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Sample records for exotic nuclear systems

  1. Unified approach to nuclear densities from exotic atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedman, E.

    2009-09-01

    Parameters of nuclear density distributions are derived from least-squares fits to strong interaction observables in exotic atoms. Global analyses of antiprotonic and pionic atoms show reasonably good agreement between the two types of probes regarding the average behaviour of root-mean-square radii of the neutron distributions. Apparent conflict regarding the shape of the neutron distribution is attributed to different radial sensitivities of these two probes.

  2. Spes: Exotic Beams for Nuclear Physics Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrighetto, Alberto; Manzolaro, Mattia; Corradetti, Stefano; Scarpa, Daniele; Vasquez, Jesu; Rossignoli, Massimo; Monetti, Alberto; Calderolla, Michele; Prete, Gianfranco

    2014-02-01

    The SPES project at Laboratori di Legnaro of INFN (Italy) is concentrating on the production of neutron-rich radioactive nuclei for nuclear physics experiments using uranium fission at a rate of 1013 fission/s. The emphasis on neutron-rich isotopes is justified by the fact that this vast territory has been little explored. The Radioactive Ion Beam (RIB) will be produced by the ISOL technique using proton induced fission on a direct target of UCx. The most critical element of the SPES project is the Multi-Foil Direct Target. Up to the present time, the proposed target represents an innovation in terms of its capability to sustain the primary beam power. This talk will present the status of the project financed by INFN, which is actually in the construction phase at Legnaro. In particular, developments related to the target and the ion-source activities using the surface ion source, plasma ion source, and laser ion source techniques will be reported.

  3. Exotic Superconductivity in Correlated Electron Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Mu, Gang; Sandu, Viorel; Li, Wei; Shen, Bing

    2015-05-25

    Over the past decades, the search for high-Tc superconductivity (SC) and its novel superconducting mechanisms is one of the most challenging tasks of condensed matter physicists and material scientists, wherein the most striking achievement is the discovery of high-c and unconventional superconductivity in strongly correlated 3d-electron systems, such as cuprates and iron pnictides/chalcogenides. Those exotic superconductors display the behaviors beyond the scope of the BCS theory (in the SC states) and the Landau-Fermi liquid theory (in the normal states). In general, such exotic superconductivity can be seen as correlated electron systems, where there are strong interplays among charge, spin, orbital, and lattice degrees of freedom. Thus, we focus on the exotic superconductivity in materials with correlated electrons in the present special issue.

  4. Exotic Superconductivity in Correlated Electron Systems

    DOE PAGES

    Mu, Gang; Sandu, Viorel; Li, Wei; ...

    2015-05-25

    Over the past decades, the search for high-Tc superconductivity (SC) and its novel superconducting mechanisms is one of the most challenging tasks of condensed matter physicists and material scientists, wherein the most striking achievement is the discovery of high-c and unconventional superconductivity in strongly correlated 3d-electron systems, such as cuprates and iron pnictides/chalcogenides. Those exotic superconductors display the behaviors beyond the scope of the BCS theory (in the SC states) and the Landau-Fermi liquid theory (in the normal states). In general, such exotic superconductivity can be seen as correlated electron systems, where there are strong interplays among charge, spin, orbital,more » and lattice degrees of freedom. Thus, we focus on the exotic superconductivity in materials with correlated electrons in the present special issue.« less

  5. Masses of exotic calcium isotopes pin down nuclear forces.

    PubMed

    Wienholtz, F; Beck, D; Blaum, K; Borgmann, Ch; Breitenfeldt, M; Cakirli, R B; George, S; Herfurth, F; Holt, J D; Kowalska, M; Kreim, S; Lunney, D; Manea, V; Menéndez, J; Neidherr, D; Rosenbusch, M; Schweikhard, L; Schwenk, A; Simonis, J; Stanja, J; Wolf, R N; Zuber, K

    2013-06-20

    The properties of exotic nuclei on the verge of existence play a fundamental part in our understanding of nuclear interactions. Exceedingly neutron-rich nuclei become sensitive to new aspects of nuclear forces. Calcium, with its doubly magic isotopes (40)Ca and (48)Ca, is an ideal test for nuclear shell evolution, from the valley of stability to the limits of existence. With a closed proton shell, the calcium isotopes mark the frontier for calculations with three-nucleon forces from chiral effective field theory. Whereas predictions for the masses of (51)Ca and (52)Ca have been validated by direct measurements, it is an open question as to how nuclear masses evolve for heavier calcium isotopes. Here we report the mass determination of the exotic calcium isotopes (53)Ca and (54)Ca, using the multi-reflection time-of-flight mass spectrometer of ISOLTRAP at CERN. The measured masses unambiguously establish a prominent shell closure at neutron number N = 32, in excellent agreement with our theoretical calculations. These results increase our understanding of neutron-rich matter and pin down the subtle components of nuclear forces that are at the forefront of theoretical developments constrained by quantum chromodynamics.

  6. Nuclear-structure studies of exotic nuclei with MINIBALL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butler, P. A.; Cederkall, J.; Reiter, P.

    2017-04-01

    High-resolution γ-ray spectroscopy has been established at ISOLDE for nuclear-structure and nuclear-reaction studies with reaccelerated radioactive ion beams provided by the REX-ISOLDE facility. The MINIBALL spectrometer comprises 24 six-fold segmented, encapsulated high-purity germanium crystals. It was specially designed for highest γ-ray detection efficiency which is advantageous for low-intensity radioactive ion beams. The MINIBALL array has been used in numerous Coulomb-excitation and transfer-reaction experiments with exotic ion beams of energies up to 3 MeV A–1. The physics case covers a wide range of topics which are addressed with beams ranging from neutron-rich magnesium isotopes up to heavy radium isotopes. In the future the HIE-ISOLDE will allow the in-beam γ-ray spectroscopy program to proceed with higher secondary-beam intensity, higher beam energy and better beam quality.

  7. Use of exotic nuclear beams for nuclear structure studies

    SciTech Connect

    Sugimoto, K.

    1984-10-01

    Possible experiments are discussed for nuclear structure studies using, as secondary beams, projectile fragments produced by high-energy heavy-ion collisions. They are, specifically, (a) determination of nuclear sizes from measurements of the total interaction cross sections of nucleus-nucleus collisions, and (b) determination of static electromagnetic moments, ..mu..'s and Q's, of short-lived ..beta..-radioactive nuclei. 9 references.

  8. Nuclear reaction cross sections of exotic nuclei in the Glauber model for relativistic mean field densities

    SciTech Connect

    Patra, S. K.; Panda, R. N.; Arumugam, P.; Gupta, Raj K.

    2009-12-15

    We have calculated the total nuclear reaction cross sections of exotic nuclei in the framework of the Glauber model, using as inputs the standard relativistic mean field (RMF) densities and the densities obtained from the more recently developed effective-field-theory-motivated RMF (the E-RMF). Both light and heavy nuclei are taken as the representative targets, and the light neutron-rich nuclei as projectiles. We found the total nuclear reaction cross section to increase as a function of the mass number, for both the target and projectile nuclei. The differential nuclear elastic scattering cross sections are evaluated for some selected systems at various incident energies. We found a large dependence of the differential elastic scattering cross section on incident energy. Finally, we have applied the same formalism to calculate both the total nuclear reaction cross section and the differential nuclear elastic scattering cross section for the recently discussed superheavy nucleus with atomic number Z=122.

  9. Exotic few-body systems with a heavy meson

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaguchi, Yasuhiro

    2014-09-01

    Hadron as an impurity bound in nuclei causes interesting phenomena which do not emerge in normal nuclei. These effects would give us the information not only on the internal structure of the nuclei, but also on the changing properties of the impurity in the nuclear medium. The hadron-nucleus systems have been studied in the light flavor sector, especially. However, a strong attraction between a heavy meson (Dbar and B) and a nucleon, provided by the one pion exchange potential (OPEP), was suggested recently. The OPEP is enhanced by the heavy quark spin symmetry which induces the mass degeneracy between the heavy pseudoscalar and vector mesons. The attraction motivates us to investigate the Dbar (B) nuclei having the exotic flavor structure. Hence, these bound states are stable against the strong decay. We discuss the possible existence of exotic few-body states realized as DbarNN and BNN. The OPEP between the Dbar (B) meson and the nucleon N is considered. By solving coupled channel equations for PNN and P* NN channels (P (P*) is the heavy pseudoscalar (vector) meson), we obtain new three-body bound states and resonances. In these states, the tensor force of the OPEP plays an important role to yield the attraction.

  10. PREFACE: International Symposium on Exotic Nuclear Structure From Nucleons (ENSFN 2012)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Honma, Michio; Utsuno, Yutaka; Shimizu, Noritaka

    2013-07-01

    The International Symposium on 'Exotic Nuclear Structure From Nucleons (ENSFN2012)' was held at the Koshiba Hall, the University of Tokyo, Japan, from October 10th to 12th, 2012. This symposium was supported by RIKEN Nishina Center (RNC) and the Center for Nuclear Study (CNS), University of Tokyo. This symposium was devoted to discussing recent achievement and perspectives in the structure of exotic nuclei from the viewpoint of the nuclear force. The following subjects were covered in this symposium from both theoretical and experimental sides: Evolution of shell structure and collectivity in exotic nuclei Ab-initio theory and its application to exotic nuclei Advancement in large-scale nuclear-structure calculations Effective Hamiltonian and energy density functional Spin-isospin responses New aspects of two- and three-body forces Impact on nuclear astrophysics Emphasis was placed on the development of large-scale nuclear-structure calculations and the new experimental information on exotic nuclei. Around 80 participants attended this symposium and we enjoyed 37 excellent invited talks and 9 selected oral presentations. A special talk was presented to celebrate the 60th birthday of professor Takaharu Otsuka, who has made invaluable contribution to the progress in the fields covered in this symposium. The organizing committee consisted of T Abe (Tokyo), M Honma (Aizu; chair), N Itagaki (YITP, Kyoto), T Mizusaki (Senshu), T Nakatsukasa (RIKEN), H Sakurai (Tokyo/RIKEN), N Shimizu (CNS, Tokyo; scientific secretary), S Shimoura (CNS, Tokyo), Y Utsuno (JAEA/CNS, Tokyo; scientific secretary). Finally, we would like to thank all the speakers and the participants as well as the other organizers for their contributions which made the symposium very successful. Michio Honma, Yutaka Utsuno and Noritaka Shimizu Editors Tokyo, April 2013 Sponsors logo1 Sponsors logo2 The PDF also contains the conference program.

  11. Studies of exotic nuclear reactions at the RESOLUT facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiedenhoever, Ingo

    2016-09-01

    The RESOLUT facility at Florida State University's accelerator laboratory produces beams of short-lived nuclei using the in-flight method. Beams such as 6He, 7Be, 8Li, 8B, 17F, 19O, 18Ne and 25Al have been successfully used in experiments. The facility has been used to develop innovative experimental techniques, such as the low-energy neutron detector RESONEUT, and the active-target detector ANASEN, which has been developed as a collaboration between FSU and LSU. These detectors have been employed in direct and indirect reaction measurements with impact on astrophysics. An Indiana-University led campaign studying fusion cross sections of exotic nuclei at RESOLUT has also been successful. The results from these three recent RIB campaigns at RESOLUT will be summarized. This work was supported by NSF under Grants Nos. PHY-1401574, PHY-0820941 and PHY-1126345 and by DOE under Grant Nos. DE-FG02-02ER41220, DE-FG02-88ER-40404 and DE-FG02-96ER40978.

  12. Ab Initio Calculations Of Nuclear Reactions And Exotic Nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Quaglioni, S.

    2014-05-05

    Our ultimate goal is to develop a fundamental theory and efficient computational tools to describe dynamic processes between nuclei and to use such tools toward supporting several DOE milestones by: 1) performing predictive calculations of difficult-to-measure landmark reactions for nuclear astrophysics, such as those driving the neutrino signature of our sun; 2) improving our understanding of the structure of nuclei near the neutron drip line, which will be the focus of the DOE’s Facility for Rare Isotope Beams (FRIB) being constructed at Michigan State University; but also 3) helping to reveal the true nature of the nuclear force. Furthermore, these theoretical developments will support plasma diagnostic efforts at facilities dedicated to the development of terrestrial fusion energy.

  13. Accuracy of Determination of the Parameters of Exotic Nuclei Nuclear Density Distributions in the Glauber Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rueter, Keiti; Novikov, Ivan

    2016-09-01

    Parameters of a nuclear density distribution for an exotic nuclei with halo or skin structures can be determined from the experimentally measure interaction cross-section. In the presented work, to extract parameters for a halo and core, we compare experimental data on interaction cross section with reaction cross-sections calculated using expressions obtained in the Glauber Model and its optical approximation. These calculations are performed using Markov Chain Monte Carlo algorithm. In addition, we discuss the accuracy of the Monte Carlo approach to calculating the interaction and reaction cross-sections. The dependence of the accuracy of the density parameters of various exotic nuclei on the ``quality'' of the random numbers chains (here, ``quality'' is defined by lag-1 autocorrelation time of a sequence of random numbers) is obtained for the Gaussian density distribution for a core and the Gaussian density distribution for a halo. KY NSF EPSCoR Research Scholars Program.

  14. The influence of nuclear deformations on the exotic cluster decay half-lives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soylu, A.; Bayrak, O.; Evlice, S.

    2015-04-01

    We systematically study the investigation of the influence of nuclear deformations of the cluster and daughter nuclei on the exotic cluster decay half-lives of heavy nuclei by the WKB method and the Bohr-Sommerfeld quantization condition. Even if the deformations of both cluster and daughter in the half-live values of cluster decays improve the results, considering the deformation of clusters is more efficient than the deformation of daughter for the heavy cluster decay half-live calculations. Moreover, taking into account of angle orientations of daughter and cluster provides a positive contributions to the results as well. The results would be useful for experimental researches in half-lives of exotic decays of some heavy nuclei and radium isotopes.

  15. Using Superconducting Qubit Circuits to Engineer Exotic Lattice Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsomokos, Dimitris; Ashhab, Sahel; Nori, Franco

    2011-03-01

    We propose an architecture based on superconducting qubits and resonators for the implementation of a variety of exotic lattice systems, such as spin and Hubbard models in higher or fractal dimensions and higher-genus topologies. Spin systems are realized naturally using qubits, while superconducting resonators can be used for the realization of Bose-Hubbard models. Fundamental requirements for these designs, such as controllable interactions between arbitrary qubit pairs, have recently been implemented in the laboratory, rendering our proposals feasible with current technology.

  16. Using superconducting qubit circuits to engineer exotic lattice systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsomokos, Dimitris I.; Ashhab, Sahel; Nori, Franco

    2010-11-01

    We propose an architecture based on superconducting qubits and resonators for the implementation of a variety of exotic lattice systems, such as spin and Hubbard models in higher or fractal dimensions and higher-genus topologies. Spin systems are realized naturally using qubits, while superconducting resonators can be used for the realization of Bose-Hubbard models. Fundamental requirements for these designs, such as controllable interactions between arbitrary qubit pairs, have recently been implemented in the laboratory, rendering our proposals feasible with current technology.

  17. Nuclear Incompressibility and the Asymmetry Term: Implications for Astrophysics and Physics with Exotic Nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Fujiwara, M.

    2010-06-01

    The compressional-mode giant resonances, the isoscalar giant monopole resonance (GMR) and the isoscalar giant dipole resonance (ISGDR), in various isotopes have been investigated using inelastic scattering of 400-MeV alpha-particles at extremely forward angles, including 0 deg. Recently, the centroid energies of the giant monopole resonance (GMR) in the Sn isotope region are found to be significantly lower than the theoretical predictions. In addition, based on the GMR results, the asymmetry-term in the nuclear incompressibility has been determined as K{sub t}au = -550+-100 MeV. Constraints on interactions employed in nuclear structure calculations are discussed on the basis of the experimentally values for K{sub i}nfinity and K{sub t}au. The combination of these two values gives stringent constraints on the interactions used for nuclear structure calculations and for formations of equation of state (EOS) of nuclear matter. A short review of the current status of the experimental studies on the compressional-mode giant resonances is given, and a possible new experiment for astrophysics and physics with exotic nuclei is suggested.

  18. Exotic encounters with dental implants: managing complications with unidentified systems.

    PubMed

    Mattheos, N; Janda, M Schittek

    2012-06-01

    As the application of dental implants increases worldwide, so is the number of technical and biological complications that general dental practitioners will be called to manage, while maintaining implant patients. In addition, the greater patient mobility encountered today combined with a growing trend of 'dental implant tourism' will very often result in situations where the dentist is requested to deal with complications in implants placed elsewhere and which sometimes might be of an 'exotic' system one cannot directly recognize. Such a situation can pose significant challenges to even experienced clinicians. The challenges are not only in the scientific field, but often include professional and ethical implications. This case report will discuss strategies for the management of implant complications in cases of unidentified implant systems. Critical factors in such situations would be the clinician's experience and special training, the correct radiographic technique, as well as access to the appropriate tools and devices.

  19. ICENES '91:Sixth international conference on emerging nuclear energy systems

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-01-01

    This document contains the program and abstracts of the sessions at the Sixth International Conference on Emerging Nuclear Energy Systems held June 16--21, 1991 at Monterey, California. These sessions included: The plenary session, fission session, fission and nonelectric session, poster session 1P; (space propulsion, space nuclear power, electrostatic confined fusion, fusion miscellaneous, inertial confinement fusion, [mu]-catalyzed fusion, and cold fusion); Advanced fusion session, space nuclear session, poster session 2P, (nuclear reactions/data, isotope separation, direct energy conversion and exotic concepts, fusion-fission hybrids, nuclear desalting, accelerator waste-transmutation, and fusion-based chemical recycling); energy policy session, poster session 3P (energy policy, magnetic fusion reactors, fission reactors, magnetically insulated inertial fusion, and nuclear explosives for power generation); exotic energy storage and conversion session; and exotic energy storage and conversion; review and closing session.

  20. Universal correlations of nuclear observables and the structure of exotic nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Casten, R.F.; Zamfir, N.V. |||

    1996-12-31

    Despite the apparent complexity of nuclear structural evolution, recent work has shown a remarkable underlying simplicity that is unexpected, global, and which leads to new signatures for structure based on the easiest-to-obtain data. As such they will be extremely valuable for use in the experiments with low intensity radioactive beams. Beautiful correlations based either on extrinsic variables such as N{sub p}N{sub n} or the P-factor or correlations between collective observables themselves have been discovered. Examples to be discussed include a tri-partite classification of structural evolution, leading to a new paradigm that discloses certain specific classes of nuclei, universal trajectories for B(E2: w{sub 1}{sup +} {r_arrow} 0{sub 1}{sup +}) values and their use in extracting hexadecapole deformations from this observable alone, the use of these B(E2) values to identify shell gaps and magic numbers in exotic nuclei, the relationship of {beta} and {gamma} deformations, and single nucleon separation energies. Predictions for nuclei far off stability by interpolation will also be discussed.

  1. Pathology of the exotic companion mammal gastrointestinal system.

    PubMed

    Reavill, Drury

    2014-05-01

    A variety of disease agents can affect the gastrointestinal tract of the exotic companion mammal, some of which can pose zoonotic health concerns. Many conditions present with nonspecific clinical signs (lethargy, variable degrees of diarrhea, and for most sick rodents, presenting hunched with spiky fur), necessitating additional laboratory testing to reach a diagnosis. Primary tumors of the digestive tract are also presented as well as miscellaneous conditions ranging from toxins to trauma.

  2. Exotic Nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Galindo-Uribarri, Alfredo {nmn}

    2010-01-01

    Current experimental developments on the study of exotic nuclei far from the valley of stability are discussed. I start with general aspects related to the production of radioactive beams followed by the description of some of the experimental tools and specialized techniques for studies in reaction spectroscopy, nuclear structure research and nuclear applications with examples from selected topical areas with which I have been involved. I discuss some of the common challenges faced in Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) and Radioactive Ion Beam (RIB) science.

  3. NUCLEAR REACTOR CONTROL SYSTEM

    DOEpatents

    Epler, E.P.; Hanauer, S.H.; Oakes, L.C.

    1959-11-01

    A control system is described for a nuclear reactor using enriched uranium fuel of the type of the swimming pool and other heterogeneous nuclear reactors. Circuits are included for automatically removing and inserting the control rods during the course of normal operation. Appropriate safety circuits close down the nuclear reactor in the event of emergency.

  4. ICENES `91:Sixth international conference on emerging nuclear energy systems. Program and abstracts

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-12-31

    This document contains the program and abstracts of the sessions at the Sixth International Conference on Emerging Nuclear Energy Systems held June 16--21, 1991 at Monterey, California. These sessions included: The plenary session, fission session, fission and nonelectric session, poster session 1P; (space propulsion, space nuclear power, electrostatic confined fusion, fusion miscellaneous, inertial confinement fusion, {mu}-catalyzed fusion, and cold fusion); Advanced fusion session, space nuclear session, poster session 2P, (nuclear reactions/data, isotope separation, direct energy conversion and exotic concepts, fusion-fission hybrids, nuclear desalting, accelerator waste-transmutation, and fusion-based chemical recycling); energy policy session, poster session 3P (energy policy, magnetic fusion reactors, fission reactors, magnetically insulated inertial fusion, and nuclear explosives for power generation); exotic energy storage and conversion session; and exotic energy storage and conversion; review and closing session.

  5. Search for the photoexcitation of exotic mesons in the pi+pi+pi- system.

    PubMed

    Nozar, M; Salgado, C; Weygand, D P; Guo, L; Adams, G; Li, Ji; Eugenio, P; Amaryan, M J; Anghinolfi, M; Asryan, G; Avakian, H; Bagdasaryan, H; Baillie, N; Ball, J P; Baltzell, N A; Barrow, S; Battaglieri, M; Bedlinskiy, I; Bektasoglu, M; Bellis, M; Benmouna, N; Berman, B L; Biselli, A S; Blaszczyk, L; Bonner, B E; Bouchigny, S; Boiarinov, S; Bradford, R; Branford, D; Briscoe, W J; Brooks, W K; Bültmann, S; Burkert, V D; Butuceanu, C; Calarco, J R; Careccia, S L; Carman, D S; Carnahan, B; Casey, L; Cazes, A; Chen, S; Cheng, L; Cole, P L; Collins, P; Coltharp, P; Cords, D; Corvisiero, P; Crabb, D; Crannell, H; Crede, V; Cummings, J P; Dale, D; Dashyan, N; De Masi, R; De Vita, R; De Sanctis, E; Degtyarenko, P V; Denizli, H; Dennis, L; Deur, A; Dharmawardane, K V; Dhuga, K S; Dickson, R; Djalali, C; Dodge, G E; Doughty, D; Dugger, M; Dytman, S; Dzyubak, O P; Egiyan, H; Egiyan, K S; El Fassi, L; Elouadrhiri, L; Fatemi, R; Fedotov, G; Feuerbach, R J; Forest, T A; Fradi, A; Funsten, H; Garçon, M; Gavalian, G; Gevorgyan, N; Gilfoyle, G P; Giovanetti, K L; Girod, F X; Goetz, J T; Gothe, R W; Griffioen, K A; Guidal, M; Guillo, M; Guler, N; Gyurjyan, V; Hadjidakis, C; Hafidi, K; Hakobyan, H; Hanretty, C; Hardie, J; Hassall, N; Heddle, D; Hersman, F W; Hicks, K; Hleiqawi, I; Holtrop, M; Hyde-Wright, C E; Ilieva, Y; Ireland, D G; Ishkhanov, B S; Isupov, E L; Ito, M M; Jenkins, D; Jo, H S; Johnstone, J R; Joo, K; Juengst, H G; Kalantarians, N; Kellie, J D; Khandaker, M; Kim, W; Klein, A; Klein, F J; Kossov, M; Krahn, Z; Kramer, L H; Kubarovsky, V; Kuhn, J; Kuhn, S E; Kuleshov, S V; Kuznetsov, V; Lachniet, J; Laget, J M; Langheinrich, J; Lawrence, D; Livingston, K; Lu, H Y; Maccormick, M; Markov, N; Mattione, P; McAleer, S; McKinnon, B; McNabb, J W C; Mecking, B A; Mehrabyan, S; Mestayer, M D; Meyer, C A; Mibe, T; Mikhailov, K; Mirazita, M; Miskimen, R; Mokeev, V; Moreno, B; Moriya, K; Morrow, S A; Moteabbed, M; Mueller, J; Munevar, E; Mutchler, G S; Nadel-Turonski, P; Nasseripour, R; Niccolai, S; Niculescu, G; Niculescu, I; Niczyporuk, B B; Niroula, M R; Niyazov, R A; O'Rielly, G V; Osipenko, M; Ostrovidov, A I; Park, K; Pasyuk, E; Paterson, C; Anefalos Pereira, S; Philips, S A; Pierce, J; Pivnyuk, N; Pocanic, D; Pogorelko, O; Polli, E; Popa, I; Pozdniakov, S; Preedom, B M; Price, J W; Prok, Y; Protopopescu, D; Qin, L M; Raue, B A; Riccardi, G; Ricco, G; Ripani, M; Ritchie, B G; Ronchetti, F; Rosner, G; Rossi, P; Rubin, P D; Sabatié, F; Salamanca, J; Santoro, J P; Sapunenko, V; Schumacher, R A; Serov, V S; Sharabian, Y G; Sharov, D; Shvedunov, N V; Skabelin, A V; Smith, E S; Smith, L C; Sober, D I; Sokhan, D; Stavinsky, A; Stepanyan, S S; Stepanyan, S; Stokes, B E; Stoler, P; Strakovsky, I I; Strauch, S; Taiuti, M; Tedeschi, D J; Thoma, U; Tkabladze, A; Tkachenko, S; Todor, L; Ungaro, M; Vineyard, M F; Vlassov, A V; Watts, D P; Weinstein, L B; Williams, M; Wolin, E; Wood, M H; Yegneswaran, A; Zana, L; Zhang, J; Zhao, B; Zhao, Z W

    2009-03-13

    A search for exotic mesons in the pi;{+}pi;{+}pi;{-} system photoproduced by the charge exchange reaction gammap-->pi;{+}pi;{+}pi;{-}(n) was carried out by the CLAS Collaboration at Jefferson Lab. A tagged-photon beam with energies in the 4.8 to 5.4 GeV range, produced through bremsstrahlung from a 5.744 GeV electron beam, was incident on a liquid-hydrogen target. A partial wave analysis was performed on a sample of 83 000 events, the highest such statistics to date in this reaction at these energies. The main objective of this study was to look for the photoproduction of an exotic J;{PC}=1;{-+} resonant state in the 1 to 2 GeV mass range. Our partial wave analysis shows production of the a_{2}(1320) and the pi_{2}(1670) mesons, but no evidence for the a_{1}(1260), nor the pi_{1}(1600) exotic state at the expected levels. An upper limit of 13.5 nb is determined for the exotic pi_{1}(1600) cross section, less than 2% of the a_{2}(1320) production.

  6. Search for the photo-excitation of exotic mesons in the pi+pi+pi- system

    SciTech Connect

    Nozar, Mina; Salgado, Carlos; Weygand, Dennis; Guo, Lei

    2009-01-01

    A search for exotic mesons in the $\\pi^{+}\\pi^{+}\\pi^{-}$ system photoproduced by the charge exchange reaction $\\gamma p\\to \\pi^{+}\\pi^{+}\\pi^{-}(n)$ was carried out by the CLAS collaboration at Jefferson Lab. A tagged-photon beam with energies in the 4.8 to 5.4 GeV range, produced through bremsstrahlung from a 5.744 GeV electron beam, was incident on a liquid-hydrogen target. A Partial Wave Analysis (PWA) was performed on a sample of 83,000 events, the highest such statistics to date in this reaction at these energies. The main objective of this study was to look for the photoproduction of an exotic $J^{PC} = 1^{-+}$ resonant state in the 1 to 2 GeV mass range. Our PWA analysis, based on the isobar model, shows production of the $a_{2}(1320)$ and the $\\pi_{2}(1670)$ mesons, but no evidence for the $a_{1}(1260)$, nor the $\\pi_{1}(1600)$ exotic state at the expected levels. An upper limit of 13.5 nb is determined for the exotic $\\pi_1(1600)$ cross section, less than 2% of the $a_2(1320)

  7. Studies on Nuclear Astrophysics and Exotic Structure at the Low-Energy RI Beam Facility CRIB

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaguchi, H.; Kahl, D.; Hayakawa, S.; Sakaguchi, Y.; Nakao, T.; Wakabayashi, Y.; Hashimoto, T.; Teranishi, T.; Kubono, S.; Cherubini, S.; Mazzocco, M.; Signorini, C.; Gulino, M.; Di Pietro, A.; Figuera, P.; La Cognata, M.; Lattuada, M.; Spitaleri, C.; Torresi, D.; Lee, P. S.; Lee, C. S.; Komatsubara, T.; Iwasa, N.; Okoda, Y.; Pierroutsakou, D.; Parascandolo, C.; La Commara, M.; Strano, E.; Boiano, C.; Boiano, A.; Manea, C.; Sánchez-Benítez, A. M.; Miyatake, H.; Watanabe, Y. X.; Ishiyama, H.; Jeong, S. C.; Imai, N.; Hirayama, Y.; Kimura, S.; Mukai, M.; Kim, Y. H.; Lin, C. J.; Jia, H. M.; Yan, L.; Yang, Y. Y.; Kawabata, T.; Kwon, Y. K.; Binh, D. N.; Khiem, L. H.; Duy, N. N.

    Studies on nuclear astrophysics, resonant structure, and nuclear reaction are going on at CRIB (CNS Radioactive Ion Beam separator), a low-energy RI beam separator operated by Center for Nuclear Study (CNS), the University of Tokyo. Two major methods used at CRIB to study nuclear reactions of astrophysical relevance are the resonant scattering, and direct measurements of (α,p) reactions using a thick-gas target. Several experiments for decay measurements and reaction mechanism are also performed using low-energy RI beams at CRIB. Some of the results from recent experiments at CRIB are discussed.

  8. Nuclear propulsion systems engineering

    SciTech Connect

    Madsen, W.W.; Neuman, J.E.: Van Haaften, D.H.

    1992-12-31

    The Nuclear Energy for Rocket Vehicle Application (NERVA) program of the 1960`s and early 1970`s was dramatically successful, with no major failures during the entire testing program. This success was due in large part to the successful development of a systems engineering process. Systems engineering, properly implemented, involves all aspects of the system design and operation, and leads to optimization of theentire system: cost, schedule, performance, safety, reliability, function, requirements, etc. The process must be incorporated from the very first and continued to project completion. This paper will discuss major aspects of the NERVA systems engineering effort, and consider the implications for current nuclear propulsion efforts.

  9. Nuclear propulsion systems engineering

    SciTech Connect

    Madsen, W.W.; Neuman, J.E.: Van Haaften, D.H.

    1992-01-01

    The Nuclear Energy for Rocket Vehicle Application (NERVA) program of the 1960's and early 1970's was dramatically successful, with no major failures during the entire testing program. This success was due in large part to the successful development of a systems engineering process. Systems engineering, properly implemented, involves all aspects of the system design and operation, and leads to optimization of theentire system: cost, schedule, performance, safety, reliability, function, requirements, etc. The process must be incorporated from the very first and continued to project completion. This paper will discuss major aspects of the NERVA systems engineering effort, and consider the implications for current nuclear propulsion efforts.

  10. Exotic clusters in an unbound region of light neutron-rich systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ito, Makoto

    2009-10-01

    In light neutron-rich systems, many kinds of molecular structures are discussed from the view point of the clustering phenomena.In particular, much attention has been concentrated on Be isotopes. The molecular orbital (MO), such as &-circ; and &+circ; associated with the covalent binding of atomic molecules, have been shown to give a good description for the low-lying states of these isotopes. In their highly-excited states, furthermore, recent experiments revealed the existence of the interesting resonant states which dominantly decay to the ^6,8He fragments. In this report, we show the unified study of the exotic structures of ^12Be=α+α+4N in an unbound region and the α+^6,8He resonant scattering. We applied the generalized two-center cluster model in which the covalent MO and the atomic orbital (AO) configurations with ^xHe+^yHe could be described in a unified manner. First, we calculated the energy spectra below an α decay-threshold. The (π32^-)^2 (σ12^+)^2 configuration corresponding to ν(0p)^4(sd)^2 becomes the ground state, while (π3 2^-)^2(π12^-)^2 having a large overlap with ν(0p)^6 appears as the first excited state. The rotational band of the ground state reaches to the maximum spin of J^π = 8^+. This result means that the magicity of N=8 is broken in ^12Be due to the formation of (π3 2^-)^2(σ12^+)^2. Next, we solved the scattering problem of α+^8He and identified the several resonance poles. In the continuum region, we found the rotational bands having the AO configurations of α+^8He, ^6He+^6He, and ^5He+^7 He. Furthermore, a much more exotic band appears in the same energy region. In this band, two valence neutrons are localized at individual α-cores (the ^5He+^5He cluster), while the other two neutrons form the covalent &+circ;- bonding between two ^5He clusters; hence, it has a ``hybrid structure'' between the MO configuration and the AO one. In the J^π=0^+ state, it is strongly excited by the two-neutron transfer reaction, α+^8He

  11. Exotic neutron-rich medium-mass nuclei with realistic nuclear forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsunoda, Naofumi; Otsuka, Takaharu; Shimizu, Noritaka; Hjorth-Jensen, Morten; Takayanagi, Kazuo; Suzuki, Toshio

    2017-02-01

    We present the first application of the newly developed extended Kuo-Krenciglowa (EKK) theory of the effective nucleon-nucleon interaction to shell-model studies of exotic nuclei, including those where conventional approaches with fitted interactions encounter difficulties. This EKK theory enables us to derive an interaction that is suitable for several major shells (s d +p f in this work). By using such an effective interaction obtained from the Entem-Machleidt QCD-based χ N3LO interaction and the Fujita-Miyazawa three-body force, the energies, E 2 properties, and spectroscopic factors of low-lying states of neutron-rich Ne, Mg, and Si isotopes are nicely described, as the first shell-model description of the "island of inversion" without fit of the interaction. The long-standing question as to how particle-hole excitations occur across the s d -p f magic gap is clarified with distinct differences from the conventional approaches. The shell evolution is shown to appear similarly to earlier studies.

  12. Nuclear medicine imaging system

    DOEpatents

    Bennett, G.W.; Brill, A.B.; Bizais, Y.J.C.; Rowe, R.W.; Zubal, I.G.

    1983-03-11

    It is an object of this invention to provide a nuclear imaging system having the versatility to do positron annihilation studies, rotating single or opposed camera gamma emission studies, and orthogonal gamma emission studies. It is a further object of this invention to provide an imaging system having the capability for orthogonal dual multipinhole tomography. It is another object of this invention to provide a nuclear imaging system in which all available energy data, as well as patient physiological data, are acquired simultaneously in list mode.

  13. Confirmation of the 1-+ meson exotics in the ηπ0 system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, G. S.; Adams, T.; Bar-Yam, Z.; Bishop, J. M.; Bodyagin, V. A.; Brown, D. S.; Cason, N. M.; Chung, S. U.; Cummings, J. P.; Demianov, A. I.; Danyo, K.; Dowd, J. P.; Eugenio, P.; Fan, X. L.; Gribushin, A. M.; Hackenburg, R. W.; Hayek, M.; Hu, J.; Ivanov, E. I.; Joffe, D.; Kern, W.; King, E.; Kodolova, O. L.; Korotkikh, V. L.; Kostin, M. A.; Kuhn, J.; LoSecco, J. M.; Lu, M.; Malinina, L. V.; Manak, J. J.; Nozar, M.; Olchanski, C.; Ostrovidov, A. I.; Pedlar, T. K.; Sarycheva, L. I.; Seth, K. K.; Shenhav, N.; Shen, X.; Shephard, W. D.; Sinev, N. B.; Stienike, D. L.; Suh, J. S.; Taegar, S. A.; Tomaradze, A.; Vardanyan, I. N.; Weygand, D. P.; White, D. B.; Willutzki, H. J.; Witkowski, M.; Yershov, A. A.; E852 Collaboration

    2007-11-01

    The exclusive reaction π- p → ηπ0 n, η →π+π-π0 at 18GeV / c has been studied with a partial wave analysis on a sample of 23 492 ηπ0 n events from BNL experiment E852. A mass-dependent fit is consistent with a resonant hypothesis for the P+ wave, thus providing evidence for a neutral exotic meson with JPC =1-+, a mass of 1257 ± 20 ± 25MeV /c2, and a width of 354 ± 64 ± 60MeV /c2. New interpretations of the meson exotics in neutral ηπ0 system observed in E852 and Crystal Barrel experiments are discussed.

  14. Nuclear Structure Studies of Exotic Nuclei with Radioactive Ion Beams A Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Winger, Jeff Allen

    2016-04-21

    Beta-decay spectroscopy provides important information on nuclear structure and properties needed to understand topics as widely varied as fundamental nuclear astrophysics to applied nuclear reactor design. However, there are significant limitations of our knowledge due to an inability to experimentally measure everything. Therefore, it is often necessary to rely on theoretical calculations which need to be vetted with experimental results. The focus of this report will be results from experimental research performed by the Principal Investigator (PI) and his research group at Mississippi State University in which the group played the lead role in proposing, implementing, performing and analyzing the experiment. This research was carried out at both the National Superconduction Cyclotron Laboratory (NSCL) at Michigan State University and the Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility (HRIBF) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The primary emphasis of the research was the use of \\bdec spectroscopy as a tool to understand the evolution of nuclear structure in neutron-rich nuclei which could then be applied to improve theory and to increase the overall knowledge of nuclear structure.

  15. Life and light: exotic photosynthesis in binary and multiple-star systems.

    PubMed

    O'Malley-James, J T; Raven, J A; Cockell, C S; Greaves, J S

    2012-02-01

    The potential for Earth-like planets within binary/multiple-star systems to host photosynthetic life was evaluated by modeling the levels of photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) such planets receive. Combinations of M and G stars in (i) close-binary systems; (ii) wide-binary systems, and (iii) three-star systems were investigated, and a range of stable radiation environments were found to be possible. These environmental conditions allow for the possibility of familiar, but also more exotic, forms of photosynthetic life, such as IR photosynthesizers and organisms that are specialized for specific spectral niches.

  16. Nuclear Systems Kilopower Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palac, Don; Gibson, Marc; Mason, Lee; Houts, Michael; McClure, Patrick; Robinson, Ross

    2016-01-01

    The Nuclear Systems Kilopower Project was initiated by NASAs Space Technology Mission Directorate Game Changing Development Program in fiscal year 2015 to demonstrate subsystem-level technology readiness of small space fission power in a relevant environment (Technology Readiness Level 5) for space science and human exploration power needs. The Nuclear Systems Kilopower Project consists of two elements. The primary element is the Kilopower Prototype Test, also called the Kilopower Reactor Using Stirling Technology(KRUSTY) Test. This element consists of the development and testing of a fission ground technology demonstrator of a 1 kWe fission power system. A 1 kWe system matches requirements for some robotic precursor exploration systems and future potential deep space science missions, and also allows a nuclear ground technology demonstration in existing nuclear test facilities at low cost. The second element, the Mars Kilopower Scalability Study, consists of the analysis and design of a scaled-up version of the 1 kWe reference concept to 10 kWe for Mars surface power projected requirements, and validation of the applicability of the KRUSTY experiment to key technology challenges for a 10 kWe system. If successful, these two elements will lead to initiation of planning for a technology demonstration of a 10 kWe fission power capability for Mars surface outpost power.

  17. Exotic orbits of asteroids in the solar system and their impacts on space missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwarz, Richard

    2017-01-01

    Speaking of exotic orbits we mean objects in co-orbital motion. Objects in co-orbital motion are two celestial bodies moving in the same orbit or similar distance to the central body then they are in the so called 1:1 mean motion resonance (MMR). There are several configurations of co-orbital objects, depending on their point of libration: 1. The satellite configuration. 2. A common configuration in our Solar System especially for asteroids is the so-called Trojans. These are two groups of asteroids moving close to the equilibrium points (Lagrangian points) L4 and L5 in a 1:1 mean motion resonance with Jupiter (also with Earth, Mars, Uranus and Neptune). That means that Jupiter's Trojans are moving either close to 60° ahead respectively 60° behind the Jupiter with the same semi-major axis as the planet. 3. Similar class to the Trojan class is the horseshoe orbits, in which objects librates around 180° from the planet. 4. Another exotic class of orbits is the exchange orbit that occurs when two co-orbital objects are of similar masses and thus exert a non-negligible influence on each other. The objects can exchange semi-major axes (e.g. Saturnian moons Janus and Epimetheus) or eccentricities when they approach each other. After the success of space missions like SOHO and Herschel-Plank the scientific interest increased towards to the benefit of the Lagrangian points and other exotic motions.

  18. Probing the exotic structure of 8B by its elastic scattering and breakup reaction on nuclear targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lukyanov, V. K.; Kadrev, D. N.; Zemlyanaya, E. V.; Lukyanov, K. V.; Antonov, A. N.; Gaidarov, M. K.; Spasova, K.

    2017-02-01

    The structure of the exotic 8B nucleus is studied by means of elastic scattering, as well as its breakup on nuclear targets. We present microscopic calculations of the optical potentials (OPs) and cross sections of elastic scattering of 8B on 12C, 58Ni, and 208Pb targets at energies 20 < E < 170 MeV. The density distributions of 8B obtained within the variational Monte Carlo (VMC) model and the three-cluster model (3CM) are used to construct the potentials. The real part of the hybrid OP is calculated using the folding model with the direct and exchange terms included, while the imaginary part is obtained on the base of the high-energy approximation (HEA) and also taken to be equal to the microscopic real part of the OP. In this model the only free parameters are the depths of the real and imaginary parts of OP obtained by fitting the elastic scattering experimental data. A dependence of their values on the model density of 8 B is found. In addition, the cluster model, in which 8B consists of a p-halo and the 7 Be core, is applied to calculate the breakup cross sections of the 8B nucleus on 9Be, 12C, and 197Au targets, as well as momentum distributions of 7Be fragments, and a comparison with the existing experimental data is made.

  19. Nuclear core positioning system

    DOEpatents

    Garkisch, Hans D.; Yant, Howard W.; Patterson, John F.

    1979-01-01

    A structural support system for the core of a nuclear reactor which achieves relatively restricted clearances at operating conditions and yet allows sufficient clearance between fuel assemblies at refueling temperatures. Axially displaced spacer pads having variable between pad spacing and a temperature compensated radial restraint system are utilized to maintain clearances between the fuel elements. The core support plates are constructed of metals specially chosen such that differential thermal expansion produces positive restraint at operating temperatures.

  20. Fundamental nucleon-nucleon interaction: probing exotic nuclear structure using GEANIE at LANCE/WNR

    SciTech Connect

    Bernstein, L

    2000-02-25

    The initial goal of this project was to study the in-medium nucleon-nucleon interaction by testing the fundamental theory of nuclear structure, the shell model, for nuclei between {sup 8}Zr and {sup 100}Sn. The shell model predicts that nuclei with ''magic'' (2,8,20,28,40,50, and 82) numbers of protons or neutrons form closed shells in the same fashion as noble gas atoms [may49]. A ''doubly magic'' nucleus with a closed shell of both protons and neutrons has an extremely simple structure and is therefore ideal for studying the nucleon-nucleon interaction. The shell model predicts that doubly magic nuclei will be spherical and that they will have large first-excited-state energies ({approx} 1 to 3 MeV). Although the first four doubly-magic nuclei exhibit this behavior, the N = Z = 40 nucleus, {sup 80}Zr, has a very low first-excited-state energy (290 keV) and appears to be highly deformed. This breakdown is attributed to the small size of the shell gap at N = Z = 40. If this description is accurate, then the N = Z = 50 doubly magic nucleus, {sup 100}Sn, will exhibit ''normal'' closed-shell behavior. The unique insight provided by doubly-magic nuclei from {sup 80}Zr to {sup 100}Sn has made them the focus of tremendous interest in the nuclear structure community. However, doubly-magic nuclei heavier than {sup 56}Ni become increasingly difficult to form due to the coulomb repulsion between the protons which favors the formation of neutron-rich nuclei. The coulomb repulsion creates a ''proton drip-line'' beyond which the addition of any additional bound protons is energetically impossible. The drip line renders the traditional experimental technique used in their formation, the heavy-ion reaction, less than ideal as a method of forming doubly-magic nuclei beyond {sup 80}Zr. The result has been a lack of an new spectroscopic information on doubly magic nuclei in more than a decade [lis87]. Furthermore, uncertainties in reaction dynamics modeling made it difficult for the

  1. Space Nuclear Power Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Houts, Michael G.

    2012-01-01

    Fission power and propulsion systems can enable exciting space exploration missions. These include bases on the moon and Mars; and the exploration, development, and utilization of the solar system. In the near-term, fission surface power systems could provide abundant, constant, cost-effective power anywhere on the surface of the Moon or Mars, independent of available sunlight. Affordable access to Mars, the asteroid belt, or other destinations could be provided by nuclear thermal rockets. In the further term, high performance fission power supplies could enable both extremely high power levels on planetary surfaces and fission electric propulsion vehicles for rapid, efficient cargo and crew transfer. Advanced fission propulsion systems could eventually allow routine access to the entire solar system. Fission systems could also enable the utilization of resources within the solar system.

  2. Nuclear reactor sealing system

    DOEpatents

    McEdwards, James A.

    1983-01-01

    A liquid metal-cooled nuclear reactor sealing system. The nuclear reactor includes a vessel sealed at its upper end by a closure head. The closure head comprises at least two components, one of which is rotatable; and the two components define an annulus therebetween. The sealing system includes at least a first and second inflatable seal disposed in series in an upper portion of the annulus. The system further includes a dip seal extending into a body of insulation located adjacent a bottom portion of the closure head. The dip seal comprises a trough formed by a lower portion of one of the components, and a seal blade pendently supported from the other component and extending downwardly into the trough. A body of liquid metal is contained in the trough which submerges a portion of the seal blade. The seal blade is provided with at least one aperture located above the body of liquid metal for providing fluid communication between the annulus intermediate the dip seal and the inflatable seals, and a body of cover gas located inside the vessel. There also is provided means for introducing a purge gas into the annulus intermediate the inflatable seals and the seal blade. The purge gas is introduced in an amount sufficient to substantially reduce diffusion of radioactive cover gas or sodium vapor up to the inflatable seals. The purge gas mixes with the cover gas in the reactor vessel where it can be withdrawn from the vessel for treatment and recycle to the vessel.

  3. Nuclear reactor shutdown system

    DOEpatents

    Bhate, Suresh K.; Cooper, Martin H.; Riffe, Delmar R.; Kinney, Calvin L.

    1981-01-01

    An inherent shutdown system for a nuclear reactor having neutron absorbing rods affixed to an armature which is held in an upper position by a magnetic flux flowing through a Curie temperature material. The Curie temperature material is fixedly positioned about the exterior of an inner duct in an annular region through which reactor coolant flows. Elongated fuel rods extending from within the core upwardly toward the Curie temperature material are preferably disposed within the annular region. Upon abnormal conditions which result in high neutron flux and coolant temperature, the Curie material loses its magnetic permeability, breaking the magnetic flux path and allowing the armature and absorber rods to drop into the core, thus shutting down the fissioning reaction. The armature and absorber rods are retrieved by lowering the housing for the electromagnet forming coils which create a magnetic flux path which includes the inner duct wall. The coil housing then is raised, resetting the armature.

  4. Nuclear medicine imaging system

    DOEpatents

    Bennett, Gerald W.; Brill, A. Bertrand; Bizais, Yves J. C.; Rowe, R. Wanda; Zubal, I. George

    1986-01-01

    A nuclear medicine imaging system having two large field of view scintillation cameras mounted on a rotatable gantry and being movable diametrically toward or away from each other is disclosed. In addition, each camera may be rotated about an axis perpendicular to the diameter of the gantry. The movement of the cameras allows the system to be used for a variety of studies, including positron annihilation, and conventional single photon emission, as well as static orthogonal dual multi-pinhole tomography. In orthogonal dual multi-pinhole tomography, each camera is fitted with a seven pinhole collimator to provide seven views from slightly different perspectives. By using two cameras at an angle to each other, improved sensitivity and depth resolution is achieved. The computer system and interface acquires and stores a broad range of information in list mode, including patient physiological data, energy data over the full range detected by the cameras, and the camera position. The list mode acquisition permits the study of attenuation as a result of Compton scatter, as well as studies involving the isolation and correlation of energy with a range of physiological conditions.

  5. Nuclear medicine imaging system

    DOEpatents

    Bennett, Gerald W.; Brill, A. Bertrand; Bizais, Yves J.; Rowe, R. Wanda; Zubal, I. George

    1986-01-07

    A nuclear medicine imaging system having two large field of view scintillation cameras mounted on a rotatable gantry and being movable diametrically toward or away from each other is disclosed. In addition, each camera may be rotated about an axis perpendicular to the diameter of the gantry. The movement of the cameras allows the system to be used for a variety of studies, including positron annihilation, and conventional single photon emission, as well as static orthogonal dual multi-pinhole tomography. In orthogonal dual multi-pinhole tomography, each camera is fitted with a seven pinhole collimator to provide seven views from slightly different perspectives. By using two cameras at an angle to each other, improved sensitivity and depth resolution is achieved. The computer system and interface acquires and stores a broad range of information in list mode, including patient physiological data, energy data over the full range detected by the cameras, and the camera position. The list mode acquisition permits the study of attenuation as a result of Compton scatter, as well as studies involving the isolation and correlation of energy with a range of physiological conditions.

  6. Relativistic Energy Density Functionals: Exotic modes of excitation

    SciTech Connect

    Vretenar, D.; Paar, N.; Marketin, T.

    2008-11-11

    The framework of relativistic energy density functionals has been applied to the description of a variety of nuclear structure phenomena, not only in spherical and deformed nuclei along the valley of {beta}-stability, but also in exotic systems with extreme isospin values and close to the particle drip-lines. Dynamical aspects of exotic nuclear structure have been investigated with the relativistic quasiparticle random-phase approximation. We present results for the evolution of low-lying dipole (pygmy) strength in neutron-rich nuclei, and charged-current neutrino-nucleus cross sections.

  7. Strange exotic atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedman, E.

    1998-08-01

    Exotic atoms of K- and Σ- are analyzed using density-dependent optical potentials constrained by a low-density limit. Emphasis is placed on radial sensitivities of the real potential. A potential depth of 180MeV inside nuclei is confirmed for K-. For Σ- a shallow attractive potential outside the nuclear surface becomes repulsive in the interior. The information content of limited data sets is demonstrated.

  8. Dynamical effects in fusion with exotic nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vo-Phuoc, K.; Simenel, C.; Simpson, E. C.

    2016-08-01

    Background: Reactions with stable beams have demonstrated strong interplay between nuclear structure and fusion. Exotic beam facilities open new perspectives to understand the impact of neutron skin, large isospin, and weak binding energies on fusion. Microscopic theories of fusion are required to guide future experiments. Purpose: To investigate new effects of exotic structures and dynamics in near-barrier fusion with exotic nuclei. Method: Microscopic approaches based on the Hartree-Fock (HF) mean-field theory are used for studying fusion barriers in -54Ca40+116Sn reactions for even isotopes. Bare potential barriers are obtained assuming frozen HF ground-state densities. Dynamical effects on the barrier are accounted for in time-dependent Hartree-Fock (TDHF) calculations of the collisions. Vibrational couplings are studied in the coupled-channel framework and near-barrier nucleon transfer is investigated with TDHF calculations. Results: The development of a neutron skin in exotic calcium isotopes strongly lowers the bare potential barrier. However, this static effect is not apparent when dynamical effects are included. On the contrary, a fusion hindrance is observed in TDHF calculations with the most neutron-rich calcium isotopes which cannot be explained by vibrational couplings. Transfer reactions are also important in these systems due to charge equilibration processes. Conclusions: Despite its impact on the bare potential, the neutron skin is not seen as playing an important role in the fusion dynamics. However, the charge transfer with exotic projectiles could lead to an increase of the Coulomb repulsion between the fragments, suppressing fusion. The effects of transfer and dissipative mechanisms on fusion with exotic nuclei deserve further studies.

  9. Exotic power and propulsion concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forward, Robert L.

    1990-01-01

    The status of some exotic physical phenomena and unconventional spacecraft concepts that might produce breakthroughs in power and propulsion in the 21st Century are reviewed. The subjects covered include: electric, nuclear fission, nuclear fusion, antimatter, high energy density materials, metallic hydrogen, laser thermal, solar thermal, solar sail, magnetic sail, and tether propulsion.

  10. Nuclear Safety for Space Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Offiong, Etim

    2010-09-01

    It is trite, albeit a truism, to say that nuclear power can provide propulsion thrust needed to launch space vehicles and also, to provide electricity for powering on-board systems, especially for missions to the Moon, Mars and other deep space missions. Nuclear Power Sources(NPSs) are known to provide more capabilities than solar power, fuel cells and conventional chemical means. The worry has always been that of safety. The earliest superpowers(US and former Soviet Union) have designed and launched several nuclear-powered systems, with some failures. Nuclear failures and accidents, however little the number, could be far-reaching geographically, and are catastrophic to humans and the environment. Building on the numerous research works on nuclear power on Earth and in space, this paper seeks to bring to bear, issues relating to safety of space systems - spacecrafts, astronauts, Earth environment and extra terrestrial habitats - in the use and application of nuclear power sources. It also introduces a new formal training course in Space Systems Safety.

  11. NUCLEAR REACTOR CONTROL SYSTEM

    DOEpatents

    Howard, D.F.; Motta, E.E.

    1961-06-27

    A method for controlling the excess reactivity in a nuclear reactor throughout the core life while maintaining the neutron flux distribution at the desired level is described. The control unit embodies a container having two electrodes of different surface area immersed in an electrolytic solution of a good neutron sbsorbing metal ion such as boron, gadolinium, or cadmium. Initially, the neutron absorber is plated on the larger electrode to control the greater neutron flux of a freshly refueled core. As the fuel burns up, the excess reactivity decreases and the neutron absorber is then plated onto the smaller electrode so that the number of neutrons absorbed also decreases. The excess reactivity in the core may thus be maintained without the introduction of serious perturbations in the neutron flux distributibn.

  12. Single particle versus collectivity, shapes of exotic nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jungclaus, Andrea

    2016-03-01

    In this article some selected topics of nuclear structure research will be discussed as illustration of the progress reached in this field during the last thirty years. These examples evidence the improvement of our understanding of the atomic nucleus reached on the basis of countless experiments, performed to study both exotic nuclei (nuclei far-off the valley of stability) as well as nuclei under exotic conditions (high excitation energy/temperature or large angular momentum/rotational frequency), using stable and radioactive ion beams. The experimental progress, in parallel to the advancement of modern theoretical descriptions, led us to a much richer view of this fundamental many-body system.

  13. The charge breeder beam line for the selective production of exotic species project at INFN-Legnaro National Laboratories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galatà, A.; Comunian, M.; Maggiore, M.; Manzolaro, M.; Angot, J.; Lamy, T.

    2014-02-01

    SPES (Selective Production of Exotic Species) is an INFN (Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare) project with the aim at producing and post-accelerating exotic beams to perform forefront research in nuclear physics. To allow post-acceleration of the radioactive ions, an ECR-based Charge Breeder (CB) developed on the basis of the Phoenix booster was chosen. The design of the complete beam line for the SPES-CB will be described: a system for stable 1+ beams production was included; special attention was paid to the medium resolution mass spectrometer after the CB to limit possible superposition of the exotic beams with the impurities present in the ECR plasma.

  14. Materials challenges for nuclear systems

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, Todd; Busby, Jeremy; Meyer, Mitch; Petti, David

    2010-11-26

    The safe and economical operation of any nuclear power system relies to a great extent, on the success of the fuel and the materials of construction. During the lifetime of a nuclear power system which currently can be as long as 60 years, the materials are subject to high temperature, a corrosive environment, and damage from high-energy particles released during fission. The fuel which provides the power for the reactor has a much shorter life but is subject to the same types of harsh environments. This article reviews the environments in which fuels and materials from current and proposed nuclear systems operate and then describes how the creation of the Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility is allowing researchers from across the U.S. to test their ideas for improved fuels and materials.

  15. Automatically scramming nuclear reactor system

    DOEpatents

    Ougouag, Abderrafi M.; Schultz, Richard R.; Terry, William K.

    2004-10-12

    An automatically scramming nuclear reactor system. One embodiment comprises a core having a coolant inlet end and a coolant outlet end. A cooling system operatively associated with the core provides coolant to the coolant inlet end and removes heated coolant from the coolant outlet end, thus maintaining a pressure differential therebetween during a normal operating condition of the nuclear reactor system. A guide tube is positioned within the core with a first end of the guide tube in fluid communication with the coolant inlet end of the core, and a second end of the guide tube in fluid communication with the coolant outlet end of the core. A control element is positioned within the guide tube and is movable therein between upper and lower positions, and automatically falls under the action of gravity to the lower position when the pressure differential drops below a safe pressure differential.

  16. Materials challenges for nuclear systems

    DOE PAGES

    Allen, Todd; Busby, Jeremy; Meyer, Mitch; ...

    2010-11-26

    The safe and economical operation of any nuclear power system relies to a great extent, on the success of the fuel and the materials of construction. During the lifetime of a nuclear power system which currently can be as long as 60 years, the materials are subject to high temperature, a corrosive environment, and damage from high-energy particles released during fission. The fuel which provides the power for the reactor has a much shorter life but is subject to the same types of harsh environments. This article reviews the environments in which fuels and materials from current and proposed nuclearmore » systems operate and then describes how the creation of the Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility is allowing researchers from across the U.S. to test their ideas for improved fuels and materials.« less

  17. Nuclear Matter Phase Transition in Infinite and Finite Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terranova, S.; Bonasera, A.

    2005-04-01

    A new "semiclassical" model of the nuclear matter, composed of u, d colored quarks, is proposed. The approach, named Constrained Molecular Dynamics (CoMD) is based on the molecular dynamics simulation of the quarks, which interact through the Richardson's potential, and on a constraint due to Pauli blocking. With a suitable choice of the quark masses, some possible Equation of State (EOS) of the nuclear matter, at temperature equal to zero and finite baryon density, are obtained. These equations of state, not only present some known properties of the nuclear matter, as the Quark-Gluon Plasma (QGP) phase transition, but also shown the existence of a new state, the Exotic Color Clustering (ECC) state, in which cluster of quarks with the same color are formed. Some new quantities, "indicators" of the phase transition, are introduced: three order parameters, Mc2, Mc3, Mc4 defined trough the Gell-Mann matrices λα, and the lifetime of the J/Ψ particle. The behavior of the J/Ψ particle is studied also in the "finite" systems, obtained by expanding the corresponding "infinite" systems. It seems that the dynamics and the finite size effects do not wash completely the phase transition occurred in infinite systems, and the J/Ψ particle is still a good signature.

  18. NCIS - a Nuclear Criticality Information System (overview)

    SciTech Connect

    Koponen, B.L.; Hampel, V.E.

    1983-07-01

    A Nuclear Criticality Information System (NCIS) is being established at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) in order to serve personnel responsible for safe storage, transport, and handling of fissile materials and those concerned with the evaluation and analysis of nuclear, critical experiments. Public concern for nuclear safety provides the incentive for improved access to nuclear safety information.

  19. Upgraded NERVA systems: Enabler nuclear system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farbman, Gerry

    1991-01-01

    The NERVA/Rover Enabler technology enables to go on a low risk, short-term program to meet the requirements of the Mars mission and maybe some lunar missions. The following subject areas are covered: NERVA technology - the foundation for tomorrow's space missions; NERVA/Rover reactor system test sequence; NERVA engine development program; nuclear thermal reactor capability based on many related Westinghouse technology programs; investment in Rover/Nerva technology; synergistic applications of NERVA technology; flow schematic of the NDR engine; the NERVA nuclear subsystem; and technology evolution.

  20. Life and the outer planets. II. Enzyme activity in ammonia-water systems and other exotic media at various temperatures.

    PubMed

    Siegel, S M; Speitel, T W

    1977-01-01

    Enzyme activities are customarily measured in aqueous solutions. Activity and thermodynamic parameters are based upon behavior in these solutions although they in no way represent the highly structured internal surface system of the cell. Actual environmental limits for enzyme action may be greater than generally assumed. Peroxidase, catalase, urease and amylase retain activity in drastically modified aqueous and nonaqueous media, including aprotic solvents. Examples include formic acid, methanol, formamide, nitromethane, 10 M LiCl and 15 M aqueous ammonia. Temperatures as low as 225-233 degrees K permit activity in some media. Ammonia-rich environments are compatible with some forms of terrestrial life. Enzyme activity in these exotic media and conditions is relevant to chemical evolution on Jupiter and similar planetary systems.

  1. Exotic shapes and exotic clusterization

    SciTech Connect

    Cseh, J.; Darai, J.; Algora, A.

    2011-10-28

    The interrelation of the largely elongated nuclear shapes and clusterization is discussed by applying semimicroscopic methods. {sup 36}Ar is considered as a specific example, where recent experimental heavy-ion scattering data seem to justify the theoretical predictions on the hyperdeformed states. Alpha-emitting reactions are also suggested for its population.

  2. An imaging nuclear survey system

    SciTech Connect

    Redus, R.; Squillante, M.R.; Gordon, J.S.; Bennett, P.; Entine, G.; Knoll, G.; Wehe, D.; Guru, S.

    1995-12-31

    A combined video and gamma ray imaging system was developed to rapidly determine the location, distribution, and intensity of gamma ray sources. This instrument includes both a conventional video camera and a gamma ray imaging system based on a position sensitive PM tube, scintillator, and pinhole collimator. The gamma camera records position and energy of each interaction, determining the energy spectrum and count rate from each direction. We have used a prototype of this instrument in preliminary field test to image radioactive sources with {gamma} ray energies between 120 keV and 2.4 MeV. This system achieves an angular resolution for the nuclear image of 6{degree} with an efficiency of 3x10{sup -6} at 1 meter, which is suitable for many nuclear applications. Sensitivity is sufficiently high that, in a low background environment, a 1 mCi {sup 137}Cs source at 5 meters can be located in <30 seconds. Alternatively, higher spatial resolution can be attained at lower efficiency and longer imaging times.

  3. Free nuclear precession gradiometer system

    SciTech Connect

    Hinton, G. F.

    1985-10-08

    A free nuclear precession gradiometer uses a fluid sample surrounded by a coil the fluid sample containing one or more nuclear species which display a magnetic moment. Current in the coil polarizes the nucleii, which when the current is abruptly terminated precess coherently about the earth's magnetic field. The exact frequency generated is a precise measure of the absolute value of the earth's magnetic field. The signal is in the form of a damped sinusoid with the rate of decay being a function of gradients in the ambient magnetic field. Two vector magnetometers are mounted rigidly on the sensor at the right angles to each other and to the earth's magnetic field. A servo system continuously orients the sensor in a two-axis gimbal system to reduce the output of the vector magnetometers to zero. The instrument is polarized, a counter is triggered to make the frequency measurement, and the signal is analyzed by determining the average amplitude of the signal over a precise interval of time. The result is simultaneous measurement of total intensity and total gradient.

  4. Nuclear Data Needs for Generation IV Nuclear Energy Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rullhusen, Peter

    2006-04-01

    Nuclear data needs for generation IV systems. Future of nuclear energy and the role of nuclear data / P. Finck. Nuclear data needs for generation IV nuclear energy systems-summary of U.S. workshop / T. A. Taiwo, H. S. Khalil. Nuclear data needs for the assessment of gen. IV systems / G. Rimpault. Nuclear data needs for generation IV-lessons from benchmarks / S. C. van der Marck, A. Hogenbirk, M. C. Duijvestijn. Core design issues of the supercritical water fast reactor / M. Mori ... [et al.]. GFR core neutronics studies at CEA / J. C. Bosq ... [et al]. Comparative study on different phonon frequency spectra of graphite in GCR / Young-Sik Cho ... [et al.]. Innovative fuel types for minor actinides transmutation / D. Haas, A. Fernandez, J. Somers. The importance of nuclear data in modeling and designing generation IV fast reactors / K. D. Weaver. The GIF and Mexico-"everything is possible" / C. Arrenondo Sánchez -- Benmarks, sensitivity calculations, uncertainties. Sensitivity of advanced reactor and fuel cycle performance parameters to nuclear data uncertainties / G. Aliberti ... [et al.]. Sensitivity and uncertainty study for thermal molten salt reactors / A. Biduad ... [et al.]. Integral reactor physics benchmarks- The International Criticality Safety Benchmark Evaluation Project (ICSBEP) and the International Reactor Physics Experiment Evaluation Project (IRPHEP) / J. B. Briggs, D. W. Nigg, E. Sartori. Computer model of an error propagation through micro-campaign of fast neutron gas cooled nuclear reactor / E. Ivanov. Combining differential and integral experiments on [symbol] for reducing uncertainties in nuclear data applications / T. Kawano ... [et al.]. Sensitivity of activation cross sections of the Hafnium, Tanatalum and Tungsten stable isotopes to nuclear reaction mechanisms / V. Avrigeanu ... [et al.]. Generating covariance data with nuclear models / A. J. Koning. Sensitivity of Candu-SCWR reactors physics calculations to nuclear data files / K. S

  5. Fieldable Nuclear Material Identification System

    SciTech Connect

    Radle, James E; Archer, Daniel E; Carter, Robert J; Mullens, James Allen; Mihalczo, John T; Britton Jr, Charles L; Lind, Randall F; Wright, Michael C

    2010-01-01

    The Fieldable Nuclear Material Identification System (FNMIS), funded by the NA-241 Office of Dismantlement and Transparency, provides information to determine the material attributes and identity of heavily shielded nuclear objects. This information will provide future treaty participants with verifiable information required by the treaty regime. The neutron interrogation technology uses a combination of information from induced fission neutron radiation and transmitted neutron imaging information to provide high confidence that the shielded item is consistent with the host's declaration. The combination of material identification information and the shape and configuration of the item are very difficult to spoof. When used at various points in the warhead dismantlement sequence, the information complimented by tags and seals can be used to track subassembly and piece part information as the disassembly occurs. The neutron transmission imaging has been developed during the last seven years and the signature analysis over the last several decades. The FNMIS is the culmination of the effort to put the technology in a usable configuration for potential treaty verification purposes.

  6. Exotic dancing and health.

    PubMed

    Maticka-Tyndale, E; Lewis, J; Clark, J P; Zubick, J; Young, S

    2000-01-01

    The health and safety of women who work as exotic dancers are firmly embedded within the social organization of the strip club and the broader social, economic and political context of the work of exotic dancing. Exotic dancers in this study expressed health concerns associated with: the effects of costuming and appearance requirements; dirty work environments; problems due to stigmatization, sexual harassment and assault; and police disinterest or victim blaming. The balance between benefits and hazards related to exotic dancing is influenced not only by the personal choices made by dancers, but also by the organization of the strip club and the broader context within which exotic dancing takes place.

  7. NASA Missions Enabled by Space Nuclear Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott, John H.; Schmidt, George R.

    2009-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews NASA Space Missions that are enabled by Space Nuclear Systems. The topics include: 1) Space Nuclear System Applications; 2) Trade Space for Electric Power Systems; 3) Power Generation Specific Energy Trade Space; 4) Radioisotope Power Generation; 5) Radioisotope Missions; 6) Fission Power Generation; 7) Solar Powered Lunar Outpost; 8) Fission Powered Lunar Outpost; 9) Fission Electric Power Generation; and 10) Fission Nuclear Thermal Propulsion.

  8. Physics of Exotic Nuclei at RIBF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakurai, Hiroyoshi

    2014-09-01

    ``Exotic nuclei'' far from the stability line are unique objects of many-body quantum system, where ratios of neutron number to proton number are much larger or much smaller than those of nuclei found in nature. Their exotic properties and phenomena emerge from their large isospin asymmetry, and even affect scenarios of nucleosynthesis in the universe. Efforts have been made to produce and investigate such exotic nuclei at the accelerator facilities in the world. One of the facilities, the Radioactive Isotope Beam Factory (RIBF) facility at RIKEN, Japan has delivered intense radioactive isotope (RI) beams since 2007. In US, the Facility for Rare Isotope Beams is being constructed to start around 2020. To access nuclei far from the stability line, especially neutron-rich nuclei, the RIBF facility is highly optimized for inflight production of fission fragments via a U beam. The Super-conducting Ring Cyclotron delivers a 345 MeV/u U beam. The U nuclide is converted at a target to fission fragments. An inflight separator BigRIPS was designed to collect about 50% of fission fragments produced at the target and separate nuclei of interest. The RI beams produced at BigRIPS are then delivered to several experimental devices. Large-scale international collaborations have been formed at three spectrometers to conduct unique programs for the investigation of decay properties single particle orbits, collective motions, nucleon correlation, and the equation-of-state of asymmetric nuclear matter. Nuclear binding energy will be measured at a newly constructed ring for the r-process path, and charge distribution of exotic nuclei will be examined at a unique setup of an RI target section in an electron storage ring. Ultra slow RI beams available at a gas catcher system will be utilized for table-top and high precision measurements. In this talk, I would give a facility overview of RIBF, and introduce objectives at RIBF. Special emphasis would be given to selected recent highlights

  9. Multimegawatt nuclear power systems for nuclear electric propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    George, Jeffrey A.

    1991-01-01

    Results from systems analysis studies of multimegawatt nuclear power systems are presented for application to nuclear electric propulsion. Specific mass estimates are presented for nearer term SP-100 reactor-based potassium Rankine and Brayton power systems for piloted and cargo missions. Growth SP-100/Rankine systems were found to range from roughly 7 to 10 kg/kWe specific mass depending on full power life requirements. The SP-100/Rankine systems were also found to result in a 4-kg/kWe savings in specific mass over SP-100/Brayton systems. The potential of advanced, higher temperature reactor and power conversion technologies for achieving reduced mass Rankine and Brayton systems was also investigated. A target goal of 5 kg/kWe specific mass was deemed reasonable given either 1400 K potassium Rankine with 1500 K lithium-cooled reactors or 2000 K gas cooled reactors with Brayton conversion.

  10. Nuclear Space Power Systems Materials Requirements

    SciTech Connect

    Buckman, R.W. Jr.

    2004-02-04

    High specific energy is required for space nuclear power systems. This generally means high operating temperatures and the only alloy class of materials available for construction of such systems are the refractory metals niobium, tantalum, molybdenum and tungsten. The refractory metals in the past have been the construction materials selected for nuclear space power systems. The objective of this paper will be to review the past history and requirements for space nuclear power systems from the early 1960's through the SP-100 program. Also presented will be the past and present status of refractory metal alloy technology and what will be needed to support the next advanced nuclear space power system. The next generation of advanced nuclear space power systems can benefit from the review of this past experience. Because of a decline in the refractory metal industry in the United States, ready availability of specific refractory metal alloys is limited.

  11. Precision lifetime measurements in light exotic nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCutchan, Elizabeth

    2017-01-01

    A new generation of ab-initio calculations, based on realistic two- and three-body forces have had a profound impact on our understanding of nuclei. They have shed light on topics such as the origin of effective forces (like spin-orbit and tensor interactions) and the mechanisms behind cluster and pairing correlations. New precise data are required to both better parameterize the three body forces and to improve numerical methods. A sensitive probe of the structure of light nuclei comes from their electromagnetic transition rates. A refined Doppler Shift Attenuation Method (DSAM) will be outlined which is used to precisely measure lifetimes in light nuclei and helps to reduce and quantity systematic uncertainties in the measurement. Using this careful DSAM, we have made a series of precise measurements of electromagnetic transition strengths in Li isotopes, A =10 nuclei, and the exotic halo nucleus, 12Be. Various phenomena, such as alpha clustering and meson-exchange currents, can be investigated in these seemingly simple systems, while the collection of data spanning stable to neutron-rich, allows us to probe the influence of additional valence neutrons. This talk will report on what has been learned, and the challenges that lie in the future, both in experiment and theory, as we push to describing and measuring even more exotic systems. Work supported by the Office of Nuclear Physics, Office of Science of the U.S. Department of Energy under contract No. DE-AC02-98CH10886.

  12. Experience with Nuclear Medicine Information System

    PubMed Central

    Volkan-Salanci, Bilge; Şahin, Figen; Babekoğlu, Vahide; Uğur, Ömer

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Radiology information system (RIS) is basically evolved for the need of radiologists and ignores the vital steps needed for a proper work flow of Nuclear Medicine Department. Moreover, CT/MRI oriented classical PACS systems are far from satisfying Nuclear Physicians like storing dynamic data for reprocessing and quantitative analysis of colored images. Our purpose was to develop a workflow based Nuclear Medicine Information System (NMIS) that fulfills the needs of Nuclear Medicine Department and its integration to hospital PACS system. Material and Methods: Workflow in NMIS uses HL7 (health level seven) and steps include, patient scheduling and retrieving information from HIS (hospital information system), radiopharmacy, acquisition, digital reporting and approval of the reports using Nuclear Medicine specific diagnostic codes. Images and dynamic data from cameras of are sent to and retrieved from PACS system (Corttex©) for reprocessing and quantitative analysis. Results: NMIS has additional functions to the RIS such as radiopharmaceutical management program which includes stock recording of both radioactive and non-radioactive substances, calculation of the radiopharmaceutical dose for individual patient according to body weight and maximum permissible activity, and calculation of radioactivity left per unit volume for each radionuclide according their half lives. Patient scheduling and gamma camera patient work list settings were arranged according to specific Nuclear Medicine procedures. Nuclear Medicine images and reports can be retrieved and viewed from HIS. Conclusion: NMIS provides functionality to standard RIS and PACS system according to the needs of Nuclear Medicine. Conflict of interest:None declared. PMID:23487446

  13. 77 FR 28407 - Special Nuclear Material Control and Accounting Systems for Nuclear Power Plants

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-14

    ... fundamentals of an SNM control and accounting system, including criteria for the receipt, internal control... COMMISSION Special Nuclear Material Control and Accounting Systems for Nuclear Power Plants AGENCY: Nuclear...-5028, ``Special Nuclear Material Control and Accounting Systems for Nuclear Power Plants.'' In...

  14. Transactions of the fourth symposium on space nuclear power systems

    SciTech Connect

    El-Genk, M.S.; Hoover, M.D.

    1987-01-01

    This paper contains the presented papers at the fourth symposium on space nuclear power systems. Topics of these papers include: space nuclear missions and applications, reactors and shielding, nuclear electric and nuclear propulsion, refractory alloys and high-temperature materials, instrumentation and control, energy conversion and storage, space nuclear fuels, thermal management, nuclear safety, simulation and modeling, and multimegawatt system concepts. (LSP)

  15. Transactions of the fifth symposium on space nuclear power systems

    SciTech Connect

    El-Genk, M.S.; Hoover, M.D.

    1988-01-01

    This paper contains the presented papers at the fourth symposium on space nuclear power systems. Topics of these paper include: space nuclear missions and applications, reactors and shielding, nuclear electric and nuclear propulsion, high-temperature materials, instrumentation and control, energy conversion and storage, space nuclear fuels, thermal management, nuclear safety, simulation and modeling, and multimegawatt system concepts. (LSP)

  16. Non-Nuclear Testing of Space Nuclear Systems at NASA MSFC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Houts, Michael G.; Pearson, Boise J.; Aschenbrenner, Kenneth C.; Bradley, David E.; Dickens, Ricky; Emrich, William J.; Garber, Anne; Godfroy, Thomas J.; Harper, Roger T.; Martin, Jim J.; Polzin, Kurt; Schoenfeld, Michael P.; Webster, Kenneth L.

    2010-01-01

    Highly realistic non-nuclear testing can be used to investigate and resolve potential issues with space nuclear power and propulsion systems. Non-nuclear testing is particularly useful for systems designed with fuels and materials operating within their demonstrated nuclear performance envelope. Non-nuclear testing allows thermal hydraulic, heat transfer, structural, integration, safety, operational, performance, and other potential issues to be investigated and resolved with a greater degree of flexibility and at reduced cost and schedule compared to nuclear testing. The primary limit of non-nuclear testing is that nuclear characteristics and potential nuclear issues cannot be directly investigated. However, non-nuclear testing can be used to augment the potential benefit from any nuclear testing that may be required for space nuclear system design and development. This paper describes previous and ongoing non-nuclear testing related to space nuclear systems at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC).

  17. Exotic Mammal Laparoscopy.

    PubMed

    Sladakovic, Izidora; Divers, Stephen J

    2016-01-01

    Laparoscopy is an evolving field in veterinary medicine, and there is an increased interest in using laparoscopic techniques in nondomestic mammals, including zoo animals, wildlife, and exotic pets. The aim of this article is to summarize the approach to laparoscopic procedures, including instrumentation, patient selection and preparation, and surgical approaches, and to review the current literature on laparoscopy in exotic mammals.

  18. Nuclear power propulsion system for spacecraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koroteev, A. S.; Oshev, Yu. A.; Popov, S. A.; Karevsky, A. V.; Solodukhin, A. Ye.; Zakharenkov, L. E.; Semenkin, A. V.

    2015-12-01

    The proposed designs of high-power space tugs that utilize solar or nuclear energy to power an electric jet engine are reviewed. The conceptual design of a nuclear power propulsion system (NPPS) is described; its structural diagram, gas circuit, and electric diagram are discussed. The NPPS incorporates a nuclear reactor, a thermal-to-electric energy conversion system, a system for the conversion and distribution of electric energy, and an electric propulsion system. Two criterion parameters were chosen in the considered NPPS design: the temperature of gaseous working medium at the nuclear reactor outlet and the rotor speed of turboalternators. The maintenance of these parameters at a given level guarantees that the needed electric voltage is generated and allows for power mode control. The processes of startup/shutdown and increasing/reducing the power, the principles of distribution of electric energy over loads, and the probable emergencies for the proposed NPPS design are discussed.

  19. Dual mode nuclear rocket system applications.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boretz, J. E.; Bell, J. M.; Plebuch, R. K.; Priest, C. C.

    1972-01-01

    Mission areas where the dual-mode nuclear rocket system is superior to nondual-mode systems are demonstrated. It is shown that the dual-mode system is competitive with the nondual-mode system even for those specific missions and particular payload configurations where it does not have a clear-cut advantage.

  20. Nuclear Power Sources for Space Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kukharkin, N. E.; Ponomarev-Stepnoi, N. N.; Usov, V. A.

    This chapter contains the information about nuclear power sources for space systems. Reactor nuclear sources are considered that use the energy of heavy nuclei fission generated by controlled chain fission reaction, as well as the isotope ones producing heat due to the energy of nuclei radioactive decay. Power of reactor nuclear sources is determined by the rate of heavy nuclei fission that may be controlled within a wide range from the zero up to the nominal one. Thermal power of isotope sources cannot be controlled. It is determined by the type and quantity of isotopes and decreases in time due to their radioactive decay. Both, in the reactor sources and in the isotope ones, nuclear power is converted into the thermal one that may be consumed for the coolant heating to produce thrust (Nuclear Power Propulsion System, NPPS) or may be converted into electricity (Nuclear Power Source, NPS) dynamically (a turbine generator) or statically (thermoelectric or thermionic converters). Electric power is supplied to the airborne equipment or is used to produce thrust in electric (ionic, plasma) low-thrust engines. A brief description is presented of the different nuclear systems with reactor and isotopic power sources implemented in Russia and the USA. The information is also given about isotopic sources for the ground-based application, mainly for navigation systems.

  1. Nano-fabrication with metallic glass-an exotic material for nano-electromechanical systems.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Parmanand; Kaushik, Neelam; Kimura, Hisamichi; Saotome, Yasunori; Inoue, Akihisa

    2007-01-24

    Completely glassy thin films of Zr-Al-Cu-Ni exhibiting a large supercooled liquid region (DeltaT(x) = 95 K), very smooth surface (R(a) = 0.2 nm) and high value of Vickers hardness (H(v) = 940) were deposited by sputtering. The micro/nano-patterning ability of these films is demonstrated by focused ion beam etching (smallest pattern approximately 12 nm), as well as by the imprint lithography technique (smallest feature approximately 34 nm). These glassy films having very good mechanical and chemical properties, combined with superb nano-patterning ability, integrateable with silicon integrated circuit technology, are promising for fabrication of a wide range of two- or three-dimensional components for future nano-electromechanical systems.

  2. Role of native and exotic woody vegetation in soil restoration in active gully systems (southern Ecuador)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borja Ramon, Pablo; Alvarado Moncayo, Dario; Vanacker, Veerle; Cisneros, Pedro; Molina, Armando; Govers, Gerard

    2015-04-01

    Revegetation projects in degraded lands have the potential to recover essential soil functions. If vegetation restoration is combined with bioengineering techniques, such as the construction of retention dams in active gully systems, soil restoration could be enhanced. One important aspect of this process is the role of vegetation on restoration of soil chemical and physical properties. There is currently a lack of knowledge on the potential of soil restoration in active badland systems, as most studies have concentrated on the direct and visible effect of revegetation on erosion control. The aim of this study is to evaluate the role of revegetation and bioengineering works on the restoration of soil physical and chemical properties. The analyses are realized in a highly degraded area of 3 km2, located in the lower part of the Loreto catchment (Southern Ecuadorian Andes). First, the soil physical and/or chemical parameters that are most sensitive to track environmental change were evaluated. Second, the role of vegetation on soil restoration was quantified. . Soil samples were taken in sites with different vegetation cover, land use and physiographic position. The following physical and chemical parameters were measured: volumetric water content (θsat, θact), bulk density, pH, texture, organic matter, C and N content. Our first results do not show a clear relationship between volumetric water content at saturation (θsat), bulk density, or C content. The saturation water content does not vary significantly between different sites, or land use types. However, significant differences are found between sites at different stages of restoration; and this for most chemical and physical soil properties. Vegetation cover (%) appears to exert a strong control on the C content in the mineral soils. The highest C values are found in soils of forest plantations with Eucalyptus and Pinus species. These plantations are located in areas that were previously affected by active

  3. Safe, Affordable, Nuclear Thermal Propulsion Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Houts, M. G.; Kim, T.; Emrich, W. J.; Hickman, R. R.; Broadway, J. W.; Gerrish, H. P.; Doughty, G. E.

    2014-01-01

    The fundamental capability of Nuclear Thermal Propulsion (NTP) is game changing for space exploration. A first generation Nuclear Cryogenic Propulsion Stage (NCPS) based on NTP could provide high thrust at a specific impulse above 900 s, roughly double that of state of the art chemical engines. Characteristics of fission and NTP indicate that useful first generation systems will provide a foundation for future systems with extremely high performance. The role of the NCPS in the development of advanced nuclear propulsion systems could be analogous to the role of the DC-3 in the development of advanced aviation. Progress made under the NCPS project could help enable both advanced NTP and advanced Nuclear Electric Propulsion (NEP).

  4. Decontamination of nuclear systems at the Grand Gulf Nuclear Station

    SciTech Connect

    Weed, R.D.; Baker, K.R.

    1996-12-31

    Early in 1994 Management at the Grand Gulf Nuclear Station realized that a potential decontamination of several reactor systems was needed to maintain the commitments to the {open_quotes}As Low As Reasonably Achievable{close_quotes} (ALARA) program. There was a substantial amount of planned outage work required to repair and replace some internals in loop isolation valves and there were inspections and other outage work that needed to be accomplished as it had been postponed from previous outages because of the radiation exposure levels in and around the system equipment. Management scheduled for the procurement specification to be revised to incorporate additional boundary areas which had not been previously considered. The schedule included the period for gathering bids, awarding a contract, and reviewing the contractor`s procedures and reports and granting approval for the decontamination to proceed during the upcoming outage. In addition to the reviews required by the engineering group for overall control of the process, the plant system engineers had to prepare procedures at the system level to provide for a smooth operation to be made during the decontamination of the systems. The system engineers were required to make certain that the decontamination fluids would be contained within the systems being decontaminated and that they would not cross contaminate any other system not being decontaminated. Since these nuclear stations do not have the provisions for decontaminating these systems with using additional equipment, the equipment required is furnished by the contractor as skid mounted packaged units which can be moved into the area, set up near the system being decontaminated, and after the decontamination is completed, the skid mounted packages are removed as part of the contract. Figure 1 shows a typical setup in block diagram required to perform a reactor system decontamination. 1 fig.

  5. Establishment, sex structure and breeding system of an exotic riparian willow, Salix X rubens

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shafroth, Patrick B.; Scott, Michael L.; Friedman, Jonathan M.; Laven, Richard D.

    1994-01-01

    Several Eurasian tree willows (Salix spp.) have become naturalized in riparian areas outside of their native range. Salix x rubens is a Eurasian willow that is conspicuous along streams in the high plains of Colorado. We examined establishment of seedlings and cuttings, the sex structure and the breeding system of S. x rubens. An experiment was conducted on establishment and growth of seedlings and cuttings under a range of hydrologic conditions. Seedlings became established under all conditions except when flooded, although many fewer seedlings became established where soil surface conditions were relatively dry. Cuttings became established under all experimental conditions, but most frequently where soil moisture was highest. The sex structure of S. x rubens was determined along several streams in the Colorado high plains. Of 2175 trees surveyed, >99% (2172) were female. Salix x rubens produce viable seed apparently as a result of hybridization with another Eurasian willow, S. alba var. vitellina. Salix x rubens often reproduces vegetatively, which, combined with low hybrid seedling survival in the field, may explain the unusual sex structure. Salix x rubens will likely continue to spread vegetatively in high plains riparian areas, and the potential for spread through hybridization could increase if males of compatible Salix spp. are planted near extant S. x rubens.

  6. Nuclear Materials Identification System Operational Manual

    SciTech Connect

    Chiang, L.G.

    2001-04-10

    This report describes the operation and setup of the Nuclear Materials Identification System (NMIS) with a {sup 252}Cf neutron source at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant. The components of the system are described with a description of the setup of the system along with an overview of the NMIS measurements for scanning, calibration, and confirmation of inventory items.

  7. Exotic statistics of leapfrogging vortex rings.

    PubMed

    Niemi, Antti J

    2005-04-01

    The leapfrogging motion of vortex rings is a three-dimensional version of the motion that in two dimensions leads to exotic exchange statistics. The statistical phase factor can be computed using the hydrodynamical Euler equation, which suggests that three-dimensional exotic exchange statistics is a common property of vortex rings in a variety of quantum liquids and gases. Potential applications range from helium superfluids to Bose-Einstein condensed alkali gases, metallic hydrogen in its liquid phases, and maybe even nuclear matter in extreme conditions.

  8. Reaction theory for exotic nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Bonaccorso, Angela

    2014-05-09

    Exotic nuclei are usually defined as those with unusual N/Z ratios. They can be found in the crust of neutron stars enbedded in a sea of electrons or created in laboratory by fragmentation of a primary beam (in-flight method) or of the target (ISOL method). They are extremely important for nuclear astrophysics, see for example Ref.[1]. Furthermore by studying them we can check the limits of validity of nuclear reaction and structure models. This contribution will be devoted to the understanding of how by using reaction theory and comparing to the data we can extract structure information. We shall discuss the differences between the mechanisms of transfer and breakup reactions, an we will try to explain how nowadays it is possible to do accurate spectroscopy in extreme conditions.

  9. Nuclear Technology Series. Course 5: Introduction to Nuclear Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center for Occupational Research and Development, Inc., Waco, TX.

    This technical specialty course is one of thirty-five courses designed for use by two-year postsecondary institutions in five nuclear technician curriculum areas: (1) radiation protection technician, (2) nuclear instrumentation and control technician, (3) nuclear materials processing technician, (4) nuclear quality-assurance/quality-control…

  10. Nuclear Technology Series. Course 24: Nuclear Systems and Safety.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center for Occupational Research and Development, Inc., Waco, TX.

    This technical specialty course is one of thirty-five courses designed for use by two-year postsecondary institutions in five nuclear technician curriculum areas: (1) radiation protection technician, (2) nuclear instrumentation and control technician, (3) nuclear materials processing technician, (4) nuclear quality-assurance/quality-control…

  11. Reductions in native grass biomass associated with drought facilitates the invasion of an exotic grass into a model grassland system.

    PubMed

    Manea, Anthony; Sloane, Daniel R; Leishman, Michelle R

    2016-05-01

    The invasion success of exotic plant species is often dependent on resource availability. Aspects of climate change such as rising atmospheric CO2 concentration and extreme climatic events will directly and indirectly alter resource availability in ecological communities. Understanding how these climate change-associated changes in resource availability will interact with one another to influence the invasion success of exotic plant species is complex. The aim of the study was to assess the establishment success of an invasive exotic species in response to climate change-associated changes in resource availability (CO2 levels and soil water availability) as a result of extreme drought. We grew grassland mesocosms consisting of four co-occurring native grass species common to the Cumberland Plain Woodland of western Sydney, Australia, under ambient and elevated CO2 levels and subjected them to an extreme drought treatment. We then added seeds of a highly invasive C3 grass, Ehrharta erecta, and assessed its establishment success (biomass production and reproductive output). We found that reduced biomass production of the native grasses in response to the extreme drought treatment enhanced the establishment success of E. erecta by creating resource pulses in light and space. Surprisingly, CO2 level did not affect the establishment success of E. erecta. Our results suggest that the invasion risk of grasslands in the future may be coupled to soil water availability and the subsequent response of resident native vegetation therefore making it strongly context- dependent.

  12. Review of Nuclear Thermal Propulsion Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabrielli, Roland Antonius; Herdrich, Georg

    2015-11-01

    This article offers a summary of past efforts in the development of Nuclear Thermal Propulsion systems for space transportation. First, the generic principle of thermal propulsion is outlined: a propellant is directly heated by a power source prior to being expanded which creates a thrusting force on the rocket. This enables deriving a motivation for the use of Nuclear Thermal Propulsion (NTP) relying on nuclear power sources. Then, a summary of major families of NTP systems is established on the basis of a literature survey. These families are distinguished by the nature of their power source, the most important being systems with radioisotope, fission, and fusion cores. Concepts proposing to harness the annihilation of matter and anti-matter are only touched briefly due to their limited maturity. For each family, an overview of physical fundamentals, technical concepts, and - if available - tested engines' propulsion parameters is given.

  13. 78 FR 38739 - Special Nuclear Material Control and Accounting Systems for Nuclear Power Plants

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-27

    ... COMMISSION Special Nuclear Material Control and Accounting Systems for Nuclear Power Plants AGENCY: Nuclear... Accounting Systems for Nuclear Power Plants.'' This regulatory guide provides guidance on recordkeeping and reporting requirements with respect to material control and accounting. This guide applies to all...

  14. Remote nuclear screening system for hostile environments

    SciTech Connect

    Addleman, R.S.; Beck, M.A.; Blewett, G.R.; Selle, E.R.; McClellan, C.S.; Dodd, D.A.; Troyer, G.L.; Keele, B.D.

    1996-02-27

    A remote measurement system has been constructed for in situ gamma and beta isotopic characterization of highly radioactive nuclear material in hostile environments. A small collimated, planar CdZnTe detector is used for gamma-ray spectroscopy. Spectral resolution of 2% full width at half maximum at 662 kiloelectronvolts has been obtained remotely using rise time compensation and limited pulse shape discrimination, Isotopc measurement of high-energy beta emitters was accomplished with a ruggedized, deeply depleted, surface barrier silicon dictator. The primary function of the remote nuclear screening system is to provide fast qualitative and quantitative isotopic assessment of high-level radioactive material.

  15. Review of Current Nuclear Vacuum System Technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Carroll, M.; McCracken, J.; Shope, T.

    2003-02-25

    Nearly all industrial operations generate unwanted dust, particulate matter, and/or liquid wastes. Waste dust and particulates can be readily tracked to other work locations, and airborne particulates can be spread through ventilation systems to all locations within a building, and even vented outside the building - a serious concern for processes involving hazardous, radioactive, or nuclear materials. Several varieties of vacuum systems have been proposed and/or are commercially available for clean up of both solid and liquid hazardous and nuclear materials. A review of current technologies highlights both the advantages and disadvantages of the various systems, and demonstrates the need for a system designed to address issues specific to hazardous and nuclear material cleanup. A review of previous and current hazardous/nuclear material cleanup technologies is presented. From simple conventional vacuums modified for use in industrial operations, to systems specifically engineered for such purposes, the advantages and disadvantages are examined in light of the following criteria: minimal worker exposure; minimal secondary waste generation;reduced equipment maintenance and consumable parts; simplicity of design, yet fully compatible with all waste types; and ease of use. The work effort reviews past, existing and proposed technologies in light of such considerations. Accomplishments of selected systems are presented, including identified areas where technological improvements could be suggested.

  16. 21 CFR 892.1310 - Nuclear tomography system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Nuclear tomography system. 892.1310 Section 892...) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1310 Nuclear tomography system. (a) Identification. A nuclear tomography system is a device intended to detect nuclear radiation in the body...

  17. 21 CFR 892.1310 - Nuclear tomography system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Nuclear tomography system. 892.1310 Section 892...) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1310 Nuclear tomography system. (a) Identification. A nuclear tomography system is a device intended to detect nuclear radiation in the body...

  18. Exotic Meson Results from BNL E852

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manak, Joseph J.

    1998-10-01

    Results from BNL experiment 852 on exotic (non-q\\overlineq) meson production are presented. Production of final states with J^PC = 1^-+ is observed in π^-p interactions at 18 GeV/c in the ηπ^-, ρπ^- and η^'π^- channels. Since such states are manifestly exotic if they are resonant, we describe amplitude analyses which use the interference between these states and other well known states to measure the phase behavior of the J^PC = 1^-+ amplitudes. The analyses show that, in addition to the previously reported(D.R. Thompson et al.), Phys. Rev. Lett. 79, 1630 (1997) evidence for an exotic meson in the ηπ^- channel, there is strong evidence for a second exotic meson decaying to ρπ^- with a mass of M=1593 ±8^+29_-47 MeV/c^2 and a width of Γ=168 ±20^+150_-12 MeV/c^2. We also show that the η^'π^- system is dominated by J^PC = 1^-+ production and we use those data to determine decay branching ratios for the exotic mesons. Such measurements are expected to be crucial in determining the constituent nature of the exotic mesons - that is, whether they are consistent with being hybrid mesons or four-quark states.

  19. TOPAZ-2 Nuclear Power System safety assurance

    SciTech Connect

    Nikitin, V.P.; Ogloblin, B.G.; Lutov, Y.I.; Luppov, A.N.; Shalaev, A.I. ); Ponomarev-Stepnoi, N.N.; Usov, V.A.; Nechaev, Y.A. )

    1993-01-15

    TOPAZ-2 Nuclear Power System (NPS) safety philosophy is based on the requirement that the reactor shall not be critical during all kinds of operations prior to its start-up on the safe orbit (except for physical start-up). Potentially dangerous operation were analyzed and both computational and experimental studies were carried out.

  20. Space nuclear system expansion joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitaker, W. D.; Shimazki, T. T.

    1973-01-01

    The engineering, design, and fabrication status of the expansion joint unit (EJU) to be employed in the NaK primary coolant piping loop of the 5-kwe Reactor thermoelectric system are described. Four EJU's are needed in the NaK primary coolant piping loop. The four EJU's which will be identical, utilize bellows as the flexing member, are hermetically sealed, and provide double containment. The bellows are of a nested-formed design, and are to be constructed of 1-ply thickness of 0.010-in. Inconel 718. The EJU's provide a minimum piping load margin of safety of +0.22.

  1. Nuclear systems for space power and propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klein, M.

    1971-01-01

    As exploration and utilization of space proceeds through the 1970s, 1980s, and beyond, spacecraft in earth orbit will become increasingly larger, spacecraft will travel deeper into space, and space activities will involve more complex operations. These trends require increasing amounts of energy for power and propulsion. The role to be played by nuclear energy is presented, including plans for deep space missions using radioisotope generators, the reactor power systems for earth orbiting stations and satellites, and the role of nuclear propulsion in space transportation.

  2. Supplements for exotic pets.

    PubMed

    Mejia-Fava, Johanna; Colitz, Carmen M H

    2014-09-01

    The use of supplements has become commonplace in an effort to complement traditional therapy and as part of long-term preventive health plans. This article discusses historical and present uses of antioxidants, vitamins, and herbs. By complementing traditional medicine with holistic and alternative nutrition and supplements, the overall health and wellness of exotic pets can be enhanced and balanced. Further research is needed for understanding the strengths and uses of supplements in exotic species. Going back to the animals' origin and roots bring clinicians closer to nature and its healing powers.

  3. NADS - Nuclear and Atomic Data System

    SciTech Connect

    McKinley, Michael S.; Beck, Bret; McNabb, Dennis

    2005-05-24

    We have developed NADS (Nuclear and Atomic Data System), a web-based graphical interface for viewing pointwise and grouped cross sections and distributions. Our implementation is a client / server model. The client is a Java applet that displays the graphical interface, which has interactive 2-D, 3-D, and 4-D plots and tables. The server, which can serve and perform computations of the data, has been implemented in Python using the FUDGE package developed by Bret Beck at LLNL. Computational capabilities include algebraic manipulation of nuclear evaluated data in databases such as LLNL's ENDL-99, ENDF/B-V, and ENDF/B-VI, as well as user data. Processed data used in LLNL's transport codes are accessible as well. NADS is available from http://nuclear.llnl.gov/.

  4. NADS - Nuclear And Atomic Data System

    SciTech Connect

    McKinley, M S; Beck, B; McNabb, D

    2004-09-17

    We have developed NADS (Nuclear and Atomic Data System), a web-based graphical interface for viewing pointwise and grouped cross-sections and distributions. Our implementation is a client / server model. The client is a Java applet that displays the graphical interface, which has interactive 2-D, 3-D, and 4-D plots and tables. The server, which can serve and perform computations the data, has been implemented in Python using the FUDGE package developed by Bret Beck at LLNL. Computational capabilities include algebraic manipulation of nuclear evaluated data in databases such as LLNL's ENDL-99, ENDF/B-V and ENDF/B-VI as well as user data. Processed data used in LLNL's transport codes are accessible as well. NADS is available from http://nuclear.llnl.gov/

  5. Integrated nuclear data utilisation system for innovative reactors.

    PubMed

    Yamano, N; Hasegawa, A; Kato, K; Igashira, M

    2005-01-01

    A five-year research and development project on an integrated nuclear data utilisation system was initiated in 2002, for developing innovative nuclear energy systems such as accelerator-driven systems. The integrated nuclear data utilisation system will be constructed as a modular code system, which consists of two sub-systems: the nuclear data search and plotting sub-system, and the nuclear data processing and utilisation sub-system. The system will be operated with a graphical user interface in order to enable easy utilisation through the Internet by both nuclear design engineers and nuclear data evaluators. This paper presents an overview of the integrated nuclear data utilisation system, describes the development of a prototype system to examine the operability of the user interface and discusses specifications of the two sub-systems.

  6. Liquid metal cooled nuclear reactor plant system

    DOEpatents

    Hunsbedt, Anstein; Boardman, Charles E.

    1993-01-01

    A liquid metal cooled nuclear reactor having a passive cooling system for removing residual heat resulting for fuel decay during reactor shutdown, or heat produced during a mishap. The reactor system is enhanced with sealing means for excluding external air from contact with the liquid metal coolant leaking from the reactor vessel during an accident. The invention also includes a silo structure which resists attack by leaking liquid metal coolant, and an added unique cooling means.

  7. Nuclear Hybrid Energy Systems: Challenges and Opportunities

    SciTech Connect

    P. Sabharwall; S.B. Sitton; S.J. Yoon; C. Stoots

    2014-07-01

    With growing demand of energy and costs of the fossil fuels, coupled with the environmental concerns have resulted in an increased interest in alternative energy sources. Nuclear hybrid energy systems (NHES) are being considered which incorporates renewable energy sources such as solar and wind energy combined with nuclear reactor and energy storage to meet the peak hours demand imposed on the grid, along with providing process heat for other potential industrial applications. This concept could potentially satisfy various energy demands and improve reliability, robustness and resilience for the entire system as a whole, along with economic and net efficiency gains. This paper provides a brief understanding of potential NHES system and architecture along with the challenges

  8. Alarm system for a nuclear control complex

    DOEpatents

    Scarola, Kenneth; Jamison, David S.; Manazir, Richard M.; Rescorl, Robert L.; Harmon, Daryl L.

    1994-01-01

    An advanced control room complex for a nuclear power plant, including a discrete indicator and alarm system (72) which is nuclear qualified for rapid response to changes in plant parameters and a component control system (64) which together provide a discrete monitoring and control capability at a panel (14-22, 26, 28) in the control room (10). A separate data processing system (70), which need not be nuclear qualified, provides integrated and overview information to the control room and to each panel, through CRTs (84) and a large, overhead integrated process status overview board (24). The discrete indicator and alarm system (72) and the data processing system (70) receive inputs from common plant sensors and validate the sensor outputs to arrive at a representative value of the parameter for use by the operator during both normal and accident conditions, thereby avoiding the need for him to assimilate data from each sensor individually. The integrated process status board (24) is at the apex of an information hierarchy that extends through four levels and provides access at each panel to the full display hierarchy. The control room panels are preferably of a modular construction, permitting the definition of inputs and outputs, the man machine interface, and the plant specific algorithms, to proceed in parallel with the fabrication of the panels, the installation of the equipment and the generic testing thereof.

  9. Glueballs, Hybrids and Exotics

    SciTech Connect

    Reyes, M. A.; Moreno, G.

    2006-09-25

    We comment on the physics analysis carried out by the Experimental High Energy Physics (EHEP) group of the Instituto de Fisica of the University of Guanajuato (IFUG), Mexico. In particular, this group has been involved in analysis carried out to search for glueball, hybrid and exotic candidates.

  10. Cusps and exotic charmonia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swanson, E. S.

    2016-06-01

    A simple, causal and analytic model of final state rescattering is used to describe all available data on the exotic resonances Zc(3900) and Zc(4025). The model provides a compelling and accurate representation of experiment with no need for poles in the scattering matrix.

  11. Exotic nonrelativistic string

    SciTech Connect

    Casalbuoni, Roberto; Gomis, Joaquim; Longhi, Giorgio

    2007-12-15

    We construct a classical nonrelativistic string model in 3+1 dimensions. The model contains a spurion tensor field that is responsible for the noncommutative structure of the model. Under double-dimensional reduction the model reduces to the exotic nonrelativistic particle in 2+1 dimensions.

  12. Light Exotic Mesons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eugenio, Paul

    2016-03-01

    tudies of meson spectra via strong decays provide insight regarding QCD at the confinement scale. These studies have led to phenomenological models for QCD such as the constituent quark model. However, QCD allows for a much richer spectrum of meson states which include extra states such as hybrids, exotics, multi-quarks, and glueballs. Within the past two decades a number of experiments have put forth tantalizing evidence for the existence of light quark exotic hybrid mesons in the mass range below 2 GeV . Recent Lattice QCD calculations of the light-quark meson spectrum indicate a constituent gluon-like excitation contributing an additional JPC =1+- and mass 1 - 1 . 5 GeV resulting in the lightest hybrid nonets with masses near 2 . 0 GeV . High statistical yields from recent experiments along with new advances in analysis techniques have shed a new light towards the understanding the latest experimental exotic candidates. Recent results from hadro-production and photo-production will be presented followed by an overview of ongoing and future efforts to search for light exotic mesons.

  13. A systems approach to the policy-level risk assessment of exotic animal diseases: network model and application to classical swine fever.

    PubMed

    Delgado, João; Pollard, Simon; Snary, Emma; Black, Edgar; Prpich, George; Longhurst, Phil

    2013-08-01

    Exotic animal diseases (EADs) are characterized by their capacity to spread global distances, causing impacts on animal health and welfare with significant economic consequences. We offer a critique of current import risk analysis approaches employed in the EAD field, focusing on their capacity to assess complex systems at a policy level. To address the shortcomings identified, we propose a novel method providing a systematic analysis of the likelihood of a disease incursion, developed by reference to the multibarrier system employed for the United Kingdom. We apply the network model to a policy-level risk assessment of classical swine fever (CSF), a notifiable animal disease caused by the CSF virus. In doing so, we document and discuss a sequence of analyses that describe system vulnerabilities and reveal the critical control points (CCPs) for intervention, reducing the likelihood of U.K. pig herds being exposed to the CSF virus.

  14. Dry Transfer Systems for Used Nuclear Fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Brett W. Carlsen; Michaele BradyRaap

    2012-05-01

    The potential need for a dry transfer system (DTS) to enable retrieval of used nuclear fuel (UNF) for inspection or repackaging will increase as the duration and quantity of fuel in dry storage increases. This report explores the uses for a DTS, identifies associated general functional requirements, and reviews existing and proposed systems that currently perform dry fuel transfers. The focus of this paper is on the need for a DTS to enable transfer of bare fuel assemblies. Dry transfer systems for UNF canisters are currently available and in use for transferring loaded canisters between the drying station and storage and transportation casks.

  15. New Nuclear Emergency Prognosis system in Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hyun-Ha; Jeong, Seung-Young; Park, Sang-Hyun; Lee, Kwan-Hee

    2016-04-01

    This paper reviews the status of assessment and prognosis system for nuclear emergency response in Korea, especially atmospheric dispersion model. The Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety (KINS) performs the regulation and radiological emergency preparedness of the nuclear facilities and radiation utilizations. Also, KINS has set up the "Radiological Emergency Technical Advisory Plan" and the associated procedures such as an emergency response manual in consideration of the IAEA Safety Standards GS-R-2, GS-G-2.0, and GS-G-2.1. The Radiological Emergency Technical Advisory Center (RETAC) organized in an emergency situation provides the technical advice on radiological emergency response. The "Atomic Computerized Technical Advisory System for nuclear emergency" (AtomCARE) has been developed to implement assessment and prognosis by RETAC. KINS developed Accident Dose Assessment and Monitoring (ADAMO) system in 2015 to reflect the lessons learned from Fukushima accident. It incorporates (1) the dose assessment on the entire Korean peninsula, Asia region, and global region, (2) multi-units accident assessment (3) applying new methodology of dose rate assessment and the source term estimation with inverse modeling, (4) dose assessment and monitoring with the environmental measurements result. The ADAMO is the renovated version of current FADAS of AtomCARE. The ADAMO increases the accuracy of the radioactive material dispersion with applying the LDAPS(Local Data Assimilation Prediction System, Spatial resolution: 1.5 km) and RDAPS(Regional Data Assimilation Prediction System, Spatial resolution: 12km) of weather prediction data, and performing the data assimilation of automatic weather system (AWS) data from Korea Meteorological Administration (KMA) and data from the weather observation tower at NPP site. The prediction model of the radiological material dispersion is based on the set of the Lagrangian Particle model and Lagrangian Puff model. The dose estimation methodology

  16. Power conditioning for space nuclear reactor systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berman, Baruch

    1987-01-01

    This paper addresses the power conditioning subsystem for both Stirling and Brayton conversion of space nuclear reactor systems. Included are the requirements summary, trade results related to subsystem implementation, subsystem description, voltage level versus weight, efficiency and operational integrity, components selection, and shielding considerations. The discussion is supported by pertinent circuit and block diagrams. Summary conclusions and recommendations derived from the above studies are included.

  17. Fission control system for nuclear reactor

    DOEpatents

    Conley, G.H.; Estes, G.P.

    Control system for nuclear reactor comprises a first set of reactivity modifying rods fixed in a reactor core with their upper ends stepped in height across the core, and a second set of reactivity modifying rods movable vertically within the reactor core and having their lower ends stepped to correspond with the stepped arrangement of the first set of rods, pairs of the rods of the first and second sets being in coaxial alignment.

  18. Systems approach to nuclear waste glass development

    SciTech Connect

    Jantzen, C M

    1986-01-01

    Development of a host solid for the immobilization of nuclear waste has focused on various vitreous wasteforms. The systems approach requires that parameters affecting product performance and processing be considered simultaneously. Application of the systems approach indicates that borosilicate glasses are, overall, the most suitable glasses for the immobilization of nuclear waste. Phosphate glasses are highly durable; but the glass melts are highly corrosive and the glasses have poor thermal stability and low solubility for many waste components. High-silica glasses have good chemical durability, thermal stability, and mechanical stability, but the associated high melting temperatures increase volatilization of hazardous species in the waste. Borosilicate glasses are chemically durable and are stable both thermally and mechanically. The borosilicate melts are generally less corrosive than commercial glasses, and the melt temperature miimizes excessive volatility of hazardous species. Optimization of borosilicate waste glass formulations has led to their acceptance as the reference nuclear wasteform in the United States, United Kingdom, Belgium, Germany, France, Sweden, Switzerland, and Japan.

  19. Shutdown system for a nuclear reactor

    DOEpatents

    Groh, Edward F.; Olson, Arne P.; Wade, David C.; Robinson, Bryan W.

    1984-01-01

    An ultimate shutdown system is provided for termination of neutronic activity in a nuclear reactor. The shutdown system includes bead chains comprising spherical containers suspended on a flexible cable. The containers are comprised of mating hemispherical shells which provide a ruggedized enclosure for reactor poison material. The bead chains, normally suspended above the reactor core on storage spools, are released for downward travel upon command from an external reactor monitor. The chains are capable of horizontal movement, so as to flow around obstructions in the reactor during their downward motion.

  20. Shutdown system for a nuclear reactor

    DOEpatents

    Groh, E.F.; Olson, A.P.; Wade, D.C.; Robinson, B.W.

    1984-06-05

    An ultimate shutdown system is provided for termination of neutronic activity in a nuclear reactor. The shutdown system includes bead chains comprising spherical containers suspended on a flexible cable. The containers are comprised of mating hemispherical shells which provide a ruggedized enclosure for reactor poison material. The bead chains, normally suspended above the reactor core on storage spools, are released for downward travel upon command from an external reactor monitor. The chains are capable of horizontal movement, so as to flow around obstructions in the reactor during their downward motion. 8 figs.

  1. Reliability assessment of nuclear structural systems

    SciTech Connect

    Reich, M.; Hwang, H.

    1983-01-01

    Reliability assessment of nuclear structural systems has been receiving more emphasis over the last few years. This paper deals with the recent progress made by the Structural Analysis Division of Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), in the development of a probability-based reliability analysis methodology for safety evaluation of reactor containments and other seismic category I structures. An important feature of this methodology is the incorporation of finite element analysis and random vibration theory. By utilizing this method, it is possible to evaluate the safety of nuclear structures under various static and dynamic loads in terms of limit state probability. Progress in other related areas, such as the establishment of probabilistic characteristics for various loads and structural resistance, are also described. Results of an application of the methodology to a realistic reinforced concrete containment subjected to dead and live loads, accidental internal pressures and earthquake ground accelerations are presented.

  2. Fluid sampling system for a nuclear reactor

    DOEpatents

    Lau, Louis K.; Alper, Naum I.

    1994-01-01

    A system of extracting fluid samples, either liquid or gas, from the interior of a nuclear reactor containment utilizes a jet pump. To extract the sample fluid, a nonradioactive motive fluid is forced through the inlet and discharge ports of a jet pump located outside the containment, creating a suction that draws the sample fluid from the containment through a sample conduit connected to the pump suction port. The mixture of motive fluid and sample fluid is discharged through a return conduit to the interior of the containment. The jet pump and means for removing a portion of the sample fluid from the sample conduit can be located in a shielded sample grab station located next to the containment. A non-nuclear grade active pump can be located outside the grab sampling station and the containment to pump the nonradioactive motive fluid through the jet pump.

  3. Fluid sampling system for a nuclear reactor

    DOEpatents

    Lau, L.K.; Alper, N.I.

    1994-11-22

    A system of extracting fluid samples, either liquid or gas, from the interior of a nuclear reactor containment utilizes a jet pump. To extract the sample fluid, a nonradioactive motive fluid is forced through the inlet and discharge ports of a jet pump located outside the containment, creating a suction that draws the sample fluid from the containment through a sample conduit connected to the pump suction port. The mixture of motive fluid and sample fluid is discharged through a return conduit to the interior of the containment. The jet pump and means for removing a portion of the sample fluid from the sample conduit can be located in a shielded sample grab station located next to the containment. A non-nuclear grade active pump can be located outside the grab sampling station and the containment to pump the nonradioactive motive fluid through the jet pump. 1 fig.

  4. System model development for nuclear thermal propulsion

    SciTech Connect

    Walton, J.T.; Hannan, N.A.; Perkins, K.R.; Buksa, J.J.; Worley, B.A.; Dobranich, D.

    1992-10-01

    A critical enabling technology in the evolutionary development of nuclear thermal propulsion (NTP) is the ability to predict the system performance under a variety of operating conditions. Since October 1991, US (DOE), (DOD) and NASA have initiated critical technology development efforts for NTP systems to be used on Space Exploration Initiative (SEI) missions to the Moon and Mars. This paper presents the strategy and progress of an interagency NASA/DOE/DOD team for NTP system modeling. It is the intent of the interagency team to develop several levels of computer programs to simulate various NTP systems. An interagency team was formed for this task to use the best capabilities available and to assure appropriate peer review. The vision and strategy of the interagency team for developing NTP system models will be discussed in this paper. A review of the progress on the Level 1 interagency model is also presented.

  5. Neural net controlled tag gas sampling system for nuclear reactors

    DOEpatents

    Gross, Kenneth C.; Laug, Matthew T.; Lambert, John D. B.; Herzog, James P.

    1997-01-01

    A method and system for providing a tag gas identifier to a nuclear fuel rod and analyze escaped tag gas to identify a particular failed nuclear fuel rod. The method and system include disposing a unique tag gas composition into a plenum of a nuclear fuel rod, monitoring gamma ray activity, analyzing gamma ray signals to assess whether a nuclear fuel rod has failed and is emitting tag gas, activating a tag gas sampling and analysis system upon sensing tag gas emission from a failed nuclear rod and evaluating the escaped tag gas to identify the particular failed nuclear fuel rod.

  6. Neural net controlled tag gas sampling system for nuclear reactors

    DOEpatents

    Gross, K.C.; Laug, M.T.; Lambert, J.B.; Herzog, J.P.

    1997-02-11

    A method and system are disclosed for providing a tag gas identifier to a nuclear fuel rod and analyze escaped tag gas to identify a particular failed nuclear fuel rod. The method and system include disposing a unique tag gas composition into a plenum of a nuclear fuel rod, monitoring gamma ray activity, analyzing gamma ray signals to assess whether a nuclear fuel rod has failed and is emitting tag gas, activating a tag gas sampling and analysis system upon sensing tag gas emission from a failed nuclear rod and evaluating the escaped tag gas to identify the particular failed nuclear fuel rod. 12 figs.

  7. Wildlife, Exotic Pets, and Emerging Zoonoses1

    PubMed Central

    Belotto, Albino; Meslin, François-Xavier

    2007-01-01

    Most emerging infectious diseases are zoonotic; wildlife constitutes a large and often unknown reservoir. Wildlife can also be a source for reemergence of previously controlled zoonoses. Although the discovery of such zoonoses is often related to better diagnostic tools, the leading causes of their emergence are human behavior and modifications to natural habitats (expansion of human populations and their encroachment on wildlife habitat), changes in agricultural practices, and globalization of trade. However, other factors include wildlife trade and translocation, live animal and bushmeat markets, consumption of exotic foods, development of ecotourism, access to petting zoos, and ownership of exotic pets. To reduce risk for emerging zoonoses, the public should be educated about the risks associated with wildlife, bushmeat, and exotic pet trades; and proper surveillance systems should be implemented. PMID:17370509

  8. System model development for nuclear thermal propulsion

    SciTech Connect

    Hannan, N.A.; Worley, B.A.; Walton, J.T.; Perkins, K.R.; Buksa, J.J.; Dobranich, D.

    1992-11-01

    A critical enabling technology in the evolutionary development of nuclear thermal propulsion (NTP) is the ability to predict the system performance under a variety of operating conditions. This is crucial for mission analysis and for control subsystem testing as well as for the modeling of various failure modes. Performance must be accurately predicted during steady-state and transient operation, including startup, shutdown and post operation cooling. The development and application of verified and validated system models has the potential to reduce the design, testing, cost and time required for the technology to reach flight-ready status. Since October 1991, the US Department of Energy (DOE), Department of Defense (DOD) and NASA have initiated critical technology development efforts for NTP systems to be used on Space Exploration Initiative (SEI) missions to the Moon and Mars. This paper presents the strategy and progress of an interagency NASA/DOE/DOD team for NTP system modeling.

  9. 21 CFR 892.1310 - Nuclear tomography system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...) Identification. A nuclear tomography system is a device intended to detect nuclear radiation in the body and... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Nuclear tomography system. 892.1310 Section 892.1310 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES...

  10. 21 CFR 892.1310 - Nuclear tomography system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...) Identification. A nuclear tomography system is a device intended to detect nuclear radiation in the body and... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Nuclear tomography system. 892.1310 Section 892.1310 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES...

  11. 21 CFR 892.1310 - Nuclear tomography system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...) Identification. A nuclear tomography system is a device intended to detect nuclear radiation in the body and... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Nuclear tomography system. 892.1310 Section 892.1310 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES...

  12. Rodded shutdown system for a nuclear reactor

    DOEpatents

    Golden, Martin P.; Govi, Aldo R.

    1978-01-01

    A top mounted nuclear reactor diverse rodded shutdown system utilizing gas fed into a pressure bearing bellows region sealed at the upper extremity to an armature. The armature is attached to a neutron absorber assembly by a series of shafts and connecting means. The armature is held in an uppermost position by an electromagnet assembly or by pressurized gas in a second embodiment. Deenergizing the electromagnet assembly, or venting the pressurized gas, causes the armature to fall by the force of gravity, thereby lowering the attached absorber assembly into the reactor core.

  13. Assessment of lightweight mobile nuclear power systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, J. L.; Rom, F. E.

    1973-01-01

    After nearly two decades of study, analysis, and experiments relating to lightweight mobile nuclear power systems (LMNPS), it seems fitting to report the status and to assess some options for the future of this technology. This report: (1) reviews the technical feasibility studies of LMNPS and airborne vehicles; (2) identifies what remains to be done to demonstrate technical feasibility of LMNPS; (3) reviews missions studies and identifies particular missions that could justify renewed support for such technology; and (4) identifies some of the nontechnical conditions that will be required for the development and eventual use of LMNPS.

  14. Nuclear reactor fuel rod attachment system

    DOEpatents

    Not Available

    1980-09-17

    A reusable system is described for removably attaching a nuclear reactor fuel rod to a support member. A locking cap is secured to the fuel rod and a locking strip is fastened to the support member. The locking cap has two opposing fingers shaped to form a socket having a body portion. The locking strip has an extension shaped to rigidly attach to the socket's body portion. The locking cap's fingers are resiliently deflectable. For attachment, the locking cap is longitudinally pushed onto the locking strip causing the extension to temporarily deflect open the fingers to engage the socket's body portion. For removal, the process is reversed.

  15. Promoting the exotic pet practice.

    PubMed

    Harris, Don J

    2005-09-01

    The marketing and promotion of an exotic pet veterinary practice allows the use of strategies that are not necessarily available in other veterinary disciplines. The advantage that an exotics practice enjoys is that it is able to capitalize not only on the unique nature of the species being attended but also on the specialized features of the hospital itself that make it specifically appropriate in caring for exotic pets. Before marketing, however, comes the responsibility that the practice live up to the claims made in promotional materials. A practice cannot ethically be presented as an "exotics" practice if it is nothing more than a dog and cat facility that is willing to attend to exotic pets. It is the competence of the veterinary staff and the appropriateness of the facility that determines the suitability of the practice for exotics management.

  16. Systems aspects of a space nuclear reactor power system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaffe, L.; Fujita, T.; Beatty, R.; Bhandari, P.; Chow, E.; Deininger, W.; Ewell, R.; Grossman, M.; Bloomfield, H.; Heller, J.

    1988-01-01

    Various system aspects of a 300-kW nuclear reactor power system for spacecraft have been investigated. Special attention is given to the cases of a reusable OTV and a space-based radar. It is demonstrated that the stowed length of the power system is important to mission design, and that orbital storage for months to years may be needed for missions involving orbital assembly.

  17. Nuclear reactor pressure vessel support system

    DOEpatents

    Sepelak, George R.

    1978-01-01

    A support system for nuclear reactor pressure vessels which can withstand all possible combinations of stresses caused by a postulated core disrupting accident during reactor operation. The nuclear reactor pressure vessel is provided with a flange around the upper periphery thereof, and the flange includes an annular vertical extension formed integral therewith. A support ring is positioned atop of the support ledge and the flange vertical extension, and is bolted to both members. The plug riser is secured to the flange vertical extension and to the top of a radially outwardly extension of the rotatable plug. This system eliminates one joint through which fluids contained in the vessel could escape by making the fluid flow path through the joint between the flange and the support ring follow the same path through which fluid could escape through the plug risers. In this manner, the sealing means to prohibit the escape of contained fluids through the plug risers can also prohibit the escape of contained fluid through the securing joint.

  18. System model development for nuclear thermal propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walton, James T.; Hannan, Nelson A.; Perkins, Ken R.; Buksa, John H.; Worley, Brian A.; Dobranich, Dean

    1992-01-01

    A critical enabling technology in the evolutionary development of nuclear thermal propulsion (NTP) is the ability to predict the system performance under a variety of operating conditions. This is crucial for mission analysis and for control subsystem testing as well as for the modeling of various failure modes. Performance must be accurately predicted during steady-state and transient operation, including startup, shutdown, and post operation cooling. The development and application of verified and validated system models has the potential to reduce the design, testing, and cost and time required for the technology to reach flight-ready status. Since Oct. 1991, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Department of Defense (DOD), and NASA have initiated critical technology development efforts for NTP systems to be used on Space Exploration Initiative (SEI) missions to the Moon and Mars. This paper presents the strategy and progress of an interagency NASA/DOE/DOD team for NTP system modeling. It is the intent of the interagency team to develop several levels of computer programs to simulate various NTP systems. The first level will provide rapid, parameterized calculations of overall system performance. Succeeding computer programs will provide analysis of each component in sufficient detail to guide the design teams and experimental efforts. The computer programs will allow simulation of the entire system to allow prediction of the integrated performance. An interagency team was formed for this task to use the best capabilities available and to assure appropriate peer review.

  19. System model development for nuclear thermal propulsion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walton, James T.; Hannan, Nelson A.; Perkins, Ken R.; Buksa, John H.; Worley, Brian A.; Dobranich, Dean

    1992-08-01

    A critical enabling technology in the evolutionary development of nuclear thermal propulsion (NTP) is the ability to predict the system performance under a variety of operating conditions. This is crucial for mission analysis and for control subsystem testing as well as for the modeling of various failure modes. Performance must be accurately predicted during steady-state and transient operation, including startup, shutdown, and post operation cooling. The development and application of verified and validated system models has the potential to reduce the design, testing, and cost and time required for the technology to reach flight-ready status. Since Oct. 1991, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Department of Defense (DOD), and NASA have initiated critical technology development efforts for NTP systems to be used on Space Exploration Initiative (SEI) missions to the Moon and Mars. This paper presents the strategy and progress of an interagency NASA/DOE/DOD team for NTP system modeling. It is the intent of the interagency team to develop several levels of computer programs to simulate various NTP systems. The first level will provide rapid, parameterized calculations of overall system performance. Succeeding computer programs will provide analysis of each component in sufficient detail to guide the design teams and experimental efforts. The computer programs will allow simulation of the entire system to allow prediction of the integrated performance. An interagency team was formed for this task to use the best capabilities available and to assure appropriate peer review.

  20. Ab initio description of continuum effects in A=11 exotic systems with chiral NN+3N forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calci, Angelo; Navratil, Petr; Roth, Robert; Dohet-Eraly, Jeremy; Quaglioni, Sofia; Hupin, Guillaume

    2016-09-01

    Based on the fundamental symmetries of QCD, chiral effective field theory (EFT) provides two- (NN), three- (3N) and many-nucleon interactions in a consistent and systematically improvable scheme. The rapid developments to construct divers families of chiral NN+3N interactions and the conceptual and technical improvements of ab initio many-body approaches pose a great opportunity for nuclear physics. By studying particular interesting phenomena in nuclear structure and reaction observables one can discriminate between different forces and study the predictive power of chiral EFT. The accurate description of the 11Be nucleus, in particular, the ground-state parity inversion and exceptionally strong E1 transition between its two bound states constitute an enormous challenge for the developments of nuclear forces and many-body approaches. We present a sensitivity analysis of structure and reaction observables to different NN+3N interactions in 11Be and n+10Be as well as the mirror p+10C scattering using the ab initio NCSM with continuum (NCSMC). Supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Nuclear Physics, under Work Proposal No. SCW1158. TRIUMF receives federal funding via a contribution agreement with the National Research Council of Canada.

  1. Supercritical Brayton Cycle Nuclear Power System Concepts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, Steven A.

    2007-01-01

    Both the NASA and DOE have programs that are investigating advanced power conversion cycles for planetary surface power on the moon or Mars, and for next generation nuclear power plants on earth. The gas Brayton cycle offers many practical solutions for space nuclear power systems and was selected as the nuclear power system of choice for the NASA Prometheus project. An alternative Brayton cycle that offers high efficiency at a lower reactor coolant outlet temperature is the supercritical Brayton cycle (SCBC). The supercritical cycle is a true Brayton cycle because it uses a single phase fluid with a compressor inlet temperature that is just above the critical point of the fluid. This paper describes the use of a supercritical Brayton cycle that achieves a cycle efficiency of 26.6% with a peak coolant temperature of 750 K and for a compressor inlet temperature of 390 K. The working fluid uses a clear odorless, nontoxic refrigerant C318 perflurocarbon (C4F8) that always operates in the gas phase. This coolant was selected because it has a critical temperature and pressure of 388.38 K and 2.777 MPa. The relatively high critical temperature allows for efficient thermal radiation that keeps the radiator mass small. The SCBC achieves high efficiency because the loop design takes advantage of the non-ideal nature of the coolant equation of state just above the critical point. The lower coolant temperature means that metal fuels, uranium oxide fuels, and uranium zirconium hydride fuels with stainless steel, ferretic steel, or superalloy cladding can be used with little mass penalty or reduction in cycle efficiency. The reactor can use liquid-metal coolants and no high temperature heat exchangers need to be developed. Indirect gas cooling or perhaps even direct gas cooling can be used if the C4F8 coolant is found to be sufficiently radiation tolerant. Other fluids can also be used in the supercritical Brayton cycle including Propane (C3H8, Tcritical = 369 K) and Hexane (C6

  2. Supercritical Brayton Cycle Nuclear Power System Concepts

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, Steven A.

    2007-01-30

    Both the NASA and DOE have programs that are investigating advanced power conversion cycles for planetary surface power on the moon or Mars, and for next generation nuclear power plants on earth. The gas Brayton cycle offers many practical solutions for space nuclear power systems and was selected as the nuclear power system of choice for the NASA Prometheus project. An alternative Brayton cycle that offers high efficiency at a lower reactor coolant outlet temperature is the supercritical Brayton cycle (SCBC). The supercritical cycle is a true Brayton cycle because it uses a single phase fluid with a compressor inlet temperature that is just above the critical point of the fluid. This paper describes the use of a supercritical Brayton cycle that achieves a cycle efficiency of 26.6% with a peak coolant temperature of 750 K and for a compressor inlet temperature of 390 K. The working fluid uses a clear odorless, nontoxic refrigerant C318 perflurocarbon (C4F8) that always operates in the gas phase. This coolant was selected because it has a critical temperature and pressure of 388.38 K and 2.777 MPa. The relatively high critical temperature allows for efficient thermal radiation that keeps the radiator mass small. The SCBC achieves high efficiency because the loop design takes advantage of the non-ideal nature of the coolant equation of state just above the critical point. The lower coolant temperature means that metal fuels, uranium oxide fuels, and uranium zirconium hydride fuels with stainless steel, ferretic steel, or superalloy cladding can be used with little mass penalty or reduction in cycle efficiency. The reactor can use liquid-metal coolants and no high temperature heat exchangers need to be developed. Indirect gas cooling or perhaps even direct gas cooling can be used if the C4F8 coolant is found to be sufficiently radiation tolerant. Other fluids can also be used in the supercritical Brayton cycle including Propane (C3H8, Tcritical = 369 K) and Hexane (C6

  3. Computer Information System For Nuclear Medicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cahill, P. T.; Knowles, R. J.....; Tsen, O.

    1983-12-01

    To meet the complex needs of a nuclear medicine division serving a 1100-bed hospital, a computer information system has been developed in sequential phases. This database management system is based on a time-shared minicomputer linked to a broadband communications network. The database contains information on patient histories, billing, types of procedures, doses of radiopharmaceuticals, times of study, scanning equipment used, and technician performing the procedure. These patient records are cycled through three levels of storage: (a) an active file of 100 studies for those patients currently scheduled, (b) a temporary storage level of 1000 studies, and (c) an archival level of 10,000 studies containing selected information. Merging of this information with reports and various statistical analyses are possible. This first phase has been in operation for well over a year. The second phase is an upgrade of the size of the various storage levels by a factor of ten.

  4. Cooling system for a nuclear reactor

    DOEpatents

    Amtmann, Hans H.

    1982-01-01

    A cooling system for a gas-cooled nuclear reactor is disclosed which includes at least one primary cooling loop adapted to pass coolant gas from the reactor core and an associated steam generator through a duct system having a main circulator therein, and at least one auxiliary cooling loop having communication with the reactor core and adapted to selectively pass coolant gas through an auxiliary heat exchanger and circulator. The main and auxiliary circulators are installed in a common vertical cavity in the reactor vessel, and a common return duct communicates with the reactor core and intersects the common cavity at a junction at which is located a flow diverter valve operative to effect coolant flow through either the primary or auxiliary cooling loops.

  5. Nuclear Hybrid Energy Systems FY16 Modeling Efforts at ORNL

    SciTech Connect

    Cetiner, Sacit M.; Greenwood, Michael Scott; Harrison, Thomas J.; Qualls, A. L.; Guler Yigitoglu, Askin; Fugate, David W.

    2016-09-01

    A nuclear hybrid system uses a nuclear reactor as the basic power generation unit. The power generated by the nuclear reactor is utilized by one or more power customers as either thermal power, electrical power, or both. In general, a nuclear hybrid system will couple the nuclear reactor to at least one thermal power user in addition to the power conversion system. The definition and architecture of a particular nuclear hybrid system is flexible depending on local markets needs and opportunities. For example, locations in need of potable water may be best served by coupling a desalination plant to the nuclear system. Similarly, an area near oil refineries may have a need for emission free hydrogen production. A nuclear hybrid system expands the nuclear power plant from its more familiar central power station role by diversifying its immediately and directly connected customer base. The definition, design, analysis, and optimization work currently performed with respect to the nuclear hybrid systems represents the work of three national laboratories. Idaho National Laboratory (INL) is the lead lab working with Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) and Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Each laboratory is providing modeling and simulation expertise for the integration of the hybrid system.

  6. Nuclear reactor fuel rod attachment system

    DOEpatents

    Christiansen, David W.

    1982-01-01

    A reusable system for removably attaching a nuclear reactor fuel rod (12) to a support member (14). A locking cap (22) is secured to the fuel rod (12) and a locking strip (24) is fastened to the support member (14). The locking cap (22) has two opposing fingers (24a and 24b) shaped to form a socket having a body portion (26). The locking strip has an extension (36) shaped to rigidly attach to the socket's body portion (26). The locking cap's fingers are resiliently deflectable. For attachment, the locking cap (22) is longitudinally pushed onto the locking strip (24) causing the extension (36) to temporarily deflect open the fingers (24a and 24b) to engage the socket's body portion (26). For removal, the process is reversed.

  7. Fuel handling system for a nuclear reactor

    DOEpatents

    Saiveau, James G.; Kann, William J.; Burelbach, James P.

    1986-01-01

    A pool type nuclear fission reactor has a core, with a plurality of core elements and a redan which confines coolant as a hot pool at a first end of the core separated from a cold pool at a second end of the core by the redan. A fuel handling system for use with such reactors comprises a core element storage basket located outside of the redan in the cold pool. An access passage is formed in the redan with a gate for opening and closing the passage to maintain the temperature differential between the hot pool and the cold pool. A mechanism is provided for opening and closing the gate. A lifting arm is also provided for manipulating the fuel core elements through the access passage between the storage basket and the core when the redan gate is open.

  8. Fuel handling system for a nuclear reactor

    DOEpatents

    Saiveau, James G.; Kann, William J.; Burelbach, James P.

    1986-12-02

    A pool type nuclear fission reactor has a core, with a plurality of core elements and a redan which confines coolant as a hot pool at a first end of the core separated from a cold pool at a second end of the core by the redan. A fuel handling system for use with such reactors comprises a core element storage basket located outside of the redan in the cold pool. An access passage is formed in the redan with a gate for opening and closing the passage to maintain the temperature differential between the hot pool and the cold pool. A mechanism is provided for opening and closing the gate. A lifting arm is also provided for manipulating the fuel core elements through the access passage between the storage basket and the core when the redan gate is open.

  9. Nuclear reactor insulation and preheat system

    DOEpatents

    Wampole, Nevin C.

    1978-01-01

    An insulation and preheat system for preselected components of a fluid cooled nuclear reactor. A gas tight barrier or compartment of thermal insulation surrounds the selected components and includes devices to heat the internal atmosphere of the compartment. An external surface of the compartment or enclosure is cooled, such as by a circulating fluid. The heating devices provide for preheating of the components, as well as maintenance of a temperature sufficient to ensure that the reactor coolant fluid will not solidify during shutdown. The external cooling limits the heat transferred to other plant structures, such as supporting concrete and steel. The barrier is spaced far enough from the surrounded components so as to allow access for remote or manual inspection, maintenance, and repair.

  10. Landau Zener Effect in Superfluid Nuclear Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirea, M.

    The Landau Zener effect is generalized for many-body systems with pairing residual interactions. The microscopic equations of motion are obtained and the 14C decay of 223Ra spectroscopic factors are deduced. An asymmetric nuclear shape parametrization given by two intersected spheres is used. The single particle level scheme is determined in the frame of the superasymmetric two-center shell model. The deformation energy is computed in the microscopic macroscopic approximation. The penetrabilities are obtained within the WKB approximation. The fine structure of the cluster decay analyzed in the frame of this formalism gives a very good agreement with the experimental ratio of partial half-lives for transition to the first excited state and to the ground state.

  11. Emerging nuclear energy systems: Economic challenge: Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Nuckolls, J.H.

    1986-01-01

    Future nuclear energy systems may achieve substantially lower energy costs than those of existing fossil energy systems and comparable capital costs. Such low cost nuclear energy would provide a strong economic incentive to minimize the use of fossil fuels. If these low cost nuclear energy systems emerge in the next few decades, 21st century civilization may be able to avert potentially disastrous CO/sub 2/ induced global climate changes. 12 refs., 1 fig.

  12. Nuclear instrumentation system design in FFTF and CRBRP

    SciTech Connect

    Warrick, R.P.

    1980-02-01

    The Nuclear Instrumentation System installed in the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) is described. The Nuclear Instrumentation System includes equipment for monitoring neutron flux levels from shutdown to full power. Detector location and mounting provisions are described. The design basis for equipment design is provided. Detailed discussion of startup testing in FFTF follows a brief discussion of pre-delivery development work and testing. Finally, a description of the Nuclear Instrumentation System planned for the Clinch River Breeder Reactor Plant is provided.

  13. Soil biota and exotic plant invasion.

    PubMed

    Callaway, Ragan M; Thelen, Giles C; Rodriguez, Alex; Holben, William E

    2004-02-19

    Invasive plants are an economic problem and a threat to the conservation of natural systems. Escape from natural enemies might contribute to successful invasion, with most work emphasizing the role of insect herbivores; however, microbial pathogens are attracting increased attention. Soil biota in some invaded ecosystems may promote 'exotic' invasion, and plant-soil feedback processes are also important. Thus, relatively rare species native to North America consistently demonstrate negative feedbacks with soil microbes that promote biological diversity, whereas abundant exotic and native species demonstrate positive feedbacks that reduce biological diversity. Here we report that soil microbes from the home range of the invasive exotic plant Centaurea maculosa L. have stronger inhibitory effects on its growth than soil microbes from where the weed has invaded in North America. Centaurea and soil microbes participate in different plant-soil feedback processes at home compared with outside Centaurea's home range. In native European soils, Centaurea cultivates soil biota with increasingly negative effects on the weed's growth, possibly leading to its control. But in soils from North America, Centaurea cultivates soil biota with increasingly positive effects on itself, which may contribute to the success of this exotic species in North America.

  14. Seminar in Critical Inquiry Twenty-first Century Nuclear Systems

    SciTech Connect

    LeMone, D. V.

    2002-02-25

    Critical Inquiry, has not only been successful in increasing university student retention rate but also in improving student academic performance beyond the initial year of transition into the University. The seminar course herein reviewed is a balanced combination of student personal and academic skill development combined with a solid background in modern nuclear systems. It is a valid premise to assume that entering students as well as stakeholders of the general public demonstrate equal levels of capability. Nuclear systems is designed to give a broad and basic knowledge of nuclear power, medical, industrial, research, and military systems (nuclear systems) in 20-25 hours.

  15. Manned space flight nuclear system safety. Volume 6: Space base nuclear system safety plan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    A qualitative identification of the steps required to assure the incorporation of radiological system safety principles and objectives into all phases of a manned space base program are presented. Specific areas of emphasis include: (1) radiological program management, (2) nuclear system safety plan implementation, (3) impact on program, and (4) summary of the key operation and design guidelines and requirements. The plan clearly indicates the necessity of considering and implementing radiological system safety recommendations as early as possible in the development cycle to assure maximum safety and minimize the impact on design and mission plans.

  16. A system for nuclear data aquisition

    SciTech Connect

    Malaquias, J.L.; Almeida, P.; Amilcar, P.

    1996-12-31

    A system is presented for use in Nuclear Physics Data Acquisition. The system is hosted on a Personal Computer`s ISA bus, and is based on the TMS320C31 digital signal processor (DSP), a fast floating point DSP that simultaneously handles several different tasks in this system, by means of an interrupt-driven architecture. The system includes three different data acquisition modules: a multichannel analyzer, a multi-channel scaler, and a signal analyzer. Using the interrupt-driven architecture, the DSP pre-processes the data coming from the three different data acquisition modules. and accepts data requests from the host PC. On the PC side, the system runs under Microsoft Windows 95 or Windows NT, and it implements the client-server model. While the data acquisition board performs its chores independently, the host PC sends it several commands on behalf of an arbitrary number of clients. Those clients each represent a window over the data being acquired, allowing different users to take different views of the data. Each client can run on the same host computer or on any other computer, provided there is a computer network (the Internet is a possibility, as long as there is enough bandwidth) connecting it to the host. This allows the experimentalist to remotely examine the experimental results from his office without having to go to the lab. On the other hand, different experimentalists can have different views of the data being acquired. All these are benefits stemming from the client-server model.

  17. Graphic user interface-based nuclear medicine reporting system.

    PubMed

    Sanger, J J

    1993-03-01

    A graphically based, computerized report generation program has been developed and deployed at a dozen nuclear medicine facilities. The system is based on the Macintosh graphical user interface (GUI) and has been designed to be easy to learn and use. The system allows the nuclear medicine practitioner to generate reports for any nuclear medicine or nuclear cardiology procedure without transcriptionist support, dramatically decreasing report turnaround time. The system includes a relational database engine that allows cost-effective storage and rapid retrieval of final reports and also supports facsimile transmission of reports directly to referring clinicians' offices.

  18. Nuclear Criticality Information System. Database examples

    SciTech Connect

    Foret, C.A.

    1984-06-01

    The purpose of this publication is to provide our users with a guide to using the Nuclear Criticality Information System (NCIS). It is comprised of an introduction, an information and resources section, a how-to-use section, and several useful appendices. The main objective of this report is to present a clear picture of the NCIS project and its available resources as well as assisting our users in accessing the database and using the TIS computer to process data. The introduction gives a brief description of the NCIS project, the Technology Information System (TIS), online user information, future plans and lists individuals to contact for additional information about the NCIS project. The information and resources section outlines the NCIS database and describes the resources that are available. The how-to-use section illustrates access to the NCIS database as well as searching datafiles for general or specific data. It also shows how to access and read the NCIS news section as well as connecting to other information centers through the TIS computer.

  19. Nuclear reactor cooling system decontamination reagent regeneration

    DOEpatents

    Anstine, Larry D.; James, Dean B.; Melaika, Edward A.; Peterson, Jr., John P.

    1985-01-01

    An improved method for decontaminating the coolant system of water-cooled nuclear power reactors and for regenerating the decontamination solution. A small amount of one or more weak-acid organic complexing agents is added to the reactor coolant, and the pH is adjusted to form a decontamination solution which is circulated throughout the coolant system to dissolve metal oxides from the interior surfaces and complex the resulting metal ions and radionuclide ions. The coolant containing the complexed metal ions and radionuclide ions is passed through a strong-base anion exchange resin bed which has been presaturated with a solution containing the complexing agents in the same ratio and having the same pH as the decontamination solution. As the decontamination solution passes through the resin bed, metal-complexed anions are exchanged for the metal-ion-free anions on the bed, while metal-ion-free anions in the solution pass through the bed, thus removing the metal ions and regenerating the decontamination solution.

  20. Ongoing Space Nuclear Systems Development in the United States

    SciTech Connect

    S. Bragg-Sitton; J. Werner; S. Johnson; Michael G. Houts; Donald T. Palac; Lee S. Mason; David I. Poston; A. Lou Qualls

    2011-10-01

    Reliable, long-life power systems are required for ambitious space exploration missions. Nuclear power and propulsion options can enable a bold, new set of missions and introduce propulsion capabilities to achieve access to science destinations that are not possible with more conventional systems. Space nuclear power options can be divided into three main categories: radioisotope power for heating or low power applications; fission power systems for non-terrestrial surface application or for spacecraft power; and fission power systems for electric propulsion or direct thermal propulsion. Each of these areas has been investigated in the United States since the 1950s, achieving various stages of development. While some nuclear systems have achieved flight deployment, others continue to be researched today. This paper will provide a brief overview of historical space nuclear programs in the U.S. and will provide a summary of the ongoing space nuclear systems research, development, and deployment in the United States.

  1. System aspects of a Space Nuclear Reactor Power System

    SciTech Connect

    Jaffe, L.; Fujita, T.; Beatty, R.; Bhandari, P.; Chow, E.; Deininger, W.; Ewell, R.; Grossman, M.; Kia, T.; Nesmith, B.

    1988-01-01

    Selected systems aspects of a 300 kW nuclear reactor power system for spacecraft have been studied. The approach included examination of two candidate missions and their associated spacecraft, and a number of special topics dealing with the power system design and operation. The missions considered were a reusable orbital transfer vehicle and a space-based radar. The special topics included: power system configuration and scaling, launch vehicle integration, operating altitude, orbital storage, start-up, thawing, control, load following, procedures in case of malfunction, restart, thermal and nuclear radiation to other portions of the spacecraft, thermal stresses between subsystems, boom and cable designs, vibration modes, altitude control, reliability, and survivability. Among the findings are that the stowed length of the power system is important to mission design and that orbital storage for months to years may be needed for missions involving orbital assembly. The power system design evolved during the study and has continued to evolve; the current design differs somewhat from that examined in this paper.

  2. Nuclear system that burns its own wastes shows promise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atchison, K.

    1975-01-01

    A nuclear fission energy system, capable of eliminating a significant amount of its radioactive wastes by burning them, is described. A theoretical investigation of this system conducted by computer analysis, is based on use of gaseous fuel nuclear reactors. Gaseous core reactors using a uranium plasma fuel are studied along with development for space propulsion.

  3. Configuration and technology implications of potential nuclear hydrogen system applications.

    SciTech Connect

    Conzelmann, G.; Petri, M.; Forsberg, C.; Yildiz, B.; ORNL

    2005-11-05

    Nuclear technologies have important distinctions and potential advantages for large-scale generation of hydrogen for U.S. energy services. Nuclear hydrogen requires no imported fossil fuels, results in lower greenhouse-gas emissions and other pollutants, lends itself to large-scale production, and is sustainable. The technical uncertainties in nuclear hydrogen processes and the reactor technologies needed to enable these processes, as well waste, proliferation, and economic issues must be successfully addressed before nuclear energy can be a major contributor to the nation's energy future. In order to address technical issues in the time frame needed to provide optimized hydrogen production choices, the Nuclear Hydrogen Initiative (NHI) must examine a wide range of new technologies, make the best use of research funding, and make early decisions on which technology options to pursue. For these reasons, it is important that system integration studies be performed to help guide the decisions made in the NHI. In framing the scope of system integration analyses, there is a hierarchy of questions that should be addressed: What hydrogen markets will exist and what are their characteristics? Which markets are most consistent with nuclear hydrogen? What nuclear power and production process configurations are optimal? What requirements are placed on the nuclear hydrogen system? The intent of the NHI system studies is to gain a better understanding of nuclear power's potential role in a hydrogen economy and what hydrogen production technologies show the most promise. This work couples with system studies sponsored by DOE-EE and other agencies that provide a basis for evaluating and selecting future hydrogen production technologies. This assessment includes identifying commercial hydrogen applications and their requirements, comparing the characteristics of nuclear hydrogen systems to those market requirements, evaluating nuclear hydrogen configuration options within a given

  4. Manned space flight nuclear system safety. Volume 1: Executive summary. Part 2: Space shuttle nuclear system safety

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    The nuclear safety integration and operational aspects of transporting nuclear payloads to and from an earth orbiting space base by space shuttle are discussed. The representative payloads considered were: (1) zirconium hydride-Brayton power module, (2) isotope-Brayton power module, and (3) small isotope power systems or heat sources. Areas of investigation also include nuclear safety related integration and packaging as well as operational requirements for the shuttle and payload systems for all phases of the mission.

  5. NTP system simulation and detailed nuclear engine modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anghaie, Samim

    1993-01-01

    The topics are presented in viewgraph form and include the following: nuclear thermal propulsion (NTP) & detailed nuclear engine modeling; modeling and engineering simulation of nuclear thermal rocket systems; nuclear thermal rocket simulation system; INSPI-NTVR core axial flow profiles; INSPI-NTRV core axial flow profiles; specific impulse vs. chamber pressure; turbine pressure ratio vs. chamber pressure; NERVA core axial flow profiles; P&W XNR2000 core axial flow profiles; pump pressure rise vs. chamber pressure; streamline of jet-induced flow in cylindrical chamber; flow pattern of a jet-induced flow in a chamber; and radiative heat transfer models.

  6. Passive sensor systems for nuclear material monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Simpson, M.L.; Boatner, L.A.; Holcomb, D.E.; McElhaney, S.A.; Mihalczo, J.T.; Muhs, J.D.; Roberts, M.R.; Hill, N.W.

    1993-09-01

    Passive fiber optic sensor systems capable of confirming the presence of special nuclear materials in storage or process facilities are being developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). These sensors provide completely passive, remote measurement capability. No power supplies, amplifiers, or other active components that could degrade system reliability are required at the sensor location. ORNL, through its research programs in scintillator materials, has developed a variety of materials for use in alpha-, beta-, gamma-, and neutron-sensitive scintillator detectors. In addition to sensors for measuring radiation flux, new sensor materials have been developed which are capable of measuring weight, temperature, and source location. An example of a passive sensor for temperature measurement is the combination of a thermophosphor (e.g., rare-earth activated Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}) with {sup 6}LiF (95% {sup 6}Li). This combination results in a new class of scintillators for thermal neutrons that absorb energy from the radiation particles and remit the energy as a light pulse, the decay rate of which, over a specified temperature range, is temperature dependent. Other passive sensors being developed include pressure-sensitive triboluminescent materials, weight-sensitive silicone rubber fibers, scintillating fibers, and other materials for gamma and neutron detection. The light from the scintillator materials of each sensor would be sent through optical fibers to a monitoring station, where the attribute quantity could be measured and compared with previously recorded emission levels. Confirmatory measurement applications of these technologies are being evaluated to reduce the effort, costs, and employee exposures associated with inventorying stockpiles of highly enriched uranium at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant.

  7. Nuclear proliferation and civilian nuclear power. Report of the Nonproliferation Alternative Systems Assessment Program. Volume V. Economics and systems analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-06-01

    This NASAP assessment considers the economics of alternative nuclear reactor and fuel-cycle systems in the light of possible patterns of uranium supply and energy demand, as well as the economic implications of improvng the proliferation resistance of the various systems. The assessment focuses on the costs of alternative nuclear technologies and the possible timing of their implementation, based on their economic attractiveness.

  8. White paper on VU for Modeling Nuclear Energy Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Klein, R; Turinsky, P

    2009-05-07

    The purpose of this whitepaper is to provide a framework for understanding the role that Verification and Validation (V&V), Uncertainty Quantification (UQ) and Risk Quantification, collectively referred to as VU, is expected to play in modeling nuclear energy systems. We first provide background for the modeling of nuclear energy based systems. We then provide a brief discussion that emphasizes the critical elements of V&V as applied to nuclear energy systems but is general enough to cover a broad spectrum of scientific and engineering disciplines that include but are not limited to astrophysics, chemistry, physics, geology, hydrology, chemical engineering, mechanical engineering, civil engineering, electrical engineering, nu nuclear engineering material clear science science, etc. Finally, we discuss the critical issues and challenges that must be faced in the development of a viable and sustainable VU program in support of modeling nuclear energy systems.

  9. EXOTIC MAGNETS FOR ACCELERATORS.

    SciTech Connect

    WANDERER, P.

    2005-09-18

    Over the last few years, several novel magnet designs have been introduced to meet the requirements of new, high performance accelerators and beam lines. For example, the FAIR project at GSI requires superconducting magnets ramped at high rates ({approx} 4 T/s) in order to achieve the design intensity. Magnets for the RIA and FAIR projects and for the next generation of LHC interaction regions will need to withstand high doses of radiation. Helical magnets are required to maintain and control the polarization of high energy protons at RHIC. In other cases, novel magnets have been designed in response to limited budgets and space. For example, it is planned to use combined function superconducting magnets for the 50 GeV proton transport line at J-PARC to satisfy both budget and performance requirements. Novel coil winding methods have been developed for short, large aperture magnets such as those used in the insertion region upgrade at BEPC. This paper will highlight the novel features of these exotic magnets.

  10. Nuclear data needs for accelerator-driven transmutation systems

    SciTech Connect

    Arthur, E.D.; Wilson, W.B.; Young, P.G.

    1994-07-01

    The possibilities of several new technologies based on use of intense, medium-energy proton accelerators are being investigated at Los Alamos National Laboratory. The potential new areas include destruction of long-lived components of nuclear waste, plutonium burning, energy production, and production of tritium. The design, assessment, and safety analysis of potential facilities involves the understanding of complex combinations of nuclear processes, which in turn places new requirements on nuclear data that transcend the traditional needs of the fission and fusion reactor communities. In this paper an assessment of the nuclear data needs for systems currently being considered in the Los Alamos Accelerator-Driven Transmutation Technologies program is given.

  11. FOREWORD: International Summer School for Advanced Studies 'Dynamics of open nuclear systems' (PREDEAL12)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delion, D. S.; Zamfir, N. V.; Raduta, A. R.; Gulminelli, F.

    2013-02-01

    renowned professors and researchers in nuclear physics. This proceedings volume is organized into four chapters, which reflects the traditional chapter structure of nuclear physics textbooks, but seen from the perspective of open quantum systems: INuclear structure IIDecay processes IIINuclear reactions and astrophysics IVContributions The lectures and contributions are listed alphabetically by author within each chapter. The volume contains many comprehensive reviews related to the topics of the School. The first week of the School was focused on nuclear structure and decay phenomena, considering the nucleus as an open system. Experts in these fields lectured on cluster radioactivity, the stability of superheavy nuclei, alpha-decay fine structure, fission versus fusion, beta and double beta decay and pairing versus alpha-clustering. New experimental results related to the nuclear stability of low-lying and high spin states were also presented. Recent developments at JINR—Dubna and GSI—Darmstadt international laboratories were also reported by their current or former directors. The second week of the event was dedicated to the physics of exotic nuclei, heavy ion reactions and multi-fragmentation, symmetries and phase transitions of open quantum systems. The stability of the atomic nucleus is an important and always interesting discussion point, especially in the context of newly discovered nuclear systems close to the stability line, such as proton/neutron rich or superheavy nuclei. Several lectures and contributions were focused on nuclear structure models describing low-lying states. This includes the status of density functional theory, new developments in Bohr-Mottelsohn Hamiltonian and shell-model theory, proton-neutron correlations, shape coexistence, back-bending phenomena and the thermodynamics of open quantum systems. Open systems in astrophysics, such as supernovae and neutron stars, were presented in detail by several lecturers. Important topics connected to

  12. Few-body model approach to the bound states of helium-like exotic three-body systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Md A.

    2016-10-01

    In this paper, calculated energies of the lowest bound S-state of Coulomb three-body systems containing an electron (e —), a negatively charged muon (μ—) and a nucleus (NZ+) of charge number Z are reported. The 3-body relative wave function in the resulting Schrödinger equation is expanded in the complete set of hyperspherical harmonics (HH). Use of the orthonormality of HH leads to an infinite set of coupled differential equations (CDE) which are solved numerically to get the energy E.

  13. Trade studies for nuclear space power systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, John M.; Bents, David J.; Bloomfield, Harvey S.

    1991-01-01

    As human visions of space applications expand and as we probe further out into the universe, our needs for power will also expand, and missions will evolve which are enabled by nuclear power. A broad spectrum of missions which are enhanced or enabled by nuclear power sources have been defined. These include Earth orbital platforms, deep space platforms, planetary exploration, and terrestrial resource exploration. The recently proposed Space Exploration Initiative (SEI) to the Moon and Mars has more clearly defined these missions and their power requirements. Presented here are results of recent studies of radioisotope and nuclear reactor energy sources, combined with various energy conversion devices for Earth orbital applications, SEI lunar/Mars rovers, surface power, and planetary exploration.

  14. Trade studies for nuclear space power systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, John M.; Bents, David J.; Bloomfield, Harvey S.

    1991-01-01

    As visions of space applications expand and as probes extend further and further out into the universe, the need for power also expands, and missions evolve which are enabled by nuclear power. A broad spectrum of missions which are enhanced or enabled by nuclear power sources are defined. These include earth orbital platforms, deep space platforms, planetary exploration and extraterrestrial resource exploration. The recently proposed Space Exploration Initiative (SEI) to the moon and Mars has more clearly defined these missions and their power requirements. This paper presents results of recent studies of radioisotope and nuclear-reactor energy sources combined with various energy-conversion devices for earth orbital applications, SEI lunar/Mars rover and surface power, and planetary exploration.

  15. A Roadmap of Innovative Nuclear Energy System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sekimoto, Hiroshi

    2017-01-01

    Nuclear is a dense energy without CO2 emission. It can be used for more than 100,000 years using fast breeder reactors with uranium from the sea. However, it raises difficult problems associated with severe accidents, spent fuel waste and nuclear threats, which should be solved with acceptable costs. Some innovative reactors have attracted interest, and many designs have been proposed for small reactors. These reactors are considered much safer than conventional large reactors and have fewer technical obstructions. Breed-and-burn reactors have high potential to solve all inherent problems for peaceful use of nuclear energy. However, they have some technical problems with materials. A roadmap for innovative reactors is presented herein.

  16. Geometrically frustrated GdInO3: An exotic system to study negative thermal expansion and spin-lattice coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paul, Barnita; Chatterjee, Swastika; Roy, Anushree; Midya, A.; Mandal, P.; Grover, Vinita; Tyagi, A. K.

    2017-02-01

    In this article, we report negative thermal expansion and spin frustration in hexagonal GdInO3. Rietveld refinements of the x-ray diffraction patterns reveal that the negative thermal expansion in the temperature range of 50-100 K stems from the triangular lattice of Gd3 + ions. The downward deviation of the low-temperature inverse susceptibility (χ-1) versus T plot from the Curie-Weiss law and the large value of the ratio, | θCW|/ TN>28 , where θCW and TN are respectively Curie-Weiss and Neel temperature, indicate a strong spin frustration, which inhibits long-range magnetic ordering down to 1.8 K. Magnetostriction measurements clearly demonstrate a spin-lattice coupling in the system. Low-temperature anomalous phonon softening, as obtained from temperature-dependent Raman measurements, also reveals the same. Our experimental observations are supported by first-principles density functional theory calculations of the electronic and phonon dispersion in GdInO3. The calculations suggest that the GdInO3 lattice is highly frustrated at low temperature. Further, the calculated normal mode frequencies of the Gd-related Γ point phonon modes reveal significant magnetoelastic coupling in this system. The competitive role of magnetic interaction energy and thermal stabilization energy in determining the change in interatomic distances is the possible origin for the negative thermal expansion in GdInO3 over a limited range of temperature.

  17. U.S. national nuclear material control and accounting system

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, S; Terentiev, V G

    1998-12-01

    Issues related to nuclear material control and accounting and illegal dealing in these materials were discussed at the April 19--20, 1996 Moscow summit meeting (G7 + Russia). The declaration from this meeting reaffirmed that governments are responsible for the safety of all nuclear materials in their possession and for the effectiveness of the national control and accounting system for these materials. The Russian delegation at this meeting stated that ''the creation of a nuclear materials accounting, control, and physical protection system has become a government priority''. Therefore, in order to create a government nuclear material control and accounting system for the Russian Federation, it is critical to study the structure, operating principles, and regulations supporting the control and accounting of nuclear materials in the national systems of nuclear powers. In particular, Russian specialists have a definite interest in learning about the National Nuclear Material Control and Accounting System of the US, which has been operating successfully as an automated system since 1968.

  18. Nuclear Material Control and Accountability System Effectiveness Tool (MSET)

    SciTech Connect

    Powell, Danny H; Elwood Jr, Robert H; Roche, Charles T; Campbell, Billy J; Hammond, Glenn A; Meppen, Bruce W; Brown, Richard F

    2011-01-01

    A nuclear material control and accountability (MC&A) system effectiveness tool (MSET) has been developed in the United States for use in evaluating material protection, control, and accountability (MPC&A) systems in nuclear facilities. The project was commissioned by the National Nuclear Security Administration's Office of International Material Protection and Cooperation. MSET was developed by personnel with experience spanning more than six decades in both the U.S. and international nuclear programs and with experience in probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) in the nuclear power industry. MSET offers significant potential benefits for improving nuclear safeguards and security in any nation with a nuclear program. MSET provides a design basis for developing an MC&A system at a nuclear facility that functions to protect against insider theft or diversion of nuclear materials. MSET analyzes the system and identifies several risk importance factors that show where sustainability is essential for optimal performance and where performance degradation has the greatest impact on total system risk. MSET contains five major components: (1) A functional model that shows how to design, build, implement, and operate a robust nuclear MC&A system (2) A fault tree of the operating MC&A system that adapts PRA methodology to analyze system effectiveness and give a relative risk of failure assessment of the system (3) A questionnaire used to document the facility's current MPC&A system (provides data to evaluate the quality of the system and the level of performance of each basic task performed throughout the material balance area [MBA]) (4) A formal process of applying expert judgment to convert the facility questionnaire data into numeric values representing the performance level of each basic event for use in the fault tree risk assessment calculations (5) PRA software that performs the fault tree risk assessment calculations and produces risk importance factor reports on the

  19. HYDROGEN IGNITION MECHANISM FOR EXPLOSIONS IN NUCLEAR FACILITY PIPE SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect

    Leishear, R

    2010-05-02

    Hydrogen and oxygen generation due to the radiolysis of water is a recognized hazard in pipe systems used in the nuclear industry, where the accumulation of hydrogen and oxygen at high points in the pipe system is expected, and explosive conditions exist. Pipe ruptures at nuclear facilities were attributed to hydrogen explosions inside pipelines, in nuclear facilities, i.e., Hamaoka, Nuclear Power Station in Japan, and Brunsbuettel in Germany. Prior to these accidents an ignition source for hydrogen was questionable, but these accidents, demonstrated that a mechanism was, in fact, available to initiate combustion and explosion. Hydrogen explosions may occur simultaneously with water hammer accidents in nuclear facilities, and a theoretical mechanism to relate water hammer to hydrogen deflagrations and explosions is presented herein.

  20. New reactor technology: safety improvements in nuclear power systems.

    PubMed

    Corradini, M L

    2007-11-01

    Almost 450 nuclear power plants are currently operating throughout the world and supplying about 17% of the world's electricity. These plants perform safely, reliably, and have no free-release of byproducts to the environment. Given the current rate of growth in electricity demand and the ever growing concerns for the environment, nuclear power can only satisfy the need for electricity and other energy-intensive products if it can demonstrate (1) enhanced safety and system reliability, (2) minimal environmental impact via sustainable system designs, and (3) competitive economics. The U.S. Department of Energy with the international community has begun research on the next generation of nuclear energy systems that can be made available to the market by 2030 or earlier, and that can offer significant advances toward these challenging goals; in particular, six candidate reactor system designs have been identified. These future nuclear power systems will require advances in materials, reactor physics, as well as thermal-hydraulics to realize their full potential. However, all of these designs must demonstrate enhanced safety above and beyond current light water reactor systems if the next generation of nuclear power plants is to grow in number far beyond the current population. This paper reviews the advanced Generation-IV reactor systems and the key safety phenomena that must be considered to guarantee that enhanced safety can be assured in future nuclear reactor systems.

  1. Fourteenth Exotic Beam Summer School EBSS 2015

    SciTech Connect

    Wiedenhoever, Ingo

    2016-07-11

    The Fourteenth Annual Exotic Beam Summer School EBSS 2015 was held August 2nd - August 7th, 2015, and belongs to the series of summer programs aimed at educating future workforce in nuclear physics-related areas, mostly about the challenges of radioactive ion beam physics. Through these schools the research community will be able to exploit fully the opportunities created by the exotic beam facilities. These facilities in the US include CARIBU at ANL, the NSCL and the future FRIB laboratory as well as smaller-scale university laboratories. The skill set needed by the future workforce is very diverse and a fundamental understanding of theoretical, technical, computational and applied fields are all important. Therefore, the Exotic Beam Summer Schools follow a unique approach, in which the students not only receive lectures but also participate in hands-on activities. The lectures covered broad topics in both the experimental and theoretical physics of nuclei far from stability as well as radioactive ions production and applications. The afternoons provided opportunities for "hands-on" projects with experimental equipment and techniques useful in FRIB research. Five activities were performed in groups of eight students, rotating through the activities over the five afternoons of the school. The center of the activities was an experiment at the FSU tandem accelerator, measuring the angular distribution and cross section of the 12C(d,p)13C transfer reaction, measured with a silicon telescope in a scattering chamber. The experimental data were analyzed by performing a DWBA calculation with the program DWUCK, and the resulting spectroscopic factors were compared to a shell model calculation. The other activities included target preparation, digital gamma-spectroscopy and modern neutron detection methods.

  2. The experimental set-up of the RIB in-flight facility EXOTIC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pierroutsakou, D.; Boiano, A.; Boiano, C.; Di Meo, P.; La Commara, M.; Manea, C.; Mazzocco, M.; Nicoletto, M.; Parascandolo, C.; Signorini, C.; Soramel, F.; Strano, E.; Toniolo, N.; Torresi, D.; Tortone, G.; Anastasio, A.; Bettini, M.; Cassese, C.; Castellani, L.; Corti, D.; Costa, L.; De Fazio, B.; Galet, G.; Glodariu, T.; Grebosz, J.; Guglielmetti, A.; Molini, P.; Pontoriere, G.; Rocco, R.; Romoli, M.; Roscilli, L.; Sandoli, M.; Stroe, L.; Tessaro, M.; Zatti, P. G.

    2016-10-01

    We describe the experimental set-up of the Radioactive Ion Beam (RIB) in-flight facility EXOTIC consisting of: (a) two position-sensitive Parallel Plate Avalanche Counters (PPACs), dedicated to the event-by-event tracking of the produced RIBs and to time of flight measurements and (b) the new high-granularity compact telescope array EXPADES (EXotic PArticle DEtection System), designed for nuclear physics and nuclear astrophysics experiments employing low-energy light RIBs. EXPADES consists of eight ΔE -Eres telescopes arranged in a cylindrical configuration around the target. Each telescope is made up of two Double Sided Silicon Strip Detectors (DSSSDs) with a thickness of 40/60 μm and 300 μm for the ΔE and Eres layer, respectively. Additionally, eight ionization chambers were constructed to be used as an alternative ΔE stage or, in conjunction with the entire DSSSD array, to build up more complex triple telescopes. New low-noise multi-channel charge-sensitive preamplifiers and spectroscopy amplifiers, associated with constant fraction discriminators, peak-and-hold and Time to Amplitude Converter circuits were developed for the electronic readout of the ΔE stage. Application Specific Integrated Circuit-based electronics was employed for the treatment of the Eres signals. An 8-channel, 12-bit multi-sampling 50 MHz Analog to Digital Converter, a Trigger Supervisor Board for handling the trigger signals of the whole experimental set-up and an ad hoc data acquisition system were also developed. The performance of the PPACs, EXPADES and of the associated electronics was obtained offline with standard α calibration sources and in-beam by measuring the scattering process for the systems 17O+58Ni and 17O+208Pb at incident energies around their respective Coulomb barriers and, successively, during the first experimental runs with the RIBs of the EXOTIC facility.

  3. Commissioned article: management of exotic snakebites.

    PubMed

    Warrell, D A

    2009-09-01

    Exotic (foreign or non-native) snakes, including venomous species, are becoming increasingly popular pets in Western countries. Some of them are kept illegally (as defined by the UK Dangerous Wild Animals Act of 1976). There is a large international market for such animals, with contraventions of the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES). In the UK, several other European countries and the USA the reported numbers of bites by venomous exotic snakes, although small, are increasing but still underestimate the occurrence of these occasionally fatal events because of the victims' reluctance to seek medical care. Victims are predominantly young men who have been drinking alcohol. Bites may be intentionally provoked. In Europe, the species most often involved are cobras, green mambas, American pit vipers particularly rattlesnakes, African adders, vipers and Asian green pit vipers. To illustrate the special problems involved, case histories are presented of bites by exotic species in the UK and of bites abroad, where patients were repatriated for treatment. In view of the relative rarity and diversity of these cases, expert advice must usually be sought. These requests should include information about the species thought to have been responsible and the history and timing of the evolution of envenoming. Sources of advice and antivenom are discussed together with recommendations for appropriate first aid and emergency treatment while this is being awaited. Respiratory and cardiovascular resuscitation may be required and when systemic or severe local envenoming develops, specific (equine or ovine) antivenom is indicated.

  4. Nuclear power plant alarm systems: Problems and issues

    SciTech Connect

    O'Hara, J.M.; Brown, W.S.

    1991-01-01

    Despite the incorporation of advanced technology into nuclear power plant alarm systems, human factors problems remain. This paper identifies to be addressed in order to allow advanced technology to be used effectively in the design of nuclear power plant alarm systems. The operator's use and processing of alarm system information will be considered. Based upon a review of alarm system research, issues related to general system design, alarm processing, display and control are discussed. It is concluded that the design of effective alarm systems depends on an understanding of the information processing capabilities and limitations of the operator. 39 refs.

  5. Assessment of lightweight mobile nuclear power systems. [for airborne vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, J. L.; Rom, F. E.

    1973-01-01

    A review was made of lightweight mobile nuclear power systems (LMNPS). Data cover technical feasibility studies of LMNPS and airborne vehicles, mission studies, and non-technical conditions that are required to develop and use LMNPS.

  6. Reliability of emergency ac power systems at nuclear power plants

    SciTech Connect

    Battle, R E; Campbell, D J

    1983-07-01

    Reliability of emergency onsite ac power systems at nuclear power plants has been questioned within the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) because of the number of diesel generator failures reported by nuclear plant licensees and the reactor core damage that could result from diesel failure during an emergency. This report contains the results of a reliability analysis of the onsite ac power system, and it uses the results of a separate analysis of offsite power systems to calculate the expected frequency of station blackout. Included is a design and operating experience review. Eighteen plants representative of typical onsite ac power systems and ten generic designs were selected to be modeled by fault trees. Operating experience data were collected from the NRC files and from nuclear plant licensee responses to a questionnaire sent out for this project.

  7. Natural circulating passive cooling system for nuclear reactor containment structure

    DOEpatents

    Gou, Perng-Fei; Wade, Gentry E.

    1990-01-01

    A passive cooling system for the contaminant structure of a nuclear reactor plant providing protection against overpressure within the containment attributable to inadvertent leakage or rupture of the system components. The cooling system utilizes natural convection for transferring heat imbalances and enables the discharge of irradiation free thermal energy to the atmosphere for heat disposal from the system.

  8. Passive cooling system for nuclear reactor containment structure

    DOEpatents

    Gou, Perng-Fei; Wade, Gentry E.

    1989-01-01

    A passive cooling system for the contaminant structure of a nuclear reactor plant providing protection against overpressure within the containment attributable to inadvertent leakage or rupture of the system components. The cooling system utilizes natural convection for transferring heat imbalances and enables the discharge of irradiation free thermal energy to the atmosphere for heat disposal from the system.

  9. Linking Humans and Systems in Nuclear Power

    SciTech Connect

    Jacques Hugo

    2013-02-01

    Traditional engineering methods do not make provision for the integration of human considerations, while traditional human factors methods do not scale well to the complexity of large-scale nuclear power plant projects. Although the need for up-to-date human factors engineering processes and tools is recognised widely in industry, so far no formal guidance has been developed. This article proposes such a framework.

  10. The NASA Advanced Exploration Systems Nuclear Thermal Propulsion Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Houts, Michael G.; Mitchell, Doyce P.; Kim, Tony; Emrich, William J.; Hickman, Robert R.; Gerrish, Harold P.; Doughty, Glen; Belvin, Anthony; Clement, Steven; Borowski, Stanley K.; Scott, John; Power, Kevin P.

    2015-01-01

    The fundamental capability of Nuclear Thermal Propulsion (NTP) is game changing for space exploration. A first generation NTP system could provide high thrust at a specific impulse (Isp) above 900 s, roughly double that of state of the art chemical engines. Characteristics of fission and NTP indicate that useful first generation systems will provide a foundation for future systems with extremely high performance. The role of a first generation NTP in the development of advanced nuclear propulsion systems could be analogous to the role of the DC-3 in the development of advanced aviation systems.

  11. Nuclear power systems for lunar and Mars exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sovie, R. J.; Bozek, J. M.

    1990-01-01

    Initial studies of a variety of mission scenarios for the new Space Exploration Initiative, and the technologies necessary to enable or significantly enhance them, have identified the development of advanced space power systems whether solar, chemical or nuclear to be of prime importance. Lightweight, compact, reliable power systems for planetary rovers and a variety of surface vehicles, utility surface power, and power for advanced propulsion systems have been identified as critical needs for these missions. These mission scenarios, the concomitant power system requirements, and the power system options considered are discussed. The significant potential benefits of nuclear power are identified for meeting the power needs of the above applications.

  12. Nuclear power systems for Lunar and Mars exploration

    SciTech Connect

    Sovie, R.J.; Bozek, J.M.

    1994-09-01

    Initial studies of a variety of mission scenarios for the new Space Exploration Initiative, and the technologies necessary to enable or significantly enhance them, have identified the development of advanced space power systems - whether solar, chemical or nuclear - to be of prime importance. Lightweight, compact, reliable power systems for planetary rovers and a variety of surface vehicles, utility surface power, and power for advanced propulsion systems were identified as critical needs for these missions. This paper discusses these mission scenarios, the concomitant power system requirements; the power system options considered and identifies the significant potential benefits of nuclear power for meeting the power needs of the above applications.

  13. Stirling System Modeling for Space Nuclear Power Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewandowski, Edward J.; Johnson, Paul K.

    2008-01-01

    A dynamic model of a high-power Stirling convertor has been developed for space nuclear power systems modeling. The model is based on the Component Test Power Convertor (CTPC), a 12.5-kWe free-piston Stirling convertor. The model includes the fluid heat source, the Stirling convertor, output power, and heat rejection. The Stirling convertor model includes the Stirling cycle thermodynamics, heat flow, mechanical mass-spring damper systems, and the linear alternator. The model was validated against test data. Both nonlinear and linear versions of the model were developed. The linear version algebraically couples two separate linear dynamic models; one model of the Stirling cycle and one model of the thermal system, through the pressure factors. Future possible uses of the Stirling system dynamic model are discussed. A pair of commercially available 1-kWe Stirling convertors is being purchased by NASA Glenn Research Center. The specifications of those convertors may eventually be incorporated into the dynamic model and analysis compared to the convertor test data. Subsequent potential testing could include integrating the convertors into a pumped liquid metal hot-end interface. This test would provide more data for comparison to the dynamic model analysis.

  14. Stirling System Modeling for Space Nuclear Power Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewandowski, Edward J.; Johnson, Paul K.

    2007-01-01

    A dynamic model of a high-power Stirling convertor has been developed for space nuclear power systems modeling. The model is based on the Component Test Power Convertor (CTPC), a 12.5-kWe free-piston Stirling convertor. The model includes the fluid heat source, the Stirling convertor, output power and heat rejection. The Stirling convertor model includes the Stirling cycle thermodynamics, heat flow, mechanical mass-spring damper systems, and the linear alternator. The model was validated against test data. Both nonlinear and linear versions of the model were developed. The linear version algebraically couples two separate linear dynamic models; one model of the Stirling cycle and one model of the thermal system, through the pressure factors. Future possible uses of the Stirling system dynamic model are discussed. A pair of commercially available 1-kWe Stirling convertors is being purchased by NASA Glenn Research Center. The specifications of those convertors may eventually be incorporated into the dynamic model and analysis compared to the convertor test data. Subsequent potential testing could include integrating the convertors into a pumped liquid metal hot-end interface. This test would provide more data for comparison to the dynamic model analysis.

  15. Modern Nuclear Data Evaluation with the TALYS Code System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koning, A. J.; Rochman, D.

    2012-12-01

    This paper presents a general overview of nuclear data evaluation and its applications as developed at NRG, Petten. Based on concepts such as robustness, reproducibility and automation, modern calculation tools are exploited to produce original nuclear data libraries that meet the current demands on quality and completeness. This requires a system which comprises differential measurements, theory development, nuclear model codes, resonance analysis, evaluation, ENDF formatting, data processing and integral validation in one integrated approach. Software, built around the TALYS code, will be presented in which all these essential nuclear data components are seamlessly integrated. Besides the quality of the basic data and its extensive format testing, a second goal lies in the diversity of processing for different type of users. The implications of this scheme are unprecedented. The most important are: 1. Complete ENDF-6 nuclear data files, in the form of the TENDL library, including covariance matrices, for many isotopes, particles, energies, reaction channels and derived quantities. All isotopic data files are mutually consistent and are supposed to rival those of the major world libraries. 2. More exact uncertainty propagation from basic nuclear physics to applied (reactor) calculations based on a Monte Carlo approach: "Total" Monte Carlo (TMC), using random nuclear data libraries. 3. Automatic optimization in the form of systematic feedback from integral measurements back to the basic data. This method of work also opens a new way of approaching the analysis of nuclear applications, with consequences in both applied nuclear physics and safety of nuclear installations, and several examples are given here. This applied experience and feedback is integrated in a final step to improve the quality of the nuclear data, to change the users vision and finally to orchestrate their integration into simulation codes.

  16. Cycle Trades for Nuclear Thermal Rocket Propulsion Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, C.; Guidos, M.; Greene, W.

    2003-01-01

    Nuclear fission has been used as a reliable source for utility power in the United States for decades. Even in the 1940's, long before the United States had a viable space program, the theoretical benefits of nuclear power as applied to space travel were being explored. These benefits include long-life operation and high performance, particularly in the form of vehicle power density, enabling longer-lasting space missions. The configurations for nuclear rocket systems and chemical rocket systems are similar except that a nuclear rocket utilizes a fission reactor as its heat source. This thermal energy can be utilized directly to heat propellants that are then accelerated through a nozzle to generate thrust or it can be used as part of an electricity generation system. The former approach is Nuclear Thermal Propulsion (NTP) and the latter is Nuclear Electric Propulsion (NEP), which is then used to power thruster technologies such as ion thrusters. This paper will explore a number of indirect-NTP engine cycle configurations using assumed performance constraints and requirements, discuss the advantages and disadvantages of each cycle configuration, and present preliminary performance and size results. This paper is intended to lay the groundwork for future efforts in the development of a practical NTP system or a combined NTP/NEP hybrid system.

  17. Preliminary design studies on a nuclear seawater desalination system

    SciTech Connect

    Wibisono, A. F.; Jung, Y. H.; Choi, J.; Kim, H. S.; Lee, J. I.; Jeong, Y. H.; No, H. C.

    2012-07-01

    Seawater desalination is one of the most promising technologies to provide fresh water especially in the arid region. The most used technology in seawater desalination are thermal desalination (MSF and MED) and membrane desalination (RO). Some developments have been done in the area of coupling the desalination plant with a nuclear reactor to reduce the cost of energy required in thermal desalination. The coupling a nuclear reactor to a desalination plant can be done either by using the co-generation or by using dedicated heat from a nuclear system. The comparison of the co-generation nuclear reactor with desalination plant, dedicated nuclear heat system, and fossil fueled system will be discussed in this paper using economical assessment with IAEA DEEP software. A newly designed nuclear system dedicated for the seawater desalination will also be suggested by KAIST (Korea Advanced Inst. of Science and Technology) research team and described in detail within this paper. The suggested reactor system is using gas cooled type reactor and in this preliminary study the scope of design will be limited to comparison of two cases in different operating temperature ranges. (authors)

  18. A Portable System for Nuclear, Chemical Agent and Explosives Identification

    SciTech Connect

    Parker, W.E.; Buckley, W.M.; Kreek, S.A.; Caffrey, A.J.; Mauger, G.J.; Lavietes, A.D.; Dougan, A.D.

    2000-09-29

    The FRIS/PINS hybrid integrates the LLNL-developed Field Radionuclide Identification System (FRIS) with the INEEL-developed Portable Isotopic Neutron Spectroscopy (PINS) chemical assay system to yield a combined general radioisotope, special nuclear material, and chemical weapons/explosives detection and identification system. The PINS system uses a neutron source and a high-purity germanium {gamma}-ray detector. The FRIS system uses an electrochemically cooled germanium detector and its own analysis software to detect and identify special nuclear material and other radioisotopes. The FRIS/PINS combined system also uses the electromechanically-cooled germanium detector. There is no other currently available integrated technology that can combine an active neutron interrogation and analysis capability for CWE with a passive radioisotope measurement and identification capability for special nuclear material.

  19. Systematic review of surveillance systems and methods for early detection of exotic, new and re-emerging diseases in animal populations.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Prieto, V; Vicente-Rubiano, M; Sánchez-Matamoros, A; Rubio-Guerri, C; Melero, M; Martínez-López, B; Martínez-Avilés, M; Hoinville, L; Vergne, T; Comin, A; Schauer, B; Dórea, F; Pfeiffer, D U; Sánchez-Vizcaíno, J M

    2015-07-01

    In this globalized world, the spread of new, exotic and re-emerging diseases has become one of the most important threats to animal production and public health. This systematic review analyses conventional and novel early detection methods applied to surveillance. In all, 125 scientific documents were considered for this study. Exotic (n = 49) and re-emerging (n = 27) diseases constituted the most frequently represented health threats. In addition, the majority of studies were related to zoonoses (n = 66). The approaches found in the review could be divided in surveillance modalities, both active (n = 23) and passive (n = 5); and tools and methodologies that support surveillance activities (n = 57). Combinations of surveillance modalities and tools (n = 40) were also found. Risk-based approaches were very common (n = 60), especially in the papers describing tools and methodologies (n = 50). The main applications, benefits and limitations of each approach were extracted from the papers. This information will be very useful for informing the development of tools to facilitate the design of cost-effective surveillance strategies. Thus, the current literature review provides key information about the advantages, disadvantages, limitations and potential application of methodologies for the early detection of new, exotic and re-emerging diseases.

  20. The advisability of prototypic testing for space nuclear systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lenard, Roger X.

    2005-07-01

    From October 1987 until 1993, the US Department of Defense conducted the Space Nuclear Thermal Propulsion program. This program's objective was to design and develop a high specific impulse, high thrust-to-weight nuclear thermal rocket engine for upper stage applications. The author was the program manager for this program until 1992. Numerous analytical, programmatic and experimental results were generated during this period of time. This paper reviews the accomplishments of the program and highlights the importance of prototypic testing for all aspects of a space nuclear program so that a reliable and safe system compliant with all regulatory requirements can be effectively engineered. Specifically, the paper will recount how many non-prototypic tests we performed only to have more representative tests consistently generate different results. This was particularly true in area of direct nuclear heat generation. As nuclear tests are generally much more expensive than non-nuclear tests, programs attempt to avoid such tests in favor of less expensive non-nuclear tests. Each time this approach was followed, the SNTP program found these tests to not be verified by nuclear heated testing. Hence the author recommends that wherever possible, a spiral development approach that includes exploratory and confirmatory experimental testing be employed to ensure a viable design.

  1. Exotic nuclei in astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penionzhkevich, Yu. E.

    2012-07-01

    Recently the academic community has marked several anniversaries connected with discoveries that played a significant role in the development of astrophysical investigations. The year 2009 was proclaimed by the United Nations the International Year of Astronomy. This was associated with the 400th anniversary of Galileo Galilei's discovery of the optical telescope, which marked the beginning of regular research in the field of astronomy. An important contribution to not only the development of physics of the microcosm, but also to the understanding of processes occurring in the Universe, was the discovery of the atomic nucleus made by E. Rutherford 100 years ago. Since then the investigations in the fields of physics of particles and atomic nuclei have helped to understand many processes in the microcosm. Exactly 80 years ago, K. Yanski used a radio-telescope in order to receive the radiation from cosmic objects for the first time, and at the present time this research area of physics is the most efficient method for studying the properties of the Universe. Finally, the April 12, 1961 (50 years ago) launching of the first sputnik into space with a human being onboard, the Russian cosmonaut Yuri Gagarin, marked the beginning of exploration of the Universe with the direct participation of man. All these achievements considerably extended our ideas about the Universe. This work is an attempt to present some problems on the evolution of the Universe: the nucleosynthesis and cosmochronology from the standpoint of physics of particles and nuclei, in particular with the use of the latest results, obtained by means of radioactive nuclear beams. The comparison is made between the processes taking place in the Universe and the mechanisms of formation and decay of nuclei, as well as of their interaction at different energies. Examples are given to show the capabilities of nuclear-physics methods for studying cosmic objects and properties of the Universe. The results of

  2. INIS: A Computer-Based International Nuclear Information System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Balakrishnan, M. R.

    1986-01-01

    Description of the International Nuclear Information System includes its history, organizational structure, subject classification scheme, thesaurus, input standards, and various products and services generated by the system. Appendices provide a list of participating countries, subjects covered by the system, and a sample output record.…

  3. Nuclear proliferation and civilian nuclear power. Report of the Nonproliferation Alternative Systems Assessment Program. Volume II. Proliferation resistance

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-06-01

    The purpose of this volume is limited to an assessment of the relative effects that particular choices of nuclear-power systems, for whatever reasons, may have on the possible spread of nuclear-weapons capabilities. This volume addresses the concern that non-nuclear-weapons states may be able to initiate efforts to acquire or to improve nuclear-weapons capabilities through civilian nuclear-power programs; it also addresses the concern that subnational groups may obtain and abuse the nuclear materials or facilities of such programs, whether in nuclear-weapons states (NWS's) or nonnuclear-weapons states (NNW's). Accordingly, this volume emphasizes one important factor in such decisions, the resistance of nuclear-power systems to the proliferation of nuclear-weapons capabilities.

  4. Integrated Nuclear-Renewable Energy Systems: Foundational Workshop Report

    SciTech Connect

    Bragg-Sitton, Shannon; Boardman, Richard; Ruth, Mark; Zinaman, Owen; Forsberg, Charles; Collins, John

    2014-08-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) recognizes the need to transform the energy infrastructure of the U.S. and elsewhere to systems that can drastically reduce environmental impacts in an efficient and economically viable manner while utilizing both hydrocarbon resources and clean energy generation sources. Thus, DOE is supporting research and development that could lead to more efficient utilization of clean energy generation sources, including renewable and nuclear options. A concept being advanced by the DOE Offices of Nuclear Energy (NE) and Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) is tighter coupling of nuclear and renewable energy sources in a manner that produces new energy currency for the combined electricity grid, industrial manufacturing, and the transportation energy sectors. This integration concept has been referred to as a “hybrid system” that is capable of providing the right type of energy, at the right time, in the right place. At the direction of DOE-NE and DOE-EERE leadership, project leads at Idaho National Laboratory (INL), National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) have identified and engaged stakeholders in discussing integrated energy systems that would optimize renewable and nuclear energy integration on a region-by-region basis. Subsequent work will entail conduct of technical, economic, environmental and socio-political evaluations of the leading integrated system options based on a set of criteria established with stakeholder input. The Foundational Workshop for Integrated Nuclear – Renewable Energy Systems was organized around the following objectives: 1. Identify and refine priority region-specific opportunities for integrated nuclear-renewable energy systems in the U.S.; 2. Select Figures of Merit (FOM) to rank and prioritize candidate systems; 3. Discuss enabling technology development needs; 4. Identify analysis requirements, capabilities and gaps to estimate FOM for

  5. Man--machine interface issues for space nuclear power systems

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, W.R.; Haugset, K. )

    1991-01-10

    The deployment of nuclear reactors in space necessitates an entirely new set of guidelines for the design of the man--machine interface (MMI) when compared to earth-based applications such as commerical nuclear power plants. Although the design objectives of earth- and space-based nuclear power systems are the same, that is, to produce electrical power, the differences in the application environments mean that the operator's role will be significantly different for space-based systems. This paper explores the issues associated with establishing the necessary MMI guidelines for space nuclear power systems. The generic human performance requirements for space-based systems are described, and the operator roles that are utilized for the operation of current and advanced earth-based reactors are briefly summarized. The development of a prototype advanced control room, the Integrated Surveillance and Control System (ISACS) at the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) Halden Reactor Project is introduced. Finally, preliminary ideas for the use of the ISACS system as a test bed for establishing MMI guidelines for space nuclear systems are presented.

  6. Nuclear-renewable hybrid energy systems: Opportunities, interconnections, and needs

    SciTech Connect

    Mark F. Ruth; Owen R. Zinaman; Mark Antkowiak; Richard D. Boardman; Robert S. Cherry; Morgan D. Bazilian

    2014-02-01

    As the U.S. energy system evolves, the amount of electricity from variable-generation sources is likely to increase, which could result in additional times when electricity demand is lower than available production. Thus, purveyors of technologies that traditionally have provided base-load electricity—such as nuclear power plants—can explore new operating procedures to deal with the associated market signals. Concurrently, innovations in nuclear reactor design coupled with sophisticated control systems now allow for more complex apportionment of heat within an integrated system such as one linked to energy-intensive chemical processes. This paper explores one opportunity – nuclear-renewable hybrid energy systems. These are defined as integrated facilities comprised of nuclear reactors, renewable energy generation, and industrial processes that can simultaneously address the need for grid flexibility, greenhouse gas emission reductions, and optimal use of investment capital. Six aspects of interaction (interconnections) between elements of nuclear-renewable hybrid energy systems are identified: Thermal, electrical, chemical, hydrogen, mechanical, and information. Additionally, system-level aspects affect selection, design, and operation of this hybrid system type. Throughout the paper, gaps and research needs are identified to promote further exploration of the topic.

  7. Dynamic Systems Analysis Report for Nuclear Fuel Recycle

    SciTech Connect

    Brent Dixon; Sonny Kim; David Shropshire; Steven Piet; Gretchen Matthern; Bill Halsey

    2008-12-01

    This report examines the time-dependent dynamics of transitioning from the current United States (U.S.) nuclear fuel cycle where used nuclear fuel is disposed in a repository to a closed fuel cycle where the used fuel is recycled and only fission products and waste are disposed. The report is intended to help inform policy developers, decision makers, and program managers of system-level options and constraints as they guide the formulation and implementation of advanced fuel cycle development and demonstration efforts and move toward deployment of nuclear fuel recycling infrastructure.

  8. Important technology considerations for space nuclear power systems

    SciTech Connect

    Kuspa, J.P.; Wahlquist, E.J.; Bitz, D.A.

    1988-03-01

    This paper discusses the technology considerations that guide the development of space nuclear power sources (NPS) by the Department of Energy (DOE) to meet a wide variety of applications. The Department and its predecessor agencies have been developing NPS since the 1950s and producing NPS for spacecraft for the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and the Department of Defense (DOD) since the early 1960s. No one nuclear power type, isotope or reactor, will suffice over the entire range of mission power required. Nor is one type of power conversion system, be it static or dynamic, the optimum choice of all space nuclear power system applications. There is a need for DOE, in partnership with its users, NASA and DOD, to develop a variety of types of space nuclear power sources -- isotope-static, isotope-dynamic, reactor-static, and reactor-dynamic -- to meet mission requirements well into the next century. 2 figs., 1 tab.

  9. Perspectives of Physics of Exotic Nuclei Beyond the Shell Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otsuka, Takaharu

    2015-11-01

    I present one of the possible paradigm shifts with exotic nuclei. This is the shell evolution due to nuclear forces, such as tensor, central and three-nucleon forces. I shall present major points with the N=34 magic number confirmed in 54Ca by RIBF of RIKEN very recently, after the theoretical prediction made in 2001. The shell evolution has been generalized to phenomena caused by massive particle-hole excitations, being referred to as Type II Shell Evolution. This can be found in 68,70Ni. In particular, the shape coexistence of spherical, oblate and prolate shapes is suggested theoretically. Thus, the perspectives of physics with exotic nuclei is being expanded further from single-particle aspects to shapes/deformation, changing the landscape of nuclear structure.

  10. The NJOY nuclear data processing system Version 91

    SciTech Connect

    MacFarlane, R.E.; Muir, D.W.

    1994-10-01

    The NJOY nuclear data processing system is a comprehensive computer code package for producing pointwise and multigroup cross sections and related quantities from elevated nuclear data in the ENDF format, including the latest US library, ENDF/B-VI. The NJOY code can work with neutrons, photons, and charged particles, and it can produce libraries for a wide variety of particle transport and reactor analysis codes.

  11. Nuclear-Spin Measurements of Quantum Hall Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirayama, Yoshiro

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is widely used in the physical, chemical, and biological sciences. However, conventional NMR techniques based on induction-detection have drawbacks of low-sensitivity and the need of a relatively large sample. It is not suitable to investigate single or double layers (or their nanostructure), which is essential in studying quantum Hall (QH) effects. In this presentation, I discussed a resistively-detected technique to overcome the low-sensitivity limitation of conventional NMR and its application to QH systems. Resistively-detected nuclear-spin-based measurements rely on enhanced interactions between electron and nuclear spins at the degenerate point of different electron-spin states. For example, at the ν = 2/3 degenerate point in a AlGaAs/GaAs system,1-3 nuclear-spin polarization far beyond the thermal equilibrium is generated using current flow (dynamic nuclear-spin polarization). Moreover, nuclear-spin polarization can be detected as enhanced resistance, which is proportional to the magnetization, Mz, of nuclear spins.2 It should be stressed that the special states of ν = 2/3 are needed for dynamic nuclear-spin polarization and Mz detection, but we can apply NMR spectrum and nuclear-spin relaxation (T1 time) measurements for any state we want to estimate. These nuclear-spin-based measurements were successfully applied to characterize QH systems, especially their electron-spin features, using single and double layer systems where characteristics are controlled electrically by the gate biases. For a single layer, we could clarify skyrmion,2 spin-polarization of composite fermion,4 and enhanced spin-orbit interactions in a strongly asymmetric confinement.5 Exciting phases, like a canted antiferromagnetic phase, were studied in a double layer QH system with a total filling factor of 2 (Refs. 6, 7). The low-frequency mode was sensitively detected by monitoring T1, reflecting correlated electron spin features.7 The clear

  12. Exotic aphid control with pathogens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Exotic aphids are invading ecosystems worldwide. The principal factors favoring establishment of these pests are their small size, parthenogenetic reproduction, short generation time, ability for long distance dispersal as winged morphs, and explosive population dynamics. In the past, attention to i...

  13. Electronic pairing in exotic superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Cox, D.L. ); Maple, M.B. )

    1995-02-01

    Superconductivity in heavy-fermion materials and high T[sub c] cuprates may involve electronic pairing with unconventional symmetries and mechanisms. Although there has been no smoking-gun proof, numerous pieces of circumstantial evidence combined with heuristic theoretical arguments make a compelling case that these materials have pairs with exotic symmetry bound by nonphonon glue. 20 refs., 5 figs.

  14. Static and dynamic high power, space nuclear electric generating systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wetch, J. R.; Begg, L. L.; Koester, J. K.

    1985-01-01

    Space nuclear electric generating systems concepts have been assessed for their potential in satisfying future spacecraft high power (several megawatt) requirements. Conceptual designs have been prepared for reactor power systems using the most promising static (thermionic) and the most promising dynamic conversion processes. Component and system layouts, along with system mass and envelope requirements have been made. Key development problems have been identified and the impact of the conversion process selection upon thermal management and upon system and vehicle configuration is addressed.

  15. Use of expert systems in nuclear power plants

    SciTech Connect

    Uhrig, R.E.

    1989-01-01

    The application of technologies, particularly expert systems, to the control room activities in a nuclear power plant has the potential to reduce operator error and increase plant safety, reliability, and efficiency. Furthermore, there are a large number of nonoperating activities (testing, routine maintenance, outage planning, equipment diagnostics, and fuel management) in which expert systems can increase the efficiency and effectiveness of overall plant and corporate operations. This document presents a number of potential applications of expert systems in the nuclear power field. 36 refs., 2 tabs.

  16. Handling effluent from nuclear thermal propulsion system ground tests

    SciTech Connect

    Shipers, L.R.; Allen, G.C.

    1992-09-09

    A variety of approaches for handling effluent from nuclear thermal propulsion system ground tests in an environmentally acceptable manner are discussed. The functional requirements of effluent treatment are defined and concept options are presented within the framework of these requirements. System concepts differ primarily in the choice of fission-product retention and waste handling concepts. The concept options considered range from closed cycle (venting the exhaust to a closed volume or recirculating the hydrogen in a closed loop) to open cycle (real time processing and venting of the effluent). This paper reviews the different methods to handle effluent from nuclear thermal propulsion system ground tests.

  17. Nuclear instrumentation system operating experience and nuclear instrument testing in the EBR-II

    SciTech Connect

    Yingling, G. E.; Curran, R. N.

    1980-01-01

    In March of 1972 three wide range nuclear channels were purchased from Gulf Atomics Corporation and installed in EBR-II as a test. The three channels were operated as a test until April 1975 when they became a permanent part of the reactor shutdown system. Also described are the activities involved in evaluating and qualifying neutron detectors for LMFBR applications. Included are descriptions of the ANL Components Technology Division Test Program and the EBR-II Nuclear Instrument Test Facilities (NITF) used for the in-reactor testing and a summary of program test results from EBR-II.

  18. Liquid metal cooled nuclear reactors with passive cooling system

    DOEpatents

    Hunsbedt, Anstein; Fanning, Alan W.

    1991-01-01

    A liquid metal cooled nuclear reactor having a passive cooling system for removing residual heat resulting from fuel decay during reactor shutdown. The passive cooling system comprises a plurality of cooling medium flow circuits which cooperate to remove and carry heat away from the fuel core upon loss of the normal cooling flow circuit to areas external thereto.

  19. A nuclear source term analysis for spacecraft power systems

    SciTech Connect

    McCulloch, W.H.

    1998-12-01

    All US space missions involving on board nuclear material must be approved by the Office of the President. To be approved the mission and the hardware systems must undergo evaluations of the associated nuclear health and safety risk. One part of these evaluations is the characterization of the source terms, i.e., the estimate of the amount, physical form, and location of nuclear material, which might be released into the environment in the event of credible accidents. This paper presents a brief overview of the source term analysis by the Interagency Nuclear Safety Review Panel for the NASA Cassini Space Mission launched in October 1997. Included is a description of the Energy Interaction Model, an innovative approach to the analysis of potential releases from high velocity impacts resulting from launch aborts and reentries.

  20. Nuclear Thermal Propulsion Mars Mission Systems Analysis and Requirements Definition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mulqueen, Jack; Chiroux, Robert C.; Thomas, Dan; Crane, Tracie

    2007-01-01

    This paper describes the Mars transportation vehicle design concepts developed by the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) Advanced Concepts Office. These vehicle design concepts provide an indication of the most demanding and least demanding potential requirements for nuclear thermal propulsion systems for human Mars exploration missions from years 2025 to 2035. Vehicle concept options vary from large "all-up" vehicle configurations that would transport all of the elements for a Mars mission on one vehicle. to "split" mission vehicle configurations that would consist of separate smaller vehicles that would transport cargo elements and human crew elements to Mars separately. Parametric trades and sensitivity studies show NTP stage and engine design options that provide the best balanced set of metrics based on safety, reliability, performance, cost and mission objectives. Trade studies include the sensitivity of vehicle performance to nuclear engine characteristics such as thrust, specific impulse and nuclear reactor type. Tbe associated system requirements are aligned with the NASA Exploration Systems Mission Directorate (ESMD) Reference Mars mission as described in the Explorations Systems Architecture Study (ESAS) report. The focused trade studies include a detailed analysis of nuclear engine radiation shield requirements for human missions and analysis of nuclear thermal engine design options for the ESAS reference mission.

  1. Radioisotope-based Nuclear Power Strategy for Exploration Systems Development

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt, George R.; Houts, Michael G.

    2006-01-20

    Nuclear power will play an important role in future exploration efforts. Its benefits pertain to practically all the different timeframes associated with the Exploration Vision, from robotic investigation of potential lunar landing sites to long-duration crewed missions on the lunar surface. However, the implementation of nuclear technology must follow a logical progression in capability that meets but does not overwhelm the power requirements for the missions in each exploration timeframe. It is likely that the surface power infrastructure, particularly for early missions, will be distributed in nature. Thus, nuclear sources will have to operate in concert with other types of power and energy storage systems, and must mesh well with the power architectures envisioned for each mission phase. Most importantly, they must demonstrate a clear advantage over other non-nuclear options (e.g., solar power, fuel cells) for their particular function. This paper describes a strategy that does this in the form of three sequential system developments. It begins with use of radioisotope generators currently under development, and applies the power conversion technology developed for these units to the design of a simple, robust reactor power system. The products from these development efforts would eventually serve as the foundation for application of nuclear power systems for exploration of Mars and beyond.

  2. CESAR robotics and intelligent systems research for nuclear environments

    SciTech Connect

    Mann, R.C.

    1992-07-01

    The Center for Engineering Systems Advanced Research (CESAR) at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) encompasses expertise and facilities to perform basic and applied research in robotics and intelligent systems in order to address a broad spectrum of problems related to nuclear and other environments. For nuclear environments, research focus is derived from applications in advanced nuclear power stations, and in environmental restoration and waste management. Several programs at CESAR emphasize the cross-cutting technology issues, and are executed in appropriate cooperation with projects that address specific problem areas. Although the main thrust of the CESAR long-term research is on developing highly automated systems that can cooperate and function reliably in complex environments, the development of advanced human-machine interfaces represents a significant part of our research. 11 refs.

  3. CESAR robotics and intelligent systems research for nuclear environments

    SciTech Connect

    Mann, R.C.

    1992-01-01

    The Center for Engineering Systems Advanced Research (CESAR) at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) encompasses expertise and facilities to perform basic and applied research in robotics and intelligent systems in order to address a broad spectrum of problems related to nuclear and other environments. For nuclear environments, research focus is derived from applications in advanced nuclear power stations, and in environmental restoration and waste management. Several programs at CESAR emphasize the cross-cutting technology issues, and are executed in appropriate cooperation with projects that address specific problem areas. Although the main thrust of the CESAR long-term research is on developing highly automated systems that can cooperate and function reliably in complex environments, the development of advanced human-machine interfaces represents a significant part of our research. 11 refs.

  4. Nuclear Engine System Simulation (NESS) version 2.0

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pelaccio, Dennis G.; Scheil, Christine M.; Petrosky, Lyman J.

    1993-01-01

    The topics are presented in viewgraph form and include the following; nuclear thermal propulsion (NTP) engine system analysis program development; nuclear thermal propulsion engine analysis capability requirements; team resources used to support NESS development; expanded liquid engine simulations (ELES) computer model; ELES verification examples; NESS program development evolution; past NTP ELES analysis code modifications and verifications; general NTP engine system features modeled by NESS; representative NTP expander, gas generator, and bleed engine system cycles modeled by NESS; NESS program overview; NESS program flow logic; enabler (NERVA type) nuclear thermal rocket engine; prismatic fuel elements and supports; reactor fuel and support element parameters; reactor parameters as a function of thrust level; internal shield sizing; and reactor thermal model.

  5. Nuclear Hybrid Energy Systems Regional Studies: West Texas & Northeastern Arizona

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia, Humberto E.; Chen, Jun; Kim, Jong Suk; McKellar, Michael George; Deason, Wesley R; Richard B. Vilim; Bragg-Sitton, Shannon M.; Boardman, Richard D.

    2015-04-01

    The primary objective of this study is to conduct a preliminary dynamic analysis of two realistic hybrid energy systems (HES) including a nuclear reactor as the main baseload heat generator (denoted as nuclear HES or nuclear hybrid energy systems [[NHES]) and to assess the local (e.g., HES owners) and system (e.g., the electric grid) benefits attainable by the application of NHES in scenarios with multiple commodity production and high penetration of renewable energy. It is performed for regional cases not generic examples based on available resources, existing infrastructure, and markets within the selected regions. This study also briefly addresses the computational capabilities developed to conduct such analyses, reviews technical gaps, and suggests some research paths forward.

  6. Nuclear Science Symposium, 26th and Symposium on Nuclear Power Systems, 11th, San Francisco, Calif., October 17-19, 1979, Proceedings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kerns, C. R.

    1980-01-01

    The paper covers the studies presented on nuclear science and nuclear power systems symposiums. The studies deal with nuclear radiation detectors, nuclear circuits and systems, space and medical instrumentation, as well as with environmental and reactor instrumentation. Data preprocessing and acquisition are discussed. Emphasis is placed on the engineered safety features of nuclear systems.

  7. Nuclear thermal rocket workshop reference system Rover/NERVA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borowski, Stanley K.

    1991-01-01

    The Rover/NERVA engine system is to be used as a reference, against which each of the other concepts presented in the workshop will be compared. The following topics are reviewed: the operational characteristics of the nuclear thermal rocket (NTR); the accomplishments of the Rover/NERVA programs; and performance characteristics of the NERVA-type systems for both Mars and lunar mission applications. Also, the issues of ground testing, NTR safety, NASA's nuclear propulsion project plans, and NTR development cost estimates are briefly discussed.

  8. NucleaRDB: information system for nuclear receptors.

    PubMed

    Vroling, Bas; Thorne, David; McDermott, Philip; Joosten, Henk-Jan; Attwood, Teresa K; Pettifer, Steve; Vriend, Gert

    2012-01-01

    The NucleaRDB is a Molecular Class-Specific Information System that collects, combines, validates and disseminates large amounts of heterogeneous data on nuclear hormone receptors. It contains both experimental and computationally derived data. The data and knowledge present in the NucleaRDB can be accessed using a number of different interactive and programmatic methods and query systems. A nuclear hormone receptor-specific PDF reader interface is available that can integrate the contents of the NucleaRDB with full-text scientific articles. The NucleaRDB is freely available at http://www.receptors.org/nucleardb.

  9. System dynamics: An introduction & applications to the nuclear industry

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, K.F.; Golay, M.W.

    1997-03-01

    The field of nuclear technology has been developing for over 50 years and has moved from the laboratory into a very large commercial industry. The growth in the underlying science and engineering has been remarkable both in its breadth and depth. The ability to design, analyze, and understand the behavior of nuclear plants is firmly established. There remain many challenging technical problems, but success of the industry is not contingent upon solving those technical problems. Rather, the success of the industry will be determined by a wider array of concerns than pure technology. For instance, nuclear plants in the future will have to compete economically against efficient, versatile, and reliable fossil technologies. In addition, potential users must be assured that the indirect costs, such as those of environmental effects and waste disposal, are acceptable. Finally, public perceptions about risks must somehow be allayed, if not resolved. The objective of this paper is to provide an introduction to a tool that may be useful to the industry in addressing the types of issues suggested above. The tool discussed is system dynamics. It has been used with considerable success in many other fields in ways that are similar to the needs of the nuclear field. In the second section of the paper the authors provide some background on the system dynamics method and illustrate how system dynamics models are constructed. In section 3 they discuss two applications in the nuclear field, the first relating to construction of nuclear plants and the second in the operation of a nuclear utility in the social/political environment of today in the United States. They conclude with some summary comments.

  10. Initiating nuclear-chemical transformations in native systems: Phenomenology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timashev, S. F.

    2016-10-01

    A possible mechanism of nuclear transformations in biological systems in vivo is proposed. Reasons why there is no ionizing radiation that could be detrimental to native systems during the corresponding nuclear reactions are given. It is established that the initial stage of these processes is associated with that of ATP hydrolysis, which initiates the action of the inner-shell electron of an atom participating in the reaction on its nucleus according to the mechanism of weak nuclear interaction. This results in the formation of a nucleus in a metastable state with a disturbed nucleon structure and a charge one unit lower than that of the initial nucleus. It is also assumed that the atom participating in the reaction is adsorbed near the mouth of one of the transport ATPases in the cell's cytoplasmic membrane, and the reason for the initiating impact the electron has on the nucleus is due to the emergence of a local electric field formed during ATP hydrolysis near the ion channel of a donor-acceptor pair of charges that is opposite to the direction of the average membrane field. It is concluded that as a result of the key role of weak nuclear interaction in these processes, the energy of nuclear transformations in biological systems in vivo is released through the emission of neutrino-antineutrino pairs that are harmless to living organisms.

  11. Defense Nuclear Material Stewardship Integrated Inventory Information Management System (IIIMS).

    SciTech Connect

    Aas, Christopher A.; Lenhart, James E.; Bray, Olin H.; Witcher, Christina Jenkin

    2004-11-01

    Sandia National Laboratories was tasked with developing the Defense Nuclear Material Stewardship Integrated Inventory Information Management System (IIIMS) with the sponsorship of NA-125.3 and the concurrence of DOE/NNSA field and area offices. The purpose of IIIMS was to modernize nuclear materials management information systems at the enterprise level. Projects over the course of several years attempted to spearhead this modernization. The scope of IIIMS was broken into broad enterprise-oriented materials management and materials forecasting. The IIIMS prototype was developed to allow multiple participating user groups to explore nuclear material requirements and needs in detail. The purpose of material forecasting was to determine nuclear material availability over a 10 to 15 year period in light of the dynamic nature of nuclear materials management. Formal DOE Directives (requirements) were needed to direct IIIMS efforts but were never issued and the project has been halted. When restarted, duplicating or re-engineering the activities from 1999 to 2003 is unnecessary, and in fact future initiatives can build on previous work. IIIMS requirements should be structured to provide high confidence that discrepancies are detected, and classified information is not divulged. Enterprise-wide materials management systems maintained by the military can be used as overall models to base IIIMS implementation concepts upon.

  12. Nuclear Science Symposium, 19th, and Nuclear Power Systems Symposium, 4th, Miami, Fla., December 6-8, 1972, Proceedings.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    Major topics covered include radiation monitoring instrumentation, nuclear circuits and systems, biomedical applications of nuclear radiation in diagnosis and therapy, plasma research for fusion power, reactor control and instrumentation, nuclear power standards, and applications of digital computers in nuclear power plants. Systems and devices for space applications are described, including the Apollo alpha spectrometer, a position sensitive detection system for UV and X-ray photons, a 4500-volt electron multiplier bias supply for satellite use, spark chamber systems, proportional counters, and other devices. Individual items are announced in this issue.

  13. A Methodology for Evaluating System Performance for Radiological/Nuclear Counterterrorism Systems - Full Paper

    SciTech Connect

    Bredt, Ofelia P.; Holter, Gregory M.; Wood, Thomas W.

    2005-04-28

    Various countermeasure systems could be deployed against radiological/nuclear terrorism. The need to compare various systems and configurations has resulted in development of a method for estimating performance of such systems. This paper presents one such performance evaluation method.

  14. Nuclear bimodal new vision solar system missions

    SciTech Connect

    Mondt, J.F.; Zubrin, R.M.

    1996-03-01

    This paper presents an analysis of the potential mission capability using space reactor bimodal systems for planetary missions. Missions of interest include the Main belt asteroids, Jupiter, Saturn, Neptune, and Pluto. The space reactor bimodal system, defined by an Air Force study for Earth orbital missions, provides 10 kWe power, 1000 N thrust, 850 s Isp, with a 1500 kg system mass. Trajectories to the planetary destinations were examined and optimal direct and gravity assisted trajectories were selected. A conceptual design for a spacecraft using the space reactor bimodal system for propulsion and power, that is capable of performing the missions of interest, is defined. End-to-end mission conceptual designs for bimodal orbiter missions to Jupiter and Saturn are described. All missions considered use the Delta 3 class or Atlas 2AS launch vehicles. The space reactor bimodal power and propulsion system offers both; new vision {open_quote}{open_quote}constellation{close_quote}{close_quote} type missions in which the space reactor bimodal spacecraft acts as a carrier and communication spacecraft for a fleet of microspacecraft deployed at different scientific targets and; conventional missions with only a space reactor bimodal spacecraft and its science payload. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  15. Why own an exotic pet?

    PubMed

    Moutou, F; Pastoret, P P

    2010-08-01

    Even though people have owned a wide variety of companion animals since times of old, the modern craze for increasingly exotic and little-known species raises a number of questions, including some of an ethical nature. While trade in exotic animals is certainly profitable for these who practise it, it poses great risks of varying types: ecological risks, threats to biodiversity conservation and health risks. Several introduced animal populations have gone on to establish a line in their new host country. We are just starting to measure the adverse impact this has had, in some cases on a very large scale. The veterinary profession doubtless has a major role to play in endeavouring to reform this trade in living creatures that unfortunately results in many losses.

  16. ENABLER Nuclear Propulsion System Conceptual Design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pauley, Keith A.; Woodham, Kurt; Ohi, Don; Haga, Heath; Henderson, Bo

    2004-02-01

    The Titan Corporation conducted a systems engineering study to develop an overall architecture that meets both the articulated and unarticulated requirements on the Prometheus Program with the least development effort. Key elements of the Titan-designed ENABLER system include a thermal fission reactor, thermionic power converters, sodium heat pipes, ion thruster engines, and a radiation shield and deployable truss to protect the payload. The overall design is scaleable over a wide range of power requirements from 10s of kilowatts to 10s of megawatts.

  17. Safety system augmentation at Russian nuclear power plants

    SciTech Connect

    Scerbo, J.A.; Satpute, S.N.; Donkin, J.Y.; Reister, R.A. |

    1996-12-31

    This paper describes the design and procurement of a Class IE DC power supply system to upgrade plant safety at the Kola Nuclear Power Plant (NPP). Kola NPP is located above the Arctic circle at Polyarnie Zorie, Murmansk, Russia. Kola NPP consists of four units. Units 1 and 2 have VVER-440/230 type reactors: Units 3 and 4 have VVER-440/213 type reactors. The VVER-440 reactor design is similar to the pressurized water reactor design used in the US. This project provided redundant, Class 1E DC station batteries and DC switchboards for Kola NPP, Units 1 and 2. The new DC power supply system was designed and procured in compliance with current nuclear design practices and requirements. Technical issues that needed to be addressed included reconciling the requirements in both US and Russian codes and satisfying the requirements of the Russian nuclear regulatory authority. Close interface with ATOMENERGOPROEKT (AEP), the Russian design organization, KOLA NPP plant personnel, and GOSATOMNADZOR (GAN), the Russian version of US Nuclear Regulatory Commission, was necessary to develop a design that would assure compliance with current Russian design requirements. Hence, this project was expected to serve as an example for plant upgrades at other similar VVER-440 nuclear plants. In addition to technical issues, the project needed to address language barriers and the logistics of shipping equipment to a remote section of the Former Soviet Union (FSU). This project was executed by Burns and Roe under the sponsorship of the US DOE as part of the International Safety Program (INSP). The INSP is a comprehensive effort, in cooperation with partners in other countries, to improve nuclear safety worldwide. A major element within the INSP is the improvement of the safety of Soviet-designed nuclear reactors.

  18. Nuclear power for space based systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Livingston, J. M.; Ivanenok, Joseph F., III

    1991-09-01

    A 100 kWe closed Brayton cycle power conversion system utilizing a recuperator coupled to a NERVA derivative reactor for a lunar power plant is presented. Power plant mass versus recuperator effectiveness, compressor inlet temperature, and turbine pressure ratio are described.

  19. (New imaging systems in nuclear medicine)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-01-01

    We continue to use and maintain PCR-I, the single-slice high- resolution high-sensitivity positron emission tomograph, while development proceeds on PCR-II, a three-dimensional PET system. A two-dimensional BGO scintillation detector has been designed and we are nearing completion of the detector, including the light guide, crystals and phototube assembly, and the gantry electronics. We are currently exploring techniques for a very high resolution (sub-mm) PET imaging system. We are using the current PCR-I system to assess changes in presynaptic dopamine receptors and glucose utilization in current biological models of Huntington's disease. Our preliminary studies support the use of the primate (Cynomolgus monkey) model of Huntington's disease to monitor in vivo functional changes. We are planning to extend this study to examine the MPTP model of Parkinson disease, and to assess the therapeutic value of D{sub 1} dopamine receptor agonists for treatment of MPTP-induced neurological defects. 13 refs., 5 figs. (MHB)

  20. Nuclear-Renewable Hybrid Energy System Market Analysis Plans

    SciTech Connect

    Ruth, Mark

    2016-06-09

    This presentation describes nuclear-renewable hybrid energy systems (N-R HESs), states their potential benefits, provides figures for the four tightly coupled N-R HESs that NREL is currently analyzing, and outlines the analysis process that is underway.

  1. Nuclear test monitoring system detected meteor explosion over Russia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balcerak, Ernie

    2013-10-01

    Sound waves from the Chelyabinsk meteor, which exploded over Russia on 15 February 2013, were detected by 20 infrasound stations that are part of the international monitoring system operated by the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty Organization (CTBTO). The fireball was the most energetic event observed since the 1908 Tunguska meteorite impact and is the most energetic event detected by the CTBTO network.

  2. Exotic Paired States with Anisotropic Spin-Dependent Fermi Surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Feiguin, Adrian E.; Fisher, Matthew P. A.

    2009-07-10

    We propose a model for realizing exotic paired states in cold Fermi gases by using a spin-dependent optical lattice to engineer mismatched Fermi surfaces for each hyperfine species. The BCS phase diagram shows a stable paired superfluid state with coexisting pockets of momentum space with gapless unpaired carriers, similar to the Sarma state in polarized mixtures, but in our case the system is unpolarized. We propose the possible existence of an exotic 'Cooper-pair Bose-metal' phase, which has a gap for single fermion excitations but gapless and uncondensed 'Cooper-pair' excitations residing on a 'Bose surface' in momentum space.

  3. Advanced materials for space nuclear power systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Titran, Robert H.; Grobstein, Toni L.; Ellis, David L.

    1991-01-01

    The overall philosophy of the research was to develop and characterize new high temperature power conversion and radiator materials and to provide spacecraft designers with material selection options and design information. Research on three candidate materials (carbide strengthened niobium alloy PWC-11 for fuel cladding, graphite fiber reinforced copper matrix composites for heat rejection fins, and tungsten fiber reinforced niobium matrix composites for fuel containment and structural supports) considered for space power system applications is discussed. Each of these types of materials offers unique advantages for space power applications.

  4. Sequential fissions of heavy nuclear systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gruyer, D.; Frankland, J. D.; Bonnet, E.; Boisjoli, M.; Chbihi, A.; Manduci, L.; Marini, P.; Mazurek, K.; Nadtochy, P. N.

    2013-12-01

    In 129Xe + natSn central collisions from 12 to 20 MeV/A measured with the INDRA 4π multidetector, the three-fragment exit channel occurs with a significant cross section. In this contribution, we show that these fragments arise from two successive binary splittings of a heavy composite system. Strong Coulomb proximity effects are observed in the three-fragment final state. By comparison with Coulomb trajectory calculations, we show that the time scale between the consecutive break-ups decreases with increasing bombarding energy, becoming compatible with quasi-simultaneous multifragmentation above 18 MeV/A.

  5. Advanced materials for space nuclear power systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Titran, Robert H.; Grobstein, Toni L.; Ellis, David L.

    1991-01-01

    The overall philosophy of the research was to develop and characterize new high temperature power conversion and radiator materials and to provide spacecraft designers with material selection options and design information. Research on three candidate materials (carbide strengthened niobium alloy PWC-11 for fuel cladding, graphite fiber reinforced copper matrix composites for heat rejection fins, and tungsten fiber reinforced niobium matrix composites for fuel containment and structural supports considered for space power system applications is discussed. Each of these types of materials offers unique advantages for space power applications.

  6. Nuclear data needs for advanced reactor systems. A NEA nuclear science committee initiative.

    SciTech Connect

    Salvatores, M.; Aliberti, G.; Palmiotti, G.; Rochman, D.; Oblozinsky, P.; Hermann, M.; Talou, P.; Kawano, T.; Leal, L.; Koning, A.; Kodeli, I.; Nuclear Engineering Division; CEA Cadarache; BNL; LANL; ORNL; NRG-Petten; NEA-Databank

    2008-01-01

    The Working Party on Evaluation Cooperation (WPEC) of the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency Nuclear Science Committee has established an International Subgroup to perform an activity in order to develop a systematic approach to define data needs for Gen-IV and, in general, for advanced reactor systems. A methodology, based on sensitivity analysis has been agreed and representative core configurations for Sodium, Gas and Lead cooled Fast Reactors (SFR, GFR, LFR) have been defined as well as a high burn-up VHTR and a high burn-up PWR. In the case of SFRs, both a TRU burner (called in fact SFR) and a core configuration with homogeneous recycling of not separated TRU (called EFR) have been considered. The methodology, the systems considered and the sensitivity approach are consistent with the work reported in ref. [1]. For the present study, the approach has been extended to the ABTR Na-cooled core, recently studied within the GNEP initiative [2]. Sensitivity coefficients (in a 15 energy group structure) have been calculated at ANL with the ERANOS code system [3] for all reactors and for the parameters most sensitive to nuclear data uncertainties: Multiplication factor, Power peak, Burn-up {Delta}k/k, Coolant void reactivity coefficient, Doppler reactivity coefficient, Nuclide density at end of cycle (transmutation potential), Neutron source at fuel fabrication, Dose in a repository.

  7. Optoelectronic inventory system for special nuclear material

    SciTech Connect

    Sieradzki, F.H.

    1994-01-01

    In support of the Department of Energy`s Dismantlement Program, the Optoelectronics Characterization and Sensor Development Department 2231 at Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico has developed an in situ nonintrusive Optoelectronic Inventory System (OIS) that has the potential for application wherever periodic inventory of selected material is desired. Using a network of fiber-optic links, the OIS retrieves and stores inventory signatures from data storage devices (which are permanently attached to material storage containers) while inherently providing electromagnetic pulse immunity and electrical noise isolation. Photovoltaic cells (located within the storage facility) convert laser diode optic power from a laser driver to electrical energy. When powered and triggered, the data storage devices sequentially output their digital inventory signatures through light-emitting diode/photo diode data links for retrieval and storage in a mobile data acquisition system. An item`s exact location is determined through fiber-optic network and software design. The OIS provides an on-demand method for obtaining acceptable inventory reports while eliminating the need for human presence inside the material storage facility. By using modularization and prefabricated construction with mature technologies and components, an OIS installation with virtually unlimited capacity can be tailored to the customer`s requirements.

  8. PEGASUS - A multi-megawatt nuclear electric propulsion system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coomes, E. P.; Cuta, J. M.; Webb, B. J.; King, D. Q.

    1986-01-01

    A propulsion system (The PEGASUS Drive) consisting of a magnetoplasmadynamic (MPD) thruster driven by a multimegawatt nuclear power system is proposed as the propulsion system for a manned Mars mission. The propulsion system described is based on a mission profile containing a 510-day burn time (for a mission time of approximately 1000 days). Electric propulsion systems have significant advantages over chemical systems, because of high specific impulse, lower propellant requirements, and lower system mass. The thermal power for the PEGASUS Drive is supplied by a boiling liquid-metal fast reactor. The system consists of the reactor, reactor shielding, power conditioning, heat rejection, and MPD thruster subsystems. It is capable of providing a maximum of 8.5 megawatts of electrical power of which 6 megawatts is needed for the thruster system, 1.5 megawatts is available for spacecraft system operations and inflight mission applications, leaving the balance for power system operation.

  9. System for detecting special nuclear materials

    DOEpatents

    Jandel, Marian; Rusev, Gencho Yordanov; Taddeucci, Terry Nicholas

    2015-07-14

    The present disclosure includes a radiological material detector having a convertor material that emits one or more photons in response to a capture of a neutron emitted by a radiological material; a photon detector arranged around the convertor material and that produces an electrical signal in response to a receipt of a photon; and a processor connected to the photon detector, the processor configured to determine the presence of a radiological material in response to a predetermined signature of the electrical signal produced at the photon detector. One or more detectors described herein can be integrated into a detection system that is suited for use in port monitoring, treaty compliance, and radiological material management activities.

  10. Nuclear magnetic resonance studies of biological systems

    SciTech Connect

    Antypas, W.G. Jr.

    1988-01-01

    The difference between intracellular and extracellular proton relaxation rates provides the basis for the determination of the mean hemoglobin concentration (MHC) in red blood cells. The observed water T{sub 1} relaxation data from red blood cell samples under various conditions were fit to the complete equation for the time-dependent decay of magnetization for a two-compartment system including chemical exchange. The MHC for each sample was calculated from the hematocrit and the intracellular water fraction as determined by NMR. The binding of the phosphorylcholine (PC) analogue, 2-(trimethylphosphonio)-ethylphosphate (phosphoryl-phosphocholine, PPC) to the PC binding myeloma proteins TEPC-15, McPC 603, and MOPC 167 was studied by {sup 31}P NMR.

  11. Exotic and qqbar resonances in the π+π-π- system produced in π-p collisions at 18 GeV/c

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, S. U.; Danyo, K.; Hackenburg, R. W.; Olchanski, C.; Suh, J. S.; Willutzki, H. J.; Denisov, S. P.; Dorofeev, V.; Lipaev, V. V.; Popov, A. V.; Ryabchikov, D. I.; Bar-Yam, Z.; Dowd, J. P.; Eugenio, P.; Hayek, M.; Kern, W.; King, E.; Shenhav, N.; Bodyagin, V. A.; Kodolova, O. L.; Korotkikh, V. L.; Kostin, M. A.; Ostrovidov, A. I.; Sarycheva, L. I.; Vardanyan, I. N.; Yershov, A. A.; Brown, D. S.; Fan, X. L.; Joffe, D.; Pedlar, T. K.; Seth, K. K.; Tomaradze, A.; Adams, T.; Bishop, J. M.; Cason, N. M.; Ivanov, E. I.; Losecco, J. M.; Manak, J. J.; Shephard, W. D.; Stienike, D. L.; Taegar, S. A.; Adams, G. S.; Cummings, J. P.; Hu, J.; Kuhn, J.; Lu, M.; Napolitano, J.; White, D. B.; Witkowski, M.; Nozar, M.; Shen, X.; Weygand, D. P.

    2002-04-01

    A partial-wave analysis of the reaction π-p-->π+π-π-p at 18 GeV/c has been performed on a data sample of 250 000 events obtained in the Brookhaven experiment E852. The well-known a1(1260), a2(1320) and π2(1670) resonant states are observed. The existence of the π(1800), a1(1700) and a4(2040) states is confirmed. The a3(1874) state is also observed. The exotic 1-+ π1(1600) state produced in the natural parity exchange process is found to decay in the ρ(770)π- channel. A mass-dependent fit results in a resonance mass of 1593+/-8+29-47 MeV/c2 and a width of 168+/-20+150-12 MeV/c2.

  12. Timing system for firing widely spaced test nuclear detonations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Partridge, Ralph E.

    1992-01-01

    The national weapons design laboratories (Los Alamos National Laboratory and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory) test fire nuclear devices at the Nevada Test Site (NTS), which is spread over an area of over 1200 square miles. On each test there are hundreds of high time resolution recordings made of nuclear output waveforms and other phenomena. In order to synchronize these recordings with each other, with the nuclear device, and with offsite recordings, there is a requirement that the permanent command center and the outlying temporary firing sites be time tied to each other and to UTC to permit firing the shot at a predetermined time with an accuracy of about a microsecond. Various aspects of the test setup and timing system are discussed.

  13. Dynamic Simulation and Optimization of Nuclear Hydrogen Production Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Paul I. Barton; Mujid S. Kaximi; Georgios Bollas; Patricio Ramirez Munoz

    2009-07-31

    This project is part of a research effort to design a hydrogen plant and its interface with a nuclear reactor. This project developed a dynamic modeling, simulation and optimization environment for nuclear hydrogen production systems. A hybrid discrete/continuous model captures both the continuous dynamics of the nuclear plant, the hydrogen plant, and their interface, along with discrete events such as major upsets. This hybrid model makes us of accurate thermodynamic sub-models for the description of phase and reaction equilibria in the thermochemical reactor. Use of the detailed thermodynamic models will allow researchers to examine the process in detail and have confidence in the accurary of the property package they use.

  14. Nuclear data for non-intrusive inspection systems

    SciTech Connect

    Bendahan, J.; Loveman, R.; Gozani, T.

    1994-12-31

    Non-intrusive inspection systems based on nuclear techniques utilize the interaction of neutrons and gamma rays to determine the elemental constituents of the inspected object. The Thermal Neutron Analysis System has been used to detect explosives and narcotics concealed in passenger luggage and small objects. More recently the Pulsed Fast Neutron Analysis technique is being used to detect contraband in large cargo containers and has been proposed for the characterization of waste drums. The design of these systems requires the utilization of simulation codes where the accuracy of the results depends largely on the nuclear libraries. Several nuclear data evaluations were reviewed and compared with existing data to identify the most accurate ones. Large discrepancies were found among the various nuclear libraries, mainly in the production cross sections and angular distributions of gamma rays, stimulated by neutron interactions. An experimental program was carried out to correct and complement the required data. Evaluations of gamma-ray production cross sections for carbon, oxygen and chlorine are reviewed and compared with existing and new experimental data.

  15. Effective specific impulse of external nuclear pulse propulsion systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reynolds, T. W.

    1972-01-01

    An investigation of a simple self-similar flow model for an external nuclear pulse propulsion system indicates that to achieve the high effective specific impulse of such a system three principal factors are required. The are (1) attaining pulses of optimum energy, (2) attaining good propellant collimation, and (3) using an ablative material for the pusher surface which has high absorptivity for radiant energy at the propellant stagnation temperature.

  16. Robotic control architecture development for automated nuclear material handling systems

    SciTech Connect

    Merrill, R.D.; Hurd, R.; Couture, S.; Wilhelmsen, K.

    1995-02-01

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is engaged in developing automated systems for handling materials for mixed waste treatment, nuclear pyrochemical processing, and weapon components disassembly. In support of these application areas there is an extensive robotic development program. This paper will describe the portion of this effort at LLNL devoted to control system architecture development, and review two applications currently being implemented which incorporate these technologies.

  17. Expert system for online surveillance of nuclear reactor coolant pumps

    DOEpatents

    Gross, Kenny C.; Singer, Ralph M.; Humenik, Keith E.

    1993-01-01

    An expert system for online surveillance of nuclear reactor coolant pumps. This system provides a means for early detection of pump or sensor degradation. Degradation is determined through the use of a statistical analysis technique, sequential probability ratio test, applied to information from several sensors which are responsive to differing physical parameters. The results of sequential testing of the data provide the operator with an early warning of possible sensor or pump failure.

  18. Titan's Exotic Weather

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffith, Caitlin A.

    2006-09-01

    Images of Titan, taken during the joint NASA and European Space Agency Cassini-Huygens mission, invoke a feeling of familiarity: washes wind downhill to damp lakebeds; massive cumuli form and quickly dissipate, suggestive of rain; and dark oval regions resemble lakes. These features arise from Titan's unique similarity with Earth: both cycle liquid between their surfaces and atmospheres, but in Titan's cool atmosphere it is methane that exists as a gas, liquid, and ice. While Titan enticingly resembles Earth, its atmosphere is 10 times thicker, so that its radiative time constant near the surface exceeds a Titan year, and prohibits large thermal gradients and seasonal surface temperature variations exceeding 3K. Titan also lacks oceans - central to Earth's climate - and instead stores much of its condensible in its atmosphere. As a result, Titan's weather differs remarkably from Earth's. Evidence for this difference appears in the location of Titan's large clouds, which frequent a narrow band at 40S latitude and a region within 30 latitude of the S. Pole. Ground-based and Cassini observations, combined with thermodynamic considerations, indicate that we are seeing large convective cloud systems. Detailed cloud models and general circulation models further suggest that these are severe rain storms, which will migrate with the change in season. Outside these migrating "gypsy" cloud bands, the atmosphere appears to be calm, humid and thus frequented by thin stratiform clouds. An intriguingly alien environment is predicted. Yet, the combined effects of Titan's patchy wet surface, atmospheric tides, possible ice volcanoes, and detailed seasonal variations remain unclear as we have witnessed only one season so far. This talk will review observations of Titan's lower atmosphere and modeling efforts to explain the observations, and explore the questions that still elude us.

  19. Fault-tolerant adaptive control for load-following in static space nuclear power systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parlos, Alexander G.; Onbasioglu, Fetiye O.; Peddicord, Kenneth L.; Metzger, John D.

    1992-01-01

    The possible use of a dual-loop model-based adaptive control system for load following in static space nuclear power systems is investigated. The proposed approach has thus far been applied only to a thermoelectric space nuclear power system but is equally applicable to other static space nuclear power systems such as thermionic systems.

  20. A sensor-based automation system for handling nuclear materials

    SciTech Connect

    Drotning, W.; Kimberly, H.; Wapman, W.; Darras, D.

    1997-03-01

    An automated system is being developed for handling large payloads of radioactive nuclear materials in an analytical laboratory. The automation system performs unpacking and repacking of payloads from shipping and storage containers, and delivery of the payloads to the stations in the laboratory. The system uses machine vision and force/torque sensing to provide sensor-based control of the automation system in order to enhance system safety, flexibility, and robustness, and achieve easy remote operation. The automation system also controls the operation of the laboratory measurement systems and the coordination of them with the robotic system. Particular attention has been given to system design features and analytical methods that provide an enhanced level of operational safety. Independent mechanical gripper interlock and tool release mechanisms were designed to prevent payload mishandling. An extensive Failure Modes and Effects Analysis of the automation system was developed as a safety design analysis tool.

  1. Systems for the Intermodal Routing of Spent Nuclear Fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, Steven K; Liu, Cheng

    2015-01-01

    The safe and secure movement of spent nuclear fuel from shutdown and active reactor facilities to intermediate or long term storage sites may, in some instances, require the use of several modes of transportation to accomplish the move. To that end, a fully operable multi-modal routing system is being developed within Oak Ridge National Laboratory s (ORNL) WebTRAGIS (Transportation Routing Analysis Geographic Information System). This study aims to provide an overview of multi-modal routing, the existing state of the TRAGIS networks, the source data needs, and the requirements for developing structural relationships between various modes to create a suitable system for modeling the transport of spent nuclear fuel via a multimodal network. Modern transportation systems are comprised of interconnected, yet separate, modal networks. Efficient transportation networks rely upon the smooth transfer of cargoes at junction points that serve as connectors between modes. A key logistical impediment to the shipment of spent nuclear fuel is the absence of identified or designated transfer locations between transport modes. Understanding the potential network impacts on intermodal transportation of spent nuclear fuel is vital for planning transportation routes from origin to destination. By identifying key locations where modes intersect, routing decisions can be made to prioritize cost savings, optimize transport times and minimize potential risks to the population and environment. In order to facilitate such a process, ORNL began the development of a base intermodal network and associated routing code. The network was developed using previous intermodal networks and information from publicly available data sources to construct a database of potential intermodal transfer locations with likely capability to handle spent nuclear fuel casks. The coding development focused on modifying the existing WebTRAGIS routing code to accommodate intermodal transfers and the selection of

  2. NUCLEAR DATA NEEDS FOR ADVANCED REACTOR SYSTEMS. A NEA NUCLEAR SCIENCE COMMITTEE INITIATIVE.

    SciTech Connect

    SALVATORES,J.M.; ALIBERTI, G.; PALMIOTTI, G.; ROCHMAN, D.; OBLOZINSKY, P.; HERMANN, M.; TALOU, P.; KAWANO, T.; LEAL, L.; KONING, A.; KODELI, I.

    2007-04-22

    The Working Party on Evaluation Cooperation (WPEC) of the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency Nuclear Science Committee has established an International Subgroup to perform an activity in order to develop a systematic approach to define data needs for Gen-IV and, in general, for advanced reactor systems. A methodology, based on sensitivity analysis has been agreed and representative core configurations for Sodium, Gas and Lead cooled Fast Reactors (SFR, GFR, LFR) have been defined as well as a high burn-up VHTR and a high burn-up PWR. In the case of SFRs, both a TRU burner (called in fact SFR) and a core configuration with homogeneous recycling of not separated TRU (called EFR) have been considered.

  3. TOF Mass Measurements of Very Exotic Nuclides: an Input for Astrophysical Calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matoš, M.; Estrade, A.; Amthor, M.; Bazin, D.; Becerril, A.; Elliot, T.; Galaviz, D.; Gade, A.; Lorusso, G.; Montes, F.; Pereira, J.; Portillo, M.; Rogers, A. M.; Schatz, H.; Stolz, A.; Aprahamian, A.; Shapira, D.; Smith, E.; Gupta, S.; Wallace, M.

    2007-10-01

    Atomic masses play a crucial role in many nuclear astrophysics calculations. Very exotic nuclei can be accessed by time-of- flight techniques at radioactive beam facilities. The NSCL facility provides a well-suited infrastructure for TOF mass measurements of very exotic nuclei. At this facility, we have recently implemented a TOF-Bρ technique and performed mass measurements of neutron-rich nuclides in the Fe region, important for calculations of the r-process and processes occurring in the crust of accreting neutron stars. Description of the TOF technique, results and future plans related to nuclear astrophysics will be presented.

  4. Anatomizing Exotic Production of the Higgs Boson

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Felix

    2014-07-10

    We discuss exotic production modes of the Higgs boson and how their phenomenology can be probed in current Higgs analyses. We highlight the importance of differential distributions in disentangling standard production mechanisms from exotic modes. We present two model benchmarks for exotic Higgs production arising from chargino-neutralino production and study their impact on the current Higgs dataset. As a corollary, we emphasize that current Higgs coupling fits do not fully explore the space of new physics deviations possible in Higgs data.

  5. Safety assessment of a robotic system handling nuclear material

    SciTech Connect

    Atcitty, C.B.; Robinson, D.G.

    1996-02-01

    This paper outlines the use of a Failure Modes and Effects Analysis for the safety assessment of a robotic system being developed at Sandia National Laboratories. The robotic system, The Weigh and Leak Check System, is to replace a manual process at the Department of Energy facility at Pantex by which nuclear material is inspected for weight and leakage. Failure Modes and Effects Analyses were completed for the robotics process to ensure that safety goals for the system had been meet. These analyses showed that the risks to people and the internal and external environment were acceptable.

  6. Nuclear Hybrid Energy System Modeling: RELAP5 Dynamic Coupling Capabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Piyush Sabharwall; Nolan Anderson; Haihua Zhao; Shannon Bragg-Sitton; George Mesina

    2012-09-01

    The nuclear hybrid energy systems (NHES) research team is currently developing a dynamic simulation of an integrated hybrid energy system. A detailed simulation of proposed NHES architectures will allow initial computational demonstration of a tightly coupled NHES to identify key reactor subsystem requirements, identify candidate reactor technologies for a hybrid system, and identify key challenges to operation of the coupled system. This work will provide a baseline for later coupling of design-specific reactor models through industry collaboration. The modeling capability addressed in this report focuses on the reactor subsystem simulation.

  7. An Integrated Safety Assessment Methodology for Generation IV Nuclear Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Timothy J. Leahy

    2010-06-01

    The Generation IV International Forum (GIF) Risk and Safety Working Group (RSWG) was created to develop an effective approach for the safety of Generation IV advanced nuclear energy systems. Early work of the RSWG focused on defining a safety philosophy founded on lessons learned from current and prior generations of nuclear technologies, and on identifying technology characteristics that may help achieve Generation IV safety goals. More recent RSWG work has focused on the definition of an integrated safety assessment methodology for evaluating the safety of Generation IV systems. The methodology, tentatively called ISAM, is an integrated “toolkit” consisting of analytical techniques that are available and matched to appropriate stages of Generation IV system concept development. The integrated methodology is intended to yield safety-related insights that help actively drive the evolving design throughout the technology development cycle, potentially resulting in enhanced safety, reduced costs, and shortened development time.

  8. Potential civil mission applications for space nuclear power systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ambrus, J. H.; Beatty, R. G. G.

    1985-01-01

    It is pointed out that the energy needs of spacecraft over the last 25 years have been met by photovoltaic arrays with batteries, primary fuel cells, and radioisotope thermoelectric generators (RTG). However, it might be difficult to satisfy energy requirements for the next generation of space missions with the currently used energy sources. Applications studies have emphasized the need for a lighter, cheaper, and more compact high-energy source than the scaling up of current technologies would permit. These requirements could be satisfied by a nuclear reactor power system. The joint NASA/DOD/DOE SP-100 program is to explore and evaluate this option. Critical elements of the technology are also to be developed, taking into account space reactor systems of the 100 kW class. The present paper is concerned with some of the civil mission categories and concepts which are enabled or significantly enhanced by the performance characteristics of a nuclear reactor energy system.

  9. Bioengineered Silk Gene Delivery System for Nuclear Targeting

    PubMed Central

    Yigit, Sezin; Tokareva, Olena; Varone, Antonio; Georgakoudi, Irene

    2015-01-01

    Gene delivery research has gained momentum with the use of lipophilic vectors that mimic viral systems to increase transfection efficiency. However, maintaining cell viability with these systems remains a major challenge. Therefore biocompatible and nontoxic biopolymers that are designed by combining non-immunological viral mimicking components with suitable carriers have been explored to address these limitations. In the present study recombinant DNA technology was used to design a multi-functional gene delivery system for nuclear targeting, while also supporting cell viability. Spider dragline silk recombinant proteins were modified with DNA condensing units and the proton sponge endosomal escape pathway was utilized for enhanced delivery. Short-term transfection efficiency in a COS-7 cell line (adherent kidney cells isolated from African green monkey) was enhanced compared to lipofectamine and polyethyleneimine (PEI), as was cell viability with these recombinant bio-polyplexes. Endosomal escape and consequent nuclear targeting were shown with fluorescence microscopy. PMID:24889658

  10. Upgrades to the NESS (Nuclear Engine System Simulation) Code

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fittje, James E.

    2007-01-01

    In support of the President's Vision for Space Exploration, the Nuclear Thermal Rocket (NTR) concept is being evaluated as a potential propulsion technology for human expeditions to the moon and Mars. The need for exceptional propulsion system performance in these missions has been documented in numerous studies, and was the primary focus of a considerable effort undertaken during the 1960's and 1970's. The NASA Glenn Research Center is leveraging this past NTR investment in their vehicle concepts and mission analysis studies with the aid of the Nuclear Engine System Simulation (NESS) code. This paper presents the additional capabilities and upgrades made to this code in order to perform higher fidelity NTR propulsion system analysis and design.

  11. The MAUS nuclear space reactor with ion propulsion system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mainardi, Enrico

    2006-06-01

    MAUS (Moltiplicatore Avanzato Ultracompatto Spaziale) is a nuclear reactor concept design capable to ensure a reliable, long-lasting, low-mass, compact energy supply needed for advanced, future space missions. The exploration of the solar system and the space beyond requires the development of nuclear energy generators for supplying electricity to space-bases, spacecrafts, probes or satellites, as well as for propelling ships in long space missions. For propulsion, the MAUS nuclear reactor could be used to power electric ion drive engines. An ion engine is able to build up to very high velocities, far greater than chemical propulsion systems, but has high power and long service requirements. The MAUS concept is described, together with the ion propulsion engine and together with the reference thermoionic process used to convert the thermal power into electricity. The design work has been performed at the Nuclear Engineering and Energy Conversion Department of the University of Rome "La Sapienza" starting from 1992 on an issue submitted by the Italian Space Agency (ASI), in cooperation with the research laboratories of ENEA.

  12. Indicator system for advanced nuclear plant control complex

    DOEpatents

    Scarola, Kenneth; Jamison, David S.; Manazir, Richard M.; Rescorl, Robert L.; Harmon, Daryl L.

    1993-01-01

    An advanced control room complex for a nuclear power plant, including a discrete indicator and alarm system (72) which is nuclear qualified for rapid response to changes in plant parameters and a component control system (64) which together provide a discrete monitoring and control capability at a panel (14-22, 26, 28) in the control room (10). A separate data processing system (70), which need not be nuclear qualified, provides integrated and overview information to the control room and to each panel, through CRTs (84) and a large, overhead integrated process status overview board (24). The discrete indicator and alarm system (72) and the data processing system (70) receive inputs from common plant sensors and validate the sensor outputs to arrive at a representative value of the parameter for use by the operator during both normal and accident conditions, thereby avoiding the need for him to assimilate data from each sensor individually. The integrated process status board (24) is at the apex of an information hierarchy that extends through four levels and provides access at each panel to the full display hierarchy. The control room panels are preferably of a modular construction, permitting the definition of inputs and outputs, the man machine interface, and the plant specific algorithms, to proceed in parallel with the fabrication of the panels, the installation of the equipment and the generic testing thereof.

  13. Nuclear thermal propulsion transportation systems for lunar/Mars exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, John S.; Borowski, Stanley K.; Mcilwain, Melvin C.; Pellaccio, Dennis G.

    1992-01-01

    Nuclear thermal propulsion technology development is underway at NASA and DoE for Space Exploration Initiative (SEI) missions to Mars, with initial near-earth flights to validate flight readiness. Several reactor concepts are being considered for these missions, and important selection criteria will be evaluated before final selection of a system. These criteria include: safety and reliability, technical risk, cost, and performance, in that order. Of the concepts evaluated to date, the Nuclear Engine for Rocket Vehicle Applications (NERVA) derivative (NDR) is the only concept that has demonstrated full power, life, and performance in actual reactor tests. Other concepts will require significant design work and must demonstrate proof-of-concept. Technical risk, and hence, development cost should therefore be lowest for the concept, and the NDR concept is currently being considered for the initial SEI missions. As lighter weight, higher performance systems are developed and validated, including appropriate safety and astronaut-rating requirements, they will be considered to support future SEI application. A space transportation system using a modular nuclear thermal rocket (NTR) system for lunar and Mars missions is expected to result in significant life cycle cost savings. Finally, several key issues remain for NTR's, including public acceptance and operational issues. Nonetheless, NTR's are believed to be the 'next generation' of space propulsion systems - the key to space exploration.

  14. Zoonotic parasites from exotic meat in Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Fazly, Z A; Nurulaini, R; Shafarin, M S; Fariza, N J; Zawida, Z; Muhamad, H Y; Adnan, M; Premaalatha, B; Erwanas, A I; Zaini, C M; Ong, C C; Chandrawathani, P

    2013-09-01

    Four zoonotic parasites, Sarcocystis spp., Toxoplasma gondii, Trichinella spp. and Taenia spp were screened in exotic meats. A total of forty-six (n=46) meat samples from various species of exotic animals were received from all the 14 states in Malaysia from January 2012 to April 2012. All exotic meat samples were examined macroscopically and histologically for the four zoonotic parasites. Results by histological examination of exotic meats showed the presence of Sarcocystis and Toxoplasma cysts at 8.7% (n=4) and 4.3% (n=2) respectively. No Trichinella spp. and Taenia spp. were found.

  15. Ectoparasites in small exotic mammals.

    PubMed

    Fehr, Michael; Koestlinger, Saskia

    2013-09-01

    Ectoparasites inhabiting the skin are responsible for significant problems in small mammals, owing to ingestion of blood, lymph, sebaceous secretions, and scavenging skin debris, as well as a hypersensitivity reaction to parasite antigen resulting in severe pruritus and subsequent self-trauma-induced lesions. In general practice, the most common diagnosis in exotic pets is an unspecified mite infestation, but other ectoparasites such as lice, fleas, insects, or even helminths may cause dermatologic diseases. If treatment with topical insecticides is planned, the small mammal should be isolated for a few hours to enable drying and spreading of the product.

  16. Advanced Thermophotovoltaic Devices for Space Nuclear Power Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Wernsman, Bernard; Mahorter, Robert G.; Siergiej, Richard; Link, Samuel D.; Wehrer, Rebecca J.; Belanger, Sean J.; Fourspring, Patrick; Murray, Susan; Newman, Fred; Taylor, Dan; Rahmlow, Tom

    2005-02-06

    Advanced thermophotovoltaic (TPV) modules capable of producing > 0.3 W/cm2 at an efficiency > 22% while operating at a converter radiator and module temperature of 1228 K and 325 K, respectively, have been made. These advanced TPV modules are projected to produce > 0.9 W/cm2 at an efficiency > 24% while operating at a converter radiator and module temperature of 1373 K and 325 K, respectively. Radioisotope and nuclear (fission) powered space systems utilizing these advanced TPV modules have been evaluated. For a 100 We radioisotope TPV system, systems utilizing as low as 2 general purpose heat source (GPHS) units are feasible, where the specific power for the 2 and 3 GPHS unit systems operating in a 200 K environment is as large as {approx} 16 We/kg and {approx} 14 We/kg, respectively. For a 100 kWe nuclear powered (as was entertained for the thermoelectric SP-100 program) TPV system, the minimum system radiator area and mass is {approx} 640 m2 and {approx} 1150 kg, respectively, for a converter radiator, system radiator and environment temperature of 1373 K, 435 K and 200 K, respectively. Also, for a converter radiator temperature of 1373 K, the converter volume and mass remains less than 0.36 m3 and 640 kg, respectively. Thus, the minimum system radiator + converter (reactor and shield not included) specific mass is {approx} 16 kg/kWe for a converter radiator, system radiator and environment temperature of 1373 K, 425 K and 200 K, respectively. Under this operating condition, the reactor thermal rating is {approx} 1110 kWt. Due to the large radiator area, the added complexity and mission risk needs to be weighed against reducing the reactor thermal rating to determine the feasibility of using TPV for space nuclear (fission) power systems.

  17. PEGASUS: A multi-megawatt nuclear electric propulsion system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coomes, Edmund P.; Cuta, Judith M.; Webb, Brent J.; King, David Q.; Patterson, Mike J.; Berkopec, Frank

    1986-01-01

    A propulsion system (PEGASUS) consisting of an electric thruster driven by a multimegawatt nuclear power system is proposed for a manned Mars mission. Magnetoplasmadynamic and mercury-ion thrusters are considered, based on a mission profile containing a 510-day burn time (for a mission time of approximately 1000 days). Both thrusters are capable of meeting the mission parameters. Electric propulsion systems have significant advantages over chemical systems, because of high specific impulse, lower propellant requirements, and lower system mass. The power for the PEGASUS system is supplied by a boiling liquid-metal fast reactor. The power system consists of the reactor, reactor shielding, power conditioning subsystems, and heat rejection subsystems. It is capable of providing a maximum of 8.5 megawatts of electrical power of which 6 megawatts is needed for the thruster system, leaving 1.5 megawatts available for inflight mission applications.

  18. Study of reactor Brayton power systems for nuclear electric spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    The feasibility of using Brayton power systems for nuclear electric spacecraft was investigated. The primary performance parameters of systems mass and radiator area were determined for systems from 100 to 1000 kW sub e. Mathematical models of all system components were used to determine masses and volumes. Two completely independent systems provide propulsion power so that no single-point failure can jeopardize a mission. The waste heat radiators utilize armored heat pipes to limit meteorite puncture. The armor thickness was statistically determined to achieve the required probability of survival. A 400 kW sub e reference system received primary attention as required by the contract. The components of this system were defined and a conceptual layout was developed with encouraging results. An arrangement with redundant Brayton power systems having a 1500 K (2240 F) turbine inlet temperature was shown to be compatible with the dimensions of the space shuttle orbiter payload bay.

  19. 1986 Nuclear Science Symposium, 33rd, and 1986 Symposium on Nuclear Power Systems, 18th, Washington, DC, Oct. 29-31, 1986, Proceedings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stubblefield, F. W. (Editor)

    1987-01-01

    Papers are presented on space, low-energy physics, and general nuclear science instrumentations. Topics discussed include data acquisition systems and circuits, nuclear medicine imaging and tomography, and nuclear radiation detectors. Consideration is given to high-energy physics instrumentation, reactor systems and safeguards, health physics instrumentation, and nuclear power systems.

  20. Naval Spent Nuclear Fuel disposal Container System Description Document

    SciTech Connect

    N. E. Pettit

    2001-07-13

    The Naval Spent Nuclear Fuel Disposal Container System supports the confinement and isolation of waste within the Engineered Barrier System of the Monitored Geologic Repository (MGR). Disposal containers/waste packages are loaded and sealed in the surface waste handling facilities, transferred underground through the access drifts using a rail mounted transporter, and emplaced in emplacement drifts. The Naval Spent Nuclear Fuel Disposal Container System provides long term confinement of the naval spent nuclear fuel (SNF) placed within the disposal containers, and withstands the loading, transfer, emplacement, and retrieval operations. The Naval Spent Nuclear Fuel Disposal Container System provides containment of waste for a designated period of time and limits radionuclide release thereafter. The waste package maintains the waste in a designated configuration, withstands maximum credible handling and rockfall loads, limits the waste form temperature after emplacement, resists corrosion in the expected handling and repository environments, and provides containment of waste in the event of an accident. Each naval SNF disposal container will hold a single naval SNF canister. There will be approximately 300 naval SNF canisters, composed of long and short canisters. The disposal container will include outer and inner cylinder walls and lids. An exterior label will provide a means by which to identify a disposal container and its contents. Different materials will be selected for the waste package inner and outer cylinders. The two metal cylinders, in combination with the Emplacement Drift System, drip shield, and the natural barrier will support the design philosophy of defense-in-depth. The use of materials with different properties prevents a single mode failure from breaching the waste package. The inner cylinder and inner cylinder lids will be constructed of stainless steel while the outer cylinder and outer cylinder lids will be made of high-nickel alloy.

  1. Nuclear electromagnetic pulse and the electric power system

    SciTech Connect

    Legro, J.R.; Reed, T.J.

    1985-01-01

    A single, high-altitude nuclear detonation over the continental United States can expose large geographic areas to transient, electromagnetic pulse (EMP). The initial electromagnetic fields produced by this event have been defined as high-altitude electromagnetic pulse (HEMP). Later-time, low frequency fields have been defined as magnetohydrodynamic-electromagnetic pulse (MHD-EMP). Nuclear detonations at, or near the surface of the earth can also produce transient EMP. These electromagnetic phenomena have been defined as source region electromagnetic pulse (SREMP). The Division of Electric Energy Systems (EES) of the United States Department of Energy (DOE) has formulated and implemented a Program Plan to assess the possible effects of the above nuclear EMP on civilian electric power systems. This unclassified research effort is under the technical leadership of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. This paper presents a brief perspective of EMP phenomenology and important interaction issues for power systems based on research performed by Westinghouse Advanced Systems Technology as a principal subcontractor in the research effort.

  2. Nuclear Thermal Rocket - Arc Jet Integrated System Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, Brian D.; Emrich, William

    2016-01-01

    In the post-shuttle era, space exploration is moving into a new regime. Commercial space flight is in development and is planned to take on much of the low earth orbit space flight missions. With the development of a heavy lift launch vehicle, the Space Launch, System, NASA has become focused on deep space exploration. Exploration into deep space has traditionally been done with robotic probes. More ambitious missions such as manned missions to asteroids and Mars will require significant technology development. Propulsion system performance is tied to the achievability of these missions and the requirements of other developing technologies that will be required. Nuclear thermal propulsion offers a significant improvement over chemical propulsion while still achieving high levels of thrust. Opportunities exist; however, to build upon what would be considered a standard nuclear thermal engine to attain improved performance, thus further enabling deep space missions. This paper discuss the modeling of a nuclear thermal system integrated with an arc jet to further augment performance. The performance predictions and systems impacts are discussed.

  3. Passive cooling safety system for liquid metal cooled nuclear reactors

    DOEpatents

    Hunsbedt, Anstein; Boardman, Charles E.; Hui, Marvin M.; Berglund, Robert C.

    1991-01-01

    A liquid metal cooled nuclear reactor having a passive cooling system for removing residual heat resulting from fuel decay during reactor shutdown. The passive cooling system comprises a plurality of partitions surrounding the reactor vessel in spaced apart relation forming intermediate areas for circulating heat transferring fluid which remove and carry away heat from the reactor vessel. The passive cooling system includes a closed primary fluid circuit through the partitions surrounding the reactor vessel and a partially adjoining secondary open fluid circuit for carrying transferred heat out into the atmosphere.

  4. Supervision and atuomatic control of robotics systems in nuclear environments

    SciTech Connect

    Benner, J.; Leinemann, K.

    1992-12-31

    The paper describes new developments in controlling remote handling systems for nuclear applications. The main emphasis is to use robotic equipment and methods for reaching a high degree of system autonomy. A remote handling workstation concept is described, supporting various stages of mission planning and supervision by means of suited geometrical, procedural and functional models. The presented control system enables easy switching between semi-autonomous and manual task execution and sensor data integration. Some experimental results of a prototypic implementation are also described.

  5. Interface requirements in nuclear medicine devices and systems

    SciTech Connect

    Maguire, G.Q. Jr.; Brill, A.B.; Noz, M.E.

    1982-01-01

    Interface designs for three nuclear medicine imaging systems, and computer networking strategies proposed for medical imaging departments are presented. Configurations for two positron-emission-tomography devices (PET III and ECAT) and a general-purpose tomography instrument (the UNICON) are analyzed in terms of specific performance parameters. Interface designs for these machines are contrasted in terms of utilization of standard versus custom modules, cost, and ease of modification, upgrade, and support. The requirements of general purpose systems for medical image analysis, display, and archiving, are considered, and a realizable state-of-the-art system is specfied, including a suggested timetable.

  6. Indirect passive cooling system for liquid metal cooled nuclear reactors

    DOEpatents

    Hunsbedt, Anstein; Boardman, Charles E.

    1990-01-01

    A liquid metal cooled nuclear reactor having a passive cooling system for removing residual heat resulting from fuel decay during reactor shutdown. The passive cooling system comprises a plurality of partitions surrounding the reactor vessel in spaced apart relation forming intermediate areas for circulating heat transferring fluid which remove and carry away heat from the reactor vessel. The passive cooling system includes a closed primary fluid circuit through the partitions surrounding the reactor vessel and a partially adjoining secondary open fluid circuit for carrying transferred heat out into the atmosphere.

  7. Reactor Subsystem Simulation for Nuclear Hybrid Energy Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Shannon Bragg-Sitton; J. Michael Doster; Alan Rominger

    2012-09-01

    Preliminary system models have been developed by Idaho National Laboratory researchers and are currently being enhanced to assess integrated system performance given multiple sources (e.g., nuclear + wind) and multiple applications (i.e., electricity + process heat). Initial efforts to integrate a Fortran-based simulation of a small modular reactor (SMR) with the balance of plant model have been completed in FY12. This initial effort takes advantage of an existing SMR model developed at North Carolina State University to provide initial integrated system simulation for a relatively low cost. The SMR subsystem simulation details are discussed in this report.

  8. Dual annular rotating "windowed" nuclear reflector reactor control system

    DOEpatents

    Jacox, Michael G.; Drexler, Robert L.; Hunt, Robert N. M.; Lake, James A.

    1994-01-01

    A nuclear reactor control system is provided in a nuclear reactor having a core operating in the fast neutron energy spectrum where criticality control is achieved by neutron leakage. The control system includes dual annular, rotatable reflector rings. There are two reflector rings: an inner reflector ring and an outer reflector ring. The reflectors are concentrically assembled, surround the reactor core, and each reflector ring includes a plurality of openings. The openings in each ring are capable of being aligned or non-aligned with each other. Independent driving means for each of the annular reflector rings is provided so that reactor criticality can be initiated and controlled by rotation of either reflector ring such that the extent of alignment of the openings in each ring controls the reflection of neutrons from the core.

  9. Rethinking the Future Grid: Integrated Nuclear Renewable Energy Systems: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Bragg-Sitton, S. M.; Boardman, R.; Ruth, M.; Zinaman, O.; Forsberg, C.

    2015-01-01

    The U.S. DOE is supporting research and development that could lead to more efficient utilization of clean energy generation sources, including renewable and nuclear options, to meet both grid demand and thermal energy needs in the industrial sector. One concept under consideration by the DOE-NE and DOE-EERE is tighter coupling of nuclear and renewable energy sources in a manner that better optimizes energy use for the combined electricity, industrial manufacturing, and transportation sectors. This integration concept has been referred to as a 'hybrid system' that is capable of apportioning thermal and electrical energy to first meet the grid demand (with appropriate power conversion systems), then utilizing excess thermal and, in some cases, electrical energy to drive a process that results in an additional product.

  10. Systems and methods for dismantling a nuclear reactor

    DOEpatents

    Heim, Robert R; Adams, Scott Ryan; Cole, Matthew Denver; Kirby, William E; Linnebur, Paul Damon

    2014-10-28

    Systems and methods for dismantling a nuclear reactor are described. In one aspect the system includes a remotely controlled heavy manipulator ("manipulator") operatively coupled to a support structure, and a control station in a non-contaminated portion of a workspace. The support structure provides the manipulator with top down access into a bioshield of a nuclear reactor. At least one computing device in the control station provides remote control to perform operations including: (a) dismantling, using the manipulator, a graphite moderator, concrete walls, and a ceiling of the bioshield, the manipulator being provided with automated access to all internal portions of the bioshield; (b) loading, using the manipulator, contaminated graphite blocks from the graphite core and other components from the bioshield into one or more waste containers; and (c) dispersing, using the manipulator, dust suppression and contamination fixing spray to contaminated matter.

  11. Expert systems and their use in nuclear power plants

    SciTech Connect

    Uhrig, R.E. |

    1990-12-31

    In the operation of a nuclear power plant, great quantities of numeric, symbolic, and quantitative information are handled by the reactor operators even during routine operation. The sheer magnitude of the number of process parameters and systems interactions poses difficulties for the operators, particularly during abnormal or emergency situations. Recovery from an upset situation depends upon the facility with which available raw data can be converted into, and assimilated as, meaningful knowledge. In operating a nuclear power plant, people are sometimes affected by fatigue, stress, emotion, and environmental factors that may have varying degrees of influence on their performance. Expert systems provide a method of removing some of the uncertainty from operator decisions by providing expert advice and rapid access to a large information base. 74 refs., 2 tabs.

  12. A Reconfigurable Instrument System for Nuclear and Particle Physics Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sang, Ziru; Li, Feng; Jiang, Xiao; Jin, Ge

    2014-04-01

    We developed a reconfigurable nuclear instrument system (RNIS) that could satisfy the requirements of diverse nuclear and particle physics experiments, and the inertial confinement fusion diagnostic. Benefiting from the reconfigurable hardware structure and digital pulse processing technology, RNIS shakes off the restrictions of cumbersome crates and miscellaneous modules. It retains all the advantages of conventional nuclear instruments and is more flexible and portable. RNIS is primarily composed of a field programmable hardware board and relevant PC software. Separate analog channels are designed to provide different functions, such as amplifiers, ADC, fast discriminators and Schmitt discriminators for diverse experimental purposes. The high-performance field programmable gate array could complete high-precision time interval measurement, histogram accumulation, counting, and coincidence anticoincidence measurement. To illustrate the prospects of RNIS, a series of applications to the experiments are described in this paper. The first, for which RNIS was originally developed, involves nuclear energy spectrum measurement with a scintillation detector and photomultiplier. The second experiment applies RNIS to a G-M tube counting experiment, and in the third, it is applied to a quantum communication experiment through reconfiguration.

  13. Dynamic Computer Model of a Stirling Space Nuclear Power System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-05-04

    I would like to thank all Naval Academy faculty involved with the Trident Scholar program . The committee readers (Professors Cerza, Nakos, and...obstacles in structural integrity , stowing for launch, deployment in orbit, and sun pointing that are far from being solved with current technology. 6...the Systems for Nuclear Auxiliary Power (SNAP) program . This program resulted in the only reactor flown in space by the United States. Also, Russia

  14. Nuclear electric power and propulsion system for earth orbital and solar system exploration applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phillips, W. M.

    1979-01-01

    This paper discusses the design of a Nuclear Electric Propulsion (NEP) system, selection of thrusters and propellant. Outer planet exploration requirements are compared to earth orbital power requirements and a nuclear electric power system with a power level of 200 to 250 kWe is recommended. Current technology appears capable of accomplishing the early missions and growth potential exists for accomplishing more difficult later missions without significant changes in the basic system.

  15. Exotic negative molecules in AMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golser, Robin; Gnaser, Hubert; Kutschera, Walter; Priller, Alfred; Steier, Peter; Wallner, Anton

    2007-06-01

    "The techniques and equipment developed for AMS studies are well suited for identifying exotic negative ions". With this sentence begins a pioneering paper by Roy Middleton and Jeff Klein (M&K) on small doubly-charged negative carbon clusters [Nucl. Instr. and Meth. B 123 (1997) 532]. M&K were the first to utilize Accelerator Mass Spectrometry to prove the existence of these clusters and a number of other exotic molecules. We review M&K's efforts and show how their work is being continued at other laboratories. The latest developments are: (1) the discovery of long-lived molecular hydrogen anions H2-,D2-and (2) the unambiguous identification of the smallest doubly-charged negative molecule (LiF3)2-. In particular we show new experimental data for D3-, and for (LiF3)2-, and we try to answer the question why M&K's search for this di-anion was unsuccessful.

  16. PREFACE: Many-body correlations from dilute to dense nuclear systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otsuka, Takaharu; Urban, Michael; Yamada, Taiichi

    2011-09-01

    The International EFES-IN2P3 conference on "Many body correlations from dilute to dense nuclear systems" was held at the Institut Henri Poincaré (IHP), Paris, France, from 15-18 February 2011, on the occasion of the retirement of our colleague Peter Schuck. Correlations play a decisive role in various many-body systems such as nuclear systems, condensed matter and quantum gases. Important examples include: pairing correlations (Cooper pairs) which give rise to nuclear superfluidity (analogous to superconductivity in condensed matter); particle-hole (RPA) correlations in the description of the ground state beyond mean-field theory; clusters; and α-particle correlations in certain nuclei. Also, the nucleons themselves can be viewed as clusters of three quarks. During the past few years, researchers have started to study how the character of these correlations changes with the variation of the density. For instance, the Cooper pairs in dense matter can transform into a Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) of true bound states at low density (this is the BCS-BEC crossover studied in ultracold Fermi gases). Similar effects play a role in neutron matter at low density, e.g., in the "neutron skin" of exotic nuclei. The α-cluster correlation becomes particularly important at lower density, such as in the excited states of some nuclei (e.g., the α-condensate-like structure in the Hoyle state of 12C) or in the formation of compact stars. In addition to nuclear physics, topics from astrophysics (neutron stars), condensed matter, and quantum gases were discussed in 48 talks and 19 posters, allowing the almost 90 participants from different communities to exchange their ideas, experiences and methods. The conference dinner took place at the Musée d'Orsay, and all the participants enjoyed the very pleasant atmosphere. One session of the conference was dedicated to the celebration of Peter's retirement. We would like to take this opportunity to wish Peter all the best and we hope

  17. Exotic and qq-bar resonances in the pi+pi-pi- system produced in pi-p collisions at 18 GeV/c

    SciTech Connect

    S. U. Chung; K. Danyo; R. W. Hackenburg; C. Olchanski; J. S. Suh; H. J. Willutzki; S. P. Denisov; V. Dorofeev; V. V. Lipaev; A. V. Popov; D. I. Ryabchikov; Z. Bar-Yam; J. P. Dowd; P. Eugenio; M. Hayek; W. Kern; E. King; N. Shenhav; V. A. Bodyagin; O. L. Kodolova; V. L. Korotkikh; M. A. Kostin; A. I. Ostrovidov; L. I. Sarycheva; I. N. Vardanyan; A. A. Yershov; D. S. Brown; X. L. Fan; D. Joffe; T. K. Pedlar; K. K. Seth; A. Tomaradze; T. Adams; J. M. Bishop; N. M. Cason; E. I. Ivanov; J. M. LoSecco; J. J. Manak; W. D. Shephard; D. L. Stienike; S. A. Taegar; G. S. Adams; J. P. Cummings; J. Hu; J. Kuhn; M. Lu; J. Napolitano; D. B. White; M. Witkowski; M. Nozar; X. Shen; D. P. Weygand

    2002-03-01

    A partial-wave analysis of the reaction pi{sup -}p-->pi{sup +}pi{sup -}pi{sup -}p at 18 GeV/c has been performed on a data sample of 250 000 events obtained in the Brookhaven experiment E852. The well-known a{sub 1}(1260), a{sub 2}(1320) and pi{sub 2}(1670) resonant states are observed. The existence of the pi(1800), a{sub 1}(1700) and a{sub 4}(2040) states is confirmed. The a{sub 3}(1874) state is also observed. The exotic 1{sup -+} pi{sub 1}(1600) state produced in the natural parity exchange process is found to decay in the rho(770)pi{sup -} channel. A mass-dependent fit results in a resonance mass of 1593{+-}8{sub -47}{sup +29} MeV/c{sup 2} and a width of 168{+-}20{sub -12}{sup +150} MeV/c{sup 2}.

  18. First observation of γ γ →p p ¯K+K- and search for exotic baryons in p K systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, C. P.; Yuan, C. Z.; Adachi, I.; Aihara, H.; Asner, D. M.; Aulchenko, V.; Aushev, T.; Ayad, R.; Babu, V.; Badhrees, I.; Bakich, A. M.; Barberio, E.; Behera, P.; Bhardwaj, V.; Bhuyan, B.; Biswal, J.; Bobrov, A.; Bonvicini, G.; Bozek, A.; Bračko, M.; Browder, T. E.; Červenkov, D.; Chang, P.; Chekelian, V.; Chen, A.; Cheon, B. G.; Chilikin, K.; Chistov, R.; Cho, K.; Chobanova, V.; Choi, S.-K.; Choi, Y.; Cinabro, D.; Dalseno, J.; Danilov, M.; Dash, N.; Doležal, Z.; Drásal, Z.; Dutta, D.; Eidelman, S.; Fang, W. X.; Fast, J. E.; Ferber, T.; Fulsom, B. G.; Gaur, V.; Gabyshev, N.; Garmash, A.; Gillard, R.; Glattauer, R.; Goldenzweig, P.; Grzymkowska, O.; Haba, J.; Hayasaka, K.; Hayashii, H.; Hou, W.-S.; Iijima, T.; Inami, K.; Inguglia, G.; Ishikawa, A.; Itoh, R.; Iwasaki, Y.; Jaegle, I.; Jeon, H. B.; Joo, K. K.; Julius, T.; Kang, K. H.; Kato, E.; Kiesling, C.; Kim, D. Y.; Kim, J. B.; Kim, K. T.; Kim, S. H.; Kim, Y. J.; Kodyš, P.; Korpar, S.; Kotchetkov, D.; Križan, P.; Krokovny, P.; Kuzmin, A.; Kwon, Y.-J.; Lange, J. S.; Li, C. H.; Li, H.; Li, L.; Li, Y.; Li Gioi, L.; Libby, J.; Liventsev, D.; Lubej, M.; Luo, T.; Masuda, M.; Matsuda, T.; Matvienko, D.; Miyabayashi, K.; Miyata, H.; Mizuk, R.; Mohanty, G. B.; Mohanty, S.; Moll, A.; Moon, H. K.; Mussa, R.; Nakano, E.; Nakao, M.; Nanut, T.; Nath, K. J.; Natkaniec, Z.; Nishida, S.; Ogawa, S.; Olsen, S. L.; Ostrowicz, W.; Pakhlov, P.; Pakhlova, G.; Pal, B.; Park, C.-S.; Park, H.; Pesántez, L.; Pestotnik, R.; Petrič, M.; Piilonen, L. E.; Pulvermacher, C.; Rauch, J.; Ritter, M.; Sakai, Y.; Sandilya, S.; Santelj, L.; Sanuki, T.; Savinov, V.; Schlüter, T.; Schneider, O.; Schnell, G.; Schwanda, C.; Seino, Y.; Semmler, D.; Senyo, K.; Seong, I. S.; Sevior, M. E.; Shibata, T.-A.; Shiu, J.-G.; Shwartz, B.; Simon, F.; Sokolov, A.; Solovieva, E.; Stanič, S.; Starič, M.; Strube, J. F.; Stypula, J.; Sumihama, M.; Sumiyoshi, T.; Takizawa, M.; Tamponi, U.; Tanida, K.; Tenchini, F.; Trabelsi, K.; Uchida, M.; Uehara, S.; Uglov, T.; Unno, Y.; Uno, S.; Urquijo, P.; Usov, Y.; Van Hulse, C.; Varner, G.; Wang, C. H.; Wang, M.-Z.; Wang, P.; Watanabe, M.; Watanabe, Y.; Williams, K. M.; Won, E.; Yamaoka, J.; Yelton, J.; Yook, Y.; Yusa, Y.; Zhang, C. C.; Zhang, Z. P.; Zhilich, V.; Zhukova, V.; Zhulanov, V.; Zupanc, A.; Belle Collaboration

    2016-06-01

    The process γ γ →p p ¯ K+K- and its intermediate processes are measured for the first time using a 980 fb-1 data sample collected with the Belle detector at the KEKB asymmetric-energy e+e- collider. The production of p p ¯K+K- and a Λ (1520 )0 (Λ ¯ (1520 )0) signal in the p K- (p ¯K+) invariant mass spectrum are clearly observed. However, no evidence for an exotic baryon near 1540 MeV /c2 , denoted as Θ (1540 )0 (Θ ¯(1540 )0) or Θ (1540 )++ (Θ (1540 )--), is seen in the p K- (p ¯K+) or p K+ (p ¯K-) invariant mass spectra. Cross sections for γ γ →p p ¯K+K-, Λ (1520 )0p ¯ K++c .c . and the products σ (γ γ →Θ (1540 )0p ¯ K++c .c .)B (Θ (1540 )0→p K-) and σ (γ γ →Θ (1540 )++p ¯ K-+c .c .)B (Θ (1540 )++→p K+) are measured. We also determine upper limits on the products of the χc 0 and χc 2 two-photon decay widths and their branching fractions to p p ¯ K+K- at the 90% credibility level.

  19. A dynamical systems model for nuclear power plant risk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hess, Stephen Michael

    The recent transition to an open access generation marketplace has forced nuclear plant operators to become much more cost conscious and focused on plant performance. Coincidentally, the regulatory perspective also is in a state of transition from a command and control framework to one that is risk-informed and performance-based. Due to these structural changes in the economics and regulatory system associated with commercial nuclear power plant operation, there is an increased need for plant management to explicitly manage nuclear safety risk. Application of probabilistic risk assessment techniques to model plant hardware has provided a significant contribution to understanding the potential initiating events and equipment failures that can lead to core damage accidents. Application of the lessons learned from these analyses has supported improved plant operation and safety over the previous decade. However, this analytical approach has not been nearly as successful in addressing the impact of plant processes and management effectiveness on the risks of plant operation. Thus, the research described in this dissertation presents a different approach to address this issue. Here we propose a dynamical model that describes the interaction of important plant processes among themselves and their overall impact on nuclear safety risk. We first provide a review of the techniques that are applied in a conventional probabilistic risk assessment of commercially operating nuclear power plants and summarize the typical results obtained. The limitations of the conventional approach and the status of research previously performed to address these limitations also are presented. Next, we present the case for the application of an alternative approach using dynamical systems theory. This includes a discussion of previous applications of dynamical models to study other important socio-economic issues. Next, we review the analytical techniques that are applicable to analysis of

  20. Heavy exotic molecules with charm and bottom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yizhuang; Zahed, Ismail

    2016-11-01

    We revisit the formation of pion-mediated heavy-light exotic molecules with both charm and bottom and their chiral partners under the general strictures of both heavy-quark and chiral symmetry. The chiral exotic partners with good parity formed using the (0+ ,1+) multiplet are about twice more bound than their primary exotic partners formed using the (0- ,1-) multiplet. The chiral couplings across the multiplets (0± ,1±) cause the chiral exotic partners to unbind, and the primary exotic molecules to be about twice more bound, for J ≤ 1. Our multi-channel coupling results show that only the charm isosinglet exotic molecules with JPC =1++ bind, which we identify as the reported neutral X (3872). Also, the bottom isotriplet exotic with JPC =1+- binds, which we identify as a mixture of the reported charged exotics Zb+ (10610) and Zb+ (10650). The bound isosinglet with JPC =1++ is suggested as a possible neutral Xb (10532) not yet reported.

  1. RETHINKING THE FUTURE GRID: INTEGRATED NUCLEAR-RENEWABLE ENERGY SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect

    S.M. Bragg-Sitton; R. Boardman

    2014-12-01

    The 2013 electricity generation mix in the United States consisted of ~13% renewables (hydropower, wind, solar, geothermal), 19% nuclear, 27% natural gas, and 39% coal. In the 2011 State of the Union Address, President Obama set a clean energy goal for the nation: “By 2035, 80 percent of America’s electricity will come from clean energy sources. Some folks want wind and solar. Others want nuclear, clean coal and natural gas. To meet this goal we will need them all.” The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Offices of Nuclear Energy (NE) and Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) recognize that “all of the above” means that we are called to best utilize all available clean energy sources. To meet the stated environmental goals for electricity generation and for the broader energy sector, there is a need to transform the energy infrastructure of the U.S. and elsewhere. New energy systems must be capable of significantly reducing environmental impacts in an efficient and economically viable manner while utilizing both hydrocarbon resources and clean energy generation sources. The U.S. DOE is supporting research and development that could lead to more efficient utilization of clean energy generation sources, including renewable and nuclear options, to meet both grid demand and thermal energy needs in the industrial sector. A concept being advanced by the DOE-NE and DOE-EERE is tighter coupling of nuclear and renewable energy sources in a manner that better optimizes energy use for the combined electricity, industrial manufacturing, and the transportation sectors. This integration concept has been referred to as a “hybrid system” that is capable of apportioning thermal and electrical energy to first meet the grid demand (with appropriate power conversion systems), then utilizing excess thermal and, in some cases, electrical energy to drive a process that results in an additional product. For the purposes of the present work, the hybrid system would

  2. Neutron-Proton equilibration in dynamically deformed nuclear systems.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez Manso, Alis; McIntosh, A. B.; Jedele, A.; Yennello, S. J.

    2017-01-01

    Understanding the nuclear Equation of State (nEoS) is fundamental for describing nuclear reaction dynamics, understanding the origin of the elements and characterizing the structure of neutron stars. The density dependence of the asymmetry energy still represents the largest uncertainty in the nEoS. We demonstrate a new time-sensitive method for studying reaction dynamics that may allow new types of constraints on the asymmetry energy. We study neutron-proton equilibration in dynamically deformed nuclear systems by investigating the correlations between the largest fragments produced in collisions of 70Zn +70Zn, 64Zn +64Zn, 64Ni +64Ni and 70Zn +64Zn at 35 MeV per nucleon measured at the Cyclotron Institute at Texas A&M University. The extent of equilibration is investigated using the rotation angle as a clock. The equilibration follows an exponential trend with consistent rate constants across a wide variety of reaction partners and systems, indicating the equilibration follows first order kinetics. The statistical and dynamical components are separated on average; the equilibration curve for the purely dynamical is consistent with the overall equilibration curve, indicating the robustness of the method to statistical contamination.

  3. Nuclear safety as applied to space power reactor systems

    SciTech Connect

    Cummings, G.E.

    1987-01-01

    To develop a strategy for incorporating and demonstrating safety, it is necessary to enumerate the unique aspects of space power reactor systems from a safety standpoint. These features must be differentiated from terrestrial nuclear power plants so that our experience can be applied properly. Some ideas can then be developed on how safe designs can be achieved so that they are safe and perceived to be safe by the public. These ideas include operating only after achieving a stable orbit, developing an inherently safe design, ''designing'' in safety from the start and managing the system development (design) so that it is perceived safe. These and other ideas are explored further in this paper.

  4. Emergency heat removal system for a nuclear reactor

    DOEpatents

    Dunckel, Thomas L.

    1976-01-01

    A heat removal system for nuclear reactors serving as a supplement to an Emergency Core Cooling System (ECCS) during a Loss of Coolant Accident (LOCA) comprises a plurality of heat pipes having one end in heat transfer relationship with either the reactor pressure vessel, the core support grid structure or other in-core components and the opposite end located in heat transfer relationship with a heat exchanger having heat transfer fluid therein. The heat exchanger is located external to the pressure vessel whereby excessive core heat is transferred from the above reactor components and dissipated within the heat exchanger fluid.

  5. Automatic inspection system for nuclear fuel pellets or rods

    DOEpatents

    Miller, Jr., William H.; Sease, John D.; Hamel, William R.; Bradley, Ronnie A.

    1978-01-01

    An automatic inspection system is provided for determining surface defects on cylindrical objects such as nuclear fuel pellets or rods. The active element of the system is a compound ring having a plurality of pneumatic jet units directed into a central bore. These jet units are connected to provide multiple circuits, each circuit being provided with a pressure sensor. The outputs of the sensors are fed to a comparator circuit whereby a signal is generated when the difference of pressure between pneumatic circuits, caused by a defect, exceeds a pre-set amount. This signal may be used to divert the piece being inspected into a "reject" storage bin or the like.

  6. A VISION of Advanced Nuclear System Cost Uncertainty

    SciTech Connect

    J'Tia Taylor; David E. Shropshire; Jacob J. Jacobson

    2008-08-01

    VISION (VerifIable fuel cycle SImulatiON) is the Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative’s and Global Nuclear Energy Partnership Program’s nuclear fuel cycle systems code designed to simulate the US commercial reactor fleet. The code is a dynamic stock and flow model that tracks the mass of materials at the isotopic level through the entire nuclear fuel cycle. As VISION is run, it calculates the decay of 70 isotopes including uranium, plutonium, minor actinides, and fission products. VISION.ECON is a sub-model of VISION that was developed to estimate fuel cycle and reactor costs. The sub-model uses the mass flows generated by VISION for each of the fuel cycle functions (referred to as modules) and calculates the annual cost based on cost distributions provided by the Advanced Fuel Cycle Cost Basis Report1. Costs are aggregated for each fuel cycle module, and the modules are aggregated into front end, back end, recycling, reactor, and total fuel cycle costs. The software also has the capability to perform system sensitivity analysis. This capability may be used to analyze the impacts on costs due to system uncertainty effects. This paper will provide a preliminary evaluation of the cost uncertainty affects attributable to 1) key reactor and fuel cycle system parameters and 2) scheduling variations. The evaluation will focus on the uncertainty on the total cost of electricity and fuel cycle costs. First, a single light water reactor (LWR) using mixed oxide fuel is examined to ascertain the effects of simple parameter changes. Three system parameters; burnup, capacity factor and reactor power are varied from nominal cost values and the affect on the total cost of electricity is measured. These simple parameter changes are measured in more complex scenarios 2-tier systems including LWRs with mixed fuel and fast recycling reactors using transuranic fuel. Other system parameters are evaluated and results will be presented in the paper. Secondly, the uncertainty due to

  7. ALARA Overview System at Crystal River Unit 3 Nuclear Station.

    PubMed

    Kline, K B; Cope, W B

    1995-08-01

    During the Spring of 1994 the Health Physics Department at Florida Power Company used video and audio equipment to support remote health physics coverage for their Crystal River Unit 3 refueling outage (Refuel 9). The system consisted of eight cameras with audio interface linked to a control center located in a low-dose area. The system allowed health physics personnel to monitor steam generator and refueling activities with minimum exposure in high-dose areas, cutting by half the dose from the previous outage. B&W Nuclear Technologies provided complete setup, maintenance and tear-down, as well as assuming responsibilities for contaminated video and audio equipment.

  8. Probing exotic phenomena at the interface of nuclear and particle physics with the electric dipole moments of diamagnetic atoms: A unique window to hadronic and semi-leptonic CP violation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamanaka, N.; Sahoo, B. K.; Yoshinaga, N.; Sato, T.; Asahi, K.; Das, B. P.

    2017-03-01

    The current status of electric dipole moments of diamagnetic atoms which involves the synergy between atomic experiments and three different theoretical areas, i.e. particle, nuclear and atomic, is reviewed. Various models of particle physics that predict CP violation, which is necessary for the existence of such electric dipole moments, are presented. These include the standard model of particle physics and various extensions of it. Effective hadron level combined charge conjugation (C) and parity (P) symmetry violating interactions are derived taking into consideration different ways in which a nucleon interacts with other nucleons as well as with electrons. Nuclear structure calculations of the CP-odd nuclear Schiff moment are discussed using the shell model and other theoretical approaches. Results of the calculations of atomic electric dipole moments due to the interaction of the nuclear Schiff moment with the electrons and the P and time-reversal (T) symmetry violating tensor-pseudotensor electron-nucleus are elucidated using different relativistic many-body theories. The principles of the measurement of the electric dipole moments of diamagnetic atoms are outlined. Upper limits for the nuclear Schiff moment and tensor-pseudotensor coupling constant are obtained combining the results of atomic experiments and relativistic many-body theories. The coefficients for the different sources of CP violation have been estimated at the elementary particle level for all the diamagnetic atoms of current experimental interest and their implications for physics beyond the standard model is discussed. Possible improvements of the current results of the measurements as well as quantum chromodynamics, nuclear and atomic calculations are suggested.

  9. A 5-GWe nuclear satellite power system conceptual design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodman, M.; Thomson, W. B.

    1978-01-01

    This paper presents the results of a brief study performed for MSFC on the conceptual design of a nuclear satellite power station which delivers 5 GWe net power to earth by microwave transmission. The system contains 26 modules each consisting of a reactor, fuel processing plant, Brayton PCU, space radiator, and nuclear shield. A high-temperature, gas-cooled, pebble-bed plutonium breeder concept was selected which is resupplied with fertile U-238. Sections of this core are periodically replaced and the spent fuel is chemically processed, the radioactive wastes separated, and stored for eventual space disposal. Fresh fuel pellets, formed from the U-238 and the bred plutonium, are recycled back to the reactor. The hot (1317 C) helium gas exiting the reactor serves as the working fluid in a 30%-efficient Brayton PCU.

  10. Next Generation Nuclear Plant Resilient Control System Functional Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Lynne M. Stevens

    2010-07-01

    Control Systems and their associated instrumentation must meet reliability, availability, maintainability, and resiliency criteria in order for high temperature gas-cooled reactors (HTGRs) to be economically competitive. Research, perhaps requiring several years, may be needed to develop control systems to support plant availability and resiliency. This report functionally analyzes the gaps between traditional and resilient control systems as applicable to HTGRs, which includes the Next Generation Nuclear Plant; defines resilient controls; assesses the current state of both traditional and resilient control systems; and documents the functional gaps existing between these two controls approaches as applicable to HTGRs. This report supports the development of an overall strategy for applying resilient controls to HTGRs by showing that control systems with adequate levels of resilience perform at higher levels, respond more quickly to disturbances, increase operational efficiency, and increase public protection.

  11. Engine System Model Development for Nuclear Thermal Propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, Karl W.; Simpson, Steven P.

    2006-01-01

    In order to design, analyze, and evaluate conceptual Nuclear Thermal Propulsion (NTP) engine systems, an improved NTP design and analysis tool has been developed. The NTP tool utilizes the Rocket Engine Transient Simulation (ROCETS) system tool and many of the routines from the Enabler reactor model found in Nuclear Engine System Simulation (NESS). Improved non-nuclear component models and an external shield model were added to the tool. With the addition of a nearly complete system reliability model, the tool will provide performance, sizing, and reliability data for NERVA-Derived NTP engine systems. A new detailed reactor model is also being developed and will replace Enabler. The new model will allow more flexibility in reactor geometry and include detailed thermal hydraulics and neutronics models. A description of the reactor, component, and reliability models is provided. Another key feature of the modeling process is the use of comprehensive spreadsheets for each engine case. The spreadsheets include individual worksheets for each subsystem with data, plots, and scaled figures, making the output very useful to each engineering discipline. Sample performance and sizing results with the Enabler reactor model are provided including sensitivities. Before selecting an engine design, all figures of merit must be considered including the overall impacts on the vehicle and mission. Evaluations based on key figures of merit of these results and results with the new reactor model will be performed. The impacts of clustering and external shielding will also be addressed. Over time, the reactor model will be upgraded to design and analyze other NTP concepts with CERMET and carbide fuel cores.

  12. Straight-Line -- A nuclear material storage information management system

    SciTech Connect

    Nilsen, C.; Mangan, D.

    1995-12-31

    Sandia National Laboratories is developing Straight-Line -- a pilot system to demonstrate comprehensive monitoring of nuclear material in storage. Straight-Line is an integrated system of sensors providing information that will enhance the safety, security, and international accountability of stored nuclear material. The goals of this effort are to (1) Provide the right sensor information to the right user in a timely manner. (2) Reduce the expenses, risks, and frequency of human inspection of the material. (3) Provide trustworthy data to international inspectors to minimize their need to make on site inspections. In pursuit of these goals, Straight-Line unites technology from Sandia`s Authenticated Item Monitoring System (AIMS) and other programs to communicate the authenticated status of the monitored item back to central magazine receivers. Straight-Line, however, incorporates several important features not found in previous systems: (1) Information Security -- the ability to collect and safely disseminate both classified and unclassified sensor data to users on a need-to-know basis. (2) Integrate into a single system the monitoring needs of safety, security, and international accountability. (3) Incorporate the use of sensors providing analog or digital output. This paper will present the overall architecture and status of the Straight-Line project.

  13. Remote controlled tool systems for nuclear sites have subsea applications

    SciTech Connect

    Bath, B.; Yemington, C.; Kuhta, B.

    1995-10-01

    Remotely operated underwater tool systems designed to operate in Nuclear Fuel Storage Basins can be applied to deep water, subsea oilfield applications. Spent nuclear fuel rods re stored underwater in large indoor swimming pool-like facilities where the water cover shields the workers from the radiation. This paper describes three specialized tooling systems that were designed and built by Sonsub for work at the Department of Energy`s Hanford site. The Door Seal Tool removed an existing seal system, cleaned a 20 ft. tall, carbon steel, underwater hatch and installed a new stainless steel gasket surface with underwater epoxy. The Concrete Sampling Tool was built to take core samples from the vertical, concrete walls of the basins. The tool has three hydraulic drills with proprietary hollow core drill bits to cut and retrieve the concrete samples. The Rack Saw remotely attached itself to a structure, cut a variety of steel shapes and pipes, and retained the cut pieces for retrieval. All of these systems are remotely operated with onboard video cameras and debris collection systems. The methods and equipment proven in this application are available to refurbish sealing surfaces and to drill or sample concrete in offshore oil field applications.

  14. Straight-Line: A nuclear material storage information management system

    SciTech Connect

    Nilsen, C.; Mangan, D.

    1995-07-01

    Sandia National Laboratories is developing Straight-Line -- a pilot system to demonstrate comprehensive monitoring of nuclear material in storage. Straight-Line is an integrated system of sensors providing information that will enhance the safety, security, and international accountability of stored nuclear material. The goals of this effort are to: (1) Provide the right sensor information to the right user immediately. (2) Reduce the expenses, risks, and frequency of human inspection of the material. (3) Provide trustworthy data to international inspectors to minimize their need to make on site inspections. In pursuit of these goals, Straight-Line unites technology from Sandia`s Authenticated Item Monitoring System (AIMS) and other programs to communicate the authenticated status of the monitored item back to central magazine receivers. Straight-Line, however, incorporates several important features not found in previous systems: (1) Information Security -- the ability to collect and safely disseminate both classified and unclassified sensor data to users on a need-to-know basis. (2) Integrate into a single system the monitoring needs of safety, security, and international accountability. (3) Incorporate the use of sensors providing analog or digital output. This paper will present the overall architecture and status of the Straight-Line project.

  15. Aging effects of US space nuclear systems in orbit

    SciTech Connect

    Bartram, B.W.; Huang, R.; Tammara, S.R.; Thielke, N.R.

    1982-05-14

    This report presents information and data in support of a cost-benefit analysis being performed by Fair child Industries (FI) on the feasibility of retrieving existing US space nuclear systems in earth orbit by the Space Shuttle. This report evaluates, for US space nuclear systems presently in orbit, the radioisotopic inventory and external radiation field as a function of time, the effect of aging on fuel containment materials over the projected lifetime of the system, and the possible radioactive source terms should reentry eventually occur. Although the radioisotopic inventories and radiation fields have been evaluated for all systems, Transit 4A and Transit Triad have been emphasized in the evaluation of the aging effects and reentry consequences because these spacecraft have the shortest projected orbital lifetimes (570 and 150 years, respectively). In addition to existing systems in orbit, the radioisotopic inventory, radiation field, and reentry source terms have been evaluated for a General Purpose Heat Source (GPHS) in a parking orbit due to an aborted Galileo Mission or International Solar Polar Mission (ISPM).

  16. Nuclear Power System Evolution: MARS Robotics Outposts to Human Exploration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cataldo, Robert L.

    2002-01-01

    NASA has been studying various architectures to explore Mars encompassing sample return; robotic outpost with extended range exploration and possibly leading to eventual human exploration missions. The more demanding missions with longer-range mobility, enhanced surface operations, high rate communications, propellant production, deep drilling at multiple sites, etc., will require larger and more robust power systems beyond the current capability of today's multi-hundred watt space nuclear power systems. The relatively low power levels of the current suite of Mars' missions are met by photovoltaic solar arrays. As the desire for continuous day and night operations, high latitude exploration and extended mission lifetimes increase, the power system designs will also have to change to meet these increased science demands. While future mission planning continues and requirements continue to evolve, one can assess several power system technologies to satisfy both mobile and stationary applications. Certain technologies tend to optimize at different power levels and lifetimes. While current landers require 100's of watts, a human mission could require 100's of kilowatts. The harsh environment of Mars (dust storms, temperature cycling, CO2 atmosphere, dust settling, wind, low atmospheric pressure, etc.) will also pose some significant design challenges to overcome. This paper will discuss the challenges facing solar, isotope and nuclear power systems.

  17. Low-Enriched Uranium Nuclear Thermal Propulsion Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Houts, Michael G.; Mitchell, Doyce P.; Aschenbrenner, Ken

    2017-01-01

    The fundamental capability of Nuclear Thermal Propulsion (NTP) is game changing for space exploration. For example, using NTP for human Mars missions can provide faster transit and/or round trip times for crew; larger mission payloads; off nominal mission opportunities (including wider injection windows); and crew mission abort options not available from other architectures. The use of NTP can also reduce required earth-to-orbit launches, reducing cost and improving ground logistics. In addition to enabling robust human Mars mission architectures, NTP can be used on exploration missions throughout the solar system. A first generation NTP system could provide high thrust at a specific impulse above 900 s, roughly double that of state of the art chemical engines. Characteristics of fission and NTP indicate that useful first generation systems will provide a foundation for future systems with extremely high performance. Progress made under the NTP project could also help enable high performance fission power systems and Nuclear Electric Propulsion (NEP). Guidance, navigation, and control of NTP may have some unique but manageable characteristics.

  18. First observation of γγ-> p$\\bar{p}$K+K- and search for exotic baryons in pK systems

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, C. P.; Yuan, C. Z.; Adachi, I.; Aihara, H.; Asner, David M.; Aulchenko, V.; Aushev, T.; Ayad, R.; Babu, V.; Badhrees, I.; Bakich, A. M.; Barberio, E.; Behera, P.; Bhardwaj, V.; Bhuyan, B.; Biswal, J.; Bobrov, A.; Bonvicini, Giovanni; Bozek, A.; Bracko, Marko; Browder, Thomas E.; Cervenkov, D.; Chang, P.; Chekelian, V.; Chen, A.; Cheon, B. G.; Chilikin, K.; Chistov, R.; Cho, K.; Chobanova, V.; Choi, S-K.; Choi, Y.; Cinabro, David A.; Dalseno, J.; Danilov, M.; Dash, N.; Dolezal, Z.; Drasal, Z.; Dutta, D.; Eidelman, S.; Fang, Wenzheng; Fast, James E.; Ferber, T.; Fulsom, Bryan G.; Gaur, Vipin; Gabyshev, N.; Garmash, A.; Gillard, R.; Glattauer, R.; Goldenzweig, P.; Grzymkowska, O.; Haba, J.; Hayasaka, K.; Hayashii, H.; Hou, W. S.; Iijima, T.; Inami, K.; Inguglia, G.; Ishikawa, A.; Itoh, R.; Iwasaki, Y.; Jaegle, Igal; Jeon, H. B.; Joo, K. K.; Julius, T.; Kang, K. H.; Kato, E.; Kiesling, C.; Kim, D. Y.; Kim, J. B.; Kim, K. T.; Kim, S. H.; Kim, Y. J.; Kodys, P.; Korpar, S.; Kotchetkov, Dmitri V.; Krizan, P.; Krokovny, Pavel; Kuzmin, A.; Kwon, Y. J.; Lange, J. S.; Li, C. H.; Li, H.; Li, Y.; Li Gioi, L.; Libby, J.; Liventsev, D.; Lubej, M.; Luo, T.; Masuda, M.; Matsuda, T.; Matvienko, D.; Miyabayashi, K.; Miyata, H.; Mizuk, R.; Mohanty, G. B.; Mohanty, Subhashree; Moll, A.; Moon, H K.; Mussa, R.; Nakano, E.; Nakao, M.; Nanut, T.; Nath, K.; Natkaniec, Z.; Nishida, S.; Ogawa, S.; Olsen, Stephen L.; Ostrowicz, W.; Pakhlov, P.; Pakhlova, G.; Pal, Bilas K.; Park, C. S.; Park, H.; Pesantez, L.; Pestotnik, R.; Petric, M.; Piilonen, Leo E.; Pulvermacher, C.; Rauch, J.; Ritter, M.; Sakai, Y.; Sandilya, Saurabh; Santelj, L.; Sanuki, T.; Savinov, Vladimir; Schluter, T.; Schneider, O.; Schnell, G.; Schwanda, C.; Seino, Y.; Semmler, D.; Senyo, K.; Seong, Ilsoo; Sevior, ME; Shibata, T. A.; Shiu, Jing-Ge; Shwartz, B.; Simon, F.; Sokolov, A.; Solovieva, E.; Stanic, S.; Staric, M.; Strube, Jan F.; Stypula, J.; Sumihama, M.; Sumiyoshi, T.; Takizawa, M.; Tamponi, Umberto; Tanida, K.; Tenchini, F.; Trabelsi, K.; Uchida, M.; Uehara, S.; Uglov, T.; Unno, Y.; Uno, S.; Urquijo, P.; Usov, Y.; Van Hulse, C.; Varner, G.; Wang, C. H.; Wang, M. Z.; Wang, P.; Watanabe, M.; Watanabe, Y.; Williams, K. M.; Won, E.; Yamaoka, Jared AK; Yelton, John; Yook, Youngmin; Yusa, Y.; Zhang, C. C.; Zhang, Z. P.; Zhilich, V.; Zhukova, V.; Zhulanov, V.; Zupanc, A.

    2016-06-30

    The process γγ→p$\\bar{p}$K+K- and its intermediate processes are measured for the first time using a 980 fb-1 data sample collected with the Belle detector at the KEKB asymmetric-energy e+e- collider. The production of p$\\bar{p}$K+K- and a Λ(1520)0 ($\\bar{Λ}$(1520)0) signal in the pK- ($\\bar{p}$K+) invariant mass spectrum are clearly observed. However, no evidence for an exotic baryon near 1540 MeV/c2, denoted as Θ(1540)0 ($\\bar{Θ}$(1540)0) or Θ(1540)++ (Θ(1540)--), is seen in the pK- ($\\bar{p}$K+) or pK+ ($\\bar{p}$K-) invariant mass spectra. Cross sections for γγ→p$\\bar{p}$K+K-, Λ(1520)0$\\bar{p}$K++c.c. and the products σ(γγ→Θ(1540)0$\\bar{p}$K++c.c.)B(Θ(1540)0→pK-) and σ(γγ→Θ(1540)++$\\bar{p}$K-+c.c.)B(Θ(1540)++→pK+) are measured. We also determine upper limits on the products of the χc0 and χc2 two-photon decay widths and their branching fractions to p$\\bar{p}$K+K- at the 90% credibility level.

  19. Fuel cycle analysis of once-through nuclear systems.

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, T. K.; Taiwo, T. A.; Nuclear Engineering Division

    2010-08-10

    Once-through fuel cycle systems are commercially used for the generation of nuclear power, with little exception. The bulk of these once-through systems have been water-cooled reactors (light-water and heavy water reactors, LWRs and HWRs). Some gas-cooled reactors are used in the United Kingdom. The commercial power systems that are exceptions use limited recycle (currently one recycle) of transuranic elements, primarily plutonium, as done in Europe and nearing deployment in Japan. For most of these once-through fuel cycles, the ultimate storage of the used (spent) nuclear fuel (UNF, SNF) will be in a geologic repository. Besides the commercial nuclear plants, new once-through concepts are being proposed for various objectives under international advanced nuclear fuel cycle studies and by industrial and venture capital groups. Some of the objectives for these systems include: (1) Long life core for remote use or foreign export and to support proliferation risk reduction goals - In these systems the intent is to achieve very long core-life with no refueling and limited or no access to the fuel. Most of these systems are fast spectrum systems and have been designed with the intent to improve plant economics, minimize nuclear waste, enhance system safety, and reduce proliferation risk. Some of these designs are being developed under Generation IV International Forum activities and have generally not used fuel blankets and have limited the fissile content of the fuel to less than 20% for the purpose on meeting international nonproliferation objectives. In general, the systems attempt to use transuranic elements (TRU) produced in current commercial nuclear power plants as this is seen as a way to minimize the amount of the problematic radio-nuclides that have to be stored in a repository. In this case, however, the reprocessing of the commercial LWR UNF to produce the initial fuel will be necessary. For this reason, some of the systems plan to use low enriched uranium

  20. Photoproduction of exotic baryon resonances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karliner, Marek; Rosner, Jonathan L.

    2016-01-01

    We point out that the new exotic resonances recently reported by LHCb in the J / ψ p channel are excellent candidates for photoproduction off a proton target. This test is crucial to confirming the resonant nature of such states, as opposed to their being kinematical effects. We specialize to an interpretation of the heavier narrow state as a molecule composed of Σc and Dbar*, and estimate its production cross section using vector dominance. The relevant photon energies and fluxes are well within the capabilities of the GlueX and CLAS12 detectors at Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (JLAB). A corresponding calculation is also performed for photoproduction of an analogous resonance which is predicted to exist in the ϒp channel.

  1. Exotic Hadrons from B Factories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fulsom, Bryan

    2017-01-01

    The first generation of B-Factories, BaBar and Belle, operated over the previous decade and produced many world-leading measurements related to flavor physics. One of the most important discoveries was that of an apparent four-quark particle, named X(3872). It was the first of a growing X, Y, Z alphabet of exotic hadrons, now numbering more than a dozen, found by the e + e - collider experiments. These multi-quark states represent an unusual departure from the standard description that hadronic matter consists of only two or three quarks. These discoveries have led to the emergence of a new category of physics within heavy meson spectroscopy. This talk will review some of these key experimental results, and highlight the potential of the next generation B-Factory, Belle II, as it begins operation in the coming year.

  2. Solar Neutrinos with Exotic Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pulido, João

    The possibility of unconventional neutrino scattering in the Sun via flavor changing neutral currents as a possible source of the solar neutrino deficit is investigated. If the effect is really significant, a resonant process will occur. Taking into account the neutrino deficit reported by the solar neutrino experiments (Kamiokande II, SAGE Gallex), one finds Δ2m21 = (0.6-1.4) × 10-5 eV2 with no vacuum mixing and 0.16 ≤ fex ≤ 0.34 where fex is the lepton violating coupling. Our understanding of the neutrino phenomenon in the Sun may be improved through accuracy improvements in experiments measuring νee- elastic scattering or others searching for exotic lepton decays.

  3. Exotic tracers for atmospheric studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lovelock, James E.; Ferber, Gilbert J.

    Tracer materials can be injected into the atmosphere to study transport and dispersion processes and to validate air pollution model calculations. Tracers should be inert, non-toxic and harmless to the environment. Tracers for long-range experiments, where dilution is very great, must be measurable at extremely low concentrations, well below the parts per trillion level. Compounds suitable for long-range tracer work are rare and efforts should be made to reserve them for meteorological studies, barring them from commercial uses which would increase atmospheric background concentrations. The use of these exotic tracers, including certain perfluorocarbons and isotopically labelled methanes, should be coordinated within the meteorological community to minimize interferences and maximize research benefits.

  4. The Exotic Exchange of Smoke Rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niemi, A. J.

    Smoke rings are fascinating, to humans and animals alike.Experienced cigarette smokers blow them for entertainment while dolphins play with air-filled underwater rings that they know how to puff.~Smoke ring machines can be bought from science gadget shops and Lord Kelvin explains in a paper [Lord Kelvin, Proceedings of the Royal Society of Edinburgh, Vol. VI (1867), p. 94; reprinted in Philos. Mag. Vol. XXXIV (1867), p.~15] how one can be constructed from a cardboard box. Even Mount Etna [http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/sci/tech/696953.stm] and our Sun [http://spacescience.com/headlines/y2000/ast03feb_1.htm] are known to be sources of huge smoke rings. But a smoke ring is not only fun to watch. It is also an organized structure with the ability to engage in complex acts, best exemplified by the leapfrogging motion of two smoke rings. Here we propose that the leapfrogging actually encodes very important Physics: It is a direct three dimensional generalization of the motion that in the two dimensional context is responsible for exotic exchange statistics which rules the properties of structures and materials such as quantum Hall systems and high-temperature superconductors. By employing very simple and universal concepts with roots in the hydrodynamical Euler equation, the universal law that describes the properties of fluids and gases, we argue that three dimensional exotic exchange statistics is commonplace. Our observations could have far reaching consequences in fluids and gases which are subject to the laws of quantum mechanics, from helium supefluids to Bose-Einstein condensed alkali gases and even metallic hydrogen in its liquid phases.

  5. Development of the RFID System for nuclear materials management.

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, K.; Tsai, H.; Liu, Y. Y.

    2008-01-01

    Radio frequency identification (RFID) is one of today's most rapidly growing technologies in the automatic data collection industry. Although commercial applications are already widespread, the use of this technology for managing nuclear materials is only in its infancy. Employing an RFID system has the potential to offer an immense payback: enhanced safety and security, reduced need for manned surveillance, real-time access to status and event history data, and overall cost-effectiveness. The Packaging Certification Program (PCP) in the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Office of Environmental Management (EM), Office of Packaging and Transportation (EM-63), is developing an RFID system for nuclear materials management. The system consists of battery-powered RFID tags with onboard sensors and memories, a reader network, application software, a database server and web pages. The tags monitor and record critical parameters, including the status of seals, movement of objects, and environmental conditions of the nuclear material packages in real time. They also provide instant warnings or alarms when preset thresholds for the sensors are exceeded. The information collected by the readers is transmitted to a dedicated central database server that can be accessed by authorized users across the DOE complex via a secured network. The onboard memory of the tags allows the materials manifest and event history data to reside with the packages throughout their life cycles in storage, transportation, and disposal. Data security is currently based on Advanced Encryption Standard-256. The software provides easy-to-use graphical interfaces that allow access to all vital information once the security and privilege requirements are met. An innovative scheme has been developed for managing batteries in service for more than 10 years without needing to be changed. A miniature onboard dosimeter is being developed for applications that require radiation surveillance. A field

  6. Robotic system for remote maintenance of a pulsed nuclear reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Thunborg, S.

    1986-01-01

    Guidelines recently established for occupational radiation exposure specify that exposure should be as low as reasonably achievable. In conformance with these guidelines, SNL has developed a remote maintenance robot (RMR) system for use in the Sandia Pulse Reactor III (SPR III) facility. The RMR should reduce occupational radiation exposure by a factor of 4 and decrease reactor downtime. Other goals include developing a technology base for a more advanced pulse reactor and for the nuclear fuel cycle programs of the US Department of Energy and US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The RMR has five major subsystems: (a) a chain-driven cart to bring the system into the reactor room; (b) a Puma 560 robot to perform dextrous operations; (c) a programmable turntable to orient the robot to any of the reactor's four sides; (d) a programmable overhead hoist for lifting components weighing up to 400 lb onto or off of the reactor; and (e) a supervisory control console for the system operator. Figure 1 is a schematic diagram of the turntable, hoist, and robot system in position around the SPR III reactor.

  7. Experimental Studies of Nuclear Interactions in Few-Nucleon Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stephan, E.; Kistryn, St.; Kalantar-Nayestanaki, N.; Kozela, A.

    2017-03-01

    Systems of three nucleons (3N) can be treated as a testing ground for modern approaches to describe nuclear interactions. At intermediate energies, observables for 3N systems are sensitive to subtle effects of the dynamics beyond the pairwise nucleon-nucleon force, so-called 3N-force (3NF). For years the search for 3NF has been motivating precise measurements of observables of elastic nucleon-deuteron scattering and for the deuteron breakup reaction. Breakup of a deuteron in collision with a proton leads to the final state of three free nucleons, with variety of possible kinematic configurations, revealing locally enhanced sensitivity to particular aspects of the interaction dynamics, like 3NF, Coulomb force between protons, or relativistic effects. This feature makes the breakup reaction a very versatile tool for validation of the theoretical description. Reactions involving four nucleons pose immense challenges with regard to exact theoretical calculations for such systems. Nonetheless, they attract attention due to expected enhanced sensitivity to certain aspects of the nuclear dynamics, manifesting themselves in various channels and configurations. The most important results of recent experimental studies of 3N and 4N systems at intermediate energies are discussed. A brief survey of the ongoing projects is given.

  8. NUCLEAR-FUELED CIRCULATORY SUPPORT SYSTEMS IV: RADIOLOGIC PERSPECTIVES

    PubMed Central

    Huffman, F. N.; Norman, J. C.

    1974-01-01

    If an implantable artificial heart can be developed, it should prove beneficial to a significant group of patients. A variety of energy sources, such as biologic, electromagnetic, and nuclear, are under evaluation. Currently, biologic fuel cell technology is not sufficiently advanced to permit its extrapolation to the power levels required for implantable circulatory support systems. Electromagnetic systems have the disadvantage of heavy batteries of considerable bulk requiring frequent recharging. Radioisotope-fueled thermal engine systems have the potential of providing degrees of freedom not possible with rechargeable units. However, radiosotope circulatory support systems subject their recipients to prolonged intracorporeal radiation, add to environmental background radiation, and constitute an exceedingly small, but finite, hazard due to possible violation of fuel containment. PMID:15215965

  9. Nuclear Hybrid Energy Systems: Molten Salt Energy Storage

    SciTech Connect

    P. Sabharwall; M. Green; S.J. Yoon; S.M. Bragg-Sitton; C. Stoots

    2014-07-01

    With growing concerns in the production of reliable energy sources, the next generation in reliable power generation, hybrid energy systems, are being developed to stabilize these growing energy needs. The hybrid energy system incorporates multiple inputs and multiple outputs. The vitality and efficiency of these systems resides in the energy storage application. Energy storage is necessary for grid stabilizing and storing the overproduction of energy to meet peak demands of energy at the time of need. With high thermal energy production of the primary nuclear heat generation source, molten salt energy storage is an intriguing option because of its distinct properties. This paper will discuss the different energy storage options with the criteria for efficient energy storage set forth, and will primarily focus on different molten salt energy storage system options through a thermodynamic analysis

  10. Software reliability and safety in nuclear reactor protection systems

    SciTech Connect

    Lawrence, J.D.

    1993-11-01

    Planning the development, use and regulation of computer systems in nuclear reactor protection systems in such a way as to enhance reliability and safety is a complex issue. This report is one of a series of reports from the Computer Safety and Reliability Group, Lawrence Livermore that investigates different aspects of computer software in reactor National Laboratory, that investigates different aspects of computer software in reactor protection systems. There are two central themes in the report, First, software considerations cannot be fully understood in isolation from computer hardware and application considerations. Second, the process of engineering reliability and safety into a computer system requires activities to be carried out throughout the software life cycle. The report discusses the many activities that can be carried out during the software life cycle to improve the safety and reliability of the resulting product. The viewpoint is primarily that of the assessor, or auditor.

  11. Young and Exotic Stellar Zoo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2005-03-01

    constellation Ara (the Altar). It was discovered in 1961 from Australia by Swedish astronomer Bengt Westerlund, who later moved from there to become ESO Director in Chile (1970 - 74). This cluster is behind a huge interstellar cloud of gas and dust, which blocks most of its visible light. The dimming factor is more than 100,000 - and this is why it has taken so long to uncover the true nature of this particular cluster. In 2001, the team of astronomers identified more than a dozen extremely hot and peculiar massive stars in the cluster, so-called "Wolf-Rayet" stars. They have since studied Westerlund 1 extensively with various ESO telescopes. They used images from the Wide Field Imager (WFI) attached to the 2.2-m ESO/MPG as well as from the SUperb Seeing Imager 2 (SuSI2) camera on the ESO 3.5-m New Technology Telescope (NTT). From these observations, they were able to identify about 200 cluster member stars. To establish the true nature of these stars, the astronomers then performed spectroscopic observations of about one quarter of them. For this, they used the Boller & Chivens spectrograph on the ESO 1.52-m telescope and the ESO Multi-Mode Instrument (EMMI) on the NTT. An Exotic Zoo These observations have revealed a large population of very bright and massive, quite extreme stars. Some would fill the solar system space within the orbit of Saturn (about 2,000 times larger than the Sun!), others are as bright as a million Suns. Westerlund 1 is obviously a fantastic stellar zoo, with a most exotic population and a true astronomical bonanza. All stars identified are evolved and very massive, spanning the full range of stellar oddities from Wolf-Rayet stars, OB supergiants, Yellow Hypergiants (nearly as bright as a million Suns) and Luminous Blue Variables (similar to the exceptional Eta Carinae object - see ESO PR 31/03). All stars so far analysed in Westerlund 1 weigh at least 30-40 times more than the Sun. Because such stars have a rather short life - astronomically speaking

  12. Online Sensor Calibration Assessment in Nuclear Power Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Coble, Jamie B.; Ramuhalli, Pradeep; Meyer, Ryan M.; Hashemian, Hash

    2013-06-01

    Safe, efficient, and economic operation of nuclear systems (nuclear power plants, fuel fabrication and storage, used fuel processing, etc.) relies on transmission of accurate and reliable measurements. During operation, sensors degrade due to age, environmental exposure, and maintenance interventions. Sensor degradation can affect the measured and transmitted signals, including sensor failure, signal drift, sensor response time, etc. Currently, periodic sensor recalibration is performed to avoid these problems. Sensor recalibration activities include both calibration assessment and adjustment (if necessary). In nuclear power plants, periodic recalibration of safety-related sensors is required by the plant technical specifications. Recalibration typically occurs during refueling outages (about every 18 to 24 months). Non-safety-related sensors also undergo recalibration, though not as frequently. However, this approach to maintaining sensor calibration and performance is time-consuming and expensive, leading to unnecessary maintenance, increased radiation exposure to maintenance personnel, and potential damage to sensors. Online monitoring (OLM) of sensor performance is a non-invasive approach to assess instrument calibration. OLM can mitigate many of the limitations of the current periodic recalibration practice by providing more frequent assessment of calibration and identifying those sensors that are operating outside of calibration tolerance limits without removing sensors or interrupting operation. This can support extended operating intervals for unfaulted sensors and target recalibration efforts to only degraded sensors.

  13. Systems resilience : a new analytical framework for nuclear nonproliferation.

    SciTech Connect

    Pregenzer, Arian Leigh

    2011-12-01

    This paper introduces the concept of systems resilience as a new framework for thinking about the future of nonproliferation. Resilience refers to the ability of a system to maintain its vital functions in the face of continuous and unpredictable change. The nonproliferation regime can be viewed as a complex system, and key themes from the literature on systems resilience can be applied to the nonproliferation system. Most existing nonproliferation strategies are aimed at stability rather than resilience, and the current nonproliferation system may be over-constrained by the cumulative evolution of strategies, increasing its vulnerability to collapse. The resilience of the nonproliferation system can be enhanced by diversifying nonproliferation strategies to include general international capabilities to respond to proliferation and focusing more attention on reducing the motivation to acquire nuclear weapons in the first place. Ideas for future research, include understanding unintended consequences and feedbacks among nonproliferation strategies, developing methodologies for measuring the resilience of the nonproliferation system, and accounting for interactions of the nonproliferation system with other systems on larger and smaller scales.

  14. System design for safe robotic handling of nuclear materials

    SciTech Connect

    Drotning, W.; Wapman, W.; Fahrenholtz, J.; Kimberly, H.; Kuhlmann, J.

    1996-03-01

    Robotic systems are being developed by the Intelligent Systems and Robotics Center at Sandia National Laboratories to perform automated handling tasks with radioactive nuclear materials. These systems will reduce the occupational radiation exposure to workers by automating operations which are currently performed manually. Because the robotic systems will handle material that is both hazardous and valuable, the safety of the operations is of utmost importance; assurance must be given that personnel will not be harmed and that the materials and environment will be protected. These safety requirements are met by designing safety features into the system using a layered approach. Several levels of mechanical, electrical and software safety prevent unsafe conditions from generating a hazard, and bring the system to a safe state should an unexpected situation arise. The system safety features include the use of industrial robot standards, commercial robot systems, commercial and custom tooling, mechanical safety interlocks, advanced sensor systems, control and configuration checks, and redundant control schemes. The effectiveness of the safety features in satisfying the safety requirements is verified using a Failure Modes and Effects Analysis. This technique can point out areas of weakness in the safety design as well as areas where unnecessary redundancy may reduce the system reliability.

  15. How exotic plants integrate into pollination networks

    PubMed Central

    Stouffer, Daniel B; Cirtwill, Alyssa R; Bascompte, Jordi; Bartomeus, Ignasi

    2014-01-01

    Summary There is increasing world-wide concern about the impact of the introduction of exotic species on ecological communities. Since many exotic plants depend on native pollinators to successfully establish, it is of paramount importance that we understand precisely how exotic species integrate into existing plant–pollinator communities. In this manuscript, we have studied a global data base of empirical pollination networks to determine whether community, network, species or interaction characteristics can help identify invaded communities. We found that a limited number of community and network properties showed significant differences across the empirical data sets – namely networks with exotic plants present are characterized by greater total, plant and pollinator richness, as well as higher values of relative nestedness. We also observed significant differences in terms of the pollinators that interact with the exotic plants. In particular, we found that specialist pollinators that are also weak contributors to community nestedness are far more likely to interact with exotic plants than would be expected by chance alone. Synthesis. By virtue of their interactions, it appears that exotic plants may provide a key service to a community's specialist pollinators as well as fill otherwise vacant ‘coevolutionary niches’. PMID:25558089

  16. The nuclear disaster management system in Taiwan: a case study of the third (Maanshan) nuclear power plant.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yung-Nane

    2016-07-01

    This paper explores the effectiveness of the nuclear disaster management system in Taiwan via a review of the third (Maanshan) nuclear power plant. In doing so, the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear disaster in Japan on 11 March 2011 is reviewed and compared with the situation in Taiwan. The latter's nuclear disaster management system is examined with respect to three key variables: information; mobilisation; and inter-organisational cooperation. In-depth interviews with 10 policy stakeholders with different backgrounds serve as the research method. The results point up the need for improvement in all dimensions. In addition, they highlight three principal problems with the nuclear disaster management system: (i) it might not be possible to provide first-hand nuclear disaster information immediately to the communities surrounding the Maanshan facility in Pingtung County, southern Taiwan; (ii) the availability of medical resources for treating radiation in Hengchun Township is limited; and (iii) the inter-organisational relationships for addressing nuclear disasters need to be strengthened. Hence, cooperation among related organisations is necessary.

  17. Nuclear Technology Series. Course 33: Control Systems I.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center for Occupational Research and Development, Inc., Waco, TX.

    This technical specialty course is one of thirty-five courses designed for use by two-year postsecondary institutions in five nuclear technician curriculum areas: (1) radiation protection technician, (2) nuclear instrumentation and control technician, (3) nuclear materials processing technician, (4) nuclear quality-assurance/quality-control…

  18. Nuclear Technology Series. Course 34: Control Systems II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center for Occupational Research and Development, Inc., Waco, TX.

    This technical specialty course is one of thirty-five courses designed for use by two-year postsecondary institutions in five nuclear technician curriculum areas: (1) radiation protection technician, (2) nuclear instrumentation and control technician, (3) nuclear materials processing technician, (4) nuclear quality-assurance/quality-control…

  19. Nuclear Technology Series. Course 10: Power Plant Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center for Occupational Research and Development, Inc., Waco, TX.

    This technical specialty course is one of thirty-five courses designed for use by two-year postsecondary institutions in five nuclear technician curriculum areas: (1) radiation protection technician, (2) nuclear instrumentation and control technician, (3) nuclear materials processing technician, (4) nuclear quality-assurance/quality-control…

  20. Nuclear Technology Series. Course 9: Reactor Auxiliary Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center for Occupational Research and Development, Inc., Waco, TX.

    This technical specialty course is one of thirty-five courses designed for use by two-year postsecondary institutions in five nuclear technician curriculum areas: (1) radiation protection technician, (2) nuclear instrumentation and control technician, (3) nuclear materials processing technician, (4) nuclear quality-assurance/quality-control…

  1. Nuclear Technology Series. Course 35: Systems and Components.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center for Occupational Research and Development, Inc., Waco, TX.

    This technical specialty course is one of thirty-five courses designed for use by two-year postsecondary institutions in five nuclear technician curriculum areas: (1) radiation protection technician, (2) nuclear instrumentation and control technician, (3) nuclear materials processing technician, (4) nuclear quality-assurance/quality-control…

  2. An Approach to Autonomous Control for Space Nuclear Power Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, Richard Thomas; Upadhyaya, Belle R.

    2011-01-01

    Under Project Prometheus, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) investigated deep space missions that would utilize space nuclear power systems (SNPSs) to provide energy for propulsion and spacecraft power. The initial study involved the Jupiter Icy Moons Orbiter (JIMO), which was proposed to conduct in-depth studies of three Jovian moons. Current radioisotope thermoelectric generator (RTG) and solar power systems cannot meet expected mission power demands, which include propulsion, scientific instrument packages, and communications. Historically, RTGs have provided long-lived, highly reliable, low-power-level systems. Solar power systems can provide much greater levels of power, but power density levels decrease dramatically at {approx} 1.5 astronomical units (AU) and beyond. Alternatively, an SNPS can supply high-sustained power for space applications that is both reliable and mass efficient. Terrestrial nuclear reactors employ varying degrees of human control and decision-making for operations and benefit from periodic human interaction for maintenance. In contrast, the control system of an SNPS must be able to provide continuous operatio for the mission duration with limited immediate human interaction and no opportunity for hardware maintenance or sensor calibration. In effect, the SNPS control system must be able to independently operate the power plant while maintaining power production even when subject to off-normal events and component failure. This capability is critical because it will not be possible to rely upon continuous, immediate human interaction for control due to communications delays and periods of planetary occlusion. In addition, uncertainties, rare events, and component degradation combine with the aforementioned inaccessibility and unattended operation to pose unique challenges that an SNPS control system must accommodate. Autonomous control is needed to address these challenges and optimize the reactor control design.

  3. Thermodynamic data management system for nuclear waste disposal performance assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, S.L.; Hale, F.V.; Siegel, M.D.

    1988-04-01

    Thermodynamic property values for use in assessing the performance of a nuclear waste repository are described. More emphasis is on a computerized data base management system which facilitates use of the thermodynamic data in sensitivity analysis and other studies which critically assess the performance of disposal sites. Examples are given of critical evaluation procedures; comparison of apparent equilibrium constants calculated from the data base, with other work; and of correlations useful in estimating missing values of both free energy and enthalpy of formation for aqueous species. 49 refs., 11 figs., 6 tabs.

  4. Reliability program requirements for Space and Terrestrial Nuclear Power Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-10-01

    The objectives of the reliability program requirements described in this report are (1) to provide contractors with an outline of the reliability requirements established by the Department of Energy (DOE) in the areas of design, development, production, testing, and acceptance of space and terrestrial nuclear systems hardware, and (2) to guide the contractor in meeting these requirements. This publication or particular portions of it is applicable as specified in the contract. Whether the contractors/subcontractors are subject to all the requirements or only to part of them will be specified by contract, program letter, or by the contract statement-of-work.

  5. A Review of Tribomaterial Technology for Space Nuclear Power Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stanford, Malcolm K.

    2007-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has recently proposed a nuclear closed-cycle electric power conversion system for generation of 100-kW of electrical power for space exploration missions. A critical issue is the tribological performance of sliding components within the power conversion unit that will be exposed to neutron radiation. This paper presents a review of the main considerations that have been made in the selection of solid lubricants for similar applications in the past as well as a recommendations for continuing development of the technology.

  6. Probabilistic assessment of space nuclear propulsion system nozzle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shah, Ashwin R.; Ball, Richard D.; Chamis, Christos C.

    1994-01-01

    In assessing the reliability of a space nuclear propulsion system (SNPS) nozzle, uncertainties associated with the following design parameters were considered: geometry, boundary conditions, material behavior, and thermal and pressure loads. A preliminary assessment of the reliability was performed using NESSUS (Numerical Evaluation of Stochastic Structures Under Stress), a finite-element computer code developed at the NASA Lewis Research Center. The sensitivity of the nozzle reliability to the uncertainties in the random variables was quantified. With respect to the effective stress, preliminary results showed that the nozzle spatial geometry uncertainties have the most significant effect at low probabilities whereas the inner wall temperature has the most significant effect at higher probabilities.

  7. System issues related to satellite communications in a nuclear environment

    SciTech Connect

    Kullstam, P.A.

    1990-05-03

    Nuclear induced signal scintillation effects are of great importance in design and deployment of military satellite systems that must provide survivable and enduring communications service. The induced scintillation will result in Rayleigh signal fading with limited signal decorrelation time and coherent bandwidth of the transmission channel as well as reduced signal power due to terminal antenna scattering loss. In this environment the coherent bandwidth and signal decorrelation time are most important design parameters for modulation subsystem design. The antenna scattering loss is important for link power budgets and satellite network loading.

  8. Interaction of electromagnetic pulse with commercial nuclear-power-plant systems

    SciTech Connect

    Ericson, D.M. Jr.; Strawe, D.F.; Sandberg, S.J.; Jones, V.K.; Rensner, G.D.; Shoup, R.W.; Hanson, R.J.; Williams, C.B.

    1983-02-01

    This study examines the interaction of the electromagnetic pulse from a high altitude nuclear burst with commercial nuclear power plant systems. The potential vulnerability of systems required for safe shutdown of a specific nuclear power plant are explored. EMP signal coupling, induced plant response and component damage thresholds are established using techniques developed over several decades under Defense Nuclear Agency sponsorship. A limited test program was conducted to verify the coupling analysis technique as applied to a nuclear power plant. The results are extended, insofar as possible, to other nuclear plants.

  9. A triggerless digital data acquisition system for nuclear decay experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Agramunt, J.; Tain, J. L.; Albiol, F.; Algora, A.; Estevez, E.; Giubrone, G.; Jordan, M. D.; Molina, F.; Rubio, B.; Valencia, E.

    2013-06-10

    In nuclear decay experiments an important goal of the Data Acquisition (DAQ) system is to allow the reconstruction of time correlations between signals registered in different detectors. Classically DAQ systems are based in a trigger that starts the event acquisition, and all data related with the event of that trigger are collected as one compact structure. New technologies and electronics developments offer new possibilities to nuclear experiments with the use of sampling ADC-s. This type of ADC-s is able to provide the pulse shape, height and a time stamp of the signal. This new feature (time stamp) allows new systems to run without an event trigger. Later, the event can be reconstructed using the time stamp information. In this work we present a new DAQ developed for {beta}-delayed neutron emission experiments. Due to the long moderation time of neutrons, we opted for a self-trigger DAQ based on commercial digitizers. With this DAQ a negligible acquisition dead time was achieved while keeping a maximum of event information and flexibility in time correlations.

  10. Reactor/Brayton power systems for nuclear electric spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Layton, J. P.

    1980-01-01

    Studies are currently underway to assess the technological feasibility of a nuclear-reactor-powered spacecraft propelled by electric thrusters. This vehicle would be capable of performing detailed exploration of the outer planets of the solar system during the remainder of this century. The purpose of this study was to provide comparative information on a closed cycle gas turbine power conversion system. The results have shown that the performance is very competitive and that a 400 kWe space power system is dimensionally compatible with a single Space Shuttle launch. Performance parameters of system mass and radiator area were determined for systems from 100 to 1000 kWe. A 400 kWe reference system received primary attention. The components of this system were defined and a conceptual layout was developed with encouraging results. The preliminary mass determination for the complete power system was very close to the desired goal of 20 kg/kWe. Use of more advanced technology (higher turbine inlet temperature) will substantially improve system performance characteristics.

  11. Exotic mammals disperse exotic fungi that promote invasion by exotic trees.

    PubMed

    Nuñez, Martin A; Hayward, Jeremy; Horton, Thomas R; Amico, Guillermo C; Dimarco, Romina D; Barrios-Garcia, M Noelia; Simberloff, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    Biological invasions are often complex phenomena because many factors influence their outcome. One key aspect is how non-natives interact with the local biota. Interaction with local species may be especially important for exotic species that require an obligatory mutualist, such as Pinaceae species that need ectomycorrhizal (EM) fungi. EM fungi and seeds of Pinaceae disperse independently, so they may use different vectors. We studied the role of exotic mammals as dispersal agents of EM fungi on Isla Victoria, Argentina, where many Pinaceae species have been introduced. Only a few of these tree species have become invasive, and they are found in high densities only near plantations, partly because these Pinaceae trees lack proper EM fungi when their seeds land far from plantations. Native mammals (a dwarf deer and rodents) are rare around plantations and do not appear to play a role in these invasions. With greenhouse experiments using animal feces as inoculum, plus observational and molecular studies, we found that wild boar and deer, both non-native, are dispersing EM fungi. Approximately 30% of the Pinaceae seedlings growing with feces of wild boar and 15% of the seedlings growing with deer feces were colonized by non-native EM fungi. Seedlings growing in control pots were not colonized by EM fungi. We found a low diversity of fungi colonizing the seedlings, with the hypogeous Rhizopogon as the most abundant genus. Wild boar, a recent introduction to the island, appear to be the main animal dispersing the fungi and may be playing a key role in facilitating the invasion of pine trees and even triggering their spread. These results show that interactions among non-natives help explain pine invasions in our study area.

  12. Exotic Mammals Disperse Exotic Fungi That Promote Invasion by Exotic Trees

    PubMed Central

    Nuñez, Martin A.; Hayward, Jeremy; Horton, Thomas R.; Amico, Guillermo C.; Dimarco, Romina D.; Barrios-Garcia, M. Noelia; Simberloff, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    Biological invasions are often complex phenomena because many factors influence their outcome. One key aspect is how non-natives interact with the local biota. Interaction with local species may be especially important for exotic species that require an obligatory mutualist, such as Pinaceae species that need ectomycorrhizal (EM) fungi. EM fungi and seeds of Pinaceae disperse independently, so they may use different vectors. We studied the role of exotic mammals as dispersal agents of EM fungi on Isla Victoria, Argentina, where many Pinaceae species have been introduced. Only a few of these tree species have become invasive, and they are found in high densities only near plantations, partly because these Pinaceae trees lack proper EM fungi when their seeds land far from plantations. Native mammals (a dwarf deer and rodents) are rare around plantations and do not appear to play a role in these invasions. With greenhouse experiments using animal feces as inoculum, plus observational and molecular studies, we found that wild boar and deer, both non-native, are dispersing EM fungi. Approximately 30% of the Pinaceae seedlings growing with feces of wild boar and 15% of the seedlings growing with deer feces were colonized by non-native EM fungi. Seedlings growing in control pots were not colonized by EM fungi. We found a low diversity of fungi colonizing the seedlings, with the hypogeous Rhizopogon as the most abundant genus. Wild boar, a recent introduction to the island, appear to be the main animal dispersing the fungi and may be playing a key role in facilitating the invasion of pine trees and even triggering their spread. These results show that interactions among non-natives help explain pine invasions in our study area. PMID:23826154

  13. Issues and opportunities in exotic hadrons

    SciTech Connect

    Briceno, Raul A.; Cohen, Thomas D.; Coito, S.; Dudek, Jozef J.; Eichten, E.; Fischer, C. S.; Fritsch, M.; Gradl, W.; Jackura, A.; Kornicer, M.; Krein, G.; Lebed, Richard F.; Machado, F. A.; Mitchell, R. E.; Morningstar, C. J.; Peardon, M.; R. Pennington, M.; Peters, K.; M. Richard, J.; P. Shen, C.; Shepherd, M. R.; Skwarnicki, T.; S. Swanson, E.; Szczepaniak, A. P.; Yuan, C. Z.

    2016-04-01

    The last few years have been witness to a proliferation of new results concerning heavy exotic hadrons. Experimentally, many new signals have been discovered that could be pointing towards the existence of tetraquarks, pentaquarks, and other exotic configurations of quarks and gluons. Theoretically, advances in lattice field theory techniques place us at the cusp of understanding complex coupled-channel phenomena, modelling grows more sophisticated, and effective field theories are being applied to an ever greater range of situations. Consequently, it is thus an opportune time to evaluate the status of the field. In the following, a series of high priority experimental and theoretical issues concerning heavy exotic hadrons is presented.

  14. New measurement of exotic decay of 225Ac by 14C emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guglielmetti, A.; Bonetti, R.; Ardisson, G.; Barci, V.; Giles, T.; Hussonnois, M.; Le Du, J. F.; Le Naour, C.; Mikheev, V. L.; Pasinetti, A. L.; Ravn, H. L.; Tretyakova, S. P.; Trubert, D.

    The branching ratio of 225Ac decay by emission of 14C was remeasured under improved experimental conditions by using a radioactive source produced at the ISOLDE mass-separator at CERN and a nuclear track detector technique. The result, B = λ14C/λα = (4.5+/-1.4)10-12, is consistent with the anomalously high value obtained in the 1993 experiment, thus confirming the importance of nuclear-structure effects in this exotic decay.

  15. Nuclear Hybrid Energy Systems: Imperatives, Prospects, and Challenges

    SciTech Connect

    Steven E. Aumeier

    2010-10-01

    As global population reaches an expected 8 billion people by 2030, primary energy consumption is expected to increase by almost 40% from approximately 520 exajoules consumed today to almost 740 exajoules. Much of this increase is expected to come from non-Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) nations, and Asia specifically. In these economies, energy used for transportation is expected to grow substantially, as is industrial, commercial and to a lesser degree residential energy use, creating considerable pressure on global and local energy markets. The magnitude and timing of growth in energy consumption likely will create a global imperative to deploy energy production technologies that balance the three pillars of energy security: • economic stability – related to the affordability of energy products, stability and predictability in their price, and the efficient and effective deployment of global capital resources in their development; • environmental sustainability – related to minimizing the negative impacts of energy production to air, land, and water systems and advancing the long-term viability of using a particular resource in a way that does not limit future generations ability to prosper; • resource security – related to the ability to access energy resources and products where and when necessary, in an affordable and predictable manner. One approach to meeting these objectives is hybrid energy systems (HES). Broadly described, HES are energy product production plants that take two or more energy resource inputs (typically includes both carbon and non-carbon based sources) and produce two or more energy products (e.g. electricity, liquid transportation fuels, industrial chemicals) in an integrated plant. Nuclear energy integration into HES offers intriguing potential, particularly if smaller (<300 MWe) reactors are available. Although the concept of using nuclear energy in a variety of non-electrical process

  16. Summary of space nuclear reactor power systems, 1983--1992

    SciTech Connect

    Buden, D.

    1993-08-11

    This report summarizes major developments in the last ten years which have greatly expanded the space nuclear reactor power systems technology base. In the SP-100 program, after a competition between liquid-metal, gas-cooled, thermionic, and heat pipe reactors integrated with various combinations of thermoelectric thermionic, Brayton, Rankine, and Stirling energy conversion systems, three concepts:were selected for further evaluation. In 1985, the high-temperature (1,350 K), lithium-cooled reactor with thermoelectric conversion was selected for full scale development. Since then, significant progress has been achieved including the demonstration of a 7-y-life uranium nitride fuel pin. Progress on the lithium-cooled reactor with thermoelectrics has progressed from a concept, through a generic flight system design, to the design, development, and testing of specific components. Meanwhile, the USSR in 1987--88 orbited a new generation of nuclear power systems beyond the, thermoelectric plants on the RORSAT satellites. The US has continued to advance its own thermionic fuel element development, concentrating on a multicell fuel element configuration. Experimental work has demonstrated a single cell operating time of about 1 1/2-y. Technology advances have also been made in the Stirling engine; an advanced engine that operates at 1,050 K is ready for testing. Additional concepts have been studied and experiments have been performed on a variety of systems to meet changing needs; such as powers of tens-to-hundreds of megawatts and highly survivable systems of tens-of-kilowatts power.

  17. Testing of Liquid Metal Components for Nuclear Surface Power Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Polzin, K. A.; Pearson, J. B.; Godfroy, T. J.; Schoenfeld, M.; Webster, K.; Briggs, M. H.; Geng, S. M.; Adkins, H. E.; Werner, J. E.

    2010-01-01

    The capability to perform testing at both the module/component level and in near prototypic reactor configurations using a non-nuclear test methodology allowed for evaluation of two components critical to the development of a potential nuclear fission power system for the lunar surface. A pair of 1 kW Stirling power convertors, similar to the type that would be used in a reactor system to convert heat to electricity, were integrated into a reactor simulator system to determine their performance using pumped NaK as the hot side working fluid. The performance in the pumped-NaK system met or exceed the baseline performance measurements where the converters were electrically heated. At the maximum hot-side temperature of 550 C the maximum output power was 2375 watts. A specially-designed test apparatus was fabricated and used to quantify the performance of an annular linear induction pump that is similar to the type that could be used to circulate liquid metal through the core of a space reactor system. The errors on the measurements were generally much smaller than the magnitude of the measurements, permitting accurate performance evaluation over a wide range of operating conditions. The pump produced flow rates spanning roughly 0.16 to 5.7 l/s (2.5 to 90 GPM), and delta p levels from less than 1 kPa to 90 kPa (greater than 0.145 psi to roughly 13 psi). At the nominal FSP system operating temperature of 525 C the maximum efficiency was just over 4%.

  18. A gamma-ray verification system for special nuclear material

    SciTech Connect

    Lanier, R.G.; Prindle, A.L.; Friensehner, A.V.; Buckley, W.M.

    1994-07-01

    The Safeguards Technology Program at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has developed a gamma-ray screening system for use by the Materials Management Section of the Engineering Sciences Division at LLNL for verifying the presence or absence of special nuclear material (SNM) in a sample. This system facilitates the measurements required under the ``5610`` series of US Department of Energy orders. MMGAM is an intelligent, menu driven software application that runs on a personal computer and requires a precalibrated multi-channel analyzer and HPGe detector. It provides a very quick and easy-to-use means of determining the presence of SNM in a sample. After guiding the operator through a menu driven set-up procedure, the system provides an on-screen GO/NO-GO indication after determining the system calibration status. This system represents advances over earlier used systems in the areas of ease-of use, operator training requirements, and quality assurance. The system records the gamma radiation from a sample using a sequence of measurements involving a background measurement followed immediately by a measurement of the unknown sample. Both spectra are stored and available for analysis or output. In the current application, the presence of {sup 235}U, {sup 238}U, {sup 239}Pu, and {sup 208}Tl isotopes are indicated by extracting, from the stored spectra, four energy ``windows`` preset around gamma-ray lines characteristic of the radioactive decay of these nuclides. The system is easily extendible to more complicated problems.

  19. Nuclear Engine System Simulation (NESS). Volume 1: Program user's guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pelaccio, Dennis G.; Scheil, Christine M.; Petrosky, Lyman J.

    1993-01-01

    A Nuclear Thermal Propulsion (NTP) engine system design analysis tool is required to support current and future Space Exploration Initiative (SEI) propulsion and vehicle design studies. Currently available NTP engine design models are those developed during the NERVA program in the 1960's and early 1970's and are highly unique to that design or are modifications of current liquid propulsion system design models. To date, NTP engine-based liquid design models lack integrated design of key NTP engine design features in the areas of reactor, shielding, multi-propellant capability, and multi-redundant pump feed fuel systems. Additionally, since the SEI effort is in the initial development stage, a robust, verified NTP analysis design tool could be of great use to the community. This effort developed an NTP engine system design analysis program (tool), known as the Nuclear Engine System Simulation (NESS) program, to support ongoing and future engine system and stage design study efforts. In this effort, Science Applications International Corporation's (SAIC) NTP version of the Expanded Liquid Engine Simulation (ELES) program was modified extensively to include Westinghouse Electric Corporation's near-term solid-core reactor design model. The ELES program has extensive capability to conduct preliminary system design analysis of liquid rocket systems and vehicles. The program is modular in nature and is versatile in terms of modeling state-of-the-art component and system options as discussed. The Westinghouse reactor design model, which was integrated in the NESS program, is based on the near-term solid-core ENABLER NTP reactor design concept. This program is now capable of accurately modeling (characterizing) a complete near-term solid-core NTP engine system in great detail, for a number of design options, in an efficient manner. The following discussion summarizes the overall analysis methodology, key assumptions, and capabilities associated with the NESS presents an

  20. Demonstrating the Viability and Affordability of Nuclear Surface Power Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vandyke, Melissa K.

    2006-01-01

    A set of tasks have been identified to help demonstrate the viability, performance, and affordability of surface fission systems. Completion of these tasks will move surface fission systems closer to reality by demonstrating affordability and performance potential. Tasks include fabrication and test of a 19-pin section of a Surface Power Unit Demonstrator (SPUD); design, fabrication, and utilization of thermal simulators optimized for surface fission' applications; design, fabrication, and utilization of GPHS module thermal simulators; design, fabrication, and test of a fission surface power system shield; and work related to potential fission surface power fuel/clad systems. Work on the SPUD will feed directly into joint NASA MSFC/NASA GRC fabrication and test of a surface power plant Engineering Development Unit (EDU). The goal of the EDU will be to perform highly realistic thermal, structural, and electrical testing on an integrated fission surface power system. Fission thermal simulator work will help enable high fidelity non-nuclear testing of pumped NaK surface fission power systems. Radioisotope thermal simulator work will help enable design and development of higher power radioisotope systems (power ultimately limited by Pu-238 availability). Shield work is designed to assess the potential of using a water neutron shield on the surface of the moon. Fuels work is geared toward assessing the current potential of using fuels that have already flown in space.

  1. Applying twisted boundary conditions for few-body nuclear systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Körber, Christopher; Luu, Thomas

    2016-05-01

    We describe and implement twisted boundary conditions for the deuteron and triton systems within finite volumes using the nuclear lattice EFT formalism. We investigate the finite-volume dependence of these systems with different twist angles. We demonstrate how various finite-volume information can be used to improve calculations of binding energies in such a framework. Our results suggests that with appropriate twisting of boundaries, infinite-volume binding energies can be reliably extracted from calculations using modest volume sizes with cubic length L ≈8 -14 fm. Of particular importance is our derivation and numerical verification of three-body analogs of "i-periodic" twist angles that eliminate the leading-order finite-volume effects to the three-body binding energy.

  2. Economic benefits of advanced materials in nuclear power systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Busby, J. T.

    2009-07-01

    A key obstacle to the commercial deployment of advanced fast reactors is the capital cost. There is a perception of higher capital cost for fast reactor systems than advanced light water reactors. However, cost estimates come with a large uncertainty since far fewer fast reactors have been built than light water reactor facilities. Furthermore, the large variability of industrial cost estimates complicates accurate comparisons. Reductions in capital cost can result from design simplifications, new technologies that allow reduced capital costs, and simulation techniques that help optimize system design. It is plausible that improved materials will provide opportunities for both simplified design and reduced capital cost. Advanced materials may also allow improved safety and longer component lifetimes. This work examines the potential impact of advanced materials on the capital investment cost of fast nuclear reactors.

  3. Nuclear Material Monitoring System (NMMS) for security screens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hyun Kim, Kwang; Hong Chang, Ji; Hyun Jung, Young

    2011-08-01

    As a Nuclear Material Monitoring System (NMMS), two large-volume plastic detectors and a NaI detector for gamma-ray sources and two He-3 tubes for neutron sources were integrated in a mobile box that can be mounted on a vehicle. Custom-made preamplifiers, shapers, and a MCA (Multi-Channel Analyzer) for each detector were conceived of and built on a compact circuit board to collect and integrate different types of data from each detector. The collected data, counts rates and spectra of the detected radiation, were continually monitored and plotted on several user-friendly display windows on a laptop computer. The system performance in the vehicle-mounted condition was tested for Co-60, Cs-137, and Cf-252 sources at various distances and speeds.

  4. Nuclear physics. Momentum sharing in imbalanced Fermi systems.

    PubMed

    Hen, O; Sargsian, M; Weinstein, L B; Piasetzky, E; Hakobyan, H; Higinbotham, D W; Braverman, M; Brooks, W K; Gilad, S; Adhikari, K P; Arrington, J; Asryan, G; Avakian, H; Ball, J; Baltzell, N A; Battaglieri, M; Beck, A; May-Tal Beck, S; Bedlinskiy, I; Bertozzi, W; Biselli, A; Burkert, V D; Cao, T; Carman, D S; Celentano, A; Chandavar, S; Colaneri, L; Cole, P L; Crede, V; D'Angelo, A; De Vita, R; Deur, A; Djalali, C; Doughty, D; Dugger, M; Dupre, R; Egiyan, H; El Alaoui, A; El Fassi, L; Elouadrhiri, L; Fedotov, G; Fegan, S; Forest, T; Garillon, B; Garcon, M; Gevorgyan, N; Ghandilyan, Y; Gilfoyle, G P; Girod, F X; Goetz, J T; Gothe, R W; Griffioen, K A; Guidal, M; Guo, L; Hafidi, K; Hanretty, C; Hattawy, M; Hicks, K; Holtrop, M; Hyde, C E; Ilieva, Y; Ireland, D G; Ishkanov, B I; Isupov, E L; Jiang, H; Jo, H S; Joo, K; Keller, D; Khandaker, M; Kim, A; Kim, W; Klein, F J; Koirala, S; Korover, I; Kuhn, S E; Kubarovsky, V; Lenisa, P; Levine, W I; Livingston, K; Lowry, M; Lu, H Y; MacGregor, I J D; Markov, N; Mayer, M; McKinnon, B; Mineeva, T; Mokeev, V; Movsisyan, A; Munoz Camacho, C; Mustapha, B; Nadel-Turonski, P; Niccolai, S; Niculescu, G; Niculescu, I; Osipenko, M; Pappalardo, L L; Paremuzyan, R; Park, K; Pasyuk, E; Phelps, W; Pisano, S; Pogorelko, O; Price, J W; Procureur, S; Prok, Y; Protopopescu, D; Puckett, A J R; Rimal, D; Ripani, M; Ritchie, B G; Rizzo, A; Rosner, G; Roy, P; Rossi, P; Sabatié, F; Schott, D; Schumacher, R A; Sharabian, Y G; Smith, G D; Shneor, R; Sokhan, D; Stepanyan, S S; Stepanyan, S; Stoler, P; Strauch, S; Sytnik, V; Taiuti, M; Tkachenko, S; Ungaro, M; Vlassov, A V; Voutier, E; Walford, N K; Wei, X; Wood, M H; Wood, S A; Zachariou, N; Zana, L; Zhao, Z W; Zheng, X; Zonta, I

    2014-10-31

    The atomic nucleus is composed of two different kinds of fermions: protons and neutrons. If the protons and neutrons did not interact, the Pauli exclusion principle would force the majority of fermions (usually neutrons) to have a higher average momentum. Our high-energy electron-scattering measurements using (12)C, (27)Al, (56)Fe, and (208)Pb targets show that even in heavy, neutron-rich nuclei, short-range interactions between the fermions form correlated high-momentum neutron-proton pairs. Thus, in neutron-rich nuclei, protons have a greater probability than neutrons to have momentum greater than the Fermi momentum. This finding has implications ranging from nuclear few-body systems to neutron stars and may also be observable experimentally in two-spin-state, ultracold atomic gas systems.

  5. Nuclear energy and waste management pyroprocess for system symbiosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogawa, Toru; Minato, Kazuo; Okamoto, Yoshihiro; Nishihara, Kenji

    2007-01-01

    The actinide management has become a key issue in nuclear energy. Recovering and fissioning transuranium elements reduce the long-term proliferation risks and the environmental burden. The better way of waste management will be made by system symbiosis: a combination of light-water reactor and fast reactor and/or accelerator-driven transmutation system should be sought. The new recycling technology should be able to achieve good economy with smaller plants, which can process fuels from different types of reactors on a common technical basis. Ease in handling the higher heat load of transuranium nuclides is also important. Pyroprocesses with the use of molten salts are regarded as the strong candidate for such recycling technology. In JAEA, the first laboratory for the high-temperature chemistry of Am and Cm has been established. The fundamental data will be combined with the computer code for predicting the molten-salts electrolytic processes.

  6. Nuclear Structure Near the Drip Lines

    SciTech Connect

    Nazarewicz, W.

    1998-08-10

    Experiments with beams of unstable nuclei will make it possible to look closely into many aspects of the nuclear many-body problem. Theoretically, exotic nuclei represent a formidable challenge for the nuclear many-body theories and their power to predict nuclear properties in nuclear terra incognita.

  7. Advances in exotic mammal clinical therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Hawkins, Michelle G

    2015-05-01

    It is important that veterinarians treating exotic companion mammals stay abreast of the latest developments relating to medications and drug delivery approaches for safety, efficacy and welfare issues. Sustained release formulations of commonly used drugs as well as newer routes for administration of therapeutic agents allow the veterinarian treating exotic companion mammals to reduce the stress associated with drug administration. Interactions can occur between vehicle and drugs when formulations are compounded, therefore research studies are warranted regarding potential problems associated with these formulations.

  8. Volume integral theorem for exotic matter

    SciTech Connect

    Nandi, Kamal Kanti; Zhang Yuanzhong; Kumar, K.B. Vijaya

    2004-12-15

    We answer an important question in general relativity about the volume integral theorem for exotic matter by suggesting an exact integral quantifier for matter violating Averaged Null Energy Condition (ANEC). It is checked against some well-known static, spherically symmetric traversable wormhole solutions of general relativity with a sign reversed kinetic term minimally coupled scalar field. The improved quantifier is consistent with the principle that traversable wormholes can be supported by arbitrarily small quantities of exotic matter.

  9. Search for exotic particles at CDF

    SciTech Connect

    Gold, M.S.

    1992-10-01

    We have searched for exotic particles in p[bar p] collisions at 1.8 TeV in data taken with the Collider Detector at Fermilab. We review our published limits on W[prime] and Z[prime] masses, and on the scale of lepton-quark compositeness. We also report preliminary mass limits based on searches for leptoquarks, supersymmetric quarks and gluons, and exotic, stable colored fermions.

  10. etapi and eta'pi spectra and interpretation of possible exotic JPC=1-+ mesons.

    PubMed

    Szczepaniak, Adam P; Swat, Maciej; Dzierba, Alex R; Teige, Scott

    2003-08-29

    We discuss a coupled channel analysis of the etapi and eta'pi systems produced in pi(-)p interactions at 18 GeV/c. We show that known Q(-)Q resonances, together with residual soft meson-meson rescattering, saturate the spectra including the exotic J(PC)=1(-+) channel. The possibility of a narrow exotic resonance at a mass near 1.6 GeV/c(2) cannot, however, be ruled out.

  11. Pathways to exotic metastable silicon allotropes

    DOE PAGES

    Haberl, Bianca; Strobel, Timothy A.; Bradby, Jodie E.

    2016-09-27

    The Group 14 element silicon possesses a complex free-energy landscape with many (local) minima, allowing for the formation of a variety of unusual structures, some of which may be stabilized at ambient conditions. Such exotic silicon allotropes represent a significant opportunity to address the ever-increasing demand for novel materials with tailored functionality since these exotic forms are expected to exhibit superlative properties including optimized band gaps for solar power conversion. The application of pressure is a well-recognized and uniquely powerful method to access exotic states of silicon since it promotes large changes to atomic bonding. Conventional high-pressure syntheses, however, lackmore » the capability to access many of these local minima and only four forms of exotic silicon allotropes have been recovered over the last 50 years. However, more recently, signifi- cant advances in high pressure methodologies and the use of novel precursor materials have yielded at least three more recoverable exotic Si structures. This review aims to give an overview of these innovative methods of high-pressure application and precursor selection and the recent discoveries of new Si allotropes. The background context of the conventional pressure methods and multitude of predicted new phases are also provided. Furthermore, this review also offers a perspective for possible access to many further exotic functional allotropes not only of silicon but also of other materials, in a technologically feasible manner« less

  12. Pathways to exotic metastable silicon allotropes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haberl, Bianca; Strobel, Timothy A.; Bradby, Jodie E.

    2016-12-01

    The Group 14 element silicon possesses a complex free-energy landscape with many (local) minima, allowing for the formation of a variety of unusual structures, some of which may be stabilized at ambient conditions. Such exotic silicon allotropes represent a significant opportunity to address the ever-increasing demand for novel materials with tailored functionality since these exotic forms are expected to exhibit superlative properties including optimized band gaps for solar power conversion. The application of pressure is a well-recognized and uniquely powerful method to access exotic states of silicon since it promotes large changes to atomic bonding. Conventional high-pressure syntheses, however, lack the capability to access many of these local minima and only four forms of exotic silicon allotropes have been recovered over the last 50 years. However, more recently, significant advances in high pressure methodologies and the use of novel precursor materials have yielded at least three more recoverable exotic Si structures. This review aims to give an overview of these innovative methods of high-pressure application and precursor selection and the recent discoveries of new Si allotropes. The background context of the conventional pressure methods and multitude of predicted new phases are also provided. This review also offers a perspective for possible access to many further exotic functional allotropes not only of silicon but also of other materials, in a technologically feasible manner.

  13. Pathways to exotic metastable silicon allotropes

    SciTech Connect

    Haberl, Bianca; Strobel, Timothy A.; Bradby, Jodie E.

    2016-09-27

    The Group 14 element silicon possesses a complex free-energy landscape with many (local) minima, allowing for the formation of a variety of unusual structures, some of which may be stabilized at ambient conditions. Such exotic silicon allotropes represent a significant opportunity to address the ever-increasing demand for novel materials with tailored functionality since these exotic forms are expected to exhibit superlative properties including optimized band gaps for solar power conversion. The application of pressure is a well-recognized and uniquely powerful method to access exotic states of silicon since it promotes large changes to atomic bonding. Conventional high-pressure syntheses, however, lack the capability to access many of these local minima and only four forms of exotic silicon allotropes have been recovered over the last 50 years. However, more recently, signifi- cant advances in high pressure methodologies and the use of novel precursor materials have yielded at least three more recoverable exotic Si structures. This review aims to give an overview of these innovative methods of high-pressure application and precursor selection and the recent discoveries of new Si allotropes. The background context of the conventional pressure methods and multitude of predicted new phases are also provided. Furthermore, this review also offers a perspective for possible access to many further exotic functional allotropes not only of silicon but also of other materials, in a technologically feasible manner

  14. Nuclear reactor heat transport system component low friction support system

    DOEpatents

    Wade, Elman E.

    1980-01-01

    A support column for a heavy component of a liquid metal fast breeder reactor heat transport system which will deflect when the pipes leading coolant to and from the heavy component expand or contract due to temperature changes includes a vertically disposed pipe, the pipe being connected to the heavy component by two longitudinally spaced cycloidal dovetail joints wherein the distal end of each of the dovetails constitutes a part of the surface of a large diameter cylinder and the centerlines of these large diameter cylinders intersect at right angles and the pipe being supported through two longitudinally spaced cycloidal dovetail joints wherein the distal end of each of the dovetails constitutes a part of the surface of a large diameter cylinder and the centerlines of these large diameter cylinders intersect at right angles, each of the cylindrical surfaces bearing on a flat and horizontal surface.

  15. Gain and Lasing in Nuclear Excited Excimer Laser Systems.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-04-24

    sources. The most advantageous volumetric nuclear excitation source is UF If enriched UF could be used as a pump source, a self- critical NPL could be...3 lower laser state by nuclear excitation and gas heating or by quenching of the upper laser state by UF6 and other species. Most NPLs demonstrated...induced effects, the loss in power density may be more critical than any nuclear considerations.I * Direct nuclear pumping of XeF excimer lasers has been

  16. EMPIRE: Nuclear Reaction Model Code System for Data Evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herman, M.; Capote, R.; Carlson, B. V.; Obložinský, P.; Sin, M.; Trkov, A.; Wienke, H.; Zerkin, V.

    2007-12-01

    EMPIRE is a modular system of nuclear reaction codes, comprising various nuclear models, and designed for calculations over a broad range of energies and incident particles. A projectile can be a neutron, proton, any ion (including heavy-ions) or a photon. The energy range extends from the beginning of the unresolved resonance region for neutron-induced reactions (∽ keV) and goes up to several hundred MeV for heavy-ion induced reactions. The code accounts for the major nuclear reaction mechanisms, including direct, pre-equilibrium and compound nucleus ones. Direct reactions are described by a generalized optical model (ECIS03) or by the simplified coupled-channels approach (CCFUS). The pre-equilibrium mechanism can be treated by a deformation dependent multi-step direct (ORION + TRISTAN) model, by a NVWY multi-step compound one or by either a pre-equilibrium exciton model with cluster emission (PCROSS) or by another with full angular momentum coupling (DEGAS). Finally, the compound nucleus decay is described by the full featured Hauser-Feshbach model with γ-cascade and width-fluctuations. Advanced treatment of the fission channel takes into account transmission through a multiple-humped fission barrier with absorption in the wells. The fission probability is derived in the WKB approximation within the optical model of fission. Several options for nuclear level densities include the EMPIRE-specific approach, which accounts for the effects of the dynamic deformation of a fast rotating nucleus, the classical Gilbert-Cameron approach and pre-calculated tables obtained with a microscopic model based on HFB single-particle level schemes with collective enhancement. A comprehensive library of input parameters covers nuclear masses, optical model parameters, ground state deformations, discrete levels and decay schemes, level densities, fission barriers, moments of inertia and γ-ray strength functions. The results can be converted into ENDF-6 formatted files using the

  17. SYSTEM ANALYSIS OF NUCLEAR-ASSISTED SYNGAS PRODUCTION FROM COAL

    SciTech Connect

    E. A. Harvego; M. G. McKellar; J. E. O'Brien

    2008-09-01

    A system analysis has been performed to assess the efficiency and carbon utilization of a nuclear-assisted coal gasification process. The nuclear reactor is a high-temperature helium-cooled reactor that is used primarily to provide power for hydrogen production via high-temperature electrolysis. The supplemental hydrogen is mixed with the outlet stream from an oxygen-blown coal gasifier to produce a hydrogen-rich gas mixture, allowing most of the carbon dioxide to be converted into carbon monoxide, with enough excess hydrogen to produce a syngas product stream with a hydrogen/carbon monoxide molar ratio of about 2:1. Oxygen for the gasifier is also provided by the high-temperature electrolysis process. Results of the analysis predict 90.5% carbon utilization with a syngas production efficiency (defined as the ratio of the heating value of the produced syngas to the sum of the heating value of the coal plus the high-temperature reactor heat input) of 66.1% at a gasifier temperature of 1866 K for the high-moisture-content lignite coal considered. Usage of lower moisture coals such as bituminous can yield carbon utilization approaching 100% and 70% syngas production efficiency.

  18. Design of radiation resistant metallic multilayers for advanced nuclear systems

    SciTech Connect

    Zhernenkov, Mikhail E-mail: gills@bnl.gov; Gill, Simerjeet E-mail: gills@bnl.gov; Stanic, Vesna; DiMasi, Elaine; Kisslinger, Kim; Ecker, Lynne; Baldwin, J. Kevin; Misra, Amit; Demkowicz, M. J.

    2014-06-16

    Helium implantation from transmutation reactions is a major cause of embrittlement and dimensional instability of structural components in nuclear energy systems. Development of novel materials with improved radiation resistance, which is of the utmost importance for progress in nuclear energy, requires guidelines to arrive at favorable parameters more efficiently. Here, we present a methodology that can be used for the design of radiation tolerant materials. We used synchrotron X-ray reflectivity to nondestructively study radiation effects at buried interfaces and measure swelling induced by He implantation in Cu/Nb multilayers. The results, supported by transmission electron microscopy, show a direct correlation between reduced swelling in nanoscale multilayers and increased interface area per unit volume, consistent with helium storage in Cu/Nb interfaces in forms that minimize dimensional changes. In addition, for Cu/Nb layers, a linear relationship is demonstrated between the measured depth-dependent swelling and implanted He density from simulations, making the reflectivity technique a powerful tool for heuristic material design.

  19. Alpha particle clusters and their condensation in nuclear systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuck, Peter; Funaki, Yasuro; Horiuchi, Hisashi; Röpke, Gerd; Tohsaki, Akihiro; Yamada, Taiichi

    2016-12-01

    In this article we review the present status of α clustering in nuclear systems. First of all, an important aspect is condensation in nuclear matter. Like for pairing, quartetting in matter is at the root of similar phenomena in finite nuclei. Cluster approaches for finite nuclei are shortly recapitulated in historical order. The α container model, recently been proposed by Tohsaki-Horiuchi-Schuck-Röpke (THSR), will be outlined and the ensuing condensate aspect of the Hoyle state at 7.65 MeV in 12C is investigated in some detail. A special case will be made with respect to the very accurate reproduction of the inelastic form factor from the ground to Hoyle state with the THSR description. The extended volume will be deduced. New developments concerning excitations of the Hoyle state will be discussed. After 15 years since the proposal of the α condensation concept a critical assessment of this idea will be given. Alpha gas states in other nuclei like 16O and 13C will be considered. An important aspect is the experimental evidence, both present and future ones. The THSR wave function can also describe configurations of one α particle on top of a doubly magic core. The cases of 20Ne and 212Po will be investigated.

  20. Thermal Simulator Development: Non-Nuclear Testing of Space Fission Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bragg-Sitton, Shannon M.; Dickens, Ricky E.

    2006-01-01

    Non-nuclear testing can be a valuable tool in the development of a space nuclear power system. At the NASA MSFC Early Flight Fission Test Facility (EFF-TF), highly designed electric heaters are used to simulate the heat from nuclear fuel to test space fission power and propulsion systems. To allow early utilization, nuclear system designs must be relatively simple, easy to fabricate, and easy to test using non-nuclear heaters to closely mimic heat from fission. In this test strategy, highly designed electric heaters are used to simulate the heat from nuclear fuel, allowing one to develop a significant understanding of individual components and integrated system operation without the cost, time and safety concerns associated with nuclear testing.

  1. Neutron interrogation system using high gamma ray signature to detect contraband special nuclear materials in cargo

    DOEpatents

    Slaughter, Dennis R.; Pohl, Bertram A.; Dougan, Arden D.; Bernstein, Adam; Prussin, Stanley G.; Norman, Eric B.

    2008-04-15

    A system for inspecting cargo for the presence of special nuclear material. The cargo is irradiated with neutrons. The neutrons produce fission products in the special nuclear material which generate gamma rays. The gamma rays are detecting indicating the presence of the special nuclear material.

  2. Refractory metal alloys and composites for space nuclear power systems

    SciTech Connect

    Titran, R.H.; Stephens, J.R.; Petrasek, D.W.

    1988-01-01

    Space power requirements for future NASA and other United States missions will range from a few kilowatts to megawatts of electricity. Maximum efficiency is a key goal of any power system in order to minimize weight and size so that the space shuttle may be used a minimum number of times to put the power supply into orbit. Nuclear power has been identified as the primary power source to meet these high levels of electrical demand. One method to achieve maximum efficiency is to operate the power supply, energy conversion system, and related components at relatively high temperatures. For systems now in the planning stages, design temperatures range from 1300 K for the immediate future to as high as 1700 K for the advanced systems. NASA Lewis Research Center has undertaken a research program on advanced technology of refractory metal alloys and composites that will provide base line information for space power systems in the 1900's and the 21st century. Special emphasis is focused on the refractory metal alloys of niobium and on the refractory metal composites which utilize tungsten alloy wire for reinforcement. Basic research on the creep and creep-rupture properties of wires, matrices, and composites will be discussed. 20 refs., 27 figs., 1 tab.

  3. Refractory metal alloys and composites for space nuclear power systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Titran, Robert H.; Stephens, Joseph R.; Petrasek, Donald W.

    1988-01-01

    Space power requirements for future NASA and other U.S. missions will range from a few kilowatts to megawatts of electricity. Maximum efficiency is a key goal of any power system in order to minimize weight and size so that the Space Shuttle may be used a minimum number of times to put the power supply into orbit. Nuclear power has been identified as the primary power source to meet these high levels of electrical demand. One method to achieve maximum efficiency is to operate the power supply, energy conservation system, and related components at relatively high temperatures. For systems now in the planning stages, design temperatures range from 1300 K for the immediate future to as high as 1700 K for the advanced systems. NASA Lewis Research Center has undertaken a research program on advanced technology of refractory metal alloys and composites that will provide baseline information for space power systems in the 1900's and the 21st century. Special emphasis is focused on the refractory metal alloys of niobium and on the refractory metal composites which utilize tungsten alloy wires for reinforcement. Basic research on the creep and creep-rupture properties of wires, matrices, and composites are discussed.

  4. Spontaneous hybrids between native and exotic Rubus in the Western United States produce offspring both by apomixis and by sexual recombination.

    PubMed

    Clark, L V; Jasieniuk, M

    2012-11-01

    Facultative asexual reproduction is a trait commonly found in invasive species. With a combination of sexual and asexual reproductive modes, such species may adapt to new environments via sexual recombination during range expansion, while at the same time having the benefits of asexuality such as the maintenance of fitness effects that depend upon heterozygosity. In the Western United States, native species of Rubus (Rosaceae) reproduce sexually whereas exotic naturalized Rubus species reproduce by pseudogamous apomixis. We hypothesized that new asexual lineages of Rubus could arise from hybridization in this range. To detect hybridization between native and exotic Rubus, we genotyped 579 individuals collected across California, Oregon and Washington with eight nuclear microsatellites and two chloroplast markers. Principal Coordinate Analysis and Bayesian clustering revealed a limited amount of hybridization of the native R. ursinus with the exotic R. armeniacus and R. pensilvanicus, as well as cultivated varieties. Genetic distances between these hybrids and their offspring indicated that both R. ursinus × R. armeniacus and R. ursinus × R. pensilvanicus produced a mix of apomictic and sexual seeds, with sexual seeds being more viable. Although neither of these hybrid types is currently considered invasive, they model the early stages of evolution of new invasive lineages, given the potential for fixed heterosis and the generation of novel genotypes. The hybrids also retain the ability to increase their fitness via sexual recombination and natural selection. Mixed reproductive systems such as those described here may be an important step in the evolution of asexual invasive species.

  5. Technological implications of SNAP reactor power system development on future space nuclear power systems

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, R.V.

    1982-11-16

    Nuclear reactor systems are one method of satisfying space mission power needs. The development of such systems must proceed on a path consistent with mission needs and schedules. This path, or technology roadmap, starts from the power system technology data base available today. Much of this data base was established during the 1960s and early 1970s, when government and industry developed space nuclear reactor systems for steady-state power and propulsion. One of the largest development programs was the Systems for Nuclear Auxiliary Power (SNAP) Program. By the early 1970s, a technology base had evolved from this program at the system, subsystem, and component levels. There are many implications of this technology base on future reactor power systems. A review of this base highlights the need for performing a power system technology and mission overview study. Such a study is currently being performed by Rockwell's Energy Systems Group for the Department of Energy and will assess power system capabilities versus mission needs, considering development, schedule, and cost implications. The end product of the study will be a technology roadmap to guide reactor power system development.

  6. Pressurized water nuclear reactor system with hot leg vortex mitigator

    DOEpatents

    Lau, Louis K. S.

    1990-01-01

    A pressurized water nuclear reactor system includes a vortex mitigator in the form of a cylindrical conduit between the hot leg conduit and a first section of residual heat removal conduit, which conduit leads to a pump and a second section of residual heat removal conduit leading back to the reactor pressure vessel. The cylindrical conduit is of such a size that where the hot leg has an inner diameter D.sub.1, the first section has an inner diameter D.sub.2, and the cylindrical conduit or step nozzle has a length L and an inner diameter of D.sub.3 ; D.sub.3 /D.sub.1 is at least 0.55, D.sub.2 is at least 1.9, and L/D.sub.3 is at least 1.44, whereby cavitation of the pump by a vortex formed in the hot leg is prevented.

  7. A compact automated radionuclide separation system for nuclear medical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bond, A. H.; Horwitz, E. P.; Hines, J. J.; Young, J. E.

    2003-01-01

    The purification of radionuclides for medical applications presents unique challenges; most notably the needs for chemical purity, radionuclidic purity, and reliable production. To address these considerations, a new generator technology and instrument have been developed to permit the rapid chromatographic purification of clinically useful quantities of radionuclides for use in diagnostic or therapeutic nuclear medicine. The device comprises a separations module containing miniature chromatographic columns, a computer controller with driver software, and the fluid delivery components. This instrument is well suited for use in radionuclide generators as separations can typically be performed in <5 min with overall decontamination factors of >106. Chromatographic experiments targeting application in a 212Bi generator have demonstrated the usefulness of the Automated Radionuclide Separator as a low-pressure chromatography system.

  8. Flammability Control In A Nuclear Waste Vitrification System

    SciTech Connect

    Zamecnik, John R.; Choi, Alexander S.; Johnson, Fabienne C.; Miller, Donald H.; Lambert, Daniel P.; Stone, Michael E.; Daniel, William E. Jr.

    2013-07-25

    The Defense Waste Processing Facility at the Savannah River Site processes high-level radioactive waste from the processing of nuclear materials that contains dissolved and precipitated metals and radionuclides. Vitrification of this waste into borosilicate glass for ultimate disposal at a geologic repository involves chemically modifying the waste to make it compatible with the glass melter system. Pretreatment steps include removal of excess aluminum by dissolution and washing, and processing with formic and nitric acids to: 1) adjust the reduction-oxidation (redox) potential in the glass melter to reduce radionuclide volatility and improve melt rate; 2) adjust feed rheology; and 3) reduce by steam stripping the amount of mercury that must be processed in the melter. Elimination of formic acid in pretreatment has been studied to eliminate the production of hydrogen in the pretreatment systems, which requires nuclear grade monitoring equipment. An alternative reductant, glycolic acid, has been studied as a substitute for formic acid. However, in the melter, the potential for greater formation of flammable gases exists with glycolic acid. Melter flammability is difficult to control because flammable mixtures can be formed during surges in offgases that both increase the amount of flammable species and decrease the temperature in the vapor space of the melter. A flammable surge can exceed the 60% of the LFL with no way to mitigate it. Therefore, careful control of the melter feed composition based on scaled melter surge testing is required. The results of engineering scale melter tests with the formic-nitric flowsheet and the use of these data in the melter flammability model are presented.

  9. System Design for a Nuclear Electric Spacecraft Utilizing Out-of-core Thermionic Conversion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Estabrook, W. C.; Phillips, W. M.; Hsieh, T.

    1976-01-01

    Basic guidelines are presented for a nuclear space power system which utilizes heat pipes to transport thermal power from a fast nuclear reactor to an out of core thermionic converter array. Design parameters are discussed for the nuclear reactor, heat pipes, thermionic converters, shields (neutron and gamma), waste heat rejection systems, and the electrical bus bar-cable system required to transport the high current/low voltage power to the processing equipment. Dimensions are compatible with shuttle payload bay constraints.

  10. Diversity Strategies for Nuclear Power Plant Instrumentation and Control Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, Richard Thomas; Belles, Randy; Cetiner, Mustafa Sacit; Holcomb, David Eugene; Korsah, Kofi; Loebl, Andy; Mays, Gary T; Muhlheim, Michael David; Mullens, James Allen; Poore III, Willis P; Qualls, A L; Wilson, Thomas L; Waterman, Michael E.

    2010-02-01

    This report presents the technical basis for establishing acceptable mitigating strategies that resolve diversity and defense-in-depth (D3) assessment findings and conform to U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) requirements. The research approach employed to establish appropriate diversity strategies involves investigation of available documentation on D3 methods and experience from nuclear power and nonnuclear industries, capture of expert knowledge and lessons learned, determination of best practices, and assessment of the nature of common-cause failures (CCFs) and compensating diversity attributes. The research described in this report does not provide guidance on how to determine the need for diversity in a safety system to mitigate the consequences of potential CCFs. Rather, the scope of this report provides guidance to the staff and nuclear industry after a licensee or applicant has performed a D3 assessment per NUREG/CR-6303 and determined that diversity in a safety system is needed for mitigating the consequences of potential CCFs identified in the evaluation of the safety system design features. Succinctly, the purpose of the research described in this report was to answer the question, 'If diversity is required in a safety system to mitigate the consequences of potential CCFs, how much diversity is enough?' The principal results of this research effort have identified and developed diversity strategies, which consist of combinations of diversity attributes and their associated criteria. Technology, which corresponds to design diversity, is chosen as the principal system characteristic by which diversity criteria are grouped to form strategies. The rationale for this classification framework involves consideration of the profound impact that technology-focused design diversity provides. Consequently, the diversity usage classification scheme involves three families of strategies: (1) different technologies, (2) different approaches within the same

  11. Potential Habitats for Exotic Life Within the Life Supporting Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leitner, Johannes J.; Firneis, Maria G.; Hitzenberger, Regina

    2010-05-01

    Questions like "Are we alone in the universe?", "How unique is Earth as a planet?" or "How unique is water-based life in the universe?" still are nowhere near of being answered. In recent years, discussions on these topics are more and more influenced by questions whether water is really the only possible solvent, or which conditions are necessary for life to evolve in planetary habitats. A change in our present geocentric mindset on the existence of life is required, in order to address these new questions [see also 1]. In May 2009 a new research platform at the University of Vienna was initiated in order to contribute to the solution of these questions. One task is to find essential biomarkers relevant to the problem of the detection of exotic life. In this context exotic life means: life, which is not necessarily based on a double bond between carbon and oxygen (C=O) and not on water as the only possible solvent. At present little is known about metabolistic systems, which are not based on C=O or on metabolisms which are operative in alternative solvents and a high effort of future laboratory work is necessary to open this window for looking for exotic life. To address the whole spectrum of life the concept of a general life supporting zone is introduced in order to extend the classical habitable zone (which is based on liquid water on a planetary surface, [2]). The life supporting zone of a planetary system is composed of different single "habitable zones" for the liquid phases of specific solvents and composites between water and other solvents. Besides exoplanetary systems which seem to be the most promising place for exotic life in our present understanding, some potential places could also exist within our Solar System and habitats like the subsurface of Enceladus, liquid ethane/methane lakes on Titan or habitable niches in the Venus atmosphere will also be taken into account. A preliminary list of appropriate solvents and their abundances in the Solar

  12. Planning for a space infrastructure for disposal of nuclear space power systems

    SciTech Connect

    Angelo, J. Jr. ); Albert, T.E.; Lee, J.

    1989-01-01

    The development of safe, reliable, and compact power systems is vital to humanity's exploration, development, and, ultimately, civilization of space. Nuclear power systems appear to present to offer the only practical option of compact high-power systems. From the very beginning of US space nuclear power activities, safety has been a paramount requirement. Assurance of nuclear safety has included prelaunch ground handling operations, launch, and space operations of nuclear power sources, and more recently serious attention has been given to postoperational disposal of spent or errant nuclear reactor systems. The purpose of this paper is to describe the progress of a project to utilize the capabilities of an evolving space infrastructure for planning for disposal of space nuclear systems. Project SIREN (Search, Intercept, Retrieve, Expulsion - Nuclear) is a project that has been initiated to consider post-operational disposal options for nuclear space power systems. The key finding of Project SIREN was that although no system currently exists to affect the disposal of a nuclear space power system, the requisite technologies for such a system either exist or are planned for part of the evolving space infrastructure.

  13. Systems to prevent nuclear material from re-entering the biosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buden, David; Angelo, Joseph A., Jr.; Lapin, Samantha

    1992-07-01

    Nuclear systems are key to the success of many space missions. There is always a concern that nuclear materials will reenter the biosphere from a mission abort. In fact, this has happened for radioisotope and reactor power systems. With possible increased use of nuclear power and propulsion systems in space, Project SIREN (Search, Intercept, Retrieve, Expulsion, Nuclear) has determined that external means can be used as a backup to current on-board systems to provide assured prevention of nuclear materials from reentry once in space. The technology base to implement a SIREN vehicle has been assessed and a data base and mission analysis program (called THOR) prepared to evaluate various missions. The degree of hazard from existing nuclear power systems in space has been assessed and found to be significant.

  14. Distinctive exotic flavor and aroma compounds of some exotic tropical fruits and berries: a review.

    PubMed

    Lasekan, Ola; Abbas, Kassim A

    2012-01-01

    The characteristic flavor of exotic tropical fruits is one of their most attractive attributes to consumers. In this article, the enormous diversity of exotic fruit flavors is reviewed. Classifying some of the exotic fruits into two classes on the basis of whether esters or terpenes predominate in the aroma was also attempted. Indeed, as far as exotic tropical fruits are concerned, the majority of fruits have terpenes predominating in their aroma profile. Some of the fruits in this group are the Amazonian fruits such as pitanga, umbu-caja, camu-camu, garcinia, and bacuri. The ester group is made up of rambutan, durians, star fruit, snake fruit, acerola, tamarind, sapodilla, genipap, soursop, cashew, melon, jackfruit, and cupuacu respectively. Also, the role of sulphur-volatiles in some of the exotic fruits is detailed.

  15. Ab initio valence-space theory for exotic nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holt, Jason

    2015-10-01

    Recent advances in ab initio nuclear structure theory have led to groundbreaking predictions in the exotic medium-mass region, from the location of the neutron dripline to the emergence of new magic numbers far from stability. Playing a key role in this progress has been the development of sophisticated many-body techniques and chiral effective field theory, which provides a systematic basis for consistent many-nucleon forces and electroweak currents. Within the context of valence-space Hamiltonians derived from the nonperturbative in-medium similarity renormalization group (IM-SRG) approach, I will discuss the importance of 3N forces in understanding and making new discoveries in the exotic sd -shell region. Beginning in oxygen, we find that the effects of 3N forces are decisive in explaining why 24O is the last bound oxygen isotope, validating first predictions of this phenomenon from several years ago. Furthermore, 3N forces play a key role in reproducing spectroscopy, including signatures of doubly magic 22,24O, and physics beyond the dripline. Similar improvements are obtained in new spectroscopic predictions for exotic fluorine and neon isotopes, where agreement with recent experimental data is competitive with state-of-the-art phenomenology. Finally, I will discuss first applications of the IM-SRG to effective valence-space operators, such as radii and E 0 transitions, as well as extensions to general operators crucial for our future understanding of electroweak processes, such as neutrinoless double-beta decay. This work was supported by NSERC and the NRC Canada.

  16. Nuclear-power-plant perimeter-intrusion alarm systems

    SciTech Connect

    Halsey, D.J.

    1982-04-01

    Timely intercept of an intruder requires the examination of perimeter barriers and sensors in terms of reliable detection, immediate assessment and prompt response provisions. Perimeter security equipment and operations must at the same time meet the requirements of the Code of Federal Regulations, 10 CFR 73.55 with some attention to the performance and testing figures of Nuclear Regulatory Guide 5.44, Revision 2, May 1980. A baseline system is defined which recommends a general approach to implementing perimeter security elements: barriers, lighting, intrusion detection, alarm assessment. The baseline approach emphasizes cost/effectiveness achieved by detector layering and logic processing of alarm signals to produce reliable alarms and low nuisance alarm rates. A cost benefit of layering along with video assessment is reduction in operating expense. The concept of layering is also shown to minimize testing costs where detectability performance as suggested by Regulatory Guide 5.44 is to be performed. Synthesis of the perimeter intrusion alarm system and limited testing of CCTV and Video Motion Detectors (VMD), were performed at E-Systems, Greenville Division, Greenville, Texas during 1981.

  17. Uncanistered Spent Nuclear fuel Disposal Container System Description Document

    SciTech Connect

    N. E. Pettit

    2001-07-13

    The Uncanistered Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Disposal Container System supports the confinement and isolation of waste within the Engineered Barrier System of the Monitored Geologic Repository (MGR). Disposal containers are loaded with intact uncanistered assemblies and/or individually canistered SNF assemblies and sealed in the surface waste handling facilities, transferred to the underground through the access drifts, and emplaced in emplacement drifts. The Uncanistered SNF Disposal Container provides long-term confinement of the commercial SNF placed inside, and withstands the loading, transfer, emplacement, and retrieval loads and environments. The Uncanistered SNF Disposal Container System provides containment of waste for a designated period of time, and limits radionuclide release. The disposal container maintains the waste in a designated configuration, withstands maximum handling and rockfall loads, limits the individual SNF assembly temperatures after emplacement, limits the introduction of moderator into the disposal container during the criticality control period, resists corrosion in the expected handling and repository environments, and provides containment of waste in the event of an accident.

  18. Reviewing real-time performance of nuclear reactor safety systems

    SciTech Connect

    Preckshot, G.G.

    1993-08-01

    The purpose of this paper is to recommend regulatory guidance for reviewers examining real-time performance of computer-based safety systems used in nuclear power plants. Three areas of guidance are covered in this report. The first area covers how to determine if, when, and what prototypes should be required of developers to make a convincing demonstration that specific problems have been solved or that performance goals have been met. The second area has recommendations for timing analyses that will prove that the real-time system will meet its safety-imposed deadlines. The third area has description of means for assessing expected or actual real-time performance before, during, and after development is completed. To ensure that the delivered real-time software product meets performance goals, the paper recommends certain types of code-execution and communications scheduling. Technical background is provided in the appendix on methods of timing analysis, scheduling real-time computations, prototyping, real-time software development approaches, modeling and measurement, and real-time operating systems.

  19. Overall system design of a PACS for nuclear medicine images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ottes, Fenno P.; Bakker, Albert R.; VanGennip, Chel; van Poppel, Bas M.; Toussaint, Pieter J.; Weber, Ruud; Weier, Onno

    1996-05-01

    This paper describes the global system design of a PACS for nuclear medicine images. This NM PACS provides facilities for image capture, storage, display, manipulation and analysis. The NM PACS workstation displays besides images also the patient data from the HIS database. The NM PACS is equipped with well-defined HIS interface, which provides interoperability with HIS systems. The system design of the NM PACS is based on: a twin client-server concept, i.e. each workstation can run a HIS client and a PACS client, each interfaced with their own server. The HIS and the PACS servers are in turn inter-connected. The PACS images can be retrieved and displayed by evoking a command to a HIS menu. The X-protocol, together with GUI tools, such as Builder Xcsessory and the Motif tools in the Xmt library, are used to create the software modules that displays, manipulates and analyzes the images. The image file storage architecture consists of a single layer, namely an array of magnetical disks.

  20. Westinghouse Small Modular Reactor nuclear steam supply system design

    SciTech Connect

    Memmott, M. J.; Harkness, A. W.; Van Wyk, J.

    2012-07-01

    The Westinghouse Small Modular Reactor (SMR) is an 800 MWt (>225 MWe) integral pressurized water reactor (iPWR), in which all of the components typically associated with the nuclear steam supply system (NSSS) of a nuclear power plant are incorporated within a single reactor pressure vessel. This paper is the first in a series of four papers which describe the design and functionality of the Westinghouse SMR. Also described in this series are the key drivers influencing the design of the Westinghouse SMR and the unique passive safety features of the Westinghouse SMR. Several critical motivators contributed to the development and integration of the Westinghouse SMR design. These design driving motivators dictated the final configuration of the Westinghouse SMR to varying degrees, depending on the specific features under consideration. These design drivers include safety, economics, AP1000{sup R} reactor expertise and experience, research and development requirements, functionality of systems and components, size of the systems and vessels, simplicity of design, and licensing requirements. The Westinghouse SMR NSSS consists of an integral reactor vessel within a compact containment vessel. The core is located in the bottom of the reactor vessel and is composed of 89 modified Westinghouse 17x17 Robust Fuel Assemblies (RFA). These modified fuel assemblies have an active core length of only 2.4 m (8 ft) long, and the entirety of the core is encompassed by a radial reflector. The Westinghouse SMR core operates on a 24 month fuel cycle. The reactor vessel is approximately 24.4 m (80 ft) long and 3.7 m (12 ft) in diameter in order to facilitate standard rail shipping to the site. The reactor vessel houses hot and cold leg channels to facilitate coolant flow, control rod drive mechanisms (CRDM), instrumentation and cabling, an intermediate flange to separate flow and instrumentation and facilitate simpler refueling, a pressurizer, a straight tube, recirculating steam

  1. Testing of Liquid Metal Components for Nuclear Surface Power Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Polzin, Kurt A.; Godfroy, Thomas J.; Pearson, J. Boise

    2010-01-01

    The Early Flight Fission Test Facility (EFF-TF) was established by the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) to provide a capability for performing hardware-directed activities to support multiple in-space nuclear reactor concepts by using a non-nuclear test methodology. This includes fabrication and testing at both the module/component level and near prototypic reactor configurations. The EFF-TF is currently supporting an effort to develop an affordable fission surface power (AFSP) system that could be deployed on the Lunar surface. The AFSP system is presently based on a pumped liquid metal-cooled (Sodium-Potassium eutectic, NaK-78) reactor design. This design was derived from the only fission system that the United States has deployed for space operation, the Systems for Nuclear Auxiliary Power (SNAP) 10A reactor, which was launched in 1965. Two prototypical components recently tested at MSFC were a pair of Stirling power conversion units that would be used in a reactor system to convert heat to electricity, and an annular linear induction pump (ALIP) that uses travelling electromagnetic fields to pump the liquid metal coolant through the reactor loop. First ever tests were conducted at MSFC to determine baseline performance of a pair of 1 kW Stirling convertors using NaK as the hot side working fluid. A special test rig was designed and constructed and testing was conducted inside a vacuum chamber at MSFC. This test rig delivered pumped NaK for the hot end temperature to the Stirlings and water as the working fluid on the cold end temperature. These test were conducted through a hot end temperature range between 400 to 550C in increments of 50 C and a cold end temperature range from 30 to 70 C in 20 C increments. Piston amplitudes were varied from 6 to 1 1mm in .5 mm increments. A maximum of 2240 Watts electric was produced at the design point of 550 hot end, 40 C cold end with a piston amplitude of 10.5mm. This power level was reached at a gross thermal

  2. Integrated System Modeling for Nuclear Thermal Propulsion (NTP)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryan, Stephen W.; Borowski, Stanley K.

    2014-01-01

    Nuclear thermal propulsion (NTP) has long been identified as a key enabling technology for space exploration beyond LEO. From Wernher Von Braun's early concepts for crewed missions to the Moon and Mars to the current Mars Design Reference Architecture (DRA) 5.0 and recent lunar and asteroid mission studies, the high thrust and specific impulse of NTP opens up possibilities such as reusability that are just not feasible with competing approaches. Although NTP technology was proven in the Rover / NERVA projects in the early days of the space program, an integrated spacecraft using NTP has never been developed. Such a spacecraft presents a challenging multidisciplinary systems integration problem. The disciplines that must come together include not only nuclear propulsion and power, but also thermal management, power, structures, orbital dynamics, etc. Some of this integration logic was incorporated into a vehicle sizing code developed at NASA's Glenn Research Center (GRC) in the early 1990s called MOMMA, and later into an Excel-based tool called SIZER. Recently, a team at GRC has developed an open source framework for solving Multidisciplinary Design, Analysis and Optimization (MDAO) problems called OpenMDAO. A modeling approach is presented that builds on previous work in NTP vehicle sizing and mission analysis by making use of the OpenMDAO framework to enable modular and reconfigurable representations of various NTP vehicle configurations and mission scenarios. This approach is currently applied to vehicle sizing, but is extensible to optimization of vehicle and mission designs. The key features of the code will be discussed and examples of NTP transfer vehicles and candidate missions will be presented.

  3. Injuries, envenomations and stings from exotic pets.

    PubMed

    Warwick, Clifford; Steedman, Catrina

    2012-07-01

    A variety of exotic vertebrate and invertebrate species are kept as 'pets' including fishes, amphibians (for example, frogs and toads), reptiles (turtles, crocodiles, lizards and snakes), birds, mammals (for example, primates, civets, and lions), and invertebrates (for example spiders, scorpions, and centipedes), and ownership of some of these animals is rising. Data for 2009-2011 suggest that the number of homes with reptiles rose by approximately 12.5%. Recent surveys, including only some of these animals, indicated that they might be present in around 18.6% of homes (equal to approximately 42 million animals of which around 40 million are indoor or outdoor fish). Many exotic 'pets' are capable of causing injury or poisoning to their keepers and some contacts prove fatal. We examined NHS Health Episode Statistics for England using selected formal categories for hospital admissions and bed days for 2004-2010 using the following categories of injury, envenomation or sting; bitten or struck by crocodile or alligator; bitten or crushed by other reptiles: contact with venomous snakes and lizards; contact with scorpions. Between 2004 and 2010 these data conservatively show a total of 760 full consultation episodes, 709 admissions and 2,121 hospital bed days were associated with injuries probably from exotic pets. Injuries, envenomations and stings from exotic pets constitute a small but important component of emerging medical problems. Greater awareness of relevant injuries and medical sequelae from exotic pet keeping may help medics formulate their clinical assessment and advice to patients.

  4. SUITABILITY OF A NEW CALORIMETER FOR EXOTIC MESON SEARCHES

    SciTech Connect

    Bookwalter, C.; Ostrovidov, A.; Eugenio, P.

    2007-01-01

    Exotic mesons, particles that have quantum numbers that are inaccessible to conventional quark-model mesons, are predicted by quantum chromodynamics (QCD), but past experiments seeking to identify exotic candidates have produced controversial results. The HyCLAS experiment (E04005) at Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF) proposes the use of the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) Large Acceptance Spectrometer (CLAS) in Hall B to study the photoproduction of exotic mesons. However, the base detector package at CLAS is not ideal for observing and measuring neutral particles, particularly at forward angles. The Deeply Virtual Compton Scattering (DVCS) experiment at TJNAF has commissioned a new calorimeter for detecting small-angle photons, but studies must be performed to determine its suitability for a meson spectroscopy experiment. The ηπ system has been under especial scrutiny in the community as a source for potential exotics, so the new calorimeter’s ability at reconstructing these resonances must be evaluated. To achieve this, the invariant mass of showers in the calorimeter are reconstructed. Also, two electroproduction reaction channels analogous to photoproduction channels of interest to HyCLAS are examined in DVCS data. It is found that, while not ideal, the new calorimeter will allow access to additional reaction channels, and its inclusion in HyCLAS is warranted. Results in basic shower reconstruction show that the calorimeter has good effi ciency in resolving π° decays, but its η reconstruction is not as strong. When examining ep → epπ°η, preliminary reconstruction of the ηπ° system shows faint signals in the a0(980) region. In the ep → e n π+ η channel, preliminary reconstruction of the ηπ+ system gave good signals in the a0(980) and a2(1320) regions, but statistics were poor. While more analyses are necessary to improve statistics and remove background, these preliminary results support the claim

  5. Dissipative Dynamics with Exotic Beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    di Toro, M.; Colonna, M.; Greco, V.; Ferini, G.; Rizzo, C.; Rizzo, J.; Baran, V.; Wolter, H. H.; Zielinska-Pfabe, M.

    2008-04-01

    Heavy Ion Collisions (HIC) represent a unique tool to probe the in-medium nuclear interaction in regions away from saturation and at high nucleon momenta. In this report we present a selection of reaction observables particularly sensitive to the isovector part of the interaction, i.e. to the symmetry term of the nuclear Equation of State (EoS) At low and Fermi energies the behavior of the symmetry energy around saturation influences dissipation and fragment production mechanisms. Predictions are shown for fusion, deep-inelastic and fragmentation collisions induced by neutron rich projectiles. At all energies the isospin transport data are supplying valuable information on value and slope of the symmetry term below saturation. The importance of studying violent collisions with radioactive beams in this energy range is finally stressed.

  6. Progress in space nuclear reactor power systems technology development - The SP-100 program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, H. S.

    1984-01-01

    Activities related to the development of high-temperature compact nuclear reactors for space applications had reached a comparatively high level in the U.S. during the mid-1950s and 1960s, although only one U.S. nuclear reactor-powered spacecraft was actually launched. After 1973, very little effort was devoted to space nuclear reactor and propulsion systems. In February 1983, significant activities toward the development of the technology for space nuclear reactor power systems were resumed with the SP-100 Program. Specific SP-100 Program objectives are partly related to the determination of the potential performance limits for space nuclear power systems in 100-kWe and 1- to 100-MW electrical classes. Attention is given to potential missions and applications, regimes of possible space power applicability, safety considerations, conceptual system designs, the establishment of technical feasibility, nuclear technology, materials technology, and prospects for the future.

  7. Future energy system in environment, economy, and energy problems (2) various nuclear energy system evaluations

    SciTech Connect

    Matsui, Kazuaki; Ujita, Hiroshi; Tashimo, Masanori

    2006-07-01

    Role and potentials of nuclear energy system in the energy options are discussed from the viewpoint of sustainable development with protecting from global warming by using the energy module structure of GRAPE model. They change and are affected dramatically by different sets of energy characteristics, nuclear behavior and energy policy even under the moderate set of presumptions. Introduction of thousands of reactors in the end of the century seems inevitable for better life and cleaner earth, but it will not come without efforts and cost. The analysis suggests the need of long term planning and R and D efforts under the wisdom. (authors)

  8. Power Conditioning System Modelling for Nuclear Electric Propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Metcalf, Kenneth J.

    1993-01-01

    NASA LeRC is currently developing a Fortran based model of a complete nuclear electric propulsion (NEP) vehicle that would be used for piloted and cargo missions to the Moon or Mars. The proposed vehicle design will use either a Brayton or K-Rankine power conversion cycle to drive a turbine coupled with a rotary alternator. Two thruster types are also being studied, ion and magnetoplasmadynamic (MPD). In support of this NEP model, Rocketdyne developed a power management and distribution (PMAD) subroutine that provides parametric outputs for selected alternator operating voltages and frequencies, thruster types, system power levels, and electronics coldplate temperatures. The end-to-end PMAD model described is based on the direct use of the alternator voltage and frequency for transmitting power to either ion or MPD thrusters. This low frequency transmission approach was compared with dc and high frequency ac designs, and determined to have the lowest mass, highest efficiency, highest reliability and lowest development costs. While its power quality is not as good as that provided by a high frequency system, it was considered adequate for both ion and MPD engine applications. The low frequency architecture will be used as the reference in future NEP PMAD studies.

  9. Power conditioning system modelling for nuclear electric propulsion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metcalf, Kenneth J.

    1993-11-01

    NASA LeRC is currently developing a Fortran based model of a complete nuclear electric propulsion (NEP) vehicle that would be used for piloted and cargo missions to the Moon or Mars. The proposed vehicle design will use either a Brayton or K-Rankine power conversion cycle to drive a turbine coupled with a rotary alternator. Two thruster types are also being studied, ion and magnetoplasmadynamic (MPD). In support of this NEP model, Rocketdyne developed a power management and distribution (PMAD) subroutine that provides parametric outputs for selected alternator operating voltages and frequencies, thruster types, system power levels, and electronics coldplate temperatures. The end-to-end PMAD model described is based on the direct use of the alternator voltage and frequency for transmitting power to either ion or MPD thrusters. This low frequency transmission approach was compared with dc and high frequency ac designs, and determined to have the lowest mass, highest efficiency, highest reliability and lowest development costs. While its power quality is not as good as that provided by a high frequency system, it was considered adequate for both ion and MPD engine applications. The low frequency architecture will be used as the reference in future NEP PMAD studies.

  10. Nuclear reactor cooling system decontamination reagent regeneration. [PWR; BWR

    DOEpatents

    Anstine, L.D.; James, D.B.; Melaika, E.A.; Peterson, J.P. Jr.

    1980-06-06

    An improved method for decontaminating the coolant system of water-cooled nuclear power reactors and for regenerating the decontamination solution is described. A small amount of one or more weak-acid organic complexing agents is added to the reactor coolant, and the pH is adjusted to form a decontamination solution which is circulated throughout the coolant system to dissolve metal oxides from the interior surfaces and complex the resulting metal ions and radionuclide ions. The coolant containing the complexed metal ions and radionuclide ions is passed through a strong-base anion exchange resin bed which has been presaturated with a solution containing the complexing agents in the same ratio and having the same pH as the decontamination solution. As the decontamination solution passes through the resin bed, metal-complexed anions are exchanged for the metal-ion-free anions on the bed, while metal-ion-free anions in the solution pass through the bed, thus removing the metal ions and regenerating the decontamination solution.

  11. Realistic Development and Testing of Fission System at a Non-Nuclear Testing Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Godfroy, Tom; VanDyke, Melissa; Dickens, Ricky; Pedersen, Kevin; Lenard, Roger; Houts, Mike

    2000-01-01

    The use of resistance heaters to simulate heat from fission allows extensive development of fission systems to be performed in non-nuclear test facilities, saving time and money. Resistance heated tests on a module has been performed at the Marshall Space Flight Center in the Propellant Energy Source Testbed (PEST). This paper discusses the experimental facilities and equipment used for performing resistance heated tests. Recommendations are made for improving non-nuclear test facilities and equipment for simulated testing of nuclear systems.

  12. Realistic development and testing of fission systems at a non-nuclear testing facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godfroy, Tom; van Dyke, Melissa; Dickens, Ricky; Pedersen, Kevin; Lenard, Roger; Houts, Mike

    2000-01-01

    The use of resistance heaters to simulate heat from fission allows extensive development of fission systems to be performed in non-nuclear test facilities, saving time and money. Resistance heated tests on a module has been performed at the Marshall Space Flight Center in the Propellant Energy Source Testbed (PEST). This paper discusses the experimental facilities and equipment used for performing resistance heated tests. Recommendations are made for improving non-nuclear test facilities and equipment for simulated testing of nuclear systems. .

  13. Analytical relationships of nuclear field and microdosimetric quantities for target fragmentation in tissue systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, John W.; Cucinotta, Francis A.; Hajnal, Ferenc

    1991-01-01

    A simple analytic formula for the nuclear fields formed by target fragmentation in tissue systems is derived using the continuous slowing down approximation (CSDA). The energy fluctuations in sensitive localized sites within the tissue system caused by these nuclear events are defined by microdosimetry. In that CSDA is used, the energy fluctuations exclude the role of secondary electrons. The relations also relate to the response of microdosimetric devices to nuclear fragmentation fields.

  14. An introduction to the design, commissioning and operation of nuclear air cleaning systems for Qinshan Nuclear Power Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Xinliang Chen; Jiangang Qu; Minqi Shi

    1995-02-01

    This paper introduces the design evolution, system schemes and design and construction of main nuclear air cleaning components such as HEPA filter, charcoal adsorber and concrete housing etc. for Qinshan 300MW PWR Nuclear Power Plant (QNPP), the first indigenously designed and constructed nuclear power plant in China. The field test results and in-service test results, since the air cleaning systems were put into operation 18 months ago, are presented and evaluated. These results demonstrate that the design and construction of the air cleaning systems and equipment manufacturing for QNPP are successful and the American codes and standards invoked in design, construction and testing of nuclear air cleaning systems for QNPP are applicable in China. The paper explains that the leakage rate of concrete air cleaning housings can also be assured if sealing measures are taken properly and embedded parts are designed carefully in the penetration areas of the housing and that the uniformity of the airflow distribution upstream the HEPA filters can be achieved generally no matter how inlet and outlet ducts of air cleaning unit are arranged.

  15. Nuclear localization signals for four distinct karyopherin-β nuclear import systems.

    PubMed

    Soniat, Michael; Chook, Yuh Min

    2015-06-15

    The Karyopherin-β family of proteins mediates nuclear transport of macromolecules. Nuclear versus cytoplasmic localization of proteins is often suggested by the presence of NLSs (nuclear localization signals) or NESs (nuclear export signals). Import-Karyopherin-βs or Importins bind to NLSs in their protein cargos to transport them through nuclear pore complexes into the nucleus. Until recently, only two classes of NLS had been biochemically and structurally characterized: the classical NLS, which is recognized by the Importin-α/β heterodimer and the PY-NLS (proline-tyrosine NLS), which is recognized by Karyopherin-β2 or Transportin-1. Structures of two other Karyopherin-βs, Kap121 and Transportin-SR2, in complex with their respective cargos were reported for the first time recently, revealing two new distinct classes of NLSs. The present paper briefly describes the classical NLS, reviews recent literature on the PY-NLS and provides in-depth reviews of the two newly discovered classes of NLSs that bind Kap121p and Transportin-SR respectively.

  16. The ARAUCARIA project. OGLE-LMC-CEP-1718: An exotic eclipsing binary system composed of two classical overtone cepheids in a 413 day orbit

    SciTech Connect

    Gieren, Wolfgang; Pilecki, Bogumił; Pietrzyński, Grzegorz; Graczyk, Dariusz; Gallenne, Alexandre E-mail: pietrzyn@astrouw.edu.pl E-mail: dgallenne@astro-udec.cl; and others

    2014-05-10

    We have obtained extensive high-quality spectroscopic observations of the OGLE-LMC-CEP-1718 eclipsing binary system in the Large Magellanic Cloud that Soszyński et al. had identified as a candidate system for containing two classical Cepheids in orbit. Our spectroscopic data clearly demonstrate binary motion of the Cepheids in a 413 day eccentric orbit, rendering this eclipsing binary system the first ever known to consist of 2 classical Cepheid variables. After disentangling the four different radial velocity variations in the system, we present the orbital solution and the individual pulsational radial velocity curves of the Cepheids. We show that both Cepheids are extremely likely to be first overtone pulsators and determine their respective dynamical masses, which turn out to be equal to within 1.5%. Since the secondary eclipse is not observed in the orbital light curve, we cannot derive the individual radii of the Cepheids, but the sum of their radii derived from the photometry is consistent with overtone pulsation for both variables. The existence of two equal-mass Cepheids in a binary system having different pulsation periods (1.96 and 2.48 days, respectively) may pose an interesting challenge to stellar evolution and pulsation theories, and a more detailed study of this system using additional data sets should yield deeper insight about the physics of stellar evolution of Cepheid variables. Future analysis of the system using additional near-infrared photometry might also lead to a better understanding of the systematic uncertainties in current Baade-Wesselink techniques of distance determinations to Cepheid variables.

  17. Exotic Baryon Resonances in the Skyrme Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diakonov, Dmitri; Petrov, Victor

    We outline how one can understand the Skyrme model from the modern perspective. We review the quantization of the SU(3) rotations of the Skyrmion, leading to the exotic baryons that cannot be made of three quarks. It is shown that in the limit of large number of colors the lowest-mass exotic baryons can be studied from the kaon-Skyrmion scattering amplitudes, an approach known after Callan and Klebanov. We follow this approach and find, both analytically and numerically, a strong Θ+ resonance in the scattering amplitude that is traced to the rotational mode. The Skyrme model does predict an exotic resonance Θ+ but grossly overestimates the width. To understand better the factors affecting the width, it is computed by several methods giving, however, identical results. In particular, we show that insofar as the width is small, it can be found from the transition axial constant. The physics leading to a narrow Θ+ resonance is briefly reviewed and affirmed.

  18. Issues and opportunities in exotic hadrons

    DOE PAGES

    Briceno, Raul A.; Cohen, Thomas D.; Coito, S.; ...

    2016-04-01

    The last few years have been witness to a proliferation of new results concerning heavy exotic hadrons. Experimentally, many new signals have been discovered that could be pointing towards the existence of tetraquarks, pentaquarks, and other exotic configurations of quarks and gluons. Theoretically, advances in lattice field theory techniques place us at the cusp of understanding complex coupled-channel phenomena, modelling grows more sophisticated, and effective field theories are being applied to an ever greater range of situations. Consequently, it is thus an opportune time to evaluate the status of the field. In the following, a series of high priority experimentalmore » and theoretical issues concerning heavy exotic hadrons is presented.« less

  19. Novel chemistry of invasive exotic plants

    PubMed Central

    Cappuccino, Naomi; Arnason, J.Thor

    2006-01-01

    Of the many exotic plants that have become naturalized in North America, only a small proportion are pests capable of invading and dominating intact natural communities. In the present study, we tested the hypothesis that the most invasive plants are phytochemically unique in their new habitats. A comparison of exotic plant species that are highly invasive in North America with exotics that are widespread, but non-invasive revealed that the invasive plants were more likely to have potent secondary compounds that have not been reported from North American native plants. On average, the compounds found in the invasive plants were reported from fewer species, fewer genera and fewer families than those from non-invasive plants. Many of the unique phytochemicals from invasive plants have been reported to have multiple activities, including antiherbivore, antifungal, antimicrobial and allelopathic (phytotoxic) effects, which may provide the plants with several advantages in their new environments. PMID:17148359

  20. The Nuclear Detonation Detection System on the GPS satellites

    SciTech Connect

    Higbie, P.R.; Blocker, N.K.

    1993-07-27

    This article begins with a historical perspective of satellite usage in monitoring nuclear detonations. Current capabilities of the 24 GPS satellites in detecting the light, gamma rays, x-rays and neutrons from a nuclear explosion are described. In particular, an optical radiometer developed at Sandia National Laboratories is characterized. Operational information and calibration procedures are emphasized.

  1. Nuclear proliferation and civilian nuclear power. Report of the Nonproliferation Alternative Systems Assessment Program. Volume IV. Commercial potential

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-06-01

    This volume of the Nonproliferation Alternative Systems Assessment Program (NASAP) report provides time and cost estimates for positioning new nuclear power systems for commercial deployment. The assessment also estimates the rates at which the new systems might penetrate the domestic market, assuming the continuing viability of the massive light-water reactor network that now exists worldwide. This assessment does not recommend specific, detailed program plans and budgets for individual systems; however, it is clear from this analysis that any of the systems investigated could be deployed if dictated by national interest.

  2. Space nuclear power system and the design of the nuclear electric propulsion OTV

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buden, D.; Garrison, P. W.

    1984-01-01

    Payload increases of three to five times that of the Shuttle/Centaur can be achieved using nuclear electric propulsion. Various nuclear power plant options being pursued by the SP-100 Program are described. These concepts can grow from 100 kWe to 1 MWe output. Spacecraft design aspects are addressed, including thermal interactions, plume interactions, and radiation fluences. A baseline configuration is described accounting for these issues. Safety aspects of starting the OTV transfer from an altitude of 300 km indicate no significant additional risk to the biosphere.

  3. Space nuclear power system and the design of the nuclear electric propulsion OTV

    SciTech Connect

    Buden, D.; Garrison, P.W.

    1984-01-01

    Payload increases of three to five times that of the Shuttle/Centaur can be achieved using nuclear electric propulsion. Various nuclear power plant options being pursued by the SP-100 Program are described. These concepts can grow from 100 kW/sub e/ to 1MW/sub e/ output. Spacecraft design aspects are addressed, including thermal interactions, plume interactions, and radiation fluences. A baseline configuration is described accounting for these issues. Safety aspects of starting the OTV transfer from an altitude of 300 km indicate no significant additional risk to the biosphere.

  4. Cooling of Magnetars with Exotic Matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasutake, Nobutoshi; Noda, Tsuneo; Fujisawa, Kotaro; Kotake, Kei; Shigeyama, Toshikazu

    Thermal evolutions of magnetars are studied concerned with effects of exotic matter. All results are shown in two spatial dimensions for comparison with observational results by NuSTAR, NICER etc. in near future. Thermal conduction of envelope/crust in magnetars is affected by the strong magnetic field, and it could be an origin of hot/cold spots, which are expressed well with the two black body fitting. This study also stresses effects of the equation of state, on which the cooling processes, the thermal conductivity, and the heat capacity strongly depend. Exotic matter changes thermal evolutions of magnetars drastically, hence the effects could be detected in observations.

  5. 77 FR 50727 - Configuration Management Plans for Digital Computer Software Used in Safety Systems of Nuclear...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-22

    ... COMMISSION Configuration Management Plans for Digital Computer Software Used in Safety Systems of Nuclear... draft regulatory guide (DG), DG-1206, ``Configuration Management Plan for Digital Computer Software Used... Digital Computer Software Used in Safety Systems of Nuclear Power Plants'' is temporarily identified...

  6. 75 FR 11136 - Federal Advisory Committee; U.S. Nuclear Command and Control System Comprehensive Review...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-10

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE Office of the Secretary Federal Advisory Committee; U.S. Nuclear Command and Control System Comprehensive.... Nuclear Command and Control System Comprehensive Review Committee. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT:...

  7. Comparison of solar photovoltaic and nuclear reactor power systems for a human-tended lunar observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hickman, J. M.; Bloomfield, H. S.

    1989-01-01

    Photovoltaic and nuclear surface power systems were examined at the 20 to 100 kW power level range for use at a human-tended lunar astronomical observatory, and estimates of the power system masses were made. One system, consisting of an SP-100 thermoelectric nuclear power supply integrated with a lunar lander, is recommended for further study due to its low system mass, potential for modular growth, and applicability to other surface power missions, particularly in the Martian system.

  8. Comparison of solar photovoltaic and nuclear reactor power systems for a human-tended lunar observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hickman, J. M.; Bloomfield, H. S.

    1989-01-01

    Photovoltaic and nuclear surface power systems were examined at the 20 to 100 kW power level range for use at a human-tended lunar astronomical observatory, andestimates of the power system masses were made. One system, consisting of an SP-100 thermoelectric nuclear power supply integrated with a lunar lander, is recommended for further study due to its low system mass, potential for modular growth, and applicability to other surface power missions, particularly in the Martian system.

  9. 10 CFR 50.69 - Risk-informed categorization and treatment of structures, systems and components for nuclear...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ..., systems and components for nuclear power reactors. 50.69 Section 50.69 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY..., systems and components for nuclear power reactors. (a) Definitions. Risk-Informed Safety Class (RISC)-1... holder of a license to operate a light water reactor (LWR) nuclear power plant under this part; a...

  10. 10 CFR 50.69 - Risk-informed categorization and treatment of structures, systems and components for nuclear...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ..., systems and components for nuclear power reactors. 50.69 Section 50.69 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY..., systems and components for nuclear power reactors. (a) Definitions. Risk-Informed Safety Class (RISC)-1... holder of a license to operate a light water reactor (LWR) nuclear power plant under this part; a...

  11. 10 CFR 50.69 - Risk-informed categorization and treatment of structures, systems and components for nuclear...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ..., systems and components for nuclear power reactors. 50.69 Section 50.69 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY..., systems and components for nuclear power reactors. (a) Definitions. Risk-Informed Safety Class (RISC)-1... holder of a license to operate a light water reactor (LWR) nuclear power plant under this part; a...

  12. 10 CFR 50.69 - Risk-informed categorization and treatment of structures, systems and components for nuclear...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ..., systems and components for nuclear power reactors. 50.69 Section 50.69 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY..., systems and components for nuclear power reactors. (a) Definitions. Risk-Informed Safety Class (RISC)-1... holder of a license to operate a light water reactor (LWR) nuclear power plant under this part; a...

  13. 10 CFR 50.69 - Risk-informed categorization and treatment of structures, systems and components for nuclear...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ..., systems and components for nuclear power reactors. 50.69 Section 50.69 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY..., systems and components for nuclear power reactors. (a) Definitions. Risk-Informed Safety Class (RISC)-1... holder of a license to operate a light water reactor (LWR) nuclear power plant under this part; a...

  14. Nuclear Science Symposium, 4th, and Nuclear Power Systems Symposium, 9th, San Francisco, Calif., October 19-21, 1977, Proceedings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    Consideration is given to the following types of high energy physics instrumentation: drift chambers, multiwire proportional chambers, calorimeters, optical detectors, ionization and scintillation detectors, solid state detectors, and electronic and digital subsystems. Attention is also paid to reactor instrumentation, nuclear medicine instrumentation, data acquisition systems for nuclear instrumentation, microprocessor applications in nuclear science, environmental instrumentation, control and instrumentation of nuclear power generating stations, and radiation monitoring. Papers are also presented on instrumentation for the High Energy Astronomy Observatory.

  15. Closed Brayton cycle power conversion systems for nuclear reactors :

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, Steven A.; Lipinski, Ronald J.; Vernon, Milton E.; Sanchez, Travis

    2006-04-01

    This report describes the results of a Sandia National Laboratories internally funded research program to study the coupling of nuclear reactors to gas dynamic Brayton power conversion systems. The research focused on developing integrated dynamic system models, fabricating a 10-30 kWe closed loop Brayton cycle, and validating these models by operating the Brayton test-loop. The work tasks were performed in three major areas. First, the system equations and dynamic models for reactors and Closed Brayton Cycle (CBC) systems were developed and implemented in SIMULINKTM. Within this effort, both steady state and dynamic system models for all the components (turbines, compressors, reactors, ducting, alternators, heat exchangers, and space based radiators) were developed and assembled into complete systems for gas cooled reactors, liquid metal reactors, and electrically heated simulators. Various control modules that use proportional-integral-differential (PID) feedback loops for the reactor and the power-conversion shaft speed were also developed and implemented. The simulation code is called RPCSIM (Reactor Power and Control Simulator). In the second task an open cycle commercially available Capstone C30 micro-turbine power generator was modified to provide a small inexpensive closed Brayton cycle test loop called the Sandia Brayton test-Loop (SBL-30). The Capstone gas-turbine unit housing was modified to permit the attachment of an electrical heater and a water cooled chiller to form a closed loop. The Capstone turbine, compressor, and alternator were used without modification. The Capstone systems nominal operating point is 1150 K turbine inlet temperature at 96,000 rpm. The annular recuperator and portions of the Capstone control system (inverter) and starter system also were reused. The rotational speed of the turbo-machinery is controlled by adjusting the alternator load by using the electrical grid as the load bank. The SBL-30 test loop was operated at

  16. Two-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance of quadrupolar systems

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Shuanhu

    1997-09-01

    This dissertation describes two-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance theory and experiments which have been developed to study quadruples in the solid state. The technique of multiple-quantum magic-angle spinning (MQMAS) is extensively reviewed and expanded upon in this thesis. Specifically, MQMAS is first compared with another technique, dynamic-angle spinning (DAS). The similarity between the two techniques allows us to extend much of the DAS work to the MQMAS case. Application of MQMAS to a series of aluminum containing materials is then presented. The superior resolution enhancement through MQMAS is exploited to detect the five- and six-coordinated aluminum in many aluminosilicate glasses. Combining the MQMAS method with other experiments, such as HETCOR, greatly expands the possibility of the use of MQMAS to study a large range of problems and is demonstrated in Chapter 5. Finally, the technique switching-angle spinning (SAS) is applied to quadrupolar nuclei to fully characterize a quadrupolar spin system in which all of the 8 NMR parameters are accurately determined. This dissertation is meant to demonstrate that with the combination of two-dimensional NMR concepts and new advanced spinning technologies, a series of multiple-dimensional NMR techniques can be designed to allow a detailed study of quadrupolar nuclei in the solid state.

  17. Monitoring system for a liquid-cooled nuclear fission reactor

    DOEpatents

    DeVolpi, Alexander

    1987-01-01

    A monitoring system for detecting changes in the liquid levels in various regions of a water-cooled nuclear power reactor, viz., in the downcomer, in the core, in the inlet and outlet plenums, at the head, and elsewhere; and also for detecting changes in the density of the liquid in these regions. A plurality of gamma radiation detectors are used, arranged vertically along the outside of the reactor vessel, and collimator means for each detector limits the gamma-radiation it receives as emitting from only isolated regions of the vessel. Excess neutrons produced by the fission reaction will be captured by the water coolant, by the steel reactor walls, or by the fuel or control structures in the vessel. Neutron capture by steel generates gamma radiation having an energy level of the order of 5-12 MeV, whereas neutron capture by water provides an energy level of approximately 2.2 MeV, and neutron capture by the fission fuel or its cladding provides an energy level of 1 MeV or less. The intensity of neutron capture thus changes significantly at any water-metal interface. Comparative analysis of adjacent gamma detectors senses changes from the normal condition with liquid coolant present to advise of changes in the presence and/or density of the coolant at these specific regions. The gamma detectors can also sense fission-product gas accumulation at the reactor head to advise of a failure of fuel-pin cladding.

  18. Pipe support for use in a nuclear system

    DOEpatents

    Pollono, Louis P.; Mello, Raymond M.

    1977-01-01

    A pipe support for high temperature, thin-walled vertical piping runs used in a nuclear system. A cylindrical pipe transition member, having the same inside diameter as the thin-walled piping, replaces a portion of the piping where support is desired. The outside diameter of the pipe transition member varies axially along its vertical dimension. For a section of the axial length adjacent the upper and lower terminations of the pipe transition member, the outside diameter is the same as the outside diameter of the thin-walled piping to which it is affixed. Intermediate of the termination sections, the outside diameter increases from the top of the member to the bottom. Adjacent the lower termination section, the diameter abruptly becomes the same as the piping. Thus, the cylindrical transition member is formed to have a generally triangular shaped cross-section along the axial dimension. Load-bearing insulation is installed next to the periphery of the member and is kept in place by an outer ring clamp. The outer ring clamp is connected to pipe hangers, which provide the desired support for the vertical thin-walled piping runs.

  19. Nuclear spin selection rules for reactive collision systems by the spin-modification probability method.

    PubMed

    Park, Kisam; Light, John C

    2007-12-14

    The spin-modification probability (SMP) method, which provides fundamental and detailed quantitative information on the nuclear spin selection rules, is discussed more systematically and generalized for reactive collision systems involving more than one configuration of reactant and product molecules, explicitly taking account of the conservation of the overall nuclear spin symmetry as well as the conservation of the total nuclear spin angular momentum, under the assumption of no nuclear hyperfine interaction. The values of SMP once calculated can be used for any system of identical nuclei of any spin as long as the system has the corresponding nuclear spin symmetry. The values of SMP calculated for simple systems can also be used for more complex systems containing several kinds of identical nuclei or various isotopomers. The generalized formulation of statistical scattering theory which can easily represent various rearrangement mechanisms is also presented.

  20. [Socio-psychological and ecological aspects within the system of nuclear radiation risk mitigation].

    PubMed

    Davydov, B I; Ushakov, I B; Zuev, V G

    2004-01-01

    The authors bring into light several aspects of nuclear radiation risks, i.e. physical safety of nuclear technologies and ecology, place of operator within the nuclear radiation safety system (proficiency, protective culture, safety guides) and consider approaches to the human factor quantification within the system of mitigation of risks from nuclear technologies, and IAEA recommendations on probable risk estimation. Future investigations should be aimed at extension of the radiation sensitivity threshold, personnel selection as by psychological so genetic testing for immunity to ionizing radiation, development of pharmachemical and physical protectors and methods of enhancing nonspecific resistance to extreme, including radiation, environments, and building of radiation event simulators for training.

  1. Applied Nuclear Accountability Systems: A Case Study in the System Architecture and Development of NuMAC

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, Andrea Beth

    2004-07-01

    This is a case study of the NuMAC nuclear accountability system developed at a private fuel fabrication facility. This paper investigates nuclear material accountability and safeguards by researching expert knowledge applied in the system design and development. Presented is a system developed to detect and deter the theft of weapons grade nuclear material. Examined is the system architecture that includes: issues for the design and development of the system; stakeholder issues; how the system was built and evolved; software design, database design, and development tool considerations; security and computing ethics. (author)

  2. Uncanistered Spent Nuclear fuel Disposal Container System Description Document

    SciTech Connect

    2000-10-12

    The Uncanistered Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Disposal Container System supports the confinement and isolation of waste within the Engineered Barrier System of the Monitored Geologic Repository (MGR). Disposal containers are loaded with intact uncanistered assemblies and/or individually canistered SNF assemblies and sealed in the surface waste handling facilities, transferred to the underground through the access drifts, and emplaced in the emplacement drifts. The Uncanistered SNF Disposal Container provides long-term confinement of the commercial SNF placed inside, and withstands the loading, transfer, emplacement, and retrieval loads and environments. The Uncanistered SNF Disposal Container System provides containment of waste for a designated period of time, and limits radionuclide release. The disposal container maintains the waste in a designated configuration, withstands maximum handling and rockfall loads, limits the individual SNF assembly temperatures after emplacement, limits the introduction of moderator into the disposal container during the criticality control period, resists corrosion in the expected handling and repository environments, and provides containment of waste in the event of an accident. Multiple boiling water reactor (BWR) and pressurized water reactor (PWR) disposal container designs are needed to accommodate the expected range of spent fuel assemblies and provide long-term confinement of the commercial SNF. The disposal container will include outer and inner cylinder walls, outer cylinder lids (two on the top, one on the bottom), inner cylinder lids (one on the top, one on the bottom), and an internal metallic basket structure. Exterior labels will provide a means by which to identify the disposal container and its contents. The two metal cylinders, in combination with the cladding, Emplacement Drift System, drip shield, and natural barrier, will support the design philosophy of defense-in-depth. The use of materials with different

  3. Molten Chloride Salts for Heat Transfer in Nuclear Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ambrosek, James Wallace

    2011-12-01

    A forced convection loop was designed and constructed to examine the thermal-hydraulic performance of molten KCl-MgCl2 (68-32 at %) salt for use in nuclear co-generation facilities. As part of this research, methods for prediction of the thermo-physical properties of salt mixtures for selection of the coolant salt were studied. In addition, corrosion studies of 10 different alloys were exposed to the KCl-MgCl2 to determine a suitable construction material for the loop. Using experimental data found in literature for unary and binary salt systems, models were found, or developed to extrapolate the available experimental data to unstudied salt systems. These property models were then used to investigate the thermo-physical properties of the LINO3-NaNO3-KNO 3-Ca(NO3), system used in solar energy applications. Using these models, the density, viscosity, adiabatic compressibility, thermal conductivity, heat capacity, and melting temperatures of higher order systems can be approximated. These models may be applied to other molten salt systems. Coupons of 10 different alloys were exposed to the chloride salt for 100 hours at 850°C was undertaken to help determine with which alloy to construct the loop. Of the alloys exposed, Haynes 230 had the least amount of weight loss per area. Nickel and Hastelloy N performed best based on maximum depth of attack. Inconel 625 and 718 had a nearly uniform depletion of Cr from the surface of the sample. All other alloys tested had depletion of Cr along the grain boundaries. The Nb in Inconel 625 and 718 changed the way the Cr is depleted in these alloys. Grain-boundary engineering (GBE) of Incoloy 800H improved the corrosion resistance (weight loss and maximum depth of attack) by nearly 50% as compared to the as-received Incoloy 800H sample. A high temperature pump, thermal flow meter, and pressure differential device was designed, constructed and tested for use in the loop, The heat transfer of the molten chloride salt was found to

  4. Detnex Project: Dispersion, Structure and Tracking of Exotic Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alvarez, M. A. G.; Gómez-Camacho, J.; Espino, J. M.; Mukha, I.; Martel, I.

    2007-05-01

    Since 1970's when double-folding model, based on M3Y interaction, had to be renormalized to fit the elastic scattering of weakly bound 6,7Li and 9Be nuclei, we learned that preconceptions based on the highly successful experience of the optical model on stable nuclei could not be simply extrapolated to the scattering of exotic nuclei. Recently, we have shown some evidences of long range mechanisms in 6He induced reactions that lead to the loss of flux in the elastic channel at kinematic conditions that suggest the nuclei are well beyond the strong absorption radius [O. R. Kakuee, M. A. G. Alvarez, M. V. Andrés, S. Cherubini, T. Davinson, A. Di Pietro, W. Galster, J. Gómez-Camacho, A. M. Laird, M. Lamehi-Rachti, I. Martel, A. M. Moro, J. Rahighi, A. M. Sánchez-Benitez, A. C. Shotter, W. B. Smith, J. Vervier, P. J. Woods. Nucl. Phys. A 765, (2006) 294]. Even so, the use of nuclear reactions as an spectroscopic tool to investigate the nuclear structure of weakly bound nuclei requires a deep understanding of the reactions induced by these nuclei. Therefore, precise experimental measurements of the elastic scattering of exotic nuclei on a variety of targets, as well as the measurements of the main reaction channels are required in order to converge experimentally and theoretically to this understanding. With this aim a campaign of experiments involving different institutions and collaborations is being carefully established and going ahead at several radioactive ion beam (RIB) facilities: ISOLDE (CERN), CRC (Be), GSI (Ge) and TRIUMPH (Ca). The main idea is to measure the scattering of He, Li, and Be isotopes, and perform an intensive theoretical treatment, besides promoting some necessary instrumental development. In particular we participate in the low energy branch of the FAIR project where we take part in the tracking studies and developments.

  5. EXFOR SYSTEMS MANUAL NUCLEAR REACTION DATA EXCHANGE FORMAT.

    SciTech Connect

    MCLANE,V.; NUCLEAR DATA CENTER NETWORK

    2000-05-19

    EXFOR is an exchange format designed to allow transmission of nuclear reaction data between the members of the Nuclear Data Centers Network. This document has been written for use by the members of the Network and includes matters of procedure and protocol, as well as detailed rules for the compilation of data. Users may prefer to consult EXFOR Basics' for a brief description of the format.

  6. Phenology of cheatgrass and associated exotic weeds

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cheatgrass (Bromus tectorum), is an exotic, highly invasive annual grass that has dramatically changed the aspect and ecological functions of vast areas of formerly big sagebrush/bunchgrass and salt desert rangelands in the Intermountain west. Cheatgrass increases the chance of ignition, rate of spr...

  7. Eye Removal Surgeries in Exotic Pets.

    PubMed

    Diehl, Kathryn A; McKinnon, Jo-Ann

    2016-01-01

    This article covers considerations and techniques of eye removal surgeries in exotic pets. After issues including surgical indications, anesthesia, patient preparation, and instrumentation are explored, surgical techniques are described. Enucleation/exenteration and modified evisceration are discussed, with species-specific nuances of small mammals, birds, reptiles, snakes, amphibians, and fish highlighted.

  8. Exotic Gauge Bosons in the 331 Model

    SciTech Connect

    Romero, D.; Ravinez, O.; Diaz, H.; Reyes, J.

    2009-04-30

    We analize the bosonic sector of the 331 model which contains exotic leptons, quarks and bosons (E,J,U,V) in order to satisfy the weak gauge SU(3){sub L} invariance. We develop the Feynman rules of the entire kinetic bosonic sector which will let us to compute some of the Z(0)' decays modes.

  9. Heat resistant materials and their feasibility issues for a space nuclear transportation system

    SciTech Connect

    Olsen, C.S.

    1991-01-01

    A number of nuclear propulsion concepts based on solid-core nuclear propulsion are being evaluated for a nuclear propulsion transportation system to support the Space Exploration Initiative (SEI) involving the reestablishment of a manned lunar base and the subsequent exploration of Mars. These systems will require high-temperature materials to meet the operating conditions with appropriate reliability and safety built into these systems through the selection and testing of appropriate materials. The application of materials for nuclear thermal propulsion (NTP) and nuclear electric propulsion (NEP) systems and the feasibility issues identified for their use will be discussed. Some mechanical property measurements have been obtained, and compatibility tests were conducted to help identify feasibility issues. 3 refs., 1 fig., 4 tabs.

  10. New Experiments with Stored Exotic Nuclei at the FRS-ESR Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Geissel, H.

    2009-08-26

    High accuracy mass and novel nuclear lifetime measurements have been performed with bare and few-electron ions produced via projectile fragmentation and fission, separated in flight and stored at relativistic energies. Characteristic experimental results and new developments are reviewed. A new generation of studies with exotic nuclei will be possible with the advent of the proposed international Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR)

  11. The NJOY nuclear data processing system: Volume 2, The NJOY, RECONR, BROADR, HEATR, and THERMR modules

    SciTech Connect

    MacFarlane, R.E.; Muir, D.W.; Boicourt, R.M.

    1982-05-01

    The NJOY nuclear data processing system is a comprehensive computer code package for producing cross sections and related nuclear parameters from ENDF/B evaluated nuclear data. This volume provides detailed descriptions of the NJOY module, which contains the executive program and utility subroutines used by the other modules, and it discusses the theory and computational methods of four of the modules used for producing pointwise cross sections: RECONR, BROADR, HEATR, and THERMR.

  12. Exotic annual grass alters fuel amounts, continuity and moisture content

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    1. Invasion by exotic plants are one of the most serious threats to native plant communities, biodiversity, and ecosystem functioning. Of particular concern are exotic plants that alter disturbance regimes. Exotic annual grasses are believed to increase wildfire frequency to the detriment of nativ...

  13. A Spouted Bed Reactor Monitoring System for Particulate Nuclear Fuel

    SciTech Connect

    D. S. Wendt; R. L. Bewley; W. E. Windes

    2007-06-01

    Conversion and coating of particle nuclear fuel is performed in spouted (fluidized) bed reactors. The reactor must be capable of operating at temperatures up to 2000°C in inert, flammable, and coating gas environments. The spouted bed reactor geometry is defined by a graphite retort with a 2.5 inch inside diameter, conical section with a 60° included angle, and a 4 mm gas inlet orifice diameter through which particles are removed from the reactor at the completion of each run. The particles may range from 200 µm to 2 mm in diameter. Maintaining optimal gas flow rates slightly above the minimum spouting velocity throughout the duration of each run is complicated by the variation of particle size and density as conversion and/or coating reactions proceed in addition to gas composition and temperature variations. In order to achieve uniform particle coating, prevent agglomeration of the particle bed, and monitor the reaction progress, a spouted bed monitoring system was developed. The monitoring system includes a high-sensitivity, low-response time differential pressure transducer paired with a signal processing, data acquisition, and process control unit which allows for real-time monitoring and control of the spouted bed reactor. The pressure transducer is mounted upstream of the spouted bed reactor gas inlet. The gas flow into the reactor induces motion of the particles in the bed and prevents the particles from draining from the reactor due to gravitational forces. Pressure fluctuations in the gas inlet stream are generated as the particles in the bed interact with the entering gas stream. The pressure fluctuations are produced by bulk movement of the bed, generation and movement of gas bubbles through the bed, and the individual motion of particles and particle subsets in the bed. The pressure fluctuations propagate upstream to the pressure transducer where they can be monitored. Pressure fluctuation, mean differential pressure, gas flow rate, reactor

  14. Nuclear electric propulsion: A better, safer, cheaper transportation system for human exploration of Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, John S.; George, Jeffrey A.; Gefert, Leon P.; Doherty, Michael P.; Sefcik, Robert J.

    1994-03-01

    NASA has completed a preliminary mission and systems study of nuclear electric propulsion (NEP) systems for 'split-sprint' human exploration and related robotic cargo missions to Mars. This paper describes the study, the mission architecture selected, the NEP system and technology development needs, proposed development schedules, and estimated development costs. Since current administration policy makers have delayed funding for key technology development activities that could make Mars exploration missions a reality in the near future, NASA will have time to evaluate various alternate mission options, and it appears prudent to ensure that Mars mission plans focus on astronaut and mission safety, while reducing costs to acceptable levels. The split-sprint nuclear electric propulsion system offers trip times comparable to nuclear thermal propulsion (NTP) systems, while providing mission abort opportunities that are not possible with 'reference' mission architectures. Thus, NEP systems offer short transit times for the astronauts, reducing the exposure of the crew to intergalactic cosmic radiation. The high specific impulse of the NEP system, which leads to very low propellant requirements, results in significantly lower 'initial mass in low earth orbit' (IMLEO). Launch vehicle packaging studies show that the NEP system can be launched, assembled, and deployed, with about one less 240-metric-ton heavy lift launch vehicle (HLLV) per mission opportunity - a very Technology development cost of the nuclear reactor for an NEP system would be shared with the proposed nuclear surface power systems, since nuclear systems will be required to provide substantial electrical power on the surface of Mars. The NEP development project plan proposed includes evolutionary technology development for nuclear electric propulsion systems that expands upon SP-100 (Space Power - 100 kw(e)) technology that has been developed for lunar and Mars surface nuclear power, and small NEP systems

  15. Nuclear electric propulsion: A better, safer, cheaper transportation system for human exploration of Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, John S.; George, Jeffrey A.; Gefert, Leon P.; Doherty, Michael P.; Sefcik, Robert J.

    1994-01-01

    NASA has completed a preliminary mission and systems study of nuclear electric propulsion (NEP) systems for 'split-sprint' human exploration and related robotic cargo missions to Mars. This paper describes the study, the mission architecture selected, the NEP system and technology development needs, proposed development schedules, and estimated development costs. Since current administration policy makers have delayed funding for key technology development activities that could make Mars exploration missions a reality in the near future, NASA will have time to evaluate various alternate mission options, and it appears prudent to ensure that Mars mission plans focus on astronaut and mission safety, while reducing costs to acceptable levels. The split-sprint nuclear electric propulsion system offers trip times comparable to nuclear thermal propulsion (NTP) systems, while providing mission abort opportunities that are not possible with 'reference' mission architectures. Thus, NEP systems offer short transit times for the astronauts, reducing the exposure of the crew to intergalactic cosmic radiation. The high specific impulse of the NEP system, which leads to very low propellant requirements, results in significantly lower 'initial mass in low earth orbit' (IMLEO). Launch vehicle packaging studies show that the NEP system can be launched, assembled, and deployed, with about one less 240-metric-ton heavy lift launch vehicle (HLLV) per mission opportunity - a very Technology development cost of the nuclear reactor for an NEP system would be shared with the proposed nuclear surface power systems, since nuclear systems will be required to provide substantial electrical power on the surface of Mars. The NEP development project plan proposed includes evolutionary technology development for nuclear electric propulsion systems that expands upon SP-100 (Space Power - 100 kw(e)) technology that has been developed for lunar and Mars surface nuclear power, and small NEP systems

  16. Basic Research Needs for Advanced Nuclear Systems. Report of the Basic Energy Sciences Workshop on Basic Research Needs for Advanced Nuclear Energy Systems, July 31-August 3, 2006

    SciTech Connect

    Roberto, J.; Diaz de la Rubia, T.; Gibala, R.; Zinkle, S.; Miller, J.R.; Pimblott, S.; Burns, C.; Raymond, K.; Grimes, R.; Pasamehmetoglu, K.; Clark, S.; Ewing, R.; Wagner, A.; Yip, S.; Buchanan, M.; Crabtree, G.; Hemminger, J.; Poate, J.; Miller, J.C.; Edelstein, N.; Fitzsimmons, T.; Gruzalski, G.; Michaels, G.; Morss, L.; Peters, M.; Talamini, K.

    2006-10-01

    -ray sources, neutron sources, nanoscale science research centers, and supercomputers, offer the opportunity to transform and accelerate the fundamental materials and chemical sciences that underpin technology development for advanced nuclear energy systems. The fundamental challenge is to understand and control chemical and physical phenomena in multi-component systems from femto-seconds to millennia, at temperatures to 1000?C, and for radiation doses to hundreds of displacements per atom (dpa). This is a scientific challenge of enormous proportions, with broad implications in the materials science and chemistry of complex systems. New understanding is required for microstructural evolution and phase stability under relevant chemical and physical conditions, chemistry and structural evolution at interfaces, chemical behavior of actinide and fission-product solutions, and nuclear and thermomechanical phenomena in fuels and waste forms. First-principles approaches are needed to describe f-electron systems, design molecules for separations, and explain materials failure mechanisms. Nanoscale synthesis and characterization methods are needed to understand and design materials and interfaces with radiation, temperature, and corrosion resistance. Dynamical measurements are required to understand fundamental physical and chemical phenomena. New multiscale approaches are needed to integrate this knowledge into accurate models of relevant phenomena and complex systems across multiple length and time scales.

  17. Principles of Wound Management and Wound Healing in Exotic Pets.

    PubMed

    Mickelson, Megan A; Mans, Christoph; Colopy, Sara A

    2016-01-01

    The care of wounds in exotic animal species can be a challenging endeavor. Special considerations must be made in regard to the animal's temperament and behavior, unique anatomy and small size, and tendency toward secondary stress-related health problems. It is important to assess the entire patient with adequate systemic evaluation and consideration of proper nutrition and husbandry, which could ultimately affect wound healing. This article summarizes the general phases of wound healing, factors that affect healing, and principles of wound management. Emphasis is placed on novel methods of treating wounds and species differences in wound management and healing.

  18. Nuclear Science Symposium, 23rd, Scintillation and Semiconductor Counter Symposium, 15th, and Nuclear Power Systems Symposium, 8th, New Orleans, La., October 20-22, 1976, Proceedings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wagner, L. J.

    1977-01-01

    The volume includes papers on semiconductor radiation detectors of various types, components of radiation detection and dosimetric systems, digital and microprocessor equipment in nuclear industry and science, and a wide variety of applications of nuclear radiation detectors. Semiconductor detectors of X-rays, gamma radiation, heavy ions, neutrons, and other nuclear particles, plastic scintillator arrays, drift chambers, spark wire chambers, and radiation dosimeter systems are reported on. Digital and analog conversion systems, digital data and control systems, microprocessors, and their uses in scientific research and nuclear power plants are discussed. Large-area imaging and biomedical nucleonic instrumentation, nuclear power plant safeguards, reactor instrumentation, nuclear power plant instrumentation, space instrumentation, and environmental instrumentation are dealt with. Individual items are announced in this issue.

  19. Nuclear physics with advanced brilliant gamma beams at ELI-NP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ur, Călin A.; Filipescu, Dan; Gheorghe, Ioana; Iancu, Violeta; Suliman, Gabriel; Teşileanu, Ovidiu

    2016-01-01

    The Extreme Light Infrastructure - Nuclear Physics facility is dedicated to nuclear physics studies with the use of extreme electromagnetic radiation. One of the main research system to be installed and operated in the facility is an outstanding high brilliance gamma beam system. The Gamma Beam System of ELI-NP will produce intense, quasi-monochromatic gamma beams via inverse Compton scattering of short laser pulses on relativistic electron beam pulses. The gamma beams available at ELI-NP will allow for the performance of photo-nuclear reactions aiming to reveal the intimate structure of the atomic nucleus. Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence, photo-fission, photo-disintegration reactions above the particle threshold will be used to study the dipole response of nuclei, the structure of the Pygmy resonances, nuclear processes relevant for astrophysics, production and study of exotic neutron-rich nuclei.

  20. Systems and methods for managing shared-path instrumentation and irradiation targets in a nuclear reactor

    DOEpatents

    Heinold, Mark R.; Berger, John F.; Loper, Milton H.; Runkle, Gary A.

    2015-12-29

    Systems and methods permit discriminate access to nuclear reactors. Systems provide penetration pathways to irradiation target loading and offloading systems, instrumentation systems, and other external systems at desired times, while limiting such access during undesired times. Systems use selection mechanisms that can be strategically positioned for space sharing to connect only desired systems to a reactor. Selection mechanisms include distinct paths, forks, diverters, turntables, and other types of selectors. Management methods with such systems permits use of the nuclear reactor and penetration pathways between different systems and functions, simultaneously and at only distinct desired times. Existing TIP drives and other known instrumentation and plant systems are useable with access management systems and methods, which can be used in any nuclear plant with access restrictions.

  1. An Exotic Species Is the Favorite Prey of a Native Enemy

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yiming; Ke, Zunwei; Wang, Supen; Smith, Geoffrey R.; Liu, Xuan

    2011-01-01

    Although native enemies in an exotic species' new range are considered to affect its ability to invade, few studies have evaluated predation pressures from native enemies on exotic species in their new range. The exotic prey naiveté hypothesis (EPNH) states that exotic species may be at a disadvantage because of its naïveté towards native enemies and, therefore, may suffer higher predation pressures from the enemy than native prey species. Corollaries of this hypothesis include the native enemy preferring exotic species over native species and the diet of the enemy being influenced by the abundance of the exotic species. We comprehensively tested this hypothesis using introduced North American bullfrogs (Lithobates catesbeianus, referred to as bullfrog), a native red-banded snake (Dinodon rufozonatum, the enemy) and four native anuran species in permanent still water bodies as a model system in Daishan, China. We investigated reciprocal recognition between snakes and anuran species (bullfrogs and three common native species) and the diet preference of the snakes for bullfrogs and the three species in laboratory experiments, and the diet preference and bullfrog density in the wild. Bullfrogs are naive to the snakes, but the native anurans are not. However, the snakes can identify bullfrogs as prey, and in fact, prefer bullfrogs over the native anurans in manipulative experiments with and without a control for body size and in the wild, indicating that bullfrogs are subjected to higher predation pressures from the snakes than the native species. The proportion of bullfrogs in the snakes' diet is positively correlated with the abundance of bullfrogs in the wild. Our results provide strong evidence for the EPNH. The results highlight the biological resistance of native enemies to naïve exotic species. PMID:21915306

  2. A Technology Roadmap for Generation IV Nuclear Energy Systems Executive Summary

    SciTech Connect

    2003-03-01

    To meet future energy needs, ten countries--Argentina, Brazil, Canada, France, Japan, the Republic of Korea, the Republic of South Africa, Switzerland, the United Kingdom, and the United States--have agreed on a framework for international cooperation in research for an advanced generation of nuclear energy systems, known as Generation IV. These ten countries have joined together to form the Generation IV International Forum (GIF) to develop future-generation nuclear energy systems that can be licensed, constructed, and operated in a manner that will provide competitively priced and reliable energy products while satisfactorily addressing nuclear safety, waste, proliferation, and public perception concerns. The objective for Generation IV nuclear energy systems is to be available for international deployment before the year 2030, when many of the world's currently operating nuclear power plants will be at or near the end of their operating licenses.

  3. Nuclear Electric Propulsion: A ``Better, Safer, Cheaper'' Transportation System for Human Exploration of Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, John S.; George, Jeffrey A.; Gefert, Leon P.; Doherty, Michael P.; Sefcik, Robert J.

    1994-07-01

    NASA has completed a preliminary mission and systems study of nuclear electric propulsion (NEP) systems for ``split-sprint'' human exploration and related robotic cargo missions to Mars. This paper describes the study, the mission architecture selected, the NEP system and technology development needs, proposed development schedules, and estimated development costs. Since current administration policy makers have delayed funding for key technology development activities that could make Mars exploration missions a reality in the near future, NASA will have time to evaluate various alternate mission options, and it appears prudent to ensure that Mars mission plans focus on astronaut and mission safety, while reducing costs to acceptable levels. The split-sprint nuclear electric propulsion system offers trip times comparable to nuclear thermal propulsion (NTP) systems, while providing mission abort opportunities that are not possible with ``reference'' mission architectures. Thus, NEP systems offer short transit times for the astronauts, reducing the exposure of the crew to intergalactic cosmic radiation. The high specific impulse of the NEP system, which leads to very low propellant requirements, results in significantly lower ``initial mass in low earth orbit'' (IMLEO). Launch vehicle packaging studies show that the NEP system can be launched, assembled, and deployed, with about one less 240-metric-ton heavy lift launch vehicle (HLLV) per mission opportunity - a very large cost savings! Technology development cost of the nuclear reactor for an NEP system would be shared with the proposed nuclear surface power systems, since nuclear systems will be required to provide substantial electrical power on the surface of Mars. The NEP development project plan proposed includes evolutionary technology development for nuclear electric propulsion systems that expands upon SP-100 (Space Power - 100 kw) technology that has been developed for lunar and Mars surface nuclear power

  4. New results on the structure of exotic nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakurai, Hiroyoshi

    2015-04-01

    `Exotic nuclei' far from the stability line are unique objects of many-body quantum system, where ratios of neutron number to proton number are much larger or much smaller than those of nuclei found in nature. Their exotic properties and phenomena emerge from their large isospin asymmetry, and even affect scenarios of nucleosynthesis in universe. One of the exotic emergences is shell evolution. The magic numbers of stable nuclei are known; 2, 8, 20, 28, 50, 82 and 126. However the numbers 8, 20 and 28 have been found no more magic in a neutron-rich region, and new magic numbers such as 6, 16, 32 and 34 have been discovered. To access nuclei far from the stability line, especially neutron-rich nuclei, a large heavy-ion accelerator facility `Radioactive Isotope Beam Factory (RIBF)' was constructed at RIKEN, Japan in 2007. The facility is highly optimized for inflight production of fission fragments via a U beam. The accelerator complex delivers an intense 345 MeV/u U beam. The U nuclide is converted at a target to fission fragments. The fragments of interest are collected and separated at an inflight separator, and are delivered to several experimental devices. The shell evolution programs at RIBF have been conducted with two methods; in-beam gamma spectroscopy and decay spectroscopy. A standard setup of in-beam gamma spectroscopy is combination of a NaI gamma detector array `DALI2' and a beam line spectrometer `ZeroDegree Spectrometer (ZDS)'. Coincidence measurements of de-excitation gamma rays at DALI2 and of reaction products at ZDS make it possible to select reaction channels event-by-event and to observe excited states of exotic nuclei in a specific reaction channel. Recently, a French-made thick liquid hydrogen target system `MINOS' has been introduced to access more neutron-rich nuclei. Isomer and beta-delayed gamma spectroscopy is organized with a Euroball germanium cluster array system `EURICA' and an active silicon stopper In this talk, I would like to

  5. Estimating exotic gene flow into native pine stands: zygotic vs. gametic components.

    PubMed

    Unger, G M; Vendramin, G G; Robledo-Arnuncio, J J

    2014-11-01

    Monitoring contemporary gene flow from widespread exotic plantations is becoming an important problem in forest conservation genetics. In plants, where both seed and pollen disperse, three components of exotic gene flow with potentially unequal consequences should be, but have not been, explicitly distinguished: zygotic, male gametic and female gametic. Building on a previous model for estimating contemporary rates of zygotic and male gametic gene flow among plant populations, we present here an approach that additionally estimates the third (female gametic) gene flow component, based on a combination of uni- and biparentally inherited markers. Using this method and a combined set of chloroplast and nuclear microsatellites, we estimate gene flow rates from exotic plantations into two Iberian relict stands of maritime pine (Pinus pinaster) and Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris). Results show neither zygotic nor female gametic gene flow but moderate (6-8%) male gametic introgression for both species, implying significant dispersal of pollen, but not of seeds, from exotic plantations into native stands shortly after introduced trees reached reproductive maturity. Numerical simulation results suggest that the model yields reasonably accurate estimates for our empirical data sets, especially for larger samples. We discuss conservation management implications of observed levels of exposure to nonlocal genes and identify research needs to determine potentially associated hazards. Our approach should be useful for plant ecologists and ecosystem managers interested in the vectors of contemporary genetic connectivity among discrete plant populations.

  6. Systemic calicivirus epidemic in captive exotic felids.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Tara M; Sikarskie, James; Kruger, John; Wise, Annabel; Mullaney, Thomas P; Kiupel, Matti; Maes, Roger K

    2007-06-01

    A 5-day-old, mother-raised, Amur tiger cub (Panthera tigris altaica) presented with tongue ulcerations. Identical lesions appeared and progressed to sloughing of the tongue in the three littermates of this cub the following day. The lesions progressed in all cubs to include sloughing of the carpal, tarsal, metacarpal, and metatarsal foot pad epithelium. Oral ulcerations were also noted in adult African lions (Panthera leo) and Amur tigers (Panthera tigris altaica), but not in two adult snow leopards (Panthera uncia) housed in the same building. All adult cats had been previously vaccinated for common feline diseases including feline calicivirus (FCV). Detection of FCV RNA in oral secretions by a real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction assay (RRT-PCR) confirmed FCV infection in the tiger cubs and one lion. A male lion and a male tiger cub died during the disease outbreak. RRT-PCR confirmed FCV in multiple tissues in both of these animals. A stray cat live-trapped outside the feline building during the epidemic was found to be positive for FCV by virus isolation and was thought to be the source of infection.

  7. Nuclear Hybrid Energy Systems Initial Integrated Case Study Development and Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Harrison, Thomas J.; Greenwood, Michael Scott

    2016-12-01

    The US Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy established the Nuclear Hybrid Energy System (NHES) project to develop a systematic, rigorous, technically accurate set of methods to model, analyze, and optimize the integration of dispatchable nuclear, fossil, and electric storage with an industrial customer. Ideally, the optimized integration of these systems will provide economic and operational benefits to the overall system compared to independent operation, and it will enhance the stability and responsiveness of the grid as intermittent, nondispatchable, renewable resources provide a greater share of grid power.

  8. 78 FR 64029 - Cost-Benefit Analysis for Radwaste Systems for Light-Water-Cooled Nuclear Power Reactors

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-25

    ... COMMISSION Cost-Benefit Analysis for Radwaste Systems for Light-Water-Cooled Nuclear Power Reactors AGENCY... Systems for Light-Water-Cooled Nuclear Power Reactors,'' in which the NRC made editorial corrections and... analysis for liquid and gaseous radwaste system components for light water nuclear power...

  9. Thermophotovoltaic Energy Conversion in Space Nuclear Reactor Power Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-12-01

    Franklin Chang-Diaz of NASA Johnson’s Advanced Space Propulsion Laboratory led me pursue this topic when he asked about the best way to get megawatts of...wise to remember the words of ADM Hyman G. Rickover, the first Director of Naval Nuclear Propulsion . An academic reactor or reactor plant almost always

  10. Develop an piezoelectric sensing based on SHM system for nuclear dry storage system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Linlin; Lin, Bin; Sun, Xiaoyi; Howden, Stephen; Yu, Lingyu

    2016-04-01

    In US, there are over 1482 dry cask storage system (DCSS) in use storing 57,807 fuel assemblies. Monitoring is necessary to determine and predict the degradation state of the systems and structures. Therefore, nondestructive monitoring is in urgent need and must be integrated into the fuel cycle to quantify the "state of health" for the safe operation of nuclear power plants (NPP) and radioactive waste storage systems (RWSS). Innovative approaches are desired to evaluate the degradation and damage of used fuel containers under extended storage. Structural health monitoring (SHM) is an emerging technology that uses in-situ sensory system to perform rapid nondestructive detection of structural damage as well as long-term integrity monitoring. It has been extensively studied in aerospace engineering over the past two decades. This paper presents the development of a SHM and damage detection methodology based on piezoelectric sensors technologies for steel canisters in nuclear dry cask storage system. Durability and survivability of piezoelectric sensors under temperature influence are first investigated in this work by evaluating sensor capacitance and electromechanical admittance. Toward damage detection, the PES are configured in pitch catch setup to transmit and receive guided waves in plate-like structures. When the inspected structure has damage such as a surface defect, the incident guided waves will be reflected or scattered resulting in changes in the wave measurements. Sparse array algorithm is developed and implemented using multiple sensors to image the structure. The sparse array algorithm is also evaluated at elevated temperature.

  11. Development of a micro nuclear magnetic resonance system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goloshevsky, Artem

    Application of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) to on-line/in-line control of industrial processes is currently limited by equipment costs and requirements for installation. A superconducting magnet generating strong fields is the most expensive part of a typical NMR instrument. In industrial environments, fringe magnetic fields make accommodation of NMR instruments difficult. However, a portable, low-cost and low-field magnetic resonance system can be used in virtually any environment. Development of a number of hardware components for a portable, low-cost NMR instrument is reported in this dissertation. Chapter one provides a discussion on a miniaturized Helmholtz spiral radio-frequency (RF) coil (average diameter equal to 3.5 mm) and an NMR probe built around a capillary (outer diameter = 1.59 mm and inner diameter = 1.02 mm) for flow imaging. Experiments of NMR spectroscopy, static and dynamic (flow) imaging, conducted with the use of the miniaturized coil, are described. Chapter two presents a microfabricated package of two biaxial gradient coils and a Helmholtz RF coil. Planar configuration of discrete wires was used to create magnetic field gradients. Performance of the microfabricated gradient coils while imaging water flow compared well with a commercial gradient set of much larger size. Chapter three reports on flow imaging experiments with power law fluids (aqueous solutions of sodium salt of carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC)) of different viscosities, carried out in the NMR probe with the miniaturized RF coil and capillary. Viscosities of the CMC solutions were determined based on the curve fits of the velocity profiles and simultaneous measurements of the flow rates. The curve fits were carried out according to the power law model equations. The NMR viscosity measurements compared well with measurements of the same CMC samples, performed on a conventional rotational rheometer. A portable, home-built transceiver, designed for NMR applications utilizing a

  12. Accuracy of Reaction Cross Section for Exotic Nuclei in Glauber Model Based on MCMC Diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rueter, Keiti; Novikov, Ivan

    2017-01-01

    Parameters of a nuclear density distribution for an exotic nuclei with halo or skin structures can be determined from the experimentally measured reaction cross-section. In the presented work, to extract parameters such as nuclear size information for a halo and core, we compare experimental data on reaction cross-sections with values obtained using expressions of the Glauber Model. These calculations are performed using a Markov Chain Monte Carlo algorithm. We discuss the accuracy of the Monte Carlo approach and its dependence on k*, the power law turnover point in the discreet power spectrum of the random number sequence and on the lag-1 autocorrelation time of the random number sequence.

  13. Exotic mosquito threats require strategic surveillance and response planning.

    PubMed

    Webb, Cameron E; Doggett, Stephen L

    2016-12-14

    Mosquito-borne diseases caused by endemic pathogens such as Ross River, Barmah Forest and Murray Valley encephalitis viruses are an annual concern in New South Wales (NSW), Australia. More than a dozen mosquito species have been implicated in the transmission of these pathogens, with each mosquito occupying a specialised ecological niche that influences their habitat associations, host feeding preferences and the environmental drivers of their abundance. The NSW Arbovirus Surveillance and Mosquito Monitoring Program provides an early warning system for potential outbreaks of mosquito-borne disease by tracking annual activity of these mosquitoes and their associated pathogens. Although the program will effectively track changes in local mosquito populations that may increase with a changing climate, urbanisation and wetland rehabilitation, it will be less effective with current surveillance methodologies at detecting or monitoring changes in exotic mosquito threats, where different surveillance strategies need to be used. Exotic container-inhabiting mosquitoes such as Aedes aegypti and Ae. albopictus pose a threat to NSW because they are nuisance-biting pests and vectors of pathogens such as dengue, chikungunya and Zika viruses. International movement of humans and their belongings have spread these mosquitoes to many regions of the world. In recent years, these two mosquitoes have been detected by the Australian Government Department of Agriculture and Water Resources at local airports and seaports. To target the detection of these exotic mosquitoes, new trapping technologies and networks of surveillance locations are required. Additionally, incursions of these mosquitoes into urban areas of the state will require strategic responses to minimise substantial public health and economic burdens to local communities.

  14. System analyses on advanced nuclear fuel cycle and waste management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheon, Myeongguk

    To evaluate the impacts of accelerator-driven transmutation of waste (ATW) fuel cycle on a geological repository, two mathematical models are developed: a reactor system analysis model and a high-level waste (HLW) conditioning model. With the former, fission products and residual trans-uranium (TRU) contained in HLW generated from a reference ATW plant operations are quantified and the reduction of TRU inventory included in commercial spent-nuclear fuel (CSNF) is evaluated. With the latter, an optimized waste loading and composition in solidification of HLW are determined and the volume reduction of waste packages associated with CSNF is evaluated. WACOM, a reactor system analysis code developed in this study for burnup calculation, is validated by ORIGEN2.1 and MCNP. WACOM is used to perform multicycle analysis for the reference lead-bismuth eutectic (LBE) cooled transmuter. By applying the results of this analysis to the reference ATW deployment scenario considered in the ATW roadmap, the HLW generated from the ATW fuel cycle is quantified and the reduction of TRU inventory contained in CSNF is evaluated. A linear programming (LP) model has been developed for determination of an optimized waste loading and composition in solidification of HLW. The model has been applied to a US-defense HLW. The optimum waste loading evaluated by the LP model was compared with that estimated by the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) in the US and a good agreement was observed. The LP model was then applied to the volume reduction of waste packages associated with CSNF. Based on the obtained reduction factors, the expansion of Yucca Mountain Repository (YMR) capacity is evaluated. It is found that with the reference ATW system, the TRU contained in CSNF could be reduced by a factor of ˜170 in terms of inventory and by a factor of ˜40 in terms of toxicity under the assumed scenario. The number of waste packages related to CSNF could be reduced by a factor of ˜8 in terms of

  15. Cercarial Dermatitis Transmitted by Exotic Marine Snail

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Andrew N.; James, David; Hui, Lucia; Hom, Albert; Loker, Eric S.

    2010-01-01

    Cercarial dermatitis (swimmer’s itch) is caused by the penetration of human skin by cercariae of schistosome parasites that develop in and are released from snail hosts. Cercarial dermatitis is frequently acquired in freshwater habitats, and less commonly in marine or estuarine waters. To investigate reports of a dermatitis outbreak in San Francisco Bay, California, we surveyed local snails for schistosome infections during 2005–2008. We found schistosomes only in Haminoea japonica, an Asian snail first reported in San Francisco Bay in 1999. Genetic markers place this schistosome within a large clade of avian schistosomes, but do not match any species for which there are genetic data. It is the second known schistosome species to cause dermatitis in western North American coastal waters; these species are transmitted by exotic snails. Introduction of exotic hosts can support unexpected emergence of an unknown parasite with serious medical or veterinary implications. PMID:20735918

  16. Examination of the role of nuclear deterrence in the 21st century: a systems analysis approach

    SciTech Connect

    Martz, Joseph C; Stevens, Patrice A; Branstetter, Linda; Hoover, Edward; O' Brien, Kevin; Slavin, Adam; Caswell, David

    2010-01-01

    competing objectives have been stated across the spectrum of political, social, and military thought. These objectives include goals of ratification of the Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty, recommitment to further downsizing of the nuclear arsenal, embracing a long-term goal of the elimination of nuclear weapons, limitations on both the production complex and upgrades to nuclear weapons and delivery systems, and controls and constraints to limit proliferation of nuclear materials and weapons, particularly to rogue states and terrorist groups.

  17. Changing Facets of Nuclear Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Covello, Aldo

    2008-04-01

    Section I. Exotic nuclear structure. Radioactive beams at TRIUMF / A. C. Shotter. Status of RI-beam factory project at RIKEN / H. Ueno. Population of neutron unbound states via two-proton knockout reactions / N. Frank ... [et al.]. Studies of neutron-rich nuclei using ISOL facilities at CERN and Jyväskylä / J. Äystö. Shell structure evolution far from stability: recent results from GANIL / F. Azaiez. Magnetic moment meaurements: pushing the limits / N. Benczer-Koller. Technique for measuring angular correlations and g-factors of excited states with large multi-detector arrays: an application to neutron rich nuclei produced in spontaneous fission / A. V. Ramayya ... [et al.]. Isospin symmetry and proton decay: identification of the 10+ isomer in [symbol]Ni / C. Fahlander ... [et al.]. Exploring the evolution of the shell structure by means of deep inelastic reactions / G. de Angelis. Studies on the exotic structure of [symbol]Al by measurements of [symbol] and P[symbol] / D. Q. Fang ... [et al.]. Extended cluster model for light and medium nuclei / M. Tomaselli ... [et al.]. Nuclear structure studies on exotic nuclei with radioactive beams - present status and future perspectives at FAIR / P. Egelhof. The SPES direct target project at the Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro / G. Prete ... [et al.] -- Section II. Nuclear structure and nuclear forces. Modern aspects of nuclear structure theory / J. Wambach. Correlations in nuclei: a review / R. Schiavilla. Correlated nucleons in k- and r-space / I. Sick. Roles of all-order core polarizations and Brown-Rho scaling in nucleon effective interactions / T. T. S. Kuo ... [et al.]. Ab initio and ab exitu no core shell model / J. P. Vary ... [et al.]. Ab-initio coupled cluster theory for open quantum systems / G. Hagen ... [et al.]. Symplectic no-core shell model / J. P. Draayer ... [et al.]. Role of deformed symplectic configurations in ab initio no-core shell model results / T. Dytrych ... [et al.]. Nuclear structure

  18. Compensation and exotic livestock disease management: the views of animal keepers and veterinarians in England.

    PubMed

    Hamilton-Webb, A; Naylor, R; Little, R; Maye, D

    2016-11-19

    Relatively little is known about the perceived influence of different compensation systems on animal keepers' management of exotic livestock disease. This paper aims to address this research gap by drawing on interviews with 61 animal keepers and 21 veterinarians, as well as a series of nine animal keeper focus groups across five different livestock sectors in England. The perceived influence of current compensation systems on disease control behaviour was explored and alternative compensation systems that respectively reward positive practices and penalise poor practices were presented in the form of scenarios, alongside a third system that considered the option of a cost-sharing levy system between industry and government. The results indicate that animal keepers consider themselves to be influenced by a range of non-financial factors, for example, feelings of responsibility, reputation and animal welfare concerns, in the context of their exotic disease management practices. The majority of animal keepers were unaware of the current compensation systems in place for exotic diseases, and were therefore not consciously influenced by financial recompense. Concerns were raised about linking compensation to disease management behaviour due to auditing difficulties. A cost-sharing levy system would likely raise awareness of exotic disease and compensation among animal keepers, but differentiation of payments based upon individual farm-level risk assessments was called for by participants as a strategy to promote positive disease management practices.

  19. Legal implications of the exotic pet practice.

    PubMed

    Maas, Adolf K

    2005-09-01

    The ever-growing complexity of veterinary laws compounds the problem for the exotic pet practice. Issues of possession, treatment, vaccination, and ethics shape the legal landscape for the veterinarian, and as new problems develop, new legislation will be created. Only by learning and understanding the current laws and regulations of the jurisdiction can a practitioner hope to keep abreast of the changes and additions as they occur and to minimize the risk of liability.

  20. Exotic Rotational Correlations in Quantum Geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Hogan, Craig

    2015-09-26

    It is argued by extrapolation of general relativity and quantum mechanics that a classical inertial frame corresponds to a statistically defined observable that rotationally fluctuates due to Planck scale indeterminacy. Physical effects of exotic nonlocal rotational correlations on large scale field states are estimated. Their entanglement with the strong interaction vacuum is estimated to produce a universal, statistical centrifugal acceleration that resembles the observed cosmological constant.

  1. Final Report - Spent Nuclear Fuel Retrieval System Manipulator System Cold Validation Testing

    SciTech Connect

    D.R. Jackson; G.R. Kiebel

    1999-08-24

    Manipulator system cold validation testing (CVT) was performed in support of the Fuel Retrieval System (FRS) Sub-Project, a subtask of the Spent Nuclear Fuel Project at the Hanford Site in Richland, Washington. The FRS will be used to retrieve and repackage K-Basin Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) currently stored in old K-Plant storage basins. The FRS is required to retrieve full fuel canisters from the basin; clean the fuel elements inside the canister to remove excessive uranium corrosion products (or sludge); remove the contents from the canisters; and sort the resulting debris, scrap, and fuel for repackaging. The fuel elements and scrap will be collected in fuel storage and scrap baskets in preparation for loading into a multi canister overpack (MCO), while the debris is loaded into a debris bin and disposed of as solid waste. The FRS is composed of three major subsystems. The Manipulator Subsystem provides remote handling of fuel, scrap, and debris; the In-Pool Equipment subsystem performs cleaning of fuel and provides a work surface for handling materials; and the Remote Viewing Subsystem provides for remote viewing of the work area by operators. There are two complete and identical FRS systems, one to be installed in the K-West basin and one to be installed in the K-East basin. Another partial system will be installed in a cold test facility to provide for operator training.

  2. Exotic Forms of Silicon for Energy Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, P. Craig

    2015-03-01

    Over the last few decades many exotic forms of carbon, such as carbon-60, carbon nanotubes, and graphene, have generated novel scientific discoveries and revolutionized many important applications. Similar potentially transformative breakthroughs may be expected with exotic forms of silicon. Such structures include, but are not necessarily limited to, (1) those formed under high pressure that are metastable at ambient pressure, (2) single layers of Si (silicene), (2) clathrate Si, which has been studied for superconducting and thermoelectric properties but not in any detail for semiconductor applications, (3) nanostructured forms of Si (nanodots and nanowires), including those composed of diamond Si, (4) porous Si, and (5) any other structures that differ in their structural, optical or electronic properties from bulk diamond Si. Silicon is an abundant, non-toxic element around which an advanced technology exists for semiconducting devices based on diamond Si. One of these exotic forms of Si could form the basis for the next revolution in electronics or even opto-electronics, since some forms exhibit direct, or nearly direct, band gaps. Recent results toward producing pure and dopable semiconductors out of Si nanodots imbedded in amorphous matrices and in clathrate Si and clathrate Si-Ge alloys will be discussed. The author acknowledges important collaborations with R. T. Collins, C. A. Koh, L. Krishna, M. Lusk, and P. Stradins. DOE SUNSHOT program, under Contract DE-EE0005326 and by the NSF MRSEC program under Grant DMR-0820518.

  3. An approach for evaluating the integrity of fuel applied in Innovative Nuclear Energy Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakae, Nobuo; Ozawa, Takayuki; Ohta, Hirokazu; Ogata, Takanari; Sekimoto, Hiroshi

    2014-03-01

    One of the important issues in the study of Innovative Nuclear Energy Systems is evaluating the integrity of fuel applied in Innovative Nuclear Energy Systems. An approach for evaluating the integrity of the fuel is discussed here based on the procedure currently used in the integrity evaluation of fast reactor fuel. The fuel failure modes determining fuel life time were reviewed and fuel integrity was analyzed and compared with the failure criteria.

  4. Nuclear electric propulsion system utilization for earth orbit transfer of large spacecraft structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silva, T. H.; Byers, D. C.

    1980-01-01

    The paper discusses a potential application of electric propulsion to perform orbit transfer of a large spacecraft structure to geosynchronous orbit (GEO) from LEO, utilizing a nuclear reactor space power source in the spacecraft on a shared basis. The discussions include spacecraft, thrust system, and nuclear reactor space power system concepts. Emphasis is placed on orbiter payload arrangements, spacecraft launch constraints, and spacecraft LEO assembly and deployment sequences.

  5. Evaluation of the prompt alerting systems at four nuclear power stations

    SciTech Connect

    Towers, D.A.; Anderson, G.S.; Keast, D.N.; Kenoyer, J.L.; Desrosiers, A.E.

    1982-09-01

    This report presents evaluations of the prompt notification siren systems at the following four US nuclear power facilities: Trojan, Three Mile Island, Indian Point, and Zion. The objective of these evaluations was to provide examples of an analytical procedure for predicting siren-system effectiveness under specific conditions in the 10-mile emergency planning zone (EPZ) surrounding nuclear power plants. This analytical procedure is discussed in report No. PNL-4227.

  6. EXFOR systems manual: Nuclear reaction data exchange format

    SciTech Connect

    McLane, V.

    1996-07-01

    This document describes EXFOR, the exchange format designed to allow transmission of nuclear reaction data between the members of the Nuclear Data Centers Network. In addition to storing the data and its bibliographic information, experimental information, including source of uncertainties, is also compiled. The status and history of the data set is also included, e.g., the source of the data, any updates which have been made, and correlations to other data sets. The exchange format, as outlined, is designed to allow a large variety of numerical data tables with explanatory and bibliographic information to be transmitted in an easily machine-readable format (for checking and indicating possible errors) and a format that can be read by personnel (for passing judgment on and correcting any errors indicated by the machine).

  7. Statistical Model of Exotic Rotational Correlations in Emergent Space-Time

    SciTech Connect

    Hogan, Craig; Kwon, Ohkyung; Richardson, Jonathan

    2016-07-11

    A statistical model is formulated to compute exotic rotational correlations that arise as inertial frames and causal structure emerge on large scales from entangled Planck scale quantum systems. Noncommutative quantum dynamics are represented by random transverse displacements that respect causal symmetry. Entanglement is represented by covariance of these displacements in Planck scale intervals defined by future null cones of events on an observer's world line. Light that propagates in a nonradial direction inherits a projected component of the exotic rotational correlation that accumulates as a random walk in phase. A calculation of the projection and accumulation leads to exact predictions for statistical properties of exotic Planck scale correlations in an interferometer of any configuration. The cross-covariance for two nearly co-located interferometers is shown to depart only slightly from the autocovariance. Specific examples are computed for configurations that approximate realistic experiments, and show that the model can be rigorously tested.

  8. PSF Analysis Support System for Nuclear Power Plants

    SciTech Connect

    Satoko Sakajo; Takashi Nakagawa; Naotaka Terashita

    2002-07-01

    Research during recent years has revealed that human errors tend to reflect the quality of performance shaping factors (PSFs). Therefore, from the viewpoint of reducing human error, PSFs, which include error-likely equipment design, written procedures, and other factors, must be analyzed and improved. This paper provides methodologies to identify and qualify the potential PSFs included in tasks at a nuclear power plant (NPP). The methodologies were applied to actual plants. (authors)

  9. Nucleon Transfer Reactions in Few-Body Nuclear Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deltuva, A.

    2017-03-01

    Three- and four-body scattering is described solving Faddeev-Yakubovsky or equivalent Alt-Grassberger-Sandhas integral equations for transition operators in momentum-space. Several realistic nuclear interaction models are used; the Coulomb force between charged particles is taken into account via the screening and renormalization method. Differential cross sections and spin observables for various nucleon transfer reactions are calculated and compared with experimental data.

  10. Nuclear Science Symposium, 20th, and Nuclear Power Systems Symposium, 5th, San Francisco, Calif., November 14-16, 1973, Proceedings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    Subjects considered are in the areas of position sensitive detectors, semiconductor detector materials, semiconductor detector technology, biomedical instrumentation, reactor instrumentation, nuclear instrumentation, and data acquisition and processing. Topics related to photon detection are discussed together with methods for environmental radiation measurement, aspects of environmental gamma-ray analysis, and nuclear techniques for elemental analysis. Attention is also given to operation and design experience with systems at nuclear power plants. Individual items are announced in this issue.

  11. Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers, Nuclear Science Symposium, 18th, and Nuclear Power Systems Symposium, 3rd, San Francisco, Calif., November 3-5, 1971, Proceedings.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    Potential advantages of fusion power reactors are discussed together with the protection of the public from radioactivity produced in nuclear power reactors, and the significance of tritium releases to the environment. Other subjects considered are biomedical instrumentation, radiation damage problems, low level environmental radionuclide analysis systems, nuclear techniques in environmental research, nuclear instrumentation, and space and plasma instrumentation. Individual items are abstracted in this issue.

  12. The exotic conformal Galilei algebra and nonlinear partial differential equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherniha, Roman; Henkel, Malte

    2010-09-01

    The conformal Galilei algebra (CGA) and the exotic conformal Galilei algebra (ECGA) are applied to construct partial differential equations (PDEs) and systems of PDEs, which admit these algebras. We show that there are no single second-order PDEs invariant under the CGA but systems of PDEs can admit this algebra. Moreover, a wide class of nonlinear PDEs exists, which are conditionally invariant under CGA. It is further shown that there are systems of non-linear PDEs admitting ECGA with the realisation obtained very recently in [D. Martelli and Y. Tachikawa, arXiv:0903.5184v2 [hep-th] (2009)]. Moreover, wide classes of non-linear systems, invariant under two different 10-dimensional subalgebras of ECGA are explicitly constructed and an example with possible physical interpretation is presented.

  13. A Hydrogen Ignition Mechanism for Explosions in Nuclear Facility Piping Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Leishear, Robert A.

    2013-09-18

    Hydrogen explosions may occur simultaneously with water hammer accidents in nuclear facilities, and a theoretical mechanism to relate water hammer to hydrogen deflagrations and explosions is presented herein. Hydrogen and oxygen generation due to the radiolysis of water is a recognized hazard in pipe systems used in the nuclear industry, where the accumulation of hydrogen and oxygen at high points in the pipe system is expected, and explosive conditions may occur. Pipe ruptures in nuclear reactor cooling systems were attributed to hydrogen explosions inside pipelines, i.e., Hamaoka, Nuclear Power Station in Japan, and Brunsbuettel in Germany. Prior to these accidents, an ignition source for hydrogen was not clearly demonstrated, but these accidents demonstrated that a mechanism was, in fact, available to initiate combustion and explosion. A new theory to identify an ignition source and explosion cause is presented here, and further research is recommended to fully understand this explosion mechanism.

  14. Toward the last frontier - A strategy for the evolutionary development of space nuclear power systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bennett, Gary L.

    1992-01-01

    A number of exciting mission opportunities are being considered for the 21st century, including advanced robotic science missions to the outer planets and beyond, human exploration of the Moon and Mars, and advanced space transportation systems. All of these missions will require some form of nuclear power; however, it is clear that current budgetary constraints preclude developing many different types of space nuclear power systems. This paper reviews the specific civil space missions which have been identified, the power levels and lifetimes required, and the technologies available. From this an evolutionary space nuclear power program is developed which builds upon the experience of radioisotope thermoelectric generators, dynamic isotope power systems, and space nuclear reactors. It is strongly suggested that not only does this approach make technical and budgetary sense but that it is consistent with the normal development of new technologies.

  15. Neutron cross-sections for advanced nuclear systems: the n_TOF project at CERN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbagallo, M.; Mastromarco, M.; Colonna, N.; Altstadt, S.; Andrzejewski, J.; Audouin, L.; Bécares, V.; Bečvář, F.; Belloni, F.; Berthoumieux, E.; Billowes, J.; Bosnar, D.; Brugger, M.; Calviani, M.; Calviño, F.; Cano-Ott, D.; Carrapiço, C.; Cerutti, F.; Chiaveri, E.; Chin, M.; Cortés, G.; Cortés-Giraldo, M. A.; Diakaki, M.; Domingo-Pardo, C.; Duran, I.; Dressler, R.; Eleftheriadis, C.; Ferrari, A.; Fraval, K.; Ganesan, S.; García, A. R.; Giubrone, G.; Gonçalves, I. F.; González-Romero, E.; Griesmayer, E.; Guerrero, C.; Gunsing, F.; Hernández-Prieto, A.; Jenkins, D. G.; Jericha, E.; Kadi, Y.; Käppeler, F.; Karadimos, D.; Kivel, N.; Koehler, P.; Krtička, M.; Kroll, J.; Lampoudis, C.; Langer, C.; Leal-Cidoncha, E.; Lederer, C.; Leeb, H.; Leong, L. S.; Losito, R.; Manousos, A.; Marganiec, J.; Martínez, T.; Massimi, C.; Mastinu, P. F.; Mendoza, E.; Mengoni, A.; Milazzo, P. M.; Mingrone, F.; Mirea, M.; Mondalaers, W.; Paradela, C.; Pavlik, A.; Perkowski, J.; Plompen, A.; Praena, J.; Quesada, J. M.; Rauscher, T.; Reifarth, R.; Riego, A.; Rubbia, C.; Sabaté-Gilarte, M.; Sarmento, R.; Saxena, A.; Schillebeeckx, P.; Schmidt, S.; Schumann, D.; Tagliente, G.; Tain, J. L.; Tarrío, D.; Tassan-Got, L.; Tsinganis, A.; Valenta, S.; Vannini, G.; Variale, V.; Vaz, P.; Ventura, A.; Vermeulen, M. J.; Vlachoudis, V.; Vlastou, R.; Wallner, A.; Ware, T.; Weigand, M.; Weiß, C.; Wright, T.; Žugec, P.

    2014-12-01

    The study of neutron-induced reactions is of high relevance in a wide variety of fields, ranging from stellar nucleosynthesis and fundamental nuclear physics to applications of nuclear technology. In nuclear energy, high accuracy neutron data are needed for the development of Generation IV fast reactors and accelerator driven systems, these last aimed specifically at nuclear waste incineration, as well as for research on innovative fuel cycles. In this context, a high luminosity Neutron Time Of Flight facility, n_TOF, is operating at CERN since more than a decade, with the aim of providing new, high accuracy and high resolution neutron cross-sections. Thanks to the features of the neutron beam, a rich experimental program relevant to nuclear technology has been carried out so far. The program will be further expanded in the near future, thanks in particular to a new high-flux experimental area, now under construction.

  16. Survey of systems safety analysis methods and their application to nuclear waste management systems

    SciTech Connect

    Pelto, P.J.; Winegardner, W.K.; Gallucci, R.H.V.

    1981-11-01

    This report reviews system safety analysis methods and examines their application to nuclear waste management systems. The safety analysis methods examined include expert opinion, maximum credible accident approach, design basis accidents approach, hazard indices, preliminary hazards analysis, failure modes and effects analysis, fault trees, event trees, cause-consequence diagrams, G0 methodology, Markov modeling, and a general category of consequence analysis models. Previous and ongoing studies on the safety of waste management systems are discussed along with their limitations and potential improvements. The major safety methods and waste management safety related studies are surveyed. This survey provides information on what safety methods are available, what waste management safety areas have been analyzed, and what are potential areas for future study.

  17. Systems to prevent nuclear material from re-entering the biosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Buden, D.; Angelo, J.A. Jr.; Lapin, S.

    1992-09-01

    Nuclear systems are key to the success of many space missions as we have witness in the Apollo science packages, Viking Mars landers, and Pioneer and Voyager planetary exploration missions. There is always a concern that nuclear materials will re-enter the biosphere from a mission abort. In fact, this has happened for radioisotope and reactor power systems. Until now, the emphasize has been an incorporating on-board means to protect the biosphere. With possible increased use of nuclear power and propulsion systems in space, Project SIREN (Search, Intercept, Retrieve, Expulsion, Nuclear) has determined that external means can be used as a back up to current on-board systems to provide assured prevention of nuclear materials from re-entry once in space. The technology base to implement a SIREN vehicle has been assessed and a data base and mission analysis program prepared (called THOR) to evaluate various missions. The degree of hazard from existing nuclear power systems in space has been assessed and found to be significant.

  18. Systems to prevent nuclear material from re-entering the biosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Buden, D. ); Angelo, J.A. Jr. ); Lapin, S. )

    1992-01-01

    Nuclear systems are key to the success of many space missions as we have witness in the Apollo science packages, Viking Mars landers, and Pioneer and Voyager planetary exploration missions. There is always a concern that nuclear materials will re-enter the biosphere from a mission abort. In fact, this has happened for radioisotope and reactor power systems. Until now, the emphasize has been an incorporating on-board means to protect the biosphere. With possible increased use of nuclear power and propulsion systems in space, Project SIREN (Search, Intercept, Retrieve, Expulsion, Nuclear) has determined that external means can be used as a back up to current on-board systems to provide assured prevention of nuclear materials from re-entry once in space. The technology base to implement a SIREN vehicle has been assessed and a data base and mission analysis program prepared (called THOR) to evaluate various missions. The degree of hazard from existing nuclear power systems in space has been assessed and found to be significant.

  19. Nuclear-Renewable Hybrid System Economic Basis for Electricity, Fuel, and Hydrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Charles Forsberg; Steven Aumeier

    2014-04-01

    Concerns about climate change and altering the ocean chemistry are likely to limit the use of fossil fuels. That implies a transition to a low-carbon nuclear-renewable electricity grid. Historically variable electricity demand was met using fossil plants with low capital costs, high operating costs, and substantial greenhouse gas emissions. However, the most easily scalable very-low-emissions generating options, nuclear and non-dispatchable renewables (solar and wind), are capital-intensive technologies with low operating costs that should operate at full capacities to minimize costs. No combination of fully-utilized nuclear and renewables can meet the variable electricity demand. This implies large quantities of expensive excess generating capacity much of the time. In a free market this results in near-zero electricity prices at times of high nuclear renewables output and low electricity demand with electricity revenue collapse. Capital deployment efficiency—the economic benefit derived from energy systems capital investment at a societal level—strongly favors high utilization of these capital-intensive systems, especially if low-carbon nuclear renewables are to replace fossil fuels. Hybrid energy systems are one option for better utilization of these systems that consumes excess energy at times of low prices to make some useful product.The economic basis for development of hybrid energy systems is described for a low-carbon nuclear renewable world where much of the time there are massivequantities of excess energy available from the electric sector.Examples include (1) high-temperature electrolysis to generate hydrogen for non-fossil liquid fuels, direct use as a transport fuel, metal reduction, etc. and (2) biorefineries.Nuclear energy with its concentrated constant heat output may become the enabling technology for economically-viable low-carbon electricity grids because hybrid nuclear systems may provide an economic way to produce dispatachable variable

  20. The Sun's New Exotic Neighbour

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2006-03-01

    Using ESO's Very Large Telescope in Chile, an international team of researchers [1] discovered a brown dwarf belonging to the 24th closest stellar system to the Sun. Brown dwarfs are intermediate objects that are neither stars nor planets. This object is the third closest brown dwarf to the Earth yet discovered, and one of the coolest, having a temperature of about 750 degrees Celsius. It orbits a very small star at about 4.5 times the mean distance between the Earth and the Sun. Its mass is estimated to be somewhere between 9 and 65 times the mass of Jupiter. At a time when astronomers are peering into the most distant Universe, looking at objects as far as 13 billion light-years away, one may think that our close neighbourhood would be very well known. Not so. Astronomers still find new star-like objects in our immediate vicinity. Using ESO's VLT, they just discovered a brown dwarf companion to the red star SCR 1845-6357, the 36th closest star to the Sun. ESO PR Photo 11/06 ESO PR Photo 11a/06 New Brown Dwarf in the Solar Neighbourhood (Artist's Impression) "This newly found brown dwarf is a valuable object because its distance is well known, allowing us to determine with precision its intrinsic brightness", said team member Markus Kasper (ESO). "Moreover, from its orbital motion, we should be able in a few years to estimate its mass. These properties are vital for understanding the nature of brown dwarfs." To discover this brown dwarf, the team used the high-contrast adaptive optics NACO Simultaneous Differential Imager (SDI [2]) on ESO's Very Large Telescope, an instrument specifically developed to search for extrasolar planets. The SDI camera enhances the ability of the VLT and its adaptive optics system to detect faint companions that would normally be lost in the glare of the primary star. In particular, the SDI camera provides additional, often very useful spectral information which can be used to determine a rough temperature for the object without follow