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Sample records for exon1 n-terminus triggers

  1. Capping of the N-terminus of PSD-95 by calmodulin triggers its postsynaptic release.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yonghong; Matt, Lucas; Patriarchi, Tommaso; Malik, Zulfiqar A; Chowdhury, Dhrubajyoti; Park, Deborah K; Renieri, Alessandra; Ames, James B; Hell, Johannes W

    2014-06-17

    Postsynaptic density protein-95 (PSD-95) is a central element of the postsynaptic architecture of glutamatergic synapses. PSD-95 mediates postsynaptic localization of AMPA receptors and NMDA receptors and plays an important role in synaptic plasticity. PSD-95 is released from postsynaptic membranes in response to Ca(2+) influx via NMDA receptors. Here, we show that Ca(2+)/calmodulin (CaM) binds at the N-terminus of PSD-95. Our NMR structure reveals that both lobes of CaM collapse onto a helical structure of PSD-95 formed at its N-terminus (residues 1-16). This N-terminal capping of PSD-95 by CaM blocks palmitoylation of C3 and C5, which is required for postsynaptic PSD-95 targeting and the binding of CDKL5, a kinase important for synapse stability. CaM forms extensive hydrophobic contacts with Y12 of PSD-95. The PSD-95 mutant Y12E strongly impairs binding to CaM and Ca(2+)-induced release of PSD-95 from the postsynaptic membrane in dendritic spines. Our data indicate that CaM binding to PSD-95 serves to block palmitoylation of PSD-95, which in turn promotes Ca(2+)-induced dissociation of PSD-95 from the postsynaptic membrane.

  2. A Novel CaV1.2 N Terminus Expressed in Smooth Muscle Cells of Resistance Size Arteries Modifies Channel Regulation by Auxiliary Subunits*S

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Xiaoyang; Liu, Jianxi; Asuncion-Chin, Maria; Blaskova, Eva; Bannister, John P.; Dopico, Alejandro M.; Jaggar, Jonathan H.

    2008-01-01

    Voltage-dependent L-type Ca2+ (CaV1.2) channels are the principal Ca2+ entry pathway in arterial myocytes. CaV1.2 channels regulate multiple vascular functions and are implicated in the pathogenesis of human disease, including hypertension. However, the molecular identity of CaV1.2 channels expressed in myocytes of myogenic arteries that regulate vascular pressure and blood flow is unknown. Here, we cloned CaV1.2 subunits from resistance size cerebral arteries and demonstrate that myocytes contain a novel, cysteine rich N terminus that is derived from exon 1 (termed “exon 1c”), which is located within CACNA1C, the CaV1.2 gene. Quantitative PCR revealed that exon 1c was predominant in arterial myocytes, but rare in cardiac myocytes, where exon 1a prevailed. When co-expressed with α2δ subunits, CaV1.2 channels containing the novel exon 1c-derived N terminus exhibited: 1) smaller whole cell current density, 2) more negative voltages of half activation (V1/2,act) and half-inactivation (V1/2,inact), and 3) reduced plasma membrane insertion, when compared with channels containing exon 1b. β1b and β2a subunits caused negative shifts in the V1/2,act and V1/2,inact of exon 1b-containing CaV1.2α1/α2δ currents that were larger than those in exon 1c-containing CaV1.2α1/α2δ currents. In contrast, β3 similarly shifted V1/2,act and V1/2,inact of currents generated by exon 1b- and exon 1c-containing channels. β subunits isoform-dependent differences in current inactivation rates were also detected between N-terminal variants. Data indicate that through novel alternative splicing at exon 1, the CaV1.2 N terminus modifies regulation by auxiliary subunits. The novel exon 1c should generate distinct voltage-dependent Ca2+ entry in arterial myocytes, resulting in tissue-specific Ca2+ signaling. PMID:17699517

  3. The N Terminus Specifies the Switch between Transport Modes of the Human Serotonin Transporter*

    PubMed Central

    Kern, Carina; Erdem, Fatma Asli; El-Kasaby, Ali; Sandtner, Walter; Freissmuth, Michael; Sucic, Sonja

    2017-01-01

    The serotonin transporter (SERT) and other monoamine transporters operate in either a forward transport mode where the transporter undergoes a full transport cycle or an exchange mode where the transporter seesaws through half-cycles. Amphetamines trigger the exchange mode, leading to substrate efflux. This efflux was proposed to rely on the N terminus, which was suggested to adopt different conformations in the inward facing, outward facing and amphetamine-bound states. This prediction was verified by tryptic digestion of SERT-expressing membranes: in the absence of Na+, the N terminus was rapidly digested. Amphetamine conferred protection against cleavage, suggesting a relay between the conformational states of the hydrophobic core and the N terminus. We searched for a candidate segment that supported the conformational switch by serial truncation removing 22 (ΔN22), 32 (ΔN32), or 42 (ΔN42) N-terminal residues. This did not affect surface expression, inhibitor binding, and substrate influx. However, amphetamine-induced efflux by SERT-ΔN32 or SERT-ΔN42 (but not by SERT-ΔN22) was markedly diminished. We examined the individual steps in the transport cycle by recording transporter-associated currents: the recovery rate of capacitive peak, but not of steady state, currents was significantly lower for SERT-ΔN32 than that of wild type SERT and SERT-ΔN22. Thus, the exchange mode of SERT-ΔN32 was selectively impaired. Our observations show that the N terminus affords the switch between transport modes. The findings are consistent with a model where the N terminus acts as a lever to support amphetamine-induced efflux by SERT. PMID:28104804

  4. Novel P2 promoter-derived HNF4{alpha} isoforms with different N-terminus generated by alternate exon insertion

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Jianmin; Levitsky, Lynne L.; Rhoads, David B.

    2009-04-15

    Hepatocyte nuclear factor 4{alpha} (HNF4{alpha}) is a critical transcription factor for pancreas and liver development and functions in islet {beta} cells to maintain glucose homeostasis. Mutations in the human HNF4A gene lead to maturity onset diabetes of the young (MODY1) and polymorphisms are associated with increased risk for type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Expression of six HNF4{alpha} variants, three each from two developmentally regulated promoters, has been firmly established. We have now detected a new set of HNF4{alpha} variants designated HNF4{alpha}10-12 expressed from distal promoter P2. These variants, generated by inclusion of previously undetected exon 1E (human = 222 nt, rodent = 136 nt) following exon 1D have an altered N-terminus but identical remaining reading frame. HNF4{alpha}10-{alpha}12 are expressed in pancreatic islets (and liver) and exhibit transactivation potentials similar to the corresponding {alpha}7-{alpha}9 isoforms. DNA-binding analyses implied much higher protein levels of HNF4{alpha}10-{alpha}12 in liver than expected from the RT-PCR data. Our results provide evidence for a more complex expression pattern of HNF4{alpha} than previously appreciated. We recommend inclusion of exon 1E and nearby DNA sequences in screening for HNF4{alpha} mutations and polymorphisms in genetic analyses of MODY1 and T2DM.

  5. Novel archaeal adhesion pilins with a conserved N terminus.

    PubMed

    Esquivel, Rianne N; Xu, Rachel; Pohlschroder, Mechthild

    2013-09-01

    Type IV pili play important roles in a wide array of processes, including surface adhesion and twitching motility. Although archaeal genomes encode a diverse set of type IV pilus subunits, the functions for most remain unknown. We have now characterized six Haloferax volcanii pilins, PilA[1-6], each containing an identical 30-amino-acid N-terminal hydrophobic motif that is part of a larger highly conserved domain of unknown function (Duf1628). Deletion mutants lacking up to five of the six pilin genes display no significant adhesion defects; however, H. volcanii lacking all six pilins (ΔpilA[1-6]) does not adhere to glass or plastic. Consistent with these results, the expression of any one of these pilins in trans is sufficient to produce functional pili in the ΔpilA[1-6] strain. PilA1His and PilA2His only partially rescue this phenotype, whereas ΔpilA[1-6] strains expressing PilA3His or PilA4His adhere even more strongly than the parental strain. Most surprisingly, expressing either PilA5His or PilA6His in the ΔpilA[1-6] strain results in microcolony formation. A hybrid protein in which the conserved N terminus of the mature PilA1His is replaced with the corresponding N domain of FlgA1 is processed by the prepilin peptidase, but it does not assemble functional pili, leading us to conclude that Duf1628 can be annotated as the N terminus of archaeal PilA adhesion pilins. Finally, the pilin prediction program, FlaFind, which was trained primarily on archaeal flagellin sequences, was successfully refined to more accurately predict pilins based on the in vivo verification of PilA[1-6].

  6. Aggregation Behavior of Chemically Synthesized, Full-Length Huntingtin Exon1

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Repeat length disease thresholds vary among the 10 expanded polyglutamine (polyQ) repeat diseases, from about 20 to about 50 glutamine residues. The unique amino acid sequences flanking the polyQ segment are thought to contribute to these repeat length thresholds. The specific portions of the flanking sequences that modulate polyQ properties are not always clear, however. This ambiguity may be important in Huntington’s disease (HD), for example, where in vitro studies of aggregation mechanisms have led to distinctly different mechanistic models. Most in vitro studies of the aggregation of the huntingtin (HTT) exon1 fragment implicated in the HD mechanism have been conducted on inexact molecules that are imprecise either on the N-terminus (recombinantly produced peptides) or on the C-terminus (chemically synthesized peptides). In this paper, we investigate the aggregation properties of chemically synthesized HTT exon1 peptides that are full-length and complete, containing both normal and expanded polyQ repeat lengths, and compare the results directly to previously investigated molecules containing truncated C-termini. The results on the full-length peptides are consistent with a two-step aggregation mechanism originally developed based on studies of the C-terminally truncated analogues. Thus, we observe relatively rapid formation of spherical oligomers containing from 100 to 600 HTT exon1 molecules and intermediate formation of short protofibril-like structures containing from 500 to 2600 molecules. In contrast to this relatively rapid assembly, mature HTT exon1 amyloid requires about one month to dissociate in vitro, which is similar to the time required for neuronal HTT exon1 aggregates to disappear in vivo after HTT production is discontinued. PMID:24921664

  7. Phosphorylation and Ionic Strength Alter the LRAP-HAP Interface in the N-terminus

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Junxia; Xu, Yimin; Shaw, Wendy J.

    2013-04-02

    strength when phosphorylated. These observations suggest that ionic strength and dephosphorylation may provide switching mechanisms to trigger a change in the function of the N-terminus. This research was supported by NIH-NIDCR Grant DE-015347. The research was performed at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), a facility operated by Battelle for the U.S. Department of Energy.

  8. The ClpP N-Terminus Coordinates Substrate Access with Protease Active Site Reactivity

    SciTech Connect

    Jennings, L.; Bohon, J; Chance, M; Licht, S

    2008-01-01

    Energy-dependent protein degradation machines, such as the Escherichia coli protease ClpAP, require regulated interactions between the ATPase component (ClpA) and the protease component (ClpP) for function. Recent studies indicate that the ClpP N-terminus is essential in these interactions, yet the dynamics of this region remain unclear. Here, we use synchrotron hydroxyl radical footprinting and kinetic studies to characterize functionally important conformational changes of the ClpP N-terminus. Footprinting experiments show that the ClpP N-terminus becomes more solvent-exposed upon interaction with ClpA. In the absence of ClpA, deletion of the ClpP N-terminus increases the initial degradation rate of large peptide substrates 5-15-fold. Unlike ClpAP, ClpP?N exhibits a distinct slow phase of product formation that is eliminated by the addition of hydroxylamine, suggesting that truncation of the N-terminus leads to stabilization of the acyl-enzyme intermediate. These results indicate that (1) the ClpP N-terminus acts as a 'gate' controlling substrate access to the active sites, (2) binding of ClpA opens this 'gate', allowing substrate entry and formation of the acyl-enzyme intermediate, and (3) closing of the N-terminal 'gate' stimulates acyl-enzyme hydrolysis.

  9. N-terminus regulation of VMAT2 mediates methamphetamine-stimulated efflux.

    PubMed

    Torres, B; Ruoho, A E

    2014-02-14

    The 20 amino acid (AA) N-terminus of the vesicular monoamine transporter 2 (VMAT2) was examined as a regulator of VMAT2 function. Removal of the first 16 or 19 AAs of the N-terminus resulted in a molecule with reduced ability to sequester [(3)H]-5HT. A glutathione-S-transferase-construct of the N-terminus underwent phosphorylation in the presence of PKC at serines 15 and 18. These putative phosphorylation sites were examined for effects on function. Phospho-mimetic substitution of serines 15 and 18 with aspartate in the full-length VMAT2 resulted in reduced [(3)H]-5HT sequestration and reduced methamphetamine (METH)-stimulated efflux of preloaded [(3)H]-5HT. In contrast, mutation of serines 15 and 18 to alanines maintained intact net substrate sequestration but eliminated METH-stimulated efflux of pre-accumulated [(3)H]-5HT. In summary, these data suggest a model in which the VMAT2 N-terminus regulates monoamine sequestration.

  10. The N-terminus of TDP-43 promotes its oligomerization and enhances DNA binding affinity

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Chung-ke; Wu, Tzong-Huah; Wu, Chu-Ya; Chiang, Ming-hui; Toh, Elsie Khai-Woon; Hsu, Yin-Chih; Lin, Ku-Feng; Liao, Yu-heng; Huang, Tai-huang; Huang, Joseph Jen-Tse

    2012-08-24

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The N-terminus of TDP-43 contains an independently folded structural domain (NTD). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The structural domains of TDP-43 are arranged in a beads-on-a-string fashion. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The NTD promotes TDP-43 oligomerization in a concentration-dependent manner. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The NTD may assist nucleic acid-binding activity of TDP-43. -- Abstract: TDP-43 is a DNA/RNA-binding protein associated with different neurodegenerative diseases such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD-U). Here, the structural and physical properties of the N-terminus on TDP-43 have been carefully characterized through a combination of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), circular dichroism (CD) and fluorescence anisotropy studies. We demonstrate for the first time the importance of the N-terminus in promoting TDP-43 oligomerization and enhancing its DNA-binding affinity. An unidentified structural domain in the N-terminus is also disclosed. Our findings provide insights into the N-terminal domain function of TDP-43.

  11. Effect of myristoylated N-terminus of Arf1 on the bending rigidity of phospholipid membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burrola Gabilondo, Beatriz; Zhou, Hernan; Randazzo, Paul A.; Losert, Wolfgang

    2010-03-01

    The protein Arf1 is part of the COPI vesicle transport process from the Golgi to the ER. It binds to membranes via a myristoylated N-terminus and it has been shown to tubulate Large Unilamellar Vesicles. The effect of the N-terminus of Arf1 on physical properties of membranes has not been studied, with the exception of curvature. We previously found that the myristoylated N-terminus increases the packing of the lipid molecules, but has no effect on the lateral mobility. We tested the hypothesis that myristoylated peptides affect the bending rigidity of phospholipid Giant Unilamellar Vesicles (GUV). We use optical tweezers to pull tethers from GUV and measure the force of pulling the tether, as well as the retraction speed of the tether once it is released. We also used flicker spectroscopy to estimate the values of the mechanical properties of GUV. We will present results of the force and tether retraction measurements, as well as mechanical properties estimates from flicker, for GUV in the presence of varying concentrations of myristoylated and non-myristoylated N-terminus of Arf1, and compare these with measurements for GUV in the absence of peptide.

  12. Characterization of the branching patterns of glycogen branching enzyme truncated on the N-terminus.

    PubMed

    Devillers, Claire H; Piper, Mary E; Ballicora, Miguel A; Preiss, Jack

    2003-10-01

    Truncation of 112 amino acids at the N-terminus (Nd(1-112)) changes the chain transfer pattern of the Escherichia coli glycogen branching enzyme (GBE) [Arch. Biochem. Biophys. 397 (2002) 279]. We investigated further the role of the N-terminus by engineering other truncated GBEs and analyzing the branching pattern by high-performance anion-exchange chromatography. The wild type GBE transfers mainly chains with a degree of polymerization (d.p.) of 8-14, the Nd(1-112) enzyme transfers a greater proportion of chains with higher d.p. 15-20, whereas the 63- and 83-amino acid deleted enzymes had an intermediate pattern of transferred chains (d.p. 10-20). These data showed that a progressive shortening of the N-terminus leads to a gradual increase in the length of the transferred chains, suggesting that the N-terminus provides a support for the glucan substrate during the processes of cleavage and transfer of the alpha-(1-4) glucan chains.

  13. Structure of the human MLH1 N-terminus: implications for predisposition to Lynch syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Hong; Zeng, Hong; Lam, Robert; Tempel, Wolfram; Kerr, Iain D.; Min, Jinrong

    2015-07-28

    The crystal structure of the human MLH1 N-terminus is reported at 2.30 Å resolution. The overall structure is described along with an analysis of two clinically important mutations. Mismatch repair prevents the accumulation of erroneous insertions/deletions and non-Watson–Crick base pairs in the genome. Pathogenic mutations in the MLH1 gene are associated with a predisposition to Lynch and Turcot’s syndromes. Although genetic testing for these mutations is available, robust classification of variants requires strong clinical and functional support. Here, the first structure of the N-terminus of human MLH1, determined by X-ray crystallography, is described. The structure shares a high degree of similarity with previously determined prokaryotic MLH1 homologs; however, this structure affords a more accurate platform for the classification of MLH1 variants.

  14. The N terminus of monoamine transporters is a lever required for the action of amphetamines.

    PubMed

    Sucic, Sonja; Dallinger, Stefan; Zdrazil, Barbara; Weissensteiner, René; Jørgensen, Trine N; Holy, Marion; Kudlacek, Oliver; Seidel, Stefan; Cha, Joo Hwan; Gether, Ulrik; Newman, Amy H; Ecker, Gerhard F; Freissmuth, Michael; Sitte, Harald H

    2010-04-02

    The serotonin transporter (SERT) terminates neurotransmission by removing serotonin from the synaptic cleft. In addition, it is the site of action of antidepressants (which block the transporter) and of amphetamines (which induce substrate efflux). We explored the functional importance of the N terminus in mediating the action of amphetamines by focusing initially on the highly conserved threonine residue at position 81, a candidate site for phosphorylation by protein kinase C. Molecular dynamics simulations of the wild type SERT, compared with its mutations SERT(T81A) and SERT(T81D), suggested structural changes in the inner vestibule indicative of an opening of the inner vestibule. Predictions from this model (e.g. the preferential accumulation of SERT(T81A) in the inward conformation, its reduced turnover number, and a larger distance between its N and C termini) were verified. Most importantly, SERT(T81A) (and the homologous mutations in noradrenaline and dopamine) failed to support amphetamine-induced efflux, and this was not remedied by aspartate at this position. Amphetamine-induced currents through SERT(T81A) were comparable with those through the wild type transporter. Both abundant Na(+) entry and accumulation of SERT(T81A) in the inward facing conformation ought to favor amphetamine-induced efflux. Thus, we surmised that the N terminus must play a direct role in driving the transporter into a state that supports amphetamine-induced efflux. This hypothesis was verified by truncating the first 64 amino acids and by tethering the N terminus to an additional transmembrane helix. Either modification abolished amphetamine-induced efflux. We therefore conclude that the N terminus of monoamine transporters acts as a lever that sustains reverse transport.

  15. The luminal N-terminus of yeast Nvj1 is an inner nuclear membrane anchor

    PubMed Central

    Millen, Jonathan I.; Pierson, Jason; Kvam, Erik; Olsen, Lars J.; Goldfarb, David S.

    2010-01-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) in S. cerevisae is largely divided between perinuclear and cortical compartments. Yeast Nvj1 localizes exclusively to small patches on the perinuclear ER, where it interacts with Vac8 in the vacuole membrane to form nucleus-vacuole (NV) junctions. Three regions of Nvj1 mediate the biogenesis of NV junctions. A membrane-spanning domain targets the protein to the ER. The C-terminus binds Vac8 in the vacuole membrane, which induces the clustering of both proteins into NV junctions. The luminal N-terminus is required for strict perinuclear localization. 3D cryo-electron tomography reveals that Nvj1 clamps the separation between the two nuclear membranes to half the width of bulk nuclear envelope. The N-terminus contains a hydrophobic sequence bracketed by basic residues that resembles outer mitochondrial membrane signal-anchors. The hydrophobic sequence can be scrambled or reversed without affecting function. Mutations that reduce the hydrophobicity of the core sequence, or affect the distribution of basic residues, cause mislocalization to the cortical ER. We conclude that the N-terminus of Nvj1 is a retention sequence that bridges the perinuclear lumen and inserts into the inner nuclear membrane. PMID:18694438

  16. Identification of Novel Potentially Toxic Oligomers Formed in Vitro from Mammalian-derived Expanded huntingtin Exon-1 Protein*

    PubMed Central

    Nucifora, Leslie G.; Burke, Kathleen A.; Feng, Xia; Arbez, Nicolas; Zhu, Shanshan; Miller, Jason; Yang, Guocheng; Ratovitski, Tamara; Delannoy, Michael; Muchowski, Paul J.; Finkbeiner, Steven; Legleiter, Justin; Ross, Christopher A.; Poirier, Michelle A.

    2012-01-01

    Huntington disease is a genetic neurodegenerative disorder that arises from an expanded polyglutamine region in the N terminus of the HD gene product, huntingtin. Protein inclusions comprised of N-terminal fragments of mutant huntingtin are a characteristic feature of disease, though are likely to play a protective role rather than a causative one in neurodegeneration. Soluble oligomeric assemblies of huntingtin formed early in the aggregation process are candidate toxic species in HD. In the present study, we established an in vitro system to generate recombinant huntingtin in mammalian cells. Using both denaturing and native gel analysis, we have identified novel oligomeric forms of mammalian-derived expanded huntingtin exon-1 N-terminal fragment. These species are transient and were not previously detected using bacterially expressed exon-1 protein. Importantly, these species are recognized by 3B5H10, an antibody that recognizes a two-stranded hairpin conformation of expanded polyglutamine believed to be associated with a toxic form of huntingtin. Interestingly, comparable oligomeric species were not observed for expanded huntingtin shortstop, a 117-amino acid fragment of huntingtin shown previously in mammalian cell lines and transgenic mice, and here in primary cortical neurons, to be non-toxic. Further, we demonstrate that expanded huntingtin shortstop has a reduced ability to form amyloid-like fibrils characteristic of the aggregation pathway for toxic expanded polyglutamine proteins. Taken together, these data provide a possible candidate toxic species in HD. In addition, these studies demonstrate the fundamental differences in early aggregation events between mutant huntingtin exon-1 and shortstop proteins that may underlie the differences in toxicity. PMID:22433867

  17. Role of the N-terminus in the structure and stability of chicken annexin V.

    PubMed

    Arboledas, D; Olmo, N; Lizarbe, M A; Turnay, J

    1997-10-20

    The role of the short N-terminal region of chicken annexin V in the maintenance of the protein structure and its influence in the conformation of the calcium binding regions was analyzed. The N-terminal domain is not essential for protein folding, wild-type and dnt-annexin V showing almost identical secondary structures. However, the partial truncation of the N-terminus significantly decreases the melting temperature of the protein and induces the partial exposure of Trp187 which is normally located in a hydrophobic pocket of the calcium binding region of domain 3 of annexin V in the Ca2+-free form.

  18. Monoclonal antibodies against the muscle-specific N-terminus of dystrophin: Characterization of dystrophin in a muscular dystrophy patient with a frameshift deletion of Exons 3-7

    SciTech Connect

    Thanh, L. T.; Man, N. thi; Morris, G.E. ); Love, D.R.; Davies, K.E. ); Helliwell, T.R. )

    1993-07-01

    The first three exons of the human muscle dystrophin gene were expressed as a [beta]-galactosidase fusion protein. 1-his protein was then used to prepare two monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) which react with native dystrophin on frozen muscle sections and with denatured dystrophin on western blots but which do not cross-react with the distrophin-related protein, utrophin. Both mAbs recognized dystrophin in muscular dystrophy (MD) patients with deletions of exon 3, and further mapping with 11 overlapping synthetic peptides showed that they both recognize an epitope encoded by the muscle-specific exon 1. Neither mAb recognizes the brain dystrophin isoform, confirming the prediction from mRNA data that this has a different N-terminus. One Becker MD patient with a frameshift deletion of exons 3-7 is shown to produce dystrophin which reacts with the N-terminal mAbs, as well as with mAbs which bind on the C-terminal side of the deletion. The data suggest that transcription begins at the normal muscle dystrophin promoter and that the normal reading frame is restored after the deletion. A number of mechanisms have been proposed for restoration of the reading frame after deletion of exons 3-7, but those which predict dystrophin with an abnormal N-terminus do not appear to be major mechanisms in this patient. 27 refs., 6 figs.

  19. Calmodulin and S100A1 protein interact with N terminus of TRPM3 channel.

    PubMed

    Holakovska, Blanka; Grycova, Lenka; Jirku, Michaela; Sulc, Miroslav; Bumba, Ladislav; Teisinger, Jan

    2012-05-11

    Transient receptor potential melastatin 3 ion channel (TRPM3) belongs to the TRP family of cation-permeable ion channels involved in many important biological functions such as pain transduction, thermosensation, and mechanoregulation. The channel was reported to play an important role in Ca(2+) homeostasis, but its gating mechanisms, functions, and regulation are still under research. Utilizing biophysical and biochemical methods, we characterized two independent domains, Ala-35-Lys-124 and His-291-Gly-382, on the TRPM3 N terminus, responsible for interactions with the Ca(2+)-binding proteins calmodulin (CaM) and S100A1. We identified several positively charged residues within these domains as having a crucial impact on CaM/S100A1 binding. The data also suggest that the interaction is calcium-dependent. We also performed competition assays, which suggested that CaM and S100A1 are able to compete for the same binding sites within the TRPM3 N terminus. This is the first time that such an interaction has been shown for TRP family members.

  20. Natural osmolytes remodel the aggregation pathway of mutant huntingtin exon 1.

    PubMed

    Borwankar, Tejas; Röthlein, Christoph; Zhang, Gong; Techen, Anne; Dosche, Carsten; Ignatova, Zoya

    2011-03-29

    In response to stress small organic compounds termed osmolytes are ubiquitously accumulated in all cell types to regulate the intracellular solvent quality and to counteract the deleterious effect on the stability and function of cellular proteins. Given the evidence that destabilization of the native state of a protein either by mutation or by environmental changes triggers the aggregation in the neurodegenerative pathologies, the modulation of the intracellular solute composition with osmolytes is an attractive strategy to stabilize an aggregating protein. Here we report the effect of three natural osmolytes on the in vivo and in vitro aggregation landscape of huntingtin exon 1 implicated in the Huntington's disease. Trimethylamine N-oxide (TMAO) and proline redirect amyloid fibrillogenesis of the pathological huntingtin exon 1 to nonamyloidogenic amorphous assemblies via two dissimilar molecular mechanisms. TMAO causes a rapid formation of bulky amorphous aggregates with minimally exposed surface area, whereas proline solubilizes the monomer and suppresses the accumulation of early transient aggregates. Conversely, glycine-betaine enhances fibrillization in a fashion reminiscent of the genesis of functional amyloids. Strikingly, none of the natural osmolytes can completely abrogate the aggregate formation; however, they redirect the amyloidogenesis into alternative, nontoxic aggregate species. Our study reveals new insights into the complex interactions of osmoprotectants with polyQ aggregates.

  1. Tectonics of a K⁺ channel: The importance of the N-terminus for channel gating.

    PubMed

    Hoffgaard, F; Kast, S M; Moroni, A; Thiel, G; Hamacher, K

    2015-12-01

    The small K⁺ channel Kcv represents the pore module of complex potassium channels. It was found that its gating can be modified by sensor domains, which are N-terminally coupled to the pore. This implies that the short N-terminus of the channel can transmit conformational changes from upstream sensors to the channel gates. To understand the functional role of the N-terminus in the context of the entire channel protein, we apply combinatorial screening of the mechanical coupling and long-range interactions in the Kcv potassium channel by reduced molecular models. The dynamics and mechanical connections in the channel complex show that the N-terminus is indeed mechanically connected to the pore domain. This includes a long rang coupling to the pore and the inner and outer transmembrane domains. Since the latter domains host the two gates of the channel, the data support the hypothesis that mechanical perturbation of the N-terminus can be transmitted to the channel gates. This effect is solely determined by the topology of the channel; sequence details only have an implicit effect on the coarse-grained dynamics via the fold and not through biochemical details at a smaller scale. This observation has important implications for engineering of synthetic channels on the basis of a K⁺ channel pore.

  2. Localization of the N-terminus of minor coat protein IIIa in the adenovirus capsid

    PubMed Central

    San Martín, Carmen; Glasgow, Joel N.; Borovjagin, Anton; Beatty, Matthew S.; Kashentseva, Elena A.; T. Curiel, David; Marabini, Roberto; Dmitriev, Igor P.

    2008-01-01

    Summary Minor coat protein IIIa is conserved in all adenoviruses and required for correct viral assembly, but its precise function in capsid organization is unknown. The latest adenovirus capsid model proposes that IIIa is located underneath the vertex region. To obtain experimental evidence on the location of IIIa and further define its role, we engineered the IIIa gene to encode heterologous N-terminal peptide extensions. Recombinant adenovirus variants with IIIa encoding six-histidine tag (6-His), 6-His and FLAG peptides, or 6-His linked to FLAG with a (Gly4Ser)3 linker were rescued and analyzed for virus yield, capsid incorporation of heterologous peptides, and capsid stability. Longer extensions could not be rescued. Western blot analysis confirmed that the modified IIIa proteins were expressed in infected cells and incorporated into virions. In the adenovirus encoding the 6-His-linker-FLAG-IIIa gene, the 6-His tag was present in light particles but not in mature virions. Immuno-electron microscopy of this virus showed that the FLAG epitope is not accessible to antibodies on the viral particles. Three-dimensional electron microscopy (3DEM) and difference mapping located the IIIa N-terminal extension beneath the vertex complex, wedged at the interface between penton base and the peripentonal hexons, therefore supporting the latest proposed model. The position of the IIIa N-terminus and its low tolerance for modification provide new clues for understanding the role of this minor coat protein in adenovirus capsid assembly and disassembly. PMID:18786542

  3. Localization of the Intracellular Activity Domain of Pasteurella multocida Toxin to the N Terminus

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Brenda A.; Ponferrada, Virgilio G.; Vallance, Jefferson E.; Ho, Mengfei

    1999-01-01

    We have shown that Pasteurella multocida toxin (PMT) directly causes transient activation of Gqα protein that is coupled to phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase Cβ1 in Xenopus oocytes (B. A. Wilson, X. Zhu, M. Ho, and L. Lu, J. Biol. Chem. 272:1268–1275, 1997). We found that antibodies directed against an N-terminal peptide of PMT inhibited the toxin-induced response in Xenopus oocytes, but antibodies against a C-terminal peptide did not. To test whether the intracellular activity domain of PMT is localized to the N terminus, we conducted a deletion mutational analysis of the PMT protein, using the Xenopus oocyte system as a means of screening for toxin activity. Using PCR and conventional cloning techniques, we cloned from a toxinogenic strain of P. multocida the entire toxA gene, encoding the 1,285-amino-acid PMT protein, and expressed the recombinant toxin as a His-tagged fusion protein in Escherichia coli. We subsequently generated a series of N-terminal and C-terminal deletion mutants and expressed the His-tagged PMT fragments in E. coli. These proteins were screened for cytotoxic activity on cultured Vero cells and for intracellular activity in the Xenopus oocyte system. Only the full-length protein without the His tag exhibited activity on Vero cells. The full-length PMT and N-terminal fragments containing the first 500 residues elicited responses in oocytes, but the C-terminal 780 amino acid fragment did not. Our results confirm that the intracellular activity domain of PMT is localized to the N-terminal 500 amino acids of the protein and that the C terminus is required for entry into cells. PMID:9864199

  4. Spontaneous Inward Opening of the Dopamine Transporter Is Triggered by PIP2-Regulated Dynamics of the N-Terminus

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    We present the dynamic mechanism of concerted motions in a full-length molecular model of the human dopamine transporter (hDAT), a member of the neurotransmitter/sodium symporter (NSS) family, involved in state-to-state transitions underlying function. The findings result from an analysis of unbiased atomistic molecular dynamics simulation trajectories (totaling >14 μs) of the hDAT molecule immersed in lipid membrane environments with or without phosphatidylinositol 4,5-biphosphate (PIP2) lipids. The N-terminal region of hDAT (N-term) is shown to have an essential mechanistic role in correlated rearrangements of specific structural motifs relevant to state-to-state transitions in the hDAT. The mechanism involves PIP2-mediated electrostatic interactions between the N-term and the intracellular loops of the transporter molecule. Quantitative analyses of collective motions in the trajectories reveal that these interactions correlate with the inward-opening dynamics of hDAT and are allosterically coupled to the known functional sites of the transporter. The observed large-scale motions are enabled by specific reconfiguration of the network of ionic interactions at the intracellular end of the protein. The isomerization to the inward-facing state in hDAT is accompanied by concomitant movements in the extracellular vestibule and results in the release of an Na+ ion from the Na2 site and destabilization of the substrate dopamine in the primary substrate binding S1 site. The dynamic mechanism emerging from the findings highlights the involvement of the PIP2-regulated interactions between the N-term and the intracellular loop 4 in the functionally relevant conformational transitions that are also similar to those found to underlie state-to-state transitions in the leucine transporter (LeuT), a prototypical bacterial homologue of the NSS. PMID:26255829

  5. Spontaneous inward opening of the dopamine transporter is triggered by PIP2-regulated dynamics of the N-terminus.

    PubMed

    Khelashvili, George; Stanley, Nathaniel; Sahai, Michelle A; Medina, Jaime; LeVine, Michael V; Shi, Lei; De Fabritiis, Gianni; Weinstein, Harel

    2015-11-18

    We present the dynamic mechanism of concerted motions in a full-length molecular model of the human dopamine transporter (hDAT), a member of the neurotransmitter/sodium symporter (NSS) family, involved in state-to-state transitions underlying function. The findings result from an analysis of unbiased atomistic molecular dynamics simulation trajectories (totaling >14 μs) of the hDAT molecule immersed in lipid membrane environments with or without phosphatidylinositol 4,5-biphosphate (PIP2) lipids. The N-terminal region of hDAT (N-term) is shown to have an essential mechanistic role in correlated rearrangements of specific structural motifs relevant to state-to-state transitions in the hDAT. The mechanism involves PIP2-mediated electrostatic interactions between the N-term and the intracellular loops of the transporter molecule. Quantitative analyses of collective motions in the trajectories reveal that these interactions correlate with the inward-opening dynamics of hDAT and are allosterically coupled to the known functional sites of the transporter. The observed large-scale motions are enabled by specific reconfiguration of the network of ionic interactions at the intracellular end of the protein. The isomerization to the inward-facing state in hDAT is accompanied by concomitant movements in the extracellular vestibule and results in the release of an Na(+) ion from the Na2 site and destabilization of the substrate dopamine in the primary substrate binding S1 site. The dynamic mechanism emerging from the findings highlights the involvement of the PIP2-regulated interactions between the N-term and the intracellular loop 4 in the functionally relevant conformational transitions that are also similar to those found to underlie state-to-state transitions in the leucine transporter (LeuT), a prototypical bacterial homologue of the NSS.

  6. Macromolecular substrate affinity for free factor VIIa is independent of a buried protease domain N-terminus.

    PubMed

    Persson, Egon

    2006-03-03

    The initial recognition and binding of macromolecular substrates by factor VIIa (FVIIa) in complex with tissue factor has been shown to be mediated by areas distinct from the active site (so-called exosites). The present aim was to shed light on whether the N-terminal tail of the protease domain of FVIIa influences factor X (FX) binding, and whether the zymogen-like conformation of free FVIIa has a decreased affinity for FX compared to the active conformation. Two derivatives of FVIIa, one (FFR-FVIIa) with a stably buried N-terminus representing the active conformation of FVIIa and one (V154G-FVIIa) with a fully exposed N-terminus representing the zymogen-like conformation, were used as inhibitors of FVIIa-catalyzed FX activation. Their inhibitory capacities were very similar, with K(i) values not significantly different from the K(m) for FX. This indicates that the conformational state of the N-terminus does not affect FX binding or, alternatively, that the activation domain including the N-terminal insertion site is easily shifted to the stable conformation ensuing FX docking to the zymogen-like conformation. The net outcome is that FX binding to the zymogen-like form of FVIIa does not appear to be impaired.

  7. The G protein-coupled receptor N-terminus and receptor signalling: N-tering a new era.

    PubMed

    Coleman, James L J; Ngo, Tony; Smith, Nicola J

    2017-05-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are a vast family of membrane-traversing proteins, essential to the ability of eukaryotic life to detect, and mount an intracellular response to, a diverse range of extracellular stimuli. GPCRs have evolved with archetypal features including an extracellular N-terminus and intracellular C-terminus that flank a transmembrane structure of seven sequential helices joined by intracellular and extracellular loops. These structural domains contribute to the ability of a GPCR to be correctly synthesised and inserted into the cell membrane, to interact with its cognate ligand(s) and to couple with signal-transducing heterotrimeric G proteins, allowing the activated receptor to selectively modulate a number of signalling cascades. Whilst well known for its importance in receptor translation and trafficking, the GPCR N-terminus is underexplored as a participant in receptor signalling. This review aims to discuss and integrate recent advances in knowledge of the vital roles of the GPCR N-terminus in receptor signalling.

  8. Novel Nine-Exon AR Transcripts (Exon 1/Exon 1b/Exons 2–8) in Normal and Cancerous Breast and Prostate Cells

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Dong Gui; McKinnon, Ross A.; Hulin, Julie-Ann; Mackenzie, Peter I.; Meech, Robyn

    2016-01-01

    Nearly 20 different transcripts of the human androgen receptor (AR) are reported with two currently listed as Refseq isoforms in the NCBI database. Isoform 1 encodes wild-type AR (type 1 AR) and isoform 2 encodes the variant AR45 (type 2 AR). Both variants contain eight exons: they share common exons 2–8 but differ in exon 1 with the canonical exon 1 in isoform 1 and the variant exon 1b in isoform 2. Splicing of exon 1 or exon 1b is reported to be mutually exclusive. In this study, we identified a novel exon 1b (1b/TAG) that contains an additional TAG trinucleotide upstream of exon 1b. Moreover, we identified AR transcripts in both normal and cancerous breast and prostate cells that contained either exon 1b or 1b/TAG spliced between the canonical exon 1 and exon 2, generating nine-exon AR transcripts that we have named isoforms 3a and 3b. The proteins encoded by these new AR variants could regulate androgen-responsive reporters in breast and prostate cancer cells under androgen-depleted conditions. Analysis of type 3 AR-GFP fusion proteins showed partial nuclear localization in PC3 cells under androgen-depleted conditions, supporting androgen-independent activation of the AR. Type 3 AR proteins inhibited androgen-induced growth of LNCaP cells. Microarray analysis identified a small set of type 3a AR target genes in LNCaP cells, including genes known to modulate growth and proliferation of prostate cancer (PCGEM1, PEG3, EPHA3, and EFNB2) or other types of human cancers (TOX3, ST8SIA4, and SLITRK3), and genes that are diagnostic/prognostic biomarkers of prostate cancer (GRINA3, and BCHE). PMID:28035996

  9. Novel Nine-Exon AR Transcripts (Exon 1/Exon 1b/Exons 2-8) in Normal and Cancerous Breast and Prostate Cells.

    PubMed

    Hu, Dong Gui; McKinnon, Ross A; Hulin, Julie-Ann; Mackenzie, Peter I; Meech, Robyn

    2016-12-27

    Nearly 20 different transcripts of the human androgen receptor (AR) are reported with two currently listed as Refseq isoforms in the NCBI database. Isoform 1 encodes wild-type AR (type 1 AR) and isoform 2 encodes the variant AR45 (type 2 AR). Both variants contain eight exons: they share common exons 2-8 but differ in exon 1 with the canonical exon 1 in isoform 1 and the variant exon 1b in isoform 2. Splicing of exon 1 or exon 1b is reported to be mutually exclusive. In this study, we identified a novel exon 1b (1b/TAG) that contains an additional TAG trinucleotide upstream of exon 1b. Moreover, we identified AR transcripts in both normal and cancerous breast and prostate cells that contained either exon 1b or 1b/TAG spliced between the canonical exon 1 and exon 2, generating nine-exon AR transcripts that we have named isoforms 3a and 3b. The proteins encoded by these new AR variants could regulate androgen-responsive reporters in breast and prostate cancer cells under androgen-depleted conditions. Analysis of type 3 AR-GFP fusion proteins showed partial nuclear localization in PC3 cells under androgen-depleted conditions, supporting androgen-independent activation of the AR. Type 3 AR proteins inhibited androgen-induced growth of LNCaP cells. Microarray analysis identified a small set of type 3a AR target genes in LNCaP cells, including genes known to modulate growth and proliferation of prostate cancer (PCGEM1, PEG3, EPHA3, and EFNB2) or other types of human cancers (TOX3, ST8SIA4, and SLITRK3), and genes that are diagnostic/prognostic biomarkers of prostate cancer (GRINA3, and BCHE).

  10. Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor-Interacting Protein (AIP) N-Terminus Gene Mutations Identified in Pituitary Adenoma Patients Alter Protein Stability and Function.

    PubMed

    Formosa, Robert; Vassallo, Josanne

    2017-03-02

    Mutations spanning the entire aryl hydrocarbon receptor-interacting protein (AIP) gene have been found in isolated familial cases of pituitary adenomas (PA). Missense mutations located in the N-terminus of the gene have been identified in several patients. However, the functional significance of these mutations remains a matter of controversy. In most studies, the N-terminus of AIP has been shown to regulate protein stability and subcellular localization of the AIP-AHR-HSP90 complex but not to be involved in protein-protein interactions. Other studies found that the N-terminal domain interacts directly with other proteins. The aim of this study was to analyze whether specific N-terminus AIP mutations identified in PA patients would be functionally different from wild-type (WT) AIP. In vitro analyses were used to assess the role of known N-terminus variants, a locally identified mutant, R9Q, and three other commonly genotyped N-terminus mutations R16H, V49M and K103R are found in PA patients. Given the functional effect of WT AIP on cAMP signalling alterations caused by N-terminus mutants on this pathway were also analyzed in GH3 cells. Results indicate that N-terminus mutations lead to de-regulation of the effect of WT AIP on cAMP signalling and increased cAMP thresholds in GH3 cells resulting in increased growth hormone (GH) secretion. Cycloheximide chase analysis identified a variation in protein degradation patterns between WT and N-terminus variants. Therefore, both functional and structural studies reveal that N-terminus mutations in the AIP gene alter protein behaviour significantly and hence can truly be pathogenic in nature.

  11. IUGR increases chromatin-remodeling factor Brg1 expression and binding to GR exon 1.7 promoter in newborn male rat hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Ke, Xingrao; McKnight, Robert A; Gracey Maniar, Lia E; Sun, Ying; Callaway, Christopher W; Majnik, Amber; Lane, Robert H; Cohen, Susan S

    2015-07-15

    Intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR) increases the risk for neurodevelopment delay and neuroendocrine reprogramming in both humans and rats. Neuroendocrine reprogramming involves the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) gene that is epigenetically regulated in the hippocampus. Using a well-characterized rodent model, we have previously shown that IUGR increases GR exon 1.7 mRNA variant and total GR expressions in male rat pup hippocampus. Epigenetic regulation of GR transcription may involve chromatin remodeling of the GR gene. A key chromatin remodeler is Brahma-related gene-1(Brg1), a member of the ATP-dependent SWItch/Sucrose NonFermentable (SWI/SNF) chromatin remodeling complex. Brg1 regulates gene expression by affecting nucleosome repositioning and recruiting transcriptional components to target promoters. We hypothesized that IUGR would increase hippocampal Brg1 expression and binding to GR exon 1.7 promoter, as well as alter nucleosome positioning over GR promoters in newborn male pups. Further, we hypothesized that IUGR would lead to accumulation of specificity protein 1 (Sp1) and RNA pol II at GR exon 1.7 promoter. Indeed, we found that IUGR increased Brg1 expression and binding to GR exon 1.7 promoter. We also found that increased Brg1 binding to GR exon 1.7 promoter was associated with accumulation of Sp1 and RNA pol II carboxy terminal domain pSer-5 (a marker of active transcription). Furthermore, the transcription start site of GR exon 1.7 was located within a nucleosome-depleted region. We speculate that changes in hippocampal Brg1 expression mediate GR expression and subsequently trigger neuroendocrine reprogramming in male IUGR rats.

  12. Improvement of retroviral retargeting by using amino acid spacers between an additional binding domain and the N terminus of Moloney murine leukemia virus SU.

    PubMed Central

    Valsesia-Wittmann, S; Morling, F J; Nilson, B H; Takeuchi, Y; Russell, S J; Cosset, F L

    1996-01-01

    We previously reported a strategy to redirect the retroviral host range by expressing single-chain antibodies (S. J. Russell, R. E. Hawkins, and G. Winter, Nucleic Acids Res. 21:1081-1085, 1993) or ligands (F.-L. Cosset, F. J Morling, Y. Takeuchi, R. A. Weiss, M. K. L. Collins, and S. J. Russell, J. Virol. 69:6314-6322, 1995) at the N terminus of Moloney murine leukemia virus (MoMLV) surface proteins (SU). Although such chimeric envelopes were able to bind the new receptors, the transduction efficiency of retargeted viruses was generally low. We hypothesized that conformational rearrangements of envelope glycoproteins were not optimally triggered following binding, and to overcome these postbinding blocks, we have generated here a set of chimeric MoMLV-derived envelopes targeted to the Ram-1 phosphate transporter in which we have varied the spacing between the Ram-1-binding domain and the MoMLV SU. All of the recombinant envelopes were correctly expressed on virions, and all bound efficiently to Ram-1. However, the interdomain spacing greatly affected the efficiency of gene transfer by retroviral vectors that had bound to Ram-1 via their chimeric envelopes. Optimal interdomain spacing allowed a 100-fold-increased viral transduction via Ram-1 compared to our previous results. PMID:8627737

  13. Transcriptional transactivation functions localized to the glucocorticoid receptor N terminus are necessary for steroid induction of lymphocyte apoptosis.

    PubMed Central

    Dieken, E S; Miesfeld, R L

    1992-01-01

    Genetic studies have suggested that transcriptional regulation of specific target genes (by either induction or repression) is the molecular basis of glucocorticoid-mediated lymphocyte apoptosis. To examine the role of transcriptional regulation more directly, we developed a complementation assay utilizing stable transfection of wild-type (wt) and mutant (nti) glucocorticoid receptor (GR) cDNA constructs into a GR-deficient S49 murine cell line (7r). Our data confirm that the level of functional GR is rate limiting for S49 apoptosis and moreover that the GR amino terminus (N terminus), which as been deleted from the nti GR, is absolutely required for complementation in this system. Surprisingly, we found that at physiological levels of receptor, expression of the nti GR in cells containing wt GR results in enhanced dexamethasone sensitivity rather than a dominant negative phenotype. One interpretation of these data is that DNA binding by wt-nti heterodimers may be functionally similar to that of wt-wt homodimers, indicating that GRE occupancy by at least one transactivation domain may be sufficient to induce the hormonal response. To determine whether acidic activating sequences such as those localized to the GR N terminus are important in the induction of lymphocyte apoptosis, we tested the activity of a chimeric receptor in which we replaced the entire GR N terminus with sequences from the herpes simplex virus VP16 protein. Our results demonstrate that 7r cells expressing VP-GR fusions are indeed steroid sensitive, strongly supporting the idea that S49 apoptosis is dependent on transcriptional regulation of specific genes which respond to acidic activating domains, implying that induction, rather than repression, may be the critical initiating event. Images PMID:1310148

  14. Aminoacylase 3 binds to and cleaves the N-terminus of the hepatitis C virus core protein.

    PubMed

    Tsirulnikov, Kirill; Abuladze, Natalia; Vahi, Ritu; Hasnain, Huma; Phillips, Martin; Ryan, Christopher M; Atanasov, Ivo; Faull, Kym F; Kurtz, Ira; Pushkin, Alexander

    2012-11-02

    Aminoacylase 3 (AA3) mediates deacetylation of N-acetyl aromatic amino acids and mercapturic acids. Deacetylation of mercapturic acids of exo- and endobiotics are likely involved in their toxicity. AA3 is predominantly expressed in kidney, and to a lesser extent in liver, brain, and blood. AA3 has been recently reported to interact with the hepatitis C virus core protein (HCVCP) in the yeast two-hybrid system. Here we demonstrate that AA3 directly binds to HCVCP (K(d) ~10 μM) that may by implicated in HCV pathogenesis. AA3 also revealed a weak endopeptidase activity towards the N-terminus of HCVCP.

  15. Aminoacylase 3 binds to and cleaves the N-terminus of the hepatitis C virus core protein

    PubMed Central

    Tsirulnikov, Kirill; Abuladze, Natalia; Vahi, Ritu; Hasnain, Huma; Phillips, Martin; Ryan, Christopher M.; Atanasov, Ivo; Faull, Kym F.; Kurtz, Ira; Pushkin, Alexander

    2012-01-01

    Aminoacylase 3 (AA3) mediates deacetylation of N-acetyl aromatic amino acids and mercapturic acids. Deacetylation of mercapturic acids of exo- and endobiotics are likely involved in their toxicity. AA3 is predominantly expressed in kidney, and to a lesser extent in liver, brain, and blood. AA3 has been recently reported to interact with the hepatitis C virus core protein (HCVCP) in the yeast two-hybrid system. Here we demonstrate that AA3 directly binds to HCVCP (Kd~10 μM) that may by implicated in HCV pathogenesis. AA3 also revealed a weak endopeptidase activity towards the N-terminus of HCVCP. PMID:23010594

  16. N-terminus conservation in the anchor polypeptide of a prokaryotic and eukaryotic alga. [Nostoc; Porphydium cruentum

    SciTech Connect

    Gantt, E.; Lipschultz, C.A.; Cunningham, F.X. Jr.; Mimuro, M.

    1987-04-01

    Energy flow between the extrinsic phycobilisomes and the photosystems within thylakoids, is probably mediated by a blue anchor polypeptide. Polypeptides in the 94 kD range, purified by LiDS-PAGE from phycobilisomes of Nostoc and Porphyrdium cruentum, crossreacted with anti-Nostoc-94 (although weakly with the latter). Though rich in ASP and GLU, the polypeptides were very hydrophobic, and low in MET, CYS, and HIS. Partial sequence of the N-terminus shows considerable homology 1 - 5 - 10 - 15 - 20 N: (S)-V-K-A-S-G-G-S-S-V-A-(R)-P-Q-L-Y-Q-(G)-L-(A)-V- P: V-()-K-A-S-G-G-S-P-V-V-K-P-Q-L-Y-(K)-()-A-(S)- between the species. There is a lack of homology when compared with ..cap alpha.. and ..beta.. polypeptides of allophycocyanin with rod linkers of phycobilisomes and other phycobiliproteins. Polypeptides of 94 and 92 kD from thylakoids of Nostoc, also immunoreactive with anti-94, were blocked at the N-terminus.

  17. The N-terminus of vaccinia virus host range protein C7L is essential for function

    PubMed Central

    Terajima, Masanori; Urban, Stina L.; Leporati, Anita M.

    2012-01-01

    Vaccinia virus (VACV), a member of the Poxviridae family of large double-stranded DNA viruses, is being used as a smallpox vaccine as well as an expression vector for immunization against other infectious diseases and cancer. The host range of wild type VACV is very broad among mammalian cells. C7L is a host range gene identified in VACV and is well conserved in mammalian poxviruses except for parapoxviruses and molluscum contagiosum virus. The molecular mechanisms by which the C7L gene exerts host range function are not well understood. The C7L protein does not have any known conserved domains or show sequence similarity to cellular proteins or viral proteins other than the C7L homologues in mammalian poxviruses. We generated recombinant vaccinia viruses carrying deletion mutants of the C7L gene using NYVAC as a parental strain and found that the N-terminus is essential for host range function of C7L, which is consistent with a previous report that showed homology among C7L homologues are greater near the N-terminus than the C-terminus. PMID:23001690

  18. Aphid transmission of a potyvirus depends on suitability of the helper component and the N terminus of the coat protein.

    PubMed

    Dombrovsky, A; Huet, H; Chejanovsky, N; Raccah, B

    2005-02-01

    The present study investigates the specificity of potyviruses for aphid species. Two potyviruses differing in their host range were used: Zucchini yellow mosaic virus (ZYMV) mainly infecting cucurbits and Turnip mosaic virus (TuMV) mainly infecting crucifers. Two sets of aphids species were used as vectors, one polyphagous (Myzus persicae and Aphis gossypii) and the other from crucifers (Brevicoryne brassicae and Lipaphis erysimi). Evidence is provided that the specificity between a vector and a potyvirus depends either on the affinity between the aphid species and the helper component (HC) protein used or on the affinity between the HC and the virions. The difference between the two potyviruses cannot be attributed to the DAG domain which is unaltered in both N termini of the CP. Therefore, a ZYMV full length clone served to exchange a fragment encoding for the N terminus of the ZYMV CP by that of TuMV. This partial exchange in the ZYMV CP, allowed the TuMV HC to transmit the chimeric virus but not the wild type ZYMV. The significance of the N terminus context of the CP in the specificity for the HC is discussed.

  19. The membrane proximal region of the cannabinoid receptor CB1 N-terminus can allosterically modulate ligand affinity.

    PubMed

    Fay, Jonathan F; Farrens, David L

    2013-11-19

    The human cannabinoid receptor, CB1, a G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR), contains a relatively long (∼110 a.a.) amino terminus, whose function is still not defined. Here we explore a potential role for the CB1 N-terminus in modulating ligand binding to the receptor. Although most of the CB1 N-terminus is not necessary for ligand binding, previous studies have found that mutations introduced into its conserved membrane proximal region (MPR) do impair the receptors ability to bind ligand. Moreover, within the highly conserved MPR (∼ residues 90-110) lie two cysteine residues that are invariant in all CB1 receptors. We find these two cysteines (C98 and C107) form a disulfide in heterologously expressed human CB1, and this C98-C107 disulfide is much more accessible to reducing agents than the previously known disulfide in extracellular loop 2 (EL2). Interestingly, the presence of the C98-C107 disulfide modulates ligand binding to the receptor in a way that can be quantitatively analyzed by an allosteric model. The C98-C107 disulfide also alters the effects of allosteric ligands for CB1, Org 27569 and PSNCBAM-1. Together, these results provide new insights into how the N-terminal MPR and EL2 act together to influence the high-affinity orthosteric ligand binding site in CB1 and suggest that the CB1 N-terminal MPR may be an area through which allosteric modulators can act.

  20. The N Terminus of the Prion Protein Mediates Functional Interactions with the Neuronal Cell Adhesion Molecule (NCAM) Fibronectin Domain.

    PubMed

    Slapšak, Urška; Salzano, Giulia; Amin, Ladan; Abskharon, Romany N N; Ilc, Gregor; Zupančič, Blaž; Biljan, Ivana; Plavec, Janez; Giachin, Gabriele; Legname, Giuseppe

    2016-10-14

    The cellular form of the prion protein (PrP(C)) is a highly conserved glycoprotein mostly expressed in the central and peripheral nervous systems by different cell types in mammals. A misfolded, pathogenic isoform, denoted as prion, is related to a class of neurodegenerative diseases known as transmissible spongiform encephalopathy. PrP(C) function has not been unequivocally clarified, and it is rather defined as a pleiotropic protein likely acting as a dynamic cell surface scaffolding protein for the assembly of different signaling modules. Among the variety of PrP(C) protein interactors, the neuronal cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) has been studied in vivo, but the structural basis of this functional interaction is still a matter of debate. Here we focused on the structural determinants responsible for human PrP(C) (HuPrP) and NCAM interaction using stimulated emission depletion (STED) nanoscopy, SPR, and NMR spectroscopy approaches. PrP(C) co-localizes with NCAM in mouse hippocampal neurons, and this interaction is mainly mediated by the intrinsically disordered PrP(C) N-terminal tail, which binds with high affinity to the NCAM fibronectin type-3 domain. NMR structural investigations revealed surface-interacting epitopes governing the interaction between HuPrP N terminus and the second module of the NCAM fibronectin type-3 domain. Our data provided molecular details about the interaction between HuPrP and the NCAM fibronectin domain, and revealed a new role of PrP(C) N terminus as a dynamic and functional element responsible for protein-protein interaction.

  1. Phosphorylation of serine residues in the N-terminus modulates the activity of ACA8, a plasma membrane Ca2+-ATPase of Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Giacometti, Sonia; Marrano, Claudia Adriana; Bonza, Maria Cristina; Luoni, Laura; Limonta, Margherita; De Michelis, Maria Ida

    2012-01-01

    ACA8 is a plasma membrane-localized isoform of calmodulin (CaM)-regulated Ca2+-ATPase of Arabidopsis thaliana. Several phosphopeptides corresponding to portions of the regulatory N-terminus of ACA8 have been identified in phospho-proteomic studies. To mimic phosphorylation of the ACA8 N-terminus, each of the serines found to be phosphorylated in those studies (Ser19, Ser22, Ser27, Ser29, Ser57, and Ser99) has been mutated to aspartate. Mutants have been expressed in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and characterized: mutants S19D and S57D—and to a lesser extent also mutants S22D and S27D—are deregulated, as shown by their low activation by CaM and by tryptic cleavage of the N-terminus. The His-tagged N-termini of wild-type and mutant ACA8 (6His-1M-I116) were expressed in Escherichia coli, affinity-purified, and used to analyse the kinetics of CaM binding by surface plasmon resonance. All the analysed mutations affect the kinetics of interaction with CaM to some extent: in most cases, the altered kinetics result in marginal changes in affinity, with the exception of mutants S57D (KD ∼10-fold higher than wild-type ACA8) and S99D (KD about half that of wild-type ACA8). The ACA8 N-terminus is phosphorylated in vitro by two isoforms of A. thaliana calcium-dependent protein kinase (CPK1 and CPK16); phosphorylation of mutant 6His-1M-I116 peptides shows that CPK16 is able to phosphorylate the ACA8 N-terminus at Ser19 and at Ser22. The possible physiological implications of the subtle modulation of ACA8 activity by phosphorylation of its N-terminus are discussed. PMID:22090438

  2. Phosphorylation of serine residues in the N-terminus modulates the activity of ACA8, a plasma membrane Ca2+-ATPase of Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Giacometti, Sonia; Marrano, Claudia Adriana; Bonza, Maria Cristina; Luoni, Laura; Limonta, Margherita; De Michelis, Maria Ida

    2012-02-01

    ACA8 is a plasma membrane-localized isoform of calmodulin (CaM)-regulated Ca(2+)-ATPase of Arabidopsis thaliana. Several phosphopeptides corresponding to portions of the regulatory N-terminus of ACA8 have been identified in phospho-proteomic studies. To mimic phosphorylation of the ACA8 N-terminus, each of the serines found to be phosphorylated in those studies (Ser19, Ser22, Ser27, Ser29, Ser57, and Ser99) has been mutated to aspartate. Mutants have been expressed in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and characterized: mutants S19D and S57D--and to a lesser extent also mutants S22D and S27D--are deregulated, as shown by their low activation by CaM and by tryptic cleavage of the N-terminus. The His-tagged N-termini of wild-type and mutant ACA8 (6His-(1)M-I(116)) were expressed in Escherichia coli, affinity-purified, and used to analyse the kinetics of CaM binding by surface plasmon resonance. All the analysed mutations affect the kinetics of interaction with CaM to some extent: in most cases, the altered kinetics result in marginal changes in affinity, with the exception of mutants S57D (K(D) ≈ 10-fold higher than wild-type ACA8) and S99D (K(D) about half that of wild-type ACA8). The ACA8 N-terminus is phosphorylated in vitro by two isoforms of A. thaliana calcium-dependent protein kinase (CPK1 and CPK16); phosphorylation of mutant 6His-(1)M-I(116) peptides shows that CPK16 is able to phosphorylate the ACA8 N-terminus at Ser19 and at Ser22. The possible physiological implications of the subtle modulation of ACA8 activity by phosphorylation of its N-terminus are discussed.

  3. Involvement of the n-terminus of Kir6.2 in coupling to the sulphonylurea receptor.

    PubMed

    Reimann, F; Tucker, S J; Proks, P; Ashcroft, F M

    1999-07-15

    1. ATP-sensitive potassium (KATP) channels are composed of pore-forming Kir6.2 and regulatory SUR subunits. ATP inhibits the channel by interacting with Kir6.2, while sulphonylureas block channel activity by interaction with a high-affinity site on SUR1 and a low-affinity site on Kir6.2. MgADP and diazoxide interact with SUR1 to promote channel activity. 2. We examined the effect of N-terminal deletions of Kir6.2 on the channel open probability, ATP sensitivity and sulphonylurea sensitivity by recording macroscopic currents in membrane patches excised from Xenopus oocytes expressing wild-type or mutant Kir6.2/SUR1. 3. A 14 amino acid N-terminal deletion (DeltaN14) did not affect the gating, ATP sensitivity or tolbutamide block of a truncated isoform of Kir6.2, Kir6.2DeltaC26, expressed in the absence of SUR1. Thus, the N-terminal deletion does not alter the intrinsic properties of Kir6.2. 4. When Kir6.2DeltaN14 was coexpressed with SUR1, the resulting KATP channels had a higher open probability (Po = 0.7) and a lower ATP sensitivity (Ki = 196 microM) than wild-type (Kir6.2/SUR1) channels (Po = 0.32, Ki = 28 microM). High-affinity tolbutamide block was also abolished. 5. Truncation of five or nine amino acids from the N-terminus of Kir6.2 also enhanced the open probability, and reduced both the ATP sensitivity and the fraction of high-affinity tolbutamide block, although to a lesser extent than for the DeltaN14 deletion. Site-directed mutagenesis suggests that hydrophobic residues in Kir6. 2 may be involved in this effect. 6. The reduced ATP sensitivity of Kir6.2DeltaN14 may be explained by the increased Po. However, when the Po was decreased (by ATP), tolbutamide was unable to block Kir6. 2DeltaN14/SUR1-K719A,K1385M currents, despite the fact that the drug inhibited Kir6.2-C166S/SUR1-K719A,K1385M currents (which in the absence of ATP have a Po of > 0.8 and are not blocked by tolbutamide). Thus the N-terminus of Kir6.2 may be involved in coupling sulphonylurea

  4. The N-Terminus of the Floral Arabidopsis TGA Transcription Factor PERIANTHIA Mediates Redox-Sensitive DNA-Binding

    PubMed Central

    Gutsche, Nora; Zachgo, Sabine

    2016-01-01

    The Arabidopsis TGA transcription factor (TF) PERIANTHIA (PAN) regulates the formation of the floral organ primordia as revealed by the pan mutant forming an abnormal pentamerous arrangement of the outer three floral whorls. The Arabidopsis TGA bZIP TF family comprises 10 members, of which PAN and TGA9/10 control flower developmental processes and TGA1/2/5/6 participate in stress-responses. For the TGA1 protein it was shown that several cysteines can be redox-dependently modified. TGA proteins interact in the nucleus with land plant-specific glutaredoxins, which may alter their activities posttranslationally. Here, we investigated the DNA-binding of PAN to the AAGAAT motif under different redox-conditions. The AAGAAT motif is localized in the second intron of the floral homeotic regulator AGAMOUS (AG), which controls stamen and carpel development as well as floral determinacy. Whereas PAN protein binds to this regulatory cis-element under reducing conditions, the interaction is strongly reduced under oxidizing conditions in EMSA studies. The redox-sensitive DNA-binding is mediated via a special PAN N-terminus, which is not present in other Arabidopsis TGA TFs and comprises five cysteines. Two N-terminal PAN cysteines, Cys68 and Cys87, were shown to form a disulfide bridge and Cys340, localized in a C-terminal putative transactivation domain, can be S-glutathionylated. Comparative land plant analyses revealed that the AAGAAT motif exists in asterid and rosid plant species. TGA TFs with N-terminal extensions of variable length were identified in all analyzed seed plants. However, a PAN-like N-terminus exists only in the rosids and exclusively Brassicaceae homologs comprise four to five of the PAN N-terminal cysteines. Redox-dependent modifications of TGA cysteines are known to regulate the activity of stress-related TGA TFs. Here, we show that the N-terminal PAN cysteines participate in a redox-dependent control of the PAN interaction with a highly conserved

  5. Sequence requirements for transcriptional arrest in exon 1 of the human adenosine deaminase gene

    SciTech Connect

    Zhi Chen; Kellems, R.E.; Innis, J.W. ); Sun, Minghua; Wright, D.A. )

    1991-12-01

    The authors have previously demonstrated that a transcriptional arrest site exists in exon 1 of the human adenosine deaminase (ADA) gene and that this site may play a role in ADA gene expression. Sequences involved in this process are not known precisely. To further define the template requirements for transcriptional arrest within exon 1 of the human ADA gene, various ADA templates were constructed and their abilities to confer transcriptional arrest were determined following injection into Xenopus oocytes. The exon 1 transcriptional arrest signal functioned downstream of several RNA polymerase II promoters and an RNA polymerase II promoter, implying that the transcriptional arrest site in exon 1 of the ADA gene is promoter independent. They identified a 43-bp DNA fragment which functions as a transcriptional arrest signal. Additional studies showed that the transcriptional arrest site functioned only in the naturally occurring orientation. Therefore, they have identified a 43-bp DNA fragment which functions as a transcriptional arrest signal in an orientation-dependent and promoter-independent manner. On the basis of the authors findings, they hypothesize that tissue-specific expression of the ADA gene is governed by factors that function as antiterminators to promote transcriptional readthrough of the exon 1 transcriptional arrest site.

  6. Huntingtin exon 1 fibrils feature an interdigitated β-hairpin-based polyglutamine core.

    PubMed

    Hoop, Cody L; Lin, Hsiang-Kai; Kar, Karunakar; Magyarfalvi, Gábor; Lamley, Jonathan M; Boatz, Jennifer C; Mandal, Abhishek; Lewandowski, Józef R; Wetzel, Ronald; van der Wel, Patrick C A

    2016-02-09

    Polyglutamine expansion within the exon1 of huntingtin leads to protein misfolding, aggregation, and cytotoxicity in Huntington's disease. This incurable neurodegenerative disease is the most prevalent member of a family of CAG repeat expansion disorders. Although mature exon1 fibrils are viable candidates for the toxic species, their molecular structure and how they form have remained poorly understood. Using advanced magic angle spinning solid-state NMR, we directly probe the structure of the rigid core that is at the heart of huntingtin exon1 fibrils and other polyglutamine aggregates, via measurements of long-range intramolecular and intermolecular contacts, backbone and side-chain torsion angles, relaxation measurements, and calculations of chemical shifts. These experiments reveal the presence of β-hairpin-containing β-sheets that are connected through interdigitating extended side chains. Despite dramatic differences in aggregation behavior, huntingtin exon1 fibrils and other polyglutamine-based aggregates contain identical β-strand-based cores. Prior structural models, derived from X-ray fiber diffraction and computational analyses, are shown to be inconsistent with the solid-state NMR results. Internally, the polyglutamine amyloid fibrils are coassembled from differently structured monomers, which we describe as a type of "intrinsic" polymorphism. A stochastic polyglutamine-specific aggregation mechanism is introduced to explain this phenomenon. We show that the aggregation of mutant huntingtin exon1 proceeds via an intramolecular collapse of the expanded polyglutamine domain and discuss the implications of this observation for our understanding of its misfolding and aggregation mechanisms.

  7. Viral diversity and diversification of major non-structural genes vif, vpr, vpu, tat exon 1 and rev exon 1 during primary HIV-1 subtype C infection.

    PubMed

    Rossenkhan, Raabya; Novitsky, Vladimir; Sebunya, Theresa K; Musonda, Rosemary; Gashe, Berhanu A; Essex, M

    2012-01-01

    To assess the level of intra-patient diversity and evolution of HIV-1C non-structural genes in primary infection, viral quasispecies obtained by single genome amplification (SGA) at multiple sampling timepoints up to 500 days post-seroconversion (p/s) were analyzed. The mean intra-patient diversity was 0.11% (95% CI; 0.02 to 0.20) for vif, 0.23% (95% CI; 0.08 to 0.38) for vpr, 0.35% (95% CI; -0.05 to 0.75) for vpu, 0.18% (95% CI; 0.01 to 0.35) for tat exon 1 and 0.30% (95% CI; 0.02 to 0.58) for rev exon 1 during the time period 0 to 90 days p/s. The intra-patient diversity increased gradually in all non-structural genes over the first year of HIV-1 infection, which was evident from the vif mean intra-patient diversity of 0.46% (95% CI; 0.28 to 0.64), vpr 0.44% (95% CI; 0.24 to 0.64), vpu 0.84% (95% CI; 0.55 to 1.13), tat exon 1 0.35% (95% CI; 0.14 to 0.56 ) and rev exon 1 0.42% (95% CI; 0.18 to 0.66) during the time period of 181 to 500 days p/s. There was a statistically significant increase in viral diversity for vif (p = 0.013) and vpu (p = 0.002). No associations between levels of viral diversity within the non-structural genes and HIV-1 RNA load during primary infection were found. The study details the dynamics of the non-structural viral genes during the early stages of HIV-1C infection.

  8. Respiratory syncytial virus fusion glycoprotein: nucleotide sequence of mRNA, identification of cleavage activation site and amino acid sequence of N-terminus of F1 subunit.

    PubMed Central

    Elango, N; Satake, M; Coligan, J E; Norrby, E; Camargo, E; Venkatesan, S

    1985-01-01

    The amino acid sequence of respiratory syncytial virus fusion protein (Fo) was deduced from the sequence of a partial cDNA clone of mRNA and from the 5' mRNA sequence obtained by primer extension and dideoxysequencing. The encoded protein of 574 amino acids is extremely hydrophobic and has a molecular weight of 63371 daltons. The site of proteolytic cleavage within this protein was accurately mapped by determining a partial amino acid sequence of the N-terminus of the larger subunit (F1) purified by radioimmunoprecipitation using monoclonal antibodies. Alignment of the N-terminus of the F1 subunit within the deduced amino acid sequence of Fo permitted us to identify a sequence of lys-lys-arg-lys-arg-arg at the C-terminus of the smaller N-terminal F2 subunit that appears to represent the cleavage/activation domain. Five potential sites of glycosylation, four within the F2 subunit, were also identified. Three extremely hydrophobic domains are present in the protein; a) the N-terminal signal sequence, b) the N-terminus of the F1 subunit that is analogous to the N-terminus of the paramyxovirus F1 subunit and the HA2 subunit of influenza virus hemagglutinin, and c) the putative membrane anchorage domain near the C-terminus of F1. Images PMID:2987829

  9. A d-Amino Acid at the N-Terminus of a Protein Abrogates Its Degradation by the N-End Rule Pathway

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Eukaryotes have evolved the ubiquitin (Ub)/proteasome system to degrade polypeptides. The Ub/proteasome system is one way that cells regulate cytosolic protein and amino acids levels through the recognition and ubiquitination of a protein’s N-terminus via E1, E2, and E3 enzymes. The process by which the N-terminus stimulates intracellular protein degradation is referred to as the N-end rule. Characterization of the N-end rule has been limited to only the natural l-amino acids. Using a cytosolic delivery platform derived from anthrax lethal toxin, we probed the stability of mixed chirality proteins, containing one d-amino acid on the N-terminus of otherwise all l-proteins. In all cases, we observed that one N-terminal d-amino acid stabilized the cargo protein to proteasomal degradation with respect to the N-end rule. We found that since the mixed chirality proteins were not polyubiquitinated, they evaded N-end-mediated proteasomal degradation. Evidently, a subtle change on the N-terminus of a natural protein can enhance its intracellular lifetime. PMID:26807441

  10. Abnormal Methylation Status of the GNAS Exon 1A Region in Pseudohypohyperparathyroidism Combined With Turner Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jie; Wang, Dong; Ren, An; Xing, Yan; Zhang, Dongliang; Wei, Jun; Yu, Ning; Xing, Xuenong; Ye, Shandong

    2015-12-01

    Pseudohypohyperparathyroidism (PHHP) is a rare type of pseudohypoparathyroidism (PHP), which seems to have a normal skeletal response to parathyroid hormone but shows renal resistance. Almost all patients with PHHP have PHP Ib, a subtype of PHP that is usually caused by GNAS methylation defects, often in exon 1A. Some features of Albright hereditary osteodystrophy can occasionally be found in patients with PHHP, but these features are also common in Turner syndrome. The authors report on an extremely rare case of a patient with PHHP and Turner syndrome, a 47-year-old woman who sought medical attention for hypocalcemia and elevated parathyroid hormone. She had no family history of hypocalcemia and no STX16 gene deletions. She had a mosaic karyotype of 46, X, del(X)(p11.4)/45, XO. Pyrosequencing was performed to determine the GNAS exon 1A methylation. The degree of methylation found in exon 1A of the patient was lower than her unaffected relatives.

  11. Synaptotagmin I delays the fast inactivation of Kv1.4 channel through interaction with its N-terminus

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The voltage-gated potassium channel Kv1.4 is an important A-type potassium channel and modulates the excitability of neurons in central nervous system. Analysis of the interaction between Kv1.4 and its interacting proteins is helpful to elucidate the function and mechanism of the channel. Results In the present research, synaptotagmin I was for the first time demonstrated to be an interacting protein of Kv1.4 and its interaction with Kv1.4 channel did not require the mediation of other synaptic proteins. Using patch-clamp technique, synaptotagmin I was found to delay the inactivation of Kv1.4 in HEK293T cells in a Ca2+-dependent manner, and this interaction was proven to have specificity. Mutagenesis experiments indicated that synaptotagmin I interacted with the N-terminus of Kv1.4 and thus delayed its N-type fast inactivation. Conclusion These data suggest that synaptotagmin I is an interacting protein of Kv1.4 channel and, as a negative modulator, may play an important role in regulating neuronal excitability and synaptic efficacy. PMID:24423395

  12. Posttranslational modification at the N terminus of the human adenovirus type 12 E1A 235R tumor antigen.

    PubMed Central

    Lucher, L A; Brackmann, K H; Symington, J S; Green, M

    1986-01-01

    The adenovirus E1A transforming region, which encodes immortalization, partial cell transformation, and gene activation functions, expresses two early mRNAs, 13S and 12S. Multiple-T antigen species with different electrophoretic mobilities are formed from each mRNA, presumably by unknown posttranslational modifications. The adenovirus type 12 (Ad12) 13S and 12S mRNAs encode E1A T antigens of 266 and 235 amino acid residues (266R and 235R), respectively. To study possible posttranslational processing at the N and C termini and to distinguish between the Ad12 266R and 235R T antigens, we prepared antibodies targeted to synthetic peptides encoded at the common C (peptide 204) and N (peptide 202) termini of the 266R and 235R T antigens and at the unique internal domain of the 266R T antigen (peptide 206). The specificity of each anti-peptide antibody was confirmed by immunoprecipitation of the 266R and 235R T antigens produced in Escherichia coli. Immunoprecipitation analysis of the E1A T antigens synthesized in Ad12-infected KB cells revealed the following. Antibody to the common C terminus recognized three T antigens with apparent Mrs of 43,000, 42,000, and 39,000 (43K, 42K, and 39K). All three forms were phosphorylated and were present in both the nucleus and the cytoplasm. The 43K and 42K T antigens were rapidly synthesized during a 10-min pulse with [35S]methionine in Ad12-infected cells. The 43K T antigen had a half-life of 20 min, the 42K T antigen had a longer half-life of about 40 min, and the 39K T antigen became the predominant E1A T antigen. Antibodies to the unique region immunoprecipitated the 43K T antigen but not the 42K and 39K T antigens. Antibody to the N terminus immunoprecipitated the 43K and 42K T antigens but not the 39K T antigen, suggesting that the 39K T antigen possessed a modified N terminus. Partial N-terminal amino acid sequence analysis showed that the 43K and 42K T antigens contain methionine at residues 1 and 5, as predicted from the

  13. Identification of a Novel Coregulator, SH3YL1, That Interacts With the Androgen Receptor N-Terminus

    PubMed Central

    Blessing, Alicia M.; Ganesan, Sathya; Rajapakshe, Kimal; Ying Sung, Ying; Reddy Bollu, Lakshmi; Shi, Yan; Cheung, Edwin; Coarfa, Cristian; Chang, Jeffrey T.; McDonnell, Donald P.

    2015-01-01

    Nuclear receptor (NR)-mediated transcriptional activity is a dynamic process that is regulated by the binding of ligands that induce distinct conformational changes in the NR. These structural alterations lead to the differential recruitment of coregulators (coactivators or corepressors) that control the expression of NR-regulated genes. Here, we show that a stretch of proline residues located within the N-terminus of androgen receptor (AR) is a bona fide coregulator binding surface, the disruption of which reduces the androgen-dependent proliferation and migration of prostate cancer (PCa) cells. Using T7 phage display, we identified a novel AR-interacting protein, Src homology 3 (SH3)-domain containing, Ysc84-like 1 (SH3YL1), whose interaction with the receptor is dependent upon this polyproline domain. As with mutations within the AR polyproline domain, knockdown of SH3YL1 attenuated androgen-mediated cell growth and migration. RNA expression analysis revealed that SH3YL1 was required for the induction of a subset of AR-modulated genes. Notable was the observation that ubinuclein 1 (UBN1), a key member of a histone H3.3 chaperone complex, was a transcriptional target of the AR/SH3YL1 complex, correlated with aggressive PCa in patients, and was necessary for the maximal androgen-mediated proliferation and migration of PCa cells. Collectively, these data highlight the importance of an amino-terminal activation domain, its associated coregulator, and downstream transcriptional targets in regulating cellular processes of pathological importance in PCa. PMID:26305679

  14. Atomic Structure and Biochemical Characterization of an RNA Endonuclease in the N Terminus of Andes Virus L Protein

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-García, Yaiza; Reguera, Juan; Busch, Carola; Witte, Gregor; Sánchez-Ramos, Oliberto; Betzel, Christian; Cusack, Stephen; Günther, Stephan; Reindl, Sophia

    2016-01-01

    Andes virus (ANDV) is a human-pathogenic hantavirus. Hantaviruses presumably initiate their mRNA synthesis by using cap structures derived from host cell mRNAs, a mechanism called cap-snatching. A signature for a cap-snatching endonuclease is present in the N terminus of hantavirus L proteins. In this study, we aimed to solve the atomic structure of the ANDV endonuclease and characterize its biochemical features. However, the wild-type protein was refractory to expression in Escherichia coli, presumably due to toxic enzyme activity. To circumvent this problem, we introduced attenuating mutations in the domain that were previously shown to enhance L protein expression in mammalian cells. Using this approach, 13 mutant proteins encompassing ANDV L protein residues 1–200 were successfully expressed and purified. Protein stability and nuclease activity of the mutants was analyzed and the crystal structure of one mutant was solved to a resolution of 2.4 Å. Shape in solution was determined by small angle X-ray scattering. The ANDV endonuclease showed structural similarities to related enzymes of orthobunya-, arena-, and orthomyxoviruses, but also differences such as elongated shape and positively charged patches surrounding the active site. The enzyme was dependent on manganese, which is bound to the active site, most efficiently cleaved single-stranded RNA substrates, did not cleave DNA, and could be inhibited by known endonuclease inhibitors. The atomic structure in conjunction with stability and activity data for the 13 mutant enzymes facilitated inference of structure–function relationships in the protein. In conclusion, we solved the structure of a hantavirus cap-snatching endonuclease, elucidated its catalytic properties, and present a highly active mutant form, which allows for inhibitor screening. PMID:27300328

  15. The syntaxin 4 N terminus regulates its basolateral targeting by munc18c-dependent and -independent mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Torres, Jacqueline; Funk, Holly M; Zegers, Mirjam M P; ter Beest, Martin B A

    2011-03-25

    To generate and maintain epithelial cell polarity, specific sorting of proteins into vesicles destined for the apical and basolateral domain is required. Syntaxin 3 and 4 are apical and basolateral SNARE proteins important for the specificity of vesicle fusion at the apical and basolateral plasma membrane domains, respectively, but how these proteins are specifically targeted to these domains themselves is unclear. Munc18/SM proteins are potential regulators of this process. Like syntaxins, they are crucial for exocytosis and vesicle fusion. However, how munc18c and syntaxin 4 regulate the function of each other is unclear. Here, we investigated the requirement of syntaxin 4 in the delivery of basolateral membrane and secretory proteins, the basolateral targeting of syntaxin 4, and the role of munc18c in this targeting. Depletion of syntaxin 4 resulted in significant reduction of basolateral targeting, suggesting no compensation by other syntaxin forms. Mutational analysis identified amino acids Leu-25 and to a lesser extent Val-26 as essential for correct localization of syntaxin 4. Recently, it was shown that the N-terminal peptide of syntaxin 4 is involved in binding to munc18c. A mutation in this region that affects munc18c binding shows that munc18c binding is required for stabilization of syntaxin 4 at the plasma membrane but not for its correct targeting. We conclude that the N terminus serves two functions in membrane targeting. First, it harbors the sorting motif, which targets syntaxin 4 basolaterally in a munc18c-independent manner and second, it allows for munc18c binding, which stabilizes the protein in a munc18c-dependent manner.

  16. Atomic Structure and Biochemical Characterization of an RNA Endonuclease in the N Terminus of Andes Virus L Protein.

    PubMed

    Fernández-García, Yaiza; Reguera, Juan; Busch, Carola; Witte, Gregor; Sánchez-Ramos, Oliberto; Betzel, Christian; Cusack, Stephen; Günther, Stephan; Reindl, Sophia

    2016-06-01

    Andes virus (ANDV) is a human-pathogenic hantavirus. Hantaviruses presumably initiate their mRNA synthesis by using cap structures derived from host cell mRNAs, a mechanism called cap-snatching. A signature for a cap-snatching endonuclease is present in the N terminus of hantavirus L proteins. In this study, we aimed to solve the atomic structure of the ANDV endonuclease and characterize its biochemical features. However, the wild-type protein was refractory to expression in Escherichia coli, presumably due to toxic enzyme activity. To circumvent this problem, we introduced attenuating mutations in the domain that were previously shown to enhance L protein expression in mammalian cells. Using this approach, 13 mutant proteins encompassing ANDV L protein residues 1-200 were successfully expressed and purified. Protein stability and nuclease activity of the mutants was analyzed and the crystal structure of one mutant was solved to a resolution of 2.4 Å. Shape in solution was determined by small angle X-ray scattering. The ANDV endonuclease showed structural similarities to related enzymes of orthobunya-, arena-, and orthomyxoviruses, but also differences such as elongated shape and positively charged patches surrounding the active site. The enzyme was dependent on manganese, which is bound to the active site, most efficiently cleaved single-stranded RNA substrates, did not cleave DNA, and could be inhibited by known endonuclease inhibitors. The atomic structure in conjunction with stability and activity data for the 13 mutant enzymes facilitated inference of structure-function relationships in the protein. In conclusion, we solved the structure of a hantavirus cap-snatching endonuclease, elucidated its catalytic properties, and present a highly active mutant form, which allows for inhibitor screening.

  17. Folding Landscape of Mutant Huntingtin Exon1: Diffusible Multimers, Oligomers and Fibrils, and No Detectable Monomer

    PubMed Central

    Sahoo, Bankanidhi; Arduini, Irene; Drombosky, Kenneth W.; Kodali, Ravindra; Sanders, Laurie H.; Greenamyre, J. Timothy; Wetzel, Ronald

    2016-01-01

    Expansion of the polyglutamine (polyQ) track of the Huntingtin (HTT) protein above 36 is associated with a sharply enhanced risk of Huntington’s disease (HD). Although there is general agreement that HTT toxicity resides primarily in N-terminal fragments such as the HTT exon1 protein, there is no consensus on the nature of the physical states of HTT exon1 that are induced by polyQ expansion, nor on which of these states might be responsible for toxicity. One hypothesis is that polyQ expansion induces an alternative, toxic conformation in the HTT exon1 monomer. Alternative hypotheses posit that the toxic species is one of several possible aggregated states. Defining the nature of the toxic species is particularly challenging because of facile interconversion between physical states as well as challenges to identifying these states, especially in vivo. Here we describe the use of fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) to characterize the detailed time and repeat length dependent self-association of HTT exon1-like fragments both with chemically synthesized peptides in vitro and with cell-produced proteins in extracts and in living cells. We find that, in vitro, mutant HTT exon1 peptides engage in polyQ repeat length dependent dimer and tetramer formation, followed by time dependent formation of diffusible spherical and fibrillar oligomers and finally by larger, sedimentable amyloid fibrils. For expanded polyQ HTT exon1 expressed in PC12 cells, monomers are absent, with tetramers being the smallest molecular form detected, followed in the incubation time course by small, diffusible aggregates at 6–9 hours and larger, sedimentable aggregates that begin to build up at 12 hrs. In these cell cultures, significant nuclear DNA damage appears by 6 hours, followed at later times by caspase 3 induction, mitochondrial dysfunction, and cell death. Our data thus defines limits on the sizes and concentrations of different physical states of HTT exon1 along the reaction

  18. The N terminus of type III secretion needle protein YscF from Yersinia pestis functions to modulate innate immune responses.

    PubMed

    Osei-Owusu, Patrick; Jessen Condry, Danielle L; Toosky, Melody; Roughead, William; Bradley, David S; Nilles, Matthew L

    2015-04-01

    The type III secretion system is employed by many pathogens, including the genera Yersinia, Shigella, Pseudomonas, and Salmonella, to deliver effector proteins into eukaryotic cells. The injectisome needle is formed by the polymerization of a single protein, e.g., YscF (Yersinia pestis), PscF (Pseudomonas aeruginosa), PrgI (Salmonella enterica SPI-1), SsaG (Salmonella enterica SPI-2), or MxiH (Shigella flexneri). In this study, we demonstrated that the N termini of some needle proteins, particularly the N terminus of YscF from Yersinia pestis, influences host immune responses. The N termini of several needle proteins were truncated and tested for the ability to induce inflammatory responses in a human monocytic cell line (THP-1 cells). Truncated needle proteins induced proinflammatory cytokines to different magnitudes than the corresponding wild-type proteins, except SsaG. Notably, N-terminally truncated YscF induced significantly higher activation of NF-κB and/or AP-1 and higher induction of proinflammatory cytokines, suggesting that a function of the N terminus of YscF is interference with host sensing of YscF, consistent with Y. pestis pathogenesis. To directly test the ability of the N terminus of YscF to suppress cytokine induction, a YscF-SsaG chimera with 15 N-terminal amino acids from YscF added to SsaG was constructed. The chimeric YscF-SsaG induced lower levels of cytokines than wild-type SsaG. However, the addition of 15 random amino acids to SsaG had no effect on NF-κB/AP-1 activation. These results suggest that the N terminus of YscF can function to decrease cytokine induction, perhaps contributing to a favorable immune environment leading to survival of Y. pestis within the eukaryotic host.

  19. The N Terminus of Type III Secretion Needle Protein YscF from Yersinia pestis Functions To Modulate Innate Immune Responses

    PubMed Central

    Osei-Owusu, Patrick; Jessen Condry, Danielle L.; Toosky, Melody; Roughead, William; Bradley, David S.

    2015-01-01

    The type III secretion system is employed by many pathogens, including the genera Yersinia, Shigella, Pseudomonas, and Salmonella, to deliver effector proteins into eukaryotic cells. The injectisome needle is formed by the polymerization of a single protein, e.g., YscF (Yersinia pestis), PscF (Pseudomonas aeruginosa), PrgI (Salmonella enterica SPI-1), SsaG (Salmonella enterica SPI-2), or MxiH (Shigella flexneri). In this study, we demonstrated that the N termini of some needle proteins, particularly the N terminus of YscF from Yersinia pestis, influences host immune responses. The N termini of several needle proteins were truncated and tested for the ability to induce inflammatory responses in a human monocytic cell line (THP-1 cells). Truncated needle proteins induced proinflammatory cytokines to different magnitudes than the corresponding wild-type proteins, except SsaG. Notably, N-terminally truncated YscF induced significantly higher activation of NF-κB and/or AP-1 and higher induction of proinflammatory cytokines, suggesting that a function of the N terminus of YscF is interference with host sensing of YscF, consistent with Y. pestis pathogenesis. To directly test the ability of the N terminus of YscF to suppress cytokine induction, a YscF-SsaG chimera with 15 N-terminal amino acids from YscF added to SsaG was constructed. The chimeric YscF-SsaG induced lower levels of cytokines than wild-type SsaG. However, the addition of 15 random amino acids to SsaG had no effect on NF-κB/AP-1 activation. These results suggest that the N terminus of YscF can function to decrease cytokine induction, perhaps contributing to a favorable immune environment leading to survival of Y. pestis within the eukaryotic host. PMID:25644012

  20. PtdIns(4,5)P2 interacts with CaM binding domains on TRPM3 N-terminus.

    PubMed

    Holendova, Blanka; Grycova, Lenka; Jirku, Michaela; Teisinger, Jan

    2012-01-01

    TRPM3 has been reported to play an important role in Ca(2+) homeostasis, but its gating mechanisms and regulation via Ca(2+) are unknown. Ca(2+) binding proteins such as calmodulin (CaM) could be probable modulators of this ion channel. We have shown that this protein binds to two independent domains, A35-K124 and H291-G382 on the TRPM3 N-terminus, which contain conserved hydrophobic as well as positively charged residues in specific positions, and that these residues have a crucial impact on its binding. We also showed that the other Ca(2+) binding protein, S100A1, is able to bind to these regions and that CaM and S100A1 compete for these binding sites on the TRPM3 N-terminus. Moreover, our results suggest that another very important TRP channel activity modulator, PtdIns(4,5)P(2), interacts with the CaM/S100A1 binding sites on the TRPM3 N-terminus with high affinity.

  1. Importance of two consecutive methionines at the N-terminus of a cellulose synthase (PtdCesA8A) for normal wood cellulose synthesis in aspen.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yunxia; Xu, Fuyu; Gou, Jiqing; Al-Haddad, Jameel; Telewski, Frank W; Bae, Hyeun-Jong; Joshi, Chandrashekhar P

    2012-11-01

    All known orthologs of a secondary wall-associated cellulose synthase (CesA) gene from Arabidopsis, AtCesA8, encode CesA proteins with two consecutive methionines at their N-termini (MM or 2M). Here, we report that these 2Ms in an aspen ortholog of AtCesA8, PtdCesA8A, are important for maintaining normal wood cellulose biosynthesis in aspen trees. Overexpression of an altered PtdCesA8A cDNA encoding a PtdCesA8A protein missing one methionine at the N-terminus (1M) in aspen resulted in substantial decrease in cellulose content and caused negative effects on wood strength, suggesting that both methionines are essential for proper CesA expression and function in developing xylem tissues. Transcripts from a pair of paralogous native PtdCesA8 genes, as well as introduced PtdCesA8A:1M transgenes were significantly reduced in developing xylem tissues of transgenic aspen plants, suggestive of a co-suppression event. Overexpression of a native PtdCesA8A cDNA encoding a CesA protein with 2Ms at the N-terminus did not cause any such phenotypic changes. These results suggest the importance of 2Ms present at the N-terminus of PtdCesA8A protein during cellulose synthesis in aspen.

  2. The N-terminus of the Montano virus nucleocapsid protein possesses broadly cross-reactive conformation-dependent epitopes conserved in rodent-borne hantaviruses.

    PubMed

    Saasa, Ngonda; Yoshida, Haruka; Shimizu, Kenta; Sánchez-Hernández, Cornelio; Romero-Almaraz, María de Lourdes; Koma, Takaaki; Sanada, Takahiro; Seto, Takahiro; Yoshii, Kentaro; Ramos, Celso; Yoshimatsu, Kumiko; Arikawa, Jiro; Takashima, Ikuo; Kariwa, Hiroaki

    2012-06-20

    The hantavirus nucleocapsid (N) protein is an important immunogen that stimulates a strong and cross-reactive immune response in humans and rodents. A large proportion of the response to N protein has been found to target its N-terminus. However, the exact nature of this bias towards the N-terminus is not yet fully understood. We characterized six monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) against the N protein of Montano virus (MTNV), a Mexican hantavirus. Five of these mAbs recognized eight American hantaviruses and six European and Asian hantaviruses, but not the Soricomorpha-borne Thottapalayam hantavirus. The N protein-reactive binding regions of the five mAbs were mapped to discontinuous epitopes within the N-terminal 13-51 amino acid residues, while a single serotype-specific mAb was mapped to residues 1-25 and 49-75. Our findings suggest that discontinuous epitopes at the N-terminus are conserved, at least in rodent-borne hantaviruses, and that they contribute considerably to N protein cross-reactivity.

  3. The membrane insertion of helical antimicrobial peptides from the N-terminus of Helicobacter pylori ribosomal protein L1.

    PubMed

    Lee, Tzong-Hsien; Hall, Kristopher N; Swann, Marcus J; Popplewell, Jonathan F; Unabia, Sharon; Park, Yoonkyung; Hahm, Kyung-Soo; Aguilar, Marie-Isabel

    2010-03-01

    The interaction of two helical antimicrobial peptides, HPA3 and HPA3P with planar supported lipid membranes was quantitatively analysed using two complementary optical biosensors. The peptides are analogues of Hp(2-20) derived from the N-terminus of Helicobacter pylori ribosomal protein L1 (RpL1). The binding of these two peptide analogues to zwitterionic dimyristoyl-phosphatidylcholine (DMPC) and negatively charged membranes composed of DMPC/dimyristoylphosphatidylglycerol (DMPG) (4:1) was determined using surface plasmon resonance (SPR) and dual polarisation interferometry (DPI). Using SPR analysis, it was shown that the proline substitution in HPA3P resulted in much lower binding for both zwitterionic and anionic membranes than HPA3. Structural changes in the planar DMPC and DMPC/DMPG (4:1) bilayers induced by the binding of both Hp(2-20) analogues were then resolved in real-time with DPI. The overall process of peptide-induced changes in membrane structure was analysed by the real-time changes in bound peptide mass as a function of bilayer birefringence. The insertion of both HPA3 and HPA3P into the supported lipid bilayers resulted in a decrease in birefringence with increasing amounts of bound peptide which reflects a decrease in the order of the bilayer. The binding of HPA3 to each membrane was associated with a higher level of bound peptide and greater membrane lipid disordering and a faster and higher degree of insertion into the membrane than HPA3P. Furthermore, the binding of both HPA3 and HPA3P to negatively charged DMPC/DMPG bilayers also leads to a greater disruption of the lipid ordering. These results demonstrate the geometrical changes in the membrane upon peptide insertion and the extent of membrane structural changes can be obtained quantitatively. Moreover, monitoring the effect of peptides on a structurally characterised bilayer has provided further insight into the role of membrane structure changes in the molecular basis of peptide

  4. A homozygous deletion of exon 1 in WISP3 causes progressive pseudorheumatoid dysplasia in two siblings

    PubMed Central

    Neerinckx, Barbara; Thues, Cedric; Wouters, Carine; Lechner, Sarah; Westhovens, Rene; Van Esch, Hilde

    2015-01-01

    Progressive pseudorheumatoid dysplasia (PPD) is a rare autosomal recessive disease that causes progressive joint stiffness and pain. It is associated with loss-of-function mutations in the WISP3 gene. We describe two sisters suffering from PPD in whom molecular genetic analysis revealed a homozygous deletion of exon 1 and of the 5′UTR of the WISP3 gene. This is the first time that a gross deletion has been described as the causal mutation in PPD. PMID:27081554

  5. Molecular Interaction between the Chaperone Hsc70 and the N-terminal Flank of Huntingtin Exon 1 Modulates Aggregation*

    PubMed Central

    Monsellier, Elodie; Redeker, Virginie; Ruiz-Arlandis, Gemma; Bousset, Luc; Melki, Ronald

    2015-01-01

    The aggregation of polyglutamine (polyQ)-containing proteins is at the origin of nine neurodegenerative diseases. Molecular chaperones prevent the aggregation of polyQ-containing proteins. The exact mechanism by which they interact with polyQ-containing, aggregation-prone proteins and interfere with their assembly is unknown. Here we dissect the mechanism of interaction between a huntingtin exon 1 fragment of increasing polyQ lengths (HttEx1Qn), the aggregation of which is tightly associated with Huntington's disease, and molecular chaperone Hsc70. We show that Hsc70, together with its Hsp40 co-chaperones, inhibits HttEx1Qn aggregation and modifies the structural, seeding, and infectious properties of the resulting fibrils in a polyQ-independent manner. We demonstrate that Hsc70 binds the 17-residue-long N-terminal flank of HttEx1Qn, and we map Hsc70-HttEx1Qn surface interfaces at the residue level. Finally, we show that this interaction competes with homotypic interactions between the N termini of different HttEx1Qn molecules that trigger the aggregation process. Our results lay the foundations of future therapeutic strategies targeting huntingtin aggregation in Huntington disease. PMID:25505179

  6. The long N-terminus of the human monocarboxylate transporter 8 is a target of ubiquitin-dependent proteasomal degradation which regulates protein expression and oligomerization capacity.

    PubMed

    Zwanziger, Denise; Schmidt, Mathias; Fischer, Jana; Kleinau, Gunnar; Braun, Doreen; Schweizer, Ulrich; Moeller, Lars Christian; Biebermann, Heike; Fuehrer, Dagmar

    2016-10-15

    Monocarboxylate transporter 8 (MCT8) equilibrates thyroid hormones between the extra- and the intracellular sides. MCT8 exists either with a short or a long N-terminus, but potential functional differences between both variants are yet not known. We, therefore, generated MCT8 constructs which are different in N-terminal length: MCT8(1-613), MCT8(25-613), MCT8(49-613) and MCT8(75-613). The M75G substitution prevents translation of MCT8(75-613) and ensures expression of full-length MCT8 protein. The K56G substitution was made to prevent ubiquitinylation. Cell-surface expression, localization and proteasomal degradation were investigated using C-terminally GFP-tagged MCT8 constructs (HEK293 and MDCK1 cells) and oligomerization capacity was determined using N-terminally HA- and C-terminally FLAG-tagged MCT8 constructs (COS7 cells). MCT8(1-613)-GFP showed a lower protein expression than the shorter MCT8(75-613)-GFP protein. The proteasome inhibitor lactacystin increased MCT8(1-613)-GFP protein amount, suggesting proteasomal degradation of MCT8 with the long N-terminus. Ubiquitin conjugation of MCT8(1-613)-GFP was found by immuno-precipitation. A diminished ubiquitin conjugation caused by K56G substitution resulted in increased MCT8(1-613)-GFP protein expression. Sandwich ELISA was performed to investigate if the bands at higher molecular weight observed in Western blot analysis are due to MCT8 oligomerization, which was indeed shown. Our data imply a role of the long N-terminus of MCT8 as target of ubiquitin-dependent proteasomal degradation affecting MCT8 amount and subsequently oligomerization capacity.

  7. Fusing the vegetative insecticidal protein Vip3Aa7 and the N terminus of Cry9Ca improves toxicity against Plutella xylostella larvae.

    PubMed

    Dong, Fang; Shi, Ruiping; Zhang, Shanshan; Zhan, Tao; Wu, Gaobing; Shen, Jie; Liu, Ziduo

    2012-11-01

    Bacillus thuringiensis insecticidal crystal proteins (ICPs) and vegetative insecticidal proteins (VIPs) have been widely used as a kind of safe bio-insecticides. A problem that has been of concern worldwide is how to improve their insecticidal activities. In this study, to determine the synergism between VIPs and ICPs effect on insecticidal activity, a construct that produces a chimeric protein of the Vip3Aa7 and the N terminus ofCry9Ca, named V3AC9C, was expressed in Escherichia coli BL21 cells. In additional experiments, the V3AC9C chimeric protein, the single Vip3Aa7, and the single N terminus of Cry9Ca were treated with trypsin. SDS-PAGE showed that the V3AC9C could be processed into two single toxins. Bioassays tested on third instar larvae of Plutella xylostella showed that the toxicity of the chimeric protein was markedly better than either of the single toxins. Interestingly, the toxicity of the chimeric protein was 3.2-fold higher than a mixture of the Vip3Aa7 and Cry9Ca toxins (mass ratio of 1:1). The synergism factor (SF) of chimeric protein containing Vip3Aa7 and Cry9Ca was calculated to be 4.79. The SF in mixture of toxins is only 1.46. Hence, the effect was more than the sum of the Vip3Aa7 and Cry9C activities. Analysis of the protein's solubility showed that the Vip3Aa7 helped the N terminus of Cry9Ca to dissolve in an alkaline buffer. It was concluded that the increase in the toxicity of the V3AC9C chimeric protein over the constituent proteins mainly resulted from this increase in solubility. These results lay a foundation for the development of a new generation of bio-insecticides and multi-gene transgenic plants.

  8. Tissue-specific expression of the human aromatase cytochrome P-450 gene by alternative use of multiple exons 1 and promoters, and switching of tissue-specific exons 1 in carcinogenesis.

    PubMed Central

    Harada, N; Utsumi, T; Takagi, Y

    1993-01-01

    Extensive screening of aromatase cDNA was carried out in cDNA libraries from various human tissues. The DNA sequences of all the isolated cDNA clones were identical in the region encoded by exons 2-10 of the aromatase gene. However, tissue-specific sequences, which were classified into four groups, were observed in the 5' portions of the clones corresponding to the region encoded by exon 1. All of them were also found in clones isolated from a human genomic library and mapped between exons 1 and 2 of the human aromatase gene reported previously, suggesting the presence of multiple exons 1 and promoters in the gene. Reverse transcription-PCR analyses of aromatase mRNAs in various tissues revealed that aromatase transcripts are tissue-specifically spliced by alternative use of multiple exons 1, although minor forms of the transcripts were also present in each tissue. Aromatase mRNA is spliced from 10 exons in most tissues, but from 9 exons in the prostate and from 10 or 11 exons in the placenta. This suggests that tissue-specific regulation of the aromatase gene in various tissues may be explained by alternative use of multiple exons 1 flanked with tissue-specific promoters. The alternative use of multiple exons 1 for liver transcripts was found to change developmentally. Furthermore, switch from an adipose-specific exon 1 to another type of exon 1 was observed in aromatase transcripts of adipose tissues of three of five breast cancer patients. Images Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:8248245

  9. Absence of the exon 1 coding sequence of the androgen receptor gene associated with teratozoospermia in a Brazilian population.

    PubMed

    Mesquita, W E J C; Approbato, M S; Moura, K K V O; Jesuíno, R S A

    2009-11-24

    The androgen receptor (AR) is a protein encoded by the AR gene, which when mutated may affect spermatogenesis, the process in which spermatozoa are produced; thus, AR mutations could lead to male infertility. We examined exon 1 of the AR gene in men with idiopathic infertility. Blood or semen samples from 111 infertile, oligozoospermic (N = 31), asthenozoospermic (N = 23), teratozoospermic (N = 33), and azoospermic (N = 24) men were analyzed. The extracted DNA was amplified for the exon 1 region of the AR gene. There was a significant correlation between the absence of exon 1 in the AR gene and spermatogenesis defects (P = 0.015). This association was significant in teratozoospermic men (51.5% of the sample). We found that lack of amplification of exon 1 of the AR gene by polymerase chain reaction is associated with morphological defects in the spermogram.

  10. NMR structure and functional characteristics of the hydrophilic N terminus of the potassium channel beta-subunit Kvbeta1.1.

    PubMed

    Wissmann, R; Baukrowitz, T; Kalbacher, H; Kalbitzer, H R; Ruppersberg, J P; Pongs, O; Antz, C; Fakler, B

    1999-12-10

    Rapid N-type inactivation of voltage-dependent potassium (Kv) channels controls membrane excitability and signal propagation in central neurons and is mediated by protein domains (inactivation gates) occluding the open channel pore from the cytoplasmic side. Inactivation domains (ID) are donated either by the pore-forming alpha-subunit or certain auxiliary beta-subunits. Upon coexpression, Kvbeta1.1 was found to endow non-inactivating members of the Kv1alpha family with fast inactivation via its unique N terminus. Here we investigated structure and functional properties of the Kvbeta1.1 N terminus (amino acids 1-62, betaN-(1-62)) using NMR spectroscopy and patch clamp recordings. betaN-(1-62) showed all hallmarks of N-type inactivation: it inactivated non-inactivating Kv1.1 channels when applied to the cytoplasmic side as a synthetic peptide, and its interaction with the alpha-subunit was competed with tetraethylammonium and displayed an affinity in the lower micromolar range. In aequous and physiological salt solution, betaN-(1-62) showed no well defined three-dimensional structure, it rather existed in a fast equilibrium of multiple weakly structured states. These structural and functional properties of betaN-(1-62) closely resemble those of the "unstructured" ID from Shaker B, but differ markedly from those of the compactly folded ID of the Kv3.4 alpha-subunit.

  11. Conserved amino acids within the N-terminus of the West Nile virus NS4A protein contribute to virus replication, protein stability and membrane proliferation

    SciTech Connect

    Ambrose, R.L.; Mackenzie, J.M.

    2015-07-15

    The West Nile virus strain Kunjin virus (WNV{sub KUN}) NS4A protein is a multifunctional protein involved in many aspects of the virus life-cycle and is a major component of the WNV{sub KUN} replication complex (RC). Previously we identified a conserved region in the C-terminus of NS4A regulating proteolytic processing and RC assembly, and now investigate key conserved residues in the N-terminus of NS4A and their contribution to WNV{sub KUN} replication. Mutation of P13 completely ablated replication, whereas, mutation of P48 and D49, near the first transmembrane helix, and G66 within the helix, showed variable defects in replication, virion secretion and membrane proliferation. Intriguingly, the P48 and G66 NS4A mutants resulted in specific proteasome depletion of NS4A that could in part be rescued with a proteasome inhibitor. Our results suggest that the N-terminus of NS4A contributes to correct folding and stability, essential for facilitating the essential roles of NS4A during replication. - Highlights: • Mutation of Proline13 of the WNV NS4A protein is lethal to replication. • 1st TMB helix of NS4A contributes to protein stability and membrane remodelling. • Unstable mutants of NS4A can be rescued with a proteasome inhibitor. • This study (and of others) contributes to a functional mapping of the NS4A protein.

  12. Sequence requirements for transcriptional arrest in exon 1 of the murine adenosine deaminase gene.

    PubMed Central

    Ramamurthy, V; Maa, M C; Harless, M L; Wright, D A; Kellems, R E

    1990-01-01

    We have previously shown that a transcription arrest site near the 5' end of the murine adenosine deaminase (ADA) gene is significantly involved in the regulation of ADA gene expression. To facilitate the analysis of this transcription arrest site, we have analyzed the transcription products from cloned ADA gene fragments injected into Xenopus laevis oocytes. When genomic fragments spanning the 5' end of the ADA gene were injected into oocytes, a 96-nucleotide (nt) ADA RNA was the major transcription product. The 5' end of this RNA mapped to the transcription initiation site for the ADA gene, and its 3' terminus mapped 7 nt downstream of the translation initiation codon within exon 1. A 300-base-pair fragment of genomic DNA spanning the 5' end of the ADA gene was sufficient to generate the 96-nt transcript which accounted for approximately one-half of the transcription products from injected templates. Deletion of a segment of approximately 65 base pairs, located immediately downstream of the 3' terminus of the 96-nt transcript, resulted in a substantial reduction in the synthesis of the 96-nt transcript and a corresponding increase in the production of larger transcripts. These studies show that the transcriptional apparatus of X. laevis oocytes responds to the transcription arrest site associated with exon 1 of the murine ADA gene and that oocyte injections provide a convenient functional assay for additional mechanistic studies. Images PMID:1690842

  13. The Role of the N-terminus of Mammalian Copper Transporter 1 in the Cellular Accumulation of Cisplatin

    PubMed Central

    Larson, Christopher A.; Adams, Preston L.; Jandial, Danielle D.; Blair, Brian G.; Safaei, Roohangiz; Howell, Stephen B.

    2010-01-01

    The mammalian Copper Transporter 1 (CTR1) is responsible for the uptake of copper (Cu) from the extracellular space, and has been shown to play a major role in the initial accumulation of platinum-based drugs. In this study we re-expressed wild type and structural variants of hCTR1 in mouse embryo fibroblasts in which both alleles of mCTR1 had been knocked out (CTR1−/−) to examine the role of the N-terminal extracellular domain of hCTR1 in the accumulation of cisplatin (cDDP). Deletion of either the first 45 amino acids or just the 40MXXM45 motif in the N-terminal domain did not alter subcellular distribution or the amount of protein in the plasma membrane but it eliminated the ability of hCTR1 to mediate the uptake of Cu. In contrast it only partially reduced cDDP transport capacity. Neither of these structural changes prevented cDDP from triggering the rapid degradation of hCTR1. However, they did alter the potency of the cDDP that achieved cell entry, possibly reflecting the fact that hCTR1 may mediate the transport of cDDP both through the pore it forms in the plasma membrane and via endocytosis. We conclude that cDDP interacts with hCTR1 both at 40MXXM45 and at sites outside the N-terminal domain that produce the conformational changes that trigger degradation. PMID:20451502

  14. Inhibition of Huntingtin Exon-1 Aggregation by the Molecular Tweezer CLR01.

    PubMed

    Vöpel, Tobias; Bravo-Rodriguez, Kenny; Mittal, Sumit; Vachharajani, Shivang; Gnutt, David; Sharma, Abhishek; Steinhof, Anne; Fatoba, Oluwaseun; Ellrichmann, Gisa; Nshanian, Michael; Heid, Christian; Loo, Joseph A; Klärner, Frank-Gerrit; Schrader, Thomas; Bitan, Gal; Wanker, Erich E; Ebbinghaus, Simon; Sanchez-Garcia, Elsa

    2017-04-13

    Huntington's disease is a neurodegenerative disorder associated with the expansion of the polyglutamine tract in the exon-1 domain of the huntingtin protein (htt(e1)). Above a threshold of 37 glutamine residues, htt(e1) starts to aggregate in a nucleation-dependent manner. A 17-residue N-terminal fragment of htt(e1) (N17) has been suggested to play a crucial role in modulating the aggregation propensity and toxicity of htt(e1). Here we identify N17 as a potential target for novel therapeutic intervention using the molecular tweezer CLR01. A combination of biochemical experiments and computer simulations shows that binding of CLR01 induces structural rearrangements within the htt(e1) monomer and inhibits htt(e1) aggregation, underpinning the key role of N17 in modulating htt(e1) toxicity.

  15. Immunochemical detection of proteins related to the human c-myc exon 1.

    PubMed Central

    Gazin, C; Rigolet, M; Briand, J P; Van Regenmortel, M H; Galibert, F

    1986-01-01

    Published sequence data of the human c-myc gene indicate the presence of a coding capacity for a polypeptide of 188 residues within the first exon. Using antibodies raised against five synthetic peptides corresponding to different non-over-lapping parts of this polypeptide, two proteins of 32 kd and 58 kd antigenically related to the synthetic peptides have been detected in extracts of human cells. The confidence of this detection has been reinforced by showing that epitopes corresponding to different peptides were indeed located on the same molecule and that the 58 kd protein appears to be a dimeric form of the 32 kd protein. That these proteins originate from the first exon was indicated by: hybrid-arrested translation experiments followed by immunodetection of the translation products; in vitro translation of messenger RNA derived from cloned exon 1 by SP6 polymerase transcription. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. Fig. 6. Fig. 7. PMID:2430795

  16. Fine-mapping of the B-cell epitope domain at the N-terminus of the preS2 region of the hepatitis B surface antigen.

    PubMed

    Sominskaya, Irina; Paulij, Wilma; Jansons, Juris; Sobotta, Dirk; Dreilina, Dzidra; Sunnen, Cecile; Meisel, Helga; Gerlich, Wolfram H; Pumpens, Paul

    2002-02-01

    In this study, we report the exact localization and substitutional characterization of a B-cell epitope domain at the N-terminus of the preS2 region of the hepatitis B surface antigen. A set of deletion variants containing preS2 sequences of different length was generated on the basis of frCP as a carrier. It was found after Western blot analysis that three monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) (2-11B1, 3-11C2, HB.OT10) recognized the linear preS2 sequence within the amino acid (aa) stretch 3-WNSTTFHQTLQDP-13. The importance of each aa residue of the epitope was proved by comparison of antibody binding to alanine-substituted peptides in both free-peptide and Pepscan variants.

  17. Removing the Vertebrate-Specific TBP N Terminus Disrupts Placental β2m-Dependent Interactions with the Maternal Immune System

    PubMed Central

    Hobbs, Nicole K.; Bondareva, Alla A.; Barnett, Sheila; Capecchi, Mario R.; Schmidt, Edward E.

    2009-01-01

    Summary Mammalian TBP consists of a 180 amino acid core that is common to all eukaryotes, fused to a vertebrate-specific N-terminal domain. We generated mice having a modified tbp allele, tbpΔN, that produces a version of TBP lacking 111 of the 135 vertebrate-specific amino acids. Most tbpΔN/ΔN fetuses (>90%) died in mid gestation from an apparent defect in the placenta. tbpΔN/ΔN fetuses could be rescued by supplying them with a wild-type tetraploid placenta. Mutants also could be rescued by rearing them in immunocom-promised mothers. In immune-competent mothers, survival of tbpΔN/ΔN fetuses increased when fetal/pla cental β2m expression was genetically disrupted. These results suggest that the TBP N terminus functions in transcriptional regulation of a placental β2m- dependent process that favors maternal immunotolerance of pregnancy. PMID:12150996

  18. Characterization of the banana streak virus capsid protein and mapping of the immunodominant continuous B-cell epitopes to the surface-exposed N terminus.

    PubMed

    Vo, Jenny N; Campbell, Paul R; Mahfuz, Nur N; Ramli, Ras; Pagendam, Daniel; Barnard, Ross; Geering, Andrew D W

    2016-12-01

    This study identified the structural proteins of two badnavirus species, Banana streak MY virus (BSMYV) and Banana streak OL virus (BSOLV), and mapped the distribution of continuous B-cell epitopes. Two different capsid protein (CP) isoforms of about 44 and 40 kDa (CP1 and CP2) and the virion-associated protein (VAP) were consistently associated with purified virions. For both viral species, the N terminus of CP2 was successfully sequenced by Edman degradation but that of CP1 was chemically blocked. De novo peptide sequencing of tryptic digests suggested that CP1 and CP2 derive from the same region of the P3 polyprotein but differ in the length of either the N or the C terminus. A three-dimensional model of the BSMYV-CP was constructed, which showed that the CP is a multi-domain structure, containing homologues of the retroviral capsid and nucleocapsid proteins, as well as a third, intrinsically disordered protein region at the N terminus, henceforth called the NID domain. Using the Pepscan approach, the immunodominant continuous epitopes were mapped to the NID domain for five different species of banana streak virus. Anti-peptide antibodies raised against these epitopes in BSMYV were successfully used for detection of native virions and denatured CPs in serological assays. Immunoelectron microscopy analysis of the virion surface using the anti-peptide antibodies confirmed that the NID domain is exposed on the surface of virions, and that the difference in mass of the two CP isoforms is due to variation in length of the NID domain.

  19. N terminus is essential for tropomyosin functions: N-terminal modification disrupts stress fiber organization and abolishes anti-oncogenic effects of tropomyosin-1.

    PubMed

    Bharadwaj, Shantaram; Hitchcock-DeGregori, Sarah; Thorburn, Andrew; Prasad, G L

    2004-04-02

    Down-regulation of several key actin-binding proteins, such as alpha-actinin, vinculin, gelsolin, and tropomyosins (TMs), is considered to contribute to the disorganized cytoskeleton present in many neoplastic cells. TMs stabilize actin filaments against the gel severing actions of proteins such as cofilin. Among multiple TMs expressed in non-muscle cells, tropomyosin-1 (TM1) isoform induces stress fibers and functions as a suppressor of malignant transformation. However, the molecular mechanisms of TM1-mediated cytoskeletal effects and tumor suppression remain poorly understood. We have hypothesized that the ability of TM1 to stabilize microfilaments is crucial for tumor suppression. In this study, by employing a variant TM1, which contains an N-terminal hemagglutinin epitope tag, we demonstrate that the N terminus is a key determinant of tropomyosin-1 function. Unlike the wild type TM1, the modified protein fails to restore stress fibers and inhibit anchorage-independent growth in transformed cells. Furthermore, the N-terminal modification of TM1 disorganizes the cytoskeleton and delays cytokinesis in normal cells, abolishes binding to F-actin, and disrupts the dimeric associations in vivo. The functionally defective TM1 allows the association of cofilin to stress fibers and disorganizes the microfilaments, whereas wild type TM1 appears to restrict the binding of cofilin to stress fibers. TM1-induced cytoskeletal reorganization appears to be mediated through preventing cofilin interaction with microfilaments. Our studies provide in vivo functional evidence that the N terminus is a critical determinant of TM1 functions, which in turn determines the organization of stress fibers.

  20. De novo exon 1 missense mutations of SKI and Shprintzen-Goldberg syndrome: two new cases and a clinical review.

    PubMed

    Au, P Y Billie; Racher, Hilary E; Graham, John M; Kramer, Nancy; Lowry, R Brian; Parboosingh, Jillian S; Innes, A Micheil

    2014-03-01

    Shprintzen-Goldberg syndrome (OMIM #182212) is a connective tissue disorder characterized by craniosynostosis, distinctive craniofacial features, skeletal abnormalities, marfanoid body habitus, aortic dilatation, and intellectual disability. Mutations in exon 1 of SKI have recently been identified as being responsible for approximately 90% of reported individuals diagnosed clinically with Shprintzen-Goldberg syndrome. SKI is a known regulator of TGFβ signaling. Therefore, like Marfan syndrome and Loeys-Dietz syndrome, Shprintzen-Goldberg syndrome is likely caused by deregulated TGFβ signals, explaining the considerable phenotypic overlap between these three disorders. We describe two additional patients with exon 1 SKI mutations and review the clinical features and literature of Shprintzen-Goldberg syndrome.

  1. Characterization of 5' promoter and exon 1-3 polymorphism of the RAET1E gene.

    PubMed

    Cox, Steven T; Pearson, Hayley; Laza-Briviesca, Raquel; Pesoa, Susanna; Vullo, Carlos; Madrigal, J Alejandro; Saudemont, Aurore

    2016-01-01

    NKG2D is an activating receptor utilized by natural killer (NK) cells that recognizes upregulated ligands on infected, tumorigenic and damaged cells, leading to their cytolysis. However, the NKG2D ligand (NKG2DL) system is very complex with eight known gene loci encoding slightly different molecules. Furthermore, most NKG2DL gene loci such as MICA and MICB are highly polymorphic with potential for functional differences. NKG2DL expression on tumors varies depending on the malignancy and tumors can also release soluble NKG2DL that exert anergic effects on NK cells when engagement with NKG2D occurs, allowing escape from NK cell immunosurveillance. We carried out RAET1E typing of IHW cell line DNA, including a 580 bp proximal promoter fragment and exons 1-3 identifying 13 of 15 known RAET1E alleles. We determined 7 polymorphisms within the promoter region, including 2 already known that contributed to 9 promoter types. RAET1E alleles with variability in the extracellular region also differed with respect to promoter type and one allele, RAET1E(∗)003, associated with 5 promoter types. We then identified putative transcription factor binding sites for RAET1E, and found 5 of the 7 promoter polymorphisms may disrupt these sites, abrogating binding of transcription factors and varying the potential level of expression.

  2. Cellular inclusion bodies of mutant huntingtin exon 1 obscure small fibrillar aggregate species.

    PubMed

    Sahl, Steffen J; Weiss, Lucien E; Duim, Whitney C; Frydman, Judith; Moerner, W E

    2012-01-01

    The identities of toxic aggregate species in Huntington's disease pathogenesis remain ambiguous. While polyQ-expanded huntingtin (Htt) is known to accumulate in compact inclusion bodies inside neurons, this is widely thought to be a protective coping response that sequesters misfolded conformations or aggregated states of the mutated protein. To define the spatial distributions of fluorescently-labeled Htt-exon1 species in the cell model PC12m, we employed highly sensitive single-molecule super-resolution fluorescence imaging. In addition to inclusion bodies and the diffuse pool of monomers and oligomers, fibrillar aggregates -100 nm in diameter and up to -1-2 µm in length were observed for pathogenic polyQ tracts (46 and 97 repeats) after targeted photo-bleaching of the inclusion bodies. These short structures bear a striking resemblance to fibers described in vitro. Definition of the diverse Htt structures in cells will provide an avenue to link the impact of therapeutic agents to aggregate populations and morphologies.

  3. Modifying the N-terminus of polyamides: PyImPyIm has improved sequence specificity over f-ImPyIm.

    PubMed

    Brown, Toni; Mackay, Hilary; Turlington, Mark; Sutterfield, Arden; Smith, Traci; Sielaff, Alan; Westrate, Laura; Bruce, Chrystal; Kluza, Jerome; O'Hare, Caroline; Nguyen, Binh; Wilson, W David; Hartley, John A; Lee, Moses

    2008-05-01

    Seven N-terminus modified derivatives of a previously published minor-groove binding polyamide (f-ImPyIm, 1) were synthesized and the biochemical and biophysical chemistry evaluated. These compounds were synthesized with the aim of attaining a higher level of sequence selectivity over f-ImPyIm (1), a previously published strong minor-groove binder. Two compounds possessing a furan or a benzofuran moiety at the N-terminus showed a footprint of 0.5microM at the cognate ACGCGT site (determined by DNase I footprinting); however, the specificity of these compounds was not improved. In contrast, PyImPyIm (4) produced a footprint of 0.5microM but showed a superior specificity using the same technique. When evaluated by thermal melting experiments and circular dichroism using ACGCGT and the non-cognate AAATTT sequence, all compounds were shown to bind in the minor-groove of DNA and stabilize the cognate sequence much better than the non-cognate (except for the non-amido-compound that did not bind either sequence, as expected). PyImPyIm (4) was interesting as the DeltaT(m) for this compound was only 4 degrees C but the footprint was very selective. No binding was observed for this compound with a third DNA (non-cognate, ACCGGT). ITC studies on compound 4 showed exothermic binding with ACGCGT and no heat change was observed for titrating the compound to the other two DNA sequences. The heat capacity (DeltaC(p)) of the PIPI/ACGCGT complex calculated from the hydrophobic interactions and SASA calculations was comparable to the experimental value obtained from ITC (-146calmol(-1)K(-1)). SPR results provided confirmation of the sequence specificity of PyImPyIm (4), with a K(eq) value determined to be 7.1x10(6) M(-1) for the cognate sequence and no observable binding to AAATTT and ACCGGT. Molecular dynamic simulations affirmed that PyImPyIm (4) binds as a dimer in an overlapped conformation, and it fits snugly in the minor-groove of the ACGCGT oligonucleotide. PyImPyIm (4) is an

  4. Application of protein N-terminal amidase in enzymatic synthesis of dipeptides containing acidic amino acids specifically at the N-terminus.

    PubMed

    Arai, Toshinobu; Noguchi, Atsushi; Takano, Eriko; Kino, Kuniki

    2013-04-01

    Dipeptides exhibit unique physiological functions and physical properties, e.g., l-aspartyl-l-phenylalanine-methyl ester (Asp-Phe-OMe, aspartame) as an artificial sweetener, and functional studies of peptides have been carried out in various fields. Therefore, to establish a manufacturing process for the useful dipeptides, we investigated its enzymatic synthesis by utilizing an l-amino acid ligase (Lal), which catalyzes dipeptide synthesis in an ATP-dependent manner. Many Lals were obtained, but the Lals recognizing acidic amino acids as N-terminal substrates have not been identified. To increase the variety of dipeptides that are enzymatically synthesized, we proposed a two-step synthesis: Asn-Xaa and Gln-Xaa (Asn, l-asparagine; Gln, l-glutamine; and Xaa, arbitrary amino acids) synthesized by Lals were continuously deamidated by a novel amidase, yielding Asp-Xaa and Glu-Xaa (Asp, l-aspartic acid; and Glu, l-glutamic acid). We searched for amidases that specifically deamidate the N-terminus of Asn or Gln in dipeptides since none have been previously reported. We focused on the protein N-terminal amidase from Saccharomyces cerevisiae (NTA1), and assayed its activity toward dipeptides. Our findings showed that NTA1 deamidated l-asparaginyl-l-valine (Asn-Val) and l-glutaminyl-glycine (Gln-Gly), but did not deamidate l-valyl-l-asparagine and l-alanyl-l-glutamine, suggesting that this deamidation activity is N-terminus specific. The specific activity toward Asn-Val and Gln-Gly were 190 ± 30 nmol min(-1) mg(-1)·protein and 136 ± 6 nmol min(-1) mg(-1)·protein. Additionally, we examined some characteristics of NTA1. Acidic dipeptide synthesis was examined by a combination of Lals and NTA1, resulting in the synthesis of 12 kinds of Asp-Xaa, including Asp-Phe, a precursor of aspartame, and 11 kinds of Glu-Xaa.

  5. Novel analogues of degarelix incorporating hydroxy-, methoxy- and pegylated-urea moieties at positions 3, 5, 6 and the N-terminus

    PubMed Central

    Samant, Manoj P.; Hong, Doley J.; Croston, Glenn; Rivier, Catherine; Rivier, Jean

    2008-01-01

    Novel degarelix (Fe200486) analogues were screened for antagonism of GnRH-induced response (IC50) in a reporter gene assay. Inhibition of luteinizing hormone release over time was measured in the castrated male rat. Nω-hydroxy- and Nω-methoxy-carbamoylation of Dab and Dap at position 3 (3-6), and Nω-hydroxy-, Nω-methoxy-carbamoylation and pegylation of 4Aph at positions 5 and 6 (7-10, 15-17, 22-25) were carried out. Modulation of hydrophobicity was achieved using different acylating groups at the N-terminus (11-14, 18-21, 26-28). Analogues 8, 15-17, 22 and 23 were equipotent to acyline (IC50 = 0.69 nM) and degarelix (IC50 = 0.58 nM) in vitro. Analogues 7, 17 and 23 were shorter acting than acyline, when 9, 11, 13, 15, 16 and 22 were longer acting. Only 9 and 14 were inactive at releasing histamine. No analogue exhibited a duration of action comparable to that of degarelix. Analogues with shorter and longer retention times on HPLC (a measure of hydrophilicity) than degarelix were identified. PMID:16759096

  6. Model Peptide Studies Reveal a Mixed Histidine-Methionine Cu(I) Binding Site at the N-Terminus of Human Copper Transporter 1.

    PubMed

    Pushie, M Jake; Shaw, Katharine; Franz, Katherine J; Shearer, Jason; Haas, Kathryn L

    2015-09-08

    Copper is a vital metal cofactor in enzymes that are essential to myriad biological processes. Cellular acquisition of copper is primarily accomplished through the Ctr family of plasma membrane copper transport proteins. Model peptide studies indicate that the human Ctr1 N-terminus binds to Cu(II) with high affinity through an amino terminal Cu(II), Ni(II) (ATCUN) binding site. Unlike typical ATCUN-type peptides, the Ctr1 peptide facilitates the ascorbate-dependent reduction of Cu(II) bound in its ATCUN site by virtue of an adjacent HH (bis-His) sequence in the peptide. It is likely that the Cu(I) coordination environment influences the redox behavior of Cu bound to this peptide; however, the identity and coordination geometry of the Cu(I) site has not been elucidated from previous work. Here, we show data from NMR, XAS, and structural modeling that sheds light on the identity of the Cu(I) binding site of a Ctr1 model peptide. The Cu(I) site includes the same bis-His site identified in previous work to facilitate ascorbate-dependent Cu(II) reduction. The data presented here are consistent with a rational mechanism by which Ctr1 provides coordination environments that facilitate Cu(II) reduction prior to Cu(I) transport.

  7. In vivo reconstitution of a homodimeric cytochrome b559 like structure: The role of the N-terminus α-subunit from Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803.

    PubMed

    Luján, María A; Martínez, Jesús I; Alonso, Pablo J; Torrado, Alejandro; Roncel, Mercedes; Ortega, José M; Sancho, Javier; Picorel, Rafael

    2015-11-01

    The cytochrome b559 is a heme-bridged heterodimeric protein with two subunits, α and β. Both subunits from Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 have previously been cloned and overexpressed in Escherichia coli and in vivo reconstitution experiments have been carried out. The formation of homodimers in the bacterial membrane with endogenous heme was only observed in the case of the β-subunit (β/β) but not with the full length α-subunit. In the present work, reconstitution of a homodimer (α/α) cytochrome b559 like structure was possible using a chimeric N-terminus α-subunit truncated before the amino acid isoleucine 17, eliminating completely a short amphipathic α-helix that lays on the surface of the membrane. Overexpression and in vivo reconstitution in the bacteria was clearly demonstrated by the brownish color of the culture pellet and the use of a commercial monoclonal antibody against the fusion protein carrier, the maltoside binding protein, and polyclonal antibodies against a synthetic peptide of the α-subunit from Thermosynechococcus elongatus. Moreover, a simple partial purification after membrane solubilization with Triton X-100 confirmed that the overexpressed protein complex corresponded with the maltoside binding protein-chimeric α-subunit cytochrome b559 like structure. The features of the new structure were determined by UV-Vis, electron paramagnetic resonance and redox potentiometric techniques. Ribbon representations of all possible structures are also shown to better understand the mechanism of the cytochrome b559 maturation in the bacterial cytoplasmic membrane.

  8. Modular elements of the TPR domain in the Mps1 N terminus differentially target Mps1 to the centrosome and kinetochore

    PubMed Central

    Marquardt, Joseph R.; Perkins, Jennifer L.; Beuoy, Kyle J.; Fisk, Harold A.

    2016-01-01

    Faithful segregation of chromosomes to two daughter cells is regulated by the formation of a bipolar mitotic spindle and the spindle assembly checkpoint, ensuring proper spindle function. Here we show that the proper localization of the kinase Mps1 (monopolar spindle 1) is critical to both these processes. Separate elements in the Mps1 N-terminal extension (NTE) and tetratricopeptide repeat (TPR) domains govern localization to either the kinetochore or the centrosome. The third TPR (TPR3) and the TPR-capping helix (C-helix) are each sufficient to target Mps1 to the centrosome. TPR3 binds to voltage-dependent anion channel 3, but although this is sufficient for centrosome targeting of Mps1, it is not necessary because of the presence of the C-helix. A version of Mps1 lacking both elements cannot localize to or function at the centrosome, but maintains kinetochore localization and spindle assembly checkpoint function, indicating that TPR3 and the C-helix define a bipartite localization determinant that is both necessary and sufficient to target Mps1 to the centrosome but dispensable for kinetochore targeting. In contrast, elements required for kinetochore targeting (the NTE and first two TPRs) are dispensable for centrosomal localization and function. These data are consistent with a separation of Mps1 function based on localization determinants within the N terminus. PMID:27339139

  9. Evidence for auto-inhibition by the N terminus of hADAR2 and activation by dsRNA binding.

    PubMed

    Macbeth, Mark R; Lingam, Arunth T; Bass, Brenda L

    2004-10-01

    Adenosine deaminases that act on RNA (ADARs) catalyze adenosine to inosine conversion in RNA that is largely double stranded. Human ADAR2 (hADAR2) contains two double-stranded RNA binding motifs (dsRBMs), separated by a 90-amino acid linker, and these are followed by the C-terminal catalytic domain. We assayed enzymatic activity of N-terminal deletion constructs of hADAR2 to determine the role of the dsRBMs and the intervening linker peptide. We found that a truncated protein consisting of one dsRBM and the deaminase domain was capable of deaminating a short 15-bp substrate. In contrast, full-length hADAR2 was inactive on this short substrate. In addition, we observed that the N terminus, which was deleted from the truncated protein, inhibits editing activity when added in trans. We propose that the N-terminal domain of hADAR2 contains sequences that cause auto-inhibition of the enzyme. Our results suggest activation requires binding to an RNA substrate long enough to accommodate interactions with both dsRBMs.

  10. Synthesis and properties of peptide nucleic acid labeled at the N-terminus with HiLyte Fluor 488 fluorescent dye.

    PubMed

    Hnedzko, Dziyana; McGee, Dennis W; Rozners, Eriks

    2016-09-15

    Fluorescently labeled peptide nucleic acids (PNAs) are important tools in fundamental research and biomedical applications. However, synthesis of labeled PNAs, especially using modern and expensive dyes, is less explored than similar preparations of oligonucleotide dye conjugates. Herein, we present a simple procedure for labeling of the PNA N-terminus with HiLyte Fluor 488 as the last step of solid phase PNA synthesis. A minimum excess of 1.25equiv of activated carboxylic acid achieved labeling yields close to 90% providing a good compromise between the price of dye and the yield of product and significant improvement over previous literature procedures. The HiLyte Fluor 488-labeled PNAs retained the RNA binding ability and in live cell fluorescence microscopy experiments were brighter and significantly more photostable than PNA labeled with carboxyfluorescein. In contrast to fluorescein-labeled PNA, the fluorescence of PNAs labeled with HiLyte Fluor 488 was independent of pH in the biologically relevant range of 5-8. The potential of HiLyte Fluor 488-labeling for studies of PNA cellular uptake and distribution was demonstrated in several cell lines.

  11. The N-terminus of histone H2B, but not that of histone H3 or its phosphorylation, is essential for chromosome condensation

    PubMed Central

    de la Barre, Anne-Elisabeth; Angelov, Dimitri; Molla, Annie; Dimitrov, Stefan

    2001-01-01

    We have studied the role of individual histone N-termini and the phosphorylation of histone H3 in chromosome condensation. Nucleosomes, reconstituted with histone octamers containing different combinations of recombinant full-length and tailless histones, were used as competitors for chromosome assembly in Xenopus egg extracts. Nucleosomes reconstituted with intact octamers inhibited chromosome condensation as efficiently as the native ones, while tailless nucleosomes were unable to affect this process. Importantly, the addition to the extract of particles containing only intact histone H2B strongly interfered with chromosome formation while such an effect was not observed with particles lacking the N-terminal tail of H2B. This demonstrates that the inhibition effect observed in the presence of competitor nucleosomes is mainly due to the N-terminus of this histone, which, therefore, is essential for chromosome condensation. Nucleosomes in which all histones but H3 were tailless did not impede chromosome formation. In addition, when competitor nucleosome particles were reconstituted with full-length H2A, H2B and H4 and histone H3 mutated at the phosphorylable serine 10 or serine 28, their inhibiting efficiency was identical to that of the native particles. Hence, the tail of H3, whether intact or phosphorylated, is not important for chromosome condensation. A novel hypothesis, termed ‘the ready production label’ was suggested to explain the role of histone H3 phosphorylation during cell division. PMID:11707409

  12. PAK6 targets to cell–cell adhesions through its N-terminus in a Cdc42-dependent manner to drive epithelial colony escape

    PubMed Central

    Morse, Elizabeth M.; Sun, Xiaowen; Olberding, Jordan R.; Ha, Byung Hak; Boggon, Titus J.; Calderwood, David A.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The six serine/threonine kinases in the p21-activated kinase (PAK) family are important regulators of cell adhesion, motility and survival. PAK6, which is overexpressed in prostate cancer, was recently reported to localize to cell–cell adhesions and to drive epithelial cell colony escape. Here we report that PAK6 targeting to cell–cell adhesions occurs through its N-terminus, requiring both its Cdc42/Rac interactive binding (CRIB) domain and an adjacent polybasic region for maximal targeting efficiency. We find PAK6 localization to cell–cell adhesions is Cdc42-dependent, as Cdc42 knockdown inhibits PAK6 targeting to cell–cell adhesions. We further find the ability of PAK6 to drive epithelial cell colony escape requires kinase activity and is disrupted by mutations that perturb PAK6 cell–cell adhesion targeting. Finally, we demonstrate that all type II PAKs (PAK4, PAK5 and PAK6) target to cell–cell adhesions, albeit to differing extents, but PAK1 (a type I PAK) does not. Notably, the ability of a PAK isoform to drive epithelial colony escape correlates with its targeting to cell–cell adhesions. We conclude that PAKs have a broader role in the regulation of cell–cell adhesions than previously appreciated. PMID:26598554

  13. Vaccination of Cattle with the N Terminus of LppQ of Mycoplasma mycoides subsp. mycoides Results in Type III Immune Complex Disease upon Experimental Infection

    PubMed Central

    Frey, Joachim; Smith, Ken; Schnier, Christian; Wesonga, Hezron; Naessens, Jan; McKeever, Declan

    2015-01-01

    Contagious bovine pleuropneumonia (CBPP) is a serious respiratory disease of cattle caused by Mycoplasma mycoides subsp. mycoides. Current vaccines against CBPP induce short-lived immunity and can cause severe postvaccine reactions. Previous studies have identified the N terminus of the transmembrane lipoprotein Q (LppQ-N′) of M. mycoides subsp. mycoides as the major antigen and a possible virulence factor. We therefore immunized cattle with purified recombinant LppQ-N′ formulated in Freund's adjuvant and challenged them with M. mycoides subsp. mycoides. Vaccinated animals showed a strong seroconversion to LppQ, but they exhibited significantly enhanced postchallenge glomerulonephritis compared to the placebo group (P = 0.021). Glomerulonephritis was characterized by features that suggested the development of antigen-antibody immune complexes. Clinical signs and gross pathological scores did not significantly differ between vaccinated and placebo groups. These findings reveal for the first time the pathogenesis of enhanced disease as a result of antibodies against LppQ during challenge and also argue against inclusion of LppQ-N′ in a future subunit vaccine for CBPP. PMID:25733516

  14. A C-terminal Hydrophobic, Solvent-protected Core and a Flexible N-terminus are Potentially Required for Human Papillomavirus 18 E7 Protein Functionality

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, S.; Tian, Y; Greenaway, F; Sun, M

    2010-01-01

    The oncogenic potential of the high-risk human papillomavirus (HPV) relies on the expression of genes specifying the E7 and E6 proteins. To investigate further the variation in oligomeric structure that has been reported for different E7 proteins, an HPV-18 E7 cloned from a Hispanic woman with cervical intraepithelial neoplasia was purified to homogeneity most probably as a stable monomeric protein in aqueous solution. We determined that one zinc ion is present per HPV-18 E7 monomer by amino acid and inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy analysis. Intrinsic fluorescence and circular dichroism spectroscopic results indicate that the zinc ion is important for the correct folding and thermal stability of HPV-18 E7. Hydroxyl radical mediated protein footprinting coupled to mass spectrometry and other biochemical and biophysical data indicate that near the C-terminus, the four cysteines of the two Cys-X{sub 2}-Cys motifs that are coordinated to the zinc ion form a solvent inaccessible core. The N-terminal LXCXE pRb binding motif region is hydroxyl radical accessible and conformationally flexible. Both factors, the relative flexibility of the pRb binding motif at the N-terminus and the C-terminal metal-binding hydrophobic solvent-protected core, combine together and facilitate the biological functions of HPV-18 E7.

  15. Upstream ORF affects MYCN translation depending on exon 1b alternative splicing

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background The MYCN gene is transcribed into two major mRNAs: one full-length (MYCN) and one exon 1b-spliced (MYCNΔ1b) mRNA. But nothing is known about their respective ability to translate the MYCN protein. Methods Plasmids were prepared to enable translation from the upstream (uORF) and major ORF of the two MYCN transcripts. Translation was studied after transfection in neuroblastoma SH-EP cell line. Impact of the upstream AUG on translation was evaluated after directed mutagenesis. Functional study with the two MYCN mRNAs was conducted by a cell viability assay. Existence of a new protein encoded by the MYCNΔ1b uORF was explored by designing a rabbit polyclonal antibody against a specific epitope of this protein. Results Both are translated, but higher levels of protein were seen with MYCNΔ1b mRNA. An upstream ORF was shown to have positive cis-regulatory activity on translation from MYCN but not from MYCNΔ1b mRNA. In transfected SH-EP neuroblastoma cells, high MYCN dosage obtained with MYCNΔ1b mRNA translation induces an antiapoptotic effect after serum deprivation that was not observed with low MYCN expression obtained with MYCN mRNA. Here, we showed that MYCNOT: MYCN Overlap Transcript, a new protein of unknown function is translated from the upstream AUG of MYCNΔ1b mRNA. Conclusions Existence of upstream ORF in MYCN transcripts leads to a new level of MYCN regulation. The resulting MYCN dosage has a weak but significant anti-apoptotic activity after intrinsic apoptosis induction. PMID:20017904

  16. Characterization of Nuclear Localization Signal in the N Terminus of CUL4B and Its Essential Role in Cyclin E Degradation and Cell Cycle Progression*

    PubMed Central

    Zou, Yongxin; Mi, Jun; Cui, Jinpeng; Lu, Defen; Zhang, Xiyu; Guo, Chenhong; Gao, Guimin; Liu, Qiji; Chen, Bingxi; Shao, Changshun; Gong, Yaoqin

    2009-01-01

    CUL4A and CUL4B, which are derived from the same ancestor, CUL4, encode scaffold proteins that organize cullin-RING ubiquitin ligase (E3) complexes. Recent genetic studies have shown that germ line mutation in CUL4B can cause mental retardation, short stature, and other abnormalities in humans. CUL4A was observed to be overexpressed in breast and hepatocellular cancers, although no germ line mutation in human CUL4A has been reported. Although CUL4A has been known to be involved in a number of cellular processes, including DNA repair and cell cycle regulation, little is known about whether CUL4B has similar functions. In this report, we tested the functional importance of CUL4B in cell proliferation and characterized the nuclear localization signal (NLS) that is essential for its function. We found that RNA interference silencing of CUL4B led to an inhibition of cell proliferation and a prolonged S phase, due to the overaccumulation of cyclin E, a substrate targeted by CUL4B for ubiquitination. We showed that, unlike CUL4A and other cullins that carry their NLS in their C termini, NLS in CUL4B is located in its N terminus, between amino acid 37 and 40, KKRK. This NLS could bind to importin α1, α3, and α5. NLS-deleted CUL4B was distributed in cytoplasm and failed to promote cell proliferation. Therefore, the nuclear localization of CUL4B mediated by NLS is critical for its normal function in cell proliferation. PMID:19801544

  17. Cross-talk between the octarepeat domain and the fifth binding site of prion protein driven by the interaction of copper(II) with the N-terminus.

    PubMed

    Di Natale, Giuseppe; Turi, Ildikó; Pappalardo, Giuseppe; Sóvágó, Imre; Rizzarelli, Enrico

    2015-03-02

    Prion diseases are a group of neurodegenerative diseases based on the conformational conversion of the normal form of the prion protein (PrP(C)) to the disease-related scrapie isoform (PrP(Sc)). Copper(II) coordination to PrP(C) has attracted considerable interest for almost 20 years, mainly due to the possibility that such an interaction would be an important event for the physiological function of PrP(C). In this work, we report the copper(II) coordination features of the peptide fragment Ac(PEG11)3PrP(60-114) [Ac = acetyl] as a model for the whole N-terminus of the PrP(C) metal-binding domain. We studied the complexation properties of the peptide by means of potentiometric, UV/Vis, circular dichroism and electrospray ionisation mass spectrometry techniques. The results revealed that the preferred histidyl binding sites largely depend on the pH and copper(II)/peptide ratio. Formation of macrochelate species occurs up to a 2:1 metal/peptide ratio in the physiological pH range and simultaneously involves the histidyl residues present both inside and outside the octarepeat domain. However, at increased copper(II)/peptide ratios amide-bound species form, especially within the octarepeat domain. On the contrary, at basic pH the amide-bound species predominate at any copper/peptide ratio and are formed preferably with the binding sites of His96 and His111, which is similar to the metal-binding-affinity order observed in our previous studies.

  18. NMR structures of anti-HIV D-peptides derived from the N-terminus of viral chemokine vMIP-II

    SciTech Connect

    Mori, Mayuko; Liu Dongxiang; Kumar, Santosh; Huang Ziwei; E-mail: ziweihuang@burnham.org

    2005-09-30

    The viral macrophage inflammatory protein-II (vMIP-II) encoded by Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus has unique biological activities in that it blocks the cell entry by several different human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) strains via chemokine receptors including CXCR4 and CCR5. In this paper, we report the solution structure of all-D-amino acid peptides derived from the N-terminus of vMIP-II, which have been shown to have strong CXCR4 binding activity and potently inhibit HIV-1 entry via CXCR4, by using long mixing time two-dimensional nuclear Overhauser enhancement spectroscopy experiments. Both of all-D-peptides vMIP-II (1-10) and vMIP-II (1-21), which are designated as DV3 and DV1, respectively, have higher CXCR4 binding ability than their L-peptide counterparts. They are partially structured in aqueous solution, displaying a turn-like structure over residues 5-8. The small temperature coefficients of His-6 amide proton for both peptides also suggest the formation of a small hydrophobic pocket centered on His-6. The structural features of DV3 are very similar to the reported solution structure of all-L-peptide vMIP-II (1-10) [M.P. Crump, E. Elisseeva, J. Gong, I. Clark-Lewis, B.D. Sykes, Structure/function of human herpesvirus-8 MIP-II (1-71) and the antagonist N-terminal segment (1-10), FEBS Lett. 489 (2001) 171], which is consistent with the notion that D- and L-enantiomeric peptides can adopt mirror image conformations. The NMR structures of the D-peptides provide a structural basis to understand their mechanism of action and design new peptidomimetic analogs to further explore the structure-activity relationship of D-peptide ligand binding to CXCR4.

  19. A lipopolysaccharide-binding domain of the Campylobacter fetus S-layer protein resides within the conserved N terminus of a family of silent and divergent homologs.

    PubMed Central

    Dworkin, J; Tummuru, M K; Blaser, M J

    1995-01-01

    Campylobacter fetus cells can produce multiple S-layer proteins ranging from 97 to 149 kDa, with a single form predominating in cultured cells. We have cloned, sequenced, and expressed in Escherichia coli a sapA homolog, sapA2, which encodes a full-length 1,109-amino-acid (112-kDa) S-layer protein. Comparison with the two previously cloned sapA homologs has demonstrated two regions of identity, approximately 70 bp before the open reading frame (ORF) and proceeding 550 bp into the ORF and immediately downstream of the ORF. The entire genome contains eight copies of each of these conserved regions. Southern analyses has demonstrated that sapA2 existed as a complete copy within the genome in all strains examined, although Northern (RNA) analysis has demonstrated that sapA2 was not expressed in the C. fetus strain from which it was cloned. Further Southern analyses revealed increasing sapA diversity as probes increasingly 3' within the ORF were used. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and then Southern blotting with the conserved N-terminal region of the sapA homologs as a probe showed that these genes were tightly clustered on the chromosome. Deletion mutagenesis revealed that the S-layer protein bound serospecifically to the C. fetus lipopolysaccharide via its conserved N-terminal region. These data indicated that the S-layer proteins shared functional activity in the conserved N terminus but diverged in a semiconservative manner for the remainder of the molecule. Variation in S-layer protein expression may involve rearrangement of complete gene copies from a single large locus containing multiple sapA homologs. PMID:7896695

  20. The Mammalian Neuronal Sodium Channel Blocker μ-Conotoxin BuIIIB has a Structured N-terminus that Influences Potency

    PubMed Central

    Kuang, Zhihe; Zhang, Min-Min; Gupta, Kallol; Gajewiak, Joanna; Gulyas, Jozsef; Balaram, Padmanabhan; Rivier, Jean E.; Olivera, Baldomero M.; Yoshikami, Doju; Bulaj, Grzegorz; Norton, Raymond S.

    2014-01-01

    Among the μ-conotoxins that block vertebrate voltage-gated sodium channels (VGSCs), some have been shown to be potent analgesics following systemic administration in mice. We have determined the solution structure of a new representative of this family, μ-BuIIIB, and established its disulfide connectivities by direct mass spectrometric collision induced dissociation fragmentation of the peptide with disulfides intact. The major oxidative folding product adopts a 1-4/2-5/3-6 pattern with the following disulfide bridges: Cys5-Cys17, Cys6-Cys23 and Cys13-Cys24. The solution structure reveals that the unique N-terminal extension in μ-BuIIIB, which is also present in μ-BuIIIA and μ-BuIIIC but absent in other μ-conotoxins, forms part of a short α-helix encompassing Glu3 to Asn8. This helix is packed against the rest of the toxin and stabilized by the Cys5-Cys17 and Cys6-Cys23 disulfide bonds. As such, the side chain of Val1 is located close to the aromatic rings of Trp16 and His20, which are located on the canonical helix that displays several residues found to be essential for VGSC blockade in related μ-conotoxins. Mutations of residues 2 and 3 in the N-terminal extension enhanced the potency of μ-BuIIIB for NaV1.3. One analog, [d-Ala2]BuIIIB, showed a 40-fold increase, making it the most potent peptide blocker of this channel characterized to date and thus a useful new tool with which to characterize this channel. Based on previous results for related μ-conotoxins, the dramatic effects of mutations at the N-terminus were unanticipated, and suggest that further gains in potency might be achieved by additional modifications of this region. PMID:23557677

  1. At-ACA8 Encodes a Plasma Membrane-Localized Calcium-ATPase of Arabidopsis with a Calmodulin-Binding Domain at the N Terminus1

    PubMed Central

    Bonza, Maria Cristina; Morandini, Piero; Luoni, Laura; Geisler, Markus; Palmgren, Michael Gjedde; De Michelis, Maria Ida

    2000-01-01

    A Ca2+-ATPase was purified from plasma membranes (PM) isolated from Arabidopsis cultured cells by calmodulin (CaM)-affinity chromatography. Three tryptic fragments from the protein were microsequenced and the corresponding cDNA was amplified by polymerase chain reaction using primers designed from the microsequences of the tryptic fragments. At-ACA8 (Arabidopsis-autoinhibited Ca2+-ATPase, isoform 8, accession no. AJ249352) encodes a 1,074 amino acid protein with 10 putative transmembrane domains, which contains all of the characteristic motifs of Ca2+-transporting P-type Ca2+-ATPases. The identity of At-ACA8p as the PM Ca2+-ATPase was confirmed by immunodetection with an antiserum raised against a sequence (valine-17 through threonine-31) that is not found in other plant CaM-stimulated Ca2+-ATPases. Confocal fluorescence microscopy of protoplasts immunodecorated with the same antiserum confirmed the PM localization of At-ACA8. At-ACA8 is the first plant PM localized Ca2+-ATPase to be cloned and is clearly distinct from animal PM Ca2+-ATPases due to the localization of its CaM-binding domain. CaM overlay assays localized the CaM-binding domain of At-ACA8p to a region of the N terminus of the enzyme around tryptophan-47, in contrast to a C-terminal localization for its animal counterparts. Comparison between the sequence of At-ACA8p and those of endomembrane-localized type IIB Ca2+-ATPases of plants suggests that At-ACA8 is a representative of a new subfamily of plant type IIB Ca2+-ATPases. PMID:10938365

  2. A nonviral peptide can replace the entire N terminus of zucchini yellow mosaic potyvirus coat protein and permits viral systemic infection.

    PubMed

    Arazi, T; Shiboleth, Y M; Gal-On, A

    2001-07-01

    Systematic deletion and peptide tagging of the amino-terminal domain (NT, ~43 amino acids) of an attenuated zucchini yellow mosaic potyvirus (ZYMV-AGII) coat protein (CP) were used to elucidate its role in viral systemic infection. Deletion mutants truncated by 8, 13, and 33 amino acid residues from the CP-NT 5' end were systemically infectious and produced symptoms similar to those of the AGII virus. Tagging these deletion mutants with either human c-Myc (Myc) or hexahistidine peptides maintained viral infectivity. Similarly, addition of these peptides to the intact AGII CP-NT did not affect viral life cycle. To determine which parts, if any, of the CP-NT are essential for viral systemic infection, a series of Myc-tagged mutants with 8 to 43 amino acids removed from the CP-NT were constructed. All Myc-tagged CP-NT deletion mutants, including those from which virtually all the viral CP-NT had been eliminated, were able to encapsidate and cause systemic infection. Furthermore, chimeric viruses with deletions of up to 33 amino acids from CP-NT produced symptoms indistinguishable from those caused by the parental AGII virus. In contrast to CP-NT Myc fusion, addition of the foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) immunogenic epitope to AGII CP-NT did not permit systemic infection. However, fusion of the Myc peptide to the N terminus of the FMDV peptide restored the capability of the virus to spread systemically. We have demonstrated that all CP-NT fused peptides were exposed on the virion surface, masking natural CP immunogenic determinants. Our findings demonstrate that CP-NT is not essential for ZYMV spread and that it can be replaced by an appropriate foreign peptide while maintaining systemic infectivity.

  3. Effects of the N terminus of mouse DNA polymerase κ on the bypass of a guanine-benzo[a]pyrenyl adduct

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yang; Guo, Caixia

    2016-01-01

    DNA polymerase κ (Polκ), one of the typical member of the Y-family DNA polymerases, has been demonstrated to bypass the 10S (+)-trans-anti-benzo[a]pyrene diol epoxide-N2-deoxyguanine adducts (BPDE-dG) efficiently and accurately. A large structural gap between the core and little finger as well as an N-clasp domain are essential to its unique translesion capability. However, whether the extreme N-terminus of Polκ is required for its activity is unclear. In this work, we constructed two mouse Polκ deletions, which have either a catalytic core (mPolκ1-516) or a core without the first 21-residues (mPolκ22-516), and tested their activities in the replication of normal and BPDE-DNA. These two Polκ deletions are nearly as efficient as the full length protein (Polκ1-852) in normal DNA synthesis. However, steady-state kinetics reveals a significant reduction in efficiency of dCTP incorporation opposite the lesion by Polκ22-516, along with increased frequencies for misinsertion compared with Polκ1-852. The next nucleotide insertion opposite the template C immediately following the BPDE-dG was also examined, and the bypass differences induced by deletions were highlighted in both insertion and extension step. We conclude that the extreme N-terminal part of Polκ is required for the processivity and fidelity of Polκ during translesion synthesis of BPDE-dG lesions. PMID:26634445

  4. An in vitro peptide complementation assay for CYT-18-dependent group I intron splicing reveals a new role for the N-terminus.

    PubMed

    Geng, Chun; Paukstelis, Paul J

    2014-03-04

    The mitochondrial tyrosyl tRNA synthetase from Neurospora crassa (CYT-18 protein) is a bifunctional group I intron splicing cofactor. CYT-18 is capable of splicing multiple group I introns from a wide variety of sources by stabilizing the catalytically active intron structures. CYT-18 and mt TyrRSs from related fungal species have evolved to assist in group I intron splicing in part by the accumulation of three N-terminal domain insertions. Biochemical and structural analysis indicate that the N-terminal insertions serve primarily to create a structure-stabilizing scaffold for critical tertiary interactions between the two major RNA domains of group I introns. Previous studies concluded that the primarily α-helical N-terminal insertion, H0, contributes to protein stability and is necessary for splicing the N. crassa ND1 intron but is dispensable for splicing the N. crassa mitochondrial LSU intron. Here, we show that CYT-18 with a complete H0 deletion retains residual ND1 intron splicing activity and that addition of the missing N-terminus in trans is capable of restoring a significant portion of its splicing activity. The development of this peptide complementation assay has allowed us to explore important characteristics of the CYT-18/group I intron interaction including the stoichiometry of H0 in intron splicing and the importance of specific H0 residues. Evaluation of truncated H0 peptides in this assay and a re-examination of the CYT-18 crystal structure suggest a previously unknown structural role of the first five N-terminal residues of CYT-18. These residues interact directly with another splicing insertion, making H0 a central structural element responsible for connecting all three N-terminal splicing insertions.

  5. Addition of positively charged tripeptide to N-terminus of the Fos basic region leucine zipper domain: implications on DNA bending, affinity, and specificity.

    PubMed

    Mahmoudi, T; Sarkar, B

    1999-09-01

    GKH-Fos(139-211)/Jun(248-334) (GKH: glycine-lysine-histidine) is a modified Fos/Jun heterodimer designed to contain a metal binding motif in the form of a GKH tripeptide at the amino terminus of Fos bZIP domain dimerized with the Jun basic region leucine zipper (bZIP) domain. We examined the effect of the addition of positively charged GKH motif to the N-terminus of Fos(139-211) on the DNA binding characteristics of the Fos(139-211)/Jun(248-334) heterodimer. Binding studies indicate that while the nonspecific DNA binding affinity of the GKH modified heterodimer increases 4-fold, it specifically binds the activating protein-1 (AP-1) site 6-fold less tightly than the control unmodified counterpart. Furthermore, helical phasing analysis indicates that GKH-Fos(139-211)/Jun(248-334) and control Fos(139-211)/Jun(248-334) both bend the DNA at the AP-1 site toward the minor groove. However, due to the presence of the positively charged GKH motif on Fos, the degree of the induced bend by GKH- Fos(139-211)/Jun(248-334) is greater than that induced by the unmodified Fos/Jun heterodimer. Our results suggest that the unfavorable energetic cost of the increased DNA bending by GKH-Fos(139-211)/Jun(248-334) results in a decrease in both specificity and affinity of binding of the heterodimer to the AP-1 site. These findings may have important implications in protein design as well in our understanding of DNA bending and factors responsible for the functional specificity of different members of the bZIP family of transcription factors.

  6. Involvement of the N Terminus of Ribosomal Protein L11 in Regulation of the RelA Protein of Escherichia coli†

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xiaoming; Ishiguro, Edward E.

    2001-01-01

    Amino acid-deprived rplK (previously known as relC) mutants of Escherichia coli cannot activate (p)ppGpp synthetase I (RelA) and consequently exhibit relaxed phenotypes. The rplK gene encodes ribosomal protein L11, suggesting that L11 is involved in regulating the activity of RelA. To investigate the role of L11 in the stringent response, a derivative of rplK encoding L11 lacking the N-terminal 36 amino acids (designated ′L11) was constructed. Bacteria overexpressing ′L11 exhibited a relaxed phenotype, and this was associated with an inhibition of RelA-dependent (p)ppGpp synthesis during amino acid deprivation. In contrast, bacteria overexpressing normal L11 exhibited a typical stringent response. The overexpressed ′L11 was incorporated into ribosomes and had no effect on the ribosome-binding activity of RelA. By several methods (yeast two-hybrid, affinity blotting, and copurification), no direct interaction was observed between the C-terminal ribosome-binding domain of RelA and L11. To determine whether the proline-rich helix of L11 was involved in RelA regulation, the Pro-22 residue was replaced with Leu by site-directed mutagenesis. The overexpression of the Leu-22 mutant derivative of L11 resulted in a relaxed phenotype. These results indicate that the proline-rich helix in the N terminus of L11 is involved in regulating the activity of RelA. PMID:11673421

  7. Association between CTLA-4 exon-1 +49A/G polymorphism and asthma: an updated meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Ying-Shui; Wang, Lin-Hong; Chang, Wei-Wei; He, Lian-Ping; Li, Jie; Jin, Yue-Long; Li, Chao-Pin

    2015-01-01

    The results of studies on association between CTLA-4 exon-1 +49A/G (rs231775) polymorphism and susceptibility to asthma are controversial. To derive a more precise estimation of the relationship between the CTLA-4 exon-1 +49A/G polymorphism and asthma, a meta-analysis of 15 published case-control studies was performed. 15 studies meeting our inclusion criteria comprising 4006 asthma cases and 3729 controls were included. The effect summary odds ratio (OR) and 95% confidence intervals were obtained. Publication bias was tested by funnel plot, Egger’s test and heterogeneity was assessed. The combined results showed that there were significant differences in genotype distribution between asthma cases and control on the basis of all studies, GG + GA versus AA (OR = 0.76, 95% CI: 0.62-0.93; P = 0.008). When stratifying for the race, the phenomenon was found that asthma cases had a significantly higher frequency of GG/GA versus AA (OR = 0.71; 95% CI: 0.51-0.99; P = 0.04) than control in Caucasian. Stratifying subjects by age indicated an association between CTLA-4 +49 GG + GA genotype and asthma in children (OR = 0.75; 95% CI: 0.62-0.90; P = 0.002), but no association in adults (OR = 0.93; 95% CI: 0.76-1.14; P = 0.48). Furthermore, significant association was observed in atopic asthma under the fixed-effects model (GG + GA vs. AA: P = 0.03, OR = 0.81, 95% CI = 0.67-0.98, P heterogeneity = 0.22). Our meta-analysis results suggest that CTLA-4 exon-1 +49A/G polymorphism might be a risk factor for asthma susceptibility, at least in Caucasian, children, and patients with atopy status. PMID:26064199

  8. Interaction of the Transcription Start Site Core Region and Transcription Factor YY1 Determine Ascorbate Transporter SVCT2 Exon 1a Promoter Activity

    PubMed Central

    Qiao, Huan; May, James M.

    2012-01-01

    Transcription of the ascorbate transporter, SVCT2, is driven by two distinct promoters in exon 1 of the transporter sequence. The exon 1a promoter lacks a classical transcription start site and little is known about regulation of promoter activity in the transcription start site core (TSSC) region. Here we present evidence that the TSSC binds the multifunctional initiator-binding protein YY1. Electrophoresis shift assays using YY1 antibody showed that YY1 is present as one of two major complexes that specifically bind to the TSSC. The other complex contains the transcription factor NF-Y. Mutations in the TSSC that decreased YY1 binding also impaired the exon 1a promoter activity despite the presence of an upstream activating NF-Y/USF complex, suggesting that YY1 is involved in the regulation of the exon 1a transcription. Furthermore, YY1 interaction with NF-Y and/or USF synergistically enhanced the exon 1a promoter activity in transient transfections and co-activator p300 enhanced their synergistic activation. We propose that the TSSC plays a vital role in the exon 1a transcription and that this function is partially carried out by the transcription factor YY1. Moreover, co-activator p300 might be able to synergistically enhance the TSSC function via a “bridge” mechanism with upstream sequences. PMID:22532872

  9. The N terminus of PA polymerase of swine-origin influenza virus H1N1 determines its compatibility with PB2 and PB1 subunits through a strain-specific amino acid serine 186.

    PubMed

    Wanitchang, Asawin; Jengarn, Juggragarn; Jongkaewwattana, Anan

    2011-01-01

    Despite several lines of evidence suggesting possible mechanisms by which the influenza virus polymerase complex, comprising PB2, PB1 and PA, work in concert during virus replication, exactly how they function is not entirely understood. The N terminal region of the PA subunit has been shown to play a key role in various functions through a number of conserved amino acid residues. However, little is known about the role of amino acids reported to be unique for a virus strain. Here, we investigated the functional implication of an amino acid (S186) present uniquely in the N terminus of the PA subunit of the pandemic H1N1 influenza virus and determined the effect of its mutation in terms of polymerase activity as well as virus growth. Using chimeric constructs of PA derived from A/PR/8/34 (H1N1) (PR8) and the swine-origin influenza virus (S-OIV) H1N1, we found that, when complexed with PB2 and PB1 of PR8, the chimeric PA protein containing the N terminus of S-OIV (1-213) with the remaining region from PR8 showed significantly reduced polymerase activity. Recombinant viruses harboring the chimeric PA also grew poorly in MDCK cells and embryonated eggs. Likewise, the chimeric PA in which the N terminus of PA of PR8 (1-213) was assembled with the remaining region of PA of S-OIV showed a similar phenotype when complexed with PB2 and PB1 of S-OIV. Interestingly, when S186 in the N terminus was altered to the residue common in most strains of influenza virus (G186), the chimeric as well as wild-type PA of S-OIV showed severely impaired polymerase activity when assayed with PB2 and PB1 of S-OIV. Collectively, this finding suggests that S186 at the N terminal region of PA of S-OIV is necessary for the protein to function optimally.

  10. Genotyping of exons 1 to 20 in Duchenne muscular dystrophy by universal multiplex PCR and short-end capillary electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Syu, Jing-Rou; Wang, Chun-Chi; Jong, Yuh-Jyh; Wu, Shou-Mei

    2014-12-01

    One rapid CE method was established to diagnose Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). DMD is a severe recessive inherited disorder frequently caused by gene deletions. Among them, exons 1-20 account for nearly 30% of occurrences. In this study, the universal multiplex PCR was used to enhance the fluorescently labeling efficiency, which was performed only by one universal fluorescent primer. After PCR, a short-end injection CE (short-end CE) speeded up the genotyping of the DMD gene. This method involved no extra purification, and was completed within 9 min. The CE conditions contained a polymer solution of 1.5% hydroxylethylcellulose in 1× TBE buffer at 6 kV for separation. This method was applied to test six DMD patients and one healthy male person. The results showed good agreement with those of multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification. This method can be applied for clinical diagnosis of DMD disease. Accurate diagnosis of the DMD gene is the best way to prevent the disease.

  11. Functional and topological studies with Trp-containing analogs of the peptide StII(1-30) derived from the N-terminus of the pore forming toxin sticholysin II: contribution to understand its orientation in membrane.

    PubMed

    Ros, Uris; Souto, Ana Lucia C F; de Oliveira, Felipe J; Crusca, Edson; Pazos, Fabiola; Cilli, Eduardo M; Lanio, Maria E; Schreier, Shirley; Alvarez, Carlos

    2013-07-01

    Sticholysin II (St II) is the most potent cytolysin produced by the sea anemone Stichodactyla helianthus, exerting hemolytic activity via pore formation in membranes. The toxin's N-terminus contains an amphipathic α-helix that is very likely involved in pore formation. We have previously demonstrated that the synthetic peptide StII(1-30) encompassing the 1-30 segment of St II forms pores of similar radius to that of the protein (around 1 nm), being a good model of toxin functionality. Here we have studied the functional and conformational properties of fluorescent analogs of StII(1-30) in lipid membranes. The analogs were obtained by replacing Leu residues at positions 2, 12, 17, and 24 with the intrinsically fluorescent amino acid Trp (StII(1-30L2W), StII(1-30L12W), StII(1-30L17W), or StII(1-30L24W), respectively). The exchange by Trp did not significantly modify the activity and conformation of the parent peptide. The blue-shift and intensity enhancement of fluorescence in the presence of membrane indicated that Trp at position 2 is more deeply buried in the hydrophobic region of the bilayer. These experiments, as well as assays with water-soluble or spin-labeled lipid-soluble fluorescence quenchers suggest an orientation of StII(1-30) with its N-terminus oriented towards the hydrophobic core of the bilayer while the rest of the peptide is more exposed to the aqueous environment, as hypothesized for sticholysins.

  12. The N-terminus region of the putative C2H2 transcription factor Ada1 harbors a species-specific activation motif that regulates asexual reproduction in Fusarium verticillioides.

    PubMed

    Malapi-Wight, Martha; Kim, Jung-Eun; Shim, Won-Bo

    2014-01-01

    Fusarium verticillioides is an important plant pathogenic fungus causing maize ear and stalk rots. In addition, the fungus is directly associated with fumonisin contamination of food and feeds. Here, we report the functional characterization of Ada1, a putative Cys2-His2 zinc finger transcription factor with a high level of similarity to Aspergillus nidulans FlbC, which is required for the activation of the key regulator of conidiation brlA. ADA1 is predicted to encode a protein with two DNA binding motifs at the C terminus and a putative activator domain at the N terminus region. Deletion of the flbC gene in A. nidulans results in "fluffy" cotton-like colonies, with a defect in transition from vegetative growth to asexual development. In this study we show that Ada1 plays a key role in asexual development in F. verticillioides. Conidia production was significantly reduced in the knockout mutant (Δada1), in which aberrant conidia and conidiophores were also observed. We identified genes that are predicted to be downstream of ADA1, based on A. nidulans conidiation signaling pathway. Among them, the deletion of stuA homologue, FvSTUA, resulted in near absence of conidia production. To further investigate the functional conservation of this transcription factor, we complemented the Δada1 strain with A. nidulans flbC, F. verticillioides ADA1, and chimeric constructs. A. nidulans flbC failed to restore conidia production similar to the wild-type level. However, the Ada1N-terminal domain, which contains a putative activator, fused to A. nidulans FlbC C-terminal motif successfully complemented the Δada1 mutant. Taken together, Ada1 is an important transcriptional regulator of asexual development in F. verticillioides and that the N-terminus domain is critical for proper function of this transcription factor.

  13. Dynamic triggering

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hill, David P.; Prejean, Stephanie; Schubert, Gerald

    2015-01-01

    Dynamic stresses propagating as seismic waves from large earthquakes trigger a spectrum of responses at global distances. In addition to locally triggered earthquakes in a variety of tectonic environments, dynamic stresses trigger tectonic (nonvolcanic) tremor in the brittle–plastic transition zone along major plate-boundary faults, activity changes in hydrothermal and volcanic systems, and, in hydrologic domains, changes in spring discharge, water well levels, soil liquefaction, and the eruption of mud volcanoes. Surface waves with periods of 15–200 s are the most effective triggering agents; body-wave trigger is less frequent. Triggering dynamic stresses can be < 1 kPa.

  14. Breed-specific expression of GR exon 1 mRNA variants and profile of GR promoter CpG methylation in the hippocampus of newborn piglets.

    PubMed

    Sun, Q; Jia, Y; Li, R; Li, X; Yang, X; Zhao, R

    2014-11-01

    Glucocorticoid receptor (GR) transcription is driven by alternative promoters to produce different exon 1 mRNA variants. CpG methylation on GR promoters profoundly affects GR transcription. GR in hippocampus is critical for energy homeostasis and stress responses, yet it remains unclear whether hippocampal expression of GR exon 1 mRNA variants and the methylation status of GR promoters differ between Large White (LW) and Erhualian (EHL) pigs showing distinct metabolic and stress-coping characteristics. EHL pigs had higher hippocampus weight relative to BW (P<0.01), which was associated with higher serum cortisol level compared with LW pigs. Hippocampal expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (P<0.05) was significantly higher, while Bax, a pro-apoptotic gene, was significantly lower in EHL pigs (P<0.05). Hippocampal expression of total GR did not differ between breeds, yet GR exon 1 to 11 mRNA was significantly higher (P<0.01) in EHL pigs, which was associated with a trend of increase (P=0.057) in GR protein content. No significant breed difference was detected for the methylation status across the whole region of the proximal GR promoter, while CpG334 and CpG266.267 were differentially methylated, in a reversed manner, between breeds. The methylation status of CpGs 248, 259, 260, 268 and 271 was negatively correlated (P<0.05) with GR exon 1 to 11 mRNA abundance. Our results provide fundamental information on the breed-specific characteristics of GR and its mRNA variants expression and the status of DNA methylation on the proximal GR promoter in the pig hippocampus.

  15. Breed-dependent transcriptional regulation of 5'-untranslated GR (NR3C1) exon 1 mRNA variants in the liver of newborn piglets.

    PubMed

    Zou, Huafeng; Li, Runsheng; Jia, Yimin; Yang, Xiaojing; Ni, Yingdong; Cong, Rihua; Soloway, Paul D; Zhao, Ruqian

    2012-01-01

    Glucocorticoids are vital for life and regulate an array of physiological functions by binding to the ubiquitously expressed glucocorticoid receptor (GR, also known as NR3C1). Previous studies demonstrate striking breed differences in plasma cortisol levels in pigs. However, investigation into the breed-dependent GR transcriptional regulation is hampered by lacking porcine GR promoter information. In this study, we sequenced 5.3 kb upstream of the translation start codon of the porcine GR gene, and identified seven alternative 5'-untranslated exons 1-4, 1-5, 1-6, 1-7, 1-8, 1-9,10 and 1-11. Among all these mRNA variants, exons 1-4 and 1-5, as well as the total GR were expressed significantly (P<0.05) higher in the liver of newborn piglets of Large White (LW) compared with Erhualian, a Chinese indigenous breed. Overall level of CpG methylation in the region flanking exons 1-4 and 1-5 did not show breed difference. However, nuclear content of Sp1, p-CREB and GR in the liver was significantly (P<0.05) higher in LW piglets, associated with enhanced binding of p-CREB, and higher level of histone H3 acetylation in 1-4 and 1-5 promoters. In contrast, GR binding to promoters of exons 1-4 and 1-5 was significantly diminished in LW piglets, implicating the presence of negative GREs. These results indicate that the difference in the hepatic expression of GR transcript variants between two breeds of pigs is determined, at least partly, by the disparity in the binding of transcription factors and the enrichment of histone H3 acetylation to the promoters.

  16. The sequence and antiapoptotic functional domains of the human cytomegalovirus UL37 exon 1 immediate early protein are conserved in multiple primary strains.

    PubMed

    Hayajneh, W A; Colberg-Poley, A M; Skaletskaya, A; Bartle, L M; Lesperance, M M; Contopoulos-Ioannidis, D G; Kedersha, N L; Goldmacher, V S

    2001-01-05

    The human cytomegalovirus UL37 exon 1 gene encodes the immediate early protein pUL37x1 that has antiapoptotic and regulatory activities. Deletion mutagenesis analysis of the open reading frame of UL37x1 identified two domains that are necessary and sufficient for its antiapoptotic activity. These domains are confined within the segments between amino acids 5 to 34, and 118 to 147, respectively. The first domain provides the targeting of the protein to mitochondria. Direct PCR sequencing of UL37 exon 1 amplified from 26 primary strains of human cytomegalovirus demonstrated that the promoter, polyadenylation signal, and the two segments of pUL37x1 required for its antiapoptotic function were invariant in all sequenced strains and identical to those in AD169 pUL37x1. In total, UL37 exon 1 varies between 0.0 and 1.6% at the nucleotide level from strain AD169. Only 11 amino acids were found to vary in one or more viral strains, and these variations occurred only in the domains of pUL37x1 dispensable for its antiapoptotic function. We infer from this remarkable conservation of pUL37x1 in primary strains that this protein and, probably, its antiapoptotic function are required for productive replication of human cytomegalovirus in humans.

  17. Sporadic—but Not Variant—Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease Is Associated with Polymorphisms Upstream of PRNP Exon 1

    PubMed Central

    Mead, Simon; Mahal, Sukhvir P; Beck, John; Campbell, Tracy; Farrall, Martin; Fisher, Elizabeth; Collinge, John

    2001-01-01

    Human prion diseases have inherited, sporadic, and acquired etiologies. The appearance of the novel acquired prion disease, variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (vCJD), and the demonstration that it is caused by the same prion strain as that causing bovine spongiform encephalopathy, has led to fears of a major human epidemic. The etiology of classical (sporadic) CJD, which has a worldwide incidence, remains obscure. A common human prion-protein–gene (PRNP) polymorphism (encoding either methionine or valine at codon 129) is a strong susceptibility factor for sporadic and acquired prion disease. However, a quantitative-trait–locus study of prion incubation periods in mice has demonstrated an important factor that is close to Prnp but is independent of its coding sequence or that of the nearby prion-like doppel gene (Prnd). We have analyzed the PRNP locus for such tightly linked susceptibility factors. Fifty-six polymorphic sites have been identified within 25 kb of the PRNP open reading frame, including sites within the PRNP promoter and the PRNP 3′ untranslated region. These have been characterized in 61 Centre d’Étude du Polymorphisme Humain (CEPH) families, demonstrating extensive linkage disequilibrium around PRNP and the existence of 11 major European PRNP haplotypes. Haplotype frequencies estimated in healthy U.K. control individuals were very similar to those deduced in the CEPH families. A common haplotype was overrepresented in patients with sporadic CJD (sCJD). Through use of a log-linear modeling approach to simultaneously model Hardy-Weinberg and linkage disequilibria, a significant independent association was found between sCJD and a polymorphism upstream of PRNP exon 1 (P=.005), in addition to the strong susceptibility conferred by codon 129 (P=2×10-8). However, although our sample size was necessarily small, no association was found between these polymorphisms and vCJD or iatrogenic CJD, in keeping with their having distinct disease mechanisms

  18. A combinatorial approach of N-terminus blocking and codon optimization strategies to enhance the soluble expression of recombinant hIL-7 in E. coli fed-batch culture.

    PubMed

    Devi, Nirmala; Adivitiya; Khasa, Yogender Pal

    2016-12-01

    Human interleukin-7 (hIL-7) is a therapeutically important cytokine involved in lymphocyte development and survival. In previous reports, a uniformly poor expression of hIL-7 has been shown in Escherichia coli host with the problem of inclusion body formation. In this study, the role of codon optimization and N-terminus blocking using various solubility enhancer fusion tags was explored to improve its soluble expression. The use of codon optimization strategy improved its expression to 80 ± 5 mg/L at shake flask level. The utilization of pelB leader sequence resulted in an unprocessed protein in the form of cytoplasmic inclusion bodies with lower expression yields. The N-terminus fusion of small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO), thioredoxin (Trx), and NusA tags increased the expression in the range of 90-140 mg/L, where >90 % of the fusion protein was obtained in soluble form. The fed-batch fermentation of SUMO-tagged hIL-7 protein was optimized at bioreactor level, where a high volumetric product concentration of 2.65 g/L was achieved by controlling the plasmid segregation instability using high antibiotic concentration. The specific product yield (YP/X) and volumetric product concentration were 1.38 and 2.55-fold higher compared to batch results, respectively. A preparative scale affinity chromatography resulted in a high recovery yield of 50.6 mg/L with ∼90 % purity. The conformational property of purified recombinant hIL-7 from CD spectroscopy showed a typical helical structure with 31.5 % α-helix and 26.43 % β-sheet. The biological activity of purified protein was tested using IL-7-dependent murine immature B lymphocyte (2E8) cell line by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2, 5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide salt (MTT) assay, where it showed a similar biological activity as standard control.

  19. An immunodominant epitope in a functional domain near the N-terminus of human granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor identified by cross-reaction of synthetic peptides with neutralizing anti-protein and anti-peptide antibodies.

    PubMed

    Beffy, P; Rovero, P; Di Bartolo, V; Laricchia Robbio, L; Dané, A; Pegoraro, S; Bertolero, F; Revoltella, R P

    1994-12-01

    We produced polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) against recombinant human (rh) granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) and performed studies of epitope mapping by ELISA, using five synthetic peptides corresponding to sequences along this molecule. Additionally, anti-peptide MAbs were generated. The antibody ability to inhibit rhGM-CSF activity was determined using as bioassay the MO7e cell line, which is dependent on hGM-CSF for growth in vitro. An immunodominant epitope able to induce the highest neutralization antibody titers was identified near the N terminus of hGM-CSF. A synthetic peptide 14-24, homologous to a sequence including part of the first alpha-helix of the molecule, was recognized by neutralizing anti-protein antibodies. Similarly, MAbs anti- 14-24 cross-reacted with rhGM-CSF and specifically blocked its function. Replacement of Val16 or Asn17 with alanine greatly reduced the antibody-binding capacity to peptide 14-24, whereas substitution of Gln20 or Glu21 was less critical. Monoclonal antibodies generated against residues 30-41 (corresponding to an intrahelical loop) and 79-91 (homologous to a sequence including part of the third alpha-helix) or its analog [Ala88](79-91)beta Ala-Cys, were conformation dependent and nonneutralizing: they failed to react or bound poorly to rhGM-CSF in ELISA, but readily recognized the homologous sequence in the denatured protein, by Western blotting.

  20. Rapid online proteolytic mapping of PEGylated rhGH for identity confirmation, quantitation of methionine oxidation and quantitation of UnPEGylated N-terminus using HPLC with UV detection.

    PubMed

    Schneiderheinze, Jeffrey; Walden, Zara; Dufield, Rob; Demarest, Charles

    2009-12-01

    Proteolytic mapping is a widely used tool in the BioPharmaceutical Industry for the analysis of post-translation modifications as well as confirmation of protein identity by comparison to a well-characterized reference standard. This manuscript presents an integrated chromatographic approach which provides the ability to rapidly digest and analyze a PEGylated rhGH for methionine oxidation, identity confirmation and free (unPEGylated) N-terminal peptide by RP-HPLC using UV detection at 280 nm. This approach utilizes an online procedure in which the digestion step is integrated to the RP-HPLC analysis via an external column switching valve. A Poroszyme Trypsin cartridge is used in the digestion step, followed by delivery of the digested sample plug through a sample loop to an orthogonal RP-HPLC column for separation and quantitation of the resulting tryptic peptides. Oxidation of the methionine (met14) in the T2 tryptic fragment was quantified with a sensitivity of approximately 1.0% (peak area percent relative to parent T2). The RP-HPLC profile obtained with the integrated system was nearly identical to that obtained via traditional methods (e.g. batch digestion followed by RP-HPLC analysis). The integrated technique, however, represents a 10-fold reduction in total analysis time when compared to the optimized batch digestion procedure. In addition, the identity of the PEGylated rhGH compound could be confirmed as well as the percentage of free N-terminus in a single injection.

  1. Isolation and expression of a novel chick G-protein cDNA coding for a G alpha i3 protein with a G alpha 0 N-terminus.

    PubMed Central

    Kilbourne, E J; Galper, J B

    1994-01-01

    We have cloned cDNAs coding for G-protein alpha subunits from a chick brain cDNA library. Based on sequence similarity to G-protein alpha subunits from other eukaryotes, one clone was designated G alpha i3. A second clone, G alpha i3-o, was identical to the G alpha i3 clone over 932 bases on the 3' end. The 5' end of G alpha i3-o, however, contained an alternative sequence in which the first 45 amino acids coded for are 100% identical to the conserved N-terminus of G alpha o from species such as rat, mouse, human, bovine and hamster. Both clones were found to be expressed in all tissues studied. The unusual alpha o-alpha i3-like G-protein chimera, G alpha i3-o, was found to be expressed at significantly lower levels than G alpha i3. In vitro transcription and translation of the G alpha i3-o cDNA clone gave a protein of approx. 41 kDa which stably bound guanosine 5'-[gamma-thio]triphosphate. G alpha i3-o appears to be the first G-protein alpha subunit cloned which contains ends that are homologous to two different alpha subunit isoforms, G alpha o and G alpha i3. Images Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 PMID:8297335

  2. Effects of systematic N-terminus deletions and benzoylations of endogenous RF-amide peptides on NPFF1R, NPFF2R, GPR10, GPR54 and GPR103.

    PubMed

    Rouméas, Laurent; Humbert, Jean-Paul; Schneider, Séverine; Doebelin, Christelle; Bertin, Isabelle; Schmitt, Martine; Bourguignon, Jean-Jacques; Simonin, Frédéric; Bihel, Frédéric

    2015-09-01

    Mammalian RF-amide peptides including RF-amide-related peptides-1 and -3, neuropeptides AF and FF, Prolactin releasing peptides, Kisspeptins and RFa peptides are currently considered endogenous peptides for the GPCRs NPFF1R, NPFF2R, GPR10, GPR54 and GPR103, respectively. While NPFF1R and NPFF2R displayed high affinity for all the RF-amide peptides, GPR10, GPR54 and GPR103 only bind their cognate ligands. Through a systematic and sequential N-terminus deletion and benzoylation of either RF-amide neuropeptide (RFRP-3, NPFF, Kp-10, PrRP20, and 26RFa), we report the corresponding impact on affinity and activity towards all the RF-amide receptors (NPFF1R, NPFF2R, GPR10, GPR54 and GPR103). Our results highlight the difficulty to develop selective peptide ligands for GPR10, GPR54 or GPR103 without a modification of the C-terminus RF-amide signature, but open the door to the design of new RF-amide peptides acting as agonist for one receptor and antagonist for another one.

  3. Molecular characterization of HOXC8 gene and methylation status analysis of its exon 1 associated with the length of cashmere fiber in Liaoning cashmere goat.

    PubMed

    Bai, Wen L; Wang, Jiao J; Yin, Rong H; Dang, Yun L; Wang, Ze Y; Zhu, Yu B; Cong, Yu Y; Deng, Liang; Guo, Dan; Wang, Shi Q; Yang, Shu H; Xue, Hui L

    2017-02-01

    Homeobox protein Hox-C8 (HOXC8) is a member of Hox family. It is expressed in the dermal papilla of the skin and is thought to be associated with the hair inductive capacity of dermal papilla cells. In the present study, we isolated and characterized a full-length open reading frame of HOXC8 cDNA from the skin tissue of Liaoning cashmere goat, as well as, established a phylogenetic relationship of goat HOXC8 with that of other species. Also, we investigated the effect of methylation status of HOXC8 exon 1 at anagen secondary hair follicle on the cashmere fiber traits in Liaoning cashmere goat. The sequence analysis indicated that the obtained cDNA was 1134-bp in length containing a complete ORF of 729-bp. It encoded a peptide of 242 amino acid residues in length. The structural analysis indicated that goat HOXC8 contained a typical homeobox domain. The phylogenetic analysis revealed that Capra hircus HOXC8 had a closer genetic relationship with that of Ovis aries, followed by Bos Taurus and Bubalus bubalis. The methylation analysis suggested that the methylation degree of HOXC8 exon 1 in anagen secondary hair follicle might be involved in regulating the growth of cashmere fiber in Liaoning cashmere goat. Our results provide new evidence for understanding the molecular structural and evolutionary characteristics of HOXC8 in Liaoning cashmere goat, as well as, for further insight into the role of methylation degree of HOXC8 exon 1 regulates the growth of cashmere fiber in goat.

  4. Trigger finger

    MedlinePlus

    ... Redness in your cut or hand Swelling or warmth in your cut or hand Yellow or green drainage from the cut Hand pain or discomfort Fever If your trigger finger returns, call your surgeon. You may need another surgery.

  5. Fusion of an Oligopeptide to the N Terminus of an Alkaline α-Amylase from Alkalimonas amylolytica Simultaneously Improves the Enzyme's Catalytic Efficiency, Thermal Stability, and Resistance to Oxidation

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Haiquan; Lu, Xinyao; Li, Jianghua; Shin, Hyun-dong; Chen, Rachel R.; Du, Guocheng

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we constructed and expressed six fusion proteins composed of oligopeptides attached to the N terminus of the alkaline α-amylase (AmyK) from Alkalimonas amylolytica. The oligopeptides had various effects on the functional and structural characteristics of AmyK. AmyK-p1, the fusion protein containing peptide 1 (AEAEAKAKAEAEAKAK), exhibited improved specific activity, catalytic efficiency, alkaline stability, thermal stability, and oxidative stability compared with AmyK. Compared with AmyK, the specific activity and catalytic constant (kcat) of AmyK-p1 were increased by 4.1-fold and 3.5-fold, respectively. The following properties were also improved in AmyK-p1 compared with AmyK: kcat/Km increased from 1.8 liter/(g·min) to 9.7 liter/(g·min), stable pH range was extended from 7.0 to 11.0 to 7.0 to 12.0, optimal temperature increased from 50°C to 55°C, and the half-life at 60°C increased by ∼2-fold. Moreover, AmyK-p1 showed improved resistance to oxidation and retained 54% of its activity after incubation with H2O2, compared with 20% activity retained by AmyK. Finally, AmyK-p1 was more compatible than AmyK with the commercial solid detergents tested. The mechanisms responsible for these changes were analyzed by comparing the three-dimensional (3-D) structural models of AmyK and AmyK-p1. The significantly enhanced catalytic efficiency and stability of AmyK-p1 suggests its potential as a detergent ingredient. In addition, the oligopeptide fusion strategy described here may be useful for improving the catalytic efficiency and stability of other industrial enzymes. PMID:23455344

  6. Lysosomal and cytosolic sialic acid 9-O-acetylesterase activities can Be encoded by one gene via differential usage of a signal peptide-encoding exon at the N terminus.

    PubMed

    Takematsu, H; Diaz, S; Stoddart, A; Zhang, Y; Varki, A

    1999-09-03

    9-O-Acetylation is one of the most common modifications of sialic acids, and it can affect several sialic acid-mediated recognition phenomena. We previously reported a cDNA encoding a lysosomal sialic acid-specific 9-O-acetylesterase, which traverses the endoplasmic reticulum-Golgi pathway and localizes primarily to lysosomes and endosomes. In this study, we report a variant cDNA derived from the same gene that contains a different 5' region. This cDNA has a putative open reading frame lacking a signal peptide-encoding sequence and is thus a candidate for the previously described cytosolic sialic acid 9-O-acetylesterase activity. Epitope-tagged constructs confirm that the new sequence causes the protein product to be targeted to the cytosol and has esterase activity. Using reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction to distinguish the two forms of message, we show that although the lysosomal sialic acid-specific 9-O-acetylesterase message has a widespread pattern of expression in adult mouse tissues, this cytosolic sialic acid 9-O-acetylesterase form has a rather restricted distribution, with the strongest expression in the liver, ovary, and brain. Using a polyclonal antibody directed against the 69-amino acid region common to both proteins, we confirmed that the expression of glycosylated and nonglycosylated polypeptides occurred in appropriate subcellular fractions of normal mouse tissues. Rodent liver polypeptides reacting to the antibody also co-purify with previously described lysosomal sialic acid esterase activity and at least a portion of the cytosolic activity. Thus, two sialic acid 9-O-acetylesterases found in very different subcellular compartments can be encoded by a single gene by differential usage of a signal peptide-encoding exon at the N terminus. The 5'-rapid amplification of cDNA ends results and the differences in tissue-specific expression suggest that expression of these two products may be differentially regulated by independent promoters.

  7. Interactions between beta D372 and gamma subunit N-terminus residues gamma K9 and gamma S12 are important to catalytic activity catalyzed by Escherichia coli F1F0-ATP synthase.

    PubMed

    Lowry, David S; Frasch, Wayne D

    2005-05-17

    Substitution of Escherichia coli F(1)F(0) ATP synthase residues betaD372 or gammaS12 with groups that are unable to form a hydrogen bond at this location decreased ATP synthase-dependent cell growth by 2 orders of magnitude, eliminated the ability of F(1)F(0) to catalyze ATPase-dependent proton pumping in inverted E. coli membranes, caused a 15-20% decrease in the coupling efficiency of the membranes as measured by the extent of succinate-dependent acridine orange fluorescence quenching, but increased soluble F(1)-ATPase activity by about 10%. Substitution of gammaK9 to eliminate the ability to form a salt bridge with betaD372 decreased soluble F(1)-ATPase activity and ATPase-driven proton pumping by 2-fold but had no effect on the proton gradient induced by addition of succinate. Mutations to eliminate the potential to form intersubunit hydrogen bonds and salt bridges between other less highly conserved residues on the gamma subunit N-terminus and the beta subunits had little effect on ATPase or ATP synthase activities. These results suggest that the betaD372-gammaK9 salt bridge contributes significantly to the rate-limiting step in ATP hydrolysis of soluble F(1) while the betaD372-gammaS12 hydrogen bond may serve as a component of an escapement mechanism for ATP synthesis in which alphabetagamma intersubunit interactions provide a means to make substrate binding a prerequisite of proton gradient-driven gamma subunit rotation.

  8. Protein Aggregation Formed by Recombinant cp19k Homologue of Balanus albicostatus Combined with an 18 kDa N-Terminus Encoded by pET-32a(+) Plasmid Having Adhesion Strength Comparable to Several Commercial Glues.

    PubMed

    Liang, Chao; Li, Yunqiu; Liu, Zhiming; Wu, Wenjian; Hu, Biru

    2015-01-01

    The barnacle is well known for its tenacious and permanent attachment to a wide variety of underwater substrates, which is accomplished by synthesizing, secreting and curing a mixture of adhesive proteins termed "barnacle cement". In order to evaluate interfacial adhesion abilities of barnacle cement proteins, the cp19k homologous gene in Balanus albicostatus (Balcp19k) was cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli. Here, we report an intriguing discovery of a gel-like super adhesive aggregation produced by Trx-Balcp19k, a recombinant Balcp19k fusion protein. The Trx-Balcp19k consists of an 18 kDa fragment at the N-terminus, which is encoded by pET-32a(+) plasmid and mainly comprised of a thioredoxin (Trx) tag, and Balcp19k at the C-terminus. The sticky aggregation was designated as "Trx-Balcp19k gel", and the bulk adhesion strength, biochemical composition, as well as formation conditions were all carefully investigated. The Trx-Balcp19k gel exhibited strong adhesion strength of 2.10 ± 0.67 MPa, which was approximately fifty folds higher than that of the disaggregated Trx-Balcp19k (40 ± 8 kPa) and rivaled those of commercial polyvinyl acetate (PVA) craft glue (Mont Marte, Australia) and UHU glue (UHU GmbH & Co. KG, Germany). Lipids were absent from the Trx-Balcp19k gel and only a trace amount of carbohydrates was detected. We postulate that the electrostatic interactions play a key role in the formation of Trx-Balcp19k gel, by mediating self-aggregation of Trx-Balcp19k based on its asymmetric distribution pattern of charged amino acids. Taken together, we believe that our discovery not only presents a promising biological adhesive with potential applications in both biomedical and technical fields, but also provides valuable paradigms for molecular design of bio-inspired peptide- or protein-based materials.

  9. Mapping of the Tacaribe Arenavirus Z-Protein Binding Sites on the L Protein Identified both Amino Acids within the Putative Polymerase Domain and a Region at the N Terminus of L That Are Critically Involved in Binding▿

    PubMed Central

    Wilda, Maximiliano; Lopez, Nora; Casabona, Juan Cruz; Franze-Fernandez, Maria T.

    2008-01-01

    Tacaribe virus (TacV) is the prototype of the New World group of arenaviruses. The TacV genome encodes four proteins: the nucleoprotein (N), the glycoprotein precursor, the polymerase (L), and a RING finger protein (Z). Using a reverse genetics system, we demonstrated that TacV N and L are sufficient to drive transcription and replication mediated by TacV-like RNAs and that Z is a powerful inhibitor of these processes (Lopez et al., J. Virol. 65:12241-12251, 2001). More recently, we provided the first evidence of an interaction between Z and L and showed that Z's inhibitory activity was dependent on its ability to bind to L (Jácamo et al., J. Virol. 77:10383-10393, 2003). In the present study, we mapped the TacV Z-binding sites on the 2,210-amino-acid L polymerase. To that end, we performed deletion analysis and point mutations of L and studied the Z-L interaction by coimmunoprecipitation with specific sera. We found that the C-terminal region of L was not essential for the interaction and identified two noncontiguous regions that were critical for binding: one at the N-terminus of L between residues 156 and 292 and a second one in the polymerase domain (domain III). The importance of domain III in binding was revealed by substitutions in D1188 and H1189 within motif A and in each residue of the conserved SDD sequence (residues 1328, 1329, and 1330) within motif C. Our results showed that of the substituted residues, only H1189 and D1329 appeared to be critically involved in binding Z. PMID:18799569

  10. Triggering Klystrons

    SciTech Connect

    Stefan, Kelton D.; /Purdue U. /SLAC

    2010-08-25

    To determine if klystrons will perform to the specifications of the LCLS (Linac Coherent Light Source) project, a new digital trigger controller is needed for the Klystron/Microwave Department Test Laboratory. The controller needed to be programmed and Windows based user interface software needed to be written to interface with the device over a USB (Universal Serial Bus). Programming the device consisted of writing logic in VHDL (VHSIC (Very High Speed Integrated Circuits) hardware description language), and the Windows interface software was written in C++. Xilinx ISE (Integrated Software Environment) was used to compile the VHDL code and program the device, and Microsoft Visual Studio 2005 was used to compile the C++ based Windows software. The device was programmed in such a way as to easily allow read/write operations to it using a simple addressing model, and Windows software was developed to interface with the device over a USB connection. A method of setting configuration registers in the trigger device is absolutely necessary to the development of a new triggering system, and the method developed will fulfill this need adequately. More work is needed before the new trigger system is ready for use. The configuration registers in the device need to be fully integrated with the logic that will generate the RF signals, and this system will need to be tested extensively to determine if it meets the requirements for low noise trigger outputs.

  11. WT1 exon 1 deletion/insertion mutations in Wilms tumor patients, associated with di- and trinucleotide repeats and deletion hotspot consensus sequences.

    PubMed Central

    Huff, V; Jaffe, N; Saunders, G F; Strong, L C; Villalba, F; Ruteshouser, E C

    1995-01-01

    The WT1 gene is known to play a role in at least some cases of Wilms tumor (WT). The first exon of the gene is highly GC rich and contains many short tandem di- and trinucleotide repeats, interrupted direct repeats, and CCTG (CAGG) motifs that have been identified as hotspots for DNA deletions. We have analyzed 80 WT patient samples for mutations in the first exon of WT1, either by SSCP analysis of the first 131 bp of the coding portion of WT1 exon 1 or by size analysis of a PCR product encompassing the coding region of exon 1 in addition to flanking noncoding regions. We report here the occurrence of somatic and germ-line deletion and insertion mutations in this portion of the gene in four WT patients. The mutations are flanked by short direct repeats, and the breakpoints are within 5 nt of a CCTG (CAGG) sequence. These data suggest that a distinctive mutational mechanism, previously unrecognized for this gene, is important for the generation of DNA mutations at the WT1 locus. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:7825606

  12. Characterization of the fundamental properties of the N-terminal truncation (Δ exon 1) variant of estrogen receptor α in the rat.

    PubMed

    Hattori, Yujiro; Ishii, Hirotaka; Morita, Akio; Sakuma, Yasuo; Ozawa, Hitoshi

    2015-10-15

    The estrogen receptor α (ERα) directs transactivation of target genes, and splice variants have been shown to exhibit altered activation properties. We previously documented the complicated alternative promoter usage and splicing patterns of the rat ERα gene; however, the information was restricted to a few specific organs. Therefore, we re-examined the rat mRNA profiles of ERα, including the generation of the exon 1-skipping, ERα46 transcript in a wider variety of rat organs and further characterized the fundamental functional properties of rat ERα46 variants. With the use of RT-PCR, we discovered unique distribution and splicing patterns for promoter-specific ERα isoforms, as well as the extensive expression of the Δ exon 1 variant in the rat. Similar to wild-type ERα, an immunocytochemical analysis showed a predominant localization of ERα46 proteins in the nuclei of transfected cells. Luciferase reporter assays revealed that ERα46 variants stimulated the transcriptional activity of an estrogen response element-driven promoter in response to estrogen. In addition, the variants exhibited distinct transactivation and reactivity to 4-hydroxytamoxifen in different cell types. Although the alternative splicing patterns are species-specific, the profiles of the alternative use of promoters, and the fundamental properties of the rat ERα46 variant are similar to those of human and mouse homologs. Therefore, the present study provides fundamental and useful information for further research into the regulation and functions of ERα gene variants.

  13. Protein Aggregation Formed by Recombinant cp19k Homologue of Balanus albicostatus Combined with an 18 kDa N-Terminus Encoded by pET-32a(+) Plasmid Having Adhesion Strength Comparable to Several Commercial Glues

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Chao; Li, Yunqiu; Liu, Zhiming; Wu, Wenjian; Hu, Biru

    2015-01-01

    The barnacle is well known for its tenacious and permanent attachment to a wide variety of underwater substrates, which is accomplished by synthesizing, secreting and curing a mixture of adhesive proteins termed “barnacle cement”. In order to evaluate interfacial adhesion abilities of barnacle cement proteins, the cp19k homologous gene in Balanus albicostatus (Balcp19k) was cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli. Here, we report an intriguing discovery of a gel-like super adhesive aggregation produced by Trx-Balcp19k, a recombinant Balcp19k fusion protein. The Trx-Balcp19k consists of an 18 kDa fragment at the N-terminus, which is encoded by pET-32a(+) plasmid and mainly comprised of a thioredoxin (Trx) tag, and Balcp19k at the C-terminus. The sticky aggregation was designated as “Trx-Balcp19k gel”, and the bulk adhesion strength, biochemical composition, as well as formation conditions were all carefully investigated. The Trx-Balcp19k gel exhibited strong adhesion strength of 2.10 ± 0.67 MPa, which was approximately fifty folds higher than that of the disaggregated Trx-Balcp19k (40 ± 8 kPa) and rivaled those of commercial polyvinyl acetate (PVA) craft glue (Mont Marte, Australia) and UHU glue (UHU GmbH & Co. KG, Germany). Lipids were absent from the Trx-Balcp19k gel and only a trace amount of carbohydrates was detected. We postulate that the electrostatic interactions play a key role in the formation of Trx-Balcp19k gel, by mediating self-aggregation of Trx-Balcp19k based on its asymmetric distribution pattern of charged amino acids. Taken together, we believe that our discovery not only presents a promising biological adhesive with potential applications in both biomedical and technical fields, but also provides valuable paradigms for molecular design of bio-inspired peptide- or protein-based materials. PMID:26317205

  14. The Inorganic Side of NGF: Copper(II) and Zinc(II) Affect the NGF Mimicking Signaling of the N-Terminus Peptides Encompassing the Recognition Domain of TrkA Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Pandini, Giuseppe; Satriano, Cristina; Pietropaolo, Adriana; Gianì, Fiorenza; Travaglia, Alessio; La Mendola, Diego; Nicoletti, Vincenzo G.; Rizzarelli, Enrico

    2016-01-01

    The nerve growth factor (NGF) N-terminus peptide, NGF(1–14), and its acetylated form, Ac-NGF(1–14), were investigated to scrutinize the ability of this neurotrophin domain to mimic the whole protein. Theoretical calculations demonstrated that non-covalent forces assist the molecular recognition of TrkA receptor by both peptides. Combined parallel tempering/docking simulations discriminated the effect of the N-terminal acetylation on the recognition of NGF(1–14) by the domain 5 of TrkA (TrkA-D5). Experimental findings demonstrated that both NGF(1–14) and Ac-NGF(1–14) activate TrkA signaling pathways essential for neuronal survival. The NGF-induced TrkA internalization was slightly inhibited in the presence of Cu2+ and Zn2+ ions, whereas the metal ions elicited the NGF(1–14)-induced internalization of TrkA and no significant differences were found in the weak Ac-NGF(1–14)-induced receptor internalization. The crucial role of the metals was confirmed by experiments with the metal-chelator bathocuproine disulfonic acid, which showed different inhibitory effects in the signaling cascade, due to different metal affinity of NGF, NGF(1–14) and Ac-NGF(1–14). The NGF signaling cascade, activated by the two peptides, induced CREB phosphorylation, but the copper addition further stimulated the Akt, ERK and CREB phosphorylation in the presence of NGF and NGF(1–14) only. A dynamic and quick influx of both peptides into PC12 cells was tracked by live cell imaging with confocal microscopy. A significant role of copper ions was found in the modulation of peptide sub-cellular localization, especially at the nuclear level. Furthermore, a strong copper ionophoric ability of NGF(1–14) was measured. The Ac-NGF(1–14) peptide, which binds copper ions with a lower stability constant than NGF(1–14), exhibited a lower nuclear localization with respect to the total cellular uptake. These findings were correlated to the metal-induced increase of CREB and BDNF

  15. Genotype-phenotype correlations for EPM2A mutations in Lafora's progressive myoclonus epilepsy: exon 1 mutations associate with an early-onset cognitive deficit subphenotype.

    PubMed

    Ganesh, Subramaniam; Delgado-Escueta, Antonio V; Suzuki, Toshimitsu; Francheschetti, Silvana; Riggio, Concetta; Avanzini, Giuiliano; Rabinowicz, Adrian; Bohlega, Saeed; Bailey, Julia; Alonso, Maria E; Rasmussen, Astrid; Thomson, Alfredo E; Ochoa, Adriana; Prado, Aurelio J; Medina, Marco T; Yamakawa, Kazuhiro

    2002-05-15

    Mutations in the EPM2A gene encoding a dual-specificity phosphatase (laforin) cause an autosomal recessive fatal disorder called Lafora's disease (LD) classically described as an adolescent-onset stimulus-sensitive myoclonus, epilepsy and neurologic deterioration. Here we related mutations in EPM2A with phenotypes of 22 patients (14 families) and identified two subsyndromes: (i) classical LD with adolescent-onset stimulus-sensitive grand mal, absence and myoclonic seizures followed by dementia and neurologic deterioration, and associated mainly with mutations in exon 4 (P = 0.0007); (ii) atypical LD with childhood-onset dyslexia and learning disorder followed by epilepsy and neurologic deterioration, and associated mainly with mutations in exon 1 (P = 0.0015). To understand the two subsyndromes better, we investigated the effect of five missense mutations in the carbohydrate-binding domain (CBD-4; coded by exon 1) and three missense mutations in the dual phosphatase domain (DSPD; coded by exons 3 and 4) on laforin's intracellular localization in HeLa cells. Expression of three mutant proteins (T194I, G279S and Y294N) in DSPD formed ubiquitin-positive cytoplasmic aggregates, suggesting that they were folding mutants set for degradation. In contrast, none of the three CBD-4 mutants showed cytoplasmic clumping. However, CBD-4 mutants W32G and R108C targeted both cytoplasm and nucleus, suggesting that laforin had diminished its usual affinity for polysomes. Our data, thus, represent the first report of a novel childhood syndrome for LD. Our results also provide clues for distinct roles for the CBD-4 and DSP domains of laforin in the etiology of two subsyndromes of LD.

  16. Firearm trigger assembly

    DOEpatents

    Crandall, David L.; Watson, Richard W.

    2010-02-16

    A firearm trigger assembly for use with a firearm includes a trigger mounted to a forestock of the firearm so that the trigger is movable between a rest position and a triggering position by a forwardly placed support hand of a user. An elongated trigger member operatively associated with the trigger operates a sear assembly of the firearm when the trigger is moved to the triggering position. An action release assembly operatively associated with the firearm trigger assembly and a movable assembly of the firearm prevents the trigger from being moved to the triggering position when the movable assembly is not in the locked position.

  17. Methylation of Exons 1D, 1F, and 1H of the Glucocorticoid Receptor Gene Promoter and Exposure to Adversity in Pre-School Aged Children

    PubMed Central

    Tyrka, Audrey R.; Parade, Stephanie H.; Eslinger, Nicole M.; Marsit, Carmen J.; Lesseur, Corina; Armstrong, David A.; Philip, Noah S.; Josefson, Brittney; Seifer, Ronald

    2016-01-01

    Epigenetic modifications to the genome are a key mechanism involved in the biological encoding of experience. Animal studies and a growing body of literature in humans have shown that early adversity is linked to methylation of the gene for the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) which is a key regulator of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis as well as a broad range of physiological systems including metabolic and immune function. One hundred eighty-four families participated, including n=74 with child welfare documentation of moderate-severe maltreatment in the past six months. Children ranged in age from 3 to 5 years, and were racially and ethnically diverse. Structured record review and interviews in the home were used to assess a history of maltreatment, other traumas, and contextual life stressors, and a composite variable assessed the number exposures to these adversities. Methylation of regions 1D, 1F, and 1H of the GR gene was measured via sodium bisulfite pyrosequencing. The composite measure of adversity was positively correlated with methylation at exons 1D and 1F in the promoter of NR3C1. Individual stress measures were significantly associated with a several CpG sites in these regions. GR gene methylation may be a mechanism of the bio-behavioral effects of adverse exposures in young children. PMID:25997773

  18. Non-covalent interactions of the carcinogen (+)-anti-BPDE with exon 1 of the human K-ras proto-oncogene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez, Jorge H.; Deligkaris, Christos

    2013-03-01

    Investigating the complementary, but different, effects of physical (non-covalent) and chemical (covalent) mutagen-DNA and carcinogen-DNA interactions is important for understanding possible mechanisms of development and prevention of mutagenesis and carcinogenesis. A highly mutagenic and carcinogenic metabolite of the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon benzo[ α]pyrene, namely (+)-anti-BPDE, is known to undergo both physical and chemical complexation with DNA. The major covalent adduct, a promutagenic, is known to be an external (+)-trans-anti-BPDE-N2-dGuanosine configuration whose origins are not fully understood. Thus, it is desirable to study the mechanisms of external non-covalent BPDE-DNA binding and their possible relationships to external covalent trans adduct formation. We present a detailed codon-by-codon computational study of the non-covalent interactions of (+)-anti-BPDE with DNA which explains and correctly predicts preferential (+)-anti-BPDE binding at minor groove guanosines. Due to its relevance to carcinogenesis, the interaction of (+)-anti-BPDE with exon 1 of the human K-ras gene has been studied in detail. Present address: Department of Physics, Drury University

  19. Methods comparison for high-resolution transcriptional analysis of archival material on Affymetrix Plus 2.0 and Exon 1.0 microarrays.

    PubMed

    Linton, Kim; Hey, Yvonne; Dibben, Sian; Miller, Crispin; Freemont, Anthony; Radford, John; Pepper, Stuart

    2009-07-01

    Microarray gene expression profiling of formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissues is a new and evolving technique. This report compares transcript detection rates on Affymetrix U133 Plus 2.0 and Human Exon 1.0 ST GeneChips across several RNA extraction and target labeling protocols, using routinely collected archival FFPE samples. All RNA extraction protocols tested (Ambion-Optimum, Ambion-RecoverAll, and Qiagen-RNeasy FFPE) provided extracts suitable for microarray hybridization. Compared with Affymetrix One-Cycle labeled extracts, NuGEN system protocols utilizing oligo(dT) and random hexamer primers, and cDNA target preparations instead of cRNA, achieved percent present rates up to 55% on Plus 2.0 arrays. Based on two paired-sample analyses, at 90% specificity this equalled an average 30 percentage-point increase (from 50% to 80%) in FFPE transcript sensitivity relative to fresh frozen tissues, which we have assumed to have 100% sensitivity and specificity. The high content of Exon arrays, with multiple probe sets per exon, improved FFPE sensitivity to 92% at 96% specificity, corresponding to an absolute increase of ~600 genes over Plus 2.0 arrays. While larger series are needed to confirm high correspondence between fresh-frozen and FFPE expression patterns, these data suggest that both Plus 2.0 and Exon arrays are suitable platforms for FFPE microarray expression analyses.

  20. Molecular and Genetic Characterization of HIV-1 Tat Exon-1 Gene from Cameroon Shows Conserved Tat HLA-Binding Epitopes: Functional Implications

    PubMed Central

    Teto, Georges; Fonsah, Julius Y.; Tagny, Claude T.; Mbanya, Dora; Nchindap, Emilienne; Kenmogne, Leopoldine; Fokam, Joseph; Njamnshi, Dora M.; Kouanfack, Charles; Njamnshi, Alfred K.; Kanmogne, Georgette D.

    2016-01-01

    HIV-1 Tat plays a critical role in viral transactivation. Subtype-B Tat has potential use as a therapeutic vaccine. However, viral genetic diversity and population genetics would significantly impact the efficacy of such a vaccine. Over 70% of the 37-million HIV-infected individuals are in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA) and harbor non-subtype-B HIV-1. Using specimens from 100 HIV-infected Cameroonians, we analyzed the sequences of HIV-1 Tat exon-1, its functional domains, post-translational modifications (PTMs), and human leukocyte antigens (HLA)-binding epitopes. Molecular phylogeny revealed a high genetic diversity with nine subtypes, CRF22_01A1/CRF01_AE, and negative selection in all subtypes. Amino acid mutations in Tat functional domains included N24K (44%), N29K (58%), and N40K (30%) in CRF02_AG, and N24K in all G subtypes. Motifs and phosphorylation analyses showed conserved amidation, N-myristoylation, casein kinase-2 (CK2), serine and threonine phosphorylation sites. Analysis of HLA allelic frequencies showed that epitopes for HLAs A*0205, B*5301, Cw*0401, Cw*0602, and Cw*0702 were conserved in 58%–100% of samples, with B*5301 epitopes having binding affinity scores > 100 in all subtypes. This is the first report of N-myristoylation, amidation, and CK2 sites in Tat; these PTMs and mutations could affect Tat function. HLA epitopes identified could be useful for designing Tat-based vaccines for highly diverse HIV-1 populations, as in SSA. PMID:27438849

  1. Asthma triggers (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... common asthma triggers are mold, pets, dust, grasses, pollen, cockroaches, odors from chemicals, and smoke from cigarettes. ... common asthma triggers are mold, pets, dust, grasses, pollen, cockroaches, odors from chemicals, and smoke from cigarettes.

  2. p97 Homologs from Caenorhabditis elegans, CDC-48.1 and CDC-48.2, suppress the aggregate formation of huntingtin exon1 containing expanded polyQ repeat.

    PubMed

    Nishikori, Shingo; Yamanaka, Kunitoshi; Sakurai, Toshihiko; Esaki, Masatoshi; Ogura, Teru

    2008-08-01

    Polyglutamine (polyQ)-expanded proteins are associated with cytotoxicity in some neurodegenerative disorders such as Huntington's disease. We have reported that the aggregation of the polyQ-expanded protein is partially suppressed by co-expression of either of two homologs of an AAA chaperone p97, CDC-48.1 or CDC-48.2, in Caenorhabditis elegans, but how p97 regulates the aggregation of polyQ-expanded proteins remains unclear. Here we present direct evidence that CDC-48.1 and CDC-48.2 suppress the aggregation of a huntingtin (Htt) exon1 fragment containing an expanded polyQ repeat in vitro. CDC-48.1 and CDC-48.2 bound the Htt exon1 fragment directly, and suppressed the formation of SDS-insoluble aggregates of Htt fragments containing 53 glutamine residues (HttQ53) independently of nucleotides. CDC-48.1 and CDC-48.2 also modulated the oligomeric states of HttQ53 during the aggregate formation. In the absence of CDC-48.1 and CDC-48.2, HttQ53 formed 70-150 kDa oligomers, whereas 300-500 kDa oligomers as well as 70-150 kDa oligomers accumulated in the presence of CDC-48.1 and CDC-48.2. Taken together, these results suggest that p97 plays a protective role in neurodegenerative disorders by directly suppressing the protein aggregation as a molecular chaperone.

  3. Lessons from (triggered) tremor

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gomberg, Joan

    2010-01-01

    I test a “clock-advance” model that implies triggered tremor is ambient tremor that occurs at a sped-up rate as a result of loading from passing seismic waves. This proposed model predicts that triggering probability is proportional to the product of the ambient tremor rate and a function describing the efficacy of the triggering wave to initiate a tremor event. Using data mostly from Cascadia, I have compared qualitatively a suite of teleseismic waves that did and did not trigger tremor with ambient tremor rates. Many of the observations are consistent with the model if the efficacy of the triggering wave depends on wave amplitude. One triggered tremor observation clearly violates the clock-advance model. The model prediction that larger triggering waves result in larger triggered tremor signals also appears inconsistent with the measurements. I conclude that the tremor source process is a more complex system than that described by the clock-advance model predictions tested. Results of this and previous studies also demonstrate that (1) conditions suitable for tremor generation exist in many tectonic environments, but, within each, only occur at particular spots whose locations change with time; (2) any fluid flow must be restricted to less than a meter; (3) the degree to which delayed failure and secondary triggering occurs is likely insignificant; and 4) both shear and dilatational deformations may trigger tremor. Triggered and ambient tremor rates correlate more strongly with stress than stressing rate, suggesting tremor sources result from time-dependent weakening processes rather than simple Coulomb failure.

  4. Causality and headache triggers

    PubMed Central

    Turner, Dana P.; Smitherman, Todd A.; Martin, Vincent T.; Penzien, Donald B.; Houle, Timothy T.

    2013-01-01

    Objective The objective of this study was to explore the conditions necessary to assign causal status to headache triggers. Background The term “headache trigger” is commonly used to label any stimulus that is assumed to cause headaches. However, the assumptions required for determining if a given stimulus in fact has a causal-type relationship in eliciting headaches have not been explicated. Methods A synthesis and application of Rubin’s Causal Model is applied to the context of headache causes. From this application the conditions necessary to infer that one event (trigger) causes another (headache) are outlined using basic assumptions and examples from relevant literature. Results Although many conditions must be satisfied for a causal attribution, three basic assumptions are identified for determining causality in headache triggers: 1) constancy of the sufferer; 2) constancy of the trigger effect; and 3) constancy of the trigger presentation. A valid evaluation of a potential trigger’s effect can only be undertaken once these three basic assumptions are satisfied during formal or informal studies of headache triggers. Conclusions Evaluating these assumptions is extremely difficult or infeasible in clinical practice, and satisfying them during natural experimentation is unlikely. Researchers, practitioners, and headache sufferers are encouraged to avoid natural experimentation to determine the causal effects of headache triggers. Instead, formal experimental designs or retrospective diary studies using advanced statistical modeling techniques provide the best approaches to satisfy the required assumptions and inform causal statements about headache triggers. PMID:23534872

  5. AMY trigger system

    SciTech Connect

    Sakai, Yoshihide

    1989-04-01

    A trigger system of the AMY detector at TRISTAN e{sup +}e{sup -} collider is described briefly. The system uses simple track segment and shower cluster counting scheme to classify events to be triggered. It has been operating successfully since 1987.

  6. Axon injury triggers EFA-6 mediated destabilization of axonal microtubules via TACC and doublecortin like kinase.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lizhen; Chuang, Marian; Koorman, Thijs; Boxem, Mike; Jin, Yishi; Chisholm, Andrew D

    2015-09-04

    Axon injury triggers a series of changes in the axonal cytoskeleton that are prerequisites for effective axon regeneration. In Caenorhabditis elegans the signaling protein Exchange Factor for ARF-6 (EFA-6) is a potent intrinsic inhibitor of axon regrowth. Here we show that axon injury triggers rapid EFA-6-dependent inhibition of axonal microtubule (MT) dynamics, concomitant with relocalization of EFA-6. EFA-6 relocalization and axon regrowth inhibition require a conserved 18-aa motif in its otherwise intrinsically disordered N-terminal domain. The EFA-6 N-terminus binds the MT-associated proteins TAC-1/Transforming-Acidic-Coiled-Coil, and ZYG-8/Doublecortin-Like-Kinase, both of which are required for regenerative growth cone formation, and which act downstream of EFA-6. After injury TAC-1 and EFA-6 transiently relocalize to sites marked by the MT minus end binding protein PTRN-1/Patronin. We propose that EFA-6 acts as a bifunctional injury-responsive regulator of axonal MT dynamics, acting at the cell cortex in the steady state and at MT minus ends after injury.

  7. Ethanol Exposure Induces Neonatal Neurodegeneration by Enhancing CB1R Exon1 Histone H4K8 Acetylation and Up-regulating CB1R Function causing Neurobehavioral Abnormalities in Adult Mice

    PubMed Central

    Subbanna, Shivakumar; Nagre, Nagaraja N.; Umapathy, Nagavedi S.; Pace, Betty S.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Ethanol exposure to rodents during postnatal day 7 (P7), which is comparable to the third trimester of human pregnancy, induces long-term potentiation and memory deficits. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying these deficits are still poorly understood. Methods: In the present study, we explored the potential role of epigenetic changes at cannabinoid type 1 (CB1R) exon1 and additional CB1R functions, which could promote memory deficits in animal models of fetal alcohol spectrum disorder. Results: We found that ethanol treatment of P7 mice enhances acetylation of H4 on lysine 8 (H4K8ace) at CB1R exon1, CB1R binding as well as the CB1R agonist-stimulated GTPγS binding in the hippocampus and neocortex, two brain regions that are vulnerable to ethanol at P7 and are important for memory formation and storage, respectively. We also found that ethanol inhibits cyclic adenosine monophosphate response element-binding protein (CREB) phosphorylation and activity-regulated cytoskeleton-associated protein (Arc) expression in neonatal and adult mice. The blockade or genetic deletion of CB1Rs prior to ethanol treatment at P7 rescued CREB phosphorylation and Arc expression. CB1R knockout mice exhibited neither ethanol-induced neurodegeneration nor inhibition of CREB phosphorylation or Arc expression. However, both neonatal and adult mice did exhibit enhanced CREB phosphorylation and Arc protein expression. P7 ethanol-treated adult mice exhibited impaired spatial and social recognition memory, which were prevented by the pharmacological blockade or deletion of CB1Rs at P7. Conclusions: Together, these findings suggest that P7 ethanol treatment induces CB1R expression through epigenetic modification of the CB1R gene, and that the enhanced CB1R function induces pCREB, Arc, spatial, and social memory deficits in adult mice. PMID:25609594

  8. LHCb Topological Trigger Reoptimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Likhomanenko, Tatiana; Ilten, Philip; Khairullin, Egor; Rogozhnikov, Alex; Ustyuzhanin, Andrey; Williams, Michael

    2015-12-01

    The main b-physics trigger algorithm used by the LHCb experiment is the so- called topological trigger. The topological trigger selects vertices which are a) detached from the primary proton-proton collision and b) compatible with coming from the decay of a b-hadron. In the LHC Run 1, this trigger, which utilized a custom boosted decision tree algorithm, selected a nearly 100% pure sample of b-hadrons with a typical efficiency of 60-70%; its output was used in about 60% of LHCb papers. This talk presents studies carried out to optimize the topological trigger for LHC Run 2. In particular, we have carried out a detailed comparison of various machine learning classifier algorithms, e.g., AdaBoost, MatrixNet and neural networks. The topological trigger algorithm is designed to select all ’interesting” decays of b-hadrons, but cannot be trained on every such decay. Studies have therefore been performed to determine how to optimize the performance of the classification algorithm on decays not used in the training. Methods studied include cascading, ensembling and blending techniques. Furthermore, novel boosting techniques have been implemented that will help reduce systematic uncertainties in Run 2 measurements. We demonstrate that the reoptimized topological trigger is expected to significantly improve on the Run 1 performance for a wide range of b-hadron decays.

  9. Calorimetry Triggering in ATLAS

    SciTech Connect

    Igonkina, O.; Achenbach, R.; Adragna, P.; Aharrouche, M.; Alexandre, G.; Andrei, V.; Anduaga, X.; Aracena, I.; Backlund, S.; Baines, J.; Barnett, B.M.; Bauss, B.; Bee, C.; Behera, P.; Bell, P.; Bendel, M.; Benslama, K.; Berry, T.; Bogaerts, A.; Bohm, C.; Bold, T.; /UC, Irvine /AGH-UST, Cracow /Birmingham U. /Barcelona, IFAE /CERN /Birmingham U. /Rutherford /Montreal U. /Santa Maria U., Valparaiso /DESY /DESY, Zeuthen /Geneva U. /City Coll., N.Y. /Barcelona, IFAE /CERN /Birmingham U. /Kirchhoff Inst. Phys. /Birmingham U. /Lisbon, LIFEP /Rio de Janeiro Federal U. /City Coll., N.Y. /Birmingham U. /Copenhagen U. /Copenhagen U. /Brookhaven /Rutherford /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Pennsylvania U. /Montreal U. /SLAC /CERN /Michigan State U. /Chile U., Catolica /City Coll., N.Y. /Oxford U. /La Plata U. /McGill U. /Mainz U., Inst. Phys. /Hamburg U. /DESY /DESY, Zeuthen /Geneva U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /CERN /Rutherford /Rio de Janeiro Federal U. /Birmingham U. /Montreal U. /CERN /Kirchhoff Inst. Phys. /Liverpool U. /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Pennsylvania U. /Kirchhoff Inst. Phys. /Geneva U. /Birmingham U. /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Rutherford /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Rutherford /Royal Holloway, U. of London /AGH-UST, Cracow /Mainz U., Inst. Phys. /Mainz U., Inst. Phys. /Birmingham U. /Hamburg U. /DESY /DESY, Zeuthen /Geneva U. /Kirchhoff Inst. Phys. /Michigan State U. /Stockholm U. /Stockholm U. /Birmingham U. /CERN /Montreal U. /Stockholm U. /Arizona U. /Regina U. /Regina U. /Rutherford /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Kirchhoff Inst. Phys. /DESY /DESY, Zeuthen /City Coll., N.Y. /University Coll. London /Humboldt U., Berlin /Queen Mary, U. of London /Argonne /LPSC, Grenoble /Arizona U. /Kirchhoff Inst. Phys. /Birmingham U. /Antonio Narino U. /Hamburg U. /DESY /DESY, Zeuthen /Kirchhoff Inst. Phys. /Birmingham U. /Chile U., Catolica /Indiana U. /Manchester U. /Kirchhoff Inst. Phys. /Rutherford /City Coll., N.Y. /Stockholm U. /La Plata U. /Antonio Narino U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Kirchhoff Inst. Phys. /Antonio Narino U. /Pavia U. /City Coll., N.Y. /Mainz U., Inst. Phys. /Mainz U., Inst. Phys. /Pennsylvania U. /Barcelona, IFAE /Barcelona, IFAE /Chile U., Catolica /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /Rutherford /Barcelona, IFAE /Nevis Labs, Columbia U. /CERN /Antonio Narino U. /McGill U. /Rutherford /Santa Maria U., Valparaiso /Rutherford /Chile U., Catolica /Brookhaven /Oregon U. /Mainz U., Inst. Phys. /Barcelona, IFAE /McGill U. /Antonio Narino U. /Antonio Narino U. /Kirchhoff Inst. Phys. /Sydney U. /Rutherford /McGill U. /McGill U. /Pavia U. /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /Kirchhoff Inst. Phys. /Kirchhoff Inst. Phys. /Mainz U., Inst. Phys. /Barcelona, IFAE /SLAC /Stockholm U. /Moscow State U. /Stockholm U. /Birmingham U. /Kirchhoff Inst. Phys. /DESY /DESY, Zeuthen /Birmingham U. /Geneva U. /Oregon U. /Barcelona, IFAE /University Coll. London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Birmingham U. /Mainz U., Inst. Phys. /Birmingham U. /Birmingham U. /Oregon U. /La Plata U. /Geneva U. /Chile U., Catolica /McGill U. /Pavia U. /Barcelona, IFAE /Regina U. /Birmingham U. /Birmingham U. /Kirchhoff Inst. Phys. /Oxford U. /CERN /Kirchhoff Inst. Phys. /UC, Irvine /UC, Irvine /Wisconsin U., Madison /Rutherford /Mainz U., Inst. Phys. /CERN /Geneva U. /Copenhagen U. /City Coll., N.Y. /Wisconsin U., Madison /Rio de Janeiro Federal U. /Wisconsin U., Madison /Stockholm U. /University Coll. London

    2011-12-08

    The ATLAS experiment is preparing for data taking at 14 TeV collision energy. A rich discovery physics program is being prepared in addition to the detailed study of Standard Model processes which will be produced in abundance. The ATLAS multi-level trigger system is designed to accept one event in 2/10{sup 5} to enable the selection of rare and unusual physics events. The ATLAS calorimeter system is a precise instrument, which includes liquid Argon electro-magnetic and hadronic components as well as a scintillator-tile hadronic calorimeter. All these components are used in the various levels of the trigger system. A wide physics coverage is ensured by inclusively selecting events with candidate electrons, photons, taus, jets or those with large missing transverse energy. The commissioning of the trigger system is being performed with cosmic ray events and by replaying simulated Monte Carlo events through the trigger and data acquisition system.

  10. Dealing with Asthma Triggers

    MedlinePlus

    ... smell given off by paint or gas, and air pollution. If you notice that an irritant triggers your ... or other tobacco products around you. If outdoor air pollution is a problem, running the air conditioner or ...

  11. Dealing with Asthma Triggers

    MedlinePlus

    ... reactions stuff in the air, like smoke and pollution colds or the flu weather conditions exercise continue ... given off by paint or gas, and air pollution. If you notice that an irritant triggers your ...

  12. ELECTRONIC TRIGGER CIRCUIT

    DOEpatents

    Russell, J.A.G.

    1958-01-01

    An electronic trigger circuit is described of the type where an output pulse is obtained only after an input voltage has cqualed or exceeded a selected reference voltage. In general, the invention comprises a source of direct current reference voltage in series with an impedance and a diode rectifying element. An input pulse of preselected amplitude causes the diode to conduct and develop a signal across the impedance. The signal is delivered to an amplifier where an output pulse is produced and part of the output is fed back in a positive manner to the diode so that the amplifier produces a steep wave front trigger pulsc at the output. The trigger point of the described circuit is not subject to variation due to the aging, etc., of multi-electrode tabes, since the diode circuit essentially determines the trigger point.

  13. Triggered Earthquakes Following Parkfield?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hough, S. E.

    2004-12-01

    When the M5.0 Arvin earthquake struck approximately 30 hours after the 28 September 2004 M6.0 Parkfield earthquake, it seemed likely if not obvious that the latter had triggered the former. The odds of a M5.0 or greater event occurring by random chance in a given 2-day window is low, on the order of 2%. However, previously published results suggest that remotely triggered earthquakes are observed only following much larger mainshocks, typically M7 or above. Moreover, using a standard beta-statistic approach, one finds no pervasive regional increase of seismicity in the weeks following the Parkfield mainshock. (Neither were any moderate events observed at regional distances following the 1934 and 1966 Parkfield earthquakes.) Was Arvin a remotely triggered earthquake? To address this issue further I compare the seismicity rate changes following the Parkfield mainshock with those following 14 previous M5.3-7.1 earthquakes in central and southern California. I show that, on average, seismicity increased to a distance of at least 120 km following these events. For all but the M7.1 Hector Mine mainshock, this is well beyond the radius of what would be considered a traditional aftershock zone. Average seismicity rates also increase, albeit more weakly, to a distance of about 220 km. These results suggest that even moderate mainshocks in central and southern California do trigger seismicity at distances up to 220 km, supporting the inference that Arvin was indeed a remotely triggered earthquake. In general, only weak triggering is expected following moderate (M5.5-6.5) mainshocks. However, as illustrated by Arvin and, in retrospect, the 1986 M5.5 Oceanside earthquake, which struck just 5 days after the M5.9 North Palm Springs earthquake, triggered events can sometimes be large enough to generate public interest, and anxiety.

  14. Trigger mechanism for engines

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, L.R.

    1989-02-28

    A trigger mechanism is described for a blower-vacuum apparatus having a trigger mounted within a handle and a small engine comprising: a throttle; a ''L'' shaped lever having first and second legs mounted for rotation about an intermediate pivot within the handle when the trigger is depressed, interconnecting the trigger and the throttle, the second leg having first teeth defined therein, the lever further having idle, full throttle and stop positions; a normally raised latch means adapted to be rotated and axially depressed, the latch means having second teeth situated on a cam to engage the first teeth for holding the lever in an intermediate position between the idle and full throttle positions when the latch means is rotated. The latch means further are cam teeth into potential engagement with the lever teeth when the trigger is depressed, lever is biased to the stop position; and idle adjusting means means for intercepting the second leg for preventing the second leg from reaching the stop position when the latch means is raised.

  15. The CMS trigger system

    DOE PAGES

    Khachatryan, Vardan

    2017-01-24

    This paper describes the CMS trigger system and its performance during Run 1 of the LHC. The trigger system consists of two levels designed to select events of potential physics interest from a GHz (MHz) interaction rate of proton-proton (heavy ion) collisions. The first level of the trigger is implemented in hardware, and selects events containing detector signals consistent with an electron, photon, muon, tau lepton, jet, or missing transverse energy. A programmable menu of up to 128 object-based algorithms is used to select events for subsequent processing. The trigger thresholds are adjusted to the LHC instantaneous luminosity during datamore » taking in order to restrict the output rate to 100 kHz, the upper limit imposed by the CMS readout electronics. The second level, implemented in software, further refines the purity of the output stream, selecting an average rate of 400 Hz for offline event storage. The objectives, strategy and performance of the trigger system during the LHC Run 1 are described.« less

  16. The CMS trigger system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khachatryan, V.; Sirunyan, A. M.; Tumasyan, A.; Adam, W.; Asilar, E.; Bergauer, T.; Brandstetter, J.; Brondolin, E.; Dragicevic, M.; Erö, J.; Flechl, M.; Friedl, M.; Frühwirth, R.; Ghete, V. M.; Hartl, C.; Hörmann, N.; Hrubec, J.; Jeitler, M.; Knünz, V.; König, A.; Krammer, M.; Krätschmer, I.; Liko, D.; Matsushita, T.; Mikulec, I.; Rabady, D.; Rahbaran, B.; Rohringer, H.; Schieck, J.; Schöfbeck, R.; Strauss, J.; Treberer-Treberspurg, W.; Waltenberger, W.; Wulz, C.-E.; Mossolov, V.; Shumeiko, N.; Suarez Gonzalez, J.; Alderweireldt, S.; Cornelis, T.; De Wolf, E. A.; Janssen, X.; Knutsson, A.; Lauwers, J.; Luyckx, S.; Van De Klundert, M.; Van Haevermaet, H.; Van Mechelen, P.; Van Remortel, N.; Van Spilbeeck, A.; Abu Zeid, S.; Blekman, F.; D'Hondt, J.; Daci, N.; De Bruyn, I.; Deroover, K.; Heracleous, N.; Keaveney, J.; Lowette, S.; Moreels, L.; Olbrechts, A.; Python, Q.; Strom, D.; Tavernier, S.; Van Doninck, W.; Van Mulders, P.; Van Onsem, G. P.; Van Parijs, I.; Barria, P.; Brun, H.; Caillol, C.; Clerbaux, B.; De Lentdecker, G.; Fasanella, G.; Favart, L.; Grebenyuk, A.; Karapostoli, G.; Lenzi, T.; Léonard, A.; Maerschalk, T.; Marinov, A.; Perniè, L.; Randle-conde, A.; Reis, T.; Seva, T.; Vander Velde, C.; Vanlaer, P.; Yonamine, R.; Zenoni, F.; Zhang, F.; Beernaert, K.; Benucci, L.; Cimmino, A.; Crucy, S.; Dobur, D.; Fagot, A.; Garcia, G.; Gul, M.; Mccartin, J.; Ocampo Rios, A. A.; Poyraz, D.; Ryckbosch, D.; Salva, S.; Sigamani, M.; Strobbe, N.; Tytgat, M.; Van Driessche, W.; Yazgan, E.; Zaganidis, N.; Basegmez, S.; Beluffi, C.; Bondu, O.; Brochet, S.; Bruno, G.; Caudron, A.; Ceard, L.; Da Silveira, G. G.; Delaere, C.; Favart, D.; Forthomme, L.; Giammanco, A.; Hollar, J.; Jafari, A.; Jez, P.; Komm, M.; Lemaitre, V.; Mertens, A.; Musich, M.; Nuttens, C.; Perrini, L.; Pin, A.; Piotrzkowski, K.; Popov, A.; Quertenmont, L.; Selvaggi, M.; Vidal Marono, M.; Beliy, N.; Hammad, G. H.; Aldá Júnior, W. L.; Alves, F. L.; Alves, G. A.; Brito, L.; Correa Martins Junior, M.; Hamer, M.; Hensel, C.; Mora Herrera, C.; Moraes, A.; Pol, M. E.; Rebello Teles, P.; Belchior Batista Das Chagas, E.; Carvalho, W.; Chinellato, J.; Custódio, A.; Da Costa, E. M.; Damiao, D. De Jesus; De Oliveira Martins, C.; Fonseca De Souza, S.; Huertas Guativa, L. M.; Malbouisson, H.; Matos Figueiredo, D.; Mundim, L.; Nogima, H.; Prado Da Silva, W. L.; Santoro, A.; Sznajder, A.; Tonelli Manganote, E. J.; Vilela Pereira, A.; Ahuja, S.; Bernardes, C. A.; De Souza Santos, A.; Dogra, S.; Fernandez Perez Tomei, T. R.; Gregores, E. M.; Mercadante, P. G.; Moon, C. S.; Novaes, S. F.; Padula, Sandra S.; Romero Abad, D.; Ruiz Vargas, J. C.; Aleksandrov, A.; Hadjiiska, R.; Iaydjiev, P.; Rodozov, M.; Stoykova, S.; Sultanov, G.; Vutova, M.; Dimitrov, A.; Glushkov, I.; Litov, L.; Pavlov, B.; Petkov, P.; Ahmad, M.; Bian, J. G.; Chen, G. M.; Chen, H. S.; Chen, M.; Cheng, T.; Du, R.; Jiang, C. H.; Plestina, R.; Romeo, F.; Shaheen, S. M.; Spiezia, A.; Tao, J.; Wang, C.; Wang, Z.; Zhang, H.; Asawatangtrakuldee, C.; Ban, Y.; Li, Q.; Liu, S.; Mao, Y.; Qian, S. J.; Wang, D.; Xu, Z.; Avila, C.; Cabrera, A.; Chaparro Sierra, L. F.; Florez, C.; Gomez, J. P.; Gomez Moreno, B.; Sanabria, J. C.; Godinovic, N.; Lelas, D.; Puljak, I.; Ribeiro Cipriano, P. M.; Antunovic, Z.; Kovac, M.; Brigljevic, V.; Kadija, K.; Luetic, J.; Micanovic, S.; Sudic, L.; Attikis, A.; Mavromanolakis, G.; Mousa, J.; Nicolaou, C.; Ptochos, F.; Razis, P. A.; Rykaczewski, H.; Bodlak, M.; Finger, M.; Finger, M., Jr.; Assran, Y.; El Sawy, M.; Elgammal, S.; Ellithi Kamel, A.; Mahmoud, M. A.; Calpas, B.; Kadastik, M.; Murumaa, M.; Raidal, M.; Tiko, A.; Veelken, C.; Eerola, P.; Pekkanen, J.; Voutilainen, M.; Härkönen, J.; Karimäki, V.; Kinnunen, R.; Lampén, T.; Lassila-Perini, K.; Lehti, S.; Lindén, T.; Luukka, P.; Mäenpää, T.; Peltola, T.; Tuominen, E.; Tuominiemi, J.; Tuovinen, E.; Wendland, L.; Talvitie, J.; Tuuva, T.; Besancon, M.; Couderc, F.; Dejardin, M.; Denegri, D.; Fabbro, B.; Faure, J. L.; Favaro, C.; Ferri, F.; Ganjour, S.; Givernaud, A.; Gras, P.; Hamel de Monchenault, G.; Jarry, P.; Locci, E.; Machet, M.; Malcles, J.; Rander, J.; Rosowsky, A.; Titov, M.; Zghiche, A.; Antropov, I.; Baffioni, S.; Beaudette, F.; Busson, P.; Cadamuro, L.; Chapon, E.; Charlot, C.; Dahms, T.; Davignon, O.; Filipovic, N.; Florent, A.; Granier de Cassagnac, R.; Lisniak, S.; Mastrolorenzo, L.; Miné, P.; Naranjo, I. N.; Nguyen, M.; Ochando, C.; Ortona, G.; Paganini, P.; Pigard, P.; Regnard, S.; Salerno, R.; Sauvan, J. B.; Sirois, Y.; Strebler, T.; Yilmaz, Y.; Zabi, A.; Agram, J.-L.; Andrea, J.; Aubin, A.; Bloch, D.; Brom, J.-M.; Buttignol, M.; Chabert, E. C.; Chanon, N.; Collard, C.; Conte, E.; Coubez, X.; Fontaine, J.-C.; Gelé, D.; Goerlach, U.; Goetzmann, C.; Le Bihan, A.-C.; Merlin, J. A.; Skovpen, K.; Van Hove, P.; Gadrat, S.; Beauceron, S.; Bernet, C.; Boudoul, G.; Bouvier, E.; Carrillo Montoya, C. A.; Chierici, R.; Contardo, D.; Courbon, B.; Depasse, P.; El Mamouni, H.; Fan, J.; Fay, J.; Gascon, S.; Gouzevitch, M.; Ille, B.; Lagarde, F.; Laktineh, I. B.; Lethuillier, M.; Mirabito, L.; Pequegnot, A. L.; Perries, S.; Ruiz Alvarez, J. D.; Sabes, D.; Sgandurra, L.; Sordini, V.; Vander Donckt, M.; Verdier, P.; Viret, S.; Toriashvili, T.; Tsamalaidze, Z.; Autermann, C.; Beranek, S.; Edelhoff, M.; Feld, L.; Heister, A.; Kiesel, M. K.; Klein, K.; Lipinski, M.; Ostapchuk, A.; Preuten, M.; Raupach, F.; Schael, S.; Schulte, J. F.; Verlage, T.; Weber, H.; Wittmer, B.; Zhukov, V.; Ata, M.; Brodski, M.; Dietz-Laursonn, E.; Duchardt, D.; Endres, M.; Erdmann, M.; Erdweg, S.; Esch, T.; Fischer, R.; Güth, A.; Hebbeker, T.; Heidemann, C.; Hoepfner, K.; Klingebiel, D.; Knutzen, S.; Kreuzer, P.; Merschmeyer, M.; Meyer, A.; Millet, P.; Olschewski, M.; Padeken, K.; Papacz, P.; Pook, T.; Radziej, M.; Reithler, H.; Rieger, M.; Scheuch, F.; Sonnenschein, L.; Teyssier, D.; Thüer, S.; Cherepanov, V.; Erdogan, Y.; Flügge, G.; Geenen, H.; Geisler, M.; Hoehle, F.; Kargoll, B.; Kress, T.; Kuessel, Y.; Künsken, A.; Lingemann, J.; Nehrkorn, A.; Nowack, A.; Nugent, I. M.; Pistone, C.; Pooth, O.; Stahl, A.; Aldaya Martin, M.; Asin, I.; Bartosik, N.; Behnke, O.; Behrens, U.; Bell, A. 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S.; Junkes, A.; Klanner, R.; Kogler, R.; Kovalchuk, N.; Lapsien, T.; Lenz, T.; Marchesini, I.; Marconi, D.; Meyer, M.; Nowatschin, D.; Ott, J.; Pantaleo, F.; Peiffer, T.; Perieanu, A.; Pietsch, N.; Poehlsen, J.; Rathjens, D.; Sander, C.; Scharf, C.; Schettler, H.; Schleper, P.; Schlieckau, E.; Schmidt, A.; Schwandt, J.; Sola, V.; Stadie, H.; Steinbrück, G.; Tholen, H.; Troendle, D.; Usai, E.; Vanelderen, L.; Vanhoefer, A.; Vormwald, B.; Akbiyik, M.; Barth, C.; Baus, C.; Berger, J.; Böser, C.; Butz, E.; Chwalek, T.; Colombo, F.; De Boer, W.; Descroix, A.; Dierlamm, A.; Fink, S.; Frensch, F.; Friese, R.; Giffels, M.; Gilbert, A.; Haitz, D.; Hartmann, F.; Heindl, S. M.; Husemann, U.; Katkov, I.; Kornmayer, A.; Lobelle Pardo, P.; Maier, B.; Mildner, H.; Mozer, M. U.; Müller, T.; Müller, Th.; Plagge, M.; Quast, G.; Rabbertz, K.; Röcker, S.; Roscher, F.; Sieber, G.; Simonis, H. J.; Stober, F. 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M.; Paramesvaran, S.; Poll, A.; Sakuma, T.; Seif El Nasr-storey, S.; Senkin, S.; Smith, D.; Smith, V. J.; Bell, K. W.; Belyaev, A.; Brew, C.; Brown, R. M.; Calligaris, L.; Cieri, D.; Cockerill, D. J. A.; Coughlan, J. A.; Harder, K.; Harper, S.; Olaiya, E.; Petyt, D.; Shepherd-Themistocleous, C. H.; Thea, A.; Tomalin, I. R.; Williams, T.; Womersley, W. J.; Worm, S. D.; Baber, M.; Bainbridge, R.; Buchmuller, O.; Bundock, A.; Burton, D.; Casasso, S.; Citron, M.; Colling, D.; Corpe, L.; Cripps, N.; Dauncey, P.; Davies, G.; De Wit, A.; Della Negra, M.; Dunne, P.; Elwood, A.; Ferguson, W.; Fulcher, J.; Futyan, D.; Hall, G.; Iles, G.; Kenzie, M.; Lane, R.; Lucas, R.; Lyons, L.; Magnan, A.-M.; Malik, S.; Nash, J.; Nikitenko, A.; Pela, J.; Pesaresi, M.; Petridis, K.; Raymond, D. M.; Richards, A.; Rose, A.; Seez, C.; Tapper, A.; Uchida, K.; Vazquez Acosta, M.; Virdee, T.; Zenz, S. C.; Cole, J. E.; Hobson, P. R.; Khan, A.; Kyberd, P.; Leggat, D.; Leslie, D.; Reid, I. D.; Symonds, P.; Teodorescu, L.; Turner, M.; Borzou, A.; Call, K.; Dittmann, J.; Hatakeyama, K.; Liu, H.; Pastika, N.; Charaf, O.; Cooper, S. I.; Henderson, C.; Rumerio, P.; Arcaro, D.; Avetisyan, A.; Bose, T.; Fantasia, C.; Gastler, D.; Lawson, P.; Rankin, D.; Richardson, C.; Rohlf, J.; St. John, J.; Sulak, L.; Zou, D.; Alimena, J.; Berry, E.; Bhattacharya, S.; Cutts, D.; Dhingra, N.; Ferapontov, A.; Garabedian, A.; Hakala, J.; Heintz, U.; Laird, E.; Landsberg, G.; Mao, Z.; Narain, M.; Piperov, S.; Sagir, S.; Syarif, R.; Breedon, R.; Breto, G.; Calderon De La Barca Sanchez, M.; Chauhan, S.; Chertok, M.; Conway, J.; Conway, R.; Cox, P. T.; Erbacher, R.; Gardner, M.; Ko, W.; Lander, R.; Mulhearn, M.; Pellett, D.; Pilot, J.; Ricci-Tam, F.; Shalhout, S.; Smith, J.; Squires, M.; Stolp, D.; Tripathi, M.; Wilbur, S.; Yohay, R.; Cousins, R.; Everaerts, P.; Farrell, C.; Hauser, J.; Ignatenko, M.; Saltzberg, D.; Takasugi, E.; Valuev, V.; Weber, M.; Burt, K.; Clare, R.; Ellison, J.; Gary, J. W.; Hanson, G.; Heilman, J.; Ivova PANEVA, M.; Jandir, P.; Kennedy, E.; Lacroix, F.; Long, O. R.; Luthra, A.; Malberti, M.; Olmedo Negrete, M.; Shrinivas, A.; Wei, H.; Wimpenny, S.; Yates, B. R.; Branson, J. G.; Cerati, G. B.; Cittolin, S.; D'Agnolo, R. T.; Derdzinski, M.; Holzner, A.; Kelley, R.; Klein, D.; Letts, J.; Macneill, I.; Olivito, D.; Padhi, S.; Pieri, M.; Sani, M.; Sharma, V.; Simon, S.; Tadel, M.; Vartak, A.; Wasserbaech, S.; Welke, C.; Würthwein, F.; Yagil, A.; Zevi Della Porta, G.; Bradmiller-Feld, J.; Campagnari, C.; Dishaw, A.; Dutta, V.; Flowers, K.; Sevilla, M. Franco; Geffert, P.; George, C.; Golf, F.; Gouskos, L.; Gran, J.; Incandela, J.; Mccoll, N.; Mullin, S. D.; Richman, J.; Stuart, D.; Suarez, I.; West, C.; Yoo, J.; Anderson, D.; Apresyan, A.; Bornheim, A.; Bunn, J.; Chen, Y.; Duarte, J.; Mott, A.; Newman, H. B.; Pena, C.; Pierini, M.; Spiropulu, M.; Vlimant, J. R.; Xie, S.; Zhu, R. Y.; Andrews, M. B.; Azzolini, V.; Calamba, A.; Carlson, B.; Ferguson, T.; Paulini, M.; Russ, J.; Sun, M.; Vogel, H.; Vorobiev, I.; Cumalat, J. P.; Ford, W. T.; Gaz, A.; Jensen, F.; Johnson, A.; Krohn, M.; Mulholland, T.; Nauenberg, U.; Stenson, K.; Wagner, S. R.; Alexander, J.; Chatterjee, A.; Chaves, J.; Chu, J.; Dittmer, S.; Eggert, N.; Mirman, N.; Kaufman, G. Nicolas; Patterson, J. R.; Rinkevicius, A.; Ryd, A.; Skinnari, L.; Soffi, L.; Sun, W.; Tan, S. M.; Teo, W. D.; Thom, J.; Thompson, J.; Tucker, J.; Weng, Y.; Wittich, P.; Abdullin, S.; Albrow, M.; Anderson, J.; Apollinari, G.; Banerjee, S.; Bauerdick, L. A. T.; Beretvas, A.; Berryhill, J.; Bhat, P. C.; Bolla, G.; Burkett, K.; Butler, J. N.; Cheung, H. W. K.; Chlebana, F.; Cihangir, S.; Elvira, V. D.; Fisk, I.; Freeman, J.; Gottschalk, E.; Gray, L.; Green, D.; Grünendahl, S.; Gutsche, O.; Hanlon, J.; Hare, D.; Harris, R. M.; Hasegawa, S.; Hirschauer, J.; Hu, Z.; Jayatilaka, B.; Jindariani, S.; Johnson, M.; Joshi, U.; Jung, A. W.; Klima, B.; Kreis, B.; Kwan, S.; Lammel, S.; Linacre, J.; Lincoln, D.; Lipton, R.; Liu, T.; Lopes De Sá, R.; Lykken, J.; Maeshima, K.; Marraffino, J. M.; Martinez Outschoorn, V. I.; Maruyama, S.; Mason, D.; McBride, P.; Merkel, P.; Mishra, K.; Mrenna, S.; Nahn, S.; Newman-Holmes, C.; O'Dell, V.; Pedro, K.; Prokofyev, O.; Rakness, G.; Sexton-Kennedy, E.; Soha, A.; Spalding, W. J.; Spiegel, L.; Taylor, L.; Tkaczyk, S.; Tran, N. V.; Uplegger, L.; Vaandering, E. W.; Vernieri, C.; Verzocchi, M.; Vidal, R.; Weber, H. A.; Whitbeck, A.; Yang, F.; Acosta, D.; Avery, P.; Bortignon, P.; Bourilkov, D.; Carnes, A.; Carver, M.; Curry, D.; Das, S.; Di Giovanni, G. P.; Field, R. D.; Furic, I. K.; Gleyzer, S. V.; Hugon, J.; Konigsberg, J.; Korytov, A.; Low, J. F.; Ma, P.; Matchev, K.; Mei, H.; Milenovic, P.; Mitselmakher, G.; Rank, D.; Rossin, R.; Shchutska, L.; Snowball, M.; Sperka, D.; Terentyev, N.; Thomas, L.; Wang, J.; Wang, S.; Yelton, J.; Hewamanage, S.; Linn, S.; Markowitz, P.; Martinez, G.; Rodriguez, J. L.; Ackert, A.; Adams, J. R.; Adams, T.; Askew, A.; Bochenek, J.; Diamond, B.; Haas, J.; Hagopian, S.; Hagopian, V.; Johnson, K. F.; Khatiwada, A.; Prosper, H.; Weinberg, M.; Baarmand, M. M.; Bhopatkar, V.; Colafranceschi, S.; Hohlmann, M.; Kalakhety, H.; Noonan, D.; Roy, T.; Yumiceva, F.; Adams, M. R.; Apanasevich, L.; Berry, D.; Betts, R. R.; Bucinskaite, I.; Cavanaugh, R.; Evdokimov, O.; Gauthier, L.; Gerber, C. E.; Hofman, D. J.; Kurt, P.; O'Brien, C.; Sandoval Gonzalez, I. D.; Silkworth, C.; Turner, P.; Varelas, N.; Wu, Z.; Zakaria, M.; Bilki, B.; Clarida, W.; Dilsiz, K.; Durgut, S.; Gandrajula, R. P.; Haytmyradov, M.; Khristenko, V.; Merlo, J.-P.; Mermerkaya, H.; Mestvirishvili, A.; Moeller, A.; Nachtman, J.; Ogul, H.; Onel, Y.; Ozok, F.; Penzo, A.; Snyder, C.; Tiras, E.; Wetzel, J.; Yi, K.; Anderson, I.; Barnett, B. A.; Blumenfeld, B.; Eminizer, N.; Fehling, D.; Feng, L.; Gritsan, A. V.; Maksimovic, P.; Martin, C.; Osherson, M.; Roskes, J.; Sady, A.; Sarica, U.; Swartz, M.; Xiao, M.; Xin, Y.; You, C.; Baringer, P.; Bean, A.; Benelli, G.; Bruner, C.; Kenny, R. P., III; Majumder, D.; Malek, M.; Murray, M.; Sanders, S.; Stringer, R.; Wang, Q.; Ivanov, A.; Kaadze, K.; Khalil, S.; Makouski, M.; Maravin, Y.; Mohammadi, A.; Saini, L. K.; Skhirtladze, N.; Toda, S.; Lange, D.; Rebassoo, F.; Wright, D.; Anelli, C.; Baden, A.; Baron, O.; Belloni, A.; Calvert, B.; Eno, S. C.; Ferraioli, C.; Gomez, J. A.; Hadley, N. J.; Jabeen, S.; Kellogg, R. G.; Kolberg, T.; Kunkle, J.; Lu, Y.; Mignerey, A. C.; Shin, Y. H.; Skuja, A.; Tonjes, M. B.; Tonwar, S. C.; Apyan, A.; Barbieri, R.; Baty, A.; Bierwagen, K.; Brandt, S.; Busza, W.; Cali, I. A.; Demiragli, Z.; Di Matteo, L.; Gomez Ceballos, G.; Goncharov, M.; Gulhan, D.; Iiyama, Y.; Innocenti, G. M.; Klute, M.; Kovalskyi, D.; Lai, Y. S.; Lee, Y.-J.; Levin, A.; Luckey, P. D.; Marini, A. C.; Mcginn, C.; Mironov, C.; Narayanan, S.; Niu, X.; Paus, C.; Ralph, D.; Roland, C.; Roland, G.; Salfeld-Nebgen, J.; Stephans, G. S. F.; Sumorok, K.; Varma, M.; Velicanu, D.; Veverka, J.; Wang, J.; Wang, T. W.; Wyslouch, B.; Yang, M.; Zhukova, V.; Dahmes, B.; Evans, A.; Finkel, A.; Gude, A.; Hansen, P.; Kalafut, S.; Kao, S. C.; Klapoetke, K.; Kubota, Y.; Lesko, Z.; Mans, J.; Nourbakhsh, S.; Ruckstuhl, N.; Rusack, R.; Tambe, N.; Turkewitz, J.; Acosta, J. G.; Oliveros, S.; Avdeeva, E.; Bloom, K.; Bose, S.; Claes, D. R.; Dominguez, A.; Fangmeier, C.; Gonzalez Suarez, R.; Kamalieddin, R.; Keller, J.; Knowlton, D.; Kravchenko, I.; Meier, F.; Monroy, J.; Ratnikov, F.; Siado, J. E.; Snow, G. R.; Alyari, M.; Dolen, J.; George, J.; Godshalk, A.; Harrington, C.; Iashvili, I.; Kaisen, J.; Kharchilava, A.; Kumar, A.; Rappoccio, S.; Roozbahani, B.; Alverson, G.; Barberis, E.; Baumgartel, D.; Chasco, M.; Hortiangtham, A.; Massironi, A.; Morse, D. M.; Nash, D.; Orimoto, T.; Teixeira De Lima, R.; Trocino, D.; Wang, R.-J.; Wood, D.; Zhang, J.; Hahn, K. A.; Kubik, A.; Mucia, N.; Odell, N.; Pollack, B.; Pozdnyakov, A.; Schmitt, M.; Stoynev, S.; Sung, K.; Trovato, M.; Velasco, M.; Brinkerhoff, A.; Dev, N.; Hildreth, M.; Jessop, C.; Karmgard, D. J.; Kellams, N.; Lannon, K.; Lynch, S.; Marinelli, N.; Meng, F.; Mueller, C.; Musienko, Y.; Pearson, T.; Planer, M.; Reinsvold, A.; Ruchti, R.; Smith, G.; Taroni, S.; Valls, N.; Wayne, M.; Wolf, M.; Woodard, A.; Antonelli, L.; Brinson, J.; Bylsma, B.; Durkin, L. S.; Flowers, S.; Hart, A.; Hill, C.; Hughes, R.; Ji, W.; Kotov, K.; Ling, T. Y.; Liu, B.; Luo, W.; Puigh, D.; Rodenburg, M.; Winer, B. L.; Wulsin, H. W.; Driga, O.; Elmer, P.; Hardenbrook, J.; Hebda, P.; Koay, S. A.; Lujan, P.; Marlow, D.; Medvedeva, T.; Mooney, M.; Olsen, J.; Palmer, C.; Piroué, P.; Saka, H.; Stickland, D.; Tully, C.; Zuranski, A.; Malik, S.; Barnes, V. E.; Benedetti, D.; Bortoletto, D.; Gutay, L.; Jha, M. K.; Jones, M.; Jung, K.; Miller, D. H.; Neumeister, N.; Radburn-Smith, B. C.; Shi, X.; Shipsey, I.; Silvers, D.; Sun, J.; Svyatkovskiy, A.; Wang, F.; Xie, W.; Xu, L.; Parashar, N.; Stupak, J.; Adair, A.; Akgun, B.; Chen, Z.; Ecklund, K. M.; Geurts, F. J. M.; Guilbaud, M.; Li, W.; Michlin, B.; Northup, M.; Padley, B. P.; Redjimi, R.; Roberts, J.; Rorie, J.; Tu, Z.; Zabel, J.; Betchart, B.; Bodek, A.; de Barbaro, P.; Demina, R.; Eshaq, Y.; Ferbel, T.; Galanti, M.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; Han, J.; Harel, A.; Hindrichs, O.; Khukhunaishvili, A.; Petrillo, G.; Tan, P.; Verzetti, M.; Arora, S.; Barker, A.; Chou, J. P.; Contreras-Campana, C.; Contreras-Campana, E.; Duggan, D.; Ferencek, D.; Gershtein, Y.; Gray, R.; Halkiadakis, E.; Hidas, D.; Hughes, E.; Kaplan, S.; Kunnawalkam Elayavalli, R.; Lath, A.; Nash, K.; Panwalkar, S.; Park, M.; Salur, S.; Schnetzer, S.; Sheffield, D.; Somalwar, S.; Stone, R.; Thomas, S.; Thomassen, P.; Walker, M.; Foerster, M.; Riley, G.; Rose, K.; Spanier, S.; York, A.; Bouhali, O.; Castaneda Hernandez, A.; Dalchenko, M.; De Mattia, M.; Delgado, A.; Dildick, S.; Eusebi, R.; Gilmore, J.; Kamon, T.; Krutelyov, V.; Mueller, R.; Osipenkov, I.; Pakhotin, Y.; Patel, R.; Perloff, A.; Rose, A.; Safonov, A.; Tatarinov, A.; Ulmer, K. A.; Akchurin, N.; Cowden, C.; Damgov, J.; Dragoiu, C.; Dudero, P. R.; Faulkner, J.; Kunori, S.; Lamichhane, K.; Lee, S. W.; Libeiro, T.; Undleeb, S.; Volobouev, I.; Appelt, E.; Delannoy, A. G.; Greene, S.; Gurrola, A.; Janjam, R.; Johns, W.; Maguire, C.; Mao, Y.; Melo, A.; Ni, H.; Sheldon, P.; Snook, B.; Tuo, S.; Velkovska, J.; Xu, Q.; Arenton, M. W.; Cox, B.; Francis, B.; Goodell, J.; Hirosky, R.; Ledovskoy, A.; Li, H.; Lin, C.; Neu, C.; Sinthuprasith, T.; Sun, X.; Wang, Y.; Wolfe, E.; Wood, J.; Xia, F.; Clarke, C.; Harr, R.; Karchin, P. E.; Kottachchi Kankanamge Don, C.; Lamichhane, P.; Sturdy, J.; Belknap, D. A.; Carlsmith, D.; Cepeda, M.; Dasu, S.; Dodd, L.; Duric, S.; Gomber, B.; Grothe, M.; Hall-Wilton, R.; Herndon, M.; Hervé, A.; Klabbers, P.; Lanaro, A.; Levine, A.; Long, K.; Loveless, R.; Mohapatra, A.; Ojalvo, I.; Perry, T.; Pierro, G. A.; Polese, G.; Ruggles, T.; Sarangi, T.; Savin, A.; Sharma, A.; Smith, N.; Smith, W. H.; Taylor, D.; Woods, N.

    2017-01-01

    This paper describes the CMS trigger system and its performance during Run 1 of the LHC. The trigger system consists of two levels designed to select events of potential physics interest from a GHz (MHz) interaction rate of proton-proton (heavy ion) collisions. The first level of the trigger is implemented in hardware, and selects events containing detector signals consistent with an electron, photon, muon, τ lepton, jet, or missing transverse energy. A programmable menu of up to 128 object-based algorithms is used to select events for subsequent processing. The trigger thresholds are adjusted to the LHC instantaneous luminosity during data taking in order to restrict the output rate to 100 kHz, the upper limit imposed by the CMS readout electronics. The second level, implemented in software, further refines the purity of the output stream, selecting an average rate of 400 Hz for offline event storage. The objectives, strategy and performance of the trigger system during the LHC Run 1 are described.

  17. Microfabricated triggered vacuum switch

    DOEpatents

    Roesler, Alexander W.; Schare, Joshua M.; Bunch, Kyle

    2010-05-11

    A microfabricated vacuum switch is disclosed which includes a substrate upon which an anode, cathode and trigger electrode are located. A cover is sealed over the substrate under vacuum to complete the vacuum switch. In some embodiments of the present invention, a metal cover can be used in place of the trigger electrode on the substrate. Materials used for the vacuum switch are compatible with high vacuum, relatively high temperature processing. These materials include molybdenum, niobium, copper, tungsten, aluminum and alloys thereof for the anode and cathode. Carbon in the form of graphitic carbon, a diamond-like material, or carbon nanotubes can be used in the trigger electrode. Channels can be optionally formed in the substrate to mitigate against surface breakdown.

  18. Triggered Nanoparticles as Therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Chang Soo; Duncan, Bradley; Creran, Brian; Rotello, Vincent M.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Drug delivery systems (DDSs) face several challenges including site-specific delivery, stability, and the programmed release of drugs. Engineered nanoparticle (NP) surfaces with responsive moieties can enhance the efficacy of DDSs for in vitro and in vivo systems. This triggering process can be achieved through both endogenous (biologically controlled release) and exogenous (external stimuli controlled release) activation. In this review, we will highlight recent examples of the use of triggered release strategies of engineered nanomaterials for in vitro and in vivo applications. PMID:24159362

  19. Trigger Circuit for Marx Generators

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-02-08

    A trigger circuit is provided for a trigger system for a Marx generator column. The column includes a plurality of metal electrode pairs wherein the...electrode (trigatron) spark gap switch forming the first spark gap of the Marx generator column. The triggering circuit includes a trigger

  20. AIDS radio triggers.

    PubMed

    Elias, A M

    1991-07-01

    In April 1991, the Ethnic Communities' Council of NSW was granted funding under the Community AIDS Prevention and Education Program through the Department of Community Services and Health, to produce a series of 6x50 second AIDS radio triggers with a 10-second tag line for further information. The triggers are designed to disseminate culturally-sensitive information about HIV/AIDS in English, Italian, Greek, Spanish, Khmer, Turkish, Macedonian, Serbo-Croatian, Arabic, Cantonese, and Vietnamese, with the goal of increasing awareness and decreasing the degree of misinformation about HIV/AIDS among people of non-English-speaking backgrounds through radio and sound. The 6 triggers cover the denial that AIDS exists in the community, beliefs that words and feelings do not protect one from catching HIV, encouraging friends to be compassionate, compassion within the family, AIDS information for a young audience, and the provision of accurate and honest information on HIV/AIDS. The triggers are slated to be completed by the end of July 1991 and will be broadcast on all possible community, ethnic, and commercial radio networks across Australia. They will be available upon request in composite form with an information kit for use by health care professionals and community workers.

  1. Triggered plasma opening switch

    DOEpatents

    Mendel, Clifford W.

    1988-01-01

    A triggerable opening switch for a very high voltage and current pulse includes a transmission line extending from a source to a load and having an intermediate switch section including a plasma for conducting electrons between transmission line conductors and a magnetic field for breaking the plasma conduction path and magnetically insulating the electrons when it is desired to open the switch.

  2. The redox environment triggers conformational changes and aggregation of hIAPP in Type II Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez Camargo, Diana C.; Tripsianes, Konstantinos; Buday, Katalin; Franko, Andras; Göbl, Christoph; Hartlmüller, Christoph; Sarkar, Riddhiman; Aichler, Michaela; Mettenleiter, Gabriele; Schulz, Michael; Böddrich, Annett; Erck, Christian; Martens, Henrik; Walch, Axel Karl; Madl, Tobias; Wanker, Erich E.; Conrad, Marcus; de Angelis, Martin Hrabě; Reif, Bernd

    2017-01-01

    Type II diabetes (T2D) is characterized by diminished insulin production and resistance of cells to insulin. Among others, endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress is a principal factor contributing to T2D and induces a shift towards a more reducing cellular environment. At the same time, peripheral insulin resistance triggers the over-production of regulatory hormones such as insulin and human islet amyloid polypeptide (hIAPP). We show that the differential aggregation of reduced and oxidized hIAPP assists to maintain the redox equilibrium by restoring redox equivalents. Aggregation thus induces redox balancing which can assist initially to counteract ER stress. Failure of the protein degradation machinery might finally result in β-cell disruption and cell death. We further present a structural characterization of hIAPP in solution, demonstrating that the N-terminus of the oxidized peptide has a high propensity to form an α-helical structure which is lacking in the reduced state of hIAPP. In healthy cells, this residual structure prevents the conversion into amyloidogenic aggregates. PMID:28287098

  3. Optically triggered infrared photodetector.

    PubMed

    Ramiro, Íñigo; Martí, Antonio; Antolín, Elisa; López, Esther; Datas, Alejandro; Luque, Antonio; Ripalda, José M; González, Yolanda

    2015-01-14

    We demonstrate a new class of semiconductor device: the optically triggered infrared photodetector (OTIP). This photodetector is based on a new physical principle that allows the detection of infrared light to be switched ON and OFF by means of an external light. Our experimental device, fabricated using InAs/AlGaAs quantum-dot technology, demonstrates normal incidence infrared detection in the 2-6 μm range. The detection is optically triggered by a 590 nm light-emitting diode. Furthermore, the detection gain is achieved in our device without an increase of the noise level. The novel characteristics of OTIPs open up new possibilities for third generation infrared imaging systems ( Rogalski, A.; Antoszewski, J.; Faraone, L. J. Appl. Phys. 2009, 105 (9), 091101).

  4. Trigger developments for ARA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Ming-Yuan

    2013-04-01

    The Askaryan Radio Array (ARA) is a planned large-scale neutrino detector at the South Pole aiming at observing ultra-high-energy cosmogenic neutrinos via detecting radio Cherenkov radiation from neutrinos' interaction with Antarctic ice. By the end of the austral summer of 2012/13 three detector stations have been deployed at depths of up to 200 m. A prototype detector station has been taking data for two years. The final array is planned to consist of 37 stations with a 200 km^2 coverage, and provide high sensitivity in the range of 10 PeV to 10 EeV. In order to increase the discover potential of the stations, advanced triggering schemes are in development which take into account the topology of signal events. Here a brief status and the triggering schemes in development will be presented, and based on simulations their improvements to ARA neutrino sensitivity will be discussed.

  5. Neural networks for triggering

    SciTech Connect

    Denby, B. ); Campbell, M. ); Bedeschi, F. ); Chriss, N.; Bowers, C. ); Nesti, F. )

    1990-01-01

    Two types of neural network beauty trigger architectures, based on identification of electrons in jets and recognition of secondary vertices, have been simulated in the environment of the Fermilab CDF experiment. The efficiencies for B's and rejection of background obtained are encouraging. If hardware tests are successful, the electron identification architecture will be tested in the 1991 run of CDF. 10 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  6. GLAST's GBM Burst Trigger

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Band, D.; Briggs, M.; Connaughton, V.; Kippen, M.; Preece, R.

    2003-01-01

    The GLAST Burst Monitor (GBM) will detect and localize bursts for the GLAST mission, and provide the spectral and temporal context in the traditional 10 keV to 25 MeV band for the high energy observations by the Large Area Telescope (LAT). The GBM will use traditional rate triggers in up to three energy bands, and on a variety of timescales between 16 ms and 16 s.

  7. Androgen receptor exon 1 mutation causes androgen insensitivity by creating phosphorylation site and inhibiting melanoma antigen-A11 activation of NH2- and carboxyl-terminal interaction-dependent transactivation.

    PubMed

    Lagarde, William H; Blackwelder, Amanda J; Minges, John T; Hnat, Andrew T; French, Frank S; Wilson, Elizabeth M

    2012-03-30

    Naturally occurring germ line mutations in the X-linked human androgen receptor (AR) gene cause incomplete masculinization of the external genitalia by disrupting AR function in males with androgen insensitivity syndrome. Almost all AR missense mutations that cause androgen insensitivity syndrome are located in the highly structured DNA and ligand binding domains. In this report we investigate the functional defect associated with an AR exon 1 missense mutation, R405S, that caused partial androgen insensitivity. The 46,XX heterozygous maternal carrier had a wild-type Arg-405 CGC allele but transmitted an AGC mutant allele coding for Ser-405. At birth, the 46,XY proband had a bifid scrotum, hypospadias, and micropenis consistent with clinical stage 3 partial androgen insensitivity. Androgen-dependent transcriptional activity of AR-R405S expressed in CV1 cells was less than wild-type AR and refractory in androgen-dependent AR NH(2)- and carboxyl interaction transcription assays that depend on the coregulator effects of melanoma antigen-A11. This mutation created a Ser-405 phosphorylation site evident by the gel migration of an AR-R405S NH(2)-terminal fragment as a double band that converted to the wild-type single band after treatment with λ-phosphatase. Detrimental effects of the R405S mutation were related to the proximity of the AR WXXLF motif (433)WHTLF(437) required for melanoma antigen-A11 and p300 to stimulate transcriptional activity associated with the AR NH(2)- and carboxyl-terminal interaction. We conclude that the coregulator effects of melanoma antigen-A11 on the AR NH(2)- and carboxyl-terminal interaction amplify the androgen-dependent transcriptional response to p300 required for normal human male sex development in utero.

  8. Subnanosecond trigger system for ETA

    SciTech Connect

    Cook, E.G.; Lauer, E.J.; Reginato, L.L.; Rogers D.; Schmidt, J.A.

    1980-05-30

    A high-voltage trigger system capable of triggering 30, 250 kV spark gaps; each with less than +- 1 ns jitter has been constructed. In addition to low jitter rates, the trigger system must be capable of delivering the high voltage pulses to the spark gaps either simultaneously or sequentially as determined by other system requirements. The trigger system consists of several stages of pulse amplification culminating in 160 kV pulses having 30 ns risetime. The trigger system is described and test data provided.

  9. Protons Trigger Mitochondrial Flashes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xianhua; Zhang, Xing; Huang, Zhanglong; Wu, Di; Liu, Beibei; Zhang, Rufeng; Yin, Rongkang; Hou, Tingting; Jian, Chongshu; Xu, Jiejia; Zhao, Yan; Wang, Yanru; Gao, Feng; Cheng, Heping

    2016-07-26

    Emerging evidence indicates that mitochondrial flashes (mitoflashes) are highly conserved elemental mitochondrial signaling events. However, which signal controls their ignition and how they are integrated with other mitochondrial signals and functions remain elusive. In this study, we aimed to further delineate the signal components of the mitoflash and determine the mitoflash trigger mechanism. Using multiple biosensors and chemical probes as well as label-free autofluorescence, we found that the mitoflash reflects chemical and electrical excitation at the single-organelle level, comprising bursting superoxide production, oxidative redox shift, and matrix alkalinization as well as transient membrane depolarization. Both electroneutral H(+)/K(+) or H(+)/Na(+) antiport and matrix proton uncaging elicited immediate and robust mitoflash responses over a broad dynamic range in cardiomyocytes and HeLa cells. However, charge-uncompensated proton transport, which depolarizes mitochondria, caused the opposite effect, and steady matrix acidification mildly inhibited mitoflashes. Based on a numerical simulation, we estimated a mean proton lifetime of 1.42 ns and diffusion distance of 2.06 nm in the matrix. We conclude that nanodomain protons act as a novel, to our knowledge, trigger of mitoflashes in energized mitochondria. This finding suggests that mitoflash genesis is functionally and mechanistically integrated with mitochondrial energy metabolism.

  10. Gravity triggered neutrino condensates

    SciTech Connect

    Barenboim, Gabriela

    2010-11-01

    In this work we use the Schwinger-Dyson equations to study the possibility that an enhanced gravitational attraction triggers the formation of a right-handed neutrino condensate, inducing dynamical symmetry breaking and generating a Majorana mass for the right-handed neutrino at a scale appropriate for the seesaw mechanism. The composite field formed by the condensate phase could drive an early epoch of inflation. We find that to the lowest order, the theory does not allow dynamical symmetry breaking. Nevertheless, thanks to the large number of matter fields in the model, the suppression by additional powers in G of higher order terms can be compensated, boosting them up to their lowest order counterparts. This way chiral symmetry can be broken dynamically and the infrared mass generated turns out to be in the expected range for a successful seesaw scenario.

  11. A case of cerebrotendinous xanthomatosis mimicking the clinical phenotype of mitochondrial disease with a novel frame-shift mutation (c. 43_44 delGG) in CYP27A1 gene exon 1.

    PubMed

    Koge, Junpei; Hayashi, Shintaro; Yamaguchi, Hiroo; Tateishi, Takahisa; Murai, Hiroyuki; Kira, Jun-Ichi

    2016-10-28

    A 37-old-male with a history of early childhood mental retardation was admitted to our hospital. He experienced recurrent syncopes at 23 years old, and at age 35 gait disturbance and hearing impairment developed gradually and worsened over time. His grandparents were in a consanguineous marriage. He was of short stature and absent of tendon xanthomas. Neurological examinations revealed scanning speech, dysphagia, right sensorineural hearing loss, spasticity in both upper and lower extremities, and spastic gait. Tendon reflexes were brisk throughout, and Babinski and Chaddock reflexes were both positive bilaterally. Laboratory tests revealed elevated lactate and pyruvate concentrations in both serum and cerebrospinal fluid. Fluid attenuated inversion recovery magnetic resonance imaging showed high intensity lesions in the bilateral cerebellar hemispheres, pyramidal tracts in the brainstem, and internal capsules symmetrically. Brain magnetic resonance spectroscopy measurements revealed an elevated lactate/creatine plus phosphocreatine ratio and a decreased N-acetyl-aspartate/creatine plus phosphocreatine ratio in the cerebellum. At this point, mitochondrial diseases, particularly myoclonic epilepsy with ragged-red fibers (MERRF), to be the most likely cause. We performed a biopsy of his left biceps brachii muscle, showing variations in fiber size with occasional central nuclei and very few ragged-red fibers. Blood mitochondrial respiratory enzyme assays showed normal values with elevated citrate synthase activity, and mitochondrial DNA analyses for MERRF revealed no pathogenic mutations. We then explored other possibilities and detected an elevated serum cholestanol concentration of 20.4 μg/ml (reference value <4.0) and genetic analysis by direct sequencing method disclosed a novel frame-shift mutation (c. 43_44delGG) in CYP27A1 gene exon1, leading to a diagnosis of cerebrotendinous xanthomatosis (CTX). This case emphasizes importance of awareness of CTX as a

  12. The CMS High Level Trigger

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trocino, Daniele

    2014-06-01

    The CMS experiment has been designed with a two-level trigger system: the Level-1 Trigger, implemented in custom-designed electronics, and the High-Level Trigger (HLT), a streamlined version of the CMS offline reconstruction software running on a computer farm. A software trigger system requires a tradeoff between the complexity of the algorithms running with the available computing power, the sustainable output rate, and the selection efficiency. We present the performance of the main triggers used during the 2012 data taking, ranging from simple single-object selections to more complex algorithms combining different objects, and applying analysis-level reconstruction and selection. We discuss the optimisation of the trigger and the specific techniques to cope with the increasing LHC pile-up, reducing its impact on the physics performance.

  13. Regulation of insulin-like growth factor I transcription by cyclic adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate (cAMP) in fetal rat bone cells through an element within exon 1: protein kinase A-dependent control without a consensus AMP response element

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McCarthy, T. L.; Thomas, M. J.; Centrella, M.; Rotwein, P.

    1995-01-01

    Insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) is a locally synthesized anabolic growth factor for bone. IGF-I synthesis by primary fetal rat osteoblasts (Ob) is stimulated by agents that increase the intracellular cAMP concentration, including prostaglandin E2 (PGE2). Previous studies with Ob cultures demonstrated that PGE2 enhanced IGF-I transcription through selective use of IGF-I promoter 1, with little effect on IGF-I messenger RNA half-life. Transient transfection of Ob cultures with an array of promoter 1-luciferase reporter fusion constructs has now allowed localization of a potential cis-acting promoter element(s) responsible for cAMP-stimulated gene expression to the 5'-untranslated region (5'-UTR) of IGF-I exon 1, within a segment lacking a consensus cAMP response element. Our evidence derives from three principal observations: 1) a transfection construct containing only 122 nucleotides (nt) of promoter 1 and 328 nt of the 5'-UTR retained full PGE2-stimulated reporter expression; 2) maximal PGE2-driven reporter expression required the presence of nt 196 to 328 of exon 1 when tested within the context of IGF-I promoter 1; 3) cotransfection of IGF-I promoter-luciferase-reporter constructs with a plasmid encoding the alpha-isoform of the catalytic subunit of murine cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) produced results comparable to those seen with PGE2 treatment, whereas cotransfection with a plasmid encoding a mutant regulatory subunit of PKA that cannot bind cAMP blocked PGE2-induced reporter expression. Deoxyribonuclease I footprinting of the 5'-UTR of exon 1 demonstrated protected sequences at HS3A, HS3B, and HS3D, three of six DNA-protein binding sites previously characterized with rat liver nuclear extracts. Of these three regions, only the HS3D binding site is located within the functionally identified hormonally responsive segment of IGF-I exon 1. These results directly implicate PKA in the control of IGF-I gene transcription by PGE2 and identify a segment of

  14. The TOTEM modular trigger system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagliesi, M. G.; Berretti, M.; Cecchi, R.; Greco, V.; Lami, S.; Latino, G.; Oliveri, E.; Pedreschi, E.; Scribano, A.; Spinella, F.; Turini, N.

    2010-05-01

    The TOTEM experiment will measure the total cross-section with the luminosity independent method and study elastic and diffractive scattering at the LHC. We are developing a modular trigger system, based on programmable logic, that will select meaningful events within 2.5 μs. The trigger algorithm is based on a tree structure in order to obtain information compression. The trigger primitive is generated directly on the readout chip, VFAT, that has a specific fast output that gives low resolution hits information. In two of the TOTEM detectors, Roman Pots and T2, a coincidence chip will perform track recognition directly on the detector readout boards, while for T1 the hits are transferred from the VFATs to the trigger hardware. Starting from more than 2000 bits delivered by the detector electronics, we extract, in a first step, six trigger patterns of 32 LVDS signals each; we build, then, on a dedicated board, a 1-bit (L1) trigger signal for the TOTEM experiment and 16 trigger bits to the CMS experiment global trigger system for future common data taking.

  15. Triggering requirements for SSC physics

    SciTech Connect

    Gilchriese, M.G.D.

    1989-04-01

    Some aspects of triggering requirements for high P{sub T} physics processes at the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) are described. A very wide range of trigger types will be required to enable detection of the large number of potential physics signatures possible at the SSC. Although in many cases trigger rates are not now well understood, it is possible to conclude that the ability to trigger on transverse energy, number and energy of jets, number and energy of leptons (electrons and muons), missing energy and combinations of these will be required. An SSC trigger system must be both highly flexible and redundant to ensure reliable detection of many new physics processes at the SSC.

  16. Chiral separation by a terminal chirality triggered P-helical quinoline oligoamide foldamer.

    PubMed

    Noguchi, Hiroki; Takafuji, Makoto; Maurizot, Victor; Huc, Ivan; Ihara, Hirotaka

    2016-03-11

    A P-helical quinoline oligoamide foldamer was grafted on silica and applied as an HPLC stationary phase for chiral separation. The P-handedness of the quinoline oligoamide foldamer was induced by a (1S)-camphanyl group, which was introduced at the N-terminus of a tetrameric quinoline oligoamide foldamer (Cmp-Q4). To immobilize the foldamer on porous silica particles, a trimethoxysilyl group was introduced at the opposing end of the foldamer. Elemental analysis indicated that the amount of foldamer on the silica surface was 0.57μmol/m(2). Circular dichroism and vibrational CD spectra of Cmp-Q4 and Cmp-Q4-immobilized silica (Sil-Q4-Cmp) suggested that the helical structure of Cmp-Q4 was altered on the silica surface whilst retaining a chiral structure. The chiral recognition ability of Sil-Q4-Cmp was evaluated with various aromatic enantiomers. Sil-Q4-Cmp showed enantio-selectivity for axially chiral molecules (e.g., αTrigger's base=1.26 and αBinaphthol=1.07). Sil-Q4-Cmp showed remarkable recognition of helical octameric quinoline oligoamides with isobutoxy and triethylene glycol side chains (α=10.35 and 14.98, respectively). In contrast, an (1S)-camphanyl group-immobilized porous silica showed no chiral recognition for any enantiomers tested in this study. To elucidate the chiral separation mechanism of Sil-Q4-Cmp, thermodynamic parameters were calculated using van't Hoff plots. HPLC results and thermodynamic parameters suggested that the chiral recognition of Sil-Q4-Cmp is based on the helical structure of Cmp-Q4 and other thermally dependent interactions such as hydrophobic effects associated with aromatic stacking. This work represents the first known application of aromatic foldamers in chiral separation.

  17. Trigger factor assisted folding of the recombinant epoxide hydrolases identified from C. pelagibacter and S. nassauensis.

    PubMed

    Saini, Priya; Wani, Shadil Ibrahim; Kumar, Ranjai; Chhabra, Ravneet; Chimni, Swapandeep Singh; Sareen, Dipti

    2014-12-01

    Epoxide hydrolases (EHs), are enantioselective enzymes as they catalyze the kinetic resolution of racemic epoxides into the corresponding enantiopure vicinal diols, which are useful precursors in the synthesis of chiral pharmaceutical compounds. Here, we have identified and cloned two putative epoxide hydrolase genes (cpeh and sneh) from marine bacteria, Candidatus pelagibacter ubique and terrestrial bacteria, Stackebrandtia nassauensis, respectively and overexpressed them in pET28a vector in Escherichia coli BL21(DE3). The CPEH protein (42kDa) was found to be overexpressed as inactive inclusion bodies while SNEH protein (40kDa) was found to form soluble aggregates. In this study, the recombinant CPEH was successfully transformed from insoluble aggregates to the soluble and functionally active form, using pCold TF vector, though with low EH activity. To prevent the soluble aggregate formation of SNEH, it was co-expressed with GroEL/ES chaperone and was also fused with trigger factor (TF) chaperone at its N-terminus. The TF chaperone-assisted correct folding of SNEH led to a purified active EH with a specific activity of 3.85μmol/min/mg. The pure enzyme was further used to biocatalyze the hydrolysis of 10mM benzyl glycidyl ether (BGE) and α-methyl styrene oxide (MSO) with an enantiomeric excess of the product (eep) of 86% and 73% in 30 and 15min, respectively. In conclusion, this is the first report about the heterologous expression of epoxide hydrolases using TF as a molecular chaperone in pCold TF expression vector, resulting in remarkable increase in the solubility and activity of the otherwise improperly folded recombinant epoxide hydrolases.

  18. Triggered Release from Polymer Capsules

    SciTech Connect

    Esser-Kahn, Aaron P.; Odom, Susan A.; Sottos, Nancy R.; White, Scott R.; Moore, Jeffrey S.

    2011-07-06

    Stimuli-responsive capsules are of interest in drug delivery, fragrance release, food preservation, and self-healing materials. Many methods are used to trigger the release of encapsulated contents. Here we highlight mechanisms for the controlled release of encapsulated cargo that utilize chemical reactions occurring in solid polymeric shell walls. Triggering mechanisms responsible for covalent bond cleavage that result in the release of capsule contents include chemical, biological, light, thermal, magnetic, and electrical stimuli. We present methods for encapsulation and release, triggering methods, and mechanisms and conclude with our opinions on interesting obstacles for chemically induced activation with relevance for controlled release.

  19. Seismology: dynamic triggering of earthquakes.

    PubMed

    Gomberg, Joan; Johnson, Paul

    2005-10-06

    After an earthquake, numerous smaller shocks are triggered over distances comparable to the dimensions of the mainshock fault rupture, although they are rare at larger distances. Here we analyse the scaling of dynamic deformations (the stresses and strains associated with seismic waves) with distance from, and magnitude of, their triggering earthquake, and show that they can cause further earthquakes at any distance if their amplitude exceeds several microstrain, regardless of their frequency content. These triggering requirements are remarkably similar to those measured in the laboratory for inducing dynamic elastic nonlinear behaviour, which suggests that the underlying physics is similar.

  20. The H1 Trigger with Emphasis on Tracking Triggers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riedlberger, J.

    1995-11-01

    Since the commissioning of the electron proton collider HERA in 1992 at DESY the H1 experiment collected data with stable performance. The collision frequency of 10.4 MHz necessitates a pipelined design of the data acquisition and the trigger. A multilevel trigger is used to provide the required selectivity on physics processes and to allow for fast rejection of background events. Subdetector-based, deadtime-free triggers are combined to produce a first level trigger. The dcr φ trigger described herein, extracts its data from the central driftchamber. The drifttime of the signals is measured online and logical functions are applied on the digitized time measurements. To account for different performance parameters of the driftchamber the hardware demands a high flexibility, thus leading to a design with Programmable Gate Arrays (XILINX). Track-finding is achieved by means of ten thousand look-up tables, each with typically 20 inputs. Although the signals for one event will arrive within 1.1 μs, it is possible to determine the timing of the event online within one bunchcrossing (0.096 μs).

  1. Anthropogenic Triggering of Large Earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mulargia, Francesco; Bizzarri, Andrea

    2014-08-01

    The physical mechanism of the anthropogenic triggering of large earthquakes on active faults is studied on the basis of experimental phenomenology, i.e., that earthquakes occur on active tectonic faults, that crustal stress values are those measured in situ and, on active faults, comply to the values of the stress drop measured for real earthquakes, that the static friction coefficients are those inferred on faults, and that the effective triggering stresses are those inferred for real earthquakes. Deriving the conditions for earthquake nucleation as a time-dependent solution of the Tresca-Von Mises criterion applied in the framework of poroelasticity yields that active faults can be triggered by fluid overpressures < 0.1 MPa. Comparing this with the deviatoric stresses at the depth of crustal hypocenters, which are of the order of 1-10 MPa, we find that injecting in the subsoil fluids at the pressures typical of oil and gas production and storage may trigger destructive earthquakes on active faults at a few tens of kilometers. Fluid pressure propagates as slow stress waves along geometric paths operating in a drained condition and can advance the natural occurrence of earthquakes by a substantial amount of time. Furthermore, it is illusory to control earthquake triggering by close monitoring of minor ``foreshocks'', since the induction may occur with a delay up to several years.

  2. Anthropogenic triggering of large earthquakes.

    PubMed

    Mulargia, Francesco; Bizzarri, Andrea

    2014-08-26

    The physical mechanism of the anthropogenic triggering of large earthquakes on active faults is studied on the basis of experimental phenomenology, i.e., that earthquakes occur on active tectonic faults, that crustal stress values are those measured in situ and, on active faults, comply to the values of the stress drop measured for real earthquakes, that the static friction coefficients are those inferred on faults, and that the effective triggering stresses are those inferred for real earthquakes. Deriving the conditions for earthquake nucleation as a time-dependent solution of the Tresca-Von Mises criterion applied in the framework of poroelasticity yields that active faults can be triggered by fluid overpressures < 0.1 MPa. Comparing this with the deviatoric stresses at the depth of crustal hypocenters, which are of the order of 1-10 MPa, we find that injecting in the subsoil fluids at the pressures typical of oil and gas production and storage may trigger destructive earthquakes on active faults at a few tens of kilometers. Fluid pressure propagates as slow stress waves along geometric paths operating in a drained condition and can advance the natural occurrence of earthquakes by a substantial amount of time. Furthermore, it is illusory to control earthquake triggering by close monitoring of minor "foreshocks", since the induction may occur with a delay up to several years.

  3. Anthropogenic Triggering of Large Earthquakes

    PubMed Central

    Mulargia, Francesco; Bizzarri, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    The physical mechanism of the anthropogenic triggering of large earthquakes on active faults is studied on the basis of experimental phenomenology, i.e., that earthquakes occur on active tectonic faults, that crustal stress values are those measured in situ and, on active faults, comply to the values of the stress drop measured for real earthquakes, that the static friction coefficients are those inferred on faults, and that the effective triggering stresses are those inferred for real earthquakes. Deriving the conditions for earthquake nucleation as a time-dependent solution of the Tresca-Von Mises criterion applied in the framework of poroelasticity yields that active faults can be triggered by fluid overpressures < 0.1 MPa. Comparing this with the deviatoric stresses at the depth of crustal hypocenters, which are of the order of 1–10 MPa, we find that injecting in the subsoil fluids at the pressures typical of oil and gas production and storage may trigger destructive earthquakes on active faults at a few tens of kilometers. Fluid pressure propagates as slow stress waves along geometric paths operating in a drained condition and can advance the natural occurrence of earthquakes by a substantial amount of time. Furthermore, it is illusory to control earthquake triggering by close monitoring of minor “foreshocks”, since the induction may occur with a delay up to several years. PMID:25156190

  4. Industrial accidents triggered by lightning.

    PubMed

    Renni, Elisabetta; Krausmann, Elisabeth; Cozzani, Valerio

    2010-12-15

    Natural disasters can cause major accidents in chemical facilities where they can lead to the release of hazardous materials which in turn can result in fires, explosions or toxic dispersion. Lightning strikes are the most frequent cause of major accidents triggered by natural events. In order to contribute towards the development of a quantitative approach for assessing lightning risk at industrial facilities, lightning-triggered accident case histories were retrieved from the major industrial accident databases and analysed to extract information on types of vulnerable equipment, failure dynamics and damage states, as well as on the final consequences of the event. The most vulnerable category of equipment is storage tanks. Lightning damage is incurred by immediate ignition, electrical and electronic systems failure or structural damage with subsequent release. Toxic releases and tank fires tend to be the most common scenarios associated with lightning strikes. Oil, diesel and gasoline are the substances most frequently released during lightning-triggered Natech accidents.

  5. Detector array control and triggering

    SciTech Connect

    Aiello, S.; Anzalone, A.; Bartolucci, M. |

    1998-08-01

    A commercial DSP-based board installed in a host-PC was employed for the fast, on-line and real-time computation of special algorithms, in order to perform event selection and operate as a 2nd level trigger. Moreover an ad hoc build interface, realized using PLDs with a view to connecting the DSP-board to the ADCs and to the data acquisition system, has been tested in order to evaluate the performances of these programmable devices used as a look-up-table and as a decisional part of a 1st level trigger.

  6. A New Look at Trigger Point Injections

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Clara S. M.; Wong, Steven H. S.

    2012-01-01

    Trigger point injections are commonly practised pain interventional techniques. However, there is still lack of objective diagnostic criteria for trigger points. The mechanisms of action of trigger point injection remain obscure and its efficacy remains heterogeneous. The advent of ultrasound technology in the noninvasive real-time imaging of soft tissues sheds new light on visualization of trigger points, explaining the effect of trigger point injection by blockade of peripheral nerves, and minimizing the complications of blind injection. PMID:21969825

  7. Suicide Triggers Described by Herodotus

    PubMed Central

    Auchincloss, Stephane; Ahmadi, Jamshid

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to better understand the triggers of suicide, particularly among the ancient Greek and Persian soldiers and commanders. Method: ‘Herodotus:TheHistories’ is a history of the rulers and soldiery who participated in the Greco-Persian wars (492-449 BCE). A new translation (2013) of this manuscript was studied. Accounts of suicide were collected and collated, with descriptions of circumstances, methods, and probable triggers. Results: Nine accounts of suicide were identified. Eight of these were named individuals (4 Greeks and 4 Persians); of whom, seven were male. Only one (not the female) appeared to act in response to a mental disorder. Other triggers of suicide included guilt, avoidance of dishonour/punishment and altruism. Cutting/ stabbing was the most common method; others included hanging, jumping, poison, and burning (the single female). Conclusion: While soldiers at a time of war do not reflect the general community, they are nevertheless members of their society. Thus, this evidence demonstrates that suicide triggered by burdensome circumstances (in addition to mental disorder) was known to the Greek and Persian people more than two millennia ago. PMID:27437010

  8. Method for triggering an action

    DOEpatents

    Hall, David R.; Bartholomew, David B.; Johnson, Monte L.; Moon, Justin; Koehler, Roger O.

    2006-10-17

    A method for triggering an action of at least one downhole device on a downhole network integrated into a downhole tool string synchronized to an event comprises determining latency, sending a latency adjusted signal, and performing the action. The latency is determined between a control device and the at least one downhole device. The latency adjusted signal for triggering an action is sent to the downhole device. The action is performed downhole synchronized to the event. A preferred method for determining latency comprises the steps: a control device sends a first signal to the downhole device; after receiving the signal, the downhole device sends a response signal to the control device; and the control device analyzes the time from sending the signal to receiving the response signal.

  9. The CDF silicon vertex trigger

    SciTech Connect

    B. Ashmanskas; A. Barchiesi; A. Bardi

    2003-06-23

    The CDF experiment's Silicon Vertex Trigger is a system of 150 custom 9U VME boards that reconstructs axial tracks in the CDF silicon strip detector in a 15 {mu}sec pipeline. SVT's 35 {mu}m impact parameter resolution enables CDF's Level 2 trigger to distinguish primary and secondary particles, and hence to collect large samples of hadronic bottom and charm decays. We review some of SVT's key design features. Speed is achieved with custom VLSI pattern recognition, linearized track fitting, pipelining, and parallel processing. Testing and reliability are aided by built-in logic state analysis and test-data sourcing at each board's input and output, a common inter-board data link, and a universal ''Merger'' board for data fan-in/fan-out. Speed and adaptability are enhanced by use of modern FPGAs.

  10. Optical Spectra of Triggered Lightning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, T. D.; Biagi, C. J.; Hill, J. D.; Jordan, D. M.; Uman, M. A.; Christian, H. J., Jr.

    2009-12-01

    In August 2009, the first optical spectra of triggered lightning flashes were acquired. Data from two triggered lightning flashes were obtained at the International Center for Lightning Research and Testing in north-central Florida. The spectrometer that was used has an average dispersion of 260 Å/mm resulting in an average resolution of 5 Å when mated to a Photron (SA1.1) high-speed camera. The spectra captured with this system had a free spectral range of 3800-8000 Å. The spectra were captured at 300,000 frames per second. The spectrometer's vertical field of view was 3 m at an altitude 50 m above the launch tower, intended to view the middle of the triggering wire. Preliminary results show that the copper spectrum dominated the earliest part of the flash and copper lines persisted during the total lifetime of the detectable spectrum. Animations over the lifetime of the stroke from the initial wire illumination to multiple return strokes show the evolution of the spectrum. In addition, coordinated high speed channel base current, electric field and imagery measurements of the exploding wire, downward leaders, and return strokes were recorded. Quantitative analysis of the spectral evolution will be discussed in the context of the overall flash development.

  11. Stimulus conflict triggers behavioral avoidance.

    PubMed

    Dignath, David; Eder, Andreas B

    2015-12-01

    According to a recent extension of the conflict-monitoring theory, conflict between two competing response tendencies is registered as an aversive event and triggers a motivation to avoid the source of conflict. In the present study, we tested this assumption. Over five experiments, we examined whether conflict is associated with an avoidance motivation and whether stimulus conflict or response conflict triggers an avoidance tendency. Participants first performed a color Stroop task. In a subsequent motivation test, participants responded to Stroop stimuli with approach- and avoidance-related lever movements. These results showed that Stroop-conflict stimuli increased the frequency of avoidance responses in a free-choice motivation test, and also increased the speed of avoidance relative to approach responses in a forced-choice test. High and low proportions of response conflict in the Stroop task had no effect on avoidance in the motivation test. Avoidance of conflict was, however, obtained even with new conflict stimuli that had not been presented before in a Stroop task, and when the Stroop task was replaced with an unrelated filler task. Taken together, these results suggest that stimulus conflict is sufficient to trigger avoidance.

  12. Development of autonomous triggering instrumentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watkins, Steve E.; Swift, Theresa M.; Fonda, James W.

    2008-03-01

    Triggering instrumentation for autonomous monitoring of load-induced strain is described for economical, fast bridge inspection. The development addresses one aspect for the management of transportation infrastructure - bridge monitoring and inspection. The objectives are to provide quantitative performance information from a load test, to minimize the setup time at the bridge, and to minimize the closure time to traffic. Multiple or networked measurements can be made for a prescribed loading sequence. The proposed smart system consists of in-situ strain sensors, an embedded data acquisition module, and a measurement triggering system. A companion control unit is mounted on the truck serving as the load. As the truck moves to the proper position, the desired measurement is automatically relayed back to the control unit. In this work, the testing protocol is developed and the performance parameters for the triggering and data acquisition are measured. The test system uses a dedicated wireless sensor mote and an infrared positioning system. The electronic procedure offers improvements in available information and economics.

  13. Relationships between age and epi-genotype of the FMR1 exon 1/intron 1 boundary are consistent with non-random X-chromosome inactivation in FM individuals, with the selection for the unmethylated state being most significant between birth and puberty.

    PubMed

    Godler, David E; Inaba, Yoshimi; Shi, Elva Z; Skinner, Cindy; Bui, Quang M; Francis, David; Amor, David J; Hopper, John L; Loesch, Danuta Z; Hagerman, Randi J; Schwartz, Charles E; Slater, Howard R

    2013-04-15

    Methylation of the fragile X-related epigenetic element 2 (FREE2) located on the exon 1/intron 1 boundary of the FMR1 gene is related to FMRP expression and cognitive impairment in full mutation (FM; CGG>200) individuals. We examined the relationship between age, the size of the FMR1 CGG expansion and the methylation output ratio (MOR) at 12 CpG sites proximal to the exon 1/intron 1 boundary using FREE2 MALDI-TOF MS. The patient cohort included 119 males and 368 females, i.e. 121 healthy controls (CGG<40), 176 premutation (CGG 55-170) and 190 FM (CGG 213-2000). For all CpG units examined, FM males showed a significantly elevated MOR compared with that in hypermethylated FM females. In FM males the MOR for most CpG units significantly positively correlated with both age and CGG size (P< 0.05). In FM females the skewing towards the unmethylated state was significant for half of the units between birth and puberty (P < 0.05). The methylation status of intron 1 CpG10-12 that was most significantly related to cognitive impairment in our earlier study, did not change significantly with age in FM females. These results challenge the concept of fragile X syndrome (FXS)-related methylation being static over time, and suggest that due to the preference for the unmethylated state in FM females, X-inactivation at this locus is not random. The findings also highlight that the prognostic value of FXS methylation testing is not uniform between all CpG sites, and thus may need to be evaluated on a site-by-site basis.

  14. Efficient Distribution of Triggered Synchronous Block Diagrams

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-10-21

    called a trigger. At a given synchronous step, if the trigger is true , the block fires normally; otherwise, the block stutters , that is, keeps its...trigger is false, no updates are made and the values written at the outputs are the same as in the previous step (i.e., the process “ stutters ”). All

  15. Holin triggering in real time.

    PubMed

    White, Rebecca; Chiba, Shinobu; Pang, Ting; Dewey, Jill S; Savva, Christos G; Holzenburg, Andreas; Pogliano, Kit; Young, Ry

    2011-01-11

    During λ infections, the holin S105 accumulates harmlessly in the membrane until, at an allele-specific time, suddenly triggering to form irregular holes of unprecedented size (>300 nm), releasing the endolysin from the cytoplasm, resulting in lysis within seconds. Here we used a functional S105-GFP chimera and real-time deconvolution fluorescence microscopy to show that the S105-GFP fusion accumulated in a uniformly distributed fashion, until suddenly, within 1 min, it formed aggregates, or rafts, at the time of lethal triggering. Moreover, the isogenic fusion to a nonlethal S105 mutant remained uniformly distributed, whereas a fusion to an early-lysing mutant showed early triggering and early raft formation. Protein accumulation rates of the WT, early, and nonlethal alleles were identical. Fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) revealed that the nonlethal mutant and untriggered WT hybrids were highly mobile in the membrane, whereas the WT raft was essentially immobile. Finally, an antiholin allele, S105(ΔTMD1)-mcherryfp, in the product of which the S105 sequence deleted for the first transmembrane domain was fused to mCherryFP. This hybrid retained full antiholin activity, in that it blocked lethal hole formation by the S105-GFP fusion, accumulated uniformly throughout the host membrane and prevented the S105-GFP protein from forming rafts. These findings suggest that phage lysis occurs when the holin reaches a critical concentration and nucleates to form rafts, analogous to the initiation of purple membrane formation after the induction of bacteriorhodopsin in halobacteria. This model for holin function may be relevant for processes in mammalian cells, including the release of nonenveloped viruses and apoptosis.

  16. Infrasonic Observations from Triggered Lightning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arechiga, R. O.; Johnson, J. B.; Edens, H. E.; Rison, W.; Thomas, R. J.; Eack, K.; Eastvedt, E. M.

    2009-12-01

    We measured acoustic signals during both triggered and natural lightning. A comparative analysis of simultaneous data from the Lightning Mapping Array (LMA), acoustic measurements and digital high-speed photography operating in the same area was made. Acoustic emissions, providing quantitative estimates of acoustic power and spectral content, will complement coincident investigations, such as X-ray emissions. Most cloud-to-ground lightning flashes lower negative charge to ground, but flashes that lower positive charge to ground are often unusually destructive and are less understood. The New Mexico Tech Lightning Mapping Array (LMA) locates the sources of impulsive RF radiation produced by lightning flashes in three spatial dimensions and time, operating in the 60 - 66 MHz television band. However, positive breakdown is rarely detected by the LMA and positive leader channels are outlined only by recoil events. Positive cloud-to-ground (CG) channels are usually not mapped (or partially mapped because they may have recoil events). Acoustic and electric field instruments are a good complement to the LMA, since they can detect both negative and positive leaders. An array of five stations was deployed during the Summer of 2009 (July 20 to August 13) in the Magdalena mountains of New Mexico, to monitor infrasound (below 20 Hz) and audio range sources due to natural and triggered lightning. The stations were located at close (57 m), medium (303 and 537 m) and far (1403 and 2556 m) distances surrounding the triggering site. Each station consisted of five sensors, one infrasonic and one in the audio range at the center, and three infrasonic in a triangular configuration. This research will provide a more complete picture, and provide further insight into the nature of lightning.

  17. Laser-triggered vacuum switch

    DOEpatents

    Brannon, Paul J.; Cowgill, Donald F.

    1990-01-01

    A laser-triggered vacuum switch has a material such as a alkali metal halide on the cathode electrode for thermally activated field emission of electrons and ions upon interaction with a laser beam, the material being in contact with the cathode with a surface facing the discharge gap. The material is preferably a mixture of KCl and Ti powders. The laser may either shine directly on the material, preferably through a hole in the anode, or be directed to the material over a fiber optic cable.

  18. Dynamic Triggering of Microseismic Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, H.; Van der Baan, M.

    2015-12-01

    Microseismic events are commonly recorded during hydraulic fracturing experiments. In microseismic interpretations, each event is often regarded as independent and uncorrelated to neighboring ones. In reality, both the rock deformation (static stresses) and transient wave motion (dynamic stresses) associated with microseismic events add to the stress field together with the external loading (fluid injection). We believe the resulting static and dynamic stress perturbations will influence both the timing and spatial evolution of the microseismic cloud. We study the dynamic triggering of microseismicity using numerical simulations of a biaxial deformation test by means of a bonded particle method (Potyondy and Cundall, 2004), where crack development can be tracked and analyzed independently. Our methodology is to compare the stress changes due to one specific event with the occurrence of the next few events in the numerical simulations. In addition, we compute the dynamic stress perturbations for recorded large events analytically given their (non-double couple) failure mechanisms. Our results show that cracks following a major event tend to form in zones affected by the dynamic stresses by promoting new failure in areas that are critically stressed. This confirms that dynamic triggering during hydraulic fracturing operations but also larger scale seismicity is likely. It also demonstrates the often complex interplay between the dynamic and static stress changes and their effect on the temporal and spatial evolution of rock deformation at all scales.

  19. Earthquake Simulator Finds Tremor Triggers

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Paul

    2015-03-27

    Using a novel device that simulates earthquakes in a laboratory setting, a Los Alamos researcher has found that seismic waves-the sounds radiated from earthquakes-can induce earthquake aftershocks, often long after a quake has subsided. The research provides insight into how earthquakes may be triggered and how they recur. Los Alamos researcher Paul Johnson and colleague Chris Marone at Penn State have discovered how wave energy can be stored in certain types of granular materials-like the type found along certain fault lines across the globe-and how this stored energy can suddenly be released as an earthquake when hit by relatively small seismic waves far beyond the traditional “aftershock zone” of a main quake. Perhaps most surprising, researchers have found that the release of energy can occur minutes, hours, or even days after the sound waves pass; the cause of the delay remains a tantalizing mystery.

  20. Starburst Triggering and Environmental Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Combes, F.

    Introduction Stability of a two-fluid medium Mechanisms to trigger starbursts Dynamical mechanisms: non-axisymmetry and torques Angular momentum transfer for the stellar component Angular momentum transfer for the gas component feedback and self-regulation Fueling activity by bars The inner Lindblad resonance Nuclear disks and nuclear bars Bar destruction through mass concentration Gas-dominated central disk Environmental effects Numerical codes and gas modelling Star-formation processes Formation of large complexes Lessons from mergers Gas morphology in mergers Tidal tails and dark matter Ring galaxies Groups and clusters Rich clusters Galaxy evolution Evolution along the hubble sequence Fragility of disks Evolution at high redshift Gas and dark matter Hot gas in rich clusters Self-gravity and fractal structure of the ISM Conclusion

  1. Documentation of myofascial trigger points.

    PubMed

    Fischer, A A

    1988-04-01

    Two basic diagnostic features of myofascial trigger points (TPs), namely, local tenderness and alteration of tissue consistency (such as in taut bands, muscle spasm), can be documented quantitatively by simple hand-held instruments. A pressure threshold meter (algometer) assists in location of TPs and their relative sensitivity. A side-to-side difference exceeding 2kg in comparison with normal values indicates pathologic tenderness. The effect of treatment can be quantified. Pressure tolerance, measured over normal muscles and shin bones, expresses pain sensitivity. Myopathy is suspected if muscle tolerance drops below bone tolerance. Tissue compliance measurement documents objectively and quantitatively alteration in soft tissue consistency. Muscle spasm, tension, spasticity, taut bands, scar tissues, or fibrositic nodules can be documented. The universal clinical dynamometer is used as part of a physical examination to quantify weakness. Thermography (heat imaging) demonstrates discoid shaped hot spots over TPs. Muscle activity, spasm, or contraction is visualized as increased heat emission in the shape of the active muscle.

  2. Earthquake Simulator Finds Tremor Triggers

    ScienceCinema

    Johnson, Paul

    2016-07-12

    Using a novel device that simulates earthquakes in a laboratory setting, a Los Alamos researcher has found that seismic waves-the sounds radiated from earthquakes-can induce earthquake aftershocks, often long after a quake has subsided. The research provides insight into how earthquakes may be triggered and how they recur. Los Alamos researcher Paul Johnson and colleague Chris Marone at Penn State have discovered how wave energy can be stored in certain types of granular materials-like the type found along certain fault lines across the globe-and how this stored energy can suddenly be released as an earthquake when hit by relatively small seismic waves far beyond the traditional “aftershock zone” of a main quake. Perhaps most surprising, researchers have found that the release of energy can occur minutes, hours, or even days after the sound waves pass; the cause of the delay remains a tantalizing mystery.

  3. Landslide triggering by rain infiltration

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Iverson, Richard M.

    2000-01-01

    Landsliding in response to rainfall involves physical processes that operate on disparate timescales. Relationships between these timescales guide development of a mathematical model that uses reduced forms of Richards equation to evaluate effects of rainfall infiltration on landslide occurrence, timing, depth, and acceleration in diverse situations. The longest pertinent timescale is A/D0, where D0 is the maximum hydraulic diffusivity of the soil and A is the catchment area that potentially affects groundwater pressures at a prospective landslide slip surface location with areal coordinates x, y and depth H. Times greater than A/D0 are necessary for establishment of steady background water pressures that develop at (x, y, H) in response to rainfall averaged over periods that commonly range from days to many decades. These steady groundwater pressures influence the propensity for landsliding at (x, y, H), but they do not trigger slope failure. Failure results from rainfall over a typically shorter timescale H2/D0 associated with transient pore pressure transmission during and following storms. Commonly, this timescale ranges from minutes to months. The shortest timescale affecting landslide responses to rainfall is √(H/g), where g is the magnitude of gravitational acceleration. Postfailure landslide motion occurs on this timescale, which indicates that the thinnest landslides accelerate most quickly if all other factors are constant. Effects of hydrologic processes on landslide processes across these diverse timescales are encapsulated by a response function, R(t*) = √(t*/π) exp (-1/t*) - erfc (1/√t*), which depends only on normalized time, t*. Use of R(t*) in conjunction with topographic data, rainfall intensity and duration information, an infinite-slope failure criterion, and Newton's second law predicts the timing, depth, and acceleration of rainfall-triggered landslides. Data from contrasting landslides that exhibit rapid, shallow motion and slow, deep

  4. Disaster triggers disaster: Earthquake triggering by tropical cyclones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wdowinski, S.; Tsukanov, I.

    2011-12-01

    Three recent devastating earthquakes, the 1999 M=7.6 Chi-Chi (Taiwan), 2010 M=7.0 Leogane (Haiti), 2010 M=6.4 Kaohsiung (Taiwan), and additional three moderate size earthquakes (66 earthquake that occurred in the central mountainous area of Taiwan within three years after the typhoon. The 2009 Morakot typhoon was followed by 2009 M=6.2 Nantou and 2010 M=6.4 Kaohsiung earthquakes; the 1969 Flossie typhoon was followed by an M=6.3 earthquake in 1972; and the 1996 Herb typhoon by the 1998 M=6.2 Rueyli and 1999 M=7.6 Chi-Chi earthquakes. The earthquake catalog of Taiwan lists only two other M>6 main-shocks that occurred in Taiwan's central mountainous belt, one of them was in 1964 only four months after the wet Typhoon Gloria poured heavy rain in the same area. We suggest that the close proximity in time and space between wet tropical cyclones and earthquakes reflects a physical link between the two hazard types in which these earthquakes were triggered by rapid erosion induced by tropical cyclone's heavy rain. Based on remote sensing observations, meshfree finite element modeling, and Coulomb failure stress analysis, we show that the

  5. Estimation of interdomain flexibility of N-terminus of factor H using residual dipolar couplings†

    PubMed Central

    Maciejewski, Mateusz; Tjandra, Nico; Barlow, Paul N.

    2011-01-01

    Characterization of segmental flexibility is needed to understand the biological mechanisms of the very large category of functionally diverse proteins, exemplified by the regulators of complement activation, that consist of numerous compact modules or domains linked by short, potentially flexible, sequences of amino acid residues. The use of NMR-derived residual dipolar couplings (RDCs), in magnetically aligned media, to evaluate interdomain motion is established but only for two-domain proteins. We focused on the three N-terminal domains (called CCPs or SCRs) of the important complement regulator, human factor H (i.e. FH1-3). These domains cooperate to facilitate cleavage of the key complement activation-specific protein fragment, C3b, forming iC3b that no longer participates in the complement cascade. We refined a three-dimensional solution structure of recombinant FH1-3 based on nuclear Overhauser effects and RDCs. We then employed a rudimentary series of RDC datasets, collected in media containing magnetically aligned bicelles (disk-like particles formed from phospholipids) under three different conditions, to estimate interdomain motions. This circumvents a requirement of previous approaches for technically difficult collection of five independent RDC datasets. More than 80% of conformers of this predominantly extended three-domain molecule exhibit flexions of < 40 °. Such segmental flexibility (together with the local dynamics of the hypervariable loop within domain 3), could facilitate recognition of C3b via initial anchoring and eventual reorganization of modules to the conformation captured in the previously solved crystal structure of a C3b:FH1-4 complex. PMID:21793561

  6. Nonenzymatic glycation at the N terminus of pathogenic prion protein in transmissible spongiform encephalopathies.

    PubMed

    Choi, Yeong-Gon; Kim, Jae-Il; Jeon, Yong-Chul; Park, Seok-Joo; Choi, Eun-Kyoung; Rubenstein, Richard; Kascsak, Richard J; Carp, Richard I; Kim, Yong-Sun

    2004-07-16

    Transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs) are transmissible neurodegenerative diseases characterized by the accumulation of an abnormally folded prion protein, termed PrPSc, and the development of pathological features of astrogliosis, vacuolation, neuronal cell loss, and in some cases amyloid plaques. Although considerable structural characterization of prion protein has been reported, neither the method of conversion of cellular prion protein, PrPC, into the pathogenic isoform nor the post-translational modification processes involved is known. We report that in animal and human TSEs, one or more lysines at residues 23, 24, and 27 of PrPSc are covalently modified with advanced glycosylation end products (AGEs), which may be carboxymethyl-lysine (CML), one of the structural varieties of AGEs. The arginine residue at position 37 may also be modified with AGE, but not the arginine residue at position 25. This result suggests that nonenzymatic glycation is one of the post-translational modifications of PrP(Sc). Furthermore, immunostaining studies indicate that, at least in clinically affected hamsters, astrocytes are the first site of this glycation process.

  7. Immunization of N terminus of enterovirus 71 VP4 elicits cross-protective antibody responses

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Enterovirus 71 (EV71) is major cause of hand, foot and mouth disease. Large epidemics of EV71 infection have been recently reported in the Asian-Pacific region. Currently, no vaccine is available to prevent EV71 infection. Results The peptide (VP4N20) consisting of the first 20 amino acids at the N-terminal of VP4 of EV71 genotype C4 were fused to hepatitis B core (HBcAg) protein. Expression of fusion proteins in E. coli resulted in the formation of chimeric virus-like particles (VLPs). Mice immunized with the chimeric VLPs elicited anti-VP4N20 antibody response. In vitro microneutralization experiments showed that anti-chimeric VLPs sera were able to neutralize not only EV71 of genotype C4 but also EV71 of genotype A. Neonatal mice model confirmed the neutralizing ability of anti-chimeric VLPs sera. Eiptope mapping led to the identification of a “core sequence” responsible for antibody recognition within the peptide. Conclusions Immunization of chimeric VLPs is able to elicit antibodies displaying a broad neutralizing activity against different genotypes of EV71 in vitro. The “core sequence” of EV71-VP4 is highly conserved across EV71 genotypes. The chimeric VLPs have a great potential to be a novel vaccine candidate with a broad cross-protection against different EV71 genotypes. PMID:24320792

  8. Structural and Functional Characterization of the N Terminus of Schizosaccharomyces pombe Cwf10

    PubMed Central

    Livesay, S. Brent; Collier, Scott E.; Bitton, Danny A.; Bähler, Jürg

    2013-01-01

    The spliceosome is a dynamic macromolecular machine that catalyzes the removal of introns from pre-mRNA, yielding mature message. Schizosaccharomyces pombe Cwf10 (homolog of Saccharomyces cerevisiae Snu114 and human U5-116K), an integral member of the U5 snRNP, is a GTPase that has multiple roles within the splicing cycle. Cwf10/Snu114 family members are highly homologous to eukaryotic translation elongation factor EF2, and they contain a conserved N-terminal extension (NTE) to the EF2-like portion, predicted to be an intrinsically unfolded domain. Using S. pombe as a model system, we show that the NTE is not essential, but cells lacking this domain are defective in pre-mRNA splicing. Genetic interactions between cwf10-ΔNTE and other pre-mRNA splicing mutants are consistent with a role for the NTE in spliceosome activation and second-step catalysis. Characterization of Cwf10-NTE by various biophysical techniques shows that in solution the NTE contains regions of both structure and disorder. The first 23 highly conserved amino acids of the NTE are essential for its role in splicing but when overexpressed are not sufficient to restore pre-mRNA splicing to wild-type levels in cwf10-ΔNTE cells. When the entire NTE is overexpressed in the cwf10-ΔNTE background, it can complement the truncated Cwf10 protein in trans, and it immunoprecipitates a complex similar in composition to the late-stage U5.U2/U6 spliceosome. These data show that the structurally flexible NTE is capable of independently incorporating into the spliceosome and improving splicing function, possibly indicating a role for the NTE in stabilizing conformational rearrangements during a splice cycle. PMID:24014766

  9. Cloning and bioinformatical analysis of the N-terminus of the sonic hedgehog gene.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yi; Zhao, Shu; Dong, Weiren; He, Suifen; Wang, Haihong; Zhang, Lihua; Tang, Yinjuan; Guo, Jiasong; Guo, Suiqun

    2013-01-25

    The sonic hedgehog protein not only plays a key role in early embryonic development, but also has essential effects on the adult nervous system, including neural stem cell proliferation, differentiation, migration and neuronal axon guidance. The N-terminal fragment of sonic hedgehog is the key functional element in this process. Therefore, this study aimed to clone and analyze the N-terminal fragment of the sonic hedgehog gene. Total RNA was extracted from the notochord of a Sprague-Dawley rat at embryonic day 9 and the N-terminal fragment of sonic hedgehog was amplified by nested reverse transcription-PCR. The N-terminal fragment of the sonic hedgehog gene was successfully cloned. The secondary and tertiary structures of the N-terminal fragment of the sonic hedgehog protein were predicted using Jpred and Phyre online.

  10. An Essential Function of the N-Terminus of Ira/Neurofibromin

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-01-01

    conserved throughout evolution [1, 2]. The yeast S. Cerevisiae has 2 homologs, Ira1 and Ira2 [3]. These yeast Ira’s not only have extensive sequence...the haploid offspring depend on IRA1 for survival. Several heterozygous diploid strains were subjected to tetrad analysis and viability of the... haploid offspring will be scored. A 2:2 life to death segregation should be observed if IRA1 is essential for yeast. However, many tetrads yielded

  11. Understanding dengue virus capsid protein disordered N-Terminus and pep14-23-based inhibition.

    PubMed

    Faustino, André F; Guerra, Gabriela M; Huber, Roland G; Hollmann, Axel; Domingues, Marco M; Barbosa, Glauce M; Enguita, Francisco J; Bond, Peter J; Castanho, Miguel A R B; Da Poian, Andrea T; Almeida, Fabio C L; Santos, Nuno C; Martins, Ivo C

    2015-02-20

    Dengue virus (DENV) infection affects millions of people and is becoming a major global disease for which there is no specific available treatment. pep14-23 is a recently designed peptide, based on a conserved segment of DENV capsid (C) protein. It inhibits the interaction of DENV C with host intracellular lipid droplets (LDs), which is crucial for viral replication. Combining bioinformatics and biophysics, here, we analyzed pep14-23 structure and ability to bind different phospholipids, relating that information with the full-length DENV C. We show that pep14-23 acquires α-helical conformation upon binding to negatively charged phospholipid membranes, displaying an asymmetric charge distribution structural arrangement. Structure prediction for the N-terminal segment reveals four viable homodimer orientations that alternatively shield or expose the DENV C hydrophobic pocket. Taken together, these findings suggest a new biological role for the disordered N-terminal region, which may function as an autoinhibitory domain mediating DENV C interaction with its biological targets. The results fit with our current understanding of DENV C and pep14-23 structure and function, paving the way for similar approaches to understanding disordered proteins and improved peptidomimetics drug development strategies against DENV and similar Flavivirus infections.

  12. Plasma Protein Binding Structure-Activity Relationships Related to the N-Terminus of Daptomycin.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Elena K; Huang, Johnny X; Carbone, Vincenzo; Han, Meiling; Zhu, Yan; Nang, Sue; Khoo, Keith K; Mak, Johnson; Cooper, Matthew A; Li, Jian; Velkov, Tony

    2017-03-10

    Daptomycin is a lipopeptide antibiotic that is highly bound to plasma proteins. To date, the plasma components and structure-activity relationships responsible for the plasma protein binding profile of daptomycin remain uncharacterized. In the present study we have employed a surface plasmon resonance assay together with molecular docking techniques to investigate the plasma protein binding structure-activity relationships related to the N-terminal fatty acyl of daptomycin. Three compounds were investigated: (1) native daptomycin, which displays an N-terminal n-decanoyl fatty acid side chain, and two analogues with modifications to the N-terminal fatty acyl chain; (2) des-acyl daptomycin; and (3) acetyl-daptomycin. The surface plasmon resonance (SPR) data showed that the binding profile of native daptomycin was in the rank order human serum albumin (HSA) ≫ α-1-antitrypsin > low-density lipoprotein ≥ hemoglobin > sex hormone binding globulin > α-1-acid-glycoprotein (AGP) > hemopexin > fibrinogen > α-2-macroglobulin > β2-microglobulin > high-density lipoprotein > fibronectin > haptoglobulin > transferrin > immunoglobulin G. Notably, binding to fatty acid free HSA was greater than binding to nondelipidated HSA. SPR and ultrafiltration studies also indicated that physiological concentrations of calcium increase binding of daptomycin and acetyl-daptomycin to HSA and AGP. A molecular model of the daptomycin-human serum albumin A complex is presented that illustrates the pivotal role of the N-terminal fatty acyl chain of daptomycin for binding to drug site 1 of HSA. In proof-of-concept, the capacity of physiological cocktails of the identified plasma proteins to inhibit the antibacterial activity of daptomycin was assessed with in vitro microbiological assays. We show that HSA, α-1-antitrypsin, low-density lipoprotein, sex hormone binding globulin, α-1-acid-glycoprotein, and hemopexin are responsible for the majority of the sequestering activity in human plasma. The findings are relevant to medicinal chemistry programs focused on the development of next-generation daptomycin lipopeptides. Tailored modifications to the N-terminal fatty acyl domain of the daptomycin molecule should yield novel daptomycin lipopeptides with more ideal plasma protein binding profiles to increase the levels of active (free) drug in plasma and improved in vivo activity.

  13. Smart trigger logic for focal plane arrays

    DOEpatents

    Levy, James E; Campbell, David V; Holmes, Michael L; Lovejoy, Robert; Wojciechowski, Kenneth; Kay, Randolph R; Cavanaugh, William S; Gurrieri, Thomas M

    2014-03-25

    An electronic device includes a memory configured to receive data representing light intensity values from pixels in a focal plane array and a processor that analyzes the received data to determine which light values correspond to triggered pixels, where the triggered pixels are those pixels that meet a predefined set of criteria, and determines, for each triggered pixel, a set of neighbor pixels for which light intensity values are to be stored. The electronic device also includes a buffer that temporarily stores light intensity values for at least one previously processed row of pixels, so that when a triggered pixel is identified in a current row, light intensity values for the neighbor pixels in the previously processed row and for the triggered pixel are persistently stored, as well as a data transmitter that transmits the persistently stored light intensity values for the triggered and neighbor pixels to a data receiver.

  14. Internal Triggering Marx Generator Using Hydrogen Thyratrons.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-12-01

    Operation of a Marx generator using hydrogen thyratrons as switches, with the switches in the upper stages of the Marx being triggered by a signal...derived from the lower stages (internal triggering) was investigated. The Marx was in a negative output configuration and utilized pulse forming...PFN’s. Timing requirements and erection diagnostics were determined using a two-stage Marx , with both stages triggered from separate external sources

  15. The BTeV trigger: Recent developments

    SciTech Connect

    Kasper, Penelope; /Fermilab

    2003-12-01

    BTeV is a collider experiment at the Fermilab Tevatron dedicated to precision measurements of CP violation, mixing and rare decays of beauty and charm hadrons. The detector is a forward spectrometer with a pixel vertex detector inside a dipole magnet. A unique feature of BTeV is the trigger, which reconstructs tracks and vertices in every beam crossing. They present here an overview of the BTeV trigger and a description of recent improvements in trigger timing.

  16. Prompt trigger primitives for a self-seeded track trigger

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dressanandt, N.; Halgeri, A.; Kamat, M.; Koppal, V.; Newcomer, M.

    2012-10-01

    A viable self-seeded track trigger for a high rate collider detector environment must have excellent angular precision, response times commensurate with beam crossing rate and low mass. We have designed a fast clustering block servicing 128 contiguous strips to be included in an LHC upgrade silicon strip front end ASIC (ABC130) with these objectives in mind. The block is based on the presence of an analog front end with binary (threshold determined) strip readout latched at each beam crossing. Combinatorial logic tests for the presence of one or two adjacent strips over threshold, a qualifying cluster, at each beam crossing and transmits up to two, eight bits clusters descriptors, specifying address and cluster width via a high speed LVDS output. It is envisioned that a correlator chip, presently in conception, receives this data and via look-up tables checks for coincident hits between silicon strip layers. Since the clustering output will report the presence of one or two hit strips, a half strip pitch ( ~ 40 um for the ATLAS detector) resolution may be possible for each cluster. Our timing results show that the combinatorial clustering logic will settle within 6 ns. Assuming a beam crossing rate of 40 MHz, 16 bits of serialized data can be shifted out at 640MHz each crossing. This will allow a beam synchronous update rate providing data for up to two clusters for each bank of 128 strips. The data latency into the correlator chip will be only two crossings. Present power estimates suggest that the fast cluster block with LVDS driver will consume less than 12 mW.

  17. Fluid pressure waves trigger earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mulargia, Francesco; Bizzarri, Andrea

    2015-03-01

    Fluids-essentially meteoric water-are present everywhere in the Earth's crust, occasionally also with pressures higher than hydrostatic due to the tectonic strain imposed on impermeable undrained layers, to the impoundment of artificial lakes or to the forced injections required by oil and gas exploration and production. Experimental evidence suggests that such fluids flow along preferred paths of high diffusivity, provided by rock joints and faults. Studying the coupled poroelastic problem, we find that such flow is ruled by a nonlinear partial differential equation amenable to a Barenblatt-type solution, implying that it takes place in form of solitary pressure waves propagating at a velocity which decreases with time as v ∝ t [1/(n - 1) - 1] with n ≳ 7. According to Tresca-Von Mises criterion, these waves appear to play a major role in earthquake triggering, being also capable to account for aftershock delay without any further assumption. The measure of stress and fluid pressure inside active faults may therefore provide direct information about fault potential instability.

  18. Trigger Points: An Anatomical Substratum

    PubMed Central

    Akamatsu, Flávia Emi; Ayres, Bernardo Rodrigues; Saleh, Samir Omar; Hojaij, Flávio; Andrade, Mauro; Hsing, Wu Tu; Jacomo, Alfredo Luiz

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to bring the trapezius muscle knowledge of the locations where the accessory nerve branches enter the muscle belly to reach the motor endplates and find myofascial trigger points (MTrPs). Although anatomoclinical correlations represent a major feature of MTrP, no previous reports describing the distribution of the accessory nerve branches and their anatomical relationship with MTrP are found in the literature. Both trapezius muscles from twelve adult cadavers were carefully dissected by the authors (anatomy professors and medical graduate students) to observe the exact point where the branches of the spinal accessory nerve entered the muscle belly. Dissection was performed through stratigraphic layers to preserve the motor innervation of the trapezius muscle, which is located deep in the muscle. Seven points are described, four of which are motor points: in all cases, these locations corresponded to clinically described MTrPs. The four points were common in these twelve cadavers. This type of clinical correlation between spinal accessory nerve branching and MTrP is useful to achieve a better understanding of the anatomical correlation of MTrP and the physiopathology of these disorders and may provide a scientific basis for their treatment, rendering useful additional information to therapists to achieve better diagnoses and improve therapeutic approaches. PMID:25811029

  19. Ionization and Triggered Star Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gritschneder, M.; Lin, D. N. C.; Murray, S. D.; Burkert, A.

    2011-12-01

    We perform a set of high resolution simulations on the impact of the UV-radiation of massive stars on the turbulent interstellar medium with the tree-SPH code iVINE. This parameter study includes different levels and driving scales of the turbulence, different ionizing flux as well as different temperatures and densities of the cold gas. We find a clear correlation between the initial state of the turbulent cloud and the final morphology and physical properties of the structures adjacent to the HII region. From the simulations we are able to derive a criterion for the formation of pillar-like structures and thus the formation of cores and stars. Gravitational collapse occurs regularly on the tips of the structures. We also derive column densities and velocity profiles of our simulations and find these to be in very good agreement with the observations of trunks and cores. In addition, we investigate the further evolution of the pillars once the massive star explodes. This leads to a supernova triggered scenario for the formation of our Solar System.

  20. Nonlinear Dynamical Triggering of Slow-Slip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, P. A.; Knuth, M. W.; Kaproth, B. M.; Carpenter, B. M.; Guyer, R. A.; Le Bas, P.; Daub, E. G.; Marone, C.

    2010-12-01

    Among the most fascinating, recent discoveries in seismology have been the phenomena of triggered slip, including triggered earthquakes and triggered-tremor, as well as triggered slow, silent-slip during which no seismic energy is radiated. Because fault nucleation depths cannot be probed directly, the physical regimes in which these phenomena occur are poorly understood. Thus determining physical properties that control diverse types of triggered fault sliding and what frictional constitutive laws govern triggered faulting variability is challenging. We are characterizing the physical controls of triggered faulting with the goal of developing constitutive relations by conducting laboratory and numerical modeling experiments in sheared granular media at varying load conditions. In order to simulate granular fault zone gouge in the laboratory, glass beads are sheared in a double-direct configuration under constant normal stress, while subject to transient perturbation by acoustic waves. We find that triggered, slow, silent-slip occurs at very small confining loads (~1-3 MPa) that are smaller than those where dynamic earthquake triggering takes place (4-7 MPa), and that triggered slow-slip is associated with bursts of LFE-like acoustic emission. Experimental evidence suggests that the nonlinear dynamical response of the gouge material induced by dynamic waves may be responsible for the triggered slip behavior: the slip-duration, stress-drop and along-strike slip displacement are proportional to the triggering wave amplitude. Further, we observe a shear-modulus decrease corresponding to dynamic-wave triggering relative to the shear modulus of stick-slips. Modulus decrease in response to dynamical wave amplitudes of roughly a microstrain and above is a hallmark of elastic nonlinear behavior. We believe that the dynamical waves increase the material non-affine elastic deformation during shearing, simultaneously leading to instability and slow-slip. The inferred

  1. Nonlinear dynamical triggering of slow slip

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Paul A; Knuth, Matthew W; Kaproth, Bryan M; Carpenter, Brett; Guyer, Robert A; Le Bas, Pierre - Yves; Daub, Eric G; Marone, Chris

    2010-12-10

    Among the most fascinating, recent discoveries in seismology have been the phenomena of triggered slip, including triggered earthquakes and triggered-tremor, as well as triggered slow, silent-slip during which no seismic energy is radiated. Because fault nucleation depths cannot be probed directly, the physical regimes in which these phenomena occur are poorly understood. Thus determining physical properties that control diverse types of triggered fault sliding and what frictional constitutive laws govern triggered faulting variability is challenging. We are characterizing the physical controls of triggered faulting with the goal of developing constitutive relations by conducting laboratory and numerical modeling experiments in sheared granular media at varying load conditions. In order to simulate granular fault zone gouge in the laboratory, glass beads are sheared in a double-direct configuration under constant normal stress, while subject to transient perturbation by acoustic waves. We find that triggered, slow, silent-slip occurs at very small confining loads ({approx}1-3 MPa) that are smaller than those where dynamic earthquake triggering takes place (4-7 MPa), and that triggered slow-slip is associated with bursts of LFE-like acoustic emission. Experimental evidence suggests that the nonlinear dynamical response of the gouge material induced by dynamic waves may be responsible for the triggered slip behavior: the slip-duration, stress-drop and along-strike slip displacement are proportional to the triggering wave amplitude. Further, we observe a shear-modulus decrease corresponding to dynamic-wave triggering relative to the shear modulus of stick-slips. Modulus decrease in response to dynamical wave amplitudes of roughly a microstrain and above is a hallmark of elastic nonlinear behavior. We believe that the dynamical waves increase the material non-affine elastic deformation during shearing, simultaneously leading to instability and slow-slip. The inferred

  2. Copper-triggered aggregation of ubiquitin.

    PubMed

    Arnesano, Fabio; Scintilla, Simone; Calò, Vincenza; Bonfrate, Elena; Ingrosso, Chiara; Losacco, Maurizio; Pellegrino, Teresa; Rizzarelli, Enrico; Natile, Giovanni

    2009-09-16

    Neurodegenerative disorders share common features comprising aggregation of misfolded proteins, failure of the ubiquitin-proteasome system, and increased levels of metal ions in the brain. Protein aggregates within affected cells often contain ubiquitin, however no report has focused on the aggregation propensity of this protein. Recently it was shown that copper, differently from zinc, nickel, aluminum, or cadmium, compromises ubiquitin stability and binds to the N-terminus with 0.1 micromolar affinity. This paper addresses the role of copper upon ubiquitin aggregation. In water, incubation with Cu(II) leads to formation of spherical particles that can progress from dimers to larger conglomerates. These spherical oligomers are SDS-resistant and are destroyed upon Cu(II) chelation or reduction to Cu(I). In water/trifluoroethanol (80:20, v/v), a mimic of the local decrease in dielectric constant experienced in proximity to a membrane surface, ubiquitin incubation with Cu(II) causes time-dependent changes in circular dichroism and Fourier-transform infrared spectra, indicative of increasing beta-sheet content. Analysis by atomic force and transmission electron microscopy reveals, in the given order, formation of spherical particles consistent with the size of early oligomers detected by gel electrophoresis, clustering of these particles in straight and curved chains, formation of ring structures, growth of trigonal branches from the rings, coalescence of the trigonal branched structures in a network. Notably, none of these ubiquitin aggregates was positive to tests for amyloid and Cu(II) chelation or reduction produced aggregate disassembly. The early formed Cu(II)-stabilized spherical oligomers, when reconstituted in 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (POPC) liposomes and in POPC planar bilayers, form annular and pore-like structures, respectively, which are common to several neurodegenerative disorders including Parkinson's, Alzheimer's, amyotrophic

  3. Methods for automatic trigger threshold adjustment

    DOEpatents

    Welch, Benjamin J; Partridge, Michael E

    2014-03-18

    Methods are presented for adjusting trigger threshold values to compensate for drift in the quiescent level of a signal monitored for initiating a data recording event, thereby avoiding false triggering conditions. Initial threshold values are periodically adjusted by re-measuring the quiescent signal level, and adjusting the threshold values by an offset computation based upon the measured quiescent signal level drift. Re-computation of the trigger threshold values can be implemented on time based or counter based criteria. Additionally, a qualification width counter can be utilized to implement a requirement that a trigger threshold criterion be met a given number of times prior to initiating a data recording event, further reducing the possibility of a false triggering situation.

  4. The LHCb trigger and its upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dziurda, A.

    2016-07-01

    The current LHCb trigger system consists of a hardware level, which reduces the LHC inelastic collision rate of 30 MHz, at which the entire detector is read out. In a second level, implemented in a farm of 20 k parallel-processing CPUs, the event rate is reduced to about 5 kHz. We review the performance of the LHCb trigger system during Run I of the LHC. Special attention is given to the use of multivariate analyses in the High Level Trigger. The major bottleneck for hadronic decays is the hardware trigger. LHCb plans a major upgrade of the detector and DAQ system in the LHC shutdown of 2018, enabling a purely software based trigger to process the full 30 MHz of inelastic collisions delivered by the LHC. We demonstrate that the planned architecture will be able to meet this challenge.

  5. Dark matter triggers of supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graham, Peter W.; Rajendran, Surjeet; Varela, Jaime

    2015-09-01

    The transit of primordial black holes through a white dwarf causes localized heating around the trajectory of the black hole through dynamical friction. For sufficiently massive black holes, this heat can initiate runaway thermonuclear fusion causing the white dwarf to explode as a supernova. The shape of the observed distribution of white dwarfs with masses up to 1.25 M⊙ rules out primordial black holes with masses ˜1019- 1020 gm as a dominant constituent of the local dark matter density. Black holes with masses as large as 1024 gm will be excluded if recent observations by the NuStar Collaboration of a population of white dwarfs near the galactic center are confirmed. Black holes in the mass range 1020- 1022 gm are also constrained by the observed supernova rate, though these bounds are subject to astrophysical uncertainties. These bounds can be further strengthened through measurements of white dwarf binaries in gravitational wave observatories. The mechanism proposed in this paper can constrain a variety of other dark matter scenarios such as Q balls, annihilation/collision of large composite states of dark matter and models of dark matter where the accretion of dark matter leads to the formation of compact cores within the star. White dwarfs, with their astronomical lifetimes and sizes, can thus act as large spacetime volume detectors enabling a unique probe of the properties of dark matter, especially of dark matter candidates that have low number density. This mechanism also raises the intriguing possibility that a class of supernova may be triggered through rare events induced by dark matter rather than the conventional mechanism of accreting white dwarfs that explode upon reaching the Chandrasekhar mass.

  6. JASMONATE-TRIGGERED PLANT IMMUNITY

    PubMed Central

    Campos, Marcelo L.; Kang, Jin-Ho; Howe, Gregg A.

    2014-01-01

    The plant hormone jasmonate (JA) exerts direct control over the production of chemical defense compounds that confer resistance to a remarkable spectrum of plant-associated organisms, ranging from microbial pathogens to vertebrate herbivores. The underlying mechanism of JA-triggered immunity (JATI) can be conceptualized as a multi-stage signal transduction cascade involving: i) pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) that couple the perception of danger signals to rapid synthesis of bioactive JA; ii) an evolutionarily conserved JA signaling module that links fluctuating JA levels to changes in the abundance of transcriptional repressor proteins; and iii) activation (de-repression) of transcription factors that orchestrate the expression of myriad chemical and morphological defense traits. Multiple negative feedback loops act in concert to restrain the duration and amplitude of defense responses, presumably to mitigate potential fitness costs of JATI. The convergence of diverse plant- and non-plant-derived signals on the core JA module indicates that JATI is a general response to perceived danger. However, the modular structure of JATI may accommodate attacker-specific defense responses through evolutionary innovation of PRRs (inputs) and defense traits (outputs). The efficacy of JATI as a defense strategy is highlighted by its capacity to shape natural populations of plant attackers, as well as the propensity of plant-associated organisms to subvert or otherwise manipulate JA signaling. As both a cellular hub for integrating informational cues from the environment and a common target of pathogen effectors, the core JA module provides a focal point for understanding immune system networks and the evolution of chemical diversity in the plant kingdom. PMID:24973116

  7. Slow Earthquakes Triggered by Typhoons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, C.; Linde, A. T.; Sacks, I. S.

    2006-12-01

    possible to determine whether these slow events are accompanied by non-volcanic tremor, as has been reported for the Nankai subduction and Cascadia slow events. We hypothesize that the slow earthquakes are triggered by the typhoon activity due to the resultant low air pressure over land reducing the locking force on the fault zone. Such repeated slow events may explain why this area of high deformation does not experience very large earthquakes.

  8. Tremors Triggered along the Queen Charlotte Fault

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aiken, C.; Peng, Z.; Chao, K.

    2012-12-01

    In the past decade, deep tectonic tremors have been observed in numerous tectonic environments surrounding the Pacific and Caribbean plates. In these regions, tremors triggered by both regional and distant earthquakes have also been observed. Despite the ubiquitous observations of triggered tremors, tremors triggered in differing strike-slip environments are less understood. Here, we conduct a preliminary search of tremors triggered by teleseismic earthquakes along the transpressive Queen Charlotte Fault (QCF) located between the Cascadia subduction zone and Alaska. Tectonic tremors have not been previously reported along the QCF. We select teleseismic earthquakes during the 1990-2012 period as having magnitude M ≥ 6.5 and occurring at least 1,000 km away from the region. We reduce the number of mainshocks by selecting those that generate greater than 1 kPa dynamic stress estimated from surface-wave magnitude equations [e.g. van der Elst and Brodsky, 2010]. Our mainshock waveforms are retrieved from the Canadian National Seismograph Network (CNSN), processed, and filtered for triggered tremor observations. We characterize triggered tremors as high-frequency signals visible among several stations and coincident with broadband surface wave peaks. So far, we have found tremors triggered along the QCF by surface waves of five great earthquakes - the 2002/11/03 Mw7.9 Denali Fault, 2004/12/26 Mw9.0 Sumatra, 2010/02/27 Mw8.8 Chile, 2011/03/11 Mw9.0 Japan, and 2012/04/11 Mw8.6 Sumatra earthquakes. We compare our results to tremors triggered by teleseismic earthquakes on strike-slip faults in central and southern California, as well as Cuba [Peng et al., 2012]. Among strike-slip faults in these regions, we also compare triggered tremor amplitudes to peak ground velocities from the mainshocks and compute dynamic stresses to determine a triggering threshold for the QCF. We find that in most cases tremors in the QCF are triggered primarily by the Love waves, and additional

  9. The D0 run II trigger system

    SciTech Connect

    Schwienhorst, Reinhard; /Michigan State U.

    2004-11-01

    The D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron was upgraded for Run II. This upgrade included improvements to the trigger system in order to be able to handle the increased Tevatron luminosity and higher bunch crossing rates compared to Run I. The D0 Run II trigger is a highly exible system to select events to be written to tape from an initial interaction rate of about 2.5 MHz. This is done in a three-tier pipelined, buffered system. The first tier (level 1) processes fast detector pick-off signals in a hardware/firmware based system to reduce the event rate to about 1. 5kHz. The second tier (level 2) uses information from level 1 and forms simple Physics objects to reduce the rate to about 850 Hz. The third tier (level 3) uses full detector readout and event reconstruction on a filter farm to reduce the rate to 20-30 Hz. The D0 trigger menu contains a wide variety of triggers. While the emphasis is on triggering on generic lepton and jet final states, there are also trigger terms for specific final state signatures. In this document we describe the D0 trigger system as it was implemented and is currently operating in Run II.

  10. Triggered tremor sweet spots in Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gomberg, Joan; Prejean, Stephanie

    2013-01-01

    To better understand what controls fault slip along plate boundaries, we have exploited the abundance of seismic and geodetic data available from the richly varied tectonic environments composing Alaska. A search for tremor triggered by 11 large earthquakes throughout all of seismically monitored Alaska reveals two tremor “sweet spots”—regions where large-amplitude seismic waves repeatedly triggered tremor between 2006 and 2012. The two sweet spots locate in very different tectonic environments—one just trenchward and between the Aleutian islands of Unalaska and Akutan and the other in central mainland Alaska. The Unalaska/Akutan spot corroborates previous evidence that the region is ripe for tremor, perhaps because it is located where plate-interface frictional properties transition between stick-slip and stably sliding in both the dip direction and laterally. The mainland sweet spot coincides with a region of complex and uncertain plate interactions, and where no slow slip events or major crustal faults have been noted previously. Analyses showed that larger triggering wave amplitudes, and perhaps lower frequencies (<~0.03 Hz), may enhance the probability of triggering tremor. However, neither the maximum amplitude in the time domain or in a particular frequency band, nor the geometric relationship of the wavefield to the tremor source faults alone ensures a high probability of triggering. Triggered tremor at the two sweet spots also does not occur during slow slip events visually detectable in GPS data, although slow slip below the detection threshold may have facilitated tremor triggering.

  11. Remotely triggered earthquakes following moderate main shocks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hough, S.E.

    2007-01-01

    Since 1992, remotely triggered earthquakes have been identified following large (M > 7) earthquakes in California as well as in other regions. These events, which occur at much greater distances than classic aftershocks, occur predominantly in active geothermal or volcanic regions, leading to theories that the earthquakes are triggered when passing seismic waves cause disruptions in magmatic or other fluid systems. In this paper, I focus on observations of remotely triggered earthquakes following moderate main shocks in diverse tectonic settings. I summarize evidence that remotely triggered earthquakes occur commonly in mid-continent and collisional zones. This evidence is derived from analysis of both historic earthquake sequences and from instrumentally recorded M5-6 earthquakes in eastern Canada. The latter analysis suggests that, while remotely triggered earthquakes do not occur pervasively following moderate earthquakes in eastern North America, a low level of triggering often does occur at distances beyond conventional aftershock zones. The inferred triggered events occur at the distances at which SmS waves are known to significantly increase ground motions. A similar result was found for 28 recent M5.3-7.1 earthquakes in California. In California, seismicity is found to increase on average to a distance of at least 200 km following moderate main shocks. This supports the conclusion that, even at distances of ???100 km, dynamic stress changes control the occurrence of triggered events. There are two explanations that can account for the occurrence of remotely triggered earthquakes in intraplate settings: (1) they occur at local zones of weakness, or (2) they occur in zones of local stress concentration. ?? 2007 The Geological Society of America.

  12. Intraplate triggered earthquakes: Observations and interpretation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hough, S.E.; Seeber, L.; Armbruster, J.G.

    2003-01-01

    We present evidence that at least two of the three 1811-1812 New Madrid, central United States, mainshocks and the 1886 Charleston, South Carolina, earthquake triggered earthquakes at regional distances. In addition to previously published evidence for triggered earthquakes in the northern Kentucky/southern Ohio region in 1812, we present evidence suggesting that triggered events might have occurred in the Wabash Valley, to the south of the New Madrid Seismic Zone, and near Charleston, South Carolina. We also discuss evidence that earthquakes might have been triggered in northern Kentucky within seconds of the passage of surface waves from the 23 January 1812 New Madrid mainshock. After the 1886 Charleston earthquake, accounts suggest that triggered events occurred near Moodus, Connecticut, and in southern Indiana. Notwithstanding the uncertainty associated with analysis of historical accounts, there is evidence that at least three out of the four known Mw 7 earthquakes in the central and eastern United States seem to have triggered earthquakes at distances beyond the typically assumed aftershock zone of 1-2 mainshock fault lengths. We explore the possibility that remotely triggered earthquakes might be common in low-strain-rate regions. We suggest that in a low-strain-rate environment, permanent, nonelastic deformation might play a more important role in stress accumulation than it does in interplate crust. Using a simple model incorporating elastic and anelastic strain release, we show that, for realistic parameter values, faults in intraplate crust remain close to their failure stress for a longer part of the earthquake cycle than do faults in high-strain-rate regions. Our results further suggest that remotely triggered earthquakes occur preferentially in regions of recent and/or future seismic activity, which suggests that faults are at a critical stress state in only some areas. Remotely triggered earthquakes may thus serve as beacons that identify regions of

  13. The upgrade of the CMS Global Trigger

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wittmann, J.; Arnold, B.; Bergauer, H.; Jeitler, M.; Matsushita, T.; Rabady, D.; Rahbaran, B.; Wulz, C.-E.

    2016-02-01

    The Global Trigger is the final step of the CMS Level-1 Trigger. Previously implemented in VME, it has been redesigned and completely rebuilt in MicroTCA technology, using the Virtex-7 FPGA chip family. It will allow to implement trigger algorithms close to the final physics selection. The new system is presented, together with performance tests undertaken in parallel operation with the legacy system during the initial months of Run II of the LHC at a beam energy of 13 TeV.

  14. Revisiting Pneumatic Nail Gun Trigger Recommendations

    PubMed Central

    Albers, James; Lipscomb, Hester; Hudock, Stephen; Dement, John; Evanoff, Bradley; Fullen, Mark; Gillen, Matt; Kaskutas, Vicki; Nolan, James; Patterson, Dennis; Platner, James; Pompeii, Lisa; Schoenfisch, Ashley

    2015-01-01

    Summary Use of a pneumatic nail gun with a sequential actuation trigger (SAT) significantly diminishes the risk for acute traumatic injury compared to use of a contact actuation trigger (CAT) nail gun. A theoretically-based increased risk of work-related musculoskeletal disorders from use of a SAT nail gun, relative to CAT, appears unlikely and remains unproven. Based on current knowledge, the use of CAT nail guns cannot be justified as a safe alternative to SAT nail guns. This letter provides a perspective of ergonomists and occupational safety researchers recommending the use of the sequential actuation trigger for all nail gun tasks in the construction industry. PMID:26366020

  15. Revisiting Pneumatic Nail Gun Trigger Recommendations.

    PubMed

    Albers, James; Lowe, Brian; Lipscomb, Hester; Hudock, Stephen; Dement, John; Evanoff, Bradley; Fullen, Mark; Gillen, Matt; Kaskutas, Vicki; Nolan, James; Patterson, Dennis; Platner, James; Pompeii, Lisa; Schoenfisch, Ashley

    2015-03-01

    Use of a pneumatic nail gun with a sequential actuation trigger (SAT) significantly diminishes the risk for acute traumatic injury compared to use of a contact actuation trigger (CAT) nail gun. A theoretically-based increased risk of work-related musculoskeletal disorders from use of a SAT nail gun, relative to CAT, appears unlikely and remains unproven. Based on current knowledge, the use of CAT nail guns cannot be justified as a safe alternative to SAT nail guns. This letter provides a perspective of ergonomists and occupational safety researchers recommending the use of the sequential actuation trigger for all nail gun tasks in the construction industry.

  16. Global Search for Deep Triggered Tremor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chao, K.; Peng, Z.; Enescu, B.; Wu, C.; Fry, B.

    2011-12-01

    Deep "non-volcanic" tremor has been observed at many major plate-boundary faults, which provides new information about fault slip behaviors below the seismogenic zone. Most 'regular' or 'ambient' tremor occurs spontaneously or accompanies slow-slip events, while some tremor can be 'triggered' by large distant earthquakes. Recent studies have shown that triggered tremor occurs on the same fault patches as ambient tremor and can be used as a proxy to estimate background tremor activity. However, it is still not clear why tremor can only be observed in certain tectonic regions, and what the necessary conditions are for tremor generation. Here we conduct a global search for tremor triggered by teleseismic earthquakes with Mw ≥ 7.5 between 2001 and 2011 following our previous studies. We focus on regions in southwest Japan and the North Island of New Zealand. In southwest Japan, we found a total of 16 teleseismic earthquakes associated with clear triggered tremor during the passing surface waves. Using standard envelope cross-correlation techniques, we found that the triggered tremor is located close to the regions where ambient tremor is identified previously. Thus far, in New Zealand, we have only identified 4 events associated with triggered tremor in the North Island. Next, we calculate the dynamic stress loading and compare the stress threshold of triggering with the following regions: the Parkfield-Cholame section of the San Andreas Fault in central California, the Calaveras Fault in northern California, the San Jacinto Fault in southern California, the southern and northern Central Range in Taiwan, and the Vancouver Island in Cascadia. The apparent triggering threshold in southwest Japan is around 3-4 KPa, close to the triggering threshold at Parkfield (2-3 KPa) and southern Central Range in Taiwan (7-8 KPa). Our next steps are to explore the triggering potentials at these regions with amplitude, frequency, incident angle and types of incoming waves, and

  17. Triggered creep as a possible mechanism for delayed dynamic triggering of tremor and earthquakes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shelly, D.R.; Peng, Z.; Hill, D.P.; Aiken, C.

    2011-01-01

    The passage of radiating seismic waves generates transient stresses in the Earth's crust that can trigger slip on faults far away from the original earthquake source. The triggered fault slip is detectable in the form of earthquakes and seismic tremor. However, the significance of these triggered events remains controversial, in part because they often occur with some delay, long after the triggering stress has passed. Here we scrutinize the location and timing of tremor on the San Andreas fault between 2001 and 2010 in relation to distant earthquakes. We observe tremor on the San Andreas fault that is initiated by passing seismic waves, yet migrates along the fault at a much slower velocity than the radiating seismic waves. We suggest that the migrating tremor records triggered slow slip of the San Andreas fault as a propagating creep event. We find that the triggered tremor and fault creep can be initiated by distant earthquakes as small as magnitude 5.4 and can persist for several days after the seismic waves have passed. Our observations of prolonged tremor activity provide a clear example of the delayed dynamic triggering of seismic events. Fault creep has been shown to trigger earthquakes, and we therefore suggest that the dynamic triggering of prolonged fault creep could provide a mechanism for the delayed triggering of earthquakes. ?? 2011 Macmillan Publishers Limited. All rights reserved.

  18. Software for implementing trigger algorithms on the upgraded CMS Global Trigger System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsushita, Takashi; Arnold, Bernhard

    2015-12-01

    The Global Trigger is the final step of the CMS Level-1 Trigger and implements a trigger menu, a set of selection requirements applied to the final list of trigger objects. The conditions for trigger object selection, with possible topological requirements on multiobject triggers, are combined by simple combinatorial logic to form the algorithms. The LHC has resumed its operation in 2015, the collision-energy will be increased to 13 TeV with the luminosity expected to go up to 2x1034 cm-2s-1. The CMS Level-1 trigger system will be upgraded to improve its performance for selecting interesting physics events and to operate within the predefined data-acquisition rate in the challenging environment expected at LHC Run 2. The Global Trigger will be re-implemented on modern FPGAs on an Advanced Mezzanine Card in MicroTCA crate. The upgraded system will benefit from the ability to process complex algorithms with DSP slices and increased processing resources with optical links running at 10 Gbit/s, enabling more algorithms at a time than previously possible and allowing CMS to be more flexible in how it handles the trigger bandwidth. In order to handle the increased complexity of the trigger menu implemented on the upgraded Global Trigger, a set of new software has been developed. The software allows a physicist to define a menu with analysis-like triggers using intuitive user interface. The menu is then realised on FPGAs with further software processing, instantiating predefined firmware blocks. The design and implementation of the software for preparing a menu for the upgraded CMS Global Trigger system are presented.

  19. Session summary: Electronics, triggering and data acquisition

    SciTech Connect

    Rescia, S.

    1991-12-01

    The session focused on the requirements for calorimetry at the SSC/LHC. Results on new readout techniques, calibration, radiation hard electronics and semiconductor devices, analog and digital front and electronics, and trigger strategies are presented.

  20. Trigger circuits for the PHENIX electromagnetic calorimeter

    SciTech Connect

    Frank, S.S.; Britton, C.L. Jr.; Winterberg, A.L.; Young, G.R.

    1997-11-01

    Monolithic and discrete circuits have been developed to provide trigger signals for the PHENIX electromagnetic calorimeter detector. These trigger circuits are deadtimeless and create overlapping 4 by 4 energy sums, a cosmic muon trigger, and a 144 channel energy sum. The front end electronics of the PHENIX system sample the energy and timing channels at each bunch crossing (BC) but it is not known immediately if this data is of interest. The information from the trigger circuits is used to determine if the data collected is of interest and should be digitized and stored or discarded. This paper presents details of the design, issues affecting circuit performance, characterization of prototypes fabricated in 1.2 {micro}m Orbit CMOS, and integration of the circuits into the EMCal electronics system.

  1. New Fast Interaction Trigger for ALICE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trzaska, Wladyslaw Henryk

    2017-02-01

    The LHC heavy-ion luminosity and collision rate from 2021 onwards will considerably exceed the design parameters of the present ALICE forward trigger detectors and the introduction of the Muon Forward Tracker (MFT) will significantly reduce the space available for the new trigger detectors. To comply with these conditions a new Fast Interaction Trigger (FIT) will be built. FIT will be the main forward trigger, luminometer, and interaction-time detector. It will also determine multiplicity, centrality, and reaction plane of heavy-ion collisions. FIT will consist of two arrays of Cherenkov quartz radiators with MCP-PMT sensors and of a plastic scintillator ring. By increasing the overall acceptance of FIT, the scintillator will improve centrality and event plane resolution. It will also add sensitivity for the detection of beam-gas events and provide some degree of redundancy. FIT is currently undergoing an intense R&D and prototyping period. It is scheduled for installation in ALICE during 2020.

  2. Remotely triggered nonvolcanic tremor in Sumbawa, Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuchs, F.; Lupi, M.; Miller, S. A.

    2014-06-01

    We present, for the first time, evidence for triggered tremor beneath the island of Sumbawa, Indonesia. We show triggered tremor in response to three teleseismic earthquakes: the Mw9.0 2011 Tohoku earthquake and two oceanic strike-slip earthquakes (Mw 8.6 and Mw8.2) offshore of Sumatra in 2012. We constrain an apparent triggering threshold of 1 mm/s ground velocity that corresponds to about 8 kPa dynamic stress. Peak tremor amplitudes of about 180 nm/s are observed, and scale with the ground velocity induced by the remote earthquakes. Triggered tremor responds to 45-65 s period surface waves and predominantly correlates with Rayleigh waves, even though the 2012 oceanic events have stronger Love wave amplitudes. We could not locate the tremor because of minimal station coverage, but data indicate several potential source volumes including the Flores Thrust, the Java subduction zone, or Tambora volcano.

  3. A hypothesis for delayed dynamic earthquake triggering

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Parsons, T.

    2005-01-01

    It's uncertain whether more near-field earthquakes are triggered by static or dynamic stress changes. This ratio matters because static earthquake interactions are increasingly incorporated into probabilistic forecasts. Recent studies were unable to demonstrate all predictions from the static-stress-change hypothesis, particularly seismicity rate reductions. However, current dynamic stress change hypotheses do not explain delayed earthquake triggering and Omori's law. Here I show numerically that if seismic waves can alter some frictional contacts in neighboring fault zones, then dynamic triggering might cause delayed triggering and an Omori-law response. The hypothesis depends on faults following a rate/state friction law, and on seismic waves changing the mean critical slip distance (Dc) at nucleation zones.

  4. Graphics Processing Units for HEP trigger systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ammendola, R.; Bauce, M.; Biagioni, A.; Chiozzi, S.; Cotta Ramusino, A.; Fantechi, R.; Fiorini, M.; Giagu, S.; Gianoli, A.; Lamanna, G.; Lonardo, A.; Messina, A.; Neri, I.; Paolucci, P. S.; Piandani, R.; Pontisso, L.; Rescigno, M.; Simula, F.; Sozzi, M.; Vicini, P.

    2016-07-01

    General-purpose computing on GPUs (Graphics Processing Units) is emerging as a new paradigm in several fields of science, although so far applications have been tailored to the specific strengths of such devices as accelerator in offline computation. With the steady reduction of GPU latencies, and the increase in link and memory throughput, the use of such devices for real-time applications in high-energy physics data acquisition and trigger systems is becoming ripe. We will discuss the use of online parallel computing on GPU for synchronous low level trigger, focusing on CERN NA62 experiment trigger system. The use of GPU in higher level trigger system is also briefly considered.

  5. Comment on "Tail reconnection triggering substorm onset".

    PubMed

    Lui, A T Y

    2009-06-12

    Angelopoulos et al. (Research Articles, 15 August 2008, p. 931) reported that magnetic reconnection in Earth's magnetotail triggered the onset of a magnetospheric substorm. We provide evidence that (i) near-Earth current disruption, occurring before the conventional tail reconnection signatures, triggered the onset; (ii) the observed auroral intensification and tail reconnection are not causally linked; and (iii) the onset they identified is a continuation of earlier substorm activities.

  6. Diclofenac: a new trigger of pemphigus vulgaris?

    PubMed

    Matz, H; Bialy-Golan, A; Brenner, S

    1997-01-01

    Many drugs have been shown to induce pemphigus, including thiol and nonthiol drugs. We present a case of pemphigus vulgaris where a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory medication, diclofenac in suppositories and topical gel preparations, is suspected of having triggered the disease. The temporal relationship between drug and outbreak of disease together with the positive migration inhibition factor test to diclofenac point to the possible involvement of this drug in triggering pemphigus vulgaris.

  7. Dynamic stresses, Coulomb failure, and remote triggering

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hill, D.P.

    2008-01-01

    Dynamic stresses associated with crustal surface waves with 15-30-sec periods and peak amplitudes 5 km). The latter is consistent with the observation that extensional or transtensional tectonic regimes are more susceptible to remote triggering by Rayleigh-wave dynamic stresses than compressional or transpressional regimes. Locally elevated pore pressures may have a role in the observed prevalence of dynamic triggering in extensional regimes and geothermal/volcanic systems.

  8. A Gamma-Ray Burst Trigger Toolkit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Band, David L.; White, Nicholas E. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The detection rate of a gamma-ray burst detector can be increased by using a count rate trigger with many accumulation times DELTAt and energy bands DELTAE Because a burst's peak flux varies when averaged over different DELTAt and DELTAE the nominal sensitivity (the numerical value of the peak flux) of a trigger system is less important than how much fainter a burst could be at the detection threshold as DELTAt and DELTAE are changed. The relative sensitivity of different triggers can be quantified by referencing the detection threshold back to the peak flux for a fiducial value of DELTAt and DELTA E. This mapping between peak flux values for different sets of DELTAt and DELTAE varies from burst to burst. Quantitative estimates of the burst detection rate for a given detector and trigger system can be based on the observed rate at a measured peak flux value in this fiducial trigger. Predictions of a proposed trigger's burst detection rate depend on the assumed burst population, and these predictions can be wildly in error for triggers that differ significantly from previous missions. I base the fiducial rate on the BATSE observations: 550 bursts per sky above a peak flux of 0.3 ph per square centimeter per second averaged over DELTAt=1.024 sec and DELTAE=50-300 keV. Using a sample of 100 burst lightcurves I find that triggering on any value of DELTAt that is a multiple of 0.064 sec decreases the average threshold peak flux on the 1.024 sec timescale by a factor of 0.6. Extending DELTAE to lower energies includes the large flux of the X-ray background, increasing the background count rate. Consequently a low energy DELTAE is advantageous only for very soft bursts. Whether a large fraction of the population of bright bursts is soft is disputed; the new population of X-ray Flashes is soft but relatively faint.

  9. Tremor, remote triggering and earthquake cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Z.

    2012-12-01

    Deep tectonic tremor and episodic slow-slip events have been observed at major plate-boundary faults around the Pacific Rim. These events have much longer source durations than regular earthquakes, and are generally located near or below the seismogenic zone where regular earthquakes occur. Tremor and slow-slip events appear to be extremely stress sensitive, and could be instantaneously triggered by distant earthquakes and solid earth tides. However, many important questions remain open. For example, it is still not clear what are the necessary conditions for tremor generation, and how remote triggering could affect large earthquake cycle. Here I report a global search of tremor triggered by recent large teleseismic earthquakes. We mainly focus on major subduction zones around the Pacific Rim. These include the southwest and northeast Japan subduction zones, the Hikurangi subduction zone in New Zealand, the Cascadia subduction zone, and the major subduction zones in Central and South America. In addition, we examine major strike-slip faults around the Caribbean plate, the Queen Charlotte fault in northern Pacific Northwest Coast, and the San Andreas fault system in California. In each place, we first identify triggered tremor as a high-frequency non-impulsive signal that is in phase with the large-amplitude teleseismic waves. We also calculate the dynamic stress and check the triggering relationship with the Love and Rayleigh waves. Finally, we calculate the triggering potential with the local fault orientation and surface-wave incident angles. Our results suggest that tremor exists at many plate-boundary faults in different tectonic environments, and could be triggered by dynamic stress as low as a few kPas. In addition, we summarize recent observations of slow-slip events and earthquake swarms triggered by large distant earthquakes. Finally, we propose several mechanisms that could explain apparent clustering of large earthquakes around the world.

  10. Global Search of Triggered Tectonic Tremor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Z.; Aiken, C.; Chao, K.; Gonzalez-Huizar, H.; Wang, B.; Ojha, L.; Yang, H.

    2013-05-01

    Deep tectonic tremor has been observed at major plate-boundary faults around the Pacific Rim. While regular or ambient tremor occurs spontaneously or accompanies slow-slip events, tremor could be also triggered by large distant earthquakes and solid earth tides. Because triggered tremor occurs on the same fault patches as ambient tremor and is relatively easy to identify, a systematic global search of triggered tremor could help to identify the physical mechanisms and necessary conditions for tremor generation. Here we conduct a global search of tremor triggered by large teleseismic earthquakes. We mainly focus on major faults with significant strain accumulations where no tremor has been reported before. These includes subduction zones in Central and South America, strike-slip faults around the Caribbean plate, the Queen Charlotte-Fairweather fault system and the Denali fault in the western Canada and Alaska, the Sumatra-Java subduction zone, the Himalaya frontal thrust faults, as well as major strike-slip faults around Tibet. In each region, we first compute the predicted dynamic stresses σd from global earthquakes with magnitude>=5.0 in the past 20 years, and select events with σd > 1 kPa. Next, we download seismic data recorded by stations from local or global seismic networks, and identify triggered tremor as a high-frequency non-impulsive signal that is in phase with the large-amplitude teleseismic waves. In cases where station distributions are dense enough, we also locate tremor based on the standard envelope cross-correlation techniques. Finally, we calculate the triggering potential for the Love and Rayleigh waves with the local fault orientation and surface-wave incident angles. So far we have found several new places that are capable of generating triggered tremor. We will summarize these observations and discuss their implications on physical mechanisms of tremor and remote triggering.

  11. 10 Joule High Voltage Trigger Micro Marx

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-06-01

    A low energy Marx generator makes a convenient trigger for various spark gaps. With an output around 200 kV and a rise time less than 2 ns, the micro... Marx can multichannel field distortion gaps or fire a number of gaps without much gap-to-gap isolation. This design features small size, low cost, and good triggering characteristics. The complete unit is shown in Fig. 1.

  12. Commissioning of the CMS High Level Trigger

    SciTech Connect

    Agostino, Lorenzo; et al.

    2009-08-01

    The CMS experiment will collect data from the proton-proton collisions delivered by the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at a centre-of-mass energy up to 14 TeV. The CMS trigger system is designed to cope with unprecedented luminosities and LHC bunch-crossing rates up to 40 MHz. The unique CMS trigger architecture only employs two trigger levels. The Level-1 trigger is implemented using custom electronics, while the High Level Trigger (HLT) is based on software algorithms running on a large cluster of commercial processors, the Event Filter Farm. We present the major functionalities of the CMS High Level Trigger system as of the starting of LHC beams operations in September 2008. The validation of the HLT system in the online environment with Monte Carlo simulated data and its commissioning during cosmic rays data taking campaigns are discussed in detail. We conclude with the description of the HLT operations with the first circulating LHC beams before the incident occurred the 19th September 2008.

  13. Trigger finger, tendinosis, and intratendinous gene expression.

    PubMed

    Lundin, A-C; Aspenberg, P; Eliasson, P

    2014-04-01

    The pathogenesis of trigger finger has generally been ascribed to primary changes in the first annular ligament. In contrast, we recently found histological changes in the tendons, similar to the findings in Achilles tendinosis or tendinopathy. We therefore hypothesized that trigger finger tendons would show differences in gene expression in comparison to normal tendons in a pattern similar to what is published for Achilles tendinosis. We performed quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction on biopsies from finger flexor tendons, 13 trigger fingers and 13 apparently healthy control tendons, to assess the expression of 10 genes which have been described to be differently expressed in tendinosis (collagen type 1a1, collagen 3a1, MMP-2, MMP-3, ADAMTS-5, TIMP-3, aggrecan, biglycan, decorin, and versican). In trigger finger tendons, collagen types 1a1 and 3a1, aggrecan and biglycan were all up-regulated, and MMP-3and TIMP-3 were down-regulated. These changes were statistically significant and have been previously described for Achilles tendinosis. The remaining four genes were not significantly altered. The changes in gene expression support the hypothesis that trigger finger is a form of tendinosis. Because trigger finger is a common condition, often treated surgically, it could provide opportunities for clinical research on tendinosis.

  14. The Zeus calorimeter first level trigger

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, W.J.

    1989-04-01

    The design of the Zeus Detector Calorimeter Level Trigger is presented. The Zeus detector is being built for operation at HERA, a new storage ring that will provide collisions between 820 GeV protons and 30 GeV electrons in 1990. The calorimeter is made of depleted uranium plates and plastic scintillator read out by wavelength shifter bars into 12,864 photomultiplier tubes. These signals are combined into 974 trigger towers with separate electromagnetic and hadronic sums. The calorimeter first level trigger is pipelined with a decision provided 5 {mu}sec after each beam crossing, occurring every 96 nsec. The trigger determines the total energy, the total transverse energy, the missing energy, and the energy and number of isolated electrons and muons. It also provides information on the number and energy of clusters. The trigger rate needs to be held to 1 kHz against a rate of proton-beam gas interactions of approximately 500 kHz. The summed trigger tower pulseheights are digitized by flash ADC`s. The digital values are linearized, stored and used for sums and pattern tests.

  15. The Topo-trigger: a new concept of stereo trigger system for imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López-Coto, R.; Mazin, D.; Paoletti, R.; Blanch Bigas, O.; Cortina, J.

    2016-04-01

    Imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes (IACTs) such as the Major Atmospheric Gamma-ray Imaging Cherenkov (MAGIC) telescopes endeavor to reach the lowest possible energy threshold. In doing so the trigger system is a key element. Reducing the trigger threshold is hampered by the rapid increase of accidental triggers generated by ambient light (the so-called Night Sky Background NSB). In this paper we present a topological trigger, dubbed Topo-trigger, which rejects events on the basis of their relative orientation in the telescope cameras. We have simulated and tested the trigger selection algorithm in the MAGIC telescopes. The algorithm was tested using MonteCarlo simulations and shows a rejection of 85% of the accidental stereo triggers while preserving 99% of the gamma rays. A full implementation of this trigger system would achieve an increase in collection area between 10 and 20% at the energy threshold. The analysis energy threshold of the instrument is expected to decrease by ~ 8%. The selection algorithm was tested on real MAGIC data taken with the current trigger configuration and no γ-like events were found to be lost.

  16. Transient triggering of near and distant earthquakes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gomberg, J.; Blanpied, M.L.; Beeler, N.M.

    1997-01-01

    We demonstrate qualitatively that frictional instability theory provides a context for understanding how earthquakes may be triggered by transient loads associated with seismic waves from near and distance earthquakes. We assume that earthquake triggering is a stick-slip process and test two hypotheses about the effect of transients on the timing of instabilities using a simple spring-slider model and a rate- and state-dependent friction constitutive law. A critical triggering threshold is implicit in such a model formulation. Our first hypothesis is that transient loads lead to clock advances; i.e., transients hasten the time of earthquakes that would have happened eventually due to constant background loading alone. Modeling results demonstrate that transient loads do lead to clock advances and that the triggered instabilities may occur after the transient has ceased (i.e., triggering may be delayed). These simple "clock-advance" models predict complex relationships between the triggering delay, the clock advance, and the transient characteristics. The triggering delay and the degree of clock advance both depend nonlinearly on when in the earthquake cycle the transient load is applied. This implies that the stress required to bring about failure does not depend linearly on loading time, even when the fault is loaded at a constant rate. The timing of instability also depends nonlinearly on the transient loading rate, faster rates more rapidly hastening instability. This implies that higher-frequency and/or longer-duration seismic waves should increase the amount of clock advance. These modeling results and simple calculations suggest that near (tens of kilometers) small/moderate earthquakes and remote (thousands of kilometers) earthquakes with magnitudes 2 to 3 units larger may be equally effective at triggering seismicity. Our second hypothesis is that some triggered seismicity represents earthquakes that would not have happened without the transient load (i

  17. Graphical processors for HEP trigger systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ammendola, R.; Biagioni, A.; Chiozzi, S.; Cotta Ramusino, A.; Di Lorenzo, S.; Fantechi, R.; Fiorini, M.; Frezza, O.; Lamanna, G.; Lo Cicero, F.; Lonardo, A.; Martinelli, M.; Neri, I.; Paolucci, P. S.; Pastorelli, E.; Piandani, R.; Pontisso, L.; Rossetti, D.; Simula, F.; Sozzi, M.; Vicini, P.

    2017-02-01

    General-purpose computing on GPUs is emerging as a new paradigm in several fields of science, although so far applications have been tailored to employ GPUs as accelerators in offline computations. With the steady decrease of GPU latencies and the increase in link and memory throughputs, time is ripe for real-time applications using GPUs in high-energy physics data acquisition and trigger systems. We will discuss the use of online parallel computing on GPUs for synchronous low level trigger systems, focusing on tests performed on the trigger of the CERN NA62 experiment. Latencies of all components need analysing, networking being the most critical. To keep it under control, we envisioned NaNet, an FPGA-based PCIe Network Interface Card (NIC) enabling GPUDirect connection. Moreover, we discuss how specific trigger algorithms can be parallelised and thus benefit from a GPU implementation, in terms of increased execution speed. Such improvements are particularly relevant for the foreseen LHC luminosity upgrade where highly selective algorithms will be crucial to maintain sustainable trigger rates with very high pileup.

  18. The D/Ø Silicon Track Trigger

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinbrück, Georg

    2003-09-01

    We describe a trigger preprocessor to be used by the D Ø experiment for selecting events with tracks from the decay of long-lived particles. This Level 2 impact parameter trigger utilizes information from the Silicon Microstrip Tracker to reconstruct tracks with improved spatial and momentum resolutions compared to those obtained by the Level 1 tracking trigger. It is constructed of VME boards with much of the logic existing in programmable processors. A common motherboard provides the I/O infrastructure and three different daughter boards perform the tasks of identifying the roads from the tracking trigger data, finding the clusters in the roads in the silicon detector, and fitting tracks to the clusters. This approach provides flexibility for the design, testing and maintenance phases of the project. The track parameters are provided to the trigger framework in 25 μs. The effective impact parameter resolution for high-momentum tracks is 35 μm, dominated by the size of the Tevatron beam.

  19. Tau Trigger at the ATLAS Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Benslama, K.; Kalinowski, A.; Belanger-Champange, C.; Brenner, R.; Bosman, M.; Casado, P.; Osuna, C.; Perez, E.; Vorwerk, V.; Czyczula, Z.; Dam, M.; Xella, S.; Demers, S.; Farrington, S.; Igonkina, O.; Kanaya, N.; Tsuno, S.; Ptacek, E.; Reinsch, A.; Strom, David M.; Torrence, E.; /Oregon U. /Sydney U. /Lancaster U. /Birmingham U.

    2011-11-09

    Many theoretical models, like the Standard Model or SUSY at large tan({beta}), predict Higgs bosons or new particles which decay more abundantly to final states including tau leptons than to other leptons. At the energy scale of the LHC, the identification of tau leptons, in particular in the hadronic decay mode, will be a challenging task due to an overwhelming QCD background which gives rise to jets of particles that can be hard to distinguish from hadronic tau decays. Equipped with excellent tracking and calorimetry, the ATLAS experiment has developed tau identification tools capable of working at the trigger level. This contribution presents tau trigger algorithms which exploit the main features of hadronic tau decays and describes the current tau trigger commissioning activities. Many of the SM processes being investigated at ATLAS, as well as numerous BSM searches, contain tau leptons in their final states. Being able to trigger effectively on the tau leptons in these events will contribute to the success of the ATLAS experiment. The tau trigger algorithms and monitoring infrastructure are ready for the first data, and are being tested with the data collected with cosmic muons. The development of efficiency measurements methods using QCD and Z {yields} {tau}{tau} events is well advanced.

  20. Trigger points – ultrasound and thermal findings

    PubMed Central

    Cojocaru, MC; Cojocaru, IM; Voiculescu, VM; Cojan-Carlea, NA; Dumitru, VL; Berteanu, M

    2015-01-01

    Rationale: Muscle pain can be elicited by any irritation of the nociceptors in the muscle or central sensitization in the central nervous system. The most frequently described muscle pain syndromes are myofascial pain syndrome and fibromyalgia syndrome. Myofascial pain syndrome has a more localized manifestation, the trigger points. Objective: If there is a correlation between the clinical findings, the ultrasound examination and the thermal pattern of trigger points exist. Material and method: The presence of trigger points can be identified by using clinical criteria. An ultrasound examination was performed to evaluate the trigger point dimensions. The ultrasound showed an ellipsoidal hypoechogenic area in the muscle. A thermography of the low back region was performed in order to observe the thermal pattern of the area. Results: Trigger points are represented by a higher temperature area surrounded by a cooler area, probably caused by a deficit in the blood flow around those points. Discussion: Infrared thermography could be a great asset for the monitoring of neuromusculoskeletal disorders and their dynamics, as well as an important aid for the initial diagnosis of conditions associated with tissue temperature alterations. PMID:26351532

  1. Self-triggering superconducting fault current limiter

    DOEpatents

    Yuan, Xing; Tekletsadik, Kasegn

    2008-10-21

    A modular and scaleable Matrix Fault Current Limiter (MFCL) that functions as a "variable impedance" device in an electric power network, using components made of superconducting and non-superconducting electrically conductive materials. The matrix fault current limiter comprises a fault current limiter module that includes a superconductor which is electrically coupled in parallel with a trigger coil, wherein the trigger coil is magnetically coupled to the superconductor. The current surge doing a fault within the electrical power network will cause the superconductor to transition to its resistive state and also generate a uniform magnetic field in the trigger coil and simultaneously limit the voltage developed across the superconductor. This results in fast and uniform quenching of the superconductors, significantly reduces the burnout risk associated with non-uniformity often existing within the volume of superconductor materials. The fault current limiter modules may be electrically coupled together to form various "n" (rows).times."m" (columns) matrix configurations.

  2. Use of GPUs in Trigger Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamanna, Gianluca

    In recent years the interest for using graphics processor (GPU) in general purpose high performance computing is constantly rising. In this paper we discuss the possible use of GPUs to construct a fast and effective real time trigger system, both in software and hardware levels. In particular, we study the integration of such a system in the NA62 trigger. The first application of GPUs for rings pattern recognition in the RICH will be presented. The results obtained show that there are not showstoppers in trigger systems with relatively low latency. Thanks to the use of off-the-shelf technology, in continous development for purposes related to video game and image processing market, the architecture described would be easily exported to other experiments, to build a versatile and fully customizable online selection.

  3. Earthquake triggering by transient and static deformations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gomberg, J.; Beeler, N.M.; Blanpied, M.L.; Bodin, P.

    1998-01-01

    Observational evidence for both static and transient near-field and far-field triggered seismicity are explained in terms of a frictional instability model, based on a single degree of freedom spring-slider system and rate- and state-dependent frictional constitutive equations. In this study a triggered earthquake is one whose failure time has been advanced by ??t (clock advance) due to a stress perturbation. Triggering stress perturbations considered include square-wave transients and step functions, analogous to seismic waves and coseismic static stress changes, respectively. Perturbations are superimposed on a constant background stressing rate which represents the tectonic stressing rate. The normal stress is assumed to be constant. Approximate, closed-form solutions of the rate-and-state equations are derived for these triggering and background loads, building on the work of Dieterich [1992, 1994]. These solutions can be used to simulate the effects of static and transient stresses as a function of amplitude, onset time t0, and in the case of square waves, duration. The accuracies of the approximate closed-form solutions are also evaluated with respect to the full numerical solution and t0. The approximate solutions underpredict the full solutions, although the difference decreases as t0, approaches the end of the earthquake cycle. The relationship between ??t and t0 differs for transient and static loads: a static stress step imposed late in the cycle causes less clock advance than an equal step imposed earlier, whereas a later applied transient causes greater clock advance than an equal one imposed earlier. For equal ??t, transient amplitudes must be greater than static loads by factors of several tens to hundreds depending on t0. We show that the rate-and-state model requires that the total slip at failure is a constant, regardless of the loading history. Thus a static load applied early in the cycle, or a transient applied at any time, reduces the stress

  4. BTeV trigger/DAQ innovations

    SciTech Connect

    Votava, Margaret; /Fermilab

    2005-05-01

    BTeV was a proposed high-energy physics (HEP) collider experiment designed for the study of B-physics and CP Violation at the Tevatron at Fermilab. BTeV included a large-scale, high-speed trigger and data acquisition (DAQ) system, reading data from the detector at 500 Gbytes/sec and writing data to mass storage at a rate of 200 Mbytes/sec. The design of the trigger/DAQ system was innovative while remaining realistic in terms of technical feasibility, schedule and cost. This paper will give an overview of the BTeV trigger/DAQ architecture, highlight some of the technical challenges, and describe the approach that was used to solve these challenges.

  5. Triggered star formation associated with HII regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogura, Katsuo

    There are two known mechanisms of triggered star formation associated with HII regions. One is the collect-and-collapse process of the shell accumulated around an expanding HII region, and the other is radiation-driven implosion (RDI) of bright-rimmed clouds (BRCs) originated from pre-existing cloud clumps. They are very briefly reviewed first. We then present the main results of our recent observations on the RDI star formation in BRCs. Finally, a third possible mechanism of triggering is suggested, which is attributed to the formation of elephant trunk-like structures due to hydrodynamical instability of ionization/shock fronts.

  6. More About The Video Event Trigger

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Glenn L.

    1996-01-01

    Report presents additional information about system described in "Video Event Trigger" (LEW-15076). Digital electronic system processes video-image data to generate trigger signal when image shows significant change, such as motion, or appearance, disappearance, change in color, brightness, or dilation of object. Potential uses include monitoring of hallways, parking lots, and other areas during hours when supposed unoccupied, looking for fires, tracking airplanes or other moving objects, identification of missing or defective parts on production lines, and video recording of automobile crash tests.

  7. Remotely triggered nonvolcanic tremor in Sumbawa, Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuchs, Florian; Lupi, Matteo; Miller, Stephen

    2015-04-01

    Nonvolcanic (or tectonic) tremor is a seismic phenomenom which can provide important information about dynamics of plate boundaries but the underlying mechanisms are not well understood. Tectonic tremor is often associated with slow-slip (termed episodic tremor and slip) and understanding the mechanisms driving tremor presents an important challenge because it is likely a dominant aspect of the evolutionary processes leading to tsunamigenic, megathrust subduction zone earthquakes. Tectonic tremor is observed worldwide, mainly along major subduction zones and plate boundaries such as in Alaska/Aleutians, Cascadia, the San Andreas Fault, Japan or Taiwan. We present, for the first time, evidence for triggered tremor beneath the island of Sumbawa, Indonesia. The island of Sumbawa, Indonesia, is part of the Lesser Sunda Group about 250 km north of the Australian/Eurasian plate collision at the Java Trench with a convergence rate of approximately 70 mm/yr. We show surface wave triggered tremor beneath Sumbawa in response to three teleseismic earthquakes: the Mw9.0 2011 Tohoku earthquake and two oceanic strike-slip earthquakes (Mw 8.6 and Mw8.2) offshore of Sumatra in 2012. Tremor amplitudes scale with ground motion and peak at 180 nm/s ground velocity on the horizontal components. A comparison of ground motion of the three triggering events and a similar (nontriggering) Mw7.6 2012 Philippines event constrains an apparent triggering threshold of approximately 1 mm/s ground velocity or 8 kPa dynamic stress. Surface wave periods of 45-65 s appear optimal for triggering tremor at Sumbawa which predominantly correlates with Rayleigh waves, even though the 2012 oceanic events have stronger Love wave amplitudes and triggering potential. Rayleigh wave triggering, low-triggering amplitudes, and the tectonic setting all favor a model of tremor generated by localized fluid transport. We could not locate the tremor because of minimal station coverage, but data indicate several

  8. THE STAR LEVEL-3 TRIGGER SYSTEM.

    SciTech Connect

    LANGE, J.S.; ADLER, C.; BERGER, J.; DEMELLO, M.; FLIERL, D.; ET AL

    1999-11-15

    The STAR level-3 trigger is a MYRINET interconnected ALPHA processor farm, performing online tracking of N{sub track} {ge} 8000 particles (N{sub point} {le} 45 per track) with a design input rate of R=100 Hz. A large scale prototype system was tested in 12/99 with laser and cosmic particle events.

  9. California foreshock sequences suggest aseismic triggering process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xiaowei; Shearer, Peter M.

    2013-06-01

    Foreshocks are one of the few well-documented precursors to large earthquakes; therefore, understanding their nature is very important for earthquake prediction and hazard mitigation. However, the triggering role of foreshocks is not yet clear. It is possible that foreshocks are a self-triggering cascade of events that simply happen to trigger an unusually large aftershock; alternatively, foreshocks might originate from an external aseismic process that ultimately triggers the mainshock. In the former case, the foreshocks will have limited utility for forecasting. The latter case has been observed for several individual large earthquakes; however, it remains unclear how common it is and how to distinguish foreshock sequences from other seismicity clusters that do not lead to large earthquakes. Here we analyze foreshocks of three M>7 mainshocks in southern California. These foreshock sequences appear similar to earthquake swarms, in that they do not start with their largest events and they exhibit spatial migration of seismicity. Analysis of source spectra shows that all three foreshock sequences feature lower average stress drops and depletion of high-frequency energy compared with the aftershocks of their corresponding mainshocks. Using a longer-term stress-drop catalog, we find that the average stress drop of the Landers and Hector Mine foreshock sequences is comparable to nearby swarms. Our observations suggest that these foreshock sequences are manifestations of aseismic transients occurring close to the mainshock hypocenters, possibly related to localized fault zone complexity, which have promoted the occurrence of both the foreshocks and the eventual mainshock.

  10. Triggering of earthquake aftershocks by dynamic stresses

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kilb, Debi; Gomberg, J.; Bodin, P.

    2000-01-01

    It is thought that small 'static' stress changes due to permanent fault displacement can alter the likelihood of, or trigger, earthquakes on nearby faults. Many studies of triggering in the nearfield, particularly of aftershocks, rely on these static changes as the triggering agent and consider them only in terms of equivalent changes in the applied load on the fault. Here we report a comparison of the aftershock pattern of the moment magnitude MW = 7.3 Landers earthquake, not only with static stress changes but also with transient, oscillatory stress changes transmitted as seismic waves (that is, 'dynamic' stresses). Dynamic stresses do not permanently change the applied load and thus can trigger earthquakes only by altering the mechanical state or properties of the fault zone. These dynamically weakened faults may fail after the seismic waves have passed by, and might even cause earthquakes that would not otherwise have occurred. We find similar asymmetries in the aftershock and dynamic stress patterns, the latter being due to rupture propagation, whereas the static stress changes lack this asymmetry. Previous studies have shown that dynamic stresses can promote failure at remote distances, but here we show that they can also do so nearby.

  11. Mathematical and physical scaling of triggered lightning

    SciTech Connect

    Ziolkowski, R.W.; Grant, J.B.

    1982-12-01

    As the aircraft industry incorporates current technology in airborne systems, electromagnetic compatibility can decrease. Composite fuselages can be more transparent to EMP, whether nuclear or lightning generated, than metal ones. Solid-state circuitry is sensitive to intense EM fluctuations whereas mechanical controls generally are not. With this increased vulnerability comes increased concern for these dangers. Recently the anxiety over lightning has risen. Answers are sought to such questions as: how do the lightning EM effects couple into the aircraft's interior. Do aircraft trigger lightning, and if so, can the triggering be minimized. An understanding, at least to some extent, of lightning would provide a needed foundation to examine the interaction of aircraft with lightning. A review of the literature on lightning and lightning-aircraft investigations, including triggered lightning, was conducted and is briefly summarized in this paper. In addition to this brief literature review, scaling the lightning event to laboratory size is also discussed. The ability to scale would allow accurate investigation of lightning effects, as well as the triggering phenomena, in scaled experiments.

  12. FPGA Trigger System to Run Klystrons

    SciTech Connect

    Gray, Darius; /Texas A-M /SLAC

    2010-08-25

    The Klystron Department is in need of a new trigger system to update the laboratory capabilities. The objective of the research is to develop the trigger system using Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) technology with a user interface that will allow one to communicate with the FPGA via a Universal Serial Bus (USB). This trigger system will be used for the testing of klystrons. The key materials used consists of the Xilinx Integrated Software Environment (ISE) Foundation, a Programmable Read Only Memory (Prom) XCF04S, a Xilinx Spartan 3E 35S500E FPGA, Xilinx Platform Cable USB II, a Printed Circuit Board (PCB), a 100 MHz oscillator, and an oscilloscope. Key considerations include eight triggers, two of which have variable phase shifting capabilities. Once the project was completed the output signals were able to be manipulated via a Graphical User Interface by varying the delay and width of the signal. This was as planned; however, the ability to vary the phase was not completed. Future work could consist of being able to vary the phase. This project will give the operators in the Klystron Department more flexibility to run various tests.

  13. Takotsubo cardiomyopathy triggered by alcohol withdrawal.

    PubMed

    Alexandre, Joakim; Benouda, Leila; Champ-Rigot, Laure; Labombarda, Fabien

    2011-07-01

    Takotsubo cardiomyopathy is a reversible cardiomyopathy frequently precipitated by a sudden emotional or physical stress. The exact physiopathology is still debated and may involve catecholamine-induced myocardial stunning. Alcohol withdrawal is associated with an hyperadrenergic state and may be a period at risk of cardiac events. We report a 56-year-old man with Takotsubo cardiomyopathy triggered by alcohol withdrawal.

  14. Myofacial Trigger Points in Advanced Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Hasuo, Hideaki; Ishihara, Tatsuhiko; Kanbara, Kenji; Fukunaga, Mikihiko

    2016-01-01

    Myofascial pain syndrome is started to be recognized as one of important factors of pain in cancer patients. However, no reports on features of myofascial trigger points were found in terminally-ill cancer populations. This time, we encountered 5 patients with myofascial pain syndrome and terminal cancer in whom delirium developed due to increased doses of opioid without a diagnosis of myofascial pain syndrome on initial presentation. The delirium subsided with dose reductions of opioid and treatment of myofascial pain syndrome. The common reason for a delayed diagnosis among the patients included an incomplete palpation of the painful sites, which led to unsuccessful myofascial trigger points identification. The features of myofascial trigger points included single onset in the cancer pain management site with opioid and the contralateral abdominal side muscles of the non-common sites. Withdrawal reflexes associated with cancer pain in the supine position, which are increasingly seen in the terminal cancer patients, were considered to have contributed to this siuation. We consider that careful palpation of the painful site is important, in order to obtain greater knowledge and understanding of the features of myofascial trigger points. PMID:26962285

  15. Multiple output timing and trigger generator

    SciTech Connect

    Wheat, Robert M.; Dale, Gregory E

    2009-01-01

    In support of the development of a multiple stage pulse modulator at the Los Alamos National Laboratory, we have developed a first generation, multiple output timing and trigger generator. Exploiting Commercial Off The Shelf (COTS) Micro Controller Units (MCU's), the timing and trigger generator provides 32 independent outputs with a timing resolution of about 500 ns. The timing and trigger generator system is comprised of two MCU boards and a single PC. One of the MCU boards performs the functions of the timing and signal generation (the timing controller) while the second MCU board accepts commands from the PC and provides the timing instructions to the timing controller. The PC provides the user interface for adjusting the on and off timing for each of the output signals. This system provides 32 output or timing signals which can be pre-programmed to be in an on or off state for each of 64 time steps. The width or duration of each of the 64 time steps is programmable from 2 {micro}s to 2.5 ms with a minimum time resolution of 500 ns. The repetition rate of the programmed pulse train is only limited by the time duration of the programmed event. This paper describes the design and function of the timing and trigger generator system and software including test results and measurements.

  16. Performance of the CMS High Level Trigger

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perrotta, Andrea

    2015-12-01

    The CMS experiment has been designed with a 2-level trigger system. The first level is implemented using custom-designed electronics. The second level is the so-called High Level Trigger (HLT), a streamlined version of the CMS offline reconstruction software running on a computer farm. For Run II of the Large Hadron Collider, the increases in center-of-mass energy and luminosity will raise the event rate to a level challenging for the HLT algorithms. The increase in the number of interactions per bunch crossing, on average 25 in 2012, and expected to be around 40 in Run II, will be an additional complication. We present here the expected performance of the main triggers that will be used during the 2015 data taking campaign, paying particular attention to the new approaches that have been developed to cope with the challenges of the new run. This includes improvements in HLT electron and photon reconstruction as well as better performing muon triggers. We will also present the performance of the improved tracking and vertexing algorithms, discussing their impact on the b-tagging performance as well as on the jet and missing energy reconstruction.

  17. [Triggering of acute coronary syndromes. Pathophysiologic relationships].

    PubMed

    González Pliego, José Angel

    2006-01-01

    In this review, the relationship of external triggers with the development of acute coronary syndromes is described. Based on current evidence, the pathophysiological mechanisms that probably result in the rupture of vulnerable coronary plaques are revised and preventive measures to stop the functional and lethal consequences of its occurrence are proposed.

  18. An "anomalous" triggered lightning flash in Florida

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gamerota, W. R.; Uman, M. A.; Hill, J. D.; Pilkey, J.; Ngin, T.; Jordan, D. M.; Mata, C. T.

    2013-04-01

    An "anomalous" rocket-and-wire triggered lightning flash, a flash whose leaders do not follow the triggering wire remnants to ground, is characterized via high-speed video images at 10 and 300 kilo-frames per second, still camera images, 66-72 MHz source locations from a Lightning Mapping Array, channel-base current, and electric field and electric field derivative (dE/dt) measurements. This is the first anomalous flash of about 410 classically triggered flashes in north-central Florida. The flash began with an upward positively charged leader (UPL) initiating from the tip of the upward-moving triggering wire about 280 m above ground level. All but the bottom 17 m of wire exploded (became luminous) 37.6 ms after UPL initiation. A stepped leader initiated, likely from the top of the wire remnants, 282 m above ground level about 1.3 ms after the wire explosion and propagated downward for 2.1 ms, attaching to the top of a grounded utility pole 117 m southwest of the launching facility. The line charge density on the stepped leader is estimated to be of the order of 10-3 C m-1. Contrary to previously reported "anomalous" flashes in France and New Mexico (roughly 16% and 31%, respectively, of their triggered flashes), in our event, there was not a tens of milliseconds current-zero period preceding the stepped leader, there was no observed downward dart leader in the UPL channel prior to the stepped leader to ground, and there was a failed attempt to reestablish current in the exploded-wire channel between the UPL and ground.

  19. On near-source earthquake triggering

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Parsons, T.; Velasco, A.A.

    2009-01-01

    When one earthquake triggers others nearby, what connects them? Two processes are observed: static stress change from fault offset and dynamic stress changes from passing seismic waves. In the near-source region (r ??? 50 km for M ??? 5 sources) both processes may be operating, and since both mechanisms are expected to raise earthquake rates, it is difficult to isolate them. We thus compare explosions with earthquakes because only earthquakes cause significant static stress changes. We find that large explosions at the Nevada Test Site do not trigger earthquakes at rates comparable to similar magnitude earthquakes. Surface waves are associated with regional and long-range dynamic triggering, but we note that surface waves with low enough frequency to penetrate to depths where most aftershocks of the 1992 M = 5.7 Little Skull Mountain main shock occurred (???12 km) would not have developed significant amplitude within a 50-km radius. We therefore focus on the best candidate phases to cause local dynamic triggering, direct waves that pass through observed near-source aftershock clusters. We examine these phases, which arrived at the nearest (200-270 km) broadband station before the surface wave train and could thus be isolated for study. Direct comparison of spectral amplitudes of presurface wave arrivals shows that M ??? 5 explosions and earthquakes deliver the same peak dynamic stresses into the near-source crust. We conclude that a static stress change model can readily explain observed aftershock patterns, whereas it is difficult to attribute near-source triggering to a dynamic process because of the dearth of aftershocks near large explosions.

  20. AMPLITUDE DISCRIMINATOR HAVING SEPARATE TRIGGERING AND RECOVERY CONTROLS UTILIZING AUTOMATIC TRIGGERING

    DOEpatents

    Chase, R.L.

    1962-01-23

    A transistorized amplitude discriminator circuit is described in which the initial triggering sensitivity and the recovery threshold are separately adjustable in a convenient manner. The discriminator is provided with two independent bias components, one of which is for circuit hysteresis (recovery) and one of which is for trigger threshold level. A switching circuit is provided to remove the second bias component upon activation of the trigger so that the recovery threshold is always at the point where the trailing edge of the input signal pulse goes through zero or other desired value. (AEC)

  1. Dynamic Triggering of Earthquakes and Tremors in Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeh, T. C.; Chen, K. H.; Liang, W. T.; Peng, Z.; Chao, K.

    2015-12-01

    Distant earthquake matters. Its long period, long lasted surface waves could bring transient stresses, later the local stress state, and trigger earthquakes and tremors at remote distances. There exists mounting evidences for the role of dynamic stress in slow/fast earthquakes triggering. Yet, little is understood about the similar/different processes for triggered earthquakes and tremors. What is the response of tremors and earthquakes to a remote earthquake? Are the triggered tremor and earthquakes co-located? Are the triggering controlled by the characteristics of distant earthquakeor local physical condition? With generation potential of non-volcanic tremors and frequent earthquake activity, Taiwan serves as a natural laboratory to explore the similarity and difference in triggering response of tremor and earthquakes. Using a collection of Mw ≥ 7.0 events from Sumatra constraint by similar azimuth, we seek to understand the general characteristics of tremors and earthquakes triggered by Sumatra events, furthermore, discuss the predominant factors of triggering in Taiwan. By examining all recordings of the 24 Sumatra Mw ≥ 7.0 earthquakes from 2000 to 2014 , we identified four triggered tremors and 12 triggered earthquakes that occurred during the surface wave passage. The Sumatra earthquakes that triggered tremors are characterized by thrust-type focal mechanisms with right-lateral component and minimum dynamic stress of ~3 kPa. The minimum dynamic stress measured for triggered earthquakes, however, is ~0.4 kPa, smaller than that of triggered tremor. The different location and stress triggering threshold for triggered tremors and earthquakes indicates different triggering mechanisms. Triggered tremors are confined in southern Central Range characterized by high attenuation, high thermal anomaly, the boundary between high and low resistivity, and localized veins on the surfaces distributed, suggesting the involvement of fluids from metamorphic dehydration

  2. High Level Trigger Configuration and Handling of Trigger Tables in the CMS Filter Farm

    SciTech Connect

    Bauer, G; Behrens, U; Boyer, V; Branson, J; Brett, A; Cano, E; Carboni, A; Ciganek, M; Cittolin, S; O'dell, V; Erhan, S; Gigi, D; Glege, F; Gomez-Reino, R; Gulmini, M; Gutleber, J; Hollar, J; Lange, D; Kim, J C; Klute, M; Lipeles, E; Perez, J L; Maron, G; Meijers, F; Meschi, E; Moser, R; Mlot, E G; Murray, S; Oh, A; Orsini, L; Paus, C; Petrucci, A; Pieri, M; Pollet, L; Racz, A; Sakulin, H; Sani, M; Schieferdecker, P; Schwick, C; Sumorok, K; Suzuki, I; Tsirigkas, D; Varela, J

    2009-11-22

    The CMS experiment at the CERN Large Hadron Collider is currently being commissioned and is scheduled to collect the first pp collision data in 2008. CMS features a two-level trigger system. The Level-1 trigger, based on custom hardware, is designed to reduce the collision rate of 40 MHz to approximately 100 kHz. Data for events accepted by the Level-1 trigger are read out and assembled by an Event Builder. The High Level Trigger (HLT) employs a set of sophisticated software algorithms, to analyze the complete event information, and further reduce the accepted event rate for permanent storage and analysis. This paper describes the design and implementation of the HLT Configuration Management system. First experiences with commissioning of the HLT system are also reported.

  3. Photoconductive semiconductor switches: Laser Q-switch trigger and switch-trigger laser integration

    SciTech Connect

    Loubriel, G.M.; Mar, A.; Hamil, R.A.; Zutavern, F.J.; Helgeson, W.D.

    1997-12-01

    This report provides a summary of the Pulser In a Chip 9000-Discretionary LDRD. The program began in January of 1997 and concluded in September of 1997. The over-arching goal of this LDRD is to study whether laser diode triggered photoconductive semiconductor switches (PCSS) can be used to activate electro-optic devices such as Q-switches and Pockels cells and to study possible laser diode/switch integration. The PCSS switches we used were high gain GaAs switches because they can be triggered with small amounts of laser light. The specific goals of the LDRD were to demonstrate: (1) that small laser diode arrays that are potential candidates for laser-switch integration will indeed trigger the PCSS switch, and (2) that high gain GaAs switches can be used to trigger optical Q-switches in lasers such as the lasers to be used in the X-1 Advanced Radiation Source and the laser used for direct optical initiation (DOI) of explosives. The technology developed with this LDRD is now the prime candidate for triggering the Q switch in the multiple lasers in the laser trigger system of the X-1 Advanced Radiation Source and may be utilized in other accelerators. As part of the LDRD we developed a commercial supplier. To study laser/switch integration we tested triggering the high gain GaAs switches with: edge emitting laser diodes, vertical cavity surface emitting lasers (VCSELs), and transverse junction stripe (TJS) lasers. The first two types of lasers (edge emitting and VCSELs) did activate the PCSS but are harder to integrate with the PCSS for a compact package. The US lasers, while easier to integrate with the switch, did not trigger the PCSS at the US laser power levels we used. The PCSS was used to activate the Q-switch of the compact laser to be used in the X-1 Advanced Radiation Source.

  4. A light-triggered protein secretion system.

    PubMed

    Chen, Daniel; Gibson, Emily S; Kennedy, Matthew J

    2013-05-13

    Optical control of protein interactions has emerged as a powerful experimental paradigm for manipulating and studying various cellular processes. Tools are now available for controlling a number of cellular functions, but some fundamental processes, such as protein secretion, have been difficult to engineer using current optical tools. Here we use UVR8, a plant photoreceptor protein that forms photolabile homodimers, to engineer the first light-triggered protein secretion system. UVR8 fusion proteins were conditionally sequestered in the endoplasmic reticulum, and a brief pulse of light triggered robust forward trafficking through the secretory pathway to the plasma membrane. UVR8 was not responsive to excitation light used to image cyan, green, or red fluorescent protein variants, allowing multicolor visualization of cellular markers and secreted protein cargo as it traverses the cellular secretory pathway. We implemented this novel tool in neurons to demonstrate restricted, local trafficking of secretory cargo near dendritic branch points.

  5. Level-2 Calorimeter Trigger Upgrade at CDF

    SciTech Connect

    Flanagan, G.U.; /Purdue U.

    2007-04-01

    The CDF Run II Level-2 calorimeter trigger is implemented in hardware and is based on an algorithm used in Run I. This system insured good performance at low luminosity obtained during the Tevatron Run II. However, as the Tevatron instantaneous luminosity increases, the limitations of the current system due to the algorithm start to become clear. In this paper, we will present an upgrade of the Level-2 calorimeter trigger system at CDF. The upgrade is based on the Pulsar board, a general purpose VME board developed at CDF and used for upgrading both the Level-2 tracking and the Level-2 global decision crate. This paper will describe the design, hardware and software implementation, as well as the advantages of this approach over the existing system.

  6. A self-triggered picoinjector in microfluidics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yiming; Liu, Songsheng; Jia, Chunping; Mao, Hongju; Jin, Qinghui; Zhao, Jianlong; Zhou, Hongbo

    2016-12-01

    Droplet-based microfluidics has recently emerged as a potential platform for studies of single-cell, directed evolution, and genetic sequencing. In droplet-based microfluidics, adding reagents into drops is one of the most important functions. In this paper, we develop a new self-triggered picoinjector to add controlled volumes of reagent into droplets at kilohertz rates. In the picoinjector, the reagent injecting is triggered by the coming droplet itself, without needing a droplet detection module. Meanwhile, the dosing volume can be precisely controlled. These features make the system more practical and reliable. We expect the new picoinjector will find important applications of droplet-based microfluidics in automated biological assay, directed evolution, enzyme assay, and so on.

  7. Cell biology of Ca2+-triggered exocytosis.

    PubMed

    Pang, Zhiping P; Südhof, Thomas C

    2010-08-01

    Ca(2+) triggers many forms of exocytosis in different types of eukaryotic cells, for example synaptic vesicle exocytosis in neurons, granule exocytosis in mast cells, and hormone exocytosis in endocrine cells. Work over the past two decades has shown that synaptotagmins function as the primary Ca(2+)-sensors for most of these forms of exocytosis, and that synaptotagmins act via Ca(2+)-dependent interactions with both the fusing phospholipid membranes and the membrane fusion machinery. However, some forms of Ca(2+)-induced exocytosis may utilize other, as yet unidentified Ca(2+)-sensors, for example, slow synaptic exocytosis mediating asynchronous neurotransmitter release. In the following overview, we will discuss the synaptotagmin-based mechanism of Ca(2+)-triggered exocytosis in neurons and neuroendocrine cells, and its potential extension to other types of Ca(2+)-stimulated exocytosis for which no synaptotagmin Ca(2+)-sensor has been identified.

  8. Insignificant solar-terrestrial triggering of earthquakes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Love, Jeffrey J.; Thomas, Jeremy N.

    2013-01-01

    We examine the claim that solar-terrestrial interaction, as measured by sunspots, solar wind velocity, and geomagnetic activity, might play a role in triggering earthquakes. We count the number of earthquakes having magnitudes that exceed chosen thresholds in calendar years, months, and days, and we order these counts by the corresponding rank of annual, monthly, and daily averages of the solar-terrestrial variables. We measure the statistical significance of the difference between the earthquake-number distributions below and above the median of the solar-terrestrial averages by χ2 and Student's t tests. Across a range of earthquake magnitude thresholds, we find no consistent and statistically significant distributional differences. We also introduce time lags between the solar-terrestrial variables and the number of earthquakes, but again no statistically significant distributional difference is found. We cannot reject the null hypothesis of no solar-terrestrial triggering of earthquakes.

  9. Trigger electronics upgrade of PHENIX muon tracker

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adachi, S.; Akiyama, T.; Aoki, K.; Asano, H.; Ebesu, S.; Fukao, Y.; Haki, Y.; Hata, M.; Ichikawa, Y.; Iinuma, H.; Ikeda, Y.; Ikeno, M.; Imai, K.; Imazu, Y.; Karatsu, K.; Kasai, M.; Kawamura, H.; Kim, E.; Kurita, K.; Mibe, T.; Murakami, T.; Murata, J.; Nakagawa, I.; Nakamura, K. R.; Nakanishi, R.; Ninomiya, K.; Nitta, M.; Ogawa, N.; Onishi, J.; Park, S.; Sada, Y.; Saito, N.; Sameshima, R.; Sasaki, O.; Sato, A.; Seitaibashi, E.; Senzaka, K.; Shoji, K.; Taketani, A.; Tanida, K.; Toyoda, T.; Watanabe, K.

    2013-03-01

    The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) offers the unique capability to collide polarized protons at high energies. One of the highlights of the polarized proton program performed at √{s}=500 GeV is that it affords the direct measurement of sea quark contribution to the proton spin via W-boson production through the measurement of the parity violating single spin asymmetry. A new trigger electronics system for forward muons, which is especially capable of W-boson detection, was developed for the PHENIX experiment. The trigger was installed as an additional electronic circuit, and it was connected in parallel with the existing cathode readout electronics of the muon tracking chamber.

  10. Sequentially triggered star formation in OB associations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Preibisch, Thomas; Zinnecker, Hans

    We discuss observational evidence for sequential and triggered star formation in galactic and extragalactic OB associations. We will first review in detail the star formation process in the Scorpius-Centaurus OB association, the nearest OB association to the Sun, where several recent extensive studies have provided comprehensive information on the stellar content and the ages of the different OB subgroups. These data have allowed us to reconstruct the star formation history of the association in some detail and provided important insight into the activity in the rho Oph and Lupus dark clouds, and with the origin of several young stellar groups in the southern sky. After discussing evidence for triggered star formation in and around various other Galactic OB associations (e.g. Ori OB1, Per OB2) we will compare the observational results with recent models of rapid star formation in the turbulent interstellar medium (cf. Briceno et al. chapter in Protostars and Planets V, in press).

  11. The BTeV trigger architecture

    SciTech Connect

    Michael H.L.S. Wang

    2003-08-21

    BTeV is a high-statistics B-physics experiment that will achieve new levels of sensitivity in testing the Standard Model explanation of CP violation, mixing, and rare decays in the b and c quark systems by operating in the unique environment of a hadron collider. In order to achieve its goals, it will make use of a state-of-the-art Si-pixel vertex detector and a novel 3-level hierarchical trigger that will look at every single beam crossing to detect the presence of heavy quark decays. This talk will describe the trigger architecture focusing on key design aspects that allow the use of commercially available technology in a highly feasible and practical solution that meets the demanding physics requirements of the BTeV experiment.

  12. The DISTO first level trigger at SATURNE

    SciTech Connect

    Balestra, F. |; Bedfer, Y.; Bertini, R. ||

    1998-06-01

    The DISTO collaboration has built a large-acceptance magnetic spectrometer designed to provide broad kinematic coverage of multi-particle final states produced in pp scattering. The spectrometer has been installed in the polarized proton beam of the Saturne accelerator in Saclay to study polarization observables in the {rvec p}p {yields} pK{sup +}{rvec Y} (Y = {Lambda}, {Sigma}{sup 0} or Y{sup *}) reaction and vector meson production ({psi}, {omega} and {rho}) in pp collisions. The common signature of such events is the multiplicity of four charged particles in the final state. A flexible 1st level trigger which uses topological information from fast detectors has been built. It is completely software programmable through a menu-driven user interface and allows switching between production and monitor triggers on successive beam spills.

  13. Checkpoint triggering in a computer system

    SciTech Connect

    Cher, Chen-Yong

    2016-09-06

    According to an aspect, a method for triggering creation of a checkpoint in a computer system includes executing a task in a processing node of the computer system and determining whether it is time to read a monitor associated with a metric of the task. The monitor is read to determine a value of the metric based on determining that it is time to read the monitor. A threshold for triggering creation of the checkpoint is determined based on the value of the metric. Based on determining that the value of the metric has crossed the threshold, the checkpoint including state data of the task is created to enable restarting execution of the task upon a restart operation.

  14. GLAST Burst Monitor Trigger Classification Algorithm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perrin, D. J.; Sidman, E. D.; Meegan, C. A.; Briggs, M. S.; Connaughton, V.

    2004-01-01

    The Gamma Ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST), currently set for launch in the first quarter of 2007, will consist of two instruments, the GLAST Burst Monitor (GBM) and the Large Area Telescope (LAT). One of the goals of the GBM is to identify and locate gamma-ray bursts using on-board software. The GLAST observatory can then be re-oriented to allow observations by the LAT. A Bayesian analysis will be used to distinguish gamma-ray bursts from other triggering events, such as solar flares, magnetospheric particle precipitation, soft gamma repeaters (SGRs), and Cygnus X-1 flaring. The trigger parameters used in the analysis are the burst celestial coordinates, angle from the Earth's horizon, spectral hardness, and the spacecraft geomagnetic latitude. The algorithm will be described and the results of testing will be presented.

  15. Modeling seismic swarms triggered by aseismic transients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Llenos, Andrea L.; McGuire, Jeffrey J.; Ogata, Yosihiko

    2009-04-01

    The rate of earthquake occurrence varies by many orders of magnitude in a given region due to variations in the stress state of the crust. Our focus here is on variations in seismicity rate triggered by transient aseismic processes such as fluid flow, fault creep or magma intrusion. While these processes have been shown to trigger earthquakes, converting observed seismicity variations into estimates of stress rate variations has been challenging. Essentially aftershock sequences often obscure changes in the background seismicity rate resulting from aseismic processes. Two common approaches for estimating the time dependence of the underlying driving mechanisms are the stochastic Epidemic Type Aftershock Sequence model (ETAS) [Ogata, Y., (1988), Statistical models for earthquake occurrences and residual analysis for point processes, J. Am. Stat. Assoc., 83, 9-27.] and a physical approach based on the rate- and state-model of fault friction [Dieterich, J., (1994), A constitutive law for rate of earthquake production and its application to earthquake clustering, J. Geophys. Res., 99, 2601-2618.]. The models have different strengths that could be combined to allow more quantitative studies of earthquake triggering. To accomplish this, we identify the parameters that relate to one another in the two models and examine their dependence on stressing rate. A particular conflict arises because the rate-state model predicts that aftershock productivity scales with stressing rate while the ETAS model assumes that it is time independent. To resolve this issue, we estimate triggering parameters for 4 earthquake swarms contemporaneous with geodetically observed deformation transients in various tectonic environments. We find that stressing rate transients increase the background seismicity rate without affecting aftershock productivity. We then specify a combined model for seismicity rate variations that will allow future studies to invert seismicity catalogs for variations in

  16. The Sandia Transportable Triggered Lightning Instrumentation Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Schnetzer, G.H.; Fisher, R.J.

    1991-01-01

    Development of the Sandia Transportable Triggered Lightning Instrumentation Facility (SATTLIF) was motivated by a requirement for the in situ testing of munitions storage bunker. Transfer functions relating the incident flash currents to voltages, currents, and electromagnetic field values throughout the structure will be obtained for use in refining and validating a lightning response computer model of this type of structure. A preliminary shakedown trial of the facility under actual operational conditions was performed during the summer of 1990 at the Kennedy Space Center's (KSC) rocket-triggered lightning test site in Florida. A description is given of the SATTLIF, which is readily transportable on a single flatbed truck or by aircraft, and its instrumentation for measuring incident lightning channel currents and the responses of systems under test. Measurements of return-stroke current peaks obtained with the SATLLIF are presented. Agreement with data acquired on the same flashes with existing KSC instrumentation is, on average, to within {approximately}7 percent. Continuing currents were measured with a resolution of {approximately}2.5 A. This field trial demonstrated the practicality of using a transportable triggered lightning facility for specialized test applications. 5 refs., 12 figs., 1 tab.

  17. Transdermal anaesthesia for percutaneous trigger finger release.

    PubMed

    Yiannakopoulos, Christos K; Ignatiadis, Ioannis A

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the safety and efficiency of transdermal anaesthesia using eutectic mixture of lidocaine and prilocaine (EMLA) in patients undergoing percutaneous trigger finger release and to compare it with lidocaine infiltration. In this prospective, randomised study percutaneous release of the A1 annular pulley was performed to treat stenosing tenosynovitis (trigger finger syndrome) in 50 patients (50 fingers). The procedure was performed either under transdermal anaesthesia using EMLA applied transcutaneously 120 minutes prior to the operation (Group A, n = 25) or using local infiltration anaesthesia using lidocaine (Group B, n = 25). Pain experienced during administration of anaesthesia and during the operation was assessed using a 10-point Visual Analogue Pain Scale (VAPS), while all patients rated the effectiveness of anaesthesia with a 5-point scale. There were no significant differences between the two groups in the VAPS during the operation (1.33 +/- 0.52 versus 1.59 +/- 0.87) and the satisfaction scores (4.6 +/- 0.2 versus 4.4 +/- 0.3). The VAPS score during the administration of anaesthesia was statistically significantly less in the EMLA group (0 versus 5.96 +/- 2.41). All patients were satisfied with the final result of the operation. Percutaneous trigger finger release can be performed as an office procedure with the use of EMLA avoiding the use of injectable local infiltration anaesthesia.

  18. Laser Trigger For High Speed Camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Rong-Seng; Lin, Chin-Wu; Cheng, Tung

    1987-09-01

    High speed camera coorperated with laser trigger to catch high speed unpredictable events has many applications: such as scoring system for the end game of missile interception, war head explosive study etc. When the event happening in a very short duration, the repetition rate of the laser ranging must be as high as 5K herze and the pulse duration should be less than 10 nsec. In some environment, like inside the aircraft, the abailable space for high speed camera to set up is limited, large film capacity camera could not be used. In order to use the small capacity film, the exact trigger time for the camera are especially important. The target velocity, camera acceleration characteristics, speed regulation, camera size, weight and the ruggedness are all be considered before the laser trigger be designed. Electric temporal gate is used to measure the time of flight ranging datum. The triangular distance measurement principle are also used to get the ranging when the base line i.e. the distance between the laser transmitter and receiver are large enough.

  19. Aspartame as a dietary trigger of headache.

    PubMed

    Lipton, R B; Newman, L C; Cohen, J S; Solomon, S

    1989-02-01

    Many dietary factors have been implicated as possible precipitants of headache. There have been recent differences of opinion with regard to the effect of the artificial sweetener aspartame as a precipitant of headache. To assess the importance of aspartame as a dietary factor in headache, 190 consecutive patients of the Montefiore Medical Center Headache Unit were questioned about the effect of alcohol, carbohydrates and aspartame in triggering their headaches. Of the 171 patients who fully completed the survey, 49.7 percent reported alcohol as a precipitating factor, compared to 8.2 percent reporting aspartame and 2.3 percent reporting carbohydrates. Patients with migraine were significantly more likely to report alcohol as a triggering factor and also reported aspartame as a precipitant three times more often than those having other types of headache. The conflicting results of two recent placebo-control studies of aspartame and headache are discussed. We conclude that aspartame may be an important dietary trigger of headache in some people.

  20. ATP-triggered anticancer drug delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mo, Ran; Jiang, Tianyue; Disanto, Rocco; Tai, Wanyi; Gu, Zhen

    2014-03-01

    Stimuli-triggered drug delivery systems have been increasingly used to promote physiological specificity and on-demand therapeutic efficacy of anticancer drugs. Here we utilize adenosine-5'-triphosphate (ATP) as a trigger for the controlled release of anticancer drugs. We demonstrate that polymeric nanocarriers functionalized with an ATP-binding aptamer-incorporated DNA motif can selectively release the intercalating doxorubicin via a conformational switch when in an ATP-rich environment. The half-maximal inhibitory concentration of ATP-responsive nanovehicles is 0.24 μM in MDA-MB-231 cells, a 3.6-fold increase in the cytotoxicity compared with that of non-ATP-responsive nanovehicles. Equipped with an outer shell crosslinked by hyaluronic acid, a specific tumour-targeting ligand, the ATP-responsive nanocarriers present an improvement in the chemotherapeutic inhibition of tumour growth using xenograft MDA-MB-231 tumour-bearing mice. This ATP-triggered drug release system provides a more sophisticated drug delivery system, which can differentiate ATP levels to facilitate the selective release of drugs.

  1. The Sandia transportable triggered lightning instrumentation facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schnetzer, George H.; Fisher, Richard J.

    1991-01-01

    Development of the Sandia Transportable Triggered Lightning Instrumentation Facility (SATTLIF) was motivated by a requirement for the in situ testing of a munitions storage bunker. Transfer functions relating the incident flash currents to voltages, currents, and electromagnetic field values throughout the structure will be obtained for use in refining and validating a lightning response computer model of this type of structure. A preliminary shakedown trial of the facility under actual operational conditions was performed during summer of 1990 at the Kennedy Space Center's (KSC) rocket-triggered lightning test site. A description is given of the SATTLIF, which is readily transportable on a single flatbed truck of by aircraft, and its instrumentation for measuring incident lightning channel currents and the responses of the systems under test. Measurements of return-stroke current peaks obtained with the SATTLIF are presented. Agreement with data acquired on the same flashes with existing KSC instrumentation is, on average, to within approximately 7 percent. Continuing currents were measured with a resolution of approximately 2.5 A. This field trial demonstrated the practicality of using a transportable triggered lightning facility for specialized test applications.

  2. ENSO-triggered floods in South America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isla, Federico Ignacio

    2016-04-01

    ENSO-triggered floods altered completely the annual discharge of most watersheds of South America. Anomalous years as 1941, 1982-83 and 1997-98 signified enormous discharges of rivers draining toward the Pacific but also to the Atlantic Ocean. These floods affected large cities as Porto Alegre, Blumenau, Curitiba, Asunción, Santa Fe and Buenos Aires. Maximum discharge months are particular and easily distinguished at those watersheds located at the South American Arid Diagonal. At watersheds conditioned by precipitations delivered from the Atlantic or Pacific anticyclonic centers the ENSO-triggered floods are difficult to discern. The floods of 1941 affected 70,000 inhabitants in Porto Alegre. In 1983, Blumenau city was flooded during several days; and the Paraná River multiplied 15 times the width of its middle floodplain. The Colorado River in Northern Patagonia connected for the last time to the Desaguadero-Chadileuvú-Curacó system and therefore received saline water. ENSO years modify also the water balance of certain piedmont lakes of Southern Patagonia: the increases in snow accumulations cause high water levels with a lag of 13 months. The correlation between the maximum monthly discharges of 1982-83 and 1997-98 at different regions and watersheds indicates they can be forecasted for future floods triggered by same phenomena. South American rivers can be classified therefore into ENSO-affected, and ENSO-dominated, for those within the Arid Diagonal that are exclusively subject to high discharges during these years.

  3. Understanding red blood cell alloimmunization triggers.

    PubMed

    Hendrickson, Jeanne E; Tormey, Christopher A

    2016-12-02

    Blood group alloimmunization is "triggered" when a person lacking a particular antigen is exposed to this antigen during transfusion or pregnancy. Although exposure to an antigen is necessary for alloimmunization to occur, it is not alone sufficient. Blood group antigens are diverse in structure, function, and immunogenicity. In addition to red blood cells (RBCs), a recipient of an RBC transfusion is exposed to donor plasma, white blood cells, and platelets; the potential contribution of these elements to RBC alloimmunization remains unclear. Much attention in recent years has been placed on recipient factors that influence RBC alloantibody responses. Danger signals, identified in murine and human studies alike as being risk factors for alloimmunization, may be quite diverse in nature. In addition to exogenous or condition-associated inflammation, autoimmunity is also a risk factor for alloantibody formation. Triggers for alloimmunization in pregnancy are not well-understood beyond the presence of a fetal/maternal bleed. Studies using animal models of pregnancy-induced RBC alloimmunization may provide insight in this regard. A better understanding of alloimmunization triggers and signatures of "responders" and "nonresponders" is needed for prevention strategies to be optimized. A common goal of such strategies is increased transfusion safety and improved pregnancy outcomes.

  4. Compact SCR trigger circuit for ignitron switch operates efficiently

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foster, L. E.

    1965-01-01

    Trigger circuit with two series-connected SCR triggers an ignitron switch used to discharge high-energy capacitor banks. It does not require a warmup period and operates at relatively high efficiency.

  5. Shock from heart device often triggers further health care needs

    MedlinePlus

    ... More Shock from heart device often triggers further health care needs American Heart Association Rapid Access Journal Report ... cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) may trigger an increase in health care needs for many patients, regardless whether the shock ...

  6. A possible level 0 trigger scheme for the STAR EMC

    SciTech Connect

    Underwood, D.

    1994-05-01

    We propose a level 0 trigger for the STAR Electromagnetic Calorimeter, EMC, which provides a global energy sum and sums over cells appropriate for triggering on direct gammas and jets. It is implemented in analog at low level and digitally with FPGA`s at higher level. It will provide trigger information in less than 800 nanoseconds.

  7. Triggered Star Formation From Shock to Disk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blackman, Eric

    2014-10-01

    Triggered star formation {TSF} occurs when supersonic flows generated by distant supernova blast waves, stellar winds {wind blown bubbles} or ionization fronts {D-type fronts in HII regions} sweep over a stable cloud. TSF may play a role in massive regions of star formation where winds, HII regions and, eventually, blast-waves sweep through dense, heterogeneous molecular material. In addition TSF has played an important role in discussions of the formation of our own solar system because it offers a natural way of injecting short lived radioactive isotopes {SLRI's} like 26^Al into material which will then form planetary bodies.The purpose of this proposal is to use advanced numerical tools to explore the physics of TSF in greater detail than has been attempted before. Previous studies have not been able to follow triggering past the early stages before a star forms. Our 3-D Adaptive Mesh Refinement {AMR} MHD code contains well tested physics modules which will allow us to track the influence of self-gravity, radiation-transport, cooling by molecules/neutrals/atoms and, finally, the collapse of gas into stars {i.e.condensed gravitating point-like objects or "sink-particles"}. With this tool we will follow triggering well past the formation of the star to explore the creation of accretion disks and their properties. In addition the microphysics routines in the code allow us to make detailed contact with HST observations such as the pillars in the Carina nebula via synthetic observations of line profiles, proper motions, Position-Velocity diagrams and statistics.

  8. Missing Transverse Momentum Trigger Performance Studies for the ATLAS Calorimeter Trigger Upgrades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stamas, Brianna; Parrish, Elliot; Lisi, Luc; Dudley, Christopher; Majewski, Stephanie

    2016-03-01

    The ATLAS Experiment is one of two general purpose detectors at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN in Geneva, Switzerland. In anticipation of discovering new physics, the detector will undergo numerous hardware upgrades including improvements to the Liquid Argon Calorimeter trigger electronics. For the upgrade, one component of the Level-1 trigger system will be the global feature extractor, gFEX, which will house three field programmable gate arrays (FPGAs). Specifically, in order to improve the missing transverse energy (ETmiss)trigger, an adapted topological clustering algorithm is being investigated for implementation on the FPGAs for reconstruction of proton-proton interactions in the ATLAS detector. Using simulated data, this study analyzes the performance of the adapted algorithm in software.

  9. New methods for trigger electronics development

    SciTech Connect

    Cleland, W.E.; Stern, E.G.

    1991-12-31

    The large and complex nature of RHIC experiments and the tight time schedule for their construction requires that new techniques for designing the electronics should be employed. This is particularly true of the trigger and data acquisition electronics which has to be ready for turn-on of the experiment. We describe the use of the Workview package from VIEWlogic Inc. for design, simulation, and verification of a flash ADC readout system. We also show how field-programmable gate arrays such as the Xilinx 4000 might be employed to construct or prototype circuits with a large number of gates while preserving flexibility.

  10. Transient involuntary mirror writing triggered by anxiety.

    PubMed

    Della Sala, Sergio; Calia, Clara; De Caro, Maria Fara; McIntosh, Robert D

    2015-01-01

    Mirror writing (MW) has mainly been observed in left-hemisphere-damaged patients writing with the left hand. This study evaluated the presence of MW in 24 patients with mild cognitive impairment (MCI). We found that MW is not a typical feature of MCI. However, one woman (FC), mislabeled initially with MCI but in fact affected by anxiety, showed florid MW when writing with her left hand, which resolved as her anxiety receded. This case study supports anecdotal reports of MW triggered by anxiety, and the features of FC's performance indicate a motor rather than a perceptual basis for the phenomenon.

  11. Extremely Intense Magnetospheric Substorms : External Triggering? Preconditioning?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsurutani, Bruce; Echer, Ezequiel; Hajra, Rajkumar

    2016-07-01

    We study particularly intense substorms using a variety of near-Earth spacecraft data and ground observations. We will relate the solar cycle dependences of events, determine whether the supersubstorms are externally or internally triggered, and their relationship to other factors such as magnetospheric preconditioning. If time permits, we will explore the details of the events and whether they are similar to regular (Akasofu, 1964) substorms or not. These intense substorms are an important feature of space weather since they may be responsible for power outages.

  12. Widespread Triggering of Nonvolcanic Tremor in California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomberg, Joan; Rubinstein, Justin L.; Peng, Zhigang; Creager, Kenneth C.; Vidale, John E.; Bodin, Paul

    2008-01-01

    We identified seven locations on or near the transform plate boundary in California where nonvolcanic tremor was triggered by the 2002 Denali earthquake. This result implies that the conditions essential for nonvolcanic tremor exist in a range of tectonic environments. Models explaining tremor typically require conditions endemic to subduction zones, that is, high temperatures and fluid pressures, because previously tremor was nearly exclusively documented in subduction zones. The absence of tremor in geothermal areas is inconsistent with such models. Additionally, we found no correlation between creeping or locked faults and tremor, contrary to predictions of frictional models of tremor.

  13. Fingerprint on trigger: A real case.

    PubMed

    Amata, B; Aprea, G M; Chiuri, A; Zampa, F

    2015-08-01

    The results obtained by employing a usual technique for latent prints development on firearms are presented. A fingermark on a trigger was enhanced and this print was used to identify the person who handled the firearm. Indeed, it is not usual to find a useful fingermark in that position and, more in general, on firearms because of many different factors described in the following sections. The uniqueness of the results reported in this paper allow to consider the present casework as very interesting for the forensic community.

  14. Metal-triggered collagen peptide disk formation.

    PubMed

    Przybyla, David E; Chmielewski, Jean

    2010-06-16

    A collagen peptide was designed for metal-triggered, hierarchical assembly through a radial growth mechanism. To achieve radial assembly, H-(byp)(2) containing Pro-Hyp-Gly repeating sequences and two staggered bipyridine ligands within the peptide was synthesized. Triple helix formation resulted in the placement of six bipyridine ligands along the triple helix, and the addition of metal ions resulted in the formation of nanometer-sized collagen peptide disks. These structures were found to disassemble upon the addition of EDTA, demonstrating that radial assembly of collagen peptide triple helices could be realized with the addition of metal ions.

  15. Red cell transfusion "trigger": a review.

    PubMed

    Petrides, Marian

    2003-07-01

    Despite the publication of several consensus guidelines that set forth recommendations for the transfusion of red cells, actual clinical practice continues to vary widely. Animal data and studies in human volunteers and patients support a red cell transfusion threshold of 7 to 8 g/dl in most patients. However, conflicting data, particularly in cardiac patients and in the elderly, suggest that it may be impossible to define a single red cell "trigger" for all patients. A well-designed, randomized, controlled trial is still needed to establish a safe threshold for red cell transfusion in adults with coronary artery disease.

  16. MASTER: OT detection during Fermi trigger inspection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popova, E.; Lipunov, V.; Buckley, D.; Gorbovskoy, E.; Tiurina, N.; Balanutsa, P.; Kuznetsov, A.; Kornilov, V.; Chazov, V.; Vlasenko, D.; Vladimirov, V.; Gress, O.; Ivanov, K.; Potter, S.; Gabovich, A.

    2016-11-01

    During inspection of Fermi trigger 501261070 ( (Ra,Dec)=47.190,-47.210; GRB_ERROR_radius=3.27deg, GRB_TIME=2016/11/19 15:11:06.40UT http://gcn.gsfc.nasa.gov/other/501261070.fermi ) MASTER-SAAO auto-detection system ( Lipunov et al., "MASTER Global Robotic Net", Advances in Astronomy, 2010, 30L ) discovered OT source at (RA, Dec) = 03h 22m 52.70s -48d 29m 10.9s on 2016-11-19 21:17:17.878UT with unfiltered m_OT=17.8 (mlim=19.7).

  17. Attenuation of the slow component of delayed rectification, action potential prolongation, and triggered activity in mice expressing a dominant-negative Kv2 alpha subunit.

    PubMed

    Xu, H; Barry, D M; Li, H; Brunet, S; Guo, W; Nerbonne, J M

    1999-10-01

    An in vivo experimental strategy, involving cardiac-specific expression of a mutant Kv 2.1 subunit that functions as a dominant negative, was exploited in studies focused on exploring the role of members of the Kv2 subfamily of pore-forming (alpha) subunits in the generation of functional voltage-gated K(+) channels in the mammalian heart. A mutant Kv2.1 alpha subunit (Kv2.1N216) was designed to produce a truncated protein containing the intracellular N terminus, the S1 membrane-spanning domain, and a portion of the S1/S2 loop. The truncated Kv2.1N216 was epitope tagged at the C terminus with the 8-amino acid FLAG peptide to generate Kv2. 1N216FLAG. No ionic currents are detected on expression of Kv2. 1N216FLAG in HEK-293 cells, although coexpression of this construct with wild-type Kv2.1 markedly reduced the amplitudes of Kv2. 1-induced currents. Using the alpha-myosin heavy chain promoter to direct cardiac specific expression of the transgene, 2 lines of Kv2. 1N216FLAG-expressing transgenic mice were generated. Electrophysiological recordings from ventricular myocytes isolated from these animals revealed that I(K, slow) is selectively reduced. The attenuation of I(K, slow) is accompanied by marked action potential prolongation, and, occasionally, spontaneous triggered activity (apparently induced by early afterdepolarizations) is observed. The time constant of inactivation of I(K, slow) in Kv2. 1N216FLAG-expressing cells (mean+/-SEM=830+/-103 ms; n=17) is accelerated compared with the time constant of I(K, slow) inactivation (mean+/-SEM=1147+/-57 ms; n=25) in nontransgenic cells. In addition, unlike I(K, slow) in wild-type cells, the component of I(K, slow) remaining in the Kv2.1N216FLAG-expressing cells is insensitive to 25 mmol/L tetraethylammonium. Taken together, these observations suggest that there are 2 distinct components of I(K, slow) in mouse ventricular myocytes and that Kv2 alpha subunits underlie the more slowly inactivating, tetraethylammonium

  18. The VME-based D0 muon trigger electronics

    SciTech Connect

    Fortner, M; Green, J; Hedin, D; Morphis, R; Repond, S; Willis, S; Zazula, R; Johns, K; Bazizi, K; Fahland, T; Hall, R E; Jerger, S; Lietzke, C; Smith, D; Butler, J M; Diehl, H T; Eartly, D; Fitzpatrick, T; Green, D; Haggerty, H; Hansen, S; Hawkins, J; Igarashi, S; Joestlein, H

    1990-11-01

    The trigger electronics for the muon system of the Fermilab D0 detector is described. The hardware trigger consists of VME-based cards designed to find probable tracks in individual chambers and then match these track segments. The fast trigger is highly parallel and able to discern probable tracks from about 15,000 trigger cells in under 200 ns from receipt of all bits in the counting house. There is a parallel confirmation trigger with a response time of 1--5 microseconds that provides a crude calculation of the momentum and charge of the muon. 6 refs., 7 figs.

  19. Triggering of repeating earthquakes in central California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wu, Chunquan; Gomberg, Joan; Ben-Naim, Eli; Johnson, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Dynamic stresses carried by transient seismic waves have been found capable of triggering earthquakes instantly in various tectonic settings. Delayed triggering may be even more common, but the mechanisms are not well understood. Catalogs of repeating earthquakes, earthquakes that recur repeatedly at the same location, provide ideal data sets to test the effects of transient dynamic perturbations on the timing of earthquake occurrence. Here we employ a catalog of 165 families containing ~2500 total repeating earthquakes to test whether dynamic perturbations from local, regional, and teleseismic earthquakes change recurrence intervals. The distance to the earthquake generating the perturbing waves is a proxy for the relative potential contributions of static and dynamic deformations, because static deformations decay more rapidly with distance. Clear changes followed the nearby 2004 Mw6 Parkfield earthquake, so we study only repeaters prior to its origin time. We apply a Monte Carlo approach to compare the observed number of shortened recurrence intervals following dynamic perturbations with the distribution of this number estimated for randomized perturbation times. We examine the comparison for a series of dynamic stress peak amplitude and distance thresholds. The results suggest a weak correlation between dynamic perturbations in excess of ~20 kPa and shortened recurrence intervals, for both nearby and remote perturbations.

  20. Electron-triggered motions in technomimetic molecules.

    PubMed

    Carella, Alexandre; Coudret, Christophe; Guirado, Gonzalo; Rapenne, Gwénaël; Vives, Guillaume; Launay, Jean-Pierre

    2007-01-14

    Technomimetic molecules are molecules designed to imitate macroscopic objects at the molecular level, also transposing the motions that these objects are able to undergo. This article focuses on technomimetic molecules with motions triggered by electrons. The first part is devoted to our work in the field of molecular switches: after having demonstrated the possibility of controlling an intramolecular electron transfer by photoisomerisation, we are now trying to control the isomerisation, either by electrochemistry, or by embedding the photochromic compound in a self-assembled monolayer and testing the electrical conduction with a STM tip. In a second part, we present our strategy on controlling the rotation in a molecular rotary motor and the family of ruthenium complexes designed to perform such a task. The molecules have a piano-stool structure with a "stator" meant to be grafted on an oxide surface, and a "rotor" bearing redox-active groups, so that addressing the molecule with nano-electrodes would trigger rotation. The electrical control of the charge state of a molecule by a STM tip is developed in a final part.

  1. Triggered self-assembly of magnetic nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, L.; Pearson, T.; Cordeau, Y.; Mefford, O. T.; Crawford, T. M.

    2016-03-01

    Colloidal magnetic nanoparticles are candidates for application in biology, medicine and nanomanufac-turing. Understanding how these particles interact collectively in fluids, especially how they assemble and aggregate under external magnetic fields, is critical for high quality, safe, and reliable deployment of these particles. Here, by applying magnetic forces that vary strongly over the same length scale as the colloidal stabilizing force and then varying this colloidal repulsion, we can trigger self-assembly of these nanoparticles into parallel line patterns on the surface of a disk drive medium. Localized within nanometers of the medium surface, this effect is strongly dependent on the ionic properties of the colloidal fluid but at a level too small to cause bulk colloidal aggregation. We use real-time optical diffraction to monitor the dynamics of self-assembly, detecting local colloidal changes with greatly enhanced sensitivity compared with conventional light scattering. Simulations predict the triggering but not the dynamics, especially at short measurement times. Beyond using spatially-varying magnetic forces to balance interactions and drive assembly in magnetic nanoparticles, future measurements leveraging the sensitivity of this approach could identify novel colloidal effects that impact real-world applications of these nanoparticles.

  2. Triggered self-assembly of magnetic nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Ye, L.; Pearson, T.; Cordeau, Y.; Mefford, O. T.; Crawford, T. M.

    2016-01-01

    Colloidal magnetic nanoparticles are candidates for application in biology, medicine and nanomanufac-turing. Understanding how these particles interact collectively in fluids, especially how they assemble and aggregate under external magnetic fields, is critical for high quality, safe, and reliable deployment of these particles. Here, by applying magnetic forces that vary strongly over the same length scale as the colloidal stabilizing force and then varying this colloidal repulsion, we can trigger self-assembly of these nanoparticles into parallel line patterns on the surface of a disk drive medium. Localized within nanometers of the medium surface, this effect is strongly dependent on the ionic properties of the colloidal fluid but at a level too small to cause bulk colloidal aggregation. We use real-time optical diffraction to monitor the dynamics of self-assembly, detecting local colloidal changes with greatly enhanced sensitivity compared with conventional light scattering. Simulations predict the triggering but not the dynamics, especially at short measurement times. Beyond using spatially-varying magnetic forces to balance interactions and drive assembly in magnetic nanoparticles, future measurements leveraging the sensitivity of this approach could identify novel colloidal effects that impact real-world applications of these nanoparticles. PMID:26975332

  3. Triggering of dendritic cell apoptosis by xanthohumol.

    PubMed

    Xuan, Nguyen Thi; Shumilina, Ekaterina; Gulbins, Erich; Gu, Shuchen; Götz, Friedrich; Lang, Florian

    2010-07-01

    Xanthohumol, a flavonoid from beer with anticancer activity is known to trigger apoptosis in a variety of tumor cells. Xanthohumol further has anti-inflammatory activity. However, little is known about the effect of xanthohumol on survival and function of immune cells. The present study thus addressed the effect of xanthohumol on dendritic cells (DCs), key players in the regulation of innate and adaptive immunity. To this end, mouse bone marrow-derived DCs were treated with xanthohumol with subsequent assessment of enzymatic activity of acid sphingomyelinase (Asm), ceramide formation determined with anti-ceramide antibodies in FACS and immunohistochemical analysis, caspase activity utilizing FITC conjugated anti-active caspase 8 or caspase 3 antibodies in FACS and by Western blotting, DNA fragmentation by determining the percentage of cells in the sub-G1 phase and cell membrane scrambling by annexin V binding in FACS analysis. As a result, xanthohumol stimulated Asm, enhanced ceramide formation, activated caspases 8 and 3, triggered DNA fragmentation and led to cell membrane scrambling, all effects virtually absent in DCs from gene targeted mice lacking functional Asm or in wild-type cells treated with sphingomyelinase inhibitor amitriptyline. In conclusion, xanthohumol stimulated Asm leading to caspase activation and apoptosis of bone marrow-derived DCs.

  4. Transient Rechargeable Batteries Triggered by Cascade Reactions.

    PubMed

    Fu, Kun; Liu, Zhen; Yao, Yonggang; Wang, Zhengyang; Zhao, Bin; Luo, Wei; Dai, Jiaqi; Lacey, Steven D; Zhou, Lihui; Shen, Fei; Kim, Myeongseob; Swafford, Laura; Sengupta, Louise; Hu, Liangbing

    2015-07-08

    Transient battery is a new type of technology that allows the battery to disappear by an external trigger at any time. In this work, we successfully demonstrated the first transient rechargeable batteries based on dissoluble electrodes including V2O5 as the cathode and lithium metal as the anode as well as a biodegradable separator and battery encasement (PVP and sodium alginate, respectively). All the components are robust in a traditional lithium-ion battery (LIB) organic electrolyte and disappear in water completely within minutes due to triggered cascade reactions. With a simple cut-and-stack method, we designed a fully transient device with an area of 0.5 cm by 1 cm and total energy of 0.1 J. A shadow-mask technique was used to demonstrate the miniature device, which is compatible with transient electronics manufacturing. The materials, fabrication methods, and integration strategy discussed will be of interest for future developments in transient, self-powered electronics. The demonstration of a miniature Li battery shows the feasibility toward system integration for all transient electronics.

  5. Triggered self-assembly of magnetic nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Ye, L; Pearson, T; Cordeau, Y; Mefford, O T; Crawford, T M

    2016-03-15

    Colloidal magnetic nanoparticles are candidates for application in biology, medicine and nanomanufacturing. Understanding how these particles interact collectively in fluids, especially how they assemble and aggregate under external magnetic fields, is critical for high quality, safe, and reliable deployment of these particles. Here, by applying magnetic forces that vary strongly over the same length scale as the colloidal stabilizing force and then varying this colloidal repulsion, we can trigger self-assembly of these nanoparticles into parallel line patterns on the surface of a disk drive medium. Localized within nanometers of the medium surface, this effect is strongly dependent on the ionic properties of the colloidal fluid but at a level too small to cause bulk colloidal aggregation. We use real-time optical diffraction to monitor the dynamics of self-assembly, detecting local colloidal changes with greatly enhanced sensitivity compared with conventional light scattering. Simulations predict the triggering but not the dynamics, especially at short measurement times. Beyond using spatially-varying magnetic forces to balance interactions and drive assembly in magnetic nanoparticles, future measurements leveraging the sensitivity of this approach could identify novel colloidal effects that impact real-world applications of these nanoparticles.

  6. Does the gut microbiota trigger Hashimoto's thyroiditis?

    PubMed

    Mori, Kouki; Nakagawa, Yoshinori; Ozaki, Hiroshi

    2012-11-01

    Hashimoto's thyroiditis is an organ-specific autoimmune disease in which both genetic predisposition and environmental factors serve as the trigger of the disease. A growing body of evidence suggests involvement of viral infection in the development of Hashimoto's thyroiditis. However, not only pathogenic microorganisms but also non-pathogenic commensal microorganisms induce proinflammatory or regulatory immune responses within the host. In accordance, series of studies indicate a critical role of intestinal commensal microbiota in the development of autoimmune diseases including inflammatory bowel diseases, type 1 diabetes, rheumatoid arthritis, and multiple sclerosis. In contrast, the role of the gut and indigenous microorganisms in Hashimoto's thyroiditis has received little attention. Whereas activation of innate pattern recognition receptors such as Toll-like receptors and disturbed intestinal epithelial barrier may contribute to thyroiditis development, only a few studies have addressed a link between the gut and Hashimoto's thyroiditis and provided just indirect and weak evidence for such a link. Despite this unsatisfactory situation, we here focus on the possible interaction between the gut and thyroid autoimmunity. Further studies are clearly needed to test the hypothesis that the gut commensal microflora represents an important environmental factor triggering Hashimoto's thyroiditis.

  7. Ceramide triggers Weibel-Palade body exocytosis.

    PubMed

    Bhatia, Rinky; Matsushita, Kenji; Yamakuchi, Munekazu; Morrell, Craig N; Cao, Wangsen; Lowenstein, Charles J

    2004-08-06

    The sphingolipid ceramide mediates a variety of stress responses, including vascular inflammation and thrombosis. Activated endothelial cells release Weibel-Palade bodies, granules containing von Willebrand factor (vWF) and P-selectin, which induce leukocyte rolling and platelet adhesion and aggregation. We hypothesized that ceramide induces vascular inflammation and thrombosis in part by triggering Weibel-Palade body exocytosis. We added ceramide to human aortic endothelial cells and assayed Weibel-Palade body exocytosis by measuring the concentration of vWF released into the media. Exogenous ceramide induces vWF release from endothelial cells in a dose-dependent manner. Activators of endogenous ceramide production, neutral sphingomyelinase, or tumor necrosis factor-alpha also induce Weibel-Palade body exocytosis. We next studied NO effects on ceramide-induced Weibel-Palade body exocytosis because NO can inhibit vascular inflammation. The NO donor S-nitroso-N-acetylpenicillamine decreases ceramide-induced vWF release in a dose-dependent manner, whereas the NO synthase inhibitor N(G)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester increases ceramide-induced vWF release. In summary, our findings show that endogenous ceramide triggers Weibel-Palade body exocytosis, and that endogenous NO inhibits ceramide-induced exocytosis. These data suggest a novel mechanism by which ceramide induces vascular inflammation and thrombosis.

  8. Engineering Challenges in Antiproton Triggered Fusion Propulsion

    SciTech Connect

    Cassenti, Brice; Kammash, Terry

    2008-01-21

    During the last decade antiproton triggered fusion propulsion has been investigated as a method for achieving high specific impulse, high thrust in a nuclear pulse propulsion system. In general the antiprotons are injected into a pellet containing fusion fuel with a small amount of fissionable material (i.e., an amount less than the critical mass) where the products from the fission are then used to trigger a fusion reaction. Initial calculations and simulations indicate that if magnetically insulated inertial confinement fusion is used that the pellets should result in a specific impulse of between 100,000 and 300,000 seconds at high thrust. The engineering challenges associated with this propulsion system are significant. For example, the antiprotons must be precisely focused. The pellet must be designed to contain the fission and initial fusion products and this will require strong magnetic fields. The fusion fuel must be contained for a sufficiently long time to effectively release the fusion energy, and the payload must be shielded from the radiation, especially the excess neutrons emitted, in addition to many other particles. We will review the recent progress, possible engineering solutions and the potential performance of these systems.

  9. Operation and modeling of the FORTE trigger box

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, T.

    1996-06-01

    The fast on-orbit recording of transient events satellite (FORTE) will carry a multiple-narrow-band trigger designed to detect impulsive VHF signals embedded in a high-noise background. The FORTE trigger boxes consist of eight VHF channels spaced across twenty MHz of bandwidth. A trigger is generated when a sufficiently bright signal is seen in a user-defined number of these channels within a specified coincidence window. In addition, the trigger circuitry incorporates a feature to reject events caused by the actuation of narrow-band carriers. This report describes the trigger`s operating principles and their implementation in the satellite hardware. We then discuss a computer model which can be used to simulate the performance of the trigger circuit.

  10. Note: A novel trigger generator for a pseudospark switch.

    PubMed

    Chatzakis, J; Hassan, S M; Clark, E L; Lee, P; Tatarakis, M

    2015-01-01

    A novel trigger generator for operating a pseudospark switch has been developed based on a series connection of several insulated gate bipolar transistors. The trigger generator can be operated in single shot mode up to a repetition rate of 1 kHz. It is characterized by a fast rise time and low jitter between the output trigger pulses of less than 1 ns. It produces 3 kV, 1 μs pulses into a 50 Ω load that can trigger a pseudospark switch. By eliminating bulkier, slower high voltage components, the overall volume of the trigger generator is reduced. This allows for faster, high voltage switching to take place and thereby increasing the power density of the unit. Using this pseudospark trigger generator, it is possible to trigger single or multiple pseudospark gaps without the requirement to use a pulse shaping circuit.

  11. Numerical modeling of shallow fault creep triggered by nearby earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, M.; Liu, Y.; McGuire, J. J.

    2011-12-01

    The 2010 El Mayor-Cucapha Mw 7.2 earthquake is the largest earthquake that strikes southern California in the last 18 years. It has triggered shallow fault creep on many faults in Salton Trough, Southern California, making it at least the 8th time in the last 42 years that a local or regional earthquake has done so. However, the triggering mechanism of fault creep and its implications to seismic hazard and fault mechanics is still poorly understood. For example, what determines the relative importance of static triggering and dynamic triggering of fault creep? What can we learn about the local frictional properties and normal stress from the triggering of fault creep? To understand the triggering mechanism and constrain fault frictional properties, we simulate the triggered fault creep on the Superstition Hills Fault (SHF), Salton Trough, Southern California. We use realistic static and dynamic shaking due to nearby earthquakes as stress perturbations to a 2D (in a 3D medium) planar fault model with rate-and-state frictional property variations both in depth and along strike. Unlike many previous studies, we focus on the simulation of triggered shallow fault creep instead of earthquakes. Our fault model can reproduce the triggering process, by static, dynamic , and combined stress perturbation. Preliminary results show that the magnitude of perturbation relative to the original stress level is an important parameter. In the static case, perturbation of 1% of normal stress trigger delayed fault creep whereas 10% of normal stress generate instantaneous creep. In the dynamic case, a change of two times in magnitude of perturbation can result in difference of triggered creep in several orders of magnitude. We explore combined triggering with different ratio of static and dynamic perturbation. The timing of triggering in a earthquake cycle is also important. With measurements on triggered creep on the SHF, we constrain local stress level and frictional parameters, which

  12. Baseflow as the trigger of intraplate earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costain, J. K.

    2012-12-01

    Intraplate earthquakes can be triggered by small changes in crustal loading, unloading, or pore-fluid pressure. A self-organized crust appears to be remarkably sensitive to extremely small changes in either pore-fluid pressure diffusion or stress loading, implying that these small changes in stress do not cause earthquakes, but only trigger them. Baseflow is commonly assumed to be equivalent to recharge. Groundwater recharge can trigger seismicity by reducing the effective normal stress on fractures. Intervals of higher groundwater recharge can be identified by determining when a stream is in baseflow recession, which is accccomplished by a hydrograph separation. Using the central Virginia seismic zone as an example, intraplate earthquakes tend to follow intervals of higher baseflow, i.e., recharge. A finite element model (FEM) of pore-fluid pressure diffusion for which the diffusion is within intersecting and hydraulically transmissive fracture zones allows comparisons to be made between 1) times of maxima in baseflow as determined for stream gaging station 02.0350.00 on the James River in the central Virginia seismic zone (CVSZ) and the time of occurrence of the Virginia 5.8 earthquake of August 23, 2010, and between 2) theoretical times of maxima in pore-fluid pressure diffusion from impulsive surface sources applied to exposed fracture zones as computed from the FEM simulation. The CVSZ, the New Madrid seismic zone, and the central Oklahoma seismic zone (COSZ) are all bisected by major river systems. Preliminary analysis of the stream gaging stations on rivers in and near the COSZ suggests that the earthquakes may be associated with the Canadian River system. The Meers fault does not seem to be involved. There is a slight correlation between the duration of baseflow and earthquake magnitude in the COSZ. The magnitude 5.6 earthquake of November 5, 2011 occurred about 200 days after a prolonged period of relatively high baseflow (recharge) as determined at stream

  13. Premonitory slip and tidal triggering of earthquakes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lockner, D.A.; Beeler, N.M.

    1999-01-01

    Earth tides. Triggered seismicity has been reported resulting from the passage of surface waves excited by the Landers earthquake. These transient waves had measured amplitudes in excess of 0.1 MPa at frequencies of 0.05 to 0.2 Hz in regions of notable seismicity increase. Similar stress oscillations in our laboratory experiments produced strongly correlated stick-slip events. We suggest that seemingly inconsistent natural observations of triggered seismicity and absence of tidal triggering indicate that failure is amplitude and frequency dependent. This is the expected result if, as in our laboratory experiments, the rheology of the Earth's crust permits delayed failure.

  14. Rational engineering of a virulence gene from Mycobacterium tuberculosis facilitates proteomic analysis of a natural protein N-terminus

    PubMed Central

    Reyna, Cristal; Mba Medie, Felix; Champion, Matthew M.; Champion, Patricia A.

    2016-01-01

    Mass spectrometry (MS) for the detection of proteins is an indispensable tool for evaluating the biological processes of the proteome. Proteomics frequently requires proteolysis of proteins into peptide fragments. Proteins can be refractory to ideal proteolysis at the sequence level rendering them difficult to analyze by routine proteomics methods. EsxA (ESAT-6, Early Secreted Antigen, 6kDa) is a major virulence determinant of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the cause of human tuberculosis. EsxA is routinely used to evaluate mycobacterial virulence in the laboratory and as a biomarker for tuberculosis in humans. The sequence of EsxA hinders deeper MS analysis beyond routine detection. Here we engineer the sequence of EsxA to add desirable tryptic properties aimed at improving complex MS analysis. We demonstrate that EsxA variants are amenable to MS analysis and remain functional in established in vitro and ex vivo assays of Esx-1-function. We provide the first demonstration of molecular engineering to specifically improve MS analysis of individual microbial proteins. PMID:27625110

  15. P113 is a merozoite surface protein that binds the N terminus of Plasmodium falciparum RH5

    PubMed Central

    Galaway, Francis; Drought, Laura G.; Fala, Maria; Cross, Nadia; Kemp, Alison C.; Rayner, Julian C.; Wright, Gavin J.

    2017-01-01

    Invasion of erythrocytes by Plasmodium falciparum merozoites is necessary for malaria pathogenesis and is therefore a primary target for vaccine development. RH5 is a leading subunit vaccine candidate because anti-RH5 antibodies inhibit parasite growth and the interaction with its erythrocyte receptor basigin is essential for invasion. RH5 is secreted, complexes with other parasite proteins including CyRPA and RIPR, and contains a conserved N-terminal region (RH5Nt) of unknown function that is cleaved from the native protein. Here, we identify P113 as a merozoite surface protein that directly interacts with RH5Nt. Using recombinant proteins and a sensitive protein interaction assay, we establish the binding interdependencies of all the other known RH5 complex components and conclude that the RH5Nt-P113 interaction provides a releasable mechanism for anchoring RH5 to the merozoite surface. We exploit these findings to design a chemically synthesized peptide corresponding to RH5Nt, which could contribute to a cost-effective malaria vaccine. PMID:28186186

  16. The N Terminus of the Retinoblastoma Protein Inhibits DNA Replication via a Bipartite Mechanism Disrupted in Partially Penetrant Retinoblastomas.

    PubMed

    Borysov, Sergiy I; Nepon-Sixt, Brook S; Alexandrow, Mark G

    2015-12-28

    The N-terminal domain of the retinoblastoma (Rb) tumor suppressor protein (RbN) harbors in-frame exon deletions in partially penetrant hereditary retinoblastomas and is known to impair cell growth and tumorigenesis. However, how such RbN deletions contribute to Rb tumor- and growth-suppressive functions is unknown. Here we establish that RbN directly inhibits DNA replication initiation and elongation using a bipartite mechanism involving N-terminal exons lost in cancer. Specifically, Rb exon 7 is necessary and sufficient to target and inhibit the replicative CMG helicase, resulting in the accumulation of inactive CMGs on chromatin. An independent N-terminal loop domain, which forms a projection, specifically blocks DNA polymerase α (Pol-α) and Ctf4 recruitment without affecting DNA polymerases ε and δ or the CMG helicase. Individual disruption of exon 7 or the projection in RbN or Rb, as occurs in inherited cancers, partially impairs the ability of Rb/RbN to inhibit DNA replication and block G1-to-S cell cycle transit. However, their combined loss abolishes these functions of Rb. Thus, Rb growth-suppressive functions include its ability to block replicative complexes via bipartite, independent, and additive N-terminal domains. The partial loss of replication, CMG, or Pol-α control provides a potential molecular explanation for how N-terminal Rb loss-of-function deletions contribute to the etiology of partially penetrant retinoblastomas.

  17. The role of the N-terminus of the myosin essential light chain in cardiac muscle contraction

    PubMed Central

    Kazmierczak, Katarzyna; Xu, Yuanyuan; Jones, Michelle; Guzman, Georgianna; Hernandez, Olga M.; Kerrick, W. Glenn L.; Szczesna-Cordary, Danuta

    2011-01-01

    Summary To study the regulation of cardiac muscle contraction by the myosin essential light chain (ELC) and the physiological significance of its N-terminal extension, we generated transgenic (Tg) mice partially replacing the endogenous mouse ventricular ELC with either the human ventricular ELC wild type (Tg-WT) or its 43 amino acid N-terminal truncation mutant (Tg-Δ43) in the murine hearts. The mutant protein is similar in sequence to the short ELC variant present in skeletal muscle and the ELC protein distribution in Tg-Δ43 ventricles resembles that of fast skeletal muscle. Cardiac muscle preparations from Tg-Δ43 mice demonstrate reduced force per cross-sectional area of muscle, which is likely caused by a reduced number of force generating myosin cross-bridges and/or by decreased force per cross-bridge. As the mice grow older, the contractile force per cross-sectional area further decreases in Tg-Δ43 mice and the mutant hearts develop a phenotype of non-pathologic hypertrophy while still maintaining normal cardiac performance. The myocardium of older Tg-Δ43 mice also exhibits reduced myosin content. Our results suggest that the role of the N-terminal ELC extension is to maintain the integrity of myosin and to modulate force generation by decreasing myosin neck region compliance and promoting strong cross-bridge formation and/or by enhancing myosin attachment to actin. PMID:19361417

  18. A conformational transition at the N terminus of the prion protein features in formation of the scrapie isoform.

    PubMed

    Peretz, D; Williamson, R A; Matsunaga, Y; Serban, H; Pinilla, C; Bastidas, R B; Rozenshteyn, R; James, T L; Houghten, R A; Cohen, F E; Prusiner, S B; Burton, D R

    1997-10-31

    The scrapie prion protein (PrPSc) is formed from the cellular isoform (PrPC) by a post-translational process that involves a profound conformational change. Linear epitopes for recombinant antibody Fab fragments (Fabs) on PrPC and on the protease-resistant core of PrPSc, designated PrP 27-30, were identified using ELISA and immunoprecipitation. An epitope region at the C terminus was accessible in both PrPC and PrP 27-30; in contrast, epitopes towards the N-terminal region (residues 90 to 120) were accessible in PrPC but largely cryptic in PrP 27-30. Denaturation of PrP 27-30 exposed the epitopes of the N-terminal domain. We argue from our findings that the major conformational change underlying PrPSc formation occurs within the N-terminal segment of PrP 27-30.

  19. Tooth Enamel Protein Amelogenin Binds to Ameloblast Cell Membrane-Mimicking Vesicles via its N-terminus

    PubMed Central

    LOKAPPA, SOWMYA BEKSHE; CHANDRABABU, KARTHIK BALAKRISHNA; MORADIAN-OLDAK, JANET

    2015-01-01

    We have recently reported that the extracellular enamel protein amelogenin has affinity to interact with phospholipids and proposed that such interactions may play key roles in enamel biomineralization as well as reported amelogenin signaling activities. Here, in order to identify the liposome-interacting domains of amelogenin we designed four different amelogenin mutants containing only a single tryptophan at positions 25, 45, 112 and 161. Circular dichroism studies of the mutants confirmed that they are structurally similar to the wild-type amelogenin. Utilizing the intrinsic fluorescence of single tryptophan residues and fluorescence resonance energy transfer FRET, we analyzed the accessibility and strength of their binding with an ameloblast cell membrane-mimicking model membrane (ACML) and a negatively charged liposome used as a membrane model. We found that amelogenin has membrane-binding ability mainly via its N-terminal, close to residues W25 and W45. Significant blue shift was also observed in the fluorescence of a N-terminal peptide following addition of liposomes. We suggest that, among other mechanisms, enamel malformation in cases of Amelogenesis Imperfecta (AI) with mutations at the N-terminal may be the result of defective amelogenin-cell interactions. PMID:26188506

  20. The N-terminus of the human RecQL4 helicase is a homeodomain-like DNA interaction motif

    PubMed Central

    Ohlenschläger, Oliver; Kuhnert, Anja; Schneider, Annerose; Haumann, Sebastian; Bellstedt, Peter; Keller, Heidi; Saluz, Hans-Peter; Hortschansky, Peter; Hänel, Frank; Grosse, Frank; Görlach, Matthias; Pospiech, Helmut

    2012-01-01

    The RecQL4 helicase is involved in the maintenance of genome integrity and DNA replication. Mutations in the human RecQL4 gene cause the Rothmund–Thomson, RAPADILINO and Baller–Gerold syndromes. Mouse models and experiments in human and Xenopus have proven the N-terminal part of RecQL4 to be vital for cell growth. We have identified the first 54 amino acids of RecQL4 (RecQL4_N54) as the minimum interaction region with human TopBP1. The solution structure of RecQL4_N54 was determined by heteronuclear liquid–state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy (PDB 2KMU; backbone root-mean-square deviation 0.73 Å). Despite low-sequence homology, the well-defined structure carries an overall helical fold similar to homeodomain DNA-binding proteins but lacks their archetypical, minor groove-binding N-terminal extension. Sequence comparison indicates that this N-terminal homeodomain-like fold is a common hallmark of metazoan RecQL4 and yeast Sld2 DNA replication initiation factors. RecQL4_N54 binds DNA without noticeable sequence specificity yet with apparent preference for branched over double-stranded (ds) or single-stranded (ss) DNA. NMR chemical shift perturbation observed upon titration with Y-shaped, ssDNA and dsDNA shows a major contribution of helix α3 to DNA binding, and additional arginine side chain interactions for the ss and Y-shaped DNA. PMID:22730300

  1. The unique N terminus of the herpes simplex virus type 1 large subunit is not required for ribonucleotide reductase activity.

    PubMed

    Conner, J; Macfarlane, J; Lankinen, H; Marsden, H

    1992-01-01

    Using purified bacterially expressed herpes simplex virus type 1 ribonucleotide reductase large subunit (R1) and the proteolytic enzymes chymotrypsin and trypsin, we have generated stable N-terminal truncations. Chymotrypsin removes 246 amino acids from the amino terminus to produce a fragment (dN246R1) which retains full enzymic activity and affinity for the small subunit (R2). Treatment of R1 with trypsin produces a 120K protein and a cleavage at amino acid residue 305 to produce a fragment (dN305R1) which remains associated with a 33K N-terminal polypeptide. Although this 33K-dN305R1 complex retains full binding affinity for R2 its reductase activity is reduced by approximately 50%. Increasing the concentration of trypsin removes the 33K N-terminal polypeptide resulting in dN305R1 which, when bound to R2, has full ribonucleotide reductase activity. Like R1, dN246R1 and dN305R1 each exist as dimers showing that the first 305 amino acids of R1 are not necessary for dimer formation. These results indicate that, in structural studies of subunit interaction, dN246R1 or dN305R1 can be considered as suitable replacements for intact R1.

  2. Feline leukemia virus subgroup C phenotype evolves through distinct alterations near the N terminus of the envelope surface glycoprotein.

    PubMed Central

    Brojatsch, J; Kristal, B S; Viglianti, G A; Khiroya, R; Hoover, E A; Mullins, J I

    1992-01-01

    Feline leukemia viruses (FeLVs) belonging to the C subgroup induce aplastic anemia in domestic cats and have the ability, unique among FeLV strains, to proliferate in guinea pig fibroblasts in tissue culture. Previous studies have shown that the pathogenic and host range specificity of a prototype molecular clone of FeLV-C [FeLV-Sarma-C (FSC)] colocalize to a region encoding the 3' 73 amino acids of the pol gene product and the N-terminal 241 amino acids of the envelope surface glycoprotein named SU. Here, we amplified, via PCR, cloned, and sequenced the SU coding sequence from three additional anemia-inducing subgroup C FeLV isolates. Chimeric viruses were constructed by replacement of fragments of FeLV-C envelope genes into the FeLV-A prototype virus 61E. Using a modified vesicular stomatitis virus-FeLV pseudotype assay, we demonstrated that the subgroup C receptor specificity for each virus was determined by changes within the N-terminal 87-92 amino acids of SU, in which most changes occurred within the 15- to 20-amino-acid first variable region (V1). Determinants for growth in guinea pig cells colocalized to this region. Despite the consistent localization of biological determinants, the only consistent features that distinguished the deduced FeLV-A and FeLV-C proteins was one lysine-to-arginine change and a structural prediction of an alpha-helix in FeLV-A proteins versus random coil in FeLV-C proteins within V1. However, arginine in equilibrium with lysine substitutions were not sufficient to convert the subgroup A virus to the subgroup C phenotype or vice versa. Thus, certain distinct structural changes within the N-terminal region of FeLV SU can result in convergent viral phenotypes. Images PMID:1326757

  3. Plasticity in Interactions of Fibroblast Growth Factor 1 (FGF1) N Terminus with FGF Receptors Underlies Promiscuity of FGF1*

    PubMed Central

    Beenken, Andrew; Eliseenkova, Anna V.; Ibrahimi, Omar A.; Olsen, Shaun K.; Mohammadi, Moosa

    2012-01-01

    Tissue-specific alternative splicing in the second half of Ig-like domain 3 (D3) of fibroblast growth factor receptors 1–3 (FGFR1 to -3) generates epithelial FGFR1b-FGFR3b and mesenchymal FGFR1c-FGFR3c splice isoforms. This splicing event establishes a selectivity filter to restrict the ligand binding specificity of FGFRb and FGFRc isoforms to mesenchymally and epithelially derived fibroblast growth factors (FGFs), respectively. FGF1 is termed the “universal FGFR ligand” because it overrides this specificity barrier. To elucidate the molecular basis for FGF1 cross-reactivity with the “b” and “c” splice isoforms of FGFRs, we determined the first crystal structure of FGF1 in complex with an FGFRb isoform, FGFR2b, at 2.1 Å resolution. Comparison of the FGF1-FGFR2b structure with the three previously published FGF1-FGFRc structures reveals that plasticity in the interactions of the N-terminal region of FGF1 with FGFR D3 is the main determinant of FGF1 cross-reactivity with both isoforms of FGFRs. In support of our structural data, we demonstrate that substitution of three N-terminal residues (Gly-19, His-25, and Phe-26) of FGF2 (a ligand that does not bind FGFR2b) for the corresponding residues of FGF1 (Phe-16, Asn-22, and Tyr-23) enables the FGF2 triple mutant to bind and activate FGFR2b. These findings taken together with our previous structural data on receptor binding specificity of FGF2, FGF8, and FGF10 conclusively show that sequence divergence at the N termini of FGFs is the primary regulator of the receptor binding specificity and promiscuity of FGFs. PMID:22057274

  4. His86 from the N-terminus of frataxin coordinates iron and is required for Fe-S cluster synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Gentry, Leslie E.; Thacker, Matthew A.; Doughty, Reece; Timkovich, Russell; Busenlehner, Laura S.

    2013-01-01

    Human frataxin has a vital role in the biosynthesis of iron–sulfur (Fe-S) clusters in mitochondria and its deficiency causes the neurodegenerative disease Friedreich’s ataxia. Proposed functions for frataxin in the Fe-S pathway include iron donation to the Fe-S cluster machinery and regulation of cysteine desulfurase activity to control the rate of Fe-S production, although further molecular detail is required to distinguish these two possibilities. It is well established that frataxin can coordinate iron using glutamate and aspartate side chains on the protein surface; however, in this work we identify a new iron coordinating residue in the Nterminus of human frataxin using complementary spectroscopic and structural approaches. Further, we demonstrate that His86 in this N-terminal region is required for high affinity iron coordination and iron assembly of Fe-S clusters by ISCU as part of the Fe-S cluster biosynthetic complex. If a binding site that includes His86 is important for Fe-S cluster synthesis as part of its chaperone function, this raises the possibility that either iron binding at the acidic surface of frataxin may be spurious or that it is required for protein–protein interactions with the Fe-S biosynthetic quaternary complex. Our data suggest that iron coordination to frataxin may be significant to the Fe-S cluster biosynthesis pathway in mitochondria. PMID:23909240

  5. EFHC1, a protein mutated in juvenile myoclonic epilepsy, associates with the mitotic spindle through its N-terminus

    SciTech Connect

    Nijs, Laurence de; Lakaye, Bernard; Coumans, Bernard; Leon, Christine; Ikeda, Takashi; Delgado-Escueta, Antonio V.; Chanas, Grazyna . E-mail: G.Chanas@ulg.ac.be

    2006-09-10

    A novel gene, EFHC1, mutated in juvenile myoclonic epilepsy (JME) encodes a protein with three DM10 domains of unknown function and one putative EF-hand motif. To study the properties of EFHC1, we expressed EGFP-tagged protein in various cell lines. In interphase cells, the fusion protein was present in the cytoplasm and in the nucleus with specific accumulation at the centrosome. During mitosis EGFP-EFHC1 colocalized with the mitotic spindle, especially at spindle poles and with the midbody during cytokinesis. Using a specific antibody, we demonstrated the same distribution of the endogenous protein. Deletion analyses revealed that the N-terminal region of EFHC1 is crucial for the association with the mitotic spindle and the midbody. Our results suggest that EFHC1 could play an important role during cell division.

  6. pH-dependent channel gating in connexin26 hemichannels involves conformational changes in N-terminus.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xia; Xu, Xue; Ma, Ming; Zhou, Wei; Wang, Yonghua; Yang, Ling

    2012-05-01

    Connexin (Cx) hemichannels controlling an exchange of ions and metabolites between the cytoplasm and extracellular milieu can be modulated by the variation of intracellular pH during physiological and pathological conditions. To address the mechanism by which the pH exerts its effect on hemichannels, we have performed two 100-ns molecular dynamics simulations of the Cx26 channel in both acidic and neutral states. The results show that: 1) transmembrane domains undergo clockwise motions around the pore axis under both acidic and neutral conditions, while extracellular segments keep stable. 2) Under neutral condition, Cx26 has a tightly closed configuration that occurs through the assembly of N-terminal helix (NTH) region. This shows a constriction formed by the interhelical interactions of Asp2 and Met1 from neighboring NTH, which shapes the narrowest segment (pore radius<2Å) of the pore, preventing the passage of ions from the extracellular side. This indicates that Asp2 may act as a channel gate. 3) Under the acidic condition, the constriction is relieved by the protonation of Asp2 causing interruption of interhelical interactions, Cx26 has a flexibly opening pore (pore radius>4.5Å) around NTH region, allowing the passage of chloride ions unimpeded by the side-chain Asp2. While in the extracellular part two chloride ions interact with the side-chain Lys41 from three subunits. Finally, we provide a plausible mechanism of pH-dependent gating of hemichannel that involves protonation of the aspartic residues, suggesting that the pH sensitivity of hemichannel permeability is a sophisticated mechanism for cell regulating ion permeation.

  7. Human Islet Amyloid Polypeptide N-Terminus Fragment Self-Assembly: Effect of Conserved Disulfide Bond on Aggregation Propensity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilitchev, Alexandre I.; Giammona, Maxwell J.; Do, Thanh D.; Wong, Amy G.; Buratto, Steven K.; Shea, Joan-Emma; Raleigh, Daniel P.; Bowers, Michael T.

    2016-06-01

    Amyloid formation by human islet amyloid polypeptide (hIAPP) has long been implicated in the pathogeny of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and failure of islet transplants, but the mechanism of IAPP self-assembly is still unclear. Numerous fragments of hIAPP are capable of self-association into oligomeric aggregates, both amyloid and non-amyloid in structure. The N-terminal region of IAPP contains a conserved disulfide bond between cysteines at position 2 and 7, which is important to hIAPP's in vivo function and may play a role in in vitro aggregation. The importance of the disulfide bond in this region was probed using a combination of ion mobility-based mass spectrometry experiments, molecular dynamics simulations, and high-resolution atomic force microscopy imaging on the wildtype 1-8 hIAPP fragment, a reduced fragment with no disulfide bond, and a fragment with both cysteines at positions 2 and 7 mutated to serine. The results indicate the wildtype fragment aggregates by a different pathway than either comparison peptide and that the intact disulfide bond may be protective against aggregation due to a reduction of inter-peptide hydrogen bonding.

  8. The role of MscL amphipathic N terminus indicates a blueprint for bilayer-mediated gating of mechanosensitive channels

    PubMed Central

    Bavi, Navid; Cortes, D. Marien; Cox, Charles D.; Rohde, Paul R.; Liu, Weihong; Deitmer, Joachim W.; Bavi, Omid; Strop, Pavel; Hill, Adam P.; Rees, Douglas; Corry, Ben; Perozo, Eduardo; Martinac, Boris

    2016-01-01

    The bacterial mechanosensitive channel MscL gates in response to membrane tension as a result of mechanical force transmitted directly to the channel from the lipid bilayer. MscL represents an excellent model system to study the basic biophysical principles of mechanosensory transduction. However, understanding of the essential structural components that transduce bilayer tension into channel gating remains incomplete. Here using multiple experimental and computational approaches, we demonstrate that the amphipathic N-terminal helix of MscL acts as a crucial structural element during tension-induced gating, both stabilizing the closed state and coupling the channel to the membrane. We propose that this may also represent a common principle in the gating cycle of unrelated mechanosensitive ion channels, allowing the coupling of channel conformation to membrane dynamics. PMID:27329693

  9. Cytoplasmic methionyl-tRNA synthetase from Bakers' yeast. A monomer with a post-translationally modified N terminus.

    PubMed

    Fasiolo, F; Gibson, B W; Walter, P; Chatton, B; Biemann, K; Boulanger, Y

    1985-12-15

    Methionyl-tRNA synthetase has been purified from a yeast strain carrying the MES1 structural gene on a high copy number plasmid (pFL1). The purified enzyme is a monomer of Mr = 85,000 in contrast to its counterpart from Escherichia coli which is a dimer made up of identical subunits (Mr = 76,000; Dardel, F., Fayat, G., and Blanquet, S. (1984) J. Bacteriol. 160, 1115-1122). The yeast enzyme was not amenable to Edman's degradation indicating a blocked NH2 terminus. Its primary structure as derived from the DNA sequence (Walter, P., Gangloff, J., Bonnet, J., Boulanger, Y., Ebel, J.P., and Fasiolo, F. (1983) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 80, 2437-2441) has been confirmed using the fast atom bombardment-mass spectrometric method. This method was applied to tryptic digests of the carboxymethylated enzyme and the corresponding data provided extensive coverage of the translated DNA sequence, thus confirming its correctness. The ambiguity concerning which of the three NH2-terminally located methionine codons is the initiation codon was easily resolved from peptides identified in this region. It was possible to show that the first methionine had been removed and that the new NH2 terminus, serine, had been acetylated. A comparison between the yeast and E. coli sequences shows that the former has an N-terminal extension of about 200 residues as compared to the latter. It also lacks the C-terminal domain which is responsible for the dimerization of the E. coli methionyl-tRNA synthetase.

  10. The role of MscL amphipathic N terminus indicates a blueprint for bilayer-mediated gating of mechanosensitive channels.

    PubMed

    Bavi, Navid; Cortes, D Marien; Cox, Charles D; Rohde, Paul R; Liu, Weihong; Deitmer, Joachim W; Bavi, Omid; Strop, Pavel; Hill, Adam P; Rees, Douglas; Corry, Ben; Perozo, Eduardo; Martinac, Boris

    2016-06-22

    The bacterial mechanosensitive channel MscL gates in response to membrane tension as a result of mechanical force transmitted directly to the channel from the lipid bilayer. MscL represents an excellent model system to study the basic biophysical principles of mechanosensory transduction. However, understanding of the essential structural components that transduce bilayer tension into channel gating remains incomplete. Here using multiple experimental and computational approaches, we demonstrate that the amphipathic N-terminal helix of MscL acts as a crucial structural element during tension-induced gating, both stabilizing the closed state and coupling the channel to the membrane. We propose that this may also represent a common principle in the gating cycle of unrelated mechanosensitive ion channels, allowing the coupling of channel conformation to membrane dynamics.

  11. The role of MscL amphipathic N terminus indicates a blueprint for bilayer-mediated gating of mechanosensitive channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bavi, Navid; Cortes, D. Marien; Cox, Charles D.; Rohde, Paul R.; Liu, Weihong; Deitmer, Joachim W.; Bavi, Omid; Strop, Pavel; Hill, Adam P.; Rees, Douglas; Corry, Ben; Perozo, Eduardo; Martinac, Boris

    2016-06-01

    The bacterial mechanosensitive channel MscL gates in response to membrane tension as a result of mechanical force transmitted directly to the channel from the lipid bilayer. MscL represents an excellent model system to study the basic biophysical principles of mechanosensory transduction. However, understanding of the essential structural components that transduce bilayer tension into channel gating remains incomplete. Here using multiple experimental and computational approaches, we demonstrate that the amphipathic N-terminal helix of MscL acts as a crucial structural element during tension-induced gating, both stabilizing the closed state and coupling the channel to the membrane. We propose that this may also represent a common principle in the gating cycle of unrelated mechanosensitive ion channels, allowing the coupling of channel conformation to membrane dynamics.

  12. Investigation of Remotely Triggered Tremor and Earthquakes in Latin America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzalez-Huizar, H.; Velasco, A. A.

    2014-12-01

    It has been shown that non-volcanic tremor (NVT) as well as small to moderate size earthquakes can be triggered by the seismic waves from distant earthquakes; however, little is understood about the triggering mechanisms. Investigating cases of remote triggering offers the opportunity to improve our knowledge about the physical mechanisms of earthquake interaction and nucleation. Furthermore, the similarities observed between remotely triggered NVT and those related to slow slip events, suggest that investigating triggered NVT may give us important insights into the mechanisms involved in slow slip events and their potential role in the earthquake cycle. In this work we present new results and the techniques we employ in identifying, locating and modeling cases of triggered earthquakes and NVT in Latin America and the Caribbean. In particular, we use global and regional seismic networks to perform an intensive search for triggered seismicity in Mexico, Cuba, Nicaragua, Costa Rica, Colombia, Ecuador, Peru, Bolivia, and Chile. Our results suggest that seismicity can be triggered in a broad variety of tectonic environments, depending strongly on the triggering dynamic stress amplitude and orientation. This investigation will help to define the regions where remote triggering occurs and their susceptibility to undergo an important increase in seismicity after the occurrence of a distant large earthquake.

  13. Solanidine and tomatidine trigger scar pruritus.

    PubMed

    Alonso, Pedro E; Rioja, Luis F

    2016-05-01

    Scar pruritus is frequently encountered in clinical practice (particularly in burn patients) owing to its poorly known pathogenesis and difficult treatment. In previous work, we demonstrated the usefulness of a diet excluding edible solanaceae (viz., potatoes, tomatoes, peppers and aubergines) in patients with antihistamine-resistant scar pruritus. We hypothesized that alkaloids in solanaceae (particularly their secondary metabolites or aglycones) might be the actual pruritogens. In order to test this hypothesis, we conducted a single-blind prospective study on patients responding favourably to a solanaceae-free diet whose scar pruritus could be ascribed to one of the four foods. The study involved applying the aglycones solanidine and tomatidine to each scar and checking whether, and which, had a pruritogenic effect. A total of 18 patients (90%) responded by developing pruritus; also, the triggering aglycone coincided with that prevailing in the pruritogenic food. We concluded that solanaceae aglycones are directly involved in the pathogenesis of scar pruritus.

  14. Synchronization trigger control system for flow visualization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chun, K. S.

    1987-01-01

    The use of cinematography or holographic interferometry for dynamic flow visualization in an internal combustion engine requires a control device that globally synchronizes camera and light source timing at a predefined shaft encoder angle. The device is capable of 0.35 deg resolution for rotational speeds of up to 73 240 rpm. This was achieved by implementing the shaft encoder signal addressed look-up table (LUT) and appropriate latches. The developed digital signal processing technique achieves 25 nsec of high speed triggering angle detection by using direct parallel bit comparison of the shaft encoder digital code with a simulated angle reference code, instead of using angle value comparison which involves more complicated computation steps. In order to establish synchronization to an AC reference signal whose magnitude is variant with the rotating speed, a dynamic peak followup synchronization technique has been devised. This method scrutinizes the reference signal and provides the right timing within 40 nsec. Two application examples are described.

  15. Hybrid metamaterials for electrically triggered multifunctional control

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Liu; Kang, Lei; Mayer, Theresa S.; Werner, Douglas H.

    2016-01-01

    Despite the exotic material properties that have been demonstrated to date, practical examples of versatile metamaterials remain exceedingly rare. The concept of metadevices has been proposed in the context of hybrid metamaterial composites: systems in which active materials are introduced to advance tunability, switchability and nonlinearity. In contrast to the successful hybridizations seen at lower frequencies, there has been limited exploration into plasmonic and photonic nanostructures due to the lack of available optical materials with non-trivial activity, together with difficulties in regulating responses to external forces in an integrated manner. Here, by presenting a series of proof-of-concept studies on electrically triggered functionalities, we demonstrate a vanadium dioxide integrated photonic metamaterial as a transformative platform for multifunctional control. The proposed hybrid metamaterial integrated with transition materials represents a major step forward by providing a universal approach to creating self-sufficient and highly versatile nanophotonic systems. PMID:27807342

  16. Simulation of rockfalls triggered by earthquakes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kobayashi, Y.; Harp, E.L.; Kagawa, T.

    1990-01-01

    A computer program to simulate the downslope movement of boulders in rolling or bouncing modes has been developed and applied to actual rockfalls triggered by the Mammoth Lakes, California, earthquake sequence in 1980 and the Central Idaho earthquake in 1983. In order to reproduce a movement mode where bouncing predominated, we introduced an artificial unevenness to the slope surface by adding a small random number to the interpolated value of the mid-points between the adjacent surveyed points. Three hundred simulations were computed for each site by changing the random number series, which determined distances and bouncing intervals. The movement of the boulders was, in general, rather erratic depending on the random numbers employed, and the results could not be seen as deterministic but stochastic. The closest agreement between calculated and actual movements was obtained at the site with the most detailed and accurate topographic measurements. ?? 1990 Springer-Verlag.

  17. Synthesising periodic triggering signals with genetic oscillators.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chun-Liang; Chen, Po-Kuei

    2014-02-01

    The potential of the clock lies in its role of triggering logic reaction for sequential biological circuits. This research introduces an idea of designing a genetic clock generator by Fourier series based on the genetic oscillators. The authors generalise the design idea using a combination of fundamental sinusoidal signals. Since biochemical reaction of the biological system is extremely slow, however, transition between minimal and maximal levels is instantaneous for an ideal clock signal; it is thus not directly realisable in biological systems. That means it would be hard to directly synthesize a square wave generator for use as a genetic clock. They apply Fourier series to represent a square wave as a finite summation of sinusoidal waves generated by some genetic oscillators with different harmonic oscillating frequencies, in which the amplitude alternates at a constant frequency between the fixed minimal and maximal levels with the same duration of time.

  18. Rheumatic mimics and selected triggers of fibromyalgia.

    PubMed

    Daoud, Katja F; Barkhuizen, Andre

    2002-08-01

    Fibromyalgia is a chronic pain syndrome of unknown etiology characterized by diffuse pain and tender points, which have been present for more than 3 months. Many patients with systemic illnesses can have diffuse pain similar to that found in fibromyalgia, including rheumatic diseases such as polymyalgia rheumatica, rheumatoid arthritis, idiopathic inflammatory myopathy, systemic lupus erythematosus, and joint hypermobility. Osteomalacia and thyroid disease are also in the differential diagnosis of diffuse pain and are imminently treatable. In addition, there has been interest throughout the past 10 years in infectious diseases including hepatitis C, Lyme disease, coxsackie B, HIV, and parvovirus infection, which may cause or trigger fibromyalgia. This paper provides a framework to use when identifying these diseases as part of the evaluation of a patient with chronic widespread musculoskeletal pain.

  19. Peptides as triggers of plant defence.

    PubMed

    Albert, Markus

    2013-12-01

    Plants are confronted with several biotic stresses such as microbial pathogens and other herbivores. To defend against such attackers, plants possess an array of pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) that sense the danger and consequently initiate a defence programme that prevents further damage and spreading of the pest. Characteristic pathogenic structures, so-called microbe-associated molecular patterns (MAMPs), serve as signals that allow the plant to sense invaders. Additionally, pathogens wound or damage the plant and the resulting release of damage-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs) serves as a warning signal. This review focuses on peptides that serve as triggers or amplifiers of plant defence and thus follow the definition of a MAMP or a DAMP.

  20. Tidal triggering effect on earthquakes occurrence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Contadakis, M. E.; Arabelos, D.; Spatalas, S. D.

    2016-01-01

    In this review we present the investigation for the tidal triggering evidence on the earthquakes at various seismic areas of Greece. The result of our analysis using the HiCum method, indicate that the monthly variation of the frequencies of earthquake occurrence is in accordance with the period of the tidal lunar monthly (Mm) variations. The same happens with the corresponding diurnal and semi-diurnal variations of the frequencies of earthquake occurrence with the diurnal (K1), (O1) and semi-diurnal solar (S2) and semidiurnal lunar (M2) tidal variations. The confidence level of the Tidal-Earthquake frequency period compliance is very sensitive to the seismicity of the area and we call it Tidal - Earthquake frequency compliance parameter. We suggest that this parameter may be used in earthquake risk evaluation.

  1. Triggering rogue waves in opposing currents.

    PubMed

    Onorato, Miguel; Proment, Davide; Toffoli, Alessandro

    2011-10-28

    We show that rogue waves can be triggered naturally when a stable wave train enters a region of an opposing current flow. We demonstrate that the maximum amplitude of the rogue wave depends on the ratio between the current velocity U(0) and the wave group velocity c(g). We also reveal that an opposing current can force the development of rogue waves in random wave fields, resulting in a substantial change of the statistical properties of the surface elevation. The present results can be directly adopted in any field of physics in which the focusing nonlinear Schrödinger equation with nonconstant coefficient is applicable. In particular, nonlinear optics laboratory experiments are natural candidates for verifying experimentally our results.

  2. External triggering of plasmoid development at Saturn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kidder, A.; Paty, C. S.; Winglee, R. M.; Harnett, E. M.

    2012-07-01

    The Cassini spacecraft has encountered multiple plasmoids in Saturn's magnetotail thought to be produced by tail reconnection. However, single spacecraft measurements make it difficult to determine plasmoid size, where they form, the composition, and the geometry of the plasma sheet when plasmoids are produced. This paper examines these issues using 3D multifluid simulations of the Kronian magnetosphere. Plasmoids may develop in multiple sectors, form at different distances from the planet, and grow to sizes large relative to the system (˜25 RS), with varying widths and lengths. These plasmoids are composed primarily of water group ions and move downtail with speeds of ˜250 km/s (the local Alfvén speed). The plasma sheet is hinged upward both prior to and following plasmoid formation. Plasmoids can be externally triggered by both flips in the orientation of the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) as well as a pulse in the solar wind dynamic pressure.

  3. Hybrid metamaterials for electrically triggered multifunctional control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Liu; Kang, Lei; Mayer, Theresa S.; Werner, Douglas H.

    2016-10-01

    Despite the exotic material properties that have been demonstrated to date, practical examples of versatile metamaterials remain exceedingly rare. The concept of metadevices has been proposed in the context of hybrid metamaterial composites: systems in which active materials are introduced to advance tunability, switchability and nonlinearity. In contrast to the successful hybridizations seen at lower frequencies, there has been limited exploration into plasmonic and photonic nanostructures due to the lack of available optical materials with non-trivial activity, together with difficulties in regulating responses to external forces in an integrated manner. Here, by presenting a series of proof-of-concept studies on electrically triggered functionalities, we demonstrate a vanadium dioxide integrated photonic metamaterial as a transformative platform for multifunctional control. The proposed hybrid metamaterial integrated with transition materials represents a major step forward by providing a universal approach to creating self-sufficient and highly versatile nanophotonic systems.

  4. Aftershock triggering by complete Coulomb stress changes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kilb, Debi; Gomberg, J.; Bodin, P.

    2002-01-01

    We examine the correlation between seismicity rate change following the 1992, M7.3, Landers, California, earthquake and characteristics of the complete Coulomb failure stress (CFS) changes (??CFS(t)) that this earthquake generated. At close distances the time-varying "dynamic" portion of the stress change depends on how the rupture develops temporally and spatially and arises from radiated seismic waves and from permanent coseismic fault displacement. The permanent "static" portion (??CFS) depends only on the final coseismic displacement. ??CFS diminishes much more rapidly with distance than the transient, dynamic stress changes. A common interpretation of the strong correlation between ??CFS and aftershocks is that load changes can advance or delay failure. Stress changes may also promote failure by physically altering properties of the fault or its environs. Because it is transient, ??CFS(t) can alter the failure rate only by the latter means. We calculate both ??CFS and the maximum positive value of ??CFS(t) (peak ??CFS(t)) using a reflectivity program. Input parameters are constrained by modeling Landers displacement seismograms. We quantify the correlation between maps of seismicity rate changes and maps of modeled ??CFS and peak ??CFS(t) and find agreement for both models. However, rupture directivity, which does not affect ??CFS, creates larger peak ??CFS(t) values northwest of the main shock. This asymmetry is also observed in seismicity rate changes but not in ??CFS. This result implies that dynamic stress changes are as effective as static stress changes in triggering aftershocks and may trigger earthquakes long after the waves have passed.

  5. Study of Tectonic Tremor in Depth: Triggering Stress Observation and Model of the Triggering Mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Tien-Huei

    Non-volcanic tremor (NVT) has been discovered in recent years due to advances in seismic instruments and increased density of seismic networks. The NVT is a special kind of seismic signal indicative of the physical conditions and the failure mechanism on the source on the fault where NVT occurs. The detection methods used and the sensitivity of them relies on the density, distance and instrumentation of the station network available. How accurately the tremor is identified in different regions varies greatly among different studies. Therefore, there has not been study that rigorously documents tectonic tremors in different regions under limited methods and data. Meanwhile, many incidences of NVTs are observed during or after small but significant strain change induced by teleseismic, regional or local earthquake. The understanding of the triggering mechanisms critical for tremor remains unclear. In addition, characteristics of the triggering of NVT in different regions are rarely compared because of the short time frame after the discovery of the triggered NVTs. We first explore tectonic tremor based on observations to learn about its triggering, frequency of occurrence, location and spectral characteristics. Then, we numerically model the triggering of instability on the estimated tremor-source, under assumptions fine-tuned according to previous studies (Thomas et al., 2009; Miyazawa et al., 2005; Hill, 2008; Ito, 2009; Rubinstein et al., 2007; Peng and Chao, 2008). The onset of the slip reveals that how and when the external loading triggers tremor. It also holds the information to the background stress conditions under which tremor source starts with. We observe and detect tremor in two regions: Anza and Cholame, along San Jacinto Fault (SJF) and San Andreas Fault (SAF) respectively. These two sections of the faults, relative to general fault zone on which general earthquakes occur, are considered transition zones where slip of slow rates occurs. Slip events

  6. Networked event-triggered control: an introduction and research trends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahmoud, Magdi S.; Sabih, Muhammad

    2014-11-01

    A physical system can be studied as either continuous time or discrete-time system depending upon the control objectives. Discrete-time control systems can be further classified into two categories based on the sampling: (1) time-triggered control systems and (2) event-triggered control systems. Time-triggered systems sample states and calculate controls at every sampling instant in a periodic fashion, even in cases when states and calculated control do not change much. This indicates unnecessary and useless data transmission and computation efforts of a time-triggered system, thus inefficiency. For networked systems, the transmission of measurement and control signals, thus, cause unnecessary network traffic. Event-triggered systems, on the other hand, have potential to reduce the communication burden in addition to reducing the computation of control signals. This paper provides an up-to-date survey on the event-triggered methods for control systems and highlights the potential research directions.

  7. The Time-of-Flight trigger at CDF

    SciTech Connect

    Bauer, G.; Mulhearn, M.J.; Paus, Ch.; Schieferdecker, P.; Tether, S.; Lewis, J.D.; Shaw, T.; Acosta, D.; Konigsberg, J.; Madorsky, A.; /Florida U.

    2006-05-01

    The Time-of-Flight (TOF) detector measures the arrival time and deposited energy of charged particles reaching scintillator bars surrounding the central tracking region of the CDF detector. Requiring high ionization in the TOF system provides a unique trigger capability, which has been used for a magnetic monopole search. Other uses, with smaller pulse height thresholds, include a high-multiplicity charged-particle trigger useful for QCD studies and a much improved cosmic ray trigger for calibrating other detector components. Although not designed as input to CDF's global Level 1 trigger, the TOF system has been easily adapted to this role by the addition of 24 cables, new firmware, and four custom TOF trigger boards (TOTRIBs). This article describes the TOF trigger.

  8. Note: Triggering behavior of a vacuum arc plasma source.

    PubMed

    Lan, C H; Long, J D; Zheng, L; Dong, P; Yang, Z; Li, J; Wang, T; He, J L

    2016-08-01

    Axial symmetry of discharge is very important for application of vacuum arc plasma. It is discovered that the triggering method is a significant factor that would influence the symmetry of arc discharge at the final stable stage. Using high-speed multiframe photography, the transition processes from cathode-trigger discharge to cathode-anode discharge were observed. It is shown that the performances of the two triggering methods investigated are quite different. Arc discharge triggered by independent electric source can be stabilized at the center of anode grid, but it is difficult to achieve such good symmetry through resistance triggering. It is also found that the triggering process is highly correlated to the behavior of emitted electrons.

  9. Performance of the ATLAS Trigger System in 2010

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdelalim, A. A.; Abdesselam, A.; Abdinov, O.; Abi, B.; Abolins, M.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; Acerbi, E.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, D. L.; Addy, T. N.; Adelman, J.; Aderholz, M.; Adomeit, S.; Adragna, P.; Adye, T.; Aefsky, S.; Aguilar-Saavedra, J. A.; Aharrouche, M.; Ahlen, S. P.; Ahles, F.; Ahmad, A.; Ahsan, M.; Aielli, G.; Akdogan, T.; Åkesson, T. P. A.; Akimoto, G.; Akimov, A. V.; Akiyama, A.; Alam, M. S.; Alam, M. A.; Albrand, S.; Aleksa, M.; Aleksandrov, I. N.; Alessandria, F.; Alexa, C.; Alexander, G.; Alexandre, G.; Alexopoulos, T.; Alhroob, M.; Aliev, M.; Alimonti, G.; Alison, J.; Aliyev, M.; Allport, P. P.; Allwood-Spiers, S. E.; Almond, J.; Aloisio, A.; Alon, R.; Alonso, A.; Alviggi, M. G.; Amako, K.; Amaral, P.; Amelung, C.; Ammosov, V. V.; Amorim, A.; Amorós, G.; Amram, N.; Anastopoulos, C.; Andari, N.; Andeen, T.; Anders, C. F.; Anderson, K. J.; Andreazza, A.; Andrei, V.; Andrieux, M.-L.; Anduaga, X. S.; Angerami, A.; Anghinolfi, F.; Anjos, N.; Annovi, A.; Antonaki, A.; Antonelli, M.; Antonelli, S.; Antonov, A.; Antos, J.; Anulli, F.; Aoun, S.; Aperio Bella, L.; Apolle, R.; Arabidze, G.; Aracena, I.; Arai, Y.; Arce, A. T. H.; Archambault, J. P.; Arfaoui, S.; Arguin, J.-F.; Arik, E.; Arik, M.; Armbruster, A. J.; Arnaez, O.; Arnault, C.; Artamonov, A.; Artoni, G.; Arutinov, D.; Asai, S.; Asfandiyarov, R.; Ask, S.; Åsman, B.; Asquith, L.; Assamagan, K.; Astbury, A.; Astvatsatourov, A.; Atoian, G.; Aubert, B.; Auerbach, B.; Auge, E.; Augsten, K.; Aurousseau, M.; Austin, N.; Avolio, G.; Avramidou, R.; Axen, D.; Ay, C.; Azuelos, G.; Azuma, Y.; Baak, M. A.; Baccaglioni, G.; Bacci, C.; Bach, A. M.; Bachacou, H.; Bachas, K.; Bachy, G.; Backes, M.; Backhaus, M.; Badescu, E.; Bagnaia, P.; Bahinipati, S.; Bai, Y.; Bailey, D. C.; Bain, T.; Baines, J. T.; Baker, O. K.; Baker, M. D.; Baker, S.; Baltasar Dos Santos Pedrosa, F.; Banas, E.; Banerjee, P.; Banerjee, Sw.; Banfi, D.; Bangert, A.; Bansal, V.; Bansil, H. S.; Barak, L.; Baranov, S. P.; Barashkou, A.; Barbaro Galtieri, A.; Barber, T.; Barberio, E. L.; Barberis, D.; Barbero, M.; Bardin, D. Y.; Barillari, T.; Barisonzi, M.; Barklow, T.; Barlow, N.; Barnett, B. M.; Barnett, R. M.; Baroncelli, A.; Barone, G.; Barr, A. J.; Barreiro, F.; Barreiro Guimarães da Costa, J.; Barrillon, P.; Bartoldus, R.; Barton, A. E.; Bartsch, D.; Bartsch, V.; Bates, R. L.; Batkova, L.; Batley, J. R.; Battaglia, A.; Battistin, M.; Battistoni, G.; Bauer, F.; Bawa, H. S.; Beare, B.; Beau, T.; Beauchemin, P. H.; Beccherle, R.; Bechtle, P.; Beck, H. P.; Beckingham, M.; Becks, K. H.; Beddall, A. J.; Beddall, A.; Bedikian, S.; Bednyakov, V. A.; Bee, C. P.; Begel, M.; Behar Harpaz, S.; Behera, P. K.; Beimforde, M.; Belanger-Champagne, C.; Bell, P. J.; Bell, W. H.; Bella, G.; Bellagamba, L.; Bellina, F.; Bellomo, M.; Belloni, A.; Beloborodova, O.; Belotskiy, K.; Beltramello, O.; Ben Ami, S.; Benary, O.; Benchekroun, D.; Benchouk, C.; Bendel, M.; Benedict, B. H.; Benekos, N.; Benhammou, Y.; Benjamin, D. P.; Benoit, M.; Bensinger, J. R.; Benslama, K.; Bentvelsen, S.; Berge, D.; Bergeaas Kuutmann, E.; Berger, N.; Berghaus, F.; Berglund, E.; Beringer, J.; Bernardet, K.; Bernat, P.; Bernhard, R.; Bernius, C.; Berry, T.; Bertin, A.; Bertinelli, F.; Bertolucci, F.; Besana, M. I.; Besson, N.; Bethke, S.; Bhimji, W.; Bianchi, R. M.; Bianco, M.; Biebel, O.; Bieniek, S. P.; Biesiada, J.; Biglietti, M.; Bilokon, H.; Bindi, M.; Binet, S.; Bingul, A.; Bini, C.; Biscarat, C.; Bitenc, U.; Black, K. M.; Blair, R. E.; Blanchard, J.-B.; Blanchot, G.; Blazek, T.; Blocker, C.; Blocki, J.; Blondel, A.; Blum, W.; Blumenschein, U.; Bobbink, G. J.; Bobrovnikov, V. B.; Bocchetta, S. S.; Bocci, A.; Boddy, C. R.; Boehler, M.; Boek, J.; Boelaert, N.; Böser, S.; Bogaerts, J. A.; Bogdanchikov, A.; Bogouch, A.; Bohm, C.; Boisvert, V.; Bold, T.; Boldea, V.; Bolnet, N. M.; Bona, M.; Bondarenko, V. G.; Boonekamp, M.; Boorman, G.; Booth, C. N.; Bordoni, S.; Borer, C.; Borisov, A.; Borissov, G.; Borjanovic, I.; Borroni, S.; Bos, K.; Boscherini, D.; Bosman, M.; Boterenbrood, H.; Botterill, D.; Bouchami, J.; Boudreau, J.; Bouhova-Thacker, E. V.; Boulahouache, C.; Bourdarios, C.; Bousson, N.; Boveia, A.; Boyd, J.; Boyko, I. R.; Bozhko, N. I.; Bozovic-Jelisavcic, I.; Bracinik, J.; Braem, A.; Branchini, P.; Brandenburg, G. W.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, G.; Brandt, O.; Bratzler, U.; Brau, B.; Brau, J. E.; Braun, H. M.; Brelier, B.; Bremer, J.; Brenner, R.; Bressler, S.; Breton, D.; Britton, D.; Brochu, F. M.; Brock, I.; Brock, R.; Brodbeck, T. J.; Brodet, E.; Broggi, F.; Bromberg, C.; Brooijmans, G.; Brooks, W. K.; Brown, G.; Brown, H.; Brubaker, E.; Bruckman de Renstrom, P. A.; Bruncko, D.; Bruneliere, R.; Brunet, S.; Bruni, A.; Bruni, G.; Bruschi, M.; Buanes, T.; Bucci, F.; Buchanan, J.; Buchanan, N. J.; Buchholz, P.; Buckingham, R. M.; Buckley, A. G.; Buda, S. I.; Budagov, I. A.; Budick, B.; Büscher, V.; Bugge, L.; Buira-Clark, D.; Bulekov, O.; Bunse, M.; Buran, T.; Burckhart, H.; Burdin, S.; Burgess, T.; Burke, S.; Busato, E.; Bussey, P.; Buszello, C. P.; Butin, F.; Butler, B.; Butler, J. M.; Buttar, C. M.; Butterworth, J. M.; Buttinger, W.; Byatt, T.; Cabrera Urbán, S.; Caforio, D.; Cakir, O.; Calafiura, P.; Calderini, G.; Calfayan, P.; Calkins, R.; Caloba, L. P.; Caloi, R.; Calvet, D.; Calvet, S.; Camacho Toro, R.; Camard, A.; Camarri, P.; Cambiaghi, M.; Cameron, D.; Cammin, J.; Campana, S.; Campanelli, M.; Canale, V.; Canelli, F.; Canepa, A.; Cantero, J.; Capasso, L.; Capeans Garrido, M. D. M.; Caprini, I.; Caprini, M.; Capriotti, D.; Capua, M.; Caputo, R.; Caramarcu, C.; Cardarelli, R.; Carli, T.; Carlino, G.; Carminati, L.; Caron, B.; Caron, S.; Carrillo Montoya, G. D.; Carter, A. A.; Carter, J. R.; Carvalho, J.; Casadei, D.; Casado, M. P.; Cascella, M.; Caso, C.; Castaneda Hernandez, A. M.; Castaneda-Miranda, E.; Castillo Gimenez, V.; Castro, N. F.; Cataldi, G.; Cataneo, F.; Catinaccio, A.; Catmore, J. R.; Cattai, A.; Cattani, G.; Caughron, S.; Cauz, D.; Cavalleri, P.; Cavalli, D.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Cavasinni, V.; Cazzato, A.; Ceradini, F.; Cerqueira, A. S.; Cerri, A.; Cerrito, L.; Cerutti, F.; Cetin, S. A.; Cevenini, F.; Chafaq, A.; Chakraborty, D.; Chan, K.; Chapleau, B.; Chapman, J. D.; Chapman, J. W.; Chareyre, E.; Charlton, D. G.; Chavda, V.; Cheatham, S.; Chekanov, S.; Chekulaev, S. V.; Chelkov, G. A.; Chelstowska, M. A.; Chen, C.; Chen, H.; Chen, L.; Chen, S.; Chen, T.; Chen, X.; Cheng, S.; Cheplakov, A.; Chepurnov, V. F.; Cherkaoui El Moursli, R.; Chernyatin, V.; Cheu, E.; Cheung, S. L.; Chevalier, L.; Chiefari, G.; Chikovani, L.; Childers, J. T.; Chilingarov, A.; Chiodini, G.; Chislett, R. T.; Chizhov, M. V.; Choudalakis, G.; Chouridou, S.; Christidi, I. A.; Christov, A.; Chromek-Burckhart, D.; Chu, M. L.; Chudoba, J.; Ciapetti, G.; Ciba, K.; Ciftci, A. K.; Ciftci, R.; Cinca, D.; Cindro, V.; Ciobotaru, M. D.; Ciocca, C.; Ciocio, A.; Cirilli, M.; Ciubancan, M.; Clark, A.; Clark, P. J.; Cleland, W.; Clemens, J. C.; Clement, B.; Clement, C.; Clifft, R. W.; Coadou, Y.; Cobal, M.; Coccaro, A.; Cochran, J.; Coe, P.; Cogan, J. G.; Coggeshall, J.; Cogneras, E.; Cojocaru, C. D.; Colas, J.; Colijn, A. P.; Collard, C.; Collins, N. J.; Collins-Tooth, C.; Collot, J.; Colon, G.; Conde Muiño, P.; Coniavitis, E.; Conidi, M. C.; Consonni, M.; Consorti, V.; Constantinescu, S.; Conta, C.; Conventi, F.; Cook, J.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, B. D.; Cooper-Sarkar, A. M.; Cooper-Smith, N. J.; Copic, K.; Cornelissen, T.; Corradi, M.; Corriveau, F.; Cortes-Gonzalez, A.; Cortiana, G.; Costa, G.; Costa, M. J.; Costanzo, D.; Costin, T.; Côté, D.; Coura Torres, R.; Courneyea, L.; Cowan, G.; Cowden, C.; Cox, B. E.; Cranmer, K.; Crescioli, F.; Cristinziani, M.; Crosetti, G.; Crupi, R.; Crépé-Renaudin, S.; Cuciuc, C.-M.; Cuenca Almenar, C.; Cuhadar Donszelmann, T.; Cuneo, S.; Curatolo, M.; Curtis, C. J.; Cwetanski, P.; Czirr, H.; Czyczula, Z.; D'Auria, S.; D'Onofrio, M.; D'Orazio, A.; Da Rocha Gesualdi Mello, A.; Da Silva, P. V. M.; Da Via, C.; Dabrowski, W.; Dahlhoff, A.; Dai, T.; Dallapiccola, C.; Dam, M.; Dameri, M.; Damiani, D. S.; Danielsson, H. O.; Dannheim, D.; Dao, V.; Darbo, G.; Darlea, G. L.; Daum, C.; Dauvergne, J. P.; Davey, W.; Davidek, T.; Davidson, N.; Davidson, R.; Davies, E.; Davies, M.; Davison, A. R.; Davygora, Y.; Dawe, E.; Dawson, I.; Dawson, J. W.; Daya, R. K.; De, K.; de Asmundis, R.; De Castro, S.; De Castro Faria Salgado, P. E.; De Cecco, S.; de Graat, J.; De Groot, N.; de Jong, P.; De La Taille, C.; De la Torre, H.; De Lotto, B.; De Mora, L.; De Nooij, L.; De Oliveira Branco, M.; De Pedis, D.; de Saintignon, P.; De Salvo, A.; De Sanctis, U.; De Santo, A.; De Vivie De Regie, J. B.; Dean, S.; Dedovich, D. V.; Degenhardt, J.; Dehchar, M.; Deile, M.; Del Papa, C.; Del Peso, J.; Del Prete, T.; Dell'Acqua, A.; Dell'Asta, L.; Della Pietra, M.; della Volpe, D.; Delmastro, M.; Delpierre, P.; Delruelle, N.; Delsart, P. A.; Deluca, C.; Demers, S.; Demichev, M.; Demirkoz, B.; Deng, J.; Denisov, S. P.; Derendarz, D.; Derkaoui, J. E.; Derue, F.; Dervan, P.; Desch, K.; Devetak, E.; Deviveiros, P. O.; Dewhurst, A.; DeWilde, B.; Dhaliwal, S.; Dhullipudi, R.; Di Ciaccio, A.; Di Ciaccio, L.; Di Girolamo, A.; Di Girolamo, B.; Di Luise, S.; Di Mattia, A.; Di Micco, B.; Di Nardo, R.; Di Simone, A.; Di Sipio, R.; Diaz, M. A.; Diblen, F.; Diehl, E. B.; Dieli, M. V.; Dietl, H.; Dietrich, J.; Dietzsch, T. A.; Diglio, S.; Dindar Yagci, K.; Dingfelder, J.; Dionisi, C.; Dita, P.; Dita, S.; Dittus, F.; Djama, F.; Djilkibaev, R.; Djobava, T.; do Vale, M. A. B.; Do Valle Wemans, A.; Doan, T. K. O.; Dobbs, M.; Dobinson, R.; Dobos, D.; Dobson, E.; Dobson, M.; Dodd, J.; Dogan, O. B.; Doglioni, C.; Doherty, T.; Doi, Y.; Dolejsi, J.; Dolenc, I.; Dolezal, Z.; Dolgoshein, B. A.; Dohmae, T.; Donadelli, M.; Donega, M.; Donini, J.; Dopke, J.; Doria, A.; Dos Anjos, A.; Dosil, M.; Dotti, A.; Dova, M. T.; Dowell, J. D.; Doxiadis, A. D.; Doyle, A. T.; Drasal, Z.; Drees, J.; Dressnandt, N.; Drevermann, H.; Driouichi, C.; Dris, M.; Dubbert, J.; Dubbs, T.; Dube, S.; Duchovni, E.; Duckeck, G.; Dudarev, A.; Dudziak, F.; Dührssen, M.; Duerdoth, I. P.; Duflot, L.; Dufour, M.-A.; Dunford, M.; Duran Yildiz, H.; Duxfield, R.; Dwuznik, M.; Dydak, F.; Dzahini, D.; Düren, M.; Ebenstein, W. L.; Ebke, J.; Eckert, S.; Eckweiler, S.; Edmonds, K.; Edwards, C. A.; Edwards, N. C.; Ehrenfeld, W.; Ehrich, T.; Eifert, T.; Eigen, G.; Einsweiler, K.; Eisenhandler, E.; Ekelof, T.; El Kacimi, M.; Ellert, M.; Elles, S.; Ellinghaus, F.; Ellis, K.; Ellis, N.; Elmsheuser, J.; Elsing, M.; Ely, R.; Emeliyanov, D.; Engelmann, R.; Engl, A.; Epp, B.; Eppig, A.; Erdmann, J.; Ereditato, A.; Eriksson, D.; Ernst, J.; Ernst, M.; Ernwein, J.; Errede, D.; Errede, S.; Ertel, E.; Escalier, M.; Escobar, C.; Espinal Curull, X.; Esposito, B.; Etienne, F.; Etienvre, A. I.; Etzion, E.; Evangelakou, D.; Evans, H.; Fabbri, L.; Fabre, C.; Fakhrutdinov, R. M.; Falciano, S.; Falou, A. C.; Fang, Y.; Fanti, M.; Farbin, A.; Farilla, A.; Farley, J.; Farooque, T.; Farrington, S. M.; Farthouat, P.; Fassnacht, P.; Fassouliotis, D.; Fatholahzadeh, B.; Favareto, A.; Fayard, L.; Fazio, S.; Febbraro, R.; Federic, P.; Fedin, O. L.; Fedorko, I.; Fedorko, W.; Fehling-Kaschek, M.; Feligioni, L.; Fellmann, D.; Felzmann, C. U.; Feng, C.; Feng, E. J.; Fenyuk, A. B.; Ferencei, J.; Ferland, J.; Fernando, W.; Ferrag, S.; Ferrando, J.; Ferrara, V.; Ferrari, A.; Ferrari, P.; Ferrari, R.; Ferrer, A.; Ferrer, M. L.; Ferrere, D.; Ferretti, C.; Ferretto Parodi, A.; Fiascaris, M.; Fiedler, F.; Filipčič, A.; Filippas, A.; Filthaut, F.; Fincke-Keeler, M.; Fiolhais, M. C. N.; Fiorini, L.; Firan, A.; Fischer, G.; Fischer, P.; Fisher, M. J.; Fisher, S. M.; Flechl, M.; Fleck, I.; Fleckner, J.; Fleischmann, P.; Fleischmann, S.; Flick, T.; Flores Castillo, L. R.; Flowerdew, M. J.; Föhlisch, F.; Fokitis, M.; Fonseca Martin, T.; Forbush, D. A.; Formica, A.; Forti, A.; Fortin, D.; Foster, J. M.; Fournier, D.; Foussat, A.; Fowler, A. J.; Fowler, K.; Fox, H.; Francavilla, P.; Franchino, S.; Francis, D.; Frank, T.; Franklin, M.; Franz, S.; Fraternali, M.; Fratina, S.; French, S. T.; Froeschl, R.; Froidevaux, D.; Frost, J. A.; Fukunaga, C.; Fullana Torregrosa, E.; Fuster, J.; Gabaldon, C.; Gabizon, O.; Gadfort, T.; Gadomski, S.; Gagliardi, G.; Gagnon, P.; Galea, C.; Gallas, E. J.; Gallas, M. V.; Gallo, V.; Gallop, B. J.; Gallus, P.; Galyaev, E.; Gan, K. K.; Gao, Y. S.; Gapienko, V. A.; Gaponenko, A.; Garberson, F.; Garcia-Sciveres, M.; García, C.; García Navarro, J. E.; Gardner, R. W.; Garelli, N.; Garitaonandia, H.; Garonne, V.; Garvey, J.; Gatti, C.; Gaudio, G.; Gaumer, O.; Gaur, B.; Gauthier, L.; Gavrilenko, I. L.; Gay, C.; Gaycken, G.; Gayde, J.-C.; Gazis, E. N.; Ge, P.; Gee, C. N. P.; Geerts, D. A. A.; Geich-Gimbel, Ch.; Gellerstedt, K.; Gemme, C.; Gemmell, A.; Genest, M. H.; Gentile, S.; George, M.; George, S.; Gerlach, P.; Gershon, A.; Geweniger, C.; Ghazlane, H.; Ghez, P.; Ghodbane, N.; Giacobbe, B.; Giagu, S.; Giakoumopoulou, V.; Giangiobbe, V.; Gianotti, F.; Gibbard, B.; Gibson, A.; Gibson, S. M.; Gilbert, L. M.; Gilchriese, M.; Gilewsky, V.; Gillberg, D.; Gillman, A. R.; Gingrich, D. M.; Ginzburg, J.; Giokaris, N.; Giordano, R.; Giorgi, F. M.; Giovannini, P.; Giraud, P. F.; Giugni, D.; Giunta, M.; Giusti, P.; Gjelsten, B. K.; Gladilin, L. K.; Glasman, C.; Glatzer, J.; Glazov, A.; Glitza, K. W.; Glonti, G. L.; Godfrey, J.; Godlewski, J.; Goebel, M.; Göpfert, T.; Goeringer, C.; Gössling, C.; Göttfert, T.; Goldfarb, S.; Goldin, D.; Golling, T.; Golovnia, S. N.; Gomes, A.; Gomez Fajardo, L. S.; Gonçalo, R.; Goncalves Pinto Firmino Da Costa, J.; Gonella, L.; Gonidec, A.; Gonzalez, S.; González de la Hoz, S.; Gonzalez Silva, M. L.; Gonzalez-Sevilla, S.; Goodson, J. J.; Goossens, L.; Gorbounov, P. A.; Gordon, H. A.; Gorelov, I.; Gorfine, G.; Gorini, B.; Gorini, E.; Gorišek, A.; Gornicki, E.; Gorokhov, S. A.; Goryachev, V. N.; Gosdzik, B.; Gosselink, M.; Gostkin, M. I.; Gouanère, M.; Gough Eschrich, I.; Gouighri, M.; Goujdami, D.; Goulette, M. P.; Goussiou, A. 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G.; Oliveira, M.; Oliveira Damazio, D.; Oliver Garcia, E.; Olivito, D.; Olszewski, A.; Olszowska, J.; Omachi, C.; Onofre, A.; Onyisi, P. U. E.; Oram, C. J.; Oreglia, M. J.; Oren, Y.; Orestano, D.; Orlov, I.; Oropeza Barrera, C.; Orr, R. S.; Ortega, E. O.; Osculati, B.; Ospanov, R.; Osuna, C.; Otero y Garzon, G.; Ottersbach, J. P.; Ouchrif, M.; Ould-Saada, F.; Ouraou, A.; Ouyang, Q.; Owen, M.; Owen, S.; Øye, O. K.; Ozcan, V. E.; Ozturk, N.; Pacheco Pages, A.; Padilla Aranda, C.; Paganis, E.; Paige, F.; Pajchel, K.; Palestini, S.; Pallin, D.; Palma, A.; Palmer, J. D.; Pan, Y. B.; Panagiotopoulou, E.; Panes, B.; Panikashvili, N.; Panitkin, S.; Pantea, D.; Panuskova, M.; Paolone, V.; Papadelis, A.; Papadopoulou, Th. D.; Paramonov, A.; Park, W.; Parker, M. A.; Parodi, F.; Parsons, J. A.; Parzefall, U.; Pasqualucci, E.; Passeri, A.; Pastore, F.; Pastore, Fr.; Pásztor, G.; Pataraia, S.; Patel, N.; Pater, J. R.; Patricelli, S.; Pauly, T.; Pecsy, M.; Pedraza Morales, M. I.; Peleganchuk, S. V.; Peng, H.; Pengo, R.; Penson, A.; Penwell, J.; Perantoni, M.; Perez, K.; Perez Cavalcanti, T.; Perez Codina, E.; Pérez García-Estañ, M. T.; Perez Reale, V.; Peric, I.; Perini, L.; Pernegger, H.; Perrino, R.; Perrodo, P.; Persembe, S.; Peshekhonov, V. D.; Peters, O.; Petersen, B. A.; Petersen, J.; Petersen, T. C.; Petit, E.; Petridis, A.; Petridou, C.; Petrolo, E.; Petrucci, F.; Petschull, D.; Petteni, M.; Pezoa, R.; Phan, A.; Phillips, A. W.; Phillips, P. W.; Piacquadio, G.; Piccaro, E.; Piccinini, M.; Pickford, A.; Piec, S. M.; Piegaia, R.; Pilcher, J. E.; Pilkington, A. D.; Pina, J.; Pinamonti, M.; Pinder, A.; Pinfold, J. L.; Ping, J.; Pinto, B.; Pirotte, O.; Pizio, C.; Placakyte, R.; Plamondon, M.; Plano, W. G.; Pleier, M.-A.; Pleskach, A. V.; Poblaguev, A.; Poddar, S.; Podlyski, F.; Poggioli, L.; Poghosyan, T.; Pohl, M.; Polci, F.; Polesello, G.; Policicchio, A.; Polini, A.; Poll, J.; Polychronakos, V.; Pomarede, D. M.; Pomeroy, D.; Pommès, K.; Pontecorvo, L.; Pope, B. G.; Popeneciu, G. A.; Popovic, D. S.; Poppleton, A.; Portell Bueso, X.; Porter, R.; Posch, C.; Pospelov, G. E.; Pospisil, S.; Potrap, I. N.; Potter, C. J.; Potter, C. T.; Poulard, G.; Poveda, J.; Prabhu, R.; Pralavorio, P.; Prasad, S.; Pravahan, R.; Prell, S.; Pretzl, K.; Pribyl, L.; Price, D.; Price, L. E.; Price, M. J.; Prichard, P. M.; Prieur, D.; Primavera, M.; Prokofiev, K.; Prokoshin, F.; Protopopescu, S.; Proudfoot, J.; Prudent, X.; Przysiezniak, H.; Psoroulas, S.; Ptacek, E.; Purdham, J.; Purohit, M.; Puzo, P.; Pylypchenko, Y.; Qian, J.; Qian, Z.; Qin, Z.; Quadt, A.; Quarrie, D. R.; Quayle, W. B.; Quinonez, F.; Raas, M.; Radescu, V.; Radics, B.; Rador, T.; Ragusa, F.; Rahal, G.; Rahimi, A. M.; Rahm, D.; Rajagopalan, S.; Rammensee, M.; Rammes, M.; Ramstedt, M.; Randrianarivony, K.; Ratoff, P. N.; Rauscher, F.; Rauter, E.; Raymond, M.; Read, A. L.; Rebuzzi, D. M.; Redelbach, A.; Redlinger, G.; Reece, R.; Reeves, K.; Reichold, A.; Reinherz-Aronis, E.; Reinsch, A.; Reisinger, I.; Reljic, D.; Rembser, C.; Ren, Z. L.; Renaud, A.; Renkel, P.; Rensch, B.; Rescigno, M.; Resconi, S.; Resende, B.; Reznicek, P.; Rezvani, R.; Richards, A.; Richter, R.; Richter-Was, E.; Ridel, M.; Rieke, S.; Rijpstra, M.; Rijssenbeek, M.; Rimoldi, A.; Rinaldi, L.; Rios, R. R.; Riu, I.; Rivoltella, G.; Rizatdinova, F.; Rizvi, E.; Robertson, S. H.; Robichaud-Veronneau, A.; Robinson, D.; Robinson, J. E. M.; Robinson, M.; Robson, A.; Rocha de Lima, J. G.; Roda, C.; Roda Dos Santos, D.; Rodier, S.; Rodriguez, D.; Rodriguez Garcia, Y.; Roe, A.; Roe, S.; Røhne, O.; Rojo, V.; Rolli, S.; Romaniouk, A.; Romanov, V. M.; Romeo, G.; Romero Maltrana, D.; Roos, L.; Ros, E.; Rosati, S.; Rosbach, K.; Rose, M.; Rosenbaum, G. A.; Rosenberg, E. I.; Rosendahl, P. L.; Rosselet, L.; Rossetti, V.; Rossi, E.; Rossi, L. P.; Rossi, L.; Rotaru, M.; Roth, I.; Rothberg, J.; Rousseau, D.; Royon, C. R.; Rozanov, A.; Rozen, Y.; Ruan, X.; Rubinskiy, I.; Ruckert, B.; Ruckstuhl, N.; Rud, V. I.; Rudolph, G.; Rühr, F.; Ruggieri, F.; Ruiz-Martinez, A.; Rulikowska-Zarebska, E.; Rumiantsev, V.; Rumyantsev, L.; Runge, K.; Runolfsson, O.; Rurikova, Z.; Rusakovich, N. A.; Rust, D. R.; Rutherfoord, J. P.; Ruwiedel, C.; Ruzicka, P.; Ryabov, Y. F.; Ryadovikov, V.; Ryan, P.; Rybar, M.; Rybkin, G.; Ryder, N. C.; Rzaeva, S.; Saavedra, A. F.; Sadeh, I.; Sadrozinski, H. F.-W.; Sadykov, R.; Safai Tehrani, F.; Sakamoto, H.; Salamanna, G.; Salamon, A.; Saleem, M.; Salihagic, D.; Salnikov, A.; Salt, J.; Salvachua Ferrando, B. M.; Salvatore, D.; Salvatore, F.; Salvucci, A.; Salzburger, A.; Sampsonidis, D.; Samset, B. H.; Sandaker, H.; Sander, H. G.; Sanders, M. P.; Sandhoff, M.; Sandoval, T.; Sandstroem, R.; Sandvoss, S.; Sankey, D. P. C.; Sansoni, A.; Santamarina Rios, C.; Santoni, C.; Santonico, R.; Santos, H.; Saraiva, J. G.; Sarangi, T.; Sarkisyan-Grinbaum, E.; Sarri, F.; Sartisohn, G.; Sasaki, O.; Sasaki, T.; Sasao, N.; Satsounkevitch, I.; Sauvage, G.; Sauvan, J. B.; Savard, P.; Savinov, V.; Savu, D. O.; Savva, P.; Sawyer, L.; Saxon, D. H.; Says, L. P.; Sbarra, C.; Sbrizzi, A.; Scallon, O.; Scannicchio, D. A.; Scarcella, M.; Schaarschmidt, J.; Schacht, P.; Schäfer, U.; Schaepe, S.; Schaetzel, S.; Schaffer, A. C.; Schaile, D.; Schamberger, R. D.; Schamov, A. G.; Scharf, V.; Schegelsky, V. A.; Scheirich, D.; Schernau, M.; Scherzer, M. I.; Schiavi, C.; Schieck, J.; Schioppa, M.; Schlenker, S.; Schlereth, J. L.; Schmidt, E.; Schmidt, M. P.; Schmieden, K.; Schmitt, C.; Schmitt, S.; Schmitz, M.; Schöning, A.; Schott, M.; Schouten, D.; Schovancova, J.; Schram, M.; Schroeder, C.; Schroer, N.; Schuh, S.; Schuler, G.; Schultes, J.; Schultz-Coulon, H.-C.; Schulz, H.; Schumacher, J. W.; Schumacher, M.; Schumm, B. A.; Schune, Ph.; Schwanenberger, C.; Schwartzman, A.; Schwemling, Ph.; Schwienhorst, R.; Schwierz, R.; Schwindling, J.; Scott, W. G.; Searcy, J.; Sedykh, E.; Segura, E.; Seidel, S. C.; Seiden, A.; Seifert, F.; Seixas, J. M.; Sekhniaidze, G.; Seliverstov, D. M.; Sellden, B.; Sellers, G.; Seman, M.; Semprini-Cesari, N.; Serfon, C.; Serin, L.; Seuster, R.; Severini, H.; Sevior, M. E.; Sfyrla, A.; Shabalina, E.; Shamim, M.; Shan, L. Y.; Shank, J. T.; Shao, Q. T.; Shapiro, M.; Shatalov, P. B.; Shaver, L.; Shaw, C.; Shaw, K.; Sherman, D.; Sherwood, P.; Shibata, A.; Shichi, H.; Shimizu, S.; Shimojima, M.; Shin, T.; Shmeleva, A.; Shochet, M. J.; Short, D.; Shupe, M. A.; Sicho, P.; Sidoti, A.; Siebel, A.; Siegert, F.; Siegrist, J.; Sijacki, Dj.; Silbert, O.; Silva, J.; Silver, Y.; Silverstein, D.; Silverstein, S. B.; Simak, V.; Simard, O.; Simic, Lj.; Simion, S.; Simmons, B.; Simonyan, M.; Sinervo, P.; Sinev, N. B.; Sipica, V.; Siragusa, G.; Sisakyan, A. N.; Sivoklokov, S. Yu.; Sjölin, J.; Sjursen, T. B.; Skinnari, L. A.; Skovpen, K.; Skubic, P.; Skvorodnev, N.; Slater, M.; Slavicek, T.; Sliwa, K.; Sloan, T. J.; Sloper, J.; Smakhtin, V.; Smirnov, S. Yu.; Smirnova, L. N.; Smirnova, O.; Smith, B. C.; Smith, D.; Smith, K. M.; Smizanska, M.; Smolek, K.; Snesarev, A. A.; Snow, S. W.; Snow, J.; Snuverink, J.; Snyder, S.; Soares, M.; Sobie, R.; Sodomka, J.; Soffer, A.; Solans, C. A.; Solar, M.; Solc, J.; Soldatov, E.; Soldevila, U.; Solfaroli Camillocci, E.; Solodkov, A. A.; Solovyanov, O. V.; Sondericker, J.; Soni, N.; Sopko, V.; Sopko, B.; Sorbi, M.; Sosebee, M.; Soukharev, A.; Spagnolo, S.; Spanò, F.; Spighi, R.; Spigo, G.; Spila, F.; Spiriti, E.; Spiwoks, R.; Spousta, M.; Spreitzer, T.; Spurlock, B.; St. Denis, R. D.; Stahl, T.; Stahlman, J.; Stamen, R.; Stanecka, E.; Stanek, R. W.; Stanescu, C.; Stapnes, S.; Starchenko, E. A.; Stark, J.; Staroba, P.; Starovoitov, P.; Staude, A.; Stavina, P.; Stavropoulos, G.; Steele, G.; Steinbach, P.; Steinberg, P.; Stekl, I.; Stelzer, B.; Stelzer, H. J.; Stelzer-Chilton, O.; Stenzel, H.; Stevenson, K.; Stewart, G. A.; Stillings, J. A.; Stockmanns, T.; Stockton, M. C.; Stoerig, K.; Stoicea, G.; Stonjek, S.; Strachota, P.; Stradling, A. R.; Straessner, A.; Strandberg, J.; Strandberg, S.; Strandlie, A.; Strang, M.; Strauss, E.; Strauss, M.; Strizenec, P.; Ströhmer, R.; Strom, D. M.; Strong, J. A.; Stroynowski, R.; Strube, J.; Stugu, B.; Stumer, I.; Stupak, J.; Sturm, P.; Soh, D. A.; Su, D.; Subramania, HS.; Succurro, A.; Sugaya, Y.; Sugimoto, T.; Suhr, C.; Suita, K.; Suk, M.; Sulin, V. V.; Sultansoy, S.; Sumida, T.; Sun, X.; Sundermann, J. E.; Suruliz, K.; Sushkov, S.; Susinno, G.; Sutton, M. R.; Suzuki, Y.; Svatos, M.; Sviridov, Yu. M.; Swedish, S.; Sykora, I.; Sykora, T.; Szeless, B.; Sánchez, J.; Ta, D.; Tackmann, K.; Taffard, A.; Tafirout, R.; Taga, A.; Taiblum, N.; Takahashi, Y.; Takai, H.; Takashima, R.; Takeda, H.; Takeshita, T.; Talby, M.; Talyshev, A.; Tamsett, M. C.; Tanaka, J.; Tanaka, R.; Tanaka, S.; Tanaka, S.; Tanaka, Y.; Tani, K.; Tannoury, N.; Tappern, G. P.; Tapprogge, S.; Tardif, D.; Tarem, S.; Tarrade, F.; Tartarelli, G. F.; Tas, P.; Tasevsky, M.; Tassi, E.; Tatarkhanov, M.; Tayalati, Y.; Taylor, C.; Taylor, F. E.; Taylor, G. N.; Taylor, W.; Teixeira Dias Castanheira, M.; Teixeira-Dias, P.; Temming, K. K.; Ten Kate, H.; Teng, P. K.; Terada, S.; Terashi, K.; Terron, J.; Terwort, M.; Testa, M.; Teuscher, R. J.; Thadome, J.; Therhaag, J.; Theveneaux-Pelzer, T.; Thioye, M.; Thoma, S.; Thomas, J. P.; Thompson, E. N.; Thompson, P. D.; Thompson, P. D.; Thompson, A. S.; Thomson, E.; Thomson, M.; Thun, R. P.; Tic, T.; Tikhomirov, V. O.; Tikhonov, Y. A.; Timmermans, C. J. W. P.; Tipton, P.; Tique Aires Viegas, F. J.; Tisserant, S.; Tobias, J.; Toczek, B.; Todorov, T.; Todorova-Nova, S.; Toggerson, B.; Tojo, J.; Tokár, S.; Tokunaga, K.; Tokushuku, K.; Tollefson, K.; Tomoto, M.; Tompkins, L.; Toms, K.; Tong, G.; Tonoyan, A.; Topfel, C.; Topilin, N. D.; Torchiani, I.; Torrence, E.; Torró Pastor, E.; Toth, J.; Touchard, F.; Tovey, D. R.; Traynor, D.; Trefzger, T.; Treis, J.; Tremblet, L.; Tricoli, A.; Trigger, I. M.; Trincaz-Duvoid, S.; Trinh, T. N.; Tripiana, M. F.; Trischuk, W.; Trivedi, A.; Trocmé, B.; Troncon, C.; Trottier-McDonald, M.; Trzupek, A.; Tsarouchas, C.; Tseng, J. C.-L.; Tsiakiris, M.; Tsiareshka, P. V.; Tsionou, D.; Tsipolitis, G.; Tsiskaridze, V.; Tskhadadze, E. G.; Tsukerman, I. I.; Tsulaia, V.; Tsung, J.-W.; Tsuno, S.; Tsybychev, D.; Tua, A.; Tuggle, J. M.; Turala, M.; Turecek, D.; Turk Cakir, I.; Turlay, E.; Turra, R.; Tuts, P. M.; Tykhonov, A.; Tylmad, M.; Tyndel, M.; Tyrvainen, H.; Tzanakos, G.; Uchida, K.; Ueda, I.; Ueno, R.; Ugland, M.; Uhlenbrock, M.; Uhrmacher, M.; Ukegawa, F.; Unal, G.; Underwood, D. G.; Undrus, A.; Unel, G.; Unno, Y.; Urbaniec, D.; Urkovsky, E.; Urrejola, P.; Usai, G.; Uslenghi, M.; Vacavant, L.; Vacek, V.; Vachon, B.; Vahsen, S.; Valenta, J.; Valente, P.; Valentinetti, S.; Valkar, S.; Valladolid Gallego, E.; Vallecorsa, S.; Valls Ferrer, J. A.; van der Graaf, H.; van der Kraaij, E.; Van Der Leeuw, R.; van der Poel, E.; van der Ster, D.; Van Eijk, B.; van Eldik, N.; van Gemmeren, P.; van Kesteren, Z.; van Vulpen, I.; Vandelli, W.; Vandoni, G.; Vaniachine, A.; Vankov, P.; Vannucci, F.; Varela Rodriguez, F.; Vari, R.; Varnes, E. W.; Varouchas, D.; Vartapetian, A.; Varvell, K. E.; Vassilakopoulos, V. I.; Vazeille, F.; Vegni, G.; Veillet, J. J.; Vellidis, C.; Veloso, F.; Veness, R.; Veneziano, S.; Ventura, A.; Ventura, D.; Venturi, M.; Venturi, N.; Vercesi, V.; Verducci, M.; Verkerke, W.; Vermeulen, J. C.; Vest, A.; Vetterli, M. C.; Vichou, I.; Vickey, T.; Viehhauser, G. H. A.; Viel, S.; Villa, M.; Villaplana Perez, M.; Vilucchi, E.; Vincter, M. G.; Vinek, E.; Vinogradov, V. B.; Virchaux, M.; Viret, S.; Virzi, J.; Vitale, A.; Vitells, O.; Viti, M.; Vivarelli, I.; Vives Vaque, F.; Vlachos, S.; Vlasak, M.; Vlasov, N.; Vogel, A.; Vokac, P.; Volpi, G.; Volpi, M.; Volpini, G.; von der Schmitt, H.; von Loeben, J.; von Radziewski, H.; von Toerne, E.; Vorobel, V.; Vorobiev, A. P.; Vorwerk, V.; Vos, M.; Voss, R.; Voss, T. T.; Vossebeld, J. H.; Vranjes, N.; Vranjes Milosavljevic, M.; Vrba, V.; Vreeswijk, M.; Vu Anh, T.; Vuillermet, R.; Vukotic, I.; Wagner, W.; Wagner, P.; Wahlen, H.; Wakabayashi, J.; Walbersloh, J.; Walch, S.; Walder, J.; Walker, R.; Walkowiak, W.; Wall, R.; Waller, P.; Wang, C.; Wang, H.; Wang, H.; Wang, J.; Wang, J.; Wang, J. C.; Wang, R.; Wang, S. M.; Warburton, A.; Ward, C. P.; Warsinsky, M.; Watkins, P. M.; Watson, A. T.; Watson, M. F.; Watts, G.; Watts, S.; Waugh, A. T.; Waugh, B. M.; Weber, J.; Weber, M.; Weber, M. S.; Weber, P.; Weidberg, A. R.; Weigell, P.; Weingarten, J.; Weiser, C.; Wellenstein, H.; Wells, P. S.; Wen, M.; Wenaus, T.; Wendler, S.; Weng, Z.; Wengler, T.; Wenig, S.; Wermes, N.; Werner, M.; Werner, P.; Werth, M.; Wessels, M.; Weydert, C.; Whalen, K.; Wheeler-Ellis, S. J.; Whitaker, S. P.; White, A.; White, M. J.; White, S.; Whitehead, S. R.; Whiteson, D.; Whittington, D.; Wicek, F.; Wicke, D.; Wickens, F. J.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wielers, M.; Wienemann, P.; Wiglesworth, C.; Wiik, L. A. M.; Wijeratne, P. A.; Wildauer, A.; Wildt, M. A.; Wilhelm, I.; Wilkens, H. G.; Will, J. Z.; Williams, E.; Williams, H. H.; Willis, W.; Willocq, S.; Wilson, J. A.; Wilson, M. G.; Wilson, A.; Wingerter-Seez, I.; Winkelmann, S.; Winklmeier, F.; Wittgen, M.; Wolter, M. W.; Wolters, H.; Wooden, G.; Wosiek, B. K.; Wotschack, J.; Woudstra, M. J.; Wraight, K.; Wright, C.; Wrona, B.; Wu, S. L.; Wu, X.; Wu, Y.; Wulf, E.; Wunstorf, R.; Wynne, B. M.; Xaplanteris, L.; Xella, S.; Xie, S.; Xie, Y.; Xu, C.; Xu, D.; Xu, G.; Yabsley, B.; Yamada, M.; Yamamoto, A.; Yamamoto, K.; Yamamoto, S.; Yamamura, T.; Yamaoka, J.; Yamazaki, T.; Yamazaki, Y.; Yan, Z.; Yang, H.; Yang, U. K.; Yang, Y.; Yang, Y.; Yang, Z.; Yanush, S.; Yao, W.-M.; Yao, Y.; Yasu, Y.; Ybeles Smit, G. V.; Ye, J.; Ye, S.; Yilmaz, M.; Yoosoofmiya, R.; Yorita, K.; Yoshida, R.; Young, C.; Youssef, S.; Yu, D.; Yu, J.; Yu, J.; Yuan, L.; Yurkewicz, A.; Zaets, V. G.; Zaidan, R.; Zaitsev, A. M.; Zajacova, Z.; Zalite, Yo. K.; Zanello, L.; Zarzhitsky, P.; Zaytsev, A.; Zeitnitz, C.; Zeller, M.; Zemla, A.; Zendler, C.; Zenin, A. V.; Zenin, O.; Ženiš, T.; Zenonos, Z.; Zenz, S.; Zerwas, D.; Zevi della Porta, G.; Zhan, Z.; Zhang, D.; Zhang, H.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, X.; Zhang, Z.; Zhao, L.; Zhao, T.; Zhao, Z.; Zhemchugov, A.; Zheng, S.; Zhong, J.; Zhou, B.; Zhou, N.; Zhou, Y.; Zhu, C. G.; Zhu, H.; Zhu, Y.; Zhuang, X.; Zhuravlov, V.; Zieminska, D.; Zimmermann, R.; Zimmermann, S.; Zimmermann, S.; Ziolkowski, M.; Zitoun, R.; Živković, L.; Zmouchko, V. V.; Zobernig, G.; Zoccoli, A.; Zolnierowski, Y.; Zsenei, A.; zur Nedden, M.; Zutshi, V.; Zwalinski, L.

    2012-01-01

    Proton-proton collisions at sqrt{s}=7 TeV and heavy ion collisions at sqrt{s_{NN}}=2.76 TeV were produced by the LHC and recorded using the ATLAS experiment's trigger system in 2010. The LHC is designed with a maximum bunch crossing rate of 40 MHz and the ATLAS trigger system is designed to record approximately 200 of these per second. The trigger system selects events by rapidly identifying signatures of muon, electron, photon, tau lepton, jet, and B meson candidates, as well as using global event signatures, such as missing transverse energy. An overview of the ATLAS trigger system, the evolution of the system during 2010 and the performance of the trigger system components and selections based on the 2010 collision data are shown. A brief outline of plans for the trigger system in 2011 is presented.

  10. Whistler-triggered emissions observed by ISIS satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nakamura, Y.; Ondoh, T.

    1989-01-01

    A statistical examination has been conducted of the ducted and nonducted whistler-triggered emissions (WTEs) observed by the ISIS satellites in the 1979-1981 period. Most WTEs are observed with simultaneous lower hybrid resonance in the topside ionosphere. The VLF emissions triggered by ducted whistlers frequently occur at L of 2-3, while those triggered by nonducted whistlers occur in the wider latitudinal regions at L of 2.2-4.3.

  11. Trigger and Readout System for the Ashra-1 Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aita, Y.; Aoki, T.; Asaoka, Y.; Morimoto, Y.; Motz, H. M.; Sasaki, M.; Abiko, C.; Kanokohata, C.; Ogawa, S.; Shibuya, H.; Takada, T.; Kimura, T.; Learned, J. G.; Matsuno, S.; Kuze, S.; Binder, P. M.; Goldman, J.; Sugiyama, N.; Watanabe, Y.

    Highly sophisticated trigger and readout system has been developed for All-sky Survey High Resolution Air-shower (Ashra) detector. Ashra-1 detector has 42 degree diameter field of view. Detection of Cherenkov and fluorescence light from large background in the large field of view requires finely segmented and high speed trigger and readout system. The system is composed of optical fiber image transmission system, 64 × 64 channel trigger sensor and FPGA based trigger logic processor. The system typically processes the image within 10 to 30 ns and opens the shutter on the fine CMOS sensor. 64 × 64 coarse split image is transferred via 64 × 64 precisely aligned optical fiber bundle to a photon sensor. Current signals from the photon sensor are discriminated by custom made trigger amplifiers. FPGA based processor processes 64 × 64 hit pattern and correspondent partial area of the fine image is acquired. Commissioning earth skimming tau neutrino observational search was carried out with this trigger system. In addition to the geometrical advantage of the Ashra observational site, the excellent tau shower axis measurement based on the fine imaging and the night sky background rejection based on the fine and fast imaging allow zero background tau shower search. Adoption of the optical fiber bundle and trigger LSI realized 4k channel trigger system cheaply. Detectability of tau shower is also confirmed by simultaneously observed Cherenkov air shower. Reduction of the trigger threshold appears to enhance the effective area especially in PeV tau neutrino energy region. New two dimensional trigger LSI was introduced and the trigger threshold was lowered. New calibration system of the trigger system was recently developed and introduced to the Ashra detector

  12. A VXIbus based trigger for the CLAS detector at CEBAF

    SciTech Connect

    Doughty, D.C. Jr.; Englert, J.; Hale, R.; Lemon, S. ); Leung, P. ); Cuevas, C.; Joyce, D. )

    1992-04-01

    This paper discusses a VXIbus based first level triggering system for the CLAS detector at CEBAF which has been designed and prototyped. It uses pipelining and a triple memory lookup to produce a dead-timeless trigger decision with an average latency of 110 ns and a jitter of 20 ns. The VXIbus Extended Start/Stop triggering protocols allow sub-nanosecond time synchronization.

  13. A VXIbus based trigger for the CLAS detector at CEBAF

    SciTech Connect

    D.C. Doughty, Jr.; J. Englert; R. Hale; S. Lemon; P. Leung; C. Cuevas; D. Joyce

    1992-04-01

    A VXIbus based first level triggering system for the CLAS detector at CEBAF has been designed and prototyped. It uses pipelining and a triple memory lookup to produce a dead-timeless trigger decision with an average latency of 110 nS and a jitter of 20 nS. The VXIbus Extended Start/Stop triggering protocols allow sub-nanosecond time synchronization.

  14. ATLAS trigger operations: Monitoring with ``Xmon'' rate prediction system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aukerman, Andrew; Hong, Tae Min

    2017-01-01

    We present the operations and online monitoring with the ``Xmon'' rate prediction system for the trigger system at the ATLAS Experiment. A two-level trigger system reduces the LHC's bunch-crossing rate, 40 MHz at design capacity, to an average recording rate of about 1 kHz, while maintaining a high efficiency of selecting events of interest. The Xmon system uses the luminosity value to predict trigger rates that are, in turn, compared with incoming rates. The predictions rely on past runs to parameterize the luminosity dependency of the event rate for a trigger algorithm. Some examples are given to illustrate the performance of the tool during recent operations.

  15. The digital trigger system for the RED-100 detector

    SciTech Connect

    Naumov, P. P. Akimov, D. Yu.; Belov, V. A.; Bolozdynya, A. I.; Efremenko, Yu. V.; Kaplin, V. A.

    2015-12-15

    The system for forming a trigger for the liquid xenon detector RED-100 is developed. The trigger can be generated for all types of events that the detector needs for calibration and data acquisition, including the events with a single electron of ionization. In the system, a mechanism of event detection is implemented according to which the timestamp and event type are assigned to each event. The trigger system is required in the systems searching for rare events to select and keep only the necessary information from the ADC array. The specifications and implementation of the trigger unit which provides a high efficiency of response even to low-energy events are considered.

  16. The upgrade of the ATLAS first-level calorimeter trigger

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Shimpei

    2016-07-01

    The first-level calorimeter trigger (L1Calo) had operated successfully through the first data taking phase of the ATLAS experiment at the CERN Large Hadron Collider. Towards forthcoming LHC runs, a series of upgrades is planned for L1Calo to face new challenges posed by the upcoming increases of the beam energy and the luminosity. This paper reviews the ATLAS L1Calo trigger upgrade project that introduces new architectures for the liquid-argon calorimeter trigger readout and the L1Calo trigger processing system.

  17. Investigation of Triggered Non-Volcanic Tremor in Latin America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzalez-Huizar, H.; Velasco, A. A.; Ruiz, M.; Minaya, E.; Moreno Toiran, B.; Castro, R. R.; Peng, Z.; Talavera, E.; Escudero, C. R.; García, L. C.; Quiroz, W.

    2013-05-01

    Non-volcanic tremor (NVT) is an episodic, small amplitude, non impulsive and high-frequency seismic signal that occurs just beneath the seismogenic zones of large faults. Little is understood about the processes that generate NVT, and little can be assessed about its potential role in the earthquake cycle. The similarities observed between remotely triggered NVT and slow slip events suggest that investigating triggered NVT may give us important insights into the mechanism evolved in slow slip events. Furthermore, understanding the physics behind triggered NVT may also improve our understanding of the physics of earthquake triggering. Thus, investigating triggered NVT constitutes an important tool for studying these and other related phenomena. In this work we present some of the results and techniques we employ in identifying potential cases of triggered NVT in Latin America. We use global and regional seismic networks to perform an intensive search of triggered NVT in Mexico, Cuba, Nicaragua, Costa Rica, Colombia, Ecuador, Peru, Bolivia and Chile. Our results suggest that NVT can be dynamically triggered in a broad variety of tectonic environments, depending strongly on the dynamic stress amplitude and orientation. Investigating remotely triggered tremor offers the opportunity to improve our knowledge about deformation mechanisms and the physics of rupture.

  18. GPUs for real-time processing in HEP trigger systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamanna, G.; Ammendola, R.; Bauce, M.; Biagioni, A.; Fantechi, R.; Fiorini, M.; Giagu, S.; Graverini, E.; Lamanna, G.; Lonardo, A.; Messina, A.; Pantaleo, F.; Paolucci, P. S.; Piandani, R.; Rescigno, M.; Simula, F.; Sozzi, M.; Vicini, P.

    2014-06-01

    We describe a pilot project for the use of Graphics Processing Units (GPUs) for online triggering applications in High Energy Physics (HEP) experiments. Two major trends can be identified in the development of trigger and DAQ systems for HEP experiments: the massive use of general-purpose commodity systems such as commercial multicore PC farms for data acquisition, and the reduction of trigger levels implemented in hardware, towards a pure software selection system (trigger-less). The very innovative approach presented here aims at exploiting the parallel computing power of commercial GPUs to perform fast computations in software both at low- and high-level trigger stages. General-purpose computing on GPUs is emerging as a new paradigm in several fields of science, although so far applications have been tailored to the specific strengths of such devices as accelerator in offline computation. With the steady reduction of GPU latencies, and the increase in link and memory throughputs, the use of such devices for real-time applications in high-energy physics data acquisition and trigger systems is becoming very attractive. We discuss in details the use of online parallel computing on GPUs for synchronous low-level trigger with fixed latency. In particular we show preliminary results on a first test in the NA62 experiment at CERN. The use of GPUs in high-level triggers is also considered, the ATLAS experiment (and in particular the muon trigger) at CERN will be taken as a study case of possible applications.

  19. GPUs for real-time processing in HEP trigger systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ammendola, R.; Biagioni, A.; Deri, L.; Fiorini, M.; Frezza, O.; Lamanna, G.; Lo Cicero, F.; Lonardo, A.; Messina, A.; Sozzi, M.; Pantaleo, F.; Paolucci, Ps; Rossetti, D.; Simula, F.; Tosoratto, L.; Vicini, P.; Gap Collaboration

    2014-06-01

    We describe a pilot project (GAP - GPU Application Project) for the use of GPUs (Graphics processing units) for online triggering applications in High Energy Physics experiments. Two major trends can be identified in the development of trigger and DAQ systems for particle physics experiments: the massive use of general-purpose commodity systems such as commercial multicore PC farms for data acquisition, and the reduction of trigger levels implemented in hardware, towards a fully software data selection system ("trigger-less"). The innovative approach presented here aims at exploiting the parallel computing power of commercial GPUs to perform fast computations in software not only in high level trigger levels but also in early trigger stages. General-purpose computing on GPUs is emerging as a new paradigm in several fields of science, although so far applications have been tailored to the specific strengths of such devices as accelerators in offline computation. With the steady reduction of GPU latencies, and the increase in link and memory throughputs, the use of such devices for real-time applications in high energy physics data acquisition and trigger systems is becoming relevant. We discuss in detail the use of online parallel computing on GPUs for synchronous low-level triggers with fixed latency. In particular we show preliminary results on a first test in the CERN NA62 experiment. The use of GPUs in high level triggers is also considered, the CERN ATLAS experiment being taken as a case study of possible applications.

  20. Upgrade of the ALICE muon trigger electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dupieux, P.; Joly, B.; Jouve, F.; Manen, S.; Vandaële, R.

    2014-09-01

    The ALICE muon trigger is a large scale detector based on single gap bakelite RPCs. An upgrade of the electronics is needed in order to withstand the increase of luminosity after the LHC Long Shutdown-2 in 2018-2019. The detector will be read out at the minimum bias rate of 100 kHz in Pb-Pb collisions (including a safety factor of 2), two orders of magnitude above the present design. For the most exposed RPCs and in the present conditions of operation, the total integrated charge could be as high as 100 mC/cm2 with rates up to 100 Hz/cm2, which is above the present limit for safe operation. In order to overcome these limitations, upgrade projects of the Front-End (FE) and Readout Electronics are scheduled. The readout upgrade at high rate with low dead time requires changing most of the present electronics. It involves a new design for the 234 Local cards receiving the LVDS signals from the FE electronics and the 16 Regional concentrator cards. The readout chain is completed by a single Common Readout Unit developed for most ALICE sub-detectors. The new architecture of the muon trigger readout will be briefly presented. The present FE electronics, designed for the streamer mode, must be replaced to prevent ageing of the RPCs in the future operating conditions. The new FE called FEERIC (for Front-End Electronics Rapid Integrated Circuit) will have to perform amplification of the analog input signals. This will allow for RPC operation in a low-gain avalanche mode, with a much smaller charge deposit (factor 3-5) in the detector as compared to the present conditions. The purpose is to discriminate RPC signals with a charge threshold around 100 fC, in both polarities, and with a time jitter below 1 ns. We will describe the FE card and FEERIC ASIC features and first prototype performance, report on test results obtained on a cosmic test bench and discuss ongoing developments.

  1. LHC signatures of WIMP-triggered baryogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Yanou; Okui, Takemichi; Yunesi, Arash

    2016-12-01

    A robust mechanism was recently proposed in which thermal freeze-out of WIMPs can provide a unified origin of dark matter and baryon abundances in our universe. We point out that this WIMP-triggered baryogenesis mechanism can exhibit a rich collider phenomenology and be tested at the current and near-future experiments at LHC, even in the case where the WIMPs are completely devoid of SM gauge and Higgs portal interactions, as may be motivated by the persistent null results of WIMP dark matter searches. We catalog a rich array of LHC signatures robustly present in such a scenario. In particular, the simplest such implementation can already offer a very clean signal of a TeV-scale resonance that decays to diphotons with a cross section that can easily be within the reach of the current and near-future LHC runs in the region of parameter space that leads to a successful baryogenesis. Other characteristic signatures include the production of multiple bottom and/or multiple top quarks, promptly or displaced. An even more exotic possibility is the production of two separate sets of isolated emerging jets connected by a charged track, which may require new dedicated studies. Finally, dinucleon decay can also provide a powerful probe of the mechanism.

  2. Environmental triggers of type 1 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Couper, J J

    2001-06-01

    High risk HLA class II alleles account for 40% of the genetic susceptibility to type 1 diabetes in Caucasians, but the majority of the genetically predisposed do not develop the disease. This supports some environmental modification of the autoimmune destruction of beta cells that precedes type 1 diabetes. Identical twin studies and geographical variation in incidence also argue for a critical role of environmental factors. Attention has been directed to the possible harmful effect of cow's milk protein (or protective effect of breast-feeding) and enteric infections in early life. Natural history studies that follow children at increased risk of type 1 diabetes provide the best opportunity to study environmental triggers. The Australian Baby Diab Study has followed approximately 500 babies from birth who have a first-degree relative with type 1 diabetes. No prospective association between duration of breast-feeding or introduction of cow's milk and the development of islet autoimmunity was found. The same Australian cohort demonstrated a relationship between rotavirus infection and the first appearance or increase in islet antibodies. Enteroviral infection is seen more frequently in prediabetic children and prior to the onset of islet autoimmunity in Finnish cohorts. Environmental factors may interact. Breast milk protects against enteric infections; enteric infections in turn could increase immunity to dietary antigens by increasing intestinal permeability. It is also possible that an alteration in gut mucosal immune function in genetically susceptible individuals underlies any effect of dietary or viral proteins on the development of islet autoimmunity in early life.

  3. An enhanced multiwavelength ultraviolet biological trigger lidar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Achey, Alexander; Bufton, Jack; Dawson, Jeffrey; Huang, Wen; Lee, Sangmin; Mehta, Nikhil; Prasad, Coorg R.

    2004-12-01

    A compact Ultraviolet Biological Trigger Lidar (UBTL) instrument for detection and discrimination of bio-warfare-agent (BWA) simulant aerosol clouds was developed by us [Prasad, et al, 2004] using a 5mW, 375nm semiconductor UV optical source (SUVOS) laser diode. It underwent successful field tests at Dugway Proving Ground and demonstrated measurement ranges of over 300m for elastic scattering and >100m for fluorescence. The UBTL was modified during mid-2004 to enhance its detection and discrimination performance with increased range of operation and sensitivity. The major optical modifications were: 1. increase in telescope collection aperture to 200 mm diameter: 2. addition of 266nm and 977nm laser transmitters: 3. addition of three detection channels for 266nm and 977nm elastic backscatter and fluorescence centered at 330nm. Also the commercial electronics of the original UBTL were replaced with a multi-channel field programmable gate array (FPGA) chip for laser diode modulation and data acquisition that allowed simultaneous and continuous operation of the UBTL sensor on all of its transmitter and receiver wavelengths. A notebook computer was added for data display and storage. Field tests were performed during July 2004 at the Edgewood Chemical and Biological Center in Maryland to establish the enhanced performance of UBTL subsystems. Results of these tests are presented and discussed.

  4. Polar Solvents Trigger Formation of Reverse Micelles.

    PubMed

    Khoshnood, Atefeh; Firoozabadi, Abbas

    2015-06-09

    We use molecular dynamics simulations and molecular thermodynamics to investigate the formation of reverse micelles in a system of surfactants and nonpolar solvents. Since the early observation of reverse micelles, the question has been whether the existence of polar solvent molecules such as water is the driving force for the formation of reverse micelles in nonpolar solvents. In this work, we use a simple coarse-grained model of surfactants and solvents to show that a small number of polar solvent molecules triggers the formation of large permanent aggregates. In the absence of polar molecules, both the thermodynamic model and molecular simulations show that small aggregates are more populated in the solution and larger ones are less frequent as the system evolves over time. The size and shape of reverse micelles depend on the size of the polar core: the shape is spherical for a large core and ellipsoidal for a smaller one. Using the coarse-grained model, we also investigate the effect of temperature and surfactant tail length. Our results reveal that the number of surfactant molecules in the micelle decreases as the temperature increases, but the average diameter does not change because the size of the polar core remains invariant. A reverse micelle with small polar core attracts fewer surfactants when the tail is long. The uptake of solvent particles by a micelle of longer surfactant tail is less than shorter ones when the polar solvent particles are initially distributed randomly.

  5. Can ice sheets trigger abrupt climatic change?

    SciTech Connect

    Hughes, T.

    1996-11-01

    The discovery in recent years of abrupt climatic changes in climate proxy records from Greenland ice cores and North Atlantic sediment cores, and from other sites around the world, has diverted attention from gradual insolation changes caused by Earth`s orbital variations to more rapid processes on Earth`s surface as forcing Quaternary climatic change. In particular, forcing by ice sheets has been quantified for a major ice stream that drained the Laurentide Ice Sheet along Hudson Strait. The history of these recent discoveries leading to an interest in ice sheets is reviewed, and a case is made that ice sheets may drive abrupt climatic change that is virtually synchronous worldwide. Attention is focused on abrupt inception and termination of a Quaternary glaciation cycle, abrupt changes recorded as stadials and interstadials within the cycle, abrupt changes in ice streams that trigger stadials and interstadials, and abrupt changes in the Laurentide Ice Sheet linked to effectively simultaneous abrupt changes in its ice streams. Remaining work needed to quantify further these changes is discussed. 90 refs., 14 figs.

  6. Early diabetic neuropathy: Triggers and mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Dobretsov, Maxim; Romanovsky, Dmitry; Stimers, Joseph R

    2007-01-01

    Peripheral neuropathy, and specifically distal peripheral neuropathy (DPN), is one of the most frequent and troublesome complications of diabetes mellitus. It is the major reason for morbidity and mortality among diabetic patients. It is also frequently associated with debilitating pain. Unfortunately, our knowledge of the natural history and pathogenesis of this disease remains limited. For a long time hyperglycemia was viewed as a major, if not the sole factor, responsible for all symptomatic presentations of DPN. Multiple clinical observations and animal studies supported this view. The control of blood glucose as an obligatory step of therapy to delay or reverse DPN is no longer an arguable issue. However, while supporting evidence for the glycemic hypothesis has accumulated, multiple controversies accumulated as well. It is obvious now that DPN cannot be fully understood without considering factors besides hyperglycemia. Some symptoms of DPN may develop with little, if any, correlation with the glycemic status of a patient. It is also clear that identification of these putative non-glycemic mechanisms of DPN is of utmost importance for our understanding of failures with existing treatments and for the development of new approaches for diagnosis and therapy of DPN. In this work we will review the strengths and weaknesses of the glycemic hypothesis, focusing on clinical and animal data and on the pathogenesis of early stages and triggers of DPN other than hyperglycemia. PMID:17226897

  7. Persistent telomere cohesion triggers a prolonged anaphase.

    PubMed

    Kim, Mi Kyung; Smith, Susan

    2014-01-01

    Telomeres use distinct mechanisms (not used by arms or centromeres) to mediate cohesion between sister chromatids. However, the motivation for a specialized mechanism at telomeres is not well understood. Here we show, using fluorescence in situ hybridization and live-cell imaging, that persistent sister chromatid cohesion at telomeres triggers a prolonged anaphase in normal human cells and cancer cells. Excess cohesion at telomeres can be induced by inhibition of tankyrase 1, a poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase that is required for resolution of telomere cohesion, or by overexpression of proteins required to establish telomere cohesion, the shelterin subunit TIN2 and the cohesin subunit SA1. Regardless of the method of induction, excess cohesion at telomeres in mitosis prevents a robust and efficient anaphase. SA1- or TIN2-induced excess cohesion and anaphase delay can be rescued by overexpression of tankyrase 1. Moreover, we show that primary fibroblasts, which accumulate excess telomere cohesion at mitosis naturally during replicative aging, undergo a similar delay in anaphase progression that can also be rescued by overexpression of tankyrase 1. Our study demonstrates that there are opposing forces that regulate telomere cohesion. The observation that cells respond to unresolved telomere cohesion by delaying (but not completely disrupting) anaphase progression suggests a mechanism for tolerating excess cohesion and maintaining telomere integrity. This attempt to deal with telomere damage may be ultimately futile for aging fibroblasts but useful for cancer cells.

  8. Intramolecular electron arrangement with a rotative trigger.

    PubMed

    Kume, Shoko; Nomoto, Kuniharu; Kusamoto, Tetsuro; Nishihara, Hiroshi

    2009-10-14

    We have constructed a single molecule system, consisting of a ferrocene-tethered copper complex, in which electron transfer between redox centers is triggered by molecular rotational motion. In the compound, an asymmetric methyl-substituted 2,2'-pyridylpyrimidine ligand, tethered to the ferrocene moiety, has two isomeric ring-inversion coordination conformations around the copper center. Both isomeric structures were characterized by X-ray crystallography. (1)H NMR and electrochemical measurements revealed that these isomers interconvert through rotation of the pyrimidine at room temperature, but the process is frozen below 233 K in the solution state. The two isomers undergo different redox processes, and the identity of the first oxidation center alternates between the copper center and ferrocene, as confirmed by chemical oxidation monitored by EPR and UV-vis absorption spectroscopy. Oxidation of the compound causes spontaneous isomerization of the pyrimidine due to the different relative stabilities of the isomers in the monovalent and divalent states. Oxidation in the motionless state at low temperatures extracts the first electron from the ferrocene center. When molecular motion is released by warming, the electron moves from the copper center to the ferrocene, leading to an enhancement of the copper(II) signal in the EPR spectrum. The synchronized motion/electron migration process was observed as a one-step UV-vis absorption spectral conversion.

  9. Submarine landslides: processes, triggers and hazard prediction.

    PubMed

    Masson, D G; Harbitz, C B; Wynn, R B; Pedersen, G; Løvholt, F

    2006-08-15

    Huge landslides, mobilizing hundreds to thousands of km(3) of sediment and rock are ubiquitous in submarine settings ranging from the steepest volcanic island slopes to the gentlest muddy slopes of submarine deltas. Here, we summarize current knowledge of such landslides and the problems of assessing their hazard potential. The major hazards related to submarine landslides include destruction of seabed infrastructure, collapse of coastal areas into the sea and landslide-generated tsunamis. Most submarine slopes are inherently stable. Elevated pore pressures (leading to decreased frictional resistance to sliding) and specific weak layers within stratified sequences appear to be the key factors influencing landslide occurrence. Elevated pore pressures can result from normal depositional processes or from transient processes such as earthquake shaking; historical evidence suggests that the majority of large submarine landslides are triggered by earthquakes. Because of their tsunamigenic potential, ocean-island flank collapses and rockslides in fjords have been identified as the most dangerous of all landslide related hazards. Published models of ocean-island landslides mainly examine 'worst-case scenarios' that have a low probability of occurrence. Areas prone to submarine landsliding are relatively easy to identify, but we are still some way from being able to forecast individual events with precision. Monitoring of critical areas where landslides might be imminent and modelling landslide consequences so that appropriate mitigation strategies can be developed would appear to be areas where advances on current practice are possible.

  10. Competition for Trophies Triggers Male Generosity

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Xiaofei Sophia; Houser, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    Background Cooperation is indispensable in human societies, and much progress has been made towards understanding human pro-social decisions. Formal incentives, such as punishment, are suggested as potential effective approaches despite the fact that punishment can crowd out intrinsic motives for cooperation and detrimentally impact efficiency. At the same time, evolutionary biologists have long recognized that cooperation, especially food sharing, is typically efficiently organized in groups living on wild foods, even absent formal economic incentives. Despite its evident importance, the source of this voluntary compliance remains largely uninformed. Drawing on costly signaling theory, and in light of the widely established competitive nature of males, we hypothesize that unique and displayable rewards (trophies) out of competition may trigger male generosity in competitive social environments. Principal Findings Here, we use a controlled laboratory experiment to show that cooperation is sustained in a generosity competition with trophy rewards, but breaks down in the same environment with equally valuable but non-unique and non-displayable rewards. Further, we find that males' competition for trophies is the driving force behind treatment differences. In contrast, it appears that female competitiveness is not modulated by trophy rewards. Significance Our results suggest new approaches to promoting cooperation in human groups that, unlike punishment mechanisms, do not sacrifice efficiency. This could have important implications in any domain where voluntary compliance matters — including relations between spouses, employers and employees, market transactions, and conformity to legal standards. PMID:21494668

  11. Delay times and jitter in triggered vacuum spark gaps using metal vapor and surface flashover types of triggers

    SciTech Connect

    Voshall, R.E.; Bhasavanich, D.; Gorman, J.G.; Buttram, M.T.

    1985-01-01

    Triggered vacuum spark gap experiments have been performed in a demountable arc chamber with a pressure of 10/sup -2/ to 10/sup -4/ mtorr. Planar copper electrodes were used in which one electrode contained the trigger. Metal vapor spark triggers and surface flash-over types of triggers were explored. We have measured the delay time between the trigger breakdown and the conduction of the main gap, and the jitter in this time, as a function of main gap voltage ranging from 3 to 20 kV and main gap separations of 13 to 19 mm. Main gap current following breakdown ranged from 3 to 15 kA. Using the metal vapor trigger, delay times as long as 500 ns were observed for a gap field of 500 V/mm while using the surface flashover type of triggers, delay times of 300 ns were observed for a similar main gap field strength. When the trigger was in the cathode electrode and the trigger was pulsed negatively, the operation of the gap was more consistent and the delay times were observed to increase with main gap voltage. The experimental data have been interpreted on the basis of plasma expansion models.

  12. Output Consensus of Heterogeneous Linear Multi-Agent Systems by Distributed Event-Triggered/Self-Triggered Strategy.

    PubMed

    Hu, Wenfeng; Liu, Lu; Feng, Gang

    2016-09-02

    This paper addresses the output consensus problem of heterogeneous linear multi-agent systems. We first propose a novel distributed event-triggered control scheme. It is shown that, with the proposed control scheme, the output consensus problem can be solved if two matrix equations are satisfied. Then, we further propose a novel self-triggered control scheme, with which continuous monitoring is avoided. By introducing a fixed timer into both event- and self-triggered control schemes, Zeno behavior can be ruled out for each agent. The effectiveness of the event- and self-triggered control schemes is illustrated by an example.

  13. Evaluation of triggering functions in convective parameterization schemes using observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ettammal, S.; Zhang, G. J.

    2013-12-01

    Realistic simulation of different modes of atmospheric variability ranging from the diurnal cycle to inter-annual variability in global climate models (GCMs) depends crucially on the convection triggering criteria. In this study, using the data from constrained variational analysis by the Atmospheric System Research program for single column models (SCM), the performance of the commonly used convective triggering functions in GCMs is evaluated, based on the equitable threat score (ETS) value, a widely used forecast verification metric. From the ETS score, four consistently better performing triggering functions were identified. They are based on dilute dCAPE, parcel buoyancy at the lifting condensation level (Bechtold scheme), undilute dCAPE and dilute CAPE triggering functions. The key variables used to define these triggering functions were examined in detail. It was found that the skill score value of the dilute dCAPE triggering function does not show much variation among different data sets. Analysis of the composite fields and probability distributions of key variables of the triggering functions, based on the correct-prediction, over-prediction, under-prediction of convection and correct prediction of no convection cases for convection onset, brings to light some critical factors responsible for the performance of the trigger functions.

  14. Inconsistency with Prior Knowledge Triggers Children's Causal Explanatory Reasoning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Legare, Cristine H.; Gelman, Susan A.; Wellman, Henry M.

    2010-01-01

    What events trigger causal explanatory reasoning in young children? Children's explanations could be triggered by either consistent events (suggesting that explanations serve a confirmatory function) or inconsistent events (suggesting that they promote discovery of new information). In 2 studies with preschool children (N = 80), events that were…

  15. Triggering for Magnetic Field Measurements of the LCLS Undulators

    SciTech Connect

    Hacker, Kirsten

    2010-12-13

    A triggering system for magnetic field measurements of the LCLS undulators has been built with a National Instruments PXI-1002 and a Xylinx FPGA board. The system generates single triggers at specified positions, regardless of encoder sensor jitter about a linear scale.

  16. Using Reflection Triggers while Learning in an Online Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Verpoorten, Dominique; Westera, Wim; Specht, Marcus

    2012-01-01

    This paper reports on a controlled experiment on the effects of three types of reflection triggers in an online course. Fifty-four volunteers, distributed in five groups, used these structured opportunities for reflection during learning. Results show that reflection triggers were extensively employed by the test persons and were perceived as…

  17. Parent Trigger Policies, Representation, and the Public Good

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allen, Ann; Saultz, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Using theories of representation and democratic education, this article examines the impetus of parent trigger policies in the United States and their potential effects on public good goals for public education. The article also uses theories of representation and responsible democratic governance to assess the parent trigger policies, or what are…

  18. Watching Others 'Vape' May Trigger Urge to Smoke

    MedlinePlus

    ... Vape' May Trigger Urge to Smoke Newer e-cigarettes boost same impulses as real cigarettes, researcher says To use the sharing features on ... 13, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- A type of e-cigarette called a vape pen can trigger the urge ...

  19. Could Stroke Trigger Be Prevented by Healthy Family Relationships?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rochette, Annie; Gaulin, Philippe; Tellier, Myriam

    2009-01-01

    Although major stroke risk factors are well documented, little is known about which life circumstances are perceived to be related to the actual triggering of a first stroke. The purpose was to explore self-perceived spontaneously related life circumstances surrounding the trigger of a first stroke. A qualitative design with a phenomenological…

  20. 47 CFR 27.1184 - Triggering a reimbursement obligation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... a fixed base station at commercial power and the incumbent BRS system would have been within the... Policies Governing Broadband Radio Service Relocation from the 2150-2160/62 Mhz Band § 27.1184 Triggering a... has triggered a cost-sharing obligation and therefore must pay an AWS relocator of a BRS system...

  1. Trigger Laws: Does Signing a Petition Give Parents a Voice?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bacon, David

    2011-01-01

    Parent trigger laws, according to their proponents, give parents power. Gregory McGinity, managing director of policy for the Broad Education Foundation, calls them "a way for parents' voices to be heard." Sounds good. But is the parent trigger concept a way to put parents in charge of their kids' education, or is it part of a political agenda…

  2. Magnetically and optoelectronically isolated trigger for pulse-power applications.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yi; Wen, Yi-Zhi; Yu, Chang-Xuan; Wan, Shu-De; Liu, Wan-Dong

    2008-08-01

    In this article the design of a magnetically and optically isolated trigger is discussed. Critical issues for trigger design are presented together with some experimental usages. In this trigger, an optical coupler is used to cut off the ground loop between the circuits of the preceding control system and the power supplies of the double functional device KT-5D (as a simple magnetic torus or a tokamak). A magnetic coupler is used to provide a pulse-power output for the silicon controlled rectifier. The output is a 230 mus transistor-transistor logic (TTL) with an amplitude of 3.0 V. The rising time and the trailing time are no more than 4.0 mus. The delay time between the input and the output of the trigger is 6.8+/-0.2 mus. A resistance-capacity branch is integrated into the trigger to provide an adjustable delay time of up to 72 ms. The zero quiescent dissipation character endows the trigger with a long lifetime of years dispensing with any charging or replacing batteries. It is observed that the trigger has a good stability even in a high electromagnetic circumstance (at the order of 1 T). Using it as a trigger for the silicon controlled rectifier, we realized the compatible operation of the steady state mode and the pulse mode in KT-5D.

  3. Studying Triggers for Interest and Engagement Using Observational Methods

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Renninger, K. Ann; Bachrach, Jessica E.

    2015-01-01

    In this article, we discuss the contribution of observational methods to understanding the processes involved in triggering interest and establishing engagement. We begin by reviewing the literatures on interest and engagement, noting their similarities, differences, and the utility to each of better understanding the triggering process. We then…

  4. Innovative Techniques for Teaching about Landslides and Triggered Landslide Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, F. E.; Malamud, B. D.

    2014-12-01

    When we think of a landslide (mass wasting), both the public and scientists often envisage an individual movement of earth material down a slope. Yet, landslides often occur not as individuals, but as parts of a triggered landslide event. This is where a trigger (e.g., an earthquake or heavy rainfall) results in up to tens of thousands of landslides in a region in the minutes to days after the trigger. In this paper, we will present ideas for innovative demonstrations, teaching practicals and projects, ranging from low-cost low-tech to more advanced digital methods, to communicate the ideas of landslides and triggered landslide events to the public and students. This paper is aimed at those in secondary school/university education and the public sector looking for examples to interest and inform their respective audiences about landslides, triggered landslide events, and the importance and implications of considering landslides not just as individuals, but as populations.

  5. Local near instantaneously dynamically triggered aftershocks of large earthquakes.

    PubMed

    Fan, Wenyuan; Shearer, Peter M

    2016-09-09

    Aftershocks are often triggered by static- and/or dynamic-stress changes caused by mainshocks. The relative importance of the two triggering mechanisms is controversial at near-to-intermediate distances. We detected and located 48 previously unidentified large early aftershocks triggered by earthquakes with magnitudes between ≥7 and 8 within a few fault lengths (approximately 300 kilometers), during times that high-amplitude surface waves arrive from the mainshock (less than 200 seconds). The observations indicate that near-to-intermediate-field dynamic triggering commonly exists and fundamentally promotes aftershock occurrence. The mainshocks and their nearby early aftershocks are located at major subduction zones and continental boundaries, and mainshocks with all types of faulting-mechanisms (normal, reverse, and strike-slip) can trigger early aftershocks.

  6. Triggering on New Physics with the CMS Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Bose, Tulika

    2016-07-29

    The BU CMS group led by PI Tulika Bose has made several significant contributions to the CMS trigger and to the analysis of the data collected by the CMS experiment. Group members have played a leading role in the optimization of trigger algorithms, the development of trigger menus, and the online operation of the CMS High-Level Trigger. The group’s data analysis projects have concentrated on a broad spectrum of topics that take full advantage of their strengths in jets and calorimetry, trigger, lepton identification as well as their considerable experience in hadron collider physics. Their publications cover several searches for new heavy gauge bosons, vector-like quarks as well as diboson resonances.

  7. Earthquake Triggering by High Power Electric Pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novikov, Victor; Konev, Yuri; Zeigarnik, Vladimir

    2010-05-01

    The study carried out by the Joint Institute for High Temperatures in cooperation with the Institute of Physics of the Earth and the Research Station in Bishkek of Russian Academy of Sciences in 1999-2008 showed a response of weak seismicity at field experiments with electric pulsed power systems, as well as acoustic emission of rock specimens under laboratory conditions on high-power electric current pulses applied to the rocks. It was suggested that the phenomenon discovered may be used in practice for partial release of tectonic stresses in the Earth crust for earthquake hazard mitigation. Nevertheless, the mechanism of the influence of man-made electromagnetic field on the regional seismicity is not clear yet. One of possible cause of the phenomenon may be pore fluid pressure increase in the rocks under stressed conditions due to Joule heat generation by electric current injected into the Earth crust. It is known that increase of pore fluid pressure in the fault zone over a critical pressure of about 0.05 MPa is sufficient to trigger an earthquake if the fault is near the critical state due to accumulated tectonic deformations. Detailed 3D-calculaton of electric current density in the Earth crust of the Northern Tien Shan provided by pulsed electric high-power system connected to grounded electric dipole showed that at the depth of earthquake epicenters (over 5 km) the electric current density is lower than 10-7 A/m2 that is not sufficient for increase of pressure in the fluid-saturated porous geological medium due to Joule heat generation, which may provide formation of cracks resulting in the fault propagation and release of tectonic stresses in the Earth crust. Nevertheless, under certain conditions, when electric current will be injected into the fault through the casing pipes of two deep wells with preliminary injection of conductive fluid into the fault, the current density may be high enough for significant increase of mechanic pressure in the porous two

  8. Global search of triggered non-volcanic tremor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chao, Tzu-Kai Kevin

    Deep non-volcanic tremor is a newly discovered seismic phenomenon with low amplitude, long duration, and no clear P- and S-waves as compared with regular earthquake. Tremor has been observed at many major plate-boundary faults, providing new information about fault slip behaviors below the seismogenic zone. While tremor mostly occurs spontaneously (ambient tremor) or during episodic slow-slip events (SSEs), sometimes tremor can also be triggered during teleseismic waves of distance earthquakes, which is known as "triggered tremor". The primary focus of my Ph.D. work is to understand the physical mechanisms and necessary conditions of triggered tremor by systematic investigations in different tectonic regions. In the first chapter of my dissertation, I conduct a systematic survey of triggered tremor beneath the Central Range (CR) in Taiwan for 45 teleseismic earthquakes from 1998 to 2009 with Mw ≥ 7.5. Triggered tremors are visually identified as bursts of high-frequency (2-8 Hz), non-impulsive, and long-duration seismic energy that are coherent among many seismic stations and modulated by the teleseismic surface waves. A total of 9 teleseismic earthquakes has triggered clear tremor in Taiwan. The peak ground velocity (PGV) of teleseismic surface waves is the most important factor in determining tremor triggering potential, with an apparent threshold of ˜0.1 cm/s, or 7-8 kPa. However, such threshold is partially controlled by the background noise level, preventing triggered tremor with weaker amplitude from being observed. In addition, I find a positive correlation between the PGV and the triggered tremor amplitude, which is consistent with the prediction of the 'clock-advance' model. This suggests that triggered tremor can be considered as a sped-up occurrence of ambient tremor under fast loading from the passing surface waves. Finally, the incident angles of surface waves also play an important rule in controlling the tremor triggering potential. The next

  9. A FLUX ROPE ERUPTION TRIGGERED BY JETS

    SciTech Connect

    Guo Juan; Zhang Hongqi; Deng Yuanyong; Lin Jiaben; Su Jiangtao; Liu Yu

    2010-03-10

    We present an observation of a filament eruption caused by recurrent chromospheric plasma injections (surges/jets) on 2006 July 6. The filament eruption was associated with an M2.5 two-ribbon flare and a coronal mass ejection (CME). There was a light bridge in the umbra of the main sunspot of NOAA 10898; one end of the filament was terminated at the region close to the light bridge, and recurrent surges were observed to be ejected from the light bridge. The surges occurred intermittently for about 8 hr before the filament eruption, and finally a clear jet was found at the light bridge to trigger the filament eruption. We analyzed the evolutions of the relative darkness of the filament and the loaded mass by the continuous surges quantitatively. It was found that as the occurrence of the surges, the relative darkness of the filament body continued growing for about 3-4 hr, reached its maximum, and kept stable for more than 2 hr until it erupted. If suppose 50% of the ejected mass by the surges could be trapped by the filament channel, then the total loaded mass into the filament channelwill be about 0.57x10{sup 16} g with a momentum of 0.57x10{sup 22} g cm s{sup -1} by 08:08 UT, which is a non-negligible effect on the stability of the filament. Based on the observations, we present a model showing the important role that recurrent chromospheric mass injection play in the evolution and eruption of a flux rope. Our study confirms that the surge activities can efficiently supply the necessary material for some filament formation. Furthermore, our study indicates that the continuous mass with momentum loaded by the surge activities to the filament channel could make the filament unstable and cause it to erupt.

  10. The ecdysis triggering hormone signaling in arthropods

    PubMed Central

    Roller, Ladislav; Žitňanová, Inka; Dai, Li; Šimo, Ladislav; Park, Yoonseong; Satake, Honoo; Tanaka, Yoshiaki; Adams, Michael E.; Žitňan, Dušan

    2010-01-01

    Ecdysis triggering hormones (ETH) from peripheral endocrine Inka cells initiate the ecdysis sequence through action on central neurons expressing ETH receptors (ETHR) in model moth and dipteran species. We used various biochemical, molecular and blast search techniques to detect these signaling molecules in representatives of diverse arthropods. Using peptide isolation from tracheal extracts, cDNA cloning or homology search, we identified ETHs in a variety of hemimetabolous and holometabolous insects. Most insects produce two related ETHs, but only a single active peptide was isolated from the cricket and one peptide is encoded by eth gene of the honeybee, parasitic wasp and aphid. Immunohistochemical staining with antiserum to Manduca PETH revealed Inka cells on tracheal surface of diverse insects. In spite of conserved ETH sequences, comparison of the natural and ETH-induced ecdysis sequence in the honeybee and beetle revealed considerable species-specific differences in pre-ecdysis and ecdysis behaviors. DNA sequences coding for putative ETHR were deduced from available genomes of several hemimetabolous and holometabolous insects. In all examined insects the ethr gene encodes two subtypes of the receptor (ETHR-A and ETHR-B). Phylogenic analysis showed that these receptors fall into a family of closely related GPCRs. Here we report for the first time presence of putative ETHs and ETHRs in genomes of other arthropods, the tick (Arachnida) and water flea (Crustacea). Possible source of ETH in ticks was detected in paired cells located in all pedal segments. Our results provide further evidence of structural and functional conservancy of ETH-ETHR signaling. PMID:19951734

  11. Triggered Snap-Through of Bistable Shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Yijie; Huang, Shicheng; Trase, Ian; Hu, Nan; Chen, Zi

    Elastic bistable shells are common structures in nature and engineering, such as the lobes of the Venus flytrap or the surface of a toy jumping poppers. Despite their ubiquity, the parameters that control the bistability of such structures are not well understood. In this study, we explore how the geometrical features of radially symmetric elastic shells affect the shape and potential energy of a shell's stable states, and how to tune certain parameters in order to generate a snap-through transition from a convex semi-stable state to concave stable state. We fabricated a series of elastic shells with varying geometric parameters out of silicone rubber and measured the resulting potential energy in the semi-stable state. Finite element simulations were also conducted in order to determine the deformation and stress in the shells during snap-through. It was found that the energy of the semi-stable state is controlled by only two geometric parameters and a dimensionless ratio. We also noted two distinct transitions during snap-through, one between monostability and semi-bistability (the state a popper toy is in before it snaps-through and jumps), and a second transition between semi-bistability and true bistability. This work shows that it is possible to use a set of simple parameters to tailor the energy landscape of an elastic shell in order to generate complex trigger motions for their potential use in smart applications. Z.C. acknowledge support from Society in Science-Branco Weiss Fellowship, administered by ETH Zurich.

  12. Dynamic triggering of Lusi, East Java Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lupi, Matteo; Saenger, Erik H.; Fuchs, Florian; Miller, Steve

    2016-04-01

    On the 27th of May 2006, a M6.3 strike slip earthquake struck beneath Yogyakarta, Java. Forty-seven hours later a mixture of mud, breccia, and gas reached the surface near Sidoarjo, 250 km far from the epicenter, creating several mud vents aligned along a NW-SE direction. The mud eruption reached a peak of 180.000 km3 of erupted material per day and it is still ongoing. The major eruption crater was named Lusi and represents the surface expression of a newborn sedimentary-hosted hydrothermal system. Lusi flooded several villages causing a loss of approximately 4 billions to Indonesia. Previous geochemical and geological data suggest that the Yogyakarta earthquake may have reactivated parts of the Watukosek fault system, a strike slip structure upon which Lusi resides. The Watukosek fault systems connects the East Java basin to the volcanic arc, which may explain the presence of both biogenic and thermogenic fluids. To quantify the effects of incoming seismic energy at Lusi we conducted a seismic wave propagation study on a geological model of Lusi's structure. A key feature of our model is a low velocity shear zone in the Kalibeng formation caused by elevated pore pressures, which is often neglected in other studies. Our analysis highlights the importance of the overall geological structure that focused the seismic energy causing elevated strain rates at depth. In particular, we show that body waves generated by the Yogyakarta earthquake may have induced liquefaction of the Kalibeng formation. As consequence, the liquefied mud injected and reactivated parts of the Watukosek fault system. Our findings are in agreement with previous studies suggesting that Lusi was an unfortunate case of dynamic triggering promoted by the Yogyakarta earthquake.

  13. Hyperglycemia triggers HIPK2 protein degradation

    PubMed Central

    Granato, Marisa; Cuomo, Laura; Pistritto, Giuseppa; Cirone, Mara; D'Orazi, Gabriella

    2017-01-01

    Homeodomain interacting protein kinase-2 (HIPK2) is an evolutionary conserved kinase that modulates several key molecular pathways to restrain tumor growth and induce p53-depending apoptotic cell-death in response to anticancer therapies. HIPK2 silencing in cancer cells leads to chemoresistance and cancer progression, in part due to p53 inhibition. Recently, hyperglycemia has been shown to reduce p53 phosphorylation at serine 46 (Ser46), the target residue of HIPK2, thus impairing p53 apoptotic function. Here we asked whether hyperglycemia could, upstream of p53, target HIPK2. We focused on the effect of high glucose (HG) on HIPK2 protein stability and the underlying mechanisms. We found that HG reduced HIPK2 protein levels, therefore impairing HIPK2-induced p53 apoptotic activity. HG-triggered HIPK2 protein downregulation was rescued by both proteasome inhibitor MG132 and by protein phosphatase inhibitors Calyculin A (CL-A) and Okadaic Acid (OA). Looking for the phosphatase involved, we found that protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) induced HIPK2 degradation, as evidenced by directly activating PP2A with FTY720 or by silencing PP2A with siRNA in HG condition. The effect of PP2A on HIPK2 protein degradation could be in part due to hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF-1) activity which has been previously shown to induce HIPK2 proteasomal degradation through several ubiquitin ligases. Validation analysed performed with HIF-1α dominant negative or with silencing of Siah2 ubiquitin ligase clearly showed rescue of HG-induced HIPK2 degradation. These findings demonstrate how hyperglycemia, through a complex protein cascade, induced HIPK2 downregulation and consequently impaired p53 apoptotic activity, revealing a novel link between diabetes/obesity and tumor resistance to therapies. PMID:27901482

  14. Operation of the Upgraded ATLAS Level-1 Central Trigger System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glatzer, Julian

    2015-12-01

    The ATLAS Level-1 Central Trigger (L1CT) system is a central part of ATLAS data-taking and has undergone a major upgrade for Run 2 of the LHC, in order to cope with the expected increase of instantaneous luminosity of a factor of two with respect to Run 1. The upgraded hardware offers more flexibility in the trigger decisions due to the factor of two increase in the number of trigger inputs and usable trigger channels. It also provides an interface to the new topological trigger system. Operationally - particularly useful for commissioning, calibration and test runs - it allows concurrent running of up to three different subdetector combinations. An overview of the operational software framework of the L1CT system with particular emphasis on the configuration, controls and monitoring aspects is given. The software framework allows a consistent configuration with respect to the ATLAS experiment and the LHC machine, upstream and downstream trigger processors, and the data acquisition system. Trigger and dead-time rates are monitored coherently at all stages of processing and are logged by the online computing system for physics analysis, data quality assurance and operational debugging. In addition, the synchronisation of trigger inputs is watched based on bunch-by-bunch trigger information. Several software tools allow for efficient display of the relevant information in the control room in a way useful for shifters and experts. The design of the framework aims at reliability, flexibility, and robustness of the system and takes into account the operational experience gained during Run 1. The Level-1 Central Trigger was successfully operated with high efficiency during the cosmic-ray, beam-splash and first Run 2 data taking with the full ATLAS detector.

  15. Remote triggering of non-volcanic tremor around Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chao, Kevin; Peng, Zhigang; Wu, Chunquan; Tang, Chi-Chia; Lin, Cheng-Horng

    2012-01-01

    We perform a systematic survey of triggered deep 'non-volcanic' tremor beneath the Central Range (CR) in Taiwan for 45 teleseismic earthquakes from 1998 to 2009 with Mw≥ 7.5 and epicentral distance ≥1000 km to the broad-band station TPUB. Triggered tremors are visually identified as bursts of high-frequency (2-8 Hz), non-impulsive and long-duration seismic energy that are coherent among many seismic stations and modulated by the teleseismic surface waves. Out of the 45 earthquakes, we identified nine teleseismic events associated with nine tremor sources in the southern and five in the northern CR. Most of the tremor sources are located within the depth range of 15-25 km in the lower crust above the Moho. We find that the amplitudes of the surface waves play an important role in determining the triggering potential, and the apparent triggering threshold is ˜0.1 cm s-1, or 7-8 KPa. However, such threshold is partially controlled by the background noise level, which could prevent weaker tremor triggered by surface waves with smaller amplitudes from being identified. The amplitudes of the triggered tremor show a positive correlation with the amplitudes of the triggering surface waves, consistent with the predictions by the 'clock-advance' model. In addition to amplitudes, other factors, such as frequency contents and incidence angles, also affect the triggering potential. We find that intermediate-period (30-10 s) surface waves could trigger/modulate tremors, suggesting that long-period (>30 s) surface waves are not always required in long-range triggering. Tremors appear to be triggered by both Love and Rayleigh waves. When the incidence angles are parallel to the strike of the CR, all six events triggered tremor primarily during the Rayleigh waves. For strike normal incidence, only the 2001 Mw7.8 Kunlun earthquake showed predominant Love-wave triggering. This observation can be qualitatively explained by a simple Coulomb failure for a left-lateral shear on the

  16. Construct development: The Suicide Trigger Scale (STS-2), a measure of a hypothesized suicide trigger state

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background This study aims to develop the construct of a 'suicide trigger state' by exploring data gathered with a novel psychometric self-report instrument, the STS-2. Methods The STS-2, was administered to 141 adult psychiatric patients with suicidal ideation. Multiple statistical methods were used to explore construct validity and structure. Results Cronbach's alpha (0.949) demonstrated excellent internal consistency. Factor analyses yielded two-component solutions with good agreement. The first component described near-psychotic somatization and ruminative flooding, while the second described frantic hopelessness. ROC analysis determined an optimal cut score for a history of suicide attempt, with significance of p < 0.03. Logistic regression analysis found items sensitive to history of suicide attempt described ruminative flooding, doom, hopelessness, entrapment and dread. Conclusions The STS-2 appears to measure a distinct and novel clinical entity, which we speculatively term the 'suicide trigger state.' High scores on the STS-2 associate with reported history of past suicide attempt. PMID:21144063

  17. Pharmaceutical Options for Triggering of Final Oocyte Maturation in ART

    PubMed Central

    Humaidan, Peter; Bernabéu, Rafael

    2014-01-01

    Since the pioneering days of in vitro fertilization, hCG has been the gold standard to induce final follicular maturation. We herein reviewed different pharmaceutical options for triggering of final oocyte maturation in ART. The new upcoming agent seems to be GnRHa with its potential advantages over hCG trigger. GnRHa triggering elicits a surge of gonadotropins resembling the natural midcycle surge of gonadotropins, without the prolonged action of hCG, resulting in the retrieval of more mature oocytes and a significant reduction in or elimination of OHSS as compared to hCG triggering. The induction of final follicular maturation using GnRHa represents a paradigm shift in the ovulation triggering concept in ART and, thus, a way to develop a safer IVF procedure. Kisspeptins are key central regulators of the neuroendocrine mechanisms of human reproduction, who have been shown to effectively elicit an LH surge and to induce final oocyte maturation in IVF cycles. This new trigger concept may, therefore, offer a completely new, “natural” pharmacological option for ovulation induction. Whether kisspeptins will be the future agent to trigger ovulation remains to be further explored. PMID:25133168

  18. Damaging sediment density flows triggered by tropical cyclones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pope, Ed L.; Talling, Peter J.; Carter, Lionel; Clare, Michael A.; Hunt, James E.

    2017-01-01

    The global network of subsea fibre-optic cables plays a critical role in the world economy and is considered as strategic infrastructure for many nations. Sediment density flows have caused significant disruption to this network in the recent past. These cable breaks represent the only means to actively monitor such flows over large oceanic regions. Here, we use a global cable break database to analyse tropical cyclone triggering of sediment density flows worldwide over 25 yrs. Cable breaking sediment density flows are triggered in nearly all areas exposed to tropical cyclones but most occur in the NW Pacific. They are triggered by one of three sets of mechanisms. Tropical cyclones directly trigger flows, synchronous to their passage, as a consequence of storm waves, currents and surges. Cyclones also trigger flows indirectly, with near-synchronous timing to their passage, as a consequence of peak flood discharges. Last, cyclones trigger flows after a delay of days as a consequence of the failure of large volumes of rapidly deposited sediment. No clear relationship emerges between tropical cyclone activity (i.e. track, frequency and intensity) and the number of sediment density flows triggered. This is a consequence of the short period of observation. However, expansion of the cable network and predicted changes to cyclone activity in specific regions increases the likelihood of increasing numbers of damaging flows.

  19. A programmable systolic trigger processor for FERA-bus data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Appelquist, G.; Hovander, B.; Sellden, B.; Bohm, C.

    1992-09-01

    A generic CAMAC based trigger processor module for fast processing of large amounts of Analog to Digital Converter (ADC) data was designed. This module was realized using complex programmable gate arrays. The gate arrays were connected to memories and multipliers in such a way that different gate array configurations can cover a wide range of module applications. Using this module, it is possible to construct complex trigger processors. The module uses both the fast ECL FERA bus and the CAMAC bus for inputs and outputs. The latter is used for set up and control but may also be used for data output. Large numbers of ADC's can be served by a hierarchical arrangement of trigger processor modules which process ADC data with pipeline arithmetics and produce the final result at the apex of the pyramid. The trigger decision is transmitted to the data acquisition system via a logic signal while numeric results may be extracted by the CAMAC controller. The trigger processor was developed for the proposed neutral particle search. It was designed to serve as a second level trigger processor. It was required to correct all ADC raw data for efficiency and pedestal, calculate the total calorimeter energy, obtain the optimal time of flight data, and calculate the particle mass. A suitable mass cut would then deliver the trigger decision.

  20. The CMS Level-1 Calorimeter Trigger for LHC Run II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinthuprasith, Tutanon

    2017-01-01

    The phase-1 upgrades of the CMS Level-1 calorimeter trigger have been completed. The Level-1 trigger has been fully commissioned and it will be used by CMS to collect data starting from the 2016 data run. The new trigger has been designed to improve the performance at high luminosity and large number of simultaneous inelastic collisions per crossing (pile-up). For this purpose it uses a novel design, the Time Multiplexed Design, which enables the data from an event to be processed by a single trigger processor at full granularity over several bunch crossings. The TMT design is a modular design based on the uTCA standard. The architecture is flexible and the number of trigger processors can be expanded according to the physics needs of CMS. Intelligent, more complex, and innovative algorithms are now the core of the first decision layer of CMS: the upgraded trigger system implements pattern recognition and MVA (Boosted Decision Tree) regression techniques in the trigger processors for pT assignment, pile up subtraction, and isolation requirements for electrons, and taus. The performance of the TMT design and the latency measurements and the algorithm performance which has been measured using data is also presented here.

  1. Environmental triggers and avoidance in the management of asthma

    PubMed Central

    Gautier, Clarisse; Charpin, Denis

    2017-01-01

    Identifying asthma triggers forms the basis of environmental secondary prevention. These triggers may be allergenic or nonallergenic. Allergenic triggers include indoor allergens, such as house dust mites (HDMs), molds, pets, cockroaches, and rodents, and outdoor allergens, such as pollens and molds. Clinical observations provide support for the role of HDM exposure as a trigger, although avoidance studies provide conflicting results. Molds and their metabolic products are now considered to be triggers of asthma attacks. Pets, dogs, and especially cats can undoubtedly trigger asthmatic symptoms in sensitized subjects. Avoidance is difficult and rarely adhered to by families. Cockroach allergens contribute to asthma morbidity, and avoidance strategies can lead to clinical benefit. Mouse allergens are mostly found in inner-city dwellings, but their implication in asthma morbidity is debated. In the outdoors, pollens can induce seasonal asthma in sensitized individuals. Avoidance relies on preventing pollens from getting into the house and on minimizing seasonal outdoor exposure. Outdoor molds may lead to severe asthma exacerbations. Nonallergenic triggers include viral infections, active and passive smoking, meteorological changes, occupational exposures, and other triggers that are less commonly involved. Viral infection is the main asthma trigger in children. Active smoking is associated with higher asthma morbidity, and smoking cessation interventions should be personalized. Passive smoking is also a risk factor for asthma exacerbation. The implementation of public smoking bans has led to a reduction in the hospitalization of asthmatic children. Air pollution levels have been linked with asthmatic symptoms, a decrease in lung function, and increased emergency room visits and hospitalizations. Since avoidance is not easy to achieve, clean air policies remain the most effective strategy. Indoor air is also affected by air pollutants, such as cigarette smoke and

  2. Performance evaluation of trigger algorithm for the MACE telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yadav, Kuldeep; Yadav, K. K.; Bhatt, N.; Chouhan, N.; Sikder, S. S.; Behere, A.; Pithawa, C. K.; Tickoo, A. K.; Rannot, R. C.; Bhattacharyya, S.; Mitra, A. K.; Koul, R.

    The MACE (Major Atmospheric Cherenkov Experiment) telescope with a light collector diameter of 21 m, is being set up at Hanle (32.80 N, 78.90 E, 4200m asl) India, to explore the gamma-ray sky in the tens of GeV energy range. The imaging camera of the telescope comprises 1088 pixels covering a total field-of-view of 4.30 × 4.00 with trigger field-of-view of 2.60 × 3.00 and an uniform pixel resolution of 0.120. In order to achieve low energy trigger threshold of less than 30 GeV, a two level trigger scheme is being designed for the telescope. The first level trigger is generated within 16 pixels of the Camera Integrated Module (CIM) based on 4 nearest neighbour (4NN) close cluster configuration within a coincidence gate window of 5 ns while the second level trigger is generated by combining the first level triggers from neighbouring CIMs. Each pixel of the telescope is expected to operate at a single pixel threshold between 8-10 photo-electrons where the single channel rate dominated by the after- pulsing is expected to be ˜500 kHz. The hardware implementation of the trigger logic is based on complex programmable logic devices (CPLD). The basic design concept, hardware implementation and performance evaluation of the trigger system in terms of threshold energy and trigger rate estimates based on Monte Carlo data for the MACE telescope will be presented in this meeting.

  3. Dynamic stresses, coulomb failure, and remote triggering: corrected

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hill, David P.

    2012-01-01

    Dynamic stresses associated with crustal surface waves with 15–30 s periods and peak amplitudes <1  MPa are capable of triggering seismicity at sites remote from the generating mainshock under appropriate conditions. Coulomb failure models based on a frictional strength threshold offer one explanation for instances of rapid‐onset triggered seismicity that develop during the surface‐wave peak dynamic stressing. Evaluation of the triggering potential of surface‐wave dynamic stresses acting on critically stressed faults using a Mohr’s circle representation together with the Coulomb failure criteria indicates that Love waves should have a higher triggering potential than Rayleigh waves for most fault orientations and wave incidence angles. That (1) the onset of triggered seismicity often appears to begin during the Rayleigh wave rather than the earlier arriving Love wave, and (2) Love‐wave amplitudes typically exceed those for Rayleigh waves suggests that the explanation for rapid‐onset dynamic triggering may not reside solely with a simple static‐threshold friction mode. The results also indicate that normal faults should be more susceptible to dynamic triggering by 20‐s Rayleigh‐wave stresses than thrust faults in the shallow seismogenic crust (<10  km) while the advantage tips in favor of reverse faults greater depths. This transition depth scales with wavelength and coincides roughly with the transition from retrograde‐to‐prograde particle motion. Locally elevated pore pressures may have a role in the observed prevalence of dynamic triggering in extensional regimes and geothermal/volcanic systems. The result is consistent with the apparent elevated susceptibility of extensional or transtensional tectonic regimes to remote triggering by Rayleigh‐wave dynamic stresses than compressional or transpressional regimes.

  4. Occurrence frequencies of IMF triggered and nontriggered substorms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hsu, Tung-Shin; McPherron, Robert L.

    2003-01-01

    The occurrence of triggered and nontriggered substorm are examined in light of current interest in such issues as substorm identification, IMF By variations, and potentially undetected small-scale solar wind perturbation. Global substorms are identified using a sudden, persistent decrease in the AL index. The onset of this global expansion is taken to be the time of the Pi 2 burst nearest in time to the beginning of the AL, decrease. IMF triggers were identified both subjectively through visual scanning of the data and automatically with a computer algorithm. Both northward turnings of the IMF Bz and decreases in the amplitude of the By component were considered as possible triggers. Two different solar wind monitors were used in the investigation: IMP-8 in a circular orbit with a distance 12 to approx.35 Re to the Earth-Sun line and ISEE-2 in an elliptical orbit with a distance only 5 to approx.10 Re to the Earth-Sun line. The IMP-8 results show that the triggering probability does not depend on the distance of the monitor from the Earth-Sun line in the range 12-35 Re. The ISEE dataset shows that closer than 12 Re the triggering probability is the same as it is in the IMP-8 data set. Thus there appears to be no dependence of triggering on the location of the monitor provided it is within 35 Re of the Earth. We also demonstrate that including the By component does not significantly increase the probability of substorm triggering. Approximately 60% of all substorms appear to be triggered. Of the 40% for which we could not identify a trigger, 10% occurred while the IMF was northward. The data suggest that substorm onset is a consequence of an internal magnetospheric instability that is highly sensitive to changes in magnetospheric convection induced by a sudden change in the IMF, but that these changes are not always necessary.

  5. Dynamic earthquake triggering in the continental U.S

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cerda, Ibrahim

    Seismological studies have classified the changes in field stress required to trigger remote earthquakes into two basic types: static and dynamic triggering. Static triggering mainly originates from geological faults already present in certain tectonic environments and they could be originated due to continental crust, subduction zones or even from a highly seismicity zone. Dynamic triggering occurs when an event (earthquake) has been induced by the passing of seismic waves from a large main shock located at least two or more fault lengths from the epicenter of the main shock. This study investigates details of dynamic triggering not seen in previous studies. This investigation focuses on gathering and analyzing data to detect and tabulate high-frequency detections (HFD) that might indicate locally triggered earthquakes on the United States continent. In particular, data in form of seismic waveforms was downloaded and collected from EarthScope's USArray, which has an active Transportable Array (TA) station program that emphasizes the broadband compilation of geophysical data across the continental U.S. All seismic waveforms were gathered using ˜400 different seismic stations primarily focusing on two types of data: local events with a magnitude M≥4.0, and teleseismic events with magnitude M≥6.5. Triggered events were identified inherent in the event's frequency spectra using an automated detector (Antelope software) and a series of filters by examining both the amplitude and frequency of the waves responsible for triggering. The results will help provide for a better understanding of the physical mechanisms involved in dynamic earthquake triggering and also will help identify zones in the U.S. continent which may be more susceptible to these kinds of events.

  6. On the proposed triggering of Jovian radio emissions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Desch, M. D.; Kaiser, M. L.

    1985-01-01

    Calvert (1985) has proposed that a solar type III radio bursts can trigger the onset of certain Jovian hectometer wavelength emissions. It is shown, using the data obtained by the Voyager Planetary Radio Astronomy experiment, that this triggering hypothesis is not supported statistically. Furthermore, the causality of this proposed triggering is questioned because much of the Jovian hectometer emission is due to a quasi-continuous radio source rotating, in lighthouse fashion, with Jupiter. Thus, an observed 'onset' of emission is simply a function of the observer's position in local time around Jupiter.

  7. CO2-Triggered Switchable Solvents, Surfactants, and Other Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Jessop, Philip G.; Mercer, Sean; Heldebrant, David J.

    2012-06-14

    Waste CO2 at atmospheric pressure can be used to trigger dramatic changes in the properties of certain switchable materials. Compared to other triggers such as light, acids, oxidants, CO2 has the advantages that it is inexpensive, nonhazardous, non-accumulating in the system, easily removed, and it does not require the material to be transparent. Known CO2-triggered switchable materials 10 now include solvents, surfactants, solutes, catalysts, particles, polymers, and gels. The added flexibility of switchable materials represents a new strategy for minimizing energy and material consumption in process and product design.

  8. Transmission electron microscopic pathoanatomy of congenital trigger thumb.

    PubMed

    Buchman, M T; Gibson, T W; McCallum, D; Cuda, D D; Ramos, A G

    1999-01-01

    Previous studies of trigger digits in children have been limited to gross morphology and light-microscopic histology. Nine children with 11 trigger thumbs formed a preliminary study group for electron-microscopic evaluation of tendon nodules and A-1 pulleys. This pathoanatomic investigation was not previously reported. Comparison was made with light-microscopic sections. Large amounts of mature collagen was observed. Fibroblasts with prominent rough endoplasmic reticulum were present. No degenerative or inflammatory changes were noted in either tendon or sheath. We believe that although the etiology of trigger digits is still uncertain, an infectious, inflammatory, or degenerative process is unlikely.

  9. Method and apparatus to trigger superconductors in current limiting devices

    DOEpatents

    Yuan, Xing; Hazelton, Drew Willard; Walker, Michael Stephen

    2004-10-26

    A method and apparatus for magnetically triggering a superconductor in a superconducting fault current limiter to transition from a superconducting state to a resistive state. The triggering is achieved by employing current-carrying trigger coil or foil on either or both the inner diameter and outer diameter of a superconductor. The current-carrying coil or foil generates a magnetic field with sufficient strength and the superconductor is disposed within essentially uniform magnetic field region. For superconductor in a tubular-configured form, an additional magnetic field can be generated by placing current-carrying wire or foil inside the tube and along the center axial line.

  10. Development of a Low-energy Trigger for VERITAS

    SciTech Connect

    Kildea, J.

    2008-12-24

    During the 2007/2008 observing season a low-energy trigger configuration was developed and tested for VERITAS. The configuration makes uses of the small ({approx}35 m) baseline between two of the VERITAS telescopes and employs a much lower discriminator threshold and tighter coincidence window compared to the standard VERITAS trigger. Five hours of Crab Nebula ON/OFF observations were obtained in low-energy mode and were used to test new low-energy analysis algorithms. We present some details of the VERITAS low-energy trigger and the associated data analysis.

  11. Low-power triggered data acquisition system and method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Champaigne, Kevin (Inventor); Sumners, Jonathan (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A low-power triggered data acquisition system and method utilizes low-powered circuitry, comparators, and digital logic incorporated into a miniaturized device interfaced with self-generating transducer sensor inputs to detect, identify and assess impact and damage to surfaces and structures wherein, upon the occurrence of a triggering event that produces a signal greater than a set threshold changes the comparator output and causes the system to acquire and store digital data representative of the incoming waveform on at least one triggered channel. The sensors may be disposed in an array to provide triangulation and location of the impact.

  12. Effector-triggered defence against apoplastic fungal pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Stotz, Henrik U.; Mitrousia, Georgia K.; de Wit, Pierre J.G.M.; Fitt, Bruce D.L.

    2014-01-01

    R gene-mediated host resistance against apoplastic fungal pathogens is not adequately explained by the terms pathogen-associated molecular pattern (PAMP)-triggered immunity (PTI) or effector-triggered immunity (ETI). Therefore, it is proposed that this type of resistance is termed ‘effector-triggered defence’ (ETD). Unlike PTI and ETI, ETD is mediated by R genes encoding cell surface-localised receptor-like proteins (RLPs) that engage the receptor-like kinase SOBIR1. In contrast to this extracellular recognition, ETI is initiated by intracellular detection of pathogen effectors. ETI is usually associated with fast, hypersensitive host cell death, whereas ETD often triggers host cell death only after an elapsed period of endophytic pathogen growth. In this opinion, we focus on ETD responses against foliar fungal pathogens of crops. PMID:24856287

  13. A view on some hydrological triggering systems in landslides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Asch, Th. W. J.; Buma, J.; Van Beek, L. P. H.

    1999-10-01

    In this paper different types of hydrological triggering systems for debris flows, shallow and deeper landslides are described. The generation of surface run-off and high peak discharges in first order alpine catchments is an important triggering mechanism for debris flows. Failure conditions in shallow landslides can occur when at a critical depth, which is determined by the cohesion of the soil and the slope angle, the moisture content in the soil becomes close to saturation, resulting in a considerable reduction of soil strength. Deeper landslides (5-20 m depth) are in most cases triggered by positive pore pressures on the slip plane induced by a rising ground water level. The assessment of meteorological threshold conditions for shallow landslides (1-2 m) needs more detailed meteorological information than for deeper landslides. In the analyses of the hydrological triggering systems of deeper landslides the presence of a permeable top layer and fissures has to be taken into consideration.

  14. Engineered biological nanofactories trigger quorum sensing response in targeted bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandes, Rohan; Roy, Varnika; Wu, Hsuan-Chen; Bentley, William E.

    2010-03-01

    Biological nanofactories, which are engineered to contain modules that can target, sense and synthesize molecules, can trigger communication between different bacterial populations. These communications influence biofilm formation, virulence, bioluminescence and many other bacterial functions in a process called quorum sensing. Here, we show the assembly of a nanofactory that can trigger a bacterial quorum sensing response in the absence of native quorum molecules. The nanofactory comprises an antibody (for targeting) and a fusion protein that produces quorum molecules when bound to the targeted bacterium. Our nanofactory selectively targets the appropriate bacteria and triggers a quorum sensing response when added to two populations of bacteria. The nanofactories also trigger communication between two bacterial populations that are otherwise non-communicating. We envision the use of these nanofactories in generating new antimicrobial treatments that target the communication networks of bacteria rather than their viability.

  15. 71. 129 HILLSIDE AVENUE, SUBSTATION, VIEW OF MOTORWOUND SPRING TRIGGERED ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    71. 129 HILLSIDE AVENUE, SUBSTATION, VIEW OF MOTOR-WOUND SPRING- TRIGGERED A. C. OIL-CIRCUIT BREAKERS ON MAIN FLOOR UNDER GALLERY. MOTOR SITES ATOP THE BRICK COMPARTMENT. - Interborough Rapid Transit Subway (Original Line), New York County, NY

  16. Resident-to-Resident Violence Triggers in Nursing Homes

    PubMed Central

    Snellgrove, Susan; Beck, Cornelia; Green, Angela; McSweeney, Jean C.

    2014-01-01

    Certified nurses’ assistants (CNAs) employed by a rural nursing home in Northeast Arkansas described their perceptions of resident-to-resident violence in order to provide insight on factors, including unmet needs, that may trigger the phenomenon. Semistructured interviews were conducted with 11 CNAs. Data were analyzed using content analysis and constant comparison. Two categories of triggers emerged from the data—active and passive. Active triggers involved the actions of other residents that were intrusive in nature, such as wandering into a residents’ personal space, taking a resident’s belongings, and so forth. Passive triggers did not involve the actions of residents but related to the internal and external environment of the residents. Examples were factors such as boredom, competition for attention and communication difficulties. Results indicate that there are factors, including unmet needs within the nursing home environment that may be identified and altered to prevent violence between residents. PMID:23447361

  17. Triggered beam pulser and current integrator for PIXE analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birch, D. T.; Skofronick, G.; Nelson, J. W.

    1987-03-01

    Two auxiliary circuits to facilitate PIXE analyses are described: a triggerable beam pulser tor pile-up reduction and dead time correction; and a versatile voltage to frequency converter for use with a beam current integrator.

  18. Advanced integrated safeguards using front-end-triggering devices

    SciTech Connect

    Howell, J.A.; Whitty, W.J.

    1995-12-01

    This report addresses potential uses of front-end-triggering devices for enhanced safeguards. Such systems incorporate video surveillance as well as radiation and other sensors. Also covered in the report are integration issues and analysis techniques.

  19. Trigger circuit forces immediate synchronization of free-running oscillator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nagano, S.

    1975-01-01

    Device provides positive triggering for inverter synchronization in uninterruptible power supplies. Integrated-circuit oscillator frequency may be higher, lower, or the same as that of the synch pulse and is always synchronized by first clock pulse.

  20. The CMS Level-1 Trigger Barrel Track Finder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ero, J.; Evangelou, I.; Flouris, G.; Foudas, C.; Guiducci, L.; Loukas, N.; Manthos, N.; Papadopoulos, I.; Paradas, E.; Sotiropoulos, S.; Sphicas, P.; Triossi, A.; Wulz, C.

    2016-03-01

    The design and performance of the upgraded CMS Level-1 Trigger Barrel Muon Track Finder (BMTF) is presented. Monte Carlo simulation data as well as cosmic ray data from a CMS muon detector slice test have been used to study in detail the performance of the new track finder. The design architecture is based on twelve MP7 cards each of which uses a Xilinx Virtex-7 FPGA and can receive and transmit data at 10 Gbps from 72 input and 72 output fibers. According to the CMS Trigger Upgrade TDR the BMTF receives trigger primitive data which are computed using both RPC and DT data and transmits data from a number of muon candidates to the upgraded Global Muon Trigger. Results from detailed studies of comparisons between the BMTF algorithm results and the results of a C++ emulator are also presented. The new BMTF will be commissioned for data taking in 2016.

  1. Skier triggering of backcountry avalanches with skilled route selection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinickas, Alexandra; Haegeli, Pascal; Jamieson, Bruce

    2015-04-01

    Jamieson (2009) provided numerical estimates for the baseline probabilities of triggering an avalanche by a backcountry skier making fresh tracks without skilled route selection as a function of the North American avalanche danger scale (i.e., hazard levels Low, Moderate, Considerable, High and Extreme). Using the results of an expert survey, he showed that triggering probabilities while skiing directly up, down or across a trigger zone without skilled route selection increase roughly by a factor of 10 with each step of the North American avalanche danger scale (i.e. hazard level). The objective of the present study is to examine the effect of skilled route selection on the relationship between triggering probability and hazard level. To assess the effect of skilled route selection on triggering probability by hazard level, we analysed avalanche hazard assessments as well as reports of skiing activity and triggering of avalanches from 11 Canadian helicopter and snowcat operations during two winters (2012-13 and 2013-14). These reports were submitted to the daily information exchange among Canadian avalanche safety operations, and reflect professional decision-making and route selection practices of guides leading groups of skiers. We selected all skier-controlled or accidentally triggered avalanches with a destructive size greater than size 1 according to the Canadian avalanche size classification, triggered by any member of a guided group (guide or guest). These operations forecast the avalanche hazard daily for each of three elevation bands: alpine, treeline and below treeline. In contrast to the 2009 study, an exposure was defined as a group skiing within any one of the three elevation bands, and consequently within a hazard rating, for the day (~4,300 ratings over two winters). For example, a group that skied below treeline (rated Moderate) and treeline (rated Considerable) in one day, would receive one count for exposure to Moderate hazard, and one count for

  2. Pathophysiology of Trigger Points in Myofascial Pain Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Money, Sarah

    2017-04-05

    Questions from patients about pain conditions and analgesic pharmacotherapy and responses from authors are presented to help educate patients and make them more effective self-advocates. Trigger point pathophysiology in myofascial pain syndrome, which involves muscle stiffness, tenderness, and pain that radiates to other areas of the body, is considered. The causes of trigger points and several theories about how they develop are reviewed, and treatment approaches, including stretching, physical therapy, dry needling, and injections, are offered.

  3. Triggered Swarms and Induced Aftershock Sequences in Geothermal Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shcherbakov, R.; Turcotte, D. L.; Yikilmaz, M. B.; Kellogg, L. H.; Rundle, J. B.

    2015-12-01

    Natural geothermal systems, which are used for energy generation, are usually associated with high seismic activity. This can be related to the large-scale injection and extraction of fluids to enhance geothermal recovery. This results in the changes of the pore pressure and pore-elastic stress field and can stimulate the occurrence of earthquakes. These systems are also prone to triggering of seismicity by the passage of seismic waves generated by large distant main shocks. In this study, we analyze clustering and triggering of seismicity at several geothermal fields in California. Particularly, we consider the seismicity at the Geysers, Coso, and Salton Sea geothermal fields. We analyze aftershock sequences generated by local large events with magnitudes greater than 4.0 and earthquake swarms generated by several significant long distant main shocks. We show that the rate of the aftershock sequences generated by the local large events in the two days before and two days after the reference event can be modelled reasonably well by the time dependent Epidemic Type Aftershock Sequence (ETAS) model. On the other hand, the swarms of activity triggered by large distant earthquakes cannot be described by the ETAS model. To model the increase in the rate of seismicity associated with triggering by large distant main shocks we introduce an additional time-dependent triggering mechanism into the ETAS model. In almost all cases the frequency-magnitude statistics of triggered sequences follow Gutenberg-Richter scaling to a good approximation. The analysis indicates that the seismicity triggered by relatively large local events can initiate sequences similar to regular aftershock sequences. In contrast, the distant main shocks trigger swarm like activity with faster decaying rates.

  4. Cross-Lingual Lexical Triggers in Statistical Language Modeling

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-01-01

    significant reductions in both perplexity and recognition errors. We also compare our cross-lingual adaptation scheme to monolingual language model adaptation...as an intermedi- ate step. In a monolingual setting, the mutual infor- mation between lexical pairs co-occurring anywhere within a long “window” of...inspiration to propose the follow- ing notion of cross-lingual lexical triggers. In a monolingual setting, a pair of words xyQz is considered a trigger

  5. Triggered transience of metastable poly(phthalaldehyde) for transient electronics.

    PubMed

    Hernandez, Hector Lopez; Kang, Seung-Kyun; Lee, Olivia P; Hwang, Suk-Won; Kaitz, Joshua A; Inci, Bora; Park, Chan Woo; Chung, Sangjin; Sottos, Nancy R; Moore, Jeffrey S; Rogers, John A; White, Scott R

    2014-12-03

    Triggerable transient electronics are demonstrated with the use of a metastable poly(phthalaldehyde) polymer substrate and encapsulant. The rate of degradation is controlled by the concentration of the photo-acid generator and UV irradiance. This work expands on the materials that can be used for transient electronics by demonstrating transience in response to a preselected trigger without the need for solution-based degradation.

  6. Studies of the Plasma Triggering Mechanism of Inverse Pinch Switch

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-11-10

    Studies of the Plasma Puff Triggering Mechanism 02 of Inverse Pinch Switch AD-A276 117 Final Report ElEC 0 A Principal Investigator Kwang S. Han Nov...based on a hypocycloidal pinch geometry was investigated to determine the optimal operating conditions for the azimuthally uniform surface flashover ...in the switch . In this study, the plasma-puff triggering mechanism based on a hypocycloidal pinch geometry was investigated to determine the optimal

  7. Review of trigger and on-line processors at SLAC

    SciTech Connect

    Lankford, A.J.

    1984-07-01

    The role of trigger and on-line processors in reducing data rates to manageable proportions in e/sup +/e/sup -/ physics experiments is defined not by high physics or background rates, but by the large event sizes of the general-purpose detectors employed. The rate of e/sup +/e/sup -/ annihilation is low, and backgrounds are not high; yet the number of physics processes which can be studied is vast and varied. This paper begins by briefly describing the role of trigger processors in the e/sup +/e/sup -/ context. The usual flow of the trigger decision process is illustrated with selected examples of SLAC trigger processing. The features are mentioned of triggering at the SLC and the trigger processing plans of the two SLC detectors: The Mark II and the SLD. The most common on-line processors at SLAC, the BADC, the SLAC Scanner Processor, the SLAC FASTBUS Controller, and the VAX CAMAC Channel, are discussed. Uses of the 168/E, 3081/E, and FASTBUS VAX processors are mentioned. The manner in which these processors are interfaced and the function they serve on line is described. Finally, the accelerator control system for the SLC is outlined. This paper is a survey in nature, and hence, relies heavily upon references to previous publications for detailed description of work mentioned here. 27 references, 9 figures, 1 table.

  8. The trigger system of the JEM-EUSO Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertaina, M.; Ebisuzaki, T.; Hamada, T.; Ikeda, H.; Kawasai, Y.; Sawabe, T.; Takahashi, Y.; JEM-EUSO Collaboration

    The trigger system of JEM-EUSO should face different major challenging points: a) cope with the limited down-link transmission rate from the ISS to Earth, by operating a severe on-board and on-time data reduction; b) use very fast, low power consuming and radiation hard electronics; c) have a high signal-over-noise performance and flexibility in order to lower as much as possible the energy threshold of the detector, adjust the system to a variable nightglow background, and trigger on different categories of events (images insisting on the same pixels or crossing huge portions of the entire focal surface). Based on the above stringent requirements, the main ingredients for the trigger logic are: the Gate Time Unit (GTU); the minimum number Nthresh of photo-electrons piling up in a GTU in a pixel to be fired; the persistency level Npers, in which fired pixels are over threshold; the localization and correlation in space and time of the fired pixels, that distinguish a real EAS from an accidental background enhancement. The core of the trigger logic is the Track Trigger Algorithm that has been specifically developed for this purpose. Its characteristics, preliminary performance and its possible implementation on FPGA or DSP will be discussed together with a general overview of the architecture of the triggering system of JEM-EUSO.

  9. A neural network z-vertex trigger for Belle II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neuhaus, S.; Skambraks, S.; Abudinen, F.; Chen, Y.; Feindt, M.; Frühwirth, R.; Heck, M.; Kiesling, C.; Knoll, A.; Paul, S.; Schieck, J.

    2015-05-01

    We present the concept of a track trigger for the Belle II experiment, based on a neural network approach, that is able to reconstruct the z (longitudinal) position of the event vertex within the latency of the first level trigger. The trigger will thus be able to suppress a large fraction of the dominating background from events outside of the interaction region. The trigger uses the drift time information of the hits from the Central Drift Chamber (CDC) of Belle II within narrow cones in polar and azimuthal angle as well as in transverse momentum (sectors), and estimates the z-vertex without explicit track reconstruction. The preprocessing for the track trigger is based on the track information provided by the standard CDC trigger. It takes input from the 2D (r — φ) track finder, adds information from the stereo wires of the CDC, and finds the appropriate sectors in the CDC for each track in a given event. Within each sector, the z-vertex of the associated track is estimated by a specialized neural network, with a continuous output corresponding to the scaled z-vertex. The input values for the neural network are calculated from the wire hits of the CDC.

  10. L1 track finding for a time multiplexed trigger

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cieri, D.; Brooke, J.; Grimes, M.; Newbold, D.; Harder, K.; Shepherd-Themistocleous, C.; Tomalin, I.; Vichoudis, P.; Reid, I.; Iles, G.; Hall, G.; James, T.; Pesaresi, M.; Rose, A.; Tapper, A.; Uchida, K.

    2016-07-01

    At the HL-LHC, proton bunches will cross each other every 25 ns, producing an average of 140 pp-collisions per bunch crossing. To operate in such an environment, the CMS experiment will need a L1 hardware trigger able to identify interesting events within a latency of 12.5 μs. The future L1 trigger will make use also of data coming from the silicon tracker to control the trigger rate. The architecture that will be used in future to process tracker data is still under discussion. One interesting proposal makes use of the Time Multiplexed Trigger concept, already implemented in the CMS calorimeter trigger for the Phase I trigger upgrade. The proposed track finding algorithm is based on the Hough Transform method. The algorithm has been tested using simulated pp-collision data. Results show a very good tracking efficiency. The algorithm will be demonstrated in hardware in the coming months using the MP7, which is a μTCA board with a powerful FPGA capable of handling data rates approaching 1 Tb/s.

  11. The FORTE receiver and sub-band triggering unit

    SciTech Connect

    Enemark, D.C.; Shipley, M.E.

    1994-08-01

    The FORTE payload receiver and trigger unit represent a significant advance over the currently flying BLACKBEARD payload aboard the ALEXIS satellite. Not only is the polarization sensitive antenna array massive compared to the BLACKBEARD monopole, but the event triggering scheme is completely different. Electromagnetic pulses (EWs) are dispersed when they pass through the ionosphere creating a chirped frequency signal which can be helpful in discriminating between natural and man-made signals. Payloads designed to digitize and store the RF signatures of these signals must include sophisticated triggering circuitry to select events of interest and prevent false alarms from wasting the available memory storage resources. The FORTE wideband receiver tunes from 20 to 320 MHz with eight sub-band trigger channels distributed across the 20 MHz IF bandwidth. The conditions which must be satisfied to generate an event trigger are processor controlled. Early testing of the prototype indicates an ability to reliably trigger on chirped RF signals several dB below the noise level. FORTE is scheduled to be launched with a Pegasus XL vehicle in late 1995.

  12. The CMS Level-1 trigger system for LHC Run II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cadamuro, L.

    2017-03-01

    The Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) experiment implements a sophisticated two-level online selection system that achieves a rejection factor of nearly 105. During Run II, the LHC has increased the centre-of-mass energy of proton-proton collisions up to 13 TeV and may progressively reach an instantaneous luminosity of 2×1034 cm‑2 s‑1 or higher. In order to guarantee a successful and ambitious physics programme under this intense environment, the CMS Trigger and Data acquisition system has been upgraded. The upgraded CMS Level-1 (L1) trigger benefits from the recent μTCA technology and is designed to maintain the performance under high instantaneous luminosity conditions. More sophisticated, innovative algorithms are now the core of the first decision layer of CMS: this drastically reduces the trigger rate and improves the trigger efficiency for a wide variety of physics processes. In this document, we present the overall architecture of the upgraded Level-1 trigger system. The performance of single object triggers, measured on collision data recorded during the 2016 running period, are also summarised.

  13. Mafic intrusions triggering eruptions in Iceland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sigmarsson, O.

    2012-04-01

    . Earlier gabbroic fractionation of plagioclase, clinopyroxene and rare olivine crystals led to more evolved compositions and saturation of iron-titanium oxides. Significant variations in glass compositions indicate several liquid-lines-of-descent, possibly at somewhat different pressure, with MgO and K2O concentrations ranging from 4.6-5.7% and 0.46 to 0.60%, respectively. These variable magma differentiation trends and the abundant microlites suggest degassing over a considerable depth range and remobilizing of magma pockets at different depths with somewhat variable compositions. This is coherent with the magma plumbing system beneath Grímsvötn being recently recharged with a deeper-derived and gas-rich basaltic melt. This basaltic intrusion resulted in mingled basaltic magma with higher gas content than before and the sub-plinian character of the last Grímsvötn eruption. The last two eruptions in Iceland therefore were both triggered by an injection of more mafic magma 1)rapidly into a solidifying silicic intrusion beneath Eyjafjallajökull and 2) more slowly disrupting a closed-system magma chamber behaviour beneath Grímsvötn volcano.

  14. Darwin's triggering mechanism of volcano eruptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galiev, Shamil

    2010-05-01

    Charles Darwin wrote that ‘… the elevation of many hundred square miles of territory near Concepcion is part of the same phenomenon, with that splashing up, if I may so call it, of volcanic matter through the orifices in the Cordillera at the moment of the shock;…' and ‘…a power, I may remark, which acts in paroxysmal upheavals like that of Concepcion, and in great volcanic eruptions,…'. Darwin reports that ‘…several of the great chimneys in the Cordillera of central Chile commenced a fresh period of activity ….' In particular, Darwin reported on four-simultaneous large eruptions from the following volcanoes: Robinson Crusoe, Minchinmavida, Cerro Yanteles and Peteroa (we cite the Darwin's sentences following his The Voyage of the Beagle and researchspace. auckland. ac. nz/handle/2292/4474). Let us consider these eruptions taking into account the volcano shape and the conduit. Three of the volcanoes (Minchinmavida (2404 m), Cerro Yanteles (2050 m), and Peteroa (3603 m)) are stratovolcanos and are formed of symmetrical cones with steep sides. Robinson Crusoe (922 m) is a shield volcano and is formed of a cone with gently sloping sides. They are not very active. We may surmise, that their vents had a sealing plug (vent fill) in 1835. All these volcanoes are conical. These common features are important for Darwin's triggering model, which is discussed below. The vent fill material, usually, has high level of porosity and a very low tensile strength and can easily be fragmented by tension waves. The action of a severe earthquake on the volcano base may be compared with a nuclear blast explosion of the base. It is known, that after a underground nuclear explosion the vertical motion and the surface fractures in a tope of mountains were observed. The same is related to the propagation of waves in conical elements. After the explosive load of the base. the tip may break and fly off at high velocity. Analogous phenomenon may be generated as a result of a

  15. Stochastic models for earthquake triggering of volcanic eruptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bebbington, M. S.; Marzocchi, W.

    2011-05-01

    Many accounts, anecdotal and statistical, have noted a causal effect on volcanic eruptions from large, not too distant, earthquakes. Physical mechanisms have been proposed that explain how small static stress changes, or larger transient dynamic stress changes, can have observable effects on a volcano. While only ˜0.4% of eruptions appear to be directly triggered within a few days of an earthquake, these physical mechanisms also imply the possibility of delayed triggering. In the few regional studies conducted, data issues (selection bias and scarcity, inhomogeneity, and cleaning of data) have tended to obscure any clear signal. Using a perturbation technique, we first show that the Indonesian volcanic region possesses no statistically significant coupling for the region as a whole. We then augment a number of point process models for eruption onsets by a time-, distance-, and earthquake magnitude-dependent triggering term and apply this to the individual volcanoes. This method weighs both positive and negative (i.e., absence of eruptions following an earthquake) evidence of triggering. Of 35 volcanoes with at least three eruptions in the study region, seven (Marapi, Talang, Krakatau, Slamet, Ebulobo, Lewotobi, and Ruang) show statistical evidence of triggering over varying temporal and spatial scales, but only after the internal state of the volcano is accounted for. This confirms that triggering is fundamentally a property of the internal magma plumbing of the volcano in question and that any earthquake can potentially "advance the clock" toward a future eruption. This is further supported by the absence of any dependence on triggering of the eruption size.

  16. Observing earthquakes triggered in the near field by dynamic deformations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gomberg, J.; Bodin, P.; Reasenberg, P.A.

    2003-01-01

    We examine the hypothesis that dynamic deformations associated with seismic waves trigger earthquakes in many tectonic environments. Our analysis focuses on seismicity at close range (within the aftershock zone), complementing published studies of long-range triggering. Our results suggest that dynamic triggering is not confined to remote distances or to geothermal and volcanic regions. Long unilaterally propagating ruptures may focus radiated dynamic deformations in the propagation direction. Therefore, we expect seismicity triggered dynamically by a directive rupture to occur asymmetrically, with a majority of triggered earthquakes in the direction of rupture propagation. Bilaterally propagating ruptures also may be directive, and we propose simple criteria for assessing their directivity. We compare the inferred rupture direction and observed seismicity rate change following 15 earthquakes (M 5.7 to M 8.1) that occured in California and Idaho in the United States, the Gulf of Aqaba, Syria, Guatemala, China, New Guinea, Turkey, Japan, Mexico, and Antarctica. Nine of these mainshocks had clearly directive, unilateral ruptures. Of these nine, seven apparently induced an asymmetric increase in seismicity rate that correlates with the rupture direction. The two exceptions include an earthquake preceded by a comparable-magnitude event on a conjugate fault and another for which data limitations prohibited conclusive results. Similar (but weaker) correlations were found for the bilaterally rupturing earthquakes we studied. Although the static stress change also may trigger seismicity, it and the seismicity it triggers are expected to be similarly asymmetric only if the final slip is skewed toward the rupture terminus. For several of the directive earthquakes, we suggest that the seismicity rate change correlates better with the dynamic stress field than the static stress change.

  17. An experimental comparison of triggered and random pulse train uncertainties

    SciTech Connect

    Henzlova, Daniela; Menlove, Howard O; Swinhoe, Martyn T

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we present an experimental comparison of signal-triggered and randomly triggered based analysis algorithms of neutron multiplicity data. Traditional shift register type signal-triggered multiplicity analysis of singles, doubles and triples rates is compared with analysis using randomly triggered gates. Two methods of random gate generation are explored - non-overlapping gates (Feyrunan approach) and periodic overlapping gates (fast accidentals). Using californium sources with low, medium and high rate in combination with AmLi sources (as a surrogate for plutonium) we investigate relative standard deviation (RSD) of data in order to determine if there are parameter spaces in which one of the measurement methods should be preferred. Neutron correlation analysis is a commonly used NDA technique to assay plutonium mass. The data can be collected in two distinct ways: using signal-triggered or randomly triggered counting gates. Analysis algorithms were developed for both approaches to determine singles (S), doubles (D) and triples (7) rates from the measured sample. Currently the most commonly implemented technique to collect neutron coincidence data utilizes shift register based electronics. Shift register uses signal-triggered counting gates to generate foreground multiplicity distribution of correlated+accidental events and a random gate (opened after a predefined long delay following the signal trigger) to generate background multiplicity distribution of accidental events. Modern shift registers include fast accidental option to sample data with a fixed clock frequency. This way a set of overlapping gates is used to generate background multiplicity distributions in order to improve the measurement precision. In parallel to shift register approach the Feynman variance technique is frequently used, which utilizes set of consecutive non-overlapping gates. In general, different user communities (e.g. safeguards, nuclear material accountancy, emergency

  18. Experimental determination of stress variation threshold resulted in earthquake triggering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novikova, Elena; Novikov, Victor; Okunev, Vladimir; Klyuchkin, Vadim

    2014-05-01

    There are many field observations of earthquake triggering by static and dynamic stress variations caused by impact of distant strong earthquakes, underground chemical and nuclear explosions, solar-lunar earth tides, strong variations of atmospheric pressure etc., as well as by electric current injection into the Earth crust. It is supposed that the external impacts on the earthquake source result in exceeding the threshold stress and earthquake triggering. Nevertheless, the mechanisms of the earthquake triggering phenomena is not clear, and the problem of determination of stress variation threshold resulted in initiation of seismic events is very important. At present, based on analysis of field observations of dynamic triggering of earthquakes (by wave train from distant strong earthquakes) performed for various regions, including the USA, Japan, China, Greece, etc. it is considered that the triggering threshold of stress variations is about of 500 kPa. An experimental study at the spring-slider system was carried out for detailed study of behavior of fault area under near-to-failure state and experimental triggering impacts, as well as for determination of the threshold variation of normal stress in the fault gauge resulted in earthquake (slip) triggering. The spring-slider system provides a spring loading rate of 0.001 to 0.02 mm/s. The travelling block of dimensions 250x120x65 mm is connected with electromechanical drive via the spring with 9.5 N/mm spring constant. The normal stress of the travelling block is up to 30 kPa. For determination of the triggering threshold of normal stress variations the electromagnetic system was activated by control system at the level of 0.98-0.99 critical (fault failure) shear stress, which provided reducing the normal stress (by 0.001% to 0.1%) in the form of rectangular pulses of 0.5 to 5.0 s duration generated in time interval of 20 to 40 s. The level of stress variation impact resulted in the slip of travelling block (with

  19. Absence of remotely triggered large earthquakes beyond the mainshock region

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Parsons, T.; Velasco, A.A.

    2011-01-01

    Large earthquakes are known to trigger earthquakes elsewhere. Damaging large aftershocks occur close to the mainshock and microearthquakes are triggered by passing seismic waves at significant distances from the mainshock. It is unclear, however, whether bigger, more damaging earthquakes are routinely triggered at distances far from the mainshock, heightening the global seismic hazard after every large earthquake. Here we assemble a catalogue of all possible earthquakes greater than M 5 that might have been triggered by every M 7 or larger mainshock during the past 30 years. We compare the timing of earthquakes greater than M 5 with the temporal and spatial passage of surface waves generated by large earthquakes using a complete worldwide catalogue. Whereas small earthquakes are triggered immediately during the passage of surface waves at all spatial ranges, we find no significant temporal association between surface-wave arrivals and larger earthquakes. We observe a significant increase in the rate of seismic activity at distances confined to within two to three rupture lengths of the mainshock. Thus, we conclude that the regional hazard of larger earthquakes is increased after a mainshock, but the global hazard is not.

  20. Integration of the Trigger and Data Acquisition Systems in ATLAS

    SciTech Connect

    Abolins, M.; Adragna, P.; Aleksandrov, E.; Aleksandrov, I.; Amorim, A.; Anderson, K.; Anduaga, X.; Aracena, I.; Asquith, L.; Avolio, G.; Backlund, S.; Badescu, E.; Baines, J.; Barria, P.; Bartoldus, R.; Batreanu, S.; Beck, H.P.; Bee, C.; Bell, P.; Bell, W.H.; Bellomo, M.; /more authors..

    2011-11-09

    During 2006 and the first half of 2007, the installation, integration and commissioning of trigger and data acquisition (TDAQ) equipment in the ATLAS experimental area have progressed. There have been a series of technical runs using the final components of the system already installed in the experimental area. Various tests have been run including ones where level 1 preselected simulated proton-proton events have been processed in a loop mode through the trigger and dataflow chains. The system included the readout buffers containing the events, event building, level 2 and event filter trigger algorithms. The scalability of the system with respect to the number of event building nodes used has been studied and quantities critical for the final system, such as trigger rates and event processing times, have been measured using different trigger algorithms as well as different TDAQ components. This paper presents the TDAQ architecture, the current status of the installation and commissioning and highlights the main test results that validate the system.

  1. Basic understanding of gonadotropin-releasing hormone-agonist triggering.

    PubMed

    Casper, Robert F

    2015-04-01

    A single bolus of human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) at midcycle has been the gold standard for triggering final oocyte maturation and ovulation in assisted reproductive technology cycles. More recently, gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH)-agonist (GnRH-a) triggering has been introduced. The GnRH-a trigger may allow a more physiologic surge of both luteinizing hormone (LH) and follicle-stimulating hormone, although whether the combined surge will result in improved oocyte and embryo quality remains to be seen. However, the short duration of the LH surge with the GnRH-a trigger (approximately 34 hours) has been shown to be beneficial for preventing ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome in GnRH antagonist in vitro fertilization (IVF) cycles when compared with the prolonged elevation of hCG (≥6 days) after exposure to an hCG bolus. This review discusses the physiologic basis for the use of a GnRH-a trigger in IVF cycles.

  2. A Parameterization for the Triggering of Landscape Generated Moist Convection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lynn, Barry H.; Tao, Wei-Kuo; Abramopoulos, Frank

    1998-01-01

    A set of relatively high resolution three-dimensional (3D) simulations were produced to investigate the triggering of moist convection by landscape generated mesoscale circulations. The local accumulated rainfall varied monotonically (linearly) with the size of individual landscape patches, demonstrating the need to develop a trigger function that is sensitive to the size of individual patches. A new triggering function that includes the effect of landscapes generated mesoscale circulations over patches of different sizes consists of a parcel's perturbation in vertical velocity (nu(sub 0)), temperature (theta(sub 0)), and moisture (q(sub 0)). Each variable in the triggering function was also sensitive to soil moisture gradients, atmospheric initial conditions, and moist processes. The parcel's vertical velocity, temperature, and moisture perturbation were partitioned into mesoscale and turbulent components. Budget equations were derived for theta(sub 0) and q(sub 0). Of the many terms in this set of budget equations, the turbulent, vertical flux of the mesoscale temperature and moisture contributed most to the triggering of moist convection through the impact of these fluxes on the parcel's temperature and moisture profile. These fluxes needed to be parameterized to obtain theta(sub 0) and q(sub 0). The mesoscale vertical velocity also affected the profile of nu(sub 0). We used similarity theory to parameterize these fluxes as well as the parcel's mesoscale vertical velocity.

  3. Interactive Teaching about Landslides and Triggered Landslide Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, Faith E.; Malamud, Bruce D.

    2015-04-01

    When we think of a landslide (mass wasting), both the public and scientists often envisage an individual movement of earth material down a slope. Yet, landslides often occur not as individuals, but as parts of a triggered landslide event. This is where a trigger (e.g., an earthquake or heavy rainfall) results in up to tens of thousands of landslides in a region in the minutes to days after the trigger. The sum of the impacts of these landslides may be greater than individual parts. This interactive Prezi poster will present ideas for innovative demonstrations, teaching practicals and projects, ranging from low-cost low-tech to more advanced digital methods, to communicate the ideas of landslides and triggered landslide events to the public and students. We will give live hands-on demonstrations and welcome discussions with other scientists to share ideas and best practices. This paper is aimed at those in secondary school/university education and the public sector looking for examples to interest and inform their respective audiences about landslides, triggered landslide events, and the importance and implications of considering landslides not just as individuals, but as populations.

  4. Estimating return period of landslide triggering by Monte Carlo simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peres, D. J.; Cancelliere, A.

    2016-10-01

    Assessment of landslide hazard is a crucial step for landslide mitigation planning. Estimation of the return period of slope instability represents a quantitative method to map landslide triggering hazard on a catchment. The most common approach to estimate return periods consists in coupling a triggering threshold equation, derived from an hydrological and slope stability process-based model, with a rainfall intensity-duration-frequency (IDF) curve. Such a traditional approach generally neglects the effect of rainfall intensity variability within events, as well as the variability of initial conditions, which depend on antecedent rainfall. We propose a Monte Carlo approach for estimating the return period of shallow landslide triggering which enables to account for both variabilities. Synthetic hourly rainfall-landslide data generated by Monte Carlo simulations are analysed to compute return periods as the mean interarrival time of a factor of safety less than one. Applications are first conducted to map landslide triggering hazard in the Loco catchment, located in highly landslide-prone area of the Peloritani Mountains, Sicily, Italy. Then a set of additional simulations are performed in order to evaluate the traditional IDF-based method by comparison with the Monte Carlo one. Results show that return period is affected significantly by variability of both rainfall intensity within events and of initial conditions, and that the traditional IDF-based approach may lead to an overestimation of the return period of landslide triggering, or, in other words, a non-conservative assessment of landslide hazard.

  5. Triggering on B-jets at CDF II

    SciTech Connect

    Amerio, Silvia; Casarsa, Massimo; Cortiana, Giorgio; Donini, Julien; Lucchesi, Donatella; Pagan Griso, Simone; /Padua U. /INFN, Padua

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we present a trigger algorithm able to select online events enriched of b-jets. This feature is of central interest in order to extend the physics reach for standard model and minimal super symmetric model Higgs decaying into a pair of b-quarks. The algorithm fully exploits the recently upgraded CDFII tracking system and Level 2 CALorimeter cluster finder. These upgrades are necessary to cope with Tevatron increasing luminosity and provide new and refined trigger primitives that are the key elements of our algorithm together with the already existing silicon vertex trigger. A b-hadron can travel some millimeters before decaying and the trigger algorithm exploits this characteristic by searching for tracks displaced with respect to the primary vertex and matched to energetic jets of particles. We discuss the study and the optimization of the algorithm, its technical implementation as well as its performance. The new trigger provides an efficient selection for Higgs decaying into a pair of b-quarks and runs up to high luminosity with an acceptable occupancy of the available bandwidth.

  6. The LUX experiment - trigger and data acquisition systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Druszkiewicz, Eryk

    2013-04-01

    The Large Underground Xenon (LUX) detector is a two-phase xenon time projection chamber designed to detect interactions of dark matter particles with the xenon nuclei. Signals from the detector PMTs are processed by custom-built analog electronics which provide properly shaped signals for the trigger and data acquisition (DAQ) systems. During calibrations, both systems must be able to handle high rates and have large dynamic ranges; during dark matter searches, maximum sensitivity requires low thresholds. The trigger system uses eight-channel 64-MHz digitizers (DDC-8) connected to a Trigger Builder (TB). The FPGA cores on the digitizers perform real-time pulse identification (discriminating between S1 and S2-like signals) and event localization. The TB uses hit patterns, hit maps, and maximum response detection to make trigger decisions, which are reached within few microseconds after the occurrence of an event of interest. The DAQ system is comprised of commercial digitizers with customized firmware. Its real-time baseline suppression allows for a maximum event acquisition rate in excess of 1.5 kHz, which results in virtually no deadtime. The performance of the trigger and DAQ systems during the commissioning runs of LUX will be discussed.

  7. Graphics Processors in HEP Low-Level Trigger Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ammendola, Roberto; Biagioni, Andrea; Chiozzi, Stefano; Cotta Ramusino, Angelo; Cretaro, Paolo; Di Lorenzo, Stefano; Fantechi, Riccardo; Fiorini, Massimi