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Sample records for exonuclease activity residing

  1. Editing of misaligned 3'-termini by an intrinsic 3'-5' exonuclease activity residing in the PHP domain of a family X DNA polymerase.

    PubMed

    Baños, Benito; Lázaro, José M; Villar, Laurentino; Salas, Margarita; de Vega, Miguel

    2008-10-01

    Bacillus subtilis gene yshC encodes a family X DNA polymerase (PolX(Bs)), whose biochemical features suggest that it plays a role during DNA repair processes. Here, we show that, in addition to the polymerization activity, PolX(Bs) possesses an intrinsic 3'-5' exonuclease activity specialized in resecting unannealed 3'-termini in a gapped DNA substrate. Biochemical analysis of a PolX(Bs) deletion mutant lacking the C-terminal polymerase histidinol phosphatase (PHP) domain, present in most of the bacterial/archaeal PolXs, as well as of this separately expressed protein region, allow us to state that the 3'-5' exonuclease activity of PolX(Bs) resides in its PHP domain. Furthermore, site-directed mutagenesis of PolX(Bs) His339 and His341 residues, evolutionary conserved in the PHP superfamily members, demonstrated that the predicted metal binding site is directly involved in catalysis of the exonucleolytic reaction. The implications of the unannealed 3'-termini resection by the 3'-5' exonuclease activity of PolX(Bs) in the DNA repair context are discussed.

  2. Structural insights into catalysis and dimerization enhanced exonuclease activity of RNase J

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Ye; Lu, Meihua; Zhang, Hui; Hu, Jing; Zhou, Congli; Xu, Qiang; Ul Hussain Shah, Amir Miraj; Xu, Hong; Wang, Liangyan; Hua, Yuejin

    2015-01-01

    RNase J is a conserved ribonuclease that belongs to the β-CASP family of nucleases. It possesses both endo- and exo-ribonuclease activities, which play a key role in pre-rRNA maturation and mRNA decay. Here we report high-resolution crystal structures of Deinococcus radiodurans RNase J complexed with RNA or uridine 5′-monophosphate in the presence of manganese ions. Biochemical and structural studies revealed that RNase J uses zinc ions for two-metal-ion catalysis. One residue conserved among RNase J orthologues (motif B) forms specific electrostatic interactions with the scissile phosphate of the RNA that is critical for the catalysis and product stabilization. The additional manganese ion, which is coordinated by conserved residues at the dimer interface, is critical for RNase J dimerization and exonuclease activity. The structures may also shed light on the mechanism of RNase J exo- and endonucleolytic activity switch. PMID:25940620

  3. Characterization of DNA polymerase X from Thermus thermophilus HB8 reveals the POLXc and PHP domains are both required for 3'-5' exonuclease activity.

    PubMed

    Nakane, Shuhei; Nakagawa, Noriko; Kuramitsu, Seiki; Masui, Ryoji

    2009-04-01

    The X-family DNA polymerases (PolXs) comprise a highly conserved DNA polymerase family found in all kingdoms. Mammalian PolXs are known to be involved in several DNA-processing pathways including repair, but the cellular functions of bacterial PolXs are less known. Many bacterial PolXs have a polymerase and histidinol phosphatase (PHP) domain at their C-termini in addition to a PolX core (POLXc) domain, and possess 3'-5' exonuclease activity. Although both domains are highly conserved in bacteria, their molecular functions, especially for a PHP domain, are unknown. We found Thermus thermophilus HB8 PolX (ttPolX) has Mg(2+)/Mn(2+)-dependent DNA/RNA polymerase, Mn(2+)-dependent 3'-5' exonuclease and DNA-binding activities. We identified the domains of ttPolX by limited proteolysis and characterized their biochemical activities. The POLXc domain was responsible for the polymerase and DNA-binding activities but exonuclease activity was not detected for either domain. However, the POLXc and PHP domains interacted with each other and a mixture of the two domains had Mn(2+)-dependent 3'-5' exonuclease activity. Moreover, site-directed mutagenesis revealed catalytically important residues in the PHP domain for the 3'-5' exonuclease activity. Our findings provide a molecular insight into the functional domain organization of bacterial PolXs, especially the requirement of the PHP domain for 3'-5' exonuclease activity.

  4. Human exonuclease 1 (EXO1) activity characterization and its function on flap structures

    PubMed Central

    Keijzers, Guido; Bohr, Vilhelm A.; Rasmussen, Lene Juel

    2015-01-01

    Human exonuclease 1 (EXO1) is involved in multiple DNA metabolism processes, including DNA repair and replication. Most of the fundamental roles of EXO1 have been described in yeast. Here, we report a biochemical characterization of human full-length EXO1. Prior to assay EXO1 on different DNA flap structures, we determined factors essential for the thermodynamic stability of EXO1. We show that enzymatic activity and stability of EXO1 on DNA is modulated by temperature. By characterization of EXO1 flap activity using various DNA flap substrates, we show that EXO1 has a strong capacity for degrading double stranded DNA and has a modest endonuclease or 5′ flap activity. Furthermore, we report novel mechanistic insights into the processing of flap structures, showing that EXO1 preferentially cleaves one nucleotide inwards in a double stranded region of a forked and nicked DNA flap substrates, suggesting a possible role of EXO1 in strand displacement. PMID:26182368

  5. Exonuclease I manipulating primer-modified gold nanoparticles for colorimetric telomerase activity assay.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lei; Zhang, Sijin; Pan, Wei; Liang, Qingcheng; Song, Xingyu

    2016-03-15

    Telomerase is a widely accepted cancer biomarker. The conventional method for telomerase activity assay, the telomeric repeat amplification protocol (TRAP), is time-consuming and susceptible to contaminants. Therefore, development of simple and sensitive strategies for telomerase detection is still a challenging subject. Here we develop a highly sensitive method for telomerase detection based on primer-modified gold nanoparticles (GNPs) manipulated by exonuclease I (Exo I). In the absence of telomerase, Exo I digests the substrate nucleic acid on the surface of GNPs, inducing the GNPs' aggregation. In the presence of telomerase, the telomerase elongation products which fold into G-quadruplex are resistant to the digestion of Exo I, and protect the GNPs from aggregation. By using this method, we can detect telomerase activity in 100 HL-60 cancer cells mL(-1) by naked eyes, and the detection limit is 29 HL-60 cells mL(-1). This method is very simple and reliable, without any separation and amplification procedure. We also demonstrate the feasibility of this protocol for screening of telomerase inhibitors as anticancer agents. This method is promising to be applied in early clinical diagnosis and drug discovery. PMID:26402592

  6. Label-free fluorescence strategy for sensitive detection of exonuclease activity using SYBR Green I as probe.

    PubMed

    Xu, Min; Li, Baoxin

    2015-01-01

    A label-free and sensitive fluorescence assay for exonuclease activity is developed using commercially available SYBR Green I (SG) dye as signal probe. A proof-of-concept of this assay has been demonstrated by using exonuclease III (Exo III) as a model enzyme. In this assay, double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) can bind SG, resulting in a strong fluorescence signal of SG. Upon the addition of Exo III, dsDNA would be digested, and SG emits very weak fluorescence. Thus, Exo III activity can be facilely measured with a simple fluorescence reader. This method has a linear detection range from 1 U/mL to 200 U/mL with a detection limit of 0.7 U/mL. This label-free approach is selective, simple, convenient and cost-efficient without any complex DNA sequence design or fluorescence dye label. The method not only provides a platform for monitoring activity and inhibition of exonuclease but also shows great potential in biological process researches, drug discovery, and clinic diagnostics.

  7. The 3'-5' exonuclease of DNA polymerase I of Escherichia coli: contribution of each amino acid at the active site to the reaction.

    PubMed Central

    Derbyshire, V; Grindley, N D; Joyce, C M

    1991-01-01

    We have used site-directed mutagenesis to change amino acid side chains that have been shown crystallographically to be in close proximity to a DNA 3' terminus bound at the 3'-5' exonuclease active site of Klenow fragment. Exonuclease assays of the resulting mutant proteins indicate that the largest effects on exonuclease activity result from mutations in a group of carboxylate side chains (Asp355, Asp424 and Asp501) anchoring two divalent metal ions that are essential for exonuclease activity. Another carboxylate (Glu357) within this cluster seems to be less important as a metal ligand, but may play a separate role in catalysis of the exonuclease reaction. A second group of residues (Leu361, Phe473 and Tyr497), located around the terminal base and ribose positions, plays a secondary role, ensuring correct positioning of the substrate in the active site and perhaps also facilitating melting of a duplex DNA substrate by interacting with the frayed 3' terminus. The pH-dependence of the 3'-5' exonuclease reaction is consistent with a mechanism in which nucleophilic attack on the terminal phosphodiester bond is initiated by a hydroxide ion coordinated to one of the enzyme-bound metal ions. PMID:1989882

  8. Studies of the 5' exonuclease and endonuclease activities of CPSF-73 in histone pre-mRNA processing.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiao-cui; Sullivan, Kelly D; Marzluff, William F; Dominski, Zbigniew

    2009-01-01

    Processing of histone pre-mRNA requires a single 3' endonucleolytic cleavage guided by the U7 snRNP that binds downstream of the cleavage site. Following cleavage, the downstream cleavage product (DCP) is rapidly degraded in vitro by a nuclease that also depends on the U7 snRNP. Our previous studies demonstrated that the endonucleolytic cleavage is catalyzed by the cleavage/polyadenylation factor CPSF-73. Here, by using RNA substrates with different nucleotide modifications, we characterize the activity that degrades the DCP. We show that the degradation is blocked by a 2'-O-methyl nucleotide and occurs in the 5'-to-3' direction. The U7-dependent 5' exonuclease activity is processive and continues degrading the DCP substrate even after complete removal of the U7-binding site. Thus, U7 snRNP is required only to initiate the degradation. UV cross-linking studies demonstrate that the DCP and its 5'-truncated version specifically interact with CPSF-73, strongly suggesting that in vitro, the same protein is responsible for the endonucleolytic cleavage of histone pre-mRNA and the subsequent degradation of the DCP. By using various RNA substrates, we define important space requirements upstream and downstream of the cleavage site that dictate whether CPSF-73 functions as an endonuclease or a 5' exonuclease. RNA interference experiments with HeLa cells indicate that degradation of the DCP does not depend on the Xrn2 5' exonuclease, suggesting that CPSF-73 degrades the DCP both in vitro and in vivo. PMID:18955505

  9. Cloning of thermostable DNA polymerases from hyperthermophilic marine Archaea with emphasis on Thermococcus sp. 9 degrees N-7 and mutations affecting 3'-5' exonuclease activity.

    PubMed Central

    Southworth, M W; Kong, H; Kucera, R B; Ware, J; Jannasch, H W; Perler, F B

    1996-01-01

    Five extremely thermophilic Archaea from hydrothermal vents were isolated, and their DNA polymerases were cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli. Protein splicing elements (inteins) are present in many archaeal DNA polymerases, but only the DNA polymerase from strain GB-C contained an intein. Of the five cloned DNA polymerases, the Thermococcus sp. 9 degrees N-7 DNA polymerase was chosen for biochemical characterization. Thermococcus sp. 9 degrees N-7 DNA polymerase exhibited temperature-sensitive strand displacement activity and apparent Km values for DNA and dNTP similar to those of Thermococcus litoralis DNA polymerase. Six substitutions in the 3'-5' exonuclease motif I were constructed in an attempt to reduce the 3'-5' exonuclease activity of Thermococcus sp. 9 degrees N-7 DNA polymerase. Five mutants resulted in no detectable 3'-5' exonuclease activity, while one mutant (Glul43Asp) had <1% of wild-type activity. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:8643567

  10. Different Regulation of the p53 Core Domain Activities 3′-to-5′ Exonuclease and Sequence-Specific DNA Binding

    PubMed Central

    Janus, Friedemann; Albrechtsen, Nils; Knippschild, Uwe; Wiesmüller, Lisa; Grosse, Frank; Deppert, Wolfgang

    1999-01-01

    In this study we further characterized the 3′-5′ exonuclease activity intrinsic to wild-type p53. We showed that this activity, like sequence-specific DNA binding, is mediated by the p53 core domain. Truncation of the C-terminal 30 amino acids of the p53 molecule enhanced the p53 exonuclease activity by at least 10-fold, indicating that this activity, like sequence-specific DNA binding, is negatively regulated by the C-terminal basic regulatory domain of p53. However, treatments which activated sequence-specific DNA binding of p53, like binding of the monoclonal antibody PAb421, which recognizes a C-terminal epitope on p53, or a higher phosphorylation status, strongly inhibited the p53 exonuclease activity. This suggests that at least on full-length p53, sequence-specific DNA binding and exonuclease activities are subject to different and seemingly opposing regulatory mechanisms. Following up the recent discovery in our laboratory that p53 recognizes and binds with high affinity to three-stranded DNA substrates mimicking early recombination intermediates (C. Dudenhoeffer, G. Rohaly, K. Will, W. Deppert, and L. Wiesmueller, Mol. Cell. Biol. 18:5332–5342), we asked whether such substrates might be degraded by the p53 exonuclease. Addition of Mg2+ ions to the binding assay indeed started the p53 exonuclease and promoted rapid degradation of the bound, but not of the unbound, substrate, indicating that specifically recognized targets can be subjected to exonucleolytic degradation by p53 under defined conditions. PMID:10022902

  11. The "Bridge" in the Epstein-Barr virus alkaline exonuclease protein BGLF5 contributes to shutoff activity during productive infection.

    PubMed

    Horst, Daniëlle; Burmeister, Wim P; Boer, Ingrid G J; van Leeuwen, Daphne; Buisson, Marlyse; Gorbalenya, Alexander E; Wiertz, Emmanuel J H J; Ressing, Maaike E

    2012-09-01

    Replication of the human herpesvirus Epstein-Barr virus drastically impairs cellular protein synthesis. This shutoff phenotype results from mRNA degradation upon expression of the early lytic-phase protein BGLF5. Interestingly, BGLF5 is the viral DNase, or alkaline exonuclease, homologues of which are present throughout the herpesvirus family. During productive infection, this DNase is essential for processing and packaging of the viral genome. In contrast to this widely conserved DNase activity, shutoff is only mediated by the alkaline exonucleases of the subfamily of gammaherpesviruses. Here, we show that BGLF5 can degrade mRNAs of both cellular and viral origin, irrespective of polyadenylation. Furthermore, shutoff by BGLF5 induces nuclear relocalization of the cytosolic poly(A) binding protein. Guided by the recently resolved BGLF5 structure, mutants were generated and analyzed for functional consequences on DNase and shutoff activities. On the one hand, a point mutation destroying DNase activity also blocks RNase function, implying that both activities share a catalytic site. On the other hand, other mutations are more selective, having a more pronounced effect on either DNA degradation or shutoff. The latter results are indicative of an oligonucleotide-binding site that is partially shared by DNA and RNA. For this, the flexible "bridge" that crosses the active-site canyon of BGLF5 appears to contribute to the interaction with RNA substrates. These findings extend our understanding of the molecular basis for the shutoff function of BGLF5 that is conserved in gammaherpesviruses but not in alpha- and betaherpesviruses.

  12. Fluorescence detection of telomerase activity in cancer cell extracts based on autonomous exonuclease III-assisted isothermal cycling signal amplification.

    PubMed

    Ding, Caifeng; Li, Xiaoqian; Wang, Wei; Chen, Yaoyao

    2016-09-15

    Based on the extension reaction of a telomerase substrate (TS) primer in the presence of the telomerase, strand-displacement process to perform more stable longer duplex chain, and stepwise hydrolysis of mononucleotides from the blunt or the recessed 3'-hydroxyl termini of duplex DNA in the presence of Exonuclease III (Exo III), an amplified fluorescence detection of telomerase activity in the cancer cells was described in this manuscript. A fluorescence probe DNA, a quencher DNA, and a TS primer were mixed to construct a three-chain DNA structure and a two-chain DNA structure because the amount of the TS primer was less than the other two DNA. In the presence of the telomerase, the quencher DNA was replaced from the probe DNA and the telomerase activity could be determined with the fluorescence enhancement. The telomerase activity in HeLa extracts equivalent to 6-2000 cells was detected by this method. Moreover, the strategy was further proved by using telomerase extracted from Romas cells. With the multiple rounds of isothermal strand displacement and the hydrolysis process, constituted consecutive of signal amplification for the novel detection paradigm that allowed measuring of telomerase activity in crude cancer cell extracts confirmed the reliability and practicality of the protocol, which reveal this platform holds great promise in the biochemical assay for the telomerase activity in early diagnosis for cancers.

  13. Physical mapping of the herpes simplex virus type 2 nuc- lesion affecting alkaline exonuclease activity by using herpes simplex virus type 1 deletion clones.

    PubMed

    Wathen, M W; Hay, J

    1984-07-01

    The nuc- lesion affecting alkaline exonuclease activity in the herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) mutant ts1348 had previously been mapped to the EcoRI-D restriction enzyme fragment of HSV-1. Eight clones with deletions representing most of HSV-1 EcoRI fragment D were selected with lambda gtWES hybrids. These clones were tested for their ability to rescue the alkaline exonuclease activity of HSV-2 nuc- ts1348 virus. The sequences colinear with the HSV-2 nuc- lesion were found to map between 0.169 and 0.174 map units on the HSV-1 Patton genome, representing an 0.8-kilobase-pair region that is 12.9 to 13.7 kilobase pairs from the left end of HSV-1 EcoRI fragment D.

  14. The retinitis pigmentosa-mutated RP2 protein exhibits exonuclease activity and translocates to the nucleus in response to DNA damage

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, Jung-Hoon; Qiu Junzhuan; Cai Sheng; Chen Yuan; Cheetham, Michael E.; Shen Binghui; Pfeifer, Gerd P. . E-mail: gpfeifer@coh.org

    2006-05-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is a genetically heterogeneous disease characterized by degeneration of the retina. Mutations in the RP2 gene are linked to the second most frequent form of X-linked retinitis pigmentosa. RP2 is a plasma membrane-associated protein of unknown function. The N-terminal domain of RP2 shares amino acid sequence similarity to the tubulin-specific chaperone protein co-factor C. The C-terminus consists of a domain with similarity to nucleoside diphosphate kinases (NDKs). Human NDK1, in addition to its role in providing nucleoside triphosphates, has recently been described as a 3' to 5' exonuclease. Here, we show that RP2 is a DNA-binding protein that exhibits exonuclease activity, with a preference for single-stranded or nicked DNA substrates that occur as intermediates of base excision repair pathways. Furthermore, we show that RP2 undergoes re-localization into the nucleus upon treatment of cells with DNA damaging agents inducing oxidative stress, most notably solar simulated light and UVA radiation. The data suggest that RP2 may have previously unrecognized roles as a DNA damage response factor and 3' to 5' exonuclease.

  15. 2'-O-aminopropyl ribonucleotides: a zwitterionic modification that enhances the exonuclease resistance and biological activity of antisense oligonucleotides.

    PubMed

    Griffey, R H; Monia, B P; Cummins, L L; Freier, S; Greig, M J; Guinosso, C J; Lesnik, E; Manalili, S M; Mohan, V; Owens, S; Ross, B R; Sasmor, H; Wancewicz, E; Weiler, K; Wheeler, P D; Cook, P D

    1996-12-20

    Oligonucleotides containing 2'-O-aminopropyl-substituted RNA have been synthesized. The 2'-O-(aminopropyl)adenosine (APA), 2'-O-(aminopropyl)cytidine (APC), 2'-O-(aminopropyl)-guanosine (APG), and 2'-O-(aminopropyl)uridine (APU) have been prepared in high yield from the ribonucleoside, protected, and incorporated into an oligonucleotide using conventional phosphoramidite chemistry. Molecular dynamics studies of a dinucleotide in water demonstrates that a short alkylamine located off the 2'-oxygen of ribonucleotides alters the sugar pucker of the nucleoside but does not form a tight ion pair with the proximate phosphate. A 5-mer with the sequence ACTUC has been characterized using NMR. As predicted from the modeling results, the sugar pucker of the APU moiety is shifted toward a C3'-endo geometry. In addition, the primary amine rotates freely and is not bound electrostatically to any phosphate group, as evidenced by the different sign of the NOE between sugar proton resonances and the signals from the propylamine chain. Incorporation of aminopropyl nucleoside residues into point-substituted and fully modified oligomers does not decrease the affinity for complementary RNA compared to 2'-O-alkyl substituents of the same length. However, two APU residues placed at the 3'-terminus of an oligomer gives a 100-fold increase in resistance to exonuclease degradation, which is greater than observed for phosphorothioate oligomers. These structural and biophysical characteristics make the 2'-O-aminopropyl group a leading choice for incorporation into antisense therapeutics. A 20-mer phosphorothioate oligonucleotide capped with two phosphodiester aminopropyl nucleotides targeted against C-raf mRNA has been transfected into cells via electroporation. This oligonucleotide has 5-10-fold greater activity than the control phosphorothioate for reducing the abundance of C-raf mRNA and protein.

  16. The 3'-to-5' exonuclease activity of vaccinia virus DNA polymerase is essential and plays a role in promoting virus genetic recombination.

    PubMed

    Gammon, Don B; Evans, David H

    2009-05-01

    Poxviruses are subjected to extraordinarily high levels of genetic recombination during infection, although the enzymes catalyzing these reactions have never been identified. However, it is clear that virus-encoded DNA polymerases play some unknown yet critical role in virus recombination. Using a novel, antiviral-drug-based strategy to dissect recombination and replication reactions, we now show that the 3'-to-5' proofreading exonuclease activity of the viral DNA polymerase plays a key role in promoting recombination reactions. Linear DNA substrates were prepared containing the dCMP analog cidofovir (CDV) incorporated into the 3' ends of the molecules. The drug blocked the formation of concatemeric recombinant molecules in vitro in a process that was catalyzed by the proofreading activity of vaccinia virus DNA polymerase. Recombinant formation was also blocked when CDV-containing recombination substrates were transfected into cells infected with wild-type vaccinia virus. These inhibitory effects could be overcome if CDV-containing substrates were transfected into cells infected with CDV-resistant (CDV(r)) viruses, but only when resistance was linked to an A314T substitution mutation mapping within the 3'-to-5' exonuclease domain of the viral polymerase. Viruses encoding a CDV(r) mutation in the polymerase domain still exhibited a CDV-induced recombination deficiency. The A314T substitution also enhanced the enzyme's capacity to excise CDV molecules from the 3' ends of duplex DNA and to recombine these DNAs in vitro, as judged from experiments using purified mutant DNA polymerase. The 3'-to-5' exonuclease activity appears to be an essential virus function, and our results suggest that this might be because poxviruses use it to promote genetic exchange.

  17. Effects of Transcription Elongation Rate and Xrn2 Exonuclease Activity on RNA Polymerase II Termination Suggest Widespread Kinetic Competition.

    PubMed

    Fong, Nova; Brannan, Kristopher; Erickson, Benjamin; Kim, Hyunmin; Cortazar, Michael A; Sheridan, Ryan M; Nguyen, Tram; Karp, Shai; Bentley, David L

    2015-10-15

    The torpedo model of transcription termination asserts that the exonuclease Xrn2 attacks the 5'PO4-end exposed by nascent RNA cleavage and chases down the RNA polymerase. We tested this mechanism using a dominant-negative human Xrn2 mutant and found that it delayed termination genome-wide. Xrn2 nuclease inactivation caused strong termination defects downstream of most poly(A) sites and modest delays at some histone and U snRNA genes, suggesting that the torpedo mechanism is not limited to poly(A) site-dependent termination. A central untested feature of the torpedo model is that there is kinetic competition between the exonuclease and the pol II elongation complex. Using pol II rate mutants, we found that slow transcription robustly shifts termination upstream, and fast elongation extends the zone of termination further downstream. These results suggest that kinetic competition between elongating pol II and the Xrn2 exonuclease is integral to termination of transcription on most human genes. PMID:26474067

  18. One severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus protein complex integrates processive RNA polymerase and exonuclease activities.

    PubMed

    Subissi, Lorenzo; Posthuma, Clara C; Collet, Axelle; Zevenhoven-Dobbe, Jessika C; Gorbalenya, Alexander E; Decroly, Etienne; Snijder, Eric J; Canard, Bruno; Imbert, Isabelle

    2014-09-16

    In addition to members causing milder human infections, the Coronaviridae family includes potentially lethal zoonotic agents causing severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) and the recently emerged Middle East respiratory syndrome. The ∼30-kb positive-stranded RNA genome of coronaviruses encodes a replication/transcription machinery that is unusually complex and composed of 16 nonstructural proteins (nsps). SARS-CoV nsp12, the canonical RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp), exhibits poorly processive RNA synthesis in vitro, at odds with the efficient replication of a very large RNA genome in vivo. Here, we report that SARS-CoV nsp7 and nsp8 activate and confer processivity to the RNA-synthesizing activity of nsp12. Using biochemical assays and reverse genetics, the importance of conserved nsp7 and nsp8 residues was probed. Whereas several nsp7 mutations affected virus replication to a limited extent, the replacement of two nsp8 residues (P183 and R190) essential for interaction with nsp12 and a third (K58) critical for the interaction of the polymerase complex with RNA were all lethal to the virus. Without a loss of processivity, the nsp7/nsp8/nsp12 complex can associate with nsp14, a bifunctional enzyme bearing 3'-5' exoribonuclease and RNA cap N7-guanine methyltransferase activities involved in replication fidelity and 5'-RNA capping, respectively. The identification of this tripartite polymerase complex that in turn associates with the nsp14 proofreading enzyme sheds light on how coronaviruses assemble an RNA-synthesizing machinery to replicate the largest known RNA genomes. This protein complex is a fascinating example of the functional integration of RNA polymerase, capping, and proofreading activities. PMID:25197083

  19. One severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus protein complex integrates processive RNA polymerase and exonuclease activities

    PubMed Central

    Subissi, Lorenzo; Posthuma, Clara C.; Collet, Axelle; Zevenhoven-Dobbe, Jessika C.; Gorbalenya, Alexander E.; Decroly, Etienne; Snijder, Eric J.; Canard, Bruno; Imbert, Isabelle

    2014-01-01

    In addition to members causing milder human infections, the Coronaviridae family includes potentially lethal zoonotic agents causing severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) and the recently emerged Middle East respiratory syndrome. The ∼30-kb positive-stranded RNA genome of coronaviruses encodes a replication/transcription machinery that is unusually complex and composed of 16 nonstructural proteins (nsps). SARS-CoV nsp12, the canonical RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp), exhibits poorly processive RNA synthesis in vitro, at odds with the efficient replication of a very large RNA genome in vivo. Here, we report that SARS-CoV nsp7 and nsp8 activate and confer processivity to the RNA-synthesizing activity of nsp12. Using biochemical assays and reverse genetics, the importance of conserved nsp7 and nsp8 residues was probed. Whereas several nsp7 mutations affected virus replication to a limited extent, the replacement of two nsp8 residues (P183 and R190) essential for interaction with nsp12 and a third (K58) critical for the interaction of the polymerase complex with RNA were all lethal to the virus. Without a loss of processivity, the nsp7/nsp8/nsp12 complex can associate with nsp14, a bifunctional enzyme bearing 3′-5′ exoribonuclease and RNA cap N7-guanine methyltransferase activities involved in replication fidelity and 5′-RNA capping, respectively. The identification of this tripartite polymerase complex that in turn associates with the nsp14 proofreading enzyme sheds light on how coronaviruses assemble an RNA-synthesizing machinery to replicate the largest known RNA genomes. This protein complex is a fascinating example of the functional integration of RNA polymerase, capping, and proofreading activities. PMID:25197083

  20. Colorimetric assay for T4 polynucleotide kinase activity based on the horseradish peroxidase-mimicking DNAzyme combined with λ exonuclease cleavage.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Cheng; Yan, Chunyan; Jiang, Jianhui; Yu, Ruqin

    2013-03-01

    T4 polynucleotide kinase (PNK) plays a critical role in various cellular events. Here, we describe a novel colorimetric strategy for estimating the activity of PNK and screening its inhibitors taking advantage of the efficient cleavage of λ exonuclease and the horseradish peroxidase-mimicking DNAzyme (HRPzyme) signal amplification. A label-free hairpin DNA with the sequence of HRPzyme was utilized in the assay. The 5'-hydroxyl terminal of the hairpin DNA was firstly phosphorylated in the presence of PNK and then digested by λ exonuclease. As a result, the blocked 'HRPzyme' sequence of the hairpin DNA was released due to the removal of its completely complementary sequence. Using this strategy, the assay for PNK activity was successfully translated into the detection of HRPzyme. Because of the completely blocking and efficiently releasing of HRPzyme, the colorimetric method exhibited an excellent performance in PNK analysis with a low detection limit of 0.06 U mL(-1) and a wide detection range from 0.06 to 100 U mL(-1). Additionally, the effects of different inhibitors on PNK activity were also evaluated. The proposed strategy holds great potential in the development of high-throughput phosphorylation investigation as well as in the screening of the related drugs.

  1. The β2 clamp in the Mycobacterium tuberculosis DNA polymerase III αβ2ε replicase promotes polymerization and reduces exonuclease activity

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Shoujin; Li, Wenjuan; Zhang, Hongtai; Fleming, Joy; Yang, Weiqiang; Wang, Shihua; Wei, Wenjing; Zhou, Jie; Zhu, Guofeng; Deng, Jiaoyu; Hou, Jian; Zhou, Ying; Lin, Shiqiang; Zhang, Xian-En; Bi, Lijun

    2016-01-01

    DNA polymerase III (DNA pol III) is a multi-subunit replication machine responsible for the accurate and rapid replication of bacterial genomes, however, how it functions in Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) requires further investigation. We have reconstituted the leading-strand replication process of the Mtb DNA pol III holoenzyme in vitro, and investigated the physical and functional relationships between its key components. We verify the presence of an αβ2ε polymerase-clamp-exonuclease replicase complex by biochemical methods and protein-protein interaction assays in vitro and in vivo and confirm that, in addition to the polymerase activity of its α subunit, Mtb DNA pol III has two potential proofreading subunits; the α and ε subunits. During DNA replication, the presence of the β2 clamp strongly promotes the polymerization of the αβ2ε replicase and reduces its exonuclease activity. Our work provides a foundation for further research on the mechanism by which the replication machinery switches between replication and proofreading and provides an experimental platform for the selection of antimicrobials targeting DNA replication in Mtb. PMID:26822057

  2. A highly sensitive homogeneous electrochemical assay for alkaline phosphatase activity based on single molecular beacon-initiated T7 exonuclease-mediated signal amplification.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lianfang; Hou, Ting; Li, Haiyin; Li, Feng

    2015-06-21

    Alkaline phosphatase (ALP), a class of enzymes that catalyzes the dephosphorylation of a variety of substrates, is one of the most commonly assayed enzymes in routine clinical practice, and an important biomarker related to many human diseases. Herein, a facile and highly sensitive homogeneous electrochemical biosensing strategy was proposed for the ALP activity detection based on single molecular beacon-initiated T7 exonuclease-assisted signal amplification. One 3'-phosphorylated and 5'-methylene blue (MB) labeled hairpin probe (HP) is ingeniously designed. In the presence of ALP, the dephosphorylation of HP, the subsequent Klenow fragment (KF) polymerase-catalyzed elongation and T7 exonuclease-catalyzed digestion of the duplex stem of HP take place, releasing MB-labeled mononucleotides and the trigger DNA (tDNA). tDNA then hybridizes with another HP and initiates the subsequent cycling cleavage process. As a result, a large amount of MB-labeled mononucleotides are released, generating a significantly amplified electrochemical signal toward the ALP activity assay. A directly measured detection limit as low as 0.1 U L(-1) is obtained, which is comparable to that of the fluorescence method and up to three orders of magnitude lower than that of the immobilization-based electrochemical strategy previously reported. In addition to high sensitivity and good selectivity, the as-proposed strategy also exhibits the advantages of simplicity and convenience, because the assay is carried out in the homogeneous solution phase and sophisticated electrode modification processes are avoided. Therefore, the homogeneous electrochemical method we proposed here is an ideal candidate for ALP activity detection in biochemical research and clinical practices. PMID:25924941

  3. A highly sensitive homogeneous electrochemical assay for alkaline phosphatase activity based on single molecular beacon-initiated T7 exonuclease-mediated signal amplification.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lianfang; Hou, Ting; Li, Haiyin; Li, Feng

    2015-06-21

    Alkaline phosphatase (ALP), a class of enzymes that catalyzes the dephosphorylation of a variety of substrates, is one of the most commonly assayed enzymes in routine clinical practice, and an important biomarker related to many human diseases. Herein, a facile and highly sensitive homogeneous electrochemical biosensing strategy was proposed for the ALP activity detection based on single molecular beacon-initiated T7 exonuclease-assisted signal amplification. One 3'-phosphorylated and 5'-methylene blue (MB) labeled hairpin probe (HP) is ingeniously designed. In the presence of ALP, the dephosphorylation of HP, the subsequent Klenow fragment (KF) polymerase-catalyzed elongation and T7 exonuclease-catalyzed digestion of the duplex stem of HP take place, releasing MB-labeled mononucleotides and the trigger DNA (tDNA). tDNA then hybridizes with another HP and initiates the subsequent cycling cleavage process. As a result, a large amount of MB-labeled mononucleotides are released, generating a significantly amplified electrochemical signal toward the ALP activity assay. A directly measured detection limit as low as 0.1 U L(-1) is obtained, which is comparable to that of the fluorescence method and up to three orders of magnitude lower than that of the immobilization-based electrochemical strategy previously reported. In addition to high sensitivity and good selectivity, the as-proposed strategy also exhibits the advantages of simplicity and convenience, because the assay is carried out in the homogeneous solution phase and sophisticated electrode modification processes are avoided. Therefore, the homogeneous electrochemical method we proposed here is an ideal candidate for ALP activity detection in biochemical research and clinical practices.

  4. Magnetic nanoparticles-cooperated fluorescence sensor for sensitive and accurate detection of DNA methyltransferase activity coupled with exonuclease III-assisted target recycling.

    PubMed

    Xue, Qingwang; Zhang, Youna; Xu, Shuling; Li, Haibo; Wang, Lei; Li, Rui; Zhang, Yuanfu; Yue, Qiaoli; Gu, Xiaohong; Zhang, Shuqiu; Liu, Jifeng; Wang, Huaisheng

    2015-11-21

    A fluorescence magnetic biosensor for the DNA methyltransferase activity was developed based on the cooperative amplification by combining the magnetic nanoparticles synergistic exonuclease III (Exo III)-assisted circular exponential amplification and a supramolecular structure ZnPPIX/G-quadruplex. First, a duplex DNA probe, which was constructed by the hybridization of a quadruplex-forming oligomer with a molecular beacon, was assembled on the magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) as a reporter. A hairpin probe (HP)-containing sequence of GATC was used as the methylation substrate of DNA adenine methyltransferase (DAM). Once HP was methylated by DAM, it could be recognized and cleaved by Dpn I, which allows the release of a single-stranded DNA. The DNA (tDNA1) then hybridizes to the MNP probe, which then triggers the exonuclease III-mediated target exponential recycling reaction. Simultaneously, numerous quadruplex forming oligomers are liberated and folded into the G-quadruplex-ZnPPIX complexes with the help of zinc(ii)-protoporphyrin IX(ZnPPIX) on the MNP surface to give a remarkable fluorescence response. In the developed sensor, a small amount of target DAM can be converted to a large number of stable DNA triggers, leading to remarkable amplification of the target. Moreover, using MNPs as a vector of the sensor may reduce the interference from the real samples, which increases the anti-interference of the sensing system. Based on this unique amplification strategy, a very low detection limit down to 2.0 × 10(-4) U mL(-1) was obtained. Furthermore, the sensor could be used to evaluate the DAM activity in different growth stages of E. coli cells and screen Dam MTase inhibitors. Therefore, the strategy proposed here provides a promising platform for monitoring the activity and inhibition of DNA MTases and has great potential to be applied further in early clinical diagnostics and medical research.

  5. Kinetics and thermodynamics of DNA polymerases with exonuclease proofreading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaspard, Pierre

    2016-04-01

    Kinetic theory and thermodynamics are applied to DNA polymerases with exonuclease activity, taking into account the dependence of the rates on the previously incorporated nucleotide. The replication fidelity is shown to increase significantly thanks to this dependence at the basis of the mechanism of exonuclease proofreading. In particular, this dependence can provide up to a 100-fold lowering of the error probability under physiological conditions. Theory is compared with numerical simulations for the DNA polymerases of T7 viruses and human mitochondria.

  6. Sensitive detection of T4 polynucleotide kinase activity based on coupled exonuclease reaction and nicking enzyme-assisted fluorescence signal amplification.

    PubMed

    Hou, Ting; Wang, Xiuzhong; Lu, Tingting; Liu, Xiaojuan; Li, Feng

    2014-05-01

    As a prominent member of the 5'-kinase family, T4 polynucleotide kinase (PNK) plays an important role in gene function regulations, and the study of PNK activity and its potential inhibitors is significant for research related to the DNA phosphorylation process. Here, we proposed a novel strategy for the detection of PNK activity and its inhibition, which combines exonuclease enzyme reaction and nicking enzyme-assisted fluorescence signal amplification. Through recycling cleavage of DNA fluorescence probe for signal amplification, a highly sensitive PNK sensing platform is developed, and a very low detection limit of 0.05 mU/mL is achieved, which is better than or comparable to that of the previously reported PNK assays. The present approach adopts a simple separation-free procedure in which the enzyme assay is conducted in homogeneous solutions. Additionally, the inhibitory effects of several known kinase inhibitors on PNK have been successfully detected. Since the proposed assay exhibits the advantages of high sensitivity and simplicity, it holds great potential in providing a promising platform for convenient and highly sensitive detection of PNK activity and its inhibitors.

  7. Chemiluminescence resonance energy transfer biosensing platform for site-specific determination of DNA methylation and assay of DNA methyltransferase activity using exonuclease III-assisted target recycling amplification.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chun; Li, Baoxin

    2014-04-15

    Site-specific determination of DNA methylation and assay of MTase activity can be used for determining specific cancer types, providing insights into the mechanism of gene repression, and developing novel drugs to treat methylation-related diseases. Herein, we develop a simple and highly sensitive chemiluminescence (CL) biosensing platform for site-specific determination of DNA methylation using Exonuclease III (Exo III)-assisted target recycling signal amplification. After bisulfite treatment of mixture of methylated DNA and unmethylated DNA, methylated DNA can hybridize with fluorescein (FAM)-labeled probe DNA to form double-stranded DNA (dsDNA), removing the FAM-labeled probe DNA from the surface of grapheme oxide, and the chemiluminescence resonance energy transfer (CRET) sensing signal can be observed and then amplified using Exo III-based recycling strategy. The biosensing platform exhibits excellent high sensitivity, and it can ever distinguish as low as 0.002% methylation level from the mixture, which is superior to most currently reported methods used for DNA methylation assay. In addition, the proposed method can also be used to sensitively assay MTase activity with determination limit of 0.007 U/mL. This CL biosensing offers the advantages of being facile, sensitive, rapid and cost-effective. These features make the system promising for future use for early cancer diagnosis and discover of new anticancer drugs.

  8. Tungsten disulfide nanosheet and exonuclease III co-assisted amplification strategy for highly sensitive fluorescence polarization detection of DNA glycosylase activity.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jingjin; Ma, Yefei; Kong, Rongmei; Zhang, Liangliang; Yang, Wen; Zhao, Shulin

    2015-08-01

    Herein, we introduced a tungsten disulfide (WS2) nanosheet and exonuclease III (Exo III) co-assisted signal amplification strategy for highly sensitive fluorescent polarization (FP) assay of DNA glycosylase activity. Two DNA glycosylases, uracil-DNA glycosylase (UDG) and human 8-oxoG DNA glycosylase 1 (hOGG1), were tested. A hairpin-structured probe (HP) which contained damaged bases in the stem was used as the substrate. The removal of damaged bases from substrate by DNA glycosylase would lower the melting temperature of HP. The HP was then opened and hybridized with a FAM dye-labeled single strand DNA (DP), generating a duplex with a recessed 3'-terminal of DP. This design facilitated the Exo III-assisted amplification by repeating the hybridization and digestion of DP, liberating numerous FAM fluorophores which could not be adsorbed on WS2 nanosheet. Thus, the final system exhibited a small FP signal. However, in the absence of DNA glycosylases, no hybridization between DP and HP was occurred, hampering the hydrolysis of DP by Exo III. The intact DP was then adsorbed on the surface of WS2 nanosheet that greatly amplified the mass of the labeled-FAM fluorophore, resulting in a large FP value. With the co-assisted amplification strategy, the sensitivity was substantially improved. In addition, this method was applied to detect UDG activity in cell extracts. The study of the inhibition of UDG was also performed. Furthermore, this method is simple in design, easy in implementation, and selective, which holds potential applications in the DNA glycosylase related mechanism research and molecular diagnostics.

  9. Functional insight into Maelstrom in the germline piRNA pathway: a unique domain homologous to the DnaQ-H 3'-5' exonuclease, its lineage-specific expansion/loss and evolutionarily active site switch.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Dapeng; Xiong, Huiling; Shan, Jufang; Xia, Xuhua; Trudeau, Vance L

    2008-01-01

    Maelstrom (MAEL) plays a crucial role in a recently-discovered piRNA pathway; however its specific function remains unknown. Here a novel MAEL-specific domain characterized by a set of conserved residues (Glu-His-His-Cys-His-Cys, EHHCHC) was identified in a broad range of species including vertebrates, sea squirts, insects, nematodes, and protists. It exhibits ancient lineage-specific expansions in several species, however, appears to be lost in all examined teleost fish species. Functional involvement of MAEL domains in DNA- and RNA-related processes was further revealed by its association with HMG, SR-25-like and HDAC_interact domains. A distant similarity to the DnaQ-H 3'-5' exonuclease family with the RNase H fold was discovered based on the evidence that all MAEL domains adopt the canonical RNase H fold; and several protist MAEL domains contain the conserved 3'-5' exonuclease active site residues (Asp-Glu-Asp-His-Asp, DEDHD). This evolutionary link together with structural examinations leads to a hypothesis that MAEL domains may have a potential nuclease activity or RNA-binding ability that may be implicated in piRNA biogenesis. The observed transition of two sets of characteristic residues between the ancestral DnaQ-H and the descendent MAEL domains may suggest a new mode for protein function evolution called "active site switch", in which the protist MAEL homologues are the likely evolutionary intermediates due to harboring the specific characteristics of both 3'-5' exonuclease and MAEL domains.

  10. A Fluorescence-based Exonuclease Assay to Characterize DmWRNexo, Orthologue of Human Progeroid WRN Exonuclease, and Its Application to Other Nucleases

    PubMed Central

    Mason, Penelope A.; Boubriak, Ivan; Cox, Lynne S.

    2013-01-01

    WRN exonuclease is involved in resolving DNA damage that occurs either during DNA replication or following exposure to endogenous or exogenous genotoxins. It is likely to play a role in preventing accumulation of recombinogenic intermediates that would otherwise accumulate at transiently stalled replication forks, consistent with a hyper-recombinant phenotype of cells lacking WRN. In humans, the exonuclease domain comprises an N-terminal portion of a much larger protein that also possesses helicase activity, together with additional sites important for DNA and protein interaction. By contrast, in Drosophila, the exonuclease activity of WRN (DmWRNexo) is encoded by a distinct genetic locus from the presumptive helicase, allowing biochemical (and genetic) dissection of the role of the exonuclease activity in genome stability mechanisms. Here, we demonstrate a fluorescent method to determine WRN exonuclease activity using purified recombinant DmWRNexo and end-labeled fluorescent oligonucleotides. This system allows greater reproducibility than radioactive assays as the substrate oligonucleotides remain stable for months, and provides a safer and relatively rapid method for detailed analysis of nuclease activity, permitting determination of nuclease polarity, processivity, and substrate preferences. PMID:24378758

  11. Motivators for Physical Activity among Ambulatory Nursing Home Older Residents

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yuh-Min; Li, Yueh-Ping

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore self-identified motivators for regular physical activity among ambulatory nursing home older residents. A qualitative exploratory design was adopted. Purposive sampling was performed to recruit 18 older residents from two nursing homes in Taiwan. The interview transcripts were analyzed by qualitative content analysis. Five motivators of physical activity emerged from the result of analysis: eagerness for returning home, fear of becoming totally dependent, improving mood state, filling empty time, and previously cultivated habit. Research on physical activity from the perspectives of nursing home older residents has been limited. An empirically grounded understanding from this study could provide clues for promoting and supporting lifelong engagement in physical activity among older residents. The motivators reported in this study should be considered when designing physical activity programs. These motivators can be used to encourage, guide, and provide feedback to support older residents in maintaining physical activity. PMID:25054175

  12. MMP-10 Regulates Collagenolytic Activity of Alternatively Activated Resident Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Rohani, Maryam G.; McMahan, Ryan S.; Razumova, Maria V.; Hertz, Angie L.; Cieslewicz, Maryelise; Pun, Suzie H.; Regnier, Michael; Wang, Ying; Birkland, Timothy P.; Parks, William C.

    2015-01-01

    MMP-10 is expressed by macrophages and epithelium in response to injury, but its functions in wound repair are unknown. We observed increased collagen deposition and skin stiffness in Mmp10−/− wounds with no difference in collagen expression or re-epithelialization. Increased collagen deposition in Mmp10−/− wounds was accompanied by less collagenolytic activity and reduced expression of specific metallocollagenases, particularly MMP-8 and MMP-13, where MMP-13 was the key collagenase. Ablation and adoptive transfer approaches and cell-based models demonstrated that the MMP-10-dependent collagenolytic activity was a product of alternatively activated (M2) resident macrophages. These data demonstrate a critical role for macrophage MMP-10 in controlling the tissue remodeling activity of macrophages and moderating scar formation during wound repair. PMID:25927164

  13. ExoMeg1: a new exonuclease from metagenomic library

    PubMed Central

    Silva-Portela, Rita C. B.; Carvalho, Fabíola M.; Pereira, Carolina P. M.; de Souza-Pinto, Nadja C.; Modesti, Mauro; Fuchs, Robert P.; Agnez-Lima, Lucymara F.

    2016-01-01

    DNA repair mechanisms are responsible for maintaining the integrity of DNA and are essential to life. However, our knowledge of DNA repair mechanisms is based on model organisms such as Escherichia coli, and little is known about free living and uncultured microorganisms. In this study, a functional screening was applied in a metagenomic library with the goal of discovering new genes involved in the maintenance of genomic integrity. One clone was identified and the sequence analysis showed an open reading frame homolog to a hypothetical protein annotated as a member of the Exo_Endo_Phos superfamily. This novel enzyme shows 3′-5′ exonuclease activity on single and double strand DNA substrates and it is divalent metal-dependent, EDTA-sensitive and salt resistant. The clone carrying the hypothetical ORF was able to complement strains deficient in recombination or base excision repair, suggesting that the new enzyme may be acting on the repair of single strand breaks with 3′ blockers, which are substrates for these repair pathways. Because this is the first report of an enzyme obtained from a metagenomic approach showing exonuclease activity, it was named ExoMeg1. The metagenomic approach has proved to be a useful tool for identifying new genes of uncultured microorganisms. PMID:26815639

  14. Pseudomonas aeruginosa phage PaP1 DNA polymerase is an A-family DNA polymerase demonstrating ssDNA and dsDNA 3'-5' exonuclease activity.

    PubMed

    Liu, Binyan; Gu, Shiling; Liang, Nengsong; Xiong, Mei; Xue, Qizhen; Lu, Shuguang; Hu, Fuquan; Zhang, Huidong

    2016-08-01

    Most phages contain DNA polymerases, which are essential for DNA replication and propagation in infected host bacteria. However, our knowledge on phage-encoded DNA polymerases remains limited. This study investigated the function of a novel DNA polymerase of PaP1, which is the lytic phage of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. PaP1 encodes its sole DNA polymerase called Gp90 that was predicted as an A-family DNA polymerase with polymerase and 3'-5' exonuclease activities. The sequence of Gp90 is homologous but not identical to that of other A-family DNA polymerases, such as T7 DNA polymerases (Pol) and DNA Pol I. The purified Gp90 demonstrated a polymerase activity. The processivity of Gp90 in DNA replication and its efficiency in single-dNTP incorporation are similar to those of T7 Pol with processive thioredoxin (T7 Pol/trx). Gp90 can degrade ssDNA and dsDNA in 3'-5' direction at a similar rate, which is considerably lower than that of T7 Pol/trx. The optimized conditions for polymerization were a temperature of 37 °C and a buffer consisting of 40 mM Tris-HCl (pH 8.0), 30 mM MgCl2, and 200 mM NaCl. These studies on DNA polymerase encoded by PaP1 help advance our knowledge on phage-encoded DNA polymerases and elucidate PaP1 propagation in infected P. aeruginosa. PMID:27052734

  15. Exonuclease I of Saccharomyces cerevisiae functions in mitotic recombination in vivo and in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Fiorentini, P; Huang, K N; Tishkoff, D X; Kolodner, R D; Symington, L S

    1997-01-01

    We previously described a 5'-3' exonuclease required for recombination in vitro between linear DNA molecules with overlapping homologous ends. This exonuclease, referred to as exonuclease I (Exo I), has been purified more than 300-fold from vegetatively grown cells and copurifies with a 42-kDa polypeptide. The activity is nonprocessive and acts preferentially on double-stranded DNA. The biochemical properties are quite similar to those of Schizosaccharomyces pombe Exo I. Extracts prepared from cells containing a mutation of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae EXO1 gene, a homolog of S. pombe exo1, had decreased in vitro recombination activity and when fractionated were found to lack the peak of activity corresponding to the 5'-3' exonuclease. The role of EXO1 on recombination in vivo was determined by measuring the rate of recombination in an exo1 strain containing a direct duplication of mutant ade2 genes and was reduced sixfold. These results indicate that EXO1 is required for recombination in vivo and in vitro in addition to its previously identified role in mismatch repair. PMID:9111347

  16. Fostering Activities of Daily Living by Intact Nursing Home Residents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blair, Charles E.; Glaister, Judy; Brown, Alston; Phillips, Carolyn

    2007-01-01

    We assessed effectiveness of four education programs in providing nursing assistants with ability to produce a therapeutic milieu supportive of intact residents' activities of daily living, positive self-esteem and mood: (1) a combination of Orem's Systems of Nursing Care and Skinner's Applied Behavioral Analysis, (2) Applied Behavioral Analysis,…

  17. DNA secondary structure of the released strand stimulates WRN helicase action on forked duplexes without coordinate action of WRN exonuclease

    SciTech Connect

    Ahn, Byungchan; Bohr, Vilhelm A.

    2011-08-12

    Highlights: {yields} In this study, we investigated the effect of a DNA secondary structure on the two WRN activities. {yields} We found that a DNA secondary structure of the displaced strand during unwinding stimulates WRN helicase without coordinate action of WRN exonuclease. {yields} These results imply that WRN helicase and exonuclease activities can act independently. -- Abstract: Werner syndrome (WS) is an autosomal recessive premature aging disorder characterized by aging-related phenotypes and genomic instability. WS is caused by mutations in a gene encoding a nuclear protein, Werner syndrome protein (WRN), a member of the RecQ helicase family, that interestingly possesses both helicase and exonuclease activities. Previous studies have shown that the two activities act in concert on a single substrate. We investigated the effect of a DNA secondary structure on the two WRN activities and found that a DNA secondary structure of the displaced strand during unwinding stimulates WRN helicase without coordinate action of WRN exonuclease. These results imply that WRN helicase and exonuclease activities can act independently, and we propose that the uncoordinated action may be relevant to the in vivo activity of WRN.

  18. Prescribing Activities that Engage Passive Residents. An Innovative Method

    PubMed Central

    Kolanowski, Ann; Buettner, Linda

    2009-01-01

    Individuals with dementia are often passive, which places them at risk for further cognitive and functional decline. Recreational activities have been used in research to reduce passive behaviors, but systematic reviews of these studies have found modest effect sizes for many activities. In this article, we describe the further theoretical development of an innovative method for prescribing activities that have a high likelihood of engaging nursing home residents who are passive and present examples for research application and clinical practice. This method may increase the effect size of activity interventions and encourage more widespread adoption of nonpharmacological interventions in practice. PMID:18274300

  19. DNA stabilization at the Bacillus subtilis PolX core--a binding model to coordinate polymerase, AP-endonuclease and 3'-5' exonuclease activities.

    PubMed

    Baños, Benito; Villar, Laurentino; Salas, Margarita; de Vega, Miguel

    2012-10-01

    Family X DNA polymerases (PolXs) are involved in DNA repair. Their binding to gapped DNAs relies on two conserved helix-hairpin-helix motifs, one located at the 8-kDa domain and the other at the fingers subdomain. Bacterial/archaeal PolXs have a specifically conserved third helix-hairpin-helix motif (GFGxK) at the fingers subdomain whose putative role in DNA binding had not been established. Here, mutagenesis at the corresponding residues of Bacillus subtilis PolX (PolXBs), Gly130, Gly132 and Lys134 produced enzymes with altered DNA binding properties affecting the three enzymatic activities of the protein: polymerization, located at the PolX core, 3'-5' exonucleolysis and apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP)-endonucleolysis, placed at the so-called polymerase and histidinol phosphatase domain. Furthermore, we have changed Lys192 of PolXBs, a residue moderately conserved in the palm subdomain of bacterial PolXs and immediately preceding two catalytic aspartates of the polymerization reaction. The results point to a function of residue Lys192 in guaranteeing the right orientation of the DNA substrates at the polymerization and histidinol phosphatase active sites. The results presented here and the recently solved structures of other bacterial PolX ternary complexes lead us to propose a structural model to account for the appropriate coordination of the different catalytic activities of bacterial PolXs.

  20. Two-step, PCR-free telomerase detection by using exonuclease III-aided target recycling.

    PubMed

    Zuo, Xiaolei; Xia, Fan; Patterson, Adriana; Soh, H Tom; Xiao, Yi; Plaxco, Kevin W

    2011-12-16

    We report the sensitive detection of telomerase activity by using exonuclease III-aided target recycling to amplify the signal produced by a chimeric LNA-DNA molecular beacon. We demonstrate the specific detection of as few as 30 telomerase-positive breast cancer cells in a single-measurement fluorescence assay that avoids the problematic PCR and gel analysis of the current "gold-standard" assay.

  1. Purification and characterization of DNase VII, a 3'. -->. 5'-directed exonuclease from human placenta

    SciTech Connect

    Hollis, G.F.; Grossman, L.

    1981-01-01

    An exonuclease, DNase VII, has been purified 6000-fold from human placenta. The enzyme has an apparent molecular weight of 43,000, requires Mg/sup 2 +/ for activity, and has a pH optimum of 7.8. The enzyme hydrolyzes single-stranded and nicked duplex DNA at the same rate proceeding in a 3' ..-->.. 5' direction liberating 5'-mononucleotides. It does not measurably hydrolyze polyribonucleotides.

  2. A possible mechanism for the dynamics of transition between polymerase and exonuclease sites in a high-fidelity DNA polymerase.

    PubMed

    Xie, Ping

    2009-08-01

    The fidelity of DNA synthesis by DNA polymerase is significantly increased by a mechanism of proofreading that is performed at the exonuclease active site separate from the polymerase active site. Thus, the transition of DNA between the two active sites is an important activity of DNA polymerase. Here, based on our proposed model, the rates of DNA transition between the two active sites are theoretically studied. With the relevant parameters, which are determined from the available crystal structure and other experimental data, the calculated transfer rate of correctly base-paired DNA from the polymerase to exonuclease sites and the transfer rate after incorporation of a mismatched base are in good agreement with the available experimental data. The transfer rates in the presence of two and three mismatched bases are also consistent with the previous experimental data. In addition, the calculated transfer rate from the exonuclease to polymerase sites has a large value even with the high binding affinity of 3'-5' ssDNA for the exonuclease site, which is also consistent with the available experimental value. Moreover, we also give some predictive results for the transfer rate of DNA containing only A:T base pairs and that of DNA containing only G:C base pairs.

  3. Understanding the challenges to facilitating active learning in the resident conferences: a qualitative study of internal medicine faculty and resident perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Sawatsky, Adam P.; Zickmund, Susan L.; Berlacher, Kathryn; Lesky, Dan; Granieri, Rosanne

    2015-01-01

    Background In the Next Accreditation System, the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education outlines milestones for medical knowledge and requires regular didactic sessions in residency training. There are many challenges to facilitating active learning in resident conferences, and we need to better understand resident learning preferences and faculty perspectives on facilitating active learning. The goal of this study was to identify challenges to facilitating active learning in resident conferences, both through identifying specific implementation barriers and identifying differences in perspective between faculty and residents on effective teaching and learning strategies. Methods The investigators invited core residency faculty to participate in focus groups. The investigators used a semistructured guide to facilitate discussion about learning preferences and teaching perspectives in the conference setting and used an ‘editing approach’ within a grounded theory framework to qualitative analysis to code the transcripts and analyze the results. Data were compared to previously collected data from seven resident focus groups. Results Three focus groups with 20 core faculty were conducted. We identified three domains pertaining to facilitating active learning in resident conferences: barriers to facilitating active learning formats, similarities and differences in faculty and resident learning preferences, and divergence between faculty and resident opinions about effective teaching strategies. Faculty identified several setting, faculty, and resident barriers to facilitating active learning in resident conferences. When compared to residents, faculty expressed similar learning preferences; the main differences were in motivations for conference attendance and type of content. Resident preferences and faculty perspectives differed on the amount of information appropriate for lecture and the role of active participation in resident conferences

  4. New function of exonuclease and highly sensitive label-free colorimetric DNA detection.

    PubMed

    Li, Hongbo; Wang, Suqin; Wu, Zaisheng; Xu, Jianguo; Shen, Guoli; Yu, Ruqin

    2016-03-15

    Enzymatic manipulation and modulation of nucleic acids are a central part of cellular function, protection, and reproduction, while rapid and accurate detection of ultralow amount of nucleic acids remains a major challenge in molecular biology research and clinic diagnosis of genetic diseases. Herein, we reported that exonuclease III can degrade the G-quadruplex structure, indicating the new exonuclease's function. Basing on the function of exonuclease III, a novel G-quadruplex-hemin DNAzyme-based colorimetric detection of tumor suppressor gene p53 was successfully developed. Although only one oligonucleotide probe was involved, the sensing strategy could suppress the optical background and achieve an efficient G-quadruplex-hemin DNAzyme-based signal amplification. Specifically, a label-free functional nucleic acid probe (called THzyme probe) was designed via introducing target DNA probe-contained hairpin structure into G-quadruplex DNAzyme. Even if this probe can fold into G-quadruplex structure in the presence of hemin very different from the double-stranded DNA, it is easily degraded by exonuclease III. Thus, no change in UV-vis absorption intensity is detected in the absence of target DNA. However, the hybridization of target DNA can protect the integrity and catalytic activity of THzyme probe, producing the DNAzyme-amplified colorimetric signal. As a result, the p53 gene was able to be detected down to 1.0 pM (final concentration in the signal-generating solution: 50.0 fM) and mismatched target DNAs were easily distinguished. It is expected that this simple sensing methodology for DNA detection can find its utility in point-of-care applications. PMID:26519729

  5. The exonuclease Nibbler regulates age-associated traits and modulates piRNA length in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Feltzin, Virzhiniya L; Khaladkar, Mugdha; Abe, Masashi; Parisi, Michael; Hendriks, Gert-Jan; Kim, Junhyong; Bonini, Nancy M

    2015-01-01

    Nibbler (Nbr) is a 3′-to-5′ exonuclease that trims the 3′end of microRNAs (miRNAs) to generate different length patterns of miRNAs in Drosophila. Despite its effect on miRNAs, we lack knowledge of its biological significance and whether Nbr affects other classes of small RNAs such as piRNAs and endo-siRNAs. Here, we characterized the in vivo function of nbr by defining the Nbr protein expression pattern and loss-of-function effects. Nbr protein is enriched in the ovary and head. Analysis of nbr null animals reveals adult-stage defects that progress with age, including held-up wings, decreased locomotion, and brain vacuoles, indicative of accelerated age-associated processes upon nbr loss. Importantly, these effects depend on catalytic residues in the Nbr exonuclease domain, indicating that the catalytic activity is responsible for these effects. Given the impact of nbr on miRNAs, we also analyzed the effect of nbr on piRNA and endo-siRNA lengths by deep-sequence analysis of libraries from ovaries. As with miRNAs, nbr mutation led to longer length piRNAs – an effect that was dependent on the catalytic residues of the exonuclease domain. These analyses indicate a role of nbr on age-associated processes and to modulate length of multiple classes of small RNAs including miRNAs and piRNAs in Drosophila. PMID:25754031

  6. The exonuclease Nibbler regulates age-associated traits and modulates piRNA length in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Feltzin, Virzhiniya L; Khaladkar, Mugdha; Abe, Masashi; Parisi, Michael; Hendriks, Gert-Jan; Kim, Junhyong; Bonini, Nancy M

    2015-06-01

    Nibbler (Nbr) is a 3'-to-5' exonuclease that trims the 3'end of microRNAs (miRNAs) to generate different length patterns of miRNAs in Drosophila. Despite its effect on miRNAs, we lack knowledge of its biological significance and whether Nbr affects other classes of small RNAs such as piRNAs and endo-siRNAs. Here, we characterized the in vivo function of nbr by defining the Nbr protein expression pattern and loss-of-function effects. Nbr protein is enriched in the ovary and head. Analysis of nbr null animals reveals adult-stage defects that progress with age, including held-up wings, decreased locomotion, and brain vacuoles, indicative of accelerated age-associated processes upon nbr loss. Importantly, these effects depend on catalytic residues in the Nbr exonuclease domain, indicating that the catalytic activity is responsible for these effects. Given the impact of nbr on miRNAs, we also analyzed the effect of nbr on piRNA and endo-siRNA lengths by deep-sequence analysis of libraries from ovaries. As with miRNAs, nbr mutation led to longer length piRNAs - an effect that was dependent on the catalytic residues of the exonuclease domain. These analyses indicate a role of nbr on age-associated processes and to modulate length of multiple classes of small RNAs including miRNAs and piRNAs in Drosophila. PMID:25754031

  7. Partial purification and properties of an exonuclease inhibitor induced by bacteriophage Mu-1.

    PubMed Central

    Williams, J G; Radding, C M

    1981-01-01

    From an induced lysogen of bacteriophage Mu-1, we partially purified a substance of high molecular weight that blocks the action of several exonucleases on double-stranded DNA. The presence of the inhibitor in cell-free extracts is dependent on induction of a Mu prophage. The Mu-related inhibitor acts by binding to double-stranded DNA rather than by interacting with the DNase. The inhibitor protects linear duplex DNA of Mu, P22, and phi X174am3 from exonucleolytic degradation by recBC DNase and lambda exonuclease. Single-stranded DNA, however, is not protected by the inhibitor from degradation by either recBC DNase or exonuclease I. The inhibitor preparation contains a protein that binds to linear duplex DNA, but not to circular duplex DNA; ends are required for binding to occur. Single-stranded DNA is not a substrate for the binding protein. These and other results suggest that the binding protein and the inhibitor are the same activity. Images PMID:6268842

  8. Meeting Resident Scholarly Activity Requirements Through a Longitudinal Quality Improvement Curriculum

    PubMed Central

    Simasek, Madeline; Ballard, Stephanie L.; Phelps, Phillip; Pingul-Ravano, Rowena; Kolb, N. Randall; Finkelstein, Alan; Weaver-Agostoni, Jacqueline; Takedai, Teiichi

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background Quality improvement (QI) skills are learned during residency, yet there are few reports of the scholarly activity outcomes of a QI curriculum in a primary care program. Intervention We examined whether scholarly activity can result from a longitudinal, experiential QI curriculum that involves residents, clinic staff, and faculty. Methods The University of Pittsburgh Medical Center Shadyside Family Medicine Residency implemented a required longitudinal outpatient practice improvement rotation (LOPIR) curriculum in 2005. The rotation format includes weekly multidisciplinary work group meetings alternating with resident presentations delivered to the entire program. Residents present the results of a literature review and provide 2 interim project updates to the residency. A completed individual project is required for residency graduation, with project results presented at Residency Research Day. Scholarly activity outcomes of the curriculum were analyzed using descriptive statistics. Results As of 2014, 60 residents completed 3 years of the LOPIR curriculum. All residents satisfied the 2014 Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) scholarly activity and QI requirements with a literature review presentation in postgraduate year 2, and the presentation of a completed QI project at Residency Research Day. Residents have delivered 83 local presentations, 13 state/regional presentations, and 2 national presentations. Residents received 7 awards for QI posters, as well as 3 grants totaling $21,639. The educational program required no additional curriculum time, few resources, and was acceptable to residents, faculty, and staff. Conclusions LOPIR is an effective way to meet and exceed the 2014 ACGME scholarly activity requirements for family medicine residents. PMID:26217429

  9. Balancing act: approaches to healthy eating and physical activity among Boston public housing residents.

    PubMed

    Scammell, Madeleine Kangsen; Torres, Shioban; Wayman, Julie; Greenwood, Nechama; Thomas, Gerry; Kozlowski, Lauren; Bowen, Deborah

    2015-01-01

    Boston public housing residents are more likely to report fair or poor health status, been diagnosed with obesity, and to be physically inactive compared with other Boston residents (Digenis-Bury, Brooks, Chen, Ostrem, & Horsburgh, 2008 ). Little is known about perceptions of and opportunities for healthy eating and physical activity in this population. We conducted eight focus groups at public housing developments to explore residents' views regarding opportunities and barriers to healthy eating and physical activity. Sixty-seven English- and Spanish-speaking residents participated. Transcripts were analyzed using qualitative content analysis. All residents described the challenge of balancing considerations of food quality, access, and affordability. Other findings included underutilized nutritional resources; abundant availability of unhealthy food; and economic and structural barriers to exercise. Transportation-related challenges were a dominant theme. Building opportunities for physical activity and providing access to affordable and quality food choices may be important interventions for promoting health among public housing residents.

  10. 5 CFR 733.104 - Prohibited political activities-employees who reside in designated localities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Prohibited political activities-employees... PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT (CONTINUED) CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS (CONTINUED) POLITICAL ACTIVITY-FEDERAL EMPLOYEES RESIDING IN DESIGNATED LOCALITIES § 733.104 Prohibited political activities—employees who reside...

  11. 5 CFR 733.104 - Prohibited political activities-employees who reside in designated localities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Prohibited political activities-employees... PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT (CONTINUED) CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS (CONTINUED) POLITICAL ACTIVITY-FEDERAL EMPLOYEES RESIDING IN DESIGNATED LOCALITIES § 733.104 Prohibited political activities—employees who reside...

  12. 5 CFR 733.104 - Prohibited political activities-employees who reside in designated localities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Prohibited political activities-employees... PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT (CONTINUED) CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS (CONTINUED) POLITICAL ACTIVITY-FEDERAL EMPLOYEES RESIDING IN DESIGNATED LOCALITIES § 733.104 Prohibited political activities—employees who reside...

  13. 5 CFR 733.104 - Prohibited political activities-employees who reside in designated localities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Prohibited political activities-employees... PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT (CONTINUED) CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS (CONTINUED) POLITICAL ACTIVITY-FEDERAL EMPLOYEES RESIDING IN DESIGNATED LOCALITIES § 733.104 Prohibited political activities—employees who reside...

  14. 5 CFR 733.104 - Prohibited political activities-employees who reside in designated localities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Prohibited political activities-employees... PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT (CONTINUED) CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS (CONTINUED) POLITICAL ACTIVITY-FEDERAL EMPLOYEES RESIDING IN DESIGNATED LOCALITIES § 733.104 Prohibited political activities—employees who reside...

  15. The Impact of Library Resources and Services on the Scholarly Activity of Medical Faculty and Residents.

    PubMed

    Quesenberry, Alexandria C; Oelschlegel, Sandy; Earl, Martha; Leonard, Kelsey; Vaughn, Cynthia J

    2016-01-01

    Librarians at an academic medical center library gathered data to determine if library services and resources impacted scholarly activity. A survey was developed and sent out to faculty and residents asking how they used the library during scholarly activity. Sixty-five faculty members and residents responded to the survey. The majority of respondents involved with scholarly activity use the library's services and resources. PubMed is the most frequently used database. The positive results show the library impacts the scholarly activity of medical faculty and residents.

  16. The Impact of Library Resources and Services on the Scholarly Activity of Medical Faculty and Residents.

    PubMed

    Quesenberry, Alexandria C; Oelschlegel, Sandy; Earl, Martha; Leonard, Kelsey; Vaughn, Cynthia J

    2016-01-01

    Librarians at an academic medical center library gathered data to determine if library services and resources impacted scholarly activity. A survey was developed and sent out to faculty and residents asking how they used the library during scholarly activity. Sixty-five faculty members and residents responded to the survey. The majority of respondents involved with scholarly activity use the library's services and resources. PubMed is the most frequently used database. The positive results show the library impacts the scholarly activity of medical faculty and residents. PMID:27391176

  17. Competency-based medical education and scholarship: Creating an active academic culture during residency.

    PubMed

    Bourgeois, James A; Hategan, Ana; Azzam, Amin

    2015-10-01

    The competency-based medical education movement has been adopted in several medical education systems across the world. This has the potential to result in a more active involvement of residents in the educational process, inasmuch as scholarship is regarded as a major area of competency. Substantial scholarly activities are well within the reach of motivated residents, especially when faculty members provide sufficient mentoring. These academically empowered residents have the advantage of early experience in the areas of scholarly discovery, integration, application, and teaching. Herein, the authors review the importance of instituting the germinal stages of scholarly productivity in the creation of an active scholarly culture during residency. Clear and consistent institutional and departmental strategies to promote scholarly development during residency are highly encouraged.

  18. WRN Exonuclease Structure, Molecular Mechanism, and DNA EndProcessing Role

    SciTech Connect

    Perry, J. Jefferson P.; Yannone, Steven M.; Holden, Lauren G.; Hitomi, Chiharu; Asaithamby, Aroumougame; Han, Seungil; Cooper, PriscillaK.; Chen, David J.; Tainer, John A.

    2006-02-15

    WRN is unique among the five human RecQ DNA helicases by having a functional exonuclease domain (WRN-exo) and being defective in the premature aging and cancer-related disorder Werner syndrome. Here, we characterize WRN-exo crystal structures, biochemical activity and participation in DNA end-joining. Metal ion complex structures, active site mutations and activity assays reveal a two-metal-ion mediated nuclease mechanism. The DNA end-binding Ku70/80 complex specifically stimulates WRN-exo activity, and structure-based mutational inactivation of WRN-exo alters DNA end-joining in human cells. We furthermore establish structural and biochemical similarities of WRN-exo to DnaQ family replicative proofreading exonucleases, with WRN-specific adaptations consistent with dsDNA specificity and functionally important conformational changes. These results indicate WRN-exo is a human DnaQ family member and support analogous proof-reading activities that are stimulated by Ku70/80 with implications for WRN functions in age related pathologies and maintenance of genomic integrity.

  19. Evaluating the Workload of On-Call Psychiatry Residents: Which Activities Are Associated with Sleep Loss?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooke, Brian K.; Cooke, Erinn O.; Sharfstein, Steven S.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to review the workload inventory of on-call psychiatry residents and to evaluate which activities were associated with reductions in on-call sleep. Method: A prospective cohort study was conducted, following 20 psychiatry residents at a 231-bed psychiatry hospital, from July 1, 2008 through June 30, 2009.…

  20. [Participation of one children hospital residents in scientific and training activities of Sociedad Argentina de Pediatría].

    PubMed

    Davenport, María Carolina; Domínguez, Paula Alejandra; Martins, Andrea Elizabeth

    2012-04-01

    The Sociedad Argentina de Pediatría, SAP (Argentine Society of Pediatrics) offers courses and scientific activities for pediatricians and residents. We evaluated the participation of Pedro de Elizalde Hospital residents in the scientific and training activities of SAP and assessed the trend of participation throughout the residency; 107 residents were surveyed; 48% were members, and the participation increased significantly throughout the residence (p <0.01). None of the surveyed residents were part of any association; 84% did not know the "Pediatricians in Training Group"; 49% participated in continued training programs, with a growing tendency to participation through-out the residency (p <0.01); 80% considered that the SAP is a friendly entity. We concluded that participation of residents in the SAP is scarce during the first two years of training, and that it shows a growth in the senior residents' group. Encouraging the interest of first and second year residents in the activities is necessary.

  1. Characterization of human herpesvirus 6A/B U94 as ATPase, helicase, exonuclease and DNA-binding proteins

    PubMed Central

    Trempe, Frédéric; Gravel, Annie; Dubuc, Isabelle; Wallaschek, Nina; Collin, Vanessa; Gilbert-Girard, Shella; Morissette, Guillaume; Kaufer, Benedikt B.; Flamand, Louis

    2015-01-01

    Human herpesvirus-6A (HHV-6A) and HHV-6B integrate their genomes into the telomeres of human chromosomes, however, the mechanisms leading to integration remain unknown. HHV-6A/B encode a protein that has been proposed to be involved in integration termed U94, an ortholog of adeno-associated virus type 2 (AAV-2) Rep68 integrase. In this report, we addressed whether purified recombinant maltose-binding protein (MBP)-U94 fusion proteins of HHV-6A/B possess biological functions compatible with viral integration. We could demonstrate that MBP-U94 efficiently binds both dsDNA and ssDNA containing telomeric repeats using gel shift assay and surface plasmon resonance. MBP-U94 is also able to hydrolyze adenosine triphosphate (ATP) to ADP, providing the energy for further catalytic activities. In addition, U94 displays a 3′ to 5′ exonuclease activity on dsDNA with a preference for 3′-recessed ends. Once the DNA strand reaches 8–10 nt in length, the enzyme dissociates it from the complementary strand. Lastly, MBP-U94 compromises the integrity of a synthetic telomeric D-loop through exonuclease attack at the 3′ end of the invading strand. The preferential DNA binding of MBP-U94 to telomeric sequences, its ability to hydrolyze ATP and its exonuclease/helicase activities suggest that U94 possesses all functions required for HHV-6A/B chromosomal integration. PMID:25999342

  2. Mapping the Escherichia coli transcription elongation complex with exonuclease III

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhaokun; Artsimovitch, Irina

    2014-01-01

    Summary RNA polymerase interactions with the nucleic acids control every step of the transcription cycle. These contacts mediate RNA polymerase recruitment to promoters; induce pausing during RNA chain synthesis, and control transcription termination. These interactions are dissected using footprinting assays, in which a bound protein protects nucleic acids from the digestion by nucleases or modification by chemical probes. Exonuclease III is frequently employed to study protein-DNA interactions owing to relatively simple procedures and low background. Exonuclease III has been used to determine RNA polymerase position in transcription initiation and elongation complexes and to infer the translocation register of the enzyme. In this chapter, we describe probing the location and the conformation of transcription elongation complexes formed by walking of the RNA polymerase along an immobilized template. PMID:25665555

  3. The Apollo 5' exonuclease functions together with TRF2 to protect telomeres from DNA repair.

    PubMed

    Lenain, Christelle; Bauwens, Serge; Amiard, Simon; Brunori, Michele; Giraud-Panis, Marie-Josèphe; Gilson, Eric

    2006-07-11

    A major issue in telomere research is to understand how the integrity of chromosome ends is preserved . The human telomeric protein TRF2 coordinates several pathways that prevent checkpoint activation and chromosome fusions. In this work, we identified hSNM1B, here named Apollo, as a novel TRF2-interacting factor. Interestingly, the N-terminal domain of Apollo is closely related to that of Artemis, a factor involved in V(D)J recombination and DNA repair. Both proteins belong to the beta-CASP metallo-beta-lactamase family of DNA caretaker proteins. Apollo appears preferentially localized at telomeres in a TRF2-dependent manner. Reduced levels of Apollo exacerbate the sensitivity of cells to TRF2 inhibition, resulting in severe growth defects and an increased number of telomere-induced DNA-damage foci and telomere fusions. Purified Apollo protein exhibits a 5'-to-3' DNA exonuclease activity. We conclude that Apollo is a novel component of the human telomeric complex and works together with TRF2 to protect chromosome termini from being recognized and processed as DNA damage. These findings unveil a previously undescribed telomere-protection mechanism involving a DNA 5'-to-3' exonuclease.

  4. Sequence specificity of exonuclease III from E. coli.

    PubMed Central

    Linxweiler, W; Hörz, W

    1982-01-01

    The influence of the nucleotide sequence on the digestion of deoxyribonuclease from E. coli, has been investigated. It was found that the rate at which mononucleotides are released varies in a sequence dependent fashion. C-residues are cleaved off rapidly and G-residues slowly while A and T are released at an intermediate rate. Quantitative analyses of digestion experiments with synthetic DNA fragments made it possible to determine rate constants for the cleavage of several dinucleotide bonds by exonuclease III. These values were found to differ by up to a factor of 3. Summation of the differences can lead to appreciable variation in the overall rate of digestion of a DNA strand. The nucleotide specificity of exonuclease III leads to a transient appearance of a series of discrete DNA fragments intermediate in digestion and a stable set of fragments in limit digests, i.e. at the point when all DNA has become single-stranded. This property of exonuclease III needs to be taken into account for the application of the enzyme in the analysis of nucleoprotein complexes. Images PMID:6752885

  5. A label-free fluorescence assay for thrombin based on aptamer exonuclease protection and exonuclease III-assisted recycling amplification-responsive cascade zinc(II)-protoporphyrin IX/G-quadruplex supramolecular fluorescent labels.

    PubMed

    Lv, Yanqin; Xue, Qingwang; Gu, Xiaohong; Zhang, Shuqiu; Liu, Jifeng

    2014-05-21

    A simple, label-free and sensitive fluorescence protein assay has been developed on the basis of aptamer exonuclease protection and exonuclease III (Exo III)-assisted recycling amplification-responsive cascade ZnPPIX/G-quadruplex supramolecular fluorescent labels. In the sensing system, a special aptamer probe containing the aptamer sequence at the 3'-terminus and the DNAzyme sequence at the 5'-terminus was applied, which has the capacity to recognize a protein target with high affinity and specificity. Exonuclease I (Exo I) can efficiently catalyze the degradation of free single stranded DNA probes in the 3' to 5' direction. In the presence of the target protein, the strong binding between the target protein and its aptamer can protect aptamer probes from degradation. Subsequently, the protected aptamer probes act as catalysators to trigger hybridization with the hairpin DNA probe that contains a partially "caged" G-quadruplex sequence. Upon interaction with the protected aptamer probes, the hairpin opens to yield the active G-quadruplex structure. In the presence of exonuclease III (Exo III), Exo III-assisted recycling amplification occurs generating numerous G-quadruplex supramolecular structures. The zinc(ii)-protoporphyrin IX (ZnPPIX) fluorophore binds to the G-quadruplexes and this results in the enhanced fluorescence of the fluorophore. The resulting fluorescence of the ZnPPIX/G-quadruplex provides the readout signal for the sensing event. Thrombin is used as the model analyte in the current proof-of-concept. The developed method was demonstrated to have very high sensitivity for the detection of proteins with a limit of detection of 0.2 pM without using washes or separations. In addition, this new method for protein detection is simple and inherits all the advantages of aptamers. The mechanism, moreover, may be generalized and used for other forms of protein analysis.

  6. The Werner's Syndrome RecQ helicase/exonuclease at the nexus of cancer and aging.

    PubMed

    Chun, Stephen G; Shaeffer, David S; Bryant-Greenwood, Peter K

    2011-03-01

    Werner's Syndrome (WS) or adult-onset progeria is an autosomal recessive disorder of accelerated aging caused by mutations of the DNA RecQ helicase/exonuclease (WRN). WRN is an ATP-dependent helicase with 3' to 5' DNA exonuclease activity that regulates the replicative potential of dividing cells, and WRN loss-of-function mutations promote cellular senescence and neoplastic transformation. These molecular findings translate clinically into adult-onset progeria manifested by premature hair graying, dermal atrophy, cardiovascular disease, and cancer predilection along with a markedly reduced life expectancy. Recently, a patient with WS who developed pancreatic adenocarcinoma was identified in Honolulu suggesting a significant prevalence of loss-of-function WRN mutations in Hawaii's Japanese-American population. Based upon the indigenous Japanese WRN loss-of-function mutation heterozygote rate of 6 per 1,000, we speculate the possibility of approximately 1,200 heterozygotes in Hawaii. Our ongoing studies aim to evaluate Hawaii's true allelic prevalence of WRN loss-of-function mutations in the Japanese-American population, and the role of WRN silencing in sporadic cancers. In summary, WRN plays a nexus-like role in the complex interplay of cellular events that regulate aging, and analysis of WRN polymorphisms in Hawaii's population will generate novel insights to advance care for age-related pathologies.

  7. An exonuclease-assisted amplification electrochemical aptasensor for Hg(2+) detection based on hybridization chain reaction.

    PubMed

    Bao, Ting; Wen, Wei; Zhang, Xiuhua; Xia, Qinghua; Wang, Shengfu

    2015-08-15

    In this work, a novel electrochemical aptasensor was developed for Hg(2+) detection based on exonuclease-assisted target recycling and hybridization chain reaction (HCR) dual signal amplification strategy. The presence of Hg(2+) induced the T-rich DNA partly folded into duplex-like structure via the Hg(2+) mediated T-Hg(2+)-T base pairs, which triggered the activity of exonuclease III (Exo III). Exo III selectively digested the double-strand DNA containing multiple T-Hg(2+)-T base pairs from its 3'-end, the released Hg(2+) participated analyte recycle. With each digestion cycle, a digestion product named as help DNA was obtained, which acted as a linkage between the capture DNA and auxiliary DNA. The presence of help DNA and two auxiliary DNA collectively facilitated successful HCR process and formed long double-stranded DNA. [Ru(NH3)6](3+) was used as redox indicator, which electrostatically bound to the double strands and produced an electrochemical signal. Exo III-assisted target recycling and HCR dual amplification significantly improved the sensitivity for Hg(2+) with a detection limit of 0.12 pM (S/N=3). Furthermore, the proposed aptasensor had a promising potential for the application of Hg(2+) detection in real aquatic sample analysis. PMID:25840017

  8. Sensitive and selective amplified fluorescence DNA detection based on exonuclease III-aided target recycling.

    PubMed

    Zuo, Xiaolei; Xia, Fan; Xiao, Yi; Plaxco, Kevin W

    2010-02-17

    A limitation of many traditional approaches to the detection of specific oligonucleotide sequences, such as molecular beacons, is that each target strand hybridizes with (and thus activates) only a single copy of the relevant probe sequence. This 1:1 hybridization ratio limits the gain of most approaches and thus their sensitivity. Here we demonstrate a nuclease-amplified DNA detection scheme in which exonuclease III is used to "recycle" target molecules, thus leading to greatly improved sensitivity relative to, for example, traditional molecular beacons without any significant restriction in the choice of target sequences. The exonuclease-amplified assay can detect target DNA at concentrations as low as 10 pM when performed at 37 degrees C, which represents a significant improvement over the equivalent molecular beacon alone. Moreover, at 4 degrees C we can obtain a detection limit as low as 20 aM, albeit at the cost of a 24 h incubation period. Finally, our assay can be easily interrogated with the naked eye and is thus amenable to deployment in the developing world, where fluorometric detection is more problematic.

  9. Residents' perceptions and experiences of social interaction and participation in leisure activities in residential aged care.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Jessica E; O'Connell, Beverly; Gaskin, Cadeyrn J

    2013-10-01

    Social interaction and participation in leisure activities are positively related to the health and well-being of elderly people. The main focus of this exploratory study was to investigate elderly peoples' perceptions and experiences of social interaction and leisure activities living in a residential aged care (RAC) facility. Six residents were interviewed. Themes emerging from discussions about their social interactions included: importance of family, fostering friendships with fellow residents, placement at dining room tables, multiple communication methods, and minimal social isolation and boredom. Excursions away from the RAC facility were favourite activities. Participants commonly were involved in leisure activities to be socially connected. Poor health, family, the RAC facility, staffing, transportation, and geography influenced their social interaction and participation in leisure activities. The use of new technologies and creative problem solving with staff are ways in which residents could enhance their social lives and remain engaged in leisure activities. PMID:24299253

  10. Ultrasensitive solution-phase electrochemical molecular beacon-based DNA detection with signal amplification by exonuclease III-assisted target recycling.

    PubMed

    Xuan, Feng; Luo, Xiaoteng; Hsing, I-Ming

    2012-06-19

    Taking advantage of the preferential exodeoxyribonuclease activity of exonuclease III in combination with the difference in diffusivity between an oligonucleotide and a mononucleotide toward a negatively charged ITO electrode, a highly sensitive and selective electrochemical molecular beacon (eMB)-based DNA sensor has been developed. This sensor realizes electrochemical detection of DNA in a homogeneous solution, with sensing signals amplified by an exonuclease III-based target recycling strategy. A hairpin-shaped oligonucleotide containing the target DNA recognition sequence, with a methylene blue tag close to the 3' terminus, is designed as the signaling probe. Hybridization with the target DNA transforms the probe's exonuclease III-inactive protruding 3' terminus into an exonuclease III-active blunt end, triggering the digestion of the probe into mononucleotides including a methylene blue-labeled electro-active mononucleotide (eNT). The released eNT, due to its less negative charge and small size, diffuses easily to the negative ITO electrode, resulting in an increased electrochemical signal. Meanwhile, the intact target DNA returns freely to the solution and hybridizes with other probes, releasing multiple eNTs and thereby further amplifies the electrochemical signal. This new immobilization-free, signal-amplified electrochemical DNA detection strategy shows great potential to be integrated in portable and cost-effective DNA sensing devices.

  11. Immobilization of Lambda Exonuclease onto Polymer Micropillar Arrays for the Solid-Phase Digestion of dsDNAs

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The process of immobilizing enzymes onto solid supports for bioreactions has some compelling advantages compared to their solution-based counterpart including the facile separation of enzyme from products, elimination of enzyme autodigestion, and increased enzyme stability and activity. We report the immobilization of λ-exonuclease onto poly(methylmethacrylate) (PMMA) micropillars populated within a microfluidic device for the on-chip digestion of double-stranded DNA. Enzyme immobilization was successfully accomplished using 3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl) carbodiimide/N-hydroxysuccinimide (EDC/NHS) coupling to carboxylic acid functionalized PMMA micropillars. Our results suggest that the efficiency for the catalysis of dsDNA digestion using λ-exonuclease, including its processivity and reaction rate, were higher when the enzyme was attached to a solid support compared to the free solution digestion. We obtained a clipping rate of 1.0 × 103 nucleotides s–1 for the digestion of λ-DNA (48.5 kbp) by λ-exonuclease. The kinetic behavior of the solid-phase reactor could be described by a fractal Michaelis–Menten model with a catalytic efficiency nearly 17% better than the homogeneous solution-phase reaction. The results from this work will have important ramifications in new single-molecule DNA sequencing strategies that employ free mononucleotide identification. PMID:24628008

  12. [Applying a creative art activity in care: report on an experience with a newly admitted resident].

    PubMed

    Wen, Hsin-Sing; Wu, Hung-Lan; Lee, Hsien-Ju

    2014-10-01

    Doing creative art has been shown to increase activity, reduce anxiety, promote confidence and self-esteem, increase sense of achievement, and facilitate participation in life activities in the elderly. This article describes a nursing experience that used creative art activities to help an elderly resident adjust to the environment and living conditions at a long-term care facility. During the care period from October 20th to December 16th, 2012, we evaluated the health problems of the resident, which included anxiety, loneliness, and low self-esteem. The creative art activity was a 30-minute intervention held 1~2 times per week for a total of 13 sessions. This article reports on the positive effects of this intervention on reducing the resident's negative emotions such as anxiety and loneliness and, in the long run, promoting self-esteem and sense of achievement.

  13. THE EFFECT OF GAMBLING ACTIVITIES ON HAPPINESS LEVELS OF NURSING HOME RESIDENTS

    PubMed Central

    Dixon, Mark R; Nastally, Becky L; Waterman, Amber

    2010-01-01

    The current study evaluated the effect of participating in simulated gambling activities on happiness levels of 3 nursing home residents. A 4-component analysis was used to measure objective responses associated with happiness during baseline, varying durations of engagement in simulated gambling activities, and 2 follow-up periods. Results indicated that all residents exhibited a higher percentage of happiness levels while engaged in simulated gambling activities compared with baseline. Follow-up assessment took place 10 min and 30 min following the intervention; no lasting effects were observed. PMID:21358915

  14. Resident-Assisted Montessori Programming (Ramp): Training Persons with Dementia to Serve as Group Activity Leaders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Camp, Cameron J.; Skrajner, Michael J.

    2004-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of an activity implemented by means of Resident-Assisted Montessori Programming (RAMP). Design and Methods: Four persons with early-stage dementia were trained to serve as leaders for a small-group activity played by nine persons with more advanced dementia. Assessments of leaders'…

  15. The Effect of Gambling Activities on Happiness Levels of Nursing Home Residents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dixon, Mark R.; Nastally, Becky L.; Waterman, Amber

    2010-01-01

    The current study evaluated the effect of participating in simulated gambling activities on happiness levels of 3 nursing home residents. A 4-component analysis was used to measure objective responses associated with happiness during baseline, varying durations of engagement in simulated gambling activities, and 2 follow-up periods. Results…

  16. Effects of Namaste Care on residents who do not benefit from usual activities.

    PubMed

    Simard, Joyce; Volicer, Ladislav

    2010-02-01

    Namaste Care is a program designed to offer meaningful activities to nursing home residents with advanced dementia or those who cannot be engaged in traditional activities. This 7-day-a-week program is staffed by specially trained nursing assistants who provide activities of daily living in an unhurried manner, with a ''loving touch'' approach to care. The program takes place in a room with lowered lighting, soft music playing, and the scent of lavender. Analyses of Minimum Data Set data before the program were implemented and after residents were involved in the program for at least 30 days showed a decrease in residents' withdrawal, social interaction, delirium indicators, and trend for decreased agitation. Namaste Care helps families feel that in spite of the many losses experienced because of the disease process, something special can still help their loved one to feel comforted, cared for, and cared about in a unique loving environment.

  17. Kinetics and thermodynamics of exonuclease-deficient DNA polymerases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaspard, Pierre

    2016-04-01

    A kinetic theory is developed for exonuclease-deficient DNA polymerases, based on the experimental observation that the rates depend not only on the newly incorporated nucleotide, but also on the previous one, leading to the growth of Markovian DNA sequences from a Bernoullian template. The dependencies on nucleotide concentrations and template sequence are explicitly taken into account. In this framework, the kinetic and thermodynamic properties of DNA replication, in particular, the mean growth velocity, the error probability, and the entropy production are calculated analytically in terms of the rate constants and the concentrations. Theory is compared with numerical simulations for the DNA polymerases of T7 viruses and human mitochondria.

  18. Associations between the built environment and physical activity in public housing residents

    PubMed Central

    Heinrich, Katie M; Lee, Rebecca E; Suminski, Richard R; Regan, Gail R; Reese-Smith, Jacqueline Y; Howard, Hugh H; Haddock, C Keith; Poston, Walker S Carlos; Ahluwalia, Jasjit S

    2007-01-01

    Background Environmental factors may influence the particularly low rates of physical activity in African American and low-income adults. This cross-sectional study investigated how measured environmental factors were related to self-reported walking and vigorous physical activity for residents of low-income public housing developments. Methods Physical activity data from 452 adult residents residing in 12 low-income housing developments were combined with measured environmental data that examined the neighborhood (800 m radius buffer) around each housing development. Aggregated ecological and multilevel regression models were used for analysis. Results Participants were predominately female (72.8%), African American (79.6%) and had a high school education or more (59.0%). Overall, physical activity rates were low, with only 21% of participants meeting moderate physical activity guidelines. Ecological models showed that fewer incivilities and greater street connectivity predicted 83% of the variance in days walked per week, p < 0.001, with both gender and connectivity predicting days walked per week in the multi-level analysis, p < 0.05. Greater connectivity and fewer physical activity resources predicted 90% of the variance in meeting moderate physical activity guidelines, p < 0.001, and gender and connectivity were the multi-level predictors, p < 0.05 and 0.01, respectively. Greater resource accessibility predicted 34% of the variance in days per week of vigorous physical activity in the ecological model, p < 0.05, but the multi-level analysis found no significant predictors. Conclusion These results indicate that the physical activity of low-income residents of public housing is related to modifiable aspects of the built environment. Individuals with greater access to more physical activity resources with fewincivilities, as well as, greater street connectivity, are more likely to be physically active. PMID:17997820

  19. Structure and function of TatD exonuclease in DNA repair.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yi-Chen; Li, Chia-Lung; Hsiao, Yu-Yuan; Duh, Yulander; Yuan, Hanna S

    2014-01-01

    TatD is an evolutionarily conserved protein with thousands of homologues in all kingdoms of life. It has been suggested that TatD participates in DNA fragmentation during apoptosis in eukaryotic cells. However, the cellular functions and biochemical properties of TatD in bacterial and non-apoptotic eukaryotic cells remain elusive. Here we show that Escherichia coli TatD is a Mg(2+)-dependent 3'-5' exonuclease that prefers to digest single-stranded DNA and RNA. TatD-knockout cells are less resistant to the DNA damaging agent hydrogen peroxide, and TatD can remove damaged deaminated nucleotides from a DNA chain, suggesting that it may play a role in the H2O2-induced DNA repair. The crystal structure of the apo-form TatD and TatD bound to a single-stranded three-nucleotide DNA was determined by X-ray diffraction methods at a resolution of 2.0 and 2.9 Å, respectively. TatD has a TIM-barrel fold and the single-stranded DNA is bound at the loop region on the top of the barrel. Mutational studies further identify important conserved metal ion-binding and catalytic residues in the TatD active site for DNA hydrolysis. We thus conclude that TatD is a new class of TIM-barrel 3'-5' exonuclease that not only degrades chromosomal DNA during apoptosis but also processes single-stranded DNA during DNA repair.

  20. The exonuclease and host shutoff functions of the SOX protein of Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus are genetically separable.

    PubMed

    Glaunsinger, Britt; Chavez, Leonard; Ganem, Don

    2005-06-01

    The Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) SOX protein, encoded by ORF37, promotes shutoff of host cell gene expression during lytic viral replication by dramatically impairing mRNA accumulation. SOX is the KSHV homolog of the alkaline exonuclease of other herpesviruses, which has been shown to function as a DNase involved in processing and packaging the viral genome. Although the exonuclease activity of these proteins is widely conserved across all herpesviruses, the host shutoff activity observed for KSHV SOX is not. We show here that SOX expression sharply reduces the half-life of target mRNAs. Extensive mutational analysis reveals that the DNase and host shutoff activities of SOX are genetically separable. Lesions affecting the DNase activity cluster in conserved regions of the protein, but residues critical for mRNA degradation are not conserved across the viral family. Additionally, we present evidence suggesting that the two different functions of SOX occur within distinct cellular compartments-DNase activity in the nucleus and host shutoff activity in the cytoplasm.

  1. Molecular motors that digest their track to rectify Brownian motion: processive movement of exonuclease enzymes.

    PubMed

    Xie, Ping

    2009-09-16

    A general model is presented for the processive movement of molecular motors such as λ-exonuclease, RecJ and exonuclease I that use digestion of a DNA track to rectify Brownian motion along this track. Using this model, the translocation dynamics of these molecular motors is studied. The sequence-dependent pausing of λ-exonuclease, which results from a site-specific high affinity DNA interaction, is also studied. The theoretical results are consistent with available experimental data. Moreover, the model is used to predict the lifetime distribution and force dependence of these paused states.

  2. Can administrative data identify active diagnoses for long-term care resident assessment?

    PubMed

    Berlowitz, Dan R; Hickey, Elaine C; Saliba, Debra

    2010-01-01

    Many veterans receive rehabilitation services in Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) nursing homes. Efficient methods for the identification of active diagnoses could facilitate care planning and outcomes assessment. We set out to determine whether diagnostic data from VA databases can be used to identify active diagnoses for Minimum Data Set (MDS) assessments. We evaluated diagnoses being considered for inclusion in MDS version 3.0 and present in at least 15% of a sample of VA nursing home residents. A research nurse following a standardized protocol identified active diagnoses from the medical records of 120 residents. A clinical nurse also identified active diagnoses in 58 of these patients. Inpatient and outpatient diagnoses from the VA National Patient Care Database were identified for the past year. We calculated kappa, sensitivity, and specificity values, considering the nurses' assessments the gold standard. We found that kappa values comparing research nurses and databases were generally poor, with only 8 of the 19 diagnoses having a value >0.60. Levels of agreement between the clinical nurse and administrative data were generally similar. We conclude that VA administrative data cannot be used to accurately identify active diagnoses for nursing home residents. How best to efficiently collect these important data remains uncertain.

  3. Structural basis for substrate recognition and processive cleavage mechanisms of the trimeric exonuclease PhoExo I

    PubMed Central

    Miyazono, Ken-ichi; Ishino, Sonoko; Tsutsumi, Kanae; Ito, Tomoko; Ishino, Yoshizumi; Tanokura, Masaru

    2015-01-01

    Nucleases play important roles in nucleic acid processes, such as replication, repair and recombination. Recently, we identified a novel single-strand specific 3′-5′ exonuclease, PfuExo I, from the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus, which may be involved in the Thermococcales-specific DNA repair system. PfuExo I forms a trimer and cleaves single-stranded DNA at every two nucleotides. Here, we report the structural basis for the cleavage mechanism of this novel exonuclease family. A structural analysis of PhoExo I, the homologous enzyme from P. horikoshii OT3, showed that PhoExo I utilizes an RNase H-like active site and possesses a 3′-OH recognition site ∼9 Å away from the active site, which enables cleavage at every two nucleotides. Analyses of the heterotrimeric and monomeric PhoExo I activities showed that trimerization is indispensable for its processive cleavage mechanism, but only one active site of the trimer is required. PMID:26138487

  4. Physical Activity Behavior, Barriers to Activity, and Opinions About a Smartphone-Based Physical Activity Intervention Among Rural Residents

    PubMed Central

    Logan, Henrietta; Manini, Todd; Dallery, Jesse

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background: Rural Americans engage in less physical activity (PA) and experience higher rates of consequent health problems (i.e., obesity, cardiovascular disease) than urban Americans. Although geographic barriers have historically made this population hard to reach, rural individuals are increasingly gaining access to smartphones. Thus, the purpose of this study was to evaluate PA behavior and barriers to PA among rural residents and to gauge their receptiveness to a smartphone-based PA intervention that is currently in the development stage. Materials and Methods: Rural Floridian adults (n=113), 18 years of age and older, completed surveys to assess PA behavior, PA barriers, and opinions about an intervention to increase PA. Specifically, they were asked to imagine a program that would require them to do PA with their mobile phones and whether they viewed intended aspects of the program as helpful. The present work is therefore formative research that sought to determine the feasibility and acceptability of a smartphone-based intervention among rural residents. Results of the survey will inform the development of a tailored, smartphone-based PA intervention. Results: The 37.2% of participants with low PA levels (<600 metabolic equivalent [MET]-min per week) were more likely to report personal and environmental barriers to PA than the 47.8% of participants with moderate PA levels (≥600 MET-min per week). More barriers were reported among participants who self-reported as white and among participants of older age, lower education level, and lower socioeconomic status. Additionally, 75.9% of participants reported features of the intervention as at least somewhat helpful. Conclusions: The growing ubiquity of smartphones among rural residents, combined with participants' positive response to the program description, supports the acceptability of a smartphone-based PA intervention for rural communities. Given the participants' receptiveness, future research

  5. Impact of enzyme concentration and residence time on apparent activity recovery in jump dilution analysis.

    PubMed

    Copeland, Robert A; Basavapathruni, Aravind; Moyer, Mikel; Scott, Margaret Porter

    2011-09-15

    Jump dilution analysis is commonly used to evaluate the reversibility of inhibition and to quantify the residence time of the inhibitor-enzyme complex. During hit and lead characterization, one sometimes observes apparently linear progress curves after jump dilution that display activity recoveries that are intermediate between those expected for fully reversible and irreversible inhibition. Computer simulations of progress curves after jump dilution indicate that seemingly linear progress curves can result when dealing with tight-binding inhibitors if substoichiometric concentrations of inhibitor are preincubated with enzyme. In this situation, the activity recovered is comparable to that expected for instantaneously reversible inhibitors. In addition, simulations demonstrate that intermediate values of activity recovery may be observed for compounds with modestly slow dissociation rates (i.e., residence times >0min but ≤20min) when the attending curvature of the data is not accounted for. The observation of intermediate values of recovery can, thus, serve as an indication of either modest residence time or a contaminating inactivator within an inhibitor sample, in either case prompting greater scrutiny of the test compound.

  6. The Application of Entrustable Professional Activities to Inform Competency Decisions in a Family Medicine Residency Program.

    PubMed

    Schultz, Karen; Griffiths, Jane; Lacasse, Miriam

    2015-07-01

    Assessing entrustable professional activities (EPAs), or carefully chosen units of work that define a profession and are entrusted to a resident to complete unsupervised once she or he has obtained adequate competence, is a novel and innovative approach to competency-based assessment (CBA). What is currently not well described in the literature is the application of EPAs within a CBA system. In this article, the authors describe the development of 35 EPAs for a Canadian family medicine residency program, including the work by an expert panel of family physician and medical education experts from four universities in three Canadian provinces to identify the relevant EPAs for family medicine in nine curriculum domains. The authors outline how they used these EPAs and the corresponding templates that describe competence at different levels of supervision to create electronic EPA field notes, which has allowed educators to use the EPAs as a formative tool to structure day-to-day assessment and feedback and a summative tool to ground competency declarations about residents. They then describe the system to compile, collate, and use the EPA field notes to make competency declarations and how this system aligns with van der Vleuten's utility index for assessment (valid, reliable, of educational value, acceptable, cost-effective). Early outcomes indicate that preceptors are using the EPA field notes more often than they used the generic field notes. EPAs enable educators to evaluate multiple objectives and important but unwieldy competencies by providing practical, manageable, measurable activities that can be used to assess competency development.

  7. Passive and active exercises are similarly effective in elderly nursing home residents

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, Takeshi; Takeshima, Nobuo; Rogers, Nicole L.; Rogers, Michael E.; Islam, Mohammod Monirul

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to compare the efficacy of passive motion exercise and active motion exercise on functional fitness in elderly nursing home residents. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty-three (female 22 and male 1) nursing home residents (84.8±4.3 yr) volunteered for this study. They were divided into a passive motion exercise group (n=12) and an active motion exercise group (n=11) and performed 30-min sessions of training twice a week for 12 weeks. Functional fitness (Arm Curl, Chair Stand, Up & Go, Sit & Reach, Back Scratch, functional Reach, and 12-min Walk tests) was evaluated before and after the intervention. [Results] No significant baseline difference was noted between the groups in measured variables. Following the 12 week intervention, no significant interaction (group × time) was noted in functional fitness variables between the groups, except for the functional reach scores (active motion exercise 40%, passive motion exercise 9%). Significant improvement over time was noted in passive motion exercise group in Arm Curl (19%), Chair Stand (15%), Up & Go (6%), and 12-min Walk (12%) scores; and in the active motion exercise group in Arm Curl (14%), Chair Stand (19%), Up & Go (11%), functional Reach (40%) and 12-min Walk (13%) scores. The adherence rates in the passive and active motion exercise groups were 95.8% and 93.1% respectively. [Conclusion] Passive motion exercise and active motion exercise were found to be similarly effective for improving the functional fitness of elderly nursing home residents. PMID:26504320

  8. The Actively Caring for People Movement at Virginia Tech and Beyond: Cultivating Compassion and Relationships in Residence Halls

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCarty, Shane M.; Mullins, Taris G.; Geller, E. Scott; Shushok, Frank, Jr.

    2013-01-01

    A professor and a group of student leaders initiated the Actively Caring for People (AC4P) Movement to establish a more civil, compassionate, and inclusive culture by inspiring intentional acts of kindness. This article explores the AC4P Movement in a first-year residence hall at Virginia Tech and a second-year residence hall at University of…

  9. Seasonal Short-Lived Radium Activity in the Venice Lagoon: The Role of Residence Time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rapaglia, J.; Ferrarin, C.; Zaggia, L.; Umgiesser, G.; Zuppi, G.; Manfe', G.

    2008-12-01

    Radium is considered to be an excellent tracer of submarine groundwater discharge (SGD) and, therefore, has been used in many studies of this process in the past decade. Comprehensive surveys of excess 223,224Ra activity were completed in the surface waters of the Venice Lagoon over 6 seasons in order to quantify seasonal variation of SGD into the lagoon. The mass balance of radium found that SGD was 5-26 times greater than total river discharge (35.5 m3 s-1), and that total SGD could differ by almost an order of magnitude pending season. Several possible parameters, which may cause the seasonal variation, were tested. These included precipitation events, average tidal elevation, average tidal excursion, wind speed and direction, yet none provided a satisfactory explanation for the difference. Residence time based on a hydrodynamic model, however, was very strongly correlated with the observed variation. When the average residence time in the lagoon was low (5 days) the SGD was calculated to be 930 m3 s-1 and when the average residence time was high (9 days) the SGD was quantified as 160 m3 s-1. Radioactive decay is already accounted for in the mass balance model and therefore this correlation must be explained by another process. The Venice Lagoon is characterized by low residence time during periods of spring tides and bora or northerly winds, both of which create exceptionally strong currents in the Venice Lagoon. The currents as well as the large tidal excursion which occurs at spring tides drive a recirculation of seawater through the surface sediments, which greatly increases short-lived Ra activity in the surface waters. This evidence suggests, therefore, that short-lived Ra mass balance studies, which are based on a single survey, may under or overestimate the mean annual SGD pending the hydrodynamics of the investigated location.

  10. Is physical activity associated with appetite? A survey of long-term care residents.

    PubMed

    Dermott, Megann; McDaniel, Jennifer L; Weiss, Edward P; Tomazic, Terry J; Mattfeldt-Beman, Mildred

    2009-01-01

    The intent of this research was to explore the influence of physical activity on the appetite of older adults in long-term care. Given the impact of the anorexia of aging and the increasing numbers of older adults, this could have significant health implications. Residents (N = 93) of a long-term care, assisted living, and rehabilitation facility were surveyed using the "Appetite & Activity Questionnaire." There was no relationship found between physical activity and appetite regardless of the participants' sex or age. BMI appeared to correlate well with the amount of activity that was performed. The most salient finding was the near absence of physical activity, even in the presence of facilities, support personnel, and available time. PMID:19234996

  11. Estimating municipal solid waste generation by different activities and various resident groups: a case study of Beijing.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhen-shan; Fu, Hui-zhen; Qu, Xiao-yan

    2011-09-15

    Reliable and accurate determinations of the quantities and composition of wastes is required for the planning of municipal solid waste (MSW) management systems. A model, based on the interrelationships of expenditure on consumer goods, time distribution, daily activities, residents groups, and waste generation, was developed and employed to estimate MSW generation by different activities and resident groups in Beijing. The principle is that MSW is produced by consumption of consumer goods by residents in their daily activities: 'Maintenance' (meeting the basic needs of food, housing and personal care), 'Subsistence' (providing the financial requirements) and 'Leisure' (social and recreational pursuits) activities. Three series of important parameters - waste generation per unit of consumer expenditure, consumer expenditure distribution to activities in unit time, and time assignment to activities by different resident groups - were determined using a statistical analysis, a sampling survey and the Analytic Hierarchy Process, respectively. Data for analysis were obtained from the Beijing Statistical Yearbook (2004-2008) and questionnaire survey. The results reveal that 'Maintenance' activity produced the most MSW, distantly followed by 'Leisure' and 'Subsistence' activities. In 2008, in descending order of MSW generation the different resident groups were floating population, non-civil servants, retired people, civil servants, college students (including both undergraduates and graduates), primary and secondary students, and preschoolers. The new estimation model, which was successful in fitting waste generation by different activities and resident groups over the investigated years, was amenable to MSW prediction.

  12. Purification and characterization of an endo-exonuclease from adult flies of Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed Central

    Shuai, K; Das Gupta, C K; Hawley, R S; Chase, J W; Stone, K L; Williams, K R

    1992-01-01

    An endo-exonuclease (designated nuclease III) has been purified to near homogeneity from adult flies of Drosophila melanogaster. The enzyme degrades single- and double-stranded DNA and RNA. It has a sedimentation co-efficient of 3.1S and a strokes radius of 27A The native form of the purified enzyme appears to be a monomer of 33,600 dalton. It has a pH optimum of 7-8.5 and requires Mg2+ or Mn2+ but not Ca2+ or Co2+ for its activity. The enzyme activity on double-stranded DNA was inhibited 50% by 30 mM NaCl, while its activity on single-stranded DNA required 100 mM NaCl for 50% inhibition. Under the latter conditions, its activity on double-stranded DNA was inhibited approximately 98%. The enzyme degrades DNA to complete acid soluble products which are a mixture of mono- and oligonucleotides with 5'-P and 3'-OH termini. Supercoiled DNA was converted by the enzyme to nicked and subsequently to linear forms in a stepwise fashion under the condition in which the enzyme works optimally on single-stranded DNA. The amino acid composition and amino acid sequencing of tryptic peptides from purified nuclease III is also reported. Images PMID:1313969

  13. Symptoms and cholinesterase activity among rural residents living near cotton fields in Nicaragua.

    PubMed Central

    Keifer, M; Rivas, F; Moon, J D; Checkoway, H

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To explore whether symptoms resulted from pesticide spray drift on residentially exposed populations in rural Nicaragua. METHODS: 100 residents, each 10 years of age or older, were randomly selected from a Nicaraguan community surrounded by actively sprayed cotton fields (the exposed community) and from a socioeconomically similar community far from agricultural spraying (the control community). Subjects working with pesticides were excluded, and the study was conducted at the end of the 1990 cotton spraying season (August-December). Demographic information, exposure questions, and prevalence of 11 acute symptoms and 17 chronic symptoms were gathered from a structured interview. Finger stick erythrocyte cholinesterase (AChE) was measured with a portable colorimeter. Acute symptoms were grouped according to their previously known associations with cholinesterase (ChE) inhibitors into four ordinal categories (asymptomatic, non-specific, possible, probable). RESULTS: Residents from the exposed community were significantly more likely to report recently sighting a spray plane near their community, exposure to pesticide from drift, crossing recently sprayed fields, eating home grown food, and feeling ill after drift exposure. The mean AChE value was significantly lower for residents of the exposed community (4.9 v 5.3 IU/dl). The proportion of subjects complaining of one or more chronic or acute symptoms was significantly higher for the exposed community (87%) than for the controls (53%). Odds ratios for residents in the exposed community, by symptom categories, were non-specific 1.6 (95% confidence interval (95% CI) 0-8 to 3.2), possible 4.1 (95% CI 1.7 to 10.2), and probable 9.93 (95% CI 2-9 to 34.4). CONCLUSION: These findings indicate a strong association between exposure to aerial pesticides and symptoms. This study should be replicated with more quantitative exposure measures, for if confirmed, the results have relevance for millions in rural

  14. Variability in Obtaining Institutional Review Board Approval for Quality Improvement Activities in Residency Programs

    PubMed Central

    Conforti, Lisa N.; Hess, Brian J.; Ross, Kathryn M.; Lynn, Lorna A.; Holmboe, Eric S.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Quality improvement (QI) activities are an important part of residency training. National studies are needed to inform best practices in QI training and experience for residents. The impact of the Institutional Review Board (IRB) process on such studies is not well described. Methods This observational study looked at time, length, comfort level, and overall quality of experience for 42 residency training programs in obtaining approval or exemption for a nationally based educational QI study. Results For the 42 programs in the study, the time period to IRB approval/exemption was highly variable, ranging from less than 1 week to 56.5 weeks; mean and median time was approximately 18 weeks (SD, 10.8). Greater reported comfort with the IRB process was associated with less time to obtain approval (r  =  −.50; P < .01; 95% CI, −0.70 to −0.23). A more positive overall quality of experience with the IRB process was also associated with less time to obtain IRB approval (r  =  −.60; P < .01; 95% CI, −0.74 to −0.36). Discussion The IRB process for residency programs initiating QI studies shows considerable variance that is not explained by attributes of the projects. New strategies are needed to assist and expedite IRB processes for QI research in educational settings and reduce interinstitutional variability and increase comfort level among educators with the IRB process. PMID:23451318

  15. A role for the Perlman syndrome exonuclease Dis3l2 in the Lin28-let-7 pathway

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Hao-Ming; Triboulet, Robinson; Thornton, James E.; Gregory, Richard I.

    2013-01-01

    The pluripotency factor Lin28 blocks the expression of let-7 microRNAs (miRNAs) in undifferentiated cells during development and functions as an oncogene in a subset of cancers1. Lin28 binds to let-7 precursor RNAs and recruits 3′ terminal uridylyl transferases (TUTases) to selectively inhibit let-7 biogenesis2–4. Uridylated pre-let-7 is refractory to processing by Dicer and is rapidly degraded by an unknown ribonuclease5. Here we identify Dis3l2 as the 3′-5′ exonuclease responsible for the decay of uridylated pre-let-7. Biochemical reconstitution assays reveal that 3′ oligouridylation stimulates Dis3l2 activity in vitro, and knockdown of Dis3l2 in mouse embryonic stem cells leads to the stabilization of pre-let-7. Our study establishes 3′ oligouridylation as an RNA decay signal for Dis3l2 and identifies the first physiological RNA substrate of this novel exonuclease that is mutated in the Perlman syndrome of fetal overgrowth and predisposition to Wilms’ tumor6. PMID:23594738

  16. cryo-EM structures of the E. coli replicative DNA polymerase reveal its dynamic interactions with the DNA sliding clamp, exonuclease and τ

    PubMed Central

    Fernandez-Leiro, Rafael; Conrad, Julian; Scheres, Sjors HW; Lamers, Meindert H

    2015-01-01

    The replicative DNA polymerase PolIIIα from Escherichia coli is a uniquely fast and processive enzyme. For its activity it relies on the DNA sliding clamp β, the proofreading exonuclease ε and the C-terminal domain of the clamp loader subunit τ. Due to the dynamic nature of the four-protein complex it has long been refractory to structural characterization. Here we present the 8 Å resolution cryo-electron microscopy structures of DNA-bound and DNA-free states of the PolIII-clamp-exonuclease-τc complex. The structures show how the polymerase is tethered to the DNA through multiple contacts with the clamp and exonuclease. A novel contact between the polymerase and clamp is made in the DNA bound state, facilitated by a large movement of the polymerase tail domain and τc. These structures provide crucial insights into the organization of the catalytic core of the replisome and form an important step towards determining the structure of the complete holoenzyme. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.11134.001 PMID:26499492

  17. The Telomere Binding Protein Cdc13 and the Single-Stranded DNA Binding Protein RPA Protect Telomeric DNA from Resection by Exonucleases.

    PubMed

    Greetham, Matthew; Skordalakes, Emmanuel; Lydall, David; Connolly, Bernard A

    2015-09-25

    The telomere is present at the ends of all eukaryotic chromosomes and usually consists of repetitive TG-rich DNA that terminates in a single-stranded 3' TG extension and a 5' CA-rich recessed strand. A biochemical assay that allows the in vitro observation of exonuclease-catalyzed degradation (resection) of telomeres has been developed. The approach uses an oligodeoxynucleotide that folds to a stem-loop with a TG-rich double-stranded region and a 3' single-stranded extension, typical of telomeres. Cdc13, the major component of the telomere-specific CST complex, strongly protects the recessed strand from the 5'→3' exonuclease activity of the model exonuclease from bacteriophage λ. The isolated DNA binding domain of Cdc13 is less effective at shielding telomeres. Protection is specific, not being observed in control DNA lacking the specific TG-rich telomere sequence. RPA, the eukaryotic single-stranded DNA binding protein, also inhibits telomere resection. However, this protein is non-specific, equally hindering the degradation of non-telomere controls.

  18. The Drosophila prage Gene, Required for Maternal Transcript Destabilization in Embryos, Encodes a Predicted RNA Exonuclease

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Jun; Lai, Yun Wei; Sartain, Caroline V.; Zuckerman, Rebecca M.; Wolfner, Mariana F.

    2016-01-01

    Egg activation, the transition of mature oocytes into developing embryos, is critical for the initiation of embryogenesis. This process is characterized by resumption of meiosis, changes in the egg’s coverings and by alterations in the transcriptome and proteome of the egg; all of these occur in the absence of new transcription. Activation of the egg is prompted by ionic changes in the cytoplasm (usually a rise in cytosolic calcium levels) that are triggered by fertilization in some animals and by mechanosensitive cues in others. The egg’s transcriptome is dramatically altered during the process, including by the removal of many maternal mRNAs that are not needed for embryogenesis. However, the mechanisms and regulators of this selective RNA degradation are not yet fully known. Forward genetic approaches in Drosophila have identified maternal-effect genes whose mutations prevent the transcriptome changes. One of these genes, prage (prg), was identified by Tadros et al. in a screen for mutants that fail to destabilize maternal transcripts. We identified the molecular nature of the prg gene through a combination of deficiency mapping, complementation analysis, and DNA sequencing of both extant prg mutant alleles. We find that prg encodes a ubiquitously expressed predicted exonuclease, consistent with its role in maternal mRNA destabilization during egg activation. PMID:27172196

  19. The Exonuclease Domain of Lassa Virus Nucleoprotein Is Involved in Antigen-Presenting-Cell-Mediated NK Cell Responses

    PubMed Central

    Russier, Marion; Reynard, Stéphanie; Carnec, Xavier

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Lassa virus is an Old World Arenavirus which causes Lassa hemorrhagic fever in humans, mostly in West Africa. Lassa fever is an important public health problem, and a safe and effective vaccine is urgently needed. The infection causes immunosuppression, probably due to the absence of activation of antigen-presenting cells (dendritic cells and macrophages), low type I interferon (IFN) production, and deficient NK cell function. However, a recombinant Lassa virus carrying D389A and G392A substitutions in the nucleoprotein that abolish the exonuclease activity and IFN activation loses its inhibitory activity and induces strong type I IFN production by dendritic cells and macrophages. We show here that during infection by this mutant Lassa virus, antigen-presenting cells trigger efficient human NK cell responses in vitro, including production of IFN-γ and cytotoxicity. NK cell activation involves close contact with both antigen-presenting cells and soluble factors. We report that infected dendritic cells and macrophages express the NKG2D ligands major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I-related chains A and B and that they may produce interleukin-12 (IL-12), IL-15, and IL-18, all involved in NK cell functions. NK cell degranulation is significantly increased in cocultures, suggesting that NK cells seem to kill infected dendritic cells and macrophages. This work confirms the inhibitory function of Lassa virus nucleoprotein. Importantly, we demonstrate for the first time that Lassa virus nucleoprotein is involved in the inhibition of antigen-presenting cell-mediated NK cell responses. IMPORTANCE The pathogenesis and immune responses induced by Lassa virus are poorly known. Recently, an exonuclease domain contained in the viral nucleoprotein has been shown to be able to inhibit the type I IFN response by avoiding the recognition of viral RNA by cell sensors. Here, we studied the responses of NK cells to dendritic cells and macrophages infected with a

  20. Activity size distribution and residence time of 7Be aerosols in the Arctic atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ioannidou, Alexandra; Paatero, Jussi

    2014-05-01

    The activity size distributions of the natural radionuclide tracer 7Be in different size range fractions (<0.39 μm, 0.39-0.69 μm, 0.69-1.3 μm, 1.3-2.1 μm, 2.1-4.2 μm, 4.2-10.2 μm and >10.2 μm) were determined in the boreal atmosphere in the Arctic Research Centre of the Finnish Meteorological Institute (FMI) at Sodankylä, Finland (67°22‧ N, 26°38‧ E, 180 m asl). The activity median aerodynamic diameter (AMAD) ranged from 0.54 μm to 1.05 μm (average 0.83 μm). A residence time of about 8 days applies to aerosols of 0.83 μm diameter, representing the residence of aerosol particles in arctic environment. The observed positive correlation between AMAD values and RH% can be explained by the fact that condensation during high relative humidity conditions becomes more intense, resulting in increased particle sizes of atmospheric aerosols. However, greater aerosol particle sizes means higher wet scavenging rate of aerosols and as a result lower activity concentration of 7Be in the atmosphere, explaining the anti-correlation between the AMAD values and activity concentrations of 7Be. But this associated with possibly higher scavenging rates of aerosols does not necessarily alone explain the anti-correlation between the AMAD and the 7Be activities. The air mass origin associated with synoptic scale weather phenomena may contribute to that too. The Flextra model was used to assess the transport pattern and to explain the deviation in radionuclide activity concentrations and AMAD values observed in the site of investigation.

  1. Delineation of structural domains and identification of functionally important residues in DNA repair enzyme exonuclease VII

    PubMed Central

    Poleszak, Katarzyna; Kaminska, Katarzyna H.; Dunin-Horkawicz, Stanislaw; Lupas, Andrei; Skowronek, Krzysztof J.; Bujnicki, Janusz M.

    2012-01-01

    Exonuclease VII (ExoVII) is a bacterial nuclease involved in DNA repair and recombination that hydrolyses single-stranded DNA. ExoVII is composed of two subunits: large XseA and small XseB. Thus far, little was known about the molecular structure of ExoVII, the interactions between XseA and XseB, the architecture of the nuclease active site or its mechanism of action. We used bioinformatics methods to predict the structure of XseA, which revealed four domains: an N-terminal OB-fold domain, a middle putatively catalytic domain, a coiled-coil domain and a short C-terminal segment. By series of deletion and site-directed mutagenesis experiments on XseA from Escherichia coli, we determined that the OB-fold domain is responsible for DNA binding, the coiled-coil domain is involved in binding multiple copies of the XseB subunit and residues D155, R205, H238 and D241 of the middle domain are important for the catalytic activity but not for DNA binding. Altogether, we propose a model of sequence–structure–function relationships in ExoVII. PMID:22718974

  2. In vivo role of Escherichia coli single-strand exonucleases in SOS induction by gamma radiation.

    PubMed

    Serment-Guerrero, Jorge; Breña-Valle, Matilde; Espinosa-Aguirre, J Javier

    2008-07-01

    Ionizing radiation causes different types of genetic damage, ranging from base modifications to single- and double-stranded DNA breaks, which may be deleterious or even lethal to the cell. There are different repair or tolerance mechanisms to counteract the damage. Among them is the Escherichia coli SOS system: a set of genes that becomes activated upon DNA damage to confer better opportunities for cell survival. However, since this response is triggered by single-stranded DNA regions, most lesions have to be processed or modified prior to SOS activation. Several genes such as recO, recB and recJ that seem to be required to induce the response have already been reported. The results of this work indicate that the four known E.coli single-strand exonucleases take part in processing gamma radiation damage, though RecJ and ExoI proved to be more important than ExoVII or ExoX. In addition, ExoV as well as glycosylases such as Nth and, to a lesser extent, Fpg are also required. A model intended to explain the role of all these genes in damage processing is presented. PMID:18407965

  3. Lipopolysaccharide preconditioning facilitates M2 activation of resident microglia after spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Hayakawa, Kentaro; Okazaki, Rentaro; Morioka, Kazuhito; Nakamura, Kozo; Tanaka, Sakae; Ogata, Toru

    2014-12-01

    The inflammatory response following spinal cord injury (SCI) has both harmful and beneficial effects; however, it can be modulated for therapeutic benefit. Endotoxin/lipopolysaccharide (LPS) preconditioning, a well-established method for modifying the immune reaction, has been shown to attenuate damage induced by stroke and brain trauma in rodent models. Although such effects likely are conveyed by tissue-repairing functions of the inflammatory response, the mechanisms that control the effects have not yet been elucidated. The present study preconditioned C57BL6/J mice with 0.05 mg/kg of LPS 48 hr before inducing contusion SCI to investigate the effect of LPS preconditioning on the activation of macrophages/microglia. We found that LPS preconditioning promotes the polarization of M1/M2 macrophages/microglia toward an M2 phenotype in the injured spinal cord on quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and immunohistochemical analyses. Flow cytometric analyses reveal that LPS preconditioning facilitates M2 activation in resident microglia but not in infiltrating macrophages. Augmented M2 activation was accompanied by vascularization around the injured lesion, resulting in improvement in both tissue reorganization and functional recovery. Furthermore, we found that M2 activation induced by LPS preconditioning is regulated by interleukin-10 gene expression, which was preceded by the transcriptional activation of interferon regulatory factor (IRF)-3, as demonstrated by Western blotting and an IRF-3 binding assay. Altogether, our findings demonstrate that LPS preconditioning has a therapeutic effect on SCI through the modulation of M1/M2 polarization of resident microglia. The present study suggests that controlling M1/M2 polarization through endotoxin signal transduction could become a promising therapeutic strategy for various central nervous system diseases. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. The effect of space microgravity on the physiological activity of mammalian resident cardiac stem cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belostotskaya, Galina; Zakharov, Eugeny

    Prolonged exposure to weightlessness during space flights is known to cause depression of heart function in mammals. The decrease in heart weight and its remodeling under the influence of prolonged weightlessness (or space microgravity) is assumed to be due to both morphological changes of working cardiomyocytes and their progressive loss, as well as to possible depletion of resident cardiac stem cells (CSCs) population, or their inability to self-renewal and regeneration of muscle tissue under conditions of weightlessness. We have previously shown that the presence of different maturity clones formed by resident CSCs not only in culture but also in the mammalian myocardium can be used as an indicator of the regenerative activity of myocardial cells [Belostotskaya, et al., 2013: 2014]. In this study, we were interested to investigate whether the 30-day near-Earth space flight on the spacecraft BION-M1 affects the regenerative potential of resident CSCs. Immediately after landing of the spacecraft, we had examined the presence of resident c-kit+, Sca-1+ and Isl1+ CSCs and their development in suspension of freshly isolated myocardial cells of C57BL mice in comparison to controls. Cardiac cell suspension was obtained by enzymatic digestion of the heart [Belostotskaya and Golovanova, 2014]. Immunocytochemically stained preparations of fixed cells were analyzed with confocal microscope Leica TCS SP5 (Germany) in the Resource Center of St-Petersburg State University. CSCs were labeled with appropriate antibodies. CSCs differentiation into mature cardiomyocytes was verified using antibodies to Sarcomeric α-Actinin and Cardiac Troponin T. Antibodies to Connexin43 were used to detect cell-cell contacts. All antibodies were conjugated with Alexa fluorochromes (488, 532, 546, 568, 594 and/or 647 nm), according to Zenon-technology (Invitrogen). It has been shown that, under identical conditions of cell isolation, more complete digestion of heart muscle was observed in

  5. Stromal cells control the epithelial residence of DCs and memory T cells by regulated activation of TGF-β.

    PubMed

    Mohammed, Javed; Beura, Lalit K; Bobr, Aleh; Astry, Brian; Chicoine, Brian; Kashem, Sakeen W; Welty, Nathan E; Igyártó, Botond Z; Wijeyesinghe, Sathi; Thompson, Emily A; Matte, Catherine; Bartholin, Laurent; Kaplan, Alesia; Sheppard, Dean; Bridges, Alina G; Shlomchik, Warren D; Masopust, David; Kaplan, Daniel H

    2016-04-01

    Cells of the immune system that reside in barrier epithelia provide a first line of defense against pathogens. Langerhans cells (LCs) and CD8(+) tissue-resident memory T cells (TRM cells) require active transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β) for epidermal residence. Here we found that integrins αvβ6 and αvβ8 were expressed in non-overlapping patterns by keratinocytes (KCs) and maintained the epidermal residence of LCs and TRM cells by activating latent TGF-β. Similarly, the residence of dendritic cells and TRM cells in the small intestine epithelium also required αvβ6. Treatment of the skin with ultraviolet irradiation decreased integrin expression on KCs and reduced the availability of active TGF-β, which resulted in LC migration. Our data demonstrated that regulated activation of TGF-β by stromal cells was able to directly control epithelial residence of cells of the immune system through a novel mechanism of intercellular communication. PMID:26901152

  6. Effects of using nursing home residents to serve as group activity leaders: lessons learned from the RAP project.

    PubMed

    Skrajner, Michael J; Haberman, Jessica L; Camp, Cameron J; Tusick, Melanie; Frentiu, Cristina; Gorzelle, Gregg

    2014-03-01

    Previous research has demonstrated that persons with early to moderate stage dementia are capable of leading small group activities for persons with more advanced dementia. In this study, we built upon this previous work by training residents in long-term care facilities to fill the role of group activity leaders using a Resident-Assisted Programming (RAP) training regimen. There were two stages to the program. In the first stage, RAP training was provided by researchers. In the second stage, RAP training was provided to residents by activities staff members of long-term care facilities who had been trained by researchers. We examine the effects of RAP implemented by researchers and by activities staff member on long-term care resident with dementia who took part in these RAP activities. We also examined effects produced by two types of small group activities: two Montessori-based activities and an activity which focuses on persons with more advanced dementia, based on the work of Jitka Zgola. Results demonstrate that levels of positive engagement seen in players during RAP (resident-led activities) were typically higher than those observed during standard activities programming led by site staff. In general, Montessori-Based Dementia Programming® produced more constructive engagement than Zgola-based programming (ZBP), though ZBP did increase a positive form of engagement involving observing activities with interest. In addition, RAP implemented by activities staff members produced effects that were, on the whole, similar to those produced when RAP was implemented by researchers. Implications of these findings for providing meaningful social roles for persons with dementia residing in long-term care, and suggestions for further research in this area, are discussed.

  7. Structural and Biochemical Studies of a Moderately Thermophilic Exonuclease I from Methylocaldum szegediense

    PubMed Central

    Fei, Li; Tian, SiSi; Moysey, Ruth; Misca, Mihaela; Barker, John J.; Smith, Myron A.; McEwan, Paul A.; Pilka, Ewa S.; Crawley, Lauren; Evans, Tom; Sun, Dapeng

    2015-01-01

    A novel exonuclease, designated as MszExo I, was cloned from Methylocaldum szegediense, a moderately thermophilic methanotroph. It specifically digests single-stranded DNA in the 3ʹ to 5ʹ direction. The protein is composed of 479 amino acids, and it shares 47% sequence identity with E. coli Exo I. The crystal structure of MszExo I was determined to a resolution of 2.2 Å and it aligns well with that of E. coli Exo I. Comparative studies revealed that MszExo I and E. coli Exo I have similar metal ion binding affinity and similar activity at mesophilic temperatures (25–47°C). However, the optimum working temperature of MszExo I is 10°C higher, and the melting temperature is more than 4°C higher as evaluated by both thermal inactivation assays and DSC measurements. More importantly, two thermal transitions during unfolding of MszExo I were monitored by DSC while only one transition was found in E. coli Exo I. Further analyses showed that magnesium ions not only confer structural stability, but also affect the unfolding of MszExo I. MszExo I is the first reported enzyme in the DNA repair systems of moderately thermophilic bacteria, which are predicted to have more efficient DNA repair systems than mesophilic ones. PMID:25658953

  8. Nuclear localization of human DNA mismatch repair protein exonuclease 1 (hEXO1)

    PubMed Central

    Knudsen, Nina Østergaard; Nielsen, Finn Cilius; Vinther, Lena; Bertelsen, Ronni; Holten-Andersen, Steen; Liberti, Sascha Emilie; Hofstra, Robert; Kooi, Krista; Rasmussen, Lene Juel

    2007-01-01

    Human exonuclease 1 (hEXO1) is implicated in DNA mismatch repair (MMR) and mutations in hEXO1 may be associated with hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC). Since the subcellular localization of MMR proteins is essential for proper MMR function, we characterized possible nuclear localization signals (NLSs) in hEXO1. Using fluorescent fusion proteins, we show that the sequence 418KRPR421, which exhibit strong homology to other monopartite NLS sequences, is responsible for correct nuclear localization of hEXO1. This NLS sequence is located in a region that is also required for hEXO1 interaction with hMLH1 and we show that defective nuclear localization of hEXO1 mutant proteins could be rescued by hMLH1 or hMSH2. Both hEXO1 and hMLH1 form complexes with the nuclear import factors importin β/α1,3,7 whereas hMSH2 specifically recognizes importin β/α3. Taken together, we infer that hEXO1, hMLH1 and hMSH2 form complexes and are imported to the nucleus together, and that redundant NLS import signals in the proteins may safeguard nuclear import and thereby MMR activity. PMID:17426132

  9. Lymphocytes in the peritoneum home to the omentum and are activated by resident dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Carlow, Douglas A; Gold, Michael R; Ziltener, Hermann J

    2009-07-15

    The omentum is of interest in the context of obesity-related metabolic disease where adipose tissue exhibits inflammatory changes; however, the immunology of the omentum is underexplored. The greater omentum is draped from the stomach and consists predominantly of adipose tissue studded with lymphoreticular aggregations (milky spots) that distinguish it from other visceral adipose tissues. Milky spots are thought to contain and conduct leukocytes in transit from the blood to the peritoneal cavity, particularly during peritonitis. We show here that both B and T lymphocytes counterflow from the peritoneal cavity to the omentum in mice. Residence in the omentum was brief with a t(1/2) residence time of 6 h. Omentum access was pertussis toxin-sensitive, dependent on activation of the Rap1 GTPase, and on the integrin LFA-1. B cells and CD44(high) T cells accessed the omentum most efficiently, but homing of resting CD44(low) T cells was also observed. Omental tissue from normal healthy mice was found to contain CD8(-)CD11b(high)MHC class II(high)CD11c(high) dendritic cells that promoted the rapid activation of T cells entering the omentum and cross-presented soluble OVA or OVA acquired from either OVA-expressing Escherichia coli or OVA-pulsed spleen cells. We conclude that the omentum incorporates two key features of immunological sentinel function, actively supported lymphocyte traffic and dendritic cells, that reinforce a conceptual framework for function in stimulating adaptive immunity. These results extend basic understanding of omental and peritoneal cavity immunology and of how proinflammatory events occurring within the peritoneal cavity might affect adipocyte and hepatocyte metabolism.

  10. Lymphocytes in the peritoneum home to the omentum and are activated by resident dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Carlow, Douglas A; Gold, Michael R; Ziltener, Hermann J

    2009-07-15

    The omentum is of interest in the context of obesity-related metabolic disease where adipose tissue exhibits inflammatory changes; however, the immunology of the omentum is underexplored. The greater omentum is draped from the stomach and consists predominantly of adipose tissue studded with lymphoreticular aggregations (milky spots) that distinguish it from other visceral adipose tissues. Milky spots are thought to contain and conduct leukocytes in transit from the blood to the peritoneal cavity, particularly during peritonitis. We show here that both B and T lymphocytes counterflow from the peritoneal cavity to the omentum in mice. Residence in the omentum was brief with a t(1/2) residence time of 6 h. Omentum access was pertussis toxin-sensitive, dependent on activation of the Rap1 GTPase, and on the integrin LFA-1. B cells and CD44(high) T cells accessed the omentum most efficiently, but homing of resting CD44(low) T cells was also observed. Omental tissue from normal healthy mice was found to contain CD8(-)CD11b(high)MHC class II(high)CD11c(high) dendritic cells that promoted the rapid activation of T cells entering the omentum and cross-presented soluble OVA or OVA acquired from either OVA-expressing Escherichia coli or OVA-pulsed spleen cells. We conclude that the omentum incorporates two key features of immunological sentinel function, actively supported lymphocyte traffic and dendritic cells, that reinforce a conceptual framework for function in stimulating adaptive immunity. These results extend basic understanding of omental and peritoneal cavity immunology and of how proinflammatory events occurring within the peritoneal cavity might affect adipocyte and hepatocyte metabolism. PMID:19553538

  11. Disparities in Adolescents' Residence in Neighborhoods Supportive of Physical Activity - United States, 2011-2012.

    PubMed

    Watson, Kathleen B; Harris, Carmen D; Carlson, Susan A; Dorn, Joan M; Fulton, Janet E

    2016-01-01

    In 2013, only 27% of adolescents in grades 9-12 met the current federal guideline for aerobic physical activity (at least 60 minutes of physical activity each day*), and sex and racial/ethnic disparities in meeting the guideline exist (1). The Community Preventive Services Task Force has recommended a range of community-level evidence-based approaches(†) to increase physical activity by improving neighborhood supports for physical activity.(§) To assess the characteristics of adolescents who live in neighborhoods that are supportive of physical activity, CDC analyzed data on U.S. children and adolescents aged 10-17 years (defined as adolescents for this report) from the 2011-2012 National Survey of Children's Health (NSCH). Overall, 65% of U.S. adolescents live in neighborhoods supportive of physical activity, defined as neighborhoods that are perceived as safe and have sidewalks or walking paths and parks, playgrounds, or recreation centers. Adolescents who were Hispanic and non-Hispanic black race/ethnicity; who lived in lower-income households, households with less educated parents, and rural areas; or who were overweight or obese were less likely to live in neighborhoods supportive of physical activity than were white adolescents and adolescents from higher income households, with a more highly educated parent, living in urban areas, and not overweight or obese. Within demographic groups, the largest disparity in the percentage of adolescents living in these neighborhoods was observed between adolescents living in households with a family income <100% of the Federal Poverty Level (FPL) (51%) and adolescents living in households with a family income ≥400% of the FPL (76%). Efforts to improve neighborhood supports, particularly in areas with a substantial percentage of low-income and minority residents, might increase physical activity among adolescents and reduce health disparities.

  12. Factors that Influence Physical Activity in Long-Term Care: Perspectives of Residents, Staff, and Significant Others

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benjamin, Kathleen; Edwards, Nancy; Guitard, Paulette; Murray, Mary Ann; Caswell, Wenda; Perrier, Marie Josee

    2011-01-01

    Physical activity has been linked to positive health outcomes for frail seniors. However, our understanding of factors that influence the physical activity of residents in the long-term care (LTC) setting is limited. This article describes our work with focus groups, one component of a multi-component study that examined factors influencing the…

  13. Television Viewing and Pedometer-Determined Physical Activity Among Multiethnic Residents of Low-Income Housing

    PubMed Central

    Bennett, Gary G.; Wolin, Kathleen Y.; Viswanath, K.; Askew, Sandy; Puleo, Elaine; Emmons, Karen M.

    2006-01-01

    Objectives. We evaluated the association between television viewing and pedometer-determined physical activity among predominantly racial/ethnic minority residents of low-income housing in metropolitan Boston in 2005. Methods. We used mixed models to analyze the association between reported hours of television viewing and pedometer-determined steps per day among 486 adults. We also examined whether television viewing was associated with the achievement of 10000 steps per day. Results. There was a mean 3.6 hours of average daily television watching. In multivariable analyses, each hour of television viewing on an average day was associated with 144 (95% confidence interval [CI]= −276, −12) fewer steps per day and a decreased likelihood of accumulating 10 000 steps per day (odds ratio [OR]=0.84; 95% CI=0.71, 0.99). Weekday and weekend television viewing were each also associated with fewer steps per day. Conclusions. Average daily television viewing was associated with reductions in total pedometer-determined physical activity levels (approximately 520 steps per day) in this lower-income sample. As part of a comprehensive physical activity promotion plan, recommendations to reduce television viewing should be made. PMID:16873736

  14. The Influence of Sitting Time and Physical Activity on Health Outcomes in Public Housing Residents

    PubMed Central

    Leach, Heather J.; Mama, Scherezade K.; Soltero, Erica G.; Lee, Rebecca E.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Examine differences between levels of physical activity and sitting time for residents of public housing developments located in high vs low income neighborhoods, and whether physical activity or sitting time had a greater influence on health outcomes. Design Secondary data analysis from the Healthful Options Using Streets and Transportation in Our Neighborhoods (HOUSTON) project. Setting Public housing developments located in Houston, TX. Participants African American, adult males and females. Main Outcome Measures Self-reported PA and time spent sitting on weekdays were measured using the International Physical Activity Questionnaire (IPAQ) short form. Participants completed measures of BMI (kg/m2), % body fat (%BF) and resting blood pressure to assess health outcomes. Neighborhood income was defined as the median household income at the census block group level, obtained from the 2006–2010 American Community Survey. Results All participants (N=216) had an annual household income of ≤$19,350, and neighborhood income ranged from $9,226 to $57,618. Participants reported an average of 4342.2 ± 4828.3 MET-min/wk of physical activity, and 4.5 ± 3.2 hours of sitting per weekday. Time spent sitting was associated with BMI (β=.50, t=2.4, P=.018), %BF (β=.87, t=3.6, P=.000), and diastolic blood pressure (β=.62, t=2.1, P=.041). Physical activity was not significantly associated with any health outcomes. Conclusion Our findings indicate that public housing residents’ health statuses are vulnerable to sedentary behaviors regardless of the affluence of the neighborhood surrounding the housing development. PMID:25065081

  15. The impact of adiposity on adipose tissue-resident lymphocyte activation in humans

    PubMed Central

    Travers, R L; Motta, A C; Betts, J A; Bouloumié, A; Thompson, D

    2015-01-01

    Background/objectives: The presence of T lymphocytes in human adipose tissue has only recently been demonstrated and relatively little is known of their potential relevance in the development of obesity-related diseases. We aimed to further characterise these cells and in particular to investigate how they interact with modestly increased levels of adiposity typical of common overweight and obesity. Subjects/methods: Subcutaneous adipose tissue and fasting blood samples were obtained from healthy males aged 35–55 years with waist circumferences in lean (<94 cm), overweight (94–102 cm) and obese (>102 cm) categories. Adipose tissue-resident CD4+ and CD8+ T lymphocytes together with macrophages were identified by gene expression and flow cytometry. T lymphocytes were further characterised by their expression of activation markers CD25 and CD69. Adipose tissue inflammation was investigated using gene expression analysis and tissue culture. Results: Participants reflected a range of adiposity from lean to class I obesity. Expression of CD4 (T-helper cells) and CD68 (macrophage), as well as FOXP3 RNA transcripts, was elevated in subcutaneous adipose tissue with increased levels of adiposity (P<0.001, P<0.001 and P=0.018, respectively). Flow cytometry revealed significant correlations between waist circumference and levels of CD25 and CD69 expression per cell on activated adipose tissue-resident CD4+ and CD8+ T lymphocytes (P-values ranging from 0.053 to <0.001). No such relationships were found with blood T lymphocytes. This increased T lymphocyte activation was related to increased expression and secretion of various pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines from subcutaneous whole adipose tissue explants. Conclusions: This is the first study to demonstrate that even modest levels of overweight/obesity elicit modifications in adipose tissue immune function. Our results underscore the importance of T lymphocytes during adipose tissue expansion, and the presence of

  16. Diversity in sound pressure levels and estimated active space of resident killer whale vocalizations.

    PubMed

    Miller, Patrick J O

    2006-05-01

    Signal source intensity and detection range, which integrates source intensity with propagation loss, background noise and receiver hearing abilities, are important characteristics of communication signals. Apparent source levels were calculated for 819 pulsed calls and 24 whistles produced by free-ranging resident killer whales by triangulating the angles-of-arrival of sounds on two beamforming arrays towed in series. Levels in the 1-20 kHz band ranged from 131 to 168 dB re 1 microPa at 1 m, with differences in the means of different sound classes (whistles: 140.2+/-4.1 dB; variable calls: 146.6+/-6.6 dB; stereotyped calls: 152.6+/-5.9 dB), and among stereotyped call types. Repertoire diversity carried through to estimates of active space, with "long-range" stereotyped calls all containing overlapping, independently-modulated high-frequency components (mean estimated active space of 10-16 km in sea state zero) and "short-range" sounds (5-9 km) included all stereotyped calls without a high-frequency component, whistles, and variable calls. Short-range sounds are reported to be more common during social and resting behaviors, while long-range stereotyped calls predominate in dispersed travel and foraging behaviors. These results suggest that variability in sound pressure levels may reflect diverse social and ecological functions of the acoustic repertoire of killer whales.

  17. Education in Quality Improvement for Practice in Primary Care During Residency Training and Subsequent Activities in Practice

    PubMed Central

    Carek, Peter J.; Dickerson, Lori M.; Stanek, Michele; Carter, Charles; Godenick, Mark T.; Jebaily, Gerard C.; Sprague, Stuart; Baxley, Elizabeth

    2014-01-01

    Background Quality improvement (QI) is an integral aspect of graduate medical education and an important competence for physicians. Objective We examined the QI activities of recent family medicine residency graduates and whether a standardized curriculum in QI during residency resulted in greater self-reported participation in QI activities in practice after graduation. Methods The family medicine residency programs affiliated with the South Carolina Area Health Education Consortium (N  =  7) were invited to participate in this study. Following completion of introductory educational activities, each site implemented regularly occurring (at least monthly) educational and patient care activities using QI principles and tools. Semiannually, representatives from each participating site met to review project aims and to provide updates regarding the QI activities in their program. To examine the impact of this project on QI activities, we surveyed graduates from participating programs from the year prior to and 2 years after the implementation of the curriculum. Results Graduates in the preimplementation and postimplementation cohorts reported participating in periodic patient care data review, patient care registries, QI projects, and disease-specific activities (57%–71% and 54%–63%, respectively). There were no significant differences in QI activities between the 2 groups except in activities associated with status of their practice as a patient-centered medical home. Conclusions Most but not all family medicine graduates reported they were actively involved in QI activities within their practices, independent of their exposure to a QI curriculum during training. PMID:24701310

  18. Estimation of ground water residence times in the Critical zone: insight from U activity ratios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chabaux, Francois; Ackerer, Julien; Lucas, Yann; viville, Daniel

    2016-04-01

    The use of radioactive disequilibria as tracers and chronometers of weathering processes and related mass transfers has been recognized since the 60'. The development, over the last two decades, of analytical methods for measuring very precisely U-series nuclides (especially, 234U, 230Th and 226Ra) in environmental samples has opened up new scientific applications in Earth Surface Sciences. Here, we propose to present the potential of U activity ratios in surface waters as chronometer of water transfers at a watershed scale. This will be illustrated from studies performed at different scales, with the analysis of U activity ratios in surface waters from small watersheds (Strengbach and Ringelbach watersheds in the Vosges Mountain, France) but also from watersheds of much more regional extension (e.g., the Upper Rhine basin or the Ganges basin). These various studies show that variations of U activity ratios in surface waters are mainly associated with 234U-238U fractionations occurring during the water transfer within the bedrock, which intensity depends on two main parameters: the petro-physical characteristics of the aquifer, principally the geometry of water-rock interfaces and the duration of the water-rock interactions. This readily explains why different U activity ratios (UAR) can be observed in the different aquifers of a continental hydrosystem and hence why UAR can be used to trace the source of river waters. For a hydrological system developed on a substratum marked by fairly homogeneous petro-physical characteristics, the main parameter controlling the UAR in waters draining such a system would be the duration of the water-rock interactions. Variations of UAR in stream or spring waters of such a system can therefore be modeled using simple reactive transport model, which allows the estimation of both the dissolution rate of the bedrock and the residence time of the waters within the aquifer.

  19. Association between chronotype, food intake and physical activity in medical residents.

    PubMed

    Mota, Maria Carliana; Waterhouse, Jim; De-Souza, Daurea Abadia; Rossato, Luana Thomazetto; Silva, Catarina Mendes; Araújo, Maria Bernadete Jeha; Tufik, Sérgio; de Mello, Marco Túlio; Crispim, Cibele Aparecida

    2016-01-01

    An individual's chronotype is a trait which reflects his/her diurnal preferences for the times of rest and activities, and displays a continuum from morningness to eveningness. Studies have shown that eveningness tends to be associated with a less healthy lifestyle, including increased likelihood of developing obesity. In this study, we examined the relationship between chronotype and food intake, physical sleep and activity in 72 resident physicians (52 women and 20 men). Assessments included chronotype evaluation by the Horne and Ostberg Morningness-Eveningness questionnaire (MEQ); food intake pattern through a self-administered food diary that was kept over the course of 3 non-successive days; physical activity level, using the Baecke questionnaire (BQ); sleep quality and quantity using the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI); and sleepiness, Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS). Linear regression analyses, after adjustments for age, sex, body mass index (BMI), hours of additional work per week ESS and total physical activity score, showed that the chronotype score was negatively associated with cholesterol (coefficient = -0.24; p = 0.04), sweets (coefficient = -0.27, p = 0.03) and vegetables (coefficient = -0.26; p = 0.04) intakes. Following the same statistical adjustments, the chronotype score was positivity associated with leisure-time index (coefficient = 0.26, p = 0.03) and BQ total score (coefficient = 0.27, p = 0.03). We concluded that most issues related to nutrition problems and unhealthy lifestyle were associated with scores indicative of eveningness. These findings emphasize the importance of assessing an individual's chronotype when examining feeding behavior.

  20. Exonuclease Domain of the Lassa Virus Nucleoprotein Is Critical To Avoid RIG-I Signaling and To Inhibit the Innate Immune Response

    PubMed Central

    Reynard, Stéphanie; Russier, Marion; Fizet, Alexandra; Carnec, Xavier

    2014-01-01

    Lassa virus (LASV), which causes a viral hemorrhagic fever, inhibits the innate immune response. The exonuclease (ExoN) domain of its nucleoprotein (NP) is implicated in the suppression of retinoic acid-inducible gene I (RIG-I) signaling. We show here that a LASV in which ExoN function has been abolished strongly activates innate immunity and that this effect is dependent on RIG-I signaling. These results highlight the key role of NP ExoN function in the immune evasion that occurs during LASV infection. PMID:25253344

  1. Estimating municipal solid waste generation by different activities and various resident groups in five provinces of China.

    PubMed

    Fu, Hui-zhen; Li, Zhen-shan; Wang, Rong-hua

    2015-07-01

    The quantities and composition of municipal solid waste (MSW) are important factors in the planning and management of MSW. Daily human activities were classified into three groups: maintenance activities (meeting the basic needs of food, housing and personal care, MA); subsistence activities (providing the financial support requirements, SA); and leisure activities (social and recreational pursuits, LA). A model, based on the interrelationships of expenditure on consumer goods, time distribution, daily activities, residents groups, and waste generation, was employed to estimate MSW generation by different activities and resident groups in five provinces (Zhejiang, Guangdong, Hebei, Henan and Sichuan) of China. These five provinces were chosen for this study and the distribution patterns of MSW generated by different activities and resident groups were revealed. The results show that waste generation in SA and LA fluctuated slightly from 2003 to 2008. For general waste generation in the five provinces, MA accounts for more than 70% of total MSW, SA approximately 10%, and LA between 10% and 16% by urban residents in 2008. Females produced more daily MSW than males in MA. Males produced more daily MSW than females in SA and LA. The wastes produced at weekends in MA and LA were far greater than on weekdays, but less than on weekdays for SA wastes. Furthermore, one of the model parameters (the waste generation per unit of consumer expenditure) is inversely proportional to per-capita disposable income of urban residents. A significant correlation between gross domestic product (GDP) and waste generation by SA was observed with a high coefficient of determination. PMID:25861710

  2. Estimating municipal solid waste generation by different activities and various resident groups in five provinces of China.

    PubMed

    Fu, Hui-zhen; Li, Zhen-shan; Wang, Rong-hua

    2015-07-01

    The quantities and composition of municipal solid waste (MSW) are important factors in the planning and management of MSW. Daily human activities were classified into three groups: maintenance activities (meeting the basic needs of food, housing and personal care, MA); subsistence activities (providing the financial support requirements, SA); and leisure activities (social and recreational pursuits, LA). A model, based on the interrelationships of expenditure on consumer goods, time distribution, daily activities, residents groups, and waste generation, was employed to estimate MSW generation by different activities and resident groups in five provinces (Zhejiang, Guangdong, Hebei, Henan and Sichuan) of China. These five provinces were chosen for this study and the distribution patterns of MSW generated by different activities and resident groups were revealed. The results show that waste generation in SA and LA fluctuated slightly from 2003 to 2008. For general waste generation in the five provinces, MA accounts for more than 70% of total MSW, SA approximately 10%, and LA between 10% and 16% by urban residents in 2008. Females produced more daily MSW than males in MA. Males produced more daily MSW than females in SA and LA. The wastes produced at weekends in MA and LA were far greater than on weekdays, but less than on weekdays for SA wastes. Furthermore, one of the model parameters (the waste generation per unit of consumer expenditure) is inversely proportional to per-capita disposable income of urban residents. A significant correlation between gross domestic product (GDP) and waste generation by SA was observed with a high coefficient of determination.

  3. Do Neighborhood Physical Activity Resources and Land Use Influence Physical Activity among African American Public Housing Residents?

    PubMed

    Parker, Nathan H; O'Connor, Daniel P; Kao, Dennis T; Lee, Rebecca E

    2016-01-01

    Few studies have examined neighborhood influences on physical activity (PA) among low-income African Americans living in public housing. This study measured the associations of PA resources and land use with PA among 216 African Americans living in 12 low-income housing developments in Houston, Texas. Neighborhood measures included both detailed information from in-person audits and geographic information systems (GIS) data. Hierarchical linear regression models tested the associations of neighborhood PA resource availability and quality and land use density and diversity with individual-level, self-reported PA. Land use diversity was positively associated with walking among men after controlling for other neighborhood characteristics. Policies that promote land use diversity or improve the pedestrian environment in areas with diverse destinations may encourage PA among public housing residents. PMID:27524771

  4. The Meaning of Non-Work Activities to Smalltown-Non Metropolitan Residents of the Piedmont Region.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Payne, Barbara P.

    Part of a larger study of recreation and leisure patterns of adults in the Piedmont Region, this report focused on the activities of small town and non-metropolitan residents. The Piedmont Region was defined as counties where the western/northern boundary is fixed by the Appalachian Mountains and the eastern/southern boundary by the coastal plains…

  5. Healthy Active Living: A Residence Community-Based Intervention to Increase Physical Activity and Healthy Eating during the Transition to First-Year University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Denver M. Y.; Bray, Steve R.; Beatty, Kevin R.; Kwan, Matthew Y. W.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To examine the effects of a Healthy Active Living (HAL) community intervention on moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA), fruit and vegetable consumption (FVC), and psychosocial mediators of physical activity among students transitioning into university. Methods: Sixty undergraduate students were assigned to reside in either the…

  6. Multiple Receptor-Ligand Interactions Direct Tissue-Resident γδ T Cell Activation

    PubMed Central

    Witherden, Deborah. A.; Ramirez, Kevin; Havran, Wendy L.

    2014-01-01

    γδ T cells represent a major T cell population in epithelial tissues, such as skin, intestine, and lung, where they function in maintenance of the epithelium and provide a crucial first line defense against environmental and pathogenic insults. Despite their importance, the molecular mechanisms directing their activation and function have remained elusive. Epithelial-resident γδ T cells function through constant communication with neighboring cells, either via direct cell-to-cell contact or cell-to-matrix interactions. These intimate relationships allow γδ T cells to facilitate the maintenance of epithelial homeostasis, tissue repair following injury, inflammation, and protection from malignancy. Recent studies have identified a number of molecules involved in these complex interactions, under both homeostatic conditions, as well as following perturbation of these barrier tissues. These interactions are crucial to the timely production of cytokines, chemokines, growth factors, and extracellular matrix proteins for restoration of homeostasis. In this review, we discuss recent advances in understanding the mechanisms directing epithelial-T cell crosstalk and the distinct roles played by individual receptor-ligand pairs of cell surface molecules in this process. PMID:25505467

  7. Primary Care Residents' Knowledge, Attitudes, Self-Efficacy, and Perceived Professional Norms Regarding Obesity, Nutrition, and Physical Activity Counseling

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Samantha; Seeholzer, Eileen L.; Gullett, Heidi; Jackson, Brigid; Antognoli, Elizabeth; Krejci, Susan A.; Flocke, Susan A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Obesity and being overweight are both significant risk factors for multiple chronic conditions. Primary care physicians are in a position to provide health behavior counseling to the majority of US adults, yet most report insufficient training to deliver effective counseling for obesity. Objective To assess the degree to which residents training in adult primary care programs are prepared to provide obesity, nutrition, and physical activity (ONPA) counseling. Methods Senior residents (postgraduate year [PGY]-3 and PGY-4) from 25 Ohio family medicine, internal medicine, and obstetrics and gynecology programs were surveyed regarding their knowledge about obesity risks and effective counseling, as well as their attitudes, self-efficacy, and perceived professional norms toward ONPA counseling. We examined summary scores, and used regression analyses to assess associations with resident demographics and training program characteristics. Results A total of 219 residents participated (62% response rate). Mean ONPA counseling knowledge score was 50.8 (± 15.6) on a 0 to 100 scale. Specialty was associated with counseling self-efficacy (P < .001) and perceived norms (P = .002). Residents who reported having engaged in an elective rotation emphasizing ONPA counseling had significantly higher self-efficacy and more positive attitudes and professional norms scores. Conclusions Our findings suggest that primary care residents' knowledge of ONPA assessment and management strategies has room for improvement. Attitudes, self-efficacy, and perceived norms also are low and vary by training program characteristics. A deeper understanding of curricula associated with improved performance in these domains could inform interventions to enhance residents' ONPA counseling skills and prevent chronic disease. PMID:26457144

  8. 75 FR 78806 - Agency Information Collection (Residency Verification Report-Veterans and Survivors) Activity...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-16

    ... approved collection. Abstract: VA Form Letter 21-914 is use to verify whether Filipino veterans of the... meet the United States residency requirements. An agency may not conduct or sponsor, and a person...

  9. A Crystallographic Study of the Role of Sequence Context in Thymine Glycol Bypass by a Replicative DNA Polymerase Serendipitously Sheds Light on the Exonuclease Complex

    SciTech Connect

    Aller, Pierre; Duclos, Stéphanie; Wallace, Susan S.; Doublié, Sylvie

    2012-06-27

    Thymine glycol (Tg) is the most common oxidation product of thymine and is known to be a strong block to replicative DNA polymerases. A previously solved structure of the bacteriophage RB69 DNA polymerase (RB69 gp43) in complex with Tg in the sequence context 5'-G-Tg-G shed light on how Tg blocks primer elongation: The protruding methyl group of the oxidized thymine displaces the adjacent 5'-G, which can no longer serve as a template for primer elongation [Aller, P., Rould, M. A., Hogg, M, Wallace, S. S. and Doublie S. (2007). A structural rationale for stalling of a replicative DNA polymerase at the most common oxidative thymine lesion, thymine glycol. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA, 104, 814-818.]. Several studies showed that in the sequence context 5'-C-Tg-purine, Tg is more likely to be bypassed by Klenow fragment, an A-family DNA polymerase. We set out to investigate the role of sequence context in Tg bypass in a B-family polymerase and to solve the crystal structures of the bacteriophage RB69 DNA polymerase in complex with Tg-containing DNA in the three remaining sequence contexts: 5'-A-Tg-G, 5'-T-Tg-G, and 5'-C-Tg-G. A combination of several factors - including the associated exonuclease activity, the nature of the 3' and 5' bases surrounding Tg, and the cis-trans interconversion of Tg - influences Tg bypass. We also visualized for the first time the structure of a well-ordered exonuclease complex, allowing us to identify and confirm the role of key residues (Phe123, Met256, and Tyr257) in strand separation and in the stabilization of the primer strand in the exonuclease site.

  10. An electrochemical peptide cleavage-based biosensor for matrix metalloproteinase-2 detection with exonuclease III-assisted cycling signal amplification.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ding; Yuan, Yali; Zheng, Yingning; Chai, Yaqin; Yuan, Ruo

    2016-05-01

    In this work, an electrochemical peptide biosensor was developed for matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) detection by conversion of a peptide cleavage event into DNA detection with exonuclease III (Exo III)-assisted cycling signal amplification.

  11. Crop rotation of flooded rice with upland maize impacts the resident and active methanogenic microbial community.

    PubMed

    Breidenbach, Björn; Blaser, Martin B; Klose, Melanie; Conrad, Ralf

    2016-09-01

    Crop rotation of flooded rice with upland crops is a common management scheme allowing the reduction of water consumption along with the reduction of methane emission. The introduction of an upland crop into the paddy rice ecosystem leads to dramatic changes in field conditions (oxygen availability, redox conditions). However, the impact of this practice on the archaeal and bacterial communities has scarcely been studied. Here, we provide a comprehensive study focusing on the crop rotation between flooded rice in the wet season and upland maize (RM) in the dry season in comparison with flooded rice (RR) in both seasons. The composition of the resident and active microbial communities was assessed by 454 pyrosequencing targeting the archaeal and bacterial 16S rRNA gene and 16S rRNA. The archaeal community composition changed dramatically in the rotational fields indicated by a decrease of anaerobic methanogenic lineages and an increase of aerobic Thaumarchaeota. Members of Methanomicrobiales, Methanosarcinaceae, Methanosaetaceae and Methanocellaceae were equally suppressed in the rotational fields indicating influence on both acetoclastic and hydrogenotrophic methanogens. On the contrary, members of soil crenarchaeotic group, mainly Candidatus Nitrososphaera, were higher in the rotational fields, possibly indicating increasing importance of ammonia oxidation during drainage. In contrast, minor effects on the bacterial community were observed. Acidobacteria and Anaeromyxobacter spp. were enriched in the rotational fields, whereas members of anaerobic Chloroflexi and sulfate-reducing members of Deltaproteobacteria were found in higher abundance in the rice fields. Combining quantitative polymerase chain reaction and pyrosequencing data revealed increased ribosomal numbers per cell for methanogenic species during crop rotation. This stress response, however, did not allow the methanogenic community to recover in the rotational fields during re-flooding and rice

  12. Structures of human exonuclease I DNA complexes suggest a unified mechanism for nuclease family

    PubMed Central

    Orans, Jillian; McSweeney, Elizabeth A.; Iyer, Ravi R.; Hast, Michael A.; Hellinga, Homme W.; Modrich, Paul; Beese, Lorena S.

    2011-01-01

    Summary Human exonuclease 1 (hExo1) plays important roles in DNA repair and recombination processes that maintain genomic integrity. It is a member of the 5′ structure-specific nuclease family of exonucleases and endonucleases that includes FEN-1, XPG, and GEN1. We present structures of hExo1 in complex with a DNA substrate, followed by mutagenesis studies, and propose a common mechanism by which this nuclease family recognizes and processes diverse DNA structures. hExo1 induces a sharp bend in the DNA at nicks or gaps. Frayed 5′ ends of nicked duplexes resemble flap junctions, unifying the mechanisms of endo- and exo-nucleolytic processing. Conformational control of a mobile region in the catalytic site suggests a mechanism for allosteric regulation by binding to protein partners. The relative arrangement of substrate binding sites in these enzymes provides an elegant solution to a complex geometrical puzzle of substrate recognition and processing. PMID:21496642

  13. Detecting Polychlorinated Biphenyls by Ah Receptor and Fluorescence Quantitative PCR with Exonuclease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Xiaoxiang; Zhuang, Huisheng

    2010-11-01

    Tetrachlorobiphenyls as ligands were cultivated with goldfish, Ah receptors were extracted from the liver of goldfish and purified by hydroxyapatite. The complex of TCB ligands-receptors were analyzed by Surface Plasmon Resonance. DNA probes were amplified by PCR using Primers F1 and F2 with the DNA recognition site of responsive enhancer. DNA probes bound to the complex were not digested by exonuclease. The DNA that bound to the complex was quantified by real time PCR. A standard curve with TCB concentration to Ct values was obtained in the range of 10-12mol/L to 10-8 mol/L, according to TCB concentration in samples. The detection limit of the assay was below 10-12mol/L of TCB. Compared with HPLC, this assay is much more sensitive. These results suggest that fluorescence quantitative PCR with exonuclease by Ah receptors fits for detection of trace PCB.

  14. Associate Residency Training Directors in Psychiatry: Demographics, Professional Activities, and Job Satisfaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arbuckle, Melissa R.; DeGolia, Sallie G.; Esposito, Karin; Miller, Deborah A.; Weinberg, Michael; Brenner, Adam M.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to characterize associate training director (ATD) positions in psychiatry. Method: An on-line survey was e-mailed in 2009 to all ATDs identified through the American Association of Directors of Psychiatric Residency Training (AADPRT). Survey questions elicited information regarding demographics,…

  15. Instructing the instructor: tissue-resident T cells activate innate immunity.

    PubMed

    Slütter, Bram; Harty, John T

    2014-10-01

    A small number of tissue-resident memory T cells (Trm) provide potent protection against infections. Three recent studies by Ariotti et al. (2014), Schenkel et al. (2014a), and Iijima and Iwasaki (2014) report that Trm rapidly produce cytokines after infection and initiate a tissue-wide anti-viral state by instructing innate immune cells.

  16. 76 FR 52287 - Political Activity-Federal Employees Residing In Designated Localities

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-22

    ...: OPM proposes to amend its regulations at 5 CFR part 733 by granting Federal employees residing in King....C. 7323(a)(2) and (3), and adding King George County to its regulatory list of designated localities in 5 CFR 733.107(c). The proposed amendment reflects OPM's determination that King George...

  17. 77 FR 26659 - Political Activity-Federal Employees Residing in Designated Localities

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-07

    ..., OPM issued a proposed rule at 72 FR 39582 to add King George County, Virginia, to this regulatory list... and proposed the addition of King George County to the regulatory list of designated localities. 76 FR... employees residing in King George County, Virginia, a partial exemption from the political...

  18. Experiential Team Building for Student Leaders in Union Activities and Residence Halls.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Don; And Others

    This guide offers college or university student union and housing office personnel assistance in developing experiential team building workshops for student leaders. The rationale for providing such training is discussed in terms of the following: (1) resident assistants are usually vital compus leaders, with the potential to be vital student…

  19. Atmospheric residence time of (210)Pb determined from the activity ratios with its daughter radionuclides (210)Bi and (210)Po.

    PubMed

    Semertzidou, P; Piliposian, G T; Appleby, P G

    2016-08-01

    The residence time of (210)Pb created in the atmosphere by the decay of gaseous (222)Rn is a key parameter controlling its distribution and fallout onto the landscape. These in turn are key parameters governing the use of this natural radionuclide for dating and interpreting environmental records stored in natural archives such as lake sediments. One of the principal methods for estimating the atmospheric residence time is through measurements of the activities of the daughter radionuclides (210)Bi and (210)Po, and in particular the (210)Bi/(210)Pb and (210)Po/(210)Pb activity ratios. Calculations used in early empirical studies assumed that these were governed by a simple series of equilibrium equations. This approach does however have two failings; it takes no account of the effect of global circulation on spatial variations in the activity ratios, and no allowance is made for the impact of transport processes across the tropopause. This paper presents a simple model for calculating the distributions of (210)Pb, (210)Bi and (210)Po at northern mid-latitudes (30°-65°N), a region containing almost all the available empirical data. By comparing modelled (210)Bi/(210)Pb activity ratios with empirical data a best estimate for the tropospheric residence time of around 10 days is obtained. This is significantly longer than earlier estimates of between 4 and 7 days. The process whereby (210)Pb is transported into the stratosphere when tropospheric concentrations are high and returned from it when they are low, significantly increases the effective residence time in the atmosphere as a whole. The effect of this is to significantly enhance the long range transport of (210)Pb from its source locations. The impact is illustrated by calculations showing the distribution of (210)Pb fallout versus longitude at northern mid-latitudes. PMID:27132252

  20. Atmospheric residence time of (210)Pb determined from the activity ratios with its daughter radionuclides (210)Bi and (210)Po.

    PubMed

    Semertzidou, P; Piliposian, G T; Appleby, P G

    2016-08-01

    The residence time of (210)Pb created in the atmosphere by the decay of gaseous (222)Rn is a key parameter controlling its distribution and fallout onto the landscape. These in turn are key parameters governing the use of this natural radionuclide for dating and interpreting environmental records stored in natural archives such as lake sediments. One of the principal methods for estimating the atmospheric residence time is through measurements of the activities of the daughter radionuclides (210)Bi and (210)Po, and in particular the (210)Bi/(210)Pb and (210)Po/(210)Pb activity ratios. Calculations used in early empirical studies assumed that these were governed by a simple series of equilibrium equations. This approach does however have two failings; it takes no account of the effect of global circulation on spatial variations in the activity ratios, and no allowance is made for the impact of transport processes across the tropopause. This paper presents a simple model for calculating the distributions of (210)Pb, (210)Bi and (210)Po at northern mid-latitudes (30°-65°N), a region containing almost all the available empirical data. By comparing modelled (210)Bi/(210)Pb activity ratios with empirical data a best estimate for the tropospheric residence time of around 10 days is obtained. This is significantly longer than earlier estimates of between 4 and 7 days. The process whereby (210)Pb is transported into the stratosphere when tropospheric concentrations are high and returned from it when they are low, significantly increases the effective residence time in the atmosphere as a whole. The effect of this is to significantly enhance the long range transport of (210)Pb from its source locations. The impact is illustrated by calculations showing the distribution of (210)Pb fallout versus longitude at northern mid-latitudes.

  1. Characterization of cell death in Escherichia coli mediated by XseA, a large subunit of exonuclease VII.

    PubMed

    Jung, Hyeim; Liang, Junwei; Jung, Yuna; Lim, Dongbin

    2015-12-01

    Exonuclease VII (ExoVII) of Escherichia coli is a single strandspecific DNA nuclease composed of two different subunits: the large subunit, XseA, and the small subunit, XseB. In this study, we found that multicopy single-stranded DNAs (msDNAs), Ec83 and Ec78, are the in vivo substrates of ExoVII; the enzyme cuts the phosphodiester bond between the fourth and fifth nucleotides from the 5'end. We used this msDNA cleavage to assess ExoVII activity in vivo. Both subunits were required for enzyme activity. Expression of XseA without XseB caused cell death, even though no ExoVII activity was detected. The lethality caused by XseA was rescued by surplus XseB. In XseA-induced death, cells were elongated and multinucleated, and their chromosomes were fragmented and condensed; these are the morphological hallmarks of apoptotic cell death in bacteria. A putative caspase recognition sequence (FVAD) was found in XseA, and its hypothetical caspase product with 257 amino acids was as active as the intact protein in inducing cell death. We propose that under ordinary conditions, XseA protects chromosome as a component of the ExoVII enzyme, but in some conditions, the protein causes cell death; the destruction of cell is probably carried out by the amino terminal fragment derived from the cleavage of XseA by caspase-like enzyme.

  2. Restorative Care’s Effect on Activities of Daily Living Dependency in Long-stay Nursing Home Residents

    PubMed Central

    Talley, Kristine M. C.; Wyman, Jean F.; Savik, Kay; Kane, Robert L.; Mueller, Christine; Zhao, Hong

    2015-01-01

    Purpose of the Study: (a) Identify the prevalence of nursing homes providing Medicare supported restorative care programs and of long stay participants, (b) compare characteristics between restorative care participants and nonparticipants, and (c) assess restorative care’s effect on change in activities of daily living (ADL) dependency. Design and Methods: Longitudinal analysis of Minimum Data Set assessments linked to the 2004 National Nursing Home Survey using a sample of 7,735 residents, age ≥ 65 years living in 1,097 nursing homes for at least 6 months. Receipt of any restorative care was used as a time varying predictor to estimate change in ADL dependency over 18 months using linear mixed models. Results: The sample was 75% female, 89% non-Hispanic White, with a mean age of 85±8, and average length of stay of 3.2±3.4 years. Most nursing homes had restorative care programs (67%), but less than one-third of long-stay residents participated. After controlling for resident and nursing home characteristics, the predicted mean ADL dependency score (range 0–28) at baseline was 18 for restorative care participants and 14 for nonparticipants. Over 18 months, ADL dependency increased 1 point for both participants and nonparticipants (p = .12). Implications: A minority of long-stay residents participated in Medicare supported restorative care programs despite their availability and potential benefits. Even though participants had greater vulnerability for deterioration in physical, mental, and functional health than nonparticipants, both groups had similar rates of ADL decline. Future research is needed to determine if providing restorative care to less dependent long-stay residents is effective. PMID:26055785

  3. Exonuclease-Catalyzed Target Recycling Amplification and Immobilization-free Electrochemical Aptasensor.

    PubMed

    Tan, Yue; Wei, Xiaofeng; Zhang, Ying; Wang, Peilong; Qiu, Bin; Guo, Longhua; Lin, Zhenyu; Yang, Huang-Hao

    2015-12-01

    A simple, sensitive, and selective immobilization-free electrochemical aptasensor had been developed which combines the advantages of the discrimination of the aggregation of long and short DNA on a negatively charged indium tin oxide (ITO) electrode, high selectivity of the aptamer, and high efficiency of exonuclease-catalyzed target recycling amplification. Ochratoxin A (OTA), a type of mycotoxin, has been chosen as the model target. Methylene blue (MB) labeled probe DNA had been hybridized with the OTA aptamer first, which cannot diffuse freely to the negative charged ITO electrode surface due to the repulsion of the negative charges, since the hybridized DNA contains large negative charges. In the presence of target (OTA), the aptamer prefers to form an OTA-aptamer complex in lieu of an aptamer-DNA duplex, which results in the dissociation of probe DNA from the probe DNA-aptamer complex. The released probe DNA could be digested into mononucleotides, including a MB-labeled electroactive mononucleotide (eT), due to the employment of the RecJf exonuclease, a single-stranded DNA specific exonuclease. Since the eT contains little negative charge, it can diffuse easily to the negative charged ITO electrode surface, which results in the enhanced electrochemical response detected. At the same time, the aptamer in the OTA-aptamer complex can be digested by RecJf exonuclease also to liberate the target, which can participate in the next reaction cycling and realize the electrochemical signal amplification. Based on this strategy, an ultrasensitive homogeneous immobilization-free electrochemical aptasensor for OTA can be developed with a low detection limit (LOD) of 0.004 ng mL(-1) (S/N = 3). The proposed biosensor combines the advantages of the simplicity of immobilization-free homogeneous ITO based electrochemical determination, high efficiency of exonuclease-catalyzed target recycling, and high selectivity of the aptamer. The fabricated biosensor has been applied to

  4. Relationship between membrane potential changes and superoxide-releasing capacity in resident and activated mouse peritoneal macrophages

    SciTech Connect

    Kitagawa, S.; Johnston, R.B. Jr.

    1985-11-01

    To understand better the molecular basis for the enhanced respiratory burst of activated macrophages (M phi), the relationship between the stimulus-induced changes in membrane potential and release of superoxide anion (O/sub 2//sup -/) in mouse peritoneal M phi was investigated. Resident M phi and M phi elicited by injection of lipopolysaccharide (LPS-M phi) or obtained from animals infected with bacille Calmette-Guerin (BCG-M phi) were used. LPS-M phi and BCG-M phi showed more pronounced changes in membrane potential (depolarization) and greater release of O/sub 2//sup -/ on contact with phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) than did resident macrophages. The lag time between addition of stimulus and onset of release of O/sub 2//sup -/ was reduced in activated compared with resident cells. Membrane potential changes began 60 to 90 sec before release of O/sub 2//sup -/ could be detected in each cell type. The dose-response curves for triggering of membrane potential changes and O/sub 2//sup -/ release by PMA were identical. The magnitude of membrane potential changes and of O/sub 2//sup -/ release in LPS-M phi and BCG-M phi declined progressively during in vitro culture, and values on day 3 approached those in resident macrophages (deactivation). Extracellular glucose was required for effective stimulated change in membrane potential and O/sub 2//sup -/ release. These findings indicate that membrane potential changes are closely associated with O/sub 2//sup -/-releasing capacity in macrophages, and that the systems that mediate membrane potential changes and production of O/sub 2//sup -/ develop or decline concomitantly during activation or deactivation of the cells.

  5. Cost-effectiveness of investing in sidewalks as a means of increasing physical activity: a RESIDE modelling study

    PubMed Central

    Veerman, J Lennert; Zapata-Diomedi, Belen; Gunn, Lucy; McCormack, Gavin R; Cobiac, Linda J; Mantilla Herrera, Ana Maria; Giles-Corti, Billie; Shiell, Alan

    2016-01-01

    Background Studies consistently find that supportive neighbourhood built environments increase physical activity by encouraging walking and cycling. However, evidence on the cost-effectiveness of investing in built environment interventions as a means of promoting physical activity is lacking. In this study, we assess the cost-effectiveness of increasing sidewalk availability as one means of encouraging walking. Methods Using data from the RESIDE study in Perth, Australia, we modelled the cost impact and change in health-adjusted life years (HALYs) of installing additional sidewalks in established neighbourhoods. Estimates of the relationship between sidewalk availability and walking were taken from a previous study. Multistate life table models were used to estimate HALYs associated with changes in walking frequency and duration. Sensitivity analyses were used to explore the impact of variations in population density, discount rates, sidewalk costs and the inclusion of unrelated healthcare costs in added life years. Results Installing and maintaining an additional 10 km of sidewalk in an average neighbourhood with 19 000 adult residents was estimated to cost A$4.2 million over 30 years and gain 24 HALYs over the lifetime of an average neighbourhood adult resident population. The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio was A$176 000/HALY. However, sensitivity results indicated that increasing population densities improves cost-effectiveness. Conclusions In low-density cities such as in Australia, installing sidewalks in established neighbourhoods as a single intervention is unlikely to cost-effectively improve health. Sidewalks must be considered alongside other complementary elements of walkability, such as density, land use mix and street connectivity. Population density is particularly important because at higher densities, more residents are exposed and this improves the cost-effectiveness. Health gain is one of many benefits of enhancing neighbourhood

  6. Resident recruitment.

    PubMed

    Longmaid, H Esterbrook

    2003-02-01

    This article has introduced the reader to the critical components of successful recruitment of radiology residents. With particular attention to the ACGME institutional and program requirements regarding resident recruitment, and an explanation of the support systems (ERAS and NRMP) currently available to those involved in applicant review and selection, the article has sought to delineate a sensible approach to recruitment. Successful recruiters have mastered the essentials of these programs and have learned to adapt the programs to their needs. As new program directors work with their departments' resident selection committees, they will identify the factors that faculty and current residents cite as most important in the successful selection of new residents. By structuring the application review process, exploiting the power of the ERAS, and crafting a purposeful and friendly interview process, radiology residency directors can find and recruit the residents who best match their programs. PMID:12585436

  7. Tritium activity concentrations and residence times of groundwater collected in Rokkasho, Japan.

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, Hidenao; Ueda, Shinji; Akata, Naofumi; Kakiuchi, Hideki; Hisamatsu, Shun'ichi

    2015-11-01

    Tritium ((3)H) concentrations were measured in groundwater samples from four surface wells (4-10 m deep), four shallow wells (24-26.5 m deep) and a 150-m-deep well in the Futamata River catchment area, which is adjacent to the large-scale commercial spent nuclear fuel reprocessing plant in Rokkasho, Japan. The (3)H concentrations in most of the surface- and shallow-well samples (<0.03-0.57 Bq l(-1)) were similar to those in precipitation (annual mean: 0.31-0.79 Bq l(-1)), suggesting that the residence time of the water in those wells was 0-15 y. The (3)H concentrations in the samples from a 26-m-deep well and the 150-m-deep well were lower than those in the other wells, indicating that groundwater with a long residence time exists in deep aquifers and the estuary area of the catchment. It is not clear whether (3)H released during test operation of the plant with actual spent nuclear fuel affected the (3)H concentrations observed in this study.

  8. Effects of oyster harvest activities on Louisiana reef habitat and resident nekton communities

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Beck, Steve; LaPeyre, Megan K.

    2015-01-01

    Oysters are often cited as “ecosystem engineers” because they modify their environment. Coastal Louisiana contains extensive oyster reef areas that have been harvested for decades, and whether differences in habitat functions exist between those areas and nonharvested reefs is unclear. We compared reef physical structure and resident community metrics between these 2 subtidal reef types. Harvested reefs were more fragmented and had lower densities of live eastern oysters (Crassostrea virginica) and hooked mussels (Ischadium recurvum) than the nonharvested reefs. Stable isotope values (13C and 15N) of dominant nekton species and basal food sources were used to compare food web characteristics. Nonpelagic source contributions and trophic positions of dominant species were slightly elevated at harvested sites. Oyster harvesting appeared to have decreased the number of large oysters and to have increased the percentage of reefs that were nonliving by decreasing water column filtration and benthopelagic coupling. The differences in reef matrix composition, however, had little effect on resident nekton communities. Understanding the thresholds of reef habitat areas, the oyster density or oyster size distribution below which ecosystem services may be compromised, remains key to sustainable management.

  9. Critical determinants for substrate recognition and catalysis in the M. tuberculosis class II AP-endonuclease/3'-5' exonuclease III.

    PubMed

    Khanam, Taran; Shukla, Ankita; Rai, Niyati; Ramachandran, Ravishankar

    2015-05-01

    The Mycobacterium tuberculosis AP-endonuclease/3'-5' exodeoxyribonuclease (MtbXthA) is an important player in DNA base excision repair (BER). We demonstrate that the enzyme has robust apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP) endonuclease activity, 3'-5' exonuclease, phosphatase, and phosphodiesterase activities. The enzyme functions as an AP-endonuclease at high ionic environments, while the 3'-5'-exonuclease activity is predominant at low ionic environments. Our molecular modelling and mutational experiments show that E57 and D251 are critical for catalysis. Although nicked DNA and gapped DNA are fair substrates of MtbXthA, the gap-size did not affect the excision activity and furthermore, a substrate with a recessed 3'-end is preferred. To understand the determinants of abasic-site recognition, we examined the possible roles of (i) the base opposite the abasic site, (ii) the abasic ribose ring itself, (iii) local distortions in the AP-site, and (iv) conserved residues located near the active site. Our experiments demonstrate that the first three determinants do not play a role in MtbXthA, and in fact the enzyme exhibits robust endonucleolytic activity against single-stranded AP DNA also. Regarding the fourth determinant, it is known that the catalytic-site of AP endonucleases is surrounded by conserved aromatic residues and intriguingly, the exact residues that are directly involved in abasic site recognition vary with the individual proteins. We therefore, used a combination of mutational analysis, kinetic assays, and structure-based modelling, to identify that Y237, supported by Y137, mediates the formation of the MtbXthA-AP-DNA complex and AP-site incision. PMID:25748880

  10. Coordinated destruction of cellular messages in translation complexes by the gammaherpesvirus host shutoff factor and the mammalian exonuclease Xrn1.

    PubMed

    Covarrubias, Sergio; Gaglia, Marta M; Kumar, G Renuka; Wong, Wesley; Jackson, Andrew O; Glaunsinger, Britt A

    2011-10-01

    Several viruses encode factors that promote host mRNA degradation to silence gene expression. It is unclear, however, whether cellular mRNA turnover pathways are engaged to assist in this process. In Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus this phenotype is enacted by the host shutoff factor SOX. Here we show that SOX-induced mRNA turnover is a two-step process, in which mRNAs are first cleaved internally by SOX itself then degraded by the cellular exonuclease Xrn1. SOX therefore bypasses the regulatory steps of deadenylation and decapping normally required for Xrn1 activation. SOX is likely recruited to translating mRNAs, as it cosediments with translation initiation complexes and depletes polysomes. Cleaved mRNA intermediates accumulate in the 40S fraction, indicating that recognition occurs at an early stage of translation. This is the first example of a viral protein commandeering cellular mRNA turnover pathways to destroy host mRNAs, and suggests that Xrn1 is poised to deplete messages undergoing translation in mammalian cells.

  11. Highly sensitive fluorescence detection of target DNA by coupling exonuclease-assisted cascade target recycling and DNAzyme amplification.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shufeng; Cheng, Chuanbin; Liu, Tao; Wang, Li; Gong, Hongwei; Li, Feng

    2015-01-15

    Because of the intrinsic importance of nucleic acid as bio-targets, the simple and sensitive detection of nucleic acid is very essential for biological studies and medical diagnostics. Herein, a simple, isothermal and highly sensitive fluorescence detection of target DNA was developed with the combination of exonuclease III (Exo III)-assisted cascade target recycling and DNAzyme amplification. A hairpin DNA probe was designed, which contained the 3'-protruding DNA fragment as target recognition unit, the caged DNA fragment in the stem region as target analogue, and the caged 8-17 DNAzyme sequence in the loop region as signal response unit. Upon sensing of target DNA, the 3'-strand of hairpin DNA probe could be stepwise removed by Exo III, accompanied by the releasing of target DNA and autonomous generation of new target analogues for the successive hybridization and cleavage process. Simultaneously, the 8-17 DNAzyme unit could be exponentially released from this hairpin DNA probe and activated for the cyclic cleavage toward the ribonucleotide-containing molecular beacon substrate, inducing a remarkable fluorescence signal amplification for target detection. A low detection limit of 20 fM with an excellent selectivity toward target DNA could be achieved. The developed cascade amplification strategy may be further extended for the detection of a wide spectrum of analytes including protein and biological small molecules by combining DNA aptamer technology.

  12. DATEL: A Scarless and Sequence-Independent DNA Assembly Method Using Thermostable Exonucleases and Ligase.

    PubMed

    Jin, Peng; Ding, Wenwen; Du, Guocheng; Chen, Jian; Kang, Zhen

    2016-09-16

    DNA assembly is a pivotal technique in synthetic biology. Here, we report a scarless and sequence-independent DNA assembly method using thermal exonucleases (Taq and Pfu DNA polymerases) and Taq DNA ligase (DATEL). Under the optimized conditions, DATEL allows rapid assembly of 2-10 DNA fragments (1-2 h) with high accuracy (between 74 and 100%). Owing to the simple operation system with denaturation-annealing-cleavage-ligation temperature cycles in one tube, DATEL is expected to be a desirable choice for both manual and automated high-throughput assembly of DNA fragments, which will greatly facilitate the rapid progress of synthetic biology and metabolic engineering. PMID:27230689

  13. Rewarding the Resident Teacher

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McBride, Jennifer M.; Drake, Richard L.

    2011-01-01

    Residents routinely make significant contributions to the education of medical students. However, little attention has been paid to rewarding these individuals for their involvement in these academic activities. This report describes a program that rewards resident teachers with an academic appointment as a Clinical Instructor. The residents…

  14. The StrongWomen Change Clubs: Engaging Residents to Catalyze Positive Change in Food and Physical Activity Environments

    PubMed Central

    Seguin, Rebecca A.; Folta, Sara C.; Nelson, Miriam E.; Heidkamp-Young, Eleanor; Fenton, Mark; Junot, Bridgid

    2014-01-01

    Introduction. The epidemic of obesity is a multifaceted public health issue. Positive policy and environmental changes are needed to support healthier eating and increased physical activity. Methods. StrongWomen Change Clubs (SWCCs) were developed through an academic-community research partnership between researchers at Cornell University and Tufts University and community partners (cooperative extension educators) in rural towns in seven U.S. states. Extension educators served as the local leader and each recruited 10–15 residents to undertake a project to improve some aspect of the nutrition or physical activity environment. Most residents had limited (or no) experience in civic engagement. At 6 and 12 months after implementation, the research team conducted key informant interviews with SWCC leaders to capture their perceptions of program process, benchmark achievement, and self-efficacy. Results. At 12 months, each SWCC had accomplished one benchmark; the majority had completed three or more benchmarks. They described common processes for achieving benchmarks such as building relationships and leveraging stakeholder partnerships. Barriers to benchmark achievement included busy schedules and resistance to and slow pace of change. Conclusion. Findings suggest that community change initiatives that involve stakeholders, build upon existing activities and organizational resources, and establish feasible timelines and goals can successfully catalyze environmental change. PMID:25525441

  15. Activation of bone marrow-resident memory T cells by circulating, antigen-bearing dendritic cells

    PubMed Central

    Cavanagh, Lois L.; Bonasio, Roberto; Mazo, Irina B.; Halin, Cornelia; Cheng, Guiying; van der Velden, Adrianus W. M.; Cariappa, Annaiah; Chase, Catherine; Russell, Paul; Starnbach, Michael N.; Koni, Pandelakis A.; Pillai, Shiv; Weninger, Wolfgang; von Andrian, Ulrich H.

    2006-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) carry antigen from peripheral tissues via lymphatics to lymph nodes (LN). We report that differentiated DC can also travel from the periphery into the blood. Circulating DC migrated to the spleen, liver and lung, but not LN. They also homed to the bone marrow (BM) where they were better retained than in most other tissues. DC homing to the BM depended on constitutively expressed VCAM-1 and endothelial selectins in BM microvessels. Two-photon intravital microscopy in BM cavities revealed that DC formed stable antigen-dependent contacts with BM-resident central memory T cells. Moreover, using this novel migratory pathway, antigen-pulsed DC could trigger central memory T cell-mediated recall responses in the BM. PMID:16155571

  16. The Volunteering-in-Place (VIP) Program: Providing meaningful volunteer activity to residents in assisted living with mild cognitive impairment.

    PubMed

    Klinedinst, N Jennifer; Resnick, Barbara

    2016-01-01

    The Volunteering-in-Place (VIP) Program was developed to provide individualized meaningful volunteer activities matched to interests and capabilities for older adults with MCI in assisted living. The purposes of this single-site pre-test/post-test pilot study were to (1) establish feasibility of the VIP Program based on treatment fidelity (design, treatment, delivery, enactment); and (2) evaluate preliminary efficacy via improvement in psychological health (depressive symptoms, usefulness, purpose, resilience, and life satisfaction) and decreased sedentary activity (survey and Fitbit) at 3 and 6 months. Ten residents participated. The majority was white, female and educated, and on average 88 years old. The VIP Program was feasible and most participants continued to volunteer at 6 months. There were non-significant improvements in depressive symptoms, usefulness, purpose, resilience and recreational physical activity. The results of this study provide support for the feasibility of the VIP Program. Further study is necessary to examine efficacy.

  17. Neuropeptide S reduces mouse aggressiveness in the resident/intruder test through selective activation of the neuropeptide S receptor.

    PubMed

    Ruzza, Chiara; Asth, Laila; Guerrini, Remo; Trapella, Claudio; Gavioli, Elaine C

    2015-10-01

    Neuropeptide S (NPS) regulates various biological functions by selectively activating the NPS receptor (NPSR). In particular NPS evokes robust anxiolytic-like effects in rodents together with a stimulant and arousal promoting action. The aim of the study was to investigate the effects of NPS on the aggressiveness of mice subjected to the resident/intruder test. Moreover the putative role played by the endogenous NPS/NPSR system in regulating mice aggressiveness was investigating using mice lacking the NPSR receptor (NPSR(-/-)) and the NPSR selective antagonists [(t)Bu-D-Gly(5)]NPS and SHA 68. NPS (0.01-1 nmol, icv) reduced, in a dose dependent manner, both the time that resident mice spent attacking the intruder mice and their number of attacks, producing pharmacological effects similar to those elicited by the standard anti-aggressive drug valproate (300 mg/kg, ip). This NPS effect was evident in NPSR wild type (NPSR(+/+)) mice but completely disappeared in NPSR(-/-) mice. Moreover, NPSR(-/-) mice displayed a significantly higher time spent attacking than NPSR(+/+) mice. [(t)Bu-D-Gly(5)]NPS (10 nmol, icv) did not change the behavior of mice in the resident/intruder test but completely counteracted NPS effects. SHA 68 (50 mg/kg, ip) was inactive per se and against NPS. In conclusion, this study demonstrated that NPS produces anti-aggressive effects in mice through the selective activation of NPSR and that the endogenous NPS/NPSR system can exert a role in the control of aggressiveness levels under the present experimental conditions.

  18. Collaboration of local governments and experts responding to the increase of the environmental radiation level secondary to the nuclear accident: a unique activity to relieve residents' anxiety.

    PubMed

    Fujii, H; Iimoto, T; Tsuzuki, T; Iiizumi, S; Someya, S; Hamamichi, S; Kessler, M M

    2015-11-01

    After the Fukushima nuclear power plant accident, 'hot spots' were found in Tokatsu area in Chiba prefecture. Although ambient radiation dose in this area was too low to harm residents' health, local residents were particularly worried about possible adverse effects from exposure to radiation. To avoid unnecessary panic reactions in the public, local governments in Tokatsu area collaborated with radiation specialists and conducted activities to provide local residents with accurate information on health effects from radiation. In addition to these activities, the authors offered one-to-one consultations with a radiologist for parents of small children and expecting mothers. They herein report this unique attempt, focusing on parents' anxiety and the age of their children. Taken together, this unique collaborative activity between local government and experts would be one of the procedures to relieve residents' anxiety.

  19. A Survey of Non-Resident Lending and Borrowing Activity in Massachusetts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Piggford, Roland R.; And Others

    This survey presenting raw data for the planning of resource sharing and other cooperative library activities in Massachusetts focuses on the borrowing and lending characteristics of libraries with regard to nonresident borrowing activity. It is intended to provide up-to-date estimates of such activity, formulate long term solutions to fiscal…

  20. An insertion approach electrochemical aptasensor for mucin 1 detection based on exonuclease-assisted target recycling.

    PubMed

    Wen, Wei; Hu, Rong; Bao, Ting; Zhang, Xiuhua; Wang, Shengfu

    2015-09-15

    In this work, a sensitive exonuclease-assisted amplification electrochemical aptasensor through insertion approach was developed for the detection of mucin 1 (MUC 1). In order to construct the aptasensor, 6-Mercapto-1-hexanol (MCH) was used to block partial sites of gold electrode (GE), followed by thiolated capture probe self-assembled on GE. Methylene blue (MB) labeled aptamer hybridized with capture probe at both ends to form double-strand DNA. For the MB labeled termini was close to GE, the electrochemical response was remarkable. The presence of MUC 1 caused the dissociation of the double-strand DNA owing to the specific recognition of aptamer to MUC 1. Then exonuclease I (Exo I) selectively digested the aptamer which bound with MUC 1, the released MUC 1 participated new binding with the rest aptamer. Insertion approach improved the reproducibility and Exo I-catalyzed target recycling improved the sensitivity of the aptasensor significantly. Under optimal experimental conditions, the proposed aptasensor had a good linear correlation ranged from 10 pM to 1 μM with a detection limit of 4 pM (Signal to Noise ratio, S/N=3). The strategy had great potential for the simple and sensitive detection of other cancer markers.

  1. Generic assay format for endo- and exonucleases based on fluorogenic substrates labeled with single fluorophores.

    PubMed

    Nikiforov, Theo T

    2014-09-15

    We previously described the development of fluorogenic assays for nucleic acid-modifying enzymes based on synthetic oligonucleotides labeled with a single fluorophore. In the current work, we studied the performance of such singly labeled substrates as a function of the nucleotide sequence in the vicinity of the fluorophore and the nature of the fluorophore itself. In agreement with published studies, we found that a 3' end of the primer terminating in a dC residue opposite a 5' dG provides the greatest degree of fluorophore quenching. Adding a second dC residue at the 3' penultimate position opposite another dG increased the quenching further. Among the various dyes tested, the difluoro substituted fluorescein derivative Oregon Green emerged as a superior fluorophore for this assay format. We have now combined these findings into a new generic format for endonuclease assays. This format allows a substrate for any endonuclease to be obtained rapidly by simply replacing the enzyme's recognition sequence within the generic labeled molecule. Compared with our previous format, the new assays show greatly expanded signal dynamic ranges. The format is applicable to other nucleic acid-modifying enzymes such as exonucleases (e.g., T7 gene 6 exonuclease) and DNA repair enzymes (e.g., uracil-DNA glycosylase). PMID:24907506

  2. Decreased number and bactericidal activity against Staphylococcus aureus of the resident cells in milk of dairy cows during early lactation.

    PubMed

    Dosogne, H; Vangroenweghe, F; Barrio, B; Rainard, P; Burvenich, C

    2001-11-01

    Phagocytic and bactericidal activity of polymorphonuclear neutrophil leukocytes (PMN) isolated from blood and milk, against Staphylococcus aureus, was compared between groups of six healthy dairy cows in early, mid- and late lactation using a bacteriological assay. PMN were isolated from blood with a high degree of purity, but the cells isolated from milk contained variable amounts of macrophages (Mphi) and lymphocytes (L). The results were therefore calculated using the percentage PMN in order to evaluate phagocytosis and killing by PMN only. Blood PMN phagocytosed 82% Staph. aureus and milk PMN 43% on average and there was no significant difference between the different stages of lactation. The bactericidal activity of blood PMN against Staph. aureus was 36+/-8% in early lactation (significantly different from mid lactation, P < 0.05), 64+/-10% in mid lactation and 53+/-6% in late lactation. Milk PMN killed only 6+/-3% Staph. aureus in early lactation (significantly different from mid lactation, P < 0.01), 27+/-3% in mid lactation and 20+/-9% Staph. aureus in late lactation. The ratio of the bactericidal activity of milk to blood PMN was 0.08, 0.43 and 0.22 in early, mid- and late lactation, respectively. In addition to the decreased function. the number of cells in milk (somatic cell count, SCC) was also 60% lower in early lactation than in mid lactation cows (P < 0.01). Our results suggest an impairment of blood and milk-resident PMN bactericidal activity against Staph. aureus and a decreased number of milk-resident PMN in dairy cows at the onset of lactation.

  3. Risk of carotid atherosclerosis is associated with low serum paraoxonase (PON1) activity among arsenic exposed residents in Southwestern Taiwan

    SciTech Connect

    Li, W.-F.; Sun, C.-W.; Cheng, T.-J.; Chang, K.-H.; Chen, C.-J.; Wang, S.-L.

    2009-04-15

    To understand whether human paraoxonase 1 (PON1) would modulate the risk for arsenic-related atherosclerosis, we studied 196 residents from an arseniasis-endemic area in Southwestern Taiwan and 291 age- and sex-matched residents from a nearby control area where arsenic exposure was found low. Carotid atherosclerosis was defined by a carotid artery intima-media wall thickness (IMT) of > 1.0 mm. Prevalence of carotid atherosclerosis was increased in the arseniasis-endemic area as compared to the control area after adjustment for conventional risk factors (OR = 2.20, p < 0.01). The prevalence was positively associated with cumulative arsenic exposure (mg/L-year) in a dose-dependent manner. Multiple logistic regression analysis showed that in the endemic group, low serum PON1 activity was an independent risk factor for atherosclerosis (OR = 4.18 low vs. high, p < 0.05). For those of low PON1 activity and high cumulative arsenic exposure, the odds ratio for the prevalence of atherosclerosis was further increased up to 5.68 (p < 0.05). No significant association was found between atherosclerosis and four polymorphisms of the PON gene cluster (PON1 - 108C/T, PON1 Q192R, PON2 A148G, PON2 C311S). However, genetic frequencies of certain alleles including PON1 Q192, PON2 G148 and PON2 C311 were found increased in the endemic group as compared to the controls and a general Chinese population, indicating a possible survival selection in the endemic group after a long arsenic exposure history. Our results showed a significant joint effect between arsenic exposure and serum PON1 activity on carotid atherosclerosis, suggesting that subjects of low PON1 activity may be more susceptible to arsenic-related cardiovascular disease.

  4. Technology in Residence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fox, Jordan

    1999-01-01

    Discusses the necessity for incorporating current technology in today's college residence halls to meet the more diverse and continued activities of its students. Technology addressed covers data networking and telecommunications, heating and cooling systems, and fire-safety systems. (GR)

  5. A multi-component universal intervention to improve diet and physical activity among adults with intellectual disabilities in community residences: a cluster randomised controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Bergström, Helena; Hagströmer, Maria; Hagberg, Jan; Elinder, Liselotte Schäfer

    2013-11-01

    People with ID have an increased risk for unhealthy diets, physical inactivity and weight disturbances. The aim of the current study was to investigate the effectiveness of a novel and complex intervention to improve diet and physical activity, targeting both caregivers and residents, in community residences for people with ID. A three component intervention based on Social Cognitive Theory was developed, including: (1) appointment of a health ambassador in each community residence attending network meetings, (2) a study circle for caregivers, and (3) a health course for the residents. The intervention lasted for 12-16 months and allowed for some local tailoring. A cluster randomised controlled trial, randomised at residence level, was conducted to evaluate the effects of the intervention. Thirty community residences for people with mild or moderate ID in Stockholm County, Sweden, were included. A total of 130 participants, 74 women and 56 men aged 20-66 years, entered, and 129 participants completed the study. The primary outcome was physical activity, measured by pedometry. Secondary outcomes were BMI, waist circumference, dietary quality measured by digital photography, satisfaction with life assessed with a scale, and work routines assessed with a questionnaire. Outcomes were related to intervention fidelity. A positive intervention effect was found on physical activity, with an average increase of 1608 steps/day among participants in the intervention group (P=0.045). The effect size was 0.29 (Cohen's d). The type of residence was found to be an effect moderator. A positive intervention effect was found as well on work routines, with an average increase of 7.1 percentage points on a self-assessment scale among residences in the intervention group (P=0.016). No significant effects were found on BMI, waist circumference, dietary quality, or satisfaction with life. In conclusion, this innovative intervention was effective in improving physical activity and work

  6. Resident-to-resident violence triggers in nursing homes.

    PubMed

    Snellgrove, Susan; Beck, Cornelia; Green, Angela; McSweeney, Jean C

    2013-11-01

    Certified nurses' assistants (CNAs) employed by a rural nursing home in Northeast Arkansas described their perceptions of resident-to-resident violence in order to provide insight on factors, including unmet needs, that may trigger the phenomenon. Semistructured interviews were conducted with 11 CNAs. Data were analyzed using content analysis and constant comparison. Two categories of triggers emerged from the data-active and passive. Active triggers involved the actions of other residents that were intrusive in nature, such as wandering into a residents' personal space, taking a resident's belongings, and so forth. Passive triggers did not involve the actions of residents but related to the internal and external environment of the residents. Examples were factors such as boredom, competition for attention and communication difficulties. Results indicate that there are factors, including unmet needs within the nursing home environment that may be identified and altered to prevent violence between residents.

  7. Elevated personal exposure to particulate matter from human activities in a residence.

    PubMed

    Ferro, Andrea R; Kopperud, Royal J; Hildemann, Lynn M

    2004-01-01

    Continuous laser particle counters collocated with time-integrated filter samplers were used to measure personal, indoor, and outdoor particulate matter (PM) concentrations for a variety of prescribed human activities during a 5-day experimental period in a home in Redwood City, CA, USA. The mean daytime personal exposures to PM(2.5) and PM(5) during prescribed activities were 6 and 17 times, respectively, as high as the pre-activity indoor background concentration. Activities that resulted in the highest exposures of PM(2.5), PM(5), and PM(10) were those that disturbed dust reservoirs on furniture and textiles, such as dry dusting, folding clothes and blankets, and making a bed. The vigor of activity and type of flooring were also important factors for dust resuspension. Personal exposures to PM(2.5) and PM(5) were 1.4 and 1.6 times, respectively, as high as the indoor concentration as measured by a stationary monitor. The ratio of personal exposure to the indoor concentration was a function of both particle size and the distance of the human activity from the stationary indoor monitor. The results demonstrate that a wide variety of indoor human resuspension activities increase human exposure to PM and contribute to the "personal cloud" effect.

  8. Promoting a healthy diet and physical activity in adults with intellectual disabilities living in community residences: Design and evaluation of a cluster-randomized intervention

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Many adults with intellectual disabilities have poor dietary habits, low physical activity and weight disturbances. This study protocol describes the design and evaluation of a health intervention aiming to improve diet and physical activity in this target group. In Sweden, adults with intellectual disabilities often live in community residences where the staff has insufficient education regarding the special health needs of residents. No published lifestyle interventions have simultaneously targeted both residents and staff. Methods/Design The intervention is designed to suit the ordinary work routines of community residences. It is based on social cognitive theory and takes 12-15 months to complete. The intervention includes three components: 1) Ten health education sessions for residents in their homes; 2) the appointment of a health ambassador among the staff in each residence and formation of a network; and 3) a study circle for staff in each residence. The intervention is implemented by consultation with managers, training of health educators, and coaching of health ambassadors. Fidelity is assessed based on the participation of residents and staff in the intervention activities. The study design is a cluster-randomised trial with physical activity as primary outcome objectively assessed by pedometry. Secondary outcomes are dietary quality assessed by digital photography, measured weight, height and waist circumference, and quality of life assessed by a quality of life scale. Intermediate outcomes are changes in work routines in the residences assessed by a questionnaire to managers. Adults with mild to moderate intellectual disabilities living in community residences in Stockholm County are eligible for inclusion. Multilevel analysis is used to evaluate effects on primary and secondary outcomes. The impact of the intervention on work routines in community residences is analysed by ordinal regression analysis. Barriers and facilitators of

  9. The anti-cancer effects of carotenoids and other phytonutrients resides in their combined activity.

    PubMed

    Linnewiel-Hermoni, Karin; Khanin, Marina; Danilenko, Michael; Zango, Gabriel; Amosi, Yaara; Levy, Joseph; Sharoni, Yoav

    2015-04-15

    Epidemiological studies have consistently shown that regular consumption of fruits and vegetables is strongly associated with reduced risk of developing chronic diseases, such as cancer. It is now accepted that the actions of any specific phytonutrient alone do not explain the observed health benefits of diets rich in fruits and vegetables as nutrients that were taken alone in clinical trials did not show consistent preventive effects. The considerable cost and complexity of such clinical trials requires prudent selection of combinations of ingredients rather than single compounds. Indeed, synergistic inhibition of prostate and mammary cancer cell growth was evident when using combinations of low concentrations of various carotenoids or carotenoids with retinoic acid and the active metabolite of vitamin-D. In this study we aimed to develop simple and sensitive in vitro methods which provide information on potent combinations suitable for inclusion in clinical studies for cancer prevention. We, thus, used reporter gene assays of the transcriptional activity of the androgen receptor in hormone-dependent prostate cancer cells and of the electrophile/antioxidant response element (EpRE/ARE) transcription system. We found that combinations of several carotenoids (e.g., lycopene, phytoene and phytofluene), or carotenoids and polyphenols (e.g., carnosic acid and curcumin) and/or other compounds (e.g., vitamin E) synergistically inhibit the androgen receptor activity and activate the EpRE/ARE system. The activation of EpRE/ARE was up to four fold higher than the sum of the activities of the single ingredients, a robust hallmark of synergy. Such combinations can further be tested in the more complex in vivo models and human studies.

  10. Localization and activation of the Drosophila protease easter require the ER-resident saposin-like protein seele.

    PubMed

    Stein, David; Charatsi, Iphigenie; Cho, Yong Suk; Zhang, Zhenyu; Nguyen, Jesse; DeLotto, Robert; Luschnig, Stefan; Moussian, Bernard

    2010-11-01

    Drosophila embryonic dorsal-ventral polarity is generated by a series of serine protease processing events in the egg perivitelline space. Gastrulation Defective processes Snake, which then cleaves Easter, which then processes Spätzle into the activating ligand for the Toll receptor. seele was identified in a screen for mutations that, when homozygous in ovarian germline clones, lead to the formation of progeny embryos with altered embryonic patterning; maternal loss of seele function leads to the production of moderately dorsalized embryos. By combining constitutively active versions of Gastrulation Defective, Snake, Easter, and Spätzle with loss-of-function alleles of seele, we find that Seele activity is dispensable for Spätzle-mediated activation of Toll but is required for Easter, Snake, and Gastrulation Defective to exert their effects on dorsal-ventral patterning. Moreover, Seele function is required specifically for secretion of Easter from the developing embryo into the perivitelline space and for Easter processing. Seele protein resides in the endoplasmic reticulum of blastoderm embryos, suggesting a role in the trafficking of Easter to the perivitelline space, prerequisite to its processing and function. Easter transport to the perivitelline space represents a previously unappreciated control point in the signal transduction pathway that controls Drosophila embryonic dorsal-ventral polarity.

  11. Factors Influencing Expectations of Physical Activity for Adolescents Residing in Appalachia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elkins, Rebecca L.; Nabors, Laura; King, Keith; Vidourek, Rebecca

    2015-01-01

    Background: Appalachian adolescents are at an increased risk for sedentary behavior; little research has addressed this concern. Purpose: This study examined adolescents' expectations for engaging in physical activity (PA), chiefly expectations for relaxation and fitness. Independent variables were self-efficacy expectations (SEEs) to…

  12. 78 FR 5194 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Petition To Remove the Conditions on Residence, Form I...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-24

    ... at 77 FR 65708, allowing for a 60-day public comment period. USCIS did receive 3 comments in... Register at 77 FR 65708 on October 30, 2012. If you need a copy of the information collection instrument... SECURITY U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services Agency Information Collection Activities: Petition...

  13. 78 FR 63236 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Application To Replace Permanent Resident Card, Form...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-23

    ... 78 FR 26647, allowing for a 60-day public comment period. USCIS received comments in connection with... SECURITY U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services Agency Information Collection Activities: Application To...-Day Notice. SUMMARY: The Department of Homeland Security (DHS), U.S. Citizenship and...

  14. 78 FR 26647 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Application To Replace Permanent Resident Card, Form I...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-07

    ... SECURITY U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services Agency Information Collection Activities: Application To... Notice. SUMMARY: The Department of Homeland Security (DHS), U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services... Security sponsoring the collection: Form I-90, U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services. (4)...

  15. Importance of Quality Recreation Activities for Older Adults Residing in Nursing Homes: Considerations for Gerontologists.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haberkost, Michael; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Based on a needs assessment survey (66 responses from 101 nursing home activity coordinators), a recreation manual and training program was developed and tested with 25 coordinators/recreation staff. The 14 who completed evaluations increased their understanding of such topics as depression; goals of nursing home recreation programs; motivation of…

  16. 77 FR 65708 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Petition To Remove the Conditions on Residence, Form...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-30

    ... SECURITY U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services Agency Information Collection Activities: Petition To...: 60-Day Notice. SUMMARY: The Department of Homeland Security (DHS), U.S. Citizenship and Immigration... by persons who assist the respondent with the preparation of the form or the cost to the...

  17. 78 FR 57869 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Record of Abandonment of Lawful Permanent Resident...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-20

    ... SECURITY U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services Agency Information Collection Activities: Record of... ACTION: 60-day notice. SUMMARY: The Department of Homeland Security (DHS), U.S. Citizenship and.... the time, effort, and resources used by the respondents to respond), the estimated cost to...

  18. 29 CFR 1975.6 - Policy as to domestic household employment activities in private residences.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 9 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Policy as to domestic household employment activities in... SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED) COVERAGE OF EMPLOYERS UNDER THE WILLIAMS-STEIGER OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ACT OF 1970 § 1975.6 Policy as to domestic...

  19. 29 CFR 1975.6 - Policy as to domestic household employment activities in private residences.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 9 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Policy as to domestic household employment activities in... WILLIAMS-STEIGER OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ACT OF 1970 § 1975.6 Policy as to domestic household... regarded as ordinary domestic household tasks, such as house cleaning, cooking, and caring for...

  20. Antimicrobial Activity of Medicated Soaps Commonly Used By Dar es Salaam Residents in Tanzania.

    PubMed

    Mwambete, K D; Lyombe, F

    2011-01-01

    An in vitro evaluation of the anti-microbial activity of medicated soaps was conducted using ditch-plate and hand washing techniques. Strains of reference microbes namely Candida albicans (ATCC90028), Staphylococcus aureus (ATCC25923), Pseudomonas aureginosa (ATCC27853) and Escherichia coli (ATCC25922) were tested at three different soaps' concentrations (1.0, 4.0 and 8.0 mg/ml). A total of 16 medicated soaps were assayed for their antimicrobial efficacy. Of these, 13 were medicated and 3 non-medicated soaps, which served as control. Ciprofloxacin and ketaconazole were employed as positive controls. Label disclosure for the soaps' ingredients and other relevant information were absorbed. The most common antimicrobial active ingredients were triclosan, trichloroxylenol and trichlorocarbanilide. ANOVA for means of zones of inhibition revealed variability of antimicrobial activity among the medicated soaps. Positive correlation (r=0.318; P<0.01) between zones of inhibition and soaps' concentrations was evidenced. Hand washing frequencies positively correlated with microbial counts. Roberts(®) soap exhibited the largest zone of inhibition (34 mm) on S. aureus. Candida albicans was the least susceptible microbe. Regency(®) and Dalan(®) exhibited the least zone of inhibition on the tested bacteria. Protex(®), Roberts(®), Family(®) and Protector(®) were equally effective (P<0.01) against S. aureus. In conclusion, majority of the assayed medicated soaps have satisfactory antibacterial activity; though lack antifungal effect with exception of Linda(®) liquid soap. The hand washing technique has proved to be inappropriate for evaluation of soaps' antimicrobial efficacy due to presence of the skin microflora. PMID:22131630

  1. Antimicrobial Activity of Medicated Soaps Commonly Used By Dar es Salaam Residents in Tanzania

    PubMed Central

    Mwambete, K. D.; Lyombe, F.

    2011-01-01

    An in vitro evaluation of the anti-microbial activity of medicated soaps was conducted using ditch-plate and hand washing techniques. Strains of reference microbes namely Candida albicans (ATCC90028), Staphylococcus aureus (ATCC25923), Pseudomonas aureginosa (ATCC27853) and Escherichia coli (ATCC25922) were tested at three different soaps’ concentrations (1.0, 4.0 and 8.0 mg/ml). A total of 16 medicated soaps were assayed for their antimicrobial efficacy. Of these, 13 were medicated and 3 non-medicated soaps, which served as control. Ciprofloxacin and ketaconazole were employed as positive controls. Label disclosure for the soaps’ ingredients and other relevant information were absorbed. The most common antimicrobial active ingredients were triclosan, trichloroxylenol and trichlorocarbanilide. ANOVA for means of zones of inhibition revealed variability of antimicrobial activity among the medicated soaps. Positive correlation (r=0.318; P<0.01) between zones of inhibition and soaps’ concentrations was evidenced. Hand washing frequencies positively correlated with microbial counts. Roberts® soap exhibited the largest zone of inhibition (34 mm) on S. aureus. Candida albicans was the least susceptible microbe. Regency® and Dalan® exhibited the least zone of inhibition on the tested bacteria. Protex®, Roberts®, Family® and Protector® were equally effective (P<0.01) against S. aureus. In conclusion, majority of the assayed medicated soaps have satisfactory antibacterial activity; though lack antifungal effect with exception of Linda® liquid soap. The hand washing technique has proved to be inappropriate for evaluation of soaps’ antimicrobial efficacy due to presence of the skin microflora. PMID:22131630

  2. The Costs and Benefits of Active Coping for Adolescents Residing in Urban Poverty.

    PubMed

    Carothers, Kristin J; Arizaga, Jessica A; Carter, Jocelyn Smith; Taylor, Jeremy; Grant, Kathryn E

    2016-07-01

    The present study addresses the lack of specificity and diversity highlighted in recent stress literature reviews by examining active coping in relationships between exposure to violence and internalizing and externalizing symptoms in a sample of urban youth from predominantly low-income, African American and Latino backgrounds. Two hundred and forty-one youth (mean age at Time 1 = 13 years; 66 % female; 41 % African American, 28 % Latino, 14 % European American, 6 % Asian American, 7 % mixed/biracial, 1 % American Indian/native American, .5 % Hawaiian/Pacific Islander, 2 % other) and their parents participated in this three-wave study. Hierarchical regression analyses tested for moderation, and a cross lag panel path analysis tested for mediation. The results provide greater support for active coping as a variable that changes the relationship between exposure to community violence and externalizing symptoms, or moderation, rather than one that explains or mediates it. Further, specificity did not emerge for type of psychological outcome but did emerge for gender, such that active coping exacerbated the association between exposure to community violence and both internalizing and externalizing symptoms for girls, but not boys. These findings highlight the importance of contextual and demographic factors in influencing stress and coping processes during adolescence. PMID:27138173

  3. Detection of DNA damage by thiazole orange fluorescence probe assisted with exonuclease III.

    PubMed

    Lu, Qian; Zhou, Zhenxian; Mei, Yuan; Wei, Wei; Liu, Songqin

    2013-11-15

    This work reports a fluorescent dye insertion approach for detection of DNA damage. The capture DNA with overhanging 3'-terminus was immobilized on silicon surface to hybridize with target DNA. The intercalation of cyanine dye of thiazole orange (TO) to the double helix structure of DNA (dsDNA) allowed intense enhancement of fluorescence signal. The DNA damage with chemicals led to poor intercalation of TO into double helix structure, resulting in the decrease of the fluorescence signal. This signal decrease could be further enhanced by exonuclease III (Exo III). With this approach, the target DNA could be detected down to 47 fM. Seven chemicals were chosen as models to monitor DNA damage. The results suggested that the present strategy could be developed to detect DNA damage, to classify the damaging mechanism with chemicals and to estimate the toxic effect of chemicals.

  4. Permanent resident

    PubMed Central

    Fisher, John F.

    2016-01-01

    The training of physicians in the past century was based primarily on responsibility and the chain-of-command. Those with the bulk of that responsibility in the fields of pediatrics and internal medicine were residents. Residents trained the medical students and supervised them carefully in caring for patients. Most attending physicians supervised their teams at arm's length, primarily serving as teachers of the finer points of diagnosis and treatment during set periods of the day or week with a perfunctory signature on write-ups or progress notes. Residents endeavored to protect the attending physician from being heavily involved unless they were unsure about a clinical problem. Before contacting the attending physician, a more senior resident would be called. Responsibility was the ultimate teacher. The introduction of diagnosis-related groups by the federal government dramatically changed the health care delivery system, placing greater emphasis on attending physician visibility in the medical record, ultimately resulting in more attending physician involvement in day-to-day care of patients in academic institutions. Without specified content in attending notes, hospital revenues would decline. Although always in charge technically, attending physicians increasingly have assumed the role once dominated by the resident. Using biographical experiences of more than 40 years, the author acknowledges and praises the educational role of responsibility in his own training and laments its declining role in today's students and house staff. PMID:27193992

  5. Permanent resident.

    PubMed

    Fisher, John F

    2016-01-01

    The training of physicians in the past century was based primarily on responsibility and the chain-of-command. Those with the bulk of that responsibility in the fields of pediatrics and internal medicine were residents. Residents trained the medical students and supervised them carefully in caring for patients. Most attending physicians supervised their teams at arm's length, primarily serving as teachers of the finer points of diagnosis and treatment during set periods of the day or week with a perfunctory signature on write-ups or progress notes. Residents endeavored to protect the attending physician from being heavily involved unless they were unsure about a clinical problem. Before contacting the attending physician, a more senior resident would be called. Responsibility was the ultimate teacher. The introduction of diagnosis-related groups by the federal government dramatically changed the health care delivery system, placing greater emphasis on attending physician visibility in the medical record, ultimately resulting in more attending physician involvement in day-to-day care of patients in academic institutions. Without specified content in attending notes, hospital revenues would decline. Although always in charge technically, attending physicians increasingly have assumed the role once dominated by the resident. Using biographical experiences of more than 40 years, the author acknowledges and praises the educational role of responsibility in his own training and laments its declining role in today's students and house staff.

  6. Kinetic analysis demonstrates a requirement for the Rat1 exonuclease in cotranscriptional pre-rRNA cleavage.

    PubMed

    Axt, Konstantin; French, Sarah L; Beyer, Ann L; Tollervey, David

    2014-01-01

    During yeast ribosome synthesis, three early cleavages generate the 20S precursor to the 18S rRNA component of the 40S subunits. These cleavages can occur either on the nascent transcript (nascent transcript cleavage; NTC) or on the 35S pre-rRNA that has been fully transcribed and released from the rDNA (released transcript cleavage; RTC). These alternative pathways cannot be assessed by conventional RNA analyses, since the pre-rRNA products of NTC and RTC are identical. They can, however, be distinguished kinetically by metabolic labeling and quantified by modeling of the kinetic data. The aim of this work was to use these approaches as a practical tool to identify factors that mediate the decision between utilization of NTC and RTC. The maturation pathways of the 40S and 60S ribosomal subunits are largely distinct. However, depletion of some early-acting 60S synthesis factors, including the 5'-exonuclease Rat1, leads to accumulation of the 35S pre-rRNA and delayed 20S pre-rRNA synthesis. We speculated that this might reflect the loss of NTC. Rat1 acts catalytically in 5.8S and 25S rRNA processing but binds to the pre-rRNA prior to these activities. Kinetic data for strains depleted of Rat1 match well with the modeled effects of strongly reduced NTC. This was confirmed by EM visualization of "Miller" chromatin spreads of nascent pre-rRNA transcripts. Modeling further indicates that NTC takes place in a limited time window, when the polymerase has transcribed ∼ 1.5 Kb past the A2 cleavage site. We speculate that assembly of early-acting 60S synthesis factors is monitored as a quality control system prior to NTC. PMID:24498264

  7. Academic careers: choice and activity of graduates of a pediatric residency program 1974-1986.

    PubMed Central

    Lovejoy, F. H.; Ledley, F. D.; Nathan, D. G.

    1993-01-01

    In summary, our data suggest that the playing field for academic medicine is changing. It is more patient care oriented, more multifaceted and supported more by clinical dollars than in the past. Greater flexibility in what constitutes "academic success" is necessary to assure a supportive environment in which tomorrow's academic faculty can develop and flourish. To accomplish these goals promotion systems that reward not only research but also teaching and clinical care accomplishments will be necessary. Clinicians will need to be compared with clinicians, teachers with teachers, clinical investigators with clinical investigators and basic investigators with basic investigators. Sources of support will need to be more clearly targeted along activity lines with clinical dollars supporting the clinician, medical education dollars supporting the teacher-educators and federal and foundation dollars supporting research. In our department, time and effort for research (45%) approximates dollar support for this activity (44%), while clinical dollars (43%) fund to a greater degree time and effort committed to clinical care (34%), and administration and teaching dollars (13%) under fund time and effort committed to these activities (21%). This suggests the need to identify increased funding to support teaching and education. Promotion expectations for women will need to be more flexible and adjusted to family responsibilities and demands. Most of all, however, we academic faculty must support enthusiastically the importance and joy of our work. We must be encouraging to our colleagues and our students and continue to recognize that for all of the difficulties and challenges, academic life is a rewarding and fulfilling enterprise. PMID:1343441

  8. Academic careers: choice and activity of graduates of a pediatric residency program 1974-1986.

    PubMed

    Lovejoy, F H; Ledley, F D; Nathan, D G

    1993-01-01

    In summary, our data suggest that the playing field for academic medicine is changing. It is more patient care oriented, more multifaceted and supported more by clinical dollars than in the past. Greater flexibility in what constitutes "academic success" is necessary to assure a supportive environment in which tomorrow's academic faculty can develop and flourish. To accomplish these goals promotion systems that reward not only research but also teaching and clinical care accomplishments will be necessary. Clinicians will need to be compared with clinicians, teachers with teachers, clinical investigators with clinical investigators and basic investigators with basic investigators. Sources of support will need to be more clearly targeted along activity lines with clinical dollars supporting the clinician, medical education dollars supporting the teacher-educators and federal and foundation dollars supporting research. In our department, time and effort for research (45%) approximates dollar support for this activity (44%), while clinical dollars (43%) fund to a greater degree time and effort committed to clinical care (34%), and administration and teaching dollars (13%) under fund time and effort committed to these activities (21%). This suggests the need to identify increased funding to support teaching and education. Promotion expectations for women will need to be more flexible and adjusted to family responsibilities and demands. Most of all, however, we academic faculty must support enthusiastically the importance and joy of our work. We must be encouraging to our colleagues and our students and continue to recognize that for all of the difficulties and challenges, academic life is a rewarding and fulfilling enterprise.

  9. Slow-Onset Inhibition of the FabI Enoyl Reductase from Francisella tularensis: Residence Time and in Vivo Activity

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, H.; England, K; Ende, C; Truglio, J; Luckner, S; Reddy, B; Marlenee, N; Knudson, S; Knudson, D; et. al.

    2009-01-01

    Francisella tularensis is a highly virulent and contagious Gram-negative intracellular bacterium that causes the disease tularemia in mammals. The high infectivity and the ability of the bacterium to survive for weeks in a cool, moist environment have raised the possibility that this organism could be exploited deliberately as a potential biological weapon. Fatty acid biosynthesis (FAS-II) is essential for bacterial viability and has been validated as a target for the discovery of novel antibacterials. The FAS-II enoyl reductase ftuFabI has been cloned and expressed, and a series of diphenyl ethers have been identified that are subnanomolar inhibitors of the enzyme with MIC90 values as low as 0.00018 ?g mL-1. The existence of a linear correlation between the Ki and MIC values strongly suggests that the antibacterial activity of the diphenyl ethers results from direct inhibition of ftuFabI within the cell. The compounds are slow-onset inhibitors of ftuFabI, and the residence time of the inhibitors on the enzyme correlates with their in vivo activity in a mouse model of tularemia infection. Significantly, the rate of breakdown of the enzyme-inhibitor complex is a better predictor of in vivo activity than the overall thermodynamic stability of the complex, a concept that has important implications for the discovery of novel chemotherapeutics that normally rely on equilibrium measurements of potency.

  10. Design and operation specifications of an active monitoring system for detecting southern resident killer whales

    SciTech Connect

    Deng, Zhiqun; Carlson, Thomas J.; Xu, Jinshan; Martinez, Jayson J.; Weiland, Mark A.; Mueller, Robert P.; Myers, Joshua R.; Jones, Mark E.

    2011-09-30

    Before final approval is given to the Snohomish County Public Utility District No. 1 for deploying the first tidal power devices in the United States in an open water environment, a system to manage the potential risk of injury to killer whales due to collision with moving turbine blades must be demonstrated. The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is tasked with establishing the performance requirements for, constructing, and testing a prototype marine animal alert system for triggering temporary turbine shutdown when there is risk of collision with a killer whale. To develop a system that relies on active sonar two critical areas must be investigated - the target strength of killer whales and the frequency content of commercially available active sonar units. PNNL studied three target strength models: a simple model, the Fourier matching model, and the Kirchoff-ray mode model. Using target strength measurements of bottlenose dolphins obtained by previous researchers and assuming killer whales share similar morphology and structure, PNNL extrapolated the target strength of an adult killer whale 7.5 m in length at a frequency of 67 kHz. To study the frequency content of a commercially available sonar unit, direct measurements of the signal transmitted by the sonar were obtained by using a hydrophone connected to a data acquisition system in both laboratory and field conditions. The measurements revealed that in addition to the primary frequency of 200 kHz, there is a secondary frequency component at 90 kHz, which is within the hearing range of killer whales. The amplitude of the 90-kHz frequency component is above the hearing threshold of killer whales but below the threshold for potential injuries.

  11. Teaching, leadership, scholarly productivity, and level of activity in the chiropractic profession: a study of graduates of the Los Angeles College of Chiropractic radiology residency program

    PubMed Central

    Young, Kenneth J.; Siordia, Lawrence

    2012-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to track the graduates of the Los Angeles College of Chiropractic (LACC) radiology residency program, review their scholarly productivity, and report those involved in teaching and leadership positions. Methods Former LACC residents’ career information was identified through publicly available electronic documents including Web sites and social media. PubMed and the Index to Chiropractic Literature databases were searched for chiropractic graduate job surveys, and proportional comparisons were made between the career paths of LACC radiology residency graduates and those of non–residency-trained chiropractors. Results Of 47 former LACC residents, 28 (60%) have or previously had careers in tertiary (chiropractic) education; and 12 (26%) have attained a department chair position or higher at tertiary teaching institutions. Twenty-two (47%) have or previously had private radiology practices, whereas 11 (23%) have or previously had clinical chiropractic practices. Often, residency graduates hold or have held 2 of these positions at once; and one, all 3. Chapters or books were authored by 13 (28%). Conclusion Radiology residency LACC graduates are professionally active, particularly in education, and demonstrate scholarly productivity. PMID:23966885

  12. Current selection for lower migratory activity will drive the evolution of residency in a migratory bird population.

    PubMed

    Pulido, Francisco; Berthold, Peter

    2010-04-20

    Global warming is impacting biodiversity by altering the distribution, abundance, and phenology of a wide range of animal and plant species. One of the best documented responses to recent climate change is alterations in the migratory behavior of birds, but the mechanisms underlying these phenotypic adjustments are largely unknown. This knowledge is still crucial to predict whether populations of migratory birds will adapt to a rapid increase in temperature. We monitored migratory behavior in a population of blackcaps (Sylvia atricapilla) to test for evolutionary responses to recent climate change. Using a common garden experiment in time and captive breeding we demonstrated a genetic reduction in migratory activity and evolutionary change in phenotypic plasticity of migration onset. An artificial selection experiment further revealed that residency will rapidly evolve in completely migratory bird populations if selection for shorter migration distance persists. Our findings suggest that current alterations of the environment are favoring birds wintering closer to the breeding grounds and that populations of migratory birds have strongly responded to these changes in selection. The reduction of migratory activity is probably an important evolutionary process in the adaptation of migratory birds to climate change, because it reduces migration costs and facilitates the rapid adjustment to the shifts in the timing of food availability during reproduction.

  13. Physical activity and sedentary behavior among adults 60 years and older: New York City residents compared with a national sample.

    PubMed

    Evenson, Kelly R; Morland, Kimberly B; Wen, Fang; Scanlin, Kathleen

    2014-10-01

    This study describes moderate to vigorous physical activity (MVPA) and sedentary behavior among New York City (NYC) residents 60 years and older and compared with national United States' estimates. Adults aged 60 or older living in NYC (n = 760) were compared with similar aged adults from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES; n = 2,451 adults). Both groups wore an ActiGraph accelerometer for one week. The NYC sample recorded 13.2, 23.8, and 37.8 mean min/day of MVPA and the NHANES sample recorded 10.6, 21.1, and 39.3, depending on the definition. Sedentary behavior averaged 9.6 hr/day for the NYC sample and 9.3 hr/day for the NHANES sample. The NYC sample spent a longer proportion of time in sedentary behavior and light activities, but more time in MVPA than the NHANES sample. Urbanicity may explain some of the differences between the two samples.

  14. What Medical Oncologist Residents Think about the Italian Speciality Schools: A Survey of the Italian Association of Medical Oncology (AIOM) on Educational, Clinical and Research Activities

    PubMed Central

    Moretti, Anna; De Angelis, Carmine; Lambertini, Matteo; Cremolini, Chiara; Imbimbo, Martina; Berardi, Rossana; Di Maio, Massimo; Cascinu, Stefano; La Verde, Nicla

    2016-01-01

    Background and objectives Relevant heterogeneity exists among Postgraduate Schools in Medical Oncology, also within the same country. In order to provide a comprehensive overview of the landscape of Italian Postgraduate Schools in Medical Oncology, the Italian Association of Medical Oncology (AIOM) undertook an online survey, inviting all the residents to describe their daily activities and to express their overall satisfaction about their programs. Methods A team composed of five residents and three consultants in medical oncology prepared a 38 items questionnaire that was published online in a reserved section, accessible through a link sent by e-mail. Residents were invited to anonymously fill in the questionnaire that included the following sub-sections: quality of teaching, clinical and research activity, overall satisfaction. Results Three-hundred and eleven (57%) out of 547 invited residents filled in the questionnaire. Two-hundred and twenty-three (72%) participants declared that attending lessons was frequently difficult and 153 (49%) declared they did not gain substantial improvement in their knowledge from them. Fifty-five percent stated that they did not receive lessons on palliative care. Their overall judgment about didactic activity was low in 63% of the interviewed. The satisfaction for clinical activity was in 86% of cases good: 84% recognized that, during the training period, they acquired a progressive independence on patients' management. About research activity, the majority (79%) of participants in the survey was actively engaged in managing patients included in clinical trials but the satisfaction level for the involvement in research activities was quite low (54%). Overall, 246 residents (79%) gave a positive global judgment of their Medical Oncology Schools. Conclusions The landscape of Italian Postgraduate Schools in Medical Oncology is quite heterogeneous across the country. Some improvements in the organization of teaching and in the

  15. Yeast glucan particles activate murine resident macrophages to secrete proinflammatory cytokines via MyD88- and Syk kinase-dependent pathways.

    PubMed

    Li, Bing; Cramer, Daniel; Wagner, Stephanie; Hansen, Richard; King, Chelsea; Kakar, Shelly; Ding, Chuanlin; Yan, Jun

    2007-08-01

    The therapeutic benefits of fungal beta-glucans have been demonstrated as immuno-stimulating agents. In this study, we aimed to explore the mechanisms used by yeast beta-glucan-rich particles to activate murine resident macrophages for cytokine secretion. We demonstrated that resident macrophages were effectively activated by whole yeast beta-glucan particles (WGPs), such as with the upregulation of co-stimulatory molecules and the secretion of cytokines. The binding ability of WGPs and the levels of cytokine secretion in resident macrophages were significantly inhibited by soluble yeast beta-glucan but not by blockade of zymosan glucan receptor dectin-1. In addition, WGP-stimulated cytokine secretion was partially dependent on the MyD-88 pathway but was not significantly affected in CR3-deficient (CR3(-/-)) mice. Furthermore, we showed that Syk kinase was recruited upon WGP stimulation and was required for the production of cytokines. Taken together, these observations suggest that beta-glucan recognition is necessary but not sufficient to induce inflammatory response on resident macrophages. In addition, beta-glucan particles may use differential mechanisms for cytokine secretion in resident macrophages that may modulate both innate and adaptive immunity.

  16. Yeast Glucan Particles Activate Murine Resident Macrophages to Secrete Proinflammatory Cytokines Via MyD88- and Syk Kinase-dependent Pathways1

    PubMed Central

    Li, Bing; Cramer, Daniel; Wagner, Stephanie; Hansen, Richard; King, Chelsea; Kakar, Shelly; Ding, Chuanlin; Yan, Jun

    2007-01-01

    The therapeutic benefits of fungal β-glucans have been demonstrated as immuno-stimulating agents. In this study, we aimed to explore the mechanisms used by yeast β-glucan-rich particles to activate murine resident macrophages for cytokine secretion. We demonstrated that resident macrophages were effectively activated by whole yeast β-glucan particles (WGPs), such as with the up-regulation of co-stimulatory molecules and the secretion of cytokines. The binding ability of WGPs and the levels of cytokine secretion in resident macrophages were significantly inhibited by soluble yeast β-glucan but not by blockade of zymosan glucan receptor dectin-1. In addition, WGP-stimulated cytokine secretion was partially dependent on the MyD-88 pathway but was not significantly affected in CR3-deficient (CR3−/−) mice. Furthermore, we showed that Syk kinase was recruited upon WGP stimulation and was required for the production of cytokines. Taken together, these observations suggest that β-glucan recognition is necessary but not sufficient to induce inflammatory response on resident macrophages. In addition, β-glucan particles may use differential mechanisms for cytokine secretion in resident macrophages that may modulate both innate and adaptive immunity. PMID:17572156

  17. Does Concern Motivate Behavior Change?: Exploring the Relationship between Physical Activity and Body Mass Index among Low-Income Housing Residents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tamers, Sara L.; Allen, Jennifer; Yang, May; Stoddard, Anne; Harley, Amy; Sorensen, Glorian

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To explore relationships between concerns and physical activity and body mass index (BMI) among a racially/ethnically diverse low-income population. Method: A cross-sectional survey documented behavioral risks among racially/ethnically diverse low-income residents in the Boston area (2005-2009). Multivariable logistic regressions were…

  18. The Rtr1p CTD phosphatase autoregulates its mRNA through a degradation pathway involving the REX exonucleases

    PubMed Central

    Hodko, Domagoj; Ward, Taylor; Chanfreau, Guillaume

    2016-01-01

    Rtr1p is a phosphatase that impacts gene expression by modulating the phosphorylation status of the C-terminal domain of the large subunit of RNA polymerase II. Here, we show that Rtr1p is a component of a novel mRNA degradation pathway that promotes its autoregulation through turnover of its own mRNA. We show that the 3′UTR of the RTR1 mRNA contains a cis element that destabilizes this mRNA. RTR1 mRNA turnover is achieved through binding of Rtr1p to the RTR1 mRNP in a manner that is dependent on this cis element. Genetic evidence shows that Rtr1p-mediated decay of the RTR1 mRNA involves the 5′-3′ DExD/H-box RNA helicase Dhh1p and the 3′-5′ exonucleases Rex2p and Rex3p. Rtr1p and Rex3p are found associated with Dhh1p, suggesting a model for recruiting the REX exonucleases to the RTR1 mRNA for degradation. Rtr1p-mediated decay potentially impacts additional transcripts, including the unspliced BMH2 pre-mRNA. We propose that Rtr1p may imprint its RNA targets cotranscriptionally and determine their downstream degradation mechanism by directing these transcripts to a novel turnover pathway that involves Rtr1p, Dhh1p, and the REX family of exonucleases. PMID:26843527

  19. Resident-to-Resident Violence Triggers in Nursing Homes

    PubMed Central

    Snellgrove, Susan; Beck, Cornelia; Green, Angela; McSweeney, Jean C.

    2014-01-01

    Certified nurses’ assistants (CNAs) employed by a rural nursing home in Northeast Arkansas described their perceptions of resident-to-resident violence in order to provide insight on factors, including unmet needs, that may trigger the phenomenon. Semistructured interviews were conducted with 11 CNAs. Data were analyzed using content analysis and constant comparison. Two categories of triggers emerged from the data—active and passive. Active triggers involved the actions of other residents that were intrusive in nature, such as wandering into a residents’ personal space, taking a resident’s belongings, and so forth. Passive triggers did not involve the actions of residents but related to the internal and external environment of the residents. Examples were factors such as boredom, competition for attention and communication difficulties. Results indicate that there are factors, including unmet needs within the nursing home environment that may be identified and altered to prevent violence between residents. PMID:23447361

  20. Residents' diverse perspectives of the impact of neighbourhood renewal on quality of life and physical activity engagement: Improvements but unresolved issues

    PubMed Central

    Coulson, J.C.; Fox, K.R.; Lawlor, D.A.; Trayers, T.

    2011-01-01

    Few studies have been published on the reactions of residents to modifications of their residential landscape. We explored residents' experiences of home zone remodelling and construction of a new cycle-walkway in a deprived neighbourhood with a particular focus on aspects of quality of life and physical activity participation. Focus groups (n=5 groups, 21 individuals) were used to investigate residents' perceptions of the effects of neighbourhood change on their lives. Consultation by planners was received positively. Several aspects of the neighbourhood were perceived to have improved, including spatial aesthetics, lighting and streetscape planting. However, influence on physical activity was minimal. Car-focused behaviour and ownership remained dominant, and safety related concerns limited behavioural choices. Residents highlighted many socio-environmental challenges that remained such as sense of neighbourhood safety, poor public transport provision, people's parking behaviour locally, and problem neighbours, and these tended to dominate conversations. Infrastructural intervention may be one important part of multi-layered solutions to improved neighbourhood life. PMID:21145277

  1. Detecting Allelic Expression Imbalance at Candidate Genes Using 5' Exonuclease Genotyping Technology.

    PubMed

    Gahan, Jillian M; Byrne, Mikaela M; Hill, Matthew; Quinn, Emma M; Murphy, Ross T; Anney, Richard J L; Ryan, Anthony W

    2015-01-01

    Genetic variation along the length of a chromosome can influence the transcription of a gene. In a heterozygous individual, this may lead to one chromosome producing different levels of RNA, compared to its paired chromosome, for a given gene. Allelic differences in gene expression can offer insight into the role of variation in transcription, and subsequently infer a route to conferring disease risk. This phenomenon is known as allele expression imbalance or AEI, which may be assayed using a PCR-based method that includes the quantification of the relative dosage of each allele (e.g., 5' exonuclease assays, TaqMan™). Importantly, in heterozygous individuals the resolution of expression imbalance is performed within a controlled system; the comparison of the alternate allele is reported relative to the wild-type, as the experiment can be performed within a single sample, controlled for background genetic information. Alternative methods for the detection of AEI include Primer-extension MALDI-TOF (Sequenom MassARRAY(®)), Next-Generation Sequencing, and SNP genotyping arrays. Here we present the methods used for the TaqMan™ approach and include a description of the SNP identification, allele-specific PCR, and analytic methods to convert allele amplification metrics to relative allele dosage.

  2. Complementation between polymerase- and exonuclease-deficient mitochondrial DNA polymerase mutants in genomically engineered flies

    PubMed Central

    Macao, Bertil; Grönke, Sebastian; Siibak, Triinu; Stewart, James B; Baggio, Francesca; Dols, Jacqueline; Partridge, Linda; Falkenberg, Maria; Wredenberg, Anna; Larsson, Nils-Göran

    2016-01-01

    Replication errors are the main cause of mtDNA mutations and a compelling approach to decrease mutation levels would therefore be to increase the fidelity of the catalytic subunit (POLγA) of the mtDNA polymerase. Here we genomically engineered the tamas locus, encoding fly POLγA, and introduced alleles expressing exonuclease- (exo-) and polymerase-deficient (pol-) POLγA versions. The exo- mutant leads to accumulation of point mutations and linear deletions of mtDNA, whereas pol- mutants cause mtDNA depletion. The mutant tamas alleles are developmentally lethal but can complement each other in trans resulting in viable flies with clonally expanded mtDNA mutations. Reconstitution of human mtDNA replication in vitro confirms that replication is a highly dynamic process where POLγA goes on and off the template to allow complementation during proofreading and elongation. The created fly models are valuable tools to study germ line transmission of mtDNA and the pathophysiology of POLγA mutation disease. PMID:26554610

  3. A DNA machine for sensitive and homogeneous DNA detection via lambda exonuclease assisted amplification.

    PubMed

    Liu, Lin; Lei, Jianping; Gao, Fenglei; Ju, Huangxian

    2013-10-15

    This work designs a DNA machine with three assistant DNAs and lambda exonuclease (Exo-λ) for sensitive and homogeneous fluorescent detection of DNA. The selective digestion of Exo-λ to blunt or recessed 5'-phosphorylated strand of probe 1-probe 2 duplex results in the release of target DNA and probe 2 to produce the fluorescence restoring of fluorophore labeled to probe 1. The released target DNA could hybridize with another probe 1-probe 2 duplex to trigger the target recycling for signal amplification, while the released probe 2 hybridized with molecular beacon to restore its fluorescence for signal enhancement. This DNA machine showed a fast response to target DNA with a linear concentration range from 0.4 pM to 4 nM. The limit of detection was 68 fM at a signal-to-noise ratio of 3. The high selectivity of the method may result from the Exo-λ's specific recognition-site of double-stranded DNA and the specific hybridization of target DNA with probe 1-probe 2 duplex. This DNA machine with the homogenous detection, rapid response as well as simplicity provides a new approach for sensitive detection of DNA.

  4. Ultrasensitive Electrochemical Biosensor for HIV Gene Detection Based on Graphene Stabilized Gold Nanoclusters with Exonuclease Amplification.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yijia; Bai, Xiaoning; Wen, Wei; Zhang, Xiuhua; Wang, Shengfu

    2015-08-26

    Because human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) has been one of the most terrible viruses in recent decades, early diagnosis of the HIV gene is of great importance for all scientists around the world. In our work, we developed a novel electrochemical biosensor based on one-step ultrasonic synthesized graphene stabilized gold nanocluster (GR/AuNC) modified glassy carbon electrode (GCE) with an exonuclease III (Exo III)-assisted target recycling amplification strategy for the detection of HIV DNA. It is the first time that GR/AuNCs have been used as biosensor platform and aptamer with cytosine-rich base set as capture probe to construct the biosensor. With the combination of cytosine-rich capture probe, good conductivity and high surfaces of GR/AuNCs, and Exo III-assisted target recycling amplification, we realized high sensitivity and good selectivity detection of target HIV DNA with a detection limit of 30 aM (S/N = 3). Furthermore, the proposed biosensor has a promising potential application for target detection in human serum analysis.

  5. DNA sequencing with stacked nanopores and exonuclease: A simulation-based analysis.

    PubMed

    Sampath, Gopalan

    2016-09-01

    Experiments have shown that DNA can be sequenced using an electrolytic cell with a nanopore and an exonuclease enzyme in the cis chamber that cleaves the leading mononucleotide in a strand of DNA. The base therein can be identified with an accuracy of 80-90% by the level of the current blockade caused in the pore; a biological adapter inside slows down the cleaved mononucleotide and lowers the detection bandwidth required. In this approach, which has been mathematically modeled, analyzed, and simulated, mononucleotides are likely to be lost to diffusion or enter the pore out of order. To remedy this, a modified cell with three stacked nanopores (named UNP, MNP, and DNP) and the enzyme attached to the trans side of UNP is proposed and modeled. Mononucleotide translocation is simulated with the random walk of a dimensionless particle; the results show that the cleaved mononucleotides translocate through MNP and DNP in sequence order without loss. If this holds in practice then with a suitably designed adapter and compatible enzyme turnover rates sequencing accuracy would be limited only by the accuracy of mononucleotide discrimination. Potential implementation issues are discussed. PMID:27313188

  6. Coagulation effect on the activity size distributions of long lived radon progeny aerosols and its application to atmospheric residence time estimation techniques.

    PubMed

    Anand, S; Mayya, Y S

    2015-03-01

    The long lived naturally occurring radon progeny species in the atmosphere, namely (210)Pb, (210)Bi and (210)Po, have been used as important tracers for understanding the atmospheric mixing processes and estimating aerosol residence times. Several observations in the past have shown that the activity size distribution of these species peaks at larger particle sizes as compared to the short lived radon progeny species - an effect that has been attributed to the process of coagulation of the background aerosols to which they are attached. To address this issue, a mathematical equation is derived for the activity-size distribution of tracer species by formulating a generalized distribution function for the number of tracer atoms present in coagulating background particles in the presence of radioactive decay and removal. A set of these equations is numerically solved for the progeny chain using Fuchs coagulation kernel combined with a realistic steady-state aerosol size spectrum that includes nucleation, accumulation and coarse mode components. The important findings are: (i) larger shifts in the modal sizes of (210)Pb and (210)Po at higher aerosol concentrations such as that found in certain Asian urban regions (ii) enrichment of tracer specific activity on particles as compared to that predicted by pure attachment laws (iii) sharp decline of daughter-to-parent activity ratios for decreasing particle sizes. The implication of the results to size-fractionated residence time estimation techniques is highlighted. A coagulation corrected graphical approach is presented for estimating the residence times from the size-segregated activity ratios of (210)Bi and (210)Po with respect to (210)Pb. The discrepancy between the residence times predicted by conventional formula and the coagulation corrected approach for specified activity ratios increases at higher atmospheric aerosol number concentrations (>10(10) #/m(3)) for smaller sizes (<1 μm). The results are further

  7. Coagulation effect on the activity size distributions of long lived radon progeny aerosols and its application to atmospheric residence time estimation techniques.

    PubMed

    Anand, S; Mayya, Y S

    2015-03-01

    The long lived naturally occurring radon progeny species in the atmosphere, namely (210)Pb, (210)Bi and (210)Po, have been used as important tracers for understanding the atmospheric mixing processes and estimating aerosol residence times. Several observations in the past have shown that the activity size distribution of these species peaks at larger particle sizes as compared to the short lived radon progeny species - an effect that has been attributed to the process of coagulation of the background aerosols to which they are attached. To address this issue, a mathematical equation is derived for the activity-size distribution of tracer species by formulating a generalized distribution function for the number of tracer atoms present in coagulating background particles in the presence of radioactive decay and removal. A set of these equations is numerically solved for the progeny chain using Fuchs coagulation kernel combined with a realistic steady-state aerosol size spectrum that includes nucleation, accumulation and coarse mode components. The important findings are: (i) larger shifts in the modal sizes of (210)Pb and (210)Po at higher aerosol concentrations such as that found in certain Asian urban regions (ii) enrichment of tracer specific activity on particles as compared to that predicted by pure attachment laws (iii) sharp decline of daughter-to-parent activity ratios for decreasing particle sizes. The implication of the results to size-fractionated residence time estimation techniques is highlighted. A coagulation corrected graphical approach is presented for estimating the residence times from the size-segregated activity ratios of (210)Bi and (210)Po with respect to (210)Pb. The discrepancy between the residence times predicted by conventional formula and the coagulation corrected approach for specified activity ratios increases at higher atmospheric aerosol number concentrations (>10(10) #/m(3)) for smaller sizes (<1 μm). The results are further

  8. The Prediction of Physical Activity Intention and Behavior in Elderly Male Residents of a Nursing Home: A Comparison of Two Behavioral Theories

    PubMed Central

    Ghahremani, Leila; Niknami, Shamsaddin; Nazari, Mahin

    2012-01-01

    Background: Regular physical activity is ranked as a leading health indicator. Despite the extensive benefits of physical activity, elder people are much less active than desired. Using Theory of Planned Behavior (TPB) and the self-efficacy construct, this study examined the prediction of physical activity intention and behavior in a sample of elderly male resident of a nursing home. Methods: In a cross-sectional study of the residents of Kahrizak Nursing Home in Tehran, Iran, elderly men who were 60 years or older, capable of independent living, mobility, and verbal communication were asked to complete measures of the TPB, self-efficacy and physical activity behavior. Results: A hierarchical step-wise multiple regression analysis indicated that affective/instrumental attitude, subjective norm, and perceived behavioral control (PBC) explained 32.8% of the variance in physical activity intention, and self-efficacy provided an additional 2.7%. In a reverse step regression, the TPB variables explained an additional 12.2% of physical activity intention. In a multiple regression analysis on physical activity behavior, affective/instrumental attitude, subjective norm, perceived behavioral control (PBC) and intention explained 15.7% of the variance in physical activity behavior while self-efficacy contributed an additional 5.6%. In the reverse step regression, TPB predictors contributed an additional 3.0% in explaining the variance in physical activity behavior. Conclusion: The results indicate that in addition to the TPB, self-efficacy may also play an important role in the prediction of behavior, and should be included in the design of physical activity programs for elderly men of nursing home residents. PMID:23115427

  9. The combined effects of activity space and neighbourhood of residence on participation in preventive health-care activities: The case of cervical screening in the Paris metropolitan area (France).

    PubMed

    Vallée, Julie; Cadot, Emmanuelle; Grillo, Francesca; Parizot, Isabelle; Chauvin, Pierre

    2010-09-01

    Estimates from multilevel regression of 1768 women living in the Paris metropolitan area showed that women who reported concentrating their daily activities in their perceived neighbourhood of residence had a statistically greater likelihood of not having undergone cervical screening during the previous 2 years. Furthermore, the characteristics of the administrative neighbourhood of residence (such as the practitioner density or the proportion of residents with a recent preventive consultation) had a statistically greater impact in terms of delayed cervical screening on women who concentrated the vast majority of their daily activities within their perceived neighbourhood of residence than among those who did not. The residential environment might promote or damage, to a greater extent, the health behaviour of people whose daily activities are concentrated within their perceived neighbourhood, since we can assume that their exposure to their neighbourhood characteristics is stronger. It could thus be useful to study more often the combined effects of activity space and neighbourhood of residence on participation in preventive health-care activities.

  10. Living longer and better than expected. A wellness-based model keeps CCRC residents active, healthy, and out of nursing homes.

    PubMed

    Crowley, M

    1992-12-01

    The McCauley, a continuing care retirement community in West Hartford, CT, promotes a wellness philosophy that helps its residents retain their health and independence and extend their lives. The wellness program centers around the individual, not around the services provided. The residents have significant input and initiative in maintaining their own health. The health program is based on a nursing model, with each resident relating to a primary nurse as needs become evident. The nurses' goal is to know each person's holistic needs--to assist in maintaining physical, emotional, and spiritual balance. The program's approach to physical health requires a strong emphasis on prevention, including individualized fitness programs. The McCauley fosters mental and social well-being by allowing patients to maintain independent living for as long as they are able and by maximizing their self-direction. Another contributor to mental well-being is the opportunity for personal growth and intellectual stimulation. The McCauley promotes spiritual well-being by supporting continued participation in churches or synagogues from previous neighborhoods, fostering a supportive network within the community, and recognizing the value of residents' volunteer activities. PMID:10122524

  11. Association between three exonuclease 1 polymorphisms and cancer risks: a meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Zi-Yu; Zheng, Si-Rong; Zhong, Jie-Hui; Zhuang, Xiao-Duan; Zhou, Jue-Yu

    2016-01-01

    To date, the results of studies exploring the relation between exonuclease 1 (Exo1) polymorphisms and cancer risks have differed. In this study, we performed a meta-analysis to investigate the effect of the three most extensively studied Exo1 polymorphisms (Pro757Leu, Glu589Lys, and Glu670Gly) on cancer susceptibility. The related studies published before August 5, 2015, were collected by searching the PubMed and EMBASE databases. We found 16 publications containing studies that were eligible for our study, including 10 studies for Pro757Leu polymorphism (4,093 cases and 3,834 controls), 12 studies for Glu589Lys polymorphism (6,479 cases and 6,550 controls), and 7 studies for Glu670Gly polymorphism (3,700 cases and 3,496 controls). Pooled odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals were used to assess the strength of the associations, and all the statistical analyses were calculated using the software program STATA version 12.0. Our results revealed that the Pro757Leu polymorphism was significantly associated with a reduced cancer risk, whereas an inverse association was found for the Glu589Lys polymorphism. Furthermore, subgroup analysis of smoking status indicated that the Glu589Lys polymorphism was significantly associated with an increased cancer risk in smokers, but not in nonsmokers. However, no evidence was found for an association between the Glu670Gly polymorphism and cancer risk. In conclusion, this meta-analysis suggests that the Pro757Leu polymorphism may provide protective effects against cancer, while the Glu589Lys polymorphism may be a risk factor for cancer. Moreover, the Glu670Gly polymorphism may have no influence on cancer susceptibility. In the future, large-scaled and well-designed studies are needed to achieve a more precise and comprehensive result. PMID:26966378

  12. 3' -> 5' Exonucleases of DNA Polymerases ε and δ Correct Base Analog Induced DNA Replication Errors on opposite DNA Strands in Saccharomyces Cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Shcherbakova, P. V.; Pavlov, Y. I.

    1996-01-01

    The base analog 6-N-hydroxylaminopurine (HAP) induces bidirectional GC -> AT and AT -> GC transitions that are enhanced in DNA polymerase ε and δ 3' -> 5' exonuclease-deficient yeast mutants, pol2-4 and pol3-01, respectively. We have constructed a set of isogenic strains to determine whether the DNA polymerases δ and ε contribute equally to proofreading of replication errors provoked by HAP during leading and lagging strand DNA synthesis. Site-specific GC -> AT and AT -> GC transitions in a Pol(+), pol2-4 or pol3-01 genetic background were scored as reversions of ura3 missense alleles. At each site, reversion was increased in only one proofreading-deficient mutant, either pol2-4 or pol3-01, depending on the DNA strand in which HAP incorporation presumably occurred. Measurement of the HAP-induced reversion frequency of the ura3 alleles placed into chromosome III near to the defined active replication origin ARS306 in two orientations indicated that DNA polymerases ε and δ correct HAP-induced DNA replication errors on opposite DNA strands. PMID:8849882

  13. Analysis of effects of MCB3681, the antibacterially active substance of prodrug MCB3837, on human resident microflora as proof of principle.

    PubMed

    Dalhoff, A; Rashid, M-U; Kapsner, T; Panagiotidis, G; Weintraub, A; Nord, C E

    2015-08-01

    The water-soluble prodrug MCB3837 is rapidly converted to MCB3681, active against Gram-positive bacterial species, after intravenous infusion. The aim of this study was to prove the principle that MCB3681 is efficacious in vivo by demonstrating its effect on the resident microflora or colonizers of the human skin, nose, oropharynx and intestine. MCB3837 was infused at a daily dose of 6 mg/kg for 5 days. MCB3681 was active against clostridia, bifidobacteria, lactobacilli, enterococci and Staphylococcus aureus, thus proving the principle that MCB3681 is antibacterially efficacious in vivo without affecting the Gram-negative microflora.

  14. Resident T Cells Are Unable To Control Herpes Simplex Virus-1 Activity in the Brain Ependymal Region during Latency.

    PubMed

    Menendez, Chandra M; Jinkins, Jeremy K; Carr, Daniel J J

    2016-08-15

    HSV type 1 (HSV-1) is one of the leading etiologies of sporadic viral encephalitis. Early antiviral intervention is crucial to the survival of herpes simplex encephalitis patients; however, many survivors suffer from long-term neurologic deficits. It is currently understood that HSV-1 establishes a latent infection within sensory peripheral neurons throughout the life of the host. However, the tissue residence of latent virus, other than in sensory neurons, and the potential pathogenic consequences of latency remain enigmatic. In the current study, we characterized the lytic and latent infection of HSV-1 in the CNS in comparison with the peripheral nervous system following ocular infection in mice. We used RT-PCR to detect latency-associated transcripts and HSV-1 lytic cycle genes within the brain stem, the ependyma (EP), containing the limbic and cortical areas, which also harbor neural progenitor cells, in comparison with the trigeminal ganglia. Unexpectedly, HSV-1 lytic genes, usually identified during acute infection, are uniquely expressed in the EP 60 d postinfection when animals are no longer suffering from encephalitis. An inflammatory response was also mounted in the EP by the maintenance of resident memory T cells. However, EP T cells were incapable of controlling HSV-1 infection ex vivo and secreted less IFN-γ, which correlated with expression of a variety of exhaustion-related inhibitory markers. Collectively, our data suggest that the persistent viral lytic gene expression during latency is the cause of the chronic inflammatory response leading to the exhaustion of the resident T cells in the EP. PMID:27357149

  15. Exonuclease mutations in DNA polymerase epsilon reveal replication strand specific mutation patterns and human origins of replication.

    PubMed

    Shinbrot, Eve; Henninger, Erin E; Weinhold, Nils; Covington, Kyle R; Göksenin, A Yasemin; Schultz, Nikolaus; Chao, Hsu; Doddapaneni, HarshaVardhan; Muzny, Donna M; Gibbs, Richard A; Sander, Chris; Pursell, Zachary F; Wheeler, David A

    2014-11-01

    Tumors with somatic mutations in the proofreading exonuclease domain of DNA polymerase epsilon (POLE-exo*) exhibit a novel mutator phenotype, with markedly elevated TCT→TAT and TCG→TTG mutations and overall mutation frequencies often exceeding 100 mutations/Mb. Here, we identify POLE-exo* tumors in numerous cancers and classify them into two groups, A and B, according to their mutational properties. Group A mutants are found only in POLE, whereas Group B mutants are found in POLE and POLD1 and appear to be nonfunctional. In Group A, cell-free polymerase assays confirm that mutations in the exonuclease domain result in high mutation frequencies with a preference for C→A mutation. We describe the patterns of amino acid substitutions caused by POLE-exo* and compare them to other tumor types. The nucleotide preference of POLE-exo* leads to increased frequencies of recurrent nonsense mutations in key tumor suppressors such as TP53, ATM, and PIK3R1. We further demonstrate that strand-specific mutation patterns arise from some of these POLE-exo* mutants during genome duplication. This is the first direct proof of leading strand-specific replication by human POLE, which has only been demonstrated in yeast so far. Taken together, the extremely high mutation frequency and strand specificity of mutations provide a unique identifier of eukaryotic origins of replication.

  16. A sensitive electrochemical DNA biosensor for specific detection of Enterobacteriaceae bacteria by Exonuclease III-assisted signal amplification.

    PubMed

    Luo, Caihui; Tang, Hua; Cheng, Wei; Yan, Li; Zhang, Decai; Ju, Huangxian; Ding, Shijia

    2013-10-15

    A specific and sensitive methodology was developed successfully for quantitative detection of Enterobacteriaceae bacteria by integrating Exonuclease III-assisted target recycling amplification with a simple electrochemical DNA biosensor. After target DNA hybridizes with capture DNA, Exonuclease III can selectively digest the capture DNA, which releases the target to undergo a new hybridization and cleavage cycle on sensor surface, leading to a successful target recycling. Finally, the left capture DNA is recognized by detection probe to produce the detectable signal, which decreases with the increasing target DNA concentration. Under the optimal conditions, the proposed strategy could detect target DNA down to 8.7 fM with a linear range from 0.01 pM to 1 nM, showing high sensitivity. Meanwhile, the sensing strategy was successfully used for detection of Enterobacteriaceae bacteria down to 40 CFU mL⁻¹ in milk samples. This strategy presented a simple, rapid and sensitive platform for Enterobacteriaceae bacteria detection and would become a versatile and powerful tool for food safety, biothreat detection and environmental monitoring.

  17. The role of daily mobility in mental health inequalities: the interactive influence of activity space and neighbourhood of residence on depression.

    PubMed

    Vallée, Julie; Cadot, Emmanuelle; Roustit, Christelle; Parizot, Isabelle; Chauvin, Pierre

    2011-10-01

    The literature reports an association between neighbourhood deprivation and individual depression after adjustment for individual factors. The present paper investigates whether vulnerability to neighbourhood features is influenced by individual "activity space" (i.e., the space within which people move about or travel in the course of their daily activities). It can be assumed that a deprived residential environment can exert a stronger influence on the mental health of people whose activity space is limited to their neighbourhood of residence, since their exposure to their neighbourhood would be greater. Moreover, we studied the relationship between activity space size and depression. A limited activity space could indeed reflect spatial and social confinement and thus be associated with a higher risk of being depressed, or, conversely, it could be linked to a deep attachment to the neighbourhood of residence and thus be associated with a lower risk of being depressed. Multilevel logistic regression analyses of a representative sample consisting of 3011 inhabitants surveyed in 2005 in the Paris, France metropolitan area and nested within 50 census blocks showed, after adjusting for individual-level variables, that people living in deprived neighbourhoods were significantly more depressed that those living in more advantaged neighbourhoods. We also observed a statistically significant cross-level interaction between activity space and neighbourhood deprivation, as they relate to depression. Living in a deprived neighbourhood had a stronger and statistically significant effect on depression in people whose activity space was limited to their neighbourhood than in those whose daily travels extended beyond it. In addition, a limited activity space appeared to be a protective factor with regard to depression for people living in advantaged neighbourhoods and a risk factor for those living in deprived neighbourhoods. It could therefore be useful to take activity space

  18. Aerosol residence times and changes in radioiodine-131I and radiocaesium-137 Cs activity over Central Poland after the Fukushima-Daiichi Nuclear reactor accident.

    PubMed

    Długosz-Lisiecka, Magdalena; Bem, Henryk

    2012-05-01

    The first detectable activities of radioiodine (131)I, and radiocaesium (134)Cs and (137)Cs in the air over Central Poland were measured in dust samples collected by the ASS-500 station in the period of 21(st) to 24(th) of March, 2011. However, the highest activity of both fission products, (131)I and (137)Cs: 8.3 mBq m(-3) and 0.75 mBq m(-3), respectively, were obtained in the samples collected on 30(th) March, i.e.∼18 days after the beginning of the fission products' discharge from the damaged units of the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant. The simultaneously determined corrected aerosol residence time for the same samples by (210)Pb/(210)Bi and (210)Pb/(210)Po methods was equal to 10 days. Additionally, on the basis of the activity ratio of two other natural cosmogenic radionuclides, (7)Be and (22)Na in these aerosol samples, it was possible to estimate the aerosol residence time at ∼150 days for the solid particles coming from the stratospheric fallout. These data, as well as the differences in the activity size distribution of (7)Be and (131)I in the air particulate matter, show, in contrast to the Chernobyl discharge, a negligible input of stratospheric transport of Fukushima-released fission products.

  19. A shutoff and exonuclease mutant of murine gammaherpesvirus-68 yields infectious virus and causes RNA loss in type I interferon receptor knockout cells.

    PubMed

    Sheridan, Victoria; Polychronopoulos, Louise; Dutia, Bernadette M; Ebrahimi, Bahram

    2014-05-01

    Significant loss of RNA followed by severely reduced cellular protein pool, a phenomenon termed host shutoff, is associated with a number of lytic virus infections and is a critical player in viral pathogenesis. Until recently, viral DNA exonucleases were associated only with processing of viral genomic DNA and its encapsidation. However, recent observations have identified host shutoff and exonuclease function for the highly conserved viral exonucleases in γ-herpesviruses, which include Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus, Epstein-Barr virus and the mouse model murine gammaherpesvirus-68, also referred to as MHV-68. In this study, we show that although ablation of the MHV-68 exonuclease ORF37 caused a restrictive phenotype in WT IFN-α/β receptor-positive cells such as NIH 3T3, lack of ORF37 was tolerated in cells lacking the IFN-α/β receptor: the ORF37Stop virus was capable of forming infectious particles and caused loss of mRNA in IFN-α/β receptor knockout cells. Moreover, ORF37Stop virus was able to establish lytic infection in the lungs of mice lacking the IFN-α/β receptor. These observations provide evidence that lytic MHV-68 infection and subsequent loss of mRNA can take place independently of ORF37. Moreover, efficient growth of ORF37Stop virus also identifies a role for this family of viral nucleases in providing a window of opportunity for virus growth by overcoming type I IFN-dependent responses.

  20. Identification of Caveolar Resident Proteins in Ventricular Myocytes Using a Quantitative Proteomic Approach: Dynamic Changes in Caveolar Composition Following Adrenoceptor Activation*

    PubMed Central

    Wypijewski, Krzysztof J.; Tinti, Michele; Chen, Wenzhang; Lamont, Douglas; Ashford, Michael L. J.; Calaghan, Sarah C.; Fuller, William

    2015-01-01

    The lipid raft concept proposes that membrane environments enriched in cholesterol and sphingolipids cluster certain proteins and form platforms to integrate cell signaling. In cardiac muscle, caveolae concentrate signaling molecules and ion transporters, and play a vital role in adrenergic regulation of excitation–contraction coupling, and consequently cardiac contractility. Proteomic analysis of cardiac caveolae is hampered by the presence of contaminants that have sometimes, erroneously, been proposed to be resident in these domains. Here we present the first unbiased analysis of the proteome of cardiac caveolae, and investigate dynamic changes in their protein constituents following adrenoreceptor (AR) stimulation. Rat ventricular myocytes were treated with methyl-β-cyclodextrin (MβCD) to deplete cholesterol and disrupt caveolae. Buoyant caveolin-enriched microdomains (BCEMs) were prepared from MβCD-treated and control cell lysates using a standard discontinuous sucrose gradient. BCEMs were harvested, pelleted, and resolubilized, then alkylated, digested, and labeled with iTRAQ reagents, and proteins identified by LC-MS/MS on a LTQ Orbitrap Velos Pro. Proteins were defined as BCEM resident if they were consistently depleted from the BCEM fraction following MβCD treatment. Selective activation of α-, β1-, and β2-AR prior to preparation of BCEMs was achieved by application of agonist/antagonist pairs for 10 min in populations of field-stimulated myocytes. We typically identified 600–850 proteins per experiment, of which, 249 were defined as high-confidence BCEM residents. Functional annotation clustering indicates cardiac BCEMs are enriched in integrin signaling, guanine nucleotide binding, ion transport, and insulin signaling clusters. Proteins possessing a caveolin binding motif were poorly enriched in BCEMs, suggesting this is not the only mechanism that targets proteins to caveolae. With the notable exception of the cavin family, very few proteins

  1. Identification of caveolar resident proteins in ventricular myocytes using a quantitative proteomic approach: dynamic changes in caveolar composition following adrenoceptor activation.

    PubMed

    Wypijewski, Krzysztof J; Tinti, Michele; Chen, Wenzhang; Lamont, Douglas; Ashford, Michael L J; Calaghan, Sarah C; Fuller, William

    2015-03-01

    The lipid raft concept proposes that membrane environments enriched in cholesterol and sphingolipids cluster certain proteins and form platforms to integrate cell signaling. In cardiac muscle, caveolae concentrate signaling molecules and ion transporters, and play a vital role in adrenergic regulation of excitation-contraction coupling, and consequently cardiac contractility. Proteomic analysis of cardiac caveolae is hampered by the presence of contaminants that have sometimes, erroneously, been proposed to be resident in these domains. Here we present the first unbiased analysis of the proteome of cardiac caveolae, and investigate dynamic changes in their protein constituents following adrenoreceptor (AR) stimulation. Rat ventricular myocytes were treated with methyl-β-cyclodextrin (MβCD) to deplete cholesterol and disrupt caveolae. Buoyant caveolin-enriched microdomains (BCEMs) were prepared from MβCD-treated and control cell lysates using a standard discontinuous sucrose gradient. BCEMs were harvested, pelleted, and resolubilized, then alkylated, digested, and labeled with iTRAQ reagents, and proteins identified by LC-MS/MS on a LTQ Orbitrap Velos Pro. Proteins were defined as BCEM resident if they were consistently depleted from the BCEM fraction following MβCD treatment. Selective activation of α-, β1-, and β2-AR prior to preparation of BCEMs was achieved by application of agonist/antagonist pairs for 10 min in populations of field-stimulated myocytes. We typically identified 600-850 proteins per experiment, of which, 249 were defined as high-confidence BCEM residents. Functional annotation clustering indicates cardiac BCEMs are enriched in integrin signaling, guanine nucleotide binding, ion transport, and insulin signaling clusters. Proteins possessing a caveolin binding motif were poorly enriched in BCEMs, suggesting this is not the only mechanism that targets proteins to caveolae. With the notable exception of the cavin family, very few proteins show

  2. Ultrasensitive sensing platform for platelet-derived growth factor BB detection based on layered molybdenum selenide-graphene composites and Exonuclease III assisted signal amplification.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ke-Jing; Shuai, Hong-Lei; Zhang, Ji-Zong

    2016-03-15

    A highly sensitive and ultrasensitive electrochemical aptasensor for platelet-derived growth factor BB (PDGF-BB) detection is fabricated based on layered molybdenum selenide-graphene (MoSe2-Gr) composites and Exonuclease III (Exo III)-aided signal amplification. MoSe2-Gr is prepared by a simple hydrothermal method and used as a promising sensing platform. Exo III has a specifical exo-deoxyribonuclease activity for duplex DNAs in the direction from 3' to 5' terminus, however its activity is limited on the duplex DNAs with more than 4 mismatched terminal bases at 3' ends. Herein, aptamer and complementary DNA (cDNA) sequences are designed with four thymine bases on 3' ends. In the presence of target protein, the aptamer associates with it and facilitates the formation of duplex DNA between cDNA and signal DNA. The duplex DNA then is digested by Exo III and releases cDNA, which hybridizes with signal DNA to perform a new cleavage process. Nevertheless, in the absence of target protein, the aptamer hybridizes with cDNA will inhibit the Exo III-assisted nucleotides cleavage. The signal DNA then hybridizes with capture DNA on the electrode. Subsequently, horse radish peroxidase is fixed on electrode by avidin-biotin reaction and then catalyzes hydrogen peroxide and hydroquinone to produce electrochemical response. Therefore, a bridge can be established between the concentration of target protein and the degree of the attenuation of the obtained signal, providing a quantitative measure of target protein with a broad detection range of 0.0001-1 nM and a detection limit of 20 fM.

  3. Ultrasensitive sensing platform for platelet-derived growth factor BB detection based on layered molybdenum selenide-graphene composites and Exonuclease III assisted signal amplification.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ke-Jing; Shuai, Hong-Lei; Zhang, Ji-Zong

    2016-03-15

    A highly sensitive and ultrasensitive electrochemical aptasensor for platelet-derived growth factor BB (PDGF-BB) detection is fabricated based on layered molybdenum selenide-graphene (MoSe2-Gr) composites and Exonuclease III (Exo III)-aided signal amplification. MoSe2-Gr is prepared by a simple hydrothermal method and used as a promising sensing platform. Exo III has a specifical exo-deoxyribonuclease activity for duplex DNAs in the direction from 3' to 5' terminus, however its activity is limited on the duplex DNAs with more than 4 mismatched terminal bases at 3' ends. Herein, aptamer and complementary DNA (cDNA) sequences are designed with four thymine bases on 3' ends. In the presence of target protein, the aptamer associates with it and facilitates the formation of duplex DNA between cDNA and signal DNA. The duplex DNA then is digested by Exo III and releases cDNA, which hybridizes with signal DNA to perform a new cleavage process. Nevertheless, in the absence of target protein, the aptamer hybridizes with cDNA will inhibit the Exo III-assisted nucleotides cleavage. The signal DNA then hybridizes with capture DNA on the electrode. Subsequently, horse radish peroxidase is fixed on electrode by avidin-biotin reaction and then catalyzes hydrogen peroxide and hydroquinone to produce electrochemical response. Therefore, a bridge can be established between the concentration of target protein and the degree of the attenuation of the obtained signal, providing a quantitative measure of target protein with a broad detection range of 0.0001-1 nM and a detection limit of 20 fM. PMID:26386905

  4. Health Risks to Children and Adults Residing in Riverine Environments where Surficial Sediments Contain Metals Generated by Active Gold Mining in Ghana.

    PubMed

    Armah, Frederick Ato; Gyeabour, Elvis Kyere

    2013-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the current status of metal pollution in the sediment from rivers, lakes, and streams in active gold mining districts in Ghana. Two hundred and fifty surface sediment samples from 99 locations were collected and analyzed for concentrations of As, Hg, Cr, Co, Cu, Fe, Zn, Pb, Cd, Ni, and Mn using inductively coupled plasma-mass spectroscopy (ICP-MS). Metal concentrations were then used to assess the human health risks to resident children and adults in central tendency exposure (CTE) and reasonable maximum exposure (RME) scenarios. The concentrations of Pb, Cd, and As were almost twice the threshold values established by the Hong Kong Interim Sediment Quality Guidelines (ISQG). Hg, Cu, and Cr concentrations in sediment were 14, 20, and 26 times higher than the Canadian Freshwater Sediment Guidelines for these elements. Also, the concentrations of Pb, Cu, Cr, and Hg were 3, 11, 12, and 16 times more than the Australian and New Zealand Environment and Conservation Council (ANZECC) sediment guideline values. The results of the human health risk assessment indicate that for ingestion of sediment under the central tendency exposure (CTE) scenario, the cancer risks for child and adult residents from exposure to As were 4.18 × 10(-6) and 1.84 × 10(-7), respectively. This suggests that up to 4 children out of one million equally exposed children would contract cancer if exposed continuously to As over 70 years (the assumed lifetime). The hazard index for child residents following exposure to Cr(VI) in the RME scenario was 4.2. This is greater than the United States Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) threshold of 1, indicating that adverse health effects to children from exposure to Cr(VI) are possible. This study demonstrates the urgent need to control industrial emissions and the severe heavy metal pollution in gold mining environments. PMID:24278631

  5. Health Risks to Children and Adults Residing in Riverine Environments where Surficial Sediments Contain Metals Generated by Active Gold Mining in Ghana

    PubMed Central

    Armah, Frederick Ato; Gyeabour, Elvis Kyere

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the current status of metal pollution in the sediment from rivers, lakes, and streams in active gold mining districts in Ghana. Two hundred and fifty surface sediment samples from 99 locations were collected and analyzed for concentrations of As, Hg, Cr, Co, Cu, Fe, Zn, Pb, Cd, Ni, and Mn using inductively coupled plasma-mass spectroscopy (ICP-MS). Metal concentrations were then used to assess the human health risks to resident children and adults in central tendency exposure (CTE) and reasonable maximum exposure (RME) scenarios. The concentrations of Pb, Cd, and As were almost twice the threshold values established by the Hong Kong Interim Sediment Quality Guidelines (ISQG). Hg, Cu, and Cr concentrations in sediment were 14, 20, and 26 times higher than the Canadian Freshwater Sediment Guidelines for these elements. Also, the concentrations of Pb, Cu, Cr, and Hg were 3, 11, 12, and 16 times more than the Australian and New Zealand Environment and Conservation Council (ANZECC) sediment guideline values. The results of the human health risk assessment indicate that for ingestion of sediment under the central tendency exposure (CTE) scenario, the cancer risks for child and adult residents from exposure to As were 4.18 × 10−6 and 1.84 × 10−7, respectively. This suggests that up to 4 children out of one million equally exposed children would contract cancer if exposed continuously to As over 70 years (the assumed lifetime). The hazard index for child residents following exposure to Cr(VI) in the RME scenario was 4.2. This is greater than the United States Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) threshold of 1, indicating that adverse health effects to children from exposure to Cr(VI) are possible. This study demonstrates the urgent need to control industrial emissions and the severe heavy metal pollution in gold mining environments. PMID:24278631

  6. Evaluation of quantitative imaging methods for organ activity and residence time estimation using a population of phantoms having realistic variations in anatomy and uptake

    SciTech Connect

    He Bin; Du Yong; Segars, W. Paul; Wahl, Richard L.; Sgouros, George; Jacene, Heather; Frey, Eric C.

    2009-02-15

    Estimating organ residence times is an essential part of patient-specific dosimetry for radioimmunotherapy (RIT). Quantitative imaging methods for RIT are often evaluated using a single physical or simulated phantom but are intended to be applied clinically where there is variability in patient anatomy, biodistribution, and biokinetics. To provide a more relevant evaluation, the authors have thus developed a population of phantoms with realistic variations in these factors and applied it to the evaluation of quantitative imaging methods both to find the best method and to demonstrate the effects of these variations. Using whole body scans and SPECT/CT images, organ shapes and time-activity curves of 111In ibritumomab tiuxetan were measured in dosimetrically important organs in seven patients undergoing a high dose therapy regimen. Based on these measurements, we created a 3D NURBS-based cardiac-torso (NCAT)-based phantom population. SPECT and planar data at realistic count levels were then simulated using previously validated Monte Carlo simulation tools. The projections from the population were used to evaluate the accuracy and variation in accuracy of residence time estimation methods that used a time series of SPECT and planar scans. Quantitative SPECT (QSPECT) reconstruction methods were used that compensated for attenuation, scatter, and the collimator-detector response. Planar images were processed with a conventional (CPlanar) method that used geometric mean attenuation and triple-energy window scatter compensation and a quantitative planar (QPlanar) processing method that used model-based compensation for image degrading effects. Residence times were estimated from activity estimates made at each of five time points. The authors also evaluated hybrid methods that used CPlanar or QPlanar time-activity curves rescaled to the activity estimated from a single QSPECT image. The methods were evaluated in terms of mean relative error and standard deviation of the

  7. Residents as teachers

    PubMed Central

    Ng, Victor K.; Burke, Clarissa A.; Narula, Archna

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Objective To examine Canadian family medicine residents’ perspectives surrounding teaching opportunities and mentorship in teaching. Design A 16-question online survey. Setting Canadian family medicine residency programs. Participants Between May and June 2011, all first- and second-year family medicine residents registered in 1 of the 17 Canadian residency programs as of September 2010 were invited to participate. A total of 568 of 2266 residents responded. Main outcome measures Demographic characteristics, teaching opportunities during residency, and resident perceptions about teaching. Results A total of 77.7% of family medicine residents indicated that they were either interested or highly interested in teaching as part of their future careers, and 78.9% of family medicine residents had had opportunities to teach in various settings. However, only 60.1% of respondents were aware of programs within residency intended to support residents as teachers, and 33.0% of residents had been observed during teaching encounters. Conclusion It appears that most Canadian family medicine residents have the opportunity to teach during their residency training. Many are interested in integrating teaching as part of their future career goals. Family medicine residencies should strongly consider programs to support and further develop resident teaching skills. PMID:24029529

  8. Microwave-assisted preparation and adsorption performance of activated carbon from biodiesel industry solid reside: influence of operational parameters.

    PubMed

    Foo, K Y; Hameed, B H

    2012-01-01

    Preparation of activated carbon has been attempted using KOH as activating agent by microwave heating from biodiesel industry solid residue, oil palm empty fruit bunch (EFBAC). The significance of chemical impregnation ratio (IR), microwave power and activation time on the properties of activated carbon were investigated. The optimum condition has been identified at the IR of 1.0, microwave power of 600 W and activation time of 7 min. EFBAC was characterized by scanning electron microscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and nitrogen adsorption isotherm. The surface chemistry was examined by zeta potential measurement, determination of surface acidity/basicity, while the adsorptive property was quantified using methylene blue as dye model compound. The optimum conditions resulted in activated carbon with a monolayer adsorption capacity of 395.30 mg/g and carbon yield of 73.78%, while the BET surface area and total pore volume were corresponding to 1372 m2/g and 0.76 cm3/g, respectively.

  9. Estimation of Citation-Based Scholarly Activity Among Radiation Oncology Faculty at Domestic Residency-Training Institutions: 1996-2007

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Mehee; Fuller, Clifton D.; Thomas, Charles R.

    2009-05-01

    Purpose: Advancement in academic radiation oncology is largely contingent on research productivity and the perceived external influence of an individual's scholarly work. The purpose of this study was to use the Hirsch index (h-index) to estimate the research productivity of current radiation oncology faculty at U.S. academic institutions between 1996 and 2007. Methods and Materials: We performed bibliometric citation database searches for available radiation oncology faculty at domestic residency-training institutions (n = 826). The outcomes analyzed included the total number of manuscripts, total number of citations, and the h-index between 1996 and 2007. Analysis of overall h-index rankings with stratification by academic ranking, junior vs. senior faculty status, and gender was performed. Results: Of the 826 radiation oncologists, the mean h-index was 8.5. Of the individuals in the top 10% by the h-index, 34% were chairpersons, 88% were senior faculty, and 13% were women. A greater h-index was associated with a higher academic ranking and senior faculty status. Recursive partitioning analysis revealed an h-index threshold of 15 (p <0.0001) as an identified breakpoint between the senior and junior faculty. Overall, women had lower h-indexes compared with men (mean, 6.4 vs. 9.4); however, when stratified by academic ranking, the gender differential all but disappeared. Conclusion: Using the h-index as a partial surrogate for research productivity, it appears that radiation oncologists in academia today comprise a prolific group, however, with a highly skewed distribution. According to the present analysis, the h-index correlated with academic ranking. Thus, it potentially has utility in the process of promotion decisions. Overall, women in radiation oncology were less academically productive than men; the possible reasons for the gender differential are discussed.

  10. Aptamer-based exonuclease protection and enzymatic recycling cleavage amplification homogeneous assay for the highly sensitive detection of thrombin.

    PubMed

    Xue, Qingwang; Zhang, Ge; Wang, Lei; Jiang, Wei

    2014-06-21

    Critical challenges in homogeneous solution-based biomolecular detection are the separation and sensitivity compared to biomolecular detection in heterogeneous solutions. In this work, a novel, separation-free and sensitive homogeneous protein detection assay based on combining aptameric exonuclease protection with nicking enzyme assisted fluorescence signal amplification (NEFSA) is developed for highly sensitive protein detection. We applied a special oligonucleotide probe containing a protein aptamer sequence at the 3'-terminus, which has the capacity to recognize the protein target with high affinity and specificity. Specifically, the aptamer probe is protected from exonuclease-catalyzed digestion upon binding to the protein target. The protected aptamer probe hybridizes with the molecular beacon (MB) probe, a reporter signal oligo-DNA. Consequently, the NEFSA process is triggered in the presence of a nicking enzyme, resulting in the continuous enzyme cleavage of many MBs, providing a fluorescent cascadic amplification detection signal for the target. Thrombin was used as the model analyte in the current proof-of-concept experiments. This method permits the detection of human thrombin specifically with a detection limit as low as 1.0 pM without using washes or separations. Our method exhibits excellent sensitivity. In addition, this new method is simple and avoids the specific conformational design of an aptasensor probe for the elimination of washing and separation steps. The mechanism, moreover, may be generalized and used for other forms of protein analysis by changing the corresponding aptamer without changing the other conditions. So our new strategy may provide a homogeneous fluorescence detection platform for many proteins.

  11. Synthesis and photocatalytic activity of TiO2 nanoparticles prepared by chemical vapor condensation method with different precursor concentration and residence time.

    PubMed

    Chin, Sungmin; Park, Eunseuk; Kim, Minsu; Bae, Gwi-Nam; Jurng, Jongsoo

    2011-10-15

    Nanosized TiO(2) photocatalysts were synthesized using a chemical vapor condensation method under a range of synthesis conditions (precursor vapor concentration and residence time in a tubular electric furnace). X-ray diffraction showed that the prepared TiO(2) powders consisted mainly of anatase (>94%) with a small amount of rutile. The mean particle diameter from the Brunauer-Emmett-Teller surface area and transmission electron microscopy measurements ranged from 9.4 to 16.6 nm. The specific surface area (92.5-163.5 m(2) g(-1)) of the prepared TiO(2) powders was found to be dependent on the synthesis conditions. The content of hydroxyl groups on the surface of the prepared TiO(2) sample was higher than those on commercial TiO(2), resulting in increased photocatalytic oxidation. The photocatalytic activity of the TiO(2) samples prepared in a methylene blue solution was strongly dependent on the crystallinity and specific surface area, which were affected by the TTIP vapor concentration and residence time. PMID:21802692

  12. Endoplasmic Reticulum Exit of Golgi-resident Defective for SREBP Cleavage (Dsc) E3 Ligase Complex Requires Its Activity.

    PubMed

    Raychaudhuri, Sumana; Espenshade, Peter J

    2015-06-01

    Layers of quality control ensure proper protein folding and complex formation prior to exit from the endoplasmic reticulum. The fission yeast Dsc E3 ligase is a Golgi-localized complex required for sterol regulatory element-binding protein (SREBP) transcription factor activation that shows architectural similarity to endoplasmic reticulum-associated degradation E3 ligases. The Dsc E3 ligase consists of five integral membrane proteins (Dsc1-Dsc5) and functionally interacts with the conserved AAA-ATPase Cdc48. Utilizing an in vitro ubiquitination assay, we demonstrated that Dsc1 has ubiquitin E3 ligase activity that requires the E2 ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme Ubc4. Mutations that specifically block Dsc1-Ubc4 interaction prevent SREBP cleavage, indicating that SREBP activation requires Dsc E3 ligase activity. Surprisingly, Golgi localization of the Dsc E3 ligase complex also requires Dsc1 E3 ligase activity. Analysis of Dsc E3 ligase complex formation, glycosylation, and localization indicated that Dsc1 E3 ligase activity is specifically required for endoplasmic reticulum exit of the complex. These results define enzyme activity-dependent sorting as an autoregulatory mechanism for protein trafficking.

  13. Endoplasmic Reticulum Exit of Golgi-resident Defective for SREBP Cleavage (Dsc) E3 Ligase Complex Requires Its Activity*

    PubMed Central

    Raychaudhuri, Sumana; Espenshade, Peter J.

    2015-01-01

    Layers of quality control ensure proper protein folding and complex formation prior to exit from the endoplasmic reticulum. The fission yeast Dsc E3 ligase is a Golgi-localized complex required for sterol regulatory element-binding protein (SREBP) transcription factor activation that shows architectural similarity to endoplasmic reticulum-associated degradation E3 ligases. The Dsc E3 ligase consists of five integral membrane proteins (Dsc1–Dsc5) and functionally interacts with the conserved AAA-ATPase Cdc48. Utilizing an in vitro ubiquitination assay, we demonstrated that Dsc1 has ubiquitin E3 ligase activity that requires the E2 ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme Ubc4. Mutations that specifically block Dsc1-Ubc4 interaction prevent SREBP cleavage, indicating that SREBP activation requires Dsc E3 ligase activity. Surprisingly, Golgi localization of the Dsc E3 ligase complex also requires Dsc1 E3 ligase activity. Analysis of Dsc E3 ligase complex formation, glycosylation, and localization indicated that Dsc1 E3 ligase activity is specifically required for endoplasmic reticulum exit of the complex. These results define enzyme activity-dependent sorting as an autoregulatory mechanism for protein trafficking. PMID:25918164

  14. [Effects of empathy on fund-raising activities on behalf of victims of the 2011 Great East Japan Earthquake, focusinig on the residents in the South Kanto area].

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Youichi; Yoo, Seonyoung; Matsui, Yutaka

    2015-02-01

    Fund-raising activities on behalf of victims of the 2011 Great East Japan Earthquake during the year after the earthquake were investigated in residents of the South Kanto area (N = 749), which is adjacent to the disaster area. The percentage of people that raised funds was 67.4%. We investigated the effects of the following on fundraising activities: demographic variables (sex, age, and educational background), trait empathy (empathic concern, perspective taking, and personal distress), former experience with fund-raising activities, effects of similarity to victims (e.g., experienced inconveniences because of the disaster, or had problems returning home), and psychological closeness to victims (e.g, have family members or acquaintances that suffered from the disaster, or that once lived in the disaster area). The results indicated that fund-raising activities were affected by former experience with fund-raising, similarity to victims, psychological closeness to victims, empathic concern, and being female. The relationship between fund-raising activities for victims and empathy are discussed.

  15. The Enzyme-mimic Activity of Ferric Nano-Core Residing in Ferritin and Its Biosensing Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Zhiwen; Wu, Hong J.; Zhang, Youyu; Li, Zhaohui; Lin, Yuehe

    2011-11-15

    Ferritins are nano-scale globular protein cages encapsulating a ferric core. They widely exist in animals, plants, and microbes, playing indispensable roles in iron homeostasis. Interestingly, our study clearly demonstrates that ferritin has an enzyme-mimic activity derived from its ferric nano-core, but not the protein cage. Further study revealed that the mimic-enzyme activity of ferritin is more thermally stable and pH-tolerant compared with horseradish peroxidase. Considering the abundance of ferritin in numerous organisms, this finding may indicate a new role of ferritin in antioxidant and detoxification metabolisms. In addition, as a natural protein-caged nanoparticle with an enzyme-mimic activity, ferritin is readily conjugated with biomolecules to construct nano-biosensors, thus holds promising potential for facile and biocompatible labeling for sensitive and robust bioassays in biomedical applications.

  16. Facility Focus: Residence Halls.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    College Planning & Management, 1999

    1999-01-01

    Describes four college residence halls that have successfully combined a comfortable, aesthetically pleasing, and socially stimulating atmosphere for its residents. Photographs and interior-design line drawings are included. (GR)

  17. Life After Residency.

    PubMed

    Sorrel, Amy Lynn

    2016-04-01

    Many residents don't receive any formal business training. The University of Texas at Austin Dell Medical School created a crash course to teach residents some of the business and job-hunting basics they'll need.

  18. Antagonistic activities of some Bifidobacterium sp. strains isolated from resident infant gastrointestinal microbiota on Gram-negative enteric pathogens.

    PubMed

    Delcaru, Cristina; Alexandru, Ionela; Podgoreanu, Paulina; Cristea, Violeta Corina; Bleotu, Coralia; Chifiriuc, Mariana Carmen; Bezirtzoglou, Eugenia; Lazar, Veronica

    2016-06-01

    The gastrointestinal microbiota contributes to the consolidation of the anti-infectious barrier against enteric pathogens. The purpose of this study was to investigate the influence of Bifidobacterium sp. strains, recently isolated from infant gastrointestinal microbiota on the in vitro growth and virulence features expression of enteropathogenic bacterial strains. The antibacterial activity of twelve Bifidobacterium sp. strains isolated from human feces was examined in vitro against a wide range of Gram negative pathogenic strains isolated from 30 infant patients (3 days to 5 years old) with diarrhea. Both potential probiotic strains (Bifidobacterium longum, Bifidobacterium pseudocatenulatum, Bifidobacterium catenulatum, Bifidobacterium breve, Bifidobacterium ruminantium) and enteropathogenic strains (EPEC, EIEC, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Salmonella sp., Yersinia enterocolitica, Pseudomonas aeruginosa) were identified by MALDI-TOF and confirmed serologically when needed. The bactericidal activity, growth curve, adherence to the cellular HEp-2 substratum and production of soluble virulence factors have been assessed in the presence of different Bifidobacterium sp. cultures and fractions (whole culture and free-cell supernatants). Among the twelve Bifidobacterium sp. strains, the largest spectrum of antimicrobial activity against 9 of the 18 enteropathogenic strains was revealed for a B. breve strain recently isolated from infant intestinal feces. The whole culture and free-cell supernatant of B. breve culture decreased the multiplication rate, shortened the log phase and the total duration of the growth curve, with an earlier entrance in the decline phase and inhibited the adherence capacity to a cellular substratum and the swimming/swarming motility too. These results indicate the significant probiotic potential of the B. breve strain. PMID:26921694

  19. "Womanhood does not reside in documentation": Queer and feminist student activism for transgender women's inclusion at women's colleges.

    PubMed

    Weber, Shannon

    2016-01-01

    This article considers queer-driven student activism at Smith College, as well as admissions policy shifts at a number of prominent U.S. women's colleges for transgender women's inclusion. The author illustrates how student attempts to dismantle the transmisogyny at Smith as a purportedly feminist "women's" space, as well as some women's colleges' shifts in admissions policy, challenge divisions between transgender and cisgender women. This paradigmatic shift reflects the campuses as comparative havens for gender and sexual exploration, the influence of postmodern gender theory in understanding identity, and the growth of "queer" as an all-encompassing signifier for sexual and gender transgression. PMID:26701768

  20. Geophysical exploration of an active pockmark field in the Bay of Concarneau, southern Brittany, and implications for resident suspension feeders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baltzer, Agnès; Ehrhold, Axel; Rigolet, Carinne; Souron, Aurélie; Cordier, Céline; Clouet, Hélène; Dubois, Stanislas F.

    2014-06-01

    About a decade ago, a large field of pockmarks (individual features up to 30 m in diameter and <2 m deep) was discovered in water depths of 15-40 m in the Bay of Concarneau in southern Brittany along the French Atlantic coast, covering an overall area of 36 km2 and characterised by unusually high pockmark densities in places reaching 2,500 per square kilometre. As revealed by geophysical swath and subbottom profile data ground-truthed by sediment cores collected during two campaigns in 2005 and 2009, the confines of the pockmark field show a spectacular spatial association with those of a vast expanse of tube mats formed by a benthic community of the suspension-feeding amphipod Haploops nirae. The present study complements those findings with subbottom chirp profiles, seabed sonar imagery and ultrasonic backscatter data from the water column acquired in April 2011. Results show that pockmark distribution is influenced by the thickness of Holocene deposits covering an Oligocene palaeo-valley system. Two groups of pockmarks were identified: (1) a group of large (>10 m diameter), more widely scattered pockmarks deeply rooted (up to 8 ms two-way travel time, TWTT) in the Holocene palaeo-valley infills, and (2) a group of smaller, more densely spaced pockmarks shallowly rooted (up to 2 ms TWTT) in interfluve deposits. Pockmark pore water analyses revealed high methane concentrations peaking at ca. 400 μl/l at 22 and 30 cm core depth in silty sediments immediately above Haploops-bearing layers. Water column data indicate acoustic plumes above pockmarks, implying ongoing pockmark activity. Pockmark gas and/or fluid expulsion resulting in increased turbidity (resuspension of, amongst others, freshly settled phytoplankton) could at least partly account for the strong spatial association with the phytoplankton-feeding H. nirae in the Bay of Concarneau, exacerbating impacts of anthropogenically induced eutrophication and growing offshore trawling activities. Tidally driven

  1. "Womanhood does not reside in documentation": Queer and feminist student activism for transgender women's inclusion at women's colleges.

    PubMed

    Weber, Shannon

    2016-01-01

    This article considers queer-driven student activism at Smith College, as well as admissions policy shifts at a number of prominent U.S. women's colleges for transgender women's inclusion. The author illustrates how student attempts to dismantle the transmisogyny at Smith as a purportedly feminist "women's" space, as well as some women's colleges' shifts in admissions policy, challenge divisions between transgender and cisgender women. This paradigmatic shift reflects the campuses as comparative havens for gender and sexual exploration, the influence of postmodern gender theory in understanding identity, and the growth of "queer" as an all-encompassing signifier for sexual and gender transgression.

  2. Phagocytic and bactericidal activity of blood and milk-resident neutrophils against Staphylococcus aureus in primiparous and multiparous cows during early lactation.

    PubMed

    Mehrzad, J; Duchateau, L; Burvenich, C

    2009-02-16

    To examine the effect of parity on polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMN) function, phagocytic and bactericidal activity of the PMN isolated from blood and milk against Staphylococcus aureus was compared between groups of 6 primiparous and 6 multiparous healthy dairy cows during early lactation using bacteriological and PMN-pathogen interaction assays. Latex-stimulated luminol-amplified chemiluminescence (CL) and viability of these PMN were also investigated. The phagocytosis and killing of S. aureus by blood were remarkably higher than those of milk PMN. Similarly, the CL and viability in blood PMN were markedly higher than in milk PMN. Both in blood and in milk the phagocytosis of S. aureus by PMN in primiparous cows was substantially higher than in multiparous cows. The killing activity of blood PMN against S. aureus was 42.3+/-3.4% and 23.2+/-1.7% in primiparous and multiparous, respectively. Milk PMN killed only 20.7+/-2% S. aureus in primiparous and 10.2+/-1.3% in multiparous cows. Blood and milk PMN CL and milk PMN viability were significantly higher in primiparous cows. The pronounced reduction in phagocytic and bactericidal activity in blood and milk-resident PMN from multiparous cows, in part, resulted from the pronounced decrease of PMN viability and free radicals production capacity; this suggests that heifers' udders could be more protected against S. aureus, which remains to be tested in the field.

  3. Annual Report on Resident Fish Activities, 1986 Fiscal Year, Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program, Action Item 41.8.

    SciTech Connect

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1986-05-01

    This report addresses the status of resident fish projects currently funded by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) under the Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program (Program) established pursuant to the Northwest Power Act (P.L. 96-501). The report provides a brief synopsis, review and discussion of 13 resident fish projects funded during September 1985 to May 1986. The resident fish section of the Program addresses measures which are intended to protect resident fish, mitigate fishery losses caused by hydroelectric projects, and compensate for past losses through enhancement measures. These measures include, but are not limited to: flow requirements, drawdown requirements, temperature control, and streambed protection.

  4. Conversations with Holocaust survivor residents.

    PubMed

    Hirst, Sandra P; LeNavenec, Carole Lynne; Aldiabat, Khaldoun

    2011-03-01

    Traumatic events in one's younger years can have an impact on how an individual copes with later life. One traumatic experience for Jewish individuals was the Holocaust. Some of these people are moving into long-term care facilities. It was within this context that the research question emerged: What are Holocaust survivor residents' perceptions of a life lived as they move into a long-term care facility? For this qualitative study, Holocaust survivors were individually interviewed. Findings emphasize that nursing care needs to ensure that Holocaust survivor residents participate in activities, receive timely health care, and receive recognition of their life experiences.

  5. Antimicrobial activity of a novel adhesive containing chlorhexidine gluconate (CHG) against the resident microflora in human volunteers

    PubMed Central

    Carty, Neal; Wibaux, Anne; Ward, Colleen; Paulson, Daryl S.; Johnson, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate the antimicrobial activity of a new, transparent composite film dressing, whose adhesive contains chlorhexidine gluconate (CHG), against the native microflora present on human skin. Methods CHG-containing adhesive film dressings and non-antimicrobial control film dressings were applied to the skin on the backs of healthy human volunteers without antiseptic preparation. Dressings were removed 1, 4 or 7 days after application. The bacterial populations underneath were measured by quantitative cultures (cylinder-scrub technique) and compared with one another as a function of time. Results The mean baseline microflora recovery was 3.24 log10 cfu/cm2. The mean log reductions from baseline measured from underneath the CHG-containing dressings were 0.87, 0.78 and 1.30 log10 cfu/cm2 on days 1, 4 and 7, respectively, compared with log reductions of 0.67, −0.87 and −1.29 log10 cfu/cm2 from underneath the control film dressings. There was no significant difference between the log reductions of the two treatments on day 1, but on days 4 and 7 the log reduction associated with the CHG adhesive was significantly higher than that associated with the control adhesive. Conclusions The adhesive containing CHG was associated with a sustained antimicrobial effect that was not present in the control. Incorporating the antimicrobial into the adhesive layer confers upon it bactericidal properties in marked contrast to the non-antimicrobial adhesive, which contributed to bacterial proliferation when the wear time was ≥4 days. PMID:24722839

  6. Tissue-resident macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Davies, Luke C.; Jenkins, Stephen J.; Allen, Judith E.; Taylor, Philip R.

    2014-01-01

    Tissue-resident macrophages are a heterogeneous population of immune cells that fulfill tissue-specific and niche-specific functions. These range from dedicated homeostatic functions, such as clearance of cellular debris and iron processing, to central roles in tissue immune-surveillance, response to infection and the resolution of inflammation. Recent studies highlight marked heterogeneity in the origins of tissue macrophages that arise from hematopoietic versus self-renewing embryo-derived populations. We discuss the tissue–niche-specific factors that dictate cell phenotype, the definition of which will allow novel strategies to promote the restoration of tissue homeostasis. Understanding the mechanisms that dictate tissue macrophage heterogeneity should explain why simplified paradigms of macrophage activation do not explain the extent of heterogeneity seen in vivo. PMID:24048120

  7. Multidimensional profiling of CSF1R screening hits and inhibitors: assessing cellular activity, target residence time, and selectivity in a higher throughput way.

    PubMed

    Uitdehaag, Joost C M; Sünnen, Cecile M; van Doornmalen, Antoon M; de Rouw, Nikki; Oubrie, Arthur; Azevedo, Rita; Ziebell, Michael; Nickbarg, Elliott; Karstens, Willem-Jan; Ruygrok, Simone

    2011-10-01

    Over the past years, improvements in high-throughput screening (HTS) technology and compound libraries have resulted in a dramatic increase in the amounts of good-quality screening hits, and there is a growing need for follow-on hit profiling assays with medium throughput to further triage hits. Here the authors present such assays for the colony-stimulating factor 1 receptor (CSF1R, Fms), including tests for cellular activity and a homogeneous assay to measure affinity for inactive CSF1R. They also present a high-throughput assay to measure target residence time, which is based on competitive binding kinetics. To better fit k(off) rates, they present a modified mathematical model for competitive kinetics. In all assays, they profiled eight reference inhibitors (imatinib, sorafenib, sunitinib, tandutinib, dasatinib, GW2580, Ki20227, and J&J's pyrido[2,3-d]pyrimidin-5-one). Using the known biochemical selectivities of these inhibitors, which can be quantified using metrics such as the selectivity entropy, the authors have determined which assay readout best predicts hit selectivity. Their profiling shows surprisingly that imatinib has a preference for the active form of CSF1R and that Ki20227 has an unusually slow target dissociation rate. This confirms that follow-on hit profiling is essential to ensure that the best hits are selected for lead optimization.

  8. Exosome Cofactors Connect Transcription Termination to RNA Processing by Guiding Terminated Transcripts to the Appropriate Exonuclease within the Nuclear Exosome.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kyumin; Heo, Dong-Hyuk; Kim, Iktae; Suh, Jeong-Yong; Kim, Minkyu

    2016-06-17

    The yeast Nrd1 interacts with the C-terminal domain (CTD) of RNA polymerase II (RNApII) through its CTD-interacting domain (CID) and also associates with the nuclear exosome, thereby acting as both a transcription termination and RNA processing factor. Previously, we found that the Nrd1 CID is required to recruit the nuclear exosome to the Nrd1 complex, but it was not clear which exosome subunits were contacted. Here, we show that two nuclear exosome cofactors, Mpp6 and Trf4, directly and competitively interact with the Nrd1 CID and differentially regulate the association of Nrd1 with two catalytic subunits of the exosome. Importantly, Mpp6 promotes the processing of Nrd1-terminated transcripts preferentially by Dis3, whereas Trf4 leads to Rrp6-dependent processing. This suggests that Mpp6 and Trf4 may play a role in choosing a particular RNA processing route for Nrd1-terminated transcripts within the exosome by guiding the transcripts to the appropriate exonuclease.

  9. Straightforward detection of SNPs in double-stranded DNA by using exonuclease III/nuclease S1/PNA system.

    PubMed

    Ren, Binzhi; Zhou, Jing-Min; Komiyama, Makoto

    2004-02-24

    Single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) have been straightforwardly genotyped by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS). Peptide nucleic acid (PNA), a DNA analog, was used as a probe molecule. In its presence, genomic dsDNA was first treated with exonuclease III and then with nuclease S1. By these one-pot reactions, single-stranded DNA fragments including the SNP sites were formed in situ. These fragments were directly analyzed by MALDI-TOF MS, and the identity of the DNA base at the SNP site was determined in terms of mass number. By using two or more PNA probes simultaneously, multiplex analysis was also successful. Various genotypes of apolipoprotein E gene (epsilon2/epsilon2, epsilon3/epsilon3, epsilon4/epsilon4, epsilon2/epsilon3 and epsilon3/epsilon4) were identified from dsDNA obtained by PCR from corresponding patients.

  10. Label-free DNA Y junction for bisphenol A monitoring using exonuclease III-based signal protection strategy.

    PubMed

    Chen, Junhua; Zhou, Shungui

    2016-03-15

    A label-free DNA Y junction sensing platform for the amplified detection of bisphenol A (BPA) has been constructed by the ingenious combination of toehold-mediated strand displacement and exonuclease III (Exo III)-based signal protection strategy. Three hairpin probes were utilized as the building blocks to fabricate the DNA Y junction with cascaded signal amplification via a series of toehold-mediated strand displacement reactions. Exo III was employed as a protecting agent for the first time to keep the Y-shaped molecular architecture intact, thereby greatly enhancing the fluorescence intensity of DNA intercalator SYBR Green I. The resulting biosensor exhibits ultrasensitivity towards BPA at low concentration (5 fM) without any labeling, modification, immobilization, or washing procedure. Our proposed sensing system also displays remarkable specificity to BPA against other possible interference molecules. Moreover, this DNA junction biosensor is robust and can be applied to the reliable monitoring of spiked BPA in environmental water samples with good recovery and accuracy. With the successful demonstration for BPA detection, the label-free DNA Y junction can be readily expanded to monitor other analytes in a simple, cost-effective, and ultrasensitive way by substituting the target-specific aptamer sequence. PMID:26414024

  11. Polydopamine Nanotubes as an Effective Fluorescent Quencher for Highly Sensitive and Selective Detection of Biomolecules Assisted with Exonuclease III Amplification.

    PubMed

    Fan, Daoqing; Zhu, Xiaoqing; Zhai, Qingfeng; Wang, Erkang; Dong, Shaojun

    2016-09-20

    In this work, the effective fluorescence quenching ability of polydopamine nanotubes (PDANTs) toward various fluorescent dyes was studied and further applied to fluorescent biosensing for the first time. The PDANTs could quench the fluorophores with different emission frequencies, aminomethylcoumarin acetate (AMCA), 6-carboxyfluorescein (FAM), 6-carboxytetramethylrhodamine (TAMRA), and Cy5. All the quenching efficiencies reached to more than 97%. Taking advantage of PDANTs' different affinities toward ssDNA and dsDNA and utilizing the complex of FAM-labeled ssDNA and PDANTs as a sensing platform, we achieved highly sensitive and selective detection of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) DNA and adenosine triphosphate (ATP) assisted with Exonuclease III amplification. The limits of detection (LODs) of HIV DNA and ATP reached to 3.5 pM and 150 nM, respectively, which were all lower than that of previous nanoquenchers with Exo III amplification, and the platform also presented good applicability in biological samples. Fluorescent sensing applications of this nanotube enlightened other targets detection based upon it and enriched the building blocks of fluorescent sensing platforms. This polydopamine nanotube also possesses excellent biocompatibility and biodegradability, which is suitable for future drug delivery, cell imaging, and other biological applications.

  12. Survey of Residence Hall Life at NCSU.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dolin, Nancy C.

    A 1977 North Carolina State University survey of a sample of on-campus students determined their attitudes toward residence hall activities, facilities, and staff. Information is shown by sex, class, and residence hall, and totals are weighted to reflect actual proportions in each dorm. Among the findings are the following: cookouts, movies, beer…

  13. [REAL AND UNREAL BACKLASHES OF AEROSPACE ACTIVITY FOR THE HEALTH OF POPULATION RESIDING NEAR AREAS OF FALL OF BEING SEPARATED PARTS OF CARRIER ROCKETS].

    PubMed

    Meshkov, N A; Valtseva, E A; Kharlamova, E N; Kulikova, A Z

    2015-01-01

    Since the late 1990s, the ongoing debate about the consequences of the rocket-space activities for the health of people residing near areas offall ofseparatingfrom parts of rockets. Some scientists (Kolyado IB et al., 2001, 2013; Shoikhet YN et al., 2005, 2008; Skrebtsova NV 2005, 2006, Sidorov PI et al., 2007) argue that the main cause of morbidity is the effect of unsymmetrical dimethyl hydrazine (UDMH). However, environmentalists find it only in areas offalling fragments of separated parts of carrier rockets. Presented in the article data were obtained as a result of perennial epidemiological and hygienic research. There was performed a hygienic assessment of the content of chemical substances in water soil andfood, nutritional status and health risk near areas of the district of falling 310 and 326. There were studied conditions of work and the health of military personnel at the sites of storage of propellant components. The relationship between revealed diseases and UDMH was not established, but there was their causality due to the influence of environmental factors characteristic of territories and living conditions. In the settlements near the area of falling district 310 the share of extremely anxious persons was shown to be 1.8 times higher than in controls, which is caused by cases of falling fragments stages of carrier rockets in the territory of settlements.

  14. [REAL AND UNREAL BACKLASHES OF AEROSPACE ACTIVITY FOR THE HEALTH OF POPULATION RESIDING NEAR AREAS OF FALL OF BEING SEPARATED PARTS OF CARRIER ROCKETS].

    PubMed

    Meshkov, N A; Valtseva, E A; Kharlamova, E N; Kulikova, A Z

    2015-01-01

    Since the late 1990s, the ongoing debate about the consequences of the rocket-space activities for the health of people residing near areas offall ofseparatingfrom parts of rockets. Some scientists (Kolyado IB et al., 2001, 2013; Shoikhet YN et al., 2005, 2008; Skrebtsova NV 2005, 2006, Sidorov PI et al., 2007) argue that the main cause of morbidity is the effect of unsymmetrical dimethyl hydrazine (UDMH). However, environmentalists find it only in areas offalling fragments of separated parts of carrier rockets. Presented in the article data were obtained as a result of perennial epidemiological and hygienic research. There was performed a hygienic assessment of the content of chemical substances in water soil andfood, nutritional status and health risk near areas of the district of falling 310 and 326. There were studied conditions of work and the health of military personnel at the sites of storage of propellant components. The relationship between revealed diseases and UDMH was not established, but there was their causality due to the influence of environmental factors characteristic of territories and living conditions. In the settlements near the area of falling district 310 the share of extremely anxious persons was shown to be 1.8 times higher than in controls, which is caused by cases of falling fragments stages of carrier rockets in the territory of settlements. PMID:26856158

  15. Life After Residency.

    PubMed

    Sorrel, Amy Lynn

    2016-04-01

    Many residents don't receive any formal business training. The University of Texas at Austin Dell Medical School created a crash course to teach residents some of the business and job-hunting basics they'll need. PMID:27049910

  16. A conserved apomixis-specific polymorphism is correlated with exclusive exonuclease expression in premeiotic ovules of apomictic boechera species.

    PubMed

    Corral, José M; Vogel, Heiko; Aliyu, Olawale M; Hensel, Götz; Thiel, Thomas; Kumlehn, Jochen; Sharbel, Timothy F

    2013-12-01

    Apomixis (asexual seed production) is characterized by meiotically unreduced egg cell production (apomeiosis) followed by its parthenogenetic development into offspring that are genetic clones of the mother plant. Fertilization (i.e. pseudogamy) of the central cell is important for the production of a functional endosperm with a balanced 2:1 maternal:paternal genome ratio. Here, we present the APOLLO (for apomixis-linked locus) gene, an Aspartate Glutamate Aspartate Aspartate histidine exonuclease whose transcripts are down-regulated in sexual ovules entering meiosis while being up-regulated in apomeiotic ovules at the same stage of development in plants of the genus Boechera. APOLLO has both "apoalleles," which are characterized by a set of linked apomixis-specific polymorphisms, and "sexalleles." All apomictic Boechera spp. accessions proved to be heterozygous for the APOLLO gene (having at least one apoallele and one sexallele), while all sexual genotypes were homozygous for sexalleles. Apoalleles contained a 20-nucleotide polymorphism present in the 5' untranslated region that contains specific transcription factor-binding sites for ARABIDOPSIS THALIANA HOMEOBOX PROTEIN5, LIM1 (for LINEAGE ABNORMAL11, INSULIN1, MECHANOSENSORY PROTEIN3), SORLIP1AT (for SEQUENCES OVERREPRESENTED IN LIGHT-INDUCED PROMOTERS IN ARABIDOPSIS THALIANA1), SORLIP2AT, and POLYA SIGNAL1. In the same region, sexalleles contain transcription factor-binding sites for DNA BINDING WITH ONE FINGER2, DNA BINDING WITH ONE FINGER3, and PROLAMIN BOX-BINDING FACTOR. Our results suggest that the expression of a single deregulated allele could induce the cascade of events leading to asexual female gamete formation in an apomictic plant.

  17. A conserved apomixis-specific polymorphism is correlated with exclusive exonuclease expression in premeiotic ovules of apomictic boechera species.

    PubMed

    Corral, José M; Vogel, Heiko; Aliyu, Olawale M; Hensel, Götz; Thiel, Thomas; Kumlehn, Jochen; Sharbel, Timothy F

    2013-12-01

    Apomixis (asexual seed production) is characterized by meiotically unreduced egg cell production (apomeiosis) followed by its parthenogenetic development into offspring that are genetic clones of the mother plant. Fertilization (i.e. pseudogamy) of the central cell is important for the production of a functional endosperm with a balanced 2:1 maternal:paternal genome ratio. Here, we present the APOLLO (for apomixis-linked locus) gene, an Aspartate Glutamate Aspartate Aspartate histidine exonuclease whose transcripts are down-regulated in sexual ovules entering meiosis while being up-regulated in apomeiotic ovules at the same stage of development in plants of the genus Boechera. APOLLO has both "apoalleles," which are characterized by a set of linked apomixis-specific polymorphisms, and "sexalleles." All apomictic Boechera spp. accessions proved to be heterozygous for the APOLLO gene (having at least one apoallele and one sexallele), while all sexual genotypes were homozygous for sexalleles. Apoalleles contained a 20-nucleotide polymorphism present in the 5' untranslated region that contains specific transcription factor-binding sites for ARABIDOPSIS THALIANA HOMEOBOX PROTEIN5, LIM1 (for LINEAGE ABNORMAL11, INSULIN1, MECHANOSENSORY PROTEIN3), SORLIP1AT (for SEQUENCES OVERREPRESENTED IN LIGHT-INDUCED PROMOTERS IN ARABIDOPSIS THALIANA1), SORLIP2AT, and POLYA SIGNAL1. In the same region, sexalleles contain transcription factor-binding sites for DNA BINDING WITH ONE FINGER2, DNA BINDING WITH ONE FINGER3, and PROLAMIN BOX-BINDING FACTOR. Our results suggest that the expression of a single deregulated allele could induce the cascade of events leading to asexual female gamete formation in an apomictic plant. PMID:24163323

  18. The Residency Training Experience in Podiatric Medicine and Surgery.

    PubMed

    Shofler, David; Chuang, Taijung; Argade, Nina

    2015-01-01

    The podiatric medicine and surgery residency is currently characterized by 3 years of comprehensive training. Contemporary issues have recently influenced the direction of training in the profession of podiatric medicine. Formal investigation into the residency training experience has, nonetheless, been limited. The purpose of the present study was to conduct a learning needs assessment of podiatric residency training. An electronic survey was developed, with comparable versions for program directors and residents. The specific topics investigated included the use of minimum activity volume numbers, learning resources, duty hours, strengths and weaknesses of residents, motivation of hosting student externship positions, noncognitive residency traits, meetings between residents and directors, resident satisfaction, and director satisfaction. A total of 197 program directors nationwide were sent the survey electronically, and 109 (53%) responded. Of 230 residents receiving the survey, 159 (78%) responded. Several statistically significant differences, and notable similarities, were observed between the 2 groups encompassing many aspects of the survey. A majority opinion, among both directors and residents, was found that the use of procedural assessment tools might improve resident evaluation. The responding directors and residents agreed that the following 3 topics were weaknesses in podiatric training: practice management, biomechanics, and performing podiatric research. Direct feedback immediately after surgery was the most valuable learning resource reported by the residents. The results of our study reflect the current status of the podiatric medicine and surgery residency and could facilitate improvement in the residency training experience.

  19. A DNA nanomachine based on rolling circle amplification-bridged two-stage exonuclease III-assisted recycling strategy for label-free multi-amplified biosensing of nucleic acid.

    PubMed

    Xue, Qingwang; Lv, Yanqin; Cui, Hui; Gu, Xiaohong; Zhang, Shuqiu; Liu, Jifeng

    2015-01-26

    An autonomous DNA nanomachine based on rolling circle amplification (RCA)-bridged two-stage exonuclease III (Exo III)-induced recycling amplification (Exo III-RCA-Exo III) was developed for label-free and highly sensitive homogeneous multi-amplified detection of DNA combined with sensitive fluorescence detection technique. According to the configuration, the analysis of DNA is accomplished by recognizing the target to a unlabeled molecular beacon (UMB) that integrates target-binding and signal transducer within one multifunctional design, followed by the target-binding of UMB in duplex DNA removed stepwise by Exo III accompanied by the releasing of target DNA for the successive hybridization and cleavage process and autonomous generation of the primer that initiate RCA process with a rational designed padlock DNA. The RCA products containing thousands of repeated catalytic sequences catalytically hybridize with a hairpin reporter probe that includes a "caged" inactive G-quadruplex sequence (HGP) and were then detected by Exo III-assisted recycling amplification, liberating the active G-quadruplex and generating remarkable ZnPPIX/G-quadruplex fluorescence signals with the help of zinc(II)-protoporphyrin IX (ZnPPIX). The proposed strategy showed a wide dynamic range over 7 orders of magnitude with a low limit of detection of 0.51 aM. In addition, this designed protocol can discriminate mismatched DNA from perfectly matched target DNA, and holds a great potential for early diagnosis in gene-related diseases.

  20. Drug information residency rotation with pharmaceutical industry.

    PubMed

    Cramer, R L

    1986-01-01

    A drug information rotation in pharmaceutical industry may be elected as a component of a hospital pharmacy residency program. Program objectives include improving communication between the pharmaceutical industry and hospital pharmacy/academia, exposing the resident to the challenges the pharmaceutical industry encounters, improving proficiency in drug information practice, and providing insight into the working relationships of various departments within the company. During the rotation, the resident serves as a member of the Drug Information Service. Resident activities include participating in interviews with corporate professionals, updating pharmacokinetic profiles, responding to drug information requests and participating in other information projects. This rotation enables the resident to better understand pharmaceutical industry's concerns and relate these concerns to clinical pharmacy practice. PMID:10277398

  1. Does Psychiatry Residency Training Reflect the "Real World" of Psychiatry Practice? A Survey of Residency Graduates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Petersen, Timothy; Fava, Maurizio; Alpert, Jonathan E.; Vorono, Sienna; Sanders, Kathy M.; Mischoulon, David

    2007-01-01

    Objective: The authors determine whether Massachusetts General Hospital's residency graduates believed their training reflected their current practice activities. Method: The authors surveyed 134 graduates from MGH and MGH-McLean residency classes from 1983 to 2003. Subjects ranked their satisfaction with different components of training on a…

  2. Annual Report on Resident Fish Activities, 1985 Fiscal Year, Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program, Action Item 41.8.

    SciTech Connect

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1985-09-01

    This report addresses the status for resident fish projects currently implemented by the Bonneville Power Administration under the amended Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program. Projects that have been in place for a sufficient length of time are discussed in greater detail with a brief evaluation presented.

  3. Do Research Activities During College, Medical School, and Residency Mediate Racial/Ethnic Disparities in Full-Time Faculty Appointments at U.S. Medical Schools?

    PubMed Central

    Jeffe, Donna B.; Yan, Yan; Andriole, Dorothy A.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To determine whether post-secondary-education research experiences and other variables mediate racial/ethnic disparities in U.S. medical school graduates’ full-time faculty appointments in academic medicine. Method Individualized, de-identified records for 1994–2000 U.S. medical school matriculants who graduated with MDs before 2005, completed graduate medical education before 2009, and had data for all variables were examined for potential mediators of racial/ethnic disparities in full-time faculty appointments using the SAS macro “MEDIATE” for estimation and statistical inference. Controlling for gender, parents’ occupation, and graduation year, the authors estimated the effects of potential mediators in separate models comparing Asian/Pacific Islander (PI) versus underrepresented minority (URM; including African American, Hispanic, and Native American/Alaska Native) graduates and white versus URM graduates. Results Of 82,758 eligible graduates, 62,749 (75.8%) had complete data; of these, 11,234 (17.9%) had full-time faculty appointments, including 18.4% (7,848/42,733) of white, 18.8% (2,125/11,297) of Asian/PI, and 14.5% (1,261/8,719) of URM graduates. Proportion of total race/ethnicity effect on full-time faculty appointment explained by all mediators was 66.0% (95% CI, 44.7%–87.4%) in a model comparing Asians/PIs with URMs and was 64.8% (95% CI, 52.2%–77.4%) in one comparing whites with URMs. Participation in post-secondary research activities (in college, medical school, residency), authorship during medical school, academic achievement, and faculty career intentions at graduation were among the significant mediators explaining the effect of race/ethnicity on full-time faculty appointment. Conclusions Post-secondary-education research experiences for URM students are among the mediators of racial/ethnic disparities in full-time faculty appointments and therefore may increase academic medicine faculty diversity. PMID:23018339

  4. Resident mesenchymal progenitors of articular cartilage

    PubMed Central

    Candela, Maria Elena; Yasuhara, Rika; Iwamoto, Masahiro; Enomoto-Iwamoto, Motomi

    2015-01-01

    Articular cartilage has poor capacity of self-renewal and repair. Insufficient number and activity of resident mesenchymal (connective tissue) progenitors is likely one of the underlying reasons. Chondroprogenitors reside not only in the superficial zone of articular cartilage but also in other zones of articular cartilage and in the neighboring tissues, including perichondrium (groove of Ranvier), synovium and fat pad. These cells may respond to injury and contribute to articular cartilage healing. In addition, marrow stromal cells can migrate through subchondral bone when articular cartilage is damaged. We should develop drugs and methods that correctly stimulate resident progenitors for improvement of repair and inhibition of degenerative changes in articular cartilage. PMID:25179676

  5. Resident mesenchymal progenitors of articular cartilage.

    PubMed

    Candela, Maria Elena; Yasuhara, Rika; Iwamoto, Masahiro; Enomoto-Iwamoto, Motomi

    2014-10-01

    Articular cartilage has poor capacity of self-renewal and repair. Insufficient number and activity of resident mesenchymal (connective tissue) progenitors is likely one of the underlying reasons. Chondroprogenitors reside not only in the superficial zone of articular cartilage but also in other zones of articular cartilage and in the neighboring tissues, including perichondrium (groove of Ranvier), synovium and fat pad. These cells may respond to injury and contribute to articular cartilage healing. In addition, marrow stromal cells can migrate through subchondral bone when articular cartilage is damaged. We should develop drugs and methods that correctly stimulate resident progenitors for improvement of repair and inhibition of degenerative changes in articular cartilage. PMID:25179676

  6. Treatment of PCR products with exonuclease I and heat-labile alkaline phosphatase improves the visibility of combined bisulfite restriction analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Watanabe, Kousuke; Emoto, Noriko; Sunohara, Mitsuhiro; Kawakami, Masanori; Kage, Hidenori; Nagase, Takahide; Ohishi, Nobuya; Takai, Daiya

    2010-08-27

    Research highlights: {yields} Incubating PCR products at a high temperature causes smears in gel electrophoresis. {yields} Smears interfere with the interpretation of methylation analysis using COBRA. {yields} Treatment with exonuclease I and heat-labile alkaline phosphatase eliminates smears. {yields} The elimination of smears improves the visibility of COBRA. -- Abstract: DNA methylation plays a vital role in the regulation of gene expression. Abnormal promoter hypermethylation is an important mechanism of inactivating tumor suppressor genes in human cancers. Combined bisulfite restriction analysis (COBRA) is a widely used method for identifying the DNA methylation of specific CpG sites. Here, we report that exonuclease I and heat-labile alkaline phosphatase can be used for PCR purification for COBRA, improving the visibility of gel electrophoresis after restriction digestion. This improvement is observed when restriction digestion is performed at a high temperature, such as 60 {sup o}C or 65 {sup o}C, with BstUI and TaqI, respectively. This simple method can be applied instead of DNA purification using spin columns or phenol/chloroform extraction. It can also be applied to other situations when PCR products are digested by thermophile-derived restriction enzymes, such as PCR restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis.

  7. An electrochemical aptasensor for thrombin detection based on the recycling of exonuclease III and double-stranded DNA-templated copper nanoparticles assisted signal amplification.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jing; Xin, Meiling; Cao, Ya; Yin, Yongmei; Shu, Yongqian; Ma, Wenli

    2015-02-20

    In this paper, we report an improved electrochemical aptasensor based on exonuclease III and double-stranded DNA (dsDNA)-templated copper nanoparticles (CuNPs) assisted signal amplification. In this sensor, duplex DNA from the hybridization of ligated thrombin-binding aptamer (TBA) subunits and probe DNA can act as an effective template for the formation of CuNPs on the electrode surface, so copper ions released from acid-dissolution of CuNPs may catalyze the oxidation of ο-phenylenediamine to produce an amplified electrochemical response. In the presence of thrombin, a short duplex domain with four complementary base pairs can be stabilized by the binding of TBA subunits with thrombin, in which TBA subunit 2 can be partially digested from 3' terminal with the cycle of exonuclease III, so the ligation of TBA subunits and the subsequent formation of CuNPs can be inhibited. By electrochemical characterization of dsDNA-templated CuNPs on the electrode surface, our aptasensor can display excellent performances for the detection of thrombin in a broad linear range from 100 fM to 1 nM with a low detection limit of 20.3 fM, which can also specially distinguish thrombin in both PBS and serum samples. Therefore, our aptasensor might have great potential for clinical diagnosis of biomarkers in the future.

  8. Teaching professionalism to residents.

    PubMed

    Klein, Eileen J; Jackson, J Craig; Kratz, Lyn; Marcuse, Edgar K; McPhillips, Heather A; Shugerman, Richard P; Watkins, Sandra; Stapleton, F Bruder

    2003-01-01

    The need to teach professionalism during residency has been affirmed by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education, which will require documentation of education and evaluation of professionalism by 2007. Recently the American Academy of Pediatrics has proposed the following components of professionalism be taught and measured: honesty/integrity, reliability/responsibility, respect for others, compassion/empathy, self-improvement, self-awareness/knowledge of limits, communication/collaboration, and altruism/advocacy. The authors describe a curriculum for introducing the above principles of professionalism into a pediatrics residency that could serve as a model for other programs. The curriculum is taught at an annual five-day retreat for interns, with 11 mandatory sessions devoted to addressing key professionalism issues. The authors also explain how the retreat is evaluated and how the retreat's topics are revisited during the residency, and discuss general issues of teaching and evaluating professionalism.

  9. An Assigned Teaching Resident Rotation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daniels-Brady, Catherine; Rieder, Ronald

    2010-01-01

    Objective: The authors' adult psychiatry residency training program identified several educational needs for residents at their institution. Junior residents needed enhanced learning of clinical interviewing skills and learning connected to the inpatient psychiatry ward rotations, and senior residents needed opportunities to prepare for the…

  10. 24 CFR 598.610 - Resident benefit standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... URBAN DEVELOPMENT COMMUNITY FACILITIES URBAN EMPOWERMENT ZONES: ROUND TWO AND THREE DESIGNATIONS Empowerment Zone Grants § 598.610 Resident benefit standards. The project or activity described in...

  11. 24 CFR 598.610 - Resident benefit standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... URBAN DEVELOPMENT COMMUNITY FACILITIES URBAN EMPOWERMENT ZONES: ROUND TWO AND THREE DESIGNATIONS Empowerment Zone Grants § 598.610 Resident benefit standards. The project or activity described in...

  12. 24 CFR 598.610 - Resident benefit standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... URBAN DEVELOPMENT COMMUNITY FACILITIES URBAN EMPOWERMENT ZONES: ROUND TWO AND THREE DESIGNATIONS Empowerment Zone Grants § 598.610 Resident benefit standards. The project or activity described in...

  13. 24 CFR 598.610 - Resident benefit standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... URBAN DEVELOPMENT COMMUNITY FACILITIES URBAN EMPOWERMENT ZONES: ROUND TWO AND THREE DESIGNATIONS Empowerment Zone Grants § 598.610 Resident benefit standards. The project or activity described in...

  14. 24 CFR 598.610 - Resident benefit standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... URBAN DEVELOPMENT COMMUNITY FACILITIES URBAN EMPOWERMENT ZONES: ROUND TWO AND THREE DESIGNATIONS Empowerment Zone Grants § 598.610 Resident benefit standards. The project or activity described in...

  15. The Residence Life Cinema.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dungan, Jane Fidler; Elion, Audrey; Gusmano, Phil

    1997-01-01

    Explores the implementation, results, and the limitations of the Residence Life Cinema program at the University of Memphis. Claims that such programs offer an innovative method for fostering student development by utilizing movies to stimulate affective and cognitive processes in students--processes that may not occur without a catalyst. (RJM)

  16. Selection of Anesthesiology Residents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, J. David, III; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Selection data for all Medical University of South Carolina anesthesiology residency applicants (about 200 per year) and the 8 selected per year were compared for 4 years. Results showed standardized test scores, grades, and class ranks of those selected were not higher than of others, but interview and recommendation scores were higher.…

  17. Financial debt of orthopedic residents.

    PubMed

    Hwang, John S; Beebe, Kathleen S; Benevenia, Joseph; Karanfilian, Briette; Berberian, Wayne S

    2012-04-01

    Many orthopedic residents accrue considerable debt by residency graduation. These debts for graduating medical students continue to increase due to the yearly increase of medical school tuition. The purpose of this study was to examine the causes of financial debt, as well the effects of debt on orthopedic residents.Orthopedic residents from postgraduate years 1 to 5 (N=27) completed an anonymous, optional financial survey. The survey asked questions regarding the characteristics of the residents' debt and their concern caused by their debt. All residents from our institute (N=27) voluntarily participated in the survey. The residents consisted of 4 (15%) women and 23 (85%) men, with 14 (56%) single residents and 12 (44%) married residents. No statistically significant difference existed in total debt >$100,000 between single and married residents or men and women. Forty-eight percent (n=13) of the residents had medical educational debt >$100,000, whereas 45% (n=12) had total debt >$200,000. Residents with total debt >$100,000 were concerned about their debt, whereas 1 of 4 residents with <$100,000 of total debt reported concern (P<.001).Debts affect orthopedic residents financially and may cause stress and hinder their medical training. Appropriate measures should be taken to help residents properly manage their debt and to provide supplemental assistance with their financial struggles. PMID:22495858

  18. Financial debt of orthopedic residents.

    PubMed

    Hwang, John S; Beebe, Kathleen S; Benevenia, Joseph; Karanfilian, Briette; Berberian, Wayne S

    2012-04-01

    Many orthopedic residents accrue considerable debt by residency graduation. These debts for graduating medical students continue to increase due to the yearly increase of medical school tuition. The purpose of this study was to examine the causes of financial debt, as well the effects of debt on orthopedic residents.Orthopedic residents from postgraduate years 1 to 5 (N=27) completed an anonymous, optional financial survey. The survey asked questions regarding the characteristics of the residents' debt and their concern caused by their debt. All residents from our institute (N=27) voluntarily participated in the survey. The residents consisted of 4 (15%) women and 23 (85%) men, with 14 (56%) single residents and 12 (44%) married residents. No statistically significant difference existed in total debt >$100,000 between single and married residents or men and women. Forty-eight percent (n=13) of the residents had medical educational debt >$100,000, whereas 45% (n=12) had total debt >$200,000. Residents with total debt >$100,000 were concerned about their debt, whereas 1 of 4 residents with <$100,000 of total debt reported concern (P<.001).Debts affect orthopedic residents financially and may cause stress and hinder their medical training. Appropriate measures should be taken to help residents properly manage their debt and to provide supplemental assistance with their financial struggles.

  19. Global Health Simulation During Residency

    PubMed Central

    Rosenman, Jane R.; Fischer, Philip R.; Arteaga, Grace M.; Hulyalkar, Manasi; Butteris, Sabrina M.; Pitt, Michael B.

    2016-01-01

    Resident participation in international health electives (IHEs) has been shown to be beneficial, yet not all residents have the opportunity to participate. We sought to determine whether participating in simulated global health cases, via the standardized Simulation Use for Global Away Rotations (SUGAR) curriculum, was useful for all pediatric residents, not merely those planning to go on an IHE. Pediatric residents in our program took part in 2 SUGAR cases and provided feedback via an online survey. Thirty-six of 40 residents participated (90%); 72% responded to the survey. Three of 10 residents not previously planning to work in resource-limited settings indicated participation in SUGAR made them more likely to do so. Nearly all residents (88%) felt SUGAR should be part of the residency curriculum. All felt better prepared for working cross-culturally. While designed to prepare trainees for work in resource-limited settings, SUGAR may be beneficial for all residents. PMID:27583300

  20. Global Health Simulation During Residency.

    PubMed

    Rosenman, Jane R; Fischer, Philip R; Arteaga, Grace M; Hulyalkar, Manasi; Butteris, Sabrina M; Pitt, Michael B

    2016-01-01

    Resident participation in international health electives (IHEs) has been shown to be beneficial, yet not all residents have the opportunity to participate. We sought to determine whether participating in simulated global health cases, via the standardized Simulation Use for Global Away Rotations (SUGAR) curriculum, was useful for all pediatric residents, not merely those planning to go on an IHE. Pediatric residents in our program took part in 2 SUGAR cases and provided feedback via an online survey. Thirty-six of 40 residents participated (90%); 72% responded to the survey. Three of 10 residents not previously planning to work in resource-limited settings indicated participation in SUGAR made them more likely to do so. Nearly all residents (88%) felt SUGAR should be part of the residency curriculum. All felt better prepared for working cross-culturally. While designed to prepare trainees for work in resource-limited settings, SUGAR may be beneficial for all residents. PMID:27583300

  1. Single-CpG resolution mapping of 5-hydroxymethylcytosine by chemical labeling and exonuclease digestion identifies evolutionarily unconserved CpGs as TET targets.

    PubMed

    Sérandour, Aurélien A; Avner, Stéphane; Mahé, Elise A; Madigou, Thierry; Guibert, Sylvain; Weber, Michaël; Salbert, Gilles

    2016-01-01

    Conventional techniques for single-base resolution mapping of epigenetic modifications of DNA such as 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5hmC) rely on the sequencing of bisulfite-modified DNA. Here we present an alternative approach called SCL-exo which combines selective chemical labeling (SCL) of 5hmC in genomic DNA with exonuclease (exo) digestion of the bead-trapped modified DNA molecules. Associated with a straightforward bioinformatic analysis, this new procedure provides an unbiased and fast method for mapping this epigenetic mark at high resolution. Implemented on mouse genomic DNA from in vitro-differentiated neural precursor cells, SCL-exo sheds light on an intrinsic lack of conservation of hydroxymethylated CpGs across vertebrates. PMID:27025842

  2. Single-CpG resolution mapping of 5-hydroxymethylcytosine by chemical labeling and exonuclease digestion identifies evolutionarily unconserved CpGs as TET targets.

    PubMed

    Sérandour, Aurélien A; Avner, Stéphane; Mahé, Elise A; Madigou, Thierry; Guibert, Sylvain; Weber, Michaël; Salbert, Gilles

    2016-03-29

    Conventional techniques for single-base resolution mapping of epigenetic modifications of DNA such as 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5hmC) rely on the sequencing of bisulfite-modified DNA. Here we present an alternative approach called SCL-exo which combines selective chemical labeling (SCL) of 5hmC in genomic DNA with exonuclease (exo) digestion of the bead-trapped modified DNA molecules. Associated with a straightforward bioinformatic analysis, this new procedure provides an unbiased and fast method for mapping this epigenetic mark at high resolution. Implemented on mouse genomic DNA from in vitro-differentiated neural precursor cells, SCL-exo sheds light on an intrinsic lack of conservation of hydroxymethylated CpGs across vertebrates.

  3. Real-time PCR Detection of Brucella Abortus: A Comparative Study of SYBR Green I, 5'-exonuclease, and Hybridization Probe Assays

    SciTech Connect

    Newby, Deborah Trishelle; Hadfield, Ted; Roberto, Francisco Figueroa

    2003-08-01

    Real-time PCR provides a means of detecting and quantifying DNA targets by monitoring PCR product accumulation during cycling as indicated by increased fluorescence. A number of different approaches can be used to generate the fluorescence signal. Three approaches—SYBR Green I (a double-stranded DNA intercalating dye), 5'-exonuclease (enzymatically released fluors), and hybridization probes (fluorescence resonance energy transfer)—were evaluated for use in a real-time PCR assay to detect Brucella abortus. The three assays utilized the same amplification primers to produce an identical amplicon. This amplicon spans a region of the B. abortus genome that includes portions of the alkB gene and the IS711 insertion element. All three assays were of comparable sensitivity, providing a linear assay over 7 orders of magnitude (from 7.5 ng down to 7.5 fg). However, the greatest specificity was achieved with the hybridization probe assay.

  4. Scientist in residence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thiel, David

    1990-03-01

    In order to enthuse secondary school students about science, and physics in particular, the author spent two one-week periods taking classes in local secondary schools as a `scientist in residence'. Two different private schools were involved and classes were given to students in the last four years preceding tertiary entrance. This article relates some of the motivation, method and implementation of this novel idea and some tentative conclusions are presented.

  5. Anti-Ephrin Type-B Receptor 2 (EphB2) and Anti-Three Prime Histone mRNA EXonuclease 1 (THEX1) Autoantibodies in Scleroderma and Lupus.

    PubMed

    Azzouz, Doua F; Martin, Gabriel V; Arnoux, Fanny; Balandraud, Nathalie; Martin, Thierry; Dubucquoi, Sylvain; Hachulla, Eric; Farge-Bancel, Dominique; Tiev, Kiet; Cabane, Jean; Bardin, Nathalie; Chiche, Laurent; Martin, Marielle; Caillet, Eléonore C; Kanaan, Sami B; Harlé, Jean Robert; Granel, Brigitte; Diot, Elisabeth; Roudier, Jean; Auger, Isabelle; Lambert, Nathalie C

    2016-01-01

    In a pilot ProtoArray analysis, we identified 6 proteins out of 9483 recognized by autoantibodies (AAb) from patients with systemic sclerosis (SSc). We further investigated the 6 candidates by ELISA on hundreds of controls and patients, including patients with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE), known for high sera reactivity and overlapping AAb with SSc. Only 2 of the 6 candidates, Ephrin type-B receptor 2 (EphB2) and Three prime Histone mRNA EXonuclease 1 (THEX1), remained significantly recognized by sera samples from SSc compared to controls (healthy or with rheumatic diseases) with, respectively, 34% versus 14% (P = 2.10-4) and 60% versus 28% (P = 3.10-8). Above all, EphB2 and THEX1 revealed to be mainly recognized by SLE sera samples with respectively 56%, (P = 2.10-10) and 82% (P = 5.10-13). As anti-EphB2 and anti-THEX1 AAb were found in both diseases, an epitope mapping was realized on each protein to refine SSc and SLE diagnosis. A 15-mer peptide from EphB2 allowed to identify 35% of SLE sera samples (N = 48) versus only 5% of any other sera samples (N = 157), including SSc sera samples. AAb titers were significantly higher in SLE sera (P<0.0001) and correlated with disease activity (p<0.02). We could not find an epitope on EphB2 protein for SSc neither on THEX1 for SSc or SLE. We showed that patients with SSc or SLE have AAb against EphB2, a protein involved in angiogenesis, and THEX1, a 3'-5' exoribonuclease involved in histone mRNA degradation. We have further identified a peptide from EphB2 as a specific and sensitive tool for SLE diagnosis. PMID:27617966

  6. Anti-Ephrin Type-B Receptor 2 (EphB2) and Anti-Three Prime Histone mRNA EXonuclease 1 (THEX1) Autoantibodies in Scleroderma and Lupus

    PubMed Central

    Azzouz, Doua F.; Martin, Gabriel V.; Arnoux, Fanny; Balandraud, Nathalie; Martin, Thierry; Dubucquoi, Sylvain; Hachulla, Eric; Farge-Bancel, Dominique; Tiev, Kiet; Cabane, Jean; Bardin, Nathalie; Chiche, Laurent; Martin, Marielle; Caillet, Eléonore C.; Kanaan, Sami B.; Harlé, Jean Robert; Granel, Brigitte; Diot, Elisabeth; Roudier, Jean; Auger, Isabelle; Lambert, Nathalie C.

    2016-01-01

    In a pilot ProtoArray analysis, we identified 6 proteins out of 9483 recognized by autoantibodies (AAb) from patients with systemic sclerosis (SSc). We further investigated the 6 candidates by ELISA on hundreds of controls and patients, including patients with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE), known for high sera reactivity and overlapping AAb with SSc. Only 2 of the 6 candidates, Ephrin type-B receptor 2 (EphB2) and Three prime Histone mRNA EXonuclease 1 (THEX1), remained significantly recognized by sera samples from SSc compared to controls (healthy or with rheumatic diseases) with, respectively, 34% versus 14% (P = 2.10−4) and 60% versus 28% (P = 3.10−8). Above all, EphB2 and THEX1 revealed to be mainly recognized by SLE sera samples with respectively 56%, (P = 2.10−10) and 82% (P = 5.10−13). As anti-EphB2 and anti-THEX1 AAb were found in both diseases, an epitope mapping was realized on each protein to refine SSc and SLE diagnosis. A 15-mer peptide from EphB2 allowed to identify 35% of SLE sera samples (N = 48) versus only 5% of any other sera samples (N = 157), including SSc sera samples. AAb titers were significantly higher in SLE sera (P<0.0001) and correlated with disease activity (p<0.02). We could not find an epitope on EphB2 protein for SSc neither on THEX1 for SSc or SLE. We showed that patients with SSc or SLE have AAb against EphB2, a protein involved in angiogenesis, and THEX1, a 3’-5’ exoribonuclease involved in histone mRNA degradation. We have further identified a peptide from EphB2 as a specific and sensitive tool for SLE diagnosis. PMID:27617966

  7. Evaluation of a Core Curriculum for Optometric Residents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heiberger, Michael H.; Suchoff, Irvin B.

    1989-01-01

    A survey of residents and residency supervisors at three Veterans' Administration hospitals affiliated with one school of optometry investigated attitudes toward core optometry curriculum activities. Activities were generally rated well for content and effectiveness of presentation, and the study also provided information for program improvement.…

  8. Promoting residencies to pharmacy students.

    PubMed

    Knapp, K K

    1991-08-01

    A program for promoting pharmacy residency training to pharmacy students at the University of the Pacific (UOP) is described. A residency club was started in 1982 to increase UOP students' interest in residency training and to provide them with relevant information. Some students needed to be convinced that residencies were primarily educational rather than staffing experiences. Students were made aware of pharmacists' practice in specialty areas, for which residency training is needed, and were taught how to prepare themselves for selection for residencies. The club was formed to encourage mutual support among the students, which would be less likely to occur if residencies were promoted only through work with individual students. Club meetings provide information about available residencies, the application process, and the value of residency training to a career in pharmacy. Students are taught how to prepare curricula vitae, how to interview, and how to select programs to which to apply. Applications for residencies increased. Although the rate of acceptance was low at first, it was expected to increase as more UOP students demonstrated their interest in and qualification for residency training. The promotion of residencies as part of a balanced career planning and placement program for pharmacy students is encouraged.

  9. Analysis of Resident Case Logs in an Anesthesiology Residency Program.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Satoshi; Tanaka, Pedro; Madsen, Matias Vested; Macario, Alex

    2016-04-15

    Our goal in this study was to examine Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education case logs for Stanford anesthesia residents graduating in 2013 (25 residents) and 2014 (26 residents). The resident with the fewest recorded patients in 2013 had 43% the number of patients compared with the resident with the most patients, and in 2014, this equaled 48%. There were residents who had 75% more than the class average number of cases for several of the 12 case types and 3 procedure types required by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education. Also, there were residents with fewer than half as many for some of the required cases or procedure types. Some of the variability may have been because of the hazards of self-reporting.

  10. Associations between the perceived environment and physical activity among adults aged 55-65 years: does urban-rural area of residence matter?

    PubMed

    Cleland, Verity; Sodergren, Marita; Otahal, Petr; Timperio, Anna; Ball, Kylie; Crawford, David; Salmon, Jo; McNaughton, Sarah A

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to determine whether associations between the perceived environment and physical activity are moderated by urban-rural status among midolder aged adults. Environmental (safety, aesthetics, physical activity environment) and physical activity (total, leisure, transport) data from 3,888 adults (55 to 65 years) from urban and rural areas of Victoria, Australia, were analyzed. Multinomial logistic regression examined interactions between urban-rural status and environments in associations with physical activity. Significant (P < .05) interactions were evident and indicated positive associations only among older rural adults for both safety and aesthetics with total and transport physical activity (e.g., rural adults reporting higher safety were 91% to 118% more likely to have higher activity than rural adults reporting low safety). In contrast, the physical activity environment was positively associated with leisure activity among only urban adults. Findings suggest that some tailoring of physical activity promotion strategies targeting the environment may be required for urban and rural midolder aged adults.

  11. Selenium status of Utah County residents

    SciTech Connect

    Bown, J.W.; Christensen, M.J.

    1986-03-01

    Counties of low and high soil selenium (Se) content appear to be in close proximity in the state of Utah. The Se status of Utah County residents was evaluated by measurement of plasma Se concentration, and plasma, platelet, and erythrocyte (RBC) Se-glutathione peroxidase (Se-GSH-Px) activity. A Random Digit Dialing procedure was employed to stratify subjects according to sex and annual income (< $10,000, $10-20,000, > $20,000) in a 2 x 3 factorial design, 7 subjects per cell. There were no significant differences due to sex or income. These results suggest (1) the Se status of Utah County residents is similar to that reported for residents of other regions in the US, and (2) no special consideration for income or gender need be made in surveys of population groups to determine Se status.

  12. Dying in hospital: the residents' viewpoint

    PubMed Central

    Ahmedzai, S

    1982-01-01

    A survey of residents' (junior house officers') experiences and attitudes to the terminal care part of their work in four Glasgow teaching hospitals showed that even a month after starting work one-fifth of the respondents had not actively managed a dying patient. Sixty-four per cent thought that they had received inadequate teaching in terminal care. Depression and anxiety had been the most difficult symptoms encountered. The residents thought that the ward nursing staff contributed much more than their senior medical colleagues to both the medical and psychological aspects of terminal care. The results indicate a need for more undergraduate education in the most relevant areas, such as coping with the psychological problems of dying patients and their relatives. Newly qualified residents require more support from senior medical staff in looking after the terminally ill. PMID:6809204

  13. Solid organ transplant training objectives for residents.

    PubMed

    Masclans, J R; Vicente, R; Ballesteros, M A; Sabater, J; Roca, O; Rello, J

    2012-11-01

    With the aim of analyzing the current state of the educational objectives in the training of medical residents in solid organ transplantation (SOT), we conducted a review of the status of the official programs of the specialities involved in SOT, focusing particularly on lung transplantation. A survey of medical residents was also conducted to allow reflexion about the topic. We obtained 44 surveys from 4 University Hospitals with active programs in SOT, mainly from intensive care medicine and anesthesiology residents. We detected an important number of courses oriented to organ donation but very limited in terms of basic training in the management of the immediate postoperative period, principles of immunosuppression and updates on immunosuppressive therapy and complications (particularly rejection and infection). We also identified that these educational aspects should be directed not only to medical residents from specialities with a close retation to SOT, but also to all who may at some time have a relation to such patients. The use of information and communication techniques (ICTs), on-line courses and also simulations should be instruments to take into account in the biomedical training of medical residents. We conclude that we need a specific training program in complications of SOT, as well as fundamental principles in immunology and immunosuppressor pharmacology. PMID:22980670

  14. Associations between the perceived environment and physical activity among adults aged 55-65 years: does urban-rural area of residence matter?

    PubMed

    Cleland, Verity; Sodergren, Marita; Otahal, Petr; Timperio, Anna; Ball, Kylie; Crawford, David; Salmon, Jo; McNaughton, Sarah A

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to determine whether associations between the perceived environment and physical activity are moderated by urban-rural status among midolder aged adults. Environmental (safety, aesthetics, physical activity environment) and physical activity (total, leisure, transport) data from 3,888 adults (55 to 65 years) from urban and rural areas of Victoria, Australia, were analyzed. Multinomial logistic regression examined interactions between urban-rural status and environments in associations with physical activity. Significant (P < .05) interactions were evident and indicated positive associations only among older rural adults for both safety and aesthetics with total and transport physical activity (e.g., rural adults reporting higher safety were 91% to 118% more likely to have higher activity than rural adults reporting low safety). In contrast, the physical activity environment was positively associated with leisure activity among only urban adults. Findings suggest that some tailoring of physical activity promotion strategies targeting the environment may be required for urban and rural midolder aged adults. PMID:24412944

  15. The problem resident behavior guide: strategies for remediation.

    PubMed

    Williamson, Kelly; Quattromani, Erin; Aldeen, Amer

    2016-04-01

    In 2012, the ACGME supplemented the core competencies with outcomes-based milestones for resident performance within the six competency domains. These milestones address the knowledge, skills, abilities, attitudes, and experiences that a resident is expected to progress through during the course of training. Even prior to the initiation of the milestones, there was a paucity of EM literature addressing the remediation of problem resident behaviors and there remain few readily accessible tools to aid in the implementation of a remediation plan. The goal of the "Problem Resident Behavior Guide" is to provide specific strategies for resident remediation based on deficiencies identified within the framework of the EM milestones. The "Problem Resident Behavior Guide" is a written instructional manual that provides concrete examples of remediation strategies to address specific milestone deficiencies. The more than 200 strategies stem from the experiences of the authors who have professional experience at three different academic hospitals and emergency medicine residency programs, supplemented by recommendations from educational leaders as well as utilization of valuable education adjuncts, such as focused simulation exercises, lecture preparation, and themed ED shifts. Most recommendations require active participation by the resident with guidance by faculty to achieve the remediation expectations. The ACGME outcomes-based milestones aid in the identification of deficiencies with regards to resident performance without providing recommendations on remediation. The Problem Resident Behavior Guide can therefore have a significant impact by filling in this gap. PMID:26667256

  16. The problem resident behavior guide: strategies for remediation.

    PubMed

    Williamson, Kelly; Quattromani, Erin; Aldeen, Amer

    2016-04-01

    In 2012, the ACGME supplemented the core competencies with outcomes-based milestones for resident performance within the six competency domains. These milestones address the knowledge, skills, abilities, attitudes, and experiences that a resident is expected to progress through during the course of training. Even prior to the initiation of the milestones, there was a paucity of EM literature addressing the remediation of problem resident behaviors and there remain few readily accessible tools to aid in the implementation of a remediation plan. The goal of the "Problem Resident Behavior Guide" is to provide specific strategies for resident remediation based on deficiencies identified within the framework of the EM milestones. The "Problem Resident Behavior Guide" is a written instructional manual that provides concrete examples of remediation strategies to address specific milestone deficiencies. The more than 200 strategies stem from the experiences of the authors who have professional experience at three different academic hospitals and emergency medicine residency programs, supplemented by recommendations from educational leaders as well as utilization of valuable education adjuncts, such as focused simulation exercises, lecture preparation, and themed ED shifts. Most recommendations require active participation by the resident with guidance by faculty to achieve the remediation expectations. The ACGME outcomes-based milestones aid in the identification of deficiencies with regards to resident performance without providing recommendations on remediation. The Problem Resident Behavior Guide can therefore have a significant impact by filling in this gap.

  17. Colorectal Surgeons Teaching General Surgery Residents: Current Challenges and Opportunities

    PubMed Central

    Schmitz, Connie C.; Chow, Christopher J.; Rothenberger, David A.

    2012-01-01

    Effective teaching for general surgery residents requires that faculty members with colorectal expertise actively engage in the education process and fully understand the current context for residency training. In this article, we review important national developments with respect to graduate medical education that impact resident supervision, curriculum implementation, resident assessment, and program evaluation. We argue that establishing a culture of respect and professionalism in today's teaching environment is one of the most important legacies that surgical educators can leave for the coming generation. Faculty role modeling and the process of socializing residents is highlighted. We review the American College of Surgeons' Code of Professional Conduct, summarize some of the current strategies for teaching and assessing professionalism, and reflect on principles of motivation that apply to resident training both for the trainee and the trainer. PMID:23997668

  18. Effects of Green House nursing homes on residents' families.

    PubMed

    Lum, Terry Y; Kane, Rosalie A; Cutler, Lois J; Yu, Tzy-Chyi

    2008-01-01

    A longitudinal quasi-experimental study with two comparison groups was conducted to test the effects of a Green House (GH) nursing home program on residents' family members. The GHs are individual residences, each serving 10 elders, where certified nursing assistant (CNA)-level resident assistants form primary relationships with residents and family, family is encouraged to visits, and professionals adapted their roles to support the model. GH family were somewhat less involved in providing assistance to their residents although family contact did not differ among the settings at any time period. GH family were more satisfied with their resident's care and with their own experience as family members, and had no greater family burden. Issues in studying family outcomes are discussed as well as implications for roles of various personnel, including social service and activities staff in a GH model.

  19. DNA Double Strand Break Repair Pathway Choice Is Directed by Distinct MRE11 Nuclease Activities

    PubMed Central

    Shibata, Atsushi; Moiani, Davide; Arvai, Andrew S.; Perry, J. Jefferson P.; Harding, Shane M.; Genois, Marie-Michelle; Maity, Ranjan; van Rossum-Fikkert, Sari; Kertokalio, Aryandi; Romoli, Filippo; Ismail, Amani; Ismalaj, Ermal; Petricci, Elena; Matthew, J Neale; Bristow, Robert G; Masson, Jean-Yves; Wyman, Claire; Jeggo, Penny; Tainer, John A.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY MRE11 within the MRE11-RAD50-NBS1 (MRN) complex acts in DNA double-strand break repair (DSBR), detection and signaling; yet, how its endo- and exonuclease activities regulate DSB repair by non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) versus homologous recombination (HR) remains enigmatic. Here we employed structure-based design with a focused chemical library to discover specific MRE11 endo- or exonuclease inhibitors. With these inhibitors we examined repair pathway choice at DSBs generated in G2 following radiation exposure. Whilst endo- or exonuclease inhibition impairs radiation-induced RPA chromatin binding, suggesting diminished resection, the inhibitors surprisingly direct different repair outcomes. Endonuclease inhibition promotes NHEJ in lieu of HR, whilst exonuclease inhibition confers a repair defect. Collectively, the results describe nuclease-specific MRE11 inhibitors, define distinct nuclease roles in DSB repair, and support a mechanism whereby MRE11 endonuclease initiates resection, thereby licensing HR followed by MRE11 exo and EXO1/BLM bidirectional resection towards and away from the DNA end, which commits to HR. PMID:24316220

  20. Resident Exposure to Peripheral Nerve Surgical Procedures During Residency Training.

    PubMed

    Gil, Joseph A; Daniels, Alan H; Akelman, Edward

    2016-05-01

    Background Variability in case exposures has been identified for orthopaedic surgery residents. It is not known if this variability exists for peripheral nerve procedures. Objective The objective of this study was to assess ACGME case log data for graduating orthopaedic surgery, plastic surgery, general surgery, and neurological surgery residents for peripheral nerve surgical procedures and to evaluate intraspecialty and interspecialty variability in case volume. Methods Surgical case logs from 2009 to 2014 for the 4 specialties were compared for peripheral nerve surgery experience. Peripheral nerve case volume between specialties was performed utilizing a paired t test, 95% confidence intervals were calculated, and linear regression was calculated to assess the trends. Results The average number of peripheral nerve procedures performed per graduating resident was 54.2 for orthopaedic surgery residents, 62.8 for independent plastic surgery residents, 84.6 for integrated plastic surgery residents, 22.4 for neurological surgery residents, and 0.4 for surgery residents. Intraspecialty comparison of the 10th and 90th percentile peripheral nerve case volume in 2012 revealed remarkable variability in training. There was a 3.9-fold difference within orthopaedic surgery, a 5.0-fold difference within independent plastic surgery residents, an 8.8-fold difference for residents from integrated plastic surgery programs, and a 7.0-fold difference within the neurological surgery group. Conclusions There is interspecialty and intraspecialty variability in peripheral nerve surgery volume for orthopaedic, plastic, neurological, and general surgery residents. Caseload is not the sole determinant of training quality as mentorship, didactics, case breadth, and complexity play an important role in training. PMID:27168883

  1. Building a resident research program in emergency medicine.

    PubMed

    Nocera, Romy; Ramoska, Edward Anthony; Hamilton, Richard Joseph

    2016-03-01

    Residency training programs requirements state, "Residents should participate in scholarly activity." However, there is little consensus regarding how best to achieve these requirements. The objective of this study is to implement a resident research program that emphasizes resident participation in quantitative or qualitative empirical work. A three-step program "Think, Do, Write" roughly follows the 3 years of the residency. During the first phase, the resident chooses a topic, formulates a hypothesis, and completes standard research certifications. Phase 2 involves obtaining Institutional Review Board approval, and conducting the study. The final phase entails analyzing and interpreting the data, and writing an abstract to present during an annual research day. Residents are encouraged to submit their projects for presentation at scientific conferences and for publication. Multiple departmental resources are available, including a Resident Research Fund, and full support of the faculty. Prior to the new program, most scholarly activity consisted of case reports, book chapters, review articles, or other miscellaneous projects; only 27 % represented empirical studies. Starting in 2012, the new program was fully implemented, resulting in notable growth in original empirical works among residents. Currently there is almost 100 % participation in studies, and numerous residents have presented at national conferences, and have peer-reviewed publications. With a comprehensive and supported program in place, emergency medicine residents proved capable of conducting high-quality empirical research within their relatively limited time. Overall, residents developed valuable skills in research design and statistical analysis, and greatly increased their productivity as academic and clinical researchers. PMID:26597875

  2. Physical activity among Norwegian adolescents- a multilevel analysis of how place of residence is associated with health behaviour: the Young-HUNT study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction The purpose of this article is to investigate whether and to what degree participation in physical activity among adolescents is associated with area economic deprivation in the municipality where they live. In the study we took account of aggregated informal social capital at the municipality level and compositional effects due to spatial concentration of individual variables known to be associated with physical activity. These include informal social participation, participation in other cultural activities, and family affluence. Methods The study was based on a secondary analysis of data from the Norwegian HUNT study and municipality characteristics from the Norwegian Social Science Data Service ‘Commune Database’ from 2006. The sample consisted of 8114 adolescents whose ages ranged from 13 to 19. The explanatory power of the independent variables on the dependent variable was assessed using a multilevel analysis in which individuals comprised the first level and were nested within the municipality level. Results The average level of physical activity was not negatively associated with the level of area economic deprivation when we adjusted for informal social participation at the community level. Adjusting for area economic deprivation, we found that informal social participation at the community level was associated with a higher level of participation in physical activity at p< .01. Conclusion For adolescents in a given municipality, informal social participation is more strongly associated with a higher level of physical activity than the degree of area economic deprivation. This finding supports our social capital hypothesis, which states that the amount of social capital is strengthening the individual’s ability to take part in physical activity. PMID:23883144

  3. Burnout During Residency Training: A Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    IsHak, Waguih William; Lederer, Sara; Mandili, Carla; Nikravesh, Rose; Seligman, Laurie; Vasa, Monisha; Ogunyemi, Dotun; Bernstein, Carol A.

    2009-01-01

    Objective Burnout is a state of mental and physical exhaustion related to work or care giving activities. Burnout during residency training has gained significant attention secondary to concerns regarding job performance and patient care. This article reviews the relevant literature on burnout in order to provide information to educators about its prevalence, features, impact, and potential interventions. Methods Studies were identified through a Medline and PsychInfo search from 1974 to 2009. Fifty-one studies were identified. Definition and description of burnout and measurement methods are presented followed by a thorough review of the studies. Results An examination of the burnout literature reveals that it is prevalent in medical students (28%–45%), residents (27%–75%, depending on specialty), as well as practicing physicians. Psychological distress and physical symptoms can impact work performance and patient safety. Distress during medical school can lead to burnout, which in turn can result in negative consequences as a working physician. Burnout also poses significant challenges during early training years in residency. Time demands, lack of control, work planning, work organization, inherently difficult job situations, and interpersonal relationships, are considered factors contributing to residents' burnout. Potential interventions include workplace-driven and individual-driven measures. Workplace interventions include education about burnout, workload modifications, increasing the diversity of work duties, stress management training, mentoring, emotional intelligence training, and wellness workshops. Individual-driven behavioral, social, and physical activities include promoting interpersonal professional relations, meditation, counseling, and exercise. Conclusions Educators need to develop an active awareness of burnout and ought to consider incorporating relevant instruction and interventions during the process of training resident physicians

  4. Commentary: experience with resident unions at one institution and implications for the future of practicing physicians.

    PubMed

    Sklar, David; Chang, Betty; Hoffman, Benjamin D

    2011-05-01

    This commentary discusses the forces behind the formation of a resident union at the University of New Mexico School of Medicine and the union's evolution over its first three years. Because unions exist primarily to provide an avenue for advocacy to their members, they could have a negative impact on resident professionalism and on the faculty-resident mentor relationship. Resident unionization could also adversely impact the perceived balance between education and clinical service, to the detriment of the professional identity development of resident physicians. Despite this concern, the authors express their initial, cautious optimism that the union is instead currently promoting resident professionalism. The resident union has provided a forum for a unified resident voice, the engagement of the residents in safety and quality improvement activities, and advocacy for, and direction of, additional patient care funds, all of which has encouraged resident professionalism. Residents who have been active in the union also seem to have maintained altruistic professional attitudes as well as engagement in their educational activities. However, as the environment changes from one of increasing resources to one of stagnant or decreasing institutional resources, inevitable conflicts will arise between advocacy for resident salaries and benefits and patient care needs, and the manner in which the resident union will balance these conflicting needs and what impact it will have on the residents' professional identity development is unclear.

  5. Label-free chemiluminescent aptasensor for platelet-derived growth factor detection based on exonuclease-assisted cascade autocatalytic recycling amplification.

    PubMed

    Bi, Sai; Luo, Baoyu; Ye, Jiayan; Wang, Zonghua

    2014-12-15

    Here an exonuclease III (Exo III)-assisted cascade autocatalytic recycling amplification (Exo-CARA) strategy is proposed for label-free chemiluminescent (CL) detection of platelet-derived growth factor BB (PDGF-BB) by taking advantage of both recognition property of aptamer and cleavage function of Exo III. Functionally, this system consists of a duplex DNA (aptamer-blocker hybrid), two kinds of hairpin structures (MB1 and MB2), and Exo III. Upon recognizing and binding with PDGF-BB, aptamer folds into a close configuration, which initiates the proposed Exo-CARA reaction (Recyclings I→II→III→II). Finally, numerous "caged" G-quadruplex sequences on DNAzyme1 and DNAzyme2 release that intercalate hemin to catalyze the oxidation of luminol by H2O2 to generate an amplified CL signal, achieving excellent specificity and high sensitivity with a detection limit of 6.8×10(-13) M PDGF-BB. The proposed strategy has the advantages of simple design, isothermal conditions, homogeneous reaction without separation and washing steps, effective-cost without the need of labeling, and high amplification efficiency, which might be a universal and promising protocol for the detection of a variety of biomolecules whose aptamers undergo similar conformational changes.

  6. A novel electrochemical aptasensor based on arch-shape structure of aptamer-complimentary strand conjugate and exonuclease I for sensitive detection of streptomycin.

    PubMed

    Mohammad Danesh, Noor; Ramezani, Mohammad; Sarreshtehdar Emrani, Ahmad; Abnous, Khalil; Taghdisi, Seyed Mohammad

    2016-01-15

    Detection and quantitation of antibiotic residues in blood serum and animal foodstuffs are of great significance. In this study, an electrochemical aptasensor was developed for sensitive and selective detection of streptomycin, based on exonuclease I (Exo I), complimentary strand of aptamer (CS), Arch-shape structure of aptamer (Apt)-CS conjugate and gold electrode. The designed aptasensor inherits characteristics of gold including large surface area and high electrochemical conductivity, as well as high sensitivity and selectivity of aptamer toward its target, property of Arch-shape structure of Apt-CS conjugate to act as a gate and barrier for the access of redox probe to the surface of electrode and the function of Exo I as an enzyme which selectively digests the 3'-end of single stranded DNA (ssDNA). In the absence of streptomycin the gate remains closed. Thus, the electrochemical signal is weak. Upon addition of streptomycin, the Apt leaves the CS and binds to streptomycin and the Arch-shape structure is disassembled. Then, Exo I addition leads to a strong electrochemical signal. The designed electrochemical aptasensor exhibited high selectivity toward streptomycin with a limit of detection (LOD) as low as 11.4nM. Moreover, the developed electrochemical aptasensor was successfully used to detect streptomycin in milk and serum with LODs of 14.1 and 15.3nM, respectively.

  7. Target-induced structure switching of hairpin aptamers for label-free and sensitive fluorescent detection of ATP via exonuclease-catalyzed target recycling amplification.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yunying; Xu, Jin; Xiang, Yun; Yuan, Ruo; Chai, Yaqin

    2014-01-15

    In this work, we described the development of a new label-free, simple and sensitive fluorescent ATP sensing platform based on exonuclease III (Exo III)-catalyzed target recycling (ECTR) amplification and SYBR Green I indicator. The hairpin aptamer probes underwent conformational structure switching and re-configuration in the presence of ATP, which led to catalytic cleavage of the re-configured aptamers by Exo III to release ATP and to initiate the ECTR process. Such ECTR process resulted in the digestion of a significant number of the hairpin aptamer probes, leading to much less intercalation of SYBR Green I to the hairpin stems and drastic suppression of the fluorescence emission for sensitive ATP detection down to the low nanomolar level. Due to the highly specific affinity bindings between aptamers and ATP, the developed method exhibited excellent selectivity toward ATP against other analogous molecules. Besides, our ATP sensing approach used un-modified aptamer probes and could be performed in a "mix-and-detect" fashion in homogenous solutions. All these distinct advantages of the developed method thus made it hold great potential for the development of simple and robust sensing strategies for the detection of other small molecules.

  8. A label-free fluorescent probe based on DNA-templated silver nanoclusters and exonuclease III-assisted recycling amplification detection of nucleic acid.

    PubMed

    Yang, Wen; Tian, Jianniao; Ma, Yefei; Wang, Lijun; Zhao, Yanchun; Zhao, Shulin

    2015-11-01

    A number of specific nucleic acids are closely related with many serious diseases, in the current research, a platform taking advantage of exonuclease III (Exo III) to realize double recycling amplification and label-free fluorescent DNA-templated silver nanoclusters (DNA-AgNCs) for detecting of nucleic acid had been developed. In this method, a molecular beacon (MB) with 3'-protruding termini and a single-stranded cytosine-rich (C-rich) probe were designed that coexist stably with Exo III. Once the target DNA appeared, portion of the MB could hybridize with target DNA and was digested by Exo III, which allowed the release of target DNA and a residual sequence. Subsequently, the residual sequence could trigger the Exo III to digest C-rich probe, and the DNA-AgNCs was not able to be synthesized because of the C-rich probe was destroyed; finally the fluorescent of solution was quenched. This assay enables to monitor human hemochromatosis gene (as a model) with high sensitivity, the detection limit is as low as 120 pM compared with other fluorescence DNA-AgNCs methods, this assay also exhibits superior specificity even against single base mismatch. The strategy is applied to detect human hemochromatosis gene in real human serum samples successfully. PMID:26572843

  9. A novel fluorescent aptasensor based on silica nanoparticles, PicoGreen and exonuclease III as a signal amplification method for ultrasensitive detection of myoglobin.

    PubMed

    Abnous, Khalil; Danesh, Noor Mohammad; Sarreshtehdar Emrani, Ahmad; Ramezani, Mohammad; Taghdisi, Seyed Mohammad

    2016-04-21

    Measurement of myoglobin (Mb) in human blood serum is of great interest for quick diagnosis of acute myocardial infarction (AMI). In this study, a novel fluorescent aptasensor was designed for ultrasensitive and selective detection of Mb, based on target-induced high fluorescence intensity, complementary strand of aptamer (CS), PicoGreen (PG) dye, exonuclease III (Exo III) and silica nanoparticles coated with streptavidin (SNPs-Streptavidin). The developed aptasensor obtains characteristics of SNPs as enhancers of fluorescence intensity, Exo III as an enzyme which selectively digests the 3'-end of double-stranded DNA (dsDNA), PG as a fluorescent dye which could selectively bind to dsDNA and high selectivity and sensitivity of aptamer (Apt) toward its target. In the absence of Mb, no free CS remains in the environment of SNPs-Streptavidin, resulting in a weak fluorescence emission. In the present of Mb, dsDNA-modified SNPs-Streptavidin complex forms, leading to a very strong fluorescence emission. The developed fluorescent aptasensor exhibited high specificity toward Mb with a limit of detection (LOD) as low as 52 pM. In addition, the designed fluorescent aptasensor was efficiently used to detect Mb in human serum.

  10. Label-free and ultrasensitive electrochemical detection of nucleic acids based on autocatalytic and exonuclease III-assisted target recycling strategy.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shufeng; Wang, Chunfeng; Zhang, Chengxin; Wang, Ying; Tang, Bo

    2013-02-19

    In this work, a very simple, label-free, isothermal, and ultrasensitive electrochemical DNA biosensor has been developed on the basis of an autocatalytic and exonuclease III (Exo III)-assisted target recycling amplification strategy. A duplex DNA probe constructed by the hybridization of a quadruplex-forming oligomer with a molecular beacon is ingeniously designed and assembled on the electrode as recognition element. Upon sensing of the analyte nucleic acid, the strand of molecular beacon in the duplex DNA probe could be stepwise removed by Exo III accompanied by the releasing of target DNA and autonomous generation of new secondary target DNA fragment for the successive hybridization and cleavage process. Simultaneously, numerous quadruplex-forming oligomers are liberated and folded into G-quadruplex-hemin complexes with the help of K(+) and hemin on the electrode surface to give a remarkable electrochemical response. Because of this autocatalytic target recycling amplification and the specifically catalyzed formation of G-quadruplex-hemin complexes, this newly designed protocol provides an ultrasensitive electrochemical detection of DNA down to the 10 fM level, can discriminate mismatched DNA from perfectly matched target DNA, and holds a great potential for early diagnosis in gene-related diseases. It further could be developed as a universal protocol for the detection of various DNA sequences and may be extended for the detection of aptamer-binding molecules.

  11. Graphene oxide and metal-mediated base pairs based "molecular beacon" integrating with exonuclease I for fluorescence turn-on detection of biothiols.

    PubMed

    Xing, Xiaojing; Zhou, Ying; Liu, Xueguo; Pang, Daiwen; Tang, Hongwu

    2014-08-27

    A novel fluorescence turn-on strategy, based on the resistance of metal-mediated molecular-beacons (MBs) toward nuclease digestion and the remarkable difference in the affinity of graphene oxide (GO) with MBs and the mononucleotides, is designed for the biothiols assay. Specifically, the metal-mediated base pairs facilitate the dye labeled MBs to fold into a hairpin structure preventing the digestion by exonuclease I, and thus allow the fluorescence quenching. The competition binding by biothiols removes metal ions from the base pairs, causing the nuclease reaction, and less decrease in the fluorescence is obtained after incubating with GO due to the weak affinity of the product-mononucleotides to GO. Hg(2+)-mediated MBs were firstly designed for the biothiols detection, and glutathione (GSH) was applied as the model target. Under the optimal conditions, the approach exhibits high sensitivity to GSH with a detection limit of 1.53 nM. Ag(+)-mediated MBs based sensor was also constructed to demonstrate its versatility, and cysteine was studied as the model target. The satisfactory results in the determination of biothiols in serum demonstrate that the method possesses great potential for detecting thiols in biological fluids. This new approach is expected to promote the exploitation of metal-mediated base pairs-based biosensors in biochemical and biomedical studies.

  12. A label-free fluorescent probe based on DNA-templated silver nanoclusters and exonuclease III-assisted recycling amplification detection of nucleic acid.

    PubMed

    Yang, Wen; Tian, Jianniao; Ma, Yefei; Wang, Lijun; Zhao, Yanchun; Zhao, Shulin

    2015-11-01

    A number of specific nucleic acids are closely related with many serious diseases, in the current research, a platform taking advantage of exonuclease III (Exo III) to realize double recycling amplification and label-free fluorescent DNA-templated silver nanoclusters (DNA-AgNCs) for detecting of nucleic acid had been developed. In this method, a molecular beacon (MB) with 3'-protruding termini and a single-stranded cytosine-rich (C-rich) probe were designed that coexist stably with Exo III. Once the target DNA appeared, portion of the MB could hybridize with target DNA and was digested by Exo III, which allowed the release of target DNA and a residual sequence. Subsequently, the residual sequence could trigger the Exo III to digest C-rich probe, and the DNA-AgNCs was not able to be synthesized because of the C-rich probe was destroyed; finally the fluorescent of solution was quenched. This assay enables to monitor human hemochromatosis gene (as a model) with high sensitivity, the detection limit is as low as 120 pM compared with other fluorescence DNA-AgNCs methods, this assay also exhibits superior specificity even against single base mismatch. The strategy is applied to detect human hemochromatosis gene in real human serum samples successfully.

  13. Residence Hall Seating That Works.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wiens, Janet

    2003-01-01

    Describes the seating chosen for residence halls at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and the University of New England. The seating required depends on ergonomics, aesthetics, durability, cost, and code requirements. In addition, residence halls must have a range of seating types to accommodate various uses. (SLD)

  14. Substance Abuse by Anesthesiology Residents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lutsky, Irving; And Others

    1991-01-01

    The analysis of 183 responses to a survey of former anesthesiology residents of the Medical College of Wisconsin found that 29 had been self-administered problematic substance abusers during their residencies, 23 had been alcohol dependent, and 6 had been drug dependent. More than 85 percent of respondents considered the drug policy information…

  15. Sexual Education for Psychiatric Residents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levine, Stephen B.; Scott, David L.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: The authors seek to promote sexuality curriculum development in departments of psychiatry. Methods: The authors first focus on educational philosophy about what residents can be taught about sexual topics and then provide numerical and narrative resident evaluation data following a 6-month, half day per week rotation in a sexuality…

  16. A theory-informed, process-oriented Resident Scholarship Program

    PubMed Central

    Thammasitboon, Satid; Darby, John B.; Hair, Amy B.; Rose, Karen M.; Ward, Mark A.; Turner, Teri L.; Balmer, Dorene F.

    2016-01-01

    Background The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education requires residency programs to provide curricula for residents to engage in scholarly activities but does not specify particular guidelines for instruction. We propose a Resident Scholarship Program that is framed by the self-determination theory (SDT) and emphasize the process of scholarly activity versus a scholarly product. Methods The authors report on their longitudinal Resident Scholarship Program, which aimed to support psychological needs central to SDT: autonomy, competence, and relatedness. By addressing those needs in program aims and program components, the program may foster residents’ intrinsic motivation to learn and to engage in scholarly activity. To this end, residents’ engagement in scholarly processes, and changes in perceived autonomy, competence, and relatedness were assessed. Results Residents engaged in a range of scholarly projects and expressed positive regard for the program. Compared to before residency, residents felt more confident in the process of scholarly activity, as determined by changes in increased perceived autonomy, competence, and relatedness. Scholarly products were accomplished in return for a focus on scholarly process. Conclusions Based on our experience, and in line with the SDT, supporting residents’ autonomy, competence, and relatedness through a process-oriented scholarship program may foster the curiosity, inquisitiveness, and internal motivation to learn that drives scholarly activity and ultimately the production of scholarly products. PMID:27306995

  17. The assessment of cytotoxic T cell and natural killer cells activity in residents of high and ordinary background radiation areas of Ramsar-Iran.

    PubMed

    Borzoueisileh, Sajad; Monfared, Ali Shabestani; Abediankenari, Saeid; Mostafazadeh, Amrollah

    2013-01-01

    The effective radiation dose of human from natural sources is about 2.4 mSv/y and the dose limit for radiation workers is 20 mSv/y. Ramsar, a city in Iran, has been the subject of concern in the last forty years for a high level of radiation measured in some spots as high as 260 mSv/y. Carcinogenesis is one of the most studied effects of radiation especially in high doses. Recent studies showed that the high level of natural radiation received by inhabitants of this area, paradoxically don't have significant health effect. Natural killer (NK) cells and cytotoxic T cells are the most important cells in tumor immune surveillance and CD107a is a widely expressed intracellular protein located in the lysosomal/endosomal membrane. CD107a transiently located on the cell membrane can be used as a marker of CD8 + T cell degranulation following stimulation. It is also expressed, to a lower extent, on activated NK cells. In this study, 60 healthy people were selected randomly and their consent obtained and confounding factors such as sex, age, life-styles was matched then the count of activated NK and CD8 + cells was compared in high and normal background radiation areas inhabitants of Ramsar. After filling the questionnaire and measurement of background radiation, blood samples of 30 healthy people from each region were analyzed immediately by means of flowcytometry. The leukocytes and their subsets were not significantly different between two groups and the count of active cells was higher in control group. The result shows that the changes in immune system occur due to radiation and maybe it is as a result of higher radiosensitivity of activated cells. PMID:23531635

  18. Activity of the HMGB1-Derived Immunostimulatory Peptide Hp91 Resides in the Helical C-terminal Portion and is Enhanced by Dimerization

    PubMed Central

    Saenz, R.; Messmer, B.; Futalan, D.; Tor, Y.; Larsson, M.; Daniels, G.; Esener, S.; Messmer, D.

    2013-01-01

    We have previously shown that an 18 amino acid long peptide, named Hp91, whose sequence corresponds to a region within the endogenous protein HMGB1, activates dendritic cells (DCs) and acts as adjuvant in vivo by potentiating Th1-type antigen-specific immune responses. We analyzed the structure-function relationship of the Hp91 peptide to investigate the amino acids and structure responsible for immune responses. We found that the cysteine at position 16 of Hp91 enabled formation of reversible peptide dimmers, monomer and dimmer were compared for DC binding and activation. Stable monomers and dimers were generated using a maleimide conjugation reaction. The dimer showed enhanced ability to bind to and activate DCs. Furthermore, the C-terminal 9 amino acids of Hp91, named UC1018 were sufficient for DC binding and Circular dichroism showed that UC1018 assumes an alpha-helical structure. The ninemer peptide UC1018 induced more potent antigen-specific CTL responses in vivo as compared to Hp91 and it protected mice from tumor development when used in a prophylactic vaccine setting. We have identified a short alpha helical peptide that acts as potent adjuvant inducing protective immune responses in vivo. PMID:24172222

  19. [Activity of elastase-like proteinases and their inhibitors in indigent nearly healthy residents in various biogeochemical conditions of the Chuvash ASSR].

    PubMed

    Stepanov, R V; Platonova, L V; Suslikov, V L; Paskhina, T S

    1991-01-01

    A proteinase-inhibitory balance of blood (elastase-like activity, alpha 1-proteinase inhibitor and alpha 2-macroglobulin activities) was studied in practically healthy inhabitants of the Chuvash ASSR two subregions--Sura river basin and Cubninocivil region, which are distinctly dissimilar in all the biogeochemical parameters involving macro- and microtrace compositions. The higher activity of elastase-like proteinases and decreased content of alpha 1-proteinase inhibitor were detected in practically healthy inhabitants of the river Sura basin, where high incidence of myocardial infarction was found, as compared with those of the Cubninocivil people. The similar alterations in the proteinase-inhibitory balance were observed in blood of experimental animals maintained on a diet containing fresh water from these subregions. The data obtained suggest that there exists causative relationship between biogeochemical parameters and development of imbalance in the proteinase-inhibitor system in practically healthy inhabitants of the river Sura basin. This imbalance is considered as a pathogenetic factor responsible for development of atherosclerosis.

  20. Early resident-to-resident physics education in diagnostic radiology.

    PubMed

    Kansagra, Akash P

    2014-01-01

    The revised ABR board certification process has updated the method by which diagnostic radiology residents are evaluated for competency in clinical radiologic physics. In this work, the author reports the successful design and implementation of a resident-taught physics course consisting of 5 weekly, hour-long lectures intended for incoming first-year radiology residents in their first month of training. To the author's knowledge, this is the first description of a course designed to provide a very early framework for ongoing physics education throughout residency without increasing the didactic burden on faculty members. Twenty-six first-year residents spanning 2 academic years took the course and reported subjective improvement in their knowledge (90%) and interest (75%) in imaging physics and a high level of satisfaction with the use of senior residents as physics educators. Based on the success of this course and the minimal resources required for implementation, this work may serve as a blueprint for other radiology residency programs seeking to develop revised physics curricula.

  1. Applying Expectancy Theory to residency training: proposing opportunities to understand resident motivation and enhance residency training.

    PubMed

    Shweiki, Ehyal; Martin, Niels D; Beekley, Alec C; Jenoff, Jay S; Koenig, George J; Kaulback, Kris R; Lindenbaum, Gary A; Patel, Pankaj H; Rosen, Matthew M; Weinstein, Michael S; Zubair, Muhammad H; Cohen, Murray J

    2015-01-01

    Medical resident education in the United States has been a matter of national priority for decades, exemplified initially through the Liaison Committee for Graduate Medical Education and then superseded by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education. A recent Special Report in the New England Journal of Medicine, however, has described resident educational programs to date as prescriptive, noting an absence of innovation in education. Current aims of contemporary medical resident education are thus being directed at ensuring quality in learning as well as in patient care. Achievement and work-motivation theories attempt to explain people's choice, performance, and persistence in tasks. Expectancy Theory as one such theory was reviewed in detail, appearing particularly applicable to surgical residency training. Correlations between Expectancy Theory as a work-motivation theory and residency education were explored. Understanding achievement and work-motivation theories affords an opportunity to gain insight into resident motivation in training. The application of Expectancy Theory in particular provides an innovative perspective into residency education. Afforded are opportunities to promote the development of programmatic methods facilitating surgical resident motivation in education.

  2. Applying Expectancy Theory to residency training: proposing opportunities to understand resident motivation and enhance residency training

    PubMed Central

    Shweiki, Ehyal; Martin, Niels D; Beekley, Alec C; Jenoff, Jay S; Koenig, George J; Kaulback, Kris R; Lindenbaum, Gary A; Patel, Pankaj H; Rosen, Matthew M; Weinstein, Michael S; Zubair, Muhammad H; Cohen, Murray J

    2015-01-01

    Medical resident education in the United States has been a matter of national priority for decades, exemplified initially through the Liaison Committee for Graduate Medical Education and then superseded by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education. A recent Special Report in the New England Journal of Medicine, however, has described resident educational programs to date as prescriptive, noting an absence of innovation in education. Current aims of contemporary medical resident education are thus being directed at ensuring quality in learning as well as in patient care. Achievement and work-motivation theories attempt to explain people’s choice, performance, and persistence in tasks. Expectancy Theory as one such theory was reviewed in detail, appearing particularly applicable to surgical residency training. Correlations between Expectancy Theory as a work-motivation theory and residency education were explored. Understanding achievement and work-motivation theories affords an opportunity to gain insight into resident motivation in training. The application of Expectancy Theory in particular provides an innovative perspective into residency education. Afforded are opportunities to promote the development of programmatic methods facilitating surgical resident motivation in education. PMID:25995656

  3. Community Needs Assessment with Hispanic, Spanish-monolingual Residents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Batsche, C.; Hernandez, M.; Montenegro, M. C.

    1999-01-01

    Describes methods to increase the participation of Hispanic residents in community-needs-assessment activities based on experiences in Tampa (Florida). Includes suggestions for defining the population, estimating population size, selecting the sample, translating instruments, and administering the survey. (SLD)

  4. Learning styles of orthodontic residents.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Janeen M; Fallis, Drew W; Peel, Jennifer L; Murchison, David F

    2009-03-01

    Significant challenges face many orthodontic residency programs, particularly a shortage of full-time experienced faculty members. Due to this shortage, it is critical that program directors design comprehensive curricula that incorporate the most effective and efficient teaching methods. It is theorized that teaching effectiveness and efficiency are optimized when the course design and content closely match students' learning preferences. This survey study was designed to distinguish the learning preferences of orthodontic residents utilizing Felder and Soloman's Index of Learning Styles, which assesses student learning preferences in four dimensions using dichotomous scales, thereby providing insight into how teaching strategies can best be structured. As a secondary focus, additional questions on the survey were asked to gain information about residents' access to the Internet and comfort level with online learning so as to address acceptance of web-based courses in response to the shortage of full-time faculty members. Orthodontic residents, contacted via email, were requested to complete an online survey; 261 responses were collected. The results indicate that orthodontic residents are highly visual learners and show a preference for sensing and sequential learning strategies. In terms of information technology, the residents are comfortable with and have adequate access to current technological assets; therefore, they may be well suited for inclusion of computer-based teaching modules and other multimedia devices in their residency curriculum.

  5. A murine platelet-activating factor receptor gene: cloning, chromosomal localization and up-regulation of expression by lipopolysaccharide in peritoneal resident macrophages.

    PubMed Central

    Ishii, S; Matsuda, Y; Nakamura, M; Waga, I; Kume, K; Izumi, T; Shimizu, T

    1996-01-01

    A murine gene encoding a platelet-activating factor receptor (PAFR) was cloned. The gene was mapped to a region of the D2.2 band of chromosome 4 both by fluorescence in situ hybridization and by molecular linkage analysis. Northern blot analysis showed a high expression of the PAFR message in peritoneal macrophages. When C3H/HeN macrophages were treated with bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or synthetic lipid A, the PAFR gene expression was induced. Bacterial LPS, but not lipid A, induced the level of PAFR mRNA in LPS unresponsive C3H/HeJ macrophages. These induction patterns were parallel to those of tumor necrosis factor-alpha mRNA. Thus the PAFR in macrophages is important in LPS-induced pathologies. PMID:8670084

  6. Transmyocardial drilling revascularization combined with heparinized bFGF-incorporating stent activates resident cardiac stem cells via SDF-1/CXCR4 axis

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Guang-Wei; Wen, Ti; Gu, Tian-Xiang; Li-Ling, Jesse; Wang, Chun; Zhao, Ye; Liu, Jing; Wang, Ying; Liu, Tian-Jun; Lue, Feng

    2012-02-15

    Objective: To investigate whether transmyocardial drilling revascularization combined with heparinized basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF)-incorporating degradable stent implantation (TMDRSI) can promote myocardial regeneration after acute myocardial infarction (AMI). Methods: A model of AMI was generated by ligating the mid-third of left anterior descending artery (LAD) of miniswine. After 6 h, the animals were divided into none-treatment (control) group (n = 6) and TMDRSI group (n = 6). For TMDRSI group, two channels with 3.5 mm in diameter were established by a self-made drill in the AMI region, into which a stent was implanted. Expression of stromal cell-derived factor-1{sub {alpha}} (SDF-1{sub {alpha}}) and CXC chemokine receptor 4 (CXCR4), cardiac stem cell (CSC)-mediated myocardial regeneration, myocardial apoptosis, myocardial viability, and cardiac function were assessed at various time-points. Results: Six weeks after the operation, CSCs were found to have differentiated into cardiomyocytes to repair the infarcted myocardium, and all above indices showed much improvement in the TMDRSI group compared with the control group (P < 0.001). Conclusions: The new method has shown to be capable of promoting CSCs proliferation and differentiation into cardiomyocytes through activating the SDF-1/CXCR4 axis, while inhibiting myocardial apoptosis, thereby enhancing myocardial regeneration following AMI and improving cardiac function. This may provide a new strategy for myocardial regeneration following AMI. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The effects of TMDR and bFGF-stent on myocardial regeneration were studied in a pig model of AMI. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer TMDR and bFGF-stent implantation activated CSCs via the SDF-1/CXCR4 axis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CSC-mediated myocardial regeneration improved cardiac function. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer It may be a new therapeutic strategy for AMI.

  7. Resident work hour restrictions impact chief resident operative experience.

    PubMed

    Christmas, A Britton; Brintzenhoff, Rita A; Sing, Ronald F; Schmelzer, Thomas M; Bolton, Sandra D; Miles, William S; Thomason, Michael H

    2009-11-01

    Since the institution of the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education resident work restrictions, much discussion has arisen regarding the potential effect on surgical resident training. We undertook this study to examine the effects on resident operative experience. We retrospectively analyzed chief residents' Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education case logs before (PRE) and after (POST) the 80-hour work restriction. Overall, 22 resident logs were evaluated, six PRE and 16 POST. Four case categories were examined: total major cases, total trauma operative cases, total chief cases, and total teaching assistant cases. Significance was defined as P < 0.05. Comparing the PRE and POST groups demonstrated a trend toward fewer total major cases (1061 vs 964, P = 0.38) and fewer total trauma operative cases (55 vs 47, P = 0.37). Teaching assistant cases increased from 67 to 91 but also failed to reach significance (P = 0.37). However, further comparison between the PRE and POST groups yielded a statistically significant decrease in the number of total chief cases (494 vs 333, P = 0.0092). The significant decrease in the number of total chief cases demonstrates that the work hour restriction most affected the chief year operative experience. Further evaluation of resident participation in nonoperative facets may reveal additional deficiencies of surgical training under work hour restrictions.

  8. Resident memory T cells in human health and disease

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Rachael A.

    2015-01-01

    Resident memory T cells are non-recirculating memory T cells that persist long term in epithelial barrier tissues, including the gastrointestinal tract, lung, skin and reproductive tract. Resident memory T cells persist in the absence of antigens, have impressive effector functions and provide rapid on-site immune protection against known pathogens in peripheral tissues. A fundamentally distinct gene expression program differentiates resident memory T cells from circulating T cells. Although these cells likely evolved to provide rapid immune protection against pathogens, autoreactive, aberrantly activated and malignant resident memory cells contribute to numerous human inflammatory diseases including mycosis fungoides and psoriasis. This review will discuss both the science and medicine of resident memory T cells, exploring how these cells contribute to healthy immune function and discussing what is known about how these cells contribute to human inflammatory and autoimmune diseases. PMID:25568072

  9. The Optometric Residency: Its Bloom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bleything, Willard B.

    1979-01-01

    Guidelines for proposed residencies in optometry are presented for pediatric, rehabilitative, and hospital optometry. Their significance in terms of costs, patient population, faculty expertise, and critical mass are discussed. (JMF)

  10. US dermatology residency program rankings.

    PubMed

    Aquino, Lisa L; Wen, Ge; Wu, Jashin J

    2014-10-01

    Unlike many other adult specialties, US News & World Report does not rank dermatology residency programs annually. We conducted a study to rank individual US dermatology residency programs based on set criteria. For each residency program, data from 2008 related to a number of factors were collected, including annual amount of National Institutes of Health (NIH) and Dermatology Foundation (DF) funding received; number of publications from full-time faculty members; number of faculty lectures given at 5 annual society meetings; and number of full-time faculty members who were on the editorial boards of 6 dermatology journals with the highest impact factors. Most of the data were obtained through extensive Internet searches, and missing data were obtained by contacting individual residency programs. The programs were ranked based on the prior factors according to a weighted ranking algorithm. A list of overall rankings also was created.

  11. Rapid hydropyrolysis of resid oil

    SciTech Connect

    Mathur, V.K.; Salahuddin, M.A.; Mohamed, A.R.

    1994-12-31

    The objective of this investigation was to study the rapid hydropyrolysis of Arabian Light atmospheric resid oil and vacuum resid oil for the production of light distillates. The results of this study have been divided into the effect of exposure time, temperature, and gaseous atmosphere. The heat flux used was in the range of 70 to about 97 watt/cm{sup 2}. The results from ASTM simulated distillation of the hydrogenated oil obtained at various experimental conditions are also presented.

  12. 38 CFR 51.70 - Resident rights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... FOR NURSING HOME CARE OF VETERANS IN STATE HOMES Standards § 51.70 Resident rights. The resident has a...; (iii) Physicians of the resident's choice (to provide care in the nursing home, physicians must...

  13. 38 CFR 51.70 - Resident rights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... FOR NURSING HOME CARE OF VETERANS IN STATE HOMES Standards § 51.70 Resident rights. The resident has a...; (iii) Physicians of the resident's choice (to provide care in the nursing home, physicians must...

  14. 24 CFR 964.135 - Resident involvement in HA management operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...) Residents shall be actively involved in a HA's decision-making process and give advice on matters such as... Comprehensive Improvement Assistance Program (CIAP), Comprehensive Grant Program, Urban Revitalization... process. (g) Resident council officers shall be encouraged to become involved in the resident...

  15. 24 CFR 964.135 - Resident involvement in HA management operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...) Residents shall be actively involved in a HA's decision-making process and give advice on matters such as... Comprehensive Improvement Assistance Program (CIAP), Comprehensive Grant Program, Urban Revitalization... process. (g) Resident council officers shall be encouraged to become involved in the resident...

  16. Exonuclease I-aided homogeneous electrochemical strategy for organophosphorus pesticide detection based on enzyme inhibition integrated with a DNA conformational switch.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiuzhong; Dong, Shanshan; Hou, Ting; Liu, Lei; Liu, Xiaojuan; Li, Feng

    2016-03-01

    A novel enzyme inhibition-based homogeneous electrochemical biosensing strategy was designed for an organophosphorus pesticide assay based on exploiting the resistance of a mercury ion-mediated helper probe (HP) toward nuclease-catalyzed digestion and the remarkable diffusivity difference between HPs and the mononucleotides toward a negatively charged indium tin oxide (ITO) electrode. In particular, the mercury ion-mediated T-Hg(2+)-T base pairs facilitate the HP labeled with methylene blue (MB) to fold into a hairpin structure, preventing its digestion by exonuclease I, and thus resulting in a low electrochemical response because of the large electrostatic repulsion between the negatively charged ITO electrode and the HPs. The competitive binding by a thiol group (-SH), produced in the hydrolysis reaction of acetylthiocholine (ACh) chloride with acetylcholinesterase (AChE), removes mercury ions from the base pairs, causing a nuclease-catalyzed digestion, and the subsequent electrochemical response increase due to the weak electrostatic repulsion between the product-mononucleotides and the ITO electrode. Mercury ion-mediated HPs were first designed for pesticide detection and diazinon was chosen as the model target. Under the optimal experimental conditions, the approach exhibited high sensitivity for diazinon detection with a detection limit of 0.25 μg L(-1). The satisfactory results in the determination of diazinon in real samples demonstrate that the method possesses great potential for detecting organophosphorus pesticides. This new approach is expected to promote the exploitation of mercury-mediated base pair-based homogenous electrochemical biosensors in biochemical studies and in the food safety field.

  17. Characterizing and controlling intrinsic biases of lambda exonuclease in nascent strand sequencing reveals phasing between nucleosomes and G-quadruplex motifs around a subset of human replication origins.

    PubMed

    Foulk, Michael S; Urban, John M; Casella, Cinzia; Gerbi, Susan A

    2015-05-01

    Nascent strand sequencing (NS-seq) is used to discover DNA replication origins genome-wide, allowing identification of features for their specification. NS-seq depends on the ability of lambda exonuclease (λ-exo) to efficiently digest parental DNA while leaving RNA-primer protected nascent strands intact. We used genomics and biochemical approaches to determine if λ-exo digests all parental DNA sequences equally. We report that λ-exo does not efficiently digest G-quadruplex (G4) structures in a plasmid. Moreover, λ-exo digestion of nonreplicating genomic DNA (LexoG0) enriches GC-rich DNA and G4 motifs genome-wide. We used LexoG0 data to control for nascent strand-independent λ-exo biases in NS-seq and validated this approach at the rDNA locus. The λ-exo-controlled NS-seq peaks are not GC-rich, and only 35.5% overlap with 6.8% of all G4s, suggesting that G4s are not general determinants for origin specification but may play a role for a subset. Interestingly, we observed a periodic spacing of G4 motifs and nucleosomes around the peak summits, suggesting that G4s may position nucleosomes at this subset of origins. Finally, we demonstrate that use of Na(+) instead of K(+) in the λ-exo digestion buffer reduced the effect of G4s on λ-exo digestion and discuss ways to increase both the sensitivity and specificity of NS-seq.

  18. A Conserved Apomixis-Specific Polymorphism Is Correlated with Exclusive Exonuclease Expression in Premeiotic Ovules of Apomictic Boechera Species1[W][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Corral, José M.; Vogel, Heiko; Aliyu, Olawale M.; Hensel, Götz; Thiel, Thomas; Kumlehn, Jochen; Sharbel, Timothy F.

    2013-01-01

    Apomixis (asexual seed production) is characterized by meiotically unreduced egg cell production (apomeiosis) followed by its parthenogenetic development into offspring that are genetic clones of the mother plant. Fertilization (i.e. pseudogamy) of the central cell is important for the production of a functional endosperm with a balanced 2:1 maternal:paternal genome ratio. Here, we present the APOLLO (for apomixis-linked locus) gene, an Aspartate Glutamate Aspartate Aspartate histidine exonuclease whose transcripts are down-regulated in sexual ovules entering meiosis while being up-regulated in apomeiotic ovules at the same stage of development in plants of the genus Boechera. APOLLO has both “apoalleles,” which are characterized by a set of linked apomixis-specific polymorphisms, and “sexalleles.” All apomictic Boechera spp. accessions proved to be heterozygous for the APOLLO gene (having at least one apoallele and one sexallele), while all sexual genotypes were homozygous for sexalleles. Apoalleles contained a 20-nucleotide polymorphism present in the 5′ untranslated region that contains specific transcription factor-binding sites for ARABIDOPSIS THALIANA HOMEOBOX PROTEIN5, LIM1 (for LINEAGE ABNORMAL11, INSULIN1, MECHANOSENSORY PROTEIN3), SORLIP1AT (for SEQUENCES OVERREPRESENTED IN LIGHT-INDUCED PROMOTERS IN ARABIDOPSIS THALIANA1), SORLIP2AT, and POLYA SIGNAL1. In the same region, sexalleles contain transcription factor-binding sites for DNA BINDING WITH ONE FINGER2, DNA BINDING WITH ONE FINGER3, and PROLAMIN BOX-BINDING FACTOR. Our results suggest that the expression of a single deregulated allele could induce the cascade of events leading to asexual female gamete formation in an apomictic plant. PMID:24163323

  19. Linear light-scattering of gold nanostars for versatile biosensing of nucleic acids and proteins using exonuclease III as biocatalyst to signal amplification.

    PubMed

    Bi, Sai; Jia, Xiaoqiang; Ye, Jiayan; Dong, Ying

    2015-09-15

    Gold nanomaterials promise a wide range of potential applications in chemical and biological sensing, imaging, and catalysis. In this paper, we demonstrate a facile method for room-temperature synthesis of gold nanostars (AuNSs) with a size of ~50 nm via seeded growth. Significantly, the AuNSs are found to have high light-scattering properties, which are successfully used as labels for sensitive and selective detection of nucleic acids and proteins by using exonuclease III (Exo III) as a biocatalyst. For DNA detection, the binding of targets to the functionalized AuNS probes leads to the Exo III-stimulated cascade recycling amplification. As a result, a large amount of AuNSs are released from magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) into solution, providing a greatly enhanced light-scattering signal for amplified sensing process. Moreover, a binding-induced DNA three-way junction (DNA TWJ) is introduced to thrombin detection, in which the binding of two aptamers to thrombin triggers assembly of the DNA motifs and initiates the subsequent DNA strand displacement reaction (SDR) and Exo III-assisted cascade recycling amplification. The detection limits of 89 fM and 5.6 pM are achieved for DNA and thrombin, respectively, which are comparable to or even exceed that of the reported isothermal amplification methods. It is noteworthy that based on the DNA TWJ strategy the sequences are independent on target proteins. Additionally, the employment of MNPs in the assays can not only simplify the operations but also improve the detection sensitivity. Therefore, the proposed amplified light-scattering assay with high sensitivity and selectivity, acceptable accuracy, and satisfactory versatility of analytes provides various applications in bioanalysis.

  20. Affinity-Mediated Homogeneous Electrochemical Aptasensor on a Graphene Platform for Ultrasensitive Biomolecule Detection via Exonuclease-Assisted Target-Analog Recycling Amplification.

    PubMed

    Ge, Lei; Wang, Wenxiao; Sun, Ximei; Hou, Ting; Li, Feng

    2016-02-16

    As is well-known, graphene shows a remarkable difference in affinity toward nonstructured single-stranded (ss) DNA and double-stranded (ds) DNA. This property makes it popular to prepare DNA-based optical sensors. In this work, taking this unique property of graphene in combination with the sensitive electrochemical transducer, we report a novel affinity-mediated homogeneous electrochemical aptasensor using graphene modified glassy carbon electrode (GCE) as the sensing platform. In this approach, the specific aptamer-target recognition is converted into an ultrasensitive electrochemical signal output with the aid of a novel T7 exonuclease (T7Exo)-assisted target-analog recycling amplification strategy, in which the ingeniously designed methylene blue (MB)-labeled hairpin DNA reporters are digested in the presence of target and, then, converted to numerous MB-labeled long ssDNAs. The distinct difference in differential pulse voltammetry response between the designed hairpin reporters and the generated long ssDNAs on the graphene/GCE allows ultrasensitive detection of target biomolecules. Herein, the design and working principle of this homogeneous electrochemical aptasensor were elucidated, and the working conditions were optimized. The gel electrophoresis results further demonstrate that the designed T7Exo-assisted target-analog recycling amplification strategy can work well. This electrochemical aptasensor realizes the detection of biomolecule in a homogeneous solution without immobilization of any bioprobe on electrode surface. Moreover, this versatile homogeneous electrochemical sensing system was used for the determination of biomolecules in real serum samples with satisfying results.

  1. A versatile and highly sensitive homogeneous electrochemical strategy based on the split aptamer binding-induced DNA three-way junction and exonuclease III-assisted target recycling.

    PubMed

    Hou, Ting; Li, Wei; Zhang, Lianfang; Li, Feng

    2015-08-21

    Herein, a highly sensitive and versatile homogeneous electrochemical biosensing strategy is proposed, based on the split aptamer-incorporated DNA three-way junction and the exonuclease (Exo) III-assisted target recycling. The aptamer of adenosine triphosphate (ATP, chosen as the model analyte) is split into two fragments and embedded in single-stranded DNA1 and DNA2, respectively. ATP specifically binds with the split aptamers, bringing DNA1 and DNA2 close to each other, thus inducing the DNA three-way junction formation through the partial hybridization among DNA1, DNA2 and the methylene blue-labelled MB-DNA. Subsequently, MB-DNA is specifically digested by Exo III, releasing a MB-labelled mononucleotide, as well as a DNA1-ATP-DNA2 complex, which acts as the recycled target and hybridizes with another intact MB-DNA to initiate the subsequent cycling cleavage process. As a result, large amounts of MB-labelled mononucleotides are released, generating a significantly amplified electrochemical signal toward the ATP assay. To the best of our knowledge, it is the first example to successfully incorporate split aptamers into DNA three-way junctions and to be adopted in a homogeneous electrochemical assay. In addition to high sensitivity, this strategy also exhibits the advantages of simplicity and convenience, because it is carried out in a homogeneous solution, and sophisticated electrode modification processes are avoided. By simply changing the sequences of the split aptamer fragments, this versatile strategy can be easily adopted to assay a large spectrum of targets. Due to its advantages of high sensitivity, excellent selectivity, versatility and simple operation, the as-proposed approach has great potential to be applied in biochemical research and clinical practices.

  2. A triple-amplification SPR electrochemiluminescence assay for chloramphenicol based on polymer enzyme-linked nanotracers and exonuclease-assisted target recycling.

    PubMed

    Miao, Yang-Bao; Ren, Hong-Xia; Gan, Ning; Zhou, You; Cao, Yuting; Li, Tianhua; Chen, Yinji

    2016-12-15

    The present study aimed to explore a novel triple-amplification electrochemiluminescence (ECL) assay for detecting of chloramphenicol (CAP). This strategy was based on single-stranded DNA-binding protein (SSB) and horseradish peroxidase (HRP) enzyme-linked polymer (EnVision reagent, EV) labeled on Au nanoparticles (EV-Au-SSB) as nanotracer and exonuclease-assisted target recycling. The composite probes were prepared via immunoreactions between the CdS nanocrystal (CdS NC)-functionalized partial complementary DNA and aptamer (CdSNCs/Apt-ssDNA1) as capture probes, and EV-Au-SSB as nanotracer. When the composite probe solution co-existed with CAP and Exo I, the aptamer on the capture probes preferentially combined with CAP, and then CAP-Apt and nanotracer complex were released into the solution. Subsequently, Exo I in the solution could further digest the CAP-Apt from the 3'-end of the aptamer and release CAP, which could participate in further reaction with the probes. It was worth mentioning that EV contained a large number of HRPs on its dendritic chain. In the EV-Au-SSB, Au could enhance ECL intensity of CdS NCs by surface plasmon resonance. What's more, HRPs on EV could catalyze the reaction of H2O2, which could obviously enhance ECL intensity of CdS NCs. This study demonstrated excellent performance of the triple-amplification ECL assay, which makes this aptasensor system suitable and promising for the practical application of CAP residues in fish samples. Moreover, the assay might provide a promising avenue to develop efficient aptasensors to determine small-molecule harmful substances in environmental monitoring and food safety. PMID:27434234

  3. Utility of accurate monoisotopic mass measurements to confidently identify lambda exonuclease generated single-stranded amplicons containing 7-deaza analogs by electrospray ionization FT-ICR mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frahm, Jennifer L.; Mason, Christopher J.; Muddiman, David C.

    2004-05-01

    A 53-base pair region on the long arm of chromosome 22 was amplified using PCR with 7-deaza-modified deoxynucleotides. Increased amplification efficiency was achieved by doubling the concentration of the modified deoxynucleotide triphosphates. Incorporation of 7-deaza purines has been previously shown to selectively eliminate fragmentation pathways during gas-phase sequencing of nucleic acids by sustained off-resonance irradiation collision-induced dissociation (SORI-CID) and infrared multiphoton dissociation. However, 7-deaza analogs result in significant duplex stability precluding interrogation of the single-stranded species by tandem mass spectrometry. Herein, we demonstrate the use of lambda exonuclease to successfully overcome this problem and are able to obtain single-stranded PCR products containing 7-deaza adenine and guanine nucleobases. Mass accuracy was used as our metric to determine complete incorporation of 7-deaza residues in PCR products>15 kDa; <= 3 ppm neutral monoisotopic mass measurement accuracies were routinely achieved. High mass measurement accuracy was obtained using a dual electrospray source and subsequently, using an isotopic fitting algorithm, the best fit between the theoretical and experimental isotopic distributions was determined using a chi-square value. Theoretical isotopic distributions were generated using an average nucleotide (averatide) chemical formula developed herein which was based on the relative frequencies of AT and GC base pairs in the human genome. Single-stranded PCR products were fragmented using SORI-CID and as expected, cleavage at the 7-deaza modified sites was not observed. Collectively, this integrated approach can facilitate top-down sequencing of PCR products by a variety of tandem mass spectrometry methods.

  4. Characterizing and controlling intrinsic biases of lambda exonuclease in nascent strand sequencing reveals phasing between nucleosomes and G-quadruplex motifs around a subset of human replication origins

    PubMed Central

    Foulk, Michael S.; Urban, John M.; Casella, Cinzia; Gerbi, Susan A.

    2015-01-01

    Nascent strand sequencing (NS-seq) is used to discover DNA replication origins genome-wide, allowing identification of features for their specification. NS-seq depends on the ability of lambda exonuclease (λ-exo) to efficiently digest parental DNA while leaving RNA-primer protected nascent strands intact. We used genomics and biochemical approaches to determine if λ-exo digests all parental DNA sequences equally. We report that λ-exo does not efficiently digest G-quadruplex (G4) structures in a plasmid. Moreover, λ-exo digestion of nonreplicating genomic DNA (LexoG0) enriches GC-rich DNA and G4 motifs genome-wide. We used LexoG0 data to control for nascent strand–independent λ-exo biases in NS-seq and validated this approach at the rDNA locus. The λ-exo–controlled NS-seq peaks are not GC-rich, and only 35.5% overlap with 6.8% of all G4s, suggesting that G4s are not general determinants for origin specification but may play a role for a subset. Interestingly, we observed a periodic spacing of G4 motifs and nucleosomes around the peak summits, suggesting that G4s may position nucleosomes at this subset of origins. Finally, we demonstrate that use of Na+ instead of K+ in the λ-exo digestion buffer reduced the effect of G4s on λ-exo digestion and discuss ways to increase both the sensitivity and specificity of NS-seq. PMID:25695952

  5. The Impact of the 80-Hour Resident Workweek on Surgical Residents and Attending Surgeons

    PubMed Central

    Hutter, Matthew M.; Kellogg, Katherine C.; Ferguson, Charles M.; Abbott, William M.; Warshaw, Andrew L.

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To assess the impact of the 80-hour resident workweek restrictions on surgical residents and attending surgeons. Summary Background Data: The ACGME mandated resident duty hour restrictions have required a major workforce restructuring. The impact of these changes needs to be critically evaluated for both the resident and attending surgeons, specifically with regards to the impact on motivation, job satisfaction, the quality of surgeon training, the quality of the surgeon's life, and the quality of patient care. Methods: Four prospective studies were performed at a single academic surgical program with data collected both before the necessary workforce restructuring and 1 year after, including: 1) time cards to assess changes in components of daily activity; 2) Web-based surveys using validated instruments to assess burnout and motivation to work; 3) structured, taped, one-on-one interviews with an external PhD investigator; and 4) statistical analyses of objective, quantitative data. Results: After the work-hour changes, surgical residents have decreased “burnout” scores, with significantly less “emotional exhaustion” (Maslach Burnout Inventory: 29.1 “high” vs. 23.1 “medium,” P = 0.02). Residents have better quality of life both in and out of the hospital. They felt they got more sleep, have a lighter workload, and have increased motivation to work (Herzberg Motivation Dimensions). We found no measurable, statistically significant difference in the quality of patient care (NSQIP data). Resident training and education objectively were not statistically diminished (ACGME case logs, ABSITE scores). Attending surgeons perceived that their quality of their life inside and outside of the hospital was “somewhat worse” because of the work-hour changes, as they had anticipated. Many concerns were identified with regards to the professional development of future surgeons, including a change toward a shift-worker mentality that is not patient

  6. 24 CFR 964.140 - Resident training.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...: (1) Community organization and leadership training; (2) Organizational development training for Resident Management Corporations and duly elected Resident Councils; (3) Public housing policies,...

  7. 24 CFR 964.140 - Resident training.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...: (1) Community organization and leadership training; (2) Organizational development training for Resident Management Corporations and duly elected Resident Councils; (3) Public housing policies,...

  8. Overwork Among Residents in India: A Medical Resident's Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Azhar, Gulrez S.; Azhar, Abdullah Z.; Azhar, Ahmad S.

    2012-01-01

    This paper argues that medical residents who do most of the hard work in big hospitals and medical colleges are overworked. A hierarchical organizational structure, staffing patterns, and fear of failure in examinations leads to overwork among residents going unreported. This can lead to poor academic performance and research work. Gaps in communication have serious implications on patient health. Undesirable practices like LAMA (leave against medical advice) also result from overwork. Issues of pay and contracts including mandatory service need to be looked into carefully. National and international recommendations on work hours have consistently been ignored. The solutions suggested are simple and easy to implement. PMID:24479024

  9. Depression in nursing home residents.

    PubMed

    Abrams, R C; Teresi, J A; Butin, D N

    1992-05-01

    Although their extent remains unclear, major and minor depressions are widespread in the nursing home population. This statement appears intuitively to be correct when consideration is given to the inactivity, decline in functional competence, loss of personal autonomy, and unavoidable confrontation with the process of death and dying that are associated with nursing home placement. In addition, some nursing home residents have had previous episodes of depression or are admitted to the facility already dysthymic or with other chronic forms of the illness. Such circumstances provide a favorable culture for the development and persistence of depressive illness. When the high frequency of other psychiatric disorders among nursing home residents is factored in, it is not surprising that long-term health care facilities have come to be regarded as de facto psychiatric hospitals. Nursing homes largely lack the treatment resources of psychiatric hospitals, however. Nursing home physicians are often unprepared to make psychiatric diagnoses, and a perfunctory annual psychiatric evaluation is insufficient to manage the complex depression syndromes of nursing home residents. Because nursing home psychiatrists typically work on a consultation basis, recommendations are not necessarily acted upon by the primary physicians. The consequences of undiagnosed and untreated depression are substantial. From the psychiatric perspective, the possibility that depression increases the risk for eventual development of permanent dementia highlights the importance of early identification for cases of reversible dementia. From the rehabilitation point of view, persistent depression among individuals with physical dependency following a catastrophic illness is associated with failure to improve in physical functioning. Depression can probably be linked to increased medical morbidity in nursing home residents, a relationship that also has been suggested for elderly medical inpatients. If so

  10. General surgery residency training issues.

    PubMed

    Klingensmith, Mary E; Lewis, Frank R

    2013-01-01

    The practice of general surgery has undergone a marked evolution in the past 20 years, which has been inadequately recognized and minimally addressed. The changes that have occurred have been disruptive to residency training, and to date there has been inadequate compensation for these. Evidence is now emerging of significant issues in the overall performance of recent graduates from at least 3 sources: the evaluation of external agents who incorporate these graduates into their practice or group, the opinions of the residents themselves, and the performance of graduates on the oral examination of the American Board of Surgery during the past 8 years. The environmental and technological causes of the present situation represent improvements in care for patients, and are clearly irreversible. Hence, solutions to the problems must be sought in other areas. To address the issues effectively, greater recognition and engagement are needed by the surgical community so that effective solutions can be crafted. These will need to include improvements in the efficiency of teaching, with the assumption of greater individual resident responsibility for their knowledge, the establishment of more defined standards for knowledge and skills acquisition by level of residency training, with flexible self-assessment available online, greater focus of the curriculum on current rather than historical practice, increased use of structured assessments (including those in a simulated environment), and modifications to the overall structure of the traditional 5-year residency.

  11. Ethics education for dermatology residents.

    PubMed

    Bercovitch, Lionel; Long, Thomas P

    2009-01-01

    The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education and the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada both require the teaching and demonstration of general competencies, which include professionalism and ethics as a condition of training program accreditation and specialty certification, respectively. Residents in dermatology and other specialties perceive their training in ethics is inadequate in numerous areas. Residents and specialists in dermatology encounter numerous ethical and professional issues throughout their workday. A dermatoethics curriculum was developed at The Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University in 2001 to address the need for training in bioethics and professionalism. The subject matter of the curriculum and didactic methods are reviewed. Guidelines for effective teaching of ethics and professionalism to dermatology residents are presented. It is important to make the teaching sessions relevant to the residents' day-to-day work experiences and personal needs. Honesty and openness on the part of faculty and trainees is important. Although informality fosters such exchanges, the sessions should be a learning experience. Resources outside the residency program should be used as necessary. Evaluation of ethics and professionalism in trainees is addressed. PMID:19539170

  12. Improving Resident Knowledge of Spacers.

    PubMed

    Kilgore, Brian; Al Katranji, Khalid; Woodall, Meredith; Shepherd, Meagan; Flesher, Susan L

    2016-10-01

    Studies show the delivery of inhaled medications is maximized when a metered-dose inhaler (MDI) with a spacer is utilized. Our residents expressed concern with their knowledge of MDIs and spacers. This study was designed to address those concerns. Residents were given a 12-question pre-intervention, self-assessment questionnaire that explored their overall knowledge and comfort in utilizing MDI with spacers. Participants then received educational intervention via multimedia videos and a demonstration of proper use of MDI with spacer. Participants were given the same questionnaire immediately following the education and again 3 months later. Improvement was significant (P < .05) for each element studied as derived from the 12 questions. Improvement remained significant when these variables were assessed in the 3-month follow-up. In this study, we successfully improved the ability of our residents to deliver quality care by improving their knowledge and confidence in utilizing MDIs with spacers. PMID:27630006

  13. What opportunities are available for resident involvement in national orthopedic and subspecialty societies?

    PubMed

    Dy, Christopher J; Cross, Michael B; Osbahr, Daryl C; Parks, Michael L; Green, Daniel W

    2011-10-01

    As physician involvement in health policy grows, there will be an increasing need for future leaders in orthopedics. Interested orthopedic residents may be unaware of opportunities for leadership involvement in professional and subspecialty organizations. This article investigates whether national and subspecialty organizations offer membership to residents, allow residents to participate in committees, and provide opportunities for scholarly activity and mentorship. The authors surveyed 20 national orthopedic professional and subspecialty societies to evaluate the availability and cost of resident membership, meeting attendance and participation, research funding, committee membership, and mentorship opportunities. Each society's Web site was reviewed, and societies were contacted by phone if further inquiry was needed. Of the 20 orthopedic societies surveyed, 11 allowed resident membership. Five of 20 societies allowed residents to serve on committees, with a total of 14 total positions for residents. Four organizations provided formalized mentorship programs to residents. Although opportunities for resident involvement in subspecialty and professional societies are available in the majority of groups surveyed, the Orthopaedic Trauma Association and American Society for Surgery of the Hand provided the most comprehensive collection of opportunities. Residents should also pursue involvement in other organizations that may be more readily accessible, such as local, state, and regional orthopedic and medical societies. Increased resident participation in these organizations may help in increasing the 14 nationally available committee positions for orthopedic residents. Our orthopedic profession and societies should encourage motivated residents to pursue involvement and leadership at the national level.

  14. 28 CFR 115.233 - Resident education.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Resident education. 115.233 Section 115... STANDARDS Standards for Community Confinement Facilities Training and Education § 115.233 Resident education... resident is transferred to a different facility. (c) The agency shall provide resident education in...

  15. 28 CFR 115.233 - Resident education.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Resident education. 115.233 Section 115... STANDARDS Standards for Community Confinement Facilities Training and Education § 115.233 Resident education... resident is transferred to a different facility. (c) The agency shall provide resident education in...

  16. 28 CFR 115.233 - Resident education.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Resident education. 115.233 Section 115... STANDARDS Standards for Community Confinement Facilities Training and Education § 115.233 Resident education... resident is transferred to a different facility. (c) The agency shall provide resident education in...

  17. Predictors of Success in an Anesthesiology Residency.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warrick, Shirley S.; Crumrine, Robert S.

    1986-01-01

    Factors that contributed to successful residency performance by anesthesiology residents were examined in order to assist the program's selection committee in developing selection criteria. The best predictor of a resident's academic average in the anethesiology program was the number of years the resident had spent in other specialities.…

  18. Crystal structure of a KSHV-SOX-DNA complex: insights into the molecular mechanisms underlying DNase activity and host shutoff.

    PubMed

    Bagnéris, Claire; Briggs, Louise C; Savva, Renos; Ebrahimi, Bahram; Barrett, Tracey E

    2011-07-01

    The early lytic phase of Kaposi's sarcoma herpesvirus infection is characterized by viral replication and the global degradation (shutoff) of host mRNA. Key to both activities is the virally encoded alkaline exonuclease KSHV SOX. While the DNase activity of KSHV SOX is required for the resolution of viral genomic DNA as a precursor to encapsidation, its exact involvement in host shutoff remains to be determined. We present the first crystal structure of a KSHV SOX-DNA complex that has illuminated the catalytic mechanism underpinning both its endo and exonuclease activities. We further illustrate that KSHV SOX, similar to its Epstein-Barr virus homologue, has an intrinsic RNase activity in vitro that although an element of host shutoff, cannot solely account for the phenomenon.

  19. Coordinated nuclease activities counteract Ku at single-ended DNA double-strand breaks

    PubMed Central

    Chanut, Pauline; Britton, Sébastien; Coates, Julia; Jackson, Stephen P.; Calsou, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    Repair of single-ended DNA double-strand breaks (seDSBs) by homologous recombination (HR) requires the generation of a 3′ single-strand DNA overhang by exonuclease activities in a process called DNA resection. However, it is anticipated that the highly abundant DNA end-binding protein Ku sequesters seDSBs and shields them from exonuclease activities. Despite pioneering works in yeast, it is unclear how mammalian cells counteract Ku at seDSBs to allow HR to proceed. Here we show that in human cells, ATM-dependent phosphorylation of CtIP and the epistatic and coordinated actions of MRE11 and CtIP nuclease activities are required to limit the stable loading of Ku on seDSBs. We also provide evidence for a hitherto unsuspected additional mechanism that contributes to prevent Ku accumulation at seDSBs, acting downstream of MRE11 endonuclease activity and in parallel with MRE11 exonuclease activity. Finally, we show that Ku persistence at seDSBs compromises Rad51 focus assembly but not DNA resection. PMID:27641979

  20. Coordinated nuclease activities counteract Ku at single-ended DNA double-strand breaks.

    PubMed

    Chanut, Pauline; Britton, Sébastien; Coates, Julia; Jackson, Stephen P; Calsou, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    Repair of single-ended DNA double-strand breaks (seDSBs) by homologous recombination (HR) requires the generation of a 3' single-strand DNA overhang by exonuclease activities in a process called DNA resection. However, it is anticipated that the highly abundant DNA end-binding protein Ku sequesters seDSBs and shields them from exonuclease activities. Despite pioneering works in yeast, it is unclear how mammalian cells counteract Ku at seDSBs to allow HR to proceed. Here we show that in human cells, ATM-dependent phosphorylation of CtIP and the epistatic and coordinated actions of MRE11 and CtIP nuclease activities are required to limit the stable loading of Ku on seDSBs. We also provide evidence for a hitherto unsuspected additional mechanism that contributes to prevent Ku accumulation at seDSBs, acting downstream of MRE11 endonuclease activity and in parallel with MRE11 exonuclease activity. Finally, we show that Ku persistence at seDSBs compromises Rad51 focus assembly but not DNA resection. PMID:27641979

  1. Influence of a single-nucleotide polymorphism of the DNA mismatch repair-related gene exonuclease-1 (rs9350) with prostate cancer risk among Chinese people.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yiming; Li, Pengju; Xu, Abai; Chen, Jie; Ma, Chao; Sakai, Akiko; Xie, Liping; Wang, Lei; Na, Yanqun; Kaku, Haruki; Xu, Peng; Jin, Zhong; Li, Xiezhao; Guo, Kai; Shen, Haiyan; Zheng, Shaobo; Kumon, Hiromi; Liu, Chunxiao; Huang, Peng

    2016-05-01

    In this study, we aimed to identify the influence of exonuclease 1 (EXO1) single-nucleotide polymorphism rs9350, which is involved in DNA mismatch repair, on prostate cancer risk in Chinese people. In our hospital-based case-control study, 214 prostate cancer patients and 253 cancer-free control subjects were enrolled from three hospitals in China. Genotyping for rs9350 was performed by the SNaPshot(®) method using peripheral blood samples. Consequently, a significantly higher prostate cancer risk was observed in patients with the CC genotype [odds ratio (OR) = 1.678, 95 % confidence interval (CI) = 1.130-2.494, P = 0.010] than in those with the CT genotype. Further, the CT/TT genotypes were significantly associated with increased prostate cancer risk (adjusted OR = 1.714, 95 % CI = 1.176-2.500, P = 0.005), and the C allele had a statistically significant compared with T allele (P = 0.009) of EXO1 (rs9350). Through stratified analysis, significant associations were revealed for the CT/TT genotype in the subgroup with diagnosis age >72 (adjusted OR = 1.776, 95 % CI = 1.051-3.002, P = 0.032) and in patients with localized disease subgroup (adjusted OR = 1.798, 95 % CI = 1.070-3.022, P = 0.027). In addition, we observed that patients with prostate-specific antigen (PSA) levels of ≤10 ng/mL were more likely to have the CT/TT genotypes than those with PSA levels of >10 ng/mL (P = 0.006). For the first time, we present evidence that the inherited EXO1 polymorphism rs9350 may have a substantial influence on prostate cancer risk in Chinese people. We believe that the rs9350 could be a useful biomarker for assessing predisposition for and early diagnosis of prostate cancer.

  2. Predictors of Residence Hall Involvement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arboleda, Ana; Wang, Yongyi; Shelley, Mack C., II; Whalen, Donald F.

    2003-01-01

    Residence hall students' (N = 1,186, 52% male, 90% White, 66% freshmen) involvement in their living community is influenced significantly by precollege student characteristics (gender, ethnicity), classification, attitudes (toward hall director, house cabinet, academic comfort, social environment, group study), and environmental variables (noise,…

  3. Confused Resident Care. Instructor Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Missouri Univ., Columbia. Instructional Materials Lab.

    This instructional module was designed for certified nurse assistants (CNA). This voluntary training program was developed as a "continuing education" option for the practicing graduate CNA with the intention of providing CNAs with the requisite knowledge and skills to provide care for the confused elderly resident in a long-term care facility.…

  4. Residents' strikes on policy issues.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Vishal; Aggarwal, Sourabh

    2009-01-01

    Strikes by residents or medical students have become fairly common and the new trend is to resort to strikes to protest matters concerning health policies. This article discusses the justification for and the ethical issues involved in these strike actions. Mechanisms to prevent such strikes are also discussed. PMID:19241959

  5. Residency effects in animal contests.

    PubMed Central

    Kemp, Darrell J.; Wiklund, Christer

    2004-01-01

    The question of why territorial residents usually win asymmetrical owner-intruder contests is critical to our understanding of animal contest evolution. Game theory suggests that, under certain conditions, residency could be used as an arbitrary means of contest settlement in a manner analogous to tossing a coin. Key empirical support for this idea is provided by a study on the speckled wood butterfly (Pararge aegeria); however, this result has proven controversial. We show conclusively that residency does not serve as an arbitrary cue for contest settlement in this species. By means of a series of manipulative experiments, conducted on two phenotypically divergent populations of P. aegeria, we also rule out the recently presented alternative that contests are settled due to resource-correlated asymmetries in thoracic temperature. Our results instead suggest that more intrinsically aggressive males accumulate as residents and continue to win due to the self-reinforcing effect of prior winning experience. Truly arbitrary contest settlement may be rare or non-existent in the wild. PMID:15306291

  6. From Residency to Lifelong Learning.

    PubMed

    Brandt, Keith

    2015-11-01

    The residency training experience is the perfect environment for learning. The university/institution patient population provides a never-ending supply of patients with unique management challenges. Resources abound that allow the discovery of knowledge about similar situations. Senior teachers provide counseling and help direct appropriate care. Periodic testing and evaluations identify deficiencies, which can be corrected with future study. What happens, however, when the resident graduates? Do they possess all the knowledge they'll need for the rest of their career? Will medical discovery stand still limiting the need for future study? If initial certification establishes that the physician has the skills and knowledge to function as an independent physician and surgeon, how do we assure the public that plastic surgeons will practice lifelong learning and remain safe throughout their career? Enter Maintenance of Certification (MOC). In an ideal world, MOC would provide many of the same tools as residency training: identification of gaps in knowledge, resources to correct those deficiencies, overall assessment of knowledge, feedback about communication skills and professionalism, and methods to evaluate and improve one's practice. This article discusses the need; for education and self-assessment that extends beyond residency training and a commitment to lifelong learning. The American Board of Plastic Surgery MOC program is described to demonstrate how it helps the diplomate reach the goal of continuous practice improvement.

  7. From Residency to Lifelong Learning.

    PubMed

    Brandt, Keith

    2015-11-01

    The residency training experience is the perfect environment for learning. The university/institution patient population provides a never-ending supply of patients with unique management challenges. Resources abound that allow the discovery of knowledge about similar situations. Senior teachers provide counseling and help direct appropriate care. Periodic testing and evaluations identify deficiencies, which can be corrected with future study. What happens, however, when the resident graduates? Do they possess all the knowledge they'll need for the rest of their career? Will medical discovery stand still limiting the need for future study? If initial certification establishes that the physician has the skills and knowledge to function as an independent physician and surgeon, how do we assure the public that plastic surgeons will practice lifelong learning and remain safe throughout their career? Enter Maintenance of Certification (MOC). In an ideal world, MOC would provide many of the same tools as residency training: identification of gaps in knowledge, resources to correct those deficiencies, overall assessment of knowledge, feedback about communication skills and professionalism, and methods to evaluate and improve one's practice. This article discusses the need; for education and self-assessment that extends beyond residency training and a commitment to lifelong learning. The American Board of Plastic Surgery MOC program is described to demonstrate how it helps the diplomate reach the goal of continuous practice improvement. PMID:26517466

  8. Learning on human resources management in the radiology residency program*

    PubMed Central

    de Oliveira, Aparecido Ferreira; Lederman, Henrique Manoel; Batista, Nildo Alves

    2014-01-01

    Objective To investigate the process of learning on human resource management in the radiology residency program at Escola Paulista de Medicina - Universidade Federal de São Paulo, aiming at improving radiologists' education. Materials and Methods Exploratory study with a quantitative and qualitative approach developed with the faculty staff, preceptors and residents of the program, utilizing a Likert questionnaire (46), taped interviews (18), and categorization based on thematic analysis. Results According to 71% of the participants, residents have clarity about their role in the development of their activities, and 48% said that residents have no opportunity to learn how to manage their work in a multidisciplinary team. Conclusion Isolation at medical records room, little interactivity between sectors with diversified and fixed activities, absence of a previous culture and lack of a training program on human resources management may interfere in the development of skills for the residents' practice. There is a need to review objectives of the medical residency in the field of radiology, incorporating, whenever possible, the commitment to the training of skills related to human resources management thus widening the scope of abilities of the future radiologists. PMID:25741056

  9. Residence Hall Proximity to Foreign Students as an Influence on Selected Attitudes and Behaviors of American College Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marion, Paul B., Jr.; Stafford, Thomas H., Jr.

    1980-01-01

    These studies conducted before and after implementation of an international residence program indicate the proximity of American students to foreign students in conventional residence halls. International halls encourage cross-cultural interaction and interest in international activities. (NRB)

  10. Combining clinical microsystems and an experiential quality improvement curriculum to improve residency education in internal medicine.

    PubMed

    Tess, Anjala V; Yang, Julius J; Smith, C Christopher; Fawcett, Caitlin M; Bates, Carol K; Reynolds, Eileen E

    2009-03-01

    Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center's internal medicine residency program was admitted to the new Education Innovation Project accreditation pathway of the Accreditation Council of Graduate Medical Education to begin in July 2006. The authors restructured the inpatient medical service to create clinical microsystems in which residents practice throughout residency. Program leadership then mandated an active curriculum in quality improvement based in those microsystems. To provide the experience to every graduating resident, a core faculty in patient safety was trained in the basics of quality improvement. The authors hypothesized that such changes would increase the number of residents participating in quality improvement projects, improve house officer engagement in quality improvement work, enhance the culture of safety the residents perceive in their training environment, improve work flow on the general medicine ward rotations, and improve the overall educational experience for the residents on ward rotations.The authors describe the first 18 months of the intervention (July 2006 to January 2008). The authors assessed attitudes and the educational experience with surveys and evaluation forms. After the intervention, the authors documented residents' participation in projects that overlapped with hospital priorities. More residents reported roles in designing and implementing quality improvement changes. Residents also noted greater satisfaction with the quality of care they deliver. Fewer residents agreed or strongly agreed that the new admitting system interfered with communication. Ongoing residency program assessment showed an improved perception of workload, and educational ratings of rotations improved. The changes required few resources and can be transported to other settings. PMID:19240439

  11. RecBC enzyme activity is required for far-UV induced respiration shutoff in Escherichia coli K12.

    PubMed

    Swenson, P A; Norton, I L

    1986-01-01

    Shutoff of respiration is one of a number of recA+ lexA+ dependent (SOS) responses caused by far ultraviolet (245 nm) radiation (UV) damage of DNA in Escherichia coli cells. Thus far no rec/lex response has been shown to require the recB recC gene product, the RecBC enzyme. We report in this paper that UV-induced respiration shutoff did not occur in either of these radiation-sensitive derivatives of K12 strain AB1157 nor in the recB recC double mutant. The sbcB gene product is exonuclease I and it has been reported that the triple mutant strain recB recC sbcB has near normal recombination efficiency and resistance to UV. The sbcB strain shut off its respiration after UV but the triple mutant did not show UV-induced respiration shutoff; the shutoff and death responses were uncoupled. We concluded that respiration shutoff requires RecBC enzyme activity. The RecBC enzyme has ATP-dependent double-strand exonuclease activity, helicase activity and several other activities. We tested a recBC+ (double dagger) mutant strain (recC 1010) that had normal recombination efficiency and resistance to UV but which possessed no ATP-dependent double-strand exonuclease activity. This strain did not shut off its respiration. The presence or absence of other RecBC enzyme activities in this mutant is not known. These results support the hypothesis that ATP-dependent double-strand exonuclease activity is necessary for UV-induced respiration shutoff.

  12. THE ETHICAL EDUCATION OF OPHTHALMOLOGY RESIDENTS: AN EXPERIMENT

    PubMed Central

    Packer, Samuel

    2005-01-01

    Purpose To demonstrate the effect of ethics education on a resident’s ability to answer questions that relate to moral dilemmas and on the clinical evaluations of residents by faculty. Methods The curriculum for the ethics education that was used for this study was designed by the author and consisted of 10 lectures of 1.5 hours each. Five residencies were included in the project. One residency received one lecture, two residencies received three lectures, and two residencies received 10 lectures. To evaluate the moral skills of the residents at the beginning of the course and at the end, the residents were given the Defining Issues Test (DIT-2) developed by James Rest, which involves answering standardized questions about four moral dilemmas. Faculty evaluations were completed before and after the ethics lectures were given. At the beginning of the ethics course, each resident was given a social survey that was designed to assess participation in community, religious, political, and societal activities as well as attitudes about these activities. All residents were also asked demographic information, including their age, gender, and year of residency. Results The results of the DIT-2 taken before and after the ethics lectures were compared. No correlations were found in faculty evaluations of clinical performance of the residents before and after the course (P = .052). Associations between DIT-2 scores and questions on community and religion in the social survey were noted. Conclusion The finding that the effect of an ethics course on residents’ ability to answer moral dilemmas did not achieve statistical significance should be accepted with the understanding that this was a first attempt at standardization of many variables, especially the format of the curriculum and materials used. The use of faculty evaluations to assess clinical performance needs to be standardized, and the faculty members need additional training to ensure validity of the results. The

  13. Site-directed mutagenesis of the human DNA repair enzyme HAP1: identification of residues important for AP endonuclease and RNase H activity.

    PubMed

    Barzilay, G; Walker, L J; Robson, C N; Hickson, I D

    1995-05-11

    HAP1 protein, the major apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP) endonuclease in human cells, is a member of a homologous family of multifunctional DNA repair enzymes including the Escherichia coli exonuclease III and Drosophila Rrp1 proteins. The most extensively characterised member of this family, exonuclease III, exhibits both DNA- and RNA-specific nuclease activities. Here, we show that the RNase H activity characteristic of exonuclease III has been conserved in the human homologue, although the products resulting from RNA cleavage are dissimilar. To identify residues important for enzymatic activity, five mutant HAP1 proteins containing single amino acid substitutions were purified and analysed in vitro. The substitutions were made at sites of conserved amino acids and targeted either acidic or histidine residues because of their known participation in the active sites of hydrolytic nucleases. One of the mutant proteins (replacement of Asp-219 by alanine) showed a markedly reduced enzymatic activity, consistent with a greatly diminished capacity to bind DNA and RNA. In contrast, replacement of Asp-90, Asp-308 or Glu-96 by alanine led to a reduction in enzymatic activity without significantly compromising nucleic acid binding. Replacement of His-255 by alanine led to only a very small reduction in enzymatic activity. Our data are consistent with the presence of a single catalytic active site for the DNA- and RNA-specific nuclease activities of the HAP1 protein. PMID:7784208

  14. Redesigning journal club in residency.

    PubMed

    Al Achkar, Morhaf

    2016-01-01

    The gap between production and implementation of knowledge is the main reason for the suboptimal quality of health care. To eliminate this gap and improve the quality of patient care, journal club (JC) in graduate medical education provides an opportunity for learning the skills of evidence-based medicine. JC, however, continues to face many challenges mainly due to poorly defined goals, inadequate preparation, and lack of interest. This article presents an innovative model to prepare and present JC based on three pillars: dialogical learning through group discussion, mentored residents as peer teachers, and including JC as part of a structured curriculum to learn evidence-based medicine. This engaging model has the potential to transform JC from a moribund session that is daunting for residents into a lively discussion to redefine clinical practice using the most current evidence. PMID:27313486

  15. Variability in veterans' alcohol use by place of residence.

    PubMed

    Vander Weg, Mark W; Cai, Xueya

    2012-01-01

    Rates of risky alcohol use appear to be elevated among active duty and veteran military personnel. Little is known, however, about characteristics associated with alcohol misuse in these groups. Furthermore, although there is evidence to suggest that patterns of alcohol use differ according to place of residence, no prior studies have investigated variability in alcohol use according to level of rurality and geographic region in US military veterans. The present study evaluated variations in alcohol use (ie, past 30-day use, heavy use, and binge drinking) and drinking and driving according to place of residence among 55,452 US military veterans participating in the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System. Veterans residing in rural areas were significantly less likely than those from suburban and urban areas to have consumed alcohol in the past 30 days (p < .001). Conversely, rural-dwelling veterans who did drink alcohol had higher odds of binge drinking (p < .005) and (relative to urban residents) drinking and driving (p = .013). Veterans residing in the South were significantly less likely than those from other geographic regions to report past 30-day alcohol use (p < .001). In addition, veterans living in the Midwest were significantly more likely than those from the South to report drinking and driving (p = .017). No differences in heavy alcohol use were observed based on location of residence. 

  16. Applicants' Self-Reported Priorities in Selecting a Residency Program

    PubMed Central

    Phitayakorn, Roy; Macklin, E. A.; Goldsmith, J.; Weinstein, Debra F.

    2015-01-01

    Background Residency recruitment is a high-stakes activity for all participants, yet there is limited information about how applicants choose among programs. Objective This study evaluated the importance applicants place on various residency program attributes; whether applicant priorities vary by sex, race/ethnicity, or specialty choice; and whether the importance of these factors changes over time. Methods Highly ranked applicants to residency programs at 2 academic medical centers were surveyed annually from 2004 to 2012 regarding the importance of 26 characteristics in selecting a program. Mean ratings of importance for each factor were analyzed to assess priority for the overall applicant group, and whether priorities differed for subgroups (by sex, race/ethnicity, and specialty). Results Of 9669 applicants surveyed, 6285 (65%) responded. The 5 factors with highest rating of importance (overall and across all subgroups) were the program's ability to prepare residents for future training or position, resident esprit de corps, faculty availability and involvement in teaching, depth and breadth of faculty, and variety of patients and clinical resources. Small but significant differences in the ratings of some factors by sex and/or specialty group were identified. Institution-level characteristics, such as call rooms, salary, and benefits, were relatively unimportant. Applicant priorities were stable over the 9-year study period. Conclusions Highly ranked applicants to competitive residency programs value educational aspects of the program most highly, along with resident morale. Top factors were consistent across subgroups and over the 9 years of the study. These findings have implications for resident recruitment strategies. PMID:26217417

  17. Changing conversations: teaching safety and quality in residency training.

    PubMed

    Voss, John D; May, Natalie B; Schorling, John B; Lyman, Jason A; Schectman, Joel M; Wolf, Andrew M D; Nadkarni, Mohan M; Plews-Ogan, Margaret

    2008-11-01

    Improving patient safety and quality in health care is one of medicine's most pressing challenges. Residency training programs have a unique opportunity to meet this challenge by training physicians in the science and methods of patient safety and quality improvement (QI).With support from the Health Resources and Services Administration, the authors developed an innovative, longitudinal, experiential curriculum in patient safety and QI for internal medicine residents at the University of Virginia. This two-year curriculum teaches the critical concepts and skills of patient safety and QI: systems thinking and human factors analysis, root cause analysis (RCA), and process mapping. Residents apply these skills in a series of QI and patient safety projects. The constructivist educational model creates a learning environment that actively engages residents in improving the quality and safety of their medical practice.Between 2003 and 2005, 38 residents completed RCAs of adverse events. The RCAs identified causes and proposed useful interventions that have produced important care improvements. Qualitative analysis demonstrates that the curriculum shifted residents' thinking about patient safety to a systems-based approach. Residents completed 237 outcome assessments during three years. Results indicate that seminars met predefined learning objectives and were interactive and enjoyable. Residents strongly believe they gained important skills in all domains.The challenge to improve quality and safety in health care requires physicians to learn new knowledge and skills. Graduate medical education can equip new physicians with the skills necessary to lead the movement to safer and better quality of care for all patients.This article is part of a theme issue of Academic Medicine on the Title VII health professions training programs.

  18. 7 CFR 273.3 - Residency.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... resident of a shelter for battered women and children as defined in § 271.2 and was a member of a household containing the person who had abused him or her. Residents of shelters for battered women and children...

  19. A Comparison between Emergency Medicine Residency Training Programs in the United States and Saudi Arabia from the Residents' Perception

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. This study was designed to compare the trainees' perception of emergency medicine (EM) training in the United States (US) and Saudi Arabia (SA) and to identify residents' levels of confidence and points of satisfaction in education, procedural skills, and work environment. Method. An IRB-exempt anonymous web-based survey was distributed to five EM residency training programs in the USA and three residency regions in SA. Results. 342 residents were polled with a 20% response rate (16.8% USA and 25.8% SA). The Saudi residents responded less positively to the questions about preparation for their boards' examinations, access to multiple educational resources, and weekly academic activities. The Saudi trainees felt less competent in less common procedures than US trainees. American trainees also more strongly agree that they have more faculty interest in their education compared to the Saudi trainees. The Saudi residents see more patients per hour compared to their US peers. Conclusion. These findings may be due to the differences in training techniques including less formal didactics and simulation experience in SA and more duty hour regulations in the USA. PMID:24563784

  20. Pharmacists teaching in family medicine residency programs

    PubMed Central

    Jorgenson, Derek; Muller, Andries; Whelan, Anne Marie; Buxton, Kelly

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Objective To determine the percentage of family medicine residency programs that have pharmacists directly involved in teaching residents, the types and extent of teaching provided by pharmacists in family medicine residency programs, and the primary source of funding for the pharmacists. Design Web-based survey. Setting One hundred fifty-eight resident training sites within the 17 family medicine residency programs in Canada. Participants One hundred residency program directors who were responsible for overseeing the training sites within the residency programs were contacted to determine the percentage of training sites in which pharmacists were directly involved in teaching. Pharmacists who were identified by the residency directors were invited to participate in the Web-based survey. Main outcome measures The percentage of training sites for family medicine residency that have pharmacists directly involved in teaching residents. The types and the extent of teaching performed by the pharmacists who teach in the residency programs. The primary source of funding that supports the pharmacists’ salaries. Results More than a quarter (25.3%) of family medicine residency training sites include direct involvement of pharmacist teachers. Pharmacist teachers reported that they spend a substantial amount of their time teaching residents using a range of teaching modalities and topics, but have no formal pharmacotherapy curriculums. Nearly a quarter (22.6%) of the pharmacists reported that their salaries were primarily funded by the residency programs. Conclusion Pharmacists have a role in training family medicine residents. This is a good opportunity for family medicine residents to learn about issues related to pharmacotherapy; however, the role of pharmacists as educators might be optimized if standardized teaching methods, curriculums, and evaluation plans were in place. PMID:21918131

  1. Evaluating Medical Residents' Literature-Appraisal Skills.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stern, David T.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    A study of 28 medical residents' skills in evaluating research compared student evaluations of a journal article with 1 developed by means of a Delphi technique utilizing 5 experts. Residents' scores were not significantly associated with residency year or self-assessed critical appraisal skill. The method is proposed as an objective means of…

  2. Toolbox for Evaluating Residents as Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coverdale, John H.; Ismail, Nadia; Mian, Ayesha; Dewey, Charlene

    2010-01-01

    Objective: The authors review existing assessment tools related to evaluating residents' teaching skills and teaching effectiveness. Methods: PubMed and PsycInfo databases were searched using combinations of keywords including "residents," "residents as teachers," "teaching skills," and "assessments" or "rating scales." Results: Eleven evaluation…

  3. 38 CFR 51.110 - Resident assessment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...) PER DIEM FOR NURSING HOME CARE OF VETERANS IN STATE HOMES Standards § 51.110 Resident assessment. The... standards of quality; and (ii) Be provided by qualified persons in accordance with each resident's written...) Review of assessments. The nursing facility management must examine each resident no less than once...

  4. 38 CFR 51.110 - Resident assessment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...) PER DIEM FOR NURSING HOME CARE OF VETERANS IN STATE HOMES Standards § 51.110 Resident assessment. The... standards of quality; and (ii) Be provided by qualified persons in accordance with each resident's written...) Review of assessments. The nursing facility management must examine each resident no less than once...

  5. 38 CFR 51.110 - Resident assessment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...) PER DIEM FOR NURSING HOME CARE OF VETERANS IN STATE HOMES Standards § 51.110 Resident assessment. The... standards of quality; and (ii) Be provided by qualified persons in accordance with each resident's written...) Review of assessments. The nursing facility management must examine each resident no less than once...

  6. 38 CFR 51.110 - Resident assessment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...) PER DIEM FOR NURSING HOME CARE OF VETERANS IN STATE HOMES Standards § 51.110 Resident assessment. The... standards of quality; and (ii) Be provided by qualified persons in accordance with each resident's written...) Review of assessments. The nursing facility management must examine each resident no less than once...

  7. 38 CFR 51.110 - Resident assessment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...) PER DIEM FOR NURSING HOME CARE OF VETERANS IN STATE HOMES Standards § 51.110 Resident assessment. The... standards of quality; and (ii) Be provided by qualified persons in accordance with each resident's written...) Review of assessments. The nursing facility management must examine each resident no less than once...

  8. Residency Training in Child Sexual Abuse Evaluation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Giardino, Angelo P.; Brayden, Robert M.; Sugarman, Jacqueline M.

    1998-01-01

    A survey of 147 pediatric faculty and 64 resident pediatricians examined the quantity and adequacy of training in child sexual abuse evaluation. Both faculty and residents believed that preparation in how to conduct a sexual abuse evaluation may be inadequate for residents during their three years of post-graduate training. (CR)

  9. 28 CFR 115.333 - Resident education.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Resident education. 115.333 Section 115... STANDARDS Standards for Juvenile Facilities Training and Education § 115.333 Resident education. (a) During... provide comprehensive age-appropriate education to residents either in person or through video...

  10. 28 CFR 115.333 - Resident education.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Resident education. 115.333 Section 115... STANDARDS Standards for Juvenile Facilities Training and Education § 115.333 Resident education. (a) During... provide comprehensive age-appropriate education to residents either in person or through video...

  11. 28 CFR 115.333 - Resident education.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Resident education. 115.333 Section 115... STANDARDS Standards for Juvenile Facilities Training and Education § 115.333 Resident education. (a) During... provide comprehensive age-appropriate education to residents either in person or through video...

  12. 42 CFR 483.10 - Resident rights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... facility and as a citizen or resident of the United States. (2) The resident has the right to be free of... jurisdiction, the rights of the resident are exercised by the person appointed under State law to act on the... extent provided by State law. (b) Notice of rights and services. (1) The facility must inform......

  13. 42 CFR 483.10 - Resident rights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... facility and as a citizen or resident of the United States. (2) The resident has the right to be free of... jurisdiction, the rights of the resident are exercised by the person appointed under State law to act on the... extent provided by State law. (b) Notice of rights and services. (1) The facility must inform......

  14. 24 CFR 964.340 - Resident compensation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Resident compensation. 964.340 Section 964.340 Housing and Urban Development Regulations Relating to Housing and Urban Development...) Program § 964.340 Resident compensation. Residents employed to provide services or renovation...

  15. Sexual Health Education: A Psychiatric Resident's Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waineo, Eva; Arfken, Cynthia L.; Morreale, Mary K.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: This report discusses psychiatric residents' perceptions of sexual health education and their opinions regarding curricular improvements. Methods: An anonymous, web-based survey was sent to residents in one general psychiatry program (N = 33). The response rate was 69.7%. Results: Residents reported inadequate experience in multiple…

  16. Interventional radiology residency: steps to implementation.

    PubMed

    Marx, M Victoria; Sabri, Saher S

    2015-08-01

    Implementation of an interventional radiology (IR) residency program requires significant planning, as well as clear communication and consensus among departmental and institutional stakeholders. The goal of this short article is to highlight key decisions and steps that are needed to launch an IR residency, and to illustrate a possible timeline for implementation of the integrated and independent IR residency models.

  17. 25 CFR 700.97 - Residence.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Residence. 700.97 Section 700.97 Indians THE OFFICE OF NAVAJO AND HOPI INDIAN RELOCATION COMMISSION OPERATIONS AND RELOCATION PROCEDURES General Policies and Instructions Definitions § 700.97 Residence. (a) Residence is established by proving that the head of...

  18. 25 CFR 700.97 - Residence.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Residence. 700.97 Section 700.97 Indians THE OFFICE OF NAVAJO AND HOPI INDIAN RELOCATION COMMISSION OPERATIONS AND RELOCATION PROCEDURES General Policies and Instructions Definitions § 700.97 Residence. (a) Residence is established by proving that the head of...

  19. 25 CFR 700.97 - Residence.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Residence. 700.97 Section 700.97 Indians THE OFFICE OF NAVAJO AND HOPI INDIAN RELOCATION COMMISSION OPERATIONS AND RELOCATION PROCEDURES General Policies and Instructions Definitions § 700.97 Residence. (a) Residence is established by proving that the head of...

  20. 25 CFR 700.97 - Residence.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Residence. 700.97 Section 700.97 Indians THE OFFICE OF NAVAJO AND HOPI INDIAN RELOCATION COMMISSION OPERATIONS AND RELOCATION PROCEDURES General Policies and Instructions Definitions § 700.97 Residence. (a) Residence is established by proving that the head of...

  1. 38 CFR 51.70 - Resident rights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... freedom from chemical or physical restraint. (4) In the case of a resident determined incompetent under... appointed under State law to act on the resident's behalf. (5) In the case of a resident who has not been... current clinical records within 24 hours (excluding weekends and holidays); and (ii) After receipt of...

  2. Purification and characterization of a DNA-pairing and strand transfer activity from mitotic Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Halbrook, J; McEntee, K

    1989-12-15

    An enzyme catalyzing homologous pairing of DNA chains has been extensively purified from mitotic yeast. The most highly purified fractions are enriched for a polypeptide with a molecular mass of approximately 120 kDa as determined by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Protein-dependent pairing of single-stranded DNAs requires a divalent cation (Mg2+ or Ca2+) but proceeds rapidly in the absence of any nucleoside triphosphates. The kinetics of reassociation are extremely rapid, with more than 60% of the single-stranded DNA becoming resistant to S1 nuclease within 1 min at a ratio of 1 protein monomer/50 nucleotides. The results of enzyme titration and DNA challenge experiments suggest that this protein does not act catalytically during renaturation but is required stoichiometrically. The protein promotes formation of joint molecules between linear M13 replicative form DNA (form III) containing short single-stranded tails and homologous single-stranded M13 viral DNA. Removal of approximately 50 nucleotides from the ends of the linear duplex using either exonuclease III (5' ends) or T7 gene 6 exonuclease (3' ends) activates the duplex for extensive strand exchange. Electron microscopic analysis of product molecules suggests that the homologous circular DNA initially associates with the single-stranded tails of the duplexes, and the heteroduplex region is extended with displacement of the noncomplementary strand. The ability of this protein to pair and to promote strand transfer using either exonuclease III or T7 gene 6 exonuclease-treated duplex substrates suggests that this activity promotes heteroduplex extension in a nonpolar fashion. The biochemical properties of the transferase are consistent with a role for this protein in heteroduplex joint formation during mitotic recombination in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

  3. Resident- and Facility-Level Predictors of Quality of Life in Long-Term Care

    PubMed Central

    Shippee, Tetyana P.; Henning-Smith, Carrie; Kane, Robert L.; Lewis, Teresa

    2015-01-01

    Purpose of the Study: Although there is substantial research on quality of care in nursing homes (NH), less is known about what contributes to quality of life (QOL) for NH residents. This study assesses multiple domains of QOL and examines facility- and resident-level correlates for different domains. Design and Methods: Data come from (a) self-reported resident interviews using a multidimensional measure of QOL; (b) resident clinical data from the Minimum Data Set; and (c) facility-level characteristics from Minnesota Department of Human Services. We used factor analysis to confirm domains of QOL, and then employed cross-sectional hierarchical linear modeling to identify significant resident- and facility-level predictors of each domain. Results: We examined six unique domains of QOL: environment, personal attention, food, engagement, negative mood, and positive mood. In multilevel models, resident-level characteristics were more reliable correlates of QOL than facility characteristics. Among resident characteristics, gender, age, marital status, activities of daily living, mood disorders, cognitive limitations, and length of stay consistently predicted QOL domains. Among facility characteristics, size, staff hours, quality of care, and percent of residents on Medicaid predicted multiple QOL domains. Implications: Examining separate domains rather than a single summary score makes associations with predictors more accurate. Resident characteristics account for the majority of variability in resident QOL. Helping residents maintain functional abilities, and providing an engaging social environment may be particularly important in improving QOL. PMID:24352532

  4. Stress and burnout in residents: impact of mindfulness-based resilience training

    PubMed Central

    Goldhagen, Brian E; Kingsolver, Karen; Stinnett, Sandra S; Rosdahl, Jullia A

    2015-01-01

    Background and objective Stress and burnout impact resident physicians. This prospective study tests the hypothesis that a mindfulness-based resilience intervention would decrease stress and burnout in residents. Methods Resident physicians from the Departments of Family Medicine, Psychiatry, and Anesthesia at Duke University, Durham, NC, USA, participated in two or three 1-hour sessions of mindfulness-based resilience activities, which introduced mindful-awareness and included practical exercises for nurturing resilience. Anonymous surveys were distributed before (completed by 47 residents) and after the intervention (both completed by 30 residents); a follow-up survey was distributed 1 month later (seven residents completed all three surveys). The survey included the Depression Anxiety Stress Scale, 21-question version (DASS-21), the Oldenburg Burnout Inventory, the Mindful Attention Awareness Scale, and ten questions from the Cognitive Failures Questionnaire. Results At baseline, most residents’ scores were in the normal range with respect to stress; however, female residents had higher DASS-21 scores than male residents (31.7, females vs 18.4, males; P=0.002). Most residents’ burnout scores were in the abnormal range, both with respect to exhaustion (38/47 residents, subscore ≥2.25) and disengagement (37/47 residents, subscore ≥2.1). Higher perceived levels of stress correlated with the instruments. Analysis of the surveys before and after the intervention showed no significant short-term change in stress, burnout, mindful-awareness, or cognitive failure. There was a trend for females and post-medical school graduate year 1 and 2 (PGY1 and PGY2) residents to have a reduction in DASS-21 scores after intervention. There was also a trend of reduced stress and burnout in residents who perceived higher stress. Conclusion Residents who are female, PGY1 and PGY2, and who perceive residency to be stressful may benefit most from a mindfulness-based resilience

  5. Effect of Prepaid Health Plans on a Family Practice Residency.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bradley, Don W.; Gehlbach, Stephen H.

    1988-01-01

    Residents and faculty members completed a survey covering the effect of prepaid health care plans at a family medicine center on the program's practice profile, cost-containment, and education activities over a three-year period. Respondents agreed that prepaid plans increased the number of patient visits. (Author/MLW)

  6. Microparticles from apoptotic platelets promote resident macrophage differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Vasina, E M; Cauwenberghs, S; Feijge, M A H; Heemskerk, J W M; Weber, C; Koenen, R R

    2011-01-01

    Platelets shed microparticles not only upon activation, but also upon ageing by an apoptosis-like process (apoptosis-induced platelet microparticles, PMap). While the activation-induced microparticles have widely been studied, not much is known about the (patho)physiological consequences of PMap formation. Flow cytometry and scanning electron microscopy demonstrated that PMap display activated integrins and interact to form microparticle aggregates. PMap were chemotactic for monocytic cells, bound to these cells, an furthermore stimulated cell adhesion and spreading on a fibronectin surface. After prolonged incubation, PMap promoted cell differentiation, but inhibited proliferation. Monocyte membrane receptor analysis revealed increased expression levels of CD11b (integrin αMβ2), CD14 and CD31 (platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule-1), and the chemokine receptors CCR5 and CXCR4, but not of CCR2. This indicated that PMap polarized the cells into resident M2 monocytes. Cells treated with PMap actively consumed oxidized low-density lipoprotein (oxLDL), and released matrix metalloproteinases and hydrogen peroxide. Further confirmation for the differentiation towards resident professional phagocytes came from the finding that PMap stimulated the expression of the (ox)LDL receptors, CD36 and CD68, and the production of proinflammatory and immunomodulating cytokines by monocytes. In conclusion, interaction of PMap with monocytic cells has an immunomodulating potential. The apoptotic microparticles polarize the cells into a resident M2 subset, and induce differentiation to resident professional phagocytes. PMID:21956548

  7. 24 CFR 248.173 - Resident homeownership program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... describe the resident council's current abilities and proposed capacity-building activities to successfully... 11063 (3 CFR 1959-1963 comp., p. 652); section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 (29 U.S.C. 794... alternative that is consistent with establishing a viable homeownership program, the Commissioner...

  8. 24 CFR 248.173 - Resident homeownership program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... describe the resident council's current abilities and proposed capacity-building activities to successfully... 11063 (3 CFR 1959-1963 comp., p. 652); section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 (29 U.S.C. 794... alternative that is consistent with establishing a viable homeownership program, the Commissioner...

  9. The Relationship between Ethnic Identity and Residence Hall Preference

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mann, Danny Stephen

    2013-01-01

    This study explored the relationship between students' residence hall preference and ethnic identity. The study explored differences in ethnic identity development among first-year Chicano/Latino college students who actively requested to live on a culturally themed living learning community and were placed there; Chicano/Latino students who…

  10. An Ambulatory Program for Surgical Residents and Medical Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levy, Margaret

    1988-01-01

    A pilot program based in a freestanding ambulatory surgery center at the Chicago Medical School Department of Surgery is described, its curriculum outlined, and the daily activities of the residents and medical students are detailed. A brief history of ambulatory surgery is given. (Author/MLW)

  11. Quality improvement skills for pediatric residents: from lecture to implementation and sustainability.

    PubMed

    Philibert, Ingrid; Gonzalez Del Rey, Javier A; Lannon, Carole; Lieh-Lai, Mary; Weiss, Kevin B

    2014-01-01

    Quality improvement (QI) skills are relevant to efforts to improve the health care system. The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) program requirements call for resident participation in local and institutional QI efforts, and the move to outcomes-based accreditation is resulting in greater focus on the resulting learning and clinical outcomes. Many programs have enhanced practice-based learning and improvement (PBLI) and systems based practice (SBP) curricula, although efforts to actively involve residents in QI activities appear to be lagging. Using information from the extensive experience of Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, we offer recommendations for how to create meaningful QI experiences for residents meet ACGME requirements and the expectations of the Clinical Learning Environment Review (CLER) process. Resident involvement in QI requires a multipronged approach that overcomes barriers and limitations that have frustrated earlier efforts to move this education from lectures to immersion experiences at the bedside and in the clinic. We present 5 dimensions of effective programs that facilitate active resident participation in improvement work and enhance their QI skills: 1) providing curricula and education models that ground residents in QI principles; 2) ensuring faculty development to prepare physicians for their role in teaching QI and demonstrating it in day-to-day practice; 3) ensuring all residents receive meaningful QI education and practical exposure to improvement projects; 4) overcoming time and other constraints to allow residents to apply their newly developed QI skills; and 5) assessing the effect of exposure to QI on resident competence and project outcomes.

  12. The role of a research seminar for child psychiatry residents.

    PubMed

    Paniagua, F A; Pumariega, A J; O'Boyle, M; Meyer, W J

    1993-03-01

    A major problem confronting the field of child and adolescent psychiatry is the development of teaching strategies to stimulate research activities and an appreciation of research. A teaching approach is described which emphasizes major research concepts using a programmed instruction method and illustrating these concepts with clinical cases. Fourteen child psychiatry residents participated in the seminar during a 3-year period. Overall, trainees' evaluation of the seminar was positive, and they demonstrated a high level of understanding across major research topics. In addition, the seminar may have contributed to an increased preference for academic careers by graduating residents.

  13. [Knowledge of breastfeeding management among residents in pediatrics].

    PubMed

    Temboury Molina, M C

    2003-03-01

    The staff of maternity wards and clinics for maternal and child health should receive appropriate basic and in-service training on the health benefits of breastfeeding and on lactation management. Pediatricians should not only be knowledgeable about the health, nutritional and physiological aspects of appropriate feeding, they should also be familiar with the mechanics of breastfeeding, its various psychosocial influences, possible difficulties and how to overcome them. To evaluate knowledge of breastfeeding among pediatrics residents throughout Spain, a survey was conducted. A total of 250 questionnaires were collected. Significant differences were observed among provinces. In most areas, residents' training was insufficient. To achieve an appropriate level of knowledge among pediatrics residents in a subject as important to mother and child health as breastfeeding, courses should be given and repeated at regular intervals. Professional associations should be actively involved in promoting appropriate training for health professionals.

  14. [Knowledge of breastfeeding management among residents in pediatrics].

    PubMed

    Temboury Molina, M C

    2003-03-01

    The staff of maternity wards and clinics for maternal and child health should receive appropriate basic and in-service training on the health benefits of breastfeeding and on lactation management. Pediatricians should not only be knowledgeable about the health, nutritional and physiological aspects of appropriate feeding, they should also be familiar with the mechanics of breastfeeding, its various psychosocial influences, possible difficulties and how to overcome them. To evaluate knowledge of breastfeeding among pediatrics residents throughout Spain, a survey was conducted. A total of 250 questionnaires were collected. Significant differences were observed among provinces. In most areas, residents' training was insufficient. To achieve an appropriate level of knowledge among pediatrics residents in a subject as important to mother and child health as breastfeeding, courses should be given and repeated at regular intervals. Professional associations should be actively involved in promoting appropriate training for health professionals. PMID:12628099

  15. Effect of residence time on the efficacy of antidandruff shampoos.

    PubMed

    Piérard-Franchimont, C; Uhoda, E; Loussouarn, G; Saint-Léger, D; Piérard, G E

    2003-12-01

    Dandruff is known to be controlled by fungistatic shampoos active against Malassezia spp. These products also remove the loosely attached scales. This study was performed to assess the effect of a 5-min residence time on the efficacy of antidandruff shampoos. Two commercially available shampoos were used in two groups of 21 panelists with severe dandruff. They contained either 1% ketoconazole or 1% piroctone olamine. In each group, intraindividual comparisons were made by a split-scalp design between the effect of a 5-min residence time versus no residence time. Both shampoos induced significant reductions in scaliness and yeast colonization. The beneficial effects were obvious immediately after one single shampooing and 3 days later as well. The improvement was greater with a 5-min residence time. The piroctone olamine treatment benefited more than the ketoconazole treatment from the extension of shampoo-exposure time. In conclusion, the benefit of a residence time in treating dandruff is documented. The level of improvement in efficacy may vary according to the nature of the shampoo.

  16. Effect of residence time on the efficacy of antidandruff shampoos.

    PubMed

    Piérard-Franchimont, C; Uhoda, E; Loussouarn, G; Saint-Léger, D; Piérard, G E

    2003-12-01

    Dandruff is known to be controlled by fungistatic shampoos active against Malassezia spp. These products also remove the loosely attached scales. This study was performed to assess the effect of a 5-min residence time on the efficacy of antidandruff shampoos. Two commercially available shampoos were used in two groups of 21 panelists with severe dandruff. They contained either 1% ketoconazole or 1% piroctone olamine. In each group, intraindividual comparisons were made by a split-scalp design between the effect of a 5-min residence time versus no residence time. Both shampoos induced significant reductions in scaliness and yeast colonization. The beneficial effects were obvious immediately after one single shampooing and 3 days later as well. The improvement was greater with a 5-min residence time. The piroctone olamine treatment benefited more than the ketoconazole treatment from the extension of shampoo-exposure time. In conclusion, the benefit of a residence time in treating dandruff is documented. The level of improvement in efficacy may vary according to the nature of the shampoo. PMID:18494909

  17. Variable residence time vortex combustor

    DOEpatents

    Melconian, Jerry O.

    1987-01-01

    A variable residence time vortex combustor including a primary combustion chamber for containing a combustion vortex, and a plurality of louvres peripherally disposed about the primary combustion chamber and longitudinally distributed along its primary axis. The louvres are inclined to impel air about the primary combustion chamber to cool its interior surfaces and to impel air inwardly to assist in driving the combustion vortex in a first rotational direction and to feed combustion in the primary combustion chamber. The vortex combustor also includes a second combustion chamber having a secondary zone and a narrowed waist region in the primary combustion chamber interconnecting the output of the primary combustion chamber with the secondary zone for passing only lower density particles and trapping higher density particles in the combustion vortex in the primary combustion chamber for substantial combustion.

  18. Women residents, women physicians and medicine's future.

    PubMed

    Serrano, Karen

    2007-08-01

    The number of women in medicine has increased dramatically in the last few decades, and women now represent half of all incoming medical students. Yet residency training still resembles the historical model when there were few women in medicine. This article reviews the issues facing women in residency today. Data suggest that the experience of female residents is more negative than that of males. Unique challenges facing female residents include the existence of gender bias and sexual harassment, a scarcity of female mentors in leadership positions, and work/family conflicts. Further research is needed to understand the experience of female residents and to identify barriers that hinder their optimal professional and personal development. Structural and cultural changes to residency programs are needed to better accommodate the needs of female trainees.

  19. Women residents, women physicians and medicine's future.

    PubMed

    Serrano, Karen

    2007-08-01

    The number of women in medicine has increased dramatically in the last few decades, and women now represent half of all incoming medical students. Yet residency training still resembles the historical model when there were few women in medicine. This article reviews the issues facing women in residency today. Data suggest that the experience of female residents is more negative than that of males. Unique challenges facing female residents include the existence of gender bias and sexual harassment, a scarcity of female mentors in leadership positions, and work/family conflicts. Further research is needed to understand the experience of female residents and to identify barriers that hinder their optimal professional and personal development. Structural and cultural changes to residency programs are needed to better accommodate the needs of female trainees. PMID:17874672

  20. Community-based advocacy training: applying asset-based community development in resident education.

    PubMed

    Hufford, Laura; West, Daniel C; Paterniti, Debora A; Pan, Richard J

    2009-06-01

    Communities and Physicians Together (CPT) at University of California, Davis Health System provides a novel approach to teaching residents to be effective community advocates. Founded in 1999, CPT is a partnership between a pediatric residency program, five community collaboratives located in diverse neighborhoods, and a grassroots child advocacy organization. Using the principles of Asset-Based Community Development, the program emphasizes establishing partnerships with community members and organizations to improve child health and identifies community assets and building capacity. Community members function as the primary faculty for CPT.The authors describe the CPT curriculum, which teaches residents to build partnerships with their assigned community. Residents have three, two-week blocks each year for CPT activities and maintain a longitudinal relationship with their community. In the first year, collaborative coordinators from each community orient residents to their community. Residents identify community assets and perform activities designed to provide them with a community member's perspective. In the second and third years, residents partner with community members and organizations to implement a project to improve the health of children in that community. CPT also provides faculty development to community partners including a workshop on medical culture and resident life. A qualitative evaluation demonstrated residents' attitudes of their role as pediatricians in the community changed with CPT.CPT is unique because it provides a model of service learning that emphasizes identifying and utilizing strengths and building capacity. This approach differs from the traditional medical model, which emphasizes deficits and needs. PMID:19474556

  1. Pain Management Among Nursing Home Residents with Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Pimentel, Camilla B.; Briesacher, Becky A.; Gurwitz, Jerry H.; Rosen, Allison B.; Pimentel, Marc T.; Lapane, Kate L.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND In the mid-1990s, 29.4% of nursing home (NH) residents with cancer suffered from daily pain, and among them 26% failed to receive any analgesics. OBJECTIVES To assess improvements in pain management of NH residents with cancer since the implementation of pain management quality indicators. DESIGN Cross-sectional study. SETTING 1,382 US NHs. PARTICIPANTS 8,094 newly-admitted, Medicare-eligible NH residents with cancer. MEASUREMENTS Nationwide data on NH resident health from the Minimum Data Set 2.0 linked to all-payer pharmacy dispensing records (February 2006–June 2007) were used to determine prevalence of pain, including frequency and intensity, and receipt of non-opioid and opioid analgesics. Multinomial logistic regression evaluated resident-level correlates of pain and binomial logistic regression identified correlates of untreated pain. RESULTS More than 65% of NH residents with cancer had any pain (28.3% daily, 37.3% less than daily), among whom 13.5% had severe and 61.3% had moderate pain. Women, residents admitted from acute care or who were bedfast, and those with compromised activities of daily living, depressed mood, indwelling catheter, or terminal prognosis were more likely to have pain. More than 17% of residents in daily pain (95% confidence interval [CI]: 16.0–19.1%) received no analgesics, including 11.7% with daily severe pain (95% CI: 8.9–14.5%) and 16.9% with daily moderate pain (95% CI: 15.1–18.8%). Treatment was negatively associated with age >85 years (adjusted odds ratio [aOR]=0.67, 95% CI: 0.55–0.81 versus aged 65–74), cognitive impairment (aOR=0.71, 95% CI: 0.61–0.82), presence of feeding tube (aOR=0.77, 95% CI: 0.60–0.99), and restraints (aOR=0.50, 95% CI: 0.31–0.82). CONCLUSION Untreated pain is still common among NH residents with cancer and persists despite pain management quality indicators. PMID:25900481

  2. 42 CFR 415.202 - Services of residents not in approved GME programs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ..., SUPERVISING PHYSICIANS IN TEACHING SETTINGS, AND RESIDENTS IN CERTAIN SETTINGS Services of Residents § 415.202... by a hospital who is authorized to practice only in a hospital setting and for the services of a... administrative costs related to teaching activities of physicians....

  3. 28 CFR 115.378 - Interventions and disciplinary sanctions for residents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... process shall consider whether a resident's mental disabilities or mental illness contributed to his or... isolation shall receive daily visits from a medical or mental health care clinician. Residents shall also... determines that the activity is not coerced. Medical and Mental Care...

  4. 28 CFR 115.378 - Interventions and disciplinary sanctions for residents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... process shall consider whether a resident's mental disabilities or mental illness contributed to his or... isolation shall receive daily visits from a medical or mental health care clinician. Residents shall also... determines that the activity is not coerced. Medical and Mental Care...

  5. 28 CFR 115.378 - Interventions and disciplinary sanctions for residents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... process shall consider whether a resident's mental disabilities or mental illness contributed to his or... isolation shall receive daily visits from a medical or mental health care clinician. Residents shall also... determines that the activity is not coerced. Medical and Mental Care...

  6. Effectiveness of Advanced Illness Care Teams for Nursing Home Residents with Dementia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chapman, Dennis G.; Toseland, Ronald W.

    2007-01-01

    This study evaluated the effectiveness of advanced illness care teams (AICTs) for nursing home residents with advanced dementia. The AICTs used a holistic approach that focused on four domains: (1) medical, (2) meaningful activities, (3) psychological, and (4) behavioral. The authors recruited 118 residents in two nursing homes for this study and…

  7. Culture Change in Long-Term Care: Participatory Action Research and the Role of the Resident

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shura, Robin; Siders, Rebecca A.; Dannefer, Dale

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: This study's purpose was to advance the process of culture change within long-term care (LTC) and assisted living settings by using participatory action research (PAR) to promote residents' competence and nourish the culture change process with the active engagement and leadership of residents. Design and Methods: Seven unit-specific PAR…

  8. A case-based approach for teaching professionalism to residents with online discussions

    PubMed Central

    NADEAU, MARK T.; TYSINGER, JAMES; WIEMERS, MARCY

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Programs must demonstrate that their residents are taught and assessed in professionalism. Most programs struggle with finding viable ways to teach and assess this critical competency. UTHSCSA Family and Community Medicine Residency developed an innovative option for interactive learning and assessment of residents in this competency which would be transferrable to other programs and specialties. Methods The innovative approach uses an asynchronous online format on Blackboard. Threaded discussions on Blackboard require thoughtful reflective writing after case assessment and critical evaluation of other resident posts. Participation, content and progress of all resident postings are monitored by administrative staff and faculty. Faculty can further engage the residents at any point to deepen the discussion and learning. Results 100% of all senior residents attained the required learning objectives. All were actively engaged in the assignments. Six cases have been developed using a Learning Matrix to demonstrate evaluation areas from the specialty specific competencies. Written feedback from residents verified the validity of case content in context of their current clinical practice. Postings by residents have provided value and insight for the faculty to access the professional development of our Family Medicine residents.  The Clinical Competency Committee evaluates all third year residents using this information specific to the professionalism milestones. By using an asynchronous online approach to case discussion, all residents are involved with all aspects of this curriculum. Conclusions More specific measurable learning outcomes are possible using this approach. Resident participation and engagement is easier to track and monitor than a lecture-based format and easier to capture valuable data than relying on evaluation feedback. Our Annual Review process will identify areas for improvement in the existing cases and help create supplemental cases

  9. Who's in Our Neighborhood? Healthcare Disparities Experiential Education for Residents

    PubMed Central

    Patow, Carl; Bryan, Debra; Johnson, Gail; Canaan, Eugenia; Oyewo, Adetolu; Panda, Mukta; Walsh, Eric; Zaidan, James

    2016-01-01

    Background: Residents and fellows frequently care for patients from diverse populations but often have limited familiarity with the cultural preferences and social determinants that contribute to the health of their patients and communities. Faculty physicians at academic health centers are increasingly interested in incorporating the topics of cultural diversity and healthcare disparities into experiential education activities; however, examples have not been readily available. In this report, we describe a variety of experiential education models that were developed to improve resident and fellow physician understanding of cultural diversity and healthcare disparities. Methods: Experiential education, an educational philosophy that infuses direct experience with the learning environment and content, is an effective adult learning method. This report summarizes the experiences of multiple sponsors of Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education–accredited residency and fellowship programs that used experiential education to inform residents about cultural diversity and healthcare disparities. The 9 innovative experiential education activities described were selected to demonstrate a wide range of complexity, resource requirements, and community engagement and to stimulate further creativity and innovation in educational design. Results: Each of the 9 models is characterized by residents' active participation and varies in length from minutes to months. In general, the communities in which these models were deployed were urban centers with diverse populations. Various formats were used to introduce targeted learners to the populations and communities they serve. Measures of educational and clinical outcomes for these early innovations and pilot programs are not available. Conclusion: The breadth of the types of activities described suggests that a wide latitude is available to organizations in creating experiential education programs that reflect their

  10. Resident guide to advocacy in dermatology.

    PubMed

    Park, Kelly K

    2015-12-01

    Many opportunities exist for residents to get involved in advocacy in dermatology, from national to grassroots levels. Residents also should be aware of opportunities to get involved in patient advocacy and become familiar with the myriad of patient advocacy groups that exist. These groups offer support and education for patients and initiate research efforts for specific dermatologic conditions that provide support for patients beyond what can be offered during a standard office visit. The value of resident involvement in advocacy also is discussed.

  11. Putting Residents First: Strategies Developed by CNAs to Prevent and Manage Resident-to-Resident Violence in Nursing Homes

    PubMed Central

    Snellgrove, Susan; Beck, Cornelia; Green, Angela; McSweeney, Jean C.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose of the Study: Resident-to-resident violence (RRV) in nursing homes (NHs) is common and threatens the safety and quality of life of both residents and caregivers. The purpose of this portion of a larger qualitative study was to explore strategies developed by certified nurses’ assistants (CNAs) to prevent and manage RRV in NHs. Design and Methods: Semistructured interviews were used to collect data. Data were analyzed utilizing content analysis and constant comparison. Results: Analysis revealed one overriding theme, “Putting Residents First” which the CNAs described as a conscious effort to put themselves or a beloved family member in the place of the resident while administering care. Within this theme, there were three related subthemes: (a) Knowing the Residents, (b) Keeping Residents Safe, and (c) Spending Quality Time. Implications: Together, these themes suggest that the formulation of strategies for decreasing and managing RRV was influenced significantly by the ability of the CNAs to empathize with the residents for whom they were caring. The results indicate that in the absence of evidence-based interventions, CNAs have developed their own strategies for the management and prevention of RRV. These strategies may provide a foundation for the development and testing of interventions aimed at preventing and managing RRV in NHs. PMID:26055786

  12. [Contribution of emergency medicine by neurologists in the western countries: residency training is the key].

    PubMed

    Nodera, Hiroyuki

    2013-01-01

    Neurologists in the United States actively involve in neurological emergency. Two factors have enabled such active contribution: (1) US residency training programs in neurology focus on management of neurological emergency as their initial training aims. Junior residents receive many lectures in emergent neurology in the initial month. (2) The numbers of the faculty members in neurology department in the US teaching hospitals are much more than those in Japan, such that each faculty member can share the teaching activities. Although the US teaching and residency systems in neurological emergency cannot be directly imported to Japan, devotion to emergency care in neurological diseases by neurologists should be incorporated into management and education in Japan.

  13. "Walkable by Willpower": resident perceptions of neighbourhood environments.

    PubMed

    Montemurro, Genevieve R; Berry, Tanya R; Spence, John C; Nykiforuk, Candace; Blanchard, Chris; Cutumisu, Nicoleta

    2011-07-01

    Resident perceptions of neighbourhood walkability, physical activity opportunities, food choice and factors influencing choice of neighbourhood were examined through focus group discussion in higher and lower walkability neighbourhoods. Almost all participants perceived their neighbourhoods as very or reasonably walkable with high food choice. Walking was described as primarily leisure or exercise focused and less frequently as destination or task-oriented. Factors influencing walking and physical activity included connectivity, path quality, weather and traffic. The ability to drive easily was a key factor in neighbourhood choice. Our findings identified important environmental factors perceived by residents as either positively or negatively influencing behaviour related to physical activity and food choice. Future research should examine the relationship between perceived and actual walkability features as well as residential selection. PMID:21600835

  14. Radiation oncology residents' computer workstation.

    PubMed

    Zusag, T W; McDonald, S; Miller, A; Purdy, J A; Rubin, P

    1992-01-01

    We are investigating the feasibility of using the Macintosh computer as a workstation platform for radiation oncology residents because of its ease of use, graphics capability, and low cost. Hypercard was chosen as the programming environment because it easily mixes graphics, text, and control functions in an integrated screen display. Furthermore, it results in a system that can be relatively easily extended and customized by individual users with varying degrees of computer skills. We have developed several software modules in order to test the ability of this environment to support the demands of such a workstation. Modules created thus far include various clinical physics aids and tutorials, treatment planning guides, oncology databases, and others. The software runs on all Macintosh configurations, but calculation speeds are improved when a 68020 or greater processor is used. In general, we have been pleased with the implementation thus far. Graphics display capability is good, but design and entry of graphics have proved labor-intensive. Searching is fast and text is easily entered and manipulated. Finished modules can be customized with minimal computer training, but implementing complex new functions requires familiarity with Hypercard's programming language. New modules, once developed, are easily integrated into the workstation universe, suggesting that cooperative development of the workstation by multiple contributors is realistically achievable. PMID:1727112

  15. Radiation oncology residents' computer workstation.

    PubMed

    Zusag, T W; McDonald, S; Miller, A; Purdy, J A; Rubin, P

    1992-01-01

    We are investigating the feasibility of using the Macintosh computer as a workstation platform for radiation oncology residents because of its ease of use, graphics capability, and low cost. Hypercard was chosen as the programming environment because it easily mixes graphics, text, and control functions in an integrated screen display. Furthermore, it results in a system that can be relatively easily extended and customized by individual users with varying degrees of computer skills. We have developed several software modules in order to test the ability of this environment to support the demands of such a workstation. Modules created thus far include various clinical physics aids and tutorials, treatment planning guides, oncology databases, and others. The software runs on all Macintosh configurations, but calculation speeds are improved when a 68020 or greater processor is used. In general, we have been pleased with the implementation thus far. Graphics display capability is good, but design and entry of graphics have proved labor-intensive. Searching is fast and text is easily entered and manipulated. Finished modules can be customized with minimal computer training, but implementing complex new functions requires familiarity with Hypercard's programming language. New modules, once developed, are easily integrated into the workstation universe, suggesting that cooperative development of the workstation by multiple contributors is realistically achievable.

  16. Current Practices in Resident Assistant Training

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koch, Virginia Albaneso

    2016-01-01

    Developing resident assistant (RA) training is a challenge for most housing and residence life staff. Grounded in the author's doctoral research on the curricular design of RA training programs, this study summarizes current practices in three types of RA training programs--preservice training, in-service training, and academic courses--and…

  17. Arthroscopic training resources in orthopedic resident education.

    PubMed

    Koehler, Ryan; John, Tamara; Lawler, Jeffrey; Moorman, Claude; Nicandri, Gregg

    2015-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the frequency of use, perceived effectiveness, and preference for arthroscopic surgical skill training resources. An electronic survey was sent to orthopedics residents, residency program directors, and orthopedic sports medicine attending physicians in the United States. The frequency and perceived effectiveness of 10 types of adjunctive arthroscopic skills training was assessed. Residents and faculty members were asked to rate their confidence in resident ability to perform common arthroscopic procedures. Surveys were completed by 40 of 152 (26.3%) orthopedic residency program directors, 70 of 426 (16.4%) sports medicine faculty, and 235 of 3,170 (7.4%) orthopedic residents. The use of adjunctive methods of training varied from only 9.8% of programs with virtual reality training to 80.5% of programs that used reading of published materials to develop arthroscopic skill. Practice on cadaveric specimens was viewed as the most effective and preferred adjunctive method of training. Residents trained on cadaveric specimens reported increased confidence in their ability to perform arthroscopic procedures. The resources for developing arthroscopic surgical skill vary considerably across orthopedic residency programs in the United States. Adjunctive training methods were perceived to be effective at supplementing traditional training in the operating room.

  18. 28 CFR 115.351 - Resident reporting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Resident reporting. 115.351 Section 115.351 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE (CONTINUED) PRISON RAPE ELIMINATION ACT NATIONAL STANDARDS Standards for Juvenile Facilities Reporting § 115.351 Resident reporting. (a) The agency...

  19. 28 CFR 115.351 - Resident reporting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Resident reporting. 115.351 Section 115.351 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE (CONTINUED) PRISON RAPE ELIMINATION ACT NATIONAL STANDARDS Standards for Juvenile Facilities Reporting § 115.351 Resident reporting. (a) The agency...

  20. 28 CFR 115.251 - Resident reporting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Resident reporting. 115.251 Section 115.251 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE (CONTINUED) PRISON RAPE ELIMINATION ACT NATIONAL STANDARDS Standards for Community Confinement Facilities Reporting § 115.251 Resident reporting. (a)...

  1. 28 CFR 115.351 - Resident reporting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Resident reporting. 115.351 Section 115.351 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE (CONTINUED) PRISON RAPE ELIMINATION ACT NATIONAL STANDARDS Standards for Juvenile Facilities Reporting § 115.351 Resident reporting. (a) The agency...

  2. 28 CFR 115.251 - Resident reporting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Resident reporting. 115.251 Section 115.251 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE (CONTINUED) PRISON RAPE ELIMINATION ACT NATIONAL STANDARDS Standards for Community Confinement Facilities Reporting § 115.251 Resident reporting. (a)...

  3. 28 CFR 115.251 - Resident reporting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Resident reporting. 115.251 Section 115.251 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE (CONTINUED) PRISON RAPE ELIMINATION ACT NATIONAL STANDARDS Standards for Community Confinement Facilities Reporting § 115.251 Resident reporting. (a)...

  4. Delinking resident duty hours from patient safety.

    PubMed

    Osborne, Roisin; Parshuram, Christopher S

    2014-01-01

    Patient safety is a powerful motivating force for change in modern medicine, and is often cited as a rationale for reducing resident duty hours. However, current data suggest that resident duty hours are not significantly linked to important patient outcomes. We performed a narrative review and identified four potential explanations for these findings. First, we question the relevance of resident fatigue in the creation of harmful errors. Second, we discuss factors, including workload, experience, and individual characteristics, that may be more important determinants of resident fatigue than are duty hours. Third, we describe potential adverse effects that may arise from--and, therefore, counterbalance any potential benefits of--duty hour reductions. Fourth, we explore factors that may mitigate any risks to patient safety associated with using the services of resident trainees. In summary, it may be inappropriate to justify a reduction in working hours on the grounds of a presumed linkage between patient safety and resident duty hours. Better understanding of resident-related factors associated with patient safety will be essential if improvements in important patient safety outcomes are to be realized through resident-focused strategies. PMID:25561349

  5. Teaching Forensic Psychiatry to General Psychiatry Residents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, Catherine F.

    2004-01-01

    Objective: The Accreditation Council on Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) requires that general psychiatry residency training programs provide trainees with exposure to forensic psychiatry. Limited information is available on how to develop a core curriculum in forensic psychiatry for general psychiatry residents and few articles have been…

  6. Residence Hall Furnishings Top 20 List.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tampke, Dale

    1999-01-01

    Provides advice on how to best meet the furniture needs of student residents now and in the future to ensure their privacy and value from the residence hall experience. Twenty tips are highlighted that include considering fire safety, upholstering, lifecycle costs, input from stakeholders, the Americans with Disabilities Act, comfort, lighting,…

  7. Medical Decision-Making by Psychiatry Residents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    El-Mallakh, Rif; Zinner, Jill; Mackey, Amanda; Tamas, Rebecca L.; Martin, Chanley M.; Dalton, Jerad; Dhaliwal, Nitu; Luddington, Nicole; Numan, Farhad U.; Nunes, Ross; Taylor, Stephen; Ye, Lu

    2007-01-01

    Objective: Several conspiring factors have resulted in an increase in the level of medical burden in psychiatric patients. Psychiatry residents require increasing levels of medical sophistication. To assess the medical decision-making of psychiatry residents, the authors examined the outcome in subjects initially seen in the emergency psychiatric…

  8. A Sexuality Curriculum for Gynecology Residents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levine, Stephen B.; And Others

    1978-01-01

    The summary report of an educational research program conducted with the obstetrics and gynecology residents at University Hospitals of Cleveland in 1976 is presented. The goals were to provide residents with basic knowledge about female sexual problems, assess skill and comfort in interviewing patients with sexual problems, document the effects…

  9. Study of Teaching Residents How to Teach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edwards, Janine C.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    The effectiveness of a teaching skills program for residents at Louisiana State University Medical Center was evaluated among 22 residents in obstetrics and gynecology, medicine, and family medicine who were randomly assigned to control and experimental groups. There was greater increase in the scores of the experimental than the control groups.…

  10. Accommodating to Restrictions on Residents' Working Hours.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foster, Henry W., Jr.; Seltzer, Vicki L.

    1991-01-01

    In response to New York State legislation limiting house staff working hours, a survey of obstetrics and gynecology resident programs (n=26) was conducted. Results were used to construct a prototype call schedule and a hypothetical monthly schedule indicating how a single resident would function without violating any state regulations. (MSE)

  11. Psychiatry Residency Training around the World

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zisook, Sidney; Balon, Richard; Bjorksten, Karin S.; Everall, Ian; Dunn, Laura; Ganadjian, Krauz; Jin, Hua; Parikh, Sagar; Sciolla, Andres; Sidhartha, Tanuj; Yoo, Tai

    2007-01-01

    Objective: The authors compare and contrast psychiatry residency training in the United States to that in Canada and selected countries in South America, Europe, and Asia. Method: Nine individuals who are intimately familiar with psychiatry residency training in the United States (primarily chairs, training directors, associate training directors,…

  12. Resident Performance and Sleep Deprivation: A Review.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Asken, Michael J.; Raham, David C.

    1983-01-01

    A review of the literature on resident performance and sleep deprivation suggests that current research is sparse and inconclusive, and existing research suggests potentially severe negative effects. It is proposed that justifications for sleep-depriving night call schedules remain untested, and their use as part of residency training should be…

  13. 42 CFR 436.403 - State residence.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... “foster care homes”, licensed as set forth in 45 CFR 1355.20, and providing food, shelter and supportive... Social Security Act, the State of residence is the State where the child lives. (g) Individuals under age... determined in accordance with 45 CFR 233.40, the rules governing residence under the AFDC program. (4)...

  14. 42 CFR 436.403 - State residence.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... “foster care homes”, licensed as set forth in 45 CFR 1355.20, and providing food, shelter and supportive... Social Security Act, the State of residence is the State where the child lives. (g) Individuals under age... determined in accordance with 45 CFR 233.40, the rules governing residence under the AFDC program. (4)...

  15. 42 CFR 436.403 - State residence.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... “foster care homes”, licensed as set forth in 45 CFR 1355.20, and providing food, shelter and supportive... Social Security Act, the State of residence is the State where the child lives. (g) Individuals under age... determined in accordance with 45 CFR 233.40, the rules governing residence under the AFDC program. (4)...

  16. 42 CFR 435.403 - State residence.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... State placement, the term also includes foster care homes, licensed as set forth in 45 CFR 1355.20, and... Act, the State of residence is the State where the child lives. (h) Individuals under Age 21. (1) For... accordance with 45 CFR 233.40, the rules governing residence under the AFDC program. (4) For...

  17. 42 CFR 435.403 - State residence.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... State placement, the term also includes foster care homes, licensed as set forth in 45 CFR 1355.20, and... Act, the State of residence is the State where the child lives. (h) Individuals under Age 21. (1) For... accordance with 45 CFR 233.40, the rules governing residence under the AFDC program. (4) For...

  18. 42 CFR 436.403 - State residence.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... “foster care homes”, licensed as set forth in 45 CFR 1355.20, and providing food, shelter and supportive... Social Security Act, the State of residence is the State where the child lives. (g) Individuals under age... determined in accordance with 45 CFR 233.40, the rules governing residence under the AFDC program. (4)...

  19. 42 CFR 435.403 - State residence.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... State placement, the term also includes foster care homes, licensed as set forth in 45 CFR 1355.20, and... Act, the State of residence is the State where the child lives. (h) Individuals under Age 21. (1) For... accordance with 45 CFR 233.40, the rules governing residence under the AFDC program. (4) For...

  20. 42 CFR 436.403 - State residence.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... “foster care homes”, licensed as set forth in 45 CFR 1355.20, and providing food, shelter and supportive... Social Security Act, the State of residence is the State where the child lives. (g) Individuals under age... determined in accordance with 45 CFR 233.40, the rules governing residence under the AFDC program. (4)...

  1. A Clinical Evaluation System for Anesthesiology Residents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Viets, J. L.; Foster, Scot D.

    1988-01-01

    Baylor College of Medicine's system for evaluating the clinical progress of anesthesiology residents, developed in response to problems of standards, staff cooperation, and student dissatisfaction with evaluation, assesses resident progress in terms of performance levels based on case complexity and degree of staff intervention. (Author/MSE)

  2. 19th Annual Residence Hall Construction Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Agron, Joe

    2008-01-01

    The construction of residence hall facilities at colleges and universities continues to be strong, as institutions scramble to meet the housing needs and varied demands of a growing student population. This article presents data collected from 39 new residence hall projects completed in 2007. According to American School & University's 19th annual…

  3. 20th Annual Residence Hall Construction Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Agron, Joe

    2009-01-01

    Even in difficult economic times, colleges and universities continue to invest in residence hall construction projects as a way to attract new students and keep existing ones on campus. According to data from "American School & University"'s 20th annual Residence Hall Construction Report, the median new project completed in 2008 was less expensive…

  4. Factor Structure of the Resident Evaluation Form.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Forsythe, George B.; And Others

    1985-01-01

    The Resident Evaluation Form (REF) was developed to assess resident physicians' clinical performance. This research sought to empirically evaluate the intuitively derived REF scales representing areas of clinical performance: interpersonal ability, cognitive ability, clinical skills, and professional attributes. Analysis yielded cognitive…

  5. Residents as Educators: A Modern Model.

    PubMed

    Kensinger, Clark D; McMaster, William G; Vella, Michael A; Sexton, Kevin W; Snyder, Rebecca A; Terhune, Kyla P

    2015-01-01

    Education during surgical residency has changed significantly. As part of the shifting landscape, the importance of an organized and structured curriculum has increased. However, establishing this is often difficult secondary to clinical demands and pressure both on faculty and residents. We present a peer-assisted learning model for academic institutions without professional non-clinical educations. The "resident as educator" (RAE) model empowers residents to be the organizers of the education curriculum. RAE is built on a culture of commitment to education, skill development and team building, allowing the upper level residents to develop and execute the curriculum. Several modules designed to address junior level residents and medical students' educational needs have been implemented, including (1) intern boot camp, (2) summer school, (3) technical skill sessions, (4) trauma orientation, (5) weekly teaching conferences, and (4) a fourth year medical student surgical preparation course. Promoting residents as educators leads to an overall benefit for the program by being cost-effective and time-efficient, while simultaneously promoting professional development of residents and a culture of education. PMID:26143515

  6. Home visits in family medicine residency

    PubMed Central

    Jakubovicz, Difat; Srivastava, Anita

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Problem addressed There has been a decline in family physicians providing home visits to housebound patients. Objective of program To increase family medicine residents’ exposure to home visits; their comfort and skills in providing home visits; and their willingness to provide home visits after graduation. Program description Between 2000 and 2010, each family practice resident at St Joseph’s Health Centre Family Medicine Teaching Unit in Toronto, Ont, was assigned at least 1 housebound patient to care for longitudinally over 2 years; the rationale for this was to increase the sense of “ownership” and responsibility among residents for their assigned homebound patients. Starting in 2003, until the program’s conclusion in 2010, residents were asked to fill out surveys before and after the program to assess their comfort with and confidence in providing home visits, as well as their satisfaction with the program. Survey responses were analyzed for changes over the course of residency training. A total of 85 residents completed the home visit teaching program between 2003 and 2010 inclusive. Conclusion While residents’ willingness to provide home visits did not increase over the course of residency, their confidence in making housecalls did increase. There was also a trend toward increased confidence among residents in working with community agencies. Thus, having home visit patients be a part of resident practices might play an important role in increasing the likelihood that future family physicians will continue to care for their patients when those patients are no longer ambulatory. PMID:26052599

  7. Adult neurology training during child neurology residency.

    PubMed

    Schor, Nina F

    2012-08-21

    As it is currently configured, completion of child neurology residency requires performance of 12 months of training in adult neurology. Exploration of whether or not this duration of training in adult neurology is appropriate for what child neurology is today must take into account the initial reasons for this requirement and the goals of adult neurology training during child neurology residency.

  8. Peer Counselor Training for Nursing Home Residents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scharlach, Andrew E.

    1988-01-01

    Designed model program designed to increase social support for newly admitted nursing home residents through a structured program of peer counseling. Found residents (N=15) receiving peer counseling improved somewhat on measures of social conditioning; peer counselors (N=15) improved with regard to appearance and grooming. (Author/ABL)

  9. 19 CFR 141.38 - Resident corporations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Resident corporations. 141.38 Section 141.38 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) ENTRY OF MERCHANDISE Powers of Attorney § 141.38 Resident corporations. A power...

  10. 19 CFR 141.38 - Resident corporations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Resident corporations. 141.38 Section 141.38 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) ENTRY OF MERCHANDISE Powers of Attorney § 141.38 Resident corporations. A power...

  11. 19 CFR 141.38 - Resident corporations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Resident corporations. 141.38 Section 141.38 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) ENTRY OF MERCHANDISE Powers of Attorney § 141.38 Resident corporations. A power...

  12. 19 CFR 141.38 - Resident corporations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Resident corporations. 141.38 Section 141.38 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) ENTRY OF MERCHANDISE Powers of Attorney § 141.38 Resident corporations. A power...

  13. Selected Health Practices Among Ohio's Rural Residents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phillips, G. Howard; Pugh, Albert

    Using a stratified random sample of 12 of Ohio's 88 counties, this 1967 study had as its objectives (1) to measure the level of participation in selected health practices by Ohio's rural residents, (2) to compare the level of participation in selected health practices of farm and rural nonfarm residents, and (3) to examine levels of participation…

  14. The Social Ecology of University Student Residences.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gerst, Marvin S.; Moos, Rudolf H.

    The development, initial standardization and substantive data of the University Residence Environment Scale (URES) is presented. The URES is a true-false perceived environment scale composed of 10 subscales (e.g., affiliation, innovation) which discriminates among the 74 student residences in the current norm group. The URES has high internal…

  15. [MENTORING PROGRAM - ANOTHER FACET OF RESIDENT EDUCATION].

    PubMed

    Fishman, Ami; Kenet, Ron; Biron-Shental, Tal

    2015-08-01

    Medical residents are exposed to physical and emotional pressure and are required to cope with numerous demands during long working hours. Often, the intense workload leads to neglect of possible difficulties and professional and personal growth and empowerment. The Mentoring Program provides each resident with an attending physician mentor to help him or her adjust to the residency and to cope with its demands. The mentor guides the resident in career development and provides support in the event of difficulties. Attending physicians received professional guidance in the objectives and meaning of mentorship and were teamed with residents. The residents completed questionnaires regarding satisfaction and self-confidence before and a year after the mentoring program was established. The program significantly increased their feelings of support, confidence and satisfaction. As the program continued, the mentors' role in guiding the residents was expanded. The Mentoring Program has become an integral part of departmental teaching and team communication. It seems that the mentors, the residents and the department, all benefit from the program. PMID:26480614

  16. Putting "Rural" into Psychiatry Residency Training Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nelson, William A.; Pomerantz, Andrew; Schwartz, Jonathan

    2007-01-01

    Objective: Evidence indicates disparities in the number of psychiatrists practicing in rural America compared to urban areas suggesting the need for a greater emphasis on rural psychiatry in residency training programs. The authors offer suggestions for integrating a rural focus in psychiatry residency training to foster greater competency and…

  17. Suicide Intervention Skills among Japanese Medical Residents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fujisawa, Daisuke; Suzuki, Yuriko; Kato, Takahiro A.; Hashimoto, Naoki; Sato, Ryoko; Aoyama-Uehara, Kumi; Fukasawa, Maiko; Tomita, Masayuki; Watanabe, Koichiro; Kashima, Haruo; Otsuka, Kotaro

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: Patient suicide is a tragic occurrence, and it can be a demoralizing experience for medical residents. Few studies, however, have assessed suicide management skills among these front-line healthcare professionals. This study evaluated the self-assessed competence and confidence of medical residents with regard to the management of…

  18. Community Residences for Mentally Retarded People: A Study of Seven Community Residences.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wehbring, Kurt; Ogren, Ciele

    The report describes the distinctive characteristics and styles of seven community residences for retarded children or adults and provides a comparative analysis with emphasis on common themes of successful group homes. The homes are compared in terms of original initiation of the residence; the development of the residence; operations (such as…

  19. Can resident-centred inspection of nursing homes work with very sick residents?

    PubMed

    Braithwaite, J; Makkai, T

    1993-04-01

    This paper seeks to address the issue of whether a resident-centred inspection process can be effective in a nursing home environment dominated by residents who require high levels of care. Two fundamental criticisms of the current Australian monitoring process are its reliance on standards that are subjective resident-centred standards and its reliance on the views of residents concerning the quality of care provided in the home. These criticisms are becoming all the more important as survival rates for the aged increase and the average level of disability of nursing home residents continues to worsen. Our data suggest that the resident-centred process, despite some difficulties, is both reliable and practical, regardless of the care needs of residents in the home. Data collected from inspection teams show that inspectors use a variety of sources to validate information, with residents being one component. These sources vary little in importance between homes with different levels of care needs or behavioural problems. Perhaps of more importance is the finding that a home's overall performance across 31 resident-centred standards is not affected by either the home's average level of total care needs or the number of residents with severe behavioural problems. There are some significant effects (in both directions) of resident disability on compliance with particular standards. Most notable is the finding that the standard requiring appropriate use of restraint is less likely to be met when there are large numbers of residents with high levels of disability or behavioural problems.

  20. Improving kidney care for residents in nursing facilities: a national model.

    PubMed

    Neumann, Mark E

    2016-02-01

    The RRC Staff Assisted Home Hemodialysis Program started in September 2013 with the target of improving care for the frail elderly residents in skilled facilities by offering hemodialysis in their home setting. Residents all receive short time, frequent dialysis. The residents no longer need to be transported to a local dialysis center three times per week in all types of weather and subject to long waits by the transport company. In addition, Medicare/Medicaid save significant dollars on transportation expenses. Residents needing rehabilitation services can receive their therapy while their dialysis schedule is adjusted around the resident's therapy. Residents no longer miss meals and medications or family visits. Collaboration between RRC and the skilled facility is patient centric whereby the care of each patient is consistent and individualized. The most meaningful measure of the success of this program is the residents themselves. They have self-reported how much better they feel with more energy. The residents can increase their socialization activities within the skilled facility. The dietitians report that the residents are eating better because there are fewer restrictions on foods and fluids. PMID:26983182

  1. [Part-time residency training in Israel].

    PubMed

    Fishbain, Dana; Levi, Baruch; Borow, Malke; Ashkenazi, Shai; Lindner, Arie

    2012-08-01

    Full-time work has long been perceived as a cornerstone of medical residency, the consensus being that a resident must apply the bulk of his time and attention to his professional training. Demographic and cultural changes that have taken place over the last several years, specifically the rise in the number of female doctors and the importance of leisure time to the younger generation, have intensified the need to find new and innovative ways to deal with the plight of the resident population. One idea, already in effect in many Western countries, is the institution of part-time residency programs. The possibility of fulfilling residency requirements on a part-time basis is intended to assist medical residents in integrating their professional development with their personal and family life, without compromising the quality of their training. A number of research studies conducted over the last several years in countries that allow part-time residency, among them the United States, England and Switzerland, aimed to examine the quality of part-time training. The various studies evinced a high level of satisfaction from the program both by the residents themselves and their supervisors, and in many aspects those doing residency part-time received higher appraisals than their full-time colleagues. Some of the residents polled noted that they would have totally foregone the practice of medicine had there not been an option to complete residency part-time. In light of the experience throughout the world and the changing landscape in Israel, the Scientific Council of the Israeli Medical Association decided to examine the issue and its various aspects, and weighed all the considerations in favor and against part-time residency. Recently, the Scientific Council approved the launch of a pilot program to allow part-time residency in several fields that were carefully selected according to specific criteria. Once the Ministry of Health completes the LegisLation process, part

  2. Mentorship and pursuit of academic medicine careers: a mixed methods study of residents from diverse backgrounds

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Mentorship influences career planning, academic productivity, professional satisfaction, and most notably, the pursuit of academic medicine careers. Little is known about the role of mentoring in recruiting Black/African American and Hispanic/Latino residents into academia. The objective of this study was to assess the influence of mentoring on academic medicine career choice among a cohort of racially and ethnically diverse residents. Methods A strategic convenience sample of U.S. residents attending national professional conferences between March and July 2010; residents completed a quantitative survey and a subset participated in focus groups. Results Of the 250 residents, 183 (73%) completed surveys and 48 participated in focus groups. Thirty-eight percent of residents were white, 31% Black/African American, 17% Asian/other, and 14% Hispanic/Latino. Most respondents (93%) reported that mentorship was important for entering academia, and 70% reported having sufficient mentorship to pursue academic careers. Three themes about mentorship emerged from focus groups: (1) qualities of successful mentorship models; (2) perceived benefits of mentorship; and (3) the value of racial/ethnic and gender concordance. Residents preferred mentors they selected rather than ones assigned to them, and expressed concern about faculty using checklists. Black/African American, Hispanic/Latino, and female residents described actively seeking out mentors of the same race/ethnicity and gender, but expressed difficulty finding such mentors. Lack of racial/ethnic concordance was perceived as an obstacle for minority mentees, requiring explanation of the context and nuances of their perspectives and situations to non-minority mentors. Conclusions The majority of residents in this study reported having access to mentors. However, data show that the lack of diverse faculty mentors may impede diverse residents’ satisfaction and benefit from mentorship relationships compared to

  3. New oil era prompts unique resid refinery

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, T.E.; Sliger, A.G.; Kain, G.E.

    1982-03-22

    Flowsheets and a process description are given for a refinery that will employ resid desulfurization and the Heavy Oil Cracking (HOC) process to upgrade the bottom of the crude barrel. The key processing concept in the new Saber facility is the combination of HOC, a proven process, that has been employed since the early 1960's, with resid hydrodesulfurization (HDS) a newer process but one that is well proven and that has found widespread application. Design feedstock for the complex is heavy Arabian 650+/degree/ F. atmospheric resid, but flexibility to run light Arabian atmospheric resid or any intermediate resid also has been incorporated into the design. Rated Capacity is 46,100 b/sd. 9 refs.

  4. Conducting a successful residency research project.

    PubMed

    Barletta, Jeffrey F

    2008-08-15

    The residency research project can be a challenging endeavor for pharmacy residents since they typically have limited experience in this area. Furthermore, as the number of accredited residency programs has increased, so has the demand for preceptors with research experience. This review is intended to assist the resident and preceptor by providing steps and guidance with conducting a successful residency research project. Items such as idea generation, proposing the right type of project, departmental review, and project management skills are discussed and guidance with writing the research protocol is provided. Items that must be addressed in every research protocol are described and a generalized protocol template is presented. In addition, the institutional review board review process is described and tips and pointers for obtaining approval are included. Finally, useful tools and resources are provided that can be used up front or throughout each phase of the research project.

  5. Simulation and resident education in spinal neurosurgery

    PubMed Central

    Bohm, Parker E.; Arnold, Paul M.

    2015-01-01

    Background: A host of factors have contributed to the increasing use of simulation in neurosurgical resident education. Although the number of simulation-related publications has increased exponentially over the past two decades, no studies have specifically examined the role of simulation in resident education in spinal neurosurgery. Methods: We performed a structured search of several databases to identify articles detailing the use of simulation in spinal neurosurgery education in an attempt to catalogue potential applications for its use. Results: A brief history of simulation in medicine is given, followed by current trends of spinal simulation utilization in residency programs. General themes from the literature are identified that are integral for implementing simulation into neurosurgical residency curriculum. Finally, various applications are reported. Conclusion: The use of simulation in spinal neurosurgery education is not as ubiquitous in comparison to other neurosurgical subspecialties, but many promising methods of simulation are available for augmenting resident education. PMID:25745588

  6. Genetic characterization of the vaccinia virus DNA polymerase: cytosine arabinoside resistance requires a variable lesion conferring phosphonoacetate resistance in conjunction with an invariant mutation localized to the 3'-5' exonuclease domain.

    PubMed

    Taddie, J A; Traktman, P

    1993-07-01

    3'-5' exonuclease function, is postulated to affect the proofreading exonuclease of the DNA polymerase.

  7. Nutritional status and chewing capacity in nursing home residents.

    PubMed

    Nordenram, G; Ljunggren, G; Cederholm, T

    2001-10-01

    Chronically ill elderly persons sustain a high risk for protein-energy malnutrition (PEM). In this study we explored some of the complex associations between nutritional status, dental health and cognitive and physical function in 192 nursing home residents (mean age 84+/-8 years, 80% female). Nutrition-related data from the Resident Assessment Instrument (RAI) were compiled into a Nutrition Score (NuSc; 0-1 = non-PEM, 2 = risk for PEM, and 3-7 = PEM). Chewing capacity, according to number and condition of occlusal contacts, was determined by a Clinical Dental Functionality score (CDF). The Cognitive Performance Scale (CPS) and activities of daily living (ADL) were determined according to the RAI. Fifty percent of the residents had NuSc > or = 2, and 25% had NuSc > or = 3. One third did not have the dental prerequisites for chewing. i.e., < 4 occlusal contacts. Almost half of the residents had severe cognitive dysfunction, and over two thirds were severely limited in their ADL activities. Subjects with > or = 4 occlusal contacts, i.e., technical chewing capacity, had better NuSc (1.5+/-1.4) than those not able to chew (2.4+/-1.6, p=0.0005). In univariate logistic regression, the odds for NuSc > or = 2 increased with reduced ADL functions. inability to chew and poor cognition. In multivariate logistic regression, ADL and chewing capacity were significantly related to NuSc > or = 2. When NuSc > or = 3 was chosen as cut-off, only ADL was related to malnutrition. In conclusion, half of this group of nursing home residents appeared to be malnourished, or were at risk for PEM. Reduced physical function was the strongest predictor of PEM, while impaired chewing capacity was associated with risk for PEM.

  8. Enhancing Teamwork Between Chief Residents and Residency Program Directors: Description and Outcomes of an Experiential Workshop

    PubMed Central

    McPhillips, Heather A.; Frohna, John G.; Murad, M. Hassan; Batra, Maneesh; Panda, Mukta; Miller, Marsha A.; Brigham, Timothy P.; Doughty, Robert A.

    2011-01-01

    Background An effective working relationship between chief residents and residency program directors is critical to a residency program's success. Despite the importance of this relationship, few studies have explored the characteristics of an effective program director-chief resident partnership or how to facilitate collaboration between the 2 roles, which collectively are important to program quality and resident satisfaction. We describe the development and impact of a novel workshop that paired program directors with their incoming chief residents to facilitate improved partnerships. Methods The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education sponsored a full-day workshop for residency program directors and their incoming chief residents. Sessions focused on increased understanding of personality styles, using experiential learning, and open communication between chief residents and program directors, related to feedback and expectations of each other. Participants completed an anonymous survey immediately after the workshop and again 8 months later to assess its long-term impact. Results Participants found the workshop to be a valuable experience, with comments revealing common themes. Program directors and chief residents expect each other to act as a role model for the residents, be approachable and available, and to be transparent and fair in their decision-making processes; both groups wanted feedback on performance and clear expectations from each other for roles and responsibilities; and both groups identified the need to be innovative and supportive of changes in the program. Respondents to the follow-up survey reported that workshop participation improved their relationships with their co-chiefs and program directors. Conclusion Participation in this experiential workshop improved the working relationships between chief residents and program directors. The themes that were identified can be used to foster communication between incoming chief

  9. Consequences of contextual factors on clinical reasoning in resident physicians.

    PubMed

    McBee, Elexis; Ratcliffe, Temple; Picho, Katherine; Artino, Anthony R; Schuwirth, Lambert; Kelly, William; Masel, Jennifer; van der Vleuten, Cees; Durning, Steven J

    2015-12-01

    Context specificity and the impact that contextual factors have on the complex process of clinical reasoning is poorly understood. Using situated cognition as the theoretical framework, our aim was to evaluate the verbalized clinical reasoning processes of resident physicians in order to describe what impact the presence of contextual factors have on their clinical reasoning. Participants viewed three video recorded clinical encounters portraying straightforward diagnoses in internal medicine with select patient contextual factors modified. After watching each video recording, participants completed a think-aloud protocol. Transcripts from the think-aloud protocols were analyzed using a constant comparative approach. After iterative coding, utterances were analyzed for emergent themes with utterances grouped into categories, themes and subthemes. Ten residents participated in the study with saturation reached during analysis. Participants universally acknowledged the presence of contextual factors in the video recordings. Four categories emerged as a consequence of the contextual factors: (1) emotional reactions (2) behavioral inferences (3) optimizing the doctor patient relationship and (4) difficulty with closure of the clinical encounter. The presence of contextual factors may impact clinical reasoning performance in resident physicians. When confronted with the presence of contextual factors in a clinical scenario, residents experienced difficulty with closure of the encounter, exhibited as diagnostic uncertainty. This finding raises important questions about the relationship between contextual factors and clinical reasoning activities and how this relationship might influence the cost effectiveness of care. This study also provides insight into how the phenomena of context specificity may be explained using situated cognition theory.

  10. [Representatives of orthopaedic and trauma surgery residents in Germany].

    PubMed

    Merschin, D; Doepfer, A-K; Wenzel, L; Mutschler, M

    2016-08-01

    In most German hospitals there are resident representatives to stand in for the rights and interests of residents. The precise number of representatives in orthopaedic and trauma surgery is unknown, as well as the field of duty and the rights of this position.The Junges Forum O&U presents survey data, which were collected from members of the German Society for Trauma Surgery (DGU), the German Society for Orthopaedics and Orthpaedic Surgery (DGOOC) and the German Society for Orthopaedics and Trauma (DGOU). All had an age below 40 years. The Survey was carried out in a period between 27th of January 2015 and 26th of March 2015.These data allowed the Junges Forum O&U to analyse the duties and numbers of representatives for residents in orthopaedic and trauma surgery in Germany. Questionnaires from 316 representatives were fully analysed. Of these, 92 % work at university hospitals. The conditions of election and the duties are not defined. The activity as representative was mainly fulfilled in spare time. The major aspect was conflict resolution between colleagues.The Junge Forum O&U presents the recommendation for election, field of duty and meetings on a regular basis with the other residents or even the first-line management. PMID:27277936

  11. West Nile Virus in Resident Birds from Yucatan, Mexico.

    PubMed

    Chaves, Andrea; Sotomayor-Bonilla, Jesus; Monge, Otto; Ramírez, Abigaíl; Galindo, Francisco; Sarmiento-Silva, Rosa Elena; Gutiérrez-Espeleta, Gustavo A; Suzán, Gerardo

    2016-01-01

    West Nile virus (WNV) in the Americas is thought to be transported at large spatial scales by migratory birds and locally spread and amplified by resident birds. Local processes, including interspecific interactions and dominance of passerine species recognized as competent reservoirs, may boost infection and maintain endemic cycles. Change in species composition has been recognized as an important driver for infection dynamics. Due to migration and changes in species diversity and composition in wintering grounds, changes in infection prevalence are expected. To these changes, we used PCR to estimate the prevalence of WNV in wild resident birds during the dry and rainy seasons of 2012 in Yucatan, Mexico. Serum samples were obtained from 104 wild birds, belonging to six orders and 35 species. We detected WNV in 14 resident birds, representing 11 species and three orders. Prevalences by order was Passeriformes (27%), Columbiformes (6%), and Piciformes (33%). Resident birds positive to WNV from Yucatan may be indicative of local virus circulation and evidence of past virus transmission activity.

  12. Consequences of contextual factors on clinical reasoning in resident physicians.

    PubMed

    McBee, Elexis; Ratcliffe, Temple; Picho, Katherine; Artino, Anthony R; Schuwirth, Lambert; Kelly, William; Masel, Jennifer; van der Vleuten, Cees; Durning, Steven J

    2015-12-01

    Context specificity and the impact that contextual factors have on the complex process of clinical reasoning is poorly understood. Using situated cognition as the theoretical framework, our aim was to evaluate the verbalized clinical reasoning processes of resident physicians in order to describe what impact the presence of contextual factors have on their clinical reasoning. Participants viewed three video recorded clinical encounters portraying straightforward diagnoses in internal medicine with select patient contextual factors modified. After watching each video recording, participants completed a think-aloud protocol. Transcripts from the think-aloud protocols were analyzed using a constant comparative approach. After iterative coding, utterances were analyzed for emergent themes with utterances grouped into categories, themes and subthemes. Ten residents participated in the study with saturation reached during analysis. Participants universally acknowledged the presence of contextual factors in the video recordings. Four categories emerged as a consequence of the contextual factors: (1) emotional reactions (2) behavioral inferences (3) optimizing the doctor patient relationship and (4) difficulty with closure of the clinical encounter. The presence of contextual factors may impact clinical reasoning performance in resident physicians. When confronted with the presence of contextual factors in a clinical scenario, residents experienced difficulty with closure of the encounter, exhibited as diagnostic uncertainty. This finding raises important questions about the relationship between contextual factors and clinical reasoning activities and how this relationship might influence the cost effectiveness of care. This study also provides insight into how the phenomena of context specificity may be explained using situated cognition theory. PMID:25753295

  13. West Nile Virus in Resident Birds from Yucatan, Mexico.

    PubMed

    Chaves, Andrea; Sotomayor-Bonilla, Jesus; Monge, Otto; Ramírez, Abigaíl; Galindo, Francisco; Sarmiento-Silva, Rosa Elena; Gutiérrez-Espeleta, Gustavo A; Suzán, Gerardo

    2016-01-01

    West Nile virus (WNV) in the Americas is thought to be transported at large spatial scales by migratory birds and locally spread and amplified by resident birds. Local processes, including interspecific interactions and dominance of passerine species recognized as competent reservoirs, may boost infection and maintain endemic cycles. Change in species composition has been recognized as an important driver for infection dynamics. Due to migration and changes in species diversity and composition in wintering grounds, changes in infection prevalence are expected. To these changes, we used PCR to estimate the prevalence of WNV in wild resident birds during the dry and rainy seasons of 2012 in Yucatan, Mexico. Serum samples were obtained from 104 wild birds, belonging to six orders and 35 species. We detected WNV in 14 resident birds, representing 11 species and three orders. Prevalences by order was Passeriformes (27%), Columbiformes (6%), and Piciformes (33%). Resident birds positive to WNV from Yucatan may be indicative of local virus circulation and evidence of past virus transmission activity. PMID:26540336

  14. 29 CFR 785.23 - Employees residing on employer's premises or working at home.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... WORKED Application of Principles Sleeping Time and Certain Other Activities § 785.23 Employees residing..., sleeping, entertaining, and other periods of complete freedom from all duties when he may leave...

  15. Effective Research Strategies for Trainees in Internal Medicine Residency Programs

    PubMed Central

    Wiederman, Michael W.; Sawyer, Robert J.

    2015-01-01

    For most training programs, the development of research endeavors among trainees is an ongoing challenge. In this article, we review various considerations when attempting to undertake research activities within an internal medicine residency training program, including availability of institutional resources (eg, dedicated research time for trainees and faculty, available faculty mentors, accessible adjunctive personnel), engagement of residents into research, classic project quagmires in training programs, the institutional review board, publication options (eg, letters to the editor, case reports, literature reviews, original research reports), and journal submission strategies. Given that research entails multiple components and distinct skills, the overall program goal should be to make research an educationally understandable process for trainees. Research can be a rewarding activity when nurtured in a facilitating educational environment. PMID:26137359

  16. The benefits of nearby nature for elderly apartment residents.

    PubMed

    Talbot, J F; Kaplan, R

    1991-01-01

    Few studies have examined the potential value of nearby nature for elderly adults. In the current study, elderly residents of two apartment complexes were interviewed about the availability of and the importance of different nearby natural settings. They were also asked how involved they were with various "nature compensations"--indoor activities, such as growing houseplants or watching nature programs on television, which might substitute for more strenuous outdoor activities. The results indicate that elderly adults consider access to nature near their homes to be very important. Nature compensations were frequently pursued but did not affect satisfactions. Satisfaction levels were significantly higher among residents whose apartments overlooked natural settings, and among those who lived closer to certain kinds of outdoor settings.

  17. Hidden ethical dilemmas in psychiatric residency training: the psychiatry resident as dual agent.

    PubMed

    Hoop, Jinger G

    2004-01-01

    In addition to learning about confidentiality, civil commitment, informed consent, and other ethical issues, psychiatry residents must deal with less visible ethical dilemmas that arise from the training process itself. Residents grapple with three inherent conflicting duties between their dual roles as physician and learner, as physician and supervisee, and as physician and employee of a training institution. These conflicts must be negotiated at a time of high stress, when residents are plagued with self-doubt, fear, fatigue, and other vulnerabilities that can lead good doctors to make ethically dubious decisions. While such conflicts and stressors are common to residency training in most specialties, they may be heightened in psychiatric residency. This paper proposes a model for understanding covert elements of ethical decision making during psychiatric residency and recommends strategies training programs can use to help residents navigate an ethical minefield. PMID:15507552

  18. Out of the wilderness: flipping the classroom to advance scholarship in an internal medicine residency program.

    PubMed

    Vincent, Dale S

    2014-11-01

    Residents in an internal medicine residency program "flipped the classroom" in a series of learner-centered activities which included the creation of a medical student interest group, a continuing medical education symposium, and a journal supplement focused on wilderness medicine topics in Hawai'i and Asia Pacific. The project encompassed both scholarly activities (discovery, integration, application, and teaching) as well as scholarship (writing for publication). The project advanced the professional formation of residents by developing competencies and producing outcomes that are key features of the ACGME Next Accreditation System.

  19. Out of the wilderness: flipping the classroom to advance scholarship in an internal medicine residency program.

    PubMed

    Vincent, Dale S

    2014-11-01

    Residents in an internal medicine residency program "flipped the classroom" in a series of learner-centered activities which included the creation of a medical student interest group, a continuing medical education symposium, and a journal supplement focused on wilderness medicine topics in Hawai'i and Asia Pacific. The project encompassed both scholarly activities (discovery, integration, application, and teaching) as well as scholarship (writing for publication). The project advanced the professional formation of residents by developing competencies and producing outcomes that are key features of the ACGME Next Accreditation System. PMID:25478292

  20. Tuition fees for residents: one physician's perspective.

    PubMed

    Cummings, B

    1999-10-01

    Although the education, expertise and guidance of Canada's academic physicians cannot be overlooked, individual universities appear to see tuition fees for residents as an easy source of much needed revenue. If tuition should "rise to market levels," perhaps residents' wages should similarly rise to reflect the amount of training received, skills required, responsibilities discharged and time expended. Unfortunately, tuition fees will be an area of contention for some time. Support of provincial resident associations and medical societies may lend both moral and, possibly, financial support to future members of the profession.