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Sample records for expenditure panel survey

  1. Accuracy of Medicare expenditures in the medical expenditure panel survey.

    PubMed

    Zuvekas, Samuel H; Olin, Gary L

    2009-01-01

    This paper examines underreporting and underrepresentation of high expenditure cases in the Medical Expenditure Panel Survey (MEPS) and their implications for analyses. Our data come from a sample of Medicare beneficiaries in the MEPS who were matched to their Medicare claims and enrollment files, with supplemental data from the Medicare Current Beneficiary Survey (MCBS). Underreporting of expenditures affected all groups of Medicare beneficiaries in the matched sample, but uniformly so that behavioral analyses were largely unaffected. Straightforward adjustments to the MEPS expenditure estimates could align them with aggregate sources, such as the National Health Expenditure Accounts, while preserving underlying relationships between expenditures and key correlates.

  2. A Flexible Model for Correlated Medical Costs, with Application to Medical Expenditure Panel Survey Data

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jinsong; Liu, Lei; Shih, Ya-Chen T.; Zhang, Daowen; Severini, Thomas A.

    2016-01-01

    We propose a flexible model for correlated medical cost data with several appealing features. First, the mean function is partially linear. Second, the distributional form for the response is not specified. Third, the covariance structure of correlated medical costs has a semiparametric form. We use extended generalized estimating equations to simultaneously estimate all parameters of interest. B-splines is used to estimate unknown functions, and a modification to Akaike Information Criterion is proposed for selecting knots in spline bases. We apply the model to correlated medical costs in the Medical Expenditure Panel Survey (MEPS) dataset. Simulation studies are conducted to assess the performance of our method. PMID:26403805

  3. A flexible model for correlated medical costs, with application to medical expenditure panel survey data.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jinsong; Liu, Lei; Shih, Ya-Chen T; Zhang, Daowen; Severini, Thomas A

    2016-03-15

    We propose a flexible model for correlated medical cost data with several appealing features. First, the mean function is partially linear. Second, the distributional form for the response is not specified. Third, the covariance structure of correlated medical costs has a semiparametric form. We use extended generalized estimating equations to simultaneously estimate all parameters of interest. B-splines are used to estimate unknown functions, and a modification to Akaike information criterion is proposed for selecting knots in spline bases. We apply the model to correlated medical costs in the Medical Expenditure Panel Survey dataset. Simulation studies are conducted to assess the performance of our method.

  4. Employment and Disability: Evidence From the 1996 Medical Expenditures Panel Survey

    PubMed Central

    Findley, Patricia A.; Sambamoorthi, Usha

    2007-01-01

    The relationship between employment and disability has gained national attention, as the ability to maintain employment is inconsistent among those with limitations. This cross-sectional study of employment among individuals (N = 1691, age 21–62 years) with self-reported limitations in the 1996 Medical Expenditures Panel Survey seeks to identify predictors of employment despite physical and/or cognitive limitations. Two predictive models of employment including 10 variables are explored; 1 included insurance (χ2 = 3856.85, p ≤ 0.00) and the other removed the insurance variable (χ2 = 280.21, p ≤ 0.00). Individuals with limitations who are employed are more likely to have a college-level education, have better physical and mental health perceptions and have private insurance. This analysis demonstrates that people do work despite reported activity, functional or sensory limitations and that socioeconomic factors are crucial in why someone is able to attain employment. PMID:15055500

  5. Chronic Pain and Health Care Spending: An Analysis of Longitudinal Data from the Medical Expenditure Panel Survey

    PubMed Central

    Stockbridge, Erica L; Suzuki, Sumihiro; Pagán, José A

    2015-01-01

    Objective To estimate average incremental health care expenditures associated with chronic pain by health care service category, expanding on prior research that focused on specific pain conditions instead of general pain, excluded low levels of pain, or did not incorporate pain duration. Data Source Medical Expenditure Panel Survey (MEPS) data (2008–2011; N = 26,671). Study Design Differences in annual expenditures for adults at different levels of pain that interferes with normal work, as measured by the SF-12, were estimated using recycled predictions from two-part logit-generalized linear regression models. Principal Findings “A little bit” of chronic pain-related interference was associated with a $2,498 increase in total adjusted expenditures over no pain interference (p < .0001) and a $1,008 increase over nonchronic pain interference (p = .0001). Moderate and severe chronic pain-related interference was associated with a $3,707 and $5,804 increase in expenditures over no pain interference and a $2,218 and $4,315 increase over nonchronic interference, respectively (p < .0001). Expenditure increases were most pronounced for inpatient and hospital outpatient expenditures compared to other types of health care expenditures. Conclusions Chronic pain limitations are associated with higher health care expenditures. Results underscore the substantial cost of pain to the health care system. PMID:25424348

  6. Medical Expenditures among Immigrant and Non-Immigrant Groups in the U.S.: Findings from the Medical Expenditures Panel Survey (2000–2008)

    PubMed Central

    Tarraf, Wassim; Miranda, Patricia Y.; González, Hector M.

    2011-01-01

    Objective To examine time trends and differences in medical expenditures between non-citizens, foreign-born, and U.S.-born citizens. Methods We used multi-year Medical Expenditures Panel Survey (2000–2008) data on non-institutionalized adults in the U.S. (N=190,965). Source specific and total medical expenditures were analyzed using regression models, bootstrap prediction techniques, and linear and non-linear decomposition methods to evaluate the relationship between immigration status and expenditures, controlling for confounding effects. Results We found that the average health expenditures between 2000 and 2008 for non-citizens immigrants ($1,836) were substantially lower compared to both foreign-born ($3,737) and U.S.-born citizens ($4,478). Differences were maintained after controlling for confounding effects. Decomposition techniques showed that the main determinants of these differences were the availability of a usual source of healthcare, insurance, and ethnicity/race. Conclusion Lower healthcare expenditures among immigrants result from disparate access to healthcare. The dissipation of demographic advantages among immigrants could prospectively produce higher pressures on the U.S. healthcare system as immigrants age and levels of chronic conditions rise. Barring a shift in policy, the brunt of the effects could be borne by an already overextended public healthcare system. PMID:22222383

  7. Disparities in the Reporting and Treatment of Health Conditions in Children: An Analysis of the Medical Expenditure Panel Survey

    PubMed Central

    Guevara, James P; Mandell, David S; Rostain, Anthony L; Zhao, Huaqing; Hadley, Trevor R

    2006-01-01

    Objectives To determine whether racial and ethnic disparities in health care use differ for physical and behavioral health conditions. Data Sources Secondary analysis of the 1996–1997 Medical Expenditure Panel Survey. Study Design Retrospective cohort study of children aged 2–18 years old who were members of participating households. Children were categorized as Hispanic, black, or white. Differences in caregiver-reported behavioral and physical health conditions and services use were compared, and estimates were weighted to reflect the complex sampling scheme. Principal Findings Of eligible children weighted to represent over 44 million in each year, 13–15 percent were Hispanic, 14 percent black, and 68–70 percent white. After adjusting for potential confounding, Hispanic and black children were less likely to report externalizing behavioral conditions than white children. Black but not Hispanic children were more likely than white children to report asthma. In addition, Hispanic and black children were less likely to report ambulatory visits, and black children were less likely to report receiving a prescription medication than white children. There were no differences in reported emergency room visits or hospitalizations. Interactions between race and various health conditions, health status, insurance, and income were not significant. Conclusions In this nationally representative sample, we identified racial and ethnic disparities in the reporting of health conditions and the use of discretionary health services. Disparities differed between those with behavioral conditions and those with physical conditions. These disparities were not explained by traditional measures including the presence of health conditions, health status, insurance, and family income, and suggest that national surveys such as Medical Expenditure Panel Survey may benefit from the inclusion of additional explanatory measures. PMID:16584463

  8. Health insurance coverage and health-related quality of life: analysis of 2000 Medical Expenditure Panel Survey data.

    PubMed

    Bharmal, Murtuza; Thomas, Joseph

    2005-11-01

    This study investigated relationships between health insurance status and health-related quality of life (HRQOL) using the 2000 Medical Expenditure Panel Survey data. Health-related quality of life was measured using the SF-12 Physical Component Summary (PCS) and SF-12 Mental Component Summary (MCS). The analysis controlled for sociodemographic and attitudinal variables and medical conditions. The analysis also investigated and controlled for possible reverse causality between HRQOL and health insurance in the models. After adjusting for covariates, individuals without health insurance had significantly lower mean PCS scores (beta=-5.8; SE=0.4) than those with health insurance. The adjusted association between no health insurance and MCS scores (beta=-1.1; SE=0.4) also was significant. The adjusted difference in HRQOL among people with health insurance and those without it exceeds or is comparable to adjusted differences in HRQOL between people with each of various medical conditions and people without them.

  9. The Impact of Increased Tax Subsidies on the Insurance Coverage of Self-Employed Families: Evidence from the 1996-2004 Medical Expenditure Panel Survey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Selden, Thomas M.

    2009-01-01

    The share of health insurance premiums that self-employed workers can deduct when computing federal income taxes rose from 30 percent in 1996 to 100 percent in 2003. Data from the 1996-2004 Medical Expenditure Panel Survey are used to show that the increased tax subsidy was associated with substantial increases in private coverage among…

  10. Racial/Ethnic Disparities in Primary Care Quality Among Type 2 Diabetes Patients, Medical Expenditure Panel Survey, 2012

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Ruwei; Shi, Leiyu; Liang, Hailun; Haile, Geraldine Pierre

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Racial and ethnic disparities exist in diabetes prevalence, access to diabetes care, diabetes-related complications and mortality rates, and the quality of diabetes care among Americans. We explored racial and ethnic disparities in primary care quality among Americans with type 2 diabetes. Methods We analyzed data on adults with type 2 diabetes derived from the household component of the 2012 Medical Expenditure Panel Survey. Multiple regression and multivariate logistic regressions were used to examine the association between race/ethnicity and primary care attributes related to first contact, longitudinality, comprehensiveness, and coordination, and clusters of confounding factors were added sequentially. Results Preliminary findings indicated differences in primary care quality between racial/ethnic minorities and whites across measures of first contact, longitudinality, comprehensiveness, and coordination. After controlling for confounding factors, these differences were no longer apparent; all racial/ethnic categories showed similar rates of primary care quality according to the 4 primary care domains of interest in the study. Conclusion Results indicate equitable primary care quality for type 2 diabetes patients across 4 key domains of primary care after controlling for socioeconomic characteristics. Additional research is necessary to support these findings, particularly when considering smaller racial/ethnic groups and investigating outcomes related to diabetes. PMID:27490365

  11. Polypharmacy and Health-Related Quality of Life Among US Adults With Arthritis, Medical Expenditure Panel Survey, 2010–2012

    PubMed Central

    Dwibedi, Nilanjana; Sambamoorthi, Usha

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Our objective was to determine the relationship between polypharmacy (treatment with prescription drugs from 6 or more drug classes concurrently) and health-related quality of life (HRQoL) among US adults with arthritis. Methods We conducted a retrospective cohort study that used 2-year longitudinal data from the Medical Expenditure Panel Survey to analyze a cohort of 6,132 adults aged over 21 years with arthritis. Measures of HRQoL were the summary scores from the mental component summary (MCS) and physical component summary (PCS) of the 12-item short-form health survey. Unadjusted and adjusted regression models were used to evaluate the association between polypharmacy and HRQoL measures. We used SAS, version 9.4, (SAS Institute Inc) to conduct all analyses. Results In unadjusted analyses, adults with arthritis taking prescription drugs from 6 or more drug classes concurrently had significantly lower MCS and PCS scores (β, −3.11, P < .001 and β, −10.26, P < .001, respectively) than adults taking prescription drugs from fewer than 6. After controlling for the demographic characteristics, number of mental and physical chronic conditions, and baseline MCS and PCS scores, adults taking prescription drugs from 6 or more drug classes concurrently had significantly lower PCS scores (β, −1.68, P < .001), than those taking prescription drugs from fewer than 6. However, no significant difference in MCS scores was found between adults taking prescription drugs from 6 or more drug classes concurrently and those taking prescription drugs from fewer than 6 (β, −0.27, P = .46). Conclusion Polypharmacy is significantly associated with lower PCS scores among adults with arthritis. Because polypharmacy can lead to drug–drug and drug–disease interactions, health care providers need to consider the risk and adopt a cautious approach in prescribing multiple drugs to manage chronic conditions and in choosing therapies to improve HRQoL among adults with

  12. Estimating health expenditure shares from household surveys

    PubMed Central

    Brooks, Benjamin PC; Hanlon, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Objective To quantify the effects of household expenditure survey characteristics on the estimated share of a household’s expenditure devoted to health. Methods A search was conducted for all country surveys reporting data on health expenditure and total household expenditure. Data on total expenditure and health expenditure were extracted from the surveys to generate the health expenditure share (i.e. fraction of the household expenditure devoted to health). To do this the authors relied on survey microdata or survey reports to calculate the health expenditure share for the particular instrument involved. Health expenditure share was modelled as a function of the survey’s recall period, the number of health expenditure items, the number of total expenditure items, the data collection method and the placement of the health module within the survey. Data exists across space and time, so fixed effects for territory and year were included as well. The model was estimated by means of ordinary least squares regression with clustered standard errors. Findings A one-unit increase in the number of health expenditure questions was accompanied by a 1% increase in the estimated health expenditure share. A one-unit increase in the number of non-health expenditure questions resulted in a 0.2% decrease in the estimated share. Increasing the recall period by one month was accompanied by a 6% decrease in the health expenditure share. Conclusion The characteristics of a survey instrument examined in the study affect the estimate of the health expenditure share. Those characteristics need to be accounted for when comparing results across surveys within a territory and, ultimately, across territories. PMID:23825879

  13. Consumer Expenditure Survey: Interview Survey, 1984. Bulletin 2267.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bureau of Labor Statistics (DOL), Washington, DC.

    This bulletin presents detailed income and expenditure data for 1984 from the interview component of the ongoing Consumer Expenditure Survey. Data in this bulletin are for the urban population. Text tables include the following: (1) annual expenditures of urban consumer units, and percent change in consumer expenditures, Interview Survey and…

  14. Determinants of Healthcare Expenditure in Economic Cooperation Organization (ECO) Countries: Evidence from Panel Cointegration Tests

    PubMed Central

    Samadi, Alihussein; Homaie Rad, Enayatollah

    2013-01-01

    Background: Over the last decade there has been an increase in healthcare expenditures while at the same time the inequity in distribution of resources has grown. These two issues have urged the researchers to review the determinants of healthcare expenditures. In this study, we surveyed the determinants of health expenditures in Economic Cooperation Organization (ECO) countries. Methods: We used Panel data econometrics methods for the purpose of this research. For long term analysis, we used Pesaran cross sectional dependency test followed by panel unit root tests to show first whether the variables were stationary or not. Upon confirmation of no stationary variables, we used Westerlund panel cointegration test in order to show whether long term relationships exist between the variables. At the end, we estimated the model with Continuous-Updated Fully Modified (CUP-FM) estimator. For short term analysis also, we used Fixed Effects (FE) estimator to estimate the model. Results: A long term relationship was found between the health expenditures per capita and GDP per capita, the proportion of population below 15 and above 65 years old, number of physicians, and urbanisation. Besides, all the variables had short term relationships with health expenditures, except for the proportion of population above 65 years old. Conclusion: The coefficient of GDP was below 1 in the model. Therefore, health is counted as a necessary good in ECO countries and governments must pay due attention to the equal distribution of health services in all regions of the country. PMID:24596838

  15. School Expenditure and School Performance: Evidence from New South Wales Schools Using a Dynamic Panel Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pugh, G.; Mangan, J.; Blackburn, V.; Radicic, D.

    2015-01-01

    This article estimates the effects of school expenditure on school performance in government secondary schools in New South Wales, Australia over the period 2006-2010. It uses dynamic panel analysis to exploit time series data on individual schools that only recently has become available. We find a significant but small effect of expenditure on…

  16. Use of Internet panels to conduct surveys.

    PubMed

    Hays, Ron D; Liu, Honghu; Kapteyn, Arie

    2015-09-01

    The use of Internet panels to collect survey data is increasing because it is cost-effective, enables access to large and diverse samples quickly, takes less time than traditional methods to obtain data for analysis, and the standardization of the data collection process makes studies easy to replicate. A variety of probability-based panels have been created, including Telepanel/CentERpanel, Knowledge Networks (now GFK KnowledgePanel), the American Life Panel, the Longitudinal Internet Studies for the Social Sciences panel, and the Understanding America Study panel. Despite the advantage of having a known denominator (sampling frame), the probability-based Internet panels often have low recruitment participation rates, and some have argued that there is little practical difference between opting out of a probability sample and opting into a nonprobability (convenience) Internet panel. This article provides an overview of both probability-based and convenience panels, discussing potential benefits and cautions for each method, and summarizing the approaches used to weight panel respondents in order to better represent the underlying population. Challenges of using Internet panel data are discussed, including false answers, careless responses, giving the same answer repeatedly, getting multiple surveys from the same respondent, and panelists being members of multiple panels. More is to be learned about Internet panels generally and about Web-based data collection, as well as how to evaluate data collected using mobile devices and social-media platforms.

  17. Use of Internet panels to conduct surveys.

    PubMed

    Hays, Ron D; Liu, Honghu; Kapteyn, Arie

    2015-09-01

    The use of Internet panels to collect survey data is increasing because it is cost-effective, enables access to large and diverse samples quickly, takes less time than traditional methods to obtain data for analysis, and the standardization of the data collection process makes studies easy to replicate. A variety of probability-based panels have been created, including Telepanel/CentERpanel, Knowledge Networks (now GFK KnowledgePanel), the American Life Panel, the Longitudinal Internet Studies for the Social Sciences panel, and the Understanding America Study panel. Despite the advantage of having a known denominator (sampling frame), the probability-based Internet panels often have low recruitment participation rates, and some have argued that there is little practical difference between opting out of a probability sample and opting into a nonprobability (convenience) Internet panel. This article provides an overview of both probability-based and convenience panels, discussing potential benefits and cautions for each method, and summarizing the approaches used to weight panel respondents in order to better represent the underlying population. Challenges of using Internet panel data are discussed, including false answers, careless responses, giving the same answer repeatedly, getting multiple surveys from the same respondent, and panelists being members of multiple panels. More is to be learned about Internet panels generally and about Web-based data collection, as well as how to evaluate data collected using mobile devices and social-media platforms. PMID:26170052

  18. Use of Internet Panels to Conduct Surveys

    PubMed Central

    Hays, Ron D.; Liu, Honghu; Kapteyn, Arie

    2015-01-01

    Use of internet panels to collect survey data is increasing because it is cost-effective, enables access to large and diverse samples quickly, takes less time than traditional methods to obtain back for analysis, and the standardization of data collection process makes studies easy to replicate. A variety of probability-based panels have been created including Telepanel/CentERpanel, Knowledge Networks (now GFK KnowledgePanel®), the American Life Panel, the LISS Panel, and the Understanding American Study panel. Despite the advantage of having a known denominator (sampling frame), the probability-based internet panels often have low recruitment participation rates and some have argued that there is little practical difference between opting out of a probability sample and opting into a non-probability (convenience) internet panel. This paper provides an overview of both probability-based and convenience panels, discussing potential benefits and cautions for each method, and summarizing approaches used to weight panel respondents to better represent the underlying population. Challenges in using internet panel data such as false answers, careless responses, giving the same answer repeatedly, getting multiple surveys from the same respondent, and panelists being members of multiple panels are discussed. There is more to be learned about internet panels generally and web-based data collection along with opportunities to evaluate data collected using mobile devices and social media platforms. PMID:26170052

  19. Estimating the Relationship between Economic Growth and Health Expenditures in ECO Countries Using Panel Cointegration Approach.

    PubMed

    Hatam, Nahid; Tourani, Sogand; Homaie Rad, Enayatollah; Bastani, Peivand

    2016-02-01

    Increasing knowledge of people about health leads to raising the share of health expenditures in government budget continuously; although governors do not like this rise because of budget limitations. This study aimed to find the association between health expenditures and economic growth in ECO countries. We added health capital in Solow model and used the panel cointegration approach to show the importance of health expenditures in economic growth. For estimating the model, first we used Pesaran cross-sectional dependency test, after that we used Pesaran CADF unit root test, and then we used Westerlund panel cointegration test to show if there is a long-term association between variables or not. After that, we used chaw test, Breusch-Pagan test and Hausman test to find the form of the model. Finally, we used OLS estimator for panel data. Findings showed that there is a positive, strong association between health expenditures and economic growth in ECO countries. If governments increase investing in health, the total production of the country will be increased, so health expenditures are considered as an investing good. The effects of health expenditures in developing countries must be higher than those in developed countries. Such studies can help policy makers to make long-term decisions.

  20. The temporal association of excessive health expenditure with suicidal ideation among primary income earners: a cross-sectional design using the Korean Welfare Panel Survey (KoWePS)

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Jaeyong; Choi, Jae Woo; Jang, Sung-in; Choi, Young; Lee, Sang Gyu; Ihm, Tae Hwan; Park, Eun-Cheol

    2015-01-01

    Objective Excessive health expenditure (EHE) is a global issue for households suffering from high-cost medical conditions, low incomes and limited insurance coverage. After the international financial crisis of 2008, EHE became a social problem in developed countries. Such economic crisis might induce severe mental stress, resulting in suicidal ideation. Methods We used the Korean Welfare Panel Study (KoWePS) from 2011 to 2013 and selected primary income earners, who were defined as practical and economic representatives of households; the total number of analysed samples was 4247 of 5717 households in the database. We only included households that had never experienced EHE before 2011. To examine the temporal relationship between EHE and suicidal ideation, we conducted a logistic regression analysis. Results Among 4247 participants, 146 (3.4%) experienced suicidal ideation, whereas 4101 (96.6%) did not. One scale of depression score (OR=1.28, CI 1.23 to 1.34, p<0.001) was associated with increased suicidal ideation. Such ideation was influenced to a greater extent by a recent EHE above 10% of disposable income (OR=1.91, CI 1.16 to 3.15, p=0.012) than by either a remote EHE (OR=1.29, CI 0.71 to 2.32) or one in 2011 and 2012 (OR=1.67, CI 1.01 to 2.78, p=0.048). Conclusions In this study, more recent EHE resulted in more suicidal ideation. In conclusion, we suggest that recent household EHE might be considered as an important factor to prevent suicidal ideation and to improve the mental health of individuals. PMID:26082463

  1. Latent Causal Structures in Panel Surveys.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolfle, Lee M.; Robertshaw, Dianne

    Since measurement errors exist in panel surveys, LISREL (a procedure for controlling measurement error by the analysis of covariance structures) was used in this investigation to determine the stability of the social-psychological concept of locus of control expectancy change with the aquisition of post secondary education. The National…

  2. Catastrophic Health Expenditures for Households with Disabled Members: Evidence from the Korean Health Panel.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jeong-Eun; Shin, Hyung-Ik; Do, Young Kyung; Yang, Eun Joo

    2016-03-01

    Persons with disabilities use more health care services due to ill health and face higher health care expenses and burden. This study explored the incidence of catastrophic health expenditures of households with persons with disabilities compared to that of those without such persons. We used the Korean Health Panel (KHP) dataset for the years 2010 and 2011. The final sample was 5,610 households; 800 (14.3%) of these were households with a person with a disability and 4,810 (85.7%) were households without such a person. Households with a person with a disability faced higher catastrophic health expenditures, spending about 1.2 to 1.4 times more of their annual living expenditures for out-of-pocket medical expenses, compared to households without persons with disabilities. Households having low economic status and members with chronic disease were more likely to face catastrophic health expenditures, while those receiving public assistance were less likely. Exemption or reduction of out-of-pocket payments in the National Health Insurance and additional financial support are needed so that the people with disabilities can use medical services without suffering financial crisis. PMID:26955233

  3. Smoking Behavior and Healthcare Expenditure in the United States, 1992–2009: Panel Data Estimates

    PubMed Central

    Lightwood, James; Glantz, Stanton A.

    2016-01-01

    Background Reductions in smoking in Arizona and California have been shown to be associated with reduced per capita healthcare expenditures in these states compared to control populations in the rest of the US. This paper extends that analysis to all states and estimates changes in healthcare expenditure attributable to changes in aggregate measures of smoking behavior in all states. Methods and Findings State per capita healthcare expenditure is modeled as a function of current smoking prevalence, mean cigarette consumption per smoker, other demographic and economic factors, and cross-sectional time trends using a fixed effects panel data regression on annual time series data for each the 50 states and the District of Columbia for the years 1992 through 2009. We found that 1% relative reductions in current smoking prevalence and mean packs smoked per current smoker are associated with 0.118% (standard error [SE] 0.0259%, p < 0.001) and 0.108% (SE 0.0253%, p < 0.001) reductions in per capita healthcare expenditure (elasticities). The results of this study are subject to the limitations of analysis of aggregate observational data, particularly that a study of this nature that uses aggregate data and a relatively small sample size cannot, by itself, establish a causal connection between smoking behavior and healthcare costs. Historical regional variations in smoking behavior (including those due to the effects of state tobacco control programs, smoking restrictions, and differences in taxation) are associated with substantial differences in per capita healthcare expenditures across the United States. Those regions (and the states in them) that have lower smoking have substantially lower medical costs. Likewise, those that have higher smoking have higher medical costs. Sensitivity analysis confirmed that these results are robust. Conclusions Changes in healthcare expenditure appear quickly after changes in smoking behavior. A 10% relative drop in smoking in every

  4. Health Care Expenditure and GDP in African Countries: Evidence from Semiparametric Estimation with Panel Data

    PubMed Central

    Lv, Zhike; Zhu, Huiming

    2014-01-01

    A large body of literature studies on the relationship between health care expenditure (HCE) and GDP have been analyzed using data intensively from developed countries, but little is known for other regions. This paper considers a semiparametric panel data analysis for the study of the relationship between per capita HCE and per capita GDP for 42 African countries over the period 1995–2009. We found that infant mortality rate per 1,000 live births has a negative effect on per capita HCE, while the proportion of the population aged 65 is statistically insignificant in African countries. Furthermore, we found that the income elasticity is not constant but varies with income level, and health care is a necessity rather than a luxury for African countries. PMID:24741366

  5. Does managed care reduce health care expenditure? Evidence from spatial panel data.

    PubMed

    Ehlert, Andree; Oberschachtsiek, Dirk

    2014-09-01

    Similar to, for example, the US, Switzerland or Great Britain the German health care sector has recently undergone a series of reforms towards managed care. These measures are intended to yield both a higher quality of care and cost containment. In our study we ask whether managed care reduces health care expenditure at the market level. We apply a macroeconomic evaluation approach based on a regional panel data set which is as yet unique in the context of managed care. Econometrically, we account for both unobserved heterogeneity and spatial dependence, i.e. regional interrelations in health care. We discuss alternative model specifications and include a range of sensitivity analyses. Our results suggest that in contrast to public perception the share of managed care contracts has a positive impact on pharmaceutical spending, in particular through regional spillover effects.

  6. Does managed care reduce health care expenditure? Evidence from spatial panel data.

    PubMed

    Ehlert, Andree; Oberschachtsiek, Dirk

    2014-09-01

    Similar to, for example, the US, Switzerland or Great Britain the German health care sector has recently undergone a series of reforms towards managed care. These measures are intended to yield both a higher quality of care and cost containment. In our study we ask whether managed care reduces health care expenditure at the market level. We apply a macroeconomic evaluation approach based on a regional panel data set which is as yet unique in the context of managed care. Econometrically, we account for both unobserved heterogeneity and spatial dependence, i.e. regional interrelations in health care. We discuss alternative model specifications and include a range of sensitivity analyses. Our results suggest that in contrast to public perception the share of managed care contracts has a positive impact on pharmaceutical spending, in particular through regional spillover effects. PMID:24691774

  7. Correlates of out-of-pocket and catastrophic health expenditures in Tanzania: results from a national household survey

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Inequality in health services access and utilization are influenced by out-of-pocket health expenditures in many low and middle-income countries (LMICs). Various antecedents such as social factors, poor health and economic factors are proposed to direct the choice of health care service use and incurring out-of-pocket payments. We investigated the association of these factors with out-of-pocket health expenditures among the adult and older population in the United Republic of Tanzania. We also investigated the prevalence and associated determinants contributing to household catastrophic health expenditures. Methods We accessed the data of a multistage stratified random sample of 7279 adult participants, aged between 18 and 59 years, as well as 1018 participants aged above 60 years, from the first round of the Tanzania National Panel survey. We employed multiple generalized linear and logistic regression models to evaluate the correlates of out-of-pocket as well as catastrophic health expenditures, accounting for the complex sample design effects. Results Increasing age, female gender, obesity and functional disability increased the adults’ out-of-pocket health expenditures significantly, while functional disability and visits to traditional healers increased the out-of-pocket health expenditures in older participants. Adult participants, who lacked formal education or worked as manual laborers earned significantly less (p < 0.001) and spent less on health (p < 0.001), despite having higher levels of disability. Large household size, household head’s occupation as a manual laborer, household member with chronic illness, domestic violence against women and traditional healer’s visits were significantly associated with high catastrophic health expenditures. Conclusion We observed that the prevalence of inequalities in socioeconomic factors played a significant role in determining the nature of both out-of-pocket and catastrophic health

  8. Health-related expenditure patterns in selected migrant groups: data from the Australian Household Expenditure Survey, 1984.

    PubMed

    Powles, J; Hage, B; Cosgrove, M

    1990-01-01

    Australians born in Italy, Greece and East and South East Asia all have substantially lower mortality levels than those born in Australia, the British Isles or Holland and Germany. Using data from the 1984 Household Expenditure Survey, the health-related consumption expenditure of these six groups was compared (excluding expenditure on medical care). The heterogeneity of household types was largely removed by confining attention to married couple households with dependent children. The two groups with mortality levels comparable to those of the Australian-born (British Isles and Holland/Germany) also shared a similar pattern of consumption expenditures. There was a tendency (not always fully consistent), for the low mortality groups to spend more on fruits, vegetables, cereal products and fish and substantially less on alcohol. Patterns that might be 'unexpected' in low mortality groups are the (presumptively) substantial expenditures on tobacco among males (especially in the Greek group) and the substantial expenditures on red meat in all three groups. Analysis of available data sets such as this can provide useful descriptions of the distribution of health-influencing behaviour in our population.

  9. 78 FR 50373 - Proposed Information Collection; Comment Request; Annual Capital Expenditures Survey

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-19

    ... 2013 through 2015 Annual Capital Expenditures Survey (ACES). The annual survey collects data on fixed assets and depreciation, sales and receipts, capitalized computer software, and capital expenditures for.... II. Method of Collection For the 2012 and prior ACES data collection; the Census Bureau used mail...

  10. Does non-profit health insurance reduce financial burden? Evidence from the Vietnam Living Standards Survey Panel.

    PubMed

    Sepehri, Ardeshir; Sarma, Sisira; Simpson, Wayne

    2006-06-01

    Many low-income countries are implementing non-profit medical insurance to increase access to health services, especially among low-income households, and to raise additional revenue for financing public health services. This paper estimates the effect of insurance on out-of-pocket health expenditures using the Vietnam Living Standards Surveys for 1993 and 1998 and appropriate models for panel data. Our findings suggest that health insurance reduces health expenditure when unobserved heterogeneity is accounted for. Failure to capture unobserved heterogeneity produces contrary results that are consistent with previous cross-sectional studies in the literature. Health insurance is found to reduce out-of-pocket expenditure between 16 and 18% and the reduction in expenditure is more pronounced for individuals with lower incomes. At mean income, the effect of health insurance is to reduce health expenditures between 28 and 35%.

  11. Catastrophic household expenditure on health in Nepal: a cross-sectional survey

    PubMed Central

    Gilmour, Stuart; Rahman, Md Mizanur; Gautam, Ghan Shyam; Shrestha, Pradeep Krishna; Shibuya, Kenji

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Objective To determine the incidence of – and illnesses commonly associated with – catastrophic household expenditure on health in Nepal. Methods We did a cross-sectional population-based survey in five municipalities of Kathmandu Valley between November 2011 and January 2012. For each household surveyed, out-of-pocket spending on health in the previous 30 days that exceeded 10% of the household’s total expenditure over the same period was considered to be catastrophic. We estimated the incidence and intensity of catastrophic health expenditure. We identified the illnesses most commonly associated with such expenditure using a Poisson regression model and assessed the distribution of expenditure by economic quintile of households using the concentration index. Findings Overall, 284 of the 1997 households studied in Kathmandu, i.e. 13.8% after adjustment by sampling weight, reported catastrophic health expenditure in the 30 days before the survey. After adjusting for confounders, this expenditure was found to be associated with injuries, particularly those resulting from road traffic accidents. Catastrophic expenditure by households in the poorest quintile were associated with at least one episode of diabetes, asthma or heart disease. Conclusion In an urban area of Nepal, catastrophic household expenditure on health was mostly associated with injuries and noncommunicable diseases such as diabetes and asthma. Throughout Nepal, interventions for the control and management of noncommunicable diseases and the prevention of road traffic accidents should be promoted. A phased introduction of health insurance should also reduce the incidence of catastrophic household expenditure. PMID:25378730

  12. Catastrophic health expenditure according to employment status in South Korea: a population-based panel study

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Jae Woo; Kim, Tae Hyun; Jang, Sung In; Jang, Suk Yong; Kim, Woo-Rim; Park, Eun Cheol

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Catastrophic health expenditure (CHE) means that the medical spending of a household exceeds a certain level of capacity to pay. Previous studies of CHE have focused on benefits supported by the public sector or high medical cost incurred by treating diseases in South Korea. This study examines variance of CHE in these households according to changes in employment status. We also determine whether a relationship exists according to income level. Design A longitudinal study. Setting We used the Korean Welfare Panel Study (KOWEPS) conducted by the Korea Institute. Participants The data came from 5335 households during 2009–2012. Outcome measure CHE, defined as health expenditures that were 40% greater than the ability of the household to pay. Results Households with people who experienced changes in job status from employed to unemployed (OR 2.79, 95% CI 2.06 to 3.78) or were unemployed with no status change (OR 1.57, 95% CI 1.28 to 1.92) were more likely to incur CHE than those containing people who were consistently employed. In addition, low-income families with members who had either lost a job (OR 3.52, 95% CI 2.44 to 5.10) or were already unemployed (OR 1.67, 95% CI 1.29 to 2.16) were more likely to incur CHE than those with family members with a consistent job. Conclusions Given the insecure employment status of people with low income, they are more likely to face barriers in obtaining needed health services. Meeting their healthcare needs is an important consideration. PMID:27456329

  13. Gender Difference in Health-Care Expenditure: Evidence from India Human Development Survey

    PubMed Central

    Saikia, Nandita; Moradhvaj; Bora, Jayanta Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Background While the gender disparity in health and mortality in various stages of life in India is well documented, there is limited evidence on female disadvantage in health-care expenditure (HCE). Aims Examine the gender difference in HCE in short-term and major morbidity in India, and understand the role of factors underlying the difference. Data and Methods Using two rounds of nationally representative panel data—the India Human Development Survey (IHDS) 2004–2005 and 2011–2012 (IHDS I & II)—we calculate morbidity prevalence rate and mean HCE by gender, and examine the adjusted effect of gender on major morbidity-related HCE by using a two-part regression model. Further, we performed Oaxaca-Blinder decomposition of the gender gap in HCE in major morbidity to understand the contribution of demographic and socio-economic factors. Results Health-care expenditure on females was systematically lower than on males across all demographic and socio-economic groups. Multivariate analysis confirms that female HCE is significantly lower than male HCE even after controlling demographic and socio-economic factors (β = -0.148, p = 0.000, CI:-0.206–0.091). For both short-term and major morbidity, a female disadvantage on HCE increased from IHDS I to IHDS II. For instance, the male–female gap in major morbidity related expenditure increased from INR 1298 to INR 4172. A decomposition analysis of gender gap in HCE demonstrates that about 48% of the gap is attributable to differences in demographic and socio-economic factors (endowment effect), whereas 50% of the gap is due to the differential effect of the determinants (coefficient effect). Interpretation Indians spend less on female health care than on male health care. Most of the gender gap in HCE is not due to differential distribution of factors affecting HCE. PMID:27391322

  14. Socioeconomic status and tobacco expenditure among Australian households: results from the 1998–99 Household Expenditure Survey

    PubMed Central

    Siahpush, M

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the relation between socioeconomic status (SES) and tobacco expenditure among Australian households. Design and setting: Cross sectional study (The Household Expenditure Survey 1998–99) by the Australian Bureau of Statistics, based on a multi-stage national sample of 9682 households. Participants: From selected households, all members aged 15 and over were interviewed. Main results: Lower SES was associated with higher odds of reporting tobacco expenditure. Among smoking households, those from lower SES spent more of their funds on tobacco. For example, households headed by a person with no educational qualification spent 34% more on tobacco than those headed by a person with a university degree. Blue collar households spent 23% more than professional households. Percentage of total household expenditure on tobacco in the first income quintile was 62% more than that of households in the fifth quintile. Conclusion: Antismoking interventions and policies that are specifically aimed at lower SES groups can potentially improve social equality. They can also ameliorate social inequalities in health, given that much of the SES differentials in morbidity and mortality are attributed to the pronounced SES gradient in smoking. PMID:14573585

  15. Quality-quantity decomposition of income elasticity of U.S. hospital care expenditure using state-level panel data.

    PubMed

    Chen, Weiwei; Okunade, Albert; Lubiani, Gregory G

    2014-11-01

    Economic theory suggests that income growth could lead to changes in consumption quantity and quality as the spending on a commodity changes. Similarly, the volume and quality of healthcare consumption could rise with incomes because of demographic changes, usage of innovative medical technologies, and other factors. Hospital healthcare spending is the largest component of aggregate US healthcare expenditures. The novel contribution of our paper is estimating and decomposing the income elasticity of hospital care expenditures (HOCEXP) into its quantity and quality components. By using a 1999-2008 panel dataset of the 50 US states, results from the seemingly unrelated regressions model estimation reveal the income elasticity of HOCEXP to be 0.427 (std. error=0.044), with about 0.391 (calculated std. error=0.044) arising from care quality improvements and 0.035 (std. error=0.050) emanating from the rise in usage volume. Our novel research findings suggest the following: (i) the quantity part of hospital expenditure is inelastic to income change; (ii) almost the entire income-induced rise in hospital expenditure comes from care quality changes; and (iii) the 0.427 income elasticity of HOCEXP, the largest component of total US healthcare expenditure, makes hospital care a normal commodity and a much stronger technical necessity than aggregate healthcare. Policy implications are discussed. PMID:24038390

  16. Quality-quantity decomposition of income elasticity of U.S. hospital care expenditure using state-level panel data.

    PubMed

    Chen, Weiwei; Okunade, Albert; Lubiani, Gregory G

    2014-11-01

    Economic theory suggests that income growth could lead to changes in consumption quantity and quality as the spending on a commodity changes. Similarly, the volume and quality of healthcare consumption could rise with incomes because of demographic changes, usage of innovative medical technologies, and other factors. Hospital healthcare spending is the largest component of aggregate US healthcare expenditures. The novel contribution of our paper is estimating and decomposing the income elasticity of hospital care expenditures (HOCEXP) into its quantity and quality components. By using a 1999-2008 panel dataset of the 50 US states, results from the seemingly unrelated regressions model estimation reveal the income elasticity of HOCEXP to be 0.427 (std. error=0.044), with about 0.391 (calculated std. error=0.044) arising from care quality improvements and 0.035 (std. error=0.050) emanating from the rise in usage volume. Our novel research findings suggest the following: (i) the quantity part of hospital expenditure is inelastic to income change; (ii) almost the entire income-induced rise in hospital expenditure comes from care quality changes; and (iii) the 0.427 income elasticity of HOCEXP, the largest component of total US healthcare expenditure, makes hospital care a normal commodity and a much stronger technical necessity than aggregate healthcare. Policy implications are discussed.

  17. 76 FR 4635 - Proposed Information Collection; Comment Request; Economic Expenditure Survey of Golden Crab...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-26

    ... Expenditure Survey of Golden Crab Fishermen in the U.S. South Atlantic Region AGENCY: National Oceanic and... National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) proposes to collect economic information from golden-crab...

  18. Do Increased Resources Increase Educational Attainment during a Period of Rising Expenditure? Evidence from English Secondary Schools Using a Dynamic Panel Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pugh, Geoff; Mangan, Jean; Gray, John

    2011-01-01

    This article estimates the effects of school expenditure on school performance at Key Stage 4 in England, over the period 2003-07 during which real per pupil expenditure increased rapidly. It adds to previous investigations by using dynamic panel analysis to: exploit time series data on individual schools that only recently has become available;…

  19. Reconciling medical expenditure estimates from the MEPS and NHEA, 2002.

    PubMed

    Sing, Merrile; Banthin, Jessica S; Selden, Thomas M; Cowan, Cathy A; Keehan, Sean P

    2006-01-01

    The Medical Expenditure Panel Survey (MEPS) and National Health Expenditure Accounts (NHEA) are often used for health care policy analysis and simulations because they contain comprehensive estimates of national health care expenditures. The NHEA are primarily based on aggregate provider revenue data, while MEPS is based on person-level data on health care expenditures. This article compares MEPS and NHEA expenditure estimates for 2002 and discusses the differences. When MEPS and the NHEA are adjusted to be on a consistent basis, their expenditure estimates differ by 13.8 percent.

  20. 78 FR 65971 - Proposed Information Collection; Comment Request; Marine Recreational Fishing Expenditure Survey

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-04

    ... Recreational Fishing Expenditure Survey AGENCY: National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA... goods such as fishing gear, boats, vehicles, and second homes. The second part, planned for 2016, will ask anglers about the expenses incurred on their most recent marine recreational fishing trip....

  1. 76 FR 18517 - Proposed Information Collection; Comment Request; Survey: Expenditures Incurred by Recipients of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-04

    ... Bureau of Economic Analysis Proposed Information Collection; Comment Request; Survey: Expenditures Incurred by Recipients of Biomedical Research and Development Awards From the National Institutes of Health... e-mail at dhynek@doc.gov . FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Steven Payson, Chief of...

  2. A Survey of Out-of-Pocket Expenditures for Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder in Israel

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raz, Raanan; Lerner-Geva, Liat; Leon, Odelia; Chodick, Gabriel; Gabis, Lidia V.

    2013-01-01

    We describe a survey of children with ASD aged 4-10 years. The main dependent variables were out-of-pocket expenditures for health services and hours of therapy. Multivariable logistic regression models were used in order to find independent predictors for service utilization. Parents of 178 of the children (87%) agreed to participate. The average…

  3. 77 FR 21086 - Patents External Quality Survey (formerly Customer Panel Quality Survey)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-09

    ... United States Patent and Trademark Office Patents External Quality Survey (formerly Customer Panel Quality Survey) ACTION: Proposed collection; comment request. SUMMARY: The United States Patent and...@uspto.gov . Include ``0651- 0057 Patents External Quality Survey comment'' in the subject line of...

  4. Is household smoking status associated with expenditure on food at restaurants, alcohol, gambling and insurance? Results from the 1998–99 Household Expenditure Survey, Australia

    PubMed Central

    Siahpush, M; Borland, R; Scollo, M

    2004-01-01

    Aim: To examine how household expenditure on food at restaurants, alcohol, gambling and insurance vary between smoking and non-smoking households. Design: Cross sectional survey of households from private dwellings, conducted by the Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS), using a stratified multistage area sample design. Setting: Australia, 1998–99. Participants: Nationally representative sample of households (n = 6892). Main outcome measures: Expenditure on meals at restaurants, alcohol, alcoholic beverages at licensed premises, gambling, and insurance. Results: The odds of reporting expenditure on restaurant food and health insurance were 20% and 40% smaller for smoking than non-smoking households, respectively. The odds of reporting expenditure on alcohol (not including expenditure at licensed premises), drinking at licensed premises, and gambling were 100%, 50%, and 40% greater for smoking than for non-smoking households, respectively. Conclusions: The study suggests that smokers are more likely to engage in risky behaviour. Implementing smoking bans in licensed premises and gambling venues can provide an opportunity to reduce smoking prevalence. Quitting or cutting down smoking can provide opportunities for expenditure on other products or services, and enhance standards of living. PMID:15564627

  5. The concentration of health care expenditures, revisited.

    PubMed

    Berk, M L; Monheit, A C

    2001-01-01

    In two previous publications, we described the distribution of health care expenditures among the civilian, noninstitutionalized U.S. population, specifically in terms of the share of aggregate expenditures accounted for by the top spenders in the distribution. Our focus revealed considerably skewed distribution, with a relatively small proportion of the population accounting for a large share of expenditures. In this paper we update our previous tabulations (last computed using data more than a decade old) with new data from the 1996 Medical Expenditure Panel Survey (MEPS). Our findings show that the skewed concentration of health care expenditures has remained very stable; 5 percent of the population accounts for the majority of health expenditures.

  6. Health Care Utilization and Expenditures for Children with Autism: Data from U.S. National Samples

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liptak, Gregory S.; Stuart, Tami; Auinger, Peggy

    2006-01-01

    Little is known about the use of medical services by children who have autism (ASD). Provide nationally representative data for health service utilization and expenditures of children with ASD. Cross-sectional survey using the Medical Expenditure Panel (MEPS), and National (Hospital) Ambulatory Medical Care Surveys (N(H)AMCS). A total of 80…

  7. Time discounting and smoking behavior: evidence from a panel survey(*).

    PubMed

    Kang, Myong-Il; Ikeda, Shinsuke

    2014-12-01

    By using a panel survey of Japanese adults, we show that smoking behavior is associated with personal time discounting and its biases, such as hyperbolic discounting and the sign effect, in the way that theory predicts: smoking depends positively on the discount rate and the degree of hyperbolic discounting and negatively on the presence of the sign effect. Positive effects of hyperbolic discounting on smoking are salient for naïve people, who are not aware of their self-control problem. By estimating smoking participation and smokers' cigarette consumption in Cragg's two-part model, we find that the two smoking decisions depend on different sets of time-discounting variables. Particularly, smoking participation is affected by being a naïve hyperbolic discounter, whereas the discount rate, the presence of the sign effect, and a hyperbolic discounting proxy constructed from procrastination behavior vis-à-vis doing homework assignments affect both types of decision making. The panel data enable us to analyze the over-time instability of elicited discount rates. The instability is shown to come from measurement errors, rather than preference shocks on time preference. Several evidences indicate that the detected associations between time preferences and smoking behavior are interpersonal one, rather than within-personal one.

  8. Time discounting and smoking behavior: evidence from a panel survey(*).

    PubMed

    Kang, Myong-Il; Ikeda, Shinsuke

    2014-12-01

    By using a panel survey of Japanese adults, we show that smoking behavior is associated with personal time discounting and its biases, such as hyperbolic discounting and the sign effect, in the way that theory predicts: smoking depends positively on the discount rate and the degree of hyperbolic discounting and negatively on the presence of the sign effect. Positive effects of hyperbolic discounting on smoking are salient for naïve people, who are not aware of their self-control problem. By estimating smoking participation and smokers' cigarette consumption in Cragg's two-part model, we find that the two smoking decisions depend on different sets of time-discounting variables. Particularly, smoking participation is affected by being a naïve hyperbolic discounter, whereas the discount rate, the presence of the sign effect, and a hyperbolic discounting proxy constructed from procrastination behavior vis-à-vis doing homework assignments affect both types of decision making. The panel data enable us to analyze the over-time instability of elicited discount rates. The instability is shown to come from measurement errors, rather than preference shocks on time preference. Several evidences indicate that the detected associations between time preferences and smoking behavior are interpersonal one, rather than within-personal one. PMID:24136867

  9. Private medical insurance and saving: evidence from the British Household Panel Survey.

    PubMed

    Guariglia, Alessandra; Rossi, Mariacristina

    2004-07-01

    This paper uses the British Household Panel Survey for the years 1996-2000 to investigate the relationship between saving and private medical insurance in the UK. Because the National Health Service (NHS) gives comprehensive health coverage and is generally free at source, one would not expect private medical insurance to crowd-out saving. However, the NHS being characterised by long waiting lists and generally poor quality, many people prefer to use private health services. In such circumstances, those individuals who are not covered by private medical insurance, and who are therefore more exposed to facing unexpected out-of-pocket private health care expenditures or income losses while waiting for public treatment might save more for precautionary reasons than those who are covered. According to our findings, which are based on a wide range of econometric specifications, there is a positive association between insurance coverage and saving, suggesting that private medical insurance does not generally crowd-out private saving. However, we found some evidence of crowding-out in those areas where the quality of medical facilities is perceived as poor, and in rural areas, characterised by fewer NHS providers.

  10. Methods for Estimating Medical Expenditures Attributable to Intimate Partner Violence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Derek S.; Finkelstein, Eric A.; Mercy, James A.

    2008-01-01

    This article compares three methods for estimating the medical cost burden of intimate partner violence against U.S. adult women (18 years and older), 1 year postvictimization. To compute the estimates, prevalence data from the National Violence Against Women Survey are combined with cost data from the Medical Expenditure Panel Survey, the…

  11. Personality Measurement and Assessment in Large Panel Surveys*

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Brent; Jackson, Joshua J.; Duckworth, Angela L.; Von Culin, Katherine

    2013-01-01

    Personality tests are being added to large panel studies with increasing regularity, such as the Health and Retirement Study (HRS). To facilitate the inclusion and interpretation of these tests, we provide some general background on personality psychology, personality assessment, and the validity of personality tests. In this review, we provide background on definitions of personality, the strengths and weaknesses of the self-report approaches to personality testing typically used in large panel studies, and the validity of personality tests for three outcomes: genetics, income, and health. We conclude with recommendations on how to improve personality assessment in future panel studies. PMID:23503719

  12. Assessing the need for a new nationally representative household panel survey in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Moffitt, Robert; Schoeni, Robert F.; Brown, Charles; Chase-Lansdale, P. Lindsay; Couper, Mick P.; Diez-Roux, Ana V.; Hurst, Erik; Seltzer, Judith A.

    2015-01-01

    We introduce this special issue on the critical matter of whether the existing household panel surveys in the U.S. are adequate to address the important emerging social science and policy questions of the next few decades. We summarize the conference papers which address this issue in different domains. The papers detail many new and important emerging research questions but also identify key limitations in existing panels in addressing those questions. To address these limitations, we consider the advantages and disadvantages of initiating a new, general-purpose omnibus household panel in the U.S. We also discuss the particular benefits of starting new panels that have specific targeted domains such as child development, population health and health care. We also develop a list of valuable enhancements to existing panels which could address many of their limitations. PMID:26688609

  13. Estimation and adjustment of self-selection bias in volunteer panel web surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niu, Chengying

    2016-06-01

    By using propensity score matching method of random sample, we matched simple random sample units and volunteer panel Web survey sample units based on the equal or similar propensity score. The unbiased estimators of the population parameters are constructed by using the matching simple random sample, and the self-selection bias is estimated. We propose propensity score weighted and matching sample post stratification weighted methods to estimate the population parameters, and the self-selection bias in volunteer panel Web Surveys are adjusted.

  14. Reconciling Medical Expenditure Estimates from the MEPS and NHEA, 2007

    PubMed Central

    Bernard, Didem; Cowan, Cathy; Selden, Thomas; Cai, Liming; Catlin, Aaron; Heffler, Stephen

    2012-01-01

    Objective Provide a comparison of health care expenditure estimates for 2007 from the Medical Expenditure Panel Survey (MEPS) and the National Health Expenditure Accounts (NHEA). Reconciling these estimates serves two important purposes. First, it is an important quality assurance exercise for improving and ensuring the integrity of each source's estimates. Second, the reconciliation provides a consistent baseline of health expenditure data for policy simulations. Our results assist researchers to adjust MEPS to be consistent with the NHEA so that the projected costs as well as budgetary and tax implications of any policy change are consistent with national health spending estimates. Data Sources The Medical Expenditure Panel Survey produced by the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, and the National Health Center for Health Statistics and the National Health Expenditures produced by the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Service's Office of the Actuary. Results In this study, we focus on the personal health care (PHC) sector, which includes the goods and services rendered to treat or prevent a specific disease or condition in an individual. The official 2007 NHEA estimate for PHC spending is $1,915 billion and the MEPS estimate is $1,126 billion. Adjusting the NHEA estimates for differences in underlying populations, covered services, and other measurement concepts reduces the NHEA estimate for 2007 to $1,366 billion. As a result, MEPS is $240 billion, or 17.6 percent, less than the adjusted NHEA total. PMID:24800157

  15. Selection of key financial indicators: a literature, panel and survey approach.

    PubMed

    Pink, George H; Daniel, Imtiaz; Hall, Linda McGillis; McKillop, Ian

    2007-01-01

    Since 1998, most hospitals in Ontario have voluntarily participated in one of the largest and most ambitious publicly available performance-reporting initiatives in the world. This article describes the method used to select key financial indicators for inclusion in the report including the literature review, panel and survey approaches that were used. The results for five years of recent data for Ontario hospitals are also presented. PMID:18271103

  16. An Experimental Study Using Opt-in Internet Panel Surveys for Behavioral Health Surveillance

    PubMed Central

    Gotway Crawford, Carol A.; Okoro, Catherine A.; Akcin, Haci M.; Dhingra, Satvinder

    2013-01-01

    Objective To present the design and preliminary results of a pilot study to investigate the use of opt-in Internet panel surveys for behavioral health surveillance. Introduction Today, surveyors in both the private and public sectors are facing considerable challenges with random digit dialed (RDD) landline telephone samples. The population coverage rates for landline telephone surveys are being eroded by wireless-only households, portable telephone numbers, telecommunication barriers (e.g., call forwarding, call blocking and pager connections), technological barriers (call-blocking, busy circuits) and increased refusal rates and privacy concerns. Addressing these issues increasingly drives up the costs associated with dual-frame telephone surveys designed to be representative of the target population as well as hinders their ability to be fully representative of the adult population of each state and territory in the United States. In an effort to continue to meet these challenges head on and assist state and territorial public health professionals in the continued collection of data that are representative of their respective populations, novel approaches to behavioral health surveillance need continued examination. Both private and public sector researchers are evaluating the use of Internet opt-in panels to augment dual-frame RDD survey methods. Compared to dual-frame RDD, opt-in Internet panels offer lower costs, quick data collection and dissemination, and the ability to gather additional data on panelists over time. However, as with dual-frame RDD, this mode has similar challenges with coverage error and non-response. Nevertheless, survey methodologists are moving forward and exploring ways to reduce or eliminate biases between the sample and the target population. Methods A collaborative pilot project was designed to assess the feasibility and accuracy of opt-in Internet panel surveys for behavioral health surveillance. This pilot project is a collaboration

  17. Estimating resting energy expenditure in patients requiring nutritional support: a survey of dietetic practice.

    PubMed

    Green, A J; Smith, P; Whelan, K

    2008-01-01

    Estimation of resting energy expenditure (REE) involves predicting basal metabolic rate (BMR) plus adjustment for metabolic stress. The aim of this study was to investigate the methods used to estimate REE and to identify the impact of the patient's clinical condition and the dietitians' work profile on the stress factor assigned. A random sample of 115 dietitians from the United Kingdom with an interest in nutritional support completed a postal questionnaire regarding the estimation of REE for 37 clinical conditions. The Schofield equation was used by the majority (99%) of dietitians to calculate BMR; however, the stress factors assigned varied considerably with coefficients of variation ranging from 18.5 (cancer with cachexia) to 133.9 (HIV). Dietitians specializing in gastroenterology assigned a higher stress factor to decompensated liver disease than those not specializing in gastroenterology (19.3 vs 10.7, P=0.004). The results of this investigation strongly suggest that there is wide inconsistency in the assignment of stress factors within specific conditions and gives rise to concern over the potential consequences in terms of under- or overfeeding that may ensue. PMID:17311053

  18. Affordability of the Health Expenditures of Insured Americans Before the Affordable Care Act.

    PubMed

    Nyman, John A; Trenz, Helen M

    2016-02-01

    Central to the Affordable Care Act is the notion of affordability and the role of health insurance in making otherwise unaffordable health care affordable. We used data from the 1996 to 2008 versions of the Medical Expenditure Panel Survey to estimate the portion of overall health care expenditures by insured respondents that would otherwise have been beyond their disposable incomes and assets. We found that about one third of insured expenditures would have been unaffordable, with a much higher percentage among publicly insured individuals. This result suggests that one of the main functions of insurance is to cover expenses that insured individuals would not otherwise be able to afford. PMID:26691116

  19. Affordability of the Health Expenditures of Insured Americans Before the Affordable Care Act.

    PubMed

    Nyman, John A; Trenz, Helen M

    2016-02-01

    Central to the Affordable Care Act is the notion of affordability and the role of health insurance in making otherwise unaffordable health care affordable. We used data from the 1996 to 2008 versions of the Medical Expenditure Panel Survey to estimate the portion of overall health care expenditures by insured respondents that would otherwise have been beyond their disposable incomes and assets. We found that about one third of insured expenditures would have been unaffordable, with a much higher percentage among publicly insured individuals. This result suggests that one of the main functions of insurance is to cover expenses that insured individuals would not otherwise be able to afford.

  20. Online and Social Media Data As an Imperfect Continuous Panel Survey

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    There is a large body of research on utilizing online activity as a survey of political opinion to predict real world election outcomes. There is considerably less work, however, on using this data to understand topic-specific interest and opinion amongst the general population and specific demographic subgroups, as currently measured by relatively expensive surveys. Here we investigate this possibility by studying a full census of all Twitter activity during the 2012 election cycle along with the comprehensive search history of a large panel of Internet users during the same period, highlighting the challenges in interpreting online and social media activity as the results of a survey. As noted in existing work, the online population is a non-representative sample of the offline world (e.g., the U.S. voting population). We extend this work to show how demographic skew and user participation is non-stationary and difficult to predict over time. In addition, the nature of user contributions varies substantially around important events. Furthermore, we note subtle problems in mapping what people are sharing or consuming online to specific sentiment or opinion measures around a particular topic. We provide a framework, built around considering this data as an imperfect continuous panel survey, for addressing these issues so that meaningful insight about public interest and opinion can be reliably extracted from online and social media data. PMID:26730933

  1. Collection of Resource and Expenditure Data on the Schools and Staffing Survey. Working Paper Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Isaacs, Julia B.; Garet, Michael S.; Sherman, Joel D.; Cullen, Andrew; Phelps, Richard

    This report discusses the possibility of expanding the resource and finance data to be collected as part of the 1999-2000 Schools and Staffing Survey (SASS) of the National Center for Education Statistics (NCES). The proposal under consideration, which is being field tested in the fall of 1998 and winter of 1999, has two major components. The…

  2. Correlation Results for a Mass Loaded Vehicle Panel Test Article Finite Element Models and Modal Survey Tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maasha, Rumaasha; Towner, Robert L.

    2012-01-01

    High-fidelity Finite Element Models (FEMs) were developed to support a recent test program at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). The FEMs correspond to test articles used for a series of acoustic tests. Modal survey tests were used to validate the FEMs for five acoustic tests (a bare panel and four different mass-loaded panel configurations). An additional modal survey test was performed on the empty test fixture (orthogrid panel mounting fixture, between the reverb and anechoic chambers). Modal survey tests were used to test-validate the dynamic characteristics of FEMs used for acoustic test excitation. Modal survey testing and subsequent model correlation has validated the natural frequencies and mode shapes of the FEMs. The modal survey test results provide a basis for the analysis models used for acoustic loading response test and analysis comparisons

  3. Health Care Utilisation and Out-of-Pocket Expenditure Associated with Back Pain: A Nationally Representative Survey of Australian Women

    PubMed Central

    Kirby, Emma R.; Broom, Alex F.; Sibbritt, David W.; Refshauge, Kathryn M.; Adams, Jon

    2013-01-01

    Background Back pain impacts on a significant proportion of the Australian population over the life course and has high prevalence rates among women, particularly in older age. Back pain care is characterised by multiple practitioner and self-prescribed treatment options, and the out-of-pocket costs associated with consultations and self-prescribed treatments have not been examined to date. Objective To analyse the extent of health care practitioner consultations and self-prescribed treatment for back pain care among Australian women, and to assess the self-reported costs associated with such usage. Methods Survey of 1,310 women (response rate 80.9%) who reported seeking help for back pain from the ‘1946-51 cohort’ of the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women’s Health. Women were asked about their use of health care practitioners and self-prescribed treatments for back pain and the costs associated with such usage. Results In the past year 76.4% consulted a complementary and alternative practitioner, 56% an allied health practitioner and 59.2% a GP/medical specialist. Overall, women consulted with, on average, 3.0 (SD = 2.0) different health care practitioners, and had, on average, 12.2 (SD = 9.7) discrete health care practitioner consultations for back pain. Average self-reported out-of-pocket expenditure on practitioners and self-prescribed treatments for back pain care per annum was AU$873.10. Conclusions Multiple provider usage for various but distinct purposes (i.e. pain/mobility versus anxiety/stress) points to the need for further research into patient motivations and experiences of back pain care in order to improve and enhance access to and continuity of care. Our results suggest that the cost of back pain care represents a significant burden, and may ultimately limit women’s access to multiple providers. We extrapolate that for Australian working-age women, total out-of-pocket expenditure on back pain care per annum is in excess of AU$1

  4. Nonresidential buildings energy consumption survey: 1979 consumption and expenditures. Part 2. Steam, fuel oil, LPG, and all fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Patinkin, L.

    1983-12-01

    This report presents data on square footage and on total energy consumption and expenditures for commercial buildings in the contiguous United States. Also included are detailed consumption and expenditures tables for fuel oil or kerosene, liquid petroleum gas (LPG), and purchased steam. Commercial buildings include all nonresidential buildings with the exception of those where industrial activities occupy more of the total square footage than any other type of activity. 7 figures, 23 tables.

  5. [Study on correction of data bias caused by different missing mechanisms in survey of medical expenditure among students enrolling in Urban Resident Basic Medical Insurance].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Haixia; Zhao, Junkang; Gu, Caijiao; Cui, Yan; Rong, Huiying; Meng, Fanlong; Wang, Tong

    2015-05-01

    The study of the medical expenditure and its influencing factors among the students enrolling in Urban Resident Basic Medical Insurance (URBMI) in Taiyuan indicated that non response bias and selection bias coexist in dependent variable of the survey data. Unlike previous studies only focused on one missing mechanism, a two-stage method to deal with two missing mechanisms simultaneously was suggested in this study, combining multiple imputation with sample selection model. A total of 1 190 questionnaires were returned by the students (or their parents) selected in child care settings, schools and universities in Taiyuan by stratified cluster random sampling in 2012. In the returned questionnaires, 2.52% existed not missing at random (NMAR) of dependent variable and 7.14% existed missing at random (MAR) of dependent variable. First, multiple imputation was conducted for MAR by using completed data, then sample selection model was used to correct NMAR in multiple imputation, and a multi influencing factor analysis model was established. Based on 1 000 times resampling, the best scheme of filling the random missing values is the predictive mean matching (PMM) method under the missing proportion. With this optimal scheme, a two stage survey was conducted. Finally, it was found that the influencing factors on annual medical expenditure among the students enrolling in URBMI in Taiyuan included population group, annual household gross income, affordability of medical insurance expenditure, chronic disease, seeking medical care in hospital, seeking medical care in community health center or private clinic, hospitalization, hospitalization canceled due to certain reason, self medication and acceptable proportion of self-paid medical expenditure. The two-stage method combining multiple imputation with sample selection model can deal with non response bias and selection bias effectively in dependent variable of the survey data.

  6. Inadequate physical activity and health care expenditures in the United States.

    PubMed

    Carlson, Susan A; Fulton, Janet E; Pratt, Michael; Yang, Zhou; Adams, E Kathleen

    2015-01-01

    This study estimates the percentage of health care expenditures in the non-institutionalized United States (U.S.) adult population associated with levels of physical activity inadequate to meet current guidelines. Leisure-time physical activity data from the National Health Interview Survey (2004-2010) were merged with health care expenditure data from the Medical Expenditure Panel Survey (2006-2011). Health care expenditures for inactive (i.e., no physical activity) and insufficiently active adults (i.e., some physical activity but not enough to meet guidelines) were compared with active adults (i.e., ≥150minutes/week moderate-intensity equivalent activity) using an econometric model. Overall, 11.1% (95% CI: 7.3, 14.9) of aggregate health care expenditures were associated with inadequate physical activity (i.e., inactive and insufficiently active levels). When adults with any reported difficulty walking due to a health problem were excluded, 8.7% (95% CI: 5.2, 12.3) of aggregate health care expenditures were associated with inadequate physical activity. Increasing adults' physical activity to meet guidelines may reduce U.S. health care expenditures.

  7. Health care expenditures associated with pediatric pain-related conditions in the United States.

    PubMed

    Groenewald, Cornelius B; Wright, Davene R; Palermo, Tonya M

    2015-05-01

    The primary objective of this study was to assess the impact of pediatric pain-related conditions on health care expenditures. We analyzed data from a nationally representative sample of 6- to 17-year-old children captured in the 2007 National Health Interview Survey and 2008 Medical Expenditure Panel Survey. Health care expenditures of children with pain-related conditions were compared with those of children without pain-related conditions. Pain-related conditions were associated with incremental health care expenditures of $1339 (95% confidence interval [CI], $248-$2447) per capita. Extrapolated to the nation, pediatric pain-related conditions were associated with $11.8 billion (95% CI, $2.18-$21.5 billion) in total incremental health care expenditures. The incremental health care expenditures associated with pediatric pain-related conditions were similar to those of attention deficit and hyperactivity disorder ($9.23 billion; 95% CI, $1.89-$18.1 billion), but more than those associated with asthma ($5.35 billion; 95% CI, $0-$12.3 billion) and obesity ($0.73 billion; 95% CI, $6.28-$8.81 billion). Health care expenditures for pediatric pain-related conditions exert a considerable economic burden on society. Efforts to prevent and treat pediatric pain-related conditions are urgently needed.

  8. Health care expenditures associated with pediatric pain-related conditions in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Groenewald, Cornelius B.; Wright, Davene R.; Palermo, Tonya M.

    2015-01-01

    The primary objective of this study was to assess the impact of pediatric pain-related conditions on health care expenditures. We analyzed data from a nationally representative sample of 6- to 17-year-old children captured in the 2007 National Health Interview Survey and 2008 Medical Expenditure Panel Survey. Health care expenditures of children with pain-related conditions were compared with those of children without pain-related conditions. Pain-related conditions were associated with incremental health care expenditures of $1339 (95% confidence interval [CI], $248-$2447) per capita. Extrapolated to the nation, pediatric pain-related conditions were associated with $11.8 billion (95% CI, $2.18-$21.5 billion) in total incremental health care expenditures. The incremental health care expenditures associated with pediatric pain-related conditions were similar to those of attention deficit and hyperactivity disorder ($9.23 billion; 95% CI, $1.89-$18.1 billion), but more than those associated with asthma ($5.35 billion; 95% CI, $0-$12.3 billion) and obesity ($0.73 billion; 95% CI, $6.28-$8.81 billion). Health care expenditures for pediatric pain-related conditions exert a considerable economic burden on society. Efforts to prevent and treat pediatric pain-related conditions are urgently needed. PMID:25734992

  9. Dynamics of Adult Participation in Part-Time Education and Training: Results from the British Household Panel Survey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Macleod, Flora; Lambe, Paul

    2008-01-01

    In this paper we analyse the dynamics of adult participation in part-time education and training throughout the 90s and into the 2000s using data from 14 waves (1992-2005) of the British Household Panel Survey (BHPS). We study the volume (stocks) of participation and non-participation and the gross flows between states. This analysis provides a…

  10. Distinguishing the Influences of Father's and Mother's Involvement on Adolescent Academic Achievement: Analyses of Taiwan Education Panel Survey Data

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hsu, Hsien-Yuan; Zhang, Dalun; Kwok, Oi-Man; Li, Yan; Ju, Song

    2011-01-01

    Using a sample drawn from Taiwan, this study evaluated the role of mother and father involvement in adolescent academic achievement. The participants were drawn from the Taiwan Education Panel Survey (TEPS) and consisted of 8,108 adolescents who studied seventh grade in 2001. Father and mother involvement related to academic achievement was…

  11. Trade as a structural driver of dietary risk factors for noncommunicable diseases in the Pacific: an analysis of household income and expenditure survey data

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Noncommunicable diseases are a health and development challenge. Pacific Island countries are heavily affected by NCDs, with diabetes and obesity rates among the highest in the world. Trade is one of multiple structural drivers of NCDs in the Pacific, but country-level data linking trade, diets and NCD risk factors are scarce. We attempted to illustrate these links in five countries. The study had three objectives: generate cross-country profiles of food consumption and expenditure patterns; highlight the main ‘unhealthy’ food imports in each country to inform targeted policymaking; and demonstrate the potential of HCES data to analyze links between trade, diets and NCD risk factors, such as obesity. Methods We used two types of data: obesity rates as reported by WHO and aggregated household-level food expenditure and consumption from Household Income and Expenditure Survey reports. We classified foods in HIES data into four categories: imported/local, ‘unhealthy’/’healthy’, nontraditional/traditional, processed/unprocessed. We generated cross-country profiles and cross-country regressions to examine the relationships between imported foods and unhealthy foods, and between imported foods and obesity. Results Expenditure on imported foods was considerable in all countries but varied across countries, with highest values in Kiribati (53%) and Tonga (52%) and lowest values in Solomon Islands and Vanuatu (30%). Rice and sugar accounted for significant amounts of imported foods in terms of expenditure and calories, ranking among the top 3 foods in most countries. We found significant or near-significant associations in expenditure and caloric intake between ‘unhealthy’ and imported foods as well as between imported foods and obesity, though inferences based on these associations should be made carefully due to data constraints. Conclusions While additional research is needed, this study supports previous findings on trade as a structural

  12. Healthcare expenditures for autism during times of school transition: some vulnerable families fall behind.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Kathleen C; Parish, Susan L; Williams, Christianna S

    2014-10-01

    This study explores the association between school transition age and healthcare expenditures for children with autism. The paper explores three questions: (1) What is the composition of services overall and paid out-of-pocket and does it differ at transition? (2) Do transition age children have higher total and out-of-pocket health care expenditures than other children with autism? (3) Does the effect of transition differ for vulnerable families who often experience problems accessing care? Pooled data from the Medical Expenditure Panel Survey 2000-2009 on children under 21 years of age with autism (n = 337) were used to describe expenditures for services by source of payment and estimate two-part models of total and out-of-pocket expenditures as a function of child transition age (5, 6, 11, 14) and other child and family characteristics. Median total annual expenditures for health care among children with autism are $2,400; median out-of-pocket expenditures are $390. The majority of total expenditures are devoted to outpatient medical services; nearly half of family out-of-pocket spending is devoted to prescription medications. When children are transition age, a larger proportion of both overall and out-of-pocket expenditures go toward ambulatory therapy, while a smaller proportion of out-of-pocket expenditures are devoted to prescription medications compared to children of other ages. Transition age children from vulnerable families experience a drop in expenditures that families with more resources fill through out-of-pocket spending. Findings raise questions about the dimensions of care for children with autism. Schools may be better positioned than health insurance to foster continuity of care.

  13. Patient-Reported Outcomes and Total Health Care Expenditure in Prediction of Patient Satisfaction: Results From a National Study

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Weiping; Chen, Wei; Bounsanga, Jerry; Cheng, Christine; Franklin, Jeremy D; Crum, Anthony B; Voss, Maren W; Hon, Shirley D

    2015-01-01

    Background Health care quality is often linked to patient satisfaction. Yet, there is a lack of national studies examining the relationship between patient satisfaction, patient-reported outcomes, and medical expenditure. Objective The aim of this study is to examine the contribution of physical health, mental health, general health, and total health care expenditures to patient satisfaction using a longitudinal, nationally representative sample. Methods Using data from the 2010-2011 Medical Expenditure Panel Survey, analyses were conducted to predict patient satisfaction from patient-reported outcomes and total health care expenditures. The study sample consisted of adult participants (N=10,157), with sampling weights representative of 233.26 million people in the United States. Results The results indicated that patient-reported outcomes and total health care expenditure were associated with patient satisfaction such that higher physical and mental function, higher general health status, and higher total health care expenditure were associated with higher patient satisfaction. Conclusions We found that patient-reported outcomes and total health care expenditure had a significant relationship with patient satisfaction. As more emphasis is placed on health care value and quality, this area of research will become increasingly needed and critical questions should be asked about what we value in health care and whether we can find a balance between patient satisfaction, outcomes, and expenditures. Future research should apply big data analytics to investigate whether there is a differential effect of patient-reported outcomes and medical expenditures on patient satisfaction across different medical specialties. PMID:27227131

  14. Estimating population food and nutrient exposure: a comparison of store survey data with household panel food purchases.

    PubMed

    Eyles, Helen; Neal, Bruce; Jiang, Yannan; Ni Mhurchu, Cliona

    2016-05-28

    Population exposure to food and nutrients can be estimated from household food purchases, but store surveys of foods and their composition are more available, less costly and might provide similar information. Our aim was to compare estimates of nutrient exposure from a store survey of packaged food with those from household panel food purchases. A cross-sectional store survey of all packaged foods for sale in two major supermarkets was undertaken in Auckland, New Zealand, between February and May 2012. Longitudinal household food purchase data (November 2011 to October 2012) were obtained from the nationally representative, population-weighted New Zealand Nielsen HomeScan® panel. Data on 8440 packaged food and non-alcoholic beverage products were collected in the store survey. Food purchase data were available for 1229 households and 16 812 products. Store survey data alone produced higher estimates of exposure to Na and sugar compared with estimates from household panel food purchases. The estimated mean difference in exposure to Na was 94 (95 % CI 72, 115) mg/100 g (20 % relative difference; P<0·01), to sugar 1·6 (95 % CI 0·8, 2·5) g/100 g (11 %; P<0·01), to SFA -0·3 (95 % CI -0·8, 0·3) g/100 g (6 %; P=0·3) and to energy -18 (-71, 35) kJ/100 g (2 %; P=0·51). Compared with household panel food purchases, store survey data provided a reasonable estimate of average population exposure to key nutrients from packaged foods. However, caution should be exercised in using such data to estimate population exposure to Na and sugar and in generalising these findings to other countries, as well as over time.

  15. Estimating population food and nutrient exposure: a comparison of store survey data with household panel food purchases.

    PubMed

    Eyles, Helen; Neal, Bruce; Jiang, Yannan; Ni Mhurchu, Cliona

    2016-05-28

    Population exposure to food and nutrients can be estimated from household food purchases, but store surveys of foods and their composition are more available, less costly and might provide similar information. Our aim was to compare estimates of nutrient exposure from a store survey of packaged food with those from household panel food purchases. A cross-sectional store survey of all packaged foods for sale in two major supermarkets was undertaken in Auckland, New Zealand, between February and May 2012. Longitudinal household food purchase data (November 2011 to October 2012) were obtained from the nationally representative, population-weighted New Zealand Nielsen HomeScan® panel. Data on 8440 packaged food and non-alcoholic beverage products were collected in the store survey. Food purchase data were available for 1229 households and 16 812 products. Store survey data alone produced higher estimates of exposure to Na and sugar compared with estimates from household panel food purchases. The estimated mean difference in exposure to Na was 94 (95 % CI 72, 115) mg/100 g (20 % relative difference; P<0·01), to sugar 1·6 (95 % CI 0·8, 2·5) g/100 g (11 %; P<0·01), to SFA -0·3 (95 % CI -0·8, 0·3) g/100 g (6 %; P=0·3) and to energy -18 (-71, 35) kJ/100 g (2 %; P=0·51). Compared with household panel food purchases, store survey data provided a reasonable estimate of average population exposure to key nutrients from packaged foods. However, caution should be exercised in using such data to estimate population exposure to Na and sugar and in generalising these findings to other countries, as well as over time. PMID:27050626

  16. The Impact of Health Insurance Programs on Out-of-Pocket Expenditures in Indonesia: An Increase or a Decrease?

    PubMed Central

    Aji, Budi; De Allegri, Manuela; Souares, Aurelia; Sauerborn, Rainer

    2013-01-01

    We used panel data from the Indonesian Family Life Survey to investigate the impact of health insurance programs on reducing out-of-pocket expenditures. We employed three linear panel data models, two of which accounted for endogeneity: pooled ordinary least squares (OLS), pooled two-stage least squares (2SLS) for instrumental variable (IV), and fixed effects (FE). The study revealed that two health insurance programs had a significantly negative impact on out-of-pocket expenditures by using IV estimates. In the IV model, Askeskin decreased out-of-pocket expenditures by 34% and Askes by 55% compared with non-Askeskin and non-Askes, respectively, while Jamsostek was found to bear a nonsignificant effect on out-of-pocket expenditures. In the FE model, only Askeskin had a significant negative effect with an 11% reduction on out-of-pocket expenditures. This study showed that two large existing health insurance programs in Indonesia, Askeskin and Askes, effectively reduced household out-of-pocket expenditures. The ability of programs to offer financial protection by reducing out-of-pocket expenditures is likely to be a direct function of their benefits package and co-payment policies. PMID:23873263

  17. The impact of health insurance programs on out-of-pocket expenditures in Indonesia: an increase or a decrease?

    PubMed

    Aji, Budi; De Allegri, Manuela; Souares, Aurelia; Sauerborn, Rainer

    2013-07-18

    We used panel data from the Indonesian Family Life Survey to investigate the impact of health insurance programs on reducing out-of-pocket expenditures. We employed three linear panel data models, two of which accounted for endogeneity: pooled ordinary least squares (OLS), pooled two-stage least squares (2SLS) for instrumental variable (IV), and fixed effects (FE). The study revealed that two health insurance programs had a significantly negative impact on out-of-pocket expenditures by using IV estimates. In the IV model, Askeskin decreased out-of-pocket expenditures by 34% and Askes by 55% compared with non-Askeskin and non-Askes, respectively, while Jamsostek was found to bear a nonsignificant effect on out-of-pocket expenditures. In the FE model, only Askeskin had a significant negative effect with an 11% reduction on out-of-pocket expenditures. This study showed that two large existing health insurance programs in Indonesia, Askeskin and Askes, effectively reduced household out-of-pocket expenditures. The ability of programs to offer financial protection by reducing out-of-pocket expenditures is likely to be a direct function of their benefits package and co-payment policies.

  18. The Association Between Self-Rated Mental Health Status and Total Health Care Expenditure

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Muoi T.; Chan, Winnie Y.; Keeler, Courtney

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Both clinical diagnoses and self-rated measures of mental illness are associated with a variety of outcomes, including physical well-being, health utilization, and expenditure. However, much of current literature primarily utilizes clinically diagnosed data. This cross-sectional study explores the impact of mental illness and health care expenditure using 2 self-rated measures: self-rated measured of perceived mental health status (SRMH) and Kessler Screening Scale for Psychological Distress (K6). Data from the 2011 Medical Expenditure Panel Survey Household Component, a nationally representative sample of noninstitutionalized individuals (n = 18,295), were analyzed using bivariate χ2 tests and a 2-part model (logistics regression and generalized linear model regression for the first and second stages, respectively). Although predictive of any health expenditure, SRMH alone was not highly predictive of the dollar value of that health expenditure conditional on any spending. By comparison, the K6 measure was significantly and positively associated with the probability of any health expenditure as well as the dollar value of that spending. Taken together, both the K6 and SRMH measures suggest a positive relationship between poor mental health and the probability of any health expenditure and total expenditure conditional on any spending, even when adjusting for other confounding factors such as race/ethnicity, sex, age, educational attainment, insurance status, and some regional characteristics. Our results suggest that psychological distress and SRMH may represent potential pathways linking poor mental health to increased health care expenditure. Further research exploring the nuances of these relationships may aid researchers, practitioners, and policy makers in addressing issues of inflated health care expenditure in populations at risk for poor mental health. PMID:26334899

  19. Family Formation Processes: Assessing the Need for a New Nationally Representative Household Panel Survey in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Manning, Wendy D.

    2015-01-01

    The American family has undergone rapid transformation. Careful measurement attention to family formation is important because families are at the heart of numerous decisions, roles, and responsibilities with implications for understanding the well-being of families, adults and children. This paper considers whether there is a need for a new household panel study that addresses family formation. This paper consists of a review of the recent body of population-based, American surveys and finds a considerable gap in the ability to study the implications of families for the health and well-being of Americans. Earlier panel surveys used to assess family life anchored questions around marital events, but changes in family patterns require attention to a more diverse set of family forms. The paper concludes with recommendations for a multi-purpose panel study. The key challenge is to keep to pace with complexity and changes in American family life while at the same time maintaining a parsimonious set of survey questions. PMID:26612969

  20. The Social Cognition Psychometric Evaluation Study: Results of the Expert Survey and RAND Panel

    PubMed Central

    Pinkham, Amy E.; Penn, David L.; Green, Michael F.; Buck, Benjamin; Healey, Kristin; Harvey, Philip D.

    2014-01-01

    Background: In schizophrenia, social cognition is strongly linked to functional outcome and is increasingly seen as a viable treatment target. The goal of the Social Cognition Psychometric Evaluation (SCOPE) study is to identify and improve the best existing measures of social cognition so they can be suitably applied in large-scale treatment studies. Initial phases of this project sought to (1) develop consensus on critical domains of social cognition and (2) identify the best existing measures of social cognition for use in treatment studies. Methods: Experts in social cognition were invited to nominate key domains of social cognition and the best measures of those domains. Nominations for measures were reduced according to set criteria, and all available psychometric information about these measures was summarized and provided to RAND panelists. Panelists rated the quality of each measure on multiple criteria, and diverging ratings were discussed at the in-person meeting to obtain consensus. Results: Expert surveys identified 4 core domains of social cognition—emotion processing, social perception, theory of mind/mental state attribution, and attributional style/bias. Using RAND panel consensus ratings, the following measures were selected for further evaluation: Ambiguous Intentions Hostility Questionnaire, Bell Lysaker Emotion Recognition Task, Penn Emotion Recognition Test, Relationships Across Domains, Reading the Mind in the Eyes Test, The Awareness of Social Inferences Test, Hinting Task, and Trustworthiness Task. Discussion: While it was possible to establish consensus, only a limited amount of psychometric information is currently available for the candidate measures, which underscores the need for well-validated and standardized measures in this area. PMID:23728248

  1. Dental Insurance Visits and Expenditures Among Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Manski, Richard J.; Goodman, Harold S.; Reid, Britt C.; Macek, Mark D.

    2004-01-01

    Objectives. We examined the effect of age, income, and coverage on dental service utilization during 1996. Methods. We used data from the 1996 Medical Expenditure Panel Survey. Results. Edentulous and poorer older adults are less likely to have coverage and less likely to report a dental visit than dentate or wealthier older adults. Conclusions. These analyses help to describe the needs of older adults as they cope with diminishing resources as a consequence of retirement, including persons previously accustomed to accessing oral health services with dental insurance. PMID:15117697

  2. Long-running German panel survey shows that personal and economic choices, not just genes, matter for happiness

    PubMed Central

    Headey, Bruce; Muffels, Ruud; Wagner, Gert G.

    2010-01-01

    Psychologists and economists take contradictory approaches to research on what psychologists call happiness or subjective well-being, and economists call subjective utility. A direct test of the most widely accepted psychological theory, set-point theory, shows it to be flawed. Results are then given, using the economists’ newer “choice approach”—an approach also favored by positive psychologists—which yields substantial payoffs in explaining long-term changes in happiness. Data come from the German Socio-Economic Panel (1984–2008), a unique 25-y prospective longitudinal survey. This dataset enables direct tests of theories explaining long-term happiness. PMID:20921399

  3. Health Insurance Coverage and Medical Expenditures of Immigrants and Native-Born Citizens in the United States

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Objectives. I examined insurance coverage and medical expenditures of both immigrant and US-born adults to determine the extent to which immigrants contribute to US medical expenditures. Methods. I used data from the 2003 Medical Expenditure Panel Survey to perform 2-part multivariate analyses of medical expenditures, controlling for health status, insurance coverage, race/ethnicity, and other sociodemographic factors. Results. Approximately 44% of recent immigrants and 63% of established immigrants were fully insured over the 12-month period analyzed. Immigrants' per-person unadjusted medical expenditures were approximately one half to two thirds as high as expenditures for the US born, even when immigrants were fully insured. Recent immigrants were responsible for only about 1% of public medical expenditures even though they constituted 5% of the population. After controlling for other factors, I found that immigrants' medical costs averaged about 14% to 20% less than those who were US born. Conclusions. Insured immigrants had much lower medical expenses than insured US-born citizens, even after the effects of insurance coverage were controlled. This suggests that immigrants' insurance premiums may be cross-subsidizing care for the US-born. If so, health care resources could be redirected back to immigrants to improve their care. PMID:19443829

  4. Out-of-pocket expenditures and the financial burden of healthcare among older adults: by nativity and length of residence in the United States.

    PubMed

    Choi, Sunha

    2015-01-01

    Newly arrived older immigrants in the United States tend to be greatly affected by increasing out-of-pocket healthcare expenditures due to their limited insurance options. To examine such disparities in the out-of-pocket expenditures, this study analyzed the Medical Expenditure Panel Survey by immigrant status. Major findings of this study indicated that although recent immigrants had lower total healthcare expenditures, they spent much higher proportions of their annual income on out-of-pocket medical payments, compared with their US-born counterparts. Dramatically higher out-of-pocket burdens among recent immigrants represent a barrier to necessary healthcare, which needs to be addressed from both public health and economic perspectives. PMID:25036656

  5. Malaria Incidence Rates from Time Series of 2-Wave Panel Surveys.

    PubMed

    Castro, Marcia C; Maheu-Giroux, Mathieu; Chiyaka, Christinah; Singer, Burton H

    2016-08-01

    Methodology to estimate malaria incidence rates from a commonly occurring form of interval-censored longitudinal parasitological data-specifically, 2-wave panel data-was first proposed 40 years ago based on the theory of continuous-time homogeneous Markov Chains. Assumptions of the methodology were suitable for settings with high malaria transmission in the absence of control measures, but are violated in areas experiencing fast decline or that have achieved very low transmission. No further developments that can accommodate such violations have been put forth since then. We extend previous work and propose a new methodology to estimate malaria incidence rates from 2-wave panel data, utilizing the class of 2-component mixtures of continuous-time Markov chains, representing two sub-populations with distinct behavior/attitude towards malaria prevention and treatment. Model identification, or even partial identification, requires context-specific a priori constraints on parameters. The method can be applied to scenarios of any transmission intensity. We provide an application utilizing data from Dar es Salaam, an area that experienced steady decline in malaria over almost five years after a larviciding intervention. We conducted sensitivity analysis to account for possible sampling variation in input data and model assumptions/parameters, and we considered differences in estimates due to submicroscopic infections. Results showed that, assuming defensible a priori constraints on model parameters, most of the uncertainty in the estimated incidence rates was due to sampling variation, not to partial identifiability of the mixture model for the case at hand. Differences between microscopy- and PCR-based rates depend on the transmission intensity. Leveraging on a method to estimate incidence rates from 2-wave panel data under any transmission intensity, and from the increasing availability of such data, there is an opportunity to foster further methodological developments

  6. Malaria Incidence Rates from Time Series of 2-Wave Panel Surveys

    PubMed Central

    Maheu-Giroux, Mathieu; Chiyaka, Christinah; Singer, Burton H.

    2016-01-01

    Methodology to estimate malaria incidence rates from a commonly occurring form of interval-censored longitudinal parasitological data—specifically, 2-wave panel data—was first proposed 40 years ago based on the theory of continuous-time homogeneous Markov Chains. Assumptions of the methodology were suitable for settings with high malaria transmission in the absence of control measures, but are violated in areas experiencing fast decline or that have achieved very low transmission. No further developments that can accommodate such violations have been put forth since then. We extend previous work and propose a new methodology to estimate malaria incidence rates from 2-wave panel data, utilizing the class of 2-component mixtures of continuous-time Markov chains, representing two sub-populations with distinct behavior/attitude towards malaria prevention and treatment. Model identification, or even partial identification, requires context-specific a priori constraints on parameters. The method can be applied to scenarios of any transmission intensity. We provide an application utilizing data from Dar es Salaam, an area that experienced steady decline in malaria over almost five years after a larviciding intervention. We conducted sensitivity analysis to account for possible sampling variation in input data and model assumptions/parameters, and we considered differences in estimates due to submicroscopic infections. Results showed that, assuming defensible a priori constraints on model parameters, most of the uncertainty in the estimated incidence rates was due to sampling variation, not to partial identifiability of the mixture model for the case at hand. Differences between microscopy- and PCR-based rates depend on the transmission intensity. Leveraging on a method to estimate incidence rates from 2-wave panel data under any transmission intensity, and from the increasing availability of such data, there is an opportunity to foster further methodological

  7. Faculty Employment and R&D Expenditures at Research Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhang, Liang; Ehrenberg, Ronald G.

    2010-01-01

    This study uses panel data to examine the relationship between faculty employment and external R&D expenditures at Research and Doctoral institutions over a 15-year period of time. On average, a 1% increase in the number of full-time faculty is associated with about 0.2% increase in total R&D expenditure. Further, a one percentage point increase…

  8. Household Expenditures on Private Tutoring: Emerging Evidence from Malaysia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kenayathulla, Husaina Banu

    2013-01-01

    Private tutoring has been a burgeoning phenomenon in Malaysia for decades. This study examines the determinants of private tutoring expenditures in Malaysia using the 2004/2005 Household Expenditures Survey and applies hurdle regression models to the data. The results indicate that total household expenditures, household head's level of…

  9. Gender, Marital Status, and Commercially Prepared Food Expenditure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kroshus, Emily

    2008-01-01

    Objective: Assess how per capita expenditure on commercially prepared food as a proportion of total food expenditure varies by the sex and marital status of the head of the household. Design: Prospective cohort study, data collected by the United States Bureau of Labor Statistics 2004 Consumer Expenditure Survey. Setting: United States.…

  10. Health Literacy Impact on National Healthcare Utilization and Expenditure

    PubMed Central

    Rasu, Rafia S.; Bawa, Walter Agbor; Suminski, Richard; Snella, Kathleen; Warady, Bradley

    2015-01-01

    Background: Health literacy presents an enormous challenge in the delivery of effective healthcare and quality outcomes. We evaluated the impact of low health literacy (LHL) on healthcare utilization and healthcare expenditure. Methods: Database analysis used Medical Expenditure Panel Survey (MEPS) from 2005-2008 which provides nationally representative estimates of healthcare utilization and expenditure. Health literacy scores (HLSs) were calculated based on a validated, predictive model and were scored according to the National Assessment of Adult Literacy (NAAL). HLS ranged from 0-500. Health literacy level (HLL) and categorized in 2 groups: Below basic or basic (HLS <226) and above basic (HLS ≥226). Healthcare utilization expressed as a physician, nonphysician, or emergency room (ER) visits and healthcare spending. Expenditures were adjusted to 2010 rates using the Consumer Price Index (CPI). A P value of 0.05 or less was the criterion for statistical significance in all analyses. Multivariate regression models assessed the impact of the predicted HLLs on outpatient healthcare utilization and expenditures. All analyses were performed with SAS and STATA® 11.0 statistical software. Results: The study evaluated 22 599 samples representing 503 374 648 weighted individuals nationally from 2005-2008. The cohort had an average age of 49 years and included more females (57%). Caucasian were the predominant racial ethnic group (83%) and 37% of the cohort were from the South region of the United States of America. The proportion of the cohort with basic or below basic health literacy was 22.4%. Annual predicted values of physician visits, nonphysician visits, and ER visits were 6.6, 4.8, and 0.2, respectively, for basic or below basic compared to 4.4, 2.6, and 0.1 for above basic. Predicted values of office and ER visits expenditures were $1284 and $151, respectively, for basic or below basic and $719 and $100 for above basic (P < .05). The extrapolated national

  11. Selection of population controls for a Salmonella case-control study in the UK using a market research panel and web-survey provides time and resource savings.

    PubMed

    Mook, P; Kanagarajah, S; Maguire, H; Adak, G K; Dabrera, G; Waldram, A; Freeman, R; Charlett, A; Oliver, I

    2016-04-01

    Timely recruitment of population controls in infectious disease outbreak investigations is challenging. We evaluated the timeliness and cost of using a market research panel as a sampling frame for recruiting controls in a case-control study during an outbreak of Salmonella Mikawasima in the UK in 2013. We deployed a web-survey by email to targeted members of a market research panel (panel controls) in parallel to the outbreak control team interviewing randomly selected public health staff by telephone and completing paper-based questionnaires (staff controls). Recruitment and completion of exposure history web-surveys for panel controls (n = 123) took 14 h compared to 15 days for staff controls (n = 82). The average staff-time cost per questionnaire for staff controls was £13·13 compared to an invoiced cost of £3·60 per panel control. Differences in the distribution of some exposures existed between these control groups but case-control studies using each group found that illness was associated with consumption of chicken outside of the home and chicken from local butchers. Recruiting market research panel controls offers time and resource savings. More rapid investigations would enable more prompt implementation of control measures. We recommend that this method of recruiting controls is considered in future investigations and assessed further to better understand strengths and limitations.

  12. Selection of population controls for a Salmonella case-control study in the UK using a market research panel and web-survey provides time and resource savings.

    PubMed

    Mook, P; Kanagarajah, S; Maguire, H; Adak, G K; Dabrera, G; Waldram, A; Freeman, R; Charlett, A; Oliver, I

    2016-04-01

    Timely recruitment of population controls in infectious disease outbreak investigations is challenging. We evaluated the timeliness and cost of using a market research panel as a sampling frame for recruiting controls in a case-control study during an outbreak of Salmonella Mikawasima in the UK in 2013. We deployed a web-survey by email to targeted members of a market research panel (panel controls) in parallel to the outbreak control team interviewing randomly selected public health staff by telephone and completing paper-based questionnaires (staff controls). Recruitment and completion of exposure history web-surveys for panel controls (n = 123) took 14 h compared to 15 days for staff controls (n = 82). The average staff-time cost per questionnaire for staff controls was £13·13 compared to an invoiced cost of £3·60 per panel control. Differences in the distribution of some exposures existed between these control groups but case-control studies using each group found that illness was associated with consumption of chicken outside of the home and chicken from local butchers. Recruiting market research panel controls offers time and resource savings. More rapid investigations would enable more prompt implementation of control measures. We recommend that this method of recruiting controls is considered in future investigations and assessed further to better understand strengths and limitations. PMID:26493476

  13. 78 FR 76285 - Proposed Information Collection; Comment Request; Panel Member Survey To Develop Indicators of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-17

    ... Member Survey To Develop Indicators of Resilient Coastal Tourism AGENCY: National Oceanic and Atmospheric... shape the tourism industry's ability to adapt to or bounce back from external shocks such as natural... to measure the resiliency of coastal tourism. To help gather this information, NOAA will conduct...

  14. The impact of poverty, chronic illnesses, and health insurance status on out-of-pocket health care expenditures in later life.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jinhyun; Richardson, Virginia

    2014-10-01

    This study aims to examine poverty, chronic illnesses, health insurance, and health care expenditures, within the context of a political economy of aging perspective. Subsamples of 1,773 older adults from the Medical Expenditure Panel Survey were selected for analyses. The results showed that chronic illnesses influenced out-of-pocket health care costs. Older persons with more than one health insurance spent less on out-of-pocket health care costs. The results have implications for health care social workers concerned with the growing costs of chronic illnesses, implementing integrated care, and advocating for extending public health insurance coverage especially for our most impoverished older adults.

  15. Evaluation of Expenditure Alternates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Poehlein, Gary W.; And Others

    1973-01-01

    Illustrates a system of calculating dollar expenditures over periods of time in terms of present value. The system enables planners, school boards, and administrators to compare expenditure alternatives as a decisionmaking factor. (Author)

  16. School context, friendship ties and adolescent mental health: A multilevel analysis of the Korean Youth Panel Survey (KYPS).

    PubMed

    Kim, Harris Hyun-Soo

    2015-11-01

    Research on the social determinants of health suggests that interpersonal networks play a critical role in facilitating individual mental and physical well-being. Prior studies also indicate that ecological or contextual factors contribute to positive health outcomes. This study extends prior research by examining the factors associated with adolescent health in an Asian context. Based on the multilevel analysis of the Korean Youth Panel Survey (2006 & 2007), a longitudinal project funded by the Korean government, it investigates some of the key variables related to the mental health of Korean students. Much of previous research focuses on the functions of social capital. This study contributes to the social epidemiology literature by investigating the possible downside of network ties. Specifically, it asks whether having delinquent friends is associated with negative mental health experiences. In addition, little research has been conducted concerning the associations between adolescent health outcomes and school characteristics. This study moves in that direction by examining the relationship between mental well-being of students and a variety of school related variables (e.g., subjective attitude toward school and quality of relationship with peers and teachers). Hierarchical linear modeling shows that, among the social capital control variables, being properly integrated into the family and frequent peer interaction significantly add to mental health. At the individual (student) level only, ties to delinquent friends are negatively associated with mental health, while at both individual and contextual levels, school characteristics are positively related to adolescent subjective well-being.

  17. School context, friendship ties and adolescent mental health: A multilevel analysis of the Korean Youth Panel Survey (KYPS).

    PubMed

    Kim, Harris Hyun-Soo

    2015-11-01

    Research on the social determinants of health suggests that interpersonal networks play a critical role in facilitating individual mental and physical well-being. Prior studies also indicate that ecological or contextual factors contribute to positive health outcomes. This study extends prior research by examining the factors associated with adolescent health in an Asian context. Based on the multilevel analysis of the Korean Youth Panel Survey (2006 & 2007), a longitudinal project funded by the Korean government, it investigates some of the key variables related to the mental health of Korean students. Much of previous research focuses on the functions of social capital. This study contributes to the social epidemiology literature by investigating the possible downside of network ties. Specifically, it asks whether having delinquent friends is associated with negative mental health experiences. In addition, little research has been conducted concerning the associations between adolescent health outcomes and school characteristics. This study moves in that direction by examining the relationship between mental well-being of students and a variety of school related variables (e.g., subjective attitude toward school and quality of relationship with peers and teachers). Hierarchical linear modeling shows that, among the social capital control variables, being properly integrated into the family and frequent peer interaction significantly add to mental health. At the individual (student) level only, ties to delinquent friends are negatively associated with mental health, while at both individual and contextual levels, school characteristics are positively related to adolescent subjective well-being. PMID:25960374

  18. Gender differences in drug use and expenditures in a privately insured population of older adults.

    PubMed

    Correa-de-Araujo, Rosaly; Miller, G Edward; Banthin, Jessica S; Trinh, Yen

    2005-01-01

    We examine gender differences in use and expenditures for prescription drugs among Medicare and privately insured older adults aged 65 and over, using data on a nationally representative sample of prescription drug purchases collected for the Medical Expenditure Panel Survey Household Component. Overall, women spent about $1,178 for drugs, about 17% more than the $1,009 in average expenditures by men. Older women constituted 50.7% of the population and had average annual aggregate expenditures for prescribed medicines of $6.93 billion compared to $5.77 billion for men. Women were more likely than men to use drugs from a number of therapeutic classes-analgesics, hormones and psychotherapeutic agents-and therapeutic subclasses-thyroid drugs, COX-2 inhibitors and anti-depressants. Women also had higher average prescriptions per user for a number of therapeutic classes-hormones, psychotherapeutic agents and analgesics-and therapeutic subclasses-anti-diabetic drugs and beta blockers. Prescribed medications are, arguably, the most important healthcare technology in preventing illness, disability, and death in older adults. It is critical that older women and men have proper access to prescribed medicines. Given the financial vulnerability of this priority population, particularly women, the expanded drug coverage available under the Medicare Modernization Act is of particular relevance in meeting this goal.

  19. Does active commuting improve psychological wellbeing? Longitudinal evidence from eighteen waves of the British Household Panel Survey

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Adam; Goryakin, Yevgeniy; Suhrcke, Marc

    2014-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study is to explore the relationship between active travel and psychological wellbeing. Method This study used data on 17,985 adult commuters in eighteen waves of the British Household Panel Survey (1991/2–2008/9). Fixed effects regression models were used to investigate how (i.) travel mode choice, (ii.) commuting time, and (iii.) switching to active travel impacted on overall psychological wellbeing and how (iv.) travel mode choice impacted on specific psychological symptoms included in the General Health Questionnaire. Results After accounting for changes in individual-level socioeconomic characteristics and potential confounding variables relating to work, residence and health, significant associations were observed between overall psychological wellbeing (on a 36-point Likert scale) and (i.) active travel (0.185, 95% CI: 0.048 to 0.321) and public transport (0.195, 95% CI: 0.035 to 0.355) when compared to car travel, (ii.) time spent (per 10 minute change) walking (0.083, 95% CI: 0.003 to 0.163) and driving (− 0.033, 95% CI: − 0.064 to − 0.001), and (iii.) switching from car travel to active travel (0.479, 95% CI: 0.199 to 0.758). Active travel was also associated with reductions in the odds of experiencing two specific psychological symptoms when compared to car travel. Conclusion The positive psychological wellbeing effects identified in this study should be considered in cost–benefit assessments of interventions seeking to promote active travel. PMID:25152507

  20. Patient-Centered Medical Home Features and Health Care Expenditures of Medicare Beneficiaries with Chronic Disease Dyads.

    PubMed

    Philpot, Lindsey M; Stockbridge, Erica L; Padrón, Norma A; Pagán, José A

    2016-06-01

    Three out of 4 Medicare beneficiaries have multiple chronic conditions, and managing the care of this growing population can be complex and costly because of care coordination challenges. This study assesses how different elements of the patient-centered medical home (PCMH) model may impact the health care expenditures of Medicare beneficiaries with the most prevalent chronic disease dyads (ie, co-occurring high cholesterol and high blood pressure, high cholesterol and heart disease, high cholesterol and diabetes, high cholesterol and arthritis, heart disease and high blood pressure). Data from the 2007-2011 Medical Expenditure Panel Survey suggest that increased access to PCMH features may differentially impact the distribution of health care expenditures across health care service categories depending on the combination of chronic conditions experienced by each beneficiary. For example, having no difficulty contacting a provider after regular hours was associated with significantly lower outpatient expenditures for beneficiaries with high cholesterol and diabetes (n = 635; P = 0.038), but it was associated with significantly higher inpatient expenditures for beneficiaries with high blood pressure and high cholesterol (n = 1599; P = 0.015), and no significant differences in expenditures in any category for beneficiaries with high blood pressure and heart disease (n = 1018; P > 0.05 for all categories). However, average total health care expenditures are largely unaffected by implementing the PCMH features considered. Understanding how the needs of Medicare beneficiaries with multiple chronic conditions can be met through the adoption of the PCMH model is important not only to be able to provide high-quality care but also to control costs. (Population Health Management 2016;19:206-211).

  1. AAPM/RSNA physics tutorial for residents: physics of flat-panel fluoroscopy systems: Survey of modern fluoroscopy imaging: flat-panel detectors versus image intensifiers and more.

    PubMed

    Nickoloff, Edward Lee

    2011-01-01

    This article reviews the design and operation of both flat-panel detector (FPD) and image intensifier fluoroscopy systems. The different components of each imaging chain and their functions are explained and compared. FPD systems have multiple advantages such as a smaller size, extended dynamic range, no spatial distortion, and greater stability. However, FPD systems typically have the same spatial resolution for all fields of view (FOVs) and are prone to ghosting. Image intensifier systems have better spatial resolution with the use of smaller FOVs (magnification modes) and tend to be less expensive. However, the spatial resolution of image intensifier systems is limited by the television system to which they are coupled. Moreover, image intensifier systems are degraded by glare, vignetting, spatial distortions, and defocusing effects. FPD systems do not have these problems. Some recent innovations to fluoroscopy systems include automated filtration, pulsed fluoroscopy, automatic positioning, dose-area product meters, and improved automatic dose rate control programs. Operator-selectable features may affect both the patient radiation dose and image quality; these selectable features include dose level setting, the FOV employed, fluoroscopic pulse rates, geometric factors, display software settings, and methods to reduce the imaging time.

  2. Trends in Educational Expenditure.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burke, Gerald

    This study provides an overview of expenditures for education and training by educational institutions in Australia, 1991-2001. The study used newly available data from the Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS) and administrative data from the main sectors' reports on the size and trends in public and private education expenditures. It analyzed…

  3. Determinants of Obesity and Associated Population Attributability, South Africa: Empirical Evidence from a National Panel Survey, 2008-2012

    PubMed Central

    Sartorius, Benn; Veerman, Lennert J.; Manyema, Mercy; Chola, Lumbwe; Hofman, Karen

    2015-01-01

    Background Obesity is a major risk factor for emerging non-communicable diseases (NCDS) in middle income countries including South Africa (SA). Understanding the multiple and complex determinants of obesity and their true population attributable impact is critical for informing and developing effective prevention efforts using scientific based evidence. This study identified contextualised high impact factors associated with obesity in South Africa. Methods Analysis of three national cross sectional (repeated panel) surveys, using a multilevel logistic regression and population attributable fraction estimation allowed for identification of contextualised high impact factors associated with obesity (BMI>30 kg/m2) among adults (15years+). Results Obesity prevalence increased significantly from 23.5% in 2008 to 27.2% in 2012, with a significantly (p-value<0.001) higher prevalence among females (37.9% in 2012) compared to males (13.3% in 2012). Living in formal urban areas, white ethnicity, being married, not exercising and/or in higher socio-economic category were significantly associated with male obesity. Females living in formal or informal urban areas, higher crime areas, African/White ethnicity, married, not exercising, in a higher socio-economic category and/or living in households with proportionate higher spending on food (and unhealthy food options) were significantly more likely to be obese. The identified determinants appeared to account for 75% and 43% of male and female obesity respectively. White males had the highest relative gain in obesity from 2008 to 2012. Conclusions The rising prevalence of obesity in South Africa is significant and over the past 5 years the rising prevalence of Type-2 diabetes has mirrored this pattern, especially among females. Targeting young adolescent girls should be a priority. Addressing determinants of obesity will involve a multifaceted strategy and requires at individual and population levels. With rising costs in the

  4. Metabolic Panel

    MedlinePlus

    A metabolic panel is a group of tests that measures different chemicals in the blood. These tests are usually ... kidneys and liver. There are two types: basic metabolic panel (BMP) and comprehensive metabolic panel (CMP). The ...

  5. The crowding-out effects of tobacco and alcohol where expenditure shares are low: analyzing expenditure data for Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Pu, Cheng-yun; Lan, Virginia; Chou, Yiing-Jenq; Lan, Chung-fu

    2008-05-01

    In this paper, we used data from the 2004 Survey of Family Income & Expenditure of Taiwan to show that the problem of the crowding-out effects of tobacco and alcohol in a country with low expenditure can still be serious. Most studies that have investigated this issue have focused on developing countries with a high expenditure share on tobacco or alcohol, and have often overlooked the effects in countries with a low expenditure on such goods. After controlling for the endogeneity of tobacco and alcohol expenditure, and the possibility that households with a zero expenditure on tobacco and alcohol may result from a corner solution rather than abstention, we found that the lowest income households are still most vulnerable to tobacco and alcohol expenditures despite an overall low expenditure in Taiwan. Even higher income households may suffer a lower standard of living due to such expenditure. In addition, some goods and services may be perceived differently by households with different levels of income and this may be caused by the difference in composition across broad expenditure categories. Our results suggest that the government ought to tackle the problem of smoking and drinking outside the realm of health, since these expenditures may harm the country's standard of living even when there is high income.

  6. Household energy consumption and expenditures 1993

    SciTech Connect

    1995-10-05

    This presents information about household end-use consumption of energy and expenditures for that energy. These data were collected in the 1993 Residential Energy Consumption Survey; more than 7,000 households were surveyed for information on their housing units, energy consumption and expenditures, stock of energy-consuming appliances, and energy-related behavior. The information represents all households nationwide (97 million). Key findings: National residential energy consumption was 10.0 quadrillion Btu in 1993, a 9% increase over 1990. Weather has a significant effect on energy consumption. Consumption of electricity for appliances is increasing. Houses that use electricity for space heating have lower overall energy expenditures than households that heat with other fuels. RECS collected data for the 4 most populous states: CA, FL, NY, TX.

  7. Expenditure on Higher Education in Europe: Past Trends and Future.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jallade, Jean-Pierre

    1980-01-01

    An overview is presented of trends in expenditures on higher education in 19 European countries, including six eastern countries. Data, presented in tables and analyzed briefly, are derived from UNESCO and OECD surveys. Data include expenditures in national currency and American dollars, and in constant and current prices, since 1961. (MSE)

  8. International Developments of Educational Expenditure, 1950-1965.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edding, Friedrich; Berstecher, Dieter

    This document describes, analyzes, and interprets international developments reflected in public educational expenditures. The report includes (1) a survey of educational expenditures of 35 UNESCO member countries between 1950 and 1965 in relation to other aggregate data, (2) a description and interpretation of shifts in the composition of total…

  9. Expenditures on Children by Families: 1999 Annual Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lino, Mark

    Since 1960, the U.S. Department of Agriculture has provided estimates of expenditures on children from birth through age 17. This technical report presents the most recent estimates for husband-wife and single-parent families, using data from the 1990-92 Consumer Expenditure Survey, updated to 1999 dollars using the Consumer Price Index. Data and…

  10. Expenditures on Children by Families: 2002 Annual Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lino, Mark

    Since 1960, the U.S. Department of Agriculture has provided estimates of expenditures on children from birth through age 17. This technical report presents the most recent estimates for husband-wife and single-parent families, using data from the 1990-92 Consumer Expenditure Survey, updated to 2002 dollars using the Consumer Price Index. Data and…

  11. Expenditures on Children by Families: 2001 Annual Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lino, Mark

    Since 1960, the U.S. Department of Agriculture has provided estimates of expenditures on children from birth through age 17. This technical report presents the most recent estimates for husband-wife and single-parent families, using data from the 1990-92 Consumer Expenditure Survey, updated to 2001 dollars using the Consumer Price Index. Data and…

  12. Expenditures on Children by Families: 2000 Annual Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lino, Mark

    Since 1960, the U.S. Department of Agriculture has provided estimates of expenditures on children from birth through age 17. This technical report presents the most recent estimates for husband-wife and single-parent families, using data from the 1990-92 Consumer Expenditure Survey, updated to 2000 dollars using the Consumer Price Index. Data and…

  13. Expenditures on Children by Families: 1997 Annual Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lino, Mark

    Since 1960, the U.S. Department of Agriculture has provided estimates of expenditures on children from birth through age 17. This technical report presents the most recent estimates for husband-wife and single-parent families, using data from the 1990-92 Consumer Expenditure Survey, updated to 1997 dollars using the Consumer Price Index. Data and…

  14. Expenditures on Children by Families: 1998 Annual Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lino, Mark

    Since 1960, the U.S. Department of Agriculture has provided estimates of expenditures on children from birth through age 17. This technical report presents the most recent estimates for husband-wife and single-parent families, using data from the 1990-92 Consumer Expenditure Survey, updated to 1998 dollars using the Consumer Price Index. Data and…

  15. The Within-Year Concentration of Medical Care: Implications for Family Out-of-Pocket Expenditure Burdens

    PubMed Central

    Selden, Thomas M

    2009-01-01

    Objective To examine the within-year concentration of family health care and the resulting exposure of families to short periods of high expenditure burdens. Data Source Household data from the pooled 2003 and 2004 Medical Expenditure Panel Survey (MEPS) yielding nationally representative estimates for the nonelderly civilian noninstitutionalized population. Study Design The paper examines the within-year concentration of family medical care use and the frequency with which family out-of-pocket expenditures exceeded 20 percent of family income, computed at the annual, quarterly, and monthly levels. Principal Findings On average among families with medical care, 49 percent of all (charge-weighted) care occurred in a single month, and 63 percent occurred in a single quarter). Nationally, 27 percent of the study population experienced at least 1 month in which out-of-pocket expenditures exceeded 20 percent of income. Monthly 20 percent burden rates were highest among the poor, at 43 percent, and were close to or above 30 percent for all but the highest income group (families above four times the federal poverty line). Conclusions Within-year spikes in health care utilization can create financial pressures missed by conventional annual burden analyses. Within-year health-related financial pressures may be especially acute among lower-income families due to low asset holdings. PMID:19674431

  16. How Do Revenue Variations Affect Expenditures within U.S. Research Universities?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leslie, Larry L.; Slaughter, Sheila; Taylor, Barrett J.; Zhang, Liang

    2012-01-01

    Using Integrated Postsecondary Education Data System (IPEDS) figures on the 96 Research Extensive Institution in academic year 2007-2008, we employ panel data from academic year 1984-1985 to 2007-2008 to identify revenue-expenditure relationships. Although we consider a wide range of functional expenditure categories, we focus our analysis on…

  17. Reporting of Drug Expenditures in the MCBS

    PubMed Central

    Poisal, John A.

    2003-01-01

    Comparing data from both the 1999 MCBS and drug utilization data supplied by the survey respondents' pharmacies, the author details the methods used to determine the level of misreporting of drug expenditures in the MCBS. Findings suggest that prescription drug expenditures are underreported by 17 percent and the number of prescriptions used is underreported by 17.7 percent. The data also identify demographic factors that predict a beneficiary's likelihood to either overreport or underreport his or her medications, as well as the extent to which beneficiaries misreport their drug use and spending. PMID:15124375

  18. Obesity and health expenditures: evidence from Australia.

    PubMed

    Buchmueller, Thomas C; Johar, Meliyanni

    2015-04-01

    Rising rates of obesity are a public health concern in every industrialized country. This study investigates the relationship between obesity and health care expenditure in Australia, where the rate of obesity has tripled in the last three decades. Now one in four Australians is considered obese, defined as having a body mass index (BMI, kg/m(2)) of 30 or over. The analysis is based on a random sample survey of over 240,000 adults aged 45 and over that is linked at the individual-level to comprehensive administrative health care claims for the period 2006-2009. This sub-population group has an obesity rate that is nearly 30% and is a major consumer of health services. Relative to the average annual health expenditures of those with normal weight, we find that the health expenditures of those with a BMI between 30 and 35 (obese type I) are 19% higher and expenditures of those with BMI greater than 35 (obese type II/III) are 51% higher. We find large and significant differences in all types of care: inpatient, emergency department, outpatient and prescription drugs. The obesity-related health expenditures are higher for obese type I women than men, but in the obese type II/III state, obesity-related expenditures are higher for men. When we stratify further by age groups, we find that obesity has the largest impact among men over age 75 and women aged 60-74 years old. In addition, we find that obesity impacts health expenditures not only through its link to chronic diseases, but also because it increases the cost of recovery from acute health shocks.

  19. National health expenditures, 1988

    PubMed Central

    1990-01-01

    Every year, analysts in the Health Care Financing Administration present figures on what our Nation spends for health. As the result of a comprehensive re-examination of the definitions, concepts, methods, and data sources used to prepare those figures, this year's report contains new estimates of national health expenditures for calendar years 1960 through 1988. Significant changes have been made to estimates of spending for professional services and to estimates of what consumers pay out of pocket for health care. In the first article, trends in use of and expenditure for various types of goods and services are discussed, as well as trends in the sources of funds used to finance health care. In a companion article, the benchmark process is described in more detail, as are the data sources and methods used to prepare annual estimates of health expenditures. PMID:10113395

  20. Comparison between the C-leg microprocessor-controlled prosthetic knee and non-microprocessor control prosthetic knees: a preliminary study of energy expenditure, obstacle course performance, and quality of life survey.

    PubMed

    Seymour, Ron; Engbretson, Brenda; Kott, Karen; Ordway, Nathaniel; Brooks, Gary; Crannell, Jessica; Hickernell, Elise; Wheeler, Katie

    2007-03-01

    This study investigated energy expenditure and obstacle course negotiation between the C-leg and various non-microprocessor control (NMC) prosthetic knees and compared a quality of life survey (SF-36v2) of use of the C-leg to national norms. Thirteen subjects with unilateral limb loss (12 with trans-femoral and one with a knee disarticulation amputation) participated in the study. The mean age was 46 years, range 30-75. Energy expenditure using both the NMC and C-leg prostheses was measured at self-selected typical and fast walking paces on a motorized treadmill. Subjects were also asked to walk through a standardized walking obstacle course carrying a 4.5 kg (10 lb) basket and with hands free. Finally, the SF-36v2 was completed for subjects while using the C-leg. Statistically significant differences were found in oxygen consumption between prostheses at both typical and fast paces with the C-leg showing decreased values. Use of the C-leg resulted in a statistically significant decrease in the number of steps and time to complete the obstacle course. Scores on a quality of life index for subjects using the C-leg were above the mean for norms for limitation in the use of an arm or leg, equal to the mean for the general United States population for the physical component score and were above this mean for the mental component score. Based on oxygen consumption and obstacle course findings, the C-leg when compared to the NMC prostheses may provide increased functional mobility and ease of performance in the home and community environment. Questionnaire results suggest a minimal quality of life impairment when using a C-leg for this cohort of individuals with amputation.

  1. National health expenditures, 1984

    PubMed Central

    Levit, Katharine R.; Lazenby, Helen; Waldo, Daniel R.; Davidoff, Lawrence M.

    1985-01-01

    Growth in health care expenditures slowed to 9.1 percent in 1984, the smallest increase in expenditures in 19 years. Economic forces and emerging structural changes within the health sector played a role in slowing growth. Of the $1,580 per person spent for health care in 1984, 41 percent was financed by public programs; 31 percent by private health insurance; and the remainder by other private sources. Together, Medicare and Medicaid accounted for 27 percent of all health spending. PMID:10311395

  2. National health expenditures, 1999.

    PubMed

    Cowan, C A; Lazenby, H C; Martin, A B; McDonnell, P A; Sensenig, A L; Smith, C E; Whittle, L S; Zezza, M A; Donham, C S; Long, A M; Stewart, M W

    2001-01-01

    The health care spending share of gross domestic product (GDP) remained steady between 1993 and 1999 as moderate-to-strong economic growth coincided with a rapid shift to managed care. This shift, along with decelerating growth in Medicare spending, appears to have generated a mostly one-time saving that lowered aggregate health expenditure growth.

  3. Understanding Expenditure Data.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dyke, Frances L.

    2000-01-01

    Stresses the importance of common understandings of cost definitions and data collection in order to create reliable databases with optimal utility for inter-institutional analysis. Examines definitions of common expenditure categories, discusses cost-accumulation rules governing financial reporting, and explains differences between direct costs…

  4. Probability of solar panel clearing events at the Insight landing sites (Mars) from a dust devil track survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reiss, D.; Lorenz, R. D.

    2015-10-01

    The InSight robotic lander is scheduled to land on Mars in September 2016. InSight was designed to perform the first comprehensive surface-based geophysical investigation of Mars [1]. Passage of vortices may have a number of influences on the geophysical measurements to be made by InSight. Seismic data could be influenced by dust devils and vortices via several mechanisms such as loading of the elastic ground by a surface pressure field which causes a local tilt [e.g. 2]. In addition, the power supply of the InSight instruments is provided by solar arrays. Solar-powered missions on Mars like the Sojourner rover in 1997 were affected by a decline in electrical power output by 0.2-0.3 %per day caused by steadily dust deposition on its horizontal solar panel [3]. The solar-powered Mars Exploration Rovers (MERs) Spirit and Opportunity experienced similar dust deposition rates [4] which led to steady power decrease over time endangering longer rover operation times. The much longer operation times of the rovers were made possible by unanticipated 'dust clearing events' of the solar arrays by wind gust or dust devils [5]. Recent studies imply that dust devils are primarily responsible for those recurrent 'dust clearing events' [6]. In this study we investigate the potential frequency of intense dust devil occurrences at the InSight landing site regions, which are able to remove dust from its solar panels. We analyzed newly formed dust devil tracks within a given time span using multi-temporal HiRISE image data covering the same surface area. Based on these measurements we will give encounter rate predictions of intense (high tangential speed and high pressure drop) dust devils with the InSight lander.

  5. Expenditures for physician services under alternative models of managed care.

    PubMed

    Kapur, K; Joyce, G F; Van Vorst, K A; Escarce, J J

    2000-06-01

    This study compares expenditures for physician services in a closed panel gatekeeper health maintenance organization (HMO) and an open panel point of service HMO that share the same physician network. The study uses administrative files of the two study HMOs for 1994-1995 to assess differences in spending for primary care physicians' (PCPs') services, specialists' services, and total physician services. When the copayments for PCP visits and PCP-referred specialist visits were $0, total physician expenditures were 4 percent higher in the gatekeeper HMO than in the point of service plan (p < .05). When the copayments for PCP visits and PCP-referred specialist visits were $10, total physician expenditures ranged from equal in both HMOs to 7 percent higher in the gatekeeper HMO (p < .01), depending on the copayment for self-referred visits. Expenditures for specialists' services were not higher in the point of service plan. The authors conclude that direct patient access to specialists does not necessarily result in higher physician or specialist expenditures in HMOs. PMID:10868071

  6. Panel Discussion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langer, James

    1997-03-01

    Panelists: Arthur Bienenstock, Stanford University Cherry Ann Murray, Lucent Technologies Venkatesh Narayanamurti, University of California-Santa Barbara Paul Peercy, SEMI-SEMATECH Robert Richardson, Cornell University James Roberto, Oak Ridge National Laboratory The Board on Physics and Astronomy is undertaking a series of reassessments of all branches of physics as the foundation of a new physics survey. As part of this project, a Committee on Condensed Matter and Materials Physics has been established under the leadership of Venkatesh Narayanamurti of the University of California-Santa Barbara. The committee has been working since June on a study that will include an illustrative recounting of major recent achievements; identification of new opportunities and challenges facing the field; and articulation-for leaders in government, industry, universities, and the public at large-of the important roles played by the field in modern society. An especially urgent issue is how to maintain the intellectual vitality of condensed matter and materials physics, and its contributions to the well-being of the United States, in an era of limited resources. The forum will feature a panel of materials researchers who are members of the Committee on Condensed Matter and Materials Physics. They will give a brief report on the status of the study and engage in a dialogue with the audience about issues facing the condensed matter and materials physics community. Broad community input is vital to the success of the study. Please come and make your voice heard!

  7. Projecting future drug expenditures: 2011.

    PubMed

    Doloresco, Fred; Fominaya, Cory; Schumock, Glen T; Vermeulen, Lee C; Matusiak, Linda; Hunkler, Robert J; Shah, Nilay D; Hoffman, James M

    2011-05-15

    PURPOSE. Drug expenditure trends in 2009 and 2010, projected drug expenditures for 2011, and factors likely to influence drug expenditures are discussed. SUMMARY. Various factors are likely to influence drug expenditures in 2011, including drugs in development, the diffusion of new drugs, generic drugs, health care reform, and biosimilars. Two distinct patterns of drug expenditures continue to exist. The dominant trend over the past several years is substantial moderation in expenditure growth for widely used drugs, primarily due to the ongoing introduction of generic medications for high-cost, frequently used medications and the influence of the economic downturn. The second pattern is substantial increases in expenditures for specialized medications, particularly in the outpatient setting. The influence of health care reform, the economy, and the emergence of biosimilars will be important trends to follow over the next several years, but they are unlikely to have substantial impact on drug expenditures in 2011. From 2008 to 2009, total U.S. drug expenditures increased by 5.2%, with total spending rising from $284.8 billion to $299.5 billion. Growth in drug expenditures in clinics grew by 5.1% from 2008 to 2009. Hospital drug expenditures increased at the moderate rate of 2.8% from 2008 to 2009; through the first nine months of 2010, hospital drug expenditures increased by only 0.8% compared with the same period in 2009. CONCLUSION. For 2011, we project a 3-5% increase in drug expenditures in outpatient settings, a 4-6% increase in expenditures for clinic-administered drugs, and a 1-3% increase in hospital drug expenditures.

  8. Reciprocal relations between effort-reward imbalance at work and adverse health: a three-wave panel survey.

    PubMed

    Shimazu, Akihito; de Jonge, Jan

    2009-01-01

    Siegrist's [1996. Adverse health effects of high-effort/low-reward conditions. Journal of Occupational Health Psychology, 1, 27-41.] Effort-Reward Imbalance (ERI) Model assumes that ERI at one point in time influences health at a later point in time. Empirical cross-sectional and longitudinal findings have supported the influence of ERI on adverse health. However, the ERI model does not explicitly take into account that the relation between ERI and adverse health may be also explained by reversed causal relations, or even reciprocal (bi-directional) relations in which ERI and health mutually influence each other. The present 3-wave panel study among 211 Japanese male blue-collar workers in one construction machinery company examined reciprocal relations between ERI and adverse health (i.e., psychological distress and physical complaints) with a 1-year time-lag per wave. Hypotheses were tested using structural equation modeling (Amos 7.0J). Results showed cross-lagged and causally dominant effects of ERI on both psychological distress and physical complaints after 1 year for both Time 1-Time 2 and Time 2-Time 3. In addition, cross-lagged effects of psychological distress on ERI were found after 1 year for both Time 1-Time 2 and Time 2-Time 3. These findings suggest that (perceived) ERI and employee health influence each other reciprocally rather than uni-directionally, and underline the importance of studying reversed causal effects in the relation between ERI and employee health.

  9. Reciprocal relations between effort-reward imbalance at work and adverse health: a three-wave panel survey.

    PubMed

    Shimazu, Akihito; de Jonge, Jan

    2009-01-01

    Siegrist's [1996. Adverse health effects of high-effort/low-reward conditions. Journal of Occupational Health Psychology, 1, 27-41.] Effort-Reward Imbalance (ERI) Model assumes that ERI at one point in time influences health at a later point in time. Empirical cross-sectional and longitudinal findings have supported the influence of ERI on adverse health. However, the ERI model does not explicitly take into account that the relation between ERI and adverse health may be also explained by reversed causal relations, or even reciprocal (bi-directional) relations in which ERI and health mutually influence each other. The present 3-wave panel study among 211 Japanese male blue-collar workers in one construction machinery company examined reciprocal relations between ERI and adverse health (i.e., psychological distress and physical complaints) with a 1-year time-lag per wave. Hypotheses were tested using structural equation modeling (Amos 7.0J). Results showed cross-lagged and causally dominant effects of ERI on both psychological distress and physical complaints after 1 year for both Time 1-Time 2 and Time 2-Time 3. In addition, cross-lagged effects of psychological distress on ERI were found after 1 year for both Time 1-Time 2 and Time 2-Time 3. These findings suggest that (perceived) ERI and employee health influence each other reciprocally rather than uni-directionally, and underline the importance of studying reversed causal effects in the relation between ERI and employee health. PMID:18980788

  10. Panel flutter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dowell, E. H.

    1972-01-01

    Criteria are presented for the prediction of panel flutter, determination of its occurrence, design for its prevention, and evaluation of its severity. Theoretical analyses recommended for the prediction of flutter stability boundaries, vibration amplitudes, and frequencies for several types of panels are described. Vibration tests and wind tunnel tests are recommended for certain panels and environmental flow conditions to provide information for design of verification analysis. Appropriate design margins on flutter stability boundaries are given and general criteria are presented for evaluating the severity of possible short-duration, limited-amplitude panel flutter on nonreusable vehicles.

  11. Catastrophic medical expenditure risk.

    PubMed

    Flores, Gabriela; O'Donnell, Owen

    2016-03-01

    We propose a measure of household exposure to particularly onerous medical expenses. The measure can be decomposed into the probability that medical expenditure exceeds a threshold, the loss due to predictably low consumption of other goods if it does and the further loss arising from the volatility of medical expenses above the threshold. Depending on the choice of threshold, the measure is consistent with a model of reference-dependent utility with loss aversion. Unlike the risk premium, the measure is only sensitive to particularly high expenses, and can identify households that expect to incur such expenses and would benefit from subsidised, but not actuarially fair, insurance. An empirical illustration using data from seven Asian countries demonstrates the importance of taking account of informal insurance and reveals clear differences in catastrophic medical expenditure risk across and within countries. In general, risk is higher among poorer, rural and chronically ill populations.

  12. What drives public health care expenditure growth? Evidence from Swiss cantons, 1970-2012.

    PubMed

    Braendle, Thomas; Colombier, Carsten

    2016-09-01

    A better understanding of the determinants of public health care expenditures is key to designing effective health policies. We integrate demand and supply-side determinants and factors from political economy into an empirical analysis of the highly decentralized Swiss health care system and control for major health care finance reforms. We compile a novel data set of the cantonal health care expenditure in Switzerland, which currently amounts to about one fifth of total health care expenditure. We analyze the period 1970-2012 and use dynamic panel estimation methods. We find that per capita income, the unemployment rate and the share of foreigners are positively related to public health care expenditure growth. With regard to political economy aspects, public health care expenditures increase with the share of women elected to parliament. However, institutional restrictions for politicians, such as fiscal rules, do not appear to limit public health care expenditure growth. PMID:27496155

  13. National Health Expenditures, 1982

    PubMed Central

    Gibson, Robert M.; Waldo, Daniel R.; Levit, Katharine R.

    1983-01-01

    Rapid growth in the share of the nation's gross national product devoted to health expenditure has heightened concern over the survival of government entitlement programs and has led to debate of the desirability of current methods of financing health care. In this article, the authors present the data at the heart of the issue, quantifying spending for various types of health care in 1982 and discussing the sources of funds for that spending. PMID:10310273

  14. Households across All Income Quintiles, Especially the Poorest, Increased Animal Source Food Expenditures Substantially during Recent Peruvian Economic Growth

    PubMed Central

    Humphries, Debbie L.; Behrman, Jere R.; Crookston, Benjamin T.; Dearden, Kirk A.; Schott, Whitney; Penny, Mary E.

    2014-01-01

    Background Relative to plant-based foods, animal source foods (ASFs) are richer in accessible protein, iron, zinc, calcium, vitamin B-12 and other nutrients. Because of their nutritional value, particularly for childhood growth and nutrition, it is important to identify factors influencing ASF consumption, especially for poorer households that generally consume less ASFs. Objective To estimate differential responsiveness of ASF consumption to changes in total household expenditures for households with different expenditures in a middle-income country with substantial recent income increases. Methods The Peruvian Young Lives household panel (n = 1750) from 2002, 2006 and 2009 was used to characterize patterns of ASF expenditures. Multivariate models with controls for unobserved household fixed effects and common secular trends were used to examine nonlinear relationships between changes in household expenditures and in ASF expenditures. Results Households with lower total expenditures dedicated greater percentages of expenditures to food (58.4% vs.17.9% in 2002 and 24.2% vs. 21.5% in 2009 for lowest and highest quintiles respectively) and lower percentages of food expenditures to ASF (22.8% vs. 33.9% in 2002 and 30.3% vs. 37.6% in 2009 for lowest and highest quintiles respectively). Average percentages of overall expenditures spent on food dropped from 47% to 23.2% between 2002 and 2009. Households in the lowest quintiles of expenditures showed greater increases in ASF expenditures relative to total consumption than households in the highest quintiles. Among ASF components, meat and poultry expenditures increased more than proportionately for households in the lowest quintiles, and eggs and fish expenditures increased less than proportionately for all households. Conclusions Increases in household expenditures were associated with substantial increases in consumption of ASFs for households, particularly households with lower total expenditures. Increases in ASF

  15. A Comparative Analysis of Information on National Industrial R&D Expenditures. Special Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burke, Mary V.

    The National Science Foundation (NSF) annually publishes information generated by its survey of research and development (R&D) expenditures by United States industry. These data are collected for NSF by the U.S. Bureau of the Census. Other organizations also publish information on industrial R&D expenditures collected by surveys or derived from…

  16. National Beef Tenderness Survey-2010: Warner-Bratzler shear force values and sensory panel ratings for beef steaks from United States retail and food service establishments.

    PubMed

    Guelker, M R; Haneklaus, A N; Brooks, J C; Carr, C C; Delmore, R J; Griffin, D B; Hale, D S; Harris, K B; Mafi, G G; Johnson, D D; Lorenzen, C L; Maddock, R J; Martin, J N; Miller, R K; Raines, C R; VanOverbeke, D L; Vedral, L L; Wasser, B E; Savell, J W

    2013-02-01

    The tenderness and palatability of retail and food service beef steaks from across the United States (12 cities for retail, 5 cities for food service) were evaluated using Warner-Bratzler shear (WBS) and consumer sensory panels. Subprimal postfabrication storage or aging times at retail establishments averaged 20.5 d with a range of 1 to 358 d, whereas postfabrication times at the food service level revealed an average time of 28.1 d with a range of 9 to 67 d. Approximately 64% of retail steaks were labeled with a packer/processor or store brand. For retail, top blade had among the lowest (P < 0.05) WBS values, whereas steaks from the round had the greatest (P < 0.05) values. There were no differences (P > 0.05) in WBS values between moist-heat and dry-heat cookery methods for the top round and bottom round steaks or between enhanced (contained salt or phosphate solution) or nonenhanced steaks. Food service top loin and rib eye steaks had the lowest (P < 0.05) WBS values compared with top sirloin steaks. Retail top blade steaks and food service top loin steaks received among the greatest (P < 0.05) consumer sensory panel ratings compared with the other steaks evaluated. Prime food service rib eye steaks received the greatest ratings (P < 0.05) for overall like, like tenderness, tenderness level, like juiciness, and juiciness level, whereas ungraded rib eye steaks received the lowest ratings (P < 0.05) for like tenderness and tenderness level. The WBS values for food service steaks were greater (P < 0.05) for the Select and ungraded groups compared with the Prime, Top Choice, and Low Choice groups. The WBS values and sensory ratings were comparable to the last survey, signifying that no recent or substantive changes in tenderness have occurred.

  17. Health Care Expenditure and GDP in Oil Exporting Countries: Evidence from OPEC Data, 1995-2012

    PubMed Central

    Fazaeli, Ali Akbar; Ghaderi, Hossein; Salehi, Masoud; Fazaeli, Ali Reza

    2016-01-01

    Background: There is a large body of literature examining income in relation to health expenditures. The share of expenditures in health sector from GDP in developed countries is often larger than in non-developed countries, suggesting that as the level of economic growth increases, health spending increase, too. Objectives: This paper estimates long-run relationships between health expenditures and GDP based on panel data of a sample of 12 countries of the Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC), using data for the period 1995-2012. Patients & Methods: We use panel data unit root tests, cointegration analysis and ECM model to find long-run and short-run relation. This study examines whether health is a luxury or a necessity for OPEC countries within a unit root and cointegration framework. Results: Panel data analysis indicates that health expenditures and GDP are co-integrated and have Engle and Granger causality. In addition, in oil countries that have oil export income, the share of government expenditures in the health sector is often greater than in private health expenditures similar developed countries. Conclusions: The findings verify that health care is not a luxury good and income has a robust relationship to health expenditures in OPEC countries. PMID:26383195

  18. College and University Employee Benefits Cost Survey.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1980

    Standardized information on expenditures by 605 colleges and universities on employee benefits for 1979 are provided. This benefit cost survey offers two principal measurements of college expenditures for each included benefits category: expenditures as a percentage of total gross payroll and expenditures as dollars per employee per year.…

  19. Financial Burden of Health Care Expenditures: Turkey

    PubMed Central

    Sulku, S Nur; Bernard, D Minbay

    2012-01-01

    In this study, we examine whether and to what extent the health insurance system in Turkey provided adequate protection against high out of pocket expenditures in the period prior to “The Health Transformation Programme”. Furthermore, we examine the distribution of out of pocket expenditures by demographic characteristics, poverty status, health service type, access to health care and self-reported health status. We employ the 2002/03 National Household Health Expenditure Survey data to analyze financial burden of health care expenditure. Following the literature, we define high burdens as expenses above 10 and 20% of income. We find that 19% of the nonelderly population were living in families spending more than 10% of family income and that 14% of the nonelderly population were living in families spending more than 20% of family income on health care. Furthermore, the poor and those living in economically less developed regions had the greatest risk of high out of pocket burdens. The risk of high financial burdens varied by the type of insurance among the insured due to differences in benefits among the five separate public schemes that provided health insurance in the pre-reform period. Our results are robust to three alternative specifications of the burden measure and including elderly adults in the sample population. We see that prior to the reforms there were not adequate protection against high health expenditures. Our study provides a baseline against which policymakers can measure the success of the health care reform in terms of providing financial protection. PMID:23113149

  20. National Health Expenditures, 1996

    PubMed Central

    Levit, Katharine R.; Lazenby, Helen C.; Braden, Bradley R.; Cowan, Cathy A.; Sensenig, Arthur L.; McDonnell, Patricia A.; Stiller, Jean M.; Won, Darleen K.; Martin, Anne B.; Sivarajan, Lekha; Donham, Carolyn S.; Long, Anna M.; Stewart, Madie W.

    1997-01-01

    The national health expenditures (NHE) series presented in this report for 1960-96 provides a view of the economic history of health care in the United States through spending for health care services and the sources financing that care. In 1996 NHE topped $1 trillion. At the same time, spending grew at the slowest rate, 4.4 percent, ever recorded in the current series. For the first time, this article presents estimates of Medicare managed care payments by type of service, as well as nursing home and home health spending in hospital-based facilities. PMID:10179997

  1. Triangulating health expenditure estimates from different data sources in developing countries: the case of Pakistan's private health expenditure.

    PubMed

    Lorenz, Christian

    2012-01-01

    This article deals with the accuracy of statistical records used for political decision making and international comparative analysis. In developing countries, even major macroeconomic indicators can include data inadequacies and methodological differences in data generation between statistical agencies. Existing data show that total health expenditure as a percentage of GDP is about 50% lower in Pakistan than in other low-income countries (LIC). To determine whether these results reflect the actual situation in Pakistan or whether they are due to statistical error, Pakistan produced National Health Accounts (NHA) for the first time in 2009 to assess health spending in 2005-6. Improved NHA estimates are also being made for 2007-8, which will be based on the following: public expenditure data published with time lags; survey results for 2007-8; and multivariate analyses of data from 2010 and 2011 surveys on health-specific out-of-pocket (OOP) expenditure, healthcare providers, non-profit institutions and census data on autonomous bodies and large hospitals. Since these data are not yet available, a best estimate of health expenditure has to be made to support policy decision making and to provide a point of comparison for future NHA results. Health expenditure data are available from different data sources and estimates have been made by applying different methods, leading to a range of health spending estimates. As a result of this diversity of estimates and data, each with its own inaccuracies or gaps, there was a clear need to triangulate the available information and to identify a best possible estimate. This article compares estimates of household health expenditure from different sources, such as the Household Integrated Economic Survey, the Family Budget Survey and National Accounts (NA). The analysis shows that health expenditure figures for Pakistan have been underestimated by both WHO and the NHA. An adjusted estimate shows OOP spending to be twice as high

  2. A smooth mixture of Tobits model for healthcare expenditure.

    PubMed

    Keane, Michael; Stavrunova, Olena

    2011-09-01

    This paper develops a smooth mixture of Tobits (SMTobit) model for healthcare expenditure. The model is a generalization of the smoothly mixing regressions framework of Geweke and Keane (J Econometrics 2007; 138: 257-290) to the case of a Tobit-type limited dependent variable. A Markov chain Monte Carlo algorithm with data augmentation is developed to obtain the posterior distribution of model parameters. The model is applied to the US Medicare Current Beneficiary Survey data on total medical expenditure. The results suggest that the model can capture the overall shape of the expenditure distribution very well, and also provide a good fit to a number of characteristics of the conditional (on covariates) distribution of expenditure, such as the conditional mean, variance and probability of extreme outcomes, as well as the 50th, 90th, and 95th, percentiles. We find that healthier individuals face an expenditure distribution with lower mean, variance and probability of extreme outcomes, compared with their counterparts in a worse state of health. Males have an expenditure distribution with higher mean, variance and probability of an extreme outcome, compared with their female counterparts. The results also suggest that heart and cardiovascular diseases affect the expenditure of males more than that of females. PMID:21830254

  3. A smooth mixture of Tobits model for healthcare expenditure.

    PubMed

    Keane, Michael; Stavrunova, Olena

    2011-09-01

    This paper develops a smooth mixture of Tobits (SMTobit) model for healthcare expenditure. The model is a generalization of the smoothly mixing regressions framework of Geweke and Keane (J Econometrics 2007; 138: 257-290) to the case of a Tobit-type limited dependent variable. A Markov chain Monte Carlo algorithm with data augmentation is developed to obtain the posterior distribution of model parameters. The model is applied to the US Medicare Current Beneficiary Survey data on total medical expenditure. The results suggest that the model can capture the overall shape of the expenditure distribution very well, and also provide a good fit to a number of characteristics of the conditional (on covariates) distribution of expenditure, such as the conditional mean, variance and probability of extreme outcomes, as well as the 50th, 90th, and 95th, percentiles. We find that healthier individuals face an expenditure distribution with lower mean, variance and probability of extreme outcomes, compared with their counterparts in a worse state of health. Males have an expenditure distribution with higher mean, variance and probability of an extreme outcome, compared with their female counterparts. The results also suggest that heart and cardiovascular diseases affect the expenditure of males more than that of females.

  4. Energy Expenditure of Sport Stacking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murray, Steven R.; Udermann, Brian E.; Reineke, David M.; Battista, Rebecca A.

    2009-01-01

    Sport stacking is an activity taught in many physical education programs. The activity, although very popular, has been studied minimally, and the energy expenditure for sport stacking is unknown. Therefore, the purposes of this study were to determine the energy expenditure of sport stacking in elementary school children and to compare that value…

  5. National health expenditures, 1985

    PubMed Central

    Waldo, Daniel R.; Levit, Katharine R.; Lazenby, Helen

    1986-01-01

    Slower price inflation in 1985 translated into slower growth of national health expenditures, but underlying growth in the use of goods and services continued along historic trends. Coupled with somewhat sluggish growth of the gross national product, this adherence to trends pushed the share of our Nation's output accounted for by health spending to 10.7 percent. Some aspects of health spending changed: Falling use of hospital services was offset by rising hospital profits and increased use of other health care services. Other aspects remained the same: Both the public sector and the private sector continued efforts to contain costs, efforts that have affected and will continue to affect not only the providers of care but the users of care as well. PMID:10311775

  6. State Action Analysis of Tax Expenditures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Robert Clarke

    1977-01-01

    Recent judicial treatment of tax expenditures in both state action and establishment clause cases is analyzed and it is argued that tax expenditures and direct expenditures should be treated as constitutional equivalents. (LBH)

  7. Validating self-reported food expenditures against food store and eating-out receipts

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Wesley; Aggarwal, Anju; Liu, Zhongyuan; Acheson, Molly; Rehm, Colin D; Moudon, Anne Vernez; Drewnowski, Adam

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To compare objective food store and eating-out receipts with self-reported household food expenditures. Design and setting The Seattle Obesity Study (SOS II) was based on a representative sample of King County adults, Washington, USA. Self-reported household food expenditures were modeled on the Flexible Consumer Behavior Survey (FCBS) Module from 2007–2009 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES). Objective food expenditure data were collected using receipts. Self-reported food expenditures for 447 participants were compared to receipts using paired t-tests, Bland-Altman plots, and kappa statistics. Bias by socio-demographics was also examined. Results Self-reported expenditures closely matched with objective receipt data. Paired t-tests showed no significant differences between receipts and self-reported data on total food expenditures, expenditures at food stores, or eating out. However, the highest income strata showed weaker agreement. Bland Altman plots confirmed no significant bias across both methods - mean difference: 6.4; agreement limits: −123.5, 143.4 for total food expenditures, mean difference 5.7 for food stores, and mean difference 1.7 for eating-out. Kappa statistics showed good agreement for each (kappa 0.51, 0.41 and 0.49 respectively. Households with higher education and income had significantly more number of receipts and higher food expenditures. Conclusion Self-reported food expenditures using NHANES questions, both for food stores and eating-out, serve as a decent proxy for objective household food expenditures from receipts. This method should be used with caution among high income populations, or with high food expenditures. This is the first validation of the FCBS food expenditures question using food store and eating-out receipts. PMID:26486299

  8. Enrollment in Private Medical Insurance and Utilization of Medical Services Among Children and Adolescents: Data From the 2009-2012 Korea Health Panel Surveys

    PubMed Central

    Doo, Young-Taek

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: The purposes of this study were to examine the status of children and adolescents with regard to enrollment in private medical insurance (PMI) and to investigate its influence on their utilization of medical services. Methods: The present study assessed 2973 subjects younger than 19 years of age who participated in five consecutive Korea Health Panel surveys from 2009 to 2012. Results: At the initial assessment, less than 20% of the study population had not enrolled in any PMI program, but this proportion decreased over time. Additionally, the number of subjects with more than two policies increased, the proportions of holders of indemnity-type only (‘I’-only) and of fixed amount+indemnity-type (‘F+I’) increased, whereas the proportion of holders with fixed amount-type only (‘F’-only) decreased. Compared with subjects without private insurance, PMI policyholders were more likely to use outpatient and emergency services, and the number of policies was proportionately related to inpatient service utilization. Regarding out-patient care, subjects with ‘F’-only PMI used these services more often than did uninsured subjects (odds ratio [OR], 1.69), whereas subjects with ‘I’-only PMI or ‘F+I’ PMI utilized a broad range of inpatient, outpatient, and emergency services relative to uninsured subjects (ORs for ‘I’-only: 1.39, 1.63, and 1.38, respectively; ORs for ‘F+I’: 1.67, 2.09, and 1.37, respectively). Conclusions: The findings suggest public policy approaches to standardizing PMI contracts, reform in calculation of premiums in PMI, re-examination regarding indemnity insurance products, and mutual control mechanisms to mediate between national health insurance services and private insurers are required. PMID:27055548

  9. Impact of changes in mode of travel to work on changes in body mass index: evidence from the British Household Panel Survey

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Adam; Panter, Jenna; Suhrcke, Marc; Ogilvie, David

    2015-01-01

    Background Active commuting is associated with various health benefits, but little is known about its causal relationship with body mass index (BMI). Methods We used cohort data from three consecutive annual waves of the British Household Panel Survey, a longitudinal study of nationally representative households, in 2004/2005 (n=15 791), 2005/2006 and 2006/2007. Participants selected for the analyses (n=4056) reported their usual main mode of travel to work at each time point. Self-reported height and weight were used to derive BMI at baseline and after 2 years. Multivariable linear regression analyses were used to assess associations between switching to and from active modes of travel (over 1 and 2 years) and change in BMI (over 2 years) and to assess dose–response relationships. Results After adjustment for socioeconomic and health-related covariates, the first analysis (n=3269) showed that switching from private motor transport to active travel or public transport (n=179) was associated with a significant reduction in BMI compared with continued private motor vehicle use (n=3090; −0.32 kg/m2, 95% CI −0.60 to −0.05). Larger adjusted effect sizes were associated with switching to active travel (n=109; −0.45 kg/m2, −0.78 to −0.11), particularly among those who switched within the first year and those with the longest journeys. The second analysis (n=787) showed that switching from active travel or public transport to private motor transport was associated with a significant increase in BMI (0.34 kg/m2, 0.05 to 0.64). Conclusions Interventions to enable commuters to switch from private motor transport to more active modes of travel could contribute to reducing population mean BMI. PMID:25954024

  10. State Health Expenditure Accounts: Minnesota's Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Blewett, Lynn A.; Sonier, Julie; Gustafson, Brent C.; Leitz, Scott D.

    1999-01-01

    Minnesota's approach to the development and use of State health expenditure accounts (SHEAs) was developed to assist State policymakers with decisions regarding health care reform. The accounts are based on an annual survey of third-party payers and summary Medicaid and Medicare data. Summary data are presented along with a discussion of data collection methodology, estimation, and dissemination. Minnesota's experience demonstrates that the ability of States to conduct detailed analysis of health care spending and to use these estimates to change State policy, inform national policy debate, conduct impact analysis, educate policymakers, and monitor market trends. PMID:11481787

  11. Financial Statistics of Institutions of Higher Education; Current Funds Revenues and Expenditures 1968-69.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mertins, Paul F.; Brandt, Norman J.

    The data presented in this publication were obtained in the fourth annual Higher Education General Information Survey (HEGIS IV), which included a questionnaire on financial statistics for the year 1968-69. Revenues and expenditures were listed under the following categories: (1) educational and general revenues (expenditures); (2) student aid…

  12. Public Expenditure on Education. OECD Studies in Resource Allocation No. 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development, Paris (France).

    This publication focuses on the part of OECD member countries' educational systems that is directly or indirectly financed by the government, examining educational expenditures in the context of conflicting claims of national resources. Chapter 1 surveys the rapid growth in expenditures through the 1960s and outlines some of the similarities in…

  13. Medical Expenditures for People with Disabilities in the United States, 1987. Disability Statistics Report 5.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trupin, Laura; And Others

    This report presents detailed tables on the medical expenditures of people, from young children to older adults, who are limited in activity or who need assistance in activities of daily living. It uses data from the 1987 National Medical Expenditures Survey and compares these with 1993 estimates. Tables of results are presented on: (1) total and…

  14. 43 CFR 3861.2-3 - Mineral surveyor's report of expenditures and improvements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Mineral surveyor's report of expenditures... Lands (Continued) BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR MINERALS MANAGEMENT (3000) MINERAL PATENT APPLICATIONS Surveys and Plats § 3861.2-3 Mineral surveyor's report of expenditures...

  15. 43 CFR 3861.2-3 - Mineral surveyor's report of expenditures and improvements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Mineral surveyor's report of expenditures... Lands (Continued) BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR MINERALS MANAGEMENT (3000) MINERAL PATENT APPLICATIONS Surveys and Plats § 3861.2-3 Mineral surveyor's report of expenditures...

  16. 43 CFR 3861.2-3 - Mineral surveyor's report of expenditures and improvements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Mineral surveyor's report of expenditures... Lands (Continued) BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR MINERALS MANAGEMENT (3000) MINERAL PATENT APPLICATIONS Surveys and Plats § 3861.2-3 Mineral surveyor's report of expenditures...

  17. Expenditures on Children by Families, 2007. Miscellaneous Publication Number 1528-2007

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lino, Mark

    2008-01-01

    Since 1960, the U.S. Department of Agriculture has provided estimates of expenditures on children from birth through age 17. This technical report presents the most recent estimates for husband-wife and single-parent families using data from the 1990-92 Consumer Expenditure Survey, updated to 2007 dollars using the Consumer Price Index. Data and…

  18. EU pharmaceutical expenditure forecast

    PubMed Central

    Urbinati, Duccio; Rémuzat, Cécile; Kornfeld, Åsa; Vataire, Anne-Lise; Cetinsoy, Laurent; Aballéa, Samuel; Mzoughi, Olfa; Toumi, Mondher

    2014-01-01

    (−€5,589 million), and, far behind them, Germany (−€831 million), Greece (−€808 million), Portugal (−€243 million), and Hungary (−€84 million). The main source of savings came from the cardiovascular, central nervous system, and respiratory areas and from biosimilar entries. Oncology, immunology, and inflammation, in contrast, lead to additional expenditure. The model was particularly sensitive to the time to market of branded products, generic prices, generic penetration, and the distribution of biosimilars. Conclusions The results of this forecast suggested a decrease in pharmaceutical expenditure in the studied period. The model was sensitive to pharmaceutical policy decisions. PMID:27226837

  19. Panel Sessions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Proceedings of the ASIS Mid-Year Meeting, 1992

    1992-01-01

    Lists the speakers and summarizes the issues addressed for 12 panel sessions on topics related to networking, including libraries and national networks, federal national resources and energy programs, multimedia issues, telecommuting, remote image serving, accessing the Internet, library automation, scientific information, applications of Z39.50,…

  20. Welfare Attitudes and Social Expenditure: Do Regimes Shape Public Opinion?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jakobsen, Tor Georg

    2011-01-01

    This article examines the link between regime types, social expenditure, and welfare attitudes. By employing data on 19 countries taken from the World Values Survey, the main aim is to see to what degree the institutions of a country affect the attitudes of its citizens. According to Esping-Andersen ("The three worlds of welfare capitalism".…

  1. Patterns of Health Expenditures and Financial Protections in Vietnam 1992-2012

    PubMed Central

    Hoang, Van Minh; Tran, Tuan Anh; Tran, Thi Giang Huong; Ha, Anh Duc; Luu, Ngoc Hoat; Nguyen, Thi Kim Phuong

    2015-01-01

    Health financing has been considered as an important building block of a health system and has a key role in promoting universal health coverage in the Vietnam. This paper aims to describe the pattern of health expenditure, including total health expenditure and composition of health expenditure, over the last two decades in Vietnam. The paper mainly uses the data from Vietnam National Health Account and Vietnam Living Standards Survey. We also included data from other relevant published literature, reports and statistics about health care expenditure in Vietnam. The per capita health expenditure in Vietnam increased from US$ 14 in 1995 to US$ 86 in 2012. The total health expenditure as a share of GDP also rose from 5.2% in 1995 to 6.9% in 2012. Public health expenditure as percentage of government expenditure rose from 7.4% in 1995 to nearly 10% in 2012. The coverage of health insurance went up from 10% in 1995 to 68.5% in 2012. However, health financing in Vietnam was depending on private expenditures (57.4% in 2012). As a result, the proportion of households with catastrophic expenditure in 2012 was 4.2%. The rate of impoverishment in 2012 was 2.5%. To ensure equity and efficient goal of health system, policy actions for containing the health care out-of-pocket payments and their poverty impacts are urgently needed in Vietnam. PMID:26617446

  2. Patterns of Health Expenditures and Financial Protections in Vietnam 1992-2012.

    PubMed

    Hoang, Van Minh; Oh, Juhwan; Tran, Tuan Anh; Tran, Thi Giang Huong; Ha, Anh Duc; Luu, Ngoc Hoat; Nguyen, Thi Kim Phuong

    2015-11-01

    Health financing has been considered as an important building block of a health system and has a key role in promoting universal health coverage in the Vietnam. This paper aims to describe the pattern of health expenditure, including total health expenditure and composition of health expenditure, over the last two decades in Vietnam. The paper mainly uses the data from Vietnam National Health Account and Vietnam Living Standards Survey. We also included data from other relevant published literature, reports and statistics about health care expenditure in Vietnam. The per capita health expenditure in Vietnam increased from US$ 14 in 1995 to US$ 86 in 2012. The total health expenditure as a share of GDP also rose from 5.2% in 1995 to 6.9% in 2012. Public health expenditure as percentage of government expenditure rose from 7.4% in 1995 to nearly 10% in 2012. The coverage of health insurance went up from 10% in 1995 to 68.5% in 2012. However, health financing in Vietnam was depending on private expenditures (57.4% in 2012). As a result, the proportion of households with catastrophic expenditure in 2012 was 4.2%. The rate of impoverishment in 2012 was 2.5%. To ensure equity and efficient goal of health system, policy actions for containing the health care out-of-pocket payments and their poverty impacts are urgently needed in Vietnam. PMID:26617446

  3. Patterns of Health Expenditures and Financial Protections in Vietnam 1992-2012.

    PubMed

    Hoang, Van Minh; Oh, Juhwan; Tran, Tuan Anh; Tran, Thi Giang Huong; Ha, Anh Duc; Luu, Ngoc Hoat; Nguyen, Thi Kim Phuong

    2015-11-01

    Health financing has been considered as an important building block of a health system and has a key role in promoting universal health coverage in the Vietnam. This paper aims to describe the pattern of health expenditure, including total health expenditure and composition of health expenditure, over the last two decades in Vietnam. The paper mainly uses the data from Vietnam National Health Account and Vietnam Living Standards Survey. We also included data from other relevant published literature, reports and statistics about health care expenditure in Vietnam. The per capita health expenditure in Vietnam increased from US$ 14 in 1995 to US$ 86 in 2012. The total health expenditure as a share of GDP also rose from 5.2% in 1995 to 6.9% in 2012. Public health expenditure as percentage of government expenditure rose from 7.4% in 1995 to nearly 10% in 2012. The coverage of health insurance went up from 10% in 1995 to 68.5% in 2012. However, health financing in Vietnam was depending on private expenditures (57.4% in 2012). As a result, the proportion of households with catastrophic expenditure in 2012 was 4.2%. The rate of impoverishment in 2012 was 2.5%. To ensure equity and efficient goal of health system, policy actions for containing the health care out-of-pocket payments and their poverty impacts are urgently needed in Vietnam.

  4. [The federal health expenditure on the uninsured population: Mexico 1980-1995].

    PubMed

    Lara, A; Gómez-Dantés, O; Urdapilleta, O; Bravo, M L

    1997-01-01

    In the last fifteen years Mexico suffered several economic crisis which have negatively affected public expenditure in social welfare and, as a consequence, public expenditure in health. This paper discusses the relationship between the adjustment policies adopted to confront these crisis and public expenditure in health care for the non-insured population, as well as the regional distribution of this expenditure. In part one, the evolution of general public expenditure, public expenditure in social welfare, and public expenditure in health between 1980 and 1995 is described. In part two, the distribution of public health expenditure for the non-insured population among the five regions in which the country was divided by the National Health Survey II is discussed. The main conclusion of this paper is that, between 1980 and 1995, the public expenditure gaps that have existed for a long time in Mexico among regions remained unchanged. These gaps basically affect the southern states of the country, are not related to health needs, and may deepen in view of the new relative cuts in public expenditure in social welfare announced by the new administration.

  5. Minority Transportation Expenditure Allocation Model

    SciTech Connect

    Vyas, Anant D.; Santini, Danilo J.; Marik, Sheri K.

    1993-04-12

    MITRAM (Minority TRansportation expenditure Allocation Model) can project various transportation related attributes of minority (Black and Hispanic) and majority (white) populations. The model projects vehicle ownership, vehicle miles of travel, workers, new car and on-road fleet fuel economy, amount and share of household income spent on gasoline, and household expenditures on public transportation and taxis. MITRAM predicts reactions to sustained fuel price changes for up to 10 years after the change.

  6. 61. Upper panel in cornerpower panel lcpa lower panel in ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    61. Upper panel in corner-power panel lcpa lower panel in corner-oxygen regeneration unit, at right-air conditioner control panel, on floor-bio-pack 45 for emergency breathing, looking northwest - Ellsworth Air Force Base, Delta Flight, Launch Control Facility, County Road CS23A, North of Exit 127, Interior, Jackson County, SD

  7. Architectural Panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    Alliance Wall Corporation's Whyteboard, a porcelain enamel on steel panels wall board, owes its color stability to a KIAC engineering background study to identify potential technologies and manufacturers of equipment which could be used to detect surface flaws. One result of the data base search was the purchase of a spectrocolorimeter which enables the company to control some 250 standard colors, and match special colors.

  8. Measuring the Displacement and Replacement of Government Health Expenditure

    PubMed Central

    Dieleman, Joseph L; Hanlon, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Research assessing the relationship between government health expenditure and development assistance for health channeled to governments (DAHG) has not considered that this relationship may depend on whether DAHG is increasing or decreasing. We explore this issue using general method of moments estimation and a panel of financial flows data spanning 119 countries and 16 years. Our primary concern is how DAHG affects government health expenditure as source (GHES). We disaggregate the average effect of DAHG and separately identify the effects of increases versus decreases in DAHG. We find that a $1 year-over-year increase in DAHG leads to a $0.62 (90% confidence interval (CI): 0.15, 1.09) decrease in GHES, whereas a $1 year-over-year decrease in DAHG does not have an effect on GHES that is statistically different from zero (CI: −0.67, 1.17). Simulation shows that the displacement of GHES between 1995 and 2010 reduced total government health expenditure by $152.8 billion (CI: 46.9, 277.6). Moreover, the irregular disbursement of DAHG reduced total government expenditure by $96.9 billion (CI: 0.5, 212.4). Thus, this research shows that health aid is fungible and highlights the cost of displacement and erratic aid disbursement. PMID:24327240

  9. Measuring the displacement and replacement of government health expenditure.

    PubMed

    Dieleman, Joseph L; Hanlon, Michael

    2014-02-01

    Research assessing the relationship between government health expenditure and development assistance for health channeled to governments (DAHG) has not considered that this relationship may depend on whether DAHG is increasing or decreasing. We explore this issue using general method of moments estimation and a panel of financial flows data spanning 119 countries and 16 years. Our primary concern is how DAHG affects government health expenditure as source (GHES). We disaggregate the average effect of DAHG and separately identify the effects of increases versus decreases in DAHG. We find that a $1 year-over-year increase in DAHG leads to a $0.62 (90% confidence interval (CI): 0.15, 1.09) decrease in GHES, whereas a $1 year-over-year decrease in DAHG does not have an effect on GHES that is statistically different from zero (CI: -0.67, 1.17). Simulation shows that the displacement of GHES between 1995 and 2010 reduced total government health expenditure by $152.8 billion (CI: 46.9, 277.6). Moreover, the irregular disbursement of DAHG reduced total government expenditure by $96.9 billion (CI: 0.5, 212.4). Thus, this research shows that health aid is fungible and highlights the cost of displacement and erratic aid disbursement.

  10. Revenues and Expenditures for Public Elementary and Secondary School Districts: School Year 2005-06 (Fiscal Year 2006). First Look. NCES 2008-345

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhou, Lei

    2008-01-01

    This brief publication contains basic revenue and expenditure data, by state, for public elementary and secondary education for school year 2005-06. It contains state-level data on revenues by source and expenditures by function, including expenditures per pupil. It presents data from the School District Finance Survey for School Year 2005-06…

  11. School Finance, Equivalent Educational Expenditure, and the Income Distribution: Equal Dollars or Equal Chances for Success?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Kathryn; Lambright, Kristina; Smeeding, Timothy M.

    2006-01-01

    This article breaks new ground in the debate on school finance and equality of per pupil school expenditures. We are able to merge school district data with the individual and family data of the Panel Study of Income Dynamics (PSID). This allows us to examine both student and school district characteristics and to assess several measures of…

  12. Drilling expenditures: doldrums, then growth

    SciTech Connect

    Krupp, H.W.; Spadine, F.R.

    1985-07-24

    Projections of US expenditures for oil and gas drilling indicate the current decline will continue another 10 to 15%. If OPEC is able to maintain the existing oil price structure, 1986 expenditures could recover the $27 billion level of 1984, but it is more likely that further erosion of prices will drive spending down another $3 per barrel to $21 billion. The forecast indicates a possible rapid climb starting at the end of the decade and reaching $60 to $65 billion by the mid-1990s as long as oil prices do not collapse, but the $27 billion level of the early 1980s will not be regained. Natural gas drilling will account for most of the increase, rising from 45% to 55% of total expenditures. 3 figures, 3 tables.

  13. Household food insecurity and food expenditure in Bolivia, Burkina Faso, And the Philippines.

    PubMed

    Melgar-Quinonez, Hugo R; Zubieta, Ana C; MkNelly, Barbara; Nteziyaremye, Anastase; Gerardo, Maria Filipinas D; Dunford, Christopher

    2006-05-01

    This study examined the association between food insecurity, determined by a modified version of the U.S. Household Food Security Survey Module (US HFSSM), and total daily per capita (DPC) consumption (measured as household expenditures) in Bolivia, Burkina Faso, and the Philippines. Household food insecurity was determined by an adapted 9-item US HFSSM version. A short version of the World Bank's Living Standards Measurement Study (LSMS) consumption module measured household expenditures. Focus groups were used to adapt the survey instrument to each local context. The sample (n approximately 330 per country) includes residents of urban and rural areas. A 12-month food expenditure aggregate was generated as part of the total household expenditures calculation. DPC food expenditure, which represented over 60% of the total household consumption, as well as expenditures on specific food groups correlated with food insecurity both as a continuous Food Insecurity Score (FinSS) and a tricategorical food insecurity status variable. ANOVA and regression analysis were executed adjusting for social and demographic covariates. Food-secure households have significantly higher (P < 0.05) total DPC food expenditures as well as expenditures on animal source foods, vegetables, and fats and oils than moderately and severely food-insecure households. The results offer evidence that the US HFSSM is able to discriminate between households at different levels of food insecurity status in diverse developing world settings.

  14. Household food insecurity and food expenditure in Bolivia, Burkina Faso, And the Philippines.

    PubMed

    Melgar-Quinonez, Hugo R; Zubieta, Ana C; MkNelly, Barbara; Nteziyaremye, Anastase; Gerardo, Maria Filipinas D; Dunford, Christopher

    2006-05-01

    This study examined the association between food insecurity, determined by a modified version of the U.S. Household Food Security Survey Module (US HFSSM), and total daily per capita (DPC) consumption (measured as household expenditures) in Bolivia, Burkina Faso, and the Philippines. Household food insecurity was determined by an adapted 9-item US HFSSM version. A short version of the World Bank's Living Standards Measurement Study (LSMS) consumption module measured household expenditures. Focus groups were used to adapt the survey instrument to each local context. The sample (n approximately 330 per country) includes residents of urban and rural areas. A 12-month food expenditure aggregate was generated as part of the total household expenditures calculation. DPC food expenditure, which represented over 60% of the total household consumption, as well as expenditures on specific food groups correlated with food insecurity both as a continuous Food Insecurity Score (FinSS) and a tricategorical food insecurity status variable. ANOVA and regression analysis were executed adjusting for social and demographic covariates. Food-secure households have significantly higher (P < 0.05) total DPC food expenditures as well as expenditures on animal source foods, vegetables, and fats and oils than moderately and severely food-insecure households. The results offer evidence that the US HFSSM is able to discriminate between households at different levels of food insecurity status in diverse developing world settings. PMID:16614440

  15. Medicaid Expenditures on Psychotropic Medications for Maltreated Children: A Study of 36 States

    PubMed Central

    Raghavan, Ramesh; Brown, Derek S; Allaire, Benjamin T; Garfield, Lauren D; Murray, Raven

    2014-01-01

    Objective Children with histories of abuse or neglect are the most expensive child population to insure for their mental health needs. This paper quantifies the magnitude of Medicaid expenditures incurred on the purchase of psychotropic drugs for these children. Methods Child participants (N=4445) in the National Survey of Child and Adolescent Well-Being (NSCAW) – consisting of children investigated for suspected abuse and neglect – were linked to their Medicaid claims from 36 states. Expenditures on psychotropic mediations between the NSCAW sample and a propensity score-matched comparison sample were compared using a two-part regression of logistic and generalized linear models. Results Children surveyed in NSCAW had twice the odds of psychotropic drug use, and $190 higher mean annual expenditures on psychotropic drugs than those in the comparison sample. Increased expenditures on antidepressants and antimanic drugs were the primary drivers of these increased expenditures. Male gender and white race/ethnicity were associated with significantly increased expenditures. Children in primary care case management had $325 lower expenditures than those in fee-for-service Medicaid. Among NSCAW children alone, male gender, older age, being in poorer health, and scoring in the clinical range of the Child Behavior Checklist all increased expenditures on psychotropic drugs. Conclusions Medicaid agencies should focus their cost containment strategies on antidepressants and antimanic drugs, consider expanding primary care case management arrangements, and expand use of instruments such as the Child Behavior Checklist to identify and treat high-need children. PMID:25178250

  16. Heat exchanger panel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warburton, Robert E. (Inventor); Cuva, William J. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    The present invention relates to a heat exchanger panel which has broad utility in high temperature environments. The heat exchanger panel has a first panel, a second panel, and at least one fluid containment device positioned intermediate the first and second panels. At least one of the first panel and the second panel have at least one feature on an interior surface to accommodate the at least one fluid containment device. In a preferred embodiment, each of the first and second panels is formed from a high conductivity, high temperature composite material. Also, in a preferred embodiment, the first and second panels are joined together by one or more composite fasteners.

  17. Assessing the Relationship between Physical Illness and Mental Health Service Use and Expenditures among Older Adults from Racial/Ethnic Minority Groups

    PubMed Central

    Jimenez, Daniel E; Cook, Benjamin; Kim, Giyeon; Reynolds, Charles F.; Alegria, Margarita; Coe-Odess, Sarah; Bartels, Stephen J.

    2015-01-01

    Objective The association of physical illness and mental health service use in older adults from racial/ethnic minority groups is an important area of study given the mental and physical health disparities and the low use of mental health services in this population. The purpose of this study is to describe the impact of comorbid physical illness on mental health service use and expenditures in older adults; and to evaluate disparities in mental health service use and expenditures among a racially/ethnically diverse sample of older adults with and without comorbid physical illness. Methods Data were obtained from the Medical Expenditure Panel Survey (years 2004–2011). The sample included 1563 whites, 519 African-Americans, and 642 Latinos and (N=2,724) aged 65+ with probable mental illness. Using two-part generalized linear models, we estimated and compared mental health service use among those with and without a comorbid physical illness. Results Mental health service use was greater for older adults with comorbid physical illness compared to those without a comorbid physical illness. Once mental health services were accessed, no differences in mental health expenditures were found. Comorbid physical illness increased the likelihood of mental health service use in older whites and Latinos. However, the presence of a comorbidity did not impact racial/ethnic disparities in mental health service use. Conclusions This study highlighted the important role of comorbid physical illness as a potential contributor to using mental health services and suggests intervention strategies to enhance engagement in mental health services by older adults from racial/ethnic minority groups. PMID:25772763

  18. 78 FR 54796 - Research Expenditures

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-06

    ... Internal Revenue Service 26 CFR Part 1 RIN 1545-BE64 Research Expenditures AGENCY: Internal Revenue Service... section 174 of the Internal Revenue Code (Code). In particular, these proposed regulations provide... property, including pilot models. The regulations will affect taxpayers engaged in research...

  19. RELIGIOUS CORRELATES OF SCHOOL EXPENDITURES.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    ALKIN, MARVIN C.

    THE HYPOTHESIS THAT PUBLIC EDUCATIONAL EXPENDITURES ARE RELATED TO THE RELIGIOUS COMPOSITION OF A COMMUNITY WAS TESTED STATISTICALLY. EIGHTEEN RANDOMLY SELECTED SAN FRANCISCO BAY AREA SCHOOL DISTRICTS FROM A TOTAL OF 130 HAVING MORE THAN 300 PUPILS IN ADA WERE USED FOR THE STUDY. QUESTIONNAIRES ON RELIGIOUS PREFERENCES WERE SENT TO 50 RANDOMLY…

  20. 44 CFR 361.8 - Ineligible expenditures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... OF HOMELAND SECURITY PREPAREDNESS NATIONAL EARTHQUAKE HAZARDS REDUCTION ASSISTANCE TO STATE AND LOCAL GOVERNMENTS Earthquake Hazards Reduction Assistance Program § 361.8 Ineligible expenditures. (a) Expenditures... annual negotiation process with FEMA how this equipment will support the earthquake hazards...

  1. 44 CFR 361.8 - Ineligible expenditures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... OF HOMELAND SECURITY PREPAREDNESS NATIONAL EARTHQUAKE HAZARDS REDUCTION ASSISTANCE TO STATE AND LOCAL GOVERNMENTS Earthquake Hazards Reduction Assistance Program § 361.8 Ineligible expenditures. (a) Expenditures... annual negotiation process with FEMA how this equipment will support the earthquake hazards...

  2. 44 CFR 361.8 - Ineligible expenditures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... OF HOMELAND SECURITY PREPAREDNESS NATIONAL EARTHQUAKE HAZARDS REDUCTION ASSISTANCE TO STATE AND LOCAL GOVERNMENTS Earthquake Hazards Reduction Assistance Program § 361.8 Ineligible expenditures. (a) Expenditures... annual negotiation process with FEMA how this equipment will support the earthquake hazards...

  3. 44 CFR 361.8 - Ineligible expenditures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... HOMELAND SECURITY PREPAREDNESS NATIONAL EARTHQUAKE HAZARDS REDUCTION ASSISTANCE TO STATE AND LOCAL GOVERNMENTS Earthquake Hazards Reduction Assistance Program § 361.8 Ineligible expenditures. (a) Expenditures... annual negotiation process with FEMA how this equipment will support the earthquake hazards...

  4. 44 CFR 361.8 - Ineligible expenditures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... OF HOMELAND SECURITY PREPAREDNESS NATIONAL EARTHQUAKE HAZARDS REDUCTION ASSISTANCE TO STATE AND LOCAL GOVERNMENTS Earthquake Hazards Reduction Assistance Program § 361.8 Ineligible expenditures. (a) Expenditures... annual negotiation process with FEMA how this equipment will support the earthquake hazards...

  5. Spatial Structure and Climatic Adaptation in African Maize Revealed by Surveying SNP Diversity in Relation to Global Breeding and Landrace Panels

    PubMed Central

    Westengen, Ola T.; Berg, Paul R.; Kent, Matthew P.; Brysting, Anne K.

    2012-01-01

    Background Climate change threatens maize productivity in sub-Saharan Africa. To ensure food security, access to locally adapted genetic resources and varieties is an important adaptation measure. Most of the maize grown in Africa is a genetic mix of varieties introduced at different historic times following the birth of the trans-Atlantic economy, and knowledge about geographic structure and local adaptations is limited. Methodology A panel of 48 accessions of maize representing various introduction routes and sources of historic and recent germplasm introductions in Africa was genotyped with the MaizeSNP50 array. Spatial genetic structure and genetic relationships in the African panel were analysed separately and in the context of a panel of 265 inbred lines representing global breeding material (based on 26,900 SNPs) and a panel of 1127 landraces from the Americas (270 SNPs). Environmental association analysis was used to detect SNPs associated with three climatic variables based on the full 43,963 SNP dataset. Conclusions The genetic structure is consistent between subsets of the data and the markers are well suited for resolving relationships and admixture among the accessions. The African accessions are structured in three clusters reflecting historical and current patterns of gene flow from the New World and within Africa. The Sahelian cluster reflects original introductions of Meso-American landraces via Europe and a modern introduction of temperate breeding material. The Western cluster reflects introduction of Coastal Brazilian landraces, as well as a Northeast-West spread of maize through Arabic trade routes across the continent. The Eastern cluster most strongly reflects gene flow from modern introduced tropical varieties. Controlling for population history in a linear model, we identify 79 SNPs associated with maximum temperature during the growing season. The associations located in genes of known importance for abiotic stress tolerance are

  6. The impact of public voluntary health insurance on private health expenditures in Vietnam.

    PubMed

    Jowett, M; Contoyannis, P; Vinh, N D

    2003-01-01

    As a financing mechanism with the potential to raise additional funds for health services, whilst improving access to services amongst the poor, non-profit health insurance has become increasingly attractive to health policy-makers. Using data from a household survey in Vietnam, out of pocket health expenditure are compared between members and eligible non-members of the government-implemented voluntary health insurance scheme. Expenditures are analysed for individuals who sought care during their most recent illness. Using an endogenous dummy variable model to control for bias resulting from self-selection into the scheme, we find that health insurance reduces average out-of-pocket expenditures by approximately 200%. Whilst income inelastic, health expenditures are found to be significantly influenced by an individuals level of income, irrespective of insurance status. Despite this, insurance reduces expenditures significantly more for the poor than for the rich.

  7. The impact of changes in county public health expenditures on general health in the population.

    PubMed

    Brown, Timothy T; Martinez-Gutierrez, Maria S; Navab, Bahar

    2014-07-01

    We estimate the effect of changes in the per capita expenditures of county departments of public health on county-level general health status. Using panel data on 40 counties in California (2001-2009), dynamic panel estimation techniques are combined with the Lewbel instrumental variable technique to estimate an aggregate demand for health function that measures the causal cumulative impact that per capita public health expenditures have on county-level general health status. We find that a $10 long-term increase in per capita public health expenditures would increase the percentage of the population reporting good, very good or excellent health by 0.065 percentage points. Each year expenditures were increased would result in ∼24,000 individuals moving from the 'poor or fair health' category to the 'good, very good or excellent health' category across these 40 counties. In terms of the overall impact of county public health departments on general health status, at current funding levels, each annual expenditure cycle results in over 207,000 individuals being in the 'good, very good or excellent' categories of health status rather than the 'poor or fair' categories.

  8. Socioeconomic inequalities in the healthiness of food choices: Exploring the contributions of food expenditures.

    PubMed

    Pechey, Rachel; Monsivais, Pablo

    2016-07-01

    Investigations of the contribution of food costs to socioeconomic inequalities in diet quality may have been limited by the use of estimated (vs. actual) food expenditures, not accounting for where individuals shop, and possible reverse mediation between food expenditures and healthiness of food choices. This study aimed to explore the extent to which food expenditure mediates socioeconomic inequalities in the healthiness of household food choices. Observational panel data on take-home food and beverage purchases, including expenditure, throughout 2010 were obtained for 24,879 UK households stratified by occupational social class. Purchases of (1) fruit and vegetables and (2) less-healthy foods/beverages indicated healthiness of choices. Supermarket choice was determined by whether households ever visited market-defined high-price and/or low-price supermarkets. Results showed that higher occupational social class was significantly associated with greater food expenditure, which was in turn associated with healthier purchasing. In mediation analyses, 63% of the socioeconomic differences in choices of less-healthy foods/beverages were mediated by expenditure, and 36% for fruit and vegetables, but these figures were reduced to 53% and 31% respectively when controlling for supermarket choice. However, reverse mediation analyses were also significant, suggesting that 10% of socioeconomic inequalities in expenditure were mediated by healthiness of choices. Findings suggest that lower food expenditure is likely to be a key contributor to less-healthy food choices among lower socioeconomic groups. However, the potential influence of cost may have been overestimated previously if studies did not account for supermarket choice or explore possible reverse mediation between expenditure and healthiness of choices. PMID:27095324

  9. Families with High Out-of-Pocket Health Services Expenditures Relative to Their Income. Final Report on Phase II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berki, S. E.

    This paper presents high-cost illness data from the first public use data file released on the 1977 National Medical Care Expenditure Survey. Characteristics of families which incurred out-of-pocket expenditures for personal health services that exceeded 5, 10, and 20 percent of their income in 1977 are described including: (1) demographics; (2)…

  10. Health Care Expenditure among People with Disabilities: Potential Role of Workplace Health Promotion and Implications for Rehabilitation Counseling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karpur, Arun; Bruyere, Susanne M.

    2012-01-01

    Workplace health-promotion programs have the potential to reduce health care expenditures, especially among people with disabilities. Utilizing nationally representative survey data, the authors provide estimates for health care expenditures related to secondary conditions, obesity, and health behaviors among working-age people with disabilities.…

  11. Heterogeneity in the Effect of Common Shocks on Healthcare Expenditure Growth.

    PubMed

    Hauck, Katharina; Zhang, Xiaohui

    2016-09-01

    Healthcare expenditure growth is affected by important unobserved common shocks such as technological innovation, changes in sociological factors, shifts in preferences, and the epidemiology of diseases. While common factors impact in principle all countries, their effect is likely to differ across countries. To allow for unobserved heterogeneity in the effects of common shocks, we estimate a panel data model of healthcare expenditure growth in 34 OECD countries over the years 1980 to 2012, where the usual fixed or random effects are replaced by a multifactor error structure. We address model uncertainty with Bayesian model averaging, to identify a small set of robust expenditure drivers from 43 potential candidates. We establish 16 significant drivers of healthcare expenditure growth, including growth in GDP per capita and in insurance premiums, changes in financing arrangements and some institutional characteristics, expenditures on pharmaceuticals, population ageing, costs of health administration, and inpatient care. Our approach allows us to provide robust evidence to policy makers on the drivers that were most strongly associated with the growth in healthcare expenditures over the past 32 years. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26940606

  12. Estimation of own and cross price elasticities of alcohol demand in the UK--A pseudo-panel approach using the Living Costs and Food Survey 2001-2009.

    PubMed

    Meng, Yang; Brennan, Alan; Purshouse, Robin; Hill-McManus, Daniel; Angus, Colin; Holmes, John; Meier, Petra Sylvia

    2014-03-01

    The estimation of price elasticities of alcohol demand is valuable for the appraisal of price-based policy interventions such as minimum unit pricing and taxation. This study applies a pseudo-panel approach to the cross-sectional Living Cost and Food Survey 2001/2-2009 to estimate the own- and cross-price elasticities of off- and on-trade beer, cider, wine, spirits and ready-to-drinks in the UK. A pseudo-panel with 72 subgroups defined by birth year, gender and socioeconomic status is constructed. Estimated own-price elasticities from the base case fixed effect models are all negative and mostly statically significant (p<0.05). Off-trade cider and beer are most elastic (-1.27 and -0.98) and off-trade spirits and on-trade ready-to-drinks are least elastic (-0.08 and -0.19). Estimated cross-price elasticities are smaller in magnitude with a mix of positive and negative signs. The results appear plausible and robust and could be used for appraising the estimated impact of price-based interventions in the UK.

  13. Revenues and Expenditures of Institutions of Higher Education: Fiscal Years 1983-1985. OERI Bulletin.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center for Education Statistics (ED/OERI), Washington, DC.

    Information on revenues and expenditures at U.S. colleges and universities are reported for fiscal years (FY) 1983, 1984, and 1985, based on findings from the Financial Statistics of Institutions of Higher Education survey, which is part of the Higher Education General Information Survey. Narrative and statistical information is presented on:…

  14. Introduction to the panel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forrest, Gary T.

    1990-05-01

    The way the last part of this seminar was structured was originally as a panel. And based on your survey results that you're all going to turn in when you leave, we tried to estimate what are the areas that you really want to know more about. And they change. Two years ago, Rich Bravman from Symbol Technologies came and he was one of the top ranked people for the day as far as the interest level, the way the material was presented. And we watched that market carefully. When you start to see laser diode based bar code scanners in the market, we decided that was a good time to come back. ESI is a phenomenal success in the diode pumped YAG market in electronics. Just unbelievable success with a brand new product, hit the market at exactly the right time for memory repair, and thirdly there's a lot of concern about the cost of laser diodes.

  15. Technical documentation - residential energy consumption survey: household transportation panel (monthly gasoline purchases and vehicle and household characteristics, June 1979-September 1981)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1983-10-01

    This survey covered over 8000 households for fuel purchases for their vehicles over a 28-month period. Each household diary covers at least one month of data. The survey was designed to: provide monthly estimates related to residential vehicle and fuel use including gallons consumed, miles driven, number of vehicles in use; provide quick feedback to the government on the extent and severity of fuel shortages; and to create a data set for analysis of fuel consumption at the household level monthly and annually. (PSB)

  16. State energy price and expenditure report 1994

    SciTech Connect

    1997-06-01

    The State Energy Price and Expenditure Report (SEPER) presents energy price and expenditure estimates individually for the 50 States and the District of Columbia and in aggregate for the United States. The price and expenditure estimates developed in the State Energy Price and Expenditure Data System (SEPEDS) are provided by energy source and economic sector and are published for the years 1970 through 1994. Consumption estimates used to calculate expenditures and the documentation for those estimates are taken from the State Energy Data Report 1994, Consumption Estimates (SEDR), published in October 1996. Expenditures are calculated by multiplying the price estimates by the consumption estimates, which are adjusted to remove process fuel; intermediate petroleum products; and other consumption that has no direct fuel costs, i.e., hydroelectric, geothermal, wind, solar, and photovoltaic energy sources. Documentation is included describing the development of price estimates, data sources, and calculation methods. 316 tabs.

  17. State energy price and expenditure report 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-12-01

    The State Energy Price and Expenditure Report (SEPER) presents energy price and expenditure estimates individually for the 50 States and the District of Columbia and in aggregate for the United States. The price and expenditure estimates are provided by energy source and economic sector and are published for the years 1970, 1980, and 1985 through 1992. Data for all years, 1970 through 1992, are available on personal computer diskettes.

  18. State energy price and expenditure report 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-09-01

    The State Energy Price and Expenditure Report (SEPER) presents energy price and expenditure estimates individually for the 50 States and the District of Columbia and in aggregate for the United States. The price and expenditure estimates are provided by energy source and economic sector and are published for the years 1970, 1975, 1980, and 1985 through 1991. Data for all years, 1970 through 1991, are available on personal computer diskettes. Documentation in Appendix A describes how the price estimates are developed, including sources of data, methods of estimation, and conversion factors applied. This report is an update of the State Energy Price and Expenditure Report 1990, published in September 1992.

  19. The Medical Cost Attributable to Obesity and Overweight in China: Estimation Based on Longitudinal Surveys.

    PubMed

    Qin, Xuezheng; Pan, Jay

    2016-10-01

    With its rapid economic growth and fast changing lifestyle, China witnessed expansionary prevalence of obesity and overweight during the recent decades. This paper provides the first nationally representative estimate of the medical cost attributable to obesity and overweight in China. We improve upon the traditional estimation methodology (two-part model) by jointly adopting the instrumental variable approach and the panel data methods in order to correct for the potential endogeneity of body size and the individual heterogeneity in medical expenditure. Using longitudinal data from 2000-2009 China Health and Nutrition Surveys, we find that body size has a significant impact on the individual expected medical expenditure and the per capita medical cost attributable to obesity and overweight in a single medical event is estimated to be 6.18 Yuan, or 5.29% of the total personal medical expenditure. This translates to 24.35 billion Yuan annual cost on the national scale, accounting for 2.46% of China's national health care expenditure. The subsample analyses also show that such cost is higher for the urban, women, and better educated people and increases over time. Our results contribute to the literature on the economic impact of obesity in developing countries and bear policy implications on controlling the rising health care costs in China. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26223895

  20. Determinants and Equity Evaluation for Health Expenditure Among Patients with Rare Diseases in China

    PubMed Central

    Xin, Xiao-Xiong; Zhao, Liang; Guan, Xiao-Dong; Shi, Lu-Wen

    2016-01-01

    Background: China has not established social security system for rare diseases. Rare diseases could easily impoverish patients and their families. Little research has studied the equity and accessibility of health services for patients with rare diseases in China. This study aimed to explore the factors that influence health expenditure of rare diseases and evaluate its equity. Methods: Questionnaire survey about living conditions and cost burden of patients with rare diseases was conducted. Individual and family information, health expenditure and reimbursement in 2014 of 982 patients were collected. The impact of medical insurance, individual sociodemographic characteristics, family characteristics, and healthcare need on total and out-of-pocket (OOP) health expenditures was analyzed through the generalized linear model. Equity of health expenditure was evaluated by both concentration index and Lorenz curve. Results: Of all the surveyed patients, 11.41% had no medical insurance and 92.10% spent money to seek medical treatment in 2014. It was suggested female (P = 0.048), over 50 years of age (P = 0.062), high-income group (P = 0.021), hospitalization (P = 0.000), and reimbursement ratio (RR) (P = 0.000) were positively correlated with total health expenditure. Diseases not needing long-term treatment (P = 0.000) was negatively correlated with total health expenditure. Over 50 years of age (P = 0.065), high-income group (P = 0.018), hospitalization (P = 0.000) and having Urban Employee Basic Medical Insurance (UEBMI) (P = 0.022) were positively correlated with OOP health expenditure. Patient or the head of the household having received higher education (P = 0.044 and P = 0.081) and reimbursement ratio (P = 0.078) were negatively correlated with OOP health expenditure. The equity evaluation found concentration indexes of health expenditure before and after reimbursement were 0.0550 and 0.0539, respectively. Conclusions: OOP health expenditure of patients with UEBMI

  1. Revenues and Expenditures by Public School Districts: School Year, 2001-02. E.D. TAB. NCES 2005-342

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Frank

    2005-01-01

    This report presents findings from the Common Core of Data (CCD) "School District Finance Survey." These data are collected annually from state education agencies through the U.S. Census Bureau's "Survey of Local Government Finances: School Systems." Data in the "School District Finance Survey" include revenues by source, expenditures by function…

  2. Revenues and Expenditures by Public School Districts: School Year 2000?2001. Statistics In Brief. NCES 2004?319

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Frank

    2004-01-01

    This report presents findings from the Common Core of Data (CCD) "School District Finance Survey." These data are collected annually from state education agencies through the U.S. Census Bureau "Survey of Local Government Finances: School Systems." Data in the "School District Finance Survey" include revenues by source, expenditures by function…

  3. Development of Self-Management Indicators for Chronic Hepatitis B Patients on Antiviral Therapy: Results of a Chinese Delphi Panel Survey

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Ling-Na; Guo, Ying; Qin, Bo; Peng, Xin; Zhu, Wen-Fen

    2015-01-01

    Objective This study aimed to develop a set of indicators that could be used to measure and monitor the self-management performance for chronic hepatitis B (CHB) patients on antiviral therapy in China. Methods A two-round Delphi study via e-mail correspondence was conducted, with a group of 30 Chinese experts. The Delphi questionnaire consisted of 53 indicators identified from a literature review. Experts rated and scored the importance of indicators on a five-point Likert scale. Consensus was considered to be reached if a median score in the top tertile (4-5) and ≥80% of panel ratings in the top tertile (4-5) after Round 2. The included indicators were validated with a group of 106 CHB patients. Results The response rates for the first and second rounds were 90.9% (n=30) and 86.7% (n=26), respectively. Three new indicators were suggested in the first round. 55 indicators were included in the second round after modified. 45 (81.8%) indicators achieved on the level of consensus, all of which had an inter-quartile range of 1 or below. The final set included 4 domains and 45 indicators which were well accepted and understandable by CHB patients. Conclusion This Delphi study produced a set of 45 self-management indicators for CHB patients on antiviral therapy in China. These indicators could be used to measure and monitor the patients’ self-management performance, with the goal of improving the quality of life in this population. PMID:26327606

  4. Health seeking behaviour and the related household out-of-pocket expenditure for chronic non-communicable diseases in rural Malawi.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qun; Brenner, Stephan; Leppert, Gerald; Banda, Thomas Hastings; Kalmus, Olivier; De Allegri, Manuela

    2015-03-01

    Malawi is facing a rising chronic non-communicable disease (CNCD) epidemic. This study explored health seeking behaviour and related expenditure on CNCDs in rural Malawi, with specific focus on detecting potential differences across population groups. We used data from the first round of a panel household health survey conducted in rural Malawi between August and October 2012 on a sample of 1199 households. Multinomial logistic regression was used to analyse factors associated with health seeking choices for CNCDs, distinguishing between no care, informal care and formal care. Descriptive statistics (mean, standard deviation and median) were used to describe related household out-of-pocket expenditure. There were 475 individuals (equivalent to 8.4% of all respondents) reporting at least one CNCD. Among them, 37.3% did not seek any care, 42.5% sought formal care (facility-based care), and 20.2% opted for informal care (traditional or home treatment). Regression analysis showed that illness severity and duration, socio-economic status, being a household head, and the proportion of household members living with a CNCD were significantly associated with health care utilization. Among those seeking care, 65.8% incurred out-of-pocket expenditure with an average of USD 1.49 spent on medical treatment and an additional USD 0.50 spent on transport. Further qualitative inquiry is needed to understand the reasons for low service utilization and to explore the potential role of supply-side factors. To increase access to care for people suffering from CNCDs, the provision of a free Essential Health Package in Malawi ought to be strengthened through the integration of system-wide screening, risk factor modification and continuity of care options for people suffering from CNCDs. This would ensure affordable services to modulate health seeking behaviour of patients at risk of major chronic illnesses.

  5. College and University Employee Retirement and Insurance Benefits Cost Survey.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1984

    Comparative information on expenditures by colleges and universities for employee retirement and insurance benefits is presented for 1984. Results of the survey, which was administered to 639 institutions, provide information on each benefit category on: expenditures as a percentage of total gross payroll, and expenditures as dollars per employee…

  6. Advanced concentrator panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bell, D. M.; Bedard, R. J., Jr.

    1981-01-01

    The prototype fabrication of a lightweight, high-quality cellular glass substrate reflective panel for use in an advanced point-focusing solar concentrator was completed. The reflective panel is a gore shaped segment of an 11-m paraboloidal dish. The overall concentrator design and the design of the reflective panels are described. prototype-specific panel design modifications are discussed and the fabrication approach and procedure outlined.

  7. Disease burden and quality of life in psoriasis patients with and without comorbid psoriatic arthritis: results from National Psoriasis Foundation panel surveys.

    PubMed

    Edson-Heredia, Emily; Zhu, Baojin; Guo, Jiaying; Maeda-Chubachi, Tomoko; Lebwohl, Mark

    2015-03-01

    The comorbidity profile and overall disease impact are not well understood in psoriasis with and without comorbid psoriatic arthritis (PsA). The objective of this study was to compare disease characteristics, comorbidities, and psoriasis-related quality of life (QOL) in patients with moderate to severe psoriasis with and without comorbid PsA using results from National Psoriasis Foundation (NPF) surveys. The study included 3395 and 2072 patients with psoriasis alone and psoriasis with PsA, respectively. The results showed the burden of psoriasis either independently or with comorbid PsA. As severity of psoriasis increased, patient health and QOL were found to decline.

  8. Military Expenditure and Socio-Economic Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ball, Nicole

    1983-01-01

    The relationship between military expenditure and the stimulation of aggregate demand, inflation, investment, trade balance, foreign exchange, the improvement of taxation, and employment creation and industrialization in the Third World is analyzed. To some extent military expenditure does promote economic growth, but it does not automatically…

  9. State energy price and expenditure report 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-09-30

    The State Energy Price and Expenditure Report (SEPER) presents energy price and expenditure estimates for the 50 States, the District of Columbia, and the United States. The estimates are provided by energy source (e.g., petroleum, natural gas, coal, and electricity) and by major consuming or economic sector. This report is an update of the State Energy Price and Expenditure Report 1988 published in September 1990. Changes from the last report are summarized in a section of the documentation. Energy price and expenditure estimates are published for the years 1970, 1975, 1980, and 1985 through 1989. Documentation follows the tables and describes how the price estimates are developed, including sources of data, methods of estimation, and conversion factors applied. Consumption estimates used to calculate expenditures, and the documentation for those estimates, are from the State Energy Data Report, Consumption Estimates, 1960--1989 (SEDR), published in May 1991. Expenditures are calculated by multiplying the price estimates by the consumption estimates, adjusted to remove process fuel and intermediate product consumption. All expenditures are consumer expenditures, that is, they represent estimates of money directly spent by consumers to purchase energy, generally including taxes. 11 figs., 43 tabs.

  10. Administrative Expenditures in Texas Public Universities, 1996.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board, Austin.

    This document presents text and graphs to provide an overview of administrative expenditures in institutions of higher education in Texas. Administrative expenditure indicators at Texas public senior universities are compared with each other, with national averages, and with averages of the 10 states nearest Texas in population. In constant…

  11. TRMM Solar Array Panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    This final report presents conclusions/recommendations concerning the TRMM Solar Array; deliverable list and schedule summary; waivers and deviations; as-shipped performance data, including flight panel verification matrix, panel output detail, shadow test summary, humidity test summary, reverse bias test panel; and finally, quality assurance summary.

  12. State energy price and expenditure report, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1998-08-01

    The State Energy Price and Expenditure Report (SEPER) presents energy price and expenditure estimates individually for the 50 States and the District of Columbia and in aggregate for the US. The estimates developed in the State Energy Price and Expenditure Data System (SEPEDS) are provided by energy source and economic sector and are published for the years 1970 through 1995. Data for all years are available on a CD-ROM and via Internet. Consumption estimates used to calculate expenditures and the documentation for those estimates are taken from the State Energy Data Report 1995, Consumption Estimates (SEDR), published in December 1997. Expenditures are calculated by multiplying the price estimates by the consumption estimates, which are adjusted to remove process fuel; intermediate petroleum products; and other consumption that has no direct fuel costs, i.e., hydroelectric, geothermal, wind, solar, and photovoltaic energy sources.

  13. Health expenditure and income in the United States.

    PubMed

    Moscone, F; Tosetti, E

    2010-12-01

    This paper investigates the long-run economic relationship between health care expenditure and income in the US at a State level. Using a panel of 49 US States over the period 1980-2004, we study the non-stationarity and co-integration between health spending and income, ultimately measuring income elasticity of health care. The tests we adopt allow us to explicitly control for cross-section dependence and unobserved heterogeneity. Specifically, in our regression equations we assume that the error has a multifactor structure, which may capture global shocks and local spill overs in health expenditure. Our results suggest that health care is a necessity rather than a luxury, with an elasticity much smaller than that estimated in other US studies. Further, we detect significant spatial concentration in US health spending. Our broad perspective of cross-section dependence as well as the methods used to capture it give new insights on the debate over the relationship between health spending and income.

  14. Safety Panel Resources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stewart, Christine E.

    2008-01-01

    The goal of this paper is to explore what resources are potentially available to safety panels and to provide some guidance on how to utilize those resources. While the examples used in this paper will concentrate on the Flight Equipment and Reliability Review Panel (FESRRP) and Extravehicular Activity (EVA) hardware that have come through that panel, as well as resources at Johnson Space Center, the paper will address how this applies to safety panels in general, and where possible cite examples for other safety panels.

  15. Incidence and correlates of 'catastrophic' maternal health care expenditure in India.

    PubMed

    Bonu, Sekhar; Bhushan, Indu; Rani, Manju; Anderson, Ian

    2009-11-01

    Using data from the 60(th) round of the National Sample Survey of India (2004), the study investigates the incidence and correlates of 'catastrophic' maternal expenditure (ME) in India. Data on ME come from 6879 births that took place during 365 days prior to the survey. The study adapts earlier definitions and methods for catastrophic total health care expenditure to measure 'catastrophic' ME as: (i) maternal health care expenditure more than 10% of the annual normative household consumption expenditure (ME-1), and (ii) maternal health care expenditure more than 40% of the annual 'capacity to pay' (ME-2). The 'capacity to pay' was derived by subtracting state-wise poverty-line household expenditure from household consumption expenditure. The average maternal expenditure varied by place of delivery: US dollar 9.5, US dollar 24.7 and US dollar 104.3 for birth at home, in a public facility and in a private facility, respectively. Sixteen per cent of households incurred ME of more than 10% of total household consumption expenditure (ME-1), while 51% households incurred ME of more than 40% of household 'capacity to pay' (ME-2). While incidence of ME-1 increased with income decile, the reverse was observed for ME-2, reflecting higher non-utilization of institutional maternal care and its non-affordability among poorer households. All the households from the poorest decile and 99% from the second poorest decile paid more than 40% of their capacity to pay. Multivariate regression results indicate that antenatal care and delivery care in private facilities increased the chances of ME-1 and ME-2 (P < 0.001). Measuring maternal expenditure against 'capacity to pay' (ME-2) may be better than measuring it as a proportion of overall household expenditure when assessing financial constraints in the use of maternal services. Improving the performance of the public sector, appropriate regulation of and partnership with the private sector, and effective direct cash transfers to

  16. Hospital–Physician Affiliations and Patient Treatments, Expenditures, and Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Madison, Kristin

    2004-01-01

    Objective To determine the relationship between hospital–physician affiliations and the treatments, expenditures, and outcomes of patients. Data Sources Sources include the Medicare Provider Analysis and Review dataset, the American Hospital Association (AHA) Annual Survey, and the Area Resource File (ARF). Study Design A multivariate regression analysis of the relationship between hospital–physician affiliations (such as physician–hospital organizations [PHOs] or salaried employment) and the treatment of Medicare patients with a diagnosis of acute myocardial infarction admitted to general medical-surgical hospitals between 1994 and 1998. Dependent variables include whether the patient received a catheterization or angioplasty or bypass surgery; whether a patient was readmitted, or died within 90 days of initial admission; and expenditures. Independent variables include patient, admission hospital, and market characteristics, as well as hospital and year fixed effects. Principal Findings The integrated salary model form of hospital–physician affiliation is associated with slightly higher procedure rates, and higher patient expenditures. At the same time, there is little evidence that hospital–physician affiliations in the aggregate have had any measurable impact on patient treatment or outcomes. Conclusions The limited effect of hospital–physician affiliations on patient outcomes is consistent with previous research showing that affiliations have not much changed the nature of health care delivery. However, the finding that the integrated salary model is associated with higher treatment intensity suggests that affiliations may have had some impact on patients, and could have more in the future. PMID:15032954

  17. Out-of-pocket health care expenditures due to excess of body weight in Portugal.

    PubMed

    Veiga, Paula

    2008-03-01

    The prevalence for excessive weight has also been increasing dramatically in Portugal over the last decades. The consequences for families as well as for the publicly funded Portuguese health care system are a matter of policy interest. This paper uses an econometric model to compute the fraction of the national out-of-pocket health care expenditures attributable to overweight and obesity among Portuguese adults. Given that public health care system pays for a substantial share of the national health care expenditures, the estimated the out-of-pocket expenditures is only a share of the total expenditures. Per-capita expenditures and the burden that obesity and overweight impose on families are also estimated. Two waves of the Portuguese National Health Survey (NHS), namely; 1995/1996 and 1998/1999 are considered. The results suggest that out-of-pocket expenditures due to excess weight have increased sharply during these 3 years. The two-part model estimates suggest that the obese and overweight are more likely to incur out-of-pocket health care expenditures but, in the restricted sample of those that incur expenditures, there is weak or no evidence that the obese or overweight spend, on average, more than those of normal weight. Overall, it is estimated that in 1995/1996, more than 1.8% out-of-pocket health care expenditures were attributable to obesity and 2% to overweight (although not statistically significant). The estimated percentages are over 2.9% for obesity and 4% for overweight in 1998/1999. Combined, the estimated attributable percentage of national out-of-pocket expenditures due to excess weight was 3.8% in 1995/1996 and 6.9% in 1998/1999. Per-capita expenditures due to obesity or overweight are small, on average, in absolute terms, but they can be a significant cost for low income families. With respect to public policy concerns, the results suggest that measures which only slightly increase the out-of-pocket health care expenditures of being obese

  18. ICFA neutrino panel report

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, K.

    2015-07-01

    In the summer of 2013 the International Committee on Future Accelerators (ICFA) established a Neutrino Panel with the mandate: "To promote international cooperation in the development of the accelerator-based neutrino-oscillation program and to promote international collaboration in the development of a neutrino factory as a future intense source of neutrinos for particle physics experiments." In its first year the Panel organised a series of regional Town Meetings to collect input from the community and to receive reports from the regional planning exercises. The Panel distilled its findings and presented them in a report to ICFA [1]. In this contribution the formation and composition of the Panel are presented together with a summary of the Panel's findings from the three Regional Town Meetings. The Panel's initial conclusions are then articulated and the steps that the Panel seeks to take are outlined.

  19. Quiet Honeycomb Panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palumbo, Daniel L.; Klos, Jacob

    2010-01-01

    Sandwich honeycomb composite panels are lightweight and strong, and, therefore, provide a reasonable alternative to the aluminum ring frame/stringer architecture currently used for most aircraft airframes. The drawback to honeycomb panels is that they radiate noise into the aircraft cabin veil- efficiently provoking the need for additional sound treatment which adds weight and reduces the material's cost advantage. A series of honeycomb panels was made -hick incorporated different design strategies aimed at reducing the honeycomb panels' radiation efficiency while at the same time maintaining their strength. The majority of the designs were centered around the concept of creating areas of reduced stiffness in the panel by adding voids and recesses to the core. The effort culminated with a reinforced/recessed panel which had 6 dB higher transmission loss than the baseline solid core panel while maintaining comparable strength.

  20. Interactive optical panel

    DOEpatents

    Veligdan, James T.

    1995-10-03

    An interactive optical panel assembly 34 includes an optical panel 10 having a plurality of ribbon optical waveguides 12 stacked together with opposite ends thereof defining panel first and second faces 16, 18. A light source 20 provides an image beam 22 to the panel first face 16 for being channeled through the waveguides 12 and emitted from the panel second face 18 in the form of a viewable light image 24a. A remote device 38 produces a response beam 40 over a discrete selection area 36 of the panel second face 18 for being channeled through at least one of the waveguides 12 toward the panel first face 16. A light sensor 42,50 is disposed across a plurality of the waveguides 12 for detecting the response beam 40 therein for providing interactive capability.

  1. Working Papers: Astronomy and Astrophysics Panel Reports

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bahcall, John N.; Beichman, Charles A.; Canizares, Claude; Cronin, James; Heeschen, David; Houck, James; Hunten, Donald; Mckee, Christopher F.; Noyes, Robert; Ostriker, Jeremiah P.

    1991-01-01

    The papers of the panels appointed by the Astronomy and Astrophysics survey Committee are compiled. These papers were advisory to the survey committee and represent the opinions of the members of each panel in the context of their individual charges. The following subject areas are covered: radio astronomy, infrared astronomy, optical/IR from ground, UV-optical from space, interferometry, high energy from space, particle astrophysics, theory and laboratory astrophysics, solar astronomy, planetary astronomy, computing and data processing, policy opportunities, benefits to the nation from astronomy and astrophysics, status of the profession, and science opportunities.

  2. Use of food expenditure data to estimate household nutrient accessibility.

    PubMed

    Simeon, D T; Patterson, A W

    1996-03-01

    The nutritional status of at-risk groups is usually monitored using health statistics. This approach has limitations as individuals are identified only after they have been afflicted by morbidity. In Jamaica, national surveys are carried out in which expenditure data on all consumption items are collected. We used these data to monitor food accessibility in at-risk groups. The identification of decreases in accessibility levels relative to requirements would enable timely intervention before there is a deterioration in nutritional status. We analysed the data from the survey of 3861 households conducted by Statistical and Planning Institutes of Jamaica in 1989. Using the food expenditure data, per capita energy and protein accessibility levels were determined. The mean energy and protein accessibility levels for the sample were 2170 Cals and 64 g, respectively. The results showed that the per capita accessibility levels of 20% and 9% of the households were less than half of requirements for energy and protein, respectively. The situation was worse in rural areas than in urban centres. However, the accessibility levels may have been underestimated as the data did not include meals bought and consumed away from the home, which may be significant to some households. We believe that the use of data from these surveys is a cost-effective way to monitor nutrient accessibility in Jamaica.

  3. Consumption and expenditure on food prepared away from home among Mexican adults in 2006

    PubMed Central

    Langellier, Brent A.

    2015-01-01

    Background The objective of this study was to describe food expenditure and consumption of foods prepared away from home among Mexican adults. Methods Data were from 45,241 adult participants in the National Health and Nutrition Survey 2006, a nationally-representative, cross-sectional survey of Mexican households. Descriptive statistics and multivariable linear and logistic regression were used to assess the relationship between location of residence, educational attainment, socioeconomic status and the following: 1) expenditure on all food and at restaurants, and 2) frequency of consumption of comida corrida/restaurant food and street food. Results Food expenditure and consumption of food prepared away from home were positively associated with socioeconomic status, educational attainment, and urban vs. rural residence (p<0.001 for all relationships in bivariate analyses). Conclusions Consumption of food prepared outside of the home may be an important part of the diet among urban Mexican adults and those with high socioeconomic status and educational attainment. PMID:25629274

  4. Household expenditure for dental care in low and middle income countries.

    PubMed

    Masood, Mohd; Sheiham, Aubrey; Bernabé, Eduardo

    2015-01-01

    This study assessed the extent of household catastrophic expenditure in dental health care and its possible determinants in 41 low and middle income countries. Data from 182,007 respondents aged 18 years and over (69,315 in 18 low income countries, 59,645 in 15 lower middle income countries and 53,047 in 8 upper middle income countries) who participated in the WHO World Health Survey (WHS) were analyzed. Expenditure in dental health care was defined as catastrophic if it was equal to or higher than 40% of the household capacity to pay. A number of individual and country-level factors were assessed as potential determinants of catastrophic dental health expenditure (CDHE) in multilevel logistic regression with individuals nested within countries. Up to 7% of households in low and middle income countries faced CDHE in the last 4 weeks. This proportion rose up to 35% among households that incurred some dental health expenditure within the same period. The multilevel model showed that wealthier, urban and larger households and more economically developed countries had higher odds of facing CDHE. The results of this study show that payments for dental health care can be a considerable burden on households, to the extent of preventing expenditure on basic necessities. They also help characterize households more likely to incur catastrophic expenditure on dental health care. Alternative health care financing strategies and policies targeted to improve fairness in financial contribution are urgently required in low and middle income countries.

  5. Household Expenditure for Dental Care in Low and Middle Income Countries

    PubMed Central

    Masood, Mohd; Sheiham, Aubrey; Bernabé, Eduardo

    2015-01-01

    This study assessed the extent of household catastrophic expenditure in dental health care and its possible determinants in 41 low and middle income countries. Data from 182,007 respondents aged 18 years and over (69,315 in 18 low income countries, 59,645 in 15 lower middle income countries and 53,047 in 8 upper middle income countries) who participated in the WHO World Health Survey (WHS) were analyzed. Expenditure in dental health care was defined as catastrophic if it was equal to or higher than 40% of the household capacity to pay. A number of individual and country-level factors were assessed as potential determinants of catastrophic dental health expenditure (CDHE) in multilevel logistic regression with individuals nested within countries. Up to 7% of households in low and middle income countries faced CDHE in the last 4 weeks. This proportion rose up to 35% among households that incurred some dental health expenditure within the same period. The multilevel model showed that wealthier, urban and larger households and more economically developed countries had higher odds of facing CDHE. The results of this study show that payments for dental health care can be a considerable burden on households, to the extent of preventing expenditure on basic necessities. They also help characterize households more likely to incur catastrophic expenditure on dental health care. Alternative health care financing strategies and policies targeted to improve fairness in financial contribution are urgently required in low and middle income countries. PMID:25923691

  6. Household expenditure for dental care in low and middle income countries.

    PubMed

    Masood, Mohd; Sheiham, Aubrey; Bernabé, Eduardo

    2015-01-01

    This study assessed the extent of household catastrophic expenditure in dental health care and its possible determinants in 41 low and middle income countries. Data from 182,007 respondents aged 18 years and over (69,315 in 18 low income countries, 59,645 in 15 lower middle income countries and 53,047 in 8 upper middle income countries) who participated in the WHO World Health Survey (WHS) were analyzed. Expenditure in dental health care was defined as catastrophic if it was equal to or higher than 40% of the household capacity to pay. A number of individual and country-level factors were assessed as potential determinants of catastrophic dental health expenditure (CDHE) in multilevel logistic regression with individuals nested within countries. Up to 7% of households in low and middle income countries faced CDHE in the last 4 weeks. This proportion rose up to 35% among households that incurred some dental health expenditure within the same period. The multilevel model showed that wealthier, urban and larger households and more economically developed countries had higher odds of facing CDHE. The results of this study show that payments for dental health care can be a considerable burden on households, to the extent of preventing expenditure on basic necessities. They also help characterize households more likely to incur catastrophic expenditure on dental health care. Alternative health care financing strategies and policies targeted to improve fairness in financial contribution are urgently required in low and middle income countries. PMID:25923691

  7. Activities Contributing to Total Energy Expenditure in the United States: Results from the NHAPS Study

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Linda; Block, Gladys; Mandel, Shelly

    2004-01-01

    Background Physical activity is increasingly recognized as an important factor influencing health and disease status. Total energy expenditure, both low-intensity and high-intensity, contributes to maintenance of healthy body weight. This paper presents the results of a quantitative approach to determining the activities that contribute to total energy expenditure in the United States. Methods Data from the National Human Activity Pattern Survey (NHAPS) were used. In 1992–1994 the NHAPS sampled 4,185 females and 3,330 males, aged 18 years and over, weighted to be representative of the 48 contiguous United States. A detailed report of each activity performed in the previous 24 hours was obtained. A score was created for each activity, by multiplying duration and intensity for each individual and summing across individuals. This score was then used to rank each activity according to its contribution to total population energy expenditure, for the total sample and separately for each gender, race, age, region, and season. Results This analysis reveals our society to be primarily sedentary; leisure time physical activity contributed only approximately 5% of the population's total energy expenditure. Not counting sleeping, the largest contributor to energy expenditure was "Driving a car", followed by "Office work" and "Watching TV". Household activities accounted for 20.1% and 33.3% of energy expenditure for males and females respectively. Conclusion The information presented in this paper may be useful in identifying common activities that could be appropriate targets for behavioral interventions to increase physical activity. PMID:15169563

  8. The Allocation of Federal Expenditures Among States

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Maw Lin

    1967-01-01

    This study explores factors associated with the allocation offederal expenditures by states and examines the implications of theseexpenditures on the state by state distribution of incomes. Theallocation of federal expenditures is functionally oriented toward theobjectives for which various government programs are set up. Thegeographical distribution of federal expenditures, therefore, washistorically considered to be a problem incidental to governmentactivity. Because of this, relatively little attention was given tothe question of why some states receive more federal allocation thanothers. In addition, the implications of this pattern of allocationamong the several states have not been intensively investigated.

  9. Neuropathic pain phenotyping by international consensus (NeuroPPIC) for genetic studies: a NeuPSIG systematic review, Delphi survey, and expert panel recommendations.

    PubMed

    van Hecke, Oliver; Kamerman, Peter R; Attal, Nadine; Baron, Ralf; Bjornsdottir, Gyda; Bennett, David L H; Bennett, Michael I; Bouhassira, Didier; Diatchenko, Luda; Freeman, Roy; Freynhagen, Rainer; Haanpää, Maija; Jensen, Troels S; Raja, Srinivasa N; Rice, Andrew S C; Seltzer, Zeʼev; Thorgeirsson, Thorgeir E; Yarnitsky, David; Smith, Blair H

    2015-11-01

    For genetic research to contribute more fully to furthering our knowledge of neuropathic pain, we require an agreed, valid, and feasible approach to phenotyping, to allow collaboration and replication in samples of sufficient size. Results from genetic studies on neuropathic pain have been inconsistent and have met with replication difficulties, in part because of differences in phenotypes used for case ascertainment. Because there is no consensus on the nature of these phenotypes, nor on the methods of collecting them, this study aimed to provide guidelines on collecting and reporting phenotypes in cases and controls for genetic studies. Consensus was achieved through a staged approach: (1) systematic literature review to identify all neuropathic pain phenotypes used in previous genetic studies; (2) Delphi survey to identify the most useful neuropathic pain phenotypes and their validity and feasibility; and (3) meeting of experts to reach consensus on the optimal phenotype(s) to be collected from patients with neuropathic pain for genetic studies. A basic "entry level" set of phenotypes was identified for any genetic study of neuropathic pain. This set identifies cases of "possible" neuropathic pain, and controls, and includes: (1) a validated symptom-based questionnaire to determine whether any pain is likely to be neuropathic; (2) body chart or checklist to identify whether the area of pain distribution is neuroanatomically logical; and (3) details of pain history (intensity, duration, any formal diagnosis). This NeuroPPIC "entry level" set of phenotypes can be expanded by more extensive and specific measures, as determined by scientific requirements and resource availability.

  10. Associations Between E-Cigarette Type, Frequency of Use, and Quitting Smoking: Findings From a Longitudinal Online Panel Survey in Great Britain

    PubMed Central

    Brose, Leonie S.; Brown, Jamie; Robson, Debbie; McNeill, Ann

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: E-cigarettes can be categorized into two basic types, (1) cigalikes, that are disposable or use pre-filled cartridges and (2) tanks, that can be refilled with liquids. The aims of this study were to examine: (1) predictors of using the two e-cigarette types, and (2) the association between type used, frequency of use (daily vs. non-daily vs. no use), and quitting. Methods: Online longitudinal survey of smokers in Great Britain was first conducted in November 2012. Of 4064 respondents meeting inclusion criteria at baseline, this study included (N = 1643) current smokers followed-up 1 year later. Type and frequency of e-cigarette use were measured at follow-up. Results: At follow-up, 64% reported no e-cigarette use, 27% used cigalikes, and 9% used tanks. Among e-cigarette users at follow-up, respondents most likely to use tanks versus cigalikes included: 40–54 versus 18–24 year olds and those with low versus moderate/high education. Compared to no e-cigarette use at follow-up, non-daily cigalike users were less likely to have quit smoking since baseline (P = .0002), daily cigalike or non-daily tank users were no more or less likely to have quit (P = .3644 and P = .4216, respectively), and daily tank users were more likely to have quit (P = .0012). Conclusions: Whether e-cigarette use is associated with quitting depends on type and frequency of use. Compared with respondents not using e-cigarettes, daily tank users were more likely, and non-daily cigalike users were less likely, to have quit. Tanks were more likely to be used by older respondents and respondents with lower education. PMID:25896067

  11. Passing by the girls? Remittance allocation for educational expenditures and social inequality in Nepal's households 2003–2004.

    PubMed

    Vogel, Ann; Korinek, Kim

    2012-01-01

    We examine the utilization of remittances for expenditures associated with development, specifically children's education. We use household-level data from the Nepal Living Standards Survey (NLSS II, 2003–04) to separate remittance effects from general household income effects to demonstrate the migration–development relationship reflected in child schooling investment. We find that family-household remittances are spent on education of children, but the expenditures are disproportionately for boys' schooling. Only when girls are members of higher-income households do greater schooling expenditures go to them. This gender-discriminating pattern at the household level contrasts with the call for universal and gender-equal education. PMID:22741164

  12. Titanium honeycomb panel testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richards, W. L.; Thompson, Randolph C.

    The paper describes the procedures of thermal mechanical tests carried out at the NASA Dryden Flight Research Facility on two tianium honeycomb wing panels bonded using liquid interface diffusion (LID) technique, and presents the results of these tests. The 58.4 cm square panels consisted of two 0.152-cm-thick Ti 6-2-4-2 face sheets LID-bonded to a 1.9-cm-thick honeycomb core, with bearing plates fastened to the perimeter of the upper and the lower panel surfaces. The panels were instrumented with sensors for measuring surface temperature, strain, and deflections to 315 C and 482 C. Thermal stress levels representative of those encountered during aerodynamic heating were produced by heating the upper panel surface and restraining all four edges. After more than 100 thermal cycles from room temperature to 315 C and 50 cycles from room temperature to 482 C, no significant structural degradation was detected in the panels.

  13. National health expenditures: a global analysis.

    PubMed Central

    Murray, C. J.; Govindaraj, R.; Musgrove, P.

    1994-01-01

    As part of the background research to the World development report 1993: investing in health, an effort was made to estimate public, private and total expenditures on health for all countries of the world. Estimates could be found for public spending for most countries, but for private expenditure in many fewer countries. Regressions were used to predict the missing values of regional and global estimates. These econometric exercises were also used to relate expenditure to measures of health status. In 1990 the world spent an estimated US$ 1.7 trillion (1.7 x 10(12) on health, or $1.9 trillion (1.9 x 10(12)) in dollars adjusted for higher purchasing power in poorer countries. This amount was about 60% public and 40% private in origin. However, as incomes rise, public health expenditure tends to displace private spending and to account for the increasing share of incomes devoted to health. PMID:7923542

  14. Aerospace safety advisory panel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    This report from the Aerospace Safety Advisory Panel (ASAP) contains findings, recommendations, and supporting material concerning safety issues with the space station program, the space shuttle program, aeronautics research, and other NASA programs. Section two presents findings and recommendations, section three presents supporting information, and appendices contain data about the panel membership, the NASA response to the March 1993 ASAP report, and a chronology of the panel's activities during the past year.

  15. Comparative Computer Expenditures for Community and Junior Colleges: A Prototype Study of 308 Institutions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arth, Maurice P.

    This three-part report provides the findings of a survey of 999 two-year colleges to determine their computer-related expenditures and seeks to facilitate inter-institutional comparisons of these data. The introduction outlines the purpose of the study, key findings, methodology, and limitations. The second section instructs personnel at…

  16. Outsourcing the Gender Factory: Living Arrangements and Service Expenditures on Female and Male Tasks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Ruijter, Esther; Treas, Judith K.; Cohen, Philip N.

    2005-01-01

    Using data from the U.S. Consumer Expenditure Survey 1998, this study analyzes how much money different types of households spend for domestic services on "female" and "male" tasks. We test alternative hypotheses based on economic and sociological theories of gender differentiation. Contrary to arguments that marriage lowers the risk to one…

  17. Fabrication of prepackaged superalloy honeycomb Thermal Protection System (TPS) panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blair, W.; Meaney, J. E.; Rosenthal, H. A.

    1985-01-01

    High temperature materials were surveyed, and Inconel 617 and titanium were selected for application to a honeycomb TPS configuration designed to withstand 2000 F. The configuration was analyzed both thermally and structurally. Component and full-sized panels were fabricated and tested to obtain data for comparison with analysis. Results verified the panel design. Twenty five panels were delivered to NASA Langley Research Center for additional evaluation.

  18. Solar reflection panels

    DOEpatents

    Diver, Jr., Richard B.; Grossman, James W.; Reshetnik, Michael

    2006-07-18

    A solar collector comprising a glass mirror, and a composite panel, wherein the back of the mirror is affixed to a front surface of the composite panel. The composite panel comprises a front sheet affixed to a surface of a core material, preferably a core material comprising a honeycomb structure, and a back sheet affixed to an opposite surface of the core material. The invention may further comprise a sealing strip, preferably comprising EPDM, positioned between the glass mirror and the front surface of the composite panel. The invention also is of methods of making such solar collectors.

  19. PANEL LIBRARY AND EDITOR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raible, E.

    1994-01-01

    The Panel Library and Editor is a graphical user interface (GUI) builder for the Silicon Graphics IRIS workstation family. The toolkit creates "widgets" which can be manipulated by the user. Its appearance is similar to that of the X-Windows System. The Panel Library is written in C and is used by programmers writing user-friendly mouse-driven applications for the IRIS. GUIs built using the Panel Library consist of "actuators" and "panels." Actuators are buttons, dials, sliders, or other mouse-driven symbols. Panels are groups of actuators that occupy separate windows on the IRIS workstation. The application user can alter variables in the graphics program, or fire off functions with a click on a button. The evolution of data values can be tracked with meters and strip charts, and dialog boxes with text processing can be built. Panels can be stored as icons when not in use. The Panel Editor is a program used to interactively create and test panel library interfaces in a simple and efficient way. The Panel Editor itself uses a panel library interface, so all actions are mouse driven. Extensive context-sensitive on-line help is provided. Programmers can graphically create and test the user interface without writing a single line of code. Once an interface is judged satisfactory, the Panel Editor will dump it out as a file of C code that can be used in an application. The Panel Library (v9.8) and Editor (v1.1) are written in C-Language (63%) and Scheme, a dialect of LISP, (37%) for Silicon Graphics 4D series workstations running IRIX 3.2 or higher. Approximately 10Mb of disk space is required once compiled. 1.5Mb of main memory is required to execute the panel editor. This program is available on a .25 inch streaming magnetic tape cartridge in UNIX tar format for an IRIS, and includes a copy of XScheme, the public-domain Scheme interpreter used by the Panel Editor. The Panel Library Programmer's Manual is included on the distribution media. The Panel Library and

  20. State energy price and expenditure report 1993

    SciTech Connect

    1995-12-01

    The State Energy Price and Expenditure Report (SEPER) presents energy price and expenditure estimates individually for the 50 states and the District of Columbia and in aggregate for the US. The five economic sectors used in SEPER correspond to those used in SEDR and are residential, commercial, industrial, transportation, and electric utility. Documentation in appendices describe how the price estimates are developed, provide conversion factors for measures used in the energy analysis, and include a glossary. 65 tabs.

  1. 42 CFR 403.754 - Monitoring expenditure level.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Monitoring expenditure level. 403.754 Section 403..., Conditions of Participation, and Payment § 403.754 Monitoring expenditure level. (a) Tracking expenditures... between the trigger level and Medicare expenditures for a FFY results in a carry forward that...

  2. 42 CFR 403.754 - Monitoring expenditure level.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Monitoring expenditure level. 403.754 Section 403..., Conditions of Participation, and Payment § 403.754 Monitoring expenditure level. (a) Tracking expenditures... between the trigger level and Medicare expenditures for a FFY results in a carry forward that...

  3. 10 CFR 603.560 - Estimate of project expenditures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Estimate of project expenditures. 603.560 Section 603.560... Business Evaluation Fixed-Support Or Expenditure-Based Approach § 603.560 Estimate of project expenditures... have confidence in the estimate of the expenditures required to achieve well-defined...

  4. Energy expenditure in rock/pop drumming.

    PubMed

    De La Rue, S E; Draper, S B; Potter, C R; Smith, M S

    2013-10-01

    Despite the vigorous nature of rock/pop drumming, there are no precise data on the energy expenditure of this activity. The aim of this study was to quantify the energy cost of rock/pop drumming. Fourteen male drummers (mean±SD; age 27±8 yrs.) completed an incremental drumming test to establish the relationship between energy expenditure and heart rate for this activity and a ramped cycle ergometer test to exhaustion as a criterion measure for peak values (oxygen uptake and heart rate). During live concert performance heart rate was continuously measured and used to estimate energy expenditure (from the energy expenditure vs. heart rate data derived from the drumming test). During concert performance, estimated energy expenditure (mean±SD) was 623±168 kcal.h⁻¹ (8.1±2.2 METs) during performances of 38.6±15.6 min, and drummers achieved a peak heart rate of 186±16 b.min⁻¹. During the drumming test participants attained 78.7±8.3% of the cycle ergometer peak oxygen uptake. Rock/pop drumming represents a relatively high-intensity form of physical activity and as such involves significant energy expenditure. Rock/pop drumming should be considered as a viable alternative to more traditional forms of physical activity.

  5. How did dentists respond to the introduction of global budgets in Taiwan? An evaluation using individual panel data.

    PubMed

    Lee, Miaw-Chwen; Jones, Andrew M

    2004-12-01

    In response to the introduction of global budgets, dentists might alter their supply behaviour, changing the number of visits, the amount of expenditure, and the type of services provided. We develop two-way fixed effects models to estimate these effects using a panel data constructed from outpatient dental care expenditures claims from the Taiwanese National Health Insurance system. The availability of a long panel allows us to estimate a "policy effect" for each dentist in the panel. The overall effect of global budgets is to constrain costs but there is evidence of a change in the mix of services. Male and younger dentists have higher policy effects than female and older dentists. Global budgets favour dentists in deprived areas and there is some evidence of increases in the expenditure per visit and the volume of composite resin fillings. PMID:15467407

  6. Current Funds Revenues and Expenditures in Institutions of Higher Education: Fiscal Years 1983-1986. OERI Bulletin.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center for Education Statistics (ED/OERI), Washington, DC.

    Findings from the Financial Statistics of Institutions of Higher Education Survey (conducted each fall as part of the Higher Education General Information Survey (HEGIS) are presented in 13 tables and a summary. Statistics show college and university current funds revenues and expenditures exceeded $100 billion for the first time in the fiscal…

  7. Microgravity Science Research Panel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carpenter, Bradley M.; Trinh, Eugene H.; DeLucas, Lawrence J.; Larson, David; Koss, Matthew; Ostrach, Simon

    2000-01-01

    This document is a transcription of the Microgravity Science Research Panel's discussion about their research and about some of the contributions that they feel have been important to the field during their time with the program. The panel includes Dr. Eugene Trinh, Dr. Lawrence DeLucas, Dr. Charles Bugg, Dr. David Larson, and Dr. Simon Ostrach.

  8. Technology Panel Reports

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    Results are presented from five technology panels which convened to identify relevant technologies within their discipline for the Large Deployable Reflector (LDR) and to assess the current and projected state of these technologies. The five panels considered the following topics: optics, materials and structure, sensing and control, science instruments, and systems and missions.

  9. Newspaper Scale and Newspaper Expenditures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blankenburg, William B.

    Employing data from the 1986 Inland Daily Newspaper Association Cost and Revenue study effects of scale on the costs of various factors in newspaper production were examined. Despite several limitations of the Inland Survey, the following tentative conclusions were reached: total expenses rise faster than circulation, and total revenues rise…

  10. Panel 5: Microbiology and Immunology Panel

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, Timothy F.; Chonmaitree, Tasnee; Barenkamp, Stephen; Kyd, Jennelle; Nokso-Koivisto, Johanna; Patel, Janak A.; Heikkinen, Terho; Yamanaka, Noboru; Ogra, Pearay; Swords, W. Edward; Sih, Tania; Pettigrew, Melinda M.

    2014-01-01

    Objective The objective is to perform a comprehensive review of the literature from January 2007 through June 2011 on the virology, bacteriology, and immunology related to otitis media. Data Sources PubMed database of the National Library of Medicine. Review Methods Three subpanels with co-chairs comprising experts in the virology, bacteriology, and immunology of otitis media were formed. Each of the panels reviewed the literature in their respective fields and wrote draft reviews. The reviews were shared with all panel members, and a second draft was created. The entire panel met at the 10th International Symposium on Recent Advances in Otitis Media in June 2011 and discussed the review and refined the content further. A final draft was created, circulated, and approved by the panel. Conclusion Excellent progress has been made in the past 4 years in advancing an understanding of the microbiology and immunology of otitis media. Advances include laboratory-based basic studies, cell-based assays, work in animal models, and clinical studies. Implications for Practice The advances of the past 4 years formed the basis of a series of short-term and long-term research goals in an effort to guide the field. Accomplishing these goals will provide opportunities for the development of novel interventions, including new ways to better treat and prevent otitis media. PMID:23536533

  11. ICFA neutrino panel report

    SciTech Connect

    Long, K.

    2015-07-15

    In the summer of 2013 the International Committee on Future Accelerators (ICFA) established a Neutrino Panel with the mandate: <<>>In its first year the Panel organised a series of regional Town Meetings to collect input from the community and to receive reports from the regional planning exercises. The Panel distilled its findings and presented them in a report to ICFA [1]. In this contribution the formation and composition of the Panel are presented together with a summary of the Panel’s findings from the three Regional Town Meetings. The Panel’s initial conclusions are then articulated and the steps that the Panel seeks to take are outlined.

  12. Aerospace Safety Advisory Panel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    The Aerospace Safety Advisory Panel (ASAP) provided oversight on the safety aspects of many NASA programs. In addition, ASAP undertook three special studies. At the request of the Administrator, the panel assessed the requirements for an assured crew return vehicle (ACRV) for the space station and reviewed the organization of the safety and mission quality function within NASA. At the behest of Congress, the panel formed an independent, ad hoc working group to examine the safety and reliability of the space shuttle main engine. Section 2 presents findings and recommendations. Section 3 consists of information in support of these findings and recommendations. Appendices A, B, C, and D, respectively, cover the panel membership, the NASA response to the findings and recommendations in the March 1992 report, a chronology of the panel's activities during the reporting period, and the entire ACRV study report.

  13. 76 FR 56973 - Elections Regarding Start-Up Expenditures, Corporation Organizational Expenditures, and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-15

    ... Wednesday, August 17, 2011 (76 FR 50887) relating to elections to deduct start-up expenditures... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY Internal Revenue Service 26 CFR Part 1 RIN 1545-BE77 Elections Regarding Start-Up Expenditures,...

  14. Neuropsychiatric Symptoms and Expenditure on Complementary and Alternative Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Purohit, Maulik P.; Zafonte, Ross D.; Sherman, Laura M.; Davis, Roger B.; Giwerc, Michelle Y.; Shenton, Martha E.; Yeh, Gloria Y.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Neuropsychiatric symptoms affect 37% of US adults. These symptoms are often refractory to standard therapies, and patients may consequently opt for complementary and alternative medicine therapies (CAM). We sought to determine the demand for CAM by those with neuropsychiatric symptoms compared to those without neuropsychiatric symptoms as measured by out-of-pocket expenditure. Method We compared CAM expenditure between US adults with and without neuropsychiatric symptoms (n = 23,393) using the 2007 National Health Interview Survey. Symptoms included depression, anxiety, insomnia, attention deficits, headaches, excessive sleepiness, and memory loss. CAM was defined per guidelines from the National Institutes of Health as mind-body therapies, biological therapies, manipulation therapies, or alternative medical systems. Expenditure on CAM by those without neuropsychiatric symptoms was compared to those with neuropsychiatric symptoms. Results Of the adults surveyed, 37% had ≥ 1 neuropsychiatric symptom and spent $ 14.8 billion out-of-pocket on CAM. Those with ≥ 1 neuropsychiatric symptom were more likely than those without neuropsychiatric symptoms to spend on CAM (27.4% vs 20.3%, P < .001). Likelihood to spend on CAM increased with number of symptoms (27.2% with ≥ 3 symptoms, P < .001). After adjustment was made for confounders using logistic regression, those with ≥ 1 neuropsychiatric symptom remained more likely to spend on CAM (odds ratio [OR] = 1.34; 95% Cl, 1.22–1.48), and the likelihood increased to 1.55 (95% Cl, 1.34–1.79) for ≥ 3 symptoms. Anxiety (OR = 1.40 [95% Cl, 1.22–1.60]) and excessive sleepiness (OR=1.36 [95% Cl, 1.21–1.54]) were the most closely associated with CAM expenditure. Conclusions Those with ≥ 1 neuropsychiatric symptom had disproportionately higher demand for CAM than those without symptoms. Research regarding safety, efficacy, and cost-effectiveness of CAM is limited; therefore, future research should evaluate

  15. The Roles of Public Higher Education Expenditure and the Privatization of the Higher Education on U.S. States Economic Growth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Curs, Bradley R.; Bhandari, Bornali; Steiger, Christina

    2011-01-01

    Previous empirical literature finds that government expenditure on higher education has a negative, or null, effect on U.S. economic growth rates. This empirical result may be driven by omission of an important variable--the privatization of higher education. Using state-level panel data from 1970 to 2005, this analysis investigates whether the…

  16. Medicine and democracy: The importance of institutional quality in the relationship between health expenditure and health outcomes in the MENA region.

    PubMed

    Bousmah, Marwân-Al-Qays; Ventelou, Bruno; Abu-Zaineh, Mohammad

    2016-08-01

    Evidence suggests that the effect of health expenditure on health outcomes is highly context-specific and may be driven by other factors. We construct a panel dataset of 18 countries from the Middle East and North Africa region for the period 1995-2012. Panel data models are used to estimate the macro-level determinants of health outcomes. The core finding of the paper is that increasing health expenditure leads to health outcomes improvements only to the extent that the quality of institutions within a country is sufficiently high. The sensitivity of the results is assessed using various measures of health outcomes as well as institutional variables. Overall, it appears that increasing health care expenditure in the MENA region is a necessary but not sufficient condition for health outcomes improvements. PMID:27370915

  17. Make Your Own Solar Panel.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Suzuki, David

    1992-01-01

    Presents an activity in which students make a simulated solar panel to learn about the principles behind energy production using solar panels. Provides information about how solar panels function to produce energy. (MCO)

  18. College and University Employee Retirement and Insurance Benefits Cost Survey.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Teachers Insurance and Annuity Association, New York, NY. College Retirement Equities Fund.

    Results of the ninth biennial survey of 585 colleges and universities concerning expenditures for employee retirement and insurance benefits for 1993 are reported. Data are presented primarily in tabular form, with some narrative. A summary of survey highlights is included. Sample findings included: weighted average employer expenditure for…

  19. Flutter Research on Skin Panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kordes, Eldon E.; Tuovila, Weimer J.; Guy, Lawrence D.

    1960-01-01

    Representative experimental results are presented to show the current status of the panel flutter problem. Results are presented for unstiffened rectangular panels and for rectangular panels stiffened by corrugated backing. Flutter boundaries are established for all types of panels when considered on the basis of equivalent isotropic plates. The effects of Mach number, differential pressure, and aerodynamic heating on panel flutter are discussed. A flutter analysis of orthotropic panels is presented in the appendix.

  20. 26 CFR 56.4911-8 - Excess lobbying expenditures of affiliated group.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... expenditures, lobbying expenditures, and grass roots expenditures of an affiliated group of organizations, and... 4911(a). For any taxable year of the affiliated group, the group's lobbying expenditures, grass roots expenditures, and exempt purpose expenditures are equal to the sum of the lobbying expenditures, grass...

  1. 26 CFR 56.4911-8 - Excess lobbying expenditures of affiliated group.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... expenditures, lobbying expenditures, and grass roots expenditures of an affiliated group of organizations, and... 4911(a). For any taxable year of the affiliated group, the group's lobbying expenditures, grass roots expenditures, and exempt purpose expenditures are equal to the sum of the lobbying expenditures, grass...

  2. 26 CFR 56.4911-8 - Excess lobbying expenditures of affiliated group.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... expenditures, lobbying expenditures, and grass roots expenditures of an affiliated group of organizations, and... 4911(a). For any taxable year of the affiliated group, the group's lobbying expenditures, grass roots expenditures, and exempt purpose expenditures are equal to the sum of the lobbying expenditures, grass...

  3. 26 CFR 56.4911-8 - Excess lobbying expenditures of affiliated group.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... expenditures, lobbying expenditures, and grass roots expenditures of an affiliated group of organizations, and... 4911(a). For any taxable year of the affiliated group, the group's lobbying expenditures, grass roots expenditures, and exempt purpose expenditures are equal to the sum of the lobbying expenditures, grass...

  4. 26 CFR 56.4911-8 - Excess lobbying expenditures of affiliated group.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... expenditures, lobbying expenditures, and grass roots expenditures of an affiliated group of organizations, and... 4911(a). For any taxable year of the affiliated group, the group's lobbying expenditures, grass roots expenditures, and exempt purpose expenditures are equal to the sum of the lobbying expenditures, grass...

  5. High-Need, High-Cost Patients: Who Are They and How Do They Use Health Care? A Population-Based Comparison of Demographics, Health Care Use, and Expenditures.

    PubMed

    Hayes, Susan L; Salzberg, Claudia A; McCarthy, Douglas; Radley, David C; Abrams, Melinda K; Shah, Tanya; Anderson, Gerard F

    2016-08-01

    Issue: Finding ways to improve outcomes and reduce spending for patients with complex and costly care needs requires an understanding of their unique needs and characteristics. Goal: Examine demographics and health care spending and use of services among adults with high needs, defined as people who have three or more chronic diseases and a functional limitation in their ability to care for themselves or perform routine daily tasks. Methods: Analysis of data from the 2009–2011 Medical Expenditure Panel Survey. Key findings: High-need adults differed notably from adults with multiple chronic diseases but no functional limitations. They had average annual health care expenditures that were nearly three times higher—and which were more likely to remain high over two years of observation—and out-of-pocket expenses that were more than a third higher, despite their lower incomes. Rates of hospital use for high-need adults were more than twice those for adults with multiple chronic conditions only; high-need adults also visited the doctor more frequently and used more home health care. Costs and use of services also varied widely within the high-need group. Conclusion: These findings suggest that interventions should be targeted and tailored to high-need individuals most likely to benefit. PMID:27571599

  6. POPOVER Review Panel report

    SciTech Connect

    Davito, A.; Baker, C.J.; King, C.J.; Costerus, B.; Nelson, T.; Prokosch, D.; Pastrnak, J.; Grace, P.

    1996-04-10

    The POPOVER series of high explosive (HE) certification tests was conducted at the Big Explosives Experimental Facility (BEEF) in Area 4 of the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The two primary objectives of POPOVER were to certify that: (1) BEEF meets DOE requirements for explosives facilities and is safe for personnel-occupied operations during testing of large charges of conventional HE. (2) Facility structures and equipment will function as intended when subjected to the effects of these charges. After careful analysis of test results, the POPOVER Review Panel concludes that the POPOVER series met both objectives. Further details on the Review Panel`s conclusions are included in Section 7--Findings and Recommendations.

  7. Government health expenditures and health outcomes.

    PubMed

    Bokhari, Farasat A S; Gai, Yunwei; Gottret, Pablo

    2007-03-01

    This paper provides econometric evidence linking a country's per capita government health expenditures and per capita income to two health outcomes: under-five mortality and maternal mortality. Using instrumental variables techniques (GMM-H2SL), we estimate the elasticity of these outcomes with respect to government health expenditures and income while treating both variables as endogenous. Consequently, our elasticity estimates are larger in magnitude than those reported in literature, which may be biased up. The elasticity of under-five mortality with respect to government expenditures ranges from -0.25 to -0.42 with a mean value of -0.33. For maternal mortality the elasticity ranges from -0.42 to -0.52 with a mean value of -0.50. For developing countries, our results imply that while economic growth is certainly an important contributor to health outcomes, government spending on health is just as important a factor.

  8. Health insurance for the poor: impact on catastrophic and out-of-pocket health expenditures in Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Galárraga, Omar; Salinas-Rodríguez, Aarón; Sesma-Vázquez, Sergio

    2009-01-01

    The goal of Seguro Popular (SP) in Mexico was to improve the financial protection of the uninsured population against excessive health expenditures. This paper estimates the impact of SP on catastrophic health expenditures (CHE), as well as out-of-pocket (OOP) health expenditures, from two different sources. First, we use the SP Impact Evaluation Survey (2005–2006), and compare the instrumental variables (IV) results with the experimental benchmark. Then, we use the same IV methods with the National Health and Nutrition Survey (ENSANUT 2006). We estimate naïve models, assuming exogeneity, and contrast them with IV models that take advantage of the specific SP implementation mechanisms for identification. The IV models estimated included two-stage least squares (2SLS), bivariate probit, and two-stage residual inclusion (2SRI) models. Instrumental variables estimates resulted in comparable estimates against the “gold standard.” Instrumental variables estimates indicate a reduction of 54% in catastrophic expenditures at the national level. SP beneficiaries also had lower expenditures on outpatient and medicine expenditures. The selection-corrected protective effect is found not only in the limited experimental dataset, but also at the national level. PMID:19756796

  9. Energy expenditure in malnourished cancer patients.

    PubMed Central

    Knox, L S; Crosby, L O; Feurer, I D; Buzby, G P; Miller, C L; Mullen, J L

    1983-01-01

    It is widely believed that the presence of a malignancy causes increased energy expenditure in the cancer patient. To test this hypothesis, resting energy expenditure (REE) was measured by bedside indirect calorimetry in 200 heterogeneous hospitalized cancer patients. Measured resting energy expenditure (REE-M) was compared with expected energy expenditure (REE-P) as defined by the Harris-Benedict formula. The study population consisted of 77 males and 123 females with a variety of tumor types: 44% with gastrointestinal malignancy, 29% with gynecologic malignancy, and 19% with a malignancy of genitourinary origin. Patients were classified as hypometabolic (REE less than 90% of predicted), normometabolic (90-110% of predicted) or hypermetabolic (greater than 110% of predicted). Fifty-nine per cent of patients exhibited aberrant energy expenditure outside the normal range. Thirty-three per cent were hypometabolic (79.2% REE-P), 41% were normometabolic (99.5% REE-P), and 26% were hypermetabolic (121.9% REE-P) (p less than 0.001). Aberrations in REE were not due to age, height, weight, sex, nutritional status (% weight loss, visceral protein status), tumor burden (no gross tumor, local, or disseminated disease), or presence of liver metastasis. Hypermetabolic patients had significantly longer duration of disease (p less than 0.04) than normometabolic patients (32.8 vs. 12.8 months), indicating that the duration of a malignancy may have a major impact upon energy metabolism. Cancer patients exhibit major aberrations in energy metabolism, but are not uniformly hypermetabolic. Energy expenditure cannot be accurately predicted in cancer patients using standard predictive formulae. Images Fig. 2. Fig. 3. PMID:6824369

  10. College and University Employee Retirement and Insurance Benefits Cost Survey, 1986.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1986

    Comparative information on expenditures by colleges and universities for employee retirement and insurance benefits is presented for 1986. Based on survey responses from 653 schools, information is provided for each benefit category on expenditures as a percentage of total gross payroll, and expenditures as dollars per employee per year. The…

  11. Energy consumption and expenditure projections by population group on the basis on the annual energy outlook 2000 forecast.

    SciTech Connect

    Poyer, D. A.; Decision and Information Sciences

    2001-05-31

    The changes in the patterns of energy use and expenditures by population group are analyzed by using the 1993 and 1997 Residential Energy Consumption Surveys. Historically, these patterns have differed among non-Hispanic White households, non-Hispanic Black households, and Hispanic households. Patterns of energy use and expenditures are influenced by geographic and metropolitan location, the composition of housing stock, economic and demographic status, and the composition of energy use by end-use category. As a consequence, as energy-related factors change across groups, patterns of energy use and expenditures also change. Over time, with changes in the composition of these factors by population group and their variable influences on energy use, the impact on energy use and expenditures has varied across these population groups.

  12. Energy Expenditure During Extravehicular Activity Through Apollo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paul, Heather L.

    2012-01-01

    Monitoring crew health during manned space missions has always been an important factor to ensure that the astronauts can complete the missions successfully and within safe physiological limits. The necessity of real-time metabolic rate monitoring during extravehicular activities (EVAs) came into question during the Gemini missions, when the energy expenditure required to complete EVA tasks exceeded the life support capabilities for cooling and humidity control and, as a result, crew members ended the EVAs fatigued and overworked. This paper discusses the importance of real-time monitoring of metabolic rate during EVAs, and provides a historical look at energy expenditure during EVAs through the Apollo Program.

  13. Energy Expenditure During Extravehicular Activity Through Apollo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paul, Heather L.

    2011-01-01

    Monitoring crew health during manned space missions has always been an important factor to ensure that the astronauts can complete the missions successfully and within safe physiological limits. The necessity of real-time metabolic rate monitoring during extravehicular activities (EVAs) came into question during the Gemini missions, when the energy expenditure required to complete EVA tasks exceeded the life support capabilities for cooling and humidity control and crewmembers (CMs) ended the EVAs fatigued and overworked. This paper discusses the importance of real-time monitoring of metabolic rate during EVA, and provides a historical look at energy expenditure during EVA through the Apollo program.

  14. 76 FR 20711 - Hearings of the Review Panel on Prison Rape

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-13

    ... Office of Justice Programs Hearings of the Review Panel on Prison Rape AGENCY: Office of Justice Programs... Review Panel on Prison Rape (Panel) will hold hearings in Washington, DC on April 26-27, 2011. The... rape, respectively, based on an anonymous survey by the BJS of inmates in a representative sample of...

  15. Comprehensive metabolic panel

    MedlinePlus

    A comprehensive metabolic panel is a group of blood tests. They provide an overall picture of your body's chemical balance and metabolism. Metabolism refers to all the physical and chemical processes ...

  16. Blue Ribbon Panel Report

    Cancer.gov

    An NCI Cancer Currents blog by the NCI acting director thanking the cancer community for contributing to the Cancer Moonshot Blue Ribbon Panel report, which was presented to the National Cancer Advisory Board on September 7.

  17. Autoimmune liver disease panel

    MedlinePlus

    Liver disease test panel - autoimmune ... Autoimmune disorders are a possible cause of liver disease. The most common of these diseases are autoimmune hepatitis and primary biliary cirrhosis. This group of tests helps your health care provider ...

  18. Comprehensive Metabolic Panel

    MedlinePlus

    ... page helpful? Also known as: CMP; Chem 12; Chemistry Panel; Chemistry Screen; SMA 12; SMA 20; SMAC (somewhat outdated ... Health Professionals ©2001 - by American Association for Clinical Chemistry • Contact Us | Terms of Use | Privacy We comply ...

  19. BMP (Basic Metabolic Panel)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Was this page helpful? Also known as: BMP; Chemistry Panel; Chemistry Screen; Chem 7; SMA 7; SMAC7 (somewhat outdated ... Health Professionals ©2001 - by American Association for Clinical Chemistry • Contact Us | Terms of Use | Privacy We comply ...

  20. 26 CFR 1.263(a)-3 - Election to deduct or capitalize certain expenditures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...) Section 173 (circulation expenditures). (2) Section 174 (research and experimental expenditures). (3) Section 175 (soil and water conservation expenditures). (4) Section 177 (trademark and trade...

  1. Pop-Art Panels

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alford, Joanna

    2012-01-01

    James Rosenquist's giant Pop-art panels included realistic renderings of well-known contemporary foods and objects, juxtaposed with famous people in the news--largely from the 1960s, '70s and '80s--and really serve as visual time capsules. In this article, eighth-graders focus on the style of James Rosenquist to create their own Pop-art panel that…

  2. Photovoltaic panel support assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Barker, J.M.; Underwood, J.C.; Shingleton, J.

    1993-07-20

    A solar energy electrical power source is described comprising in combination at least two flat photovoltaic panels disposed side-by-side in co-planar relation with one another, a pivot shaft extending transversely across the panels, at least two supports spaced apart lengthwise of the pivot shaft, means for connecting the pivot shaft to the at least two supports, attachment means for connecting the at least two panels to the pivot shaft so that the panels can pivot about the longitudinal axis of the shaft, coupling means mechanically coupling all of the panels together so as to form a unified flat array, and selectively operable drive means for mechanically pivoting the unified flat array about the axis; wherein each of the flat photovoltaic panels comprises at least two modules each comprising a plurality of electrically interconnected photovoltaic cells, the at least two modules being aligned along a line extending at a right angle to the pivot shaft, and the coupling means comprises (a) an elongate member extending parallel to and spaced from the pivot shaft and (b) means for attaching the elongate member to the panels; and further wherein each flat photovoltaic panel comprises a unitary frame consisting of a pair of end frame members extending parallel to the pivot shaft, a pair of side frame members extending between and connected to the end frame members, and a pair of spaced apart cross frame members, with one of the two modules being embraced by and secured to the side frame members and a first one of each of the end and cross frame members, and the other of the two modules being embraced by and secured to the side frame members and the second one of each of the end and cross frame members, whereby the gap created by the spaced apart cross frame members allow air to pass between them in order to reduce the sail effect when the solar array is subjected to buffeting winds.

  3. Gas filled panel insulation

    DOEpatents

    Griffith, Brent T.; Arasteh, Dariush K.; Selkowitz, Stephen E.

    1993-01-01

    A structural or flexible highly insulative panel which may be translucent, is formed from multi-layer polymeric material in the form of an envelope surrounding a baffle. The baffle is designed so as to minimize heat transfer across the panel, by using material which forms substantially closed spaces to suppress convection of the low conductivity gas fill. At least a portion of the baffle carries a low emissivity surface for suppression of infrared radiation.

  4. Gas filled panel insulation

    DOEpatents

    Griffith, B.T.; Arasteh, D.K.; Selkowitz, S.E.

    1993-12-14

    A structural or flexible highly insulative panel which may be translucent, is formed from multi-layer polymeric material in the form of an envelope surrounding a baffle. The baffle is designed so as to minimize heat transfer across the panel, by using material which forms substantially closed spaces to suppress convection of the low conductivity gas fill. At least a portion of the baffle carries a low emissivity surface for suppression of infrared radiation. 18 figures.

  5. Hexagon solar power panel

    DOEpatents

    Rubin, Irwin

    1978-01-01

    A solar energy panel comprises a support upon which silicon cells are arrayed. The cells are wafer thin and of two geometrical types, both of the same area and electrical rating, namely hexagon cells and hourglass cells. The hourglass cells are composites of half hexagons. A near perfect nesting relationship of the cells achieves a high density packing whereby optimum energy production per panel area is achieved.

  6. How do smokers control their cigarette expenditures?

    PubMed

    White, Victoria M; Gilpin, Elizabeth A; White, Martha M; Pierce, John P

    2005-08-01

    When faced with high cigarette prices, smokers can potentially control cigarette expenditures by limiting consumption or seeking cheaper cigarettes. The present study examined both these options and whether the use of price-minimizing strategies (the second option) could counteract a further price increase without smokers having to reduce consumption. Data for 5,109 smokers who purchased manufactured cigarettes were from the 2002 cross-sectional, population-based, random-digit-dialed California Tobacco Survey. We used logistic regression to examine which smokers used consumption-limiting or price-minimizing strategies, and multiple linear regression to determine how much price-minimizing strategies reduced the average price paid per pack. Overall, 32.3% of California smokers said they limited consumption and 74.1% used at least one of the five price-minimizing strategies identified: choosing cheaper retail outlets (61.1%), using promotional offers (35.2%), choosing cheaper brands (28.7%), purchasing by the carton (27.7%), and using low-tax or nontaxed sources (6.3%). Different groups of smokers used different strategies. Except for the use of promotional offers, all price-minimizing strategies significantly reduced the price paid per pack. Carton purchasers saved 1.01 US dollars/pack, and those buying from low-tax or nontaxed sources saved 1.23 US dollars/pack. However, pack buyers were reluctant to purchase cartons, mostly because they thought they might smoke too much, or because they considered the upfront cost unaffordable. The average California smoker could potentially save 0.33-0.66 US dollars/pack or 6.00-12.00 US dollars/month by using other price-minimizing strategies. Reducing consumption by 3 cigarettes/day could save a smoker 18.00 US dollars/month. Whereas price-minimizing strategies appeared to save money, cutting consumption could save even more. Thus further substantial tax increases would likely have the desired effect. PMID:16085532

  7. Energy expenditure on recreational visits to different natural environments.

    PubMed

    Elliott, Lewis R; White, Mathew P; Taylor, Adrian H; Herbert, Stephen

    2015-08-01

    Physical inactivity poses a significant challenge to physical and mental health. Environmental approaches to tackle physical inactivity have identified natural environments as potentially important public health resources. Despite this, little is known about characteristics of the activity involved when individuals visit different types of natural environment. Using Natural England's Monitor of Engagement with the Natural Environment Survey, we examined 71,603 English respondents' recreational visits to natural environments in the past week. Specifically, we examined the intensity of the activities they undertook on the visits (METs), the duration of their visit, and the associated total energy expenditure (MET minutes). Visits to countryside and urban greenspace environments were associated with more intense activities than visits to coastal environments. However, visits to coastal environments were associated with the most energy expenditure overall due to their relatively long duration. Results differed by the urbanity or rurality of the respondent's residence and also how far respondents travelled to their destination. Knowledge of what types of natural environment afford the highest volumes and intensities of physical activity could inform landscape architecture and exercise prescriptions. Isolating activity-supporting characteristics of natural environments that can be translated into urban design is important in providing physical activity opportunities for those less able to access expansive environments.

  8. Energy expenditure on recreational visits to different natural environments.

    PubMed

    Elliott, Lewis R; White, Mathew P; Taylor, Adrian H; Herbert, Stephen

    2015-08-01

    Physical inactivity poses a significant challenge to physical and mental health. Environmental approaches to tackle physical inactivity have identified natural environments as potentially important public health resources. Despite this, little is known about characteristics of the activity involved when individuals visit different types of natural environment. Using Natural England's Monitor of Engagement with the Natural Environment Survey, we examined 71,603 English respondents' recreational visits to natural environments in the past week. Specifically, we examined the intensity of the activities they undertook on the visits (METs), the duration of their visit, and the associated total energy expenditure (MET minutes). Visits to countryside and urban greenspace environments were associated with more intense activities than visits to coastal environments. However, visits to coastal environments were associated with the most energy expenditure overall due to their relatively long duration. Results differed by the urbanity or rurality of the respondent's residence and also how far respondents travelled to their destination. Knowledge of what types of natural environment afford the highest volumes and intensities of physical activity could inform landscape architecture and exercise prescriptions. Isolating activity-supporting characteristics of natural environments that can be translated into urban design is important in providing physical activity opportunities for those less able to access expansive environments. PMID:26151390

  9. Links between casino proximity and gambling participation, expenditure, and pathology.

    PubMed

    Sévigny, Serge; Ladouceur, Robert; Jacques, Christian; Cantinotti, Michael

    2008-06-01

    Two studies investigated the relationship between casino proximity and gambling participation, expenditure, and pathology. In Study 1, 8,842 participants were categorized into 1 of 4 driving distances from their home to the nearest casino in the province of Quebec: 0-100 km, 100.01-200 km, 200.01-300 km, or 300.01-981 km. In Study 2, 5,158 participants, who lived within a 100-km driving distance from the Montreal casino, were classified into 1 of 5 equidistant, 20-km driving distances. A survey company interviewed participants regarding their gambling habits. Results indicated a positive link between casino proximity and gambling participation (at the provincial and Montreal levels) and expenditure (at the provincial level only) but no link with the current prevalence rate of probable pathological gambling or of problem gambling. In a setting in which many types of gambling activities are available, casino proximity in itself does not appear to explain the rate of gambling-related problems. It is necessary to continue prospective research on exposure and adaptation theories as potential explanations for the development of pathological gambling.

  10. Using the Consumer Expenditure Survey to Teach Poverty Measurement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Diduch, Amy McCormick

    2012-01-01

    Poverty measurement is often controversial, but good public policy relies crucially on a broadly supported and understood poverty measure. In 2010, the U.S. Census Bureau announced it would begin regular reporting of a new supplemental poverty measure in October 2011. The present article provides background information for a student exercise…

  11. Returns on investment in public health: effect of public health expenditures on infant health, 1983-1990.

    PubMed

    Becker, E R; Principe, K; Adams, E K; Teutsch, S M

    1998-01-01

    In this study, we developed a broad conceptual framework focusing on how public health expenditures impact the nation's health. We then applied this framework to infant health outcomes and, using an eight-year state panel database, empirically analyzed how state public health expenditures, ceteris paribus, impact a state's level of teenage births and the receipt of prenatal care. Two hypotheses were tested. Hypothesis 1 states that over time, public health expenditures and public health activities, ceteris paribus, significantly decrease births to mothers less than 20 years of age. Hypothesis 2 states that over time, public health expenditures and public health activities, ceteris paribus, significantly decrease the number of infants whose mothers received late or no prenatal care. We find support for both hypotheses but observe that the way public health expenditures are measured has an impact on the findings. Other important implications of the study are noted. To our knowledge, this is the first article that has taken an aggregate state perspective over time and applied it to specific measures of infant health. PMID:9718507

  12. The influence of health expenditures on household impoverishment in Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Boing, Alexandra Crispim; Bertoldi, Andréa Dâmaso; Posenato, Leila Garcia; Peres, Karen Glazer

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To analyze the variation in the proportion of households living below the poverty line in Brazil and the factors associated with their impoverishment. METHODS Income and expenditure data from the Household Budget Survey, which was conducted in Brazil between 2002-2003 (n = 48,470 households) and 2008-2009 (n = 55,970 households) with a national sample, were analyzed. Two cutoff points were used to define poverty. The first cutoff is a per capita monthly income below R$100.00 in 2002-2003 and R$140.00 in 2008-2009, as recommended by the Bolsa Família Program. The second, which is proposed by the World Bank and is adjusted for purchasing power parity, defines poverty as per capita income below US$2.34 and US$3.54 per day in 2002-2003 and 2008-2009, respectively. Logistic regression was used to identify the sociodemographic factors associated with the impoverishment of households. RESULTS After subtracting health expenditures, there was an increase in households living below the poverty line in Brazil. Using the World Bank poverty line, the increase in 2002-2003 and 2008-2009 was 2.6 percentage points (6.8%) and 2.3 percentage points (11.6%), respectively. Using the Bolsa Família Program poverty line, the increase was 1.6 (11.9%) and 1.3 (17.3%) percentage points, respectively. Expenditure on prescription drugs primarily contributed to the increase in poor households. According to the World Bank poverty line, the factors associated with impoverishment include a worse-off financial situation, a household headed by an individual with low education, the presence of children, and the absence of older adults. Using the Bolsa Família Program poverty line, the factors associated with impoverishment include a worse-off financial situation and the presence of children. CONCLUSIONS Health expenditures play an important role in the impoverishment of segments of the Brazilian population, especially among the most disadvantaged. PMID:25372171

  13. Aerospace Safety Advisory Panel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    During 1997, the Aerospace Safety Advisory Panel (ASAP) continued its safety reviews of NASA's human space flight and aeronautics programs. Efforts were focused on those areas that the Panel believed held the greatest potential to impact safety. Continuing safe Space Shuttle operations and progress in the manufacture and testing of primary components for the International Space Station (ISS) were noteworthy. The Panel has continued to monitor the safety implications of the transition of Space Shuttle operations to the United Space Alliance (USA). One area being watched closely relates to the staffing levels and skill mix in both NASA and USA. Therefore, a section of this report is devoted to personnel and other related issues that are a result of this change in NASA's way of doing business for the Space Shuttle. Attention will continue to be paid to this important topic in subsequent reports. Even though the Panel's activities for 1997 were extensive, fewer specific recommendations were formulated than has been the case in recent years. This is indicative of the current generally good state of safety of NASA programs. The Panel does, however, have several longer term concerns that have yet to develop to the level of a specific recommendation. These are covered in the introductory material for each topic area in Section 11. In another departure from past submissions, this report does not contain individual findings and recommendations for the aeronautics programs. While the Panel devoted its usual efforts to examining NASA's aeronautic centers and programs, no specific recommendations were identified for inclusion in this report. In lieu of recommendations, a summary of the Panel's observations of NASA's safety efforts in aeronautics and future Panel areas of emphasis is provided. With profound sadness the Panel notes the passing of our Chairman, Paul M. Johnstone, on December 17, 1997, and our Staff Assistant, Ms. Patricia M. Harman, on October 5, 1997. Other

  14. The Fiscal Survey of States.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Governors' Association, Washington, DC.

    Findings of the 1992 Fiscal Survey of the States, published biannually are presented in this document. The survey presents aggregate and individual data on the states' general fund receipts, expenditures, and balances. Although not the totality of state spending, these funds are used to finance most broad-based state services and are the most…

  15. Australia's Educational Expenditures. Working Paper No. 50

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burke, Gerald

    2003-01-01

    This paper provides an analysis of revenue for and expenditure on Australian education institutions. It includes a review of funding from public and private sources and from overseas. Analyses are made for education as a whole and for the major sectors: schools, vocational education and training (VET) and higher education. Estimates are considered…

  16. 34 CFR 300.133 - Expenditures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 34 Education 2 2011-07-01 2010-07-01 true Expenditures. 300.133 Section 300.133 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF SPECIAL EDUCATION AND REHABILITATIVE SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION ASSISTANCE TO STATES FOR THE EDUCATION OF CHILDREN...

  17. Bailing out expectations and public health expenditure.

    PubMed

    Bordignon, Massimo; Turati, Gilberto

    2009-03-01

    We use a "natural experiment", the fiscal adjustment of Italy in the 1990s to meet the Maastricht criteria, to test a simple model of soft budget constraint that closely resembles the intergovernmental relationships in the Italian public health care sector. We show that the link between the ex-ante financing by the Central government and the health expenditure by regions was stronger when regional expectations of future bailing outs were presumably lower. Confirming previous research, we also prove that more fiscally autonomous regions were more financially responsible and that a political "alignment" effect was present, with "friendly" regional governments controlling more expenditure than unfriendly ones. Our results suggest that, at least in Italy, bailing out expectations by regions may be the missing variable emphasised by [Culyer A.J., 1988. Health care expenditures in Canada: Myth and reality. Canadian Tax Papers, 82] for empirical models explaining health expenditure. Our results also raise some worries about the outcome of the current decentralization process in Europe. PMID:19195727

  18. The energy expenditure of Iranian agricultural workers.

    PubMed

    Brun, T A; Geissler, C A; Mirbagheri, I; Hormozdiary, H; Bastani, J; Hedayat, H

    1979-10-01

    The energy cost of agricultural and standard activities and the daily energy expenditure of male agricultural workers were measured during different seasons in Iranian villages to assess the validity of past and present Food and Agricultural Organization recommended energy allowances for that population. Studies included low income farmers in a village representative of those around the central desert where harvesting takes place under conditions of extreme summer heat. Measurements were also made during the Moslem fasting period when no food may be eaten between dawn and dusk. Energy cost of typical activities was measured by indirect calorimetry using the Max-Planck respirometer and daily energy expenditure was assessed using these figures combined with a diary of activities throughout the 24-hr period. Results of individual activity values are compared with other published figures. Comparison of daily energy expenditure of fasting subjects and nonfasting after Ramazan showed no significant difference. No significant difference was found between values of standardized activities at high summer temperatures and moderate temperatures. Mean values of daily energy expenditure during winter when activity is low are around 2600 kcal/day and for the other seasons of high activity 3400 kcal/day. These figures suggest that past and present Food and Agricultural Organization standards are low for this population. PMID:484535

  19. Can Education Expenditures Reduce Income Inequality?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sylwester, Kevin

    2002-01-01

    Examines whether devoting more resources to education can positively affect the distribution of income within a country. Finds that public-education expenditures appear to be associated with a subsequent decrease in the level of income inequality. Finding is robust to the inclusion of various control variables and appears to be larger in…

  20. 10 CFR 440.18 - Allowable expenditures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... the purchase of vehicles or other certain types of equipment as defined in 10 CFR part 600 may be... 10 Energy 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Allowable expenditures. 440.18 Section 440.18 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION WEATHERIZATION ASSISTANCE FOR LOW-INCOME PERSONS § 440.18...

  1. 10 CFR 440.18 - Allowable expenditures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... the purchase of vehicles or other certain types of equipment as defined in 10 CFR part 600 may be... 10 Energy 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Allowable expenditures. 440.18 Section 440.18 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION WEATHERIZATION ASSISTANCE FOR LOW-INCOME PERSONS § 440.18...

  2. 10 CFR 440.18 - Allowable expenditures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... the purchase of vehicles or other certain types of equipment as defined in 10 CFR part 600 may be... 10 Energy 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Allowable expenditures. 440.18 Section 440.18 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION WEATHERIZATION ASSISTANCE FOR LOW-INCOME PERSONS § 440.18...

  3. Modeling Imports in a Keynesian Expenditure Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Findlay, David W.

    2010-01-01

    The author discusses several issues that instructors of introductory macroeconomics courses should consider when introducing imports in the Keynesian expenditure model. The analysis suggests that the specification of the import function should partially, if not completely, be the result of a simple discussion about the spending and import…

  4. School Financing: Movement Toward Equality of Expenditures?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Amato, Josephine

    In this paper, the political and economic forces influencing attempts to reduce the inequalities in education expenditures are examined. Current programs for financing public education (local, State, and Federal) are compared. In general, State-local tax systems are found to be regressive and improvements are suggested. Inequitability of State aid…

  5. 26 CFR 1.528-6 - Expenditure test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... expenditures on a swimming pool are qualifying expenditures despite the fact that fees from guests of members...; (4) Security personnel; (5) Legal fees; (6) Upkeep of tennis courts; (7) Swimming pools;...

  6. 26 CFR 1.528-6 - Expenditure test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... expenditures on a swimming pool are qualifying expenditures despite the fact that fees from guests of members...; (4) Security personnel; (5) Legal fees; (6) Upkeep of tennis courts; (7) Swimming pools;...

  7. 26 CFR 1.528-6 - Expenditure test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... expenditures on a swimming pool are qualifying expenditures despite the fact that fees from guests of members...; (4) Security personnel; (5) Legal fees; (6) Upkeep of tennis courts; (7) Swimming pools;...

  8. 26 CFR 1.528-6 - Expenditure test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... expenditures on a swimming pool are qualifying expenditures despite the fact that fees from guests of members...; (4) Security personnel; (5) Legal fees; (6) Upkeep of tennis courts; (7) Swimming pools;...

  9. Panel management, team culture, and worklife experience.

    PubMed

    Willard-Grace, Rachel; Dubé, Kate; Hessler, Danielle; O'Brien, Bridget; Earnest, Gillian; Gupta, Reena; Shunk, Rebecca; Grumbach, Kevin

    2015-09-01

    Burnout and professional dissatisfaction are threats to the primary care workforce. We investigated the relationship between panel management capability, team culture, cynicism, and perceived "do-ability" of primary care among primary care providers (PCPs) and staff in primary care practices. We surveyed 326 PCPs and 142 staff members in 10 county-administered, 6 university-run, and 3 Veterans Affairs primary care clinics in a large urban area in 2013. Predictor variables included capability for performing panel management and perception of team culture. Outcome variables included 2 work experience measures--the Maslach Burnout Inventory cynicism scale and a 1-item measure of the "do-ability" of primary care this year compared with last year. Generalized Estimation Equation (GEE) models were used to account for clustering at the clinic level. Greater panel management capability and higher team culture were associated with lower cynicism among PCPs and staff and higher reported "do-ability" of primary care among PCPs. Panel management capability and team culture interacted to predict the 2 work experience outcomes. Among PCPs and staff reporting high team culture, there was little association between panel management capability and the outcomes, which were uniformly positive. However, there was a strong relationship between greater panel management capability and improved work experience outcomes for PCPs and staff reporting low team culture. Team-based processes of care such as panel management may be an important strategy to protect against cynicism and dissatisfaction in primary care, particularly in settings that are still working to improve their team culture.

  10. Resting energy expenditure is not influenced by classical music

    PubMed Central

    Carlsson, Ebba; Helgegren, Hannah; Slinde, Frode

    2005-01-01

    Obesity shows an increasing prevalence worldwide and a decrease in energy expenditure has been suggested to be one of the risk factors for developing obesity. An increase in resting energy expenditure would have a great impact on total energy expenditure. This study shows that classical music do not influence resting energy expenditure compared to complete silence. Further studies should be performed including other genres of music and other types of stress-inductors than music. PMID:16135245

  11. Optimization of aircraft interior panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kourtides, Demetrius A.; Roper, Willard D.

    1986-01-01

    Eight different graphite composite panels were fabricated using four different resin matrices. The resin matrices included Hercules 71775, a blend of vinylpolystyrpyridine and bismaleimide, H795, a bismaleimide, Cycom 6162, a phenolic, and PSP 6022M, a polystyrylpyridine. Graphite panels were fabricated using fabric or unidirectional tape. This report describes the processes for preparing these panels and some of their mechanical, thermal and flammability properties. Panel properties are compared with state-of-the-art epoxy fiberglass composite panels.

  12. Panel methods: An introduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erickson, Larry L.

    1990-01-01

    Panel methods are numerical schemes for solving (the Prandtl-Glauert equation) for linear, inviscid, irrotational flow about aircraft flying at subsonic or supersonic speeds. The tools at the panel-method user's disposal are (1) surface panels of source-doublet-vorticity distributions that can represent nearly arbitrary geometry, and (2) extremely versatile boundary condition capabilities that can frequently be used for creative modeling. Panel-method capabilities and limitations, basic concepts common to all panel-method codes, different choices that were made in the implementation of these concepts into working computer programs, and various modeling techniques involving boundary conditions, jump properties, and trailing wakes are discussed. An approach for extending the method to nonlinear transonic flow is also presented. Three appendices supplement the main test. In appendix 1, additional detail is provided on how the basic concepts are implemented into a specific computer program (PANAIR). In appendix 2, it is shown how to evaluate analytically the fundamental surface integral that arises in the expressions for influence-coefficients, and evaluate its jump property. In appendix 3, a simple example is used to illustrate the so-called finite part of the improper integrals.

  13. Aerospace safety advisory panel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    The Aerospace Safety Advisory Panel (ASAP) monitored NASA's activities and provided feedback to the NASA Administrator, other NASA officials and Congress throughout the year. Particular attention was paid to the Space Shuttle, its launch processing and planned and potential safety improvements. The Panel monitored Space Shuttle processing at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) and will continue to follow it as personnel reductions are implemented. There is particular concern that upgrades in hardware, software, and operations with the potential for significant risk reduction not be overlooked due to the extraordinary budget pressures facing the agency. The authorization of all of the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) Block II components portends future Space Shuttle operations at lower risk levels and with greater margins for handling unplanned ascent events. Throughout the year, the Panel attempted to monitor the safety activities related to the Russian involvement in both space and aeronautics programs. This proved difficult as the working relationships between NASA and the Russians were still being defined as the year unfolded. NASA's concern for the unique safety problems inherent in a multi-national endeavor appears appropriate. Actions are underway or contemplated which should be capable of identifying and rectifying problem areas. The balance of this report presents 'Findings and Recommendations' (Section 2), 'Information in Support of Findings and Recommendations' (Section 3) and Appendices describing Panel membership, the NASA response to the March 1994 ASAP report, and a chronology of the panel's activities during the reporting period (Section 4).

  14. 11 CFR 9004.7 - Allocation of travel expenditures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... campaign purposes. (ii) If the trip is by non-charter commercial transportation, the actual cost shall be... travel expenditures. (a) Notwithstanding the provisions of 11 CFR 106.3, expenditures for travel relating... be reported by the candidate's authorized committee(s) as expenditures. (b)(1) For a trip which...

  15. 11 CFR 9004.7 - Allocation of travel expenditures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... campaign purposes. (ii) If the trip is by non-charter commercial transportation, the actual cost shall be... travel expenditures. (a) Notwithstanding the provisions of 11 CFR 106.3, expenditures for travel relating... be reported by the candidate's authorized committee(s) as expenditures. (b)(1) For a trip which...

  16. 11 CFR 9004.7 - Allocation of travel expenditures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... campaign purposes. (ii) If the trip is by non-charter commercial transportation, the actual cost shall be... travel expenditures. (a) Notwithstanding the provisions of 11 CFR 106.3, expenditures for travel relating... be reported by the candidate's authorized committee(s) as expenditures. (b)(1) For a trip which...

  17. 11 CFR 9008.8 - Limitation of expenditures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... the aggregate, exceed the amount to which such committee is entitled under 11 CFR 9008.4 and 9008.5... accordance with 11 CFR 9008.52. (2) Expenditures by government agencies and municipal funds. Expenditures... accordance with the requirements of 11 CFR 9008.53. (3) Expenditures to participate in or attend...

  18. Health care expenditure in Sweden--an international comparison.

    PubMed

    Gerdtham, U G; Jönsson, B

    1991-01-01

    This paper analyses health care expenditure in Sweden and compares this with the corresponding expenditure in OECD countries. The definition and measurement problems of health care expenditure are discussed, new figures for the development of health care expenditure are presented and different measures of health care expenditure are provided. We found that health care expenditure has increased by about 20% in constant prices for Sweden between 1980 and 1988, but that health care expenditure as a share of the GDP has dropped during the same period in current prices. Health care expenditure disaggregated on different age groups show for Sweden that in the age group 15-64 years, health care expenditure has not increased in constant prices between 1976 and 1985, but in the oldest age group, health care expenditure has increased considerable during this period. Health care expenditure in Sweden is as high as would be expected, taking into account the degree of economic development and the growth of expenditure during the 80s, and has followed that in comparable OECD countries. However, the relative price is lower, which means that the input of real resources are greater than in other countries. PMID:10115993

  19. Local School Expenditures and Educational Quality: A Correlation Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stinson, Thomas F.; Krahmer, Edward F.

    Twenty-four expenditure variables were correlated with achievement scores on the Iowa Test of Educational Development to find out how various types of expenditures were related to educational quality. The expenditure variables (instructional cost, operating cost less transportation, and total costs) were used as numerators in a fraction. The…

  20. 26 CFR 53.4945-1 - Taxes on taxable expenditures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 17 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Taxes on taxable expenditures. 53.4945-1...) MISCELLANEOUS EXCISE TAXES (CONTINUED) FOUNDATION AND SIMILAR EXCISE TAXES Taxes on Taxable Expenditures § 53.4945-1 Taxes on taxable expenditures. (a) Imposition of initial taxes—(1) Tax on private...

  1. Educational Expenditures in Thailand: Development, Trends, and Distribution

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sagarik, Danuvas

    2014-01-01

    This article aims to investigate the trends of education expenditure policy during the past few decades, as well as the recent allocation and distribution of education expenditure in Thailand. It also focuses on the development of the substance of education policy in Thailand. Political connection with the education expenditure policy is also…

  2. 42 CFR 403.750 - Estimate of expenditures and adjustments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Estimate of expenditures and adjustments. 403.750...-Benefits, Conditions of Participation, and Payment § 403.750 Estimate of expenditures and adjustments. (a) Estimates. CMS estimates the level of expenditures for services provided under this subpart before the...

  3. Health care expenditure in Sweden--an international comparison.

    PubMed

    Gerdtham, U G; Jönsson, B

    1991-01-01

    This paper analyses health care expenditure in Sweden and compares this with the corresponding expenditure in OECD countries. The definition and measurement problems of health care expenditure are discussed, new figures for the development of health care expenditure are presented and different measures of health care expenditure are provided. We found that health care expenditure has increased by about 20% in constant prices for Sweden between 1980 and 1988, but that health care expenditure as a share of the GDP has dropped during the same period in current prices. Health care expenditure disaggregated on different age groups show for Sweden that in the age group 15-64 years, health care expenditure has not increased in constant prices between 1976 and 1985, but in the oldest age group, health care expenditure has increased considerable during this period. Health care expenditure in Sweden is as high as would be expected, taking into account the degree of economic development and the growth of expenditure during the 80s, and has followed that in comparable OECD countries. However, the relative price is lower, which means that the input of real resources are greater than in other countries.

  4. Health care utilization in the elderly Mexican population: Expenditures and determinants

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Worldwide population aging has been considered one of the most important demographic phenomena, and is frequently referred as a determinant of health costs and expenditures. These costs are an effect either of the aging process itself (social) or because of the increase that comes with older age (individual). Objective To analyze health expenditures and its determinants in a sample of Mexican population, for three dimensions acute morbidity, ambulatory care and hospitalization focusing on different age groups, particularly the elderly. Methods A secondary analysis of the Mexican National Health and Nutrition Survey (ENSANUT), 2006 was conducted. A descriptive analysis was performed to establish a health profile by socio-demographic characteristics. Logistic regression models were estimated to determine the relation between acute morbidity, ambulatory care, hospitalization and age group; to establish the determinants of hospitalization among the population 60 years and older; and to determine hospitalization expenditures by age. Results Higher proportion of elderly reporting health problems was found. Average expenditures of hospitalization in households were $240.6 am dlls, whereas in households exclusively with elderly the expenditure was $308.9 am dlls, the highest among the considered age groups. The multivariate analysis showed higher probability of being hospitalized among the elderly, but not for risks for acute morbidity and ambulatory care. Among the elderly, older age, being male or living in a city or in a metro area implied a higher probability of hospitalization during the last year, with chronic diseases playing a key role in hospitalization. Conclusions The conditions associated with age, such as chronic diseases, have higher weight than age itself; therefore, they are responsible for the higher expenditures reported. Conclusions point towards a differentiated use and intensity of health services depending on age. The projected increase in

  5. The effect of economic insecurity on mental health: Recent evidence from Australian panel data.

    PubMed

    Rohde, Nicholas; Tang, K K; Osberg, Lars; Rao, Prasada

    2016-02-01

    This paper estimates the impact of economic insecurity on the mental health of Australian adults. Taking microdata from the 2001-2011 HILDA panel survey, we develop a conceptually diverse set of insecurity measures and explore their relationships with the SF-36 mental health index. By using fixed effects models that control for unobservable heterogeneity we produce estimates that correct for endogeneity more thoroughly than previous works. Our results show that exposure to economic risks has small but consistently detrimental mental health effects. The main contribution of the paper however comes from the breadth of risks that are found to be harmful. Job insecurity, financial dissatisfaction, reductions and volatility in income, an inability to meet standard expenditures and a lack of access to emergency funds all adversely affect health. This suggests that the common element of economic insecurity (rather than idiosyncratic phenomena associated with any specific risk) is likely to be hazardous. Our preferred estimates indicate that a standard deviation shock to economic insecurity lowers an individual's mental health score by about 1.4 percentage points. If applied uniformly across the Australian population such a shock would increase the morbidity rate of mental disorders by about 1.7%. PMID:26826683

  6. The effect of economic insecurity on mental health: Recent evidence from Australian panel data.

    PubMed

    Rohde, Nicholas; Tang, K K; Osberg, Lars; Rao, Prasada

    2016-02-01

    This paper estimates the impact of economic insecurity on the mental health of Australian adults. Taking microdata from the 2001-2011 HILDA panel survey, we develop a conceptually diverse set of insecurity measures and explore their relationships with the SF-36 mental health index. By using fixed effects models that control for unobservable heterogeneity we produce estimates that correct for endogeneity more thoroughly than previous works. Our results show that exposure to economic risks has small but consistently detrimental mental health effects. The main contribution of the paper however comes from the breadth of risks that are found to be harmful. Job insecurity, financial dissatisfaction, reductions and volatility in income, an inability to meet standard expenditures and a lack of access to emergency funds all adversely affect health. This suggests that the common element of economic insecurity (rather than idiosyncratic phenomena associated with any specific risk) is likely to be hazardous. Our preferred estimates indicate that a standard deviation shock to economic insecurity lowers an individual's mental health score by about 1.4 percentage points. If applied uniformly across the Australian population such a shock would increase the morbidity rate of mental disorders by about 1.7%.

  7. Using the Panel Study of Income Dynamics To Analyze Housing Decisions, Dynamics, and Effects

    PubMed Central

    McGonagle, Katherine; Sastry, Narayan

    2016-01-01

    The Panel Study of Income Dynamics (PSID) is the world’s longest running household panel survey. It started in 1968 and has followed the same families—and their descendants—for nearly 50 years. PSID was conducted annually from 1968 through 1997 and has been conducted biennially since 1997. As of 2015, 39 waves of data have been collected. In 2015, interviews were completed with more than 9,000 households and information was collected on about 25,000 household members. PSID has achieved high wave-to-wave response rates throughout most of its history. Since the beginning of the study, detailed information has been collected on family composition, income, assets and debt, public program participation, and housing. At the beginning of the recent housing crisis, PSID began collecting information about mortgage distress and foreclosure activity. PSID currently includes several major supplemental studies. The Child Development Supplement and the Transition into Adulthood Supplement collect detailed information about behavior and outcomes among children and young adults in PSID families, such as educational achievement, health, time use, family formation, and housing-related decisions among young adults. PSID data are publicly available free of charge to researchers; some data available only under contract to qualified researchers allow linkage with various administrative databases and include information such as census tract and block of residence that can be used to describe neighborhood characteristics. PSID data have been widely used to study topics of major interest to Cityscape readers, including housing decisionmaking, housing expenditures and financing, residential mobility and migration, and the effects of neighborhood characteristics on a variety of measures of child and family well-being. This article provides an overview of PSID and its housing- and neighborhood-related measures. We briefly describe studies using PSID on housing-related topics. Finally

  8. Origami of thick panels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yan; Peng, Rui; You, Zhong

    2015-07-01

    Origami patterns, including the rigid origami patterns in which flat inflexible sheets are joined by creases, are primarily created for zero-thickness sheets. In order to apply them to fold structures such as roofs, solar panels, and space mirrors, for which thickness cannot be disregarded, various methods have been suggested. However, they generally involve adding materials to or offsetting panels away from the idealized sheet without altering the kinematic model used to simulate folding. We develop a comprehensive kinematic synthesis for rigid origami of thick panels that differs from the existing kinematic model but is capable of reproducing motions identical to that of zero-thickness origami. The approach, proven to be effective for typical origami, can be readily applied to fold real engineering structures.

  9. Oven wall panel construction

    DOEpatents

    Ellison, Kenneth; Whike, Alan S.

    1980-04-22

    An oven roof or wall is formed from modular panels, each of which comprises an inner fabric and an outer fabric. Each such fabric is formed with an angle iron framework and somewhat resilient tie-bars or welded at their ends to flanges of the angle irons to maintain the inner and outer frameworks in spaced disposition while minimizing heat transfer by conduction and permitting some degree of relative movement on expansion and contraction of the module components. Suitable thermal insulation is provided within the module. Panels or skins are secured to the fabric frameworks and each such skin is secured to a framework and projects laterally so as slidingly to overlie the adjacent frame member of an adjacent panel in turn to permit relative movement during expansion and contraction.

  10. Advanced solar panel designs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ralph, E. L.; Linder, E.

    1995-01-01

    This paper describes solar cell panel designs that utilize new hgih efficiency solar cells along with lightweight rigid panel technology. The resulting designs push the W/kg and W/sq m parameters to new high levels. These new designs are well suited to meet the demand for higher performance small satellites. This paper reports on progress made on two SBIR Phase 1 contracts. One panel design involved the use of large area (5.5 cm x 6.5 cm) GaAs/Ge solar cells of 19% efficiency combined with a lightweight rigid graphite fiber epoxy isogrid substrate configuration. A coupon (38 cm x 38 cm) was fabricated and tested which demonstrated an array specific power level of 60 W/kg with a potential of reaching 80 W/kg. The second panel design involved the use of newly developed high efficiency (22%) dual junction GaInP2/GaAs/Ge solar cells combined with an advanced lightweight rigid substrate using aluminum honeycomb core with high strength graphite fiber mesh facesheets. A coupon (38 cm x 38 cm) was fabricated and tested which demonstrated an array specific power of 105 W/kg and 230 W/sq m. This paper will address the construction details of the panels and an a analysis of the component weights. A strawman array design suitable for a typical small-sat mission is described for each of the two panel design technologies being studied. Benefits in respect to weight reduction, area reduction, and system cost reduction are analyzed and compared to conventional arrays.

  11. Illinois Rural Life Panel Summary Report, Volume 4, 1993.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Armstrong, Nancy

    1993-01-01

    The Illinois Rural Life Panel, a sample of approximately 2,000 residents living in Illinois' 76 nonmetropolitan counties, is surveyed annually about various issues. The 1993 survey results are reported in four brief summaries. In the first summary, which discusses health care, panelists indicated dissatisfaction with the current health-care…

  12. 26 CFR 1.501(h)-1 - Application of the expenditure test to expenditures to influence legislation; introduction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... expenditures to influence legislation; introduction. 1.501(h)-1 Section 1.501(h)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL...) Exempt Organizations § 1.501(h)-1 Application of the expenditure test to expenditures to influence..., (except as otherwise provided in subsection (h)).” This requirement is called the substantial part...

  13. PRSEUS Acoustic Panel Fabrication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nicolette, Velicki; Yovanof, Nicolette P.; Baraja, Jaime; Mathur, Gopal; Thrash, Patrick; Pickell, Robert

    2011-01-01

    This report describes the development of a novel structural concept, Pultruded Rod Stitched Efficient Unitized Structure (PRSEUS), that addresses the demanding fuselage loading requirements for the Hybrid Wing or Blended Wing Body (BWB) airplane configuration with regards to acoustic response. A PRSEUS panel was designed and fabricated and provided to NASA-LaRC for acoustic response testing in the Structural Acoustics Loads and Transmission (SALT) facility). Preliminary assessments of the sound transmission characteristics of a PRSEUS panel subjected to a representative Hybrid Wing Body (HWB) operating environment were completed for the NASA Environmentally Responsible Aviation (ERA) Program.

  14. Panel 3 - characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Erck, R.A.; Erdemir, A.; Janghsing Hsieh; Lee, R.H.; Xian Zheng Pan; Deming Shu; Feldman, A.; Glass, J.T.; Kleimer, R.; Lawton, E.A.

    1993-01-01

    The task of this panel was to identify and prioritize needs in the area of characterization of diamond and diamond-like-carbon (DLC) films for use in the transportation industry. Until recent advances in production of inexpensive films of diamonds and DLC, it was not feasible that these materials could be mass produced. The Characterization Panel is restricting itself to identifying needs in areas that would be most useful to manufacturers and users in producing and utilizing diamond and DLC coatings in industry. These characterization needs include in-situ monitoring during growth, relation of structure to performance, and standards and definitions.

  15. Wisconsin Twin Panel.

    PubMed

    Van Hulle, Carol A; Lemery, Kathryn S; Goldsmith, H Hill

    2002-10-01

    The Wisconsin Twin Panel was initiated in 1994 to serve a study of the development of childhood mood and behavioral disorders. Families who give birth to twins within the state of Wisconsin are recruited within 6 months of the birth. The panel currently supports three ongoing, longitudinal research projects. Research foci include studying epigenetic contributions to emotional, physical, cognitive, and motoric development of infant and toddler twins; physiological concomitants of childhood temperament; and early risk and resiliency factors related to child psychopathology. All three studies include videotaped observational assessments and biological measures. PMID:12537886

  16. 26 CFR 1.163-8T - Allocation of interest expense among expenditures (temporary).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... not a trade or business expenditure, a passive activity expenditure, or an investment expenditure. (6...” means an expenditure (other than a passive activity expenditure or an investment expenditure) in.... On July 1, B sells the investment security for $1,000 and uses the sales proceeds to make a...

  17. 26 CFR 1.163-8T - Allocation of interest expense among expenditures (temporary).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... not a trade or business expenditure, a passive activity expenditure, or an investment expenditure. (6...” means an expenditure (other than a passive activity expenditure or an investment expenditure) in.... On July 1, B sells the investment security for $1,000 and uses the sales proceeds to make a...

  18. Library Research and Statistics. Research on Libraries and Librarianship in 2002; Number of Libraries in the United States and Canada; Highlights of NCES Surveys; Library Acquisition Expenditures, 2001-2002: U.S. Public, Academic, Special, and Government Libraries; LJ Budget Report: A Precarious Holding Pattern; Price Indexes for Public and Academic Libraries; Library Buildings 2002: The Building Buck Doesn't Stop Here.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lynch, Mary Jo; Oder, Norman; Halstead, Kent; Fox, Bette-Lee

    2003-01-01

    Includes seven reports that discuss research on libraries and librarianship, including academic, public, and school libraries; awards and grants; number of libraries in the United States and Canada; National Center for Education Statistics results; library expenditures for public, academic, special, and government libraries; library budgets; price…

  19. Engaging inner city middle school students in development of an energy expenditure food label.

    PubMed

    Spaulding, Carol J; Mcneal, Catherine J; Coppin, John David; Shimek, Christine; Field, Lindsey; Murano, Peter S

    2015-01-01

    Using food labels can be an important component of maintaining healthy weight, but young adolescents are unlikely to have the requisite skills to make use of food labeling information. Our objectives were to determine knowledge about calories and comprehension and use of the Nutrition Facts Panel among a group of inner city African-American and Hispanic middle school students, and to engage the students in refining a Calorie Converter energy expenditure food label. We used quantitative and qualitative methods including questionnaires, focus groups, and hands-on graphic design activities. Correctly defining the word "calorie" was associated with correct answers to three of four questions requiring interpretation of the Nutrition Facts Panel [χ(2)(1, 138, p < .05) = 4.56, 4.14, and 5.61.] We incorporated students' design and content modifications for the Calorie Converter label, and the majority indicated that the energy expenditure label would influence their food selection practices. PMID:25898219

  20. Effect of User Charges on Secondary Level Surgical Care Utilization and Out-of-Pocket Expenditures in Haryana State, India

    PubMed Central

    Balasubramanian, Deepak; Prinja, Shankar; Aggarwal, Arun Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Background Generation of resources for providing health care services is an important issue in developing countries. User charges in the form of Surgical Package Program (SPP) were introduced in all district hospitals of Haryana to address this problem. We evaluate the effect of this SPP program on surgical care utilization and out-of-pocket (OOP) expenditures. Methods Data on 25437 surgeries, from July 2006 to June 2013 in 3 districts of Haryana state, was analyzed using interrupted time series analysis to assess the impact of SPP on utilization of services. Adjustment was made for presence of any autocorrelation and seasonality effects. A cross sectional survey was undertaken among 180 patients in District hospital, Panchkula during June 2013 to assess the extent of out of pocket (OOP) expenditure incurred, financial risk protection and methods to cope with OOP expenditure. Catastrophic health expenditure, estimated as any expenditure in excess of 10% of the household consumption expenditure, was used to assess the extent of financial risk protection. Results User charges had a negative effect on the number of surgeries in public sector district hospitals in all the 3 districts. The mean out-of-pocket expenditure incurred by the patients was Rs.4564 (USD 74.6). The prevalence of catastrophic expenditure was 5.6%. A higher proportion among the poorest 20% population coped through borrowing money (47.2%), while majority (86.1%) of those belonging to richest quintile paid from their monthly income or savings, or had insurance. Conclusion There is a need to increase the public financing for curative services and it should be based on the needs of population. Any form of user charge in public sector hospitals should be removed. PMID:25938670

  1. 42. Interior detail, parlor, paneled chimney breast. This paneling likely ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    42. Interior detail, parlor, paneled chimney breast. This paneling likely dates from the house's phase I construction spanning from 1728 into the 1730's. - John Bartram House & Garden, House, 54th Street & Lindbergh Boulevard, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

  2. 78. DETAIL OF COMMUNICATIONS PANEL ON LAUNCH ANALYST PANEL SHOWING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    78. DETAIL OF COMMUNICATIONS PANEL ON LAUNCH ANALYST PANEL SHOWING 20 CHANNEL-SELECTION SWITCHES, ROTARY DIAL, HEADSET, AND FOOT PEDAL - Vandenberg Air Force Base, Space Launch Complex 3, Launch Operations Building, Napa & Alden Roads, Lompoc, Santa Barbara County, CA

  3. Stepped inlet optical panel

    DOEpatents

    Veligdan, James T.

    2001-01-01

    An optical panel includes stacked optical waveguides having stepped inlet facets collectively defining an inlet face for receiving image light, and having beveled outlet faces collectively defining a display screen for displaying the image light channeled through the waveguides by internal reflection.

  4. Health expenditure and finance: who gets what?

    PubMed Central

    Doherty, J.; McIntyre, D.; Bloom, G.; Brijlal, P.

    1999-01-01

    The methods used in South Africa's first comprehensive review of health finance and expenditure are outlined. Special measures were adopted to make the process acceptable to all concerned during a period of profound political transition. The estimation of indicators of access to public sector resources for districts sorted by per capita income allowed the health care problems of disadvantaged communities to be highlighted. PMID:10083715

  5. Energy expenditure in maximal jumps on sand.

    PubMed

    Muramatsu, Shigeru; Fukudome, Akinori; Miyama, Motoyoshi; Arimoto, Morio; Kijima, Akira

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to comparatively investigate the energy expenditure of jumping on sand and on a firm surface. Eight male university volleyball players were recruited in this study and performed 3 sets of 10 repetitive jumps on sand (the S condition), and also on a force platform (the F condition). The subjects jumped every two seconds during a set, and the interval between sets was 20 seconds. The subjects performed each jump on sand with maximal exertion while in the F condition they jumped as high as they did on sand. The oxygen requirement for jumping was defined as the total oxygen uptake consecutively measured between the first set of jumps and the point that oxygen uptake recovers to the resting value, and the energy expenditure was calculated. The jump height in the S condition was equivalent to 64.0 +/- 4.4% of the height in the maximal jump on the firm surface. The oxygen requirement was 7.39 +/- 0.33 liters in S condition and 6.24 +/- 0.69 liters in the F condition, and the energy expenditure was 37.0 +/- 1.64 kcal and 31.2 +/- 3.46 kcal respectively. The differences in the two counter values were both statistically significant (p < 0.01). The energy expenditure of jumping in the S condition was equivalent to 119.4 +/- 10.1% of the one in the F condition, which ratio was less than in walking and close to in running. PMID:16617210

  6. Aerospace Safety Advisory Panel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    This report covers the activities of the Aerospace Safety Advisory Panel (ASAP) for calendar year 1998-a year of sharp contrasts and significant successes at NASA. The year opened with the announcement of large workforce cutbacks. The slip in the schedule for launching the International Space Station (ISS) created a five-month hiatus in Space Shuttle launches. This slack period ended with the successful and highly publicized launch of the STS-95 mission. As the year closed, ISS assembly began with the successful orbiting and joining of the Functional Cargo Block (FGB), Zarya, from Russia and the Unity Node from the United States. Throughout the year, the Panel maintained its scrutiny of NASA's safety processes. Of particular interest were the potential effects on safety of workforce reductions and the continued transition of functions to the Space Flight Operations Contractor. Attention was also given to the risk management plans of the Aero-Space Technology programs, including the X-33, X-34, and X-38. Overall, the Panel concluded that safety is well served for the present. The picture is not as clear for the future. Cutbacks have limited the depth of talent available. In many cases, technical specialties are 'one deep.' The extended hiring freeze has resulted in an older workforce that will inevitably suffer significant departures from retirements in the near future. The resulting 'brain drain' could represent a future safety risk unless appropriate succession planning is started expeditiously. This and other topics are covered in the section addressing workforce. The major NASA programs are also limited in their ability to plan property for the future. This is of particular concern for the Space Shuttle and ISS because these programs are scheduled to operate well into the next century. In the case of the Space Shuttle, beneficial and mandatory safety and operational upgrades are being delayed because of a lack of sufficient present funding. Likewise, the ISS has

  7. Primate energy expenditure and life history

    PubMed Central

    Pontzer, Herman; Raichlen, David A.; Gordon, Adam D.; Schroepfer-Walker, Kara K.; Hare, Brian; O’Neill, Matthew C.; Muldoon, Kathleen M.; Dunsworth, Holly M.; Wood, Brian M.; Isler, Karin; Burkart, Judith; Irwin, Mitchell; Shumaker, Robert W.; Lonsdorf, Elizabeth V.; Ross, Stephen R.

    2014-01-01

    Humans and other primates are distinct among placental mammals in having exceptionally slow rates of growth, reproduction, and aging. Primates’ slow life history schedules are generally thought to reflect an evolved strategy of allocating energy away from growth and reproduction and toward somatic investment, particularly to the development and maintenance of large brains. Here we examine an alternative explanation: that primates’ slow life histories reflect low total energy expenditure (TEE) (kilocalories per day) relative to other placental mammals. We compared doubly labeled water measurements of TEE among 17 primate species with similar measures for other placental mammals. We found that primates use remarkably little energy each day, expending on average only 50% of the energy expected for a placental mammal of similar mass. Such large differences in TEE are not easily explained by differences in physical activity, and instead appear to reflect systemic metabolic adaptation for low energy expenditures in primates. Indeed, comparisons of wild and captive primate populations indicate similar levels of energy expenditure. Broad interspecific comparisons of growth, reproduction, and maximum life span indicate that primates’ slow metabolic rates contribute to their characteristically slow life histories. PMID:24474770

  8. The effect of recessions on gambling expenditures.

    PubMed

    Horváth, Csilla; Paap, Richard

    2012-12-01

    This article examines the influence of the business cycle on expenditures of three major types of legalized gambling activities: Casino gambling, lottery, and pari-mutuel wagering. Empirical results are obtained using monthly aggregated US per capita consumption time series for the period 1959.01-2010.08. Among the three gambling activities only lottery consumption appears to be recession-proof. This series is characterized by a vast and solid growth that exceeds the growth in income and the growth in other gambling sectors. Casino gambling expenditures show a positive growth during expansions and no growth during recessions. Hence, the loss in income during recessions affects casino gambling. However, income shocks which are not directly related to the business cycle do not influence casino gambling expenditures. Pari-mutuel wagering displays an overall negative trend and its average growth rate is smaller than the growth in income, especially during recessions. The findings of this article provide important implications for the gambling industry and for local governments.

  9. Racial/Ethnic Differences in Medicaid Expenditures on Psychotropic Medications among Maltreated Children

    PubMed Central

    Raghavan, Ramesh; Brown, Derek S.; Allaire, Benjamin T.; Garfield, Lauren D.; Ross, Raven E.; Snowden, Lonnie R.

    2014-01-01

    This study quantifies racial/ethnic differences in Medicaid expenditures on psychotropic drugs among a national sample of children with suspected maltreatment. We linked 4,445 child participants in the National Survey of Child and Adolescent Well-Being (NSCAW) – consisting of children investigated for suspected abuse and neglect - to their Medicaid claims obtained from 36 states. We used propensity score matching to construct a comparison group of children without known child welfare involvement, and estimated two-part generalized linear models to examine differences in annual psychotropic drug expenditures per child between children of different races/ethnicities. When compared to a matched sample of children, African American and Latino children incur $292 and $144 less expenditures on psychotropic drugs, respectively, than white children. Among NSCAW children alone, African American children display $614 less spending on psychotropic drugs when compared to white children. Racial/ethnic differences in expenditures on psychotropic drugs occur among all children on Medicaid, but the differences are especially pronounced among African American children in contact with the child welfare system. These findings demonstrate that policymakers will need to pay special attention to the needs of children of color as Medicaid expansions proceed nationwide. PMID:24646610

  10. European healthcare policies for controlling drug expenditure.

    PubMed

    Ess, Silvia M; Schneeweiss, Sebastian; Szucs, Thomas D

    2003-01-01

    In the last 20 years, expenditures on pharmaceuticals - as well as total health expenditures - have grown faster than the gross national product in all European countries. The aim of this paper was to review policies that European governments apply to reduce or at least slow down public expenditure on pharmaceutical products. Such policies can target the industry, the wholesalers and retailers, prescribers, and patients. The objectives of pharmaceutical policies are multidimensional and must take into account issues relating to public health, public expenditure and industrial incentives. Both price levels and consumption patterns determine the level of total drug expenditure in a particular country, and both factors vary greatly across countries. Licensing and pricing policies intend to influence the supply side. Three types of pricing policies can be recognised: product price control, reference pricing and profit control. Profit control is mainly used in the UK. Reference pricing systems were first used in Germany and The Netherlands and are being considered in other countries. Product price control is still the most common method for establishing the price of drugs. For the aim of fiscal consolidation, price-freeze and price-cut measures have been frequently used in the 1980s and 1990s. They have affected all types of schemes. For drug wholesalers and retailers, most governments have defined profit margins. The differences in price levels as well as the introduction of a Single European Pharmaceutical Market has led to the phenomenon of parallel imports among member countries of the European Union. This may be facilitated by larger and more powerful wholesalers and the vertical integration between wholesalers and retailers. To control costs, the use of generic drugs is encouraged in most countries, but only few countries allow pharmacists to substitute generic drugs for proprietary brands. Various interventions are used to reduce the patients' demand for drugs by

  11. Novel methodology for pharmaceutical expenditure forecast

    PubMed Central

    Vataire, Anne-Lise; Cetinsoy, Laurent; Aballéa, Samuel; Rémuzat, Cécile; Urbinati, Duccio; Kornfeld, Åsa; Mzoughi, Olfa; Toumi, Mondher

    2014-01-01

    Background and objective The value appreciation of new drugs across countries today features a disruption that is making the historical data that are used for forecasting pharmaceutical expenditure poorly reliable. Forecasting methods rarely addressed uncertainty. The objective of this project was to propose a methodology to perform pharmaceutical expenditure forecasting that integrates expected policy changes and uncertainty (developed for the European Commission as the ‘EU Pharmaceutical expenditure forecast’; see http://ec.europa.eu/health/healthcare/key_documents/index_en.htm). Methods 1) Identification of all pharmaceuticals going off-patent and new branded medicinal products over a 5-year forecasting period in seven European Union (EU) Member States. 2) Development of a model to estimate direct and indirect impacts (based on health policies and clinical experts) on savings of generics and biosimilars. Inputs were originator sales value, patent expiry date, time to launch after marketing authorization, price discount, penetration rate, time to peak sales, and impact on brand price. 3) Development of a model for new drugs, which estimated sales progression in a competitive environment. Clinical expected benefits as well as commercial potential were assessed for each product by clinical experts. Inputs were development phase, marketing authorization dates, orphan condition, market size, and competitors. 4) Separate analysis of the budget impact of products going off-patent and new drugs according to several perspectives, distribution chains, and outcomes. 5) Addressing uncertainty surrounding estimations via deterministic and probabilistic sensitivity analysis. Results This methodology has proven to be effective by 1) identifying the main parameters impacting the variations in pharmaceutical expenditure forecasting across countries: generics discounts and penetration, brand price after patent loss, reimbursement rate, the penetration of biosimilars and

  12. Report of Industry Panel Group

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gallimore, Simon; Gier, Jochen; Heitland, Greg; Povinelli, Louis; Sharma, Om; VandeWall, Allen

    2006-01-01

    A final report is presented from the industry panel group. The contents include: 1) General comments; 2) Positive progress since Minnowbrook IV; 3) Industry panel outcome; 4) Prioritized turbine projects; 5) Prioritized compressor projects; and 6) Miscellaneous.

  13. LCD Panels: The Electronic Wonder.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Glenn

    1994-01-01

    Describes Liquid Crystal Display (LCD) panels and their use in the classroom. Topics discussed include active versus passive matrix panels; the number of pixels; projectors, including transmissive or reflective overhead projectors; costs; and vendors that supply LCDs. (LRW)

  14. Healthcare expenditures for privately insured people with cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Ouyang, Lijing; Grosse, Scott D; Amendah, Djesika D; Schechter, Michael S

    2009-10-01

    With improved survival and new therapies for people with cystic fibrosis (CF), updated information on medical care expenditures for those individuals is needed. We estimated medical care expenditures, including both insurance reimbursements and patient out-of-pocket expenses, for privately insured people with CF and investigated how those expenditures varied with certain complications of CF. From a private insurance claims database of people covered by health plans associated with large corporate employers, we identified people with CF who were currently receiving medical care for the disorder and characterized their medical expenditures during the period 2004-2006. We selected a matching group of people who did not have CF based on age, sex, and geographic area, and calculated incremental expenditures associated with CF. We also examined the effect of age and certain complications of CF on these expenditures. The annual medical care expenditure for a person with actively managed CF averaged $48,098 in 2006 dollars, which was 22 times higher than for a person without CF. This ratio is high relative to other chronic disorders. Outpatient prescription medications made up the largest component of total expenditures for people with CF (39%). Those who were recorded in claims data as having a liver or lung transplant, malnutrition, diabetes, or a chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa pulmonary infection incurred much higher expenditures than people without these conditions. People with CF will incur high medical expenditures throughout their lifespan. These findings will assist in the development of economic evaluations of future CF screening and management initiatives. PMID:19768806

  15. Conducting Online Expert panels: a feasibility and experimental replicability study

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background This paper has two goals. First, we explore the feasibility of conducting online expert panels to facilitate consensus finding among a large number of geographically distributed stakeholders. Second, we test the replicability of panel findings across four panels of different size. Method We engaged 119 panelists in an iterative process to identify definitional features of Continuous Quality Improvement (CQI). We conducted four parallel online panels of different size through three one-week phases by using the RAND's ExpertLens process. In Phase I, participants rated potentially definitional CQI features. In Phase II, they discussed rating results online, using asynchronous, anonymous discussion boards. In Phase III, panelists re-rated Phase I features and reported on their experiences as participants. Results 66% of invited experts participated in all three phases. 62% of Phase I participants contributed to Phase II discussions and 87% of them completed Phase III. Panel disagreement, measured by the mean absolute deviation from the median (MAD-M), decreased after group feedback and discussion in 36 out of 43 judgments about CQI features. Agreement between the four panels after Phase III was fair (four-way kappa = 0.36); they agreed on the status of five out of eleven CQI features. Results of the post-completion survey suggest that participants were generally satisfied with the online process. Compared to participants in smaller panels, those in larger panels were more likely to agree that they had debated each others' view points. Conclusion It is feasible to conduct online expert panels intended to facilitate consensus finding among geographically distributed participants. The online approach may be practical for engaging large and diverse groups of stakeholders around a range of health services research topics and can help conduct multiple parallel panels to test for the reproducibility of panel conclusions. PMID:22196011

  16. Revenues and Expenditures for Public Elementary and Secondary Education: School Year 2006-07 (Fiscal Year 2007): First Look. NCES 2009-337

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhou, Lei

    2009-01-01

    This report presents findings on public education revenues and expenditures using fiscal year 2007 (FY 07) data from the National Public Education Financial Survey (NPEFS) of the Common Core of Data (CCD) survey system. Programs covered in the NPEFS include regular, special, and vocational education; charter schools that reported data to the state…

  17. Out-of-Pocket Expenditure on Chronic Non-Communicable Diseases in Sub-Saharan Africa: The Case of Rural Malawi

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qun; Fu, Alex Z.; Brenner, Stephan; Kalmus, Olivier; Banda, Hastings Thomas; De Allegri, Manuela

    2015-01-01

    In Sub-Saharan Africa (SSA) the disease burden of chronic non-communicable diseases (CNCDs) is rising considerably. Given weaknesses in existing financial arrangements across SSA, expenditure on CNCDs is often borne directly by patients through out-of-pocket (OOP) payments. This study explored patterns and determinants of OOP expenditure on CNCDs in Malawi. We used data from the first round of a longitudinal household health survey conducted in 2012 on a sample of 1199 households in three rural districts in Malawi. We used a two-part model to analyze determinants of OOP expenditure on CNCDs. 475 respondents reported at least one CNCD. More than 60% of the 298 individuals who reported seeking care incurred OOP expenditure. The amount of OOP expenditure on CNCDs comprised 22% of their monthly per capita household expenditure. The poorer the household, the higher proportion of their monthly per capita household expenditure was spent on CNCDs. Higher severity of disease was significantly associated with an increased likelihood of incurring OOP expenditure. Use of formal care was negatively associated with the possibility of incurring OOP expenditure. The following factors were positively associated with the amount of OOP expenditure: being female, Alomwe and household head, longer duration of disease, CNCDs targeted through active screening programs, higher socio-economic status, household head being literate, using formal care, and fewer household members living with a CNCD within a household. Our study showed that, in spite of a context where care for CNCDs should in principle be available free of charge at point of use, OOP payments impose a considerable financial burden on rural households, especially among the poorest. This suggests the existence of important gaps in financial protection in the current coverage policy. PMID:25584960

  18. Determinants of Medical and Health Care Expenditure Growth for Urban Residents in China: A Systematic Review Article

    PubMed Central

    ZHU, Xiaolong; CAI, Qiong; WANG, Jin; LIU, Yun

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, medical and health care consumption has risen, making health risk an important determinant of household spending and welfare. We aimed to examine the determinants of medical and health care expenditure to help policy-makers in the improvement of China’s health care system, benefiting the country, society and every household. This paper employs panel data from China’s provinces from 2001 to 2011 with all possible economic variations and studies the determinants of medical and healthcare expenditure for urban residents. CPI (consumer price index) of medical services and the resident consumption level of urban residents have positive influence on medical and health care expenditures for urban residents, while the local medical budget, the number of health institutions, the incidence of infectious diseases, the year-end population and the savings of urban residents will not have effect on medical and health care expenditure for urban residents. This paper proposed three relevant policy suggestions for Chinese governments based on the findings of the research. PMID:26171351

  19. Payload advisory panel recommendations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Berrien, III

    1991-01-01

    The Payload Advisory Panel proposes a restructured Earth Observing System (EOS) mission to address high-priority science and environmental policy issues in Earth System Science. These issues have been identified through studies conducted by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), and the Committee on Earth and Environmental Sciences (CEES). The restructured EOS defers efforts to improve the understanding of the middle and upper stratosphere and solid earth geophysics. The strategy of the mission combines high priority new measurements with continuation of critical data sets begun by missions which precede EOS. Collaborative arrangements with international partners are an essential part of the program and additional arrangements are posed. The need for continuity in Earth observations and the urgency of environmental questions require launch of some EOS elements as soon as possible. They further require maintenance of the EOS objective of obtaining consistent 15-year measurement records.

  20. Medical Physics Panel Discussion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guèye, Paul; Avery, Steven; Baird, Richard; Soares, Christopher; Amols, Howard; Tripuraneni, Prabhakar; Majewski, Stan; Weisenberger, Drew

    2006-03-01

    The panel discussion will explore opportunities and vistas in medical physics research and practice, medical imaging, teaching medical physics to undergraduates, and medical physics curricula as a recruiting tool for physics departments. Panel members consist of representatives from NSBP (Paul Guèye and Steven Avery), NIH/NIBIB (Richard Baird), NIST (Christopher Soares), AAPM (Howard Amols), ASTRO (Prabhakar Tripuraneni), and Jefferson Lab (Stan Majewski and Drew Weisenberger). Medical Physicists are part of Departments of Radiation Oncology at hospitals and medical centers. The field of medical physics includes radiation therapy physics, medical diagnostic and imaging physics, nuclear medicine physics, and medical radiation safety. It also ranges from basic researcher (at college institutions, industries, and laboratories) to applications in clinical environments.

  1. Clinical Space Medicine Panel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baisden, Denise L.; Billica, Roger (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The practice of space medicine is diverse. It includes routine preventive medical care of astronauts and pilots, the development of inflight medical capability and training of flight crews as well as the preflight, inflight, and postflight medical assessment and monitoring. The Johnson Space Center Medical Operations Branch is a leader in the practice of space medicine. The papers presented in this panel will demonstrate some of the unique aspects of space medicine.

  2. Heat pipe thermal conditioning panel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saaski, E. W.; Loose, J. D.; Mccoy, K. E.

    1974-01-01

    Thermal control of electronic hardware and experiments on future space vehicles is critical to proper functioning and long life. Thermal conditioning panels (cold plates) are a baseline control technique in current conceptual studies. Heat generating components mounted on the panels are typically cooled by fluid flowing through integral channels within the panel. However, replacing the pumped fluid coolant loop within the panel with heat pipes offers attractive advantages in weight, reliability, and installation. This report describes the development and fabrication of two large 0.76 x 0.76 m heat pipe thermal conditioning panels to verify performance and establish the design concept.

  3. Lightweight, Thermally Insulating Structural Panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eisen, Howard J.; Hickey, Gregory; Wen, Liang-Chi; Layman, William E.; Rainen, Richard A.; Birur, Gajanana C.

    1996-01-01

    Lightweight, thermally insulating panels that also serve as structural members developed. Honeycomb-core panel filled with low-thermal-conductivity, opacified silica aerogel preventing convection and minimizes internal radiation. Copper coating on face sheets reduces radiation. Overall thermal conductivities of panels smaller than state-of-art commercial non-structurally-supporting foam and fibrous insulations. On Earth, panels suitable for use in low-air-pressure environments in which lightweight, compact, structurally supporting insulation needed; for example, aboard high-altitude aircraft or in partially evacuated panels in refrigerators.

  4. Aerospace Safety Advisory Panel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    This Annual Report of the Aerospace Safety Advisory Panel (ASAP) presents results of activities during calendar year 2001. The year was marked by significant achievements in the Space Shuttle and International Space Station (ISS) programs and encouraging accomplishments by the Aerospace Technology Enterprise. Unfortunately, there were also disquieting mishaps with the X-43, a LearJet, and a wind tunnel. Each mishap was analyzed in an orderly process to ascertain causes and derive lessons learned. Both these accomplishments and the responses to the mishaps led the Panel to conclude that safety and risk management is currently being well served within NASA. NASA's operations evidence high levels of safety consciousness and sincere efforts to place safety foremost. Nevertheless, the Panel's safety concerns have never been greater. This dichotomy has arisen because the focus of most NASA programs has been directed toward program survival rather than effective life cycle planning. Last year's Annual Report focused on the need for NASA to adopt a realistically long planning horizon for the aging Space Shuttle so that safety would not erode. NASA's response to the report concurred with this finding. Nevertheless, there has been a greater emphasis on current operations to the apparent detriment of long-term planning. Budget cutbacks and shifts in priorities have severely limited the resources available to the Space Shuttle and ISS for application to risk-reduction and life-extension efforts. As a result, funds originally intended for long-term safety-related activities have been used for operations. Thus, while safety continues to be well served at present, the basis for future safety has eroded. Section II of this report develops this theme in more detail and presents several important, overarching findings and recommendations that apply to many if not all of NASA's programs. Section III of the report presents other significant findings, recommendations and supporting

  5. Large thermal protection system panel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Myers, Franklin K. (Inventor); Weinberg, David J. (Inventor); Tran, Tu T. (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    A protective panel for a reusable launch vehicle provides enhanced moisture protection, simplified maintenance, and increased temperature resistance. The protective panel includes an outer ceramic matrix composite (CMC) panel, and an insulative bag assembly coupled to the outer CMC panel for isolating the launch vehicle from elevated temperatures and moisture. A standoff attachment system attaches the outer CMC panel and the bag assembly to the primary structure of the launch vehicle. The insulative bag assembly includes a foil bag having a first opening shrink fitted to the outer CMC panel such that the first opening and the outer CMC panel form a water tight seal at temperatures below a desired temperature threshold. Fibrous insulation is contained within the foil bag for protecting the launch vehicle from elevated temperatures. The insulative bag assembly further includes a back panel coupled to a second opening of the foil bag such that the fibrous insulation is encapsulated by the back panel, the foil bag, and the outer CMC panel. The use of a CMC material for the outer panel in conjunction with the insulative bag assembly eliminates the need for waterproofing processes, and ultimately allows for more efficient reentry profiles.

  6. Development of Quiet Honeycomb Panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palumbo, Daniel L.; Klos, Jacob

    2009-01-01

    Sandwich honeycomb composite panels are lightweight and strong, and, therefore, provide a reasonable alternative to the aluminum ring framelstringer architecture currently used for most aircraft airframes. The drawback to honeycomb panels is that they radiate noise into the aircraft cabin very efficiently provoking the need for additional sound treatment which adds weight and reduces the material's cost advantage. A series of honeycomb panels were made which incorporated different design strategies aimed at reducing the honeycomb panels' radiation efficiency while at the same time maintaining its strength. The majority of the desi gns were centered around the concept of creatin g areas of reduced stiffness in the panel by adding voids and recesses to the core. The effort culminated with a reinforced./recessed panel which had 6 dB higher transmission loss than the baseline solid core panel while maintaining comparable strength.

  7. MEDICAL EXPENDITURE RISK AND HOUSEHOLD PORTFOLIO CHOICE

    PubMed Central

    Goldman, Dana

    2013-01-01

    Medical expenses are an increasingly important contributor to household financial risk. We examine the effect of medical expenditure risk on the willingness of Medicare beneficiaries to hold risky assets. Using a discrete factor maximum likelihood method to address the endogeneity of insurance choices, we find that having a moderately protective Medigap or employer supplemental policy increases risky asset holding by 7.1 percentage points relative to those without supplemental coverage, while participation in a highly protective Medicare HMO increases risky asset holding by 13.0 percentage points. Our results highlight an important link between the availability of health insurance and financial behavior. PMID:23997424

  8. National health expenditures projections through 2030

    PubMed Central

    Burner, Sally T.; Waldo, Daniel R.; McKusick, David R.

    1992-01-01

    If current laws and practices continue, health expenditures in the United States will reach $1.7 trillion by the year 2000, an amount equal to 18.1 percent of the Nation's gross domestic product (GDP). By the year 2030, as America's baby boomers enter their seventies and eighties, health spending will top $16 trillion, or 32 percent of GDP. The projections presented here incorporate the assumptions and conclusions of the Medicare trustees in their 1992 report to Congress on the status of Medicare, and the 1992 President's budget estimates of Medicaid outlays. PMID:10124432

  9. Measuring the relationship between sportfishing trip expenditures and anglers’ species preferences

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Long, James M.; Melstrom, Richard T.

    2016-01-01

    We examined the relationship between fishing trip expenditures and anglers’ species preferences from a survey of Oklahoma resident anglers conducted in 2014. Understanding patterns in fishing trip expenditures is important because a significant share of state wildlife agency revenue comes from taxes on purchases of fishing equipment. Presently, there is little research that addresses the question of how spending levels vary within groups of sportspersons, including anglers. We used regression analysis to identify a relationship between trip spending and several preference variables, and included controls for other characteristics of fishing trips, such as location, party size, and duration. We received 780 surveys for a response rate of 26%, but only 506 were useable due to missing data or nonfishing responses. Average trip expenditures were approximately US$140, regardless of species preferences, but anglers who preferred to fish for trout and black bass tended to spend more than those who preferred to fish for catfish and panfish. These results were even more pronounced when location was considered, those who last fished at lakes spending more than those who fished at rivers or ponds. The results underscore the differences in spending among anglers with different preferred species and fishing locations.

  10. Household energy and consumption and expenditures, 1990. Supplement, Regional

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-03-02

    The purpose of this supplement to the Household Energy Consumption and Expenditures 1990 report is to provide information on the use of energy in residential housing units, specifically at the four Census regions and nine Census division levels. This report includes household energy consumption, expenditures, and prices for natural gas, electricity, fuel oil, liquefied petroleum gas (LPG), and kerosene as well as household wood consumption. For national-level data, see the main report, Household Energy Consumption and Expenditures 1990.

  11. Cost Sharing, Health Care Expenditures, and Utilization: An International Comparison.

    PubMed

    Perkowski, Patryk; Rodberg, Leonard

    2016-01-01

    Health systems implement cost sharing to help reduce health care expenditure and utilization by discouraging the use of unnecessary health care services. We examine cost sharing in 28 countries in the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development from 1999 through 2009 in the areas of medical care, hospital care, and pharmaceuticals. We investigate associations between cost sharing, health care expenditures, and health care utilization and find no significant association between cost sharing and health care expenditures or utilization in these countries.

  12. Attitudes toward Education Expenditures in Japan: Comparisons with Social Security and Welfare Services Expenditures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nakazawa, Wataru

    2015-01-01

    This paper examines people's attitudes toward public spending on education in Japan. It is well known that Japan has the smallest public education expenditure relative to GDP among the OECD countries, and this may yield unequal opportunities in education. The tax burden in Japan is small compared to those in OECD countries, and there may be no…

  13. 76 FR 50887 - Elections Regarding Start-Up Expenditures, Corporation Organizational Expenditures, and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-17

    ... Register (73 FR 38910). A notice of proposed rulemaking (REG-164965-04) cross- referencing the temporary regulations was published in the Federal Register (73 FR 38940) on the same day. One written comment... Internal Revenue Service 26 CFR Part 1 RIN 1545-BE77 Elections Regarding Start-Up Expenditures,...

  14. Household out-of-pocket medical expenditures and national health insurance in Taiwan: income and regional inequality

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Tu-Bin; Liu, Tsai-Ching; Chen, Chin-Shyan; Tsai, Yi-Wen; Chiu, Wen-Ta

    2005-01-01

    Background Unequal geographical distribution of medical care resources and insufficient healthcare coverage have been two long-standing problems with Taiwan's public health system. The implementation of National Health Insurance (NHI) attempted to mitigate the inequality in health care use. This study examines the degree to which Taiwan's National Health Insurance (NHI) has reduced out-of-pocket medical expenditures in households in different regions and varying levels of income. Methods Data used in this study were drawn from the 1994 and 1996 Surveys of Family Income and Expenditure. We pooled the data from 1994 and 1996 and included a year dummy variable (NHI), equal to 1 if the household data came from 1996 in order to assess the impact of NHI on household out-of-pocket medical care expenditures shortly after its implementation in 1995. Results An individual who was older, female, married, unemployed, better educated, richer, head of a larger family household, or living in the central and eastern areas was more likely to have greater household out-of-pocket medical expenditures. NHI was found to have effectively reduced household out-of-pocket medical expenditures by 23.08%, particularly for more affluent households. With the implementation of NHI, lower and middle income quintiles had smaller decreases in out-of-pocket medical expenditure. NHI was also found to have reduced household out-of-pocket medical expenditures more for households in eastern Taiwan. Conclusion Although NHI was established to create free medical care for all, further effort is needed to reduce the medical costs for certain disadvantaged groups, particularly the poor and aborigines, if equality is to be achieved. PMID:16137336

  15. Effect of Health Information Technology Expenditure on Patient Level Cost

    PubMed Central

    Dowd, Bryan

    2013-01-01

    Objectives This study investigate the effect of health information technology (IT) expenditure on individual patient-level cost using California Office of Statewide Health Planning and Development (OSHPD) data obtained from 2000 to 2007. Methods We used a traditional cost function and applied hospital fixed effect and clustered error within hospitals. Results We found that a quadratic function of IT expenditure best fit the data. The quadratic function in IT expenditure predicts a decrease in cost of up to US$1,550 of IT labor per bed, US$27,909 of IT capital per bed, and US$28,695 of all IT expenditure per bed. Moreover, we found that IT expenditure reduced costs more quickly in medical conditions than surgical diseases. Conclusions Interest in health IT is increasing more than ever before. Many studies examined the effect of health IT on hospital level cost. However, there have been few studies to examine the relationship between health IT expenditure and individual patient-level cost. We found that IT expenditure was associated with patient cost. In particular, we found a quadratic relationship between IT expenditure and patient-level cost. In other word, patient-level cost is non-linearly (or a polynomial of second-order degree) related to IT expenditure. PMID:24175120

  16. The Motives of Intergenerational Transfer to the Elderly Parents in China: Consequences of High Medical Expenditure

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Xiaoyu; Li, Lixing

    2014-01-01

    The support for the elderly is facing big challenges with the problem of population aging. Transfers from adult children could partly insure elderly parents against low income and high medical expenditure. There are two main motives for transfers in the literature, namely altruism and exchange. Using data from a new household survey of people aged 45 and above in China, we estimate the transfer derivatives with the adjustment of medical expenditure in elderly parents’ income. We find a large negative impact of adjusted income on transfers at the lower end of income distribution, which is consistent with the altruistic motive. Evidence on the exchange motive is found only for sons, but not for daughters. In addition, there is evidence on the “exchange-for-service” motive, which interprets transfer as a payment to parents’ family services, such as taking care of grandchildren. PMID:23681718

  17. Performance and energy expenditure in cold environments.

    PubMed

    Rintamäki, Hannu

    2007-01-01

    This paper reviews the associations between physical performance and energy expenditure in cold environments. The basic question in cold is how to maintain adequate thermal insulation without marked cold or heat strain and with minimal impairment on physical performance. 24-hour energy expenditure is increased by 105-156 kJ when ambient temperature decreases by 1 degrees C either due to increased clothing, lowered body temperatures or environmental conditions like snow, ice or darkness. Clothing and other protective garments decrease performance due to the weight, bulkiness and friction, and by covering body areas which are important for sensory functions. Each additional kg in clothing weight increases energy costs approximately by 3% and each additional layer by 4%. Increased energy costs are associated with a decrease in physical performance: the decrease is task specific, and roughly comparable to the changes in the energy costs. The decrement in performance can be minimized by decreasing clothing weight and bulkiness as well as the friction between the clothing layers as well as the number of clothing layers. Minimal friction is important in sites where large range of movements is expected like in trouser legs and sleeves of jackets. PMID:17929641

  18. Plate-fin panel heat exchanger and panel components thereof

    SciTech Connect

    Heronemus, W.E.

    1985-02-05

    A plate-fin panel for a heat exchanger may be either formed as an aluminum extrusion or fabricated from a corrugated metal sheet sandwiched between two flat metal sheets. The extruded aluminum version may be clad with protective sheet metal jackets made of, or coated with, a corrosion resistant Cu-Ni alloy. Individual panel sections can be joined together by tongue and groove engagement to obtain a total desired panel width if available extrusion press or rolling mill capacity is insufficient. The plate-fin panels are assembled into slotted headering plates, and a layer of synthetic plastics potting compound seals dissimilar metal joints against electrolytic corrosion as well as leakage and provides sufficient adhesive strength to reduce or eliminate the need for welding the panels to the headers. Mechanical brush or hydraulic jet apparatus is capable of continuously or intermittently cleaning slime or encrustations from all panel surfaces exposed to seawater.

  19. Heterogeneity in the effect of public health insurance on catastrophic out-of-pocket health expenditures: the case of Mexico.

    PubMed

    Grogger, Jeffrey; Arnold, Tamara; León, Ana Sofía; Ome, Alejandro

    2015-06-01

    Low- and middle-income countries increasingly provide broad-based public health coverage to their residents. One of the goals of such programmes is to reduce the extent to which beneficiaries incur catastrophic out-of-pocket expenditures on health care. A recent field experiment showed that on average Mexico's new public insurance programme reduced such expenditures in rural areas. Our reanalysis of that data, augmented with administrative data on health infrastructure, shows that this effect depends strongly on the type of health facility to which the beneficiary has access. A second analysis, based on data from Mexico's National Household Income and Expenditure Surveys (abbreviated ENIGH for its name in Spanish), substantiates those findings. It shows that catastrophic expenditures have fallen sharply for rural households with access to well-staffed facilities, but that they have fallen little if at all for rural households with access to poorly staffed facilities. Our analysis of the ENIGH also shows that Mexico's public health insurance programme has sharply reduced catastrophic spending among urban households. Considering that most Mexicans live either in urban areas or in rural areas with access to well-staffed facilities, our results show that the public health insurance programme has been largely successful in achieving one of its key goals. At the same time, our results show how difficult it can be to provide effective protection against catastrophic health expenditures for residents of remote rural areas. PMID:24924422

  20. Catastrophic household expenditure for health care in a low-income society: a study from Nouna District, Burkina Faso.

    PubMed Central

    Su, Tin Tin; Kouyaté, Bocar; Flessa, Steffen

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To quantify the extent of catastrophic household health care expenditure and determine the factors responsible for it in Nouna District, Burkina Faso. METHODS: We used the Nouna Health District Household Survey to collect data on 800 households during 2000-01 for our analysis. The determinants of household catastrophic expenditure were identified by multivariate logistic regression method. FINDINGS: Even at very low levels of health care utilization and modest amount of health expenditure, 6-15% of total households in Nouna District incurred catastrophic health expenditure. The key determinants of catastrophic health expenditure were economic status, household health care utilization especially for modern medical care, illness episodes in an adult household member and presence of a member with chronic illness. CONCLUSION: We conclude that the poorest members of the community incurred catastrophic health expenses. Setting only one threshold/cut-off value to determine catastrophic health expenses may result in inaccurate estimation leading to misinterpretation of important factors. Our findings have important policy implications and can be used to ensure better access to health services and a higher degree of financial protection for low-income groups against the economic impact of illness. PMID:16501711

  1. Aerospace Safety Advisory Panel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    This report covers the activities of the Aerospace Safety Advisory Panel (ASAP) for calendar year 1998-a year of sharp contrasts and significant successes at NASA. The year opened with the announcement of large workforce cutbacks. The slip in the schedule for launching the International Space Station (ISS) created a 5-month hiatus in Space Shuttle launches. This slack period ended with the successful and highly publicized launch of the STS-95 mission. As the year closed, ISS assembly began with the successful orbiting and joining of the Functional Cargo Block (FGB), Zarya, from Russia and the Unity Node from the United States. Throughout the year, the Panel maintained its scrutiny of NASAs safety processes. Of particular interest were the potential effects on safety of workforce reductions and the continued transition of functions to the Space Flight Operations Contractor. Attention was also given to the risk management plans of the Aero-Space Technology programs, including the X-33, X-34, and X-38. Overall, the Panel concluded that safety is well served for the present. The picture is not as clear for the future. Cutbacks have limited the depth of talent available. In many cases, technical specialties are "one deep." The extended hiring freeze has resulted in an older workforce that will inevitably suffer significant departures from retirements in the near future. The resulting "brain drain" could represent a future safety risk unless appropriate succession planning is started expeditiously. This and other topics are covered in the section addressing workforce. In the case of the Space Shuttle, beneficial and mandatory safety and operational upgrades are being delayed because of a lack of sufficient present funding. Likewise, the ISS has little flexibility to begin long lead-time items for upgrades or contingency planning.

  2. Photovoltaic panel clamp

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Malcolm P.; Mittan, Margaret Birmingham; Miros, Robert H. J.; Stancel, Robert

    2013-03-19

    A photovoltaic panel clamp includes an upper and lower section. The interface between the assembled clamp halves and the module edge is filled by a flexible gasket material, such as EPDM rubber. The gasket preferably has small, finger like protrusions that allow for easy insertion onto the module edge while being reversed makes it more difficult to remove them from the module once installed. The clamp includes mounting posts or an integral axle to engage a bracket. The clamp also may include a locking tongue to secure the clamp to a bracket.

  3. Photovoltaic panel clamp

    DOEpatents

    Mittan, Margaret Birmingham; Miros, Robert H. J.; Brown, Malcolm P.; Stancel, Robert

    2012-06-05

    A photovoltaic panel clamp includes an upper and lower section. The interface between the assembled clamp halves and the module edge is filled by a flexible gasket material, such as EPDM rubber. The gasket preferably has small, finger like protrusions that allow for easy insertion onto the module edge while being reversed makes it more difficult to remove them from the module once installed. The clamp includes mounting posts or an integral axle to engage a bracket. The clamp also may include a locking tongue to secure the clamp to a bracket.

  4. Aerospace Safety Advisory Panel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    The results of the Panel's activities are presented in a set of findings and recommendations. Highlighted here are both improvements in NASA's safety and reliability activities and specific areas where additional gains might be realized. One area of particular concern involves the curtailment or elimination of Space Shuttle safety and reliability enhancements. Several findings and recommendations address this area of concern, reflecting the opinion that safety and reliability enhancements are essential to the continued successful operation of the Space Shuttle. It is recommended that a comprehensive and continuing program of safety and reliability improvements in all areas of Space Shuttle hardware/software be considered an inherent component of ongoing Space Shuttle operations.

  5. Aerospace Safety Advisory Panel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    This report presents the results of the Aerospace Safety Advisory Panel (ASAP) activities during 2002. The format of the report has been modified to capture a long-term perspective. Section II is new and highlights the Panel's view of NASA's safety progress during the year. Section III contains the pivotal safety issues facing NASA in the coming year. Section IV includes the program area findings and recommendations. The Panel has been asked by the Administrator to perform several special studies this year, and the resulting white papers appear in Appendix C. The year has been filled with significant achievements for NASA in both successful Space Shuttle operations and International Space Station (ISS) construction. Throughout the year, safety has been first and foremost in spite of many changes throughout the Agency. The relocation of the Orbiter Major Modifications (OMMs) from California to Kennedy Space Center (KSC) appears very successful. The transition of responsibilities for program management of the Space Shuttle and ISS programs from Johnson Space Center (JSC) to NASA Headquarters went smoothly. The decision to extend the life of the Space Shuttle as the primary NASA vehicle for access to space is viewed by the Panel as a prudent one. With the appropriate investments in safety improvements, in maintenance, in preserving appropriate inventories of spare parts, and in infrastructure, the Space Shuttle can provide safe and reliable support for the ISS for the foreseeable future. Indications of an aging Space Shuttle fleet occurred on more than one occasion this year. Several flaws went undetected in the early prelaunch tests and inspections. In all but one case, the problems were found prior to launch. These incidents were all handled properly and with safety as the guiding principle. Indeed, launches were postponed until the problems were fully understood and mitigating action could be taken. These incidents do, however, indicate the need to analyze the

  6. Concentrating photovoltaic solar panel

    DOEpatents

    Cashion, Steven A; Bowser, Michael R; Farrelly, Mark B; Hines, Braden E; Holmes, Howard C; Johnson, Jr., Richard L; Russell, Richard J; Turk, Michael F

    2014-04-15

    The present invention relates to photovoltaic power systems, photovoltaic concentrator modules, and related methods. In particular, the present invention features concentrator modules having interior points of attachment for an articulating mechanism and/or an articulating mechanism that has a unique arrangement of chassis members so as to isolate bending, etc. from being transferred among the chassis members. The present invention also features adjustable solar panel mounting features and/or mounting features with two or more degrees of freedom. The present invention also features a mechanical fastener for secondary optics in a concentrator module.

  7. Microgap flat panel display

    DOEpatents

    Wuest, Craig R.

    1998-01-01

    A microgap flat panel display which includes a thin gas-filled display tube that utilizes switched X-Y "pixel" strips to trigger electron avalanches and activate a phosphor at a given location on a display screen. The panel utilizes the principal of electron multiplication in a gas subjected to a high electric field to provide sufficient electron current to activate standard luminescent phosphors located on an anode. The X-Y conductive strips of a few micron widths may for example, be deposited on opposite sides of a thin insulating substrate, or on one side of the adjacent substrates and function as a cathode. The X-Y strips are separated from the anode by a gap filled with a suitable gas. Electrical bias is selectively switched onto X and Y strips to activate a "pixel" in the region where these strips overlap. A small amount of a long-lived radioisotope is used to initiate an electron avalanche in the overlap region when bias is applied. The avalanche travels through the gas filled gap and activates a luminescent phosphor of a selected color. The bias is adjusted to give a proportional electron multiplication to control brightness for given pixel.

  8. Microgap flat panel display

    DOEpatents

    Wuest, C.R.

    1998-12-08

    A microgap flat panel display is disclosed which includes a thin gas-filled display tube that utilizes switched X-Y ``pixel`` strips to trigger electron avalanches and activate a phosphor at a given location on a display screen. The panel utilizes the principal of electron multiplication in a gas subjected to a high electric field to provide sufficient electron current to activate standard luminescent phosphors located on an anode. The X-Y conductive strips of a few micron widths may for example, be deposited on opposite sides of a thin insulating substrate, or on one side of the adjacent substrates and function as a cathode. The X-Y strips are separated from the anode by a gap filled with a suitable gas. Electrical bias is selectively switched onto X and Y strips to activate a ``pixel`` in the region where these strips overlap. A small amount of a long-lived radioisotope is used to initiate an electron avalanche in the overlap region when bias is applied. The avalanche travels through the gas filled gap and activates a luminescent phosphor of a selected color. The bias is adjusted to give a proportional electron multiplication to control brightness for given pixel. 6 figs.

  9. Solar panel parallel mounting configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mutschler, Jr., Edward Charles (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    A spacecraft includes a plurality of solar panels interconnected with a power coupler and an electrically operated device to provide power to the device when the solar cells are insolated. The solar panels are subject to bending distortion when entering or leaving eclipse. Spacecraft attitude disturbances are reduced by mounting each of the solar panels to an elongated boom made from a material with a low coefficient of thermal expansion, so that the bending of one panel is not communicated to the next. The boom may be insulated to reduce its bending during changes in insolation. A particularly advantageous embodiment mounts each panel to the boom with a single mounting, which may be a hinge. The single mounting prevents transfer of bending moments from the panel to the boom.

  10. Funding Survey. SY 89/90.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Townsend, Catherine M.

    This two-part report presents the results of a budget and funding sources survey of South Carolina library media center programs. In Part 1, survey results are presented for demographic information, staffing information, funding sources, funding amounts from specific sources, allocation of resources, and categories of expenditures. In Part 2, the…

  11. 42 CFR 35.66 - Expenditure of cash contributions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... EXAMINATIONS HOSPITAL AND STATION MANAGEMENT Contributions for the Benefit of Patients § 35.66 Expenditure of cash contributions. (a) Officials authorized to accept contributions shall not maintain control over... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Expenditure of cash contributions. 35.66 Section...

  12. 26 CFR 53.4945-1 - Taxes on taxable expenditures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...) MISCELLANEOUS EXCISE TAXES (CONTINUED) FOUNDATION AND SIMILAR EXCISE TAXES Taxes on Taxable Expenditures § 53.4945-1 Taxes on taxable expenditures. (a) Imposition of initial taxes—(1) Tax on private foundation... 4945(d)) of a private foundation. This tax is to be paid by the private foundation and is at the...

  13. 26 CFR 53.4945-1 - Taxes on taxable expenditures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...) MISCELLANEOUS EXCISE TAXES (CONTINUED) FOUNDATION AND SIMILAR EXCISE TAXES Taxes on Taxable Expenditures § 53.4945-1 Taxes on taxable expenditures. (a) Imposition of initial taxes—(1) Tax on private foundation... 4945(d)) of a private foundation. This tax is to be paid by the private foundation and is at the...

  14. 26 CFR 53.4945-1 - Taxes on taxable expenditures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...) MISCELLANEOUS EXCISE TAXES (CONTINUED) FOUNDATION AND SIMILAR EXCISE TAXES Taxes on Taxable Expenditures § 53.4945-1 Taxes on taxable expenditures. (a) Imposition of initial taxes—(1) Tax on private foundation... 4945(d)) of a private foundation. This tax is to be paid by the private foundation and is at the...

  15. 26 CFR 53.4945-1 - Taxes on taxable expenditures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...) MISCELLANEOUS EXCISE TAXES (CONTINUED) FOUNDATION AND SIMILAR EXCISE TAXES Taxes on Taxable Expenditures § 53.4945-1 Taxes on taxable expenditures. (a) Imposition of initial taxes—(1) Tax on private foundation... 4945(d)) of a private foundation. This tax is to be paid by the private foundation and is at the...

  16. 25 CFR 214.13 - Diligence; annual expenditures; mining records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Diligence; annual expenditures; mining records. 214.13... OSAGE RESERVATION LANDS, OKLAHOMA, FOR MINING, EXCEPT OIL AND GAS § 214.13 Diligence; annual expenditures; mining records. (a) Lessees shall exercise diligence in the conduct of prospecting and...

  17. 25 CFR 214.13 - Diligence; annual expenditures; mining records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Diligence; annual expenditures; mining records. 214.13... OSAGE RESERVATION LANDS, OKLAHOMA, FOR MINING, EXCEPT OIL AND GAS § 214.13 Diligence; annual expenditures; mining records. (a) Lessees shall exercise diligence in the conduct of prospecting and...

  18. 25 CFR 214.13 - Diligence; annual expenditures; mining records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Diligence; annual expenditures; mining records. 214.13... OSAGE RESERVATION LANDS, OKLAHOMA, FOR MINING, EXCEPT OIL AND GAS § 214.13 Diligence; annual expenditures; mining records. (a) Lessees shall exercise diligence in the conduct of prospecting and...

  19. 25 CFR 214.13 - Diligence; annual expenditures; mining records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2012-04-01 2011-04-01 true Diligence; annual expenditures; mining records. 214.13... OSAGE RESERVATION LANDS, OKLAHOMA, FOR MINING, EXCEPT OIL AND GAS § 214.13 Diligence; annual expenditures; mining records. (a) Lessees shall exercise diligence in the conduct of prospecting and...

  20. 25 CFR 214.13 - Diligence; annual expenditures; mining records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Diligence; annual expenditures; mining records. 214.13... OSAGE RESERVATION LANDS, OKLAHOMA, FOR MINING, EXCEPT OIL AND GAS § 214.13 Diligence; annual expenditures; mining records. (a) Lessees shall exercise diligence in the conduct of prospecting and...

  1. 11 CFR 9034.7 - Allocation of travel expenditures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... required by 11 CFR 100.93(j)(1) in addition to any other documentation required in this section. For travel... 11 Federal Elections 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Allocation of travel expenditures. 9034.7...: PRESIDENTIAL PRIMARY MATCHING FUND ENTITLEMENTS § 9034.7 Allocation of travel expenditures. Link to...

  2. Predicting Significant Reductions in Instructional Expenditures by School Districts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trussel, John M.; Patrick, Patricia A.

    2012-01-01

    This article uses survival analysis to investigate the symptoms of fiscal distress that can lead to significant reductions in instructional expenditures by independent public school districts in the United States. We hypothesize that the likelihood of significant reductions in instructional expenditures is positively correlated with revenue…

  3. 26 CFR 56.4911-4 - Exempt purpose expenditures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... described in § 1.501(h)-2(b) to an organization not described in section 501(c)(3) that meets the following... 501(h) in 1981. For 1981, X had the following expenditures that are included in its exempt purpose...,000 320,000 Note: For 1981, X's exempt purpose expenditures total $320,000. The $35,000 paid by X to...

  4. 26 CFR 56.4911-4 - Exempt purpose expenditures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... described in § 1.501(h)-2(b) to an organization not described in section 501(c)(3) that meets the following... 501(h) in 1981. For 1981, X had the following expenditures that are included in its exempt purpose...,000 320,000 Note: For 1981, X's exempt purpose expenditures total $320,000. The $35,000 paid by X to...

  5. 11 CFR 9034.7 - Allocation of travel expenditures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... traveling for campaign purposes. (ii) If the trips is by non-charter commercial transportation, the actual... the provisions of 11 CFR 106.3, expenditures for travel relating to the campaign of a candidate... by the candidate's authorized committee(s) as expenditures. (b)(1) For a trip which is...

  6. 11 CFR 9034.7 - Allocation of travel expenditures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... traveling for campaign purposes. (ii) If the trips is by non-charter commercial transportation, the actual... the provisions of 11 CFR 106.3, expenditures for travel relating to the campaign of a candidate... by the candidate's authorized committee(s) as expenditures. (b)(1) For a trip which is...

  7. 11 CFR 9034.7 - Allocation of travel expenditures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... traveling for campaign purposes. (ii) If the trips is by non-charter commercial transportation, the actual... the provisions of 11 CFR 106.3, expenditures for travel relating to the campaign of a candidate... by the candidate's authorized committee(s) as expenditures. (b)(1) For a trip which is...

  8. 11 CFR 9004.7 - Allocation of travel expenditures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... travel expenditures. (a) Notwithstanding the provisions of 11 CFR 106.3, expenditures for travel relating...-commercial travel, as defined in 11 CFR 100.93(a)(3)(v), on aircraft, and travel on other means of... government entity an amount equal to the applicable rate set forth in 11 CFR 100.93(e). (ii) (iii) If...

  9. 34 CFR 200.60 - Expenditures for professional development.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Expenditures for professional development. 200.60... Paraprofessionals § 200.60 Expenditures for professional development. (a)(1) Except as provided in paragraph (a)(2... professional development activities to ensure that teachers and paraprofessionals meet the requirements...

  10. 18 CFR 367.54 - Expenditures on leased property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Expenditures on leased property. 367.54 Section 367.54 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY... ACT Service Company Property Instructions § 367.54 Expenditures on leased property. (a) The cost...

  11. Estimating Energy Expenditure with the RT3 Triaxial Accelerometer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maddison, Ralph; Jiang, Yannan; Vander Hoorn, Stephen; Mhurchu, Cliona Ni; Lawes, Carlene M. M.; Rodgers, Anthony; Rush, Elaine

    2009-01-01

    The RT3 is a relatively new triaxial accelerometer that has replaced the TriTrac. The aim of this study was to validate the RT3 against doubly labeled water (DLW) in a free-living, mixed weight sample of adults. Total energy expenditure (TEE) was measured over a 15-day period using DLW. Activity-related energy expenditure (AEE) was estimated by…

  12. Tax Increment Financing and Education Expenditures: The Case of Iowa

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nguyen-Hoang, Phuong

    2014-01-01

    This is the first study to directly examine the relationship between tax increment financing (TIF) and education expenditures, using the state of Iowa as a case study. I find that greater use of TIF is associated with reduced education expenditures. I also find little evidence to support the commonly held proposition that school spending increases…

  13. 26 CFR 1.528-6 - Expenditure test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 7 2014-04-01 2013-04-01 true Expenditure test. 1.528-6 Section 1.528-6 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Homeowners Associations § 1.528-6 Expenditure test. (a) In general....

  14. 26 CFR 1.616-1 - Development expenditures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Natural Resources § 1.616-1 Development expenditures. (a) General rule. Section... taxpayer for the development of a mine or other natural deposit (other than an oil or gas well... natural deposit. Under section 616(b), the taxpayer may elect to defer development expenditures made...

  15. 25 CFR 700.189 - Expenditure of replacement home benefits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Expenditure of replacement home benefits. 700.189 Section 700.189 Indians THE OFFICE OF NAVAJO AND HOPI INDIAN RELOCATION COMMISSION OPERATIONS AND RELOCATION PROCEDURES Replacement Housing Payments § 700.189 Expenditure of replacement home benefits. Replacement...

  16. 26 CFR 53.4955-1 - Tax on political expenditures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 17 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Tax on political expenditures. 53.4955-1... Tax on political expenditures. (a) Relationship between section 4955 excise taxes and substantive... section 501(c)(3) only if it does not participate or intervene in any political campaign on behalf of...

  17. 26 CFR 53.4955-1 - Tax on political expenditures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 17 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Tax on political expenditures. 53.4955-1... Tax on political expenditures. (a) Relationship between section 4955 excise taxes and substantive... section 501(c)(3) only if it does not participate or intervene in any political campaign on behalf of...

  18. 26 CFR 53.4955-1 - Tax on political expenditures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 17 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Tax on political expenditures. 53.4955-1... Tax on political expenditures. (a) Relationship between section 4955 excise taxes and substantive... section 501(c)(3) only if it does not participate or intervene in any political campaign on behalf of...

  19. 26 CFR 53.4955-1 - Tax on political expenditures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 17 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Tax on political expenditures. 53.4955-1... Tax on political expenditures. (a) Relationship between section 4955 excise taxes and substantive... section 501(c)(3) only if it does not participate or intervene in any political campaign on behalf of...

  20. International Comparisons of Expenditures for Education. Indicator of the Month.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Center for Education Statistics (ED), Washington, DC.

    This document provides statistical information and a brief narrative analysis of public and private expenditures on education institutions for all of the G-7 countries. The G-7 countries are: Canada, France, Japan, Germany, Italy, United Kingdom, and the United States. Statistical tables reveal the public and private expenditures on education…

  1. 25 CFR 700.189 - Expenditure of replacement home benefits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Expenditure of replacement home benefits. 700.189 Section... PROCEDURES Replacement Housing Payments § 700.189 Expenditure of replacement home benefits. Replacement home... maximum replacement home benefit. (b) All replacement home benefits shall be expended not later than...

  2. 25 CFR 700.189 - Expenditure of replacement home benefits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Expenditure of replacement home benefits. 700.189 Section... PROCEDURES Replacement Housing Payments § 700.189 Expenditure of replacement home benefits. Replacement home... maximum replacement home benefit. (b) All replacement home benefits shall be expended not later than...

  3. 26 CFR 1.615-1 - Pre-1970 exploration expenditures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 7 2011-04-01 2009-04-01 true Pre-1970 exploration expenditures. 1.615-1 Section 1.615-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Natural Resources § 1.615-1 Pre-1970 exploration expenditures. (a) General rule. Section 615 prescribes...

  4. 26 CFR 1.617-3 - Recapture of exploration expenditures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 7 2011-04-01 2009-04-01 true Recapture of exploration expenditures. 1.617-3 Section 1.617-3 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Natural Resources § 1.617-3 Recapture of exploration expenditures. (a) In general. (1)(i) Except...

  5. 26 CFR 1.615-1 - Pre-1970 exploration expenditures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Natural Resources § 1.615-1 Pre-1970 exploration expenditures... the development stage of the mine or other natural deposit. Such expenditures hereinafter in the... mine or other natural deposit will be deemed to begin at the time when, in consideration of all...

  6. Health expenditures in Latin America and the Caribbean.

    PubMed

    Govindaraj, R; Chellaraj, G; Murray, C J

    1997-01-01

    This paper presents the results of a study commissioned by the Latin American and Caribbean Technical Department of the World Bank to document and analyze health expenditures in Latin America and the Caribbean. In 1990, the countries of this region spent US$ 69 billion on health, with an average per capita health expenditure of US$ 162. On average, the countries spent 6.2% of their GDP on health, with the expenditures divided about equally between the public and private sectors. In both the public and private sectors, per capita health expenditures were positively and significantly correlated with per capita income. However, this relationship holds only for the public sector, when health expenditures are measured as a proportion of GDP. While several poorer countries were dependent on external assistance, with increasing income, the countries relied more on public expenditures to finance health care. Based on the limited time series data, it is evident that there was a considerable variation among countries regarding the proportion spent on capital investments, primary health care, and drugs, but not on salaries. Looking ahead, with increasing economic development, the proportion of GDP spent on health, along with public health expenditure as a proportion of total health expenditure, is likely to increase rapidly, while aid dependency is likely to decline. PMID:9015869

  7. 42 CFR 457.230 - FFP for State ADP expenditures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... (CONTINUED) STATE CHILDREN'S HEALTH INSURANCE PROGRAMS (SCHIPs) ALLOTMENTS AND GRANTS TO STATES General... ADP expenditures for the design, development, or installation of mechanized claims processing and... procedures regarding the availability of FFP for ADP expenditures are in 45 CFR part 74, 45 CFR part...

  8. Municipal Overburden: Its Influence on Education Expenditures in Cities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brazer, Harvey E.; McCarty, Therese A.

    The study reported in this document found no evidence for the minicipal overburden (m/o) hypothesis of urban school finance. The theory asserts that there is a causal relationship between high levels of non-school municipal expenditure or tax rates and low levels of school spending. Demand for expenditure on education in a sample of school…

  9. 42 CFR 457.740 - State expenditures and statistical reports.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false State expenditures and statistical reports. 457.740... Strategic Planning, Reporting, and Evaluation § 457.740 State expenditures and statistical reports. (a... and statistical data no later than 30 days after the end of each quarter of the Federal fiscal year....

  10. 42 CFR 457.740 - State expenditures and statistical reports.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false State expenditures and statistical reports. 457.740... Strategic Planning, Reporting, and Evaluation § 457.740 State expenditures and statistical reports. (a... and statistical data no later than 30 days after the end of each quarter of the Federal fiscal year....

  11. Health expenditures in Latin America and the Caribbean.

    PubMed

    Govindaraj, R; Chellaraj, G; Murray, C J

    1997-01-01

    This paper presents the results of a study commissioned by the Latin American and Caribbean Technical Department of the World Bank to document and analyze health expenditures in Latin America and the Caribbean. In 1990, the countries of this region spent US$ 69 billion on health, with an average per capita health expenditure of US$ 162. On average, the countries spent 6.2% of their GDP on health, with the expenditures divided about equally between the public and private sectors. In both the public and private sectors, per capita health expenditures were positively and significantly correlated with per capita income. However, this relationship holds only for the public sector, when health expenditures are measured as a proportion of GDP. While several poorer countries were dependent on external assistance, with increasing income, the countries relied more on public expenditures to finance health care. Based on the limited time series data, it is evident that there was a considerable variation among countries regarding the proportion spent on capital investments, primary health care, and drugs, but not on salaries. Looking ahead, with increasing economic development, the proportion of GDP spent on health, along with public health expenditure as a proportion of total health expenditure, is likely to increase rapidly, while aid dependency is likely to decline.

  12. Visualization-based medical expenditure analysis support system.

    PubMed

    Toyoda, Shuichi; Niki, Noboru

    2015-08-01

    Japanese municipalities have recently been required to decrease their medical expenditure, which has been expanding as a result of an increasing number of patients with chronic diseases. We attempted to visualize insurance claim data to support medical expenditure analysis for insurers or local government (e.g. cities, towns and villages). We introduce two perspectives for the visualization of medical expenditure data: the general perspective approach to understanding overall medical expenditure and the specific perspective approach focused on particular issues such as lifestyle-related diseases. We have created the visual primitives, which enables interactive visualization for very large datasets, from raw insurance claim data. This system uses hypertext markup language and Data-driven Documents and provides analysis support for a comprehensive understanding of overall medical expenditure and comparisons between municipalities over time. PMID:26736580

  13. Thyroid Hormone Mediated Modulation of Energy Expenditure

    PubMed Central

    Vaitkus, Janina A.; Farrar, Jared S.; Celi, Francesco S.

    2015-01-01

    Thyroid hormone (TH) has diverse effects on mitochondria and energy expenditure (EE), generating great interest and research effort into understanding and harnessing these actions for the amelioration and treatment of metabolic disorders, such as obesity and diabetes. Direct effects on ATP utilization are a result of TH’s actions on metabolic cycles and increased cell membrane ion permeability. However, the majority of TH induced EE is thought to be a result of indirect effects, which, in turn, increase capacity for EE. This review discusses the direct actions of TH on EE, and places special emphasis on the indirect actions of TH, which include mitochondrial biogenesis and reduced metabolic efficiency through mitochondrial uncoupling mechanisms. TH analogs and the metabolic actions of T2 are also discussed in the context of targeted modulation of EE. Finally, clinical correlates of TH actions on metabolism are briefly presented. PMID:26193258

  14. National patterns of energy demand and expenditures by Hispanics

    SciTech Connect

    Poyer, D.A.

    1987-01-01

    This paper is based on ongoing research, at Argonne National Laboratory, being done for the Office of Minority Economic Impact (MI) of the US Department of Energy. Under its legislative mandate MI is required to assess the impact of government policy, programs, and actions on US minorities. In line with this mission Argonne is currently involved in characterizing and analyzing the patterns of energy demand and expenditures of minorities. A major barrier associated with this task is the availability of sufficient data. With the possible exception of blacks, analysis of the patterns of energy demand for most minority population categories is all but impossible because of small sample sizes. The major source of residential energy consumption data, the Residential Energy Consumption Survey, only collects data on 5000 to 7000 households. For many minority population categories, this number of observations make any meaningful statistical analysis at least at the regional Census level practically impossible, with any further refinement of the analysis becoming even more difficult. In this paper our primary purpose is to describe the patterns of energy demand for Hispanics and nonhispanics but ancillary to that briefly present one possible solution to the data availability problem.

  15. 76 FR 8368 - Price Index Adjustments for Contribution and Expenditure Limits and Lobbyist Bundling Disclosure...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-14

    ... Price Index Adjustments for Contribution and Expenditure Limits and Lobbyist Bundling Disclosure Threshold AGENCY: Federal Election Commission. ACTION: Notice of adjustments to contribution and expenditure...'' or ``the Commission'') is adjusting certain contribution and expenditure limits and the...

  16. 78 FR 8530 - Price Index Adjustments for Contribution and Expenditure Limitations and Lobbyist Bundling...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-06

    ... Price Index Adjustments for Contribution and Expenditure Limitations and Lobbyist Bundling Disclosure Threshold AGENCY: Federal Election Commission. ACTION: Notice of adjustments to contribution and expenditure...'' or ``the Commission'') is adjusting certain contribution and expenditure limitations and the...

  17. Daily energy expenditure and physical activity measured in Parkinson's disease patients with and without weight loss

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) commonly exhibit weight loss, which investigators attribute to various factors, including elevated resting energy expenditure. We tested the hypothesis that daily energy expenditure (DEE) and its components, resting energy expenditure (REF) and physical activit...

  18. Daily energy expenditure, physical activity, and weight loss in Parkinson's disease patients

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) commonly exhibit weight loss (WL) which investigators attribute to various factors, including elevated energy expenditure. We tested the hypothesis that daily energy expenditure (DEE) and its components, resting energy expenditure (REE) and physical activity (P...

  19. 26 CFR 1.248-1 - Election to amortize organizational expenditures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...) Organizational expenditures defined. (1) Section 248(b) defines the term organizational expenditures. Such... corporation having a limited life, would be amortizable over such life. An expenditure which fails to...

  20. Basic patterns in national health expenditure.

    PubMed Central

    Musgrove, Philip; Zeramdini, Riadh; Carrin, Guy

    2002-01-01

    Analysed in this paper are national health accounts estimates for 191 WHO Member States for 1997, using simple comparisons and linear regressions to describe spending on health and how it is financed. The data cover all sources - out-of-pocket spending, social insurance contributions, financing from government general revenues and voluntary and employment-related private insurance - classified according to their completeness and reliability. Total health spending rises from around 2-3% of gross domestic product (GDP) at low incomes (< 1000 US dollars per capita) to typically 8-9% at high incomes (> 7000 US dollars). Surprisingly, there is as much relative variation in the share for poor countries as for rich ones, and even more relative variation in amounts in US dollars. Poor countries and poor people that most need protection from financial catastrophe are the least protected by any form of prepayment or risk-sharing. At low incomes, out-of-pocket spending is high on average and varies from 20-80% of the total; at high incomes that share drops sharply and the variation narrows. Absolute out-of-pocket expenditure nonetheless increases with income. Public financing increases faster, and as a share of GDP, and converges at high incomes. Health takes an increasing share of total public expenditure as income rises, from 5-6% to around 10%. This is arguably the opposite of the relation between total health needs and need for public spending, for any given combination of services. Within public spending, there is no convergence in the type of finance - general revenue versus social insurance. Private insurance is usually insignificant except in some rich countries. PMID:11953792

  1. Optics Alignment Panel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schroeder, Daniel J.

    1992-01-01

    The Optics Alignment Panel (OAP) was commissioned by the HST Science Working Group to determine the optimum alignment of the OTA optics. The goal was to find the position of the secondary mirror (SM) for which there is no coma or astigmatism in the camera images due to misaligned optics, either tilt or decenter. The despace position was reviewed of the SM and the optimum focus was sought. The results of these efforts are as follows: (1) the best estimate of the aligned position of the SM in the notation of HDOS is (DZ,DY,TZ,TY) = (+248 microns, +8 microns, +53 arcsec, -79 arcsec), and (2) the best focus, defined to be that despace which maximizes the fractional energy at 486 nm in a 0.1 arcsec radius of a stellar image, is 12.2 mm beyond paraxial focus. The data leading to these conclusions, and the estimated uncertainties in the final results, are presented.

  2. ALDS 1980 panel review

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, D. L.

    1981-11-01

    The overall goal of PNL (Pacific Northwest Laboratory) Applied Mathematical Sciences Research is development of a DOE (Department of Energy) capability for Analysis of Large Data Sets (ALDS) and transfer of this capability to other DOE laboratories and contractors. This capability is needed to satisfy DOE's increasing requirements for handling and analyzing large volumes of diverse energy and environmental data. The integrated statistics and computer science research includes the development of improved methodologies in data definition, data management, data analysis, and visual display. The purpose of this document is three-fold. First, the document is the permanent record of the ALDS 1979 panel review. Second, the document provides the PNL staff with a benchmark of where we were at the end of the second year of ALDS. Third, the document is available to laboratories, universities, and DOE headquarters as detailed description of the ALDS project, as well as an example of the new direction of AMS-funded research.

  3. 26 CFR 1.501(h)-1 - Application of the expenditure test to expenditures to influence legislation; introduction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 7 2014-04-01 2013-04-01 true Application of the expenditure test to expenditures to influence legislation; introduction. 1.501(h)-1 Section 1.501(h)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Exempt Organizations § 1.501(h)-1...

  4. Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Quality Profile

    SciTech Connect

    1996-03-01

    The Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) is a periodic national survey that provides timely information about energy consumption and expenditures of U.S. households and about energy-related characteristics of housing units. The survey was first conducted in 1978 as the National Interim Energy Consumption Survey (NIECS), and the 1979 survey was called the Household Screener Survey. From 1980 through 1982 RECS was conducted annually. The next RECS was fielded in 1984, and since then, the survey has been undertaken at 3-year intervals. The most recent RECS was conducted in 1993.

  5. Aerospace Safety Advisory Panel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    This annual report is based on the activities of the Aerospace Safety Advisory Panel in calendar year 2000. During this year, the construction of the International Space Station (ISS) moved into high gear. The launch of the Russian Service Module was followed by three Space Shuttle construction and logistics flights and the deployment of the Expedition One crew. Continuous habitation of the ISS has begun. To date, both the ISS and Space Shuttle programs have met or exceeded most of their flight objectives. In spite of the intensity of these efforts, it is clear that safety was always placed ahead of cost and schedule. This safety consciousness permitted the Panel to devote more of its efforts to examining the long-term picture. With ISS construction accelerating, demands on the Space Shuttle will increase. While Russian Soyuz and Progress spacecraft will make some flights, the Space Shuttle remains the primary vehicle to sustain the ISS and all other U.S. activities that require humans in space. Development of a next generation, human-rated vehicle has slowed due to a variety of technological problems and the absence of an approach that can accomplish the task significantly better than the Space Shuttle. Moreover, even if a viable design were currently available, the realities of funding and development cycles suggest that it would take many years to bring it to fruition. Thus, it is inescapable that for the foreseeable future the Space Shuttle will be the only human-rated vehicle available to the U.S. space program for support of the ISS and other missions requiring humans. Use of the Space Shuttle will extend well beyond current planning, and is likely to continue for the life of the ISS.

  6. Returns to Education in Sri Lanka: A Pseudo-Panel Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Himaz, Rozana; Aturupane, Harsha

    2016-01-01

    This study employs a pseudo-panel approach to estimate the returns to education among income earners in Sri Lanka. Pseudo-panel data are constructed from nine repeated cross sections of Sri Lanka's Labor Force Survey data from 1997 to 2008, for workers born during 1953-1974. The results show that for males, one extra year of education increases…

  7. Panel Conditioning in a Longitudinal Study of Adolescents' Substance Use: Evidence from an Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Torche, Florencia; Warren, John Robert; Halpern-Manners, Andrew; Valenzuela, Eduardo

    2012-01-01

    Panel surveys are widely used in sociology to examine life-course trajectories and to assess causal effects. However, when using panel data researchers usually assume that the act of measuring respondents' attitudes and behaviors has no effect on the attributes being measured or on the accuracy of reports about those attributes. Evidence from…

  8. Smooth quantile ratio estimation with regression: estimating medical expenditures for smoking-attributable diseases.

    PubMed

    Dominici, Francesca; Zeger, Scott L

    2005-10-01

    The methodological development of this paper is motivated by a common problem in econometrics where we are interested in estimating the difference in the average expenditures between two populations, say with and without a disease, as a function of the covariates. For example, let Y(1) and Y(2) be two non-negative random variables denoting the health expenditures for cases and controls. Smooth Quantile Ratio Estimation (SQUARE) is a novel approach for estimating Delta=E[Y(1)] - E[Y(2)] by smoothing across percentiles the log-transformed ratio of the two quantile functions. Dominici et al. (2005) have shown that SQUARE defines a large class of estimators of Delta, is more efficient than common parametric and nonparametric estimators of Delta, and is consistent and asymptotically normal. However, in applications it is often desirable to estimate Delta(x)=E[Y(1)|x]--E[Y(2)|x], that is, the difference in means as a function of x. In this paper we extend SQUARE to a regression model and we introduce a two-part regression SQUARE for estimating Delta(x) as a function of x. We use the first part of the model to estimate the probability of incurring any costs and the second part of the model to estimate the mean difference in health expenditures, given that a nonzero cost is observed. In the second part of the model, we apply the basic definition of SQUARE for positive costs to compare expenditures for the cases and controls having 'similar' covariate profiles. We determine strata of cases and control with 'similar' covariate profiles by the use of propensity score matching. We then apply two-part regression SQUARE to the 1987 National Medicare Expenditure Survey to estimate the difference Delta(x) between persons suffering from smoking-attributable diseases and persons without these diseases as a function of the propensity of getting the disease. Using a simulation study, we compare frequentist properties of two-part regression SQUARE with maximum likelihood estimators for

  9. Benchmarks for health expenditures, services and outcomes in Africa during the 1990s.

    PubMed Central

    Peters, D. H.; Elmendorf, A. E.; Kandola, K.; Chellaraj, G.

    2000-01-01

    There is limited information on national health expenditures, services, and outcomes in African countries during the 1990s. We intend to make statistical information available for national level comparisons. National level data were collected from numerous international databases, and supplemented by national household surveys and World Bank expenditure reviews. The results were tabulated and analysed in an exploratory fashion to provide benchmarks for groupings of African countries and individual country comparison. There is wide variation in scale and outcome of health care spending between African countries, with poorer countries tending to do worse than wealthier ones. From 1990-96, the median annual per capita government expenditure on health was nearly US$ 6, but averaged US$ 3 in the lowest-income countries, compared to US$ 72 in middle-income countries. Similar trends were found for health services and outcomes. Results from individual countries (particularly Ethiopia, Ghana, Côte d'Ivoire and Gabon) are used to indicate how the data can be used to identify areas of improvement in health system performance. Serious gaps in data, particularly concerning private sector delivery and financing, health service utilization, equity and efficiency measures, hinder more effective health management. Nonetheless, the data are useful for providing benchmarks for performance and for crudely identifying problem areas in health systems for individual countries. PMID:10916913

  10. Dietary diversity and food expenditure as indicators of food security in older Taiwanese.

    PubMed

    Lo, Yuan-Ting; Chang, Yu-Hung; Lee, Meei-Shyuan; Wahlqvist, Mark L

    2012-02-01

    Food quality is a measure of food security in vulnerable groups. The elderly are often nutritionally vulnerable, but how much of this is reflected in food quality and determined by financial status is unclear. We determined whether expenditure on dietary quality challenges food security in the aged. We used the representative Elderly Nutrition and Health Survey in Taiwan during 1999-2000 (n=1783), and evaluated dietary quality by a Dietary Diversity Score (DDS, range: 0-6) based on a 24-h dietary recall. Monthly mean national food prices were used to estimate food expenditure. In general, it was found to cost more to achieve a greater DDS. The food expenditure of subjects whose DDS=6 was 2.20 times greater than the DDS ≤3 group, after controlling for covariates. Elders of lower socioeconomic status tended to choose foods which would have cost less. However, a sub-group of elders who achieve the highest DDS with limited money offer approaches to food-money management. Nutrition policy directed to food insecure groups, like the aged, could employ health promotion strategies which reduce financial barriers to healthy eating.

  11. Modifiable health risk factors and medical expenditures - The case of Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Lin, Tsui-Fang

    2008-12-01

    To contain escalating healthcare spending has become a great challenge for many countries around the world. Among all factors influencing medical costs, extensive studies have shown that adoption of healthy lifestyles such as not smoking, moderate drinking, eating healthy food, and exercising regularly can contribute to good health and lower the odds of having diseases that result in higher medical spending. The goal of this paper is to explore the relationship between modifiable risk factors and healthcare costs in Taiwan. A two-part model is employed to estimate the association between modifiable risk factors and medical expenditures. A logit model is used in the first stage of estimation and a generalized linear model is used in the second stage of estimation. Linking the 2001 National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) and the claims data in the National Health Insurance Research Database (NHIRD) in Taiwan, I find some significant associations between several lifestyle variables and medical expenditures. Former smokers are found to have higher probability of using medical care and incur higher medical expenses. People with exercise habits are less likely to use inpatient care services, and they incur lower inpatient expenses. Therefore, healthcare policies promoting non-smoking and physical activities should be used in Taiwan to curb rising expenditures and to achieve better care for people with chronic diseases.

  12. 5 CFR 591.211 - What are the categories of consumer expenditures?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... groups (MEGs). These categories are food, shelter and utilities, clothing, transportation, household... expenditure groups. OPM subdivides each MEG into primary expenditure groups (PEGs). There are approximately...

  13. 5 CFR 591.211 - What are the categories of consumer expenditures?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... groups (MEGs). These categories are food, shelter and utilities, clothing, transportation, household... expenditure groups. OPM subdivides each MEG into primary expenditure groups (PEGs). There are approximately...

  14. 5 CFR 591.211 - What are the categories of consumer expenditures?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... groups (MEGs). These categories are food, shelter and utilities, clothing, transportation, household... expenditure groups. OPM subdivides each MEG into primary expenditure groups (PEGs). There are approximately...

  15. 5 CFR 591.211 - What are the categories of consumer expenditures?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... groups (MEGs). These categories are food, shelter and utilities, clothing, transportation, household... expenditure groups. OPM subdivides each MEG into primary expenditure groups (PEGs). There are approximately...

  16. 26 CFR 1.263(a)-3 - Election to deduct or capitalize certain expenditures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... include: (1) Section 173 (circulation expenditures). (2) Section 174 (research and experimental... name expenditures). (5) Section 179 (election to expense certain depreciable business assets)....

  17. Obesity and medicare expenditure: accounting for age-related height loss.

    PubMed

    Onwudiwe, Nneka C; Stuart, Bruce; Zuckerman, Ilene H; Sorkin, John D

    2011-01-01

    To determine the relationship between BMI and Medicare expenditure for adults 65-years and older and determine whether this relationship changes after accounting for misclassification due to age-related height loss. Using a cross sectional study design, the relationship between BMI and fee-for-service Medicare expenditure was examined among beneficiaries who completed the Medicare Current Beneficiary Survey (MCBS) in 2002, were not enrolled in Medicare Health Maintenance Organization, had a self-reported height and weight, and were 65 and older (n = 7,706). Subjects were classified as underweight, normal weight, overweight, obese (obese I), and severely obese (obese II/III). To adjust BMI for the artifactual increase associated with age-related height loss, the reported height was transformed by adding the sex-specific age-associated height loss to the reported height in MCBS. The main outcome variable was total Medicare expenditure. There was a significant U-shaped pattern between unadjusted BMI and Medicare expenditure: underweight $4,581 (P < 0.0003), normal weight $3,744 (P < 0.0000), overweight $3,115 (reference), obese I $3,686 (P < 0.0039), and obese II/III $4,386 (P < 0.0000). This pattern persisted after accounting for height loss: underweight $4,640 (P < 0.0000), normal weight $3,451 (P < 0.0507), overweight $3,165 (reference), obese I $3,915 (P < 0.0010), and obese II/III $4,385 (P < 0.0004) compared to overweight. In older adults, minimal cost is not found at "normal" BMI, but rather in overweight subjects with higher spending in the obese and underweight categories. Adjusting for loss-of-height with aging had little affect on cost estimates.

  18. Factors predicting the capacity of Los Angeles city-region recreation programs to promote energy expenditure.

    PubMed

    Reynolds, Kim D; Dahmann, Nicholas; Wolch, Jennifer; Joassart-Marcelli, Pascale; Dunton, Genevieve; Rudulph, Diana; Newell, Joshua; Thayer, Jennifer; Jerrett, Michael

    2014-07-01

    An audit of recreation programs with moderate or higher levels of physical activity (PA) in Los Angeles area cities (N=82) was conducted using internet, telephone, and survey methods. Metabolic Equivalents (METs) were used to code programs׳ physical activity intensity. MET-hours per recreation program was associated with required age for enrollment, percent of residents >64 years of age, and fiscal capacity of cities. Capacity to promote energy expenditure may depend on targeted age groups, age of population, and municipal fiscal capacity. Cities with lower fiscal capacity might offer those higher MET-hour activities which require less specialized equipment and seek outside funding to offer higher MET programs. PMID:24755531

  19. Factors predicting the capacity of Los Angeles city-region recreation programs to promote energy expenditure.

    PubMed

    Reynolds, Kim D; Dahmann, Nicholas; Wolch, Jennifer; Joassart-Marcelli, Pascale; Dunton, Genevieve; Rudulph, Diana; Newell, Joshua; Thayer, Jennifer; Jerrett, Michael

    2014-07-01

    An audit of recreation programs with moderate or higher levels of physical activity (PA) in Los Angeles area cities (N=82) was conducted using internet, telephone, and survey methods. Metabolic Equivalents (METs) were used to code programs׳ physical activity intensity. MET-hours per recreation program was associated with required age for enrollment, percent of residents >64 years of age, and fiscal capacity of cities. Capacity to promote energy expenditure may depend on targeted age groups, age of population, and municipal fiscal capacity. Cities with lower fiscal capacity might offer those higher MET-hour activities which require less specialized equipment and seek outside funding to offer higher MET programs.

  20. An analysis of residential energy consumption and expenditures by minority households by home type and housing vintage

    SciTech Connect

    Poyer, D.A.

    1992-01-01

    In this paper a descriptive analysis of the relationship between energy consumption, patterns of energy use, and housing stock variables is presented. The purpose of the analysis is to uncover evidence of variations in energy consumption and expenditures, and patterns of energy use between majority households (defines as households with neither a black nor Hispanic head of household), black households (defined as households with a black head of household), and Hispanic households (defined as households with a Hispanic head of household) between 1980 (time of the first DOE/EIA Residential Energy Consumption Survey, 1982a) and 1987 (time of the last DOE/EIA Residential Energy Consumption Survey, 1989a). The analysis is three-dimensional: energy consumption and expenditures are presented by time (1980 to 1987), housing vintage, and housing type. A comparative analysis of changes in energy variables for the three population groups -- majority, black, and Hispanic -- within and between specific housing stock categories is presented.

  1. An analysis of residential energy consumption and expenditures by minority households by home type and housing vintage

    SciTech Connect

    Poyer, D.A.

    1992-06-01

    In this paper a descriptive analysis of the relationship between energy consumption, patterns of energy use, and housing stock variables is presented. The purpose of the analysis is to uncover evidence of variations in energy consumption and expenditures, and patterns of energy use between majority households (defines as households with neither a black nor Hispanic head of household), black households (defined as households with a black head of household), and Hispanic households (defined as households with a Hispanic head of household) between 1980 (time of the first DOE/EIA Residential Energy Consumption Survey, 1982a) and 1987 (time of the last DOE/EIA Residential Energy Consumption Survey, 1989a). The analysis is three-dimensional: energy consumption and expenditures are presented by time (1980 to 1987), housing vintage, and housing type. A comparative analysis of changes in energy variables for the three population groups -- majority, black, and Hispanic -- within and between specific housing stock categories is presented.

  2. The Efficiency of Split Panel Designs in an Analysis of Variance Model.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xin; Wang, Wei-Guo; Liu, Hai-Jun

    2016-01-01

    We consider split panel design efficiency in analysis of variance models, that is, the determination of the cross-sections series optimal proportion in all samples, to minimize parametric best linear unbiased estimators of linear combination variances. An orthogonal matrix is constructed to obtain manageable expression of variances. On this basis, we derive a theorem for analyzing split panel design efficiency irrespective of interest and budget parameters. Additionally, relative estimator efficiency based on the split panel to an estimator based on a pure panel or a pure cross-section is present. The analysis shows that the gains from split panel can be quite substantial. We further consider the efficiency of split panel design, given a budget, and transform it to a constrained nonlinear integer programming. Specifically, an efficient algorithm is designed to solve the constrained nonlinear integer programming. Moreover, we combine one at time designs and factorial designs to illustrate the algorithm's efficiency with an empirical example concerning monthly consumer expenditure on food in 1985, in the Netherlands, and the efficient ranges of the algorithm parameters are given to ensure a good solution. PMID:27163447

  3. The Efficiency of Split Panel Designs in an Analysis of Variance Model.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xin; Wang, Wei-Guo; Liu, Hai-Jun

    2016-01-01

    We consider split panel design efficiency in analysis of variance models, that is, the determination of the cross-sections series optimal proportion in all samples, to minimize parametric best linear unbiased estimators of linear combination variances. An orthogonal matrix is constructed to obtain manageable expression of variances. On this basis, we derive a theorem for analyzing split panel design efficiency irrespective of interest and budget parameters. Additionally, relative estimator efficiency based on the split panel to an estimator based on a pure panel or a pure cross-section is present. The analysis shows that the gains from split panel can be quite substantial. We further consider the efficiency of split panel design, given a budget, and transform it to a constrained nonlinear integer programming. Specifically, an efficient algorithm is designed to solve the constrained nonlinear integer programming. Moreover, we combine one at time designs and factorial designs to illustrate the algorithm's efficiency with an empirical example concerning monthly consumer expenditure on food in 1985, in the Netherlands, and the efficient ranges of the algorithm parameters are given to ensure a good solution.

  4. The Efficiency of Split Panel Designs in an Analysis of Variance Model

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wei-Guo; Liu, Hai-Jun

    2016-01-01

    We consider split panel design efficiency in analysis of variance models, that is, the determination of the cross-sections series optimal proportion in all samples, to minimize parametric best linear unbiased estimators of linear combination variances. An orthogonal matrix is constructed to obtain manageable expression of variances. On this basis, we derive a theorem for analyzing split panel design efficiency irrespective of interest and budget parameters. Additionally, relative estimator efficiency based on the split panel to an estimator based on a pure panel or a pure cross-section is present. The analysis shows that the gains from split panel can be quite substantial. We further consider the efficiency of split panel design, given a budget, and transform it to a constrained nonlinear integer programming. Specifically, an efficient algorithm is designed to solve the constrained nonlinear integer programming. Moreover, we combine one at time designs and factorial designs to illustrate the algorithm’s efficiency with an empirical example concerning monthly consumer expenditure on food in 1985, in the Netherlands, and the efficient ranges of the algorithm parameters are given to ensure a good solution. PMID:27163447

  5. 5. Historic American Buildings Survey Courtesy of California Historical Society ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. Historic American Buildings Survey Courtesy of California Historical Society San Francisco, California Photo: ca. 1885 MIRROR PANELED BALLROOM - Ralston Hall, Ralston Avenue, Belmont, San Mateo County, CA

  6. 6. Historic American Buildings Survey Courtesy of California Historical Society ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. Historic American Buildings Survey Courtesy of California Historical Society San Francisco, California Photo: ca. 1875 MIRROR PANELED BALLROOM - Ralston Hall, Ralston Avenue, Belmont, San Mateo County, CA

  7. Differing professional views or opinions: 1994 Special Review Panel

    SciTech Connect

    1996-09-01

    In July 1994, the Executive Director for Operations of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) appointed a Special Review Panel to assess the Differing Professional View or Opinion (DPV/DPO) process, including its effectiveness, how well it is understood by employees, and the organizational climate for having such views aired and properly decided. An additional area within this review was to address the effectiveness of the DPO procedures as they pertain to public access and confidentiality. Further, the Panel was charged with the review of the submittals completed since the last review to identify employees who made significant contributions to the agency or to the public health and safety but had not been adequately recognized for this contribution. The report presents the Special Review Panel`s evaluation of the NRC`s current process for dealing with Differing Professional Views or Opinions. Provided in this report are the results of an employee opinion survey on the process; highlights and suggestions from interviews with individuals who had submitted a Differing Professional View or Opinion, as well as with agency managers directly involved with the Differing Professional Views or Opinions process; and the Special Review Panel`s recommendations for improving the DPV/DPO process.

  8. State Health Expenditure Accounts: Purposes, Priorities, and Procedures

    PubMed Central

    Long, Stephen H.; Marquis, M. Susan; Rodgers, Jack

    1999-01-01

    This article reports on the State Health Expenditure Account (SHEA) project which developed procedures States can use in tracking their health care expenditures. The purposes, priorities, and concepts of SHEAs were designed to meet the needs of State policymakers. The resulting methods are discussed and illustrated using calculations of SHEAs for California. Contrasts with the National Health Expenditure (NHE) framework are provided. Recommendations for cooperation between the Health Care Financing Administration (HCFA) and the States that would facilitate the adoption and estimation of SHEAs are offered. Details of the methods used for the California estimates can be found in the Technical Note of this article. PMID:11481777

  9. Predictability of Prescription Drug Expenditures for Medicare Beneficiaries

    PubMed Central

    Wrobel, Marian V.; Doshi, Jalpa; Stuart, Bruce C.; Briesacher, Becky

    2003-01-01

    MCBS data are used to analyze the predictability of drug expenditures by Medicare beneficiaries. Predictors include demographic characteristics and measures of health status, the majority derived using CMS' diagnosis cost group/hierarchical condition category (DCG/HCC) risk-adjustment methodology. In prospective models, demographic variables explained 5 percent of the variation in drug expenditures. Adding health status measures raised this figure between 10 and 24 percent of the variation depending on the model configuration. Adding lagged drug expenditures more than doubled predictive power to 55 percent. These results are discussed in the context of forecasting, and risk adjustment for the proposed new Medicare drug benefit. PMID:15124376

  10. Health Expenditure Trends in OECD Countries, 1990-2001

    PubMed Central

    Huber, Manfred; Orosz, Eva

    2003-01-01

    This article presents data on health care spending for 30 OECD countries from OECD Health Data 2003, the latest edition of OECD's annual data collection on health systems across industrialized countries. OECD data show health care expenditures as a proportion of gross domestic product at an all-time high, due to both increased expenditures and overall economic slowdown. The article discusses similarities and differences across countries in how health care expenditures are funded and how the health care dollar is spent among types of services. PMID:14997690

  11. Why do some countries spend more for health? An assessment of sociopolitical determinants and international aid for government health expenditures.

    PubMed

    Liang, Li-Lin; Mirelman, Andrew J

    2014-08-01

    A consensus exists that rising income levels and technological development are among key drivers of total health spending. Determinants of public sector health expenditure, by contrast, are less well understood. This study examines a complex relationship across government health expenditure (GHE), sociopolitical risks, and international aid, while taking into account the impacts of national income, debt and tax financing and aging populations on health spending. We apply a fixed-effects two-stage least squares regression method to a panel dataset comprising 120 countries for the years 1995 through 2010. Our results show that democratic accountability has a diminishing positive correlation with GHE, and that levels of GHE are higher when government is more stable. Corruption is associated with less GHE in developing countries, but with higher GHE in developed countries. We also find that development assistance for health (DAH) is fungible with domestically financed government health expenditure (DGHE). For an average country, a 1% increase in DAH to government is associated with a 0.03-0.04% decrease in DGHE. Furthermore, the degree of fungibility of DAH to government is higher in countries where corruption or ethnic tensions are widespread. However, DAH to non-governmental organizations is not fungible with DGHE. PMID:24929917

  12. Why do some countries spend more for health? An assessment of sociopolitical determinants and international aid for government health expenditures.

    PubMed

    Liang, Li-Lin; Mirelman, Andrew J

    2014-08-01

    A consensus exists that rising income levels and technological development are among key drivers of total health spending. Determinants of public sector health expenditure, by contrast, are less well understood. This study examines a complex relationship across government health expenditure (GHE), sociopolitical risks, and international aid, while taking into account the impacts of national income, debt and tax financing and aging populations on health spending. We apply a fixed-effects two-stage least squares regression method to a panel dataset comprising 120 countries for the years 1995 through 2010. Our results show that democratic accountability has a diminishing positive correlation with GHE, and that levels of GHE are higher when government is more stable. Corruption is associated with less GHE in developing countries, but with higher GHE in developed countries. We also find that development assistance for health (DAH) is fungible with domestically financed government health expenditure (DGHE). For an average country, a 1% increase in DAH to government is associated with a 0.03-0.04% decrease in DGHE. Furthermore, the degree of fungibility of DAH to government is higher in countries where corruption or ethnic tensions are widespread. However, DAH to non-governmental organizations is not fungible with DGHE.

  13. 76 FR 32957 - Hydrographic Services Review Panel

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-07

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Hydrographic Services Review Panel AGENCY: National Ocean... membership solicitation for Hydrographic Services Review Panel. SUMMARY: This notice responds to the... on the Hydrographic Services Review Panel (HSRP). The HSRP, a Federal advisory committee, advises...

  14. Aerospace Safety Advisory Panel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1989-03-01

    This report provides findings, conclusions and recommendations regarding the National Space Transportation System (NSTS), the Space Station Freedom Program (SSFP), aeronautical projects and other areas of NASA activities. The main focus of the Aerospace Safety Advisory Panel (ASAP) during 1988 has been monitoring and advising NASA and its contractors on the Space Transportation System (STS) recovery program. NASA efforts have restored the flight program with a much better management organization, safety and quality assurance organizations, and management communication system. The NASA National Space Transportation System (NSTS) organization in conjunction with its prime contractors should be encouraged to continue development and incorporation of appropriate design and operational improvements which will further reduce risk. The data from each Shuttle flight should be used to determine if affordable design and/or operational improvements could further increase safety. The review of Critical Items (CILs), Failure Mode Effects and Analyses (FMEAs) and Hazard Analyses (HAs) after the Challenger accident has given the program a massive data base with which to establish a formal program with prioritized changes.

  15. Aerospace Safety Advisory Panel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    This report provides findings, conclusions and recommendations regarding the National Space Transportation System (NSTS), the Space Station Freedom Program (SSFP), aeronautical projects and other areas of NASA activities. The main focus of the Aerospace Safety Advisory Panel (ASAP) during 1988 has been monitoring and advising NASA and its contractors on the Space Transportation System (STS) recovery program. NASA efforts have restored the flight program with a much better management organization, safety and quality assurance organizations, and management communication system. The NASA National Space Transportation System (NSTS) organization in conjunction with its prime contractors should be encouraged to continue development and incorporation of appropriate design and operational improvements which will further reduce risk. The data from each Shuttle flight should be used to determine if affordable design and/or operational improvements could further increase safety. The review of Critical Items (CILs), Failure Mode Effects and Analyses (FMEAs) and Hazard Analyses (HAs) after the Challenger accident has given the program a massive data base with which to establish a formal program with prioritized changes.

  16. Panelized wall system with foam core insulation

    DOEpatents

    Kosny, Jan; Gaskin, Sally

    2009-10-20

    A wall system includes a plurality of wall members, the wall members having a first metal panel, a second metal panel, and an insulating core between the first panel and the second panel. At least one of the first panel and the second panel include ridge portions. The insulating core can be a foam, such as a polyurethane foam. The foam can include at least one opacifier to improve the k-factor of the foam.

  17. Glass/Epoxy Door Panel for Automobiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauer, J. L. JR.

    1985-01-01

    Lightweight panel cost-effective. Integrally-molded intrusion strap key feature of composite outer door panel. Strap replaces bulky and heavy steel instrusion beam of conventional door. Standard steel inner panel used for demonstration purposes. Door redesigned to exploit advantages of composite outer panel thinner. Outer panel for automobilie door, made of glass/epoxy composite material, lighter than conventional steel door panel, meets same strength requirements, and less expensive.

  18. AGU Sonar Data Restriction Panel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The AGU Council accepted the report of the panel set up in February to study the issue of restriction by the U.S. Navy of access to high-resolution sonar data for the U.S. Exclusive Economic Zone. Panel chairman John Bossier announced that “the Navy has acted in the best interests of the nation” in lifting the restriction order. Only two areas, egress routes to two submarine bases (see “Navy Defines Areas Under Sonar Ban,” in News, this issue), remain restricted.Panel members were Bruce Douglas, Alexander Malahoff, Donald Piepgras, Paul Richards, David Smith and Manik Talwani.

  19. JTEC panel report on advanced composites in Japan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Diefendorf, R. J.; Grisaffe, S. J.; Hillig, W. B.; Perepezko, J. H.; Pipes, R. B.; Sheehan, J. E.

    1991-01-01

    The JTEC Panel on Advanced Composites visited Japan and surveyed the status and future directions of Japanese high performance ceramic and carbon fibers and their composites in metal, intermetallic, ceramic and carbon matrices. The panel's interests included not only what composite systems were chosen, but also how these systems were developed. A strong carbon and fiber industry makes Japan the leader in carbon fiber technology. Japan has initiated an oxidation resistant carbon/carbon composite program. The goals for this program are ambitious, and it is just starting, but its progress should be closely monitored in the United States.

  20. [Increases in pharmaceutical expenditures of PHI by monoclonal antibodies].

    PubMed

    Wild, F

    2013-06-01

    The dynamics of one of the most innovative segments of health care and its impact on pharmaceutical expenditure of private health insurance (PHI) is examined on the basis of drug prescription data from private health insurance companies. The study shows that the increase in pharmaceutical expenditure can be explained partly by the new treatment possibilities available with monoclonal antibodies. The per capita expenditure on drugs with monoclonal antibodies increased by 255% from 2006 to 2010 in private health insurance, while the corresponding expenditure of all pharmaceuticals has risen by only 19% in the same period. In the coming years, growth on this scale will be a challenge for all payers in the health system. PMID:23926705

  1. Multiple Sclerosis and Catastrophic Health Expenditure in Iran

    PubMed Central

    Juyani, Yaser; Hamedi, Dorsa; Hosseini Jebeli, Seyede Sedighe; Qasham, Maryam

    2016-01-01

    Background: There are many disabling medical conditions which can result in catastrophic health expenditure. Multiple Sclerosis is one of the most costly medical conditions through the world which encounter families to the catastrophic health expenditures. This study aims to investigate on what extent Multiple sclerosis patients face catastrophic costs. Method: This study was carried out in Ahvaz, Iran (2014). The study population included households that at least one of their members suffers from MS. To analyze data, Logit regression model was employed by using the default software STATA12. Results: 3.37% of families were encountered with catastrophic costs. Important variables including brand of drug, housing, income and health insurance were significantly correlated with catastrophic expenditure. Conclusions: This study suggests that although a small proportion of MS patients met the catastrophic health expenditure, mechanisms that pool risk and cost (e.g. health insurance) are required to protect them and improve financial and access equity in health care.

  2. 32 CFR 37.1290 - Expenditures or outlays.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... REGULATIONS TECHNOLOGY INVESTMENT AGREEMENTS Definitions of Terms Used in This Part § 37.1290 Expenditures or outlays. Charges made to the project or program. They may be reported either on a cash or accrual...

  3. 32 CFR 37.1290 - Expenditures or outlays.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... REGULATIONS TECHNOLOGY INVESTMENT AGREEMENTS Definitions of Terms Used in This Part § 37.1290 Expenditures or outlays. Charges made to the project or program. They may be reported either on a cash or accrual...

  4. 44 CFR 361.7 - General eligible expenditures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY PREPAREDNESS NATIONAL EARTHQUAKE HAZARDS REDUCTION ASSISTANCE TO STATE AND LOCAL GOVERNMENTS Earthquake Hazards Reduction Assistance Program § 361.7 General eligible expenditures... specifically for carrying out earthquake hazards reduction activities are eligible when engaged in...

  5. 44 CFR 361.7 - General eligible expenditures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY PREPAREDNESS NATIONAL EARTHQUAKE HAZARDS REDUCTION ASSISTANCE TO STATE AND LOCAL GOVERNMENTS Earthquake Hazards Reduction Assistance Program § 361.7 General eligible expenditures... specifically for carrying out earthquake hazards reduction activities are eligible when engaged in...

  6. 44 CFR 361.7 - General eligible expenditures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY PREPAREDNESS NATIONAL EARTHQUAKE HAZARDS REDUCTION ASSISTANCE TO STATE AND LOCAL GOVERNMENTS Earthquake Hazards Reduction Assistance Program § 361.7 General eligible expenditures... specifically for carrying out earthquake hazards reduction activities are eligible when engaged in...

  7. 44 CFR 361.7 - General eligible expenditures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY PREPAREDNESS NATIONAL EARTHQUAKE HAZARDS REDUCTION ASSISTANCE TO STATE AND LOCAL GOVERNMENTS Earthquake Hazards Reduction Assistance Program § 361.7 General eligible expenditures... specifically for carrying out earthquake hazards reduction activities are eligible when engaged in...

  8. 44 CFR 361.7 - General eligible expenditures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY PREPAREDNESS NATIONAL EARTHQUAKE HAZARDS REDUCTION ASSISTANCE TO STATE AND LOCAL GOVERNMENTS Earthquake Hazards Reduction Assistance Program § 361.7 General eligible expenditures... specifically for carrying out earthquake hazards reduction activities are eligible when engaged in...

  9. Prevalence and determinants of metabolic syndrome: a cross-sectional survey of general medical outpatient clinics using National Cholesterol Education Program-Adult Treatment Panel III criteria in Botswana

    PubMed Central

    Omech, Bernard; Tshikuka, Jose-Gaby; Mwita, Julius C; Tsima, Billy; Nkomazana, Oathokwa; Amone-P’Olak, Kennedy

    2016-01-01

    Background Low- and middle-income countries, including Botswana, are facing rising prevalence of obesity and obesity-related cardiometabolic complications. Very little information is known about clustering of cardiovascular risk factors in the outpatient setting during routine visits. We aimed to assess the prevalence and identify the determinants of metabolic syndrome among the general outpatients’ attendances in Botswana. Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted from August to October 2014 involving outpatients aged ≥20 years without diagnosis of diabetes mellitus. A precoded questionnaire was used to collect data on participants’ sociodemographics, risk factors, and anthropometric indices. Fasting blood samples were drawn and analyzed for glucose and lipid profile. Metabolic syndrome was assessed using National Cholesterol Education Program-Adult Treatment Panel III criteria. Results In total, 291 participants were analyzed, of whom 216 (74.2%) were females. The mean age of the total population was 50.1 (±11) years. The overall prevalence of metabolic syndrome was 27.1% (n=79), with no significant difference between the sexes (female =29.6%, males =20%, P=0.11). A triad of central obesity, low high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol, and elevated blood pressure constituted the largest proportion (38 [13.1%]) of cases of metabolic syndrome, followed by a combination of low high-density lipoprotein, elevated triglycerides, central obesity, and elevated blood pressure, with 17 (5.8%) cases. Independent determinants of metabolic syndrome were antihypertensive use and increased waist circumference. Conclusion Metabolic syndrome is highly prevalent in the general medical outpatients clinics. Proactive approaches are needed to screen and manage cases targeting its most important predictors.

  10. Prevalence and determinants of metabolic syndrome: a cross-sectional survey of general medical outpatient clinics using National Cholesterol Education Program-Adult Treatment Panel III criteria in Botswana

    PubMed Central

    Omech, Bernard; Tshikuka, Jose-Gaby; Mwita, Julius C; Tsima, Billy; Nkomazana, Oathokwa; Amone-P’Olak, Kennedy

    2016-01-01

    Background Low- and middle-income countries, including Botswana, are facing rising prevalence of obesity and obesity-related cardiometabolic complications. Very little information is known about clustering of cardiovascular risk factors in the outpatient setting during routine visits. We aimed to assess the prevalence and identify the determinants of metabolic syndrome among the general outpatients’ attendances in Botswana. Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted from August to October 2014 involving outpatients aged ≥20 years without diagnosis of diabetes mellitus. A precoded questionnaire was used to collect data on participants’ sociodemographics, risk factors, and anthropometric indices. Fasting blood samples were drawn and analyzed for glucose and lipid profile. Metabolic syndrome was assessed using National Cholesterol Education Program-Adult Treatment Panel III criteria. Results In total, 291 participants were analyzed, of whom 216 (74.2%) were females. The mean age of the total population was 50.1 (±11) years. The overall prevalence of metabolic syndrome was 27.1% (n=79), with no significant difference between the sexes (female =29.6%, males =20%, P=0.11). A triad of central obesity, low high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol, and elevated blood pressure constituted the largest proportion (38 [13.1%]) of cases of metabolic syndrome, followed by a combination of low high-density lipoprotein, elevated triglycerides, central obesity, and elevated blood pressure, with 17 (5.8%) cases. Independent determinants of metabolic syndrome were antihypertensive use and increased waist circumference. Conclusion Metabolic syndrome is highly prevalent in the general medical outpatients clinics. Proactive approaches are needed to screen and manage cases targeting its most important predictors. PMID:27616893

  11. Activities contributing to energy expenditure among Guatemalan adults

    PubMed Central

    Gregory, Cria O; Ramirez-Zea, Manuel; Martorell, Reynaldo; Stein, Aryeh D

    2007-01-01

    Background Guatemala has experienced a substantial increase in overweight and obesity in recent years, yet physical activity patterns and consequent energy expenditure are largely unexplored in this population. Methods To describe overall physical activity levels (PAL) and activities contributing to daily energy expenditure, we analyzed time spent in daily activities as reported by 985 women and 819 men, living in rural and urban areas of Guatemala in 2002–04. Results Physical activity levels recommended to prevent obesity (PAL ≥ 1.70) differed by residence/occupation among men (agricultural-rural: 77%; nonagricultural-rural: 36%; urban: 24%; P < 0.01), but not women (rural: 2%; urban: 3%; P = 0.5). Median energy expenditure was higher among agricultural-rural men (44 MET*h/d; MET = metabolic equivalent) compared to nonagricultural-rural (37 MET*h/d) and urban men (35 MET*h/d; P < 0.01); energy expenditure was slightly lower among rural compared to urban women (34 MET*h/d vs. 35 MET*h/d; P < 0.01). Occupation was the largest contributor to energy expenditure (19–24 MET*h/d); among women and nonagricultural-rural and urban men this was primarily of a light intensity. Energy expenditure in sedentary activities ranged from 2 MET*h/d among rural women to 6 MET*h/d among agricultural-rural men. Any sports/exercise time was reported by 35% and 5% of men and women, respectively. Nevertheless, the majority of participants believed they were significantly active to stay healthy. Conclusion Overall, energy expenditure was low in the population not dedicated to agricultural occupations; an increased focus on active leisure-time behaviors may be needed to counterbalance reductions in energy expenditure consequent to sedentarization of primary occupations. PMID:17910754

  12. Exercise Training and Energy Expenditure following Weight Loss

    PubMed Central

    Hunter, Gary R.; Fisher, Gordon; Neumeier, William H.; Carter, Stephen J.; Plaisance, Eric P.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Determine the effects of aerobic or resistance training on activity related energy expenditure (AEE, kcal/d) and physical activity index (ARTE) following weight loss. It was hypothesized that weight loss without exercise training would be accompanied by a decrease in AEE, ARTE, and non-training physical activity energy expenditure (NEAT) and that exercise training would prevent decreases in free living energy expenditure. Methods 140 pre-menopausal women underwent an average of 25 pound weight loss during an 800 kcal/day diet of furnished food. One group aerobically trained 3 times/wk (40 min/d), another resistance trained 3 times/wk (10 exercises/2 sets x10 repetitions) and the third group did not exercise. DXA was used to measure body composition, indirect calorimetry to measure resting (REE) and walking energy expenditure, and doubly labeled water to measure total energy expenditure (TEE). AEE, ARTE, and non-training physical activity energy expenditure (NEAT) were calculated. Results TEE, REE, and NEAT all decreased following weight loss for the no exercise group, but not for the aerobic and resistance trainers. Only REE decreased in the two exercise groups. The resistance trainers increased ARTE. Heart rate and oxygen uptake while walking on the flat and up a grade were consistently related to TEE, AEE, NEAT, and ARTE. Conclusion Exercise training prevents a decrease in energy expenditure, including free living energy expenditure separate from the exercise training, following weight loss. Resistance training increased physical activity, while ease and economy in walking associates with increased TEE, AEE, NEAT, and ARTE. PMID:25606816

  13. Thin film concentrator panel development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zimmerman, D. K.

    1982-01-01

    The development and testing of a rigid panel concept that utilizes a thin film reflective surface for application to a low-cost point-focusing solar concentrator is discussed. It is shown that a thin film reflective surface is acceptable for use on solar concentrators, including 1500 F applications. Additionally, it is shown that a formed steel sheet substrate is a good choice for concentrator panels. The panel has good optical properties, acceptable forming tolerances, environmentally resistant substrate and stiffeners, and adaptability to low to mass production rates. Computer simulations of the concentrator optics were run using the selected reflector panel design. Experimentally determined values for reflector surface specularity and reflectivity along with dimensional data were used in the analysis. The simulations provided intercept factor and net energy into the aperture as a function of aperture size for different surface errors and pointing errors. Point source and Sun source optical tests were also performed.

  14. PRSEUS Panel Fabrication Final Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Linton, Kim A.; Velicki, Alexander; Hoffman, Krishna; Thrash, Patrick; Pickell, Robert; Turley, Robert

    2014-01-01

    NASA and the Boeing Company have been working together under the Environmentally Responsible Aviation Project to develop stitched unitized structure for reduced weight, reduced fuel burn and reduced pollutants in the next generation of commercial aircraft. The structural concept being evaluated is PRSEUS (Pultruded Rod Stitched Efficient Unitized Structure). In the PRSEUS concept, dry carbon fabric, pultruded carbon rods, and foam are stitched together into large preforms. Then these preforms are infused with an epoxy resin into large panels in an out-of-autoclave process. These panels have stiffeners in the length-wise and width-wise directions but contain no fasteners because all stiffeners are stitched to the panel skin. This document contains a description of the fabrication of panels for use in the 30-foot-long Multi-Bay Box test article to be evaluated at NASA LaRC.

  15. Exascale Workshop Panel Report Meeting

    SciTech Connect

    Khaleel, Mohammad A.

    2010-07-01

    The Exascale Review Panel consists of 12 scientists and engineers with experience in various aspects of high-performance computing and its application, development, and management. The Panel hear presentations by several representatives of the workshops and town meetings convened over the past few years to examine the need for exascale computation capability and the justification for a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) program to develop such capability. This report summarizes information provided by the presenters and substantial written reports to the Panel in advance of the meeting in Washington D.C. on January 19-20, 2010. The report also summarizes the Panel's conclusions with regard to the justification of a DOE-led exascale initiative.

  16. Michigan Health Care Costs Review. Personal Health Care Expenditures, 1966-1981. Number 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Michigan State Office of Health and Medical Affairs, Lansing.

    Data are presented describing expenditures for personal health services in Michigan from 1977 to 1981. The rapid growth in expenditures is illustrated, as well as the rates of growth in expenditures, for major categories of health services. Personal health expenditures are defined as payments for care directly provided to patients: specifically,…

  17. Towards a Standardized Definition of Educational Expenditure. Statistical Reports and Studies, No. 34.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lassibille, Gerard

    This document is an inventory of public and private educational expenditure from an international perspective and sets out the concepts, definitions and procedures useful in accounting for educational expenditure. The monograph defines the field within which expenditure is to be observed; details the necessary expenditure data to be collected from…

  18. 26 CFR 1.263(a)-6 - Election to deduct or capitalize certain expenditures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... expenditures); (2) Section 174 (research and experimental expenditures); (3) Section 175 (soil and water conservation expenditures; endangered species recovery expenditures); (4) Section 179 (election to expense... (c)(2) and (c)(3) of this section, § 1.263(a)-3 as contained in 26 CFR part 1 edition revised as...

  19. Panel to review EOSDIS plans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    Formed in Jan. 1992, the Panel to Review EOSDIS Plans was charged with advising NASA on its plans for developing the Earth Observing System (EOS) Data and Information System (EOSDIS). Specifically, the panel was asked to do the following: assess the validity of the engineering and technical underpinnings of the EOSDIS; assess its potential value to scientific users; suggest how technical risk can be minimized; and assess whether current plans are sufficiently resilient to be adaptable to changing technology and requirements such as budget environments, data volumes, new users, and new databases. The panel completed an interim report (Addendum A) and transmitted it to NASA and other interested parties in the government on 9 Apr. 1992. Because of a delay in NASA's plans to select the contractor for EOSDIS, the panel was not able to complete its review of the program according to the original government request. With the issuance of a letter report (Addendum B) on 28 Sep. 1992, the panel became inactive until such time as NASA could release the details of the contractor's proposed architecture, schedule, and costs for developing EOSDIS. In early 1993, NASA awarded the contract for the EOSDIS Core System (ECS). On 20 Apr. 1993, NASA asked the panel to reconvene to do the following: ( 1) complete its review of NASA's approach to the EOSDIS architecture and implementation; (2) appraise NASA's responses to the panel's previous recommendations; and (3) review the planning for EOSDIS in the context of NASA's role in the Global Change Data and Information System (GCDIS) implementation plan. To respond to the NASA charge, the panel met three times in 1993 including sessions with NASA officials and the EOSDIS contractor. In addition, several of the panel members visited individual Distributed Active Archive Centers (DAAC's) to obtain additional views of EOSDIS. The panel has now obtained substantial information on the EOSDIS budget, contractor work program, and current

  20. Comparison of energy expenditure measurement techniques in severely burned patients.

    PubMed

    Schane, J; Goede, M; Silverstein, P

    1987-01-01

    The degree of accuracy of existing formulas for calculating energy expenditure can be determined by comparing them to the measured energy expenditure via indirect calorimetry. As a result, one can modify traditional predicted recommendations for nutrition alimentation of the burn patient with real-time data. In this study, 21 sequential adult admissions with second- and third-degree total body surface area (TBSA) burn wounds (range 21%-81% TBSA) underwent serial assessments of energy expenditure by indirect calorimetry. On admission, maximum, and discharge, measured energy expenditure (MEE) was compared with the calculations for predicted energy expenditure by the Curreri (CEE) and modified Harris-Benedict (MBEE) equations. The mean energy expenditure calculated from the Curreri equation on admission (CEEA) overestimated the mean MEE on admission (MEEA) by 25% (P less than 0.001) and on discharge (MEED) by 36% (P less than 0.0005). The mean modified Harris-Benedict equation overestimated the mean MEEA by 32% (P less than 0.0005) and the mean MEED by 39% (P less than 0.0005). No significant difference was noted between the mean MEE at maximum (MEEM) and the mean CEEA or the mean MBEEA. This indicates excessive overfeeding of the burn patient from admission to discharge by both standard formulas. Actual measured data provide a better indicator of varying nutritional needs throughout the hospital course than the standard formulas, and their use would result in significant savings in the expenses of enteral/parenteral nutritional supplements. PMID:3667663