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Sample records for experience scale psychometric

  1. Development and examination of the psychometric properties of the Learning Experience Scale in nursing.

    PubMed

    Takase, Miyuki; Imai, Takiko; Uemura, Chizuru

    2016-06-01

    This paper examines the psychometric properties of the Learning Experience Scale. A survey method was used to collect data from a total of 502 nurses. Data were analyzed by factor analysis and the known-groups technique to examine the construct validity of the scale. In addition, internal consistency was evaluated by Cronbach's alpha, and stability was examined by test-retest correlation. Factor analysis showed that the Learning Experience Scale consisted of five factors: learning from practice, others, training, feedback, and reflection. The scale also had the power to discriminate between nurses with high and low levels of nursing competence. The internal consistency and the stability of the scale were also acceptable. The Learning Experience Scale is a valid and reliable instrument, and helps organizations to effectively design learning interventions for nurses.

  2. Psychometric Testing of the Daily Spiritual Experiences Scale Among African Americans in the Jackson Heart Study

    PubMed Central

    Loustalot, Fleetwood; Wyatt, Sharon B.; Sims, Mario; Ellison, Christopher G.; Taylor, Herman A.; Underwood, Lynn

    2009-01-01

    This study provided the first examination of the psychometric properties of the 6-item Daily Spiritual Experiences Scale (DSES) in a large African American sample, the Jackson Heart Study (JHS). The JHS included measures of spiritual (DSES) and religious practices. Internal reliability, dimensionality, fit indices, and correlation were assessed. DSES scores reflected frequent daily spiritual experiences (12.84 ± 4.72) and reliability scores were high (α = 0.85; 95% CI 0.84–0.86). The DSES loaded on a single factor, with significant goodness-of-fit scores (RMSEA = 0.094, P < 0.01). Moderate significant correlations were noted among DSES items. Our findings confirm that the 6-item DSES had excellent psychometric properties in this sample. PMID:19693673

  3. The 'caring experience': Testing the psychometric properties of the Caring Efficacy Scale.

    PubMed

    Reid, Carol; Courtney, Mary; Anderson, Debra; Hurst, Cameron

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of the study was to undertake rigorous psychometric testing of the Caring Efficacy Scale in a sample of Registered Nurses. A cross-sectional survey of 2000 registered nurses was undertaken. The Caring Efficacy Scale was utilized to inform the psychometric properties of the selected items of the Caring Efficacy Scale. Cronbach's Alpha identified reliability of the data. Exploratory Factor Analysis and Confirmatory Factor Analysis were undertaken to validate the factors. Confirmatory factor analysis confirmed the development of two factors; Confidence to Care and Doubts and Concerns. The Caring Efficacy Scale has undergone rigorous psychometric testing, affording evidence of internal consistency and goodness-of-fit indices within satisfactory ranges. The Caring Efficacy Scale is valid for use in an Australian population of registered nurses. The scale can be used as a subscale or total score reflective of self-efficacy in nursing. This scale may assist nursing educators to predict levels of caring efficacy.

  4. Development and psychometric testing of the satisfaction with Cultural Simulation Experience Scale.

    PubMed

    Courtney-Pratt, Helen; Levett-Jones, Tracy; Lapkin, Samuel; Pitt, Victoria; Gilligan, Conor; Van der Riet, Pamela; Rossiter, Rachel; Jones, Donovan; Everson, Naleya

    2015-11-01

    Decreasing the numbers of adverse health events experienced by people from culturally diverse backgrounds rests, in part, on the ability of education providers to provide quality learning experiences that support nursing students in developing cultural competence, an essential professional attribute. This paper reports on the implementation and evaluation of an immersive 3D cultural empathy simulation. The Satisfaction with Cultural Simulation Experience Scale used in this study was adapted and validated as the first stage of this study. Exploratory factor analysis and confirmatory factor analysis were undertaken to investigate the psychometric properties of the scale using two randomly-split sub-samples. Cronbach's Alpha was used to examine internal consistency reliability. Descriptive statistics were used for analysis of mean satisfaction scores and qualitative comments to open-ended questions were analysed and coded. A purposive sample (n = 497) of second of nursing students participated in the study. The overall Cronbach's alpha for the scale was 0.95 and each subscale demonstrated high internal consistency: 0.92; 0.92; 0.72 respectively. The mean satisfaction score was 4.64 (SD 0.51) out of a maximum of 5 indicating a high level of participant satisfaction with the simulation. Three factors emerged from qualitative analysis: "Becoming culturally competent", "Learning from the debrief" and "Reflecting on practice". The cultural simulation was highly regarded by students. Psychometric testing of the Satisfaction with Cultural Simulation Experience Scale demonstrated that it is a reliable instrument. However, there is room for improvement and further testing in other contexts is therefore recommended.

  5. Psychometric properties of the Adolescent Dissociative Experiences Scale in a sample of Italian adolescents.

    PubMed

    Schimmenti, Adriano

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the psychometric properties of the Italian translation of the Adolescent Dissociative Experiences Scale (A-DES). A sample of 1,806 high-school students between the ages of 13 and 18 years, recruited in 6 Italian cities, completed the A-DES. The A-DES showed high internal consistency, excellent item-to-scale homogeneity, good split-half reliability, and a single-factor structure. The scores of the Italian adolescents were comparable to those found in previous research with the measure. No gender differences were found in mean A-DES scores, but boys and girls showed different patterns of responses on A-DES items. Age differences were also found, with 13- and 18-year-old students scoring higher on the measure than the other participants. A cluster analysis showed that participants could be consistently grouped into 2 clusters of low- and high-dissociative adolescents. This study supports the A-DES as a reliable and valid screening measure for dissociative symptoms in adolescents.

  6. Disturbed Experience of Self: Psychometric Analysis of the Self-Experience Lifetime Frequency Scale (SELF)

    PubMed Central

    Heering, Henriëtte Dorothée; Goedhart, Saskia; Bruggeman, Richard; Cahn, Wiepke; de Haan, Lieuwe; Kahn, René S.; Meijer, Carin J.; Myin-Germeys, Inez; van Os, Jim; Wiersma, Durk

    2016-01-01

    Background Schizophrenia is characterized by positive and negative symptoms, but recently anomalous self-experiences, e.g. exaggerated self-consciousness (hyperreflectivity), receive more attention as an important symptom domain in schizophrenia patients. The semi-structured interview, the Examination of Anomalous Self-Experience (EASE) [Psychopathology 2005;38:236-258], examines experiences of a disturbed sense of self in a sophisticated but time-consuming manner. Therefore, we proposed the Self-Experience Lifetime Frequency scale (SELF), an instrument intended to screen for self-disturbance phenomena. Here we compared scores of patients, their siblings and healthy controls on the SELF. Methods and Sampling The SELF is composed of a validated screener for symptoms of depersonalization complemented by questions covering several other domains of self-disturbance. A total of 426 patients with a psychotic disorder, 526 of their unaffected siblings, and 297 healthy controls completed the SELF. Patients' scores on the 12 items of the SELF were subjected to an explorative principal axis factor analysis (PAF); composite scores on factor components were compared between the three participant groups. Results The PAF revealed two components, explaining 43.9 and 9.5% of variance, respectively. The first component represents a disturbance of self-awareness; the second component reflects (milder forms of) diminished self-affection or depersonalization. The two components of the SELF revealed good internal consistency (component 1, α = 0.88; component 2, α = 0.79; ρ = 0.85). Patients showed significantly higher scores on both factor components in comparison with both siblings and controls. No significant differences were found between siblings and controls. Conclusions The findings of the current study suggest that the SELF comprises two components of self-disturbance. Patients reported more (severe) symptoms of self-disturbance on both components, suggesting that it is

  7. The Scale of Positive and Negative Experience (SPANE): Psychometric Properties and Normative Data in a Large Chinese Sample

    PubMed Central

    Li, Feng; Bai, Xinwen; Wang, Yong

    2013-01-01

    Background The Scale of Positive and Negative Experience (SPANE) is a new instrument that assesses subjective feelings of well-being and ill-being and overcome several limitations of previous popular instruments. The current study examined the scale's psychometric properties with a large Chinese sample. Principal Findings Data were collected form 21,322 full-time workers from the power industry. The psychometric properties were assessed in term of internal consistency reliability, factorial validity, convergent validity, and measurement invariance across gender, age, marital status, education level, and income level. The results demonstrate that the SPANE has high internal consistency reliability, a correlated two-factor structure (with the uniqueness of three general and specific items of positive and negative feelings allowed to correlate with each other), strict equivalence across gender, age and marital status, and strong equivalence across education and income. Furthermore, the SPANE converges well with two measures of life satisfaction. Conclusion The Chinese version of the SPANE behaves consistently with the original and can be used in future studies of emotional well-being. The scale norms are presented in terms of percentile rankings, and implications and directions for future research are discussed. PMID:23573297

  8. Physical capability scale: psychometric testing.

    PubMed

    Resnick, Barbara; Boltz, Marie; Galik, Elizabeth; Wells, Chris

    2013-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe the psychometric testing of the Basic Physical Capability Scale. The study was a secondary data analysis of combined data sets from three studies. Study participants included 93 older adults, recruited from 2 acute-care settings and 110 older adults living in long-term care facilities. Rasch analysis was used for the testing of the measurement model. There was some support for construct validity based on the fit of the items to the scale across both samples. In addition, there was support for hypothesis testing as physical function was significantly associated with physical capability. There was evidence for internal consistency (Alpha coefficients of .77-.83) and interrater reliability based on an intraclass correlation of .81. This study provided preliminary support for the reliability and validity of the Basic Physical Capability Scale, and guidance for scale revisions and continued use.

  9. The Alliance Negotiation Scale: A psychometric investigation.

    PubMed

    Doran, Jennifer M; Safran, Jeremy D; Muran, J Christopher

    2016-08-01

    This study investigates the utility and psychometric properties of a new measure of psychotherapy process, the Alliance Negotiation Scale (ANS; Doran, Safran, Waizmann, Bolger, & Muran, 2012). The ANS was designed to operationalize the theoretical construct of negotiation (Safran & Muran, 2000), and to extend our current understanding of the working alliance concept (Bordin, 1979). The ANS was also intended to improve upon existing measures such as the Working Alliance Inventory (WAI; Horvath & Greenberg, 1986, 1989) and its short form (WAI-S; Tracey & Kokotovic, 1989) by expanding the emphasis on negative therapy process. The present study investigates the psychometric validity of the ANS test scores and interpretation-including confirming its original factor structure and evaluating its internal consistency and construct validity. Construct validity was examined through the ANS' convergence and divergence with several existing scales that measure theoretically related constructs. The results bolster and extend previous findings about the psychometric integrity of the ANS, and begin to illuminate the relationship between negotiation and other important variables in psychotherapy research. (PsycINFO Database Record

  10. Measuring Mathematics Anxiety: Psychometric Analysis of a Bidimensional Affective Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bai, Haiyan; Wang, LihShing; Pan, Wei; Frey, Mary

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to develop a theoretically and methodologically sound bidimensional affective scale measuring mathematics anxiety with high psychometric quality. The psychometric properties of a 14-item Mathematics Anxiety Scale-Revised (MAS-R) adapted from Betz's (1978) 10-item Mathematics Anxiety Scale were empirically analyzed on a…

  11. Children's Separation Anxiety Scale (CSAS): Psychometric Properties

    PubMed Central

    Méndez, Xavier; Espada, José P.; Orgilés, Mireia; Llavona, Luis M.; García-Fernández, José M.

    2014-01-01

    This study describes the psychometric properties of the Children's Separation Anxiety Scale (CSAS), which assesses separation anxiety symptoms in childhood. Participants in Study 1 were 1,908 schoolchildren aged between 8 and 11. Exploratory factor analysis identified four factors: worry about separation, distress from separation, opposition to separation, and calm at separation, which explained 46.91% of the variance. In Study 2, 6,016 children aged 8–11 participated. The factor model in Study 1 was validated by confirmatory factor analysis. The internal consistency (α = 0.82) and temporal stability (r = 0.83) of the instrument were good. The convergent and discriminant validity were evaluated by means of correlations with other measures of separation anxiety, childhood anxiety, depression and anger. Sensitivity of the scale was 85% and its specificity, 95%. The results support the reliability and validity of the CSAS. PMID:25072402

  12. The Mother’s Autonomy in Decision Making (MADM) scale: Patient-led development and psychometric testing of a new instrument to evaluate experience of maternity care

    PubMed Central

    Vedam, Saraswathi; Stoll, Kathrin; Martin, Kelsey; Rubashkin, Nicholas; Partridge, Sarah; Thordarson, Dana; Jolicoeur, Ganga

    2017-01-01

    Shared decision making (SDM) is core to person-centered care and is associated with improved health outcomes. Despite this, there are no validated scales measuring women’s agency and ability to lead decision making during maternity care. Objective To develop and validate a new instrument that assesses women’s autonomy and role in decision making during maternity care. Design Through a community-based participatory research process, service users designed, content validated, and administered a cross-sectional quantitative survey, including 31 items on the experience of decision-making. Setting and participants Pregnancy experiences (n = 2514) were reported by 1672 women who saw a single type of primary maternity care provider in British Columbia. They described care by a midwife, family physician or obstetrician during 1, 2 or 3 maternity care cycles. We conducted psychometric testing in three separate samples. Main outcome measures We assessed reliability, item-to-total correlations, and the factor structure of the The Mothers’ Autonomy in Decision Making (MADM) scale. We report MADM scores by care provider type, length of prenatal appointments, preferences for role in decision-making, and satisfaction with experience of decision-making. Results The MADM scale measures a single construct: autonomy in decision-making during maternity care. Cronbach alphas for the scale exceeded 0.90 for all samples and all provider groups. All item-to-total correlations were replicable across three samples and exceeded 0.7. Eigenvalue and scree plots exhibited a clear 90-degree angle, and factor analysis generated a one factor scale. MADM median scores were highest among women who were cared for by midwives, and 10 or more points lower for those who saw physicians. Increased time for prenatal appointments was associated with higher scale scores, and there were significant differences between providers with respect to average time spent in prenatal appointments. Midwifery care

  13. Psychometric evaluation of the Nurse Spiritual Care Therapeutics Scale.

    PubMed

    Mamier, Iris; Taylor, Elizabeth Johnston

    2015-05-01

    To measure nurse-provided spiritual care, robust instrumentation is needed. This study psychometrically evaluated an instrument that operationalizes frequency of nurse-provided spiritual care, the Nurse Spiritual Care Therapeutics Scale (NSCTS). The 17-item NSCTS, with an established content validity index of 0.88, was administered online to registered nurses (RNs) in four hospitals. Responses from 554 RNs (24% response rate), most who identified as Christian, provided evidence for the NSCTS' reliability and validity. Internal reliability was supported by an alpha coefficient of .93. Validity was evidenced by item-total correlations ranging from .40 to .80, low to modest direct correlations between the NSCTS and Daily Spiritual Experience Scale and Duke University Religiosity Index, and strong loadings between 0.41 and 0.84 on one factor (explaining 49.5% of the variance) during exploratory factor analysis.

  14. Psychometric Characteristics of the Professor-Student Rapport Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ryan, Rebecca G.; Wilson, Janie H.; Pugh, James L.

    2011-01-01

    In this study, the authors assessed the psychometric properties of the Professor-Student Rapport Scale, the first scale to measure professor-student rapport. The scale was found to have adequate test-retest and internal-consistency reliability. In addition to these findings, measures used to determine convergent validity included the Working…

  15. Psychometric Properties of the Fatigue Severity Scale in Polio Survivors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burger, Helena; Franchignoni, Franco; Puzic, Natasa; Giordano, Andrea

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate by means of classical test theory and Rasch analysis the scaling characteristics and psychometric properties of the Fatigue Severity Scale (FSS) in polio survivors. A questionnaire, consisting of five general questions (sex, age, age at time of acute polio, sequelae of polio, and new symptoms), the FSS,…

  16. Development and Psychometric Properties of the Homophobic Bullying Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prati, Gabriele

    2012-01-01

    The study aimed to develop the Homophobic Bullying Scale and to investigate its psychometric properties. The items of the Homophobic Bullying Scale were created to measure high school students' bullying behaviors motivated by homophobia, including verbal bullying, relational bullying, physical bullying, property bullying, sexual harassment, and…

  17. Psychometric Evaluation of the Malay Satisfaction with Life Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swami, Viren; Chamorro-Premuzic, Tomas

    2009-01-01

    The Satisfaction With Life Scale (SWLS) is one of the most widely used scales for the measurement of subjective well-being across the globe, but no satisfactory version exists for use among Malay-speaking populations. The present study reports on the translation of a new Malay SWLS and examines its psychometric properties in a community sample of…

  18. The Alzheimer's Disease Knowledge Scale: Development and Psychometric Properties

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carpenter, Brian D.; Balsis, Steve; Otilingam, Poorni G.; Hanson, Priya K.; Gatz, Margaret

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: This study provides preliminary evidence for the acceptability, reliability, and validity of the new Alzheimer's Disease Knowledge Scale (ADKS), a content and psychometric update to the Alzheimer's Disease Knowledge Test. Design and Methods: Traditional scale development methods were used to generate items and evaluate their psychometric…

  19. The Dysfunctional Attitudes Scale: Psychometric Properties in Depressed Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rogers, Gregory M.; Park, Jong-Hyo; Essex, Marilyn J.; Klein, Marjorie H.; Silva, Susan G.; Hoyle, Rick H.; Curry, John F.; Feeny, Norah C.; Kennard, Betsy; Kratochvil, Christopher J.; Pathak, Sanjeev; Reinecke, Mark A.; Rosenberg, David R.; Weller, Elizabeth B.; March, John S.

    2009-01-01

    The psychometric properties and factor structure of the Dysfunctional Attitudes Scale were examined in a sample of 422 male and female adolescents (ages 12-17) with current major depressive disorder. The scale demonstrated high internal consistency ([alpha] = 0.93) and correlated significantly with self-report and interview-based measures of…

  20. Psychometric Properties of the Revised Teachers' Attitude toward Inclusion Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Monsen, Jeremy J.; Ewing, Donna L.; Boyle, James

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents the psychometric properties of a questionnaire measure that updates and extends Larrivee and Cook's (1979) Opinions Relative to Mainstreaming Scale in terms of structure, terminology, and language. The revised scale was tested using a sample of 106 teachers based in inclusive mainstream schools. Using Principal Component…

  1. Psychometric Evaluation of the Multidimensional Assessment of Fatigue Scale for Use with Pregnant and Postpartum Women

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fairbrother, Nichole; Hutton, Eileen K.; Stoll, Kathrin; Hall, Wendy; Kluka, Sandy

    2008-01-01

    Although fatigue is a common experience for pregnant women and new mothers, few measures of fatigue have been validated for use with this population. To address this gap, the authors assessed psychometric properties of the Multidimensional Assessment of Fatigue (MAF) scale, which was used in 2 independent samples of pregnant women. Results…

  2. Psychometric Analysis of Computer Science Help-Seeking Scales

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pajares, Frank; Cheong, Yuk Fai; Oberman, Paul

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop scales to assess instrumental help seeking, executive help seeking, perceived benefits of help seeking, and avoidance of help seeking and to examine their psychometric properties by conducting factor and reliability analyses. As this is the first attempt to examine the latent structures underlying the…

  3. Psychometric Analysis of Role Conflict and Ambiguity Scales in Academia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Khan, Anwar; Yusoff, Rosman Bin Md.; Khan, Muhammad Muddassar; Yasir, Muhammad; Khan, Faisal

    2014-01-01

    A comprehensive Psychometric Analysis of Rizzo et al.'s (1970) Role Conflict & Ambiguity (RCA) scales were performed after its distribution among 600 academic staff working in six universities of Pakistan. The reliability analysis includes calculation of Cronbach Alpha Coefficients and Inter-Items statistics, whereas validity was determined by…

  4. A Psychometric Evaluation of the Cultural Receptivity in Fostering Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coakley, Tanya M.; Orme, John G.

    2006-01-01

    Objective: The psychometric properties of a new measure of foster parents' openness toward participating in activities that promote children's cultural development are evaluated. The measure is titled the Cultural Receptivity in Fostering Scale (CRFS). Method: Data from 304 foster mothers who completed the CRFS and a battery of measures on…

  5. Psychometric Evaluation of the Simplified Chinese Version of Flourishing Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tang, Xiaoqing; Duan, Wenjie; Wang, Zhizhang; Liu, Tianyuan

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: The Flourishing Scale (FS) was developed to measure psychological well-being from the eudaimonic perspective, highlighting the flourishing of human functioning. This article evaluated the psychometric characteristics of the simplified Chinese version of FS among a Chinese community population. Method: A total of 433 participants from…

  6. A Psychometric Evaluation of the Self-Presentational Efficacy Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lamarche, Larkin; Gammage, Kimberley L.; Sullivan, Philip J.; Gabriel, David A.

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the psychometric properties of the Self-Presentational Efficacy Scale (SPES) developed by Gammage, Hall, and Martin Ginis (2004). University students (196 men and 269 women) completed the SPES and measures of social physique anxiety, fear of negative evaluation, and physical activity. Participants also completed the SPES a…

  7. Development and Psychometric Evaluation of the Interpersonal Sexual Objectification Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kozee, Holly B.; Tylka, Tracy L.; Augustus-Horvath, Casey L.; Denchik, Angela

    2007-01-01

    This study reports on the development and psychometric evaluation of the Interpersonal Sexual Objectification Scale (ISOS). Data from 576 college women were collected in three studies. Exploratory factor analysis uncovered two factors: Body Evaluation and Unwanted Explicit Sexual Advances; confirmatory factor analysis supported this factor…

  8. Psychometric Validation of the Youth Social Capital Scale in Greece

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koutra, Kleio; Orfanos, Philippos; Roumeliotaki, Theano; Kritsotakis, George; Kokkevi, Anna; Philalithis, Anastasios

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: This article describes the psychometric validation of the Youth Social Capital scale (YSCS) in 16- to 17-year-old students living in rural and urban areas in Crete, Greece. Methods: Sampling was performed among 27 secondary education units of Heraklion Prefecture. The self-reported questionnaire was answered by 692 participants…

  9. Psychometric Properties of the Chinese Cultural Beliefs about Adversity Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leung, Janet T. Y.; Shek, Daniel T. L.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of the study was to examine the psychometric properties of the Chinese Cultural Beliefs about Adversity scale (CBA). Methods: The CBA was administered in a sample of 275 Chinese parents experiencing economic disadvantage. Results: The CBA was found to be internally consistent. Consistent with the conceptual framework, factor…

  10. Preliminary Psychometric Data for the "Academic Coping Strategies Scale"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sullivan, Jeremy R.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to describe the psychometric characteristics of the "Academic Coping Strategies Scale" (ACSS), which was designed to assess college students' coping strategies within the context of a specific academic stressor. This article will present results of analyses of factor structure, internal consistency, test-retest…

  11. Homework Emotion Regulation Scale: Psychometric Properties for Middle School Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Xu, Jianzhong; Fan, Xitao; Du, Jianxia

    2016-01-01

    The goal of the present investigation is to evaluate the psychometric properties of the Homework Emotion Regulation Scale (HERS) using 796 middle school students in China. Confirmatory factor analyses (CFAs) supported the existence of two distinct yet related subscales for the HERS: Emotion Management and Cognitive Reappraisal. Concerning the…

  12. The Kuwait University Anxiety Scale: psychometric properties.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Khalek, A M

    2000-10-01

    This study was undertaken to construct the Kuwait University Anxiety Scale in two comparable Arabic and English versions. The intent was to provide a research tool as well as a measure of predisposition to develop anxiety in general among adults and adolescents. The scale is comprised by 20 brief statements answered on a 4-point intensity scale, anchored by 1: Rarely and 4: Always. Factor analysis yielded three high-loaded factors of Cognitive/Affective, Behavioral/Subjective, and Somatic Anxiety, with moderate interfactor correlations. Item-remainder correlations ranged from .27 to .74. Reliabilities ranged from .88 to .92 (alpha) and between .70 and .93 (test-retest), denoting good internal consistency and stability. Criterion-related validity of the scale ranged between .70 and .88 (5 criteria), while the loadings of the scale on a general factor of anxiety were .93 and .95 in two factor analyses, demonstrating the scale's criterion-related and factorial validity. Discriminant validity of the scale was demonstrated. The scale correlated .65 with scores on the Beck Depression scale. Male adolescents attained a higher mean score than male undergraduates. Females have significantly higher mean scores than their male counterparts. Kuwaiti norms (N = 4,660) were reported. An English version of the scale is available.

  13. The Yale Craving Scale: Development and psychometric properties

    PubMed Central

    Rojewski, Alana M.; Morean, Meghan E.; Toll, Benjamin A.; McKee, Sherry A.; Krishnan-Sarin, Suchitra; Green, Barry G.; Bartoshuk, Linda M.; O’Malley, Stephanie S.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The current study presents a psychometric evaluation of the Yale Craving Scale (YCS), a novel measure of craving for cigarettes and alcohol, respectively. The YCS is the first craving measure to use a generalized Labeled Magnitude Scale (gLMS) as the scoring format, which facilitates between-group comparisons of subjective craving and eliminates ceiling effects by assessing the full range of imaginable sensation intensities. Methods Psychometric evaluations of the YCS for use with cigarettes (YCS Smoking) and alcohol (YCS Drinking) included assessments of latent factor structure, internal consistency, ceiling effects, and test-criterion relationships. Study samples included 493 treatment-seeking smokers and 213 heavy drinkers. Results Factor analyses of the 5-item YCS Smoking and Drinking scores confirmed a 1-factor scale. The YCS Smoking and Drinking scores evidenced: (1) good internal consistency, (2) scalar measurement invariance within several subgroups (e.g., smoking/drinking status; nicotine/alcohol dependence), (3) convergent relationships with extant craving measures, and (4) concurrent relationships with smoking/drinking outcomes. Conclusions These results suggest that the YCS represents a psychometrically sound scale for assessing smoking and drinking urges in dependent populations. PMID:26183404

  14. Psychometric properties of the Violent Experiences Questionnaire.

    PubMed

    King, Alan R; Russell, Tiffany D

    2017-02-24

    The Violent Experiences Questionnaire-Revised (VEQ-R) is a brief retrospective self-report inventory which provides estimates of annual frequencies of childhood physical abuse, sibling physical abuse, exposure to parental violence, peer bullying, and corporal punishment as they were experienced from ages 5 to 16. The VEQ-R indices rely on a frequency metric that estimates the number of days on average per year a specified class of behavior occurred over a 12year retrospective period. All scores range from a frequency of 0 to a high of 104. Scale normative data was generated from both a college (N=1266) and national (N=1290) sample to expand the research applicability of this relatively new inventory. Subscales were added to estimate the frequency of victimization during childhood, the pre-teen years, and adolescence. Four "hostility" component indices were derived from perpetrator source (parent, sibling, peer, or domestic). Thresholds were established to for High, Moderate, Low, and No Risk classifications. Subscales dimensions were found to have both adequate internal and temporal consistency. Evidence of concurrent and discriminant validity was generated using the Parent-Child Conflict Tactics Scale-Short-Form(©), LONGSCAN Physical Abuse Self-Report scale, and Physical Punishment scale of the Assessing Environments III inventory.

  15. Psychometric evaluation of the Multidimensional Assessment of Fatigue scale for use with pregnant and postpartum women.

    PubMed

    Fairbrother, Nichole; Hutton, Eileen K; Stoll, Kathrin; Hall, Wendy; Kluka, Sandy

    2008-06-01

    Although fatigue is a common experience for pregnant women and new mothers, few measures of fatigue have been validated for use with this population. To address this gap, the authors assessed psychometric properties of the Multidimensional Assessment of Fatigue (MAF) scale, which was used in 2 independent samples of pregnant women. Results indicated that the psychometric properties of the scale were very similar across samples and time points. The scale possesses a high level of internal consistency, has good convergent validity with measures of sleep quality and depression, and discriminates well from a measure of social support. Contrary to previous evaluations of the MAF, data strongly suggest that the scale represents a unidimensional construct best represented by a single factor. Results indicate that the MAF is a useful measure of fatigue among pregnant and postpartum women.

  16. Psychometric evaluation of the Social Interaction Phobia Scale.

    PubMed

    Reilly, Alison R; Carleton, R Nicholas; Weeks, Justin W

    2012-01-01

    The present study evaluated the psychometric properties of a novel measure of social anxiety symptoms, the Social Interaction Phobia Scale (SIPS), as a stand-alone item set, using an undergraduate sample (N=512). The 14-item SIPS has three subscales assessing Social Interaction Anxiety, Fear of Overt Evaluation, and Fear of Attracting Attention. Confirmatory factor analyses replicated the three-factor structure for the SIPS originally reported by Carleton et al. All SIPS scores demonstrated good internal consistency. The convergent validity of the SIPS was supported by strong and positive correlations between all SIPS scores and measures of social anxiety and fear of evaluation; the finding that the relationships between all SIPS scores and a social anxiety measure were stronger than relationships between all SIPS scores and measures of other constructs supported the discriminant validity of the SIPS. Results suggest that the SIPS possesses excellent psychometric properties.

  17. Nurse Competence Scale--psychometric testing in a Norwegian context.

    PubMed

    Wangensteen, Sigrid; Johansson, Inger S; Nordström, Gun

    2015-01-01

    The aim was to test the construct validity of the Nurse Competence Scale. The Nurse Competence Scale has been used in hospital settings for various purposes in several countries. Despite this, confirmatory factor analyses are scarcely reported. The present study is based on re-analyses of data from 2007 (i.e. psychometric testing) and 593 newly graduated nurses working in various contexts were included. Confirmatory as well as exploratory factor analyses (Principal Component Analysis) were carried out. The original 7-factor model of the Nurse Competence Scale (73 items) was not confirmed. The exploratory factor analyses resulted in a Norwegian Nurse Competence Scale consisting of 46 items in the following competence categories: Planning and delivery of care, Teaching functions, Professional leadership, Research utilization and nursing values and Professional awareness. The results underline the needs for psychometric testing of an instrument after translation processes. The instrument is suitable for describing and comparing nurse competence for various reasons. It may also be helpful in creating competence development programs at an individual as well as at an organizational level. Further studies with a broader sample are recommended.

  18. [Psychometric properties of the Adolescent Sexism Detection (ASD) scale].

    PubMed

    Recio, Patricia; Cuadrado, Isabel; Ramos, Esther

    2007-08-01

    In this article, it is assumed that gender violence, or violence against women, has mainly a sociocultural basis. A scale (Adolescent Sexism Detection; ASD) to detect sexism in adolescents was developed and its psychometric properties were analysed. 245 adolescents between 14 and 17 years of age participated in the study. As a result of the factor analyses carried out, the hostile and benevolent dimensions of sexism were clearly differentiated. Convergent validity of the scale was confirmed by its high correlations with the Ambivalent Sexism Inventory (ASI). Participants scored higher in benevolent than in hostile sexism, an effect even stronger in female participants. These findings suggest that the ASD scale is a valid instrument to measure sexism among adolescents. The main findings of this study are compared to those obtained in other studies using the ASI. The potential of this scale to appropriately detect sexism among adolescents is discussed.

  19. Psychometric Evaluation of the Role Strain Scale: The Persian Version

    PubMed Central

    Kolagari, Shohreh; Zagheri Tafreshi, Mansoureh; Rassouli, Maryam; Kavousi, Amir

    2014-01-01

    Background: Nursing teachers have difficulties fulfilling multiple roles expectations and balancing the various dimensions of their roles that may lead to role strain. In order to lack of culturally and academically proper scale in Iran to measure role strain in nursing teachers, localizing a foreign scale in this field is necessary. Objectives: The objective of this study was psychometric evaluation of the Role Strain Scale (RSS) and confirming its structural model in an Iranian population. Materials and Methods: The present cross- sectional study was conducted in 2012, comprising 302 nursing teachers from around the country who were selected using stratified- cluster sampling. Psychometric evaluation process of the RSS was carried out by Face, content and constructs validity (confirmatory and exploratory factor analysis). Reliability was examined using test-retest and Cronbach’s alpha for internal consistency reliability. Results: In the primary results, in spite of being approved by face and content validity, in Construct validity, fitness indices of original Role Strain Scale showed no satisfactory findings in Iranian data. Therefore, some items from the structural model of original version were extracted by exploratory factor analysis and a five–factor model with 33 items was obtained. These factors were role conflict, role ambiguity, role overload, role incompetence, and role incongruity. New model as Persian version of RSS was confirmed by calculating fitness indices such as GFI = 0.93, AGFI = 0.94, NFI = 0.91, RMSEA = 0.093. Internal consistency reliability for the total scale and subscales were respectively 0.92, and 0.71-0.84. Results from Pearson correlation test indicate a high degree of test-retest reliability (r = 0. 89). ICC was also 0.91. Conclusions: This reliable and valid scale is academically appropriate for nursing teachers to measure role strain and helps detect and predict a multiplicity of role problems and consequently make educational

  20. The Early Intervention Parenting Self-Efficacy Scale (EIPSES): Scale Construction and Initial Psychometric Evidence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guimond, Amy B.; Wilcox, M. Jeanne; Lamorey, Suzanne G.

    2008-01-01

    The psychometric properties of an instrument designed to measure parenting efficacy within the context of early intervention, the Early Intervention Parenting Self-Efficacy Scale (EIPSES), were explored. One hundred seventeen caregivers of children receiving early intervention services completed the 20-item EIPSES. The scale was reduced to 16…

  1. Psychometric Development of the Research and Knowledge Scale

    PubMed Central

    Powell, Lauren R.; Ojukwu, Elizabeth; Person, Sharina D.; Allison, Jeroan; Rosal, Milagros C.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Many research participants are misinformed about research terms, procedures, and goals; however, no validated instruments exist to assess individual’s comprehension of health-related research information. We propose research literacy as a concept that incorporates understanding about the purpose and nature of research. Objectives: We developed the Research and Knowledge Scale (RaKS) to measure research literacy in a culturally, literacy-sensitive manner. We describe its development and psychometric properties. Research Design: Qualitative methods were used to assess perspectives of research participants and researchers. Literature and informed consent reviews were conducted to develop initial items. These data were used to develop initial domains and items of the RaKS, and expert panel reviews and cognitive pretesting were done to refine the scale. We conducted psychometric analyses to evaluate the scale. Subjects: The cross-sectional survey was administered to a purposive community-based sample (n=430) using a Web-based data collection system and paper. Measures: We did classic theory testing on individual items and assessed test-retest reliability and Kuder-Richardson-20 for internal consistency. We conducted exploratory factor analysis and analysis of variance to assess differences in mean research literacy scores in sociodemographic subgroups. Results: The RaKS is comprised of 16 items, with a Kuder-Richardson-20 estimate of 0.81 and test-retest reliability 0.84. There were differences in mean scale scores by race/ethnicity, age, education, income, and health literacy (all P<0.01). Conclusions: This study provides preliminary evidence for the reliability and validity of the RaKS. This scale can be used to measure research participants’ understanding about health-related research processes and identify areas to improve informed decision-making about research participation. PMID:27579914

  2. Spanish and English Neuropsychological Assessment Scales (SENAS): Further Development and Psychometric Characteristics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mungas, Dan; Reed, Bruce R.; Crane, Paul K.; Haan, Mary N.; Gonzalez, Hector

    2004-01-01

    The Spanish and English Neuropsychological Assessment Scales were devised to be a broad set of psychometrically matched measures with equivalent Spanish and English versions. Study 1 in this report used item response theory methods to refine scales. Results strongly supported psychometric matching across English and Spanish versions and, for most…

  3. Weight Bias Internalization Scale: Psychometric Properties and Population Norms

    PubMed Central

    Hilbert, Anja; Baldofski, Sabrina; Zenger, Markus; Löwe, Bernd; Kersting, Anette; Braehler, Elmar

    2014-01-01

    Objective Internalizing the pervasive weight bias commonly directed towards individuals with overweight and obesity, co-occurs with increased psychopathology and impaired quality of life. This study sought to establish population norms and psychometric properties of the most widely used self-report questionnaire, the Weight Bias Internalization Scale (WBIS), in a representative community sample. Design and Methods In a survey of the German population, N = 1158 individuals with overweight and obesity were assessed with the WBIS and self-report measures for convergent validation. Results Item analysis revealed favorable item-total correlation of all but one WBIS item. With this item removed, item homogeneity and internal consistency were excellent. The one-factor structure of the WBIS was confirmed using confirmatory factor analysis. Convergent validity was shown through significant associations with measures of depressive and somatoform symptoms. The WBIS contributed to the explanation of variance in depressive and somatoform symptoms over and above body mass index. Higher WBIS scores were found in women than in men, in individuals with obesity than in individuals with overweight, and in those with lower education or income than those with higher education or income. Sex-specific norms were provided. Conclusions The results showed good psychometric properties of the WBIS after removal of one item. Future research is warranted on further indicators of reliability and validity, for example, retest reliability, sensitivity to change, and prognostic validity. PMID:24489713

  4. Psychometric Properties of the Centrality of Pain Scale

    PubMed Central

    Morasco, Benjamin J.; Turk, Dennis C.; Nicolaidis, Christina

    2015-01-01

    The Centrality of Pain Scale (COPS) is a recently developed, patient-centered, 10-item self-report measure designed to assess how central, or dominating, individuals with chronic pain perceive pain in their life. The COPS previously underwent initial development and validation, and preliminary results suggested that the measure had excellent psychometric properties and COPS scores were associated with important clinical factors. The purpose of the present study is to examine the psychometric properties of the COPS in a sample of individuals with mixed chronic pain diagnoses (n=178) being treated at a US Veterans Affairs Medical Center. Principal component analysis of COPS items revealed a single factor and all items loaded highly. The COPS had high internal consistency (Cronbach’s alpha=0.902) and was significantly correlated with other measures of pain, mental health, psychological factors associated with pain, and chronic pain coping styles, suggesting convergent and divergent validity. Hierarchical linear regression analyses indicated that COPS score was independently associated with both pain severity and interference. Future research should evaluate the generalizability of the COPS in different samples, its responsiveness to treatment, and the extent to which pain centrality may be a focus of non-pharmacological interventions for chronic pain. PMID:25958315

  5. The Greek Nurses' job satisfaction scale: development and psychometric assessment.

    PubMed

    Moumtzoglou, Anastasius

    2010-01-01

    The growing literature relating to job satisfaction among nurses concludes that more research is required to understand the organizational, professional, and personal variables that improve nurse satisfaction and retention. This study developed and psychometrically tested a nurse satisfaction questionnaire, suitable for the nurses' working conditions in Greece. A cross-sectional survey, in Greek, was conducted in three public hospitals. Two-hundred and twenty-five Greek nurses evaluated the psychometric properties of the Greek Nurses' Job Satisfaction Scale (GNJSS). The 18-item questionnaire showed a high degree of internal consistency (Cronbach's alpha = 0.907) and revealed four factors that are consistent with the predetermined subscales and the conceptual base of the GNJSS. The factors, which explain 62.420% of variance, are associated with interaction and recognition, leadership style and organizational policies, self-growth and responsibility, and remuneration and work itself. Although it would be useful to carry out further analyses to assess time-based properties of reliability, the GNJSS questionnaire is a reliable and valid instrument to assess nurses' job satisfaction.

  6. Psychometric properties of the modified fatigue impact scale.

    PubMed

    Larson, Rebecca D

    2013-01-01

    Psychometric assessments are tests or questionnaires that have been designed to measure constructs of interest in an individual or a target population. A goal of many of these self-report instruments is to provide researchers with the ability to gather subjective information in a manner that might allow for quantitative analysis and interpretation of these results. This requires the instrument of choice to have adequate psychometric properties of reliability and validity. Much research has been conducted on creating self-report quality of life questionnaires for individuals with multiple sclerosis (MS). This article focuses on one in particular, the Modified Fatigue Impact Scale (MFIS). The article starts with a brief description of the rationale, construction, and scoring of the inventory. Next, the best available reliability and validity data on the MFIS are presented. The article concludes with a brief discussion on the interpretation of scores, followed by suggestions for future research. This summative analysis is intended to examine whether the instrument is adequately measuring the impact of fatigue and whether the scores allow for meaningful interpretations.

  7. Beliefs about research and social work practice: a systematic psychometric review of scales.

    PubMed

    Gregory, Virgil L

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of the author in this systematic psychometric review includes: providing social work researchers, educators, and administrators with a summary of descriptive psychometric information pertaining to scales which measure social workers' beliefs about research and social work practice, evaluating chronological changes in psychometric/statistical methodology, and summarizing the role current and future scale development efforts have in improving the use of evidence-based social work practice. Using predetermined inclusion and exclusion criteria, electronic databases and reference lists of included studies were reviewed and coded for methodological and psychometric properties. Seventeen studies satisfied inclusion and exclusion criteria. Eleven unique scales measuring social worker beliefs regarding research and social work practice were identified. The majority of scales and subscales had Cronbach's alphas that exceeded .70. Most of the scales had evidence of content, factorial, construct, and/or criterion validity. Strategies for improving psychometric research and implications for evidence-based social work practice are discussed.

  8. Psychometric properties of the Fatigue Severity Scale in polio survivors.

    PubMed

    Burger, Helena; Franchignoni, Franco; Puzic, Natasa; Giordano, Andrea

    2010-12-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate by means of classical test theory and Rasch analysis the scaling characteristics and psychometric properties of the Fatigue Severity Scale (FSS) in polio survivors. A questionnaire,consisting of five general questions (sex, age, age at time of acute polio, sequelae of polio, and new symptoms), the FSS, and three questions from the Visual Analog Scale questions on fatigue was sent to all 196 polio survivors at the Institute for Rehabilitation in Ljubljana. Responses were assessed in terms of Cronbach's a, item-to-total correlation, factor analysis, and Rasch analysis. Of the128 (65.3%) valid questionnaires returned, those presenting no missing values were used for subsequent analyses (n = 117). The FSS showed good internal consistency: Cronbach's a was greater than 0.95,item-to-total correlation ranged from 0.68 to 0.88. A reduction from seven to three rating categories was necessary to comply with criteria for correct category function. Item difficulty estimates spanned from – 0.91to + 1.09 logits. No item bias was found for sex and age.The internal consistency of FSS was high and its item separation reliability good, indicating a satisfactory replicability of item placement in other samples. In conclusion, Rasch analysis enabled us to confirm the validity of FSS (in its 8-item version, without item 1) as a measure of the severity and impact of physical symptoms of fatigue in polio survivors, so providing a useful starting point for further studies aimed at examining additional psychometric aspects and confirming the appropriateness of the simplification of its rating categories.

  9. A Job-Seeking Self-Efficacy Scale for People with Physical Disabilities: Preliminary Development and Psychometric Testing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barlow, Julie; Wright, Chris; Cullen, Lesley

    2002-01-01

    Study sought to develop and conduct preliminary testing of the psychometric properties of a job-seeking self-efficacy (JSS) scale that reflected the experiences of people with physical disabilities. Greater job seeking self-efficacy and perceived ability to manage disability at interview were associated with more positive psychological well-being.…

  10. Psychometric properties of the Child Anxiety Life Interference Scale (CALIS).

    PubMed

    Lyneham, Heidi J; Sburlati, Elizabeth S; Abbott, Maree J; Rapee, Ronald M; Hudson, Jennifer L; Tolin, David F; Carlson, Sarah E

    2013-10-01

    This paper describes the development and psychometric evaluation of a parent and child report measure of life interference and impairment associated with childhood anxiety, the Child Anxiety Life Interference Scale (CALIS). The CALIS is designed to measure life interference and impairment experienced by the child from the child (9 items) and parent (16 items) point of view and also the interference experienced by the parent in their own life. A total of 622 children between 6 and 17 years of age, and their parents, completed the CALIS. Results indicated that the CALIS has good internal consistency, moderate-to-high test re-test reliability, significant inter rater reliability, good convergent and divergent validity and is sensitive to treatment change. The CALIS is a reliable and valid tool for the assessment of life interference and impairment associated with anxiety disorders in childhood.

  11. Psychometric properties of the Adolescent Sleep Hygiene Scale.

    PubMed

    Storfer-Isser, Amy; Lebourgeois, Monique K; Harsh, John; Tompsett, Carolyn J; Redline, Susan

    2013-12-01

    This study evaluated the psychometric properties of the Adolescent Sleep Hygiene Scale (ASHS), a self-report measure assessing sleep practices theoretically important for optimal sleep. Data were collected on a community sample of 514 adolescents (16-19; 17.7 ± 0.4 years; 50% female) participating in the late adolescent examination of a longitudinal study on sleep and health. Sleep hygiene and daytime sleepiness were obtained from adolescent reports, behavior from caretaker reports, and sleep-wake estimation on weekdays from wrist actigraphy. Confirmatory factor analysis indicated the empirical and conceptually based factor structure were similar for six of the eight proposed sleep hygiene domains. Internal consistency of the revised scale (ASHSr) was α = 0.84; subscale alphas were: physiological: α = 0.60; behavioural arousal: α = 0.62; cognitive/emotional: α = 0.81; sleep environment: α = 0.61; sleep stability: α = 0.68; daytime sleep: α = 0.78. Sleep hygiene scores were associated positively with sleep duration (r = 0.16) and sleep efficiency (r = 0.12) and negatively with daytime sleepiness (r = -0.26). Results of extreme-groups analyses comparing ASHSr scores in the lowest and highest quintile provided further evidence for concurrent validity. Correlations between sleep hygiene scores and caretaker reports of school competence, internalizing and externalizing behaviours provided support for convergent validity. These findings indicate that the ASHSr has satisfactory psychometric properties for a research instrument and is a useful research tool for assessing sleep hygiene in adolescents.

  12. Psychometric Properties of "Community Assessment of Psychic Experiences": Review and Meta-analyses.

    PubMed

    Mark, Winifred; Toulopoulou, Timothea

    2016-01-01

    The Community Assessment of Psychic Experiences (CAPE) has been used extensively as a measurement for psychosis proneness in clinical and research settings. However, no prior review and meta-analysis have comprehensively examined psychometric properties (reliability and validity) of CAPE scores across different studies. To study CAPE's internal reliability--ie, how well scale items correlate with one another--111 studies were reviewed. Of these, 18 reported unique internal reliability coefficients using data at hand, which were aggregated in a meta-analysis. Furthermore, to confirm the number and nature of factors tapped by CAPE, 17 factor analytic studies were reviewed and subjected to meta-analysis in cases of discrepancy. Results suggested that CAPE scores were psychometrically reliable--ie, scores obtained could be attributed to true score variance. Our review of factor analytic studies supported a 3-factor model for CAPE consisting of "Positive", "Negative", and "Depressive" subscales; and a tripartite structure for the Negative dimension consisting of "Social withdrawal", "Affective flattening", and "Avolition" subdimensions. Meta-analysis of factor analytic studies of the Positive dimension revealed a tridimensional structure consisting of "Bizarre experiences", "Delusional ideations", and "Perceptual anomalies". Information on reliability and validity of CAPE scores is important for ensuring accurate measurement of the psychosis proneness phenotype, which in turn facilitates early detection and intervention for psychotic disorders. Apart from enhancing the understanding of psychometric properties of CAPE scores, our review revealed questionable reporting practices possibly reflecting insufficient understanding regarding the significance of psychometric properties. We recommend increased focus on psychometrics in psychology programmes and clinical journals.

  13. Psychometric Characteristics of the UCLA Loneliness Scale: A Study with Iranian College Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hojat, Mohammadreza

    1982-01-01

    The psychometric characteristics of the revised UCLA Loneliness Scale in Iranian groups correlated significantly with measures of other conceptually-related variables such as depression, anxiety, and neuroticism. Factorial structure supported the multidimensionality of the scale. (Author/PN)

  14. Psychometric Properties of Raw and Scale Scores on Mixed-Format Tests

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kolen, Michael J.; Lee, Won-Chan

    2011-01-01

    This paper illustrates that the psychometric properties of scores and scales that are used with mixed-format educational tests can impact the use and interpretation of the scores that are reported to examinees. Psychometric properties that include reliability and conditional standard errors of measurement are considered in this paper. The focus is…

  15. Evaluation of the psychometric properties of the Hungarian quality of life in depression scale.

    PubMed

    Viola, Reka; Lovas, Kornelia; Szabo, Zoltan; Czenner, Zsuzsanna; Meads, David M; Soos, Gyongyver; McKenna, Stephen P

    2008-01-01

    The paper describes the adaptation and psychometric evaluation of the Hungarian version of the quality of life in depression scale. The adaptation procedure involved: bilingual translation; field-testing for face and content validity; and assessment of instrument's reliability and construct validity. The new language version was shown to be well-accepted by respondents and to have excellent psychometric properties.

  16. Psychometric Properties of the MMPI-2-RF Somatic Complaints (RC1) Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, Michael L.; Locke, Dona E. C.

    2010-01-01

    The MMPI-2 Restructured Form (MMPI-2-RF; Tellegen & Ben-Porath, 2008) was designed to be psychometrically superior to its MMPI-2 counterpart. However, the test has yet to be extensively evaluated in diverse clinical settings. The purpose of this study was to examine the psychometric properties of the MMPI-2-RF Somatic Complaints (RC1) scale in…

  17. Psychometric development of the hypersexual behavior consequences scale.

    PubMed

    Reid, Rory C; Garos, Sheila; Fong, Timothy

    2012-09-01

    Background and aims The past decade has seen an increased interest in understanding hypersexual behavior and its associated features. Beyond the obvious risks for sexually transmitted infections, there is a paucity of literature examining specific challenges encountered by hypersexual individuals. This study investigated and developed a new scale, the Hypersexual Behavior Consequences Scale (HBCS), to assess the various consequences reported among hypersexual patients. Methods Participants were drawn from a sample of patients recruited in a DSM-5 Field Trial for Hypersexual Disorder (HD). Participants completed the Hypersexual Behavior Inventory, a structured diagnostic interview to assess for psychopathology and HD, and self-report measures of personality, life satisfaction, and the initial item pool for the HBCS. Results Factor analysis reduced the HBCS items to a single factor solution which showed high internal consistency and stability over time. Higher HBCS scores were positively correlated with higher levels of emotional dysregulation, impulsivity, and stress proneness and lower levels of satisfaction with life and happiness. HBCS scores among the hypersexual patients were significantly higher than non-hypersexual patients. Conclusions The HBCS possesses good psychometric properties and appears to capture various consequences associated with the DSM-5 proposed criteria for HD. The HBCS can be used to aid clinicians and researchers in identifying consequences associated with hypersexual behavior. The HBCS may also prove a useful tool to guide treatment interventions aimed at reducing the negative impact of hypersexuality in patient populations.

  18. Psychometric properties of the self-rating organization scale with adult samples.

    PubMed

    Takeda, Toshinobu; Tsuji, Yui; Ando, Mizuho

    2016-01-01

    Organization skills are defined broadly to include both materials and temporal features. Given its symptoms and neurobiological features, attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) should be susceptible to impairment in organization. A valid organization scale is imperative to assess and intervene individuals with ADHD. However, there is no validated organization scale in Japan. Referring to existing scales and clinical experience, the self-rating organization scale (SOS) was developed and tested in terms of its psychometric properties with 1,017 adults and students including 47 adults with ADHD. Additionally, cutoffs for disorganization were set for clinical utility. Three factors (materials disorganization, temporal disorganization, and mess) were extracted by factor analyses. The index for reliability and validity of the SOS was acceptable. The factor "mess" could reflect the unique aspect of the Japanese environment. Further study is needed to enhance the clinical utility of the SOS.

  19. Psychometric properties of the self-rating organization scale with adult samples

    PubMed Central

    Takeda, Toshinobu; Tsuji, Yui; Ando, Mizuho

    2016-01-01

    Organization skills are defined broadly to include both materials and temporal features. Given its symptoms and neurobiological features, attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) should be susceptible to impairment in organization. A valid organization scale is imperative to assess and intervene individuals with ADHD. However, there is no validated organization scale in Japan. Referring to existing scales and clinical experience, the self-rating organization scale (SOS) was developed and tested in terms of its psychometric properties with 1,017 adults and students including 47 adults with ADHD. Additionally, cutoffs for disorganization were set for clinical utility. Three factors (materials disorganization, temporal disorganization, and mess) were extracted by factor analyses. The index for reliability and validity of the SOS was acceptable. The factor “mess” could reflect the unique aspect of the Japanese environment. Further study is needed to enhance the clinical utility of the SOS. PMID:27826192

  20. Cognitive Functioning Self-Assessment Scale (CFSS): Further psychometric data.

    PubMed

    Annunziata, Maria Antonietta; Muzzatti, Barbara; Flaiban, Cristiana; Giovannini, Lorena; Lucchini, Guido

    2016-09-20

    The "Cognitive Functioning Self-Assessment Scale" (CFSS) is a questionnaire specifically developed for the self-reporting of cognitive functioning in non-neurologic settings. A previous published study had showed its good reading comprehension and face validity, defining it as monofactorial and reliable. This paper provides further psychometric data and norms derived on a larger sample from the general population. Our work is divided into two studies. In Study 1, 194 adult patients in a General Practitioner study (27.8% retested after 2 weeks) have filled-in the CFSS together with the CES-D, the State Anxiety subscale of the STAI, and a clinical and socio-demographic data form. The Cronbach's alpha of the CFSS was 0.878; the temporal stability was 0.794; in addition, CFSS showed substantial and moderate associations respectively with depression and state anxiety measures. In Study 2, CFSS data on 476 participants have been considered. CFSS score was associated to age (p < 0.01) and education (p < 0.01). In addition, CFSS descriptive statistics according to age and education levels were provided. In conclusion, although further research is surely necessary to refine the CFSS, the herein presented data together with the already published results, confirm the validity and reliability of this tool.

  1. Psychometric Properties of the Parent-Infant Caregiving Touch Scale

    PubMed Central

    Koukounari, Artemis; Pickles, Andrew; Hill, Jonathan; Sharp, Helen

    2015-01-01

    Recent work in animals suggests that the extent of early tactile stimulation by parents of offspring is an important element in early caregiving. We evaluate the psychometric properties of a new parent-report measure designed to assess frequency of tactile stimulation across multiple caregiving domains in infancy. We describe the full item set of the Parent-Infant Caregiving Touch Scale (PICTS) and, using data from a UK longitudinal Child Health and Development Study, the response frequencies and factor structure and whether it was invariant over two time points in early development (5 and 9 weeks). When their infant was 9 weeks old, 838 mothers responded on the PICTS while a stratified subsample of 268 mothers completed PICTS at an earlier 5 week old assessment (229 responded on both occasions). Three PICTS factors were identified reflecting stroking, holding and affective communication. These were moderately to strongly correlated at each of the two time points of interest and were unrelated to, and therefore distinct from, a traditional measure of maternal sensitivity at 7-months. A wholly stable psychometry over 5 and 9-week assessments was not identified which suggests that behavior profiles differ slightly for younger and older infants. Tests of measurement invariance demonstrated that all three factors are characterized by full configural and metric invariance, as well as a moderate degree of evidence of scalar invariance for the stroking factor. We propose the PICTS as a valuable new measure of important aspects of caregiving in infancy. PMID:26696945

  2. A psychometric assessment of the Circadian Amplitude and Phase Scale.

    PubMed

    Di Milia, Lee; Folkard, Simon; Hill, Joanne; Walker, Curtis

    2011-02-01

    The Circadian Amplitude and Phase Scale (CAPS) is a new self-report tool that aims to assess amplitude and phase. The CAPS consists of three factors made up of 38 items. Amplitude is posited to be assessed via two of these factors: time awareness (TA) and/or strength of preference (SOP). The remaining factor, phase, is assessed via the existing Preferences Scale (PS). Given there is no published research using this measure, the authors undertook two studies to examine its psychometric properties and construct validity. In a sample of 351 North American students, the authors identified a three-factor 34-item model using principal components analysis. The components explained 39% of the variance, and scale reliability ranged from 0.73 (SOP) to 0.88 (PS). The correlations between the components were small, suggesting they are each assessing different constructs. Thus, it is unlikely TA and SOP may both be indicators of amplitude. The distributions for each scale were divided into two groups (≤ 25th and ≥ 75th percentiles), and these groups were used to assess construct validity using alertness ratings by time-of-day. The results from a multivariate general linear model indicated a significant difference (p < .001) in sleepiness ratings by time-of-day for the PS scale only. In the second study, the authors applied confirmatory factor analysis in an attempt to replicate the factor structure identified in the student sample in a working sample (n = 388). The results suggested the model fit was not optimal. Subsequent analysis suggested a 26-item model was a better fit, but it also was not optimal. The intercorrelations between the factors were larger than in the student sample but again small, indicating the constructs are independent measures. The inability to replicate the factor structure is most likely explained by the differences in the sample characteristics of age, sex, and perhaps difficulty in interpreting the items. The limitations of these studies

  3. Psychometric Validation of the Chinese Compulsive Internet Use Scale (CIUS) with Taiwanese High School Adolescents.

    PubMed

    Dhir, Amandeep; Chen, Sufen; Nieminen, Marko

    2015-12-01

    The recent development of internet infrastructure has fuelled a popular concern that young Asian internet users are experiencing Internet addiction due to excessive Internet use. In order to understand the phenomenon, psychometric validation of a 14-item Compulsive Internet Use Scale (CIUS), with 417 Chinese adolescents has been performed. Compared to other instruments for use with Chinese populations, e.g. the 20-item Internet Addiction Test (IAT) and the 26-item Chen Internet Addiction Scale, the CIUS is relatively concise, and easy to use for measuring and diagnosing Internet addiction. The present psychometric validation has found good factorial stability with a one-factor solution for the CIUS. The internal consistency and model fit indices were very good, and even better than any previous CIUS validations. The Chinese CIUS is a valid and reliable self-reporting instrument for examining compulsive Internet use among Chinese adolescents. Other findings included: male adolescents tend to experience more compulsive Internet use than their female counterparts, and CIUS scores were positively correlated with the daily Internet use time and negatively correlated with the academic performance of the participants. No significant relationships between the CIUS, ICT accessibility, family economic condition, parental occupation or religion were found.

  4. Psychometric Evaluation of the Restructured Clinical Scales of the MMPI-2

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simms, Leonard J.; Casillas, Alex; Clark, Lee Anna; Watson, David; Doebbeling, Bradley N.

    2005-01-01

    Conceptual overlap and heterogeneity have long been noted as weaknesses of the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory's clinical scales. Restructured clinical (RC) scales recently were developed to address these concerns (A. Tellegen et al., 2003). The authors evaluated the psychometric properties of the RC scales in psychology clinic clients…

  5. Development and Psychometric Evaluation of the High School Chemistry Self-Efficacy Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aydin, Yesim Capa; Uzuntiryaki, Esen

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to develop a scale assessing high school students' self-efficacy beliefs in chemistry-related tasks and to assess psychometric properties of scores on this scale. A pilot study with a sample of 150 high school students provided initial evidence for two-factor structure of 16-item scale, named High School Chemistry…

  6. The Child PTSD Symptom Scale: Psychometric Properties in Female Adolescent Sexual Assault Survivors

    PubMed Central

    Gillihan, Seth J.; Aderka, Idan M.; Conklin, Phoebe H.; Capaldi, Sandra; Foa, Edna B.

    2013-01-01

    Traumatic experiences are common among youths and can lead to posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). In order to identify traumatized children who need PTSD treatment, instruments that can accurately and efficiently evaluate pediatric PTSD are needed. One such measure is the Child PTSD Symptom Scale (CPSS), which has been found to be a reliable and valid measure of PTSD symptom severity in school-age children exposed to natural disasters (Foa, Johnson, Feeny & Treadwell, 2001). However, the psychometric properties of the CPSS are not known in youths who have experienced other types of trauma. The current study aims to fill this gap by examining the psychometric properties of the interview (CPSS-I) and self-report (CPSS-SR) administrations of the CPSS in a sample of 91 female youths with sexual abuse-related PTSD, a population that is targeted in many treatment studies. Scores on both the CPSS-I and CPSS-SR demonstrated good to excellent internal consistency. One week test-retest reliability assessed for CPSS-SR scores was excellent (r = .86); inter-rater reliability of CPSS-I scores was also excellent (r = .87). Symptom-based diagnostic agreement between the CPSS-SR and CPSS-I was excellent at 85.5%; scores on both the CPSS-SR and CPSS-I also demonstrated good convergent validity (74.5–76.5% agreement) with the PTSD module of The Schedule of Affective Disorders and Schizophrenia for School-Age Children–Revised for DSM-IV (K-SADS; Kaufman, Birmaher, Brent, & Rao, 1997). The strong psychometric properties of the CPSS render it a valuable instrument for PTSD screening as well as for assessing symptom severity. PMID:22867010

  7. Assessing decentering: validation, psychometric properties, and clinical usefulness of the Experiences Questionnaire in a Spanish sample.

    PubMed

    Soler, Joaquim; Franquesa, Alba; Feliu-Soler, Albert; Cebolla, Ausias; García-Campayo, Javier; Tejedor, Rosa; Demarzo, Marcelo; Baños, Rosa; Pascual, Juan Carlos; Portella, Maria J

    2014-11-01

    Decentering is defined as the ability to observe one's thoughts and feelings in a detached manner. The Experiences Questionnaire (EQ) is a self-report instrument that originally assessed decentering and rumination. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the psychometric properties of the Spanish version of EQ-Decentering and to explore its clinical usefulness. The 11-item EQ-Decentering subscale was translated into Spanish and psychometric properties were examined in a sample of 921 adult individuals, 231 with psychiatric disorders and 690 without. The subsample of nonpsychiatric participants was also split according to their previous meditative experience (meditative participants, n=341; and nonmeditative participants, n=349). Additionally, differences among these three subgroups were explored to determine clinical validity of the scale. Finally, EQ-Decentering was administered twice in a group of borderline personality disorder, before and after a 10-week mindfulness intervention. Confirmatory factor analysis indicated acceptable model fit, sbχ(2)=243.8836 (p<.001), CFI=.939, GFI=.936, SRMR=.040, and RMSEA=.06 (.060-.077), and psychometric properties were found to be satisfactory (reliability: Cronbach's α=.893; convergent validity: r>.46; and divergent validity: r<-.35). The scale detected changes in decentering after a 10-session intervention in mindfulness (t=-4.692, p<.00001). Differences among groups were significant (F=134.8, p<.000001), where psychiatric participants showed the lowest scores compared to nonpsychiatric meditative and nonmeditative participants. The Spanish version of the EQ-Decentering is a valid and reliable instrument to assess decentering either in clinical and nonclinical samples. In addition, the findings show that EQ-Decentering seems an adequate outcome instrument to detect changes after mindfulness-based interventions.

  8. Review of outcome measurement instruments in Alzheimer's disease drug trials: psychometric properties of global scales.

    PubMed

    Oremus, M; Perrault, A; Demers, L; Wolfson, C

    2000-01-01

    The use of global outcome measures with strong psychometric properties in Alzheimer's disease (AD) drug trials is encouraged. This article focuses on Clinician Global Impression of Change scales, the Clinical Dementia Rating, and the Global Deterioration Scale to provide (1) a review of psychometric properties, (2) a critique of how these properties are assessed in the literature, and (3) a basis for evaluating, from the standpoint of psychometric properties, the appropriateness of using a given global scale in a drug trial. Reported reliability and validity estimates for the aforementioned scales range from fair to very good, but small sample sizes and/or inappropriate measures of correlation weaken the quality of the evidence. There is also a dearth of published information on responsiveness to change. Researchers planning AD drug trials should consider these issues, along with the interval between test administrations for test-retest reliability, to help select appropriate global outcome measurement instruments.

  9. Measuring Procrastination: Psychometric Properties of the Norwegian Versions of the Irrational Procrastination Scale (IPS) and the Pure Procrastination Scale (PPS)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Svartdal, Frode

    2017-01-01

    Procrastination has been defined in different ways. Two instruments--the Irrational Procrastination Scale (IPS) and the Pure Procrastination Scale (PPS)--focus on a core problem in procrastination--the irrational delay of intended behavior. The present paper examined the psychometric properties of the Norwegian translations of these scales. In…

  10. Assessing Gifted Students' Beliefs about Intelligence with a Psychometrically Defensible Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Park, Sunhee; Callahan, Carolyn M.; Ryoo, Ji Hoon

    2016-01-01

    The psychometric qualities of the six- and eight-item implicit theories of intelligence scales that Dweck suggested were compared using a confirmatory factor analysis with data from 239 gifted students (100 students in Grades 5-7, 139 students in Grades 8-11). The results indicate that the six-item scale fits the data better than the eight-item…

  11. Professor-Student Rapport Scale: Psychometric Properties of the Brief Version

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ryan, Rebecca

    2014-01-01

    The original Professor-Student Rapport Scale contained 34 items and predicted several single-item student outcomes. A high level of internal consistency encouraged the development of a shorter measure in order to address apparent redundancy. Our goals in the current study were to provide psychometric data for the brief version of the scale and to…

  12. A Psychometric Revision of the European American Values Scale for Asian Americans Using the Rasch Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hong, Sehee; Kim, Bryan S. K.; Wolfe, Maren M.

    2005-01-01

    In this study, the 18-item European American Values Scale for Asian Americans (M. M. Wolfe, P. H. Yang, E. C. Wong, & D. R. Atkinson, 2001) was revised on the basis of results from a psychometric analysis using the Rasch Model (G. Rasch, 1960). The results led to the establishment of the 25-item European American Values Scale for Asian…

  13. A Psychometric Examination of English and Spanish Versions of the Revised Conflict Tactics Scales

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Connelly, Cynthia D.; Newton, Rae R.; Aarons, Gregory A.

    2005-01-01

    The psychometric properties of the Revised Conflict Tactics Scales (CTS2) are examined for English-speaking (n = 211) and Spanish-speaking (n = 194) Latino women. Internal consistency of total scale scores is satisfactory (Cronbach's alpha of .70 to .84). However, subscale alphas range from .46 to .80. Confirmatory factor analyses support five…

  14. Career Adapt-Abilities Scale--Icelandic Form: Psychometric Properties and Construct Validity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vilhjalmsdottir, Guobjorg; Kjartansdottir, Guorun Birna; Smaradottir, Sigriour Briet; Einarsdottir, Sif

    2012-01-01

    This study examined the psychometric characteristics and construct validity of the Icelandic form of the Career Adapt-Abilities Scale (CAAS-Iceland). The CAAS consists of four scales that measure concern, control, curiosity, and confidence as psychosocial resources for managing occupational transitions, developmental tasks, and work traumas. The…

  15. The Psychometric Properties of Scales that Assess Market Orientation and Team Leadership Skills: A Preliminary Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kline, Theresa J. B.

    2003-01-01

    This study assessed the psychometric properties of two scales that can be used in predicting team performance: specifically how team members assess the market orientation of their work unit as well the leadership skills present in the team. The first scale is a three-dimensional assessment of the unit's market orientation (innovative, process, or…

  16. Internet Administration of the Paper-and-Pencil Gifted Rating Scale: Assessing Psychometric Equivalence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yarnell, Jordy B.; Pfeiffer, Steven I.

    2015-01-01

    The present study examined the psychometric equivalence of administering a computer-based version of the Gifted Rating Scale (GRS) compared with the traditional paper-and-pencil GRS-School Form (GRS-S). The GRS-S is a teacher-completed rating scale used in gifted assessment. The GRS-Electronic Form provides an alternative method of administering…

  17. Psychometric Characteristics of the California Preschool Social Competence Scale in a Spanish Population Sample

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Julvez, Jordi; Forns, Maria; Ribas-Fito, Nuria; Mazon, Carlos; Torrent, Maties; Garcia-Esteban, Raquel; Ellison-Loschmann, Lis; Sunyer, Jordi

    2008-01-01

    Research Findings: Few rating scales measure social competence in very young Spanish or Catalan children. We aimed to analyze the psychometric characteristics of the California Preschool Social Competence Scale (CPSCS) when applied to a Spanish- and Catalan-speaking population. Children were rated by their respective teachers within 6 months…

  18. Psychometric Properties of the PsychoSomatic Problems Scale: A Rasch Analysis on Adolescent Data

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hagquist, Curt

    2008-01-01

    The PsychoSomatic Problems (PSP)-scale is built upon eight items intended to tap information about psychosomatic problems among schoolchildren and adolescents in general populations. The purpose of the study is to analyse the psychometric properties of the PSP-scale by means of the Rasch model, with a focus on the operating characteristics of the…

  19. Development and Psychometric Evaluation of the Yale-Brown Obsessive-Compulsive Scale--Second Edition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Storch, Eric A.; Rasmussen, Steven A.; Price, Lawrence H.; Larson, Michael J.; Murphy, Tanya K.; Goodman, Wayne K.

    2010-01-01

    The Yale-Brown Obsessive-Compulsive Scale (Y-BOCS; Goodman, Price, Rasmussen, Mazure, Delgado, et al., 1989) is acknowledged as the gold standard measure of obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) symptom severity. A number of areas where the Y-BOCS may benefit from revision have emerged in past psychometric studies of the Severity Scale and Symptom…

  20. A psychometric appraisal of the Jefferson Scale of Empathy using law students

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Brett; Sifris, Adiva; Lynch, Marty

    2016-01-01

    Background A growing body of literature indicates that empathic behaviors are positively linked, in several ways, with the professional performance and mental well-being of lawyers and law students. It is therefore important to assess empathy levels among law students using psychometrically sound tools that are suitable for this cohort. Participants and methods The 20-item Jefferson Scale of Empathy – Health Profession Students Version was adapted for a law context (eg, the word “health care” became “legal”), and the new Jefferson Scale of Empathy – Law Students (JSE-L-S) version was completed by 275 students at Monash University, Melbourne, Australia. Data were subjected to principal component analysis. Results Four factors emerged from the principal component analysis (“understanding the client’s perspective”, “responding to clients’ experiences and emotions”, “responding to clients’ cues and behaviors”, and “standing in clients’ shoes”), which accounted for 46.7% of the total variance. The reliability of the factors varied, but the overall 18-item JSE-L-S yielded a Cronbach’s alpha coefficient of 0.80. Several patterns among the item loadings were similar to those reported in studies using other versions of the Jefferson Scale of Empathy. Conclusion The JSE-L-S appears to be a reliable measure of empathy among undergraduate law students, which could help provide insights into law student welfare and future performance as legal practitioners. Additional evaluation of the JSE-L-S is required to disambiguate some of the minor findings explored. Adjustments may improve the psychometric properties. PMID:27524924

  1. Psychometric properties and factorial structure of the Spence Children's Anxiety Scale (SCAS) in Spanish adolescents.

    PubMed

    Orgilés, Mireia; Spence, Susan H; Marzo, Juan C; Méndez, Xavier; Espada, José P

    2014-01-01

    The Spence Children's Anxiety Scale is an instrument widely applied in the assessment of the most common anxiety disorders in children and adolescents. This study examines its psychometric properties and the factorial structure in a large community sample of Spanish-speaking adolescents (N = 1,374) aged 13 to 17 years. The scale demonstrated strong internal consistency and good convergent and discriminant validity. Factor analysis confirmed the 6-factor original model, providing a good fit of the data for the Spanish sample. The good psychometric properties support its use by clinicians and researchers, adding evidence to the international empirical support for this measure.

  2. The development and psychometric testing of the horizontal violence scale.

    PubMed

    Longo, Joy; Newman, David

    2014-12-01

    Inappropriate behaviors of healthcare workers can threaten the delivery of safe, quality care. The purpose of this research was to develop a research instrument specific to the construct of horizontal violence and conduct foundational psychometric testing of the newly developed instrument. The overall findings on the fit indices suggest that this model does adequately measure the underlying construct of horizontal violence. The instrument can be used as a way to determine the existence and extent of horizontal violence in practice settings and used to augment the study of the work environment, particularly in relation to healthy work environments.

  3. Validation of the Flourishing Scale and Scale of Positive and Negative Experience in Portugal

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silva, Ana Junca; Caetano, Antonio

    2013-01-01

    The Flourishing Scale (FS) and the Scale of Positive and Negative Experience (SPANE) created by Diener et al. ("Soc Indic Res" 97:143-156, 2010) are instruments that assess psychological flourishing and feelings (positive and negative, and the difference between the two). In this study, the psychometric properties of both scales were…

  4. The Children’s Behavior Questionnaire very short scale: Psychometric properties and development of a one-item temperament scale

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Little research has been conducted on the psychometrics of the very short scale (36 items) of the Children’s Behavior Questionnaire, and no one-item temperament scale has been tested for use in applied work. In this study, 237 United States caregivers completed a survey to define their child’s behav...

  5. Psychometric properties of the Turkish version of the Fraboni Scale of Ageism.

    PubMed

    Kutlu, Yasemin; Kucuk, Leyla; Yildiz Findik, Ummu

    2012-12-01

    In this study, the reliability, validity, and psychometric properties of the Turkish version of the Fraboni Scale of Ageism were assessed. The psychometric properties of the scale were studied through a descriptive and correlational design. The study sample consisted of 231 healthy people living in the Marmara region of Turkey. In order to obtain three sets of data, a questionnaire was designed containing demographic questions and the Scale. The content validity index for the full scale was 0.98. The α coefficient for 25 items was 0.84, and the split-half reliability of the Fraboni Scale of Ageism was 0.81. The three factors represented 38.31% of the variance. In this study, we concluded that the Turkish version of the Fraboni Scale of Ageism is a suitable instrument for measuring ageism in the Turkish population.

  6. Identification of the psychometric properties of the leadership influence over professional practice environments scale.

    PubMed

    Adams, Jeffrey M; Nikolaev, Nikolay; Erickson, Jeanette Ives; Ditomassi, Marianne; Jones, Dorothy A

    2013-05-01

    This study uses the qualitatively developed Adams influence model (AIM) and concepts from the psychometrically validated revised professional practice environment scale to guide the development of the leadership influence over professional practice environments scale. Nurse executives and others can use this scale individually or in conjunction with instruments targeting staff or patient perceptions of their influence as part of health services research, leadership development, and professional practice environment enhancement strategy.

  7. Psychometric properties of the Francis Scale of Attitude Towards Christianity among Portuguese university students.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Ana Veríssimo; Neto, Félix

    2002-12-01

    To facilitate use of the adult form of the Francis Scale of Attitude Towards Christianity in cross-cultural studies, the psychometric characteristics of the translated scale were examined among 323 university students in Portugal (130 men and 193 women). Their ages ranged from 18 to 31 years. Analysis supported the unidimensionality, internal consistency, and construct validity of this scale in this sample of Portuguese university students.

  8. Psychometric Reevaluation of Parental Press for Academic Achievement and Postsecondary Planning Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bates, Samantha; Ball, Annahita; Wilks, Scott

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Psychometric details of the Parental Press for Academic Achievement and Postsecondary Planning Scale (PPS), developed by Chicago Consortium of Chicago School Research, are scarce. The purpose of this study was to reexamine the properties of this 7-item measure. Method: The study utilized cross-sectional, self-reported data from 100…

  9. Examining the Psychometric Properties of the Homework Management Scale for High School Students in China

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yang, Fuyi; Xu, Jianzhong

    2015-01-01

    This study reports on the psychometric evaluation of the Chinese version of the Homework Management Scale (HMS). The HMS was designed to assess students' homework management strategies. Based on a randomized split of 884 high school students in China, we conducted exploratory factor analysis on Group 1 (n = 442) and confirmatory factor analysis on…

  10. Psychometric Properties of the Chinese Version of the Social Responsiveness Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gau, Susan Shur-Fen; Liu, Li-Ting; Wu, Yu-Yu; Chiu, Yen-Nan; Tsai, Wen-Che

    2013-01-01

    This study evaluated the psychometric properties of the Chinese version of the Social Responsiveness Scale (Chinese SRS). We assessed 1419 grade 1 to grade 8 students from northern Taiwan and 401 clinic-based participants (aged 3-20, male 90.3%). All clinic-based participants were clinically diagnosed with autism spectrum disorders (ASDs),…

  11. Psychometric Evaluation of the Fear of Positive Evaluation Scale in Patients with Social Anxiety Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weeks, Justin W.; Heimberg, Richard G.; Rodebaugh, Thomas L.; Goldin, Philippe R.; Gross, James J.

    2012-01-01

    The Fear of Positive Evaluation Scale (FPES; J. W. Weeks, R. G. Heimberg, & T. L. Rodebaugh, 2008) was designed to assess fear of positive evaluation, a proposed cognitive component of social anxiety. Although previous findings on the psychometric properties of the FPES have been highly encouraging, only 1 previous study has examined the…

  12. The Psychometric Properties of the Physical Education Lesson Attitude Scale for Preservice Classroom Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oncu, Erman

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the psychometric properties of the Physical Education Attitude Scale for Preservice Classroom Teachers (PEAS-PCT). The study was conducted on 561 Turkish preservice classroom teachers at the end of the 2011-2012 Fall Semester. Exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses were conducted to ascertain the…

  13. Stereotype Threat Vulnerability: A Psychometric Investigation of the Social Identities and Attitudes Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Leann V.; Cokley, Kevin

    2016-01-01

    The authors investigated the psychometric properties of the Social Identities and Attitudes Scale developed by Picho and Brown, which captures an individual's vulnerability to Stereotype Threat effects. Confirmatory factor analyses and group invariance tests conducted on a diverse sample of 516 college students revealed adequate reliability and…

  14. The Treatment Motivation Scales for Forensic Outpatient Treatment (TMS-F): Construction and Psychometric Evaluation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drieschner, Klaus H.; Boomsma, Anne

    2008-01-01

    The Treatment Motivation Scales for forensic outpatient treatment (TMS-F) is a Dutch 85-item self-report questionnaire for the motivation of forensic outpatients to engage in their treatment and six cognitive and affective determinants of this motivation. Following descriptions of the conceptual basis and construction, the psychometric properties…

  15. Psychometric Properties of the Spence Children's Anxiety Scale (SCAS) in Cypriot Children and Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Essau, Cecilia A.; Anastassiou-Hadjicharalambous, Xenia; Munoz, Luna C.

    2011-01-01

    The Spence Children's Anxiety Scale (SCAS) is a 38-item self-report questionnaire which measures symptoms of DSM-IV anxiety disorders in children and adolescents. This study examined the psychometric properties of the Greek translation of SCAS in a large community sample of children and adolescents (N = 1,072), aged 12-17 years, in the…

  16. Development and Psychometric Evaluation of the Personal Growth Initiative Scale-II

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robitschek, Christine; Ashton, Matthew W.; Spering, Cynthia C.; Geiger, Nathaniel; Byers, Danielle; Schotts, G. Christian; Thoen, Megan A.

    2012-01-01

    The original Personal Growth Initiative Scale (PGIS; Robitschek, 1998) was unidimensional, despite theory identifying multiple components (e.g., cognition and behavior) of personal growth initiative (PGI). The present research developed a multidimensional measure of the complex process of PGI, while retaining the brief and psychometrically sound…

  17. Psychometric Support for the Ownership in Exercise and Empowerment in Exercise Scales

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, E. Whitney G.; Fry, Mary D.

    2014-01-01

    This study's purpose was to examine the psychometric properties of two new scales developed to quantitatively measure participants' ownership in exercise classes and empowerment, with respect to exercise. These two outcome measures will compliment Achievement Goal Perspective Theory (AGPT) grounded research to better understand participants'…

  18. Examination of the Psychometric Properties of the Adult Manifest Anxiety Scale-Elderly Version Scores

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lowe, Patricia A.; Reynolds, Cecil R.

    2006-01-01

    The psychometric properties of the Adult Manifest Anxiety Scale-Elderly Version (AMAS-E) scores were evaluated in two studies. In Study 1, the temporal stability and construct validity of the AMAS-E test scores were examined in a group of 226 older adults, aged 60 years and older. Results indicated adequate to excellent temporal stability (2-week…

  19. Psychometric Properties of the Therapeutic Alliance Scale for Caregivers and Parents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Accurso, Erin C.; Hawley, Kristin M.; Garland, Ann F.

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the psychometric properties of the Therapeutic Alliance Scale for Caregivers and Parents (TASCP) in a sample of 209 caregivers whose children (4-13 years of age) presented with disruptive behavior problems to a publicly funded outpatient mental health clinic in San Diego County. Information about therapeutic alliance was…

  20. Measuring Grief Following Miscarriage: Psychometric Properties of the Chinese Version of the Perinatal Grief Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lai, Beatrice P. Y.; Chung, Tony K. H.; Lee, Dominic T. S.; Kong, Grace W. S.; Lok, Ingrid H.

    2013-01-01

    Grief following miscarriage is a complex psychological response. This study was conducted to examine the psychometric properties of the Chinese version of the Perinatal Grief Scale (PGS). A total of 280 Chinese women completed the PGS immediately following a diagnosis of miscarriage (baseline) and were reassessed at 12 months follow-up. The factor…

  1. Psychometric Properties of the "Reminiscence Functions Scale" for the Portuguese Population: A Preliminary Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goncalves, Daniela C.; Guedes, Joana Martins; Fonseca, Antonio M.; Martin, Inacio

    2010-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to assess the psychometric properties of a version in Portuguese of the "Reminiscence Functions Scale." Total sample was composed of 628 participants aged between 18 and 92 years, divided into three groups according to their age (18-24 years, "n" = 249; 26-54 years, "n" = 174; 55 and…

  2. The Psychometric Properties of the Swedish Version of the EB Process Assessment Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nyström, Siv; Åhsberg, Elizabeth

    2016-01-01

    Objective: This study examines whether the psychometric properties of the short version of the Evidence-Based Practice Process Assessment Scale (EBPPAS) remain satisfactory when translated and transferred to the context of Swedish welfare services. Method: The Swedish version of EBPPAS was tested on a sample of community-based professionals in…

  3. Psychometric Assessment of the Mindful Attention Awareness Scale (MAAS) among Chinese Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Black, David S.; Sussman, Steve; Johnson, C. Anderson; Milam, Joel

    2012-01-01

    The Mindful Attention Awareness Scale (MAAS) has the longest empirical track record as a valid measure of trait mindfulness. Most of what is understood about trait mindfulness comes from administering the MAAS to relatively homogenous samples of Caucasian adults. This study rigorously evaluates the psychometric properties of the MAAS among Chinese…

  4. Psychometric Qualities of the UCLA Loneliness Scale-Version 3 as Applied in a Turkish Culture

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Durak, Mithat; Senol-Durak, Emre

    2010-01-01

    The University of California, Los Angeles, Loneliness Scale-Version 3 (UCLA LS3) is the most frequently used loneliness assessment tool. This study aimed to examine the psychometric properties of the UCLA LS3 by utilizing two separate and independent samples: Turkish university students (n = 481) and elderly (n = 284). The results demonstrate that…

  5. Classroom Community Scale in the Blended Learning Environment: A Psychometric Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barnard-Brak, Lucy; Shiu, William

    2010-01-01

    The Classroom Community Scale (CCS) has been utilized in previous research to measure sense of community of learners including those learners in blended learning environments. In the current study, the CCS was examined with respect to its psychometric properties in the blended learning environment. Reliability analyses indicate an acceptable level…

  6. Psychometric Properties of a Korean Translation of the "Scales of Independent Behavior--Revised"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cho, Su-Je; Paik, Eunhee; Lee, Byoung-In; Yi, Joonsuk

    2010-01-01

    This study explores the psychometric properties of data drawn from the Korean translation of the full "Scales of Independent Behavior--Revised" (SIB-R). In addition, semantic, content, conceptual, and technical equivalence are examined. The participants include 2,763 typically developing children and 406 children with intellectual…

  7. Examination of the Psychometric Properties of the Environmental School Transition Anxiety Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Loke, Stephen W.; Lowe, Patricia A.

    2013-01-01

    A pilot study was conducted to examine the psychometric properties of the Environmental School Transition Anxiety Scale (E-STAS) with a sample of 220 fourth- to sixth-grade students who were about to or had completed their school transition. The results of an exploratory factor analysis (EFA) of the students' responses on the E-STAS produced a…

  8. Measuring Gratitude in Youth: Assessing the Psychometric Properties of Adult Gratitude Scales in Children and Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Froh, Jeffrey J.; Fan, Jinyan; Emmons, Robert A.; Bono, Giacomo; Huebner, E. Scott; Watkins, Philip

    2011-01-01

    Before the developmental trajectory, outcomes, and related interventions of gratitude can be accurately and confidently studied among the youth, researchers must ensure that they have psychometrically sound measures of gratitude that are suitable for this population. Thus, considering that no known scales were specifically designed to measure…

  9. Item-Based Psychometrics of the Preschool Behavioral and Emotional Rating Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cress, Cynthia J.; Lambert, Matthew C.; Epstein, Michael H.

    2014-01-01

    The Preschool Behavioral and Emotional Rating Scale (PreBERS) is an assessment of emotional and behavioral strengths in preschoolers with well-established reliability and validity for educational and clinical application in children with and without disabilities. The present study provides further evidence of psychometric rigor for items and…

  10. Factor Structure and Psychometric Properties of the Injection Phobia Scale-Anxiety

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olatunji, Bunmi O.; Sawchuk, Craig N.; Moretz, Melanie W.; David, Bieke; Armstrong, Thomas; Ciesielski, Bethany G.

    2010-01-01

    The present investigation examined the factor structure and psychometric properties of the Injection Phobia Scale-Anxiety (IPS-Anx). Principal components analysis of IPS-Anx items in Study 1 (n = 498) revealed a 2-factor structure consisting of Distal Fear and Contact Fear. However, CFA results in Study 2 (n = 567) suggest that a 1-factor…

  11. Psychometric Testing of the Chinese Version of the Decisional Balance Scale (CDBS)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Huey-Shys; Sheu, Jiunn-Jye; Chen, W. William

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to conduct psychometric testing on the Chinese version of the decisional balance scale (CDBS) with Taiwanese seventh, eighth, and ninth graders who were recruited from the Taipei metropolitan area. A random cluster sampling method was used with 554 adolescents between the ages of 13 and 17 years. Factor analysis…

  12. Psychometric Qualities of the German Version of the Posttraumatic Diagnostic Scale (PTDS)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Griesel, Dorothee; Wessa, Michele; Flor, Herta

    2006-01-01

    In the present study, the psychometric properties of the German version of the Posttraumatic Diagnostic Scale (PTDS; A. Ehlers, R. Steil, H. Winter, & E. B. Foa, 1996) were evaluated in a sample of 143 trauma survivors. To investigate convergent and discriminant validity of this questionnaire, the authors assessed posttraumatic stress disorder…

  13. The Psychometric Properties of the Difficult Behavior Self-Efficacy Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oh, Hyun-Kyoung; Kozub, Francis M.

    2010-01-01

    The study was designed to estimate the psychometric properties of Hastings and Brown's (2002a) Difficult Behavior Self-efficacy Scale. Participants were two samples of physical educators teaching in Korea (n = 229) and the United States (U.S.; n = 139). An initial translation of the questionnaire to Korean and pilot study were conducted along with…

  14. Preliminary Psychometric Evidence of the "Behavioral and Emotional Screening System Teacher Rating Scale-Preschool"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greer, Fred W.; DiStefano, Christine A.; Liu, Jin; Cain, Leia K.

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to provide psychometric evidence related to the "Behavioral and Emotional Screening System Teacher Rating Scale-Preschool" form's (BESS TRS-P) ability to identify emerging problems in preschool children. Reliability and validity associated with screener scores were compared by analyzing teacher ratings of…

  15. Parent Behavior Importance Questionnaire-Revised: Scale Development and Psychometric Characteristics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mowder, Barbara A.; Shamah, Renee

    2011-01-01

    This paper reports the scale development and psychometric characteristics of the Parent Behavior Importance Questionnaire-Revised (PBIQ-R). To develop this measure, 502 subject matter experts (SMEs) evaluated 91 parenting behaviors in terms of parenting behavior specificity (e.g., bonding, discipline), importance level, and appropriateness for…

  16. Psychometric Properties of the Teacher-Reported Motor Skills Rating Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Helyn; Murrah, William M.; Cameron, Claire E.; Brock, Laura L.; Cottone, Elizabeth A.; Grissmer, David

    2015-01-01

    Children's early motor competence is associated with social development and academic achievement. However, few studies have examined teacher reports of children's motor skills. This study evaluated the psychometric properties of the Motor Skills Rating Scale (MSRS), a 19-item measure of children's teacher-reported motor skills in the classroom.…

  17. Psychometric Properties of an Attitude Scale Measuring Physician-Nurse Collaboration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hojat, Mohammadreza; Fields, Sylvia K.; Veloski, J. Jon; Griffiths, Margaret; Cohen, Mitchell J. M.; Plumb, James D.

    1999-01-01

    Examined the psychometric properties of an assessment tool for measuring attitudes toward physician/nurse collaboration. Survey results from 208 medical students and 86 nursing students support the construct validity and reliability of the scale, which can be used to evaluate programs designed to foster physician/nurse collaboration. (SLD)

  18. Further Psychometric Properties of the Tourette's Disorder Scale-Parent Rated Version (TODS-PR)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Storch, Eric A.; Murphy, Tanya K.; Geffken, Gary R.; Soto, Ohel; Sajid, Muhammad; Allen, Pam; Roberti, Jonathan W.; Killiany, Erin M.; Goodman, Wayne K.

    2004-01-01

    This study evaluated the psychometric properties of the Tourette's Disorder Scale-Parent Rated (TODS-PR), a 15-item parent-rated instrument that assesses a range of common symptoms seen in childhood Tourette's Disorder (TD) patients including tics, obsessions, compulsions, inattention, hyperactivity, aggression, and emotional disturbances.…

  19. Measuring HIV stigma at the family level: psychometric assessment of the Chinese Courtesy Stigma Scales (CCSSs).

    PubMed

    Liu, Hongjie; Xu, Yongfang; Sun, Yehuan; Dumenci, Levent

    2014-01-01

    Courtesy stigma is the stigmatization a person perceives or experiences due to their association with a stigmatized individual or group. Most HIV-related stigma scales have been developed for people living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHAs), but not for their HIV-uninfected family members. To date, few measurement scales have been designed to measure the degree of stigma among both PLWHAs and their HIV-uninfected family members at the family level. We developed a set of courtesy stigma scales and estimated their reliability and validity from 256 PLWHAs and 256 of their HIV-uninfected family members. Exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses were performed in two independent samples: a development sample (N = 216) and a validation sample (N = 296), respectively. Two factors ("public stigma" and "self-perceived stigma") had high internal consistency reliability (Cronbach's alpha coefficient between 0.83-0.90) and good construct validity (standardized factor loading range: 0.37-0.95) in both samples. These findings document that the newly developed brief instrument is a psychometrically sound measure of HIV-related stigma among both PLWHAs and their HIV-uninfected family members.

  20. Psychometric Properties of the Satisfaction with Life Scale among Turkish University Students, Correctional Officers, and Elderly Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Durak, Mithat; Senol-Durak, Emre; Gencoz, Tulin

    2010-01-01

    This study aims to extensively examine the psychometric properties of adapted version of the Satisfaction with Life Scale (SWLS) in different Turkish samples. In order to test the psychometric properties of the SWLS three separate and independent samples are utilized in this study, namely university students (n = 547), correctional officers (n =…

  1. The Perfectionistic Self-Presentation Scale--Junior Form: Psychometric Properties and Association with Social Anxiety in Early Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flett, Gordon L.; Coulter, Lisa-Marie; Hewitt, Paul L.

    2012-01-01

    This study assessed the psychometric characteristics and correlates of the Perfectionistic Self-Presentation Scale--Junior Form (PSPS-JR). The PSPS-JR was designed for use with children and adolescents, but its psychometric properties and applications among early adolescents have not been investigated. The PSPS-JR has three subscales assessing the…

  2. Development and psychometric evaluation of the Thai Human Papillomavirus Beliefs Scale.

    PubMed

    Juntasopeepun, Phanida; Davidson, Patricia M; Chang, Sungwon; Suwan, Natthawan; Phianmongkhol, Yupin; Srisomboon, Jatupol

    2011-12-01

    In this study, we developed and evaluated the psychometric properties of the Thai Human Papillomavirus Beliefs Scale. The Scale was tested on 386 young women aged 18-24 years in Chiang Mai, Thailand. Content validity of the Scale was evaluated by a panel of experts, construct validity was determined using exploratory factor analysis, and reliability was assessed for stability and internal consistency. Factor analysis provided empirical support for the existence of four factors, which accounted for 67.7% of the total variance: perceived susceptibility, perceived seriousness, perceived benefits, and perceived barriers. Cronbach's α reliability coefficients for the four subscales ranged from 0.59 to 0.86. Factors predicting intention to receive the papillomavirus vaccine were perceived susceptibility, perceived benefits, and perceived barriers. The Thai Human Papillomavirus Beliefs Scale demonstrated promising psychometric properties, indicating that it might be a useful instrument for assessing young women's human papillomavirus and cervical cancer-associated beliefs, and for predicting human papillomavirus vaccination intention.

  3. Psychometric properties of the Revised Physical and Social Anhedonia Scales in non-clinical young adults.

    PubMed

    Fonseca-Pedrero, Eduardo; Paino, Mercedes; Lemos-Giráldez, Serafín; García-Cueto, Eduardo; Villazón-García, Ursula; Bobes, Julio; Muñiz, José

    2009-11-01

    Anhedonia, a central dimension within the schizotypy construct, has been considered to be a promising vulnerability marker for schizophrenia-spectrum disorders. The Revised Physical Anhedonia Scale (RPhA) and Revised Social Anhedonia Scale (RSAS) are two self-reports widely used in the assessment of anhedonia; however, they psychometric characteristics have been scarcely investigated in Spanish population. The objective of the current work was to study the psychometric properties of the Revised Physical and Social Anhedonia Scales in non-clinical young adults. The sample was composed of 728 college students with a mean age of 20.1 years (SD = 2.5). The data indicated that the scales showed adequate psychometric characteristics. The Cronbach alpha was 0.95 (RSAS) and 0.92 (RPhA) respectively. The confirmatory factor analysis carried out on the matrix of tetrachoric correlations showed that both scales presented an essentially unidimensional solution. The Revised Physical and Social Anhedonia Scales seem to be adequate for psychosis-risk assessment in non-clinical populations. Future research should further investigate the construct validity in other populations and cultures as well as study its relation to emotional aspects and cognitive endophenotypes.

  4. Preliminary psychometric testing of the Fox Simple Quality-of-Life Scale.

    PubMed

    Fox, Sherry

    2004-06-01

    Although quality of life is extensively defined as subjective and multidimensional with both affective and cognitive components, few instruments capture important dimensions of the construct, and few are both conceptually congruent and user friendly for the clinical setting. The aim of this study was to develop and test a measure that would be easy to use clinically and capture both cognitive and affective components of quality of life. Initial item sources for the Fox Simple Quality-of-Life Scale (FSQOLS) were literature-based. Thirty items were compiled for content validity assessment by a panel of expert healthcare clinicians from various disciplines, predominantly nursing. Five items were removed as a result of the review because they reflected negatively worded or redundant items. The 25-item scale was mailed to 177 people with lung, colon, and ovarian cancer in various stages. Cancer types were selected theoretically, based on similarity in prognosis, degree of symptom burden, and possible meaning and experience. Of the 145 participants, all provided complete data on the FSQOLS. Psychometric evaluation of the FSQOLS included item-total correlations, principal components analysis with varimax rotation revealing two factors explaining 50% variance, reliability estimation using alpha estimates, and item-factor correlations. The FSQOLS exhibited significant convergent validity with four popular quality-of-life instruments: the Ferrans and Powers Quality of Life Index, the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy Scale, the Short-Form-36 Health Survey, and the General Well-Being Scale. Content validity of the scale was explored and supported using qualitative interviews of 14 participants with lung, colon and ovarian cancer, who were a subgroup of the sample for the initial instrument testing.

  5. Psychometric properties of the Multidimensional Anxiety Scale for Children (MASC) among Icelandic schoolchildren.

    PubMed

    Olason, Daníel Thor; Sighvatsson, Magnús Blöndahl; Smári, Jakob

    2004-11-01

    A psychometric assessment of the Icelandic version of the Multidimensional Anxiety Scale for Children (MASC) was undertaken among Icelandic schoolchildren, between 10 and 15 years of age. In a first study 625 children between 10 and 15 years of age filled in the MASC. A confirmatory factor analysis indicated that the four-factor structure of the instrument was justified. Further, means and standard deviations of the total scale and the subscales were similar to the original normative data reported by March (1997). In a second study the MASC, the Children Depression Inventory (CDI) and the Revised Children's Manifest Anxiety Scale (RCMAS) were administered to a sample of 249 schoolchildren between 10 and 15 years of age. The results supported the convergent and divergent validity of the MASC. Together the two studies show satisfactory psychometric properties of the Icelandic version of the MASC in a normal population.

  6. Social capital at work: psychometric analysis of a short scale in Spanish among Mexican health workers.

    PubMed

    Idrovo, Alvaro J; Camacho-Avila, Anabel; García-Rivas, Javier; Juárez-García, Arturo

    2012-09-01

    Most studies on social capital and health are carried out with large home-based surveys, neglecting that many interactions among individuals occur in the workplace. The objective of this study was to explore the psychometric properties of a scale in Spanish used to measure social capital at work. The scale designed by Kouvonen et al was translated into Spanish and tested under classical test theory, item response theory, and confirmatory factorial analysis; 152 public health workers from different socio-cultural contexts participated in the survey. Internal consistency was high (Chronbach's alpha = 0.88). Social capital at work correlated properly with two Job Content Questionnaire dimensions. A ceiling effect was detected and item difficulty was quantified. The confirmatory factor analysis showed the expected theoretical components of social capital: bonding, bridging and trust. The scale has acceptable psychometric properties, thus it can be used in future studies.

  7. Further Psychometric Examination of the Tourette's Disorder Scales

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Storch, Eric A.; Merlo, Lisa J.; Lehmkuhl, Heather; Grabill, Kristen M.; Geffken, Gary R.; Goodman, Wayne K.; Murphy, Tanya K.

    2007-01-01

    The Tourette's Disorder Scales (Shytle et al., 2003) are parent- (Tourette's Disorder Scales-Parent Rated; TODS-PR) and clinician-rated (Tourette's Disorder Scales-Clinician Rated; TODS-CR) measures that assess tics, obsessions, compulsions, inattention, hyperactivity, aggression, and emotional disturbances among children with tics. Although the…

  8. The Chinese Parental Stress Scale: psychometric evidence using Rasch modeling on clinical and nonclinical samples.

    PubMed

    Leung, Cynthia; Tsang, Sandra K M

    2010-01-01

    In this study, we examined the psychometric properties of the Parental Stress Scale (PSS; Berry & Jones, 1995) with Chinese parents. Participants included 162 parents recruited through primary schools and 38 parents with children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Rasch analysis results indicated that 2 items were outside the accepted fit statistics range and that the Likert scale response categories were not functioning properly. We identified a reduced 16-item scale with 5 categories as unidimensional, with a person reliability of .86; the Likert scale response categories worked well. The revised PSS correlated with measures of child behavior and parenting stress and could differentiate between the 2 groups of parents.

  9. Psychometric properties of the Drive for Muscularity Scale in Malay men.

    PubMed

    Swami, Viren; Barron, David; Lau, Poh Li; Jaafar, Jas Laile

    2016-06-01

    The Drive for Muscularity Scale (DMS) is a widely used measure in studies of men's body image, but few studies have examined its psychometric properties outside English-speaking samples. Here, we assessed the factor structure of a Malay translation of the DMS. A community sample of 159 Malay men from Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, completed the DMS, along with measures of self-esteem, body appreciation, and muscle discrepancy. Exploratory factor analysis led to the extraction of two factors, differentiating attitudes from behaviours, which mirrors the parent scale. Both factors also loaded on to a higher-order drive for muscularity factor. The subscales of the Malay DMS had adequate internal consistencies and good convergent validity, insofar as significant relationships were reported with self-esteem, body appreciation, muscle discrepancy, and body mass index. These results indicate that the Malay DMS has acceptable psychometric properties and can be used to assess body image concerns in Malay men.

  10. Psychometric properties of the School Fears Survey Scale for preadolescents (SFSS-II).

    PubMed

    García-Fernández, José Manuel; Espada Sánchez, José Pedro; Orgilés Amorós, Mireia; Méndez Carrillo, Xavier

    2010-08-01

    This paper describes the psychometric properties of a new children's self-report measure. The School Fears Survey Scale, Form II (SFSS-II) assesses school fears in children from ages 8 to 11. The factor solution with a Spanish sample of 3,665 children isolated four factors: Fear of academic failure and punishment, fear of physical discomfort, fear of social and school assessment and anticipatory and separation anxiety. The questionnaire was tested by confirmatory factor analysis, which accounted for 55.80% of the total variance. Results indicated that the SFSS-II has a high internal consistency (alpha= .89). The results revealed high test-retest reliability and appropriate relationship with other scales. The age by gender interaction was significant. Two-way analysis of variance found that older children and girls had higher anxiety. The instrument shows adequate psychometric guarantees and can be used for the multidimensional assessment of anxiety in clinical and educational settings.

  11. Children's Self-Efficacy Scale: Initial Psychometric Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martinelli, Selma de Cassia; Bartholomeu, Daniel; Caliatto, Susana Gakyia; Sassi, Adriana de Grecci

    2009-01-01

    This article describes the development of a self-efficacy measure for elementary school children. A sample of 514 children, ages 8 to 11, enrolled in Grades 2 to 4 of public schools in Brazil was investigated. The scale included 78 descriptive items about academic situations, in which the child was required to respond on a 5-point scale, the…

  12. The Attitudes to Disability Scale (ADS): Development and Psychometric Properties

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Power, M. J.; Green, A. M.

    2010-01-01

    Background: This paper describes the development of an Attitudes to Disability Scale for use with adults with physical or intellectual disabilities (ID). The aim of the research was to design a scale that could be used to assess the personal attitudes of individuals with either physical or ID. Method: The measure was derived following standard…

  13. Parental Flooding During Conflict: A Psychometric Evaluation of a New Scale.

    PubMed

    Del Vecchio, Tamara; Lorber, Michael F; Slep, Amy M Smith; Malik, Jill; Heyman, Richard E; Foran, Heather M

    2016-11-01

    Parents who are overwhelmed by the intensity and aversive nature of child negative affect - those who are experiencing flooding - may be less likely to react effectively and instead may focus on escaping the aversive situation, disciplining either overly permissively or punitively to escape quickly from child negative affect. However, there are no validated self-report measures of the degree to which parents experience flooding, impeding the exploration of these relations. Thus, we created and evaluated the Parent Flooding scale (PFS), assessing the extent to which parents believe their children's negative affect during parent-child conflicts is unexpected, overwhelming and distressing. We studied its factorial validity, reliability, and concurrent validity in a community sample of 453 couples with 3- to 7-year-old children (51.9 % girls) recruited via random digit dialing. Confirmatory factor analyses indicated a one-factor solution with excellent internal consistency. Test-retest stability over an average of 5.6 months was high. Concurrent validity was suggested by the associations of flooding with parents' aggression toward their children, overreactive and lax discipline, parenting satisfaction, and parents' anger, as well as with child externalizing behavior and negative affect. Incrementally concurrent validity analyses indicated that flooding was a unique predictor of mothers' and fathers' overreactive discipline and fathers' parent-child aggression and lax discipline, over and above the contributions of parents' anger and children's negative affect. The present results support the psychometric validity of the PFS.

  14. German version of the Kuwait University Anxiety Scale: psychometric parameters.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Khalek, Ahmed M; Reschke, Konrad; Rudwan, Samer; Tanjour, Ismail

    2006-10-01

    A German translation of the Kuwait University Anxiety Scale, written originally in Arabic, was prepared. A sample of 207 men and women German college students was recruited. Coefficient alpha was .88, whereas the item-remainder correlations ranged from .21 to .63, denoting good internal consistency. The correlation of the scale with the German form of the Trait Anxiety Scale was .76, indicating high criterion-related validity. Three factors were identified: General, Somatic, and Cognitive/Affective Anxiety. German students scored lower (less anxious) than students from the U.S. and 18 Arab countries. The sex difference was not significant for the German sample.

  15. Psychometric properties of the Depression Anxiety and Stress Scale-21 in older primary care patients.

    PubMed

    Gloster, Andrew T; Rhoades, Howard M; Novy, Diane; Klotsche, Jens; Senior, Ashley; Kunik, Mark; Wilson, Nancy; Stanley, Melinda A

    2008-10-01

    The Depression Anxiety Stress Scale (DASS) was designed to efficiently measure the core symptoms of anxiety and depression and has demonstrated positive psychometric properties in adult samples of anxiety and depression patients and student samples. Despite these findings, the psychometric properties of the DASS remain untested in older adults, for whom the identification of efficient measures of these constructs is especially important. To determine the psychometric properties of the DASS 21-item version in older adults, we analyzed data from 222 medical patients seeking treatment to manage worry. Consistent with younger samples, a three-factor structure best fit the data. Results also indicated good internal consistency, excellent convergent validity, and good discriminative validity, especially for the Depression scale. Receiver operating curve analyses indicated that the DASS-21 predicted the diagnostic presence of generalized anxiety disorder and depression as well as other commonly used measures. These data suggest that the DASS may be used with older adults in lieu of multiple scales designed to measure similar constructs, thereby reducing participant burden and facilitating assessment in settings with limited assessment resources.

  16. A Psychometric Examination of Rasmussen's Ego Identity Scale.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Enright, Robert D.; And Others

    1983-01-01

    Examines Rasmussen's Ego Identity Scale for internal consistency reliability and construct validity. Subjects included 114 primarily White and middle-class seventh- and twelfth-grade students. Implications for identity assessment are drawn. (Author/RH)

  17. Psychometric evaluation of women's efficiency scale in family decision-making.

    PubMed

    Erci, Behice

    2012-01-01

    The researcher's aim was to develop a women's efficiency scale in family decision-making and evaluate its psychometric properties. A convenience sample of 540 married women at five primary health care centers completed a structured questionnaire in 2007. In the assessment of construct validity, one factor explained 47.9% of the total variance. The internal reliability coefficient of this one factor-based scale was 0.78, and all items of factor loadings were above 0.40. In this study, evidence is provided for the women's efficiency scale in family decision-making's validity, reliability, and acceptability.

  18. A systematic review of the psychometric properties of the Sexual Relationship Power Scale in HIV/AIDS research.

    PubMed

    McMahon, James M; Volpe, Ellen M; Klostermann, Keith; Trabold, Nicole; Xue, Ying

    2015-02-01

    The Sexual Relationship Power Scale (SRPS) was developed over a decade ago to address the lack of reliable and valid measures of relationship power in social, behavioral and medical research. The SRPS and its two subscales (relationship control [RC], decision-making dominance [DMD]) have been used extensively in the field of HIV prevention and sexual risk behavior. We performed a systematic review of the psychometric properties of the SRPS and subscales as reported in the HIV/AIDS literature from 2000 to 2012. A total of 54 published articles were identified, which reported reliability or construct validity estimates of the scales. Description of the psychometric properties of the SRPS and subscales is reported according to study population, and several cross-population trends were identified. In general, the SRPS and RC subscale exhibited sound psychometric properties across multiple study populations and research settings. By contrast, the DMD subscale had relatively weak psychometric properties, especially when used with specific populations and research settings. Factors that influenced the psychometric properties of the various scales and subscales included the study population, mean age of the sample, number of items retained in the scale, and modifications to the original scales. We conclude with recommendations for (1) the application and use of the SRPS and subscales, (2) reporting of psychometric properties of the scales in the literature, and (3) areas for future research.

  19. A Systematic Review of the Psychometric Properties of the Sexual Relationship Power Scale in HIV/AIDS Research

    PubMed Central

    McMahon, James M.; Volpe, Ellen M.; Klostermann, Keith; Trabold, Nicole; Xue, Ying

    2014-01-01

    The Sexual Relationship Power Scale (SRPS) was developed over a decade ago to address the lack of reliable and valid measures of relationship power in social, behavioral and medical research. The SRPS and its two subscales (relationship control [RC], decision-making dominance [DMD]) have been used extensively in the field of HIV prevention and sexual risk behavior. We performed a systematic review of the psychometric properties of the SRPS and subscales as reported in the HIV/AIDS literature from 2000 to 2012. A total of 54 published articles were identified that reported reliability or construct validity estimates of the scales. Description of the psychometric properties of the SRPS and subscales are reported according to study population, and several cross-population trends were identified. In general, the SRPS and RC subscale exhibited sound psychometric properties across multiple study populations and research settings. By contrast, the DMD subscale had relatively weak psychometric properties, especially when used with specific populations and research settings. Factors that influenced the psychometric properties of the various scales and subscales included the study population, mean age of the sample, number of items retained in the scale, and modifications to the original scales. We conclude with recommendations for (a) the application and use of the SRPS and subscales, (b) reporting of psychometric properties of the scales in the literature, and (c) areas for future research. PMID:25331613

  20. Psychometric properties of Yelland and Tiggemann's Drive for Muscularity Scale.

    PubMed

    Tod, David; Morrison, Todd G; Edwards, Christian

    2012-06-01

    The purpose of the current study was to examine the dimensionality and validity of Yelland and Tiggemann's Drive for Muscularity Scale (YT-DMS). Participants were college students (305 women, M(AGE)=20.15 years, SD=4.00; 356 men, M(AGE)=20.24 years, SD=3.85) who completed the YT-DMS, the Drive for Muscularity Attitudes Questionnaire, the Drive for Leanness Scale, the Drive for Thinness Scale, and a socio-demographic questionnaire. Results indicated the YT-DMS had a stable unidimensional factor structure in both genders, and the pattern of relationships generally supported the measure's criterion and construct validity. These results reveal the YT-DMS has promise, but helps identify possible areas for improvement, such as a greater focus on sampling the content domain associated with the drive for muscularity.

  1. Development and psychometric evaluation of the Social Justice Scale (SJS).

    PubMed

    Torres-Harding, Susan R; Siers, Brian; Olson, Bradley D

    2012-09-01

    The study describes the development of the Social Justice Scale (SJS). Practitioners, educators, students, and other members of the community differ on their attitudes and values regarding social justice. It is important to assess, not only individuals' attitudes and values around social values, but also other constructs that might be related to social justice behaviors. The implication of Ajzen in Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes 50:179-211, (1991) theory of planned behavior suggests that attitudes, perceived behavioral control, and social norms predict intentions, which then lead to behaviors. A scale was designed to measure social justice-related values, attitudes, perceived behavioral control, subjective norms, and intentions based on a four-factor conception of Ajzen's theory. Confirmatory factor analysis and analyses for reliability and validity were used to test the properties of the scale.

  2. Development and psychometric validation of the HIV Treatment Knowledge Scale.

    PubMed

    Balfour, L; Kowal, J; Tasca, G A; Cooper, C L; Angel, J B; Macpherson, P A; Garber, G; Béïque, L; Cameron, D W

    2007-10-01

    Accurate treatment knowledge is required for patients to successfully manage complex medical conditions. Existing HIV knowledge scales focus on disease transmission and risk factors. This is the first study to develop and validate a scale to measure HIV treatment knowledge about complex treatment issues such as adherence, side-effects and drug resistance. A total of 346 participants were recruited into this cross-sectional study. Participants included HIV-positive patients (n=130), HIV-hepatitis C co-infected patients (n=22), hepatitis C patients, (n=78), community healthcare providers (n=35) and college students (n=81). Participants completed the proposed HIV Treatment Knowledge Scale and a validated measure of general knowledge about HIV transmission and risk factors. Two-week test-retest data were collected. Results demonstrated that the HIV Treatment Knowledge Scale was significantly correlated with general HIV knowledge across all samples. Among HIV-positive patients, the HIV Treatment Knowledge Scale was positively associated with time since HIV diagnosis. HAART-experienced patients had significantly higher treatment knowledge than HAART-naïve patients. HIV-positive patients scored significantly higher than hepatitis C patients and college students on HIV treatment knowledge. Test-retest reliability (r=0.83) and internal consistency (reliability coefficient=0.90) were both satisfactory. The HIV Treatment Knowledge Scale is a novel, easy-to-administer measure demonstrating high levels of validity and reliability. It has important applications as a clinical teaching tool with patients and healthcare workers and it could be used as an outcome indicator in HIV educational intervention studies.

  3. Teachers' Rooms Environmental Assessment Scale: Development and Psychometric Evaluation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arslan, Suna

    2016-01-01

    Teachers' rooms are important parts of educational environments, as the quality of the physical-spatial and psychosocial conditions may affect the personal and occupational developments of teachers as well as the education processes. In Study 1 (n = 245), a Teachers' Rooms-Environmental Assessment Scale (TREAS) measure of the current conditions of…

  4. Violence-Related Attitudes and Beliefs: Scale Construction and Psychometrics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brand, Pamela A.; Anastasio, Phyllis A.

    2006-01-01

    The 50-item Violence-Related Attitudes and Beliefs Scale (V-RABS) includes three subscales measuring possible causes of violent behavior (environmental influences, biological influences, and mental illness) and four subscales assessing possible controls of violent behavior (death penalty, punishment, prevention, and catharsis). Each subscale…

  5. Development and Psychometric Properties Gender Roles Attitude Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zeyneloglu, Simge; Terzioglu, Fusun

    2011-01-01

    This research was conducted for the purpose of developing a scaling tool to determine university students' attitudes towards gender roles. University students' attitudes should first be determined in order to change this traditional view to gender and to achieve a more egalitarian view. The research sample was comprised of one university's…

  6. Psychometric properties of the Trauma and Distress Scale, TADS, in an adult community sample in Finland

    PubMed Central

    Salokangas, Raimo K. R.; Schultze-Lutter, Frauke; Patterson, Paul; von Reventlow, Heinrich Graf; Heinimaa, Markus; From, Tiina; Luutonen, Sinikka; Hankala, Juha; Kotimäki, Mika; Tuominen, Lauri

    2016-01-01

    Background There is increasing evidence that a history of childhood abuse and neglect is not uncommon among individuals who experience mental disorder and that childhood trauma experiences are associated with adult psychopathology. Although several interview and self-report instruments for retrospective trauma assessment have been developed, many focus on sexual abuse (SexAb) rather than on multiple types of trauma or adversity. Methods Within the European Prediction of Psychosis Study, the Trauma and Distress Scale (TADS) was developed as a new self-report assessment of multiple types of childhood trauma and distressing experiences. The TADS includes 43 items and, following previous measures including the Childhood Trauma Questionnaire, focuses on five core domains: emotional neglect (EmoNeg), emotional abuse (EmoAb), physical neglect (PhyNeg), physical abuse (PhyAb), and SexAb. This study explores the psychometric properties of the TADS (internal consistency and concurrent validity) in 692 participants drawn from the general population who completed a mailed questionnaire, including the TADS, a depression self-report and questions on help-seeking for mental health problems. Inter-method reliability was examined in a random sample of 100 responders who were reassessed in telephone interviews. Results After minor revisions of PhyNeg and PhyAb, internal consistencies were good for TADS totals and the domain raw score sums. Intra-class coefficients for TADS total score and the five revised core domains were all good to excellent when compared to the interviewed TADS as a gold standard. In the concurrent validity analyses, the total TADS and its all core domains were significantly associated with depression and help-seeking for mental problems as proxy measures for traumatisation. In addition, robust cutoffs for the total TADS and its domains were calculated. Conclusions Our results suggest the TADS as a valid, reliable, and clinically useful instrument for assessing

  7. Psychometric properties of the dimensional anxiety scales for DSM-5 in a Brazilian community sample.

    PubMed

    DeSousa, Diogo A; Moreno, André L; Osório, Flávia L; Crippa, José Alexandre S; LeBeau, Richard; Manfro, Gisele G; Salum, Giovanni A; Koller, Silvia H

    2016-10-16

    The DSM-5 highlights the use of dimensional assessments of mental health as a supplement to categorical diagnoses. This study investigated the psychometric properties of the DSM-5 Dimensional Anxiety Scales in a Brazilian community sample. Dimensional scales for generalized anxiety disorder, social anxiety disorder, panic disorder, agoraphobia, and specific phobia were administered to 930 adults aged 18 to 70, 64.2% female. Psychometric properties investigated were: unidimensionality; measurement invariance; internal consistency; composite reliability; test-retest reliability; convergent and divergent validity; category thresholds and item performance analyses. Analyses revealed unidimensionality for all scales except for specific phobia. Measurement invariance, high internal consistency and composite reliability, and convergent and divergent validity were demonstrated. Test-retest reliability was high for all scales but generalized anxiety disorder. Item-based analyses evidenced that none of the items were very easy to endorse and that the scales offered more information about subjects with high severity estimates of anxiety. The DSM-5 Dimensional Anxiety Scales are a valid and reliable alternative to assess anxiety symptomatology in community settings, although further evaluation is needed, especially for specific phobia. The scales seem to be more useful for characterizing dimensionality of symptoms for subclinical or clinical cases than for slight or mildly anxious subjects.

  8. Psychometric development of the Problematic Pornography Use Scale.

    PubMed

    Kor, Ariel; Zilcha-Mano, Sigal; Fogel, Yehuda A; Mikulincer, Mario; Reid, Rory C; Potenza, Marc N

    2014-05-01

    Despite the increased social acceptance and widespread use of pornography over the past few decades, reliable and valid instruments assessing problematic use of pornography are lacking. This paper reports the findings of three studies aimed at developing and validating a new scale measuring problematic pornography use. The Problematic Pornography Use Scale (PPUS) items showed high internal consistency, convergent validity, and construct validity. Exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses revealed four core factors relating to proposed domains of problematic pornography use. High PPUS scores were positively correlated with measures of psychopathology, low self-esteem and poor attachment. Although PPUS scores were related to other behavioral addictions, problematic pornography use as operationalized in the current paper appears to be uniquely distinguished from features of behavioral addictions relating to gambling and Internet use. Findings highlight the potential use of the PPUS for future research and possible clinical applications by defining problematic pornography use as a behavioral addiction.

  9. The Body Image Psychological Inflexibility Scale: development and psychometric properties.

    PubMed

    Callaghan, Glenn M; Sandoz, Emily K; Darrow, Sabrina M; Feeney, Timothy K

    2015-03-30

    Body image disturbance and body dysmorphic disorder (BDD) have been researched from a variety of psychological approaches. Psychological inflexibility, or avoidance of one's own cognitive and affective states at a cost to personal values, may be a useful construct to understand these problems. In an effort to clarify the role of psychological inflexibility in body image disturbance and BDD, a measure was created based on the principles of Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT). The scale was developed by generating new items to represent the construct and revising items from an existing scale measuring aspects of body image psychological inflexibility. The study was conducted with an ethnically diverse undergraduate population using three samples during the validation process. Participants completed multiple assessments to determine the validity of the measure and were interviewed for BDD. The 16-item scale has internal consistency (α = 0.93), a single factor solution, convergent validity, and test re-test reliability (r = 0.90). Data demonstrate a relationship between psychological inflexibility and body image disturbance indicating empirical support for an ACT conceptualization of body image problems and the use of this measure for body image disturbance and BDD.

  10. Resistance to mate guarding scale in women: psychometric properties.

    PubMed

    Cousins, Alita J; Fugère, Madeleine A; Riggs, Matthew L

    2015-02-03

    One individual's actions may affect the evolutionary fitness of another individual. Sexually antagonistic coevolution occurs when one partner's behavior decreases the fitness of the other partner (Rice, 1996). This conflict pressures the other partner to counter these disadvantageous actions. Mate guarding is a mate retention tactic aimed at keeping a partner from cheating. Mate guarding may reduce mate choice, especially for extra pair mates. Therefore, some individuals may resist their partner's mate guarding tactics. We developed a scale to measure resistance to mate guarding and tested it in women (N = 1069). Using exploratory factor analysis (EFA), six theoretically sound factors emerged and explained 69% of the variance. Confirmatory Factor Analysis showed strong support for the six original subscales as well as for the overall scale. The subscales had high reliability. The validity of the Resistance to Mate Guarding Scale was also excellent. Women who stated they used more resistance to mate guarding strategies also indicated that they had partners who mate guarded more, were less invested in their relationships, felt their partners were more controlling, had a more avoidant attachment style, and had a more unrestricted sociosexual orientation.

  11. Psychometric Properties of the Participation Scale among Former Buruli Ulcer Patients in Ghana and Benin

    PubMed Central

    de Zeeuw, Janine; Douwstra, Marlies; Omansen, Till F.; Sopoh, Ghislain E.; Johnson, Christian; Phillips, Richard O.; Alferink, Marike; Saunderson, Paul; Van der Werf, Tjip S.; Dijkstra, Pieter U.; Stienstra, Ymkje

    2014-01-01

    Background Buruli ulcer is a stigmatising disease treated with antibiotics and wound care, and sometimes surgical intervention is necessary. Permanent limitations in daily activities are a common long term consequence. It is unknown to what extent patients perceive problems in participation in social activities. The psychometric properties of the Participation Scale used in other disabling diseases, such as leprosy, was assessed for use in former Buruli ulcer patients. Methods Former Buruli ulcer patients in Ghana and Benin, their relatives, and healthy community controls were interviewed using the Participation Scale, Buruli Ulcer Functional Limitation Score, and the Explanatory Model Interview Catalogue to measure stigma. The Participation Scale was tested for the following psychometric properties: discrimination, floor and ceiling effects, internal consistency, inter-item correlation, item-total correlation and construct validity. Results In total 386 participants (143 former Buruli ulcer patients with their relatives (137) and 106 community controls) were included in the study. The Participation Scale displayed good discrimination between former Buruli ulcer patients and healthy community controls. No floor and ceiling effects were found. Internal consistency (Cronbach's alpha) was 0.88. In Ghana, mean inter-item correlation of 0.29 and item-total correlations ranging from 0.10 to 0.69 were found while in Benin, a mean inter-item correlation of 0.28 was reported with item-total correlations ranging from −0.08 to 0.79. With respect to construct validity, 4 out of 6 hypotheses were not rejected, though correlations between various constructs differed between countries. Conclusion The results indicate the Participation Scale has acceptable psychometric properties and can be used for Buruli ulcer patients in Ghana and Benin. Future studies can use this Participation Scale to evaluate the long term restrictions in participation in daily social activities of former

  12. Cultural Adaptation, Psychometric Properties, and Outcomes of the Native American Spirituality Scale

    PubMed Central

    Greenfield, Brenna L.; Hallgren, Kevin A.; Venner, Kamilla L.; Hagler, Kylee J.; Simmons, Jeremiah D.; Sheche, Judith N.; Homer, Everett; Lupee, Donna

    2015-01-01

    Spirituality is central to many Native Americans (NAs) and has been associated with recovery from substance use disorders (SUDs). However, no published questionnaire uniquely taps tribal-specific spiritual beliefs and practices. This hinders efforts to integrate traditional NA spirituality into SUD treatment and track spiritual outcomes. As part of a randomized controlled trial examining SUD treatment for NAs, we adapted the Daily Spiritual Experience Scale (DSES) in collaboration with members of a Southwest tribe to create the Native American Spirituality Scale (NASS) and measured changes in the NASS over the course of treatment. The 83 participants (70% male) were from a single Southwest tribe and seeking SUD treatment. They completed the NASS at baseline, four-, eight-, and 12-months. Exploratory factor analysis of the NASS was conducted and its temporal invariance, construct validity, and longitudinal changes in the factor and item scores were examined. The NASS yielded a two-factor structure that was largely invariant across time. Factor 1 reflected behavioral practices, while Factor 2 reflected more global beliefs. Both factors significantly increased across 12 months, albeit at different assessment points. At baseline, Factor 1 was negatively related to substance use and positively associated with measures of tribal identification while Factor 2 was unrelated to these measures. Given the importance of tribal spirituality to many NAs, the development of this psychometrically sound measure is a key precursor and complement to the incorporation of tribal spirituality into treatment, as well as research on mechanisms of change for SUD treatment among NAs and assessment of NA spirituality in relation to other aspects of health. PMID:25961648

  13. Cultural adaptation, psychometric properties, and outcomes of the Native American Spirituality Scale.

    PubMed

    Greenfield, Brenna L; Hallgren, Kevin A; Venner, Kamilla L; Hagler, Kylee J; Simmons, Jeremiah D; Sheche, Judith N; Homer, Everett; Lupee, Donna

    2015-05-01

    Spirituality is central to many Native Americans (NAs) and has been associated with recovery from substance use disorders (SUDs). However, no published questionnaire uniquely taps tribal-specific spiritual beliefs and practices. This hinders efforts to integrate traditional NA spirituality into SUD treatment and track spiritual outcomes. As part of a randomized controlled trial examining SUD treatment for NAs, we adapted the Daily Spiritual Experience Scale (DSES) in collaboration with members of a Southwest tribe to create the Native American Spirituality Scale (NASS) and measured changes in the NASS over the course of treatment. The 83 participants (70% male) were from a single Southwest tribe and seeking SUD treatment. They completed the NASS at baseline, 4, 8, and 12 months. Exploratory factor analysis of the NASS was conducted and its temporal invariance, construct validity, and longitudinal changes in the factor and item scores were examined. The NASS yielded a 2-factor structure that was largely invariant across time. Factor 1 reflected behavioral practices, while Factor 2 reflected more global beliefs. Both factors significantly increased across 12 months, albeit at different assessment points. At baseline, Factor 1 was negatively related to substance use and positively associated with measures of tribal identification while Factor 2 was unrelated to these measures. Given the importance of tribal spirituality to many NAs, the development of this psychometrically sound measure is a key precursor and complement to the incorporation of tribal spirituality into treatment, as well as research on mechanisms of change for SUD treatment among NAs and assessment of NA spirituality in relation to other aspects of health.

  14. Psychometric properties of the Death Anxiety Scale (DAS) among terminally ill cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Royal, Kenneth D; Elahi, Fereshte

    2011-01-01

    Research conducted with the terminally ill population in relation to death anxiety is rare and mostly outdated. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the psychometric properties of the widely used Death Anxiety Scale (DAS) on a sample of terminal cancer patients.Additionally, validation studies of the DAS have exclusively used traditional statistical methods for analysis. The current study utilized an item response theory technique (IRT), namely the Rasch Rating Scale model for data analysis. The methodology employed may be useful for other researchers conducting validation studies from an IRT perspective.

  15. Psychometric properties of the Revised Male Body Attitudes Scale among Irish men.

    PubMed

    Ryan, Travis A; Morrison, Todd G; Roddy, Sarah; McCutcheon, Jessica

    2011-01-01

    The psychometric properties of a revised version of the Male Body Attitudes Scale (Tylka, Bergeron, & Schwartz, 2005) were investigated using two independent online samples of Irish men (ns=241 and 253, respectively). Exploratory factor analyses suggested that a 15-item, 3-factor solution representing men's attitudes toward their body fat, muscularity, and height best described the data. The internal consistency and construct validity of scores on the Revised Male Body Attitudes Scale suggest that this measure holds promise as an indicant of men's attitudes toward their physical appearance. Limitations and strengths associated with the current research are discussed and directions for future research are outlined.

  16. The attitudes toward transgendered individuals scale: psychometric properties.

    PubMed

    Walch, Susan E; Ngamake, Sakkaphat T; Francisco, Jacquelyn; Stitt, Rashunda L; Shingler, Kimberly A

    2012-10-01

    Gay, lesbian, bisexual, and transgendered individuals are sexual and gender minorities subject to stigma in a heteronormative culture with binary gender role norms. Although much research has examined sexual stigma in the form of homophobia, or negative attitudes and reactions to homosexuals and homosexuality, little is known about the stigma experienced by transgendered individuals. Transgendered people are those whose gender identity (sense of oneself as a man or a woman) or gender expression (expression of oneself as a man or a woman in behavior, manner, and/or dress) differ from conventional expectations for their physical sex. Although a scale exists to measure transphobia or negative attitudes and reactions to transgendered individuals, it includes items tapping into overt behavioral expression of this stigma, or gender-bashing, and fails to identify or define transgendered persons as the attitudinal target of the items. A new scale was developed and evaluated in an effort to assess transgender-related stigma, separately from discrimination and violence, among members of the general population. Using two separate samples of college students ranging in age from 18-64 years, exploratory (N = 134) and confirmatory factor analyses (N = 237) were performed. The resulting 20-item, self-report measure demonstrated a single-factor structure, high internal consistency reliability, and evidence of convergent and discriminant construct validity.

  17. Psychometric analysis of the Ten-Item Perceived Stress Scale.

    PubMed

    Taylor, John M

    2015-03-01

    Although the 10-item Perceived Stress Scale (PSS-10) is a popular measure, a review of the literature reveals 3 significant gaps: (a) There is some debate as to whether a 1- or a 2-factor model best describes the relationships among the PSS-10 items, (b) little information is available on the performance of the items on the scale, and (c) it is unclear whether PSS-10 scores are subject to gender bias. These gaps were addressed in this study using a sample of 1,236 adults from the National Survey of Midlife Development in the United States II. Based on self-identification, participants were 56.31% female, 77% White, 17.31% Black and/or African American, and the average age was 54.48 years (SD = 11.69). Findings from an ordinal confirmatory factor analysis suggested the relationships among the items are best described by an oblique 2-factor model. Item analysis using the graded response model provided no evidence of item misfit and indicated both subscales have a wide estimation range. Although t tests revealed a significant difference between the means of males and females on the Perceived Helplessness Subscale (t = 4.001, df = 1234, p < .001), measurement invariance tests suggest that PSS-10 scores may not be substantially affected by gender bias. Overall, the findings suggest that inferences made using PSS-10 scores are valid. However, this study calls into question inferences where the multidimensionality of the PSS-10 is ignored.

  18. The psychometric properties of the Kessler Psychological Distress Scale (K6) in a general population sample of adolescents.

    PubMed

    Mewton, Louise; Kessler, Ronald C; Slade, Tim; Hobbs, Megan J; Brownhill, Louise; Birrell, Louise; Tonks, Zoe; Teesson, Maree; Newton, Nicola; Chapman, Cath; Allsop, Steve; Hides, Leanne; McBride, Nyanda; Andrews, Gavin

    2016-10-01

    The 6-item Kessler Psychological Distress Scale (K6; Kessler et al., 2002) is a screener for psychological distress that has robust psychometric properties among adults. Given that a significant proportion of adolescents experience mental illness, there is a need for measures that accurately and reliably screen for mental disorders in this age group. This study examined the psychometric properties of the K6 in a large general population sample of adolescents (N = 4,434; mean age = 13.5 years; 44.6% male). Factor analyses were conducted to examine the dimensionality of the K6 in adolescents and to investigate sex-based measurement invariance. This study also evaluated the K6 as a predictor of scores on the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire (SDQ; Goodman, 1997). The K6 demonstrated high levels of internal consistency, with the 6 items loading primarily on 1 factor. Consistent with previous research, females reported higher mean levels of psychological distress when compared with males. The identification of sex-based measurement noninvariance in the item thresholds indicated that these mean differences most likely represented reporting bias in the K6 items rather than true differences in the underlying psychological distress construct. The K6 was a fair to good predictor of abnormal scores on the SDQ, but predictive utility was relatively low among males. Future research needs to focus on refining and augmenting the K6 scale to maximize its utility in adolescents. (PsycINFO Database Record

  19. Family Impact Scale (FIS): Cross-cultural Adaptation and Psychometric Properties for the Peruvian Spanish Language.

    PubMed

    Abanto, Jenny; Albites, Ursula; Bönecker, Marcelo; Paiva, Saul M; Castillo, Jorge L; Aguilar-Gálvez, Denisse

    2015-12-01

    The lack of a Family Impact Scale (FIS) in Spanish language limits its use as an indicator in Spanish-speaking countries and precludes comparisons with data from other cultural and ethnic groups. The purpose of this study was therefore to adapt the FIS cross-culturally to the Peruvian Spanish language and assess its reliability and validity. In order to translate and adapt the FIS cross-culturally, it was answered by 60 parents in two pilot tests, after which it was tested on 200 parents of children aged 11 to 14 years who were clinically examined for dental caries experience and malocclusions. Internal consistency was assessed by Cronbach's alpha coefficient while repeat administration of the FIS on the same 200 parents enabled the test-retest reliability to be assessed via intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC). Construct and discriminant validity were based on associations of the FIS with global ratings of oral health and clinical groups, respectively. Mean (standard deviation) FIS total score was 5.20 (5.86). Internal consistency was confirmed by Cronbach's alpha 0.84. Test-retest reliability revealed excellent reproducibility (ICC = 0.96). Construct validity was good, demonstrating statistically significant associations between total FIS score and global ratings of oral health (p=0.007) and overall wellbeing (p=0.002), as well as for the subscale scores (p<0.05) with exception of the financial burden subscale. The FIS was also able to discriminate between children with and without dental caries experience and malocclusions (p<0.05). Satisfactory psychometric results for the Peruvian Spanish FIS confirm it as a reliable, valid instrument for assessing the impact on the family caused by children's oral conditions.

  20. Psychometric properties of the gaze anxiety rating scale: convergent, discriminant, and factorial validity.

    PubMed

    Langer, Julia K; Rodebaugh, Thomas L; Menatti, Andrew R; Weeks, Justin W; Schneier, Franklin R

    2014-01-01

    Fear and avoidance of gaze are two features thought to be associated with problematic social anxiety. Avoidance of eye contact has been linked with such undesirable traits as deceptiveness, insincerity, and lower self-esteem. The Gaze Anxiety Rating Scale (GARS) is a self-report measure designed to assess gaze anxiety and avoidance, but its psychometric properties have only been assessed in one preliminary study. We further investigated psychometric properties of the GARS by assessing convergent and factorial validity. We obtained a two-factor solution: gaze anxiety and avoidance across situations (1) in general (GARS-General) and (2) related to dominance communication (GARS-Dominance). The GARS-General factor related more strongly to social anxiety than the GARS-Dominance, and convergent validity of the factors was supported by expected relationships with personality and social anxiety variables. Our results indicate that the GARS subscales are psychometrically valid measures of gaze aversion, supporting their use in future study of the relationship between social anxiety and eye contact behavior.

  1. Psychometrics of the Laffrey Health Conception Scale for adolescents.

    PubMed

    Yarcheski, Adela; Mahon, Noreen E; Yarcheski, Thomas J

    2005-01-01

    The purposes of this methodological study were to factor analyze the Laffrey Health Conception Scale (LHCS) and to assess construct validity of the instrument with early adolescents. The final sample consisted of 230 early adolescents, aged 12 to 14, who responded to instrument packets in classrooms in an urban middle school. Data obtained on the LHCS were subjected to principal components factor analysis with oblique rotation. A two-factor solution was accepted, which is consistent with early adolescents' conceptions of health. Factor I was labeled Wellness and Factor II was labeled Clinical Health. A higher order factor analysis yielded one factor with 26 items, labeled the LHCS for Early Adolescents. The 26-item LHCS had a coefficient alpha of .95. Construct validity was assessed by testing three theoretical propositions, which significantly linked health conception to social support, self-esteem, and positive health practices. The findings indicate that the LHCS is a reliable and valid measure of health conceptions in early adolescents. Results also offer flexibility to researchers interested in testing theory involving the constructs of the definition of health, wellness, and clinical health in early adolescents.

  2. Self-efficacy in Infant Care Scale: revision and further psychometric testing.

    PubMed

    Prasopkittikun, Tassanee; Tilokskulchai, Fongcum

    2010-12-01

    Maternal self-efficacy is an important factor in parenting behaviors and skills. In order to assess maternal self-efficacy in infant care, a solid measure is needed. The integrity of the assessment of self-efficacy in infant care depends upon whether or not an instrument possesses proper measurement properties. The purpose of this study was to revise the scale items and examine the further psychometric properties of the Self-efficacy in Infant Care Scale. Using a sample of 235 Thai mothers, the revised Scale, with 44 items, was found to have internal consistency and test-retest reliability values of 0.96 and 0.93, respectively. A confirmatory factor analysis supported the hypothesized structure. Also, the revised Scale was found to be correlated with a measure of a theoretically related construct; that is, the Parenting Stress Index/Short Form. The psychometric testing results suggest that the revised Scale can be used as an assessment tool for both research and clinical purposes.

  3. Psychometric assessment of the Adolescent Physical Activity Perceived Benefits and Barriers Scales.

    PubMed

    Robbins, Lorraine B; Wu, Tsu-Yin; Sikorskii, Alla; Morley, Blair

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to psychometrically test the Adolescent Physical Activity Perceived Benefits and Barriers Scales developed for middle-school-age youth. A total of 206 racially diverse 6th, 7th, and 8th graders completed questionnaires at two time points (2 weeks apart). For the 10-item Perceived Benefits Scale and the 9-item Perceived Barriers Scale, test-retest reliability (r = .70; r = .71, respectively) and internal consistency (Cronbach's alpha was .80 and .79, respectively, at time 1) were supported. Principal components analysis with Varimax rotation was employed to assess construct validity. A 2-factor solution emerged for each scale as predicted. The relationship between both scale scores and self-reported physical activity provided additional evidence of validity. Both instruments were found to be reliable and valid for measuring the perceived benefits of and barriers to physical activity in middle school youth.

  4. Psychometric Properties of the Scores on the Behavioral Inhibition and Activation Scales in a Sample of Norwegian Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bjornebekk, Gunnar

    2009-01-01

    The primary aim of this study was to examine the psychometric properties of the scores on a version for children of the Carver and White Behavioral Inhibition and Activation scales (the BIS-BAS scales). This involved administering the BIS-BAS scales, the Positive and Negative Affect Schedule, the Junior Eysenck Personality Questionnaire…

  5. Psychometric properties of the drive for muscularity scale in Mexican males.

    PubMed

    Escoto, Consuelo; Alvarez-Rayón, Georgina; Mancilla-Díaz, Juan Manuel; Camacho Ruiz, Esteban Jaime; Franco Paredes, Karina; Juárez Lugo, Carlos Saúl

    2013-03-01

    This study refers to the evaluation of the psychometric properties of the Drive for Muscularity Scale among Mexican population. The exploratory factor analysis was carried out with 369 university males (mean age = 20.93 years). A three-factor structure that explains 45.64 % of the variance was found for the scale: 31.10 % by attitudes (α = 0.87), 10.70 % by substance intake (α = 0.72) and 3.84 % by training adherence (α = 0.68). Only the two first sub-scales and total score (α = 0.86) offered acceptable levels of internal consistence. The confirmatory factor analysis, carried out with 200 males (mean age = 20.79 years), verified both the suitability of this factor structure and the two-factor structure proposed by McCreary et al. (Psychol Men Masc 5:49-58, 1). Drive for muscularity is important in comprehending male body image and Drive for Muscularity Scale has demonstrated to be psychometrically suitable to assess this construct in Mexican males.

  6. Psychometric Validation Study of the Liebowitz Social Anxiety Scale - Self-Reported Version for Brazilian Portuguese

    PubMed Central

    Forni dos Santos, Larissa; Loureiro, Sonia Regina; Crippa, José Alexandre de Souza; Osório, Flávia de Lima

    2013-01-01

    Social Anxiety Disorder (SAD) is prevalent and rarely diagnosed due to the difficulty in recognizing its symptoms as belonging to a disorder. Therefore, the evaluation/screening scales are of great importance for its detection, with the most used being the Liebowitz Social Anxiety Scale (LSAS). Thus, this study proposed to evaluate the psychometric properties of internal consistency and convergent validity, as well as the confirmatory factorial analysis and reliability of the self-reported version of the LSAS (LSAS-SR), translated into Brazilian Portuguese, in a sample of the general population (N = 413) and in a SAD clinical sample (N = 252). The convergent validity with specific scales for the evaluation of SAD and a general anxiety scale presented correlations ranging from 0.21 to 0.84. The confirmatory factorial analysis did not replicate the previously indicated findings of the literature, with the difficulty being in obtaining a consensus factorial structure common to the diverse cultures in which the instrument was studied. The LSAS-SR presented excellent internal consistency (α = 0.90–0.96) and test-retest reliability (Intraclass Correlation Coefficient = 0.81; Pearson’s = 0.82). The present findings support those of international studies that attest to the excellent psychometric properties of the LSAS-SR, endorsing its status as the gold standard. PMID:23922961

  7. Psychometric Evaluation of the Physical Activity Enjoyment Scale in Adults with Functional Limitations.

    PubMed

    Murrock, Carolyn J; Bekhet, Abir; Zauszniewski, Jaclene A

    2016-01-01

    Enjoyment is an important construct for understanding physical activity participation, and it has not been examined in adults with functional limitations. This secondary analysis reported the reliability and validity of the Physical Activity Enjoyment Scale (PACES) in a convenience sample of 40 adults with functional limitations. The participants completed the PACES, Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression Scale (CES-D), and the Late Life Function and Disability Instrument (LLFDI) prior to beginning a 12-week feasibility dance intervention study. Results indicated reliability as Cronbach's alpha was .95 and mean inter-item correlation was .52. To further support reliability, homogeneity of the instrument was evaluated using item-to-total scale correlations. Homogeneity was supported as all items had corrected item-to-total correlations greater than .30. For validity, the PACES was significantly related to only the Physical Function component of the LLFDI (r = .38, p = .02), but not the CES-D. Exploratory factor analysis revealed a 3-factor structure that accounted for 73.76% of the variance. This feasibility intervention dance study represented the first attempt to examine the psychometric properties of the PACES in adults with functional limitations. The findings demonstrate support for the scale's reliability and validity among adults with functional limitations. Results are informative as further psychometric testing of the PACES is recommended using randomized clinical trials with larger sample sizes. Enjoyment for physical activity is an important construct for understanding physical activity participation in adults with functional limitations.

  8. Psychometric properties of three medication adherence scales in patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Salt, Elizabeth; Hall, Lynne; Peden, Ann R; Home, Rob

    2012-01-01

    Patient adherence to their health care protocols is important to encourage the best health outcomes in rheumatoid arthritis (RA); however, little attention has been given to assessing the psychometric properties of adherence measures in this patient population. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the psychometric properties of three existing self-report measures of medication adherence in a sample of patients with RA--the compliance-questionnaire-rheumatology (CQR), the Medication Adherence Report Scale (MARS), and the medication adherence scale (MAS). A cross-sectional study of 108 clinic patients with rheumatoid arthritis was conducted to evaluate the reliability and validity of the measures. Cronbach's alpha was .77 for both the CQR and a modified version of the MARS. For the MAS, the Kuder-Richardson 20 reliability was .25. Although not strong, test-retest reliability was adequate for all measures. Factor analysis indicated that both the MARS and the CQR measure two factors. All three instruments were moderately correlated with each other, with correlations ranging between .48 and .56. Although these scales were significantly correlated, moderate correlations among the scales indicate that they may not measure the same aspects of adherence. Among the three adherence measures, the modified MARS demonstrated the best evidence of reliability and validity and ease of administration in this sample of persons with RA.

  9. Effect of personality item writing on psychometric properties of ideal-point and likert scales.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jialin; Mead, Alan D

    2014-12-01

    The present study was designed to investigate personality item-writing practices and their effect on the psychometric properties of personality items and scales. Personality items were developed based on ideal-point and dominance models, analyzed using the generalized graded unfolding model, and empirically classified as having an ideal-point or dominance form. Results suggested that writing dominance items were slightly easier (more successful) than writing ideal-point items, but this varied slightly by personality dimensions. Of 3 ideal-point item writing tactics, the "neutral" tactic was least successful; success writing "double-barreled" and "average" ideal-point items was comparable to that of dominance items. Three personality scales were then constructed using successful ideal-point and dominance items. Scales constructed using ideal-point items had substantially inferior psychometric properties, including lower score reliability, lower correlations with important criteria, and mixed test information results. However, lower predictive validity of ideal-point scale scores may be due to lower reliability of the scores. Practical and methodological implications were also discussed. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved).

  10. Psychometric Properties of the Persian Version of Self-Transcendence Scale: Adolescent Version

    PubMed Central

    Farahani, Azam Shirinabadi; Rassouli, Maryam; Yaghmaie, Farideh; Majd, Hamid Alavi; Sajjadi, Moosa

    2016-01-01

    Background: Given the greater tendency during adolescence toward risk-taking, identifying and measuring the factors affecting the adolescents’ health is highly important to ensure the efficacy of health promoting interventions. One of these factors is self-transcendence. The aim of this study was to assess the psychometric features of the Self-Transcendence Scale (adolescents’ version) in students in Tehran, the capital city of Iran. Methods: This research was conducted in 2015. For this purpose, 1210 high school students were selected through the multistage cluster sampling method. After the backward-forward translation, the psychometric properties of the scale were examined through the assessment of the (face and construct) validity and reliability (internal consistency and stability) of the scale. The construct validity was assessed using two methods, factor analysis, and convergence of the scale with the Hopefulness Scale for Adolescents. Results: The result of face validity was minor modifications in some words. The exploratory factor analysis resulted in the extraction of two dimensions, with explaining 52.79% of the variance collectively. In determining the convergent validity, the correlation between hopefulness score and self-transcendence score was r=0.47 (P<0.001). The internal consistency of the scale was determined using Cronbach’s alpha of 0.82 for the whole scale and 0.75 and 0.70 for each of the sub-scales. The stability reliability was found to have an ICC of 0.86 and a confidence interval of 95%. Conclusion: The Persian version of the Adolescents’ Self-Transcendence Scale showed an acceptable validity and reliability and can be used in the assessment of self-transcendence in Iranian adolescents. PMID:27218113

  11. Comparing the psychometric properties of the pediatric outcomes data collection instrument and the activities scales for kids: a review.

    PubMed

    Christakou, Anna; Laiou, Athanasia

    2014-09-01

    The aim of this study was to review and evaluate the psychometric properties of two general musculoskeletal outcome measures focusing on pediatric physical disability, namely, the Pediatric Outcomes Data Collection Instrument (PODCI) and the Activities Scales for Kids (ASK). Although this review reveals the psychometric superiority of ASK to PODCI, further research should confirm the psychometric properties of both the instruments. A number of psychometric issues need to be further addressed. Specifically, future studies should examine additional types of reliability and validity, for example, content, construct, criterion, and discriminant with more sophisticated statistical analyses, for example, Aiken's item content validity coefficient and confirmatory factor analysis. Until these issues are addressed, researchers should be cautious utilizing these instruments in children with musculoskeletal problems in a clinical setting.

  12. Measuring Problematic Mobile Phone Use: Development and Preliminary Psychometric Properties of the PUMP Scale

    PubMed Central

    Merlo, Lisa J.; Stone, Amanda M.; Bibbey, Alex

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to develop and assess the psychometric properties of an English language measure of problematic mobile phone use. Participants were recruited from a university campus, health science center, and other public locations. The sample included 244 individuals (68.4% female) aged 18–75. Results supported a unidimensional factor structure for the 20-item self-report Problematic Use of Mobile Phones (PUMP) Scale. Internal consistency was excellent (α = 0.94). Strong correlations (r = .76, P < .001) were found between the PUMP Scale and an existing scale of cellular phone dependency that was validated in Asia, as well as items assessing frequency and intensity of mobile phone use. Results provide preliminary support for the use of the PUMP Scale to measure problematic use of mobile phones. PMID:24826371

  13. Brief Sensation Seeking Scale for Chinese - Cultural Adaptation and Psychometric Assessment

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xinguang; Li, Fang; Nydegger, Liesl; Gong, Jie; Ren, Yuanjing; Dinaj-Koci, Veronica; Sun, Huiling; Stanton, Bonita

    2012-01-01

    International behavioral research requires instruments that are not culturally-biased to assess sensation seeking. In this study we described a culturally adapted version of the Brief Sensation Seeking Scale for Chinese (BSSS-C) and its psychometric characteristics. The adapted scale was assessed using an adult sample (n=238) with diverse educational and residential backgrounds. The BSSS-C (Cronbach alpha=0.90) was correlated with the original Brief Sensation Seeking Scale (r = 0.85, p<0.01) and fitted the four-factor model well (CFI=0.98, SRMR=0.03). The scale scores significantly predicted intention to and actual engagement in a number of health risk behaviors, including alcohol consumption, cigarette smoking, and sexual risk behaviors. In conclusion, the BSSS-C has adequate reliability and validity, supporting its utility in China and potential in other developing countries. PMID:23316097

  14. Brief Sensation Seeking Scale for Chinese - Cultural Adaptation and Psychometric Assessment.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xinguang; Li, Fang; Nydegger, Liesl; Gong, Jie; Ren, Yuanjing; Dinaj-Koci, Veronica; Sun, Huiling; Stanton, Bonita

    2013-04-01

    International behavioral research requires instruments that are not culturally-biased to assess sensation seeking. In this study we described a culturally adapted version of the Brief Sensation Seeking Scale for Chinese (BSSS-C) and its psychometric characteristics. The adapted scale was assessed using an adult sample (n=238) with diverse educational and residential backgrounds. The BSSS-C (Cronbach alpha=0.90) was correlated with the original Brief Sensation Seeking Scale (r = 0.85, p<0.01) and fitted the four-factor model well (CFI=0.98, SRMR=0.03). The scale scores significantly predicted intention to and actual engagement in a number of health risk behaviors, including alcohol consumption, cigarette smoking, and sexual risk behaviors. In conclusion, the BSSS-C has adequate reliability and validity, supporting its utility in China and potential in other developing countries.

  15. Psychometric testing of an instrument measuring core competencies of nursing students: an application of Mokken scaling.

    PubMed

    Perng, Shoa-Jen; Watson, Roger

    2013-01-01

    Assessing the core competencies of nursing students provides information about students' learning outcomes for educational evaluation and improvement. The aim of this study was to develop the Nursing Students Core Competencies scale to measure 8 core competencies of nursing students in Taiwan. The study employed factor analysis and Mokken scaling analysis for psychometric testing of this instrument between a group of nursing graduates and their evaluators. The results indicated that the Nursing Students Core Competencies scale has demonstrated evidence of internal consistency, structural validity, unidimensionality, and a hierarchy of items for students' self-assessment and instructor's rating. The use of Mokken scaling analysis extends the knowledge of developing competence assessment tools; it can be used to reveal the domains or items of competency nursing students perceive that are easy or difficult, providing information for curricular design.

  16. An instrument to assess self-statements during public speaking: scale development and preliminary psychometric properties.

    PubMed

    Hofmann, S G; Dibartolo, P M

    2000-01-01

    Public speaking is the most commonly reported fearful social situation. Although a number of contemporary theories emphasize the importance of cognitive processes in social anxiety, there is no instrument available to assess fearful thoughts experienced during public speaking. The Self-Statements During Public Speaking (SSPS) scale is a 10-item questionnaire consisting of two 5-item subscales, the "Positive Self-Statements" (SSPS-P) and the "Negative Self-Statements" subscale (SSPS-N). Four studies report on the development and the preliminary psychometric properties of this instrument.

  17. Development and psychometric testing of the Suicide Caring Competence Scale (SCCS) for family caregivers in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Sun, Fan-Ko; Chiang, Chun-Ying; Chen, Wei-Jen; Wang, Ruey-Hsia; Huang, Hui-Man; Lin, Hung-Yen

    2014-08-01

    Suicide caring competence is important for family caregivers to care their relatives with suicidal tendencies. The purpose of this study was to develop and test the psychometric properties of the Suicide Caring Competence Scale (SCCS) for family caregivers in Taiwan. A 20-item SCCS was tested on 165 family caregivers. Confirmatory factor analysis indicated that five subscales with 19 items best fit the data. The Cronbach's α and test-retest reliability of the SCCS was 0.90 and 0.81, respectively. The SCCS demonstrated acceptable construct validity and reliability. Nurses can use the SCCS to assess the suicide caring competence of family caregivers.

  18. Academic Motivation Scale: adaptation and psychometric analyses for high school and college students

    PubMed Central

    Stover, Juliana Beatriz; de la Iglesia, Guadalupe; Boubeta, Antonio Rial; Liporace, Mercedes Fernández

    2012-01-01

    The Academic Motivation Scale (AMS), supported in Self-Determination Theory, has been applied in recent decades as well in high school as in college education. Although several versions in Spanish are available, the underlying linguistic and cultural differences raise important issues when they are applied to Latin-American population. Consequently an adapted version of the AMS was developed, and its construct validity was analyzed in Argentine students. Results obtained on a sample that included 723 students from Buenos Aires (393 high school and 330 college students) verified adequate psychometric properties in this new version, solving some controversies regarded to its dimensionality. PMID:22888280

  19. Psychometric Properties of the Theory of Mind Assessment Scale in a Sample of Adolescents and Adults

    PubMed Central

    Bosco, Francesca M.; Gabbatore, Ilaria; Tirassa, Maurizio; Testa, Silvia

    2016-01-01

    This research aimed at the evaluation of the psychometric properties of the Theory of Mind Assessment Scale (Th.o.m.a.s.). Th.o.m.a.s. is a semi-structured interview meant to evaluate a person's Theory of Mind (ToM). It is composed of several questions organized in four scales, each focusing on one of the areas of knowledge in which such faculty may manifest itself: Scale A (I-Me) investigates first-order first-person ToM; Scale B (Other-Self) investigates third-person ToM from an allocentric perspective; Scale C (I-Other) again investigates third-person ToM, but from an egocentric perspective; and Scale D (Other-Me) investigates second-order ToM. The psychometric proprieties of Th.o.m.a.s. were evaluated in a sample of 156 healthy persons: 80 preadolescent and adolescent (aged 11–17 years, 42 females) and 76 adults (aged from 20 to 67 years, 35 females). Th.o.m.a.s. scores show good inter-rater agreement and internal consistency; the scores increase with age. Evidence of criterion validity was found as Scale B scores were correlated with those of an independent instrument for the evaluation of ToM, the Strange Stories task. Confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) showed good fit of the four-factors theoretical model to the data, although the four factors were highly correlated. For each of the four scales, Rasch analyses showed that, with few exceptions, items fitted the Partial credit model and their functioning was invariant for gender and age. The results of this study, along with those of previous researches with clinical samples, show that Th.o.m.a.s. is a promising instrument to assess ToM in different populations. PMID:27242563

  20. Psychometric properties and construct validity of the Muscle Appearance Satisfaction Scale among Hungarian men.

    PubMed

    Babusa, Bernadett; Urbán, Róbert; Czeglédi, Edit; Túry, Ferenc

    2012-01-01

    Limited studies have evaluated the psychometric properties of the Muscle Appearance Satisfaction Scale (MASS), a measure of muscle dysmorphia, in different cultures and languages. The aims were to examine the psychometric properties of the Hungarian version of the MASS (MASS-HU), and to investigate its relationship with self-esteem and exercise-related variables. Two independent samples of male weight lifters (ns=289 and 43), and a sample of undergraduates (n=240) completed the MASS, Eating Disorder Inventory, and Rosenberg Self-esteem Scale. Exploratory factor analysis supported the original five-factor structure of the MASS only in the weight lifter sample. The MASS-HU had excellent scale score reliability and good test-retest reliability. The construct validity of the MASS-HU was tested with multivariate regression analyses which indicated an inverse relationship between self-esteem and muscle dysmorphia. The 18-item MASS-HU was found to be a useful measure for the assessment of muscle dysmorphia among male weight lifters.

  1. Perceptions of coronary heart disease: the development and psychometric testing of a measurement scale.

    PubMed

    Chan, C W

    2014-01-01

    Individuals' perceptions of coronary heart disease (CHD) have implications for the ways in which they respond to the disease, process risks, make decisions, and take action to reduce CHD risks. This study aimed to develop and evaluate the psychometric properties of the perceptions of coronary heart disease scale (PCS) among a Hong Kong Chinese population. A cross-sectional study was conducted using a convenient sample (n = 232) of participants recruited from a variety of catchments including public domains, a cardiac unit, and a cardiac rehabilitation and prevention center. Exploratory factor analysis identified a nine-item, two-factor model that accounted for 52.5% of the total explained variance. The two factors were the perceived risk (five items) and perceived seriousness (four items) of CHD. The PCS demonstrated good content validity; acceptable total, and subscale internal consistency (.73, .61 - .81); and significant contrast-group differences with higher levels of CHD perceptions among males (p = .002), younger participants (p < .001), and those with higher educational levels (p < .001), suggesting excellent construct validity. The newly developed PCS demonstrates acceptable psychometric properties as a short measurement scale, which supports its use in future research. Future validation of this scale is warranted.

  2. Prevention of smoking in Middle School Students: psychometric assessment of the Temptations to Try Smoking Scale.

    PubMed

    McGee, Heather A; Babbin, Steven F; Redding, Colleen; Paiva, Andrea; Oatley, Karin; Meier, Kathryn S; Harrington, Magdalena; Velicer, Wayne F

    2012-04-01

    Establishment of psychometrically sound measures is critical to the development of effective interventions. The current study examined the psychometric properties, including factorial invariance, of a six item Temptations to Try Smoking Scale on a sample of middle school students. The sample of 6th grade students (N=3527) was from 20 Rhode Island middle schools and was 52% male and 84% white. The Temptations to Try Smoking Scale consisted of two correlated subscales: Positive Social and Curiosity/Stress. Structural equation modeling was implemented to evaluate the factorial invariance across four different subgroups defined by gender (male/female), race (white/black), ethnicity (Hispanic/Non-Hispanic), and school size (<200/ >200 6th graders). A model is factorially invariant when the measurement model is the same in each of the subgroups. Three levels of invariance were examined in sequential order: 1) Configural Invariance (unconstrained nonzero factor loadings); 2) Pattern Identity Invariance (equal factor loadings); and 3) Strong Factorial Invariance (equal factor loadings and measurement errors). Strong Factorial Invariance provided a good fit to the model across gender (CFI=.96), race (CFI=.96), ethnicity (CFI=.94), and school size (CFI=.97). Coefficient Alphas for the two subscales, Positive Social and Curiosity/Stress, were .87 and .86, respectively. These findings provide empirical support for the construct validity of the Temptations to Try Smoking Scale in middle school students.

  3. Evaluation of the psychometric properties of two short forms of the social interaction anxiety scale and the social phobia scale.

    PubMed

    Le Blanc, Allura L; Bruce, Laura C; Heimberg, Richard G; Hope, Debra A; Blanco, Carlos; Schneier, Franklin R; Liebowitz, Michael R

    2014-06-01

    The Social Interaction Anxiety Scale and Social Phobia Scale are widely used measures of social anxiety. Using data from individuals with social anxiety disorder (n = 435) and nonanxious controls (n = 86), we assessed the psychometric properties of two independently developed short forms of these scales. Indices of convergent and discriminant validity, diagnostic specificity, sensitivity to treatment, and readability were examined. Comparisons of the two sets of short forms to each other and the original long forms were conducted. Both sets of scales demonstrated adequate internal consistency in the patient sample, showed expected patterns of correlation with measures of related and unrelated constructs, adequately discriminated individuals with social anxiety disorder from those without, and showed decreases in scores over the course of cognitive-behavioral therapy and/or pharmacotherapy. However, some significant differences in scale performance were noted. Implications for the clinical assessment of social anxiety are discussed.

  4. [A short form of the positions on nursing diagnosis scale: development and psychometric testing].

    PubMed

    Romero-Sánchez, José Manuel; Paloma-Castro, Olga; Paramio-Cuevas, Juan Carlos; Pastor-Montero, Sonia María; O'Ferrall-González, Cristina; Gabaldón-Bravo, Eva Maria; González-Domínguez, Maria Eugenia; Castro-Yuste, Cristina; Frandsen, Anna J; Martínez-Sabater, Antonio

    2013-06-01

    The Positions on Nursing Diagnosis (PND) is a scale that uses the semantic differential technique to measure nurses' attitudes towards the nursing diagnosis concept. The aim of this study was to develop a shortened form of the Spanish version of this scale and evaluate its psychometric properties and efficiency. A double theoretical-empirical approach was used to obtain a short form of the PND, the PND-7-SV, which would be equivalent to the original. Using a cross-sectional survey design, the reliability (internal consistency and test-retest reliability), construct (exploratory factor analysis, known-groups technique and discriminant validity) and criterion-related validity (concurrent validity), sensitivity to change and efficiency of the PND-7-SV were assessed in a sample of 476 Spanish nursing students. The results endorsed the utility of the PND-7-SV to measure attitudes toward nursing diagnosis in an equivalent manner to the complete form of the scale and in a shorter time.

  5. Persian adaptation of Foreign Language Reading Anxiety Scale: a psychometric analysis.

    PubMed

    Baghaei, Purya; Hohensinn, Christine; Kubinger, Klaus D

    2014-04-01

    The validity and psychometric properties of a new Persian adaptation of the Foreign Language Reading Anxiety Scale were investigated. The scale was translated into Persian and administered to 160 undergraduate students (131 women, 29 men; M age = 23.4 yr., SD = 4.3). Rasch model analysis on the scale's original 20 items revealed that the data do not fit the partial credit model. Principal components analysis identified three factors: one related to feelings of anxiety about reading, the second reflected the reverse-worded items, and the third related to general ideas about reading in a foreign language. In a re-analysis, the 12 items that loaded on the first factor showed a good fit with the partial credit model.

  6. Positive Relational Management for Healthy Organizations: Psychometric Properties of a New Scale for Prevention for Workers

    PubMed Central

    Di Fabio, Annamaria

    2016-01-01

    This contribution aims at evaluating the psychometric properties of the Positive Relational Management Scale (PRMS) in a sample of 251 Italian workers. The dimensionality, reliability, and concurrent validity of the scale were investigated. Confirmatory factor analysis supported a correlated three-dimensional version of the scale, comprising Respect, Caring, and Connectedness. Latent correlations among the dimensions were moderate-to-strong (0.44–0.57), but suggestive of the multidimensionality of the scores. In addition, good internal consistency was confirmed. The concurrent validity is good as the Pearson’s correlations between PRMS and measure for social support, life satisfaction, life meaningfulness, and flourishing range from 0.39 to 0.52. The results indicate that the PRMS is a valid instrument for measuring positive relational management at work in the Italian context within a positive preventive perspective. PMID:27790163

  7. The social adjustment scale-self-report: psychometric properties for older adults.

    PubMed

    Zweig, Richard A; Turkel, Elihu

    2007-12-01

    To assess the reliability and validity of the Social Adjustment Scale-Self-Report for older adults, 129 community dwelling elderly ranging in age from 63 to 87 years (M=72.3 yr., SD=5.0) were surveyed using a modified version of the scale. The average internal consistency of subscales was satisfactory (mean coefficient alpha=.62). Overall social functioning impairment (total score) was associated with measures of depression (Beck Depression Inventory, r =.58) and global psychiatric symptoms (Brief Symptom Inventory, r = .55). Older adults scored higher on Marital role, Family Unit role, and overall social functioning impairment compared to mixed-age adults assessed in previous research, and higher on marital role impairment but similarly on overall social functioning when compared with a mixed-age sample from primary care. The modified Social Adjustment Scale-Self-Report has acceptable psychometric characteristics for research use with older adults, and select subscales may account for findings of age-related differences.

  8. Psychometric Evaluation of a Chinese Version of the eHealth Literacy Scale (eHEALS) in School Age Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koo, Malcolm; Norman, Cameron D.; Chang, Hsiao-Mei

    2012-01-01

    The eight-item eHealth Literacy Scale (eHEALS) is a previously validated scale developed to assess consumers' combined knowledge, comfort, and perceived skills at finding, evaluating, and applying electronic health information to health problems. In the present study, a Chinese version of the eHEALS was developed and its psychometric properties…

  9. Initial Development and Psychometric Properties of the Adolescent Perceptions of Parental Pro-Educational Attitudes and Behaviors Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herlickson, Allison B.; Wettersten, Kara B.; Herrick, Christen G.; Kim, Grace Y.; Hunter, Patricia J.; Guilmino, Adam; Faul, Kiri; Jagow-France, Desiree; Mach, Barbara; Napton, Sean; Beecher, Timothy; Holzer, Kendra; Rudolph, Susan E.

    2009-01-01

    The Initial development and psychometric properties of the Adolescent Perceptions of Parental Pro-Educational Attitudes and Behaviors Scale (APPEABS) are reviewed. Evidence of content convergent, and construct validity are reported. The APPEABS demonstrated usefulness as a scale of predicting the role of adolescents' perceptions of parents'…

  10. Psychometric Properties of the Resiliency Scales for Children and Adolescents and Use for Youth with Psychiatric Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prince-Embury, Sandra

    2010-01-01

    This study examines psychometric properties of the Resiliency Scales for Children and Adolescents (RSCA) in two clinical samples: one child sample (n = 110) and one adolescent sample (n = 178). The purpose of the study was to examine the distribution characteristics and internal consistency of RSCA scale, subscale, and index scores for youth who…

  11. Design and Psychometric Properties of Male Adolescent Health Needs-Assessment Scale

    PubMed Central

    Zare, Elham; Simbar, Masoumeh; Shahhosseini, Zohreh; Alavi Majd, Hamid

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background: Given the importance of adolescents’ health in establishing health in the newly thriving generation of every society, the first step for adolescents’ health promotion is health needs assessment. The present study was, therefore, conducted to design a valid and reliable scale for health needs assessment of male adolescents. Methods: This is an exploratory sequential mixed method study (2014-2015). The qualitative part was performed using content analysis approach and aimed to generate items pool. Data collection was performed by 7 focus group discussions with 51 male adolescents, and 10 semi-structured in-depth interviews with 10 other adolescents. Nine further in-depth interviews were also performed with 9 key informants. Purposive sampling was used and continued until data saturation. In the quantitative part, the designed scale was psychometrically assessed through the examination of the face and content validities using qualitative and quantitative methods and also the construct validity using the exploratory factor analysis along with the tool’s internal consistency and stability. Results: The content analysis of the data from the qualitative part led to the extraction of 4 main themes and 103 items, which moved to the quantitative stage. The mean content validity index of the scale was estimated 0.91 and content validity ratio was 0.89. The exploratory factor analysis showed 4 factors for the designed scale (49 items), including physical, psychological, social and sexual health needs. The internal consistency and the stability assessment of the scale showed 0.79 and 0.89, respectively. (P<0.001) Conclusion: According to the psychometric assessment, MAHNAS is a valid and reliable scale compatible with the Iranian culture that can be used in the health needs assessment of male adolescents. PMID:27713893

  12. Psychometric Evaluation of the HIV Stigma Scale in a Swedish Context

    PubMed Central

    Lindberg, Maria H.; Wettergren, Lena; Wiklander, Maria; Svedhem-Johansson, Veronica; Eriksson, Lars E.

    2014-01-01

    Background HIV-related stigma has negative consequences for infected people's lives and is a barrier to HIV prevention. Therefore valid and reliable instruments to measure stigma are needed to enable mapping of HIV stigma. This study aimed to evaluate the psychometric properties of the HIV stigma scale in a Swedish context with regard to construct validity, data quality, and reliability. Methods The HIV stigma scale, developed by Berger, Ferrans, and Lashley (2001), was distributed to a cross-sectional sample of people living with HIV in Sweden (n = 194). The psychometric evaluation included exploratory factor analysis together with an analysis of the distribution of scores, convergent validity by correlations between the HIV stigma scale and measures of emotional well-being, and an analysis of missing items and floor and ceiling effects. Reliability was assessed using Cronbach's α. Results The exploratory factor analysis suggested a four-factor solution, similar to the original scale, with the dimensions personalised stigma, disclosure concerns, negative self-image, and concerns with public attitudes. One item had unacceptably low loadings and was excluded. Correlations between stigma dimensions and emotional well-being were all in the expected direction and ranged between −0.494 and −0.210. The instrument generated data of acceptable quality except for participants who had not disclosed their HIV status to anybody. In line with the original scale, all subscales demonstrated acceptable internal consistency with Cronbach's α 0.87–0.96. Conclusion A 39-item version of the HIV stigma scale used in a Swedish context showed satisfactory construct validity and reliability. Response alternatives are suggested to be slightly revised for items assuming the disclosure of diagnosis to another person. We recommend that people that have not disclosed should skip all questions belonging to the dimension personalised stigma. Our analysis confirmed construct validity

  13. The Quality of Care and Support (QOCS) for people with disability scale: development and psychometric properties.

    PubMed

    Lucas-Carrasco, Ramona; Eser, Erhan; Hao, Yuantao; McPherson, Kathryn M; Green, Ann; Kullmann, Lajos

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes the development of a Quality of Care and Support (QOCS) scale for use with adult persons with physical and intellectual disabilities. In the pilot phase of the study, 12 centers from around the world carried out focus groups with people with physical and disabilities, their carers, and with professionals in order to identify themes that were relevant for their quality of care. Items generated from the focus groups were then tested in a pilot study with 1400 respondents from 15 different centers worldwide, with items being tested and reduced using both classical and modern psychometric methods. A field trial study was then carried out with 3772 respondents, again with the use of both classical and modern psychometric methods. The outcome of the two rounds of data collection and analysis is a 17-item module for assessment of quality of care in physically or intellectually disabled people. Further modifications are also proposed for the use of the QOCS with adults with intellectual disabilities, including simplification of wording of some of the items, the use of a three-point response scale, and the inclusion of smiley faces.

  14. Psychometric properties of the Revised Chen Internet Addiction Scale (CIAS-R) in Chinese adolescents.

    PubMed

    Mak, Kwok-Kei; Lai, Ching-Man; Ko, Chih-Hung; Chou, Chien; Kim, Dong-Il; Watanabe, Hiroko; Ho, Roger C M

    2014-10-01

    The Revised Chen Internet Addiction Scale (CIAS-R) was developed to assess Internet addiction in Chinese populations, but its psychometric properties in adolescents have not been examined. This study aimed to evaluate the factor structure and psychometric properties of CIAS-R in Hong Kong Chinese adolescents. 860 Grade 7 to 13 students (38 % boys) completed the CIAS-R, the Young's Internet Addiction Test (IAT), and the Health of the Nation Outcome Scales for Children and Adolescents (HoNOSCA) in a survey. The prevalence of Internet addiction as assessed by CIAS-R was 18 %. High internal consistency and inter-item correlations were reported for the CIAS-R. Results from the confirmatory factor analysis suggested a four-factor structure of Compulsive Use and Withdrawal, Tolerance, Interpersonal and Health-related Problems, and Time Management Problems. Moreover, results of hierarchical multiple regression supported the incremental validity of the CIAS-R to predict mental health outcomes beyond the effects of demographic differences and self-reported time spent online. The CIAS is a reliable and valid measure of internet addiction problems in Hong Kong adolescents. Future study is warranted to validate the cutoffs of the CIAS-R for identification of adolescents with Internet use problems who may have mental health needs.

  15. Psychometric properties of the Japanese version of the Weiss Functional Impairment Rating Scale: Self-Report.

    PubMed

    Takeda, Toshinobu; Tsuji, Yui; Kanazawa, Junichiro; Sakai, Takanobu; Weiss, Margaret D

    2016-12-24

    The Weiss Functional Impairment Rating Scale Self-Report has been translated into nine languages and has been widely used in assessing functional impairment of adults with ADHD. This study is a psychometric validation of the WFIRS-S in Japanese. The WFIRS-S-J and other questionnaires were administered to 46 adults with attention-deficit-hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), 104 control adults, and 889 university students. ADHD diagnoses were made using the Japanese semi-structured diagnostic interview for adult ADHD, which is compatible with the DSM-5. All subscales of the WFIRS-S-J had Cronbach's α values of around 0.80. Total scores on the WFIRS-S-J had high test-retest reliability after a 2-week interval. The total score, subscale scores, and 59 of the individual item scores of the 70 items in the WFIRS-S-J were significantly higher in the ADHD group than in the other two groups, although more than half of the items in subdomain G (risk) showed floor effects and did not reach significance. Generally WFIRS-S-J subdomain scores were moderately correlated with scores on the Japanese version of Conners' Adult ADHD Rating Scales Self-Report subscales. WFIRS-S-J scores were also correlated (albeit more weakly; 0.31 ≤ r ≤ 0.55) with Beck Depression Inventory II total scores. The WFIRS-S-J showed acceptable psychometric properties, although further study is necessary.

  16. Psychometric properties of the Spanish version of the mindful attention awareness scale (MAAS) in patients with fibromyalgia

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Mindful-based interventions improve functioning and quality of life in fibromyalgia (FM) patients. The aim of the study is to perform a psychometric analysis of the Spanish version of the Mindful Attention Awareness Scale (MAAS) in a sample of patients diagnosed with FM. Methods The following measures were administered to 251 Spanish patients with FM: the Spanish version of MAAS, the Chronic Pain Acceptance Questionnaire, the Pain Catastrophising Scale, the Injustice Experience Questionnaire, the Psychological Inflexibility in Pain Scale, the Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire and the Euroqol. Factorial structure was analysed using Confirmatory Factor Analyses (CFA). Cronbach's α coefficient was calculated to examine internal consistency, and the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) was calculated to assess the test-retest reliability of the measures. Pearson’s correlation tests were run to evaluate univariate relationships between scores on the MAAS and criterion variables. Results The MAAS scores in our sample were low (M = 56.7; SD = 17.5). CFA confirmed a two-factor structure, with the following fit indices [sbX2 = 172.34 (p < 0.001), CFI = 0.95, GFI = 0.90, SRMR = 0.05, RMSEA = 0.06. MAAS was found to have high internal consistency (Cronbach’s α = 0.90) and adequate test-retest reliability at a 1–2 week interval (ICC = 0.90). It showed significant and expected correlations with the criterion measures with the exception of the Euroqol (Pearson = 0.15). Conclusion Psychometric properties of the Spanish version of the MAAS in patients with FM are adequate. The dimensionality of the MAAS found in this sample and directions for future research are discussed. PMID:23317306

  17. Antisocial thinking in adolescents: further psychometric development of the Antisocial Beliefs and Attitudes Scale (ABAS).

    PubMed

    Butler, Stephen M; Parry, Rachael; Fearon, R M Pasco

    2015-03-01

    Investigating the impact of "off-line" cognitive structures on the broad range of antisocial behaviors shown by young people has been hampered by the absence of psychometrically robust measures of antisocial cognitions. This study evaluates the psychometric properties of the Antisocial Beliefs and Attitudes Scale (ABAS), a developmentally sensitive measure of young people's beliefs and attitudes toward social standards of acceptable behavior at home and at school. The reliability and validity of the ABAS was assessed in a sample of British school children (N = 486) aged 9-16 years (M = 12.79, SD = 1.90) and male young offenders (N = 84) aged 13-17 years (M = 15.15, SD = 0.27). Participants completed the ABAS, together with a self-report measure of antisocial behavior; maternal reports of antisocial activity were also collected in the offending sample. Confirmatory factor analysis replicated the 2-factor structure of Rule Noncompliance and Peer Conflict previously derived from a sample of Canadian school children, and these factors showed good test-retest reliability. Rule Noncompliance predicted self-reported antisocial behavior for ages 11-16 years, while Peer Conflict predicted antisocial behavior for ages 9-16 years. Comparisons between young offenders and an age-matched subsample of males from the school group showed significant differences. In young offenders, Rule Noncompliance and Peer Conflict were significantly predictive of self-reported antisocial behavior, while Rule Noncompliance independently predicted mothers' ratings of their sons' antisocial behavior. These findings provide support for the ABAS as a psychometrically sound measure of antisocial thinking.

  18. Psychometric Properties of the Heart Disease Knowledge Scale: Evidence from Item and Confirmatory Factor Analyses

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Bee Chiu; Kueh, Yee Cheng; Arifin, Wan Nor; Ng, Kok Huan

    2016-01-01

    Background Heart disease knowledge is an important concept for health education, yet there is lack of evidence on proper validated instruments used to measure levels of heart disease knowledge in the Malaysian context. Methods A cross-sectional, survey design was conducted to examine the psychometric properties of the adapted English version of the Heart Disease Knowledge Questionnaire (HDKQ). Using proportionate cluster sampling, 788 undergraduate students at Universiti Sains Malaysia, Malaysia, were recruited and completed the HDKQ. Item analysis and confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) were used for the psychometric evaluation. Construct validity of the measurement model was included. Results Most of the students were Malay (48%), female (71%), and from the field of science (51%). An acceptable range was obtained with respect to both the difficulty and discrimination indices in the item analysis results. The difficulty index ranged from 0.12–0.91 and a discrimination index of ≥ 0.20 were reported for the final retained 23 items. The final CFA model showed an adequate fit to the data, yielding a 23-item, one-factor model [weighted least squares mean and variance adjusted scaled chi-square difference = 1.22, degrees of freedom = 2, P-value = 0.544, the root mean square error of approximation = 0.03 (90% confidence interval = 0.03, 0.04); close-fit P-value = > 0.950]. Conclusion Adequate psychometric values were obtained for Malaysian undergraduate university students using the 23-item, one-factor model of the adapted HDKQ. PMID:27660543

  19. Measuring illness management outcomes: a psychometric study of clinician and consumer rating scales for illness self management and recovery.

    PubMed

    Salyers, Michelle P; Godfrey, Jenna L; Mueser, Kim T; Labriola, Shauna

    2007-10-01

    Psychometric properties of the Illness Management and Recovery (IMR) Scales (consumer and clinician versions), new 15-item instruments measuring illness self-management and pursuit of recovery goals, were evaluated in consumers with severe mental illness. Both versions had moderate internal consistency and high 2-week test-retest reliability. In addition, the consumer version was correlated with self-ratings of recovery and symptoms, and the clinician version was correlated with clinician ratings of community functioning, indicating convergent validity. The results suggest the IMR Scales have adequate psychometric properties and may be useful in treatment planning and assessing recovery in individuals with severe mental illness.

  20. Development of the Contact Lens User Experience: CLUE Scales

    PubMed Central

    Wirth, R. J.; Edwards, Michael C.; Henderson, Michael; Henderson, Terri; Olivares, Giovanna; Houts, Carrie R.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Purpose The field of optometry has become increasingly interested in patient-reported outcomes, reflecting a common trend occurring across the spectrum of healthcare. This article reviews the development of the Contact Lens User Experience: CLUE system designed to assess patient evaluations of contact lenses. CLUE was built using modern psychometric methods such as factor analysis and item response theory. Methods The qualitative process through which relevant domains were identified is outlined as well as the process of creating initial item banks. Psychometric analyses were conducted on the initial item banks and refinements were made to the domains and items. Following this data-driven refinement phase, a second round of data was collected to further refine the items and obtain final item response theory item parameters estimates. Results Extensive qualitative work identified three key areas patients consider important when describing their experience with contact lenses. Based on item content and psychometric dimensionality assessments, the developing CLUE instruments were ultimately focused around four domains: comfort, vision, handling, and packaging. Item response theory parameters were estimated for the CLUE item banks (377 items), and the resulting scales were found to provide precise and reliable assignment of scores detailing users’ subjective experiences with contact lenses. Conclusions The CLUE family of instruments, as it currently exists, exhibits excellent psychometric properties. PMID:27383257

  1. A Brief Scale to Measure Problematic Sexually Explicit Media Consumption: Psychometric Properties of the Compulsive Pornography Consumption (CPC) Scale among Men who have Sex with Men

    PubMed Central

    Noor, Syed WB; Simon Rosser, B. R.; Erickson, Darin J.

    2015-01-01

    Although the phenomenon of hypersexuality has been described in the literature, and scales of compulsive sexual behavior have been published, the existing measures do not assess compulsive sexually explicit media (SEM) consumption. This study tested the psychometric properties of a new scale, the Compulsive Pornography Consumption (CPC). Exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses results showed good psychometric performance of a five item two factor preoccupation-compulsivity solution. As hypothesized, the scale correlates positively with compulsive sexual behavior, internalized homonegativity, and negatively with sexual self-esteem. The scale will enable researchers to investigate the etiologic factors of compulsive SEM use, and enable clinicians to assess problematic consumption. PMID:25838755

  2. Development and psychometric analysis of the student–teacher relationship scale – short form

    PubMed Central

    Settanni, Michele; Longobardi, Claudio; Sclavo, Erica; Fraire, Michela; Prino, Laura E.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study is the construction and validation of an Italian Short Form version of the Student–Teacher Relationship Scale (STRS; Fraire et al., 2013). The analyses were conducted on 1256 students and 210 teachers. The STRS is a self-report measure assessing teachers’ perception of the quality of their relationship with students ranging from preschool to third grade. The items were selected from the original Italian adaptation of the regular STRS (Pianta, 2001) through Rasch (1960/1980) analysis, which allowed us to identify a subset of items with proven psychometric properties. The STRS-SF consists of two subscales: Conflict (eight items) and Closeness (six items). Results indicate that the 14-item instrument shows good internal consistency (α>0.80), high correlations with the scales from the regular STRS (r > 0.90) and equivalence across gender. PMID:26167156

  3. Psychometric Properties of the 20-Item Toronto Alexithymia Scale in a Group of Italian Younger Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Faraci, Palmira; Gori, Alessio

    2015-01-01

    Objective Alexithymia is a personality construct that inhibits and interferes with normal affect regulating abilities. The purpose of our study was to assess psychometric properties of TAS-20 in younger adolescents. Methods Data were collected from 508 younger adolescents (48.8% male and 51.2% female) with a mean age of 12.56 years (DS=0.50, range: 12-13 years). We administered the following scales: 20-Item-Toronto Alexithymia Scale. Results The confirmatory factor analysis performed on the second random subsample showed reasonable goodness-of-fit for the oblique bi-factorial model: [chi]2 (32, n=254)=54.22; p=0.008; χ2/df=1.69; NNFI=0.92; CFI=0.95; SRMR=0.05; RMSEA=0.05; 90% confidence interval=0.027-0.078. Conclusion Based on the outcomes of our research we support the idea of evaluating adolescents for alexithymia. PMID:26508961

  4. Depression Anxiety and Stress Scales (DASS-21): psychometric analysis across four racial groups.

    PubMed

    Norton, Peter J

    2007-09-01

    Growing cross-cultural awareness has led researchers to examine frequently used research instruments and assessment tools in racially diverse populations. The present study was conducted to assess the psychometric characteristics of the 21-item version of the Depression, Anxiety, and Stress Scales (DASS-21) among different racial groups. The DASS-21 was chosen because it appears to be a reliable and easy to administer measure, ideal for both clinical and research purposes. Results suggest that the internal consistency, and convergent and divergent validity of the DASS-21 are similar across racial groups. Multigroup CFA, however, indicated that item loadings were invariant, while scale covariances were not invariant. This suggests that, although the items may load similarly on the depression, anxiety and stress constructs, these constructs may be differentially inter-related across groups. Implications for application in clinical practice are discussed.

  5. Psychometric properties of the Attitudes Scale facing Alcohol and Alcoholism in nursing students 1

    PubMed Central

    de Vargas, Divane; Rocha, Fernanda Mota

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: to verify the psychometric properties of the Attitudes Scale facing Alcohol and Alcoholism (EAFAA) and people with disorders related to the use of alcohol in nursing students. Method: a convenience sample (n=420) completed the EAFAA, the data were submitted to Exploratory Factor Analysis (EFA) and Confirmatory Factor Analysis (CFA). Results: the EFA resulted in an instrument composed of 48 items divided into four factors. The CFA has established the validity of the factorial structure. The internal consistency of the scale was considered adequate (α=0.85) presenting a sensitivity of 70% and specificity of 75%. Conclusion: the EAFAA constitutes a reliable instrument to identify the attitudes of nursing students towards alcohol, alcoholism and persons with disorders related to alcohol use. PMID:27992026

  6. Development and psychometric analysis of the student-teacher relationship scale - short form.

    PubMed

    Settanni, Michele; Longobardi, Claudio; Sclavo, Erica; Fraire, Michela; Prino, Laura E

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study is the construction and validation of an Italian Short Form version of the Student-Teacher Relationship Scale (STRS; Fraire et al., 2013). The analyses were conducted on 1256 students and 210 teachers. The STRS is a self-report measure assessing teachers' perception of the quality of their relationship with students ranging from preschool to third grade. The items were selected from the original Italian adaptation of the regular STRS (Pianta, 2001) through Rasch (1960/1980) analysis, which allowed us to identify a subset of items with proven psychometric properties. The STRS-SF consists of two subscales: Conflict (eight items) and Closeness (six items). Results indicate that the 14-item instrument shows good internal consistency (α>0.80), high correlations with the scales from the regular STRS (r > 0.90) and equivalence across gender.

  7. Perceiving beauty in all women: Psychometric evaluation of the Broad Conceptualization of Beauty Scale.

    PubMed

    Tylka, Tracy L; Iannantuono, Amy C

    2016-06-01

    Women's ability to broadly conceptualize beauty (i.e., perceive many looks, appearances, body sizes/shapes, and inner characteristics as beautiful) has been identified as a facet of positive body image in qualitative research. A scale is needed to be able to assess this construct within quantitative research. Therefore, we developed the Broad Conceptualization of Beauty Scale (BCBS), which measures the extent women define female beauty widely within external and internal characteristics, and examined its psychometric properties among four community samples totaling 1086 women. Exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses revealed a unidimensional structure with nine items. The internal consistency, test-retest reliability, and construct (convergent, discriminant, and incremental) validity of its scores were upheld. Researchers and clinicians can use the BCBS alone to assess women's perceptions of female beauty, or they can use the BCBS alongside women's perceptions of self-beauty to more comprehensively explore women's ability to broadly conceptualize beauty for others and themselves.

  8. Psychometric evaluation of the Generalized Problematic Internet Use Scale 2 in an Italian sample.

    PubMed

    Fioravanti, Giulia; Primi, Caterina; Casale, Silvia

    2013-10-01

    The 15-item Generalized Problematic Internet Use Scale 2 (GPIUS2) is one of the few theory-driven instruments to measure problematic Internet use (PIU). Since PIU has emerged in several cultural contexts, it seems relevant to evaluate the psychometric properties of the scale across various cultures. The aim of the present study was to test the psychometric properties (i.e., dimensionality, reliability, and validity) of the Italian version of the GPIUS2. The sample consisted of 371 participants (128 males and 243 females), and their age ranged from 14 to 33 years (M=18.07 years, SD=5.58). The GPIUS2 and the Internet Addiction Test (IAT) were administered individually in both high school and college classes. With regard to scale dimensionality, the best-fit measurement model includes four first-order factors: preference for online social interaction, mood regulation, deficient self-regulation, and negative outcomes (Satorra-Bentler scaled chi-square [S-Bχ(2)]/df=2.27; comparative fit index [CFI]=0.94; Tucker-Lewis index [TLI]=0.93; root mean square error of approximation [RMSEA]=0.05). With regard to reliability, internal-consistency Cronbach's alpha ranged from 0.78 to 0.89. Convergent validity is demonstrated with significant correlations between GPIUS2 (total score and all the subscale scores) and IAT score. Results showed that GPIUS2 scores significantly discriminated between high school and undergraduate students. The overall findings of the present study provide evidence that the Italian version of the GPIUS2 appears to be an adequate measure of generalized PIU cognitions, behaviors, and outcomes. Suggestions for further research are provided.

  9. PWC - PAIRWISE COMPARISON SOFTWARE: SOFTWARE PROGRAM FOR PAIRWISE COMPARISON TASK FOR PSYCHOMETRIC SCALING AND COGNITIVE RESEARCH

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ricks, W. R.

    1994-01-01

    PWC is used for pair-wise comparisons in both psychometric scaling techniques and cognitive research. The cognitive tasks and processes of a human operator of automated systems are now prominent considerations when defining system requirements. Recent developments in cognitive research have emphasized the potential utility of psychometric scaling techniques, such as multidimensional scaling, for representing human knowledge and cognitive processing structures. Such techniques involve collecting measurements of stimulus-relatedness from human observers. When data are analyzed using this scaling approach, an n-dimensional representation of the stimuli is produced. This resulting representation is said to describe the subject's cognitive or perceptual view of the stimuli. PWC applies one of the many techniques commonly used to acquire the data necessary for these types of analyses: pair-wise comparisons. PWC administers the task, collects the data from the test subject, and formats the data for analysis. It therefore addresses many of the limitations of the traditional "pen-and-paper" methods. By automating the data collection process, subjects are prevented from going back to check previous responses, the possibility of erroneous data transfer is eliminated, and the burden of the administration and taking of the test is eased. By using randomization, PWC ensures that subjects see the stimuli pairs presented in random order, and that each subject sees pairs in a different random order. PWC is written in Turbo Pascal v6.0 for IBM PC compatible computers running MS-DOS. The program has also been successfully compiled with Turbo Pascal v7.0. A sample executable is provided. PWC requires 30K of RAM for execution. The standard distribution medium for this program is a 5.25 inch 360K MS-DOS format diskette. Two electronic versions of the documentation are included on the diskette: one in ASCII format and one in MS Word for Windows format. PWC was developed in 1993.

  10. Psychometric validation of a German version of the compulsive Internet use scale.

    PubMed

    Wartberg, Lutz; Petersen, Kay-Uwe; Kammerl, Rudolf; Rosenkranz, Moritz; Thomasius, Rainer

    2014-02-01

    Excessive Internet use and Internet addiction are currently increasing in many industrial nations. Verified and validated measuring instruments could contribute to a better understanding of this still quite recent development. The aim of this survey was to investigate the psychometric properties of a German version of the Compulsive Internet Use Scale (CIUS). We surveyed a representative German quota sample of 1,723 adolescents aged between 14 and 17 years, as well as one parent each, with standardized questionnaires. In addition, adolescents and parents were asked whether the media use by the youth was considered problematic or excessive, and whether it led to arguments at home. We conducted confirmatory factor analyses (CFA) with maximum likelihood estimation to examine the factorial validity of the German CIUS, as well as reliability and correlation analyses. The results of the CFA indicate good psychometric properties for the German version of the CIUS. They appear in line with the findings for the original version of the questionnaire. Furthermore, the CIUS showed high internal consistency, and we found significant correlations between the "CIUS-summary score" and different ratings of problems with the media usage by the youth and the parents. The German version of the CIUS seems to be a valid and suitable diagnostic tool for measuring problematic to pathological Internet use.

  11. The Development and Psychometric Validation of an Arabic-Language Version of the Pain Catastrophizing Scale

    PubMed Central

    Fares, Souha

    2017-01-01

    Context. The Pain Catastrophizing Scale (PCS) is the most widely used measure of pain-specific catastrophizing. Objectives. The purpose of the present study was to develop and psychometrically evaluate an Arabic-language version of the PCS. Methods. In Study 1, 150 adult chronic nonmalignant pain patients seeking treatment at a hospital setting completed the PCS-A and a number of self-report measures assessing clinical parameters of pain, symptoms of depression, and quality of life. Study 2 employed a cold pressor pain task to examine the PCS-A in a sample of 44 healthy university students. Results. Exploratory factor analyses suggested a two-factor structure. Confirmatory factor analysis comparing the 2-factor model, Sullivan's original 3-factor model, and a 1-factor model based on the total score all provided adequate fit to the data. Cronbach's alpha coefficients across all models met or exceeded accepted standards of reliability. Catastrophizing was associated with higher levels of depression and increased pain intensity and interference. Catastrophizing predicted decreased quality of life, even after controlling for the contribution of gender, employment, depression, and pain interference. PCS-A scores were positively correlated with heightened experimental pain severity and decreased pain tolerance. Conclusion. The present results provide strong support for the psychometric properties of the PCS-A. PMID:28190958

  12. The Development and Psychometric Validation of an Arabic-Language Version of the Pain Catastrophizing Scale.

    PubMed

    Huijer, Huda Abu-Saad; Fares, Souha; French, Douglas J

    2017-01-01

    Context. The Pain Catastrophizing Scale (PCS) is the most widely used measure of pain-specific catastrophizing. Objectives. The purpose of the present study was to develop and psychometrically evaluate an Arabic-language version of the PCS. Methods. In Study 1, 150 adult chronic nonmalignant pain patients seeking treatment at a hospital setting completed the PCS-A and a number of self-report measures assessing clinical parameters of pain, symptoms of depression, and quality of life. Study 2 employed a cold pressor pain task to examine the PCS-A in a sample of 44 healthy university students. Results. Exploratory factor analyses suggested a two-factor structure. Confirmatory factor analysis comparing the 2-factor model, Sullivan's original 3-factor model, and a 1-factor model based on the total score all provided adequate fit to the data. Cronbach's alpha coefficients across all models met or exceeded accepted standards of reliability. Catastrophizing was associated with higher levels of depression and increased pain intensity and interference. Catastrophizing predicted decreased quality of life, even after controlling for the contribution of gender, employment, depression, and pain interference. PCS-A scores were positively correlated with heightened experimental pain severity and decreased pain tolerance. Conclusion. The present results provide strong support for the psychometric properties of the PCS-A.

  13. Psychometric properties of the French version of a scale measuring perceived emotional intelligence : the Trait Meta-Mood Scale (TMMS)

    PubMed Central

    Bourdier, Léna; Duclos, Jeanne; Ringuenet, Damien; Berthoz, Sylvie

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The Trait Meta-Mood Scale (TMMS), a 30-item self-assessment questionnaire, has been developed to measure perceived emotional intelligence (EI) level in 3 dimensions: Attention, Clarity and Repair. This study aimed to explore the psychometric properties of the French version of this instrument. Method: The instrument factor structure, normality, internal consistency, stability and concurrent validity were assessed in a sample of 824 young adults (456 female). Besides TMMS, participants completed self-assessment questionnaires for affectivity (Shortened Beck Depression Inventory, State and Trait Anxiety Inventory, Positive and Negative emotion scale), alexithymia (Bermond-Vorst Alexithymia Questionnaire-B) and interpersonal functioning (Empathy Quotient). Discriminant validity was tested in 64 female patients with anorexia nervosa, identified in literature as having difficulties with introspection, expression and emotional regulation. Results: Confirmatory factor analysis results replicate the 3-factor structure. Internal consistency and reliability indices are adequate. Direction and degree of correlation coefficients between TMMS dimensions and other questionnaires support the instrument concurrent validity. TMMS allows to highlight differences in perceived EI levels between men and women (Attention: p < 0.001 ; Clarity: p < 0.05) as well as between patients with anorexia nervosa and control subjects (p < 0.001 for all 3 dimensions). Conclusion: This first validation study shows satisfying psychometric properties for TMMS French version. PMID:27310229

  14. Psychometric Properties of the Positive and Negative Affect Scale for Children (PANAS-C) in Children with Anxiety Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hughes, Alicia A.; Kendall, Philip C.

    2009-01-01

    This study investigated the psychometric properties of the Positive and Negative Affect Scale for Children (PANAS-C) (Laurent et al. Psychol Asses 1: 326-338, 1999) in a sample of 139 children (ages 7-14 years) diagnosed with a principal anxiety disorder. Results from this study provided support for the convergent validity of the PANAS-C with…

  15. The Adaptation of the Mathematics Anxiety Rating Scale-Elementary Form into Turkish, Language Validity, and Preliminary Psychometric Investigation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baloglu, Mustafa; Balgalmis, Esra

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to adapt the Mathematics Anxiety Rating Scale- Elementary Form (MARS-E, Suinn, 1988) into Turkish by first doing the translation of its items and then the preliminary psychometric investigation of the Turkish form. The study included four different samples: 30 bilingual language experts, 50 Turkish language…

  16. Psychometric Properties of the Liebowitz Social Anxiety Scale in a Longitudinal Study of Latinos with Anxiety Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beard, Courtney; Rodriguez, Benjamin F.; Weisberg, Risa B.; Perry, Ashley; Keller, Martin B.

    2012-01-01

    The Liebowitz Social Anxiety Scale (LSAS) is one of the most commonly used measures of social anxiety symptoms. To date, no study has examined its psychometric properties in a Latino sample. The authors examined the reliability, temporal stability, and convergent validity of the LSAS in 73 Latinos diagnosed with an anxiety disorder. The original…

  17. The Appraisal of Social Concerns Scale: Psychometric Validation with a Clinical Sample of Patients with Social Anxiety Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schultz, Luke T.; Heimberg, Richard G.; Rodebaugh, Thomas L.; Schneier, Franklin R.; Liebowitz, Michael R.; Telch, Michael J.

    2006-01-01

    The Appraisal of Social Concerns (ASC) Scale was created by Telch et al. (2004) to improve upon existing self-report measures of social anxiety-related cognition. In a largely nonclinical sample, the ASC was found to possess three factors and was psychometrically sound. In a smaller clinical sample, the ASC demonstrated sensitivity to the effects…

  18. Psychometric Analyses of the Problem-Focused Style of Coping (PF-SOC) Scale with Taiwanese Samples

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chang, Yuhsuan; Lan, Yu-Ling; Lin, Hung-Yu; Heppner, Puncky Paul

    2012-01-01

    The current research comprises two samples that investigated the psychometric properties of the Problem-Focused Style of Coping (PF-SOC; Heppner, Cook, Wright, & Johnson) scale using two Taiwanese samples. In Sample 1 (N = 809), we investigated the structural dimensions of the PF-SOC using a principal component analysis (PCA) and confirmed…

  19. Psychometric Properties of the Frost Multidimensional Perfectionism Scale with Australian Adolescent Girls: Clarification of Multidimensionality and Perfectionist Typology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hawkins, Colleen C.; Watt, Helen M. G.; Sinclair, Kenneth E.

    2006-01-01

    The psychometric properties of the Frost, Marten, Lahart, and Rosenblate Multidimensional Perfectionism Scale (1990) are investigated to determine its usefulness as a measurement of perfectionism with Australian secondary school girls and to find empirical support for the existence of both healthy and unhealthy types of perfectionist students.…

  20. Empirical Validation and Psychometric Evaluation of the Brief Fear of Negative Evaluation Scale in Patients with Social Anxiety Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weeks, Justin W.; Heimberg, Richard G.; Fresco, David M.; Hart, Trevor A.; Turk, Cynthia L.; Schneier, Franklin R.; Liebowitz, Michael R.

    2005-01-01

    The Brief Fear of Negative Evaluation Scale (BFNE; M. R. Leary, 1983a) is often used to assess fear of negative evaluation, the core feature of social anxiety disorder. However, few studies have examined its psychometric properties in large samples of socially anxious patients. Although the BFNE yields a single total score, confirmatory factor…

  1. A Psychometric Study of the Teacher Work-Autonomy Scale with a Sample of U.S. Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strong, Luman E. G.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to evaluate the psychometric properties of Friedman's (1999) Teacher Work-Autonomy Scale (TWA) in order to determine whether it was an acceptable instrument to measure U.S. teachers' autonomy in the present educational context. A second purpose was to ascertain the current status of teachers' perceptions of their…

  2. Conceptual and Psychometric Properties of a Self-Efficacy Perception Scale Based on Teaching Turkish as a Foreign Language

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sahin, Cavus; Eryaman, Mustafa Yunus; Kocer, Tugba; Kocer, Omer

    2013-01-01

    The main purpose of this descriptive research study is to investigate the conceptual and psychometric properties of a self-efficacy perception scale developed for determining self-efficacy perception of 3rd and 4th grade Turkish pre-service teachers, who took Turkish as a Foreign Language (TFL) course theoretically in undergraduate level, towards…

  3. Factor Structure and Psychometric Properties of the Multidimensional Anxiety Scale for Children in an African American Adolescent Sample

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kingery, Julie Newman; Ginsburg, Golda S.; Burstein, Marcy

    2009-01-01

    The current study examined the psychometric properties and factor structure of the Multidimensional Anxiety Scale for Children (MASC) among a community sample of 118 African American students (58 females; ages 14-19 years; mean age = 15.79) in an urban, parochial high school. Adolescents completed the MASC and several other self-report measures of…

  4. Psychometric Evaluation of an Arabic Version of the Spiritual Involvement and Beliefs Scale in Jordanian Muslim College Nursing Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Musa, Ahmad S.

    2015-01-01

    A review of the nursing and health-related literature on spirituality revealed that no valid and reliable research tool exists in Arabic for measuring spiritual beliefs and practices for Arab Muslim population. This study translated the Spiritual Involvement and Beliefs Scale (SIBS) into Arabic and examined the psychometric properties of the…

  5. Development and Psychometric Evaluation of the Reasons for Living-Older Adults Scale: A Suicide Risk Assessment Inventory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edelstein, Barry A.; Heisel, Marnin J.; McKee, Deborah R.; Martin, Ronald R.; Koven, Lesley P.; Duberstein, Paul R.; Britton, Peter C.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The purposes of these studies were to develop and initially evaluate the psychometric properties of the Reasons for Living Scale-Older Adult version (RFL-OA), an older adults version of a measure designed to assess reasons for living among individuals at risk for suicide. Design and Methods: Two studies are reported. Study 1 involved…

  6. Psychometric Properties of the Student Risk Screening Scale: An Effective Tool for Use in Diverse Urban Elementary Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oakes, Wendy Peia; Wilder, Kaitlin S.; Lane, Kathleen Lynne; Powers, Lisa; Yokoyama, Lynn T. K.; O'Hare, Mary Ellen; Jenkins, Abbie B.

    2010-01-01

    The authors examined the psychometric properties of the "Student Risk Screening Scale", as used in three ethnically, culturally, and economically diverse urban midwestern elementary schools. The results suggest strong internal consistency ([alpha] = 0.81-0.82) and test-retest stability (r = 0.86). Initial ratings of risk as measured by…

  7. Examination of the Psychometric Properties of the Test Anxiety Scale for Elementary Students (TAS-E) Scores

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lowe, Patricia A.; Grumbein, Matthew J.; Raad, Jennifer M.

    2011-01-01

    The psychometric properties of the Test Anxiety Scale for Elementary Students (TAS-E) scores were examined. In Study 1, an exploratory factor analysis (EFA) was performed on the responses of 997 students in Grades 2 to 6 on the TAS-E. The results of the EFA produced a four-factor solution: Physiological Hyperarousal, Social Concerns, Task…

  8. The Psychometric Properties of the Hospital Anxiety and Depressions Scale Adapted for Use with People with Intellectual Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dagnan, D.; Jahoda, A.; McDowell, K.; Masson, J.; Banks, P.; Hare, D.

    2008-01-01

    Background: There is increasing recognition of depression in people with intellectual disabilities (ID). There is a need to develop well-standardised self-report measures for both clinical and research purposes. This paper presents some psychometric properties of the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) adapted for use with people with ID.…

  9. The Child-Adolescent Perfectionism Scale: Development, Psychometric Properties, and Associations With Stress, Distress, and Psychiatric Symptoms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flett, Gordon L.; Hewitt, Paul L.; Besser, Avi; Su, Chang; Vaillancourt, Tracy; Boucher, Daniel; Munro, Yvette; Davidson, Lisa A.; Gale, Olga

    2016-01-01

    There is growing interest in perfectionism among children and adolescents as well as growing interest in the measures designed to assess perfectionism in young people. The current article describes the development and psychometric characteristics of the Child-Adolescent Perfectionism Scale (CAPS), a measure that assesses self-oriented…

  10. Assessment of Alzheimer's disease symptom recognition in Korean Americans and psychometric analysis of Alzheimer's Disease Symptom Recognition Scale (ADSRS).

    PubMed

    Lee, Sang E; Casado, Banghwa Lee

    2015-01-01

    This study examined recognition of Alzheimer's disease symptoms among Korean Americans (KAs) and assessed psychometric properties of the Alzheimer's Disease Symptom Recognition Scale (ADSRS). A cross-sectional survey collected data from 209 KAs, using a self-administered questionnaire. Results show that KAs recognized symptoms related to memory and cognitive functioning well, but had very limited recognition of neuropsychiatric symptoms. Psychometric analysis of ADSRS identified 4 factors in their symptom recognition. Findings suggest a need to raise awareness of Alzheimer's symptoms over the course of the disease. Assessment using ADSRS can be incorporated in communication in the practice context and public outreach.

  11. Measuring stigma in people with HIV: psychometric assessment of the HIV stigma scale.

    PubMed

    Berger, B E; Ferrans, C E; Lashley, F R

    2001-12-01

    An instrument to measure the stigma perceived by people with HIV was developed based on the literature on stigma and psychosocial aspects of having HIV. Items surviving two rounds of content review were assembled in a booklet and distributed through HIV-related organizations across the United States. Psychometric analysis was performed on 318 questionnaires returned by people with HIV (19% women, 21% African American, 8% Hispanic). Four factors emerged from exploratory factor analysis: personalized stigma, disclosure concerns, negative self-image, and concern with public attitudes toward people with HIV. Extraction of one higher-order factor provided evidence of a single overall construct. Construct validity also was supported by relationships with related constructs: self-esteem, depression, social support, and social conflict. Coefficient alphas between .90 and .93 for the subscales and .96 for the 40-item instrument provided evidence of internal consistency reliability. The HIV Stigma Scale was reliable and valid with a large, diverse sample of people with HIV.

  12. Psychometric properties of the Hebrew version of the Dutch Work Addiction Scale (DUWAS-10).

    PubMed

    Littman-Ovadia, Hadassah; Balducci, Cristian; Ben-Moshe, Tali

    2014-01-01

    The present study examined the psychometric properties of the Hebrew version of the Dutch Work Addiction Scale (DUWAS-10), developed by Schaufeli, Shimazu, and Taris (2009). Three hundred fifty-one employees completed a questionnaire measuring workaholism; of these, 251 employees completed questionnaires measuring work engagement, job satisfaction, overcommitment, and burnout. The results confirmed the expected two-factor structure of workaholism: working excessively and working compulsively. Strong correlations were obtained between self-reports and peer-reports, and satisfactory correlations were obtained between the first and second administrations of the DUWAS-10. Furthermore, DUWAS-10 scores showed predictable relations with actual number of hours worked per week, work engagement, job satisfaction, overcommitment, and burnout. Interestingly, despite working fewer hours per week, women reported higher levels of workaholism in comparison to men, and managers reported higher levels of workaholism in comparison to nonmanagerial employees.

  13. Psychometric properties of the Spence Children's Anxiety Scale (SCAS) in Mainland Chinese children and adolescents.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jinxia; Xing, Xiaopei; Wang, Meifang

    2012-10-01

    This study examined the psychometric properties of the Spence Children's Anxiety Scale (SCAS) in a Mainland Chinese community sample. The 38-item Chinese version of SCAS was administered to 1878 children and adolescents. Multiple group confirmatory factor analyses supported a common 6-factor model of SCAS for children and adolescents, and for boys and girls. The internal consistency and test-retest reliability of SCAS were satisfactory. Convergent and divergent validity of SCAS were supported by significant correlations with a measure of anxiety to a greater extent than with a measure of depression. Adolescents reported higher anxiety levels than children, and girls reported higher anxiety levels than boys. Compared to other studies, anxiety symptoms of Chinese children were found at a moderate level, but anxiety symptoms of Chinese adolescents were found at a high level. Our findings suggest that the SCAS is suitable for assessing anxiety symptoms in Mainland Chinese children and adolescents.

  14. Measuring use of positive thinking skills: psychometric testing of a new scale.

    PubMed

    Bekhet, Abir K; Zauszniewski, Jaclene A

    2013-09-01

    Positive thinking interventions improve adaptive functioning and quality of life in many populations. However, no direct measure of positive thinking skills taught during intervention exists. This psychometric study of a convenience sample of 109 autism spectrum disorder (ASD) caregivers examined a new eight-item Positive Thinking Skills Scale (PTSS), which measures the frequency of use of positive thinking skills. The PTSS was found to be internally consistent (α = .90). Construct validity was supported by significant correlations (p < .01) with positive cognitions (r = .53), resourcefulness (r = .63), depression (r = -.45), and general well-being (r = .40). The findings support use of the PTSS as a potential indicator of intervention fidelity among ASD caregivers. However, because it is not specific for ASD caregivers, the PTSS has the potential for wider usage in other populations for whom the identification of specific positive thinking skills could provide direction for future intervention.

  15. Psychometric properties of the Social Physique Anxiety Scale (SPAS-7) in Spanish adolescents.

    PubMed

    Sáenz-Alvarez, Piedad; Sicilia, Álvaro; González-Cutre, David; Ferriz, Roberto

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to validate the Spanish version of Motl and Conroy's model of the Social Physique Anxiety Scale (SPAS-7). To achieve this goal, a sample of 398 secondary school students was used, and the psychometric properties of the SPAS-7 were examined through different analyses. The results supported the seven-item model, although the item 5 did not show any significant correlation with two items from this model and had a lower factor loading than the rest of items. The structure of the model was invariant across gender and Body Mass Index (BMI). Alpha value over .70 and suitable levels of temporal stability were obtained. Girls and students classified according to the BMI as overweight and obese had higher scores in social physique anxiety than boys and the group classified as underweight and normal range. The findings of this study provided reliability and validity for the SPAS-7 in a Spanish adolescent sample.

  16. The Invalidating Childhood Environment Scale (ICES): psychometric properties and relationship to borderline personality symptomatology.

    PubMed

    Robertson, Christopher D; Kimbrel, Nathan A; Nelson-Gray, Rosemery O

    2013-06-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the psychometric properties of the Invalidating Childhood Environment Scale (ICES; Mountford, Corstorphine, Tomlinson, & Waller, 2004), a measure designed to retrospectively assess exposure to parental invalidation. The ICES was administered to a sample of female college students along with measures of parental bonding and borderline personality disorder (BPD) symptomatology. In contrast with previous findings, the ICES demonstrated excellent internal consistency within a nonclinical sample. It also correlated in the predicted directions with measures of parental bonding and BPD symptomatology. Taken together, these findings suggest that the ICES is a promising retrospective measure of parental invalidation. They also provide some support for the hypothesized link between parental invalidation and BPD symptomatology and suggest that additional research with clinical samples is needed.

  17. Application of psychometric theory to the measurement of voice quality using rating scales.

    PubMed

    Shrivastav, Rahul; Sapienza, Christine M; Nandur, Vuday

    2005-04-01

    Rating scales are commonly used to study voice quality. However, recent research has demonstrated that perceptual measures of voice quality obtained using rating scales suffer from poor interjudge agreement and reliability, especially in the mid-range of the scale. These findings, along with those obtained using multidimensional scaling (MDS), have been interpreted to show that listeners perceive voice quality in an idiosyncratic manner. Based on psychometric theory, the present research explored an alternative explanation for the poor interlistener agreement observed in previous research. This approach suggests that poor agreement between listeners may result, in part, from measurement errors related to a variety of factors rather than true differences in the perception of voice quality. In this study, 10 listeners rated breathiness for 27 vowel stimuli using a 5-point rating scale. Each stimulus was presented to the listeners 10 times in random order. Interlistener agreement and reliability were calculated from these ratings. Agreement and reliability were observed to improve when multiple ratings of each stimulus from each listener were averaged and when standardized scores were used instead of absolute ratings. The probability of exact agreement was found to be approximately .9 when using averaged ratings and standardized scores. In contrast, the probability of exact agreement was only .4 when a single rating from each listener was used to measure agreement. These findings support the hypothesis that poor agreement reported in past research partly arises from errors in measurement rather than individual differences in the perception of voice quality.

  18. RELIABILITY, VALIDITY, AND PSYCHOMETRIC PROPERTIES OF THE GREEK TRANSLATION OF THE CAMBRIDGE DEPERSONALIZATION SCALE (CDS)

    PubMed Central

    Kontoangelos, Konstantinos; Tsiori, Sofia; Poulakou, Garyfalia; Protopapas, Konstantinos; Katsarolis, Ioannis; Sakka, Vissaria; Kavatha, Dimitra; Papadopoulos, Antonios; Antoniadou, Anastasia; Papageorgiou, Charalambos C.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: The Cambridge Depersonalisation Scale is meant to capture the frequency and duration of depersonalisation symptoms over the ‘last 6 months’. Methods: In order to develop a Greek version of CDS scale, the CDS scale was translated in Greek by 2 psychiatrists. Then, the Greek version of CDS scale was back-translated by a person who did not knew the original English version. The back-translated version was reviewed in order to establish whether is consistent with the original English version. After this procedure we administered the Greek version of CDS scale to a sample of 294 Greeks in order to assess the reliability and the validity of the Greek version of scale. Results: The five components solution accounted for 58.204% of the total variation. Initial eigenvalues of the five components were: factor 1=11.555, factor 2=1.564, factor 3=1.356, factor 4=1.247 and factor 5=1.157. Six items did not load on any factor. Correlations between factors were low ranged from 0.134 to 0.314 and no complex variables were found. Cronbach’s alpha and Guttman split-half coefficient were used to evaluate interval consistency of CDS scale in 294 individuals. The alpha coefficients and Guttman split-half coefficient of the CDS scale were 0.938 and 0.921, respectively. The test-retest reliability proved to be satisfactory. The intraclass correlation coefficients for the total CDS score was very good and equal to 0,883. The CDS scale correlated highly with the SCL-90 and all subscales (p-value<0.0001). Conclusion: The psychometric strength of CDS – Greek its reliable for its future use, particularly for screening for subjects with possible diagnosis of CDS. PMID:27999491

  19. Development and psychometric testing of a scale assessing the sharing of medical information and interprofessional communication: the CSI scale

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Interprofessional collaboration is essential in creating a safer patient environment. It includes the need to develop communication and coordination between professionals, implying a better sharing of medical information. Several questionnaires exist in the literature, but none of them have been developed in the French context. The objective was to develop and test the psychometric properties of the communication and sharing information (CSI) scale which assesses specifically interprofessional communication, especially the sharing of medical information and the effectiveness of communication between members of the team. Methods The questionnaire construction process used a literature review and involved a panel of voluntary professionals. A list of 32 items explored the quality of shared information delivered to patients and the effectiveness of interprofessional communication. The study was conducted in 16 voluntary units in a University Hospital (France), which included medical, surgical, obstetrics, intensive care, pediatrics, oncology and rehabilitation care. The scale-development process comprised an exploratory principal component analysis, Cronbach’s α-coefficients and structural equation modeling (SEM). Results From these 16 units, a total of 503 health professionals took part in the study. Among them, 23.9% were physicians (n = 120), 43.9% nurses (n = 221) and 32.2% nurse assistants (n = 162). The validated questionnaire comprised 13 items and 3 dimensions relative to “the sharing of medical information” (5 items), “communication between physicians” (4 items) and “communication between nurses and nurse assistants” (4 items). The 3 dimensions accounted for 63.7% of the variance of the final questionnaire. Their respective Cronbach’s alpha coefficients were 0.80, 0.87 and 0.81. SEM confirmed the existence of the 3 latent dimensions but the best characteristics were obtained with a hierarchical model including the three

  20. Attitudes toward teen mothers among nursing students and psychometric evaluation of Positivity Toward Teen Mothers scale.

    PubMed

    Kim, Son Chae; Burke, Leanne; Sloan, Chris; Barnett, Shannon

    2013-09-01

    To prepare future nurses who can deliver high quality nursing care to teen mothers, a better understanding of the nursing students' perception of teen mothers is needed. A descriptive cross-sectional study was conducted among 228 nursing students to evaluate the psychometric properties of the Positivity Toward Teen Mothers (PTTM) scale, to explore nursing students' general empathy and attitudes toward teen mothers, and to investigate the predictors of nursing students' attitudes toward teen mothers. Principal component factor analysis with varimax rotation resulted in a 19-item PTTM-Revised scale with Non-judgmental and Supportive subscales. Cronbach's alphas for the subscales were 0.84 and 0.69, respectively, and 0.87 for the total scale. Simultaneous multiple regression models showed that general empathy and having a teen mother in the family or as an acquaintance were significant predictors of positive attitudes toward teen mothers, whereas age was a significant negative predictor. The PTTM-Revised scale is a promising instrument for assessing attitudes toward teen mothers.

  1. Psychometric testing of the Jefferson Scale of Empathy Health Profession Students' version with Australian paramedic students.

    PubMed

    Williams, Brett; Brown, Ted; Boyle, Malcolm; Dousek, Simon

    2013-03-01

    Evidence now suggests that improved empathic behaviors can have a positive impact on healthcare outcomes. Therefore, having psychometrically-sound empathy scales is important for healthcare educators. In this study, the factor structure of the 20-item Jefferson Scale Empathy-Health Profession Students' version, when completed by a group of undergraduate paramedic students from a large Australian university, was investigated. Data from the Scale completed by 330 paramedic students were analyzed using principal components analysis followed by a maximum likelihood confirmatory factor analysis to test goodness of fit to the sample data. Two factors emerged from the principal components analysis, "compassionate care" and "perspective taking", accounting for 44.2% of the total variance. The 17-item two-factor model produced good model fit and good reliability estimates. Three of the original items did not fit the model. Results from the confirmatory factor analysis suggest that the 17-item Jefferson Scale Empathy-Health Profession Students' version is a valid and reliable measure for undergraduate paramedic students' empathy levels.

  2. Psychometric properties and confirmatory factor analysis of the Jefferson Scale of Physician Empathy

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Empathy towards patients is considered to be associated with improved health outcomes. Many scales have been developed to measure empathy in health care professionals and students. The Jefferson Scale of Physician Empathy (JSPE) has been widely used. This study was designed to examine the psychometric properties and the theoretical structure of the JSPE. Methods A total of 853 medical students responded to the JSPE questionnaire. A hypothetical model was evaluated by structural equation modelling to determine the adequacy of goodness-of-fit to sample data. Results The model showed excellent goodness-of-fit. Further analysis showed that the hypothesised three-factor model of the JSPE structure fits well across the gender differences of medical students. Conclusions The results supported scale multi-dimensionality. The 20 item JSPE provides a valid and reliable scale to measure empathy among not only undergraduate and graduate medical education programmes, but also practising doctors. The limitations of the study are discussed and some recommendations are made for future practice. PMID:21810268

  3. Psychometric Validation of the Academic Motivation Scale in a Dental Student Sample.

    PubMed

    Orsini, Cesar; Binnie, Vivian; Evans, Phillip; Ledezma, Priscilla; Fuentes, Fernando; Villegas, Maria J

    2015-08-01

    The Academic Motivation Scale is one of the most frequently used instruments to assess academic motivation. It relies on the self-determination theory of human motivation. However, motivation has been understudied in dental education. Therefore, to address the lack of valid instruments to assess academic motivation in dental education and contribute to future research in the field, the aim of this study was to analyze the psychometric properties of this instrument in a sample of dental students. Participants were 989 Chilean undergraduate dental students (86% response rate) who completed a survey containing a Chilean face-valid version of the Spanish Academic Motivation Scale and three other motivation-related instruments to assess the survey's construct and criterion validity. Later, 76 of the students (out of 100 invited) took the survey again to assess its test-retest stability. The instrument's construct validity was supported by the superior goodness of fit of the seven-subscale Academic Motivation Scale over competing models through confirmatory factor analysis and by the expected correlations among its subscales. The concurrent criterion validity was supported by the confirmation of correlations between its subscales and external criteria. Adequate internal consistency and test-retest correlations were also found. The evidence from this study suggests that the Academic Motivation Scale is a preliminarily valid and reliable instrument to assess motivation in the predoctoral dental context. Future research in this area is needed to confirm or refute these results.

  4. Inpatients with major depressive disorder: Psychometric properties of the new Multidimensional Depression Scale.

    PubMed

    Darharaj, Mohammad; Habibi, Mojtaba; Power, Michael J; Farzadian, Farzaneh; Rahimi, Maesoumeh; Kholghi, Habibeh; Kazemitabar, Maryam

    2016-12-01

    The New Multi-dimensional Depression Scale (NMDS) is one of the most comprehensive scales that measures depression symptoms in four domains, including emotional, cognitive, somatic, and interpersonal. This study aimed to evaluate the factor structure and psychometric properties of the NMDS in a group of Iranian inpatients with Major Depressive Disorder (MDD). At first, the scale was translated into Persian and used as part of a battery consisting of the Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II), Oxford Happiness Inventory (OHI), Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI), and Short Form Health Survey (SF-36). The battery was administered to 271 inpatients with MDD (90 men and 181 women) aged from 18 to 60 who had been referred to psychiatric hospitals in Tehran, Iran. Confirmatory factor analysis of the Persian version of the NMDS upheld its original four-factor structure. Moreover, the results showed its good internal consistency (Cronbach's alpha coefficient ranging from 0.70 for the emotional subscale to 0.83 for the interpersonal subscale). In addition, the NMDS scores were correlated with other constructs in empirically and theoretically expected ways, which provides evidence for the convergent (positive significant relationships with anxiety and cognitive and somatic-affective symptoms of depression) and divergent (negative significant relationships with happiness and mental health and physical health) validity of the scale. These findings supported the Persian version of the NMDS as a reliable and valid measure for the assessment of depression symptoms in patients with MDD.

  5. Ataxia rating scales--psychometric profiles, natural history and their application in clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Saute, Jonas Alex Morales; Donis, Karina Carvalho; Serrano-Munuera, Carmen; Genis, David; Ramirez, Luís Torres; Mazzetti, Pilar; Pérez, Luis Velázquez; Latorre, Pilar; Sequeiros, Jorge; Matilla-Dueñas, Antoni; Jardim, Laura Bannach

    2012-06-01

    We aimed to perform a comprehensive systematic review of the existing ataxia scales. We described the disorders for which the instruments have been validated and used, the time spent in its application, its validated psychometric properties, and their use in studies of natural history and clinical trials. A search from 1997 onwards was performed in the MEDLINE, LILACS, and Cochrane databases. The web sites ClinicalTrials.gov and Orpha.net were also used to identify the endpoints used in ongoing randomized clinical trials. We identified and described the semiquantitative ataxia scales (ICARS, SARA, MICARS, BARS); semiquantitative ataxia and non-ataxia scales (UMSARS, FARS, NESSCA); a semiquantitative non-ataxia scale (INAS); quantitative ataxia scales (CATSYS 2000, AFCS, CCFS and CCFSw, and SCAFI); and the self-performed ataxia scale (FAIS). SARA and ICARS were the best studied and validated so far, and their reliability sustain their use. Ataxia and non-ataxia scores will probably provide a better view of the overall disability in long-term trials and studies of natural history. Up to now, no clear advantage has been disclosed for any of them; however, we recommend the use of specific measurements of gait since gait ataxia is the first significant manifestation in the majority of ataxia disorders and comment on the best scales to be used in specific ataxia forms. Quantitative ataxia scales will be needed to speed up evidence from phase II clinical trials, from trials focused on the early phase of diseases, and for secondary endpoints in phase III trials. Finally, it is worth remembering that estimation of the actual minimal clinically relevant difference is still lacking; this, together with changes in quality of life, will probably be the main endpoints to measure in future therapeutic studies.

  6. Development and Psychometric Testing of a Breast Cancer Survivor Self-Efficacy Scale

    PubMed Central

    Champion, Victoria L.; Ziner, Kim W.; Monahan, Patrick O.; Stump, Timothy E.; Cella, David; Smith, Lisa G.; Bell, Cynthia J.; Von Ah, Diane; Sledge, George W.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose/Objectives To describe the development of a self-efficacy instrument that measures perceived ability to manage symptoms and quality-of-life problems resulting from the diagnosis and treatment of breast cancer. Design Items were developed and content validity assessed. A 14-item scale was psychometrically evaluated using internal consistency reliability and several types of construct validity. Sample 1,127 female breast cancer survivors (BCSs). Methods Written consents were mailed to the research office. Data were collected via mail and telephone. Main Research Variables Demographics, symptom bother, communication with healthcare provider, attention function, fear of recurrence, depression, marital satisfaction, fatigue, sexual functioning, trait and state anxiety, and overall well-being. Findings Data demonstrated that the breast cancer self-efficacy scale (BCSES) was reliable, with an alpha coefficient of 0.89, inter-item correlations ranging from 0.3–0.6, and item-total correlation coefficients ranging from 0.5–0.73. Three of 14 items were deleted because of redundancy as identified through high (> 0.7) inter-item correlations. Factor analysis revealed that the scale was unidimensional. Predictive validity was supported through testing associations between self-efficacy and theoretically supported quality-of-life variables, including physical, psychological, and social dimensions, as well as overall well-being. Conclusions The BCSES demonstrated high internal consistency reliability, unidimensionality, and excellent content and construct validity. This scale should be integrated into interventions that target self-efficacy for managing symptoms in BCSs. Implications for Nursing Nurses working with BCSs may use this tool to assess areas in which survivors might need to build confidence to adequately cope with their specific survivorship concerns. Knowledge Translation The use of the BCSES can inform nurse researchers about the impact of an intervention

  7. Developing the Cyber Victimization Experiences and Cyberbullying Behaviors Scales.

    PubMed

    Betts, Lucy R; Spenser, Karin A

    2017-04-12

    The reported prevalence rates of cyber victimization experiences and cyberbullying behaviors vary. Part of this variation is likely due to the diverse definitions and operationalizations of the constructs adopted in previous research and the lack of psychometrically robust measures. Through 2 studies, the authors developed (Study 1) and evaluated (Study 2) the cyber victimization experiences and cyberbullying behaviors scales. Participants in Study 1 were 393 (122 boys, 171 girls) and in Study 2 were 345 (153 boys, 192 girls) 11-15-year-olds who completed measures of cyber victimization experiences, cyberbullying behaviors, face-to-face victimization experiences, face-to-face bullying behaviors, and social desirability. The 3-factor cyber victimization experiences scale comprised threat, shared images, and personal attack. The 3-factor cyberbullying behaviors scale comprised sharing images, gossip, and personal attack. Both scales demonstrated acceptable internal consistency and convergent validity.

  8. Psychometric Properties of the Beck Scale for Depression (Beck Depression Inventory BDI-II)--A Study on a Sample of Students in the State of Kuwait Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dahem, Ahmed Mohammed Faleh

    2016-01-01

    The study aimed to identify the psychometric properties of the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI-II) the Arabized version by Gharib (2000); the study sample consisted of 500 male and female students from the Kuwaiti universities by 250 males and 250 females on whom the BDI-II scale was applied twice; the psychometric characteristics such as the…

  9. The Intuitive Eating Scale-2: item refinement and psychometric evaluation with college women and men.

    PubMed

    Tylka, Tracy L; Kroon Van Diest, Ashley M

    2013-01-01

    The 21-item Intuitive Eating Scale (IES; Tylka, 2006) measures individuals' tendency to follow their physical hunger and satiety cues when determining when, what, and how much to eat. While its scores have demonstrated reliability and validity with college women, the IES-2 was developed to improve upon the original version. Specifically, we added 17 positively scored items to the original IES items (which were predominantly negatively scored), integrated an additional component of intuitive eating (Body-Food Choice Congruence), and evaluated its psychometric properties with 1,405 women and 1,195 men across three studies. After we deleted 15 items (due to low item-factor loadings, high cross-loadings, and redundant content), the results supported the psychometric properties of the IES-2 with women and men. The final 23-item IES-2 contained 11 original items and 12 added items. Exploratory and second-order confirmatory factor analyses upheld its hypothesized 4-factor structure (its original 3 factors, plus Body-Food Choice Congruence) and a higher order factor. The IES-2 was largely invariant across sex, although negligible differences on 1 factor loading and 2 item intercepts were detected. Demonstrating validity, the IES-2 total scores and most IES-2 subscale scores were (a) positively related to body appreciation, self-esteem, and satisfaction with life; (b) inversely related to eating disorder symptomatology, poor interoceptive awareness, body surveillance, body shame, body mass index, and internalization of media appearance ideals; and (c) negligibly related to social desirability. IES-2 scores also garnered incremental validity by predicting psychological well-being above and beyond eating disorder symptomatology. The IES-2's applications for empirical research and clinical work are discussed.

  10. Determining thresholds using adaptive procedures and psychometric fits: evaluating efficiency using theory, simulations, and human experiments.

    PubMed

    Karmali, Faisal; Chaudhuri, Shomesh E; Yi, Yongwoo; Merfeld, Daniel M

    2016-03-01

    When measuring thresholds, careful selection of stimulus amplitude can increase efficiency by increasing the precision of psychometric fit parameters (e.g., decreasing the fit parameter error bars). To find efficient adaptive algorithms for psychometric threshold ("sigma") estimation, we combined analytic approaches, Monte Carlo simulations, and human experiments for a one-interval, binary forced-choice, direction-recognition task. To our knowledge, this is the first time analytic results have been combined and compared with either simulation or human results. Human performance was consistent with theory and not significantly different from simulation predictions. Our analytic approach provides a bound on efficiency, which we compared against the efficiency of standard staircase algorithms, a modified staircase algorithm with asymmetric step sizes, and a maximum likelihood estimation (MLE) procedure. Simulation results suggest that optimal efficiency at determining threshold is provided by the MLE procedure targeting a fraction correct level of 0.92, an asymmetric 4-down, 1-up staircase targeting between 0.86 and 0.92 or a standard 6-down, 1-up staircase. Psychometric test efficiency, computed by comparing simulation and analytic results, was between 41 and 58% for 50 trials for these three algorithms, reaching up to 84% for 200 trials. These approaches were 13-21% more efficient than the commonly used 3-down, 1-up symmetric staircase. We also applied recent advances to reduce accuracy errors using a bias-reduced fitting approach. Taken together, the results lend confidence that the assumptions underlying each approach are reasonable and that human threshold forced-choice decision making is modeled well by detection theory models and mimics simulations based on detection theory models.

  11. Psychometric properties of the Barratt Impulsiveness Scale in patients with gambling disorders, hypersexuality, and methamphetamine dependence.

    PubMed

    Reid, Rory C; Cyders, Melissa A; Moghaddam, Jacquelene F; Fong, Timothy W

    2014-11-01

    Although the Barratt Impulsiveness Scale (BIS; Patton, Stanford, & Barratt, 1995) is a widely-used self-report measure of impulsivity, there have been numerous questions about the invariance of the factor structure across clinical populations (Haden & Shiva, 2008, 2009; Ireland & Archer, 2008). The goal of this article is to examine the factor structure of the BIS among a sample consisting of three populations exhibiting addictive behaviors and impulsivity: pathological gamblers, hypersexual patients, and individuals seeking treatment for methamphetamine dependence to determine if modification to the existing factors might improve the psychometric properties of the BIS. The current study found that the factor structure of the BIS does not replicate in this sample and instead produces a 12-item three-factor solution consisting of motor-impulsiveness (5 items), non-planning impulsiveness (3 items), and immediacy impulsiveness (4 items). The clinical utility of the BIS in this population is questionable. The authors suggest future studies to investigate comparisons with this modified version of the BIS and other impulsivity scales such as the UPPS-P Impulsive Behavior Scale in clinical populations when assessing disposition toward rash action.

  12. Psychometric properties of the Florence CyberBullying-CyberVictimization Scales.

    PubMed

    Palladino, Benedetta Emanuela; Nocentini, Annalaura; Menesini, Ersilia

    2015-02-01

    The present study tried to answer the research need for empirically validated and theoretically based instruments to assess cyberbullying and cybervictimization. The psychometric properties of the Florence CyberBullying-CyberVictimization Scales (FCBVSs) were analyzed in a sample of 1,142 adolescents (Mage=15.18 years; SD=1.12 years; 54.5% male). For both cybervictimization and cyberbullying, results support a gender invariant model involving 14 items and four factors covering four types of behaviors (written-verbal, visual, impersonation, and exclusion). The second-order confirmatory factor analysis confirmed that a "global," second-order measure of cyberbullying and cybervictimization fits the data well. Overall, the scales showed good validity (construct, concurrent, and convergent) and reliability (internal consistency and test-retest). In addition, using the global key question measure as a criterion, ROC analyses, determining the ability of a test to discriminate between groups, allowed us to identify cutoff points to classify respondents as involved/not involved starting from the continuum measure derived from the scales.

  13. Psychometric update of the Social Anxiety Screening Scale (SASS/EDAS) in a Spanish adolescent population.

    PubMed

    Piqueras, José Antonio; Olivares, José; Hidalgo, María Dolores; Vera-Villarroel, Pablo; Marzo, Juan Carlos

    2011-11-01

    The aim of this work was to update the validation of the Social Anxiety Screening Scale (SASS/EDAS) in a sample of Spanish adolescents. To achieve this, one study with a sample of 1489 students in secondary education, of ages 14 to 17 years, were carried out. The psychometric properties of EDAS were examined through confirmatory factor analysis, reliability (Cronbach's alpha), temporal stability (test-retest), and concurrent criterion validity. The results supported the three-independent-factor structure (avoidance, distress and interference), that showed best fit indices compared to alternative models. They also showed that the scores of participants on EDAS scales were reliable in terms of internal consistency (alpha > .80) and moderately reliable concerning temporal stability (r = .48-.60) over a five-week period. The correlations between the EDAS factors and other social anxiety measures were positive and significant. Data provide empirical evidence of the estimation of reliability and validity of this scale. Future work should extend the validation of the EDAS in clinical samples.

  14. MMPI-2 Symptom Validity (FBS) Scale: psychometric characteristics and limitations in a Veterans Affairs neuropsychological setting.

    PubMed

    Gass, Carlton S; Odland, Anthony P

    2014-01-01

    The Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory-2 (MMPI-2) Symptom Validity (Fake Bad Scale [FBS]) Scale is widely used to assist in determining noncredible symptom reporting, despite a paucity of detailed research regarding its itemmetric characteristics. Originally designed for use in civil litigation, the FBS is often used in a variety of clinical settings. The present study explored its fundamental psychometric characteristics in a sample of 303 patients who were consecutively referred for a comprehensive examination in a Veterans Affairs (VA) neuropsychology clinic. FBS internal consistency (reliability) was .77. Its underlying factor structure consisted of three unitary dimensions (Tiredness/Distractibility, Stomach/Head Discomfort, and Claimed Virtue of Self/Others) accounting for 28.5% of the total variance. The FBS's internal structure showed factoral discordance, as Claimed Virtue was negatively related to most of the FBS and to its somatic complaint components. Scores on this 12-item FBS component reflected a denial of socially undesirable attitudes and behaviors (Antisocial Practices Scale) that is commonly expressed by the 1,138 males in the MMPI-2 normative sample. These 12 items significantly reduced FBS reliability, introducing systematic error variance. In this VA neuropsychological referral setting, scores on the FBS have ambiguous meaning because of its structural discordance.

  15. The psychometric properties of the difficult behavior self-efficacy scale.

    PubMed

    Oh, Hyun-Kyoung; Kozub, Francis M

    2010-07-01

    The study was designed to estimate the psychometric properties of Hastings and Brown's (2002a) Difficult Behavior Self-efficacy Scale. Participants were two samples of physical educators teaching in Korea (n=229) and the United States (U.S.; n=139). An initial translation of the questionnaire to Korean and pilot study were conducted along with the larger study using a confirmatory factor analysis procedure. Internal consistency estimates (weighed Omega) for the five-item scale were 0.88 both the Korean and U.S. samples. The average variances extracted for the one factor were 0.59 for the total data set and 0.57 each for the Korean and U.S. samples. Confirmatory factor analysis supported a five-item, unidimensional model for self-efficacy for the total sample: Goodness of Fit Index (GFI)=0.97, Nonnormed Fit Index (NNFI)=0.95, Comparative Fit Index (CFI)=0.98, and Standardized Root Mean Square Residual (SRMR)=0.03. Only the Root Mean Square Error of Approximation (RMSEA=0.12) fell below criterion levels of acceptable fit, with similar fit indices occurring in separate analyses of the Korean and U.S. samples. Invariance testing across the two samples supported metric invariance (similarity of factor loadings) but not scalar invariance (U.S. means higher on all five items). The factor structure for the self-efficacy scale provides an initial estimate of validity and internal consistency for use with different teacher groups.

  16. The compensatory health beliefs scale: psychometric properties of a cross-culturally adapted scale for use in The Netherlands.

    PubMed

    de Nooijer, Jascha; Puijk-Hekman, Saskia; van Assema, Patricia

    2009-10-01

    This study assesses the psychometric properties of a measuring scale for compensatory health beliefs (CHBs), culturally adapted for use in the Dutch context. CHBs refer to the idea that people can compensate for unhealthy (mostly pleasant) behaviours with healthy behaviours, e.g. 'It is OK to eat a chocolate bar, because I am going to the gym tonight'. We are critical towards such beliefs as they may also be an excuse to justify unhealthy behaviours. Before such effects can be studied, an appropriate tool to measure CHBs must be developed. We adapted a Canadian scale, consisting of four factors relating to beliefs about substance use, eating/sleeping habits, stress and weight regulation, translating it according to guidelines for cross-cultural adaptation and testing it among 145 Dutch students. Factor analysis showed that the structure was not entirely identical in the Dutch context, and the internal consistency of the four subscales was also low. The overall scale showed a high internal consistency (alpha = 0.78), indicating the existence of an underlying construct, and a high Pearson correlation between the first and second measurements (r = 0.82), showing good stability. We recommend using the overall scale and further studying its reliability among other subgroups as well as its validity.

  17. Development and Psychometric Properties of the Family Distress in Advanced Dementia Scale

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Richard N.; Mazor, Kathleen M.; Prigerson, Holly G.; Mitchell, Susan L.

    2015-01-01

    Objective The majority of scales to measure family member distress in dementia are designed for community settings and do not capture the unique burdens of the nursing home (NH) environment. We report the psychometric properties of a new Family Distress in Advanced Dementia Scale for use in the NH setting. Design, Setting, Participants Cross-sectional questionnaire of 130 family member health care proxies of NH residents with advanced dementia in 31 Boston-area NHs. Methods Thirty-one initial items were evaluated, measuring the frequency over the past 3 months of sources of distress. Exploratory factor analysis identified domains of distress; Cronbach’s alpha was computed for each domain. Associations between the domains and other measures were evaluated using Pearson correlation coefficients, including measures of depression (PHQ-9), satisfaction with care (Satisfaction with Care at the End-of-Life in Dementia [SWC-EOLD]) and caregiver burden (Zarit Burden Interview short version). Results Factor analysis suggested three domains: Emotional Distress (9 items), Dementia Preparedness (5 items), and NH Relations (7 items). Cronbach’s alpha coefficients were 0.82, 0.75 and 0.83 respectively. The PHQ-9 correlated most strongly with the Emotional Distress factor (r = 0.34), the SWC-EOWD correlated most strongly with the NH Relations factor (r = 0.35), as did the Zarit Burden Scale (r = 0.50). Conculsions The Family Distress in Advanced Dementia Scale encompasses three domains of distress. This scale represents a much needed tool to assess distress among family members of NH residents with advanced dementia and provides a metric to evaluate interventions in the population. PMID:25940236

  18. "Barriers to Cognitive Behavioral Therapy Homework Completion Scale- Depression Version": Development and Psychometric Evaluation.

    PubMed

    Callan, Judith A; Dunbar-Jacob, Jacqueline; Sereika, Susan M; Stone, Clement; Fasiczka, Amy; Jarrett, Robin B; Thase, Michael E

    2012-01-01

    We conducted a two-phase study to develop and evaluate the psychometric properties of an instrument to identify barriers to Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT) homework completion in a depressed sample. In Phase I, we developed an item pool by interviewing 20 depressed patients and 20 CBT therapists. In Phase II, we created and administered a draft instrument to 56 people with depression. Exploratory Factor Analysis revealed a 2-factor oblique solution of "Patient Factors" and "Therapy/Task Factors." Internal consistency coefficients ranged from .80 to .95. Temporal stability was demonstrated through Pearson correlations of .72 (for the therapist/task subscale) to .95 (for the patient subscale) over periods of time that ranged from 2 days to 3 weeks. The patient subscale was able to satisfactorily classify patients (75 to 79 %) with low and high adherence at both sessions. Specificity was .66 at both time points. Sensitivity was .80 at sessions B and .77 at session C. There were no consistent predictors of assignment compliance when measured by the Assignment Compliance Rating Scale (Primakoff, Epstein, & Covi, 1986). The Rating Scale and subscale scores did, however, correlate significantly with assignment non-compliance (.32 to .46).

  19. The Brunnsviken Brief Quality of Life Scale (BBQ): Development and Psychometric Evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Lindner, Philip; Frykheden, Ola; Forsström, David; Andersson, Erik; Ljótsson, Brjánn; Hedman, Erik; Andersson, Gerhard; Carlbring, Per

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Measurements of subjective quality of life (QoL) are an important complement to symptom ratings in clinical research and practice. Despite there being several established QoL self-rating scales, we identified a need for a freely accessible, easy-to-use inventory, validated for use with both clinical and non-clinical samples, based on the overall life satisfaction conceptualization of QoL. The Brunnsviken Brief Quality of life scale (BBQ) was designed to meet these requirements. Items were selected by performing a factor analysis on a large data-set of QoL ratings collected previously. Six life areas (Leisure time, View on life, Creativity, Learning, Friends and Friendship, and View of self) were identified as important for overall QoL and were included in the BBQ. A psychometric evaluation was performed using two independent samples: healthy undergraduate students (n = 163), and a sample seeking treatment for social anxiety disorder (n = 568). Results suggested a unifactorial structure, with good concurrent and convergent validity, high internal and test-retest reliability, and accurate classification ability. We conclude that the BBQ is a valid and reliable measure of subjective QoL for use in clinical and research settings. The BBQ is presently available in 31 languages and can be freely downloaded from www.bbqscale.com. PMID:26886248

  20. Psychometric properties of the Chinese-version Quality of Nursing Work Life Scale.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ya-Wen; Dai, Yu-Tzu; McCreary, Linda L; Yao, Grace; Brooks, Beth A

    2014-09-01

    In this study, we developed and tested the psychometric properties of the Chinese-version Quality of Nursing Work Life Scale along seven subscales: supportive milieu with security and professional recognition, work arrangement and workload, work/home life balance, head nurse's/supervisor's management style, teamwork and communication, nursing staffing and patient care, and milieu of respect and autonomy. An instrument-development procedure with three phases was conducted in seven hospitals in 2010-2011. Phase I comprised translation and the cultural-adaptation process, phase II comprised a pilot study, and phase III comprised a field-testing process. Purposive sampling was used in the pilot study (n = 150) and the large field study (n = 1254). Five new items were added, and 85.7% of the original items were retained in the 41 item Chinese version. Principal component analysis revealed that a model accounted for 56.6% of the variance with acceptable internal consistency, concurrent validity, and discriminant validity. This study gave evidence of reliability and validity of the 41 item Chinese-version Quality of Nursing Work Life Scale.

  1. Measuring romantic love: psychometric properties of the infatuation and attachment scales.

    PubMed

    Langeslag, Sandra J E; Muris, Peter; Franken, Ingmar H A

    2013-01-01

    Romantic love is ubiquitous and has major influences on people's lives. Because romantic love consists of infatuation and attachment, researchers need to be able to differentiate between these constructs when examining the behavioral, affective, cognitive, and physiological correlates of this intriguing phenomenon. Existing love questionnaires appear less suitable for measuring the two-dimensional construct of romantic love. We present here the new 20-item Infatuation and Attachment Scales (IAS) questionnaire. In Study 1, exploratory factor analyses in a Dutch-speaking sample (n = 162) revealed a clear-cut two-factor structure, with 10 infatuation and 10 attachment items loading on separate components. This two-factor structure was confirmed in a new Dutch-speaking sample (n = 214, Study 2), and in an English-speaking sample (n = 183, Study 3). In all studies, it was additionally shown that both scales possessed good convergent and discriminant validity, as well as excellent internal consistency and test-retest reliability. We argue that the IAS is a widely applicable, psychometrically sound instrument that will be useful in future research exploring the effects of infatuation and attachment on behavior, emotion, cognition, peripheral physiology, and brain functioning.

  2. The stroke caregiver unmet resource needs scale: development and psychometric testing.

    PubMed

    King, Rosemarie B; Hartke, Robert J; Lee, Jungwha; Raad, Jason

    2013-12-01

    The purposes of this study were to develop and validate a measure of unmet resource needs of the caregivers of survivors of stroke and to describe the caregivers' unmet needs during 1 year. A longitudinal, descriptive design was used to test the reliability and validity of the Unmet Resource Needs (URN) measure. Item development was based on literature review and preliminary study findings. A stress and coping conceptual model framed the hypotheses. Psychometric testing was based on 6-month postdischarge data (n = 166). Content and structural construct validity, internal consistency reliability through 1 year, and concurrent validity were tested. Change in URN over time was examined. Content validity was supported by floor and ceiling effects less than 5%. Principal axis factoring yielded a 12-item, two-factor solution reflecting general and technology unmet needs. Internal consistency reliability was satisfactory for the total scale and subscales at all times, excepting the baseline three-item technology scale (α = .56). Concurrent validity was supported by significant correlations with model constructs (threat, positive problem solving, depression, preparedness; p < .01) in the expected direction. Functional status and resource use were not associated with the URN. Repeated measures analysis of variance (n = 123) indicated a significant decrease in unmet needs from baseline to 3, 6, and 12 months postdischarge (p < .001). Nevertheless, 42% reported one or more unmet needs at year 1. Assessment and counseling on unmet needs is indicated throughout the caregiving trajectory to reduce negative outcomes.

  3. The Sensed Presence Questionnaire (SenPQ): initial psychometric validation of a measure of the “Sensed Presence” experience

    PubMed Central

    Bell, Vaughan

    2017-01-01

    Background The experience of ‘sensed presence’—a feeling or sense that another entity, individual or being is present despite no clear sensory or perceptual evidence—is known to occur in the general population, appears more frequently in religious or spiritual contexts, and seems to be prominent in certain psychiatric or neurological conditions and may reflect specific functions of social cognition or body-image representation systems in the brain. Previous research has relied on ad-hoc measures of the experience and no specific psychometric scale to measure the experience exists to date. Methods Based on phenomenological description in the literature, we created the 16-item Sensed Presence Questionnaire (SenPQ). We recruited participants from (i) a general population sample, and; (ii) a sample including specific selection for religious affiliation, to complete the SenPQ and additional measures of well-being, schizotypy, social anxiety, social imagery, and spiritual experience. We completed an analysis to test internal reliability, the ability of the SenPQ to distinguish between religious and non-religious participants, and whether the SenPQ was specifically related to positive schizotypical experiences and social imagery. A factor analysis was also conducted to examine underlying latent variables. Results The SenPQ was found to be reliable and valid, with religious participants significantly endorsing more items than non-religious participants, and the scale showing a selective relationship with construct relevant measures. Principal components analysis indicates two potential underlying factors interpreted as reflecting ‘benign’ and ‘malign’ sensed presence experiences. Discussion The SenPQ appears to be a reliable and valid measure of sensed presence experience although further validation in neurological and psychiatric conditions is warranted. PMID:28367379

  4. Development and psychometric testing of the active aging scale for Thai adults

    PubMed Central

    Thanakwang, Kattika; Isaramalai, Sang-arun; Hatthakit, Urai

    2014-01-01

    Background Active aging is central to enhancing the quality of life for older adults, but its conceptualization is not often made explicit for Asian elderly people. Little is known about active aging in older Thai adults, and there has been no development of scales to measure the expression of active aging attributes. Purpose The aim of this study was to develop a culturally relevant composite scale of active aging for Thai adults (AAS-Thai) and to evaluate its reliability and validity. Methods Eight steps of scale development were followed: 1) using focus groups and in-depth interviews, 2) gathering input from existing studies, 3) developing preliminary quantitative measures, 4) reviewing for content validity by an expert panel, 5) conducting cognitive interviews, 6) pilot testing, 7) performing a nationwide survey, and 8) testing psychometric properties. In a nationwide survey, 500 subjects were randomly recruited using a stratified sampling technique. Statistical analyses included exploratory factor analysis, item analysis, and measures of internal consistency, concurrent validity, and test–retest reliability. Results Principal component factor analysis with varimax rotation resulted in a final 36-item scale consisting of seven factors of active aging: 1) being self-reliant, 2) being actively engaged with society, 3) developing spiritual wisdom, 4) building up financial security, 5) maintaining a healthy lifestyle, 6) engaging in active learning, and 7) strengthening family ties to ensure care in later life. These factors explained 69% of the total variance. Cronbach’s alpha coefficient for the overall AAS-Thai was 0.95 and varied between 0.81 and 0.91 for the seven subscales. Concurrent validity and test–retest reliability were confirmed. Conclusion The AAS-Thai demonstrated acceptable overall validity and reliability for measuring the multidimensional attributes of active aging in a Thai context. This newly developed instrument is ready for use as a

  5. Evaluation of Mackey Childbirth Satisfaction Rating Scale in Iran: What Are the Psychometric Properties?

    PubMed Central

    Moudi, Zahra; Tavousi, Mahmoud

    2016-01-01

    Background With the integration of the evaluation of patient satisfaction in the overall assessment of healthcare services, authorities can be assured about the alignment of these services with patient needs and the suitability of care provided at the local level. Objectives This study was conducted in 2013 in Zahedan, Iran, in order to assess the psychometric properties of the Iranian version of the mackey childbirth satisfaction rating scale (MCSRS). Patients and Methods For this study, a methodological design was used. After translating the MCSRS and confirming its initial validity, the questionnaires were distributed among women with uncomplicated pregnancies and no prior history of cesarean section. The participants had given birth to healthy, full-term, singletons (with cephalic presentation) via normal vaginal delivery at hospitals within the past six months. Cronbach’s alpha and test-retest (via the intraclass correlation coefficient) were applied to analyze the internal consistency and reliability of the scale. Moreover, the validity of the scale was tested via exploratory factor analysis, confirmatory factor analysis, and convergent validity. Results The MCSRS consists of six subscales. Through the process of validation, two partner-related items (“partner” subscale) of the scale were excluded due to cultural barriers and hospital policies. Cronbach’s alpha for the total scale was 0.78. It ranged between 0.70 and 0.86 for five subscales, and was 0.31 for the “baby” subscale. Factor analysis confirmed the subscales of “nurse,” “physician,” and “baby,” which were identified in the original scale. However, in the translated version, the “self” subscale was divided into two separate dimensions. The six subscales explained 70.37% of the variance. Confirmatory factor analysis indicated a good fitness for the new model. Convergent validity showed a significant correlation between the MCSRS and the SERVQUAL scale (r = 0.72, P < 0

  6. Psychometric Properties of the Chinese Version of the Conners' Parent and Teacher Rating Scales-Revised: Short Form

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gau, Susan Shur-Fen; Soong, Wei-Tsuen; Chiu, Yen-Nan; Tsai, Wen-Che

    2006-01-01

    Objective: This article examines the psychometric properties of the Chinese version of the Conners' Parent and Teacher Rating Scales-Revised: Short Forms (CPRS-R:S-C and CTRS-R:S-C) in a representative sample of 2,584 first to ninth graders in Taipei and 479 clinical participants (274 with ADHD). Method: The instruments include the CPRS-R:S-C,…

  7. Psychometric properties of the Wender-Reimherr Adult Attention Deficit Disorder Scale.

    PubMed

    Marchant, Barrie K; Reimherr, Fred W; Robison, Diane; Robison, Reid J; Wender, Paul H

    2013-09-01

    The Wender-Reimherr adult attention deficit disorder scale (WRAADDS; Wender, 1995) is a clinician-rated scale based on the Utah Criteria for attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in adults. It assesses ADHD symptom severity across 7 domains: attention difficulties, hyperactivity/restlessness, temper, affective lability, emotional over-reactivity, disorganization, and impulsivity. The normative sample consisted of 120 males and females ages 20-49 with no personal or family history of ADHD. Patients with ADHD met Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (4th ed., text rev.; DSM-IV-TR; American Psychiatric Association, 2000) criteria, included males and females ages 20-60, and came from 5 clinical trials. Measures of reliability (test-retest r = .96; interrater r = .75) and internal consistency (Cronbach's alpha = 0.78) were acceptable. The WRAADDS correlated with the Conners' Adult ADHD Rating Scale (CAARS; Conners, Erhardt, & Sparrow, 1999) total scores (r = .501, p < .001). WRAADDS hyperactivity + impulsivity correlated with the CAARS hyperactivity/impulsivity (r = .601, p < .001), and WRAADDS attention + disorganization correlated with the CAARS inattention (r = .430, p < .001). Discriminate validity (adults with vs. without ADHD) was significant for all domains (p < .001). Factor analysis yielded a 2-factor solution accounting for 58% of the variance, one containing the emotional dimensions and the second containing attention and disorganization. Hyperactivity/restlessness and impulsivity were split between both factors. Changes in response to treatment for the WRAADDS and CAARS were highly correlated (p < .001). These psychometric data support continued use of the WRAADDS in adults with ADHD.

  8. Validation and Psychometric Properties of the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit Parental Belief Scale

    PubMed Central

    Melnyk, Bernadette; Oswalt, Krista L.; Sidora-Arcoleo, Kimberly

    2015-01-01

    Background Parental perception of their infants and confidence/beliefs about their parenting are among the most salient factors influencing outcomes of preterm infants. Objectives The purpose of this study was to assess the psychometric properties of scores on the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit Parent Belief Scale (NICU PBS) in a sample of mothers and fathers of preterm infants receiving intensive care. The NICU PBS is a rating instrument designed to assess parental beliefs about their premature infant and their role during hospitalization. Methods The sample consisted of 245 mothers and 143 fathers. As part of the Creating Opportunities for Parent Empowerment (COPE) trial, participants completed the NICU PBS four to eight days after NICU admission and again approximately four days prior to discharge. Validation data were obtained at various times throughout the study. Confirmatory factor analysis was used to evaluate the NICU PBS factor structure. Results A three-factor solution was accepted (Parental Role Confidence, Parent-Baby Interaction, and Knowledge of the NICU). Reliability of scores on the total scale and subscales was high; Cronbach’s alpha ranged from .75 to .91. Test-retest correlations ranged from .84 to .92. Younger maternal age, birth of another child, and return to work within the past 12 months, and lower stress, depression, and anxiety were all significantly associated with higher scores on all subscales and the total score. Lower education, lower household income, receipt of Medicaid, and non-White race were associated with higher scores on the Parent Role Confidence subscale and total. Lower household income and receipt of Medicaid were associated with higher Parent-Baby Interaction scores. Discussion The NICU PBS can be used reliably with mothers and fathers of premature infants who are hospitalized in the NICU, and it may be a useful scale in predicting parental stress, depression, and anxiety. PMID:24589647

  9. A psychometric evaluation of the panic disorder severity scale for children and adolescents.

    PubMed

    Elkins, R Meredith; Pincus, Donna B; Comer, Jonathan S

    2014-06-01

    The Panic Disorder Severity Scale (PDSS; Shear et al., 1997) is a well-validated measure that assesses symptoms of panic disorder with or without agoraphobia (PDA) in adults. The Panic Disorder Severity Scale for Children (PDSS-C) is an adaptation of the PDSS for youth ages 11-17. The current study evaluated the psychometric properties of the PDSS-C. Participants included 60 adolescents from a randomized controlled trial investigating the efficacy of an intensive cognitive behavioral treatment (CBT) for adolescent PDA. Convergent and discriminant validity of PDSS-C scores were evaluated via observed associations between the PDSS-C and the Childhood Anxiety Sensitivity Index (CASI; Silverman, Fleisig, Rabian, & Peterson, 1991), Multidimensional Anxiety Scale for Children (MASC; March, Parker, Sullivan, Stallings, & Conners, 1997), and Children's Depression Inventory (CDI; Kovacs, 2003). Baseline and posttreatment data afforded the opportunity to evaluate the measure's sensitivity to treatment-related change. PDSS-C scores demonstrated acceptable internal consistency (α = .82) and adequate 1-day test-retest reliability (r = .79). Convergent and discriminant validity of the PDSS-C scores were supported through significant associations with the CASI and the MASC, and nonsignificant associations with the CDI, respectively. Linear regression analysis demonstrated sensitivity to treatment-related changes-that is, greater PDSS-C change scores were significantly associated with assignment to CBT vs. waitlist condition. Clinical utility was further established through significant associations between PDSS-C change scores and MASC and CASI change scores, and through nonsignificant associations with CDI change scores. Results support the use of PDSS-C scores as reliable, valid, and clinically useful for the assessment of youth panic disorder in research and clinical settings.

  10. PIUS-a: Problematic Internet Use Scale in adolescents. Development and psychometric validation.

    PubMed

    Rial Boubeta, Antonio; Gómez Salgado, Patricia; Isorna Folgar, Manuel; Araujo Gallego, Manuel; Varela Mallou, Jesús

    2015-03-01

    Adolescents' use of the Internet is becoming a matter of great concern for different sectors of society. The psychological and behavioural consequences of problematic Internet use in young people demands quick and effective answers. One of the major challenges in this context is the development of empirically validated tools, which would facilitate early detection and screening for potential risk cases. This is precisely the aim of this paper. Based on a sample of 1,709 secondary-school students from Galicia (a region in northern Spain) aged 11 to 17 (M = 13.74, SD = 1.43), the analysis carried out permitted us to present a brief and simple tool (with just 11 items). It has substantial theoretical support, since both the existing background information and the views of experts from the academic and professional spheres were taken into account in the course of its development. The scale is adapted to the Spanish cultural context and to the language of young people. It has satisfactory psychometric properties in terms of reliability of the scores (α = .82), evidence of its internal structure (tested via a Confirmatory Factorial Analysis), sensitivity (81%), and specificity (82.6%). Moreover, its use enables the gradation of adolescents on a risk or problematic Internet use continuum. In our view, all of this lends it enormous applied potential in both the educational and clinical contexts.

  11. Psychometric Evaluation of the Child PTSD Symptom Scale in Spanish and English

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, Rika M. L.; Gold, Jeffrey I.; Beas, Virginia N.; Young, Christina M.; Kassam-Adams, Nancy

    2015-01-01

    Background Given the consistent growth of the Latino population in the United States, there is a critical need for validated Spanish measures to assess posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms in children. The current study examines the psychometric properties of the Child PTSD Symptom Scale (CPSS). Methods We examined 259 children (8 to 17 years) who had experienced a recent traumatic event. Study measures were completed in Spanish (n=106; boys = 58, girls = 48) or in English (n=153; boys = 96, girls = 57). In addition to internal consistency, confirmatory factor analyses were conducted by testing four models to examine construct validity: (1) PTS Single-Factor, (2) DSM-IV three-factor, (3) Numbing four-factor, and (4) Dysphoria four-factor models. Results Findings demonstrated good internal consistency for both the English and Spanish versions of the CPSS. The English version revealed superior fit to the data for several models of PTS symptoms structure compared to the Spanish version. Conclusions The current study demonstrated construct validity for the English CPSS, but not for the Spanish CPSS. Future studies will examine additional alternative models as well as convergent and discriminant validity of the Spanish CPSS. PMID:25129027

  12. Psychometric evaluation of dietary self-efficacy and outcome expectation scales in female college freshmen.

    PubMed

    Kedem, Leia E; Evans, Ellen M; Chapman-Novakofski, Karen

    2014-11-01

    Lifestyle interventions commonly measure psychosocial beliefs as precursors to positive behavior change, but often overlook questionnaire validation. This can affect measurement accuracy if the survey has been developed for a different population, as differing behavioral influences may affect instrument validity. The present study aimed to explore psychometric properties of self-efficacy and outcome expectation scales-originally developed for younger children-in a population of female college freshmen (N = 268). Exploratory principal component analysis was used to investigate underlying data patterns and assess validity of previously published subscales. Composite scores for reliable subscales (Cronbach's α ≥ .70) were calculated to help characterize self-efficacy and outcome expectation beliefs in this population. The outcome expectation factor structure clearly comprised of positive (α = .81-.90) and negative outcomes (α = .63-.67). The self-efficacy factor structure included themes of motivation and effort (α = .75-.94), but items pertaining to hunger and availability cross-loaded often. Based on cross-loading patterns and low Cronbach's alpha values, respectively, self-efficacy items regarding barriers to healthy eating and negative outcome expectation items should be refined to improve reliability. Composite scores suggested that eating healthfully was associated with positive outcomes, but self-efficacy to do so was lower. Thus, dietary interventions for college students may be more successful by including skill-building activities to enhance self-efficacy and increase the likelihood of behavior change.

  13. Psychometric Testing of the Self-Efficacy for Interdisciplinary Plans of Care Scale.

    PubMed

    Molle, Elizabeth; Froman, Robin

    2017-01-01

    Computerized interdisciplinary plans of care have revitalized nurse-centric care plans into dynamic and meaningful electronic documents. To maximize the benefits of these documents, it is important to understand healthcare professionals' attitudes, specifically their confidence, for making computerized interdisciplinary care plans useful and meaningful documents. The purpose of the study was to test the psychometric properties of the Self-Efficacy for Interdisciplinary Plans of Care instrument intended to measure healthcare professionals' self-efficacy for using such documents. Content validity was assessed by an expert review panel. Content validity indices ranged from 0.75 to 1.00, with a scale CVI of 0.94. A sample of 389 healthcare providers completed the 14-item instrument. Principal axis factoring was used to assess factor structure. The exploratory factor analysis yielded a single-factor structure accounting for 71.76% of covariance. Cronbach internal consistency coefficient for the single factor solution was .97. The corrected item-total correlations ranged from 0.71 to 0.90. The coefficient of stability, during a 2-week period, with a subset of the sample (n = 38), was estimated at 0.82. The results of this study suggest that the Self-Efficacy for Interdisciplinary Plans of Care has sturdy reliability and validity for measuring the self-efficacy of healthcare providers to make computerized interdisciplinary plans of care meaningful and useful documents.

  14. Psychometric Properties of Difficulties of Working with Patients with Personality Disorders and Attitudes Towards Patients with Personality Disorders Scales

    PubMed Central

    EREN, Nurhan

    2014-01-01

    Introduction In this study, we aimed to develop two reliable and valid assessment instruments for investigating the level of difficulties mental health workers experience while working with patients with personality disorders and the attitudes they develop tt the patients. Methods The research was carried out based on the general screening model. The study sample consisted of 332 mental health workers in several mental health clinics of Turkey, with a certain amount of experience in working with personality disorders, who were selected with a random assignment method. In order to collect data, the Personal Information Questionnaire, Difficulty of Working with Personality Disorders Scale (PD-DWS), and Attitudes Towards Patients with Personality Disorders Scale (PD-APS), which are being examined for reliability and validity, were applied. To determine construct validity, the Adjective Check List, Maslach Burnout Inventory, and State and Trait Anxiety Inventory were used. Explanatory factor analysis was used for investigating the structural validity, and Cronbach alpha, Spearman-Brown, Guttman Split-Half reliability analyses were utilized to examine the reliability. Also, item reliability and validity computations were carried out by investigating the corrected item-total correlations and discriminative indexes of the items in the scales. Results For the PD-DWS KMO test, the value was .946; also, a significant difference was found for the Bartlett sphericity test (p<.001). The computed test-retest coefficient reliability was .702; the Cronbach alpha value of the total test score was .952. For PD-APS KMO, the value was .925; a significant difference was found in Bartlett sphericity test (p<.001); the computed reliability coefficient based on continuity was .806; and the Cronbach alpha value of the total test score was .913. Analyses on both scales were based on total scores. Conclusion It was found that PD-DWS and PD-APS have good psychometric properties, measuring the

  15. Psychometric evaluation of the Holden Communication Scale (HCS) for persons with dementia

    PubMed Central

    Strøm, Benedicte Sørensen; Engedal, Knut; Šaltytė Benth, Jūratė; Grov, Ellen-Karine

    2016-01-01

    Objective To investigate the psychometric properties of the Holden Communication Scale (HCS) and the association between scores on HCS and cognitive function among persons with dementia. Method Internal consistency was assessed by the Cronbach's α coefficient and inter-item correlations. Test-retest was carried out to test the instrument's stability. An exploratory factor analysis with the principal components extraction method and oblimin rotation was performed to evaluate construct validity. Pearson's correlation coefficients were calculated to explore associations between the scores on the HCS and cognitive function. Results A total of 128 persons with moderate-to-severe cognitive impairment (mean Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) score 8.9 (SD 7.0)) participated. The mean age was 85.2 (SD 7.2) and 101 of the participants were women. The Cronbach's α of the HCS was 0.94 and test-retest reliability was r=0.71. The corrected item-total correlation ranged from 0.63 to 0.79 and factor analysis showed a 1-factor structure of the HCS, which explained 63% of the variance. However, a forced 3-factor structure explained 76% of the variance. The correlation between cognitive function as measured by the MMSE and ability to communicate as measured with HCS was found to be moderate for those with an MMSE score of 0–10 (−0.61) and low for persons with an MMSE score of 11–20 (−0.06). Conclusions The HCS is a reliable and valid scale for assessing communication ability in persons with moderate and severe cognitive impairment, and might have a 1-factor or 3-factor structure. PMID:27965255

  16. Rating Scale Analysis and Psychometric Properties of the Caregiver Self-Efficacy Scale for Transfers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cipriani, Daniel J.; Hensen, Francine E.; McPeck, Danielle L.; Kubec, Gina L. D.; Thomas, Julie J.

    2012-01-01

    Parents and caregivers faced with the challenges of transferring children with disability are at risk of musculoskeletal injuries and/or emotional stress. The Caregiver Self-Efficacy Scale for Transfers (CSEST) is a 14-item questionnaire that measures self-efficacy for transferring under common conditions. The CSEST yields reliable data and valid…

  17. The Experience in Personal Social Systems Questionnaire (EXIS.pers): Development and Psychometric Properties.

    PubMed

    Hunger, Christina; Bornhäuser, Annette; Link, Leoni; Geigges, Julian; Voss, Andreas; Weinhold, Jan; Schweitzer, Jochen

    2017-03-01

    This study presents the theoretical background, development, and psychometric properties of the German and English versions of the Experience in Personal Social Systems Questionnaire (EXIS.pers). It assesses how the members of a personal social system experience their situation within that system. It is designed as a research tool for interventions in which only one member of the system participates (e.g., Family Constellation Seminars). The EXIS.pers was created to measure change on the individual level relating to one's own important personal social system. In Study 1, we used exploratory factor analysis (EFA) for latent variable identification of the original German EXIS.pers (n = 179). In Studies 2 and 3, we used confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) to examine the dimensionality of the German (n = 634) and English (n = 310) EXIS.pers. Internal consistencies and cross-cultural structural equivalence were assessed. EFA indicated that a four-factor model provided best fit for the German EXIS.pers. For both the German and English EXIS.pers, CFA provided the best fit for a five-factor bi-level model that included a general factor (Experience In Personal Social Systems) and four dimensions (Belonging, Autonomy, Accord, Confidence). Good internal consistencies, external associations, and cross-cultural structural equivalence were demonstrated. This study provides first evidence for the German and English EXIS.pers as an economical and reliable measure of an individual's experience within his or her personal social systems.

  18. The symptoms and functioning severity scale (SFSS): psychometric evaluation and discrepancies among youth, caregiver, and clinician ratings over time.

    PubMed

    Athay, M Michele; Riemer, Manuel; Bickman, Leonard

    2012-03-01

    This paper describes the development and psychometric evaluation of the symptoms and functioning severity scale (SFSS), which includes three parallel forms to systematically capture clinician, youth, and caregiver perspectives of youth symptoms on a frequent basis. While there is widespread consensus that different raters of youth psychopathology vary significantly in their assessment, this is the first paper that specifically investigated the discrepancies among clinician, youth, and caregiver ratings throughout the treatment process within a community mental health setting. Results for all three respondent versions indicated the SFSS is a psychometrically sound instrument for use in this population. Significant discrepancies in scores existed at baseline among the three respondents. Longitudinal analyses reveal the youth-clinician and caregiver-clinician score discrepancies decreased significantly over time. Differences by youth gender existed for caregiver-clinician discrepancies. The average youth-caregiver score discrepancy remained consistent throughout treatment. Implications for future research and clinical practice are discussed.

  19. Factor Structure and Correlates of the Dissociative Experiences Scale in a Large Offender Sample

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ruiz, Mark A.; Poythress, Norman G.; Lilienfeld, Scott O.; Douglas, Kevin S.

    2008-01-01

    The authors examined the psychometric properties, factor structure, and construct validity of the Dissociative Experiences Scale (DES) in a large offender sample (N = 1,515). Although the DES is widely used with community and clinical samples, minimal work has examined offender samples. Participants were administered self-report and interview…

  20. Measuring Cognitive Errors Using the Cognitive Distortions Scale (CDS): Psychometric Properties in Clinical and Non-Clinical Samples

    PubMed Central

    Özdel, Kadir; Taymur, Ibrahim; Guriz, Seher Olga; Tulaci, Riza Gökcer; Kuru, Erkan; Turkcapar, Mehmet Hakan

    2014-01-01

    The Cognitive Distortions Scale was developed to assess thinking errors using case examples in two domains: interpersonal and personal achievement. Although its validity and reliability has been previously demonstrated in non-clinical samples, its psychometric properties and scoring has not yet been evaluated. The aim of the current study was to evaluate the psychometric properties of the Cognitive Distortions Scale in two Turkish samples and to examine the usefulness of the categorical scoring system. A total of 325 individuals (Sample 1 and Sample 2) were enrolled in this study to assess those psychometric properties. Our Sample 1 consisted of 225 individuals working as interns at the Diskapi Yildirim Beyazit Teaching and Research Hospital and Sample 2 consisted of 100 patients diagnosed with depression presenting to the outpatient unit of the same Hospital. Construct validity was assessed using the Beck Depression Inventory, the State Trait Anxiety Inventory, the Dysfunctional Attitude Scale, and the Automatic Thought Questionnaire. Factor analyses supported a one-factor model in these clinical and non-clinical samples. Cronbach's α values were excellent in both the non-clinical and clinical samples (0.933 and 0.918 respectively). Cognitive Distortions Scale scores showed significant correlation with relevant clinical measures. Study Cognitive Distortions Scale scores were stable over a time span of two weeks. This study showed that the Cognitive Distortions Scale is a valid and reliable measure in clinical and non-clinical populations. In addition, it shows that the categorical exists/does not exist scoring system is relevant and could be used in clinical settings. PMID:25170942

  1. A Systematic Review and Psychometric Evaluation of Adaptive Behavior Scales and Recommendations for Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Floyd, Randy G.; Shands, Elizabeth I.; Alfonso, Vincent C.; Phillips, Jessica F.; Autry, Beth K.; Mosteller, Jessica A.; Skinner, Mary; Irby, Sarah

    2015-01-01

    Adaptive behavior scales are vital in assessing children and adolescents who experience a range of disabling conditions in school settings. This article presents the results of an evaluation of the design characteristics, norming, scale characteristics, reliability and validity evidence, and bias identification studies supporting 14…

  2. Development and psychometric evaluation of the FACE-Q satisfaction with appearance scale: a new patient-reported outcome instrument for facial aesthetics patients.

    PubMed

    Pusic, Andrea L; Klassen, Anne F; Scott, Amie M; Cano, Stefan J

    2013-04-01

    Satisfaction with appearance and improved quality of life are key outcomes for patients undergoing facial aesthetic procedures. The FACE-Q is a new patient-reported outcome (PRO) instrument encompassing a suite of independently functioning scales designed to measure a range of important outcomes for facial aesthetics patients. FACE-Q scales were developed with strict adherence to international guidelines for PRO instrument development. This article describes the development and psychometric evaluation of the core FACE-Q scale, the Satisfaction with Facial Appearance scale. Both modern and traditional psychometric methods were used to confirm that this new 10-item scale is a reliable, valid, and responsive measure.

  3. Cultural Adaptation and Psychometric Properties of the Persian Version of the Circumstances, Motivation, and Readiness Scale

    PubMed Central

    Norozi, Ensiyeh; Miri, Mohammad Reza; Soltani, Raheleh; Eslami, Ahmad Ali; Harivandi, Ali Reza; Dastjerdi, Reza

    2016-01-01

    Background Treatment motivation has always been an important issue in substance abuse treatment. In recent decades, several instruments have been developed to measure this concept. Objectives In this study, cultural adaptation and psychometric properties of the Persian version of the circumstances, motivation and readiness scale (CMR) are illustrated in a sample of Iranian addicts. Materials and Methods The translation process followed Beaton et al.’s (2000) guideline for the cross-cultural adaptation of self-administered questionnaires, including the steps of translation, synthesis, back translation, expert committee review, and pre-testing. The final version of the Persian CMR was assessed for internal consistency and construct validity (n = 203). Results There was one eliminated item in the cross-cultural adaptation process. Also, four items that had low correlation with the total score were excluded from the questionnaire during the initial analysis. Using the remaining items, Principle axis factoring with Promax rotation was performed and three factors, circumstance, motivation, and readiness, were identified. The secondary order three factor model provided a good statistical and conceptual fit for the data. Internal consistency met the criterion for a reliable measure (Cronbach’s alpha = 0.840). The α range for these identified factors was 0.597 to 0.837. Conclusions Although the CMR was originally designed for use in TC treatment, this study suggests that it is also applicable, with some modifications, in short-term residential camps. Also, it is concluded that the Persian translation of the CMR can be applied for studies among Persian addicts. PMID:27622165

  4. Psychometric properties of the social phobia and social interaction anxiety scales: evidence of construct equivalence in an African American sample.

    PubMed

    Carter, Michele M; Sbrocco, Tracy; Tang, Dickson; Rekrut, Frances M; Condit, Caitlin

    2014-10-01

    This study evaluated the psychometric properties of the Social Phobia Scale and Social Interaction Anxiety scale in a community sample of African Americans. We conducted a confirmatory factor analysis of the combined scales comparing the data to 2- and 3-factor solutions commonly reported in the literature. The results indicated that neither solution produce an adequate fit to the data in this study. We then proceeded to conduct an exploratory factor analysis within a confirmatory framework of both scales. While we were able to extract a 2-factor solution from the data, the item composition of the factors was somewhat different for African Americans than what is typically reported in non-Hispanic White samples. While we conclude that use of the two social anxiety scales is warranted, we make recommendations regarding the interpretation of both scales with African Americans.

  5. Measuring homonegativity: psychometric analysis of Herek's attitudes toward lesbians and gay men scale (ATLG) in Colombia, South America.

    PubMed

    Moreno, Alexander; Herazo, Edwin; Oviedo, Heidi; Campo-Arias, Adalberto

    2015-01-01

    The empirical study of negative attitudes toward gay and lesbian people (homonegativity) is a way to understand the reason for its prevalence. The aim of this study was to examine the psychometric properties of a Spanish version of the Attitudes Toward Lesbians and gay men scale (ATLG). A total of 359 undergraduate students were recruited from two different cities in Colombia, South America. Participants' attitudes toward gays and lesbian people were assessed using the ATLG Scale and the Homophobia Scale; anxiety was measured using a short version of the Zung Self-Rating Anxiety Scale. Internal consistency analyses have shown that the ATLG Scale is a reliable measure of homonegativity in a Colombian sample. In addition, principal components analyses, as well as convergent and divergent validity analyses have confirmed that the ATLG Scale is a valid and reliable measure of homonegativity in the Colombian context and support its use as a research instrument.

  6. The Jefferson Scale of Attitudes Toward Interprofessional Collaboration (JeffSATIC): development and multi-institution psychometric data.

    PubMed

    Hojat, Mohammadreza; Ward, Julia; Spandorfer, John; Arenson, Christine; Van Winkle, Lon J; Williams, Brett

    2015-05-01

    This study was designed to develop a psychometrically sound instrument to measure attitudes toward interprofessional collaboration in health profession students and practitioners regardless of their professions and areas of practice. Based on a review of the literature a list of 27 items was generated, 12 faculty judged the face validity of the items, and 124 health profession faculty examined the content validity of the items. The preliminary version of the instrument was administered to 1976 health profession students in three universities (Thomas Jefferson University, n = 510; Midwestern University, n = 392; and Monash University, n = 1074). Twenty items that survived the psychometric scrutiny were included in the Jefferson Scale of Attitudes Toward Interprofessional Collaboration (JeffSATIC). Two constructs of "working relationships" and "accountability" emerged from factor analysis of the JeffSATIC. Cronbach's α coefficients for the JeffSATIC ranged from 0.84 to 0.90 in the three samples. Women obtained significantly higher JeffSATIC mean scores than men. Medical students obtained lower mean score on the JeffSATIC than most other health profession students at the same university. Psychometric support from a relatively large sample size of students in a variety of health profession programs in this multi-institutional study is encouraging which adds to the credibility of the JeffSATIC.

  7. Psychometric Properties of the Pain Numeric Rating Scale When Applied to Multiple Body Regions among Professional Musicians

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Background Despite the broad popularity of a numeric rating scale (NRS) its psychometric properties are not well known. The objective was to determine if there is any difference in the discrimination ability of the NRS when used for measuring pain severity separately in different body regions. Methods Cross-sectional survey study of 630 professional musicians. Item Response Theory (IRT) was used to define the psychometric properties of the NRS. Results The discrimination ability of the pain NRS was dependent on the body area to which it was applied. The discrimination was low 0.5 (95% CI 0.4. to 0.7) for the hand region and perfect for the shoulder and upper part of the neck– 3.2 (95% CI 1.2 to 5.2) and 10.5 (95% CI 10.0 to 10.9), respectively. Both shoulder and neck NRSs showed a great shift towards higher levels of pain severity meaning that the ability of the NRS to discriminate low levels of pain is poor. NRS scores obtained from all other regions did not demonstrate any discrimination ability. Conclusions The pain NRS might have different psychometric properties depending on the body area to which it is applied. Overall, the modest discrimination ability of the pain NRS implies that it should be used in screening questionnaires with some reservations. PMID:27603011

  8. Psychometric properties of the child and parent versions of Spence children's anxiety scale in a Danish community and clinical sample.

    PubMed

    Arendt, Kristian; Hougaard, Esben; Thastum, Mikael

    2014-12-01

    This study examined the psychometric properties and norms of the Spence Children's Anxiety Scale (SCAS) and the associated parent version (SCAS-P) in a Danish community and a clinical sample. The total sample consisted of 1240 children (972 from community sample), age 7-17 years, and 805 parents (537 from community sample). Results indicated that SCAS and SCAS-P had good internal consistency on the total scale and all subscales, with exception of the subscale for fear of physical injury. Both scales showed satisfactory 2-week and 3-month retest stability. All subscales and total scales of the SCAS and SCAS-P discriminated between the clinical and community sample. A comparison with the Beck Youth Inventories and the Strength and Difficulty Questionnaire in the clinical sample supported the scales' convergent and divergent validity. Results of confirmatory factor analyses for SCAS and SCAS-P were in favor of the original model with six correlated factors.

  9. Development and psychometric evaluation of scales to measure professional confidence in manual medicine: a Rasch measurement approach

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Health professionals in athletic training, chiropractic, osteopathy, and physiotherapy fields, require high-level knowledge and skills in their assessment and management of patients. This is important when communicating with patients and applying a range of manual procedures. Prior to embarking on professional practice, it is imperative to acquire optimal situation-specific levels of self-confidence for a beginner practitioner in these areas. In order to foster this professional self-confidence within the higher education context, it is necessary to have valid and reliable scales that can measure and track levels and how they change. This study reports on the development and psychometric analysis of two new scales, Patient Communication Confidence Scale (PCCS) and the Clinical Skills Confidence Scale (CSCS), to measure confidence in these two areas for students in manual medicine programs. The Rasch measurement model was used to guide the development of the scales and establish their psychometric properties. Methods The responses to 269 returned questionnaires over two occasions were submitted to psychometric analysis, with various aspects of the scales examined including: item thresholds; item fit; Differential Item Functioning; targeting; item locations; item dependencies; and reliability. To provide further evidence of validity, scores were correlated with two existing valid scales. Results Analyses showed that the scales provided valid and reliable measures of confidence for this sample of persons. High Person Separation Indices (0.96 for PCCS; 0.93 for SCSC) provided statistical evidence of reliability, meaning the scales are able to discriminate amongst persons with different levels of confidence. For the PCCS, item categories were operating as required, and for the CSCS only two items’ thresholds were slightly disordered. Three tests of fit revealed good fit to the model (indicating the internal consistency of both scales) and results of the

  10. Psychometric Reanalysis of Happiness, Temperament, and Spirituality Scales with Children in Faith-Based Elementary Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cleveland, Richard E.

    2014-01-01

    This dissertation performed an investigation of the psychometric properties of six instruments used in the 2012 Happiness Project research study. The project revisited the 2010 study conducted by Holder, Coleman, and Wallace. Holder et al. (2010) investigated the relationships among variables relating to student happiness and spirituality while…

  11. A review of the psychometric properties of the Health of the Nation Outcome Scales (HoNOS) family of measures

    PubMed Central

    Pirkis, Jane E; Burgess, Philip M; Kirk, Pia K; Dodson, Sarity; Coombs, Tim J; Williamson, Michelle K

    2005-01-01

    Background The Health of the Nation Outcome Scales was developed to routinely measure outcomes for adults with mental illness. Comparable instruments were also developed for children and adolescents (the Health of the Nation Outcome Scales for Children and Adolescents) and older people (the Health of the Nation Outcome Scales 65+). All three are being widely used as outcome measures in the United Kingdom, Australia and New Zealand. There is, however, no comprehensive review of these instruments. This paper fills this gap by reviewing the psychometric properties of each. Method Articles and reports relating to the instruments were retrieved, and their findings synthesised to assess the instruments' validity (content, construct, concurrent, predictive), reliability (test-retest, inter-rater), sensitivity to change, and feasibility/utility. Results Mostly, the instruments perform adequately or better on most dimensions, although some of their psychometric properties warrant closer examination. Conclusion Collectively, the Health of the Nation Outcome Scales family of measures can assess outcomes for different groups on a range of mental health-related constructs, and can be regarded as appropriate for routinely monitoring outcomes. PMID:16313678

  12. Nursing students' attitudes toward mental health nursing and consumers: psychometric properties of a self-report scale.

    PubMed

    Hayman-White, Karla; Happell, Brenda

    2005-08-01

    There is a paucity of measures suitable for assessing the impact of educational and clinical placement strategies on nursing students' career preferences and attitudes toward mental health nursing and consumers of mental health services. Information derived from such scales could be used to improve existing recruitment strategies to this specialty area and identify misperceptions held by individuals joining the health care workforce. This article details the psychometric properties of a self-report scale designed to assess (1) preparedness for the mental health field, (2) attitudes toward mental illness and consumers of mental health services, and (3) attitudes toward mental health nursing, including career preferences. Results are based on data from a large Victorian study that explored the attitudes of 802 nursing students before their clinical placement in the mental health field. Principal components analysis with oblique rotation was used to identify the number and composition of components composing the newly developed scale. Results indicated seven components composed of relatively homogenous items; most items were good to excellent measures of each component. Cronbach alpha values indicated acceptable internal consistency of items composing four of the suggested components. Overall, findings indicated that the self-report scale is a useful instrument with acceptable psychometric properties. Descriptive and correlational analyses emphasized the importance of educational preparation preplacement and highlighted the potential for educational strategies to improve recruitment via improved attitudes and preparedness.

  13. A Pilot Psychometric Study on the Validation of the Older Women’s Non-Medical Stress Scale (OWN-MSS) on an Ethnically Diverse Sample

    PubMed Central

    Laganà, Luciana; Prilutsky, Roxanne R.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Older women often experience various types of stressors, including the death of a spouse and associated financial stress (often with a lack of social support), emotional stress due to factors such as caregiving and being single, and the challenges of the aging process. These circumstances could produce or aggravate anxious symptomatology that can in turn compound the negative effects of aging. A brief scale of perceived stress that is not confounded with health status and covers multiple culturally relevant potential stressors is needed for quick use in busy medical settings. Aim To assess the reliability and the validity of an original stress scale designed to measure perceptions of stress beyond health status in a non-clinical convenience sample of community-dwelling older women. Method In this cross-sectional pilot investigation, via conducting item-total correlations and correlational tests of validity, we studied the psychometric properties of our measure using data from volunteer older subjects (mainly low-income and from non-Caucasian backgrounds). The domains covered by the nine items of the tool were selected based on a literature review of common stressors experienced by older adults, especially by older women. Data were collected face-to-face using a demographic list, a well-established depression measure, a brief posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) screener, and our 9-item stress tool. Primary outcomes: reliability and validity of the scale of older women’s non-medical stress. Secondary outcomes: demographic characteristics of the sample and correlations between stress items. Results Based on our sample of older women (N=40, mean age 71 years), good internal consistency between the items of the stress scale was found (Cronbach’s a=.66). The findings of the data analyses also revealed that our psychometric tool has good convergent validity with the PTSD screener (r=.53). Moreover, in contrast with most other stress tools, it has strong

  14. [Psychometric properties of a Multidimensional Scale of Social Expression to assess social skills in the Internet context].

    PubMed

    Carballo, José L; Pérez-Jover, Ma Virtudes; Espada, José P; Orgilés, Mireia; Piqueras, José Antonio

    2012-02-01

    The increase in the use of New Technologies in social relationships could be generating a new paradigm in social skills. Valid and reliable instruments to assess these changes are needed. The aim of this study is to analyze the psychometric properties of the Multidimensional Scale of Social Expression (EMES) in the assessment of social skills on the Internet and Social Networks. A total of 413 college students from the province of Alicante participated on this study. The scale was applied according to two contexts: Real and Internet/Virtual. High internal consistency was shown. The 12-factor structure found for the Virtual Context scale is similar to that of the original study. The scale had shown to be a good predictor of hours of Internet use. In conclusion, EMES-C is useful for assessing real context and Internet context social skills.

  15. Korean Patient-Perceived Satisfaction Scale of Community-Based Case Management Services (Korean-PSCCM): Development and Psychometric Evaluation.

    PubMed

    Park, Claire Su-Yeon; Yoon, Saunjoo L; Yun, Soon-Nyung; Park, Eunok

    2017-01-01

    This study aimed to develop and psychometrically test an instrument for measuring patient-perceived satisfaction with community-based case management services in Korea. The study was conducted in 4 phases: Phase I, development of the instrument; Phase II, pilot testing of the instrument; Phase III, a large-scale study to test reliability and validity; and Phase IV, conversion of the new instrument from Korean to English. The new instrument was determined to have six factors-advocacy of case manager, outcome of care, communication skills, practice of a healthy lifestyle, referral, and recognition of risk factors-and also shown to be reliable.

  16. Assessing Patient Attitudes to Computerized Screening in Primary Care: Psychometric Properties of the Computerized Lifestyle Assessment Scale

    PubMed Central

    Hogg-Johnson, Sheilah; Skinner, Harvey A

    2008-01-01

    Background Computer-based health-risk assessments are electronic surveys which can be completed by patients privately, for example during their waiting time in a clinic, generating a risk report for the clinician and a recommendation sheet for the patient at the point of care. Despite increasing popularity of such computer-based health-risk assessments, patient attitudes toward such tools are rarely evaluated by reliable and valid scales. The lack of psychometric appraisal of appropriate scales is an obstacle to advancing the field. Objective This study evaluated the psychometric properties of a 14-item Computerized Lifestyle Assessment Scale (CLAS). Methods Out of 212 female patients receiving the study information at a family practice clinic, 202 completed a paper questionnaire, for a response rate of 97.6%. After 2 weeks, 52 patients completed the scale a second time. Results Principal component analysis revealed that CLAS is a multidimensional scale consisting of four subscales (factors): (1) Benefits: patient-perceived benefits toward the quality of medical consultation and means of achieving them, (2) Privacy-Barrier: concerns about information privacy, (3) Interaction-Barrier: concerns about potential interference in their interaction with the physician, and (4) Interest: patient interest in computer-assisted health assessments. Each subscale had good internal consistency reliability ranging from .50 (2-item scale) to .85 (6-item scale). The study also provided evidence of scale stability over time with intraclass correlation coefficients of .91, .82, .86, and .67 for the four subscales, respectively. Construct validity was supported by concurrent hypotheses testing. Conclusions The CLAS is a promising approach for evaluating patients’ attitudes toward computer-based health-risk assessments. PMID:18440918

  17. Psychometric properties of the Spanish version of the UPPS-P Impulsive Behavior Scale: A Rasch rating scale analysis and confirmatory factor analysis.

    PubMed

    Pilatti, Angelina; Lozano, Oscar M; Cyders, Melissa A

    2015-12-01

    The present study was aimed at determining the psychometric properties of the Spanish version of the UPPS-P Impulsive Behavior Scale in a sample of college students. Participants were 318 college students (36.2% men; mean age = 20.9 years, SD = 6.4 years). The psychometric properties of this Spanish version were analyzed using the Rasch model, and the factor structure was examined using confirmatory factor analysis. The verification of the global fit of the data showed adequate indexes for persons and items. The reliability estimates were high for both items and persons. Differential item functioning across gender was found for 23 items, which likely reflects known differences in impulsivity levels between men and women. The factor structure of the Spanish version of the UPPS-P replicates previous work with the original UPPS-P Scale. Overall, results suggest that test scores from the Spanish version of the UPPS-P show adequate psychometric properties to accurately assess the multidimensional model of impulsivity, which represents the most exhaustive measure of this construct.

  18. Investigating the psychometric properties of the Jefferson Scale of Physician Empathy in a sample of Malaysian medical students

    PubMed Central

    Spasenoska, Marija; Costello, Shane; Williams, Brett

    2016-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this present study was to investigate the psychometric properties of the Jefferson Scale of Physician Empathy – student version (JSPE-S). Subjects and methods This study recruited 193 Malaysian medical students enrolled in year one and year two studies. A principal-component analysis with Varimax rotation was conducted. Procrustes rotation was used to confirm the item to model fit, which allows for a comparison of actual structure against an ideal hypothesized structure. Items were systematically removed based on low communalities of < 0.3 and poor loading of items onto components. Results A two-component solution was found, comprised of “perspective taking” and “compassionate care”. Following item removal, eleven items remained. A Procrustes analysis revealed that this eleven-item measure demonstrated an excellent model fit. A possible third component was identified, though is not recommended for use, due to construct underrepresentation. Conclusion This study found the Jefferson Scale of Physician Empathy fitted best to a two-component model using eleven items. Item, component, and overall congruence were very high, and scale reliabilities were adequate. The results of this study suggest that the eleven-item, two-component solution demonstrates excellent psychometric properties and structural validity in a Malaysian medical student population. Future research could consider using the short eleven-item measure in both student and health care profession samples to investigate the role of empathy in health care. PMID:27350763

  19. Psychometric properties of the Jefferson Scale of Empathy-Health Professional Student's version: An Italian validation study with nursing students.

    PubMed

    Montanari, Paola; Petrucci, Cristina; Russo, Silvia; Murray, Ian; Dimonte, Valerio; Lancia, Loreto

    2015-12-01

    This methodological study was conducted to test the psychometric properties of the Jefferson Scale of Empathy-Health Professional Student's version (JSE-HPS), in a convenience sample of 797 Italian nursing students and to describe their empathic engagement. Data were subjected to exploratory and confirmatory factor analysis, test-retest, correlation analysis, t-test, and analysis of variance method. Principal component factor extraction with Oblimin rotation on the first half of the sample was conducted. The analysis suggested a three-factor solution for 14 items: "compassionate care/emotional engagement," "perspective-taking," and "standing in the patient's shoes." Confirmatory factor analysis on the second half of the sample showed good fit indexes for the 14-item solution, indicated by the exploratory factor analysis, and the 20 item solution of the scale, with the exception of one item. Test-retest correlation was 0.50 (P < 0.001) for the overall scale. Results from group comparisons and correlations are also provided and discussed. The Italian version of the JSE-HPS is a psychometrically sound tool. The translated 20-item solution is also suitable to carry out cross-cultural comparisons.

  20. The Child PTSD Symptom Scale: Psychometric Properties in Female Adolescent Sexual Assault Survivors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gillihan, Seth J.; Aderka, Idan M.; Conklin, Phoebe H.; Capaldi, Sandra; Foa, Edna B.

    2013-01-01

    Traumatic experiences are common among youths and can lead to posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). In order to identify traumatized children who need PTSD treatment, instruments that can accurately and efficiently evaluate pediatric PTSD are needed. One such measure is the Child PTSD Symptom Scale (CPSS), which has been found to be a reliable and…

  1. Measuring workplace trauma response in Australian paramedics: an investigation into the psychometric properties of the Impact of Event Scale

    PubMed Central

    Hogan, Nicola; Costello, Shane; Boyle, Malcolm; Williams, Brett

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Investigation into the psychological effects of violence toward health care workers and its associated trauma is increasing. The Impact of Event Scale (IES) provides a measure of current, subjective, emotional distress symptomatic of a specific traumatic event. However, its validity among paramedics is largely unknown. Problem The purpose of this study was to investigate the psychometric properties and factor structure of the IES with a sample of Australian paramedics. Methods The study aimed to investigate the psychometric properties and factor structure of the 15-item IES with a sample of Australian paramedics using Exploratory Factor Analysis with model fit statistics as found in confirmatory analysis. Results Maximum Likelihood Factor Analysis with Varimax rotation supported the hypothesis that a two-factor solution would provide the best fit of the data. Procrustes rotation provided further support for this hypothesis indicating that the factors, labeled “Intrusion” and “Avoidance”, as well as the individual items of the 12-item final model, were a good fit to an ideal solution. Conclusion The revision of the scale has improved its validity for use in the general population of paramedics, improving the potential for its use in trauma-related research. PMID:26719731

  2. Evaluating the psychometric properties of the Interpersonal Needs Questionnaire and the Acquired Capability for Suicide Scale in military veterans.

    PubMed

    Gutierrez, Peter M; Pease, James; Matarazzo, Bridget B; Monteith, Lindsey L; Hernandez, Theresa; Osman, Augustine

    2016-12-01

    Joiner's (2005) interpersonal-psychological theory of suicide (IPTS) has become one of the most frequently studied in the field. Currently there are 2 primary measures designed to assess the 3 main constructs of the theory-the Interpersonal Needs Questionnaire (INQ; Van Orden, Witte, Gordon, Bender, & Joiner, 2008) and the Acquired Capability for Suicide Scale (ACSS; Van Orden et al., 2008). The psychometric properties of these 2 measures were evaluated in a sample of 477 U.S. military veterans. It was determined that the factor structure for both measures is consistent with the underlying theory and that all internal consistency reliability estimates are good. Acceptable convergent validity was found for the INQ, but not for the ACSS. Recommendations for refining the ACSS based on the results of the current analyses are provided. Comparisons of scale performance were made with data from participants with and without a history of 1 or more suicide attempts. Burdensomeness alone and the interaction between thwarted belongingness and burdensomeness were associated with prior suicide attempts. In conclusion, although some refinement may improve performance of the ACSS, both measures are appropriate and psychometrically sound for use in research and clinical applications with veterans of the U.S. military. (PsycINFO Database Record

  3. The life closure scale: additional psychometric testing of a tool to measure psychological adaptation in death and dying.

    PubMed

    Dobratz, Marjorie C

    2004-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to conduct additional psychometric testing on an instrument designed to measure psychological adaptation in end-of-life populations across a wide spectrum of terminal illnesses. A sample of 20 participants completed initial testing of the Life Closure Scale (LCS); however, its usefulness was limited by the small sample size. A larger sample of 113 home hospice individuals who met established criteria and who gave informed consent completed the 27-item LCS for additional psychometric testing. Cronbach's alphas and correlation coefficients were computed, and factor analysis was conducted to establish internal consistency reliability, theoretical clarity, and criterion-related validity. The number of scale items was reduced to 20, with a total alpha of.87. Cronbach's alphas for the two subscales were.80 (self-reconciled) and.82 (self-restructuring). Item-total correlations for the subscales ranged from a low of.37 to a high of.68, with confirmatory factor analysis yielding two loadings. These findings lend credence to the usefulness of the LCS in measuring psychological adaptation in dying persons.

  4. A New Look at the Psychometrics of the Parenting Scale through the Lens of Item Response Theory

    PubMed Central

    Lorber, Michael F.; Xu, Shu; Smith Slep, Amy M.; Bulling, Lisanne; O'Leary, Susan G.

    2015-01-01

    The psychometrics of the Parenting Scale's Overreactivity and Laxness subscales were evaluated using item response theory (IRT) techniques. The IRT analyses were based on two community samples of cohabiting parents of 3- to 8-year-old children, combined to yield an N of 852 families. The results supported the utility of the Overreactivity and Laxness subscales, particularly in discriminating among parents in the mid to upper reaches of each construct. The original versions of the Overreactivity and Laxness subscales were more reliable than alternative, shorter versions identified in replicated factor analyses from previously published research and in IRT analyses in the present research. Moreover, in several cases, the original versions of these subscales, in comparison with the shortened versions, exhibited greater six-month stabilities and correlations with child externalizing behavior and couple relationship satisfaction. Reliability was greater for the Laxness than for the Overreactivity subscale. Item performance on each subscale was highly variable. Together, the present findings are generally supportive of the psychometrics of the Parenting Scale, particularly for clinical research and practice. They also suggest areas for further development. PMID:24828855

  5. A new look at the psychometrics of the parenting scale through the lens of item response theory.

    PubMed

    Lorber, Michael F; Xu, Shu; Slep, Amy M Smith; Bulling, Lisanne; O'Leary, Susan G

    2014-01-01

    The psychometrics of the Parenting Scale's Overreactivity and Laxness subscales were evaluated using item response theory (IRT) techniques. The IRT analyses were based on 2 community samples of cohabiting parents of 3- to 8-year-old children, combined to yield a total sample size of 852 families. The results supported the utility of the Overreactivity and Laxness subscales, particularly in discriminating among parents in the mid to upper reaches of each construct. The original versions of the Overreactivity and Laxness subscales were more reliable than alternative, shorter versions identified in replicated factor analyses from previously published research and in IRT analyses in the present research. Moreover, in several cases, the original versions of these subscales, in comparison with the shortened versions, exhibited greater 6-month stabilities and correlations with child externalizing behavior and couple relationship satisfaction. Reliability was greater for the Laxness than for the Overreactivity subscale. Item performance on each subscale was highly variable. Together, the present findings are generally supportive of the psychometrics of the Parenting Scale, particularly for clinical research and practice. They also suggest areas for further development.

  6. A psychometric analysis of the Revised Child Anxiety and Depression Scales--parent version in a school sample.

    PubMed

    Ebesutani, Chad; Chorpita, Bruce F; Higa-McMillan, Charmaine K; Nakamura, Brad J; Regan, Jennifer; Lynch, Roxanna E

    2011-02-01

    The Revised Child Anxiety and Depression Scale-Parent Version (RCADS-P) is a parent-report questionnaire of youth anxiety and depression with scales corresponding to the DSM diagnoses of separation anxiety disorder, social phobia, generalized anxiety disorder, panic disorder, obsessive-compulsive disorder, and major depressive disorder. The RCADS-P was recently developed and has previously demonstrated strong psychometric properties in a clinic-referred sample (Ebesutani et al., Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology 38, 249-260, 2010b). The present study examined the psychometric properties of the RCADS-P in a school-based population. As completed by parents of 967 children and adolescents, the RCADS-P demonstrated high internal consistency, test-retest reliability, and good convergent/divergent validity, supporting the RCADS-P as a measure of internalizing problems specific to depression and five anxiety disorders in school samples. Normative data are also reported to allow for the derivation of T-scores to enhance clinicians' ability to make classification decisions using RCADS-P subscale scores.

  7. Psychometric properties of the Japanese CES-D, SDS, and PHQ-9 depression scales in university students.

    PubMed

    Umegaki, Yusuke; Todo, Naoya

    2017-03-01

    We used an item response theory (IRT) model to simultaneously compare the psychometric properties of 3 commonly used self-report depression scales translated into Japanese-the Zung Self-Rating Depression Scale (SDS), the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale (CES-D), and the Patient Health Questionnaire Depression Scale (PHQ-9)-in a Japanese university student sample. Although the 3 scales were likely to measure the same underlying construct-that is, depression-the choices of the negatively worded items in the SDS and CES-D did not function well. The CES-D provided more information than the other scales at the range of depression severity approximately from the mean through 2 standard deviations above the mean, while the PHQ-9 provided more information for the other degrees of depression. The PHQ-9 performed better as a whole, as it provided more information than the other scales on the broadest range of depression severity, and it did not contain items with inefficient choices. The CES-D may also be a good choice when sampling students with elevated levels of depressive symptoms. Finally, we linked the 3 instruments on a common scale using parameters derived from IRT analysis, and we provided a crosswalk table to enable the conversion of each scale score. (PsycINFO Database Record

  8. A systematic review of the psychometric properties of self-reported scales assessing burn contractures reveals the need for a new tool to measure contracture outcomes.

    PubMed

    Ehanire, Tosan; Vissoci, Joao Ricardo Nickenig; Slaughter, Keimun; Coêlho, Rafael; Bond, Jennifer; Rodrigues, Clarissa; Pietrobon, Ricardo; Levinson, Howard

    2013-01-01

    Approximately 40% of burn patients develop scar contractures. It is unknown which scar contracture therapy best optimizes activities of daily living (ADL).The appropriateness of self-reported outcome tools in measuring anti-scar contracture therapies has not been assessed. We conducted a systematic review to determine the quality of existing self-reported scales in measuring ADL among burn patients by analyzing and comparing psychometric properties-factor analysis, validity, reliability, and responsiveness. EMBASE, LILACS, American Psychological Association PsycNET databases were searched for relevant articles. Forty-one articles discussing 10 burn and non-burn-specific scales met eligibility criteria of ADL assessment, and available psychometric analyses. A common strength in most scales was good overall reliability. Common weaknesses were insufficient data on factor analyses, content validity specific to ADL assessment, and responsiveness. The psychometric analyses studies on these scales had poor sample variability. There is insufficient data on the dimensionality and responsiveness of existing scales to support their use for measuring ADL in burn patients. Existing scales do not comprehensively measure ADLs as an isolated parameter. A psychometrically valid, comprehensive self-reported burn contracture scale that measures ADLs among a diverse group of burn patients needs to be developed to optimize burn contracture treatments and develop new therapies.

  9. Psychometric Evaluation of the Filipino Versions of the Duke University Religion Index and the Spiritual Coping Strategies Scale in Filipino Hemodialysis Patients.

    PubMed

    Cruz, Jonas Preposi; Reyes, Ralph Warren P; Colet, Paolo C; Estacio, Joel C; Caldeira, Sílvia; Vitorino, Luciano Magalhães; Koenig, Harold G

    2017-01-04

    This study evaluated the psychometric properties of the Filipino versions of the Duke University Religion Index (DUREL-F) and the Spiritual Coping Strategies scale (SCS-F) for hemodialysis (HD) patients in the Philippines. A convenient sample of 162 HD patients was included in this descriptive, cross-sectional study. The DUREL-F and SCS-F exhibited acceptable internal consistency and stability reliability, as well as excellent content and construct validity. The findings confirmed the soundness of the psychometric properties of the two scales. Thus, they can be used for timely and accurate assessment of religiosity and spiritual coping utilization among Filipino patients receiving HD.

  10. Psychometric Properties of the Dutch Depression Stigma Scale (DSS) and Associations with Personal and Perceived Stigma in a Depressed and Community Sample

    PubMed Central

    Cuijpers, P.; Griffiths, K. M.; Kleiboer, A. M.

    2016-01-01

    Background Research on depression stigma is needed to gain more insight into the underlying construct and to reduce the level of stigma in the community. However, few validated measurements of depression stigma are available in the Netherlands. Therefore, this study first sought to examine the psychometric properties of the Dutch translation of the Depression Stigma Scale (DSS). Second, we examined which demographic (gender, age, education, partner status) and other variables (anxiety and knowledge of depression) are associated with personal and perceived stigma within these samples. Methods The study population consisted of an adult convenience sample (n = 253) (study 1) and a community adult sample with elevated depressive symptoms (n = 264) (study 2). Factor structure, internal consistency, and validity were assessed. The associations between stigma, demographic variables and anxiety level were examined with regression analyses. Results Confirmatory factor analysis supported the validity and internal consistency of the DSS personal stigma scale. Internal consistency was sufficient (Cronbach’s alpha = .70 (study 1) and .77 (study 2)). The results regarding the perceived stigma scale revealed no clear factor structure. Regression analyses showed that personal stigma was higher in younger people, those with no experience with depression, and those with lower education. Conclusions This study established the validity and internal consistency of the DSS personal scale in the Netherlands, in a community sample and in people with elevated depressive symptoms. However, additional research is needed to examine the factor structure of the DSS perceived scale and its use in other samples. PMID:27500969

  11. Examining Individual Differences in Interpersonal Influence: On the Psychometric Properties of the Generalized Opinion Leadership Scale (GOLS).

    PubMed

    Batinic, Bernad; Appel, Markus; Gnambs, Timo

    2016-01-01

    Opinion leadership describes an individual's tendency to informally influence others' attitudes and overt behaviors. In contrast to contemporary views of opinion leadership as a highly domain-specific trait, this paper introduces a multi-faceted personality trait, generalized opinion leadership (GOL) that characterizes exceptionally influential individuals independent of a specific subject area. Two studies report on the psychometric properties of a scale to assess GOL. Study 1 is based on three independent samples (N = 1,575, N = 1,275, and N = 231) and demonstrates the factorial structure of the instrument and its measurement invariance across sex, age, and educational levels. Study 2 (N = 310) analyzes multitrait-multiinformant data to highlight the scale's discriminant validity with regard to innovativeness and trendsetting.

  12. Measuring the Youth Bullying Experience: A Systematic Review of the Psychometric Properties of Available Instruments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vessey, Judith; Strout, Tania D.; DiFazio, Rachel L.; Walker, Allison

    2014-01-01

    Background: Bullying is a significant problem in schools and measuring this concept remains problematic. The purposes of this study were to (1) identify the published self-report measures developed to assess youth bullying; (2) evaluate their psychometric properties and instrument characteristics; and (3) evaluate the quality of identified…

  13. Evaluation of Psychometric Properties of the Malay Version Perceived Stress Scale in Two Occupational Settings In Malaysia

    PubMed Central

    Al-Dubai, SAR; Ganasegeran, K; Barua, A; Rizal, AM; Rampal, KG

    2014-01-01

    Background: The 10-item version of Perceived Stress Scale (PSS-10) is a widely used tool to measure stress. The Malay version of the PSS-10 has been validated among Malaysian Medical Students. However, studies have not been conducted to assess its validity in occupational settings. Aim: The aim of this study is to assess the psychometric properties of the Malay version of the PSS-10 in two occupational setting in Malaysia. Subjects and Methods: This study was conducted among 191 medical residents and 513 railway workers. An exploratory factor analysis was performed using the principal component method with varimax rotation. Correlation analyses, Kaiser-Meyer-Olkin, Bartlett's test of Sphericity and Cronbach's alpha were obtained. Statistical analysis was carried out using statistical package for the social sciences version 16 (SPSS, Chicago, IL, USA) software. Results: Analysis yielded two factor structure of the Malay version of PSS-10 in both occupational groups. The two factors accounted for 59.2% and 64.8% of the variance in the medical residents and the railway workers respectively. Factor loadings were greater than 0.59 in both occupational groups. Cronbach's alpha co-efficient was 0.70 for medical residents and 0.71 for railway workers. Conclusion: The Malay version of PSS-10 had adequate psychometric properties and can be used to measure stress among occupational settings in Malaysia. PMID:25184074

  14. Fearlessness about Death: The psychometric properties and construct validity of the revision to the Acquired Capability for Suicide Scale

    PubMed Central

    Ribeiro, Jessica D.; Witte, Tracy K.; Van Orden, Kimberly A.; Selby, Edward A.; Gordon, Kathryn H.; Bender, Theodore W.; Joiner, Thomas E.

    2014-01-01

    The Interpersonal Theory of Suicide proposes that suicidal behavior is so frightening that in order for an individual to engage in suicidal behavior, desire for suicide must be accompanied by the capability to do so. The capability for suicide is characterized by both a sense of fearlessness about death and elevated physiological pain tolerance. The primary aim of the current project was to reevaluate and revise the Acquired Capability for Suicide Scale (ACSS) and offer a revision to the scale. Expert review of the scale items resulted in retaining seven items assessing fearlessness about death. The recommendation is made to refer to the revised scale as the ACSS-Fearlessness about Death (ACSS-FAD) to reflect its content more specifically. A model with the 7 retained items provided good fit to the data across three independent samples of young adults. Multiple group analyses examining measurement invariance across men and women found that the latent structure of the scale is comparable across gender. Data are also presented demonstrating convergent and discriminant validity for the scale in young adults and an inpatient psychiatric sample. Findings support the viability of the ACSS-FAD, indicating the scale has a replicable factor structure that generalizes across males and females and is substantively related to the construct of fearlessness about death. Taken together, the present work extends our knowledge of the psychometrics of the ACSS-FAD in particular and the nature of fearlessness about death in general. PMID:24274043

  15. Scale Development and Psychometrics for Parents’ Satisfaction with Developmental Care in Neonatal Intensive Care Unit

    PubMed Central

    RAFIEY, Hassan; SOLEIMANI, Farin; TORKZAHRANI, Shahnaz; SALAVATI, Mahyar; NASIRI, Malihe

    2016-01-01

    Objective Developmental care comprises a wide range of medical and nursing interventions used in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) to mitigate and reduce stressors affecting preterm or ill neonates. Because patient satisfaction survey is a valuable quality improvement tool, we aimed to develop and test the psychometric properties of a tool for measuring parent satisfaction of developmental care in the NICU. Materials &Methods In this psychometric methodological study, the item pool and initial questionnaire were designed based on a comprehensive literature review and exploring NICU parent satisfaction questionnaires. The validity of the designed questionnaire was determined using face, content (qualitative and quantitative), and construct validity. Exploratory factor analysis was performed using responses from 400 parents of infants hospitalized in the NICUs of 34 hospitals in 2015 in Tehran, Iran. The reliability of the questionnaire was identified using Cronbach’s alpha and stability measures. Results The initial questionnaire was designed with 72 items in five domains. After testing the face validity, 3 items were omitted. The results of validity testing were acceptable. The exploratory factor analysis was performed on 69 items, and 5 factors (care and treatment with 20 items, information with 15 items, hospital facilities with 9 items, parental education with 7 items, and parental participation with 8 items) were extracted. The reliability was supported by high internal consistency (α = 0.92). Conclusion This questionnaire could be valid and reliable tool for measuring parents’ satisfaction. PMID:27843462

  16. Development and Psychometric Testing of the Caregiver Communication Competence Scale in Patients With Dementia.

    PubMed

    Chao, Hui-Chen; Yang, Ya-Ping; Huang, Mei-Chih; Wang, Jing-Jy

    2016-01-01

    Appropriate communication skills are essential for understanding patient needs, particularly those of patients with dementia. Assessing health care providers' competence in communicating with patients with dementia is critical for planning a communication education program. However, no formally established scale can be used. The purpose of the current study was to develop a valid and reliable instrument for determining the communication competence of health care providers with patients with dementia. Through use of a literature review and previous clinical experience, an initial 28-item scale was developed to assess the frequency of use of each item by health care providers. Fourteen items were extracted and three factors were distinguished. Results indicated that the internal consistency reliability of the 14-item scale was 0.84. Favorable convergent and discriminant validities were reached. The communication competence scale provides administrators or educators with a useful tool for assessing communication competence of health care providers when interacting with patients with dementia so a suitable education program can be planned and implemented.

  17. Validation of the ostracism experience scale for adolescents.

    PubMed

    Gilman, Rich; Carter-Sowell, Adrienne; Dewall, C Nathan; Adams, Ryan E; Carboni, Inga

    2013-06-01

    This study validates a new self-report measure, the Ostracism Experience Scale for Adolescents (OES-A). Nineteen items were tested on a sample of 876 high school seniors to assess 2 of the most common ostracism experiences: being actively excluded from the peer group and being largely ignored by others. Exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses, bivariate correlations, and hierarchical regression provided support for the construct validity of the measure. The findings provided psychometric support for the OES-A, which could be used in research into the nature and correlates of social ostracism among older adolescents when a brief self-report measure is needed. Further, the OES-A may help determine how social ostracism subtypes differentially predict health-compromising behaviors later in development, as well as factors that protect against the most pernicious effects of ostracism.

  18. M-Learning: A Psychometric Study of the Mobile Learning Perception Scale and the Relationships between Teachers' Perceptions and School Level

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roche, Allyn J.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to evaluate the psychometric properties of Uzunboylu and Ozdamli (2011) Mobile Learning Perception Scale (MLPS) in order to determine whether it was an acceptable instrument to measure U.S. teachers' perception of mobile learning (m-learning) in the classroom. A second purpose was to determine if relationships…

  19. A Closer Look at the Psychometric Properties of the Revised Children's Manifest Anxiety Scale-Second Edition among U.S. Elementary and Secondary School Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lowe, Patricia A.

    2014-01-01

    The psychometric properties of the Revised Children's Manifest Anxiety Scale-Second Edition (RCMAS-2) were examined in a sample of 1,003 U.S. elementary and secondary students in Grades 2 to 12. Confirmatory factor analyses (CFAs) were performed comparing the five-factor (target) model consisting of three anxiety (Physiological Anxiety, Social…

  20. Career Adapt-Abilities Scale in a French-Speaking Swiss Sample: Psychometric Properties and Relationships to Personality and Work Engagement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rossier, Jerome; Zecca, Gregory; Stauffer, Sarah D.; Maggiori, Christian; Dauwalder, Jean-Pierre

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the psychometric properties of the Career Adapt-Abilities Scale (CAAS) in a French-speaking Swiss sample and its relationship with personality dimensions and work engagement. The heterogeneous sample of 391 participants (M[subscript age] = 39.59, SD = 12.30) completed the CAAS-International and a short version…

  1. Measuring Adolescent Life Satisfaction: Psychometric Properties of the Satisfaction With Life Scale in a Sample of Italian Adolescents and Young Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Di Fabio, Annamaria; Gori, Alessio

    2016-01-01

    This study examined the factor structure and the psychometric properties of the Satisfaction With Life Scale (SWLS) in a sample of 1,515 Italian (females = 60.26%, males = 39.74%) adolescents and young adults (M[subscript age] = 17.6 years, SD = 1.21). Results confirmed the unidimensionality, good reliability, and concurrent validity of the…

  2. Attachment in Adults with Intellectual Disabilities: Preliminary Investigation of the Psychometric Properties of the Manchester Attachment Scale-Third Party Observational Measure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Penketh, Victoria; Hare, Dougal Julian; Flood, Andrea; Walker, Samantha

    2014-01-01

    Background: The Manchester Attachment Scale-Third party observational measure (MAST) was developed to assess secure attachment style for adults with intellectual disabilities. The psychometric properties of the MAST were examined. Materials and Methods: Professional carers (N = 40) completed the MAST and measures related to the construct of…

  3. Score Reliability and Validity of the Student Risk Screening Scale: A Psychometrically Sound, Feasible Tool for Use in Urban Middle Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lane, Kathleen Lynne; Bruhn, Allison L.; Eisner, Shanna L.; Kalberg, Jemma Robertson

    2010-01-01

    In this article, the authors examine the psychometric properties of the "Student Risk Screening Scale" (SRSS) for use in urban middle schools. Results of Studies 1 and 2 suggest strong internal consistency and test-retest stability. Study 1 supports the predictive validity of the SRSS, with students at low risk being able to be differentiated from…

  4. Computerized and Paper-and-Pencil Versions of the Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale: A Comparison of Psychometric Features and Respondent Preferences.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vispoel, Walter P.; Boo, Jaeyool; Bleiler, Timothy

    2001-01-01

    Evaluated the characteristics of computerized and paper-and-pencil versions of the Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale (SES) using scores for 224 college students. Results show that mode of administration has little effect on the psychometric properties of the SES although the computerized version took longer and was preferred by examinees. (SLD)

  5. Psychometric evaluation of the Korean Version of the Self-Efficacy for Exercise Scale for older adults.

    PubMed

    Choi, Mona; Ahn, Sangwoo; Jung, Dukyoo

    2015-01-01

    We evaluated the psychometric properties of the Korean version of the Self-Efficacy for Exercise Scale (SEE-K). The SEE-K consists of nine items and was translated into Korean using the forward-backward translation method. We administered it to 212 community-dwelling older adults along with measures of outcome expectation for exercise, quality of life, and physical activity. The validity was determined using confirmatory factor analysis and Rasch analysis with INFIT and OUTFIT statistics, which showed acceptable model fit. The concurrent validity was confirmed according to positive correlations between the SEE-K, outcome expectation for exercise, and quality of life. Furthermore, the high physical activity group had higher SEE-K scores. Finally, the reliability of the SEE-K was deemed acceptable based on Cronbach's alpha, coefficients of determination, and person and item separation indices with reliability. Thus, the SEE-K appears to have satisfactory validity and reliability among older adults in South Korea.

  6. Analysis of the psychometric properties of the Spanish version of the Trait Meta-Mood Scale in a sports context.

    PubMed

    Martín-Albo, José; Núñez, Juan L; León, Jaime

    2010-04-01

    The purpose of the present research was to analyze the psychometric properties of the Trait Meta-Mood Scale (TMMS) in sport context. The TMMS is a 24-item self-report measure that assesses perceived emotional intelligence, which is the extent to which people believe they pay attention to their emotions and are capable of distinguishing and regulating them. Participants were 368 athletes (257 male, 111 female; M age=21.4 yr., SD=5.5; range=14-40). Factor validity was tested via Confirmatory Factor Analysis. Based on factor loadings, covariances, and modification indices, the TMMS was reduced to a 22-item model. This respecification showed adequate reliability and construct validity. Multistep analysis of invariance indicated that the factor structure of the TMMS is invariant across sex. Predictive validity was assessed through path analysis. The results support the use of the Spanish version of the TMMS in a sport context.

  7. Testing Students with Special Educational Needs in Large-Scale Assessments - Psychometric Properties of Test Scores and Associations with Test Taking Behavior.

    PubMed

    Pohl, Steffi; Südkamp, Anna; Hardt, Katinka; Carstensen, Claus H; Weinert, Sabine

    2016-01-01

    Assessing competencies of students with special educational needs in learning (SEN-L) poses a challenge for large-scale assessments (LSAs). For students with SEN-L, the available competence tests may fail to yield test scores of high psychometric quality, which are-at the same time-measurement invariant to test scores of general education students. We investigated whether we can identify a subgroup of students with SEN-L, for which measurement invariant competence measures of adequate psychometric quality may be obtained with tests available in LSAs. We furthermore investigated whether differences in test-taking behavior may explain dissatisfying psychometric properties and measurement non-invariance of test scores within LSAs. We relied on person fit indices and mixture distribution models to identify students with SEN-L for whom test scores with satisfactory psychometric properties and measurement invariance may be obtained. We also captured differences in test-taking behavior related to guessing and missing responses. As a result we identified a subgroup of students with SEN-L for whom competence scores of adequate psychometric quality that are measurement invariant to those of general education students were obtained. Concerning test taking behavior, there was a small number of students who unsystematically picked response options. Removing these students from the sample slightly improved item fit. Furthermore, two different patterns of missing responses were identified that explain to some extent problems in the assessments of students with SEN-L.

  8. Testing Students with Special Educational Needs in Large-Scale Assessments – Psychometric Properties of Test Scores and Associations with Test Taking Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Pohl, Steffi; Südkamp, Anna; Hardt, Katinka; Carstensen, Claus H.; Weinert, Sabine

    2016-01-01

    Assessing competencies of students with special educational needs in learning (SEN-L) poses a challenge for large-scale assessments (LSAs). For students with SEN-L, the available competence tests may fail to yield test scores of high psychometric quality, which are—at the same time—measurement invariant to test scores of general education students. We investigated whether we can identify a subgroup of students with SEN-L, for which measurement invariant competence measures of adequate psychometric quality may be obtained with tests available in LSAs. We furthermore investigated whether differences in test-taking behavior may explain dissatisfying psychometric properties and measurement non-invariance of test scores within LSAs. We relied on person fit indices and mixture distribution models to identify students with SEN-L for whom test scores with satisfactory psychometric properties and measurement invariance may be obtained. We also captured differences in test-taking behavior related to guessing and missing responses. As a result we identified a subgroup of students with SEN-L for whom competence scores of adequate psychometric quality that are measurement invariant to those of general education students were obtained. Concerning test taking behavior, there was a small number of students who unsystematically picked response options. Removing these students from the sample slightly improved item fit. Furthermore, two different patterns of missing responses were identified that explain to some extent problems in the assessments of students with SEN-L. PMID:26941665

  9. Psychometric Properties and Validation of the Arabic Social Media Addiction Scale

    PubMed Central

    Al-Menayes, Jamal

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the psychometric properties of the Arabic version of the SMAS. SMAS is a variant of IAT customized to measure addiction to social media instead of the Internet as a whole. Using a self-report instrument on a cross-sectional sample of undergraduate students, the results revealed the following. First, the exploratory factor analysis showed that a three-factor model fits the data well. Second, concurrent validity analysis showed the SMAS to be a valid measure of social media addiction. However, further studies and data should verify the hypothesized model. Finally, this study showed that the Arabic version of the SMAS is a valid and reliable instrument for use in measuring social media addiction in the Arab world. PMID:26347848

  10. Psychometric Comparison of the Full and Abbreviated Versions of the Dysfunctional Beliefs and Attitudes about Sleep Scale

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Ka-Fai; Ho, Fiona Yan-Yee; Yeung, Wing-Fai

    2016-01-01

    Study Objectives: The different versions of the Dysfunctional Beliefs and Attitudes about Sleep Scale (DBAS) have limited comparison and summary of the findings across studies. We aimed to examine which version and which subscales had better psychometric properties. Methods: Data were derived from a randomized controlled trial of internet-based cognitive-behavioral therapy for insomnia (CBT-I) vs. waitlist in 312 participants with self-report diagnosis of insomnia disorder. The response distribution, internal consistency, construct and concurrent validity, and sensitivity to change were analyzed. Results: Floor or ceiling effects were found in 19 of the 30 DBAS items. Item-total correlation was < 0.30 in 43.3%, 31.3%, and 10.0% of the items in DBAS-30, DBAS-16, DBAS-10. Internal consistency was satisfactory for total scores, with Cronbach α ranging from 0.73–0.81, but 2 subscales of DBAS-30 and 1 subscale of DBAS-10 had Cronbach α < 0.35. Factor analysis produced 8, 4, and 3 factors for DBAS-30, DBAS-16, and DBAS-10. Only the factor structure of DBAS-16 was compatible with previous studies. Concurrent validity with insomnia, anxiety, and depressive symptoms was much stronger than with sleep diary parameters. Sensitivities to change of the DBAS scores following CBT-I and with sleep improvement were found, except the DBAS-30 “attributions” subscale and DBAS-16 “medication” subscale. Conclusions: The DBAS-16 possesses better internal consistency, a reproducible factor structure, strong concurrent validity, and sensitivity to change, and therefore is recommended for research use. The DBAS-30 and DBAS-10 have their own strengths, but there are limitations in their application as a quantitative measure in research. Citation: Chung KF, Ho FY, Yeung WF. Psychometric comparison of the full and abbreviated versions of the dysfunctional beliefs and attitudes about sleep scale. J Clin Sleep Med 2016;12(6):821–828. PMID:26857054

  11. Brief version of the Fear of Negative Evaluation Scale - Straightforward Items (BFNE-S): psychometric properties in a Spanish population.

    PubMed

    Pitarch, María José Gallego

    2010-11-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the psychometric properties of the Brief version of the Fear of Negative Evaluation Scale - Straightforward Items (BFNE-S) in a non-clinical Spanish population. Rodebaugh et al. (2004) recommend the use of this scale composed of 8 straightforwardly-worded items, instead of the 12-item version of the BFNE. The sample consisted of 542 undergraduate students, 71.3% of whom were women and 28.7% were men; the mean age was 21.71 (4.78) years. Exploratory factor analysis produced one factor which accounted for 51.28% of variance. The internal consistency of the scale was alpha = .89. The BFNE-S correlated with the Social Avoidance and Distress Scale (r = .44), the Personal Report of Confidence as Speaker Modified (r = .44), the Public Speaking Self-Efficacy Questionnaire (r = -.38) and both subscales of the Self-Statements during Public Speaking (SSPS-P r = -.22; SSPS-N r = .53). ANOVAs revealed significant differences in the BFNE-S amongst a non-clinical population, persons suffering from specific social phobia, non-generalized social phobia and generalized social phobia.

  12. Development and psychometric properties of an informant assessment scale of theory of mind for adults with traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Dengke; Pang, Yanxia; Cai, Weixiong; Fazio, Rachel L; Ge, Jianrong; Su, Qiaorong; Xu, Shuiqin; Pan, Yinan; Chen, Sanmei; Zhang, Hongwei

    2016-08-01

    Impairment of theory of mind (ToM) is a common phenomenon following traumatic brain injury (TBI) that has clear effects on patients' social functioning. A growing body of research has focused on this area, and several methods have been developed to assess ToM deficiency. Although an informant assessment scale would be useful for examining individuals with TBI, very few studies have adopted this approach. The purpose of the present study was to develop an informant assessment scale of ToM for adults with traumatic brain injury (IASToM-aTBI) and to test its reliability and validity with 196 adults with TBI and 80 normal adults. A 44-item scale was developed following a literature review, interviews with patient informants, consultations with experts, item analysis, and exploratory factor analysis (EFA). The following three common factors were extracted: social interaction, understanding of beliefs, and understanding of emotions. The psychometric analyses indicate that the scale has good internal consistency reliability, split-half reliability, test-retest reliability, inter-rater reliability, structural validity, discriminate validity and criterion validity. These results provide preliminary evidence that supports the reliability and validity of the IASToM-aTBI as a ToM assessment tool for adults with TBI.

  13. PSYCHOMETRIC PROPERTIES OF THE THREE PATHWAYS TO WELL-BEING SCALE IN A LARGE SAMPLE OF ARGENTINEAN ADOLESCENTS.

    PubMed

    Góngora, Vanesa C; Castro Solano, Alejandro

    2015-08-01

    The Authentic Happiness Theory considers that well-being can be reached by three main pathways: a pleasant life, an engaged life, or a meaningful life. This study investigates the psychometric properties of the Three Pathways to Well-being scale in Argentinean adolescents and compares that to prior results for Argentinean adults. A sample of 255 Argentinean adolescent students (110 boys, 145 girls) aged between 13 and 18 years (M age = 15.5, SD = 1.6) was used in this study. The participants completed the Spanish versions of the Three Pathways to Well-being scale, the Meaning in Life Questionnaire, the Satisfaction With Life Scale, and the Personal Wellbeing Index. Confirmatory factor analyses verified the three-factor structure of the test, accounting for 46% of the variance. The internal consistencies were α = .76 for the pleasant life, α = .80 for the engaged life, and α = .70 for the meaningful life. Concurrent validity was examined with the Satisfaction With Life Scale, the Personal Wellbeing Index, and the Meaning in Life Questionnaire, and the engaged life was the pathway most strongly associated with the positive related measures.

  14. Measuring death-related anxiety in advanced cancer: preliminary psychometrics of the Death and Dying Distress Scale.

    PubMed

    Lo, Christopher; Hales, Sarah; Zimmermann, Camilla; Gagliese, Lucia; Rydall, Anne; Rodin, Gary

    2011-10-01

    The alleviation of distress associated with death and dying is a central goal of palliative care, despite the lack of routine measurement of this outcome. In this study, we introduce the Death and Dying Distress Scale (DADDS), a new, brief measure we have developed to assess death-related anxiety in advanced cancer and other palliative populations. We describe its preliminary psychometrics based on a sample of 33 patients with advanced or metastatic cancer. The DADDS broadly captures distress about the loss of time and opportunity, the process of death and dying, and its impact on others. The initial version of the scale has a one-factor structure and good internal reliability. Dying and death-related distress was positively associated with depression and negatively associated with spiritual, emotional, physical, and functional well-being, providing early evidence of construct validity. This distress was relatively common, with 45% of the sample scoring in the upper reaches of the scale, suggesting that the DADDS may be a relevant outcome for palliative intervention. We conclude by presenting a revised 15-item version of the scale for further study in advanced cancer and other palliative populations.

  15. Development and Psychometric Evaluation of the School Bullying Scales: A Rasch Measurement Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cheng, Ying-Yao; Chen, Li-Ming; Liu, Kun-Shia; Chen, Yi-Ling

    2011-01-01

    The study aims to develop three school bullying scales--the Bully Scale, the Victim Scale, and the Witness Scale--to assess secondary school students' bullying behaviors, including physical bullying, verbal bullying, relational bullying, and cyber bullying. The items of the three scales were developed from viewpoints of bullies, victims, and…

  16. Psychometric properties of the Tuckman Procrastination Scale in a Turkish sample.

    PubMed

    Ozer, Bilge Uzun; Saçkes, Mesut; Tuckman, Bruce W

    2013-12-01

    A stepwise validation procedure was carried out to translate and develop a Turkish version of the Tuckman Procrastination Scale. A total of 858 college students completed the Tuckman Procrastination Scale, the Academic Self-efficacy Scale, and the Rosenberg Self-esteem Scale. Two items in the original scale loaded on a different factor and were removed from the measure. The 14-item scale had a one-factor solution as supported by subsequent confirmatory factor analysis. The Turkish version of the Tuckman Procrastination Scale scores correlated negatively with academic self-efficacy and self-esteem scores. Overall results provided evidence for the validity and the reliability of the scale scores.

  17. Psychometric properties of the Polish version of the eight-item Morisky Medication Adherence Scale in hypertensive adults.

    PubMed

    Jankowska-Polanska, Beata; Uchmanowicz, Izabella; Chudiak, Anna; Dudek, Krzysztof; Morisky, Donald E; Szymanska-Chabowska, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Low adherence to pharmacological treatment is often associated with poor blood pressure control, but identification of nonadherent patients in outpatient settings is difficult. The aim of the study was to translate and evaluate the psychometric properties of the Polish version of the structured self-report eight-item Morisky Medication Adherence Scale (MMAS-8) among patients with hypertension. The study was conducted in a family doctor practice between January and July 2015. After a standard "forward-backward" procedure to translate MMAS-8 into Polish, the questionnaire was administered to 160 patients with hypertension. Reliability was tested using a measure of internal consistency (Cronbach's α) and test-retest reliability. Validity was confirmed using known group validity. Three levels of adherence were considered based on the following scores: 0 to <6 (low); 6 to <8 (medium); and 8 (high). Complete questionnaires were returned by 110 respondents (mean age: 60.7 years ±12.6; 54.6% were female). The mean number of pills taken daily was 3.61±4.31. The mean adherence score was 6.42± 2.0. Moderate internal consistency was found (Cronbach's α=0.81), and test-retest reliability was satisfactory (r=0.461-0.905; P<0.001). Reproducibility expressed by Cohen's κ coefficient =0.61 was good. In high-adherent patients, the percentage of well-controlled blood pressure was higher than in low-adherent patients (33.3% vs 19.1%, χ (2)=0.87, P=0.648). Psychometric evaluation of the Polish version of the MMAS-8 indicates that it is a reliable and valid measure tool to detect nonadherent patients. The MMAS-8 may be routinely used to support communication about the medication-taking behavior in hypertensive patients.

  18. The Anticipated Effects of Alcohol Scale: Development and Psychometric Evaluation of a Novel Assessment Tool for Measuring Alcohol Expectancies

    PubMed Central

    Morean, Meghan E.; Corbin, William R.; Treat, Teresa A.

    2013-01-01

    Alcohol expectancy (AEs) research has enhanced our understanding of how anticipated alcohol effects confer risk for heavy drinking and alcohol-related problems. However, extant AE measures have limitations within one or more of the following areas: assessing a comprehensive range of effects, specifying the hypothetical number of drinks consumed, assessing AEs by limb of the blood alcohol curve (BAC), and/or psychometric evaluation. Building upon the strengths of existing measures, we employed conceptual and statistical advances in measurement development to create the novel, psychometrically-sound Anticipated Effects of Alcohol Scale (AEAS). Unique to this study, pilot data ensured that the SEAS comprised a comprehensive sampling of effects that varied in valence (positive/negative) and arousal (low/high) and were identified as plausible outcomes of drinking. The AEAS specified the number of drinks individuals imagined consuming (adjusted for sex) and the hypothetical drinking episode length (2 hours). AEs were also assessed separately by BAC limb. For validation purposes, the AEAS was included in several survey studies of young adults (ages 18-30). The validity argument for the proposed interpretation of AEAS test scores was based upon the following: 1) exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses (N=546) identified a 22-item, 4-factor internal structure, categorizing alcohol effects into quadrants (high/low arousal crossed with positive/negative valence); 2) scalar measurement invariance was established for BAC limb, sex, and binge drinking status; 3) convergence/divergence was observed with alternative AEs measures and mood; and 4) test-criterion relationships were observed with several alcohol-related outcomes. The reliability argument was based on test-retest and internal consistency coefficients. PMID:22708572

  19. Psychometric properties of the Polish version of the eight-item Morisky Medication Adherence Scale in hypertensive adults

    PubMed Central

    Jankowska-Polanska, Beata; Uchmanowicz, Izabella; Chudiak, Anna; Dudek, Krzysztof; Morisky, Donald E; Szymanska-Chabowska, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Low adherence to pharmacological treatment is often associated with poor blood pressure control, but identification of nonadherent patients in outpatient settings is difficult. The aim of the study was to translate and evaluate the psychometric properties of the Polish version of the structured self-report eight-item Morisky Medication Adherence Scale (MMAS-8) among patients with hypertension. The study was conducted in a family doctor practice between January and July 2015. After a standard “forward–backward” procedure to translate MMAS-8 into Polish, the questionnaire was administered to 160 patients with hypertension. Reliability was tested using a measure of internal consistency (Cronbach’s α) and test–retest reliability. Validity was confirmed using known group validity. Three levels of adherence were considered based on the following scores: 0 to <6 (low); 6 to <8 (medium); and 8 (high). Complete questionnaires were returned by 110 respondents (mean age: 60.7 years ±12.6; 54.6% were female). The mean number of pills taken daily was 3.61±4.31. The mean adherence score was 6.42± 2.0. Moderate internal consistency was found (Cronbach’s α=0.81), and test–retest reliability was satisfactory (r=0.461–0.905; P<0.001). Reproducibility expressed by Cohen’s κ coefficient =0.61 was good. In high-adherent patients, the percentage of well-controlled blood pressure was higher than in low-adherent patients (33.3% vs 19.1%, χ2=0.87, P=0.648). Psychometric evaluation of the Polish version of the MMAS-8 indicates that it is a reliable and valid measure tool to detect nonadherent patients. The MMAS-8 may be routinely used to support communication about the medication-taking behavior in hypertensive patients. PMID:27672314

  20. Cross-cultural adaptation and psychometric properties of the Korean Scale for Internet Addiction (K-Scale) in Japanese high school students.

    PubMed

    Mak, Kwok-Kei; Nam, JeeEun Karin; Kim, Dongil; Aum, Narae; Choi, Jung-Seok; Cheng, Cecilia; Ko, Huei-Chen; Watanabe, Hiroko

    2017-03-01

    The Korean Scale for Internet Addiction (K-Scale) was developed in Korea for assessing addictive internet behaviors. This study aims to adopt K-Scale and examine its psychometric properties in Japanese adolescents. In 2014, 589 (36.0% boys) high school students (Grade 10-12) from Japan completed a survey, including items of Japanese versions of K-Scale and Smartphone Scale for Smartphone Addiction (S-Scale). Model fit indices of the original four-factor structure, three-factor structure obtained from exploratory factor analysis, and improved two-factor structure of K-Scale were computed using confirmatory factor analysis, with internal reliability of included items reported. The convergent validity of K-Scale was tested against self-rated internet addiction, and S-Scale using multiple regression models. The results showed that a second-order two-factor 13-item structure was the most parsimonious model (NFI=0.919, NNFI=0.935, CFI=0.949, and RMSEA=0.05) with good internal reliability (Cronbach's alpha=0.87). The two factors revealed were "Disturbance of Adaptation and Life Orientation" and "Withdrawal and Tolerance". Moreover, the correlation between internet user classifications defined by K-Scale and self-rating was significant. K-Scale total score was significantly and positively associated with S-Scale total (adjusted R(2)=0.440) and subscale scores (adjusted R(2)=0.439). In conclusion, K-Scale is a valid and reliable assessment scale of internet addiction for Japanese high school students after modifications.

  1. The Interpersonal Shame Inventory for Asian Americans: Scale Development and Psychometric Properties

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Y. Joel; Kim, Bryan S. K.; Nguyen, Chi P.; Cheng, Janice Ka Yan; Saw, Anne

    2016-01-01

    This article reports the development and psychometric properties of the Interpersonal Shame Inventory (ISI), a culturally salient and clinically relevant measure of interpersonal shame for Asian Americans. Across 4 studies involving Asian American college students, the authors provided evidence for this new measure’s validity and reliability. Exploratory factor analyses and confirmatory factor analyses provided support for a model with 2 correlated factors: external shame (arising from concerns about others’ negative evaluations) and family shame (arising from perceptions that one has brought shame to one’s family), corresponding to 2 subscales: ISI-E and ISI-F, respectively. Evidence for criterion-related, concurrent, discriminant, and incremental validity was demonstrated by testing the associations between external shame and family shame and immigration/international status, generic state shame, face concerns, thwarted belongingness, perceived burdensomeness, self-esteem, depressive symptoms, and suicide ideation. External shame and family shame also exhibited differential relations with other variables. Mediation findings were consistent with a model in which family shame mediated the effects of thwarted belongingness on suicide ideation. Further, the ISI subscales demonstrated high alpha coefficients and test–retest reliability. These findings are discussed in light of the conceptual, methodological, and clinical contributions of the ISI. PMID:24188650

  2. The DSM-5 Dimensional Anxiety Scales in a Dutch non-clinical sample: psychometric properties including the adult separation anxiety disorder scale.

    PubMed

    Möller, Eline L; Bögels, Susan M

    2016-09-01

    With DSM-5, the American Psychiatric Association encourages complementing categorical diagnoses with dimensional severity ratings. We therefore examined the psychometric properties of the DSM-5 Dimensional Anxiety Scales, a set of brief dimensional scales that are consistent in content and structure and assess DSM-5-based core features of anxiety disorders. Participants (285 males, 255 females) completed the DSM-5 Dimensional Anxiety Scales for social anxiety disorder, generalized anxiety disorder, specific phobia, agoraphobia, and panic disorder that were included in previous studies on the scales, and also for separation anxiety disorder, which is included in the DSM-5 chapter on anxiety disorders. Moreover, they completed the Screen for Child Anxiety Related Emotional Disorders Adult version (SCARED-A). The DSM-5 Dimensional Anxiety Scales demonstrated high internal consistency, and the scales correlated significantly and substantially with corresponding SCARED-A subscales, supporting convergent validity. Separation anxiety appeared present among adults, supporting the DSM-5 recognition of separation anxiety as an anxiety disorder across the life span. To conclude, the DSM-5 Dimensional Anxiety Scales are a valuable tool to screen for specific adult anxiety disorders, including separation anxiety. Research in more diverse and clinical samples with anxiety disorders is needed. © 2016 The Authors International Journal of Methods in Psychiatric Research Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. The DSM‐5 Dimensional Anxiety Scales in a Dutch non‐clinical sample: psychometric properties including the adult separation anxiety disorder scale

    PubMed Central

    Bögels, Susan M.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract With DSM‐5, the American Psychiatric Association encourages complementing categorical diagnoses with dimensional severity ratings. We therefore examined the psychometric properties of the DSM‐5 Dimensional Anxiety Scales, a set of brief dimensional scales that are consistent in content and structure and assess DSM‐5‐based core features of anxiety disorders. Participants (285 males, 255 females) completed the DSM‐5 Dimensional Anxiety Scales for social anxiety disorder, generalized anxiety disorder, specific phobia, agoraphobia, and panic disorder that were included in previous studies on the scales, and also for separation anxiety disorder, which is included in the DSM‐5 chapter on anxiety disorders. Moreover, they completed the Screen for Child Anxiety Related Emotional Disorders Adult version (SCARED‐A). The DSM‐5 Dimensional Anxiety Scales demonstrated high internal consistency, and the scales correlated significantly and substantially with corresponding SCARED‐A subscales, supporting convergent validity. Separation anxiety appeared present among adults, supporting the DSM‐5 recognition of separation anxiety as an anxiety disorder across the life span. To conclude, the DSM‐5 Dimensional Anxiety Scales are a valuable tool to screen for specific adult anxiety disorders, including separation anxiety. Research in more diverse and clinical samples with anxiety disorders is needed. © 2016 The Authors International Journal of Methods in Psychiatric Research Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. PMID:27378317

  4. The Scaled Thermal Explosion Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Wardell, J F; Maienschein, J L

    2002-07-05

    We have developed the Scaled Thermal Explosion Experiment (STEX) to provide a database of reaction violence from thermal explosion for explosives of interest. Such data are needed to develop, calibrate, and validate predictive capability for thermal explosions using simulation computer codes. A cylinder of explosive 25, 50 or 100 mm in diameter, is confined in a steel cylinder with heavy end caps, and heated under controlled conditions until reaction. Reaction violence is quantified through non-contact micropower impulse radar measurements of the cylinder wall velocity and by strain gauge data at reaction onset. Here we describe the test concept, design and diagnostic recording, and report results with HMX- and RDX-based energetic materials.

  5. A Psychometric Evaluation of an Advanced Pharmacy Practice Experience Clinical Competency Framework

    PubMed Central

    Doty, Randell E.; Nemire, Ruth E.

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To assess the psychometric properties of the clinical competency framework known as the System of Universal Clinical Competency Evaluation in the Sunshine State (SUCCESS), including its internal consistency and content, construct, and criterion validity. Methods. Sub-competency items within each hypothesized competency pair were subjected to principal components factor analysis to demonstrate convergent and discriminant validity. Varimax rotation was conducted for each competency pair (eg, competency 1 vs competency 2, competency 1 vs competency 3, competency 2 vs competency 3). Internal consistency was evaluated using Cronbach alpha. Results. Of the initial 78 pairings, 44 (56%) demonstrated convergent and discriminant validity. Five pairs of competencies were unidimensional. Of the 34 pairs where at least 1 competency was multidimensional, most (91%) were from competencies 7, 11, and 12, indicating modifications were warranted in those competencies. After reconfiguring the competencies, 76 (94%) of the 81 pairs resulted in 2 factors as required. A unidimensional factor emerged when all 13 of the competencies were entered into a factor analysis. The internal consistency of all of the competencies was satisfactory. Conclusion. Psychometric evaluation shows the SUCCESS framework demonstrates adequate reliability and validity for most competencies. However, it also provides guidance where improvements are needed as part of a continuous quality improvement program. PMID:25861100

  6. A Chinese version of the Psychotic Symptom Rating Scales: psychometric properties in recent-onset and chronic psychosis

    PubMed Central

    Chien, Wai-Tong; Lee, Isabella Yuet-Ming; Wang, Li-Qun

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to test the reliability, validity, and factor structure of a Chinese version of the Psychotic Symptom Rating Scale (PSYRATS) in 198 and 202 adult patients with recent-onset and chronic psychosis, respectively. The PSYRATS has been translated into different language versions and has been validated for clinical and research use mainly in chronic psychotic patients but not in recent-onset psychosis patients or in Chinese populations. The psychometric analysis of the translated Chinese version included assessment of its content validity, semantic equivalence, interrater and test–retest reliability, reproducibility, sensitivity to changes in psychotic symptoms, internal consistency, concurrent validity (compared to a valid psychotic symptom scale), and factor structure. The Chinese version demonstrated very satisfactory content validity as rated by an expert panel, good semantic equivalence with the original version, and high interrater and test–retest (at 2-week interval) reliability. It also indicated very good reproducibility of and sensitivity to changes in psychotic symptoms in line with the symptom severity measured with the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS). The scale consisted of four factors for the hallucination subscale and two factors for the delusion subscale, explaining about 80% of the total variance of the construct, indicating satisfactory correlations between the hallucination and delusion factors themselves, between items, factors, subscales, and overall scale, and between factors and relevant item and subscale scores of the PANSS. The Chinese version of the PSYRATS is a reliable and valid instrument to measure symptom severity in Chinese psychotic patients complementary to other existing measures mainly in English language. PMID:28331325

  7. Psychometric Properties of ADHD Rating Scales among Children with Mental Retardation I: Reliability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Michael L.; Fee, Virginia E.; Netterville, Amanda K.

    2004-01-01

    The reliability of Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) rating scales in children with mental retardation was assessed. Parents, teachers, and teaching assistants completed ADHD rating scales on 48 children aged 5-12 diagnosed with mental retardation. Measures included the Child Behavior Checklist (CBCL), Conners Rating Scales, the…

  8. The Phonological Awareness Scale of Early Childhood Period (PASECP) Development and Psychometric Features

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sari, Burcu; Aktan Acar, Ebru

    2013-01-01

    This study has two main aims. The first aim of the study is to develop a scale for determining early childhood period phonological awareness skills, and to put forward the validity-reliability of this scale. The second aim is to determine the norm values of this scale developed for the Marmara Region. For this reason, the research has been carried…

  9. Modifying the Response Labels of an ADHD Teacher Rating Scale: Psychometric and Epidemiologic Implications

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rowland, Andrew S.; Umbach, David M.; Bohlig, E. Michael; Stallone, Lil; Sandler, Dale P.

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the impact of changing the response labels of a teacher rating scale in a population-based study of ADHD. Method: For parents, the Diagnostic Interview Schedule for Children, which asks whether each of 18 symptoms occurred "often" in the past year, was used. For teachers, most scales use a 4-point scale, with…

  10. The Rainbow Families Scale (RFS): a measure of experiences among individuals with lesbian and gay parents.

    PubMed

    Lick, David J; Schmidt, Karen M; Patterson, Charlotte J

    2011-01-01

    According to two decades of research, parental sexual orientation does not affect overall child development. Researchers have not found significant differences between offspring of heterosexual parents and those of lesbian and gay parents in terms of their cognitive, psychological, or emotional adjustment. Still, there are gaps in the literature regarding social experiences specific to offspring of lesbian and gay parents. This study's objective was to construct a measure of those experiences. The Rainbow Families Scale (RFS) was created on the basis of focus group discussions (N = 9 participants), and then piloted (N = 24) and retested with a new sample (N = 91) to examine its psychometric properties. Exploratory factor analyses uncovered secondary dimensions and Rasch analytic procedures examined item fit, reliability, and category usage. Misfitting items were eliminated where necessary, yielding a psychometrically sound measurement tool to aid in the study of individuals with lesbian and gay parents.

  11. Effect of personality traits, age and sex on aggressive driving: Psychometric adaptation of the Driver Aggression Indicators Scale in China.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Huihui; Qu, Weina; Ge, Yan; Sun, Xianghong; Zhang, Kan

    2017-04-02

    This study aimed to assess the reliability and validity of the Chinese version of the Driver Aggression Indicators Scale (DAIS), which measures aggressive driving behaviors. Besides, demographic variables (sex and age) and the big five personality traits were examined as potential impact factors of aggressive driving. A total of 422 participants completed the DAIS, Big Five Personality Inventory (BFPI), and the socio-demographic scale. First, psychometric results confirmed that the DAIS had a stable two-factor structure and acceptable internal consistency. Then, agreeableness and conscientiousness were negatively correlated with hostile aggression and revenge committed by the drivers themselves, while neuroticism was positively correlated with aggressive driving committed by the drivers themselves. Meanwhile, more agreeable drivers may perceive less hostile aggression and revenge. More neurotic drivers may perceive more aggressive warning. Finally, the effects of age and sex on aggressive driving were not same as most studies. We found that older age group perceived and committed more hostile acts of aggression and revenge than younger age groups. Female drivers of 49-60 years perceived more aggressive warnings committed by other drivers.

  12. Psychometric Properties of the Persian Version of Spiritual Well-Being Scale in Patients with Acute Myocardial Infarction.

    PubMed

    Soleimani, Mohammad Ali; Pahlevan Sharif, Saeed; Allen, Kelly A; Yaghoobzadeh, Ameneh; Sharif Nia, Hamid; Gorgulu, Ozkan

    2016-09-15

    The purpose of this study was to assess the psychometric properties of the Persian version of Spiritual Well-Being Scale (SWBS) in patients with acute myocardial infarction. A multisite, cross-sectional survey was employed to determine the instrument's reliability (Cronbach's α and construct reliability) and validity (face, content, and construct). Using systematic sampling of adult outpatients at primary care clinic sites in the Qazvin City, Iran (N = 300), it was found that the Cronbach's alpha and construct reliability of both factors associated with the SWBS were above 0.7. The construct validity of the scale was determined using exploratory factor analysis. The findings supported two factors: relation with God and relation with life. Further investigation through confirmatory factor analysis (eigenvalues of greater than one) confirmed a third factor construct associated with the SWBS. A total of 50.65 % of the variance were explained by these three factors. The overall findings of the study demonstrated that the SWBS is a valid and reliable instrument that has potential utility in future research and clinical practice settings.

  13. Psychometric properties of the Portuguese version of the Depressive Cognition Scale in Brazilian adults with diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Sousa, Valmi D; Zanetti, Maria L; Zauszniewski, Jaclene A; Mendes, Isabel A C; Daguano, Michelle O

    2008-01-01

    Identifying depressive cognitions in Brazilians with diabetes can be important step to prevent the development of clinical depression, which is negatively associated with diabetes self-management. This study focused on the psychometric testing of the Portuguese version of the Depressive Cognition Scale, the Escala Cognitiva de Depressão (ECD), among 82 Brazilian adults with diabetes mellitus. The questionnaire was assessed for internal consistency, homogeneity, and construct validity using factor analysis and convergent validity assessment with the Portuguese version of the Beck Depression Inventory, the Inventário de Depressão Beck (IDB). Cronbach's alpha for the ECD was .88. The homogeneity of the instrument was supported by item-to-total correlations between .30 and .70. Factor extraction generated only one factor with eigenvalues greater than 1, which is consistent with the English version. The ECD's total score had a weak but significant correlation with the IDB's total score (r = .24, p < .05), indicating convergent validity. Evidence for the reliability and construct validity of the ECD was provided by this study. This scale has the potential to become a useful screening tool for depressive cognitions among Brazilians with diabetes.

  14. Frommelt Attitudes Toward Care of the Dying Scale Form B: psychometric testing of the Italian version for students.

    PubMed

    Mastroianni, Chiara; Piredda, Michela; Taboga, Chiara; Mirabella, Fiorino; Marfoli, Elisabetta; Casale, Giuseppe; Matarese, Maria; Frommelt, Katherine H Murray; De Marinis, Maria Grazia

    2015-01-01

    Nurses' attitudes toward caring for dying patients have an impact on the quality of the care provided. Education can improve knowledge and attitudes toward end-of-life care. No validated tool that measures such attitudes is available for Italian nursing students. The aim of this study was to translate the Frommelt Attitudes Toward Care of the Dying Scale (FATCOD) Form B from English into Italian and to establish its validity and reliability within an Italian population of students. A two-stage design was used. Stage I adapted the original version of the tool and tested it for content validity through a multistep process. Stage 2 tested its psychometric properties by analyzing internal consistency, test-retest reliability, and construct validity. The convenience sample consisted of 465 nursing students from all the universities of one Italian region. Measures of stability showed a very good overall (0.87) intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC). The discriminating capacity of the scale was adequate with good values of asymmetry and kurtosis for most of the items. Good internal consistency was found. The six factors derived from the factor analysis are the following: Fear/Malaise, Communication, Relationship, Care of the family, Family as Caring, and Active Care. FATCOD Form B-I is a valid, reliable, and acceptable tool for evaluation of attitudes toward end-of-life care in Italian students. It measures six specific dimensions that should be highlighted during health care student education and training.

  15. Measuring Ocean Literacy in Pre-Service Teachers: Psychometric Properties of the Greek Version of the Survey of Ocean Literacy and Experience (SOLE)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Markos, Angelos; Boubonari, Theodora; Mogias, Athanasios; Kevrekidis, Theodoros

    2017-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to respond to the increasing demand for comprehensive tools for the measurement of ocean literacy, by investigating the psychometric characteristics of a Greek version of the Survey of Ocean Literacy and Experience (SOLE), an instrument that assesses conceptual understanding of general ocean sciences content,…

  16. Assessing metacognitive skills in waking and sleep: a psychometric analysis of the Metacognitive, Affective, Cognitive Experience (MACE) questionnaire.

    PubMed

    Kahan, Tracey L; Sullivan, Kieran T

    2012-03-01

    The Metacognitive, Affective, Cognitive Experience (MACE) questionnaire was designed to assess metacognition across sleep and waking (Kahan & LaBerge, 1996). The present research evaluates the psychometric properties of the MACE. Data from two recent studies (N=185) were used to assess the inter-item consistency, test-retest reliability, and factorial, convergent, and discriminant validity of the MACE. Results show that the MACE is a reliable measure with good construct validity. Exploratory factor analyses revealed one self-regulation and two monitoring factors. One monitoring factor emphasized monitoring internal conditions; the other emphasized monitoring external conditions. This factor structure is consistent with the Metacognitive Model (Nelson & Narens, 1990). Tests of convergent and discriminant validity suggest that the MACE is assessing metacognition and is appropriately related to similar constructs such as mindfulness and self-consciousness. The implication of these findings as well as suggestions for research and clinical applications of the MACE are discussed.

  17. Brazilian version of the Jefferson Scale of Empathy: psychometric properties and factor analysis

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Empathy is a central characteristic of medical professionalism and has recently gained attention in medical education research. The Jefferson Scale of Empathy is the most commonly used measure of empathy worldwide, and to date it has been translated in 39 languages. This study aimed to adapt the Jefferson Scale of Empathy to the Brazilian culture and to test its reliability and validity among Brazilian medical students. Methods The Portuguese version of the Jefferson Scale of Empathy was adapted to Brazil using back-translation techniques. This version was pretested among 39 fifth-year medical students in September 2010. During the final fifth- and sixth-year Objective Structured Clinical Examination (October 2011), 319 students were invited to respond to the scale anonymously. Cronbach’s alpha, exploratory factor analysis, item-total correlation, and gender comparisons were performed to check the reliability and validity of the scale. Results The student response rate was 93.7% (299 students). Cronbach’s coefficient for the scale was 0.84. A principal component analysis confirmed the construct validity of the scale for three main factors: Compassionate Care (first factor), Ability to Stand in the Patient’s Shoes (second factor), and Perspective Taking (third factor). Gender comparisons did not reveal differences in the scores between female and male students. Conclusions The adapted Brazilian version of the Jefferson Scale of Empathy proved to be a valid, reliable instrument for use in national and cross-cultural studies in medical education. PMID:22873730

  18. Psychometric Properties of the Gifted Students' Coping with Anger and Decision Making Skills Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ersoy, Evren; Deniz, Mehmet Engin

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to develop the scale concerning gifted children's' skills for making decisions and coping with anger and to examine the validity and reliability of the scale. A total of 324 students, which 151 were female and 173 were male, studying in 3 different Science and Arts Center's (BILSEM) in Istanbul during 2014-2015…

  19. Psychometric Properties of the Dyskinesia Identification System: Condensed User Scale (DISCUS).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sprague, Robert L.; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Individuals with developmental disability (n=400) were assessed with the "Dyskinesia Identification System: Condensed User Scale" (DISCUS), a 15-item tardive dyskinesia rating scale shortened from the "Dyskinesia Identification System-Coldwater." Based on interrater reliability, 2-week stability, and other analyses, DISCUS is…

  20. Psychometric Properties of the Career Decision-Making Self-Efficacy Scale in Chinese College Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hampton, Nan Zhang

    This study explores the applicability of the Career Decision-Making Self-Efficacy Scale (CDMSE) to Chinese college students. The reliability and validity of the scale are examined using two independent samples (128 students from a polytechnic institute and 157 students from a teacher's college in China). The results indicate that the CDMSE is…

  1. Development and Psychometric Evaluation of a Multidimensional Scale of Willingness to Communicate in a Foreign Language

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baghaei, Purya

    2013-01-01

    This study aims to develop and validate a multidimensional scale of willingness to communicate in a foreign language. Multidimensional random coefficient multinomial logit model was employed to analyze the scale. Likelihood deviance test and information criteria showed that a three-dimensional model fits significantly better than a two-dimensional…

  2. Career Adapt-Abilities Scale-USA Form: Psychometric Properties and Relation to Vocational Identity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Porfeli, Erik J.; Savickas, Mark L.

    2012-01-01

    This article reports construction and initial validation of the United States form of the Career Adapt-Abilities Scale (CAAS). The CAAS consists of four scales, each with six items, which measure concern, control, curiosity, and confidence as psychosocial resources for managing occupational transitions, developmental tasks, and work traumas.…

  3. Career Adapt-Abilities Scale--South African Form: Psychometric Properties and Construct Validity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maree, Jacobus Gideon

    2012-01-01

    The Career Adapt-Abilities Scale--South African Form (CAAS) consists of four scales, each with six items that measure concern, control, curiosity, and confidence as psychosocial resources for managing occupational transitions, developmental tasks and work traumas. Internal consistency estimates for the subscale and total scores ranged from good to…

  4. Career Adapt-Abilities Scale-Belgium Form: Psychometric Characteristics and Construct Validity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dries, Nicky; Van Esbroeck, Raoul; van Vianen, Annelies E. M.; De Cooman, Rein; Pepermans, Roland

    2012-01-01

    The Dutch version of the Career Adapt-Abilities Scale-Belgium Form (CAAS-Belgium) consists of four scales, each with six items, which measure concern, control, curiosity, and confidence as psychosocial resources for managing occupational transitions, developmental tasks, and work traumas. A pilot survey was administered to 700 high school,…

  5. Career Adapt-Abilities Scale--Taiwan Form: Psychometric Properties and Construct Validity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tien, Hsiu-Lan Shelley; Wang, Yu-Chen; Chu, Hui-Chuang; Huang, Tsu-Lun

    2012-01-01

    The present study tested the reliability and validity of the Career Adapt-Ability Scale--Taiwan Form (CAAS-Taiwan Form). The CAAS consists of four scales, each with six items, which measure concern, control, curiosity, and confidence as psychosocial resources for managing occupational transitions, developmental tasks, and work traumas. Internal…

  6. Career Adapt-Abilities Scale--Portugal Form: Psychometric Properties and Relationships to Employment Status

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duarte, M. Eduarda; Soares, M. C.; Fraga, S.; Rafael, M.; Lima, M. R.; Paredes, I.; Agostinho, R.; Djalo, A.

    2012-01-01

    The Career-Adaptabilities Scale (CAAS)--Portugal Form consists of four scales, each with seven items, which measure concern, control, curiosity, and confidence as psychosocial resources for managing occupational transitions, developmental tasks, and work traumas. Internal consistency estimates for the subscale and total scores ranged from good to…

  7. Career Adapt-Abilities Scale--Brazilian Form: Psychometric Properties and Relationships to Personality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Teixeira, Marco Antonio Pereira; Bardagi, Marucia Patta; Lassance, Maria Celia Pacheco; Magalhaes, Mauro de Oliveira; Duarte, Maria Eduarda

    2012-01-01

    The Career Adapt-Abilities Scale--Brazilian Form (CAASBrazil) consists of four scales which measure concern, control, curiosity, and confidence as psychosocial resources for managing occupational transitions, developmental tasks, and work traumas. Internal consistency estimates for the subscale and total scores ranged from good to excellent. The…

  8. A Psychometric Revision of the Asian Values Scale Using the Rasch Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Bryan S. K.; Hong, Sehee

    2004-01-01

    In this article, the 36-item Asian Values Scale (B. S. K. Kim, D. R. Atkinson, & P. H. Yang, 1999) was revised on the basis of G. Rasch's (1960) model and data from 618 Asian Americans. The results led to the establishment of a 25-item measure named the Asian Values Scale-Revised.

  9. Testing the Psychometric Features of the Academic Intellectual Leadership Scale in a University Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Uslu, Baris

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to develop a scale for measuring the level of academics' intellectual leadership, test the scale by examining the influence of their personal and institutional characteristics, and then investigate the relationship of academic intellectual leadership (AIL) to communication, climate, and managerial flexibility…

  10. Comparison of the psychometric properties of two balance scales in children with cerebral palsy.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Yong-Jin; Kim, Gyoung-Mo

    2016-12-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to compare the item difficulty degree between the Pediatric Balance Scale and Fullerton Advanced Balance scale for children with cerebral palsy. [Subjects and Methods] Forty children with cerebral palsy (male=17, female=23) voluntarily participated in the study. Item difficulty was expressed in the Rasch analysis using a logit value, with a higher value indicative of increasing item difficulty. [Results] Among the 24 items of the combined Pediatric Balance Scale and Fullerton Advanced Balance scale, the most difficult item was "Walk with head turns", whereas, the easiest item was "Sitting with back unsupported and feet supported on the floor". Among the 14 items of the Pediatric Balance Scale, 9 items (item 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 11, and 12) had negative logit values, whereas for the Fullerton Advanced Balance scale, only 1 item (item 1) had a negative logit value. [Conclusion] The Fullerton Advanced Balance scale is a more appropriate tool to assess balance ability than the Pediatric Balance Scale in in a group of higher functioning children with cerebral palsy.

  11. Psychometric testing of the Revised Humane Caring Scale for adult patients in Singapore.

    PubMed

    Goh, Mien Li; Ang, Emily N K; Chan, Yiong-Huak; He, Hong-Gu; Vehviläinen-Julkunen, Katri

    2015-09-01

    In this study, we examined the validity and reliability of the Revised Humane Caring Scale as used by adult patients in a tertiary hospital in Singapore. A three-phase descriptive quantitative study was conducted. In phase I, an expert panel of nurses and inpatients examined the content validity of the scale; phase II comprised a pilot study on 20 patients; and in phase III, a large-scale study on 235 patients was implemented to test the internal consistency of the scale. The results revealed that the content validity index of the scale ranged from 0.856 to 1, and the scale had a high inter-rater agreement kappa value of 0.940. Cronbach's alpha ranged from 0.798 to 0.877 in phase II, and from 0.579 to 0.760 in phase III, respectively. The Revised Humane Caring Scale revealed good content validity and an acceptable level of internal consistency. The scale is an acceptable measurement tool for evaluating adult patients' satisfaction during hospitalization.

  12. Testing the Psychometric Properties of the Scale of Ethnocultural Empathy in Turkey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Özdikmenli-Demir, Gözde; Demir, Serdar

    2014-01-01

    The validity and reliability of the Scale of Ethnocultural Empathy (SEE) was tested using a sample of 348 emerging adult university students living in Turkey. Different from the original scale's four-factor structure, results of principal components analyses and confirmatory factor analyses exposed that there were three factors explaining 45% of…

  13. Psychometric Properties of the Children's Scale of Hostility and Aggression: Reactive/Proactive (C-SHARP)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farmer, Cristan A.; Aman, Michael G.

    2010-01-01

    Although often lacking "malice", aggression is fairly common in children with intellectual or developmental disability (I/DD). Despite this, there are no scales available that are appropriate for an in-depth analysis of aggressive behavior in this population. Such scales are needed for the study of aggressive behavior, which is a common target…

  14. Comparison of the psychometric properties of two balance scales in children with cerebral palsy

    PubMed Central

    Jeon, Yong-Jin; Kim, Gyoung-Mo

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to compare the item difficulty degree between the Pediatric Balance Scale and Fullerton Advanced Balance scale for children with cerebral palsy. [Subjects and Methods] Forty children with cerebral palsy (male=17, female=23) voluntarily participated in the study. Item difficulty was expressed in the Rasch analysis using a logit value, with a higher value indicative of increasing item difficulty. [Results] Among the 24 items of the combined Pediatric Balance Scale and Fullerton Advanced Balance scale, the most difficult item was “Walk with head turns”, whereas, the easiest item was “Sitting with back unsupported and feet supported on the floor”. Among the 14 items of the Pediatric Balance Scale, 9 items (item 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 11, and 12) had negative logit values, whereas for the Fullerton Advanced Balance scale, only 1 item (item 1) had a negative logit value. [Conclusion] The Fullerton Advanced Balance scale is a more appropriate tool to assess balance ability than the Pediatric Balance Scale in in a group of higher functioning children with cerebral palsy. PMID:28174467

  15. Development and Psychometric Testing of the Humanistic Nurse-Patient Scale.

    PubMed

    Boscart, Veronique M; Pringle, Dorothy; Peter, Elizabeth; Wynn, Francine; McGilton, Katherine S

    2016-03-01

    Quality of life and well-being of older patients in chronic care facilities is often determined by their relationships with nurses. The authors developed and tested a scale to assess patients' views of what matters most when relating to nurses. Based on the humanistic nursing theory by Paterson and Zderad (1988), 69 items were created and tested with a sample of 40 patients, resulting in refinement of a scale with 24 items. This scale was factor analysed on responses from 249 patients residing in five facilities in Ontario, Canada. The Humanistic Relationship Importance Scale demonstrated strong internal consistency, stability, and reliability with a five-factor solution (α = .87). Construct validity was supported through factual identification. This scale is a valid measure of patients' perspectives of a nurse-patient relationship in chronic care and can be used to measure health professionals' relationships with their older patients and evaluate interventions to enhance relational care.

  16. Measuring Anhedonia in Adolescents: A Psychometric Analysis.

    PubMed

    Leventhal, Adam M; Unger, Jennifer B; Audrain-McGovern, Janet; Sussman, Steve; Volk, Heather E; Strong, David R

    2015-01-01

    Anhedonia-the reduced capacity to experience pleasure-is a trait implicated in mental and physical health. Yet, psychometric data on anhedonia measures in adolescents are absent. We conducted an in-depth psychometric analysis of the Snaith-Hamilton Pleasure Scale (SHAPS; Snaith et al., 1995 )-a self-report measure of anticipated pleasure response to 14 pleasant experiences-in adolescents. Adolescents (N = 585, M age = 14.5) completed the SHAPS and other paper-and-pencil surveys. Item response theory models were used to evaluate the psychometric performance of each SHAPS item. Correlations of the SHAPS with other personality and psychopathology measures were calculated to evaluate construct validity. Results showed that (a) certain items (e.g., reported pleasure from basic experiences like "seeing smiling faces" or "smelling flowers") provided more information about latent anhedonia than others; and (b) SHAPS scales exhibited construct-consistent convergent and discriminant validity (i.e., stronger correlations with low positive affect constructs, weaker correlations with negative affect). Reporting diminished pleasure from basic pleasant experiences accurately indicates adolescent anhedonia, which is important for future scale development and understanding the phenomenology of anhedonia in teens. These data support using the SHAPS for assessing anhedonia in epidemiological research and school-based universal prevention programming in general adolescent populations.

  17. Psychometric properties of the Positive and Negative Affect Scale for Children (PANAS-C) in children with anxiety disorders.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Alicia A; Kendall, Philip C

    2009-09-01

    This study investigated the psychometric properties of the Positive and Negative Affect Scale for Children (PANAS-C) (Laurent et al. Psychol Asses 1: 326-338, 1999) in a sample of 139 children (ages 7-14 years) diagnosed with a principal anxiety disorder. Results from this study provided support for the convergent validity of the PANAS-C with established measures of childhood anxiety and depression. As predicted, negative affect was significantly associated with measures of anxiety and depression whereas positive affect was associated with depression. However, weaknesses in discriminant validity were found, most notably with regard to social anxiety. Consistent with previous research, social anxiety was significantly associated with low levels of positive affect (PA). Furthermore, results from regression analyses indicated that PA made a significant unique contribution to the prediction of social anxiety as well as depression scores. Findings are discussed with regard to the usefulness of the PANAS-C to differentiate anxiety and depression in children with anxiety disorders.

  18. A psychometric comparison of the Internet Addiction Test, the Internet-Related Problem Scale, and self-diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Widyanto, Laura; Griffiths, Mark D; Brunsden, Vivienne

    2011-03-01

    One of the more prominent issues in the field of Internet addiction is the validity of the instrument used to assess users' level of Internet involvement. Many of the instruments used to assess Internet addiction have high face validity but have yet to be tested psychometrically. The aim of this study is to compare two of the most used Internet addiction research measures, the Internet Addiction Test (IAT) and the Internet-Related Problem Scale (IRPS), along with a self-diagnostic question simply asking Internet users if they thought they were addicted to the Internet. A total of 225 Internet users participated in the study (69 males and 156 females). Participants who defined themselves as Internet addicts had higher scores on both the IAT and IRPS, and the three different Internet addiction measures were strongly correlated to each other. For the IAT, factor analysis generated three factors (emotional/psychological conflict; time management issues; mood modification) explaining 56.3% of the variance. For the IRPS, factor analysis generated four factors (negative effects of Internet use; mood modification; loss of control; increased Internet use) explaining 60.2% of the variance. The implications for these findings are discussed.

  19. Measuring Youths’ Perceptions of Counseling Impact: Description, Psychometric Evaluation, and Longitudinal Examination of the Youth Counseling Impact Scale v.2

    PubMed Central

    Kearns, Marcia A.; Athay, M. Michele; Riemer, Manuel

    2012-01-01

    The Youth Counseling Impact Scale (YCIS) is an empirically validated treatment progress measure that assesses youths’ perceptions of the short term effectiveness of therapy. Since its initial publication, the original 10-item measure has been shortened to ease measurement burden and revised to include a question about a youth’s insight into his or her strengths. The current study describes the development of the revised YCIS (v.2) and evaluates its psychometric properties. Additionally, this study examines whether the YCIS (v.2) total score or subscale scores change over time and investigates whether there are gender or age differences for youths’ perceptions of the impact of therapy. Results found the revised version obtained comparable information to that of the original measure, and that the revised version retained the factor structure of the original model with one primary general factor of Counseling Impact and two secondary factors (Insight and Change). Results also suggested that while the YCIS (v.2) total score and Change subscale score did not change linearly over the course of treatment, the Insight subscale score showed a small but significant linear increase over time. No significant differences in YCIS scores based on youth age or gender were found. The implication of these findings, the clinical and empirical utility of this measure, and its limitations are discussed. PMID:22407563

  20. Secondary Psychometric Examination of the Dimensional Obsessive-Compulsive Scale: Classical Testing, Item Response Theory, and Differential Item Functioning.

    PubMed

    Thibodeau, Michel A; Leonard, Rachel C; Abramowitz, Jonathan S; Riemann, Bradley C

    2015-12-01

    The Dimensional Obsessive-Compulsive Scale (DOCS) is a promising measure of obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) symptoms but has received minimal psychometric attention. We evaluated the utility and reliability of DOCS scores. The study included 832 students and 300 patients with OCD. Confirmatory factor analysis supported the originally proposed four-factor structure. DOCS total and subscale scores exhibited good to excellent internal consistency in both samples (α = .82 to α = .96). Patient DOCS total scores reduced substantially during treatment (t = 16.01, d = 1.02). DOCS total scores discriminated between students and patients (sensitivity = 0.76, 1 - specificity = 0.23). The measure did not exhibit gender-based differential item functioning as tested by Mantel-Haenszel chi-square tests. Expected response options for each item were plotted as a function of item response theory and demonstrated that DOCS scores incrementally discriminate OCD symptoms ranging from low to extremely high severity. Incremental differences in DOCS scores appear to represent unbiased and reliable differences in true OCD symptom severity.

  1. Psychometric properties of Greek versions of the Modified Corah Dental Anxiety Scale (MDAS) and the Dental Fear Survey (DFS)

    PubMed Central

    Coolidge, Trilby; Arapostathis, Konstantinos Nikolaos; Emmanouil, Dimitris; Dabarakis, Nikolaos; Patrikiou, Antonis; Economides, Nikolaos; Kotsanos, Nikolaos

    2008-01-01

    Background A growing body of literature describes the performance of dental fear questionnaires in various countries. We describe the psychometric properties of Greek versions of the Modified Dental Anxiety Scale (MDAS) and the Dental Fear Survey (DFS) in adult Greek patients. Methods Greek versions of the MDAS and DFS were administered to two samples of adult dental patients. In the first sample, 195 patients attending one of three private practice dental offices in a large city in Greece completed the questionnaires in the waiting room before dental treatment. After treatment, their dentists (who did not know how the patients had answered the questionnaire) rated their anxiety during dental treatment. In the second sample, 41 patients attending a Greek university dental school clinic completed the questionnaire twice at two separate visits, in order to provide test-retest data. Cronbach's alpha was used to compute the internal consistencies, while Spearman's rho was used to compute the test-retest reliabilities. Construct validity was assessed by correlating the responses to the MDAS and DFS by Spearman's rho. Spearman's rho was also used to examine the criterion validities, by comparing the questionnaire responses with the dentists' ratings of anxiety. Results The internal consistencies for the MDAS were 0.90 and 0.92 in the two samples; for the DFS, the internal consistencies were 0.96 in both samples. The test-retest reliabilities were 0.94 for the MDAS and 0.95 for the DFS. The correlation between the two questionnaires was 0.89. The patients' responses to both questionnaires were significantly related to the dentists' ratings of their anxiety during dental treatment (both p values <0.001). Conclusion The results indicate that the Greek versions of the MDAS and DFS have good internal consistencies and test-retest reliabilities, as well as good construct and criterion validities. The psychometric properties of the Greek versions of these questionnaires appear

  2. Brief Psychometric Analysis of the Self-Efficacy Teacher Report Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Erford, Bradley T.; Duncan, Kelly; Savin-Murphy, Janet

    2010-01-01

    This study provides preliminary analysis of reliability and validity of scores on the Self-Efficacy Teacher Report Scale, which was designed to assess teacher perceptions of self-efficacy of students aged 8 to 17 years. (Contains 3 tables.)

  3. The LAOM Multidimensional Anxiety Scale for Measuring Anxiety in Children and Adolescents: Addressing the Psychometric Properties of the Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kozina, Ana

    2012-01-01

    The article introduces a new anxiety scale, called the LAOM (Lestvica anksioznosti za otroke in mladostnike [The anxiety scale for children and adolescents]) for measuring self-reported multidimensional anxiety. The scale has been developed with a special focus on the school setting, using one sample from an elementary school which is…

  4. A Large Scale Study of the Psychometric Characteristics of the IBR Modified Overt Aggression Scale: Findings and Evidence for Increased Self-Destructive Behaviors in Adult Females with Autism Spectrum Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohen, Ira L.; Tsiouris, John A.; Flory, Michael J.; Kim, Soh-Yule; Freedland, Robert; Heaney, Glenn; Pettinger, Jill; Brown, W. Ted

    2010-01-01

    The psychometric characteristics of the IBR Modified Overt Aggression Scale were studied in over 2,000 people with Intellectual Disability (ID). Reliability ranged from good to excellent. Aggression toward others and objects was highest in the youngest adults, in those in the moderate to severe range of ID, and in those with an autism spectrum…

  5. Development and Psychometric Analysis of a Nurses' Attitudes and Skills Safety Scale: Initial Results.

    PubMed

    Armstrong, Gail E; Dietrich, Mary; Norman, Linda; Barnsteiner, Jane; Mion, Lorraine

    Health care organizations have incorporated updated safety principles in the analysis of errors and in norms and standards. Yet no research exists that assesses bedside nurses' perceived skills or attitudes toward updated safety concepts. The aims of this study were to develop a scale assessing nurses' perceived skills and attitudes toward updated safety concepts, determine content validity, and examine internal consistency of the scale and subscales. Understanding nurses' perceived skills and attitudes about safety concepts can be used in targeting strategies to enhance their safety practices.

  6. The psychometric properties of the generalized anxiety disorder-7 scale in Hispanic Americans with English or Spanish language preference.

    PubMed

    Mills, Sarah D; Fox, Rina S; Malcarne, Vanessa L; Roesch, Scott C; Champagne, Brian R; Sadler, Georgia Robins

    2014-07-01

    The Generalized Anxiety Disorder-7 scale (GAD-7) is a self-report questionnaire that is widely used to screen for anxiety. The GAD-7 has been translated into numerous languages, including Spanish. Previous studies evaluating the structural validity of the English and Spanish versions indicate a unidimensional factor structure in both languages. However, the psychometric properties of the Spanish language version have yet to be evaluated in samples outside of Spain, and the measure has not been tested for use among Hispanic Americans. This study evaluated the reliability, structural validity, and convergent validity of the English and Spanish language versions of the GAD-7 for Hispanic Americans in the United States. A community sample of 436 Hispanic Americans with an English (n = 210) or Spanish (n = 226) language preference completed the GAD-7. Multiple-group confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) was used to examine the goodness-of-fit of the unidimensional factor structure of the GAD-7 across language-preference groups. Results from the multiple-group CFA indicated a similar unidimensional factor structure with equivalent response patterns and item intercepts, but different variances, across language-preference groups. Internal consistency was good for both English and Spanish language-preference groups. The GAD-7 also evidenced good convergent validity as demonstrated by significant correlations in expected directions with the Perceived Stress Scale, the Patient Health Questionnaire-9, and the Physical Health domain of the World Health Organization Quality of Life-BREF assessment. The unidimensional GAD-7 is suitable for use among Hispanic Americans with an English or Spanish language preference.

  7. Psychometric properties of the Persian version of Social Adaptation Self-evaluation Scale in community-dwelling older adults

    PubMed Central

    Farokhnezhad Afshar, Pouya; Foroughan, Mahshid; Vedadhir, AbouAli; Ghazi Tabatabaie, Mahmood

    2017-01-01

    Introduction The Social Adaptation Self-evaluation Scale (SASS) is used to measure social function and social motivation in depressed patients. There is little attention to social function in the treatment of depression. The aim of this study was to assess the validity and reliability of the Persian version of SASS (P-SASS) for older adults. Participants and methods This is a cross-sectional and methodological study. The participants were 550 community-dwelling older adults living in Tehran who were selected randomly from the primary health care centers. To assess the psychometric properties of SASS, we first did translation and cross-cultural adjustment on SASS and then used P-SASS and the Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS) for gathering data. A number of analyses, including Pearson’s correlation, exploratory factor analysis, and Cronbach’s α, and receiver operating characteristic curve were used to manage the data with the IBM SPSS Statistics V.22. Results The mean age of the participants was 66.09±6.67 years, and 58.9% of them were male. The Cronbach’s α was 0.97. The test–retest reliability correlation coefficient was 0.78. Principal component analysis showed that P-SASS consists of two components. P-SASS score showed a significant negative correlation with GDS (r=−0.91, P<0.01), which suggests good convergent validity. The P-SASS cutoff point was 28 (sensitivity: 0.97 and specificity: 0.94). Conclusion P-SASS has good reliability and validity for older adults. So, it can be considered as an appropriate tool to evaluate the social function and social motivation of older persons with and without depression. PMID:28392681

  8. Measuring Anhedonia in Adolescents: A Psychometric Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Leventhal, Adam M.; Unger, Jennifer B.; Audrain-McGovern, Janet; Sussman, Steve; Volk, Healther E.; Strong, David R.

    2015-01-01

    Anhedonia—the reduced capacity to experience pleasure—is a trait implicated in mental and physical health. Yet, psychometric data on anhedonia measures in adolescents are absent. We conducted an in-depth psychometric analysis of the Snaith-Hamilton Pleasure Scale (SHAPS; Snaith et al., 1995)—a self-report measure of anticipated pleasure response to 14 pleasant experiences—in adolescents. Adolescents (N=585; M age=14.5) completed the SHAPS and other paper-and-pencil surveys. Item response theory models were used to evaluate the psychometric performance of each SHAPS item. Correlations of the SHAPS with other personality and psychopathology measures were calculated to evaluate construct validity. Results showed that: (1) certain items (e.g., reported pleasure from basic experiences like “seeing smiling faces” or “smelling flowers”) provided more information about latent anhedonia than others; and (2) SHAPS scales exhibited construct-consistent convergent and discriminant validity (i.e., stronger correlations with low positive affect constructs; weaker correlations with negative affect). Reporting diminished pleasure from basic pleasant experiences accurately indicates adolescent anhedonia, which is important for future scale development and understanding the phenomenology of anhedonia in teens. These data support using the SHAPS for assessing anhedonia in epidemiological research and school-based universal prevention programming in general adolescent populations. PMID:25893676

  9. The Development and Psychometric Evaluation of the Brief Resilient Coping Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sinclair, Vaughn G.; Wallston, Kenneth A.

    2004-01-01

    This article introduces the Brief Resilient Coping Scale (BRCS), a 4-item measure designed to capture tendencies to cope with stress in a highly adaptive manner. Two samples of individuals with rheumatoid arthritis (ns = 90 and 140) provide evidence for the reliability and validity of the BRCS. The BRCS has adequate internal consistency and…

  10. The Development and Psychometric Properties of the Humanitarian Emergency Settings Perceived Needs (HESPER) Scale

    PubMed Central

    Semrau, Maya; van Ommeren, Mark; Blagescu, Monica; Griekspoor, Andre; Howard, Louise M.; Jordans, Mark; Lempp, Heidi; Marini, Anita; Pedersen, Jon; Pilotte, Isabelle; Slade, Mike

    2012-01-01

    Objectives. We developed the Humanitarian Emergency Settings Perceived Needs (HESPER) Scale, a valid and reliable scale to rapidly assess perceived needs of populations in humanitarian settings in low- and middle-income countries. Methods. We generated items through a literature review; reduced the number of items on the basis of a survey with humanitarian experts; pilot-tested the scale in Gaza, Jordan, Sudan, and the United Kingdom; and field-tested it in Haiti, Jordan, and Nepal. Results. During field-testing, intraclass correlation coefficients (absolute agreement) for the total number of unmet needs were 0.998 in Jordan, 0.986 in Haiti, and 0.995 in Nepal (interrater reliability), and 0.961 in Jordan and 0.773 in Nepal (test–retest reliability). Cohen’s κ for the 26 individual HESPER items ranged between 0.66 and 1.0 (interrater reliability) and between 0.07 and 1.0 (test–retest reliability) across sites. Most HESPER items correlated as predicted with related questions of the World Health Organization Quality of Life-100 (WHOQOL-100), and participants found items comprehensive and relevant, suggesting criterion (concurrent) validity and content validity. Conclusions. The HESPER Scale rapidly provides valid and reliable population-based data on perceived needs in humanitarian settings. PMID:22897533

  11. Exploratory Factor Analysis and Psychometric Evaluation of the Teacher Reporting Attitude Scale for Child Sexual Abuse

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walsh, Kerryann; Rassafiani, Mehdi; Mathews, Ben; Farrell, Ann; Butler, Des

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents an evaluation of an instrument to measure teachers' attitudes toward reporting child sexual abuse and discusses the instrument's merit for research into reporting practice. Based on responses from 444 Australian teachers, the Teachers' Reporting Attitude Scale for Child Sexual Abuse was evaluated using exploratory factor…

  12. Psychometric Evaluation of the Hebrew Language Version of the Satisfaction with Life Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anaby, Dana; Jarus, Tal; Zumbo, Bruno D.

    2010-01-01

    The satisfaction with life scale (SWLS) is a widely accepted and widely used tool for measuring well-being. Although its potential as a cross-cultural index is recognized, an introduction and systematic validation of the Hebrew version is needed. Thus, the purpose of this study is: (1) to describe the process of developing the Hebrew version of…

  13. Assessment of Romantic Perfectionism: Psychometric Properties of the Romantic Relationship Perfectionism Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matte, Melody; Lafontaine, Marie-France

    2012-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to provide validity evidence for the scores from the Romantic Relationship Perfectionism Scale. Results indicate a two-factor structure, adequate reliability, and overall good convergent, concurrent, discriminant, and incremental validity evidence. The strengths and limitations of this measure are discussed.…

  14. Measuring Kindness at School: Psychometric Properties of a School Kindness Scale for Children and Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Binfet, John Tyler; Gadermann, Anne M.; Schonert-Reichl, Kimberly A.

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we sought to create and validate a brief measure to assess students' perceptions of kindness in school. Participants included 1,753 students in Grades 4 to 8 attending public schools in a large school district in southern British Columbia. The School Kindness Scale (SKS) demonstrated a unidimensional factor structure and adequate…

  15. Psychometric Evaluation of the Arabic Language Version of the Demands of Immigration Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aroian, Karen J.; Kaskiri, Eleni A.; Templin, Thomas N.

    2008-01-01

    This study extends prior work with the Russian-language version of the Demands of Immigration Scale (DIS) with former Soviet immigrants and evaluates the reliability and validity of the Arabic-language version of the DIS with Arab immigrants. Three hundred and ninety-four Arab immigrant women completed the Arabic DIS and two measures of mood.…

  16. The Quality of Care and Support (QOCS) for People with Disability Scale: Development and Psychometric Properties

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lucas-Carrasco, Ramona; Eser, Erhan; Hao, Yuantao; McPherson, Kathryn M.; Green, Ann; Kullmann, Lajos

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes the development of a Quality of Care and Support (QOCS) scale for use with adult persons with physical and intellectual disabilities. In the pilot phase of the study, 12 centers from around the world carried out focus groups with people with physical and disabilities, their carers, and with professionals in order to identify…

  17. The CANEP Scale: Preliminary Psychometric Findings of a Measure of Youths' Perception of Their Neighborhood Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bisegger, Corinna; Cloetta, Bernhard; Ravens-Sieberer, Ulrike

    2008-01-01

    The impact of the environment on the quality of life and health is considered to be important for adults as well as for children and adolescents. To include the subjective view of children and adolescents in this context, instruments for measuring the perception of the environment are needed. The new scale CANEP (Children's and Adolescents'…

  18. Psychometric Evaluation of Data from the Race-Related Events Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crusto, Cindy A.; Dantzler, John; Roberts, Yvonne Humenay; Hooper, Lisa M.

    2015-01-01

    Using exploratory factor analysis, we examined the factor structure of data collected from the Race-Related Events Scale, which assesses perceived exposure to race-related stress. Our sample (N = 201) consisted of diverse caregivers of Head Start preschoolers. Three factors explained 81% of the variance in the data and showed sound reliability.

  19. The Three Domains of Disgust Scale: Factor Structure, Psychometric Properties, and Conceptual Limitations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olatunji, Bunmi O.; Adams, Thomas; Ciesielski, Bethany; David, Bieke; Sarawgi, Shivali; Broman-Fulks, Joshua

    2012-01-01

    This investigation examined the measurement properties of the Three Domains of Disgust Scale (TDDS). Principal components analysis in Study 1 (n = 206) revealed three factors of Pathogen, Sexual, and Moral Disgust that demonstrated excellent reliability, including test-retest over 12 weeks. Confirmatory factor analyses in Study 2 (n = 406)…

  20. Psychometric Properties of the Chinese Somatic Scale in Hong Kong Secondary School Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shek, Daniel T. L.; Mak, Wai Kwong

    1989-01-01

    Describes the chronic and acute subscales (SOMAC and SOMAA) of the Chinese Somatic Scale that was administered to 2150 Hong Kong secondary education students to measure their psychological well being. Results showed that both the SOMAC and SOMAA had acceptable reliability and validity status as compared with similar type tests. (GG)

  1. Career Adapt-Abilities Scale--Korea Form: Psychometric Properties and Construct Validity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tak, Jinkook

    2012-01-01

    The Career Adapt-Abilities Scale (CAAS)--Korea Form consists of four subscales, each with six items. The subscales measure concern, control, curiosity, and confidence as psychosocial resources for managing occupational transitions, developmental tasks, and work traumas. Internal consistency estimates for the subscale and total scores ranged from…

  2. Career Adapt-Abilities Scale-France Form: Psychometric Properties and Relationships to Anxiety and Motivation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pouyaud, Jacques; Vignoli, Emmanuelle; Dosnon, Odile; Lallemand, Noelle

    2012-01-01

    The CAAS-France Form consists of four scales, each with six items, which measure concern, control, curiosity, and confidence as psychosocial resources for managing occupational transitions, developmental tasks, and work traumas. Internal consistency estimates for the subscale and total scores ranged from moderate to good. The factor structure was…

  3. Psychometric Properties of the Working Memory Rating Scale for Spanish-Speaking English Language Learners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guzman-Orth, Danielle; Grimm, Ryan; Gerber, Michael; Orosco, Michael; Swanson, H. Lee; Lussier, Cathy

    2015-01-01

    The Working Memory Rating Scale (WMRS) was designed as a behavioral rating tool to assist teachers in identifying students at risk of working memory difficulties. The instrument was originally normed on 417 monolingual English-speaking children from the United Kingdom. The purpose of this study was to test the reliability and validity of the WMRS…

  4. The Psychometric Properties and Utility of the Short Sadistic Impulse Scale (SSIS)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Meara, Aisling; Davies, Jason; Hammond, Sean

    2011-01-01

    Sadistic personality disorder (SPD) has been underresearched and often misunderstood in forensic settings. Furthermore, personality disorders in general are the subject of much controversy in terms of their classification (i.e., whether they should be categorical or dimensional). The Sadistic Attitudes and Behaviors Scale (SABS; Davies & Hand,…

  5. Adaptation and Psychometric Properties of the Spanish Version of the Supports Intensity Scale (SIS)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Verdugo, Miguel-Angel; Arias, Benito; Ibanez, Alba; Schalock, Robert L.

    2010-01-01

    The Supports Intensity Scale (SIS) is used to determine the profile and intensity of the supports needed by a person to participate successfully in major life activities. With its publication into 13 languages, a need has arisen to document its reliability and validity across language and cultural groups. Here we explain the adaptation and the…

  6. The Intuitive Eating Scale-2: Item Refinement and Psychometric Evaluation with College Women and Men

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tylka, Tracy L.; Kroon Van Diest, Ashley M.

    2013-01-01

    The 21-item Intuitive Eating Scale (IES; Tylka, 2006) measures individuals' tendency to follow their physical hunger and satiety cues when determining when, what, and how much to eat. While its scores have demonstrated reliability and validity with college women, the IES-2 was developed to improve upon the original version. Specifically, we added…

  7. The Controllability Beliefs Scale Used with Carers of People with Intellectual Disabilities: Psychometric Properties

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dagnan, D.; Hull, A.; McDonnell, A.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Beliefs about the controllability of behaviour have been consistently shown to be important in understanding the responses of carers to the challenging behaviour of people with intellectual disabilities (IDs). This paper reports the reliability and validity of the Controllability Beliefs Scale (CBS), a 15-item measure of beliefs…

  8. Factorial Validity and Psychometric Examination of the Exercise Dependence Scale-Revised

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Downs, Danielle Symons; Hausenblas, Heather A.; Nigg, Claudio R.

    2004-01-01

    The research purposes were to examine the factorial and convergent validity, internal consistency, and test-retest reliability of the Exercise Dependence Scale (EDS). Two separate studies, containing a total of 1,263 college students, were undertaken to accomplish these purposes. Participants completed the EDS and measures of exercise behavior and…

  9. Emotional Eating Scale for Children and Adolescents: Psychometric Characteristics in a Spanish Sample

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perpina, Conxa; Cebolla, Ausias; Botella, Cristina; Lurbe, Empar; Torro, Maria-Isabel

    2011-01-01

    The aims of this study were to validate the Emotional Eating Scale version for children (EES-C) in a Spanish population and study the differences in emotional eating among children with binge eating (BE), overeating (OE), and no episodes of disordered eating (NED). The questionnaire was completed by 199 children aged 9 to 16 years. Confirmatory…

  10. Psychometric Validation of the Revised Family Affluence Scale: a Latent Variable Approach.

    PubMed

    Torsheim, Torbjørn; Cavallo, Franco; Levin, Kate Ann; Schnohr, Christina; Mazur, Joanna; Niclasen, Birgit; Currie, Candace

    The aim was to develop and test a brief revised version of the family affluence scale. A total of 7120 students from Denmark, Greenland, Italy, Norway, Poland, Romania, Scotland and Slovakia reported on a list of 16 potential indicators of affluence. Responses were subject to item screening and test of dimensionality. Bifactor analysis revealed a strong general factor of affluence in all countries, but with additional specific factors in all countries. The specific factors mainly reflected overlapping item content. Item screening was conducted to eliminate items with low discrimination and local dependence, reducing the number of items from sixteen to six: Number of computers, number of cars, own bedroom, holidays abroad, dishwasher, and bathroom. The six-item version was estimated with Samejima's graded response model, and tested for differential item functioning by country. Three of the six items were invariant across countries, thus anchoring the scale to a common metric across countries. The six-item scale correlated with parental reported income groups in six out of eight countries. Findings support a revision to six items in the family affluence scale.

  11. Psychometric Characteristics of the Korean Version of the Satisfaction with Life Scale Adapted for Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lim, Young-Jin

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the internal consistency reliability, test-retest reliability, factorial structure validity, and convergent validity of a Korean version of the Satisfaction With Life Scale adapted for children (K-SWLS-C). Participants consisted of 653 elementary school students (48% were male). The internal consistency of the…

  12. Psychometric Properties of the Korean Version of the Clinical Language Disorder Rating Scale (CLANG)

    PubMed Central

    Park, Seon-Cheol; Jang, Eun Young; Lee, Kang Uk; Lee, Jung Goo; Lee, Hwa-Young; Choi, Joonho

    2016-01-01

    Objective Our study aimed to measure inter-rater and test-retest reliability, concurrent and convergent validity, and factor solutions of the Korean version of the Clinical Language Disorder Rating Scale (CLANG). Methods The Korean version of the CLANG for assessing thought, language, and communication, the Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale, Young Mania Rating Scale, and Calgary Depression Scale for Schizophrenia were used to evaluate language disorder, formal thought disorder, positive and negative symptoms, manic symptoms, and depressive symptoms, respectively, in 167 hospitalized patients with schizophrenia. The factor solution was obtained by the direct oblimin method. A receiver operating characteristic curve was used to find the optimal cut-off score for discriminating schizophrenia patients with and without disorganized speech. Results Inter-rater reliability was considered moderate (intraclass coefficient=0.67, F=3.30, p=0.04), and test-retest reliability was considered high (r=0.94, p<0.001). Five factors, namely, pragmatics, disclosure, production, prosody, and association, were identified. An optimal cut-off score of 7 points with 84.5% sensitivity and 81.7% specificity was proposed for distinguishing schizophrenia patients with and without disorganized speech. Conclusion Our findings suggest that the Korean version of the CLANG is a promising tool for evaluating language disorder in patients with schizophrenia. PMID:26792040

  13. A Psychometric Study of the Bayley Scales of Infant and Toddler Development in Persian Language Children

    PubMed Central

    AZARI, Nadia; SOLEIMANI, Farin; VAMEGHI, Roshanak; SAJEDI, Firoozeh; SHAHSHAHANI, Soheila; KARIMI, Hossein; KRASKIAN, Adis; SHAHROKHI, Amin; TEYMOURI, Robab; GHARIB, Masoud

    2017-01-01

    Objective Bayley Scales of infant & toddler development is a well-known diagnostic developmental assessment tool for children aged 1–42 months. Our aim was investigating the validity & reliability of this scale in Persian speaking children. Materials & Methods The method was descriptive-analytic. Translation- back translation and cultural adaptation was done. Content & face validity of translated scale was determined by experts’ opinions. Overall, 403 children aged 1 to 42 months were recruited from health centers of Tehran, during years of 2013-2014 for developmental assessment in cognitive, communicative (receptive & expressive) and motor (fine & gross) domains. Reliability of scale was calculated through three methods; internal consistency using Cronbach’s alpha coefficient, test-retest and interrater methods. Construct validity was calculated using factor analysis and comparison of the mean scores methods. Results Cultural and linguistic changes were made in items of all domains especially on communication subscale. Content and face validity of the test were approved by experts’ opinions. Cronbach’s alpha coefficient was above 0.74 in all domains. Pearson correlation coefficient in various domains, were ≥ 0.982 in test retest method, and ≥0.993 in inter-rater method. Construct validity of the test was approved by factor analysis. Moreover, the mean scores for the different age groups were compared and statistically significant differences were observed between mean scores of different age groups, that confirms validity of the test. Conclusion The Bayley Scales of Infant and Toddler Development is a valid and reliable tool for child developmental assessment in Persian language children. PMID:28277556

  14. The Northwick Park Therapy Dependency Assessment scale: a psychometric analysis from a large multicentre neurorehabilitation dataset

    PubMed Central

    Alexandrescu, Roxana; Siegert, Richard J.; Turner-Stokes, Lynne

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Purpose: To assess the internal reliability, construct and concurrent validity and responsiveness of the Northwick Park Therapy Dependency Assessment (NPTDA) scale. Method: A cohort of 2505 neurorehabilitation patients submitted to the UK Rehabilitation Outcomes Collaborative database. Cronbach’s coefficient-α was used to assess internal reliability and factor analysis (FA) to assess construct validity. We compared NPTDA scores at admission and discharge to determine responsiveness. Results: Coefficient-α for the whole scale was 0.74. The exploratory FA resulted in a four-factor model (Physical, Psychosocial, Discharge planning and Activities) that accounted for 43% of variance. This model was further supported by the confirmatory FA. The final model had a good fit: root-mean-square error of approximation of 0.069, comparative fit index/Tucker–Lewis index of 0.739/0.701 and the goodness of fit index of 0.909. The NPTDA scores at admission and discharge were significantly different for each of the factors. Expected correlations were seen between the admission scores for the NPTDA, the Rehabilitation Complexity Scale (r = 0.30, p < 0.01) and the Functional Independence Measure (r = −0.25, p < 0.01). Conclusions: The scale demonstrated acceptable internal reliability and good construct and concurrent validity. NPTDA may be used to describe and quantify changes in therapy inputs in the course of a rehabilitation programme.Implications for RehabilitationThe Northwick Park Therapy Dependency Assessment (NPTDA) is designed as a measure therapy intervention, which reflects both quantitative and qualitative aspects of the inputs provided (including staff time and the different types of intervention) during inpatient rehabilitation.The scale demonstrated acceptable internal reliability and good construct and concurrent validity.NPTDA is responsive to change in the therapy inputs provided during neurorehabilitation between admission and

  15. The psychometric properties of the Turkish Stroke and Aphasia Quality Of Life Scale-39.

    PubMed

    Atamaz Calis, Funda; Celik, Serpil; Demir, Orcun; Aykanat, Dilek; Yagiz On, Arzu

    2016-06-01

    The Stroke and Aphasia Quality Of Life Scale (SAQOL-39) is a widely used instrument in assessing the quality of life in aphasic patients. Our purpose was to translate the SAQOL-39 into the Turkish language (SAQOL-39/TR) and assess its reliability and validity in patients who had aphasia. SAQOL-39/TR was obtained using the 'translation-backward translation' method and administered to 40 patients with aphasia. The reliability studies were performed by means of internal consistency and test-retest reliability. The validation studies were carried out by means of construct validity using within-scale analyses and analyses against the external criteria. Correlation analysis was performed between scales and the Ege Aphasia Test, the Barthel index, the 12-item General Health Questionnaire and the Brunnstrom recovery stages (BRS) of the arm, hand, and lower extremity. In the results, the scores of the SAQOL-39 were not different between groups. Cronbach's α variables were good for all domains (0.80, 0.88, 0.89, 0.82, and 0.83). Test-retest reliability was also high (0.96, 0.97, 0.91, 0.70, and 0.96). There were significant correlations with coefficients ranging from 0.36 to 0.60 among the domains of scale and other measures. Moderate-high correlations were also seen with BRS-arm, BRS-hand, and BRS-lower extremity (r, 0.27-0.58). It was found that all domains were highly related with all domains of Ege aphasia test, except praxia (P<0.001). This study showed that the SAQOL-39/TR has acceptable validity and reliability in assessing the quality of life. However, similar results of the scale in patients with dysarthria suggest that the SAQOL-39 may not be specific to only aphasic patients.

  16. Caregiver's concerns-quality of life scale (CC-QoLS): development and evaluation of psychometric properties.

    PubMed

    Unwin, Gemma; Deb, Shoumitro

    2014-10-01

    We have developed a Caregiver's Concerns-Quality of Life Scale (CC-QoLS) for adults with intellectual disabilities (ID) who exhibit aggressive behaviour. The CC-QoLS is a brief (8 items in each subscale, CC and QoL respectively) proxy measure completed by caregivers. This is a specific health related quality of life instrument (HRQoL) combined with measures of caregiver's concerns for use as an outcome measure to assess clinical and cost effectiveness of interventions for aggression in adults with ID. The CC-QoLS was found to have good face validity and very good test-retest reliability with an ICC of 0.81 for CC (range 0.46-0.83 across items) and 0.80 for QoL (range 0.65-0.81 across items). Similarly, the scale had good inter-rater reliability with an ICC of 0.67 for CC (range 0.31-0.63 across items) and 0.63 for QoL (range 0.31-0.65 across items). Internal consistency for each subscale was also good (Cronbach's alpha was 0.85 for CC and 0.80 for QoL; Split-half Spearman-Brown was 0.81 for CC and 0.70 for QoL). Furthermore, the scale showed good concurrent validity with measures of severity of aggressive behaviour, namely Modified Overt Aggression Scale (MOAS) (CC: r=0.4; p≤0.01 and QoL: r=-0.2; p≤0.05) and Aberrant Behavior Checklist-Irritability subscale (ABC-I) (CC: r=0.5; p≤0.01 and QoL: r=-0.02; p≤0.05) as well as Caregiver's Uplift and Burden Scale score (<0.05). We believe that the CC-QoLS is a user friendly, easy to complete, first-ever HRQoL measure for adults with ID and aggressive behaviour with very good psychometric properties.

  17. Psychometric validation of the German translation of the Gastrointestinal Symptom Rating Scale (GSRS) and Quality of Life in Reflux and Dyspepsia (QOLRAD) questionnaire in patients with reflux disease

    PubMed Central

    Kulich, Károly R; Malfertheiner, Peter; Madisch, Ahmed; Labenz, Joachim; Bayerdörffer, Ekkehard; Miehlke, Stephan; Carlsson, Jonas; Wiklund, Ingela K

    2003-01-01

    Background Symptoms of heartburn has an impact on health-related quality of life (HRQL). When a questionnaire is translated into a new language, a linguistic validation is necessary but not sufficient unless the psychometric characteristics have been verified. The aim is to document the psychometric characteristics of the German translation of the Gastrointestinal Symptom Rating Scale (GSRS) and Quality of Life in Reflux and Dyspepsia (QOLRAD) questionnaire. Methods 142 patients with symptoms of heartburn (Age: M = 47.5, ± 14.6; Males = 44.4%) completed the German translation of GSRS, the QOLRAD, the Short-Form-36 (SF-36) and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression (HAD) scale. Results The internal consistency reliability of GSRS ranged from 0.53–0.91 and of QOLRAD from 0.90–0.94, respectively. The test-retest reliability of GSRS ranged from 0.49–0.73 and of QOLRAD from 0.70–0.84. The relevant domains of the GSRS and QOLRAD domain scores significantly correlated. GSRS domains of Abdominal Pain and Constipation correlated (negatively) with most of the domains of the SF-36. The relevant QOLRAD domains significantly correlated with all SF-36 domains. Conclusions The psychometric characteristics of the German translation of GSRS and QOLRAD were found to be good, with satisfactory reliability and validity. The reliability of the GSRS Abdominal Pain domain was moderate. PMID:14613560

  18. Psychometric properties of the Physical Activity Scale for the Elderly in Chinese patients with COPD

    PubMed Central

    Tao, Yan-xia; Wang, Lan; Dong, Xiao-yan; Zheng, Hong; Zheng, Ya-shu; Tang, Xing-yue; Zhao, Yue; Zhang, Qing

    2017-01-01

    Background For patients with COPD, physical activity (PA) is recommended as the core component of pulmonary rehabilitation, but there is lack of a validated questionnaire for assessing the PA effectively. Aim To evaluate the reliability and validity of the Chinese version of Physical Activity Scale for the Elderly (PASE-C) in patients with COPD. Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted with 167 outpatients aged 60 years or older with COPD. Test−retest reliability and internal consistency were calculated by intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) and Cronbach’s coefficient α, respectively. Validity was evaluated by correlation with the International Physical Activity Questionnaire-Short (IPAQ-S), data of pedometer, Self-Efficacy for Managing Chronic Disease 6-Item Scale (SES6), Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS), Medical Outcomes Study 36-Item Short Form Health Survey (SF-36), grip strength, and disease characteristics. Results The PASE-C had an excellent seven-day test−retest reliability (ICC=0.98) and an acceptable internal consistency (Cronbach’s α=0.71). The content validity was supported by an item-content validity index, a scale-content validity index/universal agreement, and a scale-content validity index/average value of 0.70–1, 0.70, and 0.93, respectively. Concurrent validity was tested by correlation with IPAQ-S (r=0.651). Criterion validity was confirmed by correlation with the walking steps (r=0.611) and energy expenditure (r=0.493). For construct validity, PASE-C had correlations with SES6 (r=0.396), HADS for depression (r=−0.234), seven subscales of SF-36 (r=0.182–0.525), grip strength (r=0.341), and disease characteristics including the duration of COPD (r=−0.215), modified British Medical Research Council scale (r=−0.354), forced expiratory volume in one second as percentage of predicted (r=0.307), and Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease grade (r=−0.264), with a good construct validity (all P

  19. Psychometric properties of a Spanish version of the UPPS-P impulsive behavior scale: reliability, validity and association with trait and cognitive impulsivity.

    PubMed

    Verdejo-García, Antonio; Lozano, Oscar; Moya, Maribel; Alcázar, Miguel Angel; Pérez-García, Miguel

    2010-01-01

    Impulsivity is a multifaceted construct central to several forms of psychopathology. Recently, Lynam, Smith, Whiteside, and Cyders (2006) developed the UPPS-P scale, a multidimensional inventory that assesses 5 personality pathways contributing to impulsive behavior: negative urgency, lack of perseverance, lack of premeditation, sensation seeking, and positive urgency. In this study, we aimed (a) to analyze the psychometric properties of a Spanish version of the UPPS-P scale and (b) to explore the relationship between the different dimensions of the UPPS-P scale and conceptually related constructs including trait measures derived from different models of impulsive personality (the Gray's [1987] and Plutchik's [1984] models) and a state measure of cognitive impulsivity, the Delay-Discounting Test (Kirby, Petry, & Bickel, 1999). We administered the UPPS-P scale along with the Sensitivity to Punishment and Sensitivity to Reward Questionnaire (Torrubia, Avila, Molto, & Caseras, 2001), the Plutchik Impulsivity Scale (Plutchik & Van Praag, 1989), and the Delay-Discounting Test to a sample of 150 undergraduate students. Results showed that the Spanish adaptation of the UPPS-P scale have appropriate psychometric properties. Different dimensions of the UPPS-P were differentially associated with predicted conceptually related constructs. We conclude that the Spanish adaptation of the UPPS-P scale is a useful instrument for fine-grained assessment of impulsivity in Spanish-speaking adult population.

  20. Psychometric evaluation and normative data for the depression, anxiety, and stress scales-21 (DASS-21) in a nonclinical sample of U.S. adults.

    PubMed

    Sinclair, Samuel Justin; Siefert, Caleb J; Slavin-Mulford, Jenelle M; Stein, Michelle B; Renna, Megan; Blais, Mark A

    2012-09-01

    Health care professionals are coming under increased pressure to empirically monitor patient outcomes across settings as a means of improving clinical practice. Within the psychiatric and primary care communities, many have begun utilizing brief psychometric measures of psychological functioning to accomplish these goals. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the psychometric properties and clinical utility of the Depression, Anxiety, and Stress Scales-21-item version (DASS-21), and contribute normative data to facilitate interpretation using a sample of U.S. adults (N = 503). Item-scale convergence was generally supported, although assumptions of item-scale divergence were not met. Only 86%, 50%, and 43% of Depression, Anxiety, and Stress items, respectively, correlated significantly greater with their hypothesized scales than other scales. Internal consistency reliability was acceptable for all scales and comparable to existing research (αs = .91, .80, and .84 for Depression, Anxiety, and Stress, respectively). Scale-level correlations were greater than what has been reported elsewhere (range of rs = .68 to .73), and principal components analysis supported the extraction of only one component accounting for 47% of the item-level variance. However, confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) favored a three-factor structure when compared to a one-factor model. The implications for the health care professions are discussed.

  1. The controlling interpersonal style in a coaching context: development and initial validation of a psychometric scale.

    PubMed

    Bartholomew, Kimberley J; Ntoumanis, Nikos; Thøgersen-Ntoumani, Cecilie

    2010-04-01

    This article outlines the development and initial validation of the Controlling Coach Behaviors Scale (CCBS), a multidimensional self-report measure designed to assess sports coaches' controlling interpersonal style from the perspective of self-determination theory (Ryan & Deci, 2002). Study 1 generated a pool of items, based on past literature and feedback from coaches, athletes, and academic experts. The factorial structure of the questionnaire was tested using exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses across Studies 2 and 3. The final CCBS model in Study 3 comprised 4 factors (controlling use of rewards, conditional regard, intimidation, and excessive personal control) and was cross-validated using a third independent sample in Study 4. The scale demonstrated good content and factorial validity, as well as internal consistency and invariance across gender and sport type. Suggestions for its use in research pertaining to the darker side of coaching and sport participation are discussed.

  2. Psychometric properties of a four-component Norwegian Organizational Justice Scale.

    PubMed

    Olsen, Olav Kjellevold; Myrseth, Helga; Eidhamar, Are; Hystad, Sigurd W

    2012-04-01

    Organizational justice has attracted attention as a predictor of employees' mental and physical health as well as commitment and work outcomes. The lack of a Norwegian translation of an organizational justice scale has precluded its use in Norway. Four dimensions of the organizational justice construct were examined in a Norwegian military context, including facet measures of distributional, interpersonal, and informational justice developed by Colquitt in 2001, in addition to procedural justice developed by Moorman in 1991. Confirmatory factor analyses supported a four-dimensional structure with good internal consistency. Follow-up analyses have suggested that the four dimensions were nested beneath a general, latent organizational justice factor. A positive relationship between organizational justice and self-sacrificial behavior was found, indicating satisfactory construct validity. The results demonstrate that the Norwegian Organizational Justice Scale is a reliable and construct-valid measure of organizational justice in a Norwegian setting.

  3. Further psychometric evaluation of the Japanese version of an academic self-concept scale.

    PubMed

    Paik, Chie Matsuzawa; Michael, William B

    2002-05-01

    In the present study, the author replicated earlier research (Paik & Michael, 1999) seeking additional information on the reliability and construct validity of a Japanese academic self-concept scale, a 70-item questionnaire comprising 5 subscales (Aspiration, Anxiety, Academic Interest and Satisfaction, Leadership and Initiative, and Identification vs. Alienation). A sample of 196 Japanese high school students completed the scale. Internal consistency reliability for the 5 subscales ranged from .75 to .87. Confirmatory factor analyses performed on several alternative models showed that the a priori 5-factor model fit the observed data best-a finding consistent with the previous study. Results of Z tests revealed statistically significant score differences between genders and between high and low academic achievers.

  4. The Domain-Specific Risk Taking Scale for Adult Populations: Item Selection and Preliminary Psychometric Properties

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-12-01

    indicated residing in the United States , 101 in Canada, and the others, in a variety of countries (e.g., China, India, Israel, etc.). Perhaps not...the world-wide-web, we gained access to a sample of respondents in Canada and the United States that is far more representative of the general...distinguish between low and high scorers on the scale. Exploratory factor analysis ( EFA ) is extremely useful for constructing measures (Wegener

  5. [Development and psychometric validation of the Brief Smartphone Addiction Scale (BSAS) with schoolchidren].

    PubMed

    Csibi, Sándor; Demetrovics, Zsolt; Szabó, Attila

    2016-01-01

    Smartphone use among children increases continuously. A growing range of stimulating applications may trigger the risk of addiction. The aim of this study was to develop a brief, easy-to-use and score tool for screening children at risk for smartphone addiction. A 6-item agree-disagree Likert scale (6-point range), was developed on the basis of the 'components' model of addiction (Griffiths, 2005). The brief tool was administered to 441 Hungarian speaking schoolchildren (mean age=13.4 years, SD=2.22) along with the 26-item Smartphone Addiction Inventory (SPAI; Lin et al, 2014). Principal components analysis yielded a single component for the 6-item tool, which accounted for 52.38% of the total variance. The internal reliability of the scale was good (Cronbach's alpha=0.82). Content validity was confirmed by statistically significant differences between heavy and light users (p <.001). The brief tool correlated positively and significantly with the 26-item SPAI (r = 0.67, p <.001), that justified its congruent validity. Younger children (9-13 years) scored higher on the scale than their older (14-18 years) peers (p <.001). The Hungarian version of the brief smartphone addiction inventory appears to be a valid and reliable tool for screening for mobile phone addiction among schoolchildren.

  6. The psychometric properties of Chinese version of SCI Exercise Self-Efficacy Scale in patients with stroke

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Xiaofang; Liu, Yanjin; Wang, Aixia; Wang, Min

    2016-01-01

    Objective To test the Chinese version of the SCI Exercise Self-Efficacy Scale (C-ESES) in stroke patients and evaluate its validity and reliability. Background Physical inactivity is a well established and changeable risk factor for stroke, and regular exercise of 3–7 days per week is essential for stroke survivors and the general population. Though regular exercise is beneficial, it has been proved that duration, frequency, and intensity of exercise are generally low in stroke survivors. Methods The performance of the instrument was assessed in 350 Chinese stroke survivors and repeated in 50 patients to examine test–retest reliability. Questionnaires included a form on demographic and socioeconomic characteristics, C-ESES, and the Chinese version of the General Self-Efficacy Scale. The AMOS 20.0 and SPSS 17.0 were chosen to evaluate their validity and reliability. Results Even though 350 participants answered the questionnaires in the present study, useful data were obtained from 321 participants (response rate: 91.71%). Correlation between item and the total scale score (Item–Total Correlation) ranged from 0.551 to 0.718, indicating that no item needed to be omitted; two factors, with factor loading 0.620 and 0.806, were obtained from an exploratory principal components analysis, assuming 59.745% of the total variance. The two factors were named internal motivation and external motivation. A confirmatory factor analysis supported the results with a suitable model (χ5=291.157; df=185; P<0.001; root mean square error of approximation =0.044; goodness-of-fit index =0.938; adjusted goodness-of-fit index =0.914; comparative fit index =0.858). The C-ESES correlated well with the validated General Self-Efficacy Scale (r=0.827, P<0.01). Good internal consistency (Cronbach’s α=0.757 to 0.879) and test–retest reliability (r=0.750, P<0.01) were obtained. Conclusion The C-ESES is a short, easy to understand, and psychometrically sound measurement to evaluate

  7. Psychometric evaluation of a short observational tool for small-scale research projects in dementia.

    PubMed

    Smallwood, J; Irvine, E; Coulter, F; Connery, H

    2001-03-01

    Dementia is a degenerating illness and the lack of a reliable measure of self-report in particular presents particular difficulties for research. Often in the later stages of dementia behavioural measurement is the only tool available for the evaluation of treatment techniques. This paper describes and evaluates a short observational tool suitable for clinical assessment purposes. The scale has been shown to have the potential for adequate inter-rater reliability, test retest reliability, and convergent and divergent validity, if the study limitations reflecting statistical rather than ecological validity, and limitations of sample size are borne in mind.

  8. Development and Psychometric Testing of the Attitude Toward Potential Pregnancy Scale

    PubMed Central

    Paterno, Mary T.; Han, Hae-Ra

    2014-01-01

    Objective To develop and test a comprehensive tool for measuring women’s attitudes toward the possibility of becoming pregnant. Design Cross-sectional mixed methods study. Setting Two obstetric/gynecologic (OB/GYN) clinics and one family planning clinic in Baltimore, Maryland. Participants One-hundred thirty (130) non-pregnant, primarily African American women (84%) ages 18 to 29. Methods Participants completed a computer-based survey as part of a larger retrospective mixed methods study. The Attitude Toward Potential Pregnancy Scale (APPS) was assessed using exploratory factor analysis and hypothesis testing. Results Cronbach’s alpha for internal consistency for the APPS was 0.86. Item-total correlations ranged from 0.56 to 0.75. All items loaded on one factor. Support for construct validity was demonstrated using logistic regression, where the odds of being a highly effective contraceptive user decreased by 8% with each one-point increase in score on the APPS (odds ratio=0.92; confidence interval 0.87–0.98). Conclusions This study provides support for reliability and validity of the APPS. The APPS may be a useful tool for understanding pregnancy attitude in future studies and in clinical practice. Further research is needed to assess the usefulness of the scale with other groups of women, its utility in the clinical practice setting, and its potential predictive validity for unintended pregnancy. PMID:25316218

  9. The German VR Simulation Realism Scale--psychometric construction for virtual reality applications with virtual humans.

    PubMed

    Poeschl, Sandra; Doering, Nicola

    2013-01-01

    Virtual training applications with high levels of immersion or fidelity (for example for social phobia treatment) produce high levels of presence and therefore belong to the most successful Virtual Reality developments. Whereas display and interaction fidelity (as sub-dimensions of immersion) and their influence on presence are well researched, realism of the displayed simulation depends on the specific application and is therefore difficult to measure. We propose to measure simulation realism by using a self-report questionnaire. The German VR Simulation Realism Scale for VR training applications was developed based on a translation of scene realism items from the Witmer-Singer-Presence Questionnaire. Items for realism of virtual humans (for example for social phobia training applications) were supplemented. A sample of N = 151 students rated simulation realism of a Fear of Public Speaking application. Four factors were derived by item- and principle component analysis (Varimax rotation), representing Scene Realism, Audience Behavior, Audience Appearance and Sound Realism. The scale developed can be used as a starting point for future research and measurement of simulation realism for applications including virtual humans.

  10. Psychometric Properties of the “Sport Motivation Scale (SMS)” Adapted to Physical Education

    PubMed Central

    Granero-Gallegos, Antonio; Baena-Extremera, Antonio; Gómez-López, Manuel; Sánchez-Fuentes, José Antonio; Abraldes, J. Arturo

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the factor structure of a Spanish version of the Sport Motivation Scale adapted to physical education. A second aim was to test which one of three hypothesized models (three, five and seven-factor) provided best model fit. 758 Spanish high school students completed the Sport Motivation Scale adapted for Physical Education and also completed the Learning and Performance Orientation in Physical Education Classes Questionnaire. We examined the factor structure of each model using confirmatory factor analysis and also assessed internal consistency and convergent validity. The results showed that all three models in Spanish produce good indicators of fitness, but we suggest using the seven-factor model (χ2/gl = 2.73; ECVI = 1.38) as it produces better values when adapted to physical education, that five-factor model (χ2/gl = 2.82; ECVI = 1.44) and three-factor model (χ2/gl = 3.02; ECVI = 1.53). Key Points Physical education research conducted in Spain has used the version of SMS designed to assess motivation in sport, but validity reliability and validity results in physical education have not been reported. Results of the present study lend support to the factorial validity and internal reliability of three alternative factor structures (3, 5, and 7 factors) of SMS adapted to Physical Education in Spanish. Although all three models in Spanish produce good indicators of fitness, but we suggest using the seven-factor model. PMID:25435772

  11. Emotional Eating Scale for children and adolescents: psychometric characteristics in a Spanish sample.

    PubMed

    Perpiñá, Conxa; Cebolla, Ausiàs; Botella, Cristina; Lurbe, Empar; Torró, Maria-Isabel

    2011-01-01

    The aims of this study were to validate the Emotional Eating Scale version for children (EES-C) in a Spanish population and study the differences in emotional eating among children with binge eating (BE), overeating (OE), and no episodes of disordered eating (NED). The questionnaire was completed by 199 children aged 9 to 16 years. Confirmatory factor analysis revealed five scales: eating in response to anger, anxiety, restlessness, helplessness, and depression. The EES-C showed good internal consistency and test-retest reliability, and it showed moderate relationships with measures of disordered-eating [Children's Eating Attitudes Test-26 (ChEAT-26), Questionnaire of Eating and Weight Patterns-Adolescent Version (QEWP-A)] and psychopathology (State-Trait Anxiety Inventory for Children, Children's Depression Inventory, Child Behavior Checklist). There were significant differences between the BE/NED groups (with the OE group in the middle position) in desire to eat when Anger (the girls in BE group, and the oldest children in OE group obtaining higher scores) or Helplessness were present. Eating due to Depression was higher in the older groups. Multiple regression analysis conducted showed that anxiety-trait was the best predictor of emotional eating. Results support the potential utility of the EES-C in the study of emotional eating in children and its validity in the Spanish population.

  12. Hypervigilance in college students: Associations with betrayal and dissociation and psychometric properties in a Brief Hypervigilance Scale.

    PubMed

    Bernstein, Rosemary E; Delker, Brianna C; Knight, Jeffrey A; Freyd, Jennifer J

    2015-09-01

    Betrayal trauma theory (Freyd, 1994, 1996) proposes that traumas high in social betrayal are expected to lead to psychological outcomes of dissociation, amnesia, and/or shame because these responses are adaptive to a survivor trying to preserve a necessary relationship in the face of mistreatment. Within the field of trauma studies more generally, there is substantial support for the proposition that traumas that cause intense fear should lead to posttraumatic anxiety and hypervigilance. Despite ample evidence for both theorized causal pathways, very few studies have tested associations between betrayal exposure, hypervigilance, and dissociation. The current study had 2 aims: first, as no self-report measure of hypervigilance had been developed for nonveteran populations, we sought to identify a subset of Hypervigilance Questionnaire (Knight, 1993) items that validly and reliably measure hypervigilance within college undergraduates (n = 489; 62.6% female, 69.9% Caucasian) with and without elevated levels of posttraumatic stress. Second, we tested the associations among trauma history, hypervigilance, and dissociation. Psychometric analyses revealed 5 hypervigilance items we introduce as the Brief Hypervigilance Scale. Partial correlations revealed that each posttraumatic response was not related to a history of low betrayal trauma (i.e. non-interpersonal trauma) controlling for betrayal trauma (i.e. interpersonal trauma), but was related to betrayal trauma controlling for low betrayal trauma. These associations remained significant after controlling for the other posttraumatic response (i.e. hypervigilance or dissociation). Follow-up analyses revealed that hypervigilance was independently associated with adult, but not child high betrayal trauma, and the opposite was true for dissociation. Implications for theory, research, and clinical practice are discussed.

  13. Psychometric properties of the Perceived Stress Scale (PSS): measurement invariance between athletes and non-athletes and construct validity

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Ju-Han; Nien, Chiao-Lin; Hsu, Ya-Wen; Liu, Hong-Yu

    2016-01-01

    Background Although Perceived Stress Scale (PSS, Cohen, Kamarack & Mermelstein, 1983) has been validated and widely used in many domains, there is still no validation in sports by comparing athletes and non-athletes and examining related psychometric indices. Purpose The purpose of this study was to examine the measurement invariance of PSS between athletes and non-athletes, and examine construct validity and reliability in the sports contexts. Methods Study 1 sampled 359 college student-athletes (males = 233; females = 126) and 242 non-athletes (males = 124; females = 118) and examined factorial structure, measurement invariance and internal consistency. Study 2 sampled 196 student-athletes (males = 139, females = 57, Mage = 19.88 yrs, SD = 1.35) and examined discriminant validity and convergent validity of PSS. Study 3 sampled 37 student-athletes to assess test-retest reliability of PSS. Results Results found that 2-factor PSS-10 fitted the model the best and had appropriate reliability. Also, there was a measurement invariance between athletes and non-athletes; and PSS positively correlated with athletic burnout and life stress but negatively correlated with coping efficacy provided evidence of discriminant validity and convergent validity. Further, the test-retest reliability for PSS subscales was significant (r = .66 and r = .50). Discussion It is suggested that 2-factor PSS-10 can be a useful tool in assessing perceived stress either in sports or non-sports settings. We suggest future study may use 2-factor PSS-10 in examining the effects of stress on the athletic injury, burnout, and psychiatry disorders. PMID:27994983

  14. Psychometric evaluation of the Persian version of the Templer's Death Anxiety Scale in cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Soleimani, Mohammad Ali; Yaghoobzadeh, Ameneh; Bahrami, Nasim; Sharif, Saeed Pahlevan; Sharif Nia, Hamid

    2016-10-01

    In this study, 398 Iranian cancer patients completed the 15-item Templer's Death Anxiety Scale (TDAS). Tests of internal consistency, principal components analysis, and confirmatory factor analysis were conducted to assess the internal consistency and factorial validity of the Persian TDAS. The construct reliability statistic and average variance extracted were also calculated to measure construct reliability, convergent validity, and discriminant validity. Principal components analysis indicated a 3-component solution, which was generally supported in the confirmatory analysis. However, acceptable cutoffs for construct reliability, convergent validity, and discriminant validity were not fulfilled for the three subscales that were derived from the principal component analysis. This study demonstrated both the advantages and potential limitations of using the TDAS with Persian-speaking cancer patients.

  15. Development and psychometric testing of the Register - Connectedness Scale for Older Adults.

    PubMed

    Register, M Elizabeth; Herman, Joanne; Tavakoli, Abbas S

    2011-02-01

    Connectedness, maintaining active engagement with life, is crucial to successful aging. Yet, no instruments were found to measure connectedness. The purpose of this study was to develop and test a connectedness scale for older adults. A 72-item instrument was administered to 428 community-dwelling older adults. The sample was largely female, White widows/widowers, with a mean age of 76 (SD 6.95) years. The instrument was reduced to 45 items representing five factors with loadings ranging from .40 to .86. The factor labels and their reliability estimates were: (a) self-regulating (.86), (b) facing aging (.85), (c) being part of a family (.87), (d) having friends (.87), and (e) being spiritual (.88). This promising instrument may advance the science of successful aging.

  16. Psychometric properties of the adjective rating scale for withdrawal across treatment groups, gender, and over time.

    PubMed

    Barbosa-Leiker, Celestina; McPherson, Sterling; Mamey, Mary Rose; Burns, G Leonard; Roll, John

    2014-02-01

    The adjective rating scale for withdrawal (ARSW) is commonly used to assess opiate withdrawal in clinical practice and research. The aims of this study were to examine the factor structure of the ARSW, test measurement invariance across gender and treatment groups, and assess longitudinal measurement invariance across the clinical trial. Secondary data analysis of the National Drug Abuse Treatment Clinical Trials Network 000-3, a randomized clinical trial comparing two tapering strategies, was performed. The ARSW was analyzed at baseline, end of taper and 1-month follow-up (N=515 opioid-dependent individuals). A 1-factor model of the ARSW fit the data and demonstrated acceptable reliability. Measurement invariance was supported across gender and taper groups. Longitudinal measurement invariance was not found across the course of the trial, with baseline assessment contributing to the lack of invariance. If change over time is of interest, change from post-treatment through follow-up may offer the most valid comparison.

  17. Psychometric properties of the Chinese version of the Self-Efficacy for Appropriate Medication Use Scale in patients with stroke

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Xiao-fang; Liu, Yan-jin; Wang, Ai-xia; Lv, Pei-hua

    2016-01-01

    Background It has been reported that stroke has a higher incidence and mortality rate in the People’s Republic of China compared to the global average. These conditions can be managed by proper medication use, but ensuring medication adherence is challenging. Objective To translate the Self-Efficacy for Appropriate Medication Use Scale into Chinese and test its validity and reliability in patients with stroke. Methods Instrument performances were measured from January 15, 2015 to April 28, 2015 on a convenience sample of 400 patients with stroke recruited at four neurology departments of the First Affiliated Hospital of Zhengzhou University. Questionnaires included the Chinese versions of the Self-Efficacy for Appropriate Medication Use Scale (C-SEAMS) and the General Self-Efficacy Scale (C-GSE). Construct validity, convergent validity, internal consistency, and test–retest reliability were measured. Results Item analysis showed that item-to-total correlations were in the range of 0.362–0.672. Exploratory factor analysis revealed two factors (which accounted for 60.862% of total variance), with factor loading ranging from 0.534 to 0.756. Confirmatory factor analysis was performed to support the results, with an acceptable fit (χ2=73.716; df=64; P<0.01; goodness-of-fit index =0.902; adjusted goodness-of-fit index =0.897; comparative fit index =0.865; root-mean-square error of approximation =0.058). The convergent validity of the C-SEAMS correlated well with the validated measure of the C-GSE in measuring self-efficacy (r=0.531, P<0.01). Good internal consistency (Cronbach’s alpha ranged from 0.826 to 0.915) and test–retest reliability (Pearson’s correlation coefficient r=0.642, P<0.01) were found. Conclusion The C-SEAMS is a brief and psychometrically sound measure for evaluating self-efficacy for medication adherence in the Chinese population with stroke. PMID:27042023

  18. Development and Psychometric Properties of the Instrumental Activities of Daily Living: Compensation Scale

    PubMed Central

    Schmitter-Edgecombe, Maureen; Parsey, Carolyn; Lamb, Richard

    2014-01-01

    The Instrumental Activities of Daily Living – Compensation (IADL-C) scale was developed to capture early functional difficulties and to quantify compensatory strategy use that may mitigate functional decline in the aging population. The IADL-C was validated in a sample of cognitively healthy older adults (N=184) and individuals with mild cognitive impairment (MCI; N=92) and dementia (N=24). Factor analysis and Rasch item analysis led to the 27-item IADL-C informant questionnaire with four functional domain subscales (money and self-management, home daily living, travel and event memory, and social skills). The subscales demonstrated good internal consistency (Rasch reliability 0.80 to 0.93) and test-retest reliability (Spearman coefficients 0.70 to 0.91). The IADL-C total score and subscales showed convergent validity with other IADL measures, discriminant validity with psychosocial measures, and the ability to discriminate between diagnostic groups. The money and self management subscale showed notable difficulties for individuals with MCI, whereas difficulties with home daily living became more prominent for dementia participants. Compensatory strategy use increased in the MCI group and decreased in the dementia group. PMID:25344901

  19. Development and psychometric properties of the instrumental activities of daily living: compensation scale.

    PubMed

    Schmitter-Edgecombe, Maureen; Parsey, Carolyn; Lamb, Richard

    2014-12-01

    The Instrumental Activities of Daily Living - Compensation (IADL-C) scale was developed to capture early functional difficulties and to quantify compensatory strategy use that may mitigate functional decline in the aging population. The IADL-C was validated in a sample of cognitively healthy older adults (N=184) and individuals with mild cognitive impairment (MCI; N=92) and dementia (N=24). Factor analysis and Rasch item analysis led to the 27-item IADL-C informant questionnaire with four functional domain subscales (money and self-management, home daily living, travel and event memory, and social skills). The subscales demonstrated good internal consistency (Rasch reliability 0.80 to 0.93) and test-retest reliability (Spearman coefficients 0.70 to 0.91). The IADL-C total score and subscales showed convergent validity with other IADL measures, discriminant validity with psychosocial measures, and the ability to discriminate between diagnostic groups. The money and self management subscale showed notable difficulties for individuals with MCI, whereas difficulties with home daily living became more prominent for dementia participants. Compensatory strategy use increased in the MCI group and decreased in the dementia group.

  20. Descriptive Characteristics and Initial Psychometric Properties of the Non-Suicidal Self-Injury Disorder Scale.

    PubMed

    Victor, Sarah E; Davis, Tchiki; Klonsky, E David

    2016-06-07

    Non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI) is highly prevalent and associated with tissue damage, emotional distress, and psychiatric disorders. While often discussed in the context of Borderline Personality Disorder and suicide, research demonstrates that NSSI is distinct from these constructs and should be viewed as an independent diagnostic category. Recently, Non-Suicidal Self-Injury Disorder (NSSID) was included in the revised Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders as a condition for further study. In this article, we describe the properties of a self-report measure designed to assess proposed criteria for NSSID. Undergraduate students at 2 large, public universities completed the NSSID Scale (NSSIDS) along with other measures of NSSI characteristics and psychopathology. Among participants with a history of NSSI, approximately half (54.55%) met diagnostic criteria for NSSID. Participants were most frequently excluded from an NSSID diagnosis on the basis of criterion A (frequency of NSSI) and criterion E (distress or impairment related to NSSI), while participants were least likely to be excluded from diagnosis on the basis of criterion D (NSSI method exclusions) and criterion F (diagnostic "rule-outs"). Consistent with previous literature, the most commonly reported precipitants to NSSI were negative feelings or thoughts (criterion C2). Participants who met criteria for NSSID reported more severe depression, anxiety, and NSSI than participants who engaged in NSSI but did not meet criteria for NSSID. These results support the use of the NSSIDS as a reliable and valid self-report measure of NSSID symptoms.

  1. Measuring Sexual Motives: A Test of the Psychometric Properties of the Sexual Motivations Scale.

    PubMed

    Jardin, Charles; Garey, Lorra; Zvolensky, Michael J

    2016-11-14

    Sexual motives refer to functions served by sexual behavior. The Sex Motivations Scale (SMS) has frequently been used to assess sexual motives. At its development, the SMS demonstrated good internal consistency; convergent, divergent, and criterion validity; and configural invariance across sex, age, and Caucasians and African Americans. Yet the metric and scalar invariance of the SMS has not been examined, nor has the measurement invariance of the SMS across Hispanic and Asian Americans, sexual minority status, and relationship status been tested. The criterion validity of the SMS also has yet to be examined for nonintercourse sexual behaviors, such as sexting. The present study aimed to address these gaps in a diverse sample of 2,201 college students (77.60% female; Mage = 22.06; 27.84% Caucasian). Results further affirmed the configural, metric, and scalar invariance of the SMS. The convergent and divergent validity of the SMS was supported in relation to positive and negative affect and attachment patterns; and specific SMS subscales demonstrated associations with sexual intercourse behaviors and sexting, supporting the criterion validity of the SMS. These findings suggest the relevance of the SMS in assessing sexual motives across diverse populations and behaviors.

  2. The Coaching Behavior Scale for Sport (CBS-S): A psychometric evaluation of the Swedish version.

    PubMed

    Carlsson, A; Lundqvist, C

    2016-01-01

    The present study validated a Swedish version of the 47-item Coaching Behavior Scale for Sport (CBS-S). Sample 1 consisted of 506 team sport athletes [262 men and 244 women; mean age: 22.20, standard deviation (SD) = 3.90] distributed across 41 coaches at the two highest national levels of various sports. Athletes completed the CBS-S and established questionnaires of coaching behaviors (LSS), self-confidence (CSAI-2R), and coach-athlete relationship (CART-Q). An additional sample of 39 basketball players (21 men and 18 women; mean age = 17.40, SD = 2.39) completed the CBS-S twice, approximately 4 weeks apart. Confirmatory factor analysis showed an acceptable model fit for the seven-factor version of the CBS-S, although two items of the negative personal rapport subscale displayed insufficient factor loadings. Correlations between the subscales of the CBS-S and established instruments were in accordance with theoretical expectations, supporting the concurrent validity. Cronbach's alpha (> 0.82) for all dimensions provided support for the reliability of the CBS-S, and test-retest correlations indicated moderate stability over time. Cultural differences in the assessment of coaching behaviors and the usability of the CBS-S by coaches for self-reflection and development are discussed.

  3. Psychometric Validation of the Anticipated Effects of Alcohol Mixed With Energy Drinks Scale.

    PubMed

    Norberg, Melissa M; Newins, Amie R; Mills, Llewellyn; Ham, Lindsay S

    2017-03-02

    Young people are increasingly consuming alcohol mixed with energy drinks (AmEDs). As coingestion of these beverages results in greater adverse consequences than from drinking alcohol alone, we need to understand what factors contribute to and deter coingestion. Existing studies in this area have not utilized a theoretically based or empirically validated measure of outcome expectancies for drinking AmEDs. Our study modified Morean, Corbin, and Treat's (2012) Anticipated Effects of Alcohol Scale to assess the expected effects of drinking AmEDs. We evaluated the factor structure and concurrent validity of the Anticipated Effects of Alcohol Mixed with Energy Drinks (AEAMEDS) among 549 university students, aged 18-25, who had a lifetime history of consuming alcohol (231 had consumed AmEDs in the past 90 days). Exploratory and confirmatory factor analysis supported a 4-factor structure. Consistent with hypotheses, stronger high arousal/positive expectancies and weaker low arousal/negative expectancies were associated with greater AmED use. At the bivariate level, stronger low arousal/positive expectancies were associated with greater quantities of AmED use, but this relationship disappeared when taking into account other outcome expectancies. Moreover, students expected low arousal/positive expectancies to be less intense when consuming AmEDs than alcohol alone, but ratings for all other AmED expectancies were equivalent to consuming alcohol alone. These findings contribute to our knowledge of risk and protective factors for AmED use. (PsycINFO Database Record

  4. Psychometric Properties of the Adjective Rating Scale for Withdrawal across treatment groups, gender, and over time

    PubMed Central

    Barbosa-Leiker, Celestina; McPherson, Sterling; Mamey, Mary Rose; Burns, G. Leonard; Roll, John

    2013-01-01

    The Adjective Rating Scale of Withdrawal (ARSW) is commonly used to assess opiate withdrawal in clinical practice and research. The aims of this study were to examine the factor structure of the ARSW, test measurement invariance across gender and treatment groups, and assess longitudinal measurement invariance across the clinical trial. Secondary data analysis of the National Drug Abuse Treatment Clinical Trials Network 000-3, a randomized clinical trial comparing two tapering strategies, was performed. The ARSW was analyzed at baseline, end of taper and 1-month follow-up (N =515 opioid-dependent individuals). A 1-factor model of the ARSW fit the data and demonstrated acceptable reliability. Measurement invariance was supported across gender and taper groups. Longitudinal measurement invariance was not found across the course of the trial, with baseline assessment contributing to the lack of invariance. If change over time is of interest, change from post-treatment through follow-up may offer the most valid comparison. PMID:24074852

  5. Cross-Cultural Adaptation and Psychometric Properties Testing of the Arabic Anterior Knee Pain Scale.

    PubMed

    Alshehri, Abdullah; Lohman, Everett; Daher, Noha S; Bahijri, Khalid; Alghamdi, Abdulmohsen; Altorairi, Nezar; Arnons, Arin; Matar, Abdullah

    2017-04-01

    BACKGROUND PFPS is one of the most frequently occurring overuse injuries affecting the lower limbs. A variety of functional and self-reported outcome measures have been used to assess clinical outcomes of patients with PFPS, however, only the Anterior Knee Pain Scale (AKPS) has been designed for PFPS patients. MATERIAL AND METHODS We followed international recommendations to perform a cross-cultural adaptation of the AKPS. The Arabic AKPS and the Arabic RAND 36-item Health Survey were administered to 40 patients who were diagnosed with PFPS. Participants were assessed at baseline and after 2 to 3 days assessed with the Arabic AKPS only. The measurements tested were reliability, validity, and feasibility. RESULTS The Arabic AKPS showed high reliability for both temporal stability, internal consistency (Cronbach's alpha was 0.81 for the first assessment and 0.75 for the second), excellent test-retest reliability (Intraclass Correlation Coefficients ICC=0.96; 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.93, 0.98) and good agreement (standard error of measurement SEM=1.8%). The Arabic AKPS was significantly correlated with physical components of the RAND 36-Item Health Survey (Spearman's rho=0.69: p<0.001). No ceiling or floor effects were observed. CONCLUSIONS The Arabic AKPS is a valid and reliable tool and is comparable to the original English version and other translated versions.

  6. Exploration of the psychometric characteristics of the Liebowitz Social Anxiety Scale in a Spanish adolescent sample.

    PubMed

    Zubeidat, Ihab; Salinas, José María; Sierra, Juan Carlos

    2008-01-01

    Social phobia is an excessive concern about scrutiny by other people in situations the person considers embarrassing or humiliating. The purpose of this study is to explore the factor structure, reliability, and validity of the social fear and social avoidance subscales of the Liebowitz Social Anxiety Scale (LSAS) and to analyze the score distribution of both subscales. To this end, we assessed a sample of 1,012 Spanish adolescents attending school. The results of a first-order factor analysis indicate the existence of a dominant factor in both subscales of the LSAS--as well as three other less relevant factors--and explain most of the variance of the subscales. The internal consistency of the first factor was quite high in both subscales. The LSAS and its two subscales showed adequate theoretical validity with different variables related to social interaction. Finally, the different scores obtained in both subscales make it possible to group adolescents into three clusters with different characteristics. A study of the sociodemographic variables of the components of the clusters showed a significant relation only with sex.

  7. Cross-Cultural Adaptation and Psychometric Properties Testing of the Arabic Anterior Knee Pain Scale

    PubMed Central

    Alshehri, Abdullah; Lohman, Everett; Daher, Noha S.; Bahijri, Khalid; Alghamdi, Abdulmohsen; Altorairi, Nezar; Arnos, Arin; Matar, Abdullah

    2017-01-01

    Background PFPS is one of the most frequently occurring overuse injuries affecting the lower limbs. A variety of functional and self-reported outcome measures have been used to assess clinical outcomes of patients with PFPS, however, only the Anterior Knee Pain Scale (AKPS) has been designed for PFPS patients. Material/Methods We followed international recommendations to perform a cross-cultural adaptation of the AKPS. The Arabic AKPS and the Arabic RAND 36-item Health Survey were administered to 40 patients who were diagnosed with PFPS. Participants were assessed at baseline and after 2 to 3 days assessed with the Arabic AKPS only. The measurements tested were reliability, validity, and feasibility. Results The Arabic AKPS showed high reliability for both temporal stability, internal consistency (Cronbach’s alpha was 0.81 for the first assessment and 0.75 for the second), excellent test-retest reliability (Intraclass Correlation Coefficients ICC=0.96; 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.93, 0.98) and good agreement (standard error of measurement SEM=1.8%). The Arabic AKPS was significantly correlated with physical components of the RAND 36-Item Health Survey (Spearman’s rho=0.69: p<0.001). No ceiling or floor effects were observed. Conclusions The Arabic AKPS is a valid and reliable tool and is comparable to the original English version and other translated versions. PMID:28364114

  8. The development and psychometric properties of a new scale to measure mental illness related stigma by health care providers: The opening minds scale for Health Care Providers (OMS-HC)

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Research on the attitudes of health care providers towards people with mental illness has repeatedly shown that they may be stigmatizing. Many scales used to measure attitudes towards people with mental illness that exist today are not adequate because they do not have items that relate specifically to the role of the health care provider. Methods We developed and tested a new scale called the Opening Minds Scale for Health Care Providers (OMS-HC). After item-pool generation, stakeholder consultations and content validation, focus groups were held with 64 health care providers/trainees and six people with lived experience of mental illness to develop the scale. The OMS-HC was then tested with 787 health care providers/trainees across Canada to determine its psychometric properties. Results The initial testing OMS-HC scale showed good internal consistency, Cronbach’s alpha = 0.82 and satisfactory test-retest reliability, intraclass correlation = 0.66 (95% CI 0.54 to 0.75). The OMC-HC was only weakly correlated with social desirability, indicating that the social desirability bias was not likely to be a major determinant of OMS-HC scores. A factor analysis favoured a two-factor structure which accounted for 45% of the variance using 12 of the 20 items tested. Conclusions The OMS–HC provides a good starting point for further validation as well as a tool that could be used in the evaluation of programs aimed at reducing mental illness related stigma by health care providers. The OMS-HC incorporates various dimensions of stigma with a modest number of items that can be used with busy health care providers. PMID:22694771

  9. Korean Version of Inventory of Complicated Grief Scale: Psychometric Properties in Korean Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    We aimed to validate the Inventory of Complicated Grief (ICG)-Korean version among 1,138 Korean adolescents, representing a response rate of 57% of 1,997 students. Participants completed a set of questionnaires including demographic variables (age, sex, years of education, experience of grief), the ICG, the Children's Depression Inventory (CDI) and the Lifetime Incidence of Traumatic Events-Child (LITE-C). Exploratory factor analysis was performed to determine whether the ICG items indicated complicated grief in Korean adolescents. The internal consistency of the ICG-Korean version was Cronbach's α=0.87. The test-retest reliability for a randomly selected sample of 314 participants in 2 weeks was r=0.75 (P<0.001). Concurrent validity was assessed using a correlation between the ICG total scores and the CDI total scores (r=0.75, P<0.001). The criterion-related validity based on the comparison of ICG total scores between adolescents without complicated grief (1.2±3.7) and adolescent with complicated grief (3.2±6.6) groups was relatively high (t=5.71, P<0.001). The data acquired from the 1,138 students was acceptable for a factor analysis (Kaiser-Meyer-Olkin Measure of Sampling Adequacy=0.911; Bartlett's Test of Sphericity, χ2=13,144.7, P<0.001). After omission of 3 items, the value of Cronbach's α increased from 0.87 for the 19-item ICG-Korean version to 0.93 for the 16-item ICG-Korean version. These results suggest that the ICG is a useful tool in assessing for complicated grief in Korean adolescents. However, the 16-item version of the ICG appeared to be more valid compared to the 19-item version of the ICG. We suggest that the 16-item version of the ICG be used to screen for complicated grief in Korean adolescents. PMID:26770046

  10. Psychometric Properties of the Caregiver Assessment of Movement Participation Scale for Screening Children with Development Coordination Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tsang, Kwan Lan; Bond, Trevor; Lo, Sing Kai

    2010-01-01

    Using Rasch analysis, the psychometric properties of a newly developed 35-item parent-proxy instrument, the Caregiver Assessment of Movement Participation (CAMP), designed to measure movement participation problems in children with Developmental Coordination Disorder, were examined. The CAMP was administered to 465 school children aged 5-10 years.…

  11. Assessing the Key Processes of Youth-Led Participatory Research: Psychometric Analysis and Application of an Observational Rating Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ozer, Emily J.; Douglas, Laura

    2015-01-01

    Youth-led Participatory Action Research (YPAR)--in which young people conduct research aimed at improving problems in their schools and communities--is increasing in public health, youth development, and education. We report on the development and psychometric testing of the YPAR Process Template (YPT)--to assess the quality of key YPAR processes…

  12. Development and psychometric evaluation of a new team effectiveness scale for all types of community adult mental health teams: a mixed-methods approach.

    PubMed

    El Ansari, Walid; Lyubovnikova, Joanne; Middleton, Hugh; Dawson, Jeremy F; Naylor, Paul B; West, Michael A

    2016-05-01

    Defining 'effectiveness' in the context of community mental health teams (CMHTs) has become increasingly difficult under the current pattern of provision required in National Health Service mental health services in England. The aim of this study was to establish the characteristics of multi-professional team working effectiveness in adult CMHTs to develop a new measure of CMHT effectiveness. The study was conducted between May and November 2010 and comprised two stages. Stage 1 used a formative evaluative approach based on the Productivity Measurement and Enhancement System to develop the scale with multiple stakeholder groups over a series of qualitative workshops held in various locations across England. Stage 2 analysed responses from a cross-sectional survey of 1500 members in 135 CMHTs from 11 Mental Health Trusts in England to determine the scale's psychometric properties. Based on an analysis of its structural validity and reliability, the resultant 20-item scale demonstrated good psychometric properties and captured one overall latent factor of CMHT effectiveness comprising seven dimensions: improved service user well-being, creative problem-solving, continuous care, inter-team working, respect between professionals, engagement with carers and therapeutic relationships with service users. The scale will be of significant value to CMHTs and healthcare commissioners both nationally and internationally for monitoring, evaluating and improving team functioning in practice.

  13. Rasch analysis of the Persian version of PedsQLTM Oral Health Scale: further psychometric evaluation on item validity including differential item functioning

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Chung-Ying; Kumar, Santhosh; Pakpour, Amir H.

    2016-01-01

    Background: The study aimed to further evaluate the psychometric properties of one recently developed oral health related quality of life (OHRQoL) instrument (PedsQL Oral Health Scale), including student self-report and parent-proxy report. Specifically, we tested the item validity,threshold order, local dependency, and differential item functioning (DIF) across gender and rater. Methods: This is a cross-sectional study, and study population was recruited in Qazvin, Iran using one-stage sampling with the unit of school. Students and their parents (1529 dyads) separately completed the Persian version of PedsQL Oral Health Scale. The psychometric properties were analyzed using Rasch rating scale model, including item validity, threshold order for response categories, and DIF across gender (boys vs. girls in student self-report) and rater (student self report vs. parent-proxy report). Results: All items had satisfactory in fit and outfit mean square error. One disordering category (the response of often) was found in parent-proxy report, while all categories were ordered in student self-report. All items were DIF-trivial across gender and rater. Conclusion: PedsQL Oral Health Scale is a valid instrument to measure OHRQoL. However, our results indicated that the parent-proxy report was inferior to the student self-report, and healthcare providers should primarily use the student self-report. PMID:27579258

  14. Scaled experiments of volcanic spreading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merle, Olivier; Borgia, Andrea

    1996-06-01

    Experiments were conducted to study the spreading of volcanic constructs. Volcanoes are simulated by a sand cone, and the volcanic substratum is simulated by a sand layer (brittle substratum) overlying a silicone layer (ductile substratum). Similarity conditions between natural volcanoes and experimental prototypes led to the definition of dimensionless π numbers. Experiments determine π values which predict whether or not spreading takes place. Of particular importance are the ratio between the thickness of the brittle substratum and the height of the volcano (π2) and the brittle/ductile ratio of the substratum (π3). π2 indicates that the volcano must be large enough to "break" the substratum before spreading occurs, whereas π3 controls the style of deformation. During spreading, these dimensionless numbers change with time, reaching values that tend toward those observed for stable configurations. Experimental values are compared with those from well-constrained natural examples. It is found that an essential requirement for volcanic spreading is the presence of a low-viscosity layer within the substratum. Flow of the weak layer away from the excess load is responsible for the spreading. The overlying edifice displays radial intersecting grabens, due to concentric stretching, dissected summit areas; concentric zones of thrusts and folds form in the substratum around the edifice, and diapirs of the ductile substratum rise within the fault zones.

  15. Perceived Effects of Sexually Explicit Media among Men who have Sex with Men and Psychometric Properties of the Pornography Consumption Effects Scale (PCES)

    PubMed Central

    Hald, Gert Martin; Smolenski, Derek; Simon Rosser, B. R.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Researchers have proposed that consumption of Sexually Explicit Media (SEM) may not only adversely influence sexual attitudes and behaviors of Men Who Have Sex with Men (MSM) but (also) play a positive role in the development and sexual education of MSM, be a major source of sexual information for MSM, and provide validation, understanding, and confirmation of MSM’s sexual orientation. However, such claims are in urgent need of empirical validation as is the development of psychometrically sound and easily implemented instruments able to reliably assist such validations. Aim To investigate how MSM who consume SEM self-perceive the impact of SEM on their STI-related sexual risk behaviors (i.e. anal intercourse), sexual knowledge, enjoyment of sex, interest in sex, attitudes toward sex, and understanding of their sexual orientation. Further, to provide a thorough psychometric validation of a reduced and reworked version of the Pornography Consumption Effect Scale. Main Outcomes Measures A revised version of the Pornography Consumption Effect Scale (PCES) by Hald and Malamuth (2008). Results This study found that 97% of MSM reported positive effects of SEM consumption on their sexual knowledge, enjoyment of and interest in sex, attitudes toward sex, and understanding of their sexual orientation. Only 3 % reported any negative effects of their SEM consumption. SEM consumption was found to significantly increase consumers’ interest in having protected anal intercourse while not significantly influencing their interests in having unprotected anal intercourse. The revised version of the PCES showed excellent psychometric performance. Conclusion The study found that MSM generally report positive effects of their consumption of sexually explicit materials in areas related to their sexual knowledge, attitudes, behaviors, and orientation. This finding could have important implications for the sexual health and well-being of MSM by suggesting that SEM

  16. Measuring Negative Attitudes towards Overweight and Obesity in the German Population – Psychometric Properties and Reference Values for the German Short Version of the Fat Phobia Scale (FPS)

    PubMed Central

    Stein, Janine; Luppa, Melanie; Ruzanska, Ulrike; Sikorski, Claudia; König, Hans-Helmut; Riedel-Heller, Steffi G.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Obesity is one of the leading public health problems worldwide. Obese individuals are often stigmatized and the psychosocial consequences of overweight and obesity are the subject of current research. To detect stigmatizing attitudes towards obese people, the Fat Phobia Scale (FPS) was developed in the USA in the early nineties. In addition, the 14-item short form of the FPS was constructed. The FPS belongs to the most commonly used instruments for measuring negative attitudes towards obese people because of its good psychometric properties. For the recently developed German short form of the FPS, however, the comprehensive investigation of the psychometric properties and the determination of reference values are still pending. Thus, the main objectives of this study were the evaluation of the psychometric quality of the scale as well as the calculation of reference values. Methods The study was based on a representative survey in the German general population. A sample of 1,657 subjects (18–94 years) was assessed via structured telephone interviews including the 14-item German version of the FPS. Descriptive statistics and inference-statistical analyses were conducted. Reference values in terms of percentage ranks were calculated. Results Substantial evidence for the reliability and validity of the German short version of the FPS was found. This study, for the first time in Germany, provides age-specific reference values for the German short form of the FPS allowing the interpretation of individual test scores. Conclusion Facing the far-reaching consequences of experienced stigmatization of obese individuals, these study results provide an important basis for further studies aiming at the investigation of negative attitudes towards overweight and obesity. PMID:25474195

  17. Evidence-based measurement in multiple sclerosis: the psychometric properties of the physical and psychological dimensions of three quality of life rating scales.

    PubMed

    Riazi, A; Hobart, J C; Lamping, D L; Fitzpatrick, R; Thompson, A J

    2003-08-01

    The selection of measures of quality of life used in clinical trials of multiple sclerosis (MS) should be evidence-based. Head-to-head comparison of measures facilitates the selection of measures. The aim of the study was to compare the psychometric properties of the physical and psychological dimensions in three measures of quality of life to aid choice of the most appropriate scale for use in clinical trials of MS. One hundred and twenty-one people with MS (rehabilitation = 57; steroids = 64) completed a selection of health measures before and after treatment. The psychometric properties of three measures of physical function (MSIS-29 physical, SF-36 physical functioning, FAMS mobility) and three measures of psychological function (MSIS-29 psychological, SF-36 mental health, FAMS emotional well-being) were compared by examining data quality, scaling assumptions, acceptability, reliability, validity and responsiveness. Physical (0.63-0.71) and psychological (0.70-0.75) scales were substantially correlated indicating they measure related constructs. The MSIS-29 physical and psychological scales satisfied all criteria for internal consistency reliability (physical = 0.91; psychological = 0.89) and validity. The SF-36 physical scale had a notable floor effect (20%). The FAMS mobility scale had lower reliability (alpha = 0.78) compared to other measures. The MSIS-29 physical (effect size = 0.91) and psychological (effect size = 0.62) scales were the most responsive. In these three samples, the MSIS-29 had better measurement properties for combined physical and psychological health than the SF-36 and the FAMS.

  18. Initial Psychometric Properties of the Experiences Questionnaire: Validation of a Self-Report Measure of Decentering

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fresco, David M.; Moore, Michael T.; van Dulmen, Manfred H. M.; Segal, Zindel V.; Ma, S. Helen; Teasdale, John D.; Williams, J. Mark G.

    2007-01-01

    Decentering is defined as the ability to observe one's thoughts and feelings as temporary, objective events in the mind, as opposed to reflections of the self that are necessarily true. The Experiences Questionnaire (EQ) was designed to measure both decentering and rumination but has not been empirically validated. The current study investigated…

  19. Development and preliminary psychometric properties of the Care Experience Feedback Improvement Tool (CEFIT)

    PubMed Central

    Beattie, Michelle; Shepherd, Ashley; Lauder, William; Atherton, Iain; Cowie, Julie; Murphy, Douglas J

    2016-01-01

    Objective To develop a structurally valid and reliable, yet brief measure of patient experience of hospital quality of care, the Care Experience Feedback Improvement Tool (CEFIT). Also, to examine aspects of utility of CEFIT. Background Measuring quality improvement at the clinical interface has become a necessary component of healthcare measurement and improvement plans, but the effectiveness of measuring such complexity is dependent on the purpose and utility of the instrument used. Methods CEFIT was designed from a theoretical model, derived from the literature and a content validity index (CVI) procedure. A telephone population surveyed 802 eligible participants (healthcare experience within the previous 12 months) to complete CEFIT. Internal consistency reliability was tested using Cronbach's α. Principal component analysis was conducted to examine the factor structure and determine structural validity. Quality criteria were applied to judge aspects of utility. Results CVI found a statistically significant proportion of agreement between patient and practitioner experts for CEFIT construction. 802 eligible participants answered the CEFIT questions. Cronbach's α coefficient for internal consistency indicated high reliability (0.78). Interitem (question) total correlations (0.28–0.73) were used to establish the final instrument. Principal component analysis identified one factor accounting for 57.3% variance. Quality critique rated CEFIT as fair for content validity, excellent for structural validity, good for cost, poor for acceptability and good for educational impact. Conclusions CEFIT offers a brief yet structurally sound measure of patient experience of quality of care. The briefness of the 5-item instrument arguably offers high utility in practice. Further studies are needed to explore the utility of CEFIT to provide a robust basis for feedback to local clinical teams and drive quality improvement in the provision of care experience for patients

  20. Improvement of psychometric properties of a scale measuring inpatient satisfaction with care: a better response rate and a reduction of the ceiling effect

    PubMed Central

    Moret, Leïla; Nguyen, Jean-Michel; Pillet, Nathalie; Falissard, Bruno; Lombrail, Pierre; Gasquet, Isabelle

    2007-01-01

    Background The objective was to solve two problems of an already validated scale measuring inpatient opinion on care: 1) a high non-response rate for some items due to the "not applicable" response option and 2) a skewed score distribution with high ceiling effect. Methods The EQS-H scale ("échelle de qualité des soins en hospitalisation") comprised 26 items and 2 sub-scales of 13 items each, 'quality of medical information' (MI) and 'relationships with staff and daily routine' (RS). Three studies were conducted: a first mono-centre study (n = 552, response rate = 83.4%, self-completion of the scale the day before discharge) to construct a shorter version of the scale without the items with high non-response rate and maintaining those useful to ensure good internal validity (construct, convergent and divergent) and reliability; a second mono-centre study (n = 1246, response rate = 77.9%, self-completion of the scale before discharge) to confirm psychometric properties of the new version; a third multi-centre national study (n = 886, response rate 41.7%, self-completion at home 15 days after discharge) to test a new response pattern in order to reduce ceiling effect. Results Six items having a non-response rate >20% were deleted, increasing rates of exhaustive response to all items from 15% to 48%. Factorial analysis supported the evidence for removing 4 more items to ensure good internal validity and reliability of the new version. These good results (initial variance explained: 43%; Cronbach's α: 0.80 (MI) and 0.81 (RS)) were confirmed by the second study. The new response format produced a normalisation of the 2 scores with a large decrease in ceiling effect (25% to 4% for MI subscale and 61% to 8% for RS). Psychometric properties of the final version were excellent: the 2 subscales (8 items each) explained 66% of the variance in principal component analysis, Cronbach's α were respectively 0.92 (MI) and 0.93 (RS). Conclusion The new version of the EQS-H has

  1. The psychometric properties of the Stages of Change Readiness and Treatment Eagerness Scale (SOCRATES) in a clinical sample of active duty military service members.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Damon; Francis, Joseph P; Tafrate, Raymond Chip

    2005-11-01

    The increasing prominence of the construct of readiness to change in the field of substance abuse treatment has led to the development of instruments designed to assess the construct. We examined the psychometric properties of one such instrument, the Stages of Change Readiness and Treatment Eagerness Scale (SOCRATES), in a sample of treatment-seeking, active duty, U.S. military service members diagnosed with alcohol and/or drug dependence. A principal components analysis of the items was consistent with the tridimensional structure of the SOCRATES found among treatment-seeking civilians but resulted in a 14-item scale, as opposed to the 19-item version found for civilians. Normative data, in the form of means and decile rankings for the SOCRATES subscales, for substance-dependent military patients are provided to complement those available for civilian patients. Future research should examine the concurrent and predictive validity of the scale.

  2. Beliefs in genetic determinism and attitudes towards psychiatric genetic research: psychometric scale properties, construct associations, demographic correlates, and cross-cultural comparisons.

    PubMed

    Voracek, Martin; Swami, Viren; Loibl, Lisa Mariella; Furnham, Adrian

    2007-12-01

    Using two new scales, this study examined beliefs in genetic determinism and attitudes towards psychiatric genetic research in student samples from Austria, Malaysia, Romania, and the United Kingdom. For both constructs, effects of culture were detectable, whereas those related to key demographics were either small and inconsistent across samples (political orientation and religiosity) or zero (sex and age). Judged from factorial dimensionality and internal consistency, the psychometric properties of both scales were satisfactory. Belief in genetic determinism had lower prevalence and corresponded only modestly to positive attitudes towards psychiatric genetic research which had higher prevalence. The correlations of both constructs with a preference of inequality among social groups (social dominance orientation) were modest and inconsistent across samples. Both scales appear appropriate for cross-cultural applications, in particular for research into lay theories and public perceptions regarding genetic vs environmental effects on human behavior, mental disorders, and behavioral and psychiatric genetic research related to these.

  3. The scaling of experiments on volcanic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merle, Olivier

    2015-06-01

    In this article, the basic principles of the scaling procedure are first reviewed by a presentation of scale factors. Then, taking an idealized example of a brittle volcanic cone intruded by a viscous magma, the way to choose appropriate analogue materials for both the brittle and ductile parts of the cone is explained by the use of model ratios. Lines of similarity are described to show that an experiment simulates a range of physical processes instead of a unique natural case. The pi theorem is presented as an alternative scaling procedure and discussed through the same idealized example to make the comparison with the model ratio procedure. The appropriateness of the use of gelatin as analogue material for simulating dyke formation is investigated. Finally, the scaling of some particular experiments such as pyroclastic flows or volcanic explosions is briefly presented to show the diversity of scaling procedures in volcanology.

  4. The Multimedia Piers-Harris Children's Self-Concept Scale 2: Its Psychometric Properties, Equivalence with the Paper-and-Pencil Version, and Respondent Preferences

    PubMed Central

    Flahive, Mon-hsin Wang; Chuang, Ying-Chih; Li, Chien-Mo

    2015-01-01

    A multimedia version of Piers-Harris Children's Self-Concept Scale 2 (Piers-Harris 2) was created with audio and cartoon animation to facilitate the measurement of self-concept among younger children. This study aimed to assess the psychometric qualities of the computer version of Piers-Harris 2 scores, examine its score equivalence with the paper-and-pencil version, and survey the respondent preference of the two versions. Two hundred and forty eight Taiwanese students from the first to fourth grade were recruited. In regard to the psychometric properties, high internal consistency (α = .91) was found for the total score of multimedia Piers-Harris 2. High interscale correlations (.77 to .83) of the multimedia Piers-Harris 2 scores and the results of confirmatory factor analysis suggested the multimedia Piers-Harris 2 contained good structural characteristics. The scores of the multimedia Piers-Harris 2 also had significant correlations with the scores of the Elementary School Children’s Self Concept Scale. The equality of convergence and criterion-related validities of Piers-Harris 2 scores for the multimedia and paper-and-pencil versions and the results of ICCs between the scores of the multimedia and paper-and-pencil Piers-Harris 2 suggested their high level of equivalence. Participants showed more positive attitudes towards the multimedia version. PMID:26252499

  5. The Fear-avoidance Components Scale (FACS): Development and Psychometric Evaluation of a New Measure of Pain-related Fear Avoidance.

    PubMed

    Neblett, Randy; Mayer, Tom G; Hartzell, Meredith M; Williams, Mark J; Gatchel, Robert J

    2016-04-01

    Pain-related fear avoidance (FA), a common problem for patients with painful medical conditions, involves pain-related catastrophizing cognitions, hypervigilance, and avoidance behaviors, which can ultimately lead to decreased functioning, depression, and disability. Several patient-reported instruments have been developed to measure FA, but they have been criticized for limited construct validity, inadequate item specificity, lack of cutoff scores, and missing important FA components. The Fear-Avoidance Components Scale (FACS) is a new patient-reported measure designed to comprehensively evaluate FA in patients with painful medical conditions. It combines important components of FA found in prior FA scales, while trying to correct some of their deficiencies, within a framework of the most current FA model. Psychometric evaluation of the FACS found high internal consistency (α = 0.92) and high test/retest reliability (r = 0.90-0.94, P < 0.01). FACS scores differentiated between 2 separate chronic pain patient samples and a nonpatient comparison group. When clinically relevant severity levels were created, FACS severity scores were highly associated with FA-related patient-reported psychosocial and objective lifting performance variables. These results suggest that the FACS is a psychometrically strong and reliable measure that can help healthcare providers assess FA-related barriers to function and recovery.

  6. The Multimedia Piers-Harris Children's Self-Concept Scale 2: Its Psychometric Properties, Equivalence with the Paper-and-Pencil Version, and Respondent Preferences.

    PubMed

    Flahive, Mon-hsin Wang; Chuang, Ying-Chih; Li, Chien-Mo

    2015-01-01

    A multimedia version of Piers-Harris Children's Self-Concept Scale 2 (Piers-Harris 2) was created with audio and cartoon animation to facilitate the measurement of self-concept among younger children. This study aimed to assess the psychometric qualities of the computer version of Piers-Harris 2 scores, examine its score equivalence with the paper-and-pencil version, and survey the respondent preference of the two versions. Two hundred and forty eight Taiwanese students from the first to fourth grade were recruited. In regard to the psychometric properties, high internal consistency (α = .91) was found for the total score of multimedia Piers-Harris 2. High interscale correlations (.77 to .83) of the multimedia Piers-Harris 2 scores and the results of confirmatory factor analysis suggested the multimedia Piers-Harris 2 contained good structural characteristics. The scores of the multimedia Piers-Harris 2 also had significant correlations with the scores of the Elementary School Children's Self Concept Scale. The equality of convergence and criterion-related validities of Piers-Harris 2 scores for the multimedia and paper-and-pencil versions and the results of ICCs between the scores of the multimedia and paper-and-pencil Piers-Harris 2 suggested their high level of equivalence. Participants showed more positive attitudes towards the multimedia version.

  7. Additional psychometric data for the Spanish Modified Dental Anxiety Scale, and psychometric data for a Spanish version of the Revised Dental Beliefs Survey

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Hispanics comprise the largest ethnic minority group in the United States. Previous work with the Spanish Modified Dental Anxiety Scale (MDAS) yielded good validity, but lower test-retest reliability. We report the performance of the Spanish MDAS in a new sample, as well as the performance of the Spanish Revised Dental Beliefs Survey (R-DBS). Methods One hundred sixty two Spanish-speaking adults attending Spanish-language church services or an Hispanic cultural festival completed questionnaires containing the Spanish MDAS, Spanish R-DBS, and dental attendance questions, and underwent a brief oral examination. Church attendees completed the questionnaire a second time, for test-retest purposes. Results The Spanish MDAS and R-DBS were completed by 156 and 136 adults, respectively. The test-retest reliability of the Spanish MDAS was 0.83 (95% CI = 0.60-0.92). The internal reliability of the Spanish R-DBS was 0.96 (95% CI = 0.94-0.97), and the test-retest reliability was 0.86 (95% CI = 0.64-0.94). The two measures were significantly correlated (Spearman's rho = 0.38, p < 0.001). Participants who do not currently go to a dentist had significantly higher MDAS scores (t = 3.40, df = 106, p = 0.003) as well as significantly higher R-DBS scores (t = 2.21, df = 131, p = 0.029). Participants whose most recent dental visit was for pain or a problem, rather than for a check-up, scored significantly higher on both the MDAS (t = 3.00, df = 106, p = 0.003) and the R-DBS (t = 2.85, df = 92, p = 0.005). Those with high dental fear (MDAS score 19 or greater) were significantly more likely to have severe caries (Chi square = 6.644, df = 2, p = 0.036). Higher scores on the R-DBS were significantly related to having more missing teeth (Spearman's rho = 0.23, p = 0.009). Conclusion In this sample, the test-retest reliability of the Spanish MDAS was higher. The significant relationships between dental attendance and questionnaire scores, as well as the difference in caries

  8. Initial psychometric properties of the experiences questionnaire: validation of a self-report measure of decentering.

    PubMed

    Fresco, David M; Moore, Michael T; van Dulmen, Manfred H M; Segal, Zindel V; Ma, S Helen; Teasdale, John D; Williams, J Mark G

    2007-09-01

    Decentering is defined as the ability to observe one's thoughts and feelings as temporary, objective events in the mind, as opposed to reflections of the self that are necessarily true. The Experiences Questionnaire (EQ) was designed to measure both decentering and rumination but has not been empirically validated. The current study investigated the factor structure of the EQ in both undergraduate and clinical populations. A single, unifactorial decentering construct emerged using 2 undergraduate samples. The convergent and discriminant validity of this decentering factor was demonstrated in negative relationships with measures of depression symptoms, depressive rumination, experiential avoidance, and emotion regulation. Finally, the factor structure of the EQ was replicated in a clinical sample of individuals in remission from depression, and the decentering factor evidenced a negative relationship to concurrent levels of depression symptoms. Findings from this series of studies offer initial support for the EQ as a measure of decentering.

  9. The assessment of generalized anxiety disorder: psychometric validation of the Spanish version of the self-administered GAD-2 scale in daily medical practice

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Aim To psychometrically validate the Spanish version of the self-administered 2-item GAD-2 scale for screening probable patients with generalised anxiety disorder (GAD). Methods The GAD-2 was self-administered by patients diagnosed with GAD according to DSM-IV criteria and by age- and sex-matched controls who were recruited at random in mental health and primary care centres. Criteria validity was explored using ROC curve analysis, and sensitivity, specificity and positive and negative predictive values were determined for different cut-off values. Concurrent validity was also established using the HAM-A, HADS, and WHODAS II scales. Results The study sample consisted of 212 subjects (106 patients with GAD) with a mean age of 50.38 years (SD = 16.76). No items of the scale were left blank. Floor and ceiling effects were negligible. No patients with GAD had to be assisted to complete the questionnaire. Reliability (internal consistency) was high; Cronbach’s α = 0.875. A cut-off point of 3 showed adequate sensitivity (91.5%) and specificity (85.8%), with a statistically significant area under the curve (AUC = 0.937, p < 0.001), to distinguish GAD patients from controls. Concurrent validity was also high and significant with HAM-A (0.806, p < 0.001), HADS (anxiety domain, 0.825, p < 0.001) and WHO-DAS II (0.642, p < 0.001) scales. Conclusion The Spanish version of the GAD-2 scale has been shown to have appropriate psychometric properties to rapidly detect probable cases of GAD in the Spanish cultural context under routine clinical practice conditions. PMID:22992432

  10. Measuring Positive Emotion With the Mood and Anxiety Symptom Questionnaire: Psychometric Properties of the Anhedonic Depression Scale.

    PubMed

    Kendall, Ashley D; Zinbarg, Richard E; Bobova, Lyuba; Mineka, Susan; Revelle, William; Prenoveau, Jason M; Craske, Michelle G

    2016-02-01

    Low positive emotion distinguishes depression from most types of anxiety. Formative work in this area employed the Anhedonic Depression scale from the Mood and Anxiety Symptom Questionnaire (MASQ-AD), and the MASQ-AD has since become a popular measure of positive emotion, often used independently of the full MASQ. However, two key assumptions about the MASQ-AD-that it should be represented by a total scale score, and that it measures time-variant experiences-have not been adequately tested. The present study factor analyzed MASQ-AD data collected annually over 3 years (n = 618, mean age = 17 years at baseline), and then decomposed its stable and unstable components. The results suggested the data were best represented by a hierarchical structure, and that less than one quarter of the variance in the general factor fluctuated over time. The implications for interpreting past findings from the MASQ-AD, and for conducting future research with the scale, are discussed.

  11. Psychometric Properties of the Chinese Version of the Fear of Negative Evaluation Scale-Brief (BFNE) and the BFNE-Straightforward for Middle School Students

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Jia; Zhang, Chunyu; Li, Yadan; Xue, Song; Zhang, Jinfu

    2015-01-01

    Background The 12-item brief version of the Fear of Negative Evaluation Scale (BFNE) is one of the most widely used instruments to assess fear of negative evaluation. Recent evidence strongly supports the version composed of 8 straightforward items (BFNE-S), which possessesstronger psychometric properties. The purpose of the current study is to examine the psychometric prop-erties of the Chinese versions of the BFNE and BFNE-S for middle school students. Methodology A total of 1009 middle school students were recruited in this study. The BFNE, the BFNE-S, the Friedman-Bendas Text Anxiety Scale (FBTAS), and the Social Anxiety Scale (SAS) were administered to 497 participants, and 52 participants were re-tested after four weeks. The BFNE, the BFNE-S, the Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale (RSES), and the Balanced Inventory of Desirable Responding (BIDR) wereadministered to 492 participants. The BFNE and BFNE-S significantly cor-related with all the scales, supporting their convergent, divergent and concurrent validity. Principal Findings The Cronbach's alpha of the BFNE (BFNE-S) was 0.864 (0.867) with 497 par-ticipants and 0.886 (0.844) with 492 participants, and the test-retest reliability coefficient was 0.791 (0.855) (ICC). Although the EFA identified a two-factor solution in which the 8 straightfor-ward items loaded on one factor and the 4 reversed items loaded on the other, the CFA, using a random intercept model to control the wording effect, supported a unidimensional factor struc-ture of the BFNE. Both EFA and CFA supported the unidimensional assumption of the BFNE-S. The correlations of the BFNE and BFNE-S were 0.929 and 0.952 in two samples. Conclusions The Chinese versions of the BFNE and BFNE-S demonstrate adequate psychometric properties for assessing fear of negative evaluation. The results support their use among the Chinese middle school students. Considering its greater parsimony and excellent reliability and validity, the BFNE-S is a better tool. PMID

  12. Evaluation of the psychometric properties of the phlebitis and infiltration scales for the assessment of complications of peripheral vascular access devices.

    PubMed

    Groll, Dianne; Davies, Barbara; Mac Donald, Joan; Nelson, Susanne; Virani, Tazim

    2010-01-01

    To prevent complications from peripheral vascular access device (PVAD) therapy, the Infusion Nurses Society (INS) developed 2 scales to measure the extent and severity of phlebitis and infiltration in PVADs. This study evaluated the psychometric properties of these scales to validate them with respect to their interrater reliability, concurrent validity, feasibility, and acceptability. A total of 182 patients at 2 sites were enrolled, and 416 observations of PVAD sites were made. Two nurses independently rated each PVAD site for the presence or absence of phlebitis and/or infiltration by using the INS scales. The interrater reliability was calculated, as was the agreement of the observed versus charted incidence of phlebitis and infiltration (concurrent validity) and the ease of use of the scales (feasibility, acceptability). Interrater reliability for both the Phlebitis and Infiltration scales and concurrent validity were found to be statistically significant (P < .05). The study nurses reported the scales to be easy to use, taking an average of 1.3 minutes to complete both. The importance of valid measures for use in research cannot be underestimated. The INS Phlebitis and Infiltration scales have been shown to be easy to use, valid, and reliable scales.

  13. Confirmatory factor analysis and psychometric properties of the Spanish version of the Multidimensional Body-Self Relations Questionnaire-Appearance Scales.

    PubMed

    Roncero, María; Perpiñá, Conxa; Marco, Jose H; Sánchez-Reales, Sergio

    2015-06-01

    The Multidimensional Body-Self Relations Questionnaire (MBSRQ) is the most comprehensive instrument to assess body image. The MBSRQ-Appearance Scales (MBSRQ-AS) is a reduced version that has been validated in other languages. The main aim of the present study was to confirm the factor structure of the Spanish version of the MBSRQ-AS and analyze its psychometric properties in 1041 nonclinical individuals. Confirmatory factor analysis showed excellent goodness of fit indices for the five-factor structure (Appearance Evaluation, Appearance Orientation, Body Areas Satisfaction, Overweight Preoccupation, and Self-Classified Weight). Factors possessed adequate scale score reliability indices. Some of the factors showed significant associations with the Eating Attitudes Test. Significant differences were found between boys/men and girls/women, and among age groups. The Spanish version of the MBSRQ-AS is a valid instrument for use in nonclinical population settings in people from 15 to 46 years old.

  14. [Cross-cultural adaptation and psychometric tests of a self-efficacy scale and an adherence scale for French adolescents with Type 1 diabetes

    PubMed

    Colson, Sébastien; Coté, José; Collombier, Madeleine; Debout, Christophe; Bonnel, Galadriel; Reynaud, Rachel; Lagouanelle-Simeoni, Marie-Claude

    2016-12-01

    Introduction : many structured educational programs, using the concept of self-efficacy, have been studied in English-speaking countries. Background : tools were developed in English to assess this concept along with treatment adherence. However, there seems to be no French version of these tools in scientific literature. Aim : to adapt the tools to the French language and to test the psychometric properties of the Self-Efficacy for Diabetes Self-Management (SEDM) and the Diabetes Self-Management Profile (DSMP). Methods : a cross-cultural adaptation of the SEDM and DSMP in French was performed. The psychometric properties were tested in a pilot study that took place between January 1st and December 31st, 2015. Results : Cronbach’s alpha coefficient of SEDM in French was 0.84, test-retest reliability 0.80 and sensitivity to change was moderate. The Cronbach’s alpha and sensitivity to change of the French DSMP were low, and the test-retest was 0.71. Discussion and conclusions : the first results of the psychometric properties of French SEDM were rather encouraging. The use of the French version of DSMP seems compromised in terms of psychometric properties and the opinion of the participants.

  15. Scaled Lunar Module Jet Erosion Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1966-01-01

    Scaled Lunar Module Jet Erosion Experiments. An experimental research program was conducted on the erosion of particulate surfaces by a jet exhaust. These experiments were scaled to represent the lunar module (LM) during landing. A conical cold-gas nozzle simulating the lunar module nozzle was utilized. The investigation was conducted within a large vacuum chamber by using gravel or glass beads as a simulated soil. The effects of thrust, descent speed, nozzle terminal height, particle size on crater size, and visibility during jet erosion were determined. [Entire movie available on DVD from CASI as Doc ID 20070031010. Contact help@sti.nasa.gov

  16. [The Frankfurt-Pamplona subjective experience scale].

    PubMed

    Cuesta Zorita, M J; Peralta Martín, V; Irigoyen Recalde, I

    1995-01-01

    Several instruments have been designed to assess subjective experiences (SE). The Frankfurt Complaint Questionnaire (FCQ) is the most widely used scale to assess SE. This study was aimed to replicate the factor validation of the scale in a Spanish sample. A factor analysis we carried out on the 98-items of FCQ. No a four-factor solution was found, as initially it had been proposed by authors of the scale. A simplified version of the FCQ was derived through procedures of unidimensionality analysis of factors.

  17. A Korean version of the Appraisal of Diabetes Scale (ADS-K): psychometric evaluation with a population of Koreans with type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Lee, Eun-Hyun; Lee, Young Whee; Lee, Kwan-Woo; Nam, Moonsuk; Kim, Yong Seong; Han, Seung Jin

    2015-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the psychometric properties of the Appraisal of Diabetes Scale (ADS) in Korean patients with Type 2 diabetes. The English-language version of the ADS was translated into Korean using a forward-and-backward translation technique. The Korean version of the ADS (ADS-K) was administered to 250 patients who were recruited from two university hospitals. The data were analyzed using principal-component analysis, Cronbach's alpha, analysis of variance, t test, and Pearson's correlation. Six of seven items were meaningfully clustered into a two-factor structure by principal-component analysis, these factors accounting for 63.75% of the total variance. The underlying structure was consistent regardless of either gender or the presence of complications. The Cronbach's alpha of the subscales ranged from .71 to .79, indicating an acceptable internal consistency reliability. As hypothesized, the ADS-K score was moderately correlated with the diabetes-specific quality of life and had satisfactory convergent validity. The known-groups validity of the ADS-K was established using depression groups and HbA1c control status. The ADS-K demonstrated good psychometric properties. In addition, it possessed satisfactory practical properties, such as acceptability and feasibility. Therefore, the ADS-K appears to be suitable for use in both clinical research and clinical practice.

  18. Psychometric Evaluation of the Substance Use Risk Profile Scale (SURPS) in an Inpatient Sample of Substance Users Using Cue-Reactivity Methodology

    PubMed Central

    Schlauch, Robert C.; Crane, Cory A.; Houston, Rebecca J.; Molnar, Danielle S.; Schlienz, Nicolas J.; Lang, Alan R.

    2015-01-01

    The current project sought to examine the psychometric properties of a personality based measure (Substance Use Risk Profile Scale; SURPS: introversion-hopelessness, anxiety sensitivity, impulsivity, and sensation seeking) designed to differentially predict substance use preferences and patterns by matching primary personality-based motives for use to the specific effects of various psychoactive substances. Specifically, we sought to validate the SURPS in a clinical sample of substance users using cue reactivity methodology to assess current inclinations to consume a wide range of psychoactive substances. Using confirmatory factor analysis and correlational analyses, the SURPS demonstrated good psychometric properties and construct validity. Further, impulsivity and sensation-seeking were associated with use of multiple substances but could be differentiated by motives for use and susceptibility to the reinforcing effects of stimulants (i.e., impulsivity) and alcohol (i.e. sensation-seeking). In contrast, introversion-hopelessness and anxiety sensitivity demonstrated a pattern of use more focused on reducing negative affect, but were not differentiated based on specific patterns of use. Taken together, results suggests that among those receiving inpatient treatment for substance use disorders, the SURPS is a valid instrument for measuring four distinct personality dimensions that may be sensitive to motivational susceptibilities to specific patterns of alcohol and drug use. PMID:26052180

  19. The Subjective Effects of Alcohol Scale: development and psychometric evaluation of a novel assessment tool for measuring subjective response to alcohol.

    PubMed

    Morean, Meghan E; Corbin, William R; Treat, Teresa A

    2013-09-01

    Three decades of research demonstrate that individual differences in subjective response (SR) to acute alcohol effects predict heavy drinking and alcohol-related problems. However, the SR patterns conferring the greatest risk remain under debate. Morean and Corbin (2010) highlighted that extant SR measures commonly have limitations within the following areas: assessment of a comprehensive range of effects, assessment of effects over the complete course of a drinking episode, and/or psychometric validation. Furthermore, the consistent pairing of certain SR measures and theoretical models has made integration of findings difficult. To address these issues, we developed the Subjective Effects of Alcohol Scale (SEAS), a novel, psychometrically sound SR measure for use in alcohol administration studies. Pilot data ensured that the SEAS comprised a comprehensive range of effects that varied in terms of valence and arousal and were perceived as plausible effects of drinking. For validation purposes, the SEAS was included in a 2-site, placebo-controlled, alcohol administration study (N = 215). Exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses identified a 14-item, 4-factor model categorizing effects into affective quadrants (high/low arousal positive; high/low arousal negative). SEAS scores evidenced the following: (a) scalar measurement invariance by limb of the blood alcohol curve (BAC) and beverage condition; (b) good internal consistency; (c) convergence/divergence with extant SR measures, alcohol expectancies, and alcohol use; and (d) concurrent/incremental utility in accounting for alcohol-related outcomes, highlighting the novel high arousal negative and low arousal.

  20. Psychometric comparison of the generalized anxiety disorder scale-7 and the Penn State Worry Questionnaire for measuring response during treatment of generalised anxiety disorder.

    PubMed

    Dear, Blake F; Titov, Nickolai; Sunderland, Matthew; McMillan, Dean; Anderson, Tracy; Lorian, Carolyn; Robinson, Emma

    2011-01-01

    The Penn State Worry Questionnaire (PSWQ) is a widely used measure of the worry characteristic of generalised anxiety disorder (GAD). The 7-item Generalized Anxiety Disorder Scale (GAD-7) is a new brief screening tool for GAD, which is being increasingly used in research and clinical practice. The present study sought to provide comparison data on the relative psychometric properties of these two scales. The data of 195 adults who met Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-IV) criteria for GAD and who participated in two randomised treatment controlled trials were used. Factor analyses, internal consistency, correlational analyses, responsiveness to change, and agreement between the scales based on indentified clinical cutoffs were conducted. Factor analyses confirmed a one-factor structure for the GAD-7 and a three-factor structure involving two method factors for the PSWQ. Both the GAD-7 and the PSWQ demonstrated adequate internal consistency (Cronbach's alpha: .79-.91 and .86-.91, respectively), and moderate correlations (r = .51-.71) were observed between the scales across the treatment time points. The scales exhibited small correlations with the Sheehan Disability Scale at pretreatment (GAD-7 r = .38; PSWQ r = .26), but moderate correlations at posttreatment and follow-up (r = .59-.79). Agreement between the scales was limited using various clinical cutoffs identified within the literature. Both measures were sensitive to change, although the GAD-7 appeared to be more sensitive and may, therefore, confer some advantages in clinical work.

  1. Psychometric properties of the Brazilian-Portuguese version of the Spence Children's Anxiety Scale (SCAS): self- and parent-report versions.

    PubMed

    DeSousa, Diogo A; Pereira, Anderson S; Petersen, Circe S; Manfro, Gisele G; Salum, Giovanni A; Koller, Silvia H

    2014-06-01

    This study examined the psychometric properties of the Spence Children's Anxiety Scale (SCAS) self- and parent-report versions in a community (n=712) and a clinical (n=70) sample of Brazilian children and adolescents. Confirmatory factor analysis conducted in the community sample provided support to the original six correlated factors model of the SCAS. Moreover, the SCAS demonstrated good internal consistency, convergent and divergent validity, and a significant informant effect on the total score with higher anxiety levels in the self-report than in the parent-report version. Considering the clinical sample, we could demonstrate that the SCAS total scores have good discriminant validity differentiating: (a) anxious, community, and negative screening groups; and (b) children diagnosed with different severity levels of anxiety disorders. Our findings suggest that the SCAS (self- and parent-report versions) is suitable for assessing anxiety symptoms in Brazilian children and adolescents in community and clinical settings.

  2. The Social Interaction Phobia Scale: Continued support for the psychometric validity of the SIPS using clinical and non-clinical samples.

    PubMed

    Menatti, Alison R; Weeks, Justin W; Carleton, R Nicholas; Morrison, Amanda S; Heimberg, Richard G; Hope, Debra A; Blanco, Carlos; Schneier, Franklin R; Liebowitz, Michael R

    2015-05-01

    The present study sought to extend findings supporting the psychometric validity of a promising measure of social anxiety (SA) symptoms, the Social Interaction Phobia Scale (SIPS; Carleton et al., 2009). Analyses were conducted using three samples: social anxiety disorder (SAD) patients, generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) patients, and healthy controls. SIPS scores of SAD patients demonstrated internal consistency and construct validity, and the previously demonstrated three-factor structure of the SIPS was replicated. Further, the SIPS total score uniquely predicted SA symptoms, and SIPS scores were significantly higher for SAD patients than GAD patients or controls. Two cut-off scores that discriminated SAD patients from GAD patients and from healthy controls were identified. The current study is the first to replicate the SIPS three-factor model in a large, treatment-seeking sample of SAD patients and establish a cut-off score discriminating SAD from GAD patients. Findings support the SIPS as a valid, SAD-specific assessment instrument.

  3. The Positivity Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caprara, Gian Vittorio; Alessandri, Guido; Eisenberg, Nancy; Kupfer, A.; Steca, Patrizia; Caprara, Maria Giovanna; Yamaguchi, Susumu; Fukuzawa, Ai; Abela, John

    2012-01-01

    Five studies document the validity of a new 8-item scale designed to measure "positivity," defined as the tendency to view life and experiences with a positive outlook. In the first study (N = 372), the psychometric properties of Positivity Scale (P Scale) were examined in accordance with classical test theory using a large number of…

  4. Development and psychometric testing of the Attitudes, Subjective Norms, Perceived Behavioural Control, and Intention to Pursue a Career in Mental Health Nursing scale.

    PubMed

    Wilbourn, Mark; Salamonson, Yenna; Ramjan, Lucie; Chang, Sungwon

    2017-01-19

    The aim of the present study was to develop and test the psychometric properties of the Attitudes, Subjective Norms, Perceived Behavioural Control, and Intention to Pursue a Career in Mental Health Nursing (ASPIRE) scale, an instrument to assess nursing students' intention to work in mental health nursing. Understanding the factors influencing undergraduate nursing students' career intentions might lead to improved recruitment strategies. However, there are no standardized tools to measure and assess students' intention to pursue a career in mental health nursing. The present study used a cross-sectional survey design undertaken at a large tertiary institution in Western Sydney (Australia) between May and August 2013. It comprised three distinct and sequential phases: (i) items were generated representing the four dimensions of the theory of planned behaviour; (ii) face and content validity were tested by a representative reference group and panel of experts; and (iii) survey data from 1109 first- and second-year and 619 third-year students were used in exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses to test the factorial validity of the scale. Internal consistency was measured using Cronbach's alpha. Items generated for the ASPIRE scale were subject to face and content validity testing. Results showed good factorial validity and reliability for the final 14-item scale. Principal axis factoring revealed a one-factor solution, the hypothesized model being supported by confirmatory factor analysis. The ASPIRE scale is a valid and reliable instrument for measuring intention to pursue a career in mental health nursing among Bachelor of Nursing students.

  5. Psychometric Properties and Validity of a Multi-dimensional Risk Perception Scale Developed in the Context of a Microbicide Acceptability Study

    PubMed Central

    Fava, Joseph L.; Severy, Lawrence; Rosen, Rochelle K.; Salomon, Liz; Shulman, Lawrence; Guthrie, Kate Morrow

    2015-01-01

    Currently available risk perception scales tend to focus on risk behaviors and overall risk (vs partner-specific risk). While these types of assessments may be useful in clinical contexts, they may be inadequate for understanding the relationship between sexual risk and motivations to engage in safer sex or one’s willingness to use prevention products during a specific sexual encounter. We present the psychometric evaluation and validation of a scale that includes both general and specific dimensions of sexual risk perception. A one-time, audio computer-assisted self-interview was administered to 531 women aged 18–55 years. Items assessing sexual risk perceptions, both in general and in regards to a specific partner, were examined in the context of a larger study of willingness to use HIV/STD prevention products and preferences for specific product characteristics. Exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses yielded two sub-scales: general perceived risk and partner-specific perceived risk. Validity analyses demonstrated that the two subscales were related to many sociodemographic and relationship factors. We suggest that this risk perception scale may be useful in research settings where the outcomes of interest are related to motivations to use HIV and STD prevention products and/ or product acceptability. Further, we provide specific guidance on how this risk perception scale might be utilized to understand such motivations with one or more specific partners. PMID:26621151

  6. Psychometric properties of Multidimensional Health Locus of Control - A and General Self-Efficacy Scale in civil servants: ELSA-Brasil Musculoskeletal Study (ELSA-Brasil MSK)

    PubMed Central

    Machado, Luciana A. C.; Telles, Rosa W.; Costa-Silva, Luciana; Barreto, Sandhi M.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background Health-related control and self-efficacy beliefs can be assessed in the general population using Multidimensional Health Locus of Control-A subscales (MHLC-A) and the General Self-Efficacy Scale (GSES), respectively. Objective To test construct validity, internal consistency, reliability (test-retest) and ceiling and floor effects of Portuguese-Brazil versions of MHLC-A and GSES. Method Civil servants (N=2901) enrolled in a large Brazilian cohort were included. A new version of the GSES was produced (GSES-Brazil). Procedures for cross-cultural adaptation and testing of psychometric properties followed well-accepted international guidelines. Results Confirmatory factor analyses yielded the following indices: MHLC-A (tridimensional model): χ2[df]=223.45[132], p-value <0.01; CFI=0.87; TLI=0.85; RMSEA=0.07 (0.07-0.08); WRMR=3.00. GSES-Brazil (unidimensional model): χ2[df]=788.60[35], p-value <0.01; CFI=0.95; TLI=0.94; RMSEA=0.09 (0.08-0.09); WRMR=2.50. Cronbach’s alpha coefficients and Intraclass Correlation Coefficients (ICC2,1) ranged from 0.57 (0.54-0.59) and 0.57 (0.47-0.65) for MHLC-A internality to 0.80 (0.79-0.81) and 0.71 (0.66-0.77) for GSES-Brazil, respectively. There was no evidence of ceiling and floor effects. Convergent validity analyses provided further support for construct validity of both scales. Conclusion These findings support the use of the newly developed version of GSES-Brazil for the assessment of general self-efficacy of adult Brazilians. Internal consistency was lower than ideal for MHLC-A, indicating these subscales may need further refinements to provide a more psychometrically sound measure of control beliefs. PMID:27878226

  7. An induction linac injector for scaled experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Rutkowski, H.L.; Faltens, A.; Pike, C.; Brodzik, D.; Johnson, R.M.; Vanecek, D. ); Hewett, D.W. )

    1991-04-01

    An injector is being developed at LBL that would serve as the front end of a scaled induction linac accelerator technology experiment for heavy ion fusion. The ion mass being used is in the range 10--18. It is a multi-beam device intended to accelerate up to 2 MeV with 500 mA in each beam. The first half of the accelerating column has been built and experiments with one carbon beam are underway at the 1 MeV level. 5 refs., 1 fig.

  8. Scaled Lunar Module Jet Erosion Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Land, Norman S.; Scholl, Harland F.

    1966-01-01

    An experimental research program was conducted on the erosion of particulate surfaces by a jet exhaust. These experiments were scaled to represent the lunar module (LM) during landing. A conical cold-gas nozzle simulating the lunar module nozzle was utilized. The investigation was conducted within a large vacuum chamber by using gravel or glass beads as a simulated soil. The effects of thrust, descent speed, nozzle terminal height, particle size on crater size, and visibility during jet erosion were determined.

  9. Scaled experiments of explosions in cavities

    DOE PAGES

    Grun, J.; Cranch, G. A.; Lunsford, R.; ...

    2016-05-11

    Consequences of an explosion inside an air-filled cavity under the earth's surface are partly duplicated in a laboratory experiment on spatial scales 1000 smaller. The experiment measures shock pressures coupled into a block of material by an explosion inside a gas-filled cavity therein. The explosion is generated by suddenly heating a thin foil that is located near the cavity center with a short laser pulse, which turns the foil into expanding plasma, most of whose energy drives a blast wave in the cavity gas. Variables in the experiment are the cavity radius and explosion energy. Measurements and GEODYN code simulationsmore » show that shock pressuresmeasured in the block exhibit a weak dependence on scaled cavity radius up to ~25 m/kt1/3, above which they decrease rapidly. Possible mechanisms giving rise to this behavior are described. As a result, the applicability of this work to validating codes used to simulate full-scale cavityexplosions is discussed.« less

  10. Scaled experiments of explosions in cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Grun, J.; Cranch, G. A.; Lunsford, R.; Compton, S.; Walton, O. R.; Weaver, J.; Dunlop, W.; Fournier, K. B.

    2016-05-11

    Consequences of an explosion inside an air-filled cavity under the earth's surface are partly duplicated in a laboratory experiment on spatial scales 1000 smaller. The experiment measures shock pressures coupled into a block of material by an explosion inside a gas-filled cavity therein. The explosion is generated by suddenly heating a thin foil that is located near the cavity center with a short laser pulse, which turns the foil into expanding plasma, most of whose energy drives a blast wave in the cavity gas. Variables in the experiment are the cavity radius and explosion energy. Measurements and GEODYN code simulations show that shock pressuresmeasured in the block exhibit a weak dependence on scaled cavity radius up to ~25 m/kt1/3, above which they decrease rapidly. Possible mechanisms giving rise to this behavior are described. As a result, the applicability of this work to validating codes used to simulate full-scale cavityexplosions is discussed.

  11. Development and psychometric evaluation of the Self-efficacy for Appropriate Medication Use Scale (SEAMS) in low-literacy patients with chronic disease.

    PubMed

    Risser, Jessica; Jacobson, Terry A; Kripalani, Sunil

    2007-01-01

    Medication nonadherence remains a significant obstacle to achieving improved health outcomes in patients with chronic disease. Self-efficacy, the confidence in one's ability to perform a given task such as taking one's medications, is an important determinant of medication adherence, indicating the need for reliable and valid tools for measuring this construct. This study sought to develop a self-efficacy scale for medication adherence in chronic disease management that can be used in patients with a broad range of literacy skills. The Self-efficacy for Appropriate Medication Use (SEAMS) was developed by a multidisciplinary team with expertise in medication adherence and health literacy. Its psychometric properties were evaluated among 436 patients with coronary heart disease and other comorbid conditions. Reliability was evaluated by measuring internal consistency and test-retest reliability. Principal component factor analysis was performed to evaluate the validity of the SEAMS. Reliability and validity analyses were also performed separately among patients with low and higher literacy levels. The final 13-item scale had good internal consistency reliability (Cronbach's alpha = 0.89). A two-factor solution was found, explaining 52.3% of the scale's variance. The scale performed similarly across literacy levels. The SEAMS is a reliable and valid instrument that may provide a valuable assessment of medication self-efficacy in chronic disease management, and appears appropriate for use in patients with low literacy skills.

  12. Psychometric Properties and Correlates of the Beck Hopelessness Scale in Family Caregivers of Nigerian Patients with Psychiatric Disorders in Southwestern Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Aloba, Olutayo; Ajao, Olayinka; Alimi, Taiwo; Esan, Olufemi

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To examine the construct and correlates of hopelessness among family caregivers of Nigerian psychiatric patients. Materials and Methods: This is a cross-sectional, descriptive study involving 264 family caregiver-patients’ dyads recruited from two university teaching hospitals psychiatric clinics in Southwestern Nigeria. Results: Exploratory factor analysis revealed a two-factor 9-item model of the Beck Hopelessness Scale (BHS) among the family caregivers. Confirmatory factor analysis of the model revealed satisfactory indices of fitness (goodness of fit index = 0.97, comparative fit index = 0.96, Chi-square/degree of freedom (CMIN/DF) = 1.60, root mean square error of approximation = 0.048, expected cross-validation index = 0.307, and standardized root mean residual = 0.005). Reliability of the scale was modestly satisfactory (Cronbach's alpha 0.72). Construct validity of scale was supported by significant correlations with the family caregivers’ scores on the Zarit Burden Interview, mini international neuropsychiatric interview suicidality module, General Health Questionnaire-12 (GHQ-12), and Patient Health Questionnaire-9. The greatest variance in the family caregivers’ scores on the BHS was contributed by their scores on the psychological distress scale (GHQ-12). Conclusions: The BHS has adequate psychometric properties among Nigerian psychiatric patients’ family caregivers. There is the need to pay attention to the psychological well-being of the family caregivers of Nigerian psychiatric patients. PMID:28163498

  13. Model-scale sound propagation experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Willshire, William L., Jr.

    1988-01-01

    The results of a scale model propagation experiment to investigate grazing propagation above a finite impedance boundary are reported. In the experiment, a 20 x 25 ft ground plane was installed in an anechoic chamber. Propagation tests were performed over the plywood surface of the ground plane and with the ground plane covered with felt, styrofoam, and fiberboard. Tests were performed with discrete tones in the frequency range of 10 to 15 kHz. The acoustic source and microphones varied in height above the test surface from flush to 6 in. Microphones were located in a linear array up to 18 ft from the source. A preliminary experiment using the same ground plane, but only testing the plywood and felt surfaces was performed. The results of this first experiment were encouraging, but data variability and repeatability were poor, particularly, for the felt surface, making comparisons with theoretical predictions difficult. In the main experiment the sound source, microphones, microphone positioning, data acquisition, quality of the anechoic chamber, and environmental control of the anechoic chamber were improved. High-quality, repeatable acoustic data were measured in the main experiment for all four test surfaces. Comparisons with predictions are good, but limited by uncertainties of the impedance values of the test surfaces.

  14. Measuring HIV Self-Management in Women Living with HIV/AIDS: A Psychometric Evaluation Study of the HIV Self-Management Scale

    PubMed Central

    Webel, Allison R.; Asher, Alice; Cuca, Yvette; Okonsky, Jennifer G.; Kaihura, Alphoncina; Rose, Carol Dawson; Hanson, Jan E.; Salata, Robert A.

    2012-01-01

    Objective To develop and validate the HIV Self-Management Scale for women, a new measure of HIV self-management, defined as the day-to-day decisions that individuals make to manage their illness. Methods The development and validation of the scale was undertaken in three phases: focus groups, expert review and psychometric evaluation. Focus groups identified items describing the process and context of self-management in women living with HIV/AIDS (WLHA). Items were refined using expert review and were then administered to WLHA in two sites in the U.S. (n=260). Validity of the scale was assessed through factor analyses, model fit statistics, reliability testing, and convergent and discriminate validity. Results The final scale consists of 3-domains with 20 items describing the construct of HIV self-management. Daily self-management health practices, Social support and HIV self-management, and Chronicity of HIV self-management comprise the three domains. These domains explained 48.6% of the total variance in the scale. The item mean scores ranged from 1.7-2.77, and each domain demonstrated acceptable reliability (0.72-0.86) and stability (0.61-0.85). Conclusions Self-management is critical for WLHA, who constitute over 50% of PLWHA and have poorer health outcomes than their male counterparts. Methods to assess the self-management behavior of WLHA are needed to enhance their health and well-being. Presently no scales exist to measure HIV self-management. Our new 20-item HIV Self-Management Scale is a valid and reliable measure of HIV self-management in this population. Differences in aspects of self-management may be related to social roles and community resources and interventions targeting these factors may decrease morbidity in WLHA. PMID:22569267

  15. Development and Psychometric Testing Chinese Version of the Frommelt Attitude Toward Care of the Dying Scale, Form B in Nurses and Nursing Students.

    PubMed

    Wang, Li-Ping; Li, Ya-Jie; Yan, Wen-Zhen; Li, Guan-Mei

    2016-03-01

    Nursing students' and nurses' attitudes toward caring for the dying need to be explored. The Frommelt Attitude Toward Care of the Dying (FATCOD) scale has not previously been used in the Chinese language. The aim of this study was to examine the reliability and validity of the Chinese version of the FATCOD scale. A convenience sample of 154 nurses and 200 nursing students was recruited. The Chinese version of the FATCOD was used to test construct validity, concurrent validity, convergent validity, and internal consistency. The Cronbach's alpha coefficient of the Chinese version of the FATCOD scale, Form B (FATCOD-B-C) was 0.790. The Cronbach's alpha coefficients for each subscale ranged from 0.610 to 0.863. The test-retest reliability was satisfactory (r = 0.959, P < 0.001). The overall content validity index was 0.92. Seven factors were identified in exploratory factor analysis. The results provide preliminary support for the reliability and validity of the FATCOD-B-C in nurses and nursing students. Additional psychometric testing is recommended to confirm the factor analysis, but this study provides further evidence of the applicability of the FATCOD-B-C in clinical care services.

  16. [Psychometric analysis of the AF5 multidimensional scale of self-concept in a sample of adolescents and adults in Catalonia].

    PubMed

    Malo Cerrato, Sara; Bataller Sallent, Sílvia; Casas Aznar, Ferran; Gras Pérez, Ma Eugenia; González Carrasco, Mònica

    2011-11-01

    The aim of this study is to carry out a psychometric study of the AF5 scale in a sample of 4.825 Catalan subjects from 11 to 63 years-old. They are students from secondary compulsory education (ESO), from high school, middle-level vocational training (CFGM) and from the university. Using a principal component analysis (PCA) the theoretical validity of the components is established and the reliability of the instrument is also analyzed. Differential analyses are performed by gender and normative group using a 2 x 6 factorial design. The normative group variable includes the different levels classified into 6 sub-groups: university, post-compulsory secondary education (high school and CFGM), 4th of ESO, 3rd of ESO, 2nd of ESO and 1st of ESO. The results indicate that the reliability of the Catalan version of the scale is similar to the original scale. The factorial structure also fits with the original model established beforehand. Significant differences by normative group in the four components of self-concept explored (social, family, academic/occupational and physical) are observed. By gender, significant differences appear in the component of physical self-concept, academic and social but not in the family component.

  17. Psychometric Limitations of the Center for Epidemiologic Studies-Depression Scale for Assessing Depressive Symptoms among Adults with HIV/AIDS: A Rasch Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Kottorp, Anders; Lee, Kathryn A.

    2016-01-01

    The Center for Epidemiological Studies-Depression (CES-D) scale is a widely used measure of depressive symptoms, but its psychometric properties have not been adequately evaluated among adults with HIV/AIDS. This study used an item response theory approach (Rasch analysis) to evaluate the CES-D's validity and reliability in relation to key demographic and clinical variables in adults with HIV/AIDS. A convenience sample of 347 adults with HIV/AIDS (231 males, 93 females, and 23 transgenders; age range 22–77 years) completed the CES-D. A Rasch model application was used to analyze the CES-D's rating scale functioning, internal scale validity, person-response validity, person-separation validity, internal consistency, differential item functioning (DIF), and differential test functioning. CES-D scores were generally high and associated with several demographic and clinical variables. The CES-D distinguished 3 distinct levels of depression and had acceptable internal consistency but lacked unidimensionality, five items demonstrated poor fit to the model, 15% of the respondents demonstrated poor fit, and eight items demonstrated DIF related to gender, race, or AIDS diagnosis. Removal of misfitting items resulted in minimal improvement in the CES-D's substantive and structural validity. CES-D scores should be interpreted with caution in adults with HIV/AIDS, particularly when comparing scores across gender and racial groups. PMID:27042347

  18. Psychometric properties of the Japanese version of the Adult Attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) Self-Report Scale (ASRS-J) and its short scale in accordance with DSM-5 diagnostic criteria.

    PubMed

    Takeda, Toshinobu; Tsuji, Yui; Kurita, Hiroshi

    2017-04-01

    We developed the Japanese version of the Adult ADHD Self-Report Scale (ASRS-J) and report its psychometric properties. The ASRS-J and other questionnaires were administered to 48 adults with ADHD, 46 adults with non-ADHD psychiatric disorders, 96 non-clinical adults, and 894 university students. ADHD diagnoses were made using the Japanese semi-structured diagnostic interview for adult ADHD, which is compatible with the DSM-5. The ASRS-J, its subscales, and the short form, all had Cronbach's α values of around 0.80. Total scores on the ASRS-J and the ASRS-J-6 were highly correlated with readministration after a two-week interval. The total and 18 individual item scores in the ASRS-J were significantly higher in the ADHD group than the other three groups. ASRS-J scores were correlated with scores on the Japanese version of Conners' Adult ADHD Rating Scales-Self Report subscales (0.59≤r≤0.77), with one exception. ASRS-J scores were also correlated (albeit more weakly; r=0.38) with Beck Depression Inventory-II total scores. Employing optimal cut-offs, sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values of the ASRS-J and ASRS-J-6 are all above 0.69. The ASRS-J and ASRS-J-6 showed acceptable psychometric properties, although further study is necessary.

  19. Physical scale experiments on torrential filter structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiari, Michael; Moser, Markus; Trojer, Martin; Hübl, Johannes

    2016-04-01

    In the framework of the INTERREG Project "SedAlp" physical scale model experiments are carried out in the hydraulic laboratory of the Institute of Mountain Risk Engineering at the University of Life Sciences in Vienna in order to optimize torrent protection structures. Two different types of check dams are investigated. A screen-dam with inclined vertical beams is compared with a beam-dam with horizontal beams. The experiments evaluate the variation of sediment transport of these structures including the influence of coarse woody debris. Therefore the distance between the steel elements can be adjusted to show their ability to filter sediment. The physical scale of the experiments is 1:30. All experimental runs are Froude scaled. Both dams are tested in elongated and pear-shaped sediment retention basins in order to investigate the shape effect of the deposition area. For a systematic comparison of the two check dams experiments with fluvial bedload transport are made. First a typical hydrograph for an extreme flood with unlimited sediment supply is modelled. A typical torrential sediment mixture with a wide grain-size distribution is fed by a conveyor belt according the transport capacity of the upstream reach. Then the deposition is scanned with a laser-scan device in order to analyse the deposition pattern and the deposited volume. Afterwards a flood with a lower reoccurrence period without sediment transport from upstream is modelled to investigate the ability of the protection structure for self-emptying. To investigate the influence of driftwood on the deposition behaviour experiments with logs are made. Different log diameters and lengths are added upstream the basin. The results show, that the deposition during the experiments was not controlled by sorting-effects at the location of the dam. The deposition always started from upstream, where the transport capacity was reduced due to the milder slope and the widening of the basin. No grain sorting effects

  20. Measuring the frequency of emotions—validation of the Scale of Positive and Negative Experience (SPANE) in Germany

    PubMed Central

    Heise, Elke; Schuldt, Mirijam

    2017-01-01

    The Scale of Positive and Negative Experience (SPANE) measures the frequency of positive and negative affect. It consists of two subscales, one for positive and one for negative affect with six adjectives each and assesses a broad range of emotions. In this study, the psychometric properties of the German version of the scale were explored with reliability and confirmatory factorial analysis by using a German sample of N = 498. To examine the convergent validity of the SPANE we correlated its subscales with other well-being and happiness measures. Retest-reliabilities were tested after four weeks, taking into account the occurrence of emotionally significant life events. The scale was also applied to evaluate a training of subjective well-being and in a study on text comprehensibility. The results confirmed the postulated two-factor structure of the SPANE and showed good psychometric properties and convergent validity. In conclusion, the German version of the scale behaves in accordance with the original scale and may be used in future studies of well-being. PMID:28178328