Science.gov

Sample records for exonic region 15-16

  1. Majority of hMLH1 mutations responsible for hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer cluster at the exonic region 15-16

    SciTech Connect

    Wijnen, J.; Khan, P.M.; Klift, H. van der

    1996-02-01

    Hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) is a common autosomal dominant cancer susceptibility condition. Inherited mutations in at least four DNA mismatch repair genes, hMSH2, hMLH1, hPMS1, and hPMS2, are known to cause HNPCC. In this study we used denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) to screen for hMLH1 mutations in 34 unrelated HNPCC families (30 Dutch, 3 Italian, and 1 Danish). Ten novel pathogenic germ-line mutations (seven affecting splice sites, two frameshifts, and one in-frame deletion of a single amino acid) have been identified in 12 (35%) of these families. In a previous study, hMSH2 mutations were found in 21% of the same families. While the spectrum of mutations at the hMSH2 gene among HNPCC patients appears heterogeneous, a cluster of hMLH1 mutations has been found in the region encompassing exons 15 and 16, which accounts for 50% of all the independent hMLH1 mutations described to date and for >20% of the unrelated HNPCC kindreds here analyzed. This unexpected finding has a great practical value in the clinical scenario of genetic services. 34 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  2. Agora XI: The Learning Region (Thessaloniki, Greece, March 15-16, 2001). CEDEFOP Panorama Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guggenheim, Eric Fries, Ed.

    This conference program describes "education and training agencies taking a leading role in promoting innovation on a regional basis" as the focus of the Agora and puts forward the following three key issues to be debated during it: (1) the concept of the learning region itself and a critique of its strengths and weaknesses; (2)…

  3. Distribution bias of the sequence matching between exons and introns in exon joint and EJC binding region in C. elegans.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qiang; Li, Hong; Zhao, Xiaoqing; Zheng, Yan; Zhou, Deliang

    2015-01-07

    We propose a mechanism that there are matching relations between mRNA sequences and corresponding post-spliced introns, and introns play a significant role in the process of gene expression. In order to reveal the sequence matching features, Smith-Waterman local alignment method is used on C. elegans mRNA sequences to obtain optimal matched segments between exon-exon sequences and their corresponding introns. Distribution characters of matching frequency on exon-exon sequences and sequence characters of optimal matched segments are studied. Results show that distributions of matching frequency on exon-exon junction region have obvious differences, and the exon boundary is revealed. Distributions of the length and matching rate of optimal matched segments are consistent with sequence features of siRNA and miRNA. The optimal matched segments have special sequence characters compared with their host sequences. As for the first introns and long introns, matching frequency values of optimal matched segments with high GC content, rich CG dinucleotides and high λCG values show the minimum distribution in exon junction complex (EJC) binding region. High λCG values in optimal matched segments are main characters in distinguishing EJC binding region. Results indicate that EJC and introns have competitive and cooperative relations in the process of combining on protein coding sequences. Also intron sequences and protein coding sequences do have concerted evolution relations.

  4. Evidence for a novel exon in the coding region of the adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) gene

    SciTech Connect

    Xia, Ling; St. Denis, K.A.; Bapat, B.

    1995-08-10

    Germline mutations of the tumor suppressor gene APC cause familial adenomatous polyposis. Somatic APC alterations are involved in several sporadic neoplasma, including colorectal, duodenal, gastric, and esophageal carcinoma. The APC mRNA is encoded by 15 exons. Additional transcripts have been reported, due to alternative splicing of coding as well as noncoding regions. Two mRNA isoforms occur due to a deletion of exon 7 or a partial deletion of exon 9. We have identified a novel exon, flanked by APC exons 10 and 11, which is expressed as an alternatively transcribed product of the gene. Further, we have shown that the novel exon consists of a heptad repeat motif and is conserved across species. 18 refs., 2 figs.

  5. A Fast Algorithm for Exonic Regions Prediction in DNA Sequences

    PubMed Central

    Saberkari, Hamidreza; Shamsi, Mousa; Heravi, Hamed; Sedaaghi, Mohammad Hossein

    2013-01-01

    The main purpose of this paper is to introduce a fast method for gene prediction in DNA sequences based on the period-3 property in exons. First, the symbolic DNA sequences were converted to digital signal using the electron ion interaction potential method. Then, to reduce the effect of background noise in the period-3 spectrum, we used the discrete wavelet transform at three levels and applied it on the input digital signal. Finally, the Goertzel algorithm was used to extract period-3 components in the filtered DNA sequence. The proposed algorithm leads to decrease the computational complexity and hence, increases the speed of the process. Detection of small size exons in DNA sequences, exactly, is another advantage of the algorithm. The proposed algorithm ability in exon prediction was compared with several existing methods at the nucleotide level using: (i) specificity - sensitivity values; (ii) receiver operating curves (ROC); and (iii) area under ROC curve. Simulation results confirmed that the proposed method can be used as a promising tool for exon prediction in DNA sequences. PMID:24672762

  6. Isolation of candidate genes from the Batten Disease (JNCL) region using exon amplification

    SciTech Connect

    Lerner, T.J.; Haines, J.L.; Buckler, A. |

    1994-09-01

    Batten Disease (juvenile neuronal cercoid lipofuscinosis; JNCL) is the most common neurodegenerative disorder of childhood. Clinically, this autosomal recessive disorder is characterized by loss of vision, seizures, and progressive encephalopathy. The JNCL gene CLN3 has been genetically mapped to a 2 cM region in 16p12.1-11.2 and shows significant allelic association with alleles at five marker loci, D16S288, D16S272, D16S299, D16S298, and SPN, within this interval. Extended haplotype analysis strongly suggests that CLN3 must lie in the vicinity of D16S299/D16S298. We have used these markers as STSs to isolate YACs from the CEPH and Los Alamos flow-sorted chromosome 16 YAC libraries. These YACs, in turn, have been used to generate cosmid contigs by hybridization of inter-Alu PCR products to the gridded Los Alamos chr. 16 cosmid library and by direct sub-cloning. In order to identify genes originating from this region we have used the technique of exon amplification. This procedure produces trapped exon clones, which can represent single exons or multiple exons spliced together and is an efficient method for obtaining probes for physical mapping and for screening cDNA libraries. In all experiments, we have analyzed cosmid DNA using a modification of the original exon amplification procedure that increases both the efficiency and sensitivity of the approach. We have used the resulting exon probes to screen retina and brain cDNA libraries for candidate JNCL genes. Our preliminary studies indicate that the Batten candidate region is gene-rich.

  7. Translational regulation of human neuronal nitric-oxide synthase by an alternatively spliced 5'-untranslated region leader exon.

    PubMed

    Newton, Derek C; Bevan, Sian C; Choi, Stephen; Robb, G Brett; Millar, Adam; Wang, Yang; Marsden, Philip A

    2003-01-03

    Expression of the neuronal nitric-oxide synthase (nNOS) mRNA is subject to complex cell-specific transcriptional regulation, which is mediated by alternative promoters. Unexpectedly, we identified a 89-nucleotide alternatively spliced exon located in the 5'-untranslated region between exon 1 variants and a common exon 2 that contains the translational initiation codon. Alternative splicing events that do not affect the open reading frame are distinctly uncommon in mammals; therefore, we assessed its functional relevance. Transient transfection of reporter RNAs performed in a variety of cell types revealed that this alternatively spliced exon acts as a potent translational repressor. Stably transfected cell lines confirmed that the alternatively spliced exon inhibited translation of the native nNOS open reading frame. Reverse transcription-PCR and RNase protection assays indicated that nNOS mRNAs containing this exon are common and expressed in both a promoter-specific and tissue-restricted fashion. Mutational analysis identified the functional cis-element within this novel exon, and a secondary structure prediction revealed that it forms a putative stem-loop. RNA electrophoretic mobility shift assay techniques revealed that a specific cytoplasmic RNA-binding complex interacts with this motif. Hence, a unique splicing event within a 5'-untranslated region is demonstrated to introduce a translational control element. This represents a newer model for the translational control of a mammalian mRNA.

  8. Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) gene modification in transgenic animals: functional consequences of selected exon and regulatory region deletion.

    PubMed

    Camp, Shelley; Zhang, Limin; Marquez, Michael; de la Torre, Brian; Long, Jeffery M; Bucht, Goran; Taylor, Palmer

    2005-12-15

    AChE is an alternatively spliced gene. Exons 2, 3 and 4 are invariantly spliced, and this sequence is responsible for catalytic function. The 3' alternatively spliced exons, 5 and 6, are responsible for AChE disposition in tissue [J. Massoulie, The origin of the molecular diversity and functional anchoring of cholinesterases. Neurosignals 11 (3) (2002) 130-143; Y. Li, S. Camp, P. Taylor, Tissue-specific expression and alternative mRNA processing of the mammalian acetylcholinesterase gene. J. Biol. Chem. 268 (8) (1993) 5790-5797]. The splice to exon 5 produces the GPI anchored form of AChE found in the hematopoietic system, whereas the splice to exon 6 produces a sequence that binds to the structural subunits PRiMA and ColQ, producing AChE expression in brain and muscle. A third alternative RNA species is present that is not spliced at the 3' end; the intron 3' of exon 4 is used as coding sequence and produces the read-through, unanchored form of AChE. In order to further understand the role of alternative splicing in the expression of the AChE gene, we have used homologous recombination in stem cells to produce gene specific deletions in mice. Alternatively and together exon 5 and exon 6 were deleted. A cassette containing the neomycin gene flanked by loxP sites was used to replace the exon(s) of interest. Tissue analysis of mice with exon 5 deleted and the neomycin cassette retained showed very low levels of AChE expression, far less than would have been anticipated. Only the read-through species of the enzyme was produced; clearly the inclusion of the selection cassette disrupted splicing of exon 4 to exon 6. The selection cassette was then deleted in exon 5, exon 6 and exons 5 + 6 deleted mice by breeding to Ella-cre transgenic mice. AChE expression in serum, brain and muscle has been analyzed. Another AChE gene targeted mouse strain involving a region in the first intron, found to be critical for AChE expression in muscle cells [S. Camp, L. Zhang, M. Marquez, B

  9. Association study of the CNR1 gene exon 3 alternative promoter region polymorphisms and substance dependence

    PubMed Central

    Herman, Aryeh I.; Kranzler, Henry R.; Cubells, Joseph F.; Gelernter, Joel; Covault, Jonathan

    2008-01-01

    An alternative promoter producing a novel 5′-untranslated region of cannabinoid receptor mRNA has recently been described in CNR1, the gene encoding the cannabinoid receptor protein. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) adjacent to this site were reported to be associated with polysubstance abuse (Zhang et al. 2004). We examined the association of 4 SNPs (rs6928499, rs806379, rs1535255, rs2023239) in the distal region of intron 2 of CNR1 both with individual substance dependence diagnoses (i.e., alcohol, cocaine, and opioids), as well as with polysubstance dependence. The study samples consisted of European American and African American subjects with drug and or alcohol dependence (n=895), and controls (n = 472). Subjects were grouped as polysubstance dependent, opioid dependent, cocaine dependent, cannabis dependent and alcohol dependent. There was a modest association of marker rs1535255 with alcohol dependence, respectively (P=0.04), though with correction for multiple phenotype comparisons, this effect was not considered statistically significant. These findings fail to replicate the original report of an association between SNPs adjacent to an alternative CNR1 exon 3 transcription start site and polysubstance abuse. PMID:16741937

  10. Exon organization of the mouse entactin gene corresponds to the structural domains of the polypeptide and has regional homology to the low-density lipoprotein receptor gene

    SciTech Connect

    Durkin, M.E.; Chung, A.E.; Wewer, U.M.

    1995-03-20

    Entactin is a widespread basement membrane protein of 150 kDa that binds to type IV collagen and laminin. The complete exon-intron structure of the mouse entactin gene has been determined from {lambda} genomic DNA clones. The gene spans at least 65 kb and contains 20 exons. The exon organization of the mouse entactin gene closely corresponds to the organization of the polypeptide into distinct structural and functional domains. The two amino-terminal globular domains are encoded by three exons each. Single exons encode the two protease-sensitive, O-glycosylated linking regions. The six EGF-like repeats and the single thyroglobulin-type repeat are each encoded by separate exons. The carboxyl-terminal half of entactin displays sequence homology to the growth factor-like region of the low-density lipoprotein receptor, and in both genes this region is encoded by eight exons. The positions of four introns are also conserved in the homologous region of the two genes. These observations suggest that the entactin gene has evolved via exon shuffling. Finally, several sequence polymorphisms useful for gene linkage analysis were found in the 3{prime} noncoding region of the last exon. 52 refs., 8 figs.

  11. Alternative exon-encoding regions of Locusta migratoria muscle myosin modulate the pH dependence of ATPase activity.

    PubMed

    Li, J; Lu, Z; He, J; Chen, Q; Wang, X; Kang, L; Li, X-D

    2016-12-01

    Whereas the vertebrate muscle myosin heavy chains (MHCs) are encoded by a family of Mhc genes, most insects examined to date contain a single Mhc gene and produce all of the different MHC isoforms by alternative RNA splicing. Here, we found that the migratory locust, Locusta migratoria, has one Mhc gene, which contains 41 exons, including five alternative exclusive exons and one differently included penultimate exon, and potentially encodes 360 MHC isoforms. From the adult L. migratoria, we identified 14 MHC isoforms (including two identical isoforms): four from flight muscle (the thorax dorsal longitudinal muscle), three from jump muscle (the hind leg extensor tibiae muscle) and seven from the abdominal intersegmental muscle. We purified myosins from flight muscle and jump muscle and characterized their motor activities. At neutral pH, the flight and the jump muscle myosins displayed similar levels of in vitro actin-gliding activity, whereas the former had a slightly higher actin-activated ATPase activity than the latter. Interestingly, the pH dependences of the actin-activated ATPase activity of these two myosins are different. Because the dominant MHC isoforms in these two muscles are identical except for the two alternative exon-encoding regions, we propose that these two alternative regions modulate the pH dependence of L. migratoria muscle myosin.

  12. Promoting School Excellence through the Application of Effective Schools Research: Summary and Proceedings of a 1984 Regional Exchange Workshop (Nashville, Tennessee, April 15-16, 1984). Occasional Paper Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sattes, Beth D., Ed.

    A regional workshop was held in which educational researchers and practitioners shared their innovations, successes, concerns, and progress in using research and development to promote excellence in their state and local education agencies. This document reports its proceedings. "School Improvement: What the Research Says," by David P.…

  13. Abnormal Methylation Status of the GNAS Exon 1A Region in Pseudohypohyperparathyroidism Combined With Turner Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jie; Wang, Dong; Ren, An; Xing, Yan; Zhang, Dongliang; Wei, Jun; Yu, Ning; Xing, Xuenong; Ye, Shandong

    2015-12-01

    Pseudohypohyperparathyroidism (PHHP) is a rare type of pseudohypoparathyroidism (PHP), which seems to have a normal skeletal response to parathyroid hormone but shows renal resistance. Almost all patients with PHHP have PHP Ib, a subtype of PHP that is usually caused by GNAS methylation defects, often in exon 1A. Some features of Albright hereditary osteodystrophy can occasionally be found in patients with PHHP, but these features are also common in Turner syndrome. The authors report on an extremely rare case of a patient with PHHP and Turner syndrome, a 47-year-old woman who sought medical attention for hypocalcemia and elevated parathyroid hormone. She had no family history of hypocalcemia and no STX16 gene deletions. She had a mosaic karyotype of 46, X, del(X)(p11.4)/45, XO. Pyrosequencing was performed to determine the GNAS exon 1A methylation. The degree of methylation found in exon 1A of the patient was lower than her unaffected relatives.

  14. Haplotype determination of the upstream regulatory region and the second exon of the BoLA-DRB3 gene in Holstein cattle.

    PubMed

    Goszczynski, D E; Ripoli, M V; Takeshima, S-N; Baltian, L; Aida, Y; Giovambattista, G

    2014-03-01

    Polymorphisms of the BoLA-DRB3 gene are located primarily in the second exon [antigen binding site (ABS)] and, to a lesser extent, in the upstream regulatory region (URR). It can be hypothesised that exon 2 and the URR are under different types of natural selection. The aim of this work was to determine the URR-exon 2 haplotypes; 34 Holstein samples were genotyped by direct sequencing. A total of 7 URR alleles and 23 exon 2 alleles were detected, and 3 of the URR alleles were novel. Our results may suggest that no relationship exists between the URR and exon 2 of the BoLA-DRB3 gene (linkage disequilibrium P value > 0.05), most likely due to recombination over time. Our results also suggest that both regions of class II genes may be included in the development of new genotyping methods based on next-generation DNA sequencing technologies.

  15. 46 CFR 193.15-16 - Lockout valves.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... EQUIPMENT Carbon Dioxide and Clean Agent Extinguishing Systems, Details § 193.15-16 Lockout valves. (a) A lockout valve must be provided on any carbon dioxide extinguishing system protecting a space over 6,000... complete isolation of the system from the protected space or spaces, making it impossible for carbon...

  16. 46 CFR 193.15-16 - Lockout valves.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... EQUIPMENT Carbon Dioxide and Clean Agent Extinguishing Systems, Details § 193.15-16 Lockout valves. (a) A lockout valve must be provided on any carbon dioxide extinguishing system protecting a space over 6,000... complete isolation of the system from the protected space or spaces, making it impossible for carbon...

  17. Interaction of the Transcription Start Site Core Region and Transcription Factor YY1 Determine Ascorbate Transporter SVCT2 Exon 1a Promoter Activity

    PubMed Central

    Qiao, Huan; May, James M.

    2012-01-01

    Transcription of the ascorbate transporter, SVCT2, is driven by two distinct promoters in exon 1 of the transporter sequence. The exon 1a promoter lacks a classical transcription start site and little is known about regulation of promoter activity in the transcription start site core (TSSC) region. Here we present evidence that the TSSC binds the multifunctional initiator-binding protein YY1. Electrophoresis shift assays using YY1 antibody showed that YY1 is present as one of two major complexes that specifically bind to the TSSC. The other complex contains the transcription factor NF-Y. Mutations in the TSSC that decreased YY1 binding also impaired the exon 1a promoter activity despite the presence of an upstream activating NF-Y/USF complex, suggesting that YY1 is involved in the regulation of the exon 1a transcription. Furthermore, YY1 interaction with NF-Y and/or USF synergistically enhanced the exon 1a promoter activity in transient transfections and co-activator p300 enhanced their synergistic activation. We propose that the TSSC plays a vital role in the exon 1a transcription and that this function is partially carried out by the transcription factor YY1. Moreover, co-activator p300 might be able to synergistically enhance the TSSC function via a “bridge” mechanism with upstream sequences. PMID:22532872

  18. Sequence comparison and predicted structure for the four exon-encoded regions of human insulin-like growth factor binding protein 4.

    PubMed

    Landale, E C; Strong, D D; Mohan, S; Baylink, D J

    1995-01-01

    The IGFBPs bind to and modulate the function of the IGFs in various ways. Human IGFBP-4 inhibits IGF mediated cell proliferation. The IGFBP exon-encoded regions were aligned and secondary structure predictions for hIGFBP-4 were developed yielding predicted 3D co-ordinates for each such region of hIGFBP-4. The exon 1 encoded region is the most conserved among the IGFBPs. That of hIGFBP-4 is predicted as an array of beta-strands that include the glycine and cysteine rich IGFBP consensus pattern and that terminate with a helix. The exon 2 encoded region is the most variable among the IGFBPs. That of hIGFBP-4 is predicted as mostly an amphipathic helix. The remaining regions are also conserved among the IGFBPs. Those of hIGFBP-4 are also predicted to contain helices. The predicted structure of hIGFBP-4 comprises amino terminal beta-strands with four helices in the carboxy terminal two thirds of the molecule.

  19. Maternal separation alters nerve growth factor and corticosterone levels but not the DNA methylation status of the exon 17 glucocorticoid receptor promoter region

    PubMed Central

    Daniels, WMU; Fairbairn, LR; van Tilburg, G; McEvoy, CRE; Zigmond, MJ; Russell, VA; Stein, DJ

    2010-01-01

    Separating rat pups from their mothers during the early stages of life is an animal model commonly used to study the development of psychiatric disorders such as anxiety and depression. The present study investigated how soon after the termination of the maternal separation period behavioural and neuroendocrine abnormalities relevant to above-mentioned illnesses would manifest. Sprague Dawley rat pups were subjected to maternal separation (3 hours per day from postnatal day 2 through 14) and their behaviour and HPA axis activity determined 7 days later. We also measured nerve growth factor levels in their hippocampi and assessed the DNA methylation status of the promoter region of exon 17 of the glucocorticoid receptor in this brain region. As early as 7 days after the termination of the adverse event, a change in behaviour was observed that was associated with increased plasma corticosterone release and elevated nerve growth factor levels in the hippocampus. No alteration in the methylation status of the exon 17 glucocorticoid receptor promoter region was observed. Our data indicate that early life adversity may lead to the rapid development of abnormal behaviours and HPA axis dysregulation though no epigenetic changes to the exon 17 glucocorticoid receptor promoter region occurred. We further propose that the observed increased neurotrophin levels reflect compensatory mechanisms that attempt to combat the long-term deleterious effects of maternal separation. PMID:19816761

  20. Red-shifting the optical response of firefly oxyluciferin with group 15/16 substitutions.

    PubMed

    Milne, Bruce F

    2014-12-07

    Time-dependent density functional theory has been used to investigate the effects of group 15/16 element substitution on the optical response of firefly oxyluciferin. A range of analogues containing symmetrical substitutions at the N and S atom positions of the naturally-occurring oxyluciferin have been found to have red-shifted electronic excitation energies with the heaviest derivative investigated (As/Se) displaying a shift of -0.69 eV. Fluorescence emission wavelengths for all P- and As-containing derivatives in DMSO are estimated to lie in the 710-930 nm region making them interesting for bio-imaging applications.

  1. Cleopatra Patera on Venus: Venera 15/16 evidence for a volcanic origin.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schaber, G.G.; Kozak, R.C.; Masursky, H.

    1987-01-01

    The non-concentric nature, anomalous depth, and terraced morphology of the nested craters that compose Cleopatra Patera are more closely analogous to volcanic craters (calderas) than multi-ring impact structures. Associated deposits northeast and downslope of the Patera first recognized on Venera 15/16 radar images are interpreted as volcanic plains related to, and perhaps cogenetic with, Cleopatra. A volcanic origin not only is easily reconciled with the tectonic setting of the Patera, it is almost required by the correlation between the Patera and regional structural trend. -from Authors

  2. Coding region variant 186H/R in Exon 4 of APOBEC3G among individuals of Western India.

    PubMed

    Singh, Hariom; Marathe, Shruti; Nain, Sumitra; Nema, Vijay; Angadi, Mansa; Bapat, Shradha; Pawar, Jyoti; Ghate, Manisha; Sahay, Seema; Gangakhedkar, Raman R

    2016-05-01

    The allelic variations in the AIDS restriction genes have been associated with the acquisition of HIV-1 and its progression. The distribution of antiviral gene variants significantly differs between populations. Therefore, we aimed to evaluate the distribution of variant allele of 186H/R in exon4 of APOBEC3G between HIV infected individuals and healthy controls among western Indian.In the present cross-sectional study, we enrolled a total of 153 HIV-infected patients confirmed and 156 unrelated healthy individuals. Polymorphism for 186H/R in exon4 of APOBEC3G gene was genotyped by PCR-RFLP. With the frequency of 186HR heterozygous genotype of APOBEC3G was found to be 13% in healthy controls and none in HIV infected cases. The frequency of 186HH common genotype of APOBEC3G was observed higher in HIV infected individuals compared with healthy controls (100% vs 91.7%). The variant genotype 186RR in APOBEC3G was not found in both the groups. The frequency of 186R allele of APOBEC3G was found 4.16% in healthy controls and nil in HIV-infected cases. The frequency of 186H allele of APOBEC3G was found to be higher in HIV-infected cases compared with healthy controls (100% vs 95.83%). The frequency of 186R allele in exon4 of APOBEC3G was found to be 4.16% in healthy controls. This observation differs from the previous report published from North India stating the absence of 186R allele of APOBEC3G in the North Indian individuals. The variant 186H/R in exon4 of APOBEC3G was neither associated with risk of acquisition of HIV-1 nor its progression.

  3. Cleopatra Patera on Venus - Venera 15/16 evidence for a volcanic origin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaber, G. G.; Kozak, R. C.; Masursky, H.

    1987-01-01

    The nonconcentric nature, anomalous depth, and terraced morphology of the nested craters that compose Cleopatra Patera are more closely analogous to volcanic craters (calderas) than multiring impact structures. Associated deposits northeast and downslope of the Patera first recognized on Venera 15/16 radar images are interpreted as volcanic plains related to, and perhaps cogenetic with, Cleopatra. The plains lavas probably originated as effusions from a radial rift zone or ring fissures. Rim deposits surrounding Cleopatra are asymmetric along the structural fabric of the region, also indicating fissure-type eruptions. Finally, a volcanic origin not only is easily reconciled with the tectonic setting of the Patera, it is almost required by the correlation between the Patera and regional structural trend.

  4. Region-specific expression and hormonal regulation of the first exon variants of rat prolactin receptor mRNA in rat brain and anterior pituitary gland.

    PubMed

    Nogami, H; Hoshino, R; Ogasawara, K; Miyamoto, S; Hisano, S

    2007-08-01

    Recent studies have revealed the occurrence of five first exon variants of the rat prolactin receptor mRNA, suggesting that multiple promoters direct prolactin receptor transcription in response to different regulatory factors. In the present study, regional expression of these first exon variants, as well as two prolactin receptor subtypes generated by alternative splicing, was examined in the brains and anterior pituitary glands of female rats. Expression of the long-form was detected in the choroid plexus, hypothalamus, hippocampus, cerebral cortex and anterior pituitary gland, whereas the short form was detected only in the choroid plexus. E1-3 mRNA, a first exon variant, was detected in the choroid plexus, hypothalamus, and anterior pituitary gland, whereas E1-4 was detected only in the choroid plexus. Other variants were not detectable by the polymerase chain reaction protocol employed in this study. Ovariectomy increased the short form in the choroid plexus and the E1-3 expression in the choroid plexus and pituitary gland, but changes in the long-form and E1-4 expression were minimal. Replacement of oestrogens and prolactin suggest that oestrogens down-regulate E1-3 expression in the choroid plexus and pituitary gland, and that the negative effect of oestrogen is mediated by prolactin in the pituitary gland. The present results revealed the region-specific promoter usage in prolactin receptor mRNA transcription, as well as the involvement of oestrogens in the regulation of E1-3 mRNA expression in the brain and pituitary gland.

  5. Genetic and physical mapping of 2q35 in the region of NRAMP and IL8R genes: Identification of a polymorphic repeat in exon 2 of NRAMP

    SciTech Connect

    White, J.K.; Shaw, M.A.; Barton, C.H.

    1994-11-15

    Recent interest has focused on the region of conserved synteny between mouse chromosome 1 and human 2q33-q37, particularly over the region encoding the murine macrophage resistance gene Ity/Lsh/Bcg (candidate Nramp) and members of the Il8r interleukin-8 (IL8) receptor gene cluster. In this paper, identification of a restriction fragment length polymorphism in the Il8RB gene in 35 pedigrees previously typed for markers in the 2q33-37 interval provided evidence (lod scores > 3) for linkage between Il8RB and the 2q34-135 markers FN1, TNP1, VIL1, and DES. Physical mapping, using yeast artificial chromosomes isolated with VIL1, confirmed that IL8RA, IL8RB and the IL8RB pseudogene map within the NRAMP-VIL1 interval, with the physical distance (155 kb) from 5{prime} LSH to 3{prime} VIL1 representing {approx}3-fold that observed in the mouse. Partial sequencing of NRAMP confirmed the presence of the N-terminal proline/serine-rich putative SH3 binding domain in exon 2 of the human gene. Further analysis of Brazilian leprosy and visceral leishmaniasis pedigrees identified a rare second allele varying in a 9-nucleotide repeat motif of the exon 2 sequence but segregating independently of the disease phenotype. 38 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  6. Proteins, exons and molecular evolution.

    PubMed

    Holland, S K; Blake, C C

    1987-01-01

    The discovery of the eukaryotic gene structure has prompted research into the potential relationship between protein structure and function and the corresponding exon/intron patterns. The exon shuffling hypothesis put forward by Gilbert and Blake suggests the encodement of structural and functional protein elements by exons which can recombine to create novel proteins. This provides an explanation for the relatively rapid evolution of proteins from a few primordial molecules. As the number of gene and protein structures increases, evidence of exon shuffling is becoming more apparent and examples are presented both from modern multi-domain proteins and ancient proteins. Recent work into the chemical properties and catalytic functions of RNA have led to hypotheses based upon the early existence of RNA. These theories suggest that the split gene structure originated in the primordial soup as a result of random RNA synthesis. Stable regions of RNA, or exons, were utilised as primitive enzymes. In response to selective pressures for information storage, the activity was directly transferred from the RNA enzymes or ribozymes, to proteins. These short polypeptides fused together to create larger proteins with a wide range of functions. Recent research into RNA processing and exon size, discussed in this review, provides a clearer insight into the evolutionary development of the gene and protein structure.

  7. Investigation of the 5' flanking region and exon 3 polymorphisms of IGF-1 gene showed moderate association with semen quality in Sanjabi breed rams.

    PubMed

    Bakhtiar, R; Abdolmohammadi, A; Hajarian, H; Nikousefat, Z; Kalantar-Neyestanaki, D

    2017-08-26

    In this study, semen samples were collected from 96 Sanjabi rams in order to investigate the IGF-1 gene polymorphisms and their relationship with the characteristics of semen quality and testicular size. The dimensions of scrotal length, width and circumference were measured during autumn and spring over two years. Blood samples were simultaneously collected from jugular vein to extract DNA. PCR was performed using specific primers to amplify 294 and 272bp fragments including 5' regulatory region and exon 3 of IGF-1 gene, respectively. PCR products were digested by BFOI and Eco88l restriction enzymes, respectively. Two genotypes including AA (194 and 100bp), AB (294, 194 and 100bp) and all possible genotypes including CC (182 and 90bp), CT (272, 182, and 90bp) and TT (272bp) were observed for 5' flanking region and exon 3 of IGF-1 gene, respectively. The significant differences among IGF-1 genotypes for testicular dimensions were not observed. However, the polymorphism of 5' flanking region in the studied population had significant effect on individual motility and percent morphology traits. Animals with AB genotype had significantly higher individual motility compared with AA genotype (P < 0.05). Also, animals with AA genotype had significantly the highest percent morphology compared with AB genotype (P < 0.1). The exon 3 of IGF-1 gene had significant effect on individual motility, concentration, morphology and water test traits. Animals with CT genotype had the highest sperm concentration (P < 0.1) and water test (P < 0.05) compared to CC and TT genotypes. Moreover, animals with TT genotype had significantly the highest percent morphology compared with other genotypes (P < 0.05). Briefly, the results indicated that individual motility, concentration, percent morphology and water test traits could be in association with IGF-1 genotypes. It might be concluded that polymorphisms in IGF-1gene can be considered to develop male fertility in future and for

  8. Widespread Shortening of 3' Untranslated Regions and Increased Exon Inclusion Are Evolutionarily Conserved Features of Innate Immune Responses to Infection.

    PubMed

    Pai, Athma A; Baharian, Golshid; Pagé Sabourin, Ariane; Brinkworth, Jessica F; Nédélec, Yohann; Foley, Joseph W; Grenier, Jean-Christophe; Siddle, Katherine J; Dumaine, Anne; Yotova, Vania; Johnson, Zachary P; Lanford, Robert E; Burge, Christopher B; Barreiro, Luis B

    2016-09-01

    The contribution of pre-mRNA processing mechanisms to the regulation of immune responses remains poorly studied despite emerging examples of their role as regulators of immune defenses. We sought to investigate the role of mRNA processing in the cellular responses of human macrophages to live bacterial infections. Here, we used mRNA sequencing to quantify gene expression and isoform abundances in primary macrophages from 60 individuals, before and after infection with Listeria monocytogenes and Salmonella typhimurium. In response to both bacteria we identified thousands of genes that significantly change isoform usage in response to infection, characterized by an overall increase in isoform diversity after infection. In response to both bacteria, we found global shifts towards (i) the inclusion of cassette exons and (ii) shorter 3' UTRs, with near-universal shifts towards usage of more upstream polyadenylation sites. Using complementary data collected in non-human primates, we show that these features are evolutionarily conserved among primates. Following infection, we identify candidate RNA processing factors whose expression is associated with individual-specific variation in isoform abundance. Finally, by profiling microRNA levels, we show that 3' UTRs with reduced abundance after infection are significantly enriched for target sites for particular miRNAs. These results suggest that the pervasive usage of shorter 3' UTRs is a mechanism for particular genes to evade repression by immune-activated miRNAs. Collectively, our results suggest that dynamic changes in RNA processing may play key roles in the regulation of innate immune responses.

  9. Multiple transcription start sites, DNase I-hypersensitive sites, and an opposite-strand exon in the 5' region of the CHO dhfr gene.

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, P J; Carothers, A M; Han, J H; Harding, J D; Kas, E; Venolia, L; Chasin, L A

    1986-01-01

    Transcription of the 26-kilobase (kb) dihydrofolate reductase (dhfr) gene in CHO cells is initiated at two sites: a major site (approximately 85% of the dhfr mRNA) at -63 relative to the translation start and a minor site (approximately 15%) at -107. Transcription also occurs from the opposite DNA strand in the dhfr 5' region, with a probable initiation site at approximately -195 relative to the dhfr translation start. A 4-kb polyadenylated RNA that is derived from the opposite-strand transcription increases threefold in abundance after serum starvation of CHO cells for 24 h. dhfr mRNA levels do not change during this time. The first dhfr exon lies within a 1-kb genomic region marked by exceptionally high G + C content and lack of DNA methylation. This region also includes a 214-base-pair (bp) exon for the opposite-strand transcript and five of the six DNase I-hypersensitive sites identified at the dhfr locus. Analysis of the DNA sequences of hamster, human (M. Chen, T. Shimada, A. D. Moulton, A. Cline, R. K. Humphries, J. Maizel, and A. W. Nienhuis, J. Biol. Chem. 259:3933-3943, 1984), and mouse (M. McGrogan, C. C. Simonsen, D. T. Smouse, P. J. Farnham, and R. T. Schimke, J. Biol. Chem. 260:2307-2314, 1985) dhfr genes reveals the presence of a 29-bp unit that is conserved 45 to 49 bp upstream of major and minor dhfr transcription start sites. This unit follows the consensus: GRGGCGGTGGCCTNNNNTGTCRCAARTRGGTR. The 5' part of the 29-bp unit contains a GC box that agrees with the GGGCGG consensus-binding site for the RNA polymerase II transcription factor Sp1 (D. Gidoni, W. A. Dynan, and R. Tjian, Nature (London) 312:409-413, 1984). Each of the three mammalian dhfr genes has several G-rich GC boxes proximal to the major dhfr transcription start site and several GC boxes of the opposite orientation (C rich) in a distal region about 500 bp upstream. Images PMID:3023846

  10. An exonic splicing silencer in the testes-specific DNA ligase III β exon

    PubMed Central

    Chew, Shern L.; Baginsky, Lysa; Eperon, Ian C.

    2000-01-01

    Alternative pre-mRNA splicing of two terminal exons (α and β) regulates the expression of the human DNA ligase III gene. In most tissues, the α exon is expressed. In testes and during spermatogenesis, the β exon is used instead. The α exon encodes the interaction domain with a scaffold DNA repair protein, XRCC1, while the β exon-encoded C-terminal does not. Sequence elements regulating the alternative splicing pattern were mapped by in vitro splicing assays in HeLa nuclear extracts. Deletion of a region beginning in the β exon and extending into the downstream intron derepressed splicing to the β exon. Two silencing elements were found within this 101 nt region: a 16 nt exonic splicing silencer immediately upstream of the β exon polyadenylation signal and a 45 nt intronic splicing silencer. The exonic splicing silencer inhibited splicing, even when the polyadenylation signal was deleted or replaced by a 5′ splice site. This element also enhanced polyadenylation under conditions unfavourable to splicing. The splicing silencer partially inhibited assembly of spliceosomal complexes and functioned in an adenoviral pre-mRNA context. Silencing of splicing by the element was associated with cross-linking of a 37 kDa protein to the RNA substrate. The element exerts opposite functions in splicing and polyadenylation. PMID:10606636

  11. Sequence of the intron/exon junctions of the coding region of the human androgen receptor gene and identification of a point mutation in a family with complete androgen insensitivity

    SciTech Connect

    Lubahn, D.B.; Simental, J.A.; Higgs, H.N.; Wilson, E.M.; French, F.S. ); Brown, T.R.; Migeon, C.J. )

    1989-12-01

    Androgens act through a receptor protein (AR) to mediate sex differentiation and development of the male phenotype. The authors have isolated the eight exons in the amino acid coding region of the AR gene from a human X chromosome library. Nucleotide sequences of the AR gene intron/exon boundaries were determined for use in designing synthetic oligonucleotide primers to bracket coding exons for amplification by the polymerase chain reaction. Genomic DNA was amplified from 46, XY phenotypic female siblings with complete androgen insensitivity syndrome. AR binding affinity for dihydrotestosterone in the affected siblings was lower than in normal males, but the binding capacity was normal. Sequence analysis of amplified exons demonstrated within the AR steroid-binding domain (exon G) a single guanine to adenine mutation, resulting in replacement of valine with methionine at amino acid residue 866. As expected, the carrier mother had both normal and mutant AR genes. Thus, a single point mutation in the steroid-binding domain of the AR gene correlated with the expression of an AR protein ineffective in stimulating male sexual development.

  12. Sequence of the intron/exon junctions of the coding region of the human androgen receptor gene and identification of a point mutation in a family with complete androgen insensitivity.

    PubMed

    Lubahn, D B; Brown, T R; Simental, J A; Higgs, H N; Migeon, C J; Wilson, E M; French, F S

    1989-12-01

    Androgens act through a receptor protein (AR) to mediate sex differentiation and development of the male phenotype. We have isolated the eight exons in the amino acid coding region of the AR gene from a human X chromosome library. Nucleotide sequences of the AR gene intron/exon boundaries were determined for use in designing synthetic oligonucleotide primers to bracket coding exons for amplification by the polymerase chain reaction. Genomic DNA was amplified from 46,XY phenotypic female siblings with complete androgen insensitivity syndrome. AR binding affinity for dihydrotestosterone in the affected siblings was lower than in normal males, but the binding capacity was normal. Sequence analysis of amplified exons demonstrated within the AR steroid-binding domain (exon G) a single guanine to adenine mutation, resulting in replacement of valine with methionine at amino acid residue 866. As expected, the carrier mother had both normal and mutant AR genes. Thus, a single point mutation in the steroid-binding domain of the AR gene correlated with the expression of an AR protein ineffective in stimulating male sexual development.

  13. Sequence of the intron/exon junctions of the coding region of the human androgen receptor gene and identification of a point mutation in a family with complete androgen insensitivity.

    PubMed Central

    Lubahn, D B; Brown, T R; Simental, J A; Higgs, H N; Migeon, C J; Wilson, E M; French, F S

    1989-01-01

    Androgens act through a receptor protein (AR) to mediate sex differentiation and development of the male phenotype. We have isolated the eight exons in the amino acid coding region of the AR gene from a human X chromosome library. Nucleotide sequences of the AR gene intron/exon boundaries were determined for use in designing synthetic oligonucleotide primers to bracket coding exons for amplification by the polymerase chain reaction. Genomic DNA was amplified from 46,XY phenotypic female siblings with complete androgen insensitivity syndrome. AR binding affinity for dihydrotestosterone in the affected siblings was lower than in normal males, but the binding capacity was normal. Sequence analysis of amplified exons demonstrated within the AR steroid-binding domain (exon G) a single guanine to adenine mutation, resulting in replacement of valine with methionine at amino acid residue 866. As expected, the carrier mother had both normal and mutant AR genes. Thus, a single point mutation in the steroid-binding domain of the AR gene correlated with the expression of an AR protein ineffective in stimulating male sexual development. Images PMID:2594783

  14. Prominent use of distal 5′ transcription start sites and discovery of a large number of additional exons in ENCODE regions

    PubMed Central

    Denoeud, France; Kapranov, Philipp; Ucla, Catherine; Frankish, Adam; Castelo, Robert; Drenkow, Jorg; Lagarde, Julien; Alioto, Tyler; Manzano, Caroline; Chrast, Jacqueline; Dike, Sujit; Wyss, Carine; Henrichsen, Charlotte N.; Holroyd, Nancy; Dickson, Mark C.; Taylor, Ruth; Hance, Zahra; Foissac, Sylvain; Myers, Richard M.; Rogers, Jane; Hubbard, Tim; Harrow, Jennifer; Guigó, Roderic; Gingeras, Thomas R.; Antonarakis, Stylianos E.; Reymond, Alexandre

    2007-01-01

    This report presents systematic empirical annotation of transcript products from 399 annotated protein-coding loci across the 1% of the human genome targeted by the Encyclopedia of DNA elements (ENCODE) pilot project using a combination of 5′ rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE) and high-density resolution tiling arrays. We identified previously unannotated and often tissue- or cell-line-specific transcribed fragments (RACEfrags), both 5′ distal to the annotated 5′ terminus and internal to the annotated gene bounds for the vast majority (81.5%) of the tested genes. Half of the distal RACEfrags span large segments of genomic sequences away from the main portion of the coding transcript and often overlap with the upstream-annotated gene(s). Notably, at least 20% of the resultant novel transcripts have changes in their open reading frames (ORFs), most of them fusing ORFs of adjacent transcripts. A significant fraction of distal RACEfrags show expression levels comparable to those of known exons of the same locus, suggesting that they are not part of very minority splice forms. These results have significant implications concerning (1) our current understanding of the architecture of protein-coding genes; (2) our views on locations of regulatory regions in the genome; and (3) the interpretation of sequence polymorphisms mapping to regions hitherto considered to be “noncoding,” ultimately relating to the identification of disease-related sequence alterations. PMID:17567994

  15. Aβ1-15/16 as a potential diagnostic marker in neurodegenerative diseases.

    PubMed

    Nutu, Magdalena; Bourgeois, Philippe; Zetterberg, Henrik; Portelius, Erik; Andreasson, Ulf; Parent, Stéphane; Lipari, Francesco; Hall, Sara; Constantinescu, Radu; Hansson, Oskar; Blennow, Kaj

    2013-03-01

    Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarkers for Alzheimer's disease (AD) reflect brain biochemistry. Using combined immunoprecipitation and mass spectrometry, we have shown that amyloid beta 1-15 (Aβ1-15) is produced by concerted β- and α-secretase cleavage of amyloid precursor protein (APP) and that the relative levels of Aβ1-16 in AD compared to controls are increased. Furthermore, drug-induced γ-secretase inhibition enhances the relative levels of Aβ1-15 and Aβ1-16. Here, we investigate a novel immunoassay for Aβ1-15/16 in a broad range of neurodegenerative conditions. The CSF level of Aβ1-15/16 was measured by the bead-based amplified luminescent proximity homogeneous assay (Alpha technology). Concentrations of Aβ1-15/16 were analyzed in subjects with Parkinson disease (PD; n = 90), PD with dementia (PDD) (n = 32), dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB) (n = 68), AD (n = 48), progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP) (n = 45), multiple system atrophy (MSA) (n = 46), and corticobasal degeneration (CBD) (n = 12). The detecting antibody is specific to the C-terminal epitope of Aβ15. We found that a carboxypeptidase (CPB) present in fetal bovine serum (FBS), a component of the buffers used, degrades Aβ1-16 to Aβ1-15, which is then detected by the Aβ1-15/16 assay. Significantly, lower levels of Aβ1-15/16 were detected in PD, PDD, PSP, and MSA compared to other neurodegenerative diseases and controls. Using the specific Aβ1-15/16 assay, a reliable quantification of Aβ1-15 or Aβ1-15/16 in CSF samples is obtained. We found reduced levels of Aβ1-15 in parkinsonian disease groups. The molecular mechanism behind this reduction is at present unknown.

  16. Periodic sequence patterns in human exons

    SciTech Connect

    Baldi, P.; Brunak, S.; Engelbrecht, J.; Chauvin, Y.; Krogh, A.

    1995-12-31

    We analyze the sequential structure of human exons and their flanking introns by hidden Markov models. Together, models of donor site regions, acceptor site regions and flanked internal exons, show that exons -- besides the reading frame -- hold a specific periodic pattern. The pattern, which has the consensus: non-T(A/T)G and a minimal periodicity of roughly 10 nucleotides, is not a consequence of the nucleotide statistics in the three codon positions, nor of the well known nucleosome positioning signal. We discuss the relation between the pattern and other known sequence elements responsible for the intrinsic bending or curvature of DNA.

  17. Modeling exon expression using histone modifications.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Shijia; Wang, Guohua; Liu, Bo; Wang, Yadong

    2013-01-01

    Histones undergo numerous covalent modifications that play important roles in regulating gene expression. Previous investigations have focused on the effects of histone modifications on gene promoters, whereas efforts to unravel their effects on transcribed regions have lagged behind. To elucidate the effects of histone modification on transcribed regions, we constructed a quantitative model, which we suggest can predict the variation of gene expression more faithfully than the model constructed on promoters. Moreover, motivated by the fact that exon spicing is functionally coupled to transcription, we also devised a quantitative model to predict alternative exon expression using histone modifications on exons. This model was found to be general across different exon types and even cell types. Furthermore, an interaction network linking histone modifications to alternative exon expression was constructed using partial correlations. The network indicated that gene expression and specific histone modifications (H3K36me3 and H4K20me1) could directly influence the exon expression, while other modifications could act in an additive way to account for the stability and robustness. In addition, our results suggest that combinations of histone modifications contribute to exon splicing in a redundant and cumulative fashion. To conclude, this study provides a better understanding of the effects of histone modifications on gene transcribed regions.

  18. Modeling Exon Expression Using Histone Modifications

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Shijia; Wang, Guohua; Liu, Bo; Wang, Yadong

    2013-01-01

    Histones undergo numerous covalent modifications that play important roles in regulating gene expression. Previous investigations have focused on the effects of histone modifications on gene promoters, whereas efforts to unravel their effects on transcribed regions have lagged behind. To elucidate the effects of histone modification on transcribed regions, we constructed a quantitative model, which we suggest can predict the variation of gene expression more faithfully than the model constructed on promoters. Moreover, motivated by the fact that exon spicing is functionally coupled to transcription, we also devised a quantitative model to predict alternative exon expression using histone modifications on exons. This model was found to be general across different exon types and even cell types. Furthermore, an interaction network linking histone modifications to alternative exon expression was constructed using partial correlations. The network indicated that gene expression and specific histone modifications (H3K36me3 and H4K20me1) could directly influence the exon expression, while other modifications could act in an additive way to account for the stability and robustness. In addition, our results suggest that combinations of histone modifications contribute to exon splicing in a redundant and cumulative fashion. To conclude, this study provides a better understanding of the effects of histone modifications on gene transcribed regions. PMID:23825663

  19. Identification and characterization of polymorphisms within the 5' flanking region, first exon and part of first intron of bovine GH gene.

    PubMed

    Ferraz, A L J; Bortolossi, J C; Curi, R A; Ferro, M I T; Ferro, J A; Furlan, L R

    2006-06-01

    The aim of the present study was to identify and characterize polymorphisms within the 5' flanking region, first exon and part of first intron of the bovine growth hormone gene among different beef cattle breeds: Nelore (n = 25), Simmental (n = 39), Simbrasil (n = 24), Simmental x Nelore (n = 30), Canchim x Nelore (n = 30) and Angus x Nelore (n = 30). Two DNA fragments (GH1, 464 bp and GH2, 453 bp) were amplified by polymerase chain reaction and then used for polymorphism identification by SSCP. Within the GH1 fragment, five polymorphisms were identified, corresponding to three different alleles: GH1.1, GH1.2 and GH1.3 (GenBank: AY662648, AY662649 and AY662650, respectively). These allele sequences were aligned and compared with bovine GH gene nucleotide sequence (GenBank: M57764 and AF118837), resulting in the identification of five insertion/deletions (INDELs) and five single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). In the GH2 fragment two alleles were identified, GH2.1 and GH2.2 (GenBank: AY662651 and AY662652, respectively). The allele sequences were compared with GenBank sequences (M57764, AF007750 and AH009106) and three INDELs and four SNPs were identified. In conclusion, we were able to identify six new polymorphisms of the bovine GH gene (one INDEL and five SNPs), which can be used as molecular markers in genetic studies.

  20. EA20: Regional School Design Workshop (14th, St. Catharines, Ontario, March 15-16, 1972).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ontario Dept. of Education, Toronto. School Planning and Building Research Section.

    This document contains the speeches and notes of workshop participants assembled to discuss the rehabilitation and renovation of existing schools in keeping with new educational requirements. Thirty-seven selections cover such topics as criteria for planning; development of school sites; community use of the schools; education and architecture;…

  1. Inhomogeneous DNA: Conducting exons and insulating introns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krokhin, A. A.; Bagci, V. M. K.; Izrailev, F. M.; Usatenko, O. V.; Yampol'Skii, V. A.

    2009-08-01

    Parts of DNA sequences known as exons and introns play very different roles in coding and storage of genetic information. Here we show that their conducting properties are also very different. Taking into account long-range correlations among four basic nucleotides that form double-stranded DNA sequence, we calculate electron localization length for exon and intron regions. Analyzing different DNA molecules, we obtain that the exons have narrow bands of extended states, unlike the introns where all the states are well localized. The band of extended states is due to a specific form of the binary correlation function of the sequence of basic DNA nucleotides.

  2. Papers from the Community College Governance Conference, February 15-16, 1974.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Washington State Board for Community Coll. Education, Olympia.

    Papers presented at a conference on community college governance, held in Seattle, Washington on February 15-16, 1974, are provided. The papers are: "Governance for the Two-Year College" by Richard C. Richardson, Jr.: "The Faculty Stake in Governance" by Richard J. Frankie; "The Student Stake in Governance" by Alan R. Shark; "The Public Interest…

  3. Advancing Student Achievement through Labor-Management Collaboration (Denver, Colorado, February 15-16, 2011)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    US Department of Education, 2011

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents the highlights of a conference entitled "Advancing Student Achievement through Labor-Management Collaboration" held in Denver, Colorado last February 15-16, 2011. This first-of-its-kind conference on labor-management collaboration is a historic effort to transform the relationships among local superintendents, school…

  4. Stress analysis of Tellus Regio, Venus, based on gravity and topography - Comparison with Venera 15/16 radar images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, David R.; Gaddis, Lisa

    1991-01-01

    The tectonics of the Tellus Region highland on Venus is examined using the altimetry and gravity data collected by Pioneer Venus, which were incorporated into a thin elastic shell model to calculate both the global (long-wavelength) and the regional (short-wavelength) stresses for various assumed values of crust, lithosphere, and mantle thickness and modes of compensation. The resultant stress fields were compared to the surface morphology observed in the Venera 15/16 radar images and interpreted in terms of stress history of Tellus Regio. The best fitting parameters were found to be consistent with minor amounts of lithospheric flexure being necessary to produce the observed surface features of this region.

  5. Coincident indices of exons and introns.

    PubMed

    Xu, J; Chen, R; Ling, L; Shen, R; Sun, J

    1993-07-01

    In this paper, the coincident index, proposed by W. F. Friedman in cryptology, is made use of in DNA sequence analysis and exon prediction. The coincident index of exons exceeds that of introns by many times, and is mainly affected by window length, which is correlated negatively with the coincident index. An optimal exon prediction scheme was obtained by experimental analysis with an orthogonal table. Besides exons, many other special sites such as tandem repeats can be identified by using the coincident index approach. The application of this approach to the ARV-2 (AIDS associated retrovirus 2) genome found three new possible coding regions and some unusual base composition regions which are probably related to definite biological functions.

  6. Association between polymorphisms of exon 12 and exon 24 of JHDM2A gene and male infertility

    PubMed Central

    Hojati, Zohreh; Nouri Emamzadeh, Fatemeh; Dehghanian, Fariba

    2016-01-01

    Background: Some dynamic changes occurs during spermatogenesis such as histone removal and its replacement with transition nuclear protein and protamine. These proteins are required for packing and condensation of sperm chromatin. JHDM2A is a histone demethylase that directly binds to promoter regions of Tnp1 and Prm1 genes and controls their expression by removing H3K9 at their promoters. Objective: The association between polymorphisms of exon 12 and exon 24 in JHDM2A gene and male infertility were evaluated for the first time. Materials and Methods: In this experimental study, 400 infertile men (oligospermia and azoospermia) and normal healthy fathers were evaluated (n=200). Single Strand Conformation Polymorphism (SSCP-PCR) and polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) methods were used for screening any polymorphisms that are exist in exon 12 and exon 24. Results: Exon 24 PCR products were analyzed by RFLP but no polymorphism was found in this exon at the restriction site of EcoRV enzyme. Our monitoring along the whole nucleotides of exon 12 and exon 24 were continued using SSCP method, but we found no change along these exons. Conclusion: Generally, this study evaluated the association between polymorphisms in exon 12 and exon 24 of JHDM2A gene and male infertility which suggests that polymorphisms of these exons may not be associated with the risk of male infertility. PMID:27525322

  7. Intronic motif pairs cooperate across exons to promote pre-mRNA splicing

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background A very early step in splice site recognition is exon definition, a process that is as yet poorly understood. Communication between the two ends of an exon is thought to be required for this step. We report genome-wide evidence for exons being defined through the combinatorial activity of motifs located in flanking intronic regions. Results Strongly co-occurring motifs were found to specifically reside in four intronic regions surrounding a large number of human exons. These paired motifs occur around constitutive and alternative exons but not pseudo exons. Most co-occurring motifs are limited to intronic regions within 100 nucleotides of the exon. They are preferentially associated with weaker exons. Their pairing is conserved in evolution and they exhibit a lower frequency of single nucleotide polymorphism when paired. Paired motifs display specificity with respect to distance from the exon borders and in constitutive versus alternative splicing. Many resemble binding sites for heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoproteins. Specific pairs are associated with tissue-specific genes, the higher expression of which coincides with that of the pertinent RNA binding proteins. Tested pairs acted synergistically to enhance exon inclusion, and this enhancement was found to be exon-specific. Conclusions The exon-flanking sequence pairs identified here by genomic analysis promote exon inclusion and may play a role in the exon definition step in pre-mRNA splicing. We propose a model in which multiple concerted interactions are required between exonic sequences and flanking intronic sequences to effect exon definition. PMID:20704715

  8. Isolation of exons from cloned DNA by exon trapping.

    PubMed

    Nisson, P E; Watkins, P C; Krizman, D B

    2001-05-01

    Exon trapping is an RNA polymerase chain reaction (PCR) method to clone expressed sequences or exons directly from mammalian genomic DNA. The basic protocol in this unit describes the method for trapping internal exons from cosmid clones and the second basic protocol describes trapping of 3 terminal exons. An describes 3 terminal exon trapping, which avoids subcloning of target DNA by ligating it to the vector for direct transfection. A describes a rapid cloning procedure using uracil DNA glycosylase.

  9. Cleopatra crater on Venus - Venera 15/16 data and impact/volcanic origin controversy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basilevsky, A. T.; Ivanov, B. A.

    1990-02-01

    The morphology and morphometry of the 100-km diameter, 2.4-km deep Cleopatra crater on Venus are examined using Venera 15/16 images. The Cleopatra crater is compared to circular structures on Venus, Mercury, Mars, the earth and the moon. Consideration is given to the possible causes for the genesis of the Cleopatra crater. It is concluded that Cleopatra has a clear impact basin morphology with an anomalous crater depth.

  10. Correlations of CTLA-4 exon-1 rs231775A>G and promoter region rs5742909C>T polymorphisms with the therapeutic efficacy of (131)I radionuclide in Graves' disease.

    PubMed

    Luan, Sha; Gao, Yue; Wang, Chun; Pei, Chun-Ying; Zhao, Chang-Jiu

    2017-06-06

    This study aimed to investigate the correlation of CTLA-4 exon-1 rs231775A>G and promoter region rs5742909C>T polymorphisms with the therapeutic efficacy of radionuclide (131)I in Graves' disease amongst the Chinese Han population. The (131)I radionuclide therapy was applied to 261 patients with Graves' disease. Based on therapeutic efficacy, the patients were assigned into the remission and the non-remission groups. PCR-RFLP was applied to detect CTLA-4 exon-1 rs231775A>G and promoter region rs5742909C>T polymorphisms. Haplotype analysis was conducted by means of SHEsis. The relation between various factors and (131)I therapy was detected by Logistic regression analysis. A close relationship was found between CTLA-4 rs231775A>G and the efficacy of (131)I treatment for Graves' disease (AG + GG vs. AA: OR = 5.190, 95%CI = 1.390~19.430; G vs. A: OR = 2.204, 95%CI = 1.267~3.835). There was statistical significance in relation to the distribution of AC, GT and GC on Graves' disease in the remission and non-remission groups (OR = 0.424, 95%CI = 0.227~0.791; OR = 1.976, 95%CI = 0.998~3.912; OR = 4.495, 95%CI = 2.770~7.294). Logistic regression analysis indicated that the CTLA-4 exon-1 rs231775A>G polymorphism (OR = 15.861, 95%CI = 1.601~157.089) and GT haplotype (OR = 1.375, 95%CI = 0.592~3.196) to be related factors of efficacy of (131)I therapy in Graves' disease. The obtained results indicated that the CTLA-4 exon-1 rs231775A>G polymorphism and the GT haplotype may be correlated to the therapeutic efficacy of the radionuclide (131)I for patients with Graves' disease. ©2017 The Author(s).

  11. Maternal mosaicism for a second mutational event--a novel deletion--in a familial adenomatous polyposis family harboring a new germ-line mutation in the alternatively spliced-exon 9 region of APC.

    PubMed

    Davidson, Sima; Leshanski, Lucy; Rennert, Gad; Eidelman, Shmuel; Amikam, Dorit

    2002-01-01

    Familial Adenomatous Polyposis (FAP) is an autosomal dominant heritable disorder caused by germ-line mutations in the APC gene. To date, more than 300 germ-line mutations within this gene have been described. Using PCR, SSCP and DNA sequencing, we have identified a new mutation in the alternatively spliced region of exon 9 (1042C-->T), which results in a stop signal. This mutation manifested an aggressive form of FAP with onset of symptoms in one proband at age 17. Our results differ from reported exon 9 mutations in the spliced-out portion of the gene manifesting an attentuated form of FAP (AAPC) [Varesco et al 1994; van der Luijt et al. 1995; Curia et al. 1998; Young et al. 1998]. When analyzing this family, we encountered a mutant FAP gene which had undergone a second mutational event, a deletion. In addition to linkage analysis, both the occurrence of the two exon 9 mutation-carrier siblings, of which one is affected, harboring the same novel deletion in one generation of this family, and its absence in both parents indicates the existence of maternal germ-line mosaicism for cells bearing the latter second mutational event. Our study is only the second report of parental mosaicism in the APC gene. Copyright 2001 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  12. PERSISTENT CURRENT EFFECT IN 15-16 T NB3SN ACCELERATOR DIPOLES AND ITS CORRECTION

    SciTech Connect

    Kashikhin, V. V.; Zlobin, A. V.

    2016-11-08

    Nb3Sn magnets with operating fields of 15-16 T are considered for the LHC Energy Doubler and a future Very High Energy pp Collider. Due to large coil volume, high critical current density and large superconducting (SC) filament size the persistent current effect is very large in Nb3Sn dipoles al low fields. This paper presents the results of analysis of the persistent current effect in the 15 T Nb3Sn dipole demonstrator being developed at FNAL, and describes different possibilities of its correction including passive SC wires, iron shims and coil geometry.

  13. Characterization of Venera 15/16 geologic units from Pioneer Venus reflectivity and roughness data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bindschadler, D. L.; Head, J. W.

    1989-01-01

    The characterization of geologic units defined for the Venus surface on the basis of Venera 15/16 image data is presently conducted in light of Pioneer Venus reflectivity and rms slope data. Four geologic-unit groups are distinguished: smooth rocky units, rough ones, rough high-dielectric units, and diffusely-scattering ones. Models have been tested for the surface-property origins of several units, and it is determined that plains and tectonic units may be contrasted in terms not only of surface roughness but of surface-roughening tectonic deformation that appears to dominate the erosional regime of Venus.

  14. Promoter polymorphism T-786C, 894G→T at exon 7 of endothelial nitric oxide synthase gene are associated with risk of osteoporosis in Sichuan region male residents

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Zuchao; Zhang, Yu; Qiu, Guixing

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the association between genetic polymorphism of T-786C in promoter region, 894G→T at exon 7 of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) gene and osteoporosis (OP) disease. Method: The genotypes of 350 patients with osteoporosis and 350 healthy controls were detected by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and DNA sequencing. The allele ratios and genotype distributions in the patients and controls were assessed using the Pearson χ2-test. Odds ratios (OR) with two tailed P-values and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were calculated as a measure of the association of the eNOS genotypes with OP. Result: the C allele distribution frequency of T-786C eNOS gene in OP group (8.5%) was significantly higher than that in control group (3.9%), relative risk (OR) of OP associated with the CC genotype was 2.68 (95% CI, 0.92 to 1.37). The T allele frequency of 894G→T at exon 7 in eNOS gene in OP group (11.5%) was also significantly higher than that in control group (5.2%), OR of OP associated with the TT genotype was 2.60 (all P<0.05). Conclusion: The analysis results indicated that both T-786C in promoter region and 894G→T at exon 7 of eNOS gene might be genetic predisposal factors of OP, these polymorphisms may be independently or synergic with other loci to have an impact on the incidence of OP. PMID:26823879

  15. Pervasive Layering in the Lunar Highland Crust: Evidence from Apollos 15, 16,and 17

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lowman, Paul D., Jr.; Yang, Tiffany

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents results of a photogeologic reconnaissance of 70 mm photographs taken on the lunar surface during the Apollo 15, 16, and 17 missions, whose primary objective was to investigate the lunar highland crust. Photographs at all three sites, notably the Apennine Front, show pervasive layered structure. These layers are easily distinguished from lighting artifacts, and are considered genuine crustal structures. Their number, thickness, and extent implies that they are lava flows, not ejecta blankets or intrusive features. They appear to be the upper part of the earliest lunar crust, possibly forming a layer tens of kilometers thick. Remote sensing studies (X-ray fluorescence and reflectance spectroscopy), indicate that the highland crust is dominantly a feldspathic basalt. It is concluded that the highland layers represent a global crust formed by eruptions of high-alumina basalt in the first few hundred million years of the Moon's history.

  16. Hardware accelerator for prediction of exons.

    PubMed

    Yusuf, Adeel; Khan, Shoab A

    2006-01-01

    Gene annotation is by nature a computationally intensive problem, as it needs to process huge data size of DNA sequences. This forces the need to look for alternate ways of implementing algorithms to predict exons. The paper presents an accelerator for indexing DNA sequences. The accelerator effectively exploits the 3-periodicity property exhibited by protein coding regions and indicates their presence in the sequence. Experimental results show superior performance compared with software-based approach for evaluating exons from DNA. The accelerator based PCI pluggable card offers a great utility to scientists and engineers actively involved in indexing DNA sequences.

  17. Correlations of CTLA-4 Exon-1 49 A/G and Promoter Region 318 C/T Polymorphisms with the Therapeutic Efficacy of (131) I Radionuclide in Graves' Disease in Chinese Han Population.

    PubMed

    Han, Xin-Rui; Wen, Xin; Wang, Shan; Fan, Shao-Hua; Zhuang, Juan; Wang, Yong-Jian; Zhang, Zi-Feng; Li, Meng-Qiu; Hu, Bin; Shan, Qun; Sun, Chun-Hui; Bao, Ya-Xing; Luan, Sha; Zhao, Chang-Jiu; Wu, Dong-Mei; Lu, Jun; Zheng, Yuan-Lin

    2017-08-04

    This study aimed to investigate the correlation of CTLA-4 exon-1 49 A/G and promoter region-318 C/T polymorphisms with the therapeutic efficacy of radionuclide (131) I for Graves' disease in Chinese Han population. The (131) I radionuclide therapy was applied in 261 patients with Graves' disease. The patients were classified into the remission and non-remission groups. PCR-RFLP was implemented to detect CTLA-4 exon-1 49 A/G and promoter region-318 C/T polymorphisms. Haplotypes of CTLA-4 49 A/G and -318 C/T were analyzed using SHEsis software online. Logistic regression model was applied to analyze the association between multiple factors and the efficacy of (131) I therapy. The results showed that CTLA-4 49 A/G was closely related to the efficacy of (131) I treatment for Graves' disease (AG + GG vs. AA: OR = 6.125, 95%CI = 1.431∼26.22, P = 0.006; G vs. A: OR = 2.204, 95%CI = 1.267 ∼3 .835, P = 0.004). Moreover, the findings revealed that haplotype A-C (P = 0.018, OR = 0.424, 95%CI: 0.205∼0.876) and G-C (P = 0.014, OR = 2.204, 95%CI: 1.267∼3.835) were associated with the efficacy of (131) I therapy in treating Graves' disease. Logistic regression analysis indicated that thyroid weight (OR = 1.050, 95%CI = 1.007∼1.095, P = 0.022) and CTLA-4 exon-1 49 A/G polymorphism (OR = 8.082, 95%CI = 1.049∼62.234, P = 0.045) were both related factors with efficacy of (131) I therapy in Graves' disease. These data indicated that CTLA-4 exon-1 49 A/G polymorphism may be associated with therapeutic efficacy of radionuclide (131) I for patients with Graves' disease. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  18. Structure function analysis of SH2D2A isoforms expressed in T cells reveals a crucial role for the proline rich region encoded by SH2D2A exon 7

    PubMed Central

    Granum, Stine; Sundvold-Gjerstad, Vibeke; Dai, Ke-Zheng; Kolltveit, Kristin Melkevik; Hildebrand, Kjersti; Huitfeldt, Henrik S; Lea, Tor; Spurkland, Anne

    2006-01-01

    Background The activation induced T cell specific adapter protein (TSAd), encoded by SH2D2A, interacts with and modulates Lck activity. Several transcript variants of TSAd mRNA exist, but their biological significance remains unknown. Here we examined expression of SH2D2A transcripts in activated CD4+ T cells and used the SH2D2A variants as tools to identify functionally important regions of TSAd. Results TSAd was found to interact with Lck in human CD4+ T cells ex vivo. Three interaction modes of TSAd with Lck were identified. TSAd aa239–256 conferred binding to the Lck-SH3 domain, whereas one or more of the four tyrosines within aa239–334 encoded by SH2D2A exon 7 was found to confer interaction with the Lck-SH2-domain. Finally the TSAd-SH2 domain was found to interact with Lck. The SH2D2A exon 7 encoding TSAd aa 239–334 was found to harbour information essential not only for TSAd interaction with Lck, but also for TSAd modulation of Lck activity and translocation of TSAd to the nucleus. All five SH2D2A transcripts were found to be expressed in CD3 stimulated CD4+ T cells. Conclusion These data show that TSAd and Lck may interact through several different domains and that Lck TSAd interaction occurs in CD4+ T cells ex vivo. Alternative splicing of exon 7 encoding aa239–334 results in loss of the majority of protein interaction motives of TSAd and yields truncated TSAd molecules with altered ability to modulate Lck activity. Whether TSAd is regulated through differential alternative splicing of the SH2D2A transcript remains to be determined. PMID:16839418

  19. Detection of 98. 5% of the mutations in 200 Belgian cystic fibrosis alleles by reverse dot-blot and sequencing of the complete coding region and exon/intron junctions of the CFTR gene

    SciTech Connect

    Cuppens, H.; Marynen, P.; Cassiman, J.J. ); De Boeck, C. )

    1993-12-01

    The authors have previously shown that about 85% of the mutations in 194 Belgian cystic fibrosis alleles could be detected by a reverse dot-blot assay. In the present study, 50 Belgian chromosomes were analyzed for mutations in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator gene by means of direct solid phase automatic sequencing of PCR products of individual exons. Twenty-six disease mutations and 14 polymorphisms were found. Twelve of these mutations and 3 polymorphisms were not described before. With the exception of one mutant allele carrying two mutations, these mutations were the only mutations found in the complete coding region and their exon/intron boundaries. The total sensitivity of mutant CF alleles that could be identified was 98.5%. Given the heterogeneity of these mutations, most of them very rare, CFTR mutation screening still remains rather complex in the population, and population screening, whether desirable or not, does not appear to be technically feasible with the methods currently available. 24 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  20. Evolutionary history of exon shuffling.

    PubMed

    França, Gustavo S; Cancherini, Douglas V; de Souza, Sandro J

    2012-06-01

    Exon shuffling has been characterized as one of the major evolutionary forces shaping both the genome and the proteome of eukaryotes. This mechanism was particularly important in the creation of multidomain proteins during animal evolution, bringing a number of functional genetic novelties. Here, genome information from a variety of eukaryotic species was used to address several issues related to the evolutionary history of exon shuffling. By comparing all protein sequences within each species, we were able to characterize exon shuffling signatures throughout metazoans. Intron phase (the position of the intron regarding the codon) and exon symmetry (the pattern of flanking introns for a given exon or block of adjacent exons) were features used to evaluate exon shuffling. We confirmed previous observations that exon shuffling mediated by phase 1 introns (1-1 exon shuffling) is the predominant kind in multicellular animals. Evidence is provided that such pattern was achieved since the early steps of animal evolution, supported by a detectable presence of 1-1 shuffling units in Trichoplax adhaerens and a considerable prevalence of them in Nematostella vectensis. In contrast, Monosiga brevicollis, one of the closest relatives of metazoans, and Arabidopsis thaliana, showed no evidence of 1-1 exon or domain shuffling above what it would be expected by chance. Instead, exon shuffling events are less abundant and predominantly mediated by phase 0 introns (0-0 exon shuffling) in those non-metazoan species. Moreover, an intermediate pattern of 1-1 and 0-0 exon shuffling was observed for the placozoan T. adhaerens, a primitive animal. Finally, characterization of flanking intron phases around domain borders allowed us to identify a common set of symmetric 1-1 domains that have been shuffled throughout the metazoan lineage.

  1. [Attitudes to over-the-counter analgesics among 15-16 year-old teenagers].

    PubMed

    Holager, Tanja; Lagerløv, Per; Helseth, Sølvi; Rosvold, Elin O

    2009-08-13

    More information is needed on teenagers' attitudes to self-medication with OTC-analgesics, and their access to medicine and information. An anonymous questionnaire study was performed among all tenth grade students in Drammen, a middle sized city in Norway, in spring 2007. 367 students participated in the study, 55 of them had a non-western background. 24 % of boys and 41 % of girls stated that analgesics could be used whenever they experienced pain. Among these, 91 % had taken analgesics during the previous four weeks, among those who thought that analgesics should not be used 50 % had taken it. The girls reported episodes of pain more often than the boys, but analgesics were used to treat pain to the same extent by all students, irrelevant of sex and cultural background. 77 % of students with a western origin and 62 % of those from non-western countries felt free to use OTC-analgesics at home without asking for permission. 31 % of western girls got analgesics from their friends. 8.5 % bought medicines at the pharmacy and 7.1 % bought them in grocery shops. Information on how to alleviate pain with medicine was usually given by the parents. Teenagers in secondary school have different opinions on self-medication with OTC-analgesics. The parents assist their children in how to manage pain. 15 - 16 year-olds experience much pain, and mainly have free access to analgesics at home.

  2. The carcinogenicity of 15,16-dihydro-11-methyl-cyclopenta[a]phenanthren-17-one.

    PubMed Central

    Coombs, M. M.; Bhatt, T. S.; Young, S.

    1979-01-01

    Direct comparison of skin-tumour induction by 15,16-dihydro-11-methylcyclopenta[a]phenanthren-17-one (I) and by benzo[a]pyrene on mouse skin, both by repeated application or by initiation with a single dose followed by promotion with croton oil, demonstrated that these two carcinogens have similar potency. After repeated application of (I) the mean latent period for skin-tumour induction was linearly related to the logarithm of the dose over a 10-fold dose range. Under these conditions, application of the aryl-hydrocarbon-hydroxylase inhibitor 7,8-benzoflavone together with (I) inhibited tumour induction by about 40%. By contrast, in the 2-stage experiment, little effect on tumour incidence or latent period was observed when this inhibitor was applied with the single initiating dose of (I). Co-administration of the epoxide-hydratase inhibitor 1,1,1-trichloropropene oxide caused enhancement by shortening the latent period. After s.c. injection of (I) into mice, a similar number of tumours was induced on skin remote from the site of injection by promotion with corton oil begun either one week or 6 months after initiation. Gastric instillation of (I) into female rats induced mammary adenocarcinomas. PMID:526432

  3. Therapeutic exon skipping for dysferlinopathies?

    PubMed

    Aartsma-Rus, Annemieke; Singh, Kavita H K; Fokkema, Ivo F A C; Ginjaar, Ieke B; van Ommen, Gert-Jan; den Dunnen, Johan T; van der Maarel, Silvère M

    2010-08-01

    Antisense-mediated exon skipping is a promising therapeutic approach for Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) currently tested in clinical trials. The aim is to reframe dystrophin transcripts using antisense oligonucleotides (AONs). These hide an exon from the splicing machinery to induce exon skipping, restoration of the reading frame and generation of internally deleted, but partially functional proteins. It thus relies on the characteristic of the dystrophin protein, which has essential N- and C-terminal domains, whereas the central rod domain is largely redundant. This approach may also be applicable to limb-girdle muscular dystrophy type 2B (LGMD2B), Myoshi myopathy (MM) and distal myopathy with anterior tibial onset (DMAT), which are caused by mutations in the dysferlin-encoding DYSF gene. Dysferlin has a function in repairing muscle membrane damage. Dysferlin contains calcium-dependent C2 lipid binding (C2) domains and an essential transmembrane domain. However, mildly affected patients in whom one or a large number of DYSF exons were missing have been described, suggesting that internally deleted dysferlin proteins can be functional. Thus, exon skipping might also be applicable as a LGMD2B, MM and DMAT therapy. In this study we have analyzed the dysferlin protein domains and DYSF mutations and have described what exons are promising targets with regard to applicability and feasibility. We also show that DYSF exon skipping seems to be as straightforward as DMD exon skipping, as AONs to induce efficient skipping of four DYSF exons were readily identified.

  4. Exon-intron organization and sequence comparison of human and murine T11 (CD2) genes

    SciTech Connect

    Diamond, D.J.; Clayton, L.K.; Sayre, P.H.; Reinherz, E.L.

    1988-03-01

    Genomic DNA clones containing the human and murine genes coding for the 50-kDa T11 (CD2) T-cell surface glycoprotein were characterized. The human T11 gene is approx. = 12 kilobases long and comprised of five exons. A leader exon (L) contains the 5'-untranslated region and most of the nucleotides defining the signal peptide (amino acids (aa) -24 to -5). Two exons encode the extracellular segment; exon Ex1 is 321 base pairs (bp) long and codes for four residues of the leader peptide and aa 1-103 of the mature protein, and exon Ex2 is 231 bp long and encodes aa 104-180. Exon TM is 123 bp long and codes for the single transmembrane region of the molecule (aa 181-221). Exon C is a large 765-bp exon encoding virtually the entire cytoplasmic domain (aa 222-327) and the 3'-untranslated region. The murine region T11 gene has a similar organization with exon-intron boundaries essentially identical to the human gene. Substantial conservation of nucleotide sequences between species in both 5'- and 3'-gene flanking regions equivalent to that among homologous exons suggests that murine and human genes may be regulated in a similar fashion. The probable relationship of the individual T11 exons to functional and structural protein domains is discussed.

  5. EasyExonPrimer: automated primer design for exon sequences.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xiaolin; Munroe, David J

    2006-01-01

    EasyExonPrimer is a web-based software that automates the design of PCR primers to amplify exon sequences from genomic DNA. EasyExonPrimer is written in Perl and uses Primer3 to design PCR primers based on the genome builds and annotation databases available at the University of California, Santa Cruz (UCSC) Genome Browser database (http://genome.ucsc.edu/). It masks repeats and known single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) sites in the genome and designs standardised primers using optimised conditions. Users can input genes by RefSeq mRNA ID, gene name or keyword. The primer design is optimised for large-scale resequencing of exons. For exons larger than 1 kb, the user has the option of breaking the exon sequence down into overlapping smaller fragments. All primer pairs are then verified using the In-Silico PCR software to test for uniqueness in the genome. We have designed >1000 pairs of primers for 90 genes; 95% of the primer pairs successfully amplified exon sequences under standard PCR conditions without requiring further optimisation. EasyExonPrimer is available from http://129.43.22.27/~primer/. The source code is also available upon request. Xiaolin Wu (forestwu@mail.nih.gov).

  6. A 2-nt RNA enhancer on exon 11 promotes exon 11 inclusion of the Ron proto-oncogene.

    PubMed

    Moon, Heegyum; Cho, Sunghee; Loh, Tiing Jen; Zhou, Jianhua; Ghigna, Claudia; Biamonti, Giuseppe; Green, Michael R; Zheng, Xuexiu; Shen, Haihong

    2014-01-01

    Ron is a human receptor for the macrophage-stimulating protein (MSP). Exon 11 skipping of Ron pre-mRNA produces the Ron∆165 protein that has a deletion of a 49 amino acid region in the β-chain extracellular domain. Ron∆165 is constitutively active even in the absence of its ligand. Through stepwise deletion analysis, we identified a 2-nt RNA enhancer, which is located 74 nt upstream from the 5' splice site of exon 11, for exon 11 inclusion. Through double-base and single-base substitution analysis of the 2-nt RNA, we demonstrated that the GA, CC, UG and AC dinucleotides on exon 11, in addition to the wild-type AG sequence, function as enhancers for exon 11 inclusion of the Ron pre-mRNA.

  7. Widespread Shortening of 3’ Untranslated Regions and Increased Exon Inclusion Are Evolutionarily Conserved Features of Innate Immune Responses to Infection

    PubMed Central

    Pagé Sabourin, Ariane; Nédélec, Yohann; Dumaine, Anne; Yotova, Vania; Johnson, Zachary P.; Lanford, Robert E.; Burge, Christopher B.

    2016-01-01

    The contribution of pre-mRNA processing mechanisms to the regulation of immune responses remains poorly studied despite emerging examples of their role as regulators of immune defenses. We sought to investigate the role of mRNA processing in the cellular responses of human macrophages to live bacterial infections. Here, we used mRNA sequencing to quantify gene expression and isoform abundances in primary macrophages from 60 individuals, before and after infection with Listeria monocytogenes and Salmonella typhimurium. In response to both bacteria we identified thousands of genes that significantly change isoform usage in response to infection, characterized by an overall increase in isoform diversity after infection. In response to both bacteria, we found global shifts towards (i) the inclusion of cassette exons and (ii) shorter 3’ UTRs, with near-universal shifts towards usage of more upstream polyadenylation sites. Using complementary data collected in non-human primates, we show that these features are evolutionarily conserved among primates. Following infection, we identify candidate RNA processing factors whose expression is associated with individual-specific variation in isoform abundance. Finally, by profiling microRNA levels, we show that 3’ UTRs with reduced abundance after infection are significantly enriched for target sites for particular miRNAs. These results suggest that the pervasive usage of shorter 3’ UTRs is a mechanism for particular genes to evade repression by immune-activated miRNAs. Collectively, our results suggest that dynamic changes in RNA processing may play key roles in the regulation of innate immune responses. PMID:27690314

  8. A genomic region encompassing a newly identified exon provides enhancing activity sufficient for normal myo7aa expression in zebrafish sensory hair cells.

    PubMed

    Ernest, Sylvain; Rosa, Frédéric M

    2015-09-01

    MYO7A is an unconventional myosin involved in the structural organization of hair bundles at the apex of sensory hair cells (SHCs) where it serves mechanotransduction in the process of hearing and balance. Mutations of MYO7A are responsible for abnormal shaping of hair bundles, resulting in human deafness and murine deafness/circling behavior. Myo7aa, expressed in SHCs of the inner ear and lateral line of zebrafish, causes circling behavior and abnormal hair cell function when deficient in mariner mutant. This work identifies a new hair cell-specific enhancer, highly conserved between species, located within Intron 2-3 of zebrafish myosin 7a (myo7aa) gene. This enhancer is contained within a 761-bp DNA fragment that encompasses a newly identified Exon of myo7aa and whose activity does not depend on orientation. Compensation of mariner mutation by expression of mCherry-Myo7aa fusion protein under the control of this 761-bp DNA fragment results in recovery of balance, normal hair bundle shape and restored hair cell function. Two smaller adjacent fragments (344-bp and 431-bp), extracted from the 761-bp fragment, both show hair cell-specific enhancing activity, with apparently reduced intensity and coverage. These data should help understand the role of Myo7aa in sensory hair cell differentiation and function. They provide tools to decipher how myo7aa gene is expressed and regulated in SHCs by allowing the identification of potential transcription factors involved in this process. The discovered enhancer could represent a new target for the identification of deafness-causing mutations affecting human MYO7A.

  9. Quantitative analysis of terrain units mapped in the northern quarter of Venus from Venera 15/16 data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schaber, G. G.

    1991-01-01

    The contacts between 34 geological/geomorphic terrain units in the northern quarter of Venus mapped from Venera 15/16 data were digitized and converted to a Sinusoidal Equal-Area projection. The result was then registered with a merged Pioneer Venus/Venera 15/16 altimetric database, root mean square (rms) slope values, and radar reflectivity values derived from Pioneer Venus. The resulting information includes comparisons among individual terrain units and terrain groups to which they are assigned in regard to percentage of map area covered, elevation, rms slopes, distribution of suspected craters greater than 10 km in diameter.

  10. Computational definition of sequence motifs governing constitutive exon splicing.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiang H-F; Chasin, Lawrence A

    2004-06-01

    We have searched for sequence motifs that contribute to the recognition of human pre-mRNA splice sites by comparing the frequency of 8-mers in internal noncoding exons versus unspliced pseudo exons and 5' untranslated regions (5' untranslated regions [UTRs]) of transcripts of intronless genes. This type of comparison avoids the isolation of sequences that are distinguished by their protein-coding information. We classified sequence families comprising 2069 putative exonic enhancers and 974 putative exonic silencers. Representatives of each class functioned as enhancers or silencers when inserted into a test exon and assayed in transfected mammalian cells. As a class, the enhancer sequencers were more prevalent and the silencer elements less prevalent in all exons compared with introns. A survey of 58 reported exonic splicing mutations showed good agreement between the splicing phenotype and the effect of the mutation on the motifs defined here. The large number of effective sequences implied by these results suggests that sequences that influence splicing may be very abundant in pre-mRNA.

  11. 47 CFR 90.315 - Special provisions governing use of frequencies in the 476-494 MHz band (TV Channels 15, 16, 17...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... in the 476-494 MHz band (TV Channels 15, 16, 17) in the Southern Louisiana-Texas Offshore Zone. 90...) § 90.315 Special provisions governing use of frequencies in the 476-494 MHz band (TV Channels 15, 16... cochannel protection to TV stations on Channels 15, 16 and 17. Station operating parameters shall be...

  12. 47 CFR 90.315 - Special provisions governing use of frequencies in the 476-494 MHz band (TV Channels 15, 16, 17...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... in the 476-494 MHz band (TV Channels 15, 16, 17) in the Southern Louisiana-Texas Offshore Zone. 90...) § 90.315 Special provisions governing use of frequencies in the 476-494 MHz band (TV Channels 15, 16... cochannel protection to TV stations on Channels 15, 16 and 17. Station operating parameters shall be...

  13. The New Outlook for Science. Science and Belief: from Copernicus to Darwin, Block VI, Units 15-16.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Open Univ., Walton, Bletchley, Bucks (England).

    This text contains units 15-16 in the Open University course, Science and Belief: from Copernicus to Darwin. It is an inter-faculty second level course in the history of science. Unit 15 is concerned with Nature and History and includes uniformitarianism, human history, evolutionism, and Darwinism. Unit objectives, readings, and questions with the…

  14. Computer Algorithms Used in Computing the Mk 15/16 Constant 0.7 ATA Oxygen Partial Pressure Decompression Tables.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-01-01

    COMPUTER ALGORITHM USED IN COMPUTING THE FINAL W 15/16 CONSTANT 0.7 ATA OXYGEN PARTIAL . PERFORING ORG. REPORT MUNDER PRESSURE DECOMPRESSION TABLES 7...earlier Model Parameter Input Files bad only one subfile which could then be read and printed before an end of file is encounted and the program stops

  15. The New Outlook for Science. Science and Belief: from Copernicus to Darwin, Block VI, Units 15-16.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Open Univ., Walton, Bletchley, Bucks (England).

    This text contains units 15-16 in the Open University course, Science and Belief: from Copernicus to Darwin. It is an inter-faculty second level course in the history of science. Unit 15 is concerned with Nature and History and includes uniformitarianism, human history, evolutionism, and Darwinism. Unit objectives, readings, and questions with the…

  16. Exons, Introns, and DNA Thermodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlon, Enrico; Malki, Mehdi Lejard; Blossey, Ralf

    2005-05-01

    The genes of eukaryotes are characterized by protein coding fragments, the exons, interrupted by introns, i.e., stretches of DNA which do not carry useful information for protein synthesis. We have analyzed the melting behavior of randomly selected human cDNA sequences obtained from genomic DNA by removing all introns. A clear correspondence is observed between exons and melting domains. This finding may provide new insights into the physical mechanisms underlying the evolution of genes.

  17. Exonal deletion of SLC24A4 causes hypomaturation amelogenesis imperfecta.

    PubMed

    Seymen, F; Lee, K-E; Tran Le, C G; Yildirim, M; Gencay, K; Lee, Z H; Kim, J-W

    2014-04-01

    Amelogenesis imperfecta is a heterogeneous group of genetic conditions affecting enamel formation. Recently, mutations in solute carrier family 24 member 4 (SLC24A4) have been identified to cause autosomal recessive hypomaturation amelogenesis imperfecta. We recruited a consanguineous family with hypomaturation amelogenesis imperfecta with generalized brown discoloration. Sequencing of the candidate genes identified a 10-kb deletion, including exons 15, 16, and most of the last exon of the SLC24A4 gene. Interestingly, this deletion was caused by homologous recombination between two 354-bp-long homologous sequences located in intron 14 and the 3' UTR. This is the first report of exonal deletion in SLC24A4 providing confirmatory evidence that the function of SLC24A4 in calcium transport has a crucial role in the maturation stage of amelogenesis.

  18. Deletion of Dystrophin In-Frame Exon 5 Leads to a Severe Phenotype: Guidance for Exon Skipping Strategies

    PubMed Central

    Toh, Zhi Yon Charles; Thandar Aung-Htut, May; Pinniger, Gavin; Adams, Abbie M.; Krishnaswarmy, Sudarsan; Wong, Brenda L.; Fletcher, Sue; Wilton, Steve D.

    2016-01-01

    Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophy severity depends upon the nature and location of the DMD gene lesion and generally correlates with the dystrophin open reading frame. However, there are striking exceptions where an in-frame genomic deletion leads to severe pathology or protein-truncating mutations (nonsense or frame-shifting indels) manifest as mild disease. Exceptions to the dystrophin reading frame rule are usually resolved after molecular diagnosis on muscle RNA. We report a moderate/severe Becker muscular dystrophy patient with an in-frame genomic deletion of DMD exon 5. This mutation has been reported by others as resulting in Duchenne or Intermediate muscular dystrophy, and the loss of this in-frame exon in one patient led to multiple splicing events, including omission of exon 6, that disrupts the open reading frame and is consistent with a severe phenotype. The patient described has a deletion of dystrophin exon 5 that does not compromise recognition of exon 6, and although the deletion does not disrupt the reading frame, his clinical presentation is more severe than would be expected for classical Becker muscular dystrophy. We suggest that the dystrophin isoform lacking the actin-binding sequence encoded by exon 5 is compromised, reflected by the phenotype resulting from induction of this dystrophin isoform in mouse muscle in vivo. Hence, exon skipping to address DMD-causing mutations within DMD exon 5 may not yield an isoform that confers marked clinical benefit. Additional studies will be required to determine whether multi-exon skipping strategies could yield more functional dystrophin isoforms, since some BMD patients with larger in-frame deletions in this region have been reported with mild phenotypes. PMID:26745801

  19. Discovery and Characterization of Human Exonic Transcriptional Regulatory Elements

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Arshad H.; Lin, Andy; Smith, Desmond J.

    2012-01-01

    We sought exonic transcriptional regulatory elements by shotgun cloning human cDNA fragments into luciferase reporter vectors and measuring the resulting expression levels in liver cells. We uncovered seven regulatory elements within coding regions and three within 3' untranslated regions (UTRs). Two of the putative regulatory elements were enhancers and eight were silencers. The regulatory elements were generally but not consistently evolutionarily conserved and also showed a trend toward decreased population diversity. Furthermore, the exonic regulatory elements were enriched in known transcription factor binding sites (TFBSs) and were associated with several histone modifications and transcriptionally relevant chromatin. Evidence was obtained for bidirectional cis-regulation of a coding region element within a tubulin gene, TUBA1B, by the transcription factors PPARA and RORA. We estimate that hundreds of exonic transcriptional regulatory elements exist, an unexpected finding that highlights a surprising multi-functionality of sequences in the human genome. PMID:23029400

  20. Exon-phase symmetry and intrinsic structural disorder promote modular evolution in the human genome

    PubMed Central

    Schad, Eva; Kalmar, Lajos; Tompa, Peter

    2013-01-01

    A key signature of module exchange in the genome is phase symmetry of exons, suggestive of exon shuffling events that occurred without disrupting translation reading frame. At the protein level, intrinsic structural disorder may be another key element because disordered regions often serve as functional elements that can be effectively integrated into a protein structure. Therefore, we asked whether exon-phase symmetry in the human genome and structural disorder in the human proteome are connected, signalling such evolutionary mechanisms in the assembly of multi-exon genes. We found an elevated level of structural disorder of regions encoded by symmetric exons and a preferred symmetry of exons encoding for mostly disordered regions (>70% predicted disorder). Alternatively spliced symmetric exons tend to correspond to the most disordered regions. The genes of mostly disordered proteins (>70% predicted disorder) tend to be assembled from symmetric exons, which often arise by internal tandem duplications. Preponderance of certain types of short motifs (e.g. SH3-binding motif) and domains (e.g. high-mobility group domains) suggests that certain disordered modules have been particularly effective in exon-shuffling events. Our observations suggest that structural disorder has facilitated modular assembly of complex genes in evolution of the human genome. PMID:23460204

  1. ExonVisualiser – application for visualization exon units in 2D and 3D protein structures

    PubMed Central

    Piwowar, Monika; Krzysztof, Porembski; Piotr, Piwowar

    2012-01-01

    The web application oriented on identification and visualization of protein regions encoded by exons is presented. The Exon Visualiser can be used for visualisation on different levels of protein structure: at the primary (sequence) level and secondary structures level, as well as at the level of tertiary protein structure. The programme is suitable for processing data for all genes which have protein expressions deposited in the PDB database. The procedure steps implemented in the application: I) loading exons sequences and theirs coordinates from GenBank file as well as protein sequences: CDS from GenBank and aminoacid sequence from PDB II) consensus sequence creation (comparing amino acid sequences form PDB file with the CDS sequence from GenBank file) III) matching exon coordinates IV) visualisation in 2D and 3D protein structures. Presented web-tool among others provides the color-coded graphical display of protein sequences and chains in three dimensional protein structures which are correlated with the corresponding exons. Availability http://149.156.12.53/ExonVisualiser/ PMID:23275735

  2. In-frame dystrophin following exon 51-skipping improves muscle pathology and function in the exon 52-deficient mdx mouse.

    PubMed

    Aoki, Yoshitsugu; Nakamura, Akinori; Yokota, Toshifumi; Saito, Takashi; Okazawa, Hitoshi; Nagata, Tetsuya; Takeda, Shin'ichi

    2010-11-01

    A promising therapeutic approach for Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is exon skipping using antisense oligonucleotides (AOs). In-frame deletions of the hinge 3 region of the dystrophin protein, which is encoded by exons 50 and 51, are predicted to cause a variety of phenotypes. Here, we performed functional analyses of muscle in the exon 52-deleted mdx (mdx52) mouse, to predict the function of in-frame dystrophin following exon 51-skipping, which leads to a protein lacking most of hinge 3. A series of AOs based on phosphorodiamidate morpholino oligomers was screened by intramuscular injection into mdx52 mice. The highest splicing efficiency was generated by a two-oligonucleotide cocktail targeting both the 5' and 3' splice sites of exon 51. After a dose-escalation study, we systemically delivered this cocktail into mdx52 mice seven times at weekly intervals. This induced 20-30% of wild-type (WT) dystrophin expression levels in all muscles, and was accompanied by amelioration of the dystrophic pathology and improvement of skeletal muscle function. Because the structure of the restored in-frame dystrophin resembles human dystrophin following exon 51-skipping, our results are encouraging for the ongoing clinical trials for DMD. Moreover, the therapeutic dose required can provide a suggestion of the theoretical equivalent dose for humans.

  3. Exon structure of the human dystrophin gene

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, R.G.; Coffey, A.J.; Bobrow, M.; Bentley, D.R.

    1993-05-01

    Application of a novel vectorette PCR approach to defining intron-exon boundaries has permitted completion of analysis of the exon structure of the largest and most complex known human gene. The authors present here a summary of the exon structure of the entire human dystrophin gene, together with the sizes of genomic HindIII fragments recognized by each exon, and (where available) GenBank accession numbers for adjacent intron sequences. 20 refs., 1 tab.

  4. Floods of September 15-16, 1992, in the Thompson, Weldon, and Chariton River basins, south-central Iowa

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Eash, D.A.; Koppensteiner, B.A.

    1997-01-01

    Water-surface-elevation profiles and peak discharges for the floods of September 15-16, 1992, in the Thompson, Weldon, and Chariton River Basins, south-central Iowa, are presented in this report. The profiles illustrate the 1992 floods along the Thompson, Weldon, Chariton, and South Fork Chariton Rivers and along Elk Creek in the south-central Iowa counties of Adair, Clarke, Decatur, Lucas, Madison, Ringgold, Union, and Wayne. Water-surface-elevation profiles for the floods of July 4, 1981, along the Chariton River in Lucas County and along the South Fork Chariton River in Wayne County also are included in the report for comparative purposes. The September 15-16, 1992, floods are the largest known peak discharges at gaging stations Thompson River at Davis City (station number 06898000) 57,000 cubic feet per second, Weldon River near Leon (station number 06898400) 76,200 cubic feet per second, Chariton River near Chariton (station number 06903400) 37,700 cubic feet per second, and South Fork Chariton River near Promise City (station number 06903700) 70,600 cubic feet per second. The peak discharges were, respectively, 1.7, 2.6, 1.4, and 2.1 times larger than calculated 100-year recurrence-interval discharges. The report provides information on flood stages and discharges and floodflow frequencies for streamflow-gaging stations in the Thompson, Weldon, and Chariton River Basins using flood information collected through 1995. Information on temporary bench marks and reference points established in the Thompson and Weldon River Basins during 1994-95, and in the Chariton River Basin during 1983-84 and 1994-95, also is included in the report. A flood history summarizes rainfall conditions and damages for floods that occurred during 1947, 1959, 1981, 1992, and 1993.

  5. Recombinant Exon-Encoded Resilins for Elastomeric Biomaterials

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Guokui; Rivkin, Amit; Lapidot, Shaul; Hu, Xiao; Arinus, Shira B.; Dgany, Or; Shoseyov, Oded; Kaplan, David L.

    2011-01-01

    Resilin is an elastomeric protein found in specialized regions of the cuticle of most insects, providing outstanding material properties including high resilience and fatigue lifetime for insect flight and jumping needs. Two exons (1 and 3) from the resilin gene in Drosophila melanogaster were cloned and the encoded proteins expressed as soluble products in Escherichia coli. A heat and salt precipitation method was used for efficient purification of the recombinant proteins. The proteins were solution cast from water and formed into rubber-like biomaterials via horseradish peroxidase-mediated cross-linking. Comparative studies of the two proteins expressed from the two different exons were investigated by Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) and Circular Dichrosim (CD) for structural features. Little structural organization was found, suggesting structural order was not induced by the enzyme-mediateed dityrosine cross-links. Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) was used to study the elastomeric properties of the uncross-linked and cross-linked proteins. The protein from exon 1 exhibited 90% resilience in comparison to 63% for the protein from exon 3, and therefore may be the more critical domain for functional materials to mimic native resilin. Further, the cross-linking of the recombinant exon 1 via the citrate-modified photo-Fenton reaction was explored as an alternative dityrosine mediated polymerization method and resulted in both highly elastic and adhesive materials. The citrate-modified photo-Fenton system may be suitable for in-vivo applications of resilin biomaterials. PMID:21963157

  6. FOXP2: novel exons, splice variants, and CAG repeat length stability.

    PubMed

    Bruce, Heather A; Margolis, Russell L

    2002-08-01

    FOXP2 is a transcription factor containing a polyglutamine tract, a zinc-finger motif, and a forkhead DNA-binding domain. The FOXP2 gene is located on 7q31. A missense mutation in the forkhead domain (exon 14) and a balanced reciprocal translocation t(5;7)(q22;q31.2) with a breakpoint between exons 3b and 4 have recently been associated with a speech and language disorder (SPCH1). The role of FOXP2 in this neurodevelopmental disorder suggests that mutations in FOXP2 could cause other neuropsychiatric disorders. To begin investigation of this possibility, we examined the genomic structure and CAG/CAA repeat region of FOXP2. We detected little polymorphism and no expansions in the FOXP2 CAG/CAA repeat in 142 individuals with progressive movement disorders. We found evidence of alternate splice variants and six previously undetected exons: three 5' untranslated exons (s1, s2, s3), two additional untranslated exons (2a and 2b) between exons 2 and 3, a translated exon (4a) between exons 4 and 5, and a longer version of exon 10 (10+) that contains an alternate stop codon and produces a truncated protein (FOXP2-S). Our results suggest that FOXP2 spans at least 603 kb of genomic DNA, more than twice the previously defined region, and provide evidence of a promoter region flanking exon s1. This demonstration of additional FOXP2 exons and splice variants should facilitate understanding of FOXP2 function and the search for additional FOXP2 mutations.

  7. Exon 44 nonsense mutation in two-Duchenne muscular dystrophy brothers detected by heteroduplex analysis.

    PubMed

    Prior, T W; Papp, A C; Snyder, P J; Burghes, A H; Sedra, M S; Western, L M; Bartolo, C; Mendell, J R

    1993-01-01

    Utilizing a heteroduplex method, we screened the dystrophin exon 43-45 region for point mutations, including small deletions and insertions. The method depends upon the formation of a heteroduplex between wild-type and mutant DNA PCR products. DNA specimens from one hundred and four DMD patients without detected deletions or duplications were multiplexed amplified for exons 43, 44, and 45. The PCR products were mixed with the PCR products from nonaffected controls, electrophoresed, and examined for the presence of altered mobility heteroduplex bands. An exon 44 nonsense mutation in two DMD brothers and a common intron 44 polymorphism were identified using this approach. Although the exon 44-45 region is a hotspot for deletion breakpoints, it does not appear to be prone to point mutations. The technique is extremely useful for screening several exons simultaneously and it allowed us to screen a large number of patients.

  8. Splicing of designer exons informs a biophysical model for exon definition

    PubMed Central

    Arias, Mauricio A.; Chasin, Lawrence A.

    2015-01-01

    Pre-mRNA molecules in humans contain mostly short internal exons flanked by longer introns. To explain the removal of such introns, exon recognition instead of intron recognition has been proposed. We studied this exon definition using designer exons (DEs) made up of three prototype modules of our own design: an exonic splicing enhancer (ESE), an exonic splicing silencer (ESS), and a Reference Sequence (R) predicted to be neither. Each DE was examined as the central exon in a three-exon minigene. DEs made of R modules showed a sharp size dependence, with exons shorter than 14 nt and longer than 174 nt splicing poorly. Changing the strengths of the splice sites improved longer exon splicing but worsened shorter exon splicing, effectively displacing the curve to the right. For the ESE we found, unexpectedly, that its enhancement efficiency was independent of its position within the exon. For the ESS we found a step-wise positional increase in its effects; it was most effective at the 3′ end of the exon. To apply these results quantitatively, we developed a biophysical model for exon definition of internal exons undergoing cotranscriptional splicing. This model features commitment to inclusion before the downstream exon is synthesized and competition between skipping and inclusion fates afterward. Collision of both exon ends to form an exon definition complex was incorporated to account for the effect of size; ESE/ESS effects were modeled on the basis of stabilization/destabilization. This model accurately predicted the outcome of independent experiments on more complex DEs that combined ESEs and ESSs. PMID:25492963

  9. Splicing of designer exons informs a biophysical model for exon definition.

    PubMed

    Arias, Mauricio A; Lubkin, Ashira; Chasin, Lawrence A

    2015-02-01

    Pre-mRNA molecules in humans contain mostly short internal exons flanked by longer introns. To explain the removal of such introns, exon recognition instead of intron recognition has been proposed. We studied this exon definition using designer exons (DEs) made up of three prototype modules of our own design: an exonic splicing enhancer (ESE), an exonic splicing silencer (ESS), and a Reference Sequence (R) predicted to be neither. Each DE was examined as the central exon in a three-exon minigene. DEs made of R modules showed a sharp size dependence, with exons shorter than 14 nt and longer than 174 nt splicing poorly. Changing the strengths of the splice sites improved longer exon splicing but worsened shorter exon splicing, effectively displacing the curve to the right. For the ESE we found, unexpectedly, that its enhancement efficiency was independent of its position within the exon. For the ESS we found a step-wise positional increase in its effects; it was most effective at the 3' end of the exon. To apply these results quantitatively, we developed a biophysical model for exon definition of internal exons undergoing cotranscriptional splicing. This model features commitment to inclusion before the downstream exon is synthesized and competition between skipping and inclusion fates afterward. Collision of both exon ends to form an exon definition complex was incorporated to account for the effect of size; ESE/ESS effects were modeled on the basis of stabilization/destabilization. This model accurately predicted the outcome of independent experiments on more complex DEs that combined ESEs and ESSs.

  10. Novel Nine-Exon AR Transcripts (Exon 1/Exon 1b/Exons 2-8) in Normal and Cancerous Breast and Prostate Cells.

    PubMed

    Hu, Dong Gui; McKinnon, Ross A; Hulin, Julie-Ann; Mackenzie, Peter I; Meech, Robyn

    2016-12-27

    Nearly 20 different transcripts of the human androgen receptor (AR) are reported with two currently listed as Refseq isoforms in the NCBI database. Isoform 1 encodes wild-type AR (type 1 AR) and isoform 2 encodes the variant AR45 (type 2 AR). Both variants contain eight exons: they share common exons 2-8 but differ in exon 1 with the canonical exon 1 in isoform 1 and the variant exon 1b in isoform 2. Splicing of exon 1 or exon 1b is reported to be mutually exclusive. In this study, we identified a novel exon 1b (1b/TAG) that contains an additional TAG trinucleotide upstream of exon 1b. Moreover, we identified AR transcripts in both normal and cancerous breast and prostate cells that contained either exon 1b or 1b/TAG spliced between the canonical exon 1 and exon 2, generating nine-exon AR transcripts that we have named isoforms 3a and 3b. The proteins encoded by these new AR variants could regulate androgen-responsive reporters in breast and prostate cancer cells under androgen-depleted conditions. Analysis of type 3 AR-GFP fusion proteins showed partial nuclear localization in PC3 cells under androgen-depleted conditions, supporting androgen-independent activation of the AR. Type 3 AR proteins inhibited androgen-induced growth of LNCaP cells. Microarray analysis identified a small set of type 3a AR target genes in LNCaP cells, including genes known to modulate growth and proliferation of prostate cancer (PCGEM1, PEG3, EPHA3, and EFNB2) or other types of human cancers (TOX3, ST8SIA4, and SLITRK3), and genes that are diagnostic/prognostic biomarkers of prostate cancer (GRINA3, and BCHE).

  11. Novel Nine-Exon AR Transcripts (Exon 1/Exon 1b/Exons 2–8) in Normal and Cancerous Breast and Prostate Cells

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Dong Gui; McKinnon, Ross A.; Hulin, Julie-Ann; Mackenzie, Peter I.; Meech, Robyn

    2016-01-01

    Nearly 20 different transcripts of the human androgen receptor (AR) are reported with two currently listed as Refseq isoforms in the NCBI database. Isoform 1 encodes wild-type AR (type 1 AR) and isoform 2 encodes the variant AR45 (type 2 AR). Both variants contain eight exons: they share common exons 2–8 but differ in exon 1 with the canonical exon 1 in isoform 1 and the variant exon 1b in isoform 2. Splicing of exon 1 or exon 1b is reported to be mutually exclusive. In this study, we identified a novel exon 1b (1b/TAG) that contains an additional TAG trinucleotide upstream of exon 1b. Moreover, we identified AR transcripts in both normal and cancerous breast and prostate cells that contained either exon 1b or 1b/TAG spliced between the canonical exon 1 and exon 2, generating nine-exon AR transcripts that we have named isoforms 3a and 3b. The proteins encoded by these new AR variants could regulate androgen-responsive reporters in breast and prostate cancer cells under androgen-depleted conditions. Analysis of type 3 AR-GFP fusion proteins showed partial nuclear localization in PC3 cells under androgen-depleted conditions, supporting androgen-independent activation of the AR. Type 3 AR proteins inhibited androgen-induced growth of LNCaP cells. Microarray analysis identified a small set of type 3a AR target genes in LNCaP cells, including genes known to modulate growth and proliferation of prostate cancer (PCGEM1, PEG3, EPHA3, and EFNB2) or other types of human cancers (TOX3, ST8SIA4, and SLITRK3), and genes that are diagnostic/prognostic biomarkers of prostate cancer (GRINA3, and BCHE). PMID:28035996

  12. [Self-medication with over-the-counter analgesics among 15-16 year-old teenagers].

    PubMed

    Lagerløv, Per; Holager, Tanja; Helseth, Sølvi; Rosvold, Elin O

    2009-08-13

    OTC analgesics were released for sale outside pharmacies in Norway in 2003. This study assesses indications and frequency of use of these drugs among 15-16 year-old teenagers in Norway after 2003. We developed a questionnaire, which contained 65 questions with one or more response options. This was given to all pupils in the final grade at six junior high schools in a town with 60,000 inhabitants (Drammen). 367 of 626 (58.6 %) pupils participated. 50 % of the boys and 71 % of the girls had used OTC analgesics during the last four weeks; 26 % of them on a daily or weekly basis. Girls experienced episodes of pain more frequently than boys, but the proportion of episodes treated with analgesics did not differ between the sexes. Headache and muscle pain were common. Half of those with severe headache/migraine used OTC analgesics on a daily or weekly basis. The teenagers reported several reasons for experiencing pain and discomfort, such as long time spent in front of various screens, tight time schedules with physical exercise and friends, drinking too little and much noise in the classroom. Use of OTC analgesics has increased considerably among Norwegian teenagers. Drug-induced headache may occur as an adverse event. If more effort is made to improve life situations that adolescents perceive as painful and a cause of discomfort, the need for OTC analgesics may be reduced.

  13. Low power consumption high speed CMOS dual-modulus 15/16 prescaler for optical and wireless communications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hui-Min; Zhang, Xiao-Xing; Dai, Yu-Jie; Lv, Ying-Jie

    2011-09-01

    Frequency synthesizer is an important part of optical and wireless communication system. Low power comsumption prescaler is one of the most critical unit of frequency synthesizer. For the frequency divider, it must be programmable for channel selection in multi-channel communication systems. A dual-modulus prescaler (DMP) is needed to provide variable division ratios. DMP is considered as a critical power dissipative block since it always operates at full speed. This paper introduces a high speed and low power complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) 15/16 DMP based on true single-phase-clock (TSPC) and transmission gates (TGs) cell. A conventional TSPC is optimized in terms of devices size, and it is resimulated. The TSPC is used in the synchronous and asynchronous counter. TGs are used in the control logic. The DMP circuit is implemented in 0.18 μm CMOS process. The simulation results are provided. The results show wide operating frequency range from 7.143 MHz to 4.76 GHz and it comsumes 3.625 mW under 1.8 V power supply voltage at 4.76 GHz.

  14. Computational discovery of internal micro-exons.

    PubMed

    Volfovsky, Natalia; Haas, Brian J; Salzberg, Steven L

    2003-06-01

    Very short exons, also known as micro-exons, occur in large numbers in some eukaryotic genomes. Existing annotation tools have a limited ability to recognize these short sequences, which range in length up to 25 bp. Here, we describe a computational method for the identification of micro-exons using near-perfect alignments between cDNA and genomic DNA sequences. Using this method, we detected 319 micro-exons in 4 complete genomes, of which 224 were previously unknown, human (170), the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans (4), the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster (14), and the mustard plant Arabidopsis thaliana (36). Comparison of our computational method with popular cDNA alignment programs shows that the new algorithm is both efficient and accurate. The algorithm also aids in the discovery of micro-exon-skipping events and cross-species micro-exon conservation.

  15. Identification of protein features encoded by alternative exons using Exon Ontology.

    PubMed

    Tranchevent, Léon-Charles; Aubé, Fabien; Dulaurier, Louis; Benoit-Pilven, Clara; Rey, Amandine; Poret, Arnaud; Chautard, Emilie; Mortada, Hussein; Desmet, François-Olivier; Chakrama, Fatima Zahra; Moreno-Garcia, Maira Alejandra; Goillot, Evelyne; Janczarski, Stéphane; Mortreux, Franck; Bourgeois, Cyril F; Auboeuf, Didier

    2017-06-01

    Transcriptomic genome-wide analyses demonstrate massive variation of alternative splicing in many physiological and pathological situations. One major challenge is now to establish the biological contribution of alternative splicing variation in physiological- or pathological-associated cellular phenotypes. Toward this end, we developed a computational approach, named "Exon Ontology," based on terms corresponding to well-characterized protein features organized in an ontology tree. Exon Ontology is conceptually similar to Gene Ontology-based approaches but focuses on exon-encoded protein features instead of gene level functional annotations. Exon Ontology describes the protein features encoded by a selected list of exons and looks for potential Exon Ontology term enrichment. By applying this strategy to exons that are differentially spliced between epithelial and mesenchymal cells and after extensive experimental validation, we demonstrate that Exon Ontology provides support to discover specific protein features regulated by alternative splicing. We also show that Exon Ontology helps to unravel biological processes that depend on suites of coregulated alternative exons, as we uncovered a role of epithelial cell-enriched splicing factors in the AKT signaling pathway and of mesenchymal cell-enriched splicing factors in driving splicing events impacting on autophagy. Freely available on the web, Exon Ontology is the first computational resource that allows getting a quick insight into the protein features encoded by alternative exons and investigating whether coregulated exons contain the same biological information. © 2017 Tranchevent et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  16. Expression of the unique NCAM VASE exon is independently regulated in distinct tissues during development

    PubMed Central

    1990-01-01

    During development of the rat central nervous system, neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) mRNAs containing in the extracellular domain a 30-bp alternative exon, here named VASE, replace RNAs that lack this exon. The presence of this alternative exon between previously described exons 7 and 8 changes the predicted loop structure of the derived polypeptide from one resembling an immunoglobulin constant region domain to one resembling an immunoglobulin variable domain. This change could have significant effects on NCAM polypeptide function and cell-cell interaction. In this report we test multiple rat tissues for the presence of additional alternative exons at this position and also examine the regulation of splicing of the previously described exon. To sensitively examine alternative splicing, polymerase chain reactions (PCRs) with primers flanking the exon 7/exon 8 alternative splicing site were performed. Four categories of RNA samples were tested for new exons: whole brain from embryonic day 11 to adult, specific brain regions dissected from adult brain, clonal lines of neural cells in vitro, and muscle cells and tissues cultured in vitro and obtained by dissection. Within the limits of the PCR methodology, no evidence for any alternative exon other than the previously identified VASE was obtained. The regulation of expression of this exon was found to be complex and tissue specific. Expression of the 30-bp exon in the heart and nervous system was found to be regulated independently; a significant proportion of embryonic day 15 heart NCAM mRNAs contain VASE while only a very small amount of day 15 nervous system mRNAs contain VASE. Some adult central nervous system regions, notably the olfactory bulb and the peripheral nervous system structures adrenal gland and dorsal root ganglia, express NCAM which contains very little VASE. VASE is undetectable in NCAM PCR products from the olfactory epithelium. Other nervous system regions express significant quantities of

  17. Contrasting chromatin organization of CpG islands and exons in the human genome

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background CpG islands and nucleosome-free regions are both found in promoters. However, their association has never been studied. On the other hand, DNA methylation is absent in promoters but is enriched in gene bodies. Intragenic nucleosomes and their modifications have been recently associated with RNA splicing. Because the function of intragenic DNA methylation remains unclear, I explored the possibility of its involvement in splicing regulation. Results Here I show that CpG islands were associated not only with methylation-free promoters but also with nucleosome-free promoters. Nucleosome-free regions were observed only in promoters containing a CpG island. However, the DNA sequences of CpG islands predicted the opposite pattern, implying a limitation of sequence programs for the determination of nucleosome occupancy. In contrast to the methylation-and nucleosome-free states of CpG-island promoters, exons were densely methylated at CpGs and packaged into nucleosomes. Exon-enrichment of DNA methylation was specifically found in spliced exons and in exons with weak splice sites. The enrichment patterns were less pronounced in initial exons and in non-coding exons, potentially reflecting a lower need for their splicing. I also found that nucleosomes, DNA methylation, and H3K36me3 marked the exons of transcripts with low, medium, and high gene expression levels, respectively. Conclusions Human promoters containing a CpG island tend to remain nucleosome-free as well as methylation-free. In contrast, exons demonstrate a high degree of methylation and nucleosome occupancy. Exonic DNA methylation seems to function together with exonic nucleosomes and H3K36me3 for the proper splicing of transcripts with different expression levels. PMID:20602769

  18. Disruption of the splicing enhancer sequence within exon 27 of the dystrophin gene by a nonsense mutation induces partial skipping of the exon and is responsible for Becker muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed Central

    Shiga, N; Takeshima, Y; Sakamoto, H; Inoue, K; Yokota, Y; Yokoyama, M; Matsuo, M

    1997-01-01

    The mechanism of exon skipping induced by nonsense mutations has not been well elucidated. We now report results of in vitro splicing studies which disclosed that a particular example of exon skipping is due to disruption of a splicing enhancer sequence located within the exon. A nonsense mutation (E1211X) due to a G to T transversion at the 28th nucleotide of exon 27 (G3839T) was identified in the dystrophin gene of a Japanese Becker muscular dystrophy case. Partial skipping of the exon resulted in the production of truncated dystrophin mRNA, although the consensus sequences for splicing at both ends of exon 27 were unaltered. To determine how E1211X induced exon 27 skipping, the splicing enhancer activity of purine-rich region within exon 27 was examined in an in vitro splicing system using chimeric doublesex gene pre-mRNA. The mutant sequence containing G3839T abolished splicing enhancer activity of the wild-type purine-rich sequence for the upstream intron in this chimeric pre-mRNA. An artificial polypurine oligonucleotide mimicking the purine-rich sequence of exon 27 also showed enhancer activity that was suppressed by the introduction of a T nucleotide. Furthermore, the splicing enhancer activity was more markedly inhibited when a nonsense codon was created by the inserted T residue. This is the first evidence that partial skipping of an exon harboring a nonsense mutation is due to disruption of a splicing enhancer sequence. PMID:9410897

  19. Human decorin gene: Intron-exon junctions and chromosomal localization

    SciTech Connect

    Vetter, U.; Young, M.F.; Fisher, L.W. ); Vogel, W.; Just, W. )

    1993-01-01

    All of the protein-encoding exons and the 3[prime]flanking region of the human decorin gene have been cloned an partially sequenced. The locations of the intron-exon junctions within the coding portion of the gene were identical to those found for the homologous human gene, biglycan. The sizes of the introns in the decorin gene, however, were substantially larger than those of the same introns of the biglycan gene. Portions of introns 1, 2, and 3 as well as exon 1 were not found during our extensive screening process. The 5[prime] end of intron 2 was found to have an AG-rich region followed immediately by a CT-rich region. Furthermore, the 5[prime] end of intron 3 was very rich in thymidine, whereas the 3[prime] end of intron 7 was rich in adenosine. Several cDNA clones constructed from cultured human bone cell mRNA were found to contain a different sequence at the 5[prime] end compared to that previously published for mRNA from a human embryonic fibroblast cell line. We were also unable to find the alternate 3[prime] flanking region of the previously published cDNA sequence. We have mapped the human decorin gene by in situ methods to chromosome 12q2l.3. 30 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  20. 8,9-Dehydrohispanolone-15,16-lactol diterpene prevents LPS-triggered inflammatory responses by inhibiting endothelial activation.

    PubMed

    Jiménez-García, Lidia; Través, Paqui G; López-Fontal, Raquel; Herranz, Sandra; Higueras, María Angeles; de Las Heras, Beatriz; Hortelano, Sonsoles; Luque, Alfonso

    2016-07-15

    Endothelial activation contributes to lung inflammatory disorders by inducing leucocyte recruitment to pulmonary parenchyma. Consequently, vascular-targeted therapies constitute promising strategies for the treatment of inflammatory pathologies. In the present study, we evaluated the effect of 8,9-dehydrohispanolone-15,16-lactol diterpene (DT) on lung endothelium during inflammation. Lung endothelial cells pre-treated with DT and activated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or tumour necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) exhibited reduced expression of the pro-inflammatory cytokines Cxcl10, Ccl5 and Cxcl1, whereas the anti-inflammatory molecules IL1r2 and IL-10 were induced. Consistent with this result, DT pre-treatment inhibited nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) nuclear translocation, by interfering with IκBα phosphorylation, and consequently NF-κB transcriptional activity in endothelium activated by LPS or TNF-α. Furthermore, DT, probably through p38 signalling, induced transcriptional activation of genes containing activator protein 1 (AP-1)-binding elements. Inhibition of p38 prevented IL1r2 mRNA expression in endothelium incubated with DT alone or in combination with LPS or TNF-α. Accordingly, conditioned medium (CM) from these cells failed to stimulate leucocytes as measured by a reduction in adhesive ability of the leucocyte cell line J774 to fibronectin (FN). Additionally, DT reduced the expression of the endothelial adhesion molecules E-selectin, vascular cell adhesion molecule 1 (VCAM-1) and intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1) after activation. Similarly, expression of VCAM-1 and ICAM-1 molecules on the lung endothelial layer of C57/BL6 mice pre-treated with DT and challenged with LPS were unchanged. Finally, inhibition of vascular adhesion molecule expression by DT decreased the interaction of J774 cells with lung endothelial cells in an inflammatory environment. Our findings establish DT as a novel endothelial inhibitor for the treatment of inflammatory

  1. Requirements for mini-exon inclusion in potato invertase mRNAs provides evidence for exon-scanning interactions in plants.

    PubMed

    Simpson, C G; Hedley, P E; Watters, J A; Clark, G P; McQuade, C; Machray, G C; Brown, J W

    2000-03-01

    Invertases are responsible for the breakdown of sucrose to fructose and glucose. In all but one plant invertase gene, the second exon is only 9 nt in length and encodes three amino acids of a five-amino-acid sequence that is highly conserved in all invertases of plant origin. Sequences responsible for normal splicing (inclusion) of exon 2 have been investigated in vivo using the potato invertase, invGF gene. The upstream intron 1 is required for inclusion whereas the downstream intron 2 is not. Mutations within intron 1 have identified two sequence elements that are needed for inclusion: a putative branchpoint sequence and an adjacent U-rich region. Both are recognized plant intron splicing signals. The branchpoint sequence lies further upstream from the 3' splice site of intron 1 than is normally seen in plant introns. All dicotyledonous plant invertase genes contain this arrangement of sequence elements: a distal branchpoint sequence and adjacent, downstream U-rich region. Intron 1 sequences upstream of the branchpoint and sequences in exons 1, 2, or 3 do not determine inclusion, suggesting that intron or exon splicing enhancer elements seen in vertebrate mini-exon systems are absent. In addition, mutation of the 3' and 5' splice sites flanking the mini-exon cause skipping of the mini-exon, suggesting that both splice sites are required. The branchpoint/U-rich sequence is able to promote splicing of mini-exons of 6, 3, and 1 nt in length and of a chicken cTNT mini-exon of 6 nt. These sequence elements therefore act as a splicing enhancer and appear to function via interactions between factors bound at the branchpoint/U-rich region and at the 5' splice site of intron 2, activating removal of this intron followed by removal of intron 1. This first example of splicing of a plant mini-exon to be analyzed demonstrates that particular arrangement of standard plant intron splicing signals can drive constitutive splicing of a mini-exon.

  2. Introns differ from exons by their redundancy

    SciTech Connect

    Popova, T.G.; Sadovskii, M.G.

    1995-10-01

    This paper is devoted to an analysis of the intrinsic structure of the gene from the point of view of the redundancy of different structural units - exons and introns. Human genes for which the exon-intron structure has been clearly established were studied. The redundancy of each exon and intron in the gene was determined. It was shown that, in human genes, introns are more redundant than exons. Redundancy is determined as the smallest length of a word (oliconucleotide) beginning with which all words in the studied nucleotide sequence are found exactly once. Mechanisms leading to the disruption of the general pattern of ratios of redundancy of exons and introns are studied. 12 refs., 3 tabs.

  3. Genome-wide survey of ds exonization to enrich transcriptomes and proteomes in plants.

    PubMed

    Liu, Li-Yu Daisy; Charng, Yuh-Chyang

    2012-01-01

    Insertion of transposable elements (TEs) into introns can lead to their activation as alternatively spliced cassette exons, an event called exonization which can enrich the complexity of transcriptomes and proteomes. Previously, we performed the first experimental assessment of TE exonization by inserting a Ds element into each intron of the rice epsps gene. Exonization of Ds in plants was biased toward providing splice donor sites from the beginning of the inserted Ds sequence. Additionally, Ds inserted in the reverse direction resulted in a continuous splice donor consensus region by offering 4 donor sites in the same intron. The current study involved genome-wide computational analysis of Ds exonization events in the dicot Arabidopsis thaliana and the monocot Oryza sativa (rice). Up to 71% of the exonized transcripts were putative targets for the nonsense-mediated decay (NMD) pathway. The insertion patterns of Ds and the polymorphic splice donor sites increased the transcripts and subsequent protein isoforms. Protein isoforms contain protein sequence due to unspliced intron-TE region and/or a shift of the reading frame. The number of interior protein isoforms would be twice that of C-terminal isoforms, on average. TE exonization provides a promising way for functional expansion of the plant proteome.

  4. 11p15-subband specific search for transcribed sequences using exon trapping

    SciTech Connect

    Loebbert, R.; Prawitt, D.; Monroe, D.

    1994-09-01

    Evidence from cytogenetic and molecular data suggest that the region 11p15 contains genes involved in different disorders, like Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome (BWS), long QT syndrome (LQT), Usher syndrome type I and tumor development. Focusing on the subregion 11p15.1, we are isolating and characterizing new transcribed sequences. The applied strategy includes exon amplification and subsequent PCR screening of cDNA libraries. So far 100 YACs and 38 cosmid clones from 11p15.1-15.3 have been collected and are currently arrayed. 16 cosmids have been analyzed for transcribed sequences using the exon amplification scheme developed by Buckler et al. (1991). We were able to identify 18 exons that contain correct open reading frames and map back to the cosmid clones. A data base search revealed that two exons represent parts of known genes from this region (ST5 and AMPD3). Moreover, we identified one exon that represents an EGF-like repeat with homologies to various proteins. Using PCR and primers from the exon sequences, a fetal brain library, which has been arranged in the form of hierarchic arrayed phage pools, was screened. Up to now, two cDNA clones corresponding to different exons were isolated and are currently sequenced.

  5. The Contribution of Exon-Skipping Events on Chromosome 22 to Protein Coding Diversity

    PubMed Central

    Hide, Winston A.; Babenko, Vladimir N.; van Heusden, Peter A.; Seoighe, Cathal; Kelso, Janet F.

    2001-01-01

    Completion of the human genome sequence provides evidence for a gene count with lower bound 30,000–40,000. Significant protein complexity may derive in part from multiple transcript isoforms. Recent EST based studies have revealed that alternate transcription, including alternative splicing, polyadenylation and transcription start sites, occurs within at least 30–40% of human genes. Transcript form surveys have yet to integrate the genomic context, expression, frequency, and contribution to protein diversity of isoform variation. We determine here the degree to which protein coding diversity may be influenced by alternate expression of transcripts by exhaustive manual confirmation of genome sequence annotation, and comparison to available transcript data to accurately associate skipped exon isoforms with genomic sequence. Relative expression levels of transcripts are estimated from EST database representation. The rigorous in silico method accurately identifies exon skipping using verified genome sequence. 545 genes have been studied in this first hand-curated assessment of exon skipping on chromosome 22. Combining manual assessment with software screening of exon boundaries provides a highly accurate and internally consistent indication of skipping frequency. 57 of 62 exon skipping events occur in the protein coding regions of 52 genes. A single gene, (FBXO7) expresses an exon repetition. 59% of highly represented multi-exon genes are likely to express exon-skipped isoforms in ratios that vary from 1:1 to 1:>100. The proportion of all transcripts corresponding to multi-exon genes that exhibit an exon skip is estimated to be 5%. PMID:11691849

  6. Detection of an exon 53 polymorphism in the dystrophin gene.

    PubMed

    Prior, T W; Papp, A C; Snyder, P J; Sedra, M S

    1993-10-01

    We utilized a heteroduplex method to screen for small mutations in Duchenne muscular dystrophy patients who did not have deletions or duplications. A dystrophin exon 53 heteroduplex band was identified in 14.4% of the affected patients. Direct sequencing of the amplified product from DNA producing the heteroduplex revealed the presence of a polymorphism in the coding region. The codon for asparagine was converted from AAT to AAC.

  7. Molecular analysis of contiguous exons of the phenylalanine hydroxylase gene: identification of a new PKU mutation.

    PubMed Central

    Dianzani, I; Camaschella, C; Saglio, G; Ferrero, G B; Ramus, S; Ponzone, A; Cotton, R G

    1993-01-01

    A modified application of the chemical cleavage of mismatch (CCM) method has been used to screen three contiguous exons (exons 9, 10, and 11) of the phenylalanine hydroxylase gene in 17 Italian PKU patients. A new nonsense heterozygous C-->G transversion within exon 11 (S359X) was identified in a single patient. Only one of the four mutations previously reported in this DNA region in Caucasians was found. This lesion, IVS X-546, was detected in five of the 34 PKU alleles examined. Our results underline the versatility of the CCM method for scanning a gene for multiple mutations. Images PMID:8097261

  8. Molecular analysis of contiguous exons of the phenylalanine hydroxylase gene: identification of a new PKU mutation.

    PubMed

    Dianzani, I; Camaschella, C; Saglio, G; Ferrero, G B; Ramus, S; Ponzone, A; Cotton, R G

    1993-03-01

    A modified application of the chemical cleavage of mismatch (CCM) method has been used to screen three contiguous exons (exons 9, 10, and 11) of the phenylalanine hydroxylase gene in 17 Italian PKU patients. A new nonsense heterozygous C-->G transversion within exon 11 (S359X) was identified in a single patient. Only one of the four mutations previously reported in this DNA region in Caucasians was found. This lesion, IVS X-546, was detected in five of the 34 PKU alleles examined. Our results underline the versatility of the CCM method for scanning a gene for multiple mutations.

  9. Tissue-specific expression of the human aromatase cytochrome P-450 gene by alternative use of multiple exons 1 and promoters, and switching of tissue-specific exons 1 in carcinogenesis.

    PubMed Central

    Harada, N; Utsumi, T; Takagi, Y

    1993-01-01

    Extensive screening of aromatase cDNA was carried out in cDNA libraries from various human tissues. The DNA sequences of all the isolated cDNA clones were identical in the region encoded by exons 2-10 of the aromatase gene. However, tissue-specific sequences, which were classified into four groups, were observed in the 5' portions of the clones corresponding to the region encoded by exon 1. All of them were also found in clones isolated from a human genomic library and mapped between exons 1 and 2 of the human aromatase gene reported previously, suggesting the presence of multiple exons 1 and promoters in the gene. Reverse transcription-PCR analyses of aromatase mRNAs in various tissues revealed that aromatase transcripts are tissue-specifically spliced by alternative use of multiple exons 1, although minor forms of the transcripts were also present in each tissue. Aromatase mRNA is spliced from 10 exons in most tissues, but from 9 exons in the prostate and from 10 or 11 exons in the placenta. This suggests that tissue-specific regulation of the aromatase gene in various tissues may be explained by alternative use of multiple exons 1 flanked with tissue-specific promoters. The alternative use of multiple exons 1 for liver transcripts was found to change developmentally. Furthermore, switch from an adipose-specific exon 1 to another type of exon 1 was observed in aromatase transcripts of adipose tissues of three of five breast cancer patients. Images Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:8248245

  10. Isolation and characterization of new exon 11-associated N-terminal splice variants of the human mu opioid receptor gene.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jin; Xu, Mingming; Hurd, Yasmin L; Pasternak, Gavril W; Pan, Ying-Xian

    2009-02-01

    Alternative splicing of the mu opioid receptor genes to create multiple mu receptor subtypes has been demonstrated in animals and humans. Previously, we identified a number of C-terminal variants in mice, rats and human, followed by several N-terminal variants associated with a new upstream exon in mice (exon 11). Behavioral studies in exon 11 knockout mice suggest an important role for the exon 11 variants in the analgesic actions of heroin and morphine-6beta-glucuronide, but not morphine or methadone. We now have identified a homologous human exon 11 and three similar human exon 11-associated variants, suggesting conservation of exon 11 and its associated variants across species. hMOR-1i has an additional 93 amino acids at the tip of the N-terminus but is otherwise identical to hMOR-1. When expressed in Chinese hamster ovary cells, the additional 93 amino acids in hMOR-1i had little effect on opioid binding, but significantly altered agonist-induced G-protein activation. hMOR-1G1 and hMOR-1G2 predicted six transmembrane domain variants, similar to those seen in mice. The regional expression of these exon 11-associated variants, as determined by RT-PCR, varied markedly, implying region-specific alternative splicing. The presence of exon 11-associated variants in humans raises questions regarding their potential role in heroin and morphine-6beta-glucuronide actions in people as they do in mice.

  11. Remarkable selective constraints on exonic dinucleotide repeats.

    PubMed

    Haasl, Ryan J; Payseur, Bret A

    2014-09-01

    Long dinucleotide repeats found in exons present a substantial mutational hazard: mutations at these loci occur often and generate frameshifts. Here, we provide clear and compelling evidence that exonic dinucleotides experience strong selective constraint. In humans, only 18 exonic dinucleotides have repeat lengths greater than six, which contrasts sharply with the genome-wide distribution of dinucleotides. We genotyped each of these dinucleotides in 200 humans from eight 1000 Genomes Project populations and found a near-absence of polymorphism. More remarkably, divergence data demonstrate that repeat lengths have been conserved across the primate phylogeny in spite of what is likely considerable mutational pressure. Coalescent simulations show that even a very low mutation rate at these loci fails to explain the anomalous patterns of polymorphism and divergence. Our data support two related selective constraints on the evolution of exonic dinucleotides: a short-term intolerance for any change to repeat length and a long-term prevention of increases to repeat length. In general, our results implicate purifying selection as the force that eliminates new, deleterious mutants at exonic dinucleotides. We briefly discuss the evolution of the longest exonic dinucleotide in the human genome--a 10 x CA repeat in fibroblast growth factor receptor-like 1 (FGFRL1)--that should possess a considerably greater mutation rate than any other exonic dinucleotide and therefore generate a large number of deleterious variants. © 2014 The Author(s). Evolution © 2014 The Society for the Study of Evolution.

  12. Young People's Participation in Extracurricular Physical Education: A Study of 15-16 Year Olds in North-West England and North-East Wales

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Andy; Thurston, Miranda; Green, Ken; Lamb, Kevin

    2007-01-01

    This paper examines the levels and forms of participation in extracurricular physical education (PE) of a cohort of 1010 15-16 year olds attending seven state schools in north-west England and north-east Wales. The data reveal that extracurricular PE provision in all schools retained a particular focus on competitive team sports alongside a number…

  13. Impaired motor coordination in mice lacking the EDA exon of the fibronectin gene.

    PubMed

    Chauhan, Anil Kumar; Moretti, Federico Andrea; Iaconcig, Alessandra; Baralle, Francisco Ernesto; Muro, Andrés Fernando

    2005-06-03

    The extracellular matrix (ECM) plays an important role in the central nervous system (CNS) by modulating the migration of cells, axons and dendrites of neurons. Fibronectin (FN) is a major component of the ECM in the CNS and plays essential roles in development, cell adhesion and cell migration. Specific FN-isoforms, generated by alternative splicing at three conserved regions, the extra domain B (EDB), extra domain A (EDA) and type III homologies connecting segment (IIICS), have been shown to modulate these processes in vitro and in vivo. The inclusion of the EDA exon in the brain is highly regulated during development and aging, suggesting an important role of this exon in brain function. However, the direct role of FN-isoforms in brain function and behaviour is still obscure. Therefore, to directly assess the role of the FN-EDA exon in vivo, we have generated two mouse strains devoid of EDA exon regulated splicing in the FN gene that constitutively include (EDA(+/+)) or exclude (EDA(-/-)) the EDA exon in all tissues. Here, we show the behavioural consequences of the absence of regulated splicing of the EDA exon in the FN gene. Deletion of the EDA domain in the FN protein results in reduced motor-coordination abilities and vertical exploratory capacity, whereas mice that constitutively include the EDA domain displayed a decrease in locomotory activity in the open field (OF) test. These results strongly suggest that regulated splicing of the EDA exon is necessary for a normal function of the brain.

  14. Exon grafting yields a "two active-site" lysozyme.

    PubMed

    Li, Shuang; Li, Bin; Fei, Yanqun; Jiang, Dazhi; Sheng, Yongjie; Sun, Yanhong; Zhang, Jin

    2007-07-13

    The design of enzymes with enhanced stability and activity has long been a goal in protein engineering. We report a strategy to engineer an additional active site for human lysozyme, grafted the entire human lysozyme exon 2, which encodes the catalytically competent domain, into the gene at a position corresponding to an exposed loop region in the translated protein. Exon 2 grafting created a novel lysozyme with twice the activity of the wild type enzyme, equal activity came from each of the two active sites. We dissected the contributions of each active site using site-directed mutagenesis of the catalytic doublets of (E35A/D53A), circular dichroism, fluorescence spectra, and molecular modeling. Temperature and pH stability of the "two active-site" enzyme were similar to those of wild-type lysozyme. Thus, we provide a novel strategy for engineering the active site of enzymes.

  15. Repression of α-actinin SM exon splicing by assisted binding of PTB to the polypyrimidine tract

    PubMed Central

    Matlin, Arianne J.; Southby, Justine; Gooding, Clare; Smith, Christopher W.J.

    2007-01-01

    Polypyrimidine tract binding protein (PTB) acts as a regulatory repressor of a large number of alternatively spliced exons, often requiring multiple binding sites in order to repress splicing. In one case, cooperative binding of PTB has been shown to accompany repression. The SM exon of the α-actinin pre-mRNA is also repressed by PTB, leading to inclusion of the alternative upstream NM exon. The SM exon has a distant branch point located 386 nt upstream of the exon with an adjacent 26 nucleotide pyrimidine tract. Here we have analyzed PTB binding to the NM and SM exon region of the α-actinin pre-mRNA. We find that three regions of the intron bind PTB, including the 3′ end of the polypyrimidine tract (PPT) and two additional regions between the PPT and the SM exon. The downstream PTB binding sites are essential for full repression and promote binding of PTB to the PPT with a consequent reduction in U2AF65 binding. Our results are consistent with a repressive mechanism in which cooperative binding of PTB to the PPT competes with binding of U2AF65, thereby specifically blocking splicing of the SM exon. PMID:17592047

  16. Repression of alpha-actinin SM exon splicing by assisted binding of PTB to the polypyrimidine tract.

    PubMed

    Matlin, Arianne J; Southby, Justine; Gooding, Clare; Smith, Christopher W J

    2007-08-01

    Polypyrimidine tract binding protein (PTB) acts as a regulatory repressor of a large number of alternatively spliced exons, often requiring multiple binding sites in order to repress splicing. In one case, cooperative binding of PTB has been shown to accompany repression. The SM exon of the alpha-actinin pre-mRNA is also repressed by PTB, leading to inclusion of the alternative upstream NM exon. The SM exon has a distant branch point located 386 nt upstream of the exon with an adjacent 26 nucleotide pyrimidine tract. Here we have analyzed PTB binding to the NM and SM exon region of the alpha-actinin pre-mRNA. We find that three regions of the intron bind PTB, including the 3' end of the polypyrimidine tract (PPT) and two additional regions between the PPT and the SM exon. The downstream PTB binding sites are essential for full repression and promote binding of PTB to the PPT with a consequent reduction in U2AF(65) binding. Our results are consistent with a repressive mechanism in which cooperative binding of PTB to the PPT competes with binding of U2AF(65), thereby specifically blocking splicing of the SM exon.

  17. Protein domains correlate strongly with exons in multiple eukaryotic genomes--evidence of exon shuffling?

    PubMed

    Liu, Mingyi; Grigoriev, Andrei

    2004-09-01

    We conducted a multi-genome analysis correlating protein domain organization with the exon-intron structure of genes in nine eukaryotic genomes. We observed a significant correlation between the borders of exons and domains on a genomic scale for both invertebrates and vertebrates. In addition, we found that the more complex organisms displayed consistently stronger exon-domain correlation, with substantially more significant correlations detected in vertebrates compared with invertebrates. Our observations concur with the principles of exon shuffling theory, including the prediction of predominantly symmetric phase of introns flanking the borders of correlating exons. These results suggest that extensive exon shuffling events during evolution significantly contributed to the shaping of eukaryotic proteomes.

  18. Modulation of splicing of the preceding intron by antisense oligonucleotide complementary to intra-exon sequence deleted in dystrophin Kobe

    SciTech Connect

    Takeshima, Y.; Matuso, M.; Sakamoto, H.; Nishio, H.

    1994-09-01

    Molecular analysis of dystrophin Kobe showed that exon 19 of the dystrophin gene bearing a 52 bp deletion was skipped during splicing, although the known consensus sequences at the 5{prime} and 3{prime} splice site of exon 19 were maintained. These data suggest that the deleted sequence of exon 19 may function as a cis-acting factor for exact splicing for the upstream intron. To investigate this potential role, an in vitro splicing system using dystrophin precursors was established. A two-exon precursor containing exon 18, truncated intron 18, and exon 19 was accurately spliced. However, splicing of intron 18 was dramatically inhibited when wild exon 19 was replaced with mutated exon 19. Even though the length of exon 19 was restored to normal by replacing the deleted sequence with other sequence, splicing of intron 18 was not fully reactivated. Characteristically, splicing of intron 18 was inactivated more markedly when the replaced sequence contained less polypurine stretches. These data suggested that modification of the exon sequence would result in a splicing abnormality. Antisense 31 mer 2`-O-methyl ribonucleotide was targeted against 5{prime} end of deleted region of exon 19 to modulate splicing of the mRNA precursor. Splicing of intron 18 was inhibited in a dose- and time-dependent manner. This is the first in vitro evidence to show splicing of dystrophin pre-mRNA can be managed by antisense oligonucleotides. These experiments represent an approach in which antisense oligonucleotides are used to restore the function of a defective dystrophin gene in Duchenne muscular dystrophy by inducing skipping of certain exons during splicing.

  19. Alternative 5' exons and differential splicing regulate expression of protein 4.1R isoforms with distinct n-termini

    SciTech Connect

    Parra, Marilyn K.; Gee, Sherry L.; Koury, Mark J.; Mohandas, Narla; Conboy, John G.

    2003-03-25

    Among the alternative pre-mRNA splicing events that characterize protein 4.1R gene expression, one involving exon 2' plays a critical role in regulating translation initiation and N-terminal protein structure. Exon 2' encompasses translation initiation site AUG1 and is located between alternative splice acceptor sites at the 5' end of exon 2; its inclusion or exclusion from mature 4.1R mRNA regulates expression of longer or shorter isoforms of 4.1R protein, respectively. The current study reports unexpected complexity in the 5' region of the 4.1R gene that directly affects alternative splicing of exon 2'. Three mutually exclusive alternative 5' exons, designated 1A, 1B, and 1C, were identified far upstream of exon 2 in both mouse and human genomes; all three are associated with strong transcriptional promoters in the flanking genomic sequence. Importantly, exons 1A and 1B splice differentially with respect to exon 2', generating transcripts with different 5' ends and distinct N-terminal protein coding capacity. Exon 1A-type transcripts splice so as to exclude exon 2' and therefore utilize the downstream AUG2 for translation of 80kD 4.1R protein, whereas exon 1B transcripts include exon 2' and initiate at AUG1 to synthesize 135kD isoforms. RNA blot analyses revealed that 1A transcripts increase in abundance in late erythroblasts, consistent with the previously demonstrated upregulation of 80kD 4.1R during terminal erythroid differentiation. Together these results suggest that synthesis of structurally distinct 4.1R protein isoforms in various cell types is regulated by a novel mechanism requiring coordination between upstream transcription initiation events and downstream alternative splicing events.

  20. Correlation of the exon/intron organization to the conserved domains of the mouse transcriptional corepressor TIF1beta.

    PubMed

    Cammas, F; Garnier, J; Chambon, P; Losson, R

    2000-08-08

    TIF1beta, a member of the transcriptional intermediary factor 1 family, has been reported to function as a corepressor for the large class of KRAB domain-containing zinc finger proteins of the Krüppel type. In this study, we report the genomic organization and nucleotide sequence of the mouse TIF1beta gene. This gene comprises 17 coding exons located within 7 kb of genomic DNA. Exon sizes vary from 37 bp (exon 10) to 901 bp (exon 1), and intron sizes range from 71 bp to 1843 bp. All introns have the conserved GT and AG dinucleotides present at the donor and acceptor sites, respectively. The functional/homology regions of the TIF1beta protein are encoded by distinct exons. The amino-terminal RING finger is encoded by two exons interrupted by a small intron. The B boxes lie within individual exons. Similarly to the RING finger, the PHD finger is encoded by two exons. Three exons constitute the carboxy-terminal bromodomain, and their position correlates well with the secondary structure elements of the domain as predicted by computer modeling. Taken together, these results will facilitate the genetic manipulation of TIF1beta for future in vivo structure-function studies.

  1. Bodywide skipping of exons 45-55 in dystrophic mdx52 mice by systemic antisense delivery.

    PubMed

    Aoki, Yoshitsugu; Yokota, Toshifumi; Nagata, Tetsuya; Nakamura, Akinori; Tanihata, Jun; Saito, Takashi; Duguez, Stephanie M R; Nagaraju, Kanneboyina; Hoffman, Eric P; Partridge, Terence; Takeda, Shin'ichi

    2012-08-21

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), the commonest form of muscular dystrophy, is caused by lack of dystrophin. One of the most promising therapeutic approaches is antisense-mediated elimination of frame-disrupting mutations by exon skipping. However, this approach faces two major hurdles: limited applicability of each individual target exon and uncertain function and stability of each resulting truncated dystrophin. Skipping of exons 45-55 at the mutation hotspot of the DMD gene would address both issues. Theoretically it could rescue more than 60% of patients with deletion mutations. Moreover, spontaneous deletions of this specific region are associated with asymptomatic or exceptionally mild phenotypes. However, such multiple exon skipping of exons 45-55 has proved technically challenging. We have therefore designed antisense oligo (AO) morpholino mixtures to minimize self- or heteroduplex formation. These were tested as conjugates with cell-penetrating moieties (vivo-morpholinos). We have tested the feasibility of skipping exons 45-55 in H2K-mdx52 myotubes and in mdx52 mice, which lack exon 52. Encouragingly, with mixtures of 10 AOs, we demonstrated skipping of all 10 exons in vitro, in H2K-mdx52 myotubes and on intramuscular injection into mdx52 mice. Moreover, in mdx52 mice in vivo, systemic injections of 10 AOs induced extensive dystrophin expression at the subsarcolemma in skeletal muscles throughout the body, producing up to 15% of wild-type dystrophin protein levels, accompanied by improved muscle strength and histopathology without any detectable toxicity. This is a unique successful demonstration of effective rescue by exon 45-55 skipping in a dystrophin-deficient animal model.

  2. High Resolution Melting Analysis for JAK2 Exon 14 and Exon 12 Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Rapado, Inmaculada; Grande, Silvia; Albizua, Enriqueta; Ayala, Rosa; Hernández, José-Angel; Gallardo, Miguel; Gilsanz, Florinda; Martinez-Lopez, Joaquin

    2009-01-01

    JAK2 mutations are important criteria for the diagnosis of Philadelphia chromosome-negative myeloproliferative neoplasms. We aimed to assess JAK2 exon 14 and exon 12 mutations by high-resolution melting (HRM) analysis, which allows variation screening. The exon 14 analysis included 163 patients with polycythemia vera, secondary erythrocytoses, essential thrombocythemia, or secondary thrombocytoses, and 126 healthy subjects. The study of exon 12 included 40 JAK2 V617F-negative patients (nine of which had polycythemia vera, and 31 with splanchnic vein thrombosis) and 30 healthy subjects. HRM analyses of JAK2 exons 14 and 12 gave analytical sensitivities near 1% and both intra- and interday coefficients of variation of less than 1%. For HRM analysis of JAK2 exon 14 in polycythemia vera and essential thrombocythemia, clinical sensitivities were 93.5% and 67.9%, clinical specificities were 98.8% and 97.0%, positive predictive values were 93.5% and 79.2%, and negative predictive values were 98.8% and 94.6, respectively. Correlations were observed between the results from HRM and three commonly used analytical methods. The JAK2 exon 12 HRM results agreed completely with those from sequencing analysis, and the three mutations in exon 12 were detected by both methods. Hence, HRM analysis of exons 14 and 12 in JAK2 shows better diagnostic values than three other routinely used methods against which it was compared. In addition, HRM analysis has the advantage of detecting unknown mutations. PMID:19225136

  3. A five prime splice-region G yields C mutation in exon 1 of the human. beta. -globin gene inhibits pre-mRNA splicing: A mechanism for. beta. sup + -thalassemia

    SciTech Connect

    Vidaud, M.; Vidaud, D.; Amselem, S.; Rosa, J.; Goossens, M. ); Gattoni, R.; Stevenin, J. ); Chibani, J. )

    1989-02-01

    The authors have characterized a Mediterranean {beta}-thalassemia allele containing a sequence change at codon 30 that alters both {beta}-globin pre-mRNA splicing and the structure of the homoglobin product. Presumably, this G {yields} C transversion at position {minus}1 of intron 1 reduces severely the utilization of the normal 5{prime} splice site since the level of the Arg {yields} Thr mutant hemoglobin (designated hemoglobin Kairouan) found in the erythrocytes of the patient is very low (2% of total hemoglobin). Since no natural mutations of the guanine located at position {minus}1 of the CAG/GTAAGT consensus sequence had been isolated previously. They investigated the role of this nucleotide in the constitution of an active 5{prime} splice site by studying the splicing of the pre-mRNA in cell-free extracts. They demonstrate that correct splicing of the mutant pre-mRNA is 98% inhibited. Their results provide further insights into the mechanisms of pre-mRNA maturation by revealing that the last residue of the exon plays a role at least equivalent to that of the intron residue at position +5.

  4. The patterns of p53 gene mutations differ inside and outside of exons 5-8 in breast and other cancers

    SciTech Connect

    Hartmann, A.; Blaszyk, H.; McGovern, R.M.

    1994-09-01

    Most studies of the p53 gene in tumors examine only exons 5-8. In these exons, there is a predominance of missense mutations clustered in four regions of high evolutionary conservation. We previously found 64 mutations in exons 5-8 of the p53 gene in 194 primary breast cancers. Herein, we report 18 additional mutations found by analyzing the promotor region, the first noncoding exon, and the remaining coding exons. Mutations were found in exons 4, 9, and 10, and flanking splice junctions, but not in the promotor region or in exons 1, 2, 3, and 11. Outside of exons 5-8 not a single missense mutation was found. Microdeletions and microinsertions predominate but nonsense and splice site mutations also occur. In contrast, the majority of mutations in exons 5-8 were missense changes which exclusively occurred at amino acids that were identical in all known p53 sequences which represent about 1.6 billion years of evolutionary divergence. The difference in the mutational pattern between these two regions of the p53 gene is due to a lack of missense and inframe microdeletion mutations outside exons 5-8 (p<.0001), whereas frameshift deletions and insertions, nonsense mutations and splicing defects are equally distributed over the gene. A review of the literature shows that the difference in the patterns of mutation inside and outside of exons 5-8 we have found in breast cancer is present in other types of cancers as well. These data show the importance of comparing equivalent exons when examining the pattern of p53 gene mutation in different populations. In addition, the paucity of missense mutations in breast and other cancers (even at amino acids identical throughout p53 gene evolution) indicates that at least some of the missense mutations in exons 2-4 and 9-11 result in a phenotype other than malignant transformation.

  5. Efficient selection of 3'-terminal exons from vertebrate DNA.

    PubMed Central

    Krizman, D B; Berget, S M

    1993-01-01

    Identification of expressed sequences within genomic DNA is a hurdle in the characterization of complex genomes. We developed an exon trapping scheme that provides a positive selection for vertebrate 3'-terminal exons. A copy of the trapped exon sequence is obtained by RT/PCR amplification. The technique detects valid terminal exons without interference from partial exons or non-specific sequences, including simple human repeated sequences. Application to random human cosmids yielded one unique trapped terminal exon per cosmid on average. Because vertebrate terminal exons average 600-700 nucleotides in length, the technique provides transcribed sequences of sufficient length to assist further mapping efforts. Images PMID:8255777

  6. Efficient selection of 3'-terminal exons from vertebrate DNA.

    PubMed

    Krizman, D B; Berget, S M

    1993-11-11

    Identification of expressed sequences within genomic DNA is a hurdle in the characterization of complex genomes. We developed an exon trapping scheme that provides a positive selection for vertebrate 3'-terminal exons. A copy of the trapped exon sequence is obtained by RT/PCR amplification. The technique detects valid terminal exons without interference from partial exons or non-specific sequences, including simple human repeated sequences. Application to random human cosmids yielded one unique trapped terminal exon per cosmid on average. Because vertebrate terminal exons average 600-700 nucleotides in length, the technique provides transcribed sequences of sufficient length to assist further mapping efforts.

  7. Tropomyosin exon 6b is troponin-specific and required for correct acto-myosin regulation.

    PubMed

    Maytum, Robin; Bathe, Friederike; Konrad, Manfred; Geeves, Michael A

    2004-04-30

    The specificity of tropomyosin (Tm) exon 6b for interaction with and functioning of troponin (Tn) has been studied using recombinant fibroblast Tm isoforms 5a and 5b. These isoforms differ internally by exons 6a/6b and possess non-muscle exons 1b/9d at the termini, hence they lack the primary TnT(1)-tropomyosin interaction, allowing study of exon 6 exchange in isolation from this. Using kinetic techniques to measure regulation of myosin S1 binding to actin and fluorescently labeled Tm to directly measure Tn binding, we show that binding of Tn to both isoforms is similar (0.1-0.5 microm) and both produce well regulated systems. Calcium has little effect on Tn binding to the actin.Tm complex and both exons produce a 3-fold reduction in the S1 binding rate to actin.Tm.Tn in its absence. This confirms previous results that show exon 6 has little influence on Tn affinity to actin.Tm or its ability to fully inhibit the acto-myosin interaction. Thin filaments reconstituted with Tn and Tm5a or skeletal Tm (containing exon 6b) show nearly identical calcium dependence of acto-myosin regulation. However, Tm5b produces a dramatic increase in calcium sensitivity, shifting the activation mid-point by almost an order of magnitude. This shows that exon 6 sequence and, hence, Tm structure in this region have a significant effect upon the calcium regulation of Tn. This finding supports evidence that familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy mutations occurring adjacent to this region can effect calcium regulation.

  8. Naturally occurring nucleosome positioning signals in human exons and introns.

    PubMed

    Baldi, P; Brunak, S; Chauvin, Y; Krogh, A

    1996-11-08

    We describe the structural implications of a periodic pattern found in human exons and introns by hidden Markov models. We show that exons (besides the reading frame) have a specific sequential structure in the form of a pattern with triplet consensus non-T(A/T)G, and a minimal periodicity of roughly ten nucleotides. The periodic pattern is also present in intron sequences, although the strength per nucleotide is weaker. Using two independent profile methods based on triplet bendability parameters from DNase I experiments and nucleosome positioning data, we show that the pattern in multiple alignments of internal exon and intron sequences corresponds to a periodic "in phase" bending potential towards the major groove of the DNA. The nucleosome positioning data show that the consensus triplets (and their complements) have a preference for locations on a bent double helix where the major groove faces inward and is compressed. The in-phase triplets are located adjacent to GCC/GGC triplets known to have the strongest bias in their positioning on the nuclesome. Analysis of mRNA sequences encoding proteins with known tertiary structure exclude the possibility that the pattern is a consequence of the previously well-known periodicity caused by the encoding of alpha-helices in proteins. Finally, we discuss the relation between the bending potential of coding and non-coding regions and its impact on the translational positioning of nucleosomes and the recognition of genes by the transcriptional machinery.

  9. Does Parental Divorce Increase Risk Behaviors among 15/16 and 18/19 year-old Adolescents? A Study from Oslo, Norway

    PubMed Central

    Zeratsion, Henok; Bjertness, Cecilie B; Lien, Lars; Haavet, Ole R; Dalsklev, Madeleine; Halvorsen, Jon A; Bjertness, Espen; Claussen, Bjørgulf

    2014-01-01

    Background: Several studies have reported an increase in risk behaviors among adolescents after experience of parental divorce. The aim of the study was to investigate whether parental divorce is associated with risk behavior among adolescents independent of mental health problems, first when early divorce was experienced, and second after experience of late parental divorce. Method: One prospective (n=1861) and one cross-sectional study (n=2422) were conducted using data from two Young-HUBRO surveys in Oslo, Norway. All 15/16 year-old 10th grade students who participated in the first survey in the school year 2000/01 were followed-up in 2004 when they were 18/19 year-olds. The follow-up rate was 68%. The prospective study investigated the influence of late parental divorce that occurred between the age of 15/16 and 18/19. In the cross-sectional study we focused on early parental divorce that occurred before the participants were 15/16 year-old. Results:In the prospective study we could not discern a significant association between experiencing late parental divorce and an increase in risk behaviors among 18/19 year-old adolescents. In the cross-sectional study parental divorce was significantly associated with cigarette smoking and using doping agents. Conclusion: Parental divorce that occurs when the children of divorced parents are 15/16 year-old or younger is associated with an increase in cigarette smoking and use of doping agents. However, no evidence of significant association is found between experience of late parental divorce and risk behaviors in late adolescence. PMID:25006342

  10. Quality information for quality use of medicines; 2nd International Conference, Kazan, 15-16 October 2010.

    PubMed

    Ziganshina, Lilia E; Menkes, David B; Herxheimer, Andrew

    2011-01-01

    Kazan hosted Russia's first international conference on medicines that was entirely independent of the pharmaceutical industry, attracting 414 participants from 9 countries and 20 regions of the Russian Federation. The meeting was greeted and endorsed by world leaders in pharmaceutical information, policy and regulation. Delegates discussed the professional and social problems arising from unethical drug promotion, including compromised evidence from clinical trials and consequent impairments in health service delivery. The Conference adopted a resolution prioritizing policy development and health system needs, notably including the development of clinical pharmacology. A website documents conference materials and provides an interface for future collaboration: http://evidenceupdate-tatarstan.ru/confer.

  11. Categorization and characterization of transcript-confirmed constitutively and alternatively spliced introns and exons from human.

    PubMed

    Clark, Francis; Thanaraj, T A

    2002-02-15

    By spliced alignment of human DNA and transcript sequence data we constructed a data set of transcript-confirmed exons and introns from 2793 genes, 796 of which (28%) were seen to have multiple isoforms. We find that over one-third of human exons can translate in more than one frame, and that this is highly correlated with G+C content. Introns containing adenosine at donor site position +3 (A3), rather than guanosine (G3), are more common in low G+C regions, while the converse is true in high G+C regions. These two classes of introns are shown to have distinct lengths, consensus sequences and correlations among splice signals, leading to the hypothesis that A3 donor sites are associated with exon definition, and G3 donor sites with intron definition. Minor classes of introns, including GC-AG, U12-type GT-AG, weak, and putative AG-dependant introns are identified and characterized. Cassette exons are more prevalent in low G+C regions, while exon isoforms are more prevalent in high G+C regions. Cassette exon events outnumber other alternative events, while exon isoform events involve truncation twice as often as extension, and occur at acceptor sites twice as often as at donor sites. Alternative splicing is usually associated with weak splice signals, and in a majority of cases, preserves the coding frame. The reported characteristics of constitutive and alternative splice signals, and the hypotheses offered regarding alternative splicing and genome organization, have important implications for experimental research into RNA processing. The 'AltExtron' data sets are available at http://www.bit.uq.edu.au/altExtron/ and http://www.ebi.ac.uk/~thanaraj/altExtron/.

  12. The role of germline promoters and I exons in cytokine-induced gene-specific class switch recombination.

    PubMed

    Dunnick, Wesley A; Shi, Jian; Holden, Victoria; Fontaine, Clinton; Collins, John T

    2011-01-01

    Germline transcription precedes class switch recombination (CSR). The promoter regions and I exons of these germline transcripts include binding sites for activation- and cytokine-induced transcription factors, and the promoter regions/I exons are essential for CSR. Therefore, it is a strong hypothesis that the promoter/I exons regions are responsible for much of cytokine-regulated, gene-specific CSR. We tested this hypothesis by swapping the germline promoter and I exons for the murine γ1 and γ2a H chain genes in a transgene of the entire H chain C-region locus. We found that the promoter/I exon for γ1 germline transcripts can direct robust IL-4-induced recombination to the γ2a gene. In contrast, the promoter/I exon for the γ2a germline transcripts works poorly in the context of the γ1 H chain gene, resulting in expression of γ1 H chains that is <1% the wild-type level. Nevertheless, the small amount of recombination to the chimeric γ1 gene is induced by IFN-γ. These results suggest that cytokine regulation of CSR, but not the magnitude of CSR, is regulated by the promoter/I exons.

  13. Exon expression profiling reveals stimulus-mediated exon use in neural cells

    PubMed Central

    McKee, Adrienne E; Neretti, Nicola; Carvalho, Luis E; Meyer, Clifford A; Fox, Edward A; Brodsky, Alexander S; Silver, Pamela A

    2007-01-01

    Background: Neuronal cells respond to changes in intracellular calcium ([Ca2+]i) by affecting both the abundance and architecture of specific mRNAs. Although calcium-induced transcription and transcript variation have both been recognized as important sources of gene regulation, the interplay between these two phenomena has not been evaluated on a genome-wide scale. Results: Here, we show that exon-centric microarrays can be used to resolve the [Ca2+]i-modulated gene expression response into transcript-level and exon-level regulation. Global assessments of affected transcripts reveal modulation within distinct functional gene categories. We find that transcripts containing calcium-modulated exons exhibit enrichment for calcium ion binding, calmodulin binding, plasma membrane associated, and metabolic proteins. Additionally, we uncover instances of regulated exon use in potassium channels, neuroendocrine secretory proteins and metabolic enzymes, and demonstrate that regulated changes in exon expression give rise to distinct transcript variants. Conclusion: Our findings connect extracellular stimuli to specific exon behavior, and suggest that changes in transcript and exon abundance are reflective of a coordinated gene expression response to elevated [Ca2+]i. The technology we describe here lends itself readily to the resolution of stimulus-induced gene expression at both the transcript and exon levels. PMID:17683528

  14. Source Mechanisms and Stress Fields of the 15-16 June 2013 Crete Earthquake Sequence along Hellenic Subduction Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorgun, E.

    2016-12-01

    15 June 2013 Mw 6.1 off-shore southern Crete earthquake and its aftershock sequence along Hellenic Subduction Zone are examined. Centroid moment tensors (CMT) for 40 earthquakes with moment magnitudes (Mw) between 3.5 and 6.1 are determined by applying a waveform inversion method. The mainshock is shallow focus thrust event with a minor strike-slip component at a depth of 20 km. The seismic moment (Mo) of the mainshock is estimated as 2.07 × 1018 Nm and rupture duration of the mainshock is 4 s. The focal mechanisms of aftershocks are mainly thrust faulting with a strike-slip component. The geometry of the moment tensors (Mw≥3.5) reveals a thrust faulting regime with N-S trending direction of P-axis in the entire activated region. According to high-resolution CMT solutions of the off-shore southern Crete earthquake sequence, one main cluster consisting of 40 events is revealed. The aftershock activity in the observation period between 15 June and 15 July 2013 extends from N to S direction. Seismic cross-sections indicate that a complex pattern of the hypocenter distribution with the activation of two segments. The subduction interface is clearly revealed with high-resolution hypocenter source relocation and moment tensor solution. The best constrained focal depths indicate that the aftershock sequence is mainly confined in the upper plate (depth < 30 km) and are ranging from about 5 - 28 km depth. A stress tensor inversion of focal mechanism data is performed to obtain a more precise picture of the off-shore southern Crete stress field. The stress tensor inversion results indicate a predominant thrust stress regime with a NE-SW oriented maximum horizontal compressive stress (SH). According to variance of the stress tensor inversion, to first order, the southern Crete region is characterized by a homogeneous interplate stress field. We also investigate the Coulomb stress change associated with the mainshock to evaluate any significant enhancement of stresses along

  15. Source Mechanisms and Stress Fields of the 15-16 June 2013 Crete Earthquake Sequence Along Hellenic Subduction Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Görgün, Ethem

    2017-03-01

    15 June 2013 M w 6.1 off-shore southern Crete earthquake and its aftershock sequence along Hellenic Subduction Zone are examined. Centroid moment tensors (CMTs) for 40 earthquakes with moment magnitudes ( M w) between 3.5 and 6.1 are determined by applying a waveform inversion method. The mainshock is shallow focus thrust event with a minor strike-slip component at a depth of 20 km. The seismic moment ( M o) of the mainshock is estimated as 2.07 × 1018 Nm, and rupture duration of the mainshock is 4 s. The focal mechanisms of aftershocks are mainly thrust faulting with a strike-slip component. The geometry of the moment tensors ( M w ≥ 3.5) reveals a thrust faulting regime with N-S trending direction of P axis in the entire activated region. According to high-resolution CMT solutions of the off-shore southern Crete earthquake sequence, one main cluster consisting of 40 events is revealed. The aftershock activity in the observation period between 15 June and 15 July 2013 extends from N to S and NW to SE directions. Seismic cross sections indicate a complex pattern of the hypocenter distribution with the activation of two segments. The subduction interface is clearly revealed with high-resolution hypocenter source relocation and moment tensor solution. The best-constrained focal depths indicate that the aftershock sequence is mainly confined in the upper plate (depth < 30 km) and is ranging from about 5-28 km depth. A stress tensor inversion of focal mechanism data is performed to obtain a more precise picture of the off-shore southern Crete stress field. The stress tensor inversion results indicate a predominant thrust stress regime with a NE-SW-oriented maximum horizontal compressive stress ( S H). According to variance of the stress tensor inversion, to first order, the southern Crete region is characterized by a homogeneous interplate stress field. We also investigate the Coulomb stress change associated with the mainshock to evaluate any significant

  16. Antisense PMO Found in Dystrophic Dog Model Was Effective in Cells from Exon 7-Deleted DMD Patient

    PubMed Central

    Saito, Takashi; Nakamura, Akinori; Aoki, Yoshitsugu; Yokota, Toshifumi; Okada, Takashi; Osawa, Makiko; Takeda, Shin'ichi

    2010-01-01

    Background Antisense oligonucleotide-induced exon skipping is a promising approach for treatment of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). We have systemically administered an antisense phosphorodiamidate morpholino oligomer (PMO) targeting dystrophin exons 6 and 8 to a dog with canine X-linked muscular dystrophy in Japan (CXMDJ) lacking exon 7 and achieved recovery of dystrophin in skeletal muscle. To date, however, antisense chemical compounds used in DMD animal models have not been directly applied to a DMD patient having the same type of exon deletion. We recently identified a DMD patient with an exon 7 deletion and tried direct translation of the antisense PMO used in dog models to the DMD patient's cells. Methodology/Principal Findings We converted fibroblasts of CXMDJ and the DMD patient to myotubes by FACS-aided MyoD transduction. Antisense PMOs targeting identical regions of dog and human dystrophin exons 6 and 8 were designed. These antisense PMOs were mixed and administered as a cocktail to either dog or human cells in vitro. In the CXMDJ and human DMD cells, we observed a similar efficacy of skipping of exons 6 and 8 and a similar extent of dystrophin protein recovery. The accompanying skipping of exon 9, which did not alter the reading frame, was different between cells of these two species. Conclusion/Significance Antisense PMOs, the effectiveness of which has been demonstrated in a dog model, achieved multi-exon skipping of dystrophin gene on the FACS-aided MyoD-transduced fibroblasts from an exon 7-deleted DMD patient, suggesting the feasibility of systemic multi-exon skipping in humans. PMID:20805873

  17. Antisense PMO found in dystrophic dog model was effective in cells from exon 7-deleted DMD patient.

    PubMed

    Saito, Takashi; Nakamura, Akinori; Aoki, Yoshitsugu; Yokota, Toshifumi; Okada, Takashi; Osawa, Makiko; Takeda, Shin'ichi

    2010-08-18

    Antisense oligonucleotide-induced exon skipping is a promising approach for treatment of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). We have systemically administered an antisense phosphorodiamidate morpholino oligomer (PMO) targeting dystrophin exons 6 and 8 to a dog with canine X-linked muscular dystrophy in Japan (CXMD(J)) lacking exon 7 and achieved recovery of dystrophin in skeletal muscle. To date, however, antisense chemical compounds used in DMD animal models have not been directly applied to a DMD patient having the same type of exon deletion. We recently identified a DMD patient with an exon 7 deletion and tried direct translation of the antisense PMO used in dog models to the DMD patient's cells. We converted fibroblasts of CXMD(J) and the DMD patient to myotubes by FACS-aided MyoD transduction. Antisense PMOs targeting identical regions of dog and human dystrophin exons 6 and 8 were designed. These antisense PMOs were mixed and administered as a cocktail to either dog or human cells in vitro. In the CXMD(J) and human DMD cells, we observed a similar efficacy of skipping of exons 6 and 8 and a similar extent of dystrophin protein recovery. The accompanying skipping of exon 9, which did not alter the reading frame, was different between cells of these two species. Antisense PMOs, the effectiveness of which has been demonstrated in a dog model, achieved multi-exon skipping of dystrophin gene on the FACS-aided MyoD-transduced fibroblasts from an exon 7-deleted DMD patient, suggesting the feasibility of systemic multi-exon skipping in humans.

  18. Bioinformatic analysis of exon repetition, exon scrambling and trans-splicing in humans.

    PubMed

    Shao, Xiang; Shepelev, Valery; Fedorov, Alexei

    2006-03-15

    Using bioinformatic approaches we aimed to characterize poorly understood abnormalities in splicing known as exon scrambling, exon repetition and trans-splicing. We developed a software package that allows large-scale comparison of all human expressed sequence tags (EST) sequences to the entire set of human gene sequences. Among 5,992,495 EST sequences, 401 cases of exon repetition and 416 cases of exon scrambling were found. The vast majority of identified ESTs contain fragments rather than full-length repeated or scrambled exons. Their structures suggest that the scrambled or repeated exon fragments may have arisen in the process of cDNA cloning and not from splicing abnormalities. Nevertheless, we found 11 cases of full-length exon repetition showing that this phenomenon is real yet very rare. In searching for examples of trans-splicing, we looked only at reproducible events where at least two independent ESTs represent the same putative trans-splicing event. We found 15 ESTs representing five types of putative trans-splicing. However, all 15 cases were derived from human malignant tissues and could have resulted from genomic rearrangements. Our results provide support for a very rare but physiological occurrence of exon repetition, but suggest that apparent exon scrambling and trans-splicing result, respectively, from in vitro artifact and gene-level abnormalities. Exon-Intron Database (EID) is available at http://www.meduohio.edu/bioinfo/eid. Programs are available at http://www.meduohio.edu/bioinfo/software.html. The Laboratory website is available at http://www.meduohio.edu/medicine/fedorov Supplementary file is available at http://www.meduohio.edu/bioinfo/software.html.

  19. Different RPGR exon ORF15 mutations in Canids provide insights into photoreceptor cell degeneration.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qi; Acland, Gregory M; Wu, Wen X; Johnson, Jennifer L; Pearce-Kelling, Sue; Tulloch, Brian; Vervoort, Raf; Wright, Alan F; Aguirre, Gustavo D

    2002-05-01

    The canine disease, X-linked progressive retinal atrophy (XLPRA), is similar to human RP3, an X-linked form of retinitis pigmentosa, and maps to the same region in the X chromosome. Analysis of the physical map of the XLPRA and RP3 intervals shows a high degree of conservation in terms of genes and their order. We have found different mutations in exon ORF15 of the RPGR gene in two distinct mutant dog strains (XLPRA1, XLPRA2). Microdeletions resulting in a premature stop or a frameshift mutation result in very different retinal phenotypes, which are allele-specific and consistent for each mutation. The phenotype associated with the frameshift mutation in XLPRA2 is very severe and manifests during retinal development; the phenotype resulting from the XLPRA1 nonsense mutation is expressed only after normal photoreceptor morphogenesis. Splicing of RPGR mRNA transcripts in retina is complex, and either exon ORF15 or exon 19 can be a terminal exon. The retina-predominant transcript contains ORF15 as a terminal exon, and is expressed in normal and mutant retinas. The frameshift mutation dramatically alters the deduced amino acid sequence, and the protein aggregates in the endoplasmic reticulum of transfected cells. The cellular and molecular results in the two canine RPGR exon ORF15 mutations have implications for understanding the phenotypic variability found in human RP3 families that carry similar mutations.

  20. Implications of single nucleotide polymorphisms in CD44 exon 2 for risk of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Juhua; Nagarkatti, Prakash S; Zhong, Yin; Zhang, Jiajia; Nagarkatti, Mitzi

    2011-09-01

    CD44 is a cell-surface glycoprotein involved in many cellular functions including lymphocyte activation, recirculation and homing, hematopoiesis and tumor metastasis, suggesting that CD44 may play an important role in breast cancer development. In this study, we examined whether CD44 exon 2 polymorphisms are associated with increased susceptibility to breast cancer. Direct nucleotide sequencing analysis showed that multiple single nucleotide polymorphisms were present in the CD44 exon 2 coding region in female patients with breast cancer. There was no significant difference in the frequency of any one single nucleotide polymorphism in the CD44 exon 2 coding region between patients with breast cancer and normal donors. However, CD44 polymorphisms in the CD44 exon 2 coding region were identified in approximately 40% of patients with breast cancer, which was significantly higher than in normal donors (odds ratio, 9.34; 95% confidence interval = 2.58-33.82; P < 0.0001). The Wilcoxon-Mann-Whitney test analysis showed that the patients with the CD44 polymorphisms in CD44 exon 2 coding sequence had breast cancer at earlier ages, 49 ± 3 versus 62 ± 2 years (P < 0.0005), and larger tumor burdens (4.9 ± 1.22 vs. 1.6 ± 0.15 mm, P < 0.01) at the time of diagnosis. Interestingly, African-American female patients having the CD44 polymorphisms in CD44 exon 2 coding sequence were diagnosed with breast cancer at very young age (41 ± 2 years). Our results show that CD44 exon 2 polymorphisms are associated with breast cancer development, and such analysis may be effectively used in the evaluation of risk, prediction of cancer, prevention, diagnosis, and epidemiological studies of breast cancer.

  1. Novel Exons and Splice Variants in the Human Antibody Heavy Chain Identified by Single Cell and Single Molecule Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Vollmers, Christopher; Penland, Lolita; Kanbar, Jad N.; Quake, Stephen R.

    2015-01-01

    Antibody heavy chains contain a variable and a constant region. The constant region of the antibody heavy chain is encoded by multiple groups of exons which define the isotype and therefore many functional characteristics of the antibody. We performed both single B cell RNAseq and long read single molecule sequencing of antibody heavy chain transcripts and were able to identify novel exons for IGHA1 and IGHA2 as well as novel isoforms for IGHM antibody heavy chain. PMID:25611855

  2. Changes in alternative splicing of human and mouse genes are accompanied by faster evolution of constitutive exons.

    PubMed

    Cusack, Brian P; Wolfe, Kenneth H

    2005-11-01

    Alternative splicing is known to be an important source of protein sequence variation, but its evolutionary impact has not been explored in detail. Studying alternative splicing requires extensive sampling of the transcriptome, but new data sets based on expressed sequence tags aligned to chromosomes make it possible to study alternative splicing on a genome-wide scale. Although genes showing alternative splicing by exon skipping are conserved as compared to the genome as a whole, we find that genes where structural differences between human and mouse result in genome-specific alternatively spliced exons in one species show almost 60% greater nonsynonymous divergence in constitutive exons than genes where exon skipping is conserved. This effect is also seen for genes showing species-specific patterns of alternative splicing where gene structure is conserved. Our observations are not attributable to an inherent difference in rate of evolution between these two sets of proteins or to differences with respect to predictors of evolutionary rate such as expression level, tissue specificity, or genetic redundancy. Where genome-specific alternatively spliced exons are seen in mammals, the vast majority of skipped exons appear to be recent additions to gene structures. Furthermore, among genes with genome-specific alternatively spliced exons, the degree of nonsynonymous divergence in constitutive sequence is a function of the frequency of incorporation of these alternative exons into transcripts. These results suggest that alterations in alternative splicing pattern can have knock-on effects in terms of accelerated sequence evolution in constant regions of the protein.

  3. HEXEvent: a database of Human EXon splicing Events.

    PubMed

    Busch, Anke; Hertel, Klemens J

    2013-01-01

    HEXEvent (http://hexevent.mmg.uci.edu) is a new database that permits the user to compile genome-wide exon data sets of human internal exons showing selected splicing events. User queries can be customized based on the type and the frequency of alternative splicing events. For each splicing version of an exon, an ESTs count is given, specifying the frequency of the event. A user-specific definition of constitutive exons can be entered to designate an exon exclusion level still acceptable for an exon to be considered as constitutive. Similarly, the user has the option to define a maximum inclusion level for an exon to be called an alternatively spliced exon. Unlike other existing splicing databases, HEXEvent permits the user to easily extract alternative splicing information for individual, multiple or genome-wide human internal exons. Importantly, the generated data sets are downloadable for further analysis.

  4. Differentially expressed three non-coding alternate exons at 5' UTR of regulatory type I beta subunit gene of mouse.

    PubMed

    Banday, Abdul Rouf; Azim, Shafquat; Tabish, Mohammad

    2012-04-01

    Prkar1b gene encodes regulatory type I, beta subunit (RIβ) of cAMP dependent protein kinase A in mouse. Among the various isoforms of regulatory and catalytic subunits that comprise mammalian PKA, RIβ subunit is considered to be one of the important subunits for neuronal functions. This is involved in multiple forms of synaptic plasticity, and influences memory and learning by maintaining hippocampal long-term potentiation (LTP). Deficient expression of this gene has been implicated in autoimmune disease systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). We have identified two novel non-coding exons of the Prkar1b gene (designated as exon 1A and exon 1B), which are spliced to the canonical exon 2 and constitute the 5' untranslated region giving rise to three alternative transcript isoforms. We have also confirmed the expression of the previously known first exon (designated as exon 1C) with known transcript published earlier. The transcripts containing exons 1A, 1B and 1C are differentially regulated during the development and tissue types. In silico study of more than 20 kb nucleotide sequence upstream of known translational initiation codon revealed three distinct promoter regions named as PA, PB, and PC upstream of the exon 1A, exon 1B and exon 1C respectively. PB is non-CpG related promoter but PA and PC are CpG related promoters, however all three promoters are TATA less. Further analysis showed that these promoters possess potential signature sequences for common as well as different transcription factors suggesting complex regulation of Prkar1b gene.

  5. Accelerated exchange of exon segments in Viperid three-finger toxin genes (Sistrurus catenatus edwardsii; Desert Massasauga)

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Background Snake venoms consist primarily of proteins and peptides showing a myriad of potent biological activities which have been shaped by both adaptive and neutral selective forces. Venom proteins are encoded by multigene families that have evolved through a process of gene duplication followed by accelerated evolution in the protein coding region. Results Here we report five gene structures of three-finger toxins from a viperid snake, Sistrurus catenatus edwardsii. These toxin genes are structured similarly to elapid and hydrophiid three-finger toxin genes, with two introns and three exons. Both introns and exons show distinct patterns of segmentation, and the insertion/deletion of segments may define their evolutionary history. The segments in introns, when present, are highly similar to their corresponding segments in other members of the gene family. In contrast, some segments in the exons show high similarity, while others are often distinctly different among corresponding regions of the isoforms. Conclusion Ordered, conserved exon structure strongly suggests that segments in corresponding regions in exons have been exchanged with distinctly different ones during the evolution of these genes. Such a "switching" of segments in exons may result in drastically altering the molecular surface topology and charge, and hence the molecular targets of these three-finger toxins. Thus the phenomenon of accelerated segment switch in exons to alter targeting (ASSET) may play an important role in the evolution of three-finger toxins, resulting in a family of toxins with a highly conserved structural fold but widely varying biological activities. PMID:18606022

  6. Selected Proceedings of the Eastern Regional Meeting of the American Business Communication Association (Cleveland State University, Ohio, April 15-16, 1977).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cleveland State Univ., OH.

    The ten papers included in this document discuss the following topics: educating Americans about the United States economic system, writing and publishing your next book, the advantages and disadvantages of one-way and two-way communication in business (e.g., writing versus telephoning), structural flexibility in business communication courses,…

  7. Exon skipping therapy for Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Kole, Ryszard; Krieg, Arthur M

    2015-06-29

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is caused mostly by internal deletions in the gene for dystrophin, a protein essential for maintaining muscle cell membrane integrity. These deletions abrogate the reading frame and the lack of dystrophin results in progressive muscle deterioration. DMD patients experience progressive loss of ambulation, followed by a need for assisted ventilation, and eventual death in mid-twenties. By the method of exon skipping in dystrophin pre-mRNA the reading frame is restored and the internally deleted but functional dystrophin is produced. Two oligonucleotide drugs that induce desired exon skipping are currently in advanced clinical trials.

  8. A Large Inversion Involving GNAS Exon A/B and All Exons Encoding Gsα Is Associated With Autosomal Dominant Pseudohypoparathyroidism Type Ib (PHP1B).

    PubMed

    Grigelioniene, Giedre; Nevalainen, Pasi I; Reyes, Monica; Thiele, Susanne; Tafaj, Olta; Molinaro, Angelo; Takatani, Rieko; Ala-Houhala, Marja; Nilsson, Daniel; Eisfeldt, Jesper; Lindstrand, Anna; Kottler, Marie-Laure; Mäkitie, Outi; Jüppner, Harald

    2017-04-01

    Pseudohypoparathyroidism type Ib (PHP1B) is characterized primarily by resistance to parathyroid hormone (PTH) and thus hypocalcemia and hyperphosphatemia, in most cases without evidence for Albright hereditary osteodystrophy (AHO). PHP1B is associated with epigenetic changes at one or several differentially-methylated regions (DMRs) within GNAS, which encodes the α-subunit of the stimulatory G protein (Gsα) and splice variants thereof. Heterozygous, maternally inherited STX16 or GNAS deletions leading to isolated loss-of-methylation (LOM) at exon A/B alone or at all maternal DMRs are the cause of autosomal dominant PHP1B (AD-PHP1B). In this study, we analyzed three affected individuals, the female proband and her two sons. All three revealed isolated LOM at GNAS exon A/B, whereas the proband's healthy maternal grandmother and uncle showed normal methylation at this locus. Haplotype analysis was consistent with linkage to the STX16/GNAS region, yet no deletion could be identified. Whole-genome sequencing of one of the patients revealed a large heterozygous inversion (1,882,433 bp). The centromeric breakpoint of the inversion is located 7,225 bp downstream of GNAS exon XL, but its DMR showed no methylation abnormality, raising the possibility that the inversion disrupts a regulatory element required only for establishing or maintaining exon A/B methylation. Because our three patients presented phenotypes consistent with PHP1B, and not with PHP1A, the Gsα promoter is probably unaffected by the inversion. Our findings expand the spectrum of genetic mutations that lead to LOM at exon A/B alone and thus biallelic expression of the transcript derived from this alternative first GNAS exon. © 2017 American Society for Bone and Mineral Research. © 2017 American Society for Bone and Mineral Research.

  9. Triple-layer dissection of the lung adenocarcinoma transcriptome – regulation at the gene, transcript, and exon levels

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Min-Kung; Wu, I-Ching; Cheng, Ching-Chia; Su, Jen-Liang; Hsieh, Chang-Huain; Lin, Yeong-Shin; Chen, Feng-Chi

    2015-01-01

    Lung adenocarcinoma is one of the most deadly human diseases. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying this disease, particularly RNA splicing, have remained underexplored. Here, we report a triple-level (gene-, transcript-, and exon-level) analysis of lung adenocarcinoma transcriptomes from 77 paired tumor and normal tissues, as well as an analysis pipeline to overcome genetic variability for accurate differentiation between tumor and normal tissues. We report three major results. First, more than 5,000 differentially expressed transcripts/exonic regions occur repeatedly in lung adenocarcinoma patients. These transcripts/exonic regions are enriched in nicotine metabolism and ribosomal functions in addition to the pathways enriched for differentially expressed genes (cell cycle, extracellular matrix receptor interaction, and axon guidance). Second, classification models based on rationally selected transcripts or exonic regions can reach accuracies of 0.93 to 1.00 in differentiating tumor from normal tissues. Of the 28 selected exonic regions, 26 regions correspond to alternative exons located in such regulators as tumor suppressor (GDF10), signal receptor (LYVE1), vascular-specific regulator (RASIP1), ubiquitination mediator (RNF5), and transcriptional repressor (TRIM27). Third, classification systems based on 13 to 14 differentially expressed genes yield accuracies near 100%. Genes selected by both detection methods include C16orf59, DAP3, ETV4, GABARAPL1, PPAR, RADIL, RSPO1, SERTM1, SRPK1, ST6GALNAC6, and TNXB. Our findings imply a multilayered lung adenocarcinoma regulome in which transcript-/exon-level regulation may be dissociated from gene-level regulation. Our described method may be used to identify potentially important genes/transcripts/exonic regions for the tumorigenesis of lung adenocarcinoma and to construct accurate tumor vs. normal classification systems for this disease. PMID:26356813

  10. A survey on intron and exon lengths.

    PubMed Central

    Hawkins, J D

    1988-01-01

    The lengths of introns and exons in various parts of genes of vertebrates, insects, plants and fungi are tabulated. Differences between the various groups of organisms are apparent. The results are discussed and support the idea that, generally speaking, introns were present in primitive genomes, though in some cases they may have been inserted into pre-existing genes. PMID:3057449

  11. Delineation of the Marfan phenotype associated with mutations in exons 23-32 of the FBN1 gene

    SciTech Connect

    Putnam, E.A.; Cho, M.; Milewicz, D.M.

    1996-03-29

    Marfan syndrome is a dominantly inherited connective tissue disorder with a wide range of phenotypic severity. The condition is the result of mutations in FBN1, a large gene composed of 65 exons encoding the fibrillin-1 protein. While mutations causing classic manifestations of Marfan syndrome have been identified throughout the FBN1 gene, the six previously characterized mutations resulting in the severe, perinatal lethal form of Marfan syndrome have clustered in exons 24-32 of the gene. We screened 8 patients with either neonatal Marfan syndrome or severe cardiovascular complications of Marfan syndrome for mutations in this region of the gene. Using intron-based exon-specific primers, we amplified exons 23-32 from genomic DNAs, screened these fragments by single-stranded conformational polymorphism analysis, and sequenced indicated exons. This analysis documented mutations in exons 25-27 of the FBN1 mutations in 6 of these patients. These results, taken together with previously published FBN1 mutations in this region, further define the phenotype associated with mutations in exons 24-32 of the FBN1 gene, information important for the development of possible diagnostic tests and genetic counseling. 49 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  12. Use of epitope libraries to identify exon-specific monoclonal antibodies for characterization of altered dystrophins in muscular dystrophy

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen thi Man; Morris, G.E. )

    1993-06-01

    The majority of mutations in Xp21-linked muscular dystrophy (MD) can be identified by PCR or Southern blotting, as deletions or duplications of groups of exons in the dystrophin gene, but it is not always possible to predict how much altered dystrophin, if any, will be produced. Use of exon-specific monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) on muscle biopsies from MD patients can, in principle, provide information on both the amount of altered dystrophin produced and, when dystrophin is present, the nature of the genetic deletion or point mutation. For this purpose, mAbs which recognize regions of dystrophin encoded by known exons and whose binding is unaffected by the absence of adjacent exons are required. To map mAbs to specific exons, random [open quotes]libraries[close quotes] of expressed dystrophin fragments were created by cloning DNAseI digestion fragments of a 4.3-kb dystrophin cDNA into a pTEX expression vector. The libraries were then used to locate the epitopes recognized by 48 mAbs to fragments of 25--60 amino acids within the 1,434-amino-acid dystrophin fragment used to produce the antibodies. This is sufficiently detailed to allow further refinement by using synthetic peptides and, in many cases, to identify the exon in the DMD (Duchenne MD) gene which encodes the epitope. To illustrate their use in dystrophin analysis, a Duchenne patient with a frameshift deletion of exons 42 and 43 makes a truncated dystrophin encoded by exons 1--41, and the authors now show that this can be detected in the sarcolemma by mAbs up to and including those specific for exon 41 epitopes but not by mAbs specific for exon 43 or later epitopes. 38 refs., 2 figs., 4 tabs.

  13. Exon organization of the human FKBP-12 gene: Correlation with structural and functional protein domains

    SciTech Connect

    DiLella, A.G.; Craig, R.J. )

    1991-09-03

    FKBP-12, the major T-cell binding protein for the immunosuppressive agents FK506 and rapamycin, catalyzes the interconversion of the cis and trans rotamers of the peptidyl-prolyl amide bond of peptide and protein substrates. The function of rotamase activity in cells and the role of FKBP-12 in immunoregulation is uncertain. In this paper the authors report the cloning and characterization of the human chromosomal FKBP-12 gene and four processed FKBP-12 pseudogenes. The FKBP-12 gene is 24 kilobases in length and contains five exons. The protein-coding region of the gene is divided into four exon modules that correlate with the structural and functional domains of the protein. The novel structure of FKBP-12 resulting form the topology of the antiparallel {beta}-sheet is the topological crossing of two loops that are encoded by separate exons. Separate exons also encode the antiparallel {beta}-sheet and {alpha}-helical region that define the drug-binding pocket and enzyme activity site of FKBP-12. The exon organization of the FKBP-12 gene structure will enable inactivation of this gene by homologous recombination in cells to provide a model to study the role of FKBP-12 in immunoregulation and normal cellular processes.

  14. Depletion of TDP 43 overrides the need for exonic and intronic splicing enhancers in the human apoA-II gene.

    PubMed

    Mercado, Pablo Arrisi; Ayala, Youhna M; Romano, Maurizio; Buratti, Emanuele; Baralle, Francisco E

    2005-01-01

    Exon 3 of the human apolipoprotein A-II (apoA-II) gene is efficiently included in the mRNA although its acceptor site is significantly weak because of a peculiar (GU)16 tract instead of a canonical polypyrimidine tract within the intron 2/exon 3 junction. Our previous studies demonstrated that the SR proteins ASF/SF2 and SC35 bind specifically an exonic splicing enhancer (ESE) within exon 3 and promote exon 3 splicing. In the present study, we show that the ESE is necessary only in the proper context. In addition, we have characterized two novel sequences in the flanking introns that modulate apoA-II exon 3 splicing. There is a G-rich element in intron 2 that interacts with hnRNPH1 and inhibits exon 3 splicing. The second is a purine rich region in intron 3 that binds SRp40 and SRp55 and promotes exon 3 inclusion in mRNA. We have also found that the (GU) repeats in the apoA-II context bind the splicing factor TDP-43 and interfere with exon 3 definition. Significantly, blocking of TDP-43 expression by small interfering RNA overrides the need for all the other cis-acting elements making exon 3 inclusion constitutive even in the presence of disrupted exonic and intronic enhancers. Altogether, our results suggest that exonic and intronic enhancers have evolved to balance the negative effects of the two silencers located in intron 2 and hence rescue the constitutive exon 3 inclusion in apoA-II mRNA.

  15. Depletion of TDP 43 overrides the need for exonic and intronic splicing enhancers in the human apoA-II gene

    PubMed Central

    Mercado, Pablo Arrisi; Ayala, Youhna M.; Romano, Maurizio; Buratti, Emanuele; Baralle, Francisco E.

    2005-01-01

    Exon 3 of the human apolipoprotein A-II (apoA-II) gene is efficiently included in the mRNA although its acceptor site is significantly weak because of a peculiar (GU)16 tract instead of a canonical polypyrimidine tract within the intron 2/exon 3 junction. Our previous studies demonstrated that the SR proteins ASF/SF2 and SC35 bind specifically an exonic splicing enhancer (ESE) within exon 3 and promote exon 3 splicing. In the present study, we show that the ESE is necessary only in the proper context. In addition, we have characterized two novel sequences in the flanking introns that modulate apoA-II exon 3 splicing. There is a G-rich element in intron 2 that interacts with hnRNPH1 and inhibits exon 3 splicing. The second is a purine rich region in intron 3 that binds SRp40 and SRp55 and promotes exon 3 inclusion in mRNA. We have also found that the (GU) repeats in the apoA-II context bind the splicing factor TDP-43 and interfere with exon 3 definition. Significantly, blocking of TDP-43 expression by small interfering RNA overrides the need for all the other cis-acting elements making exon 3 inclusion constitutive even in the presence of disrupted exonic and intronic enhancers. Altogether, our results suggest that exonic and intronic enhancers have evolved to balance the negative effects of the two silencers located in intron 2 and hence rescue the constitutive exon 3 inclusion in apoA-II mRNA. PMID:16254078

  16. Limited HLA sequence variation outside of antigen recognition domain exons of 360 10 of 10 matched unrelated hematopoietic stem cell transplant donor-recipient pairs.

    PubMed

    Hou, L; Vierra-Green, C; Lazaro, A; Brady, C; Haagenson, M; Spellman, S; Hurley, C K

    2017-01-01

    Traditional DNA-based typing focuses primarily on interrogating the exons of human leukocyte antigen (HLA) genes that form the antigen recognition domain (ARD). The relevance of mismatching donor and recipient for HLA variation outside the ARD on hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) outcomes is unknown. This study was designed to evaluate the frequency of variation outside the ARD in 10 of 10 (HLA-A, -B, -C, -DRB1, -DQB1) matched unrelated donor transplant pairs (n = 360). Next-generation DNA sequencing was used to characterize both HLA exons and introns for HLA-A, -B, -C alleles; exons 2, 3 and the intervening intron for HLA-DRB1 and exons only for HLA-DQA1 and -DQB1. Over 97% of alleles at each locus were matched for their nucleotide sequence outside of the ARD exons. Of the 4320 allele comparisons overall, only 17 allele pairs were mismatched for non-ARD exons, 41 for noncoding regions and 9 for ARD exons. The observed variation between donor and recipient usually involved a single nucleotide difference (88% of mismatches); 88% of the non-ARD exon variants impacted the amino acid sequence. The impact of amino acid sequence variation caused by substitutions in exons outside ARD regions in D-R pairs will be difficult to assess in HSCT outcome studies because these mismatches do not occur very frequently.

  17. Homozygous deletion but not mutation of exons 5 and 8 of the fragile histidine triad (FHIT) gene is associated with features of differentiated thyroid carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Yin, De-Tao; Wang, Lin; Sun, Jianrei; Yin, Fengyan; Yan, Qingtao; Shen, Ru-Long; Gao, Jian-Xin; He, Gang

    2010-01-01

    The fragile histidine triad (FHIT) gene encompasses the most common human fragile site, FRA3B at 3p14.2, a region that is involved in homozygous deletions in a variety of human tumors. FHIT is considered to be a tumor suppressor gene that is frequently inactivated in various types of cancer. To study the role of the FHIT gene in thyroid tumorigenesis, we looked for homozygous deletions or mutations of exons 5 and 8 of the FHIT gene in 65 cases of differentiated thyroid carcinoma (DTC) and their matched non-cancerous epithelium (NCE), using exon-specific PCR amplification and PCR single strand conformation polymorphism (PCR-SSCP) techniques. In DTC, the incidence of homozygous deletion of exon 5 was 30.8% (20/65), and it was associated with tumor metastasis to lymph nodes (p <0.05). The incidence of homozygous deletion of exon 8 was 29.2% (19/65), and it was associated with the tumor pathological grade, TNM stage, and lymph node metastasis (p <0.05). There was strong correlation between homozygous deletions of exon 5 and exon 8 (p <0.01). No point mutations were observed in either exon 5 or exon 8. These findings suggest that: (a) exons 5 and 8 of FHIT are key target regions of deletion, (b) homozygous deletions of exon 5 and exon 8 may be good biomarkers for the biological behavior of DTC, and (c) point mutation of these exons may not be involved in the inactivation of the FHIT gene in DTC.

  18. Identification and characterization of seven new exon 11-associated splice variants of the rat μ opioid receptor gene, OPRM1.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jin; Xu, Mingming; Rossi, Grace C; Pasternak, Gavril W; Pan, Ying-Xian

    2011-01-21

    The mouse mu opioid receptor (OPRM1) gene undergoes extensive alternative splicing at both the 3'- and 5'-ends of the gene. Previously, several C-terminal variants generated through 3' splicing have been identified in the rat OPRM1 gene. In both mice and humans 5' splicing generates a number of exon 11-containing variants. Studies in an exon 11 knockout mouse suggest the functional importance of these exon 11-associated variants in mediating the analgesic actions of a subset of mu opioids, including morphine-6β-glucuronide (M6G) and heroin, but not others such as morphine and methadone. We now have examined 5' splicing in the rat. The current studies identified in the rat a homologous exon 11 and seven exon 11-associated variants, suggesting conservation of exon 11 and its associated variants among mouse, rat and human. RT-PCR revealed marked differences in the expression of these variants across several brain regions, implying region-specific mRNA processing of the exon 11-associated variants. Of the seven rat exon 11-associated variants, four encoded the identical protein as found in rMOR-1, two predicted 6 TM variants, and one, rMOR-1H2, generated a novel N-terminal variant in which a stretch of an additional 50 amino acids was present at the N-terminus of the previously established rMOR-1 sequence. When expressed in CHO cells, the presence of the additional 50 amino acids in rMOR-1H2 significantly altered agonist-induced G protein activation with little effect on opioid binding. The identification of the rat exon 11 and its associated variants further demonstrated conservation of 5' splicing in OPRM1 genes among rodents and humans. The functional relevance of these exon 11 associated variants was suggested by the region-specific expression of their mRNAs and the influence of the N-terminal sequence on agonist-induced G protein coupling in the novel N-terminal variant, rMOR-1H2. The importance of the exon 11-associated variants in mice in M6G and heroin

  19. Use of fake identification to purchase alcohol amongst 15-16 year olds: a cross-sectional survey examining alcohol access, consumption and harm

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Despite legislation and enforcement activities to prevent underage access to alcohol, underage individuals continue to be able to access alcohol and to do so at levels which put them at significant risk of alcohol-related harm. Methods An opportunistic survey of 15-16 year olds (n = 9,833) across North West England was used to examine alcohol consumption, methods of access and related harms experienced (such as regretted sex). Associations between these were analysed using chi square and logistic regression techniques. Results Over a quarter (28.3%) of 15-16 year old participants who drank reported having bought their own alcohol. One seventh (14.9%) of these owned at least one form of fake identification for which by far the most common purchase method was online. Logistic regression analyses showed that those who owned fake identification were significantly more likely to be male (AOR = 2.0; 95% CI = 1.7-2.5; P < 0.001) and to receive a higher personal weekly income (comparing those who received > £30 with those who received ≤ £10: AOR = 3.7; 95% CI = 2.9-4.9; P < 0.001). After taking into account differences in demographic characteristics and personal weekly income, ownership of fake identification was significantly associated with binge drinking (AOR = 3.5, 95% CI = 2.8-4.3; P < 0.001), frequent drinking (AOR = 3.0, 95% CI = 2.5-3.7; P < 0.001) and public drinking (AOR = 3.3, 95% CI = 2.5-4.1; P < 0.001) compared with those who did not own fake identification. Further, those who reported owning fake identification were significantly more likely to report experiencing a variety of alcohol-related harms such as regretted sex after drinking (chi square, all P < 0.001). Conclusions Young people (aged 15-16 years) who have access to fake identification are at a particularly high risk of reporting hazardous alcohol consumption patterns and related harm. Owning fake identification should be considered a risk factor for involvement in risky drinking

  20. A majority of m6A residues are in the last exons, allowing the potential for 3′ UTR regulation

    PubMed Central

    Ke, Shengdong; Alemu, Endalkachew A.; Mertens, Claudia; Gantman, Emily Conn; Fak, John J.; Mele, Aldo; Haripal, Bhagwattie; Zucker-Scharff, Ilana; Moore, Michael J.; Park, Christopher Y.; Vågbø, Cathrine Broberg; Kusśnierczyk, Anna; Klungland, Arne; Darnell, James E.; Darnell, Robert B.

    2015-01-01

    We adapted UV CLIP (cross-linking immunoprecipitation) to accurately locate tens of thousands of m6A residues in mammalian mRNA with single-nucleotide resolution. More than 70% of these residues are present in the 3′-most (last) exons, with a very sharp rise (sixfold) within 150–400 nucleotides of the start of the last exon. Two-thirds of last exon m6A and >40% of all m6A in mRNA are present in 3′ untranslated regions (UTRs); contrary to earlier suggestions, there is no preference for location of m6A sites around stop codons. Moreover, m6A is significantly higher in noncoding last exons than in next-to-last exons harboring stop codons. We found that m6A density peaks early in the 3′ UTR and that, among transcripts with alternative polyA (APA) usage in both the brain and the liver, brain transcripts preferentially use distal polyA sites, as reported, and also show higher proximal m6A density in the last exons. Furthermore, when we reduced m6A methylation by knocking down components of the methylase complex and then examined 661 transcripts with proximal m6A peaks in last exons, we identified a set of 111 transcripts with altered (approximately two-thirds increased proximal) APA use. Taken together, these observations suggest a role of m6A modification in regulating proximal alternative polyA choice. PMID:26404942

  1. RBFOX2 Promotes Protein 4.1R Exon 16 Selection via U1 snRNP Recruitment

    PubMed Central

    Ou, Alexander C.; Park, Jennie; Yu, Faye; Yu, Brian; Lee, Angela; Yang, Guang; Zhou, Anyu; Benz, Edward J.

    2012-01-01

    The erythroid differentiation-specific splicing switch of protein 4.1R exon 16, which encodes a spectrin/actin-binding peptide critical for erythrocyte membrane stability, is modulated by the differentiation-induced splicing factor RBFOX2. We have now characterized the mechanism by which RBFOX2 regulates exon 16 splicing through the downstream intronic element UGCAUG. Exon 16 possesses a weak 5′ splice site (GAG/GTTTGT), which when strengthened to a consensus sequence (GAG/GTAAGT) leads to near-total exon 16 inclusion. Impaired RBFOX2 binding reduces exon 16 inclusion in the context of the native weak 5′ splice site, but not the engineered strong 5′ splice site, implying that RBFOX2 achieves its effect by promoting utilization of the weak 5′ splice site. We further demonstrate that RBFOX2 increases U1 snRNP recruitment to the weak 5′ splice site through direct interaction between its C-terminal domain (CTD) and the zinc finger region of U1C and that the CTD is required for the effect of RBFOX2 on exon 16 splicing. Our data suggest a novel mechanism for exon 16 5′ splice site activation in which the binding of RBFOX2 to downstream intronic splicing enhancers stabilizes the pre-mRNA–U1 snRNP complex through interactions with U1C. PMID:22083953

  2. Intrasplicing coordinates alternative first exons with alternative splicing in the protein 4.1R gene

    SciTech Connect

    Conboy, John G.; Parra, Marilyn K.; Tan, Jeff S.; Mohandas, Narla; Conboy, John G.

    2008-11-07

    In the protein 4.1R gene, alternative first exons splice differentially to alternative 3' splice sites far downstream in exon 2'/2 (E2'/2). We describe a novel intrasplicing mechanism by which exon 1A (E1A) splices exclusively to the distal E2'/2 acceptor via two nested splicing reactions regulated by novel properties of exon 1B (E1B). E1B behaves as an exon in the first step, using its consensus 5' donor to splice to the proximal E2'/2 acceptor. A long region of downstream intron is excised, juxtaposing E1B with E2'/2 to generate a new composite acceptor containing the E1B branchpoint/pyrimidine tract and E2 distal 3' AG-dinucleotide. Next, the upstream E1A splices over E1B to this distal acceptor, excising the remaining intron plus E1B and E2' to form mature E1A/E2 product. We mapped branch points for both intrasplicing reactions and demonstrated that mutation of the E1B 5' splice site or branchpoint abrogates intrasplicing. In the 4.1R gene, intrasplicing ultimately determines N-terminal protein structure and function. More generally, intrasplicing represents a new mechanism whereby alternative promoters can be coordinated with downstream alternative splicing.

  3. Distribution of SR protein exonic splicing enhancer motifs in human protein-coding genes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jinhua; Smith, Philip J; Krainer, Adrian R; Zhang, Michael Q

    2005-01-01

    Exonic splicing enhancers (ESEs) are pre-mRNA cis-acting elements required for splice-site recognition. We previously developed a web-based program called ESEfinder that scores any sequence for the presence of ESE motifs recognized by the human SR proteins SF2/ASF, SRp40, SRp55 and SC35 (http://rulai.cshl.edu/tools/ESE/). Using ESEfinder, we have undertaken a large-scale analysis of ESE motif distribution in human protein-coding genes. Significantly higher frequencies of ESE motifs were observed in constitutive internal protein-coding exons, compared with both their flanking intronic regions and with pseudo exons. Statistical analysis of ESE motif frequency distributions revealed a complex relationship between splice-site strength and increased or decreased frequencies of particular SR protein motifs. Comparison of constitutively and alternatively spliced exons demonstrated slightly weaker splice-site scores, as well as significantly fewer ESE motifs, in the alternatively spliced group. Our results underline the importance of ESE-mediated SR protein function in the process of exon definition, in the context of both constitutive splicing and regulated alternative splicing.

  4. Unmasking alternative splicing inside protein-coding exons defines exitrons and their role in proteome plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Marquez, Yamile; Höpfler, Markus; Ayatollahi, Zahra; Barta, Andrea; Kalyna, Maria

    2015-01-01

    Alternative splicing (AS) diversifies transcriptomes and proteomes and is widely recognized as a key mechanism for regulating gene expression. Previously, in an analysis of intron retention events in Arabidopsis, we found unusual AS events inside annotated protein-coding exons. Here, we also identify such AS events in human and use these two sets to analyse their features, regulation, functional impact, and evolutionary origin. As these events involve introns with features of both introns and protein-coding exons, we name them exitrons (exonic introns). Though exitrons were detected as a subset of retained introns, they are clearly distinguishable, and their splicing results in transcripts with different fates. About half of the 1002 Arabidopsis and 923 human exitrons have sizes of multiples of 3 nucleotides (nt). Splicing of these exitrons results in internally deleted proteins and affects protein domains, disordered regions, and various post-translational modification sites, thus broadly impacting protein function. Exitron splicing is regulated across tissues, in response to stress and in carcinogenesis. Intriguingly, annotated intronless genes can be also alternatively spliced via exitron usage. We demonstrate that at least some exitrons originate from ancestral coding exons. Based on our findings, we propose a “splicing memory” hypothesis whereby upon intron loss imprints of former exon borders defined by vestigial splicing regulatory elements could drive the evolution of exitron splicing. Altogether, our studies show that exitron splicing is a conserved strategy for increasing proteome plasticity in plants and animals, complementing the repertoire of AS events. PMID:25934563

  5. Discussing epigenetics in Southern California: a report from the International Symposium on Epigenetic Control and Cellular Plasticity, UCI, December 15-16, 2011.

    PubMed

    Rattner, Barbara P

    2012-04-01

    With the goal of discussing how epigenetic control and chromatin remodeling contribute to the various processes that lead to cellular plasticity and disease, this symposium marks the collaboration between the Institut National de la Santé et de la Recherche Médicale (INSERM) in France and the University of California, Irvine (UCI). Organized by Paolo Sassone-Corsi (UCI) and held at the Beckman Center of the National Academy of Sciences at the UCI campus December 15-16, 2011, this was the first of a series of international conferences on epigenetics dedicated to the scientific community in Southern California. The meeting also served as the official kick off for the newly formed Center for Epigenetics and Metabolism at the School of Medicine, UCI (http://cem.igb.uci.edu).

  6. Can use of healthcare services among 15-16-year-olds predict an increased level of high school dropout? A longitudinal community study.

    PubMed

    Homlong, Lisbeth; Rosvold, Elin O; Haavet, Ole R

    2013-09-19

    To study associations between healthcare seeking in 15-16-year-olds and high school dropout 5 years later. Longitudinal community study. Data from a comprehensive youth health survey conducted in 2000-2004, linked to data from national registries up to 2010. 13 964 10th grade secondary school students in six Norwegian counties. Logistic regression was used to compute ORs for high school dropout. The total proportion of students not completing high school 5 years after registering was 29% (girls 24%, boys 34%). Frequent attenders to school health services and youth health clinics at age 15-16 years had a higher dropout rate (37/48% and 45/71%), compared with those with no or moderate use. Adolescents referred to mental health services were also more likely to drop out (47/62%). Boys with moderate use of a general practitioner (GP) had a lower dropout rate (30%). A multiple logistic regression analysis, in which we adjusted for selected health indicators and sociodemographic background variables, revealed that seeking help from the youth health clinic and consulting mental health services, were associated with increased level of high school dropout 5 years later. Frequent attenders (≥4 contacts) had the highest odds of dropping out. Yet, boys who saw a GP and girls attending the school health services regularly over the previous year were less likely than their peers to drop out from high school. Adolescents who seek help at certain healthcare services can be at risk of dropping out of high school later. Health workers should pay particular attention to frequent attenders and offer follow-up when needed. However, boys who attended a GP regularly were more likely to continue to high school graduation, which may indicate a protective effect of having a regular and stable relationship with a GP.

  7. MicroRNA-10b inhibition reduces E2F1-mediated transcription and miR-15/16 activity in glioblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Teplyuk, Nadiya M.; Uhlmann, Erik J.; Wong, Andus Hon-Kit; Karmali, Priya; Basu, Meenakshi; Gabriely, Galina; Jain, Anant; Wang, Yang; Chiocca, E. Antonio; Stephens, Robert; Marcusson, Eric; Yi, Ming; Krichevsky, Anna M.

    2015-01-01

    MicroRNA-10b (miR-10b) is commonly elevated in glioblastoma (GBM), while not expressed in normal brain tissues. Targeted inhibition of miR-10b has pleiotropic effects on GBM derived cell lines, it reduces GBM growth in animal models, but does not affect normal neurons and astrocytes. This data raises the possibility of developing miR-10b-targeting GBM therapy. However, the mechanisms contributing to miR-10b-mediated glioma cell survival and proliferation are unexplored. We found that inhibition of miR-10b has distinct effects on specific glioma cell lines. In cells expressing high levels of tumor suppressor p21WAF1/Cip1, it represses E2F1-mediated transcription, leading to down-regulation of multiple E2F1 target genes encoding for S-phase specific proteins, epigenetic modulators, and miRNAs (e.g. miR-15/16), and thereby stalling progression through the S-phase of cell cycle. Subsequently, miR-15/16 activities are reduced and many of their direct targets are de-repressed, including ubiquitin ligase FBXW7 that destabilizes Cyclin E. Conversely, GBM cells expressing low p21 level, or after p21 knock-down, exhibit weaker or no E2F1 response to miR-10b inhibition. Comparative analysis of The Cancer Genome Atlas revealed a strong correlation between miR-10b and multiple E2F target genes in GBM and low-grade glioma. Taken together, these findings indicate that miR-10b regulates E2F1-mediated transcription in GBM, in a p21-dependent fashion. PMID:25738367

  8. Exon4 amelogenin transcripts in enamel biomineralization.

    PubMed

    Stahl, J; Nakano, Y; Horst, J; Zhu, L; Le, M; Zhang, Y; Liu, H; Li, W; Den Besten, P K

    2015-06-01

    Amelogenins are proteins formed by alternative splicing of the amelogenin gene, and are essential for tooth enamel formation. However, the unique functions of various alternatively spliced amelogenins in enamel formation are not well understood. In this study, we determined the spatiotemporal location of amelogenins derived from transcripts containing exon4 (AMG+4) in the enamel matrix, and the relative binding of recombinant AMG+4 to hydroxyapatite (HAP). Immunohistochemistry and mass spectrometry analyses showed that AMG+4 proteins were secreted into the enamel matrix at the early maturation stage. A stage-specific increase in the synthesis of AMG+4 was further supported by our observation that in mice overexpressing leucine-rich amelogenin peptide (TgLRAP), in which ameloblasts differentiate earlier, AMG+4 transcripts were also upregulated earlier. In vitro binding studies, supported by in silico modeling of protein binding to calcium and phosphate, showed that more recombinant AMG+4 bound to hydroxyapatite (HAP) as compared with recombinant AMG-4. The temporal and spatial localization of amelogenins containing exon4 peptide, and their functional differences in HAP binding, suggests that the unique properties of amelogenins containing exon4 cause a specific enhancement of biomineralization related to stabilization of early-formed HAP at the maturation stage. © International & American Associations for Dental Research 2015.

  9. Skipping multiple exons of dystrophin transcripts using cocktail antisense oligonucleotides.

    PubMed

    Echigoya, Yusuke; Yokota, Toshifumi

    2014-02-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is one of the most common and lethal genetic disorders, with 20,000 children per year born with DMD globally. DMD is caused by mutations in the dystrophin (DMD) gene. Antisense-mediated exon skipping therapy is a promising therapeutic approach that uses short DNA-like molecules called antisense oligonucleotides (AOs) to skip over/splice out the mutated part of the gene to produce a shortened but functional dystrophin protein. One major challenge has been its limited applicability. Multiple exon skipping has recently emerged as a potential solution. Indeed, many DMD patients need exon skipping of multiple exons in order to restore the reading frame, depending on how many base pairs the mutated exon(s) and adjacent exons have. Theoretically, multiple exon skipping could be used to treat approximately 90%, 80%, and 98% of DMD patients with deletion, duplication, and nonsense mutations, respectively. In addition, multiple exon skipping could be used to select deletions that optimize the functionality of the truncated dystrophin protein. The proof of concept of systemic multiple exon skipping using a cocktail of AOs has been demonstrated in dystrophic dog and mouse models. Remaining challenges include the insufficient efficacy of systemic treatment, especially for therapies that target the heart, and limited long-term safety data. Here we review recent preclinical developments in AO-mediated multiple exon skipping and discuss the remaining challenges.

  10. The "alternative" choice of constitutive exons throughout evolution.

    PubMed

    Lev-Maor, Galit; Goren, Amir; Sela, Noa; Kim, Eddo; Keren, Hadas; Doron-Faigenboim, Adi; Leibman-Barak, Shelly; Pupko, Tal; Ast, Gil

    2007-11-01

    Alternative cassette exons are known to originate from two processes-exonization of intronic sequences and exon shuffling. Herein, we suggest an additional mechanism by which constitutively spliced exons become alternative cassette exons during evolution. We compiled a dataset of orthologous exons from human and mouse that are constitutively spliced in one species but alternatively spliced in the other. Examination of these exons suggests that the common ancestors were constitutively spliced. We show that relaxation of the 5' splice site during evolution is one of the molecular mechanisms by which exons shift from constitutive to alternative splicing. This shift is associated with the fixation of exonic splicing regulatory sequences (ESRs) that are essential for exon definition and control the inclusion level only after the transition to alternative splicing. The effect of each ESR on splicing and the combinatorial effects between two ESRs are conserved from fish to human. Our results uncover an evolutionary pathway that increases transcriptome diversity by shifting exons from constitutive to alternative splicing.

  11. The “Alternative” Choice of Constitutive Exons throughout Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Eddo; Keren, Hadas; Doron-Faigenboim, Adi; Leibman-Barak, Shelly; Pupko, Tal; Ast, Gil

    2007-01-01

    Alternative cassette exons are known to originate from two processes—exonization of intronic sequences and exon shuffling. Herein, we suggest an additional mechanism by which constitutively spliced exons become alternative cassette exons during evolution. We compiled a dataset of orthologous exons from human and mouse that are constitutively spliced in one species but alternatively spliced in the other. Examination of these exons suggests that the common ancestors were constitutively spliced. We show that relaxation of the 5′ splice site during evolution is one of the molecular mechanisms by which exons shift from constitutive to alternative splicing. This shift is associated with the fixation of exonic splicing regulatory sequences (ESRs) that are essential for exon definition and control the inclusion level only after the transition to alternative splicing. The effect of each ESR on splicing and the combinatorial effects between two ESRs are conserved from fish to human. Our results uncover an evolutionary pathway that increases transcriptome diversity by shifting exons from constitutive to alternative splicing. PMID:18020709

  12. Exon capture optimization in amphibians with large genomes.

    PubMed

    McCartney-Melstad, Evan; Mount, Genevieve G; Shaffer, H Bradley

    2016-09-01

    Gathering genomic-scale data efficiently is challenging for nonmodel species with large, complex genomes. Transcriptome sequencing is accessible for organisms with large genomes, and sequence capture probes can be designed from such mRNA sequences to enrich and sequence exonic regions. Maximizing enrichment efficiency is important to reduce sequencing costs, but relatively few data exist for exon capture experiments in nonmodel organisms with large genomes. Here, we conducted a replicated factorial experiment to explore the effects of several modifications to standard protocols that might increase sequence capture efficiency for amphibians and other taxa with large, complex genomes. Increasing the amounts of c0 t-1 repetitive sequence blocker and individual input DNA used in target enrichment reactions reduced the rates of PCR duplication. This reduction led to an increase in the percentage of unique reads mapping to target sequences, essentially doubling overall efficiency of the target capture from 10.4% to nearly 19.9% and rendering target capture experiments more efficient and affordable. Our results indicate that target capture protocols can be modified to efficiently screen vertebrates with large genomes, including amphibians. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. FGFR2 exon IIIa and IIIc mutations in Crouzon, Jackson-Weiss, and Pfeiffer syndromes: Evidence for missense changes, insertions, and a deletion due to alternative RNA splicing

    SciTech Connect

    Meyers, G.A.; Przylepa, K.A.; Scott, A.F.

    1996-03-01

    Fibroblast growth factor receptor 2 (FGFR2) mutations have been associated with the craniosynostotic conditions Crouzon, Jackson-Weiss, and Pfeiffer syndromes. Previously, mutations were described in the exons IIIa and IIIc, which form the extracellular, third immunoglobulin-like domain (IgM) and adjacent linker regions, both of which are normally involved in ligand binding. For all three conditions, mutations were found in exon IIIc. Only in Crouzon syndrome were mutations identified in exon IIIa. In this study, 39 cases with one of these three conditions were screened for exon IIIa or IIIc mutations. Eleven mutations are reported in 17 unrelated cases. Mutations in exon IIIa are identified for not only Crouzon but also Jackson-Weiss and Pfeiffer syndromes. Four mutations in either exon IIIa or exon IIIc reported only in Crouzon syndrome are present also in one of the other two syndromes. Two insertions, one in exon IIIa in a Crouzon syndrome patient and the other in exon IIIc in a Pfeiffer syndrome patient, were observed. The latter mutation has the same alternative RNA splicing effect as a reported synonymous mutation for Crouzon syndrome. A missense mutation was detected in one Pfeiffer syndrome family in which two members had craniosynostosis without limb anomalies. The inter- and intrafamilial variability in expression of FGFR2 mutations suggests that these three syndromes, presumed to be clinically distinct, are instead representative of a spectrum of related craniosynostotic and digital disorders. 16 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  14. Histone modifications involved in cassette exon inclusions: a quantitative and interpretable analysis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hui; Jin, Ting; Guan, Jihong; Zhou, Shuigeng

    2014-12-19

    Chromatin structure and epigenetic modifications have been shown to involve in the co-transcriptional splicing of RNA precursors. In particular, some studies have suggested that some types of histone modifications (HMs) may participate in the alternative splicing and function as exon marks. However, most existing studies pay attention to the qualitative relationship between epigenetic modifications and exon inclusion. The quantitative analysis that reveals to what extent each type of epigenetic modification is responsible for exon inclusion is very helpful for us to understand the splicing process. In this paper, we focus on the quantitative analysis of HMs' influence on the inclusion of cassette exons (CEs) into mature RNAs. With the high-throughput ChIP-seq and RNA-seq data obtained from ENCODE website, we modeled the association of HMs with CE inclusions by logistic regression whose coefficients are meaningful and interpretable for us to reveal the effect of each type of HM. Three type of HMs, H3K36me3, H3K9me3 and H4K20me1, were found to play major role in CE inclusions. HMs' effect on CE inclusions is conservative across cell types, and does not depend on the expression levels of the genes hosting CEs. HMs located in the flanking regions of CEs were also taken into account in our analysis, and HMs within bounded flanking regions were shown to affect moderately CE inclusions. Moreover, we also found that HMs on CEs whose length is approximately close to nucleosomal-DNA length affect greatly on CE inclusion. We suggested that a few types of HMs correlate closely to alternative splicing and perhaps function jointly with splicing machinery to regulate the inclusion level of exons. Our findings are helpful to understand HMs' effect on exon definition, as well as the mechanism of co-transcriptional splicing.

  15. Functional Analysis of Mutations in Exon 9 of NF1 Reveals the Presence of Several Elements Regulating Splicing

    PubMed Central

    Hernández-Imaz, Elisabete; Martín, Yolanda; de Conti, Laura; Melean, German; Valero, Ana; Baralle, Marco; Hernández-Chico, Concepción

    2015-01-01

    Neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) is one of the most common human hereditary disorders, predisposing individuals to the development of benign and malignant tumors in the nervous system, as well as other clinical manifestations. NF1 is caused by heterozygous mutations in the NF1 gene and around 25% of the pathogenic changes affect pre-mRNA splicing. Since the molecular mechanisms affected by these mutations are poorly understood, we have analyzed the splicing mutations identified in exon 9 of NF1, which is particularly prone to such changes, to better define the possible splicing regulatory elements. Using a minigene approach, we studied the effect of five splicing mutations in this exon described in patients. These highlighted three regulatory motifs within the exon. An in vivo splicing analysis of an extensive collection of changes generated in the minigene demonstrated that the CG motif at c.910-911 is critical for the recognition of exon 9. We also found that the GC motif at c.945-946 is involved in exon recognition through SRSF2 and that this motif is part of a Composite Exon Splicing Regulatory Element made up of physically overlapping enhancer and silencer elements. Finally, through an in vivo splicing analysis and in vitro binding assays, we demonstrated that the c.1007G>A mutation creates an Exonic Splicing Silencer element that binds the hnRNPA1 protein. The complexity of the splicing regulatory elements present in exon 9 is most likely responsible for the fact that mutations in this region represent 25% of all exonic changes that affect splicing in the NF1 gene. PMID:26509978

  16. Transposable elements in disease-associated cryptic exons.

    PubMed

    Vorechovsky, Igor

    2010-02-01

    Transposable elements (TEs) make up a half of the human genome, but the extent of their contribution to cryptic exon activation that results in genetic disease is unknown. Here, a comprehensive survey of 78 mutation-induced cryptic exons previously identified in 51 disease genes revealed the presence of TEs in 40 cases (51%). Most TE-containing exons were derived from short interspersed nuclear elements (SINEs), with Alus and mammalian interspersed repeats (MIRs) covering >18 and >16% of the exonized sequences, respectively. The majority of SINE-derived cryptic exons had splice sites at the same positions of the Alu/MIR consensus as existing SINE exons and their inclusion in the mRNA was facilitated by phylogenetically conserved changes that improved both traditional and auxiliary splicing signals, thus marking intronic TEs amenable for pathogenic exonization. The overrepresentation of MIRs among TE exons is likely to result from their high average exon inclusion levels, which reflect their strong splice sites, a lack of splicing silencers and a high density of enhancers, particularly (G)AA(G) motifs. These elements were markedly depleted in antisense Alu exons, had the most prominent position on the exon-intron gradient scale and are proposed to promote exon definition through enhanced tertiary RNA interactions involving unpaired (di)adenosines. The identification of common mechanisms by which the most dynamic parts of the genome contribute both to new exon creation and genetic disease will facilitate detection of intronic mutations and the development of computational tools that predict TE hot-spots of cryptic exon activation.

  17. Absence of the exon 1 coding sequence of the androgen receptor gene associated with teratozoospermia in a Brazilian population.

    PubMed

    Mesquita, W E J C; Approbato, M S; Moura, K K V O; Jesuíno, R S A

    2009-11-24

    The androgen receptor (AR) is a protein encoded by the AR gene, which when mutated may affect spermatogenesis, the process in which spermatozoa are produced; thus, AR mutations could lead to male infertility. We examined exon 1 of the AR gene in men with idiopathic infertility. Blood or semen samples from 111 infertile, oligozoospermic (N = 31), asthenozoospermic (N = 23), teratozoospermic (N = 33), and azoospermic (N = 24) men were analyzed. The extracted DNA was amplified for the exon 1 region of the AR gene. There was a significant correlation between the absence of exon 1 in the AR gene and spermatogenesis defects (P = 0.015). This association was significant in teratozoospermic men (51.5% of the sample). We found that lack of amplification of exon 1 of the AR gene by polymerase chain reaction is associated with morphological defects in the spermogram.

  18. Exon duplications in the ATP7A gene: Frequency and Transcriptional Behaviour

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Menkes disease (MD) is an X-linked, fatal neurodegenerative disorder of copper metabolism, caused by mutations in the ATP7A gene. Thirty-three Menkes patients in whom no mutation had been detected with standard diagnostic tools were screened for exon duplications in the ATP7A gene. Methods The ATP7A gene was screened for exon duplications using multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA). The expression level of ATP7A was investigated by real-time PCR and detailed analysis of the ATP7A mRNA was performed by RT-PCR followed by sequencing. In order to investigate whether the identified duplicated fragments originated from a single or from two different X-chromosomes, polymorphic markers located in the duplicated fragments were analyzed. Results Partial ATP7A gene duplication was identified in 20 unrelated patients including one patient with Occipital Horn Syndrome (OHS). Duplications in the ATP7A gene are estimated from our material to be the disease causing mutation in 4% of the Menkes disease patients. The duplicated regions consist of between 2 and 15 exons. In at least one of the cases, the duplication was due to an intra-chromosomal event. Characterization of the ATP7A mRNA transcripts in 11 patients revealed that the duplications were organized in tandem, in a head to tail direction. The reading frame was disrupted in all 11 cases. Small amounts of wild-type transcript were found in all patients as a result of exon-skipping events occurring in the duplicated regions. In the OHS patient with a duplication of exon 3 and 4, the duplicated out-of-frame transcript coexists with an almost equally represented wild-type transcript, presumably leading to the milder phenotype. Conclusions In general, patients with duplication of only 2 exons exhibit a milder phenotype as compared to patients with duplication of more than 2 exons. This study provides insight into exon duplications in the ATP7A gene. PMID:22074552

  19. Functional characterization of two novel 5' untranslated exons reveals a complex regulation of NOD2 protein expression.

    PubMed

    Rosenstiel, Philip; Huse, Klaus; Franke, Andre; Hampe, Jochen; Reichwald, Kathrin; Platzer, Cornelia; Roberts, Roland G; Mathew, Christopher G; Platzer, Matthias; Schreiber, Stefan

    2007-12-20

    NOD2 is an innate immune receptor for the bacterial cell wall component muramyl-dipeptide. Mutations in the leucine-rich repeat region of NOD2, which lead to an impaired recognition of muramyl-dipeptide, have been associated with Crohn disease, a human chronic inflammatory bowel disease. Tissue specific constitutive and inducible expression patterns of NOD2 have been described that result from complex regulatory events for which the molecular mechanisms are not yet fully understood. We have identified two novel exons of the NOD2 gene (designated exon 1a and 1b), which are spliced to the canonical exon 2 and constitute the 5' untranslated region of two alternative transcript isoforms (i.e. exon 1a/1b/2 and exon 1a/2). The two novel transcripts are abundantly expressed and seem to comprise the majority of NOD2 transcripts under physiological conditions. We confirm the expression of the previously known canonical first exon (designated exon 1c) of the gene in unstimulated mononuclear cells. The inclusion of the second alternative exon 1b, which harbours three short upstream open reading frames (uORFs), is downregulated upon stimulation with TNF-alpha or under pro-inflammatory conditions in the inflamed intestinal mucosa in vivo. Using the different 5' UTR splice forms fused to a firefly luciferase (LUC) reporter we demonstrate a rapamycin-sensitive inhibitory effect of the uORFs on translation efficacy. The differential usage of two alternative promoters in the NOD2 gene leads to tissue-specific and context-dependent NOD2 transcript isoform patterns. We demonstrate for the first time that context-dependent alternative splicing is linked to uORF-mediated translational repression. The results suggest complex parallel control mechanisms that independently regulate NOD2 expression in the context of inflammatory signaling.

  20. Functional characterization of two novel 5' untranslated exons reveals a complex regulation of NOD2 protein expression

    PubMed Central

    Rosenstiel, Philip; Huse, Klaus; Franke, Andre; Hampe, Jochen; Reichwald, Kathrin; Platzer, Cornelia; Roberts, Roland G; Mathew, Christopher G; Platzer, Matthias; Schreiber, Stefan

    2007-01-01

    Background NOD2 is an innate immune receptor for the bacterial cell wall component muramyl-dipeptide. Mutations in the leucine-rich repeat region of NOD2, which lead to an impaired recognition of muramyl-dipeptide, have been associated with Crohn disease, a human chronic inflammatory bowel disease. Tissue specific constitutive and inducible expression patterns of NOD2 have been described that result from complex regulatory events for which the molecular mechanisms are not yet fully understood. Results We have identified two novel exons of the NOD2 gene (designated exon 1a and 1b), which are spliced to the canonical exon 2 and constitute the 5' untranslated region of two alternative transcript isoforms (i.e. exon 1a/1b/2 and exon 1a/2). The two novel transcripts are abundantly expressed and seem to comprise the majority of NOD2 transcripts under physiological conditions. We confirm the expression of the previously known canonical first exon (designated exon 1c) of the gene in unstimulated mononuclear cells. The inclusion of the second alternative exon 1b, which harbours three short upstream open reading frames (uORFs), is downregulated upon stimulation with TNF-α or under pro-inflammatory conditions in the inflamed intestinal mucosa in vivo. Using the different 5' UTR splice forms fused to a firefly luciferase (LUC) reporter we demonstrate a rapamycin-sensitive inhibitory effect of the uORFs on translation efficacy. Conclusion The differential usage of two alternative promoters in the NOD2 gene leads to tissue-specific and context-dependent NOD2 transcript isoform patterns. We demonstrate for the first time that context-dependent alternative splicing is linked to uORF-mediated translational repression. The results suggest complex parallel control mechanisms that independently regulate NOD2 expression in the context of inflammatory signaling. PMID:18096043

  1. EGFR exon 20 insertion mutation in Japanese lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Hidefumi; Endo, Katsuhiko; Takada, Minoru; Kawahara, Masaaki; Kitahara, Naoto; Tanaka, Hisaichi; Okumura, Meinoshin; Matsumura, Akihide; Iuchi, Keiji; Kawaguchi, Tomoya; Kawano, Osamu; Yukiue, Haruhiro; Yokoyama, Tomoki; Yano, Motoki; Fujii, Yoshitaka

    2007-12-01

    Mutations of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) gene have been reported in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), especially in female, never smoker patients with adenocarcinoma. Some common somatic mutations in EGFR, including deletion mutations in exon 19 and leucine to arginine substitution at amino acid position 858 (L858R) in exon 21, have been examined for their ability to predict sensitivity to gefitinib or erlotinib. On the other hand, previous report has shown that the insertion mutation at exon 20 is related to gefitinib resistance. We investigated the exon 20 EGFR mutation statuses in 322 surgically treated non-small cell lung cancer cases. Two hundred and five adenocarcinoma cases were included. The presence or absence of EGFR mutations of kinase domains was analyzed by direct sequences. EGFR insertion mutations at exon 20 were found from 7 of 322 (2.17%) lung cancer patients. We also detected the 18 deletion type mutations in exon 19, and 25 L858R type mutations in exon 21. There was a tendency towards higher exon 20 insertion ratio in never smoker (never smoker 4.4% versus smoker 1.3%, p=0.0996) and female (female 4.5% versus male 1.3%, p=0.0917). Two exon 20 insertion cases were treated with gefitinib and failed to response. EGFR insertion mutation in exon 20 could not be ignored from Japanese lung cancers.

  2. Antisense oligonucleotide-mediated exon skipping as a strategy to reduce proteolytic cleavage of ataxin-3.

    PubMed

    Toonen, Lodewijk J A; Schmidt, Iris; Luijsterburg, Martijn S; van Attikum, Haico; van Roon-Mom, Willeke M C

    2016-10-12

    Spinocerebellar ataxia type-3 (SCA3) is a neurodegenerative disorder caused by a polyglutamine repeat expansion in the ataxin-3 protein. Cleavage of mutant ataxin-3 by proteolytic enzymes yields ataxin-3 fragments containing the polyglutamine stretch. These shorter ataxin-3 fragments are thought to be involved in SCA3 pathogenesis due to their increased cellular toxicity and their involvement in formation of the characteristic neuronal aggregates. As a strategy to prevent formation of toxic cleavage fragments, we investigated an antisense oligonucleotide-mediated modification of the ataxin-3 pre-mRNA through exon skipping of exon 8 and 9, resulting in the removal of a central 88 amino acid region of the ataxin-3 protein. This removed protein region contains several predicted cleavage sites and two ubiquitin-interacting motifs. In contrast to unmodified mutant ataxin-3, the internally truncated ataxin-3 protein did not give rise to potentially toxic cleavage fragments when incubated with caspases. In vitro experiments did not show cellular toxicity of the modified ataxin-3 protein. However, the modified protein was incapable of binding poly-ubiquitin chains, which may interfere with its normal deubiquitinating function. Low exon skipping efficiencies combined with reduction in important ataxin-3 protein functions suggest that skipping of exon 8 and 9 is not a viable therapeutic option for SCA3.

  3. Detection EGFR exon 19 status of lung cancer patients by DNA electrochemical biosensor.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xiong-Wei; Weng, Xiu-Hua; Wang, Chang-Lian; Lin, Wei-Wei; Liu, Ai-Lin; Chen, Wei; Lin, Xin-Hua

    2016-06-15

    Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) exon 19 mutation status is a very important prediction index for tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) therapy. In this paper, we constructed a superior selective sandwich-type electrochemical biosensor to detect in-frame deletions in exon 19 of EGFR in real samples of patients with non-small cell lung carcinoma. Based on the characteristics of different hybridization efficiency in different hybridization phase conditions, different region around EGFR exon 19 deletion hotspots was selected to design DNA probes to improve biosensor performance. The results confirm that alteration of deletion location in target deliberately according to different hybridization phase is able to improve selectivity of sandwich-type DNA biosensor. Satisfactory discrimination ability can be achieved when the deletions are located in the capture probe interaction region. In order to improve efficiency of ssDNA generation from dsDNA, we introduce Lambda exonuclease (λ-exo) to sandwich-type biosensor system. EGFR exon 19 statuses of clinical real samples from lung cancer patients can be discriminated successfully by the proposed method. Our research would make the electrochemical biosensor be an excellent candidate for EGFR detection for lung cancer patients.

  4. Antisense oligonucleotide-mediated exon skipping as a strategy to reduce proteolytic cleavage of ataxin-3

    PubMed Central

    Toonen, Lodewijk J. A.; Schmidt, Iris; Luijsterburg, Martijn S.; van Attikum, Haico; van Roon-Mom, Willeke M. C.

    2016-01-01

    Spinocerebellar ataxia type-3 (SCA3) is a neurodegenerative disorder caused by a polyglutamine repeat expansion in the ataxin-3 protein. Cleavage of mutant ataxin-3 by proteolytic enzymes yields ataxin-3 fragments containing the polyglutamine stretch. These shorter ataxin-3 fragments are thought to be involved in SCA3 pathogenesis due to their increased cellular toxicity and their involvement in formation of the characteristic neuronal aggregates. As a strategy to prevent formation of toxic cleavage fragments, we investigated an antisense oligonucleotide-mediated modification of the ataxin-3 pre-mRNA through exon skipping of exon 8 and 9, resulting in the removal of a central 88 amino acid region of the ataxin-3 protein. This removed protein region contains several predicted cleavage sites and two ubiquitin-interacting motifs. In contrast to unmodified mutant ataxin-3, the internally truncated ataxin-3 protein did not give rise to potentially toxic cleavage fragments when incubated with caspases. In vitro experiments did not show cellular toxicity of the modified ataxin-3 protein. However, the modified protein was incapable of binding poly-ubiquitin chains, which may interfere with its normal deubiquitinating function. Low exon skipping efficiencies combined with reduction in important ataxin-3 protein functions suggest that skipping of exon 8 and 9 is not a viable therapeutic option for SCA3. PMID:27731380

  5. MBNL1 and PTB cooperate to repress splicing of Tpm1 exon 3

    PubMed Central

    Gooding, Clare; Edge, Christopher; Lorenz, Mike; Coelho, Miguel B.; Winters, Mikael; Kaminski, Clemens F.; Cherny, Dmitry; Eperon, Ian C.; Smith, Christopher W.J.

    2013-01-01

    Exon 3 of the rat α-tropomyosin (Tpm1) gene is repressed in smooth muscle cells, allowing inclusion of the mutually exclusive partner exon 2. Two key types of elements affect repression of exon 3 splicing: binding sites for polypyrimidine tract-binding protein (PTB) and additional negative regulatory elements consisting of clusters of UGC or CUG motifs. Here, we show that the UGC clusters are bound by muscleblind-like proteins (MBNL), which act as repressors of Tpm1 exon 3. We show that the N-terminal region of MBNL1, containing its four CCCH zinc-finger domains, is sufficient to mediate repression. The same region of MBNL1 can make a direct protein-to-protein interaction with PTB, and RNA binding by MBNL promotes this interaction, apparently by inducing a conformational change in MBNL. Moreover, single molecule analysis showed that MBNL-binding sites increase the binding of PTB to its own sites. Our data suggest that the smooth muscle splicing of Tpm1 is mediated by allosteric assembly of an RNA–protein complex minimally comprising PTB, MBNL and their cognate RNA-binding sites. PMID:23511971

  6. Gene identification using exon amplification on human chromosome 18q21: implications for bipolar disorder.

    PubMed

    Chen, H; Huo, Y; Patel, S; Zhu, X; Swift-Scanlan, T; Reeves, R H; DePaulo, R; Ross, C A; McInnis, M G

    2000-09-01

    We previously reported linkage between bipolar disorder and a region on human chromosome (HC) 18q21. To identify genes in this region, exon trapping was performed on cosmids isolated from an HC18-specific cosmid library (LL18NC02) using 47 sequence tagged site (STS) markers from 18q21 as hybridization probes. A total of 285 unique sequences (exons) were obtained from 850 sequenced clones. Homology searching of the databases using NCBI's BLAST algorithms revealed that 31 exons have identity to known genes and/or ESTs, seven are identical to regions of finished genomic sequences in the 18q21 region, 20 have significant similarity (>30% sequence identity) to genes from human and/or other species, 19 were repetitive sequences, and 208 sequences (72%) are novel. Seventy per cent of the trapped sequences were predicted to be derived from genes using library screening and RT-PCR analyses. This represents an initial stage in characterizing genes in a susceptibility region for further study in bipolar disorder or other diseases that map to this region.

  7. Methylation pattern of H19 exon 1 is closely related to preeclampsia and trophoblast abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Lu, Linshan; Hou, Zheng; Li, Li; Yang, Yanhong; Wang, Xiaohong; Zhang, Beilei; Ren, Mo; Zhao, Dan; Miao, Zhuo; Yu, Lili; Yao, Yuanqing

    2014-09-01

    Preeclampsia (PE) is a pregnancy-induced disorder characterized by the overproliferation of trophoblasts. Hydatidiform moles, which are associated with a high risk of developing PE, are characterized by the excessive proliferation of trophoblastic tissue. H19 is highly expressed in placental tissue; however, its biological function remains unclear. A fundamental modification of the H19 gene is DNA methylation, which typically occurs in CG-rich regions at the promoter or the first exon region. In this study, in order to investigate the DNA methylation pattern of the H19 exon 1 region in placental tissues and trophoblast cells, placental specimens were collected from women in the first trimester of pregrancy (FTP) and the third trimester of pregnancy (TTP), as well as from from women with severe preeclampsia (sPE). We found that the DNA methylation levels of H19 exon 1 were significantly higher in the tissues obtained from women in TTP than from those obtained from women in FFP. The methylation status of CpG 1 sites within exon 1 of H19 was markedly higher in the placental tissues obtained from women with sPE than in the tissues obtained from women in TTP. In addition, we used the human choriocarcinoma cell line, JEG-3, and treated the cells with the methylation inhibitor, 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine (5-Aza‑Dc). Following treatment with 5-Aza-Dc, the methylation levels at this CpG site showed marked hypomethylation. In addtion, the cell proliferative, migratory and invasive capacities of the cells were remarkably inhibited. Our data suggest that hypermethylation at individual CpG sites within exon 1 of H19 may be involved in the dysfunction of trophoblasts and the pathogenesis of PE.

  8. 15/16 ips Operation of the Precision Instrument Company Model P15100 tape recorder to record the standard (30 Hz) NCER seismic data multiplex system

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Eaton, Jerry P.

    1976-01-01

    In recent months the need has arisen to record special seismic networks consisting of a dozen or more standard NCER seismic systems telemetered to a central collection point on a reliable, portable, low-power tape recorder. Because of its simplicity and the ease with which it can be adapted for the purpose, the PI 5100 field recorder should be considered for such use. In the tests described here, a PI 5100 was speeded up to run at 15/16 inches per second (ips) and signals from the standard multiplex system test modulator bank were recorded on one tape track by means of a simple, improvised AM record amplifier. The results of these tests are extremely encouraging: the dynamic range of the system when played back on the Bell and Howell Model 3700 B reproduce machine, with subtractive compensation, is nearly as high as for the system employing the B&H 3700 B for recording. These notes indicate the principle employed to speed up the recorder, outline the circuit required to drive the tape heads in the AM record mode, and describe the tests carried out to evaluate the system's performance.

  9. Lymphocyte subpopulations in the liver, spleen, intestines, and mesenteric nodes: an immunohistochemical study using human fetuses at 15-16 weeks.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Si Eun; Kim, Ji Hyun; Yu, Hee Chul; Murakami, Gen; Cho, Baik Hwan

    2014-08-01

    The roles of the liver and intestines in lymphocyte differentiation in human fetuses were assessed by immunohistochemical analysis of the thymus, bone marrow, liver, spleen, intestines, and lymph nodes of 15-16 week human fetuses using primary antibodies against IgM, CD3, CD7, CD8, CD10, CD20, CD45RO, HLA-DR, and CD68. The density of immunoreactive lymphocytes was high in the thymus and lymph nodes, but much lower in the bones, liver, spleen, and intestines. The medulla of the thymus contained IgM-positive mature B lymphocytes as well as CD20-positve B lymphocytes. In contrast, CD10-positive immature B lymphocytes were restricted in the cortex. There were no site-dependent differences among axillary, mediastinal, mesenteric, and pelvic lymph nodes. CD68-positive cells were observed at all sites examined. Many HLA-DR-positive round cells were present in the thymus, with fewer in the liver and spleen. The absolute number of lymphocytes was estimated to be ≥10-fold higher in lymph nodes than in liver. Although limited by analysis of only one fetal stage, these findings suggest that mesenteric nodes are likely to be more important than the liver, spleen, and intestines for lymphocyte proliferation and differentiation in human mid-term fetuses. Copyright © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. What Are the Barriers Which Discourage 15-16 Year-Old Girls from Participating in Team Sports and How Can We Overcome Them?

    PubMed Central

    Wetton, Abigail R.; Jones, Angela R.; Pearce, Mark S.

    2013-01-01

    Given the clear benefits of regular physical activity (such as reduced risks of cardiovascular disease and obesity, as well as other benefits including those related to mental health), exploration of the reasons that adolescent girls give for not taking part in team sports may be particularly valuable for enhancing later rates of participation. We combined questionnaires (n = 60) and semistructured interviews (n = 6) to assess the barriers that prevent 15-16-year-old girls from participating in extracurricular team games and what can be done to overcome these barriers and improve physical activity levels. Four barriers became prominent as to why girls in this sample do not participate: Internal Factors, Existing Stereotypes, Other Hobbies and Teachers. Methods to overcome these barriers were identified; changing teachers' attitudes and shifting the media's focus away from male sport. Following the successful summer Olympics and Paralympics in the UK, and the resulting positive focus on some of the nation's female athletes, a shift in focus may be possible. However, this needs to be maintained to allow girls more opportunities, role models and motivation to participate in sport. PMID:24073416

  11. What are the barriers which discourage 15-16 year-old girls from participating in team sports and how can we overcome them?

    PubMed

    Wetton, Abigail R; Radley, Rebecca; Jones, Angela R; Pearce, Mark S

    2013-01-01

    Given the clear benefits of regular physical activity (such as reduced risks of cardiovascular disease and obesity, as well as other benefits including those related to mental health), exploration of the reasons that adolescent girls give for not taking part in team sports may be particularly valuable for enhancing later rates of participation. We combined questionnaires (n = 60) and semistructured interviews (n = 6) to assess the barriers that prevent 15-16-year-old girls from participating in extracurricular team games and what can be done to overcome these barriers and improve physical activity levels. Four barriers became prominent as to why girls in this sample do not participate: Internal Factors, Existing Stereotypes, Other Hobbies and Teachers. Methods to overcome these barriers were identified; changing teachers' attitudes and shifting the media's focus away from male sport. Following the successful summer Olympics and Paralympics in the UK, and the resulting positive focus on some of the nation's female athletes, a shift in focus may be possible. However, this needs to be maintained to allow girls more opportunities, role models and motivation to participate in sport.

  12. The many faces of rare diseases (RD): meeting report on Rare Disease in South-Eastern Europe, 15-16 November 2013, Skopje, Republic of Macedonia.

    PubMed

    Gucev, Z; Tasic, V; Polenakovic, M

    2014-03-01

    The Second meeting on Rare Diseases in South Eastern Europe (SEE) was held in Skope, Macedonia on November 15-16, 2013. Objective and main data: Rare diseases (RD) are a major problem in developed and especially in countries without affluence. 6-8% of every population suffers from RD. The cumulative effect of RDs on the health system of a country is increasing. Diagnosis often remains a challenge and requires international collaboration. Treatment in diseases for which medication exist is often inaccessible to patients because of the high costs. All countries of SEE need screening programs that address more diseases. Patient organizations play a major role in increasing awareness and providing the needed pressure on society to treat treatable RDs. On the other hand, RDs are frequently a source of valuable new molecular insights not only on mechanisms of their etiology and pathology, but sometimes provide an insight on mechanisms of frequent diseases in man. Further efforts are needed in improving all the RD aspects mentioned.

  13. 15,16-Dihydrotanshinone I from the Functional Food Salvia miltiorrhiza Exhibits Anticancer Activity in Human HL-60 Leukemia Cells: in Vitro and in Vivo Studies.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jun-Jen; Wu, Hsueh-Hsia; Chen, Tzu-Ho; Leung, Wan; Liang, Yu-Chih

    2015-08-17

    15,16-Dihydrotanshinone I (DHTS) is extracted from Salvia miltiorrhiza Bunge which is a functional food in Asia. In this study, we investigated the apoptotic effect of DHTS on the human acute myeloid leukemia (AML) type III HL-60 cell line. We found that treatment with 1.5 μg/mL DHTS increased proapoptotic Bax and Bad protein expressions and activated caspases-3, -8, and -9, thus leading to poly ADP ribose polymerase (PARP) cleavage and resulting in cell apoptosis. DHTS induced sustained c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) phosphorylation and Fas ligand (FasL) expression. The anti-Fas blocking antibody reversed the DHTS-induced cell death, and the JNK-specific inhibitor, SP600125, inhibited DHTS-induced caspase-3, -8, -9, and PARP cleavage. In a xenograft nude mice model, 25 mg/kg DHTS showed a great effect in attenuating HL-60 tumor growth. Taken together, these results suggest that DHTS can induce HL-60 cell apoptosis in vitro and inhibit HL-60 cell growth in vivo; the underlying mechanisms might be mediated through activation of the JNK and FasL signal pathways.

  14. 15,16-Dihydrotanshinone I from the Functional Food Salvia miltiorrhiza Exhibits Anticancer Activity in Human HL-60 Leukemia Cells: in Vitro and in Vivo Studies

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jun-Jen; Wu, Hsueh-Hsia; Chen, Tzu-Ho; Leung, Wan; Liang, Yu-Chih

    2015-01-01

    15,16-Dihydrotanshinone I (DHTS) is extracted from Salvia miltiorrhiza Bunge which is a functional food in Asia. In this study, we investigated the apoptotic effect of DHTS on the human acute myeloid leukemia (AML) type III HL-60 cell line. We found that treatment with 1.5 μg/mL DHTS increased proapoptotic Bax and Bad protein expressions and activated caspases-3, -8, and -9, thus leading to poly ADP ribose polymerase (PARP) cleavage and resulting in cell apoptosis. DHTS induced sustained c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) phosphorylation and Fas ligand (FasL) expression. The anti-Fas blocking antibody reversed the DHTS-induced cell death, and the JNK-specific inhibitor, SP600125, inhibited DHTS-induced caspase-3, -8, -9, and PARP cleavage. In a xenograft nude mice model, 25 mg/kg DHTS showed a great effect in attenuating HL-60 tumor growth. Taken together, these results suggest that DHTS can induce HL-60 cell apoptosis in vitro and inhibit HL-60 cell growth in vivo; the underlying mechanisms might be mediated through activation of the JNK and FasL signal pathways. PMID:26287183

  15. Structure of tau exon 10 splicing regulatory element RNA and destabilization by mutations of frontotemporal dementia and parkinsonism linked to chromosome 17

    PubMed Central

    Varani, Luca; Hasegawa, Masato; Spillantini, Maria Grazia; Smith, Michael J.; Murrell, Jill R.; Ghetti, Bernardino; Klug, Aaron; Goedert, Michel; Varani, Gabriele

    1999-01-01

    Coding region and intronic mutations in the tau gene cause frontotemporal dementia and parkinsonism linked to chromosome 17. Intronic mutations and some missense mutations increase splicing in of exon 10, leading to an increased ratio of four-repeat to three-repeat tau isoforms. Secondary structure predictions have led to the proposal that intronic mutations and one missense mutation destabilize a putative RNA stem-loop structure located close to the splice-donor site of the intron after exon 10. We have determined the three-dimensional structure of this tau exon 10 splicing regulatory element RNA by NMR spectroscopy. We show that it forms a stable, folded stem-loop structure whose thermodynamic stability is reduced by frontotemporal dementia and parkinsonism linked to chromosome 17 mutations and increased by compensatory mutations. By exon trapping, the reduction in thermodynamic stability is correlated with increased splicing in of exon 10. PMID:10393977

  16. Exon-intron structure of the human neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptor {alpha}4 subunit (CHRNA4)

    SciTech Connect

    Steinlein, O.; Weiland, S.; Stoodt, J.; Propping, P.

    1996-03-01

    The human neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptor {alpha}4 subunit gene (CHRNA4) is located in the candidate region for three different phenotypes: benign familial neonatal convulsions, autosomal dominant nocturnal frontal lobe epilepsy, and low-voltage EEG. Recently, a missense mutation in transmembrane domain 2 of CHRNA4 was found to be associated with autosomal dominant nocturnal frontal lobe epilepsy in one extended pedigree. We have determined the genomic organization of CHRNA4, which consists of six exons distributed over approximately 17 kb of genomic DNA. The nucleotide sequence obtained from the genomic regions adjacent to the exon boundaries enabled us to develop a set of primer pairs for PCR amplification of the complete coding region. The sequence analysis provides the basis for a comprehensive mutation screening of CHRNA4 in the above-mentioned phenotypes and possibly in other types of idopathic epilepsies. 29 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  17. Cooperative binding of TIA-1 and U1 snRNP in K-SAM exon splicing activation

    SciTech Connect

    Gesnel, Marie-Claude; Theoleyre, Sandrine; Del Gatto-Konczak, Fabienne; Breathnach, Richard . E-mail: breathna@nantes.inserm.fr

    2007-07-13

    In 293 cells, splicing of the human fibroblast growth factor receptor-2 K-SAM alternative exon is inefficient, but can be made efficient by provoking TIA-1 binding to the U-rich IAS1 sequence downstream from the exon's 5' splice site. We show here that TIA-1 domains known to interact with U1 snRNP and to recruit it to 5' splice sites in vitro are required for TIA-1 activation of K-SAM exon splicing in vivo. We further show that tethering downstream from the K-SAM exon a fusion between the U1 snRNP component U1C and the bacteriophage MS2 coat protein provokes IAS1-dependent exon splicing, and present evidence that the fusion functions after its incorporation into U1 snRNP. Our in vivo data, taken together with previous in vitro results, show that K-SAM splicing activation involves cooperative binding of TIA-1 and U1 snRNP to the exon's 5' splice site region.

  18. An evaluation of transcriptome-based exon capture for frog phylogenomics across multiple scales of divergence (Class: Amphibia, Order: Anura).

    PubMed

    Portik, Daniel M; Smith, Lydia L; Bi, Ke

    2016-09-01

    Custom sequence capture experiments are becoming an efficient approach for gathering large sets of orthologous markers in nonmodel organisms. Transcriptome-based exon capture utilizes transcript sequences to design capture probes, typically using a reference genome to identify intron-exon boundaries to exclude shorter exons (<200 bp). Here, we test directly using transcript sequences for probe design, which are often composed of multiple exons of varying lengths. Using 1260 orthologous transcripts, we conducted sequence captures across multiple phylogenetic scales for frogs, including outgroups ~100 Myr divergent from the ingroup. We recovered a large phylogenomic data set consisting of sequence alignments for 1047 of the 1260 transcriptome-based loci (~561 000 bp) and a large quantity of highly variable regions flanking the exons in transcripts (~70 000 bp), the latter improving substantially by only including ingroup species (~797 000 bp). We recovered both shorter (<100 bp) and longer exons (>200 bp), with no major reduction in coverage towards the ends of exons. We observed significant differences in the performance of blocking oligos for target enrichment and nontarget depletion during captures, and differences in PCR duplication rates resulting from the number of individuals pooled for capture reactions. We explicitly tested the effects of phylogenetic distance on capture sensitivity, specificity, and missing data, and provide a baseline estimate of expectations for these metrics based on a priori knowledge of nuclear pairwise differences among samples. We provide recommendations for transcriptome-based exon capture design based on our results, cost estimates and offer multiple pipelines for data assembly and analysis.

  19. Splicing of phenylalanine hydroxylase (PAH) exon 11 is vulnerable: molecular pathology of mutations in PAH exon 11.

    PubMed

    Heintz, Caroline; Dobrowolski, Steven F; Andersen, Henriette Skovgaard; Demirkol, Mübeccel; Blau, Nenad; Andresen, Brage Storstein

    2012-08-01

    In about 20-30% of phenylketonuria (PKU) patients, phenylalanine (Phe) levels can be controlled by cofactor 6R-tetrahydrobiopterin (BH(4)) administration. The phenylalanine hydroxylase (PAH) genotype has a predictive value concerning BH(4)-response and therefore a correct assessment of the mutation molecular pathology is important. Mutations that disturb the splicing of exons (e.g. interplay between splice site strength and regulatory sequences like exon splicing enhancers (ESEs)/exon splicing silencers (ESSs)) may cause different severity of PKU. In this study, we identified PAH exon 11 as a vulnerable exon and used patient derived lymphoblast cell lines and PAH minigenes to study the molecular defect that impacted pre-mRNA processing. We showed that the c.1144T>C and c.1066-3C>T mutations cause exon 11 skipping, while the c.1139C>T mutation is neutral or slightly beneficial. The c.1144T>C mutation resides in a putative splicing enhancer motif and binding by splicing factors SF2/ASF, SRp20 and SRp40 is disturbed. Additional mutations in potential splicing factor binding sites contributed to elucidate the pathogenesis of mutations in PAH exon 11. We suggest that PAH exon 11 is vulnerable due to a weak 3' splice site and that this makes exon 11 inclusion dependent on an ESE spanning position c.1144. Importantly, this implies that other mutations in exon 11 may affect splicing, since splicing is often determined by a fine balance between several positive and negative splicing regulatory elements distributed throughout the exon. Finally, we identified a pseudoexon in intron 11, which would have pathogenic consequences if activated by mutations or improved splicing conditions. Exonic mutations that disrupt splicing are unlikely to facilitate response to BH(4) and may lead to inconsistent genotype-phenotype correlations. Therefore, recognizing such mutations enhances our ability to predict the BH(4)-response.

  20. Exon redefinition by a point mutation within exon 5 of the glucose-6-phosphatase gene is the major cause of glycogen storage disease type 1a in Japan

    SciTech Connect

    Kajihara, Susumu; Yamamoto, Kyosuke; Kido, Keiko

    1995-09-01

    Glycogen storage disease (GSD) type 1a (von Gierke disease) is an autosomal recessive disorder caused by a deficiency in microsomal glucose-6-phosphatase (G6Pase). We have identified a novel mutation in the G6Pase gene of a individual with GSD type 1a. The cDNA from the patient`s liver revealed a 91-nt deletion in exon 5. The genomic DNA from the patient`s white blood cells revealed no deletion or mutation at the splicing junction of intron 4 and exon 5. The 3{prime} splicing occurred 91 bp from the 5{prime} site of exon 5 (at position 732 in the coding region), causing a substitution of a single nucleotide (G to T) at position 727 in the coding region. Further confirmation of the missplicing was obtained by transient expression of allelic minigene constructs into animal cells. Another eight unrelated families of nine Japanese patients were all found to have this mutation. This mutation is a new type of splicing mutation in the G6Pase gene, and 91% of patients and carriers suffering from GSD1a in Japan are detectable with this splicing mutation. 28 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  1. Alternative mRNA splicing of 3'-terminal exons generates ascorbate peroxidase isoenzymes in spinach (Spinacia oleracea) chloroplasts.

    PubMed Central

    Ishikawa, T; Yoshimura, K; Tamoi, M; Takeda, T; Shigeoka, S

    1997-01-01

    We have isolated two cDNA clones encoding spinach (Spinacia oleracea) stromal and thylakoid-bound ascorbate peroxidase isoenzymes [Ishikawa, Sakai, Yoshimura, Takeda and Shigeoka (1996) FEBS Lett. 384, 289-293]. The gene (ApxII) encoding both chloroplastic ascorbate peroxidase isoenzymes was isolated and the organization of the gene was determined. Alignment between the cDNAs and the gene for chloroplastic ascorbate peroxidase isoenzymes indicates that both enzymes arise from a common pre-mRNA by alternative splicing of two 3'-terminal exons. Genomic Southern-blot analysis supported this finding. The gene spanned nearly 8.5 kbp and contained 13 exons split by 12 introns. The penultimate exon 12 (residues 7376-7530) for the stromal ascorbate peroxidase mRNA consisted of one codon for Asp365 before the TAA termination codon, and the entire 3'-untranslated region, including a potential polyadenylation signal (AATAAA). The final exon 13 (residues 7545-7756) for the thylakoid-bound ascorbate peroxidase mRNA consisted of the corresponding coding sequence of the hydrophobic C-terminal region, the TGA termination codon and the entire 3'-untranslated region, including a potential polyadenylation signal (AATATA). Both exons were interrupted by a 14 bp non-coding sequence. Northern-blot and reverse transcription-PCR analysis showed that the transcripts for stromal and thylakoid-bound ascorbate peroxidase are present in spinach leaves. PMID:9396722

  2. Simultaneous scoring of 10 chromosomes (9,13,14,15,16,18,21,22,X, and Y) in interphase nuclei by using spectral imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fung, Jingly; Weier, Heinz-Ulli G.; Goldberg, James D.; Pedersen, Roger A.

    1999-06-01

    Numerical aberrations involving parts of or entire chromosomes have detrimental effects on mammalian embryonic, and perinatal development. Only few fetuses with chromosomal imbalances survive to term, and their abnormalities lead to stillbirth or cause severely altered phenotypes in the offspring (such as trisomies involving chromosomes 13, 18, 21, and anomalies of X, and Y). Because aneuploidy of any of the 24 chromosomes will have significant consequences, an optimized preimplantation and prenatal genetic diagnosis (PGD) test will score all the chromosomes. Since most cells to be analyzed will be in interphase rather than metaphase, we developed a rapid procedure for the analysis of interphase cells such as lymphocytes, amniocytes, or early embryonic cells (blastomeres). Our approach was based on in situ hybridization of chromosome-specific non-isotopically labeled DNA probes and Spectral Imaging. The Spectral Imaging system uses an interferometer instead of standard emission filters in a fluorescence microscope to record high resolution spectra from fluorescently stained specimens. This bio-imaging system combines the techniques of fluorescence optical microscopy, charged coupled device imaging, Fourier spectroscopy, light microscopy, and powerful analysis software. The probe set used here allowed simultaneous detection of 10 chromosomes (9, 13, 14, 15, 16, 18, 21, 22, X, Y) in interphase nuclei. Probes were obtained commercially or prepared in-house. Following 16 - 40 h hybridization to interphase cells and removal of unbound probes, image spectra (range 450 - 850 nm, resolution 10 nm) were recorded and analyzed using an SD200 Spectral Imaging system (ASI, Carlsbad, CA). Initially some amniocytes were unscoreable due to their thickness, and fixation protocols had to be modified to achieve satisfactory results. In summary, this study shows the simultaneous detection of at least 10 different chromosomes in interphase cells using a novel approach for multi

  3. Relationship between oral health-related knowledge, attitudes and behavior among 15-16-year-old adolescents: a structural equation modeling approach.

    PubMed

    Tolvanen, Mimmi; Lahti, Satu; Miettunen, Jouko; Hausen, Hannu

    2012-03-01

    The aim of this study was to confirm the previously observed attitudinal factor structure related to behavioral change and the knowledge-attitude-behavior model on dental health and hygiene among adolescents. The study population consisted of all 8(th) and 9(th) graders (15-16 years) who started the 2004-2005 school year in Rauma, Finland (n = 827). Data on knowledge, attitudes, toothbrushing and using fluoride toothpaste were gathered by questionnaires. Hypothesized structure included four attitudinal factors related to dental health and hygiene: 'importance of toothbrushing when participating in social situations' (F1), 'importance of toothbrushing for health-related reasons and better appearance' (F2), 'being concerned about developing caries lesions' (F3) and 'importance of toothbrushing for feeling accepted' (F4). Structural equation modeling (SEM) was used to test the hypothesized model: pathways lead from knowledge to behavior both directly and via attitudes. The hypothesized model was also modified by removing non-significant pathways and studying the inter-relationships between attitudes. A confirmatory factor analysis revealed that factor F4 had to be removed. In the final model, knowledge influenced behavior directly and via two attitude factors, F1 and F2, which were inter-related. 'Concern about developing caries lesions' was a background factor influencing only knowledge. The final factor structure and SEM model were acceptable-to-good fit. Knowledge had a smaller effect on behavior than on attitudes. Our results support theories about the causal knowledge-attitudes-behavior chain, also for adolescents' oral health-related behaviors.

  4. Exon Exchange Approach to Repair Duchenne Dystrophin Transcripts

    PubMed Central

    Lorain, Stéphanie; Peccate, Cécile; Le Hir, Maëva; Garcia, Luis

    2010-01-01

    Background Trans-splicing strategies for mRNA repair involve engineered transcripts designed to anneal target mRNAs in order to interfere with their natural splicing, giving rise to mRNA chimeras where endogenous mutated exons have been replaced by exogenous replacement sequences. A number of trans-splicing molecules have already been proposed for replacing either the 5′ or the 3′ part of transcripts to be repaired. Here, we show the feasibility of RNA surgery by using a double trans-splicing approach allowing the specific substitution of a given mutated exon. Methodology/Principal Findings As a target we used a minigene encoding a fragment of the mdx dystrophin gene enclosing the mutated exon (exon 23). This minigene was cotransfected with a variety of exon exchange constructions, differing in their annealing domains. We obtained accurate and efficient replacement of exon 23 in the mRNA target. Adding up a downstream intronic splice enhancer DISE in the exon exchange molecule enhanced drastically its efficiency up to 25–45% of repair depending on the construction in use. Conclusions/Significance These results demonstrate the possibility to fix up mutated exons, refurbish deleted exons and introduce protein motifs, while keeping natural untranslated sequences, which are essential for mRNA stability and translation regulation. Conversely to the well-known exon skipping, exon exchange has the advantage to be compatible with almost any type of mutations and more generally to a wide range of genetic conditions. In particular, it allows addressing disorders caused by dominant mutations. PMID:20531943

  5. The deletion of exon 3 in the cardiac ryanodine receptor is rescued by β strand switching.

    PubMed

    Lobo, Paolo A; Kimlicka, Lynn; Tung, Ching-Chieh; Van Petegem, Filip

    2011-06-08

    Mutations in the cardiac Ryanodine Receptor (RYR2) are linked to triggered arrhythmias. Removal of exon 3 results in a severe form of catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia (CPVT). This exon encodes secondary structure elements that are crucial for folding of the N-terminal domain (NTD), raising the question of why the deletion is neither lethal nor confers a loss of function. We determined the 2.3 Å crystal structure of the NTD lacking exon 3. The removal causes a structural rescue whereby a flexible loop inserts itself into the β trefoil domain and increases thermal stability. The exon 3 deletion is not tolerated in the corresponding RYR1 domain. The rescue shows a novel mechanism by which RYR2 channels can adjust their Ca²⁺ release properties through altering the structure of the NTD. Despite the rescue, the deletion affects interfaces with other RYR2 domains. We propose that relative movement of the NTD is allosterically coupled to the pore region.

  6. Gene identification by 3' terminal exon trapping.

    PubMed

    Krizman, D B

    1996-01-01

    3' terminal exon trapping offers a powerful and efficient technology for rendering fragments of transcribed genes from large stretches of unsequenced, vertebrate, genomic DNA. The products from this methodology are the starting point for further studies of gene discovery and analysis. Future considerations for this technology include answering questions about the degree of efficiency from various trapping substrates and whether or not this approach can be scaled up for large-scale gene discovery such as individual chromosome or whole genomic approaches. With the onset of EST database searching, the final analysis becomes a computer assay that is consistent with the future of genetics as this field continues to move towards informational experimentation based on DNA sequence.

  7. Identification of 3'-terminal exons from yeast artificial chromosomes.

    PubMed

    Krizman, D B; Hofmann, T A; DeSilva, U; Green, E D; Meltzer, P S; Trent, J M

    1995-06-01

    We report an extension of 3'-terminal exon trapping technology to the identification of transcribed sequences from yeast artificial chromosomes (YACs). A 350-kb YAC containing mouse genomic DNA was gel-purified and used as the target DNA for the 3'-terminal exon trapping strategy. A novel direct ligation/transfection approach was employed to increase the efficiency of trapping 3'-terminal exons from recombinant vector-derived chimeric mRNA. The resulting RT-PCR product was then used to generate a plasmid library. Randomly chosen individual subclones from this library were sequenced, and the results indicate that 86% met sequence criteria characteristic of 3'-terminal exons, whereas 14% were background from identified sources. PCR mapping efforts suggest eight putative last exons present within this YAC, whereas RT-PCR studies demonstrate that three reside within valid expressed sequences.

  8. SNP discovery in candidate adaptive genes using exon capture in a free-ranging alpine ungulate

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Roffler, Gretchen H.; Amish, Stephen J.; Smith, Seth; Cosart, Ted F.; Kardos, Marty; Schwartz, Michael K.; Luikart, Gordon

    2016-01-01

    Identification of genes underlying genomic signatures of natural selection is key to understanding adaptation to local conditions. We used targeted resequencing to identify SNP markers in 5321 candidate adaptive genes associated with known immunological, metabolic and growth functions in ovids and other ungulates. We selectively targeted 8161 exons in protein-coding and nearby 5′ and 3′ untranslated regions of chosen candidate genes. Targeted sequences were taken from bighorn sheep (Ovis canadensis) exon capture data and directly from the domestic sheep genome (Ovis aries v. 3; oviAri3). The bighorn sheep sequences used in the Dall's sheep (Ovis dalli dalli) exon capture aligned to 2350 genes on the oviAri3 genome with an average of 2 exons each. We developed a microfluidic qPCR-based SNP chip to genotype 476 Dall's sheep from locations across their range and test for patterns of selection. Using multiple corroborating approaches (lositan and bayescan), we detected 28 SNP loci potentially under selection. We additionally identified candidate loci significantly associated with latitude, longitude, precipitation and temperature, suggesting local environmental adaptation. The three methods demonstrated consistent support for natural selection on nine genes with immune and disease-regulating functions (e.g. Ovar-DRA, APC, BATF2, MAGEB18), cell regulation signalling pathways (e.g. KRIT1, PI3K, ORRC3), and respiratory health (CYSLTR1). Characterizing adaptive allele distributions from novel genetic techniques will facilitate investigation of the influence of environmental variation on local adaptation of a northern alpine ungulate throughout its range. This research demonstrated the utility of exon capture for gene-targeted SNP discovery and subsequent SNP chip genotyping using low-quality samples in a nonmodel species.

  9. Gene correction of a duchenne muscular dystrophy mutation by meganuclease-enhanced exon knock-in.

    PubMed

    Popplewell, Linda; Koo, Taeyoung; Leclerc, Xavier; Duclert, Aymeric; Mamchaoui, Kamel; Gouble, Agnés; Mouly, Vincent; Voit, Thomas; Pâques, Frédéric; Cédrone, Frédéric; Isman, Olga; Yáñez-Muñoz, Rafael J; Dickson, George

    2013-07-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a severe inherited, muscle-wasting disorder caused by mutations in the DMD gene. Gene therapy development for DMD has concentrated on vector-based DMD minigene transfer, cell-based gene therapy using genetically modified adult muscle stem cells or healthy wild-type donor cells, and antisense oligonucleotide-induced exon-skipping therapy to restore the reading frame of the mutated DMD gene. This study is an investigation into DMD gene targeting-mediated correction of deletions in human patient myoblasts using a target-specific meganuclease (MN) and a homologous recombination repair matrix. The MN was designed to cleave within DMD intron 44, upstream of a deletion hotspot, and integration-competent lentiviral vectors expressing the nuclease (LVcMN) were generated. MN western blotting and deep gene sequencing for LVcMN-induced non-homologous end-joining InDels (microdeletions or microinsertions) confirmed efficient MN expression and activity in transduced DMD myoblasts. A homologous repair matrix carrying exons 45-52 (RM45-52) was designed and packaged into integration-deficient lentiviral vectors (IDLVs; LVdRM45-52). After cotransduction of DMD myoblasts harboring a deletion of exons 45 to 52 with LVcMN and LVdRM45-52 vectors, targeted knock-in of the RM45-52 region in the correct location in DMD intron 44, and expression of full-length, correctly spliced wild-type dystrophin mRNA containing exons 45-52 were observed. This work demonstrates that genome surgery on human DMD gene mutations can be achieved by MN-induced locus-specific genome cleavage and homologous recombination knock-in of deleted exons. The feasibility of human DMD gene repair in patient myoblasts has exciting therapeutic potential.

  10. Characterization of Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) DRB Exon 2 and DRA Exon 3 Fragments in a Primary Terrestrial Rabies Vector (Procyon lotor)

    PubMed Central

    Castillo, Sarrah; Srithayakumar, Vythegi; Meunier, Vanessa; Kyle, Christopher J.

    2010-01-01

    The major histocompatibility complex (MHC) presents a unique system to explore links between genetic diversity and pathogens, as diversity within MHC is maintained in part by pathogen driven selection. While the majority of wildlife MHC studies have investigated species that are of conservation concern, here we characterize MHC variation in a common and broadly distributed species, the North American raccoon (Procyon lotor). Raccoons host an array of broadly distributed wildlife diseases (e.g., canine distemper, parvovirus and raccoon rabies virus) and present important human health risks as they persist in high densities and in close proximity to humans and livestock. To further explore how genetic variation influences the spread and maintenance of disease in raccoons we characterized a fragment of MHC class II DRA exon 3 (250bp) and DRB exon 2 (228 bp). MHC DRA was found to be functionally monomorphic in the 32 individuals screened; whereas DRB exon 2 revealed 66 unique alleles among the 246 individuals screened. Between two and four alleles were observed in each individual suggesting we were amplifying a duplicated DRB locus. Nucleotide differences between DRB alleles ranged from 1 to 36 bp (0.4–15.8% divergence) and translated into 1 to 21 (1.3–27.6% divergence) amino acid differences. We detected a significant excess of nonsynonymous substitutions at the peptide binding region (P = 0.005), indicating that DRB exon 2 in raccoons has been influenced by positive selection. These data will form the basis of continued analyses into the spatial and temporal relationship of the raccoon rabies virus and the immunogenetic response in its primary host. PMID:20706587

  11. Characterization of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) DRB exon 2 and DRA exon 3 fragments in a primary terrestrial rabies vector (Procyon lotor).

    PubMed

    Castillo, Sarrah; Srithayakumar, Vythegi; Meunier, Vanessa; Kyle, Christopher J

    2010-08-10

    The major histocompatibility complex (MHC) presents a unique system to explore links between genetic diversity and pathogens, as diversity within MHC is maintained in part by pathogen driven selection. While the majority of wildlife MHC studies have investigated species that are of conservation concern, here we characterize MHC variation in a common and broadly distributed species, the North American raccoon (Procyon lotor). Raccoons host an array of broadly distributed wildlife diseases (e.g., canine distemper, parvovirus and raccoon rabies virus) and present important human health risks as they persist in high densities and in close proximity to humans and livestock. To further explore how genetic variation influences the spread and maintenance of disease in raccoons we characterized a fragment of MHC class II DRA exon 3 (250 bp) and DRB exon 2 (228 bp). MHC DRA was found to be functionally monomorphic in the 32 individuals screened; whereas DRB exon 2 revealed 66 unique alleles among the 246 individuals screened. Between two and four alleles were observed in each individual suggesting we were amplifying a duplicated DRB locus. Nucleotide differences between DRB alleles ranged from 1 to 36 bp (0.4-15.8% divergence) and translated into 1 to 21 (1.3-27.6% divergence) amino acid differences. We detected a significant excess of nonsynonymous substitutions at the peptide binding region (P = 0.005), indicating that DRB exon 2 in raccoons has been influenced by positive selection. These data will form the basis of continued analyses into the spatial and temporal relationship of the raccoon rabies virus and the immunogenetic response in its primary host.

  12. Alternative splicing regulation of APP exon 7 by RBFox proteins.

    PubMed

    Alam, Shafiul; Suzuki, Hitoshi; Tsukahara, Toshifumi

    2014-12-01

    RBFox proteins are well-known alternative splicing regulators. We have shown previously that during neuronal differentiation of P19 cells induced by all-trans retinoic acid and cell aggregation, RBFox1 shows markedly increased temporal expression. To find its key splicing regulation, we examined the effect of RBFox1 on 33 previously reported and validated neuronal splicing events of P19 cells. We observed that alternative splicing of three genes, specifically, amyloid precursor protein (APP), disks large homolog 3 (DLG3), and G protein, alpha activating activity polypeptide O (GNAO1), was altered by transient RBFox1 expression in HEK293 and HeLa cells. Moreover, an RBFox1 mutant (RBFox1FA) that was unable to bind the target RNA sequence ((U)GCAUG) did not induce these splicing events. APP generates amyloid beta peptides that are involved in the pathology of Alzheimer's disease, and therefore we examined APP alternative splicing regulation by RBFox1 and other splicing regulators. Our results indicated that RBFox proteins promote the skipping of APP exon 7, but not the inclusion of exon 8. We made APP6789 minigenes and observed that two (U)GCAUG sequences, located upstream of exon 7 and in exon 7, functioned to induce skipping of exon 7 by RBFox proteins. Overall, RBFox proteins may shift APP from exon 7 containing isoforms, APP770 and APP751, toward the exon 7 lacking isoform, APP695, which is predominant in neural tissues.

  13. High correspondence between Affymetrix exon and standard expression arrays.

    PubMed

    Okoniewski, Michał J; Hey, Yvonne; Pepper, Stuart D; Miller, Crispin J

    2007-02-01

    Exon arrays aim to provide comprehensive gene expression data at the level of individual exons, similar to that provided on a per-gene basis by existing expression arrays. This report describes the performance of Affymetrix GeneChip Human Exon 1.0 ST array by using replicated RNA samples from two human cell lines, MCF7 and MCF10A, hybridized both to Exon 1.0 ST and to HG-U133 Plus2 arrays. Cross-comparison between array types requires an appropriate mapping to be found between individual probe sets. Three possible mappings were considered, reflecting different strategies for dealing with probe sets that target different parts of the same transcript. Irrespective of the mapping used, Exon 1.0 ST and HG-U133 Plus2 arrays show a high degree of correspondence. More than 80% of HG-U133 Plus2 probe sets may be mapped to the Exon chip, and fold changes are found well preserved for over 96% of those probe sets detected present. Since HG-U133 Plus2 arrays have already been extensively validated, these results lend a significant degree of confidence to exon arrays.

  14. The multifunctional peptidylglycine alpha-amidating monooxygenase gene: exon/intron organization of catalytic, processing, and routing domains.

    PubMed

    Ouafik, L H; Stoffers, D A; Campbell, T A; Johnson, R C; Bloomquist, B T; Mains, R E; Eipper, B A

    1992-10-01

    Peptidylglycine alpha-amidating monooxygenase (PAM; EC 1.14.17.3) is a multifunctional protein containing two enzymes that act sequentially to catalyze the alpha-amidation of neuroendocrine peptides. Peptidylglycine alpha-hydroxylating monooxygenase (PHM) catalyzes the first step of the reaction and is dependent on copper, ascorbate, and molecular oxygen. Peptidyl-alpha-hydroxyglycine alpha-amidating lyase (PAL) catalyzes the second step of the reaction. Previous studies demonstrated that alternative splicing results in the production of bifunctional PAM proteins that are integral membrane or soluble proteins as well as soluble monofunctional PHM proteins. Rat PAM is encoded by a complex single copy gene that consists of 27 exons and encompasses more than 160 kilobases (kb) of genomic DNA. The 12 exons comprising PHM are distributed over at least 76 kb genomic DNA and range in size from 49-185 base pairs; four of the introns within the PHM domain are over 10 kb in length. Alternative splicing in the PHM region can result in a truncated, inactive PHM protein (rPAM-5), or a soluble, monofunctional PHM protein (rPAM-4) instead of a bifunctional protein. The eight exons comprising PAL are distributed over at least 19 kb genomic DNA. The exons encoding PAL range in size from 54-209 base pairs and have not been found to undergo alternative splicing. The PHM and PAL domains are separated by a single alternatively spliced exon surrounded by lengthy introns; inclusion of this exon results in the production of a form of PAM (rPAM-1) in which endoproteolytic cleavage at a paired basic site can separate the two catalytic domains. The exon following the PAL domain encodes the trans-membrane domain of PAM; alternative splicing at this site produces integral membrane or soluble PAM proteins. The COOH-terminal domain of PAM is comprised of a short exon subject to alternative splicing and a long exon encoding the final 68 amino acids present in all bifunctional PAM proteins along

  15. Structure of the human zinc finger protein HIVEP3: molecular cloning, expression, exon-intron structure, and comparison with paralogous genes HIVEP1 and HIVEP2.

    PubMed

    Hicar, M D; Liu, Y; Allen, C E; Wu, L C

    2001-01-01

    Here we report the cloning and characterization of HIVEP3, the newest member in the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 enhancer-binding protein family that encodes large zinc finger proteins and regulates transcription via the kappaB enhancer motif. The largest open reading frame of HIVEP3 contains 2406 aa. and is approximately 80% identical to the mouse counterpart. The HIVEP3 gene is located in the chromosomal region 1p34 and is at least 300 kb with 10 exons. RNA studies show that multiple HIVEP3 transcripts are differentially expressed and regulated. Additionally, transcription termination occurs in the ultimate exon, exon 10, or in exon 6. Therefore, HIVEP3 may produce protein isoforms that contain or exclude the carboxyl DNA binding domain and the leucine zipper by alternative RNA splicing and differential polyadenylation. Sequence homologous to HIVEP3 exon 6 is not found in mouse nor are the paralogous genes HIVEP1 and HIVEP2. Zoo-blot analysis suggests that sequences homologous to the human exon 6 are present only in primates and cow. Therefore, a foreign DNA harboring a termination exon likely was inserted into the HIVEP3 locus relatively recently in evolution, resulting in the acquisition of novel gene regulatory mechanisms as well as the generation of structural and functional diversity. Copyright 2001 Academic Press.

  16. Deletion of twenty seven nucleotides within exon 11 of the band 3 gene identified in ovalocytosis in Lombok Island, Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Alimsardjono, H; Mukono, I S; Dachlan, Y P; Matsuo, M

    1997-03-01

    This study reports the molecular characterization of ovalocytosis in Lombok Island, Indonesia. The analysis of genomic DNA by polymerase chain reaction shows that all 21 ovalocytotic individuals have two amplified products of different size from a region encompassing exon 11 of the band 3 gene. The sequence of the larger product matched perfectly with that of normal individuals. In the sequence of the smaller product, 27 nucleotides within exon 11 were deleted. The heterozygous presence of the deletion identified in other parts of Southeast Asia was confirmed in patients with ovalocytosis in an isolated island of eastern Indonesia.

  17. Transcriptome-based exon capture enables highly cost-effective comparative genomic data collection at moderate evolutionary scales

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background To date, exon capture has largely been restricted to species with fully sequenced genomes, which has precluded its application to lineages that lack high quality genomic resources. We developed a novel strategy for designing array-based exon capture in chipmunks (Tamias) based on de novo transcriptome assemblies. We evaluated the performance of our approach across specimens from four chipmunk species. Results We selectively targeted 11,975 exons (~4 Mb) on custom capture arrays, and enriched over 99% of the targets in all libraries. The percentage of aligned reads was highly consistent (24.4-29.1%) across all specimens, including in multiplexing up to 20 barcoded individuals on a single array. Base coverage among specimens and within targets in each species library was uniform, and the performance of targets among independent exon captures was highly reproducible. There was no decrease in coverage among chipmunk species, which showed up to 1.5% sequence divergence in coding regions. We did observe a decline in capture performance of a subset of targets designed from a much more divergent ground squirrel genome (30 My), however, over 90% of the targets were also recovered. Final assemblies yielded over ten thousand orthologous loci (~3.6 Mb) with thousands of fixed and polymorphic SNPs among species identified. Conclusions Our study demonstrates the potential of a transcriptome-enabled, multiplexed, exon capture method to create thousands of informative markers for population genomic and phylogenetic studies in non-model species across the tree of life. PMID:22900609

  18. Exclusion of exon 2 is a common mRNA splice variant of primate telomerase reverse transcriptases.

    PubMed

    Withers, Johanna B; Ashvetiya, Tamara; Beemon, Karen L

    2012-01-01

    Telomeric sequences are added by an enzyme called telomerase that is made of two components: a catalytic protein called telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) and an integral RNA template (TR). Telomerase expression is tightly regulated at each step of gene expression, including alternative splicing of TERT mRNA. While over a dozen different alternative splicing events have been reported for human TERT mRNA, these were all in the 3' half of the coding region. We were interested in examining splicing of the 5' half of hTERT mRNA, especially since exon 2 is unusually large (1.3 kb). Internal mammalian exons are usually short, typically only 50 to 300 nucleotides, and most long internal exons are alternatively processed. We used quantitative RT-PCR and high-throughput sequencing data to examine the variety and quantity of mRNA species generated from the hTERT locus. We determined that there are approximately 20-40 molecules of hTERT mRNA per cell in the A431 human cell line. In addition, we describe an abundant, alternatively-spliced mRNA variant that excludes TERT exon 2 and was seen in other primates. This variant causes a frameshift and results in translation termination in exon 3, generating a 12 kDa polypeptide.

  19. Ameliorating pathogenesis by removing an exon containing a missense mutation: a potential exon-skipping therapy for laminopathies.

    PubMed

    Scharner, J; Figeac, N; Ellis, J A; Zammit, P S

    2015-06-01

    Exon skipping, as a therapy to restore a reading frame or switch protein isoforms, is under clinical trial. We hypothesised that removing an in-frame exon containing a mutation could also improve pathogenic phenotypes. Our model is laminopathies: incurable tissue-specific degenerative diseases associated with LMNA mutations. LMNA encodes A-type lamins, that together with B-type lamins, form the nuclear lamina. Lamins contain an alpha-helical central rod domain composed of multiple heptad repeats. Eliminating LMNA exon 3 or 5 removes six heptad repeats, so shortens, but should not otherwise significantly alter, the alpha-helix. Human Lamin A or Lamin C with a deletion corresponding to amino acids encoded by exon 5 (Lamin A/C-Δ5) localised normally in murine lmna-null cells, rescuing both nuclear shape and endogenous Lamin B1/emerin distribution. However, Lamin A carrying pathogenic mutations in exon 3 or 5, or Lamin A/C-Δ3, did not. Furthermore, Lamin A/C-Δ5 was not deleterious to wild-type cells, unlike the other Lamin A mutants including Lamin A/C-Δ3. Thus Lamin A/C-Δ5 function as effectively as wild-type Lamin A/C and better than mutant versions. Antisense oligonucleotides skipped LMNA exon 5 in human cells, demonstrating the possibility of treating certain laminopathies with this approach. This proof-of-concept is the first to report the therapeutic potential of exon skipping for diseases arising from missense mutations.

  20. 5′ exon interactions within the human spliceosome establish a framework for exon junction complex structure and assembly

    PubMed Central

    Reichert, Vienna L.; Le Hir, Hervé; Jurica, Melissa S.; Moore, Melissa J.

    2002-01-01

    A general consequence of pre-mRNA splicing is the stable deposition of several proteins 20–24 nucleotides (nt) upstream of exon–exon junctions on spliced mRNAs. This exon junction complex (EJC) contains factors involved in mRNA export, cytoplasmic localization, and nonsense-mediated mRNA decay. Here we probed the mechanism and timing of EJC assembly. Over the course of splicing, the 5′ exon is subject to numerous dynamic protein–RNA interactions involving at least nine distinct polypeptides. Within the fully assembled spliceosome, these interactions afford protection to the last 25–27 nt of the 5′ exon intermediate. Coincident with exon ligation, interactions at the 3′ end of the 5′ exon disappear, and new species associate with position −24. Mass spectrometry and Western blotting of purified H, C, and mRNP complexes revealed that at least one EJC component, REF/Aly, can interact with pre-mRNA prior to spliceosome assembly, whereas Y14, Magoh, RNPS1, UAP56, and SRm160 are found in intermediate-containing spliceosomes. Upon exon ligation, association of RNPS1, UAP56, and SRm160 is destabilized. In contrast, REF/Aly, Y14, and Magoh remain stably bound to spliced mRNA, indicating that these three proteins are components of the EJC core. PMID:12414731

  1. Exonic Mutations in the SLC12A3 Gene Cause Exon Skipping and Premature Termination in Gitelman Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Takeuchi, Yoichi; Mishima, Eikan; Shima, Hisato; Akiyama, Yasutoshi; Suzuki, Chitose; Suzuki, Takehiro; Kobayashi, Takayasu; Suzuki, Yoichi; Nakayama, Tomohiro; Takeshima, Yasuhiro; Vazquez, Norma; Ito, Sadayoshi; Gamba, Gerardo

    2015-01-01

    A variety of genetic backgrounds cause the loss of function of thiazide-sensitive sodium chloride cotransporter, encoded by SLC12A3, responsible for the phenotypes in Gitelman syndrome. Recently, the phenomenon of exon skipping, in which exonic mutations result in abnormal splicing, has been associated with various diseases. Specifically, mutations in exonic splicing enhancer (ESE) sequences can promote exon skipping. Here, we used a bioinformatics program to analyze 88 missense mutations in the SLC12A3 gene and identify candidate mutations that may induce exon skipping. The three candidate mutations that reduced ESE scores the most were further investigated by minigene assay, and two (p.A356V and p.M672I) caused abnormal splicing in vitro. Furthermore, we identified the p.M672I (c.2016G>A) mutation in a patient with Gitelman syndrome and found that this single nucleotide mutation causes exclusion of exon 16 in the SLC12A3 mRNA transcript. Functional analyses revealed that the protein encoded by the aberrant SLC12A3 transcript does not transport sodium. These results suggest that aberrant exon skipping is one previously unrecognized mechanism by which missense mutations in SLC12A3 can lead to Gitelman syndrome. PMID:25060058

  2. Whole exon 5 and intron 5 replaced by RHCE in DVa(Hus).

    PubMed

    Shao, Chaopeng; Xiong, Wen; Wang, Wei

    2004-01-01

    The DVa(Hus) was previously investigated through cDNA analysis, which revealed an RHD-CE(5)-D hybrid allele. However, the 5' and 3' breakpoints remain unknown. In this article, gene recombinations between the RHD and RHCE alleles were investigated by a combination approach of a sequence-specific primer PCR (PCR-SSP) and an RHD full-length coding region sequencing method on two Chinese subjects with weak D phenotypes. The hybrid Rhesus box of each individual was also investigated through an established PCR-based method. As a result, two partial D phenotypes, DVa(Hus) and DVI type III, were identified, each carrying one hybrid RHD-CE-D allele. The two samples were also serotyped with Rh phontypes of DccEe and DCcee, respectively. Other sequencing analyses of the DVaHus sample showed that the sequence of intron 4 is identical with RHD, whereas the whole sequence of exon 5 and intron 5 is identical with RHCE except for seven polymorphisms in the intron 5. We may concluded that in the case of this Chinese DVa(Hus), the whole exon 5 and complete intron 5 of a total segment of 1801 nucleotides were replaced by RHCE suggesting that the breakpoints of the replaced region are the 5' end of the exon 5 and the 3' end of the intron 5.

  3. Mutation in exon 7 of PTCH deregulates SHH/PTCH/SMO signaling: possible linkage to WNT.

    PubMed

    Musani, Vesna; Gorry, Philippe; Basta-Juzbasic, Aleksandra; Stipic, Tonci; Miklic, Pavle; Levanat, Sonja

    2006-05-01

    The novel PTCH mutation and clinical manifestations within Gorlin syndrome family links PTCH haploinsufficiency and aberrant activation of the Wnt pathway. We report a family case with Gorlin syndrome, characterized by the usual phenotype features such as widespread basocellular tumors and craniofacial and bone malformations, but also including a less common appearance of craniopharyngioma. These clinical manifestations might be associated with a novel constitutional mutation of the PTCH gene, 1047insAGAA, which we found in exon 7. It changes the normal amino acid sequence leading to termination of the PTCH protein at exon 9. The analyzed tumors of the family show extensive loss of heterozygosity in the PTCH region, both basocellular and in particular craniopharyngioma, and in the latter a high expression of beta-catenin was detected. Our findings suggest involvement of the SHH/PTCH/SMO pathway in pathogenesis of the analyzed disorders, including its possible contribution to aberrant activation of the Wnt pathway in craniopharyngioma.

  4. X:Map: annotation and visualization of genome structure for Affymetrix exon array analysis

    PubMed Central

    Yates, Tim; Okoniewski, Michał J.; Miller, Crispin J.

    2008-01-01

    Affymetrix exon arrays aim to target every known and predicted exon in the human, mouse or rat genomes, and have reporters that extend beyond protein coding regions to other areas of the transcribed genome. This combination of increased coverage and precision is important because a substantial proportion of protein coding genes are predicted to be alternatively spliced, and because many non-coding genes are known also to be of biological significance. In order to fully exploit these arrays, it is necessary to associate each reporter on the array with the features of the genome it is targeting, and to relate these to gene and genome structure. X:Map is a genome annotation database that provides this information. Data can be browsed using a novel Google-maps based interface, and analysed and further visualized through an associated BioConductor package. The database can be found at http://xmap.picr.man.ac.uk. PMID:17932061

  5. A 5' Noncoding Exon Containing Engineered Intron Enhances Transgene Expression from Recombinant AAV Vectors in vivo.

    PubMed

    Lu, Jiamiao; Williams, James A; Luke, Jeremy; Zhang, Feijie; Chu, Kirk; Kay, Mark A

    2017-01-01

    We previously developed a mini-intronic plasmid (MIP) expression system in which the essential bacterial elements for plasmid replication and selection are placed within an engineered intron contained within a universal 5' UTR noncoding exon. Like minicircle DNA plasmids (devoid of bacterial backbone sequences), MIP plasmids overcome transcriptional silencing of the transgene. However, in addition MIP plasmids increase transgene expression by 2 and often >10 times higher than minicircle vectors in vivo and in vitro. Based on these findings, we examined the effects of the MIP intronic sequences in a recombinant adeno-associated virus (AAV) vector system. Recombinant AAV vectors containing an intron with a bacterial replication origin and bacterial selectable marker increased transgene expression by 40 to 100 times in vivo when compared with conventional AAV vectors. Therefore, inclusion of this noncoding exon/intron sequence upstream of the coding region can substantially enhance AAV-mediated gene expression in vivo.

  6. Systematic identification and analysis of exonic splicing silencers.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zefeng; Rolish, Michael E; Yeo, Gene; Tung, Vivian; Mawson, Matthew; Burge, Christopher B

    2004-12-17

    Exonic splicing silencers (ESSs) are cis-regulatory elements that inhibit the use of adjacent splice sites, often contributing to alternative splicing (AS). To systematically identify ESSs, an in vivo splicing reporter system was developed to screen a library of random decanucleotides. The screen yielded 141 ESS decamers, 133 of which were unique. The silencer activity of over a dozen of these sequences was also confirmed in a heterologous exon/intron context and in a second cell type. Of the unique ESS decamers, most could be clustered into groups to yield seven putative ESS motifs, some resembling known motifs bound by hnRNPs H and A1. Potential roles of ESSs in constitutive splicing were explored using an algorithm, ExonScan, which simulates splicing based on known or putative splicing-related motifs. ExonScan and related bioinformatic analyses suggest that these ESS motifs play important roles in suppression of pseudoexons, in splice site definition, and in AS.

  7. Human glucose phosphate isomerase: Exon mapping and gene structure

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Weiming; Lee, Pauline; Beutler, E.

    1995-10-10

    The structure of the gene for human glucose phosphate isomerase (GPI) has been determined. Three GPI clones were isolated from a human genomic library by using a full-length GPI cDNA probe and were characterized. Oligonucleotides based on the known cDNA sequence were used as primers in amplification and sequence analyses. This led to the identification of the exon-intron junctions. By this approach, 18 exons and 17 introns have been identified. The exons range in size from 44 to 431 nucleotides. The intronic sequences surrounding the exons provide useful information for the identification of mutations that give rise to human GPI deficiency associated with chronic hemolytic anemia. 13 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  8. Disentangling Sources of Selection on Exonic Transcriptional Enhancers

    PubMed Central

    Agoglia, Rachel M.; Fraser, Hunter B.

    2016-01-01

    In addition to coding for proteins, exons can also impact transcription by encoding regulatory elements such as enhancers. It has been debated whether such features confer heightened selective constraint, or evolve neutrally. We have addressed this question by developing a new approach to disentangle the sources of selection acting on exonic enhancers, in which we model the evolutionary rates of every possible substitution as a function of their effects on both protein sequence and enhancer activity. In three exonic enhancers, we found no significant association between evolutionary rates and effects on enhancer activity. This suggests that despite having biochemical activity, these exonic enhancers have no detectable selective constraint, and thus are unlikely to play a major role in protein evolution. PMID:26500252

  9. Exonic Sp1 sites are required for neural-specific expression of the glycine receptor beta subunit gene.

    PubMed Central

    Tintrup, H; Fischer, M; Betz, H; Kuhse, J

    2001-01-01

    The gene encoding the beta subunit of the inhibitory glycine receptor (GlyR) is widely expressed throughout the mammalian central nervous system. To unravel the elements regulating its transcription, we isolated its 5' non-coding and upstream flanking regions from mouse. Sequence analysis revealed significant differences between the 5' region of the beta subunit gene and the corresponding regions of the homologous GlyR alpha subunit genes; it also identified a novel exon (exon 0) that encodes most of the 5'-untranslated portion of the GlyR beta mRNA. Primer extension experiments disclosed multiple transcriptional start sites. Transfection experiments with luciferase reporter gene constructs showed that sequences encompassing 1.58 kb of upstream flanking region and 180 bp of exon 0 displayed high promoter activity in two neuroblastoma cell lines but not in non-neural cells. Analysis of various deletion constructs showed that the 5' flanking region preceding the transcriptional start sites silences expression in non-neural cells but is not essential for general promoter activity. In contrast, the deletion of sequences within exon 0 drastically decreased or abolished transcription; the removal of sequences harbouring Sp1 consensus sequences within exon 0 decreased expression specifically in a neuroblastoma cell line. Band-shift assays confirmed the binding of Sp1 to sites within the deleted sequence. Our results indicate that neural-specific expression of the GlyR beta subunit gene might depend on a direct interaction of Sp1 transcription factors with cis elements located downstream from transcription initiation sites. PMID:11256962

  10. Exon Silencing by UAGG Motifs in Response to Neuronal Excitation

    PubMed Central

    An, Ping; Grabowski, Paula J

    2007-01-01

    Alternative pre-mRNA splicing plays fundamental roles in neurons by generating functional diversity in proteins associated with the communication and connectivity of the synapse. The CI cassette of the NMDA R1 receptor is one of a variety of exons that show an increase in exon skipping in response to cell excitation, but the molecular nature of this splicing responsiveness is not yet understood. Here we investigate the molecular basis for the induced changes in splicing of the CI cassette exon in primary rat cortical cultures in response to KCl-induced depolarization using an expression assay with a tight neuron-specific readout. In this system, exon silencing in response to neuronal excitation was mediated by multiple UAGG-type silencing motifs, and transfer of the motifs to a constitutive exon conferred a similar responsiveness by gain of function. Biochemical analysis of protein binding to UAGG motifs in extracts prepared from treated and mock-treated cortical cultures showed an increase in nuclear hnRNP A1-RNA binding activity in parallel with excitation. Evidence for the role of the NMDA receptor and calcium signaling in the induced splicing response was shown by the use of specific antagonists, as well as cell-permeable inhibitors of signaling pathways. Finally, a wider role for exon-skipping responsiveness is shown to involve additional exons with UAGG-related silencing motifs, and transcripts involved in synaptic functions. These results suggest that, at the post-transcriptional level, excitable exons such as the CI cassette may be involved in strategies by which neurons mount adaptive responses to hyperstimulation. PMID:17298175

  11. Modulating Calcium Signals to Boost AON Exon Skipping for DMD

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-10-01

    changing DMD treatment. We have assessed whether dantrolene, an already FDA-approved drug , can boost efficacy of AON exon skipping in the context of...RNA Seq analysis to identify mechanisms of activity and specificity in order to guide discovery of second-generation skipping drugs or combinations...for DMD. Here, we will assess whether dantrolene, an FDA-approved drug already demonstrated to boost efficacy of AON exon skipping in the context of

  12. The evolution, impact and properties of exonic splice enhancers

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background In humans, much of the information specifying splice sites is not at the splice site. Exonic splice enhancers are one of the principle non-splice site motifs. Four high-throughput studies have provided a compendium of motifs that function as exonic splice enhancers, but only one, RESCUE-ESE, has been generally employed to examine the properties of enhancers. Here we consider these four datasets to ask whether there is any consensus on the properties and impacts of exonic splice enhancers. Results While only about 1% of all the identified hexamer motifs are common to all analyses we can define reasonably sized sets that are found in most datasets. These consensus intersection datasets we presume reflect the true properties of exonic splice enhancers. Given prior evidence for the properties of enhancers and splice-associated mutations, we ask for all datasets whether the exonic splice enhancers considered are purine enriched; enriched near exon boundaries; able to predict trends in relative codon usage; slow evolving at synonymous sites; rare in SNPs; associated with weak splice sites; and enriched near longer introns. While the intersect datasets match expectations, only one original dataset, RESCUE-ESE, does. Unexpectedly, a fully experimental dataset identifies motifs that commonly behave opposite to the consensus, for example, being enriched in exon cores where splice-associated mutations are rare. Conclusions Prior analyses that used the RESCUE-ESE set of hexamers captured the properties of consensus exonic splice enhancers. We estimate that at least 4% of synonymous mutations are deleterious owing to an effect on enhancer functioning. PMID:24359918

  13. Tdp-43 cryptic exons are highly variable between cell types.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Yun Ha; Ling, Jonathan P; Lin, Sophie Z; Donde, Aneesh N; Braunstein, Kerstin E; Majounie, Elisa; Traynor, Bryan J; LaClair, Katherine D; Lloyd, Thomas E; Wong, Philip C

    2017-02-02

    TDP-43 proteinopathy is a prominent pathological feature that occurs in a number of human diseases including amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), frontotemporal dementia (FTD), and inclusion body myositis (IBM). Our recent finding that TDP-43 represses nonconserved cryptic exons led us to ask whether cell type-specific cryptic exons could exist to impact unique molecular pathways in brain or muscle. In the present work, we investigated TDP-43's function in various mouse tissues to model disease pathogenesis. We generated mice to conditionally delete TDP-43 in excitatory neurons or skeletal myocytes and identified the cell type-specific cryptic exons associated with TDP-43 loss of function. Comparative analysis of nonconserved cryptic exons in various mouse cell types revealed that only some cryptic exons were common amongst stem cells, neurons, and myocytes; the majority of these nonconserved cryptic exons were cell type-specific. Our results suggest that in human disease, TDP-43 loss of function may impair cell type-specific pathways.

  14. Short Exon Detection via Wavelet Transform Modulus Maxima

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiaolei; Shen, Zhiwei; Zhang, Guishan; Shen, Yuanyu; Chen, Miaomiao; Zhao, Jiaxiang; Wu, Renhua

    2016-01-01

    The detection of short exons is a challenging open problem in the field of bioinformatics. Due to the fact that the weakness of existing model-independent methods lies in their inability to reliably detect small exons, a model-independent method based on the singularity detection with wavelet transform modulus maxima has been developed for detecting short coding sequences (exons) in eukaryotic DNA sequences. In the analysis of our method, the local maxima can capture and characterize singularities of short exons, which helps to yield significant patterns that are rarely observed with the traditional methods. In order to get some information about singularities on the differences between the exon signal and the background noise, the noise level is estimated by filtering the genomic sequence through a notch filter. Meanwhile, a fast method based on a piecewise cubic Hermite interpolating polynomial is applied to reconstruct the wavelet coefficients for improving the computational efficiency. In addition, the output measure of a paired-numerical representation calculated in both forward and reverse directions is used to incorporate a useful DNA structural property. The performances of our approach and other techniques are evaluated on two benchmark data sets. Experimental results demonstrate that the proposed method outperforms all assessed model-independent methods for detecting short exons in terms of evaluation metrics. PMID:27635656

  15. Exon deletions of the phenylalanine hydroxylase gene in Italian hyperphenylalaninemics

    PubMed Central

    Calì, Francesco; Ruggeri, Giuseppa; Vinci, Mirella; Meli, Concetta; Carducci, Carla; Leuzzi, Vincenzo; Pozzessere, Simone; Schinocca, Pietro; Ragalmuto, Alda; Chiavetta, Valeria; Miccichè, Salvatore

    2010-01-01

    A consistent finding of many studies describing the spectrum of mutant phenylalanine hydroxylase (PAH) alleles underlying hyperphenylalaninemia is the impossibility of achieving a 100% mutation ascertainment rate using conventional gene-scanning methods. These methods include denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE), denaturing high performance liquid chromatography (DHPLC), and direct sequencing. In recent years, it has been shown that a significant proportion of undetermined alleles consist of large deletions overlapping one or more exons. These deletions have been difficult to detect in compound heterozygotes using gene-scanning methods due to a masking effect of the non-deleted allele. To date, no systematic search has been carried out for such exon deletions in Italian patients with phenylketonuria or mild hyperphenylalaninemia. We used multiplex ligation- dependent probe amplification (MLPA), comparative multiplex dosage analysis (CMDA), and real-time PCR to search for both large deletions and duplications of the phenylalanine hydroxylase gene in Italian hyperphenylalaninemia patients. Four deletions removing different phenylalanine hydroxylase (PAH) gene exons were identified in 12 patients. Two of these deletions involving exons 4-5-6-7-8 (systematic name c.353-?_912 + ?del) and exon 6 (systematic name c.510-?_706 + ?del) have not been reported previously. In this study, we show that exon deletion of the PAH gene accounts for 1.7% of all mutant PAH alleles in Italian hyperphenylalaninemics. PMID:19946181

  16. 5'- and 3'-terminal nucleotides in the FGFR2 ISAR splicing element core have overlapping roles in exon IIIb activation and exon IIIc repression.

    PubMed

    Jones, R B; Carstens, R P; Luo, Y; McKeehan, W L

    2001-09-01

    The cell type-specific, mutually-exclusive alternative splicing of the fibroblast growth factor receptor 2 (FGFR2) pre-mRNA is tightly regulated. A sequence termed ISAR (intronic splicing activator and repressor) has been implicated as an important cis regulatory element in both activation of exon IIIb and repression of exon IIIc splicing in epithelial cells. In order to better understand how this single sequence could have dual roles, we transfected minigenes containing a series of 2-bp mutations in the 18 3'-most nucleotides of ISAR that we refer to as the ISAR core. Transfection of cells with dual-exon (IIIb and IIIc) minigenes revealed that mutation of terminal sequences of the core led to decreased exon IIIb inclusion and increased exon IIIc inclusion. Transfection of cells with single-exon IIIb minigenes and single-exon IIIc minigenes revealed that mutation of terminal sequences of the ISAR core led to decreased exon IIIb inclusion and increased exon IIIc inclusion, respectively. Nucleotides of the ISAR core responsible for exon IIIb activation appear to overlap very closely with those required for exon IIIc repression. We describe a model in which ISAR and a 5' intronic sequence known as IAS2 form a stem structure required for simultaneous exon IIIb activation and exon IIIc repression.

  17. An RRM-ZnF RNA recognition module targets RBM10 to exonic sequences to promote exon exclusion.

    PubMed

    Collins, Katherine M; Kainov, Yaroslav A; Christodolou, Evangelos; Ray, Debashish; Morris, Quaid; Hughes, Timothy; Taylor, Ian A; Makeyev, Eugene V; Ramos, Andres

    2017-04-04

    RBM10 is an RNA-binding protein that plays an essential role in development and is frequently mutated in the context of human disease. RBM10 recognizes a diverse set of RNA motifs in introns and exons and regulates alternative splicing. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying this seemingly relaxed sequence specificity are not understood and functional studies have focused on 3΄ intronic sites only. Here, we dissect the RNA code recognized by RBM10 and relate it to the splicing regulatory function of this protein. We show that a two-domain RRM1-ZnF unit recognizes a GGA-centered motif enriched in RBM10 exonic sites with high affinity and specificity and test that the interaction with these exonic sequences promotes exon skipping. Importantly, a second RRM domain (RRM2) of RBM10 recognizes a C-rich sequence, which explains its known interaction with the intronic 3΄ site of NUMB exon 9 contributing to regulation of the Notch pathway in cancer. Together, these findings explain RBM10's broad RNA specificity and suggest that RBM10 functions as a splicing regulator using two RNA-binding units with different specificities to promote exon skipping.

  18. Representation of DNA sequences in genetic codon context with applications in exon and intron prediction.

    PubMed

    Yin, Changchuan

    2015-04-01

    To apply digital signal processing (DSP) methods to analyze DNA sequences, the sequences first must be specially mapped into numerical sequences. Thus, effective numerical mappings of DNA sequences play key roles in the effectiveness of DSP-based methods such as exon prediction. Despite numerous mappings of symbolic DNA sequences to numerical series, the existing mapping methods do not include the genetic coding features of DNA sequences. We present a novel numerical representation of DNA sequences using genetic codon context (GCC) in which the numerical values are optimized by simulation annealing to maximize the 3-periodicity signal to noise ratio (SNR). The optimized GCC representation is then applied in exon and intron prediction by Short-Time Fourier Transform (STFT) approach. The results show the GCC method enhances the SNR values of exon sequences and thus increases the accuracy of predicting protein coding regions in genomes compared with the commonly used 4D binary representation. In addition, this study offers a novel way to reveal specific features of DNA sequences by optimizing numerical mappings of symbolic DNA sequences.

  19. Macaca specific exon creation event generates a novel ZKSCAN5 transcript.

    PubMed

    Kim, Young-Hyun; Choe, Se-Hee; Song, Bong-Seok; Park, Sang-Je; Kim, Myung-Jin; Park, Young-Ho; Yoon, Seung-Bin; Lee, Youngjeon; Jin, Yeung Bae; Sim, Bo-Woong; Kim, Ji-Su; Jeong, Kang-Jin; Kim, Sun-Uk; Lee, Sang-Rae; Park, Young-Il; Huh, Jae-Won; Chang, Kyu-Tae

    2016-02-15

    ZKSCAN5 (also known as ZFP95) is a zinc-finger protein belonging to the Krűppel family. ZKSCAN5 contains a SCAN box and a KRAB A domain and is proposed to play a distinct role during spermatogenesis. In humans, alternatively spliced ZKSCAN5 transcripts with different 5'-untranslated regions (UTRs) have been identified. However, investigation of our Macaca UniGene Database revealed novel alternative ZKSCAN5 transcripts that arose due to an exon creation event. Therefore, in this study, we identified the full-length sequences of ZKSCAN5 and its alternative transcripts in Macaca spp. Additionally, we investigated different nonhuman primate sequences to elucidate the molecular mechanism underlying the exon creation event. We analyzed the evolutionary features of the ZKSCAN5 transcripts by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and genomic PCR, and by sequencing various nonhuman primate DNA and RNA samples. The exon-created transcript was only detected in the Macaca lineage (crab-eating monkey and rhesus monkey). Full-length sequence analysis by rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE) identified ten full-length transcripts and four functional isoforms of ZKSCAN5. Protein sequence analyses revealed the presence of two groups of isoforms that arose because of differences in start-codon usage. Together, our results demonstrate that there has been specific selection for a discrete set of ZKSCAN5 variants in the Macaca lineage. Furthermore, study of this locus (and perhaps others) in Macaca spp. might facilitate our understanding of the evolutionary pressures that have shaped the mechanism of exon creation in primates.

  20. Nr4a3, a possibile oncogenic factor for neuroblastoma associated with CpGi methylation within the third exon.

    PubMed

    Uekusa, Shota; Kawashima, Hiroyuki; Sugito, Kiminobu; Yoshizawa, Shinsuke; Shinojima, Yui; Igarashi, Jun; Ghosh, Srimoyee; Wang, Xaofei; Fujiwara, Kyoko; Ikeda, Taro; Koshinaga, Tsugumichi; Soma, Masayoshi; Nagase, Hiroki

    2014-05-01

    Aberrant methylation of Nr4a3 exon 3 CpG island (CpGi) was initially identified during multistep mouse skin carcinogenesis. Nr4a3 is also known as a critical gene for neuronal development. Thus, we examined the Nr4a3 exon 3 CpGi methylation in mouse brain tissues from 15-day embryos, newborns and 12-week-old adults and found significant increase of its methylation and Nr4a3 expression during mouse brain development after birth. In addition, homologous region in human genome was frequently and aberrantly methylated in neuroblastoma specimens. A quantitative analysis of DNA methylation revealed that hypomethylation of CpG islands on Nr4a3 exon 3, but not on exon 1 was identified in three neuroblastomas compared with matched adrenal glands. Additional analysis for 20 neuroblastoma patients was performed and 8 of 20 showed hypomethylation of the CpGi on Nr4a3 exon 3. The survival rate of those 8 patients was significantly lower compared with those in patients with hypermethylation. Immunohistochemical Nr4a3 expression was generally faint in neuroblastoma tissues compared with normal tissues. Moreover, the MYCN amplified NB9 cell line showed hypomethylation and low expression of Nr4a3, while the non-MYCN amplified NB69 cell line showed hypermethylation and high expression. These results indicate that DNA hypomethylation of the CpGi at Nr4a3 exon 3 is associated with low Nr4a3 expression, and correlates with poor prognosis of neuroblastoma. Since Nr4a3 upregulation associated with the hypermethylation and neuronal differentiation in mice, poor prognosis of neuroblastoma associated with Nr4a3 low expression may be partly explained by dysregulation of its differentiation.

  1. Alternatively spliced products lacking exon 12 dominate the expression of fragile X mental retardation 1 gene in human tissues.

    PubMed

    Fu, Xianguo; Zheng, Dezhu; Liao, Juan; Li, Qingqin; Lin, Yuxiang; Zhang, Duo; Yan, Aizhen; Lan, Fenghua

    2015-08-01

    Fragile X mental retardation 1 gene (FMR1) expression is associated with fragile X syndrome (FXS) and exhibits several splicing products. However, the proportion of spliced isoforms that are expressed in different tissues remains unclear. In the present study, long-chain reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction with a T cloning-sequencing method was conducted in order to analyze the entire coding region of the FMR1 gene in human tissues. In particular, FXS-associated tissues were analyzed, including the brain and testis. Twenty alternatively spliced isoforms were observed among 271 recombinants, including six novel ones. The isoform that consisted of the entire FMR1 coding region (ISO1) accounted for a small proportion of all isoforms. Isoforms lacking exon 12 were the most abundant. In particular, spliced isoforms ISO7 and ISO17 were the most abundant. However, their relative abundance varied between the peripheral blood cells, and the testis and brain tissues. Bioinformatic analyses suggested that exon 12 may be the sole exon undergoing positive selection. The results of the present study suggested that the mechanisms underlying alternative splicing (AS) of the FMR1 gene may be more complex. Furthermore, the functions of alternatively spliced products lacking exon 12 require further investigation. The results of the present study provide novel insights into the association between AS and the structure and function of the FMR1 gene.

  2. Structural organization of the human type VII collagen gene (COL7A1), composed of more exons than any previously characterized gene

    SciTech Connect

    Christiano, A.M.; Chung-Honet, L.C.; Greenspan, D.S.; Hoffman, G.G.; Lee, S.; Cheng, W. ); Uitto, J. )

    1994-05-01

    The human type VII collagen (COL7A1) gene is the locus for mutations in at least some cases of dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa. Here the authors describe the entire intron/exon organization of COL7A1, which is shown to have 118 exons, more than any previously described gene. Despite this complexity, COL7A1 is compact. Consisting of 31,132 bp from transcription start site to polyadenylation site, it is only about three times the size of type VII collagen mRNA. Thus, COL7A1 introns are small. A 71-nucleotide COL7A1 intron is the smallest intron yet reported in a collagen gene, and only one COL7A1 intron is greater than 1 kb in length. All exons in the COL7A1 triple helix coding region that do not begin with sequences corresponding to imperfections of the triple helix begin with intact codons for Gly residues of Gly-X-Y repeats. This is reminiscent of the structure of fibrillar rather than other nonfibrillar collagen genes. In addition, the COL7A1 triple helix coding region contains many exons of recurring sizes (e.g., 25 exons are 36 bp, 12 exons are 45 bp, 8 exons are 63 bp), suggesting an evolutionary origin distinct from those of other nonfibrillar collagen genes. Sequences from the 5[prime] portion of COL7A1 are presented along with the 3766-bp intergenic sequence, which separated COL7A1 from the upstream gene encoding the core I protein of the cytochrome bc[sub 1] complex. The COL7A1 promoter region is found to lack extensive homologies with promoter regions of other genes expressed primarily in skin. 60 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  3. Clinical and mutation-type analysis from an international series of 198 probands with a pathogenic FBN1 exons 24–32 mutation

    PubMed Central

    Faivre, L; Collod-Beroud, G; Callewaert, B; Child, A; Binquet, C; Gautier, E; Loeys, B L; Arbustini, E; Mayer, K; Arslan-Kirchner, M; Stheneur, C; Kiotsekoglou, A; Comeglio, P; Marziliano, N; Wolf, J E; Bouchot, O; Khau-Van-Kien, P; Beroud, C; Claustres, M; Bonithon-Kopp, C; Robinson, P N; Adès, L; De Backer, J; Coucke, P; Francke, U; De Paepe, A; Jondeau, G; Boileau, C

    2009-01-01

    Mutations in the FBN1 gene cause Marfan syndrome (MFS) and a wide range of overlapping phenotypes. The severe end of the spectrum is represented by neonatal MFS, the vast majority of probands carrying a mutation within exons 24–32. We previously showed that a mutation in exons 24–32 is predictive of a severe cardiovascular phenotype even in non-neonatal cases, and that mutations leading to premature truncation codons are under-represented in this region. To describe patients carrying a mutation in this so-called ‘neonatal' region, we studied the clinical and molecular characteristics of 198 probands with a mutation in exons 24–32 from a series of 1013 probands with a FBN1 mutation (20%). When comparing patients with mutations leading to a premature termination codon (PTC) within exons 24–32 to patients with an in-frame mutation within the same region, a significantly higher probability of developing ectopia lentis and mitral insufficiency were found in the second group. Patients with a PTC within exons 24–32 rarely displayed a neonatal or severe MFS presentation. We also found a higher probability of neonatal presentations associated with exon 25 mutations, as well as a higher probability of cardiovascular manifestations. A high phenotypic heterogeneity could be described for recurrent mutations, ranging from neonatal to classical MFS phenotype. In conclusion, even if the exons 24–32 location appears as a major cause of the severity of the phenotype in patients with a mutation in this region, other factors such as the type of mutation or modifier genes might also be relevant. PMID:19002209

  4. A mutation in an alternative untranslated exon of hexokinase 1 associated with Hereditary Motor and Sensory Neuropathy – Russe (HMSNR)

    PubMed Central

    Hantke, Janina; Chandler, David; King, Rosalind; Wanders, Ronald JA; Angelicheva, Dora; Tournev, Ivailo; McNamara, Elyshia; Kwa, Marcel; Guergueltcheva, Velina; Kaneva, Radka; Baas, Frank; Kalaydjieva, Luba

    2009-01-01

    Hereditary Motor and Sensory Neuropathy – Russe (HMSNR) is a severe autosomal recessive disorder, identified in the Gypsy population. Our previous studies mapped the gene to 10q22-q23 and refined the gene region to ∼70 kb. Here we report the comprehensive sequencing analysis and fine mapping of this region, reducing it to ∼26 kb of fully characterised sequence spanning the upstream exons of Hexokinase 1 (HK1). We identified two sequence variants in complete linkage disequilibrium, a G>C in a novel alternative untranslated exon (AltT2) and a G>A in the adjacent intron, segregating with the disease in affected families and present in the heterozygote state in only 5/790 population controls. Sequence conservation of the AltT2 exon in 16 species with invariable preservation of the G allele at the mutated site, strongly favour the exonic change as the pathogenic mutation. Analysis of the Hk1 upstream region in mouse mRNA from testis and neural tissues showed an abundance of AltT2-containing transcripts generated by extensive, developmentally regulated alternative splicing. Expression is very low compared with ubiquitous Hk1 and all transcripts skip exon1, which encodes the protein domain responsible for binding to the outer mitochondrial membrane, and regulation of energy production and apoptosis. Hexokinase activity measurement and immunohistochemistry of the peripheral nerve showed no difference between patients and controls. The mutational mechanism and functional effects remain unknown and could involve disrupted translational regulation leading to increased anti-apoptotic activity (suggested by the profuse regenerative activity in affected nerves), or impairment of an unknown HK1 function in the peripheral nervous system (PNS). PMID:19536174

  5. Sequencing of Candidate Genes in Dominican Families Implicates Both Rare Exonic and Common Non-Exonic Variants for Carotid Intima-Media Thickness at Bifurcation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Liyong; Beecham, Ashley; Dueker, Nicole; Blanton, Susan H.; Rundek, Tatjana; Sacco, Ralph L.

    2015-01-01

    Background Through linkage and tagSNP-based association studies in 100 Dominican Republic (DR) families, we previously identified ANLN and AOAH (7p14.3) as candidate genes for carotid intima-media thickness at bifurcation (bIMT). Methods and Results Introns, exons and flanking regions of ANLN and AOAH were re-sequenced in 151 individuals from 9 families with evidence for linkage at 7p14.3. For common variants [CV, minor allele frequency (MAF) ≥ 5%], single variant-based analysis was performed. For rare variants (RV, MAF<5%), gene-based analysis aggregating all RVs within a gene was performed. CV analysis revealed the strongest signal at rs3815483 (P=0.0003) in ANLN and rs60023210 (P=0.00005) in AOAH. In ANLN, RV analysis found suggestive evidence for association with exonic RVs (P=0.08), and in particular non-synonymous RVs (P=0.04) but not with all RVs (P=0.15). The variant alleles of all non-synonymous RVs segregated with the major allele of rs3815483 and were associated with lower bIMT while a novel synonymous RV segregated with the minor allele of rs3815483 and was associated with greater bIMT. Additional analysis in 561 DR individuals found suggestive evidence for association with all ANLN non-synonymous RVs (P=0.08). In AOAH, no evidence for association with RVs was detected. Instead, conditional analysis revealed that multiple independent intronic CVs are associated with bIMT in addition to rs60023210. Conclusions We demonstrate the utility of using family-based studies to evaluate the contribution of RVs. Our data suggest two modes of genetic architecture underlying the linkage and association at ANLN (multiple exonic RVs) and AOAH (multiple intronic CVs with uncharacterized functions). PMID:26319989

  6. Antisense-mediated exon skipping to reframe transcripts.

    PubMed

    Turczynski, Sandrina; Titeux, Matthias; Pironon, Nathalie; Hovnanian, Alain

    2012-01-01

    Numerous genetic disorders are caused by loss-of-function mutations that disrupt the open reading frame of the gene either by nonsense or by frameshift (insertion, deletion, indel, or splicing) mutations. Most of the time, the result is the absence of functional protein synthesis due to mRNA degradation by nonsense-mediated mRNA decay, or rapid degradation of a truncated protein. Antisense-based splicing modulation is a powerful tool that has the potential to treat genetic disorders by restoring the open reading frame through selective removal of the mutated exon, or by restoring correct splicing.We have developed this approach for a severe genetic skin disorder, recessive dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa, caused by mutations in the COL7A1 gene encoding type VII collagen. This gene is particularly suited for exon-skipping approaches due to its unique genomic structure. It is composed of 118 exons, 83 of which are in frame. Moreover, these exons encode a single repetitive collagenous domain.Using this gene as an example, we describe general methods that demonstrate the feasibility and efficacy of the antisense-mediated exon-skipping strategy to reframe transcripts.

  7. Analysis of cDNAs of the proto-oncogene c-src: heterogeneity in 5' exons and possible mechanism for the genesis of the 3' end of v-src.

    PubMed Central

    Dorai, T; Levy, J B; Kang, L; Brugge, J S; Wang, L H

    1991-01-01

    To further characterize the gene structure of the proto-oncogene c-src and the mechanism for the genesis of the v-src sequence in Rous sarcoma virus, we have analyzed genomic and cDNA copies of the chicken c-src gene. From a cDNA library of chicken embryo fibroblasts, we isolated and sequenced several overlapping cDNA clones covering the full length of the 4-kb c-src mRNA. The cDNA sequence contains a 1.84-kb sequence downstream from the 1.6-kb pp60c-src coding region. An open reading frame of 217 amino acids, called sdr (src downstream region), was found 105 nucleotides from the termination codon for pp60c-src. Within the 3' noncoding region, a 39-bp sequence corresponding to the 3' end of the RSV v-src was detected 660 bases downstream of the pp60c-src termination codon. The presence of this sequence in the c-src mRNA exon supports a model involving an RNA intermediate during transduction of the c-src sequence. The 5' region of the c-src cDNA was determined by analyzing several cDNA clones generated by conventional cloning methods and by polymerase chain reaction. Sequences of these chicken embryo fibroblast clones plus two c-src cDNA clones isolated from a brain cDNA library show that there is considerable heterogeneity in sequences upstream from the c-src coding sequence. Within this region, which contains at least 300 nucleotides upstream of the translational initiation site in exon 2, there exist at least two exons in each cDNA which fall into five cDNA classes. Four unique 5' exon sequences, designated exons UE1, UE2, UEX, and UEY, were observed. All of them are spliced to the previously characterized c-src exons 1 and 2 with the exception of type 2 cDNA. In type 2, the exon 1 is spliced to a novel downstream exon, designated exon 1a, which maps in the region of the c-src DNA defined previously as intron 1. Exon UE1 is rich in G+C content and is mapped at 7.8 kb upstream from exon 1. This exon is also present in the two cDNA clones from the brain c

  8. Protein 4.1R Exon 16 3' Splice Site Activation Requires Coordination among TIA1, Pcbp1, and RBM39 during Terminal Erythropoiesis.

    PubMed

    Huang, Shu-Ching; Zhang, Henry S; Yu, Brian; McMahon, Ellen; Nguyen, Dan T; Yu, Faye H; Ou, Alexander C; Ou, Jennie Park; Benz, Edward J

    2017-05-01

    Exon 16 of protein 4.1R encodes a spectrin/actin-binding peptide critical for erythrocyte membrane stability. Its expression during erythroid differentiation is regulated by alternative pre-mRNA splicing. A UUUUCCCCCC motif situated between the branch point and the 3' splice site is crucial for inclusion. We show that the UUUU region and the last three C residues in this motif are necessary for the binding of splicing factors TIA1 and Pcbp1 and that these proteins appear to act in a collaborative manner to enhance exon 16 inclusion. This element also activates an internal exon when placed in a corresponding intronic position in a heterologous reporter. The impact of these two factors is further enhanced by high levels of RBM39, whose expression rises during erythroid differentiation as exon 16 inclusion increases. TIA1 and Pcbp1 associate in a complex containing RBM39, which interacts with U2AF65 and SF3b155 and promotes U2 snRNP recruitment to the branch point. Our results provide a mechanism for exon 16 3' splice site activation in which a coordinated effort among TIA1, Pcbp1, and RBM39 stabilizes or increases U2 snRNP recruitment, enhances spliceosome A complex formation, and facilitates exon definition through RBM39-mediated splicing regulation. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  9. Characterization of human deoxyribonuclease I gene (DNASE1) promoters reveals the utilization of two transcription-starting exons and the involvement of Sp1 in its transcriptional regulation.

    PubMed

    Kominato, Yoshihiko; Ueki, Misuzu; Iida, Reiko; Kawai, Yasuyuki; Nakajima, Tamiko; Makita, Chikako; Itoi, Masako; Tajima, Yutaka; Kishi, Koichiro; Yasuda, Toshihiro

    2006-07-01

    Levels of deoxyribonuclease I (DNase I) activity in vivo have been shown to be altered by physiological and/or pathological processes. However, no information is available on the regulation of DNase I gene (DNASE1) expression in vivo or in vitro. We first mapped the transcription start sites of DNASE1 in human pancreas and in the DNase I-producing human pancreatic cancer cell line QGP-1, and revealed a novel site approximately 12 kb upstream of exon 1, which was previously believed to be the single transcription-starting exon. This initiation site marks an alternative starting exon, designated 1a. Exons 1 and 1a were used simultaneously as transcription-starting exons in pancreas and QGP-1 cells. Promoter assay, EMSA and chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis with QGP-1 cells showed the promoter region of exon 1a in which the Sp1 transcription factor is specifically involved in promoter activity. This is the first to be identified as a transcription factor responsible for gene expression of vertebrate DNase I genes. Furthermore, RT-PCR analysis indicated alternative splicing of human DNASE1 pre-mRNA in pancreas and QGP-1 cells. Only two transcripts among eight alternative splicing products identified can be translated to produce intact DNase I protein. These results suggest that human DNASE1 expression is regulated through the use of alternative promoter and alternative splicing.

  10. SMN2 exon 7 splicing is inhibited by binding of hnRNP A1 to a common ESS motif that spans the 3' splice site.

    PubMed

    Doktor, Thomas Koed; Schroeder, Lisbeth Dahl; Vested, Anne; Palmfeldt, Johan; Andersen, Henriette Skovgaard; Gregersen, Niels; Andresen, Brage Storstein

    2011-02-01

    Spinal Muscular Atrophy is caused by homozygous loss of SMN1 with phenotypic modulation by SMN2. SMN2 expresses only limited amounts of full-length transcript due to skipping of exon 7 caused by disruption of an SF2/ASF binding ESE. Additionally, hnRNP A1 has been reported to inhibit inclusion of SMN2 exon 7. We previously reported high similarity between the sequence spanning the 3' ss of SMN1 and SMN2 exon 7 and an hnRNP A1 binding ESS, which regulates MCAD exon 5 splicing. We show here that this 3' ss motif indeed functions as a crucial hnRNP A1 binding ESS, which inhibits inclusion of SMN1/2 exon 7 and is antagonized by the SMN1 ESE, but not by the inactive SMN2 sequence. Pull-down experiments revealed a specific interaction between hnRNP A1 and the 3' ss AG-dinucleotide, which could be disrupted by mutations shown to improve splicing in reporter minigenes. Genomic analyses revealed that in the human genome, 3' ss matching the SMN1/2 ESS motif region are much less abundant than 3' ss with a disrupted ESS motif. This indicates that this ESS may be a general splicing inhibitory motif, which binds hnRNP A1 and inhibits exon inclusion by binding to 3' ss harboring this ESS motif.

  11. Evolution of the Exon-Intron Structure in Ciliate Genomes.

    PubMed

    Bondarenko, Vladyslav S; Gelfand, Mikhail S

    2016-01-01

    A typical eukaryotic gene is comprised of alternating stretches of regions, exons and introns, retained in and spliced out a mature mRNA, respectively. Although the length of introns may vary substantially among organisms, a large fraction of genes contains short introns in many species. Notably, some Ciliates (Paramecium and Nyctotherus) possess only ultra-short introns, around 25 bp long. In Paramecium, ultra-short introns with length divisible by three (3n) are under strong evolutionary pressure and have a high frequency of in-frame stop codons, which, in the case of intron retention, cause premature termination of mRNA translation and consequent degradation of the mis-spliced mRNA by the nonsense-mediated decay mechanism. Here, we analyzed introns in five genera of Ciliates, Paramecium, Tetrahymena, Ichthyophthirius, Oxytricha, and Stylonychia. Introns can be classified into two length classes in Tetrahymena and Ichthyophthirius (with means 48 bp, 69 bp, and 55 bp, 64 bp, respectively), but, surprisingly, comprise three distinct length classes in Oxytricha and Stylonychia (with means 33-35 bp, 47-51 bp, and 78-80 bp). In most ranges of the intron lengths, 3n introns are underrepresented and have a high frequency of in-frame stop codons in all studied species. Introns of Paramecium, Tetrahymena, and Ichthyophthirius are preferentially located at the 5' and 3' ends of genes, whereas introns of Oxytricha and Stylonychia are strongly skewed towards the 5' end. Analysis of evolutionary conservation shows that, in each studied genome, a significant fraction of intron positions is conserved between the orthologs, but intron lengths are not correlated between the species. In summary, our study provides a detailed characterization of introns in several genera of Ciliates and highlights some of their distinctive properties, which, together, indicate that splicing spellchecking is a universal and evolutionarily conserved process in the biogenesis of short introns in

  12. Evolution of the Exon-Intron Structure in Ciliate Genomes

    PubMed Central

    Gelfand, Mikhail S.

    2016-01-01

    A typical eukaryotic gene is comprised of alternating stretches of regions, exons and introns, retained in and spliced out a mature mRNA, respectively. Although the length of introns may vary substantially among organisms, a large fraction of genes contains short introns in many species. Notably, some Ciliates (Paramecium and Nyctotherus) possess only ultra-short introns, around 25 bp long. In Paramecium, ultra-short introns with length divisible by three (3n) are under strong evolutionary pressure and have a high frequency of in-frame stop codons, which, in the case of intron retention, cause premature termination of mRNA translation and consequent degradation of the mis-spliced mRNA by the nonsense-mediated decay mechanism. Here, we analyzed introns in five genera of Ciliates, Paramecium, Tetrahymena, Ichthyophthirius, Oxytricha, and Stylonychia. Introns can be classified into two length classes in Tetrahymena and Ichthyophthirius (with means 48 bp, 69 bp, and 55 bp, 64 bp, respectively), but, surprisingly, comprise three distinct length classes in Oxytricha and Stylonychia (with means 33–35 bp, 47–51 bp, and 78–80 bp). In most ranges of the intron lengths, 3n introns are underrepresented and have a high frequency of in-frame stop codons in all studied species. Introns of Paramecium, Tetrahymena, and Ichthyophthirius are preferentially located at the 5' and 3' ends of genes, whereas introns of Oxytricha and Stylonychia are strongly skewed towards the 5' end. Analysis of evolutionary conservation shows that, in each studied genome, a significant fraction of intron positions is conserved between the orthologs, but intron lengths are not correlated between the species. In summary, our study provides a detailed characterization of introns in several genera of Ciliates and highlights some of their distinctive properties, which, together, indicate that splicing spellchecking is a universal and evolutionarily conserved process in the biogenesis of short introns in

  13. Exonic Re-Sequencing of the Chromosome 2q24.3 Parkinson's Disease Locus.

    PubMed

    Labbé, Catherine; Ogaki, Kotaro; Lorenzo-Betancor, Oswaldo; Carrasquillo, Minerva M; Heckman, Michael G; McCarthy, Allan; Soto-Ortolaza, Alexandra I; Walton, Ronald L; Lynch, Timothy; Siuda, Joanna; Opala, Grzegorz; Krygowska-Wajs, Anna; Barcikowska, Maria; Czyzewski, Krzysztof; Dickson, Dennis W; Uitti, Ryan J; Wszolek, Zbigniew K; Ross, Owen A

    2015-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) in Parkinson's disease (PD) have identified over 20 genomic regions associated with disease risk. Many of these loci include several candidate genes making it difficult to pinpoint the causal gene. The locus on chromosome 2q24.3 encompasses three genes: B3GALT1, STK39, and CERS6. In order to identify if the causal variants are simple missense changes, we sequenced all 31 exons of these three genes in 187 patients with PD. We identified 13 exonic variants including four non-synonymous and three insertion/deletion variants (indels). These non-synonymous variants and rs2102808, the GWAS tag SNP, were genotyped in three independent series consisting of a total of 1976 patients and 1596 controls. Our results show that the seven identified 2q24.3 coding variants are not independently responsible for the GWAS association signal at the locus; however, there is a haplotype, which contains both rs2102808 and a STK39 exon 1 6bp indel variant, that is significantly associated with PD risk (Odds Ratio [OR] = 1.35, 95% CI: 1.11-1.64, P = 0.003). This haplotype is more associated than each of the two variants independently (OR = 1.23, P = 0.005 and 1.10, P = 0.10, respectively). Our findings suggest that the risk variant is likely located in a non-coding region. Additional sequencing of the locus including promoter and regulatory regions will be needed to pinpoint the association at this locus that leads to an increased risk to PD.

  14. How slow RNA polymerase II elongation favors alternative exon skipping.

    PubMed

    Dujardin, Gwendal; Lafaille, Celina; de la Mata, Manuel; Marasco, Luciano E; Muñoz, Manuel J; Le Jossic-Corcos, Catherine; Corcos, Laurent; Kornblihtt, Alberto R

    2014-05-22

    Splicing is functionally coupled to transcription, linking the rate of RNA polymerase II (Pol II) elongation and the ability of splicing factors to recognize splice sites (ss) of various strengths. In most cases, slow Pol II elongation allows weak splice sites to be recognized, leading to higher inclusion of alternative exons. Using CFTR alternative exon 9 (E9) as a model, we show here that slowing down elongation can also cause exon skipping by promoting the recruitment of the negative factor ETR-3 onto the UG-repeat at E9 3' splice site, which displaces the constitutive splicing factor U2AF65 from the overlapping polypyrimidine tract. Weakening of E9 5' ss increases ETR-3 binding at the 3' ss and subsequent E9 skipping, whereas strengthening of the 5' ss usage has the opposite effect. This indicates that a delay in the cotranscriptional emergence of the 5' ss promotes ETR-3 recruitment and subsequent inhibition of E9 inclusion.

  15. Large-scale remodeling of a repressed exon ribonucleoprotein to an exon definition complex active for splicing

    PubMed Central

    Wongpalee, Somsakul Pop; Vashisht, Ajay; Sharma, Shalini; Chui, Darryl; Wohlschlegel, James A; Black, Douglas L

    2016-01-01

    Polypyrimidine-tract binding protein PTBP1 can repress splicing during the exon definition phase of spliceosome assembly, but the assembly steps leading to an exon definition complex (EDC) and how PTBP1 might modulate them are not clear. We found that PTBP1 binding in the flanking introns allowed normal U2AF and U1 snRNP binding to the target exon splice sites but blocked U2 snRNP assembly in HeLa nuclear extract. Characterizing a purified PTBP1-repressed complex, as well as an active early complex and the final EDC by SILAC-MS, we identified extensive PTBP1-modulated changes in exon RNP composition. The active early complex formed in the absence of PTBP1 proceeded to assemble an EDC with the eviction of hnRNP proteins, the late recruitment of SR proteins, and binding of the U2 snRNP. These results demonstrate that during early stages of splicing, exon RNP complexes are highly dynamic with many proteins failing to bind during PTBP1 arrest. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.19743.001 PMID:27882870

  16. During in vivo maturation of eukaryotic nuclear mRNA, splicing yields excised exon circles.

    PubMed Central

    Bailleul, B

    1996-01-01

    Circular splicing has already been described on nuclear pre-mRNA for certain splice sites far apart in the multi exonic ETS-1 gene and in the single 1.2 kb exon of the Sry locus. To date, it is unclear how splice site juxtaposition occurs in normal and circular splicing. The splice site selection of an internal exon is likely to involve pairing between splice sites across that exon. Based on this, we predict that, albeit at low frequency, internal exons yield circular RNA by splicing as an error-prone mechanism of exon juxtaposition or, perhaps more interestingly, as a regulated mechanism on alternative exons. To address this question, the circular exon formation was analyzed at three ETS-1 internal exons (one alternative spliced exon and two constitutive), in human cell line and blood cell samples. Here, we show by RT-PCR and sequencing that exon circular splicing occurs at the three individual exons that we examined. RNase protection experiments suggest that there is no correlation between exon circle expression and exon skipping. PMID:8604331

  17. Identification of mutations in exons 1 through 8 of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene.

    PubMed

    Zielenski, J; Bozon, D; Kerem, B; Markiewicz, D; Durie, P; Rommens, J M; Tsui, L C

    1991-05-01

    Five different mutations have been identified in the gene causing cystic fibrosis (CF) through sequencing regions encompassing exons 1-8, including the 5' untranslated leader. Two of these apparent mutations are missense mutations, one in exon 3 (Gly to Glu at position 85; G85E) and another in exon 5 (Gly to Arg at 178; G178R), both causing significant changes in the corresponding amino acids in the encoded protein--cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR). Two others affect the highly conserved RNA splice junction flanking the 3' end of exons 4 and 5 (621 + 1G----T, 711 + 1G----T), resulting in a probable splicing defect. The last mutation is a single-basepair deletion in exon 4, causing a frameshift. These five mutations account for the 9 of 31 non-delta F508 CF chromosomes in our Canadian CF family collection and they are not found in any of the normal chromosomes. Three of the mutations, 621 + 1G----T, 711 + 1G----T, and G85E, are found in the French-Canadian population, with 621 + 1G----T being the most abundant (5/7). There are two other sequence variations in the CFTR gene; one of them (129G----C) is located 4 nucleotides upstream of the proposed translation initiation codon and, although present only on CF chromosomes, it is not clear whether it is a disease-causing mutation; the other (R75Q) is most likely a sequence variation within the coding region.

  18. Deletion of Brca2 exon 27 causes hypersensitivity to DNA crosslinks, chromosomal instability, and reduced life span in mice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Donoho, Greg; Brenneman, Mark A.; Cui, Tracy X.; Donoviel, Dorit; Vogel, Hannes; Goodwin, Edwin H.; Chen, David J.; Hasty, Paul

    2003-01-01

    The Brca2 tumor-suppressor gene contributes to genomic stability, at least in part by a role in homologous recombinational repair. BRCA2 protein is presumed to function in homologous recombination through interactions with RAD51. Both exons 11 and 27 of Brca2 code for domains that interact with RAD51; exon 11 encodes eight BRC motifs, whereas exon 27 encodes a single, distinct interaction domain. Deletion of all RAD51-interacting domains causes embryonic lethality in mice. A less severe phenotype is seen with BRAC2 truncations that preserve some, but not all, of the BRC motifs. These mice can survive beyond weaning, but are runted and infertile, and die very young from cancer. Cells from such mice show hypersensitivity to some genotoxic agents and chromosomal instability. Here, we have analyzed mice and cells with a deletion of only the RAD51-interacting region encoded by exon 27. Mice homozygous for this mutation (called brca2(lex1)) have a shorter life span than that of control littermates, possibly because of early onsets of cancer and sepsis. No other phenotype was observed in these animals; therefore, the brca2(lex1) mutation is less severe than truncations that delete some BRC motifs. However, at the cellular level, the brca2(lex1) mutation causes reduced viability, hypersensitivity to the DNA interstrand crosslinking agent mitomycin C, and gross chromosomal instability, much like more severe truncations. Thus, the extreme carboxy-terminal region encoded by exon 27 is important for BRCA2 function, probably because it is required for a fully functional interaction between BRCA2 and RAD51. Copyright 2003 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  19. Ternary europium mesoporous polymeric hybrid materials Eu({beta}-diketonate){sub 3}pvpd-SBA-15(16): host-guest construction, characterization and photoluminescence

    SciTech Connect

    Gu Yanjing; Yan Bing; Li Yanyan

    2012-06-15

    Novel organic-inorganic mesoporous luminescent polymeric hybrid materials containing europium(III) complexes incorporated to mesoporous silica SBA-15/SBA-16 have been prepared by simple physical doping (impregnation) methods, followed by the addition polymerization reaction of the monomer 4-vinylpyridine (vpd) extending along the mesoporous channels. The precursor europium(III) complexes are synthesized by {beta}-diketonate ({beta}-diketonate=2-thenoyltrifluoroacetonate (tta), hexafluoroacetylacetonate (hfac), trifluoroacetylacetonate (taa)) and monomer 4-vinylpyridine (vpd) coordinated to Eu{sup 3+}, and SBA-15/SBA-16 are obtained via a sol-gel process. After the physical doping and the polymerization reaction, the final ternary materials Eu({beta}-diketonate){sub 3}pvpd-SBA-15/Eu({beta}-diketonate){sub 3}pvpd-SBA-16 ({beta}-diketonate=tta, hfac, taa) are received. The physical properties and espeically the photoluminescence of these hybrids are characterized, and the XRD and BET results reveal that all of these hybrid materials have uniformity in the mesostructure. The detailed luminescence investigation on all the materials show that Eu(tta){sub 3}pvpd-SBA-16 have the highest luminescence intensity and the materials with taa ligands have longer lifetimes. - Grapical abstract: Luminescent mesoporous polymeric hybrid materials containing europium complexes hydrogen bonding to silica SBA-15/SBA-16 followed by the addition polymerization reaction of 4-vinylpyridine (vpd) extending along the mesoporous channels. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Functional mesoporous with simple impregnation method. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer New lanthanide mesoporous hybrids with polymer ligands. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Luminescence in visible region.

  20. Alternative splicing of micro-exons creates multiple forms of the insect cell adhesion molecule fasciclin I.

    PubMed

    McAllister, L; Rehm, E J; Goodman, G S; Zinn, K

    1992-03-01

    Fasciclin I is a homophilic cell adhesion molecule in insects that is dynamically expressed on a subset of axon pathways in the embryonic nervous system, and on a variety of other cells and tissues during development. The fasciclin I protein consists of four homologous 150 amino acid domains. In this article, we describe the complete sequence of the Drosophila fasciclin I (fasI) gene. The gene consists of 15 exons and is distributed over 14 kilobases of DNA. We examine the structure and temporal expression pattern of multiple fasciclin I mRNAs that differ in the lengths of their 3' untranslated regions. We also show that a highly conserved sequence at the end of the second domain can be altered by the addition of three or six amino acids that are encoded by two alternatively spliced 9 base pair (bp) micro-exons. In grasshopper fasciclin I mRNAs, there are 9 bp and 6 bp insertions at the same position. The first of these insertions is identical in sequence to the first fly micro-exon. The grasshopper insertions are not found together in the same mRNA, so grasshopper fasciclin I species differ by the addition of three or two extra amino acids to the second domain. The alternatively spliced mRNAs are differentially expressed during embryogenesis, and all three of them are present in nerve cord preparations. We suggest that the amino acids inserted by alternative micro-exon splicing may alter the binding specificity of fasciclin I.

  1. Human MN/CA9 gene, a novel member of the carbonic anhydrase family: Structure and exon to protein domain relationships

    SciTech Connect

    Opavsky, R.; Pastorekova, S.; Zelnik, V.

    1996-05-01

    We have isolated, sequenced, and characterized a human MN/CA9 gene. This gene is a novel member of the carbonic anhydrase (CA) family, which codes for widely distributed catalysts of the reversible conversion of carbon dioxide to carbonic acid. So far, MN/CA IX is the only tumor-associated CA isoenzyme. The entire genomic sequence of MN/CA9, including the 5{prime}-flanking region, encompasses 10.9 kb. The coding sequence is divided into 11 exons, whose organization and relationships to predicted protein domains suggest that the gene arose by exon shuffling. Exon 1 encodes a signal peptide and a proteoglycan-related region. Exons 2-8 code for a CA domain with a highly conserved active site. The exon/intron pattern of the CA coding region is similar but not identical to other described animal kingdom {alpha}-CA genes. Exons 10 and 11 encode a transmembrane anchor and an intracytoplasmic tail, respectively. We have also determined the transcription initiation and termination sites by RNase protection assay and analyzed the 3.5-kb region upstream of the MN/CA9 gene. Sequence of the proximate 5{prime} end of the flanking regions shows extensive homology to the long terminal repeats of HERV-K endogenous retroviruses. The putative MN/CA9 promoter immediately preceding the transcription start site does not possess a TATA box, but contains consensus sequences for the AP1, AP2, p53, and Inr transcription start site does not possess a TATA box, but contains consensus sequences for the AP1, AP2, p53, and Inr transcription factors. This study will allow further investigations of the molecular events regulating expression of MN/CA IX as well as elucidation of its biological function. 36 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  2. NextSearch: A Search Engine for Mass Spectrometry Data against a Compact Nucleotide Exon Graph.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyunwoo; Park, Heejin; Paek, Eunok

    2015-07-02

    Proteogenomics research has been using six-frame translation of the whole genome or amino acid exon graphs to overcome the limitations of reference protein sequence database; however, six-frame translation is not suitable for annotating genes that span over multiple exons, and amino acid exon graphs are not convenient to represent novel splice variants and exon skipping events between exons of incompatible reading frames. We propose a proteogenomic pipeline NextSearch (Nucleotide EXon-graph Transcriptome Search) that is based on a nucleotide exon graph. This pipeline consists of constructing a compact nucleotide exon graph that systematically incorporates novel splice variations and a search tool that identifies peptides by directly searching the nucleotide exon graph against tandem mass spectra. Because our exon graph stores nucleotide sequences, it can easily represent novel splice variations and exon skipping events between incompatible reading frame exons. Searching for peptide identification is performed against this nucleotide exon graph, without converting it into a protein sequence in FASTA format, achieving an order of magnitude reduction in the size of the sequence database storage. NextSearch outputs the proteome-genome/transcriptome mapping results in a general feature format (GFF) file, which can be visualized by public tools such as the UCSC Genome Browser.

  3. Positional dissociation between the genetic mutation responsible for pseudohypoparathyroidism type Ib and the associated methylation defect at exon A/B: evidence for a long-range regulatory element within the imprinted GNAS1 locus.

    PubMed

    Bastepe, M; Pincus, J E; Sugimoto, T; Tojo, K; Kanatani, M; Azuma, Y; Kruse, K; Rosenbloom, A L; Koshiyama, H; Jüppner, H

    2001-06-01

    Pseudohypoparathyroidism type Ib (PHP-Ib) is a paternally imprinted disorder which maps to a region on chromosome 20q13.3 that comprises GNAS1 at its telomeric boundary. Exon A/B of this gene was recently shown to display a loss of methylation in several PHP-Ib patients. In nine unrelated PHP-Ib kindreds, in whom haplotype analysis and mode of inheritance provided no evidence against linkage to this chromosomal region, we confirmed lack of exon A/B methylation for affected individuals, while unaffected carriers showed no epigenetic abnormality at this locus. However, affected individuals in one kindred (Y2) displayed additional methylation defects involving exons NESP55, AS and XL, and unaffected carriers in this family showed an abnormal methylation at exon NESP55, but not at other exons. Taken together, current evidence thus suggests that distinct mutations within or close to GNAS1 can lead to PHP-Ib and the associated epigenetic changes. To further delineate the telomeric boundary of the PHP-Ib locus, the previously reported kindred F, in which patient F-V/51 is recombinant within GNAS1, was investigated with several new markers and direct nucleotide sequence analysis. These studies revealed that F-V/51 remains recombinant at a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) located 1.2 kb upstream of XL. No heterozygous mutation was identified between exon XL and an SNP approximately 8 kb upstream of NESP55, where this affected individual becomes linked, suggesting that the genetic defect responsible for parathyroid hormone resistance in kindred F, and probably other PHP-Ib patients, is located >or=56 kb centromeric of the abnormally methylated exon A/B. A region upstream of the known coding exons of GNAS1 is therefore predicted to exert, presumably through imprinting of exon A/B, long-range effects on G(s)alpha expression.

  4. Unusual splice site mutations disrupt FANCA exon 8 definition.

    PubMed

    Mattioli, Chiara; Pianigiani, Giulia; De Rocco, Daniela; Bianco, Anna Monica Rosaria; Cappelli, Enrico; Savoia, Anna; Pagani, Franco

    2014-07-01

    The pathological role of mutations that affect not conserved splicing regulatory sequences can be difficult to determine. In a patient with Fanconi anemia, we identified two unpredictable splicing mutations that act on either sides of FANCA exon 8. In patients-derived cells and in minigene splicing assay, we showed that both an apparently benign intronic c.710-5T>C transition and the nonsense c.790C>T substitution induce almost complete exon 8 skipping. Site-directed mutagenesis experiments indicated that the c.710-5T>C transition affects a polypyrimidine tract where most of the thymidines cannot be compensated by cytidines. The c.790C>T mutation located in position -3 relative to the donor site induce exon 8 skipping in an NMD-independent manner and complementation experiments with modified U1 snRNAs showed that U1 snRNP is only partially involved in the splicing defect. Our results highlight the importance of performing splicing functional assay for correct identification of disease-causing mechanism of genomic variants and provide mechanistic insights on how these two FANCA mutations affect exon 8 definition. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Lineage-specific sequence evolution and exon edge conservation partially explain the relationship between evolutionary rate and expression level in A. thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Bush, Stephen J; Kover, Paula X; Urrutia, Araxi O

    2015-01-01

    Rapidly evolving proteins can aid the identification of genes underlying phenotypic adaptation across taxa, but functional and structural elements of genes can also affect evolutionary rates. In plants, the ‘edges’ of exons, flanking intron junctions, are known to contain splice enhancers and to have a higher degree of conservation compared to the remainder of the coding region. However, the extent to which these regions may be masking indicators of positive selection or account for the relationship between dN/dS and other genomic parameters is unclear. We investigate the effects of exon edge conservation on the relationship of dN/dS to various sequence characteristics and gene expression parameters in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana. We also obtain lineage-specific dN/dS estimates, making use of the recently sequenced genome of Thellungiella parvula, the second closest sequenced relative after the sister species Arabidopsis lyrata. Overall, we find that the effect of exon edge conservation, as well as the use of lineage-specific substitution estimates, upon dN/dS ratios partly explains the relationship between the rates of protein evolution and expression level. Furthermore, the removal of exon edges shifts dN/dS estimates upwards, increasing the proportion of genes potentially under adaptive selection. We conclude that lineage-specific substitutions and exon edge conservation have an important effect on dN/dS ratios and should be considered when assessing their relationship with other genomic parameters. PMID:25930165

  6. Highly Sensitive and Reliable Detection of EGFR Exon 19 Deletions by Droplet Digital Polymerase Chain Reaction.

    PubMed

    Oskina, Natalya; Oscorbin, Igor; Khrapov, Evgeniy; Boyarskikh, Ulyana; Subbotin, Dmitriy; Demidova, Irina; Imyanitov, Evgeny; Filipenko, Maxim

    2017-06-06

    Analysis of EGFR mutations is becoming a routine clinical practice but the optimal EGFR mutation testing method is still to be determined. We determined the nucleotide sequence of deletions located in exon 19 of the EGFR gene in lung tumor samples of patients residing in different regions of Russia (153 tumor DNA specimens), using Sanger sequencing. We developed a droplet digital polymerase chain reaction assay capable of detecting all common EGFR deletions in exon 19. We also compared the therascreen amplification refractory mutation system assay with a droplet digital polymerase chain reaction assay for the detection of all the deletions in our study. The droplet digital polymerase chain reaction assay demonstrated 100% sensitivity against polymerase chain reaction fragment length analysis and detected all possible types of deletions revealed in our study (22 types). At the same time, the therascreen EGFR RGQ PCR Kit was not able to detect deletions c.2252-2276>A and c.2253-2276 and showed low performance for another long deletion. Thus, we can conclude that the extraordinary length of deletions and their atypical locations (shift at the 3'-region compared to known deletions) could be problematic for the therascreen EGFR RGQ PCR Kit and should be taken into account during targeted mutation test development. However, droplet digital polymerase chain reaction is a promising and reliable assay that can be used as a diagnostic tool to genotype formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded cancer samples for EGFR or another clinically relevant somatic mutation.

  7. Gene duplication, exon gain and neofunctionalization of OEP16-related genes in land plants.

    PubMed

    Drea, Sinéad C; Lao, Nga T; Wolfe, Kenneth H; Kavanagh, Tony A

    2006-06-01

    OEP16, a channel protein of the outer membrane of chloroplasts, has been implicated in amino acid transport and in the substrate-dependent import of protochlorophyllide oxidoreductase A. Two major clades of OEP16-related sequences were identified in land plants (OEP16-L and OEP16-S), which arose by a gene duplication event predating the divergence of seed plants and bryophytes. Remarkably, in angiosperms, OEP16-S genes evolved by gaining an additional exon that extends an interhelical loop domain in the pore-forming region of the protein. We analysed the sequence, structure and expression of the corresponding Arabidopsis genes (atOEP16-S and atOEP16-L) and demonstrated that following duplication, both genes diverged in terms of expression patterns and coding sequence. AtOEP16-S, which contains multiple G-box ABA-responsive elements (ABREs) in the promoter region, is regulated by ABI3 and ABI5 and is strongly expressed during the maturation phase in seeds and pollen grains, both desiccation-tolerant tissues. In contrast, atOEP-L, which lacks promoter ABREs, is expressed predominantly in leaves, is induced strongly by low-temperature stress and shows weak induction in response to osmotic stress, salicylic acid and exogenous ABA. Our results indicate that gene duplication, exon gain and regulatory sequence evolution each played a role in the divergence of OEP16 homologues in plants.

  8. High resolution melting analysis of KRAS, BRAF and PIK3CA in KRAS exon 2 wild-type metastatic colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background KRAS is an EGFR effector in the RAS/RAF/ERK cascade that is mutated in about 40% of metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC). Activating mutations in codons 12 and 13 of the KRAS gene are the only established negative predictors of response to anti-EGFR therapy and patients whose tumors harbor such mutations are not candidates for therapy. However, 40 to 60% of wild-type cases do not respond to anti-EGFR therapy, suggesting the involvement of other genes that act downstream of EGFR in the RAS-RAF-MAPK and PI3K-AKT pathways or activating KRAS mutations at other locations of the gene. Methods DNA was obtained from a consecutive series of 201 mCRC cases (FFPE tissue), wild-type for KRAS exon 2 (codons 12 and 13). Mutational analysis of KRAS (exons 3 and 4), BRAF (exons 11 and 15), and PIK3CA (exons 9 and 20) was performed by high resolution melting (HRM) and positive cases were then sequenced. Results One mutation was present in 23.4% (47/201) of the cases and 3.0% additional cases (6/201) had two concomitant mutations. A total of 53 cases showed 59 mutations, with the following distribution: 44.1% (26/59) in KRAS (13 in exon 3 and 13 in exon 4), 18.6% (11/59) in BRAF (two in exon 11 and nine in exon 15) and 37.3% (22/59) in PIK3CA (16 in exon 9 and six in exon 20). In total, 26.4% (53/201) of the cases had at least one mutation and the remaining 73.6% (148/201) were wild-type for all regions studied. Five of the mutations we report, four in KRAS and one in BRAF, have not previously been described in CRC. BRAF and PIK3CA mutations were more frequent in the colon than in the sigmoid or rectum: 20.8% vs. 1.6% vs. 0.0% (P=0.000) for BRAF and 23.4% vs. 12.1% vs. 5.4% (P=0.011) for PIK3CA mutations. Conclusions About one fourth of mCRC cases wild-type for KRAS codons 12 and 13 present other mutations either in KRAS, BRAF, or PIK3CA, many of which may explain the lack of response to anti-EGFR therapy observed in a significant proportion of these patients. PMID

  9. Deep RNA sequencing reveals the smallest known mitochondrial micro exon in animals: The placozoan cox1 single base pair exon.

    PubMed

    Osigus, Hans-Jürgen; Eitel, Michael; Schierwater, Bernd

    2017-01-01

    The phylum Placozoa holds a key position for our understanding of the evolution of mitochondrial genomes in Metazoa. Placozoans possess large mitochondrial genomes which harbor several remarkable characteristics such as a fragmented cox1 gene and trans-splicing cox1 introns. A previous study also suggested the existence of cox1 mRNA editing in Trichoplax adhaerens, yet the only formally described species in the phylum Placozoa. We have analyzed RNA-seq data of the undescribed sister species, Placozoa sp. H2 ("Panama" clone), with special focus on the mitochondrial mRNA. While we did not find support for a previously postulated cox1 mRNA editing mechanism, we surprisingly found two independent transcripts representing intermediate cox1 mRNA splicing stages. Both transcripts consist of partial cox1 exon as well as overlapping intron fragments. The data suggest that the cox1 gene harbors a single base pair (cytosine) micro exon. Furthermore, conserved group I intron structures flank this unique micro exon also in other placozoans. We discuss the evolutionary origin of this micro exon in the context of a self-splicing intron gain in the cox1 gene of the last common ancestor of extant placozoans.

  10. The IL-9 receptor gene (IL9R): Genomic structure, chromosomal localization in the pseudoautosomal region of the long arm of sex chromosomes, and identification of IL9R pseudogenes at 9qter, 10pter, 16pter, 18pter

    SciTech Connect

    Kermouni, A.; Godelaine, D.; Lurquin, C.; Szikora, J.P.

    1995-09-20

    Cosmids containing the human IL-9 receptor (R) gene (IL9R) have been isolated from a genomic library using the IL9R cDNA as a probe. We have shown that the human IL9R gene is composed of 11 exons and 10 introns, stretching over {approx} 17 kb, and is located within the pseudoautosomal region of the Xq and Yq chromosome, in the vicinity of the telomere. Analysis of the 5` flanking region revealed multiple transcription initiation sites as well as potential binding motifs for AP1, AP2, AP3, Sp1, and NF-kB, although this region lacks a TATA box. Using the human IL9R cosmid as a probe to perform fluorescence in situ hybridization, additional signals were identified in the subtelomeric regions of chromosomes 9q, 10p, 16p, and 18p. IL9R homologs located on chromosomes 9 and 18 were partially characterized, while those located on chromosomes 16 and 10 were completely sequenced. Although they are similiar to the IL9R gene ({approx} 90% identity), none of these copies encodes a functional receptor: none of them contains sequences homologous to the 5` flanking region or exon 1 of the IL9R gene, and the remaining ORFs have been inactivated by various point mutations and deletions. Taken together, our results indicate that the IL9R gene is located at Xq28 and Yq12, in the long arm pseudoautosomal region, and that four IL9R pseudogenes are located on 9q34, 10p15, 16p13.3 and 18p11.3, probably dispersed as the result of translocations during evolution. 42 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

  11. Identification of a novel first exon in the human dystrophin gene and of a new promoter located more than 500 kb upstream of the nearest known promoter

    SciTech Connect

    Yanagawa, H.; Nishio, H.; Takeshima, Y.

    1994-09-01

    The dystrophin gene, which is muted in patients with Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophies, is the largest known human gene. Five alternative promoters have been characterized until now. Here we show that a novel dystrophin isoform with a different first exon can be produced through transcription initiation at a previously-unidentified alternative promoter. The case study presented is that of patient with Duchenne muscular dystrophy who had a deletion extending from 5{prime} end of the dystrophin gene to exon 2, including all promoters previously mapped in the 5{prime} part of the gene. Transcripts from lymphoblastoid cells were found to contain sequences corresponding to exon 3, indicating the presence of new promoter upstream of this exon. The nucleotide sequence of amplified cDNA corresponding to the 5{prime} end of the new transcript indicated that the 5{prime} end of exon 3 was extended by 9 codons, only the last (most 3{prime}) of which codes for methionine. The genomic nucleotide sequence upstream from the new exon, as determined using inverse polymerase chain reaction, revealed the presence of sequences similar to a TATA box, an octamer motif and an MEF-2 element. The identified promoter/exon did not map to intron 2, as might have been expected, but to a position more than 500 kb upstream of the most 5{prime} of the previously-identified promoters, thereby adding 500 kb to the dystrophin gene. The sequence of part of the new promoter region is very similar to that of certain medium reiteration frequency repetitive sequences. These findings may help us understand the molecular evolution of the dystrophin gene.

  12. Exon skipping creates novel splice variants of DMC1 gene in ruminants.

    PubMed

    Ahlawat, S; Chopra, M; Jaiswal, L; Sharma, R; Arora, R; Brahma, B; Lal, S V; De, S

    2016-04-01

    Disrupted meiotic cDNA1 (DMC1) recombinase plays a pivotal role in homology search and strand exchange reactions during meiotic homologous recombination. In the present study, full length coding sequence of DMC1 gene was sequence characterized for the first time from four ruminant species (cattle, buffalo, sheep and goat) and phylogenetic relationship of ruminant DMC1 with other eukaryotes was analyzed. DMC1 gene encodes a putative protein of 340 amino acids in cattle, sheep and buffalo and 341 amino acids in goat. A high degree of evolutionary conservation at both nucleotide and amino acid level was observed for the four ruminant orthologs. In cattle and sheep, novel alternatively spliced mRNAs with skipping of exons 7 and 8 (Transcript variant 1, TV1) were isolated in addition to the full length (FL) transcript. Novel transcript variants with partial skipping of exon 7 and complete skipping of exon 8 (Transcript variant 2, TV2) were found in sheep and goat. The presence of these variants was validated by amplifying cDNA isolated from testis tissue of ruminants using two oligonucleotides flanking the deleted region. To accurately estimate their relative proportions, real-time PCR was performed using primers specific for each variant. Expression level of DMC1-FL was significantly higher than that of TV1 in cattle and TV2 in goat (P < 0.05). Relative ratio for expression of DMC1-FL: TV1: TV2 in sheep was 6.78: 1.43: 1. In-silico analysis revealed presence of splice variants of DMC1 gene across other mammalian species underpinning the role of alternative splicing in functional innovation.

  13. EXONSAMPLER: a computer program for genome-wide and candidate gene exon sampling for targeted next-generation sequencing.

    PubMed

    Cosart, Ted; Beja-Pereira, Albano; Luikart, Gordon

    2014-11-01

    The computer program EXONSAMPLER automates the sampling of thousands of exon sequences from publicly available reference genome sequences and gene annotation databases. It was designed to provide exon sequences for the efficient, next-generation gene sequencing method called exon capture. The exon sequences can be sampled by a list of gene name abbreviations (e.g. IFNG, TLR1), or by sampling exons from genes spaced evenly across chromosomes. It provides a list of genomic coordinates (a bed file), as well as a set of sequences in fasta format. User-adjustable parameters for collecting exon sequences include a minimum and maximum acceptable exon length, maximum number of exonic base pairs (bp) to sample per gene, and maximum total bp for the entire collection. It allows for partial sampling of very large exons. It can preferentially sample upstream (5 prime) exons, downstream (3 prime) exons, both external exons, or all internal exons. It is written in the Python programming language using its free libraries. We describe the use of EXONSAMPLER to collect exon sequences from the domestic cow (Bos taurus) genome for the design of an exon-capture microarray to sequence exons from related species, including the zebu cow and wild bison. We collected ~10% of the exome (~3 million bp), including 155 candidate genes, and ~16,000 exons evenly spaced genomewide. We prioritized the collection of 5 prime exons to facilitate discovery and genotyping of SNPs near upstream gene regulatory DNA sequences, which control gene expression and are often under natural selection.

  14. Characterizing exons 11 and 1 promoters of the mu opioid receptor (Oprm) gene in transgenic mice

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Jin; Xu, Mingming; Pan, Ying-Xian

    2006-01-01

    Background The complexity of the mouse mu opioid receptor (Oprm) gene was demonstrated by the identification of multiple alternatively spliced variants and promoters. Our previous studies have identified a novel promoter, exon 11 (E11) promoter, in the mouse Oprm gene. The E11 promoter is located ~10 kb upstream of the exon 1 (E1) promoter. The E11 promoter controls the expression of nine splice variants in the mouse Oprm gene. Distinguished from the TATA-less E1 promoter, the E11 promoter resembles a typical TATA-containing eukaryote class II promoter. The aim of this study is to further characterize the E11 and E1 promoters in vivo using a transgenic mouse model. Results We constructed a ~20 kb transgenic construct in which a 3.7 kb E11 promoter region and an 8.9 kb E1 promoter region controlled expression of tau/LacZ and tau/GFP reporters, respectively. The construct was used to establish a transgenic mouse line. The expression of the reporter mRNAs, determined by a RT-PCR approach, in the transgenic mice during embryonic development displayed a temporal pattern similar to that of the endogenous promoters. X-gal staining for tau/LacZ reporter and GFP imaging for tau/GFP reporter showed that the transgenic E11 and E1 promoters were widely expressed in various regions of the central nervous system (CNS). The distribution of tau/GFP reporter in the CNS was similar to that of MOR-1-like immunoreactivity using an exon 4-specific antibody. However, differential expression of both promoters was observed in some CNS regions such as the hippocampus and substantia nigra, suggesting that the E11 and E1 promoters were regulated differently in these regions. Conclusion We have generated a transgenic mouse line to study the E11 and E1 promoters in vivo using tau/LacZ and tau/GFP reporters. The reasonable relevance of the transgenic model was demonstrated by the temporal and spatial expression of the transgenes as compared to those of the endogenous transcripts. We believe

  15. HnRNP C, YB-1 and hnRNP L coordinately enhance skipping of human MUSK exon 10 to generate a Wnt-insensitive MuSK isoform

    PubMed Central

    Nasrin, Farhana; Rahman, Mohammad Alinoor; Masuda, Akio; Ohe, Kenji; Takeda, Jun-ichi; Ohno, Kinji

    2014-01-01

    Muscle specific receptor tyrosine kinase (MuSK) is an essential postsynaptic transmembrane molecule that mediates clustering of acetylcholine receptors (AChR). MUSK exon 10 is alternatively skipped in human, but not in mouse. Skipping of this exon disrupts a cysteine-rich region (Fz-CRD), which is essential for Wnt-mediated AChR clustering. To investigate the underlying mechanisms of alternative splicing, we exploited block-scanning mutagenesis with human minigene and identified a 20-nucleotide block that contained exonic splicing silencers. Using RNA-affinity purification, mass spectrometry, and Western blotting, we identified that hnRNP C, YB-1 and hnRNP L are bound to MUSK exon 10. siRNA-mediated knockdown and cDNA overexpression confirmed the additive, as well as the independent, splicing suppressing effects of hnRNP C, YB-1 and hnRNP L. Antibody-mediated in vitro protein depletion and scanning mutagenesis additionally revealed that binding of hnRNP C to RNA subsequently promotes binding of YB-1 and hnRNP L to the immediate downstream sites and enhances exon skipping. Simultaneous tethering of two splicing trans-factors to the target confirmed the cooperative effect of YB-1 and hnRNP L on hnRNP C-mediated exon skipping. Search for a similar motif in the human genome revealed nine alternative exons that were individually or coordinately regulated by hnRNP C and YB-1. PMID:25354590

  16. HnRNP C, YB-1 and hnRNP L coordinately enhance skipping of human MUSK exon 10 to generate a Wnt-insensitive MuSK isoform.

    PubMed

    Nasrin, Farhana; Rahman, Mohammad Alinoor; Masuda, Akio; Ohe, Kenji; Takeda, Jun-Ichi; Ohno, Kinji

    2014-10-30

    Muscle specific receptor tyrosine kinase (MuSK) is an essential postsynaptic transmembrane molecule that mediates clustering of acetylcholine receptors (AChR). MUSK exon 10 is alternatively skipped in human, but not in mouse. Skipping of this exon disrupts a cysteine-rich region (Fz-CRD), which is essential for Wnt-mediated AChR clustering. To investigate the underlying mechanisms of alternative splicing, we exploited block-scanning mutagenesis with human minigene and identified a 20-nucleotide block that contained exonic splicing silencers. Using RNA-affinity purification, mass spectrometry, and Western blotting, we identified that hnRNP C, YB-1 and hnRNP L are bound to MUSK exon 10. siRNA-mediated knockdown and cDNA overexpression confirmed the additive, as well as the independent, splicing suppressing effects of hnRNP C, YB-1 and hnRNP L. Antibody-mediated in vitro protein depletion and scanning mutagenesis additionally revealed that binding of hnRNP C to RNA subsequently promotes binding of YB-1 and hnRNP L to the immediate downstream sites and enhances exon skipping. Simultaneous tethering of two splicing trans-factors to the target confirmed the cooperative effect of YB-1 and hnRNP L on hnRNP C-mediated exon skipping. Search for a similar motif in the human genome revealed nine alternative exons that were individually or coordinately regulated by hnRNP C and YB-1.

  17. Alternative exon skipping biases substrate preference of the deubiquitylase USP15 for mysterin/RNF213, the moyamoya disease susceptibility factor

    PubMed Central

    Kotani, Yuri; Morito, Daisuke; Sakata, Kenshiro; Ainuki, Shiori; Sugihara, Munechika; Hatta, Tomohisa; Iemura, Shun-ichiro; Takashima, Seiji; Natsume, Tohru; Nagata, Kazuhiro

    2017-01-01

    The deubiquitylating enzyme USP15 plays significant roles in multiple cellular pathways including TGF-β signaling, RNA splicing, and innate immunity. Evolutionarily conserved skipping of exon 7 occurs during transcription of the mRNAs encoding USP15 and its paralogue USP4, yielding two major isoforms for each gene. Exon 7 of USP15 encodes a serine-rich stretch of 29 amino acid residues located in the inter-region linker that connects the N-terminal putative regulatory region and the C-terminal enzymatic region. Previous findings suggested that the variation in the linker region leads to functional differences between the isoforms of the two deubiquitylating enzymes, but to date no direct evidence regarding such functional divergence has been published. We found that the long isoform of USP15 predominantly recognizes and deubiquitylates mysterin, a large ubiquitin ligase associated with the onset of moyamoya disease. This observation represents the first experimental evidence that the conserved exon skipping alters the substrate specificity of this class of deubiquitylating enzymes. In addition, we found that the interactomes of the short and long isoforms of USP15 only partially overlapped. Thus, USP15, a key gene in multiple cellular processes, generates two functionally different isoforms via evolutionarily conserved exon skipping. PMID:28276505

  18. Gain of a New Exon by a Lineage-Specific Alu Element-Integration Event in the BCS1L Gene during Primate Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Park, Sang-Je; Kim, Young-Hyun; Lee, Sang-Rae; Choe, Se-Hee; Kim, Myung-Jin; Kim, Sun-Uk; Kim, Ji-Su; Sim, Bo-Woong; Song, Bong-Seok; Jeong, Kang-Jin; Jin, Yeung-Bae; Lee, Youngjeon; Park, Young-Ho; Park, Young Il; Huh, Jae-Won; Chang, Kyu-Tae

    2015-01-01

    BCS1L gene encodes mitochondrial protein and is a member of conserved AAA protein family. This gene is involved in the incorporation of Rieske FeS and Qcr10p into complex III of respiratory chain. In our previous study, AluYRa2-derived alternative transcript in rhesus monkey genome was identified. However, this transcript has not been reported in human genome. In present study, we conducted evolutionary analysis of AluYRa2-exonized transcript with various primate genomic DNAs and cDNAs from humans, rhesus monkeys, and crab-eating monkeys. Remarkably, our results show that AluYRa2 element has only been integrated into genomes of Macaca species. This Macaca lineage-specific integration of AluYRa2 element led to exonization event in the first intron region of BCS1L gene by producing a conserved 3′ splice site. Intriguingly, in rhesus and crab-eating monkeys, more diverse transcript variants by alternative splicing (AS) events, including exon skipping and different 5′ splice sites from humans, were identified. Alignment of amino acid sequences revealed that AluYRa2-exonized transcript has short N-terminal peptides. Therefore, AS events play a major role in the generation of various transcripts and proteins during primate evolution. In particular, lineage-specific integration of Alu elements and species-specific Alu-derived exonization events could be important sources of gene diversification in primates. PMID:26537194

  19. Genotyping of Intron Inversions and Point Mutations in Exon 14 of the FVIII Gene in Iranian Azeri Turkish Families with Hemophilia A.

    PubMed

    Shekari Khaniani, Mahmoud; Ebrahimi, Abdollah; Daraei, Setareh; Derakhshan, Sima Mansoori

    2016-12-01

    Hemophilia A (HA) is an inherited X-linked bleeding disorder caused by a variety of mutations that are distributed throughout the large FVIII gene (F8). The most common mutations in studied populations with severe HA are introns 22 and 1 inversions, gross exon deletions and point mutations in exon 14. The aim of this study was to define the frequency of these common mutations in Iranian population of Azeri Turkish in North West of Iran. Fifty patients with severe HA and forty-three female potential carriers were genotyped by inverse shifting polymerase chain reaction (IS-PCR), long-range PCR, multiplex PCR, and sequencing methods for the detection of Intron 22 and 1 inversions, gross exon deletions, and exon 14 point mutations, respectively. F8 intron 22 inversion was detected in 22 (44 %) out of 50 patients. Moreover, we detected one intron 1 inversion (2 %), and one point mutation in exon 14 (2 %). In this population, 52 % of the patients with hemophilia A did not show to carry a mutation in the analyzed regions by three mentioned methods. F8 intron 22 inversion was the major causative mutation in nearly 50 % of severe HA cases in an Azerbaijani Turkish population, which is similar to the incidence of other populations. IS-PCR is a robust, rapid, efficient, and cost-effective method for the genetic analysis of patients with severe HA and for HA carrier detection, especially in developing countries.

  20. Characterization of genetic deletions in Becker muscular dystrophy using monoclonal antibodies against a deletion-prone region of dystrophin

    SciTech Connect

    Thanh, L.T.; Man, Nguyen Thi; Morris, G.E.

    1995-08-28

    We have produced a new panel of 20 monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) against a region of the dystrophin protein corresponding to a deletion-prone region of the Duchenne muscular dystrophy gene (exons 45-50). We show that immunohistochemistry or Western blotting with these {open_quotes}exon-specific{close_quotes} mAbs can provide a valuable addition to Southern blotting or PCR methods for the accurate identification of genetic deletions in Becker muscular dystrophy patients. The antibodies were mapped to the following exons: exon 45 (2 mAbs), exon 46 (6), exon 47 (1), exons 47/48 (4), exons 48-50 (6), and exon 50 (1). PCR amplification of single exons or groups of exons was used both to produce specific dystrophin immunogens and to map the mAbs obtained. PCR-mediated mutagenesis was also used to identify regions of dystrophin important for mAb binding. Because the mAbs can be used to characterize the dystrophin produced by individual muscle fibres, they will also be useful for studying {open_quotes}revertant{close_quotes} fibres in Duchenne muscle and for monitoring the results of myoblast therapy trials in MD patients with deletions in this region of the dystrophin gene. 27 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs.

  1. Alternatively spliced adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) gene transcripts that delete exons mutated in attenuated APC.

    PubMed

    Samowitz, W S; Thliveris, A; Spirio, L N; White, R

    1995-09-01

    Reverse transcription-PCR combined with either (a) restriction enzyme digestion and repeat PCR or (b) ligase chain reaction has identified two new alternatively spliced transcripts of the adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) gene. In one of these transcripts exons 1-4 and the first 16 bases of exon 5 are deleted; in the other exons 2-4 and the first 16 bases of 5 are deleted. Both transcripts use an intraexonic splice acceptor in exon 5. These transcripts delete exons mutated in attenuated APC (3 and 4) and could account for the reduction in severity of this variant.

  2. Multiple splicing defects in an intronic false exon.

    PubMed

    Sun, H; Chasin, L A

    2000-09-01

    Splice site consensus sequences alone are insufficient to dictate the recognition of real constitutive splice sites within the typically large transcripts of higher eukaryotes, and large numbers of pseudoexons flanked by pseudosplice sites with good matches to the consensus sequences can be easily designated. In an attempt to identify elements that prevent pseudoexon splicing, we have systematically altered known splicing signals, as well as immediately adjacent flanking sequences, of an arbitrarily chosen pseudoexon from intron 1 of the human hprt gene. The substitution of a 5' splice site that perfectly matches the 5' consensus combined with mutation to match the CAG/G sequence of the 3' consensus failed to get this model pseudoexon included as the central exon in a dhfr minigene context. Provision of a real 3' splice site and a consensus 5' splice site and removal of an upstream inhibitory sequence were necessary and sufficient to confer splicing on the pseudoexon. This activated context also supported the splicing of a second pseudoexon sequence containing no apparent enhancer. Thus, both the 5' splice site sequence and the polypyrimidine tract of the pseudoexon are defective despite their good agreement with the consensus. On the other hand, the pseudoexon body did not exert a negative influence on splicing. The introduction into the pseudoexon of a sequence selected for binding to ASF/SF2 or its replacement with beta-globin exon 2 only partially reversed the effect of the upstream negative element and the defective polypyrimidine tract. These results support the idea that exon-bridging enhancers are not a prerequisite for constitutive exon definition and suggest that intrinsically defective splice sites and negative elements play important roles in distinguishing the real splicing signal from the vast number of false splicing signals.

  3. Structural basis for exon recognition by a group II intron

    SciTech Connect

    Toor, Navtej; Rajashankar, Kanagalaghatta; Keating, Kevin S.; Pyle, Anna Marie

    2008-11-18

    Free group II introns are infectious retroelements that can bind and insert themselves into RNA and DNA molecules via reverse splicing. Here we report the 3.4-A crystal structure of a complex between an oligonucleotide target substrate and a group IIC intron, as well as the refined free intron structure. The structure of the complex reveals the conformation of motifs involved in exon recognition by group II introns.

  4. Mutations Preventing Regulated Exon Skipping in MET Cause Osteofibrous Dysplasia

    PubMed Central

    Gray, Mary J.; Kannu, Peter; Sharma, Swarkar; Neyt, Christine; Zhang, Dongping; Paria, Nandina; Daniel, Philip B.; Whetstone, Heather; Sprenger, Hans-Georg; Hammerschmidt, Philipp; Weng, Angela; Dupuis, Lucie; Jobling, Rebekah; Mendoza-Londono, Roberto; Dray, Michael; Su, Peiqiang; Wilson, Megan J.; Kapur, Raj P.; McCarthy, Edward F.; Alman, Benjamin A.; Howard, Andrew; Somers, Gino R.; Marshall, Christian R.; Manners, Simon; Flanagan, Adrienne M.; Rathjen, Karl E.; Karol, Lori A.; Crawford, Haemish; Markie, David M.; Rios, Jonathan J.; Wise, Carol A.; Robertson, Stephen P.

    2015-01-01

    The periosteum contributes to bone repair and maintenance of cortical bone mass. In contrast to the understanding of bone development within the epiphyseal growth plate, factors that regulate periosteal osteogenesis have not been studied as intensively. Osteofibrous dysplasia (OFD) is a congenital disorder of osteogenesis and is typically sporadic and characterized by radiolucent lesions affecting the cortical bone immediately under the periosteum of the tibia and fibula. We identified germline mutations in MET, encoding a receptor tyrosine kinase, that segregate with an autosomal-dominant form of OFD in three families and a mutation in a fourth affected subject from a simplex family and with bilateral disease. Mutations identified in all families with dominant inheritance and in the one simplex subject with bilateral disease abolished the splice inclusion of exon 14 in MET transcripts, which resulted in a MET receptor (METΔ14) lacking a cytoplasmic juxtamembrane domain. Splice exclusion of this domain occurs during normal embryonic development, and forced induction of this exon-exclusion event retarded osteoblastic differentiation in vitro and inhibited bone-matrix mineralization. In an additional subject with unilateral OFD, we identified a somatic MET mutation, also affecting exon 14, that substituted a tyrosine residue critical for MET receptor turnover and, as in the case of the METΔ14 mutations, had a stabilizing effect on the mature protein. Taken together, these data show that aberrant MET regulation via the juxtamembrane domain subverts core MET receptor functions that regulate osteogenesis within cortical diaphyseal bone. PMID:26637977

  5. Novel exon nucleotide deletion causes adrenoleukodystrophy in a Brazilian family.

    PubMed

    Valadares, E R; Trindade, A L C; Oliveira, L R; Arantes, R R; Daker, M V; Viana, B M; Haase, V G; Jardim, L B; Lopes, G C; Godard, A L B

    2011-01-18

    Adrenoleukodystrophy is a neurodegenerative X-linked recessive disorder. It is characterized by abnormal function of peroxisomes, which leads to an accumulation of very long-chain fatty acids in plasma and tissues, especially in the cortex of adrenal glands and white matter of the central nervous system, causing demyelinating disease and adrenocortical insufficiency (Addison's disease). It is caused by a mutation in the ABCD1 gene (ATP-binding cassette, subfamily D, member 1), which encodes the protein adrenoleukodystrophy that is involved in the transport of fatty acids into the peroxisome for degradation. Variable expression has been recognized in families of patients who have this disease. A Brazilian family from Minas Gerais State, Brazil, was studied. The proband is an adult living in Minas Gerais State, Brazil; he had adrenomyeloneuropathy, adrenocortical insufficiency and a stable cerebral form. DNA was extracted from a blood sample and was sequenced to identify the mutation. The patient's exons were cloned for confirmation. A new mutation was found in exon 5 of the ABCD1 gene (c.1430delA), as well as a single-nucleotide polymorphism in exon 6. The mutation causes a frame shift, resulting in a truncated protein with almost total absence of the ATP binding domain.

  6. An Exon-Capture System for the Entire Class Ophiuroidea

    PubMed Central

    Hugall, Andrew F.; O’Hara, Timothy D.; Hunjan, Sumitha; Nilsen, Roger; Moussalli, Adnan

    2016-01-01

    Exon-capture studies have typically been restricted to relatively shallow phylogenetic scales due primarily to hybridization constraints. Here, we present an exon-capture system for an entire class of marine invertebrates, the Ophiuroidea, built upon a phylogenetically diverse transcriptome foundation. The system captures approximately 90% of the 1,552 exon target, across all major lineages of the quarter-billion-year-old extant crown group. Key features of our system are 1) basing the target on an alignment of orthologous genes determined from 52 transcriptomes spanning the phylogenetic diversity and trimmed to remove anything difficult to capture, map, or align; 2) use of multiple artificial representatives based on ancestral state reconstructions rather than exemplars to improve capture and mapping of the target; 3) mapping reads to a multi-reference alignment; and 4) using patterns of site polymorphism to distinguish among paralogy, polyploidy, allelic differences, and sample contamination. The resulting data give a well-resolved tree (currently standing at 417 samples, 275,352 sites, 91% data-complete) that will transform our understanding of ophiuroid evolution and biogeography. PMID:26474846

  7. Targeted Exon Sequencing in Usher Syndrome Type I

    PubMed Central

    Bujakowska, Kinga M.; Consugar, Mark; Place, Emily; Harper, Shyana; Lena, Jaclyn; Taub, Daniel G.; White, Joseph; Navarro-Gomez, Daniel; Weigel DiFranco, Carol; Farkas, Michael H.; Gai, Xiaowu; Berson, Eliot L.; Pierce, Eric A.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. Patients with Usher syndrome type I (USH1) have retinitis pigmentosa, profound congenital hearing loss, and vestibular ataxia. This syndrome is currently thought to be associated with at least six genes, which are encoded by over 180 exons. Here, we present the use of state-of-the-art techniques in the molecular diagnosis of a cohort of 47 USH1 probands. Methods. The cohort was studied with selective exon capture and next-generation sequencing of currently known inherited retinal degeneration genes, comparative genomic hybridization, and Sanger sequencing of new USH1 exons identified by human retinal transcriptome analysis. Results. With this approach, we were able to genetically solve 14 of the 47 probands by confirming the biallelic inheritance of mutations. We detected two likely pathogenic variants in an additional 19 patients, for whom family members were not available for cosegregation analysis to confirm biallelic inheritance. Ten patients, in addition to primary disease–causing mutations, carried rare likely pathogenic USH1 alleles or variants in other genes associated with deaf-blindness, which may influence disease phenotype. Twenty-one of the identified mutations were novel among the 33 definite or likely solved patients. Here, we also present a clinical description of the studied cohort at their initial visits. Conclusions. We found a remarkable genetic heterogeneity in the studied USH1 cohort with multiplicity of mutations, of which many were novel. No obvious influence of genotype on phenotype was found, possibly due to small sample sizes of the genotypes under study. PMID:25468891

  8. Therapeutic effects of exon skipping and losartan on skeletal muscle of mdx mice.

    PubMed

    Lee, Eun-Joo; Kim, Ah-Young; Lee, Eun-Mi; Lee, Myeong-Mi; Min, Chang-Woo; Kang, Kyung-Ku; Park, Jin-Kyu; Hwang, Meeyul; Kwon, Soon-Hak; Tremblay, Jacques P; Jeong, Kyu-Shik

    2014-08-01

    Various attempts have been made to find treatments for Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) patients. Exon skipping is one of the promising technologies for DMD treatment by restoring dystropin protein, which is one of the muscle components. It is well known that losartan, an angiotensin II type1 receptor blocker, promotes muscle regeneration and differentiation by lowering the level of transforming growth factor-beta1 signaling. In this study, we illustrated the combined effects of exon skipping and losartan on skeletal muscle of mdx mice. We supplied mdx mice with losartan for 2 weeks before exon skipping treatment. The losartan with the exon skipping group showed less expression of myf5 than the losartan treated group. Also the losartan with exon skipping group recovered normal muscle architecture, in contrast to the losartan group which still showed many central nuclei. However, the exon skipping efficiency and the restoration of dystrophin protein were lower in the losartan with exon skipping group compared to the exon skipping group. We reveal that losartan promotes muscle regeneration and shortens the time taken to restore normal muscle structure when combined with exon skipping. However, combined treatment of exon skipping and losartan decreases the restoration of dystrophin protein meaning decrease of exon skipping efficiency.

  9. Efficient use of a translation start codon in BDNF exon I.

    PubMed

    Koppel, Indrek; Tuvikene, Jürgen; Lekk, Ingrid; Timmusk, Tõnis

    2015-09-01

    The brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) gene contains a number of 5' exons alternatively spliced with a common 3' exon. BDNF protein is synthesized from alternative transcripts as a prepro-precursor encoded by the common 3' exon IX, which has a translation start site 21 bp downstream of the splicing site. BDNF mRNAs containing exon I are an exception to this arrangement as the last three nucleotides of this exon constitute an in-frame AUG. Here, we show that this AUG is efficiently used for translation initiation in PC12 cells and cultured cortical neurons. Use of exon I-specific AUG produces higher levels of BDNF protein than use of the common translation start site, resulting from a higher translation rate. No differences in protein degradation, constitutive or regulated secretion were detected between BDNF isoforms with alternative 5' termini. As the BDNF promoter preceding exon I is known to be highly regulated by neuronal activity, our results suggest that the function of this translation start site may be efficient stimulus-dependent synthesis of BDNF protein. The brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) gene contains multiple untranslated 5' exons alternatively spliced to one common protein-coding 3' exon. However, exon I contains an in-frame ATG in a favorable translation context. Here, we show that use of this ATG is associated with more efficient protein synthesis than the commonly used ATG in exon IX. © 2015 International Society for Neurochemistry.

  10. Efficient internal exon recognition depends on near equal contributions from the 3' and 5' splice sites.

    PubMed

    Shepard, Peter J; Choi, Eun-A; Busch, Anke; Hertel, Klemens J

    2011-11-01

    Pre-mRNA splicing is carried out by the spliceosome, which identifies exons and removes intervening introns. In vertebrates, most splice sites are initially recognized by the spliceosome across the exon, because most exons are small and surrounded by large introns. This gene architecture predicts that efficient exon recognition depends largely on the strength of the flanking 3' and 5' splice sites. However, it is unknown if the 3' or the 5' splice site dominates the exon recognition process. Here, we test the 3' and 5' splice site contributions towards efficient exon recognition by systematically replacing the splice sites of an internal exon with sequences of different splice site strengths. We show that the presence of an optimal splice site does not guarantee exon inclusion and that the best predictor for exon recognition is the sum of both splice site scores. Using a genome-wide approach, we demonstrate that the combined 3' and 5' splice site strengths of internal exons provide a much more significant separator between constitutive and alternative exons than either the 3' or the 5' splice site strength alone.

  11. Comparison of multiple vertebrate genomes reveals the birth and evolution of human exons.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiang H-F; Chasin, Lawrence A

    2006-09-05

    Orthologous gene structures in eight vertebrate species were compared on a genomic scale to detect the birth and maturation of new internal exons during the course of evolution. We found that 40% of new human exons are alternatively spliced, and most of these are cassette exons (exons that are either included or skipped in their entirety) with low inclusion rates. This proportion decreases steadily as older and older exons are examined, even as splicing efficiency increases. Remarkably, the great majority of new cassette exons are composed of highly repeated sequences, especially Alu. Many new cassette exons are 5' untranslated exons; the proportion that code for protein increases steadily with age. New protein-coding exons evolve at a high rate, as evidenced by the initially high substitution rates (K(s) and K(a)), as well as the SNP density compared with older exons. This dynamic picture suggests that de novo recruitment rather than shuffling is the major route by which exons are added to genes, and that species-specific repeats could play a significant role in recent evolution.

  12. A two-stage exon recognition model based on synergetic neural network.

    PubMed

    Huang, Zhehuang; Chen, Yidong

    2014-01-01

    Exon recognition is a fundamental task in bioinformatics to identify the exons of DNA sequence. Currently, exon recognition algorithms based on digital signal processing techniques have been widely used. Unfortunately, these methods require many calculations, resulting in low recognition efficiency. In order to overcome this limitation, a two-stage exon recognition model is proposed and implemented in this paper. There are three main works. Firstly, we use synergetic neural network to rapidly determine initial exon intervals. Secondly, adaptive sliding window is used to accurately discriminate the final exon intervals. Finally, parameter optimization based on artificial fish swarm algorithm is used to determine different species thresholds and corresponding adjustment parameters of adaptive windows. Experimental results show that the proposed model has better performance for exon recognition and provides a practical solution and a promising future for other recognition tasks.

  13. Use of an engineered ribozyme to produce a circular human exon.

    PubMed Central

    Mikheeva, S; Hakim-Zargar, M; Carlson, D; Jarrell, K

    1997-01-01

    We report the use of an engineered ribozyme to produce a circular human exon in vitro. Specifically, we have designed a derivative of a yeast self-splicing group II intron that is able to catalyze the formation of a circular exon encoding the first kringle domain (K1) of the human tissue plasminogen activator protein. We show that the circular K1 exon is formed with high fidelity in vitro. Furthermore, the system is designed such that the circular exon that is produced consists entirely of human exon sequence. Thus, our results demonstrate that all yeast exon sequences are dispensable for group II intron catalyzed inverse splicing. This is the first demonstration that an engineered ribozyme can be used to create a circular exon containing only human sequences, linked together at a precise desired ligation point. We expect these results to be generalizable, so that similar ribozymes can be designed to precisely create circular derivatives of any nucleotide sequence. PMID:9396820

  14. Multi-exon Skipping Using Cocktail Antisense Oligonucleotides in the Canine X-linked Muscular Dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Kuraoka, Mutsuki; Lee, Joshua J.A.; Takeda, Shin'ichi; Yokota, Toshifumi

    2016-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is one of the most common lethal genetic diseases worldwide, caused by mutations in the dystrophin (DMD) gene. Exon skipping employs short DNA/RNA-like molecules called antisense oligonucleotides (AONs) that restore the reading frame and produce shorter but functional proteins. However, exon skipping therapy faces two major hurdles: limited applicability (up to only 13% of patients can be treated with a single AON drug), and uncertain function of truncated proteins. These issues were addressed with a cocktail AON approach. While approximately 70% of DMD patients can be treated by single exon skipping (all exons combined), one could potentially treat more than 90% of DMD patients if multiple exon skipping using cocktail antisense drugs can be realized. The canine X-linked muscular dystrophy (CXMD) dog model, whose phenotype is more similar to human DMD patients, was used to test the systemic efficacy and safety of multi-exon skipping of exons 6 and 8. The CXMD dog model harbors a splice site mutation in intron 6, leading to a lack of exon 7 in dystrophin mRNA. To restore the reading frame in CXMD requires multi-exon skipping of exons 6 and 8; therefore, CXMD is a good middle-sized animal model for testing the efficacy and safety of multi-exon skipping. In the current study, a cocktail of antisense morpholinos targeting exon 6 and exon 8 was designed and it restored dystrophin expression in body-wide skeletal muscles. Methods for transfection/injection of cocktail oligos and evaluation of the efficacy and safety of multi-exon skipping in the CXMD dog model are presented. PMID:27285612

  15. The structure of the human tissue-type plasminogen activator gene: correlation of intron and exon structures to functional and structural domains.

    PubMed Central

    Ny, T; Elgh, F; Lund, B

    1984-01-01

    A genomic clone carrying the human tissue-type plasminogen activator (t-PA) gene was isolated from a cosmid library, and the gene structure was elucidated by restriction mapping, Southern blotting, and DNA sequencing. The cosmid contained all the coding parts of the mRNA, except for the first 58 bases in the 5' end of the mRNA, and had a total length of greater than 20 kilobases. It was separated into at least 14 exons by at least 13 introns, and the exons seemed to code for structural or functional domains. Thus, the signal peptide, the propeptide, and the domains of the heavy chain, including the regions homologous to growth factors, and to the "finger" structure of fibronectin, are all encoded by separate exons. In addition, the two kringle regions of t-PA were both coded for by two exons and were cleaved by introns at identical positions. The region coding for the light chain, comprising the serine protease part of the molecule was split by four introns, revealing a gene organization similar to other serine proteases. PMID:6089198

  16. A distal enhancer and an ultraconserved exon are derived from a novel retroposon.

    PubMed

    Bejerano, Gill; Lowe, Craig B; Ahituv, Nadav; King, Bryan; Siepel, Adam; Salama, Sofie R; Rubin, Edward M; Kent, W James; Haussler, David

    2006-05-04

    Hundreds of highly conserved distal cis-regulatory elements have been characterized so far in vertebrate genomes. Many thousands more are predicted on the basis of comparative genomics. However, in stark contrast to the genes that they regulate, in invertebrates virtually none of these regions can be traced by using sequence similarity, leaving their evolutionary origins obscure. Here we show that a class of conserved, primarily non-coding regions in tetrapods originated from a previously unknown short interspersed repetitive element (SINE) retroposon family that was active in the Sarcopterygii (lobe-finned fishes and terrestrial vertebrates) in the Silurian period at least 410 million years ago (ref. 4), and seems to be recently active in the 'living fossil' Indonesian coelacanth, Latimeria menadoensis. Using a mouse enhancer assay we show that one copy, 0.5 million bases from the neuro-developmental gene ISL1, is an enhancer that recapitulates multiple aspects of Isl1 expression patterns. Several other copies represent new, possibly regulatory, alternatively spliced exons in the middle of pre-existing Sarcopterygian genes. One of these, a more than 200-base-pair ultraconserved region, 100% identical in mammals, and 80% identical to the coelacanth SINE, contains a 31-amino-acid-residue alternatively spliced exon of the messenger RNA processing gene PCBP2 (ref. 6). These add to a growing list of examples in which relics of transposable elements have acquired a function that serves their host, a process termed 'exaptation', and provide an origin for at least some of the many highly conserved vertebrate-specific genomic sequences.

  17. Intragenic GNAS deletion involving exon A/B in pseudohypoparathyroidism type 1A resulting in an apparent loss of exon A/B methylation: potential for misdiagnosis of pseudohypoparathyroidism type 1B.

    PubMed

    Fernandez-Rebollo, Eduardo; García-Cuartero, Beatriz; Garin, Intza; Largo, Cristina; Martínez, Francisco; Garcia-Lacalle, Concepcion; Castaño, Luis; Bastepe, Murat; Pérez de Nanclares, Guiomar

    2010-02-01

    Several endocrine diseases that share resistance to PTH are grouped under the term pseudohypoparathyroidism (PHP). Patients with PHP type Ia show additional hormone resistance, defective erythrocyte G(s)alpha activity, and dysmorphic features termed Albright's hereditary osteodystrophy (AHO). Patients with PHP-Ib show less diverse hormone resistance and normal G(s)alpha activity; AHO features are typically absent in PHP-Ib. Mutations affecting G(s)alpha coding exons of GNAS and epigenetic alterations in the same gene are associated with PHP-Ia and -Ib, respectively. The epigenetic GNAS changes in familial PHP-Ib are caused by microdeletions near or within GNAS but without involving G(s)alpha coding exons. We sought to identify the molecular defect in a patient who was diagnosed with PHP-Ia based on clinical presentation (hormone resistance and AHO) but displayed the molecular features typically associated with PHP-Ib (loss of methylation at exon A/B) without previously described genetic mutations. Microsatellite typing, comparative genome hybridization, and allelic dosage were performed for proband and her parents. Comparative genome hybridization revealed a deletion of 30,431 bp extending from the intronic region between exons XL and A/B to intron 5. The same mutation was also demonstrated, by PCR, in the patient's mother, but polymorphism and allele dosage analyses indicated that she had this mutation in a mosaic manner. We discovered a novel multiexonic GNAS deletion transmitted to our patient from her mother who is mosaic for this mutation. The deletion led to different phenotypic manifestations in the two generation and appeared, in the patient, as loss of GNAS imprinting.

  18. ATRX binds to atypical chromatin domains at the 3′ exons of zinc finger genes to preserve H3K9me3 enrichment

    PubMed Central

    Chowdhury, Asif H.; Hasson, Dan; Dyer, Michael A.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT ATRX is a SWI/SNF chromatin remodeler proposed to govern genomic stability through the regulation of repetitive sequences, such as rDNA, retrotransposons, and pericentromeric and telomeric repeats. However, few direct ATRX target genes have been identified and high-throughput genomic approaches are currently lacking for ATRX. Here we present a comprehensive ChIP-sequencing study of ATRX in multiple human cell lines, in which we identify the 3′ exons of zinc finger genes (ZNFs) as a new class of ATRX targets. These 3′ exonic regions encode the zinc finger motifs, which can range from 1–40 copies per ZNF gene and share large stretches of sequence similarity. These regions often contain an atypical chromatin signature: they are transcriptionally active, contain high levels of H3K36me3, and are paradoxically enriched in H3K9me3. We find that these ZNF 3′ exons are co-occupied by SETDB1, TRIM28, and ZNF274, which form a complex with ATRX. CRISPR/Cas9-mediated loss-of-function studies demonstrate (i) a reduction of H3K9me3 at the ZNF 3′ exons in the absence of ATRX and ZNF274 and, (ii) H3K9me3 levels at atypical chromatin regions are particularly sensitive to ATRX loss compared to other H3K9me3-occupied regions. As a consequence of ATRX or ZNF274 depletion, cells with reduced levels of H3K9me3 show increased levels of DNA damage, suggesting that ATRX binds to the 3′ exons of ZNFs to maintain their genomic stability through preservation of H3K9me3. PMID:27029610

  19. Splicing repression allows the gradual emergence of new Alu-exons in primate evolution

    PubMed Central

    Attig, Jan; Ruiz de los Mozos, Igor; Haberman, Nejc; Wang, Zhen; Emmett, Warren; Zarnack, Kathi; König, Julian; Ule, Jernej

    2016-01-01

    Alu elements are retrotransposons that frequently form new exons during primate evolution. Here, we assess the interplay of splicing repression by hnRNPC and nonsense-mediated mRNA decay (NMD) in the quality control and evolution of new Alu-exons. We identify 3100 new Alu-exons and show that NMD more efficiently recognises transcripts with Alu-exons compared to other exons with premature termination codons. However, some Alu-exons escape NMD, especially when an adjacent intron is retained, highlighting the importance of concerted repression by splicing and NMD. We show that evolutionary progression of 3' splice sites is coupled with longer repressive uridine tracts. Once the 3' splice site at ancient Alu-exons reaches a stable phase, splicing repression by hnRNPC decreases, but the exons generally remain sensitive to NMD. We conclude that repressive motifs are strongest next to cryptic exons and that gradual weakening of these motifs contributes to the evolutionary emergence of new alternative exons. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.19545.001 PMID:27861119

  20. Skipping of exon 27 in C3 gene compromises TED domain and results in complete human C3 deficiency.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Karina Ribeiro; Fraga, Tatiana Rodrigues; Lucatelli, Juliana Faggion; Grumach, Anete Sevciovic; Isaac, Lourdes

    2016-05-01

    Primary deficiency of complement C3 is rare and usually associated with increased susceptibility to bacterial infections. In this work, we investigated the molecular basis of complete C3 deficiency in a Brazilian 9-year old female patient with a family history of consanguinity. Hemolytic assays revealed complete lack of complement-mediated hemolytic activity in the patient's serum. While levels of the complement regulatory proteins Factor I, Factor H and Factor B were normal in the patient's and family members' sera, complement C3 levels were undetectable in the patient's serum and were reduced by at least 50% in the sera of the patient's parents and brother. Additionally, no C3 could be observed in the patient's plasma and cell culture supernatants by Western blot. We also observed that patient's skin fibroblasts stimulated with Escherichia coli LPS were unable to secrete C3, which might be accumulated within the cells before being intracellularly degraded. Sequencing analysis of the patient's C3 cDNA revealed a genetic mutation responsible for the complete skipping of exon 27, resulting in the loss of 99 nucleotides (3450-3549) located in the TED domain. Sequencing of the intronic region between the exons 26 and 27 of the C3 gene (nucleotides 6690313-6690961) showed a nucleotide exchange (T→C) at position 6690626 located in a splicing donor site, resulting in the complete skipping of exon 27 in the C3 mRNA. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier GmbH.

  1. Grey, a novel mutation in the murine Lyst gene, causes the beige phenotype by skipping of exon 25.

    PubMed

    Runkel, Fabian; Büssow, Heinrich; Seburn, Kevin L; Cox, Gregory A; Ward, Diane McVey; Kaplan, Jerry; Franz, Thomas

    2006-03-01

    The murine beige mutant phenotype and the human Chediak-Higashi syndrome are caused by mutations in the murine Lyst (lysosomal trafficking regulator) gene and the human CHS gene, respectively. In this report we have analyzed a novel murine mutant Lyst allele, called Lyst(bg-grey), that had been found in an ENU mutation screen and named grey because of the grey coat color of affected mice. The phenotype caused by the Lyst(bg-grey) mutation was inherited in a recessive fashion. Melanosomes of melanocytes associated with hair follicles and the choroid layer of the eye, as well as melanosomes in the neural tube-derived pigment epithelium of the retina, were larger and irregularly shaped in homozygous mutants compared with those of wild-type controls. Secretory vesicles in dermal mast cells of the mutant skin were enlarged as well. Test crosses with beige homozygous mutant mice (Lyst(bg)) showed that double heterozygotes (Lyst(bg)/Lyst(bg-grey)) were phenotypically indistinguishable from either homozygous parent, demonstrating that the ENU mutation was an allele of the murine Lyst gene. RT-PCR analyses revealed the skipping of exon 25 in Lyst(bg-grey) mutants, which is predicted to cause a missense D2399E mutation and the loss of the following 77 amino acids encoded by exon 25 but leave the C-terminal end of the protein intact. Analysis of the genomic Lyst locus around exon 25 showed that the splice donor at the end of exon 25 showed a T-to-C transition point mutation. Western blot analysis suggests that the Lyst(bg-grey) mutation causes instability of the LYST protein. Because the phenotype of Lyst(bg) and Lyst(bg-grey) mutants is indistinguishable, at least with respect to melanosomes and secretory granules in mast cells, the Lyst(bg-grey) mutation defines a critical region for the stability of the murine LYST protein.

  2. Complex mutations & subpopulations of deletions at exon 19 of EGFR in NSCLC revealed by next generation sequencing: potential clinical implications.

    PubMed

    Marchetti, Antonio; Del Grammastro, Maela; Filice, Giampaolo; Felicioni, Lara; Rossi, Giulio; Graziano, Paolo; Sartori, Giuliana; Leone, Alvaro; Malatesta, Sara; Iacono, Michele; Guetti, Luigi; Viola, Patrizia; Mucilli, Felice; Cuccurullo, Franco; Buttitta, Fiamma

    2012-01-01

    Microdeletions at exon 19 are the most frequent genetic alterations affecting the Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR) gene in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and they are strongly associated with response to treatment with tyrosine kinase inhibitors. A series of 116 NSCLC DNA samples investigated by Sanger Sequencing (SS), including 106 samples carrying exon 19 EGFR deletions and 10 without deletions (control samples), were subjected to deep next generation sequencing (NGS). All samples with deletions at SS showed deletions with NGS. No deletions were seen in control cases. In 93 (88%) cases, deletions detected by NGS were exactly corresponding to those identified by SS. In 13 cases (12%) NGS resolved deletions not accurately characterized by SS. In 21 (20%) cases the NGS showed presence of complex (double/multiple) frameshift deletions producing a net in-frame change. In 5 of these cases the SS could not define the exact sequence of mutant alleles, in the other 16 cases the results obtained by SS were conventionally considered as deletions plus insertions. Different interpretative hypotheses for complex mutations are discussed. In 46 (43%) tumors deep NGS showed, for the first time to our knowledge, subpopulations of DNA molecules carrying EGFR deletions different from the main one. Each of these subpopulations accounted for 0.1% to 17% of the genomic DNA in the different tumors investigated. Our findings suggest that a region in exon 19 is highly unstable in a large proportion of patients carrying EGFR deletions. As a corollary to this study, NGS data were compared with those obtained by immunohistochemistry using the 6B6 anti-mutant EGFR antibody. The immunoreaction was E746-A750del specific. In conclusion, NGS analysis of EGFR exon 19 in NSCLCs allowed us to formulate a new interpretative hypothesis for complex mutations and revealed the presence of subpopulations of deletions with potential pathogenetic and clinical impact.

  3. Sensitive detection of deletions of one or more exons in the neurofibromatosis type 2 (NF2) gene by multiplexed gene dosage polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed

    Diebold, Ruth; Bartelt-Kirbach, Britta; Evans, D Gareth; Kaufmann, Dieter; Hanemann, C Oliver

    2005-02-01

    Mutation detection in the neurofibromatosis type 2 (NF2) gene is challenging because when combining mutation detection methods such as single-strand conformational polymorphism and heteroduplex analysis, denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis, and direct sequencing of aberrant polymerase chain reaction (PCR) fragments only 30 to 60% of the constitutional mutations are detected. Because large deletions and complete chromosome rearrangements are also described methods such as microarray-comparative genomic hybridization and fluorescence in situ hybridization are also used. The one type of mutation often missed corresponds to deletions encompassing one or few exons. To detect this type we have developed a swift and reliable method. We perform a gene dosage analysis with two fluorescent multiplex PCR assays that amplify 15 of the 17 NF2 exons. The labeled PCR products are quantified and gene dose is calculated with respect to controls. We tested the reliability of this method with DNA from eight NF2 patients with known heterozygous NF2 deletions, eight controls and four unknown NF2 patients. In all of the patients with known heterozygous deletions we found in several exons a reduction of gene dosage to 50 to 69%. In one NF2 patient with previously unknown mutation and a severe phenotype we found the gene dosage of two exons reduced by 50% indicating a deletion of these two exons on one allele. This finding was validated by reverse transcriptase-PCR on fibroblast and schwannoma cell cultures of this patient and cDNA sequencing. Our gene dosage assay will detect deletions of one or more exons as well as gross deletions of the whole coding region of the gene. It can complement the existing screening methods because it is faster and easier.

  4. IUGR increases chromatin-remodeling factor Brg1 expression and binding to GR exon 1.7 promoter in newborn male rat hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Ke, Xingrao; McKnight, Robert A; Gracey Maniar, Lia E; Sun, Ying; Callaway, Christopher W; Majnik, Amber; Lane, Robert H; Cohen, Susan S

    2015-07-15

    Intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR) increases the risk for neurodevelopment delay and neuroendocrine reprogramming in both humans and rats. Neuroendocrine reprogramming involves the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) gene that is epigenetically regulated in the hippocampus. Using a well-characterized rodent model, we have previously shown that IUGR increases GR exon 1.7 mRNA variant and total GR expressions in male rat pup hippocampus. Epigenetic regulation of GR transcription may involve chromatin remodeling of the GR gene. A key chromatin remodeler is Brahma-related gene-1(Brg1), a member of the ATP-dependent SWItch/Sucrose NonFermentable (SWI/SNF) chromatin remodeling complex. Brg1 regulates gene expression by affecting nucleosome repositioning and recruiting transcriptional components to target promoters. We hypothesized that IUGR would increase hippocampal Brg1 expression and binding to GR exon 1.7 promoter, as well as alter nucleosome positioning over GR promoters in newborn male pups. Further, we hypothesized that IUGR would lead to accumulation of specificity protein 1 (Sp1) and RNA pol II at GR exon 1.7 promoter. Indeed, we found that IUGR increased Brg1 expression and binding to GR exon 1.7 promoter. We also found that increased Brg1 binding to GR exon 1.7 promoter was associated with accumulation of Sp1 and RNA pol II carboxy terminal domain pSer-5 (a marker of active transcription). Furthermore, the transcription start site of GR exon 1.7 was located within a nucleosome-depleted region. We speculate that changes in hippocampal Brg1 expression mediate GR expression and subsequently trigger neuroendocrine reprogramming in male IUGR rats.

  5. Sequencing of the coding exons of the LRP1 and LDLR genes on individual DNA samples reveals novel mutations in both genes.

    PubMed

    Van Leuven, F; Thiry, E; Lambrechts, M; Stas, L; Boon, T; Bruynseels, K; Muls, E; Descamps, O

    2001-02-15

    Five coding polymorphisms in de LRP1 gene, i.e. A217V, A775P, D2080N, D2632E and G4379S were discovered by sequencing its 89 exons in three test-groups of 22 healthy individuals, 29 Alzheimer patients and 18 individuals with different clinical and molecularly uncharacterized lipid metabolism problems. No genetic defect was evident in the LRP1 gene of any of the Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients, further excluding LRP1 as a major genetic problem in AD. Lipoprotein receptor related protein (LRP) A217V (exon 6) was clearly present in all groups as a polymorphism, while D2632E was observed only once in a healthy volunteer. On the other hand, LRP1 alleles A775P, D2080N, and G4379 were encountered only in patients with FH or with undefined problems of lipid metabolism. This finding forced one to also analyze the LDL receptor (LDLR) gene, for which a method was devised to sequence the entire region comprising LDLR exons 2-18. The resulting sequence contig of 33567 nucleotides yielded finally an exact physical map that corrects published and listed LDLR gene maps in many positions. In addition, next to known mutations in LDLR that cause FH, four novel LDLR defects were defined, i.e. del e7-10, exon 9 mutation N407T, a 20 bp insertion in exon 4, and a double mutation C292W/K290R in exon 6. No evidence for pathology connected to the LRP1 'mutations' was obtained by subsequent screening for the five LRP1 variants in larger groups of 110 FH patients and 118 patients with molecularly undefined, clinical problems of cholesterol and/or lipid metabolism. In three individuals with a mutant LDLR gene a variant LRP1 allele was also present, but without direct, obvious clinical compound effects, indicating that the variant LRP1 alleles must, for the present, be considered polymorphisms.

  6. Quantitative evaluation of all hexamers as exonic splicing elements.

    PubMed

    Ke, Shengdong; Shang, Shulian; Kalachikov, Sergey M; Morozova, Irina; Yu, Lin; Russo, James J; Ju, Jingyue; Chasin, Lawrence A

    2011-08-01

    We describe a comprehensive quantitative measure of the splicing impact of a complete set of RNA 6-mer sequences by deep sequencing successfully spliced transcripts. All 4096 6-mers were substituted at five positions within two different internal exons in a 3-exon minigene, and millions of successfully spliced transcripts were sequenced after transfection of human cells. The results allowed the assignment of a relative splicing strength score to each mutant molecule. The effect of 6-mers on splicing often depended on their location; much of this context effect could be ascribed to the creation of different overlapping sequences at each site. Taking these overlaps into account, the splicing effect of each 6-mer could be quantified, and 6-mers could be designated as enhancers (ESEseqs) and silencers (ESSseqs), with an ESRseq score indicating their strength. Some 6-mers exhibited positional bias relative to the two splice sites. The distribution and conservation of these ESRseqs in and around human exons supported their classification. Predicted RNA secondary structure effects were also seen: Effective enhancers, silencers and 3' splice sites tend to be single stranded, and effective 5' splice sites tend to be double stranded. 6-mers that may form positive or negative synergy with another were also identified. Chromatin structure may also influence the splicing enhancement observed, as a good correspondence was found between splicing performance and the predicted nucleosome occupancy scores of 6-mers. This approach may prove of general use in defining nucleic acid regulatory motifs, substitute for functional SELEX in most cases, and provide insights about splicing mechanisms.

  7. Novel methodologies for spectral classification of exon and intron sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwan, Hon Keung; Kwan, Benjamin Y. M.; Kwan, Jennifer Y. Y.

    2012-12-01

    Digital processing of a nucleotide sequence requires it to be mapped to a numerical sequence in which the choice of nucleotide to numeric mapping affects how well its biological properties can be preserved and reflected from nucleotide domain to numerical domain. Digital spectral analysis of nucleotide sequences unfolds a period-3 power spectral value which is more prominent in an exon sequence as compared to that of an intron sequence. The success of a period-3 based exon and intron classification depends on the choice of a threshold value. The main purposes of this article are to introduce novel codes for 1-sequence numerical representations for spectral analysis and compare them to existing codes to determine appropriate representation, and to introduce novel thresholding methods for more accurate period-3 based exon and intron classification of an unknown sequence. The main findings of this study are summarized as follows: Among sixteen 1-sequence numerical representations, the K-Quaternary Code I offers an attractive performance. A windowed 1-sequence numerical representation (with window length of 9, 15, and 24 bases) offers a possible speed gain over non-windowed 4-sequence Voss representation which increases as sequence length increases. A winner threshold value (chosen from the best among two defined threshold values and one other threshold value) offers a top precision for classifying an unknown sequence of specified fixed lengths. An interpolated winner threshold value applicable to an unknown and arbitrary length sequence can be estimated from the winner threshold values of fixed length sequences with a comparable performance. In general, precision increases as sequence length increases. The study contributes an effective spectral analysis of nucleotide sequences to better reveal embedded properties, and has potential applications in improved genome annotation.

  8. Characterization of a novel mutation in exon 10 of the adrenoleukodystrophy gene.

    PubMed

    Holzinger, A; Maier, E; Stöckler-Ipsiroglu, S; Braun, A; Roscher, A A

    1998-06-01

    We have detected a novel mutation in the adrenoleukodystrophy (ALD) gene in skin fibroblasts in primary culture derived from a patient suffering from the adrenocortical insufficiency-only-phenotype of ALD. This nonsense mutation (C2400T/Q672X) is the only mutation reported to date affecting exon 10. It leads to a translation product lacking the 74 C-terminal amino acids. As a consequence of the loss of this region, which immediately follows the putative nucleotide binding domain, the ALD protein (ALDP) was not detectable at all by ALDP-specific monoclonal antibodies. Since ALDP-specific mRNA was readily detected in these fibroblasts, the loss of protein is probably not attributable to RNA instability but may be explained by protein instability. If the Q672X mutation leads in fact to an unstable translation product this would be consistent with the hypothesis that the C-terminus is crucial for ALDP stability.

  9. Dipole angular entropy techniques for intron-exon segregation in DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subramanian, Nithya; Bose, R.

    2012-04-01

    We propose techniques for computing the angular entropies of DNA sequences, based on the orientations of the dipole moments of the nucleotide bases. The angles of the dipole moment vectors of the bases are used to compute the dipole angular entropy and the Fourier harmonics of the angles are used to compute the dipole angular spectral entropy for a given sequence. We also show that the coding (exons) and noncoding (introns) regions of the DNA can be segregated based on their dipole angular entropies and dipole angular spectral entropies. Segregation using these techniques is found to be computationally faster and more accurate than the previously reported methods. The proposed techniques can also be improvised to use the magnitude of the dipole moments of the bases in addition to the angles.

  10. Evidence that the SRY protein is encoded by a single exon on the human Y chromosome

    SciTech Connect

    Behlke, M.A. Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA ); Bogan, J.S.; Beer-Romero, P.; Page, D.C. )

    1993-09-01

    To facilitate studies of the SRY gene, a 4741-bp portion of the sex-determining region of the human Y chromosome was sequenced and characterized. Two RNAs were found to hybridize to this genomic segment, one transcript deriving from SRY and the second cross-hybridizing to a pseudogene located 2.5 kb 5[prime] of the SRY open reading frame (ORF). Analysis of the SRY transcript using 3[prime] and 5[prime] rapid amplification and cloning of ends suggested that the entire SRY protein is encoded by a single exon. A 700-bp CpG island is located immediately 5[prime] of the pseudogene (and 2 kb 5[prime] of the SRY ORF). Within this CpG island lies the sequence CGCCCCCGC, a potential binding site for the EGR-1/WT1 family of transcription factors, some of which appear to function in gonadal development. 19 refs., 1 fig.

  11. Detection of a novel mutation in exon 20 of the BRCA1 gene.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Abhijit; Katarkar, Atul; Chaudhuri, Keya; Mukhopadhyay, Ashis; Basak, Jayasri

    2013-12-01

    Hereditary breast cancer constitutes 5-10% of all breast cancer cases. Inherited mutations in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 tumor-suppressor genes account for the majority of hereditary breast cancer cases. The BRCA1 C-terminal region (BRCT) has a functional duplicated globular domain, which helps with DNA damage repair and cell cycle checkpoint protein control. More than 100 distinct BRCA1 missense variants with structural and functional effects have been documented within the BRCT domain. Interpreting the results of mutation screening of tumor-suppressor genes that can have high-risk susceptibility mutations is increasingly important in clinical practice. This study includes a novel mutation, p.His1746 Pro (c.5237A>C), which was found in BRCA1 exon 20 of a breast cancer patient. In silico analysis suggests that this mutation could alter the stability and orientation of the BRCT domain and the differential binding of the BACH1 substrate.

  12. Characterization of six mutations in Exon 37 of neurofibromatosis type 1 gene

    SciTech Connect

    Upadhyaya, M.; Osborn, M.; Maynard, J.; Harper, P.

    1996-07-26

    Neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) is one of the most common inherited disorders, with an incidence of 1 in 3,000. We screened a total of 320 unrelated NF1 patients for mutations in exon 37 of the NF1 gene. Six independent mutations were identified, of which three are novel, and these include a recurrent nonsense mutation identified in 2 unrelated patients at codon 2281 (G2281X), a 1-bp insertion (6791 ins A) resulting in a change of TAG (tyrosine) to a TAA (stop codon), and a 3-bp deletion (6839 del TAC) which generated a frameshift. Another recurrent nonsense mutation, Y2264X, which was detected in 2 unrelated patients in this study, was also previously reported in 2 NF1 individuals. All the mutations were identified within a contiguous 49-bp sequence. Further studies are warranted to support the notion that this region of the gene contains highly mutable sequences. 17 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  13. NMR structure of the 5' splice site in the group IIB intron Sc.ai5γ--conformational requirements for exon-intron recognition.

    PubMed

    Kruschel, Daniela; Skilandat, Miriam; Sigel, Roland K O

    2014-03-01

    A crucial step of the self-splicing reaction of group II intron ribozymes is the recognition of the 5' exon by the intron. This recognition is achieved by two regions in domain 1 of the intron, the exon-binding sites EBS1 and EBS2 forming base pairs with the intron-binding sites IBS1 and IBS2 located at the end of the 5' exon. The complementarity of the EBS1•IBS1 contact is most important for ensuring site-specific cleavage of the phosphodiester bond between the 5' exon and the intron. Here, we present the NMR solution structures of the d3' hairpin including EBS1 free in solution and bound to the IBS1 7-mer. In the unbound state, EBS1 is part of a flexible 11-nucleotide (nt) loop. Binding of IBS1 restructures and freezes the entire loop region. Mg(2+) ions are bound near the termini of the EBS1•IBS1 helix, stabilizing the interaction. Formation of the 7-bp EBS1•IBS1 helix within a loop of only 11 nt forces the loop backbone to form a sharp turn opposite of the splice site, thereby presenting the scissile phosphate in a position that is structurally unique.

  14. WT1 exon 1 deletion/insertion mutations in Wilms tumor patients, associated with di- and trinucleotide repeats and deletion hotspot consensus sequences.

    PubMed Central

    Huff, V; Jaffe, N; Saunders, G F; Strong, L C; Villalba, F; Ruteshouser, E C

    1995-01-01

    The WT1 gene is known to play a role in at least some cases of Wilms tumor (WT). The first exon of the gene is highly GC rich and contains many short tandem di- and trinucleotide repeats, interrupted direct repeats, and CCTG (CAGG) motifs that have been identified as hotspots for DNA deletions. We have analyzed 80 WT patient samples for mutations in the first exon of WT1, either by SSCP analysis of the first 131 bp of the coding portion of WT1 exon 1 or by size analysis of a PCR product encompassing the coding region of exon 1 in addition to flanking noncoding regions. We report here the occurrence of somatic and germ-line deletion and insertion mutations in this portion of the gene in four WT patients. The mutations are flanked by short direct repeats, and the breakpoints are within 5 nt of a CCTG (CAGG) sequence. These data suggest that a distinctive mutational mechanism, previously unrecognized for this gene, is important for the generation of DNA mutations at the WT1 locus. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:7825606

  15. A phosphorylation pattern-recognizing antibody specifically reacts to RNA polymerase II bound to exons

    PubMed Central

    Han, Jungwon; Lee, Jong-Hyuk; Park, Sunyoung; Yoon, Soomin; Yoon, Aerin; Hwang, Do B; Lee, Hwa K; Kim, Min S; Lee, Yujean; Yang, Won J; Youn, Hong-Duk; Kim, Hyori; Chung, Junho

    2016-01-01

    The C-terminal domain of RNA polymerase II is an unusual series of repeated residues appended to the C-terminus of the largest subunit and serves as a flexible binding scaffold for numerous nuclear factors. The binding of these factors is determined by the phosphorylation patterns on the repeats in the domain. In this study, we generated a synthetic antibody library by replacing the third heavy chain complementarity-determining region of an anti-HER2 (human epidermal growth factor receptor 2) antibody (trastuzumab) with artificial sequences of 7–18 amino-acid residues. From this library, antibodies were selected that were specific to serine phosphopeptides that represent typical phosphorylation patterns on the functional unit (YSPTSPS)2 of the RNA polymerase II C-terminal domain (CTD). Antibody clones pCTD-1stS2 and pCTD-2ndS2 showed specificity for peptides with phosphoserine at the second residues of the first or second heptamer repeat, respectively. Additional clones specifically reacted to peptides with phosphoserine at the fifth serine of the first repeat (pCTD-1stS5), the seventh residue of the first repeat and fifth residue of the second repeat (pCTD-S7S5) or the seventh residue of either the first or second repeat (pCTD-S7). All of these antibody clones successfully reacted to RNA polymerase II in immunoblot analysis. Interestingly, pCTD-2ndS2 precipitated predominately RNA polymerase II from the exonic regions of genes in genome-wide chromatin immunoprecipitation sequencing analysis, which suggests that the phosphoserine at the second residue of the second repeat of the functional unit (YSPTSPS)2 is a mediator of exon definition. PMID:27857068

  16. Genetic variation in exon 5 of troponin - I gene in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy cases.

    PubMed

    Annapurna, S D; Reena, T R; Nallari, Pratibha; Calambur, Narasimhan

    2007-05-01

    Cardiomyopathies are a heterogeneous group of heart muscle disorders and are classified as 1) Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy (HCM) 2) Dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) 3) Restrictive cardiomyopathy (RCM) and 4) Arrhythmogenic right ventricular dysplasia (ARVD) as per WHO classification, of which HCM and DCM are common. HCM is a complex but relatively common form of inherited heart muscle disease with prevalence of 1 in 500 individuals and is commonly associated with sarcomeric gene mutations. Cardiac muscle troponin I (TNNI-3) is one such sarcomeric protein and is a subunit of the thin filament-associated troponin-tropomyosin complex involved in calcium regulation of skeletal and cardiac muscle contraction. Mutations in this gene were found to be associated with a history of sudden cardiac death in HCM patients. Therefore the present study aims to identify for mutations associated with troponin I gene in a set of HCM patients from Indian population. Mutational analyses of 92 HCM cases were carried out following PCR based SSCP analysis. The study revealed band pattern variation in 3 cases from a group of 92 HCM patients. This band pattern variation, on sequencing revealed base changes, one at nt 2560 with G>T transversion in exon-5 region with a wobble and others at nt 2479 and nt 2478 with G>C and C>G transversions in the intronic region upstream of the exon 5 on sequencing. Further analysis showed that one of the probands showed apical form of hypertrophy, two others showing asymmetric septal hypertrophy. Two of these probands showed family history of the condition. Hence, the study supports earlier reports of involvement of TNNI-3 in the causation of apical and asymmetrical forms of hypertrophy.

  17. Genetic variation in exon 5 of troponin - I gene in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy cases

    PubMed Central

    Annapurna, S. D.; Reena, T. R.; Nallari, Pratibha; Calambur, Narasimhan

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Cardiomyopathies are a heterogeneous group of heart muscle disorders and are classified as 1) Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy (HCM) 2) Dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) 3) Restrictive cardiomyopathy (RCM) and 4) Arrhythmogenic right ventricular dysplasia (ARVD) as per WHO classification, of which HCM and DCM are common. HCM is a complex but relatively common form of inherited heart muscle disease with prevalence of 1 in 500 individuals and is commonly associated with sarcomeric gene mutations. Cardiac muscle troponin I (TNNI-3) is one such sarcomeric protein and is a subunit of the thin filament-associated troponin-tropomyosin complex involved in calcium regulation of skeletal and cardiac muscle contraction. Mutations in this gene were found to be associated with a history of sudden cardiac death in HCM patients. AIM: Therefore the present study aims to identify for mutations associated with troponin I gene in a set of HCM patients from Indian population. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Mutational analyses of 92 HCM cases were carried out following PCR based SSCP analysis. RESULTS: The study revealed band pattern variation in 3 cases from a group of 92 HCM patients. This band pattern variation, on sequencing revealed base changes, one at nt 2560 with G>T transversion in exon-5 region with a wobble and others at nt 2479 and nt 2478 with G>C and C>G transversions in the intronic region upstream of the exon 5 on sequencing. Further analysis showed that one of the probands showed apical form of hypertrophy, two others showing asymmetric septal hypertrophy. Two of these probands showed family history of the condition. CONCLUSIONS: Hence, the study supports earlier reports of involvement of TNNI-3 in the causation of apical and asymmetrical forms of hypertrophy. PMID:21957345

  18. Hypomethylation of the interphotoreceptor retinoid-binding protein (IRBP) promotor and first exon is linked to expression of the gene.

    PubMed Central

    Albini, A; Toffenetti, J; Zhu, Z; Chader, G J; Noonan, D M

    1990-01-01

    The interphotoreceptor retinoid-binding protein (IRBP) is limited in expression to retinal photoreceptor cells and a subset of pinealocytes. We have obtained a genomic clone containing the entire coding region and 7 kb of 5' flanking sequence. As a first step in studying IRBP gene regulation we have examined the CpG methylation patterns of the entire IRBP gene in expressing and non-expressing human cells. This has been done by isolation of high molecular weight DNA from Y-79 cells grown in suspension or attached to poly-D-lysine, which synthesize IRBP at different levels, and from human lymphocytes, which were shown by northern analysis to lack IRBP message. The DNA was digested by either Hpa II, Msp I, or Hha I. Southern blots were prepared with these digests and hybridized with probes made from fragments covering the complete genomic clone. Probes from the first exon, the introns and the 3' end gave banding patterns which showed no differences between the expressing cells and the lymphocytes. A probe from the very 5' end did not give a clear banding pattern, probably due to the presence of repetitive elements in the probe. However, a Hind III probe covering the 5' flanking 3 kb and the beginning of the first exon hybridized with a 1.8 kb band in Hpa II digests of Y-79 cells which was not present in Hpa II digests of lymphocyte DNA. In addition, a 2.1-2.3 kb Hha I band was found only in the Y-79 DNA digests. Sequence analysis of the promoter region indicated that these bands were due to hypomethylation of sites within a CpG rich island from -1578 to -1108 in the promoter and hypomethylation of sites in the beginning of the first exon. A Hha I site between the CpG island and the first exon was not hypomethylated in the expressing Y-79 cells. We propose that hypomethylation of the CpG rich island of the IRBP promoter and the first exon is linked to the expression of this gene. Images PMID:2402443

  19. Comparative analysis identifies exonic splicing regulatory sequences--The complex definition of enhancers and silencers.

    PubMed

    Goren, Amir; Ram, Oren; Amit, Maayan; Keren, Hadas; Lev-Maor, Galit; Vig, Ida; Pupko, Tal; Ast, Gil

    2006-06-23

    Exonic splicing regulatory sequences (ESRs) are cis-acting factor binding sites that regulate constitutive and alternative splicing. A computational method based on the conservation level of wobble positions and the overabundance of sequence motifs between 46,103 human and mouse orthologous exons was developed, identifying 285 putative ESRs. Alternatively spliced exons that are either short in length or contain weak splice sites show the highest conservation level of those ESRs, especially toward the edges of exons. ESRs that are abundant in those subgroups show a different distribution between constitutively and alternatively spliced exons. Representatives of these ESRs and two SR protein binding sites were shown, experimentally, to display variable regulatory effects on alternative splicing, depending on their relative locations in the exon. This finding signifies the delicate positional effect of ESRs on alternative splicing regulation.

  20. The complete local genotype–phenotype landscape for the alternative splicing of a human exon

    PubMed Central

    Julien, Philippe; Miñana, Belén; Baeza-Centurion, Pablo; Valcárcel, Juan; Lehner, Ben

    2016-01-01

    The properties of genotype–phenotype landscapes are crucial for understanding evolution but are not characterized for most traits. Here, we present a >95% complete local landscape for a defined molecular function—the alternative splicing of a human exon (FAS/CD95 exon 6, involved in the control of apoptosis). The landscape provides important mechanistic insights, revealing that regulatory information is dispersed throughout nearly every nucleotide in an exon, that the exon is more robust to the effects of mutations than its immediate neighbours in genotype space, and that high mutation sensitivity (evolvability) will drive the rapid divergence of alternative splicing between species unless it is constrained by selection. Moreover, the extensive epistasis in the landscape predicts that exonic regulatory sequences may diverge between species even when exon inclusion levels are functionally important and conserved by selection. PMID:27161764

  1. Personalized exon skipping strategies to address clustered non-deletion dystrophin mutations.

    PubMed

    Forrest, Sarah; Meloni, Penny L; Muntoni, Francesco; Kim, Jihee; Fletcher, Sue; Wilton, Steve D

    2010-12-01

    Antisense oligomer induced exon skipping is showing promise as a therapy to reduce the severity of Duchenne muscular dystrophy. To date, the focus has been on excluding single exons flanking frame-shifting deletions in the dystrophin gene. However, a third of all Duchenne muscular dystrophy causing mutations are more subtle DNA changes. Thirty nine dystrophin exons are potentially frame-shifting and mutations in these will require the targeted removal of exon blocks to generate in-frame transcripts. We report that clustered non-deletion mutations in the dystrophin gene respond differently to different antisense oligomer preparations targeting the same dual exon block, the removal of which bypasses the mutation and restores the open reading-frame. The personalized nature of the responses to antisense oligomer application presents additional challenges to the induction of multi-exon skipping with a single oligomer preparation.

  2. Testing the exon theory of genes: the evidence from protein structure.

    PubMed

    Stoltzfus, A; Spencer, D F; Zuker, M; Logsdon, J M; Doolittle, W F

    1994-07-08

    A tendency for exons to correspond to discrete units of protein structure in protein-coding genes of ancient origin would provide clear evidence in favor of the exon theory of genes, which proposes that split genes arose not by insertion of introns into unsplit genes, but from combinations of primordial mini-genes (exons) separated by spacers (introns). Although putative examples of such correspondence have strongly influenced previous debate on the origin of introns, a general correspondence has not been rigorously proved. Objective methods for detecting correspondences were developed and applied to four examples that have been cited previously as evidence of the exon theory of genes. No significant correspondence between exons and units of protein structure was detected, suggesting that the putative correspondence does not exist and that the exon theory of genes is untenable.

  3. Exon definition as a potential negative force against intron losses in evolution.

    PubMed

    Niu, Deng-Ke

    2008-11-13

    Previous studies have indicated that the wide variation in intron density (the number of introns per gene) among different eukaryotes largely reflects varying degrees of intron loss during evolution. The most popular model, which suggests that organisms lose introns through a mechanism in which reverse-transcribed cDNA recombines with the genomic DNA, concerns only one mutational force. Using exons as the units of splicing-site recognition, exon definition constrains the length of exons. An intron-loss event results in fusion of flanking exons and thus a larger exon. The large size of the newborn exon may cause splicing errors, i.e., exon skipping, if the splicing of pre-mRNAs is initiated by exon definition. By contrast, if the splicing of pre-mRNAs is initiated by intron definition, intron loss does not matter. Exon definition may thus be a selective force against intron loss. An organism with a high frequency of exon definition is expected to experience a low rate of intron loss throughout evolution and have a high density of spliceosomal introns. The majority of spliceosomal introns in vertebrates may be maintained during evolution not because of potential functions, but because of their splicing mechanism (i.e., exon definition). Further research is required to determine whether exon definition is a negative force in maintaining the high intron density of vertebrates. This article was reviewed by Dr. Scott W. Roy (nominated by Dr. John Logsdon), Dr.Eugene V. Koonin, and Dr. Igor B. Rogozin (nominated by Dr. Mikhail Gelfand). For the full reviews,please go to the Reviewers' comments section.

  4. Non-hominid TP63 lacks retroviral LTRs but contains a novel conserved upstream exon.

    PubMed

    Beyer, Ulrike; Dobbelstein, Matthias

    2011-06-15

    We have recently identified novel isoforms of human p63, with specific expression in testicular germ cells. The synthesis of these p63 mRNA species is driven by the long terminal repeat (LTR) of the endogenous retrovirus ERV9. This LTR was inserted upstream of the previously known TP63 exons roughly 15 million years ago, leading to the expression of novel exons and the synthesis of germline-specific transactivating p63 (GTAp63) isoforms in humans and great apes (Beyer et al. Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 2011; 108:3624-9). However, this study did not reveal whether similar upstream exons can also be found in the TP63 genes of non-hominid animals. Here we performed rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE) to identify a novel upstream exon of murine TP63, located in the 5' position from the previously described start of transcription. This exon, termed "exon U3" in our previous publication, is conserved within a broad range of mammalian species, including hominids. However, in contrast to the human TP63 gene structure, the murine exon U3 represented the most upstream transcribed sequence of TP63. Murine exon U3 is then alternatively spliced to acceptor sites within exon 1 or upstream of exon 2, resulting in two different available translational start sites. p63 mRNAs comprising exon U3 are detectable in various tissues, with no particular preference for testicular cells. Thus, whereas the retroviral LTR in hominid species results in strictly germline-associated p63 isoforms, the upstream exon in non-hominids fails to confer this tissue specificity. This notion strongly supports the concept that the synthesis of a testis-specific p63 isoform is a recently acquired, unique feature of humans and great apes.

  5. Lex-SVM: exploring the potential of exon expression profiling for disease classification.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Xiongying; Zhao, Yi; Liu, Changning; Bu, Dongbo

    2011-04-01

    Exon expression profiling technologies, including exon arrays and RNA-Seq, measure the abundance of every exon in a gene. Compared with gene expression profiling technologies like 3' array, exon expression profiling technologies could detect alterations in both transcription and alternative splicing, therefore they are expected to be more sensitive in diagnosis. However, exon expression profiling also brings higher dimension, more redundancy, and significant correlation among features. Ignoring the correlation structure among exons of a gene, a popular classification method like L1-SVM selects exons individually from each gene and thus is vulnerable to noise. To overcome this limitation, we present in this paper a new variant of SVM named Lex-SVM to incorporate correlation structure among exons and known splicing patterns to promote classification performance. Specifically, we construct a new norm, ex-norm, including our prior knowledge on exon correlation structure to regularize the coefficients of a linear SVM. Lex-SVM can be solved efficiently using standard linear programming techniques. The advantage of Lex-SVM is that it can select features group-wisely, force features in a subgroup to take equal weihts and exclude the features that contradict the majority in the subgroup. Experimental results suggest that on exon expression profile, Lex-SVM is more accurate than existing methods. Lex-SVM also generates a more compact model and selects genes more consistently in cross-validation. Unlike L1-SVM selecting only one exon in a gene, Lex-SVM assigns equal weights to as many exons in a gene as possible, lending itself easier for further interpretation.

  6. Exon 10 skipping in ACAT1 caused by a novel c.949G>A mutation located at an exonic splice enhancer site.

    PubMed

    Otsuka, Hiroki; Sasai, Hideo; Nakama, Mina; Aoyama, Yuka; Abdelkreem, Elsayed; Ohnishi, Hidenori; Konstantopoulou, Vassiliki; Sass, Jörn Oliver; Fukao, Toshiyuki

    2016-11-01

    Beta-ketothiolase deficiency, also known as mitochondrial acetoacetyl-CoA thiolase (T2) deficiency, is an autosomal recessive disease caused by mutations in the acetyl‑CoA acetyltransferase 1 (ACAT1) gene. A German T2‑deficient patient that developed a severe ketoacidotic episode at the age of 11 months, was revealed to be a compound heterozygote of a previously reported null mutation, c.472A>G (p.N158D) and a novel mutation, c.949G>A (p.D317N), in ACAT1. The c.949G>A mutation was suspected to cause aberrant splicing as it is located within an exonic splicing enhancer sequence (c. 947CTGACGC) that is a potential binding site for serine/arginine‑rich splicing factor 1. A mutation in this sequence, c.951C>T, results in exon 10 skipping. A minigene construct was synthesized that included exon 9‑truncated intron 9‑exon 10‑truncated intron 10‑exon 11, and the splicing of this minigene revealed that the c.949G>A mutant construct caused exon 10 skipping in a proportion of the transcripts. Furthermore, additional substitution of G for C at the first nucleotide of exon 10 (c.941G>C) abolished the effect of the c.949G>A mutation. Transient expression analysis of the c.949G>A mutant cDNA revealed no residual T2 activity in the mutated D317N enzyme. Therefore, c.949G>A (D317N) is a pathogenic missense mutation, and diminishes the effect of an exonic splicing enhancer and causes exon 10 skipping. The present study demonstrates that a missense mutation, or even a synonymous substitution, may disrupt enzyme function by interference with splicing.

  7. Genomic V exons from whole genome shotgun data in reptiles.

    PubMed

    Olivieri, D N; von Haeften, B; Sánchez-Espinel, C; Faro, J; Gambón-Deza, F

    2014-08-01

    Reptiles and mammals diverged over 300 million years ago, creating two parallel evolutionary lineages amongst terrestrial vertebrates. In reptiles, two main evolutionary lines emerged: one gave rise to Squamata, while the other gave rise to Testudines, Crocodylia, and Aves. In this study, we determined the genomic variable (V) exons from whole genome shotgun sequencing (WGS) data in reptiles corresponding to the three main immunoglobulin (IG) loci and the four main T cell receptor (TR) loci. We show that Squamata lack the TRG and TRD genes, and snakes lack the IGKV genes. In representative species of Testudines and Crocodylia, the seven major IG and TR loci are maintained. As in mammals, genes of the IG loci can be grouped into well-defined IMGT clans through a multi-species phylogenetic analysis. We show that the reptilian IGHV and IGLV genes are distributed amongst the established mammalian clans, while their IGKV genes are found within a single clan, nearly exclusive from the mammalian sequences. The reptilian and mammalian TRAV genes cluster into six common evolutionary clades (since IMGT clans have not been defined for TR). In contrast, the reptilian TRBV genes cluster into three clades, which have few mammalian members. In this locus, the V exon sequences from mammals appear to have undergone different evolutionary diversification processes that occurred outside these shared reptilian clans. These sequences can be obtained in a freely available public repository (http://vgenerepertoire.org).

  8. Deletion of ameloblastin exon 6 is associated with amelogenesis imperfecta.

    PubMed

    Poulter, James A; Murillo, Gina; Brookes, Steven J; Smith, Claire E L; Parry, David A; Silva, Sandra; Kirkham, Jennifer; Inglehearn, Chris F; Mighell, Alan J

    2014-10-15

    Amelogenesis imperfecta (AI) describes a heterogeneous group of inherited dental enamel defects reflecting failure of normal amelogenesis. Ameloblastin (AMBN) is the second most abundant enamel matrix protein expressed during amelogenesis. The pivotal role of AMBN in amelogenesis has been confirmed experimentally using mouse models. However, no AMBN mutations have been associated with human AI. Using autozygosity mapping and exome sequencing, we identified genomic deletion of AMBN exon 6 in a second cousin consanguineous family with three of the six children having hypoplastic AI. The genomic deletion corresponds to an in-frame deletion of 79 amino acids, shortening the protein from 447 to 368 residues. Exfoliated primary teeth (unmatched to genotype) were available from family members. The most severely affected had thin, aprismatic enamel (similar to that reported in mice homozygous for Ambn lacking exons 5 and 6). Other teeth exhibited thicker but largely aprismatic enamel. One tooth had apparently normal enamel. It has been suggested that AMBN may function in bone development. No clinically obvious bone or other co-segregating health problems were identified in the family investigated. This study confirms for the first time that AMBN mutations cause non-syndromic human AI and that mouse models with disrupted Ambn function are valid.

  9. JuncDB: an exon–exon junction database

    PubMed Central

    Chorev, Michal; Guy, Lotem; Carmel, Liran

    2016-01-01

    Intron positions upon the mRNA transcript are sometimes remarkably conserved even across distantly related eukaryotic species. This has made the comparison of intron–exon architectures across orthologous transcripts a very useful tool for studying various evolutionary processes. Moreover, the wide range of functions associated with introns may confer biological meaning to evolutionary changes in gene architectures. Yet, there is currently no database that offers such comparative information. Here, we present JuncDB (http://juncdb.carmelab.huji.ac.il/), an exon–exon junction database dedicated to the comparison of architectures between orthologous transcripts. It covers nearly 40 000 sets of orthologous transcripts spanning 88 eukaryotic species. JuncDB offers a user-friendly interface, access to detailed information, instructive graphical displays of the comparative data and easy ways to download data to a local computer. In addition, JuncDB allows the analysis to be carried out either on specific genes, or at a genome-wide level for any selected group of species. PMID:26519469

  10. Exon Microarray Analysis of Human Dorsolateral Prefrontal Cortex in Alcoholism

    PubMed Central

    Manzardo, Ann M.; Gunewardena, Sumedha; Wang, Kun; Butler, Merlin G.

    2014-01-01

    Background Alcohol abuse is associated with cellular and biochemical disturbances that impact upon protein and nucleic acid synthesis, brain development, function and behavioral responses. To further characterize the genetic influences in alcoholism and the effects of alcohol consumption on gene expression, we used a highly sensitive exon microarray to examine mRNA expression in human frontal cortex of alcoholics and control males. Methods Messenger RNA was isolated from the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (dlPFC, Brodmann area 9) of 7 adult Alcoholic (6 males, 1 female, mean age 48 years) and 7 matched controls. Affymetrix Human Exon 1.0 ST Array was performed according to standard procedures and the results analyzed at the gene level. Microarray findings were validated using qRT-PCR, and the ontology of disturbed genes characterized using Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (IPA). Results Decreased mRNA expression was observed for genes involved in cellular adhesion (e.g., CTNNA3, ITGA2), transport (e.g., TF, ABCA8), nervous system development (e.g., LRP2, UGT8, GLDN) and signaling (e.g., RASGRP, LGR5) with influence over lipid and myelin synthesis (e.g., ASPA, ENPP2, KLK6). IPA identified disturbances in network functions associated with neurological disease, and development including cellular assembly and organization impacting on psychological disorders. Conclusions Our data in alcoholism support a reduction in expression of dlPFC mRNA for genes involved with neuronal growth, differentiation and signaling that targets white matter of the brain. PMID:24890784

  11. Exon Shuffling and Origin of Scorpion Venom Biodiversity

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xueli; Gao, Bin; Zhu, Shunyi

    2016-01-01

    Scorpion venom is a complex combinatorial library of peptides and proteins with multiple biological functions. A combination of transcriptomic and proteomic techniques has revealed its enormous molecular diversity, as identified by the presence of a large number of ion channel-targeted neurotoxins with different folds, membrane-active antimicrobial peptides, proteases, and protease inhibitors. Although the biodiversity of scorpion venom has long been known, how it arises remains unsolved. In this work, we analyzed the exon-intron structures of an array of scorpion venom protein-encoding genes and unexpectedly found that nearly all of these genes possess a phase-1 intron (one intron located between the first and second nucleotides of a codon) near the cleavage site of a signal sequence despite their mature peptides remarkably differ. This observation matches a theory of exon shuffling in the origin of new genes and suggests that recruitment of different folds into scorpion venom might be achieved via shuffling between body protein-coding genes and ancestral venom gland-specific genes that presumably contributed tissue-specific regulatory elements and secretory signal sequences. PMID:28035955

  12. Deletion of ameloblastin exon 6 is associated with amelogenesis imperfecta

    PubMed Central

    Poulter, James A.; Murillo, Gina; Brookes, Steven J.; Smith, Claire E. L.; Parry, David A.; Silva, Sandra; Kirkham, Jennifer; Inglehearn, Chris F.; Mighell, Alan J.

    2014-01-01

    Amelogenesis imperfecta (AI) describes a heterogeneous group of inherited dental enamel defects reflecting failure of normal amelogenesis. Ameloblastin (AMBN) is the second most abundant enamel matrix protein expressed during amelogenesis. The pivotal role of AMBN in amelogenesis has been confirmed experimentally using mouse models. However, no AMBN mutations have been associated with human AI. Using autozygosity mapping and exome sequencing, we identified genomic deletion of AMBN exon 6 in a second cousin consanguineous family with three of the six children having hypoplastic AI. The genomic deletion corresponds to an in-frame deletion of 79 amino acids, shortening the protein from 447 to 368 residues. Exfoliated primary teeth (unmatched to genotype) were available from family members. The most severely affected had thin, aprismatic enamel (similar to that reported in mice homozygous for Ambn lacking exons 5 and 6). Other teeth exhibited thicker but largely aprismatic enamel. One tooth had apparently normal enamel. It has been suggested that AMBN may function in bone development. No clinically obvious bone or other co-segregating health problems were identified in the family investigated. This study confirms for the first time that AMBN mutations cause non-syndromic human AI and that mouse models with disrupted Ambn function are valid. PMID:24858907

  13. Negative regulatory elements upstream of a novel exon of the neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptor alpha 2 subunit gene.

    PubMed Central

    Bessis, A; Savatier, N; Devillers-Thiéry, A; Bejanin, S; Changeux, J P

    1993-01-01

    The expression of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor alpha 2 subunit gene is highly restricted to the Spiriform lateralis nucleus of the Chick diencephalon. As a first step toward understanding the molecular mechanism underlying this regulation, we have investigated the structural and regulatory properties of the 5' sequence of this gene. A strategy based on the ligation of an oligonucleotide to the first strand of the cDNA (SLIC) followed by PCR amplification was used. A new exon was found approximately 3kb upstream from the first coding exon, and multiple transcription start sites of the gene were mapped. Analysis of the flanking region shows many consensus sequences for the binding of nuclear proteins, suggesting that the 1 kb flanking region contains at least a portion of the promoter of the gene. We have analysed the negative regulatory elements present within this region and found that a silencer region located between nucleotide -144 and +76 is active in fibroblasts as well as in neurons. This silencer is composed of six tandem repeat Oct-like motifs (CCCCATGCAAT), but does not bind any member of the Oct family. Moreover these motifs were found to act as a silencer only when they were tandemly repeated. When two, four or five motifs were deleted, the silencer activity of the motifs unexpectedly became an enhancer activity in all cells we have tested. Images PMID:8502560

  14. Coding exon-structure aware realigner (CESAR) utilizes genome alignments for accurate comparative gene annotation

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Virag; Elghafari, Anas; Hiller, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Identifying coding genes is an essential step in genome annotation. Here, we utilize existing whole genome alignments to detect conserved coding exons and then map gene annotations from one genome to many aligned genomes. We show that genome alignments contain thousands of spurious frameshifts and splice site mutations in exons that are truly conserved. To overcome these limitations, we have developed CESAR (Coding Exon-Structure Aware Realigner) that realigns coding exons, while considering reading frame and splice sites of each exon. CESAR effectively avoids spurious frameshifts in conserved genes and detects 91% of shifted splice sites. This results in the identification of thousands of additional conserved exons and 99% of the exons that lack inactivating mutations match real exons. Finally, to demonstrate the potential of using CESAR for comparative gene annotation, we applied it to 188 788 exons of 19 865 human genes to annotate human genes in 99 other vertebrates. These comparative gene annotations are available as a resource (http://bds.mpi-cbg.de/hillerlab/CESAR/). CESAR (https://github.com/hillerlab/CESAR/) can readily be applied to other alignments to accurately annotate coding genes in many other vertebrate and invertebrate genomes. PMID:27016733

  15. An annotation infrastructure for the analysis and interpretation of Affymetrix exon array data.

    PubMed

    Okoniewski, Michał J; Yates, Tim; Dibben, Siân; Miller, Crispin J

    2007-01-01

    Affymetrix exon arrays contain probesets intended to target every known and predicted exon in the entire genome, posing significant challenges for high-throughput genome-wide data analysis. X:MAP http://xmap.picr.man.ac.uk, an annotation database, and exonmap http://www.bioconductor.org/packages/2.0/bioc/html/exonmap.html, a BioConductor/R package, are designed to support fine-grained analysis of exon array data. The system supports the application of standard statistical techniques, prior to the use of genome scale annotation to provide gene-, transcript- and exon-level summaries and visualization tools.

  16. An annotation infrastructure for the analysis and interpretation of Affymetrix exon array data

    PubMed Central

    Okoniewski, Michał J; Yates, Tim; Dibben, Siân; Miller, Crispin J

    2007-01-01

    Affymetrix exon arrays contain probesets intended to target every known and predicted exon in the entire genome, posing significant challenges for high-throughput genome-wide data analysis. X:MAP , an annotation database, and exonmap , a BioConductor/R package, are designed to support fine-grained analysis of exon array data. The system supports the application of standard statistical techniques, prior to the use of genome scale annotation to provide gene-, transcript- and exon-level summaries and visualization tools. PMID:17498294

  17. A Relaxed Active Site After Exon Ligation by the Group I Intron

    SciTech Connect

    Lipchock,S.; Strobel, S.

    2008-01-01

    During RNA maturation, the group I intron promotes two sequential phosphorotransfer reactions resulting in exon ligation and intron release. Here, we report the crystal structure of the intron in complex with spliced exons and two additional structures that examine the role of active-site metal ions during the second step of RNA splicing. These structures reveal a relaxed active site, in which direct metal coordination by the exons is lost after ligation, while other tertiary interactions are retained between the exon and the intron. Consistent with these structural observations, kinetic and thermodynamic measurements show that the scissile phosphate makes direct contact with metals in the ground state before exon ligation and in the transition state, but not after exon ligation. Despite no direct exonic interactions and even in the absence of the scissile phosphate, two metal ions remain bound within the active site. Together, these data suggest that release of the ligated exons from the intron is preceded by a change in substrate-metal coordination before tertiary hydrogen bonding contacts to the exons are broken.

  18. Exon deletion patterns of the dystrophin gene in 82 Vietnamese Duchenne/Becker muscular dystrophy patients.

    PubMed

    Tran, Van Khanh; Ta, Van Thanh; Vu, Dung Chi; Nguyen, Suong Thi-Bang; Do, Hai Ngoc; Ta, Minh Hieu; Tran, Thinh Huy; Matsuo, Masafumi

    2013-12-01

    Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophies (DMD/BMD) are the most common inherited muscle diseases caused by mutations in the dystrophin gene. The reading frame rule explains the genotype-phenotype relationship in DMD/BMD. In Vietnam, extensive mutation analysis has never been conducted in DMD/BMD. Here, 152 Vietnamese muscular dystrophy patients were examined for dystrophin exon deletion by amplifying 19 deletion-prone exons and deletion ends were confirmed by dystrophin cDNA analysis if necessary. The result was that 82 (54%) patients were found to have exon deletions, thus confirming exact deletion ends. A further result was that 37 patterns of deletion were classified. Deletions of exons 45-50 and 49-52 were the most common patterns identified, numbering six cases each (7.3%). The reading frame rule explained the genotype-phenotype relationship, but not five (6.1%) DMD cases. Each of five patients had deletions of exons 11-27 in common. The applicability of the therapy producing semifunctional in frame mRNA in DMD by inducing skipping of a single exon was examined. Induction of exon 51 skipping was ranked at top priority, since 16 (27%) patients were predicted to have semifunctional mRNA skipping. Exons 45 and 53 were the next ranked, with 12 (20%) and 11 (18%) patients, respectively. The largest deletion database of the dystrophin gene, established in Vietnamese DMD/BMD patients, disclosed a strong indication for exon-skipping therapy.

  19. Exon dosage analysis of parkin gene in Chinese sporadic Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Guo, Ji-Feng; Dong, Xiao-Li; Xu, Qian; Li, Nan; Yan, Xin-Xiang; Xia, Kun; Tang, Bei-Sha

    2015-09-14

    Parkin gene mutations are by far the most common mutations in both familial Parkinson's disease (PD) and sporadic PD. Approximately, 50% of parkin mutations is exon dosage mutations (i.e., deletions and duplications of entire exons). Here, we first established a MLPA assay for quick detection of parkin exon rearrangements. Then, we studied parkin exon dosage mutations in 755 Chinese sporadic PDdisease patients using the established MLPA assay. We found that there were 25 (3.3%) patients with exon dosage alterations including deletions and duplications, 20 (11.4%) patients with exon rearrangements in 178 early-onset patients, and 5 (0.86%) patients with exon rearrangement mutations in 579 later-onset patients. The percentage of individuals with parkin dosage mutations is more than 33% when the age at onset is less than 30 years old, but less than 7% when the age at onset is more than 30. In these mutations, deletion is the main mutational style, especially in exon 2-5. Our results indicated that exon dosage mutations in parkin gene might be the main cause for sporadic PD, especially in EOP.

  20. Prediction of mutant mRNA splice isoforms by information theory-based exon definition.

    PubMed

    Mucaki, Eliseos J; Shirley, Ben C; Rogan, Peter K

    2013-04-01

    Mutations that affect mRNA splicing often produce multiple mRNA isoforms, resulting in complex molecular phenotypes. Definition of an exon and its inclusion in mature mRNA relies on joint recognition of both acceptor and donor splice sites. This study predicts cryptic and exon-skipping isoforms in mRNA produced by splicing mutations from the combined information contents (R(i), which measures binding-site strength, in bits) and distribution of the splice sites defining these exons. The total information content of an exon (R(i),total) is the sum of the R(i) values of its acceptor and donor splice sites, adjusted for the self-information of the distance separating these sites, that is, the gap surprisal. Differences between total information contents of an exon (ΔR(i,total)) are predictive of the relative abundance of these exons in distinct processed mRNAs. Constraints on splice site and exon selection are used to eliminate nonconforming and poorly expressed isoforms. Molecular phenotypes are computed by the Automated Splice Site and Exon Definition Analysis (http://splice.uwo.ca) server. Predictions of splicing mutations were highly concordant (85.2%; n = 61) with published expression data. In silico exon definition analysis will contribute to streamlining assessment of abnormal and normal splice isoforms resulting from mutations. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Exon 2, 3, and 4 polymorphism of HLA-DPA1

    SciTech Connect

    Rozemuller, E.H.; Versluis, L.F.; Bouwens, A.G.M.; Tilanus, M.G.J.

    1995-01-01

    Currently HLA-DPB1 typing is mainly performed by using DNA techniques based upon the identification of exon 2 polymorphism. A direct sequencing approach has recently been described for HLA-DPB1. Cellular DP reactivity, however, may also be dependent on HLA-DPA1 polymorphism. Polymorphism of HLA-DPA1 exon 2 and exon 4 has recently been described. In contrast to previous reports all DPA1 alleles can be discriminated on the basis of exon 2 polymorphism. 7 refs., 1 fig.

  2. Identification of AcMNPV EXON0 (ac141) domains required for efficient production of budded virus, dimerization and association with BV/ODV-C42 and FP25.

    PubMed

    Fang, Minggang; Nie, Yingchao; Dai, Xiaojiang; Theilmann, David A

    2008-05-25

    The Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcMNPV) late gene exon0 (ac141) is required for the efficient production of budded virus (BV). EXON0 interacts with nucleopcapsid protein BV/ODV-C42 and FP25 and enables egress of nucleocapsids from the nucleus to the cytoplasm. This study examines the functional domains of EXON0 that play a role in BV production. Six putative domains of the 261 amino acid EXON0 were deleted and examined for functionality by determining their ability to rescue an AcMNPV exon0 knockout bacmid. Domain mapping results showed that all the six domains were required but deletion of the N-terminal acidic region and the leucine zipper domains had the greatest impact on BV production. Yeast 2-hybrid and co-immunoprecipitation demonstrated that EXON0 formed dimers. Point mutation analysis demonstrated that the leucine zipper was required for dimer formation and interaction with BV/ODV-C42 and FP25. The charged domain was also required for BV/ODV-C42 interaction.

  3. Mutation analysis of methylmalonyl CoA mutase gene exon 2 in Egyptian families: Identification of 25 novel allelic variants.

    PubMed

    Ghoraba, Dina A; Mohammed, Magdy M; Zaki, Osama K

    2015-02-01

    Methylmalonic aciduria (MMA) is an autosomal recessive disorder of methylmalonate and cobalamin (cbl; vitamin B12) metabolism. It is an inborn error of organic acid metabolism which commonly results from a defect in the gene encoding the methylmalonyl-CoA mutase (MCM) apoenzyme. Here we report the results of mutation study of exon 2 of the methylmalonyl CoA mutase (MUT) gene, coding MCM residues from 1 to 128, in ten unrelated Egyptian families affected with methylmalonic aciduria. Patients were presented with a wide-anion gap metabolic acidosis. The diagnosis has established by the measurement of C3 (propionylcarnitine) and C3:C2 (propionylcarnitine/acetylcarnitine) in blood by using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC/MS-MS) and was confirmed by the detection of an abnormally elevated level of methylmalonic acid in urine by using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC/MS) and isocratic cation exchange high-performance liquid-chromatography (HPLC). Direct sequencing of gDNA of the MUT gene exon 2 has revealed a total of 26 allelic variants: ten of which were intronic, eight were located upstream to the exon 2 coding region, four were novel modifications predicted to affect the splicing region, three were novel mutations within the coding region: c.15G > A (p.K5K), c.165C > A (p.N55K) and c.7del (p.R3EfsX14), as well as the previously reported mutation c.323G > A (p.R108H).

  4. Exonic Re-Sequencing of the Chromosome 2q24.3 Parkinson’s Disease Locus

    PubMed Central

    Labbé, Catherine; Ogaki, Kotaro; Lorenzo-Betancor, Oswaldo; Carrasquillo, Minerva M.; Heckman, Michael G.; McCarthy, Allan; Soto-Ortolaza, Alexandra I.; Walton, Ronald L.; Lynch, Timothy; Siuda, Joanna; Opala, Grzegorz; Krygowska-Wajs, Anna; Barcikowska, Maria; Czyzewski, Krzysztof; Dickson, Dennis W.; Uitti, Ryan J.; Wszolek, Zbigniew K.; Ross, Owen A.

    2015-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) in Parkinson’s disease (PD) have identified over 20 genomic regions associated with disease risk. Many of these loci include several candidate genes making it difficult to pinpoint the causal gene. The locus on chromosome 2q24.3 encompasses three genes: B3GALT1, STK39, and CERS6. In order to identify if the causal variants are simple missense changes, we sequenced all 31 exons of these three genes in 187 patients with PD. We identified 13 exonic variants including four non-synonymous and three insertion/deletion variants (indels). These non-synonymous variants and rs2102808, the GWAS tag SNP, were genotyped in three independent series consisting of a total of 1976 patients and 1596 controls. Our results show that the seven identified 2q24.3 coding variants are not independently responsible for the GWAS association signal at the locus; however, there is a haplotype, which contains both rs2102808 and a STK39 exon 1 6bp indel variant, that is significantly associated with PD risk (Odds Ratio [OR] = 1.35, 95% CI: 1.11–1.64, P = 0.003). This haplotype is more associated than each of the two variants independently (OR = 1.23, P = 0.005 and 1.10, P = 0.10, respectively). Our findings suggest that the risk variant is likely located in a non-coding region. Additional sequencing of the locus including promoter and regulatory regions will be needed to pinpoint the association at this locus that leads to an increased risk to PD. PMID:26090850

  5. Exon-intron structure and sequence variation of the calreticulin gene among Rhipicephalus sanguineus group ticks.

    PubMed

    Porretta, Daniele; Latrofa, Maria Stefania; Dantas-Torres, Filipe; Mastrantonio, Valentina; Iatta, Roberta; Otranto, Domenico; Urbanelli, Sandra

    2016-12-12

    Calreticulin proteins (CRTs) are important components of tick saliva, which is involved in the blood meal success, pathogen transmission and host allergic responses. The characterization of the genes encoding for salivary proteins, such as CRTs, is pivotal to understand the mechanisms of tick-host interaction during blood meal and to develop tick control strategies based on their inhibition. In hard ticks, crt genes were shown to have only one intron with conserved position among species. In this study we investigated the exon-intron structure and variation of the crt gene in Rhipicephalus spp. ticks in order to assess the crt exon-intron structure and the potential utility of crt gene as a molecular marker. We sequenced the exon-intron region of crt gene in ticks belonging to so-called tropical and temperate lineages of Rhipicephalus sanguineus (sensu lato), Rhipicephalus sp. I, Rhipicephalus sp. III, Rhipicephalus sp. IV, R. guilhoni, R. muhsamae and R. turanicus. Genetic divergence and phylogenetic relationships between the sequences obtained were estimated. All individuals belonging to the tropical lineage of R. sanguineus (s.l.), R. guilhoni, R. muhsamae, R. turanicus, Rhipicephalus sp. III and Rhipicephalus sp. IV analysed showed crt intron-present alleles. However, both crt intron-present and intron-absent alleles were found in Rhipicephalus sp. I and the temperate lineage of R. sanguineus (s.l.), showing the occurrence of an intraspecific intron presence-absence polymorphism. Phylogenetic relationships among the crt intron-present sequences showed distinct lineages for all taxa, with the tropical and temperate lineages of R. sanguineus (s.l.) being more closely related to each other. We expanded previous studies about the characterization of crt gene in hard ticks. Our results highlighted a previously overlooked variation in the crt structure among Rhipicephalus spp., and among hard ticks in general. Notably, the intron presence/absence polymorphism

  6. Unusual intron in the second exon of a Type III polyketide synthase gene of Alpinia calcarata Rosc.

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Plant phenolic compounds form a valuable resource of secondary metabolites having a broad spectrum of biological activities. Type III polyketide synthases play a key role in the formation of basic structural skeleton of the phenolic compounds. As a group of medicinal plants, PKSs with novel features are expected in the genome of Zingiberaceae. The genomic exploration of PKS in Alpinia calcarata conducted in this study identified the presence of an unusual intron at the region forming the second exon of typical PKSs, forming a gateway information of distribution of novel PKSs in Zingiberaceae. PMID:21637618

  7. Extensive interactions of PRP8 protein with the 5' and 3' splice sites during splicing suggest a role in stabilization of exon alignment by U5 snRNA.

    PubMed Central

    Teigelkamp, S; Newman, A J; Beggs, J D

    1995-01-01

    Precursor RNAs containing 4-thiouridine at specific sites were used with UV-crosslinking to map the binding sites of the yeast protein splicing factor PRP8. PRP8 protein interacts with a region of at least eight exon nucleotides at the 5' splice site and a minimum of 13 exon nucleotides and part of the polypyrimidine tract in the 3' splice site region. Crosslinking of PRP8 to mutant and duplicated 3' splice sites indicated that the interaction is not sequence specific, nor does it depend on the splice site being functional. Binding of PRP8 to the 5' exon was established before step 1 and to the 3' splice site region after step 1 of splicing. These interactions place PRP8 close to the proposed catalytic core of the spliceosome during both transesterification reactions. To date, this represents the most extensive mapping of the binding site(s) of a splicing factor on the substrate RNA. We propose that the large binding sites of PRP8 stabilize the intrinsically weaker interactions of U5 snRNA with both exons at the splice sites for exon alignment by the U5 snRNP. Images PMID:7781612

  8. THE CRYSTAL STRUCTURE OF 2,7-DIACETOXYTRANS-15,16-DIMETHYL-15,16-DIHYDROPYRENE,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    AROMATIC COMPOUNDS, CRYSTAL STRUCTURE ), (*POLYCYCLIC COMPOUNDS, CRYSTAL STRUCTURE ), (* CRYSTAL STRUCTURE , POLYCYCLIC COMPOUNDS), ESTERS, MOLECULAR STRUCTURE, CHEMICAL BONDS, X RAY DIFFRACTION, SCINTILLATION COUNTERS, CANADA

  9. Major histocompatibility complex class I evolution in songbirds: universal primers, rapid evolution and base compositional shifts in exon 3

    PubMed Central

    Alcaide, Miguel; Liu, Mark

    2013-01-01

    Genes of the Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) have become an important marker for the investigation of adaptive genetic variation in vertebrates because of their critical role in pathogen resistance. However, despite significant advances in the last few years the characterization of MHC variation in non-model species still remains a challenging task due to the redundancy and high variation of this gene complex. Here we report the utility of a single pair of primers for the cross-amplification of the third exon of MHC class I genes, which encodes the more polymorphic half of the peptide-binding region (PBR), in oscine passerines (songbirds; Aves: Passeriformes), a group especially challenging for MHC characterization due to the presence of large and complex MHC multigene families. In our survey, although the primers failed to amplify exon 3 from two suboscine passerine birds, they amplified exon 3 of multiple MHC class I genes in all 16 species of oscine songbirds tested, yielding a total of 120 sequences. The 16 songbird species belong to 14 different families, primarily within the Passerida, but also in the Corvida. Using a conservative approach based on the analysis of cloned amplicons (n = 16) from each species, we found between 3 and 10 MHC sequences per individual. Each allele repertoire was highly divergent, with the overall number of polymorphic sites per species ranging from 33 to 108 (out of 264 sites) and the average number of nucleotide differences between alleles ranging from 14.67 to 43.67. Our survey in songbirds allowed us to compare macroevolutionary dynamics of exon 3 between songbirds and non-passerine birds. We found compelling evidence of positive selection acting specifically upon peptide-binding codons across birds, and we estimate the strength of diversifying selection in songbirds to be about twice that in non-passerines. Analysis using comparative methods suggest weaker evidence for a higher GC content in the 3rd codon position of

  10. BRCA2 minor transcript lacking exons 4–7 supports viability in mice and may account for survival of humans with a pathogenic biallelic mutation

    PubMed Central

    Thirthagiri, Eswary; Klarmann, Kimberly D.; Shukla, Anil K.; Southon, Eileen; Biswas, Kajal; Martin, Betty K.; North, Susan Lynn; Magidson, Valentin; Burkett, Sandra; Haines, Diana C.; Noer, Kathleen; Matthai, Roberta; Tessarollo, Lino; Loncarek, Jadranka; Keller, Jonathan R.; Sharan, Shyam K.

    2016-01-01

    The breast cancer gene, BRCA2, is essential for viability, yet patients with Fanconi anemia-D1 subtype are born alive with biallelic mutations in this gene. The hypomorphic nature of the mutations is believed to support viability, but this is not always apparent. One such mutation is IVS7+2T>G, which causes premature protein truncation due to skipping of exon 7. We previously identified a transcript lacking exons 4–7, which restores the open-reading frame, encodes a DNA repair proficient protein and is expressed in IVS7+2T>G carriers. However, because the exons 4–7 encoded region contains several residues required for normal cell-cycle regulation and cytokinesis, this transcript's ability to support viability can be argued. To address this, we generated a Brca2 knock-in mouse model lacking exons 4–7 and demonstrated that these exons are dispensable for viability as well as tumor-free survival. This study provides the first in vivo evidence of the functional significance of a minor transcript of BRCA2 that can play a major role in the survival of humans who are homozygous for a clearly pathogenic mutation. Our results highlight the importance of assessing protein function restoration by premature truncating codon bypass by alternative splicing when evaluating the functional significance of variants such as nonsense and frame-shift mutations that are assumed to be clearly pathogenic. Our findings will impact not only the assessment of variants that map to this region, but also influence counseling paradigms and treatment options for such mutation carriers. PMID:26920070

  11. BRCA2 minor transcript lacking exons 4-7 supports viability in mice and may account for survival of humans with a pathogenic biallelic mutation.

    PubMed

    Thirthagiri, Eswary; Klarmann, Kimberly D; Shukla, Anil K; Southon, Eileen; Biswas, Kajal; Martin, Betty K; North, Susan Lynn; Magidson, Valentin; Burkett, Sandra; Haines, Diana C; Noer, Kathleen; Matthai, Roberta; Tessarollo, Lino; Loncarek, Jadranka; Keller, Jonathan R; Sharan, Shyam K

    2016-05-15

    The breast cancer gene, BRCA2, is essential for viability, yet patients with Fanconi anemia-D1 subtype are born alive with biallelic mutations in this gene. The hypomorphic nature of the mutations is believed to support viability, but this is not always apparent. One such mutation is IVS7+2T>G, which causes premature protein truncation due to skipping of exon 7. We previously identified a transcript lacking exons 4-7, which restores the open-reading frame, encodes a DNA repair proficient protein and is expressed in IVS7+2T>G carriers. However, because the exons 4-7 encoded region contains several residues required for normal cell-cycle regulation and cytokinesis, this transcript's ability to support viability can be argued. To address this, we generated a Brca2 knock-in mouse model lacking exons 4-7 and demonstrated that these exons are dispensable for viability as well as tumor-free survival. This study provides the first in vivo evidence of the functional significance of a minor transcript of BRCA2 that can play a major role in the survival of humans who are homozygous for a clearly pathogenic mutation. Our results highlight the importance of assessing protein function restoration by premature truncating codon bypass by alternative splicing when evaluating the functional significance of variants such as nonsense and frame-shift mutations that are assumed to be clearly pathogenic. Our findings will impact not only the assessment of variants that map to this region, but also influence counseling paradigms and treatment options for such mutation carriers. Published by Oxford University Press 2016. This work is written by (a) US Government employee(s) and is in the public domain in the US.

  12. CDKN2A exon-wise deletion status and novel somatic mutations in Indian glioma patients.

    PubMed

    Sibin, M K; Bhat, Dhananjaya I; Lavanya, Ch; Manoj, M Jeru; Aakershita, S; Chetan, G K

    2014-02-01

    Over the years, deletions of CDKN2A (p16) tumor suppressor gene has been studied using FISH and multiplex PCR, with major focus on exon 2 in various cancers, and the frequency of mutation is found to be varied in different studies. In this study, we analyzed the deletion status of all three exons of p16 and frequency of exon 2 somatic point mutations in glioma from the Indian population and its clinical implications. Multiplex PCR was carried out in order to check deletion of all 3 exons in 50 glioma samples. Nonconventional PCR-SSCP analysis and sequencing was done to identify mutations in 48 cases. Deletion of at least one of the three exons of p16 INK4A was observed in ten cases (20 %). The frequencies of exon-wise deletions were 10 % for exon 1, 4 % for exon 2, and 8 % for exon 3. Two out of 48 samples were positive for mutations in p16 exon 2. One sample had a transition of G to C on position 147 with a codon change TGG to TGC which does not contribute to the protein structure. Another sample had a transversion of A to G on the position 154 with a codon change ATG to GTG with change in amino acid methionine to valine in 52nd position. Deletion pattern was found to be varied in three exons. Frequency of p16 gene mutation was less in the Indian population (4.2 %), and this mutation does not contribute to any remarkable change in protein structure.

  13. Complete exon sequencing of all known Usher syndrome genes greatly improves molecular diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Usher syndrome (USH) combines sensorineural deafness with blindness. It is inherited in an autosomal recessive mode. Early diagnosis is critical for adapted educational and patient management choices, and for genetic counseling. To date, nine causative genes have been identified for the three clinical subtypes (USH1, USH2 and USH3). Current diagnostic strategies make use of a genotyping microarray that is based on the previously reported mutations. The purpose of this study was to design a more accurate molecular diagnosis tool. Methods We sequenced the 366 coding exons and flanking regions of the nine known USH genes, in 54 USH patients (27 USH1, 21 USH2 and 6 USH3). Results Biallelic mutations were detected in 39 patients (72%) and monoallelic mutations in an additional 10 patients (18.5%). In addition to biallelic mutations in one of the USH genes, presumably pathogenic mutations in another USH gene were detected in seven patients (13%), and another patient carried monoallelic mutations in three different USH genes. Notably, none of the USH3 patients carried detectable mutations in the only known USH3 gene, whereas they all carried mutations in USH2 genes. Most importantly, the currently used microarray would have detected only 30 of the 81 different mutations that we found, of which 39 (48%) were novel. Conclusions Based on these results, complete exon sequencing of the currently known USH genes stands as a definite improvement for molecular diagnosis of this disease, which is of utmost importance in the perspective of gene therapy. PMID:21569298

  14. Biased exon/intron distribution of cryptic and de novo 3′ splice sites

    PubMed Central

    Královičová, Jana; Christensen, Mikkel B.; Vořechovský, Igor

    2005-01-01

    We compiled sequences of previously published aberrant 3′ splice sites (3′ss) that were generated by mutations in human disease genes. Cryptic 3′ss, defined here as those resulting from a mutation of the 3′YAG consensus, were more frequent in exons than in introns. They clustered in ∼20 nt region adjacent to authentic 3′ss, suggesting that their under-representation in introns is due to a depletion of AG dinucleotides in the polypyrimidine tract (PPT). In contrast, most aberrant 3′ss that were induced by mutations outside the 3′YAG consensus (designated ‘de novo’) were in introns. The activation of intronic de novo 3′ss was largely due to AG-creating mutations in the PPT. In contrast, exonic de novo 3′ss were more often induced by mutations improving the PPT, branchpoint sequence (BPS) or distant auxiliary signals, rather than by direct AG creation. The Shapiro–Senapathy matrix scores had a good prognostic value for cryptic, but not de novo 3′ss. Finally, AG-creating mutations in the PPT that produced aberrant 3′ss upstream of the predicted BPS in vivo shared a similar ‘BPS-new AG’ distance. Reduction of this distance and/or the strength of the new AG PPT in splicing reporter pre-mRNAs improved utilization of authentic 3′ss, suggesting that AG-creating mutations that are located closer to the BPS and are preceded by weaker PPT may result in less severe splicing defects. PMID:16141195

  15. Intron-exon organization and chromosomal localization of the human TIA-1 gene

    SciTech Connect

    Kawakami, A.; Tian, Qingsheng; Streuli, M. ); Poe, M. ); Edelhoff, S.; Disteche, C.M. ); Anderson, P. Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA )

    1994-05-15

    TIA-1 is a 40-kDa cytotoxic granule-associated RNA-binding protein (p40-TIA-1), the expression of which is restricted to cytolytic lymphoctyes. The major granule-associated species is a 15-kDa protein (p15-TIA-1) that seems to be derived from the carboxyl terminus of p40-TIA-1. Although some evidence suggests that p15-TIA-1 is derived from p40-TIA-1 by proteolytic processing, it is also possible that each isoform is derived from discrete mRNA initiated from alternative promoters within the TIA-1 gene. To learn more about the relationship between p15-TIA-1 and p40-TIA-1, the authors have determined the complete intron-exon organization of the TIA-1 gene. The gene consists of 13 exons separated by 12 intervening sequences and spans greater than 46 kb of DNA located on chromosome 2, band p13. The transcription start site of the mRNA transcript encoding p40-TIA-1 was identified by primer extension and S1 mapping analysis. The putative promoter region preceding this transcription start site stimulated the expression of a reporter gene in transfected Jurkat and YT cells. Attempts to identify a second promoter capable of initiating an mRNA encoding p15-TIA-1 were unsuccessful, supporting the possibility that p15-TIA-1 can be derived from p40-TIA-1 proteolytically. Granule-associated serine proteases that have been implicated in cytolytic lymphocyte killing (granzyme A and granzyme B) were unable to cleave TIA-1, suggesting that processing may occur before TIA-1 enters the cytotoxic granule. 22 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  16. The mouse collagen X gene: complete nucleotide sequence, exon structure and expression pattern.

    PubMed Central

    Elima, K; Eerola, I; Rosati, R; Metsäranta, M; Garofalo, S; Perälä, M; De Crombrugghe, B; Vuorio, E

    1993-01-01

    Overlapping genomic clones covering the 7.2 kb mouse alpha 1(X) collagen gene, 0.86 kb of promoter and 1.25 kb of 3'-flanking sequences were isolated from two genomic libraries and characterized by nucleotide sequencing. Typical features of the gene include a unique three-exon structure, similar to that in the chick gene, with the entire triple-helical domain of 463 amino acids coded by a single large exon. The highest degree of amino acid and nucleotide sequence conservation was seen in the coding region for the collagenous and C-terminal non-collagenous domains between the mouse and known chick, bovine and human collagen type X sequences. More divergence between the sequences occurred in the N-terminal non-collagenous domain. Similarity between the mammalian collagen X sequences extended into the 3'-untranslated sequence, particularly near the polyadenylation site. The promoter of the mouse collagen X gene was found to contain two TATAA boxes 159 bp apart; primer extension analyses of the transcription start site revealed that both were functional. The promoter has an unusual structure with a very low G + C content of 28% between positions -220 and -1 of the upstream transcription start site. Northern and in situ hybridization analyses confirmed that the expression of the alpha 1(X) collagen gene is restricted to hypertrophic chondrocytes in tissues undergoing endochondral calcification. The detailed sequence information of the gene is useful for studies on the promoter activity of the gene and for generation of transgenic mice. Images Figure 3 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:8424763

  17. Evolution of EF-hand calcium-modulated proteins. IV. Exon shuffling did not determine the domain compositions of EF-hand proteins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kretsinger, R. H.; Nakayama, S.

    1993-01-01

    In the previous three reports in this series we demonstrated that the EF-hand family of proteins evolved by a complex pattern of gene duplication, transposition, and splicing. The dendrograms based on exon sequences are nearly identical to those based on protein sequences for troponin C, the essential light chain myosin, the regulatory light chain, and calpain. This validates both the computational methods and the dendrograms for these subfamilies. The proposal of congruence for calmodulin, troponin C, essential light chain, and regulatory light chain was confirmed. There are, however, significant differences in the calmodulin dendrograms computed from DNA and from protein sequences. In this study we find that introns are distributed throughout the EF-hand domain and the interdomain regions. Further, dendrograms based on intron type and distribution bear little resemblance to those based on protein or on DNA sequences. We conclude that introns are inserted, and probably deleted, with relatively high frequency. Further, in the EF-hand family exons do not correspond to structural domains and exon shuffling played little if any role in the evolution of this widely distributed homolog family. Calmodulin has had a turbulent evolution. Its dendrograms based on protein sequence, exon sequence, 3'-tail sequence, intron sequences, and intron positions all show significant differences.

  18. Evolution of EF-hand calcium-modulated proteins. IV. Exon shuffling did not determine the domain compositions of EF-hand proteins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kretsinger, R. H.; Nakayama, S.

    1993-01-01

    In the previous three reports in this series we demonstrated that the EF-hand family of proteins evolved by a complex pattern of gene duplication, transposition, and splicing. The dendrograms based on exon sequences are nearly identical to those based on protein sequences for troponin C, the essential light chain myosin, the regulatory light chain, and calpain. This validates both the computational methods and the dendrograms for these subfamilies. The proposal of congruence for calmodulin, troponin C, essential light chain, and regulatory light chain was confirmed. There are, however, significant differences in the calmodulin dendrograms computed from DNA and from protein sequences. In this study we find that introns are distributed throughout the EF-hand domain and the interdomain regions. Further, dendrograms based on intron type and distribution bear little resemblance to those based on protein or on DNA sequences. We conclude that introns are inserted, and probably deleted, with relatively high frequency. Further, in the EF-hand family exons do not correspond to structural domains and exon shuffling played little if any role in the evolution of this widely distributed homolog family. Calmodulin has had a turbulent evolution. Its dendrograms based on protein sequence, exon sequence, 3'-tail sequence, intron sequences, and intron positions all show significant differences.

  19. Absence of an intron splicing silencer in porcine Smn1 intron 7 confers immunity to the exon skipping mutation in human SMN2.

    PubMed

    Doktor, Thomas Koed; Schrøder, Lisbeth Dahl; Andersen, Henriette Skovgaard; Brøner, Sabrina; Kitewska, Anna; Sørensen, Charlotte Brandt; Andresen, Brage Storstein

    2014-01-01

    Spinal Muscular Atrophy is caused by homozygous loss of SMN1. All patients retain at least one copy of SMN2 which produces an identical protein but at lower levels due to a silent mutation in exon 7 which results in predominant exclusion of the exon. Therapies targeting the splicing of SMN2 exon 7 have been in development for several years, and their efficacy has been measured using either in vitro cellular assays or in vivo small animal models such as mice. In this study we evaluated the potential for constructing a mini-pig animal model by introducing minimal changes in the endogenous porcine Smn1 gene to maintain the native genomic structure and regulation. We found that while a Smn2-like mutation can be introduced in the porcine Smn1 gene and can diminish the function of the ESE, it would not recapitulate the splicing pattern seen in human SMN2 due to absence of a functional ISS immediately downstream of exon 7. We investigated the ISS region and show here that the porcine ISS is inactive due to disruption of a proximal hnRNP A1 binding site, while a distal hnRNP A1 binding site remains functional but is unable to maintain the functionality of the ISS as a whole.

  20. An Enhancer Near ISL1 and an Ultraconserved Exon of PCBP2 areDerived from a Retroposon

    SciTech Connect

    Bejerano, Gill; Lowe, Craig; Ahituv, Nadav; King, Bryan; Siepel,Adam; Salama, Sofie; Rubin, Edward M.; Kent, W. James; Haussler, David

    2005-11-27

    Hundreds of highly conserved distal cis-regulatory elementshave been characterized to date in vertebrate genomes1. Many thousandsmore are predicted based on comparative genomics2,3. Yet, in starkcontrast to the genes they regulate, virtually none of these regions canbe traced using sequence similarity in invertebrates, leaving theirevolutionary origin obscure. Here we show that a class of conserved,primarily non-coding regions in tetrapods originated from a novel shortinterspersed repetitive element (SINE) retroposon family that was activein Sarcopterygii (lobe-finned fishes and terrestrial vertebrates) in theSilurian at least 410 Mya4, and, remarkably, appears to be recentlyactive in the "living fossil" Indonesian coelacanth, Latimeriamenadoensis. We show that one copy is a distal enhancer, located 500kbfrom the neuro-developmental gene ISL1. Several others represent new,possibly regulatory, alternatively spliced exons in the middle ofpre-existing Sarcopterygian genes. One of these is the>200bpultraconserved region5, 100 percent identical in mammals, and 80 percentidentical to the coelacanth SINE, that contains a 31aa alternativelyspliced exon of the mRNA processing gene PCBP26. These add to a growinglist of examples7 in which relics of transposable elements have acquireda function that serves their host, a process termed "exaptation"8, andprovide an origin for at least some of the highly-conservedvertebrate-specific genomic sequences recently discovered usingcomparative genomics.

  1. A Fusion Protein of HCMV IE1 exon4 and IE2 exon5 Stimulates Potent Cellular Immunity in an MVA Vaccine Vector

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Z; Zhou, W; Srivastava, T; La Rosa, C; Mandarino, A; Forman, SJ; Zaia, JA; Britt, WJ; Diamond, DJ

    2008-01-01

    A therapeutic CMV vaccine incorporating an antigenic repertoire capable of eliciting a cellular immune response has yet to be successfully implemented for patients who already have acquired an infection. To address this problem, we have developed a vaccine candidate derived from modified vaccinia Ankara (MVA) that expresses three immunodominant antigens (pp65, IE1, IE2) from CMV. The novelty of this vaccine is the fusion of two adjacent exons from the immediate-early region of CMV, their successful expression in MVA, and robust immunogenicity in both primary and memory response models. Evaluation of the immunogenicity of the viral vaccine in mouse models shows that it can stimulate primary immunity against all three antigens in both the CD4+ and CD8+ T cell subsets. Evaluation of human PBMC from healthy CMV-positive donors or patients within 6 months of receiving hematopoietic cell transplant shows robust stimulation of existing CMV-specific CD4+ and CD8+ T cells subsets. PMID:18538366

  2. Random Splicing of Several Exons Caused by a Single Base Change in the Target Exon of CRISPR/Cas9 Mediated Gene Knockout

    PubMed Central

    Kapahnke, Marcel; Banning, Antje; Tikkanen, Ritva

    2016-01-01

    The clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)-associated sequence 9 (CRISPR/Cas9) system is widely used for genome editing purposes as it facilitates an efficient knockout of a specific gene in, e.g. cultured cells. Targeted double-strand breaks are introduced to the target sequence of the guide RNAs, which activates the cellular DNA repair mechanism for non-homologous-end-joining, resulting in unprecise repair and introduction of small deletions or insertions. Due to this, sequence alterations in the coding region of the target gene frequently cause frame-shift mutations, facilitating degradation of the mRNA. We here show that such CRISPR/Cas9-mediated alterations in the target exon may also result in altered splicing of the respective pre-mRNA, most likely due to mutations of splice-regulatory sequences. Using the human FLOT-1 gene as an example, we demonstrate that such altered splicing products also give rise to aberrant protein products. These may potentially function as dominant-negative proteins and thus interfere with the interpretation of the data generated with these cell lines. Since most researchers only control the consequences of CRISPR knockout at genomic and protein level, our data should encourage to also check the alterations at the mRNA level. PMID:27983621

  3. A fusion protein of HCMV IE1 exon4 and IE2 exon5 stimulates potent cellular immunity in an MVA vaccine vector

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Z.; Zhou, W.; Srivastava, T.; La Rosa, C.; Mandarino, A.; Forman, S.J.; Zaia, J.A.; Britt, W.J.; Diamond, D.J.

    2008-08-01

    A therapeutic CMV vaccine incorporating an antigenic repertoire capable of eliciting a cellular immune response has yet to be successfully implemented for patients who already have acquired an infection. To address this problem, we have developed a vaccine candidate derived from modified vaccinia Ankara (MVA) that expresses three immunodominant antigens (pp65, IE1, IE2) from CMV. The novelty of this vaccine is the fusion of two adjacent exons from the immediate-early region of CMV, their successful expression in MVA, and robust immunogenicity in both primary and memory response models. Evaluation of the immunogenicity of the viral vaccine in mouse models shows that it can stimulate primary immunity against all three antigens in both the CD4{sup +} and CD8{sup +} T cell subsets. Evaluation of human PBMC from healthy CMV-positive donors or patients within 6 months of receiving hematopoietic cell transplant shows robust stimulation of existing CMV-specific CD4{sup +} and CD8{sup +} T cell subsets.

  4. Characterization of disease-associated mutations affecting an exonic splicing enhancer and two cryptic splice sites in exon 13 of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator gene.

    PubMed

    Aznarez, Isabel; Chan, Elayne M; Zielenski, Julian; Blencowe, Benjamin J; Tsui, Lap-Chee

    2003-08-15

    Sequences in exons can play an important role in constitutive and regulated pre-mRNA splicing. Since exonic splicing regulatory sequences are generally poorly conserved and their mechanism of action is not well understood, the consequence of exonic mutations on splicing can only be determined empirically. In this study, we have investigated the consequence of two cystic fibrosis (CF) disease-causing mutations, E656X and 2108delA, on the function of a putative exonic splicing enhancer (ESE) in exon 13 of the CFTR gene. We have also determined whether five other CF mutations D648V, D651N, G654S, E664X and T665S located near this putative ESE could lead to aberrant splicing of exon 13. Using minigene constructs, we have demonstrated that the E656X and 2108delA mutations could indeed cause aberrant splicing in a predicted manner, supporting a role for the putative ESE sequence in pre-mRNA splicing. In addition, we have shown that D648V, E664X and T665S mutations could cause aberrant splicing of exon 13 by improving the polypyrimidine tracts of two cryptic 3' splice sites. We also provide evidence that the relative levels of two splicing factors, hTra2alpha and SF2/ASF, could alter the effect on splicing of some of the exon 13 disease mutations. Taken together, our results suggest that the severity of CF disease could be modulated by changes in the fidelity of CFTR pre-mRNA splicing.

  5. Alternative splicing and evolution: diversification, exon definition and function.

    PubMed

    Keren, Hadas; Lev-Maor, Galit; Ast, Gil

    2010-05-01

    Over the past decade, it has been shown that alternative splicing (AS) is a major mechanism for the enhancement of transcriptome and proteome diversity, particularly in mammals. Splicing can be found in species from bacteria to humans, but its prevalence and characteristics vary considerably. Evolutionary studies are helping to address questions that are fundamental to understanding this important process: how and when did AS evolve? Which AS events are functional? What are the evolutionary forces that shaped, and continue to shape, AS? And what determines whether an exon is spliced in a constitutive or alternative manner? In this Review, we summarize the current knowledge of AS and evolution and provide insights into some of these unresolved questions.

  6. Exon-level expression analyses identify MYCN and NTRK1 as major determinants of alternative exon usage and robustly predict primary neuroblastoma outcome

    PubMed Central

    Schramm, A; Schowe, B; Fielitz, K; Heilmann, M; Martin, M; Marschall, T; Köster, J; Vandesompele, J; Vermeulen, J; de Preter, K; Koster, J; Versteeg, R; Noguera, R; Speleman, F; Rahmann, S; Eggert, A; Morik, K; Schulte, J H

    2012-01-01

    Background: Using mRNA expression-derived signatures as predictors of individual patient outcome has been a goal ever since the introduction of microarrays. Here, we addressed whether analyses of tumour mRNA at the exon level can improve on the predictive power and classification accuracy of gene-based expression profiles using neuroblastoma as a model. Methods: In a patient cohort comprising 113 primary neuroblastoma specimens expression profiling using exon-level analyses was performed to define predictive signatures using various machine-learning techniques. Alternative transcript use was calculated from relative exon expression. Validation of alternative transcripts was achieved using qPCR- and cell-based approaches. Results: Both predictors derived from the gene or the exon levels resulted in prediction accuracies >80% for both event-free and overall survival and proved as independent prognostic markers in multivariate analyses. Alternative transcript use was most prominently linked to the amplification status of the MYCN oncogene, expression of the TrkA/NTRK1 neurotrophin receptor and survival. Conclusion: As exon level-based prediction yields comparable, but not significantly better, prediction accuracy than gene expression-based predictors, gene-based assays seem to be sufficiently precise for predicting outcome of neuroblastoma patients. However, exon-level analyses provide added knowledge by identifying alternative transcript use, which should deepen the understanding of neuroblastoma biology. PMID:23047593

  7. Exon-level expression analyses identify MYCN and NTRK1 as major determinants of alternative exon usage and robustly predict primary neuroblastoma outcome.

    PubMed

    Schramm, A; Schowe, B; Fielitz, K; Heilmann, M; Martin, M; Marschall, T; Köster, J; Vandesompele, J; Vermeulen, J; de Preter, K; Koster, J; Versteeg, R; Noguera, R; Speleman, F; Rahmann, S; Eggert, A; Morik, K; Schulte, J H

    2012-10-09

    Using mRNA expression-derived signatures as predictors of individual patient outcome has been a goal ever since the introduction of microarrays. Here, we addressed whether analyses of tumour mRNA at the exon level can improve on the predictive power and classification accuracy of gene-based expression profiles using neuroblastoma as a model. In a patient cohort comprising 113 primary neuroblastoma specimens expression profiling using exon-level analyses was performed to define predictive signatures using various machine-learning techniques. Alternative transcript use was calculated from relative exon expression. Validation of alternative transcripts was achieved using qPCR- and cell-based approaches. Both predictors derived from the gene or the exon levels resulted in prediction accuracies >80% for both event-free and overall survival and proved as independent prognostic markers in multivariate analyses. Alternative transcript use was most prominently linked to the amplification status of the MYCN oncogene, expression of the TrkA/NTRK1 neurotrophin receptor and survival. As exon level-based prediction yields comparable, but not significantly better, prediction accuracy than gene expression-based predictors, gene-based assays seem to be sufficiently precise for predicting outcome of neuroblastoma patients. However, exon-level analyses provide added knowledge by identifying alternative transcript use, which should deepen the understanding of neuroblastoma biology.

  8. Exon skipping as a therapeutic strategy applied to an RYR1 mutation with pseudo-exon inclusion causing a severe core myopathy.

    PubMed

    Rendu, John; Brocard, Julie; Denarier, Eric; Monnier, Nicole; Piétri-Rouxel, France; Beley, Cyriaque; Roux-Buisson, Nathalie; Gilbert-Dussardier, Brigitte; Perez, Marie José; Romero, Norma; Garcia, Luis; Lunardi, Joël; Fauré, Julien; Fourest-Lieuvin, Anne; Marty, Isabelle

    2013-07-01

    Central core disease is a myopathy often arising from mutations in the type 1 ryanodine receptor (RYR1) gene, encoding the sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium release channel RyR1. No treatment is currently available for this disease. We studied the pathological situation of a severely affected child with two recessive mutations, which resulted in a massive reduction in the amount of RyR1. The paternal mutation induced the inclusion of a new in-frame pseudo-exon in RyR1 mRNA that resulted in the insertion of additional amino acids leading to the instability of the protein. We hypothesized that skipping this additional exon would be sufficient to restore RyR1 expression and to normalize calcium releases. We therefore developed U7-AON lentiviral vectors to force exon skipping on affected primary muscle cells. The efficiency of the exon skipping was evaluated at the mRNA level, at the protein level, and at the functional level using calcium imaging. In these affected cells, we observed a decreased inclusion of the pseudo-exon, an increased RyR1 protein expression, and a restoration of calcium releases of normal amplitude either upon direct RyR1 stimulation or in response to membrane depolarization. This study is the first demonstration of the potential of exon-skipping strategy for the therapy of central core disease, from the molecular to the functional level.

  9. Exon microarray analysis of human dorsolateral prefrontal cortex in alcoholism.

    PubMed

    Manzardo, Ann M; Gunewardena, Sumedha; Wang, Kun; Butler, Merlin G

    2014-06-01

    Alcohol abuse is associated with cellular and biochemical disturbances that impact upon protein and nucleic acid synthesis, brain development, function, and behavioral responses. To further characterize the genetic influences in alcoholism and the effects of alcohol consumption on gene expression, we used a highly sensitive exon microarray to examine mRNA expression in human frontal cortex of alcoholics and control males. Messenger RNA was isolated from the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (dlPFC; Brodmann area 9) of 7 adult alcoholic (6 males, 1 female, mean age 49 years) and 7 matched controls. Affymetrix Human Exon 1.0 ST array was performed according to standard procedures and the results analyzed at the gene level. Microarray findings were validated using quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction, and the ontology of disturbed genes characterized using Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (IPA). Decreased mRNA expression was observed for genes involved in cellular adhesion (e.g., CTNNA3, ITGA2), transport (e.g., TF, ABCA8), nervous system development (e.g., LRP2, UGT8, GLDN), and signaling (e.g., RASGRP3, LGR5) with influence over lipid and myelin synthesis (e.g., ASPA, ENPP2, KLK6). IPA identified disturbances in network functions associated with neurological disease and development including cellular assembly and organization impacting on psychological disorders. Our data in alcoholism support a reduction in expression of dlPFC mRNA for genes involved with neuronal growth, differentiation, and signaling that targets white matter of the brain. Copyright © 2014 by the Research Society on Alcoholism.

  10. Unusual Intron Conservation near Tissue-Regulated Exons Found by Splicing Microarrays

    PubMed Central

    Sugnet, Charles W; Srinivasan, Karpagam; Clark, Tyson A; O'Brien, Georgeann; Cline, Melissa S; Wang, Hui; Williams, Alan; Kulp, David; Blume, John E; Haussler, David; Ares, Manuel

    2006-01-01

    Alternative splicing contributes to both gene regulation and protein diversity. To discover broad relationships between regulation of alternative splicing and sequence conservation, we applied a systems approach, using oligonucleotide microarrays designed to capture splicing information across the mouse genome. In a set of 22 adult tissues, we observe differential expression of RNA containing at least two alternative splice junctions for about 40% of the 6,216 alternative events we could detect. Statistical comparisons identify 171 cassette exons whose inclusion or skipping is different in brain relative to other tissues and another 28 exons whose splicing is different in muscle. A subset of these exons is associated with unusual blocks of intron sequence whose conservation in vertebrates rivals that of protein-coding exons. By focusing on sets of exons with similar regulatory patterns, we have identified new sequence motifs implicated in brain and muscle splicing regulation. Of note is a motif that is strikingly similar to the branchpoint consensus but is located downstream of the 5′ splice site of exons included in muscle. Analysis of three paralogous membrane-associated guanylate kinase genes reveals that each contains a paralogous tissue-regulated exon with a similar tissue inclusion pattern. While the intron sequences flanking these exons remain highly conserved among mammalian orthologs, the paralogous flanking intron sequences have diverged considerably, suggesting unusually complex evolution of the regulation of alternative splicing in multigene families. PMID:16424921

  11. SR proteins regulate V6 exon splicing of CD44 pre-mRNA.

    PubMed

    Loh, Tiing Jen; Moon, Heegyum; Jang, Ha Na; Liu, Yongchao; Choi, Namjeong; Shen, Shengfu; Williams, Darren Reece; Jung, Da-Woon; Zheng, Xuexiu; Shen, Haihong

    2016-11-01

    CD44 pre-mRNA includes 20 exons, of which exons 1-5 (C1-C5) and exons 16-20 (C6-C10) are constant exons, whereas exons 6-15 (V1-V10) are variant exons. V6-exon-containing isoforms have been known to be implicated in tumor cell invasion and metastasis. In the present study, we performed a SR protein screen for CD44 V6 splicing using overexpression and lentivirus-mediated shRNA treatment. Using a CD44 V6 minigene, we demonstrate that increased SRSF3 and SRSF4 expression do not affect V6 splicing, but increased expression of SRSF1, SRSF6 and SRSF9 significantly inhibit V6 splicing. In addition, using a constitutive exon-specific primer set, we could not detect alterations of CD44 splicing after SR protein-targeting shRNA treatment. However, using a V6 specific primer, we identified that reduced SRSF2 expression significantly reduced the V6 isoform, but increased V6-10 and V6,7-10 isoforms. Our results indicate that SR proteins are important regulatory proteins for CD44 V6 splicing. [BMB Reports 2016; 49(11): 612-616].

  12. Regulation of Dscam exon 17 alternative splicing by steric hindrance in combination with RNA secondary structures.

    PubMed

    Yue, Yuan; Li, Guoli; Yang, Yun; Zhang, Wenjing; Pan, Huawei; Chen, Ran; Shi, Feng; Jin, Yongfeng

    2013-12-01

    The gene Down syndrome cell adhesion molecule (Dscam) potentially encodes 38 016 distinct isoforms in Drosophila melanogaster via mutually exclusive splicing. Here we reveal a combinatorial mechanism of regulation of Dscam exon 17 mutually exclusive splicing through steric hindrance in combination with RNA secondary structure. This mutually exclusive behavior is enforced by steric hindrance, due to the close proximity of the exon 17.2 branch point to exon 17.1 in Diptera, and the interval size constraint in non-Dipteran species. Moreover, intron-exon RNA structures are evolutionarily conserved in 36 non-Drosophila species of six distantly related orders (Diptera, Lepidoptera, Coleoptera, Hymenoptera, Hemiptera, and Phthiraptera), which regulates the selection of exon 17 variants via masking the splice site. By contrast, a previously uncharacterized RNA structure specifically activated exon 17.1 by bringing splice sites closer together in Drosophila, while the other moderately suppressed exon 17.1 selection by hindering the accessibility of polypyrimidine sequences. Taken together, these data suggest a phylogeny of increased complexity in regulating alternative splicing of Dscam exon 17 spanning more than 300 million years of insect evolution. These results also provide models of the regulation of alternative splicing through steric hindrance in combination with dynamic structural codes.

  13. Regulation of Dscam exon 17 alternative splicing by steric hindrance in combination with RNA secondary structures

    PubMed Central

    Yue, Yuan; Li, Guoli; Yang, Yun; Zhang, Wenjing; Pan, Huawei; Chen, Ran; Shi, Feng; Jin, Yongfeng

    2013-01-01

    The gene Down syndrome cell adhesion molecule (Dscam) potentially encodes 38 016 distinct isoforms in Drosophila melanogaster via mutually exclusive splicing. Here we reveal a combinatorial mechanism of regulation of Dscam exon 17 mutually exclusive splicing through steric hindrance in combination with RNA secondary structure. This mutually exclusive behavior is enforced by steric hindrance, due to the close proximity of the exon 17.2 branch point to exon 17.1 in Diptera, and the interval size constraint in non-Dipteran species. Moreover, intron-exon RNA structures are evolutionarily conserved in 36 non-Drosophila species of six distantly related orders (Diptera, Lepidoptera, Coleoptera, Hymenoptera, Hemiptera, and Phthiraptera), which regulates the selection of exon 17 variants via masking the splice site. By contrast, a previously uncharacterized RNA structure specifically activated exon 17.1 by bringing splice sites closer together in Drosophila, while the other moderately suppressed exon 17.1 selection by hindering the accessibility of polypyrimidine sequences. Taken together, these data suggest a phylogeny of increased complexity in regulating alternative splicing of Dscam exon 17 spanning more than 300 million years of insect evolution. These results also provide models of the regulation of alternative splicing through steric hindrance in combination with dynamic structural codes. PMID:24448213

  14. Assessing The Evolutionary Diversity Of Exon Skipping Events In Human, Mouse And Rat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Fang-Rong; Chen, Chao-Jung; Kuo, Min-Chieh; Chang, Hwan-You; Shia, Wei-Chung

    2008-01-01

    This study is to research on the cross-species comparative analysis of homologous genetic sequence among human, mouse and rat by bioinformatics method, hopefully assessing the evolutionary diversity through exon length, reading frame preservation and KA/KS ratio test of alternative splicing events. Alternative splicing (AS) is an important mechanism in eukaryotic organism. We choose the "exon skipping events" from AS events for research. In the data of "conserved exon skipping events", we get 668 human-mouse conserved events, 179 human-rat conserved events and 266 conserved mouse-rat events. There are some extra data such as "non-conserved exon skipping events" and "species-specific events". We found out that the length of AS exon is shorter in conserved exon skipping event, but the ratio of reading frame preservation is higher. Among them, the minor form is the most special. We even got the same result in non-conserved exon skipping events. We calculated the KA/KS value by KA/KS ratio test and found out that the human-mouse KA/KS ratio is 0.158, the human-rat is 0.182 and the mouse-rat is 0.190. This represents that the human-mouse conserved events have the highest purifying selection pressure. In the end, we adopt KA/KS ratio test to do a further analysis between conserved and non-conserved exon skipping events and evaluate the evolutionary diversity of cross-species comparation.

  15. SR proteins regulate V6 exon splicing of CD44 pre-mRNA

    PubMed Central

    Loh, Tiing Jen; Moon, Heegyum; Jang, Ha Na; Liu, Yongchao; Choi, Namjeong; Shen, Shengfu; Williams, Darren Reece; Jung, Da-Woon; Zheng, Xuexiu; Shen, Haihong

    2016-01-01

    CD44 pre-mRNA includes 20 exons, of which exons 1–5 (C1–C5) and exons 16–20 (C6–C10) are constant exons, whereas exons 6–15 (V1–V10) are variant exons. V6-exon-containing isoforms have been known to be implicated in tumor cell invasion and metastasis. In the present study, we performed a SR protein screen for CD44 V6 splicing using overexpression and lentivirus-mediated shRNA treatment. Using a CD44 V6 minigene, we demonstrate that increased SRSF3 and SRSF4 expression do not affect V6 splicing, but increased expression of SRSF1, SRSF6 and SRSF9 significantly inhibit V6 splicing. In addition, using a constitutive exon-specific primer set, we could not detect alterations of CD44 splicing after SR protein-targeting shRNA treatment. However, using a V6 specific primer, we identified that reduced SRSF2 expression significantly reduced the V6 isoform, but increased V6–10 and V6,8–10 isoforms. Our results indicate that SR proteins are important regulatory proteins for CD44 V6 splicing. PMID:27530682

  16. Modeling the evolution dynamics of exon-intron structure with a general random fragmentation process

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Most eukaryotic genes are interrupted by spliceosomal introns. The evolution of exon-intron structure remains mysterious despite rapid advance in genome sequencing technique. In this work, a novel approach is taken based on the assumptions that the evolution of exon-intron structure is a stochastic process, and that the characteristics of this process can be understood by examining its historical outcome, the present-day size distribution of internal translated exons (exon). Through the combination of simulation and modeling the size distribution of exons in different species, we propose a general random fragmentation process (GRFP) to characterize the evolution dynamics of exon-intron structure. This model accurately predicts the probability that an exon will be split by a new intron and the distribution of novel insertions along the length of the exon. Results As the first observation from this model, we show that the chance for an exon to obtain an intron is proportional to its size to the 3rd power. We also show that such size dependence is nearly constant across gene, with the exception of the exons adjacent to the 5′ UTR. As the second conclusion from the model, we show that intron insertion loci follow a normal distribution with a mean of 0.5 (center of the exon) and a standard deviation of 0.11. Finally, we show that intron insertions within a gene are independent of each other for vertebrates, but are more negatively correlated for non-vertebrate. We use simulation to demonstrate that the negative correlation might result from significant intron loss during evolution, which could be explained by selection against multi-intron genes in these organisms. Conclusions The GRFP model suggests that intron gain is dynamic with a higher chance for longer exons; introns are inserted into exons randomly with the highest probability at the center of the exon. GRFP estimates that there are 78 introns in every 10 kb coding sequences for vertebrate genomes

  17. Two intron sequences in yeast mitochondrial COX1 gene: homology among URF-containing introns and strain-dependent variation in flanking exons.

    PubMed

    Hensgens, L A; Bonen, L; de Haan, M; van der Horst, G; Grivell, L A

    1983-02-01

    The DNA sequences of two optional introns in the gene for subunit I of cytochome c oxidase in yeast mitochondrial DNA have been determined. Both contain long unassigned reading frames (URFs). These display regions of amino acid homology with six other URFs, two of which encode proteins involved in mitochondrial RNA splicing. Such conserved regions may thus define functionally important domains of proteins involved in RNA processing. This homology also implies that these URFs had a common ancestral sequence, which has been duplicated and dispersed around the genome. Comparison of the flanking exons in the long strain KL14-4A with their unsplit counterpart in D273-10B reveals clustered sequence differences, which lead in D273-10B to codons rarely used in exons. These differences may be linked to the loss or absence of one of the optional introns.

  18. Characterization of the exon structure of the Menkes disease gene using vectorette PCR

    SciTech Connect

    Tuemer, Z.; Tonnesen, T.; Horn, N.

    1995-04-10

    The gene defective in Menkes disease, an X-linked recessive disturbance of copper metabolism, has been isolated and predicted to encode a copper-binding P-type ATPase. We determined the complete exon-intron structure of the Menkes disease gene, which spans about 150 kb of genomic DNA. The gene contains 23 exons, and the ATG start codon is in the second exon. All of the exon-intron boundaries were sequenced and conformed to the GT/AT rule, except for the 5{prime} splice site of intron 9. A preliminary comparison demonstrated a striking similarity between the exon structures of the Menkes and Wilson disease genes, giving insight into their evolution. 33 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  19. TDP-43 repression of nonconserved cryptic exons is compromised in ALS-FTD.

    PubMed

    Ling, Jonathan P; Pletnikova, Olga; Troncoso, Juan C; Wong, Philip C

    2015-08-07

    Cytoplasmic aggregation of TDP-43, accompanied by its nuclear clearance, is a key common pathological hallmark of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and frontotemporal dementia (ALS-FTD). However, a limited understanding of this RNA-binding protein (RBP) impedes the clarification of pathogenic mechanisms underlying TDP-43 proteinopathy. In contrast to RBPs that regulate splicing of conserved exons, we found that TDP-43 repressed the splicing of nonconserved cryptic exons, maintaining intron integrity. When TDP-43 was depleted from mouse embryonic stem cells, these cryptic exons were spliced into messenger RNAs, often disrupting their translation and promoting nonsense-mediated decay. Moreover, enforced repression of cryptic exons prevented cell death in TDP-43-deficient cells. Furthermore, repression of cryptic exons was impaired in ALS-FTD cases, suggesting that this splicing defect could potentially underlie TDP-43 proteinopathy.

  20. Differential methylation of the promoter and first exon of the RASSF1A gene in hepatocarcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Surbhi; Xie, Lijia; Boldbaatar, Batbold; Lin, Selena Y.; Hamilton, James P.; Meltzer, Stephen J.; Chen, Shun-Hua; Hu, Chi-Tan; Block, Timothy M.; Song, Wei; Su, Ying-Hsiu

    2015-01-01

    Aim Aberrant methylation of the promoter, P2, and the first exon, E1, regions of the tumor suppressor gene RASSF1A, have been associated with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), albeit with poor specificity. This study analyzed the methylation profiles of P1, P2 and E1 regions of the gene to identify the region of which methylation most specifically corresponds to HCC and to evaluate the potential of this methylated region as a biomarker in urine for HCC screening. Methods Bisulfite DNA sequencing and quantitative methylation-specific polymerase chain reaction assays were performed to compare methylation of the 56 CpG sites in regions P1, P2 and E1 in DNA isolated from normal, hepatitic, cirrhotic, adjacent non-HCC, and HCC liver tissue and urine samples for the characterization of hypermethylation of the RASSF1A gene as a biomarker for HCC screening. Results In tissue, comparing HCC (n = 120) with cirrhosis and hepatitis together (n = 70), methylation of P1 had an area under the receiver operating characteristics curve (AUROC) of 0.90, whereas methylation of E1 and P2 had AUROC of 0.84 and 0.72, respectively. At 90% sensitivity, specificity for P1 methylation was 72.9% versus 38.6% for E1 and 27.1% for P2. Methylated P1 DNA was detected in urine in association with cirrhosis and HCC. It had a sensitivity of 81.8% for α-fetoprotein negative HCC. Conclusion Among the three regions analyzed, methylation of P1 is the most specific for HCC and holds great promise as a DNA marker in urine for screening of cirrhosis and HCC. PMID:25382672

  1. Identification of NURR1 (Exon 4) and FOXA1 (Exon 3) Haplotypes Associated with mRNA Expression Levels in Peripheral Blood Lymphocytes of Parkinson's Patients in Small Indian Population

    PubMed Central

    Tippabathani, Jayakrishna; Radhakrishnan, Vaishnavie; Banik, Somashree; Kapoor, Sonia

    2017-01-01

    Here, we study the expression of NURR1 and FOXA1 mRNA in peripheral blood lymphocytes and its haplotypes in coding region in a small Chennai population of India. Thirty cases of Parkinson's patients (PD) with anti-PD medications (20 males aged 65.85 ± 1.19 and 10 females aged 65.7 ± 1.202) and 30 age matched healthy people (20 males aged 68.45 ± 1.282 and 10 females aged 65.8 ± 1.133) were included. The expression of NURR1 and FOXA1 in PBL was detected by Q-PCR and haplotypes were identified by PCR-SSCP. In the 30 PD cases examined, NURR1 and FOXA1 expression was significantly reduced in both male and female PD patients. However, NURR1 (57.631% reduced in males; 28.93% in females) and FOXA1 (64.42% in males; 55.76% in females) mRNA expression did differ greatly between male and female PD patients. Polymorphisms were identified at exon 4 of the NURR1 and at exon 3 of the FOXA1, respectively, in both male and female patients. A near significant difference in SSCP patterns between genders of control and PD population was analyzed suggesting that further investigations of more patients, more molecular markers, and coding regions should be performed. Such studies could potentially reveal peripheral molecular marker of early PD and different significance to the respective genders. PMID:28255498

  2. Alternative splicing of U2AF1 reveals a shared repression mechanism for duplicated exons

    PubMed Central

    Kralovicova, Jana; Vorechovsky, Igor

    2017-01-01

    The auxiliary factor of U2 small nuclear ribonucleoprotein (U2AF) facilitates branch point (BP) recognition and formation of lariat introns. The gene for the 35-kD subunit of U2AF gives rise to two protein isoforms (termed U2AF35a and U2AF35b) that are encoded by alternatively spliced exons 3 and Ab, respectively. The splicing recognition sequences of exon 3 are less favorable than exon Ab, yet U2AF35a expression is higher than U2AF35b across tissues. We show that U2AF35b repression is facilitated by weak, closely spaced BPs next to a long polypyrimidine tract of exon Ab. Each BP lacked canonical uridines at position -2 relative to the BP adenines, with efficient U2 base-pairing interactions predicted only for shifted registers reminiscent of programmed ribosomal frameshifting. The BP cluster was compensated by interactions involving unpaired cytosines in an upstream, EvoFold-predicted stem loop (termed ESL) that binds FUBP1/2. Exon Ab inclusion correlated with predicted free energies of mutant ESLs, suggesting that the ESL operates as a conserved rheostat between long inverted repeats upstream of each exon. The isoform-specific U2AF35 expression was U2AF65-dependent, required interactions between the U2AF-homology motif (UHM) and the α6 helix of U2AF35, and was fine-tuned by exon Ab/3 variants. Finally, we identify tandem homologous exons regulated by U2AF and show that their preferential responses to U2AF65-related proteins and SRSF3 are associated with unpaired pre-mRNA segments upstream of U2AF-repressed 3′ss. These results provide new insights into tissue-specific subfunctionalization of duplicated exons in vertebrate evolution and expand the repertoire of exon repression mechanisms that control alternative splicing. PMID:27566151

  3. The exon-intron organization of the human erythroid [beta]-spectrin gene

    SciTech Connect

    Amin, K.M.; Forget, B.G. ); Scarpa, A.L.; Curtis, P.J. ); Winkelmann, J.C. )

    1993-10-01

    The human erythrocyte [beta]-spectrin gene DNA has been cloned from overlapping human genomic phage and cosmid recombinants. The entire erythroid [beta]-spectrin mRNA is encoded by 32 exons that range in size from 49 to 871 bases. The exon/intron junctions have been identified and the exons mapped. There is no correlation between intron positions and the repeat units of 106 amino acids within domain II of the [beta]-spectrin gene. The scatter of the introns over the 17 repeats argues against the 106-amino-acid unit representing a minigene that underwent repeated duplication resulting in the present [beta]-spectrin gene. In fact, the two largest exons, exon 14 (871 bp) and 16 (757 bp), extend over 4 and 3 repeat units of 106 amino acids, respectively, while repeat [beta]10 is encoded by 4 exons. No single position of an intron in the [beta]-spectrin gene is conserved between any of the 17 [beta]-spectrin and 22 [alpha]-spectrin repeat units. The nucleotide sequences of the exon/intron boundaries conform to the consensus splice site sequences except for exon 20, whose 5[prime] donor splice-site sequence begins with GC. The [beta]-spectrin isoform present in the human brain, the skeletal muscle, and the cardiac muscle is an alternatively spliced product of the erythroid [beta]-spectrin gene. This splice site is located within the coding sequences of exon 32 and its utilization in nonerythroid tissues leads to the use of 4 additional downstream exons with a size range of 44 to 530 bp. 55 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  4. Cloning and characterization of human inducible nitric oxide synthase splice variants: A domain, encoded by exons 8 and 9, is critical for dimerization

    PubMed Central

    Eissa, N. Tony; Yuan, Jean W.; Haggerty, Cynthia M.; Choo, Esther K.; Palmer, Celeste D.; Moss, Joel

    1998-01-01

    The inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) contains an amino-terminal oxygenase domain, a carboxy-terminal reductase domain, and an intervening calmodulin-binding region. For the synthesis of nitric oxide (NO), iNOS is active as a homodimer. The human iNOS mRNA is subject to alternative splicing, including deletion of exons 8 and 9 that encode amino acids 242–335 of the oxygenase domain. In this study, iNOS8−9− and full-length iNOS (iNOSFL) were cloned from bronchial epithelial cells. Expression of iNOS8−9− in 293 cell line resulted in generation of iNOS8−9− mRNA and protein but did not lead to NO production. In contrast to iNOSFL, iNOS8−9− did not form dimers. Similar to iNOSFL, iNOS8−9− exhibited NADPH-diaphorase activity and contained tightly bound calmodulin, indicating that the reductase and calmodulin-binding domains were functional. To identify sequences in exons 8 and 9 that are critical for dimerization, iNOSFL was used to construct 12 mutants, each with deletion of eight residues in the region encoded by exons 8 and 9. In addition, two “control” iNOS deletion mutants were synthesized, lacking either residues 45–52 of the oxygenase domain or residues 1131–1138 of the reductase domain. Whereas both control deletion mutants generated NO and formed dimers, none of the 12 other mutants formed dimers or generated NO. The region encoded by exons 8 and 9 is critical for iNOS dimer formation and NO production but not for reductase activity. This region could be a potential target for therapeutic interventions aimed at inhibiting iNOS dimerization and hence NO synthesis. PMID:9636200

  5. BEAT: Bioinformatics Exon Array Tool to store, analyze and visualize Affymetrix GeneChip Human Exon Array data from disease experiments

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background It is known from recent studies that more than 90% of human multi-exon genes are subject to Alternative Splicing (AS), a key molecular mechanism in which multiple transcripts may be generated from a single gene. It is widely recognized that a breakdown in AS mechanisms plays an important role in cellular differentiation and pathologies. Polymerase Chain Reactions, microarrays and sequencing technologies have been applied to the study of transcript diversity arising from alternative expression. Last generation Affymetrix GeneChip Human Exon 1.0 ST Arrays offer a more detailed view of the gene expression profile providing information on the AS patterns. The exon array technology, with more than five million data points, can detect approximately one million exons, and it allows performing analyses at both gene and exon level. In this paper we describe BEAT, an integrated user-friendly bioinformatics framework to store, analyze and visualize exon arrays datasets. It combines a data warehouse approach with some rigorous statistical methods for assessing the AS of genes involved in diseases. Meta statistics are proposed as a novel approach to explore the analysis results. BEAT is available at http://beat.ba.itb.cnr.it. Results BEAT is a web tool which allows uploading and analyzing exon array datasets using standard statistical methods and an easy-to-use graphical web front-end. BEAT has been tested on a dataset with 173 samples and tuned using new datasets of exon array experiments from 28 colorectal cancer and 26 renal cell cancer samples produced at the Medical Genetics Unit of IRCCS Casa Sollievo della Sofferenza. To highlight all possible AS events, alternative names, accession Ids, Gene Ontology terms and biochemical pathways annotations are integrated with exon and gene level expression plots. The user can customize the results choosing custom thresholds for the statistical parameters and exploiting the available clinical data of the samples for a

  6. Microsomal epoxide hydrolase (EPHX1), slow (exon 3, 113His) and fast (exon 4, 139Arg) alleles confer susceptibility to squamous cell esophageal cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Jain, Meenu; Tilak, Anup Raj; Upadhyay, Rohit; Kumar, Ashwani; Mittal, Balraj

    2008-07-15

    Genetic polymorphisms in xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes may alter risk of various cancers. Present case-control study evaluated the influence of EPHX1 genetic variations on squamous cell esophageal cancer (ESCC) susceptibility in 107 patients and 320 controls. EPHX1 polymorphic alleles were genotyped by direct sequencing (exon 3, Tyr113His) or PCR-RFLP (exon 4, His139Arg). Patients with exon 3 genotypes (Tyr113His, His113His) and 113His allele were at risk of ESCC (OR{sub Tyr113His} 2.0, 95% CI = 1.2-3.4, p = 0.007; OR{sub His113His} 2.3 95% CI = 1.0-5.2, p = 0.03 and OR{sub His} 1.5, 95% CI = 1.0-2.1, p = 0.01). In contrast, individuals with exon 4, 139Arg allele were at low risk of cancer (OR 0.34, 95% CI = 0.20-0.56, p = 0.001). However, none of haplotype combinations of exon 3 (Tyr113His) and exon 4 (His139Arg) polymorphisms showed modulation of risk for ESCC. Sub-grouping of patients based on anatomical location of tumor predicted that patients with exon 3, His113His and Tyr113His genotypes were at higher risk for developing ESCC tumor at upper and middle third locations (OR 4.4, 95% CI = 1.0-18.5, p = 0.04; OR 2.5, 95% CI = 1.3-5.0, p = 0.005 respectively). The frequency of exon 4, His139Arg genotype was significantly lower in ESCC patients with lower third tumor location as compared to controls (14.8% vs. 36.3%, p = 0.02). In case-only study, gene-environment interaction of EPHX1 genotypes with tobacco, alcohol and occupational exposures did not appear to modulate the cancer susceptibility. In conclusion, exon 3, Tyr113His genotype was associated with higher risk of ESCC particularly at upper and middle-third anatomical locations of tumor. However, His139Arg genotype of exon 4, exhibited low risk for ESCC as well as its clinical characteristics.

  7. Identification of beta1C-2, a novel variant of the integrin beta1 subunit generated by utilization of an alternative splice acceptor site in exon C.

    PubMed Central

    Svineng, G; Fässler, R; Johansson, S

    1998-01-01

    A new splice variant of the human integrin subunit beta1 has been identified and designated beta1C-2. It differs from the previously reported beta1C (in this report designated beta1C-1) by 18 nucleotides, and is generated by splicing from exon 6 to an alternative splice acceptor site within exon C, causing an in-frame deletion of six amino acids of the cytoplasmic region of beta1C-1. The beta1C-2 mRNA is present in several human cell lines and tissues at low levels, similarly to beta1C-1. In peripheral T-lymphocytes, beta1C-2 is the selectively expressed isoform. Neither beta1C-1 nor beta1C-2 mRNA could be detected in mouse tissues, and Southern hybridization of a mouse genomic beta1 clone with a human exon-C-specific probe failed to identify a corresponding mouse exon. The antisense orientation of exon C is highly homologous to an Alu element. Since Alu elements are restricted to primates, the beta1C-1 and beta1C-2 variants of the integrin subunit beta1 are specific for these species. The protein coded for by the beta1C-2 cDNA can be expressed and localized to the surface of beta1 deficient mouse cells. However, while stable transformed clones expressing high levels of the beta1A were commonly found, the beta1C-1 and beta1C-2 expressing clones expressed barely detectable amounts of the beta1 protein. Hence, high levels of beta1C-2 may be incompatible with cell proliferation, as previously suggested for beta1C-1. PMID:9494094

  8. An Exon-Specific U1snRNA Induces a Robust Factor IX Activity in Mice Expressing Multiple Human FIX Splicing Mutants

    PubMed Central

    Balestra, Dario; Scalet, Daniela; Pagani, Franco; Rogalska, Malgorzata Ewa; Mari, Rosella; Bernardi, Francesco; Pinotti, Mirko

    2016-01-01

    In cellular models we have demonstrated that a unique U1snRNA targeting an intronic region downstream of a defective exon (Exon-specific U1snRNA, ExSpeU1) can rescue multiple exon-skipping mutations, a relevant cause of genetic disease. Here, we explored in mice the ExSpeU1 U1fix9 toward two model Hemophilia B-causing mutations at the 5′ (c.519A > G) or 3′ (c.392-8T > G) splice sites of F9 exon 5. Hydrodynamic injection of wt-BALB/C mice with plasmids expressing the wt and mutant (hFIX-2G5′ss and hFIX-8G3′ss) splicing-competent human factor IX (hFIX) cassettes resulted in the expression of hFIX transcripts lacking exon 5 in liver, and in low plasma levels of inactive hFIX. Coinjection of U1fix9, but not of U1wt, restored exon inclusion of variants and in the intrinsically weak FIXwt context. This resulted in appreciable circulating hFIX levels (mean ± SD; hFIX-2G5′ss, 1.0 ± 0.5 µg/ml; hFIX-8G3′ss, 1.2 ± 0.3 µg/ml; and hFIXwt, 1.9 ± 0.6 µg/ml), leading to a striking shortening (from ~100 seconds of untreated mice to ~80 seconds) of FIX-dependent coagulation times, indicating a hFIX with normal specific activity. This is the first proof-of-concept in vivo that a unique ExSpeU1 can efficiently rescue gene expression impaired by distinct exon-skipping variants, which extends the applicability of ExSpeU1s to panels of mutations and thus cohort of patients. PMID:27701399

  9. Becker Muscular Dystrophy (BMD) caused by duplication of exons 3-6 of the dystrophin gene presenting as dilated cardiomyopathy

    SciTech Connect

    Tsai, A.C.; Allingham-Hawkins, D.J.; Becker, L.

    1994-09-01

    X-linked dilated cardiomyopathy (XLCM) is a progressive myocardial disease presenting with congestive heart failure in teenage males without clinical signs of skeletal myopathy. Tight linkage of XLCM to the DMD locus has been demonstrated; it has been suggested that, at least in some families, XLCM is a {open_quotes}dystrophinopathy.{close_quotes} We report a 14-year-old boy who presented with acute heart failure due to dilated cardiomyopathy. He had no history of muscle weakness, but physical examination revealed pseudohypertrophy of the calf muscles. He subsequently received a heart transplantation. Family history was negative. Serum CK level at the time of diagnosis was 10,416. Myocardial biopsy showed no evidence of carditis. Dystrophin staining of cardiac and skeletal muscle with anti-sera to COOH and NH{sub 2}termini showed a patchy distribution of positivity suggestive of Becker muscular dystrophy. Analysis of 18 of the 79 dystrophin exons detected a duplication that included exons 3-6. The proband`s mother has an elevated serum CK and was confirmed to be a carrier of the same duplication. A mutation in the muscle promotor region of the dystrophin gene has been implicated in the etiology of SLCM. However, Towbin et al. (1991) argued that other 5{prime} mutations in the dystrophin gene could cause selective cardiomyopathy. The findings in our patient support the latter hypothesis. This suggests that there are multiple regions in the dystrophin gene which, when disrupted, can cause isolated dilated cardiomyopathy.

  10. TAT gene mutation analysis in three Palestinian kindreds with oculocutaneous tyrosinaemia type II; characterization of a silent exonic transversion that causes complete missplicing by exon 11 skipping.

    PubMed

    Maydan, G; Andresen, B S; Madsen, P P; Zeigler, M; Raas-Rothschild, A; Zlotogorski, A; Gutman, A; Korman, S H

    2006-10-01

    Deficiency of the hepatic cytosolic enzyme tyrosine aminotransferase (TAT) causes marked hypertyrosinaemia leading to painful palmoplantar hyperkeratoses, pseudodendritic keratitis and variable mental retardation (oculocutaneous tyrosinaemia type II or Richner-Hanhart syndrome). Parents may therefore seek prenatal diagnosis, but this is not possible by biochemical assays as tyrosine does not accumulate in amniotic fluid and TAT is not expressed in chorionic villi or amniocytes. Molecular analysis is therefore the only possible approach for prenatal diagnosis and carrier detection. To this end, we sought TAT gene mutations in 9 tyrosinaemia II patients from three consanguineous Palestinian kindreds. In two kindreds (7 patients), the only potential abnormality identified after sequencing all 12 exons and exon-intron boundaries was homozygosity for a silent, single-nucleotide transversion c.1224G > T (p.T408T) at the last base of exon 11. This was predicted to disrupt the 5' donor splice site of exon 11 and result in missplicing. However, as TAT is expressed exclusively in liver, patient mRNA could not be obtained for splicing analysis. A minigene approach was therefore used to assess the effect of c.1224G > T on exon 11 splicing. Transfection experiments with wild-type and c.1224G > T mutant minigene constructs demonstrated that c.1224G > T results in complete exon 11 skipping, illustrating the utility of this approach for confirming a putative splicing defect when cDNA is unavailable. Homozygosity for a c.1249C > T (R417X) exon 12 nonsense mutation (previously reported in a French patient) was identified in both patients from the third kindred, enabling successful prenatal diagnosis of an unaffected fetus using chorionic villous tissue.

  11. Association of three polymorphisms of scavenger receptor class BI gene (exon8, exon1, intron5) with coronary stenosis in a coronary Tunisian population.

    PubMed

    Rejeb, Jihène; Omezzine, Asma; Boumaiza, Imen; Rebhi, Lamia; Kacem, Slim; Rejeb, Nabila Ben; Nabli, Naoufel; Abdelaziz, Ahmed Ben; Boughzala, Essia; Bouslama, Ali

    2012-12-15

    The potential role of scavenger receptor class BI (gene name SCARB1) in the regulation of lipoproteins metabolism and atherosclerosis has attracted considerable interest. We tested the relationship of SCARB1 polymorphisms with significant coronary stenosis (SCS) and lipid profile in a coronary Tunisian population. Three SCARB1 polymorphisms (exon8 (C/T), exon1 (G/A), intron5 (C/T)) were studied in 316 Tunisian patients undergoing coronary angiography. SCS was defined as a luminal narrowing of ≥ 50% in at least one major coronary artery. Lipid profile was measured. Genotyping was performed using PCR-RFLP. Individuals with TT genotypes of exon8 were associated with higher concentrations of plasma HDL-C and ApoAI in the group without SCS. Carriers of T allele of exon8 were associated with 41% lower risk of SCS. This protective effect seemed to be particularly significant in women, nondiabetics and nonsmokers. Subjects homozygous for the variant allele of intron5 were significantly associated with an increased risk of SCS, particularly in smokers. AA genotype of exon1 was associated with an increased risk of SCS in diabetics and in patients with metabolic syndrome. The (CAT) haplotype was associated with increase in the risk of SCS compared to the wild haplotype and had a 4-fold greater risk of SCS than patients with haplotype (TGC) which seems to be the most protective against SCS. Carriers of T allele of exon8 in SCARB1 seemed to increase HDL-C and ApoAI concentrations and reduce the risk of SCS. The intron5, exon1 and (CAT) haplotype seemed to have an atherogenic effect. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Characterization of 5' promoter and exon 1-3 polymorphism of the RAET1E gene.

    PubMed

    Cox, Steven T; Pearson, Hayley; Laza-Briviesca, Raquel; Pesoa, Susanna; Vullo, Carlos; Madrigal, J Alejandro; Saudemont, Aurore

    2016-01-01

    NKG2D is an activating receptor utilized by natural killer (NK) cells that recognizes upregulated ligands on infected, tumorigenic and damaged cells, leading to their cytolysis. However, the NKG2D ligand (NKG2DL) system is very complex with eight known gene loci encoding slightly different molecules. Furthermore, most NKG2DL gene loci such as MICA and MICB are highly polymorphic with potential for functional differences. NKG2DL expression on tumors varies depending on the malignancy and tumors can also release soluble NKG2DL that exert anergic effects on NK cells when engagement with NKG2D occurs, allowing escape from NK cell immunosurveillance. We carried out RAET1E typing of IHW cell line DNA, including a 580 bp proximal promoter fragment and exons 1-3 identifying 13 of 15 known RAET1E alleles. We determined 7 polymorphisms within the promoter region, including 2 already known that contributed to 9 promoter types. RAET1E alleles with variability in the extracellular region also differed with respect to promoter type and one allele, RAET1E(∗)003, associated with 5 promoter types. We then identified putative transcription factor binding sites for RAET1E, and found 5 of the 7 promoter polymorphisms may disrupt these sites, abrogating binding of transcription factors and varying the potential level of expression.

  13. Pattern recognition in DNA sequences: The intron-exon junction problem

    SciTech Connect

    Mural, R.J.; Uberbacher, E.C. Tennessee Univ., Oak Ridge, TN . Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences); Mann, R.C. )

    1990-01-01

    One of the fundamental problems facing the field of genomic sequence analysis is the difficulty in locating relatively small coding regions of DNA within the much larger non-coding regions. Neural networks, linguistic analysis and various types of expert systems have been used with various degrees of success to address this problem. We have developed several methods for recognizing the presence of splice junctions and coding DNA which are based on artificial intelligence, linguistic and statistical approaches. The triplet vocabulary in and around splice junctions has been analyzed for primates, and the occurrences of preferred triplets in potential junctions seems to be a very selective method for distinguishing true junctions from otherwise similar sequences. given a 50% mix of true and false junctions, this method scores 93%--95% correct. Several approaches have been used to identify exons. These include a frame bias matrix algorithm and an algorithm which estimates the fractal dimension of dinucleotide usage. Attempts are underway to combine the outputs of the various methods using a rule-based approach to improve the overall performance of these predictors. 13 refs., 4 figs.

  14. EGFR exon mutation distribution and outcome in non-small-cell lung cancer: a Portuguese retrospective study.

    PubMed

    de Mello, Ramon Andrade; Pires, Filipa Soares; Marques, Dânia Sofia; Oliveira, Júlio; Rodrigues, Ana; Soares, Marta; Azevedo, Isabel; Peixoto, Ana; Santos, Catarina; Pinto, Carla; Hespanhol, Venceslau; Teixeira, Manuel R; Amaro, Teresina; Queiroga, Henrique; Araújo, António

    2012-12-01

    Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutations play a predictive role in advanced stages of non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients. We conducted this study in order to assess EGFR status in a Portuguese population and its role in NSCLC patients' outcomes. Patients were submitted to EGFR assessment by high-resolution melting and/or direct sequencing. Kaplan-Meier curve was used to assess overall survival and progression-free survival (PFS). Two hundred forty eight out of 322 participants were assessed for EGFR status. Forty-two patients (16.9 %) presented EGFR-mutated status: one patient (2.4 %) presented exon 18; 21 patients (50 %), exon 19; one patient (2.4 %), exon 20; and 18 patients (45.2 %), exon 21 mutations, p < 0.001. PFS was not assessed (n.a.) for patient with exon 18 mutation, and for the other patients with mutations, it was 7 months (3.96-10.03) (exon 19), <1 month (exon 20), and 7 months (0-14.2) (exon 21) (p = 0.027). Overall survival (OS) was 11 months (exon 18), 11 months (1-18) (exon 19), 1 month (exon 20), and 7.5 months (2-70) (exon 21) (p = n.a). This study suggests that the EGFR mutation is herein observed in a higher proportion than expected for a Caucasian population, and OS is a little less than that published in the literature.

  15. Does the Mutant CAG Expansion in Huntingtin mRNA Interfere with Exonucleolytic Cleavage of its First Exon?

    PubMed

    Liu, Wanzhao; Pfister, Edith L; Kennington, Lori A; Chase, Kathryn O; Mueller, Christian; DiFiglia, Marian; Aronin, Neil

    2016-01-01

    Silencing mutant huntingtin mRNA by RNA interference (RNAi) is a therapeutic strategy for Huntington's disease. RNAi induces specific endonucleolytic cleavage of the target HTT mRNA, followed by exonucleolytic processing of the cleaved mRNA fragments. We investigated the clearance of huntingtin mRNA cleavage products following RNAi, to find if particular huntingtin mRNA sequences persist. We especially wanted to find out if the expanded CAG increased production of a toxic mRNA species by impeding degradation of human mutant huntingtin exon 1 mRNA. Mice expressing the human mutant HTT transgene with 128 CAG repeats (YAC128 mice) were injected in the striatum with self-complementary AAV9 vectors carrying a miRNA targeting exon 48 of huntingtin mRNA (scAAV-U6-miRNA-HTT-GFP). Transgenic huntingtin mRNA levels were measured in striatal lysates after two weeks. For qPCR, we used species specific primer-probe combinations that together spanned 6 positions along the open reading frame and untranslated regions of the human huntingtin mRNA. Knockdown was also measured in the liver following tail vein injection. Two weeks after intrastriatal administration of scAAV9-U6-miRNA-HTT-GFP, we measured transgenic mutant huntingtin in striatum using probes targeting six different sites along the huntingtin mRNA. Real time PCR showed a reduction of 29% to 36% in human HTT. There was no significant difference in knockdown measured at any of the six sites, including exon 1. In liver, we observed a more pronounced HTT mRNA knockdown of 70% to 76% relative to the untreated mice, and there were also no significant differences among sites. Our results demonstrate that degradation is equally distributed across the human mutant huntingtin mRNA following RNAi-induced cleavage.

  16. Structural, biochemical and clinical characterization of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) exon 20 insertion mutations in lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yasuda, Hiroyuki; Park, Eunyoung; Yun, Cai-Hong; Sng, Natasha J.; Lucena-Araujo, Antonio R.; Yeo, Wee-Lee; Huberman, Mark S.; Cohen, David W.; Nakayama, Sohei; Ishioka, Kota; Yamaguchi, Norihiro; Hanna, Megan; Oxnard, Geoffrey R.; Lathan, Christopher S.; Moran, Teresa; Sequist, Lecia V.; Chaft, Jamie E.; Riely, Gregory J.; Arcila, Maria E.; Soo, Ross A.; Meyerson, Matthew; Eck, Michael J.; Kobayashi, Susumu S.; Costa, Daniel B.

    2014-01-01

    Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) gene mutations (G719X, exon 19 deletions/insertions, L858R and L861Q) predict favorable responses to EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) in advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). However, EGFR exon 20 insertion mutations (∼10% of all EGFR mutations) are generally associated with insensitivity to available TKIs (gefitinib, erlotinib and afatinib). The basis of this primary resistance is poorly understood.  We study a broad subset of exon 20 insertion mutations, comparing in vitro TKI sensitivity with responses to gefitinib and erlotinib in NSCLC patients; and find that most are resistant to EGFR TKIs. The crystal structure of a representative TKI-insensitive mutant (D770_N771insNPG) reveals an unaltered ATP-binding pocket and the inserted residues form a wedge at the end of the C-helix that promotes the active kinase conformation. Unlike EGFR-L858R, D770_N771insNPG activates EGFR without increasing its affinity for EGFR TKIs. Unexpectedly, we find that EGFR-A763_Y764insFQEA is highly sensitive to EGFR TKIs in vitro; and patients whose NSCLCs harbor this mutation respond to erlotinib. Analysis of the A763_Y764insFQEA mutant indicates that the inserted residues shift the register of the C-helix in the N-terminal direction, altering the structure in the region that is also affected by the TKI-sensitive EGFR-L858R. Our studies reveal intricate differences between EGFR mutations, their biology and their response to EGFR TKIs. PMID:24353160

  17. Mutations in exons of the CYP17-II gene affect sex steroid concentration in male Japanese flounder ( Paralichthys olivaceus)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Ruiqin; He, Feng; Wen, Haishen; Li, Jifang; Shi, Bao; Shi, Dan; Liu, Miao; Mu, Weijie; Zhang, Yuanqing; Hu, Jian; Han, Weiguo; Zhang, Jianan; Wang, Qingqing; Yuan, Yuren; Liu, Qun

    2012-03-01

    As a specific gene of fish, cytochrome P450c17-II ( CYP17-II) gene plays a key role in the growth, development an reproduction level of fish. In this study, the single-stranded conformational polymorphism (SSCP) technique was used to characterize polymorphisms within the coding region of CYP17-II gene in a population of 75 male Japanese flounder ( Paralichthys olivaceus). Three single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were identified in CYP17-II gene of Japanese flounder. They were c.G594A (p.G188R), c.G939A and c.G1502A (p.G490D). SNP1 (c.G594A), located in exon 4 of CYP17-II gene, was significantly associated with gonadosomatic index (GSI). Individuals with genotype GG of SNP1 had significantly lower GSI ( P < 0.05) than those with genotype AA or AG. SNP2 (c.G939A) located at the CpG island of CYP17-II gene. The mutation changed the methylation of exon 6. Individuals with genotype AA of SNP2 had significantly lower serum testosterone (T) level and hepatosomatic index (HSI) compared to those with genotype GG. The results suggested that SNP2 could influence the reproductive endocrine of male Japanese flounder. However, the SNP3 (c.G1502A) located in exon 9 did not affect the four measured reproductive traits. This study showed that CYP17-II gene could be a potentially useful candidate gene for the research of genetic breeding and physiological aspects of Japanese flounder.

  18. Structural, biochemical, and clinical characterization of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) exon 20 insertion mutations in lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Yasuda, Hiroyuki; Park, Eunyoung; Yun, Cai-Hong; Sng, Natasha J; Lucena-Araujo, Antonio R; Yeo, Wee-Lee; Huberman, Mark S; Cohen, David W; Nakayama, Sohei; Ishioka, Kota; Yamaguchi, Norihiro; Hanna, Megan; Oxnard, Geoffrey R; Lathan, Christopher S; Moran, Teresa; Sequist, Lecia V; Chaft, Jamie E; Riely, Gregory J; Arcila, Maria E; Soo, Ross A; Meyerson, Matthew; Eck, Michael J; Kobayashi, Susumu S; Costa, Daniel B

    2013-12-18

    Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) gene mutations (G719X, exon 19 deletions/insertions, L858R, and L861Q) predict favorable responses to EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) in advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). However, EGFR exon 20 insertion mutations (~10% of all EGFR mutations) are generally associated with insensitivity to available TKIs (gefitinib, erlotinib, and afatinib). The basis of this primary resistance is poorly understood. We studied a broad subset of exon 20 insertion mutations, comparing in vitro TKI sensitivity with responses to gefitinib and erlotinib in NSCLC patients, and found that most are resistant to EGFR TKIs. The crystal structure of a representative TKI-insensitive mutant (D770_N771insNPG) reveals an unaltered adenosine triphosphate-binding pocket, and the inserted residues form a wedge at the end of the C helix that promotes the active kinase conformation. Unlike EGFR-L858R, D770_N771insNPG activates EGFR without increasing its affinity for EGFR TKIs. Unexpectedly, we find that EGFR-A763_Y764insFQEA is highly sensitive to EGFR TKIs in vitro, and patients whose NSCLCs harbor this mutation respond to erlotinib. Analysis of the A763_Y764insFQEA mutant indicates that the inserted residues shift the register of the C helix in the N-terminal direction, altering the structure in the region that is also affected by the TKI-sensitive EGFR-L858R. Our studies reveal intricate differences between EGFR mutations, their biology, and their response to EGFR TKIs.

  19. Does the mutant CAG expansion in huntingtin mRNA interfere with exonucleolytic cleavage of its first exon?

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Wanzhao; Pfister, Edith L.; Kennington, Lori A.; Chase, Kathryn O.; Mueller, Christian; DiFiglia, Marian; Aronin, Neil

    2016-01-01

    Background Silencing mutant huntingtin mRNA by RNA interference (RNAi) is a therapeutic strategy for Huntington’s disease. RNAi induces specific endonucleolytic cleavage of the target HTT mRNA, followed by exonucleolytic processing of the cleaved mRNA fragments. Objectives We investigated the clearance of huntingtin mRNA cleavage products following RNAi, to find if particular huntingtin mRNA sequences persist. We especially wanted to find out if the expanded CAG increased production of a toxic mRNA species by impeding degradation of human mutant huntingtin exon 1 mRNA. Methods Mice expressing the human mutant HTT transgene with 128 CAG repeats (YAC128 mice) were injected in the striatum with self-complementary AAV9 vectors carrying a miRNA targeting exon 48 of huntingtin mRNA (scAAV-U6-miRNA-HTT-GFP). Transgenic huntingtin mRNA levels were measured in striatal lysates after two weeks. For qPCR, we used species specific primer-probe combinations that together spanned 6 positions along the open reading frame and untranslated regions of the human huntingtin mRNA. Knockdown was also measured in the liver following tail vein injection. Results Two weeks after intrastriatal administration of scAAV9-U6-miRNA-HTT-GFP, we measured transgenic mutant huntingtin in striatum using probes targeting six different sites along the huntingtin mRNA. Real time PCR showed a reduction of 29% to 36% in human HTT. There was no significant difference in knockdown measured at any of the six sites, including exon 1. In liver, we observed a more pronounced HTT mRNA knockdown of 70% to 76% relative to the untreated mice, and there were also no significant differences among sites. Conclusions Our results demonstrate that degradation is equally distributed across the human mutant huntingtin mRNA following RNAi-induced cleavage. PMID:27003665

  20. Association of a G2014A transition in exon 8 of the estrogen receptor-alpha gene with postmenopausal osteoporosis.

    PubMed

    Ongphiphadhanakul, B; Chanprasertyothin, S; Payattikul, P; Saetung, S; Piaseu, N; Chailurkit, L; Rajatanavin, R

    2001-12-01

    We report the association of a newly identified synonymous G2014A single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) which does not alter the amino acid sequence in exon 8 of the estrogen receptor-alpha (ERalpha) gene with osteoporosis in Thai postmenopausal women. Subjects consisted of 228 postmenopausal women aged more than 55 years divided into two groups--with vertebral or femoral osteoporosis (n = 106) or without osteoporosis (n = 122)--according to bone mineral density (BMD) criteria. The exon 8 G2014A SNP, which is 6 nucleotides upstream from the end of the stop codon, was identified by PCR-RFLP. Data are expressed as the mean and 95% CI. The allele frequency of the G2014A polymorphism was 26.4% in osteoporotic subjects and was significantly higher than that in non-osteoporotic women (15.2%) (p<0.05). By stepwise logistic regression analysis, it was found that the G2014A polymorphism was related to the presence of osteoporosis (odds ratio 2.7 per A allele, 95% CI 1.49-4.76) independently of body weight (odds ratio 0.93 per kg, 95% CI 0.89-0.96) and years since menopause (odds ratio 1.12 per year, 95% CI 1.08-1.19). In a multiple linear regression model, L2-L4 BMD of osteoporotic subjects was associated with body weight (p<0.05), endogenous estradiol levels (p<0.05) and the G2014A genotype (p<0.001), while it was related only to body weight (p<0.05) and estradiol levels in non-osteoporotic women (p<0.05). We conclude that a G2014A SNP in exon 8 of ERalpha is associated with the presence and severity of postmenopausal osteoporosis. Linkage disequilibrium between this polymorphism and the 3'-untranslated region of the ERalpha gene which may participate in the regulation of ERalpha gene expression remains to be determined.

  1. Identification of Novel Potentially Toxic Oligomers Formed in Vitro from Mammalian-derived Expanded huntingtin Exon-1 Protein*

    PubMed Central

    Nucifora, Leslie G.; Burke, Kathleen A.; Feng, Xia; Arbez, Nicolas; Zhu, Shanshan; Miller, Jason; Yang, Guocheng; Ratovitski, Tamara; Delannoy, Michael; Muchowski, Paul J.; Finkbeiner, Steven; Legleiter, Justin; Ross, Christopher A.; Poirier, Michelle A.

    2012-01-01

    Huntington disease is a genetic neurodegenerative disorder that arises from an expanded polyglutamine region in the N terminus of the HD gene product, huntingtin. Protein inclusions comprised of N-terminal fragments of mutant huntingtin are a characteristic feature of disease, though are likely to play a protective role rather than a causative one in neurodegeneration. Soluble oligomeric assemblies of huntingtin formed early in the aggregation process are candidate toxic species in HD. In the present study, we established an in vitro system to generate recombinant huntingtin in mammalian cells. Using both denaturing and native gel analysis, we have identified novel oligomeric forms of mammalian-derived expanded huntingtin exon-1 N-terminal fragment. These species are transient and were not previously detected using bacterially expressed exon-1 protein. Importantly, these species are recognized by 3B5H10, an antibody that recognizes a two-stranded hairpin conformation of expanded polyglutamine believed to be associated with a toxic form of huntingtin. Interestingly, comparable oligomeric species were not observed for expanded huntingtin shortstop, a 117-amino acid fragment of huntingtin shown previously in mammalian cell lines and transgenic mice, and here in primary cortical neurons, to be non-toxic. Further, we demonstrate that expanded huntingtin shortstop has a reduced ability to form amyloid-like fibrils characteristic of the aggregation pathway for toxic expanded polyglutamine proteins. Taken together, these data provide a possible candidate toxic species in HD. In addition, these studies demonstrate the fundamental differences in early aggregation events between mutant huntingtin exon-1 and shortstop proteins that may underlie the differences in toxicity. PMID:22433867

  2. CEDER: Accurate detection of differentially expressed genes by combining significance of exons using RNA-Seq

    PubMed Central

    Wan, Lin; Sun, Fengzhu

    2012-01-01

    RNA-Seq is widely used in transcriptome studies, and the detection of differentially expressed genes (DEGs) between two classes of individuals, e.g. cases vs controls, using RNA-Seq is of fundamental importance. Many statistical methods for DEG detection based on RNA-Seq data have been developed and most of them are based on the read counts mapped to individual genes. On the other hand, genes are composed of exons and the distribution of reads for the different exons can be heterogeneous. We hypothesize that the detection accuracy of differentially expressed genes can be increased by analyzing individual exons within a gene and then combining the results of the exons. We therefore developed a novel program, termed CEDER, to accurately detect DGEs by combining the significance of the exons. CEDER first tests for differentially expressed exons yielding a p-value for each, and then gives a score indicating the potential for a gene to be differentially expressed by integrating the p-values of the exons in the gene. We showed that CEDER can significantly increase the accuracy of existing methods for detecting DEGs on two benchmark RNA-Seq datasets and simulated datasets. PMID:22641709

  3. FUNCTIONAL UNDERSTANDING OF THE DIVERSE EXON-INTRON STRUCTURES OF HUMAN GPCR GENES

    PubMed Central

    HAMMOND, DOROTHY A.; OLMAN, VICTOR

    2014-01-01

    The GPCR genes have a variety of exon-intron structures even though their proteins are all structurally homologous. We have examined all human GPCR genes with at least two functional protein isoforms, totaling 199, aiming to gain an understanding of what may have contributed to the large diversity of the exon-intron structures of the GPCR genes. The 199 genes have a total of 808 known protein splicing isoforms with experimentally verified functions. Our analysis reveals that 1,301 (80.6%) adjacent exon-exon pairs out of the total of 1,613 in the 199 genes have either exactly one exon skipped or the intron in-between retained in at least one of the 808 protein splicing isoforms. This observation has a statistical significance p-value of 2.051762* e−09, assuming that the observed splicing isoforms are independent of the exon-intron structures. Our interpretation of this observation is that the exon boundaries of the GPCR genes are not randomly determined; instead they may be selected to facilitate specific alternative splicing for functional purposes. PMID:24467758

  4. Reengineering a transmembrane protein to treat muscular dystrophy using exon skipping.

    PubMed

    Gao, Quan Q; Wyatt, Eugene; Goldstein, Jeff A; LoPresti, Peter; Castillo, Lisa M; Gazda, Alec; Petrossian, Natalie; Earley, Judy U; Hadhazy, Michele; Barefield, David Y; Demonbreun, Alexis R; Bönnemann, Carsten; Wolf, Matthew; McNally, Elizabeth M

    2015-11-02

    Exon skipping uses antisense oligonucleotides as a treatment for genetic diseases. The antisense oligonucleotides used for exon skipping are designed to bypass premature stop codons in the target RNA and restore reading frame disruption. Exon skipping is currently being tested in humans with dystrophin gene mutations who have Duchenne muscular dystrophy. For Duchenne muscular dystrophy, the rationale for exon skipping derived from observations in patients with naturally occurring dystrophin gene mutations that generated internally deleted but partially functional dystrophin proteins. We have now expanded the potential for exon skipping by testing whether an internal, in-frame truncation of a transmembrane protein γ-sarcoglycan is functional. We generated an internally truncated γ-sarcoglycan protein that we have termed Mini-Gamma by deleting a large portion of the extracellular domain. Mini-Gamma provided functional and pathological benefits to correct the loss of γ-sarcoglycan in a Drosophila model, in heterologous cell expression studies, and in transgenic mice lacking γ-sarcoglycan. We generated a cellular model of human muscle disease and showed that multiple exon skipping could be induced in RNA that encodes a mutant human γ-sarcoglycan. Since Mini-Gamma represents removal of 4 of the 7 coding exons in γ-sarcoglycan, this approach provides a viable strategy to treat the majority of patients with γ-sarcoglycan gene mutations.

  5. A novel insertion mutation on exon 20 of epidermal growth factor receptor, conferring resistance to erlotinib.

    PubMed

    Khan, Nawazish A; Mirshahidi, Saied; Mirshahidi, Hamid R

    2014-05-01

    The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is a transmembrane glycoprotein tyrosine kinase receptor. The small-molecule tyrosine kinase receptor inhibitors (TKIs) are in clinical use to treat non-small cell lung cancer with EGFR mutations. Variable tumor responses to erlotinib and gefitinib have been observed. The response to these TKIs varies by the type of EGFR mutations found in the tumor. The deletion on exon 19 and the L858R substitution on exon 21 constitute the most frequent mutations and are known to show good response to TKIs. However, mutations on exon 20 are less common and seem to respond poorly to TKIs. In clinical settings, the reported response of exon 20 mutations to reversible TKIs (both gefitinib and erlotinib) remains inconstant. The type of coexisting mutation seems to affect the response of these insertions to TKIs. We herein present a case of disease progression despite the use of erlotinib in a female patient who had a novel insertion mutation on exon 20. Our patient was a never-smoker and was identified to have a Pro772_His773insGlnCysPro mutation on exon 20. She had previously been treated with cisplatin and gemcitabine and then with carboplatin and pemetrexed. She was treated with erlotinib upon intolerance to second-line chemotherapy and did not respond. Our patient had a novel insertion mutation on exon 20, which was found to be resistant to erlotinib.

  6. Comparison of exon 5 sequences from 35 class I genes of the BALB/c mouse

    PubMed Central

    1989-01-01

    DNA sequences of the fifth exon, which encodes the transmembrane domain, were determined for the BALB/c mouse class I MHC genes and used to study the relationships between them. Based on nucleotide sequence similarity, the exon 5 sequences can be divided into seven groups. Although most members within each group are at least 80% similar to each other, comparison between groups reveals that the groups share little similarity. However, in spite of the extensive variation of the fifth exon sequences, analysis of their predicted amino acid translations reveals that only four class I gene fifth exons have frameshifts or stop codons that terminate their translation and prevent them from encoding a domain that is both hydrophobic and long enough to span a lipid bilayer. Exactly 27 of the remaining fifth exons could encode a domain that is similar to those of the transplantation antigens in that it consists of a proline-rich connecting peptide, a transmembrane segment, and a cytoplasmic portion with membrane- anchoring basic residues. The conservation of this motif in the majority of the fifth exon translations in spite of extensive variation suggests that selective pressure exists for these exons to maintain their ability to encode a functional transmembrane domain, raising the possibility that many of the nonclassical class I genes encode functionally important products. PMID:2584927

  7. Oncogene- and drug resistance-associated alternative exon usage in acute myeloid leukemia (AML)

    PubMed Central

    Mohamed, Aminetou Mint; Balsat, Marie; Thenoz, Morgan; Koering, Catherine; Payen-Gay, Lea; Cheok, Meyling; Mortada, Hussein; Auboeuf, Didier; Pinatel, Christiane; El-Hamri, Mohamed; Dumontet, Charles; Cros, Emeline; Flandrin-Gresta, Pascale; Nibourel, Olivier; Preudhomme, Claude; Michallet, Mauricette; Thomas, Xavier; Nicolini, Franck; Solly, Françoise; Guyotat, Denis; Campos, Lydia

    2016-01-01

    In addition to spliceosome gene mutations, oncogene expression and drug resistance in AML might influence exon expression. We performed exon-array analysis and exon-specific PCR (ESPCR) to identify specific landscapes of exon expression that are associated with DEK and WT1 oncogene expression and the resistance of AML cells to AraC, doxorubicin or azacitidine. Data were obtained for these five conditions through exon-array analysis of 17 cell lines and 24 patient samples and were extended through qESPCR of samples from 152 additional AML cases. More than 70% of AEUs identified by exon-array were technically validated through ESPCR. In vitro, 1,130 to 5,868 exon events distinguished the 5 conditions from their respective controls while in vivo 6,560 and 9,378 events distinguished chemosensitive and chemoresistant AML, respectively, from normal bone marrow. Whatever the cause of this effect, 30 to 80% of mis-spliced mRNAs involved genes unmodified at the whole transcriptional level. These AEUs unmasked new functional pathways that are distinct from those generated by transcriptional deregulation. These results also identified new putative pathways that could help increase the understanding of the effects mediated by DEK or WT1, which may allow the targeting of these pathways to prevent resistance of AML cells to chemotherapeutic agents. PMID:26284582

  8. Reengineering a transmembrane protein to treat muscular dystrophy using exon skipping

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Quan Q.; Wyatt, Eugene; Goldstein, Jeff A.; LoPresti, Peter; Castillo, Lisa M.; Gazda, Alec; Petrossian, Natalie; Earley, Judy U.; Hadhazy, Michele; Barefield, David Y.; Demonbreun, Alexis R.; Bönnemann, Carsten; Wolf, Matthew; McNally, Elizabeth M.

    2015-01-01

    Exon skipping uses antisense oligonucleotides as a treatment for genetic diseases. The antisense oligonucleotides used for exon skipping are designed to bypass premature stop codons in the target RNA and restore reading frame disruption. Exon skipping is currently being tested in humans with dystrophin gene mutations who have Duchenne muscular dystrophy. For Duchenne muscular dystrophy, the rationale for exon skipping derived from observations in patients with naturally occurring dystrophin gene mutations that generated internally deleted but partially functional dystrophin proteins. We have now expanded the potential for exon skipping by testing whether an internal, in-frame truncation of a transmembrane protein γ-sarcoglycan is functional. We generated an internally truncated γ-sarcoglycan protein that we have termed Mini-Gamma by deleting a large portion of the extracellular domain. Mini-Gamma provided functional and pathological benefits to correct the loss of γ-sarcoglycan in a Drosophila model, in heterologous cell expression studies, and in transgenic mice lacking γ-sarcoglycan. We generated a cellular model of human muscle disease and showed that multiple exon skipping could be induced in RNA that encodes a mutant human γ-sarcoglycan. Since Mini-Gamma represents removal of 4 of the 7 coding exons in γ-sarcoglycan, this approach provides a viable strategy to treat the majority of patients with γ-sarcoglycan gene mutations. PMID:26457733

  9. The first exon duplication mouse model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy: A tool for therapeutic development.

    PubMed

    Vulin, Adeline; Wein, Nicolas; Simmons, Tabatha R; Rutherford, Andrea M; Findlay, Andrew R; Yurkoski, Jacqueline A; Kaminoh, Yuuki; Flanigan, Kevin M

    2015-11-01

    Exon duplication mutations account for up to 11% of all cases of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), and a duplication of exon 2 is the most common duplication in patients. For use as a platform for testing of duplication-specific therapies, we developed a mouse model that carries a Dmd exon 2 duplication. By using homologous recombination we duplicated exon 2 within intron 2 at a location consistent with a human duplication hotspot. mRNA analysis confirms the inclusion of a duplicated exon 2 in mouse muscle. Dystrophin expression is essentially absent by immunofluorescent and immunoblot analysis, although some muscle specimens show very low-level trace dystrophin expression. Phenotypically, the mouse shows similarities to mdx, the standard laboratory model of DMD. In skeletal muscle, areas of necrosis and phagocytosis are seen at 3 weeks, with central nucleation prominent by four weeks, recapitulating the "crisis" period in mdx. Marked diaphragm fibrosis is noted by 6 months, and remains unchanged at 12 months. Our results show that the Dup2 mouse is both pathologically (in degree and distribution) and physiologically similar to mdx. As it recapitulates the most common single exon duplication found in DMD patients, this new model will be a useful tool to assess the potential of duplicated exon skipping.

  10. The evolutionary fate of alternatively spliced homologous exons after gene duplication.

    PubMed

    Abascal, Federico; Tress, Michael L; Valencia, Alfonso

    2015-04-29

    Alternative splicing and gene duplication are the two main processes responsible for expanding protein functional diversity. Although gene duplication can generate new genes and alternative splicing can introduce variation through alternative gene products, the interplay between the two processes is complex and poorly understood. Here, we have carried out a study of the evolution of alternatively spliced exons after gene duplication to better understand the interaction between the two processes. We created a manually curated set of 97 human genes with mutually exclusively spliced homologous exons and analyzed the evolution of these exons across five distantly related vertebrates (lamprey, spotted gar, zebrafish, fugu, and coelacanth). Most of these exons had an ancient origin (more than 400 Ma). We found examples supporting two extreme evolutionary models for the behaviour of homologous axons after gene duplication. We observed 11 events in which gene duplication was accompanied by splice isoform separation, that is, each paralog specifically conserved just one distinct ancestral homologous exon. At other extreme, we identified genes in which the homologous exons were always conserved within paralogs, suggesting that the alternative splicing event cannot easily be separated from the function in these genes. That many homologous exons fall in between these two extremes highlights the diversity of biological systems and suggests that the subtle balance between alternative splicing and gene duplication is adjusted to the specific cellular context of each gene.

  11. Intron-exon organization of the active human protein S gene PS. alpha. and its pseudogene PS. beta. : Duplication and silencing during primate evolution

    SciTech Connect

    Ploos van Amstel, H.; Reitsma, P.H.; van der Logt, C.P.; Bertina, R.M. )

    1990-08-28

    The human protein S locus on chromosome 3 consists of two protein S genes, PS{alpha} and PS{beta}. Here the authors report the cloning and characterization of both genes. Fifteen exons of the PS{alpha} gene were identified that together code for protein S mRNA as derived from the reported protein S cDNAs. Analysis by primer extension of liver protein S mRNA, however, reveals the presence of two mRNA forms that differ in the length of their 5{prime}-noncoding region. Both transcripts contain a 5{prime}-noncoding region longer than found in the protein S cDNAs. The two products may arise from alternative splicing of an additional intron in this region or from the usage of two start sites for transcription. The intron-exon organization of the PS{alpha} gene fully supports the hypothesis that the protein S gene is the product of an evolutional assembling process in which gene modules coding for structural/functional protein units also found in other coagulation proteins have been put upstream of the ancestral gene of a steroid hormone binding protein. The PS{beta} gene is identified as a pseudogene. It contains a large variety of detrimental aberrations, viz., the absence of exon I, a splice site mutation, three stop codons, and a frame shift mutation. Overall the two genes PS{alpha} and PS{beta} show between their exonic sequences 96.5% homology. Southern analysis of primate DNA showed that the duplication of the ancestral protein S gene has occurred after the branching of the orangutan from the African apes. A nonsense mutation that is present in the pseudogene of man also could be identified in one of the two protein S genes of both chimpanzee and gorilla. This implicates that silencing of one of the two protein S genes must have taken place before the divergence of the three African apes.

  12. Changes in exon–intron structure during vertebrate evolution affect the splicing pattern of exons

    PubMed Central

    Gelfman, Sahar; Burstein, David; Penn, Osnat; Savchenko, Anna; Amit, Maayan; Schwartz, Schraga; Pupko, Tal; Ast, Gil

    2012-01-01

    Exon–intron architecture is one of the major features directing the splicing machinery to the short exons that are located within long flanking introns. However, the evolutionary dynamics of exon–intron architecture and its impact on splicing is largely unknown. Using a comparative genomic approach, we analyzed 17 vertebrate genomes and reconstructed the ancestral motifs of both 3′ and 5′ splice sites, as also the ancestral length of exons and introns. Our analyses suggest that vertebrate introns increased in length from the shortest ancestral introns to the longest primate introns. An evolutionary analysis of splice sites revealed that weak splice sites act as a restrictive force keeping introns short. In contrast, strong splice sites allow recognition of exons flanked by long introns. Reconstruction of the ancestral state suggests these phenomena were not prevalent in the vertebrate ancestor, but appeared during vertebrate evolution. By calculating evolutionary rate shifts in exons, we identified cis-acting regulatory sequences that became fixed during the transition from early vertebrates to mammals. Experimental validations performed on a selection of these hexamers confirmed their regulatory function. We additionally revealed many features of exons that can discriminate alternative from constitutive exons. These features were integrated into a machine-learning approach to predict whether an exon is alternative. Our algorithm obtains very high predictive power (AUC of 0.91), and using these predictions we have identified and successfully validated novel alternatively spliced exons. Overall, we provide novel insights regarding the evolutionary constraints acting upon exons and their recognition by the splicing machinery. PMID:21974994

  13. Complex Exon-Intron Marking by Histone Modifications Is Not Determined Solely by Nucleosome Distribution

    PubMed Central

    Chiang, Kelly; Bonhoure, Nicolas; Koch, Christoph M.; Bye, Jackie; James, Keith; Foad, Nicola S.; Ellis, Peter; Watkins, Nicholas A.; Ouwehand, Willem H.; Langford, Cordelia; Andrews, Robert M.; Dunham, Ian; Vetrie, David

    2010-01-01

    It has recently been shown that nucleosome distribution, histone modifications and RNA polymerase II (Pol II) occupancy show preferential association with exons (“exon-intron marking”), linking chromatin structure and function to co-transcriptional splicing in a variety of eukaryotes. Previous ChIP-sequencing studies suggested that these marking patterns reflect the nucleosomal landscape. By analyzing ChIP-chip datasets across the human genome in three cell types, we have found that this marking system is far more complex than previously observed. We show here that a range of histone modifications and Pol II are preferentially associated with exons. However, there is noticeable cell-type specificity in the degree of exon marking by histone modifications and, surprisingly, this is also reflected in some histone modifications patterns showing biases towards introns. Exon-intron marking is laid down in the absence of transcription on silent genes, with some marking biases changing or becoming reversed for genes expressed at different levels. Furthermore, the relationship of this marking system with splicing is not simple, with only some histone modifications reflecting exon usage/inclusion, while others mirror patterns of exon exclusion. By examining nucleosomal distributions in all three cell types, we demonstrate that these histone modification patterns cannot solely be accounted for by differences in nucleosome levels between exons and introns. In addition, because of inherent differences between ChIP-chip array and ChIP-sequencing approaches, these platforms report different nucleosome distribution patterns across the human genome. Our findings confound existing views and point to active cellular mechanisms which dynamically regulate histone modification levels and account for exon-intron marking. We believe that these histone modification patterns provide links between chromatin accessibility, Pol II movement and co-transcriptional splicing. PMID:20808788

  14. DNA aptamers against exon v10 of CD44 inhibit breast cancer cell migration.

    PubMed

    Iida, Joji; Clancy, Rebecca; Dorchak, Jesse; Somiari, Richard I; Somiari, Stella; Cutler, Mary Lou; Mural, Richard J; Shriver, Craig D

    2014-01-01

    CD44 adhesion molecules are expressed in many breast cancer cells and have been demonstrated to play a key role in regulating malignant phenotypes such as growth, migration, and invasion. CD44 is an integral transmembrane protein encoded by a single 20-exon gene. The diversity of the biological functions of CD44 is the result of the various splicing variants of these exons. Previous studies suggest that exon v10 of CD44 plays a key role in promoting cancer invasion and metastasis, however, the molecular mechanisms are not clear. Given the fact that exon v10 is in the ectodomain of CD44, we hypothesized that CD44 forms a molecular complex with other cell surface molecules through exon v10 in order to promote migration of breast cancer cells. In order to test this hypothesis, we selected DNA aptamers that specifically bound to CD44 exon v10 using Systematic Evolution of Ligands by Exponential Enrichment (SELEX). We selected aptamers that inhibited migration of breast cancer cells. Co-immunoprecipitation studies demonstrated that EphA2 was co-precipitated with CD44. Pull-down studies demonstrated that recombinant CD44 exon v10 bound to EphA2 and more importantly aptamers that inhibited migration also prevented the binding of EphA2 to exon v10. These results suggest that CD44 forms a molecular complex with EphA2 on the breast cancer cell surface and this complex plays a key role in enhancing breast cancer migration. These results provide insight not only for characterizing mechanisms of breast cancer migration but also for developing target-specific therapy for breast cancers and possibly other cancer types expressing CD44 exon v10.

  15. Increased damage of exon 5 of p53 gene in workers from an arsenic plant.

    PubMed

    Wen, Weihua; Che, Wangjun; Lu, Lin; Yang, Jun; Gao, Xufang; Wen, Jinghua; Heng, Zhengchang; Cao, Shuqiao; Cheng, Huirong

    2008-08-25

    Mutagenesis is a multistage process. Substitution mutations can be induced by base modified through alteration of pairing property. Mutations of exon 5 and 8 of p53 gene have been found in most arsenicosis patients with precarcinomas and carcinomas, but never in arsenicosis individuals without precarcinomas and carcinomas. This study investigates whether base modification exists in exon 5 and 8 of p53 gene, and explores the dose-effect relationship between damage of exon 5 of p53 gene and urinary arsenic. Concentrations of urinary 8-hydroxydeoxyguanine (8-OHdG) are analyzed to identify the occurrence of DNA damage. The real-time PCR developed by Sikorsky et al. is applied to detect base modification in exon 5 and 8 of p53 gene for apparently healthy participants. Our results show that the mean total arsenic concentrations of two exposed groups from an arsenic plant are significantly elevated compared with the control group, and the damage level of exon 5 of the high-exposed group is significantly higher than that of the control group, but which does not happen in exon 8. The closely correlation between the damage index of exon 5 and urinary organic arsenic concentration are found. Concentration of 8-OHdG of the high-exposed group is significantly higher than that of the control group. These results imply that base modification in exon 5 of p53 gene can be induced by arsenic. In addition, our study suggests that the damage level of exon 5 is a useful biomarker to assess adverse health effect levels caused by chronic exposure to arsenic.

  16. Exon-skipped dystrophins for treatment of Duchenne muscular dystrophy: mass spectrometry mapping of most exons and cooperative domain designs based on single molecule mechanics.

    PubMed

    Krieger, Christine Carag; Bhasin, Nishant; Tewari, Manorama; Brown, Andre E X; Safer, Daniel; Sweeney, H Lee; Discher, Dennis E

    2010-12-01

    Force-bearing linkages between the cytoskeleton and extracellular matrix are clearly important to normal cell viability-as is evident in a disease such as Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) which arises in the absence of the linkage protein dystrophin. Therapeutic approaches to DMD include antisense-mediated skipping of exons to delete nonsense mutations while maintaining reading frame, but the structure and stability of the resulting proteins are generally unclear. Here we use mass spectrometry to detect most dystrophin exons, and we express and physically characterize dystrophin "nano"-constructs based on multiexon deletions that might find use in a large percentage of DMD patients. The primary structure challenge is addressed first with liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) which can detect tryptic peptides from 53 of dystrophin's 79 exons; equivalent information from immunodetection would require 53 different high-specificity antibodies. Folding predictions for the nano-constructs reveal novel helical bundle domains that arise out of exon-deleted "linkers," while secondary structure studies confirm high helicity and also melting temperatures well above physiological. Extensional forces with an atomic force microscope nonetheless unfold the constructs, and the ensemble of unfolding trajectories reveal the number of folded domains, proving consistent with structure predictions. A mechanical cooperativity parameter for unfolding of tandem domains is also introduced as the best predictor of a multiexon deletion that is asymptomatic in humans. The results thereby provide insight and confidence in exon-skipped designs.

  17. p53 exon 7 mutations as a predictor of poor prognosis in patients with colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Iniesta, P; Vega, F J; Caldés, T; Massa, M; de Juan, C; Cerdán, F J; Sánchez, A; López, J A; Torres, A J; Balibrea, J L; Benito, M

    1998-08-14

    We have studied 61 resected colorectal adenocarcinomas in order to investigate p53 mutations as a prognostic factor for this pathology. Mutations in exons 5-9 of the p53 gene were analyzed by the polymerase chain reaction-single strand conformation polymorphism (PCR-SSCP) technique followed by sequencing. Our data indicate that p53 exon 7 mutations were prevalent in the latest stages of colorectal carcinogenesis and patients bearing this alteration had the worst prognosis. Therefore, according to our results, mutations affecting exon 7 of the p53 gene could be considered as a useful marker of biological aggressiveness for colorectal cancer.

  18. Dipole entropy based techniques for segmentation of introns and exons in DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramakrishnan, Nithya; Bose, R.

    2012-08-01

    We have used superinformation, which is a measure of the disorder of the entropy content of different portions of a sequence, to analyze the structural variations of the introns and exons in DNA. We have computed superinformation for the angles of the dipole moments of the base-pairs and nucleotides in the double and single-stranded forms of DNA, respectively. We show that the computed dipole-angular superinformation of the introns are significantly higher than those of the exons and that these techniques could be used for intron-exon segmentation. They also yield more accurate and computationally faster results than the previously reported methods.

  19. Identification of a new complex rearrangement affecting exon 20 of BRCA1.

    PubMed

    Del Valle, Jesús; Campos, Olga; Velasco, Angela; Darder, Esther; Menéndez, Mireia; Feliubadaló, Lídia; Tornero, Eva; Blanco, Ignacio; Izquierdo, Angel; Brunet, Joan; Capellá, Gabriel; Lázaro, Conxi

    2011-11-01

    In this study, we present a novel complex rearrangement in the BRCA1 gene. The genomic rearrangement was identified using one of the two commercially available MLPA BRCA1 kits but was not confirmed with the other. In this report, we present the full characterization at the DNA and RNA levels of a new partial deletion of exon 20 of BRCA1. This is a complex deletion with four breakpoints which promotes aberrant splicing with partial deletion of exon 20 plus the insertion of a cryptic exon corresponding to a fragment of intron 20. The aberrant splicing generates an abnormal transcript with a frameshift that will result in a truncated BRCA1 protein.

  20. Gastrointestinal malignancies harbor actionable MET exon 14 deletions

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Mineui; Kim, Sun Young; Jang, Jiryeon; Ahn, Soomin; Kang, So Young; Lee, Sujin; Kim, Seung Tae; Kim, Bogyou; Choi, Jaehyun; Kim, Kyung-Ah; Lee, Jiyun; Park, Charny; Park, Se Hoon; Park, Joon Oh; Lim, Ho Yeong; Kang, Won Ki; Park, Keunchil; Park, Young Suk; Kim, Kyoung-Mee

    2015-01-01

    Recently, MET exon 14 deletion (METex14del) has been postulated to be one potential mechanism for MET protein overexpression. We screened for the presence of METex14del transcript by multiplexed fusion transcript analysis using nCounter assay followed by confirmation with quantitative reverse transcription PCR with correlation to MET protein expression by immunohistochemistry (IHC) and MET amplification by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). We extracted RNAs from 230 patients enrolled onto the prospective molecular profiling clinical trial (NEXT-1) (NCT02141152) between November 2013 and August 2014. Thirteen METex14del cases were identified including 3 gastric cancer, 4 colon cancer, 5 non-small cell lung cancer, and one adenocarcinoma of unknown primary. Of these 13 METex14del cases, 11 were MET IHC 3+ and 2 were 2+. Only one out of the 13 METex14del cases was MET amplified (MET/CEP ratio > 2.0). Growths of two (gastric, colon) METex14del+ patient tumor derived cell lines were profoundly inhibited by both MET tyrosine kinase inhibitors and a monoclonal antibody targeting MET. In conclusion, METex14del is a unique molecular aberration present in gastrointestinal (GI) malignancies corresponding with overexpression of MET protein but rarely with MET amplification. Substantial growth inhibition of METex14del+ patient tumor derived cell lines by several MET targeting drugs strongly suggests METex14del is a potential actionable driver mutation in GI malignancies. PMID:26375439

  1. A novel intronic cis element, ISE/ISS-3, regulates rat fibroblast growth factor receptor 2 splicing through activation of an upstream exon and repression of a downstream exon containing a noncanonical branch point sequence.

    PubMed

    Hovhannisyan, Ruben H; Carstens, Russ P

    2005-01-01

    Mutually exclusive splicing of fibroblast growth factor receptor 2 (FGFR2) exons IIIb and IIIc yields two receptor isoforms, FGFR2-IIIb and -IIIc, with distinctly different ligand binding properties. Several RNA cis elements in the intron (intron 8) separating these exons have been described that are required for splicing regulation. Using a heterologous splicing reporter, we have identified a new regulatory element in this intron that confers cell-type-specific inclusion of an unrelated exon that mirrors its ability to promote cell-type-specific inclusion of exon IIIb. This element promoted inclusion of exon IIIb while at the same time silencing exon IIIc inclusion in cells expressing FGFR2-IIIb; hence, we have termed this element ISE/ISS-3 (for "intronic splicing enhancer-intronic splicing silencer 3"). Silencing of exon IIIc splicing by ISE/ISS-3 was shown to require a branch point sequence (BPS) using G as the primary branch nucleotide. Replacing a consensus BPS with A as the primary branch nucleotide resulted in constitutive splicing of exon IIIc. Our results suggest that the branch point sequence constitutes an important component that can contribute to the efficiency of exon definition of alternatively spliced cassette exons. Noncanonical branch points may thus facilitate cell-type-specific silencing of regulated exons by flanking cis elements.

  2. Rare EGFR exon 18 and exon 20 mutations in non-small-cell lung cancer on 10 117 patients: a multicentre observational study by the French ERMETIC-IFCT network

    PubMed Central

    Beau-Faller, M.; Prim, N.; Ruppert, A.-M.; Nanni-Metéllus, I.; Lacave, R.; Lacroix, L.; Escande, F.; Lizard, S.; Pretet, J.-L.; Rouquette, I.; de Crémoux, P.; Solassol, J.; de Fraipont, F.; Bièche, I.; Cayre, A.; Favre-Guillevin, E.; Tomasini, P.; Wislez, M.; Besse, B.; Legrain, M.; Voegeli, A.-C.; Baudrin, L.; Morin, F.; Zalcman, G.; Quoix, E.; Blons, H.; Cadranel, J.

    2014-01-01

    Background There is scarce data available about epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutations other than common exon 19 deletions and exon 21 (L858R) mutations. Patients and methods EGFR exon 18 and/or exon 20 mutations were collected from 10 117 non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) samples analysed at 15 French National Cancer Institute (INCa)-platforms of the ERMETIC-IFCT network. Results Between 2008 and 2011, 1047 (10%) samples were EGFR-mutated, 102 (10%) with rare mutations: 41 (4%) in exon 18, 49 (5%) in exon 20, and 12 (1%) with other EGFR mutations. Exon 20 mutations were related to never-smoker status, when compared with exon 18 mutations (P < 0.001). Median overall survival (OS) of metastatic disease was 21 months [95% confidence interval (CI) 12–24], worse in smokers than in non-smoker patients with exon 20 mutations (12 versus 21 months; hazard ratio [HR] for death 0.27, 95% CI 0.08–0.87, P = 0.03). Under EGFR-tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs), median OS was 14 months (95% CI 6–21); disease control rate was better for complex mutations (6 of 7, 86%) than for single mutations (16 of 40, 40%) (P = 0.03). Conclusions Rare EGFR-mutated NSCLCs are heterogeneous, with resistance of distal exon 20 insertions and better sensitivity of exon 18 or complex mutations to EGFR-TKIs, probably requiring individual assessment. PMID:24285021

  3. Two N-myc polypeptides with distinct amino termini encoded by the second and third exons of the gene.

    PubMed Central

    Mäkelä, T P; Saksela, K; Alitalo, K

    1989-01-01

    The N-myc and c-myc genes encode closely related nuclear phosphoproteins. We found that the N-myc protein from human tumor cell lines appears as four closely migrating polypeptide bands (p58 to p64) in sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gels. This and the recent finding that the c-myc protein is synthesized from two translational initiation sites located in the first and second exons of the gene (S. R. Hann, M. W. King, D. L. Bentley, C. W. Anderson, and R. N. Eisenman, Cell 52:185-195, 1988) prompted us to study the molecular basis of the N-myc protein heterogeneity. Dephosphorylation by alkaline phosphatase reduced the four polypeptide bands to a doublet with an electrophoretic mobility corresponding to the two faster-migrating N-myc polypeptides (p58 and p60). When expressed transiently in COS cells, an N-myc deletion construct lacking the first exon produced polypeptides similar to the wild-type N-myc protein, indicating that the first exon of the N-myc gene is noncoding. Furthermore, mutants deleted of up to two thirds of C-terminal coding domains still retained the capacity to produce a doublet of polypeptides, suggesting distinct amino termini for the two N-myc polypeptides. The amino-terminal primary structure of the N-myc protein was studied by site-specific point mutagenesis of the 5' end of the long open reading frame and by N-terminal radiosequencing of the two polypeptides. Our results show that the N-myc polypeptides are initiated from two alternative in-phase AUG codons located 24 base pairs apart at the 5' end of the second exon. Both of these polypeptides are phosphorylated and localized to the nucleus even when expressed separately. Interestingly, DNA rearrangements activating the c-myc gene are often found in the 1.7-kilobase-pair region between the two c-myc translational initiation sites and correlate with the loss of the longer c-myc polypeptide. Thus the close spacing of the two N-myc initiation codons could explain the relative resistance

  4. Hereditary sideroblastic anaemia due to a mutation in exon 10 of the erythroid 5-aminolaevulinate synthase gene.

    PubMed

    Edgar, A J; Wickramasinghe, S N

    1998-02-01

    DNA sequencing of the coding region of the erythroid 5-aminolaevulinate synthase (ALAS2) cDNA from a male with pyridoxine-responsive sideroblastic anaemia revealed a missense mutation C1622G and a closely linked polymorphism C1612A in exon 10 of the gene. Sequence analysis of the genomic DNA from other family members revealed that the proband's mother and daughter were heterozygous carriers of the mutation, consistent with the X-linked inheritance. The C1622G mutation results in a histidine to aspartic acid substitution at amino acid residue 524. The histidine residue is conserved in both the erythroid and housekeeping ALAS proteins in vertebrates, all other known ALAS proteins and other oxamine synthases that have pyridoxal 5'-phosphate as a co-factor. This histidine is located in a predicted loop, preceding a long alpha-helix region near the carboxy-terminus.

  5. Deletion mutations of the Bs-alpha gene in patients with Albright hereditary osteodystrophy: Possible mutation hot-spot in exon 7

    SciTech Connect

    Weinstein, L.S.; Hainline, B.E.; Schuster, V.

    1994-09-01

    Albright hereditary osteodystrophy (AHO) is an autosomal dominant disease characterized by short stature, centripetal obesity, subcutaneous ossifications and focal brachydactyly. Patients with this disorder may have these features alone (pseudopseudohypoparathyroidism) or these features in association with resistance to multiple hormones which raise intracellular cAMP (pseudohypoparathyroidism, PHP). In most kindreds, affected members have decreased function of the G protein Gs and decreased levels of the Gs{alpha}-subunit. Heterozygous inactivating mutations of the Gs{alpha} gene have been previously identified in AHO. Exons 2-13 of the Gs{alpha} gene and their splice junctions were PCR-amplified and the products analyzed by temperature gradient gel electrophoresis (TGGE) and direct sequencing. Using this approach, a new heterozygous 2 bp deletion in exon 4 creating a premature stop codon was identified in 5 affected members of a previously reported family. The mutation was not present in an unaffected family member. We also have identified a previously reported 4 bp deletion in the coding region of exon 7 in 2 further unrelated sporadic cases of PHP. In one case, the mutation was absent in her siblings and in both parents, confirming that this is a de novo mutation in this patient. This specific 4 bp deletion has now been reported in 4 PHP patients, at least 3 of whom are unrelated. These results suggest that this region of the Gs{alpha} gene may be a hot-spot for deletions.

  6. One Novel Frameshift Mutation on Exon 64 of COL7A1 Gene in an Iranian Individual Suffering Recessive Dystrophic Epidermolysis Bullosa.

    PubMed

    Khaniani, Mahmoud Shekari; Sohrabi, Nasrin; Derakhshan, Neda Mansoori; Derakhshan, Sima Mansoori

    2015-01-01

    Recessive dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa (RDEB) is an extremely rare subtype of bullous dermatosis caused by the COL7A1 gene mutation. After genomic DNA extraction from the peripheral blood sample of all subjects (3 pedigree members and 3 unrelated control individuals), COL7A1 gene screening was performed by PCR amplification and direct DNA sequencing of all of the coding exons and flanking intronic regions. Genetic analysis of the COL7A1 gene in an affected individual revealed a novel mutation: c.5493delG (p.K1831Nfs*10) in exon 64 of the COL7A1 gene in homozygous state. This mutation was not discovered in 3 unrelated Iranian control individuals. These data suggest that c.5493delG may influence the phenotype of RDEB. The result of this case report contributes to the expanding database on COL7A1 mutations.

  7. Pseudo-exon activation caused by a deep-intronic mutation in the fibrinogen gamma-chain gene as a novel mechanism for congenital afibrinogenaemia.

    PubMed

    Spena, Silvia; Asselta, Rosanna; Platé, Manuela; Castaman, Giancarlo; Duga, Stefano; Tenchini, Maria Luisa

    2007-10-01

    Congenital afibrinogenaemia, characterized by severe fibrinogen deficiency, is caused by mutations within FGA, FGB or FGG. Conventional sequencing of coding regions and splice signals of these three genes did not reveal any mutation in an afibrinogenaemic proband. After confirming disease co-segregation with the fibrinogen cluster, full intron sequencing was tackled leading to the identification of a novel transvertion within FGG intron 6 (IVS6-320A-->T). Its effect on mRNA processing was evaluated in-vitro: the in-frame inclusion of a 75-bp pseudo-exon carrying a premature stop was found, representing the first report of pseudo-exon activation as a mechanism leading to afibrinogenaemia.

  8. Alternative splicing of Wilms tumor suppressor 1 (Wt1) exon 4 results in protein isoforms with different functions.

    PubMed

    Schnerwitzki, Danny; Perner, Birgit; Hoppe, Beate; Pietsch, Stefan; Mehringer, Rebecca; Hänel, Frank; Englert, Christoph

    2014-09-01

    The Wilms tumor suppressor gene Wt1 encodes a zinc finger transcription factor that is essential for development of multiple organs including kidneys, gonads, spleen and heart. In mammals Wt1 comprises 10 exons with two characteristic splicing events: inclusion or skipping of exon 5 and alternative usage of two splice donor sites between exons 9 and 10. Most fish including zebrafish and medaka possess two wt1 paralogs, wt1a and wt1b, both lacking exon 5. Here we have characterized wt1 in guppy, platyfish and the short-lived African killifish Nothobranchius furzeri. All fish except zebrafish show alternative splicing of exon 4 of wt1a but not of wt1b with the wt1a(-exon 4) isoform being the predominant splice variant. With regard to function, Wt1a(+exon 4) showed less dimerization but stimulated transcription more effectively than the Wt1a(-exon 4) isoform. A specific knockdown of wt1a exon 4 in zebrafish was associated with anomalies in kidney development demonstrating a physiological function for Wt1a exon 4. Interestingly, alternative splicing of exon 4 seems to be an early evolutionary event as it is observed in the single wt1 gene of the sturgeon, a species that has not gone through teleost-specific genome duplication. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. hnRNP L inhibits CD44 V10 exon splicing through interacting with its upstream intron.

    PubMed

    Loh, Tiing Jen; Cho, Sunghee; Moon, Heegyum; Jang, Ha Na; Williams, Darren Reece; Jung, Da-Woon; Kim, Il-Chul; Ghigna, Claudia; Biamonti, Giuseppe; Zheng, Xuexiu; Shen, Haihong

    2015-06-01

    CD44 is a complex cell adhesion molecule that mediates communication and adhesion between adjacent cells as well as between cells and the extracellular matrix. CD44 pre-mRNA produces various mRNA isoforms through alternative splicing of 20 exons, among which exons 1-5 (C1-C5) and 16-20 (C6-C10) are constant exons, whereas exons 6-15 (V1-V10) are variant exons. CD44 V10 exon has important roles in breast tumor progression and Hodgkin lymphoma. Here we show that increased expression of hnRNP L inhibits V10 exon splicing of CD44 pre-mRNA, whereas reduced expression of hnRNP L promotes V10 exon splicing. In addition, hnRNP L also promotes V10 splicing of endogenous CD44 pre-mRNA. Through mutation analysis, we demonstrate that the effects of hnRNP L on V10 splicing are abolished when the CA-rich sequence on the upstream intron of V10 exon is disrupted. However, hnRNP L effects are stronger if more CA-repeats are provided. Furthermore, we show that hnRNP L directly contacts the CA-rich sequence. Importantly, we provide evidences that hnRNP L inhibits U2AF65 binding on the upstream Py tract of V10 exon. Our results reveal that hnRNP L is a new regulator for CD44 V10 exon splicing.

  10. Polymorphysims of CYP17-I Gene in the Exons Were Associated with the Reproductive Endocrine of Japanese Flounder (Paralichthys olivaceus)

    PubMed Central

    Ma, R. Q.; He, F.; Wen, H. S.; Li, J. F.; Mu, W. J.; Liu, M.; Zhang, Y. Q.; Hu, J.; Qun, L.

    2012-01-01

    The cytochrome P450c17-I (CYP17-I) is one of the enzymes critical to gonadal development and the synthesis of androgens. Two single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were detected within the coding region of the CYP17-I gene in a population of 75 male Japanese flounder (Paralichthys olivaceus). They were SNP1 (c.C445T) located in exon2 and SNP2 (c.T980C (p.Phe307Leu)) located in exon5. Four physiological indices, which were serum testosterone (T), serum 17β-estradiol (E2), Hepatosomatic index (HSI), and Gonadosomatic index (GSI), were studied to examine the effect of the two SNPs on the reproductive endocrines of Japanese flounder. Multiple comparisons revealed that CT genotype of SNP1 had a much lower T level than CC genotype (p<0.05) and the GSI of individuals with CC genotype of SNP2 was higher than those with TT genotype (p<0.05). Four diplotypes were constructed based on the two SNPs and the diplotype D3 had a significantly lower T level and GSI. In conclusion, the two SNPs were significantly associated with reproductive traits of Japanese flounder. PMID:25049628

  11. [Whole exon 5 and intron 5 replaced by RHD/CE in partial D phenotype DVa (Hus)].

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yi-Yan; Xiong, Wen; Shao, Chao-Peng

    2005-02-01

    The study was purposed to analyze DNA and allele structure of the partial D phenotypes D(Va) and D(VI) of the Rhesus blood group in Chinese. Through polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and direct genomic DNA sequencing, the RHD gene was detected in three weak D individuals identified serologically. The results showed that among the three weak D individuals, one was identified as partial D phenotype D(Va) (Hus) type and genotyped DccEe; another two were testified as D(VI) III type and genotyped DCcee. Moreover, the breakpoints of the replaced region by RHCE in D(Va) (Hus) were 5' end of the exon 5 and 3' end of the intron 5, and there were 7 novel polymorphisms in intron 5: 23-25(GCA)2, 98G>A, 168-169insG, 205-206insT, 494-495insA, 1256-1257insC, 1347G>T. In conclusion the whole exon 5 and intron 5 are replaced by RHCE in D(Va) (Hus) detected in Chinese.

  12. A novel splice site mutation in SMARCAL1 results in aberrant exon definition in a child with Schimke immunoosseous dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Carroll, Clinton; Hunley, Tracy E; Guo, Yan; Cortez, David

    2015-10-01

    Schimke Immunoosseous Dysplasia (SIOD) is a rare, autosomal recessive disorder of childhood characterized by spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia, focal segmental glomerulosclerosis and renal failure, T-cell immunodeficiency, and cancer in certain instances. Approximately half of patients with SIOD are reported to have biallelic mutations in SMARCAL1 (SWI/SNF-related matrix-associated actin-dependent regulator of chromatin, subfamily a-like 1), which encodes a DNA translocase that localizes to sites of DNA replication and repairs damaged replication forks. We present a novel mutation (NM_014140.3:c.2070+2insT) that results in defective SMARCAL1 mRNA splicing in a child with SIOD. This mutation, within the donor site of intron 12, results in the skipping of exon 12, which encodes part of a critical hinge region connecting the two lobes of the ATPase domain. This mutation was not recognized as deleterious by diagnostic SMARCAL1 sequencing, but discovered through next generation sequencing and found to result in absent SMARCAL1 expression in patient-derived lymphoblasts. The splicing defect caused by this mutation supports the concept of exon definition. Furthermore, it illustrates the need to broaden the search for SMARCAL1 mutations in patients with SIOD lacking coding sequence variants. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Origin and evolution of a new exon of 14-3-3ξ in bees and phylogenetic analysis.

    PubMed

    Zhan, Leilei; Jiang, Chao

    2013-04-01

    Mutually exclusive splicing, one type of alternative splicing, involves selection of alternatively spliced exons arranged in tandem and creates protein products with substitution of one segment of the amino acid sequence for another. Previous studies revealed that exon 5 of 14-3-3ξ from Apis mellifera (western honeybee) had three mutually exclusive exons, while orthologous exon of Nasonia vitripennis (parasitic wasp) had only two, suggesting that cases of exon gain or loss might have happened during the evolution of hymenopteran species. In the current study, we annotated and analyzed the 14-3-3ξ genes from 20 hymenopteran species successfully, and the results of phylogenetic analysis revealed the presence of a new mutually exclusive exon in corbiculate bees. In addition, we found that duplication via staggered homologous recombination was responsible for the origin of the new exon.

  14. WT1 exon deletion/insertion mutations in Wilms tumor patients associated with di- and trinucleotide repeats and deletion hotspot consensus sequences

    SciTech Connect

    Huff, V.; Saunders, G.F.; Strong, L.C.

    1994-09-01

    The genetic etiology of Wilms tumor (WT), a childhood kidney tumor, is known to be heterogeneous. One WT gene, WT1 located on chromosomal band 11p13, has been isolated, and mutations specific to the WT1 locus have been identified in some WT patients, demonstrating its importance in the etiology of at least some WT cases. Because of the patient populations selected for study and a focus on specific regions of the gene in identifying WT1 mutations, most mutations described to date are single base substitutions and have occurred in the 3{prime} portion of the gene in exons 7-10 which encode the zinc finger domains of the protein. DNA mutations at the WT1 locus have been reported to be infrequent in WT patients, implying that post-transcriptional modification of the WT1 gene product or alterations at other distinct loci perhaps more commonly play a role in tumorigenesis than do WT1 DNA mutations. We report here the occurrence in four WT patients of inactivating frameshift mutations, three somatic deletions and one germline insertion, in exon 1. This exon is GC-rich (>70%) and contains regions of both di- and trinucleotide direct repeats and ten copies of the sequence, CCTG (CAGG), which has been described as a deletion hotspot in mammalian DNA. The four WT1 exon 1 deletion/insertions range in size from four to 34 bases, are flanked by bi- and/or trinucleotide repeats, and occur in a general context of repetitive sequences. Furthermore, all breakpoints occur at or within five nucleotides of the tetranucleotide sequence, CCTG (CAGG). These data suggest that a mutational mechanism previously unrecognized in WT patients is operating in this repetitive portion of the WT1 gene. The frequency with which mutations of this type are observed in WT patients awaits the complete evaluation of a series of patients. Nevertheless these data indicate that WT1 mutations are more frequent in WT patients than previously thought.

  15. SURVEY AND SUMMARY: exon-intron organization of genes in the slime mold Physarum polycephalum.

    PubMed

    Trzcinska-Danielewicz, J; Fronk, J

    2000-09-15

    The slime mold Physarum polycephalum is a morphologically simple organism with a large and complex genome. The exon-intron organization of its genes exhibits features typical for protists and fungi as well as those characteristic for the evolutionarily more advanced species. This indicates that both the taxonomic position as well as the size of the genome shape the exon-intron organization of an organism. The average gene has 3.7 introns which are on average 138 bp, with a rather narrow size distribution. Introns are enriched in AT base pairs by 13% relative to exons. The consensus sequences at exon-intron boundaries resemble those found for other species, with minor differences between short and long introns. A unique feature of P.polycephalum introns is the strong preference for pyrimidines in the coding strand throughout their length, without a particular enrichment at the 3'-ends.

  16. Identification of a tyrosinase (TYR) exon 4 deletion in albino ferrets (Mustela putorius furo).

    PubMed

    Blaszczyk, W M; Distler, C; Dekomien, G; Arning, L; Hoffmann, K-P; Epplen, J T

    2007-08-01

    Albinism is due to a lack of pigmentation in hair, skin and eye, and has been shown to occur in several animal species. Mutations of the tyrosinase (TYR) gene account for albinism in domestic cats, rabbits, cattle, mice and rats. In this study, we demonstrate that a TYR mutation accounts for albinism in the ferret (Mustela putorius furo). The coding sequence of the five exons of TYR was determined in genomic DNA from wild-type pigmented 'sable' coloured and albino ferrets. It was not possible to amplify TYR exon 4 in albino ferrets originating from different breeds. The deletion of exon 4 in albino ferrets was confirmed by Southern blot hybridization of genomic DNA from albino and pigmented ferrets. This is the first report of a deletion of a TYR exon in a non-human mammal.

  17. Classifying nucleic acid sub-sequences as introns or exons using genetic programming

    SciTech Connect

    Handley, S.

    1995-12-31

    An evolutionary computation technique, genetic programming, created programs that classify messenger RNA sequences into one of two classes: (1) the sequence is expressed as (part of) a protein (an exon), or (2) not expressed as protein (an intron).

  18. Exon array data analysis using Affymetrix power tools and R statistical software

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    The use of microarray technology to measure gene expression on a genome-wide scale has been well established for more than a decade. Methods to process and analyse the vast quantity of expression data generated by a typical microarray experiment are similarly well-established. The Affymetrix Exon 1.0 ST array is a relatively new type of array, which has the capability to assess expression at the individual exon level. This allows a more comprehensive analysis of the transcriptome, and in particular enables the study of alternative splicing, a gene regulation mechanism important in both normal conditions and in diseases. Some aspects of exon array data analysis are shared with those for standard gene expression data but others present new challenges that have required development of novel tools. Here, I will introduce the exon array and present a detailed example tutorial for analysis of data generated using this platform. PMID:21498550

  19. Recurring exon deletions in the haptoglobin (HP) gene associate with lower blood cholesterol levels

    PubMed Central

    Boettger, Linda M.; Salem, Rany M.; Handsaker, Robert E.; Peloso, Gina; Kathiresan, Sekar; Hirschhorn, Joel; McCarroll, Steven A.

    2016-01-01

    Two exons of the human haptoglobin (HP) gene exhibit copy number variation that affects HP multimerization and underlies one of the first protein polymorphisms identified in humans. The evolutionary origins and medical significance of this polymorphism have been uncertain. Here we show that this variation has likely arisen from the recurring reversion of an ancient hominin-specific duplication of these exons. Though this polymorphism has been largely invisible to genome-wide genetic studies to date, we describe a way to analyze it by imputation from SNP haplotypes and find among 22,288 individuals that these HP exonic deletions associate with reduced LDL and total cholesterol levels. We show that these deletions, and a SNP that affects HP expression, are the likely drivers of the strong but complex association of cholesterol levels to SNPs near HP. Recurring exonic deletions in the haptoglobin gene likely enhance human health by lowering cholesterol levels in the blood. PMID:26901066

  20. Analysis of KIT expression and KIT exon 11 mutations in canine oral malignant melanomas.

    PubMed

    Murakami, A; Mori, T; Sakai, H; Murakami, M; Yanai, T; Hoshino, Y; Maruo, K

    2011-09-01

    KIT, a transmembrane receptor tyrosine kinase, is one of the specific targets for anti-cancer therapy. In humans, its expression and mutations have been identified in malignant melanomas and therapies using molecular-targeted agents have been promising in these tumours. As human malignant melanoma, canine malignant melanoma is a fatal disease with metastases and the poor response has been observed with all standard protocols. In our study, KIT expression and exon 11 mutations in dogs with histologically confirmed malignant oral melanomas were evaluated. Although 20 of 39 cases were positive for KIT protein, there was no significant difference between KIT expression and overall survival. Moreover, polymerase chain reaction amplification and sequencing of KIT exon 11 in 17 samples did not detect any mutations and proved disappointing. For several reasons, however, KIT expression and mutations of various exons including exon 11 should be investigated in more cases.

  1. Exon array data analysis using Affymetrix power tools and R statistical software.

    PubMed

    Lockstone, Helen E

    2011-11-01

    The use of microarray technology to measure gene expression on a genome-wide scale has been well established for more than a decade. Methods to process and analyse the vast quantity of expression data generated by a typical microarray experiment are similarly well-established. The Affymetrix Exon 1.0 ST array is a relatively new type of array, which has the capability to assess expression at the individual exon level. This allows a more comprehensive analysis of the transcriptome, and in particular enables the study of alternative splicing, a gene regulation mechanism important in both normal conditions and in diseases. Some aspects of exon array data analysis are shared with those for standard gene expression data but others present new challenges that have required development of novel tools. Here, I will introduce the exon array and present a detailed example tutorial for analysis of data generated using this platform.

  2. Hereditary vitamin D resistant rickets due to deletion of exon 3 of the vitamin D receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Rut, A.R.; O`Riordan, J.L.H.; Hughes, M.R.

    1994-09-01

    Hereditary vitamin D resistant rickets is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by severe rickets, hypolcalcaemia, secondary hyperparathyroidism and occasionally, the absence of body hair. The pathological process involves resistance of target tissues to the actions of calcitriol [1,25(OH{sub 2}D{sub 3})], the hormonal form of vitamin D. Calcitriol mediates its actions through a nuclear receptor (VDR) which has been cloned and shown to be a member of the superfamily of steriod/thyroid/retinoic acid receptors. Skin fibroblasts were obtained from a Greek child with characteristic features of the condition. Total RNA was extracted from rapidly dividing cells and reverse transcribed. The coding region was amplified by PCR with primers 31a in the 5{prime} untranslated region and 31b in the 3{prime} untranslated region of the VDR cDNA sequence. The 5{prime} and 3{prime} halves of VDR were further amplified using primers tagged with M13 forward and reverse primer sequences. The whole process was carried out in duplicate starting with RNA. Sequence data was obtained using Taq dye primer cycle sequencing (ABI). Agarose gel electrophoresis revealed that the 5{prime} product was approximately 100 bp shorter than control. This was confirmed by sequencing which demonstrated a 131 bp deletion of the C-terminal part of the DNA binding domain (bases 147-277). Bases 147-277 are coded for by exon 3 and this deletion is bounded by the splice junctions. This is the first report of a deletion in VDR in any patient with vitamin D-resistant rickets. Such a deletion not only removes the second zinc finger but also results in a frameshift that corrupts the remainder of the receptor. Such a deletion may have arisen as a result of a microdeletion of genomic DNA or, more likely, as a result of defective splicing.

  3. Decoding of exon splicing patterns in the human RUNX1-RUNX1T1 fusion gene.

    PubMed

    Grinev, Vasily V; Migas, Alexandr A; Kirsanava, Aksana D; Mishkova, Olga A; Siomava, Natalia; Ramanouskaya, Tatiana V; Vaitsiankova, Alina V; Ilyushonak, Ilia M; Nazarov, Petr V; Vallar, Laurent; Aleinikova, Olga V

    2015-11-01

    The t(8;21) translocation is the most widespread genetic defect found in human acute myeloid leukemia. This translocation results in the RUNX1-RUNX1T1 fusion gene that produces a wide variety of alternative transcripts and influences the course of the disease. The rules of combinatorics and splicing of exons in the RUNX1-RUNX1T1 transcripts are not known. To address this issue, we developed an exon graph model of the fusion gene organization and evaluated its local exon combinatorics by the exon combinatorial index (ECI). Here we show that the local exon combinatorics of the RUNX1-RUNX1T1 gene follows a power-law behavior and (i) the vast majority of exons has a low ECI, (ii) only a small part is represented by "exons-hubs" of splicing with very high ECI values, and (iii) it is scale-free and very sensitive to targeted skipping of "exons-hubs". Stochasticity of the splicing machinery and preferred usage of exons in alternative splicing can explain such behavior of the system. Stochasticity may explain up to 12% of the ECI variance and results in a number of non-coding and unproductive transcripts that can be considered as a noise. Half-life of these transcripts is increased due to the deregulation of some key genes of the nonsense-mediated decay system in leukemia cells. On the other hand, preferred usage of exons may explain up to 75% of the ECI variability. Our analysis revealed a set of splicing-related cis-regulatory motifs that can explain "attractiveness" of exons in alternative splicing but only when they are considered together. Cis-regulatory motifs are guides for splicing trans-factors and we observed a leukemia-specific profile of expression of the splicing genes in t(8;21)-positive blasts. Altogether, our results show that alternative splicing of the RUNX1-RUNX1T1 transcripts follows strict rules and that the power-law component of the fusion gene organization confers a high flexibility to this process. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights

  4. POF and HP1 bind expressed exons, suggesting a balancing mechanism for gene regulation.

    PubMed

    Johansson, Anna-Mia; Stenberg, Per; Pettersson, Fredrik; Larsson, Jan

    2007-11-01

    Two specific chromosome-targeting and gene regulatory systems are present in Drosophila melanogaster. The male X chromosome is targeted by the male-specific lethal complex believed to mediate the 2-fold up-regulation of the X-linked genes, and the highly heterochromatic fourth chromosome is specifically targeted by the Painting of Fourth (POF) protein, which, together with heterochromatin protein 1 (HP1), modulates the expression level of genes on the fourth chromosome. Here we use chromatin immunoprecipitation and tiling microarray analysis to map POF and HP1 on the fourth chromosome in S2 cells and salivary glands at high resolution. The enrichment profiles were complemented by transcript profiles to examine the link between binding and transcripts. The results show that POF specifically binds to genes, with a strong preference for exons, and the HP1 binding profile is a mirror image of POF, although HP1 displays an additional "peak" in the promoter regions of bound genes. HP1 binding within genes is much higher than the basal HP1 enrichment on Chromosome 4. Our results suggest a balancing mechanism for the regulation of the fourth chromosome where POF and HP1 competitively bind at increasing levels with increased transcriptional activity. In addition, our results contradict transposable elements as a major nucleation site for HP1 on the fourth chromosome.

  5. Exon sequencing of PAX3 and T (brachyury) in cases with spina bifida.

    PubMed

    Agopian, A J; Bhalla, Angela D; Boerwinkle, Eric; Finnell, Richard H; Grove, Megan L; Hixson, James E; Shimmin, Lawrence C; Sewda, Anshuman; Stuart, Colin; Zhong, Yu; Zhu, Huiping; Mitchell, Laura E

    2013-09-01

    Based on studies in animals and humans, PAX3 and T (brachyury) are candidate genes for spina bifida. However, neither gene has been definitively identified as a risk factor for this condition. Sanger sequencing was used to identify variants in all PAX3 and T exons and promoter regions in 114 spina bifida cases. For known variants, allele frequencies in cases were compared with those from public databases using unadjusted odds ratios. Novel variants were genotyped in parents and assessed for predicted functional impact. We identified common variants in PAX3 (n = 2) and T (n = 3) for which the allele frequencies in cases were significantly different from those reported in at least one public database. We also identified novel variants in both PAX3 (n = 11) and T (n = 1) in spina bifida cases. Several of the novel PAX3 variants are predicted to be highly conserved and/or impact gene function or expression. These studies provide some evidence that common variants of PAX3 and T are associated with spina bifida. Rare and novel variants in these genes were also identified in affected individuals. However, additional studies will be required to determine whether these variants influence the risk of spina bifida. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Multiple non-coding exons and alternative splicing in the mouse Mas protooncogene.

    PubMed

    Alenina, Natalia; Böhme, Ilka; Bader, Michael; Walther, Thomas

    2015-09-01

    The Mas protooncogene encodes a G protein-coupled receptor with the common seven transmembrane domains, expressed mainly in the testis and brain. We provided evidence that Mas is a functional angiotensin-(1-7) receptor and can interact with the angiotensin II type 1 (AT1) receptor. The gene is transcriptionally regulated during development in the brain and testis, but its structure was unresolved. In this study we used 5'- and 3'-RACE, RT-PCR, and RNase-protection assays to elucidate the complete Mas gene structure and organization. We identified 12 exons in the mouse Mas gene with 11 in the 5' untranslated mRNA, which can be alternatively spliced. We also showed that Mas transcription can start from 4 tissue-specific promoters, whereby testis-specific Mas mRNA is transcribed from two upstream promoters, and the expression of Mas in the brain starts from two downstream promoters. Alternative splicing and multiple promoter usage result in at least 12 Mas transcripts in which different 5' untranslated regions are fused to a common coding sequence. Moreover, termination of Mas mRNA is regulated by two different polyadenylation signals. The gene spans approximately 27 kb, and the longest detected mRNA contains 2,451 bp. Thus, our results characterize the Mas protooncogene as the gene with the most complex gene structure of all described members of the gene family coding for G protein-coupled receptors. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Further genotype-phenotype correlation emerging from two families with PLP1 exon 4 skipping.

    PubMed

    Biancheri, Roberta; Grossi, Serena; Regis, Stefano; Rossi, Andrea; Corsolini, Fabio; Rossi, Daniela Paola; Cavalli, Pietro; Severino, Mariasavina; Filocamo, Mirella

    2014-03-01

    Proteolipid protein 1 (PLP1) gene-related disorders due to mutations in the PLP1 include a wide spectrum of X-linked disorders ranging from severe connatal Pelizaeus-Merzbacher disease (PMD) to spastic paraplegia 2 (SPG2). Duplications, deletions or point mutations in coding and noncoding regions of the PLP1 gene may occur. We report the clinical, neuroradiologic and molecular findings in six patients from two unrelated families. The affected males showed severe mental retardation, spastic tetraparesis, inability of walking and pes cavus at onset in early infancy. Brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed hypomyelination and brain atrophy. Nystagmus was never observed. The affected females showed adult-onset progressive spastic paraparesis leading to wheel-chair dependency and subtle white matter changes on brain MRI. Molecular studies in the two families identified two different intronic mutations, the novel c.622+2T>C and the known c.622+1G>A, leading to the skipping of PLP1-exon 4. The clinical presentation of the affected males did not consistently fit in any of the PLP1-related disorder subtypes (i.e., connatal or classic PMD, SPG2 and 'PLP1 null syndrome'), and in addition, the carrier females were symptomatic despite the severe clinical picture of their respective probands. This study provides new insight into the genotype-phenotype correlations of patients with PLP1 splice-site mutations.

  8. The association of ICAM-1 Exon 6 (E469K) but not of ICAM-1 Exon 4 (G241R) and PECAM-1 Exon 3 (L125V) polymorphisms with the development of differentiation syndrome in acute promyelocytic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Dore, Adriana I; Santana-Lemos, Barbara A A; Coser, Virginia M; Santos, Flávia L S; Dalmazzo, Leandro F; Lima, Ana S G; Jacomo, Rafael H; Elias, Jorge; Falcão, Roberto Passetto; Pereira, Waldir V; Rego, Eduardo M

    2007-11-01

    The use of all trans-retinoic acid (ATRA) is the basis of treatment of acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) and represents the paradigm of differentiation therapy. In general, ATRA is well-tolerated but may be associated with a potentially lethal side-effect, referred to as retinoic acid or differentiation syndrome (DS). The cellular and molecular mechanisms of DS are poorly understood and involve changes in the adhesive qualities and cytokine secretion of leukemic cells during ATRA-induced differentiation. As leukocyte extravasation is a key event in DS pathogenesis, we analyzed the association between the polymorphisms at Exon 4 (G241R) and Exon 6 (E469K) of ICAM-1 and Exon 3 (L125V) of PECAM-1 genes with DS development in APL patients treated with ATRA and anthracyclines. DS was diagnosed in 23/127 (18.1%) APL patients at an average of 11.5 days after the start of ATRA. All patients presented respiratory distress associated with increased ground-glass opacity in chest radiographies. Other accompanying symptoms were: fever not attributable to infection (65.2%), generalized edema (37.5%), weight gain (37.5%), and impairment of renal function (8.6%). We detected an association between development of DS and the AA genotype at Codon 469 of ICAM-1 (odds ratio of 3.5; 95% confidence interval: 1.2-10.2). Conversely, no significant association was detected between G241R or L125V polymorphisms at Exon 4 of ICAM-1 and Exon 3 of PECAM-1, respectively. Our results suggest that susceptibility to DS in APL patients may be influenced by genetic variation in adhesion molecule loci.

  9. Plant Proteins Are Smaller Because They Are Encoded by Fewer Exons than Animal Proteins.

    PubMed

    Ramírez-Sánchez, Obed; Pérez-Rodríguez, Paulino; Delaye, Luis; Tiessen, Axel

    2016-12-01

    Protein size is an important biochemical feature since longer proteins can harbor more domains and therefore can display more biological functionalities than shorter proteins. We found remarkable differences in protein length, exon structure, and domain count among different phylogenetic lineages. While eukaryotic proteins have an average size of 472 amino acid residues (aa), average protein sizes in plant genomes are smaller than those of animals and fungi. Proteins unique to plants are ∼81aa shorter than plant proteins conserved among other eukaryotic lineages. The smaller average size of plant proteins could neither be explained by endosymbiosis nor subcellular compartmentation nor exon size, but rather due to exon number. Metazoan proteins are encoded on average by ∼10 exons of small size [∼176 nucleotides (nt)]. Streptophyta have on average only ∼5.7 exons of medium size (∼230nt). Multicellular species code for large proteins by increasing the exon number, while most unicellular organisms employ rather larger exons (>400nt). Among subcellular compartments, membrane proteins are the largest (∼520aa), whereas the smallest proteins correspond to the gene ontology group of ribosome (∼240aa). Plant genes are encoded by half the number of exons and also contain fewer domains than animal proteins on average. Interestingly, endosymbiotic proteins that migrated to the plant nucleus became larger than their cyanobacterial orthologs. We thus conclude that plants have proteins larger than bacteria but smaller than animals or fungi. Compared to the average of eukaryotic species, plants have ∼34% more but ∼20% smaller proteins. This suggests that photosynthetic organisms are unique and deserve therefore special attention with regard to the evolutionary forces acting on their genomes and proteomes.

  10. EGFR exon 20 insertion mutations in lung adenocarcinomas: prevalence, molecular heterogeneity, and clinicopathologic characteristics.

    PubMed

    Arcila, Maria E; Nafa, Khedoudja; Chaft, Jamie E; Rekhtman, Natasha; Lau, Christopher; Reva, Boris A; Zakowski, Maureen F; Kris, Mark G; Ladanyi, Marc

    2013-02-01

    In contrast to other primary epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutations in lung adenocarcinomas, insertions in exon 20 of EGFR have been generally associated with resistance to EGFR-tyrosine kinase inhibitors. Their molecular spectrum, clinicopathologic characteristics, and prevalence are not well established. Tumors harboring EGFR exon 20 insertions were identified through an algorithmic screen of 1,500 lung adenocarcinomas. Cases were first tested for common mutations in EGFR (exons 19 and 21) and KRAS (exon 2) and, if negative, further analyzed for EGFR exon 20 insertions. All samples underwent extended genotyping for other driver mutations in EGFR, KRAS, BRAF, ERBB2/HER2, NRAS, PIK3CA, MEK1, and AKT by mass spectrometry; a subset was evaluated for ALK rearrangements. We identified 33 EGFR exon 20 insertion cases [2.2%, 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.6-3.1], all mutually exclusive with mutations in the other genes tested (except PIK3CA). They were more common among never-smokers (P < 0.0001). There was no association with age, sex, race, or stage. Morphologically, tumors were similar to those with common EGFR mutations but with frequent solid histology. Insertions were highly variable in position and size, ranging from 3 to 12 bp, resulting in 13 different insertions, which, by molecular modeling, are predicted to have potentially different effects on erlotinib binding. EGFR exon 20 insertion testing identifies a distinct subset of lung adenocarcinomas, accounting for at least 9% of all EGFR-mutated cases, representing the third most common type of EGFR mutation after exon 19 deletions and L858R. Insertions are structurally heterogeneous with potential implications for response to EGFR inhibitors.

  11. Oxidative Stress Triggers Body-Wide Skipping of Multiple Exons of the Spinal Muscular Atrophy Gene

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Joonbae; Singh, Natalia N.; Ottesen, Eric W.; Sivanesan, Senthilkumar; Shishimorova, Maria; Singh, Ravindra N.

    2016-01-01

    Humans carry two nearly identical copies of Survival Motor Neuron gene: SMN1 and SMN2. Loss of SMN1 leads to spinal muscular atrophy (SMA), the most frequent genetic cause of infant mortality. While SMN2 cannot compensate for the loss of SMN1 due to predominant skipping of exon 7, correction of SMN2 exon 7 splicing holds the promise of a cure for SMA. Previously, we used cell-based models coupled with a multi-exon-skipping detection assay (MESDA) to demonstrate the vulnerability of SMN2 exons to aberrant splicing under the conditions of oxidative stress (OS). Here we employ a transgenic mouse model and MESDA to examine the OS-induced splicing regulation of SMN2 exons. We induced OS using paraquat that is known to trigger production of reactive oxygen species and cause mitochondrial dysfunction. We show an overwhelming co-skipping of SMN2 exon 5 and exon 7 under OS in all tissues except testis. We also show that OS increases skipping of SMN2 exon 3 in all tissues except testis. We uncover several new SMN2 splice isoforms expressed at elevated levels under the conditions of OS. We analyze cis-elements and transacting factors to demonstrate the diversity of mechanisms for splicing misregulation under OS. Our results of proteome analysis reveal downregulation of hnRNP H as one of the potential consequences of OS in brain. Our findings suggest SMN2 as a sensor of OS with implications to SMA and other diseases impacted by low levels of SMN protein. PMID:27111068

  12. Intersubtype Genetic Variation of HIV-1 Tat Exon 1.

    PubMed

    Roy, Chandra Nath; Khandaker, Irona; Oshitani, Hitoshi

    2015-06-01

    HIV-1 Tat is a regulatory protein that plays a pivotal role in viral transcription and replication. Our study aims to investigate the genetic variation of Tat exon 1 in all subtypes of HIV-1: A, B, C, D, F, G, H, J, and K. We performed phylogenetic, mutation, and selection pressure analyses on a total of 1,179 sequences of different subtypes of HIV-1 Tat obtained from the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The mean nucleotide divergences (%) among the analyzed sequences of subtypes A, B, C, D, F, G, H, J, and K were 88, 89, 90, 88, 86, 89, 88, 97, and 97, respectively. We revealed that subtype B evolved relatively faster than other subtypes. The second and fifth domains were found comparatively more variable among all subtypes. Site-by-site tests of positive selection revealed that several positions in all subtypes were under significant positive selection. Positively selected sites were found in the acidic domain at positions 3, 4, and 19, in the cysteine-rich domains at positions 24, 29, 32, and 36, in the core domain at position 40, and in the basic domain for the rest of the positions for all subtypes. Positions 58 and 68 in the basic domain were positively selected in subtypes A, B, C and B, C, F, respectively. We also observed high variability within positively selected sites in amino acid positions. Our study findings on HIV-1 Tat genetic variability may contribute to a better understanding of HIV-1 evolution as well as to the development of effective Tat-targeted therapeutics and vaccines.

  13. A diverse epigenetic landscape at human exons with implication for expression

    PubMed Central

    Singer, Meromit; Kosti, Idit; Pachter, Lior; Mandel-Gutfreund, Yael

    2015-01-01

    DNA methylation is an important epigenetic marker associated with gene expression regulation in eukaryotes. While promoter methylation is relatively well characterized, the role of intragenic DNA methylation remains unclear. Here, we investigated the relationship of DNA methylation at exons and flanking introns with gene expression and histone modifications generated from a human fibroblast cell-line and primary B cells. Consistent with previous work