any type of mutations and more generally to a wide range of genetic conditions. In particular, it allows addressing disorders caused by dominant mutations. PMID:20531943

  16. Antisense oligonucleotide-mediated exon skipping as a strategy to reduce proteolytic cleavage of ataxin-3.

    PubMed

    Toonen, Lodewijk J A; Schmidt, Iris; Luijsterburg, Martijn S; van Attikum, Haico; van Roon-Mom, Willeke M C

    2016-10-12

    Spinocerebellar ataxia type-3 (SCA3) is a neurodegenerative disorder caused by a polyglutamine repeat expansion in the ataxin-3 protein. Cleavage of mutant ataxin-3 by proteolytic enzymes yields ataxin-3 fragments containing the polyglutamine stretch. These shorter ataxin-3 fragments are thought to be involved in SCA3 pathogenesis due to their increased cellular toxicity and their involvement in formation of the characteristic neuronal aggregates. As a strategy to prevent formation of toxic cleavage fragments, we investigated an antisense oligonucleotide-mediated modification of the ataxin-3 pre-mRNA through exon skipping of exon 8 and 9, resulting in the removal of a central 88 amino acid region of the ataxin-3 protein. This removed protein region contains several predicted cleavage sites and two ubiquitin-interacting motifs. In contrast to unmodified mutant ataxin-3, the internally truncated ataxin-3 protein did not give rise to potentially toxic cleavage fragments when incubated with caspases. In vitro experiments did not show cellular toxicity of the modified ataxin-3 protein. However, the modified protein was incapable of binding poly-ubiquitin chains, which may interfere with its normal deubiquitinating function. Low exon skipping efficiencies combined with reduction in important ataxin-3 protein functions suggest that skipping of exon 8 and 9 is not a viable therapeutic option for SCA3.

  17. Antisense oligonucleotide-mediated exon skipping as a strategy to reduce proteolytic cleavage of ataxin-3

    PubMed Central

    Toonen, Lodewijk J. A.; Schmidt, Iris; Luijsterburg, Martijn S.; van Attikum, Haico; van Roon-Mom, Willeke M. C.

    2016-01-01

    Spinocerebellar ataxia type-3 (SCA3) is a neurodegenerative disorder caused by a polyglutamine repeat expansion in the ataxin-3 protein. Cleavage of mutant ataxin-3 by proteolytic enzymes yields ataxin-3 fragments containing the polyglutamine stretch. These shorter ataxin-3 fragments are thought to be involved in SCA3 pathogenesis due to their increased cellular toxicity and their involvement in formation of the characteristic neuronal aggregates. As a strategy to prevent formation of toxic cleavage fragments, we investigated an antisense oligonucleotide-mediated modification of the ataxin-3 pre-mRNA through exon skipping of exon 8 and 9, resulting in the removal of a central 88 amino acid region of the ataxin-3 protein. This removed protein region contains several predicted cleavage sites and two ubiquitin-interacting motifs. In contrast to unmodified mutant ataxin-3, the internally truncated ataxin-3 protein did not give rise to potentially toxic cleavage fragments when incubated with caspases. In vitro experiments did not show cellular toxicity of the modified ataxin-3 protein. However, the modified protein was incapable of binding poly-ubiquitin chains, which may interfere with its normal deubiquitinating function. Low exon skipping efficiencies combined with reduction in important ataxin-3 protein functions suggest that skipping of exon 8 and 9 is not a viable therapeutic option for SCA3. PMID:27731380

  18. Improvements to previous algorithms to predict gene structure and isoform concentrations using Affymetrix Exon arrays

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Exon arrays provide a way to measure the expression of different isoforms of genes in an organism. Most of the procedures to deal with these arrays are focused on gene expression or on exon expression. Although the only biological analytes that can be properly assigned a concentration are transcripts, there are very few algorithms that focus on them. The reason is that previously developed summarization methods do not work well if applied to transcripts. In addition, gene structure prediction, i.e., the correspondence between probes and novel isoforms, is a field which is still unexplored. Results We have modified and adapted a previous algorithm to take advantage of the special characteristics of the Affymetrix exon arrays. The structure and concentration of transcripts -some of them possibly unknown- in microarray experiments were predicted using this algorithm. Simulations showed that the suggested modifications improved both specificity (SP) and sensitivity (ST) of the predictions. The algorithm was also applied to different real datasets showing its effectiveness and the concordance with PCR validated results. Conclusions The proposed algorithm shows a substantial improvement in the performance over the previous version. This improvement is mainly due to the exploitation of the redundancy of the Affymetrix exon arrays. An R-Package of SPACE with the updated algorithms have been developed and is freely available. PMID:21110835

  19. Abnormal splicing switch of DMD's penultimate exon compromises muscle fibre maintenance in myotonic dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Rau, Frédérique; Lainé, Jeanne; Ramanoudjame, Laetitita; Ferry, Arnaud; Arandel, Ludovic; Delalande, Olivier; Jollet, Arnaud; Dingli, Florent; Lee, Kuang-Yung; Peccate, Cécile; Lorain, Stéphanie; Kabashi, Edor; Athanasopoulos, Takis; Koo, Taeyoung; Loew, Damarys; Swanson, Maurice S.; Le Rumeur, Elisabeth; Dickson, George; Allamand, Valérie; Marie, Joëlle; Furling, Denis

    2015-01-01

    Myotonic Dystrophy type 1 (DM1) is a dominant neuromuscular disease caused by nuclear-retained RNAs containing expanded CUG repeats. These toxic RNAs alter the activities of RNA splicing factors resulting in alternative splicing misregulation and muscular dysfunction. Here we show that the abnormal splicing of DMD exon 78 found in dystrophic muscles of DM1 patients is due to the functional loss of MBNL1 and leads to the re-expression of an embryonic dystrophin in place of the adult isoform. Forced expression of embryonic dystrophin in zebrafish using an exon-skipping approach severely impairs the mobility and muscle architecture. Moreover, reproducing Dmd exon 78 missplicing switch in mice induces muscle fibre remodelling and ultrastructural abnormalities including ringed fibres, sarcoplasmic masses or Z-band disorganization, which are characteristic features of dystrophic DM1 skeletal muscles. Thus, we propose that splicing misregulation of DMD exon 78 compromises muscle fibre maintenance and contributes to the progressive dystrophic process in DM1. PMID:26018658

  20. Gene identification by 3' terminal exon trapping.

    PubMed

    Krizman, D B

    1996-01-01

    3' terminal exon trapping offers a powerful and efficient technology for rendering fragments of transcribed genes from large stretches of unsequenced, vertebrate, genomic DNA. The products from this methodology are the starting point for further studies of gene discovery and analysis. Future considerations for this technology include answering questions about the degree of efficiency from various trapping substrates and whether or not this approach can be scaled up for large-scale gene discovery such as individual chromosome or whole genomic approaches. With the onset of EST database searching, the final analysis becomes a computer assay that is consistent with the future of genetics as this field continues to move towards informational experimentation based on DNA sequence.

  1. Identification of 3'-terminal exons from yeast artificial chromosomes.

    PubMed

    Krizman, D B; Hofmann, T A; DeSilva, U; Green, E D; Meltzer, P S; Trent, J M

    1995-06-01

    We report an extension of 3'-terminal exon trapping technology to the identification of transcribed sequences from yeast artificial chromosomes (YACs). A 350-kb YAC containing mouse genomic DNA was gel-purified and used as the target DNA for the 3'-terminal exon trapping strategy. A novel direct ligation/transfection approach was employed to increase the efficiency of trapping 3'-terminal exons from recombinant vector-derived chimeric mRNA. The resulting RT-PCR product was then used to generate a plasmid library. Randomly chosen individual subclones from this library were sequenced, and the results indicate that 86% met sequence criteria characteristic of 3'-terminal exons, whereas 14% were background from identified sources. PCR mapping efforts suggest eight putative last exons present within this YAC, whereas RT-PCR studies demonstrate that three reside within valid expressed sequences.

  2. Distribution bias of the sequence matching between exons and introns in exon joint and EJC binding region in C. elegans.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qiang; Li, Hong; Zhao, Xiaoqing; Zheng, Yan; Zhou, Deliang

    2015-01-07

    We propose a mechanism that there are matching relations between mRNA sequences and corresponding post-spliced introns, and introns play a significant role in the process of gene expression. In order to reveal the sequence matching features, Smith-Waterman local alignment method is used on C. elegans mRNA sequences to obtain optimal matched segments between exon-exon sequences and their corresponding introns. Distribution characters of matching frequency on exon-exon sequences and sequence characters of optimal matched segments are studied. Results show that distributions of matching frequency on exon-exon junction region have obvious differences, and the exon boundary is revealed. Distributions of the length and matching rate of optimal matched segments are consistent with sequence features of siRNA and miRNA. The optimal matched segments have special sequence characters compared with their host sequences. As for the first introns and long introns, matching frequency values of optimal matched segments with high GC content, rich CG dinucleotides and high λCG values show the minimum distribution in exon junction complex (EJC) binding region. High λCG values in optimal matched segments are main characters in distinguishing EJC binding region. Results indicate that EJC and introns have competitive and cooperative relations in the process of combining on protein coding sequences. Also intron sequences and protein coding sequences do have concerted evolution relations.

  3. Musical rhythm and pitch: a differential effect on auditory dynamics as revealed by the N1/MMN/P3a complex.

    PubMed

    Sebastian Lelo de Larrea-Mancera, E; Rodríguez-Agudelo, Yaneth; Solís-Vivanco, Rodolfo

    2017-04-04

    Music represents a complex form of human cognition. To what extent our auditory system is attuned to music is yet to be clearly understood. Our principal aim was to determine whether the neurophysiological operations underlying pre-attentive auditory change detection (N1enhancement (N1e)/Mismatch Negativity (MMN)) and the subsequent involuntary attentional reallocation (P3a) towards infrequent sound omissions, are influenced by differences in musical content. Specifically, we intended to explore any interaction effects that rhythmic and pitch dimensions of musical organization may have over these processes. Results showed that both the N1e and MMN amplitudes were differentially influenced by rhythm and pitch dimensions. MMN latencies were shorter for musical structures containing both domains. This suggests some neurocognitive independence between pitch and rhythm domains, but also calls for further address on possible interactions between both of them at the level of early, automatic auditory detection. Furthermore, results demonstrate that the N1e reflects basic sensory memory processes. Lastly, we show that the involuntary switch of attention associated with the P3a reflects a general-purpose mechanism not modulated by musical features. Altogether, the N1e/MMN/P3a complex elicited by infrequent sound omissions revealed evidence of musical influence over early stages of auditory perception.

  4. Securinine enhances SMN2 exon 7 inclusion in spinal muscular atrophy cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yu-Chia; Chang, Jan-Gowth; Liu, Ting-Yuan; Jong, Yuh-Jyh; Cheng, Wei-Lin; Yuo, Chung-Yee

    2017-04-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is an autosomal recessive disease characterized by the degeneration of motor neurons in the spinal cord, leading to muscular atrophy. SMA is caused by deletions or mutations in the survival motor neuron gene (SMN1) on chromosome 5q13. A second copy of the SMN gene (SMN2) also exists on chromosome 5, and both genes can produce functional protein. However, due to alternative splicing of the exon 7, the majority of SMN protein produced by SMN2 is truncated and unable to compensate for the loss of SMN1. Increasing full-length SMN protein production by promoting the exon 7 inclusion in SMN2 mRNA or increasing SMN2 gene transcription could be a therapeutic approach for SMA. In this study, we screened for the compounds that enhance SMN2 exon 7 inclusion by using SMN2 minigene-luciferase reporter system. We found that securinine can increase luciferase activity, indicating that securinine promoted SMN2 exon 7 inclusion. In addition, securinine increased full-length SMN2 mRNA and SMN protein expression in SMA patient-derived lymphoid cell lines. To investigate the mechanism of securinine effect on SMN2 splicing, we compared the protein levels of relevant splicing factors between securinine-treated and untreated cells. We found that securinine downregulated hnRNP A1 and Sam68 and upregulated Tra2-β1 expression. However, securinine, unlike HDAC inhibitors, did not enhance tra2-β1 gene transcription, indicating a post-transcriptional mechanism for Tra2-β1 upregulation. Furthermore, we treated SMA-like mice with securinine by i.p. injection and found that securinine treatment increased SMN2 exon 7 inclusion and SMN protein expression in the brain and spinal cord. According to our results, securinine might have the potential to become a therapeutic drug for SMA disease. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  5. A modified group I intron can function as both a ribozyme and a 5' exon in a trans-exon ligation reaction.

    PubMed

    Tasiouka, K I; Burke, J M

    1994-06-24

    Here, we show that a single RNA molecule derived from a group-I intron can provide the catalytic activity, the substrate recognition domain and the attacking nucleophile in a reaction that mimics the exon ligation step of splicing. To accomplish this reaction, we have linked a 5' exon sequence to the 3' end of an attenuated form of the self-splicing Tetrahymena rRNA intron. The ribozyme (I-E1) attacks an oligoribonucleotide analog of the 3' splice site (I'-E2) to generate a product containing ligated exons (I-E1-E2) and a small intron fragment (I'). Two modified introns were constructed and tested for activity. A construct designed to interact with the 3' splice site through intermolecular P9.0 and P10 helices was found to be inactive due to failure to form a stable ribozyme-substrate complex. A second modified intron and substrate combination was engineered, in which the complex was further stabilized by an intermolecular P9.2 helix. In this case, stable complexes and reaction products were identified. The reaction efficiency was low compared to splicing of the unmodified intron-containing precursor, and will be optimized in future experiments. Following optimization, we believe that this system may be exploited to examine the functional consequences of a wide variety of 3' splice-site modifications, and may provide the basis for development of highly selective trans-acting ribozymes.

  6. A 2-nt RNA enhancer on exon 11 promotes exon 11 inclusion of the Ron proto-oncogene.

    PubMed

    Moon, Heegyum; Cho, Sunghee; Loh, Tiing Jen; Zhou, Jianhua; Ghigna, Claudia; Biamonti, Giuseppe; Green, Michael R; Zheng, Xuexiu; Shen, Haihong

    2014-01-01

    Ron is a human receptor for the macrophage-stimulating protein (MSP). Exon 11 skipping of Ron pre-mRNA produces the Ron∆165 protein that has a deletion of a 49 amino acid region in the β-chain extracellular domain. Ron∆165 is constitutively active even in the absence of its ligand. Through stepwise deletion analysis, we identified a 2-nt RNA enhancer, which is located 74 nt upstream from the 5' splice site of exon 11, for exon 11 inclusion. Through double-base and single-base substitution analysis of the 2-nt RNA, we demonstrated that the GA, CC, UG and AC dinucleotides on exon 11, in addition to the wild-type AG sequence, function as enhancers for exon 11 inclusion of the Ron pre-mRNA.

  7. Computational definition of sequence motifs governing constitutive exon splicing.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiang H-F; Chasin, Lawrence A

    2004-06-01

    We have searched for sequence motifs that contribute to the recognition of human pre-mRNA splice sites by comparing the frequency of 8-mers in internal noncoding exons versus unspliced pseudo exons and 5' untranslated regions (5' untranslated regions [UTRs]) of transcripts of intronless genes. This type of comparison avoids the isolation of sequences that are distinguished by their protein-coding information. We classified sequence families comprising 2069 putative exonic enhancers and 974 putative exonic silencers. Representatives of each class functioned as enhancers or silencers when inserted into a test exon and assayed in transfected mammalian cells. As a class, the enhancer sequencers were more prevalent and the silencer elements less prevalent in all exons compared with introns. A survey of 58 reported exonic splicing mutations showed good agreement between the splicing phenotype and the effect of the mutation on the motifs defined here. The large number of effective sequences implied by these results suggests that sequences that influence splicing may be very abundant in pre-mRNA.

  8. Alternative splicing regulation of APP exon 7 by RBFox proteins.

    PubMed

    Alam, Shafiul; Suzuki, Hitoshi; Tsukahara, Toshifumi

    2014-12-01

    RBFox proteins are well-known alternative splicing regulators. We have shown previously that during neuronal differentiation of P19 cells induced by all-trans retinoic acid and cell aggregation, RBFox1 shows markedly increased temporal expression. To find its key splicing regulation, we examined the effect of RBFox1 on 33 previously reported and validated neuronal splicing events of P19 cells. We observed that alternative splicing of three genes, specifically, amyloid precursor protein (APP), disks large homolog 3 (DLG3), and G protein, alpha activating activity polypeptide O (GNAO1), was altered by transient RBFox1 expression in HEK293 and HeLa cells. Moreover, an RBFox1 mutant (RBFox1FA) that was unable to bind the target RNA sequence ((U)GCAUG) did not induce these splicing events. APP generates amyloid beta peptides that are involved in the pathology of Alzheimer's disease, and therefore we examined APP alternative splicing regulation by RBFox1 and other splicing regulators. Our results indicated that RBFox proteins promote the skipping of APP exon 7, but not the inclusion of exon 8. We made APP6789 minigenes and observed that two (U)GCAUG sequences, located upstream of exon 7 and in exon 7, functioned to induce skipping of exon 7 by RBFox proteins. Overall, RBFox proteins may shift APP from exon 7 containing isoforms, APP770 and APP751, toward the exon 7 lacking isoform, APP695, which is predominant in neural tissues.

  9. High correspondence between Affymetrix exon and standard expression arrays.

    PubMed

    Okoniewski, Michał J; Hey, Yvonne; Pepper, Stuart D; Miller, Crispin J

    2007-02-01

    Exon arrays aim to provide comprehensive gene expression data at the level of individual exons, similar to that provided on a per-gene basis by existing expression arrays. This report describes the performance of Affymetrix GeneChip Human Exon 1.0 ST array by using replicated RNA samples from two human cell lines, MCF7 and MCF10A, hybridized both to Exon 1.0 ST and to HG-U133 Plus2 arrays. Cross-comparison between array types requires an appropriate mapping to be found between individual probe sets. Three possible mappings were considered, reflecting different strategies for dealing with probe sets that target different parts of the same transcript. Irrespective of the mapping used, Exon 1.0 ST and HG-U133 Plus2 arrays show a high degree of correspondence. More than 80% of HG-U133 Plus2 probe sets may be mapped to the Exon chip, and fold changes are found well preserved for over 96% of those probe sets detected present. Since HG-U133 Plus2 arrays have already been extensively validated, these results lend a significant degree of confidence to exon arrays.

  10. Ameliorating pathogenesis by removing an exon containing a missense mutation: a potential exon-skipping therapy for laminopathies.

    PubMed

    Scharner, J; Figeac, N; Ellis, J A; Zammit, P S

    2015-06-01

    Exon skipping, as a therapy to restore a reading frame or switch protein isoforms, is under clinical trial. We hypothesised that removing an in-frame exon containing a mutation could also improve pathogenic phenotypes. Our model is laminopathies: incurable tissue-specific degenerative diseases associated with LMNA mutations. LMNA encodes A-type lamins, that together with B-type lamins, form the nuclear lamina. Lamins contain an alpha-helical central rod domain composed of multiple heptad repeats. Eliminating LMNA exon 3 or 5 removes six heptad repeats, so shortens, but should not otherwise significantly alter, the alpha-helix. Human Lamin A or Lamin C with a deletion corresponding to amino acids encoded by exon 5 (Lamin A/C-Δ5) localised normally in murine lmna-null cells, rescuing both nuclear shape and endogenous Lamin B1/emerin distribution. However, Lamin A carrying pathogenic mutations in exon 3 or 5, or Lamin A/C-Δ3, did not. Furthermore, Lamin A/C-Δ5 was not deleterious to wild-type cells, unlike the other Lamin A mutants including Lamin A/C-Δ3. Thus Lamin A/C-Δ5 function as effectively as wild-type Lamin A/C and better than mutant versions. Antisense oligonucleotides skipped LMNA exon 5 in human cells, demonstrating the possibility of treating certain laminopathies with this approach. This proof-of-concept is the first to report the therapeutic potential of exon skipping for diseases arising from missense mutations.

  11. 5′ exon interactions within the human spliceosome establish a framework for exon junction complex structure and assembly

    PubMed Central

    Reichert, Vienna L.; Le Hir, Hervé; Jurica, Melissa S.; Moore, Melissa J.

    2002-01-01

    A general consequence of pre-mRNA splicing is the stable deposition of several proteins 20–24 nucleotides (nt) upstream of exon–exon junctions on spliced mRNAs. This exon junction complex (EJC) contains factors involved in mRNA export, cytoplasmic localization, and nonsense-mediated mRNA decay. Here we probed the mechanism and timing of EJC assembly. Over the course of splicing, the 5′ exon is subject to numerous dynamic protein–RNA interactions involving at least nine distinct polypeptides. Within the fully assembled spliceosome, these interactions afford protection to the last 25–27 nt of the 5′ exon intermediate. Coincident with exon ligation, interactions at the 3′ end of the 5′ exon disappear, and new species associate with position −24. Mass spectrometry and Western blotting of purified H, C, and mRNP complexes revealed that at least one EJC component, REF/Aly, can interact with pre-mRNA prior to spliceosome assembly, whereas Y14, Magoh, RNPS1, UAP56, and SRm160 are found in intermediate-containing spliceosomes. Upon exon ligation, association of RNPS1, UAP56, and SRm160 is destabilized. In contrast, REF/Aly, Y14, and Magoh remain stably bound to spliced mRNA, indicating that these three proteins are components of the EJC core. PMID:12414731

  12. Exonic Mutations in the SLC12A3 Gene Cause Exon Skipping and Premature Termination in Gitelman Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Takeuchi, Yoichi; Mishima, Eikan; Shima, Hisato; Akiyama, Yasutoshi; Suzuki, Chitose; Suzuki, Takehiro; Kobayashi, Takayasu; Suzuki, Yoichi; Nakayama, Tomohiro; Takeshima, Yasuhiro; Vazquez, Norma; Ito, Sadayoshi; Gamba, Gerardo

    2015-01-01

    A variety of genetic backgrounds cause the loss of function of thiazide-sensitive sodium chloride cotransporter, encoded by SLC12A3, responsible for the phenotypes in Gitelman syndrome. Recently, the phenomenon of exon skipping, in which exonic mutations result in abnormal splicing, has been associated with various diseases. Specifically, mutations in exonic splicing enhancer (ESE) sequences can promote exon skipping. Here, we used a bioinformatics program to analyze 88 missense mutations in the SLC12A3 gene and identify candidate mutations that may induce exon skipping. The three candidate mutations that reduced ESE scores the most were further investigated by minigene assay, and two (p.A356V and p.M672I) caused abnormal splicing in vitro. Furthermore, we identified the p.M672I (c.2016G>A) mutation in a patient with Gitelman syndrome and found that this single nucleotide mutation causes exclusion of exon 16 in the SLC12A3 mRNA transcript. Functional analyses revealed that the protein encoded by the aberrant SLC12A3 transcript does not transport sodium. These results suggest that aberrant exon skipping is one previously unrecognized mechanism by which missense mutations in SLC12A3 can lead to Gitelman syndrome. PMID:25060058

  13. A Role for SMN Exon 7 Splicing in the Selective Vulnerability of Motor Neurons in Spinal Muscular Atrophy

    PubMed Central

    Ruggiu, Matteo; McGovern, Vicki L.; Lotti, Francesco; Saieva, Luciano; Li, Darrick K.; Kariya, Shingo; Monani, Umrao R.; Burghes, Arthur H. M.

    2012-01-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is an inherited motor neuron disease caused by homozygous loss of the Survival Motor Neuron 1 (SMN1) gene. In the absence of SMN1, inefficient inclusion of exon 7 in transcripts from the nearly identical SMN2 gene results in ubiquitous SMN decrease but selective motor neuron degeneration. Here we investigated whether cell type-specific differences in the efficiency of exon 7 splicing contribute to the vulnerability of SMA motor neurons. We show that normal motor neurons express markedly lower levels of full-length SMN mRNA from SMN2 than do other cells in the spinal cord. This is due to inefficient exon 7 splicing that is intrinsic to motor neurons under normal conditions. We also find that SMN depletion in mammalian cells decreases exon 7 inclusion through a negative feedback loop affecting the splicing of its own mRNA. This mechanism is active in vivo and further decreases the efficiency of exon 7 inclusion specifically in motor neurons of severe-SMA mice. Consistent with expression of lower levels of full-length SMN, we find that SMN-dependent downstream molecular defects are exacerbated in SMA motor neurons. These findings suggest a mechanism to explain the selective vulnerability of motor neurons to loss of SMN1. PMID:22037760

  14. Deletion of Dystrophin In-Frame Exon 5 Leads to a Severe Phenotype: Guidance for Exon Skipping Strategies

    PubMed Central

    Toh, Zhi Yon Charles; Thandar Aung-Htut, May; Pinniger, Gavin; Adams, Abbie M.; Krishnaswarmy, Sudarsan; Wong, Brenda L.; Fletcher, Sue; Wilton, Steve D.

    2016-01-01

    Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophy severity depends upon the nature and location of the DMD gene lesion and generally correlates with the dystrophin open reading frame. However, there are striking exceptions where an in-frame genomic deletion leads to severe pathology or protein-truncating mutations (nonsense or frame-shifting indels) manifest as mild disease. Exceptions to the dystrophin reading frame rule are usually resolved after molecular diagnosis on muscle RNA. We report a moderate/severe Becker muscular dystrophy patient with an in-frame genomic deletion of DMD exon 5. This mutation has been reported by others as resulting in Duchenne or Intermediate muscular dystrophy, and the loss of this in-frame exon in one patient led to multiple splicing events, including omission of exon 6, that disrupts the open reading frame and is consistent with a severe phenotype. The patient described has a deletion of dystrophin exon 5 that does not compromise recognition of exon 6, and although the deletion does not disrupt the reading frame, his clinical presentation is more severe than would be expected for classical Becker muscular dystrophy. We suggest that the dystrophin isoform lacking the actin-binding sequence encoded by exon 5 is compromised, reflected by the phenotype resulting from induction of this dystrophin isoform in mouse muscle in vivo. Hence, exon skipping to address DMD-causing mutations within DMD exon 5 may not yield an isoform that confers marked clinical benefit. Additional studies will be required to determine whether multi-exon skipping strategies could yield more functional dystrophin isoforms, since some BMD patients with larger in-frame deletions in this region have been reported with mild phenotypes. PMID:26745801

  15. Gene duplication followed by exon structure divergence substitutes for alternative splicing in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Lambert, Matthew J; Olsen, Kyle G; Cooper, Cynthia D

    2014-08-10

    In this study we report novel findings regarding the evolutionary relationship between gene duplication and alternative splicing, two processes that increase proteomic diversity. By studying teleost fish, we find that gene duplication followed by exon structure divergence between paralogs, but not gene duplication alone, leads to a significant reduction in alternative splicing, as measured by both the proportion of genes that undergo alternative splicing as well as mean number of transcripts per gene. Additionally, we show that this effect is independent of gene family size and gene function. Furthermore, we provide evidence that the reduction in alternative splicing may be due to the partitioning of ancestral splice forms among the duplicate genes - a form of subfunctionalization. Taken together these results indicate that exon structure evolution subsequent to gene duplication may be a common substitute for alternative splicing.

  16. Systematic identification and analysis of exonic splicing silencers.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zefeng; Rolish, Michael E; Yeo, Gene; Tung, Vivian; Mawson, Matthew; Burge, Christopher B

    2004-12-17

    Exonic splicing silencers (ESSs) are cis-regulatory elements that inhibit the use of adjacent splice sites, often contributing to alternative splicing (AS). To systematically identify ESSs, an in vivo splicing reporter system was developed to screen a library of random decanucleotides. The screen yielded 141 ESS decamers, 133 of which were unique. The silencer activity of over a dozen of these sequences was also confirmed in a heterologous exon/intron context and in a second cell type. Of the unique ESS decamers, most could be clustered into groups to yield seven putative ESS motifs, some resembling known motifs bound by hnRNPs H and A1. Potential roles of ESSs in constitutive splicing were explored using an algorithm, ExonScan, which simulates splicing based on known or putative splicing-related motifs. ExonScan and related bioinformatic analyses suggest that these ESS motifs play important roles in suppression of pseudoexons, in splice site definition, and in AS.

  17. Human glucose phosphate isomerase: Exon mapping and gene structure

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Weiming; Lee, Pauline; Beutler, E.

    1995-10-10

    The structure of the gene for human glucose phosphate isomerase (GPI) has been determined. Three GPI clones were isolated from a human genomic library by using a full-length GPI cDNA probe and were characterized. Oligonucleotides based on the known cDNA sequence were used as primers in amplification and sequence analyses. This led to the identification of the exon-intron junctions. By this approach, 18 exons and 17 introns have been identified. The exons range in size from 44 to 431 nucleotides. The intronic sequences surrounding the exons provide useful information for the identification of mutations that give rise to human GPI deficiency associated with chronic hemolytic anemia. 13 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  18. Disentangling Sources of Selection on Exonic Transcriptional Enhancers

    PubMed Central

    Agoglia, Rachel M.; Fraser, Hunter B.

    2016-01-01

    In addition to coding for proteins, exons can also impact transcription by encoding regulatory elements such as enhancers. It has been debated whether such features confer heightened selective constraint, or evolve neutrally. We have addressed this question by developing a new approach to disentangle the sources of selection acting on exonic enhancers, in which we model the evolutionary rates of every possible substitution as a function of their effects on both protein sequence and enhancer activity. In three exonic enhancers, we found no significant association between evolutionary rates and effects on enhancer activity. This suggests that despite having biochemical activity, these exonic enhancers have no detectable selective constraint, and thus are unlikely to play a major role in protein evolution. PMID:26500252

  19. Exon Silencing by UAGG Motifs in Response to Neuronal Excitation

    PubMed Central

    An, Ping; Grabowski, Paula J

    2007-01-01

    Alternative pre-mRNA splicing plays fundamental roles in neurons by generating functional diversity in proteins associated with the communication and connectivity of the synapse. The CI cassette of the NMDA R1 receptor is one of a variety of exons that show an increase in exon skipping in response to cell excitation, but the molecular nature of this splicing responsiveness is not yet understood. Here we investigate the molecular basis for the induced changes in splicing of the CI cassette exon in primary rat cortical cultures in response to KCl-induced depolarization using an expression assay with a tight neuron-specific readout. In this system, exon silencing in response to neuronal excitation was mediated by multiple UAGG-type silencing motifs, and transfer of the motifs to a constitutive exon conferred a similar responsiveness by gain of function. Biochemical analysis of protein binding to UAGG motifs in extracts prepared from treated and mock-treated cortical cultures showed an increase in nuclear hnRNP A1-RNA binding activity in parallel with excitation. Evidence for the role of the NMDA receptor and calcium signaling in the induced splicing response was shown by the use of specific antagonists, as well as cell-permeable inhibitors of signaling pathways. Finally, a wider role for exon-skipping responsiveness is shown to involve additional exons with UAGG-related silencing motifs, and transcripts involved in synaptic functions. These results suggest that, at the post-transcriptional level, excitable exons such as the CI cassette may be involved in strategies by which neurons mount adaptive responses to hyperstimulation. PMID:17298175

  20. Modulating Calcium Signals to Boost AON Exon Skipping for DMD

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-10-01

    changing DMD treatment. We have assessed whether dantrolene, an already FDA-approved drug , can boost efficacy of AON exon skipping in the context of...RNA Seq analysis to identify mechanisms of activity and specificity in order to guide discovery of second-generation skipping drugs or combinations...for DMD. Here, we will assess whether dantrolene, an FDA-approved drug already demonstrated to boost efficacy of AON exon skipping in the context of

  1. The evolution, impact and properties of exonic splice enhancers

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background In humans, much of the information specifying splice sites is not at the splice site. Exonic splice enhancers are one of the principle non-splice site motifs. Four high-throughput studies have provided a compendium of motifs that function as exonic splice enhancers, but only one, RESCUE-ESE, has been generally employed to examine the properties of enhancers. Here we consider these four datasets to ask whether there is any consensus on the properties and impacts of exonic splice enhancers. Results While only about 1% of all the identified hexamer motifs are common to all analyses we can define reasonably sized sets that are found in most datasets. These consensus intersection datasets we presume reflect the true properties of exonic splice enhancers. Given prior evidence for the properties of enhancers and splice-associated mutations, we ask for all datasets whether the exonic splice enhancers considered are purine enriched; enriched near exon boundaries; able to predict trends in relative codon usage; slow evolving at synonymous sites; rare in SNPs; associated with weak splice sites; and enriched near longer introns. While the intersect datasets match expectations, only one original dataset, RESCUE-ESE, does. Unexpectedly, a fully experimental dataset identifies motifs that commonly behave opposite to the consensus, for example, being enriched in exon cores where splice-associated mutations are rare. Conclusions Prior analyses that used the RESCUE-ESE set of hexamers captured the properties of consensus exonic splice enhancers. We estimate that at least 4% of synonymous mutations are deleterious owing to an effect on enhancer functioning. PMID:24359918

  2. Design of a tobacco exon array with application to investigate the differential cadmium accumulation property in two tobacco varieties

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background For decades the tobacco plant has served as a model organism in plant biology to answer fundamental biological questions in the areas of plant development, physiology, and genetics. Due to the lack of sufficient coverage of genomic sequences, however, none of the expressed sequence tag (EST)-based chips developed to date cover gene expression from the whole genome. The availability of Tobacco Genome Initiative (TGI) sequences provides a useful resource to build a whole genome exon array, even if the assembled sequences are highly fragmented. Here, the design of a Tobacco Exon Array is reported and an application to improve the understanding of genes regulated by cadmium (Cd) in tobacco is described. Results From the analysis and annotation of the 1,271,256 Nicotiana tabacum fasta and quality files from methyl filtered genomic survey sequences (GSS) obtained from the TGI and ~56,000 ESTs available in public databases, an exon array with 272,342 probesets was designed (four probes per exon) and tested on two selected tobacco varieties. Two tobacco varieties out of 45 accumulating low and high cadmium in leaf were identified based on the GGE biplot analysis, which is analysis of the genotype main effect (G) plus analysis of the genotype by environment interaction (GE) of eight field trials (four fields over two years) showing reproducibility across the trials. The selected varieties were grown under greenhouse conditions in two different soils and subjected to exon array analyses using root and leaf tissues to understand the genetic make-up of the Cd accumulation. Conclusions An Affymetrix Exon Array was developed to cover a large (~90%) proportion of the tobacco gene space. The Tobacco Exon Array will be available for research use through Affymetrix array catalogue. As a proof of the exon array usability, we have demonstrated that the Tobacco Exon Array is a valuable tool for studying Cd accumulation in tobacco leaves. Data from field and greenhouse

  3. Source analysis of P3a and P3b components to investigate interaction of depression and anxiety in attentional systems

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yuezhi; Wang, Wuyi; Liu, Tiebang; Ren, Lijie; Zhou, Yunfei; Yu, Changhong; Qu, Xingda; Hu, Yong

    2015-01-01

    This study examined the impact of depressive disorders, anxiety disorders and the comorbidity of these disorders on the regional electrophysiological features of brain activity. Sixty-four-channel event-related potentials (ERP) were acquired during a visual oddball task in patients with depressive disorder, patients with anxiety disorders, patients with comorbid depressive and anxiety disorders and healthy subjects. An fMRI-constrained source model was applied to ERP to identify different cortical activities in the patient and control groups. Comorbid patients showed an abnormal frontal-greater-than-parietal P3b topography in the right hemisphere and the highest P3a amplitude at frontal and central sites at the scalp midline. For P3b, depressed patients showed decreased right-lateralized activity in the precentral sulcus (PrCS) and posterior parietal cortex (PPC). Anxious patients demonstrated hyperactive prefrontal cortices (PFC). Comorbid patients presented decreased activity in the cingulate gyrus, right PrCS and right PPC and increased activity in the left PFC and left insular (INS). For P3a, hyperactive left PrCS was found in comorbid patients. Comorbid patients showed both anxiety-related and depression-related activity. A superimposition effect of depression and anxiety was identified with (1) aggravated hypo-function of the right-lateralized dorsal attention and salience networks and (2) complicated anxiety-related hyper-function of the left-lateralized ventral attention and salience networks. PMID:26598026

  4. Tdp-43 cryptic exons are highly variable between cell types.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Yun Ha; Ling, Jonathan P; Lin, Sophie Z; Donde, Aneesh N; Braunstein, Kerstin E; Majounie, Elisa; Traynor, Bryan J; LaClair, Katherine D; Lloyd, Thomas E; Wong, Philip C

    2017-02-02

    TDP-43 proteinopathy is a prominent pathological feature that occurs in a number of human diseases including amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), frontotemporal dementia (FTD), and inclusion body myositis (IBM). Our recent finding that TDP-43 represses nonconserved cryptic exons led us to ask whether cell type-specific cryptic exons could exist to impact unique molecular pathways in brain or muscle. In the present work, we investigated TDP-43's function in various mouse tissues to model disease pathogenesis. We generated mice to conditionally delete TDP-43 in excitatory neurons or skeletal myocytes and identified the cell type-specific cryptic exons associated with TDP-43 loss of function. Comparative analysis of nonconserved cryptic exons in various mouse cell types revealed that only some cryptic exons were common amongst stem cells, neurons, and myocytes; the majority of these nonconserved cryptic exons were cell type-specific. Our results suggest that in human disease, TDP-43 loss of function may impair cell type-specific pathways.

  5. Intronic motif pairs cooperate across exons to promote pre-mRNA splicing

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background A very early step in splice site recognition is exon definition, a process that is as yet poorly understood. Communication between the two ends of an exon is thought to be required for this step. We report genome-wide evidence for exons being defined through the combinatorial activity of motifs located in flanking intronic regions. Results Strongly co-occurring motifs were found to specifically reside in four intronic regions surrounding a large number of human exons. These paired motifs occur around constitutive and alternative exons but not pseudo exons. Most co-occurring motifs are limited to intronic regions within 100 nucleotides of the exon. They are preferentially associated with weaker exons. Their pairing is conserved in evolution and they exhibit a lower frequency of single nucleotide polymorphism when paired. Paired motifs display specificity with respect to distance from the exon borders and in constitutive versus alternative splicing. Many resemble binding sites for heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoproteins. Specific pairs are associated with tissue-specific genes, the higher expression of which coincides with that of the pertinent RNA binding proteins. Tested pairs acted synergistically to enhance exon inclusion, and this enhancement was found to be exon-specific. Conclusions The exon-flanking sequence pairs identified here by genomic analysis promote exon inclusion and may play a role in the exon definition step in pre-mRNA splicing. We propose a model in which multiple concerted interactions are required between exonic sequences and flanking intronic sequences to effect exon definition. PMID:20704715

  6. 5'- and 3'-terminal nucleotides in the FGFR2 ISAR splicing element core have overlapping roles in exon IIIb activation and exon IIIc repression.

    PubMed

    Jones, R B; Carstens, R P; Luo, Y; McKeehan, W L

    2001-09-01

    The cell type-specific, mutually-exclusive alternative splicing of the fibroblast growth factor receptor 2 (FGFR2) pre-mRNA is tightly regulated. A sequence termed ISAR (intronic splicing activator and repressor) has been implicated as an important cis regulatory element in both activation of exon IIIb and repression of exon IIIc splicing in epithelial cells. In order to better understand how this single sequence could have dual roles, we transfected minigenes containing a series of 2-bp mutations in the 18 3'-most nucleotides of ISAR that we refer to as the ISAR core. Transfection of cells with dual-exon (IIIb and IIIc) minigenes revealed that mutation of terminal sequences of the core led to decreased exon IIIb inclusion and increased exon IIIc inclusion. Transfection of cells with single-exon IIIb minigenes and single-exon IIIc minigenes revealed that mutation of terminal sequences of the ISAR core led to decreased exon IIIb inclusion and increased exon IIIc inclusion, respectively. Nucleotides of the ISAR core responsible for exon IIIb activation appear to overlap very closely with those required for exon IIIc repression. We describe a model in which ISAR and a 5' intronic sequence known as IAS2 form a stem structure required for simultaneous exon IIIb activation and exon IIIc repression.

  7. ExonVisualiser – application for visualization exon units in 2D and 3D protein structures

    PubMed Central

    Piwowar, Monika; Krzysztof, Porembski; Piotr, Piwowar

    2012-01-01

    The web application oriented on identification and visualization of protein regions encoded by exons is presented. The Exon Visualiser can be used for visualisation on different levels of protein structure: at the primary (sequence) level and secondary structures level, as well as at the level of tertiary protein structure. The programme is suitable for processing data for all genes which have protein expressions deposited in the PDB database. The procedure steps implemented in the application: I) loading exons sequences and theirs coordinates from GenBank file as well as protein sequences: CDS from GenBank and aminoacid sequence from PDB II) consensus sequence creation (comparing amino acid sequences form PDB file with the CDS sequence from GenBank file) III) matching exon coordinates IV) visualisation in 2D and 3D protein structures. Presented web-tool among others provides the color-coded graphical display of protein sequences and chains in three dimensional protein structures which are correlated with the corresponding exons. Availability http://149.156.12.53/ExonVisualiser/ PMID:23275735

  8. In-frame dystrophin following exon 51-skipping improves muscle pathology and function in the exon 52-deficient mdx mouse.

    PubMed

    Aoki, Yoshitsugu; Nakamura, Akinori; Yokota, Toshifumi; Saito, Takashi; Okazawa, Hitoshi; Nagata, Tetsuya; Takeda, Shin'ichi

    2010-11-01

    A promising therapeutic approach for Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is exon skipping using antisense oligonucleotides (AOs). In-frame deletions of the hinge 3 region of the dystrophin protein, which is encoded by exons 50 and 51, are predicted to cause a variety of phenotypes. Here, we performed functional analyses of muscle in the exon 52-deleted mdx (mdx52) mouse, to predict the function of in-frame dystrophin following exon 51-skipping, which leads to a protein lacking most of hinge 3. A series of AOs based on phosphorodiamidate morpholino oligomers was screened by intramuscular injection into mdx52 mice. The highest splicing efficiency was generated by a two-oligonucleotide cocktail targeting both the 5' and 3' splice sites of exon 51. After a dose-escalation study, we systemically delivered this cocktail into mdx52 mice seven times at weekly intervals. This induced 20-30% of wild-type (WT) dystrophin expression levels in all muscles, and was accompanied by amelioration of the dystrophic pathology and improvement of skeletal muscle function. Because the structure of the restored in-frame dystrophin resembles human dystrophin following exon 51-skipping, our results are encouraging for the ongoing clinical trials for DMD. Moreover, the therapeutic dose required can provide a suggestion of the theoretical equivalent dose for humans.

  9. An RRM-ZnF RNA recognition module targets RBM10 to exonic sequences to promote exon exclusion.

    PubMed

    Collins, Katherine M; Kainov, Yaroslav A; Christodolou, Evangelos; Ray, Debashish; Morris, Quaid; Hughes, Timothy; Taylor, Ian A; Makeyev, Eugene V; Ramos, Andres

    2017-04-04

    RBM10 is an RNA-binding protein that plays an essential role in development and is frequently mutated in the context of human disease. RBM10 recognizes a diverse set of RNA motifs in introns and exons and regulates alternative splicing. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying this seemingly relaxed sequence specificity are not understood and functional studies have focused on 3΄ intronic sites only. Here, we dissect the RNA code recognized by RBM10 and relate it to the splicing regulatory function of this protein. We show that a two-domain RRM1-ZnF unit recognizes a GGA-centered motif enriched in RBM10 exonic sites with high affinity and specificity and test that the interaction with these exonic sequences promotes exon skipping. Importantly, a second RRM domain (RRM2) of RBM10 recognizes a C-rich sequence, which explains its known interaction with the intronic 3΄ site of NUMB exon 9 contributing to regulation of the Notch pathway in cancer. Together, these findings explain RBM10's broad RNA specificity and suggest that RBM10 functions as a splicing regulator using two RNA-binding units with different specificities to promote exon skipping.

  10. Antisense-mediated exon skipping: a therapeutic strategy for titin-based dilated cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Gramlich, Michael; Pane, Luna Simona; Zhou, Qifeng; Chen, Zhifen; Murgia, Marta; Schötterl, Sonja; Goedel, Alexander; Metzger, Katja; Brade, Thomas; Parrotta, Elvira; Schaller, Martin; Gerull, Brenda; Thierfelder, Ludwig; Aartsma-Rus, Annemieke; Labeit, Siegfried; Atherton, John J; McGaughran, Julie; Harvey, Richard P; Sinnecker, Daniel; Mann, Matthias; Laugwitz, Karl-Ludwig; Gawaz, Meinrad Paul; Moretti, Alessandra

    2015-01-01

    Frameshift mutations in the TTN gene encoding titin are a major cause for inherited forms of dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM), a heart disease characterized by ventricular dilatation, systolic dysfunction, and progressive heart failure. To date, there are no specific treatment options for DCM patients but heart transplantation. Here, we show the beneficial potential of reframing titin transcripts by antisense oligonucleotide (AON)-mediated exon skipping in human and murine models of DCM carrying a previously identified autosomal-dominant frameshift mutation in titin exon 326. Correction of TTN reading frame in patient-specific cardiomyocytes derived from induced pluripotent stem cells rescued defective myofibril assembly and stability and normalized the sarcomeric protein expression. AON treatment in Ttn knock-in mice improved sarcomere formation and contractile performance in homozygous embryos and prevented the development of the DCM phenotype in heterozygous animals. These results demonstrate that disruption of the titin reading frame due to a truncating DCM mutation can be restored by exon skipping in both patient cardiomyocytes in vitro and mouse heart in vivo, indicating RNA-based strategies as a potential treatment option for DCM. PMID:25759365

  11. Exon junction complex subunits are required to splice Drosophila MAP kinase, a large heterochromatic gene

    PubMed Central

    Roignant, Jean-Yves; Treisman, Jessica E.

    2010-01-01

    Summary The exon junction complex (EJC) is assembled on spliced mRNAs upstream of exon-exon junctions, and can regulate their subsequent translation, localization, or degradation. We isolated mutations in Drosophila mago nashi (mago), which encodes a core EJC subunit, based on their unexpectedly specific effects on photoreceptor differentiation. Loss of Mago prevents Epidermal growth factor receptor signaling, due to a large reduction in MAPK mRNA levels. MAPK expression also requires the EJC subunits Y14 and eIF4AIII, and EJC-associated splicing factors. Mago depletion does not affect the transcription or stability of MAPK mRNA, but alters its splicing pattern. MAPK expression from an exogenous promoter requires Mago only when the template includes introns. MAPK is the primary functional target of mago in eye development; in cultured cells, Mago knockdown disproportionately affects other large genes located in heterochromatin. These data support a nuclear role for EJC components in splicing a specific subset of introns. PMID:20946982

  12. PTESFinder: a computational method to identify post-transcriptional exon shuffling (PTES) events.

    PubMed

    Izuogu, Osagie G; Alhasan, Abd A; Alafghani, Hani M; Santibanez-Koref, Mauro; Elliott, David J; Elliot, David J; Jackson, Michael S

    2016-01-13

    Transcripts, which have been subject to Post-transcriptional exon shuffling (PTES), have an exon order inconsistent with the underlying genomic sequence. These have been identified in a wide variety of tissues and cell types from many eukaryotes, and are now known to be mostly circular, cytoplasmic, and non-coding. Although there is no uniformly ascribed function, several have been shown to be involved in gene regulation. Accurate identification of these transcripts can, however, be difficult due to artefacts from a wide variety of sources. Here, we present a computational method, PTESFinder, to identify these transcripts from high throughput RNAseq data. Uniquely, it systematically excludes potential artefacts emanating from pseudogenes, segmental duplications, and template switching, and outputs both PTES and canonical exon junction counts to facilitate comparative analyses. In comparison with four existing methods, PTESFinder achieves highest specificity and comparable sensitivity at a variety of read depths. PTESFinder also identifies between 13 % and 41.6 % more structures, compared to publicly available methods recently used to identify human circular RNAs. With high sensitivity and specificity, user-adjustable filters that target known sources of false positives, and tailored output to facilitate comparison of transcript levels, PTESFinder will facilitate the discovery and analysis of these poorly understood transcripts.

  13. Macaca specific exon creation event generates a novel ZKSCAN5 transcript.

    PubMed

    Kim, Young-Hyun; Choe, Se-Hee; Song, Bong-Seok; Park, Sang-Je; Kim, Myung-Jin; Park, Young-Ho; Yoon, Seung-Bin; Lee, Youngjeon; Jin, Yeung Bae; Sim, Bo-Woong; Kim, Ji-Su; Jeong, Kang-Jin; Kim, Sun-Uk; Lee, Sang-Rae; Park, Young-Il; Huh, Jae-Won; Chang, Kyu-Tae

    2016-02-15

    ZKSCAN5 (also known as ZFP95) is a zinc-finger protein belonging to the Krűppel family. ZKSCAN5 contains a SCAN box and a KRAB A domain and is proposed to play a distinct role during spermatogenesis. In humans, alternatively spliced ZKSCAN5 transcripts with different 5'-untranslated regions (UTRs) have been identified. However, investigation of our Macaca UniGene Database revealed novel alternative ZKSCAN5 transcripts that arose due to an exon creation event. Therefore, in this study, we identified the full-length sequences of ZKSCAN5 and its alternative transcripts in Macaca spp. Additionally, we investigated different nonhuman primate sequences to elucidate the molecular mechanism underlying the exon creation event. We analyzed the evolutionary features of the ZKSCAN5 transcripts by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and genomic PCR, and by sequencing various nonhuman primate DNA and RNA samples. The exon-created transcript was only detected in the Macaca lineage (crab-eating monkey and rhesus monkey). Full-length sequence analysis by rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE) identified ten full-length transcripts and four functional isoforms of ZKSCAN5. Protein sequence analyses revealed the presence of two groups of isoforms that arose because of differences in start-codon usage. Together, our results demonstrate that there has been specific selection for a discrete set of ZKSCAN5 variants in the Macaca lineage. Furthermore, study of this locus (and perhaps others) in Macaca spp. might facilitate our understanding of the evolutionary pressures that have shaped the mechanism of exon creation in primates.

  14. Post-entrapment genome engineering: First exon size does not affect the expression of fusion transcripts generated by gene entrapment

    PubMed Central

    Osipovich, Anna B.; Singh, Aparna; Ruley, H. Earl

    2005-01-01

    Gene trap mutagenesis in mouse embryonic stem cells has been widely used for genome-wide studies of mammalian gene function. However, while large numbers of genes can be disrupted, individual mutations may suffer from limitations due to the structure and/or placement of targeting vector. To extend the utility of gene trap mutagenesis, replaceable 3′ [or poly(A)] gene trap vectors were developed that permit sequences inserted in individual entrapment clones to be engineered by Cre-mediated recombination. 3′ traps incorporating different drug resistance genes could be readily exchanged, simply by selecting for the drug-resistance gene of the replacement vector. By substituting different 3′ traps, we show that otherwise identical fusion genes containing a large first exon (804 nt) are not expressed at appreciably lower levels than genes expressing small first exons (384 and 151 nt). Thus, size appears to have less effect on the expression and processing of first exons than has been reported for internal exons. Finally, a retroviral poly(A) trap (consisting of a RNA polymerase II promoter, a neomycin-resistance gene, and 5′-splice site) typically produced mutagenized clones in which vector sequences spliced to the 3′-terminal exons of cellular transcription units, suggesting strong selection for fusion transcripts that evade nonsense-mediated decay. The efficient exchange of poly(A) traps should greatly extend the utility of mutant libraries generated by gene entrapment and provides new strategies to study the rules that govern the expression of exons inserted throughout the genome. PMID:15741512

  15. Recombinant Exon-Encoded Resilins for Elastomeric Biomaterials

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Guokui; Rivkin, Amit; Lapidot, Shaul; Hu, Xiao; Arinus, Shira B.; Dgany, Or; Shoseyov, Oded; Kaplan, David L.

    2011-01-01

    Resilin is an elastomeric protein found in specialized regions of the cuticle of most insects, providing outstanding material properties including high resilience and fatigue lifetime for insect flight and jumping needs. Two exons (1 and 3) from the resilin gene in Drosophila melanogaster were cloned and the encoded proteins expressed as soluble products in Escherichia coli. A heat and salt precipitation method was used for efficient purification of the recombinant proteins. The proteins were solution cast from water and formed into rubber-like biomaterials via horseradish peroxidase-mediated cross-linking. Comparative studies of the two proteins expressed from the two different exons were investigated by Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) and Circular Dichrosim (CD) for structural features. Little structural organization was found, suggesting structural order was not induced by the enzyme-mediateed dityrosine cross-links. Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) was used to study the elastomeric properties of the uncross-linked and cross-linked proteins. The protein from exon 1 exhibited 90% resilience in comparison to 63% for the protein from exon 3, and therefore may be the more critical domain for functional materials to mimic native resilin. Further, the cross-linking of the recombinant exon 1 via the citrate-modified photo-Fenton reaction was explored as an alternative dityrosine mediated polymerization method and resulted in both highly elastic and adhesive materials. The citrate-modified photo-Fenton system may be suitable for in-vivo applications of resilin biomaterials. PMID:21963157

  16. SMN2 exon 7 splicing is inhibited by binding of hnRNP A1 to a common ESS motif that spans the 3' splice site.

    PubMed

    Doktor, Thomas Koed; Schroeder, Lisbeth Dahl; Vested, Anne; Palmfeldt, Johan; Andersen, Henriette Skovgaard; Gregersen, Niels; Andresen, Brage Storstein

    2011-02-01

    Spinal Muscular Atrophy is caused by homozygous loss of SMN1 with phenotypic modulation by SMN2. SMN2 expresses only limited amounts of full-length transcript due to skipping of exon 7 caused by disruption of an SF2/ASF binding ESE. Additionally, hnRNP A1 has been reported to inhibit inclusion of SMN2 exon 7. We previously reported high similarity between the sequence spanning the 3' ss of SMN1 and SMN2 exon 7 and an hnRNP A1 binding ESS, which regulates MCAD exon 5 splicing. We show here that this 3' ss motif indeed functions as a crucial hnRNP A1 binding ESS, which inhibits inclusion of SMN1/2 exon 7 and is antagonized by the SMN1 ESE, but not by the inactive SMN2 sequence. Pull-down experiments revealed a specific interaction between hnRNP A1 and the 3' ss AG-dinucleotide, which could be disrupted by mutations shown to improve splicing in reporter minigenes. Genomic analyses revealed that in the human genome, 3' ss matching the SMN1/2 ESS motif region are much less abundant than 3' ss with a disrupted ESS motif. This indicates that this ESS may be a general splicing inhibitory motif, which binds hnRNP A1 and inhibits exon inclusion by binding to 3' ss harboring this ESS motif.

  17. How slow RNA polymerase II elongation favors alternative exon skipping.

    PubMed

    Dujardin, Gwendal; Lafaille, Celina; de la Mata, Manuel; Marasco, Luciano E; Muñoz, Manuel J; Le Jossic-Corcos, Catherine; Corcos, Laurent; Kornblihtt, Alberto R

    2014-05-22

    Splicing is functionally coupled to transcription, linking the rate of RNA polymerase II (Pol II) elongation and the ability of splicing factors to recognize splice sites (ss) of various strengths. In most cases, slow Pol II elongation allows weak splice sites to be recognized, leading to higher inclusion of alternative exons. Using CFTR alternative exon 9 (E9) as a model, we show here that slowing down elongation can also cause exon skipping by promoting the recruitment of the negative factor ETR-3 onto the UG-repeat at E9 3' splice site, which displaces the constitutive splicing factor U2AF65 from the overlapping polypyrimidine tract. Weakening of E9 5' ss increases ETR-3 binding at the 3' ss and subsequent E9 skipping, whereas strengthening of the 5' ss usage has the opposite effect. This indicates that a delay in the cotranscriptional emergence of the 5' ss promotes ETR-3 recruitment and subsequent inhibition of E9 inclusion.

  18. Discovery and Characterization of Human Exonic Transcriptional Regulatory Elements

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Arshad H.; Lin, Andy; Smith, Desmond J.

    2012-01-01

    We sought exonic transcriptional regulatory elements by shotgun cloning human cDNA fragments into luciferase reporter vectors and measuring the resulting expression levels in liver cells. We uncovered seven regulatory elements within coding regions and three within 3' untranslated regions (UTRs). Two of the putative regulatory elements were enhancers and eight were silencers. The regulatory elements were generally but not consistently evolutionarily conserved and also showed a trend toward decreased population diversity. Furthermore, the exonic regulatory elements were enriched in known transcription factor binding sites (TFBSs) and were associated with several histone modifications and transcriptionally relevant chromatin. Evidence was obtained for bidirectional cis-regulation of a coding region element within a tubulin gene, TUBA1B, by the transcription factors PPARA and RORA. We estimate that hundreds of exonic transcriptional regulatory elements exist, an unexpected finding that highlights a surprising multi-functionality of sequences in the human genome. PMID:23029400

  19. Large-scale remodeling of a repressed exon ribonucleoprotein to an exon definition complex active for splicing

    PubMed Central

    Wongpalee, Somsakul Pop; Vashisht, Ajay; Sharma, Shalini; Chui, Darryl; Wohlschlegel, James A; Black, Douglas L

    2016-01-01

    Polypyrimidine-tract binding protein PTBP1 can repress splicing during the exon definition phase of spliceosome assembly, but the assembly steps leading to an exon definition complex (EDC) and how PTBP1 might modulate them are not clear. We found that PTBP1 binding in the flanking introns allowed normal U2AF and U1 snRNP binding to the target exon splice sites but blocked U2 snRNP assembly in HeLa nuclear extract. Characterizing a purified PTBP1-repressed complex, as well as an active early complex and the final EDC by SILAC-MS, we identified extensive PTBP1-modulated changes in exon RNP composition. The active early complex formed in the absence of PTBP1 proceeded to assemble an EDC with the eviction of hnRNP proteins, the late recruitment of SR proteins, and binding of the U2 snRNP. These results demonstrate that during early stages of splicing, exon RNP complexes are highly dynamic with many proteins failing to bind during PTBP1 arrest. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.19743.001 PMID:27882870

  20. During in vivo maturation of eukaryotic nuclear mRNA, splicing yields excised exon circles.

    PubMed Central

    Bailleul, B

    1996-01-01

    Circular splicing has already been described on nuclear pre-mRNA for certain splice sites far apart in the multi exonic ETS-1 gene and in the single 1.2 kb exon of the Sry locus. To date, it is unclear how splice site juxtaposition occurs in normal and circular splicing. The splice site selection of an internal exon is likely to involve pairing between splice sites across that exon. Based on this, we predict that, albeit at low frequency, internal exons yield circular RNA by splicing as an error-prone mechanism of exon juxtaposition or, perhaps more interestingly, as a regulated mechanism on alternative exons. To address this question, the circular exon formation was analyzed at three ETS-1 internal exons (one alternative spliced exon and two constitutive), in human cell line and blood cell samples. Here, we show by RT-PCR and sequencing that exon circular splicing occurs at the three individual exons that we examined. RNase protection experiments suggest that there is no correlation between exon circle expression and exon skipping. PMID:8604331

  1. NextSearch: A Search Engine for Mass Spectrometry Data against a Compact Nucleotide Exon Graph.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyunwoo; Park, Heejin; Paek, Eunok

    2015-07-02

    Proteogenomics research has been using six-frame translation of the whole genome or amino acid exon graphs to overcome the limitations of reference protein sequence database; however, six-frame translation is not suitable for annotating genes that span over multiple exons, and amino acid exon graphs are not convenient to represent novel splice variants and exon skipping events between exons of incompatible reading frames. We propose a proteogenomic pipeline NextSearch (Nucleotide EXon-graph Transcriptome Search) that is based on a nucleotide exon graph. This pipeline consists of constructing a compact nucleotide exon graph that systematically incorporates novel splice variations and a search tool that identifies peptides by directly searching the nucleotide exon graph against tandem mass spectra. Because our exon graph stores nucleotide sequences, it can easily represent novel splice variations and exon skipping events between incompatible reading frame exons. Searching for peptide identification is performed against this nucleotide exon graph, without converting it into a protein sequence in FASTA format, achieving an order of magnitude reduction in the size of the sequence database storage. NextSearch outputs the proteome-genome/transcriptome mapping results in a general feature format (GFF) file, which can be visualized by public tools such as the UCSC Genome Browser.

  2. Unusual splice site mutations disrupt FANCA exon 8 definition.

    PubMed

    Mattioli, Chiara; Pianigiani, Giulia; De Rocco, Daniela; Bianco, Anna Monica Rosaria; Cappelli, Enrico; Savoia, Anna; Pagani, Franco

    2014-07-01

    The pathological role of mutations that affect not conserved splicing regulatory sequences can be difficult to determine. In a patient with Fanconi anemia, we identified two unpredictable splicing mutations that act on either sides of FANCA exon 8. In patients-derived cells and in minigene splicing assay, we showed that both an apparently benign intronic c.710-5T>C transition and the nonsense c.790C>T substitution induce almost complete exon 8 skipping. Site-directed mutagenesis experiments indicated that the c.710-5T>C transition affects a polypyrimidine tract where most of the thymidines cannot be compensated by cytidines. The c.790C>T mutation located in position -3 relative to the donor site induce exon 8 skipping in an NMD-independent manner and complementation experiments with modified U1 snRNAs showed that U1 snRNP is only partially involved in the splicing defect. Our results highlight the importance of performing splicing functional assay for correct identification of disease-causing mechanism of genomic variants and provide mechanistic insights on how these two FANCA mutations affect exon 8 definition. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. A Fast Algorithm for Exonic Regions Prediction in DNA Sequences

    PubMed Central

    Saberkari, Hamidreza; Shamsi, Mousa; Heravi, Hamed; Sedaaghi, Mohammad Hossein

    2013-01-01

    The main purpose of this paper is to introduce a fast method for gene prediction in DNA sequences based on the period-3 property in exons. First, the symbolic DNA sequences were converted to digital signal using the electron ion interaction potential method. Then, to reduce the effect of background noise in the period-3 spectrum, we used the discrete wavelet transform at three levels and applied it on the input digital signal. Finally, the Goertzel algorithm was used to extract period-3 components in the filtered DNA sequence. The proposed algorithm leads to decrease the computational complexity and hence, increases the speed of the process. Detection of small size exons in DNA sequences, exactly, is another advantage of the algorithm. The proposed algorithm ability in exon prediction was compared with several existing methods at the nucleotide level using: (i) specificity - sensitivity values; (ii) receiver operating curves (ROC); and (iii) area under ROC curve. Simulation results confirmed that the proposed method can be used as a promising tool for exon prediction in DNA sequences. PMID:24672762

  4. Identification of two point mutations and a one base deletion in exon 19 of the dystrophin gene by heteroduplex formation.

    PubMed

    Prior, T W; Papp, A C; Snyder, P J; Burghes, A H; Sedra, M S; Western, L M; Bartello, C; Mendell, J R

    1993-03-01

    Two thirds of the Duchenne muscular dystrophy population have either gene deletions or duplications. The nondeletion/duplication cases are most likely the result of point mutations or small deletions and duplications that cannot be easily identified by current strategies. The major obstacle in identifying small mutations is due to the large size of the dystrophin gene. We selectively screened 5 DMD exons containing CpG dinucleotides in 110 DMD patients without detectable deletions or duplications. Nonsenses mutations are frequently due to a C- to -T transition within a CG dinucleotide pair. To screen for the nonsense mutations, we used the heteroduplex method. Utilizing this approach, we identified 2 different nonsense mutations and a single base deletion all occurring in exon 19. This is the first report of a clustering of small mutations in the dystrophin gene.

  5. AVCRI104P3, a novel multitarget compound with cognition-enhancing and anxiolytic activities: studies in cognitively poor middle-aged mice.

    PubMed

    Giménez-Llort, L; Ratia, M; Pérez, B; Camps, P; Muñoz-Torrero, D; Badia, A; Clos, M V

    2015-06-01

    The present work describes, for the first time, the in vivo effects of the multitarget compound AVCRI104P3, a new anticholinesterasic drug with potent inhibitory effects on human AChE, human BuChE and BACE-1 activities as well as on the AChE-induced and self-induced Aβ aggregation. We characterized the behavioral effects of chronic treatment with AVCRI104P3 (0.6 μmol kg(-1), i.p., 21 days) in a sample of middle aged (12-month-old) male 129/Sv×C57BL/6 mice with poor cognitive performance, as shown by the slow acquisition curves of saline-treated animals. Besides, a comparative assessment of cognitive and non-cognitive actions was done using its in vitro equipotent doses of huprine X (0.12 μmol kg(-1)), a huperzine A-tacrine hybrid. The screening assessed locomotor activity, anxiety-like behaviors, cognitive function and side effects. The results on the 'acquisition' of spatial learning and memory show that AVCRI104P3 exerted pro-cognitive effects improving both short- and long-term processes, resulting in a fast and efficient acquisition of the place task in the Morris water maze. On the other hand, a removal test and a perceptual visual learning task indicated that both AChEIs improved short-term 'memory' as compared to saline treated mice. Both drugs elicited the same response in the corner test, but only AVCRI104P3 exhibited anxiolytic-like actions in the dark/light box test. These cognitive-enhancement and anxiolytic-like effects demostrated herein using a sample of middle-aged animals and the lack of adverse effects, strongly encourage further studies on AVCRI104P3 as a promising multitarget therapeutic agent for the treatment of cholinergic dysfunction underlying natural aging and/or dementias.

  6. Antifungal Mechanism of Action of Lactoferrin: Identification of H+-ATPase (P3A-Type) as a New Apoptotic-Cell Membrane Receptor

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Human lactoferrin (hLf) is a protein of the innate immune system which induces an apoptotic-like process in yeast. Determination of the susceptibility to lactoferrin of several yeast species under different metabolic conditions, respiratory activity, cytoplasmic ATP levels, and external medium acidification mediated by glucose assays suggested plasma membrane Pma1p (P3A-type ATPase) as the hLf molecular target. The inhibition of plasma membrane ATPase activity by hLf and the identification of Pma1p as the hLf-binding membrane protein confirmed the previous physiological evidence. Consistent with this, cytoplasmic ATP levels progressively increased in hLf-treated Candida albicans cells. However, oligomycin, a specific inhibitor of the mitochondrial F-type ATPase proton pump (mtATPase), abrogated the antifungal activity of hLf, indicating a crucial role for mtATPase in the apoptotic process. We suggest that lactoferrin targeted plasma membrane Pma1p H+-ATPase, perturbing the cytoplasmic ion homeostasis (i.e., cytoplasmic H+ accumulation and subsequent K+ efflux) and inducing a lethal mitochondrial dysfunction. This initial event involved a normal mitochondrial ATP synthase activity responsible for both the ATP increment and subsequent hypothetical mitochondrial proton flooding process. We conclude that human lactoferrin inhibited Pma1p H+-ATPase, inducing an apoptotic-like process in metabolically active yeast. Involvement of mitochondrial H+-ATPase (nonreverted) was essential for the progress of this programmed cell death in which the ionic homeostasis perturbation seems to precede classical nonionic apoptotic events. PMID:27139463

  7. Deep RNA sequencing reveals the smallest known mitochondrial micro exon in animals: The placozoan cox1 single base pair exon.

    PubMed

    Osigus, Hans-Jürgen; Eitel, Michael; Schierwater, Bernd

    2017-01-01

    The phylum Placozoa holds a key position for our understanding of the evolution of mitochondrial genomes in Metazoa. Placozoans possess large mitochondrial genomes which harbor several remarkable characteristics such as a fragmented cox1 gene and trans-splicing cox1 introns. A previous study also suggested the existence of cox1 mRNA editing in Trichoplax adhaerens, yet the only formally described species in the phylum Placozoa. We have analyzed RNA-seq data of the undescribed sister species, Placozoa sp. H2 ("Panama" clone), with special focus on the mitochondrial mRNA. While we did not find support for a previously postulated cox1 mRNA editing mechanism, we surprisingly found two independent transcripts representing intermediate cox1 mRNA splicing stages. Both transcripts consist of partial cox1 exon as well as overlapping intron fragments. The data suggest that the cox1 gene harbors a single base pair (cytosine) micro exon. Furthermore, conserved group I intron structures flank this unique micro exon also in other placozoans. We discuss the evolutionary origin of this micro exon in the context of a self-splicing intron gain in the cox1 gene of the last common ancestor of extant placozoans.

  8. Selection preserves Ubiquitin Specific Protease 4 alternative exon skipping in therian mammals.

    PubMed

    Vlasschaert, Caitlyn; Xia, Xuhua; Gray, Douglas A

    2016-02-02

    Ubiquitin specific protease 4 (USP4) is a highly networked deubiquitinating enzyme with reported roles in cancer, innate immunity and RNA splicing. In mammals it has two dominant isoforms arising from inclusion or skipping of exon 7 (E7). We evaluated two plausible mechanisms for the generation of these isoforms: (A) E7 skipping due to a long upstream intron and (B) E7 skipping due to inefficient 5' splice sites (5'SS) and/or branchpoint sites (BPS). We then assessed whether E7 alternative splicing is maintained by selective pressure or arose from genetic drift. Both transcript variants were generated from a USP4-E7 minigene construct with short flanking introns, an observation consistent with the second mechanism whereby differential splice signal strengths are the basis of E7 skipping. Optimization of the downstream 5'SS eliminated E7 skipping. Experimental validation of the correlation between 5'SS identity and exon skipping in vertebrates pinpointed the +6 site as the key splicing determinant. Therian mammals invariably display a 5'SS configuration favouring alternative splicing and the resulting isoforms have distinct subcellular localizations. We conclude that alternative splicing of mammalian USP4 is under selective maintenance and that long and short USP4 isoforms may target substrates in various cellular compartments.

  9. Functional classification of DNA variants by hybrid minigenes: Identification of 30 spliceogenic variants of BRCA2 exons 17 and 18

    PubMed Central

    Fraile-Bethencourt, Eugenia; Díez-Gómez, Beatriz; Acedo, Alberto; Sanz, David J.

    2017-01-01

    .8023A>G, c.8035G>T and c.8331G>A), accounting for 30.8% of all pathogenic/likely pathogenic variants of exons 17–18 at the BRCA Share database. The remaining 8 variants (c.7975A>G, c.7977-6T>G, c.7988A>T, c.7992T>A, c.8007A>G, c.8009C>T, c.8009C>G, and c.8072C>T) induced partial splicing anomalies with important ratios of the full-length transcript (≥70%), so that they remained classified as VUS. Aberrant splicing is therefore especially prevalent in BRCA2 exons 17 and 18 due to the presence of active ESEs involved in exon recognition. Splicing functional assays with minigenes are a valuable strategy for the initial characterization of the splicing outcomes and the subsequent clinical interpretation of variants of any disease-gene, although these results should be checked, whenever possible, against patient RNA. PMID:28339459

  10. EXONSAMPLER: a computer program for genome-wide and candidate gene exon sampling for targeted next-generation sequencing.

    PubMed

    Cosart, Ted; Beja-Pereira, Albano; Luikart, Gordon

    2014-11-01

    The computer program EXONSAMPLER automates the sampling of thousands of exon sequences from publicly available reference genome sequences and gene annotation databases. It was designed to provide exon sequences for the efficient, next-generation gene sequencing method called exon capture. The exon sequences can be sampled by a list of gene name abbreviations (e.g. IFNG, TLR1), or by sampling exons from genes spaced evenly across chromosomes. It provides a list of genomic coordinates (a bed file), as well as a set of sequences in fasta format. User-adjustable parameters for collecting exon sequences include a minimum and maximum acceptable exon length, maximum number of exonic base pairs (bp) to sample per gene, and maximum total bp for the entire collection. It allows for partial sampling of very large exons. It can preferentially sample upstream (5 prime) exons, downstream (3 prime) exons, both external exons, or all internal exons. It is written in the Python programming language using its free libraries. We describe the use of EXONSAMPLER to collect exon sequences from the domestic cow (Bos taurus) genome for the design of an exon-capture microarray to sequence exons from related species, including the zebu cow and wild bison. We collected ~10% of the exome (~3 million bp), including 155 candidate genes, and ~16,000 exons evenly spaced genomewide. We prioritized the collection of 5 prime exons to facilitate discovery and genotyping of SNPs near upstream gene regulatory DNA sequences, which control gene expression and are often under natural selection.

  11. Exon grafting yields a "two active-site" lysozyme.

    PubMed

    Li, Shuang; Li, Bin; Fei, Yanqun; Jiang, Dazhi; Sheng, Yongjie; Sun, Yanhong; Zhang, Jin

    2007-07-13

    The design of enzymes with enhanced stability and activity has long been a goal in protein engineering. We report a strategy to engineer an additional active site for human lysozyme, grafted the entire human lysozyme exon 2, which encodes the catalytically competent domain, into the gene at a position corresponding to an exposed loop region in the translated protein. Exon 2 grafting created a novel lysozyme with twice the activity of the wild type enzyme, equal activity came from each of the two active sites. We dissected the contributions of each active site using site-directed mutagenesis of the catalytic doublets of (E35A/D53A), circular dichroism, fluorescence spectra, and molecular modeling. Temperature and pH stability of the "two active-site" enzyme were similar to those of wild-type lysozyme. Thus, we provide a novel strategy for engineering the active site of enzymes.

  12. Alternatively spliced adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) gene transcripts that delete exons mutated in attenuated APC.

    PubMed

    Samowitz, W S; Thliveris, A; Spirio, L N; White, R

    1995-09-01

    Reverse transcription-PCR combined with either (a) restriction enzyme digestion and repeat PCR or (b) ligase chain reaction has identified two new alternatively spliced transcripts of the adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) gene. In one of these transcripts exons 1-4 and the first 16 bases of exon 5 are deleted; in the other exons 2-4 and the first 16 bases of 5 are deleted. Both transcripts use an intraexonic splice acceptor in exon 5. These transcripts delete exons mutated in attenuated APC (3 and 4) and could account for the reduction in severity of this variant.

  13. Multiple splicing defects in an intronic false exon.

    PubMed

    Sun, H; Chasin, L A

    2000-09-01

    Splice site consensus sequences alone are insufficient to dictate the recognition of real constitutive splice sites within the typically large transcripts of higher eukaryotes, and large numbers of pseudoexons flanked by pseudosplice sites with good matches to the consensus sequences can be easily designated. In an attempt to identify elements that prevent pseudoexon splicing, we have systematically altered known splicing signals, as well as immediately adjacent flanking sequences, of an arbitrarily chosen pseudoexon from intron 1 of the human hprt gene. The substitution of a 5' splice site that perfectly matches the 5' consensus combined with mutation to match the CAG/G sequence of the 3' consensus failed to get this model pseudoexon included as the central exon in a dhfr minigene context. Provision of a real 3' splice site and a consensus 5' splice site and removal of an upstream inhibitory sequence were necessary and sufficient to confer splicing on the pseudoexon. This activated context also supported the splicing of a second pseudoexon sequence containing no apparent enhancer. Thus, both the 5' splice site sequence and the polypyrimidine tract of the pseudoexon are defective despite their good agreement with the consensus. On the other hand, the pseudoexon body did not exert a negative influence on splicing. The introduction into the pseudoexon of a sequence selected for binding to ASF/SF2 or its replacement with beta-globin exon 2 only partially reversed the effect of the upstream negative element and the defective polypyrimidine tract. These results support the idea that exon-bridging enhancers are not a prerequisite for constitutive exon definition and suggest that intrinsically defective splice sites and negative elements play important roles in distinguishing the real splicing signal from the vast number of false splicing signals.

  14. Structural basis for exon recognition by a group II intron

    SciTech Connect

    Toor, Navtej; Rajashankar, Kanagalaghatta; Keating, Kevin S.; Pyle, Anna Marie

    2008-11-18

    Free group II introns are infectious retroelements that can bind and insert themselves into RNA and DNA molecules via reverse splicing. Here we report the 3.4-A crystal structure of a complex between an oligonucleotide target substrate and a group IIC intron, as well as the refined free intron structure. The structure of the complex reveals the conformation of motifs involved in exon recognition by group II introns.

  15. Detection of an exon 53 polymorphism in the dystrophin gene.

    PubMed

    Prior, T W; Papp, A C; Snyder, P J; Sedra, M S

    1993-10-01

    We utilized a heteroduplex method to screen for small mutations in Duchenne muscular dystrophy patients who did not have deletions or duplications. A dystrophin exon 53 heteroduplex band was identified in 14.4% of the affected patients. Direct sequencing of the amplified product from DNA producing the heteroduplex revealed the presence of a polymorphism in the coding region. The codon for asparagine was converted from AAT to AAC.

  16. Mutations Preventing Regulated Exon Skipping in MET Cause Osteofibrous Dysplasia

    PubMed Central

    Gray, Mary J.; Kannu, Peter; Sharma, Swarkar; Neyt, Christine; Zhang, Dongping; Paria, Nandina; Daniel, Philip B.; Whetstone, Heather; Sprenger, Hans-Georg; Hammerschmidt, Philipp; Weng, Angela; Dupuis, Lucie; Jobling, Rebekah; Mendoza-Londono, Roberto; Dray, Michael; Su, Peiqiang; Wilson, Megan J.; Kapur, Raj P.; McCarthy, Edward F.; Alman, Benjamin A.; Howard, Andrew; Somers, Gino R.; Marshall, Christian R.; Manners, Simon; Flanagan, Adrienne M.; Rathjen, Karl E.; Karol, Lori A.; Crawford, Haemish; Markie, David M.; Rios, Jonathan J.; Wise, Carol A.; Robertson, Stephen P.

    2015-01-01

    The periosteum contributes to bone repair and maintenance of cortical bone mass. In contrast to the understanding of bone development within the epiphyseal growth plate, factors that regulate periosteal osteogenesis have not been studied as intensively. Osteofibrous dysplasia (OFD) is a congenital disorder of osteogenesis and is typically sporadic and characterized by radiolucent lesions affecting the cortical bone immediately under the periosteum of the tibia and fibula. We identified germline mutations in MET, encoding a receptor tyrosine kinase, that segregate with an autosomal-dominant form of OFD in three families and a mutation in a fourth affected subject from a simplex family and with bilateral disease. Mutations identified in all families with dominant inheritance and in the one simplex subject with bilateral disease abolished the splice inclusion of exon 14 in MET transcripts, which resulted in a MET receptor (METΔ14) lacking a cytoplasmic juxtamembrane domain. Splice exclusion of this domain occurs during normal embryonic development, and forced induction of this exon-exclusion event retarded osteoblastic differentiation in vitro and inhibited bone-matrix mineralization. In an additional subject with unilateral OFD, we identified a somatic MET mutation, also affecting exon 14, that substituted a tyrosine residue critical for MET receptor turnover and, as in the case of the METΔ14 mutations, had a stabilizing effect on the mature protein. Taken together, these data show that aberrant MET regulation via the juxtamembrane domain subverts core MET receptor functions that regulate osteogenesis within cortical diaphyseal bone. PMID:26637977

  17. Human decorin gene: Intron-exon junctions and chromosomal localization

    SciTech Connect

    Vetter, U.; Young, M.F.; Fisher, L.W. ); Vogel, W.; Just, W. )

    1993-01-01

    All of the protein-encoding exons and the 3[prime]flanking region of the human decorin gene have been cloned an partially sequenced. The locations of the intron-exon junctions within the coding portion of the gene were identical to those found for the homologous human gene, biglycan. The sizes of the introns in the decorin gene, however, were substantially larger than those of the same introns of the biglycan gene. Portions of introns 1, 2, and 3 as well as exon 1 were not found during our extensive screening process. The 5[prime] end of intron 2 was found to have an AG-rich region followed immediately by a CT-rich region. Furthermore, the 5[prime] end of intron 3 was very rich in thymidine, whereas the 3[prime] end of intron 7 was rich in adenosine. Several cDNA clones constructed from cultured human bone cell mRNA were found to contain a different sequence at the 5[prime] end compared to that previously published for mRNA from a human embryonic fibroblast cell line. We were also unable to find the alternate 3[prime] flanking region of the previously published cDNA sequence. We have mapped the human decorin gene by in situ methods to chromosome 12q2l.3. 30 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  18. Naturally occurring nucleosome positioning signals in human exons and introns.

    PubMed

    Baldi, P; Brunak, S; Chauvin, Y; Krogh, A

    1996-11-08

    We describe the structural implications of a periodic pattern found in human exons and introns by hidden Markov models. We show that exons (besides the reading frame) have a specific sequential structure in the form of a pattern with triplet consensus non-T(A/T)G, and a minimal periodicity of roughly ten nucleotides. The periodic pattern is also present in intron sequences, although the strength per nucleotide is weaker. Using two independent profile methods based on triplet bendability parameters from DNase I experiments and nucleosome positioning data, we show that the pattern in multiple alignments of internal exon and intron sequences corresponds to a periodic "in phase" bending potential towards the major groove of the DNA. The nucleosome positioning data show that the consensus triplets (and their complements) have a preference for locations on a bent double helix where the major groove faces inward and is compressed. The in-phase triplets are located adjacent to GCC/GGC triplets known to have the strongest bias in their positioning on the nuclesome. Analysis of mRNA sequences encoding proteins with known tertiary structure exclude the possibility that the pattern is a consequence of the previously well-known periodicity caused by the encoding of alpha-helices in proteins. Finally, we discuss the relation between the bending potential of coding and non-coding regions and its impact on the translational positioning of nucleosomes and the recognition of genes by the transcriptional machinery.

  19. Novel exon nucleotide deletion causes adrenoleukodystrophy in a Brazilian family.

    PubMed

    Valadares, E R; Trindade, A L C; Oliveira, L R; Arantes, R R; Daker, M V; Viana, B M; Haase, V G; Jardim, L B; Lopes, G C; Godard, A L B

    2011-01-18

    Adrenoleukodystrophy is a neurodegenerative X-linked recessive disorder. It is characterized by abnormal function of peroxisomes, which leads to an accumulation of very long-chain fatty acids in plasma and tissues, especially in the cortex of adrenal glands and white matter of the central nervous system, causing demyelinating disease and adrenocortical insufficiency (Addison's disease). It is caused by a mutation in the ABCD1 gene (ATP-binding cassette, subfamily D, member 1), which encodes the protein adrenoleukodystrophy that is involved in the transport of fatty acids into the peroxisome for degradation. Variable expression has been recognized in families of patients who have this disease. A Brazilian family from Minas Gerais State, Brazil, was studied. The proband is an adult living in Minas Gerais State, Brazil; he had adrenomyeloneuropathy, adrenocortical insufficiency and a stable cerebral form. DNA was extracted from a blood sample and was sequenced to identify the mutation. The patient's exons were cloned for confirmation. A new mutation was found in exon 5 of the ABCD1 gene (c.1430delA), as well as a single-nucleotide polymorphism in exon 6. The mutation causes a frame shift, resulting in a truncated protein with almost total absence of the ATP binding domain.

  20. Therapeutic effects of exon skipping and losartan on skeletal muscle of mdx mice.

    PubMed

    Lee, Eun-Joo; Kim, Ah-Young; Lee, Eun-Mi; Lee, Myeong-Mi; Min, Chang-Woo; Kang, Kyung-Ku; Park, Jin-Kyu; Hwang, Meeyul; Kwon, Soon-Hak; Tremblay, Jacques P; Jeong, Kyu-Shik

    2014-08-01

    Various attempts have been made to find treatments for Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) patients. Exon skipping is one of the promising technologies for DMD treatment by restoring dystropin protein, which is one of the muscle components. It is well known that losartan, an angiotensin II type1 receptor blocker, promotes muscle regeneration and differentiation by lowering the level of transforming growth factor-beta1 signaling. In this study, we illustrated the combined effects of exon skipping and losartan on skeletal muscle of mdx mice. We supplied mdx mice with losartan for 2 weeks before exon skipping treatment. The losartan with the exon skipping group showed less expression of myf5 than the losartan treated group. Also the losartan with exon skipping group recovered normal muscle architecture, in contrast to the losartan group which still showed many central nuclei. However, the exon skipping efficiency and the restoration of dystrophin protein were lower in the losartan with exon skipping group compared to the exon skipping group. We reveal that losartan promotes muscle regeneration and shortens the time taken to restore normal muscle structure when combined with exon skipping. However, combined treatment of exon skipping and losartan decreases the restoration of dystrophin protein meaning decrease of exon skipping efficiency.

  1. Efficient use of a translation start codon in BDNF exon I.

    PubMed

    Koppel, Indrek; Tuvikene, Jürgen; Lekk, Ingrid; Timmusk, Tõnis

    2015-09-01

    The brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) gene contains a number of 5' exons alternatively spliced with a common 3' exon. BDNF protein is synthesized from alternative transcripts as a prepro-precursor encoded by the common 3' exon IX, which has a translation start site 21 bp downstream of the splicing site. BDNF mRNAs containing exon I are an exception to this arrangement as the last three nucleotides of this exon constitute an in-frame AUG. Here, we show that this AUG is efficiently used for translation initiation in PC12 cells and cultured cortical neurons. Use of exon I-specific AUG produces higher levels of BDNF protein than use of the common translation start site, resulting from a higher translation rate. No differences in protein degradation, constitutive or regulated secretion were detected between BDNF isoforms with alternative 5' termini. As the BDNF promoter preceding exon I is known to be highly regulated by neuronal activity, our results suggest that the function of this translation start site may be efficient stimulus-dependent synthesis of BDNF protein. The brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) gene contains multiple untranslated 5' exons alternatively spliced to one common protein-coding 3' exon. However, exon I contains an in-frame ATG in a favorable translation context. Here, we show that use of this ATG is associated with more efficient protein synthesis than the commonly used ATG in exon IX. © 2015 International Society for Neurochemistry.

  2. Exon-intron organization and sequence comparison of human and murine T11 (CD2) genes

    SciTech Connect

    Diamond, D.J.; Clayton, L.K.; Sayre, P.H.; Reinherz, E.L.

    1988-03-01

    Genomic DNA clones containing the human and murine genes coding for the 50-kDa T11 (CD2) T-cell surface glycoprotein were characterized. The human T11 gene is approx. = 12 kilobases long and comprised of five exons. A leader exon (L) contains the 5'-untranslated region and most of the nucleotides defining the signal peptide (amino acids (aa) -24 to -5). Two exons encode the extracellular segment; exon Ex1 is 321 base pairs (bp) long and codes for four residues of the leader peptide and aa 1-103 of the mature protein, and exon Ex2 is 231 bp long and encodes aa 104-180. Exon TM is 123 bp long and codes for the single transmembrane region of the molecule (aa 181-221). Exon C is a large 765-bp exon encoding virtually the entire cytoplasmic domain (aa 222-327) and the 3'-untranslated region. The murine region T11 gene has a similar organization with exon-intron boundaries essentially identical to the human gene. Substantial conservation of nucleotide sequences between species in both 5'- and 3'-gene flanking regions equivalent to that among homologous exons suggests that murine and human genes may be regulated in a similar fashion. The probable relationship of the individual T11 exons to functional and structural protein domains is discussed.

  3. Efficient internal exon recognition depends on near equal contributions from the 3' and 5' splice sites.

    PubMed

    Shepard, Peter J; Choi, Eun-A; Busch, Anke; Hertel, Klemens J

    2011-11-01

    Pre-mRNA splicing is carried out by the spliceosome, which identifies exons and removes intervening introns. In vertebrates, most splice sites are initially recognized by the spliceosome across the exon, because most exons are small and surrounded by large introns. This gene architecture predicts that efficient exon recognition depends largely on the strength of the flanking 3' and 5' splice sites. However, it is unknown if the 3' or the 5' splice site dominates the exon recognition process. Here, we test the 3' and 5' splice site contributions towards efficient exon recognition by systematically replacing the splice sites of an internal exon with sequences of different splice site strengths. We show that the presence of an optimal splice site does not guarantee exon inclusion and that the best predictor for exon recognition is the sum of both splice site scores. Using a genome-wide approach, we demonstrate that the combined 3' and 5' splice site strengths of internal exons provide a much more significant separator between constitutive and alternative exons than either the 3' or the 5' splice site strength alone.

  4. Comparison of multiple vertebrate genomes reveals the birth and evolution of human exons.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiang H-F; Chasin, Lawrence A

    2006-09-05

    Orthologous gene structures in eight vertebrate species were compared on a genomic scale to detect the birth and maturation of new internal exons during the course of evolution. We found that 40% of new human exons are alternatively spliced, and most of these are cassette exons (exons that are either included or skipped in their entirety) with low inclusion rates. This proportion decreases steadily as older and older exons are examined, even as splicing efficiency increases. Remarkably, the great majority of new cassette exons are composed of highly repeated sequences, especially Alu. Many new cassette exons are 5' untranslated exons; the proportion that code for protein increases steadily with age. New protein-coding exons evolve at a high rate, as evidenced by the initially high substitution rates (K(s) and K(a)), as well as the SNP density compared with older exons. This dynamic picture suggests that de novo recruitment rather than shuffling is the major route by which exons are added to genes, and that species-specific repeats could play a significant role in recent evolution.

  5. Emerging β-Sheet Rich Conformations in Supercompact Huntingtin Exon-1 Mutant Structures.

    PubMed

    Kang, Hongsuk; Vázquez, Francisco X; Zhang, Leili; Das, Payel; Toledo-Sherman, Leticia; Luan, Binquan; Levitt, Michael; Zhou, Ruhong

    2017-07-05

    There exists strong correlation between the extended polyglutamines (polyQ) within exon-1 of Huntingtin protein (Htt) and age onset of Huntington's disease (HD); however, the underlying molecular mechanism is still poorly understood. Here we apply extensive molecular dynamics simulations to study the folding of Htt-exon-1 across five different polyQ-lengths. We find an increase in secondary structure motifs at longer Q-lengths, including β-sheet content that seems to contribute to the formation of increasingly compact structures. More strikingly, these longer Q-lengths adopt supercompact structures as evidenced by a surprisingly small power-law scaling exponent (0.22) between the radius-of-gyration and Q-length that is substantially below expected values for compact globule structures (∼0.33) and unstructured proteins (∼0.50). Hydrogen bond analyses further revealed that the supercompact behavior of polyQ is mainly due to the "glue-like" behavior of glutamine's side chains with significantly more side chain-side chain H-bonds than regular proteins in the Protein Data Bank (PDB). The orientation of the glutamine side chains also tend to be "buried" inside, explaining why polyQ domains are insoluble on their own.

  6. A two-stage exon recognition model based on synergetic neural network.

    PubMed

    Huang, Zhehuang; Chen, Yidong

    2014-01-01

    Exon recognition is a fundamental task in bioinformatics to identify the exons of DNA sequence. Currently, exon recognition algorithms based on digital signal processing techniques have been widely used. Unfortunately, these methods require many calculations, resulting in low recognition efficiency. In order to overcome this limitation, a two-stage exon recognition model is proposed and implemented in this paper. There are three main works. Firstly, we use synergetic neural network to rapidly determine initial exon intervals. Secondly, adaptive sliding window is used to accurately discriminate the final exon intervals. Finally, parameter optimization based on artificial fish swarm algorithm is used to determine different species thresholds and corresponding adjustment parameters of adaptive windows. Experimental results show that the proposed model has better performance for exon recognition and provides a practical solution and a promising future for other recognition tasks.

  7. Use of an engineered ribozyme to produce a circular human exon.

    PubMed Central

    Mikheeva, S; Hakim-Zargar, M; Carlson, D; Jarrell, K

    1997-01-01

    We report the use of an engineered ribozyme to produce a circular human exon in vitro. Specifically, we have designed a derivative of a yeast self-splicing group II intron that is able to catalyze the formation of a circular exon encoding the first kringle domain (K1) of the human tissue plasminogen activator protein. We show that the circular K1 exon is formed with high fidelity in vitro. Furthermore, the system is designed such that the circular exon that is produced consists entirely of human exon sequence. Thus, our results demonstrate that all yeast exon sequences are dispensable for group II intron catalyzed inverse splicing. This is the first demonstration that an engineered ribozyme can be used to create a circular exon containing only human sequences, linked together at a precise desired ligation point. We expect these results to be generalizable, so that similar ribozymes can be designed to precisely create circular derivatives of any nucleotide sequence. PMID:9396820

  8. Multi-exon Skipping Using Cocktail Antisense Oligonucleotides in the Canine X-linked Muscular Dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Kuraoka, Mutsuki; Lee, Joshua J.A.; Takeda, Shin'ichi; Yokota, Toshifumi

    2016-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is one of the most common lethal genetic diseases worldwide, caused by mutations in the dystrophin (DMD) gene. Exon skipping employs short DNA/RNA-like molecules called antisense oligonucleotides (AONs) that restore the reading frame and produce shorter but functional proteins. However, exon skipping therapy faces two major hurdles: limited applicability (up to only 13% of patients can be treated with a single AON drug), and uncertain function of truncated proteins. These issues were addressed with a cocktail AON approach. While approximately 70% of DMD patients can be treated by single exon skipping (all exons combined), one could potentially treat more than 90% of DMD patients if multiple exon skipping using cocktail antisense drugs can be realized. The canine X-linked muscular dystrophy (CXMD) dog model, whose phenotype is more similar to human DMD patients, was used to test the systemic efficacy and safety of multi-exon skipping of exons 6 and 8. The CXMD dog model harbors a splice site mutation in intron 6, leading to a lack of exon 7 in dystrophin mRNA. To restore the reading frame in CXMD requires multi-exon skipping of exons 6 and 8; therefore, CXMD is a good middle-sized animal model for testing the efficacy and safety of multi-exon skipping. In the current study, a cocktail of antisense morpholinos targeting exon 6 and exon 8 was designed and it restored dystrophin expression in body-wide skeletal muscles. Methods for transfection/injection of cocktail oligos and evaluation of the efficacy and safety of multi-exon skipping in the CXMD dog model are presented. PMID:27285612

  9. Absence of an intron splicing silencer in porcine Smn1 intron 7 confers immunity to the exon skipping mutation in human SMN2.

    PubMed

    Doktor, Thomas Koed; Schrøder, Lisbeth Dahl; Andersen, Henriette Skovgaard; Brøner, Sabrina; Kitewska, Anna; Sørensen, Charlotte Brandt; Andresen, Brage Storstein

    2014-01-01

    Spinal Muscular Atrophy is caused by homozygous loss of SMN1. All patients retain at least one copy of SMN2 which produces an identical protein but at lower levels due to a silent mutation in exon 7 which results in predominant exclusion of the exon. Therapies targeting the splicing of SMN2 exon 7 have been in development for several years, and their efficacy has been measured using either in vitro cellular assays or in vivo small animal models such as mice. In this study we evaluated the potential for constructing a mini-pig animal model by introducing minimal changes in the endogenous porcine Smn1 gene to maintain the native genomic structure and regulation. We found that while a Smn2-like mutation can be introduced in the porcine Smn1 gene and can diminish the function of the ESE, it would not recapitulate the splicing pattern seen in human SMN2 due to absence of a functional ISS immediately downstream of exon 7. We investigated the ISS region and show here that the porcine ISS is inactive due to disruption of a proximal hnRNP A1 binding site, while a distal hnRNP A1 binding site remains functional but is unable to maintain the functionality of the ISS as a whole.

  10. Alternative splicing of exon 17 and a missense mutation in exon 20 of the insulin receptor gene in two brothers with a novel syndrome of insulin resistance (congenital fiber-type disproportion myopathy).

    PubMed

    Vorwerk, P; Christoffersen, C T; Müller, J; Vestergaard, H; Pedersen, O; De Meyts, P

    1999-01-01

    The insulin receptor (IR) in two brothers with a rare syndrome of congenital muscle fiber type disproportion myopathy (CFTDM) associated with diabetes and severe insulin resistance was studied. By direct sequencing of Epstein-Barr virus-transformed lymphocytes both patients were found to be compound heterozygotes for mutations in the IR gene. The maternal allele was alternatively spliced in exon 17 due to a point mutation in the -1 donor splice site of the exon. The abnormal skipping of exon 17 shifts the amino acid reading frame and leads to a truncated IR, missing the entire tyrosine kinase domain. In the correct spliced variant, the point mutation is silent and results in a normally translated IR. The paternal allele carries a missense mutation in the tyrosine kinase domain. All three cDNA variants were present in the lymphocytes of the patients. Purified IR from 293 cells overexpressing either of the two mutated receptors lacked basal or stimulated IR beta-subunit autophosphorylation. A third brother who inherited both normal alleles has an normal muscle phenotype and insulin sensitivity, suggesting a direct linkage of these IR mutations with the CFTDM phenotype.

  11. Splicing repression allows the gradual emergence of new Alu-exons in primate evolution

    PubMed Central

    Attig, Jan; Ruiz de los Mozos, Igor; Haberman, Nejc; Wang, Zhen; Emmett, Warren; Zarnack, Kathi; König, Julian; Ule, Jernej

    2016-01-01

    Alu elements are retrotransposons that frequently form new exons during primate evolution. Here, we assess the interplay of splicing repression by hnRNPC and nonsense-mediated mRNA decay (NMD) in the quality control and evolution of new Alu-exons. We identify 3100 new Alu-exons and show that NMD more efficiently recognises transcripts with Alu-exons compared to other exons with premature termination codons. However, some Alu-exons escape NMD, especially when an adjacent intron is retained, highlighting the importance of concerted repression by splicing and NMD. We show that evolutionary progression of 3' splice sites is coupled with longer repressive uridine tracts. Once the 3' splice site at ancient Alu-exons reaches a stable phase, splicing repression by hnRNPC decreases, but the exons generally remain sensitive to NMD. We conclude that repressive motifs are strongest next to cryptic exons and that gradual weakening of these motifs contributes to the evolutionary emergence of new alternative exons. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.19545.001 PMID:27861119

  12. Polyquaternium-mediated delivery of morpholino oligonucleotides for exon-skipping in vitro and in mdx mice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Mingxing; Wu, Bo; Shah, Sapana N; Lu, Peijuan; Lu, Qilong

    2017-11-01

    Antisense oligonucleotide therapy for Duchenne muscular dystrophy has shown great potential in preclinical and clinical trials, but its therapeutic applications are still limited due to inefficient delivery. In this study, we investigated a few polyquaterniums (PQs) with different size and composition for their potential to improve delivery performance of an antisense phosphorodiamidate morpholino oligomer (PMO) both in vitro and in vivo. The results showed that Luviquat(TM) series, especially PQ-1 and PQ-3, promoted the exon-skipping efficiency comparable to Endoporter-mediated PMO delivery in vitro. Significant enhancement in skipping dystrophin exon 23 has also been achieved with PQ-3 up to seven-fold when compared to PMO alone in mdx mice. Cytotoxicity of the PQs was lower than Endoporter and PEI 25 K in vitro and muscle damage not clearly detected in vivo under the tested concentrations. These results together demonstrate that the optimization of PQ in molecular size, composition and distribution of positive charges is the key factor to achieve enhanced PMO exon-skipping efficiency. The higher efficiency and lower toxicity endow polyquaternium series as AO delivery enhancing agents for treating muscular dystrophy and other diseases.

  13. Biochemical identification of new proteins involved in splicing repression at the Drosophila P-element exonic splicing silencer

    PubMed Central

    Horan, Lucas; Yasuhara, Jiro C.; Kohlstaedt, Lori A.; Rio, Donald C.

    2015-01-01

    Splicing of the Drosophila P-element third intron (IVS3) is repressed in somatic tissues due to the function of an exonic splicing silencer (ESS) complex present on the 5′ exon RNA. To comprehensively characterize the mechanisms of this alternative splicing regulation, we used biochemical fractionation and affinity purification to isolate the silencer complex assembled in vitro and identify the constituent proteins by mass spectrometry. Functional assays using splicing reporter minigenes identified the proteins hrp36 and hrp38 and the cytoplasmic poly(A)-binding protein PABPC1 as novel functional components of the splicing silencer. hrp48, PSI, and PABPC1 have high-affinity RNA-binding sites on the P-element IVS3 5′ exon, whereas hrp36 and hrp38 proteins bind with low affinity to the P-element silencer RNA. RNA pull-down and immobilized protein assays showed that hrp48 protein binding to the silencer RNA can recruit hrp36 and hrp38. These studies identified additional components that function at the P-element ESS and indicated that proteins with low-affinity RNA-binding sites can be recruited in a functional manner through interactions with a protein bound to RNA at a high-affinity binding site. These studies have implications for the role of heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoproteins (hnRNPs) in the control of alternative splicing at cis-acting regulatory sites. PMID:26545814

  14. Somatic mosaicism detected by exon-targeted, high-resolution aCGH in 10 362 consecutive cases

    PubMed Central

    Pham, Justin; Shaw, Chad; Pursley, Amber; Hixson, Patricia; Sampath, Srirangan; Roney, Erin; Gambin, Tomasz; Kang, Sung-Hae L; Bi, Weimin; Lalani, Seema; Bacino, Carlos; Lupski, James R; Stankiewicz, Pawel; Patel, Ankita; Cheung, Sau-Wai

    2014-01-01

    Somatic chromosomal mosaicism arising from post-zygotic errors is known to cause several well-defined genetic syndromes as well as contribute to phenotypic variation in diseases. However, somatic mosaicism is often under-diagnosed due to challenges in detection. We evaluated 10 362 patients with a custom-designed, exon-targeted whole-genome oligonucleotide array and detected somatic mosaicism in a total of 57 cases (0.55%). The mosaicism was characterized and confirmed by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and/or chromosome analysis. Different categories of abnormal cell lines were detected: (1) aneuploidy, including sex chromosome abnormalities and isochromosomes (22 cases), (2) ring or marker chromosomes (12 cases), (3) single deletion/duplication copy number variations (CNVs) (11 cases), (4) multiple deletion/duplication CNVs (5 cases), (5) exonic CNVs (4 cases), and (6) unbalanced translocations (3 cases). Levels of mosaicism calculated based on the array data were in good concordance with those observed by FISH (10–93%). Of the 14 cases evaluated concurrently by chromosome analysis, mosaicism was detected solely by the array in 4 cases (29%). In summary, our exon-targeted array further expands the diagnostic capability of high-resolution array comparative genomic hybridization in detecting mosaicism for cytogenetic abnormalities as well as small CNVs in disease-causing genes. PMID:24398791

  15. The Presence of HIV-1 Tat Protein Second Exon Delays Fas Protein-mediated Apoptosis in CD4+ T Lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    López-Huertas, María Rosa; Mateos, Elena; Sánchez del Cojo, María; Gómez-Esquer, Francisco; Díaz-Gil, Gema; Rodríguez-Mora, Sara; López, Juan Antonio; Calvo, Enrique; López-Campos, Guillermo; Alcamí, José; Coiras, Mayte

    2013-01-01

    HIV-1 replication is efficiently controlled by the regulator protein Tat (101 amino acids) and codified by two exons, although the first exon (1–72 amino acids) is sufficient for this process. Tat can be released to the extracellular medium, acting as a soluble pro-apoptotic factor in neighboring cells. However, HIV-1-infected CD4+ T lymphocytes show a higher resistance to apoptosis. We observed that the intracellular expression of Tat delayed FasL-mediated apoptosis in both peripheral blood lymphocytes and Jurkat cells, as it is an essential pathway to control T cell homeostasis during immune activation. Jurkat-Tat cells showed impairment in the activation of caspase-8, deficient release of mitochondrial cytochrome c, and delayed activation of both caspase-9 and -3. This protection was due to a profound deregulation of proteins that stabilized the mitochondrial membrane integrity, such as heat shock proteins, prohibitin, or nucleophosmin, as well as to the up-regulation of NF-κB-dependent anti-apoptotic proteins, such as BCL2, c-FLIPS, XIAP, and C-IAP2. These effects were observed in Jurkat expressing full-length Tat (Jurkat-Tat101) but not in Jurkat expressing the first exon of Tat (Jurkat-Tat72), proving that the second exon, and particularly the NF-κB-related motif ESKKKVE, was necessary for Tat-mediated protection against FasL apoptosis. Accordingly, the protection exerted by Tat was independent of its function as a regulator of both viral transcription and elongation. Moreover, these data proved that HIV-1 could have developed strategies to delay FasL-mediated apoptosis in infected CD4+ T lymphocytes through the expression of Tat, thus favoring the persistent replication of HIV-1 in infected T cells. PMID:23364796

  16. High expression level of Tra2-β1 is responsible for increased SMN2 exon 7 inclusion in the testis of SMA mice.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yu-Chia; Chang, Jan-Gowth; Jong, Yuh-Jyh; Liu, Ting-Yuan; Yuo, Chung-Yee

    2015-01-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is an inherited neuromuscular disease caused by deletion or mutation of SMN1 gene. All SMA patients carry a nearly identical SMN2 gene, which produces low level of SMN protein due to mRNA exon 7 exclusion. Previously, we found that the testis of SMA mice (smn-/- SMN2) expresses high level of SMN2 full-length mRNA, indicating a testis-specific mechanism for SMN2 exon 7 inclusion. To elucidate the underlying mechanism, we established primary cultures of testis cells from SMA mice and analyzed them for SMN2 exon 7 splicing. We found that primary testis cells after a 2-hour culture still expressed high level of SMN2 full-length mRNA, but the level decreased after longer cultures. We then compared the protein levels of relevant splicing factors, and found that the level of Tra2-β1 also decreased during testis cell culture, correlated with SMN2 full-length mRNA downregulation. In addition, the testis of SMA mice expressed the highest level of Tra2-β1 among the many tissues examined. Furthermore, overexpression of Tra2-β1, but not ASF/SF2, increased SMN2 minigene exon 7 inclusion in primary testis cells and spinal cord neurons, whereas knockdown of Tra2-β1 decreased SMN2 exon 7 inclusion in primary testis cells of SMA mice. Therefore, our results indicate that high expression level of Tra2-β1 is responsible for increased SMN2 exon 7 inclusion in the testis of SMA mice. This study also suggests that the expression level of Tra2-β1 may be a modifying factor of SMA disease and a potential target for SMA treatment.

  17. Quantitative evaluation of all hexamers as exonic splicing elements.

    PubMed

    Ke, Shengdong; Shang, Shulian; Kalachikov, Sergey M; Morozova, Irina; Yu, Lin; Russo, James J; Ju, Jingyue; Chasin, Lawrence A

    2011-08-01

    We describe a comprehensive quantitative measure of the splicing impact of a complete set of RNA 6-mer sequences by deep sequencing successfully spliced transcripts. All 4096 6-mers were substituted at five positions within two different internal exons in a 3-exon minigene, and millions of successfully spliced transcripts were sequenced after transfection of human cells. The results allowed the assignment of a relative splicing strength score to each mutant molecule. The effect of 6-mers on splicing often depended on their location; much of this context effect could be ascribed to the creation of different overlapping sequences at each site. Taking these overlaps into account, the splicing effect of each 6-mer could be quantified, and 6-mers could be designated as enhancers (ESEseqs) and silencers (ESSseqs), with an ESRseq score indicating their strength. Some 6-mers exhibited positional bias relative to the two splice sites. The distribution and conservation of these ESRseqs in and around human exons supported their classification. Predicted RNA secondary structure effects were also seen: Effective enhancers, silencers and 3' splice sites tend to be single stranded, and effective 5' splice sites tend to be double stranded. 6-mers that may form positive or negative synergy with another were also identified. Chromatin structure may also influence the splicing enhancement observed, as a good correspondence was found between splicing performance and the predicted nucleosome occupancy scores of 6-mers. This approach may prove of general use in defining nucleic acid regulatory motifs, substitute for functional SELEX in most cases, and provide insights about splicing mechanisms.

  18. Novel methodologies for spectral classification of exon and intron sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwan, Hon Keung; Kwan, Benjamin Y. M.; Kwan, Jennifer Y. Y.

    2012-12-01

    Digital processing of a nucleotide sequence requires it to be mapped to a numerical sequence in which the choice of nucleotide to numeric mapping affects how well its biological properties can be preserved and reflected from nucleotide domain to numerical domain. Digital spectral analysis of nucleotide sequences unfolds a period-3 power spectral value which is more prominent in an exon sequence as compared to that of an intron sequence. The success of a period-3 based exon and intron classification depends on the choice of a threshold value. The main purposes of this article are to introduce novel codes for 1-sequence numerical representations for spectral analysis and compare them to existing codes to determine appropriate representation, and to introduce novel thresholding methods for more accurate period-3 based exon and intron classification of an unknown sequence. The main findings of this study are summarized as follows: Among sixteen 1-sequence numerical representations, the K-Quaternary Code I offers an attractive performance. A windowed 1-sequence numerical representation (with window length of 9, 15, and 24 bases) offers a possible speed gain over non-windowed 4-sequence Voss representation which increases as sequence length increases. A winner threshold value (chosen from the best among two defined threshold values and one other threshold value) offers a top precision for classifying an unknown sequence of specified fixed lengths. An interpolated winner threshold value applicable to an unknown and arbitrary length sequence can be estimated from the winner threshold values of fixed length sequences with a comparable performance. In general, precision increases as sequence length increases. The study contributes an effective spectral analysis of nucleotide sequences to better reveal embedded properties, and has potential applications in improved genome annotation.

  19. SRSF2 Mutations Contribute to Myelodysplasia Through Mutant-Specific Effects on Exon Recognition

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Eunhee; Ilagan, Janine O.; Liang, Yang; Daubner, Gerrit M.; Lee, Stanley C.-W.; Ramakrishnan, Aravind; Li, Yue; Chung, Young Rock; Micol, Jean-Baptiste; Murphy, Michele; Cho, Hana; Hana, Min-Kyung; Zebari, Ahmad S.; Aumann, Shlomzion; Park, Christopher Y.; Buonamici, Silvia; Smith, Peter G.; Deeg, H. Joachim; Lobry, Camille; Aifantis, Iannis; Modis, Yorgo; Allain, Frederic H.-T.; Halene, Stephanie; Bradley, Robert K.; Abdel-Wahab, Omar

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Mutations affecting spliceosomal proteins are the most common class of mutations in patients with myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS), yet their role in MDS pathogenesis has not been delineated. Here we report that mutations affecting the splicing factor SRSF2 directly impair hematopoietic differentiation in vivo, which is not due to SRSF2 loss of function. By contrast, SRSF2 mutations alter SRSF2’s normal sequence-specific RNA binding activity, thereby altering recognition of specific exonic splicing enhancer motifs to drive recurrent mis-splicing of key hematopoietic regulators. This includes SRSF2 mutation-dependent splicing of EZH2 that triggers nonsense-mediated decay, which, in turn, results in impaired hematopoietic differentiation. These data provide a mechanistic link between a mutant spliceosomal protein, alterations in splicing of key regulators, and impaired hematopoiesis. PMID:25965569

  20. Biased exon/intron distribution of cryptic and de novo 3′ splice sites

    PubMed Central

    Královičová, Jana; Christensen, Mikkel B.; Vořechovský, Igor

    2005-01-01

    We compiled sequences of previously published aberrant 3′ splice sites (3′ss) that were generated by mutations in human disease genes. Cryptic 3′ss, defined here as those resulting from a mutation of the 3′YAG consensus, were more frequent in exons than in introns. They clustered in ∼20 nt region adjacent to authentic 3′ss, suggesting that their under-representation in introns is due to a depletion of AG dinucleotides in the polypyrimidine tract (PPT). In contrast, most aberrant 3′ss that were induced by mutations outside the 3′YAG consensus (designated ‘de novo’) were in introns. The activation of intronic de novo 3′ss was largely due to AG-creating mutations in the PPT. In contrast, exonic de novo 3′ss were more often induced by mutations improving the PPT, branchpoint sequence (BPS) or distant auxiliary signals, rather than by direct AG creation. The Shapiro–Senapathy matrix scores had a good prognostic value for cryptic, but not de novo 3′ss. Finally, AG-creating mutations in the PPT that produced aberrant 3′ss upstream of the predicted BPS in vivo shared a similar ‘BPS-new AG’ distance. Reduction of this distance and/or the strength of the new AG PPT in splicing reporter pre-mRNAs improved utilization of authentic 3′ss, suggesting that AG-creating mutations that are located closer to the BPS and are preceded by weaker PPT may result in less severe splicing defects. PMID:16141195

  1. Major histocompatibility complex class I evolution in songbirds: universal primers, rapid evolution and base compositional shifts in exon 3

    PubMed Central

    Alcaide, Miguel; Liu, Mark

    2013-01-01

    Genes of the Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) have become an important marker for the investigation of adaptive genetic variation in vertebrates because of their critical role in pathogen resistance. However, despite significant advances in the last few years the characterization of MHC variation in non-model species still remains a challenging task due to the redundancy and high variation of this gene complex. Here we report the utility of a single pair of primers for the cross-amplification of the third exon of MHC class I genes, which encodes the more polymorphic half of the peptide-binding region (PBR), in oscine passerines (songbirds; Aves: Passeriformes), a group especially challenging for MHC characterization due to the presence of large and complex MHC multigene families. In our survey, although the primers failed to amplify exon 3 from two suboscine passerine birds, they amplified exon 3 of multiple MHC class I genes in all 16 species of oscine songbirds tested, yielding a total of 120 sequences. The 16 songbird species belong to 14 different families, primarily within the Passerida, but also in the Corvida. Using a conservative approach based on the analysis of cloned amplicons (n = 16) from each species, we found between 3 and 10 MHC sequences per individual. Each allele repertoire was highly divergent, with the overall number of polymorphic sites per species ranging from 33 to 108 (out of 264 sites) and the average number of nucleotide differences between alleles ranging from 14.67 to 43.67. Our survey in songbirds allowed us to compare macroevolutionary dynamics of exon 3 between songbirds and non-passerine birds. We found compelling evidence of positive selection acting specifically upon peptide-binding codons across birds, and we estimate the strength of diversifying selection in songbirds to be about twice that in non-passerines. Analysis using comparative methods suggest weaker evidence for a higher GC content in the 3rd codon position of

  2. Hypomethylation of the interphotoreceptor retinoid-binding protein (IRBP) promotor and first exon is linked to expression of the gene.

    PubMed Central

    Albini, A; Toffenetti, J; Zhu, Z; Chader, G J; Noonan, D M

    1990-01-01

    The interphotoreceptor retinoid-binding protein (IRBP) is limited in expression to retinal photoreceptor cells and a subset of pinealocytes. We have obtained a genomic clone containing the entire coding region and 7 kb of 5' flanking sequence. As a first step in studying IRBP gene regulation we have examined the CpG methylation patterns of the entire IRBP gene in expressing and non-expressing human cells. This has been done by isolation of high molecular weight DNA from Y-79 cells grown in suspension or attached to poly-D-lysine, which synthesize IRBP at different levels, and from human lymphocytes, which were shown by northern analysis to lack IRBP message. The DNA was digested by either Hpa II, Msp I, or Hha I. Southern blots were prepared with these digests and hybridized with probes made from fragments covering the complete genomic clone. Probes from the first exon, the introns and the 3' end gave banding patterns which showed no differences between the expressing cells and the lymphocytes. A probe from the very 5' end did not give a clear banding pattern, probably due to the presence of repetitive elements in the probe. However, a Hind III probe covering the 5' flanking 3 kb and the beginning of the first exon hybridized with a 1.8 kb band in Hpa II digests of Y-79 cells which was not present in Hpa II digests of lymphocyte DNA. In addition, a 2.1-2.3 kb Hha I band was found only in the Y-79 DNA digests. Sequence analysis of the promoter region indicated that these bands were due to hypomethylation of sites within a CpG rich island from -1578 to -1108 in the promoter and hypomethylation of sites in the beginning of the first exon. A Hha I site between the CpG island and the first exon was not hypomethylated in the expressing Y-79 cells. We propose that hypomethylation of the CpG rich island of the IRBP promoter and the first exon is linked to the expression of this gene. Images PMID:2402443

  3. Random Splicing of Several Exons Caused by a Single Base Change in the Target Exon of CRISPR/Cas9 Mediated Gene Knockout

    PubMed Central

    Kapahnke, Marcel; Banning, Antje; Tikkanen, Ritva

    2016-01-01

    The clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)-associated sequence 9 (CRISPR/Cas9) system is widely used for genome editing purposes as it facilitates an efficient knockout of a specific gene in, e.g. cultured cells. Targeted double-strand breaks are introduced to the target sequence of the guide RNAs, which activates the cellular DNA repair mechanism for non-homologous-end-joining, resulting in unprecise repair and introduction of small deletions or insertions. Due to this, sequence alterations in the coding region of the target gene frequently cause frame-shift mutations, facilitating degradation of the mRNA. We here show that such CRISPR/Cas9-mediated alterations in the target exon may also result in altered splicing of the respective pre-mRNA, most likely due to mutations of splice-regulatory sequences. Using the human FLOT-1 gene as an example, we demonstrate that such altered splicing products also give rise to aberrant protein products. These may potentially function as dominant-negative proteins and thus interfere with the interpretation of the data generated with these cell lines. Since most researchers only control the consequences of CRISPR knockout at genomic and protein level, our data should encourage to also check the alterations at the mRNA level. PMID:27983621

  4. Comparative analysis identifies exonic splicing regulatory sequences--The complex definition of enhancers and silencers.

    PubMed

    Goren, Amir; Ram, Oren; Amit, Maayan; Keren, Hadas; Lev-Maor, Galit; Vig, Ida; Pupko, Tal; Ast, Gil

    2006-06-23

    Exonic splicing regulatory sequences (ESRs) are cis-acting factor binding sites that regulate constitutive and alternative splicing. A computational method based on the conservation level of wobble positions and the overabundance of sequence motifs between 46,103 human and mouse orthologous exons was developed, identifying 285 putative ESRs. Alternatively spliced exons that are either short in length or contain weak splice sites show the highest conservation level of those ESRs, especially toward the edges of exons. ESRs that are abundant in those subgroups show a different distribution between constitutively and alternatively spliced exons. Representatives of these ESRs and two SR protein binding sites were shown, experimentally, to display variable regulatory effects on alternative splicing, depending on their relative locations in the exon. This finding signifies the delicate positional effect of ESRs on alternative splicing regulation.

  5. The complete local genotype–phenotype landscape for the alternative splicing of a human exon

    PubMed Central

    Julien, Philippe; Miñana, Belén; Baeza-Centurion, Pablo; Valcárcel, Juan; Lehner, Ben

    2016-01-01

    The properties of genotype–phenotype landscapes are crucial for understanding evolution but are not characterized for most traits. Here, we present a >95% complete local landscape for a defined molecular function—the alternative splicing of a human exon (FAS/CD95 exon 6, involved in the control of apoptosis). The landscape provides important mechanistic insights, revealing that regulatory information is dispersed throughout nearly every nucleotide in an exon, that the exon is more robust to the effects of mutations than its immediate neighbours in genotype space, and that high mutation sensitivity (evolvability) will drive the rapid divergence of alternative splicing between species unless it is constrained by selection. Moreover, the extensive epistasis in the landscape predicts that exonic regulatory sequences may diverge between species even when exon inclusion levels are functionally important and conserved by selection. PMID:27161764

  6. Personalized exon skipping strategies to address clustered non-deletion dystrophin mutations.

    PubMed

    Forrest, Sarah; Meloni, Penny L; Muntoni, Francesco; Kim, Jihee; Fletcher, Sue; Wilton, Steve D

    2010-12-01

    Antisense oligomer induced exon skipping is showing promise as a therapy to reduce the severity of Duchenne muscular dystrophy. To date, the focus has been on excluding single exons flanking frame-shifting deletions in the dystrophin gene. However, a third of all Duchenne muscular dystrophy causing mutations are more subtle DNA changes. Thirty nine dystrophin exons are potentially frame-shifting and mutations in these will require the targeted removal of exon blocks to generate in-frame transcripts. We report that clustered non-deletion mutations in the dystrophin gene respond differently to different antisense oligomer preparations targeting the same dual exon block, the removal of which bypasses the mutation and restores the open reading-frame. The personalized nature of the responses to antisense oligomer application presents additional challenges to the induction of multi-exon skipping with a single oligomer preparation.

  7. Testing the exon theory of genes: the evidence from protein structure.

    PubMed

    Stoltzfus, A; Spencer, D F; Zuker, M; Logsdon, J M; Doolittle, W F

    1994-07-08

    A tendency for exons to correspond to discrete units of protein structure in protein-coding genes of ancient origin would provide clear evidence in favor of the exon theory of genes, which proposes that split genes arose not by insertion of introns into unsplit genes, but from combinations of primordial mini-genes (exons) separated by spacers (introns). Although putative examples of such correspondence have strongly influenced previous debate on the origin of introns, a general correspondence has not been rigorously proved. Objective methods for detecting correspondences were developed and applied to four examples that have been cited previously as evidence of the exon theory of genes. No significant correspondence between exons and units of protein structure was detected, suggesting that the putative correspondence does not exist and that the exon theory of genes is untenable.

  8. Exon definition as a potential negative force against intron losses in evolution.

    PubMed

    Niu, Deng-Ke

    2008-11-13

    Previous studies have indicated that the wide variation in intron density (the number of introns per gene) among different eukaryotes largely reflects varying degrees of intron loss during evolution. The most popular model, which suggests that organisms lose introns through a mechanism in which reverse-transcribed cDNA recombines with the genomic DNA, concerns only one mutational force. Using exons as the units of splicing-site recognition, exon definition constrains the length of exons. An intron-loss event results in fusion of flanking exons and thus a larger exon. The large size of the newborn exon may cause splicing errors, i.e., exon skipping, if the splicing of pre-mRNAs is initiated by exon definition. By contrast, if the splicing of pre-mRNAs is initiated by intron definition, intron loss does not matter. Exon definition may thus be a selective force against intron loss. An organism with a high frequency of exon definition is expected to experience a low rate of intron loss throughout evolution and have a high density of spliceosomal introns. The majority of spliceosomal introns in vertebrates may be maintained during evolution not because of potential functions, but because of their splicing mechanism (i.e., exon definition). Further research is required to determine whether exon definition is a negative force in maintaining the high intron density of vertebrates. This article was reviewed by Dr. Scott W. Roy (nominated by Dr. John Logsdon), Dr.Eugene V. Koonin, and Dr. Igor B. Rogozin (nominated by Dr. Mikhail Gelfand). For the full reviews,please go to the Reviewers' comments section.

  9. Non-hominid TP63 lacks retroviral LTRs but contains a novel conserved upstream exon.

    PubMed

    Beyer, Ulrike; Dobbelstein, Matthias

    2011-06-15

    We have recently identified novel isoforms of human p63, with specific expression in testicular germ cells. The synthesis of these p63 mRNA species is driven by the long terminal repeat (LTR) of the endogenous retrovirus ERV9. This LTR was inserted upstream of the previously known TP63 exons roughly 15 million years ago, leading to the expression of novel exons and the synthesis of germline-specific transactivating p63 (GTAp63) isoforms in humans and great apes (Beyer et al. Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 2011; 108:3624-9). However, this study did not reveal whether similar upstream exons can also be found in the TP63 genes of non-hominid animals. Here we performed rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE) to identify a novel upstream exon of murine TP63, located in the 5' position from the previously described start of transcription. This exon, termed "exon U3" in our previous publication, is conserved within a broad range of mammalian species, including hominids. However, in contrast to the human TP63 gene structure, the murine exon U3 represented the most upstream transcribed sequence of TP63. Murine exon U3 is then alternatively spliced to acceptor sites within exon 1 or upstream of exon 2, resulting in two different available translational start sites. p63 mRNAs comprising exon U3 are detectable in various tissues, with no particular preference for testicular cells. Thus, whereas the retroviral LTR in hominid species results in strictly germline-associated p63 isoforms, the upstream exon in non-hominids fails to confer this tissue specificity. This notion strongly supports the concept that the synthesis of a testis-specific p63 isoform is a recently acquired, unique feature of humans and great apes.

  10. Lex-SVM: exploring the potential of exon expression profiling for disease classification.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Xiongying; Zhao, Yi; Liu, Changning; Bu, Dongbo

    2011-04-01

    Exon expression profiling technologies, including exon arrays and RNA-Seq, measure the abundance of every exon in a gene. Compared with gene expression profiling technologies like 3' array, exon expression profiling technologies could detect alterations in both transcription and alternative splicing, therefore they are expected to be more sensitive in diagnosis. However, exon expression profiling also brings higher dimension, more redundancy, and significant correlation among features. Ignoring the correlation structure among exons of a gene, a popular classification method like L1-SVM selects exons individually from each gene and thus is vulnerable to noise. To overcome this limitation, we present in this paper a new variant of SVM named Lex-SVM to incorporate correlation structure among exons and known splicing patterns to promote classification performance. Specifically, we construct a new norm, ex-norm, including our prior knowledge on exon correlation structure to regularize the coefficients of a linear SVM. Lex-SVM can be solved efficiently using standard linear programming techniques. The advantage of Lex-SVM is that it can select features group-wisely, force features in a subgroup to take equal weihts and exclude the features that contradict the majority in the subgroup. Experimental results suggest that on exon expression profile, Lex-SVM is more accurate than existing methods. Lex-SVM also generates a more compact model and selects genes more consistently in cross-validation. Unlike L1-SVM selecting only one exon in a gene, Lex-SVM assigns equal weights to as many exons in a gene as possible, lending itself easier for further interpretation.

  11. Exon 10 skipping in ACAT1 caused by a novel c.949G>A mutation located at an exonic splice enhancer site.

    PubMed

    Otsuka, Hiroki; Sasai, Hideo; Nakama, Mina; Aoyama, Yuka; Abdelkreem, Elsayed; Ohnishi, Hidenori; Konstantopoulou, Vassiliki; Sass, Jörn Oliver; Fukao, Toshiyuki

    2016-11-01

    Beta-ketothiolase deficiency, also known as mitochondrial acetoacetyl-CoA thiolase (T2) deficiency, is an autosomal recessive disease caused by mutations in the acetyl‑CoA acetyltransferase 1 (ACAT1) gene. A German T2‑deficient patient that developed a severe ketoacidotic episode at the age of 11 months, was revealed to be a compound heterozygote of a previously reported null mutation, c.472A>G (p.N158D) and a novel mutation, c.949G>A (p.D317N), in ACAT1. The c.949G>A mutation was suspected to cause aberrant splicing as it is located within an exonic splicing enhancer sequence (c. 947CTGACGC) that is a potential binding site for serine/arginine‑rich splicing factor 1. A mutation in this sequence, c.951C>T, results in exon 10 skipping. A minigene construct was synthesized that included exon 9‑truncated intron 9‑exon 10‑truncated intron 10‑exon 11, and the splicing of this minigene revealed that the c.949G>A mutant construct caused exon 10 skipping in a proportion of the transcripts. Furthermore, additional substitution of G for C at the first nucleotide of exon 10 (c.941G>C) abolished the effect of the c.949G>A mutation. Transient expression analysis of the c.949G>A mutant cDNA revealed no residual T2 activity in the mutated D317N enzyme. Therefore, c.949G>A (D317N) is a pathogenic missense mutation, and diminishes the effect of an exonic splicing enhancer and causes exon 10 skipping. The present study demonstrates that a missense mutation, or even a synonymous substitution, may disrupt enzyme function by interference with splicing.

  12. Exon capture optimization in amphibians with large genomes.

    PubMed

    McCartney-Melstad, Evan; Mount, Genevieve G; Shaffer, H Bradley

    2016-09-01

    Gathering genomic-scale data efficiently is challenging for nonmodel species with large, complex genomes. Transcriptome sequencing is accessible for organisms with large genomes, and sequence capture probes can be designed from such mRNA sequences to enrich and sequence exonic regions. Maximizing enrichment efficiency is important to reduce sequencing costs, but relatively few data exist for exon capture experiments in nonmodel organisms with large genomes. Here, we conducted a replicated factorial experiment to explore the effects of several modifications to standard protocols that might increase sequence capture efficiency for amphibians and other taxa with large, complex genomes. Increasing the amounts of c0 t-1 repetitive sequence blocker and individual input DNA used in target enrichment reactions reduced the rates of PCR duplication. This reduction led to an increase in the percentage of unique reads mapping to target sequences, essentially doubling overall efficiency of the target capture from 10.4% to nearly 19.9% and rendering target capture experiments more efficient and affordable. Our results indicate that target capture protocols can be modified to efficiently screen vertebrates with large genomes, including amphibians. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Genomic V exons from whole genome shotgun data in reptiles.

    PubMed

    Olivieri, D N; von Haeften, B; Sánchez-Espinel, C; Faro, J; Gambón-Deza, F

    2014-08-01

    Reptiles and mammals diverged over 300 million years ago, creating two parallel evolutionary lineages amongst terrestrial vertebrates. In reptiles, two main evolutionary lines emerged: one gave rise to Squamata, while the other gave rise to Testudines, Crocodylia, and Aves. In this study, we determined the genomic variable (V) exons from whole genome shotgun sequencing (WGS) data in reptiles corresponding to the three main immunoglobulin (IG) loci and the four main T cell receptor (TR) loci. We show that Squamata lack the TRG and TRD genes, and snakes lack the IGKV genes. In representative species of Testudines and Crocodylia, the seven major IG and TR loci are maintained. As in mammals, genes of the IG loci can be grouped into well-defined IMGT clans through a multi-species phylogenetic analysis. We show that the reptilian IGHV and IGLV genes are distributed amongst the established mammalian clans, while their IGKV genes are found within a single clan, nearly exclusive from the mammalian sequences. The reptilian and mammalian TRAV genes cluster into six common evolutionary clades (since IMGT clans have not been defined for TR). In contrast, the reptilian TRBV genes cluster into three clades, which have few mammalian members. In this locus, the V exon sequences from mammals appear to have undergone different evolutionary diversification processes that occurred outside these shared reptilian clans. These sequences can be obtained in a freely available public repository (http://vgenerepertoire.org).

  14. Deletion of ameloblastin exon 6 is associated with amelogenesis imperfecta.

    PubMed

    Poulter, James A; Murillo, Gina; Brookes, Steven J; Smith, Claire E L; Parry, David A; Silva, Sandra; Kirkham, Jennifer; Inglehearn, Chris F; Mighell, Alan J

    2014-10-15

    Amelogenesis imperfecta (AI) describes a heterogeneous group of inherited dental enamel defects reflecting failure of normal amelogenesis. Ameloblastin (AMBN) is the second most abundant enamel matrix protein expressed during amelogenesis. The pivotal role of AMBN in amelogenesis has been confirmed experimentally using mouse models. However, no AMBN mutations have been associated with human AI. Using autozygosity mapping and exome sequencing, we identified genomic deletion of AMBN exon 6 in a second cousin consanguineous family with three of the six children having hypoplastic AI. The genomic deletion corresponds to an in-frame deletion of 79 amino acids, shortening the protein from 447 to 368 residues. Exfoliated primary teeth (unmatched to genotype) were available from family members. The most severely affected had thin, aprismatic enamel (similar to that reported in mice homozygous for Ambn lacking exons 5 and 6). Other teeth exhibited thicker but largely aprismatic enamel. One tooth had apparently normal enamel. It has been suggested that AMBN may function in bone development. No clinically obvious bone or other co-segregating health problems were identified in the family investigated. This study confirms for the first time that AMBN mutations cause non-syndromic human AI and that mouse models with disrupted Ambn function are valid.

  15. JuncDB: an exon–exon junction database

    PubMed Central

    Chorev, Michal; Guy, Lotem; Carmel, Liran

    2016-01-01

    Intron positions upon the mRNA transcript are sometimes remarkably conserved even across distantly related eukaryotic species. This has made the comparison of intron–exon architectures across orthologous transcripts a very useful tool for studying various evolutionary processes. Moreover, the wide range of functions associated with introns may confer biological meaning to evolutionary changes in gene architectures. Yet, there is currently no database that offers such comparative information. Here, we present JuncDB (http://juncdb.carmelab.huji.ac.il/), an exon–exon junction database dedicated to the comparison of architectures between orthologous transcripts. It covers nearly 40 000 sets of orthologous transcripts spanning 88 eukaryotic species. JuncDB offers a user-friendly interface, access to detailed information, instructive graphical displays of the comparative data and easy ways to download data to a local computer. In addition, JuncDB allows the analysis to be carried out either on specific genes, or at a genome-wide level for any selected group of species. PMID:26519469

  16. Exon Microarray Analysis of Human Dorsolateral Prefrontal Cortex in Alcoholism

    PubMed Central

    Manzardo, Ann M.; Gunewardena, Sumedha; Wang, Kun; Butler, Merlin G.

    2014-01-01

    Background Alcohol abuse is associated with cellular and biochemical disturbances that impact upon protein and nucleic acid synthesis, brain development, function and behavioral responses. To further characterize the genetic influences in alcoholism and the effects of alcohol consumption on gene expression, we used a highly sensitive exon microarray to examine mRNA expression in human frontal cortex of alcoholics and control males. Methods Messenger RNA was isolated from the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (dlPFC, Brodmann area 9) of 7 adult Alcoholic (6 males, 1 female, mean age 48 years) and 7 matched controls. Affymetrix Human Exon 1.0 ST Array was performed according to standard procedures and the results analyzed at the gene level. Microarray findings were validated using qRT-PCR, and the ontology of disturbed genes characterized using Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (IPA). Results Decreased mRNA expression was observed for genes involved in cellular adhesion (e.g., CTNNA3, ITGA2), transport (e.g., TF, ABCA8), nervous system development (e.g., LRP2, UGT8, GLDN) and signaling (e.g., RASGRP, LGR5) with influence over lipid and myelin synthesis (e.g., ASPA, ENPP2, KLK6). IPA identified disturbances in network functions associated with neurological disease, and development including cellular assembly and organization impacting on psychological disorders. Conclusions Our data in alcoholism support a reduction in expression of dlPFC mRNA for genes involved with neuronal growth, differentiation and signaling that targets white matter of the brain. PMID:24890784

  17. Exon Shuffling and Origin of Scorpion Venom Biodiversity

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xueli; Gao, Bin; Zhu, Shunyi

    2016-01-01

    Scorpion venom is a complex combinatorial library of peptides and proteins with multiple biological functions. A combination of transcriptomic and proteomic techniques has revealed its enormous molecular diversity, as identified by the presence of a large number of ion channel-targeted neurotoxins with different folds, membrane-active antimicrobial peptides, proteases, and protease inhibitors. Although the biodiversity of scorpion venom has long been known, how it arises remains unsolved. In this work, we analyzed the exon-intron structures of an array of scorpion venom protein-encoding genes and unexpectedly found that nearly all of these genes possess a phase-1 intron (one intron located between the first and second nucleotides of a codon) near the cleavage site of a signal sequence despite their mature peptides remarkably differ. This observation matches a theory of exon shuffling in the origin of new genes and suggests that recruitment of different folds into scorpion venom might be achieved via shuffling between body protein-coding genes and ancestral venom gland-specific genes that presumably contributed tissue-specific regulatory elements and secretory signal sequences. PMID:28035955

  18. Deletion of ameloblastin exon 6 is associated with amelogenesis imperfecta

    PubMed Central

    Poulter, James A.; Murillo, Gina; Brookes, Steven J.; Smith, Claire E. L.; Parry, David A.; Silva, Sandra; Kirkham, Jennifer; Inglehearn, Chris F.; Mighell, Alan J.

    2014-01-01

    Amelogenesis imperfecta (AI) describes a heterogeneous group of inherited dental enamel defects reflecting failure of normal amelogenesis. Ameloblastin (AMBN) is the second most abundant enamel matrix protein expressed during amelogenesis. The pivotal role of AMBN in amelogenesis has been confirmed experimentally using mouse models. However, no AMBN mutations have been associated with human AI. Using autozygosity mapping and exome sequencing, we identified genomic deletion of AMBN exon 6 in a second cousin consanguineous family with three of the six children having hypoplastic AI. The genomic deletion corresponds to an in-frame deletion of 79 amino acids, shortening the protein from 447 to 368 residues. Exfoliated primary teeth (unmatched to genotype) were available from family members. The most severely affected had thin, aprismatic enamel (similar to that reported in mice homozygous for Ambn lacking exons 5 and 6). Other teeth exhibited thicker but largely aprismatic enamel. One tooth had apparently normal enamel. It has been suggested that AMBN may function in bone development. No clinically obvious bone or other co-segregating health problems were identified in the family investigated. This study confirms for the first time that AMBN mutations cause non-syndromic human AI and that mouse models with disrupted Ambn function are valid. PMID:24858907

  19. Coding exon-structure aware realigner (CESAR) utilizes genome alignments for accurate comparative gene annotation

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Virag; Elghafari, Anas; Hiller, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Identifying coding genes is an essential step in genome annotation. Here, we utilize existing whole genome alignments to detect conserved coding exons and then map gene annotations from one genome to many aligned genomes. We show that genome alignments contain thousands of spurious frameshifts and splice site mutations in exons that are truly conserved. To overcome these limitations, we have developed CESAR (Coding Exon-Structure Aware Realigner) that realigns coding exons, while considering reading frame and splice sites of each exon. CESAR effectively avoids spurious frameshifts in conserved genes and detects 91% of shifted splice sites. This results in the identification of thousands of additional conserved exons and 99% of the exons that lack inactivating mutations match real exons. Finally, to demonstrate the potential of using CESAR for comparative gene annotation, we applied it to 188 788 exons of 19 865 human genes to annotate human genes in 99 other vertebrates. These comparative gene annotations are available as a resource (http://bds.mpi-cbg.de/hillerlab/CESAR/). CESAR (https://github.com/hillerlab/CESAR/) can readily be applied to other alignments to accurately annotate coding genes in many other vertebrate and invertebrate genomes. PMID:27016733

  20. An annotation infrastructure for the analysis and interpretation of Affymetrix exon array data.

    PubMed

    Okoniewski, Michał J; Yates, Tim; Dibben, Siân; Miller, Crispin J

    2007-01-01

    Affymetrix exon arrays contain probesets intended to target every known and predicted exon in the entire genome, posing significant challenges for high-throughput genome-wide data analysis. X:MAP http://xmap.picr.man.ac.uk, an annotation database, and exonmap http://www.bioconductor.org/packages/2.0/bioc/html/exonmap.html, a BioConductor/R package, are designed to support fine-grained analysis of exon array data. The system supports the application of standard statistical techniques, prior to the use of genome scale annotation to provide gene-, transcript- and exon-level summaries and visualization tools.

  1. An annotation infrastructure for the analysis and interpretation of Affymetrix exon array data

    PubMed Central

    Okoniewski, Michał J; Yates, Tim; Dibben, Siân; Miller, Crispin J

    2007-01-01

    Affymetrix exon arrays contain probesets intended to target every known and predicted exon in the entire genome, posing significant challenges for high-throughput genome-wide data analysis. X:MAP , an annotation database, and exonmap , a BioConductor/R package, are designed to support fine-grained analysis of exon array data. The system supports the application of standard statistical techniques, prior to the use of genome scale annotation to provide gene-, transcript- and exon-level summaries and visualization tools. PMID:17498294

  2. A Relaxed Active Site After Exon Ligation by the Group I Intron

    SciTech Connect

    Lipchock,S.; Strobel, S.

    2008-01-01

    During RNA maturation, the group I intron promotes two sequential phosphorotransfer reactions resulting in exon ligation and intron release. Here, we report the crystal structure of the intron in complex with spliced exons and two additional structures that examine the role of active-site metal ions during the second step of RNA splicing. These structures reveal a relaxed active site, in which direct metal coordination by the exons is lost after ligation, while other tertiary interactions are retained between the exon and the intron. Consistent with these structural observations, kinetic and thermodynamic measurements show that the scissile phosphate makes direct contact with metals in the ground state before exon ligation and in the transition state, but not after exon ligation. Despite no direct exonic interactions and even in the absence of the scissile phosphate, two metal ions remain bound within the active site. Together, these data suggest that release of the ligated exons from the intron is preceded by a change in substrate-metal coordination before tertiary hydrogen bonding contacts to the exons are broken.

  3. Exon deletion patterns of the dystrophin gene in 82 Vietnamese Duchenne/Becker muscular dystrophy patients.

    PubMed

    Tran, Van Khanh; Ta, Van Thanh; Vu, Dung Chi; Nguyen, Suong Thi-Bang; Do, Hai Ngoc; Ta, Minh Hieu; Tran, Thinh Huy; Matsuo, Masafumi

    2013-12-01

    Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophies (DMD/BMD) are the most common inherited muscle diseases caused by mutations in the dystrophin gene. The reading frame rule explains the genotype-phenotype relationship in DMD/BMD. In Vietnam, extensive mutation analysis has never been conducted in DMD/BMD. Here, 152 Vietnamese muscular dystrophy patients were examined for dystrophin exon deletion by amplifying 19 deletion-prone exons and deletion ends were confirmed by dystrophin cDNA analysis if necessary. The result was that 82 (54%) patients were found to have exon deletions, thus confirming exact deletion ends. A further result was that 37 patterns of deletion were classified. Deletions of exons 45-50 and 49-52 were the most common patterns identified, numbering six cases each (7.3%). The reading frame rule explained the genotype-phenotype relationship, but not five (6.1%) DMD cases. Each of five patients had deletions of exons 11-27 in common. The applicability of the therapy producing semifunctional in frame mRNA in DMD by inducing skipping of a single exon was examined. Induction of exon 51 skipping was ranked at top priority, since 16 (27%) patients were predicted to have semifunctional mRNA skipping. Exons 45 and 53 were the next ranked, with 12 (20%) and 11 (18%) patients, respectively. The largest deletion database of the dystrophin gene, established in Vietnamese DMD/BMD patients, disclosed a strong indication for exon-skipping therapy.

  4. Exon dosage analysis of parkin gene in Chinese sporadic Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Guo, Ji-Feng; Dong, Xiao-Li; Xu, Qian; Li, Nan; Yan, Xin-Xiang; Xia, Kun; Tang, Bei-Sha

    2015-09-14

    Parkin gene mutations are by far the most common mutations in both familial Parkinson's disease (PD) and sporadic PD. Approximately, 50% of parkin mutations is exon dosage mutations (i.e., deletions and duplications of entire exons). Here, we first established a MLPA assay for quick detection of parkin exon rearrangements. Then, we studied parkin exon dosage mutations in 755 Chinese sporadic PDdisease patients using the established MLPA assay. We found that there were 25 (3.3%) patients with exon dosage alterations including deletions and duplications, 20 (11.4%) patients with exon rearrangements in 178 early-onset patients, and 5 (0.86%) patients with exon rearrangement mutations in 579 later-onset patients. The percentage of individuals with parkin dosage mutations is more than 33% when the age at onset is less than 30 years old, but less than 7% when the age at onset is more than 30. In these mutations, deletion is the main mutational style, especially in exon 2-5. Our results indicated that exon dosage mutations in parkin gene might be the main cause for sporadic PD, especially in EOP.

  5. Prediction of mutant mRNA splice isoforms by information theory-based exon definition.

    PubMed

    Mucaki, Eliseos J; Shirley, Ben C; Rogan, Peter K

    2013-04-01

    Mutations that affect mRNA splicing often produce multiple mRNA isoforms, resulting in complex molecular phenotypes. Definition of an exon and its inclusion in mature mRNA relies on joint recognition of both acceptor and donor splice sites. This study predicts cryptic and exon-skipping isoforms in mRNA produced by splicing mutations from the combined information contents (R(i), which measures binding-site strength, in bits) and distribution of the splice sites defining these exons. The total information content of an exon (R(i),total) is the sum of the R(i) values of its acceptor and donor splice sites, adjusted for the self-information of the distance separating these sites, that is, the gap surprisal. Differences between total information contents of an exon (ΔR(i,total)) are predictive of the relative abundance of these exons in distinct processed mRNAs. Constraints on splice site and exon selection are used to eliminate nonconforming and poorly expressed isoforms. Molecular phenotypes are computed by the Automated Splice Site and Exon Definition Analysis (http://splice.uwo.ca) server. Predictions of splicing mutations were highly concordant (85.2%; n = 61) with published expression data. In silico exon definition analysis will contribute to streamlining assessment of abnormal and normal splice isoforms resulting from mutations. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Exon-phase symmetry and intrinsic structural disorder promote modular evolution in the human genome

    PubMed Central

    Schad, Eva; Kalmar, Lajos; Tompa, Peter

    2013-01-01

    A key signature of module exchange in the genome is phase symmetry of exons, suggestive of exon shuffling events that occurred without disrupting translation reading frame. At the protein level, intrinsic structural disorder may be another key element because disordered regions often serve as functional elements that can be effectively integrated into a protein structure. Therefore, we asked whether exon-phase symmetry in the human genome and structural disorder in the human proteome are connected, signalling such evolutionary mechanisms in the assembly of multi-exon genes. We found an elevated level of structural disorder of regions encoded by symmetric exons and a preferred symmetry of exons encoding for mostly disordered regions (>70% predicted disorder). Alternatively spliced symmetric exons tend to correspond to the most disordered regions. The genes of mostly disordered proteins (>70% predicted disorder) tend to be assembled from symmetric exons, which often arise by internal tandem duplications. Preponderance of certain types of short motifs (e.g. SH3-binding motif) and domains (e.g. high-mobility group domains) suggests that certain disordered modules have been particularly effective in exon-shuffling events. Our observations suggest that structural disorder has facilitated modular assembly of complex genes in evolution of the human genome. PMID:23460204

  7. Exon 2, 3, and 4 polymorphism of HLA-DPA1

    SciTech Connect

    Rozemuller, E.H.; Versluis, L.F.; Bouwens, A.G.M.; Tilanus, M.G.J.

    1995-01-01

    Currently HLA-DPB1 typing is mainly performed by using DNA techniques based upon the identification of exon 2 polymorphism. A direct sequencing approach has recently been described for HLA-DPB1. Cellular DP reactivity, however, may also be dependent on HLA-DPA1 polymorphism. Polymorphism of HLA-DPA1 exon 2 and exon 4 has recently been described. In contrast to previous reports all DPA1 alleles can be discriminated on the basis of exon 2 polymorphism. 7 refs., 1 fig.

  8. FOXP2: novel exons, splice variants, and CAG repeat length stability.

    PubMed

    Bruce, Heather A; Margolis, Russell L

    2002-08-01

    FOXP2 is a transcription factor containing a polyglutamine tract, a zinc-finger motif, and a forkhead DNA-binding domain. The FOXP2 gene is located on 7q31. A missense mutation in the forkhead domain (exon 14) and a balanced reciprocal translocation t(5;7)(q22;q31.2) with a breakpoint between exons 3b and 4 have recently been associated with a speech and language disorder (SPCH1). The role of FOXP2 in this neurodevelopmental disorder suggests that mutations in FOXP2 could cause other neuropsychiatric disorders. To begin investigation of this possibility, we examined the genomic structure and CAG/CAA repeat region of FOXP2. We detected little polymorphism and no expansions in the FOXP2 CAG/CAA repeat in 142 individuals with progressive movement disorders. We found evidence of alternate splice variants and six previously undetected exons: three 5' untranslated exons (s1, s2, s3), two additional untranslated exons (2a and 2b) between exons 2 and 3, a translated exon (4a) between exons 4 and 5, and a longer version of exon 10 (10+) that contains an alternate stop codon and produces a truncated protein (FOXP2-S). Our results suggest that FOXP2 spans at least 603 kb of genomic DNA, more than twice the previously defined region, and provide evidence of a promoter region flanking exon s1. This demonstration of additional FOXP2 exons and splice variants should facilitate understanding of FOXP2 function and the search for additional FOXP2 mutations.

  9. CDKN2A exon-wise deletion status and novel somatic mutations in Indian glioma patients.

    PubMed

    Sibin, M K; Bhat, Dhananjaya I; Lavanya, Ch; Manoj, M Jeru; Aakershita, S; Chetan, G K

    2014-02-01

    Over the years, deletions of CDKN2A (p16) tumor suppressor gene has been studied using FISH and multiplex PCR, with major focus on exon 2 in various cancers, and the frequency of mutation is found to be varied in different studies. In this study, we analyzed the deletion status of all three exons of p16 and frequency of exon 2 somatic point mutations in glioma from the Indian population and its clinical implications. Multiplex PCR was carried out in order to check deletion of all 3 exons in 50 glioma samples. Nonconventional PCR-SSCP analysis and sequencing was done to identify mutations in 48 cases. Deletion of at least one of the three exons of p16 INK4A was observed in ten cases (20 %). The frequencies of exon-wise deletions were 10 % for exon 1, 4 % for exon 2, and 8 % for exon 3. Two out of 48 samples were positive for mutations in p16 exon 2. One sample had a transition of G to C on position 147 with a codon change TGG to TGC which does not contribute to the protein structure. Another sample had a transversion of A to G on the position 154 with a codon change ATG to GTG with change in amino acid methionine to valine in 52nd position. Deletion pattern was found to be varied in three exons. Frequency of p16 gene mutation was less in the Indian population (4.2 %), and this mutation does not contribute to any remarkable change in protein structure.

  10. Familial gastrointestinal stromal tumor syndrome: report of 2 cases with KIT exon 11 mutation.

    PubMed

    Jones, Derek H; Caracciolo, Jamie T; Hodul, Pamela J; Strosberg, Jonathan R; Coppola, Domenico; Bui, Marilyn M

    2015-01-01

    As with cases of sporadic gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST), familial GIST syndrome arises from mutations in KIT or PDGFRA. Only a few dozen such families have been described in the literature. Cases of 2 individuals from 2 different newly described kindreds with familial GIST syndrome were retrospectively reviewed. Pertinent immunohistochemical stains, including CD117, CD34, DOG1, desmin, and S100, were performed. Samples from each case were sent to outside facilities for molecular analysis. A review of the relevant literature was performed and the number of familial GIST syndrome cases reported was updated through July 2014. In case 1, a woman 40 years of age with a family history of GIST presented with abdominal pain and gastrointestinal bleeding. Biopsy of a gastric mass revealed spindle-cell type GIST. Molecular analysis revealed a heterozygous mutation of p.Asp579del in exon 11 of KIT. The patient was placed on imatinib therapy and an initial positive response was demonstrated by imaging. Disease regression was seen on computed tomography, and several GIST tumors were surgically resected. The patient has had stable disease since surgery. In case 2, an asymptomatic woman 29 years of age presented for screening due to a family history of GIST. One small nodule was noted in her stomach and another was noted in the duodenum; both were surgically resected. The patient recovered well following surgery. The GIST in this patient was noted to have similar histological, immunohistochemical, and molecular findings as case 1. Imatinib has often been shown to be an effective therapy in both the familial and sporadic forms of GIST. There is no standard protocol for addressing the surveillance of patients with spindle-cell type GIST seen in the setting of familial GIST syndrome and with a p.Asp579del mutation of exon 11 on KIT.

  11. WNT10A exonic variant increases the risk of keratoconus by decreasing corneal thickness.

    PubMed

    Cuellar-Partida, Gabriel; Springelkamp, Henriët; Lucas, Sionne E M; Yazar, Seyhan; Hewitt, Alex W; Iglesias, Adriana I; Montgomery, Grant W; Martin, Nicholas G; Pennell, Craig E; van Leeuwen, Elisabeth M; Verhoeven, Virginie J M; Hofman, Albert; Uitterlinden, André G; Ramdas, Wishal D; Wolfs, Roger C W; Vingerling, Johannes R; Brown, Matthew A; Mills, Richard A; Craig, Jamie E; Klaver, Caroline C W; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Burdon, Kathryn P; MacGregor, Stuart; Mackey, David A

    2015-09-01

    Keratoconus is a degenerative eye condition which results from thinning of the cornea and causes vision distortion. Treatments such as ultraviolet (UV) cross-linking have proved effective for management of keratoconus when performed in early stages of the disease. The central corneal thickness (CCT) is a highly heritable endophenotype of keratoconus, and it is estimated that up to 95% of its phenotypic variance is due to genetics. Genome-wide association efforts of CCT have identified common variants (i.e. minor allele frequency (MAF) >5%). However, these studies typically ignore the large set of exonic variants whose MAF is usually low. In this study, we performed a CCT exome-wide association analysis in a sample of 1029 individuals from a population-based study in Western Australia. We identified a genome-wide significant exonic variant rs121908120 (P = 6.63 × 10(-10)) in WNT10A. This gene is 437 kb from a gene previously associated with CCT (USP37). We showed in a conditional analysis that the WNT10A variant completely accounts for the signal previously seen at USP37. We replicated our finding in independent samples from the Brisbane Adolescent Twin Study, Twin Eye Study in Tasmania and the Rotterdam Study. Further, we genotyped rs121908120 in 621 keratoconus cases and compared the frequency to a sample of 1680 unscreened controls from the Queensland Twin Registry. We found that rs121908120 increases the risk of keratoconus two times (odds ratio 2.03, P = 5.41 × 10(-5)).

  12. Muscle function recovery in golden retriever muscular dystrophy after AAV1-U7 exon skipping.

    PubMed

    Vulin, Adeline; Barthélémy, Inès; Goyenvalle, Aurélie; Thibaud, Jean-Laurent; Beley, Cyriaque; Griffith, Graziella; Benchaouir, Rachid; le Hir, Maëva; Unterfinger, Yves; Lorain, Stéphanie; Dreyfus, Patrick; Voit, Thomas; Carlier, Pierre; Blot, Stéphane; Garcia, Luis

    2012-11-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is an X-linked recessive disorder resulting from lesions of the gene encoding dystrophin. These usually consist of large genomic deletions, the extents of which are not correlated with the severity of the phenotype. Out-of-frame deletions give rise to dystrophin deficiency and severe DMD phenotypes, while internal deletions that produce in-frame mRNAs encoding truncated proteins can lead to a milder myopathy known as Becker muscular dystrophy (BMD). Widespread restoration of dystrophin expression via adeno-associated virus (AAV)-mediated exon skipping has been successfully demonstrated in the mdx mouse model and in cardiac muscle after percutaneous transendocardial delivery in the golden retriever muscular dystrophy dog (GRMD) model. Here, a set of optimized U7snRNAs carrying antisense sequences designed to rescue dystrophin were delivered into GRMD skeletal muscles by AAV1 gene transfer using intramuscular injection or forelimb perfusion. We show sustained correction of the dystrophic phenotype in extended muscle areas and partial recovery of muscle strength. Muscle architecture was improved and fibers displayed the hallmarks of mature and functional units. A 5-year follow-up ruled out immune rejection drawbacks but showed a progressive decline in the number of corrected muscle fibers, likely due to the persistence of a mild dystrophic process such as occurs in BMD phenotypes. Although AAV-mediated exon skipping was shown safe and efficient to rescue a truncated dystrophin, it appears that recurrent treatments would be required to maintain therapeutic benefit ahead of the progression of the disease.

  13. Requirements for mini-exon inclusion in potato invertase mRNAs provides evidence for exon-scanning interactions in plants.

    PubMed

    Simpson, C G; Hedley, P E; Watters, J A; Clark, G P; McQuade, C; Machray, G C; Brown, J W

    2000-03-01

    Invertases are responsible for the breakdown of sucrose to fructose and glucose. In all but one plant invertase gene, the second exon is only 9 nt in length and encodes three amino acids of a five-amino-acid sequence that is highly conserved in all invertases of plant origin. Sequences responsible for normal splicing (inclusion) of exon 2 have been investigated in vivo using the potato invertase, invGF gene. The upstream intron 1 is required for inclusion whereas the downstream intron 2 is not. Mutations within intron 1 have identified two sequence elements that are needed for inclusion: a putative branchpoint sequence and an adjacent U-rich region. Both are recognized plant intron splicing signals. The branchpoint sequence lies further upstream from the 3' splice site of intron 1 than is normally seen in plant introns. All dicotyledonous plant invertase genes contain this arrangement of sequence elements: a distal branchpoint sequence and adjacent, downstream U-rich region. Intron 1 sequences upstream of the branchpoint and sequences in exons 1, 2, or 3 do not determine inclusion, suggesting that intron or exon splicing enhancer elements seen in vertebrate mini-exon systems are absent. In addition, mutation of the 3' and 5' splice sites flanking the mini-exon cause skipping of the mini-exon, suggesting that both splice sites are required. The branchpoint/U-rich sequence is able to promote splicing of mini-exons of 6, 3, and 1 nt in length and of a chicken cTNT mini-exon of 6 nt. These sequence elements therefore act as a splicing enhancer and appear to function via interactions between factors bound at the branchpoint/U-rich region and at the 5' splice site of intron 2, activating removal of this intron followed by removal of intron 1. This first example of splicing of a plant mini-exon to be analyzed demonstrates that particular arrangement of standard plant intron splicing signals can drive constitutive splicing of a mini-exon.

  14. Characterization of disease-associated mutations affecting an exonic splicing enhancer and two cryptic splice sites in exon 13 of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator gene.

    PubMed

    Aznarez, Isabel; Chan, Elayne M; Zielenski, Julian; Blencowe, Benjamin J; Tsui, Lap-Chee

    2003-08-15

    Sequences in exons can play an important role in constitutive and regulated pre-mRNA splicing. Since exonic splicing regulatory sequences are generally poorly conserved and their mechanism of action is not well understood, the consequence of exonic mutations on splicing can only be determined empirically. In this study, we have investigated the consequence of two cystic fibrosis (CF) disease-causing mutations, E656X and 2108delA, on the function of a putative exonic splicing enhancer (ESE) in exon 13 of the CFTR gene. We have also determined whether five other CF mutations D648V, D651N, G654S, E664X and T665S located near this putative ESE could lead to aberrant splicing of exon 13. Using minigene constructs, we have demonstrated that the E656X and 2108delA mutations could indeed cause aberrant splicing in a predicted manner, supporting a role for the putative ESE sequence in pre-mRNA splicing. In addition, we have shown that D648V, E664X and T665S mutations could cause aberrant splicing of exon 13 by improving the polypyrimidine tracts of two cryptic 3' splice sites. We also provide evidence that the relative levels of two splicing factors, hTra2alpha and SF2/ASF, could alter the effect on splicing of some of the exon 13 disease mutations. Taken together, our results suggest that the severity of CF disease could be modulated by changes in the fidelity of CFTR pre-mRNA splicing.

  15. Alternative splicing and evolution: diversification, exon definition and function.

    PubMed

    Keren, Hadas; Lev-Maor, Galit; Ast, Gil

    2010-05-01

    Over the past decade, it has been shown that alternative splicing (AS) is a major mechanism for the enhancement of transcriptome and proteome diversity, particularly in mammals. Splicing can be found in species from bacteria to humans, but its prevalence and characteristics vary considerably. Evolutionary studies are helping to address questions that are fundamental to understanding this important process: how and when did AS evolve? Which AS events are functional? What are the evolutionary forces that shaped, and continue to shape, AS? And what determines whether an exon is spliced in a constitutive or alternative manner? In this Review, we summarize the current knowledge of AS and evolution and provide insights into some of these unresolved questions.

  16. Exon-level expression analyses identify MYCN and NTRK1 as major determinants of alternative exon usage and robustly predict primary neuroblastoma outcome

    PubMed Central

    Schramm, A; Schowe, B; Fielitz, K; Heilmann, M; Martin, M; Marschall, T; Köster, J; Vandesompele, J; Vermeulen, J; de Preter, K; Koster, J; Versteeg, R; Noguera, R; Speleman, F; Rahmann, S; Eggert, A; Morik, K; Schulte, J H

    2012-01-01

    Background: Using mRNA expression-derived signatures as predictors of individual patient outcome has been a goal ever since the introduction of microarrays. Here, we addressed whether analyses of tumour mRNA at the exon level can improve on the predictive power and classification accuracy of gene-based expression profiles using neuroblastoma as a model. Methods: In a patient cohort comprising 113 primary neuroblastoma specimens expression profiling using exon-level analyses was performed to define predictive signatures using various machine-learning techniques. Alternative transcript use was calculated from relative exon expression. Validation of alternative transcripts was achieved using qPCR- and cell-based approaches. Results: Both predictors derived from the gene or the exon levels resulted in prediction accuracies >80% for both event-free and overall survival and proved as independent prognostic markers in multivariate analyses. Alternative transcript use was most prominently linked to the amplification status of the MYCN oncogene, expression of the TrkA/NTRK1 neurotrophin receptor and survival. Conclusion: As exon level-based prediction yields comparable, but not significantly better, prediction accuracy than gene expression-based predictors, gene-based assays seem to be sufficiently precise for predicting outcome of neuroblastoma patients. However, exon-level analyses provide added knowledge by identifying alternative transcript use, which should deepen the understanding of neuroblastoma biology. PMID:23047593

  17. Exon-level expression analyses identify MYCN and NTRK1 as major determinants of alternative exon usage and robustly predict primary neuroblastoma outcome.

    PubMed

    Schramm, A; Schowe, B; Fielitz, K; Heilmann, M; Martin, M; Marschall, T; Köster, J; Vandesompele, J; Vermeulen, J; de Preter, K; Koster, J; Versteeg, R; Noguera, R; Speleman, F; Rahmann, S; Eggert, A; Morik, K; Schulte, J H

    2012-10-09

    Using mRNA expression-derived signatures as predictors of individual patient outcome has been a goal ever since the introduction of microarrays. Here, we addressed whether analyses of tumour mRNA at the exon level can improve on the predictive power and classification accuracy of gene-based expression profiles using neuroblastoma as a model. In a patient cohort comprising 113 primary neuroblastoma specimens expression profiling using exon-level analyses was performed to define predictive signatures using various machine-learning techniques. Alternative transcript use was calculated from relative exon expression. Validation of alternative transcripts was achieved using qPCR- and cell-based approaches. Both predictors derived from the gene or the exon levels resulted in prediction accuracies >80% for both event-free and overall survival and proved as independent prognostic markers in multivariate analyses. Alternative transcript use was most prominently linked to the amplification status of the MYCN oncogene, expression of the TrkA/NTRK1 neurotrophin receptor and survival. As exon level-based prediction yields comparable, but not significantly better, prediction accuracy than gene expression-based predictors, gene-based assays seem to be sufficiently precise for predicting outcome of neuroblastoma patients. However, exon-level analyses provide added knowledge by identifying alternative transcript use, which should deepen the understanding of neuroblastoma biology.

  18. Exon skipping as a therapeutic strategy applied to an RYR1 mutation with pseudo-exon inclusion causing a severe core myopathy.

    PubMed

    Rendu, John; Brocard, Julie; Denarier, Eric; Monnier, Nicole; Piétri-Rouxel, France; Beley, Cyriaque; Roux-Buisson, Nathalie; Gilbert-Dussardier, Brigitte; Perez, Marie José; Romero, Norma; Garcia, Luis; Lunardi, Joël; Fauré, Julien; Fourest-Lieuvin, Anne; Marty, Isabelle

    2013-07-01

    Central core disease is a myopathy often arising from mutations in the type 1 ryanodine receptor (RYR1) gene, encoding the sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium release channel RyR1. No treatment is currently available for this disease. We studied the pathological situation of a severely affected child with two recessive mutations, which resulted in a massive reduction in the amount of RyR1. The paternal mutation induced the inclusion of a new in-frame pseudo-exon in RyR1 mRNA that resulted in the insertion of additional amino acids leading to the instability of the protein. We hypothesized that skipping this additional exon would be sufficient to restore RyR1 expression and to normalize calcium releases. We therefore developed U7-AON lentiviral vectors to force exon skipping on affected primary muscle cells. The efficiency of the exon skipping was evaluated at the mRNA level, at the protein level, and at the functional level using calcium imaging. In these affected cells, we observed a decreased inclusion of the pseudo-exon, an increased RyR1 protein expression, and a restoration of calcium releases of normal amplitude either upon direct RyR1 stimulation or in response to membrane depolarization. This study is the first demonstration of the potential of exon-skipping strategy for the therapy of central core disease, from the molecular to the functional level.

  19. Exon microarray analysis of human dorsolateral prefrontal cortex in alcoholism.

    PubMed

    Manzardo, Ann M; Gunewardena, Sumedha; Wang, Kun; Butler, Merlin G

    2014-06-01

    Alcohol abuse is associated with cellular and biochemical disturbances that impact upon protein and nucleic acid synthesis, brain development, function, and behavioral responses. To further characterize the genetic influences in alcoholism and the effects of alcohol consumption on gene expression, we used a highly sensitive exon microarray to examine mRNA expression in human frontal cortex of alcoholics and control males. Messenger RNA was isolated from the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (dlPFC; Brodmann area 9) of 7 adult alcoholic (6 males, 1 female, mean age 49 years) and 7 matched controls. Affymetrix Human Exon 1.0 ST array was performed according to standard procedures and the results analyzed at the gene level. Microarray findings were validated using quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction, and the ontology of disturbed genes characterized using Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (IPA). Decreased mRNA expression was observed for genes involved in cellular adhesion (e.g., CTNNA3, ITGA2), transport (e.g., TF, ABCA8), nervous system development (e.g., LRP2, UGT8, GLDN), and signaling (e.g., RASGRP3, LGR5) with influence over lipid and myelin synthesis (e.g., ASPA, ENPP2, KLK6). IPA identified disturbances in network functions associated with neurological disease and development including cellular assembly and organization impacting on psychological disorders. Our data in alcoholism support a reduction in expression of dlPFC mRNA for genes involved with neuronal growth, differentiation, and signaling that targets white matter of the brain. Copyright © 2014 by the Research Society on Alcoholism.

  20. Unusual Intron Conservation near Tissue-Regulated Exons Found by Splicing Microarrays

    PubMed Central

    Sugnet, Charles W; Srinivasan, Karpagam; Clark, Tyson A; O'Brien, Georgeann; Cline, Melissa S; Wang, Hui; Williams, Alan; Kulp, David; Blume, John E; Haussler, David; Ares, Manuel

    2006-01-01

    Alternative splicing contributes to both gene regulation and protein diversity. To discover broad relationships between regulation of alternative splicing and sequence conservation, we applied a systems approach, using oligonucleotide microarrays designed to capture splicing information across the mouse genome. In a set of 22 adult tissues, we observe differential expression of RNA containing at least two alternative splice junctions for about 40% of the 6,216 alternative events we could detect. Statistical comparisons identify 171 cassette exons whose inclusion or skipping is different in brain relative to other tissues and another 28 exons whose splicing is different in muscle. A subset of these exons is associated with unusual blocks of intron sequence whose conservation in vertebrates rivals that of protein-coding exons. By focusing on sets of exons with similar regulatory patterns, we have identified new sequence motifs implicated in brain and muscle splicing regulation. Of note is a motif that is strikingly similar to the branchpoint consensus but is located downstream of the 5′ splice site of exons included in muscle. Analysis of three paralogous membrane-associated guanylate kinase genes reveals that each contains a paralogous tissue-regulated exon with a similar tissue inclusion pattern. While the intron sequences flanking these exons remain highly conserved among mammalian orthologs, the paralogous flanking intron sequences have diverged considerably, suggesting unusually complex evolution of the regulation of alternative splicing in multigene families. PMID:16424921

  1. SR proteins regulate V6 exon splicing of CD44 pre-mRNA.

    PubMed

    Loh, Tiing Jen; Moon, Heegyum; Jang, Ha Na; Liu, Yongchao; Choi, Namjeong; Shen, Shengfu; Williams, Darren Reece; Jung, Da-Woon; Zheng, Xuexiu; Shen, Haihong

    2016-11-01

    CD44 pre-mRNA includes 20 exons, of which exons 1-5 (C1-C5) and exons 16-20 (C6-C10) are constant exons, whereas exons 6-15 (V1-V10) are variant exons. V6-exon-containing isoforms have been known to be implicated in tumor cell invasion and metastasis. In the present study, we performed a SR protein screen for CD44 V6 splicing using overexpression and lentivirus-mediated shRNA treatment. Using a CD44 V6 minigene, we demonstrate that increased SRSF3 and SRSF4 expression do not affect V6 splicing, but increased expression of SRSF1, SRSF6 and SRSF9 significantly inhibit V6 splicing. In addition, using a constitutive exon-specific primer set, we could not detect alterations of CD44 splicing after SR protein-targeting shRNA treatment. However, using a V6 specific primer, we identified that reduced SRSF2 expression significantly reduced the V6 isoform, but increased V6-10 and V6,7-10 isoforms. Our results indicate that SR proteins are important regulatory proteins for CD44 V6 splicing. [BMB Reports 2016; 49(11): 612-616].

  2. Assessing The Evolutionary Diversity Of Exon Skipping Events In Human, Mouse And Rat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Fang-Rong; Chen, Chao-Jung; Kuo, Min-Chieh; Chang, Hwan-You; Shia, Wei-Chung

    2008-01-01

    This study is to research on the cross-species comparative analysis of homologous genetic sequence among human, mouse and rat by bioinformatics method, hopefully assessing the evolutionary diversity through exon length, reading frame preservation and KA/KS ratio test of alternative splicing events. Alternative splicing (AS) is an important mechanism in eukaryotic organism. We choose the "exon skipping events" from AS events for research. In the data of "conserved exon skipping events", we get 668 human-mouse conserved events, 179 human-rat conserved events and 266 conserved mouse-rat events. There are some extra data such as "non-conserved exon skipping events" and "species-specific events". We found out that the length of AS exon is shorter in conserved exon skipping event, but the ratio of reading frame preservation is higher. Among them, the minor form is the most special. We even got the same result in non-conserved exon skipping events. We calculated the KA/KS value by KA/KS ratio test and found out that the human-mouse KA/KS ratio is 0.158, the human-rat is 0.182 and the mouse-rat is 0.190. This represents that the human-mouse conserved events have the highest purifying selection pressure. In the end, we adopt KA/KS ratio test to do a further analysis between conserved and non-conserved exon skipping events and evaluate the evolutionary diversity of cross-species comparation.

  3. SR proteins regulate V6 exon splicing of CD44 pre-mRNA

    PubMed Central

    Loh, Tiing Jen; Moon, Heegyum; Jang, Ha Na; Liu, Yongchao; Choi, Namjeong; Shen, Shengfu; Williams, Darren Reece; Jung, Da-Woon; Zheng, Xuexiu; Shen, Haihong

    2016-01-01

    CD44 pre-mRNA includes 20 exons, of which exons 1–5 (C1–C5) and exons 16–20 (C6–C10) are constant exons, whereas exons 6–15 (V1–V10) are variant exons. V6-exon-containing isoforms have been known to be implicated in tumor cell invasion and metastasis. In the present study, we performed a SR protein screen for CD44 V6 splicing using overexpression and lentivirus-mediated shRNA treatment. Using a CD44 V6 minigene, we demonstrate that increased SRSF3 and SRSF4 expression do not affect V6 splicing, but increased expression of SRSF1, SRSF6 and SRSF9 significantly inhibit V6 splicing. In addition, using a constitutive exon-specific primer set, we could not detect alterations of CD44 splicing after SR protein-targeting shRNA treatment. However, using a V6 specific primer, we identified that reduced SRSF2 expression significantly reduced the V6 isoform, but increased V6–10 and V6,8–10 isoforms. Our results indicate that SR proteins are important regulatory proteins for CD44 V6 splicing. PMID:27530682

  4. Modeling the evolution dynamics of exon-intron structure with a general random fragmentation process

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Most eukaryotic genes are interrupted by spliceosomal introns. The evolution of exon-intron structure remains mysterious despite rapid advance in genome sequencing technique. In this work, a novel approach is taken based on the assumptions that the evolution of exon-intron structure is a stochastic process, and that the characteristics of this process can be understood by examining its historical outcome, the present-day size distribution of internal translated exons (exon). Through the combination of simulation and modeling the size distribution of exons in different species, we propose a general random fragmentation process (GRFP) to characterize the evolution dynamics of exon-intron structure. This model accurately predicts the probability that an exon will be split by a new intron and the distribution of novel insertions along the length of the exon. Results As the first observation from this model, we show that the chance for an exon to obtain an intron is proportional to its size to the 3rd power. We also show that such size dependence is nearly constant across gene, with the exception of the exons adjacent to the 5′ UTR. As the second conclusion from the model, we show that intron insertion loci follow a normal distribution with a mean of 0.5 (center of the exon) and a standard deviation of 0.11. Finally, we show that intron insertions within a gene are independent of each other for vertebrates, but are more negatively correlated for non-vertebrate. We use simulation to demonstrate that the negative correlation might result from significant intron loss during evolution, which could be explained by selection against multi-intron genes in these organisms. Conclusions The GRFP model suggests that intron gain is dynamic with a higher chance for longer exons; introns are inserted into exons randomly with the highest probability at the center of the exon. GRFP estimates that there are 78 introns in every 10 kb coding sequences for vertebrate genomes

  5. P3: a practice focused learning environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irving, Paul W.; Obsniuk, Michael J.; Caballero, Marcos D.

    2017-09-01

    There has been an increased focus on the integration of practices into physics curricula, with a particular emphasis on integrating computation into the undergraduate curriculum of scientists and engineers. In this paper, we present a university-level, introductory physics course for science and engineering majors at Michigan State University called P3 (projects and practices in physics) that is centred around providing introductory physics students with the opportunity to appropriate various science and engineering practices. The P3 design integrates computation with analytical problem solving and is built upon a curriculum foundation of problem-based learning, the principles of constructive alignment and the theoretical framework of community of practice. The design includes an innovative approach to computational physics instruction, instructional scaffolds, and a unique approach to assessment that enables instructors to guide students in the development of the practices of a physicist. We present the very positive student related outcomes of the design gathered via attitudinal and conceptual inventories and research interviews of students’ reflecting on their experiences in the P3 classroom.

  6. Characterization of the exon structure of the Menkes disease gene using vectorette PCR

    SciTech Connect

    Tuemer, Z.; Tonnesen, T.; Horn, N.

    1995-04-10

    The gene defective in Menkes disease, an X-linked recessive disturbance of copper metabolism, has been isolated and predicted to encode a copper-binding P-type ATPase. We determined the complete exon-intron structure of the Menkes disease gene, which spans about 150 kb of genomic DNA. The gene contains 23 exons, and the ATG start codon is in the second exon. All of the exon-intron boundaries were sequenced and conformed to the GT/AT rule, except for the 5{prime} splice site of intron 9. A preliminary comparison demonstrated a striking similarity between the exon structures of the Menkes and Wilson disease genes, giving insight into their evolution. 33 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  7. Exon 44 nonsense mutation in two-Duchenne muscular dystrophy brothers detected by heteroduplex analysis.

    PubMed

    Prior, T W; Papp, A C; Snyder, P J; Burghes, A H; Sedra, M S; Western, L M; Bartolo, C; Mendell, J R

    1993-01-01

    Utilizing a heteroduplex method, we screened the dystrophin exon 43-45 region for point mutations, including small deletions and insertions. The method depends upon the formation of a heteroduplex between wild-type and mutant DNA PCR products. DNA specimens from one hundred and four DMD patients without detected deletions or duplications were multiplexed amplified for exons 43, 44, and 45. The PCR products were mixed with the PCR products from nonaffected controls, electrophoresed, and examined for the presence of altered mobility heteroduplex bands. An exon 44 nonsense mutation in two DMD brothers and a common intron 44 polymorphism were identified using this approach. Although the exon 44-45 region is a hotspot for deletion breakpoints, it does not appear to be prone to point mutations. The technique is extremely useful for screening several exons simultaneously and it allowed us to screen a large number of patients.

  8. TDP-43 repression of nonconserved cryptic exons is compromised in ALS-FTD.

    PubMed

    Ling, Jonathan P; Pletnikova, Olga; Troncoso, Juan C; Wong, Philip C

    2015-08-07

    Cytoplasmic aggregation of TDP-43, accompanied by its nuclear clearance, is a key common pathological hallmark of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and frontotemporal dementia (ALS-FTD). However, a limited understanding of this RNA-binding protein (RBP) impedes the clarification of pathogenic mechanisms underlying TDP-43 proteinopathy. In contrast to RBPs that regulate splicing of conserved exons, we found that TDP-43 repressed the splicing of nonconserved cryptic exons, maintaining intron integrity. When TDP-43 was depleted from mouse embryonic stem cells, these cryptic exons were spliced into messenger RNAs, often disrupting their translation and promoting nonsense-mediated decay. Moreover, enforced repression of cryptic exons prevented cell death in TDP-43-deficient cells. Furthermore, repression of cryptic exons was impaired in ALS-FTD cases, suggesting that this splicing defect could potentially underlie TDP-43 proteinopathy.

  9. Contrasting chromatin organization of CpG islands and exons in the human genome

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background CpG islands and nucleosome-free regions are both found in promoters. However, their association has never been studied. On the other hand, DNA methylation is absent in promoters but is enriched in gene bodies. Intragenic nucleosomes and their modifications have been recently associated with RNA splicing. Because the function of intragenic DNA methylation remains unclear, I explored the possibility of its involvement in splicing regulation. Results Here I show that CpG islands were associated not only with methylation-free promoters but also with nucleosome-free promoters. Nucleosome-free regions were observed only in promoters containing a CpG island. However, the DNA sequences of CpG islands predicted the opposite pattern, implying a limitation of sequence programs for the determination of nucleosome occupancy. In contrast to the methylation-and nucleosome-free states of CpG-island promoters, exons were densely methylated at CpGs and packaged into nucleosomes. Exon-enrichment of DNA methylation was specifically found in spliced exons and in exons with weak splice sites. The enrichment patterns were less pronounced in initial exons and in non-coding exons, potentially reflecting a lower need for their splicing. I also found that nucleosomes, DNA methylation, and H3K36me3 marked the exons of transcripts with low, medium, and high gene expression levels, respectively. Conclusions Human promoters containing a CpG island tend to remain nucleosome-free as well as methylation-free. In contrast, exons demonstrate a high degree of methylation and nucleosome occupancy. Exonic DNA methylation seems to function together with exonic nucleosomes and H3K36me3 for the proper splicing of transcripts with different expression levels. PMID:20602769

  10. The Contribution of Exon-Skipping Events on Chromosome 22 to Protein Coding Diversity

    PubMed Central

    Hide, Winston A.; Babenko, Vladimir N.; van Heusden, Peter A.; Seoighe, Cathal; Kelso, Janet F.

    2001-01-01

    Completion of the human genome sequence provides evidence for a gene count with lower bound 30,000–40,000. Significant protein complexity may derive in part from multiple transcript isoforms. Recent EST based studies have revealed that alternate transcription, including alternative splicing, polyadenylation and transcription start sites, occurs within at least 30–40% of human genes. Transcript form surveys have yet to integrate the genomic context, expression, frequency, and contribution to protein diversity of isoform variation. We determine here the degree to which protein coding diversity may be influenced by alternate expression of transcripts by exhaustive manual confirmation of genome sequence annotation, and comparison to available transcript data to accurately associate skipped exon isoforms with genomic sequence. Relative expression levels of transcripts are estimated from EST database representation. The rigorous in silico method accurately identifies exon skipping using verified genome sequence. 545 genes have been studied in this first hand-curated assessment of exon skipping on chromosome 22. Combining manual assessment with software screening of exon boundaries provides a highly accurate and internally consistent indication of skipping frequency. 57 of 62 exon skipping events occur in the protein coding regions of 52 genes. A single gene, (FBXO7) expresses an exon repetition. 59% of highly represented multi-exon genes are likely to express exon-skipped isoforms in ratios that vary from 1:1 to 1:>100. The proportion of all transcripts corresponding to multi-exon genes that exhibit an exon skip is estimated to be 5%. PMID:11691849

  11. Alternative splicing of U2AF1 reveals a shared repression mechanism for duplicated exons

    PubMed Central

    Kralovicova, Jana; Vorechovsky, Igor

    2017-01-01

    The auxiliary factor of U2 small nuclear ribonucleoprotein (U2AF) facilitates branch point (BP) recognition and formation of lariat introns. The gene for the 35-kD subunit of U2AF gives rise to two protein isoforms (termed U2AF35a and U2AF35b) that are encoded by alternatively spliced exons 3 and Ab, respectively. The splicing recognition sequences of exon 3 are less favorable than exon Ab, yet U2AF35a expression is higher than U2AF35b across tissues. We show that U2AF35b repression is facilitated by weak, closely spaced BPs next to a long polypyrimidine tract of exon Ab. Each BP lacked canonical uridines at position -2 relative to the BP adenines, with efficient U2 base-pairing interactions predicted only for shifted registers reminiscent of programmed ribosomal frameshifting. The BP cluster was compensated by interactions involving unpaired cytosines in an upstream, EvoFold-predicted stem loop (termed ESL) that binds FUBP1/2. Exon Ab inclusion correlated with predicted free energies of mutant ESLs, suggesting that the ESL operates as a conserved rheostat between long inverted repeats upstream of each exon. The isoform-specific U2AF35 expression was U2AF65-dependent, required interactions between the U2AF-homology motif (UHM) and the α6 helix of U2AF35, and was fine-tuned by exon Ab/3 variants. Finally, we identify tandem homologous exons regulated by U2AF and show that their preferential responses to U2AF65-related proteins and SRSF3 are associated with unpaired pre-mRNA segments upstream of U2AF-repressed 3′ss. These results provide new insights into tissue-specific subfunctionalization of duplicated exons in vertebrate evolution and expand the repertoire of exon repression mechanisms that control alternative splicing. PMID:27566151

  12. The exon-intron organization of the human erythroid [beta]-spectrin gene

    SciTech Connect

    Amin, K.M.; Forget, B.G. ); Scarpa, A.L.; Curtis, P.J. ); Winkelmann, J.C. )

    1993-10-01

    The human erythrocyte [beta]-spectrin gene DNA has been cloned from overlapping human genomic phage and cosmid recombinants. The entire erythroid [beta]-spectrin mRNA is encoded by 32 exons that range in size from 49 to 871 bases. The exon/intron junctions have been identified and the exons mapped. There is no correlation between intron positions and the repeat units of 106 amino acids within domain II of the [beta]-spectrin gene. The scatter of the introns over the 17 repeats argues against the 106-amino-acid unit representing a minigene that underwent repeated duplication resulting in the present [beta]-spectrin gene. In fact, the two largest exons, exon 14 (871 bp) and 16 (757 bp), extend over 4 and 3 repeat units of 106 amino acids, respectively, while repeat [beta]10 is encoded by 4 exons. No single position of an intron in the [beta]-spectrin gene is conserved between any of the 17 [beta]-spectrin and 22 [alpha]-spectrin repeat units. The nucleotide sequences of the exon/intron boundaries conform to the consensus splice site sequences except for exon 20, whose 5[prime] donor splice-site sequence begins with GC. The [beta]-spectrin isoform present in the human brain, the skeletal muscle, and the cardiac muscle is an alternatively spliced product of the erythroid [beta]-spectrin gene. This splice site is located within the coding sequences of exon 32 and its utilization in nonerythroid tissues leads to the use of 4 additional downstream exons with a size range of 44 to 530 bp. 55 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  13. BEAT: Bioinformatics Exon Array Tool to store, analyze and visualize Affymetrix GeneChip Human Exon Array data from disease experiments

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background It is known from recent studies that more than 90% of human multi-exon genes are subject to Alternative Splicing (AS), a key molecular mechanism in which multiple transcripts may be generated from a single gene. It is widely recognized that a breakdown in AS mechanisms plays an important role in cellular differentiation and pathologies. Polymerase Chain Reactions, microarrays and sequencing technologies have been applied to the study of transcript diversity arising from alternative expression. Last generation Affymetrix GeneChip Human Exon 1.0 ST Arrays offer a more detailed view of the gene expression profile providing information on the AS patterns. The exon array technology, with more than five million data points, can detect approximately one million exons, and it allows performing analyses at both gene and exon level. In this paper we describe BEAT, an integrated user-friendly bioinformatics framework to store, analyze and visualize exon arrays datasets. It combines a data warehouse approach with some rigorous statistical methods for assessing the AS of genes involved in diseases. Meta statistics are proposed as a novel approach to explore the analysis results. BEAT is available at http://beat.ba.itb.cnr.it. Results BEAT is a web tool which allows uploading and analyzing exon array datasets using standard statistical methods and an easy-to-use graphical web front-end. BEAT has been tested on a dataset with 173 samples and tuned using new datasets of exon array experiments from 28 colorectal cancer and 26 renal cell cancer samples produced at the Medical Genetics Unit of IRCCS Casa Sollievo della Sofferenza. To highlight all possible AS events, alternative names, accession Ids, Gene Ontology terms and biochemical pathways annotations are integrated with exon and gene level expression plots. The user can customize the results choosing custom thresholds for the statistical parameters and exploiting the available clinical data of the samples for a

  14. Microsomal epoxide hydrolase (EPHX1), slow (exon 3, 113His) and fast (exon 4, 139Arg) alleles confer susceptibility to squamous cell esophageal cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Jain, Meenu; Tilak, Anup Raj; Upadhyay, Rohit; Kumar, Ashwani; Mittal, Balraj

    2008-07-15

    Genetic polymorphisms in xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes may alter risk of various cancers. Present case-control study evaluated the influence of EPHX1 genetic variations on squamous cell esophageal cancer (ESCC) susceptibility in 107 patients and 320 controls. EPHX1 polymorphic alleles were genotyped by direct sequencing (exon 3, Tyr113His) or PCR-RFLP (exon 4, His139Arg). Patients with exon 3 genotypes (Tyr113His, His113His) and 113His allele were at risk of ESCC (OR{sub Tyr113His} 2.0, 95% CI = 1.2-3.4, p = 0.007; OR{sub His113His} 2.3 95% CI = 1.0-5.2, p = 0.03 and OR{sub His} 1.5, 95% CI = 1.0-2.1, p = 0.01). In contrast, individuals with exon 4, 139Arg allele were at low risk of cancer (OR 0.34, 95% CI = 0.20-0.56, p = 0.001). However, none of haplotype combinations of exon 3 (Tyr113His) and exon 4 (His139Arg) polymorphisms showed modulation of risk for ESCC. Sub-grouping of patients based on anatomical location of tumor predicted that patients with exon 3, His113His and Tyr113His genotypes were at higher risk for developing ESCC tumor at upper and middle third locations (OR 4.4, 95% CI = 1.0-18.5, p = 0.04; OR 2.5, 95% CI = 1.3-5.0, p = 0.005 respectively). The frequency of exon 4, His139Arg genotype was significantly lower in ESCC patients with lower third tumor location as compared to controls (14.8% vs. 36.3%, p = 0.02). In case-only study, gene-environment interaction of EPHX1 genotypes with tobacco, alcohol and occupational exposures did not appear to modulate the cancer susceptibility. In conclusion, exon 3, Tyr113His genotype was associated with higher risk of ESCC particularly at upper and middle-third anatomical locations of tumor. However, His139Arg genotype of exon 4, exhibited low risk for ESCC as well as its clinical characteristics.

  15. BRCA2 minor transcript lacking exons 4–7 supports viability in mice and may account for survival of humans with a pathogenic biallelic mutation

    PubMed Central

    Thirthagiri, Eswary; Klarmann, Kimberly D.; Shukla, Anil K.; Southon, Eileen; Biswas, Kajal; Martin, Betty K.; North, Susan Lynn; Magidson, Valentin; Burkett, Sandra; Haines, Diana C.; Noer, Kathleen; Matthai, Roberta; Tessarollo, Lino; Loncarek, Jadranka; Keller, Jonathan R.; Sharan, Shyam K.

    2016-01-01

    The breast cancer gene, BRCA2, is essential for viability, yet patients with Fanconi anemia-D1 subtype are born alive with biallelic mutations in this gene. The hypomorphic nature of the mutations is believed to support viability, but this is not always apparent. One such mutation is IVS7+2T>G, which causes premature protein truncation due to skipping of exon 7. We previously identified a transcript lacking exons 4–7, which restores the open-reading frame, encodes a DNA repair proficient protein and is expressed in IVS7+2T>G carriers. However, because the exons 4–7 encoded region contains several residues required for normal cell-cycle regulation and cytokinesis, this transcript's ability to support viability can be argued. To address this, we generated a Brca2 knock-in mouse model lacking exons 4–7 and demonstrated that these exons are dispensable for viability as well as tumor-free survival. This study provides the first in vivo evidence of the functional significance of a minor transcript of BRCA2 that can play a major role in the survival of humans who are homozygous for a clearly pathogenic mutation. Our results highlight the importance of assessing protein function restoration by premature truncating codon bypass by alternative splicing when evaluating the functional significance of variants such as nonsense and frame-shift mutations that are assumed to be clearly pathogenic. Our findings will impact not only the assessment of variants that map to this region, but also influence counseling paradigms and treatment options for such mutation carriers. PMID:26920070

  16. Evidence of a stabilizing mutation of β-catenin encoded by CTNNB1 exon 3 in a large series of sporadic parathyroid adenomas.

    PubMed

    Starker, Lee F; Fonseca, Annabelle L; Fonseca, Annabelle; Akerström, Göran; Björklund, Peyman; Westin, Gunnar; Carling, Tobias

    2012-12-01

    Aberrant accumulation of β-catenin plays an important role in a variety of human neoplasms. This can be caused by stabilizing mutation of β-catenin (CTNNB1, exon 3) or by mutation or deregulated expression of other components of the WNT/β-catenin signaling pathway. Accumulation of non-phosphorylated active β-catenin has been reported to commonly occur in parathyroid adenomas from patients with primary hyperparathyroidism (pHPT), either due to the aberrantly spliced internally truncated WNT receptor LRP5 (LRP5Δ) or to a stabilizing mutation of β-catenin. The S37A mutation was reported to occur in 7.3 % in a single study of parathyroid adenomas, while in other studies no stabilizing mutations of β-catenin exon 3 were identified. The aim of this study was to determine the mutational frequency of the CTNNB1 gene, specifically exon 3 in a large series of parathyroid adenomas. One hundred and eighty sporadic parathyroid adenomas were examined for mutations in exon 3 of CTNNB1 by direct DNA sequencing, utilizing previously published primer sequences. The mutation S33C (TCT>TGT) was detected by direct-DNA sequencing of PCR fragments in 1 out of 180 sporadic parathyroid adenomas (0.68 %). Like serine 37, mutations of serine 33 have been reported in many neoplasms with resulting β-catenin stabilization, enhanced transcription, and oncogenic activities. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed an overexpression of the β-catenin protein in the lone mutant tumor. Taking also previous studies into account we conclude that activating mutations of the regulatory GSK-3β phosphorylation sites serine 33 and 37, encoded by CTNNB1 exon 3, rarely occur in parathyroid adenomas from patients with pHPT.

  17. Development of a novel PTT assay for mutation detection in PALB2 large exons and PALB2 screening in medullary breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Poumpouridou, Nikoleta; Goutas, Nikolaos; Tsionou, Christina; Dimas, Kleanthi; Lianidou, Evi; Kroupis, Christos

    2016-04-01

    Beyond BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes, PALB2 (Partner and localizer of BRCA2) emerges as the third breast cancer susceptibility gene due to its role in the same DNA repair pathway: homologous recombination. In most populations studied so far, PALB2 mutations are detected in 1-2% of BRCA negative female patients. PALB2 gene contains 13 exons; exons 4 and 5 consist 65% of the coding area. We developed a protein truncation test (PTT) for quick screening of truncating pathogenic mutations of these two large exons. Specific primers were de novo, in silico designed and the PTT-PCR products were translated in the presence of biotinylated lysine and detected colorimetrically. The assay was initially tested in 30 patients with hereditary breast cancer, negative for BRCA mutations and then, in 17 patients with the rare medullary breast cancer subtype. Small PALB2 exons were screened with high-resolution melting curve analysis (HRMA) and the large DNA rearrangements with multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA). Any alterations detected were verified by Sanger DNA Sequencing. The developed PTT methodology is highly specific for clinical significant mutations; positive control samples that produce truncated PALB2 peptides were correctly identified and the method was accurate when compared to DNA sequencing. We did not detect any deleterious PALB2 mutation in both groups of patients. HRMA and MLPA were also negative for all tested samples. However, our novel, fast and cost-effective PTT method for pathogenic mutation detection of the two large PALB2 exons can be applied in screening of a large number of breast cancer patients.

  18. BRCA2 minor transcript lacking exons 4-7 supports viability in mice and may account for survival of humans with a pathogenic biallelic mutation.

    PubMed

    Thirthagiri, Eswary; Klarmann, Kimberly D; Shukla, Anil K; Southon, Eileen; Biswas, Kajal; Martin, Betty K; North, Susan Lynn; Magidson, Valentin; Burkett, Sandra; Haines, Diana C; Noer, Kathleen; Matthai, Roberta; Tessarollo, Lino; Loncarek, Jadranka; Keller, Jonathan R; Sharan, Shyam K

    2016-05-15

    The breast cancer gene, BRCA2, is essential for viability, yet patients with Fanconi anemia-D1 subtype are born alive with biallelic mutations in this gene. The hypomorphic nature of the mutations is believed to support viability, but this is not always apparent. One such mutation is IVS7+2T>G, which causes premature protein truncation due to skipping of exon 7. We previously identified a transcript lacking exons 4-7, which restores the open-reading frame, encodes a DNA repair proficient protein and is expressed in IVS7+2T>G carriers. However, because the exons 4-7 encoded region contains several residues required for normal cell-cycle regulation and cytokinesis, this transcript's ability to support viability can be argued. To address this, we generated a Brca2 knock-in mouse model lacking exons 4-7 and demonstrated that these exons are dispensable for viability as well as tumor-free survival. This study provides the first in vivo evidence of the functional significance of a minor transcript of BRCA2 that can play a major role in the survival of humans who are homozygous for a clearly pathogenic mutation. Our results highlight the importance of assessing protein function restoration by premature truncating codon bypass by alternative splicing when evaluating the functional significance of variants such as nonsense and frame-shift mutations that are assumed to be clearly pathogenic. Our findings will impact not only the assessment of variants that map to this region, but also influence counseling paradigms and treatment options for such mutation carriers. Published by Oxford University Press 2016. This work is written by (a) US Government employee(s) and is in the public domain in the US.

  19. Expression of the unique NCAM VASE exon is independently regulated in distinct tissues during development

    PubMed Central

    1990-01-01

    During development of the rat central nervous system, neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) mRNAs containing in the extracellular domain a 30-bp alternative exon, here named VASE, replace RNAs that lack this exon. The presence of this alternative exon between previously described exons 7 and 8 changes the predicted loop structure of the derived polypeptide from one resembling an immunoglobulin constant region domain to one resembling an immunoglobulin variable domain. This change could have significant effects on NCAM polypeptide function and cell-cell interaction. In this report we test multiple rat tissues for the presence of additional alternative exons at this position and also examine the regulation of splicing of the previously described exon. To sensitively examine alternative splicing, polymerase chain reactions (PCRs) with primers flanking the exon 7/exon 8 alternative splicing site were performed. Four categories of RNA samples were tested for new exons: whole brain from embryonic day 11 to adult, specific brain regions dissected from adult brain, clonal lines of neural cells in vitro, and muscle cells and tissues cultured in vitro and obtained by dissection. Within the limits of the PCR methodology, no evidence for any alternative exon other than the previously identified VASE was obtained. The regulation of expression of this exon was found to be complex and tissue specific. Expression of the 30-bp exon in the heart and nervous system was found to be regulated independently; a significant proportion of embryonic day 15 heart NCAM mRNAs contain VASE while only a very small amount of day 15 nervous system mRNAs contain VASE. Some adult central nervous system regions, notably the olfactory bulb and the peripheral nervous system structures adrenal gland and dorsal root ganglia, express NCAM which contains very little VASE. VASE is undetectable in NCAM PCR products from the olfactory epithelium. Other nervous system regions express significant quantities of

  20. TAT gene mutation analysis in three Palestinian kindreds with oculocutaneous tyrosinaemia type II; characterization of a silent exonic transversion that causes complete missplicing by exon 11 skipping.

    PubMed

    Maydan, G; Andresen, B S; Madsen, P P; Zeigler, M; Raas-Rothschild, A; Zlotogorski, A; Gutman, A; Korman, S H

    2006-10-01

    Deficiency of the hepatic cytosolic enzyme tyrosine aminotransferase (TAT) causes marked hypertyrosinaemia leading to painful palmoplantar hyperkeratoses, pseudodendritic keratitis and variable mental retardation (oculocutaneous tyrosinaemia type II or Richner-Hanhart syndrome). Parents may therefore seek prenatal diagnosis, but this is not possible by biochemical assays as tyrosine does not accumulate in amniotic fluid and TAT is not expressed in chorionic villi or amniocytes. Molecular analysis is therefore the only possible approach for prenatal diagnosis and carrier detection. To this end, we sought TAT gene mutations in 9 tyrosinaemia II patients from three consanguineous Palestinian kindreds. In two kindreds (7 patients), the only potential abnormality identified after sequencing all 12 exons and exon-intron boundaries was homozygosity for a silent, single-nucleotide transversion c.1224G > T (p.T408T) at the last base of exon 11. This was predicted to disrupt the 5' donor splice site of exon 11 and result in missplicing. However, as TAT is expressed exclusively in liver, patient mRNA could not be obtained for splicing analysis. A minigene approach was therefore used to assess the effect of c.1224G > T on exon 11 splicing. Transfection experiments with wild-type and c.1224G > T mutant minigene constructs demonstrated that c.1224G > T results in complete exon 11 skipping, illustrating the utility of this approach for confirming a putative splicing defect when cDNA is unavailable. Homozygosity for a c.1249C > T (R417X) exon 12 nonsense mutation (previously reported in a French patient) was identified in both patients from the third kindred, enabling successful prenatal diagnosis of an unaffected fetus using chorionic villous tissue.

  1. Association of three polymorphisms of scavenger receptor class BI gene (exon8, exon1, intron5) with coronary stenosis in a coronary Tunisian population.

    PubMed

    Rejeb, Jihène; Omezzine, Asma; Boumaiza, Imen; Rebhi, Lamia; Kacem, Slim; Rejeb, Nabila Ben; Nabli, Naoufel; Abdelaziz, Ahmed Ben; Boughzala, Essia; Bouslama, Ali

    2012-12-15

    The potential role of scavenger receptor class BI (gene name SCARB1) in the regulation of lipoproteins metabolism and atherosclerosis has attracted considerable interest. We tested the relationship of SCARB1 polymorphisms with significant coronary stenosis (SCS) and lipid profile in a coronary Tunisian population. Three SCARB1 polymorphisms (exon8 (C/T), exon1 (G/A), intron5 (C/T)) were studied in 316 Tunisian patients undergoing coronary angiography. SCS was defined as a luminal narrowing of ≥ 50% in at least one major coronary artery. Lipid profile was measured. Genotyping was performed using PCR-RFLP. Individuals with TT genotypes of exon8 were associated with higher concentrations of plasma HDL-C and ApoAI in the group without SCS. Carriers of T allele of exon8 were associated with 41% lower risk of SCS. This protective effect seemed to be particularly significant in women, nondiabetics and nonsmokers. Subjects homozygous for the variant allele of intron5 were significantly associated with an increased risk of SCS, particularly in smokers. AA genotype of exon1 was associated with an increased risk of SCS in diabetics and in patients with metabolic syndrome. The (CAT) haplotype was associated with increase in the risk of SCS compared to the wild haplotype and had a 4-fold greater risk of SCS than patients with haplotype (TGC) which seems to be the most protective against SCS. Carriers of T allele of exon8 in SCARB1 seemed to increase HDL-C and ApoAI concentrations and reduce the risk of SCS. The intron5, exon1 and (CAT) haplotype seemed to have an atherogenic effect. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Dystrophin-deficient large animal models: translational research and exon skipping

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Xinran; Bao, Bo; Echigoya, Yusuke; Yokota, Toshifumi

    2015-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is an X-linked recessive genetic disorder caused by mutations in the dystrophin gene. Affecting approximately 1 in 3,600-9337 boys, DMD patients exhibit progressive muscle degeneration leading to fatality as a result of heart or respiratory failure. Despite the severity and prevalence of the disease, there is no cure available. While murine models have been successfully used in illustrating the mechanisms of DMD, their utility in DMD research is limited due to their mild disease phenotypes such as lack of severe skeletal muscle and cardiac symptoms. To address the discrepancy between the severity of disease displayed by murine models and human DMD patients, dystrophin-deficient dog models with a splice site mutation in intron 6 were established. Examples of these are Golden Retriever muscular dystrophy and beagle-based Canine X-linked muscular dystrophy. These large animal models are widely employed in therapeutic DMD research due to their close resemblance to the severity of human patient symptoms. Recently, genetically tailored porcine models of DMD with deleted exon 52 were developed by our group and others, and can potentially act as a new large animal model. While therapeutic outcomes derived from these large animal models can be more reliably extrapolated to DMD patients, a comprehensive understanding of these models is still needed. This paper will discuss recent progress and future directions of DMD studies with large animal models such as canine and porcine models. PMID:26396664

  3. EGFR exon mutation distribution and outcome in non-small-cell lung cancer: a Portuguese retrospective study.

    PubMed

    de Mello, Ramon Andrade; Pires, Filipa Soares; Marques, Dânia Sofia; Oliveira, Júlio; Rodrigues, Ana; Soares, Marta; Azevedo, Isabel; Peixoto, Ana; Santos, Catarina; Pinto, Carla; Hespanhol, Venceslau; Teixeira, Manuel R; Amaro, Teresina; Queiroga, Henrique; Araújo, António

    2012-12-01

    Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutations play a predictive role in advanced stages of non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients. We conducted this study in order to assess EGFR status in a Portuguese population and its role in NSCLC patients' outcomes. Patients were submitted to EGFR assessment by high-resolution melting and/or direct sequencing. Kaplan-Meier curve was used to assess overall survival and progression-free survival (PFS). Two hundred forty eight out of 322 participants were assessed for EGFR status. Forty-two patients (16.9 %) presented EGFR-mutated status: one patient (2.4 %) presented exon 18; 21 patients (50 %), exon 19; one patient (2.4 %), exon 20; and 18 patients (45.2 %), exon 21 mutations, p < 0.001. PFS was not assessed (n.a.) for patient with exon 18 mutation, and for the other patients with mutations, it was 7 months (3.96-10.03) (exon 19), <1 month (exon 20), and 7 months (0-14.2) (exon 21) (p = 0.027). Overall survival (OS) was 11 months (exon 18), 11 months (1-18) (exon 19), 1 month (exon 20), and 7.5 months (2-70) (exon 21) (p = n.a). This study suggests that the EGFR mutation is herein observed in a higher proportion than expected for a Caucasian population, and OS is a little less than that published in the literature.

  4. Impaired motor coordination in mice lacking the EDA exon of the fibronectin gene.

    PubMed

    Chauhan, Anil Kumar; Moretti, Federico Andrea; Iaconcig, Alessandra; Baralle, Francisco Ernesto; Muro, Andrés Fernando

    2005-06-03

    The extracellular matrix (ECM) plays an important role in the central nervous system (CNS) by modulating the migration of cells, axons and dendrites of neurons. Fibronectin (FN) is a major component of the ECM in the CNS and plays essential roles in development, cell adhesion and cell migration. Specific FN-isoforms, generated by alternative splicing at three conserved regions, the extra domain B (EDB), extra domain A (EDA) and type III homologies connecting segment (IIICS), have been shown to modulate these processes in vitro and in vivo. The inclusion of the EDA exon in the brain is highly regulated during development and aging, suggesting an important role of this exon in brain function. However, the direct role of FN-isoforms in brain function and behaviour is still obscure. Therefore, to directly assess the role of the FN-EDA exon in vivo, we have generated two mouse strains devoid of EDA exon regulated splicing in the FN gene that constitutively include (EDA(+/+)) or exclude (EDA(-/-)) the EDA exon in all tissues. Here, we show the behavioural consequences of the absence of regulated splicing of the EDA exon in the FN gene. Deletion of the EDA domain in the FN protein results in reduced motor-coordination abilities and vertical exploratory capacity, whereas mice that constitutively include the EDA domain displayed a decrease in locomotory activity in the open field (OF) test. These results strongly suggest that regulated splicing of the EDA exon is necessary for a normal function of the brain.

  5. CEDER: Accurate detection of differentially expressed genes by combining significance of exons using RNA-Seq

    PubMed Central

    Wan, Lin; Sun, Fengzhu

    2012-01-01

    RNA-Seq is widely used in transcriptome studies, and the detection of differentially expressed genes (DEGs) between two classes of individuals, e.g. cases vs controls, using RNA-Seq is of fundamental importance. Many statistical methods for DEG detection based on RNA-Seq data have been developed and most of them are based on the read counts mapped to individual genes. On the other hand, genes are composed of exons and the distribution of reads for the different exons can be heterogeneous. We hypothesize that the detection accuracy of differentially expressed genes can be increased by analyzing individual exons within a gene and then combining the results of the exons. We therefore developed a novel program, termed CEDER, to accurately detect DGEs by combining the significance of the exons. CEDER first tests for differentially expressed exons yielding a p-value for each, and then gives a score indicating the potential for a gene to be differentially expressed by integrating the p-values of the exons in the gene. We showed that CEDER can significantly increase the accuracy of existing methods for detecting DEGs on two benchmark RNA-Seq datasets and simulated datasets. PMID:22641709

  6. FUNCTIONAL UNDERSTANDING OF THE DIVERSE EXON-INTRON STRUCTURES OF HUMAN GPCR GENES

    PubMed Central

    HAMMOND, DOROTHY A.; OLMAN, VICTOR

    2014-01-01

    The GPCR genes have a variety of exon-intron structures even though their proteins are all structurally homologous. We have examined all human GPCR genes with at least two functional protein isoforms, totaling 199, aiming to gain an understanding of what may have contributed to the large diversity of the exon-intron structures of the GPCR genes. The 199 genes have a total of 808 known protein splicing isoforms with experimentally verified functions. Our analysis reveals that 1,301 (80.6%) adjacent exon-exon pairs out of the total of 1,613 in the 199 genes have either exactly one exon skipped or the intron in-between retained in at least one of the 808 protein splicing isoforms. This observation has a statistical significance p-value of 2.051762* e−09, assuming that the observed splicing isoforms are independent of the exon-intron structures. Our interpretation of this observation is that the exon boundaries of the GPCR genes are not randomly determined; instead they may be selected to facilitate specific alternative splicing for functional purposes. PMID:24467758

  7. Reengineering a transmembrane protein to treat muscular dystrophy using exon skipping.

    PubMed

    Gao, Quan Q; Wyatt, Eugene; Goldstein, Jeff A; LoPresti, Peter; Castillo, Lisa M; Gazda, Alec; Petrossian, Natalie; Earley, Judy U; Hadhazy, Michele; Barefield, David Y; Demonbreun, Alexis R; Bönnemann, Carsten; Wolf, Matthew; McNally, Elizabeth M

    2015-11-02

    Exon skipping uses antisense oligonucleotides as a treatment for genetic diseases. The antisense oligonucleotides used for exon skipping are designed to bypass premature stop codons in the target RNA and restore reading frame disruption. Exon skipping is currently being tested in humans with dystrophin gene mutations who have Duchenne muscular dystrophy. For Duchenne muscular dystrophy, the rationale for exon skipping derived from observations in patients with naturally occurring dystrophin gene mutations that generated internally deleted but partially functional dystrophin proteins. We have now expanded the potential for exon skipping by testing whether an internal, in-frame truncation of a transmembrane protein γ-sarcoglycan is functional. We generated an internally truncated γ-sarcoglycan protein that we have termed Mini-Gamma by deleting a large portion of the extracellular domain. Mini-Gamma provided functional and pathological benefits to correct the loss of γ-sarcoglycan in a Drosophila model, in heterologous cell expression studies, and in transgenic mice lacking γ-sarcoglycan. We generated a cellular model of human muscle disease and showed that multiple exon skipping could be induced in RNA that encodes a mutant human γ-sarcoglycan. Since Mini-Gamma represents removal of 4 of the 7 coding exons in γ-sarcoglycan, this approach provides a viable strategy to treat the majority of patients with γ-sarcoglycan gene mutations.

  8. A novel insertion mutation on exon 20 of epidermal growth factor receptor, conferring resistance to erlotinib.

    PubMed

    Khan, Nawazish A; Mirshahidi, Saied; Mirshahidi, Hamid R

    2014-05-01

    The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is a transmembrane glycoprotein tyrosine kinase receptor. The small-molecule tyrosine kinase receptor inhibitors (TKIs) are in clinical use to treat non-small cell lung cancer with EGFR mutations. Variable tumor responses to erlotinib and gefitinib have been observed. The response to these TKIs varies by the type of EGFR mutations found in the tumor. The deletion on exon 19 and the L858R substitution on exon 21 constitute the most frequent mutations and are known to show good response to TKIs. However, mutations on exon 20 are less common and seem to respond poorly to TKIs. In clinical settings, the reported response of exon 20 mutations to reversible TKIs (both gefitinib and erlotinib) remains inconstant. The type of coexisting mutation seems to affect the response of these insertions to TKIs. We herein present a case of disease progression despite the use of erlotinib in a female patient who had a novel insertion mutation on exon 20. Our patient was a never-smoker and was identified to have a Pro772_His773insGlnCysPro mutation on exon 20. She had previously been treated with cisplatin and gemcitabine and then with carboplatin and pemetrexed. She was treated with erlotinib upon intolerance to second-line chemotherapy and did not respond. Our patient had a novel insertion mutation on exon 20, which was found to be resistant to erlotinib.

  9. Comparison of exon 5 sequences from 35 class I genes of the BALB/c mouse

    PubMed Central

    1989-01-01

    DNA sequences of the fifth exon, which encodes the transmembrane domain, were determined for the BALB/c mouse class I MHC genes and used to study the relationships between them. Based on nucleotide sequence similarity, the exon 5 sequences can be divided into seven groups. Although most members within each group are at least 80% similar to each other, comparison between groups reveals that the groups share little similarity. However, in spite of the extensive variation of the fifth exon sequences, analysis of their predicted amino acid translations reveals that only four class I gene fifth exons have frameshifts or stop codons that terminate their translation and prevent them from encoding a domain that is both hydrophobic and long enough to span a lipid bilayer. Exactly 27 of the remaining fifth exons could encode a domain that is similar to those of the transplantation antigens in that it consists of a proline-rich connecting peptide, a transmembrane segment, and a cytoplasmic portion with membrane- anchoring basic residues. The conservation of this motif in the majority of the fifth exon translations in spite of extensive variation suggests that selective pressure exists for these exons to maintain their ability to encode a functional transmembrane domain, raising the possibility that many of the nonclassical class I genes encode functionally important products. PMID:2584927

  10. Oncogene- and drug resistance-associated alternative exon usage in acute myeloid leukemia (AML)

    PubMed Central

    Mohamed, Aminetou Mint; Balsat, Marie; Thenoz, Morgan; Koering, Catherine; Payen-Gay, Lea; Cheok, Meyling; Mortada, Hussein; Auboeuf, Didier; Pinatel, Christiane; El-Hamri, Mohamed; Dumontet, Charles; Cros, Emeline; Flandrin-Gresta, Pascale; Nibourel, Olivier; Preudhomme, Claude; Michallet, Mauricette; Thomas, Xavier; Nicolini, Franck; Solly, Françoise; Guyotat, Denis; Campos, Lydia

    2016-01-01

    In addition to spliceosome gene mutations, oncogene expression and drug resistance in AML might influence exon expression. We performed exon-array analysis and exon-specific PCR (ESPCR) to identify specific landscapes of exon expression that are associated with DEK and WT1 oncogene expression and the resistance of AML cells to AraC, doxorubicin or azacitidine. Data were obtained for these five conditions through exon-array analysis of 17 cell lines and 24 patient samples and were extended through qESPCR of samples from 152 additional AML cases. More than 70% of AEUs identified by exon-array were technically validated through ESPCR. In vitro, 1,130 to 5,868 exon events distinguished the 5 conditions from their respective controls while in vivo 6,560 and 9,378 events distinguished chemosensitive and chemoresistant AML, respectively, from normal bone marrow. Whatever the cause of this effect, 30 to 80% of mis-spliced mRNAs involved genes unmodified at the whole transcriptional level. These AEUs unmasked new functional pathways that are distinct from those generated by transcriptional deregulation. These results also identified new putative pathways that could help increase the understanding of the effects mediated by DEK or WT1, which may allow the targeting of these pathways to prevent resistance of AML cells to chemotherapeutic agents. PMID:26284582

  11. 11p15-subband specific search for transcribed sequences using exon trapping

    SciTech Connect

    Loebbert, R.; Prawitt, D.; Monroe, D.

    1994-09-01

    Evidence from cytogenetic and molecular data suggest that the region 11p15 contains genes involved in different disorders, like Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome (BWS), long QT syndrome (LQT), Usher syndrome type I and tumor development. Focusing on the subregion 11p15.1, we are isolating and characterizing new transcribed sequences. The applied strategy includes exon amplification and subsequent PCR screening of cDNA libraries. So far 100 YACs and 38 cosmid clones from 11p15.1-15.3 have been collected and are currently arrayed. 16 cosmids have been analyzed for transcribed sequences using the exon amplification scheme developed by Buckler et al. (1991). We were able to identify 18 exons that contain correct open reading frames and map back to the cosmid clones. A data base search revealed that two exons represent parts of known genes from this region (ST5 and AMPD3). Moreover, we identified one exon that represents an EGF-like repeat with homologies to various proteins. Using PCR and primers from the exon sequences, a fetal brain library, which has been arranged in the form of hierarchic arrayed phage pools, was screened. Up to now, two cDNA clones corresponding to different exons were isolated and are currently sequenced.

  12. Reengineering a transmembrane protein to treat muscular dystrophy using exon skipping

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Quan Q.; Wyatt, Eugene; Goldstein, Jeff A.; LoPresti, Peter; Castillo, Lisa M.; Gazda, Alec; Petrossian, Natalie; Earley, Judy U.; Hadhazy, Michele; Barefield, David Y.; Demonbreun, Alexis R.; Bönnemann, Carsten; Wolf, Matthew; McNally, Elizabeth M.

    2015-01-01

    Exon skipping uses antisense oligonucleotides as a treatment for genetic diseases. The antisense oligonucleotides used for exon skipping are designed to bypass premature stop codons in the target RNA and restore reading frame disruption. Exon skipping is currently being tested in humans with dystrophin gene mutations who have Duchenne muscular dystrophy. For Duchenne muscular dystrophy, the rationale for exon skipping derived from observations in patients with naturally occurring dystrophin gene mutations that generated internally deleted but partially functional dystrophin proteins. We have now expanded the potential for exon skipping by testing whether an internal, in-frame truncation of a transmembrane protein γ-sarcoglycan is functional. We generated an internally truncated γ-sarcoglycan protein that we have termed Mini-Gamma by deleting a large portion of the extracellular domain. Mini-Gamma provided functional and pathological benefits to correct the loss of γ-sarcoglycan in a Drosophila model, in heterologous cell expression studies, and in transgenic mice lacking γ-sarcoglycan. We generated a cellular model of human muscle disease and showed that multiple exon skipping could be induced in RNA that encodes a mutant human γ-sarcoglycan. Since Mini-Gamma represents removal of 4 of the 7 coding exons in γ-sarcoglycan, this approach provides a viable strategy to treat the majority of patients with γ-sarcoglycan gene mutations. PMID:26457733

  13. The first exon duplication mouse model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy: A tool for therapeutic development.

    PubMed

    Vulin, Adeline; Wein, Nicolas; Simmons, Tabatha R; Rutherford, Andrea M; Findlay, Andrew R; Yurkoski, Jacqueline A; Kaminoh, Yuuki; Flanigan, Kevin M

    2015-11-01

    Exon duplication mutations account for up to 11% of all cases of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), and a duplication of exon 2 is the most common duplication in patients. For use as a platform for testing of duplication-specific therapies, we developed a mouse model that carries a Dmd exon 2 duplication. By using homologous recombination we duplicated exon 2 within intron 2 at a location consistent with a human duplication hotspot. mRNA analysis confirms the inclusion of a duplicated exon 2 in mouse muscle. Dystrophin expression is essentially absent by immunofluorescent and immunoblot analysis, although some muscle specimens show very low-level trace dystrophin expression. Phenotypically, the mouse shows similarities to mdx, the standard laboratory model of DMD. In skeletal muscle, areas of necrosis and phagocytosis are seen at 3 weeks, with central nucleation prominent by four weeks, recapitulating the "crisis" period in mdx. Marked diaphragm fibrosis is noted by 6 months, and remains unchanged at 12 months. Our results show that the Dup2 mouse is both pathologically (in degree and distribution) and physiologically similar to mdx. As it recapitulates the most common single exon duplication found in DMD patients, this new model will be a useful tool to assess the potential of duplicated exon skipping.

  14. The evolutionary fate of alternatively spliced homologous exons after gene duplication.

    PubMed

    Abascal, Federico; Tress, Michael L; Valencia, Alfonso

    2015-04-29

    Alternative splicing and gene duplication are the two main processes responsible for expanding protein functional diversity. Although gene duplication can generate new genes and alternative splicing can introduce variation through alternative gene products, the interplay between the two processes is complex and poorly understood. Here, we have carried out a study of the evolution of alternatively spliced exons after gene duplication to better understand the interaction between the two processes. We created a manually curated set of 97 human genes with mutually exclusively spliced homologous exons and analyzed the evolution of these exons across five distantly related vertebrates (lamprey, spotted gar, zebrafish, fugu, and coelacanth). Most of these exons had an ancient origin (more than 400 Ma). We found examples supporting two extreme evolutionary models for the behaviour of homologous axons after gene duplication. We observed 11 events in which gene duplication was accompanied by splice isoform separation, that is, each paralog specifically conserved just one distinct ancestral homologous exon. At other extreme, we identified genes in which the homologous exons were always conserved within paralogs, suggesting that the alternative splicing event cannot easily be separated from the function in these genes. That many homologous exons fall in between these two extremes highlights the diversity of biological systems and suggests that the subtle balance between alternative splicing and gene duplication is adjusted to the specific cellular context of each gene.

  15. Bodywide skipping of exons 45-55 in dystrophic mdx52 mice by systemic antisense delivery.

    PubMed

    Aoki, Yoshitsugu; Yokota, Toshifumi; Nagata, Tetsuya; Nakamura, Akinori; Tanihata, Jun; Saito, Takashi; Duguez, Stephanie M R; Nagaraju, Kanneboyina; Hoffman, Eric P; Partridge, Terence; Takeda, Shin'ichi

    2012-08-21

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), the commonest form of muscular dystrophy, is caused by lack of dystrophin. One of the most promising therapeutic approaches is antisense-mediated elimination of frame-disrupting mutations by exon skipping. However, this approach faces two major hurdles: limited applicability of each individual target exon and uncertain function and stability of each resulting truncated dystrophin. Skipping of exons 45-55 at the mutation hotspot of the DMD gene would address both issues. Theoretically it could rescue more than 60% of patients with deletion mutations. Moreover, spontaneous deletions of this specific region are associated with asymptomatic or exceptionally mild phenotypes. However, such multiple exon skipping of exons 45-55 has proved technically challenging. We have therefore designed antisense oligo (AO) morpholino mixtures to minimize self- or heteroduplex formation. These were tested as conjugates with cell-penetrating moieties (vivo-morpholinos). We have tested the feasibility of skipping exons 45-55 in H2K-mdx52 myotubes and in mdx52 mice, which lack exon 52. Encouragingly, with mixtures of 10 AOs, we demonstrated skipping of all 10 exons in vitro, in H2K-mdx52 myotubes and on intramuscular injection into mdx52 mice. Moreover, in mdx52 mice in vivo, systemic injections of 10 AOs induced extensive dystrophin expression at the subsarcolemma in skeletal muscles throughout the body, producing up to 15% of wild-type dystrophin protein levels, accompanied by improved muscle strength and histopathology without any detectable toxicity. This is a unique successful demonstration of effective rescue by exon 45-55 skipping in a dystrophin-deficient animal model.

  16. Changes in exon–intron structure during vertebrate evolution affect the splicing pattern of exons

    PubMed Central

    Gelfman, Sahar; Burstein, David; Penn, Osnat; Savchenko, Anna; Amit, Maayan; Schwartz, Schraga; Pupko, Tal; Ast, Gil

    2012-01-01

    Exon–intron architecture is one of the major features directing the splicing machinery to the short exons that are located within long flanking introns. However, the evolutionary dynamics of exon–intron architecture and its impact on splicing is largely unknown. Using a comparative genomic approach, we analyzed 17 vertebrate genomes and reconstructed the ancestral motifs of both 3′ and 5′ splice sites, as also the ancestral length of exons and introns. Our analyses suggest that vertebrate introns increased in length from the shortest ancestral introns to the longest primate introns. An evolutionary analysis of splice sites revealed that weak splice sites act as a restrictive force keeping introns short. In contrast, strong splice sites allow recognition of exons flanked by long introns. Reconstruction of the ancestral state suggests these phenomena were not prevalent in the vertebrate ancestor, but appeared during vertebrate evolution. By calculating evolutionary rate shifts in exons, we identified cis-acting regulatory sequences that became fixed during the transition from early vertebrates to mammals. Experimental validations performed on a selection of these hexamers confirmed their regulatory function. We additionally revealed many features of exons that can discriminate alternative from constitutive exons. These features were integrated into a machine-learning approach to predict whether an exon is alternative. Our algorithm obtains very high predictive power (AUC of 0.91), and using these predictions we have identified and successfully validated novel alternatively spliced exons. Overall, we provide novel insights regarding the evolutionary constraints acting upon exons and their recognition by the splicing machinery. PMID:21974994

  17. Complex Exon-Intron Marking by Histone Modifications Is Not Determined Solely by Nucleosome Distribution

    PubMed Central

    Chiang, Kelly; Bonhoure, Nicolas; Koch, Christoph M.; Bye, Jackie; James, Keith; Foad, Nicola S.; Ellis, Peter; Watkins, Nicholas A.; Ouwehand, Willem H.; Langford, Cordelia; Andrews, Robert M.; Dunham, Ian; Vetrie, David

    2010-01-01

    It has recently been shown that nucleosome distribution, histone modifications and RNA polymerase II (Pol II) occupancy show preferential association with exons (“exon-intron marking”), linking chromatin structure and function to co-transcriptional splicing in a variety of eukaryotes. Previous ChIP-sequencing studies suggested that these marking patterns reflect the nucleosomal landscape. By analyzing ChIP-chip datasets across the human genome in three cell types, we have found that this marking system is far more complex than previously observed. We show here that a range of histone modifications and Pol II are preferentially associated with exons. However, there is noticeable cell-type specificity in the degree of exon marking by histone modifications and, surprisingly, this is also reflected in some histone modifications patterns showing biases towards introns. Exon-intron marking is laid down in the absence of transcription on silent genes, with some marking biases changing or becoming reversed for genes expressed at different levels. Furthermore, the relationship of this marking system with splicing is not simple, with only some histone modifications reflecting exon usage/inclusion, while others mirror patterns of exon exclusion. By examining nucleosomal distributions in all three cell types, we demonstrate that these histone modification patterns cannot solely be accounted for by differences in nucleosome levels between exons and introns. In addition, because of inherent differences between ChIP-chip array and ChIP-sequencing approaches, these platforms report different nucleosome distribution patterns across the human genome. Our findings confound existing views and point to active cellular mechanisms which dynamically regulate histone modification levels and account for exon-intron marking. We believe that these histone modification patterns provide links between chromatin accessibility, Pol II movement and co-transcriptional splicing. PMID:20808788

  18. DNA aptamers against exon v10 of CD44 inhibit breast cancer cell migration.

    PubMed

    Iida, Joji; Clancy, Rebecca; Dorchak, Jesse; Somiari, Richard I; Somiari, Stella; Cutler, Mary Lou; Mural, Richard J; Shriver, Craig D

    2014-01-01

    CD44 adhesion molecules are expressed in many breast cancer cells and have been demonstrated to play a key role in regulating malignant phenotypes such as growth, migration, and invasion. CD44 is an integral transmembrane protein encoded by a single 20-exon gene. The diversity of the biological functions of CD44 is the result of the various splicing variants of these exons. Previous studies suggest that exon v10 of CD44 plays a key role in promoting cancer invasion and metastasis, however, the molecular mechanisms are not clear. Given the fact that exon v10 is in the ectodomain of CD44, we hypothesized that CD44 forms a molecular complex with other cell surface molecules through exon v10 in order to promote migration of breast cancer cells. In order to test this hypothesis, we selected DNA aptamers that specifically bound to CD44 exon v10 using Systematic Evolution of Ligands by Exponential Enrichment (SELEX). We selected aptamers that inhibited migration of breast cancer cells. Co-immunoprecipitation studies demonstrated that EphA2 was co-precipitated with CD44. Pull-down studies demonstrated that recombinant CD44 exon v10 bound to EphA2 and more importantly aptamers that inhibited migration also prevented the binding of EphA2 to exon v10. These results suggest that CD44 forms a molecular complex with EphA2 on the breast cancer cell surface and this complex plays a key role in enhancing breast cancer migration. These results provide insight not only for characterizing mechanisms of breast cancer migration but also for developing target-specific therapy for breast cancers and possibly other cancer types expressing CD44 exon v10.

  19. Increased damage of exon 5 of p53 gene in workers from an arsenic plant.

    PubMed

    Wen, Weihua; Che, Wangjun; Lu, Lin; Yang, Jun; Gao, Xufang; Wen, Jinghua; Heng, Zhengchang; Cao, Shuqiao; Cheng, Huirong

    2008-08-25

    Mutagenesis is a multistage process. Substitution mutations can be induced by base modified through alteration of pairing property. Mutations of exon 5 and 8 of p53 gene have been found in most arsenicosis patients with precarcinomas and carcinomas, but never in arsenicosis individuals without precarcinomas and carcinomas. This study investigates whether base modification exists in exon 5 and 8 of p53 gene, and explores the dose-effect relationship between damage of exon 5 of p53 gene and urinary arsenic. Concentrations of urinary 8-hydroxydeoxyguanine (8-OHdG) are analyzed to identify the occurrence of DNA damage. The real-time PCR developed by Sikorsky et al. is applied to detect base modification in exon 5 and 8 of p53 gene for apparently healthy participants. Our results show that the mean total arsenic concentrations of two exposed groups from an arsenic plant are significantly elevated compared with the control group, and the damage level of exon 5 of the high-exposed group is significantly higher than that of the control group, but which does not happen in exon 8. The closely correlation between the damage index of exon 5 and urinary organic arsenic concentration are found. Concentration of 8-OHdG of the high-exposed group is significantly higher than that of the control group. These results imply that base modification in exon 5 of p53 gene can be induced by arsenic. In addition, our study suggests that the damage level of exon 5 is a useful biomarker to assess adverse health effect levels caused by chronic exposure to arsenic.

  20. Exon-skipped dystrophins for treatment of Duchenne muscular dystrophy: mass spectrometry mapping of most exons and cooperative domain designs based on single molecule mechanics.

    PubMed

    Krieger, Christine Carag; Bhasin, Nishant; Tewari, Manorama; Brown, Andre E X; Safer, Daniel; Sweeney, H Lee; Discher, Dennis E

    2010-12-01

    Force-bearing linkages between the cytoskeleton and extracellular matrix are clearly important to normal cell viability-as is evident in a disease such as Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) which arises in the absence of the linkage protein dystrophin. Therapeutic approaches to DMD include antisense-mediated skipping of exons to delete nonsense mutations while maintaining reading frame, but the structure and stability of the resulting proteins are generally unclear. Here we use mass spectrometry to detect most dystrophin exons, and we express and physically characterize dystrophin "nano"-constructs based on multiexon deletions that might find use in a large percentage of DMD patients. The primary structure challenge is addressed first with liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) which can detect tryptic peptides from 53 of dystrophin's 79 exons; equivalent information from immunodetection would require 53 different high-specificity antibodies. Folding predictions for the nano-constructs reveal novel helical bundle domains that arise out of exon-deleted "linkers," while secondary structure studies confirm high helicity and also melting temperatures well above physiological. Extensional forces with an atomic force microscope nonetheless unfold the constructs, and the ensemble of unfolding trajectories reveal the number of folded domains, proving consistent with structure predictions. A mechanical cooperativity parameter for unfolding of tandem domains is also introduced as the best predictor of a multiexon deletion that is asymptomatic in humans. The results thereby provide insight and confidence in exon-skipped designs.

  1. p53 exon 7 mutations as a predictor of poor prognosis in patients with colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Iniesta, P; Vega, F J; Caldés, T; Massa, M; de Juan, C; Cerdán, F J; Sánchez, A; López, J A; Torres, A J; Balibrea, J L; Benito, M

    1998-08-14

    We have studied 61 resected colorectal adenocarcinomas in order to investigate p53 mutations as a prognostic factor for this pathology. Mutations in exons 5-9 of the p53 gene were analyzed by the polymerase chain reaction-single strand conformation polymorphism (PCR-SSCP) technique followed by sequencing. Our data indicate that p53 exon 7 mutations were prevalent in the latest stages of colorectal carcinogenesis and patients bearing this alteration had the worst prognosis. Therefore, according to our results, mutations affecting exon 7 of the p53 gene could be considered as a useful marker of biological aggressiveness for colorectal cancer.

  2. Dipole entropy based techniques for segmentation of introns and exons in DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramakrishnan, Nithya; Bose, R.

    2012-08-01

    We have used superinformation, which is a measure of the disorder of the entropy content of different portions of a sequence, to analyze the structural variations of the introns and exons in DNA. We have computed superinformation for the angles of the dipole moments of the base-pairs and nucleotides in the double and single-stranded forms of DNA, respectively. We show that the computed dipole-angular superinformation of the introns are significantly higher than those of the exons and that these techniques could be used for intron-exon segmentation. They also yield more accurate and computationally faster results than the previously reported methods.

  3. Identification of a new complex rearrangement affecting exon 20 of BRCA1.

    PubMed

    Del Valle, Jesús; Campos, Olga; Velasco, Angela; Darder, Esther; Menéndez, Mireia; Feliubadaló, Lídia; Tornero, Eva; Blanco, Ignacio; Izquierdo, Angel; Brunet, Joan; Capellá, Gabriel; Lázaro, Conxi

    2011-11-01

    In this study, we present a novel complex rearrangement in the BRCA1 gene. The genomic rearrangement was identified using one of the two commercially available MLPA BRCA1 kits but was not confirmed with the other. In this report, we present the full characterization at the DNA and RNA levels of a new partial deletion of exon 20 of BRCA1. This is a complex deletion with four breakpoints which promotes aberrant splicing with partial deletion of exon 20 plus the insertion of a cryptic exon corresponding to a fragment of intron 20. The aberrant splicing generates an abnormal transcript with a frameshift that will result in a truncated BRCA1 protein.

  4. Molecular analysis of contiguous exons of the phenylalanine hydroxylase gene: identification of a new PKU mutation.

    PubMed Central

    Dianzani, I; Camaschella, C; Saglio, G; Ferrero, G B; Ramus, S; Ponzone, A; Cotton, R G

    1993-01-01

    A modified application of the chemical cleavage of mismatch (CCM) method has been used to screen three contiguous exons (exons 9, 10, and 11) of the phenylalanine hydroxylase gene in 17 Italian PKU patients. A new nonsense heterozygous C-->G transversion within exon 11 (S359X) was identified in a single patient. Only one of the four mutations previously reported in this DNA region in Caucasians was found. This lesion, IVS X-546, was detected in five of the 34 PKU alleles examined. Our results underline the versatility of the CCM method for scanning a gene for multiple mutations. Images PMID:8097261

  5. Molecular analysis of contiguous exons of the phenylalanine hydroxylase gene: identification of a new PKU mutation.

    PubMed

    Dianzani, I; Camaschella, C; Saglio, G; Ferrero, G B; Ramus, S; Ponzone, A; Cotton, R G

    1993-03-01

    A modified application of the chemical cleavage of mismatch (CCM) method has been used to screen three contiguous exons (exons 9, 10, and 11) of the phenylalanine hydroxylase gene in 17 Italian PKU patients. A new nonsense heterozygous C-->G transversion within exon 11 (S359X) was identified in a single patient. Only one of the four mutations previously reported in this DNA region in Caucasians was found. This lesion, IVS X-546, was detected in five of the 34 PKU alleles examined. Our results underline the versatility of the CCM method for scanning a gene for multiple mutations.

  6. Gastrointestinal malignancies harbor actionable MET exon 14 deletions

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Mineui; Kim, Sun Young; Jang, Jiryeon; Ahn, Soomin; Kang, So Young; Lee, Sujin; Kim, Seung Tae; Kim, Bogyou; Choi, Jaehyun; Kim, Kyung-Ah; Lee, Jiyun; Park, Charny; Park, Se Hoon; Park, Joon Oh; Lim, Ho Yeong; Kang, Won Ki; Park, Keunchil; Park, Young Suk; Kim, Kyoung-Mee

    2015-01-01

    Recently, MET exon 14 deletion (METex14del) has been postulated to be one potential mechanism for MET protein overexpression. We screened for the presence of METex14del transcript by multiplexed fusion transcript analysis using nCounter assay followed by confirmation with quantitative reverse transcription PCR with correlation to MET protein expression by immunohistochemistry (IHC) and MET amplification by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). We extracted RNAs from 230 patients enrolled onto the prospective molecular profiling clinical trial (NEXT-1) (NCT02141152) between November 2013 and August 2014. Thirteen METex14del cases were identified including 3 gastric cancer, 4 colon cancer, 5 non-small cell lung cancer, and one adenocarcinoma of unknown primary. Of these 13 METex14del cases, 11 were MET IHC 3+ and 2 were 2+. Only one out of the 13 METex14del cases was MET amplified (MET/CEP ratio > 2.0). Growths of two (gastric, colon) METex14del+ patient tumor derived cell lines were profoundly inhibited by both MET tyrosine kinase inhibitors and a monoclonal antibody targeting MET. In conclusion, METex14del is a unique molecular aberration present in gastrointestinal (GI) malignancies corresponding with overexpression of MET protein but rarely with MET amplification. Substantial growth inhibition of METex14del+ patient tumor derived cell lines by several MET targeting drugs strongly suggests METex14del is a potential actionable driver mutation in GI malignancies. PMID:26375439

  7. A novel intronic cis element, ISE/ISS-3, regulates rat fibroblast growth factor receptor 2 splicing through activation of an upstream exon and repression of a downstream exon containing a noncanonical branch point sequence.

    PubMed

    Hovhannisyan, Ruben H; Carstens, Russ P

    2005-01-01

    Mutually exclusive splicing of fibroblast growth factor receptor 2 (FGFR2) exons IIIb and IIIc yields two receptor isoforms, FGFR2-IIIb and -IIIc, with distinctly different ligand binding properties. Several RNA cis elements in the intron (intron 8) separating these exons have been described that are required for splicing regulation. Using a heterologous splicing reporter, we have identified a new regulatory element in this intron that confers cell-type-specific inclusion of an unrelated exon that mirrors its ability to promote cell-type-specific inclusion of exon IIIb. This element promoted inclusion of exon IIIb while at the same time silencing exon IIIc inclusion in cells expressing FGFR2-IIIb; hence, we have termed this element ISE/ISS-3 (for "intronic splicing enhancer-intronic splicing silencer 3"). Silencing of exon IIIc splicing by ISE/ISS-3 was shown to require a branch point sequence (BPS) using G as the primary branch nucleotide. Replacing a consensus BPS with A as the primary branch nucleotide resulted in constitutive splicing of exon IIIc. Our results suggest that the branch point sequence constitutes an important component that can contribute to the efficiency of exon definition of alternatively spliced cassette exons. Noncanonical branch points may thus facilitate cell-type-specific silencing of regulated exons by flanking cis elements.

  8. Rare EGFR exon 18 and exon 20 mutations in non-small-cell lung cancer on 10 117 patients: a multicentre observational study by the French ERMETIC-IFCT network

    PubMed Central

    Beau-Faller, M.; Prim, N.; Ruppert, A.-M.; Nanni-Metéllus, I.; Lacave, R.; Lacroix, L.; Escande, F.; Lizard, S.; Pretet, J.-L.; Rouquette, I.; de Crémoux, P.; Solassol, J.; de Fraipont, F.; Bièche, I.; Cayre, A.; Favre-Guillevin, E.; Tomasini, P.; Wislez, M.; Besse, B.; Legrain, M.; Voegeli, A.-C.; Baudrin, L.; Morin, F.; Zalcman, G.; Quoix, E.; Blons, H.; Cadranel, J.

    2014-01-01

    Background There is scarce data available about epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutations other than common exon 19 deletions and exon 21 (L858R) mutations. Patients and methods EGFR exon 18 and/or exon 20 mutations were collected from 10 117 non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) samples analysed at 15 French National Cancer Institute (INCa)-platforms of the ERMETIC-IFCT network. Results Between 2008 and 2011, 1047 (10%) samples were EGFR-mutated, 102 (10%) with rare mutations: 41 (4%) in exon 18, 49 (5%) in exon 20, and 12 (1%) with other EGFR mutations. Exon 20 mutations were related to never-smoker status, when compared with exon 18 mutations (P < 0.001). Median overall survival (OS) of metastatic disease was 21 months [95% confidence interval (CI) 12–24], worse in smokers than in non-smoker patients with exon 20 mutations (12 versus 21 months; hazard ratio [HR] for death 0.27, 95% CI 0.08–0.87, P = 0.03). Under EGFR-tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs), median OS was 14 months (95% CI 6–21); disease control rate was better for complex mutations (6 of 7, 86%) than for single mutations (16 of 40, 40%) (P = 0.03). Conclusions Rare EGFR-mutated NSCLCs are heterogeneous, with resistance of distal exon 20 insertions and better sensitivity of exon 18 or complex mutations to EGFR-TKIs, probably requiring individual assessment. PMID:24285021

  9. Epidermal growth factor receptor exon 20 p.S768I mutation in non-small cell lung carcinoma: A case report combined with a review of the literature and investigation of clinical significance.

    PubMed

    Improta, Giuseppina; Pettinato, Angela; Gieri, Stefania; Scandurra, Giuseppa; Skovrider-Ruminski, Wojciech; Høgdall, Estrid; Fraggetta, Filippo

    2016-01-01

    Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) plays a significant role in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), the most prevalent form of lung cancer worldwide. Therefore, EGFR may be a useful molecular target for personalized therapy utilizing tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs). Somatic activating EGFR mutations may be used to identify tumors sensitive to the effects of small-molecule EGFR-TKIs (gefitinib and erlotinib), and alternative, less frequently observed mutations, including the majority of mutations identified within exon 20, may be associated with a lack of response to TKIs. However, due to the comparative rarity of EGFR exon 20 mutations, clinical information concerning the association between EGFR exon 20 mutations and responsiveness to TKIs has been limited within the relevant literature, particularly for certain rare mutations, including p.S768I. The current study reports the case of a patient with NSCLC harboring a p.S768I mutation in the EGFR gene [a substitution at codon 768 of exon 20 (c.2303G>T, p.S768I)], as well as a mutation at codon 719, exon 18 (p.G719A). The relevant literature concerning this rare EGFR somatic mutation is also reviewed.

  10. A Large Inversion Involving GNAS Exon A/B and All Exons Encoding Gsα Is Associated With Autosomal Dominant Pseudohypoparathyroidism Type Ib (PHP1B).

    PubMed

    Grigelioniene, Giedre; Nevalainen, Pasi I; Reyes, Monica; Thiele, Susanne; Tafaj, Olta; Molinaro, Angelo; Takatani, Rieko; Ala-Houhala, Marja; Nilsson, Daniel; Eisfeldt, Jesper; Lindstrand, Anna; Kottler, Marie-Laure; Mäkitie, Outi; Jüppner, Harald

    2017-04-01

    Pseudohypoparathyroidism type Ib (PHP1B) is characterized primarily by resistance to parathyroid hormone (PTH) and thus hypocalcemia and hyperphosphatemia, in most cases without evidence for Albright hereditary osteodystrophy (AHO). PHP1B is associated with epigenetic changes at one or several differentially-methylated regions (DMRs) within GNAS, which encodes the α-subunit of the stimulatory G protein (Gsα) and splice variants thereof. Heterozygous, maternally inherited STX16 or GNAS deletions leading to isolated loss-of-methylation (LOM) at exon A/B alone or at all maternal DMRs are the cause of autosomal dominant PHP1B (AD-PHP1B). In this study, we analyzed three affected individuals, the female proband and her two sons. All three revealed isolated LOM at GNAS exon A/B, whereas the proband's healthy maternal grandmother and uncle showed normal methylation at this locus. Haplotype analysis was consistent with linkage to the STX16/GNAS region, yet no deletion could be identified. Whole-genome sequencing of one of the patients revealed a large heterozygous inversion (1,882,433 bp). The centromeric breakpoint of the inversion is located 7,225 bp downstream of GNAS exon XL, but its DMR showed no methylation abnormality, raising the possibility that the inversion disrupts a regulatory element required only for establishing or maintaining exon A/B methylation. Because our three patients presented phenotypes consistent with PHP1B, and not with PHP1A, the Gsα promoter is probably unaffected by the inversion. Our findings expand the spectrum of genetic mutations that lead to LOM at exon A/B alone and thus biallelic expression of the transcript derived from this alternative first GNAS exon. © 2017 American Society for Bone and Mineral Research. © 2017 American Society for Bone and Mineral Research.

  11. Alternative splicing of Wilms tumor suppressor 1 (Wt1) exon 4 results in protein isoforms with different functions.

    PubMed

    Schnerwitzki, Danny; Perner, Birgit; Hoppe, Beate; Pietsch, Stefan; Mehringer, Rebecca; Hänel, Frank; Englert, Christoph

    2014-09-01

    The Wilms tumor suppressor gene Wt1 encodes a zinc finger transcription factor that is essential for development of multiple organs including kidneys, gonads, spleen and heart. In mammals Wt1 comprises 10 exons with two characteristic splicing events: inclusion or skipping of exon 5 and alternative usage of two splice donor sites between exons 9 and 10. Most fish including zebrafish and medaka possess two wt1 paralogs, wt1a and wt1b, both lacking exon 5. Here we have characterized wt1 in guppy, platyfish and the short-lived African killifish Nothobranchius furzeri. All fish except zebrafish show alternative splicing of exon 4 of wt1a but not of wt1b with the wt1a(-exon 4) isoform being the predominant splice variant. With regard to function, Wt1a(+exon 4) showed less dimerization but stimulated transcription more effectively than the Wt1a(-exon 4) isoform. A specific knockdown of wt1a exon 4 in zebrafish was associated with anomalies in kidney development demonstrating a physiological function for Wt1a exon 4. Interestingly, alternative splicing of exon 4 seems to be an early evolutionary event as it is observed in the single wt1 gene of the sturgeon, a species that has not gone through teleost-specific genome duplication. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. hnRNP L inhibits CD44 V10 exon splicing through interacting with its upstream intron.

    PubMed

    Loh, Tiing Jen; Cho, Sunghee; Moon, Heegyum; Jang, Ha Na; Williams, Darren Reece; Jung, Da-Woon; Kim, Il-Chul; Ghigna, Claudia; Biamonti, Giuseppe; Zheng, Xuexiu; Shen, Haihong

    2015-06-01

    CD44 is a complex cell adhesion molecule that mediates communication and adhesion between adjacent cells as well as between cells and the extracellular matrix. CD44 pre-mRNA produces various mRNA isoforms through alternative splicing of 20 exons, among which exons 1-5 (C1-C5) and 16-20 (C6-C10) are constant exons, whereas exons 6-15 (V1-V10) are variant exons. CD44 V10 exon has important roles in breast tumor progression and Hodgkin lymphoma. Here we show that increased expression of hnRNP L inhibits V10 exon splicing of CD44 pre-mRNA, whereas reduced expression of hnRNP L promotes V10 exon splicing. In addition, hnRNP L also promotes V10 splicing of endogenous CD44 pre-mRNA. Through mutation analysis, we demonstrate that the effects of hnRNP L on V10 splicing are abolished when the CA-rich sequence on the upstream intron of V10 exon is disrupted. However, hnRNP L effects are stronger if more CA-repeats are provided. Furthermore, we show that hnRNP L directly contacts the CA-rich sequence. Importantly, we provide evidences that hnRNP L inhibits U2AF65 binding on the upstream Py tract of V10 exon. Our results reveal that hnRNP L is a new regulator for CD44 V10 exon splicing.

  13. Becker Muscular Dystrophy (BMD) caused by duplication of exons 3-6 of the dystrophin gene presenting as dilated cardiomyopathy

    SciTech Connect

    Tsai, A.C.; Allingham-Hawkins, D.J.; Becker, L.

    1994-09-01

    X-linked dilated cardiomyopathy (XLCM) is a progressive myocardial disease presenting with congestive heart failure in teenage males without clinical signs of skeletal myopathy. Tight linkage of XLCM to the DMD locus has been demonstrated; it has been suggested that, at least in some families, XLCM is a {open_quotes}dystrophinopathy.{close_quotes} We report a 14-year-old boy who presented with acute heart failure due to dilated cardiomyopathy. He had no history of muscle weakness, but physical examination revealed pseudohypertrophy of the calf muscles. He subsequently received a heart transplantation. Family history was negative. Serum CK level at the time of diagnosis was 10,416. Myocardial biopsy showed no evidence of carditis. Dystrophin staining of cardiac and skeletal muscle with anti-sera to COOH and NH{sub 2}termini showed a patchy distribution of positivity suggestive of Becker muscular dystrophy. Analysis of 18 of the 79 dystrophin exons detected a duplication that included exons 3-6. The proband`s mother has an elevated serum CK and was confirmed to be a carrier of the same duplication. A mutation in the muscle promotor region of the dystrophin gene has been implicated in the etiology of SLCM. However, Towbin et al. (1991) argued that other 5{prime} mutations in the dystrophin gene could cause selective cardiomyopathy. The findings in our patient support the latter hypothesis. This suggests that there are multiple regions in the dystrophin gene which, when disrupted, can cause isolated dilated cardiomyopathy.

  14. Polymorphisms in exons 1B and 1C of the type I interleukin-1 receptor gene in patients with endometriosis.

    PubMed

    D'Amora, Paulo; Sato, Hélio; Girão, Manoel J B C; Silva, Ismael D C G; Schor, Eduardo

    2006-09-01

    To study possible correlation between the prevalence of polymorphisms in the type I interleukin-1 receptor gene and pelvic endometriosis. Genotypes of 223 women were analyzed: 109 women with surgically and histologically confirmed endometriosis and 114 healthy women. Distributions of two single-base polymorphisms of the human interleukin-1 receptor type I (IL-1RI) gene were evaluated: PstI, due to a C-->T transition in exon 1B and BsrBI a C-->A transition at position 52 in exon 1C. Polymorphisms were detected by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) followed by restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis (RFLP) resolved on 3% agarose gels stained with ethidium bromide. Genotypes for PstI polymorphisms did not differ significantly among control and endometriosis (P = 0.058). However, in relation to BsrBI polymorphism, protective risk was observed for the development of endometriosis [OR 0.39-IC 95% (0.2-0.9)]. BsrBI heterozygote genotype (C/A) showed protective effect against endometriosis development.

  15. Mechanism of Deletion Removing All Dystrophin Exons in a Canine Model for DMD Implicates Concerted Evolution of X Chromosome Pseudogenes.

    PubMed

    VanBelzen, D Jake; Malik, Alock S; Henthorn, Paula S; Kornegay, Joe N; Stedman, Hansell H

    2017-03-17

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a lethal, X-linked, muscle-wasting disorder caused by mutations in the large, 2.4-Mb dystrophin gene. The majority of DMD-causing mutations are sporadic, multi-exon, frameshifting deletions, with the potential for variable immunological tolerance to the dystrophin protein from patient to patient. While systemic gene therapy holds promise in the treatment of DMD, immune responses to vectors and transgenes must first be rigorously evaluated in informative preclinical models to ensure patient safety. A widely used canine model for DMD, golden retriever muscular dystrophy, expresses detectable amounts of near full-length dystrophin due to alternative splicing around an intronic point mutation, thereby confounding the interpretation of immune responses to dystrophin-derived gene therapies. Here we characterize a naturally occurring deletion in a dystrophin-null canine, the German shorthaired pointer. The deletion spans 5.6 Mb of the X chromosome and encompasses all coding exons of the DMD and TMEM47 genes. The sequences surrounding the deletion breakpoints are virtually identical, suggesting that the deletion occurred through a homologous recombination event. Interestingly, the deletion breakpoints are within loci that are syntenically conserved among mammals, yet the high homology among this subset of ferritin-like loci is unique to the canine genome, suggesting lineage-specific concerted evolution of these atypical sequence elements.

  16. Nanoparticle Delivery of Antisense Oligonucleotides and Their Application in the Exon Skipping Strategy for Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Falzarano, Maria Sofia; Passarelli, Chiara

    2014-01-01

    Antisense therapy is a powerful tool for inducing post-transcriptional modifications and thereby regulating target genes associated with disease. There are several classes of antisense oligonucleotides (AONs) with therapeutic use, such as double-stranded RNAs (interfering RNAs, utilized for gene silencing, and single-stranded AONs with various chemistries, which are useful for antisense targeting of micro-RNAs and mRNAs. In particular, the use of AONs for exon skipping, by targeting pre-mRNA, is proving to be a highly promising therapy for some genetic disorders like Duchenne muscular dystrophy and spinal muscular atrophy. However, AONs are unable to cross the plasma membrane unaided, and several other obstacles still remain to be overcome, in particular their instability due to their nuclease sensitivity and their lack of tissue specificity. Various drug delivery systems have been explored to improve the bioavailability of nucleic acids, and nanoparticles (NPs) have been suggested as potential vectors for DNA/RNA. This review describes the recent progress in AON conjugation with natural and synthetic delivery systems, and provides an overview of the efficacy of NP-AON complexes as an exon-skipping treatment for Duchenne muscular dystrophy. PMID:24506782

  17. Diagnostic challenges in patients with bleeding phenotype and von Willebrand exon 28 polymorphism p.D1472H.

    PubMed

    Francis, J C; Hui, S K; Mahoney, D; Dietrich, J E; Friedman, K D; Soundar, E; Srivaths, L V

    2014-05-01

    Exon 28 polymorphism p.D1472H is associated with significantly lower von Willebrand Ristocetin cofactor activity (VWF:RCoF) to von Willebrand antigen (VWF:Ag) ratio compared to normal, but has been reported as not conferring haemorrhagic risk. The impact of this polymorphism while assessing symptomatic patients for von Willebrand disease (VWD) has not been previously analysed. We retrospectively reviewed charts of children with clinically significant bleeding and abnormal VW panel who underwent VW exon 28 analysis. Twenty-three of 63 patients studied had p.D1472H. Of these 23 patients, 6 with borderline low VWF:RCo were given provisional diagnosis of VWD type 1 by treating physicians, which could be alternatively explained as due to the effect of p.D1472H. None of the patients with low VWF:RCo, decreased VWF:RCo/VWF:Ag ratio and p.D1472H had VWD type 2M mutations identified. This study illustrates the challenge in diagnosing VWD using ristocetin-based VW assay in symptomatic patients with p.D1472H.

  18. Nanoparticle delivery of antisense oligonucleotides and their application in the exon skipping strategy for Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Falzarano, Maria Sofia; Passarelli, Chiara; Ferlini, Alessandra

    2014-02-01

    Antisense therapy is a powerful tool for inducing post-transcriptional modifications and thereby regulating target genes associated with disease. There are several classes of antisense oligonucleotides (AONs) with therapeutic use, such as double-stranded RNAs (interfering RNAs, utilized for gene silencing, and single-stranded AONs with various chemistries, which are useful for antisense targeting of micro-RNAs and mRNAs. In particular, the use of AONs for exon skipping, by targeting pre-mRNA, is proving to be a highly promising therapy for some genetic disorders like Duchenne muscular dystrophy and spinal muscular atrophy. However, AONs are unable to cross the plasma membrane unaided, and several other obstacles still remain to be overcome, in particular their instability due to their nuclease sensitivity and their lack of tissue specificity. Various drug delivery systems have been explored to improve the bioavailability of nucleic acids, and nanoparticles (NPs) have been suggested as potential vectors for DNA/RNA. This review describes the recent progress in AON conjugation with natural and synthetic delivery systems, and provides an overview of the efficacy of NP-AON complexes as an exon-skipping treatment for Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

  19. Origin and evolution of a new exon of 14-3-3ξ in bees and phylogenetic analysis.

    PubMed

    Zhan, Leilei; Jiang, Chao

    2013-04-01

    Mutually exclusive splicing, one type of alternative splicing, involves selection of alternatively spliced exons arranged in tandem and creates protein products with substitution of one segment of the amino acid sequence for another. Previous studies revealed that exon 5 of 14-3-3ξ from Apis mellifera (western honeybee) had three mutually exclusive exons, while orthologous exon of Nasonia vitripennis (parasitic wasp) had only two, suggesting that cases of exon gain or loss might have happened during the evolution of hymenopteran species. In the current study, we annotated and analyzed the 14-3-3ξ genes from 20 hymenopteran species successfully, and the results of phylogenetic analysis revealed the presence of a new mutually exclusive exon in corbiculate bees. In addition, we found that duplication via staggered homologous recombination was responsible for the origin of the new exon.

  20. Exon-skipping and mRNA decay in human liver tissue: molecular consequences of pathogenic bile salt export pump mutations

    PubMed Central

    Dröge, Carola; Schaal, Heiner; Engelmann, Guido; Wenning, Daniel; Häussinger, Dieter; Kubitz, Ralf

    2016-01-01

    The bile salt export pump BSEP mediates bile formation. Over 150 BSEP mutations are associated with progressive familial intrahepatic cholestasis type 2 (PFIC-2), with few characterised specifically. We examined liver tissues from two PFIC-2 patients compound heterozygous for the splice-site mutation c.150 + 3A > C and either c.2783_2787dup5 resulting in a frameshift with a premature termination codon (child 1) or p.R832C (child 2). Splicing was analysed with a minigene system and mRNA sequencing from patients’ livers. Protein expression was shown by immunofluorescence. Using the minigene, c.150 + 3A > C causes complete skipping of exon 3. In liver tissue of child 1, c.2783_2787dup5 was found on DNA but not on mRNA level, implying nonsense-mediated mRNA decay (NMD) when c.2783_2787dup5 is present. Still, BSEP protein as well as mRNA with and without exon 3 were detectable and can be assigned to the c.150 + 3A > C allele. Correctly spliced transcripts despite c.150 + 3A > C were also confirmed in liver of child 2. In conclusion, we provide evidence (1) for effective NMD due to a BSEP frameshift mutation and (2) partial exon-skipping due to c.150 + 3A > C. The results illustrate that the extent of exon-skipping depends on the genomic and cellular context and that regulation of splicing may have therapeutic potential. PMID:27114171

  1. Exon-skipping and mRNA decay in human liver tissue: molecular consequences of pathogenic bile salt export pump mutations.

    PubMed

    Dröge, Carola; Schaal, Heiner; Engelmann, Guido; Wenning, Daniel; Häussinger, Dieter; Kubitz, Ralf

    2016-04-26

    The bile salt export pump BSEP mediates bile formation. Over 150 BSEP mutations are associated with progressive familial intrahepatic cholestasis type 2 (PFIC-2), with few characterised specifically. We examined liver tissues from two PFIC-2 patients compound heterozygous for the splice-site mutation c.150 + 3A > C and either c.2783_2787dup5 resulting in a frameshift with a premature termination codon (child 1) or p.R832C (child 2). Splicing was analysed with a minigene system and mRNA sequencing from patients' livers. Protein expression was shown by immunofluorescence. Using the minigene, c.150 + 3A > C causes complete skipping of exon 3. In liver tissue of child 1, c.2783_2787dup5 was found on DNA but not on mRNA level, implying nonsense-mediated mRNA decay (NMD) when c.2783_2787dup5 is present. Still, BSEP protein as well as mRNA with and without exon 3 were detectable and can be assigned to the c.150 + 3A > C allele. Correctly spliced transcripts despite c.150 + 3A > C were also confirmed in liver of child 2. In conclusion, we provide evidence (1) for effective NMD due to a BSEP frameshift mutation and (2) partial exon-skipping due to c.150 + 3A > C. The results illustrate that the extent of exon-skipping depends on the genomic and cellular context and that regulation of splicing may have therapeutic potential.

  2. A disruptive mutation in exon 3 of the GNAS gene with albright hereditary osteodystrophy, normocalcemic pseudohypoparathyroidism, and selective long transcript variant Gsalpha-L deficiency.

    PubMed

    Thiele, Susanne; Werner, Ralf; Ahrens, Wiebke; Hoppe, Ute; Marschke, Christine; Staedt, Pia; Hiort, Olaf

    2007-05-01

    The GNAS gene encodes the alpha-subunit of stimulatory G proteins, which play a crucial role in intracellular signal transduction of peptide and neurotransmitter receptors. In addition to transcript variants that differ in their first exon due to different promoters, there are two long (Gsalpha-L) and two short (Gsalpha-S) splice variants, created by alternative splicing. Heterozygous inactivating maternally inherited mutations of GNAS lead to a phenotype in which Albright hereditary osteodystrophy is associated with pseudohypoparathyroidism type Ia. The GNAS gene of a 10-yr-old girl with brachymetacarpia, mental retardation, normocalcemic pseudohypoparathyroidism, and hypothyroidism was investigated. We found a heterozygous insertion of an adenosine in exon 3 altering codon 85 and leading to a frame shift inducing a stop codon in exon 4. Molecular studies of cDNA from blood RNA demonstrated normal, biallelic expression of Gsalpha-S transcripts, whereas expression of Gsalpha-L transcripts from the maternal allele was reduced. Immunoblot analysis revealed a reduced Gsalpha-L protein level to about 50%, whereas the protein level of Gsalpha-S was unaltered. Furthermore, the Gsalpha protein activity in erythrocyte membranes was diminished to about 75% of normal. Both the reduced activity and the mutation were also found in the mother and the affected younger brother. This report demonstrates the first evidence for a pathogenic mutation in exon 3 of the GNAS gene. The mutation is associated with a phenotype of Albright hereditary osteodystrophy and pseudohypoparathyroidism type Ia due to selective deficiency of Gsalpha-L and a partial reduction of Gsalpha activity.

  3. SURVEY AND SUMMARY: exon-intron organization of genes in the slime mold Physarum polycephalum.

    PubMed

    Trzcinska-Danielewicz, J; Fronk, J

    2000-09-15

    The slime mold Physarum polycephalum is a morphologically simple organism with a large and complex genome. The exon-intron organization of its genes exhibits features typical for protists and fungi as well as those characteristic for the evolutionarily more advanced species. This indicates that both the taxonomic position as well as the size of the genome shape the exon-intron organization of an organism. The average gene has 3.7 introns which are on average 138 bp, with a rather narrow size distribution. Introns are enriched in AT base pairs by 13% relative to exons. The consensus sequences at exon-intron boundaries resemble those found for other species, with minor differences between short and long introns. A unique feature of P.polycephalum introns is the strong preference for pyrimidines in the coding strand throughout their length, without a particular enrichment at the 3'-ends.

  4. Classifying nucleic acid sub-sequences as introns or exons using genetic programming

    SciTech Connect

    Handley, S.

    1995-12-31

    An evolutionary computation technique, genetic programming, created programs that classify messenger RNA sequences into one of two classes: (1) the sequence is expressed as (part of) a protein (an exon), or (2) not expressed as protein (an intron).

  5. Exon array data analysis using Affymetrix power tools and R statistical software

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    The use of microarray technology to measure gene expression on a genome-wide scale has been well established for more than a decade. Methods to process and analyse the vast quantity of expression data generated by a typical microarray experiment are similarly well-established. The Affymetrix Exon 1.0 ST array is a relatively new type of array, which has the capability to assess expression at the individual exon level. This allows a more comprehensive analysis of the transcriptome, and in particular enables the study of alternative splicing, a gene regulation mechanism important in both normal conditions and in diseases. Some aspects of exon array data analysis are shared with those for standard gene expression data but others present new challenges that have required development of novel tools. Here, I will introduce the exon array and present a detailed example tutorial for analysis of data generated using this platform. PMID:21498550

  6. Recurring exon deletions in the haptoglobin (HP) gene associate with lower blood cholesterol levels

    PubMed Central

    Boettger, Linda M.; Salem, Rany M.; Handsaker, Robert E.; Peloso, Gina; Kathiresan, Sekar; Hirschhorn, Joel; McCarroll, Steven A.

    2016-01-01

    Two exons of the human haptoglobin (HP) gene exhibit copy number variation that affects HP multimerization and underlies one of the first protein polymorphisms identified in humans. The evolutionary origins and medical significance of this polymorphism have been uncertain. Here we show that this variation has likely arisen from the recurring reversion of an ancient hominin-specific duplication of these exons. Though this polymorphism has been largely invisible to genome-wide genetic studies to date, we describe a way to analyze it by imputation from SNP haplotypes and find among 22,288 individuals that these HP exonic deletions associate with reduced LDL and total cholesterol levels. We show that these deletions, and a SNP that affects HP expression, are the likely drivers of the strong but complex association of cholesterol levels to SNPs near HP. Recurring exonic deletions in the haptoglobin gene likely enhance human health by lowering cholesterol levels in the blood. PMID:26901066

  7. Analysis of KIT expression and KIT exon 11 mutations in canine oral malignant melanomas.

    PubMed

    Murakami, A; Mori, T; Sakai, H; Murakami, M; Yanai, T; Hoshino, Y; Maruo, K

    2011-09-01

    KIT, a transmembrane receptor tyrosine kinase, is one of the specific targets for anti-cancer therapy. In humans, its expression and mutations have been identified in malignant melanomas and therapies using molecular-targeted agents have been promising in these tumours. As human malignant melanoma, canine malignant melanoma is a fatal disease with metastases and the poor response has been observed with all standard protocols. In our study, KIT expression and exon 11 mutations in dogs with histologically confirmed malignant oral melanomas were evaluated. Although 20 of 39 cases were positive for KIT protein, there was no significant difference between KIT expression and overall survival. Moreover, polymerase chain reaction amplification and sequencing of KIT exon 11 in 17 samples did not detect any mutations and proved disappointing. For several reasons, however, KIT expression and mutations of various exons including exon 11 should be investigated in more cases.

  8. Exon array data analysis using Affymetrix power tools and R statistical software.

    PubMed

    Lockstone, Helen E

    2011-11-01

    The use of microarray technology to measure gene expression on a genome-wide scale has been well established for more than a decade. Methods to process and analyse the vast quantity of expression data generated by a typical microarray experiment are similarly well-established. The Affymetrix Exon 1.0 ST array is a relatively new type of array, which has the capability to assess expression at the individual exon level. This allows a more comprehensive analysis of the transcriptome, and in particular enables the study of alternative splicing, a gene regulation mechanism important in both normal conditions and in diseases. Some aspects of exon array data analysis are shared with those for standard gene expression data but others present new challenges that have required development of novel tools. Here, I will introduce the exon array and present a detailed example tutorial for analysis of data generated using this platform.

  9. The association of ICAM-1 Exon 6 (E469K) but not of ICAM-1 Exon 4 (G241R) and PECAM-1 Exon 3 (L125V) polymorphisms with the development of differentiation syndrome in acute promyelocytic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Dore, Adriana I; Santana-Lemos, Barbara A A; Coser, Virginia M; Santos, Flávia L S; Dalmazzo, Leandro F; Lima, Ana S G; Jacomo, Rafael H; Elias, Jorge; Falcão, Roberto Passetto; Pereira, Waldir V; Rego, Eduardo M

    2007-11-01

    The use of all trans-retinoic acid (ATRA) is the basis of treatment of acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) and represents the paradigm of differentiation therapy. In general, ATRA is well-tolerated but may be associated with a potentially lethal side-effect, referred to as retinoic acid or differentiation syndrome (DS). The cellular and molecular mechanisms of DS are poorly understood and involve changes in the adhesive qualities and cytokine secretion of leukemic cells during ATRA-induced differentiation. As leukocyte extravasation is a key event in DS pathogenesis, we analyzed the association between the polymorphisms at Exon 4 (G241R) and Exon 6 (E469K) of ICAM-1 and Exon 3 (L125V) of PECAM-1 genes with DS development in APL patients treated with ATRA and anthracyclines. DS was diagnosed in 23/127 (18.1%) APL patients at an average of 11.5 days after the start of ATRA. All patients presented respiratory distress associated with increased ground-glass opacity in chest radiographies. Other accompanying symptoms were: fever not attributable to infection (65.2%), generalized edema (37.5%), weight gain (37.5%), and impairment of renal function (8.6%). We detected an association between development of DS and the AA genotype at Codon 469 of ICAM-1 (odds ratio of 3.5; 95% confidence interval: 1.2-10.2). Conversely, no significant association was detected between G241R or L125V polymorphisms at Exon 4 of ICAM-1 and Exon 3 of PECAM-1, respectively. Our results suggest that susceptibility to DS in APL patients may be influenced by genetic variation in adhesion molecule loci.

  10. Unique genome of dicyemid mesozoan: highly shortened spliceosomal introns in conservative exon/intron structure.

    PubMed

    Ogino, Kazutoyo; Tsuneki, Kazuhiko; Furuya, Hidetaka

    2010-01-01

    Dicyemids are enigmatic endoparasites, or endosymbionts, living in the renal sac of benthic cephalopod molluscs. The body of dicyemids consists of only 9-41 cells, with neither extracellular matrices nor differentiated tissues. Due to the unusually simple body organization, dicyemids have long been the subject of phylogenetic controversy. Molecular evidences suggest dicyemids are lophotrochozoans that have secondarily lost many morphological characters. We studied 40 genes of the dicyemid Dicyema japonicum and found that their spliceosomal introns are very short (mean length=26 bp). This size was shorter than that of introns of animals, such as Fugu rubripes and Oikopleura dioica which possess compact genome and introns. In the intron size, the dicyemid was nearly equal to the chlorarachniophyte Bigelowiella natans nucleomorph (18-21 bp) which has the shortest introns of any known eukaryote. Despite the short introns, the intron density (5.3 introns/gene) of the dicyemid is similar to that in model invertebrates. In addition, the exon/intron structure of the dicyemid is more similar to vertebrates than to the model invertebrates. These results suggest that the positions of the introns are possibly conserved under functional constraints.

  11. Tight regulation of plant immune responses by combining promoter and suicide exon elements

    DOE PAGES

    Gonzalez, Tania L.; Liang, Yan; Nguyen, Bao N.; ...

    2015-07-02

    Effector-triggered immunity (ETI) is activated when plant disease resistance (R) proteins recognize the presence of pathogen effector proteins delivered into host cells. The ETI response generally encompasses a defensive ‘hypersensitive response’ (HR) that involves programmed cell death at the site of pathogen recognition. While many R protein and effector protein pairs are known to trigger HR, other components of the ETI signaling pathway remain elusive. Effector genes regulated by inducible promoters cause background HR due to leaky protein expression, preventing the generation of relevant transgenic plant lines. By employing the HyP5SM suicide exon, we have developed a strategy to tightlymore » regulate effector proteins such that HR is chemically inducible and non-leaky. This alternative splicing-based gene regulation system was shown to successfully control Bs2/AvrBs2-dependent and RPP1/ATR1Δ51-dependent HR in Nicotiana benthamiana and Nicotiana tabacum, respectively. It was also used to generate viable and healthy transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana plants that inducibly initiate HR. In conclusion, beyond enabling studies on the ETI pathway, our regulatory strategy is generally applicable to reduce or eliminate undesired background expression of transgenes.« less

  12. Tight regulation of plant immune responses by combining promoter and suicide exon elements

    SciTech Connect

    Gonzalez, Tania L.; Liang, Yan; Nguyen, Bao N.; Staskawicz, Brian J.; Loqué, Dominique; Hammond, Ming C.

    2015-07-02

    Effector-triggered immunity (ETI) is activated when plant disease resistance (R) proteins recognize the presence of pathogen effector proteins delivered into host cells. The ETI response generally encompasses a defensive ‘hypersensitive response’ (HR) that involves programmed cell death at the site of pathogen recognition. While many R protein and effector protein pairs are known to trigger HR, other components of the ETI signaling pathway remain elusive. Effector genes regulated by inducible promoters cause background HR due to leaky protein expression, preventing the generation of relevant transgenic plant lines. By employing the HyP5SM suicide exon, we have developed a strategy to tightly regulate effector proteins such that HR is chemically inducible and non-leaky. This alternative splicing-based gene regulation system was shown to successfully control Bs2/AvrBs2-dependent and RPP1/ATR1Δ51-dependent HR in Nicotiana benthamiana and Nicotiana tabacum, respectively. It was also used to generate viable and healthy transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana plants that inducibly initiate HR. In conclusion, beyond enabling studies on the ETI pathway, our regulatory strategy is generally applicable to reduce or eliminate undesired background expression of transgenes.

  13. Tight regulation of plant immune responses by combining promoter and suicide exon elements

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez, Tania L.; Liang, Yan; Nguyen, Bao N.; Staskawicz, Brian J.; Loqué, Dominique; Hammond, Ming C.

    2015-01-01

    Effector-triggered immunity (ETI) is activated when plant disease resistance (R) proteins recognize the presence of pathogen effector proteins delivered into host cells. The ETI response generally encompasses a defensive ‘hypersensitive response’ (HR) that involves programmed cell death at the site of pathogen recognition. While many R protein and effector protein pairs are known to trigger HR, other components of the ETI signaling pathway remain elusive. Effector genes regulated by inducible promoters cause background HR due to leaky protein expression, preventing the generation of relevant transgenic plant lines. By employing the HyP5SM suicide exon, we have developed a strategy to tightly regulate effector proteins such that HR is chemically inducible and non-leaky. This alternative splicing-based gene regulation system was shown to successfully control Bs2/AvrBs2-dependent and RPP1/ATR1Δ51-dependent HR in Nicotiana benthamiana and Nicotiana tabacum, respectively. It was also used to generate viable and healthy transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana plants that inducibly initiate HR. Beyond enabling studies on the ETI pathway, our regulatory strategy is generally applicable to reduce or eliminate undesired background expression of transgenes. PMID:26138488

  14. Further genotype-phenotype correlation emerging from two families with PLP1 exon 4 skipping.

    PubMed

    Biancheri, Roberta; Grossi, Serena; Regis, Stefano; Rossi, Andrea; Corsolini, Fabio; Rossi, Daniela Paola; Cavalli, Pietro; Severino, Mariasavina; Filocamo, Mirella

    2014-03-01

    Proteolipid protein 1 (PLP1) gene-related disorders due to mutations in the PLP1 include a wide spectrum of X-linked disorders ranging from severe connatal Pelizaeus-Merzbacher disease (PMD) to spastic paraplegia 2 (SPG2). Duplications, deletions or point mutations in coding and noncoding regions of the PLP1 gene may occur. We report the clinical, neuroradiologic and molecular findings in six patients from two unrelated families. The affected males showed severe mental retardation, spastic tetraparesis, inability of walking and pes cavus at onset in early infancy. Brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed hypomyelination and brain atrophy. Nystagmus was never observed. The affected females showed adult-onset progressive spastic paraparesis leading to wheel-chair dependency and subtle white matter changes on brain MRI. Molecular studies in the two families identified two different intronic mutations, the novel c.622+2T>C and the known c.622+1G>A, leading to the skipping of PLP1-exon 4. The clinical presentation of the affected males did not consistently fit in any of the PLP1-related disorder subtypes (i.e., connatal or classic PMD, SPG2 and 'PLP1 null syndrome'), and in addition, the carrier females were symptomatic despite the severe clinical picture of their respective probands. This study provides new insight into the genotype-phenotype correlations of patients with PLP1 splice-site mutations.

  15. Tropomyosin exon 6b is troponin-specific and required for correct acto-myosin regulation.

    PubMed

    Maytum, Robin; Bathe, Friederike; Konrad, Manfred; Geeves, Michael A

    2004-04-30

    The specificity of tropomyosin (Tm) exon 6b for interaction with and functioning of troponin (Tn) has been studied using recombinant fibroblast Tm isoforms 5a and 5b. These isoforms differ internally by exons 6a/6b and possess non-muscle exons 1b/9d at the termini, hence they lack the primary TnT(1)-tropomyosin interaction, allowing study of exon 6 exchange in isolation from this. Using kinetic techniques to measure regulation of myosin S1 binding to actin and fluorescently labeled Tm to directly measure Tn binding, we show that binding of Tn to both isoforms is similar (0.1-0.5 microm) and both produce well regulated systems. Calcium has little effect on Tn binding to the actin.Tm complex and both exons produce a 3-fold reduction in the S1 binding rate to actin.Tm.Tn in its absence. This confirms previous results that show exon 6 has little influence on Tn affinity to actin.Tm or its ability to fully inhibit the acto-myosin interaction. Thin filaments reconstituted with Tn and Tm5a or skeletal Tm (containing exon 6b) show nearly identical calcium dependence of acto-myosin regulation. However, Tm5b produces a dramatic increase in calcium sensitivity, shifting the activation mid-point by almost an order of magnitude. This shows that exon 6 sequence and, hence, Tm structure in this region have a significant effect upon the calcium regulation of Tn. This finding supports evidence that familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy mutations occurring adjacent to this region can effect calcium regulation.

  16. EGFR exon 20 insertion mutations in lung adenocarcinomas: prevalence, molecular heterogeneity, and clinicopathologic characteristics.

    PubMed

    Arcila, Maria E; Nafa, Khedoudja; Chaft, Jamie E; Rekhtman, Natasha; Lau, Christopher; Reva, Boris A; Zakowski, Maureen F; Kris, Mark G; Ladanyi, Marc

    2013-02-01

    In contrast to other primary epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutations in lung adenocarcinomas, insertions in exon 20 of EGFR have been generally associated with resistance to EGFR-tyrosine kinase inhibitors. Their molecular spectrum, clinicopathologic characteristics, and prevalence are not well established. Tumors harboring EGFR exon 20 insertions were identified through an algorithmic screen of 1,500 lung adenocarcinomas. Cases were first tested for common mutations in EGFR (exons 19 and 21) and KRAS (exon 2) and, if negative, further analyzed for EGFR exon 20 insertions. All samples underwent extended genotyping for other driver mutations in EGFR, KRAS, BRAF, ERBB2/HER2, NRAS, PIK3CA, MEK1, and AKT by mass spectrometry; a subset was evaluated for ALK rearrangements. We identified 33 EGFR exon 20 insertion cases [2.2%, 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.6-3.1], all mutually exclusive with mutations in the other genes tested (except PIK3CA). They were more common among never-smokers (P < 0.0001). There was no association with age, sex, race, or stage. Morphologically, tumors were similar to those with common EGFR mutations but with frequent solid histology. Insertions were highly variable in position and size, ranging from 3 to 12 bp, resulting in 13 different insertions, which, by molecular modeling, are predicted to have potentially different effects on erlotinib binding. EGFR exon 20 insertion testing identifies a distinct subset of lung adenocarcinomas, accounting for at least 9% of all EGFR-mutated cases, representing the third most common type of EGFR mutation after exon 19 deletions and L858R. Insertions are structurally heterogeneous with potential implications for response to EGFR inhibitors.

  17. Evolution of the Exon-Intron Structure in Ciliate Genomes.

    PubMed

    Bondarenko, Vladyslav S; Gelfand, Mikhail S

    2016-01-01

    A typical eukaryotic gene is comprised of alternating stretches of regions, exons and introns, retained in and spliced out a mature mRNA, respectively. Although the length of introns may vary substantially among organisms, a large fraction of genes contains short introns in many species. Notably, some Ciliates (Paramecium and Nyctotherus) possess only ultra-short introns, around 25 bp long. In Paramecium, ultra-short introns with length divisible by three (3n) are under strong evolutionary pressure and have a high frequency of in-frame stop codons, which, in the case of intron retention, cause premature termination of mRNA translation and consequent degradation of the mis-spliced mRNA by the nonsense-mediated decay mechanism. Here, we analyzed introns in five genera of Ciliates, Paramecium, Tetrahymena, Ichthyophthirius, Oxytricha, and Stylonychia. Introns can be classified into two length classes in Tetrahymena and Ichthyophthirius (with means 48 bp, 69 bp, and 55 bp, 64 bp, respectively), but, surprisingly, comprise three distinct length classes in Oxytricha and Stylonychia (with means 33-35 bp, 47-51 bp, and 78-80 bp). In most ranges of the intron lengths, 3n introns are underrepresented and have a high frequency of in-frame stop codons in all studied species. Introns of Paramecium, Tetrahymena, and Ichthyophthirius are preferentially located at the 5' and 3' ends of genes, whereas introns of Oxytricha and Stylonychia are strongly skewed towards the 5' end. Analysis of evolutionary conservation shows that, in each studied genome, a significant fraction of intron positions is conserved between the orthologs, but intron lengths are not correlated between the species. In summary, our study provides a detailed characterization of introns in several genera of Ciliates and highlights some of their distinctive properties, which, together, indicate that splicing spellchecking is a universal and evolutionarily conserved process in the biogenesis of short introns in

  18. Evolution of the Exon-Intron Structure in Ciliate Genomes

    PubMed Central

    Gelfand, Mikhail S.

    2016-01-01

    A typical eukaryotic gene is comprised of alternating stretches of regions, exons and introns, retained in and spliced out a mature mRNA, respectively. Although the length of introns may vary substantially among organisms, a large fraction of genes contains short introns in many species. Notably, some Ciliates (Paramecium and Nyctotherus) possess only ultra-short introns, around 25 bp long. In Paramecium, ultra-short introns with length divisible by three (3n) are under strong evolutionary pressure and have a high frequency of in-frame stop codons, which, in the case of intron retention, cause premature termination of mRNA translation and consequent degradation of the mis-spliced mRNA by the nonsense-mediated decay mechanism. Here, we analyzed introns in five genera of Ciliates, Paramecium, Tetrahymena, Ichthyophthirius, Oxytricha, and Stylonychia. Introns can be classified into two length classes in Tetrahymena and Ichthyophthirius (with means 48 bp, 69 bp, and 55 bp, 64 bp, respectively), but, surprisingly, comprise three distinct length classes in Oxytricha and Stylonychia (with means 33–35 bp, 47–51 bp, and 78–80 bp). In most ranges of the intron lengths, 3n introns are underrepresented and have a high frequency of in-frame stop codons in all studied species. Introns of Paramecium, Tetrahymena, and Ichthyophthirius are preferentially located at the 5' and 3' ends of genes, whereas introns of Oxytricha and Stylonychia are strongly skewed towards the 5' end. Analysis of evolutionary conservation shows that, in each studied genome, a significant fraction of intron positions is conserved between the orthologs, but intron lengths are not correlated between the species. In summary, our study provides a detailed characterization of introns in several genera of Ciliates and highlights some of their distinctive properties, which, together, indicate that splicing spellchecking is a universal and evolutionarily conserved process in the biogenesis of short introns in

  19. Intersubtype Genetic Variation of HIV-1 Tat Exon 1.

    PubMed

    Roy, Chandra Nath; Khandaker, Irona; Oshitani, Hitoshi

    2015-06-01

    HIV-1 Tat is a regulatory protein that plays a pivotal role in viral transcription and replication. Our study aims to investigate the genetic variation of Tat exon 1 in all subtypes of HIV-1: A, B, C, D, F, G, H, J, and K. We performed phylogenetic, mutation, and selection pressure analyses on a total of 1,179 sequences of different subtypes of HIV-1 Tat obtained from the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The mean nucleotide divergences (%) among the analyzed sequences of subtypes A, B, C, D, F, G, H, J, and K were 88, 89, 90, 88, 86, 89, 88, 97, and 97, respectively. We revealed that subtype B evolved relatively faster than other subtypes. The second and fifth domains were found comparatively more variable among all subtypes. Site-by-site tests of positive selection revealed that several positions in all subtypes were under significant positive selection. Positively selected sites were found in the acidic domain at positions 3, 4, and 19, in the cysteine-rich domains at positions 24, 29, 32, and 36, in the core domain at position 40, and in the basic domain for the rest of the positions for all subtypes. Positions 58 and 68 in the basic domain were positively selected in subtypes A, B, C and B, C, F, respectively. We also observed high variability within positively selected sites in amino acid positions. Our study findings on HIV-1 Tat genetic variability may contribute to a better understanding of HIV-1 evolution as well as to the development of effective Tat-targeted therapeutics and vaccines.

  20. A diverse epigenetic landscape at human exons with implication for expression

    PubMed Central

    Singer, Meromit; Kosti, Idit; Pachter, Lior; Mandel-Gutfreund, Yael

    2015-01-01

    DNA methylation is an important epigenetic marker associated with gene expression regulation in eukaryotes. While promoter methylation is relatively well characterized, the role of intragenic DNA methylation remains unclear. Here, we investigated the relationship of DNA methylation at exons and flanking introns with gene expression and histone modifications generated from a human fibroblast cell-line and primary B cells. Consistent with previous work we found that intragenic methylation is positively correlated with gene expression and that exons are more highly methylated than their neighboring intronic environment. Intriguingly, in this study we identified a unique subset of hypomethylated exons that demonstrate significantly lower methylation levels than their surrounding introns. Furthermore, we observed a negative correlation between exon methylation and the density of the majority of histone modifications. Specifically, we demonstrate that hypo-methylated exons at highly expressed genes are associated with open chromatin and have a characteristic histone code comprised of significantly high levels of histone markings. Overall, our comprehensive analysis of the human exome supports the presence of regulatory hypomethylated exons in protein coding genes. In particular our results reveal a previously unrecognized diverse and complex role of the epigenetic landscape within the gene body. PMID:25765649

  1. Different RPGR exon ORF15 mutations in Canids provide insights into photoreceptor cell degeneration.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qi; Acland, Gregory M; Wu, Wen X; Johnson, Jennifer L; Pearce-Kelling, Sue; Tulloch, Brian; Vervoort, Raf; Wright, Alan F; Aguirre, Gustavo D

    2002-05-01

    The canine disease, X-linked progressive retinal atrophy (XLPRA), is similar to human RP3, an X-linked form of retinitis pigmentosa, and maps to the same region in the X chromosome. Analysis of the physical map of the XLPRA and RP3 intervals shows a high degree of conservation in terms of genes and their order. We have found different mutations in exon ORF15 of the RPGR gene in two distinct mutant dog strains (XLPRA1, XLPRA2). Microdeletions resulting in a premature stop or a frameshift mutation result in very different retinal phenotypes, which are allele-specific and consistent for each mutation. The phenotype associated with the frameshift mutation in XLPRA2 is very severe and manifests during retinal development; the phenotype resulting from the XLPRA1 nonsense mutation is expressed only after normal photoreceptor morphogenesis. Splicing of RPGR mRNA transcripts in retina is complex, and either exon ORF15 or exon 19 can be a terminal exon. The retina-predominant transcript contains ORF15 as a terminal exon, and is expressed in normal and mutant retinas. The frameshift mutation dramatically alters the deduced amino acid sequence, and the protein aggregates in the endoplasmic reticulum of transfected cells. The cellular and molecular results in the two canine RPGR exon ORF15 mutations have implications for understanding the phenotypic variability found in human RP3 families that carry similar mutations.

  2. Dantrolene enhances antisense-mediated exon skipping in human and mouse models of Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Kendall, Genevieve C; Mokhonova, Ekaterina I; Moran, Miriana; Sejbuk, Natalia E; Wang, Derek W; Silva, Oscar; Wang, Richard T; Martinez, Leonel; Lu, Qi L; Damoiseaux, Robert; Spencer, Melissa J; Nelson, Stanley F; Miceli, M Carrie

    2012-12-12

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) causes profound and progressive muscle weakness and loss, resulting in early death. DMD is usually caused by frameshifting deletions in the gene DMD, which leads to absence of dystrophin protein. Dystrophin binds to F-actin and components of the dystrophin-associated glycoprotein complex and protects the sarcolemma from contraction-induced injury. Antisense oligonucleotide-mediated exon skipping is a promising therapeutic approach aimed at restoring the DMD reading frame and allowing expression of an intact dystrophin glycoprotein complex. To date, low levels of dystrophin protein have been produced in humans by this method. We performed a small-molecule screen to identify existing drugs that enhance antisense-directed exon skipping. We found that dantrolene, currently used to treat malignant hyperthermia, potentiates antisense oligomer-guided exon skipping to increase exon skipping to restore the mRNA reading frame, the sarcolemmal dystrophin protein, and the dystrophin glycoprotein complex in skeletal muscles of mdx mice when delivered intramuscularly or intravenously. Further, dantrolene synergized with multiple weekly injections of antisense to increase muscle strength and reduce serum creatine kinase in mdx mice. Dantrolene similarly promoted antisense-mediated exon skipping in reprogrammed myotubes from DMD patients. Ryanodine and Rycal S107, which, like dantrolene, targets the ryanodine receptor, also promoted antisense-driven exon skipping, implicating the ryanodine receptor as the critical molecular target.

  3. NF1 single and multi-exons copy number variations in neurofibromatosis type 1.

    PubMed

    Imbard, Apolline; Pasmant, Eric; Sabbagh, Audrey; Luscan, Armelle; Soares, Magali; Goussard, Philippe; Blanché, Hélène; Laurendeau, Ingrid; Ferkal, Salah; Vidaud, Michel; Pinson, Stéphane; Bellanne-Chantelot, Christine; Vidaud, Dominique; Wolkenstein, Pierre; Parfait, Béatrice

    2015-04-01

    Neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) is caused by dominant loss-of-function mutations of the tumor suppressor NF1 containing 57 constitutive coding exons. A huge number of different pathogenic NF1 alterations has been reported. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the usefulness of a multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) approach in NF1 patients to detect single and multi-exon NF1 gene copy number variations. A genotype-phenotype correlation was then performed in NF1 patients carrying these types of genetic alterations. Among 565 NF1 index cases from the French NF1 cohort, single and multi-exon deletions/duplications screening identified NF1 partial deletions/duplications in 22 patients (~4%) using MLPA analysis. Eight single exon deletions, 11 multiple exons deletions, 1 complex rearrangement and 2 duplications were identified. All results were confirmed using a custom array-CGH. MLPA and custom array-CGH allowed the identification of rearrangements that were missed by cDNA/DNA sequencing or microsatellite analysis. We then performed a targeted next-generation sequencing of NF1 that allowed confirmation of all 22 rearrangements. No clear genotype-phenotype correlations were found for the most clinically significant disease features of NF1 in patients with single and multi-exons NF1 gene copy number changes.

  4. BRAF exon 15 mutations in pediatric renal stromal tumors: prevalence in metanephric stromal tumors.

    PubMed

    Marsden, Lily; Jennings, Lawrence J; Gadd, Samantha; Yu, Min; Perlman, Elizabeth J; Cajaiba, Mariana M

    2017-02-01

    Metanephric stromal tumors (MSTs) are rare renal stromal tumors that predominantly affect children. They belong to the metanephric family of tumors, along with metanephric adenofibroma and metanephric adenoma. The previous documentation of BRAF exon 15 mutations in 88% of metanephric adenomas and in isolated cases of metanephric adenofibroma prompted us to investigate the prevalence of these mutations in MSTs and in other pediatric renal stromal tumors. In this study, 17 MSTs, 22 congenital mesoblastic nephromas, and 6 ossifying renal tumors of infancy were selected for BRAF exon 15 testing. Tumor genomic DNA was extracted from formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue, followed by polymerase chain reaction amplification and Sanger dideoxy sequencing with primers flanking the BRAF exon 15 gene. BRAF exon 15 mutations were found in 11 (65%) of the 17 cases of MST, all corresponding to a thymidine-to-adenine substitution at codon 600 (BRAF V600E). All other renal stromal tumors tested were negative for BRAF exon 15 mutations. In conclusion, BRAF V600E mutations are encountered in most MSTs, supporting a link with other metanephric tumors and suggesting a clonal event possibly affecting primordial renal cells. In addition, BRAF V600E mutations have been associated with oncogene-induced senescence in other benign tumors, providing clues to the pathogenesis of metanephric neoplasms in keeping with their overall benign behavior. Our results also suggest a potential diagnostic use for BRAF exon 15 mutations in differentiating MSTs from other pediatric renal stromal tumors, particularly in limited samples.

  5. Signal-exon trap: a novel method for the identification of signal sequences from genomic DNA

    PubMed Central

    Péterfy, Miklós; Gyuris, Tibor; Takács, László

    2000-01-01

    We describe a genomic DNA-based signal sequence trap method, signal-exon trap (SET), for the identification of genes encoding secreted and membrane-bound proteins. SET is based on the coupling of an exon trap to the translation of captured exons, which allows screening of the exon-encoded polypeptides for signal peptide function. Since most signal sequences are expected to be located in the 5′-terminal exons of genes, we first demonstrate that trapping of these exons is feasible. To test the applicability of SET for the screening of complex genomic DNA, we evaluated two critical features of the method. Specificity was assessed by the analysis of random genomic DNA and efficiency was demonstrated by screening a 425 kb YAC known to contain the genes of four secretory or membrane-bound proteins. All trapped clones contained a translation initiation signal followed by a hydrophobic stretch of amino acids representing either a known signal peptide, transmembrane domain or novel sequence. Our results suggest that SET is a potentially useful method for the isolation of signal sequence-containing genes and may find application in the discovery of novel members of known secretory gene clusters, as well as in other positional cloning approaches. PMID:10710443

  6. Splicing of COB intron 5 requires pairing between the internal guide sequence and both flanking exons.

    PubMed

    Partono, S; Lewin, A S

    1990-11-01

    Group I introns are characterized by a set of conserved sequence elements and secondary structures. Evidence supporting the pairing of certain of these sequences has come from the comparison of intron sequences and from the analysis of mutations that disrupt splicing by interfering with pairing. One of the structures proposed for all group I introns is an internal guide sequence that base pairs with the upstream and the downstream exons, bringing them into alignment for ligation. We made specific mutations in the internal guide sequence and the flanking exons of the fifth intron in the yeast mitochondrial gene for apocytochrome b (COB). Mutations that disrupted the pairing between the internal guide sequence and the upstream exon (the P1 pairing) blocked addition of guanosine to the 5' end of the intron during autocatalytic reactions and prevented formation of the full-length circular intron. In contrast, transcripts containing mutations that disrupted the pairing between the guide sequence and the downstream exon (the P10 helix) initiated splicing but failed to ligate exons. Compensatory mutations that restored helices of normal stability mitigated the effects of the original mutations. These data provide direct evidence for the importance of the base pairing between the internal guide sequence and the downstream exon in the splicing of a wild-type group I intron.

  7. Alternative splicing of anciently exonized 5S rRNA regulates plant transcription factor TFIIIA.

    PubMed

    Fu, Yan; Bannach, Oliver; Chen, Hao; Teune, Jan-Hendrik; Schmitz, Axel; Steger, Gerhard; Xiong, Liming; Barbazuk, W Brad

    2009-05-01

    Identifying conserved alternative splicing (AS) events among evolutionarily distant species can prioritize AS events for functional characterization and help uncover relevant cis- and trans-regulatory factors. A genome-wide search for conserved cassette exon AS events in higher plants revealed the exonization of 5S ribosomal RNA (5S rRNA) within the gene of its own transcription regulator, TFIIIA (transcription factor for polymerase III A). The 5S rRNA-derived exon in TFIIIA gene exists in all representative land plant species but not in green algae and nonplant species, suggesting it is specific to land plants. TFIIIA is essential for RNA polymerase III-based transcription of 5S rRNA in eukaryotes. Integrating comparative genomics and molecular biology revealed that the conserved cassette exon derived from 5S rRNA is coupled with nonsense-mediated mRNA decay. Utilizing multiple independent Arabidopsis overexpressing TFIIIA transgenic lines under osmotic and salt stress, strong accordance between phenotypic and molecular evidence reveals the biological relevance of AS of the exonized 5S rRNA in quantitative autoregulation of TFIIIA homeostasis. Most significantly, this study provides the first evidence of ancient exaptation of 5S rRNA in plants, suggesting a novel gene regulation model mediated by the AS of an anciently exonized noncoding element.

  8. Global regulatory mechanism underlying the activation of an exon network required for neurogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Raj, Bushra; Irimia, Manuel; Braunschweig, Ulrich; Sterne-Weiler, Timothy; O’Hanlon, Dave; Yuan-Lin, Zhen; Chen, Ginny I.; Easton, Laura; Ule, Jernej; Gingras, Anne-Claude; Eyras, Eduardo; Blencowe, Benjamin J.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY The vertebrate and neural-specific SR-related protein nSR100/SRRM4 regulates an extensive program of alternative splicing with critical roles in nervous system development. However, the mechanism by which nSR100 controls its target exons is poorly understood. We demonstrate that nSR100-dependent neural exons are associated with a unique configuration of intronic cis-elements that promote rapid switch-like regulation during neurogenesis. A key feature of this configuration is the insertion of specialized intronic enhancers between polypyrimidine tracts and acceptor sites that bind nSR100 to potently activate exon inclusion in neural cells, while weakening 3′ splice site recognition and contributing to exon skipping in non-neural cells. nSR100 further operates by forming multiple interactions with early spliceosome components bound proximal to 3′ splice sites. These multifaceted interactions achieve dominance over neural exon silencing mediated by the splicing regulator PTBP1. The results thus illuminate a widespread mechanism by which a critical neural exon network is activated during neurogenesis. PMID:25219497

  9. Crystal Structure of the CLOCK Transactivation Domain Exon19 in Complex with a Repressor.

    PubMed

    Hou, Zhiqiang; Su, Lijing; Pei, Jimin; Grishin, Nick V; Zhang, Hong

    2017-08-01

    In the canonical clock model, CLOCK:BMAL1-mediated transcriptional activation is feedback regulated by its repressors CRY and PER and, in association with other coregulators, ultimately generates oscillatory gene expression patterns. How CLOCK:BMAL1 interacts with coregulator(s) is not well understood. Here we report the crystal structures of the mouse CLOCK transactivating domain Exon19 in complex with CIPC, a potent circadian repressor that functions independently of CRY and PER. The Exon19:CIPC complex adopts a three-helical coiled-coil bundle conformation containing two Exon19 helices and one CIPC. Unique to Exon19:CIPC, three highly conserved polar residues, Asn341 of CIPC and Gln544 of the two Exon19 helices, are located at the mid-section of the coiled-coil bundle interior and form hydrogen bonds with each other. Combining results from protein database search, sequence analysis, and mutagenesis studies, we discovered for the first time that CLOCK Exon19:CIPC interaction is a conserved transcription regulatory mechanism among mammals, fish, flies, and other invertebrates. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. A multiplexed fragment analysis-based assay for detection of JAK2 exon 12 mutations.

    PubMed

    Furtado, Larissa V; Weigelin, Helmut C; Elenitoba-Johnson, Kojo S J; Betz, Bryan L

    2013-09-01

    Mutations within exon 12 of the JAK2 gene occur in most cases of JAK2 V617F-mutation negative polycythemia vera. Several methods have been developed to identify exon 12 mutations, with both Sanger sequencing and high resolution melting (HRM) being widely used. However, mutations can occur at allelic levels lower than 15%, which may hamper detection by these methods. We developed a novel fragment analysis-based assay capable of detecting nearly all JAK2 exon 12 mutations associated with polycythemia vera down to a sensitivity of 2% mutant allele. Test results were reviewed from a set of 20 reference cases and 1731 consecutive specimens that were referred to our laboratory for testing. Assay performance was compared to sequencing and HRM across a series of 27 specimens with JAK2 exon 12 mutations. Positive cases consisted of 22 with deletion mutations, four with duplications, and one with K539L. Nine cases had mutation levels between 6% and 15% that may not be reliably detected by sequencing or HRM. All cases were easily interpreted in the fragment analysis assay. Sequencing, HRM, and fragment analysis each represent viable platforms for detection of JAK2 exon 12 mutations. Our method performed favorably by providing a simple, robust, and highly sensitive solution for JAK2 exon 12 mutation testing.

  11. Single exon-resolution targeted chromosomal microarray analysis of known and candidate intellectual disability genes

    PubMed Central

    Tucker, Tracy; Zahir, Farah R; Griffith, Malachi; Delaney, Allen; Chai, David; Tsang, Erica; Lemyre, Emmanuelle; Dobrzeniecka, Sylvia; Marra, Marco; Eydoux, Patrice; Langlois, Sylvie; Hamdan, Fadi F; Michaud, Jacques L; Friedman, Jan M

    2014-01-01

    Intellectual disability affects about 3% of individuals globally, with∼50% idiopathic. We designed an exonic-resolution array targeting all known submicroscopic chromosomal intellectual disability syndrome loci, causative genes for intellectual disability, and potential candidate genes, all genes encoding glutamate receptors and epigenetic regulators. Using this platform, we performed chromosomal microarray analysis on 165 intellectual disability trios (affected child and both normal parents). We identified and independently validated 36 de novo copy-number changes in 32 trios. In all, 67% of the validated events were intragenic, involving only exon 1 (which includes the promoter sequence according to our design), exon 1 and adjacent exons, or one or more exons excluding exon 1. Seventeen of the 36 copy-number variants involve genes known to cause intellectual disability. Eleven of these, including seven intragenic variants, are clearly pathogenic (involving STXBP1, SHANK3 (3 patients), IL1RAPL1, UBE2A, NRXN1, MEF2C, CHD7, 15q24 and 9p24 microdeletion), two are likely pathogenic (PI4KA, DCX), two are unlikely to be pathogenic (GRIK2, FREM2), and two are unclear (ARID1B, 15q22 microdeletion). Twelve individuals with genomic imbalances identified by our array were tested with a clinical microarray, and six had a normal result. We identified de novo copy-number variants within genes not previously implicated in intellectual disability and uncovered pathogenic variation of known intellectual disability genes below the detection limit of standard clinical diagnostic chromosomal microarray analysis. PMID:24253858

  12. Single exon-resolution targeted chromosomal microarray analysis of known and candidate intellectual disability genes.

    PubMed

    Tucker, Tracy; Zahir, Farah R; Griffith, Malachi; Delaney, Allen; Chai, David; Tsang, Erica; Lemyre, Emmanuelle; Dobrzeniecka, Sylvia; Marra, Marco; Eydoux, Patrice; Langlois, Sylvie; Hamdan, Fadi F; Michaud, Jacques L; Friedman, Jan M

    2014-06-01

    Intellectual disability affects about 3% of individuals globally, with∼50% idiopathic. We designed an exonic-resolution array targeting all known submicroscopic chromosomal intellectual disability syndrome loci, causative genes for intellectual disability, and potential candidate genes, all genes encoding glutamate receptors and epigenetic regulators. Using this platform, we performed chromosomal microarray analysis on 165 intellectual disability trios (affected child and both normal parents). We identified and independently validated 36 de novo copy-number changes in 32 trios. In all, 67% of the validated events were intragenic, involving only exon 1 (which includes the promoter sequence according to our design), exon 1 and adjacent exons, or one or more exons excluding exon 1. Seventeen of the 36 copy-number variants involve genes known to cause intellectual disability. Eleven of these, including seven intragenic variants, are clearly pathogenic (involving STXBP1, SHANK3 (3 patients), IL1RAPL1, UBE2A, NRXN1, MEF2C, CHD7, 15q24 and 9p24 microdeletion), two are likely pathogenic (PI4KA, DCX), two are unlikely to be pathogenic (GRIK2, FREM2), and two are unclear (ARID1B, 15q22 microdeletion). Twelve individuals with genomic imbalances identified by our array were tested with a clinical microarray, and six had a normal result. We identified de novo copy-number variants within genes not previously implicated in intellectual disability and uncovered pathogenic variation of known intellectual disability genes below the detection limit of standard clinical diagnostic chromosomal microarray analysis.

  13. Endogenous Multiple Exon Skipping and Back-Splicing at the DMD Mutation Hotspot

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Hitoshi; Aoki, Yoshitsugu; Kameyama, Toshiki; Saito, Takashi; Masuda, Satoru; Tanihata, Jun; Nagata, Tetsuya; Mayeda, Akila; Takeda, Shin’ichi; Tsukahara, Toshifumi

    2016-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a severe muscular disorder. It was reported that multiple exon skipping (MES), targeting exon 45–55 of the DMD gene, might improve patients’ symptoms because patients who have a genomic deletion of all these exons showed very mild symptoms. Thus, exon 45–55 skipping treatments for DMD have been proposed as a potential clinical cure. Herein, we detected the expression of endogenous exons 44–56 connected mRNA transcript of the DMD using total RNAs derived from human normal skeletal muscle by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), and identified a total of eight types of MES products around the hotspot. Surprisingly, the 5′ splice sites of recently reported post-transcriptional introns (remaining introns after co-transcriptional splicing) act as splicing donor sites for MESs. We also tested exon combinations to generate DMD circular RNAs (circRNAs) and determined the preferential splice sites of back-splicing, which are involved not only in circRNA generation, but also in MESs. Our results fit the current circRNA-generation model, suggesting that upstream post-transcriptional introns trigger MES and generate circRNA because its existence is critical for the intra-intronic interaction or for extremely distal splicing. PMID:27754374

  14. Non-Ambulant Duchenne Patients Theoretically Treatable by Exon 53 Skipping have Severe Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Servais, Laurent; Montus, Marie; Guiner, Caroline Le; Ben Yaou, Rabah; Annoussamy, Mélanie; Moraux, Amélie; Hogrel, Jean-Yves; Seferian, Andreea M.; Zehrouni, Karima; Le Moing, Anne-Gaëlle; Gidaro, Teresa; Vanhulle, Catherine; Laugel, Vincent; Butoianu, Nina; Cuisset, Jean-Marie; Sabouraud, Pascal; Cances, Claude; Klein, Andrea; Leturcq, France; Moullier, Philippe; Voit, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background: Exon skipping therapy is an emerging approach in Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD). Antisense oligonucleotides that induce skipping of exon 51, 44, 45, or 53 are currently being evaluated in clinical trials. These trials were designed on the basis of data available in general DMD population. Objectives: Our objective was to compare the clinical and functional statuses of non-ambulant DMD patients theoretically treatable by exon 53 skipping and of DMD patients with other mutations. Methods: We first compared fifteen non-ambulant DMD patients carrying deletions theoretically treatable by exon 53 skipping (DMD-53) with fifteen closely age-matched DMD patients with mutations not treatable by exon 53 skipping (DMD-all-non-53) then with fifteen DMD patients carrying deletions not treatable by exon 53 skipping (DMD-del-non-53). Results: We found that DMD-53 patients had a lower left ventricular ejection fraction, more contractures and they tend to have weaker grips and pinch strengths than other DMD patients. DMD-53 patients lost ambulation significantly younger than other DMD patients. This result was confirmed by comparing ages at loss of ambulation in all non-ambulant DMD patients of the DMD cohort identified in a molecular diagnostic lab. Conclusions: These prospective and retrospective data demonstrate that DMD-53 patients have clinically more severe phenotypes than other DMD patients. PMID:27858743

  15. Antisense-mediated exon skipping: A versatile tool with therapeutic and research applications

    PubMed Central

    Aartsma-Rus, Annemieke; van Ommen, Gert-Jan B.

    2007-01-01

    Antisense-mediated modulation of splicing is one of the few fields where antisense oligonucleotides (AONs) have been able to live up to their expectations. In this approach, AONs are implemented to restore cryptic splicing, to change levels of alternatively spliced genes, or, in case of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), to skip an exon in order to restore a disrupted reading frame. The latter allows the generation of internally deleted, but largely functional, dystrophin proteins and would convert a severe DMD into a milder Becker muscular dystrophy phenotype. In fact, exon skipping is currently one of the most promising therapeutic tools for DMD, and a successful first-in-man trial has recently been completed. In this review the applicability of exon skipping for DMD and other diseases is described. For DMD AONs have been designed for numerous exons, which has given us insight into their mode of action, splicing in general, and splicing of the DMD gene in particular. In addition, retrospective analysis resulted in guidelines for AON design for DMD and most likely other genes as well. This knowledge allows us to optimize therapeutic exon skipping, but also opens up a range of other applications for the exon skipping approach. PMID:17684229

  16. Competing RNA secondary structures are required for mutually exclusive splicing of the Dscam exon 6 cluster.

    PubMed

    May, Gemma E; Olson, Sara; McManus, C Joel; Graveley, Brenton R

    2011-02-01

    Alternative splicing of eukaryotic pre-mRNAs is an important mechanism for generating proteome diversity and regulating gene expression. The Drosophila melanogaster Down Syndrome Cell Adhesion Molecule (Dscam) gene is an extreme example of mutually exclusive splicing. Dscam contains 95 alternatively spliced exons that potentially encode 38,016 distinct mRNA and protein isoforms. We previously identified two sets of conserved sequence elements, the docking site and selector sequences in the Dscam exon 6 cluster, which contains 48 mutually exclusive exons. These elements were proposed to engage in competing RNA secondary structures required for mutually exclusive splicing, though this model has not yet been experimentally tested. Here we describe a new system that allowed us to demonstrate that the docking site and selector sequences are indeed required for exon 6 mutually exclusive splicing and that the strength of these RNA structures determines the frequency of exon 6 inclusion. We also show that the function of the docking site has been conserved for ~500 million years of evolution. This work demonstrates that conserved intronic sequences play a functional role in mutually exclusive splicing of the Dscam exon 6 cluster.

  17. Critical Glycosylated Residues in Exon Three of Erythrocyte Glycophorin A Engage Plasmodium falciparum EBA-175 and Define Receptor Specificity

    PubMed Central

    Salinas, Nichole D.; Paing, May M.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Erythrocyte invasion is an essential step in the pathogenesis of malaria. The erythrocyte binding-like (EBL) family of Plasmodium falciparum proteins recognizes glycophorins (Gp) on erythrocytes and plays a critical role in attachment during invasion. However, the molecular basis for specific receptor recognition by each parasite ligand has remained elusive, as is the case with the ligand/receptor pair P. falciparum EBA-175 (PfEBA-175)/GpA. This is due largely to difficulties in producing properly glycosylated and functional receptors. Here, we developed an expression system to produce recombinant glycosylated and functional GpA, as well as mutations and truncations. We identified the essential binding region and determinants for PfEBA-175 engagement, demonstrated that these determinants are required for the inhibition of parasite growth, and identified the glycans important in mediating the PfEBA-175–GpA interaction. The results suggest that PfEBA-175 engages multiple glycans of GpA encoded by exon 3 and that the presentation of glycans is likely required for high-avidity binding. The absence of exon 3 in GpB and GpE due to a splice site mutation confers specific recognition of GpA by PfEBA-175. We speculate that GpB and GpE may have arisen due to selective pressure to lose the PfEBA-175 binding site in GpA. The expression system described here has wider application for examining other EBL members important in parasite invasion, as well as additional pathogens that recognize glycophorins. The ability to define critical binding determinants in receptor-ligand interactions, as well as a system to genetically manipulate glycosylated receptors, opens new avenues for the design of interventions that disrupt parasite invasion. PMID:25205096

  18. Deciphering the impact of somatic mutations in exon 20 and exon 9 of PIK3CA gene in breast tumors among Indian women through molecular dynamics approach.

    PubMed

    Sudhakar, N; Priya Doss, C George; Thirumal Kumar, D; Chakraborty, Chiranjib; Anand, Kushi; Suresh, M

    2016-01-01

    We examined 25 breast tumor samples for somatic mutations in exon 20 and exon 9 of PIK3CA gene in South Indian population. Genomic DNA was isolated and amplified for PIK3CA gene, followed by direct sequencing of purified polymerase chain reaction products. We identified PI3K3CA mutations in 5 of 25 (20%), including four of the mutations in p.H1047R and one in p.H1047L. Nucleotide base substitution A to G (c.3140A > G) and A to T (c.3140A > T) results in p.H1047R and p.H1047L mutation in exon 20 of PIK3CA gene. We did not observe any mutation in exon 9 of PIK3CA gene. Furthermore, we investigated the effect of mutations on protein structure and function by the combination of sequence and structure-based in silico prediction methods. This determined the underlying relationship between the mutation and its phenotypic effects. Next step, we complemented by molecular dynamics simulation analysis (30 ns) of native and mutant structures that measured the effect of mutation on protein structure. The obtained results support that the application of computational methods helps predict the biological significance of mutations.

  19. JAK2 Exon 14 Deletion in Patients with Chronic Myeloproliferative Neoplasms

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Wanlong; Kantarjian, Hagop; Zhang, Xi; Wang, Xiuqiang; Zhang, Zhong; Yeh, Chen-Hsiung; O'Brien, Susan; Giles, Francis; Bruey, Jean Marie; Albitar, Maher

    2010-01-01

    Background The JAK2 V617F mutation in exon 14 is the most common mutation in chronic myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs); deletion of the entire exon 14 is rarely detected. In our previous study of >10,000 samples from patients with suspected MPNs tested for JAK2 mutations by reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR) with direct sequencing, complete deletion of exon 14 (Δexon14) constituted <1% of JAK2 mutations. This appears to be an alternative splicing mutation, not detectable with DNA-based testing. Methodology/Principal Findings We investigated the possibility that MPN patients may express the JAK2 Δexon14 at low levels (<15% of total transcript) not routinely detectable by RT-PCR with direct sequencing. Using a sensitive RT-PCR–based fluorescent fragment analysis method to quantify JAK2 Δexon14 mRNA expression relative to wild-type, we tested 61 patients with confirmed MPNs, 183 with suspected MPNs (93 V617F-positive, 90 V617F-negative), and 46 healthy control subjects. The Δexon14 variant was detected in 9 of the 61 (15%) confirmed MPN patients, accounting for 3.96% to 33.85% (mean  = 12.04%) of total JAK2 transcript. This variant was also detected in 51 of the 183 patients with suspected MPNs (27%), including 20 of the 93 (22%) with V617F (mean [range] expression  = 5.41% [2.13%–26.22%]) and 31 of the 90 (34%) without V617F (mean [range] expression  = 3.88% [2.08%–12.22%]). Immunoprecipitation studies demonstrated that patients expressing Δexon14 mRNA expressed a corresponding truncated JAK2 protein. The Δexon14 variant was not detected in the 46 control subjects. Conclusions/Significance These data suggest that expression of the JAK2 Δexon14 splice variant, leading to a truncated JAK2 protein, is common in patients with MPNs. This alternatively spliced transcript appears to be more frequent in MPN patients without V617F mutation, in whom it might contribute to leukemogenesis. This mutation is missed if DNA rather than RNA is used for

  20. Canine and human gastrointestinal stromal tumors display similar mutations in c-KIT exon 11

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) are common mesenchymal neoplasms in the gastrointestinal tract of humans and dogs. Little is known about the pathogenesis of these tumors. This study evaluated the role of c-KIT in canine GISTs; specifically, we investigated activating mutations in exons 8, 9, 11, 13, and 17 of c-KIT and exons 12, 14, and 18 of platelet-derived growth factor receptor, alpha polypeptide (PDGFRA), all of which have been implicated in human GISTs. Methods Seventeen canine GISTs all confirmed to be positive for KIT immunostaining were studied. Exons 8, 9, 11, 13 and 17 of c-KIT and exons 12, 14, and 18 of PDGFRA, were amplified from DNA isolated from formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded samples. Results Of these seventeen cases, six amplicons of exon 11 of c-KIT showed aberrant bands on gel electrophoresis. Sequencing of these amplicons revealed heterozygous in-frame deletions in six cases. The mutations include two different but overlapping six base pair deletions. Exons 8, 9, 13, and 17 of c-KIT and exons 12, 14, and 18 of PDGFRA had no abnormalities detected by electrophoresis and sequencing did not reveal any mutations, other than synonymous single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) found in exon 11 of c-KIT and exons 12 and 14 of PDGFRA. Conclusions The deletion mutations detected in canine GISTs are similar to those previously found in the juxtamembrane domain of c-KIT in canine cutaneous mast cell tumors in our laboratory as well as to those reported in human GISTs. Interestingly, none of the other c-KIT or PDGFRA exons showed any abnormalities in our cases. This finding underlines the critical importance of c-KIT in the pathophysiology of canine GISTs. The expression of KIT and the identification of these activating mutations in c-KIT implicate KIT in the pathogenesis of these tumors. Our results indicate that mutations in c-KIT may be of prognostic significance and that targeting KIT may be a rational approach to treatment of these

  1. Systematic Dissection of Coding Exons at Single Nucleotide Resolution Supports an Additional Role in Cell-Specific Transcriptional Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Mee J.; Findlay, Gregory M.; Martin, Beth; Zhao, Jingjing; Bell, Robert J. A.; Smith, Robin P.; Ku, Angel A.; Shendure, Jay; Ahituv, Nadav

    2014-01-01

    In addition to their protein coding function, exons can also serve as transcriptional enhancers. Mutations in these exonic-enhancers (eExons) could alter both protein function and transcription. However, the functional consequence of eExon mutations is not well known. Here, using massively parallel reporter assays, we dissect the enhancer activity of three liver eExons (SORL1 exon 17, TRAF3IP2 exon 2, PPARG exon 6) at single nucleotide resolution in the mouse liver. We find that both synonymous and non-synonymous mutations have similar effects on enhancer activity and many of the deleterious mutation clusters overlap known liver-associated transcription factor binding sites. Carrying a similar massively parallel reporter assay in HeLa cells with these three eExons found differences in their mutation profiles compared to the liver, suggesting that enhancers could have distinct operating profiles in different tissues. Our results demonstrate that eExon mutations could lead to multiple phenotypes by disrupting both the protein sequence and enhancer activity and that enhancers can have distinct mutation profiles in different cell types. PMID:25340400

  2. RBFOX and PTBP1 proteins regulate the alternative splicing of micro-exons in human brain transcripts

    PubMed Central

    Sanchez-Pulido, Luis; Haerty, Wilfried

    2015-01-01

    Ninety-four percent of mammalian protein-coding exons exceed 51 nucleotides (nt) in length. The paucity of micro-exons (≤ 51 nt) suggests that their recognition and correct processing by the splicing machinery present greater challenges than for longer exons. Yet, because thousands of human genes harbor processed micro-exons, specialized mechanisms may be in place to promote their splicing. Here, we survey deep genomic data sets to define 13,085 micro-exons and to study their splicing mechanisms and molecular functions. More than 60% of annotated human micro-exons exhibit a high level of sequence conservation, an indicator of functionality. While most human micro-exons require splicing-enhancing genomic features to be processed, the splicing of hundreds of micro-exons is enhanced by the adjacent binding of splice factors in the introns of pre-messenger RNAs. Notably, splicing of a significant number of micro-exons was found to be facilitated by the binding of RBFOX proteins, which promote their inclusion in the brain, muscle, and heart. Our analyses suggest that accurate regulation of micro-exon inclusion by RBFOX proteins and PTBP1 plays an important role in the maintenance of tissue-specific protein–protein interactions. PMID:25524026

  3. RBFOX and PTBP1 proteins regulate the alternative splicing of micro-exons in human brain transcripts.

    PubMed

    Li, Yang I; Sanchez-Pulido, Luis; Haerty, Wilfried; Ponting, Chris P

    2015-01-01

    Ninety-four percent of mammalian protein-coding exons exceed 51 nucleotides (nt) in length. The paucity of micro-exons (≤ 51 nt) suggests that their recognition and correct processing by the splicing machinery present greater challenges than for longer exons. Yet, because thousands of human genes harbor processed micro-exons, specialized mechanisms may be in place to promote their splicing. Here, we survey deep genomic data sets to define 13,085 micro-exons and to study their splicing mechanisms and molecular functions. More than 60% of annotated human micro-exons exhibit a high level of sequence conservation, an indicator of functionality. While most human micro-exons require splicing-enhancing genomic features to be processed, the splicing of hundreds of micro-exons is enhanced by the adjacent binding of splice factors in the introns of pre-messenger RNAs. Notably, splicing of a significant number of micro-exons was found to be facilitated by the binding of RBFOX proteins, which promote their inclusion in the brain, muscle, and heart. Our analyses suggest that accurate regulation of micro-exon inclusion by RBFOX proteins and PTBP1 plays an important role in the maintenance of tissue-specific protein-protein interactions.

  4. Molecular basis of recessive congenital methemoglobinemia, types I and II: Exon skipping and three novel missense mutations in the NADH-cytochrome b5 reductase (diaphorase 1) gene.

    PubMed

    Kugler, W; Pekrun, A; Laspe, P; Erdlenbruch, B; Lakomek, M

    2001-04-01

    Hereditary methemoglobinemia due to reduced nicotin amide adenine dinucleotide (NADH)-cytochrome b5 reductase (b5r) deficiency is classified into an erythrocyte type (I) and a generalized type (II). We investigated the b5r gene of three unrelated patients with types I and II and found four novel mutations. The patient with type I was homozygous for a c.535 G-->A exchange in exon 6 (A179T). The patients with type II were found to be homozygous for a c.757 G-->A transition in exon 9 (V253M) and compound heterozygous for two mutations, respectively. One allele presented a c.379 A-->G transition (M127V). The second allele carried a sequence difference at the invariant 3' splice-acceptor dinucleotide of intron 4 (IVS4-2A-->G) resulting in skipping of exon 5. To characterize a possible effect of this mutation on RNA metabolism, poly(A)(+) RNA was analyzed by RT-PCR and sequencing. The results show that RNA is made from the allele harboring the 3'-splice site mutation. Furthermore, western blot analysis revealed a complete absence of immunologically detectable b5r in skin fibroblasts of this patient. The compound heterozygosity for the splice site and the missense mutations apparently caused hereditary methemoglobinemia type II in this patient. Hum Mutat 17:348, 2001. Copyright 2001 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  5. Novel CTCF binding at a site in exon1A of BCL6 is associated with active histone marks and a transcriptionally active locus.

    PubMed

    Batlle-López, A; Cortiguera, M G; Rosa-Garrido, M; Blanco, R; del Cerro, E; Torrano, V; Wagner, S D; Delgado, M D

    2015-01-08

    BCL6 is a zinc-finger transcriptional repressor, which is highly expressed in germinal centre B-cells and is essential for germinal centre formation and T-dependent antibody responses. Constitutive BCL6 expression is sufficient to produce lymphomas in mice. Deregulated expression of BCL6 due to chromosomal rearrangements, mutations of a negative autoregulatory site in the BCL6 promoter region and aberrant post-translational modifications have been detected in a number of human lymphomas. Tight lineage and temporal regulation of BCL6 is, therefore, required for normal immunity, and abnormal regulation occurs in lymphomas. CCCTC-binding factor (CTCF) is a multi-functional chromatin regulator, which has recently been shown to bind in a methylation-sensitive manner to sites within the BCL6 first intron. We demonstrate a novel CTCF-binding site in BCL6 exon1A within a potential CpG island, which is unmethylated both in cell lines and in primary lymphoma samples. CTCF binding, which was found in BCL6-expressing cell lines, correlated with the presence of histone variant H2A.Z and active histone marks, suggesting that CTCF induces chromatin modification at a transcriptionally active BCL6 locus. CTCF binding to exon1A was required to maintain BCL6 expression in germinal centre cells by avoiding BCL6-negative autoregulation. Silencing of CTCF in BCL6-expressing cells reduced BCL6 mRNA and protein expression, which is sufficient to induce B-cell terminal differentiation toward plasma cells. Moreover, lack of CTCF binding to exon1A shifts the BCL6 local chromatin from an active to a repressive state. This work demonstrates that, in contexts in which BCL6 is expressed, CTCF binding to BCL6 exon1A associates with epigenetic modifications indicative of transcriptionally open chromatin.

  6. Mutation Screening of Exons 7 and 13 of the TMC1 Gene in Autosomal Recessive Non-syndromic Hearing Loss (ARNSHL) in Iran

    PubMed Central

    Moradipour, Negar; Ghasemi-Dehkordi, Payam; Heibati, Fatemeh; Parchami-Barjui, Shahrbanuo; Abolhasani, Marziyeh; Rashki, Ahmad; Hashemzadeh-Chaleshtori, Morteza

    2016-01-01

    Background: Non-syndromic hearing loss (NSHL) is the most common birth defect and occurs in approximately 1/1,000 newborns. NSHL is a heterogeneous trait and can arise due to both genetic and environmental factors. Mutations of the transmembrane channel-like 1 (TMC1) gene cause non-syndromic deafness in humans and mice. Objectives: The aim of the present study was to investigate the association of TMC1 gene mutations of the locus DFNB7/11 in exons 7 and 13 in a cohort of 100 patients with hearing loss in Iran using polymerase chain reaction–single-stranded conformation polymorphism (PCR-SSCP), heteroduplex analysis (HA), and DNA sequencing. Patients and Methods: In this experimental study, the blood samples of 100 NSHL patients were collected from 10 provinces in Iran. These patients had a mean age of 16.5 ± 2.01 years and 74.15% of their parents had consanguinity. DNA was extracted from specimens and mutations of exons 7 and 13 of the TMC1 gene were investigated using PCR-SSCP. All samples were checked via HA reaction and suspected specimens with shift bands were subjected to DNA sequencing for investigation of any gene variation. Results: In this study, no mutation was found in the two exons of TMC1 gene. It was concluded from these results that mutations of the TMC1 gene’s special exons 7 and 13 have a low contribution in patients and are not great of clinical importance in these Iranian provinces. Conclusions: More studies are needed to investigate the relationship between other parts of this gene with hearing loss in different populations through the country. More research could clarify the role of this gene and its relation with deafness and provide essential information for the prevention and management of auditory disorders caused by genetic factors in the Iranian population. PMID:27247785

  7. Categorization and characterization of transcript-confirmed constitutively and alternatively spliced introns and exons from human.

    PubMed

    Clark, Francis; Thanaraj, T A

    2002-02-15

    By spliced alignment of human DNA and transcript sequence data we constructed a data set of transcript-confirmed exons and introns from 2793 genes, 796 of which (28%) were seen to have multiple isoforms. We find that over one-third of human exons can translate in more than one frame, and that this is highly correlated with G+C content. Introns containing adenosine at donor site position +3 (A3), rather than guanosine (G3), are more common in low G+C regions, while the converse is true in high G+C regions. These two classes of introns are shown to have distinct lengths, consensus sequences and correlations among splice signals, leading to the hypothesis that A3 donor sites are associated with exon definition, and G3 donor sites with intron definition. Minor classes of introns, including GC-AG, U12-type GT-AG, weak, and putative AG-dependant introns are identified and characterized. Cassette exons are more prevalent in low G+C regions, while exon isoforms are more prevalent in high G+C regions. Cassette exon events outnumber other alternative events, while exon isoform events involve truncation twice as often as extension, and occur at acceptor sites twice as often as at donor sites. Alternative splicing is usually associated with weak splice signals, and in a majority of cases, preserves the coding frame. The reported characteristics of constitutive and alternative splice signals, and the hypotheses offered regarding alternative splicing and genome organization, have important implications for experimental research into RNA processing. The 'AltExtron' data sets are available at http://www.bit.uq.edu.au/altExtron/ and http://www.ebi.ac.uk/~thanaraj/altExtron/.

  8. Development of Therapeutic Chimeric Uricase by Exon Replacement/Restoration and Site-Directed Mutagenesis

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Guangrong; Yang, Weizhen; Chen, Jing; Li, Miaomiao; Jiang, Nan; Zhao, Baixue; Chen, Si; Wang, Min; Chen, Jianhua

    2016-01-01

    The activity of urate oxidase was lost during hominoid evolution, resulting in high susceptibility to hyperuricemia and gout in humans. In order to develop a more “human-like” uricase for therapeutic use, exon replacement/restoration and site-directed mutagenesis were performed to obtain porcine–human uricase with higher homology to deduced human uricase (dHU) and increased uricolytic activity. In an exon replacement study, substitution of exon 6 in wild porcine uricase (wPU) gene with corresponding exon in dhu totally abolished its activity. Substitutions of exon 5, 3, and 1–2 led to 85%, 60%, and 45% loss of activity, respectively. However, replacement of exon 4 and 7–8 did not significantly change the enzyme activity. When exon 5, 6, and 3 in dhu were replaced by their counterparts in wpu, the resulting chimera H1-2P3H4P5-6H7-8 was active, but only about 28% of wPU. Multiple sequence alignment and homology modeling predicted that mutations of E24D and E83G in H1-2P3H4P5-6H7-8 were favorable for further increase of its activity. After site-directed mutagenesis, H1-2P3H4P5-6H7-8 (E24D & E83G) with increased homology (91.45%) with dHU and higher activity and catalytic efficiency than the FDA-approved porcine–baboon chimera (PBC) was obtained. It showed optimum activity at pH 8.5 and 35 °C and was stable in a pH range of 6.5–11.0 and temperature range of 20–40 °C. PMID:27213357

  9. Implications of single nucleotide polymorphisms in CD44 exon 2 for risk of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Juhua; Nagarkatti, Prakash S; Zhong, Yin; Zhang, Jiajia; Nagarkatti, Mitzi

    2011-09-01

    CD44 is a cell-surface glycoprotein involved in many cellular functions including lymphocyte activation, recirculation and homing, hematopoiesis and tumor metastasis, suggesting that CD44 may play an important role in breast cancer development. In this study, we examined whether CD44 exon 2 polymorphisms are associated with increased susceptibility to breast cancer. Direct nucleotide sequencing analysis showed that multiple single nucleotide polymorphisms were present in the CD44 exon 2 coding region in female patients with breast cancer. There was no significant difference in the frequency of any one single nucleotide polymorphism in the CD44 exon 2 coding region between patients with breast cancer and normal donors. However, CD44 polymorphisms in the CD44 exon 2 coding region were identified in approximately 40% of patients with breast cancer, which was significantly higher than in normal donors (odds ratio, 9.34; 95% confidence interval = 2.58-33.82; P < 0.0001). The Wilcoxon-Mann-Whitney test analysis showed that the patients with the CD44 polymorphisms in CD44 exon 2 coding sequence had breast cancer at earlier ages, 49 ± 3 versus 62 ± 2 years (P < 0.0005), and larger tumor burdens (4.9 ± 1.22 vs. 1.6 ± 0.15 mm, P < 0.01) at the time of diagnosis. Interestingly, African-American female patients having the CD44 polymorphisms in CD44 exon 2 coding sequence were diagnosed with breast cancer at very young age (41 ± 2 years). Our results show that CD44 exon 2 polymorphisms are associated with breast cancer development, and such analysis may be effectively used in the evaluation of risk, prediction of cancer, prevention, diagnosis, and epidemiological studies of breast cancer.

  10. Development of Therapeutic Chimeric Uricase by Exon Replacement/Restoration and Site-Directed Mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Xie, Guangrong; Yang, Weizhen; Chen, Jing; Li, Miaomiao; Jiang, Nan; Zhao, Baixue; Chen, Si; Wang, Min; Chen, Jianhua

    2016-05-20

    The activity of urate oxidase was lost during hominoid evolution, resulting in high susceptibility to hyperuricemia and gout in humans. In order to develop a more "human-like" uricase for therapeutic use, exon replacement/restoration and site-directed mutagenesis were performed to obtain porcine-human uricase with higher homology to deduced human uricase (dHU) and increased uricolytic activity. In an exon replacement study, substitution of exon 6 in wild porcine uricase (wPU) gene with corresponding exon in dhu totally abolished its activity. Substitutions of exon 5, 3, and 1-2 led to 85%, 60%, and 45% loss of activity, respectively. However, replacement of exon 4 and 7-8 did not significantly change the enzyme activity. When exon 5, 6, and 3 in dhu were replaced by their counterparts in wpu, the resulting chimera H1-2P₃H₄P5-6H7-8 was active, but only about 28% of wPU. Multiple sequence alignment and homology modeling predicted that mutations of E24D and E83G in H1-2P₃H₄P5-6H7-8 were favorable for further increase of its activity. After site-directed mutagenesis, H1-2P₃H₄P5-6H7-8 (E24D & E83G) with increased homology (91.45%) with dHU and higher activity and catalytic efficiency than the FDA-approved porcine-baboon chimera (PBC) was obtained. It showed optimum activity at pH 8.5 and 35 °C and was stable in a pH range of 6.5-11.0 and temperature range of 20-40 °C.

  11. Widespread exon skipping triggers degradation by nuclear RNA surveillance in fission yeast.

    PubMed

    Bitton, Danny A; Atkinson, Sophie R; Rallis, Charalampos; Smith, Graeme C; Ellis, David A; Chen, Yuan Y C; Malecki, Michal; Codlin, Sandra; Lemay, Jean-François; Cotobal, Cristina; Bachand, François; Marguerat, Samuel; Mata, Juan; Bähler, Jürg

    2015-06-01

    Exon skipping is considered a principal mechanism by which eukaryotic cells expand their transcriptome and proteome repertoires, creating different splice variants with distinct cellular functions. Here we analyze RNA-seq data from 116 transcriptomes in fission yeast (Schizosaccharomyces pombe), covering multiple physiological conditions as well as transcriptional and RNA processing mutants. We applied brute-force algorithms to detect all possible exon-skipping events, which were widespread but rare compared to normal splicing events. Exon-skipping events increased in cells deficient for the nuclear exosome or the 5'-3' exonuclease Dhp1, and also at late stages of meiotic differentiation when nuclear-exosome transcripts decreased. The pervasive exon-skipping transcripts were stochastic, did not increase in specific physiological conditions, and were mostly present at less than one copy per cell, even in the absence of nuclear RNA surveillance and during late meiosis. These exon-skipping transcripts are therefore unlikely to be functional and may reflect splicing errors that are actively removed by nuclear RNA surveillance. The average splicing rate by exon skipping was ∼ 0.24% in wild type and ∼ 1.75% in nuclear exonuclease mutants. We also detected approximately 250 circular RNAs derived from single or multiple exons. These circular RNAs were rare and stochastic, although a few became stabilized during quiescence and in splicing mutants. Using an exhaustive search algorithm, we also uncovered thousands of previously unknown splice sites, indicating pervasive splicing; yet most of these splicing variants were cryptic and increased in nuclear degradation mutants. This study highlights widespread but low frequency alternative or aberrant splicing events that are targeted by nuclear RNA surveillance.

  12. A Brassica exon array for whole-transcript gene expression profiling.

    PubMed

    Love, Christopher G; Graham, Neil S; O Lochlainn, Seosamh; Bowen, Helen C; May, Sean T; White, Philip J; Broadley, Martin R; Hammond, John P; King, Graham J

    2010-09-16

    Affymetrix GeneChip® arrays are used widely to study transcriptional changes in response to developmental and environmental stimuli. GeneChip® arrays comprise multiple 25-mer oligonucleotide probes per gene and retain certain advantages over direct sequencing. For plants, there are several public GeneChip® arrays whose probes are localised primarily in 3' exons. Plant whole-transcript (WT) GeneChip® arrays are not yet publicly available, although WT resolution is needed to study complex crop genomes such as Brassica, which are typified by segmental duplications containing paralogous genes and/or allopolyploidy. Available sequence data were sampled from the Brassica A and C genomes, and 142,997 gene models identified. The assembled gene models were then used to establish a comprehensive public WT exon array for transcriptomics studies. The Affymetrix GeneChip® Brassica Exon 1.0 ST Array is a 5 µM feature size array, containing 2.4 million 25-base oligonucleotide probes representing 135,201 gene models, with 15 probes per gene distributed among exons. Discrimination of the gene models was based on an E-value cut-off of 1E(-5), with ≤98% sequence identity. The 135 k Brassica Exon Array was validated by quantifying transcriptome differences between leaf and root tissue from a reference Brassica rapa line (R-o-18), and categorisation by Gene Ontologies (GO) based on gene orthology with Arabidopsis thaliana. Technical validation involved comparison of the exon array with a 60-mer array platform using the same starting RNA samples. The 135 k Brassica Exon Array is a robust platform. All data relating to the array design and probe identities are available in the public domain and are curated within the BrassEnsembl genome viewer at http://www.brassica.info/BrassEnsembl/index.html.

  13. A Brassica Exon Array for Whole-Transcript Gene Expression Profiling

    PubMed Central

    Love, Christopher G.; Graham, Neil S.; Ó Lochlainn, Seosamh; Bowen, Helen C.; May, Sean T.; White, Philip J.

    2010-01-01

    Affymetrix GeneChip® arrays are used widely to study transcriptional changes in response to developmental and environmental stimuli. GeneChip® arrays comprise multiple 25-mer oligonucleotide probes per gene and retain certain advantages over direct sequencing. For plants, there are several public GeneChip® arrays whose probes are localised primarily in 3′ exons. Plant whole-transcript (WT) GeneChip® arrays are not yet publicly available, although WT resolution is needed to study complex crop genomes such as Brassica, which are typified by segmental duplications containing paralogous genes and/or allopolyploidy. Available sequence data were sampled from the Brassica A and C genomes, and 142,997 gene models identified. The assembled gene models were then used to establish a comprehensive public WT exon array for transcriptomics studies. The Affymetrix GeneChip® Brassica Exon 1.0 ST Array is a 5 µM feature size array, containing 2.4 million 25-base oligonucleotide probes representing 135,201 gene models, with 15 probes per gene distributed among exons. Discrimination of the gene models was based on an E-value cut-off of 1E−5, with ≤98% sequence identity. The 135 k Brassica Exon Array was validated by quantifying transcriptome differences between leaf and root tissue from a reference Brassica rapa line (R-o-18), and categorisation by Gene Ontologies (GO) based on gene orthology with Arabidopsis thaliana. Technical validation involved comparison of the exon array with a 60-mer array platform using the same starting RNA samples. The 135 k Brassica Exon Array is a robust platform. All data relating to the array design and probe identities are available in the public domain and are curated within the BrassEnsembl genome viewer at http://www.brassica.info/BrassEnsembl/index.html. PMID:20862292

  14. Common exonic missense variants in the C2 domain of the human KIBRA protein modify lipid binding and cognitive performance.

    PubMed

    Duning, K; Wennmann, D O; Bokemeyer, A; Reissner, C; Wersching, H; Thomas, C; Buschert, J; Guske, K; Franzke, V; Flöel, A; Lohmann, H; Knecht, S; Brand, S-M; Pöter, M; Rescher, U; Missler, M; Seelheim, P; Pröpper, C; Boeckers, T M; Makuch, L; Huganir, R; Weide, T; Brand, E; Pavenstädt, H; Kremerskothen, J

    2013-06-18

    The human KIBRA gene has been linked to human cognition through a lead intronic single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP; rs17070145) that is associated with episodic memory performance and the risk to develop Alzheimer's disease. However, it remains unknown how this relates to the function of the KIBRA protein. Here, we identified two common missense SNPs (rs3822660G/T [M734I], rs3822659T/G [S735A]) in exon 15 of the human KIBRA gene to affect cognitive performance, and to be in almost complete linkage disequilibrium with rs17070145. The identified SNPs encode variants of the KIBRA C2 domain with distinct Ca(2+) dependent binding preferences for monophosphorylated phosphatidylinositols likely due to differences in the dynamics and folding of the lipid-binding pocket. Our results further implicate the KIBRA protein in higher brain function and provide direction to the cellular pathways involved.

  15. Common exonic missense variants in the C2 domain of the human KIBRA protein modify lipid binding and cognitive performance

    PubMed Central

    Duning, K; Wennmann, D O; Bokemeyer, A; Reissner, C; Wersching, H; Thomas, C; Buschert, J; Guske, K; Franzke, V; Flöel, A; Lohmann, H; Knecht, S; Brand, S-M; Pöter, M; Rescher, U; Missler, M; Seelheim, P; Pröpper, C; Boeckers, T M; Makuch, L; Huganir, R; Weide, T; Brand, E; Pavenstädt, H; Kremerskothen, J

    2013-01-01

    The human KIBRA gene has been linked to human cognition through a lead intronic single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP; rs17070145) that is associated with episodic memory performance and the risk to develop Alzheimer's disease. However, it remains unknown how this relates to the function of the KIBRA protein. Here, we identified two common missense SNPs (rs3822660G/T [M734I], rs3822659T/G [S735A]) in exon 15 of the human KIBRA gene to affect cognitive performance, and to be in almost complete linkage disequilibrium with rs17070145. The identified SNPs encode variants of the KIBRA C2 domain with distinct Ca2+ dependent binding preferences for monophosphorylated phosphatidylinositols likely due to differences in the dynamics and folding of the lipid-binding pocket. Our results further implicate the KIBRA protein in higher brain function and provide direction to the cellular pathways involved. PMID:23778582

  16. Tissue-specific expression of the human aromatase cytochrome P-450 gene by alternative use of multiple exons 1 and promoters, and switching of tissue-specific exons 1 in carcinogenesis.

    PubMed Central

    Harada, N; Utsumi, T; Takagi, Y

    1993-01-01

    Extensive screening of aromatase cDNA was carried out in cDNA libraries from various human tissues. The DNA sequences of all the isolated cDNA clones were identical in the region encoded by exons 2-10 of the aromatase gene. However, tissue-specific sequences, which were classified into four groups, were observed in the 5' portions of the clones corresponding to the region encoded by exon 1. All of them were also found in clones isolated from a human genomic library and mapped between exons 1 and 2 of the human aromatase gene reported previously, suggesting the presence of multiple exons 1 and promoters in the gene. Reverse transcription-PCR analyses of aromatase mRNAs in various tissues revealed that aromatase transcripts are tissue-specifically spliced by alternative use of multiple exons 1, although minor forms of the transcripts were also present in each tissue. Aromatase mRNA is spliced from 10 exons in most tissues, but from 9 exons in the prostate and from 10 or 11 exons in the placenta. This suggests that tissue-specific regulation of the aromatase gene in various tissues may be explained by alternative use of multiple exons 1 flanked with tissue-specific promoters. The alternative use of multiple exons 1 for liver transcripts was found to change developmentally. Furthermore, switch from an adipose-specific exon 1 to another type of exon 1 was observed in aromatase transcripts of adipose tissues of three of five breast cancer patients. Images Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:8248245

  17. Control of Human PLP1 Expression Through Transcriptional Regulatory Elements and Alternatively Spliced Exons in Intron 1

    PubMed Central

    Hamdan, Hamdan; Kockara, Neriman T.; Jolly, Lee Ann; Haun, Shirley

    2015-01-01

    *These authors contributed equally to this work.Although the myelin proteolipid protein gene (PLP1) encodes the most abundant protein in central nervous system (CNS) myelin, not much is known about the mechanisms that govern expression of the human gene (hPLP1). Much more is known about the processes that regulate Plp1 gene expression in rodents. From studies with Plp1-lacZ transgenic mice, it was determined that the first intron of mouse Plp1 (mPlp1) is required to attain high levels of expression in brain, concurrent with the active myelination period. Other studies have suggested that within mPlp1 intron 1 (>8 kb) lie several regions with enhancer-like activity. To test whether these sequences (and possibly others) in hPLP1 intron 1 are functional, deletion-transfection analysis was performed with hPLP1-lacZ constructs that contain various portions of the intron, or lack it altogether. Results presented here demonstrate the importance of hPLP1 intron 1 in achieving maximal levels of expression in the immortalized oligodendroglial cell line, Oli-neu. Deletion analysis indicates that the intron contains multiple positive regulatory elements which are active in Oli-neu cells. Some of these elements appear to be functionally conserved between human and mouse, while others are not. Furthermore, our studies demonstrate that multiple splice variants can be formed due to inclusion of extra (supplementary) exons from what is classically thought of as hPLP1 intron 1. Thus, splicing of these novel exons (which are not recognized as such in mPlp1 due to lack of conserved splice sites) must utilize factors common to both human and mouse since Oli-neu cells are of mouse origin. PMID:25694552

  18. Mutational analysis of the GNAS1 exons encoding the stimulatory G protein in five patients with pseudohypoparathyroidism type 1a.

    PubMed

    Lim, Sharon H M; Poh, Larry K S; Cowell, Chris T; Tey, Beng-Hea; Loke, Kah-Yin

    2002-03-01

    We analyzed the GNAS1 gene in five patients with pseudohypoparathyroidism type 1a (PHP1a) by performing polymerase chain reaction, followed by sequencing all 13 exons of the gene, single-stranded conformational polymorphism (SSCP) or heteroduplex analysis (HD). Three novel mutations were discovered: (1) a de novo 3 bp insertion of CTG in codon 47 of exon 1; (2) a missense mutation 1103T in exon 4; and (3) a de novo mutation of Arg280Gly in exon 10. Two other mutations, previously described in the literature, include: (1) a de novo 4 bp deletion (deltaGACT) involving codons 189 and 190 in exon 7, and (2) a deletion of a cytosine nucleotide at codon 115 in exon 5. We conclude that mutational analysis of the GNAS1 gene is a strong supportive tool for the diagnosis of PHP1a, and is a useful adjunct to the synthetic parathyroid hormone infusion test for PTH resistance.

  19. Therapeutic NOTCH3 cysteine correction in CADASIL using exon skipping: in vitro proof of concept.

    PubMed

    Rutten, Julie W; Dauwerse, Hans G; Peters, Dorien J M; Goldfarb, Andrew; Venselaar, Hanka; Haffner, Christof; van Ommen, Gert-Jan B; Aartsma-Rus, Annemieke M; Lesnik Oberstein, Saskia A J

    2016-04-01

    Cerebral autosomal dominant arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leukoencephalopathy, or CADASIL, is a hereditary cerebral small vessel disease caused by characteristic cysteine altering missense mutations in the NOTCH3 gene. NOTCH3 mutations in CADASIL result in an uneven number of cysteine residues in one of the 34 epidermal growth factor like-repeat (EGFr) domains of the NOTCH3 protein. The consequence of an unpaired cysteine residue in an EGFr domain is an increased multimerization tendency of mutant NOTCH3, leading to toxic accumulation of the protein in the (cerebro)vasculature, and ultimately reduced cerebral blood flow, recurrent stroke and vascular dementia. There is no therapy to delay or alleviate symptoms in CADASIL. We hypothesized that exclusion of the mutant EGFr domain from NOTCH3 would abolish the detrimental effect of the unpaired cysteine and thus prevent toxic NOTCH3 accumulation and the negative cascade of events leading to CADASIL. To accomplish this NOTCH3 cysteine correction by EGFr domain exclusion, we used pre-mRNA antisense-mediated skipping of specific NOTCH3 exons. Selection of these exons was achieved using in silico studies and based on the criterion that skipping of a particular exon or exon pair would modulate the protein in such a way that the mutant EGFr domain is eliminated, without otherwise corrupting NOTCH3 structure and function. Remarkably, we found that this strategy closely mimics evolutionary events, where the elimination and fusion of NOTCH EGFr domains led to the generation of four functional NOTCH homologues. We modelled a selection of exon skip strategies using cDNA constructs and show that the skip proteins retain normal protein processing, can bind ligand and be activated by ligand. We then determined the technical feasibility of targeted NOTCH3 exon skipping, by designing antisense oligonucleotides targeting exons 2-3, 4-5 and 6, which together harbour the majority of distinct CADASIL-causing mutations

  20. Identification of various exon combinations of the ews/fli1 translocation: an optimized RT-PCR method for paraffin embedded tissue -- a report by the CWS-study group.

    PubMed

    Stegmaier, S; Leuschner, I; Aakcha-Rudel, E; Münch, P; Kazanowska, B; Bekassy, A; Treuner, J; Koscielniak, E

    2004-01-01

    Chromosomal translocations t(11;22) (q24;q12) are characteristic of about 80-90 % of Ewing's sarcoma family of tumors [bone and soft tissue Ewing's sarcoma and peripheral neuroectodermal tumors (PNET)]. They generate ews/fli1 rearrangements showing great diversity in breakpoint exon combination. In about 5 % of Ewing's tumors, ews is fused to the erg gene at 21q22. The various chimeric proteins encoded may function as aberrant oncogenic transcription factors. These specific translocations can be used for exact molecular diagnosis in these poorly differentiated small round-cell tumors. Moreover, the prognostic relevance of different translocational variants has been previously suggested. Furthermore, the sensitive molecular detection of minimal metastatic and residual disease and its clinical significance can be evaluated. To address these questions more definitively in the large number of patients registered in multicenter studies, it is often necessary to access archival paraffin-embedded tumor tissue if no fresh or frozen tumor material is available for analysis by RT (reverse transcription)-PCR. Specific problems arise from formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded tissue due to the degradation of RNA and insufficient extraction efficiency. Therefore, primer distance and product size are limited for successful PCR amplification. This conflicts with the requirement for identification of various possible exon combinations by PCR simultaneously using one single primer pair with larger distance. We examined paraffin embedded soft part tumor tissue samples from 47 Ewing's tumor patients. Patients were treated according to either CWS (Cooperative Weichteilsarkomstudie, CWS-91 or CWS-96) or Euro-E.W.I.N.G. 99 therapy protocols. We established a novel RT-PCR method, using 3 different exon specific sets of PCR primer pairs, selected according to the coding ews and fli1 nucleotide sequences (NCBI database), suitable for RT-PCR identification of variant ews/fli1 fusion

  1. Intrasplicing coordinates alternative first exons with alternative splicing in the protein 4.1R gene

    SciTech Connect

    Conboy, John G.; Parra, Marilyn K.; Tan, Jeff S.; Mohandas, Narla; Conboy, John G.

    2008-11-07

    In the protein 4.1R gene, alternative first exons splice differentially to alternative 3' splice sites far downstream in exon 2'/2 (E2'/2). We describe a novel intrasplicing mechanism by which exon 1A (E1A) splices exclusively to the distal E2'/2 acceptor via two nested splicing reactions regulated by novel properties of exon 1B (E1B). E1B behaves as an exon in the first step, using its consensus 5' donor to splice to the proximal E2'/2 acceptor. A long region of downstream intron is excised, juxtaposing E1B with E2'/2 to generate a new composite acceptor containing the E1B branchpoint/pyrimidine tract and E2 distal 3' AG-dinucleotide. Next, the upstream E1A splices over E1B to this distal acceptor, excising the remaining intron plus E1B and E2' to form mature E1A/E2 product. We mapped branch points for both intrasplicing reactions and demonstrated that mutation of the E1B 5' splice site or branchpoint abrogates intrasplicing. In the 4.1R gene, intrasplicing ultimately determines N-terminal protein structure and function. More generally, intrasplicing represents a new mechanism whereby alternative promoters can be coordinated with downstream alternative splicing.

  2. Distribution of SR protein exonic splicing enhancer motifs in human protein-coding genes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jinhua; Smith, Philip J; Krainer, Adrian R; Zhang, Michael Q

    2005-01-01

    Exonic splicing enhancers (ESEs) are pre-mRNA cis-acting elements required for splice-site recognition. We previously developed a web-based program called ESEfinder that scores any sequence for the presence of ESE motifs recognized by the human SR proteins SF2/ASF, SRp40, SRp55 and SC35 (http://rulai.cshl.edu/tools/ESE/). Using ESEfinder, we have undertaken a large-scale analysis of ESE motif distribution in human protein-coding genes. Significantly higher frequencies of ESE motifs were observed in constitutive internal protein-coding exons, compared with both their flanking intronic regions and with pseudo exons. Statistical analysis of ESE motif frequency distributions revealed a complex relationship between splice-site strength and increased or decreased frequencies of particular SR protein motifs. Comparison of constitutively and alternatively spliced exons demonstrated slightly weaker splice-site scores, as well as significantly fewer ESE motifs, in the alternatively spliced group. Our results underline the importance of ESE-mediated SR protein function in the process of exon definition, in the context of both constitutive splicing and regulated alternative splicing.

  3. Synonymous mutations in CFTR exon 12 affect splicing and are not neutral in evolution

    PubMed Central

    Pagani, Franco; Raponi, Michela; Baralle, Francisco E.

    2005-01-01

    It is well established that exonic sequences contain regulatory elements of splicing that overlap with coding capacity. However, the conflict between ensuring splicing efficiency and preserving the coding capacity for an optimal protein during evolution has not been specifically analyzed. In fact, studies on genomic variability in fields as diverse as clinical genetics and molecular evolution mainly focus on the effect of mutations on protein function. Synonymous variations, in particular, are assumed to be functionally neutral both in clinical diagnosis and when measuring evolutionary distances between species. Using the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) exon 12 splicing as a model, we have established that about one quarter of synonymous variations result in exon skipping and, hence, in an inactive CFTR protein. Furthermore, comparative splicing evaluation of mammalian sequence divergences showed that artificial combinations of CFTR exon 12 synonymous and nonsynonymous substitutions are incompatible with normal RNA processing. In particular, the combination of the mouse synonymous with the human missense variations causes exon skipping. It follows that there are two sequential levels at which evolutionary selection of genomic variants take place: splicing control and protein function optimization. PMID:15840711

  4. [Exon skipping therapy for Duchenne muscular dystrophy by using antisense Morpholino].

    PubMed

    Takeda, Shin'ichi

    2009-11-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is caused by the lack of dystrophin protein at the sarcolemma. Exon skipping by antisense oligonucleotides is a novel method to restore the reading frame of the mutated DMD gene, and rescue dystrophin production. We recently reported that systemic delivery of Morpholino antisense oligonucleotides targeting exon 6 and 8 of the canine DMD gene, efficiently recovered functional dystrophin proteins at the sarcolamma of dystrophic dogs, and improved performance of affected dogs without serious side effects (Yokota et al., Ann Neurol. 65 (6): 667-676, 2009). To optimize therapeutic antisense Morpholinos for more frequent mutations of the DMD gene, we designed antisense Morpholinos targeting exon 51 of the mouse DMD gene, and injected them separately or in combination into the muscles of mdx52 mice, in which exon 52 has been deleted by a gene targeting technique (Araki et al., 1997). We also tried systemic delivery of antisense Morpholino to skip exon 51 in mdx52 mice. It is important to verify the effectiveness and side effects of antisense Morpholino in experimental animal models such as dystrophic dogs or mdx52 mice, before clinical trials in DMD patients.

  5. Targeted skipping of human dystrophin exons in transgenic mouse model systemically for antisense drug development.

    PubMed

    Wu, Bo; Benrashid, Ehsan; Lu, Peijuan; Cloer, Caryn; Zillmer, Allen; Shaban, Mona; Lu, Qi Long

    2011-01-01

    Antisense therapy has recently been demonstrated with great potential for targeted exon skipping and restoration of dystrophin production in cultured muscle cells and in muscles of Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD) patients. Therapeutic values of exon skipping critically depend on efficacy of the drugs, antisense oligomers (AOs). However, no animal model has been established to test AO targeting human dystrophin exon in vivo systemically. In this study, we applied Vivo-Morpholino to the hDMD mouse, a transgenic model carrying the full-length human dystrophin gene, and achieved for the first time more than 70% efficiency of targeted human dystrophin exon skipping in vivo systemically. We also established a GFP-reporter myoblast culture to screen AOs targeting human dystrophin exon 50. Antisense efficiency for most AOs is consistent between the reporter cells, human myoblasts and in the hDMD mice in vivo. However, variation in efficiency was also clearly observed. A combination of in vitro cell culture and a Vivo-Morpholino based evaluation in vivo systemically in the hDMD mice therefore may represent a prudent approach for selecting AO drug and to meet the regulatory requirement.

  6. iGEMS: an integrated model for identification of alternative exon usage events

    PubMed Central

    Sood, Sanjana; Szkop, Krzysztof J.; Nakhuda, Asif; Gallagher, Iain J.; Murie, Carl; Brogan, Robert J.; Kaprio, Jaakko; Kainulainen, Heikki; Atherton, Philip J.; Kujala, Urho M.; Gustafsson, Thomas; Larsson, Ola; Timmons, James A.

    2016-01-01

    DNA microarrays and RNAseq are complementary methods for studying RNA molecules. Current computational methods to determine alternative exon usage (AEU) using such data require impractical visual inspection and still yield high false-positive rates. Integrated Gene and Exon Model of Splicing (iGEMS) adapts a gene-level residuals model with a gene size adjusted false discovery rate and exon-level analysis to circumvent these limitations. iGEMS was applied to two new DNA microarray datasets, including the high coverage Human Transcriptome Arrays 2.0 and performance was validated using RT-qPCR. First, AEU was studied in adipocytes treated with (n = 9) or without (n = 8) the anti-diabetes drug, rosiglitazone. iGEMS identified 555 genes with AEU, and robust verification by RT-qPCR (∼90%). Second, in a three-way human tissue comparison (muscle, adipose and blood, n = 41) iGEMS identified 4421 genes with at least one AEU event, with excellent RT-qPCR verification (95%, n = 22). Importantly, iGEMS identified a variety of AEU events, including 3′UTR extension, as well as exon inclusion/exclusion impacting on protein kinase and extracellular matrix domains. In conclusion, iGEMS is a robust method for identification of AEU while the variety of exon usage between human tissues is 5–10 times more prevalent than reported by the Genotype-Tissue Expression consortium using RNA sequencing. PMID:27095197

  7. TIA1 prevents skipping of a critical exon associated with spinal muscular atrophy.

    PubMed

    Singh, Natalia N; Seo, Joonbae; Ottesen, Eric W; Shishimorova, Maria; Bhattacharya, Dhruva; Singh, Ravindra N

    2011-03-01

    Prevention of skipping of exon 7 during pre-mRNA splicing of Survival Motor Neuron 2 (SMN2) holds the promise for cure of spinal muscular atrophy (SMA), a leading genetic cause of infant mortality. Here, we report T-cell-restricted intracellular antigen 1 (TIA1) and TIA1-related (TIAR) proteins as intron-associated positive regulators of SMN2 exon 7 splicing. We show that TIA1/TIAR stimulate exon recognition in an entirely novel context in which intronic U-rich motifs are separated from the 5' splice site by overlapping inhibitory elements. TIA1 and TIAR are modular proteins with three N-terminal RNA recognition motifs (RRMs) and a C-terminal glutamine-rich (Q-rich) domain. Our results reveal that any one RRM in combination with a Q domain is necessary and sufficient for TIA1-associated regulation of SMN2 exon 7 splicing in vivo. We also show that increased expression of TIA1 counteracts the inhibitory effect of polypyrimidine tract binding protein, a ubiquitously expressed factor recently implicated in regulation of SMN exon 7 splicing. Our findings expand the scope of TIA1/TIAR in genome-wide regulation of alternative splicing under normal and pathological conditions.

  8. Antisense oligonucleotide–mediated MDM4 exon 6 skipping impairs tumor growth

    PubMed Central

    Dewaele, Michael; Tabaglio, Tommaso; Willekens, Karen; Bezzi, Marco; Teo, Shun Xie; Low, Diana H.P.; Koh, Cheryl M.; Rambow, Florian; Fiers, Mark; Rogiers, Aljosja; Radaelli, Enrico; Al-Haddawi, Muthafar; Tan, Soo Yong; Hermans, Els; Amant, Frederic; Yan, Hualong; Lakshmanan, Manikandan; Koumar, Ratnacaram Chandrahas; Lim, Soon Thye; Derheimer, Frederick A.; Campbell, Robert M.; Bonday, Zahid; Tergaonkar, Vinay; Shackleton, Mark; Blattner, Christine; Marine, Jean-Christophe; Guccione, Ernesto

    2015-01-01

    MDM4 is a promising target for cancer therapy, as it is undetectable in most normal adult tissues but often upregulated in cancer cells to dampen p53 tumor-suppressor function. The mechanisms that underlie MDM4 upregulation in cancer cells are largely unknown. Here, we have shown that this key oncogenic event mainly depends on a specific alternative splicing switch. We determined that while a nonsense-mediated, decay-targeted isoform of MDM4 (MDM4-S) is produced in normal adult tissues as a result of exon 6 skipping, enhanced exon 6 inclusion leads to expression of full-length MDM4 in a large number of human cancers. Although this alternative splicing event is likely regulated by multiple splicing factors, we identified the SRSF3 oncoprotein as a key enhancer of exon 6 inclusion. In multiple human melanoma cell lines and in melanoma patient–derived xenograft (PDX) mouse models, antisense oligonucleotide–mediated (ASO-mediated) skipping of exon 6 decreased MDM4 abundance, inhibited melanoma growth, and enhanced sensitivity to MAPK-targeting therapeutics. Additionally, ASO-based MDM4 targeting reduced diffuse large B cell lymphoma PDX growth. As full-length MDM4 is enhanced in multiple human tumors, our data indicate that this strategy is applicable to a wide range of tumor types. We conclude that enhanced MDM4 exon 6 inclusion is a common oncogenic event and has potential as a clinically compatible therapeutic target. PMID:26595814

  9. Evaluation of exon-skipping strategies for Duchenne muscular dystrophy utilizing dystrophin-deficient zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Berger, Joachim; Berger, Silke; Jacoby, Arie S; Wilton, Steve D; Currie, Peter D

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Duchenne muscular dystophy (DMD) is a severe muscle wasting disease caused by mutations in the dystrophin gene. By utilizing antisense oligonucleotides, splicing of the dystrophin transcript can be altered so that exons harbouring a mutation are excluded from the mature mRNA. Although this approach has been shown to be effective to restore partially functional dystrophin protein, the level of dystrophin protein that is necessary to rescue a severe muscle pathology has not been addressed. As zebrafish dystrophin mutants (dmd) resemble the severe muscle pathology of human patients, we have utilized this model to evaluate exon skipping. Novel dmd mutations were identified to enable the design of phenotype rescue studies via morpholino administration. Correlation of induced exon-skipping efficiency and the level of phenotype rescue suggest that relatively robust levels of exon skipping are required to achieve significant therapeutic ameliorations and that pre-screening analysis of exon-skipping drugs in zebrafish may help to more accurately predict clinical trials for therapies of DMD. PMID:21251213

  10. Sequence requirements for transcriptional arrest in exon 1 of the human adenosine deaminase gene

    SciTech Connect

    Zhi Chen; Kellems, R.E.; Innis, J.W. ); Sun, Minghua; Wright, D.A. )

    1991-12-01

    The authors have previously demonstrated that a transcriptional arrest site exists in exon 1 of the human adenosine deaminase (ADA) gene and that this site may play a role in ADA gene expression. Sequences involved in this process are not known precisely. To further define the template requirements for transcriptional arrest within exon 1 of the human ADA gene, various ADA templates were constructed and their abilities to confer transcriptional arrest were determined following injection into Xenopus oocytes. The exon 1 transcriptional arrest signal functioned downstream of several RNA polymerase II promoters and an RNA polymerase II promoter, implying that the transcriptional arrest site in exon 1 of the ADA gene is promoter independent. They identified a 43-bp DNA fragment which functions as a transcriptional arrest signal. Additional studies showed that the transcriptional arrest site functioned only in the naturally occurring orientation. Therefore, they have identified a 43-bp DNA fragment which functions as a transcriptional arrest signal in an orientation-dependent and promoter-independent manner. On the basis of the authors findings, they hypothesize that tissue-specific expression of the ADA gene is governed by factors that function as antiterminators to promote transcriptional readthrough of the exon 1 transcriptional arrest site.

  11. A computational and experimental approach toward a priori identification of alternatively spliced exons

    PubMed Central

    PHILIPPS, DANA L.; PARK, JUNG W.; GRAVELEY, BRENTON R.

    2004-01-01

    Alternative splicing is a powerful means of regulating gene expression and enhancing protein diversity. In fact, the majority of metazoan genes encode pre-mRNAs that are alternatively spliced to produce anywhere from two to tens of thousands of mRNA isoforms. Thus, an important part of determining the complete proteome of an organism is developing a catalog of all mRNA isoforms. Alternatively spliced exons are typically identified by aligning EST clusters to reference mRNAs or genomic DNA. However, this approach is not useful for genomes that lack robust EST coverage, and tools that enable accurate prediction of alternatively spliced exons would be extraordinarily useful. Here, we use comparative genomics to identify, and experimentally verify, potential alternative exons based solely on their high degree of conservation between Drosophila melanogaster and D. pseudoobscura. At least 40% of the exons that fit our prediction criteria are in fact alternatively spliced. Thus, comparative genomics can be used to accurately predict certain classes of alternative exons without relying on EST data. PMID:15525709

  12. Targeted Skipping of Human Dystrophin Exons in Transgenic Mouse Model Systemically for Antisense Drug Development

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Peijuan; Cloer, Caryn; Zillmer, Allen; Shaban, Mona; Lu, Qi Long

    2011-01-01

    Antisense therapy has recently been demonstrated with great potential for targeted exon skipping and restoration of dystrophin production in cultured muscle cells and in muscles of Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD) patients. Therapeutic values of exon skipping critically depend on efficacy of the drugs, antisense oligomers (AOs). However, no animal model has been established to test AO targeting human dystrophin exon in vivo systemically. In this study, we applied Vivo-Morpholino to the hDMD/mdx mouse, a transgenic model carrying the full-length human dystrophin gene with mdx background, and achieved for the first time more than 70% efficiency of targeted human dystrophin exon skipping in vivo systemically. We also established a GFP-reporter myoblast culture to screen AOs targeting human dystrophin exon 50. Antisense efficiency for most AOs is consistent between the reporter cells, human myoblasts and in the hDMD/mdx mice in vivo. However, variation in efficiency was also clearly observed. A combination of in vitro cell culture and a Vivo-Morpholino based evaluation in vivo systemically in the hDMD/mdx mice therefore may represent a prudent approach for selecting AO drug and to meet the regulatory requirement. PMID:21611204

  13. Huntingtin exon 1 fibrils feature an interdigitated β-hairpin-based polyglutamine core.

    PubMed

    Hoop, Cody L; Lin, Hsiang-Kai; Kar, Karunakar; Magyarfalvi, Gábor; Lamley, Jonathan M; Boatz, Jennifer C; Mandal, Abhishek; Lewandowski, Józef R; Wetzel, Ronald; van der Wel, Patrick C A

    2016-02-09

    Polyglutamine expansion within the exon1 of huntingtin leads to protein misfolding, aggregation, and cytotoxicity in Huntington's disease. This incurable neurodegenerative disease is the most prevalent member of a family of CAG repeat expansion disorders. Although mature exon1 fibrils are viable candidates for the toxic species, their molecular structure and how they form have remained poorly understood. Using advanced magic angle spinning solid-state NMR, we directly probe the structure of the rigid core that is at the heart of huntingtin exon1 fibrils and other polyglutamine aggregates, via measurements of long-range intramolecular and intermolecular contacts, backbone and side-chain torsion angles, relaxation measurements, and calculations of chemical shifts. These experiments reveal the presence of β-hairpin-containing β-sheets that are connected through interdigitating extended side chains. Despite dramatic differences in aggregation behavior, huntingtin exon1 fibrils and other polyglutamine-based aggregates contain identical β-strand-based cores. Prior structural models, derived from X-ray fiber diffraction and computational analyses, are shown to be inconsistent with the solid-state NMR results. Internally, the polyglutamine amyloid fibrils are coassembled from differently structured monomers, which we describe as a type of "intrinsic" polymorphism. A stochastic polyglutamine-specific aggregation mechanism is introduced to explain this phenomenon. We show that the aggregation of mutant huntingtin exon1 proceeds via an intramolecular collapse of the expanded polyglutamine domain and discuss the implications of this observation for our understanding of its misfolding and aggregation mechanisms.

  14. Exon organization of the human FKBP-12 gene: Correlation with structural and functional protein domains

    SciTech Connect

    DiLella, A.G.; Craig, R.J. )

    1991-09-03

    FKBP-12, the major T-cell binding protein for the immunosuppressive agents FK506 and rapamycin, catalyzes the interconversion of the cis and trans rotamers of the peptidyl-prolyl amide bond of peptide and protein substrates. The function of rotamase activity in cells and the role of FKBP-12 in immunoregulation is uncertain. In this paper the authors report the cloning and characterization of the human chromosomal FKBP-12 gene and four processed FKBP-12 pseudogenes. The FKBP-12 gene is 24 kilobases in length and contains five exons. The protein-coding region of the gene is divided into four exon modules that correlate with the structural and functional domains of the protein. The novel structure of FKBP-12 resulting form the topology of the antiparallel {beta}-sheet is the topological crossing of two loops that are encoded by separate exons. Separate exons also encode the antiparallel {beta}-sheet and {alpha}-helical region that define the drug-binding pocket and enzyme activity site of FKBP-12. The exon organization of the FKBP-12 gene structure will enable inactivation of this gene by homologous recombination in cells to provide a model to study the role of FKBP-12 in immunoregulation and normal cellular processes.

  15. rMAPS: RNA map analysis and plotting server for alternative exon regulation

    PubMed Central

    Park, Juw Won; Jung, Sungbo; Rouchka, Eric C.; Tseng, Yu-Ting; Xing, Yi

    2016-01-01

    RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) play a critical role in the regulation of alternative splicing (AS), a prevalent mechanism for generating transcriptomic and proteomic diversity in eukaryotic cells. Studies have shown that AS can be regulated by RBPs in a binding-site-position dependent manner. Depending on where RBPs bind, splicing of an alternative exon can be enhanced or suppressed. Therefore, spatial analyses of RBP motifs and binding sites around alternative exons will help elucidate splicing regulation by RBPs. The development of high-throughput sequencing technologies has allowed transcriptome-wide analyses of AS and RBP–RNA interactions. Given a set of differentially regulated alternative exons obtained from RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) experiments, the rMAPS web server (http://rmaps.cecsresearch.org) performs motif analyses of RBPs in the vicinity of alternatively spliced exons and creates RNA maps that depict the spatial patterns of RBP motifs. Similarly, rMAPS can also perform spatial analyses of RBP–RNA binding sites identified by cross-linking immunoprecipitation sequencing (CLIP-seq) experiments. We anticipate rMAPS will be a useful tool for elucidating RBP regulation of alternative exon splicing using high-throughput sequencing data. PMID:27174931

  16. A bioinformatics analysis of alternative exon usage in human genes coding for extracellular matrix proteins.

    PubMed

    Sakabe, Noboru Jo; Vibranovski, Maria Dulcetti; de Souza, Sandro José

    2004-12-30

    Alternative splicing increases protein diversity through the generation of different mRNA molecules from the same gene. Although alternative splicing seems to be a widespread phenomenon in the human transcriptome, it is possible that different subgroups of genes present different patterns, related to their biological roles. Analysis of a subgroup may enhance common features of its members that would otherwise disappear amidst a heterogeneous population. Extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins are a good set for such analyses since they are structurally and functionally related. This family of proteins is involved in a large variety of functions, probably achieved by the combinatorial use of protein domains through exon shuffling events. To determine if ECM genes have a different pattern of alternative splicing, we compared clusters of expressed sequences of ECM to all other genes regarding features related to the most frequent type of alternative splicing, alternative exon usage (AEU), such as: the number of alternative exon-intron structures per cluster, the number of AEU events per exon-intron structure, the number of exons per event, among others. Although we did not find many differences between the two sets, we observed a higher frequency of AEU events involving entire protein domains in the ECM set, a feature that could be associated with their multi-domain nature. As other subgroups or even the ECM set in different tissues could present distinct patterns of AEU, it may be premature to conclude that alternative splicing is homogeneous among groups of related genes.

  17. Lack of exon 10 in the murine tau gene results in mild sensorimotor defects with aging

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Complex species-specific, developmental- and tissue-dependent mechanisms regulate alternative splicing of tau, thereby diversifying tau protein synthesis. The functional role of alternative splicing of tau e.g. exon 10 has never been examined in vivo, although genetic studies suggest that it is important to neurodegenerative disease. Results Gene-targeting was used to delete exon 10 in murine tau on both alleles (E10−/−) to study its functional role. Moreover, mice devoid of exon 10 (E10+/−) on one allele were generated to investigate the effects of 1:1 balanced expression of 4R-/3R-tau protein, since equal amounts of 4R-/3R-tau protein are synthesized in human brain. Middle-aged E10−/− mice displayed sensorimotor disturbances in the rotarod when compared to age-matched E10+/− and wild-type mice, and their muscular grip strength was less than that of E10+/− mice. The performance of E10+/− mice and wild-type mice (E10+/+) was similar in sensorimotor tests. Cognitive abilities or anxiety-like behaviours did not depend on exon 10 in tau, and neither pathological inclusions nor gene-dependent morphological abnormalities were found. Conclusion Ablation of exon 10 in the murine tau gene alters alternative splicing and tau protein synthesis which results in mild sensorimotor phenotypes with aging. Presumably related microtubule-stabilizing genes rescue other functions. PMID:24261309

  18. Cellular Localization and Processing of Primary Transcripts of Exonic MicroRNAs

    PubMed Central

    Slezak-Prochazka, Izabella; Kluiver, Joost; de Jong, Debora; Kortman, Gertrud; Halsema, Nancy; Poppema, Sibrand; Kroesen, Bart-Jan; van den Berg, Anke

    2013-01-01

    Processing of miRNAs occurs simultaneous with the transcription and splicing of their primary transcripts. For the small subset of exonic miRNAs it is unclear if the unspliced and/or spliced transcripts are used for miRNA biogenesis. We assessed endogenous levels and cellular location of primary transcripts of three exonic miRNAs. The ratio between unspliced and spliced transcripts varied markedly, i.e. >1 for BIC, <1 for pri-miR-146a and variable for pri-miR-22. Endogenous unspliced transcripts were located almost exclusively in the nucleus and thus available for miRNA processing for all three miRNAs. Endogenous spliced pri-miRNA transcripts were present both in the nucleus and in the cytoplasm and thus only partly available for miRNA processing. Overexpression of constructs containing the 5’ upstream exonic or intronic sequence flanking pre-miR-155 resulted in strongly enhanced miR-155 levels, indicating that the flanking sequence does not affect processing efficiency. Exogenously overexpressed full-length spliced BIC transcripts were present both in the nucleus and in the cytoplasm, were bound by the Microprocessor complex and resulted in enhanced miR-155 levels. We conclude that both unspliced and spliced transcripts of exonic miRNAs can be used for pre-miRNA cleavage. Splicing and cytoplasmic transport of spliced transcripts may present a mechanism to regulate levels of exonic microRNAs. PMID:24073292

  19. Differential splicing of exon 5 of the Wilms tumour (WTI) gene.

    PubMed

    Renshaw, J; King-Underwood, L; Pritchard-Jones, K

    1997-08-01

    The WTI gene encodes a developmentally regulated transcription factor whose function is altered by alternative splicing at two sites: the 17 amino acids of exon 5, whose functional effects are ill-defined, and the 3 amino acids (KTS) between exons 9 and 10, which determine sequence-specific DNA binding and nuclear localisation. Germline mutations, which prevent normal KTS splicing, can underlie the Denys-Drash syndrome, and disruptions of splicing of exon 5 may occur in Wilms tumours. We analysed by reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) amplification the relative ratios of the four splice variants of WTI mRNA in normal and tumour tissues and found tissue-specific, developmental stage-specific, and species-specific differences in the splicing of exon 5 but not of KTS. We found no evidence for disrupted splicing in acute leukaemias or gonadal tumours. The significance of these findings is discussed, and the possibility is raised that WTI may orchestrate the appropriate response to growth and differentiation factor signalling, mediated by alterations in the relative levels of exon 5 containing WTI isoforms.

  20. Unmasking alternative splicing inside protein-coding exons defines exitrons and their role in proteome plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Marquez, Yamile; Höpfler, Markus; Ayatollahi, Zahra; Barta, Andrea; Kalyna, Maria

    2015-01-01

    Alternative splicing (AS) diversifies transcriptomes and proteomes and is widely recognized as a key mechanism for regulating gene expression. Previously, in an analysis of intron retention events in Arabidopsis, we found unusual AS events inside annotated protein-coding exons. Here, we also identify such AS events in human and use these two sets to analyse their features, regulation, functional impact, and evolutionary origin. As these events involve introns with features of both introns and protein-coding exons, we name them exitrons (exonic introns). Though exitrons were detected as a subset of retained introns, they are clearly distinguishable, and their splicing results in transcripts with different fates. About half of the 1002 Arabidopsis and 923 human exitrons have sizes of multiples of 3 nucleotides (nt). Splicing of these exitrons results in internally deleted proteins and affects protein domains, disordered regions, and various post-translational modification sites, thus broadly impacting protein function. Exitron splicing is regulated across tissues, in response to stress and in carcinogenesis. Intriguingly, annotated intronless genes can be also alternatively spliced via exitron usage. We demonstrate that at least some exitrons originate from ancestral coding exons. Based on our findings, we propose a “splicing memory” hypothesis whereby upon intron loss imprints of former exon borders defined by vestigial splicing regulatory elements could drive the evolution of exitron splicing. Altogether, our studies show that exitron splicing is a conserved strategy for increasing proteome plasticity in plants and animals, complementing the repertoire of AS events. PMID:25934563

  1. Assessment of the feasibility of exon 45–55 multiexon skipping for duchenne muscular dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    van Vliet, Laura; de Winter, Christa L; van Deutekom, Judith CT; van Ommen, Gert-Jan B; Aartsma-Rus, Annemieke

    2008-01-01

    Background The specific skipping of an exon, induced by antisense oligonucleotides (AON) during splicing, has shown to be a promising therapeutic approach for Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) patients. As different mutations require skipping of different exons, this approach is mutation dependent. The skipping of an entire stretch of exons (e.g. exons 45 to 55) has recently been suggested as an approach applicable to larger groups of patients. However, this multiexon skipping approach is technically challenging. The levels of intended multiexon skips are typically low and highly variable, and may be dependent on the order of intron removal. We hypothesized that the splicing order might favor the induction of multiexon 45–55 skipping. Methods We here tested the feasibility of inducing multiexon 45–55 in control and patient muscle cell cultures using various AON cocktails. Results In all experiments, the exon 45–55 skip frequencies were minimal and comparable to those observed in untreated cells. Conclusion We conclude that current state of the art does not sufficiently support clinical development of multiexon skipping for DMD. PMID:19046429

  2. KIT exon 11 deletion-inversions represent complex mutations in gastrointestinal stromal tumors.

    PubMed

    Lasota, Jerzy; Miettinen, Markku

    2007-05-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) are the most common mesenchymal tumors of the gastrointestinal tract. KIT expression and mutational KIT activation have been documented in a majority of GISTs. Most mutations have been found in KIT juxtamembrane domain encoded by exon 11. Recently, we have identified three, complex KIT exon 11 mutations previously unreported in GISTs. These mutations consisted of several nucleotide deletions accompanied by insertions of inverted complementary DNA strand sequences. All three mutations were found in the 5' part of KIT exon 11. At the protein level, these mutations lead to the same end result: in-frame loss and insertion of a number of amino acids and could be considered examples of deletion-insertion. Although proper description of these mutations at the genomic level is a complex task and requires an individual approach, the uniform name deletion-inversion is suggested for this type of mutation, based on the present study. The frequency of deletion-inversions among KIT exon 11 mutant GISTs was estimated to be <0.5%, based on evaluation of 700 KIT exon 11 mutants. Molecular events leading to formation of deletion-inversions remain elusive and should be studied further.

  3. Modulation of splicing of the preceding intron by antisense oligonucleotide complementary to intra-exon sequence deleted in dystrophin Kobe

    SciTech Connect

    Takeshima, Y.; Matuso, M.; Sakamoto, H.; Nishio, H.

    1994-09-01

    Molecular analysis of dystrophin Kobe showed that exon 19 of the dystrophin gene bearing a 52 bp deletion was skipped during splicing, although the known consensus sequences at the 5{prime} and 3{prime} splice site of exon 19 were maintained. These data suggest that the deleted sequence of exon 19 may function as a cis-acting factor for exact splicing for the upstream intron. To investigate this potential role, an in vitro splicing system using dystrophin precursors was established. A two-exon precursor containing exon 18, truncated intron 18, and exon 19 was accurately spliced. However, splicing of intron 18 was dramatically inhibited when wild exon 19 was replaced with mutated exon 19. Even though the length of exon 19 was restored to normal by replacing the deleted sequence with other sequence, splicing of intron 18 was not fully reactivated. Characteristically, splicing of intron 18 was inactivated more markedly when the replaced sequence contained less polypurine stretches. These data suggested that modification of the exon sequence would result in a splicing abnormality. Antisense 31 mer 2`-O-methyl ribonucleotide was targeted against 5{prime} end of deleted region of exon 19 to modulate splicing of the mRNA precursor. Splicing of intron 18 was inhibited in a dose- and time-dependent manner. This is the first in vitro evidence to show splicing of dystrophin pre-mRNA can be managed by antisense oligonucleotides. These experiments represent an approach in which antisense oligonucleotides are used to restore the function of a defective dystrophin gene in Duchenne muscular dystrophy by inducing skipping of certain exons during splicing.

  4. hnRNP F directs formation of an exon 4 minus variant of tumor-associated NADH oxidase (ENOX2).

    PubMed

    Tang, Xiaoyu; Kane, Vanessa D; Morré, Dorothy M; Morré, D James

    2011-11-01

    HUVEC or mouse 3T3 cells infected with SV-40 generate within 3 to 5 days post-infection an ENOX2 species corresponding to the exon-4 minus splice variant of a tumor-associated NADH oxidase (ENOX2 or tNOX) expressed at the cancer cell surface. This study was to seek evidence for splicing factors that might direct formation of the exon 4 minus ENOX2 splice variant. To determine if silencing of ENOX2 exon 4 occurs because of motifs located in exon 4, transfections were performed on MCF-10A (mammary non-cancer), BT-20 (mammary cancer), and HeLa (cervical cancer) cells using a GFP minigene construct containing either a constitutively spliced exon (albumin exon 2) or the alternatively spliced ENOX2 exon 4 between the two GFP halves. Removal of exon 4 from the processed RNA of the GFP minigene construct occurred with HeLa and to a lesser extent with BT-20 but not in non-cancer MCF-10A cells. The Splicing Rainbow Program was used to identify all of the possible hnRNPs binding sites of exon 4 of ENOX2. There are 8 Exonic Splicing Silencers (ESSs) for hnRNP binding in the exon 4 sequences. Each of these sites were mutated by site-directed mutagenesis to test if any were responsible for the splicing skip. Results showed MutG75 ESS mutation changed the GFP expression which is a sign of splicing silence, while other mutations did not. As MutG75 changed the ESS binding site for hnRNP F, this result suggests that hnRNP F directs formation of the exon 4 minus variant of ENOX2.

  5. Alternative 5' exons and differential splicing regulate expression of protein 4.1R isoforms with distinct n-termini

    SciTech Connect

    Parra, Marilyn K.; Gee, Sherry L.; Koury, Mark J.; Mohandas, Narla; Conboy, John G.

    2003-03-25

    Among the alternative pre-mRNA splicing events that characterize protein 4.1R gene expression, one involving exon 2' plays a critical role in regulating translation initiation and N-terminal protein structure. Exon 2' encompasses translation initiation site AUG1 and is located between alternative splice acceptor sites at the 5' end of exon 2; its inclusion or exclusion from mature 4.1R mRNA regulates expression of longer or shorter isoforms of 4.1R protein, respectively. The current study reports unexpected complexity in the 5' region of the 4.1R gene that directly affects alternative splicing of exon 2'. Three mutually exclusive alternative 5' exons, designated 1A, 1B, and 1C, were identified far upstream of exon 2 in both mouse and human genomes; all three are associated with strong transcriptional promoters in the flanking genomic sequence. Importantly, exons 1A and 1B splice differentially with respect to exon 2', generating transcripts with different 5' ends and distinct N-terminal protein coding capacity. Exon 1A-type transcripts splice so as to exclude exon 2' and therefore utilize the downstream AUG2 for translation of 80kD 4.1R protein, whereas exon 1B transcripts include exon 2' and initiate at AUG1 to synthesize 135kD isoforms. RNA blot analyses revealed that 1A transcripts increase in abundance in late erythroblasts, consistent with the previously demonstrated upregulation of 80kD 4.1R during terminal erythroid differentiation. Together these results suggest that synthesis of structurally distinct 4.1R protein isoforms in various cell types is regulated by a novel mechanism requiring coordination between upstream transcription initiation events and downstream alternative splicing events.

  6. Categorization of 77 dystrophin exons into 5 groups by a decision tree using indexes of splicing regulatory factors as decision markers

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Duchenne muscular dystrophy, a fatal muscle-wasting disease, is characterized by dystrophin deficiency caused by mutations in the dystrophin gene. Skipping of a target dystrophin exon during splicing with antisense oligonucleotides is attracting much attention as the most plausible way to express dystrophin in DMD. Antisense oligonucleotides have been designed against splicing regulatory sequences such as splicing enhancer sequences of target exons. Recently, we reported that a chemical kinase inhibitor specifically enhances the skipping of mutated dystrophin exon 31, indicating the existence of exon-specific splicing regulatory systems. However, the basis for such individual regulatory systems is largely unknown. Here, we categorized the dystrophin exons in terms of their splicing regulatory factors. Results Using a computer-based machine learning system, we first constructed a decision tree separating 77 authentic from 14 known cryptic exons using 25 indexes of splicing regulatory factors as decision markers. We evaluated the classification accuracy of a novel cryptic exon (exon 11a) identified in this study. However, the tree mislabeled exon 11a as a true exon. Therefore, we re-constructed the decision tree to separate all 15 cryptic exons. The revised decision tree categorized the 77 authentic exons into five groups. Furthermore, all nine disease-associated novel exons were successfully categorized as exons, validating the decision tree. One group, consisting of 30 exons, was characterized by a high density of exonic splicing enhancer sequences. This suggests that AOs targeting splicing enhancer sequences would efficiently induce skipping of exons belonging to this group. Conclusions The decision tree categorized the 77 authentic exons into five groups. Our classification may help to establish the strategy for exon skipping therapy for Duchenne muscular dystrophy. PMID:22462762

  7. Correlation of the exon/intron organization to the conserved domains of the mouse transcriptional corepressor TIF1beta.

    PubMed

    Cammas, F; Garnier, J; Chambon, P; Losson, R

    2000-08-08

    TIF1beta, a member of the transcriptional intermediary factor 1 family, has been reported to function as a corepressor for the large class of KRAB domain-containing zinc finger proteins of the Krüppel type. In this study, we report the genomic organization and nucleotide sequence of the mouse TIF1beta gene. This gene comprises 17 coding exons located within 7 kb of genomic DNA. Exon sizes vary from 37 bp (exon 10) to 901 bp (exon 1), and intron sizes range from 71 bp to 1843 bp. All introns have the conserved GT and AG dinucleotides present at the donor and acceptor sites, respectively. The functional/homology regions of the TIF1beta protein are encoded by distinct exons. The amino-terminal RING finger is encoded by two exons interrupted by a small intron. The B boxes lie within individual exons. Similarly to the RING finger, the PHD finger is encoded by two exons. Three exons constitute the carboxy-terminal bromodomain, and their position correlates well with the secondary structure elements of the domain as predicted by computer modeling. Taken together, these results will facilitate the genetic manipulation of TIF1beta for future in vivo structure-function studies.

  8. Frameshift deletions of exons 3-7 and revertant fibers in Duchenne muscular dystrophy: mechanisms of dystrophin production.

    PubMed Central

    Winnard, A V; Mendell, J R; Prior, T W; Florence, J; Burghes, A H

    1995-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) patients with mutations that disrupt the translational reading frame produce little or no dystrophin. Two exceptions are the deletion of exons 3-7 and the occurrence of rare dystrophin-positive fibers (revertant fibers) in muscle of DMD patients. Antibodies directed against the amino-terminus and the 5' end of exon 8 did not detect dystrophin in muscle from patients who have a deletion of exons 3-7. However, in all cases, dystrophin was detected with an antibody directed against the 3' end of exon 8. The most likely method of dystrophin production in these cases is initiation at a new start codon in exon 8. We also studied two patients who have revertant fibers: one had an inherited duplication of exons 5-7, which, on immunostaining, showed two types of revertant fibers; and the second patient had a 2-bp nonsense mutation in exon 51, which creates a cryptic splice site. An in-frame mRNA that uses this splice site in exon 51 was detected. Immunostaining demonstrated the presence of the 3' end of exon 51, which is in agreement with the use of this mRNA in revertant fibers. The most likely method of dystrophin production in these fibers is a second mutation that restores the reading frame. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:7825572

  9. Isolation and characterization of new exon 11-associated N-terminal splice variants of the human mu opioid receptor gene.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jin; Xu, Mingming; Hurd, Yasmin L; Pasternak, Gavril W; Pan, Ying-Xian

    2009-02-01

    Alternative splicing of the mu opioid receptor genes to create multiple mu receptor subtypes has been demonstrated in animals and humans. Previously, we identified a number of C-terminal variants in mice, rats and human, followed by several N-terminal variants associated with a new upstream exon in mice (exon 11). Behavioral studies in exon 11 knockout mice suggest an important role for the exon 11 variants in the analgesic actions of heroin and morphine-6beta-glucuronide, but not morphine or methadone. We now have identified a homologous human exon 11 and three similar human exon 11-associated variants, suggesting conservation of exon 11 and its associated variants across species. hMOR-1i has an additional 93 amino acids at the tip of the N-terminus but is otherwise identical to hMOR-1. When expressed in Chinese hamster ovary cells, the additional 93 amino acids in hMOR-1i had little effect on opioid binding, but significantly altered agonist-induced G-protein activation. hMOR-1G1 and hMOR-1G2 predicted six transmembrane domain variants, similar to those seen in mice. The regional expression of these exon 11-associated variants, as determined by RT-PCR, varied markedly, implying region-specific alternative splicing. The presence of exon 11-associated variants in humans raises questions regarding their potential role in heroin and morphine-6beta-glucuronide actions in people as they do in mice.

  10. Exonal deletion of SLC24A4 causes hypomaturation amelogenesis imperfecta.

    PubMed

    Seymen, F; Lee, K-E; Tran Le, C G; Yildirim, M; Gencay, K; Lee, Z H; Kim, J-W

    2014-04-01

    Amelogenesis imperfecta is a heterogeneous group of genetic conditions affecting enamel formation. Recently, mutations in solute carrier family 24 member 4 (SLC24A4) have been identified to cause autosomal recessive hypomaturation amelogenesis imperfecta. We recruited a consanguineous family with hypomaturation amelogenesis imperfecta with generalized brown discoloration. Sequencing of the candidate genes identified a 10-kb deletion, including exons 15, 16, and most of the last exon of the SLC24A4 gene. Interestingly, this deletion was caused by homologous recombination between two 354-bp-long homologous sequences located in intron 14 and the 3' UTR. This is the first report of exonal deletion in SLC24A4 providing confirmatory evidence that the function of SLC24A4 in calcium transport has a crucial role in the maturation stage of amelogenesis.

  11. Genetic characterization of MHC class II DQB exon 2 variants in gayal (Bos frontalis)

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Yongke; Xi, Dongmei; Li, Guozhi; Hao, Tiantian; Chen, Yuhan; Yang, Yuai

    2014-01-01

    In the present study, exon 2 of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II DQB gene from 39 gayals (Bos frontalis) was isolated, characterized and compared with previously reported patterns for other bovidae. It was revealed by sequence analyses that there are 36 DQB exon 2 variants among 39 gayals. These variants exhibited a high degree of nucleotide and amino acid substitutions with most amino acid variations occurring at positions forming the peptide-binding sites (PBS). The DQB loci were analysed for patterns of synonymous (d S) and non-synonymous (d N) substitution. The gayals were observed to be under strong balancing selection in the DQB exon 2 PBS (d N = 0.094, P = 0.001). It appears that this variability among gayals could confer the ability to mount immune responses to a wide variety of peptides or pathogens. PMID:26019566

  12. Immunochemical detection of proteins related to the human c-myc exon 1.

    PubMed Central

    Gazin, C; Rigolet, M; Briand, J P; Van Regenmortel, M H; Galibert, F

    1986-01-01

    Published sequence data of the human c-myc gene indicate the presence of a coding capacity for a polypeptide of 188 residues within the first exon. Using antibodies raised against five synthetic peptides corresponding to different non-over-lapping parts of this polypeptide, two proteins of 32 kd and 58 kd antigenically related to the synthetic peptides have been detected in extracts of human cells. The confidence of this detection has been reinforced by showing that epitopes corresponding to different peptides were indeed located on the same molecule and that the 58 kd protein appears to be a dimeric form of the 32 kd protein. That these proteins originate from the first exon was indicated by: hybrid-arrested translation experiments followed by immunodetection of the translation products; in vitro translation of messenger RNA derived from cloned exon 1 by SP6 polymerase transcription. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. Fig. 6. Fig. 7. PMID:2430795

  13. Molecular Genetic Analysis of a Suprasellar Immature Teratoma : Mutation of Exon 4 P53 Gene

    PubMed Central

    Udin, Nujaimin; Ahmad, Ku Asmarina Ku; Ahmad, Farizan; Omar, Effat; Aziz, Mohd Ezanee; Kumar, Raj; Abdullah, Jafri Malin

    2008-01-01

    We described an intracranial immature teratoma in a 13 year old Malay boy who presented with history of chronic headache and blurring of vision. Physical findings revealed bilateral papilloedema but no other localizing sign. A Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the brain revealed a suprasellar well defined lobulated midline heterogenous mass which was intraoperatively described as mainly solid tumour with multiple small cystic component filled with yellowish jelly like material. Histopathological finding confirmed the case as immature teratoma. Molecular genetic analysis of p53 and p27 genes revealed substitution of nucleotide G to C at location nucleotide 12139, exon 4 of gene p53. No alteration was detected at exon 5–6 and 8 of p53 gene and exon 1 and 2 of p27 gene. This is the first case report of an intracranial immature teratoma with genetic mutation occuring in a Malay boy. PMID:22589625

  14. Exon 32 Skipping of Dysferlin Rescues Membrane Repair in Patients’ Cells

    PubMed Central

    Barthélémy, Florian; Blouin, Cédric; Wein, Nicolas; Mouly, Vincent; Courrier, Sébastien; Dionnet, Eugénie; Kergourlay, Virginie; Mathieu, Yves; Garcia, Luis; Butler-Browne, Gillian; Lamaze, Christophe; Lévy, Nicolas; Krahn, Martin; Bartoli, Marc

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Dysferlinopathies are a family of disabling muscular dystrophies with LGMD2B and Miyoshi myopathy as the main phenotypes. They are associated with molecular defects in DYSF, which encodes dysferlin, a key player in sarcolemmal homeostasis. Previous investigations have suggested that exon skipping may be a promising therapy for a subset of patients with dysferlinopathies. Such an approach aims to rescue functional proteins when targeting modular proteins and specific tissues. We sought to evaluate the dysferlin functional recovery following exon 32 skipping in the cells of affected patients. Exon skipping efficacy was characterized at several levels by use of in vitro myotube formation assays and quantitative membrane repair and recovery tests. Data obtained from these assessments confirmed that dysferlin function is rescued by quasi-dysferlin expression in treated patient cells, supporting the case for a therapeutic antisense-based trial in a subset of dysferlin-deficient patients. PMID:27858744

  15. Genetic characterization of MHC class II DQB exon 2 variants in gayal (Bos frontalis).

    PubMed

    Sun, Yongke; Xi, Dongmei; Li, Guozhi; Hao, Tiantian; Chen, Yuhan; Yang, Yuai

    2014-09-03

    In the present study, exon 2 of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II DQB gene from 39 gayals (Bos frontalis) was isolated, characterized and compared with previously reported patterns for other bovidae. It was revealed by sequence analyses that there are 36 DQB exon 2 variants among 39 gayals. These variants exhibited a high degree of nucleotide and amino acid substitutions with most amino acid variations occurring at positions forming the peptide-binding sites (PBS). The DQB loci were analysed for patterns of synonymous (dS) and non-synonymous (dN) substitution. The gayals were observed to be under strong balancing selection in the DQB exon 2 PBS (dN = 0.094, P = 0.001). It appears that this variability among gayals could confer the ability to mount immune responses to a wide variety of peptides or pathogens.

  16. The stop mutation R553X in the CFTR gene results in exon skipping

    SciTech Connect

    Hull, J.; Shackleton, S.; Harris, A. )

    1994-01-15

    Stop or nonsense mutations are known to disrupt gene function in a number of different ways. The authors have studied the effects of the stop mutation R553X in exon 11 of the CFTR gene by analyzing mRNA extracted from nasal epithelial cells harvested from patients with cystic fibrosis. Four patients who were compound heterozygotes for the R553X mutation were studied. Ten non-CF control subjects were also studied. In all four patients, full-length CFTR mRNA was identified, but only a very small proportion of this was derived from the R553X allele. A smaller transcript, lacking exon 11, was also seen in the R553X patients but not in the controls. Most of this transcript was derived from the R553X allele. These results suggest that the R553X mutation results in skipping of the exon in which it is located. 14 refs., 3 figs.

  17. Abnormal Methylation Status of the GNAS Exon 1A Region in Pseudohypohyperparathyroidism Combined With Turner Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jie; Wang, Dong; Ren, An; Xing, Yan; Zhang, Dongliang; Wei, Jun; Yu, Ning; Xing, Xuenong; Ye, Shandong

    2015-12-01

    Pseudohypohyperparathyroidism (PHHP) is a rare type of pseudohypoparathyroidism (PHP), which seems to have a normal skeletal response to parathyroid hormone but shows renal resistance. Almost all patients with PHHP have PHP Ib, a subtype of PHP that is usually caused by GNAS methylation defects, often in exon 1A. Some features of Albright hereditary osteodystrophy can occasionally be found in patients with PHHP, but these features are also common in Turner syndrome. The authors report on an extremely rare case of a patient with PHHP and Turner syndrome, a 47-year-old woman who sought medical attention for hypocalcemia and elevated parathyroid hormone. She had no family history of hypocalcemia and no STX16 gene deletions. She had a mosaic karyotype of 46, X, del(X)(p11.4)/45, XO. Pyrosequencing was performed to determine the GNAS exon 1A methylation. The degree of methylation found in exon 1A of the patient was lower than her unaffected relatives.

  18. Development of detection method for novel fusion gene using GeneChip exon array

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Fusion genes have been recognized to play key roles in oncogenesis. Though, many techniques have been developed for genome-wide analysis of fusion genes, a more efficient method is desired. Results We introduced a new method of detecting the novel fusion gene by using GeneChip Exon Array that enables exon expression analysis on a whole-genome scale and TAIL-PCR. To screen genes with abnormal exon expression profiles, we developed computational program, and confirmed that the program was able to search the fusion partner gene using Exon Array data of T-cell acute lymphocytic leukemia (T-ALL) cell lines. It was reported that the T-ALL cell lines, ALL-SIL, BE13 and LOUCY, harbored the fusion gene NUP214-ABL1, NUP214-ABL1 and SET-NUP214, respectively. The program extracted the candidate genes with abnormal exon expression profiles: 1 gene in ALL-SIL, 1 gene in BE13, and 2 genes in LOUCY. The known fusion partner gene NUP214 was included in the genes in ALL-SIL and LOUCY. Thus, we applied the proposed program to the detection of fusion partner genes in other tumors. To discover novel fusion genes, we examined 24 breast cancer cell lines and 20 pancreatic cancer cell lines by using the program. As a result, 20 and 23 candidate genes were obtained for the breast and pancreatic cancer cell lines respectively, and seven genes were selected as the final candidate gene based on information of the EST data base, comparison with normal cell samples and visual inspection of Exon expression profile. Finding of fusion partners for the final candidate genes was tried by TAIL-PCR, and three novel fusion genes were identified. Conclusions The usefulness of our detection method was confirmed. Using this method for more samples, it is thought that fusion genes can be identified. PMID:24533689

  19. Histone modifications involved in cassette exon inclusions: a quantitative and interpretable analysis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hui; Jin, Ting; Guan, Jihong; Zhou, Shuigeng

    2014-12-19

    Chromatin structure and epigenetic modifications have been shown to involve in the co-transcriptional splicing of RNA precursors. In particular, some studies have suggested that some types of histone modifications (HMs) may participate in the alternative splicing and function as exon marks. However, most existing studies pay attention to the qualitative relationship between epigenetic modifications and exon inclusion. The quantitative analysis that reveals to what extent each type of epigenetic modification is responsible for exon inclusion is very helpful for us to understand the splicing process. In this paper, we focus on the quantitative analysis of HMs' influence on the inclusion of cassette exons (CEs) into mature RNAs. With the high-throughput ChIP-seq and RNA-seq data obtained from ENCODE website, we modeled the association of HMs with CE inclusions by logistic regression whose coefficients are meaningful and interpretable for us to reveal the effect of each type of HM. Three type of HMs, H3K36me3, H3K9me3 and H4K20me1, were found to play major role in CE inclusions. HMs' effect on CE inclusions is conservative across cell types, and does not depend on the expression levels of the genes hosting CEs. HMs located in the flanking regions of CEs were also taken into account in our analysis, and HMs within bounded flanking regions were shown to affect moderately CE inclusions. Moreover, we also found that HMs on CEs whose length is approximately close to nucleosomal-DNA length affect greatly on CE inclusion. We suggested that a few types of HMs correlate closely to alternative splicing and perhaps function jointly with splicing machinery to regulate the inclusion level of exons. Our findings are helpful to understand HMs' effect on exon definition, as well as the mechanism of co-transcriptional splicing.

  20. Isolation of candidate genes from the Batten Disease (JNCL) region using exon amplification

    SciTech Connect

    Lerner, T.J.; Haines, J.L.; Buckler, A. |

    1994-09-01

    Batten Disease (juvenile neuronal cercoid lipofuscinosis; JNCL) is the most common neurodegenerative disorder of childhood. Clinically, this autosomal recessive disorder is characterized by loss of vision, seizures, and progressive encephalopathy. The JNCL gene CLN3 has been genetically mapped to a 2 cM region in 16p12.1-11.2 and shows significant allelic association with alleles at five marker loci, D16S288, D16S272, D16S299, D16S298, and SPN, within this interval. Extended haplotype analysis strongly suggests that CLN3 must lie in the vicinity of D16S299/D16S298. We have used these markers as STSs to isolate YACs from the CEPH and Los Alamos flow-sorted chromosome 16 YAC libraries. These YACs, in turn, have been used to generate cosmid contigs by hybridization of inter-Alu PCR products to the gridded Los Alamos chr. 16 cosmid library and by direct sub-cloning. In order to identify genes originating from this region we have used the technique of exon amplification. This procedure produces trapped exon clones, which can represent single exons or multiple exons spliced together and is an efficient method for obtaining probes for physical mapping and for screening cDNA libraries. In all experiments, we have analyzed cosmid DNA using a modification of the original exon amplification procedure that increases both the efficiency and sensitivity of the approach. We have used the resulting exon probes to screen retina and brain cDNA libraries for candidate JNCL genes. Our preliminary studies indicate that the Batten candidate region is gene-rich.

  1. Compartmentalization of PDGF on extracellular binding sites dependent on exon-6-encoded sequences

    PubMed Central

    1992-01-01

    The PDGFs are a family of molecules assembled as disulfide-bonded homo- and heterodimers from two distinct but highly homologous polypeptide chains (PDGF-A and PDGF-B). Two PDGF A-chain transcripts, which arise from alternative usage of the 69-bp exon 6 and exon 7, give rise to two forms of PDGF-A. In spite of the conservation of two PDGF A-chain forms over at least 350 million years, no differences in their biological activities have been identified. We have investigated the activity of the sequence encoded by the alternatively spliced exon 6 of the PDGF A- chain (peptide AL). Addition of peptide AL at 10(-5)-10(-9) M to cultured endothelium and smooth muscle induced a dose-dependent, 3-20- fold increase in PDGF in conditioned media within 30 min. Peptide AL had no detectable effect on A- or B-chain transcript levels, and decrease in culture temperature did not prevent rapid release of PDGF. In human umbilical vein endothelial cells treated with peptide AL, the PDGF release was principally PDGF-BB, while in smooth muscle cells it was primarily PDGF-AA. The capacity to induce release of PDGF is shared by the homologous peptide encoded by exon 6 of the B-chain of PDGF. Binding studies and cross-linking analysis are consistent with a charge- based association of exon 6 sequences with membrane- and matrix- associated heparan-sulfate proteoglycans. We hypothesize that translation of exon 6 of the A- or B-chain of PDGF results in compartmentalization of these forms of PDGF with HS-PG, whereas forms lacking this sequence would be soluble and diffuse. PMID:1309814

  2. Viral diversity and diversification of major non-structural genes vif, vpr, vpu, tat exon 1 and rev exon 1 during primary HIV-1 subtype C infection.

    PubMed

    Rossenkhan, Raabya; Novitsky, Vladimir; Sebunya, Theresa K; Musonda, Rosemary; Gashe, Berhanu A; Essex, M

    2012-01-01

    To assess the level of intra-patient diversity and evolution of HIV-1C non-structural genes in primary infection, viral quasispecies obtained by single genome amplification (SGA) at multiple sampling timepoints up to 500 days post-seroconversion (p/s) were analyzed. The mean intra-patient diversity was 0.11% (95% CI; 0.02 to 0.20) for vif, 0.23% (95% CI; 0.08 to 0.38) for vpr, 0.35% (95% CI; -0.05 to 0.75) for vpu, 0.18% (95% CI; 0.01 to 0.35) for tat exon 1 and 0.30% (95% CI; 0.02 to 0.58) for rev exon 1 during the time period 0 to 90 days p/s. The intra-patient diversity increased gradually in all non-structural genes over the first year of HIV-1 infection, which was evident from the vif mean intra-patient diversity of 0.46% (95% CI; 0.28 to 0.64), vpr 0.44% (95% CI; 0.24 to 0.64), vpu 0.84% (95% CI; 0.55 to 1.13), tat exon 1 0.35% (95% CI; 0.14 to 0.56 ) and rev exon 1 0.42% (95% CI; 0.18 to 0.66) during the time period of 181 to 500 days p/s. There was a statistically significant increase in viral diversity for vif (p = 0.013) and vpu (p = 0.002). No associations between levels of viral diversity within the non-structural genes and HIV-1 RNA load during primary infection were found. The study details the dynamics of the non-structural viral genes during the early stages of HIV-1C infection.

  3. Characterization of Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) DRB Exon 2 and DRA Exon 3 Fragments in a Primary Terrestrial Rabies Vector (Procyon lotor)

    PubMed Central

    Castillo, Sarrah; Srithayakumar, Vythegi; Meunier, Vanessa; Kyle, Christopher J.

    2010-01-01

    The major histocompatibility complex (MHC) presents a unique system to explore links between genetic diversity and pathogens, as diversity within MHC is maintained in part by pathogen driven selection. While the majority of wildlife MHC studies have investigated species that are of conservation concern, here we characterize MHC variation in a common and broadly distributed species, the North American raccoon (Procyon lotor). Raccoons host an array of broadly distributed wildlife diseases (e.g., canine distemper, parvovirus and raccoon rabies virus) and present important human health risks as they persist in high densities and in close proximity to humans and livestock. To further explore how genetic variation influences the spread and maintenance of disease in raccoons we characterized a fragment of MHC class II DRA exon 3 (250bp) and DRB exon 2 (228 bp). MHC DRA was found to be functionally monomorphic in the 32 individuals screened; whereas DRB exon 2 revealed 66 unique alleles among the 246 individuals screened. Between two and four alleles were observed in each individual suggesting we were amplifying a duplicated DRB locus. Nucleotide differences between DRB alleles ranged from 1 to 36 bp (0.4–15.8% divergence) and translated into 1 to 21 (1.3–27.6% divergence) amino acid differences. We detected a significant excess of nonsynonymous substitutions at the peptide binding region (P = 0.005), indicating that DRB exon 2 in raccoons has been influenced by positive selection. These data will form the basis of continued analyses into the spatial and temporal relationship of the raccoon rabies virus and the immunogenetic response in its primary host. PMID:20706587

  4. Characterization of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) DRB exon 2 and DRA exon 3 fragments in a primary terrestrial rabies vector (Procyon lotor).

    PubMed

    Castillo, Sarrah; Srithayakumar, Vythegi; Meunier, Vanessa; Kyle, Christopher J

    2010-08-10

    The major histocompatibility complex (MHC) presents a unique system to explore links between genetic diversity and pathogens, as diversity within MHC is maintained in part by pathogen driven selection. While the majority of wildlife MHC studies have investigated species that are of conservation concern, here we characterize MHC variation in a common and broadly distributed species, the North American raccoon (Procyon lotor). Raccoons host an array of broadly distributed wildlife diseases (e.g., canine distemper, parvovirus and raccoon rabies virus) and present important human health risks as they persist in high densities and in close proximity to humans and livestock. To further explore how genetic variation influences the spread and maintenance of disease in raccoons we characterized a fragment of MHC class II DRA exon 3 (250 bp) and DRB exon 2 (228 bp). MHC DRA was found to be functionally monomorphic in the 32 individuals screened; whereas DRB exon 2 revealed 66 unique alleles among the 246 individuals screened. Between two and four alleles were observed in each individual suggesting we were amplifying a duplicated DRB locus. Nucleotide differences between DRB alleles ranged from 1 to 36 bp (0.4-15.8% divergence) and translated into 1 to 21 (1.3-27.6% divergence) amino acid differences. We detected a significant excess of nonsynonymous substitutions at the peptide binding region (P = 0.005), indicating that DRB exon 2 in raccoons has been influenced by positive selection. These data will form the basis of continued analyses into the spatial and temporal relationship of the raccoon rabies virus and the immunogenetic response in its primary host.

  5. Welcome to the splice age: antisense oligonucleotide–mediated exon skipping gains wider applicability

    PubMed Central

    McNally, Elizabeth M.; Wyatt, Eugene J.

    2016-01-01

    Exon skipping uses antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs) to alter transcript splicing for the purpose of rescuing or modulating protein expression. In this issue of the JCI, Lee and colleagues developed and evaluated an ASO-dependent method for treating certain molecularly defined diseases associated with alterations in lamin A/C (LMNA) splicing. Exon skipping by ASOs is gaining traction as a therapeutic strategy, and the use of ASOs is now being applied to bypass mutations and generate modified but functional proteins for an array of genetic disorders. PMID:26999602

  6. Exon redefinition by a point mutation within exon 5 of the glucose-6-phosphatase gene is the major cause of glycogen storage disease type 1a in Japan

    SciTech Connect

    Kajihara, Susumu; Yamamoto, Kyosuke; Kido, Keiko

    1995-09-01

    Glycogen storage disease (GSD) type 1a (von Gierke disease) is an autosomal recessive disorder caused by a deficiency in microsomal glucose-6-phosphatase (G6Pase). We have identified a novel mutation in the G6Pase gene of a individual with GSD type 1a. The cDNA from the patient`s liver revealed a 91-nt deletion in exon 5. The genomic DNA from the patient`s white blood cells revealed no deletion or mutation at the splicing junction of intron 4 and exon 5. The 3{prime} splicing occurred 91 bp from the 5{prime} site of exon 5 (at position 732 in the coding region), causing a substitution of a single nucleotide (G to T) at position 727 in the coding region. Further confirmation of the missplicing was obtained by transient expression of allelic minigene constructs into animal cells. Another eight unrelated families of nine Japanese patients were all found to have this mutation. This mutation is a new type of splicing mutation in the G6Pase gene, and 91% of patients and carriers suffering from GSD1a in Japan are detectable with this splicing mutation. 28 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  7. De novo exonic mutation in MYH7 gene leading to exon skipping in a patient with early onset muscular weakness and fiber-type disproportion.

    PubMed

    Pajusalu, Sander; Talvik, Inga; Noormets, Klari; Talvik, Tiina; Põder, Haide; Joost, Kairit; Puusepp, Sanna; Piirsoo, Andres; Stenzel, Werner; Goebel, Hans H; Nikopensius, Tiit; Annilo, Tarmo; Nõukas, Margit; Metspalu, Andres; Õunap, Katrin; Reimand, Tiia

    2016-03-01

    Here we report on a case of MYH7-related myopathy in a boy with early onset of muscular weakness and delayed motor development in infancy. His most affected muscles were neck extensors showing a dropped head sign, proximal muscles of lower limbs with positive Gower's sign, and trunk muscles. Brain and spinal cord MRI scans, echocardiography, and laboratory analyses including creatine kinase and lactate did not reveal any abnormalities. Muscle histopathology showed fiber-type disproportion. Whole exome sequencing of the parents-offspring trio revealed a novel de novo c.5655G>A p.(Ala1885=) synonymous substitution of the last nucleotide in exon 38 of the MYH7 gene. Further RNA investigations proved the skipping of exon 38 (p.1854_1885del). This is a first report of an exon-skipping mutation in the MYH7 gene causing myopathy. This report broadens both the phenotypic and genotypic spectra of MYH7-related myopathies. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Antisense PMO Found in Dystrophic Dog Model Was Effective in Cells from Exon 7-Deleted DMD Patient

    PubMed Central

    Saito, Takashi; Nakamura, Akinori; Aoki, Yoshitsugu; Yokota, Toshifumi; Okada, Takashi; Osawa, Makiko; Takeda, Shin'ichi

    2010-01-01

    Background Antisense oligonucleotide-induced exon skipping is a promising approach for treatment of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). We have systemically administered an antisense phosphorodiamidate morpholino oligomer (PMO) targeting dystrophin exons 6 and 8 to a dog with canine X-linked muscular dystrophy in Japan (CXMDJ) lacking exon 7 and achieved recovery of dystrophin in skeletal muscle. To date, however, antisense chemical compounds used in DMD animal models have not been directly applied to a DMD patient having the same type of exon deletion. We recently identified a DMD patient with an exon 7 deletion and tried direct translation of the antisense PMO used in dog models to the DMD patient's cells. Methodology/Principal Findings We converted fibroblasts of CXMDJ and the DMD patient to myotubes by FACS-aided MyoD transduction. Antisense PMOs targeting identical regions of dog and human dystrophin exons 6 and 8 were designed. These antisense PMOs were mixed and administered as a cocktail to either dog or human cells in vitro. In the CXMDJ and human DMD cells, we observed a similar efficacy of skipping of exons 6 and 8 and a similar extent of dystrophin protein recovery. The accompanying skipping of exon 9, which did not alter the reading frame, was different between cells of these two species. Conclusion/Significance Antisense PMOs, the effectiveness of which has been demonstrated in a dog model, achieved multi-exon skipping of dystrophin gene on the FACS-aided MyoD-transduced fibroblasts from an exon 7-deleted DMD patient, suggesting the feasibility of systemic multi-exon skipping in humans. PMID:20805873

  9. Antisense PMO found in dystrophic dog model was effective in cells from exon 7-deleted DMD patient.

    PubMed

    Saito, Takashi; Nakamura, Akinori; Aoki, Yoshitsugu; Yokota, Toshifumi; Okada, Takashi; Osawa, Makiko; Takeda, Shin'ichi

    2010-08-18

    Antisense oligonucleotide-induced exon skipping is a promising approach for treatment of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). We have systemically administered an antisense phosphorodiamidate morpholino oligomer (PMO) targeting dystrophin exons 6 and 8 to a dog with canine X-linked muscular dystrophy in Japan (CXMD(J)) lacking exon 7 and achieved recovery of dystrophin in skeletal muscle. To date, however, antisense chemical compounds used in DMD animal models have not been directly applied to a DMD patient having the same type of exon deletion. We recently identified a DMD patient with an exon 7 deletion and tried direct translation of the antisense PMO used in dog models to the DMD patient's cells. We converted fibroblasts of CXMD(J) and the DMD patient to myotubes by FACS-aided MyoD transduction. Antisense PMOs targeting identical regions of dog and human dystrophin exons 6 and 8 were designed. These antisense PMOs were mixed and administered as a cocktail to either dog or human cells in vitro. In the CXMD(J) and human DMD cells, we observed a similar efficacy of skipping of exons 6 and 8 and a similar extent of dystrophin protein recovery. The accompanying skipping of exon 9, which did not alter the reading frame, was different between cells of these two species. Antisense PMOs, the effectiveness of which has been demonstrated in a dog model, achieved multi-exon skipping of dystrophin gene on the FACS-aided MyoD-transduced fibroblasts from an exon 7-deleted DMD patient, suggesting the feasibility of systemic multi-exon skipping in humans.

  10. [Exon 5 alternative splicing of the cytochrome P450 aromatase could be a regulatory mechanism for estrogen production in humans].

    PubMed

    Pepe, Carolina M; Saraco, Nora I; Baquedano, María Sonia; Guercio, Gabriela; Vaiani, Elisa; Berensztein, Esperanza; Rivarola, Marco A; Belgorosky, Alicia

    2007-01-01

    P450 aromatase (P450Aro), involved in androgen to estrogen conversion, is encoded by the CYP19 gene. P450Aro c655G>A mutation described in heterozygous form in a girl and in homozygous form in an adult male with P450Aro deficiency results in an aberrant splicing due to disruption of a donor splice site. A truncated inactive protein would be expected if intron5 is retained. Surprisingly, the girl described with this mutation showed spontaneous breast development and pubertal estradiol (E2) levels suggesting residual P450Aro activity (AA). Formerly, we postulate the in frame E5 skipping as a consequence of this mutation generating a protein with some degree of activity. When P450Aro mRNA expression was analysed from patient's lymphocytes, an aberrant spliced mRNA lacking E5 (-E5mRNA) was detected, suggesting an association between E5 skipping and the presence of the mutation. Splicing assays in Y1 cells confirmed this association. -Ex5 cDNA expression in Y1 cells resulted in an inactive protein that could not explain patient's phenotype. Exon 5 might be predicted as a poorly defined exon suggesting a susceptibility to splicing mutations and physiological alternative splicing (AS) events. Therefore, -Ex5mRNA was assessed as a natural occurring alternative transcript in normal human steroidogenic tissues. As P450Aro -E5mRNA expression was detected in human term placenta, prepubertal testis and prepubertal adrenal, we might speculate that AS of P450Aro coding region would occur in humans and would be involved in the complex AA regulation. Furthermore, tissue specific regulation of AS might suggest low expression of +E5mRNA from the c655G>A allele explaining residual AA evidenced in the affected girl.

  11. Changes in alternative splicing of human and mouse genes are accompanied by faster evolution of constitutive exons.

    PubMed

    Cusack, Brian P; Wolfe, Kenneth H

    2005-11-01

    Alternative splicing is known to be an important source of protein sequence variation, but its evolutionary impact has not been explored in detail. Studying alternative splicing requires extensive sampling of the transcriptome, but new data sets based on expressed sequence tags aligned to chromosomes make it possible to study alternative splicing on a genome-wide scale. Although genes showing alternative splicing by exon skipping are conserved as compared to the genome as a whole, we find that genes where structural differences between human and mouse result in genome-specific alternatively spliced exons in one species show almost 60% greater nonsynonymous divergence in constitutive exons than genes where exon skipping is conserved. This effect is also seen for genes showing species-specific patterns of alternative splicing where gene structure is conserved. Our observations are not attributable to an inherent difference in rate of evolution between these two sets of proteins or to differences with respect to predictors of evolutionary rate such as expression level, tissue specificity, or genetic redundancy. Where genome-specific alternatively spliced exons are seen in mammals, the vast majority of skipped exons appear to be recent additions to gene structures. Furthermore, among genes with genome-specific alternatively spliced exons, the degree of nonsynonymous divergence in constitutive sequence is a function of the frequency of incorporation of these alternative exons into transcripts. These results suggest that alterations in alternative splicing pattern can have knock-on effects in terms of accelerated sequence evolution in constant regions of the protein.

  12. Cryptic exon incorporation occurs in Alzheimer's brain lacking TDP-43 inclusion but exhibiting nuclear clearance of TDP-43.

    PubMed

    Sun, Mingkuan; Bell, William; LaClair, Katherine D; Ling, Jonathan P; Han, Heather; Kageyama, Yusuke; Pletnikova, Olga; Troncoso, Juan C; Wong, Philip C; Chen, Liam L

    2017-06-01

    Abnormal accumulation of TDP-43 into cytoplasmic or nuclear inclusions with accompanying nuclear clearance, a common pathology initially identified in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and frontotemporal dementia (FTD), has also been found in Alzheimer' disease (AD). TDP-43 serves as a splicing repressor of nonconserved cryptic exons and that such function is compromised in brains of ALS and FTD patients, suggesting that nuclear clearance of TDP-43 underlies its inability to repress cryptic exons. However, whether TDP-43 cytoplasmic aggregates are a prerequisite for the incorporation of cryptic exons is not known. Here, we assessed hippocampal tissues from 34 human postmortem brains including cases with confirmed diagnosis of AD neuropathologic changes along with age-matched controls. We found that cryptic exon incorporation occurred in all AD cases exhibiting TDP-43 pathology. Furthermore, incorporation of cryptic exons was observed in the hippocampus when TDP-43 inclusions was restricted only to the amygdala, the earliest stage of TDP-43 progression. Importantly, cryptic exon incorporation could be detected in AD brains lacking TDP-43 inclusion but exhibiting nuclear clearance of TDP-43. These data supports the notion that the functional consequence of nuclear depletion of TDP-43 as determined by cryptic exon incorporation likely occurs as an early event of TDP-43 proteinopathy and may have greater contribution to the pathogenesis of AD than currently appreciated. Early detection and effective repression of cryptic exons in AD patients may offer important diagnostic and therapeutic implications for this devastating illness of the elderly.

  13. Repression of α-actinin SM exon splicing by assisted binding of PTB to the polypyrimidine tract

    PubMed Central

    Matlin, Arianne J.; Southby, Justine; Gooding, Clare; Smith, Christopher W.J.

    2007-01-01

    Polypyrimidine tract binding protein (PTB) acts as a regulatory repressor of a large number of alternatively spliced exons, often requiring multiple binding sites in order to repress splicing. In one case, cooperative binding of PTB has been shown to accompany repression. The SM exon of the α-actinin pre-mRNA is also repressed by PTB, leading to inclusion of the alternative upstream NM exon. The SM exon has a distant branch point located 386 nt upstream of the exon with an adjacent 26 nucleotide pyrimidine tract. Here we have analyzed PTB binding to the NM and SM exon region of the α-actinin pre-mRNA. We find that three regions of the intron bind PTB, including the 3′ end of the polypyrimidine tract (PPT) and two additional regions between the PPT and the SM exon. The downstream PTB binding sites are essential for full repression and promote binding of PTB to the PPT with a consequent reduction in U2AF65 binding. Our results are consistent with a repressive mechanism in which cooperative binding of PTB to the PPT competes with binding of U2AF65, thereby specifically blocking splicing of the SM exon. PMID:17592047

  14. Repression of alpha-actinin SM exon splicing by assisted binding of PTB to the polypyrimidine tract.

    PubMed

    Matlin, Arianne J; Southby, Justine; Gooding, Clare; Smith, Christopher W J

    2007-08-01

    Polypyrimidine tract binding protein (PTB) acts as a regulatory repressor of a large number of alternatively spliced exons, often requiring multiple binding sites in order to repress splicing. In one case, cooperative binding of PTB has been shown to accompany repression. The SM exon of the alpha-actinin pre-mRNA is also repressed by PTB, leading to inclusion of the alternative upstream NM exon. The SM exon has a distant branch point located 386 nt upstream of the exon with an adjacent 26 nucleotide pyrimidine tract. Here we have analyzed PTB binding to the NM and SM exon region of the alpha-actinin pre-mRNA. We find that three regions of the intron bind PTB, including the 3' end of the polypyrimidine tract (PPT) and two additional regions between the PPT and the SM exon. The downstream PTB binding sites are essential for full repression and promote binding of PTB to the PPT with a consequent reduction in U2AF(65) binding. Our results are consistent with a repressive mechanism in which cooperative binding of PTB to the PPT competes with binding of U2AF(65), thereby specifically blocking splicing of the SM exon.

  15. Involvement of exon 11-associated variants of the mu opioid receptor MOR-1 in heroin, but not morphine, actions.

    PubMed

    Pan, Ying-Xian; Xu, Jin; Xu, Mingming; Rossi, Grace C; Matulonis, Joshua E; Pasternak, Gavril W

    2009-03-24

    Heroin remains a major drug of abuse and is preferred by addicts over morphine. Like morphine, heroin has high affinity and selectivity for mu-receptors, but its residual analgesia in exon 1 MOR-1 knockout mice that do not respond to morphine suggests a different mechanism of action. MOR-1 splice variants lacking exon 1 have been observed in mice, humans, and rats, raising the possibility that they might be responsible for the residual heroin and morphine-6beta-glucuronide (M6G) analgesia in the exon 1 knockout mice. To test this possibility, we disrupted exon 11 of MOR-1, which eliminates all of the variants that do not contain exon 1. Morphine and methadone analgesia in the exon 11 knockout mouse was normal, but the analgesic actions of heroin, M6G, and fentanyl were markedly diminished in the radiant heat tail-flick and hot-plate assays. Similarly, the ability of M6G to inhibit gastrointestinal transit was greatly diminished in these exon 11 knockout mice, whereas the ability of morphine was unchanged. These findings identify receptors selectively involved with heroin and M6G actions and confirm the relevance of the exon 11-associated variants and raise important issues regarding the importance of atypical truncated G-protein-coupled receptors.

  16. Polymorphism in the Alternative Donor Site of the Cryptic Exon of LHCGR: Functional Consequences and Associations with Testosterone Level

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Wei; Han, Bing; Zhu, Wenjiao; Cheng, Tong; Fan, Mengxia; Wu, Jiajun; Yang, Ying; Zhu, Hui; Si, Jiqiang; Lyu, Qifeng; Chai, Weiran; Zhao, Shuangxia; Song, Huaidong; Kuang, Yanping; Qiao, Jie

    2017-01-01

    Selective splicing is a feature of luteinizing hormone receptor (LHCGR). A cryptic exon (LHCGR-exon 6A) was found to be derived from alternative splicing in intron 6 of the LHCGR gene, which including two transcripts LHCGR-exon 6A-long and LHCGR-exon 6A-short. We addressed the functional consequences of SNP rs68073206, located at the +5 position of an alternative 5′ splice donor site, and observed its association with male infertility in the subjects with azoospermia, oligoasthenozoospermia and normozoospermia. The translation product of splicing variant LHCGR-exon 6A was expressed in the cytoplasm and exhibited no affinity with [125I]-hCG. No dominant negative effect was observed in cells co-expressed with LHCGR-exon 6A and wild-type LHCGR. The long transcript (LHCGR-exon 6A-long) was significantly elevated in the granulosa cells with G/G genotypes, which could be reproduced in vitro by mini-gene construct transfection. Genotyping analysis showed no association between rs68073206 and male infertility. However, this polymorphism was significantly associated with testosterone levels in normozoospermic subjects (n = 210). In conclusion, SNP rs68073206 in the splicing site of the cryptic exon 6A of the LHCGR gene affect the splicing pattern in the gene, which may play a role in the modulation of the LHCGR sensitivity in the gonads. PMID:28367994

  17. Detection EGFR exon 19 status of lung cancer patients by DNA electrochemical biosensor.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xiong-Wei; Weng, Xiu-Hua; Wang, Chang-Lian; Lin, Wei-Wei; Liu, Ai-Lin; Chen, Wei; Lin, Xin-Hua

    2016-06-15

    Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) exon 19 mutation status is a very important prediction index for tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) therapy. In this paper, we constructed a superior selective sandwich-type electrochemical biosensor to detect in-frame deletions in exon 19 of EGFR in real samples of patients with non-small cell lung carcinoma. Based on the characteristics of different hybridization efficiency in different hybridization phase conditions, different region around EGFR exon 19 deletion hotspots was selected to design DNA probes to improve biosensor performance. The results confirm that alteration of deletion location in target deliberately according to different hybridization phase is able to improve selectivity of sandwich-type DNA biosensor. Satisfactory discrimination ability can be achieved when the deletions are located in the capture probe interaction region. In order to improve efficiency of ssDNA generation from dsDNA, we introduce Lambda exonuclease (λ-exo) to sandwich-type biosensor system. EGFR exon 19 statuses of clinical real samples from lung cancer patients can be discriminated successfully by the proposed method. Our research would make the electrochemical biosensor be an excellent candidate for EGFR detection for lung cancer patients.

  18. Intron 1 and exon 1 alpha estrogen receptor gene polymorphisms in women with endometriosis.

    PubMed

    Sato, Hélio; Nogueira-de-Souza, Naiara C; D'Amora, Paulo; Silva, Ismael D C G; Girão, Manoel J B C; Schor, Eduardo

    2008-12-01

    To evaluate the association of intron 1 and exon 1 polymorphisms in the estrogen receptor alpha gene (ER-alpha) with endometriosis in women. Association study. Endometriosis Unit, Federal University of São Paulo. The control group consisted of volunteers older than 45 years who had no evidence of endometriosis antecedents. Two groups with the disease were evaluated: the first group had stage I or II endometriosis and the second group stage III or IV. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) followed by digestion with HaeIII and MspI endonucleases (RFLP) were applied to detect intron 1 and exon 1 polymorphisms, respectively, in a total of 125 controls and 105 affected women. Frequency and distribution of HaeIII and MspI polymorphisms in ER-alpha. No significant differences in the frequency of polymorphisms either in intron 1 or exon 1 of ER-alpha were found when endometriosis patients were compared with control subjects. Furthermore, the frequency of ER-alpha polymorphisms within the two different groups of patients with disease was statistically similar. The odds ratio between presence of intron 1 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) and endometriosis was 0.904, and the odds ratio between exon 1 SNP and endometriosis was 0.976. The evaluated polymorphisms were not associated with endometriosis.

  19. Deletions Overlapping VCAN Exon 8 Are New Molecular Defects for Wagner Disease.

    PubMed

    Burin-des-Roziers, Cyril; Rothschild, Pierre-Raphael; Layet, Valérie; Chen, Jian-Min; Ghiotti, Tiffany; Leroux, Céline; Cremers, Frans P M; Brézin, Antoine P; Valleix, Sophie

    2017-01-01

    Wagner disease is a rare nonsyndromic autosomal-dominant vitreoretinopathy, associated with splice mutations specifically targeting VCAN exon 8. We report the extensive genetic analysis of two Wagner probands, previously found negative for disease-associated splice mutations. Next-generation sequencing (NGS), quantitative real-time PCR, and long-range PCR identified two deletions (3.4 and 10.5 kb) removing at least one exon-intron boundary of exon 8, and both correlating with an imbalance of VCAN mRNA isoforms. We showed that the 10.5-kb deletion occurred de novo, causing somatic mosaicism in the proband's mother who had an unusually mild asymmetrical phenotype. Therefore, exon 8 deletions are novel VCAN genetic defects responsible for Wagner disease, and VCAN mosaic mutations may be involved in the pathogenesis of Wagner disease with attenuated phenotype. NGS is then an effective screening tool for genetic diagnosis of Wagner disease, improving the chance of identifying all disease-causative variants as well as mosaic mutations in VCAN. © 2016 WILEY PERIODICALS, INC.

  20. Defining the ends of Parkin exon 4 deletions in two different families with Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Clarimon, Jordi; Johnson, Janel; Dogu, Okan; Horta, Wagner; Khan, Naheed; Lees, Andrew J; Hardy, John; Singleton, Andrew

    2005-02-05

    Autosomal recessive juvenile parkinsonism (AR-JP, PARK2) is characterized by an early onset parkinsonism, often presenting with dystonia as an early feature. Mutations in Parkin are a relatively common cause of AR-JP and are estimated to be present in approximately 30% of familial young onset Parkinson disease (PD) [Abbas et al. (1999); Hum Mol Genet 8:567-574]. These mutations include exon rearrangements (deletions and duplications), point mutations, and small deletions. Similar genomic mutations have been described in unrelated patients, thereby indicating independent mutational events or ancient founder effects. We have identified homozygous deletion mutations of exon 4 in Parkin in two unrelated families, one from Brazil and the other from Turkey [Dogu et al. (2004); Mov Dis 9:812-816; Khan et al., Mov Dis, in press]. We have performed molecular analysis of the deletion breakpoints and this data indicates these mutations originated independently. We present here data demonstrating that the mutation responsible for disease in the Brazilian kindred consists of two separate deletions (1,069 and 1,750 bp) surrounding and including exon 4. The deletion removing parkin exon 4 identified in the Turkish family extended 156,203 bp. In addition to demonstrating that disease in these families is not caused by a single founder mutation, these data show that there is no common fragile site between these mutational events.

  1. Mutations in exon 10 of the RET proto-oncogene in Hirschsprung`s disease

    SciTech Connect

    Attie, T.; Eng, C.; Mulligan, L.M.

    1994-09-01

    Hirschsprung`s disease (HSCR) is a frequent congenital malformation ascribed to the absence of autonomic ganglion cells in the terminal hindgut. Recently, we have identified mutations in the RET proto-oncogene in HSCR families. Mutations of the RET gene have also been reported in multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2A (MEN 2A) and familial medullary thyroid carcinoma (FMTC). While RET mutations in HSCR are scattered on the whole coding sequence, MEN 2A and FMTC mutations are clustered in 5 cystein codons of exons 10 and 11. Here, we report on HSCR families carrying mutations in exon 10 of the RET gene, one of them involving a cystein codon. Germ-line mutations in exon 10 of the RET gene may contribute to either an early development defect (HSCR) or inherited predisposition to cancer (MEN 2A and FMTC), probable depending on the nature and location of the mutation. These data also suggest that HSCR patients with mutations in exon 10 might subsequently prove to be at risk for MEN 2A or FMTC since several MEN 2A/HSCR associations have been reported.

  2. Concurrent mutation in exons 1 and 2 of the K-ras oncogene in colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Palmirotta, Raffaele; Savonarola, Annalisa; Ludovici, Giorgia; De Marchis, Maria Laura; Covello, Renato; Ettorre, Giuseppe Maria; Ialongo, Cristiano; Guadagni, Fiorella

    2011-01-01

    The K-ras gene is frequently mutated in colorectal cancer and has been associated with tumor initiation and progression; approximately 90% of the activating mutations are found in codons 12 and 13 of exon 1 and just under 5% in codon 61 located in exon 2. These mutations determine single aminoacidic substitutions in the GTPase pocket leading to a block of the GTP hydrolytic activity of the K-ras p21 protein, and therefore to its constitutive activation. Point mutations in sites of the K-ras gene, other than codons 12, 13 and 61, and other types of genetic alterations, may occur in a minority of cases, such as in the less frequent cases of double mutations in the K-ras gene. However, all mutations in this gene, even those which occur in non-canonical sites or double mutations, are relevant oncogenic alterations in colorectal cancer and may underlie K-ras pathway hyperactivation. In the present study, we report the case of a patient with colorectal cancer presenting a concurrent point mutation in exons 1 and 2 of the K-ras gene, a GGT to TGT substitution (Glycine to Cysteine) at codon 12, and a GAC to AAC substitution (Aspartic Acid to Asparagine) at codon 57. In addition, we found in the same patient's sample a silent polymorphism at codon 11 (Ala11Ala) of exon 1.

  3. A novel first exon directs hormone-sensitive transcription of the pig prolactin receptor

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Endocrine, paracrine, and autocrine prolactin (PRL) acts through its receptor (PRLR) to confer a wide range of biological functions, including its established role during lactation.We have identified a novel first exon of the porcine PRLR that gives rise to three different mRNA transcripts. Transcri...

  4. A novel point mutation in exon 20 of EGFR showed sensitivity to erlotinib.

    PubMed

    Xing, Kailin; Zhou, Xiaoyan; Zhao, Xinmin; Sun, Si; Luo, Zhiguo; Wang, Huijie; Yu, Hui; Wang, Jialei; Chang, Jianhua; Wu, Xianghua; Hu, Aiqun

    2014-07-01

    Mutations of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) gene are good predictors of response to treatment with EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). It is well established that classic mutations, such as in-frame deletions in exon 19 and the point mutation L858R in exon 21, are associated with high sensitivity to EGFR TKIs. Though mutations in exon 20 are almost correlated with EGFR-TKIs resistance, the awareness that they might confer sensitivity to TKI treatment should be emphasized. Herein, we describe a novel mutation in exon 20 of EGFR in a Chinese male non-smoker, who was diagnosed with stage IV lung adenocarcinoma and characterized by the codon 769 point mutation GTG>GCG, which translates into alanine instead of valine (p.V769A). In this case, the patient showed a good clinical response to erlotinib after paclitaxel/cisplatin first-line and docetaxel second-line chemotherapies. Therefore, we suggest that this rare mutation (p.V769A) may be a sensitive EGFR mutation in NSCLC. The identification of novel EGFR mutations provides new predictive biomarkers for TKI treatment and is essential to the successful use of targeted therapies.

  5. EGFR Exon 20 Insertion/Duplication Mutations Characterize Fibrous Hamartoma of Infancy.

    PubMed

    Park, Jason Y; Cohen, Cynthia; Lopez, Dania; Ramos, Erica; Wagenfuehr, Jennifer; Rakheja, Dinesh

    2016-12-01

    Fibrous hamartoma of infancy (FHI) is a benign mesenchymal tumor histologically characterized by a mixture of intersecting fascicles of fibroblasts/myofibroblasts in collagenous stroma, nests of primitive oval or stellate cells in basophilic mucoid stroma, and mature adipose tissue. We hypothesized that FHI, because of histologic overlap with mesenchymal overgrowth tumors seen in CLOVES (Congenital Lipomatous Overgrowth with Vascular, Epidermal, Skeletal anomalies) and Proteus syndromes, may harbor mutations in signaling pathways associated with cellular proliferation. Formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded material from a discovery set of 4 cases of FHI was investigated by targeted next-generation sequencing of a panel of cancer-associated genes. The results were confirmed by targeted Sanger sequencing of EGFR exon 20. A validation set of 8 cases of FHI and 10 cases of other pediatric fatty tumors were investigated by targeted Sanger sequencing of EGFR exon 20. All 12 cases of FHI, and none of the 10 control tumors, showed EGFR exon 20 insertion/duplication mutations. This is the first report of molecular aberrations in FHI. The consistent occurrence of EGFR exon 20 insertion/duplication mutations in 100% of cases of FHI studied suggests that they must play a principal role in the pathogenesis of FHI, likely by conferring a potential for growth and local infiltration. Although surgical treatment will remain the mainstay of FHI treatment, tyrosine kinase inhibitors may have an adjunctive role in cases that are difficult to resect.

  6. Exon skipping: a first in class strategy for Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Niks, Erik H; Aartsma-Rus, Annemieke

    2017-02-01

    Exon skipping is a therapeutic approach for Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) that has been in development for close to two decades. This approach uses antisense oligonucleotides (AONs) to modulate pre-mRNA splicing of dystrophin transcripts to restore the disrupted DMD reading frame. The approach has moved from in vitro proof of concept studies to the clinical trial phase and marketing authorization applications with regulators. The first AON (eteplirsen) has recently received accelerated approval by the Food and Drug Administration in the US. Areas covered: In this review the authors explain the antisense-mediated exon skipping approach, outline how it needs be tailored for different DMD mutation types and describe the challenges and opportunities for each mutation type. The authors summarize the clinical development of antisense-mediated exon 51 skipping, and discuss methods to improve efficiency. Finally, the authors provide their opinion on current developments and identify topics for future prioritization. Expert opinion: Exon skipping development has been a learning experience for all those involved. Aside from an approved therapy, its development has yielded side benefits including the development of tools for clinical trials and has increased collaboration between academics, patients, industry and regulators.

  7. MBNL1 and PTB cooperate to repress splicing of Tpm1 exon 3

    PubMed Central

    Gooding, Clare; Edge, Christopher; Lorenz, Mike; Coelho, Miguel B.; Winters, Mikael; Kaminski, Clemens F.; Cherny, Dmitry; Eperon, Ian C.; Smith, Christopher W.J.

    2013-01-01

    Exon 3 of the rat α-tropomyosin (Tpm1) gene is repressed in smooth muscle cells, allowing inclusion of the mutually exclusive partner exon 2. Two key types of elements affect repression of exon 3 splicing: binding sites for polypyrimidine tract-binding protein (PTB) and additional negative regulatory elements consisting of clusters of UGC or CUG motifs. Here, we show that the UGC clusters are bound by muscleblind-like proteins (MBNL), which act as repressors of Tpm1 exon 3. We show that the N-terminal region of MBNL1, containing its four CCCH zinc-finger domains, is sufficient to mediate repression. The same region of MBNL1 can make a direct protein-to-protein interaction with PTB, and RNA binding by MBNL promotes this interaction, apparently by inducing a conformational change in MBNL. Moreover, single molecule analysis showed that MBNL-binding sites increase the binding of PTB to its own sites. Our data suggest that the smooth muscle splicing of Tpm1 is mediated by allosteric assembly of an RNA–protein complex minimally comprising PTB, MBNL and their cognate RNA-binding sites. PMID:23511971

  8. Tandemly repeated exons encode 81-base repeats in multiple, developmentally regulated Schistosoma mansoni transcripts.

    PubMed Central

    Davis, R E; Davis, A H; Carroll, S M; Rajkovic, A; Rottman, F M

    1988-01-01

    The adult Schistosoma mansoni cDNA clone 10-3 encodes an antigen that is recognized by sera from infected humans. We characterized multiple developmentally regulated transcripts homologous to the 10-3 cDNA and portions of the complex genomic loci encoding those transcripts. Transcripts of approximately 950, 870, and 780 nucleotides were expressed in adults, whereas only the 780-nucleotide transcript was observed in the larval stage. These transcripts were highly similar, containing variable numbers of identical direct tandem repeats of 81 bases. Although the sequence of the repeating elements and sequences 3' to them were identical in all the transcripts, sequences 5' of the repeating elements exhibited variations, including a 27-base insertion, alternative start sites for transcription, and alternate 5' exon usage. These transcripts appeared to be derived in part by the developmentally controlled alternative splicing of small exons and the use of alternative transcription initiation sites from the one or two complex loci of at least 40 kilobase pairs. Each 81-base repeat in the transcripts was encoded by three dispersed 27-base-pair exons. These 27-base-pair exons were contained within highly conserved, reiterated 3-kilobase-pair genomic tandem arrays. Images PMID:3211127

  9. A strategy of exon shuffling for making large peptide repertoires displayed on filamentous bacteriophage.

    PubMed

    Fisch, I; Kontermann, R E; Finnern, R; Hartley, O; Soler-Gonzalez, A S; Griffiths, A D; Winter, G

    1996-07-23

    It has been suggested that recombination and shuffling between exons has been a key feature in the evolution of proteins. We propose that this strategy could also be used for the artificial evolution of proteins in bacteria. As a first step, we illustrate the use of a self-splicing group I intron with inserted lox-Cre recombination site to assemble a very large combinatorial repertoire (> 10(11) members) of peptides from two different exons. Each exon comprised a repertoire of 10 random amino acids residues; after splicing, the repertoires were joined together through a central five-residue spacer to give a combinatorial repertoire of 25-residue peptides. The repertoire was displayed on filamentous bacteriophage by fusion to the pIII phage coat protein and selected by binding to several proteins, including beta-glucuronidase. One of the peptides selected against beta-glucuronidase was chemically synthesized and shown to inhibit the enzymatic activity (inhibition constant: 17 nM); by further exon shuffling, an improved inhibitor was isolated (inhibition constant: 7 nM). Not only does this approach provide the means for making very large peptide repertoires, but we anticipate that by introducing constraints in the sequences of the peptides and of the linker, it may be possible to evolve small folded peptides and proteins.

  10. Exonic microdeletions of the gephyrin gene impair GABAergic synaptic inhibition in patients with idiopathic generalized epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Dejanovic, Borislav; Lal, Dennis; Catarino, Claudia B; Arjune, Sita; Belaidi, Abdel A; Trucks, Holger; Vollmar, Christian; Surges, Rainer; Kunz, Wolfram S; Motameny, Susanne; Altmüller, Janine; Köhler, Anna; Neubauer, Bernd A; Epicure Consortium; Nürnberg, Peter; Noachtar, Soheyl; Schwarz, Günter; Sander, Thomas

    2014-07-01

    Gephyrin is a postsynaptic scaffolding protein, essential for the clustering of glycine and γ-aminobutyric acid type-A receptors (GABAARs) at inhibitory synapses. An impairment of GABAergic synaptic inhibition represents a key pathway of epileptogenesis. Recently, exonic microdeletions in the gephyrin (GPHN) gene have been associated with neurodevelopmental disorders including autism spectrum disorder, schizophrenia and epileptic seizures. Here we report the identification of novel exonic GPHN microdeletions in two patients with idiopathic generalized epilepsy (IGE), representing the most common group of genetically determined epilepsies. The identified GPHN microdeletions involve exons 5-9 (Δ5-9) and 2-3 (Δ2-3), both affecting the gephyrin G-domain. Molecular characterization of the GPHN Δ5-9 variant demonstrated that it perturbs the clustering of regular gephyrin at inhibitory synapses in cultured mouse hippocampal neurons in a dominant-negative manner, resulting in a significant loss of γ2-subunit containing GABAARs. GPHN Δ2-3 causes a frameshift resulting in a premature stop codon (p.V22Gfs*7) leading to haplo-insufficiency of the gene. Our results demonstrate that structural exonic microdeletions affecting the GPHN gene constitute a rare genetic risk factor for IGE and other neuropsychiatric disorders by an impairment of the GABAergic inhibitory synaptic transmission.

  11. The deletion of exon 3 in the cardiac ryanodine receptor is rescued by β strand switching.

    PubMed

    Lobo, Paolo A; Kimlicka, Lynn; Tung, Ching-Chieh; Van Petegem, Filip

    2011-06-08

    Mutations in the cardiac Ryanodine Receptor (RYR2) are linked to triggered arrhythmias. Removal of exon 3 results in a severe form of catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia (CPVT). This exon encodes secondary structure elements that are crucial for folding of the N-terminal domain (NTD), raising the question of why the deletion is neither lethal nor confers a loss of function. We determined the 2.3 Å crystal structure of the NTD lacking exon 3. The removal causes a structural rescue whereby a flexible loop inserts itself into the β trefoil domain and increases thermal stability. The exon 3 deletion is not tolerated in the corresponding RYR1 domain. The rescue shows a novel mechanism by which RYR2 channels can adjust their Ca²⁺ release properties through altering the structure of the NTD. Despite the rescue, the deletion affects interfaces with other RYR2 domains. We propose that relative movement of the NTD is allosterically coupled to the pore region.

  12. SNP discovery in candidate adaptive genes using exon capture in a free-ranging alpine ungulate

    Treesearch

    Gretchen H. Roffler; Stephen J. Amish; Seth Smith; Ted Cosart; Marty Kardos; Michael K. Schwartz; Gordon Luikart

    2016-01-01

    Identification of genes underlying genomic signatures of natural selection is key to understanding adaptation to local conditions. We used targeted resequencing to identify SNP markers in 5321 candidate adaptive genes associated with known immunological, metabolic and growth functions in ovids and other ungulates. We selectively targeted 8161 exons in protein-coding...

  13. Oxidative stress controls the choice of alternative last exons via a Brahma–BRCA1–CstF pathway

    PubMed Central

    Fontana, Gabriele A.; Rigamonti, Aurora; Lenzken, Silvia C.; Filosa, Giuseppe; Alvarez, Reinaldo; Calogero, Raffaele; Bianchi, Marco E.; Barabino, Silvia M.L.

    2017-01-01

    Alternative splicing of terminal exons increases transcript and protein diversity. How physiological and pathological stimuli regulate the choice between alternative terminal exons is, however, largely unknown. Here, we show that Brahma (BRM), the ATPase subunit of the hSWI/SNF chromatin-remodeling complex interacts with BRCA1/BARD1, which ubiquitinates the 50 kDa subunit of the 3′ end processing factor CstF. This results in the inhibition of transcript cleavage at the proximal poly(A) site and a shift towards inclusion of the distal terminal exon. Upon oxidative stress, BRM is depleted, cleavage inhibition is released, and inclusion of the proximal last exon is favoored. Our findings elucidate a novel regulatory mechanism, distinct from the modulation of transcription elongation by BRM that controls alternative splicing of internal exons. PMID:27591253

  14. Oxidative stress controls the choice of alternative last exons via a Brahma-BRCA1-CstF pathway.

    PubMed

    Fontana, Gabriele A; Rigamonti, Aurora; Lenzken, Silvia C; Filosa, Giuseppe; Alvarez, Reinaldo; Calogero, Raffaele; Bianchi, Marco E; Barabino, Silvia M L

    2017-01-25

    Alternative splicing of terminal exons increases transcript and protein diversity. How physiological and pathological stimuli regulate the choice between alternative terminal exons is, however, largely unknown. Here, we show that Brahma (BRM), the ATPase subunit of the hSWI/SNF chromatin-remodeling complex interacts with BRCA1/BARD1, which ubiquitinates the 50 kDa subunit of the 3' end processing factor CstF. This results in the inhibition of transcript cleavage at the proximal poly(A) site and a shift towards inclusion of the distal terminal exon. Upon oxidative stress, BRM is depleted, cleavage inhibition is released, and inclusion of the proximal last exon is favoored. Our findings elucidate a novel regulatory mechanism, distinct from the modulation of transcription elongation by BRM that controls alternative splicing of internal exons.

  15. Folding Landscape of Mutant Huntingtin Exon1: Diffusible Multimers, Oligomers and Fibrils, and No Detectable Monomer

    PubMed Central

    Sahoo, Bankanidhi; Arduini, Irene; Drombosky, Kenneth W.; Kodali, Ravindra; Sanders, Laurie H.; Greenamyre, J. Timothy; Wetzel, Ronald

    2016-01-01

    Expansion of the polyglutamine (polyQ) track of the Huntingtin (HTT) protein above 36 is associated with a sharply enhanced risk of Huntington’s disease (HD). Although there is general agreement that HTT toxicity resides primarily in N-terminal fragments such as the HTT exon1 protein, there is no consensus on the nature of the physical states of HTT exon1 that are induced by polyQ expansion, nor on which of these states might be responsible for toxicity. One hypothesis is that polyQ expansion induces an alternative, toxic conformation in the HTT exon1 monomer. Alternative hypotheses posit that the toxic species is one of several possible aggregated states. Defining the nature of the toxic species is particularly challenging because of facile interconversion between physical states as well as challenges to identifying these states, especially in vivo. Here we describe the use of fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) to characterize the detailed time and repeat length dependent self-association of HTT exon1-like fragments both with chemically synthesized peptides in vitro and with cell-produced proteins in extracts and in living cells. We find that, in vitro, mutant HTT exon1 peptides engage in polyQ repeat length dependent dimer and tetramer formation, followed by time dependent formation of diffusible spherical and fibrillar oligomers and finally by larger, sedimentable amyloid fibrils. For expanded polyQ HTT exon1 expressed in PC12 cells, monomers are absent, with tetramers being the smallest molecular form detected, followed in the incubation time course by small, diffusible aggregates at 6–9 hours and larger, sedimentable aggregates that begin to build up at 12 hrs. In these cell cultures, significant nuclear DNA damage appears by 6 hours, followed at later times by caspase 3 induction, mitochondrial dysfunction, and cell death. Our data thus defines limits on the sizes and concentrations of different physical states of HTT exon1 along the reaction

  16. An exon-specific U1 small nuclear RNA (snRNA) strategy to correct splicing defects

    PubMed Central

    Fernandez Alanis, Eugenio; Pinotti, Mirko; Dal Mas, Andrea; Balestra, Dario; Cavallari, Nicola; Rogalska, Malgorzata E.; Bernardi, Francesco; Pagani, Franco

    2012-01-01

    A significant proportion of disease-causing mutations affect precursor-mRNA splicing, inducing skipping of the exon from the mature transcript. Using F9 exon 5, CFTR exon 12 and SMN2 exon 7 models, we characterized natural mutations associated to exon skipping in Haemophilia B, cystic fibrosis and spinal muscular atrophy (SMA), respectively, and the therapeutic splicing rescue by using U1 small nuclear RNA (snRNA). In minigene expression systems, loading of U1 snRNA by complementarity to the normal or mutated donor splice sites (5′ss) corrected the exon skipping caused by mutations at the polypyrimidine tract of the acceptor splice site, at the consensus 5′ss or at exonic regulatory elements. To improve specificity and reduce potential off-target effects, we developed U1 snRNA variants targeting non-conserved intronic sequences downstream of the 5′ss. For each gene system, we identified an exon-specific U1 snRNA (ExSpeU1) able to rescue splicing impaired by the different types of mutations. Through splicing-competent cDNA constructs, we demonstrated that the ExSpeU1-mediated splicing correction of several F9 mutations results in complete restoration of secreted functional factor IX levels. Furthermore, two ExSpeU1s for SMA improved SMN exon 7 splicing in the chromosomal context of normal cells. We propose ExSpeU1s as a novel therapeutic strategy to correct, in several human disorders, different types of splicing mutations associated with defective exon definition. PMID:22362925

  17. Use of epitope libraries to identify exon-specific monoclonal antibodies for characterization of altered dystrophins in muscular dystrophy

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen thi Man; Morris, G.E. )

    1993-06-01

    The majority of mutations in Xp21-linked muscular dystrophy (MD) can be identified by PCR or Southern blotting, as deletions or duplications of groups of exons in the dystrophin gene, but it is not always possible to predict how much altered dystrophin, if any, will be produced. Use of exon-specific monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) on muscle biopsies from MD patients can, in principle, provide information on both the amount of altered dystrophin produced and, when dystrophin is present, the nature of the genetic deletion or point mutation. For this purpose, mAbs which recognize regions of dystrophin encoded by known exons and whose binding is unaffected by the absence of adjacent exons are required. To map mAbs to specific exons, random [open quotes]libraries[close quotes] of expressed dystrophin fragments were created by cloning DNAseI digestion fragments of a 4.3-kb dystrophin cDNA into a pTEX expression vector. The libraries were then used to locate the epitopes recognized by 48 mAbs to fragments of 25--60 amino acids within the 1,434-amino-acid dystrophin fragment used to produce the antibodies. This is sufficiently detailed to allow further refinement by using synthetic peptides and, in many cases, to identify the exon in the DMD (Duchenne MD) gene which encodes the epitope. To illustrate their use in dystrophin analysis, a Duchenne patient with a frameshift deletion of exons 42 and 43 makes a truncated dystrophin encoded by exons 1--41, and the authors now show that this can be detected in the sarcolemma by mAbs up to and including those specific for exon 41 epitopes but not by mAbs specific for exon 43 or later epitopes. 38 refs., 2 figs., 4 tabs.

  18. Differentially expressed three non-coding alternate exons at 5' UTR of regulatory type I beta subunit gene of mouse.

    PubMed

    Banday, Abdul Rouf; Azim, Shafquat; Tabish, Mohammad

    2012-04-01

    Prkar1b gene encodes regulatory type I, beta subunit (RIβ) of cAMP dependent protein kinase A in mouse. Among the various isoforms of regulatory and catalytic subunits that comprise mammalian PKA, RIβ subunit is considered to be one of the important subunits for neuronal functions. This is involved in multiple forms of synaptic plasticity, and influences memory and learning by maintaining hippocampal long-term potentiation (LTP). Deficient expression of this gene has been implicated in autoimmune disease systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). We have identified two novel non-coding exons of the Prkar1b gene (designated as exon 1A and exon 1B), which are spliced to the canonical exon 2 and constitute the 5' untranslated region giving rise to three alternative transcript isoforms. We have also confirmed the expression of the previously known first exon (designated as exon 1C) with known transcript published earlier. The transcripts containing exons 1A, 1B and 1C are differentially regulated during the development and tissue types. In silico study of more than 20 kb nucleotide sequence upstream of known translational initiation codon revealed three distinct promoter regions named as PA, PB, and PC upstream of the exon 1A, exon 1B and exon 1C respectively. PB is non-CpG related promoter but PA and PC are CpG related promoters, however all three promoters are TATA less. Further analysis showed that these promoters possess potential signature sequences for common as well as different transcription factors suggesting complex regulation of Prkar1b gene.

  19. LncRNA expression profiles of EGFR exon 19 deletions in lung adenocarcinoma ascertained by using microarray analysis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yumin; Chen, Wei; Chen, Jie; Pan, Qinshi; Pan, Jingye

    2014-09-01

    Studies showed that long chain non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) involved in the development and progression of lung cancer. However, the mechanisms of EGFR exon 19 deletion in lung adenocarcinoma were unclear. Lung adenocarcinoma was divided into EGFR exon 19 deletion group and EGFR wild-type group. We studied the differential expression profiles of lncRNAs in EGFR exon 19 deletion in lung adenocarcinoma by high-throughput microarray. Using abundant and varied probes, we were able to assess 30,586 lncRNAs and 26,109 mRNAs in our microarray. Compared with the wild-type EGFR, we found that 1,533 lncRNAs and 1,406 mRNAs were differentially expressed (≥ twofold change) in EGFR exon 19 deletion in lung adenocarcinoma, indicating that many lncRNAs were significantly upregulated or downregulated in EGFR exon 19 deletion in lung adenocarcinoma. The 10 lncRNAs were aberrantly expressed in EGFR exon 19 deletion in lung adenocarcinoma compared with wild-type EGFR group validated by real-time RT-PCR. Among these, RP11-325I22.2 and LOC440905 were the most aberrantly expressed in 20 cases of EGFR exon 19 deletion in lung adenocarcinoma samples by real-time RT-PCR. Our study showed lncRNAs expression pattern in EGFR exon 19 deletion in lung adenocarcinoma by microarray. RP11-325I22.2 and LOC440905 might play an important role in the mechanism of EGFR exon 19 deletion in lung adenocarcinoma. The study may provide a new mechanism of EGFR exon 19 deletion in lung adenocarcinoma.

  20. Characterization of a spliced exon product of herpes simplex type-1 latency-associated transcript in productively infected cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, Wen; Mukerjee, Ruma; Gartner, Jared J.; Hatzigeorgiou, Artemis G.; Sandri-Goldin, Rozanne M.; Fraser, Nigel W. . E-mail: nfraser@mail.med.upenn.edu

    2006-12-20

    The latency-associated transcripts (LATs) of herpes simplex virus type-1 (HSV-1) are the only viral RNAs accumulating during latent infections in the sensory ganglia of the peripheral nervous system. The major form of LAT that accumulates in latently infected neurons is a 2 kb intron, spliced from a much less abundant 8.3 primary transcript. The spliced exon mRNA has been hard to detect. However, in this study, we have examined the spliced exon RNA in productively infected cells using ribonuclease protection (RPA), and quantitative RT-PCR (q-PCR) assays. We were able to detect the LAT exon RNA in productively infected SY5Y cells (a human neuronal cell line). The level of the LAT exon RNA was found to be approximately 5% that of the 2 kb intron RNA and thus is likely to be relatively unstable. Quantitative RT-PCR (q-PCR) assays were used to examine the LAT exon RNA and its properties. They confirmed that the LAT exon mRNA is present at a very low level in productively infected cells, compared to the levels of other viral transcripts. Furthermore, experiments showed that the LAT exon mRNA is expressed as a true late gene, and appears to be polyadenylated. In SY5Y cells, in contrast to most late viral transcripts, the LAT exon RNA was found to be mainly nuclear localized during the late stage of a productive infection. Interestingly, more LAT exon RNA was found in the cytoplasm in differentiated compared to undifferentiated SY5Y cells, suggesting the nucleocytoplasmic distribution of the LAT exon RNA and its related function may be influenced by the differentiation state of cells.

  1. Analysis of c-KIT exon 11 mutations in canine gastrointestinal stromal tumours.

    PubMed

    Takanosu, M; Amano, S; Kagawa, Y

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the type and frequency of c-KIT exon 11 mutations in canine gastrointestinal stromal tumours (GISTs) and investigate the association between the c-KIT mutation status and KIT immunohistochemical staining pattern. Mutations in exon 11 of c-KIT were examined in 46 formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded canine GISTs using PCR of genomic DNA and reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR) of cDNA. Exon 11 c-KIT mutations were detected in 15/46 (32.6%) cases by conventional PCR and 34/46 (73.9%) cases by RT-PCR; the mutation detection rate was significantly higher for RT-PCR (P = 0.004, Fisher's exact test). Ten different mutations, including deletion, internal tandem duplication and point mutations, were identified by RT-PCR. Immunohistochemistry was performed using an anti-KIT antibody; diffuse KIT staining was detected in the tumour cell cytoplasm in 32/46 (69.6%) cases and partial or stippled cytoplasmic staining of KIT was observed in 14/46 (30.4%) cases. Neither pattern was significantly associated with c-KIT exon 11 mutation status (P = 1.000, chi-square test). These data indicate that c-KIT exon 11 mutations occur frequently in canine GISTs, similar to human GISTs; however, there is no association between c-KIT mutations and the KIT expression pattern in canine GISTs. This study suggests that RT-PCR is more sensitive than conventional PCR for the detection of c-KIT mutations in canine GISTs.

  2. Aggregation Behavior of Chemically Synthesized, Full-Length Huntingtin Exon1

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Repeat length disease thresholds vary among the 10 expanded polyglutamine (polyQ) repeat diseases, from about 20 to about 50 glutamine residues. The unique amino acid sequences flanking the polyQ segment are thought to contribute to these repeat length thresholds. The specific portions of the flanking sequences that modulate polyQ properties are not always clear, however. This ambiguity may be important in Huntington’s disease (HD), for example, where in vitro studies of aggregation mechanisms have led to distinctly different mechanistic models. Most in vitro studies of the aggregation of the huntingtin (HTT) exon1 fragment implicated in the HD mechanism have been conducted on inexact molecules that are imprecise either on the N-terminus (recombinantly produced peptides) or on the C-terminus (chemically synthesized peptides). In this paper, we investigate the aggregation properties of chemically synthesized HTT exon1 peptides that are full-length and complete, containing both normal and expanded polyQ repeat lengths, and compare the results directly to previously investigated molecules containing truncated C-termini. The results on the full-length peptides are consistent with a two-step aggregation mechanism originally developed based on studies of the C-terminally truncated analogues. Thus, we observe relatively rapid formation of spherical oligomers containing from 100 to 600 HTT exon1 molecules and intermediate formation of short protofibril-like structures containing from 500 to 2600 molecules. In contrast to this relatively rapid assembly, mature HTT exon1 amyloid requires about one month to dissociate in vitro, which is similar to the time required for neuronal HTT exon1 aggregates to disappear in vivo after HTT production is discontinued. PMID:24921664

  3. Weak definition of IKBKAP exon 20 leads to aberrant splicing in familial dysautonomia.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, El Chérif; Hims, Matthew M; Shomron, Noam; Burge, Christopher B; Slaugenhaupt, Susan A; Reed, Robin

    2007-01-01

    Splicing mutations that lead to devastating genetic diseases are often located in nonconserved or weakly conserved sequences that normally do not affect splicing. Thus, the underlying reason for the splicing defect is not immediately obvious. An example of this phenomenon is observed in the neurodevelopmental disease familial dysautonomia (FD), which is caused by a single-base change in the 5' splice site (5'ss) of intron 20 in the IKBKAP gene (c.2204+6T>C). This mutation, which is in the sixth position of the intron and results in exon 20 skipping, has no phenotype in many other introns. To determine why the position 6 mutation causes aberrant splicing only in certain cases, we first used an in silico approach to identify potential sequences involved in exon 20 skipping. Computational analyses of the exon 20 5'ss itself predicted that this nine-nucleotide splicing signal, even when it contains the T>C mutation, is not sufficiently weak to explain the FD phenotype. However, the computational analysis predicted that both the upstream 3' splice site (3'ss) and exon 20 contain weak splicing signals, indicating that the FD 5'ss, together with the surrounding splicing signals, are not adequate for defining exon 20. These in silico predictions were corroborated using IKBKAP minigenes in a new rapid and simple in vitro coupled RNA polymerase (RNAP) II transcription/splicing assay. Finally, the weak splicing signals that flank the T>C mutation were validated as the underlying cause of familial dysautonomia in vivo using transient transfection assays. Together, our study demonstrates the general utility of combining in silico data with an in vitro RNAP II transcription/splicing system for rapidly identifying critical sequences that underlie the numerous splicing diseases caused by otherwise silent mutations. (c) 2006 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  4. Methylation pattern of H19 exon 1 is closely related to preeclampsia and trophoblast abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Lu, Linshan; Hou, Zheng; Li, Li; Yang, Yanhong; Wang, Xiaohong; Zhang, Beilei; Ren, Mo; Zhao, Dan; Miao, Zhuo; Yu, Lili; Yao, Yuanqing

    2014-09-01

    Preeclampsia (PE) is a pregnancy-induced disorder characterized by the overproliferation of trophoblasts. Hydatidiform moles, which are associated with a high risk of developing PE, are characterized by the excessive proliferation of trophoblastic tissue. H19 is highly expressed in placental tissue; however, its biological function remains unclear. A fundamental modification of the H19 gene is DNA methylation, which typically occurs in CG-rich regions at the promoter or the first exon region. In this study, in order to investigate the DNA methylation pattern of the H19 exon 1 region in placental tissues and trophoblast cells, placental specimens were collected from women in the first trimester of pregrancy (FTP) and the third trimester of pregnancy (TTP), as well as from from women with severe preeclampsia (sPE). We found that the DNA methylation levels of H19 exon 1 were significantly higher in the tissues obtained from women in TTP than from those obtained from women in FFP. The methylation status of CpG 1 sites within exon 1 of H19 was markedly higher in the placental tissues obtained from women with sPE than in the tissues obtained from women in TTP. In addition, we used the human choriocarcinoma cell line, JEG-3, and treated the cells with the methylation inhibitor, 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine (5-Aza‑Dc). Following treatment with 5-Aza-Dc, the methylation levels at this CpG site showed marked hypomethylation. In addtion, the cell proliferative, migratory and invasive capacities of the cells were remarkably inhibited. Our data suggest that hypermethylation at individual CpG sites within exon 1 of H19 may be involved in the dysfunction of trophoblasts and the pathogenesis of PE.

  5. Alternatively Spliced Homologous Exons Have Ancient Origins and Are Highly Expressed at the Protein Level.

    PubMed

    Abascal, Federico; Ezkurdia, Iakes; Rodriguez-Rivas, Juan; Rodriguez, Jose Manuel; del Pozo, Angela; Vázquez, Jesús; Valencia, Alfonso; Tress, Michael L

    2015-06-01

    Alternative splicing of messenger RNA can generate a wide variety of mature RNA transcripts, and these transcripts may produce protein isoforms with diverse cellular functions. While there is much supporting evidence for the expression of alternative transcripts, the same is not true for the alternatively spliced protein products. Large-scale mass spectroscopy experiments have identified evidence of alternative splicing at the protein level, but with conflicting results. Here we carried out a rigorous analysis of the peptide evidence from eight large-scale proteomics experiments to assess the scale of alternative splicing that is detectable by high-resolution mass spectroscopy. We find fewer splice events than would be expected: we identified peptides for almost 64% of human protein coding genes, but detected just 282 splice events. This data suggests that most genes have a single dominant isoform at the protein level. Many of the alternative isoforms that we could identify were only subtly different from the main splice isoform. Very few of the splice events identified at the protein level disrupted functional domains, in stark contrast to the two thirds of splice events annotated in the human genome that would lead to the loss or damage of functional domains. The most striking result was that more than 20% of the splice isoforms we identified were generated by substituting one homologous exon for another. This is significantly more than would be expected from the frequency of these events in the genome. These homologous exon substitution events were remarkably conserved--all the homologous exons we identified evolved over 460 million years ago--and eight of the fourteen tissue-specific splice isoforms we identified were generated from homologous exons. The combination of proteomics evidence, ancient origin and tissue-specific splicing indicates that isoforms generated from homologous exons may have important cellular roles.

  6. Alternatively Spliced Homologous Exons Have Ancient Origins and Are Highly Expressed at the Protein Level

    PubMed Central

    Abascal, Federico; Ezkurdia, Iakes; Rodriguez-Rivas, Juan; Rodriguez, Jose Manuel; del Pozo, Angela; Vázquez, Jesús; Valencia, Alfonso; Tress, Michael L.

    2015-01-01

    Alternative splicing of messenger RNA can generate a wide variety of mature RNA transcripts, and these transcripts may produce protein isoforms with diverse cellular functions. While there is much supporting evidence for the expression of alternative transcripts, the same is not true for the alternatively spliced protein products. Large-scale mass spectroscopy experiments have identified evidence of alternative splicing at the protein level, but with conflicting results. Here we carried out a rigorous analysis of the peptide evidence from eight large-scale proteomics experiments to assess the scale of alternative splicing that is detectable by high-resolution mass spectroscopy. We find fewer splice events than would be expected: we identified peptides for almost 64% of human protein coding genes, but detected just 282 splice events. This data suggests that most genes have a single dominant isoform at the protein level. Many of the alternative isoforms that we could identify were only subtly different from the main splice isoform. Very few of the splice events identified at the protein level disrupted functional domains, in stark contrast to the two thirds of splice events annotated in the human genome that would lead to the loss or damage of functional domains. The most striking result was that more than 20% of the splice isoforms we identified were generated by substituting one homologous exon for another. This is significantly more than would be expected from the frequency of these events in the genome. These homologous exon substitution events were remarkably conserved—all the homologous exons we identified evolved over 460 million years ago—and eight of the fourteen tissue-specific splice isoforms we identified were generated from homologous exons. The combination of proteomics evidence, ancient origin and tissue-specific splicing indicates that isoforms generated from homologous exons may have important cellular roles. PMID:26061177

  7. Exon Organization and Novel Alternative Splicing of Ank3 in Mouse Heart

    PubMed Central

    Yamankurt, Gokay; Wu, Henry C.; McCarthy, Michael; Cunha, Shane R.

    2015-01-01

    Ankyrin-G is an adaptor protein that links membrane proteins to the underlying cytoskeletal network. Alternative splicing of the Ank3 gene gives rise to multiple ankyrin-G isoforms in numerous tissues. To date, only one ankyrin-G isoform has been characterized in heart and transcriptional regulation of the Ank3 gene is completely unknown. In this study, we describe the first comprehensive analysis of Ank3 expression in heart. Using a PCR-based screen of cardiac mRNA transcripts, we identify two new exons and 28 alternative splice variants of the Ank3 gene. We measure the relative expression of each splice variant using quantitative real-time PCR and exon-exon boundary spanning primers that specifically amplify individual Ank3 variants. Six variants are rarely expressed (<1%), while the remaining variants display similar expression patterns in three hearts. Of the five first exons in the Ank3 gene, exon 1d is only expressed in heart and skeletal muscle as it was not detected in brain, kidney, cerebellum, and lung. Immunoblot analysis reveals multiple ankyrin-G isoforms in heart, and two ankyrin-G subpopulations are detected in adult cardiomyocytes by immunofluorescence. One population co-localizes with the voltage-gated sodium channel NaV1.5 at the intercalated disc, while the other population expresses at the Z-line. Two of the rare splice variants excise a portion of the ZU5 motif, which encodes the minimal spectrin-binding domain, and these variants lack β-spectrin binding. Together, these data demonstrate that Ank3 is subject to complex splicing regulation resulting in a diverse population of ankyrin-G isoforms in heart. PMID:26024478

  8. SNP discovery in candidate adaptive genes using exon capture in a free-ranging alpine ungulate

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Roffler, Gretchen H.; Amish, Stephen J.; Smith, Seth; Cosart, Ted F.; Kardos, Marty; Schwartz, Michael K.; Luikart, Gordon

    2016-01-01

    Identification of genes underlying genomic signatures of natural selection is key to understanding adaptation to local conditions. We used targeted resequencing to identify SNP markers in 5321 candidate adaptive genes associated with known immunological, metabolic and growth functions in ovids and other ungulates. We selectively targeted 8161 exons in protein-coding and nearby 5′ and 3′ untranslated regions of chosen candidate genes. Targeted sequences were taken from bighorn sheep (Ovis canadensis) exon capture data and directly from the domestic sheep genome (Ovis aries v. 3; oviAri3). The bighorn sheep sequences used in the Dall's sheep (Ovis dalli dalli) exon capture aligned to 2350 genes on the oviAri3 genome with an average of 2 exons each. We developed a microfluidic qPCR-based SNP chip to genotype 476 Dall's sheep from locations across their range and test for patterns of selection. Using multiple corroborating approaches (lositan and bayescan), we detected 28 SNP loci potentially under selection. We additionally identified candidate loci significantly associated with latitude, longitude, precipitation and temperature, suggesting local environmental adaptation. The three methods demonstrated consistent support for natural selection on nine genes with immune and disease-regulating functions (e.g. Ovar-DRA, APC, BATF2, MAGEB18), cell regulation signalling pathways (e.g. KRIT1, PI3K, ORRC3), and respiratory health (CYSLTR1). Characterizing adaptive allele distributions from novel genetic techniques will facilitate investigation of the influence of environmental variation on local adaptation of a northern alpine ungulate throughout its range. This research demonstrated the utility of exon capture for gene-targeted SNP discovery and subsequent SNP chip genotyping using low-quality samples in a nonmodel species.

  9. Gene correction of a duchenne muscular dystrophy mutation by meganuclease-enhanced exon knock-in.

    PubMed

    Popplewell, Linda; Koo, Taeyoung; Leclerc, Xavier; Duclert, Aymeric; Mamchaoui, Kamel; Gouble, Agnés; Mouly, Vincent; Voit, Thomas; Pâques, Frédéric; Cédrone, Frédéric; Isman, Olga; Yáñez-Muñoz, Rafael J; Dickson, George

    2013-07-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a severe inherited, muscle-wasting disorder caused by mutations in the DMD gene. Gene therapy development for DMD has concentrated on vector-based DMD minigene transfer, cell-based gene therapy using genetically modified adult muscle stem cells or healthy wild-type donor cells, and antisense oligonucleotide-induced exon-skipping therapy to restore the reading frame of the mutated DMD gene. This study is an investigation into DMD gene targeting-mediated correction of deletions in human patient myoblasts using a target-specific meganuclease (MN) and a homologous recombination repair matrix. The MN was designed to cleave within DMD intron 44, upstream of a deletion hotspot, and integration-competent lentiviral vectors expressing the nuclease (LVcMN) were generated. MN western blotting and deep gene sequencing for LVcMN-induced non-homologous end-joining InDels (microdeletions or microinsertions) confirmed efficient MN expression and activity in transduced DMD myoblasts. A homologous repair matrix carrying exons 45-52 (RM45-52) was designed and packaged into integration-deficient lentiviral vectors (IDLVs; LVdRM45-52). After cotransduction of DMD myoblasts harboring a deletion of exons 45 to 52 with LVcMN and LVdRM45-52 vectors, targeted knock-in of the RM45-52 region in the correct location in DMD intron 44, and expression of full-length, correctly spliced wild-type dystrophin mRNA containing exons 45-52 were observed. This work demonstrates that genome surgery on human DMD gene mutations can be achieved by MN-induced locus-specific genome cleavage and homologous recombination knock-in of deleted exons. The feasibility of human DMD gene repair in patient myoblasts has exciting therapeutic potential.

  10. Exonic deletions of mismatch repair genes MLH1 and MSH2 correlate with prognosis and protein expression levels in malignant melanomas.

    PubMed

    Korabiowska, Monika; Brinck, Ulrich; Stachura, Jerzy; Jawien, Jacek; Hasse, Frank Michael; Cordon-Cardos, Carlos; Fischer, Gösta

    2006-01-01

    The mutations of MLH1 and MSH2 have been reported to be responsible for malignant transformation and tumour progression in several sporadic tumours. Eighty-six primary malignant melanomas with known follow-up were investigated. Point mutations of DNA mismatch repair MLH1 and MSH2 in malignant melanomas were not found. Exon 12 (MSH2) was not present in 26 out of the 86 melanomas and exon 13 (MSH2) was lost in 25 of the tumours. The loss of exon 15 (MLH1) was observed in 22 out of the 86 tumours and the loss of exon 16 (MLH1) in 24 melanomas. The loss of exons correlated strongly with the loss of MLH1 and MSH2 protein expression. In multivariate analysis, including all 4 exons and expressions of MLH1 and MSH2, prognostic significance was found only for loss of exon 12 (MSH2) and loss of exon 15 (MLH1).

  11. A novel frameshift mutation in the first exon of the 21-OH gene found in homozygosity in an apparently nonconsanguineous family.

    PubMed

    Ezquieta, B; Oyarzábal, M; Jariego, C M; Varela, J M; Chueca, M

    1999-01-01

    Congenital adrenal hyperplasia is most frequently due to steroid 21-hydroxylase (21-OH) deficiency. Due to the existence of a pseudogene in tandem duplicated with the 21-OH gene, asymmetric recombination causes the majority of the molecular defects underlying this deficiency: gene conversions and deletions of the functional gene. Screening for a small array of mutations, those existing in the pseudogene together with deletions, allows the characterization of most mutated alleles, 91% in the Spanish population. We report the case of a boy from a nonconsanguineous family, diagnosed during the neonatal period of a salt-wasting form of the deficiency, in which this screening did not allow the characterization of the paternal or the maternal allele. This infrequent finding in a nonconsanguineous family was further investigated. Single-strand conformation polymorphism screening for new mutations revealed an abnormally migrating pattern when polymerase chain reaction fragments from 21-OH gene exon 1 of the patient and relatives were analyzed. Upon direct sequencing, the insertion of a T at position 64 (64insT, frameshift generating a stop codon at exon 2) was found in homozygosity in the patient. Microsatellite typing in the HLA region revealed the patient to be homozygous for five markers (heterozygosities 0.62 to 0.74). Apparently this new mutation was generated several generations ago and has been preserved for years. Consanguinity had been discarded for several generations, although both families could be traced back to a small rural area in Navarra (Spain).

  12. Immunohistochemical Localization of Wild-type EGFR, E746-A750 Frame Deletion in Exon 19, and L858R Point Mutation in Exon 21 in Triple-negative Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Vora, Hemangini H; Patel, Nupur A; Thakore, Prushin M; Shukla, Shilin N

    2015-10-01

    This study evaluated wild-type EGFR, E746-A750 frame deletion in exon 19, and L858R point mutation in exon 21 by immunohistochemistry in patients with triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC). A retrospective study included 99 untreated early-stage and advanced-stage TNBC patients. Immunohistochemical localization of wild-type EGFR, EGFR E746-A750 deletion in exon 19, and EGFR L858R mutation in exon 21 was performed on formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue blocks using mutation-specific primary antibodies. EGFR protein expression was noted in 27% (27/99) of patients with 2+ or 3+ staining intensity in 7% (7/99) of patients. Significant correlation of EGFR protein expression with subgroups of clinicopathologic parameters was not found. In univariate and multivariate survival analysis, high EGFR expression (2+ or 3+) emerged as a significant prognostic factor for disease-free survival. With respect to mutation status, exon 19 deletion was observed in 3% (3/99) of patients. One patient with exon 19 deletion having high EGFR protein (2+) expression developed lung metastasis, whereas the other 2 patients with exon 19 deletion had low EGFR protein (1+) expression and remained disease free during the study period. EGFR protein overexpression was observed in one fourth of TNBCs with very low incidence of EGFR-activating mutations in patients of western India.

  13. TET2 exon 2 skipping is an independent favorable prognostic factor for cytogenetically normal acute myelogenous leukemia (AML): TET2 exon 2 skipping in AML.

    PubMed

    Mohamed, Aminetou Mint; Balsat, Marie; Koering, Catherine; Maucort-Boulch, Delphine; Boissel, Nicolas; Payen-Gay, Lea; Cheok, Meyling; Mortada, Hussein; Auboeuf, Didier; Pinatel, Christiane; El-Hamri, Mohamed; Tigaud, Isabelle; Hayette, Sandrine; Dumontet, Charles; Cros, Emeline; Flandrin-Gresta, Pascale; Nibourel, Olivier; Preudhomme, Claude; Thomas, Xavier; Nicolini, Franck-Emmanuel; Solly, Françoise; Guyotat, Denis; Campos, Lydia; Michallet, Mauricette; Ceraulo, Antony; Mortreux, Franck; Wattel, Eric

    2017-01-16

    In AML, approximately one-third of expressed genes are abnormally spliced, including aberrant TET2 exon 2 expression. In a discovery cohort (n=99), TET2 exon 2 skipping (TET2E2S) was found positively associated with a significant reduction in the cumulative incidence of relapse (CIR). Age, cytogenetics, and TET2E2S were independent prognostic factors for disease-free survival (DFS), and favorable effects on outcomes predominated in cytogenetic normal (CN)-AML and younger patients. Using the same cutoff in a validation cohort of 86 CN-AML patients, TET2E2S(high) patients were found to be younger than TET2(low) patients without a difference in the rate of complete remission. However, TET2E2S(high) patients exhibited a significantly lower CIR (p<10(-4)). TET2E2S and FLT3-ITD, but not age or NPM1 mutation status were independent prognostic factors for DFS and event-free survival (EFS), while TET2E2S was the sole prognostic factor that we identified for overall survival (OS). In both the intermediate-1 and favorable ELN genetic categories, TET2E2S remained significantly associated with prolonged survival. There was no correlation between TET2E2S status and outcomes in 34 additional AML patients who were unfit for IC. Therefore our results suggest that assessments of TET2 exon 2 splicing status might improve risk stratification in CN-AML patients treated with IC.

  14. Sequencing of Candidate Genes in Dominican Families Implicates Both Rare Exonic and Common Non-Exonic Variants for Carotid Intima-Media Thickness at Bifurcation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Liyong; Beecham, Ashley; Dueker, Nicole; Blanton, Susan H.; Rundek, Tatjana; Sacco, Ralph L.

    2015-01-01

    Background Through linkage and tagSNP-based association studies in 100 Dominican Republic (DR) families, we previously identified ANLN and AOAH (7p14.3) as candidate genes for carotid intima-media thickness at bifurcation (bIMT). Methods and Results Introns, exons and flanking regions of ANLN and AOAH were re-sequenced in 151 individuals from 9 families with evidence for linkage at 7p14.3. For common variants [CV, minor allele frequency (MAF) ≥ 5%], single variant-based analysis was performed. For rare variants (RV, MAF<5%), gene-based analysis aggregating all RVs within a gene was performed. CV analysis revealed the strongest signal at rs3815483 (P=0.0003) in ANLN and rs60023210 (P=0.00005) in AOAH. In ANLN, RV analysis found suggestive evidence for association with exonic RVs (P=0.08), and in particular non-synonymous RVs (P=0.04) but not with all RVs (P=0.15). The variant alleles of all non-synonymous RVs segregated with the major allele of rs3815483 and were associated with lower bIMT while a novel synonymous RV segregated with the minor allele of rs3815483 and was associated with greater bIMT. Additional analysis in 561 DR individuals found suggestive evidence for association with all ANLN non-synonymous RVs (P=0.08). In AOAH, no evidence for association with RVs was detected. Instead, conditional analysis revealed that multiple independent intronic CVs are associated with bIMT in addition to rs60023210. Conclusions We demonstrate the utility of using family-based studies to evaluate the contribution of RVs. Our data suggest two modes of genetic architecture underlying the linkage and association at ANLN (multiple exonic RVs) and AOAH (multiple intronic CVs with uncharacterized functions). PMID:26319989

  15. Identification and qualification of 500 nuclear, single-copy, orthologous genes for the Eupulmonata (Gastropoda) using transcriptome sequencing and exon capture.

    PubMed

    Teasdale, Luisa C; Köhler, Frank; Murray, Kevin D; O'Hara, Tim; Moussalli, Adnan

    2016-09-01

    The qualification of orthology is a significant challenge when developing large, multiloci phylogenetic data sets from assembled transcripts. Transcriptome assemblies have various attributes, such as fragmentation, frameshifts and mis-indexing, which pose problems to automated methods of orthology assessment. Here, we identify a set of orthologous single-copy genes from transcriptome assemblies for the land snails and slugs (Eupulmonata) using a thorough approach to orthology determination involving manual alignment curation, gene tree assessment and sequencing from genomic DNA. We qualified the orthology of 500 nuclear, protein-coding genes from the transcriptome assemblies of 21 eupulmonate species to produce the most complete phylogenetic data matrix for a major molluscan lineage to date, both in terms of taxon and character completeness. Exon capture targeting 490 of the 500 genes (those with at least one exon >120 bp) from 22 species of Australian Camaenidae successfully captured sequences of 2825 exons (representing all targeted genes), with only a 3.7% reduction in the data matrix due to the presence of putative paralogs or pseudogenes. The automated pipeline Agalma retrieved the majority of the manually qualified 500 single-copy gene set and identified a further 375 putative single-copy genes, although it failed to account for fragmented transcripts resulting in lower data matrix completeness when considering the original 500 genes. This could potentially explain the minor inconsistencies we observed in the supported topologies for the 21 eupulmonate species between the manually curated and 'Agalma-equivalent' data set (sharing 458 genes). Overall, our study confirms the utility of the 500 gene set to resolve phylogenetic relationships at a range of evolutionary depths and highlights the importance of addressing fragmentation at the homolog alignment stage for probe design.

  16. Deletion of exons 1-3 of the MEN1 gene in a large Italian family causes the loss of menin expression.

    PubMed

    Zatelli, Maria Chiara; Tagliati, Federico; Di Ruvo, Mauro; Castermans, Emilie; Cavazzini, Luigi; Daly, Adrian F; Ambrosio, Maria Rosaria; Beckers, Albert; degli Uberti, Ettore

    2014-06-01

    Multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 (MEN1) syndrome is an autosomal dominant disease, characterized by parathyroid adenomas, endocrine gastroenteropancreatic tumors and pituitary adenomas, due to inactivating mutations of the MEN1 gene (chromosome 11q13). MEN1 mutations are mainly represented by nonsense, deletions/insertions, splice site or missense mutations that can be detected by direct sequencing of genomic DNA. However, MEN1 patients with large heterozygous deletions may escape classical genetic screening and may be misidentified as phenocopies, thereby hindering proper clinical surveillance. We employed a real-time polymerase chain reaction application, the TaqMan copy number variation assay, to evaluate a family in which we failed to identify an MEN1 mutation by direct sequencing, despite a clear clinical diagnosis of MEN1 syndrome. Using the TaqMan copy number variation assay we identified a large deletion of the MEN1 gene involving exons 1 and 2, in three affected family members, but not in the other nine family members that were to date clinically unaffected. The same genetic alteration was not found in a group of ten unaffected subjects, without family history of endocrine tumors. The MEN1 deletion was further confirmed by multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification, which showed the deletion extended from exon 1 to exon 3. This new approach allowed us to correctly genetically diagnose three clinical MEN1 patients that were previously considered as MEN1 phenocopies. More importantly, we excluded the presence of genetic alterations in the unaffected family members. These results underline the importance of using a variety of available biotechnology approaches when pursuing a genetic diagnosis in a clinically suggestive setting of inherited endocrine cancer.

  17. Penetrance and phenotypic effects of C/T polymorphism at 1595 position in exon 5 of the TRAIL gene among prostate cancer patients in Pakistani population.

    PubMed

    Farooqi, Ammad Ahmad; Mansoor, Qaisar; Fayyaz, Sundas; Ismail, Muhammad

    2015-01-01

    It is becoming progressively more understandable that variations within the sequence of tumor suppressor genes and oncogenes may contribute to cancer progression. Increasingly it is being realized that cancer cells get resistant to pro-apoptotic signals and evidence has started to shed light on the fact that nucleotide polymorphisms may lead to suboptimal apoptotic capacity and therefore increased cancer risk. It has previously been shown that there is a relationship between C/T polymorphism at 1595 position in exon 5 of the TRAIL gene and cancer however rapidly accumulating data cannot be extrapolated to other populations due to intra- and inter-ethnic variability. The study is focused on the C/T polymorphism at 1595 position in exon 5 of the TRAIL gene in prostate cancer patients diagnosed in local population in Pakistan. 126 prostate cancer patients and 91 control subjects participated in this study. 5ml venous blood was taken from participants with informed consent. DNA was extracted using standard organic methods. PCR-RFLP analysis was done for C/T polymorphism at 1595 position in exon 5 of the TRAIL gene using site specific primers and restriction enzyme. The results were statistically evaluated in SPSS14. In this particular study it was found that there was no significant difference in major allele C genotype between patients and controls, p value > 0.05. Similar statistically non-significant difference was observed for T allele genotype in the patient and control groups. However the heterozygous genotype CT was significantly higher, p value 0.053 (-0.05), in prostate cancer patients as compared to controls. This is the first study providing a clue of relationship of C/T polymorphism role in prostate cancer development and progression in our population.

  18. Accelerated exchange of exon segments in Viperid three-finger toxin genes (Sistrurus catenatus edwardsii; Desert Massasauga)

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Background Snake venoms consist primarily of proteins and peptides showing a myriad of potent biological activities which have been shaped by both adaptive and neutral selective forces. Venom proteins are encoded by multigene families that have evolved through a process of gene duplication followed by accelerated evolution in the protein coding region. Results Here we report five gene structures of three-finger toxins from a viperid snake, Sistrurus catenatus edwardsii. These toxin genes are structured similarly to elapid and hydrophiid three-finger toxin genes, with two introns and three exons. Both introns and exons show distinct patterns of segmentation, and the insertion/deletion of segments may define their evolutionary history. The segments in introns, when present, are highly similar to their corresponding segments in other members of the gene family. In contrast, some segments in the exons show high similarity, while others are often distinctly different among corresponding regions of the isoforms. Conclusion Ordered, conserved exon structure strongly suggests that segments in corresponding regions in exons have been exchanged with distinctly different ones during the evolution of these genes. Such a "switching" of segments in exons may result in drastically altering the molecular surface topology and charge, and hence the molecular targets of these three-finger toxins. Thus the phenomenon of accelerated segment switch in exons to alter targeting (ASSET) may play an important role in the evolution of three-finger toxins, resulting in a family of toxins with a highly conserved structural fold but widely varying biological activities. PMID:18606022

  19. 2'-O-Methyl RNA/Ethylene-Bridged Nucleic Acid Chimera Antisense Oligonucleotides to Induce Dystrophin Exon 45 Skipping.

    PubMed

    Lee, Tomoko; Awano, Hiroyuki; Yagi, Mariko; Matsumoto, Masaaki; Watanabe, Nobuaki; Goda, Ryoya; Koizumi, Makoto; Takeshima, Yasuhiro; Matsuo, Masafumi

    2017-02-10

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a fatal muscle-wasting disease characterized by dystrophin deficiency from mutations in the dystrophin gene. Antisense oligonucleotide (AO)-mediated exon skipping targets restoration of the dystrophin reading frame to allow production of an internally deleted dystrophin protein with functional benefit for DMD patients who have out-of-frame deletions. After accelerated US approval of eteplirsen (Exondys 51), which targets dystrophin exon 51 for skipping, efforts are now focused on targeting other exons. For improved clinical benefits, this strategy requires more studies of the delivery method and modification of nucleic acids. We studied a nucleotide with a 2'-O,4'-C-ethylene-bridged nucleic acid (ENA), which shows high nuclease resistance and high affinity for complementary RNA strands. Here, we describe the process of developing a 2'-O-methyl RNA(2'-OMeRNA)/ENA chimera AO to induce dystrophin exon 45 skipping. One 18-mer 2'-OMeRNA/ENA chimera (AO85) had the most potent activity for inducing exon 45 skipping in cultured myotubes. AO85 was administered to mdx mice without significant side effects. AO85 transfection into cultured myotubes from 13 DMD patients induced exon 45 skipping in all samples at different levels and dystrophin expression in 11 patients. These results suggest the possible efficacy of AO-mediated exon skipping changes in individual patients and highlight the 2'-OMeRNA/ENA chimera AO as a potential fundamental treatment for DMD.

  20. First report of a pathogenic mutation on exon 24 of the NOTCH3 gene in a CADASIL family.

    PubMed

    Valenti, Raffaella; Bianchi, Silvia; Pescini, Francesca; D'Eramo, Camilla; Inzitari, Domenico; Dotti, Maria Teresa; Pantoni, Leonardo

    2011-09-01

    Cerebral autosomal dominant arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leukoencephalopathy (CADASIL) is a genetically transmitted small vessel disease clinically characterized by migraine, recurrent subcortical strokes, and cognitive and mood disorders. Pathogenic mutations are located on any of the exons of the NOTCH3 gene coding for epidermal-growth factor (EGF)-like repeats of the extracellular domain of the NOTCH3 receptor. Because the gene is large and the mutations cluster on some exons, many laboratories restrict the analysis to these exons. We report the first missense mutation involving exon 24 and causing CADASIL in a 64-year-old man. The patient was admitted to the hospital for a loss of consciousness accompanied by profuse sweating. On examination, some parkinsonian features were present. Over the last 4 years, he had developed postural instability and gait disturbances with repeated falls, behavioral disorders, and cognitive impairment. A diagnostic hypothesis of atypical parkinsonism had been advanced. The presence of multiple subcortical lacunar infarcts and leukoencephalopathy extended to the external capsule on cerebral MRI suggested the presence of CADASIL. The diagnosis was confirmed by finding a heterozygous mutation leading to a cysteine substitution on exon 24 of the NOTCH3 gene. One proband's brother, who had progressive gait disturbances, unilateral action tremor and bradykinesia, and an asymptomatic niece also resulted affected. This report underlines that when CADASIL is suspected the genetic analysis should be performed on all the NOTCH3 exons coding for EGF-like repeats including exon 24 and confirms that CADASIL may have heterogeneous phenotypes.

  1. Translational regulation of human neuronal nitric-oxide synthase by an alternatively spliced 5'-untranslated region leader exon.

    PubMed

    Newton, Derek C; Bevan, Sian C; Choi, Stephen; Robb, G Brett; Millar, Adam; Wang, Yang; Marsden, Philip A

    2003-01-03

    Expression of the neuronal nitric-oxide synthase (nNOS) mRNA is subject to complex cell-specific transcriptional regulation, which is mediated by alternative promoters. Unexpectedly, we identified a 89-nucleotide alternatively spliced exon located in the 5'-untranslated region between exon 1 variants and a common exon 2 that contains the translational initiation codon. Alternative splicing events that do not affect the open reading frame are distinctly uncommon in mammals; therefore, we assessed its functional relevance. Transient transfection of reporter RNAs performed in a variety of cell types revealed that this alternatively spliced exon acts as a potent translational repressor. Stably transfected cell lines confirmed that the alternatively spliced exon inhibited translation of the native nNOS open reading frame. Reverse transcription-PCR and RNase protection assays indicated that nNOS mRNAs containing this exon are common and expressed in both a promoter-specific and tissue-restricted fashion. Mutational analysis identified the functional cis-element within this novel exon, and a secondary structure prediction revealed that it forms a putative stem-loop. RNA electrophoretic mobility shift assay techniques revealed that a specific cytoplasmic RNA-binding complex interacts with this motif. Hence, a unique splicing event within a 5'-untranslated region is demonstrated to introduce a translational control element. This represents a newer model for the translational control of a mammalian mRNA.

  2. The role of germline promoters and I exons in cytokine-induced gene-specific class switch recombination.

    PubMed

    Dunnick, Wesley A; Shi, Jian; Holden, Victoria; Fontaine, Clinton; Collins, John T

    2011-01-01

    Germline transcription precedes class switch recombination (CSR). The promoter regions and I exons of these germline transcripts include binding sites for activation- and cytokine-induced transcription factors, and the promoter regions/I exons are essential for CSR. Therefore, it is a strong hypothesis that the promoter/I exons regions are responsible for much of cytokine-regulated, gene-specific CSR. We tested this hypothesis by swapping the germline promoter and I exons for the murine γ1 and γ2a H chain genes in a transgene of the entire H chain C-region locus. We found that the promoter/I exon for γ1 germline transcripts can direct robust IL-4-induced recombination to the γ2a gene. In contrast, the promoter/I exon for the γ2a germline transcripts works poorly in the context of the γ1 H chain gene, resulting in expression of γ1 H chains that is <1% the wild-type level. Nevertheless, the small amount of recombination to the chimeric γ1 gene is induced by IFN-γ. These results suggest that cytokine regulation of CSR, but not the magnitude of CSR, is regulated by the promoter/I exons.

  3. EGFR exon 20 insertion mutations in non-small-cell lung cancer: preclinical data and clinical implications.

    PubMed

    Yasuda, Hiroyuki; Kobayashi, Susumu; Costa, Daniel B

    2012-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related death. The identification of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) somatic mutations defined a new, molecularly classified subgroup of non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Classic EGFR activating mutations, such as inframe deletions in exon 19 or the Leu858Arg (L858R) point mutation in exon 21 are associated with sensitivity to first generation quinazoline reversible EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs). EGFR exon 20 insertion mutations, which are typically located after the C-helix of the tyrosine kinase domain of EGFR, may account for up to 4% of all EGFR mutations. Preclinical models have shown that the most prevalent EGFR exon 20 insertion mutated proteins are resistant to clinically achievable doses of reversible (gefitinib, erlotinib) and irreversible (neratinib, afatinib, PF00299804) EGFR TKIs. Growing clinical experience with patients whose tumours harbour EGFR exon 20 insertions corresponds with the preclinical data; very few patients have had responses to EGFR TKIs. Despite the prevalence and biological importance of EEGFR exon 20 insertions, few reports have summarised all preclinical and clinical data on these mutations. Here, we review the literature and provide an update with an emphasis on the structural, molecular, and clinical implications of EGFR exon 20 insertions.

  4. A majority of m6A residues are in the last exons, allowing the potential for 3′ UTR regulation

    PubMed Central

    Ke, Shengdong; Alemu, Endalkachew A.; Mertens, Claudia; Gantman, Emily Conn; Fak, John J.; Mele, Aldo; Haripal, Bhagwattie; Zucker-Scharff, Ilana; Moore, Michael J.; Park, Christopher Y.; Vågbø, Cathrine Broberg; Kusśnierczyk, Anna; Klungland, Arne; Darnell, James E.; Darnell, Robert B.

    2015-01-01

    We adapted UV CLIP (cross-linking immunoprecipitation) to accurately locate tens of thousands of m6A residues in mammalian mRNA with single-nucleotide resolution. More than 70% of these residues are present in the 3′-most (last) exons, with a very sharp rise (sixfold) within 150–400 nucleotides of the start of the last exon. Two-thirds of last exon m6A and >40% of all m6A in mRNA are present in 3′ untranslated regions (UTRs); contrary to earlier suggestions, there is no preference for location of m6A sites around stop codons. Moreover, m6A is significantly higher in noncoding last exons than in next-to-last exons harboring stop codons. We found that m6A density peaks early in the 3′ UTR and that, among transcripts with alternative polyA (APA) usage in both the brain and the liver, brain transcripts preferentially use distal polyA sites, as reported, and also show higher proximal m6A density in the last exons. Furthermore, when we reduced m6A methylation by knocking down components of the methylase complex and then examined 661 transcripts with proximal m6A peaks in last exons, we identified a set of 111 transcripts with altered (approximately two-thirds increased proximal) APA use. Taken together, these observations suggest a role of m6A modification in regulating proximal alternative polyA choice. PMID:26404942

  5. 2′-O-Methyl RNA/Ethylene-Bridged Nucleic Acid Chimera Antisense Oligonucleotides to Induce Dystrophin Exon 45 Skipping

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Tomoko; Awano, Hiroyuki; Yagi, Mariko; Matsumoto, Masaaki; Watanabe, Nobuaki; Goda, Ryoya; Koizumi, Makoto; Takeshima, Yasuhiro; Matsuo, Masafumi

    2017-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a fatal muscle-wasting disease characterized by dystrophin deficiency from mutations in the dystrophin gene. Antisense oligonucleotide (AO)-mediated exon skipping targets restoration of the dystrophin reading frame to allow production of an internally deleted dystrophin protein with functional benefit for DMD patients who have out-of-frame deletions. After accelerated US approval of eteplirsen (Exondys 51), which targets dystrophin exon 51 for skipping, efforts are now focused on targeting other exons. For improved clinical benefits, this strategy requires more studies of the delivery method and modification of nucleic acids. We studied a nucleotide with a 2′-O,4′-C-ethylene-bridged nucleic acid (ENA), which shows high nuclease resistance and high affinity for complementary RNA strands. Here, we describe the process of developing a 2′-O-methyl RNA(2′-OMeRNA)/ENA chimera AO to induce dystrophin exon 45 skipping. One 18-mer 2′-OMeRNA/ENA chimera (AO85) had the most potent activity for inducing exon 45 skipping in cultured myotubes. AO85 was administered to mdx mice without significant side effects. AO85 transfection into cultured myotubes from 13 DMD patients induced exon 45 skipping in all samples at different levels and dystrophin expression in 11 patients. These results suggest the possible efficacy of AO-mediated exon skipping changes in individual patients and highlight the 2′-OMeRNA/ENA chimera AO as a potential fundamental treatment for DMD. PMID:28208626

  6. RBFOX2 Promotes Protein 4.1R Exon 16 Selection via U1 snRNP Recruitment

    PubMed Central

    Ou, Alexander C.; Park, Jennie; Yu, Faye; Yu, Brian; Lee, Angela; Yang, Guang; Zhou, Anyu; Benz, Edward J.

    2012-01-01

    The erythroid differentiation-specific splicing switch of protein 4.1R exon 16, which encodes a spectrin/actin-binding peptide critical for erythrocyte membrane stability, is modulated by the differentiation-induced splicing factor RBFOX2. We have now characterized the mechanism by which RBFOX2 regulates exon 16 splicing through the downstream intronic element UGCAUG. Exon 16 possesses a weak 5′ splice site (GAG/GTTTGT), which when strengthened to a consensus sequence (GAG/GTAAGT) leads to near-total exon 16 inclusion. Impaired RBFOX2 binding reduces exon 16 inclusion in the context of the native weak 5′ splice site, but not the engineered strong 5′ splice site, implying that RBFOX2 achieves its effect by promoting utilization of the weak 5′ splice site. We further demonstrate that RBFOX2 increases U1 snRNP recruitment to the weak 5′ splice site through direct interaction between its C-terminal domain (CTD) and the zinc finger region of U1C and that the CTD is required for the effect of RBFOX2 on exon 16 splicing. Our data suggest a novel mechanism for exon 16 5′ splice site activation in which the binding of RBFOX2 to downstream intronic splicing enhancers stabilizes the pre-mRNA–U1 snRNP complex through interactions with U1C. PMID:22083953

  7. Complementary intron sequence motifs associated with human exon repetition: a role for intragenic, inter-transcript interactions in gene expression.

    PubMed

    Dixon, Richard J; Eperon, Ian C; Samani, Nilesh J

    2007-01-15

    Exon repetition describes the presence of tandemly repeated exons in mRNA in the abse